2007-08 DFC Annual Report (black and white)

2007-08 DFC Annual Report (black and white)
Department for Families and Communities
ANNUAL REPORT 2007-08
Office Address
Riverside Centre
North Terrace
Adelaide SA 5000
Postal Address
GPO Box 292
ADELAIDE SA 5001
Telephone
(08) 8226 8800
© Government of South Australia, September 2008
ISSN 1832-8938
ISBN 978-1-920983-67-3
This Annual Report was prepared by the Strategy and Research Division of the Department for
Families and Communities.
The Annual Report is available on the Department for Families and Communities’ internet site at
www.familiesandcommunities.sa.gov.au.
The information in this publication can be provided in an alternative format or another language on
request. Please contact (08) 8413 8126.
Letter of transmittal
Hon Jennifer Rankine MP
Minister for Families and Communities
Minister for Housing
Minister for Ageing
Minister for Disability
Dear Minister
I have pleasure in presenting the Annual Report of the Department for Families and Communities for
the year ended 30 June 2008.
The Annual Report highlights the many achievements of the department during the 2007-08 financial
year which reflect the efforts in contributing towards the targets of South Australia’s Strategic Plan.
The report complies with the requirements of the Public Sector Management Act 1995 and the Public
Finance and Audit Act 1987.
Joslene Mazel
Chief Executive
Department for Families and Communities
30 September 2008
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
1
Contents
Letter of transmittal............................................................................................................................... 1
DFC at a glance...................................................................................................................................... 4
Chief Executive’s report ....................................................................................................................... 5
About DFC
Who we are ............................................................................................................................................. 7
Our aim .................................................................................................................................................... 7
Our culture ............................................................................................................................................... 7
Our operating principles .......................................................................................................................... 8
Connecting to the Future ......................................................................................................................... 9
Major highlights for 2007-08 .................................................................................................................. 11
Our clients ............................................................................................................................................. 13
Staff profile ............................................................................................................................................ 13
Financial profile ..................................................................................................................................... 13
Organisational structure ........................................................................................................................ 13
Our performance
South Australia’s Strategic Plan ............................................................................................................ 15
Objective 1 – Affordable housing choices and communities that prosper ............................................ 21
Objective 2 – High need housing .......................................................................................................... 34
Objective 3 – Independence and community connection...................................................................... 47
Objective 4 – Keeping them safe .......................................................................................................... 62
Objective 5 – Effective and sustainable business practices.................................................................. 71
Our people
Human resources and consulting.......................................................................................................... 94
Workplace statistics............................................................................................................................... 98
Occupational health, safety and welfare ............................................................................................. 104
Health and wellbeing of employees..................................................................................................... 113
Learning and development .................................................................................................................. 114
Volunteers ........................................................................................................................................... 115
Governance arrangements
Governance principles......................................................................................................................... 116
Internal governance bodies ................................................................................................................. 117
Legislation ........................................................................................................................................... 119
Boards, committees and trusts............................................................................................................ 120
Risk management and internal audit................................................................................................... 127
Privacy ................................................................................................................................................. 127
Procurement ........................................................................................................................................ 128
Customer service................................................................................................................................. 128
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
2
Contents
Corporate social responsibility
Workplace............................................................................................................................................ 131
Environment ........................................................................................................................................ 134
Social and community activities .......................................................................................................... 136
Socially responsible procurement ....................................................................................................... 136
Strengthening partnerships ............................................................................................................. 138
Research............................................................................................................................................. 145
Key events.......................................................................................................................................... 146
Publications ....................................................................................................................................... 148
Rewards and recognition.................................................................................................................. 150
Corporate reporting
Reconciliation statement ..................................................................................................................... 151
Disability action plan............................................................................................................................ 152
Reporting against the Carers Recognition Act .................................................................................... 155
Greening of Government Operations (GoGO) Framework ................................................................. 159
Energy efficiency action plan report .................................................................................................... 163
Freedom of Information ....................................................................................................................... 164
Regional Impact Assessment Statements........................................................................................... 166
Urban Design Charter.......................................................................................................................... 167
Asbestos management in government buildings ................................................................................ 167
Fraud ................................................................................................................................................... 169
Overseas travel ................................................................................................................................... 170
Contractual arrangements ................................................................................................................... 171
Consultants.......................................................................................................................................... 174
Accounts payment performance.......................................................................................................... 175
Financial statements ......................................................................................................................... 176
Our sites and contact details ........................................................................................................... 231
Glossary ............................................................................................................................................. 240
Feedback ............................................................................................................................................ 242
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
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DFC at a glance
Major highlights
for 2007-08
Main activities
Our commitment
Our culture
Governance
Staff
Finances
Highlights for the year, page 11.
We lead the State Government’s work in ageing, anti-poverty,
carers, child protection, communities, disability services,
families, housing and youth justice.
That all South Australians have access to quality services that
protect and enhance the community’s wellbeing and support is
provided to those in need.
We make things happen for our customers by applying our
values: connected, ethical, brave and respectful, page 7.
Governance is the process by which organisations are directed,
controlled and held to account. Our department is guided by
seven governance principles, page 116.
Employed 5336 full time equivalents, page 98.
The net cost of providing our services for the financial year was
$771 million, funded primarily from the South Australian
Government. Refer to the Financial statements for more
information, page 176.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
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Chief Executive’s report
On 31 July 2008, Ms Sue Vardon, after a long career in the public service at both the national and
state levels, announced her retirement as the Chief Executive of our department after three and a half
years. Ms Joslene Mazel, formerly the Executive Director, Aboriginal Affairs and Reconciliation
Division, Department of the Premier and Cabinet, commenced as our Chief Executive on 14 August
2008.
2007-08 was another challenging and rewarding year for the Department for Families and
Communities. The way we came together to deal with each of the challenges faced shows we have
much to be proud of.
One of the biggest challenges we faced was the continuing growing demands of children in care and
increasing needs of vulnerable families and the resulting pressure that this placed on our finances. I
appreciated the assistance from David Imber, of the Department of Treasury and Finance, who helped
us address the financial pressures facing the department. The next challenge for us in this respect is
to make use of the positive budget for 2008-09, and ensure that every new dollar is used wisely to
achieve our reforms.
Throughout the year I visited as many departmental work sites across the State as possible and saw
the highly skilled and dedicated workforce in all of our various locations. Staff from different parts of
the department are coming together and discussing the challenges of delivering services, particularly
in remote areas, and are working together to identify innovative ways to help our customers. All of
these visits reinforced for me the importance of our staff on the front line, who are helping families that
are experiencing serious problems, and collaboration across the department and with our partners.
I am surrounded by young and enthusiastic staff who are keen to make sure we embrace new
technologies and use them to improve our organisation. This year I launched the [email protected] e-asy chat
line which provides staff with a way of communicating directly with me on particular topics once a
month. Topics discussed on the blog have included carers, youth retention and recruitment,
communicating change in our organisation and technology and customer self-service. I have really
enjoyed these sessions and many of the great ideas raised are being investigated.
Providing high quality customer focused services has been central to everything we do. We continue
to be committed to achieving excellence in this area. Over the last year in particular, we have
achieved much with respect to improving customer service to our external customers, including the
development of a complaints management system, the launch of the Community Engagement Charter
and Directions Statement and the implementation of a Customer Satisfaction Measurement Strategy.
Many of these initiatives have been inspired by the staff actually working in these areas. To strengthen
services to external customers we have also reviewed our internal customer service. I am proud of our
strong culture which means working together and putting our customers and their families first.
The variety of work that we undertake was acknowledged nationally and internationally during this
year with a number of visitors from other jurisdictions and countries to learn more about what we do.
This included a delegation from Thailand from the Department for Social Development and Welfare,
including social workers, physical therapists, nurses and social development workers who were keen
to learn more about South Australian community services and Australian culture in general. We also
hosted guests from Canada, England and the Shandong Province in China. The former Tasmanian
Premier and the Tasmanian Minister for Health and Human Services also visited to learn more about
what we have been doing in Housing SA to address financial viability, the 15 per cent affordable and
high need housing planning targets and a number of other innovative housing initiatives. Thank you to
all the staff who have made these visits successful. I know that we gained as much out of these visits
as the delegates themselves.
Earlier this year, Commissioner Mullighan’s Commission of Inquiry Report (Children in State Care)
was released, which provided the Government with 54 recommendations to consider. The Inquiry has
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
5
Chief Executive’s report
provided an opportunity for former children in State Care to come forward with their experience of
abuse. In many cases, this has been the start of a process of healing. A highlight from this work to
date has been the Premier's formal apology to those who were harmed while in State Care. I wish to
acknowledge those staff, particularly in Families SA who contributed to the Inquiry by providing
support to the Commissioner and providing post care support to those people who were in State Care.
Looking back over the last year, I am reminded of all our achievements and successes. These
achievements are testament to the dedication and hard work of an outstanding group of public
servants, volunteers and partners. The commitment and innovation shown by staff continues to be a
strength of the organisation as we continue to strive to improve the lives of South Australians.
Finally to Minister Jay Weatherill, I would like to acknowledge the excellent working relationship and
partnership between his office and the department. We have been privileged to work for a Minister
who has provided us with strong leadership throughout the year. All our staff have appreciated his
clear vision and his understanding of the complexities of our work. We have been very fortunate to
have worked with a Minister who has given us so much support and encouragement to perform at our
best.
Ms Sue Vardon AO
Chief Executive
Department for Families and Communities
30 June 2008
This report on the financial and corporate performance of the Department for Families and
Communities during the 2007-08 financial year reflects the results and achievements of the
department under the direction of Ms Sue Vardon AO. I am pleased that she had an opportunity to
reflect on the performance of the department over the year before she retired in August.
I would like to take this opportunity to acknowledge the contribution and leadership of Ms Vardon
throughout her career in the public service, particularly the last three and a half years as Chief
Executive of the department. She should be very proud of the work that has occurred under her
leadership to reform and improve the department’s services for the citizens of South Australia.
I am looking forward to working with all the department’s employees and stakeholders to consolidate
and build on these reforms. The department is an incredibly diverse portfolio which holds many
challenges, as well as opportunities to make a positive difference for an important sector of the State’s
population.
Ms Joslene Mazel
Chief Executive
Department for Families and Communities
30 September 2008
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
6
About DFC
Who we are
The Department for Families and Communities (DFC) is responsible for setting strategic priorities,
policy development and administration of public and community housing, child protection, disability
services and ageing and community care services. The department was established on 1 July 2004,
following the separation of the Department for Human Services into DFC and the Department of
Health
Our aim
We have a broad mandate to work with those in need who, through circumstance, may be poor,
vulnerable, at risk of harm or isolated and disconnected. We are committed to ensuring that all South
Australians have access to quality services that protect and enhance the community's wellbeing and
provide support to people when they need it.
Our culture
The foundations of our strategic directions are the Departments’ values. These values are critical to
the delivery of high quality customer focussed services which are central to every aspect of our
department. By incorporating our values into our behaviour and processes, we make things happen
for our customers.
CONNECTED
RESPECTFUL
We consider the big picture
when dealing with small
things, we connect with
others, across boundaries,
to get the best result. We
share information, ideas and
solutions.
We show our esteem for
each other in how we work
together, in an environment
that facilitates safe, fair and
equitable interaction.
BRAVE
We are fearless and bold in
tackling the hardest issues.
We have the courage to
explore beyond the horizon
and discover new ways
together. We also know that
simple common sense may
give us the answer.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
ETHICAL
We do the right thing, acting
in accordance with our
public sector, professional
and personal codes: with
integrity, fairness, respect
and transparency. We are
accountable for our actions.
7
About DFC
Our operating principles
Deprived or disadvantaged people and communities have poorer housing, health, education and life
expectancy, and fewer job opportunities and higher crime rates than communities that prosper. Our
efforts to build a socially inclusive society will help to close the gap.
Our commitment
Children, young people, people with disabilities, older South Australians
and families can expect to be safe, supported and connected. Access to
safe, secure, affordable and appropriate housing is central to the health and
quality of life of individuals and families. The provision of shelter is our first
obligation to those in need or at risk of harm. Strong links, with defined and
discrete responsibilities, between those who provide accommodation and
those who deliver services, is the key to sustaining safety and wellbeing.
Our services
The people we serve: individuals, families and the community, are at the
centre of our planning and decision making. The privilege and the dignity of
choice is our guide. We recognise the differences of ages, cultures and
abilities. We listen, respond and integrate the values, views and aspirations
of our customers into the way forward. Our work takes us into people’s
lives, their relationships and their changing life circumstances. This requires
us to act with respect, humility and sound judgement.
Responses that are flexible, immediate but also sustained, that tackle the
issues early and consider the whole person, now and tomorrow, will deliver
future success. We let the facts, not our presumptions, determine the
course of action. We anticipate and prevent problems.
Our responses
We are accountable for spending public money wisely. Resources need to
be deployed effectively to build individual capacities and strong
communities across the State. We draw on shared knowledge of what
works well, on new thinking and emerging evidence to achieve value for
money in matching resources to need.
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander South Australians continue to be the
most disadvantaged citizens across all indicators. Recognising this, our
programs, responses and our efforts will target the complex, entrenched
and interrelated circumstances that are impediments to Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islander people moving forward.
Our partners
We continue to build our relationships with our partners in other sectors,
other governments, volunteers and the community. A commitment to a
shared and common purpose is the foundation for agreement. We
collaborate actively in our joint endeavours.
Our people
Valued and well supported employees who know what is expected of them
are critical to business success. The community benefits from the
contributions of our people as workers, leaders, volunteers and carers.
Our communication
We are committed to communication that is clear and accessible. It is open,
timely and effective.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
8
About DFC
Connecting to the Future
Connecting to the Future: the strategic agenda for the Department for Families and Communities
2005-2008, identifies the South Australian Government’s priorities for the department. It is the
framework that shapes the services we provide and the decisions we make to reflect the
Government’s priorities in the portfolio areas of care and protection of children and young people,
disability, ageing and affordable housing.
Five key objectives provide the framework in which we operate:
OBJECTIVE
CONTRIBUTING DIVISIONS
STRATEGY
Objective 1: Affordable
housing choices and
communities that prosper
•
•
HomeStart Finance
Housing SA
•
Housing Plan for South Australia
Objective 2: High need
housing
•
Housing SA
•
Housing Plan for South Australia
Objective 3: Independence
and community connection
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander Services
Community Connect
Disability SA
Domiciliary Care SA
Office for Problem Gambling
Office for the Ageing
Volunteers Unit
•
•
•
Supported Accommodation Strategy
Promoting Independence
Improving with Age - Our Ageing
Plan for South Australia
Community Engagement Charter
and Directions Statement
DFC Volunteer Operational
Guidelines
•
Families SA
•
•
Objective 4: Keeping them
safe and connected
•
•
•
•
•
Objective 5: Effective and
sustainable business
practices
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Chief Executive’s Office
Financial Services
Information, Communication
and Technology
Organisational Development
Risk Management and Internal
Audit
State Recovery Office
Strategy and Research
•
•
•
•
•
Keeping Them Safe
Keeping Them Safe – In Our Care:
Implementation Plan
Rapid Response: Whole of
Government Services for Children
and Young People under the
Guardianship of the Minister
To Break the Cycle
Children in State Care Commission
of Inquiry (Allegations of Sexual
Abuse and Death from Criminal
Conduct) Report
Strategic Research Agenda 2006-09
Department for Families and
Communities Risk Management
Policy and Framework
DFC Occupational Health, Safety,
Welfare and Injury Management
Implementation Plan 2008-2010
DFC Aboriginal Employment
Strategy 2007-2012
DFC Workforce Plan 2007-2012
The five objectives align with and demonstrate our commitment to supporting the achievement of
South Australia’s Strategic Plan.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
9
About DFC
Alignment of Connecting to the Future to South Australia’s Strategic Plan (SASP)
OBJECTIVE
THEME
SASP TARGET
1
Affordable housing choices
and communities that
prosper
To work with others to expand
and improve affordable
housing choices across the
State and help build
communities that prosper.
•
•
•
•
•
•
Affordable homes
Growing prosperity
Community renewal
Regional South Australia
Sustainability
Aboriginal South Australians
T3.14 – Energy efficiency
(dwellings)
T6.1 – Aboriginal wellbeing
T6.7 – Affordable housing
T6.8 – Housing stress
T6.9 – Aboriginal housing
2
High need housing
To develop and implement
better high need housing and
service responses for people
at risk or in need.
•
•
•
•
•
Shelter
High need
Homelessness
Transition
Aboriginal South Australians
T6.1 – Aboriginal wellbeing
T6.6 – Homelessness
T6.8 – Housing stress
T6.9 – Aboriginal housing
3
Independence and
community connection
To enable people to take
charge of their lives and
ensure community connection
opportunities are available to
all.
•
•
•
•
•
•
Community connection
Services
Community sector
Carers
Aboriginal South Australians
Volunteers
T2.7 – Psychological wellbeing
T5.6 – Volunteering
T6.1 – Aboriginal wellbeing
T6.5 – Economic disadvantage
T6.10 – Housing for people with
disabilities
T6.11 – Participation by people
with disabilities
T6.22 – People with disabilities
•
•
•
Child-centric
Lead agency
Early intervention and
prevention
Families
Guardianship children and
young people
Care partnerships
Juvenile justice
Learning
Aboriginal South Australians
T2.7 – Psychological wellbeing
T2.8 – Statewide crime rates
T6.1 – Aboriginal wellbeing
T6.4 – Early childhood –
Australian Early Development
Index
T6.5 – Economic disadvantage
T6.15 – Learning or earning
4
5
Keeping them safe and
connected
To ensure children, young
people and families are safe,
supported and connected to
the future.
Effective and sustainable
business practices
To establish and maintain
efficient, effective and
sustainable business practices
to underpin delivery of the
Connecting to the Future
strategic agenda.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Governance
Customers
Business rigour and
relationships
Information and systems
Planning and performance
People
Communication
Environment
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
T1.7, T1.8 and T1.9 –
Performance in the public sector
T3.13 – Energy efficiency
(government buildings)
T6.22, T6.23 and T6.24 –
Diversity in the public sector
10
About DFC
Major highlights for 2007-08
Objectives
1
2
3
Affordable housing
choices and
communities that
prosper
High need housing
Independence and
community
connection
Highlights
•
Achieved 222 new affordable rental housing commitments in partnership
arrangements
•
Realigned the Not for Profit Growth program in South Australia to the
National Regulatory Framework
•
Responded to Commonwealth announced National Indigenous Housing
Reform Strategy
•
Developed strategic proposal for sector reform of Supported
Accommodation Assistance Program
•
Undertook business impact assessment for new legislation to replace the
Supported Residential Facilities Act 1992
•
Completed 39 homes units within the Franklin Street Bus Station complex
for use by Common Ground Adelaide Ltd
•
Created 40 new community based group home places through the
Strathmont Centre Redevelopment and Community Living Project
•
Implemented the Supported Accommodation Strategy
•
Strengthened consumer advisory mechanisms to support the reform of
services for people with a disability
•
Introduced the Companion Card which enables companions assisting
eligible persons to access free entry to community events/activities, and
public transport, at both State and National levels
•
Further progress on transitioning people with a disability from institutional
care to community settings
•
Developed and commenced implementation of a consistent DFC
Performance Management Framework for community grants
•
Launched an online access point for community grants and information for
funded community services organisations
•
Increased the number of non-government organisations engaging in a
quality framework and non-government organisations achieving
accreditation under the Service Excellence internationally accredited
management standards
•
Developed the Community Engagement Charter and Directions Statement
and increased community engagement activities
•
Developed the Community Benefit SA Special Family Support Grants
Program and funded projects to deliver intensive family support services in
high need areas
•
Implemented the new Dame Roma Mitchell Trust Fund ‘Trust Deed’ that
provides funding specifically for young people with a disability who have
been in care
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
11
About DFC
4
5
Keeping them safe
and connected
Effective and
sustainable
business practices
•
Provided additional indexation on grants to the community services sector
of one per cent annually for four years for community services wages and
conditions
•
Established SA Community Care Access Points for frail older people and
their carers that need community based services in the Western Adelaide
and country areas of Gawler, Barossa, Lower North and Yorke Peninsula
•
Continued to expand basic Home and Community Care maintenance and
support for frail older people and their carers
•
Established a register of South Australian retirement villages and
advanced investigations of breaches of the Retirement Villages Act 1987
•
Implemented the second round of projects, built on existing reporting
systems and developed new research initiatives from Improving with Age –
Our Ageing Plan for South Australia
•
Evaluated and restructured problem gambling help services to better
attend to the needs of problem gamblers including the establishment of
statewide regional service networks
•
Integrated Metropolitan Domiciliary Care into the department and began
operations as Domiciliary Care SA
•
Developed and implemented a web-based volunteer data management
application as well as further developed and released the Volunteer
Emergency Recovery Information System for local and national use
•
Increased financial support for foster, relative and kinship carers by an
average of 26 per cent
•
Trialled Child Safety Conferences to improve child protection responses
•
Established integrated Children’s Centres for children 0-8 years of age and
their families in partnership with other agencies
•
Commenced implementation of Keeping Them Safe - In Our Care strategy
•
Improved systems to manage and supervise youth justice clients
•
Developed and implemented Safe Houses for Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander women and children fleeing domestic violence
•
Developed a Customer Satisfaction Measurement Strategy
•
Increased the participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
in the department, spread across all classifications
•
Implemented recruitment strategies to ensure at least 50 per cent of
women at executive levels
•
Increased the number of people with disabilities employed in the
department
•
Reduced energy usage by ten per cent throughout the portfolio
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
12
About DFC
Our clients
Our clients are at the centre of our planning and decision making and include individuals, families and
the community. We connect clients to services in:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Housing
Disability services
Family support
Community strengths
Youth justice
Care and protection of children
•
Ageing
Concessions
Problem gambling
Domiciliary care
Disaster response
•
•
•
•
Staff profile
Persons employed
6090
Male employees
1809
Female employees
4281
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees
Number of Executives
235
48
Financial profile
During 2007-08, our financial performance included:
• Revenue from South Australian Government (sourced from Income Statement): $760 million
• Total expenses (sourced from Income Statement): $1.67 billion
• Net Cost of providing services (sourced from Income Statement): $771 million
• Total Equity (sourced from Balance Sheet): $144.7 million
For further information refer to the Financial statements on page 176.
Organisational structure
The following restructuring occurred during 2007-08:
• On 1 July 2007, Metropolitan Domiciliary Care transferred from the Department of Health to our
department, and began operations as Domiciliary Care SA. The objective of the transfer was to
make it simpler for South Australians to access domiciliary care services, to ensure consistent
service provision delivery across South Australia and to improve the integration of these services
with other aspects of community service provisions funded or provided by our department.
• In June 2008, Anne Gale was appointed to an additional Deputy Chief Executive position with
specific responsibility for Disability SA, the Office for the Ageing and Domiciliary Care SA. The
position consolidates recent reforms in the department to form a strong ageing and disability
portfolio.
These changes are reflected in our organisational structure chart.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
13
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
r
Chief Information
Officer
Phil Hogg
Corporate Services
Director
Dennis Huxley
n &o
n
HomeStart Finance
Chief Executive
Officer
Gary Storkey
Organisational
Development
Executive Director
Peter Bull
p
Strategy and
Research
Director
Liz Wilson
Office for Disability
and Client Services
Executive Director
Suzanne Carman
Recovery
Director
Ronnie Faggotter
Volunteers
Director
Stephen Blight
Office for the
Ageing
Executive Director
David Caudrey
Risk Management
and Internal Audit
Director
Chris Firth
Aboriginal and
Torres Strait
Islander Services
Director
Chris Larkin
Domiciliary Care SA
Executive Director
Jane Pickering
Office for Problem
Gambling
Director
Leeanne Head
Community
Connect
Director
Lynette Pugh
Deputy Chief
Executive
Anne Gale
Disability Services
Executive Director
Lynn Young
DISABILITY SA
Chief Executive
Sue Vardon
Hon Jay Weatherill MP
Minister for Families and Communities
Minister for Housing
Minister for Ageing
Minister for Disability
Financial Services
Executive Director
Joe Ullianich
Housing Services
Executive Director
Helen Fulcher
Affordable Housing
and Sector
Development
General Manager
Philip Fagan-Schmidt
HOUSING SA
Deputy Chief
Executive
Peter Smith
SAAHT Board
SAHT Board
HomeStart Board
z = DFC Strategic Objective
Chief Executive’s
Office
Manager
Judy Davies
Special
Investigation Unit
Manager
Steve James
Families SA
Executive Director
Beth Dunning
q
Guardian for Children
and Young People
Pam Simmons
Child Death and
Serious Injury Review
Committee
The Council for the
Care of Children
About DFC
Organisational structure as at 30 June 2008
14
Our performance
South Australia’s Strategic Plan
South Australia’s Strategic Plan (SASP) was first launched in March 2004. An updated version of the
Plan was released in January 2007, as a result of the achievement of original targets and to reflect the
views and priorities of South Australians from the ‘SA Have Your Say’ consultation process.
SASP was developed as a framework for government, industry, community and individuals to work
together to improve the wellbeing of all South Australians through improved prosperity and economic
growth, coupled with enhanced access to services including health and education. The revised SASP
contains 98 targets, up from 84 in the previous Plan, with targets grouped under six interrelated key
objectives:
1 - Growing Prosperity
2 - Improving Wellbeing
3 - Attaining Sustainability
4 - Fostering Creativity and Innovation
5 - Building Communities
6 - Expanding Opportunity
We are the lead reporting agency for six targets under Objective 6, Expanding Opportunity which
includes targets related to the most disadvantaged South Australian individuals and families.
The following summarises progress against those targets for which we are the lead agency.
Housing
T6.7 - Affordable housing: increase affordable home purchase and rental opportunities by
five percentage points by 2014
Percentage of dwelling sales in South Australia that are affordable
for low and moderate income households (2003-04 baseline)
50
40
38.8
26.2
36.6
36.6
27.2
2007-08
33.8
2006-07
20
2005-06
30
2004-05
Per cent
Affordable dwelling sales refers
to housing that is appropriate for
the needs of low and moderateincome households and is
priced so that they can meet
other essential basic living
costs. Low and moderate
income households are defined
as those households which
have incomes below 120 per
cent of the gross median
income of all households.
10
Proportion of dwelling sales
2013-14
2012-13
2011-12
2010-11
2009-10
2008-09
2003-04
0
Target
Source: Land Services Branch and ABS Census
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
15
Our performance
Percentage of new rental bonds lodged in South Australia that are
affordable to low income households (2003-04 baseline)
70
60
64.8
59.8
54.2
64.4
56.0
47.2
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
2007-08
40
2003-04
50
Per cent
Affordable rental refers to
housing that is appropriate for
the needs of low income
households and is priced so that
they can meet other essential
basic living costs. Low income
households are defined as
those households which have
incomes below 80 per cent of
the gross median income of all
households.
30
20
10
Proportion of rental bonds
2013-14
2012-13
2011-12
2010-11
2009-10
2008-09
0
Target
Source: Tenancies Branch (Office of Consumer and Business Affairs) and ABS Census
T6.8 - Housing stress: halve the number of South Australians experiencing housing stress by 2014
Number of South Australian households
experiencing housing stress (2001 baseline)
Housing stress is defined as
households with less than 80
per cent of median household
income who pay more than 25
per cent of their income in rent
or more than 30 per cent of their
income on mortgage costs.
70000
18464
60000
Number
Australian Bureau of Statistics
(ABS) 2006 national Census
data illustrates that the number
of households experiencing
housing stress in South
Australia increased by 18 121
households from 51 596 in 2001
to 69 717 in 2006.
80000
50000
12628
11099
41559
40497
40000
30000
51253
20000
25798
10000
0
1996
Rental
2001
2006
Homebuyers
2011
2014
Target
Source: ABS Census
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
16
Our performance
T6.9 - Aboriginal housing: reduce overcrowding in Aboriginal households by ten per cent by 2014
Number of overcrowded Aboriginal households in South Australia
using the Proxy Occupancy Standard (2001 baseline)
700
600
500
Number
2001 ABS Census data, using
the Proxy Occupancy Standard,
recorded a total of 690
overcrowded Aboriginal
households in South Australia.
This figure decreased by eight
households as at the 2006
Census, with 682 Aboriginal
households recorded as
overcrowded.
400
690
682
621
300
200
100
0
2001
2006
2011
2014
Number of overcrowded Aboriginal households
Target
Source: ABS Census
For information on actions to progress the achievement of targets T6.7, T6.8 and T6.9 refer to our
performance against Objective 1 – Affordable housing choices and communities that prosper
commencing page 21 and Objective 2 – High need housing commencing page 34.
Disability
T6.10 - Housing for people with disabilities: double the number of people with disabilities
appropriately housed and supported in community based accommodation by 2014
Number of group home places in South Australia
(baseline: 2002-03)
A total of 1330 group home
places are required by June
2014 to achieve target T6.10.
This equates to approximately
60 places per year from
30 June 2003.
1200
1330
1000
Number
As at 30 June 2007, 217 group
home places had been created,
with a further 448 places
required by June 2014.
1400
800
600
665
716 756 772 882 962
400
200
Group home places
2013-14
2012-13
2011-12
2010-11
2009-10
2008-09
2007-08
2006-07
2005-06
2004-05
2003-04
2002-03
0
Target
Source: Disability SA
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
17
Our performance
T6.11 - Participation by people with disabilities: increase by 400 the number of people with
disability involved in day options program by 2014
Number of people with a disability in South Australia
involved in day options (baseline: 2005-06)
1600
1400
1449
1049
1112
1173
2006-07
2007-08
1000
2005-06
1200
Number
Day options assist school
leavers with an intellectual
disability to have interesting and
meaningful things to do during
the day. It helps young people
make a successful transition
from school to adult life by
providing a range of choices
and the opportunity to continue
their development and
education.
800
600
400
200
To achieve target T6.11 day
options programs available for
people with an intellectual
disability and Autism Spectrum
Disorder and moderate to very
high support needs are being
expanded. Data for 2006-07
and 2007-08 are provisional and
may be revised.
Number involved in day options
2013-14
2012-13
2011-12
2010-11
2009-10
2008-09
0
Target
Source: Disability SA
For information on actions to progress the achievement of targets T6.10 and T6.11 refer to our
performance against Objective 3 – Independence and community connection on page 47.
Diversity in the public sector
T6.22 - People with disabilities: double the number of people with disabilities employed by 2014
Number of people with disabilities employed in the South
Australian public sector (administrative units) (2006 baseline)
1600
1554
1400
1200
1000
600
777
887
2006-07
800
2005-06
Number
The South Australian Public
Sector Workforce Information
June 2007: Summary Report
states that as at June 2007
there were 887 employees in
Administrative Units with an
ongoing disability requiring
adaptation to their workplace.
This represents an increase of
110 employees (14.2 per cent)
from June 2006.
400
200
Number of people with disabilities employed
2013-14
2012-13
2011-12
2010-11
2009-10
2008-09
0
2007-08
2007-08 data was not available
as at 30 September 2008.
Target
Source: Department of the Premier and Cabinet
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
18
Our performance
All government departments are required to contribute against whole-of-government SASP targets.
The following summarises our achievements against these targets during 2007-08.
Target
2007-08 Achievement(s)
T1.7 – Performance in the public sector customer and client satisfaction with
government services: Increase the satisfaction of
South Australians with government services by ten
per cent by 2010, maintaining or exceeding that level
of satisfaction thereafter.
A Customer Satisfaction Measurement Strategy to
measure progress against target T1.7 was
developed, with Round One implemented in March
2008. For further information on customer service
refer to page 128.
T1.8 – Performance in the public sector –
government decision-making: Become, by 2010,
the best-performing jurisdiction in Australia in
timeliness and transparency of decisions which
impact the business community (and maintain that
rating).
The State Government’s red tape reduction target
aligns to the achievement of target T1.8. Between
August 2007 and June 2008, we fully or partially
implemented red tape reduction initiatives that will
save business $1.124 million.
T1.9 – Performance in the public sector administrative efficiency: Increase the ratio of
operational to administrative expenditure in State
Government by 2010, and maintain or better that
ratio thereafter.
We contribute to the achievement of target T1.9
through our participation in the Shared Services
Reform which aims to reduce expenditure on
administrative functions.
T3.13 – Energy efficiency - government
buildings: Improve the energy efficiency of
government buildings by 25 per cent from 2000-01
levels by 2014.
We are on target to improve energy efficiencies
throughout our department by an estimated 22 per
cent from the energy baseline created in 2000-01.
For further information refer to our reporting against
the GoGO Framework on page 159.
T5.1 – Boards and committees: Increase the
number of women on all State Government boards
and committees to 50 per cent on average by 2008,
and maintain thereafter by ensuring that 50 per cent
of women are appointed, on average, each quarter.
As at 30 June 2008, 57.9 per cent of members of
boards and committees listed on the Department of
the Premier and Cabinet (DPC) Boards and
Committees Information System (BCIS), for which
our department provides administrative support,
were women.
T5.2 – Chairs of boards and committees: Increase Of the boards and committees listed on the BCIS,
the number of women chairing State Government
55.6 per cent of those for which our department
boards and committees to 50 per cent by 2010.
provides administrative support were chaired by
women as at 30 June 2008.
T6.1 – Aboriginal wellbeing: Improve the overall
wellbeing of Aboriginal South Australians.
Our actions to improve Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander wellbeing during 2007-08 include:
• provision of the Nunga Loan by HomeStart
Finance to improve home ownership rates
• increasing housing stock in remote areas
• improving access to housing and housing
services
• establishment of Youth and Substance Misuse
Diversion Programs and Family Centres and
Homemaker Programs on the Anangu
•
Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (APY) Lands
development and implementation of Safe Houses
for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women
and children fleeing domestic violence.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
19
Our performance
Target
2007-08 Achievement(s)
T6.22 – People with disabilities: Double the
number of people with disabilities employed by
2014.
As at 30 June 2007, there were 115 employees with
ongoing disabilities requiring workplace adaptation.
This has decreased to 64, however, it must be noted
that this data was sourced from a voluntary staff
survey distributed in June 2008. Data only provides
a notional representation of workplace adaptations.
This measure can also be influenced by a number of
factors including contract changes, changes to
WorkCover and temporary adaptations. An
additional measure introduced in 2007-08, shows
there are 282 employees with disabilities according
to the Commonwealth Disability Discrimination Act
1992. Progress against this additional measure will
be reported in 2008-09.
T6.23 – Women: Have women comprising half of
the public sector employees in the executive levels
(including Chief Executives) by 2014.
Of the 48 executive level positions in our department
28 are held by women. This equates to 58.3 per cent
of executive level positions.
T6.24 – Aboriginal employees: Increase the
Of the 6090 people employed in our department,
participation of Aboriginal people in the South
235 (3.9 per cent) are Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait
Australian public sector, spread across all
Islander employees.
classifications and agencies, to two per cent by 2010
and maintain or better those levels through to 2014.
Regular and transparent reporting against SASP targets occurs to ensure credibility and public
accountability of the Plan. Performance measures for SASP targets use the best available data from a
range of sources, including ABS publications.
As a lead reporting agency, we prepared implementation plans for the aforementioned targets which
were produced in consultation with other government departments and relevant key stakeholders.
Fact sheets summarising strategies to achieve targets and progress to date have also been prepared
and are publicly available for downloading from www.saplan.org.au.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
20
Our performance
Objective 1 – Affordable housing choices and communities that
prosper
Goal
To work with others to expand and improve affordable housing choices across the State and help build
communities that prosper.
Context
Many low to moderate income households in South Australia are finding it increasingly difficult to
secure an affordable home. While the South Australian housing market is comparatively more
affordable than other Australian states, affordability has been declining over recent years, which is a
major concern for the State Government.
Our department has lead responsibility for facilitating, in collaboration with the private sector,
government agencies, local government and community partners, the delivery of innovative affordable
housing solutions for South Australians on low to moderate incomes. Home ownership opportunities
are being provided by the implementation of the Affordable Homes Program, which is also securing
the viability of public housing.
We work collaboratively with local communities to regenerate the social, physical and environmental
aspects of some of South Australia’s most disadvantaged communities. Through this objective we will
also be seeking to enhance and expand the range of housing services for Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander families and communities.
Through HomeStart Finance we continue to facilitate home ownership opportunities by lending to
lower income households with home finance products such as the EquityStart, Advantage and
Breakthrough Loans. We also continue to work with those customers who experience difficulty in
accessing private rental accommodation through the Private Rental Assistance and Private Rental
Liaison Officer Programs.
Our achievements under Objective 1 contribute to the following SASP targets:
Increase the energy efficiency of dwellings by ten per cent by 2014 (Target T3.14)
Improve the overall wellbeing of Aboriginal South Australians (Target T6.1)
Increase affordable home purchase and rental opportunities by five percentage points by 2014
(Target T6.7)
• Halve the number of South Australians experiencing housing stress by 2014 (Target T6.8)
• Reduce overcrowding in Aboriginal households by ten per cent by 2014 (Target T6.9).
•
•
•
Lead Responsibility
Housing SA has the lead responsibility for Objective 1 within our department, which includes:
• Affordable Housing and Sector Development
• HomeStart Finance
• Housing Services
• Corporate Services.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
21
Our performance
Performance Overview
Affordable Rental
The Affordable Housing Innovations Fund (AHIF) was established in 2004-05 to provide a source of
funds for the development of affordable rental housing initiatives in partnership with not-for-profit
organisations, local and State Government, and the private sector. Fifteen capital projects were
approved for funding during 2007-08, involving partnering organisations committed to delivering 222
affordable rental housing outcomes in metropolitan and regional areas. These projects have a total
estimated cost of $47.6 million of which $23.3 million or 49 per cent will be funded through AHIF
grants.
In 2008-09, we will establish 200 new affordable rental housing commitments in partnership
arrangements.
Affordable Homes Program
The Affordable Homes Program requires the sale of approximately 8000 public housing properties
with the proceeds used to repay $880 million of South Australian Housing Trust and South Australian
Community Housing Association debt over a nine year period. 2007-08 represented the first year of
the program, and we exceeded the revenue goal of $66.7 million by raising more than $8 million in
excess of the targeted amount. This was achieved with 50 fewer public housing sales than the
anticipated number of 464. Sales to public housing tenants and other low to moderate income earners
were maximised.
The Affordable Homes Property Locator was introduced in August 2007, maximising sales of social
housing properties to low and moderate income earners. Properties are advertised exclusively on the
Property Locator internet site which enables customers who meet eligibility criteria to purchase in a
market without investor competition.
In 2008-09, we will continue the Affordable Homes Program by targeting sales to low and moderate
income earners, public housing tenants and affordable housing providers. A sales target of 760
dwellings to achieve a revenue goal of $110.5 million has been established.
Affordable Housing
In July 2007, an amendment to the Development Act 1993 introduced improved access to affordable
housing securing 15 per cent affordable housing policy within declared major development proposals.
During 2007-08, we continued to work with developers to ensure the inclusion of 15 per cent
affordable housing in all new significant developments within government land releases. We also
further developed building a range of affordable housing products in new housing developments and
through partnerships.
The Commonwealth Government has indicated an intention to replace the Commonwealth State
Housing Agreement with a more comprehensive National Affordable Housing Agreement, which will
provide funding for housing and homelessness programs. In 2008-09, we will negotiate a new National
Affordable Housing Agreement with the Commonwealth Government.
Not for Profit Growth Housing Program
We have commenced the development of a Not for Profit Growth Housing Program in South Australia,
based on partnerships with private finance and non-government organisations with proven capacity for
managing housing stock growth. The development of the Not for Profit Growth Housing Program is
occurring in alignment with the National Regulatory Framework for not for profit providers which will
reduce the reporting and regulatory burdens on providers operating across state and territory borders,
leading to significant savings.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
22
Our performance
The development of a Not for Profit Growth Housing Program will improve sector capacity by enabling
not for profit growth providers, organisations that aim to operate at significant scale, to actively
leverage their holdings and investments to increase affordable housing outcomes. In 2008-09, the
approval, registration and regulation system will be developed for the Not for Profit Growth Housing
Program.
HomeStart Finance
HomeStart Finance provides affordable home finance and housing solutions for South Australians.
HomeStart achieved an operating profit before tax of $6.8 million in 2007-08, with $12.1 million
returned to the State Government in the form of dividends, tax equivalents and fees.
During 2007-08 HomeStart lent $233.5 million to 1570 new customers, with overall lending of
$275.1 million. Of new customers, 71 per cent earned less than the average weekly ordinary time
earnings and 42 per cent received Centrelink benefits as their primary source of income. At 30 June
2008, HomeStart’s total lending portfolio was $1.274 billion, with a total of 14 352 loans.
Affordable home finance and housing solutions provided by HomeStart include:
• The EquityStart Loan which provides up to $50 000 (depending on income and representing up to
one third of the total loan amount) in addition to a HomeStart Loan. Interest is CPI indexed with no
scheduled payments or maturity date and is available to Housing SA tenants.
• The Breakthrough Loan which allows a customer to borrow up to 35 per cent more without
increasing monthly loan repayments. HomeStart will share a portion of the home’s capital gain
once the property is sold. To 30 June 2008, 218 Breakthrough Loans had settled to the value of
$47.6 million (HomeStart loans plus subsidised Breakthrough loans).
• The Nunga Loan that is open to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander South Australians who meet
HomeStart’s Nunga Loan lending criteria. To 30 June 2008, 370 Nunga Loans had settled to the
value of $58.7 million.
For further information on the achievements of HomeStart, refer to the HomeStart Finance Annual
Report 2007-08, accessible at www.homestart.com.au.
Total number of EquityStart settlements at 30 June
HomeStart EquityStart Loan
800
639
700
600
500
354
400
300
200
100
9
2008
2007
2006
0
2005
To 30 June 2008, 854
EquityStart Loans had settled to
the value of $138.5 million
(HomeStart loans plus
subsidised EquityStart loans).
854
900
Number
Launched in April 2005 as an
initiative of the Housing Plan for
South Australia, the EquityStart
Loan is part of the
Government’s commitment to
assist current public social
housing tenants into home
ownership.
Source: HomeStart Finance
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
23
Our performance
DFC doing more
HomeStart approved a construction loan for land purchased at Elizabeth by a customer with a
disability to build a new home close to relevant services. Unfortunately, after the purchase was
finalised, the land was rezoned by the Council for commercial and other purposes, but excluding
residential housing. The customer couldn’t build the home and was unlikely to be able to access
any similar land within such close proximity to services. However, with the customer’s permission,
HomeStart staff intervened and approached the Council to initiate a discussion about rezoning
the relevant piece of land. The Council was sympathetic to our customer’s situation which
ultimately allowed the construction of a residential property on the land.
Urban Renewal
The State Government is strongly committed to a vision of urban regeneration that involves more than
just ‘bricks and mortar’. Efforts at improving the physical environment, housing and infrastructure, are
being accompanied by a strong commitment to also improving the social environment.
During 2007-08, we continued redevelopment of public housing estates through urban renewal
programs and other smaller scale developments. Urban renewal projects in Salisbury North
(Hawksbury Park), The Parks (Westwood), Gilles Plains (Wandana), Kilburn South (Mapleton Grove),
Port Pirie (Risdon Grove) and Whyalla (Myall Place) all progressed as planned. In 2007-08, total
expenditure on urban renewal projects was $27.5 million, and total revenue from these projects was
$46 million.
In 2008-09, we will contribute to the Playford North Urban Renewal Project, to deliver whole of
government outcomes for Adelaide’s outer northern suburbs. We will continue the redevelopment of
public housing estates through urban renewal programs and other smaller scale developments, and in
collaboration with different levels of government and non-government agencies, finalise the Human
Services Plan.
Safe Tracks
Developed in 2007, the Safe Tracks initiative is a statewide strategic response to the mobility of
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander persons. Safe Tracks addresses the related housing, health,
safety and wellbeing needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander South Australians moving between
remote communities and the regional centres of Ceduna, Coober Pedy, Port Augusta and Adelaide.
Safe Tracks is underpinned by an integrated whole of government approach to service and
infrastructure planning and delivery, as well as the development of co-coordinated Transitional
Accommodation and Integrated Service Centres in each of the four regions.
A Senior Officers Group was established in Ceduna in 2008 to provide strategic direction and
leadership to prioritise regional inter agency service needs, assist in providing an effective and timely
service system for Anangu clients as well as related community development issues.
The Adelaide Region Rapid Response Model was also developed to address ongoing public space
and mobility issues at a local reserve and has been operational since December 2007. A partnership
proposal was submitted to the Commonwealth Government for the development of Transitional
Accommodation and Integrated Service Centres in the Coober Pedy and Adelaide Regions and a
review of management and service support operations and outcomes at the Ceduna and Port Augusta
Transitional Accommodation Centres undertaken.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
24
Our performance
In 2008-09, we will continue the development and implementation of the Safe Tracks strategy by
continuing to manage the transitional accommodation programs and related integrated service
responses in the Ceduna and Port Augusta regions.
One in 180
Premiering at a community event on 19 February 2008 at the Odeon Cinema Semaphore, One in 180
is a Housing SA training DVD that can be used by government departments, organisations and
community groups to generate discussion and increase awareness of the issues impacting on
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Elders. The title of the DVD is based on statistics showing that
there is approximately one Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander South Australian for every 180 nonAboriginal South Australian over the age of 65.
Professionally produced by Housing SA in conjunction with Clear Digital Vision, One in 180 presents
the thoughts of traditional and urban Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Elders and what struggles
they have faced living in a predominantly white Australia. The DVD was developed to increase
awareness amongst Housing SA staff of the needs of ageing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
public housing tenants and to acquire the skills and resources necessary to make relevant referrals,
and connect older Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander residents to appropriate support services
within their respective communities.
Other priorities for 2008-09
In 2008-09, we will commence a review of the Housing Improvement Act 1940 (the Act) which will
involve consultation with relevant government agencies, external advocacy organisations and industry
representatives. Issues to be considered by the review include:
• clarity of the roles and responsibilities of Housing SA and Local Government agencies
• strengthening powers of Housing SA to meet its obligations under the Act
• penalties for breaches under the Act
• updating of relevant sections of the Act for consistency with the regulations and other legislation
• prosecution for breaches of the Act, as a result of landlords charging a rent to private tenants, in
excess of the rent fixed by Housing SA under the Act.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
25
Our performance
DFC Scorecard
The DFC Scorecard has been developed as a management information and reporting framework to
ensure the internal and external accountability for the performance of our department, and to improve
evidence-based decision-making processes, particularly in relation to the allocation of resources.
Outcome 1 – Affordable Housing Choices and Communities that Prosper
Key Performance
Indicator (KPI)
Target
(June 2008)
Actual
(June 2008)
Graph
25000
TOP LEVEL KPI
Affordable Housing
Choices and
Communities that
Prosper
20000
15000
N/A
21 151
Number of new
affordable housing
outcomes generated
annually.
10000
5000
0
2005-06
•
2006-07
2007-08
This number comprises new public and Aboriginal housing allocations, Private Rental Assistance Program
assistance (bonds, rent in advance and arrears), people housed throughout the Private Rental Liaison Officer
program, new allocations to special needs customers, house sales through the Property Locator and
HomeStart Finance loans.
500
400
Affordable Homes
Number of divestment
house sales through the
Affordable Homes
Program (accumulative).
300
464
414
200
100
0
July
Sept
Nov
2006-07
•
•
Jan
M ar
M ay
Target
During 2007-08, 414 properties were sold through the Affordable Homes Program. Despite this the revenue
goal of $66.7 million was exceeded by raising more than $8 million in excess of the targeted amount by selling
50 less houses than initially anticipated, meaning that this number of properties could be retained as part of
the social housing portfolio.
Over a nine year period the DFC Housing Group will sell approximately 8000 properties as affordable
homeownership options to tenants and other low income earners, and to social landlords and institutional
investors through programs currently under development by the SA Affordable Housing Trust.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
26
Our performance
KPI
Target
(June 2008)
Actual
(June 2008)
Graph
•
Affordable Homes
Percentage of
divestment properties
secured as affordable
housing.
•
There were 63 per cent of divestment
properties secured as affordable housing
through EquityStart sales to tenants and
Property Locator sales.
The majority of sale properties valued at
under $250 000 are now listed on the
Property Locator, resulting in owner occupier
sales increasing to 80 per cent in the second
half of 2007-08.
200
150
Affordable Homes
Number of households
assisted through
HomeStart Finance.
100
113
132
50
0
July
Sept
Nov
Jan
M ar
2006-07
•
•
M ay
Target
During 2007-08, over 1500 households were assisted through HomeStart Finance. The continued lack of
affordable housing supply and deterioration in housing affordability has affected demand over the last financial
year and impacted on HomeStart's results.
Response to current promotional activities in the form of initial call volumes and internet site enquiries has
been positive. It is expected that loan settlements will reflect this increase in activity in coming months.
80
60
Affordable Homes
Number of people
housed by the Private
Rental Liaison Officer
Program.
40
N/A
60
20
0
July
Sept
Nov
2006-07
•
•
Jan
M ar
M ay
Target
The Private Rental Liaison Program (PRLO) does not have a target for the total number of customers assisted
as the program is demand driven.
During 2007-08, a further 142 customers were housed through the PRLO compared to 2006-07. This is
primarily due to the expansion of PRLO's funded through Housing SA.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
27
Our performance
KPI
Target
(June 2008)
Actual
(June 2008)
Graph
3000
Sustainability
Number of public
houses with water
conservation devices
installed in 2007-08
(e.g. dual flush and low
flow shower heads)
(accumulative).
2000
2400
2577
1000
0
July
Sept
Nov
Jan
M ar
2006-07
•
M ay
Target
75 per cent of Housing SA houses had water conservation devices by the end of 2007-08.
30%
Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander South
Australians
Percentage of people
housed through the
Private Rental Liaison
Officer program who
identify as Aboriginal
and Torres Strait
Islanders.
25%
20%
15%
5%
11.6%
10%
5%
0%
July
Sept
Nov
Jan
M ar
2006-07
•
M ay
Target
The percentage of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander customers housed during 2007-08 increased with 34.6
per cent of people housed in Port Augusta, 31.4 per cent in the Riverland and 23 per cent in the Murraylands.
25%
20%
Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander South
Australians
Percentage of Housing
SA allocations to
Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islanders.
15%
N/A
12.9%
10%
5%
0%
July
Sept
Nov
2006-07
•
•
Jan
M ar
M ay
Target
No target has been set as this KPI is demand driven.
During 2007-08, 14.5 per cent of Housing SA allocations were to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
customers.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
28
Our performance
KPI
Target
(June 2008)
Actual
(June 2008)
Graph
10
8
Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander South
Australians
6
5
7
Number of Nunga Loan
settlements.
4
2
0
July
Sept
Nov
Jan
M ar
2006-07
•
•
M ay
Target
59 Nunga Loans were achieved during 2007-08, above the target but slightly below the 61 achieved in
2006-07.
The Nunga Loan product is regularly reviewed to ensure it meets the needs of the target market while at the
same time the product risk continues to be effectively managed.
40
Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander South
Australians
Number of Aboriginal
and Torres Strait
Islander South
Australians employed in
projects.
30
20
35
33
10
0
July
Sept
Nov
Jan
M ar
2006-07
•
M ay
Target
During 2007-08, an average of 33 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people were employed in projects.
20
15
Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander South
Australians
Number of projects
employing Aboriginal
and Torres Strait
Islander South
Australians.
10
12
12
5
0
July
Sept
Nov
2006-07
•
Jan
M ar
M ay
Target
During 2007-08, there was an average of 12 projects employing Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
29
Our performance
KPI
Target
(June 2008)
Actual
(June 2008)
Graph
10%
Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander South
Australians
Percentage of
Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander South
Australians receiving
assistance through the
Private Rental
Assistance Scheme.
8%
6%
N/A
5.6%
4%
2%
0%
July
Sept
Nov
Jan
M ar
2006-07
•
•
•
M ay
Target
No target has been set as this KPI is demand driven.
Customers have 14 weeks to use Private Rental Assistance after it has been approved. When customers use
assistance in a later month to when it was approved, the assistance is reported against the month it was
approved in by amending the previous months' data.
Therefore the 2007-08 total figure is expected to increase as the 14 weeks to use the assistance expires.
80%
60%
Affordable Homes
Percentage of private
investment in new
affordable rental.
40%
>50%
51%
20%
0%
Sept
Dec
2006-07
•
M ar
June
Target
During 2007-08, the percentage of private investment in new affordable rental was above 50 per cent, ranging
from 51.8 per cent to 56.5 per cent.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
30
Our performance
KPI
Target
(June 2008)
Actual
(June 2008)
Graph
2500
2000
Affordable Homes
Number of affordable
housing opportunities
secured through the 15
per cent policy
(accumulative).
1500
2000
2200
1000
500
0
Sept
•
•
•
•
Dec
2006-07
M ar
June
Target
The Affordable Housing Innovations Unit has met the affordable housing target of 15 per cent set for
significant new developments, supported in legislation and delivering on the ground successes.
Agreements have been signed with private developers to provide in excess of 720 new affordable homes as
part of projects delivering more than 4000 homes over the next 5 years.
Negotiations to finalise agreements are also well underway to provide an additional 2000 new affordable
homes.
The Statutes Amendment (Affordable Housing) Bill came into effect on 1 July 2007. As part of this Bill, a target
of 15 per cent affordable housing including a 5 per cent component for high need housing in all significant new
housing developments has been set.
Regional South
Australia
In the June 2008 quarter a Memorandum of
Understanding (MOU) was signed by the Mayor
of Port Lincoln Council and the Murray Bridge
Affordable Housing Project was identified as for
possible inclusion in National Affordable Rental
Scheme.
Number of affordable
housing opportunities in
identified regions
(Roxby Downs, Port
Lincoln and Murray
Bridge).
10%
Growing Prosperity
Proportion of councils
that have adopted
affordable housing
policies.
5%
5%
5%
0%
Sept
Dec
2006-07
•
•
M ar
June
Target
Councils adopting affordable housing policies include Charles Sturt, Salisbury, Onkaparinga, Port Adelaide
Enfield and the Adelaide City Council.
Seven have been commented on and include affordable housing, and are subject to approval by the Minister
for Urban Development and Planning.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
31
Our performance
KPI
Target
(June 2008)
Actual
(June 2008)
Graph
500
400
Growing Prosperity
300
Number of new housing
opportunities provided
for low income
customers
(accumulative).
469
373
200
100
0
Sept
Dec
M ar
2006-07
•
•
June
Target
Total public, Aboriginal and community housing construction was 373, below the target of 469.
Dwellings not completed in 2007-08 are carried forward to 2008-09.
400
Sustainability
Number of public
houses constructed
complying with
accessibility and
adaptability principles as
set out in the Asset
Services Division's
minimum specification
for new construction
(accumulative).
300
85% of total
new housing
(317)
200
324
100
0
Sept
Dec
M ar
2006-07
•
•
June
Target
The target for public houses constructed complying with accessibility and adaptability principles as set out in
the Asset Services Division's minimum specification for new construction is 85 per cent. Site constraints
generally restrict compliance with the specification.
During 2007-08, approximately 95 per cent of new public houses were constructed complying with
accessibility and adaptability principles as set out in the Asset Services Division’s minimum specification for
new construction.
100%
Sustainability
Number of community
houses constructed
complying with
accessibility and
adaptability principles as
set out in the Asset
Services Division's
minimum specification
for new construction.
75%
50%
100%
100%
25%
0%
Sept
Dec
2006-07
•
M ar
June
Target
100 per cent of community houses constructed comply with accessibility and adaptability principles as set out
in the Asset Services Division's minimum specification for new construction.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
32
Our performance
Target
(June 2008)
KPI
Actual
(June 2008)
Graph
Community Renewal
Number of housing
associations approved
to grow.
Not available until new regulation system
commences - date unknown as yet.
Community Renewal
Accreditation system considered for
establishment in 2007-08 however is not
proceeding.
Percentage of sector
involved in quality
improvement systems.
100%
75%
Community Renewal
Percentage of
associations and
cooperatives who have
submitted Asset
Management Plans by
31 May 2008.
50%
N/A
59%
25%
0%
Sept
Dec
2006-07
•
•
M ar
June
Target
New KPI therefore no previous data is available for comparison.
At the end of 2007-08 there were 29 Community Housing Organisations with outstanding Asset Management
Plans.
Community Renewal
Improvement in
community strength
indicators over time.
Information not collected in 2007-08. Currently
working with Co-operatives on a new
management model.
Target has been achieved or exceeded
Requires attention: the difference between the target and data is less than 10 per cent
Requires urgent and decisive action: the difference between the target and data is greater than 10 per cent
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
33
Our performance
Objective 2 – High need housing
Goal
To develop and implement better high need housing and service responses for people at risk or in
need.
Context
While the majority of South Australians have the ability to live independently in the community, for
some, extra assistance is required. Our department has a significant responsibility to provide
appropriate housing for people who have high needs and who experience difficulty in the private
housing market. We also have a key role in ensuring additional support services are provided to assist
people to maintain their accommodation, delivering stability, quality of life and a sense of security and
connectedness.
We are focussing on providing shelter, intervening early and joining up responses for people at risk.
Existing services within our department have been reconfigured to provide customers with a
continuum of housing options, making accommodation and support available when people need it
most and providing real options for them when their needs change. To deliver on this a new service
delivery model has been developed to improve access to the full range of Housing SA services, taking
into consideration the increasing number of private and public tenancies requiring support and
improving intensive tenancy support.
The lead document to guide reform of the Supported Accommodation Assistance Program and high
needs housing sector, Department for Families and Communities Approaches to Homelessness,
provides the direction for an Integrated Homelessness and High Needs Housing Service System. We
are working closely with the Commonwealth Government on the development of the National Rental
Affordability Scheme, a Commonwealth-State initiative to provide incentives for the construction of
new affordable rental housing.
Also, we are working towards minimising homelessness and enhancing housing options for Aboriginal
and Torres Strait Islander people with high and complex needs by providing pathways to affordable
housing.
Our achievements under Objective 2 contribute to the following SASP targets:
Improve the overall wellbeing of Aboriginal South Australians (Target T6.1)
Halve the number of ‘rough sleepers’ in South Australia by 2010 and maintain thereafter
(Target T6.6)
• Halve the number of South Australians experiencing housing stress by 2014 (Target T6.8)
• Reduce overcrowding in Aboriginal households by ten per cent by 2014 (Target T6.9)
• Double the number of people with disabilities appropriately housed and supported in community
based accommodation by 2014 (Target T6.10).
•
•
Lead Responsibility
The following divisions of Housing SA have responsibility for Objective 2:
• Affordable Housing and Sector Development
• Housing Services
• Corporate Services.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
34
Our performance
Performance Overview
Homelessness
We target housing to those in greatest need by increasing options for homeless people. This
contributes significantly to the achievement of SASP target T6.6, halve the number of ‘rough sleepers’
in South Australia by 2010 and maintain thereafter.
During 2007-08, we participated in the Commonwealth Homelessness Green and White Paper
process and reform of the homelessness system in South Australia to align with the national
directions. The Street to Home program also extended its service during 2007-08, to cover the wider
metropolitan area.
To further address homelessness in 2008-09, we will participate in the development of a high needs
housing plan aligned with the Housing SA strategic asset plan and develop future directions for
homelessness services in alignment with the Commonwealth Government homelessness initiative.
Strategic funding and service planning priorities will be established for vulnerable people in the inner
city and a Foyer Plus model will be developed to provide young people with stable housing linked to
life skills, education, training and workforce participation. Foyer is a supportive housing model for
young people that aims to prevent youth homelessness, youth unemployment and alienation of young
people at risk.
Supported Accommodation Assistance Program
The Supported Accommodation Assistance Program (SAAP) is a joint Commonwealth/State funded
initiative to provide transitional supported accommodation and a range support services to people who
are homeless or at risk of homelessness. During 2007-08, a strategic proposal for sector reform of
SAAP was developed. The SAAP reform has been realigned to meet the priorities of the State
Government and the Commonwealth Government in regards to homelessness. A new integrated
homelessness services model has been developed that encompasses the three pillars of SAAP
reform as part of a wider departmental approach to homelessness.
In 2008-09, we will lead the Integrated Housing and Support System Project (formally SAAP reform)
subject to the outcomes of the Commonwealth White Paper on homelessness. The project aims to
better integrate homelessness and housing services for people in need.
DFC doing more
Housing SA staff who worked with local non-government agencies to house a family who
had been transient or homeless for many years were acknowledged by the Church Minister from
a Church group that the family had been involved in. The Church Minister wrote:
‘Just wanted to say a big thanks for your help in moving C's case along so quickly. She is now
working part time with local schools and is a key leader of the women's art and craft and
personal support group at our church. This means so much in terms of her stability and
security for herself and boys. We are very grateful. Once again, our sincere thanks.’
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
35
Our performance
Common Ground
Common Ground Adelaide Ltd was established as a not for profit company limited by guarantee in
December 2006. It seeks to provide a pathway for individuals towards stability and self sufficiency with
the model based on the premise that access to stable high quality housing is a vital step towards
assisting people who have been homeless or are in housing stress.
During 2007-08, 39 accommodation units within the Franklin Street Bus Station redevelopment were
completed for use by Common Ground Adelaide Ltd. The first three tenants moved into the units on
1 February 2008, with all units available for tenants now fully occupied.
Housing SA Service Delivery Model
In April 2008, Housing SA implemented a new service delivery model based on offering the full
continuum of housing options and coordinating effective packages of support for customers with high
needs. The model created teams of service delivery staff in Housing SA offices to provide services
across the housing continuum including:
• access to emergency and crisis accommodation
• provision of private rental assistance and support for customers in private rental accommodation
• advocacy for customers experiencing difficulty accessing private rental accommodation
• referral to community housing
• increased access for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander customers to a wider range of housing
options and supports
• linking customers to support services to help stabilise their housing
• exploration of home ownership as an option for customers and referrals to HomeStart Finance
where appropriate
• active relationships and referrals with agencies including Families SA, Domiciliary Care SA,
Disability SA and Mental Health Services.
The new service model will continue to be embedded during 2008-09 and we will undertake a
comprehensive evaluation of the model, including an assessment of the impact on customers, staff
and partners. We will also develop a continuous improvement process to ensure Housing SA is
meeting the needs of customers.
The implementation of the service delivery model included the creation of specialised teams to focus
on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander housing customers. In 2008-09 we will increase the
confidence of all teams to respond to the needs of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander customers.
Sustaining Public and Private Tenancies
There is an ongoing need to support customers in a range of housing tenures, including both private
and public rental. There is a range of programs and tools in place across our department which are
provided by a number of service partners, supporting customers with a range of needs. These include
the:
• Supported Tenancy Program, a Social Inclusion Unit homelessness prevention initiative that
provides support services to Housing SA tenants and their families who are at risk of eviction. Nongovernment organisations provide case management and direct support services that address the
underlying issues that may place a tenancy at risk.
• Supported Tenancy Scheme, which leases Housing SA properties directly to government and nongovernment organisations who provide transitional accommodation and support services to
vulnerable members of the community.
• Private Rental Assistance Program, which enables low income households to access and maintain
accommodation in the private rental market through the provision of services such as information,
advice and advocacy on housing issues as well as financial assistance for bond, rent in advance or
rent in arrears.
• Private Rental Liaison Program, an initiative of the Social Inclusion Unit, which initiates and
implements early intervention and prevention strategies aimed at maximising opportunities to
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
36
Our performance
•
acquire tenancies in the private rental market for eligible participants. Participants are generally
people who have had no previous rental experience, have poor English/literacy skills or difficulty
understanding forms. The program also works with people who feel they are being discriminated
against, are over the age of 18 and leaving home for the first time, or who lack confidence in
approaching landlords or real estate agents and property managers.
Operational Protocol between Housing SA and Families SA, which provides support to families with
child protection concerns who are at risk of eviction from public housing. The protocol requires a
collaborative inter-agency approach to working with families and children at risk, utilising principles
of early intervention and prevention.
In 2008-09, we will implement the use of housing plans as a key case management and support tool
for public and private rental customers and a revised home visit process to support vulnerable
customers. A revised Operational Protocol between Families SA and Housing SA will be implemented
and monitored for families with children who are at risk of eviction from public housing and the
Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between Housing SA and Mental Health Services will also be
monitored.
To further improve the safety and wellbeing of social housing tenants and their communities, we will
implement and monitor a revised, evaluated MOU with the South Australia Police and further develop
policy responses to address overcrowding within existing Housing SA tenancies.
Community Housing
During 2007-08, we allocated a net 78 additional rental dwellings to the community housing sector
which focus on population groups with high needs, for example homelessness, disabilities and
domestic violence. This included newbuilds, upgraded existing social housing dwellings and new
leases.
In 2008-09, we aim to provide 140 additional rental dwellings to housing associations which house
people with high needs. This will be achieved with a planned 90 newbuilds, 45 upgraded public
housing properties and five upgraded vacant community housing properties. Accounting for the
anticipated divestment of around 40 properties from the sector, the increase in lettable stock is
targeted at 100 dwellings for 2008-09..
Bond assistance and rent grants provided through the
Private Rental Assistance Program
Private Rental Assistance
Program
16000
14000
12000
10449
11468
9837
12051
9738
12445
10441
6000
13593
8000
10719
10000
14144
Number
Private rental services are
available to eligible customers
through the Private Rental
Assistance Program. This
includes the provision of bond
guarantees to enable customers
to access private rental housing,
as well as cash bonds to
facilitate access to other forms
of housing. In certain
circumstances, grants for rent
payments are provided to
customers to assist in
establishing or maintaining
private rental tenancies.
4000
2000
0
2003-04
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
2007-08
Total number of bonds guaranteed, including cash bonds
Total number of rent grants provided
Source: Housing SA
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
37
Our performance
Indigenous Housing
In May 2007, the then Commonwealth Government introduced a National Indigenous Housing Reform
Strategy through the budget process which intended to:
• abolish the Community Housing and Infrastructure Program
• introduce a new Australian Remote Indigenous Accommodation Program
• direct Aboriginal Rental Housing Program funding to public housing models, rather than all
Aboriginal housing models.
The policy intent, following the election of the new Commonwealth Government in November 2007,
was to honour previous agreements provided by the former government and to continue a reform
process, however, in a different manner.
Our department responded to the Commonwealth announced National Indigenous Housing Reform
Strategy by providing impact assessments on the affects of the National Indigenous Housing Reform
Strategy on housing on Aboriginal Community Lands in South Australia, through the Housing
Ministers’ Conference. The current Indigenous Housing and Community Infrastructure Agreement was
also rolled over in preparedness for negotiation of a new Indigenous Housing Agreement.
During 2007-08, we increased Aboriginal housing stock in remote communities by completing 22 new
houses and 29 house upgrades. A further 17 new and purchased houses for mainstream Aboriginal
rental housing were also delivered. As the lead government department, we also established a
steering committee to drive progress toward achieving SASP Target T6.9, reduce overcrowding in
Aboriginal household by ten per cent by 2014.
In partnership with the Aboriginal Affairs and Reconciliation Division (AARD) of DPC, we consulted
with the APY Executive Board on a $25 million capital project proposal. In addition, we provided
advice to AARD regarding the negotiations with the Commonwealth Government.
In 2008-09, we will finalise negotiations on the new Indigenous Housing Agreement with the
Commonwealth Government, which will be implemented statewide. We will also increase Aboriginal
housing stock in remote communities by completing 30 new houses and 40 house upgrades, with a
further 21 new and purchased houses for mainstream Aboriginal rental housing.
Disruptive Behaviour Policy and Procedures
Revised Housing SA Disruptive Behaviour Policy and Procedures have been developed and
implemented. As part of this process, the Disruptive Management Team (DMT) was formed to better
address the ongoing problems of disruptive behaviour by Housing SA tenancies. The aim of this group
is to deal intensively with ongoing and seriously disruptive tenancy issues and seek resolution via
support. Where tenants are wilfully disruptive, unwilling to accept support to resolve their behaviour or
unwilling to change their disruptive ways, their cases are referred to the Residential Tenancies
Tribunal (RTT) for eviction.
The revised policy and procedures were implemented during February 2008, along with amendments
to the Residential Tenancies Act 1995 to support the process. During 2007-08, 26 cases were referred
to the DMT from Housing SA regional offices. A further five cases which were adjourned following RTT
hearings were passed to the DMT to monitor and manage.
The majority of tenants referred to the DMT required, and were willing to accept, support to assist
them to remain in their homes. Approximately 31 per cent had identified mental health issues and
needed some form of intervention or support to live independently without disturbing their neighbours.
Only four were found to be wilfully disruptive. One tenant was referred to the RTT, while a further three
chose to vacate their tenancies prior to RTT hearings. The remainder were willing to accept support
services and/or modify their behaviour to the satisfaction of Housing SA and their neighbours.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
38
Our performance
There is also an opportunity for the DMT to work with tenants who would benefit from the opportunity
to transfer to another Housing SA property. This strategy has been used effectively in conjunction with
support packages and probationary tenancy leases to enable them to demonstrate their willingness to
modify their behaviour.
National Rental Affordability Scheme
The National Rental Affordability Scheme, a Commonwealth Government initiative with State and
Territory participation, is a significant supply side response to deal directly with rental property
shortages and rapidly rising rents. The scheme aims to help address the shortage of rental housing
and rising rents by facilitating the supply of new lower rent homes through the allocation of a National
Rental Incentive to participating organisations.
At its March 2008 meeting, the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) agreed to implement the
National Rental Affordability Scheme. Resulting from this was agreement by South Australia to
contribute $2000 per dwelling per annum under certain terms and conditions. The target for South
Australia is to facilitate the allocation of 150 rental incentives for 2008-09, and then to increase
numbers from there.
Disability Housing Program
Through Housing SA, properties are leased to government and non-government organisations that
provide accommodation and support services to people with a disability. The Housing SA Disability
Housing Program is undergoing a major expansion by providing an extra 200 properties over a four
year period, commencing in 2006-07. During 2007-08, we continued to target housing to those in
greatest need by providing additional properties for the Disability Housing Program. We will increase
property allocations to the disability sector in 2008-09 by a minimum of 50 properties.
Number of people housed in the private rental market
through the Private Rental Liaison Officer Program
Private Rental Liaison
Officer Program
700
600
604
500
400
432
460
300
200
100
188
2007-08
2006-07
2005-06
0
2004-05
Number
The Private Rental Liaison
Officer Program commenced in
May 2004 to assist people who
are unable to find and secure
accommodation in the private
rental market. A Private Rental
Liaison Officer provides
customers with assistance in
finding suitable accommodation,
advice regarding their rights and
responsibilities, and referrals to
relevant organisations to assist
with their needs.
Source: Housing SA
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
39
Our performance
Supported Residential Facilities Act 1992
During 2007-08, a business impact assessment for new legislation to replace the Supported
Residential Facilities Act 1992 was undertaken. Regulations under the Supported Residential Facilities
Act 1992 will be remade during 2008-09.
Other priorities for 2008-09
•
In 2008-09, we will implement a new housing service model on the APY Lands.
In December 2007, the APY Executive Board and our department entered into a MOU which
provided a preliminary framework for the transition of community managed housing on the APY
Lands to state management. The agreement prioritised:
- a property and household audit to provide a first ever baseline of data for asset and housing
management planning
- the establishment of a new approach to the management and delivery of existing and new
housing
- the connection of delivery and management of housing services with complementary activities
and services present on the APY Lands
- work with communities, governments, providers and employers to actively generate local
employment opportunities in asset and housing management activity.
The implementation of the new housing model and housing management system is dependent
upon successful negotiations with the Commonwealth Government.
•
During 2007-08, Housing SA developed the draft 2008-2010 Customer Participation Strategy for
Housing to strengthen customer participation and embrace the intent of the department’s
Community Engagement Charter and Engagement Directions Statement. The proposed strategy
outlines four key strategy areas being:
- Partnerships in service delivery
- Customer feedback
- Customer consultation
- Building customer’s capacity to participate.
Broad consultation will be undertaken in relation to the draft strategy during early 2008-09.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
40
Our performance
DFC Scorecard
Outcome 2 – High Need Housing
KPI
Target
(June 2008)
Actual
(June 2008)
Graph
50%
40%
TOP LEVEL KPI
High Need Housing
Greatest need
allocations as a
proportion of all
allocations (Housing
Services data).
30%
N/A
N/A
20%
10%
0%
2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08
Hist orical
Nat ional Benchmark
•
•
•
Greatest Need Allocation – where the tenant was homeless, their life or safety was at risk in their
accommodation, their health condition was aggravated by their housing, their housing was inappropriate to
their needs, and/or they had very high rental housing costs. Excludes Special Needs Housing, Aboriginal
Housing Services and Community Housing Allocations.
2007-08 data is unavailable until January 2009 when it is publicly released.
The 2005-06 performance aligns with that of 2003-04 and 2004-05 where 43 per cent of public housing
allocations were to greatest need allocations (as defined by the Commonwealth State Housing Agreement
Performance Indicator Framework). South Australia continues to perform above the national average for this
indicator.
100%
TOP LEVEL KPI
75%
High Need Housing
Greatest need
allocations as a
proportion of all
allocations (Office for
Community Housing
data).
50%
N/A
N/A
25%
0%
2003-04 2004-05 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08
Hist orical
Nat ional Benchmark
•
•
Greatest Need Allocation – where the tenant was homeless, their life or safety was at risk in their
accommodation, their health condition was aggravated by their housing, their housing was inappropriate to
their needs, and/or they had very high rental housing costs. Excludes Special Needs Housing, Aboriginal
Housing Services and Housing Services Allocations.
2007-08 data is unavailable until January 2009 when it is publicly released.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
41
Our performance
KPI
Target
(June 2008)
Actual
(June 2008)
Graph
100%
High Need (Public
Housing)
Urgent and high need
category 1 and 2
allocations as a
proportion of all
allocations to long term
social (public and
Aboriginal) housing.
(excludes transfers)
•
80%
60%
Annual target
SAHT – 84%
AHA – 93%
84%
40%
20%
0%
July
Sept
Nov
2006-07
Jan
M ar
Jan
M ar
M ay
Target
During 2007-08, 83.7 per cent of allocations were to category 1 and 2 applicants.
4000
3000
High Need
Number of disability
modifications to existing
dwellings
(accumulative).
2000
3500
3814
1000
0
July
•
•
Sept
Nov
2006-07
M ay
Target
During 2007-08, there were 3814 modifications exceeding the target of 3500.
Modifications are undertaken based on customer demand/needs.
$4,000,000
$3,000,000
High Need
Value of disability
modifications to existing
dwellings
(accumulative).
$2,000,000
$2 978 000
$3 379 586
$1,000,000
$0
July
Sept
Nov
2006-07
•
•
Jan
M ar
M ay
Target
During 2007-08, the total cost of modifications was $3 379 586.
Modifications include small works such as installation of hand rails and ramps and major works include
remodelling of bathrooms and kitchens.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
42
Our performance
KPI
Target
(June 2008)
Actual
(June 2008)
Graph
30%
20%
Homelessness
Percentage of new
Housing SA allocations
to people self identified
as homeless.
N/A
16.6%
10%
0%
July
Sept
Nov
Jan
M ar
2006-07
•
•
•
M ay
Target
No target has been set as this KPI is demand driven.
The total number of allocations to the homeless in 2007-08 was 314, 13.5 per cent of total allocations.
In 2006-07 there were 466 allocations to the homeless, 14.7 per cent of total allocations.
200
Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander South
Australians
Number of Aboriginal
and Torres Strait
Islander South
Australians supported
into affordable housing
options (excluding
Community Housing).
150
100
N/A
93
50
0
July
Sept
Nov
Jan
M ar
2006-07
•
•
•
M ay
Target
No target has been set as this KPI is demand driven.
During 2007-08, there were 350 new allocations to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander customers (173 for
Public Housing, and 177 for Aboriginal Housing), 53 Short Term Leases, 24 Direct Leases and 75 customers
were housed by Private Rental Liaison Officers.
The largest form of assistance to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander customers is through the Private Rental
Assistance Program (1234 assisted customers).
3%
2%
Shelter
Supported Tenancy
Scheme properties as a
proportion of all social
housing properties.
N/A
2.5%
1%
0%
July
Sept
Nov
2006-07
•
Jan
M ar
M ay
Target
The Supported Tenancy Scheme does not have targets as it is reliant on the availability of stock and
applications from non-government agencies for properties that meet their service and funding requirements.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
43
Our performance
KPI
Target
(June 2008)
Actual
(June 2008)
Graph
1200
800
Transition
Number of Supported
Tenancy Scheme
properties.
N/A
1129
400
0
July
Sept
Nov
Jan
2006-07
•
•
M ar
M ay
Target
The Supported Tenancy Scheme does not have targets as it is reliant on the availability of stock and
applications from non-government agencies for properties that meet their service and funding requirements.
The number of Supported Tenancy Scheme properties increased by 45 during the year to 1129.
Transition
This data is not collected from Supported
Tenancy Scheme agencies.
Number of people
housed in Supported
Tenancy Scheme
properties.
Transition
This data is not collected from Supported
Tenancy Scheme agencies.
Average length of stay
of people housed in
Supported Tenancy
Scheme properties.
100%
High Need
Percentage of new and
upgraded social housing
(i.e. constructed,
redeveloped or
purchased) located in
areas of identified need
per strategic and
regional asset plans.
80%
60%
100%
100%
40%
20%
0%
Sept
Dec
2006-07
•
M ar
June
Target
High demand areas determined by applications and redevelopment activity. Current focus is on the western
and southern regions.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
44
Our performance
KPI
Target
(June 2008)
Actual
(June 2008)
Graph
40
30
Homelessness
Number of people
sleeping rough in the
inner city supported into
long term housing
through the Street to
Home Project.
20
N/A
31
10
0
Sept
Dec
M ar
2006-07
•
•
•
June
Target
People Sleeping Rough – people living on the streets, in squats or cars. Excludes rough sleepers outside the
inner city.
A total of 68 people who were sleeping rough in the inner city were supported into long term housing through
the Street to Home project during 2007-08.
No targets are set for this KPI as it is reliant on the availability of stock and applications from non-government
agencies for properties that meet their service and funding requirements.
100
80
Homelessness
Number of people
assisted through the
Supported Tenancies
Program.
60
N/A
45
40
20
0
Sept
Dec
2006-07
•
•
M ar
June
Target
No target has been set for this KPI as assistance, is demand driven.
252 people were assisted through the Supported Tenancy Program during 2007-08.
Homelessness
Number of beds offered
to the homeless through
the Common Ground
program.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
Full occupancy of the Franklin Street Apartments
has been achieved (37 residents).
45
Our performance
Target
(June 2008)
KPI
Actual
(June 2008)
Graph
200
150
Homelessness
Number of inner city
homeless as per street
counts.
100
N/A
N/A
50
0
July
Sept
Nov
Jan
2006-07
•
•
M ar
M ay
Target
A count was conducted in May 2008 through three day centres and Street to Home. 79 people were counted
as homeless, down from the 93 counted in August 2007 and the 108 counted in June 2007.
Street counts are conducted twice a year, from June to August.
High Need
(Community Housing)
Urgent and high need
category 1 and 2
allocations as a
proportion of all
allocations to long term
social (community)
housing (excludes
transfers).
This data will be available on completion of the
annual Community Housing Data Collection
process (approximately late October).
•
High Need
•
Number of assets
constructed for specific
high needs/special
projects.
•
During 2007-08, eight purpose designed five
bedroom houses were constructed for the
Strathmont Community Living Project.
This project involves buying land and building
new community homes for people with
intellectual disabilities across the
metropolitan area with recurrent spending
allocated for maintenance and the provision
of services.
Group-home living provides higher staff to
resident ratios, increased privacy and a focus
on social networks.
Target has been achieved or exceeded
Requires attention: the difference between the target and data is less than 10 per cent
Requires urgent and decisive action: the difference between the target and data is greater than 10 per cent
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
46
Our performance
Objective 3 – Independence and community connection
Goal
To enable people to take charge of their lives and ensure community connection opportunities are
available to all.
Context
Our department targets a range of programs and activities to support people to live independently,
strengthen the non-government sector, and to work with local government to build safe, caring and
strong communities. We continue to expand the supply and quality of community based
accommodation options for people with disabilities, and ensure people with disabilities are provided
with opportunities that allow for development and progress.
We work collaboratively to improve relationships and provide support to community service
organisations to enable quality services to be delivered to achieve best outcomes for customers.
Funding has been realigned to provide greater support for vulnerable families, so that families can
provide safe and supportive environments for children and young people.
We continue to respond effectively to the many challenges from the ageing of the South Australian
population. We administer programs that encourage independence and community connection
including Home and Community Care, Grants for Seniors, Positive Ageing Development Grants and
the Seniors Card Program. We also ensure that people who have reduced capacity to care for
themselves are assisted to stay living in their own homes, close to loved ones, family and local
community.
Our achievements under Objective 3 contribute to the following SASP targets:
• Equal or lower than the Australian average for psychological distress by 2014 (Target T2.7)
• Maintain the high level of volunteering in South Australia at 50 per cent participation rate or higher
(Target T5.6)
• Improve the overall wellbeing of Aboriginal South Australians (Target T6.1)
• Reduce the percentage of South Australians receiving government benefits (excluding age
pensions) as their major income source to below the Australian average by 2014 (Target T6.5)
• Double the number of people with disabilities appropriately housed and supported in community
based accommodation by 2014 (Target T6.10)
• Increase by 400 the number of people with disability involved in day options program by 2014
(Target T6.11).
Lead Responsibility
The main areas of our department that share responsibility for Objective 3 are:
• Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Services
• Community Connect
• Concessions and Anti-Poverty Services
• Disability SA (Disability Services and the Office for Disability and Client Services)
• Domiciliary Care SA
• Office for Problem Gambling
• Office for the Ageing
• Volunteers Unit.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
47
Our performance
Performance Overview
Ageing
Improving with Age – Our Ageing Plan for South Australia
Improving with Age – Our Ageing Plan for South Australia is the State Government’s blueprint for
responding to an increasingly ageing population. Launched in February 2006, the Ageing Plan aims to
ensure the needs of older people are met.
During 2007-08, we continued the implementation of Improving with Age – Our Ageing Plan for South
Australia through new and existing initiatives, reporting and monitoring processes, collaboration and
research. Key initiatives included:
• Making a difference to the lives of older South Australians – a booklet celebrating our
achievements on the first anniversary of the Ageing Plan
• Our Actions to prevent the abuse of older South Australians – an action plan to assist in preventing
the abuse of older people by providing information and raising awareness in the community
• The Australian Longitudinal Study on Ageing: 15 years of Ageing in South Australia Report – a
study of ageing undertaken by the Centre for Ageing Studies at Flinders University, to gain a better
understanding of the factors that influence health and wellbeing as we age.
Implementation of the Ageing Plan will continue in 2008-09 with key initiatives including:
Medical Devices Partnering Program – a collaboration between South Australian researchers, end
users and industry to develop cutting edge medical devices
• Circle of Friends – an initiative engaging older people in social activities and networks to reduce
isolation
• Portraits of Ageing; Making the most of it! – a light-hearted event to celebrate International Day of
Older Persons on 1 October 2008
• Building Business Capacity in Workforce Development – a collaborative project led by the
Department of Education, Employment, Science and Technology (DFEEST) to develop a training
program encouraging employers to project and plan for their future workforce needs through
implementing strategies which will support and encourage the retention of mature aged workers in
a positive manner.
•
Register of Retirement Villages
During 2007-08, through the Office for the Ageing (OFTA) we established a Register of South
Australian retirement villages and advanced investigations of breaches of the Retirement Villages Act
1987 (the Act).
Amendments to the Act, which came into effect on 1 November 2006, established a Register of
Retirement Villages on 1 July 2007. As a result of the establishment of the Register, the number of
retirement villages (459), independent living units (13 761) and serviced apartments (1331) in South
Australia and their location is now definitively known. Also, we can now estimate the number of
residents that live in retirement villages (approximately 21 500).
During 2007-08, OFTA dealt with 456 enquiries from residents, families, administering authorities of
retirement villages and the general public; attended seven hearings at the RTT; and conducted 16
mediations between residents and administering authorities of retirement villages.
The Register will be updated by OFTA in 2008-09 based on information provided by retirement
villages. This will enable access to data to demonstrate trends in retirement villages. OFTA will
continue to investigate breaches of the Act and conduct mediations between residents of retirement
villages and administering authorities in an effort to resolve disputes.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
48
Our performance
Grandparents Raising Grandchildren
The Minister for Families and Communities, Hon Jay Weatherill MP launched the Grandparents
Raising Grandchildren: An information resource for relative caregivers on 5 August 2007. The
publication has provided valuable information to grandparents caring for their grandchildren about
supports and services across South Australia from the State Government, Commonwealth
Government and non-government organisations. The publication was so well received that an updated
print run was undertaken in June 2008.
The publication comprises four booklets: Booklet 1 – General Information; Booklet 2 – Support for
Families; Booklet 3 – Education, Parenting and Health; and Booklet 4 – Legal Issues. Initially
developed in conjunction with Grandparents for Grandchildren SA Inc, the publication was developed
and reprinted with financial assistance through the State Government’s Improving with Age – Our
Ageing Plan for South Australia.
Home and Community Care Program
The Home and Community Care (HACC) Program is a joint Commonwealth and State initiative which
funds the provision of basic maintenance and support services for frail older people, younger people
with disabilities and their carers. HACC services include personal care, delivered meals, home
maintenance and modification services, respite care, social support and transport. These services
support independence and community connections.
During 2007-08 we continued to expand HACC maintenance and support for younger and older
people with disabilities and their carers with an estimated 100 000 people receiving a HACC service.
This represents an increase of 4000 people since 2006-07. In 2008-09 we will continue to expand
basic HACC maintenance and support with the number of people to receive a service forecast to
exceed 104 000.
Total HACC funding in South Australia ($ million)
HACC Funding
160
$149.7
140
$138.6
120
$128.1
$118.6
$ million
The State Government provides
38 per cent of the funding for
the HACC Program and has
agreed to make forward
matching contributions over the
next three financial years.
These forward matching
contributions further strengthen
the State Government’s
commitment to meeting the
significant and growing demand
for home and community care
services in South Australia.
100
$109.7
80
60
40
20
0
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
2007-08
2008-09
Source: Office for the Ageing
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
49
Our performance
South Australian Seniors Card
Established in 1993, the South Australian Seniors Card Program is a valuable service provided to
eligible people 60 years of age and over. Administered by the Office for the Ageing, the program aims
to encourage active lifestyle choices by entitling cardholders to a number of government concessions
and a range of discounts on a variety of products and services provided by retailers and businesses
which support the program.
During 2007-08, the Office for the Ageing received approximately 19 200 new applications, averaging
400 per week. There are currently just over 276 000 registered cardholders on the South Australian
Seniors Card database.
Between April and June 2008 a comprehensive Communications Strategy and Feedback Project was
undertaken comprising meetings, focus groups, a survey and phone interviews. The project has
provided an opportunity to market and profile the Seniors Card Program in South Australia. A
summary of the project findings will be included with the 2009 Seniors Card Directory which will be
distributed to cardholders in November/December 2008.
Carers
The Office for Carers administers the South Australian Carers Recognition Act 2005 (the Act) which
recognises the important role of carers in the community. In addition, the Office has responsibility for
coordinating departmental reporting against the Act and producing an annual progress report.
In this second year of reporting, information was gathered which enabled comparisons and progress
against the Carers Recognition Act 2005 to be considered. Fundamental to reporting of the Act has
been the requirement to measure levels of compliance and achievements.
During 2007-08, a series of workshops were conducted in relation to the Act and the associated
legislated obligations. Information sessions were offered to 168 HACC agencies across South
Australia, with other relevant local health services also attending. The workshops provided
opportunities for services to both increase their understanding about the issues for carers and to also
consider local opportunities for capacity building. The workshops also enabled the Office for Carers to
consult broadly with carers and the organisations that represent them to identify key issues.
The Office for Carers has identified a number of issues for further development and in 2008-09 will
continue to lead across government policy development to progress the Carers Recognition Act 2005
toward improved health and wellbeing for South Australian carers.
In 2008-09, the Office for Carers will engage with carers, service providers and government agencies
to ensure a breadth of information and knowledge is incorporated in the development of a carers
framework. The aim of this work will be to inform strategic policy directions and priorities and will be
underpinned by processes of partnership and collaboration. A further goal will be raising the profile of
issues faced by discreet groups of carers including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander carers, young
carers, relinquishing carers and those caring for a person with a mental illness. Collaboration with the
Commonwealth Government to foster coordination and consistency of response to carers needs has
been identified as a key target for the coming year.
A key role of the Office for Carers is to review, analyse and provide recommendations to annual
reporting against the Act. A framework which enables departmental reporting to be compared across
time and across departments will facilitate the analysis of achievements and identification of areas to
be addressed. The development of a robust reporting system will be considered a key focus of the
across government Carers Implementation Group during 2008-09.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
50
Our performance
Disability
Supported Accommodation Strategy
The Supported Accommodation Strategy was informed by the findings of the Supported
Accommodation Task Force. The measures within the strategy provide a streamlined single system
for planning, organising and managing supported accommodation.
The Supported Accommodation Strategy was implemented during 2007-08, which involved
establishing the following mechanisms:
• standardised assessment processes
• an integrated single service needs registration process to provide reliable data on demand for
support and accommodation
• introduction of a single waiting list
• vacancy reporting for both the government and non government sectors
• allocation of vacancies based on priority of need and appropriateness of service.
In 2008-09, information and data from the single waiting list and vacancy reporting system will allow
for better planning for current and future need. This will inform planning to progress SASP target
T6.10.
Community Based Accommodation
As the lead reporting agency for SASP target T6.10, our department is responsible for implementing
strategies to double the number of people with disabilities appropriately housed and supported in
community based accommodation by 2014.
During 2007-08, further progress on transitioning people with a disability from institutional care to
community settings occurred through a number of projects, including:
• the Younger People in Residential Aged Care (YPIRAC) program which assisted a number of
individuals with a disability under the age of 50 years, to access a range of support and
accommodation options
• Disability SA worked with all clients at Highgate Park and their families to identify their interest in
returning to the community
• the Minda Project 105 developed new accommodation in the community for people with disabilities
• the Strathmont Centre Redevelopment and Community Living Project returned 40 people to
community living.
In 2008-09, we will continue the transitioning of people from institutional to community based
accommodation and develop new group homes and other accommodation options for people waiting
for supported accommodation. Allocation will be from the single waiting list and will be on the basis of
need.
Strathmont Centre Redevelopment and Community Living Project
The Strathmont Centre Redevelopment and Community Living Project seeks to relocate 150 residents
from Strathmont Centre to community living in purpose built group homes. During 2007-08, 40 new
community based group home places were created and a Business Case for Stage 2 of the
redevelopment of the Strathmont site commenced, which will outline the case for the remaining 99
people to move to supported community living and to close the site.
A further 60 residents will be relocated from the Strathmont Centre to supported community
accommodation during 2008-09, of which ten purpose built homes will accommodate 50 individuals
throughout the metropolitan area. The remaining ten residents to be accommodated in disability
accessible property rented through Housing SA.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
51
Our performance
DFC doing more
A delighted mother of a Disability SA client who lived in the Strathmont Centre before moving to
a new purpose-built community house at Sturt wrote to Disability SA as follows…
‘When the move to the community was first spoken of a few years ago, I was very adamant
and determined that she would not move to the community. I didn’t think she would get
the same level of attention she was getting at that time in Strathmont.
Then I was told about two new houses being purpose built in the Sturt area, which
is much closer to the family. I had a look at the houses and spoke to some of the staff
who were going to be working there and gradually my mind was turned around.
It was still with some trepidation that I finally consented to the move to Sturt. That
decision has been the best decision I have ever made. Listening to her (singing) today
has finally proved to me that she is happy again and well looked after. The staff
are outstanding in the way they care for both her, myself and the family. Nothing seems
to be too much trouble for them. They bring her to see me whenever I ask them.
Looking back over the last year or so that she has been at Sturt, I cannot believe
I was so resistant to her moving. My thanks must go to all concerned with
the move and especially to the staff who care for her.’
Consumer Advisory Mechanisms
Consumer advisory mechanisms are an essential check and balance for disability services and also
for government in its policy and planning in relation to services for people with a disability. Our
department has strengthened consumer advisory mechanisms to support the reform of services for
people with a disability.
The Minister’s Disability Advisory Council was established in December 2007, to provide the Minister
for Disability with independent advice on whole of government issues related to disability. The
Disability Advisory Network of South Australia (DANSA), a consumer consultation group with
membership from a diverse group of people, was also established during 2007-08. DANSA provides
advice to Disability SA regarding services, development and future planning. The State Aboriginal
Network and DANSA have developed close links to ensure that all people with a disability are heard.
We will continue to develop consumer consultation and feedback mechanisms in 2008-09.
Communities
DFC Performance Management Framework
In 2007-08, we developed and commenced implementation of the DFC Performance Management
Framework to better manage the grant funding we provide to the community services sector. The
Framework aims to deliver better community value in regards to the grant funding provided, by
regularly monitoring the performance of funded organisations in the provision of community services.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
52
Our performance
Community Sector
During 2007-08, the DFC Connecting Communities internet site was established to provide nongovernment organisations, government agencies, community groups, volunteers, businesses, and
community leaders with access to information on funding grants, organisational development and
resources to improve service delivery.
The site provides information and resources on a range of topics including:
• fact sheets on topics such as indexation, capital items, carers, insurance and service agreement
information
• community capacity building resources such as community engagement, community strengthening
and community volunteering
• organisational development information such as strategic planning, risk management and quality
management.
During 2007-08, we commenced payment of the State Government’s additional one per cent
indexation to State programs in each of the next four years to the community services sector. The
additional indexation is to be directed towards wages and conditions for workers in non-government
organisations.
The DFC Connecting Communities internet site will be further developed in 2008-09, by including
online grant application and reporting and addressing issues received in feedback. In addition, we will
improve the process for the provision of the additional one per cent indexation on grants to the
community services sector by addressing issues that were highlighted in 2007-08.
Service Excellence
The Service Excellence Program is a comprehensive, integrated quality management framework
accessible to funded organisations of our department. An independent evaluation of the Service
Excellence Program found that when compared with other quality frameworks, it was the most cost
efficient, and the only quality system tailored for the community service sector within a government
context.
At June 2008, 51 per cent of non-government organisations in the community sector funded by our
department were engaging in the Service Excellence Program. Eighty four organisations now have
accreditation against the internationally accredited Service Excellence Program Standards.
Dame Roma Mitchell Trust Fund
The Dame Roma Mitchell Trust Fund for Children and Young People was established in 2003 by the
South Australian Government and the South Australian Council of Social Service to make grants
available to children and young people who are, or have been, under the Guardianship of the Minister,
or who have lived in long term family care supported by our department.
Grants are provided to assist children and young people achieve personal goals, to contribute to their
health and wellbeing and to provide developmental opportunities. In July 2006, an additional $1 million
was allocated via a separate deed specifically for children and young people with a disability who are,
or who have been, in State Care.
During 2007-08, the new Dame Roma Mitchell Trust Fund Trust Deed was implemented, providing
funding specifically for young people with a disability who have been in care. We also enhanced the
Dame Roma Mitchell Trust Fund business practices to improve customer service and grant
management efficiency including:
• development of Board funding criteria
• development and implementation of a customer feedback mechanism
• trial of a internet based application
• streamlined application and assessment processes, including data management.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
53
Our performance
In 2007-08, a total of $253 888 was distributed, $206 000 to 97 children and young people and an
additional $47 888 to 30 children and young people with a disability in the first full year of operation of
the new disability deed. Approximately 94 per cent of all applicants received at least partial funding of
their application.
In 2008-09, a communication plan to the Disability Sector will be implemented, with an emphasis on
promotion and accessibility to ensure the Disability Deed funds are accessed.
Community Benefit SA
Community Benefit SA, also known as the Charitable and Social Welfare Fund, was established under
Section 73B of the Gaming Machines Act 1992. Community Benefit SA distributes money from gaming
machine taxes over two funding rounds each year in February and August to non-government
organisations for one-off community service projects that benefit disadvantaged individuals, families
and communities.
Modifications to the Funding Guidelines of Community Benefit SA in 2007-08 give a high priority to
funding projects that provide support to disadvantaged families with children. During 2007-08, a total
of $1.18 million was granted to 133 projects supporting disadvantaged families with children,
amounting to 30 per cent of funding compared with 23 per cent in 2006-07.
During 2007-08, the Community Benefit SA Special Family Support Grants Program was developed
and funded projects to deliver intensive family support services in high need areas. An evaluation of
the Special Family Support Grant Program will be initiated in 2008-09, including the development of an
evaluation framework and a final report which will be used to inform the program about the next steps
and improving future service delivery.
Community Benefit SA –
Funded Projects
Community Benefit SA is a
community service funding
program that assists
disadvantaged individuals,
families and communities
across the metropolitan, rural
and remote regions of South
Australia.
This is achieved by funding oneoff projects which support
organisations delivering
services and programs that
achieve a large range of social
and practical outcomes
assisting disadvantaged
individuals, families and
communities.
Categories of Community Benefit SA funded projects 2007-08
Vehicle
$432 230 (11.2%)
Community
development
$276 970 (7.2%)
Services for
individuals/families
$404 900 (10.5%)
Community
facilities
$1 513 660
(39.1%)
Recruit and train
volunteers
$246 870 (6.4%)
Program
equipment
$190 550 (4.9%)
Office and IT
equipment
$176 970 (4.6%)
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
Group
programs/activities
$602 170 (15.6%)
Fundraising
$27 620 (0.7%)
Source: Community Benefit SA
54
Our performance
Community Engagement Charter and Directions Statement
Launched in November 2007, the Community Engagement Charter sets a vision for our department in
relation to community engagement and outlines the core principles for guiding our work in building
stronger relationships with South Australian communities. It signals our commitment to actively involve
South Australians in government processes and decision-making activities, to have valuable
community input into setting priorities, to ensure that we stay in touch with what South Australians
want, and to deliver better services to the community.
The Community Engagement Directions Statement incorporates the principles for engagement
outlined in the Community Engagement Charter and provides a guide for engagement of our
customers and the broader community in the planning, development and provision of our services.
In 2008-09 we will:
commence implementation of the Community Engagement Charter and Directions Statement
which will include hosting a Community Engagement Conference in Adelaide
• monitor customer and community engagement across our department
• develop resources for staff and community groups regarding effective community engagement
• integrate community engagement into our regional planning processes.
•
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Programs
Our department administers Commonwealth and State funded programs on the APY Lands, across
the portfolio areas of Families SA, Housing SA, Disability SA, youth, substance misuse, aged care,
community services and domestic violence services. We work closely with DPC to deliver these
services, and provide coordination support to Department of Health programs.
During 2007-08, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Services (ATSIS) further established integrated
community based programs and facilities in all major communities on the APY Lands. Programs
include:
•
•
•
Youth and Substance Misuse Diversion Programs, which includes coordinated school holiday
programs in all major communities; four Youth Newsletters (Yangupala/Kungawara) were produced
to inform people both on and off the APY Lands about issues and events for young people; and the
coordination and support of various major events and programs for youth on the APY Lands,
including the Finke Desert Race, the sports league, horse and music training programs.
Independent surveys confirm that petrol sniffing has reduced from 222 people in 2004 to 38 people
in 2007.
Family Centres and Homemaker Programs are operating in all major communities on the APY
Lands and are providing some support to smaller communities. Programs include home based
instruction in the areas of housekeeping, parenting skills, planning and preparation of nutritional
meals, budgeting and money management, preventative health care and personal hygiene. The
programs facilitate positive outcomes for most Anangu in all major communities either through
employment, training or homemaking support processes.
The establishment of an integrated disability program across the APY Lands which includes:
support for people with a disability and their carers in most APY Lands communities; access to
regular physiotherapy services and independent living equipment and support; as well as an
intensive support program assisting a small number of clients with complex needs to live peacefully
in their community. Disability clients have had an increased opportunity to participate in supporting
riders in the Finke desert race, attend local sports league fixtures and gain access to programs in
both youth sheds and family centres.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
55
Our performance
In 2008-09, ATSIS will fully integrate the Disability programs and Office for the Ageing funded services
into the service system and develop closer links with the APY Lands based services provided by
Families SA and the Office for Aboriginal Housing. The development of the Youth, Disability,
Homemaker and Family Centres as hubs for community based social services will also be further
progressed.
Problem Gambling
Following the completion of an evaluation in March 2008, Gambling Help Services are to be
restructured with current services to be divided into two program streams: Statewide and Special
Purpose Services, and Regional Services. This will deliver greater service efficiencies, more
appropriately targeted and accessible services and improved client outcomes.
In 2008-09, we will implement the new structure of the Gambling Help Services across South Australia
to improve the take up rate of therapy and counselling services by problem gamblers.
Volunteering
During 2007-08, the Volunteers Unit developed and implemented the Volunteer Information
Management System (VIMS), a web based volunteer data management application, and further
developed and released the Volunteer Emergency Recovery Information System (VERIS) for local and
national use. Both on-line software applications have attracted interest from local and interstate
government and non-government organisations.
In 2008-09, we will implement a revised stakeholder management model to increase effectiveness and
efficiency of volunteer management. For the first time volunteer managers from the service delivery
divisions will meet together on regular occasions to seek to resolve management issues common to all
service delivery divisions. Work will also be undertaken in selected regional centres to build upon this
collaborative effort to share resources and expertise in volunteer management.
Concessions
We are streamlining our concessions program to improve ease of access for customers. Concessions
for which South Australians may be eligible include council rates, water and sewerage rates, the
Emergency Services Levy, energy, public transport and spectacles.
In 2007-08, we developed and launched Concessions Finder, an on-line tool to enable customers to
find information about eligibility and methods of applying for their entitlements. We also implemented
processes so that applications are no longer required every quarter from customers receiving
Centrelink benefits. Automatic validation is undertaken and if the customer remains eligible their
concession is paid automatically.
In 2008-09, we will implement on-line and over the telephone application processes for concessions.
Domiciliary Care SA
Metropolitan Domiciliary Care transitioned into our department from the Department of Health in
July 2007. Administrative and staffing arrangements were realigned to meet the requirements of our
department and to create the new division of Domiciliary Care SA.
Domiciliary Care SA provides services to people who have reduced ability to care for themselves,
assisting them to stay living in their own homes, close to loved ones, family and local community.
Domiciliary Care SA covers the metropolitan area of Adelaide and primarily assists those aged over
65, although younger people with a disability may qualify for support in some instances. Services
provided include physical assistance, rehabilitation and personal care, as well as providing respite and
support for carers.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
56
Our performance
During 2007-08, Domiciliary Care SA provided 467 739 occasions of service to 12 097 clients across
eight Client Service Areas. This comprised 432 513 hours of care (encompassing Domiciliary Care SA
and Aged Care Assessment Teams (ACAT)) and 111 619 hours of indirect services (including
Domiciliary Care SA and ACAT).
Other priorities for 2008-09
•
Implement strategies to achieve SASP target T6.11, to increase by 400 the number of people with
a disability involved in day options program by 2014. In January 2009, the number of clients
attending day options will be increased by approximately 50 to ensure this target can be achieved.
Strategies to be undertaken during 2008-09 to meet the target include:
- identifying of eligible school leavers
- standardising assessment tools
- annual showcasing of service options
- allocate servicing based on established benchmarking.
•
Lead an across-government strategy to double the number of people with a disability employed in
the Public Sector by 2014. During 2008-09, progress against SASP target T6.22 will be monitored
through the Promoting Independence Reference Group. Policies and practices will be put in place
that will build on existing processes to make the State Government an inclusive employer of
excellence through:
- establishing accurate baseline data for the employment target, as well as negotiating individual
State Government Portfolio targets
- developing a training framework to improve recruitment practices towards people with
disabilities, which will include a series of resources, promotional tools and workshops for all
managers and human resource personnel.
•
Disability SA will move towards service approaches which offer people with a disability the
opportunity for choice, control, independence and inclusion. This includes self managed support
and person centred active support in accommodation services.
Age Profile of Clients of
Domiciliary Care SA
0-29 (1%)
85+ (26%)
The vast majority of clients of
Domiciliary Care SA (86 per
cent) are aged 65 years and
over. The largest proportion is
aged between 76-85 years (41
per cent) and the next largest
over 85 years (26 per cent).
This profile reflects our
response to meeting the needs
of South Australia’s ageing
population.
30-39 (1%)
40-49 (2%)
50-65 (10%)
76-85 (41%)
66-75 (19%)
Source: Domiciliary Care SA
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
57
Our performance
•
Improve access and delivery of disability services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
with a disability. In 2008-09, Disability SA will finalise the development and commence
implementation of Standard 13, A Cultural Competency and Inclusion Standard for all South
Australian disability agencies registered on the Disability Services Provider Panel. Standard 13 will
promote a consistent approach to improve access to services by Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander people through the introduction of an additional disability services standard for cultural
competency and inclusion. It will articulate practical steps to support agencies to achieve this. In
addition, Disability SA will aim to increase access by Indigenous people through recruitment and
retention of Aboriginal staff within Disability SA and continuing interactive cultural learning for the
Disability Services sector.
•
Reform the Supported Residential Facilities (SRF) Sector in South Australia. A four year
sustainment package will incorporate:
- continuing the Board and Care Subsidy
- maintaining initiatives that support people who have been affected by previous SRF closures
- redeveloping the SRF Disability Support Program for residents who have complex needs
- refocusing the allied health services on lifting the health status of residents across the sector
- establishing new initiatives to support people in the SRF sector so that they are not required to
move as a result of changing care needs
- establishing a system of controlled entry to manage risk from inappropriate referrals and
transition packages for people inappropriately placed in the sector, who require alternative
accommodation options.
•
Enhance community services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families with children and
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth, including the implementation of a new model of training
to youth workers employed by agencies funded by the Aboriginal Youth Development Program or
the Aboriginal Youth Action Committee Program. These programs provide greater one to one
trainer student interaction and support to maximise opportunities for youth workers to develop their
skills and expertise. Mainstream youth agencies will have a greater focus on the Aboriginal
population driven by specific key performance indicators in new Service Agreements and an
Aboriginal substance misuse program in the inner city will continue service development after
commencing in the second half of 2007-08.
•
Commence the SA Access Point demonstration project to simplify entry to the community care
service system and streamline assessment and referral processes for older people.
•
Build on the collation of sector development activities that our department funds to increase the
quality and capacity of the community sector. The Building Capacity in the Community Services
Sector Action Plan will be developed in conjunction with the community services sector to provide
clear directions for the department and non-government organisations, building partnerships in the
planning and delivery of services to our South Australian community.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
58
Our performance
DFC Scorecard
Outcome 3 – Independence and Community Connection
KPI
Target
(June 2008)
Actual
(June 2008)
Graph
TOP LEVEL KPI
Independence and
Community
Connection
KPI currently under development
Percentage of DFC
customers report that
they access community
support and services.
100%
80%
60%
Community Sector
Percentage of agencies
that have a formal
agreement in place.
87%
87%
40%
20%
0%
July
•
•
•
Sept
Nov
2006-07
Jan
M ar
M ay
Target
As at 30 June 2008 there were 360 organisations funded of which 313 had Master Agreements in place,
indicating no change from March.
While the number of funded organisation has increased, the same proportion of Master Agreements have
been sent. Please note there were a number of other projects, mostly to government organisations where the
Master Agreement is not applicable.
We will continue to administer Master Agreements as new agencies are funded.
14%
12%
Community
Connection
Percentage increase in
funded places for
Community
Accommodation and
Care Places
(accumulative).
10%
8%
6.7%
6.6%
6%
4%
2%
0%
Sept
•
•
Dec
2006-07
M ar
June
Target
Previous targets were based on the expected number of new places within each quarter.
These figures have been revised in August 2008 to reflect cumulative figures per annum.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
59
Our performance
KPI
Target
(June 2008)
Actual
(June 2008)
Graph
300
Services
Number of nongovernment
organisations accredited
under the Service
Excellence Framework
(or similar).
200
250
261
100
0
Sept
•
Dec
2006-07
M ar
June
Target
There has been a steady increase in both the Service Excellence Program and HACC accreditation numbers.
30%
20%
Volunteers
Percentage of DFC
volunteers relative to
total DFC workforce.
20%
N/A
10%
0%
Sept
•
•
Dec
2006-07
M ar
June
Target
June 2008 data is not available as the software information system had to be temporarily withdrawn from
production, however, data trends would suggest the figure is stable at 17 per cent.
The software information management system is being upgraded and should be available for first quarter
reporting during 2008-09.
6
Carers
Number of Government
departments required to
comply with reporting
obligations under the
Carers Recognition Act
2005.
4
5
6
2
0
Sept
•
•
•
Dec
2006-07
M ar
June
Target
Obligations under the Carers Recognition Act 2005 require government departments to report annually.
The KPI was previously reported as a percentage with the target 70 per cent. In view of the small number of
government departments which report (six), the KPI has been changed to whole numbers for 2007-08.
2007-08 reporting will be received in October 2008.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
60
Our performance
Target
(June 2008)
KPI
Actual
(June 2008)
Graph
Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander South
Australians
Percentage of DFC
balanced scorecard
outcomes measured for
outcomes for Aboriginal
and Torres Strait
Islander people.
Further data analysis to be conducted.
Target has been achieved or exceeded
Requires attention: the difference between the target and data is less than 10 per cent
Requires urgent and decisive action: the difference between the target and data is greater than 10 per cent
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
61
Our performance
Objective 4 – Keeping them safe
Goal
To ensure children, young people and families are safe, supported and connected to the future.
Context
Our commitment to support the safety and wellbeing of children and young people within their families
is reflected in Keeping Them Safe, the Government’s response to the Layton Review of Child
Protection. A feature of this policy is the linking of the reform agenda to many other government
agencies to encourage the across government responsibility for protecting children. Through Keeping
Them Safe – In Our Care we are improving care planning to provide greater stability and certainty for
children and young people and redesigning care services to ensure children and young people are
supported to achieve their potential with successful transition to adulthood.
Resources are being provided to support families where children and young people are at immediate
risk of entering the care system. We are also realigning programs within our department, such as the
Family and Community Development Program, to provide support and services to families with high
needs so that more children and young people can stay with their families safely.
We recognise foster carers as our partners in caring for children and young people. We have
increased financial support to foster, relative and kinship carers and increased support services,
including the introduction of a foster carer identification card.
We acknowledge that our ability to respond to children and families in need requires programs which
are provide by other government agencies and other community and non-government services.
Through Rapid Response, children under the Guardianship of the Minister are provided with priority
access to housing, health, education, employment and welfare services to ensure that their stability in
care is supported.
Families SA manages a substantial part of the young offenders system. Families SA has progressed
the establishment of the Metropolitan Youth Justice Services to improve systems to manage and
supervise youth justice clients, developed and implemented a statewide Through Care case
management approach and introduced a criminogenic assessment process.
Our achievements under Objective 4 contribute to the following SASP targets:
Equal or lower than the Australian average for psychological distress by 2014 (Target T2.7)
Reduce victim reported crime by 12 per cent by 2014 (Target T2.8)
Improve the overall wellbeing of Aboriginal South Australians (Target T6.1)
Improve South Australia’s performance on the Australian Early Development Index (Target T6.4)
Reduce the percentage of South Australians receiving government benefits (excluding age
pensions) as their major income source to below the Australian average by 2014 (Target T6.5)
• By 2010 increase the number of 15 to 19 year olds engaged full time in school, work or further
education/training (or combination thereof) to 90 per cent (Target T6.15).
•
•
•
•
•
Lead Responsibility
Families SA has the lead responsibility for Objective 4 within our department.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
62
Our performance
Performance Overview
Keeping Them Safe — In Our Care Strategy
The Keeping Them Safe – In Our Care strategy was launched in May 2007 to reform the alternative
care sector. The strategy was developed following a comprehensive consultation period involving all
alternative care stakeholders including government agencies, non-government service providers,
foster carers, relative and kinship carers and children and young people.
The reforms emphasise the importance of strengthening families to provide safe care for their children.
Where children are unable to remain home, the goal is to provide stable and high quality care and
maintain connections with family. The strategy commits to high quality support to carers, both foster
and relative/kin carers. It also aims to improve the quality of non-family based care.
During 2007-08, we commenced implementation of the Keeping Them Safe — In Our Care strategy
by establishing an Intensive Placement Support Team to assist those children and young people most
at risk. Nineteen houses were leased from Housing SA and provided to non-government organisations
to accommodate and manage children and young people, using a range of flexible responsive care
models. The first stage of the new Alternative Care Support (formerly Children’s Payments) system
was also implemented.
Standards for the provision of alternative care in South Australia were finalised in 2007-08, in
consultation with key sector stakeholders. Health standards for children and young people under
Guardianship were also finalised and distributed. A carer identification card to enable improved access
to support services for foster, relative and kinship carers was implemented that increased support
provided to relative carers.
In 2008-09, we will further implement the Keeping Them Safe – In Our Care strategy. We will develop
and implement a range of community based services to provide support to families who are subject to
child protection notifications, with the aim of stabilising the family situation and enhancing parenting
capacity.
Intensive family preservation services will be developed and implemented to support families with
children aged 0 to 12 years at high risk of entry to alternative care, and those children who are in
alternative care placement to return to the safe care of their family. We will also increase the capacity
of services for the recruitment, assessment, approval and registration of foster, relative and kinship
carers and redesign residential care services within Families SA to increase capacity.
Foster, Relative and Kinship Carers
The Keeping Them Safe – In Our Care strategy will develop and implement an extensive strategy not
just to increase the number of foster and relative carers and provide more support, but redefine the
roles of carers in relation to the care needs of the child or young person, implement competency
based training and provide appropriate financial support.
During 2007-08, the foster carer recruitment program focused on increasing the number of general
carers and carers for sibling groups. Marketing strategies were developed in partnership with the
contracted non-government agencies and delivered in metropolitan and regional areas. These
campaigns resulted in a significant increase in enquiries and attendance at information sessions.
Financial support for foster, relative and kinship carers increased by an average of 26 per cent in
2007-08, and training and development opportunities for carers and support workers was provided.
In 2008-09, we will increase support to foster, relative and kinship carers. The 2008-09 Budget
provides $4.6 million over four years to increase carer payments and restructure the alternative care
payment system to create a more equitable support system for all.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
63
Our performance
Funding for cultural planning and maintenance for Aboriginal children in care will be used to support
the maintenance and connection of Aboriginal children to their culture. A ten per cent loading for
carers will also be introduced in the remote and very remote areas as defined by the ABS, in
recognition of the higher costs of living and transport in these communities.
Children’s Centres
We work in partnership with the Department of Education and Children’s Services (DECS) and the
Department of Health to establish Children’s Centres which provide positive environments and
integrated services for children and families, so that they can achieve the best possible learning,
health and wellbeing outcomes. The State Government has committed $23 million over four years for
the establishment of 20 Children’s Centres by 2010. During 2007-08, five Family Services
Coordinators were appointed to work in the Children’s Centres, providing intensive counselling,
parenting programs, family support services and service coordination for vulnerable children and
families.
The implementation of the Children’s Centres initiative will continue during 2008-09, including
developing targeted programs and support services to preserve families and build family resilience
and enhancing the connections of children who are the most vulnerable. These outcomes will be
achieved by building partnerships with government and non-government agencies to respond
promptly and effectively to the care, safety and developmental needs of children.
Child Safety Conferences
Child Safety Conferences were trialled in 2007-08 to improve child protection responses. This
outcome is achieved through Child Safety Conferences as families are engaged where children and
young people have been identified as being at risk, and are also fully involved in the decision making
and planning for children’s safety. Findings from the trial reviews led to the refinement of processes to
ensure consistency in process and outcomes.
During 2008-09, we will implement Child Safety Conferences in collaboration with other child
protection practice reforms.
Origins of children adopted in South Australia
Adoption Services
8
7
6
Number
The Adoption and Family
Information Service of
Families SA, processes
adoption orders, and provides
people with information about
their adoption, usually to
enable them to re-connect with
their birth families.
5
4
3
2
1
Thailand
Taiwan
South
Australia
Philippines
Korea
India
Ethiopia
China
0
Source: Adoption and Family Information Service
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
64
Our performance
Keeping them safe - key statistics
2003-04
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
2007-08
Tier 1 notifications
785
920
615
895
1 019
Tier 2 notifications
8 688
9 489
7 771
9 570
11 529
Tier 3 notifications
3 825
4 516
4 228
5 178
4 594
952
1 152
1 131
1 247
1 451
320
401
397
492
397
1 051
1 046
1 158
1 299
1 551
Suspended detention
116
115
84
103
93
Obligation
234
238
214
267
272
Community service orders
523
479
513
423
365
Bail
493
480
401
431
546
Emergency financial assistance
30 171
33 929
34 181
31 649
27 027
Financial counselling
24 037
24 278
25 873
24 460
20 439
2 628
2 935
2 638
2 206
2 279
Number of child protection notifications*
EXF notifications
Children on care and protection orders
12 month care and protection order
Guardianship until 18 years
Young offenders
(community based orders)
Financial support services provided
Domestic violence financial assistance
Children in alternative care placements as at 30 June
Foster Care
878
890
902
911
911
Relative/Kinship Care
262
341
467
553
663
Financially Assisted Adoption
6
4
3
3
4
Families SA Residential Care
52
83
86
93
102
Non Government Residential
6
6
4
12
29
DFC Housing
N/A
N/A
2
27
26
Non Government Emergency
N/A
N/A
3
17
26
Interim Emergency Accommodation
N/A
5
30
62
80
*
Tier 1: child is in immediate danger and Families SA responds immediately.
Tier 2: child is at risk of significant harm and Families SA responds within a short timeframe.
Tier 3: family has high needs but there is a low risk to child in the short-term. Families SA provides support as required.
EXF: allegations of extra-familial (outside the child’s family) abuse are referred to the South Australia Police.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
65
Our performance
DFC doing more
A financial counsellor at Families SA received a teary eyed thankyou from a single parent with
two teenage daughters who was entrenched in thousands of dollars worth of debt. The customer
made particular mention of the way the counsellor made her feel respected and helped her with
making choices. The customer said the counsellor showed her the ‘light at the end of the tunnel.’
The counsellor carefully developed a three month budget plan for the customer.
Youth Justice
Following the release of the report To Break the Cycle in June 2007, prepared by
Monsignor Cappo AO, Commissioner for Social Inclusion and the chair of the Social Inclusion Board,
an across government task force was formed to progress reform of the youth justice system.
During 2007-08, we further improved systems to manage and supervise youth justice clients and
reformed youth justice services, including the reconfiguration of metropolitan services, development of
a new case management system for use statewide and development of associated policy and
procedures. Youth justice teams have been established in metropolitan Adelaide and high risk
offenders are now receiving more intensive supervision. All youth in Training Centres are now
allocated to a community Case Manager and transition planning is happening for all youth, particularly
high risk youth, transitioning from Training Centres.
In 2008-09, we will further enhance the management and supervision of youth justice clients, including
those involved in chronic offending and Aboriginal specific interventions. Further development and
implementation of evidence based rehabilitation programs for young offenders will be undertaken, with
a focus on culturally appropriate interventions. Families SA will work in collaboration with the
Department of the Premier and Cabinet (AARD) and the Attorney General’s Department to establish
the Community Protection Panel which will provide intensive monitoring and intervention to serious
repeat offenders.
Average daily occupancy in Training Centres
Training Centres
80
70
60
Number
Our department is responsible
for the care and welfare of
young people sentenced to
detention due to criminal
activity, in either the Cavan
Training Centre or the Magill
Training Centre. We are
obliged to enhance community
safety and ensure young
people who offend are held
accountable for their actions,
and have a duty to work with
these young people to
minimise the chance that they
re-offend on release.
71.9
65.3
61.7
60.7
50
51.6
40
30
20
10
0
2003-04
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
2007-08
Source: Families SA
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
66
Our performance
Safe Houses
The Commonwealth Government and the State Government have jointly funded the development and
implementation of a Safe House for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and children fleeing
domestic violence in Ceduna. A model of service was developed during 2007-08 which provides
intensive case management, accommodation and re-establishment services for women and children.
The Ceduna Safe House operates with support from the local Families SA office.
During 2007-08, our department, in partnership with the local community, DPC and the
Commonwealth Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs
(FaHCSIA), developed a funding proposal for the establishment of a Safe House in Coober Pedy. In
2008-09, the new Safe House Service in Coober Pedy will commence from a temporary location, run
by Uniting Care Wesley. We will also complete the establishment of new sites for the Safe House
Services in Coober Pedy and Ceduna.
SA Government Response to the Children in State Care Commission of Inquiry Report
The Children in State Care Commission of Inquiry was established under the Commission of Inquiry
(Children in State Care and Children on APY Lands) Act 2004. The terms of reference of the
Commission of Inquiry were to inquire into any allegations of:
a. sexual abuse of a person who, at the time that the alleged abuse occurred, was a child in State
Care; or
b. criminal conduct which resulted in the death of a person who, at the time that the alleged conduct
occurred, was a child in State Care.
The Commission of Inquiry provided the Children in State Care Commission of Inquiry (Allegations of
Sexual Abuse and Death from Criminal Conduct) Report to the Governor on Friday 28 March 2008.
The Commission of Inquiry made 54 recommendations.
The report of the Commission of Inquiry was tabled in Parliament on 1 April 2008 and on 17 June
2008 the Minister for Families and Communities tabled the Government’s first response to the
Commission of Inquiry’s Report. Under the Commission of Inquiry (Children in State Care and on the
APY Lands) Act 2004 the Minister for Families and Communities must make a further response to the
Commission of Inquiry Report within six months after receipt of the Report by the Governor, stating:
• the recommendations of the Commission of Inquiry that will be carried out and the manner in which
they will be carried out; and
• the recommendations of the Commission of Inquiry that will not be carried out and the reasons for
not carrying them out.
Our department is leading the introduction of a package of legislation to give effect to the
Government’s response to the Children in State Care Commission of Inquiry and to recommendation
21 of the Children on APY Lands Commission of Inquiry. This legislation will be introduced in 2008-09.
We also chair a Multi-Agency Working Group, established to coordinate and progress the
Government’s response to the Commission’s recommendations.
Other priorities for 2008-09
•
•
•
•
Increase the capacity of the non-government sector to work with families to keep children safe and
prevent children’s entry to alternative care, and to return children safely home.
Increase the number of social workers on the APY Lands in response to the Mullighan Report.
Progress the replacement of the secure youth training centres.
Strengthen the whole of government response to children’s safety and wellbeing.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
67
Our performance
DFC Scorecard
Outcome 4 – Keeping Them Safe
KPI
Target
(June 2008)
Actual
(June 2008)
Graph
25%
20%
TOP LEVEL KPI
Child-centric
Percentage of children
subject to a further
substantiation of
abuse/neglect within 12
months.
15%
<20%
21.5%
10%
5%
0%
Sep
Dec
M arch
2006-07
•
•
June
Target
The proportion of children subject to a further substantiation of abuse has remained relatively unchanged over
the past nine months.
Families SA is planning with Community Connect for increased service capacity to provide sustained family
support interventions.
100%
80%
Guardianship,
Children and Young
People
Percentage of
Guardianship of the
Minister cases that have
had annual reviews
completed on time.
60%
90%
58%
40%
20%
0%
July
Sept
Nov
2006-07
•
•
•
Jan
M ar
M ay
Target
Guardianship of the Minister – where the Minister has duty of care for clients until 18 years old. Excludes
youth over 18 years of age and children/youth who have been or are under the Guardianship of the Minister
for less than 12 months.
The percentage of Guardianship of the Minister young people with completed Annual Reviews is declining.
This is in the context of an increased number of children on long-term Guardianship of the Minister orders.
Families SA is collaborating with the Guardian to improve the quality of the Annual Review process. The
establishment of Connected Care Teams in Families SA District Centres has the objective of improving
outcomes for children and young people under Guardianship of the Minister.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
68
Our performance
KPI
Target
(June 2008)
Actual
(June 2008)
Graph
100%
90%
Aboriginal South
Australians
80%
Percentage of
Aboriginal children and
young people that are
placed in accordance
with the Aboriginal Child
Placement Principle.
80%
74.1%
70%
60%
50%
July
Sept
Nov
Jan
2006-07
•
•
•
•
M ar
M ay
Target
Aboriginal Child Placement Principle – an Aboriginal child who is being placed in alternative care must be
placed with the first in order of priority of the following persons who is available to provide care:
(i) a member of the child’s family, as determined by reference to the appropriate kinship rules
(ii) a member of the child’s community who has a relationship of responsibility for the child, as determined by
reference to the appropriate traditional law or custom
(iii) a member of the child’s community, as determined by reference to the appropriate traditional law or
custom
(iv) a person with the same cultural background as the child
(v) a non-Indigenous person who is able to ensure that the child maintains significant contact with the child’s
birth family, community and culture.
The slight decline in the proportion of Aboriginal children who are placed with their Aboriginal relatives/kin and
with Aboriginal foster carers is in the context of increased numbers of Aboriginal children in alternative care
placements.
Focus continues to be placed on the recruitment of Aboriginal relative carers, to ensure that Aboriginal
children remain connected with their kinship networks and culture.
Relative and kinship carers now receive the same rate of alternative care support payment as foster carers,
irrespective of the type of order child or young person is subject to.
5%
4%
Children in Interim
Emergency
Accommodation
Percentage of children
in alternative care who
are in interim
emergency care.
3%
N/A
3.8%
2%
1%
0%
July
•
•
•
Sept
Nov
2006-07
Jan
M ar
M ay
Target
This is a new KPI therefore there is no historical data for comparison.
The proportion of the total population of children in alternative care who are in interim emergency
accommodation increased over the January to March period.
A proactive strategy is in place to transition children from Interim Emergency Accommodation to more suitable
placements. This is dependent on the growth in alternative care capacity.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
69
Our performance
Target
(June 2008)
KPI
Actual
(June 2008)
Graph
90%
80%
Care Partnerships
Percentage of children
exiting alternative care
that have had three or
less placements.
70%
85%
74.7%
60%
50%
Sep
Dec
M arch
2006-07
•
•
•
June
Target
Alternative Care – a system involving a range of services for children, young people and families,
supplementing the care provided by families or at times substituting for that care.
The proportion of children exiting care with three or less placements is well under the target, indicating
placement instability for children in alternative care.
Increased placement capacity is being sought. Processes to improve the recruitment of foster and relative
carers and an increase in congregate care capacity are in development.
60%
Juvenile Justice
Percentage of youth
justice sentences that
are the second or
subsequent sentence in
the young persons
lifetime youth justice
contact with Families
SA.
40%
<42.5%
60.1%
20%
0%
Sep
Dec
M arch
2006-07
•
•
•
June
Target
Juvenile Offending – young people between the ages of 10 and 18 years who break the law. Includes all
juvenile sentences excepting all remand and bail orders.
The percentage of sentences which are the second or subsequent sentence has not met the target.
Implementation of relevant recommendations of the To Break the Cycle report is in progress. The
development of a through care case management approach to serious and persistent offenders is being
implemented.
Target has been achieved or exceeded
Requires attention: the difference between the target and data is less than 10 per cent
Requires urgent and decisive action: the difference between the target and data is greater than 10 per cent
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
70
Our performance
Objective 5 – Effective and sustainable business practices
Goal
To establish and maintain efficient, effective and sustainable business practices to underpin delivery of
the Connecting to the Future strategic agenda.
Context
Sound governance and administrative arrangements are a prerequisite to ensuring that we achieve
our Minister’s Agenda. We therefore focus on five key areas within Objective 5 being Government,
Customers and Communities, People, Partners and Business Capability.
The collaborative effort of the direct and indirect service delivery areas and the corporate divisions
drives excellence and innovation across our department, delivering effective and sustainable business
practices that support the service delivery objectives of Connecting to the Future.
Our achievements under Objective 5 contribute to the following SASP targets:
• Increase the satisfaction of South Australians with government services by ten per cent by 2010,
maintaining or exceeding that level of satisfaction thereafter (Target T1.7)
• Become, by 2010, the best-performing jurisdiction in Australia in timeliness and transparency of
decisions which impact the business community (and maintain that rating) (Target T1.8)
• Increase the ratio of operational to administrative expenditure in State Government by 2010, and
maintain or better that ratio thereafter (Target T1.9)
• Improve the energy efficiency of government buildings by 25 per cent from 2000-01 levels by 2014
(Target T3.13)
• Double the number of people with disabilities employed by 2014 (Target T6.22)
• Have women comprising half of the public sector employees in the executive levels (including Chief
Executives) by 2014 (Target T6.23)
• Increase the participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the South Australian
public sector, spread across all classifications and agencies, to two per cent by 2010 and maintain
or better those levels through to 2014 (Target T6.24).
Lead Responsibility
The main corporate areas of our department that share responsibility for Objective 5 are:
• Chief Executive’s Office
• Financial Services
• Information, Communication and Technology
• Organisational Development
• Risk Management and Internal Audit
• State Recovery Office
• Strategy and Research.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
71
Our performance
Performance Overview
Customer Satisfaction Measurement Strategy
All State Government Departments are required to contribute to the achievement of SASP target T1.7,
Performance in the public sector - customer and client satisfaction with government services. The
target aims to increase the satisfaction of South Australians with government services by ten per cent
by 2010, maintaining or exceeding that level of satisfaction thereafter. To progress target T1.7 during
2007-08, we developed a Customer Satisfaction Measurement Strategy and continued the
development of a baseline measure for customer satisfaction across our department.
In 2008-09, we will implement the Customer Satisfaction Measurement Strategy across our
department, including a trial with the non-government organisation sector, and work in partnership with
our funded services to improve customer satisfaction with services.
Disaster Recovery
During December 2007, bushfires burned on Kangaroo Island affecting 20 per cent of the Island’s total
area, and had a significant impact on the island’s tourist industry. Our department established a
disaster recovery assistance function and coordinated relief following the Kangaroo Island bushfires.
During 2007-08 we influenced, at the national level, the formulation and adoption of the new National
Principles for Disaster Recovery. In July 2007 a project to review Australia’s principles of disaster
recovery commenced. Originally endorsed in 1986, the principles describe the aims and features of
good practice in recovery. The principles underpin activity undertaken by many agencies and
organisations in recovery following a disaster or other crisis.
Risk Management and Internal Audit
During 2007-08, internal audits completed and overseen by the DFC Risk Management and Audit
Committee included:
• Grant Funding Allocation and Distribution Review
• Disability SA ICT Controls and Governance
• Case Management Project
• Internal Customer Service
• Management of Client Funds Disability SA
• C3MS (Connection client and case management system) Part B Report – Requirements and
Definition Review
• Injury Management Internal Audit Review
• Control Self Assessment Process
• Control Framework.
To support the achievement of corporate objectives, an enterprise-wide risk management system
linking with the annual strategic and business planning processes was established. The integration of
risk management practices into other major programs, such as Workforce Health and Safety, has
been implemented.
Further, during 2007-08:
Risk Assessment Facilitators undertook the ‘Manage Risk’ competency based training program
a web-based risk reporting database was fully implemented
Risk Management Intranet site tools and resources were developed, as a customer service
improvement initiative for Risk Assessment Facilitators, Managers and staff.
•
•
•
A revision of the training requirements and expectations on risk assessment and treatment will be
undertaken during 2008-09.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
72
Our performance
Contract Management
We have improved contract management across our department and in particular the contract
management abilities of our staff. During 2007-08, we provided accredited contract management
training to 74 staff and implemented expenditure and performance monitoring for strategic contracts.
In 2008-09, we will enhance training already delivered through contract management forums and
networking opportunities and introduce guidelines for the management of panels.
Procurement Processes
During 2007-08, Housing SA procurement processes were streamlined through the introduction of
program-based acquisition plans. A holistic review of prequalification processes throughout our
department will be undertaken in 2008-09.
DFC doing more
The work of our Media and Communication Unit has been regularly praised
by their internal customers. This includes:
’I would like to comment on the tremendous work undertaken by Media and Communications.
On a number of occasions our Unit has contacted them to ask for assistance with publications
and special events that we need help and guidance with and they have been absolutely superb.
Quite often the requests were within very tight deadlines and on every occasion they have been
able to meet our request with a minimum of fuss, on time and to high quality.
What’s more it was done with a beautiful smile.’
And:
‘…their customer service is impeccable and you are a delight to work with.’
Diversity in the Public Sector
The following SASP targets seek to increase representation by people with disabilities, women at
executive levels and the level of employment of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders in the public
sector:
• T6.22 People with disabilities: double the number of people with disabilities employed by 2014
• T6.23 Women: have women comprising half of the public sector employees in the executive levels
(including Chief Executives) by 2014
• T6.24 Aboriginal employees: increase the participation of Aboriginal people in the South Australian
public sector, spread across all classifications and agencies, to two per cent by 2010 and maintain
or better those levels through to 2014.
Our performance against the above targets is highlighted on page 20. To advance these targets,
during 2007-08 we:
• issued workforce profile reports quarterly to monitor profile progress
• reviewed workforce data collection and issued a new employee survey to update employee data
and identification records
• consulted with Disability Works to improve access for people with a disability to vacancies through
the short term register
• achieved a high level of female participation in Youth Challenges and Business Improvement
Challenges, increasing professional development access
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
73
Our performance
•
completed the Aboriginal Employment Strategy and established the Aboriginal Employment
Steering Committee to guide achievement of employment strategies.
To progress these targets in 2008-09, we will:
increase the number of positions referred to the Disability Employment Register
continue to mentor and support women to aspire to executive roles and continue in these roles
implement the Aboriginal Employment Strategy Implementation Plan.
•
•
•
Regional Boundaries
In December 2006, State Cabinet approved the establishment of 12 State Government Regions to be
implemented by all government departments over a two year timeframe, ending December 2008. In
compliance, we are realigning service delivery, planning and reporting to the new 12 State
Government Regions which will:
• offer greater efficiency by providing consistency and improved collaborative reporting, planning and
service delivery across our department
• increase collaborative opportunities within our department and whole of government
• provide an opportunity to implement a more equitable staffing structure with the realignment of
teams
• encourage closer community linkage, liaison and working relationships between all levels of
government, local community organisations and members of the public
• support improved public sector efficiency.
Other priorities for 2008-09
In 2008-09, we will continue to improve service access to customers by implementing Connected
Service Centres in Mount Barker and Mount Gambier.
Due to the population growth in Mount Barker and as a result of the new State Government regional
boundaries, there is an urgent need to provide larger office accommodation facilities. The former
Mount Barker Council Chambers has been secured for our department for a period of three years.
Minor modifications are required to establish the tenancy as a Connected Service Centre and this will
be available by October/November 2008. The majority of existing infrastructure will be used to
minimise cost as it is only an interim arrangement for a secured period of three years.
In Mount Gambier an interim office providing Housing SA, Families SA and Disability SA connected
services is successfully operating from the Housing SA office. Some parts of Families SA and
Disability SA are located in other buildings and will co-locate to the new DFC Connected Service
Centre in August 2009.
Co-located service centres in Coober Pedy, Ceduna, Port Lincoln, Murray Bridge and Whyalla will be
operational during 2008-09.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
74
Our performance
DFC Scorecard
Outcome 5 – Our Partners
KPI
Target
(June 2008)
Actual
(June 2008)
Graph
100%
80%
TOP LEVEL KPI
60%
Our Partners
Level of satisfaction of
agencies with their
partnership
arrangement with DFC.
85%
62%
40%
20%
0%
Sept
Dec
M ar
2006-07
•
•
June
Target
Strategies in development to improve this level of satisfaction.
Annual partnership survey to be undertaken in May/June 2009.
100%
80%
Ethical Processes
Percentage of partners
with DFC contracts or
service agreements
placed on the
government web site.
60%
100%
100%
40%
20%
0%
Sept
Dec
M ar
2006-07
June
Target
60%
50%
Performance
Percentage of nongovernment
organisations engaged
in the Service
Excellence Framework.
40%
30%
47%
51%
20%
10%
0%
Sept
Dec
2006-07
•
M ar
June
Target
Numbers of organisations engaged continues to grow but significant percentage increase is also due to lower
numbers of funded non-government organisations.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
75
Our performance
KPI
Target
(June 2008)
Actual
(June 2008)
Graph
100
Performance
Number of partners that
have active
performance
management issues
and/or are having
payments being
withheld 2007-08.
75
50
<55
19
25
0
Sept
Dec
M ar
2006-07
•
June
Target
There were 974 projects listed on the Funding and Grants Management System that had payments
scheduled, of those 29 projects were being withheld.
20%
Performance
Percentage of partners
that have active
performance
management issues
and/or are having
payments being
withheld 2007-08.
15%
10%
<10%
2%
5%
0%
Sept
Dec
M ar
2006-07
•
June
Target
There were 974 projects listed on the Funding and Grants Management System that had payments
scheduled, of those 29 projects were being withheld.
100%
80%
Compliance and
Standards
Percentage of all
contracts for goods and
services awarded within
the across government
average timeframe.
60%
80%
95%
40%
20%
0%
Sept
Dec
2006-07
•
•
•
M ar
June
Target
Contracts – formal agreements entered into with external organisations following a public tender.
Government average timeframe – average number of days across government and collated by DAIS contract
services.
Goods and services – all goods and services excluding community services.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
76
Our performance
KPI
Target
(June 2008)
Actual
(June 2008)
Graph
100%
80%
Compliance and
Standards
Percentage of all
contracts for goods and
services executed within
the across government
average timeframe.
60%
80%
30%
40%
20%
0%
Sept
Dec
M ar
2006-07
•
•
•
•
•
June
Target
Contracts – formal agreements entered into with external organisations following a public tender.
Government average timeframe – average number of days across government and collated by DAIS contract
services.
Goods and services – all goods and services excluding community services.
Decrease in the number of contracts executed within government average timeframe was a result of an
increase in the number of higher complexity contracts being negotiated.
Review negotiating process for projects of high complexity.
80
Community Sector
and Supplier
Development
Number of sector and
partner development
initiatives planned and
implemented in
2007-08.
60
40
42
74
20
0
Sept
Dec
M ar
2006-07
•
•
•
June
Target
Current activities updated.
Collation of current activities recently finalised.
Plan of future activities being developed.
100%
Community Sector
and Supplier
Development
Percentage of sector
and partner
development initiatives
planned and
implemented in
2007-08.
80%
60%
90%
90%
40%
20%
0%
Sept
Dec
2006-07
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
M ar
June
Target
77
Our performance
KPI
Target
(June 2008)
Actual
(June 2008)
Graph
30
Working with the
Community
Number of business
units implementing or
funding community
building initiatives.
20
14
26
10
0
Sept
Dec
M ar
2006-07
•
June
Target
Collation of data undertaken November 2007.
100%
80%
Engagement and
Communication
Percentage of partners
satisfied with
communication by DFC.
60%
70%
53%
40%
20%
0%
Sept
Dec
M ar
2006-07
•
•
•
June
Target
Original survey was undertaken by email which did not provide a large number of responses.
As there have been no significant changes to the communication processes by DFC, it is assumed that the
current survey gained a wider spread of the target audience thus providing a more realistic figure.
Implementation of Building Capacity Action Plan which incorporates a strong focus on improving
communication and a stronger collaborative working relationship.
100%
80%
Ethical Processes
Percentage of partners
who report (via
Satisfaction Survey) that
DFC has treated them
fairly.
60%
80%
72%
40%
20%
0%
Sept
Dec
2006-07
•
•
•
M ar
June
Target
Original target was based on a previous survey undertaken by email.
As there have been no significant changes to the ethical processes of DFC, it is assumed that the greater
sample base has provided a more accurate measure of satisfaction.
Implementation of Building Capacity Action Plan which incorporates a strong focus on improving
communication and a stronger collaborative working relationship.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
78
Our performance
Target
(June 2008)
KPI
Actual
(June 2008)
Graph
100%
80%
Performance
Percentage of service
agreement KPI's met for
each Minister's Housing
Advice and Community
Fund funded agency.
60%
75%
80%
40%
20%
0%
Sept
Dec
2006-07
•
M ar
June
Target
Performance Reviews against Service Agreements conducted annually for each funded organisation.
Target has been achieved or exceeded
Requires attention: the difference between the target and data is less than 10 per cent
Requires urgent and decisive action: the difference between the target and data is greater than 10 per cent
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
79
Our performance
Outcome 5 – Our People Development
KPI
Target
(June 2008)
Actual
(June 2008)
Graph
80%
60%
TOP LEVEL KPI
Our People
Development
40%
73%
56%
Percentage of staff that
are satisfied working for
DFC.
20%
0%
Sept
Dec
M ar
2006-07
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
June
Target
Satisfaction – comprises a range of factors incorporating safety, career opportunities, management
effectiveness, inclusiveness and fair decision making.
The total number of responses received in the 2008 Staff Survey was 2271 which constituted a participation
rate of 36 per cent, lower than the 45 per cent rate in 2007.
Domiciliary Care SA participated in the DFC Staff Survey for the first time in 2008.
Direct service areas within DFC accounted for the lowest participation rates.
The three most significant issues contributing to poor staff satisfaction in 2008, were staff perceptions
concerning equity of decision making; recognition by immediate Manager/Supervisor for a job well done; and
staff skills being properly utilised including having the appropriate tools to do the job.
Performance Partnership Plans continue to empower employees through clarity of their job expectations,
tailoring to ensure better use of employee skills and abilities.
Learning programs for Managers and leaders continue to be implemented across DFC encouraging
conversations with staff so as to reinforce equitable decision making processes are practised.
20%
15%
Attracting and
Retaining our People
Reduce in staff turnover
by 3 per cent.
10%
16%
13%
5%
0%
Sept
Dec
M ar
2006-07
•
•
•
June
Target
The data for 2007-08 excluded casuals and included Domiciliary Care SA.
In the 2006-07 financial year casuals and Domiciliary Care SA were excluded from the data.
Due to the age profile and incoming labour force the target may need to be revised for 2008-09.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
80
Our performance
KPI
Target
(June 2008)
Actual
(June 2008)
Empowering our
People to Perform
Percentage of staff who
report that they have the
materials, they have
appropriate supervision,
and their Manager
encourages them to
participate in decisions
that affect their work
and to try new ideas and
ways of working to
increase their
effectiveness.
•
•
Graph
80%
60%
40%
74%
65%
20%
0%
Sept
Dec
M ar
2006-07
June
Target
The most significant issue was a reduction in the willingness to take calculated risks. This may have been
impacted by the increase in uncertainty resulting from the reform process.
Learning programs, for Managers and leaders continue to be implemented across DFC.
80%
60%
Building Trust in our
People
Percentage of staff that
report they are treated
fairly in decision making.
40%
58%
50%
20%
0%
Sept
Dec
M ar
2006-07
•
June
Target
DFC continues to encourage Managers and leaders to participate in learning programs offered by the College
for Learning and Development.
80%
60%
Caring for our People
Percentage of staff that
report they are safe,
free from bullying and
cared about at work.
40%
73%
69%
20%
0%
Sept
Dec
2006-07
•
•
•
•
M ar
June
Target
Significant improvement in staff feeling that they are safe from injury at work.
Respectful treatment at work policies and training continue to be implemented across DFC.
Access for all DFC staff to health and wellbeing programs to assist promotion of health and safety.
DFC's values continue to be promoted to new employees through induction offered by the College for
Learning and Development and reinforced in programs to existing staff.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
81
Our performance
KPI
Target
(June 2008)
Actual
(June 2008)
Graph
80%
60%
Caring for our People
Percentage of staff that
report that they perceive
diversity is supported in
the workplace.
40%
79%
78%
20%
0%
Sept
Dec
M ar
2006-07
•
•
•
June
Target
Health and wellbeing programs continue to be implemented to promote health and safety. Disability
awareness and discrimination training continues to be implemented across DFC.
The DFC induction with the College for Learning and Development also continues to include diversity training.
Aboriginal Employment Strategy is supported in its implementation.
80%
Encouraging our
People through
Change
Percentage of staff
report that leaders
manage organisational
change and continuous
improvement well.
60%
40%
69%
59%
20%
0%
Sept
Dec
M ar
2006-07
•
•
•
June
Target
Leaders are not managing change or continuous improvement well. The recent reforms may have contributed
to this. Leaders continue to access learning programs offered by the College for Learning and Development
and settle into their new positions as a result of the reform.
Performance Partnership Plans continue to be implemented across DFC.
Consultation processes during restructures continue to be refined.
80%
Recognition of our
People
Percentage of staff that
report that they receive
regular recognition from
their immediate
manager for a job well
done.
60%
40%
66%
57%
20%
0%
Sept
Dec
2006-07
•
•
M ar
June
Target
Managers continue to participate in conversations with DFC staff through Performance Partnership Plans.
Rewards and recognition research paper being developed on appropriate rewards and recognitions that could
be implemented by DFC within the next 12 months to compliment existing award programs.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
82
Our performance
Target
(June 2008)
KPI
Actual
(June 2008)
Graph
8
Recognition of our
People
Every year there is one
or more external
applications for
recognition of
organisational
achievements lodged by
Organisational Learning
and Development.
6
4
>1
7
2
0
Sept
Dec
M ar
2006-07
•
•
June
Target
7 applications were made for awards:
- July 2007 Premiers Award Showcasing Excellence in the Public Sector (shortlisted as a finalist)
- September 2007 SA Training Awards Employer of the Year (not shortlisted)
- SA Training Initiative Award (finalist)
- April 2008 Minister's Award for Excellence for Employers of Australian Apprentices (not shortlisted)
- 2007 Adult Learning Australia Awards for DFC Induction Program (not shortlisted)
- May 2008 SA Health and Community Services Industry Skills Board Award for Creating a Learning Culture
Award Sponsor (Winner of Creating a Learning Culture Category)
- May 2008 SA Health and Community Services Industry Skills Board (finalist individual achievement
Annette Kirby).
Recognition of our people and the quality of DFC services is an important valuing activity. We will continue to
lodge applications for awards to positively promote DFC business.
Target has been achieved or exceeded
Requires attention: the difference between the target and data is less than 10 per cent
Requires urgent and decisive action: the difference between the target and data is greater than 10 per cent
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
83
Our performance
Outcome 5 – Government
KPI
Target
(June 2008)
Actual
(June 2008)
Graph
100%
80%
TOP LEVEL KPI
60%
Government
Percentage of SASP
implementation plans to
progress lead reporting
targets achieved.
100%
65.7%
40%
20%
0%
Sept
Dec
M ar
06/ 07
•
•
•
June
Target
Implementation plans for the SASP housing targets (T6.7, T6.8 and T6.9) and disability targets (T6.10, T6.11
and T6.22) were finalised and submitted to DPC in April 2008.
A total of 35 KPI's/Milestones (14 housing and 21 disability) were due for achievement as at or prior to
30 June 2008.
Nine of the housing KPI's/Milestones (64.3 per cent) and 14 (66.7 per cent) of the disability were achieved
within the timeframe specified in the implementation plans.
100%
80%
SASP
Percentage of
contributing and whole
of government SASP
target implementation
plans milestones met.
60%
100%
91.7%
40%
20%
0%
Sept
Dec
06/07
•
•
•
M ar
June
Target
Data relates only to implementation plans for targets T1.7 (Performance in the public sector - customer and
client satisfaction with government services) and T6.24 (Aboriginal employees).
A total of 24 KPI's/Milestones were due for achievement as at or prior to 30 June 2008. Of the 24
KPI's/Milestones, 22 were achieved within the timeframe specified in the implementation plans.
Implementation plans for the remaining whole of government targets of SASP and targets for which DFC
contributes to the achievement of will be prepared during 2008-09.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
84
Our performance
KPI
Target
(June 2008)
Actual
(June 2008)
Graph
100%
80%
Crisis Response and
Recovery
Percentage of actions of
the State Recovery
Committee Action Plan
for which positive
progress has been
achieved.
60%
N/A
70%
40%
20%
0%
Sept
Dec
M ar
06/07
•
•
June
Target
No quarterly targets are assigned to this KPI as the State Recovery Committee; may decide not to take action
against some (or many) of the actions of the State Recovery Committee Action Plan; may lack the resources
to progress actions; or another event/disaster may occur taking precedence over other work.
A number of actions have commenced/progressed including: guidelines for the revised Zone Emergency
Management Committee's have been endorsed by the State Emergency Management Committee (SEMC)
and planning has commenced for implementation; and the development of a whole of government information
management plan has commenced. Kangaroo Island Bushfire debrief (which may identify new actions) has
been deferred several times. Awaiting Kangaroo Island bushfire debrief documentation.
Whole of Government
State Strategies
Progress against targets
in whole of government
strategies.
Greening of
Government (GoGO):
Percentage change in
energy, water and waste
consumption.
There have been difficulties in reporting on this
KPI on a quarterly basis in 2007-08.
Data will be available annually at the end of
September 2008.
100%
Achieving the
Ministers Agenda
Percentage of Chief
Executives performance
objectives and
strategies achieved
(including on track to be
achieved against the
SASP target) to the
Minister's satisfaction.
80%
60%
N/A
N/A
40%
20%
0%
Sept
Dec
06/ 07
•
•
M ar
June
Target
As at 30 June 2008, Chief Executive Performance Accountabilities were not issued. There were no specific
performance objectives and strategies against which to calculate a percentage achieved.
This KPI will be reviewed for 2008-2009.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
85
Our performance
KPI
Target
(June 2008)
Actual
(June 2008)
Better Government
South Australia
achieves better than
national averages on
Productivity
Commission Report on
Government Services
Targets and
Benchmarks in:
Housing, Aged Care
Services, Services for
People with a Disability,
Protection and Support
Services.
•
•
100%
80%
60%
N/A
N/A
40%
20%
0%
Sept
Dec
M ar
06/ 07
June
Target
New KPI for 2007-08, therefore no target has been determined.
Report on Government Services 2008 released 31 January 2008. Data for March 2008 is based on a sample
of indicators on Government Services Targets and Benchmarks in: Housing, Aged Care Services, Services for
People with a Disability and Child Protection and Out of Home Care.
National Agreements
Positive outcomes for
South Australia in
Commonwealth State
Housing Agreement
(CSHA) and
Commonwealth/State
Territory Disability
Agreement (CSTDA):
Percentage of CSHA
financial and
performance reporting
requirements met.
•
Graph
100%
80%
60%
N/A
N/A
40%
20%
0%
Sept
Dec
M ar
06/ 07
June
Target
Under the current CSHA 2003-08, bilateral performance reporting is on an annual basis (i.e. the 2006-07
financial year report was due 31 December 2007).
100%
80%
National Agreements
Positive outcomes for
South Australia in CSHA
and CSTDA:
Percentage of CSTDA
financial and
performance reporting
requirements met.
60%
N/A
N/A
40%
20%
0%
Sept
Dec
06/ 07
•
•
M ar
June
Target
Under the CSTDA Performance Reporting Framework the following timelines apply; CSTDA Funding
contribution 31 December; Financial Acquittal 31 December; CSTDA Performance Report - NMDS data 31
October to external data agency and to Commonwealth 31 December; Implementation Plan Progress Report
31 December.
The following timelines were not met; CSTDA Funding contribution 31 December and Financial Acquittal 31
December.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
86
Our performance
Target
(June 2008)
KPI
Actual
(June 2008)
Whole of Government
State Strategies
Progress against targets
in whole of government
strategies.
Promoting
Independence:
Percentage of enhanced
outcomes achieved in
reporting against
Promoting
Independence: Disability
Action Plans for South
Australia.
•
Graph
100%
80%
60%
N/A
NA
40%
20%
0%
Sept
Dec
06/ 07
M ar
June
Target
DFC achieved Enhanced Outcomes in five of six outcomes as stated in Promoting Independence: Disability
Action Plans for South Australia – 7th Progress Report on Implementation, and reported in December 2007
quarter.
Target has been achieved or exceeded
Requires attention: the difference between the target and data is less than 10 per cent
Requires urgent and decisive action: the difference between the target and data is greater than 10 per cent
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
87
Our performance
Outcome 5 – Business Capability
KPI
Target
(June 2008)
Actual
(June 2008)
Graph
1%
Strong Governance
Percentage variation
between year end
projections in the
Executive Management
Report and annual
budget (taking into
account anticipated DTF
budget adjustments).
0%
±2.00%
-0.02%
-1%
-2%
-3%
July
Oct
Jan
Apr
2006-07
•
Target
The unfavourable position throughout the year was caused by the significant growth in the numbers of children
requiring emergency and alternative care. In April 2008, Cabinet approved the budget supplementation to
meet these cost pressures which enabled the department to come in on budget.
100%
Effective Partnerships
Percentage of partners
that report satisfaction
with DFC
communication, as
reported in the annual
DFC Partner
Satisfaction Survey.
75%
50%
70%
58%
25%
0%
Sept
•
•
Dec
2006-07
M ar
June
Target
The original sample size was significantly smaller than this year’s sample. As there have been no significant
changes to the communication process of DFC, it is assumed that the greater sample base has provided a
more accurate measure.
Implementation of the Building Capacity Action Plan which incorporates a strong focus on improving
communication and provides an opportunity for a stronger collaborative working relationship.
100%
Integrated Service
Offer
Percentage of staff who
report that they have
access to the relevant
organisational
information that they
need to do their job well.
75%
50%
N/A
74%
25%
0%
Sept
•
Dec
2006-07
M ar
June
Target
The staff survey was unable to distinguish staff roles i.e. in customer access points nor those in customer
case management roles. Therefore, the KPI was changed to include all staff who completed the staff survey in
DFC.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
88
Our performance
Target
(June 2008)
KPI
Actual
(June 2008)
Graph
100%
Value Driven
Operation
Percentage of
customers reporting that
they are satisfied with
the overall quality,
accessibility and
timeliness of service
delivery.
75%
50%
N/A
85%
25%
0%
Sept
•
•
•
•
Dec
2006-07
M ar
June
Target
Three of the eight core questions from the Customer Satisfaction Measurement Survey measure these key
drivers.
Overall results – Question 1, satisfaction with overall quality of service (90 per cent); Question 2, satisfaction
with the accessibility (81 per cent); Question 3, satisfaction with the timeliness of service (92 per cent).
These results are from Round 1 of the Customer Satisfaction Baseline Measurement. Round Two results are
due by the end of October 2008.
The baseline measurement is still being established.
100%
Connected Customer
Interaction
Percentage of
customers reporting that
they were informed of
everything they required
to get the service or
product.
75%
50%
N/A
85%
25%
0%
Sept
Dec
2006-07
•
•
•
M ar
June
Target
Customer Satisfaction Measurement Survey – overall percentage results for Question 5, customers were
informed of everything they needed to know in order to get what they needed (85 per cent).
These results are from Round 1 of the Customer Satisfaction Baseline Measurement. Round Two results are
due by the end of October 2008.
The baseline measurement is still being established.
Target has been achieved or exceeded
Requires attention: the difference between the target and data is less than 10 per cent
Requires urgent and decisive action: the difference between the target and data is greater than 10 per cent
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
89
Our performance
Outcome 5 – Our Customers and Communities
KPI
Target
(June 2008)
Actual
(June 2008)
Graph
100%
90%
Our Customers
70 per cent of
customers report they
are satisfied with our
service.
70%
90%
80%
70%
•
•
•
•
Housing SA
Concessions
Families SA
Disability SA
90 per cent aggregated score for 2007-08.
These results are from Round 1.
Further results for 2008 will be gathered in Round 2, due end of October 2008.
We are still in the process of establishing the baseline measurement for DFC.
40%
Customer Service
Access and Support
Percentage of Business
Units will measure
customer service
against agreed
Customer Service
Standards.
30%
20%
N/A
15%
10%
0%
Sept
Dec
2006-07
•
•
•
•
M ar
June
Target
Round 1 surveyed eight out of DFC's 49 Customer Service Centres (409 face to face and 191 phone
interviews).
Three out of 25 other DFC Operational Divisions – Concessions (230 phone interviews); Highgate Park and
Strathmont Centre (50 face to face interviews).
Additional Business Units will be included in Round 2 with results due end of October 2008.
We are still in the process of establishing the baseline measurement for DFC.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
90
Our performance
KPI
Target
(June 2008)
Actual
(June 2008)
Graph
80%
DFC Service Offer
Support and
Promotion
All Business Units
describe services,
expectations and
obligations in plain,
preferred language and
in formats that are most
commonly used by our
customers.
•
•
•
60%
40%
N/A
74%
20%
0%
Sept
Dec
M ar
2006-07
June
Target
In comparison with 2006-07 results, a 40 per cent increase of customer service centre's are displaying the
DFC promotional material i.e. Customer Service Standards posters and multilingual signage.
Evidence suggests, however, that there is not enough information brochures and materials displayed in
customer service centre's to inform customers on current services and non-government organisations.
Top ten DFC brochure list being developed in conjunction with DFC Media and Communications Unit.
90%
60%
Service Culture
All Business Units will
measure customer
service against agreed
Customer Service
Standards.
87%
87%
30%
0%
Sept
Dec
2006-07
•
•
•
•
•
M ar
June
Target
Six of the eight core questions are aligned to the Customer Service Standards.
Percentage of customer satisfaction for these questions; Question 2, overall satisfaction with the accessibility
of the service/product (82 per cent); Question 3, overall satisfaction with the amount of time it took to get the
service/product (92 per cent); Question 4, being treated fairly (89 per cent); Question 5, informed of everything
to get the service/product (85 per cent);Question 6, staff were knowledgeable and competent (84 per
cent);Question 7, staff went the extra mile (90 per cent).
These results are from Round 1.
Further results for 2008 will be gathered in Round 2, due end of October 2008.
We are still in the process of establishing the baseline measurement for DFC.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
91
Our performance
KPI
Target
(June 2008)
Actual
(June 2008)
Graph
35
30
25
20
Service Environment
Number of service
centres will achieve a
5 Star customer service
experience rating.
15
N/A
27%
10
5
0
Five
Stars
•
•
•
Fo ur
Stars
Three
Stars
Two
Stars
One Star
Housing 2007-08
Disability 2007-08
Families 2007-08
2006-07
The second round of 5 Star results show that out of 49 Customer Service Centres, 13 received 5 Stars, 25
received 4 Stars, nine received 3 Stars, one received 2 Stars and nil received 1 Star.
The second round of results was completed in May 2008.
In comparison to last years Round 1 results, 5 extra Customer Service Centres attained 5 Stars this year. As
more Connected Service Centres merge, results may alter.
Customer Service
Recovery
Number of Business
Units that record and
report on customer
feedback to CSU on a
quarterly basis.
•
•
•
•
•
N/A
N/A
The 4 major Operational Divisions include
Disability SA, Families SA, Housing SA and
Domiciliary Care SA and have current service
recovery mechanisms in place.
All operational divisions have current feedback and complaints management processes and service recovery
mechanisms which work independently of each other. However, these processes and systems are not
consistent across the department and lack an ability to aggregate all captured data for the purpose of
reporting requirements to the Minister for Families and Communities, Chief Executive, HCSCC and other
levels of management.
The new proposed system will provide joined up responses in relation to a range of captured data including
level of importance, impact, turnaround response times and escalated complaints to the Minister for Families
and Communities.
The DFC Customer Feedback and Customer Complaints Management process for the whole of DFC will
capture all data within one system through an online reporting mechanism. The reporting system will record a
range of factors such as the seriousness of complaints, systemic problems and conduct of staff.
The range of remedies available depends on the type of feedback or complaint. Where complaints relate to
existing policies outside of the DFC Feedback and Complaints Management policy, the system allows to
record, track and report on these complaints however, the process for handling or investigating the complaint
will remain in accordance with existing policy and procedure.
The Customer Service Strategy Unit will continue to meet with HCSCC to review progress.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
92
Our performance
Target
(June 2008)
KPI
Actual
(June 2008)
Graph
80%
Customer
Engagement and
Customer Knowledge
60%
40%
Number of Business
Units that are
implementing a strategy
for customer
engagement.
N/A
15%
20%
0%
Sept
Dec
2006-07
•
•
•
•
•
M ar
June
Target
Percentage of units that currently interact with customers through the CSM baseline measurement.
Charter of Principles endorsed and launched by Minister in November 2007.
Launched on the Community internet site.
Direction Statement with Minister for approval.
Resources for staff being developed.
Target has been achieved or exceeded
Requires attention: the difference between the target and data is less than 10 per cent
Requires urgent and decisive action: the difference between the target and data is greater than 10 per cent
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
93
Our people
Human resources and consulting
Valued and well supported employees who know what is expected of them are critical to the success
of our business operations. Human resources and consulting provides a range of services to achieve
our business objectives through effective human resource management practices and principles. The
following information highlights our people management and key human resource achievements
during 2007-08.
Workforce Planning
Workforce planning has continued across our department with the publication of a five year DFC
Workforce Plan in July 2007. We have completed extensive data cleansing, developed quarterly
workforce reporting across the department and are continuing to implement a range of strategies as a
result of the Workforce Plan.
Human Resources Policy Review
A review of human resources policies and procedures has resulted in the consolidation of many
policies and revised procedures, which are now available on our intranet. Appointment and
assignment procedures have been revised, and delegations improved to increase business efficiency.
Flexible working arrangements have also been updated and a series of fact sheets to provide
employees with information on available options released, including carers rights.
Performance Partnerships
As part of the review of human resource policies and procedures a new performance management
system has been developed. The Performance Partnerships the Lets Talk Framework clearly identifies
our department’s approach to creating a workplace culture of high performance.
The Framework is underpinned by meaningful conversations about what motivates our employees. It
supports a development and professional growth focus and emphasises the importance of ongoing
conversations and feedback between employees and their Managers.
Attraction and Recruitment
Recruitment strategies have commenced focusing initially on Families SA country regions to attract a
wider pool of applicants. This has included a review of advertising and marketing strategies to promote
the benefits of living in regional locations. A dedicated careers page has been developed to host a
range of material for prospective job seekers encompassing information on the region, housing
options, education, local healthcare and work options for spouse/partner. Marketing of positions in
Disability SA has also commenced and recruitment approaches will continue to extend across our
department.
Advertising processes have been streamlined, including the use of online application forms. There is
an increased usage of the internet to promote careers in our department and we are currently
reviewing the careers page on our internet site to promote our department as an employer of choice. A
feedback mechanism has been built into the revised advertising processes.
South Australian Government Youth Training Scheme and Trainee Employment Register
Thirteen trainees have been employed across our department through the South Australian
Government Youth Training Scheme. Our College for Learning and Development delivers
qualifications and offers learning support for the duration of the traineeship.
An agreement between our department and the Department of Treasury and Finance (DTF) has
provided an opportunity for the Traineeship Program to support one external trainee towards
completing their traineeship. The trainee is funded by DTF and is provided with a placement for the
remainder of their traineeship within our department.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
94
Our people
DFC Aboriginal Employment Strategy 2007-2012 ‘Everybody’s Business’
The DFC Aboriginal Employment Strategy 2007-2012 ‘Everybody’s Business’ was launched during
2007-08 following extensive research and internal consultation. The strategy is linked to our Workforce
Plan and focuses on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander recruitment, retention, staff development
and strategy monitoring.
The Aboriginal Employment team, comprising the Senior Consultant Aboriginal Employment and
Consultant Aboriginal Employment, is involved in building and retaining the Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander workforce across our department. This includes providing consistent attraction and
retention advice, input into strategic human resources policy and planning approaches, and working in
collaboration with related external partners.
During 2007-08, the program has supported up to seven Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander scholars
and three cadets across our department who are studying Social Work, Psychology, Nursing and
Aboriginal Studies. In addition, a total of five students completed the Wiltja scholarship and graduated
Year 12. The scholarship also contributed towards a cultural trip to New Zealand in October 2007.
South Australian Public Sector Aboriginal Recruitment and Development Strategy and the
Aboriginal Employment Register
Through the DFC Aboriginal Employment Strategy 2007 – 2012 “Everybody’s business” strategies to
increase usage of the Aboriginal Employment Initiatives’ Aboriginal register have been implemented.
Various metropolitan and regional locations refer vacancies to the register. These requests are
coordinated by the Aboriginal Employment Team to ensure consistency, advice and support
throughout the recruitment process.
The Aboriginal Employment Strategy sets targets to increase the number of positions referred to the
Aboriginal Employment Register for Aboriginal focused and mainstream positions. Targeted
advertising and recruitment of key positions delivering Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander services is
used, including the use of the Boomerang Network.
Recruitment and selection processes have been reviewed and promoted to support recruitment of
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees. In addition, attendance at Career Expos such as the
Croc Festival, Nunga Expo and other major significant cultural events promotes employment, careers
and scholarships to a wider audience. Links with schools and tertiary education institutions have been
established to engage Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in work placements and work
experience programs.
Strategy for Employment of People with Disabilities
Our Disability Action Plan reflects targets for employment of people with disabilities. We have
reviewed the use of the Disability Employment Register and have developed a series of fact sheets to
articulate our strategy for increasing the employment of people with a disability. The fact sheets outline
the process required to access the register, dispels myths associated with employing people with a
disability and provides information on workplace adjustments/modifications.
Career Exhibitions
Our department participated in a number of career exhibitions and fairs both locally, interstate and for
the first time internationally. We visited Wellington and Auckland, New Zealand in conjunction with the
Department of Health to participate in an international Career Fair. The main focus has been on
recruitment for critical roles in both Families SA and Disability SA sectors.
The career fairs have resulted in several registrations of interest for positions in our department. We
also continue to participate in the South Australian Government Adelaide Make the Move campaigns
in both Sydney and Melbourne.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
95
Our people
Competency Based Job and Person Specifications
During 2007-08, we significantly progressed the development of competency based job and person
specifications to assist in simplifying the development of recruitment tools. Job families have been
established to group roles with similar functions to facilitate learning networks and increase
connections between functions across our department. Nine job families have been identified across
our department, identifying core behaviours and skills required in particular roles.
The job families model provides structured learning and development pathways for all employees.
Close liaison occurs between the College for Learning and Development and Human Resources to
monitor the effectiveness of the job families model and linkages between human resource
management practices and the learning and development pathways.
The workforce planning process has also assisted in identifying five core competencies to apply
across every job family. The behaviours that help predict successful performance in a particular role
are linked to these competencies which are incorporated in the revised job and person specifications.
A competency dictionary is being developed to enable electronic composition of specifications.
Application forms are also used to simplify the recruitment process, reducing the application writing
process and assisting in more applicants to consider roles in our department.
Code of Conduct
Our department uses a number of strategies to promote adherence to the principles of the Code of
Conduct for South Australian Public Sector Employees (2005). All new employees undergo an
accredited induction program which includes Code of Conduct training. The Respectful Treatment at
Work Policy and Grievance and Disciplinary Procedures have been promoted and implemented
across the department to manage all grievances.
Standardised and customised education programs on respectful treatment at work are offered which
covers both Respectful Treatment at Work, the Code of Conduct and employee/employer obligations.
In addition a series of fact sheets on respectful treatment at work have been developed.
Regular information updates are provided on the topic of respectful treatment at work via our intranet
and the Chief Executive’s Connect newsletter. Mentoring of managers is also provided.
Families SA has delivered specific Code of Conduct training to all regional areas. This training outlines
employees’ requirements as public servants. Each section of the Code of Conduct is examined and
examples are provided of inappropriate conduct.
Our department has the following policies and practices in place for reporting breaches of the Code of
Conduct:
• Respectful Treatment at Work Policy, which also covers grievances associated with administrative
decisions
• Grievance and Discipline Procedures, which includes grievance/discipline management processes
• Whistleblowers Policy and Procedure
• Human resources intranet has been updated to make it easier for employees to access relevant
policies and procedures
• Public Sector Management Act 1995 processes for Notice of Inquiry and preliminary investigations.
Mentoring Program
The DFC Mentoring Program continues to develop and extend beyond the boundaries of traditional
mentoring. The program operates online, enabling regional and metropolitan employees to access
various discussion boards, on-line conferences and a resource centre.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
96
Our people
The program is unique as it is based on life and career experiences rather than seniority or years of
service. Mentor categories have expanded to include discipline specific mentoring. One of our
business units using this new initiative is the Project Management Office which provides mentoring
opportunities specifically for Project Officers.
Young Professionals Committee
The Young Professionals Committee continues to develop, engaging more under 35’s across a wide
cross section of our department. Currently there are just under 1700 young professionals employed,
and the Committee itself brings together 12 young people across our business units.
The Committee facilitates young professionals’ development and networking opportunities, with
projects such as the highly successful panel discussion event based on Objective 1 SASP, Growing
Prosperity. The panel comprised of prominent people from different areas of expertise, who presented
their unique perspectives. The presentations were thought-provoking, and centred on collaboration. It
reinforced the contribution young public servants make to the quality of our service to the public.
Alumni Network
An Alumni Network has been established as a key knowledge retention strategy. This Network will
assist to retain the breadth of knowledge, skills and experience of past employees. It will also assist in
maintaining valuable relationships and in building strong mentoring and coaching.
The Alumni Network is promoted via a dedicated web page and networking opportunities. The official
launch will be held in August 2008.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
97
Our people
Workplace statistics
Unless otherwise stated, the following data is provided from the South Australian Public Sector
Workforce Information Collection (WIC) Department for Families and Communities Annual Report
2007-08. The data was extracted from the Complete Human Resource and Information System and
uploaded onto the Workforce Analysis and Comparison Application (WACA) internet site. Data is
based on all employees (including casuals) who had a contract of employment during 1 July 2007 to
30 June 2008 (2007-08 pay periods were the reporting parameters).
Employee numbers, gender and status
Persons
6090
Full-time equivalent (FTE)
5336
Number of persons separated from the agency during the 2007-08 financial year
981
Number of persons recruited to the agency during the 2007-08 financial year
978
Number of persons on leave without pay at 30 June 2008
240
Number of employees by gender
Gender
% Persons
% FTEs
Male
29.7
31.2
Female
70.3
68.8
Number of employees by salary bracket – Persons
Salary bracket
Male
Female
Total
$0 – $46 399
773
1867
2600
$46 400 – $58 999
488
1223
1711
$59 000 – $75 499
425
962
1387
$75 500 – $94 999
141
198
339
$95 000+
22
31
53
1809
4281
6090
Total
Status of employees in current position – FTEs
Ongoing
Short-Term
Contract
Long-Term
Contract
Other (Casual)
Total
Male
1509.9
96.2
45.0
0
1651.1
Female
3272.6
347.0
65.3
0
3684.9
Total
4782.5
443.2
110.3
0
5336.0
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
98
Our people
Status of employees in current position – Persons
Ongoing
Short-Term
Contract
Long-Term
Contract
Other (Casual)
Total
Male
1549
100
45
115
1809
Female
3615
388
66
212
4281
Total
5164
488
111
327
6090
Persons
Executive contracts – Persons
Number of executives by status in current position, gender and classification
Ongoing
Classification
Contract
Tenured
Contract
Untenured
Other (Casual)
Total
Male
Female
Male
Female
Male
Female
Male
Female
Male
Female
EXEC A
0
0
1
0
12
16
0
0
13
16
EXEC B
0
0
0
0
4
5
0
0
4
5
EXEC C
0
0
0
0
3
4
0
0
3
4
EXEC D
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
0
1
1
EXEC E
0
0
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
Total
0
0
1
0
20
27
0
0
21
27
Source: Data extracted as at 30 June 2008 (not WIC data).
Leave management
Total number of days leave taken
Leave Type
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
2007-08
Sick leave
21 550
26 016
39 322
55 700
Family carer’s leave
1 325
1 754
3 384
3 526
Miscellaneous Special Leave
2 397
2 430
3 352
5 900
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
99
Our people
Workforce diversity – Persons
Number of employees by age bracket by gender
Age Bracket
Male
Female
Total
% of Total
South Australian
Workforce
Benchmark (%)*
15 – 19
9
16
25
0.41
6.7
20 – 24
64
231
295
4.84
10.7
25 – 29
146
418
564
9.26
9.8
30 – 34
190
459
649
10.66
9.8
35 – 39
212
478
690
11.33
11.1
40 – 44
209
538
747
12.27
11.9
45 – 49
261
653
914
15.01
12.3
50 – 54
337
664
1001
16.44
10.6
55 – 59
247
537
786
12.91
9.1
60 – 64
109
230
338
5.55
5.3
65+
24
57
81
1.33
2.7
Total
1809
4281
6090
100
100
* Source: ABS Australian Demographic Statistics, 6291.0.55.001 Labour Force Status (ST LM8) by sex, age,
state, marital status – employed – total from Feb78 Supertable, South Australia at June 2008.
Workforce diversity – Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees – Persons
Aboriginal staff
Total staff
Percentage
Aboriginal
SASP Target
$0 – $46 399
80
2600
3.1
2%
$46 400 – $58 999
96
1711
5.6
2%
$59 000 – $75 499
42
1387
3.0
2%
$75 500 – $94 999
15
339
4.4
2%
$95 000+
2
53
3.8
2%
235
6090
3.9
2%
Salary bracket
Total
Cultural and linguistic diversity
Male
Female
Total
% of
Agency
% of South
Australian
Community*
Number of employees born overseas
447
942
1389
22.8
20.3
Number of employees who speak
language(s) other than English at home
225
428
653
10.7
16.6
* Benchmarks from ABS Publication Basic Community Profile (South Australia) Cat No. 2001.0, 2006 Census
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
100
Our people
Number of employees with disabilities* according to the Commonwealth Disability
Discrimination Act 1992 – Persons
Male
Female
Total
% of Agency
87
195
282
4.6
Source: Data extracted from Complete Human Resource Information System (CHRIS) as at 30 June 2008, on the
basis of those staff who have identified as having a disability agreeing for this information to be included on
CHRIS.
* Definition: Disabilities which are physical, intellectual, psychiatric, sensory and neurological. A disability can
affect a person’s capacity to communicate, interact with others, learn, or get about independently. People with an
ongoing disability who have an employment restriction, due to their disability and:
• are restricted in the type of work they could do, or need modified hours of work (either a restriction in hours
they can work, different time schedules, or flexible hours of attending); or
• require an employer to provide adaptive equipment, a modified work environment, or make other special work
related arrangements; or
• need to be given ongoing assistance or supervision.
Types of employee disabilities – Persons
Disability
Male
Female
Total
% of Agency
Physical
67
37
104
1.7
Intellectual
5
5
10
0.2
Sensory
19
25
44
0.7
Psychological / Psychiatric
22
6
28
0.5
Other
13
8
21
0.3
Total
126
81
207
3.4
Source: Data provided by DFC Online Services from a staff survey distributed in June 2008. Data does not
provide an accurate profile of every disability type as the staff survey was voluntary, and, as respondents were
anonymous, data can not be tracked to CHRIS data.
Number of employees with ongoing disabilities requiring workplace adaptation – Persons
Male
Female
Total
% of Agency
41
23
64
1.1
Source: Data provided by DFC Online Services from a voluntary staff survey distributed in June 2008. Data only
provides a notional representation of workplace adaptations, and, as respondents were anonymous, data can not
be tracked to CHRIS data.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
101
Our people
Performance development
Documented review of individual performance management
% Total Workforce
Employees with a review within the past 12 months
21.9
Employees with a review older than 12 months
25.3
Employees with no review
52.5
Leadership and management training expenditure
Training and Development
Total Cost
% of Total Salary
Expenditure
Total training and development expenditure
$5 579 000
1.41%
$600 000
0.15%
Total leadership and management development
expenditure
Accredited training packages
Number of accredited training packages by classification
Classification
Number
Classification
Number
Administrative Services Officer – ASO1
83
Manager Administrative Services –
MAS3
16
Administrative Services Officer – ASO2
536
Operational Services – OPS1
83
Administrative Services Officer – ASO3
194
Operational Services – OPS2
346
Administrative Services Officer – ASO4
370
Operational Services – OPS3
1 094
Administrative Services Officer – ASO5
432
Operational Services – OPS4
620
Administrative Services Officer – ASO6
478
Operational Services – OPS5
354
Administrative Services Officer – ASO7
73
Operational Services – OPS6
41
Administrative Services Officer – ASO8
51
Operational Services – OPS7
41
Disability Services Officer – DIS1
513
Operational Services – OPX2
506
Disability Services Officer – DIS2
2 639
Operational Services – OPX3
250
Enrolled Nurse – EN01
29
Operational Services – OPX4
121
Enrolled Nurse – ENDP
5
Operational Services – OPX5
42
Executive Officer – EXEC
8
Professional Officer – PO01
794
Health Ancillary Employee – WHA2
2
Professional Officer – PO02
752
Health Ancillary Employee – WHA3
750
Professional Officer – PO03
398
Health Ancillary Employee – WHA4
35
Professional Officer – PO04
32
Legal Officer – LE03
13
Trainee – TRA1
32
Total
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
11 733
102
Our people
Vale
It is with great sadness that we acknowledge the passing of staff members during 2007-08, including:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Catharine May
Christine Beasley
Denise Hewitt
Maxine Forbes
Tracy Koci
John Farmer
All will be sadly missed by their many friends and colleagues in our department and we express our
sincere sympathy to their families.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
103
Our people
Occupational health, safety and welfare
Performance against the elements of Safety in the Public Sector 2007- 2010 Strategy
The Safety in the Public Sector 2007-2010 strategy embeds the Premier’s Zero Harm Vision and
underpins SASP target T2.11, greater safety at work. The strategy was implemented to build on the
previous Workplace Safety Management Strategy 2004-2006, and provides an across government
framework for sustainable safety performance that promotes safety as a means of improving business
performance, reducing the human social and financial cost of injury, and the associated impacts on
service performance.
Strategy: Sustainable Commitment
Indicator
DFC Response
How do we demonstrate to our
Zero Harm Vision
employees and clients that we have a
• The Premier’s Safety in the Public Sector 2007–2010
commitment to the Zero Harm Vision
commitment statement has been implemented and disseminated
and 100 per cent Return to Work?
through our worksites.
• The Chief Executive’s Commitment Statement has been
implemented and disseminated throughout our worksites.
• The Connecting to the Future Strategic Agenda for Department
for Families and Communities 2005-2008 Objective 5 captures
safety management as a core business value. Managers are
required to implement effective safety management systems and
ensure that business is conducted in a way that is safe for
employees and the community. Connecting to the Future is
scheduled for review as part of the forthcoming business
planning cycle.
• We have implemented an Occupational Health, Safety and
Welfare and Injury Management (OHS&W) and Injury
Management System Framework that captures the key elements
of legislative compliance and integrates health, safety and injury
management as a core business value to achieve improved
performance outcomes.
100 per cent Return to Work
•
•
•
We have customised and implemented a new Injury
Management System that includes early intervention strategies
and a risk assessment process for all new claims.
Our department has a dedicated hotline for managers to
promptly report incidents and injuries, thereby enabling the
rehabilitation team to assess rehabilitation and return to work
support and initiatives.
The rehabilitation team includes a dedicated Vocational Services
Provider whose primary responsibility is to develop opportunities
where all other avenues have been exhausted, and coordinate
and initiate alternative placements whilst supporting injured
employees make a successful transition to an appropriate role.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
104
Our people
Indicator
DFC Response
What evidence do we have that this
commitment by senior executive and
management is making a difference
to morale and productivity?
•
•
•
•
•
What are the key activities that
ensure our commitment to the Zero
Harm Vision and 100 per cent Return
to Work is preventing injuries, getting
people back to safe work and
reducing waste?
•
•
•
In what way is this activity
contributing to ongoing improvement
of our services and the achievement
of South Australia’s Strategic Plan?
•
Senior executives and management actively support
rehabilitation and return to work programs that enable work
injured employees to access meaningful work within their level of
capacity.
We have introduced an endorsed Health and Wellbeing Program
that enables employees to participate in corporate health
initiatives.
Employees are encouraged and supported to access flexible
workplace practices and a Respectful Treatment at Work Policy
has been implemented.
A Performance Partnership Program that focuses on workplace
goals, individual achievements and learning and developmental
opportunities has been implemented.
The DFC College for Learning and Development, a Registered
Training Organisation, conducts a four day corporate induction
program and provides a suite of nationally accredited
competency based learning programs.
We have customised and implemented a new Injury
Management System that includes early intervention strategies
and supports rehabilitation and early return to work within a safe
and supported work environment.
A risk assessment process is currently in place that focuses on
appropriate strategies to reduce psychological injuries and
manual tasks across our department and improve the return to
work outcomes.
An Employee Assistance Program is available that provides
choice and supports the diversity of the workforce and members
of their immediate families.
There has been a reduction in the number of workers
compensation claims lodged during 2007-08. The introduction of
improved work practices culminate in safer work environments
that support employees in the delivery of improved services to
our clients.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
105
Our people
Strategy: Financial Accountability
Indicator
DFC Response
How are the Zero Harm Vision and
100 per cent Return to Work
initiatives supported by our financial
decision making?
•
•
•
How do we hold decision makers
accountable for performance against
the requirements of the Zero Harm
Vision and 100 per cent Return to
Work?
•
•
•
What are the strategic investments
we have made in this portfolio /
agency to prevent loss from
avoidable safety, health and welfare
incidents?
•
•
•
Have there been other beneficial
effects from these investments?
•
•
•
How do we use safety to minimise
negative risk and enhance positive
opportunities to achieve the
objectives of South Australia’s
Strategic Plan?
•
•
The funding of internal and external specialist medical,
rehabilitation and claims expertise to support our people in
health and safety, wellbeing, and injury management matters.
Our safety performance is central to business decision making
through the inclusion of safety risk within financial and resource
management frameworks.
Financial accountability in the investment for portfolio/agency
specific loss prevention and safety improvement strategies.
The Chief Executive, Executive Directors and Senior Managers
have performance or partnership plans that include contributing
to and achieving SASP greater safety at work target. Regular
reviews are conducted and a full performance review is
undertaken annually.
Budget holders have the financial accountability for safety
performance.
Producing executive reports to enable monitoring and reporting
of our health, safety and injury management performance to
address risk, trends and implement corrective actions.
We have customised and implemented a new Injury
Management System that includes early intervention strategies
and supports rehabilitation and early return to work within a safe
and supported work environment.
Dedicated resources to engage specialists with a focus on audit,
learning and development, manual handling interventions and
claims, rehabilitation and medical expertise.
Purchase and customisation of online OHS&W and Injury
Management learning packages.
The restructure of the injury management system and early
intervention strategies have resulted in greater efficiencies,
improved performance and a reduction in the number of new
claims lodged.
Workers are more skilled, they have more transportable skills,
which builds morale and confidence within the employees of our
department.
The learning programs accessed by our employees provide
access to alternative or promotional employment opportunities
which assists our department to be an employer of choice and
impacts on retention and health and wellbeing.
Safety is captured within our Risk Management Policy. This
includes adoption of the OHS&W and Injury Management
System Framework and related processes that apply risk
assessments to prevent, reduce, and/or minimise occupational
injury or illness.
Risk management is integrated into all business activities and
systems to add value. The OHS&W and Injury Management
System Framework requires managers and employees to
capture and apply Risk Management Principles in order to
respond to emerging trends or potential risk at the operational
level.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
106
Our people
Strategy: Integrated Risk Management
Indicator
DFC Response
How have we improved our ability to
manage the occupational safety and
health risks that face the
organisation?
•
•
•
•
The provision of internal and external expertise to support our
staff in health, safety, wellbeing and injury management matters.
The regular reporting of performance to executive, management
and OHS Committees to identify trends, and implement
appropriate corrective treatment plans.
Significant OHS&W risks that are captured within the Risk
Management process are elevated and considered in the
development of the DFC Planning and Reporting Framework.
Development and implementation of our OHS&W and Injury
Management Implementation Plan.
Strategy: Rigorous Evaluation
Indicator
DFC Response
How is the Portfolio / Agency
progressing against the milestones
within the Portfolio / Agency
implementation plan for the Safety in
the Public Sector 2007 – 2010
strategy?
•
•
What systems and methods are in
place that allow us to realistically and
defensibly assess, analyse report and
improve our OHS&W performance?
•
•
•
•
Refer to Table 1, DFC Performance against Safety in the Public
Sector (SIPS) Targets.
The implementation of an OHS&W and Injury Management
Framework System captures our responsibilities and
accountabilities. Programs such as workplace inspections,
internal audits, incident reporting and investigations,
preventative maintenance, early intervention strategies, and
corrective actions are regularly applied to improve the OHS&W
performance.
Regular analysis of data to identify emerging trends, and
provision of comprehensive reports to executive, management
and OHS committees on the performance outcomes measured
against our department’s objectives and targets.
Regular monitoring of the progress of identified and agreed
actions within the DFC divisional business planning cycle.
An internal audit program has been implemented to assess
compliance with business systems. Corrective actions and
identified system improvements are implemented.
Annual staff, and regular client surveys are conducted and the
results used to provide feedback on service levels that also
provide opportunities for improvement.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
107
Our people
Table 1: DFC Performance against Safety in the Public Sector (SIPS) Targets
Base
2005-06
Target
1. Workplace Fatalities
Numbers
or %
Performance
12 months to end of June 2008 *
Notional
Actual
Quarterly
Variation
Target **
Final
Target
Numbers
or %
0
0
0
0
0
2. New Workplace Injury Claims
595
519
536
-17
476
3. New Workplace Injury Claims
Frequency Rate
61.1
55.3
55.0
+0.3
48.9
4. Lost Time Injury Frequency
Rate ***
31.0
23.1
27.9
-4.8
24.8
64
55
58
-3
51
6a. Early Assessment
within two days
40.48%
19.46%
80.0%
-60.54%
80% or
more
6b. Early Intervention
within five days
87.92%
91.95%
80.0%
+11.95%
80% or
more
6c. Return to work within
five business days
69.7%
73.0%
75.0%
-2%
75% or
more
7a. Claims determined in
ten business days
77.6%
74.4%
75%
-0.6%
75% or
more
7b. Claims still to be
determined after
three months
4.9%
7.4%
3.0%
+4.4%
3% or
less
$645 778
Below
previous
two years
average
-$287 510
Below
previous
two years
average
5. New Psychological Injury
Claims
6. Rehabilitation and Return to
Work:
7. Claim Determination:
8. Income Maintenance
Payments for Recent Injuries:
2006-07 Injuries
(at 24 months development)
2007-08 Injuries
(at 12 months development)
$2 589 447
$637 610
$1 943 669
$925 120
*
Except for target 8 which is year to date. For targets 5, 6c, 7a and 7b performance is measured up to
the previous quarter to allow reporting lag.
**
Based on cumulative reduction from base at a constant quarterly figure.
***
Lost Time Injury Frequency Rate: Injury frequency rate for new lost time injury/disease for each one
million hours worked. This frequency rate is calculated for benchmarking and is used by the
WorkCover Corporation.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
108
Our people
Key Organisational Activities and OHS&W and Injury Management Outcomes
Corporate Strategic Plan
OHS&W and Injury Management are integrated into all aspects of our business operations. We have
in place the following documents in which OHS&W and Injury Management are integrated:
• 2007-08 Business Plan
• The Next Steps 2007 (the link between the Strategic Agenda and the Annual Plan)
• DFC OHS&W & IM Implementation Plan 2008-2010
• Making it Happen: Culture, Values and Behaviours
OHS&W and Injury Management Action Plan Outcomes
A signed copy of the Chief Executive’s Safety Commitment 2008 Statement has been circulated and is
available on our intranet site. A copy of the DFC OHS&W & IM Implementation Plan 2008-2010 is also
available to staff from our intranet site.
Consultative Arrangements
OHS&W Committee structures are in place across our department. The DFC OHS&W Peak
Committee is supported by divisional strategic and local committees who meet on a regular basis, and
the structure consists of both management and employee representation. All information is updated,
circulated, and posted on our department’s intranet site.
OHSW committees receive regular reports on workers compensation performance, outcomes against
targets, accident/incident data, and Employee Assistance Program (EAP) usage. Regular reports and
meetings occur with the EAP providers and an annual Staff Climate Survey is conducted with results
and resulting actions published and available to all employees. Industrial Liaison Forums are held
across the department, and with each of the divisions, as per the agreed schedule.
The consultative processes extend to OHS&W committees and registered associations through
regular scheduled forums, with membership consisting of management, employee and industrial
representatives, and all major policies and guidelines are referred to them for comment.
Claims Resources
We have a centralised injury management team who are appropriately qualified and experienced in
the field of administering and managing the Workers Rehabilitation and Compensation Act 1986.
Table 2:
OHS Notices and Corrective Action taken
Number of notifiable occurrences pursuant to OHS&W Regulations Division 6.6
9
Number of notifiable injuries pursuant to OHS&W Regulations Division 6.6
4
Number of notices served pursuant to OHS&W Act s35, s39 and s40
(default, improvement and prohibition notices)
2
Comment: System improvements have been implemented to address the notifiable occurrences
during the reporting period.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
109
Our people
Table 3:
Workers Compensation Expenditure for 2007-08 compared with 2006-07
2007-08
2006-07
Variation
+ (-)
%
Change
+ (-)
Income maintenance
$5 261 226
$3 673 011
$1 588 214
43%
Lump sum settlements redemptions
(Section 42)
$3 126 508
$448 460
$2 678 048
597%
Lump sum settlements permanent disability
(Section 43)
$1 129 942
$689 015
$440 926
64%
Medical/hospital costs combined
$2 425 981
$1 918 502
$507 479
26%
$849 270
$559 791
$289 479
52%
$12 792 928
$7 288 781
$5 504 147
76%
Expenditure
Other
Total claims expenditure
Comment: The increase in expenditure in section 42 lump sum redemption payments is due to a
targeted approach to finalise some long term workers compensation claims. A corresponding increase
in section 43 lump sum payments is also attributed to the finalisation of the long term claims. The
contributing factor to the 47 per cent increase in total income maintenance expenditure is mainly due
to the increase in the number of psychological injury claims lodged. This is also reflected in the
increase in total claims expenditure reported in Table 4.
Table 4:
Total Claims Expenditure and Income Maintenance paid by Divisions 2007-08
Total paid
2007-08
Total paid
2006-07
Variation
Income paid
2007-08
Income
2006-07
Variation
Domiciliary Care SA
$858 577
$476 441
80%
$283 676
$222 078
28%
DFC Central
$450 313
$94 256
378%
$181 134
$34 033
432%
Disability SA
$5 757 701
$3 962 357
45%
$1 929 073
$2 004 970
-4%
$153
$972
-84%
$0
$0
0%
Families SA
$4 853 917
$2 597 823
87%
$2 446 249
$1 364 468
79%
Housing SA
$872 267
$343 110
154%
$421 092
$162 833
159%
$12 792 931
$7 474 962
71%
$5 261 226
$3 788 383
39%
HomeStart Finance
Total
Comment: There has been an overall increase of 71 per cent in total claims expenditure, which is
significantly influenced by a strategic approach to finalise a number of long term workers
compensation claims. This approach will reduce the department’s long term liability.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
110
Our people
Table 5:
Total New Claims Lodged and Number of New Claims Receiving Income
Maintenance Payments by Divisions 2007-08
New claims
2007-08
New claims
2006-07
Variation
New income
2007-08
New income
claims
2006-07
Variation
Domiciliary Care SA
34
52
-34.62%
25
39
-35.90%
DFC Central
14
14
0%
13
3
333.33%
Disability SA
216
204
5.88%
107
150
-28.67%
2
0
N/A
0
0
N/A
Families SA
117
159
-26.42%
84
59
42.37%
Housing SA
30
36
-16.67%
17
10
70.00%
Total
413
465
11%
246
261
6%
HomeStart Finance
Comment: We have achieved an overall 11 per cent reduction in the number of new claims lodged,
and a six per cent reduction to claim numbers where income maintenance was paid.
Effects of Working Conditions on Employees
Significant workplace changes or working conditions relating to a maximum three year period of
registration, and the manner in which employee safety and wellbeing is impacted, has been
addressed. During the registration period significant changes will occur in regard to employment
arrangements as a result of the implementation of shared services across government. This will see
the transition of a number of staff to an alternative employer and worksite. It will also result in changes
to work systems within the department. A major change management process has begun planning to
ensure that staff are effectively consulted on these changes.
During this period, preparation will occur for the next round of enterprise bargaining that may lead to
some changes in employment arrangements. This is an across government process, which is closely
managed by required industrial consultation procedures.
Views of Registered Associations
Registered associations are consulted through structured arrangements as per Section 3.5.9 of the
Code of Conduct for self-insurers. Our Industrial Liaison Committee, with representation of major
unions, senior executive and each division has an industrial relations forum to consult recognised
employee representatives and executives about industrial matters, and those affecting staff and the
workplace. In addition, individual consultations are established in response to any major changes.
Evaluation Findings and Partnership Plan
WorkCover Partnership Plan and DFC WorkCover Partnership Action Plan 2008-09 were submitted by
WorkCover Evaluator on 2 June 2008.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
111
Our people
Safety Performance Targets
The following safety performance targets, to be achieved by 2010, have been adopted by our
department as per the Safety in the Public Sector 2007-2010 strategy:
•
zero fatalities
•
20 per cent reduction in total new workplace injury claims
•
20 per cent reduction in new workplace injury claims frequency rate
•
20 per cent reduction in lost time injury frequency rate
•
20 per cent reduction in new psychological claims
•
80 per cent of new claims assessed within two business days of a workplace manager/supervisor
being notified of the injury
•
80 per cent of rehabilitation commenced within five business days of an assessment of
rehabilitation required being made
•
75 per cent returned to work within five business days
•
75 per cent of new claims determined within ten business days
•
three per cent of new claims still to be determined after three months
•
injury management payment below the average of previous two years.
To achieve these targets we will:
•
further develop and implement the DFC Injury Management System
•
further develop and implement the DFC OHSW&IM Policy Framework
•
improve treatment to mitigate risks to people’s health, safety and wellbeing
•
improve prevention of occupational injury and illness, in particular psychological health, manual
tasks and, slips, trips and falls
•
improve sustained return to work and rehabilitation strategies and a provision of safe work places
•
integrate all divisions of our department into one OHSW&IM system
•
train, support and motivate employees to identify and manage hazards effectively
•
improve communication and consultation processes across our department
•
monitor, review and continuously improve our OHSW&IM systems and programs.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
112
Our people
Health and wellbeing of employees
We have a Health and Wellbeing Program as part of Workforce Health and Safety, which is designed
to include programs that encourage a more positive state of physical, mental and social wellbeing
amongst employees. The Program focuses on six key elements which make up a person’s wellbeing.
These are financial, caring, creative, community, social and physical.
Our commitment to the health and wellbeing of all employees is reflected through the following
programs and initiatives:
Employee Assistance Program
The Employee Assistance Program (EAP) delivers counselling and support services through the
service provider Cognition, to any employee or an immediate family member seeking assistance with
a challenging issue or seeking to improve their health and well being. We have also contracted the
Sacred Site Within Healing Centre to provide choice for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
employees wanting to access counselling services through EAP.
Voluntary Influenza Immunisation Program
Influenza is a highly contagious virus that disrupts the lives of millions of Australian workers each year.
Between May and the end of June 2008, we offered a free flu vaccination to all employees through our
voluntary Influenza Immunisation Program. The total voluntary flu vaccinations taken up by employees
were 1548. This figure does not include regional employees as they use their local general
practitioners with the respective business units covering the medical gap.
Tour Down Under
During the 2008 Tour Down Under 3403 amateur and recreational cyclists rode Stage 4 from Mannum
to Strathalbyn. 36 riders from DFC Corporate, Housing SA, Disability SA, Domiciliary Care SA and
Families SA, supported by our department, participated in the stage as ‘Team Connect’.
Corporate Cup
Our department promotes increased physical activity amongst staff members by encouraging the
formation of teams to participate in the annual Corporate Cup. This not only improves personal fitness
and wellbeing but can also act as a team building experience.
Gym membership
Staff are provided with the opportunity to access corporate gym offers from the Next Generation Gym,
Choice Fitness at Hyatt Regency Adelaide, or EFM Health Clubs.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
113
Our people
Learning and development
The DFC College for Learning and Development was created to support the ongoing learning for staff
employed in our department. Expected outcomes of the College include the development of a highly
skilled and productive workforce, increased job satisfaction, retention, succession planning and the
ability to issue national qualifications to our staff.
The College has taken responsibility as a one stop shop for all aspects of Contracts of Training in our
department to ensure effective monitoring, processing of claims and audit trials are in place.
In September 2006 the College became a Registered Training Organisation (RTO). As an enterprise
RTO the College claimed State User Choice funds as well as Commonwealth Incentives funds. In
August 2007, after consultation with unions, new staff on full time employment offers of longer than 12
months were offered a Contract of Training. Contracts of Training enable us to access State User
Choice funds as well as Commonwealth Incentive funding, which are utilised by DFC to support
ongoing strategic business needs.
Since becoming an RTO a total of 862 parchments which align to the strategic business needs of DFC
have been issued to staff in the following qualifications:
• Certificate II in Community Services Work
• Certificate II in Disability Work
• Certificate III in Government
• Certificate III in Government (specialising in Business Excellence)
• Certificate III in Government (specialising in Management)
• Certificate III in Government (specialising in Client Information)
• Certificate III in Disability Work
• Certificate IV in Disability Work
• Certificate IV in Community Services (Protective Care)
• Certificate IV in Youth Work (Juvenile Justice)
• Certificate IV in Community Services (Financial Counselling)
• Diploma of Statutory Child Protection
During 2007-08, 653 parchments were issued achieving a 218 per cent result against the target set of
300 parchments.
Certificate IV in Business and Certificate IV in Business (Front Line Management) have been added to
our scope of registration. This allows us to deliver programs such as Project Management, Contract
Management and Risk Management, all aligned to DFC policies and practices and critical skills and
knowledge required to support DFC business practices.
The College aims to have 610 graduates in 2008-09 from a range of qualifications. Learning programs
to meet the strategic business needs of Domiciliary Care SA will be implemented during 2008-09.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
114
Our people
Volunteers
The contribution of volunteers is critical to the successful delivery of services across all areas of our
department. We are committed to contributing to the achievement of SASP target T5.6, to maintain the
high level of volunteering in South Australia at 50 per cent participation rate or higher. We value the
contribution that volunteers make and listen to volunteers to learn how we can best support them in
their tasks.
The Volunteers Unit, formed in December 2005, has a facilitating and coordinating role in developing
agency wide volunteer policy, operational guidelines and standard recognition and acknowledgement
procedures for volunteers. (The Unit has also identified the development of common information
collation and retrieval processes as being essential to managing the volunteers who give their time
and energy so freely.) As at June 2008, there were 1267 volunteers across Disability SA (942
volunteers), Families SA (210), Domiciliary Care SA (70) and Housing SA (45).
Our volunteers are managed in a manner consistent with the National standards for involving
volunteers in not for profit organisations and our volunteering policy and Mutual Obligation Charter
apply to all of our funded agencies. We provide volunteers with safe, meaningful tasks and well
managed workplaces with clearly stated rules, rights, and responsibilities. The necessary legal
safeguards are in place to protect volunteers while carrying out their duties and we trust the sensitivity
and discretion of volunteers and their regard for confidentiality requirements. Volunteers are promptly
reimbursed where expenses are incurred in the course of their volunteer work.
We are also committed to recognising volunteers for their efforts. Since January 2006 eight major
awards ceremonies have been held. Volunteers of Families SA were recognised by His Excellency the
Governor at an awards ceremony at Government House on 6 December 2007. On Tuesday 18 March
2008, 32 Housing SA volunteers received awards presented by the Minister for Housing at the
Housing SA Volunteer Recognition Ceremony, held at Parliament House. The majority of award
recipients were Housing SA tenants who participated in the five regional advisory boards. The
volunteers support tenants in accessing information and representing customers and their housing
issues. Volunteers on the Salisbury North Urban Improvement Project Reference Group were also
recognised for their contribution. The most recent ceremony was held for volunteers of Disability SA
on 18 May 2008 at the Zoological Gardens.
Similarly, Domiciliary Care SA celebrates the efforts of their volunteers by an annual recognition
Christmas lunch and certificates for long serving members on completion of terms of service.
Domiciliary Care SA also supports five consumer committees with more than 70 volunteer clients and
carer members who use their services. Relevant external training is offered to any interested members
and all groups receive annual orientation information and regular presentations by senior managers
and Executives to inform them about internal policy debates and decisions.
DFC doing more
A volunteer from a Families SA District Centre was pleasantly surprised by how her contribution
was acknowledged by the department during the National Volunteer Week. The activities
arranged during the week made the volunteer feel appreciated and valued. It made her feel part
of the team and provided motivation for her to continue to volunteer with Families SA.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
115
Governance arrangements
Governance principles
Our department is guided by the following seven governance principles.
1. Ministerial Accountability
The Minister is accountable to the community for the delivery of efficient and effective services that
respond to the community’s needs. During 2007-08, our department was responsible to:
Hon Jay Weatherill MP
Minister for Families and Communities
Minister for Housing
Minister for Ageing
Minister for Disability
2. Chief Executive Accountability
Effective governance arrangements are those that ensure an unimpeded accountability chain between
the Minister and the Chief Executive, and between the Chief Executive and the department’s
executive management.
3. Citizen/Customer Centred Services
The most complex and intractable problems for individuals, families and communities require joined up
responses and collaboration across functional boundaries. Effective governance arrangements are
those that support seamless partnerships over time between the provider and the customer: a
continuum of care and support when needed by individuals and families, with no-one falling between
the cracks.
Information on customer needs, including unmet needs, determines the Government’s investment
priorities and strategies for the allocation of funds. Good governance keeps service delivery policy,
strategy and standards within the accountability chain from the Minister to Chief Executive, that is,
under the direct control of the Chief Executive.
4. Voice of the Citizen
Effective governance arrangements are those that give a voice to customers, carers, advocates and
other stakeholders. Governments are elected by the citizens, the electoral mandate being the most
powerful determinant of government policies, but not the only one.
5. Community Sector Partnerships
In the provision of community services, the non-government sector is often well placed to deliver
services that are in touch with special needs, are locally and community based, that build individual
and community capacity, encourage altruistic and philanthropic endeavour and tap community
resources.
Effective governance arrangements are those that clearly define roles and responsibilities in funding
arrangements between government agencies and their community sector partners, including
accountability for funding outcomes. They enable transfer of responsibility and greater risk sharing
between government and non-government partners as the capacity to manage is developed.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
116
Governance arrangements
6. Operating Commercially to Deliver Public Value
Commercial public enterprises that deliver social goods need to have the necessary level of
independence to foster commercial enterprise and deliver a return on investment. In these cases, the
application of sound commercial practices will maximise value to government and to the community
without diminishing accountability.
Effective governance arrangements are those that enable public enterprises to deliver on their
mandate as determined by the government without undue interference, at arms length, but with
transparency and disclosure protocols embedded that mitigate risk and protect the public interest.
7. Procurement Flexibility
Agencies that are responsible for maintaining, acquiring and developing assets, such as housing
stock, require funding flexibility to accommodate capital projects, often large and with long lead times.
Flexibility supports the capacity to pursue investment opportunities, often in partnership with the
private sector.
Effective governance arrangements are those that ensure that control of the asset is vested in the
hands of the asset owner, along with responsibility for asset management strategy and policy. Funding
arrangements must be reportable and transparent, but not necessarily tied to annual capital budget
cycles.
Internal governance bodies
In 2007-08, there were ten major corporate governance structures. These have scope that are
organisation wide or cover substantial parts of the organisation.
Big Group
The Big Group meets every six weeks to share information and knowledge, debate issues and make
decisions linked to our strategic directions. Membership of the body includes all Executives, key
Managers and specific functional staff.
Monday Morning Management Meeting (MMMM)
MMMM’s occur every Monday, except in the week following Big Group or on public holidays, to share
information and discuss issues. Chaired by the Chief Executive, membership of the body includes
Executives and selected Managers.
Strategic Finance Committee
The Strategic Finance Committee meets monthly to monitor the performance of the department
budget, consider new initiatives and determine budget strategies. The Committee’s focus is on both
capital and operating budget performance.
Risk Management and Audit Committee
The Risk Management and Audit Committee meets five to six times a year to:
• determine the internal audit program
• review internal audit and Auditor-General reports
• oversee the risk management function and operations of our department.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
117
Governance arrangements
Direct Service Executive
The Direct Service Executive meets monthly to:
• lead the strategic directions and style for connected services for our customers and ensure staff
are clear about these frameworks
• develop and lead a common service delivery culture
• increase the level of connected service delivery and sponsor related best practice
• set privacy and other business process rules and remove barriers to connected services
• encourage flexibility in connected service delivery models as appropriate to respective communities
of interest
• provide a forum for debate on new or revised program and policy initiatives from DFC central office
which impact on major direct service delivery agencies.
Indirect Service Executive
The Indirect Service Executive meets monthly to:
• ensure the strategic directions are integrated and promoted through policy development, service
planning, modelling and funding
• promote a culture of partnership with the non-government sector, to develop quality assurance,
best practice and community engagement strategies
• identify and facilitate opportunities for regional ‘joined up’ service planning and delivery across
program areas, non-government organisations and DFC direct service providers
• promote developments in program policies, practices, systems and service delivery models
ensuring coordination, efficiency, effectiveness, flexibility and responsiveness to changing needs
• connect inter-government relations and reforms in all DFC program areas and other related
portfolios
• engage with the Service Delivery Executive to progress our departmental reform agenda for
improved citizen services, including connected service centres for easier and simplified access and
assessment.
Accredited Procurement Unit
The Accredited Procurement Unit meets weekly to oversee procurement operations to:
• ensure a strategic approach to procurement
• ensure probity, accountability and transparency
• provide for ethical and fair treatment.
ICT Council and ICT Technical Committee
The ICT (Information and Communication Technology) Council and ICT Technical Committee meets
monthly to discuss ICT strategy and program advice and ICT policies, standards and practices.
DFC Peak Occupational Health, Safety and Welfare Steering Committee
The Occupational Heath and Safety Steering Committee meets quarterly in relation to the strategic
oversight of our department’s workplace safety management plan.
Industrial Liaison Committee
The Industrial Liaison Committee meets bi-monthly to address industrial issues with departmental
wide impact and addresses issues that have not been resolved at the Divisional Industrial Liaison
Forums.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
118
Governance arrangements
Legislation
Acts and Regulations administered by the department at 30 June 2008:
Families and Communities portfolio
Adoption Act 1988
Adoption Regulations 2004
Carers Recognition Act 2005
Child Protection Review (Powers and Immunities) Act 2002
Children's Protection Act 1993
Children's Protection Regulations 2006
Commission of Inquiry (Children in State Care and Children on APY Lands) Act 2004
Family and Community Services Act 1972
Family and Community Services Regulations 1996
Housing portfolio
Housing Agreement Act 1991
Housing and Urban Development (Administrative Arrangements) (HomeStart Finance)
Regulations 2007
Housing and Urban Development (Administrative Arrangements) (South Australian Aboriginal Housing
Authority Dissolution) Regulations 2007
Housing and Urban Development (Administrative Arrangements) (South Australian Urban Projects
Authority Dissolution) Regulations 1997
Housing and Urban Development (Administrative Arrangements) Act 1995
Housing Improvement (Section 60 statements) Regulations 2001
Housing Improvement (Standards) Regulations 2007
Housing Improvement Act 1940
South Australian Co-operative and Community Housing (Associated Land Owners) Regulations 2002
South Australian Co-operative and Community Housing (Electoral Procedures) Revocation
Regulations 2007
South Australian Co-operative and Community Housing (General) Regulations 2007
South Australian Co-operative and Community Housing (Housing Associations) Regulations 1996
South Australian Co-Operative and Community Housing (Housing Co-operatives – Investment
Shares) Regulations 2007
South Australian Co-operative and Community Housing Act 1991
South Australian Housing Trust (Abandoned Goods) Regulations 1995
South Australian Housing Trust (General) Regulations 1995
South Australian Housing Trust (Water Rates) Regulations 1995
South Australian Housing Trust Act 1995
Supported Residential Facilities Act 1992
Supported Residential Facilities Regulations 1994
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
119
Governance arrangements
Ageing portfolio
Aged Citizens Clubs (Subsidies) Act 1963
Office for the Ageing Act 1995
Retirement Villages Act 1987
Retirement Villages Regulations 2006
Disability portfolio
Disability Services Act 1993
Julia Farr Services (Trusts) Act 2007
Boards, committees and trusts
Boards, committees and trusts meeting one or more of the following criteria are required to be
recorded on the Boards and Committees Information System (BCIS), administered by the Boards and
Committees Unit, DPC:
• the board is established by or under an Act of the Parliament of South Australia
• one or more members of the board receives remuneration, whether statutory or non-statutory
• the responsible Minister has expressed a specific desire for the board to be listed on the database.
Our department provided administrative support to the following boards, committees and trusts listed
on BCIS, as at 30 June 2008.
Families and Communities portfolio
Board / Committee /
Function
Trust
Charitable and Social
The Charitable and Social Welfare
Welfare Fund Board
Fund, also known as Community
(Community Benefit SA) Benefit SA (CBSA), was established
under Section 73B of the Gaming
Machines Act 1992. The Charitable
and Social Welfare Fund Board, under
the direction of the Minister for
Families and Communities, oversees
and provides direction for the Fund
and approves the funding provided
through CBSA. For further information
on CBSA refer to page 54.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
Achievement/s
•
•
•
Five projects were provided total
funding of $700 000 per year by
the CBSA Special Family Support
Grants to deliver intensive family
support services in four high need
areas.
Modifications to the CBSA funding
guidelines, giving high priority to
funding projects that provide
support to disadvantaged families
with children.
In 2007-08, CBSA funded 258 one
off projects for a total of
$3.5 million.
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Governance arrangements
Board / Committee /
Trust
Child Death and
Serious Injury Review
Committee
Dame Roma Mitchell
Trust Fund for Children
and Young People
Board
State Emergency Relief
Fund Committee
The Council for the
Care of Children
Function
Achievement/s
The Child Death and Serious Injury
Review Committee makes
recommendations to the Minister for
Families and Communities which
identify legislative or administrative
means of contributing to the
prevention of death or serious injury to
children.
For information on the
achievements of the Child Death and
Serious Injury Review Committee,
refer to the Committee's Annual
Report accessible at
www.cdsirc.sa.gov.au.
The Dame Roma Mitchell Trust Fund
for Children and Young People Board
was established to oversee the Dame
Roma Mitchell Trust Fund for Children
and Young People. The Board has
responsibility for ensuring appropriate
procedures are in place for the
allocation of grants, including
reviewing applications, recommending
the level of funding for successful
applicants to the Public Trustee and
reporting. For further information on
the Dame Roma Mitchell Trust Fund
for Children and Young People refer to
page 53.
•
The State Emergency Relief Fund
Committee administers the statutory
fund (s 37 Emergency Management
Act 2004) which disburses donated
money to victims of emergencies and
disasters.
•
The Council for the Care of Children:
• advises the Government on the
rights and interests of children
• reviews child protection legislation
and advises the Minister for
Families and Communities on the
care and protection of children
• reports on Government progress to
keep children safe and healthy and
ensure learning and recreational
opportunities
• promotes the safe care of children
including children in the care of the
Minister, Aboriginal children, and
children with disabilities.
For information on the
achievements of the Council for the
Care of Children, refer to the Council's
Annual Report, accessible at
www.childrensa.sa.gov.au.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
•
•
•
•
Development of board funding
criteria.
Customer feedback mechanism
developed and implemented.
Trial of web based application.
Streamlined application and
assessment process, including
data management.
Arrangements were finalised, with
the assistance of the Public
Trustee, to establish a trust for
each of the children of the victims
of the Gladstone factory explosion.
The State Emergency Relief Fund
Committee disbursed publicly
donated monies to those who
suffered injury, loss or damage as
a result of the storm in the
Renmark area in January 2007.
121
Governance arrangements
Housing portfolio
Board / Committee /
Trust
Homes for 100 Project
Committee
Function
The Homes for 100 Project Committee
is a partnership between the State
Government and Bedford Industries in
a $10 million joint project to create
homes for people with disabilities.
Achievement/s
•
•
•
Purchased and modified seven
newbuild properties to provide
shared supported accommodation
for a number of clients with low and
moderate support needs.
Identified and quarantined three
allotments for development.
Continued to explore innovative
application of funds through the
development of various models
that includes the Bedford Social
Landlords model and the National
Rental Affordability Scheme which
aims to increase the supply of
affordable rental housing.
HomeStart Finance
Asset and Liability
Committee
The HomeStart Finance Asset and
Liability Committee is responsible for:
• managing HomeStart’s net interest
margin
• monitoring HomeStart’s Treasury
policies to ensure their adherence
to global practice and their
relevance, within Government, to
HomeStart
• reviewing and approving changes
in asset pricing policy and policy
setting
• managing HomeStart’s capital
base
• managing the Risk Transfer
Vehicle, a division of HomeStart
established to protect the
organisation from residual
mortgage default risk arising from
loans written since 1 July 2000.
For information on the achievements
of the HomeStart Finance Asset and
Liability Committee, refer to the
HomeStart Finance Annual Report
2007-08, accessible at
www.homestart.com.au.
HomeStart Finance
Audit Committee
The primary responsibilities of the
Audit Committee include:
• reviewing the financial reporting
processes and outputs
• monitoring the risk management
plan and framework and the status
of risks
• reviewing compliance with relevant
laws and regulations
• monitoring the internal and external
audit function.
For information on the achievements
of the HomeStart Finance Audit
Committee refer to the HomeStart
Finance Annual Report 2007-08,
accessible at www.homestart.com.au.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
122
Governance arrangements
Board / Committee /
Trust
HomeStart Finance
Board of Management
Housing and Urban
Development Advisory
Committee
Housing Appeal Panel
Function
Achievement/s
Members of the HomeStart Board of
Management are appointed by the
Governor for a term not exceeding
three years. Board members are
independent of the organisation with
the primary responsibility of the board
focused on:
• corporate accountability
• strategic planning
• monitoring and policy
development.
For information on the achievements
of the HomeStart Finance Board of
Management refer to the HomeStart
Finance Annual Report 2007-08,
accessible at www.homestart.com.au.
The Housing and Urban Development
Advisory Committee is a joint
committee with the Minister for
Housing and the Minister for Urban
Development and Planning. The
Committee:
• promotes in camera discussions
between Government and the
private sector in the housing and
development industries
• jointly advises the Minister for
Housing and the Minister for Urban
Development and Planning on
housing and strategic urban
development matters.
•
The Housing Appeal Panel:
hears appeals from public housing
customers about decisions made
by Housing SA under its
operational policy and procedures
• hears applications for appeal from
members and member/tenants of
Community Housing Organisations
(CHO) against decisions of the
CHO
• hears applications for appeal from
individuals whose application for
membership to a CHO has been
rejected
• provides an independent
administrative review of decisions
• makes recommendations to the
Minister for Housing regarding the
application for appeal.
•
•
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
•
•
•
•
•
Considered issues associated with
the Planning Review and
implementation of new national
initiatives in affordable housing.
Provided advice on proposed
definitions for ‘medium’ and ‘high’
density development and South
Australian Growth Areas.
Considered the impact of recent
Supreme Court judgements on
development in South Australia.
376 internal appeals were received
with 43 per cent of Housing SA
decisions upheld.
79 appeals were concluded by the
Panel with 61 per cent of decisions
affirmed.
Introduction of amendments to the
South Australian Co-operative and
Community Housing Act 1991.
Development of Fact Sheets and
Guidelines by Housing SA’s Office
for Community Housing.
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Governance arrangements
Board / Committee /
Trust
Minister’s Strategic
Housing Advisory
Committee
Function
Achievement/s
The Minister’s Strategic Housing
Advisory Committee (MSHAC)
provides strategic advice to the
Minister for Housing from the nongovernment sector on directions and
issues across the whole of housing.
•
South Australian
Affordable Housing
Trust Board of
Management
The South Australian Affordable
Housing Trust (SAAHT) Board of
Management was created to help
deliver more affordable homes for
South Australians who are locked out
of the housing market, by meeting the
housing needs of low-income workers
and families.
The SAAHT Board of Management
met nine times during 2007-08 and
oversaw the:
• development of Affordable Housing
Innovations Fund (AHIF)
• progression of large scale
affordable housing developments
(over 20 potential renewal sites
were investigated in 2007-08 with a
smaller number of sites undergoing
pre-feasibility work)
• development of affordable housing
practice within local government.
South Australian
Housing Trust Board of
Management
The South Australian Housing Trust
(SAHT) Board of Management
undertakes the functions of, and the
Corporate Governance role for, the
South Australian Housing Trust Act
1995 for the Trust on behalf of the
Minister for Housing.
South Australian
Housing Trust Board of
Management Audit
Sub-committee
The Audit Sub-committee oversees
internal audit, the risk management
framework and business review
processes on behalf of the South
Australian Housing Trust Board.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
•
A series of consultations were held
to gather information from the
community to better inform the
advice provided to the Minister.
The chair of MSHAC was
appointed as a member of the
Housing and Urban Development
Advisory Committee, to provide an
interface between the planning and
development process and
human/social services.
During 2007-08, the SAHT Board
met 11 times
entered into a Performance
Agreement with Housing SA to
undertake housing services on
behalf of the SAHT
• continually monitored the
performance of Housing SA under
this agreement and the financial
position of SAHT
• approved the budget and Business
Plan.
•
•
The Audit Sub-committee met four
times during 2007-08 and:
• approved the Internal Audit Plan
• reviewed the South Australian
Housing Trust’s annual accounts
• addressed Internal Audit and
External Audit management
reports
• monitored our department’s
strategic risk management
process.
124
Governance arrangements
Board / Committee /
Trust
Westwood Urban
Renewal Project
Committee
Function
The Westwood Urban Renewal
Project Committee was established in
1999 in accordance with the Project
Agreement for Westwood, and will
continue to meet for the duration of the
project.
Achievement/s
The Westwood Urban Renewal
Project Committee continues to fulfill
its obligations under the Westwood
Project Agreement.
The role of the project committee is to
monitor performance against
objectives and the various legal
documents which guide the project,
namely:
• Project Agreement (and
subsequent amending
agreements)
• Government Commitment Deed
• Council Commitment Deed
• Macquarie Bank Limited Deed.
The project committee has a clear and
specific role in bringing together the
separate obligations and
responsibilities, and related interests
of the South Australian Housing Trust
and Urban Pacific Limited.
Ageing portfolio
Board / Committee /
Trust
Ministerial Advisory
Board on Ageing
Function
The Ministerial Advisory Board on
Ageing was established under the
Office for the Ageing Act 1995 to
provide the Minister for Ageing with
advice on policy, planning and
services. This includes monitoring and
advising on the impact of government
policies on older people and
conducting consultations on issues of
importance.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
Achievement/s
•
•
Contributed to the administration of
annual Grants for Seniors and
Positive Ageing Development
Grants.
Continued to provide support for
the implementation of Improving
with Age – Our Ageing Plan for
South Australia.
125
Governance arrangements
Disability portfolio
Board / Committee /
Trust
Minister’s Disability
Advisory Council
Function
•
The Minister's Disability Advisory
Council was officially appointed on
3 December 2007 to provide high-level
advice to the Minister for Disability on
issues affecting people with a disability •
and to provide input into the
development of government policy.
Achievement/s
In February 2008 the Council
received their first reference from
the Minister for Disability on the
topic of self-managed funding.
In May 2008 the Council provided
the Minister for Disability with
strategic advice on ways forward,
including a possible consultation
process.
The following portfolio boards, committees and trusts concluded in 2007-08:
• Disability Advisory Council of South Australia
• South Australian Aboriginal Housing Authority Board of Management
• South Australian Community Housing Authority Audit Sub-committee
• South Australian Community Housing Authority Board
• South Australian Community Housing Authority Board of Management
• South Australian Community Housing Authority Finance Sub-committee
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
126
Governance arrangements
Risk management and internal audit
Risk management
Risk Management is critical to the effective management of an organisation’s sound governance and
management practice. The ability to effectively manage the potential risks facing an organisation and
to exploit opportunities is the difference between a successful organisation and one that stagnates or
fails. In recognising this, we have developed the Department for Families and Communities Risk
Management Policy and Framework which is based on the generic Australian/New Zealand Standard
on Risk Management (AS/NZS 4360:2004).
The policy makes all Executives accountable for the effective implementation of the Risk Management
Policy and Framework which aims to protect and enhance resources while supporting the
achievement of our department’s objectives. In addition, the Workplace Safety Management in the SA
Public Sector: 2004-2006 Implementation Plan outlines the requirement that all Executives and
Managers are trained in the use of the AS/NZS 4360 Risk management, for the purpose of
establishing integrated reporting systems.
In 2007-08, the Risk Management and Audit Committee met on six occasions to consider:
• our department’s key strategic and operational risks and associated risk mitigation strategies
identified as part of the risk management process
• the results of internal audits and special investigations completed
• progress made in implementing outstanding agreed audit actions
• the financial statements of our department.
Internal audit
The internal audit function is to carry out the analysis and independent appraisal on the adequacy and
effectiveness of the departments risk management and internal control systems. The internal audit
function is independent to the external audit function.
Internal Audit develops relationships with management to provide independent, objective assurance
and consulting services designed to add value and improve the operations of the department. Internal
Audit helps the department accomplish its objectives by bringing a systematic, disciplined approach to
investigate, evaluate and advise on the effectiveness and efficiency of all mission critical business
processes, focussing on process deliverables, risk and knowledge management, key performance
indicators, macro and micro control, and governance processes.
Privacy
All divisions and staff of our department are bound by the Code of Fair Information Practice. The Code
contains the privacy principles which guide the collection, use, disclosure and handling of personal
information. Statutory authorities such as the South Australian Housing Trust are not bound by the
Code. The South Australian Housing Trust is bound by a similar but not identical set of privacy
principles which were originally issued by the State Government as Cabinet Administrative Instruction
1/89 and then re-issued on 30 July 1992 as DPC Circular No. 012 Information Privacy Principles
Instruction.
In addition, there are specific legislative provisions on handling information in relation to specific areas
of work or in specific circumstances, for example in the Children’s Protection Act 1993, Adoption Act
1988 or Disability Services Act 1993. These legislative requirements take precedence over the Code
or the Cabinet Instruction.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
127
Governance arrangements
HomeStart also complies with the requirements of the Privacy Act 1988 (Commonwealth), in particular
Part IIIA (which regulates credit providers and credit reporting) and the Credit Reporting Code of
Conduct.
Procurement
Procurement involves the management of our purchase of goods, services and works to ensure that
value for money outcomes are achieved in accordance with Government and State Procurement
Board policies and departmental guidelines. Procurement within the South Australian Government is
underpinned by three principles:
• obtaining value in the expenditure of public money
• providing for ethical and fair treatment of participants
• ensuring probity, accountability and transparency in procurement operations.
We operate a robust, responsive and transparent procurement governance regime that supports the
objectives of the State Procurement Act 2004. The Procurement and Contract Management Unit
(PCMU) is responsible for managing the procurement of goods and services across our department,
including contractors and consultancy services. PCMU staff have a blend of private and public sector
experiences and tertiary qualifications.
The PCMU has implemented a comprehensive suite of procurement policies that fully support State
Procurement Board directions. Value for money, ethical treatment and accountability are supported
through the PCMU's annual business plan, quarterly activity reports and six monthly updated forward
procurement plan.
The Accredited Procurement Unit (APU) is responsible for ensuring transparent and accountable
procurement practices, overseeing significant procurement activity and for progressing strategic
procurement reform. The APU ensures that procurement delegates are following fair practices, getting
best value and making defendable decisions. The APU does this by setting business rules and
procedures, reviewing transactions worth $550 000 and above and issuing directions to delegates.
Knowledge and understanding of our procurement policies and procedures is maintained through an
ongoing information and learning program delivered by the PCMU. The program includes ongoing
account management meetings with key internal customers and regular team workshops on
delegations and procurement processes. The PCMU is also furthering the principles of value for
money, accountability and transparency through the delivery of accredited contract management
training to our staff in conjunction with the Grants Management Unit and the College for Learning and
Development.
Customer service
The department aims to provide world class services to the people of South Australia. As such, we
contribute to the achievement of SASP target T1.7, Performance in the public sector – customer and
client satisfaction with government services, through our commitment to improve service delivery and
customer satisfaction by having our customers at the centre of our operations.
In May 2006, we commissioned a review to identify both strengths and opportunities for improvement
to our current customer service operations. As a result of the review a Customer Service Strategy Unit
was established in July 2006 to coordinate all process improvement activity, ensuring that there is no
a duplication of effort and outcomes are standardised department wide.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
128
Governance arrangements
The work of the Customer Service Strategy Unit is guided by target T1.7 of SASP and the DFC
Customer Service Framework which was developed by a Customer Services Champion Group. The
Framework is comprised of six key areas of focus being:
• Customer Service Access and Support
• Support and promote our Service Offer
• Service Culture
• Customer Service Delivery Environment
• Customer Service Recovery and Customer Relations
• Customer Engagement and Knowledge.
The Customer Service Strategy Unit is responsible for reporting on our progress against target T1.7,
work in the Customer Service Framework and takes the lead role in developing, implementing and
evaluating all new customer service strategies.
Customer Satisfaction Measurement
The Customer Service Strategy Unit is implementing a Customer Satisfaction Measurement Strategy
across our department which will form part of the departmental response on progress being made
towards the reporting requirements for SASP Target 1.7.
To simplify and align customer satisfaction measurement practices across the public sector, a set of
eight core questions have been adopted, made up of three summary questions and five questions that
measure the key drivers for customer satisfaction. The questions are based on the Canadian Common
Measurement Tool and have been benchmarked across Canada and other English speaking
countries.
Round 1 of the Customer Satisfaction Measurement Strategy was implemented in Housing SA,
Families SA, Disability SA and Concessions and Anti-Poverty Services. The aggregated result for the
department was 90.5 per cent, well above the DFC Key Performance Indicator of 70 per cent.
Planning for Round 2 has been finalised, which also includes a proposal for the trial of the Customer
Satisfaction Measurement with key agencies in the non-government funded sector.
Customer Service Standards
To ensure a stronger customer focused service culture Customer Service Standards have been
introduced that detail our commitment to delivering the best services possible to customers. Services
are to be delivered in a way that is respectful, friendly, helpful, prompt, efficient and fair. The Customer
Service Standards Practice Guidelines provide staff with practical advice on how to provide the best
possible service to customers.
Six of the eight core questions from the Canadian Common Measurement Tool are aligned to the
Customer Service Standards. The following results were obtained in the Round 1 of the Customer
Satisfaction Measurement Strategy:
• 82 per cent of our customers were satisfied with the accessibility of our services and products
(Question 2)
• 92 per cent of our customers were satisfied with the amount of time it took to get the
service/product (Question 3)
• 89 per cent reported that they were treated fairly (Question 4)
• 85 per cent reported that they were informed of all the information they required to get the
service/product (Question 5)
• 84 per cent reported that staff were knowledgeable and competent (Question 6)
• 90 per cent indicated that staff went the extra mile (Question 7).
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
129
Governance arrangements
Complaints Management System
The DFC Complaints Management System has been developed in conjunction with key stakeholders
across our department and external bodies such as the Health and Community Services Complaints
Commission (HCSCC). The new process will capture all data within one system through an online
reporting mechanism. The reporting system will record a range of factors such as the seriousness of
complaints, systemic issues and conduct of staff.
The new system will enable the reporting of trends and key performance indicators and will also
highlight opportunities for service improvements. A new DFC Complaints Management Policy is in
development.
Outside of our governance arrangements, customers who still experience difficulty resolving a
complaint can contact the HCSCC. We have a protocol with the HCSCC which sets out a framework
of procedures and timeframes for dealing with complaints to the Commissioner. Further information on
the HCSCC is available from www.hcscc.sa.gov.au
5 Star Rating System for Customer Service Centres
The DFC 5 Star Rating System has been implemented across customer service centres as a self
assessment system to help provide improved customer service standards within a customer service
friendly environment. Round 2 of the 5 Star Rating System was conducted in early 2008 with the
results indicating that a further five customer service centres attained a rating of 5 stars.
Multicultural Audit
A Multicultural Audit of our People, Processes and Programs was completed in 2007-08. A DFC
Cultural Inclusion Framework is in development to implement some of the key recommendations
arising from the Audit.
Cultural Reference Tool
The Cultural Reference Tool is an intranet information portal which will enable departmental staff to
access ethnic and cultural information on both international and Indigenous cultures representative of
the department’s customer base. The tool will assist staff to familiarise themselves with other cultures
and provide information on geography, language, health and welfare as well as background and
cultural and other useful information.
In addition, the tool will complement staff knowledge leading to an enhanced, more effective delivery
of services to customers. This knowledge will assist staff to see the customer within their whole
circumstances and to provide services which take this into account.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
130
Corporate social responsibility
We are aware of the importance of corporate social responsibility reporting and the challenges we
face in fully integrating this throughout our work. One of the biggest challenges is developing a culture
where staff share responsibility for sustainability.
Workplace
The following programs and initiatives highlight the commitment of our department to the professional
development and work life balance of our employees. For information on programs and initiatives to
promote the health and wellbeing of all employees refer to page 113.
Flexible Work Practices Policy
Our department supports flexible work practices that maintain our ability to meet business and service
opportunities while providing employees with flexible working arrangements to support the balance of
work and life responsibilities, including the care of dependents. Flexible work options available to
employees to enable a balance of work and life responsibilities include:
• flexitime which is used by many employees to plan for personal responsibilities. Employees can
carryover up to a maximum of 15 hours into the next accounting period, which can be taken by
negotiation between the employee and their line manager
• time off in lieu which is provided to employees who work outside of normal work hours owing to
travel or urgent work needs
• part-time work and job share arrangements are available to employees and working from home
policies are applied across a range of service areas within our department. Employees can also
elect to temporarily reduce their working hours to address family or personal circumstances
• 15 days Special Leave With Pay is available to employees and can be taken for a combination of
factors including care of family members, bereavement, urgent pressing necessity; moving,
volunteering in emergencies and cultural leave
• paid maternity leave and graduated part-time work on return from such leave is available to
women, and parenting leave is provided.
Adopting flexible working arrangements to enable employees to manage the balance of primary care
of dependents and work responsibilities have provided opportunities for skilled and experienced
workers to contribute at a greater intellectual capacity than if flexible work practices were not available.
Flexible working arrangements have also been highly successful in maintaining motivation and
commitment of employees, in addition to reducing stress, sick absenteeism and increased
productivity.
Number of employees using voluntary flexible working arrangements by gender 2007-08
Leave Type
Male
Female
Total
20
46
66
1099
2395
3494
Compressed Weeks
16
58
74
Part-time Job Share
6
74
80
Working from Home
11
32
43
Purchased Leave
Flexitime
Employees wishing to access flexible arrangements are able to negotiate one or a combination of
flexible arrangements. Decisions made take into account the suitability of work performed, any
potential disruption to service delivery, agency resources and possible effects on team work.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
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Corporate social responsibility
DFC Australia Day Awards
Medallions and Certificates are presented to staff who have made a noteworthy contribution to the
work of our department during the last year, or given outstanding service over a number of years. This
year our Minister presented individual and team awards for excellence in either Customer Service or
Innovation. Recipients were as follows:
CUSTOMER SERVICE
INNOVATION
Individual Awards
Individual Awards
-
Helen Cook, Youth Worker, Magill Training
Centre
-
Marie Farley, Chief Project Officer, Office for the
Ageing
-
Ros Coppard, Recreation Officer/Holiday Coordinator, Disability SA
-
Annette Giaretto, Regional Guardianship Service
Co-ordinator, Families SA
-
Mark Downing, PC Support, ICT Services
-
Jacqui Lawson, Senior Co-ordinator APY Lands
– Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Services
-
Mary Ireland, Senior Community Development
Officer
-
Lionel Lovell, Supervisor, Special Projects,
Families SA
-
David Magor-Hampel, Supervisor, Early
Intervention and Youth Team, Marion District
Centre, Families SA
-
Charlie Marshall, Customer Services Officer
-
Sue Nyiro, Research officer, Adoption and
Family Information Service
-
Joanne Poblocki, Supervisor, Antipoverty and
Customer Services, Families SA
-
Annie O’Connell, Occupational Therapist,
Disability SA
-
Sitiveni Rogoimuri, Outreach Access Worker,
Families SA
-
Aaron Osterby, On-line Information Strategist,
Information and Knowledge Management
-
Annette Simpson, Head Cook, Magill Training
Centre
-
Aldis Putnins, Senior Clinical Psychologist,
Families SA
-
Matthew Massy-Westropp, Manager, Domiciliary
Equipment Service, Domiciliary Care SA
-
Tracy Ritchie, Principal Aboriginal Consultant,
Families SA
-
Lauren Wilkinson, Executive Projects Manager,
Domiciliary Care SA
-
Belinda Trimboli, Principal Policy and Project
Officer, Strategy and Research
-
Toni Woehlert, Assistant Project Officer, Office
for the Ageing
-
-
Ruth Ziegeler, Social Worker, Team Manager,
Disability Services
Posthumous Award
Tracy Koci, Principal Program Manager, Child
Protection Directorate, Families SA
-
Posthumous Award
Catharine May, Supervisor, Murray Bridge
District Centre, Families SA
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
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Corporate social responsibility
CUSTOMER SERVICE
INNOVATION
Team Awards
Team Awards
-
Information Resource Unit – Disability SA
Stephanie Edwards, Tania Papas, Yvonne
Pavier
-
Geographic Information Systems
Gary Maguire, Stephen Retallack, Leighton
Moulds, Nick Weinmann
-
Home and Community Care Minimum Data
Set Team – Office for the Ageing
Katrina Kong, Aurelia Strozik, Heather Pearce
-
Policy, Strategy and Research Team
Lisette Claridge, Rosie Mangan, Caroline
Fogden
-
DFC Library and Information Service Disability Collection Staff Group
Karen Hill, Julie Glazbrook, Gabriele Monis, Pam
Bates-Waters
-
Woodville Life Story Scrap Booking Project,
Families SA
Tracey Skehan, Natasha Giordani, Bonnie Perry
-
Special Presentation at Marla
Maria Stewart, Previously Community Support
Office now Acting Disability Coordinator
Brenda Stubbs, Family Home Support
Coordinator
Affordable Homes Program - Development
Team
Theresa McGinley, Michelle DeNichilo, Adrian
Hall (On-line Services)
Alice Lawson, Jarrod Gitsham (Affordable
Housing)
-
Special Presentation at Mt Gambier
Customer Service Team – DFC Service
Centre Mount Gambier
Patsy Ruby, Helen Fiegert, Kathleen Duffy,
Erica Richardson, Sarah Wilson,
Andrea Newton, Joylene Close, Monique Ritter,
Maree Townsend, Irene Higgs, Teresa Cain
College for Learning and Development
The College for Learning and Development was created to support the ongoing learning for staff, with
the expected outcomes focusing on creating a highly skilled and productive workforce, job satisfaction,
staff retention, succession planning and the ability to issue national qualifications to staff. The College
has graduated over 800 students with an accredited qualification.
We have established a nationally accredited four day induction program for all new employees. Formal
evaluation of the induction program is conducted regularly and learning plans are established for new
employees and are monitored by the College for Learning and Development.
Refer to page 114 for further information on the College.
Business Improvement Challenge
The Business Improvement Challenge is a continuous improvement development program open to all
employees. The program provides an opportunity for staff of any age, level and profession to work on
an improvement project and present their recommendations to the Chief Executive and other key
stakeholders.
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Corporate social responsibility
Staff undertaking the program participate within a small team which works on an issue of significance
to our department. Project topics may be nominated by participants or are provided from a list of
corporate opportunities for improvement, with participants making recommendations for improvement
on their project at the end of the program.
Learning outcomes for participants include:
• project scoping
• understanding continuous improvement thinking
• process thinking and process mapping
• customer value techniques
• data gathering and analysis
• cause and effect analysis
• prioritisation techniques
• techniques for resolving conflict
• awareness of team development and cycles
• presenting recommendations.
The program aligns to the Certificate III in Government, specialising in Business Excellence
(Continuous Improvement).
Youth Challenge
Staff under the age of 30 participated in the Youth Challenge Program, a unique learning and
development experience that involves working offline for one week to deliver solutions to real issues.
Participating staff were assigned a challenge, and working as a team, formulated a solution that was
presented to the Chief Executive, Executive Director Organisational Development and other senior
staff.
Six rounds of the Youth Challenge Program were conducted during 2007-08. By participating in the
Youth Challenge Program, staff developed project management and presentation skills and by
working within a team incorporating new team dynamics, worked outside of their comfort zone.
Environment
Statement of Commitment to the Environment
Our department is committed to reducing the impact of our activities on the environment and
contributes to progressing the South Australian’ Government’s Greening of Government (GoGO)
Framework which promotes collaboration and action on greening strategies across State Government
agencies. For information on our reporting against GoGO refer to page 159.
As stated in our Statement of Commitment to the Environment, signed in April 2006 by our Minister
and Chief Executive, we work within the GoGO Framework to:
• minimise energy use by implementing energy efficiency measures as required under the
Government‘s Energy Action Plan
• minimise greenhouse gas emissions, waste and pollution in our vehicle fleet, in building
accommodation, management, design and maintenance, in procurement and through water
conservation
• reduce our waste to landfill by reviewing waste collection procedures and increasing re-use and
recycling
• gather information, monitor and report in significant environmental impact areas
• increase environmental awareness and learning among our employees
• promote and comply with relevant environmental legislation and government policy standards
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
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Corporate social responsibility
•
communicate policies and environmental initiatives to our employees, our customers and the
broader community.
To maintain a healthy sustainable environment for all members of staff, clients, and the community,
we minimise the waste we create and undertake our business operations in a manner that ensures
resources are acquired, maintained, used and disposed of responsibly and in a manner that is
environmentally sensitive.
Our Statement of Commitment to the Environment has been distributed to work sites for display in a
prominent position so that it can be viewed by our employees, customers and the broader community
to convey our commitment to sustainability principles and the environment.
Design Guidelines for Sustainable Housing and Liveable Neighbourhoods
The Design Guidelines for Sustainable Housing and Liveable Neighbourhoods were introduced in
2005 as a suite of guidelines for new housing. The guidelines, which now apply to both new and
existing housing, address house design, amenity targets, land tilting and service infrastructure, site
layouts, housing modifications and generic design guidelines for upgrades.
During 2005-06, the Environmentally Sustainable Design Guide was introduced as part of the suite of
guidelines under the Design Guidelines for Sustainable Housing and Liveable Neighbourhoods. This
guide addresses issues such as energy efficiency, passive solar design, sun shading, water
conservation, urban waste water management and building construction. All Housing SA projects are
required to consider this guide and incorporate its practices where appropriate.
The dwellings, constructed as part of the Newbuild and Redevelopment Program are designed to be
innovative, affordable and sustainable, and meet the requirements of Housing SA’s rigorous design
guidelines with respect to site orientation. Dwellings are also sympathetic to occupants in a group site
and neighbouring dwellings. All dwellings meet a minimum five star energy rating requirement with
retention tanks used to capture and re-use water.
Waste Management
In the demolition of existing dwellings, all contractors are required to have a recycling strategy for the
range of building materials from the sites. This ensures that the amount of demolition materials and
construction waste deposited to landfill are minimised through the reuse, recycling or converting of
waste to usable products.
Solar Cities Program
Our department, through Housing SA, is working with the successful Adelaide Solar Cities Consortium
to implement a community housing solar package under the Australian Government’s Solar Cities
program. This program provides energy savings and diversifies the beneficiaries of solar systems in
South Australia.
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Corporate social responsibility
Social and community activities
Fundraising
Our department recognises the vital role that charities play in contributing to the social fabric of our
community by having a charity calendar of events promoted through the Health and Wellbeing
Program on our intranet site. During 2007-08 our staff participated in a range of charity events
including Australia’s Biggest Morning Tea and World’s Greatest Shave.
Volunteering
We raise awareness of opportunities, and encourage staff, to participate in volunteering activities. An
example of staff volunteering is our membership since February 2008 of the Australian Red Cross
Blood Service corporate blood donation program ‘Club Red’. As a large organisation we can make a
big difference, and as at 30 June 2008 we had approximately 155 members.
Finke Desert Race
The Substance Misuse and Youth Program organised a team to participate in the Finke Desert Race
held in June 2008. The event required riders to navigate a 460 kilometre multi-terrain course from
Alice Springs to the community of Finke in the Northern Territory over two days.
APY Racing comprises 25 young men aged between 17 and 30 from Amata, Fregon, Mimili,
Ernabella, Indulkana and Watarru communities. Two riders from the APY Racing team finished fourth
and fifth in the 0 to 200cc class. The race is an opportunity for the young men to participate in team
sports, which promotes leadership. The race also promotes self-esteem and a healthy lifestyle and
diverts young people from substance misuse.
Socially responsible procurement
Our department continuously improves social and environmental performance through procurement.
This is achieved through our Social Responsibility in Procurement Policy which guides our department
towards socially and environmentally preferred products and services that enhance positive social or
environmental outcomes.
The Social Responsibility in Procurement Policy gives preference to environmentally friendly goods
where price, performance, quality, suitability and other evaluation criteria are comparable, and
encourages the use of life cycle costing. The policy also ensures evaluation criteria regarding social
responsibility are incorporated into tender documents when appropriate.
In the selection of products and services we will:
unless there are valid technical reasons for not doing so, give consideration to energy efficient
goods where these provide equal value for money as similar quality goods
• unless no practical alternative is available, not purchase products known to involve the use of
ozone depleting substances, either as a refrigerant or in the production of insulating foams
• unless there are valid technical reasons for not doing so, give consideration to recycled/recyclable
goods if they are available at the same value for money as similar quality goods made of virgin
materials
• only procure products and services from organisations that comply with Equal Opportunity
legislation and Disability Services Act and Standards
•
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
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Corporate social responsibility
•
•
during procurement processes give consideration to suppliers who demonstrate socially
responsible work practices in relation to stakeholder engagement, ethical business behaviour,
social accountability and equitable employment processes
give recognition to suppliers who employ people with disabilities, people who are Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islander and people who are otherwise considered disadvantaged in the community.
To maximise procurement opportunities to address broader social responsibility objectives a social
responsibility in procurement action plan was prepared. Procurement policies were also updated to
ensure that at least one organisation from our socially responsible organisation register is invited to
quote for applicable low value purchases.
Non-government organisations funded by our department have been provided with access to our
contracts, such as our department’s stationery and cleaning contracts. Procurement staff are available
to manage up to three tenders nominated by non-government organisations.
During 2007-08, our stationery provider, Lyreco, provided:
back to school packs for children under the Guardianship of the Minister
a donation to the Dame Roma Mitchell Fund
vehicles to assist with the Government response to the bushfires in Kangaroo Island.
•
•
•
In 2008-09, we will explore opportunities with Lyreco to expand the use of recycled paper. We will
introduce further opportunities to partner with organisations that support vulnerable people by
facilitating non-government organisations to access across government contracts and provide
tendering services to non-government organisations as required.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
137
Strengthening partnerships
We engage and collaborate with a variety of organisations and other government departments at the
Local Government, State and Australian Government level to deliver integrated effective services and
to influence policy.
Objective 1 - Affordable housing choices and communities that prosper
Cross Agency
Partnerships
Contribution to
National Policy
•
Collaborative partnerships entered into across government and with nongovernment organisations for the development and implementation of the Safe
Tracks Strategy, including project management committees and service delivery
protocols.
•
Partnership with AARD to deliver housing and infrastructure services on Aboriginal
Community Lands through the Indigenous Housing and Community Infrastructure
Agreement.
•
Partnership with AARD to renegotiate new housing agreements with the
Commonwealth Government.
•
A MOU was signed with the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (APY) Executive
Board to deliver interim housing services on Aboriginal Lands.
•
In addition we are represented on the:
-
Homelessness Inter-Ministerial Committee which is chaired by the Minister for
Families and Communities
-
Local Government Association Affordable Housing Working Group
•
Membership of the Not-for-Profit Subgroup of the Policy and Research Working
Group which contributed to the development of the national regulatory framework;
development of the national capacity development program; review of the national
Community Housing Standards; and provided input into national policy in relation
to the development of the National Affordable Housing Agreement.
•
Indigenous Housing Ten Year Statement - delivery against national policy
imperatives under the Australian Housing Ministers ten year statement of new
directions for Indigenous housing, Building a Better Future: Indigenous Housing to
2010.
•
Impact assessments on the affects of the National Indigenous Housing Reform
Strategy highlighted issues at Housing Ministers’ Conference which are proposed
to be responded by the Commonwealth Government in providing a transition
period for Reform.
•
In addition to the above we are represented on the following:
-
National Affordability Rental Scheme Working Group
-
Council of Australian Governments’ Housing Working Group
-
Housing Ministers Advisory Committee.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
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Strengthening partnerships
Objective 2 - High need housing
Cross Agency
Partnerships
Contribution to
National Policy
•
During 2007-08, a MOU between Housing SA and the South Australia Police
continued to operate. The MOU aims to improve the safety and wellbeing of social
housing tenants and their communities and outlines a process for Housing SA and
the South Australia Police to work together to address issues of social disorder and
crime within social housing, reassure and protect the community from crime and to
promote community collaboration.
•
A MOU between Housing SA and Mental Health Services was developed and
implemented during 2007-08 to guide the coordinated delivery of mental health
services, psychiatric disability support and general housing services. The MOU has
facilitated improved communication between the agencies and supports a
collaborative approach towards planning joint programs and practice models. The
MOU promotes the development of early intervention strategies to maximise
successful tenancy outcomes.
•
A MOU between Housing SA and the Department for Correctional Services was
signed in early May 2008, with Housing SA committed to providing 60 housing
placements for participants in the project and a housing outreach service to
correctional facilities. The project is an across government collaboration funded
through the Social Inclusion Board, and aims to reduce the incidence of
homelessness for people exiting correctional institutions. Non-government
organisations are engaged to provide community based support to eligible
participants housed within the project.
•
In conjunction with the Department of Health’s Mental Health Services, the
Returning Home Partnership Program assists long term residents move from
Glenside Campus to reintegrate into the community. MIND (formally The Richmond
Fellowship), Neami and Life Without Barriers are the non-government agencies
providing the community-based support to help people with a psychiatric disability
successfully sustain housing in the community. Housing SA has committed 30
housing placements for eligible program participants.
•
The Standing Committee on Indigenous Housing provides advice on all areas of
Indigenous housing to the Housing Ministers’ Advisory Council through the Policy
and Research Working Group. We represented Aboriginal housing in South
Australia by playing a lead role in advice upon Indigenous housing policy reforms
and providing formal responses to the review report of the Community Housing
and Infrastructure Program.
DFC doing more
Port Adelaide Community Mental Health has provided the Housing SA Parks Office with
excellent feedback about the customer service being provided to a mutual client who
was facing eviction. As a result of close collaboration between staff from both agencies
an eviction was averted, the tenant is once again receiving medical treatment and a
plan is being arranged to administer the client’s finances.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
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Strengthening partnerships
Objective 3 - Independence and community connection
Cross Agency
Partnerships
•
The Ageing Plan Across Government Working Group includes a representative
from each State Government department, and is committed to implementing the
Ageing Plan through policy, planning and program development.
•
The Whole of Government Carers Implementation Group, established in
November 2006, to oversee and manage the implementation of the SA Carers
Recognition Act 2005. The Implementation Group helped develop the framework
for annual reporting as required by the Carers Recognition Act 2005.
•
Our Actions to Prevent the Abuse of Older South Australians Reference Group,
established to oversee the implementation of the Action Plan. Representatives
from Legal Services Commission, Office of the Public Advocate, Public Trustee,
South Australia Police, Department for Health, Advance Directives Review, Office
for the Ageing, Council of Aboriginal Elders and Aged Rights Advocacy Service.
•
Extensive consultation was undertaken with community care service providers,
health and government sectors and consumers on South Australia’s Dementia
Action Plan: Facing the Challenges Together. Our department, together with the
Department of Health, will be responsible for monitoring the implementation of the
Action Plan in 2008-09.
•
Through Aged and Community Services – Better Practice Project training and
support opportunities have been implemented for all HACC funded agencies to
adopt a person centred approach to service delivery that enhances the citizenship
and positive roles of older people. The Living as an Older Person competency
training package was implemented through the Train-the-Trainer sessions.
•
Extensive consultation has been undertaken with the Department of Health and
Ageing and the community care sector to establish the SA Community Care
Access Points.
•
Through the Office for Problem Gambling, we work with the Department of
Treasury and Finance Gambling Policy Unit, the Independent Gambling Authority
and the Office for Liquor Gambling and Licensing to develop responsive services
for problem gamblers.
•
Through the Volunteers Unit, we sponsored the development of a draft whole of
government policy on volunteering and the development of a draft proposal to
increase access by volunteer organisations to underutilised government facilities.
•
Liaised with the Commonwealth Department of Families, Housing, Community
Services and Indigenous Affairs and each State and Territory to progress the
Younger People in Residential Aged Care (YPIRAC) program.
•
Collaborated with the Brain Injury Rehabilitation Unit of the Hampstead
Rehabilitation Centre, a campus of Royal Adelaide Hospital, in relation to
supporting and planning transition to the community and the development of a
scoping paper to investigate services for people with a brain injury with a view to
providing more integrated services.
•
Disability SA’s Psychiatric Disability Service, the Eastern Mental Health Service,
the Felixstow Community Mental Health Team, Anglicare (Central and Northern)
and Housing SA (Modbury and Adelaide offices) have collaborated on a 12 month
project working intensively with a group of ten high need homeless people with
mental illness, multiple disabilities and challenging behaviours who have
traditionally been excluded from secure accommodation.
•
Disability Support Training and Research Tool (D-START), a joint project between
Disability SA and the University of South Australia, is an assessment tool for
measuring disability service eligibility which is currently being trialled.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
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Strengthening partnerships
Contribution to
National Policy
•
A Memorandum of Administrative Agreement between the Office for Disability and
Client Services and the Department of Health to provide an accommodation
service and disability support to people with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)
encephalopathy, which addresses the individual’s needs and public health
concerns.
•
Funded by AusAid, we worked in collaboration with the Thailand Department of
Social Development and Welfare to assist the Thailand Government to implement
community based care within the disability and aged care sectors. This project
included an exchange program where Thai workers from within these sectors and
visited Adelaide to learn about the South Australian government and nongovernment community based disability and aged care programs.
•
Memorandum of Administrative Arrangement with SA Water regarding delivery of
concessions.
•
Elder Friendly Communities Project with Local Government, the University of South
Australia and Home and Community Care providers to support older people
maintain social connections and expand networks throughout the community.
•
We are a member of the National Dementia Framework for Action 2006-2010
Working Party.
•
Through the Office for Problem Gambling, we support the secretariat and are the
national chair of the Community and Disability Services Ministers’ Advisory Council
(CDSMAC) Gambling Working Party which initiates national improvements for
gambling help services.
•
Liaised with Commonwealth, State and Territory representatives to develop
national ACAT protocols and policies regarding the assessment of people under
50 years of age for long term residential aged care facility placements.
•
Our department is a member of the Disability Policy Research Working Group, a
sub-group of CDSMAC.
•
Negotiation of the next National Disability Agreement and National Policy Priorities.
•
National network of State Government concessions programs established with
links to Commonwealth to ensure information exchange and consideration of
national policy issues.
•
In partnership with the Commonwealth Government, we jointly funded seven
projects under the Regional Partnerships Program and conducted joint application
workshops and provided individual agency consultations in Adelaide, Ardrossan,
Melrose, Barossa, Mount Barker, Naracoorte, Marion and Tea Tree Gully.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
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Strengthening partnerships
Objective 4 - Keeping them safe and connected
Cross Agency
Partnerships
•
Priority Setting in Child Protection, a major four year research project funded by
the Australian Research Council, that brings together lead researchers from the
University of South Australia, the Australian Centre of Child Protection and the
University of Adelaide to work in partnership with our department, the Social
Inclusion Unit, the Department of Education and Children’s Services, Department
of Health and the Children, Youth and Women's Health Service.
•
The Rapid Response initiative, a whole of government service initiative
implemented to provide timely response to the needs of children under
Guardianship of the Minister, including physical health, psychological and
emotional health, developmental progress, disability needs, education and housing
needs.
•
Through the Children’s Centres Operations Group we work in partnership with the
Department of Education and Children’s Services and the Department of Health, in
the implementation of the Children’s Centres at a strategic, project and operational
level. The Children’s Centres initiative will deliver a range of integrated early
childhood services providing pre-school education, child care and sustained
parenting support and health information for children and families.
•
In addition to the above, we are represented on the:
-
Absenteeism Task Force (DECS)
-
Across Government Guardianship Steering Committee
-
Agencies Supporting Housing for Refugees and Asylum Seekers
-
Break the Cycle Task Force
-
Care and Protection Senior Officers Group
-
Centrelink Multicultural Forum
-
Chief Executive Co-ordinating Committee: Child Development
-
Community Safety Committee
-
DECS Learning Wellbeing Steering Committee
-
DFEEST DFC DECS Employment Young Offenders Task Group
-
Early Childhood Senior Officers Group
-
Family Safety Framework Implementation Committee
-
Infants at Risk Forums – Riverland, Mallee, Children, Youth and Women's
Health Service, DFC, NGO, Country Health SA and South Australia Police
-
Interagency Literacy Project for children and young people under the
Guardianship of the Minister (DECS/Public Libraries group)
-
Inter-Ministerial Committee Child Development
-
Inter-Ministerial Committee: School Retention
-
MultiAgency Working Group – SA Government Response to Mullighan
(Children in State Care Inquiry)
-
SA Drug Summit Senior Officers Group
-
SA Healthy Weight Task Force
-
SA Multicultural Settlement Services
-
SA Refugee Health Network
-
School Retention Senior Officers’ Group
-
State Working Group for Grandparents raising Grandchildren in Informal Care
-
Suspension, Exclusion, Expulsion Reference Committee (DECS)
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
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Strengthening partnerships
Contribution to
National Policy
-
Women’s Safety Strategy – Whole of Government
-
Reference Group
-
Youth Justice Senior Officers Group
-
Youth Sector Network
•
Priority Setting in Child Protection project will inform national policy by providing a
rigorous economic assessment of a range of child protection interventions;
estimating the comparative returns on investment of different options for
addressing child abuse and neglect and associated harms.
•
Grandparents Raising Grandchildren in Informal Care - in 2007-08 we continued to
chair meetings with Centrelink, the Commonwealth Government’s Department for
Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA),
Medicare Australia, Helping Hand: Aged Care and Grandparents for Grandchildren
SA Inc. During the year these meetings were extended to include a number of
other grandparenting support groups, including Anglicare, Time for Kids,
Indigenous Grannies and Northern Carers. Topics discussed at these meetings
have included access to the Foster Child Health Care Card, accessibility of
information for grandparents, issues regarding Legal Aid eligibility and estate
planning.
•
In addition we are represented on the:
-
Australasian Juvenile Justice Administrators
-
Child Health and Wellbeing Working Group
-
COAG Workforce Participation – Early Years Working Party
-
Community Services Ministers’ Advisory Council
-
Cross-Jurisdictional Child Protection Alert Processes Working Group
-
Foster Care Working Group
-
Inter-Country Adoptions Sub-Committee
-
Memorial for Forgotten Australians
-
National Approach for Child Protection Working Group
-
National Community Services Information Management Group
-
National Child Protection and Support Services Data Working Group
-
National Juvenile Justice Data Sub-Committee
-
National MOU for Unaccompanied Refugee Minors
-
National Standards for Youth Justice
-
Commonwealth-State Agreement for the Implementation of the Hague
Convention on Inter-Country Adoption
-
SA Settlement Planning Committee
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
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Strengthening partnerships
Objective 5 - Effective and sustainable business practices
Cross Agency
Partnerships
Contribution to
National Policy
•
Shared Service Agreement with Department of Health
•
Partnership with the Migrant Resource Centre, Multicultural SA and the
Metropolitan Fire Service to deliver initiatives aimed at helping culturally and
linguistically diverse communities to prepare for, respond to, and recover from
incidents, crises and other emergencies.
•
Membership of the Public Sector Customer Service Network, a cross public sector
group established to assist agencies with strategies to improve customer
satisfaction via information sharing and the development of shared resources.
•
Memorandum of Administrative Arrangement for E-Learning program (Child Safe
Environments program) with TAFE, facilitation of student placements in workplace
and provision of Certificate IV in Training and Assessment for Volunteer Managers.
•
Agreement with the University of South Australia and Flinders University for
student placements.
•
Working collaboratively with TAFE, South Australia Police, Flinders University,
Swinburne University of Technology and DPC in the delivery of training programs.
•
The Chief Executive of our department currently chairs the Disaster Recovery Sub
Committee, an operational sub-committee of CDSMAC.
•
In addition we are represented on the following:
-
Australasian Statutory Child Protection Learning and Development Forum
-
Australian Juvenile Justice Administrators Learning and Development
sub committee.
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Research
Research is an important underpinning to strategic development and improved service delivery. Our
department recognises its importance and has built a strong capability and profile in research.
We can facilitate priority research in many ways: by advocacy at the national and state level; by
commissioning and funding important studies; by making a financial or in-kind contribution; by
providing access for researchers to information, staff, clients or resources; and through support to
post-graduate studies and students. Through the DFC Research Fund we funded a range of high
priority projects which directly support the Government’s strategic objectives.
DFC’s Strategic Research Agenda 2006-09, is proving effective in stimulating an increased volume of
high quality, focused and relevant research. Research collaborations are a particular focus for our
department as they enable us to leverage the maximum benefit from our research investment.
Relationships and networks have been established with key researchers and research centres around
Australia and we are partners in a number of major Australian Research Council funded studies. This
is also generating new research activity for South Australia.
The Research and Analysis Unit is responsible for leading and coordinating our research effort.
Information on the research projects conducted in or funded by our department during 2007-08 is
available from the Research section of our internet site at www.familiesandcommunities.sa.gov.au.
In 2008-09, we will allocate funds to a range of projects as determined by strategic objectives. A high
priority will be given to critical issues related to out of home care and child protection. We will lead the
development of two new major national studies in these areas.
A further priority will be developing new strategies to support the transfer of research findings into
action, to ensure evidence-based policy, planning and practice.
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Key events
Date
6 to 8 July
July
Event Title
Housing SA Display – Building and Home Improvement Expo, Wayville Showground
NAIDOC Celebrations
1 August
Signing of the Hawksbury Park (Salisbury North) Stage 5 Agreement between the
South Australian Housing Trust and the City of Salisbury (attended by the Minister for
Housing)
14 August
SA Housing Summit
17 August
Housing SA Display – Masters Builders Association Builders Excellence Awards
Dinner, Adelaide Convention Centre
12 September
DFC College for Learning and Development – Graduation Ceremony, Adelaide
12 September
Foster Carer’s Week
28 September
DisAbility Expo – Morphettville Racecourse
28 September
Launch of the Westwood Community Mural at Centro Arndale by the Minister for
Housing
4 October
Risdon Grove Urban Improvement Project Completion Celebration – Port Pirie
4 October
Home and Community Care Triennial Plan Information Session
5 October
Myall Place Urban Improvement Project Completion Celebration – Whyalla Norrie
15 October
Sector Information Forum hosted by the Minister’s Strategic Housing Advisory
Committee
29 to 31 October
Aboriginal Home and Community Care Workers Forum
1 November
Official opening of ten upgraded units at Woodville North by the Minister for Housing
15 November
World Youth Day Cross and Message Stick visit to Strathmont
22 to 23
November
The Future is Now: Disability SA Conference
23 November
Launch of Concessions Finder, Community Engagement Charter and Connecting
Communities internet site at Balcony Room, Parliament House
3 December
Launch of the South Australian Disability Companion Card
6 December
Families SA Volunteer Awards, Government House – presented by His Excellency,
Rear Admiral Kevin Scarce AO CSC RANR
7 to 9 January
Aboriginal Youth Action Committee Conference – Youth of today are our leaders of
tomorrow
19 February
Launch of One in 180 short film – premiere screening as a community event at the
Odeon Cinema Semaphore, officiated by the Minister for Housing
3 March
Service Excellence Recognition Ceremony
18 March
Housing SA Volunteer Awards, Parliament House – presented by the Minister for
Housing
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Key events
Date
Event Title
26 March
DFC College for Learning and Development – Graduation Ceremony, Adelaide
30 March
Launch of the Foster Carers Identification Card
4 April
Official opening of an eight unit Community Housing development at Risdon Grove,
Port Pirie by the Minister for Housing, the Hon Jay Weatherill MP
22 April
Close the Gap Day
23 April
Launch of Hickinbotham Affordable Housing Display Village and visit by the Minister
for Housing to Boystown trainees at Hawksbury Park (Salisbury North)
5 May
12 to 16 May
Implementation commenced of the SA Community Access Points for Western
Adelaide and country areas of Gawler, Barossa, Lower North and Yorke Peninsula
Gambling Awareness Week 2008
13 May
DFC College for Learning and Development – Graduation Ceremony, Mount Gambier
18 May
Disability SA Volunteer Awards, Zoological Gardens – presented by Gay Thompson
MP
20 May
Presentation: Engage ,Connect, Communicate – Web 2.0 opportunities and
implications for Government
27 May to 3 June
3 June
3 to 4 June
Reconciliation Week
Presentation of Westwood Education Scholarships
Aboriginal Home and Community Care Workers Forum
19 June
Signing of the Affordable Housing Program Facilitation Agreement for the Bedford
Homes for 100 Project between the Minister for Housing, South Australian Housing
Trust and Bedford Industries
25 June
Graduation of Youth Workers (Certificate 3, Certificate 4 and Diploma Certificates) –
training conducted by Relationships Australia with the presentation at Coorong
Wilderness Lodge
25 June
Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Home and Community Care Workers Forum
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Publications
The following publications were produced and released publicly in 2007-08. These, together with a
range of facts sheets and brochures, are available from our internet site.
•
Aboriginal Employment Strategy 2007-2012: Connected, Ethical, Brave and Respectful
•
After hours Crisis Care (fact sheet)
•
Certainty for Children in Care
•
Classification of sub-standard dwellings (brochure)
•
Community Benefit SA - Funding Guidelines Booklet
•
Connecting Individuals, Families and Communities (brochure)
•
Customer Chat (newsletter)
•
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2006-07
•
Disability Matters (newsletter)
•
Do you rent privately owned accommodation in poor condition? (brochure)
•
Engaging Older Volunteers Project
•
Grandparents Raising Grandchildren: An information resource for relative caregivers
•
Hawksbury Park (brochure)
•
Health Standards for Children and Young People under the Guardianship of the Minister
•
Home and Community Care South Australia Triennial Plan 2008-09 to 2010-11
•
Housing Plan for South Australia: Two Year Report Card
•
Housing SA Tenant Information (brochure)
•
Indicators of Community Strength across South Australian Local Government Areas
•
Julia Farr Services Annual Report 2005-06
•
Julia Farr Services Annual Report 2006-07
•
Making a difference to the lives of older South Australians (brochure)
•
Managing Menstrual Care: A Resource Guide about Managing Menstruation for Women with
Intellectual Disability
•
My Stuff: Leaving Care Kit
•
Office for Problem Gambling (brochure)
•
Our Actions to prevent the abuse of older South Australians 2007
•
Playford Alive questions and answers
•
Problem Gambling Services: Action Plan
•
Rapid Response Progress Report December 2007
•
Recognising and Supporting Carers
•
South Australian Aboriginal Housing Authority Annual Report 2006-07
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
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Publications
•
South Australian Community Housing Authority Annual Report 2006-07
•
South Australian Housing Trust Annual Report 2006-07
•
Standards of Alternative Care in South Australia
•
The Australian Longitudinal Study of Ageing: 15 Years of Ageing in South Australia
•
The HAWKSBURY VOICE (newsletter)
•
There is no excuse for child abuse: Keeping children safe is everyone’s responsibility (fact sheet)
•
Trust in Focus 2006-07
•
Wandana Gilles Plains (brochure)
•
When Families SA visits you: information for families about child protection assessments
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
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Rewards and recognition
In 2007-08, the work of our department and individual staff members was recognised through the
presentation of external awards including:
Human Services at Work Awards for Excellence in Workforce Development
The SA Health and Community Services Skills Board Human Services at Work Awards for Excellence
in Workforce Development were awarded on 22 May 2008. The awards recognise the achievements
of organisations working to ensure an available skilled workforce for the industry.
The DFC College for Learning and Developed was the winner of the Creating a Learning Culture
category. Annette Kirby, Dean of the College for Learning and Development, was a finalist in the
Individual Achievement Award category and our department was a finalist in the Strategic Workforce
Planning category.
South Australian Training Awards
The South Australian Training Awards are the peak state awards for vocational education and training.
The awards recognise the achievements of individuals and also reward organisations for innovative
approaches to training that develop industries and the workforce. The Care and Protection Team of
the College for Learning and Development was a finalist for the awards awarded on 31 August 2007
for the Keeping Them Safe: The statutory child protection training initiative.
Churchill Fellowship
Julie Dini of Disability SA was awarded a 2007 Churchill Fellowship to study specialist and treatment
programs developed overseas to assist foster carers of children with autism and/or intellectual
disability. These include programs operating in the United States, United Kingdom, Netherlands and
Finland.
Architecture Week 2007
The South Australian Chapter of the Royal Australian Institute of Architects hosted/co-hosted a series
of events between 22 and 27 October as part of Architecture Week 2007. This included the unveiling
of a 25 Year Award plaque at Dr Kent's Paddock, as recognition of a successful medium density
housing project of architectural and historical significance.
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Reconciliation statement
We have an important role to play in addressing the considerable disadvantage experienced by
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and communities in South Australia. We are strongly
committed to supporting reconciliation initiatives to improve family and community outcomes for South
Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and implementing policies and services that
are responsive to their needs and have positive impacts on wellbeing, health and quality of life. The
importance of ensuring that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people have a voice in the
development of our policies, programs and services is a priority for us.
We have created a Statement of Reconciliation which was endorsed by senior South Australian
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community leaders. Our Statement of Reconciliation recognises
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people as the first Australians with unique cultures, languages
and spiritual relationships to the land and sea.
The Statement of Reconciliation reflects our commitment to the principles of the South Australian
Government’s Cultural Inclusion Framework, including building a culturally competent workforce,
culturally inclusive program and service design and by undertaking culturally inclusive inter-agency
collaboration.
In our Statement of Reconciliation we have also committed to:
• developing policies and delivering services that are appropriate, relevant and that meet the needs
of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, families and communities
• working in positive and practical ways with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities to
achieve integrated services that provide long term sustainable outcomes
• identifying champions to promote and raise awareness of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
issues within our department, across government and in the broader community
• increasing the number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people employed in our department,
including in decision making positions
• demonstrating leadership in reconciliation.
Significant activities to promote reconciliation and to support both Reconciliation Week and National
Aboriginal Islander Day Observance Committee (NAIDOC) week were undertaken during 2007-08.
This included a whole of department event in Reconciliation week, coordinated by Housing SA and
sponsored by the DFC Reconciliation Committee. The event focussed on the Close the Gap campaign
to raise awareness of the significant health disadvantage Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
experience and the important role that our agencies play in delivering programs and services that
support reducing the 17 year life expectancy gap between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
and non-Aboriginal people.
At Ceduna, events were held in both Reconciliation Week and NAIDOC week as an initiative of the
Ceduna Working Together Group. An initiative of our department, this group was formed three years
ago and includes representatives from Commonwealth, State and local government and nongovernment agencies from the Ceduna region.
The past year was very significant for the Reconciliation agenda. The national apology to the stolen
generations, delivered by the Prime Minister on 13 February 2008, was an important step towards
building a respectful new relationship between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and nonth
Aboriginal Australians. 26 May 2008 also marked the 10 Anniversary of the first National Sorry Day.
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During 2007-08, we also celebrated the 40th anniversary of the 1967 Referendum which approved two
amendments to the Australian Constitution relating to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians.
To mark this event, the South Australian Government Reconciliation Reference Committee held a
series of nine regional Roundtables on Reconciliation across the State, culminating in a State Forum
in Adelaide. The purpose of these roundtables and the state forum was to provide opportunities for
public sector employees and communities to be engaged on the topic of Reconciliation and to capture
their views on this important social justice agenda. The Mid North Roundtable on Reconciliation was
sponsored by our Chief Executive, Sue Vardon. A Partnerships for Reconciliation report was recently
released outlining the key themes and areas for action.
The DFC Reconciliation Reference Committee was reviewed during 2007-08 and a new membership
established with representation from all business areas of our department. The new Committee
revised its Terms of Reference in February 2008 and developed a Reconciliation Action Plan to
ensure that we undertake activities to achieve real and tangible progress in Reconciliation and to
ensure that the reconciliation agenda of the State Government is supported. The Reconciliation Action
Plan is currently being reviewed as a result of the Partnerships for Reconciliation report to ensure that
we are undertaking activities to address key themes, particularly in relation to cultural awareness,
executive leadership, access to service delivery, identifying and developing Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander leadership and community engagement in decision making.
During 2007-08, work continued to improve employment outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander employees of our department culminating in the launch of our Aboriginal Employment
Strategy in June 2008. The strategy has four goals being:
• attracting our future Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander workforce
• retaining our Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff
• investing in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander staff
• monitoring and evaluating the strategy.
Initiatives and a range of actions across Families SA, Disability SA, Housing SA and Domiciliary Care
SA to actively promote employment opportunities for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and
to deliver services in culturally appropriate ways continued throughout 2007-08. The updated SASP
targets relating to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander wellbeing provide a central focal point for
Aboriginal policy, planning and program development.
Disability action plan
The Promoting Independence: Disability Action Plans for South Australia policy requires all State
Government portfolios to report annually on the implementation of Disability Action Plans. This whole
of government disability strategy is entering its eighth year of reporting and now reports against six
key outcome areas.
The Seventh Annual whole of Government Progress Report was formally released by the Minister for
Disability on 3 December 2007. The Executive Director of the Office for Disability and Client Services
(ODACS), chairs the Promoting Independence Reference Group which coordinates and monitors the
strategy. This group has responsibility for coordinating departmental reports, overseeing the
implementation of, and producing annual reports on strategic Disability Action Plans and policy
priorities across State Government. ODACS has the central coordination role in continuing the work of
the Promoting Independence Strategy in improving access and inclusion across Government.
Our DFC Disability Action Plan Implementation Committee has been in place for just over three years
and has undertaken significant work in providing direction in developing strategies and actions to
eliminate practices which discriminate against people with disabilities.
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The DFC Disability Action Plan (2007-2009) has been developed to assist us to meet the legislative
requirements of the Commonwealth Disability Discrimination Act 1992 and the reporting requirements
of the South Australian Government’s disability policy, Promoting Independence: Disability Action
Plans for South Australia.
The following is a summary of our progress against the six key Outcomes of the Promoting
Independence strategy.
Outcome 1: Portfolios and their agencies ensure accessibility to their services to people with
disabilities
The key strategy to achieve compliance for this outcome is contained in our Disability Action Plan
which sets directions for divisions and agencies to audit and redesign policies, programs and facilities
to ensure that they are inclusive of people with disabilities and eliminate practices that are
discriminatory to people with disabilities.
During 2007-08, we completed the access assessment review for all buildings owned and leased by
our department. The process included an assessment of costs associated with upgrades to buildings
to ensure accessibility. Our department is currently in the process of drafting a master plan to identify
high, medium and low priority upgrades for these facilities.
Outcome 2: Portfolios and their agencies ensure information about their services and
programs is inclusive of people with disabilities
Improved information provision and communication strategies have been identified as key priority
areas for action in the DFC Disability Action Plan, where it states that the department will establish
policies and protocols to ensure equitable access for people with disabilities to information and
communication strategies on its programs and services.
Corporate Services are responsible for the auditing of information service provisions across our
department to ensure they incorporate appropriate considerations of disability access requirements.
Outcome 3: Portfolios and their agencies deliver advice or services to people with disabilities
with awareness and understanding of issues affecting people with disabilities
One of the key strategies to achieve this outcome has been the development of a whole of
government Disability Awareness and Discrimination Training Framework and we have a lead role in
this project.
The Promoting Independence Reference Group identified the need for our department to lead the
review of the Disability Awareness and Discrimination Training Framework as a priority in 2007-08,
and implement the review changes in 2008-09. This review will ensure the consistency and integrity of
disability awareness and discrimination training being delivered to public sector staff.
The purpose of the Disability Awareness and Discrimination Training Framework is to provide staff with
the foundation on which to:
• identify and adopt competent practices when relating to people who have a disability and/or their
needs
• demonstrate an understanding of the implications of the Disability Discrimination Act 1992 and avoid
practices that discriminate against people who have a disability.
A series of disability fact sheets were developed and published to promote the employment of people with
a disability.
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Outcome 4: Portfolios and their agencies provide opportunities for consultation with people
with disabilities in decision-making processes regarding service delivery and in the
implementation of complaints and grievance mechanisms
A key principle underpinned in the DFC Disability Action Plan is the requirement to consult with people
with disabilities on service delivery and mechanisms. These contacts have, and will continue to be,
actively involved in all ongoing communication and consultation in decision-making processes to
ensure optimal levels of services appropriate to the needs of people with disabilities.
During 2007-08, the Ministerial Disability Advisory Council (MDAC) provided relevant feedback on the
DFC Disability Action Plan and MDAC will continue to be actively involved in the decision-making
processes.
Outcome 5: Each Portfolio Chief Executive will ensure that their portfolio has met the
requirements of the Disability Discrimination Act 1992 and the Equal Opportunity Act 1984
The DFC Disability Action Plan is the key strategy to achieve compliance with the Disability
Discrimination Act 1992 and the Equal Opportunity Act 1984. There is commitment to the overall
compliance to the development, implementation and monitoring of the DFC Action Plan, including its
incorporation into divisional Business Plans.
Outcome 6: Portfolios report on how they are increasing the rate of employment of people with
a disability in order to meet South Australia’s Strategic Plan target T6.22, to double the number
of people with disabilities employed in the public sector by 2014
SASP includes target T6.22, to double the number of people with disabilities employed in the public
sector by 2014. Our department, through ODACS, is the lead reporting government department for
this target.
During 2007-08, our department has continued to ensure that target T6.22 is met through working
collaboratively with the Public Sector Workforce Division and the Promoting Independence Reference
Group.
A critical component of the implementation plan for T6.22 (Strategy 3) is to overcome the systematic
disadvantage historically encountered by people with disabilities. This required the need to develop a
range of innovative employment initiatives which enable existing perceptions regarding disability to be
explored and false assumptions and negative attitudes to be dispelled. Debunking the myths and
promoting the benefits of employing people with disabilities has been a prime feature of all
methodology and this has been supplemented with the development of comprehensive information
relating to the subsidies and support schemes available.
In addition Chief Executives should comment on how the policy has been integrated into their
planning processes and the strategies in place to ensure employment practices and recruiting
strategies do not discriminate against people with disabilities
This work has been developed to supplement the Disability Awareness and Discrimination Training
Framework with a module developed for Managers, Human Resource Managers and Human
Resource operatives. The training will be referred to in the Employment Policy. This recommendation
links with the Disability Action Plan 3.2–3.6.
In collaboration with Human Resources and Disability Employment Networks, negotiations have
commenced to develop performance management strategies for Managers to facilitate for employees
with disabilities.
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The DFC Employee Arrangements Policy, which was endorsed in January 2008, addresses the
recruitment and selection policy and procedures to provide appropriate practices which prevent direct
or indirect discrimination against people with a disability.
Reporting against the Carers Recognition Act
The Carers Recognition Act 2005 (the Act) requires carers to be recognised in their own right. The Act
requires carers or their representative to be consulted in policy and program development or in
strategic or operational planning which impact upon them and the carer role. The SA Carers Charter is
a schedule of the Act. The Principles of the Charter identify specific areas for attention by State
Government departments in providing services to carers or the people they care for.
DFC is one of six ‘applicable’ State Government departments identified to provide relevant services to
carers and required to report compliance with the Act annually. Departments of Health; Education and
Children’s Services; Further Education, Employment, Science and Technology; Transport, Energy and
Infrastructure; and the Justice Portfolio including South Australia Police are also required to comply.
In 2006, the Office for Carers was established to lead the implementation of the Carers Recognition
Act 2005 across government, and to administer the legislation and provide policy advice.
Section 6 (1) of the Act requires that applicable State Government organisations and their
employees have an awareness and understanding of the Carers Charter and take action in
the provision of relevant services to carers to reflect those Principles.
In 2007-08 we:
• distributed more than 3000 Supporting Carers folders which includes the Act, the SA Carers
Charter and the SA Carers Policy, and other promotional material
• met DFC divisional representatives to identify ways to implement the requirements of the Carers
Recognition Act 2005 within this department. This Group acts as a conduit for the dissemination of
information and awareness raising via team and division meetings; distribution of the Supporting
Carers folders; and promotion of information (e.g. fact sheets available on the intranet)
• held carer information sessions for all Disability SA regional, program and specialist Managers
• attended the Disability Expo in September 2007 to meet and talk with carers and the people they
care for and to provide information
• held Carers Week activities which raised the issue of employed carers
• disseminated a quarterly Office for Carers newsletter to carers, carer services, government and
non-government organisations about the activities of the Office, as well as information of services,
activities and issues pertaining to carers
• offered training to 168 Home and Community Care funded agencies in 15 metropolitan and rural
South Australia locations in relation to the Act and the obligations for service providers. Other
health service providers were invited to attend at many of the venues
• informed Housing Services front line staff of the Act and its obligations in a multitude of formats
• provided information to the Ministerial Strategic Housing Advisory Committee and a number of
Housing SA funded organisations and services
• have included specific clauses relating to the Carers legislation in current Service Agreements with
agencies funded by the department
• have made information sheets available on our internet for non-government organisations
regarding the Act and obligations pertaining to the Act and the Master and Service Agreements
• provided information regarding the Carers Recognition Act 2005 to all new staff as a component of
induction.
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Principle 1 – Carers have choices within their caring role
Carers need information about options, services and supports which is vital to enable carers to make
choices for their caring role.
In 2007-08 we:
• launched the ‘Grandparents Raising Grandchildren’ information resource to relative caregivers in
conjunction with Grandparents for Grandchildren SA Inc
• specifically considered the education and training needs of carers during development of the
Strategic Plan for South Australian Carers (2009 -2012)
• introduced a new service delivery model in April 2008 in Housing SA which explores appropriate
ways of identifying customers who are carers. Consideration will be given to involvement of carers
in service planning and linking carers to support services if required.
• provided information on support systems and resources available to carers in Disability Matters, a
publication of the Office for Disability and Client Services (ODACS). The Disability SA internet site
provides links to information for carers.
Principle 2 - Carers health and wellbeing are critical to the community
Carers health and wellbeing can be significantly and negatively affected by their caring role.
In 2007-08:
• the findings from national and state research specific to carer health and wellbeing was made
available and the implications were considered at the government and reference group meetings.
The research will inform policy directions
• health and wellbeing of carers received specific focus in the Strategic Plan for South Australian
Carers (2009 -2012) in considering support requirements for the continuum of care; respite needs,
training and social connection for carers
• Community Connect, through funded programs and services, supports carers by providing
information on health and wellbeing, and effective future planning.
Principle 3 - Carers play a critical role in maintaining the fabric of society
We have placed significant emphasis on the issues for our employees who also have caring
responsibilities, considering workplace flexibility and family friendly policies, but also in promoting an
organisational culture which supports and understands the needs and rights of carers. This includes
the following:
• generic and specific policies applicable to employees who have caring and family responsibilities
are available online
• employees who are carers were the focus of Carers Week 2007. Our Chief Executive, Sue Vardon,
hosted a morning tea and subsequent events to consult on issues for working carers. Concerns
were expressed by employees about variability in manager and work colleagues understanding
and responsiveness to caring requirements. A support and action group was formed by
employees/carers from these sessions
• the staff survey included a series of questions relating to employees who are carers. These
questions will be a first step in estimating the number of carers working in our department and help
determine strategies to assist carers balance the dual responsibilities
• Our Chief Executive hosted a blog on carers which opened discussion across the whole
department and identified a range of ideas to be considered in supporting its employees
• information sessions and support to managers is provided via the human resource network. Issues
about carers are integrated in our performance partnerships sessions and respectful treatment
workshops, to ensure staff and managers are aware of the diversity of workforce and associated
issues.
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Principle 4 - Service providers work in partnership with carers
The Act requires consultation with carers where decisions about care or treatment options have
impact on the carer.
Section 6 (2) of the Act requires that applicable State Government organisations consult
carers, or persons or bodies that represent carers, in policy or program development; or
strategic or operational planning
We have worked in partnership and consulted with carers in 2007-08:
• Office for Carers undertook statewide consultation with carers and carer support agencies. This
has been used to shape key directions for the framework of the Strategic Plan for South Australian
Carers 2009-12. The Plan represents an important step to addressing the key issues for South
Australian carers and will provide direction for all parts of the sector to work together to improve
services for SA carers
• our Chief Executive, Sue Vardon, chairs the South Australian Carers’ Reference Group. This group
provides information and advice to Government on issues affecting carers and the person(s) they
care for
• the Housing SA Customer Participation Strategy: 2008-11 (draft) has been developed and aims to
strengthen customer participation in planning, policy development, and service delivery through a
wide range of consultation and feedback mechanisms and will provide opportunities for customers
and stakeholders to participate in forums on policy, planning and service delivery matters
• the Office for the Ageing (OFTA) has undertaken consultancies which specifically sought carers’
input - Geographic Gaps for Carer Services and Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Carers
Analysis
• OFTA has undertaken Better Practice training for HACC funded services across the State. The
training emphasises consumer and carer involvement in all decision making for all services
• support for carers is an integral part of the work of Disability SA. Consultation with carers occurred
through a variety of avenues.
Principle 5 - Carers in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities need specific
consideration
This was addressed in 2007-08 through:
• Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander carers representation on the Carers’ Reference Group
• Talking Circles which sought views on current services and future service needs at the Triennial
Conference for Aboriginal consumers and carers
• an Aboriginal Standards and Ethics Committee which has been established to ensure services
meet the needs of the consumer/carers
• the Aboriginal Disability Network (ADNSA) which is the mechanism used by Disability SA to seek
and appoint Aboriginal Carer representation. ADNSA meets quarterly with Disability SA Directors
• Housing Services assisting Ngarrindjeri Elders in the Murray and Fleurieu Region participate in a
program which aimed to improve communication and information exchange and to demystify
processes thereby facilitating access to programs
• Office for Carers and Office for the Ageing led several consultation sessions with Aboriginal carers
and Aboriginal service providers. The sessions informed both the development of the Strategic
Plan for South Australian Carers (2009-2012) and HACC funding directions
• OFTA applying for funding to initiate an Aboriginal carers and Grandparents Needs Analysis in
2009. This project will provide the basis for specific funding allocations for Aboriginal carers within
the HACC target group.
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Principle 6 - All children and young people have the right to enjoy life and reach their
potential
Young people and children who are carers have been considered in policies and practices by:
• Carers Reference Group includes representation from young carers. In 2008 this Group gave
specific focus to the issues of young carers
• our department has the lead for the South Australian Government in a study funded through the
Australian Research Council exploring issues for young carers. The research undertaken by the
Social Policy Research Centre (University of New South Wales) will provide a knowledge base to
inform policy and service responses. In 2007-08 focus groups were held in South Australia as part
of this study
• the Strategic Plan for South Australian Carers (2009 -2012) includes a specific focus on young
carers
• OFTA currently funds projects in the northern and southern metropolitan areas to respond to young
carers in an age appropriate manner, i.e. through educational support and social activities. These
projects link with specific respite funding within the Commonwealth Respite Centres for young
carers
• Savings and Loans Credit Union (SA) Ltd approached our department in October regarding their
Corporate Social Responsibility program with a view to assisting young carers by raising
awareness of the issues and needs of young carers
• Community Benefit SA supports direct service provider agencies to develop programs and services
that enable young carers to participate in further education and employment.
Principle 7 - Resources are available to provide timely, appropriate and adequate
assistance to carers
Informal carers represent the backbone of the community care system and in the context of a rising
number of people in the community requiring care, an increasing proportion of the population are or
will become carers. Resource allocation for carers will continue to be a priority.
In 2007-08:
a statewide Strategic Plan was developed by the Office for Carers to progress the agenda for
carers. The Plan will facilitate departments working together to establish an equitable, planned and
co-ordinated response to carers
• OFTA continued to identify opportunities to improve existing services and develop new services.
This includes:
- statewide respite, providing the opportunity for carers to take time out to address their own
emotional, social, physical and health needs
- the Retreat Program, which has a regional focus. Retreats are one component of an integrated
service delivery model which will focus on early intervention
- $650 000 funding has been allocated to respond to identified regional gaps in services
(Adelaide Hills, Strathalbyn / Mt Compass, Kangaroo Island and outer southern metropolitan
areas)
- $90 000 one-off funding has been allocated to support culturally and linguistically diverse
communities in developing carer services. The culturally and linguistically diverse consultancy
has provided the basis for funding six communities in the 2008-09 HACC Funding Round.
• Disability SA launched the Companion Card in December 2007
• Community Benefit SA continues to support carers. In financial year 2007-08 a total of 16 projects,
totalling $270 440 were funded, directly relating to carers and their needs.
•
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Greening of Government Operations (GoGO) Framework
All State Government agencies are required to manage the impacts on the environment which may
occur in the course of carrying out their operations, as stated in the Greening of Government
Operations (GoGO) Action Plan. Approved by State Cabinet in February 2006, GoGO builds upon the
Government Energy Efficiency Action Plan and commits agencies to achieve eight strategic
milestones within specified timeframes.
GoGO strategic milestones
Timeframe
Date Achieved by DFC
Milestone 1: Established Chief Executive
‘Statement of Commitment to greening of
agency operations’
30 June 2006
30 April 2006
Milestone 2: Allocated resources to set up
governance and initiate internal review
31 January 2007
31 May 2005
Milestone 3: Completed initial review of
environmental impacts and determined priorities
and allocated resources
30 June 2007
30 June 2005
Milestone 4: Set performance goals/internal
targets (informed by SASP targets and/or other
targets agreed by Government)
30 June 2007
30 June 2005
Milestone 5: Approved agency Implementation
Plan and Communication Plan
30 June 2007
1 January 2006
Milestone 6: Reported on status/progress in
reaching performance goals/targets
30 June 2007
30 June 2006
Milestone 7: Initiated agency Implementation
Plan
30 June 2007 onwards
30 June 2006 onwards
Milestone 8: Undertaking ongoing measuring,
monitoring, reporting and, continuous
improvement of performance
30 June 2007 onwards
30 June 2006 onwards
The Action Plan contains eight priority areas to ensure that the Government continuously improves its
environmental performance. The priority areas and our performance against these for 2007-08 are as
follows.
Priority Area 1: Energy Management
In 2006-07, we achieved an overall building energy efficiency improvement of 18.9 per cent below the
baseline established in 2000-01. During 2007-08, our department implemented a number of programs
to further improve energy efficiency.
• Stage 1 of the implementation of the Print Device Consolidation Program, which reduces the
number of print devices, was completed. The number of print devices, located in the Riverside
Centre, has been reduced from 318 to 236. This is a reduction of 27 per cent, saving approximately
$113 000 in recurrent and capital costs per annum and an estimated 27.5 tonnes of CO2 emissions
per annum.
• The implementation of the Energy Information and Data Gathering System (EIDGS) which tracks
energy usage.
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Corporate reporting
•
•
•
The establishment of green pilot programs to provide live examples to staff to follow in energy
efficiencies, water consumption, waste management, travel and fleet, and green procurement.
Changing staff work behaviours and practices to incorporate energy efficiencies and greening
cultural change.
Working with Facility Managers and DFC Building Services to improve energy efficiencies in our
sites that have been identified as consuming more than 160 Mega Watts of energy per annum. An
energy plan has been formatted for this purpose.
Our energy management priorities for 2008-09 are:
Implementation of Stage 2 of the Print Device Consolidation Program which will reduce print
devices within Riverside Centre building to 96 devices, an overall reduction of 222 print devices or
70 per cent consolidation. This will result in savings of approximately $183 000 in recurrent and
capital costs per annum and an estimated saving of CO2 emissions of 45.14 tonnes per annum.
• Commencement in July 2008 of the Print Device Consolidation Program in Highgate Centre,
Disability SA. The number of print devices will be reduced from 90 to 35, a consolidation of
approximately 64 per cent. Over a five year period this will result in a savings reduction in recurrent
and capital costs from $600 000 to $300 000 and a saving of CO2 emissions of 100 tonnes.
• Further extension of the Print Device Consolidation Program throughout Disability SA, Housing SA
and Domiciliary Care SA. Consultation will occur with Families SA regarding the program.
• Extending the Green Pilot Program to other areas within our department.
• Continuing to implement a culture change in staff work behaviours and work practices to
incorporate energy efficiencies and greening principles in making our department carbon neutral.
• Continuing to work with Facility Managers and DFC Building Services to reduce energy
consumption in sites that have been identified as consuming more than 160 Mega Watts per
annum.
• Using EIDGS to track energy usage and provide feedback to work sites on energy use.
• Identifying any new energy efficiency innovations that will be helpful to achieving our stated targets
and goals.
•
Priority Area 2: Water Conservation and Wastewater Management
Our development of a water efficiency plan relies in the first instance on the identification of water
consumption across the whole of our department. The EIDGS program aims to facilitate the
implementation of future water saving measures and cost savings. The program gives priority to the
reduction of water consumption at the source and helps facilitate improvements.
The EIDGS program will identify water consumption in high use sites and develop plans and
measures in conjunction with SA Water, and expand them to other sites throughout our department.
Until this is program is implemented, we are unable to report on water usage and water cost within the
department.
To progress our achievements against this priority area during 2008-09, we will:
• set targets and goals to reduce water consumption
• appoint Greening Champions to help facilitate water savings and raise staff awareness in water
saving techniques
• use Facility Managers in conjunction with DFC Building Services to develop a maintenance
program
• collect data and information regarding water consumption and water costs
• develop standards for the refitting of water fixtures and develop an ongoing maintenance program
• optimise the air-conditioning system in all offices and sites through the development of a
maintenance program
• explore the use of recycled water at residential care sites
• explore the possibility of reducing lawn areas at sites
• raise staff awareness regarding water restrictions employed at present and in the future
• include grey water diversion in new buildings, an example of this being the new Connected
Services Centre being built in Mount Gambier.
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Corporate reporting
Our department will liaise closely with SA Water in regards to water conservation to progress the
achievement of targets and goals as outlined in Objective 3 Attaining Sustainability, of SASP.
Priority Area 3: Waste Management
In 2005-06, we implemented a new waste management system in the Riverside Centre which was
then implemented during 2006-07 in the EDS Building, occupied by Families SA. The waste
management system relies on separating wet waste to landfill, recycling milk cartons, bottles and cans
and recycling all photocopying paper, newspapers and cardboard.
Staff participation remains high with approximately 54 per cent recycled waste and 46 per cent wet
waste being recorded (figures supplied by SITA Environmental Solutions, Waste Provider). The
majority of the recycled waste is achieved by photocopying paper waste and there is still room for
improvement in the amount of wet waste going to landfill, and the amount of commingled wet waste
that is going to landfill. By making changes to the present system, significant dollar savings can be
achieved and substantial waste can be diverted from landfill than at present.
The improved waste management system in Riverside Centre was implemented in June 2008. The
monthly report for June indicated that 68 per cent of waste was recycled and 32 per cent of wet waste
had been sent to landfill which is a significant overall improvement (figures supplied by SITA
Environmental Solutions, Waste Provider).
Paper purchased from our major paper supplier for standard office use including white A4, recycled
and coloured paper was 57 615 reams at an estimated cost of $269 060. The distribution of usage
was Families SA 32 per cent, DFC Corporate 22 per cent, Housing SA (including HomeStart) 21 per
cent, Disability SA 16 per cent and Domiciliary Care SA nine per cent. The increased use of double
sided printing has contributed towards reduction in paper usage.
Priority Area 4: Built Facilities Management
Work has commenced on the new 5 Star Green Star Connected Services Centre in Mount Gambier,
with the new building expected to be fully operational by August 2009. The building will have many
innovations attached to the project including trombie walls, in-slab heating/cooling coils, solar
heating/cooling, geothermal storage, solar flues, and underfloor displacement ventilation. The
Connected Services Centre will be amongst a handful of 5 Star Green Buildings in South Australia.
We have also commenced work on the fit-out of the Mount Barker Connected Services Centre which
will include eco lighting, a new waste management system, print device consolidation and an energy
management plan. The building is expected to be fully operational by August/September 2008.
We have adopted a New Lease Approvals Checklist which is now operational and will raise
sustainability and greening standards in our offices and sites. The checklist details a number of
greening standards as follows:
• Is there an energy management plan in place?
• Is there a water efficiency plan in place?
• Is there a waste management plan in place?
• Is there an office recycling program in place?
• Is there secure bicycle storage on site?
• Has an environmental management plan been sighted?
• Is there a formal client feedback mechanism in place?
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Corporate reporting
Priority Area 5: Travel and Fleet Management
The DFC Greening of the Fleet initiative has continued through 2007-08, under the management of
DFC Fleet Management Services. The original target set in 2005 was for all passenger vehicles to be
low emission fuelled (i.e. one third Hybrid and two third LPG capable) by 2008-09, resulting in 25 per
cent savings in CO2 emissions and a reduction in fuel costs. Based on the fleet at that time, the
current mix is 21 per cent Hybrid and 61 per cent LPG capable, which equates to 82 per cent of the
passenger fleet or 58 per cent of the total DFC fleet.
It is estimated that this initiative has resulted in a ten per cent decrease in CO2 emissions across the
2006-07 and 2007-08 financial years for the vehicles included in the original initiative. Savings in fuel
costs are difficult to estimate given the fluctuation in fuel pricing, although it is to be addressed in
2008-09.
On 1 July 2007, Domiciliary Care SA was transferred to our department and brought with them a fleet
of 263 vehicles with a relatively small content of low emission fuelled vehicles, compared with our
department. As a result, the original targets outlined will not be met by the target date. However, even
with the inclusion of the Domiciliary Care SA fleet, 51 per cent of our fleet is low emission fuelled
which is above the 50 per cent target set by the Tackling Climate Change initiative for 2019, and it is
estimated that CO2 emissions from passenger vehicles decreased by four per cent in 2007-08.
As at the end of May 2008, the State Government had 252 Hybrid vehicles in its fleet, of which 135
were in our department’s fleet. This amounts to 53 per cent of the total government fleet.
During 2008-09 the DFC Greening of Fleet targets and fleet mix will be reviewed to reflect the overall
numbers of vehicles now in the fleet.
Priority Area 6: Green Procurement
To support our Social Responsibility in Procurement Policy, the Procurement and Contract
Management Unit worked to incorporate sustainability and greening procedures into its procurement
processes.
Priority Area 7: Human Resources Management
Human Resources in our department continue to support sustainability and greening processes by
incorporating a greening statement in the Job and Person Specifications of all employees.
Priority Area 8: Government Administrative Policies and Guidelines
Our department continues to reflect sustainability and greening in our administrative policies,
procedures and guidelines.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
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Corporate reporting
Energy efficiency action plan report
Performance against Annual Energy Use Targets
During 2007-08, Metropolitan Domiciliary Care was integrated into our department and began
operations as Domiciliary Care SA. As a result of the additional staff transferring to our department,
our energy management portfolio baseline and portfolio targets have changed given the increased
energy usage. While we have experienced a decrease in energy efficiency we remain on track to
achieve the final target of a 25 per cent decrease from the baseline by 2014.
Base Year 2000-013:
DFC Central
Housing SA
Disability SA
Dom Care SA
Families SA
Portfolio Total
Energy Use (GJ)1
GHG Emissions2
Business Measures6
5 659
7 063
30 664
7 122
18 945
1 533
1 913
8 305
1 929
5 131
435
766
1 781
656
1 458
69 453
18 811
5 096
Base Year 2000-013:
DFC Central
Housing SA
Disability SA
Dom Care SA
Families SA
Portfolio Total
Year Being Reported:
DFC Central
Housing SA
Disability SA
Dom Care SA
Families SA
Portfolio Total
Portfolio Target4
(for Year Being Reported)
Final Portfolio Target5
(for 2014)
Energy Efficiency (Mega Joules per FTE)
13 009
9 221
17 217
10 856
12 994
63 297
5 659
8 499
22 569
4 327
22 569
63 623
1 831
2 302
6 112
1 172
6 112
17 529
654
830
1 790
587
1 641
5 502
11 764 MJ per FTE (-19.01% from the baseline)
10 221 MJ per FTE (-25% from the baseline)
Notes:
1
Energy use data will be expressed in gigajoules (GJ) and will be the sum of all fuel types used in each agency
(i.e. electricity, natural gas, bottled gas, etc.) for that period. This data will have been collected at a site level and
aggregated up to agency level by the portfolio Reference Group member.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
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Corporate reporting
2
Many portfolios are pursuing a ‘triple bottom line’ reporting approach. It is therefore an optional extra that
portfolios may wish to include Greenhouse Gas Emissions (in CO2) as a means of quantifying a significant aspect
of environmental performance. Greenhouse gas coefficients differ for fuel types. Please contact Energy Division,
Department for Transport, Energy and Infrastructure to obtain these coefficients for South Australia.
3
It is acknowledged that portfolio structures change over time. Therefore the Portfolio baseline will represent the
structure of the portfolio in the given reporting period.
4
The Portfolio target for the current year is based on an agreed methodology and can be obtained through the
portfolio Reference Group member.
5
The Portfolio target in 2014 should equal a 25% energy efficiency improvement from the base year 2000/01.
6
Business measures are also known as normalisation factors. A key performance indicator for energy efficiency
is energy intensity, i.e. the energy consumed per unit of a given business measure. Some typical business
measures are the number of employees (FTEs) and the square metres of floor area of a building. The energy
2
intensity therefore becomes the energy used per unit defined by the business measure such as MJ/m and
MJ/FTE.
Freedom of Information
The Freedom of Information Act 1991 gives members of the public a legally enforceable right of
access to information held by agencies, subject to certain restrictions.
Structure and functions of the Department for Families and Communities
Our department provides a range of services to those who are vulnerable or economically and socially
disadvantaged. Our services are provided both at a metropolitan and regional level at district centres
and offices throughout South Australia.
The structure and functions of our department, including divisional reporting to the Chief Executive,
are outlined on page 14 of this annual report.
The direction of our department is also influenced by the input of the advisory boards and committees
listed on page 120.
Functions of the Department for Families and Communities affecting the public
The functions of our department directly impact on the public by assisting and enhancing families and
communities’ wellbeing through services directed to the areas of ageing, child protection and
adolescents at risk, family assistance, disability, domiciliary care, housing, Indigenous affairs and
social inclusion. These integrated services are provided statewide to respond to those families and
individuals in need of assistance.
Our work with families and communities aims to drive change to make improvements in peoples’
quality of life, creating opportunities for South Australians who may be facing difficulties.
Public participation in agency policy development
There are a number of ways the public can contribute to policy development as we often seek external
expertise comprising both government and non-government representatives.
Policy advice is sought through statutory and non-statutory advisory committees, comprising peak
organisations and board representatives. In connecting with the community, consultative advice may
be undertaken in the planning, development and implementation of policy. We consult with our major
interest groups, circulate discussion papers, call for submissions on particular topics and convene
public meetings on legislative reform and policy initiatives.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
164
Corporate reporting
These processes ultimately allow the community to have a significant input on services they require,
resulting in the directing of resources to the areas identified as most in need.
Types of documents held
Our department holds various types of documents principally divided into the categories of
administrative, policy and client files comprising:
• internal administrative instructions for functions associated in the areas of financial management,
human resources, property management and practice procedures
• general publications including books, discussion and background papers, reports, reviews, serial
publications, pamphlets, posters, surveys, guidelines, policies, programs, strategies, directories,
evaluations, assessments and proposals
• other documents such as administrative circulars on general management and industrial circulars.
The DFC Library keeps information on where publications are stored and whether they are free, for
sale, or accessible for inspection. Our Library is located at:
Riverside Centre
North Terrace
Adelaide SA 5000
Telephone: 8413 9028
Access to documents
Applications for access to documents and policies including purchase costs, or amendment of
personal records held by our department should be addressed to:
Departmental Liaison Officer (Freedom of Information)
Department for Families and Communities
GPO Box 292
Adelaide SA 5001
Telephone: 8413 9050
Applications for access should be made between 9 am and 5 pm.
Departmental policy documents
Department for Families and Communities
Building the Capacity of People
SA Carers Policy
Informal Relative Caregiver’s Statutory Declaration Policy
Code of Fair Information Practice
Connecting to the Future: the Strategic Agenda for the Department of Families and Communities
2005-2008
DFC: Community Engagement Charter
DFC: The Next Steps
Procurement: Forward Procurement Plan
Reconciliation: Statement of Reconciliation
Refugees: Services for People of Refugee Backgrounds
Strategic Research Agenda 2006-2009
Volunteering Policy
Volunteering: Customer Service Standards
Volunteers: DFC and Volunteers: Our Charter of Mutual Obligation
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
165
Corporate reporting
Office for the Ageing
Ageing: Improving with Age: Our Ageing Plan for South Australia
Home and Community Care
Home and Community Care: Consumer Survey Instrument and Guidelines
Reconciliation: Office for the Ageing Statement of Reconciliation
Retirement Villages
Disability SA
Disability Awareness and Discrimination Training Framework
Supported Accommodation Strategy
Promoting Independence
Families SA
Child Safe Environments: Principles of Good Practice
Families SA Customer Service Standards
Foster Carers Charter
Keeping Them Safe: The SA Government's Child Protection Reform Program
My Stuff: Leaving Care Kit
Privacy and Your Personal Information - Families SA
Resolving Your Complaint - Families SA
There is No Excuse for Child Abuse
Rapid Response: Whole of Government Services for Children and Young People under the
Guardianship of the Minister
Housing SA
Housing Plan for South Australia
Freedom of Information – statistical reporting
The Information Statement does not require reporting on Freedom of Information statistics as our
annual statistics have been provided to State Records for the compilation of a whole of government
Freedom of Information statistical report.
Regional Impact Assessment Statements
Under the Regional Impact Assessment Statements Policy, agencies must prepare and publish
Regional Impact Assessment Statements prior to implementing significant changes to existing South
Australian Government services to rural and regional areas. Our department did not undertake any
Regional Impact Assessment Statements during 2007-08.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
166
Corporate reporting
Urban Design Charter
Housing SA leads the way in the promotion of good urban design outcomes. The Design Guidelines
for Sustainable Housing and Liveable Neighbourhoods capture existing corporate knowledge and
design philosophy for the development and acquisition of rental housing, and provide guidance on the
shape and form of future housing. The guidelines provide information on site layouts and house
designs, land titling and service infrastructure, amenity targets, adaptable housing, housing
modifications and upgrades and environmental sustainability.
These guidelines are used by Housing SA Asset Services Division for capital projects and are
included in tendering and contract documentation. The guidelines are accessible through our
department’s internet site at www.familiesandcommunities.sa.gov.au.
Asbestos management in government buildings
The State Government has adopted guidelines for asbestos management in government buildings,
which includes the requirement that agencies must report on their asbestos risk reduction programs.
As part of our asset management, through the Department for Transport, Energy and Infrastructure
(DTEI), we undertake an annual asbestos inspection of our sites. Any works required as a result of the
inspections are carried out by relevant approved providers through DTEI.
During 2007-08, asbestos was removed by a specialist contractor in two buildings at the Strathmont
Centre Campus. This involved damaged air conditioning sheets in roof light wells.
Asbestos management report (excluding Housing SA)
Number of Sites
Category
At start
of year
At end of
year
1
0
0
2
1
0
3
5
8
4
41
44
5
34
50
6
25
4
Category
Description
Interpretation
One or more items at
these sites …
Remove
should be removed promptly
Remove as soon as
practicable
Use care during
maintenance
should be scheduled for removal at a
practicable time
may need removal during
maintenance works
has asbestos present. Inspect
according to legislation and policy
Monitor condition
No asbestos
identified/identified
asbestos has been
removed
Further information
required
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
(All asbestos identified as per
OHS&W 4.2.10(1) has been
removed)
(These sites not yet categorised)
167
Corporate reporting
Definitions:
Category: The site performance score, determined by the lowest item performance score at each site.
Number of Sites in Category: A count of how many sites have the corresponding site performance score, with
separate counts done at the start and the end of each year.
Category Description: Indicates the recommended action corresponding to the lowest item performance score
(recorded in the asbestos register by a competent person, as per OHS & W Regulations (SA) 1995, 4.2.10).
Interpretation: A brief real-world example of what each category implies for a site.
Housing SA asbestos management report
Housing SA, through the Responsive Maintenance Program, allocates funds for the inspection, testing
and, where it is deemed necessary, removal, of asbestos products from residential properties. Any
works required as a result of the inspections are carried out by relevant approved providers through
DTEI.
Properties used for commercial residential or non-residential purposes, such as group homes and
boarding houses through the High Needs Housing programs, are required to have an Asbestos
Register located on the property. During 2007-08, the removal of asbestos in areas comprising floor
coverings replacement, roof eaves, porches, external cladding, sleep outs, kitchens and wet areas
was addressed. These properties fall into Categories 2, 5 and 6.
The following table shows the total number of residential sites owned by the South Australian Housing
Trust, with the number of locations within those sites shown in brackets, which had asbestos removed.
Category
Number
of
Housing
SA Sites
At start
of year
At end of
year
1
304 (480)
N/A
N/A
2
0
101
89
3
487 (569)
N/A
N/A
4
338 (436)
N/A
N/A
5
N/A
85
110
6
N/A
1514
1634
Category
Description
Interpretation
One or more items at
these sites …
Remove
should be removed promptly
Remove as soon
as practicable
Use care during
maintenance
should be scheduled for
removal at a practicable time
may need removal during
maintenance works
has asbestos present. Inspect
according to legislation and
policy
Monitor condition
No asbestos
identified/identifie
d asbestos has
been removed
Further
information
required
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
(All asbestos identified as per
OHS&W 4.2.10(1) has been
removed)
(These sites not yet
categorised)
168
Corporate reporting
Definitions:
Category: The site performance score, determined by the lowest item performance score at each site.
Number of Sites in Category: A count of how many sites have the corresponding site performance score, with
separate counts done at the start and the end of each year.
Category Description: Indicates the recommended action corresponding to the lowest item performance score
(recorded in the asbestos register by a competent person, as per OHS & W Regulations (SA) 1995, 4.2.10).
Interpretation: A brief real-world example of what each category implies for a site.
Fraud
There have been no new instances of confirmed employee related fraud during 2007-08. In relation to
outstanding employee related fraud from previous years, all cases have been referred to the South
Australia Police with investigations and hearings continuing.
Improvements are currently being implemented to enhance fraud management, including the
establishment of a Fraud Control Framework that outlines the department’s approach to prevention,
detection and reporting of fraud and a control self assessment questionnaire on fraud.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
169
Corporate reporting
Overseas travel
We are required to provide a summary of overseas travel undertaken by employees during 2007-08.
This section of the annual report satisfies this requirement.
Overseas travel is defined in the Commissioner’s Public Sector Management Standard 3.2, ‘Travel’,
which states that travel within Australasia (including visits to New Zealand, Papua New Guinea and
Australian Territories) is not subject to the overseas travel requirements of this standard, unless it
forms part of a more extensive itinerary encompassing other overseas destinations.
Number of
Employees
Destination/s
Reason for Travel
•
2
USA and Canada
•
•
World Conference on Disaster Management –
integrate the research agenda of the Disaster
Recovery Sub Committee of the Community
and Disability Services Ministers’ Advisory
Council (CDSMAC) with initiatives running
within Canada and USA.
Conference - identify community resilience
strategies being implemented in other
countries.
Meet with a range of people involved in
recovery of Greensburg Kansas (destroyed by
a tornado in 2007).
Total Cost to
Agency *
$14 327
2
Italy
Conference - Assessing the Evidence-base of
Intervention for Vulnerable children and their
families.
$8 660
1
Ethiopia
Participate in the Australian Central Adoption
Agency delegation to Ethiopia.
$5 160
1
Netherlands
Inaugural global academic conference on internal
audit and governance sponsored by Institute of
Internal Auditors from USA, UK and Europe.
$3 100
Thailand
AusAid Public Sector Linkages Program intensive training and site visits to assist the
Thailand Department of Social Development and
Welfare to improve the delivery of disability and
aged care services. Travel funded through AusAid
grant.
Nil
5
* costs to the agency exclude employee related expenses
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
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Corporate reporting
Contractual arrangements
In 2007-08, there were 25 contracts with a value greater than $4 million (GST inclusive) which
extended beyond a single year.
Organisation
Description
Duration of
arrangements
Value ($)
Aged Care and
Housing Group
Home and Community Care Services
including meal services to enable people to
take charge of their lives and ensure
community connection opportunities are
available to all
1 July 2007 –
30 June 2010
4 084 960
City of Port
Adelaide Enfield
Funding to run community services through
the Parks Community Centre
1 October 2007 –
30 September 2010
6 577 528
Community
Accommodation
and Respite Agency
Incorporated ***
Community Accommodation and Respite
Agency provides accommodation support
and respite to children and adults with a
disability. Funding is on an annual basis and
will continue in 2008-09 under a revised
contract
1 July 2007 –
30 June 2008
Country Health SA
Incorporated
through Berri–
Riverland Health
Service
Home and Community Care Services
including meal services to enable people to
take charge of their lives and ensure
community connection opportunities are
available to all
1 October 2007 –
30 June 2010
6 126 000
Country Health SA
Incorporated
through Clare
District Hospital
Home and Community Care Services
including meal services to enable people to
take charge of their lives and ensure
community connection opportunities are
available to all
1 July 2005 –
30 June 2009
3 930 320
Country Health SA
Incorporated
through Mount
Gambier and
Districts Health
Service
Flexible Options for Home Living
1 October 2007 –
30 June 2010
7 854 000
Country Health SA
Incorporated
through Mount
Barker and Districts
Health Service
Home and Community Care Services
including meal services to enable people to
take charge of their lives and ensure
community connection opportunities are
available to all
1 October 2007 –
30 June 2010
5 299 900
Country Health SA
Incorporated
through Murray
Bridge Soldiers'
Memorial Hospital
Incorporated
Home and Community Care Services
including meal services to enable people to
take charge of their lives and ensure
community connection opportunities are
available to all
1 October 2007 –
30 June 2010
4 158 600
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
11 716 657
171
Corporate reporting
Organisation
Description
Duration of
arrangements
Value ($)
Country Health SA
Incorporated
through Port Pirie
Regional Health
Service
Home and Community Care Services
including meal services to enable people to
take charge of their lives and ensure
community connection opportunities are
available to all
1 October 2007 –
30 June 2010
6 185 160
Country Health SA
Incorporated
through Victor
Harbour–South
Coast District
Hospital
Incorporated
Home and Community Care Services
including meal services to enable people to
take charge of their lives and ensure
community connection opportunities are
available to all
1 October 2007 –
30 June 2010
5 955 800
Electrolux
Supply of cookers
1 April 2004 –
31 March 2009
7 259 594
John Hindmarsh
(South Australia)
Pty Ltd
Manage the delivery of programmed and
responsive maintenance work
29 June 2001 –
present **
8 859 136
Leveda
Incorporated ***
Leveda provides accommodation support to
adults and children with a disability. Funding
is on an annual basis and will continue in
2008-09 under a revised contract
1 July 2007 –
30 June 2008
4 907 431
Meals on Wheels
(SA) Incorporated
Home and Community Care Services
including meal services to enable people to
take charge of their lives and ensure
community connection opportunities are
available to all
1 July 2007 –
30 June 2010
6 005 670
Minda Incorporated
Minda provides accommodation support,
community support, community access and
respite services, enabling children and
adults with an intellectual disability to take
charge of their lives and ensure community
connection opportunities. Funding is on an
annual basis and will continue in 2008-09
under a revised contract
1 July 2007 –
30 June 2008
34 337 554
Multi Agency
Community Housing Development in partnership with MACHA on
Association
Logan Street in Adelaide city to provide 16
(MACHA)
affordable housing outcomes
Incorporated
Novita Children's
Services
Incorporated ***
30 November 2007 –
August 2008
Novita Children’s Services provide
1 July 2007 –
community support, including case
30 June 2008
management, therapy support, early
childhood intervention and behaviour
specialist intervention to children up to the
age of 18 years with a physical and/or
neurological disability or acquired brain
injury. Funding is on an annual basis and will
continue in 2008-09 under a revised contract
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
4 500 000
9 430 972
172
Corporate reporting
Organisation
Description
Duration of
arrangements
Value ($)
Programme
Maintenance
Services, Tungsten
Group Pty Ltd
Manage the delivery of programmed and
responsive maintenance work
29 June 2001 –
present **
7 728 059
Reece Pty Ltd
Supply of hot water units
5 June 2006 –
4 June 2009
4 426 356
Resthaven
Incorporated
Home and Community Care Services
including meal services to enable people to
take charge of their lives and ensure
community connection opportunities are
available to all
1 October 2007 –
30 June 2010
Royal District
Nursing Service of
SA Incorporated
Home and Community Care Services
including meal services to enable people to
take charge of their lives and ensure
community connection opportunities are
available to all
1 July 2005 –
30 June 2008
Contractual agreement between the South
Sarah Constructions
Australian Housing Trust and Sarah
Pty Ltd
Constructions to redevelop Afton House
Spastic Centres of
South Australia
Incorporated ***
June 2005 –
October 2008
4 628 234
48 974 310
14 300 000
Spastic Centres of South Australia
Incorporated – CSTDA. Funding is on an
annual basis and will continue in 2008-09
under a revised contract
1 July 2007 –
30 June 2008
5 245 354
UnitingCare Wesley
Provision of services and management of
the Maintenance Centre
1 October 2000
– present **
10 094 672 *
Urban Pacific Ltd
(UPL)
Contractual agreement between the South
Australian Housing Trust and UPL for the
Westwood Urban Renewal Project
1999 – 2011
340 000 000
(estimated)
* Payment for the period 1 July 2001 to 30 June 2008
** Contracts are currently being renegotiated
*** Contracts are renewed each year – funding will be expected to continue into the 2008-09 financial year
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
173
Corporate reporting
Consultants
Consultancies below $10 000
There were seven consultancies in 2007-08 that cost below $10 000, with a total expenditure of
$39 638.
Consultancies between $10 000 and $50 000
There were nine consultancies in 2007-08 that cost between $10 000 and $50 000, with a total
expenditure of $226 910. The consultancies and the project on which each worked are outlined below.
Consultant
Purpose of Consultancy
Fresbout Consulting
Develop a nationally agreed set of data item definitions that provide
opportunities to develop consistent data collection across jurisdictions
in the future. Determine which of the data item definitions should be
included as primary data items, such as basic demographic data and
secondary data items such as gambling intervention outcome data.
Data test and publish completed National Data Dictionary for
Gambling Help Services.
Gibson Quaii - ASS Pty Ltd
Review recent developments in Housing SA call centres; review the
Maintenance Centre and Telephone Customer Service Centre; review
and analyse total costs of service delivery; review hours of operation,
KPIs, staffing and structure; provide a comprehensive written report
on findings including cost/benefit analysis and recommendations.
Monica Redden
Review of HACC funded Aged Care North project and report on
strengths, weaknesses, areas for improvement, impact on the region
and cost effectiveness of the model.
Monica Redden
Detail and recommend the preferred service model(s), service and/or
auspicing arrangements for the provision of carer support relating to
Home and Community Care funded services in SA.
Square Holes Pty Ltd
Undertake a quantitative telephone survey of randomly selected
respondents in relation to Foster Care perceptions, analyse data
obtained and provide information in report format at completion of
project.
Strategic Matters
Identify issues impacting on customers of Office for the Ageing,
research and recommend best practice engagement and feedback
strategies. Develop and provide a report on a procedure for customer
complaints and feedback mechanisms.
Trevor Armstrong
Undertake a needs analysis in regards to each HACC agency's
capacity to govern its own affairs; collate the information and report
on a training plan for each agency and deliver governance training for
the agencies.
University of Adelaide
To provide the background data and variables to develop a number of
scenario planning tools to assist and influence policy and service
directions in the future and provide a framework for monitoring the
wellbeing of the older population of South Australia.
University of South Australia
Review of ‘Programs in Secure Care’ in South Australia and other
Australian jurisdictions. Analysis of likely effectiveness of the
programs currently offered.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
174
Corporate reporting
Consultancies above $50 000
There were five consultancies in 2007-08 that cost over $50 000, with a total expenditure of $383 131.
The consultancies and the project on which each worked are outlined below.
Consultant
Purpose of Consultancy
Community Business Bureau
To examine and report on the financial and administrative
infrastructure of HACC funded carer support services and make
recommendations on areas for improvement. The information will be
used to contribute to the development of equitable funding
arrangements across carer support services.
Multicultural Communities
Identify those services providing carer support, which are responsive
to the needs of carers from culturally diverse communities;
summarise the outcomes of consultations with existing carers and
recommend the most appropriate carer support service delivery
models to respond to these needs.
National Council on Crime and
Delinquency
Review current Families SA decision making intake tools, conduct a
series of meetings, develop basic training materials, assist to train
and implement structured decision making processes and provide
ongoing assistance and follow up.
University of South Australia
Develop and deliver cultural and linguistic diversity competence
training for approximately 1800 HACC funded agency staff from
around the state. One session type catering for people that have
received some cultural competence training previously, one session
type for those who have not received any such training.
University of South Australia
Outline necessary steps to, and develop an Elder Abuse Prevention
Action Plan that outlines key areas for action such that responses to
elder abuse can be developed. Develop a strategy to promote and
distribute the action plan amongst key stakeholders and for
implementation of the plan.
Account payment performance
Treasurer’s Instruction 11 Payment of Creditors’ Accounts requires all undisputed accounts to be paid
within 30 days of the date of the invoice or claim, unless there is a discount or a written agreement
between the public authority and the creditor. During 2007-08, our department was able to pay 94.73
per cent of all invoices by the due date.
Number of
accounts paid
% of accounts
paid (by number)
Value of $A of
accounts paid
% of accounts
paid by value
204 819
94.73%
$1 201 139 335
98.61%
Paid late, but within
30 days of due date
8 960
4.14%
$13 127 157
1.08%
Paid more than 30 days
from due date
2 427
1.12%
$3 800 312
0.31%
Paid by due date
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
175
Financial statements
Financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2008 for the Department for
Families and Communities
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
176
Financial statements
Certified statements by the Chief Executive and principal finance officer
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
177
Financial statements
Audit certificate
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
178
Financial statements
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
179
Financial statements
INCOME STATEMENT
for the year ended 30 June 2008
Note
2008
$’000
2007
$’000
Expenses
Employee benefit expenses
6
394 688
290 905
Supplies and services
7
166 946
105 108
Depreciation and amortisation
8
3 403
3 045
Grants, subsidies and client payments
9
600 678
642 135
Net loss from disposal of non-current assets
14
757
-
Other expenses
10
201
93
1 166 673
1 041 286
98 260
Total expenses
Income
Rent, fees and charges
11
106 941
Dividends – HomeStart Finance
2.8
-
5 000
Commonwealth revenues
12
280 157
247 862
Interest revenue
13
442
12
Net gain from disposal of non-current assets
14
-
90
Other revenues
15
Total income
Net cost of providing services
8 043
3 481
395 583
354 705
(771 090)
(686 581)
656 228
Revenues from/payments to SA Government
Revenues from SA Government
16.1
744 035
Grants from SA Government agencies
16.2
16 080
22 581
760 115
678 809
(10 975)
(7 772)
(4 213)
39 708
(15 188)
31 936
Total revenue from SA Government
Net result before restructure
Net result from restructuring
Net (expenses)/revenues from administrative restructure
Net result after restructure
32
The net result after restructure is attributable to the SA Government as owner.
The above Income Statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
180
Financial statements
BALANCE SHEET
as at 30 June 2008
Note
2008
$’000
2007
$’000
Current assets
Cash and cash equivalents
18
44 929
18 496
Receivables
19
21 967
26 868
Inventories
20
Total current assets
347
285
67 243
45 649
Non-current assets
Receivables
19
14 131
13 651
Property, plant and equipment
21
210 240
163 080
Capital works in progress
22
8 822
6 080
Intangible assets
23
167
-
233 360
182 811
300 603
228 460
Total non-current assets
Total assets
Current liabilities
Payables
24
32 314
19 423
Employee benefits
25
45 226
36 643
Provisions
27
7 451
4 716
Other liabilities
28
115
111
85 106
60 893
Total current liabilities
Non-current liabilities
Payables
24
4 519
4 822
Employee benefits
25
46 954
33 426
Borrowings
26
285
285
Provisions
27
19 023
12 666
70 781
51 199
Total liabilities
155 887
112 092
Net assets
144 716
116 368
Total non-current liabilities
Equity
Contributed capital
29
26 991
19 474
Asset revaluation reserve
29
49 452
13 433
Retained earnings
29
Total equity
68 273
83 461
144 716
116 368
144 716
116 368
Total equity is attributable to the SA Government as owner
Unexpected funding commitments
17
Unrecognised contractual commitments
31
Contingent assets and liabilities
33
The above Balance Sheet should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
181
Financial statements
STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY
for the year ended 30 June 2008
Note
Balance at 30 June 2006
Changes in accounting policy
4
Error correction
4
Contributed
Capital
$’000
Asset
Revaluation
Reserve
$’000
10 763
13 433
51 175
75 371
-
-
(8 090)
(8 090)
Retained
Earnings
$’000
Total
$’000
-
-
8 440
8 440
10 763
13 433
51 525
75 721
Net result after restructure for 2006-07
-
-
31 936
31 936
Total recognised income and expense for 2006-07
-
-
31 936
31 936
8 711
-
-
8 711
19 474
13 433
83 461
116 368
Gains (Loss) on revaluation of property, plant and equipment during 2007-08
-
36 019
-
36 019
Net income/expense recognised directly in equity for 2007-08
-
36 019
-
36 019
Net result after restructure for 2007-08
-
-
(15 188)
(15 188)
(15 188)
Restated balance at 30 June 2006
Equity contributions from the SA Government
Balance at 30 June 2007
29
Total recognised income and expense for 2007-08
Equity contribution from the SA Government
Balance at 30 June 2008
29
-
-
(15 188)
7 517
-
-
7 517
26 991
49 452
68 273
144 716
All changes in equity are attributable to the SA Government as owner.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
182
Financial statements
CASH FLOW STATEMENT
for the year ended 30 June 2008
Note
2008
$’000
2007
$’000
Cash Flows From Operating Activities
Cash Outflows
Employee benefit payments
(382 502)
(285 400)
Supplies and services
(161 349)
(109 914)
Grants and subsidies
(600 037)
(646 060)
(40 655)
(43 583)
(2 190)
(2 018)
GST payments on purchases
GST paid to the ATO
Other payments
Cash used in operations
-
(4)
(1 186 733)
(1 086 979)
Cash Inflows
Fees and charges
107 048
96 095
Receipts from Commonwealth
287 477
240 542
-
5 000
Dividends received
Interest received
446
279
GST receipts on receivables
2 171
2 125
GST recovered from the ATO
40 189
49 074
Other receipts
8 089
3 364
Cash generated from operating activities
445 420
396 479
Cash Flows from SA Government
Receipts from SA Government
744 035
651 336
Grants from SA Government Agencies
Cash generated from SA Government
Net cash provided by/(used in) operating activities
34
16 080
27 473
760 115
678 809
18 802
(11 691)
(4 301)
(4 057)
(4 301)
(4 057)
44
235
44
235
(4 257)
(3 822)
Cash Flows From Investing Activities
Cash Outflows
Purchase of property, plant and equipment (including WIP)
Cash used in investing activities
Cash Inflows
Proceeds from sale of property, plant and equipment
Cash generated from investing activities
Net cash provided by/(used in) investing activities
Cash Flows from Financing Activities
Cash Inflows
Capital Contributions from Government
7 517
8 711
Proceeds from restructuring activities
4 371
1 359
11 888
10 070
Net cash provided by/(used in) financing activities
11 888
10 070
Net Increase/(Decrease) in cash and cash equivalents
26 433
(5 443)
18 496
23 939
44 929
18 496
Cash generated from financing activities
Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the financial year
Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the financial year
Non-cash transactions
18
18
The above Cash Flow Statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
183
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
45 278
Total income
(66 058)
21 503
-
Dividends – HomeStart Finance
Commonwealth revenues
Interest revenue
Net gain from disposal of non-current assets
Other revenues
Net cost of providing services
23 775
Rent, fees and charges
Income
111 336
85 728
-
Grants, subsidies and client payments
Net loss from disposal of non-current assets
Other expenses
Total expenses
25 608
-
2008
$'000
(60 101)
43 668
1 600
21 395
-
20 673
103 769
80 949
-
22 483
335
2
2007
$'000
Affordable Housing
Choices and
Communities that
Prosper
F1
Employee benefit expenses
Supplies and services
Depreciation and amortisation
Expenses
for the year ended 30 June 2008
Program Schedule of Expenses and Income
(119 370)
105 273
69 499
-
35 774
224 643
186 208
-
38 413
22
-
(110 115)
106 910
3 400
68 265
-
35 245
217 025
177 559
4
38 221
1 238
3
(308 613)
210 722
188 057
364
3 967
18 334
519 335
249 845
3
124
167 621
100 232
1 510
2008
$'000
(266 628)
174 422
157 194
12
2 986
14 230
441 050
314 378
-
92 983
32 699
990
2007
$'000
F3
2007
$'000
F2
2008
$'000
Independence and
Community
Connection
High Need Housing
(211 491)
3 729
1 098
336
2 295
215 220
70 929
749
-
114 438
28 061
1 043
2008
$'000
F4
(196 443)
2 690
1 008
90
249
1 343
199 133
60 477
-
109 775
27 533
1 348
2007
$'000
Keeping Them Safe
and Connected
(65 558)
30 581
78
3 740
26 763
96 139
7 968
5
77
48 608
38 631
850
2008
$'000
F5
(51 705)
26 966
246
26 720
78 671
14 283
89
26 275
37 322
702
2007
$'000
Effective and
Sustainable Business
Practices
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2008
$'000
F7
(1 589)
49
-
49
1 638
29
-
1 168
441
-
2007
$'000
Office for Women
(771 090)
395 583
280 157
442
8 043
106 941
1 166 673
600 678
757
201
394 688
166 946
3 403
2008
$'000
Total
(686 581)
354 705
5 000
247 862
12
90
3 481
98 260
1 041 286
647 675
93
290 905
99 568
3 045
2007
$'000
Financial statements
184
Financial statements
NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
For the year ended 30 June 2008
1.
Objectives and functions of the Department
The Department for Families and Communities (the Department) was established on 5 March 2004 and
commenced operating on 1 July 2004, to provide a clear focus for the South Australian Government’s goals for
the protection of our children and young people and to help build the resilience and well-being of families and
communities. The vision of the Department is to be an innovative, effective and responsive leader in improving
the quality of family and community life in South Australia. The Department has a broad mandate to work with
those in need who, through circumstance, may be poor, vulnerable, at risk of harm or isolated and disconnected.
To achieve this vision, the Department will actively work towards a community where:
• enhanced wellbeing is a fundamental right
• everybody shares the responsibility for building and supporting stronger families and communities
• everybody benefits from improved wellbeing.
The Department serves the Minister for Families and Communities, Housing, Ageing and Disability. The
Department has the responsibility for delivery of specific programs to the public with respect to activities assigned
to the Department under various Acts as delegated, by the respective Ministers, to the Chief Executive of the
Department.
The Department also functions as a service provider to the South Australian Housing Trust. The financial affairs of
the South Australian Housing Trust does not form part of the Department's financial report.
1.1
Administered items
The Department administered certain revenues, expenses, assets and liabilities on behalf of other government
agencies and non government entities. They are not controlled by the Department and are consequently not
recognised in the Department's financial statements. They are regarded as significant and disclosed in a separate
set of financial statements.
1.2
Administrative Restructures
2007-08
Julia Farr Services (JFS) was incorporated under the South Australian Health Commission Act 1976. Effective 1
July 2004, the Minister of Health delegated responsibility for JFS to the Minister for Disability. On 28 June 2007,
the Governor proclaimed to dissolve JFS in accordance with reforms to the governance arrangements for the
management of the provision of disability services. Effective 1 July 2007, the Board of JFS dissolved and the
assets and liabilities of JFS were transferred, assigned or vested in the Minister for Disability.
Metropolitan Domiciliary Care (MDC) was incorporated under the South Australian Health Commission Act 1976.
On 28 June 2007, the Governor proclaimed to dissolve MDC in accordance with reforms to the governance
arrangements for the management of the provision of health services. Effective 1 July 2007, the Board of MDC
dissolved and the assets and liabilities of MDC were transferred, assigned or vested in the Minister for Ageing
(refer Note 32).
Prior to 1 July 2007, the Department of Health (DH) provided general accounting, financial accounting, financial
systems and accounting policy advice to the Department. The provision of these services was covered by a
Service Level Agreement. Effective 1 July 2007, the Department became the provider of these services to DH. A
revised Service Level Agreement reflects that the Department is now the provider. The liabilities transferred from
DH are employee liabilities.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
185
Financial statements
2006-07
The Intellectual Disability Services Council (IDSC) and the Independent Living Centre (ILC) were incorporated
under the South Australian Health Commission Act 1976. Effective 1 July 2004, the Minister of Health delegated
responsibility for IDSC and ILC to the Minister for Disability. On 29 June 2006, the Governor proclaimed to
dissolve IDSC and ILC in accordance with reforms to the governance arrangements for the management of the
provision of disability services. Effective 1 July 2006, the Boards of IDSC and ILC dissolved and the assets and
liabilities of IDSC and ILC were transferred, assigned or vested in the Minister for Disability.
The Office for Women was transferred from the Department for Families and Communities to the AttorneyGeneral's Department on 1 April 2007.
1.3
Funding for the Department
Funding for the Department comes mainly from appropriation funding from State and Commonwealth
Government sources. These funds are applied to both controlled and administered activities.
The Department also receives amounts from other sources including rent, fees, and charges, and dividends from
portfolio housing agencies.
2.
Summary of significant accounting policies
2.1
Basis of accounting
The financial report is a general purpose financial report. The accounts have been prepared in accordance with:
• applicable Australian Accounting Standards
• Treasurer's Instructions (TIs) and Accounting Policy Statements (APS) promulgated under the provision of the
Public Finance and Audit Act, 1987
• other mandatory professional reporting requirements in Australia.
Statement of compliance
Australian Accounting Standards include Australian equivalents to International Financial Reporting Standards
and AAS 29, Financial Reporting by Government Departments.
The preparation of the financial report requires the use of certain accounting estimates, where management is
required to exercise its judgement in the process of applying the Department's accounting policies. The areas
involving a higher degree of judgments or where assumptions and estimates are significant to the financial
statements are outlined in the applicable notes.
The preparation of the financial report also requires compliance with accounting policy statements issued
pursuant to section 41 of the Public Finance and Audit Act 1987, by authority of Treasurer's Instruction 19,
Financial Reporting. In the interest of public accountability and transparency the accounting policy statements
require the following note disclosures that have been included in this financial report:
• revenues, expenses, financial assets and financial liabilities where the counterparty/transaction is with an
entity within the SA Government as at reporting date, classified according to their nature
• expenses incurred as a result of engaging consultants (as reported in the Income Statement)
• employee target voluntary separation packages
• employees whose normal remuneration is $100 000 or more (within $10 000 bandwidths) and aggregate
remuneration paid or payable or otherwise made available, directly or indirectly by the Department to those
employees, and
• board/committee member and remuneration information, where a board or committee member is entitled to
receive income from membership other than direct out of pocket reimbursement.
The Income Statement, Balance Sheet and Statement of Changes in Equity have been prepared on an accrual
basis and are in accordance with the historic cost convention, except for certain assets that were valued in
accordance with the valuation policy applicable.
The Cash Flow Statement has been prepared on a cash basis.
The financial report has been prepared based on a twelve month operating cycle and presented in Australian
currency.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
186
Financial statements
The existence of the Department and the ongoing delivery of current programs and services are dependent on
Government policy and on continuing appropriations by Parliament.
Early adoption of accounting standards
The Australian Accounting Standards and Interpretations that have been recently issued or amended but are not
yet effective, have not been adopted by the Department for the reporting period ending 30 June 2007. The
Department has assessed the impact of new and amended standards and interpretations and considers that there
will be no impact on the accounting policies or financial report of the Department.
2.2
Reporting entity
The Department's financial statements include both departmental and administered items. The Department's
financial statements include assets, liabilities, income and expenses controlled or incurred by the Department in
its own right. The Administered financial statements include assets, liabilities, income and expenses which the
Department administers on behalf of the SA Government, but does not control. A separate set of financial
statements is produced as these administered items are regarded as significant in respect to the Department's
operations.
2.3
Comparative figures
The presentation and classification of items in the financial report are consistent with prior periods except where a
specific Accounting Policy Statement or an Australian Accounting Standard has required a change.
Where presentation and classification of items in the financial report have been amended, comparative amounts
have been reclassified unless reclassification is impracticable. Any restated comparative amounts do not replace
the original financial report for the preceding period.
2.4
Rounding
All amounts in the financial statements have been rounded to the nearest thousand dollars ($'000).
2.5
Taxation
The Department is not subject to income tax. The Department is liable for payroll tax, fringe benefits tax, goods
and services tax (GST) and the emergency services levy. Income, expenses and assets are recognised net of the
amount of GST except:
• where the amount of GST incurred by the Department as a purchaser is not recoverable from the Australian
Taxation Office, GST is recognised as part of the cost of acquisition of an asset or is part of an item of
expenses
• where appropriate, receivables and payables are stated with the amount of GST included.
The net amount of GST recoverable from, or payable to, Australian Taxation Office is included as part of
receivables or payables in the Balance Sheet.
Cash flows are included in the Cash Flow Statement on a gross basis. The GST component of cash flows arising
from investing and financing activities, which is recoverable from or payable to the Australian Taxation Office, is
classified as part of operating cash flows.
Commitments and contingencies include the amount of GST recoverable from, or payable to the Australian Tax
Office.
2.6
Income and expenses
Income and expenses are recognised in the Department's Income Statement when and only when the flow or
consumption or loss of future economic benefits has occurred and can be reliably measured. Income and
expenses have been classified according to their nature and have not been offset unless required or permitted by
a specific accounting standard or where offsetting reflects the substance of the transaction.
The notes to the financial statements disclose revenues, expenses, financial assets and financial liabilities where
the counterparty/transaction is with an entity within the SA Government as at the reporting date.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
187
Financial statements
Fees and charges
Revenues from fees and charges are derived from the provision of goods and services to other SA government
agencies and to the public. This revenue is recognised upon delivery of the service to the clients or by reference
to the stage of completion.
Disposal of non-current assets
Income from the disposal of non-current assets is recognised when control of the asset has passed to the buyer
and determined by comparing proceeds with carrying amount. When revalued assets are sold, the revaluation
increments are transferred to retained earnings.
Resources received/provided free of charge
Resources received/provided free of charge are recorded as revenue and expenditure in the Income Statement at
their fair value. Resources provided free of charge are recorded in the expense line items to which they relate.
Grant contributions received
Grants that are received from other entities by the Department for general assistance or a particular purpose may
be for capital or recurrent purposes and the name of the category reflects the use of the grant. These entities may
be other SA Government agencies or the Commonwealth Government. The grants given are usually subject to
terms and conditions set out in the contract, correspondence, or by legislation. The contribution is recognised as
an asset and income when the Department obtains control of the contributions or the right to receive the
contribution.
Grants paid
Grants that are paid to other entities by the Department for general assistance or a particular purpose may be for
capital or recurrent purposes and the name of the category reflects the use of the grant. These entities may be
other SA Government agencies, Non Government Organisations or the public. The grants given are usually
subject to terms and conditions set out in the contract, correspondence, or by legislation. For contributions
payable, the contribution will be recognised as a liability and expense when the entity has a present obligation to
pay the contribution.
2.7
Revenues from SA Government
Appropriations are recognised as revenues when the Department obtains control over the funding. Control over
appropriations is normally obtained upon their receipt.
Where money has been appropriated in the form of an equity contribution, the Treasurer has acquired a financial
interest in the net assets of the Department and the contribution is recorded as contributed equity.
2.8
Dividends
In 2006-07 dividends were received by the Department from HomeStart Finance, in compliance with Section
26(8) of the Housing and Urban Development (Administrative Arrangements) Act, 1995 and redistributed to
portfolio housing entities consistent with Departmental strategic plans. In 2007-08, dividends were paid directly to
the Department of Treasury and Finance.
2.9
Current and non current items
Assets and liabilities are characterised as either current or non-current in nature. The Department has a clearly
identifiable operating cycle of 12 months. Therefore assets and liabilities that will be realised as part of the normal
operating cycle will be classified as current assets or current liabilities. All other assets and liabilities are classified
as non-current.
2.10 Cash and cash equivalents
Cash and cash equivalents as reported in the Balance Sheet includes cash on hand, deposits held at call and
other short-term, highly liquid investments with maturities of three months or less that are readily converted to
cash and which are subject to insignificant risk of changes in value. Cash and cash equivalents in the Cash Flow
Statement comprise cash and cash equivalents as defined above. Cash is measured at nominal value.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
188
Financial statements
In October 2003 the Government introduced a policy with respect to aligning agency cash balances with the
appropriation and expenditure authority. During the 2007-08 and 2006-07 financial years the Department was not
required to transfer any of its cash balance to the Consolidated Account.
2.11 Receivables
Receivables include amounts receivable from trade, prepayments, and other accruals.
Trade receivables arise in the normal course of selling goods and services to other agencies and to the public.
Trade receivables are receivable within 30 days after the issue of an invoice or otherwise in accordance with
relevant contractual arrangements.
Other debtors arise outside the normal course of selling goods and services to other agencies and to the public.
Collectability of trade receivables is reviewed on an ongoing basis. Debts that are known to be uncollectible, after
all reasonable attempts have been made to collect the debt, are written off when identified. An allowance for
doubtful debts is raised when there is objective evidence that the Department will not be able to collect the debts.
2.12 Inventories
Inventories are stated at the lower of cost and their net realisable value. Inventories held for use by the
Department are measured at cost, with cost being allocated in accordance with the first-in, first-out method.
2.13 Non current asset acquisition and recognition
Assets are initially recorded at cost plus any incidental cost involved with the acquisition. Where assets are
acquired at no value, or minimal value, they are recorded at their fair value in the Balance Sheet. Where the
assets are acquired at no or nominal value as part of a restructuring of administrative arrangements then the
assets are recorded at the value recorded by the transferor prior to transfer.
The Department capitalises all non-current physical assets with a value of $10 000 or greater.
Assets held for sale are separately disclosed and measured at the lower of carrying amount and fair value less
cost to sell.
Works in progress are projects physically incomplete as at reporting date.
2.14 Revaluation of non-current assets
In accordance with APF III, Asset Accounting Framework:
• all non-current physical assets are valued at written down current cost (a proxy for fair value), and
• revaluation of non-current assets or groups of assets is performed when its fair value at the time of acquisition
is greater than $1 million and estimated useful life is greater than three years.
Land and buildings at fair value
The Department revalues its land and buildings every three years. However, if at any time management considers
that the carrying amount of the asset materially differs from the fair value, then the asset will be revalued
regardless of when the last valuation took place. Non-current physical assets that are acquired between
revaluations are held at cost until the next valuation, where they are revalued to fair value.
The Department's land and buildings were due to be revalued as at 30 June 2009. During the 2007-08 financial
year, management considered that prices had materially appreciated and a desktop valuation was carried out on
land and buildings by a Professional Valuer. The fair value valuation methodology was used by the Valuer in
conducting the desk top valuation. As a result of the desktop valuation, asset values were adjusted to be in
accordance with the fair value as determined by the Valuer.
The Professional Valuer engaged to perform the independent desk top valuation was:
• Martin Burns - M.B.A., B.App.Sc. Property Resource Management, Associate Australian Property Institute
(AAPI), Certified Practising Valuer (CPV), Liquid Pacific Limited
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
189
Financial statements
Land and Buildings transferred from JFS and MDC on 1 July 2007, were transferred at the value recorded by JFS
and MDC prior to the transfer. As at 30 June 2008 these asset values were adjusted in accordance with the
outcome of the desk top valuation.
Assets deemed to be at fair value
For those classes of non-current assets where an independent revaluation has not been undertaken, the criteria
which require revaluation within APF III Asset Accounting Framework have not been met. For these classes of
non-current assets, written down cost is deemed to be at fair value as determined by APF III Asset Accounting
Framework.
Asset classes where written down cost is deemed to be fair value, include:
• Leasehold Improvements
• Buildings and Improvements in Progress (WIP)
• Computing Equipment
• Motor Vehicles
• Other Plant and Equipment.
2.15 Impairment
All non-current assets are tested for an indication of impairment at each reporting date. Where there is an
indication of impairment, the recoverable amount is estimated. An amount by which the asset's carrying amount
exceeds the recoverable amount is recorded as an impairment loss. An impairment loss is recognised
immediately in the Income Statement, unless the asset has been revalued. For revalued assets an impairment
loss is offset against the revaluation reserve for that same class of assets, to the extent that the impairment loss
does not exceed the amount in the asset revaluation reserve for that class of asset.
2.16 Depreciation and amortisation of non current assets
All non-current assets, having a limited useful life, are systematically depreciated/amortised over their useful lives
in a manner that reflects the consumption of their service potential. Amortisation is used in relation to intangible
assets, while depreciation is applied to physical assets such as property plant and equipment. The useful lives of
all major assets held by the Department are reassessed on an annual basis.
The value of leasehold improvements is amortised over the estimated useful life of each improvement, or the
unexpired period of the relevant lease, whichever is shorter. Land and assets held for sale are not depreciated.
Depreciation/amortisation for non-current assets is determined as follows:
Class of asset
• Buildings and Improvements
Depreciation method
Useful life (years)
Straight Line
25-50 years
•
Leasehold Improvements
Straight Line
life of lease
•
Computing Equipment
Straight Line
3 years
•
Motor Vehicles
Straight Line
10 years
•
Other Plant and Equipment
Straight Line
3-15 years
•
Intangible Assets - computer software
Straight Line
3 years
2.17 Intangibles
An intangible asset is an identifiable non-monetary asset without physical substance. Intangible assets are
measured at cost. Following initial recognition, intangible assets are carried at cost less any accumulated
amortisation and any accumulated impairment losses.
The acquisition or internal development of software is capitalised when the expenditure meets the asset definition
criteria (identifiability, control, and the existence of future economic benefits) and the asset recognition criteria
(probability of future economic benefit and cost can be reliably measured) and when the amount of expenditure is
greater than or equal to $10 000.
All research and development costs that do not meet the capitalisation criteria outlined in AASB 138 Intangible
Assets are expensed.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
190
Financial statements
2.18 Payables
Payables include creditors, accrued expenses and employment on-costs. Creditors represent the amounts owing
for goods and services received prior to the end of the reporting period that are unpaid at the end of the reporting
period. Creditors include all unpaid invoices received relating to normal operations of the Department.
Accrued expenses represents goods and services provided by other parties during the period that are unpaid at
the end of the reporting period and where an invoice has not been processed or received.
All payables are measured at their nominal amount and are unsecured. Invoices are normally settled promptly in
accordance with TI 11 Payment of Creditors' Accounts after the Department receives an invoice.
Employment on-costs include superannuation contributions and payroll tax with respect to the outstanding
liabilities for salaries and wages, long service leave and annual leave.
The Department makes contributions to several superannuation schemes operated by the State Government.
These contributions are treated as an expense when they occur. There is no liability for payments to beneficiaries
as the Department of Treasury and Finance centrally recognises the superannuation liability in the whole of
government financial statements. The only liability outstanding at balance date relates to any contributions due
but not yet paid to the superannuation schemes.
2.19 Employee benefits
These benefits accrue for employees as a result of services provided up to the reporting date and remain unpaid.
Long term employee benefits are measured at the present value and short term employee benefits are measured
at nominal amounts.
Sick leave
A provision has not been made for sick leave as all sick leave is non-vesting and the average sick leave taken in
future years is estimated to be less than the annual entitlement of sick leave.
Annual leave
The liability for annual leave is measured as the amount unpaid at the reporting date at remuneration rates
expected to be paid at reporting date. The annual leave liability is expected to be paid within twelve months and is
measured at the undiscounted nominal amount.
Long service leave
The liability for long service leave was determined through an actuarial assessment undertaken by Mercer
(Australia) Pty Ltd, in accordance with AASB 119 Employee Benefits. The following assumptions were made by
the actuary when performing the assessment:
• salary increases of 3.5 per cent per annum based on the current enterprise bargaining agreement and shortterm forecasts
• discounting of 6.4 per cent per annum based on the gross ten year Commonwealth Government bonds rate at
30 June 2008.
Accrued salaries and wages
The liability for accrued salaries and wages is measured as the amount unpaid at the reporting date at
remuneration rates current at reporting date.
2.20 Provisions
Insurance
The Department is a participant in the State Government's Insurance Program. The Department pays a premium
to South Australian Government Financing Authority, SAICORP Division (SAICORP) for professional indemnity
insurance and general public liability insurance and is responsible for the payment of claim amounts up to an
agreed amount (the deductible). SAICORP provides the balance of funding for claims in excess of the deductible.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
191
Financial statements
The provision for Public Liability and Professional Indemnity Insurance represents liabilities for outstanding claims
in respect of incidents that have occurred. The liabilities include claims incurred and reported but not paid, claims
incurred but not reported (IBNR), claims incurred but not enough reserve (IBNER) and the anticipated costs of
settling those claims. The claims liabilities are measured as the present values of the expected future payments.
Claims incurred but not paid and claim settlement costs that can be directly attributed to particular claims are
assessed by reviewing individual claim files.
In respect of IBNR and IBNER claims, an amount of $50 000 has been set aside for both the Public Liability
Claims and Professional Indemnity Claims. These amounts are based upon historical claims activity, with
allowance for prudential margins and are reviewed annually. Public Liability and Professional Indemnity Claims
relating to periods prior to the restructuring of the former Department of Human Services, effective 1 July 2004,
are the responsibility of the Department of Health.
The provision for property claims represents outstanding payments for incurred damage to property. An allowance
is also included for (IBNER) claims. This provision is based upon historical claims activity and with allowance for
prudential margins and is reviewed annually.
Workers compensation
The Department is an exempt employer under the Workers Rehabilitation and Compensation Act 1986. Under a
scheme arrangement the Department is responsible for the management of workers rehabilitation and
compensation.
The workers compensation liability recognised for the employees of the Department is based on an
apportionment of an actuarial assessment of the whole of government workers compensation liability conducted
by Taylor Fry Consulting Actuaries based on 30 April 2008 data. Taylor Fry Consulting Actuaries extrapolate this
data to 30 June 2008. For the 2007-08 financial year the Department has reflected a workers compensation
provision of $25.49 million (2007 $16.55 million) (Refer Note 27.2).
The actuarial assessment conducted by Taylor Fry Consulting Actuaries is based on the Payment Per Claim
Incurred (PPCI) valuation method. The assessment has been conducted in accordance with AASB 137
Provisions, Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets and the Work Cover Guidelines for Actuarial
Assessments. The liability covers claims incurred but not yet paid, incurred but not reported and the anticipated
direct and indirect costs of settling those claims. The liability for outstanding claims is measured as the present
value of the expected future payments reflecting the fact that all the claims do not have to be paid out in the
immediate future.
2.21 Leases
The Department has not entered into any finance leases. The Department has entered into some operating
leases.
Operating leases
In respect of operating leases, the lessor retains substantially the entire risks and benefits incidental to the
ownership of the leased items. Operating lease payments are recognised as an expense on a basis which is
representative of the pattern of benefits derived from the leased assets.
2.22 Government/non-government disclosures
The Department has complied with APF II General Purpose Financial Reporting Framework where the
Department must disclose by way of note whether transactions are with entities that are within or external to the
South Australian Government. These transactions are classified by their nature and relate to income, expenses,
financial assets and financial liabilities.
3.
Financial risk management
The Department has non-interest bearing assets in the form of cash on hand and receivables, and non-interest
bearing liabilities in the form of payables. The Department's exposure to market risk is minimal and cash flow
interest risk is minimal. From 1 July 2006, as a result of policy changes, the Department does not receive interest
on cash balances in the Departmental operating account. This balance comprises the majority of the
Department's controlled cash.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
192
Financial statements
The Department has no significant concentration of credit risk. The Department has policies and procedures in
place to ensure that transactions occur with customers with appropriate credit history.
In relation to liquidity/funding risk, the continued existence of the Department in its present form and with its
present programs, is dependent on Government policy and on continuing appropriations by Parliament for the
Department's administration and programs.
4.
Change in accounting policy
2007-08
Accounting Error- Change in Accounting for Employee Related Services Recoverable
Employees of the Department provide services to the South Australian Housing Trust (SAHT). The Department
recognises as a liability, all employee entitlements for these staff. As these amounts are recoverable from SAHT,
a receivable is also recognised. In past years, the Department has recognised a receivable for only part of the
value of entitlements for employees assigned to the SAHT. The SAHT is however, meeting the full employment
costs of these employees. The accounting treatment of the recovery of employee entitlement was reviewed in
2007-08. As a result it was established that prior year financial reports had understated the receivable by $8.44
million. In accordance with AASB 108 ‘Accounting Policies, Changes in Accounting Estimates and Errors’ this
error has been corrected by increasing the value of the receivable in the current and prior year to reflect the full
cost of Departmental employees providing services to the SAHT. Opening equity has also been adjusted to reflect
the impact of the correction on earlier years.
2006-07
Change in asset threshold
Effective 1 July 2006, the asset capitalisation threshold for the Department was increased to $10 000. The
previous asset capitalisation threshold was $5 000. The increase in the asset capitalisation threshold will ensure
that there is consistency in the asset capitalisation threshold across various entities within the portfolio. The
increase is in accordance with Accounting Policy Framework III Asset Accounting Framework issued by the
Department of Treasury and Finance where assets with a fair value at the time of acquisition of less than $10 000
need not be recognised (capitalised) as an asset. The change in accounting policy was accounted for by adjusting
the balance of retained earnings for 2006 by $0.165 million for DFC, and by an adjustment of $8.090 million
directly to equity in 2006-07 for the former ILC and IDSC (ILC $7.955 million, and IDSC $0.135 million).
5.
Programs of the Department
In achieving its objective the Department provides a range of services classified into the following programs:
Program 1: Affordable Housing Choices and Communities that Prosper
To work with others to expand and improve affordable housing choices across the state and help build
communities that prosper.
This program encompasses the management of grants for housing services to low-income households. This
includes grants for the provision of private rental services, public, Aboriginal and community managed housing,
the funding and regulation of community housing.
Program 2: High Need Housing
To develop and implement better high need housing and service responses for people at risk or in high need.
This program encompasses the management of grants for housing services for people in high need and
supported accommodation assistance for people in crisis as well as providing other services and programs
related to high need housing.
Program 3: Independence and Community Connection
To enable people to take charge of their lives and ensure community connection opportunities are available to all.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
193
Financial statements
This program encompasses the provision of services related to supporting people with disabilities to live in the
community, managing grants and providing advice to the Minister for the promotion of health, social wellbeing and
quality of life of the community, implementing strategies and programs to promote the participation and support of
older people in the community.
Program 4: Keeping Them Safe and Connected
Providing services that ensure children, young people and families are safe, supported and connected to the
future.
This encompasses child protection, alternative care for those children and young people not able to be cared for
by their own families, case management and support for young people under the Guardianship of the Minister,
adoption and post adoption services, youth justice services as directed by the Youth Court (e.g. remand, bail
orders, Community Service Orders, Supervision and Home Detention), provision of secure care facilities for
young people who are detained, emergency financial assistance, domestic violence assistance, anti-poverty
preventative programs and recovery services for victims of disasters.
Program 5: Effective and Sustainable Business Practices
To establish and maintain efficient, effective and accountable business practices to underpin delivery of the
Connecting to the Future strategic agenda.
Services provided include strategic and overarching support services such as policy development, reporting and
advice, strategic planning, continuous improvement tools and quality management, research and evaluation,
financial services, legal services, information management, workforce and infrastructure development, for the
entire Portfolio.
2006-07 Programs Reported:
In 2006-07 the Department reported on an additional program:
Program 7: Office for Women
Pursuit of the full and equal participation of women in the social and economic life of the State by providing
innovative and balanced public policy advice to government. Providing high quality statewide information, support
and referral services through the Women's Information Service. This program was transferred to the AttorneyGeneral's Department on 1 April 2007.
6.
Employee benefit expenses
Note
Salaries and wages
Long service leave
Annual leave
2008
$'000
2007
$'000
282 901
212 553
9 209
5 924
28 941
20 725
Superannuation
31 971
24 472
Workers compensation
15 631
7 272
Payroll tax
19 457
14 903
6 578
5 056
394 688
290 905
Other employee related expenses
Total employee benefit expenses
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
194
Financial statements
Remuneration of Employees
The number of employees whose remuneration received or receivable falls within the following bands:
2008
2007
$100 000 – 109 999
77
43
$110 000 – 119 999
33
20
$120 000 – 129 999
15
8
$130 000 – 139 999
10
11
$140 000 – 149 999
5
4
$150 000 – 159 999
4
7
$160 000 – 169 999
9
4
$170 000 – 179 999
2
3
$180 000 – 189 999
2
4
$190 000 – 199 999
5
3
$200 000 – 209 999
2
2
$210 000 – 219 999
-
1
$220 000 – 229 999
5
-
$230 000 – 239 999
-
-
$240 000 – 249 999
-
1
$250 000 – 259 999
-
-
$260 000 – 269 999
-
-
$270 000 – 279 999
1
-
$280 000 – 289 999
-
1
$290 000 – 299 999
-
-
$300 000 – 309 999
-
-
$310 000 – 319 999
-
-
$320 000 – 329 999
-
1
$330 000 – 339 999
1
-
171
113
Total number of employees
The table includes all employees who received remuneration of $100 000 or more during the year.
Remuneration of employees reflects all costs of employment including salaries and wages, superannuation
contributions, fringe benefits tax and any other salary sacrifice benefits. The total remuneration received by these
employees for the year was $21.7 million (2007 $14.9 million).
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
195
Financial statements
7.
Supplies and services
Accommodation and property related
Advertising and promotions
Brokerage fees
Client related expenses
2008
$'000
2007
$'000
27 213
22 792
380
539
46 882
18 298
4 408
5 142
Communication and computing
18 373
16 917
Contractors and agency staff
19 931
8 563
Consultants
650
508
Drugs and medical supplies
4 615
962
Insurance
1 196
857
Interpreter and translator fees
Managed payments
Minor equipment
85
21
3 097
2 716
7 950
5 130
10 534
7 109
Printing, stationery, postage and periodicals
3 604
3 025
Seminars, courses and training
1 911
1 350
Travel and accommodation
2 367
2 118
Motor vehicles
Other administration
13 387
8 784
166 583
104 831
Audit fees paid / payable to the Auditor General's Department *
363
277
Total audit fees
363
277
166 946
105 108
Total supplies and services (excluding audit fees)
Total supplies and services (including audit fees)
* Other services: There were no other services provided by the Auditor-General's Department
Supplies and services provided by entities within SA Government
Accommodation and property related
Advertising and promotions
$'000
$'000
18 460
15 491
7
47
Brokerage fees
107
-
Client related expenses
176
287
6 669
8 036
679
2 635
Communication and computing
Contractors and agency staff
Consultants
Insurance
Interpreter and translator fees
Managed payments
Minor equipment
Motor vehicles
Printing, stationery, postage and periodicals
Repairs and maintenance
-
16
988
852
1
-
2 751
2 466
229
260
9 895
6 661
106
128
-
457
Seminars, courses and training
71
90
Travel and accommodation
11
12
1 636
2 210
41 786
39 648
Audit fees paid / payable to the Auditor General's Department *
363
277
Total audit fees – SA Government
363
277
42 149
39 925
Other administration
Total supplies and services - SA Government (excluding audit fees)
Total supplies and services - SA Government (including audit fees)
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
196
Financial statements
The number and dollar amount of consultancies paid/payable (included in supplies and services) that fell within
the following band:
No
2008
$'000
No
2007
$'000
Below $10 000
7
40
11
29
Between $10 000 and $50 000
9
227
13
299
Above $50 000
5
383
3
180
Total paid/payable to the consultants engaged
21
650
27
508
8.
Depreciation and amortisation
2008
$’000
2007
$’000
1 868
1 733
148
52
Depreciation
Buildings and improvements
Computing equipment
Motor vehicles
ILEP equipment
Other plant and equipment
Total depreciation
5
5
597
540
235
142
2 853
2 472
493
573
Amortisation
Leasehold improvements
Computer Software
57
-
Total amortisation
550
573
3 403
3 045
2008
$'000
2008
$'000
Recurrent funding to Julia Farr Services
-
57 363
Capital funding to Julia Farr Services
-
31
Aboriginal Community Benefit Grants
1 477
1 332
115 801
109 556
Total depreciation and amortisation
9.
Grants, subsidies and client payments by Program
Commonwealth State Territory Disability Agreement Grants
Community Connect Grants
2 227
2 687
Supported Accommodation (Commonwealth State Housing Agreement)
2 738
3 561
Julia Farr Association Establish Grant
1 396
-
Supported Residential Facility
8 176
7 953
Commonwealth State Housing Agreement
112 837
106 312
Housing SA -Tax Equivalent Regime
135 766
123 062
Supported Accommodation Assistance Program
31 314
27 819
Home and Community Care
96 418
113 930
Children's Payments
44 015
38 233
Family and Community Development
Alternative Care
8 610
8 394
22 030
17 573
Emergency Financial Assistance
3 559
3 085
Concessions - SA Spectacle Scheme
Aged Care Grants (formerly Funds for Seniors)
880
4 487
1 027
7 675
Parks Community Centre (Local Government Grant)
1 969
1 921
Strathmont Centre Devolution Grant
5 465
6 264
Other
1 513
4 357
600 678
642 135
Total Grant, Subsidies and Client Payments
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
197
Financial statements
Grants, Subsidies and Client Payments by Program Paid/Payable
within SA Government
2008
$'000
2007
$'000
Recurrent funding to Julia Farr Services
-
57 363
Capital funding to Julia Farr Services
-
31
Aboriginal Community Benefit Grants
40
5
1 962
1 109
2 024
614
-
1 400
Commonwealth State Territory Disability Agreement Grants
Community Connect Grants
Supported Accommodation (Commonwealth State Housing Agreement)
Supported Residential Facility
892
366
Commonwealth State Housing Agreement
111 505
97 791
Housing SA -Tax equivalent regime
135 766
123 062
Supported Accommodation Assistance Program
Home and Community Care
Children's Payments
Family and Community Development
Alternative Care
Emergency Financial Assistance
1 214
1 148
25 829
49 937
904
550
-
5
935
355
35
94
Aged Care Grants (formerly Funds for Seniors)
2 395
6 059
Strathmont Centre Devolution Grant
5 465
6 264
Other
671
2 101
288 722
349 169
2008
$'000
2007
$'000
SA Govt Entities
256 754
291 778
SA Health Units
Non Government Organisations (NGO's)
31 029
247 289
56 747
235 224
Total Grant, Subsidies and Client Payments - SA Government
Grants and Subsidies by Recipient Type
Local Government
9.1
17 044
16 262
Universities
542
374
Grant -Commonwealth & Other State/Territory Gov.
446
432
Children’s Payments and Emergency Financial Assistance* Gov.
939
644
Children’s Payments and Emergency Financial Assistance* Non Gov.
Grand Total
46 635
40 674
600 678
642 135
*Small Payments are made to numerous providers in accordance with the Departmental client payment policies.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
198
Financial statements
9.1
Funding to Non-Government Organisations
2008
$'000
2007
$'000
Minda Incorporated
31 332
30 669
Royal District Nursing
16 696
16 161
NOVITA Childrens Services Inc
14 318
11 898
Anglicare SA
11 387
9 309
Community Accommodation Respite Agency
11 321
10 966
Centacare Catholic Family
6 885
6 226
Aged Care & Housing Group Inc
5 465
3 322
Uniting Care Wesley Adelaide Inc
5 211
5 434
Uniting Care Wesley Port Adelaide Inc
4 918
4 932
Spastic Centres Of SA Inc (formerly Community Access Services of SA Inc)
4 770
4 486
Leveda Incorporated
4 592
4 245
Anglican Community Care Inc
3 968
3 135
Aboriginal Family Support
3 909
3 210
The Salvation Army (SA)
3 906
3 989
Southern Junction Community
3 673
3 208
Julia Farr Association Inc
3 556
2 920
Life Without Barriers
3 519
3 191
Baptist Community Services
2 969
3 310
Resthaven Inc
2 884
2 249
Uniting Care Wesley Port Pirie Inc
2 723
2 301
Lifes for Living
2 620
2 298
Royal Society for the Blind
2 427
2 158
Orana
2 126
2 056
Helping Hand Aged Care
1 983
1 546
Autism Association of SA Inc
1 928
1 715
Meals on Wheels Inc
1 852
1 838
Community Lifestyles Inc
1 734
1 473
Community Living Options
1 646
1 399
Guide Dogs Association
1 573
1 629
St Johns Youth Services Inc
1 560
1 518
Catherine House Inc
1 410
1 374
Community Living For Disabled
1 375
1 214
Carers Assoc of SA Inc
1 360
1 350
Country Home Advocacy
1 339
1 318
Paraquad SA (formerly The Paraplegic & Quadriplegic Assoc of SA Inc)
1 329
1 350
Aboriginal Prisoners and Offenders Support Services Inc
1 306
1 273
Central Eastern Domestic
1 293
1 214
Individual Supported Accommodation Services
1 283
1 277
Hills Community Options
1 271
1 216
Barkuma Inc
1 217
1 127
Community Living and Support Services Inc
1 192
1 266
Aboriginal Elders and Community Care Services Inc
1 132
1 135
Community Living Project Inc.
1 118
1 083
Northern Carer's Network Inc
Lifestyle Assistance and Accommodation Service Inc
1 109
1 104
1 146
1 056
Bedford Industries
1 097
713
Alabricare(SA)
1 020
1 015
Other
Total funding to Non-Government Organisations
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
58 883
62 306
247 289
235 224
199
Financial statements
* Payments to Non SA Government Organisations, where total payments to an organisation are greater than $1.0
million are individually disclosed above.
Payments less than $1.0 million are in Other. This excludes payments for Childrens' Payments and Emergency
Financial Assistance.
10.
Other expenses
Bad and doubtful debts
Transferred assets
2008
$'000
2007
$'000
171
89
30
-
-
4
201
93
Other expenses paid/payable to entities within the SA Government
$'000
$'000
Bad and doubtful debts
(118)
84
Other
Total other expenses
Transferred assets
30
-
(88)
84
2008
$'000
2007
$'000
Employee services *
59 448
55 543
Insurance recoveries
1 593
808
Recoveries
18 101
11 606
Business services
Total other expenses - SA Government
11.
Rent, fees and charges received/receivable
16 314
15 699
Fees, fines and penalties
887
742
Rent
737
609
9 861
13 253
106 941
98 260
2008
$'000
2007
$'000
Employee services *
59 448
55 543
Insurance recoveries
909
190
Recoveries
12 365
9 064
Business services
Patient and client fees
Total rent, fees and charges
Rent, fees and charges received/receivable from entities within SA
Government
15 052
15 235
Fees, fines and penalties
784
163
Rent
600
460
-
128
89 158
80 783
Patient and client fees
Total rent, fees and charges - SA Government
* Represents the recovery of costs for the provision of employee related services to Housing SA
12
Commonwealth revenues
2008
$'000
2007
$'000
Housing Assistance
73 739
72 539
Commonwealth State Disability Agreement
79 563
68 506
Home and Community Care
85 407
78 952
Supported Accommodation Assistance Program
17 263
17 121
6 316
7 522
Aged Care Assessment Program
FBT Transitional Compensation from ATO
Other
Total Commonwealth revenues
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
10 434
-
7 435
3 222
280 157
247 862
200
Financial statements
13.
Interest revenue
2008
$'000
2007
$'000
Interest on funds held
442
12
Total interest revenue
442
12
2008
$'000
2007
$'000
14.
Net (loss)/gain from disposal of non-current and other assets
Land and buildings
Proceeds from disposal
-
235
Less net book value of assets disposed
(749)
(145)
Net (loss)/gain from disposal of land and buildings
(749)
90
Plant and equipment
Proceeds from disposal
Less net book value of assets disposed
Net (loss) from disposal of plant and equipment
Total assets
Total proceeds from disposal
44
-
(52)
-
(8)
-
44
235
Less total value of assets disposed
(801)
(145)
Total net (loss)/gain from disposal of assets
(757)
90
2008
$'000
2007
$'000
15.
Other revenues
Assets received for nil consideration
-
181
Other
8 043
3 300
Total other revenues
8 043
3 481
Other Revenue received/receivable from entities within SA Government
2008
$'000
2007
$'000
Assets received for nil consideration
15.1
-
181
Other
15.1
1 884
1 281
Total other revenues - SA Government
1 884
1 462
15.1 Assets received for nil consideration
During the reporting period the Department received the following assets free of charge or for nominal
consideration.
2008
$'000
2007
$'000
Land & buildings
-
166
Plant & equipment
-
15
Total assets received for nil consideration
-
181
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
201
Financial statements
16.
Revenues from SA Government
16.1
Revenues from SA Government
2008
$'000
2007
$'000
584 244
499 809
Appropriations from Consolidated Account pursuant to the Appropriation Act
General appropriation
Department of Treasury and Finance - Contingency Funds
Tax Equivalent Regime Reimbursement - HomeStart Finance
Tax Equivalent Regime Reimbursement - Housing SA
State Housing Assistance Funds
Total SA Government appropriations
16.2
692
4 892
1 250
1 500
134 103
123 347
23 746
26 680
744 035
656 228
2008
$'000
2007
$'000
Grants from SA Government Agencies
Community Development Fund
3 413
3 489
Social Inclusion
5 561
5 923
Other
Total Grants from SA Government agencies
Total revenues from SA Government
7 106
13 169
16 080
22 581
760 115
678 809
17.
Unexpended funding commitments
The Department is engaged in a variety of funding programs involving State and Commonwealth sources who
provide monies to the Department on the premise that these funds are expended in a manner consistent with the
terms of the program. As at 30 June 2008, the Department had outstanding funding commitments to the following
programs:
2008
$'000
2007
$'000
Home and Community Care Program
4 022
3 568
CSHA Projects
3 515
6 071
Young People in Nursing Homes
2 000
-
Supported Accommodation Assistance Program
892
449
Office for the Ageing - Common Arrangements
576
-
Aged Care Assessment Program
351
123
Community Care Innovation Fund
282
-
The Way Forward
200
-
Water Remissions Funding
142
-
Social Inclusion Program
132
-
Domiciliary Care SA - Aged Care Assessment Team (ACAT)
53
228
Post Care Services (AFIS)
17
-
SRF Fire Safety Program
-
1 452
Families SA Commonwealth Programs
-
386
Social Inclusion - Homelessness Grants
-
196
WECAN Aboriginal Schools Program
-
59
National Child Protection and Support Service
-
40
Maria Daysh - Bequest
Total operating
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
-
10
12 182
12 582
202
Financial statements
Tregenza Avenue - Office Redevelopment
3 984
-
Case Management System
3 572
2 614
Families SA - Residential Care Units
2 805
-
Reorganisation of services relating to I&CC
1 000
-
Youth Training Centre Sustainment
575
607
SACOSS Children Facility
310
310
Strathmont Centre
284
145
Youth Detention Centre Project Team
121
-
Families SA Accommodation
111
1 151
Child Protection Review - Staff Accommodation
48
341
Total capital
12 810
5 168
Total unexpended funding commitments
24 992
17 750
2008
$'000
2007
$'000
18.
Cash and cash equivalents
Special Deposit Account with the Treasurer
44 291
17 397
Advance Account
329
304
Other Deposits
295
753
Cash on Hand
14
42
44 929
18 496
Current
2008
$'000
2007
$'000
Debtors
10 184
7 536
Total cash and cash equivalents
Cash deposits are recognised at their nominal amounts.
19.
Receivables
Less allowance for doubtful debts
(282)
(399)
Employee related services recoverable
8 165
6 947
Overpaid salaries
136
118
Sundry
124
2 613
-
7 320
160
179
Grant receivables
Prepayments
Goods and Services Tax receivable
Total current receivables
3 480
2 554
21 967
26 868
Non-current
Sundry
569
449
Employee related services recoverable
13 562
13 202
Total non-current receivables
14 131
13 651
Total receivables
36 098
40 519
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
203
Financial statements
Receivables from SA Government entities
2008
$'000
2007
$'000
Debtors
7 983
4 433
Less allowance for doubtful debts
(65)
(70)
21 727
20 149
Sundry
-
546
Prepayments
-
157
Employee related services recoverable
Goods and Services Tax receivable
Total receivables - SA Government
-
2 554
29 645
27 769
Interest rate and credit risk
Receivables are raised for all goods and services provided for which payment has not been received.
Receivables are normally settled within 30 days. Trade receivables, prepayments and accrued revenues are noninterest bearing. Other than recognised in the allowance for doubtful debts, it is not anticipated that counterparties
will fail to discharge their obligations. The carrying amount of receivables approximates net fair value due to being
receivable on demand. In addition, there is no concentration of credit risk.
Maturity and analysis of receivables - please refer to note 30.
Categorisation of financial instruments and risk exposure information - please refer to note 30
Bad and doubtful debts
The Department has recognised a bad and doubtful debt expense of $0.171 million in the income statement.
Movement in allowance for doubtful debts
The allowance for doubtful debts (allowance for impairment loss) is recognised when there is objective evidence
that a receivable is impaired.
An allowance for impairment loss has been recognised in "Other Expenses" in the Income Statement for specific
debtors and debtors assessed on a collective basis for which such evidence exists.
Movements in the allowance for doubtful debts (impairment loss)
$'000
Carrying amount at the beginning of the period
399
Transfer from administrative restructure
79
Decrease in the allowance
(189)
Amounts written off
(394)
Amounts recovered during the year
217
Increase/(decrease) in allowance recognised in profit or loss
170
Carrying amount at the end of the period
282
20.
Inventories
2008
$'000
2007
$'000
Drug Supplies
57
61
Stores
67
74
Medical, surgical and laboratory supplies
73
14
Food and hotel supplies
70
58
Other
80
78
347
285
Total inventories
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
204
Financial statements
21.
Property, plant and equipment
2008
$'000
2007
$'000
Land and buildings
Vacant land (fair value)
Site land (fair value)
5 312
4 360
139 581
109 051
Vacant buildings (fair value)
-
-
Less accumulated depreciation - vacant buildings
-
-
Buildings and improvements (fair value)
71 697
58 106
Less accumulated depreciation - buildings and improvements
(11 050)
(12 856)
Total land and buildings
205 540
158 661
Leasehold improvements
Leasehold improvements at cost (deemed fair value)
Less accumulated amortisation - leasehold improvements
7 916
7 980
(6 657)
(6 300)
1 259
1 680
Total leasehold improvements
Plant and equipment
Computing equipment at cost (deemed fair value)
Less accumulated depreciation - computing equipment at cost
Motor vehicles at cost (deemed fair value)
Less accumulated depreciation - motor vehicles at cost
ILEP equipment at cost (deemed fair value)
Less accumulated depreciation - ILEP equipment at cost
320
138
(230)
(114)
3 506
2 877
(1 279)
3 332
1 941
(1 903)
(1 109)
3 441
2 739
216 590
171 517
Total plant and equipment
Total property, plant and equipment at valuation (fair value)
418
(133)
(1 876)
Other plant and equipment at cost (deemed fair value)
Less accumulated depreciation - other plant and equipment at cost
778
(486)
Total property, plant and equipment at cost (deemed fair value)
15 852
13 354
Less total accumulated amortisation
(6 657)
(6 300)
Less total accumulated depreciation
(15 545)
(15 491)
Total property, plant and equipment
210 240
163 080
21.1 Reconciliation of land, buildings and leasehold improvements
The following table shows the movement of land, buildings and improvements, and leasehold improvements
during 2007-08.
Carrying amount at the beginning of the year
Vacant
land
Site land
$’000
4 360
$'000
109 051
Buildings
Leasehold
and
Improvement Improvements
s
$'000
45 250
$'000
1 680
Total land,
buildings
and
leasehold
imp.
$'000
160 341
Purchases
-
-
-
79
79
Disposals
-
(749)
-
-
(749)
Revaluation increment/(decrement)
952
24 609
10 459
-
36 020
Depreciation and amortisation for the year
-
-
(1 868)
(493)
(2 361)
Acquisition/(disposal) through administrative restructure
-
6 670
6 806
38
13 514
Other movements
-
-
-
(45)
(45)
5 312
139 581
60 647
1 259
206 799
Carrying amount at 30 June 2008
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
205
Financial statements
21.2 Reconciliation of plant and equipment
The following table shows the movement of plant and equipment during 2007-08.
Carrying amount at the beginning of the year
Computing
equipment
Motor
vehicles
ILEP
equipment
Other plant
and
equipment
Total plant
and
equipment
$'000
285
$'000
24
$'000
1 598
$'000
832
$'000
2 739
114
71
629
401
1 215
Assets disposed for nil consideration
Purchases
-
-
-
(30)
(30)
Disposals
-
-
-
(36)
(36)
(148)
(5)
(597)
(235)
(985)
543
Depreciation and amortisation for the year
Acquisition/(disposal) through administrative restructure
41
-
-
502
-
-
-
(5)
(5)
292
90
1 630
1 429
3 441
Other movements
Carrying amount at 30 June 2008
22.
Capital works in progress
2008
$'000
2007
$'000
Buildings and improvements in progress at cost (deemed fair value)
8 822
6 080
Total capital works in progress
8 822
6 080
Reconciliation of capital works in progress
Total capital
works in progress
The following table shows the movement of capital works in progress during 2007-08
$'000
Carrying amount at the beginning of the year
6 080
Purchases
2 871
WIP adjustments
(129)
Carrying amount at 30 June 2008
8 822
23.
Intangible Assets
2008
$'000
Computer software
Less accumulated amortisation - computer software
Total Intangible Assets
2007
$'000
167
-
-
-
167
-
The department has no contractual commitments for the acquisition of intangible assets.
Reconciliation of intangible assets
The following table shows the movement of intangible assets during 2007-08
Total intangible
assets
$'000
Carrying amount at the beginning of the year
Transfers In
57
Purchases
167
Depreciation and amortisation for the year
(57)
Carrying amount at 30 June 2008
167
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
206
Financial statements
24.
Payables
Current
2008
$'000
2007
$'000
Creditors
14 725
7 515
Disability Health Service workers compensation
-
381
Disability Health Service budget under-runs
-
891
Grants to SAHT - Tax Equivalent Regime
5 591
34
Other accrued expenses
4 000
3 170
Employee benefit on-costs
7 739
6 409
Other
Total current payables
259
1 023
32 314
19 423
-
902
Non-current
Disability Health Service workers compensation
Grants to Non-Government Organisations
621
743
Employee benefit on-costs
3 898
3 177
Total non-current payables
4 519
4 822
36 833
24 245
2008
$'000
2007
$'000
Total payables
Payables to SA Government entities
Creditors
Disability Health Service workers compensation
Disability Health Service budget under-runs
Grants to SAHT - Tax Equivalent Regime
Other accrued expenses
Employee benefit on-costs
Other
Total Payables - SA Government
2 575
2 666
-
1 283
-
891
5 591
34
404
729
11 550
8 542
-
-
20 120
14 145
Interest rate and credit risk
Creditors and accruals are raised for all amounts billed but unpaid. Sundry creditors are normally settled within 30
days. Employment on-costs are settled when the respective employee benefit that they relate to is discharged. All
payables are non-interest bearing. The carrying amount of payables approximates net fair value due to the
amounts being payable on demand.
Maturity and analysis of payables - please refer to note 30.
Categorisation of financial instruments and risk exposure information - please refer to note 30.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
207
Financial statements
25.
Employee benefits
2008
$'000
Current
Annual leave
Long service leave
Accrued salaries and wages
2007
$'000
27 931
20 660
9 046
10 527
8 249
5 456
45 226
36 643
Long service leave
46 954
33 426
Total non-current employee benefits
46 954
33 426
Total employee benefits
92 180
70 069
Total current employee benefits
Non-current
The total current and non-current employee expenses (i.e. aggregate employee benefit plus related on costs) for
2008 is $52.95 million (2007: $43.052 million) and $49.68 million (2007: $36.60 million) respectively.
26.
Borrowings
Non-current
2008
$'000
2007
$'000
Advance - Treasury Imprest Account
285
285
Total non-current borrowings - SA Government
285
285
Total borrowings
285
285
2008
$'000
2007
$'000
27.
Provisions
Current
Insurance
27.1
316
251
Workers compensation
27.2
7 135
4 465
7 451
4 716
Total current provisions
Non-current
Insurance
27.1
669
577
Workers compensation
27.2
18 354
12 089
Total non-current provisions
19 023
12 666
Total provisions
26 474
17 382
A liability has been reported to reflect unsettled workers compensation claims. The workers compensation
provision is based on an actuarial assessment performed by the Public Sector Workforce Division of the
Department of the Premier and Cabinet.
27.1
Reconciliation of insurance
The following table shows the movement of insurance during 2007-08
Public liability
$'000
Property
$'000
Total
$'000
805
297
23
51
828
348
Reduction due to payments
(90)
(31)
(121)
Net revision of estimates
(79)
9
(70)
Carrying amount at 30 June 2008
933
52
985
Carrying amount at beginning of financial year
Increase to provision due to revision of estimates
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
208
Financial statements
The following table shows the movement of insurance during 2006-07
Public liability
$'000
Property
$'000
Total
$'000
780
103
43
-
823
103
Reduction due to payments
(50)
(20)
(70)
Net revision of estimates
(28)
-
(28)
Carrying amount at 30 June 2007
805
23
828
Carrying amount at beginning of financial year
Increase to provision due to revision of estimates
27.2
Reconciliation of workers compensation
The following table shows the movement of workers compensation during 2007-08
2008
$'000
Carrying amount at beginning of financial year
Transfers in at 1 July
16 554
7 142
Increase to provision due to revision of estimates
14 948
Reduction due to payments
(13 155)
Carrying amount at 30 June 2008
25 489
The following table shows the movement of Workers Compensation during 2006-07
2007
$'000
Carrying amount at beginning of financial year
Transfers in at 1 July
8 466
9 770
Increase to provision due to revision of estimates
5 122
Reduction due to payments
(6 804)
Carrying amount at 30 June 2007
16 554
28.
Other liabilities
2008
$'000
2007
$'000
Unclaimed monies
115
69
Unearned revenue
-
42
Total current other liabilities
115
111
Total other liabilities
115
111
2008
$'000
2007
$'000
-
-
2008
$'000
2007
$'000
Contributed capital
26 991
19 474
Retained earnings
68 273
83 461
Asset revaluation reserve
49 452
13 433
144 716
116 368
Current
Other liabilities with SA Government entities
Total other liabilities - SA Government
29.
Equity
Total equity
The Asset Revaluation Reserve is used to record increments and decrements on the revaluation of Non Current
Assets.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
209
Financial statements
30.
Financial instruments
30.1
Categorisation of financial instruments
Carrying
amount
2008
Fair
value
2008
Carrying
amount
2007
Fair
value
2007
18, 34
$'000
44 929
$'000
44 929
$'000
18 496
$'000
18 496
19
32 618
32 618
37 965
37 965
77 547
77 547
56 461
56 461
24 245
Note
Financial Assets
Cash and Cash Equivalents
Receivables
Total Financial Assets
Financial Liabilities
Payables
24
36 833
36 833
24 245
Interest bearing liabilities
26
285
285
285
285
37 118
37 118
24 530
24 530
Total Financial Liabilities
The amount of receivables and payables disclosed above, excludes statutory receivables and payables such as
GST input tax credit payable and recoverable.
30.2 Credit Risk
Credit risk arises when there is the possibility of the Department's debtors defaulting on their contractual
obligations resulting in financial loss to the Department.
The Department has minimal concentration of credit risk. The Department does not engage in high risk hedging
for its financial assets
30.3 Ageing analysis of financial assets
The following table discloses the ageing of financial assets, past due including impaired assets past due.
Past due by
Overdue for
< 30 days
Overdue for
30 - 60 days
Overdue >
60 days
Not Impaired
$'000
$'000
$'000
$'000
Receivables
1 013
156
477
1 646
-
-
-
-
Receivables
-
-
(282)
(282)
Other financial assets
-
-
-
-
1 013
156
195
1 364
Overdue for
< 30 days
Overdue for
30 - 60 days
Overdue >
60 days
Total
$'000
$'000
$'000
$'000
123
33
304
460
-
-
-
-
Receivables
-
-
(399)
(399)
Other financial assets
-
-
-
-
123
33
(95)
61
2008
Other financial assets
Total
Impaired
2007
Not Impaired
Receivables
Other financial assets
Impaired
The amount of receivables and payables disclosed above, excludes statutory receivables and payables such as
GST input tax credit payable and recoverable.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
210
Financial statements
30.4
Maturity analysis of financial assets and liabilities
Contractual Maturity
Carrying
amount
2008
Financial Assets
< 1 Year
1 - 5 Years
> 5 Years
$'000
$'000
$'000
$'000
Cash and Cash Equivalents
44 929
44 929
-
-
Receivables
32 618
18 487
5 994
8 137
Other Financial Assets
-
-
-
-
77 547
63 416
5 994
8 137
36 833
32 314
4 519
-
285
-
-
285
Finance lease liability
-
-
-
-
Other financial liabilities
-
-
-
-
37 118
32 314
4 519
285
Carrying
amount
< 1 Year
1 - 5 Years
> 5 Years
$'000
Total Financial Assets
Financial Liabilities
Payables
Borrowings
Total Financial Liabilities
2007
$'000
$'000
$'000
Cash and Cash Equivalents
Financial Assets
18 496
18 496
-
-
Receivables
37 965
24 314
5 729
7 922
Other Financial Assets
-
-
-
-
56 461
42 810
5 729
7 922
24 245
19 423
4 822
-
285
-
-
285
Finance lease liability
-
-
-
-
Other financial liabilities
-
-
-
-
24 530
19 423
4 822
285
Total Financial Assets
Financial Liabilities
Payables
Borrowings
Total Financial Liabilities
Maturity analysis of receivables and payables excludes statutory receivables and payables such as GST
receivables and payables.
30.5 Liquidity Risk
Liquidity risk arises where the Department is unable to meet its financial obligations as they fall due. The
continued existence of the Department is dependent on State Government policy and on continued appropriations
by Parliament for the Department's administration and programs delivery. The Department settles undisputed
accounts within 30 days from the date of the invoice or the date the invoice is first received.
31.
Unrecognised contractual commitments
31.1 Capital commitments
Capital expenditure contracted at the reporting date, but not recognised as liabilities in the financial report, are as
follows:
Within one year
2008
$'000
5 822
2007
$'000
164
Later than one year but not later than five years
9 255
-
Later than five years
Total capital commitments
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
-
-
15 077
164
211
Financial statements
Included in capital expenditure commitments above is $1.37 million (2007: $13 000) which is the GST component
of the capital expenditure commitments.
31.2
Operating lease commitments
Commitments under non-cancellable operating leases at the reporting date not
recognised as liabilities in the financial report, are payable as follows:
2008
$'000
2007
$'000
Not later than one year
15 059
14 317
Later than one year but not later than five years
31 835
27 401
Later than five years
41 719
-
Total operating lease commitments (including GST)
88 613
41 718
Included in the operating lease commitments above is $8.06 million (2007: $3.70 million) which is the GST
component of the operating lease payments.
The Department has many lease agreements. These leases are for administrative purposes and vary in length.
Lease payments are monthly and predominantly paid in advance. Each lease agreement has renewal options for
a determined period, exercisable by both the lessor and lessee.
32.
Net revenues from restructure
32.1
Net revenues from restructure for 2007-08
Transfers into the Department
Metropolitan Domiciliary Care (MDC) was incorporated under the South Australian Health Commission Act 1976.
On 28 June 2007, the Governor proclaimed to dissolve MDC in accordance with reforms to the governance
arrangements for the management of the provision of health services. Effective 1 July 2007, the Board of MDC
dissolved and the assets and liabilities of MDC were transferred, assigned or vested in the Minister for Ageing.
Julia Farr Services (JFS) was incorporated under the South Australian Health Commission Act 1976. Effective
1 July 2004, the Minister of Health delegated responsibility for JFS to the Minister for Disability. On 28 June 2007,
the Governor proclaimed to dissolve JFS in accordance with reforms to the governance arrangements for the
management of the provision of disability services. Effective 1 July 2007, the Board of JFS dissolved and the
assets and liabilities of JFS were transferred, assigned or vested in the Minister for Disability.
Prior to 1 July 2007, the Department of Health (DH) provided general accounting, financial accounting, financial
systems and accounting policy advice to the Department. The provision of these services was covered by a
Service Level Agreement. Effective 1 July 2007, the Department became the provider of these services to DH and
relevant staff were transferred from DH to the Department. The Chief Executive of DH and the Chief Executive of
the Department approved the transfers in accordance with the requirements of the Public Sector Management Act
1995. A revised Service Level Agreement reflects that the Department is now the service provider. The liabilities
transferred from DH are employee liabilities.
2007-08
MDC
JFS
DH
Total
$'000
$'000
$'000
$'000
Assets
18 876
5 963
-
24 839
Liabilities
15 478
13 017
557
29 052
3 398
(7 054)
(557)
(4 213)
Net Assets
Increase/(decrease) in net assets due to transfers into the Department
(4 213)
Increase/ (decrease) in net assets due to Administrative Restructure in 2007-2008
Net revenues/ (loss) from restructure
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
MDC
JFS
DH
Total
$'000
$'000
$'000
$'000
3 398
(7 054)
(557)
(4 213)
212
Financial statements
32.2
Net revenues from restructure for 2006-07
Transfers into the Department
The Intellectual Disability Services Council (IDSC) and the Independent Living Centre (ILC) were incorporated
under the South Australian Health Commission Act 1976. Effective 1 July 2004, the Minister of Health delegated
responsibility for IDSC and ILC to the Minister for Disability. On 29 June 2006 the Governor proclaimed to
dissolve IDSC and ILC in association with reforms to the governance arrangements within the South Australian
Government with respect to the management of the provision of disability services. Effective 1 July 2006, the
Boards of IDSC and ILC dissolved and the assets and liabilities of IDSC and ILC were transferred, assigned or
were vested in the Minister for Disability.
2006-07
IDSC
ILC
Total
$'000
$'000
$'000
Assets
63 355
10 551
73 906
Liabilities
32 641
1 565
34 206
Net assets
30 714
8 986
39 700
Increase in net assets due to transfers into the Department
39 700
Transfers out of the Department
On 22 March 2007, the Governor proclaimed the transfer of the employees of the Office for Women (OFW) from
the Department for Families and Communities (DFC) to the Attorney-General's Department. It is taken that the
proclamation also means the transfer of assets and liabilities of OFW to the Attorney-General's Department. In
accordance with APF II General Purpose Financial Reporting Framework, for financial accounting and reporting
purposes the transfer is taken to occur as at 1 April 2007.
2006-07
OFW
Total
$'000
$'000
Assets
246
246
Liabilities
254
254
(8)
(8)
Net assets
Increase in net assets due to transfers out of the Department
8
Increase in net assets due to administrative restructure in 2006-2007
Net revenues from restructure
IDSC
ILC
OFW
Total
$'000
$'000
$'000
$'000
30 714
8 986
8
39 708
33.
Contingent assets and liabilities
The Department does not have any known contingent assets and liabilities.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
213
Financial statements
34.
Cash flow reconciliations
2008
$'000
2007
$'000
Reconciliation of cash and cash equivalents - cash at year end as per:
Cash Flow Statement
44 929
18 496
Cash and cash equivalents disclosed in the Balance Sheet
44 929
18 496
Reconciliation of net cash provided by operating activities to net cost of
providing services:
Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities
Less revenues from SA Government
Less grants from SA Government agencies
18 802
(11 691)
(744 035)
(651 336)
(16 080)
(27 473)
(741 313)
(690 500)
(2 853)
(2 472)
(550)
(30)
(573)
-
Assets received for nil consideration
-
181
Impairment of non-current assets
-
-
(757)
90
-
-
Add/less non cash items
Depreciation
Amortisation
Assets transferred
Gain/loss from disposal of non-current assets
Revaluation increments/decrements
Bad and doubtful debts
(171)
-
WIP Adjustment
(129)
-
Increase/(decrease) in receivables
(10 097)
2 256
Increase/(decrease) in inventories
(93)
59
(10 328)
8 214
(4 765)
(3 536)
Changes in assets and liabilities
Decrease/(increase) in payables and provisions
Decrease/(increase) in employee benefits
Decrease/(increase) in other liabilities
Net cost of providing services
(4)
(300)
(771 090)
(686 581)
35.
Remuneration of Directors and Related Party Disclosure
There are various committees, forums, groups, panels and councils that have been created to assist the
Department in meeting its objectives. In addition, there are committees that have been created by the Minister.
Where any of the members are remunerated, certain disclosures are required under the Accounting Policy
Frameworks issued by the Department of Treasury and Finance.
Members of the Board/Committees during the financial year were:
Child Death and Serious Injury Review Committee
William "Brian" Butler
Nigel Stewart
Roger Byard
Alison Tucker
Linda Dore
John Venditto
Dymphna Eszenyi
Fiona Ward
Dianne Gursansky
Richenda Webb
Diana Hetzel
Helen Wighton
Samantha Laubsch
Peter Woite
Christopher Shakes
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
214
Financial statements
Charitable and Social Welfare Board (Community Benefit SA)
Declan Andrews
Mark Henley
Letitia Ashworth
Michelle Jones
Christina Birch
Elizabeth Kosmala
Colleen Fitzpatrick
Council for the Care of Children
Fiona Arney
Cody Morris
Peter Bicknell
Daryle Rigney
Jane Chapman
Chris Robinson
Juliet Haslam
Emily Rozee
Diana Hetzel
Simon Schrapel
Mellita Kimber
Anthony Sherbon
Jayne Lehmann
Suzanne Vardon
Joslene Mazel
Ministerial Advisory Board on Ageing
Sue Balde
Patricia Greethead
Brian Butler
Graeme Hugo
Janice Cass
Gerard McEwen
Rosemary Crowley
Theadora Papadopoulos
James Giles
Joan Stone
Minister's Disability Advisory Council
Susan Andrews
Sharon Holmes
Katharine Annear
Evdokia Kalaitzidis
Monika Baker
Neil Lillecrapp
Jackie Beard
Gaelle Mellis
Maurice Corcoran
Sandra Miller
Mikaila Crotty
Jane Mussared
Silvana Gant
Tony Starkey
Michelle Hagarty
Michael Taggart
Lorna Hallahan
Michael Wilson
Miriam High
Risk Management and Audit Committee
Peter Bull
Dennis Huxley
David Caudrey
Geoff Lamshed
Jamie Dreckow
Mary Patetsos
Elizabeth Durward
Jane Pickering
Michael J B Evans
Joseph Ullianich
Phil Fagan-Schmidt
Supported Residential Facilities Advisory Committee
Maxine Ashton
Christopher Wurm
Phillip Beddall
Alison Creaser (D)
Jane Chapman
Kevin Duke (D)
Dianne Chapple
Elizabeth Evans (D)
Deidre Cope
Lloyd Evans (D)
Marilyn Crabtree
Kathryn Farr (D)
Michael Livori
Val Hall (D)
Keith Moorman
Jeanette Linn (D)
Paul Pledger
Suzanne Marshall (D)
Peter Smith
Neville Stephens (D)
Sue Whitington
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
215
Financial statements
(D) denotes a deputy member. Deputies listed may or may not have attended a committee meeting during the
financial year.
Total income received, or due and receivable, by Members was $0.093 million.
The number of Members whose income from the entity falls within the following bands is:
2008
No. of Members
$0
35
$1 - $9 999
60
$10 000 - $19 999
-
$20 000 - $29 999
Total
95
In accordance with Department of the Premier and Cabinet Circular No. 16, government employees did not
receive any remuneration for board, committee or forum duties during the financial year.
Benefits given by the Department to superannuation funds or otherwise in connection with the retirement of
members were $0.006 million.
During the financial year, no loans were made to members. At the reporting date, no outstanding loans exist with
Members.
Transactions between related parties are on conditions no more favourable than those which it is reasonable to
expect the entity would have adopted if dealing with the related party at arm's length in the same circumstances.
36.
Events after balance date
Shared Services SA is the agency within Government that has been set up to provide corporate services at a
whole of government level. During 2008-09, staff from the Department will transfer to Shared Services SA.
37.
Administered items
The revenues, expenditures, assets and liabilities that were administered but not controlled by the Department
have not been included in the financial statements. These administered transactions and balances are regarded
as significant in relation to the Department's overall financial performance and in accordance the APF II, General
Purpose Financial Reporting Framework, separate consolidated administered financial statements and notes to
the accounts have been prepared.
38.
Residential Aged Care Sector Reporting
The former Julia Farr Services (JFS) was an approved provider of residential aged care (RAC) with 62 places
licensed by the Commonwealth Department of Health and Aging. Effective 1 July 2007, the Governor proclaimed
the dissolution of Julia Farr Services and all assets and liabilities vested in or held by Julia Farr Services were
transferred or assigned to or vested in, the Minister for Disability. Certain assets held by the former Julia Farr
Services are subject to the terms and conditions of the Home for Incurables Trust and the Minister for Disability
has been appointed as trustee. The trust assets are administered but not controlled by the Department, hence
they are not included in the accounts of the Department.
The former Intellectual Disability Services Council (IDSC) was also an approved provider of residential aged care
with 32 places licensed by the Commonwealth Department of Health and Aging. On 29 June 2006 the Governor
proclaimed to dissolve IDSC in association with reforms to the governance arrangements within the South
Australian Government with respect to the management of the provision of disability services. Effective 1 July
2006, the Board of IDSC dissolved and the assets and liabilities of IDSC were transferred, assigned or were
vested in the Minister for Disability.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
216
Financial statements
INCOME STATEMENT
for the year ended 30 June 2008
RAC - JFS RAC - IDSC
Non RAC
$'000
$'000
1021
3051
Employee benefit expenses
3 275
2 934
388 479
394 688
Supplies and services
2 486
496
163 964
166 946
Depreciation and amortisation
4
115
3 284
3 403
Grants, subsidies and client payments
-
-
600 678
600 678
757
Commonwealth Aged Care Provider ID:
$'000
Total
Expenses
Net loss from disposal of non-current assets
(1)
-
758
Other expenses
1
1
199
201
Total expenses
5 765
3 546
1 157 362
1 166 673
Income
Rent, fees and charges
1 088
593
105 260
106 941
Commonwealth revenues
Interest revenue
1 728
-
1 581
-
276 848
442
280 157
442
Other revenues
-
-
8 043
8 043
2 816
2 174
390 593
395 583
(2 949)
(1 372)
(766 769)
(771 090)
Revenues from SA Government
-
-
744 035
744 035
Grants from SA Government agencies
-
-
16 080
16 080
Total revenue from SA Government
-
-
760 115
760 115
(2 949)
(1 372)
(6 654)
(10 975)
Total income
Net cost of providing services
Revenues from/ payments to SA Government
Net result before restructure
Net result from restructuring
Net revenues from administrative restructure
Net result after restructure
-
-
(4 213)
(4 213)
(2 949)
(1 372)
(10 867)
(15 188)
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
217
Financial statements
BALANCE SHEET
As at 30 June 2008
Commonwealth Aged Care Provider ID:
RAC - JFS RAC - IDSC
$'000
$'000
1021
3051
Non RAC
Total
$'000
$'000
Current assets
Cash and cash equivalents*
Receivables
Inventories
Total current assets
-
-
44 929
44 929
13
8
21 946
21 967
-
-
347
347
13
8
67 222
67 243
Non-current assets
Receivables
Property, plant and equipment
Capital works in progress
-
-
14 131
14 131
18
10 188
200 034
210 240
-
-
8 822
8 822
Intangible assets
167
167
Total non-current assets
18
10 188
223 154
233 360
Total assets
31
10 196
290 376
300 603
Current liabilities
Payables
52
48
32 214
32 314
Employee benefits
338
312
44 576
45 226
Provisions
107
90
7 254
7 451
-
-
115
115
497
450
84 159
85 106
Other liabilities
Total current liabilities
Non-current liabilities
Payables
Employee benefits
37
36
4 446
4 519
401
386
46 167
46 954
Borrowings
-
-
285
285
Provisions
270
228
18 525
19 023
Total non-current liabilities
708
650
69 423
70 781
1 205
1 100
153 582
155 887
(1 174)
9 096
136 794
144 716
Total liabilities
Net assets
Equity
Contributed capital
-
-
26 991
26 991
Asset revaluation reserve
-
1 646
47 806
49 452
Retained earnings
(2 949)
(1 372)
72 594
68 273
Total equity
(2 949)
274
147 391
144 716
* Cash deficits in residential aged care are funded by contributions from SA Government.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
218
Financial statements
ADMINISTERED ITEMS INCOME STATEMENT
for the year ended 30 June 2008
2008
2007
Note
$'000
$'000
Grants and contributions
A4
9 644
9 645
Rent, fees and charges
A5
506
43
546
154
12 293
8 048
Administered Income
Interest
Client Trust Fund Receipts
Other Income
Total
113
152
23 102
18 042
125 546
106 415
125 546
106 415
148 648
124 457
Revenues from/ Payments to SA Government
Revenues from SA Government
A6
Total Revenues from (payments to) SA Government
Total Administered Income
Administered Expenses
Employee benefit costs
Supplies and services
Grants, subsidies and client payments
A7
Depreciation and amortisation
Client Trust Fund Payments
Total Administered Expenses
Operating Surplus/(Deficit)
266
238
1 235
1 424
134 882
128 057
645
-
10 889
7 269
147 917
136 988
731
(12 531)
Operating Surplus/(Deficit) is attributable to the SA Government as Owner.
The accompanying notes form part of these statements.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
219
Financial statements
ADMINISTERED ITEMS BALANCE SHEET
as at 30 June 2008
Note
2008
2007
$'000
$'000
23 393
15 716
Current Assets
Cash
Receivables
Other
Total Current Assets
1 920
19
-
2 264
25 313
17 999
Non-Current Assets
Property, Plant and Equipment
A9.1
27 067
-
Investment Property
A9.2
1 139
-
28 206
-
53 519
17 999
Payables
2 424
2 863
Overdraft
20
19
Employee Benefits
12
9
2
2
2 458
2 893
-
-
Total Non-Current Assets
Total Assets
Current Liabilities
Provisions
Total Current Liabilities
Non-Current Liabilities
Total Non-Current Liabilities
Total Liabilities
2 458
2 893
51 061
15 106
Retained Earnings
31 677
15 106
Asset Revaluation Reserve
19 384
-
51 061
15 106
Net Assets
Equity
Total Equity
The accompanying notes form part of these statements.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
220
Financial statements
ADMINISTERED ITEMS
STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY
for the year ended 30 June 2008
Asset
Note
Balance at 1 July 2006
Contributed
Revaluation
Retained
Capital
Reserve
Earnings
Total
$'000
$'000
$'000
$'000
-
-
21 440
21 440
Restructure-transfer into Department
-
-
6 202
6 202
Adjustment to Equity
-
-
(5)
(5)
Operating (Deficit)/Surplus for 2006-07
-
-
(12 531)
(12 531)
Total recognised income and expense for 2006-07
-
-
(6 334)
(6 334)
-
-
15 106
15 106
Restructure-transfer into Department
-
19 384
15 840
35 224
Operating (Deficit)/Surplus for 2007-08
-
-
731
731
Total recognised income and expense for 2007-08
-
19 384
16 571
35 955
-
19 384
31 677
51 061
Balance at 30 June 2007
Balance at 30 June 2008
Total Equity is attributable to the SA Government as Owner.
The accompanying notes form part of these statements.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
221
Financial statements
ADMINISTERED ITEMS CASH FLOW STATEMENT
for the year ended 30 June 2008
Note
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES
2008
2007
$’000
$'000
Cash Outflows
Employee benefit payments
Concessions
Other grants, subsidies and client payments
Supplies and services
Client Trust Fund Payments
Cash used in operations
(263)
(238)
(111 543)
(106 922)
(23 370)
(20 144)
(1 279)
(1 555)
(10 889)
(7 269)
(147 344)
(136 128)
125 546
106 415
Cash Inflows
Receipts from SA Government
Taxes, fees and charges
2
2
Grants and contributions
9 815
9 746
Interest received
Client Trust Fund Receipts
Other receipts
Cash generated from operations
NET CASH PROVIDED BY/(USED IN) OPERATING ACTIVITIES
A10
546
154
12 293
8 048
445
83
148 647
124 448
1 303
(11 680)
3 900
-
3 900
-
2 473
6 202
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES
Proceeds from sale of property, plant and equipment
NET CASH PROVIDED BY/(USED IN) INVESTING ACTIVITIES
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES
Restructuring activities
Cash overdraft
1
-
2 474
6 202
7 677
(5 478)
Cash at the beginning of the Financial Year
15 716
21 194
Cash at the end of the Financial Year
23 393
15 716
NET CASH PROVIDED BY/(USED IN) FINANCING ACTIVITIES
Net (Decrease)/Increase in Cash Held
The accompanying notes form part of these statements.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
222
Financial statements
NOTES TO ADMINISTERED ITEMS FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
for the year ended 30 June 2008
A1. Background
The Revenues, Expenditures, Assets and Liabilities that were administered but not controlled by the Department
have not been included in the financial statements of the Department. These administered transactions and
balances are regarded as significant in relation to the Department's overall financial performance and in
accordance with APF II, General Purpose Financial Reporting Framework, separate consolidated administered
financial statements and notes the accounts have been prepared.
A2. Accounting Policies
The accounting policies pertaining to the administered items for the Department are contained in Note 2 Summary
of Significant Accounting Policies for the Department.
Cash and cash equivalents
Cash and cash equivalents as reported in the Balance Sheet includes cash on hand, deposits held at call and
other short-term, highly liquid investments with maturities of three months or less that are readily converted to
cash and which are subject to insignificant risk of changes in value. Cash and cash equivalents in the Cash Flow
Statement comprise cash and cash equivalents as defined above. Cash is measured at nominal value.
A3. Programs of Administered Items
• Gamblers Rehabilitation
• Charitable and Social Welfare
• Home for Incurables Trust**
• Supported Residential Facilities Indemnity Fund
• Client Trust Accounts
• Minister's Salary
• CRC Trust
• Concessions
• Community Service Obligations
• State Emergency Relief Fund
** Effective 1 July 2007, the Minister for Disability became the trustee of the Home for Incurables Trust by virtue of
the vesting of assets and liabilities of the former Julia Farr Services. Separate financial information pertaining to
the Home for Incurables Trust is in Note A12.
Client Trust Accounts
The Department of Families and Communities acts as trustee of client trust accounts, relating to clients of the
former Intellectual Disability Services Council Incorporated (IDSC) and from 1 July 2007, the former Julia Farr
Services (JFS). The balance of the client trust accounts at 30 June 2008 was $8.25 million (2007 $6.84 million).
These amounts cannot be used by the Department for Families and Communities to achieve its own objectives,
and accordingly are not included in the controlled financial statements.
2008
$'000
Opening Balance 1 July
Add Receipts
Less Expenses
Closing Balance 30 June
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
2007
$'000
6 844
6 065
12 293
8 048
(10 889)
(7 269)
8 248
6 844
223
Financial statements
A4.
Grants and contributions
2008
2007
$'000
$'000
Gamblers Rehabilitation
5 345
5 345
Charitable & Social Welfare
4 000
4 000
Concessions
Minister's Salary
Total Grants, Subsidies and Client Payments
A5.
Other
Total Rent, Fees and Charges
227
9 644
9 645
2008
$'000
2007
$'000
411
-
95
43
506
43
Revenue from SA Government
Concessions
Community Service Obligations
Total Revenue from SA Government
A7.
73
241
Rent, Fees and Charges
Rental Income
A6.
58
2008
2007
$'000
$'000
110 272
96 211
15 274
10 204
125 546
106 415
Grants, subsidies and client payments
2008
2007
$'000
$'000
Gamblers Rehabilitation
5 319
4 512
Charitable & Social Welfare
3 856
5 743
111 502
107 913
14 171
9 801
Concessions
Community Service Obligations
State Emergency Relief Fund
Total Grants, Subsidies and Client Payments
34
88
134 882
128 057
A8. Consultancies
The number and dollar amount of Consultancies paid/payable (included in supplies and services) that fell within
the following bands:
No
2008
$'000
No
2007
$'000
Below $10 000
-
-
-
-
Between $10 000 and $50 000
1
18
1
14
Above $50 000
-
-
1
82
Total Paid/Payable to the Consultants Engaged
1
18
2
96
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
224
Financial statements
A9.
Property, Plant and Equipment
1.
Property, plant and equipment
Land and buildings
Site land (fair value)
2008
$'000
2007
$'000
6 911
-
Buildings and improvements (fair value)
21 445
-
Less accumulated depreciation - buildings and improvements
(1 289)
-
Total land and buildings
27 067
-
Reconciliation of Land and Buildings
The following table shows the movement of land, buildings and improvements, and leasehold improvements
during 2007-08.
Carrying amount at time of transfer through Administrative Restructure
Depreciation and amortisation for the year
Carrying amount at 30 June 2008
2.
Site land
Buildings and
Improvements
Total
Land,
Buildings
$'000
6 911
$'000
20 801
$'000
27 712
-
(645)
(645)
6 911
20 156
27 067
Investment Property
2008
$'000
Investment Building
Revaluation increment/(decrement)
Fair Value at 30 June 2008
560
560
2008
$'000
Investment Land
Revaluation increment/(decrement)
Fair Value at 30 June 2008
3.
579
579
Non -current classified as held for sale
2008
$'000
Ringwood Land and Building carrying amount at time of transfer through
Administrative Restructure
Settlement of the sale of the Ringwood Land and Building 31 August 2008
Carrying amount at 30 June 2008
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
3 900
(3 900)
-
225
Financial statements
A10. Cash Flow Reconciliations
2008
2007
$'000
$'000
Reconciliation of Cash - at year end as per:
Cash Flow Statement
23 393
15 716
Balance Sheet
23 393
15 716
-
-
1 303
(11 680)
Reconciliation of Net Cash Inflows/(Outflows) from Operating
Activities to Net (Deficit)/Surplus
Net Cash Provided By / (Used In) Operating Activities
Add/Less non cash items
Depreciation and Amortisation
(645)
-
Correction of prior period error
-
4
Changes in Assets and Liabilities
Increase/(Decrease) in Receivables
Increase/(Decrease) in Other Assets
Decrease/(Increase) in Payables
Decrease/(Increase) in Employee Benefits
Net (Deficit)/Surplus
1 901
1
(2 264)
454
439
(1 305)
(3)
(5)
731
(12 531)
A11. Administered contingent assets and liabilities
The Department has no administered contingent assets and liabilities.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
226
Financial statements
A12. Home for Incurables Trust
As part of wide ranging reforms relating to the delivery of disability services by the Department, effective 1 July
2007, Julia Farr Services was dissolved and all assets and liabilities vested in or held by Julia Farr Services were
transferred or assigned or vested with the Minister for Disability. Certain assets held by the former Julia Farr
Services are subject to the terms and conditions of the Home for Incurables Trust. The Original Trust was
established in June 1879 and was varied by the Supreme Court on 7 November 1997.
The former Board of Julia Farr Services was trustee of the Home for Incurables Trust and on dissolution, the
Board of Julia Farr Services resolved to resign as trustee of the Home for Incurables Trust. The Minister for
Disability is the trustee for the Home for Incurables Trust.
The role of the Trust is " …to apply property vested in it for the purpose of providing for persons whose ability to
live independently is temporarily or permanently impaired or in jeopardy as a consequence of an acquired brain
injury or degenerative neurological condition or a physical condition resulting in disability including but not limiting
the foregoing in any way whatsoever, the following services and facilities;
(a) by providing for them, in a variety of residential, centre and community based settings
(i) accommodation
(ii) nursing, medical, allied health and attendant care service
(iii) personal and community support services
(iv) technical and personal support aids
(v) rehabilitation, respite and recreational services
(vi) out patient and day care services
(vii) measures and services to enhance their quality of life;
(b) by providing facilities for education research with respect to such persons; and
(c) by providing any services and facilities ancillary or in relation to the foregoing or by providing additional
services and facilities that may be appropriate from time to time."
The following Income, Expenditures, Assets and Liabilities of the Home for Incurables Trust have been included in
the administered items financial statements, but are separately disclosed in the following schedules in accordance
with the governance requirements of the Trust.
Schedule of Income and Expenses - Home for Incurables Trust
2008
$'000
Expenses
Property expenses
88
Depreciation and amortisation
645
Total Expenses
733
Income
Rental income
411
Interest
414
Total Income
825
Net Operating Surplus/(Deficit)
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
92
227
Financial statements
Schedule of Assets and Liabilities - Home for Incurables Trust
2008
$'000
Current Assets
Cash and Cash Equivalents
Deposits with the Treasurer
Deposits with SAFA
452
6 658
Total Cash and Cash Equivalents
7 110
Total Current Assets
7 110
Non Current Assets
Property, Plant and Equipment
Investment Properties
27 067
1 139
Total Non Current Assets
28 206
Total Assets
35 316
Total Liabilities
Net Assets
35 316
Schedule of Changes in Equity - Home for Incurables Trust
Balance on transfer at 1 July 2007
Asset
Revaluation
Reserve
Retained
Earnings
Total
$'000
19 384
$'000
15 840
$'000
35 224
Net income/expense recognised directly to equity
-
-
-
Net operating result/deficit
-
92
92
Total recognised income and expense for the period
Balance at the end of the reporting period
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
-
92
92
19 384
15 932
35 316
228
Financial statements
Schedule of Administered Cash Flows - Home for Incurables Trust
2008
$'000
Cash Flows from Operating Activities
Cash Inflows
Interest Revenue
414
Rental Revenue
411
Total Cash Inflows
825
Cash Outflows
Property expenses
(88)
Total Cash Outflows
(88)
Net Cash Inflows/(Cash Outflows)-Operating Activities
737
Cash Flows from Investing Activities
Cash Inflows
Proceeds sale of property, plant and equipment
3 900
Total Cash Inflows
3 900
Net Cash Inflows/(Cash Outflows)-Investing Activities
3 900
Cash Flows from Financing Activities
Transfer on 1 July 2007
2 473
Total Cash Inflows
2 473
Net Cash Inflows/(Cash Outflows)-Financing Activities
2 473
Net Increase / (Decrease) in cash held
7 110
Cash at the beginning of the reporting period
Cash at the end of the reporting period
7 110
Accounting Policies
The accounting policies pertaining to the administered items for the Department are contained in Note 2 Summary
of Significant Accounting Policies for the Department.
Cash and cash equivalents
Cash and cash equivalents as reported in the Balance Sheet includes cash on hand, deposits held at call and
other short-term, highly liquid investments with maturities of three months or less that are readily convertible to
cash and which are subject to insignificant risk of changes in value. Cash and cash equivalents in the Cash Flow
Statement comprise cash and cash equivalents as defined above. Cash is measured at nominal value.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
229
Financial statements
Reconciliation of Property Plant and Equipment - Home for Incurables Trust
Property, plant and equipment
2008
$'000
Land and buildings
Site land (fair value)
6 911
Buildings and improvements (fair value)
21 445
Less accumulated depreciation - buildings and improvements
(1 289)
Total land and buildings
27 067
Reconciliation of Land and Buildings - Home for Incurables Trust
The following table shows the movement of land, buildings and improvements, and leasehold improvements for
the HFI Trust during 2007-08.
Carrying amount at time of transfer through Administrative Restructure
Depreciation and amortisation for the year
Carrying amount at 30 June 2008
Site land
Buildings and
lmprovements
Total
Land,
Buildings
$'000
6 911
$'000
20 801
$'000
27 712
-
(645)
(645)
6 911
20 156
27 067
Investment Property - Home for Incurables Trust
2008
$'000
Investment Building
Revaluation increment/(decrement)
Fair Value at 30 June 2008
560
560
2008
$'000
Investment Land
Revaluation increment/(decrement)
Fair Value at 30 June 2008
579
579
Non -current classified as held for sale - Home for Incurables Trust
2008
$'000
Ringwood Land and Building carrying amount at time of transfer through
Administrative Restructure
Settlement of the sale of the Ringwood Land and Building 31 August 2008
Carrying amount at 30 June 2008
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
3 900
(3 900)
-
230
Our sites and contact details
Housing SA
Metropolitan
Country
Adelaide
120 Flinders Street
Adelaide SA 5000
Telephone: 131 299
Berri
29 Vaughan Terrace
Berri SA 5343
Telephone: 131 299
Gawler
4 Seventh Avenue
Gawler South SA 5118
Telephone: 131 299
Ceduna
22 McKenzie Street
Ceduna SA 5690
Telephone: 8625 2896
Elizabeth
1st Floor, Raleigh Chambers
Elizabeth City Centre SA 5112
Telephone: 131 299
Coober Pedy
Lot 334 Hutchinson Street
Coober Pedy SA 5723
Telephone: 8672 3797
Marion
235 Sturt Road
Sturt SA 5047
Telephone: 131 299
Murray Bridge
Mobilong House
Seventh Street
Murray Bridge SA 5253
Telephone: 131 299
Modbury
100 Reservoir Road
Modbury SA 5092
Telephone: 131 299
Noarlunga
1st Floor Noarlunga House
Noarlunga Centre SA 5168
Telephone: 131 299
Port Augusta
13 Mackay Street
Port Augusta SA 5700
Telephone: 131 299
Port Lincoln
10 Hallett Place
Port Lincoln SA 5606
Telephone: 131 299
The Parks
Building 4, The Parks Community Centre
2-46 Cowan Street
Angle Park SA 5010
Telephone: 131 299
Port Pirie
76 Florence Street
Port Pirie SA 5540
Telephone: 131 299
Port Adelaide
296 St Vincent Street
Port Adelaide SA 5015
Telephone: 131 299
South East
4 James Street
Mount Gambier SA 5290
Telephone: 131 299
Salisbury
1 Ann Street
Salisbury SA 5108
Telephone: 131 299
Whyalla
173 Nicolson Avenue
Whyalla Norrie SA 5608
Telephone: 131 299
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
231
Our sites and contact details
Families SA
Metropolitan
Southern Metropolitan Region
Northern Metropolitan Region
Adelaide
219 Morphett Street
Adelaide SA 5000
Telephone: 8304 0120
Elizabeth
18 Langsford Drive
Elizabeth SA 5112
Telephone: 8207 9000
Marion
233 Sturt Road
Sturt SA 5043
Telephone: 8298 0800
Gawler
Shop 9 Northern Market Shopping Centre
Cowan Street (corner Murray Street)
Gawler SA 5118
Telephone: 8521 4444
Onkaparinga District Centre
5 Alexander Kelly Drive
Noarlunga Centre
Telephone: 8207 3000
Onkaparinga District Centre
(Aberfoyle Park Office)
Shop 15
Hub Shopping Centre 5159
Telephone: 8374 6111
Port Adelaide
Port Adelaide is an outreach location
of Woodville District Centre
Location: shop front within the
Port Adelaide Community Health Building,
Corner of Dale and
Church Streets, Port Adelaide
Business hours: Monday, Wednesday and
Friday 1pm – 4pm
Telephone: 8240 2277
Woodville
824-826 Port Road
Woodville SA 5033
Telephone: 8406 2777 (social work and
administration)
Telephone: 8406 2700 (financial support)
Mount Barker District Centre
23 Mann Street
Mount Barker SA
North East District Centre
995 North East Road
Modbury SA 5092
Telephone: 8407 4999
North East District Centre (Enfield Office)
350 Main North Road
Blair Athol SA 5084
Telephone: 8407 4999
Salisbury
16-18 Ann Street
Salisbury SA 5108
Telephone: 8209 4910
Virginia
An outreach service of Gawler District Centre
Virginia Institute, Old Port Wakefield Road,
Virginia
A walk in service for Emergency Financial
Assistance, Financial Counselling, Concessions
and Information
Friday 10 am to 3 pm
Victor Harbor
Branch office of Mount Barker DC
3/10 Crozier Road
Victor Harbor SA 5211
Telephone: 8552 2011
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
232
Our sites and contact details
Country
Regional Offices
Ceduna
O'Loughlin Terrace
Ceduna SA 5690
Telephone: 8626 2444 (Freecall 1800 330 032)
Southern Metropolitan Region
District Centres - Adelaide, Marion, Mount Barker,
Onkaparinga
Coober Pedy
Hutchison Street
Coober Pedy SA 5723
Telephone: 8672 4555 (Freecall 1800 032 205)
Building 2 Netley Commercial Park
300 Richmond Road
Netley SA 5037
Telephone: 8124 4301
Kadina (branch office of Port Pirie)
10 Digby Street
Kadina SA 5554
Telephone: 8821 3065
Northern Metropolitan Region
District Centres - Elizabeth, Gawler, North
Eastern, Salisbury, Woodville
Mount Barker (branch office of Murray Bridge)
27 Hutchison Street
Mount Barker SA 5251
Telephone: 8391 0488 (Freecall 1800 330 042)
Module 6 Endeavour House
Fourth Avenue
Mawson Lakes SA 5095
Telephone: 8360 4700
Limestone Coast
4 James Street
Mount Gambier SA 5290
Telephone: 8724 4844 (Freecall 1800 800 747)
Murray Bridge
1-5 Seventh Street
Murray Bridge SA 5253
Telephone: 8535 6200 (Freecall 1800 330 042)
Port Augusta
5 El Alamein Road
Port Augusta SA 5700
Telephone: 8648 5060 (Freecall 1800 100 118)
Country Regional Office
District Centres - Ceduna, Coober Pedy, Mount
Gambier, Murray Bridge, Port Augusta, Port
Lincoln, Port Pirie, Riverland, Whyalla
Tintara House
2-4 Henley Beach Road
Mile End SA 5031
Telephone: 8150 8103
Port Lincoln
71 Tasman Terrace
Port Lincoln SA 5606
Telephone: 8688 3344 (Freecall 1800 018 331)
Port Pirie
75 Gertrude Street
Port Pirie SA 5540
Telephone: 8638 4311 (Freecall 1800 804 550)
Riverland
14 Kay Avenue
Berri SA 5343
Telephone: 8595 2400 (Freecall 1800 800 195)
Whyalla
163 Nicholson Avenue
Whyalla Norrie SA 5608
Telephone: 8648 8880 (Freecall 1800 245 242)
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
233
Our sites and contact details
Disability SA
Information, Enquiries and Referrals
Telephone: 1300 786 117
Email: [email protected]
Internet: www.disability.sa.gov.au
Disability SA Central Office
103 Fisher Street
Fullarton SA 5063
Telephone: 8272 1988
Office for Disability and Client Services
Level 3, Citi Centre Building
11 Hindmarsh Square
Adelaide SA 5000
Telephone: 8226 6052
Email: [email protected]
TTY: 8226 6245
Companion Card
Telephone: 1800 667 110
TTY: 1800 898 888
National Relay Service: 13 36 77
Speech to Speech Relay Service: 1300 555 727
DFC Library and Information Service
(Disability Collection)
c/- Strathmont Centre
696-710 Grand Junction Road
Oakden SA 5086
Opening hours: 9-5 Monday to Friday
Telephone: 8266 8556
Central
Regency Park
171 Days Road
Regency Park SA 5010
Telephone: 8348 6000
Gilles Plains
21 Blacks Road
Gilles Plains SA 5086
Telephone: 8266 5260
TTY: 8366 7333
South
Fullarton Campus (Highgate Park)
103 Fisher Street
Fullarton SA 5063
Telephone: 8272 1988
Daw Park
180 Daws Road
Daw Park SA 5041
Telephone: 8277 8566
Christies Beach
98 Beach Road
Christies Beach SA 5165
Telephone: 8384 7299
Residential Facilities
North
Highgate Park
103 Fisher Street
Fullarton SA 5063
Telephone: 8272 1988
Salisbury
46 Commercial Road
Salisbury SA 5108
Telephone: 8282 5500
Strathmont Centre
696-710 Grand Junction Road
Oakden SA 5086
Telephone: 8266 8511
Salisbury
57 Park Terrace
Salisbury SA 5108
Telephone: 8182 1560
Northgate Aged Care Service
78-96 Dumfries Avenue
Northgate SA 5076
Telephone: 8266 8000
Gilles Plains
31 Blacks Road
Gilles Plains SA 5086
Telephone: 8366 7300
Trinity Court
11-15 Heritage Court
Oakden SA 5086
Telephone: 8261 6777
Service Coordination Metropolitan
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
234
Our sites and contact details
Service Coordination Country
Country North
Ceduna
c/- Ceduna Community Health Centre
3 Eyre Highway
Ceduna SA 5690
Telephone: 8626 2138
Port Lincoln
75 Liverpool Street
Port Lincoln SA 5606
Telephone: 8683 0499
Whyalla
c/- 5th Floor, Whyalla Hospital
20 Wood Terrace
Whyalla SA 5600
Telephone: 8648 8686
Berri
28 Kay Avenue
Berri SA 5343
Telephone: 8582 2400
Naracoorte
c/- Naracoorte Community Health
Cedar Avenue
Naracoorte SA 5271
Telephone: 8762 8160
Mount Gambier
4 James Street
Mount Gambier SA 5290
Telephone: 8725 5633
Greater Adelaide
Port Augusta
40 Flinders Terrace
Port Augusta SA 5700
Telephone: 8641 1600
Gawler
10 Adelaide Road
Gawler SA 5118
Telephone: 8521 4700
Port Pirie
c/- Community Health Building
Alexander Street
Port Pirie SA 5540
Telephone: 8632 4222
Angaston
c/- Barossa and Area Community Health Service
29 North Street
Angaston SA 5353
Telephone: 8563 8544
Kadina
15 Taylor Street
Kadina SA 5554
Telephone: 8821 2511
Mount Barker
22 Druids Avenue
Mount Barker SA 5251
Telephone: 8391 3022
Clare
Clarevale Office Precinct - Office 1
17 Lennon Street
Clare SA 5453
Telephone: 8842 3744
Victor Harbor
c/- Southern Fleurieu Health Service
Harbour View Terrace
Victor Harbor SA 5211
Telephone: 8552 0600
Coober Pedy
Hutchinson Street
Coober Pedy SA 5723
Telephone: 8672 4555
Kangaroo Island
(Wednesday to Friday third week each month)
c/- Kangaroo Island Health Service
Cook Centre, Esplanade, Kingscote
Kangaroo Island SA 5223
Telephone: 8553 4231
Country South
Murray Bridge
6 Verdun Road
Murray Bridge SA 5253
Telephone: 8532 4503
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
235
Our sites and contact details
Community Lifestyle Support
Respite Services
Interact Campbelltown
57c Acacia Avenue North
Campbelltown SA 5074
Telephone: 8337 7388
19 Austral Terrace
Morphettville SA 5043
Telephone: 8294 1771
Cheltenham
975 Port Road
Cheltenham SA 5014
Telephone: 8447 7933
Equipment, Aids, Continence Resource
Centre
Clovelly Park
1130 South Road
Clovelly Park SA 5042
Telephone: 8277 3922
11 Blacks Road
Gilles Plains SA 5086
Telephone: 8266 5260
General enquiries (SA and NT only)
Telephone: 1300 885 886
Kadina
15 Taylor Street
Kadina SA 5554
Telephone: 8821 3521
ASSIST
Mount Gambier
4 James Street
Mount Gambier SA 5290
Telephone: 8725 5633
ASSIST North
Telephone: 8266 8950
ASSIST Central
Telephone: 8266 5260
ASSIST South
Telephone: 8372 1495
Mitchell Park
Telephone: 8177 1296
Other Useful Contacts
Northlink, Oakden
c/- Strathmont Centre
696-710 Grand Junction Road
Oakden SA 5086
Telephone: 8266 8511
Para Hills
5 Wilkinson Road
Para Hills SA 5096
Telephone: 8265 8888
Centre for Disability Health
Telephone: 8397 8100
Exceptional Needs Unit
Telephone: 8448 4610
Child and Youth Specialist Service
Telephone: 8348 6500
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
236
Our sites and contact details
Domiciliary Care SA
General Enquiries and Client Referrals
(Metropolitan Access Team)
Telephone: 8193 1234
Woodville Office
19-21a Belmore Terrace
Woodville SA 5011
Telephone: 8440 6700
Central Administration
18 Fullarton Road
Norwood SA 5067
Telephone: 8132 6000
Domiciliary Equipment Service
Telephone: 8193 1232
Client Service Offices
Manual Handling Australia
Telephone: 8275 0768
Elizabeth Office
Cnr Mark Road and Oldham Road
Elizabeth Vale SA 5112
Telephone: 8256 8500
Hampstead Office
207 Hampstead Road
Northfield SA 5085
Telephone: 8304 6200
Therapy Solutions
Telephone: 8256 8600
Tregenza Avenue Aged Care Service
21 Tregenza Ave
Elizabeth South SA 5112
Telephone: 8182 1900
Mawson Lakes Office
First Floor Innovation House
First Avenue, Technology House
Mawson Lakes SA 5095
Telephone: 8256 8599
Netley Office
Buildings 2 and 4, 300 Richmond Road
Netley SA 5037
Telephone: 8193 1234
Noarlunga Office
Noarlunga Health Centre, Alexander Kelly Drive
Noarlunga SA 5168
Telephone: 8384 9277
Park Holme Office
670 Marion Road
Park Holme SA 5043
Telephone: 8277 3366
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
237
Our sites and contact details
Metropolitan Office Sites
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
238
Our sites and contact details
Country Office Sites
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
239
Glossary
AARD
Aboriginal Affairs and Reconciliation Division
ABS
Australian Bureau of Statistics
ACAT
Aged Care Assessment Teams
ADNSA
Aboriginal Disability Network
AHIF
Affordable Housing Innovations Fund
APU
Accredited Procurement Unit
APY
Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara
ATSIS
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Services
BCIS
Boards and Committees Information System
CBSA
Community Benefit SA
CDSMAC
Community and Disability Services Ministers’ Advisory Council
CHO
Community Housing Organisations
CHRIS
Complete Human Resource Information System
COAG
Council of Australian Governments
CSHA
Commonwealth State Housing Agreement
CSTDA
Commonwealth/State Territory Disability Agreement
DANSA
Disability Advisory Network of South Australia
DECS
Department of Education and Children’s Services
DFC
Department for Families and Communities
DFEEST
Department of Education, Employment, Science and Technology
DH
Department of Health
DMT
Disruptive Management Team
DPC
Department of the Premier and Cabinet
DTEI
Department for Transport, Energy and Infrastructure
DTF
Department of Treasury and Finance
EAP
Employee Assistance Program
EIDGS
Energy Information and Data Gathering System
FaHCSIA
Commonwealth Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs
FTE
Full-Time Equivalent
GJ
Gigajoules
GoGO
Greening of Government
GST
Goods and Services Tax
HACC
Home and Community Care
HCSCC
Health and Community Services Complaints Commission
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
240
Glossary
ICT
Information and Communication Technology
IDSC
Intellectual Disability Services Council
ILC
Independent Living Centre
JFS
Julia Farr Services
KPI
Key Performance Indicator
MACHA
Multi Agency Community Housing Association
MDAC
Ministerial Disability Advisory Council
MDC
Metropolitan Domiciliary Care
MOU
Memorandum of Understanding
MSHAC
Minister’s Strategic Housing Advisory Committee
NAIDOC
National Aboriginal Islander Day Observance Committee
NGO's
Non-Government Organisations
ODACS
Office for Disability and Client Services
OFTA
Office for the Ageing
OFW
Office for Women
OHS&W
Occupational Health Safety and Welfare
PCMU
Procurement and Contract Management Unit
PRLO
Private Rental Liaison Program
RAC
Residential Aged Care
RTO
Registered Training Organisation
RTT
Residential Tenancies Tribunal
SAAHT
South Australian Affordable Housing Trust
SAAP
Supported Accommodation Assistance Program
SAHT
South Australian Housing Trust
SASP
South Australia’s Strategic Plan
SIPS
Safety in the Public Sector
SRF
Supported Residential Facilities
UPL
Urban Pacific Ltd
VERIS
Volunteer Emergency Recovery Information System
VIMS
Volunteer Information Management System
WACA
Workforce Analysis and Comparison Application
WIC
Workforce Information Collection
WIP
Buildings and Improvements in Progress
YPIRAC
Younger People in Residential Aged Care
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
241
Feedback
Feedback regarding the Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08 can be
submitted via email to [email protected] Comments provided will ensure that we satisfy the
requirements and expectations of our stakeholders and members of the public in the development of
our Annual Report for 2008-09.
Department for Families and Communities Annual Report 2007-08
242
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