os2nsm

os2nsm
IBM Network Station
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
for WorkSpace On-Demand 2.0
IBM
IBM Network Station
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
for WorkSpace On-Demand 2.0
IBM
Note
Before using this information and the product it supports, be sure to read the information in “Appendix E. Notices” on
page 155.
© Copyright International Business Machines Corporation 1998. All rights reserved.
Note to U.S. Government Users — Documentation related to restricted rights — Use, duplication or disclosure is
subject to restrictions set forth in GSA ADP Schedule Contract with IBM Corp.
Contents
About IBM Network Station Manager 3.0 For WorkSpace On-Demand 2.0 .
How to Use this Book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Who should read this book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
vii
vii
vii
Chapter 1. Understanding the Network Station .
What Is the Network Station? . . . . . . . .
How Do Network Stations Work? . . . . . . .
What Do I Need To Know About TCP/IP Networks?
LAN Network Examples . . . . . . . . .
MAC Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . .
IP Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Subnets and Subnet Masks . . . . . . . .
Boot Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NVRAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
BOOTP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DHCP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TFTP or NFS for Boot File Service . . . . . .
Java on the Network Station . . . . . . . .
Windows Applications on the Network Station . .
Network Station Memory Requirements . . . .
Taking Advantage of Multiple Server Environments
Roaming User Example . . . . . . . . .
Load Balancing Example . . . . . . . . .
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OS/2
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Chapter 3. Logging On and Working With IBM Network Station Manager
Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Logging On . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Roam Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
After You Log In . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with the 5250 Emulation Application . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Learning About the 5250 Emulation Function . . . . . . . . . . . .
Eliminating the 5250 Emulator New Session Dialog Box for Japanese Users .
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Chapter 2. Installing and Configuring an IBM Network Station on
Warp Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Prerequisite Software and Hardware . . . . . . . . . . .
Before You Begin the Installation Process. . . . . . . . . .
Installing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Attended Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Unattended (CID) Installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Uninstalling IBM Network Station Manager . . . . . . . . . .
Attended Uninstallation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Unattended (CID) Uninstallation . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Netscape Navigator 2.02 for OS/2 . . . . . . . .
Configuring DHCP on OS/2 Warp Server . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring DHCP for Load Balancing . . . . . . . . . . .
Adding IBM Network Stations to OS/2 Warp Server . . . . . .
Verifying Network Servers and Services . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring Printers on OS/2 Warp Server . . . . . . . . .
Running Java Applications and Applets on OS/2 Warp Server . .
Before You Continue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
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iii
Accessing Help . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with the 3270 Application . . . . . . .
Learning About the 3270 Emulation Function . .
Eliminating the 3270 Emulator New Session Dialog
Accessing Help . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with the NC Navigator Browser . . . . .
Learning About NC Navigator Browser Functions .
Learning About NC Navigator Mail Functions . .
Learning About NC Navigator News Functions . .
Accessing Help . . . . . . . . . . . . .
JAVA Virtual Machine . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting an Application . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting an Applet . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with the Time Zone Environment Variable
Learning About Printer Datastreams . . . . . . .
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Chapter 4. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program . . . . . .
IBM Network Station Manager Program - an Overview . . . . . . . . . .
IBM Network Station Manager Program Flow . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Who Can Use the IBM Network Station Manager Program? . . . . . . .
Working with IBM Network Station Manager Program Defaults . . . . . .
Starting the IBM Network Station Manager Program Using a Browser . . . .
Working with the IBM Network Station Manager Program Setup Tasks Examples. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing your Desktop Style to Lotus eSuite WorkPlace . . . . . . . .
Changing Your Desktop Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Updating the Boot Monitor Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Overriding the Network Station Boot Setting . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Updating the Domain Name Server (DNS) Configuration on the Network
Station . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring a Local Area Network Attached Printer . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring a Network Station-Attached Printer for Other Users . . . . .
Working with Menu Bar Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Time Zone (TZ) Environment Variable . . . . . . . . . . .
Automatically Starting a 5250 Session on a Network Station . . . . . . .
Configuring a Local (ICA) Client Session Menu Button for a Network Station .
Configuring a Terminal Session for a Network Station . . . . . . . . .
Changing Your Icon Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Disabling the Control Menu for a 5250 Session . . . . . . . . . . .
Enabling the 5250 or 3270 Emulator for Euro Currency Support . . . . .
Changing the Screen Size of a 3270 Session . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enabling Java Applets for NC Navigator . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating Directory Buttons for NC Navigator . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with Your Network Proxies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing the Menus and Messages Language Type . . . . . . . . .
Assigning Group Settings to a User . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IBM Network Station Manager Program Education . . . . . . . . . .
Accessing and Using How To Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Additional IBM Network Station Manager Program Examples . . . . . . .
Setting Up an AIX Session Using the IBM Network Station Manager
Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Up a Microsoft Windows NT Session Using the IBM Network Station
Manager Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter 5. Working with User Services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Accessing User Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
iv
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Console . .
Login . . .
Terminals .
WindowMgr .
Utilities . .
Setup . . .
Statistics . .
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Chapter 6. Working With the IBM Network Station Setup Utility . .
Accessing the IBM Network Station Setup Utility . . . . . . . . .
IBM Network Station Setup Utility Tasks . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Monitor Resolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working With the Blanking Pedestal . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting the Startup Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting a Keyboard Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Verbose Diagnostic Messages . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working With MAC Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Resetting an IBM Network Station to the Factory Defaults. . . . .
Viewing the Boot PROM Version of an IBM Network Station . . . .
Configuring an IBM Network Station to Boot from the Network Setting
Configuring an IBM Network Station to Boot from the NVRAM Setting
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Appendix A. Problem Resolution
Problem Resolution Tables . . .
Common Error Situations. . .
Error Codes . . . . . . .
PC Server Error Situations . .
OS/400 Error Situations . . .
AIX Error Situations . . . . .
OS/390 Error Situations . . .
VM/ESA Error Situations . . .
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Appendix B. National Language Support
Locale Information . . . . . . . . .
DBCS Unique Support . . . . . . . .
Input Methods . . . . . . . . . .
Printers . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Appendix C. IBM Network Station Manager Program Shipped Default
Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
Appendix D. Serial Port Printer Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
Using a 9 to 25 pin cable through a db25-db25 null modem interposer . . . . 153
Using a 9 to 25 Pin Null Modem Cable. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154
Appendix E. Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
Trademarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
Contents
v
vi
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
About IBM Network Station Manager 3.0 For WorkSpace
On-Demand 2.0
This book describes how to install, configure, and use the IBM Network Station
Manager. This book contains specific instructions about how to install and configure
IBM Network Station Manager on an OS/2 Warp Server which is running
WorkSpace On-Demand.
How to Use this Book
Chapter 1
An introduction to Network Stations.
Chapter 2
Installing and configuring IBM Network Station Manager on your OS/2 Warp
Server.
Chapter 3
Working with IBM Network Station Manager applications.
Chapter 4
Working with the IBM Network Station Manager program.
Chapter 5
Using tools to help manage the Network Station environment.
Chapter 6
Using the Setup Utility to view or set configurations.
Who should read this book
This information is intended for the person who is installing and administering the
IBM Network Station Manager.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
vii
viii
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Chapter 1. Understanding the Network Station
What Is the Network Station? . . . . . . . .
How Do Network Stations Work? . . . . . . .
What Do I Need To Know About TCP/IP Networks?
LAN Network Examples . . . . . . . . .
LAN Network Example 1 . . . . . . . .
LAN Network Example 2 . . . . . . . .
LAN Network Example 3 . . . . . . . .
MAC Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . .
IP Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Subnets and Subnet Masks . . . . . . . .
Boot Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NVRAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
BOOTP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DHCP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TFTP or NFS for Boot File Service . . . . . .
Java on the Network Station . . . . . . . .
Windows Applications on the Network Station . .
Network Station Memory Requirements . . . .
Taking Advantage of Multiple Server Environments
Roaming User Example . . . . . . . . .
Load Balancing Example . . . . . . . . .
Configuring DHCP to Avoid Conflicts . . .
Determining DHCP Classes . . . . . . .
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What Is the Network Station?
Traditionally, the user’s interface with the server has been either the
nonprogrammable workstation or the personal computer (PC). The IBM Network
Station network computer (hereafter referred to as Network Station) offers an
attractive alternative to traditional methods of network computing. Individual diskless
workstations connect to a server (or series of servers), and you can manage them
centrally with the IBM Network Station Manager program.
Using a Network Station is similar to using a PC. The Network Station uses a
keyboard, mouse, and display. The biggest difference is that the Network Station
files reside on a network server rather than on a hard drive inside of each user’s
machine. The Network Station presents a graphical user interface (GUI), which
provides the user access to many resources. Network Stations can access the
following kinds of resources:
v 5250 emulator
v 3270 emulator
v Remote X applications
v Web browser
v Java applets or applications
v Microsoft Windows NT applications
v Local and remote printers
The Network Station communicates using Transmission Control Protocol/Internet
Protocol (TCP/IP) over a token-ring, Ethernet, or twinaxial connection to the server.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
1
Each Network Station runs the common client program, and the server runs the
IBM Network Station Manager program and several other application programs.
How Do Network Stations Work?
Figure 1 shows what happens when you power on an IBM Network Station.
Figure 1. Network Station Power-On Sequence
«1¬ A non-volatile random access memory (NVRAM) resident boot monitor program
is started. The Network Station automatically runs a series of power-on self tests
(POST).
«2¬ The Network Station contacts a BOOTP or DHCP boot server. The Network
Station exchanges its media access control (MAC) address for the IP address that
is provided by the server. The boot server also provides the address or path of the
base code server. The Network Station may alternatively retrieve this information
from values that are stored in its NVRAM.
«3¬ The Network Station downloads the base code from the base code server using
trivial file transfer protocol (TFTP) or network file system (NFS).
«4¬ The Network Station downloads the terminal-based configuration information
from the terminal configuration server.
«5¬ The Network Station presents a log-on screen. When the user enters a userid
and password, the authentication server verifies the user’s identification.
2
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
«6¬ The user’s configuration server downloads and initiates the personalized
environment preferences of the user.
«7¬ The Network Station displays the personalized desktop of the user. The user
accesses applications on the servers where they reside.
The IBM Network Station Manager program allows you to set and change
configurations for Network Stations and Network Station users. Your HTTP server
makes the IBM Network Station Manager program available to your Web browser.
See “Chapter 4. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program” on page 55 for
more information about the IBM Network Station Manager program.
Each Network Station contains a simple network management protocol (SNMP)
agent as part of its operating system. An SNMP manager at a central location can
communicate and exchange information with the agent on a Network Station. You
can use this information to manage your network environment. SNMP is an
industry-standard protocol for network management.
Each Network Station can display the IBM Network Station Setup Utility. The IBM
Network Station Setup Utility allows you to View or Set (change) configuration
settings on a particular Network Station. For example, you can view the MAC
address or set the monitor resolution of the Network Station. See “Chapter 6.
Working With the IBM Network Station Setup Utility” on page 101 for more
information.
After the Network Station base code is loaded, the User Services programs become
available. User Services are programs that provide users with tools to manage the
Network Station’s operational environment. Listed below are some of the user
services:
v Monitoring messages applicable to a specific Network Station
v Locking your screen (with password control)
v Monitoring statistics (for example, how much memory is available on a specific
Network Station)
See “Chapter 5. Working with User Services” on page 97 for more information on
User Services.
What Do I Need To Know About TCP/IP Networks?
In order for the Network Station to communicate with your servers, you need a
TCP/IP network. If you understand your TCP/IP network, installing and configuring
your Network Station and IBM Network Station Manager program is much easier. To
help understand your network, you should draw a diagram of your network.
Refer to the network examples in this section to help you understand how to
configure your network. Choose the network example that most closely resembles
your network diagram. Refer to these examples as you go about configuring and
installing Network Stations on your network.
Note: You do not need to be an expert in order to set up a TCP/IP network.
However, you should have an understanding of basic TCP/IP. A detailed
introduction to TCP/IP is beyond the scope of this book. If you need to
improve your understanding of TCP/IP, you can contact your IBM sales
representative, who has information about classes in your area.
Chapter 1. Understanding the Network Station
3
LAN Network Examples
LAN Network Example 1
Figure 2 shows an example of a network diagram in which two Network Stations
are connected over a simple local area network (LAN).
Figure 2. Two Network Stations Connected to the Server over a Simple LAN
LAN Network Example 2
Figure 3 on page 5 shows an example of a network diagram in which two Network
Stations are connected to the server over a local LAN. Two more Network Stations
connect to the server through a router over a remote LAN.
4
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Figure 3. Two Network Stations Connected to the Server over a Local LAN and Two Network
Stations Connected to the Server through a Router over a Remote LAN
LAN Network Example 3
In Figure 4 on page 6, additional Network Stations connect to the server using both
Ethernet and token-ring connections. Two token-ring LANs connect via a router. A
Domain Name Server also connects to the network.
Chapter 1. Understanding the Network Station
5
Figure 4. Four Network Stations Connected to a Network Using a Router and a Domain
Name Server
MAC Addresses
Every Network Station comes with a unique identifying number that can be used to
keep track of which IP address has been assigned to it. Media access control
(MAC) addresses of each Network Station are assigned by manufacturing and
hard-coded into the machine. The MAC address of a Network Station is on the side
panel of the small box in which the logic unit is packaged (see Figure 5 on page 7).
If you no longer have the box, see “Finding the Default MAC Address” on page 105
for instructions on how to find the MAC address.
6
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Figure 5. MAC Address on the Box
You can override the burned-in MAC address with a customer-assigned MAC
address. See “Specifying a User-Configurable MAC Address” on page 106 for
instructions on how to override the burned-in MAC address.
IP Addresses
Internet Protocol (IP) addresses are numbers that are assigned to devices on a
network (or on the Internet). IP addresses allow computers to communicate through
TCP/IP. IP addresses consist of four numbers (from 0 to 255) that are separated by
periods, for example 192.168.1.1. The numbers that are separated by periods
indicate the network to which a computer belongs and the specific location of the
host computer within that network.
IP addresses are not just for computers such as Network Stations, but also for
routers, servers, and even subnets and networks themselves. For example, the IP
address of a network might be 192.168.1.0. A router on that network might use the
IP address 192.168.1.1. A Network Station on the same network might have the
address 192.168.1.145.
Each Network Station must have a unique IP address. If you are using the DHCP
boot method, you must specify a range of IP addresses so that the server can
assign an address to each Network Station. For intranets (networks within your own
organization), you can assign your own addresses. However, if you want to connect
to the Internet, a central authority must officially assign the network addresses and
domain names. At the time of this writing, the authority is as follows:
Network Solutions, Inc.
InterNIC Registration Services
505 Huntmar Park Drive
Chapter 1. Understanding the Network Station
7
Herndon, VA 22070
1-703-742-4811
E-mail: [email protected]
WWW: http://rs.internic.net
Subnets and Subnet Masks
A subnet is a division within a computer network. Some administrators of large
networks need to divide their networks into subnetworks (or subnets). Subnets allow
certain groups of users to share access to certain files or resources. Other
administrators divide their networks in order to make the most efficient use of a
relatively small address pool. Most small networks do not require subnetting. A
basic introduction to subnets and subnet masks is in the paragraphs that follow. You
should read this discussion only if it is up to you to subnet your network or to find
out the subnet mask.
The subnet mask is a value that allows the system to determine which are the
network parts and which are the host parts of an IP address. In IP addressing, there
are many different subnet masks. Sometimes the first six digits of an IP address
indicate the network; other times the first nine digits indicate the network. The
subnet mask is the code that determines which digits indicate the network and
which indicate the host.
Later in the book, you will record your network’s subnet mask on a table. If you
belong to a large subnetted network that someone else set up, you can ask that
person for the subnet mask value. If you know that your network is not subnetted,
use the following table to find your subnet mask.
Remember: You should use Table 1 only if you are sure that your network is not
subnetted.
Table 1. Subnet Mask Default Values According to Network Class
Network Type
Left-Most Value of IP
Address
Subnet Mask Default
Class A
0 through 126
255.0.0.0
Class B
128 through 191
255.255.0.0
Class C
192 through 223
255.255.255.0
An IP address such as 192.168.1.2 is really a dotted decimal expression of a 32-bit
binary value. In binary numbers, 192.168.1.2 is expressed as
11000000.10101000.00000001.00000010. Each set of eight numbers (0 or 1)
represents eight bits of the IP address. Every IP address contains some bits that
identify it as belonging to a particular network. The other bits identify a single host
(such as a Network Station) along the network.
Most networks fall into one of three classes: Class A, Class B, or Class C. As
Table 1 shows, the network’s class can be determined by examining the first eight
bits of the network’s IP address. When expressed in dotted decimal notation, those
first eight bits are the leftmost number of the address, the number that comes
before the first dot. In Class A networks, the first eight bits are expressed in decimal
as a number from 1 to 126. For Class B networks, that number ranges from 128 to
191. For Class C networks, the value of the first eight bits of the IP address ranges
from 192 to 223.
8
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
The class of the network determines how much space is available for subnetting.
For example, in a Class A network, the network portion of the address is only the
first eight bits. In other words, the first eight bits are all that is necessary to indicate
the network to which the IP address belongs. That leaves the remaining 24 bits to
serve as pointers toward the subnet and the individual hosts that lie on the network.
In this discussion, host means any device that has a unique IP address including
Network Stations. The IP address of a Class A network is network.host.host.host.
The host.host.host does not indicate three separate hosts, but rather that three
eight-bit segments (or 24 bits) are required to indicate a single host on the network.
Obviously, there can be only a very small number of true Class A networks. In fact,
there are only 126 such networks. Most of these belong to large corporations or
universities, which acquired their Class A networks in the early days of the Internet
when network addresses were plentiful. All Class A network addresses are
assigned.
In a Class B network, the first 16 bits of an IP address indicate the network while
the remaining 16 are available for subnetting. IP addresses that belong to Class B
networks are network.network.host.host.
In a Class C network, the first 24 bits indicate the network, while only the last eight
can be used for subnetting or to identify the host. IP addresses that belong to Class
C networks are network.network.network.host. Class C networks are the most
common type of network.
You must know more than the class of the network to determine how an IP address
is deciphered. When you subnet a network, it is not always apparent what subnet a
device belongs to unless you know the subnet mask. For example, given the Class
C IP address 192.168.1.45, you know that the network to which the device belongs
is 192.168.1.0. You can tell this by applying the simplified formula
network.network.network.host. However, you do not know how the network is
subnetted or to what subnet the device belongs. Additionally, the class of the
network is not always apparent. The subnet mask allows you to determine all of
these things.
Like IP addresses, subnet masks are 32–bit values expressed in dotted decimal
notation. The subnet mask 255.255.255.0 is expressed in binary as
11111111.11111111.11111111.00000000. A binary 1 in the subnet mask indicates that
the corresponding bit in the IP address is treated as part of the network address.
Using Boolean algebra, if you perform an ″AND″ operation on the binary IP address
and subnet mask, the result is the IP address of the network. In Boolean algebra,
the ″AND″ function means that if both numbers are 1s, the result is 1. If either
number is not a 1, the result is 0. For example, given the IP address 192.168.1.2
and the subnet mask 255.255.255.0, the ″AND″ operation is as follows:
11000000.10101000.00000001.00000010 = IP add. 192.168.1.2
11111111.11111111.11111111.00000000 = Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0
11000000.10101000.00000001.00000000 = Subnet add. 192.168.1.0.
You can think of the subnet mask as a code for deciphering what an IP address
means. You can use Table 2 on page 10 to determine how many subnets are
indicated by specific eight-bit mask values. For example, if you see the address
192.168.1.35 and you know that the subnet mask of the Class C network to which
that address belongs is 255.255.255.128, you know how to decipher the address.
By using Table 2 on page 10, you can say that the network address is 192.168.1.0
and that the host whose IP address ends in .35 belongs to the first of two subnets.
Chapter 1. Understanding the Network Station
9
To put it more simply, the network address 192.168.1.0 means that devices whose
addresses begin with 192.168.1 belong to the 192.168.1 network. The first 24 bits
of the address indicate the network, and the last eight bits of the address indicate
the subnet and host. The way that you arrived at this distinction was by applying
the subnet mask. Because the subnet mask ends in 128, you know that the network
is broken into two subnets. If you want to divide the Class C network 192.168.1.0
into two subnets, you should use a subnet mask of 255.255.255.128. The first 24
bits of the address indicate the network. The last eight bits of the address indicate
the hosts.
Since the maximum value of each eight bits is 11111111 in binary or 255 in decimal,
there are, theoretically, 255 possible hosts in the two subnets. Therefore, the
theoretical number of possible hosts per subnet is 255 hosts that are divided by two
subnets, or 128 hosts per subnet. You could theoretically use the IP addresses
192.168.1.0 through 192.168.1.127 for the first subnet and 198.165.1.128 through
192.168.1.255 for your second subnet. In reality, you would have to give up some
of these addresses. The first and last addresses in each subnet have special
values. You cannot assign the first and last addresses to any devices on the
network. The first address in each subnet is the subnet address; the last address is
the broadcast address. Therefore, the true range of your addresses is 192.168.1.1
to 192.168.1.126 and 192.168.1.129 to 192.168.1.254.
If you need to subnet a Class C network, the way in which you specify the last eight
bits of the subnet mask determines how you divide your network. Table 2 shows the
number of available subnets according to the value that is given to an eight-bit
subnet mask in a Class C network.
Table 2. Subnet Mask Values For Class C Addresses
Subnet Mask
Binary Value
Number of Subnets
Number of
Hosts Per
Subnet
255.255.255.0
00000000
1
254
255.255.255.128
10000000
2
126
255.255.255.192
11000000
4
62
255.255.255.224
11100000
8
30
255.255.255.240
11110000
16
14
255.255.255.248
11111000
32
6
255.255.255.252
11111100
64
2
255.255.255.254
11111110
128
0
255.255.255.255
11111111
254, Do not use on Class 0
C networks
Suppose that you want to break the same Class C network into four subnets
instead of two. Using Table 2, you choose the subnet mask 255.255.255.192. You
can then configure a network with 248 hosts on four subnets. Since 248 hosts
divided by four subnets equals 62, you could have 62 hosts on each of your four
subnets. You can create a table for planning your network that looks like Table 3 on
page 11.
By planning ahead, you should allocate IP and mask addresses to anticipate a
maximum number of controllers and Network Stations. If you do not do this and
your network environment changes, you will have to reallocate your initial
assignments. Then your initial devices will receive different IP addresses.
10
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Table 3. Subnet Mask 255.255.255.192 Example
Subnet
IP Address
Comments
1st Subnet
192.168.1.0
Network Address (not assigned to any host)
1st Subnet
192.168.1.1
Network Station #1
1st Subnet
.
.
.
192.168.1.2
.
.
.
Network Station #2
.
.
.
1st Subnet
192.168.1.62
Network Station #62
1st Subnet
192.168.1.63
Broadcast Address (not assigned to any host)
2nd Subnet
192.168.1.64
Network Address (not assigned to any host)
2nd Subnet
192.168.1.65
Network Station #63
2nd Subnet
.
.
.
192.168.1.66
.
.
.
Network Station #64
.
.
.
2nd Subnet
192.168.1.126
Network Station #124
2nd Subnet
192.168.1.127
Broadcast Address (not assigned to any host)
3rd Subnet
192.168.1.128
Network Address (not assigned to any host)
3rd Subnet
192.168.1.129
Network Station #125
3rd Subnet
.
.
.
192.168.1.130
.
.
.
Network Station #126
.
.
.
3rd Subnet
192.168.1.190
Network Station #186
3rd Subnet
192.168.1.191
Broadcast address (not assigned to any host)
4th Subnet
192.168.1.192
Network Address (not assigned to any host)
4th Subnet
192.168.1.193
Network Station #187
4th Subnet
.
.
.
192.168.1.194
.
.
.
Network Station #188
.
.
.
4th Subnet
192.168.1.254
Network Station #248
4th Subnet
192.168.1.255
Broadcast Address (not assigned to any host)
Of course, you could assign any network device to any IP address. We simply filled
the Comment section of our sample tables with ″Network Station #X″ by way of
illustration. In reality, you must devote IP addresses to routers, Domain Name
Servers, and other devices on your network.
Class C networks are not the only networks to be subnetted. Class B networks are
often subnetted. The only difference in subnetting a Class B network is that the
network portion of its address is shorter (and its host portion is longer) than that of
a Class C address. For example, the network portion of the Class B address
192.168.0.0 is 192.168. That leaves the last 16 bits (the 0.0) free for subnetting. To
divide that network into two large subnets, you would use the subnet mask
255.255.192.0. That configuration results in the two subnets 192.168.0.0 through
192.168.127.0 and 192.168.128.0 through 192.168.254.0.
Subnets are meaningful only to hosts on your physical network. Hosts outside of
your network are concerned only with the network portion of the IP address.
Chapter 1. Understanding the Network Station
11
Routers inside your network apply the subnet mask to IP addresses to determine
how to deliver information packets inside the network.
For more information about subnets, refer to the Redbook, TCP/IP Tutorial and
Technical Overview, GG24-3376.
Boot Methods
Because a Network Station has no disk from which to boot, it must request
information either from its own non-volatile-random-access memory (NVRAM) or
from a server. The Network Station needs to find an IP address for itself. The IP
address allows the Network Station to communicate with other hosts. The Network
Station must use one of three methods to request and receive this information:
v Non-Volatile-Random-Access Memory (NVRAM)
v Bootstrap Protocol (BOOTP)
v Dynamic Host Control Protocol (DHCP)
Each platform supports a different set of boot methods. Table 4 shows the boot
methods that are available for each platform.
Table 4. Boot Methods Supported by Various Operating Systems
Boot
Methods
OS/390
VM/ESA
OS/400
AIX
NT
OS/2
NVRAM,
BOOTP,
DHCP
NVRAM,
BOOTP,
DHCP
NVRAM,
BOOTP,
DHCP
NVRAM,
BOOTP,
DHCP
NVRAM,
DHCP
NVRAM,
DHCP
Note: If you use the BOOTP or DHCP boot methods, you must configure all
routers and gateways in your network to send and receive BOOTP or DHCP
packets. If you cannot configure your routers to be BOOTP or DHCP relay
agents, you could do either of the following:
v Use an AIX or UNIX system that has the necessary configuration support
to receive limited BOOTP or DHCP broadcasts. Then forward those
broadcasts to the appropriate server.
v Use the NVRAM boot method for those Network Stations that are behind
a router that cannot forward BOOTP or DHCP broadcasts.
NVRAM
Non-Volatile Random-Access Memory (NVRAM) refers to the local Network Station
memory. When you use the NVRAM boot method, you code the IP addresses of the
Network Station and its server into the memory of the individual Network Station.
The Network Station powers on and requests the base code file download from the
server.
The NVRAM boot method is most practical in small, stable networks. You may also
choose to use the NVRAM boot method for one of the following reasons:
v As a method to avoid routers that block BOOTP and DHCP broadcast requests.
BOOTP and DHCP broadcast requests for IP addresses can create unnecessary
traffic on the network. Many network routers are configured not to pass these
broadcast requests. Since NVRAM does not need to request its IP address
(because it has been entered in the memory of the Network Station), it does not
make the broadcasts.
12
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
v As an aid in finding and correcting problems with network connections.
v As an aid in finding and correcting problems with BOOTP or DHCP
configurations.
This method may not work well for larger networks for the following reasons:
v You must enter setup data into each Network Station manually.
v DHCP and BOOTP can configure many more parameters (such as the DNS
address) that cannot be easily configured with this method.
For information about how to configure NVRAM, see “Configuring an IBM Network
Station to Boot from the NVRAM Setting” on page 108.
BOOTP
Bootstrap protocol (BOOTP) is a TCP/IP protocol that allows the Network Station to
request an IP address and the location of the base code file from a server. If you
are using an OS/2 Warp Server, BootP is not supported as a method of booting the
Network Station.
To use the BOOTP boot method, the network administrator must record the MAC
addresses of all the Network Stations on the network. Then the network
administrator assigns each of them an IP address. The administrator then enters
those assignments on a BOOTP table. When you need to change IP addresses,
you can do so centrally on the table in the boot server rather than individually on
each Network Station.
When a Network Station powers on, it broadcasts its MAC address to the BOOTP
server. The server looks up the IP address of the Network Station according to its
MAC address. BOOTP then returns a reply that assigns the IP address for the
Network Station and the name and location of the base code file.
Because BOOTP assigns IP addresses statically (fixing an IP address according to
a computer’s MAC address and then recording this assignment), it is less versatile
than DHCP.
DHCP
Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) is also a TCP/IP protocol. DHCP
provides a way for a server to automatically allocate IP addresses and configuration
information without forcing the administrator to record and track the MAC addresses
of the networked computers. DHCP is capable of assigning either a permanent IP
address or a temporary IP address for every host or Network Station within a
predetermined range of IP addresses. It is also capable of assigning IP addresses
either statically or dynamically.
The static assignment is similar to the way BOOTP allocates IP addresses. You
define the MAC address of every Network Station in the DHCP server configuration
along with an IP address, which is reserved for the station with this MAC address.
When the Network Station sends a request into the DHCP server, identifying itself
by its MAC address, the server returns the IP address that it has reserved for that
client.
In dynamic IP address assignment, the server still identifies a Network Station by its
MAC address. However, instead of using a fixed IP address, it allocates any
Chapter 1. Understanding the Network Station
13
address out of the available pool. The server leases the address to the Network
Station for a specified period of time. The address returns to the pool either when
the client releases it or when the lease runs out.
DHCP can allow for unlisted clients. Any client, even if its MAC address is not
defined in the DHCP configuration, may request an IP address from the pool of
available addresses. The use of unlisted clients might be appropriate in an
environment in which it is not necessary or preferable to keep track of MAC
addresses.
While BOOTP servers can handle requests only from BOOTP clients, DHCP can
handle requests from both DHCP and BOOTP clients.
DHCP servers (unlike BOOTP servers) can reuse IP addresses that are not
currently being used.
Finally, DHCP provides a large set of configuration options, including user-defined
options. These options configure many advanced network environments. See
“Taking Advantage of Multiple Server Environments” on page 17 for more
information.
TFTP or NFS for Boot File Service
The Network Station can use either of two protocols to receive the base code file
from the base code server. The protocol that you use may depend on the operating
system platform of your base code server (see Table 5).
Trivial file transfer protocol (TFTP) is a simple protocol that is used to transfer files.
TFTP is available on every platform.
The network file system (NFS) makes files and directories available to clients. NFS
is generally more reliable than TFTP.
Table 5. Protocols Supported by Various Operating Systems
Protocols
OS/390
VM/ESA
OS/400
AIX
NT
TFTP,
NFS
TFTP,
NFS
TFTP
TFTP, NFS TFTP,
NFS
OS/2
TFTP,
NFS
Note: If you are booting WorkSpace On-Demand clients by using TFTP on an
OS/2 system, you must use NFS to boot Network Stations.
Java on the Network Station
Java is a programming language that is designed to bridge the gap between
different platforms. Java’s imperative, ″Write once, run anywhere,″ refers to its
portability and to the ability of a single Java program to run on different platforms.
To view Java applications, you need a bundle of Java-enabling programs called a
Java Virtual Machine (JVM). Using the JVM on diskless clients such as the Network
Station allows the user to access applications without using permanent disk space
either on the Network Station or on the server. You can download a JVM from
servers, making it possible to start and configure Java programs.
14
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
There are two kinds of Java programs:
v Applets — require a browser or applet viewer
v Applications — display directly
The first variety, applets, rely on a browser or applet viewer to provide windows and
graphical layout. In general, the browser does not trust applets since they are
downloaded across the Internet. In other words, the browser can restrict applets
from reading or writing to local files and from connecting to machines other than
those from which they are downloaded. These restrictions protect users from
virus-contaminated programs and provide a safe environment for examining
programs on the Internet.
The Network Station can run Java applets and applications. Only a single Java
application can run within the Network Station. When a Java application is running,
it precludes applets from running, both on the desktop and in the browser.
For more information about Java, see the following Web sites:
v http://www.javasoft.com
v http://www.ibm.com/java
Windows Applications on the Network Station
Network Stations can run Windows applications through the use of a multi-user
Windows server. There are several products that can provide a multi-user Windows
server:
v Citrix WinFrame is a multi-user windows application server based on Microsoft
Windows NT 3.51. Citrix WinFrame communicates to the Network Station using
the independent computer architecture (ICA) protocol.
v NCD WinCenter is a multi-user windows application product that requires Citirix
WinFrame. NCD WinCenter communicates to the Network Station using the X11
protocol.
v Citrix MetaFrame is a multi-user windows application product that requires
Microsoft Windows NT Server 4.0, Terminal Server Edition. Citrix MetaFrame
communicates to the Network Station using the ICA protocol.
Network Stations that boot from a Release 2.5 IBM Network Station Manager
licensed program server can communicate to a multi-user windows server using the
X11 protocol. Network Stations that boot from a Release 3 IBM Network Station
Manager licensed program server can communicate to a multi-user Windows server
using the X11 protocol or the ICA protocol.
For more information see the following Web sites:
v WinFrame and MetaFrame - http://www.citrix.com
v WinCenter - http://www.ncd.com
v Microsoft Windows NT Server 4.0, Terminal Server Edition http://www.microsoft.com
Chapter 1. Understanding the Network Station
15
Network Station Memory Requirements
Each of the applications that are downloaded to the Network Station require
memory. Use Table 6 as a guide in determining how much memory each Network
Station requires.
Table 6. Minimum Memory Requirements for Network Stations
Item Requiring Memory
Languages With Languages with Double Byte
Non-extended
Extended
Character Set
Fonts (MB)
Fonts1 (MB)
Languages2
(MB)
Base System
8.0
14.0
12.0
ICA client, if used
2.0
2.0
2.0
v Minimum buffer size
v 5.0
v 5.0
v 5.0
v Recommended buffer size
v 7.0
v 7.0
v 7.0
v Minimum buffer size for eSuite
v 14
v 14
v 14
v Recommended buffer size for
eSuite
v 18
v 18
v 18
v Recommended buffer size for
JITC
v 18
v 18
v 18
3270 Emulator (1st session)
4.0
9.6
7.5
each additional 3270 session
1.0
1.5
1.5
5250 Emulator (1st session)
4.2
10.3
7.5
each additional 5250 session
1.1
1.0
1.0
x-Terminal Client
0.3
0.3
.3
each additional x-Terminal session 0.12
0.12
0.12
NC Navigator Browser
7.2
8.0
17
Lotus eSuite Desktop
4.6
4.6
4.6
v Web Browser
v 2.4
v 2.4
v 2.4
v Calendar
v 3.0
v 3.0
v 3.0
v Mail
v 2.2
v 2.2
v 2.2
v Address book
v 1.4
v 1.4
v 1.4
v Work Files
v 0.9
v 0.9
v 0.9
v Instructions
v 0.3
v 0.3
v 0.3
v Word Processor
v 1.9
v 1.9
v 1.9
v Spreadsheet
v 1.1
v 1.1
v 1.1
v Presentation
v 1.8
v 1.8
v 1.8
VTxxx emulation (first session)
0.6
0.6
0.6
each additional VTxxx session
0.2
0.2
0.2
For JAVA applets or applications
Notes:
1. SBCS and extended fonts: Bulgarian, Byelorussian, Croation, Macedonian, Russian,
Serbian and Ukrainian
2. DBCS: Traditional Chinese, Simplified Chinese, Japanese, and Korean
3. Invokes Java applets. You must include Java memory requirement (from above) too.
16
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Taking Advantage of Multiple Server Environments
You can install the IBM Network Station Manager licensed program on multiple
computer systems. Each of these computer systems can perform specific server
roles. On any particular computer, the IBM Network Station Manager program can
perform more than one server role. A brief description of each server role follows:
BOOTP/DHCP Server
The BOOTP or DHCP server provides the Network Station with information
such as its IP address, the base code server address, and the address of
the terminal configuration server. You can change these addresses on
DHCP servers. See “Load Balancing Example” on page 18 for an example
of how to specify a different address for the base code server and terminal
configuration server. You do not need to install the IBM Network Station
Manager program on this server.
Base Code Server
The IBM Network Station Manager program on this server provides the
operating system and the application programs that are downloaded to the
Network Stations. You do not use this server to configure Network Stations.
Terminal Configuration Server
The IBM Network Station Manager program on this server provides
terminal-based configuration settings. The IBM Network Station Manager
program manages these settings. Examples of items to configure on this
server are a printer that is attached to the Network Station or the Network
Station’s keyboard language. The address of the terminal configuration
server is the same as the address of the base code server by default. The
inventory server (AS/400 only) runs on this server.
Authentication Server
The IBM Network Station Manager program on this server provides user
authentication (where the user logs in) and user-based configuration
settings. The IBM Network Station Manager program manages these
settings. Examples of what you might configure on this server are a user’s
start-up programs or a user’s browser preferences. The address of the
authentication server is the same as the address of the base code server
by default. See “Roaming User Example” for an example of how to specify
a different address for the authentication server.
Some examples when you might want to take advantage of multiple servers, are as
follows:
v A user from Chicago is visiting New York and expects to sign on and use the
same configuration that he has at home. For more information, see “Roaming
User Example”.
v All users power on their IBM Network Station at 8:00 AM and create network
congestion. For more information, see “Load Balancing Example” on page 18.
Note: All servers must be running version 1 release 3 of the IBM Network Station
Manager licensed program for these examples to work.
Roaming User Example
Figure 6 on page 18 shows how multiple servers can allow visiting users to obtain
their home configurations.
Chapter 1. Understanding the Network Station
17
Figure 6. Roaming User Example
In the case of a user from Chicago visiting New York, one server is in Chicago, and
one server is in New York.
The server in New York provides the following information:
v The IBM Network Station IP address
v The operating system and applications
v The terminal-based configuration information
v A log-on dialog
The visiting user selects the Roam button on the login dialog. The user then enters
the name or address of the Chicago authentication server (10.2.1.2).
The Chicago authentication server provides the following information:
v The authentication of the user
v The user-based configuration information
The IBM Network Station Manager program on the server in New York manages the
terminal-based configuration information. The IBM Network Station Manager
program on the server in Chicago manages the user-based configuration
information.
Load Balancing Example
Figure 7 on page 19 shows how multiple servers can reduce network congestion
when a large number of Network Stations power on simultaneously. The
administrator installs the IBM Network Station Manager program on multiple servers
that act as base code servers. This distributes copies of the large executable files
(operating system and applications) across servers. You can use DHCP to configure
groups of Network Stations to access different base code servers.
Note: There is no way to separate the base code server from the terminal
configuration server when using BOOTP. You can only do this by using
DHCP.
18
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Figure 7. Load Balancing Example
This example uses four systems to divide up the work load:
v Two Microsoft Windows NT systems are performing the role of base code
servers (host 10.3.1.2, the base code server that we use in our example, and
host 10.4.1.2). This example uses two base code servers to divide the work load.
Any number of base code servers is possible.
v An RS/6000 system is performing the role of a DHCP server (host 10.2.1.2). You
do not need to install the IBM Network Station Manager program on this system.
v An AS/400 system is performing the role of terminal configuration and
authentication server (host 10.1.1.2). We use the IBM Network Station Manager
program that is installed on the terminal configuration and authentication server
to centrally manage all user configurations and terminal configurations. One IBM
Network Station Manager program should manage all IBM Network Stations to
prevent conflicts.
A user would see a log-on dialog from the base code server and do the following:
1. Click the Roam button.
2. Enter the address of the authentication server (10.1.1.2).
Tip: If you want to use DHCP, you should use the IBM Network Station Manager
program to check that DHCP is configuring DNS. Ensure that you have
selected DNS Configuration from BOOTP or DHCP server. To find this
setting, click Hardware, click Workstations, and then select System
Defaults.
For this configuration to work, you must configure the items in Table 7 in the DHCP
server settings.
Table 7. DHCP Options for Load Balancing
Description
Example
Option 66 or bootstrap server - base
code server IP address
10.3.1.2
Option 67 - bootfile path
/netstation/prodbase/kernel
Option 211 - protocol to use for the base nfs
code server. Possible values are tftp, nfs
or rfs/400.
Chapter 1. Understanding the Network Station
19
Table 7. DHCP Options for Load Balancing (continued)
Description
Example
Option 212 - terminal configuration
server IP address. Up to two addresses
separated by a blank can be specified.
10.1.1.2
Option 213 - Configuration files path
name for option 212. Up to two paths
separated by a blank can be specified.
/QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation/configs/
rfs/400
Option 214 - Protocol to use for option
212. Possible values are tftp, nfs, or
rfs/400. Up to two values separated by a
blank can be specified.
Notes:
1. Options 211, 212, 213, and 214 are site specific options in DHCP. If you are already
using these options for another purpose, you will need to configure DHCP to avoid
conflicts. See “Configuring DHCP to Avoid Conflicts”.
2. When two configuration servers are specified, the first server is tried. If that fails, then
the second server is tried. If the second server is successful, then the second value in
options 213 and 214 are used.
3. The IBM Network Stations must be using boot monitor version 3.0.0 or later. See
“Viewing the Boot PROM Version of an IBM Network Station” on page 107 for
information on how to view the boot monitor version.
Refer to “Configuring DHCP for Load Balancing” on page 31 for instructions on how
to configure DHCP for load balancing on OS/2 Warp Server.
Configuring DHCP to Avoid Conflicts
The DHCP options in Table 7 on page 19 have the flexibility to apply on a network,
subnet, class, or client basis. If you find that options 211-214 are already in use for
other purposes, you can separate these options by subnet or class. Use Table 8 to
determine the Network Station classes.
Determining DHCP Classes
Table 8 lists the DHCP classes assigned to each IBM Network Station type and
model.
Table 8. IBM Network Station DHCP Classes
20
Type-Model
Class
8361-100
IBMNSM 2.0.0
8361-110
IBMNSM 2.1.0
8361-200
IBMNSM 1.0.0
8361-210
IBMNSM 1.1.0
8361-341
IBMNSM 3.4.1
8362-A22
IBMNSM A.2.0
8362-A23
IBMNSM A.2.0
8362-A52
IBMNSM A.5.0
8362-A53
IBMNSM A.5.0
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Table 8. IBM Network Station DHCP Classes (continued)
If you cannot find the type and model number of your Network Station listed in the table,
then do the following:
1. Power on the Network Station.
2. As soon as the Network Station begins to search for its host server (message NS0500),
press the Escape key.
3. Press the F2 key to view the hardware configuration. The class number is in the DHCP
field.
Chapter 1. Understanding the Network Station
21
22
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Chapter 2. Installing and Configuring an IBM Network Station
on OS/2 Warp Server
This chapter describes how to install and configure an IBM Network Station
Manager on an OS/2 Warp Server running WorkSpace On-Demand 2.0.
Planning
Review the following requirements before you install IBM Network Station Manager.
Prerequisite Software and Hardware
OS/2 System
OS/2 Warp Server (Entry, Advanced, SMP)
Hard Disk
Local drive (formatted with a file system that supports long
file names) with 500 MB available. For machines with 32 MB
of RAM, the SWAPPER.DAT file may grow as large as 50
MB during the installation process.
Memory
see WorkSpace On-Demand 2.0
Software Prerequisites
WorkSpace On-Demand 2.0 with Feature Install and TCP/IP
configured.
Web Server
Lotus Domino Go Webserver, Version 4.6.2.5 or later.
Browser
Netscape Navigator for OS/2, Version 2.02 or later.
Note: Lotus Domino Go Webserver and Netscape Communicator 4.04 for OS/2 are
included on the IBM Network Station Manager CD.
Before You Begin the Installation Process
Review the Readme file, located in the root directory of the IBM Network Station
Manager CD, for any last minute updates to the installation process. A printable
Portable Document Format (.PDF) version of the Network Station Manager 3.0 for
WorkSpace On-Demand 2.0 book is located on the Network Station Management
CD at X:\DOC\UserGuid\os2nsm.pdf (where X: is the CD-ROM drive letter). An
HTML version of the book can be found at X:\DOC\UserGuid\HTML\index.htm.
A printable Post Script (.PS) version of this install chapter is located at
X:\DOC\install\nsminst.ps, and a (.INF) version of this install chapter is located at
X:\DOC\install\nsminst.inf.
To make sure IBM Network Station Manager groups are created on your server
during the installation process, start the IBM Warp Server File and Print Services.
Installing
You can install IBM Network Station Manager using one of the following methods:
Attended
From the CD or a redirected LAN drive, use the IBM Network Station
Manager install command. See “Attended Installation” on page 24 for
step-by-step directions.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
23
Unattended (CID)
From a remote machine, use a software distribution manager (SDM) install
command or program. See “Unattended (CID) Installation” for more
information.
Attended Installation
To
1.
2.
3.
4.
install IBM Network Station Manager:
Insert the IBM Network Station Manager CD into the CD-ROM drive.
Open an OS/2 window.
Change the drive letter to your CD-ROM drive.
Type cd NSM and press Enter.
5. Type install and press Enter.
6. The Netscape browser starts. Follow the instructions in the window.
Unattended (CID) Installation
Configuration, Installation, and Distribution (CID) refers to an installation method
that requires limited or no interaction during the installation process. A response file
provides the requested installation information and a software distribution manager
(SDM) controls the installation process.
CID-Enabled Program Support
You can use any SDM program, such as NetView Distribution Manager/2 (NVDM/2),
to remotely install IBM Network Station Manager. An example of a NVDM/2 profile
to install NSM is as follows:
TargetDir = C:\
Section Catalog
Begin
ObjectType = SOFTWARE
GlobalName = IBM.NSM.INSTALL.REF.3.0
Description = "Install IBM Network Station Manager 3.0 for OS/2"
End
Section Install
Begin
Program = SA:\IMG\NSM\INSTALL.CMD
Parms = /S:$(SourceDir) /B:C /R2:$(ResponseFile) /L1:$(Logfile)
ResponseFile = SA:\RSP\NSM\$(WorkStatName).RSP
SourceDir = SA:\IMG\NSM
LogFile1 = SB:\LOG\NSM\$(WorkStatName).LOG
End
Refer to your program documentation for more information.
CID-Enabled Command-Line Support
Feature Install provides a command-line method for remote installation. The default
IBM Network Station Manager response file is X:\NSM\NSM.RSP. The user can
overwrite options in this file by editing the secondary response file
X:\NSM\NSMR2.RSP in an ASCII text editor.
Note: Do not edit the primary response file; only the secondary response file
should be edited.
24
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Install
Purpose: The INSTALL command enables you to perform an unattended
installation from the command line.
Syntax:
ÊÊ
INSTALL
/L1: LogFile
/?
/R2: ResponseFile
Ê
/B: BootDrive
ÊÍ
Ê
/S: SourcePath
Parameters:
Note: The parameters are not order specific.
/B: BootDrive
The boot drive of the target machine. This is an optional parameter. If it is not
specified, the default value of c is used. For example: /B:D
/L1: LogFile
The fully qualified name of the log message file that is created during the
installation. This is a required parameter for unattended installations. For
example: /L1:Y:\LOGS\NSMINST.LOG
/R2: ResponseFile
The fully qualified file name of the secondary response file. This is a required
parameter for unattended installation. For example: /R2:X\NSM\OVERRIDE.RSP
/S: SourcePath
The drive letter and path for the installation files. This is an optional parameter.
If not specified, the path to the INSTALL.CMD file is used.
/? Displays the syntax and help for commands. If you type an incorrect parameter,
help is automatically displayed. This is an optional parameter.
Examples: A command line to install IBM Network Station Manager:
INSTALL /R2:X:\NSM\NSMR2.RSP /L1:Y:\LOG\NSMINST.LOG /B:E /S:Z:\NSM
Chapter 2. Installing and Configuring an IBM Network Station on OS/2 Warp Server
25
Uninstalling IBM Network Station Manager
IBM Network Station Manager can be uninstalled in two ways:
Attended
From the Uninstall IBM Network Station Manager icon. See “Attended
Installation” on page 24 for step-by-step directions.
Unattended (CID)
From a command line. See “Unattended (CID) Installation” on page 24 for
more information.
Attended Uninstallation
To uninstall IBM Network Station Manager using the Uninstall IBM Network
Station Manager icon:
1. Open the OS/2 System folder.
2. Open the System Setup folder.
3. Open the Uninstall Features folder.
4. Double-click the Uninstall IBM Network Station Manager icon.
5. Verify the NSM-Inventory check box is selected.
6. Click the Uninstall button.
Unattended (CID) Uninstallation
To uninstall IBM Network Station Manager using the command line:
1. Open an OS/2 window.
2. Change the drive letter to the drive on which IBM Network Station Manager is
installed.
3. Type cd \NSTATION and press Enter
4. Type NSMUINST /CID and press Enter
Configuring
Review the following procedures before you configure your IBM Network Station
Manager environment.
Configuring Netscape Navigator 2.02 for OS/2
To administer IBM Network Station Manager from OS/2, you must configure
Netscape Navigator 2.02 as follows:
1. Select the Netscape Navigator for OS/2 icon.
2. Right-click and select Settings from the pop-up menu.
3. Click the Program tab if it is not already selected.
4. In the Parameters field, type -3.
5. Close the dialog box.
If you are using Netscape Navigator 2.02, you must also configure the IBM
Network Station Manager icon as follows:
1. Select the IBM Network Station Manager icon.
26
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
2.
3.
4.
5.
Right-click and select Settings from the pop-up menu.
Click the Program tab if it is not already selected.
In the Parameters field, type -3 before the URL.
Close the dialog box.
Note: If you are using Netscape Communicator 4.x, no additional configuration
changes are required.
Configuring DHCP on OS/2 Warp Server
The following sections explain how to configure Dynamic Host Configuration
Protocol (DHCP) on OS/2 Warp Server. You will need the following information
before you begin:
v
v
v
v
v
v
v
Dynamic Domain Name System (DDNS) server with an IP address
Host name
Domain name
Subnet address
Subnet mask
IP address range
Lease time
Configuring TCP/IP Support for the Server System
Note: If you configured TCP/IP during the WorkSpace On-Demand 2.0 installation,
you can skip to “Starting the DHCP Server” on page 28.
To configure the TCP/IP support for the server, do the following:
1. From the OS/2 Desktop, open the TCP/IP Shadows folder.
2. Open the TCP/IP Configuration notebook.
3. Select the Network tab.
a. In the Interface to Configure list box, select LAN Interface 0.
b. Under Configuration Options, select Enable Interface.
c. Select the Manually, Using radio button.
d. Type your IP Address.
e. Type your Subnet Mask.
4. Select the Routing tab:
a. Click the Add button to display the Route Entry window.
b. Type your Destination address.
c. Type your Route address.
d. Type your Subnet mask.
e. Click Add.
5. Select the Hostnames tab:
a. Type your Computer’s Host Name.
b. Type your Local Domain Name.
c.
d.
e.
f.
Select the Name Server Addresses list box.
Click Add.
Type your Name Server Address.
Click OK.
Chapter 2. Installing and Configuring an IBM Network Station on OS/2 Warp Server
27
6. Select the Autostart tab:
a. Select nfsd in the Autostarted Services list box.
b. Check Autostart Services, Foreground Session, and Minimized radio
buttons.
c. Click OK.
7. Click OK to exit the notebook and save your changes.
Starting the DHCP Server
To start the DHCP server, do one of the following:
v Open the DHCP Server icon in the DHCP Server Services folder (in the TCP/IP
Shadows folder).
v At the OS/2 command line, type dhcpsd.
Note: To display messages, do one of the following:
v Type -v (verbose) on the dhcpsd command, for example:
dhcpsd -v
v Edit the properties of the icon:
1. Right-click the DHCP Server icon to display the pop-up dialog box.
2. Select Properties from the pop-up dialog box.
3. Select the Program tab if it is not already selected.
4. In the Parameters field, type -v.
5. Close the dialog box.
Configuring the DHCP Server
Use the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) Server Configuration
program to create, modify, and validate configuration files for your IBM DHCP
servers. Data validation occurs for each configuration entry as you make it.
Configure the DHCP server and place the DHCP server configuration file in the
subdirectory identified by the ETC environment variable. This assigns an address
and options to the subnet the client is in. To do this:
1. Start the DHCP Server Configuration program.
2. Click the Global icon.
3. From the Configure menu, click Add Subnet to open the Subnet notebook.
4. On the Subnet Definition page:
v Type these values:
– Subnet name
– Subnet address
– Subnet mask
– IP Address range
v (Optional) In the Addresses Excluded from Range field, type the server’s
address in the From field and then click Add to add the server’s address to
the Exclusion List.
v In the Lease Time and Comment field, click the Enter a Lease Time radio
button and set the time.
5. On the DHCP Options page:
v In the options list, click option 1, Subnet Mask. Type your Subnet Mask.
28
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
v In the options list, click option 6, Domain Name Server. Type your IP
Address and then click Add.
v In the options list, click option 15, Domain Name. Type your Domain
Name.
To help you configure DHCP, record your network information in Table 9.
Table 9. Gathering DHCP Information
DHCP Option
Number
Field
Description
Write Your Network’s Value
Here
Defining the Subnet Options
N/A
Subnet Number
(Subnet IP
Address)
The IP address associated with a particular
subnet. For Class C networks whose subnet
mask is 255.255.255.0, the subnet address is
the same as the network address. For Figure 4
on page 6, the subnet IP address is
192.168.1.0. If the subnet mask of your network
is not 255.255.255.0, see “Subnets and Subnet
Masks” on page 8 for more information.
N/A
Start DHCP Pool The first IP address in the range which you have
Address (IP
specified for your pool of available addresses. In
Range From)
Network Example 3, for the subnet 192.168.1.0,
the Start DHCP Pool Address can be
192.168.1.2.
N/A
Last DHCP Pool The last IP address in the range which you have
Address (IP
specified for your pool of available addresses. In
Range To)
Network Example 3, for the subnet 192.168.1.0,
the Last DHCP Pool Address can be
192.168.1.3.
Defining DHCP Options
Option 1
Subnet Mask
A value that enables network devices to direct
packets of information accurately in a subnetted
environment. For Figure 4 on page 6, the subnet
mask is 255.255.255.0. For a discussion of
subnet masks, refer to “Subnets and Subnet
Masks” on page 8.
Option 3
Router IP
The IP address of the default router to which
Address (Default TCP/IP packets not addressed to your network
Gateway)
will be sent. In Network Example 3, for the
subnet 192.168.1.0, the default gateway IP
address is 192.168.1.1.
Option 6
Domain Name
Server (IP
Adress)
Delivering the Domain Name Server IP address
to clients allows them to use either fully qualified
host names or IP addresses when they
communicate with other devices. In Figure 4 on
page 6, the IP address of the Domain Name
Server is 192.168.1.5.
Option 15
Domain Name
The domain name allows the Network Station to
specify its domain to other devices. In Figure 4
on page 6, where the fully qualified host name
is server.mycompany.com, the domain name is
mycompany.com.
Chapter 2. Installing and Configuring an IBM Network Station on OS/2 Warp Server
29
Table 9. Gathering DHCP Information (continued)
DHCP Option
Number
Field
Description
Write Your Network’s Value
Here
Option 66
TFTP Server
Name (TFTP or
NFS)
The server from which the Network Station
downloads its operating system. This option
serves the operating system kernel using both
NFS and TFTP. When you specify this option,
you must use an IP address, not the computer
name of the server. NFS is the recommended
download protocol. Enable the NFS download
with Option 211.
Option 67
Boot File name
The name of the file that contains the Network
Station operating system. This value is a
constant and has been entered for you on the
table.
/netstation/prodbase/kernel
Note: This is the NFS
pathname.
Option 211
Base Code
Server Protocol
This option sets the protocol used for the
operating system kernel download. Specifiy this
option to enable Option 66 to serve the kernel
using NFS.
nfs
6. On the Miscellaneous page, in the DDNS Server for PTR Record Updates
field, type the server’s IP address. A key for the DHCP server is created
automatically when you close the program. The key enables the DHCP server
to send host name updates for the addresses it allocates to the primary DDNS
server.
7. Click OK to close the notebook.
8. Double-click the DHCP Server icon to open the DHCP Server Parameters
notebook.
9. On the DDNS PTR Records page, check the Automatically Update or
Delete PTR Records check box to specify DHCP server support for DDNS
PTR records.
10. Click OK to close the notebook.
11. (Optional) You can view the resulting configuration file. To do this, click the
subnet, and, on the View pull-down, click View Entire File to see the file.
12. Click File -> Exit to exit the program.
For more information on using the DHCP Server Configuration program, see the
online help.
Configuring and Starting the DDNS Server
To configure the DDNS Server, do the following:
1. Start the DDNS Server Administrator program.
2. In the Domain Name Server notebook, select the Server tab to verify that the
information for the name server is correct. Click OK.
3. Define the DDNS server as the primary server for your domain as follows:
a. Click Add Primary Domain on the tool bar to open the Primary Domain
notebook.
b. On the Domain Configuration page, be sure the domain type is dynamic
(the default); then, type the your complete domain name.
c. Click OK to close the notebook. When you close the notebook, the zone key
for the domain is created automatically for you. An alias is also created for
this server.
30
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
4. Define the DDNS server as the primary server for the reverse domain as
follows:
a. Click Add Primary Domain on the tool bar to open the Primary Domain
notebook.
b. On the Domain Configuration tab, be sure the domain type is dynamic (the
default), and type your complete reverse domain name.
c. Click OK to close the notebook. When you close the notebook, the zone key
for the domain is created automatically for you.
5. Click File -> Save on the menu bar to save the configuration.
6. Click Server -> Start the Name Server on the menu bar to start the DDNS
server.
7. Click File -> Exit to exit the program.
Configuring DHCP for Load Balancing
You can configure DHCP so a client obtains its IP address from the DHCP server,
loads the kernel from a second server, and loads configuration from a third server.
To simplify DHCP administration in your network, give your IBM Network Station
Manager servers permanent IP addresses.
Configuring IBM DHCP
To configure DHCP options for load balancing, use the IBM DHCP interface and the
DHCP starter file (dhcpsd.cfg). The DHCP starter file contains the class information
and the options that are not provided from the IBM DHCP interface. To configure
IBM DHCP for load balancing, open this template file from the DHCP configuration
utility.
If you chose not to run the DHCP starter file, create DHCP options 212, 213, and
214. Configure DHCP option 66, the base code server IP address. Use the
following steps:
1. Open the TCP/IP Shadows folder.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Open the TCP/IP Configuration folder.
Open the TCP/IP Configuration (Local) notebook.
Open the DHCP Server Configuration icon.
Select Global.
Select Configure -> Modify selected item.
7. Select the DHCP Options tab.
8. Click the New button.
9. Fill in the Create New Option screen once for each of the options. Use the
information in Table 10 as a reference for the options that you create.
Table 10. Options to Create Load Balancing
Value Format
Option Name
Option Number
Brief Description Option Value
of Option
Description
Value You
Should Specify
String
Terminal
Configuration
Server
212
IP address of
server to deliver
terminal
configuration
data.
IP address of
terminal
configuration
server.
Your IP address
of terminal
configuration
server.
Chapter 2. Installing and Configuring an IBM Network Station on OS/2 Warp Server
31
Table 10. Options to Create Load Balancing (continued)
String
Terminal
213
Configuration path
The path to
access terminal
configuration
information for
option 212
(terminal
configuration
server).
Path name
/netstation
/prodbase /configs
String
Terminal
Configuration
Protocol
Protocol to use
for option 212
(terminal
configuration
server).
NFS or TFTP
NFS
214
10. After you create all four DHCP options, click OK to return to the main DHCP
configuration page.
11. Select Global or the class, subnet, or client for which you want to configure
your new DHCP options.
12. When the parameters window appears, select option 66, base code server.
Type the IP address of the server you want to download the kernel from.
13. Select each of the four DHCP options you create and use the last column of
Table 10 on page 31 to type the appropriate values.
14. When you are finished, click OK to save your changes and exit the DHCP
configuration utility.
Adding IBM Network Stations to OS/2 Warp Server
To add Network Stations to an existing OS/2 Warp Server environment, complete
the following tasks:
v Add a user account for the Network Station. See “Adding a User”.
v Add the new user account to either the NSMADMIN or NSMUSER group.
v Configure DHCP configuration as specified in “Making Configuration Changes to
DHCP” on page 34.
Adding a User
You must add a user to the domain before that user can access the network. You
can use the LAN Server Administration GUI to add approximately 16,000 users to
each domain.
Note: You can also use the NET USER command to define approximately 1800 users
on a domain. If you use User Profile Management to view user definitions,
you can see approximately 1260 users on each domain.
To add a user:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Open the LAN Server Administration folder.
Open the appropriate domain object.
To display the User Accounts folder, open User Accounts.
To display the User Account - Create notebook, drag a copy of the Template
to a convenient location in the folder.
5. Complete the required fields (indicated by an asterisk (*))and modify other
fields as needed.
32
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
6. To display the first Password page, select the Password tab.
7. Type the new password in the New Password field.
Note: For security purposes, the password is displayed as asterisks (*) when
you type it.
8. Type the new password again in the Confirmation field.
9. To continue to the second Password page, select the folded page corner.
10. (Optional) Complete the remaining fields on this page.
11. (Optional) Complete the fields on other pages.
12. Select Create.
Adding a Group
To work with several users at the same time, create user groups. On the OS/2 LAN,
groups are used for access control and for message purposes.
To add a group:
1. Open the LAN Server Administration folder.
2. Open the appropriate domain object.
3. To display the Groups folder, open Groups.
4. To display the Group - Create notebook, drag a copy of the Group Template to
a convenient position in the folder.
5. To add a group, complete the pages under each tab.
6. After you complete and check the properties, select Create.
Adding Users to Groups
Use the following steps to add users to a group.
Note: A user must be in the NSMADMIN or NSMUSER group to use IBM Network
Station Manager.
To add users:
1. Open the LAN Server Administration folder.
2. Open the appropriate domain object.
3. To display the Groups folder, open Groups.
4. To display the Group notebook, open the group you want to update.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
To display the Users page, select the Users tab.
To display the Add Users to Group window, select Add.
Select one or more users to add.
Select Add. The selected users are added.
Select Set or Apply.
Modifying a User
Using the LAN Server Administration GUI, you can make the following updates to
user account information:
v User type (user, user with operator privilege, or administrator)
v Optional description about the user account
v Password
Chapter 2. Installing and Configuring an IBM Network Station on OS/2 Warp Server
33
v
v
v
v
v
Password options
Home directory
Logon workstation
Logon authority (whether the user can log on to the domain)
Group memberships (such as adding a user to a group and deleting a user from
a group)
v Logon assignments
v Public applications
For more information, consult the LAN Administration Guide, located in the
Information folder.
Making Configuration Changes to DHCP
When you change your network configuration, ensure that the DHCP configuration
reflects those changes. When you add an IBM Network Station to your network,
consider the following:
v Will the addition of this Network Station cause a shortage of available IP
addresses?
v Should this Network Station belong to a particular subnet?
v Will this Network Station receive its address dynamically, or will it have a
permanently assigned address?
v Do I need to consider any configuration information that is unique to this
particular Network Station?
If you make any changes to the DHCP configuration, see “Configuring DHCP on
OS/2 Warp Server” on page 27.
Verifying Network Servers and Services
To be sure IBM Network Station Manager functions correctly, you must verify that
the following servers and services are up and running :
IBM Warp Server File and Print Services
Verify that ″net start server″ is in STARTUP.CMD.
IBM TCP/IP Services
Verify that TCPSTART.CMD is in the Startup folder in the OS/2 System folder.
IBM DHCP server
Verify that this option is configured in the TCP/IP Configuration notebook.
NFS or TFTP server
Verify that these options are configured and enabled for autostart in the
TCP/IP Configuration notebook.
Lotus Domino Go Webserver
Verify that the Lotus Domino Go Webserver icon is in the Startup folder
in the OS/2 System folder.
Network Station Login Daemon
Verify that ″start nsld.exe″ is in \TCPIP\BIN\TCPEXIT.CMD.
34
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Configuring Printers on OS/2 Warp Server
If the datastream generated by the application matches a datastream that your
printer understands, you can configure printers for your Network Stations with the
IBM Network Station Manager. Table 13 on page 54 identifies which datastreams
are compatible.
Configuring Basic Printer Scenarios
Table 11 explains the basic steps to configure the printers shown in Figure 8.
Note: Review the online help information text for IBM Network Station Manager
Printer Settings to become more familiar with the Print function for Network
Stations.
Identify the scenario that best meets your needs and follow the steps to configure
your printers.
OS/2 Warp Server
1
4
PCL
only
Printer
IBM
Network
Station
PS
Printer
A
IBM
Network
Station
B
5
PCL
only
Printer
Figure 8. Possible Network Station Printing Scenarios
Table 11. Configuration Descriptions for Basic Printer Scenarios
Print Configuration
Print Job Flow in
Figure 8
Instructions
Network Station to a LAN
printer
Network Station A to
Printer 1
In the IBM Network Station Manager software, configure an
entry in the Remote Printer Server field for the LAN printer.
Network Station to a local Network Station B to
printer
Printer 5
In the IBM Network Station Manager software, configure an
entry in the Local Parallel Printer or the Local Serial
Printer field, depending on how the printer connects to the
Network Station.
Network Station to
another Network Station
with an attached printer
In the IBM Network Station Manager software, configure an
entry in the Remote Printer Server field with the IP address
of the Network Station to which the printer is attached. In the
Queue name field, type PARALLEL1 or SERIAL1, depending on
how the printer connects to the Network Station.
Network Station A to
Network Station B to
Printer 5
Chapter 2. Installing and Configuring an IBM Network Station on OS/2 Warp Server
35
To configure an OS/2 Warp Server to an IBM Network Station with an attached
printer, do the following:
1. Open the TCP/IP Shadows folder.
2. Open the TCP/IP Configuration folder.
3. Open the TCP/IP Configuration (Local) folder.
4. In the TCP/IP Configuration notebook, select the Autostart tab.
5. Select lprportd from the services in the left hand column.
6. If the Autostart Service option is already selected skip to step 9. Otherwise,
select the option and the Detached option.
7. Press the OK button to close the TCP/IP Configuration notebook and save the
changes.
8. Shutdown and restart the server.
9. Boot the Network Station from the OS/2 Warp Server.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
Open the OS/2 System folder.
Open the Templates folder.
Right-click on the Printer template and select Install from the pop-up menu.
In the Create a Printer window, enter the name of the printer.
Select the default printer driver for the type of printer attached to the Network
Station. If the correct printer driver is not installed, select the Install new
printer driver button to add the correct driver.
15. Select an available LPR output port to use for the printer. The LPR ports have
a name in the form \PIPE\LPDx where the x is a number. Currently used ports
are cross-hatched.
16. Open the selected port by double-clicking it.
17. In the LPD Server field, type the name or IP address of the Network Station to
which the printer is attached. In the LPD Printer field, type the name of the
printer or print queue (SERIAL1 or PARALLEL1) on that Network Station.
Optionally, you may enter the Warp Server’s host name in the ″Host Name″
field.
18. Press OK to save the printer port settings.
19. Press the Create button to create the printer.
Printer Administration Techniques
Network Stations can print to most types of printers. To set up your printer
environment, create a print network diagram. This will help you develop a printing
strategy.
Consider the following techniques:
Table 12. Advantages and Disadvantages of Printer Techniques
36
Technique
Advantages
Disadvantages
Print jobs sent to the OS/2
Warp Server, which controls
the printers.
Reduces workload on
Network Station when print
buffer is full. Works well in an
environment with mixed
printer datastreams.
Increases printing time.
Increases workload on the
server. Increases network
traffic. Increases chance of
the server misinterpreting the
datastream.
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Table 12. Advantages and Disadvantages of Printer Techniques (continued)
Print jobs sent directly to the
printers.
Reduces printing time.
Decreases workload on the
server. Decreases network
traffic. Reduces chance of
the server misinterpreting the
datastream.
Does not work well in an
environment with mixed
printer datastreams.
Increases workload on the
Network Station; may hinder
performance.
Running Java Applications and Applets on OS/2 Warp Server
When you load Java applications and applets from the network file system, put
them in the subdirectory AppBase under the directory \nstation\. Create
subdirectories in the AppBase directory, as needed. Because this is a read-only
directory through NFS (Network File System), save data to the user directory.
To create a button to access an applet in the \nstation\ directory, do the following:
1. Use an ASCII text editor to open the file
x:\nstation\prodbase\configs\defaults.dft, where x is the drive on which you
installed the IBM Network Station Manager.
2. In the empty defaults.dft file, add the following line:
set file-service-table[-1] = {"/netstation/AppBase" nil
x.x.x.x nfs "/netstation/Appbase" unix 3 30 1024 1024}
where x.x.x.x is your server IP address.
3. Save your change.
4. Start the IBM Network Station Manager in your browser.
5. Select the Startup tab.
6. Select Menus.
7. Scroll down to the Java Applications menu items.
8. Add the menu item label.
9. In the Applet URL field, type /netstation/AppBase/applet.html.
10. Click Finish.
The button loads the applet through NFS into Applet Viewer on the Network
Station.
To set up a button for an application in the \nstation\ directory:
1. Use an ASCII text editor to open the file
x:\nstation\prodbase\configs\defaults.dft, where x is the drive on which you
installed the IBM Network Station Manager.
2. In the empty defaults.dft file, add the following line:
set file-service-table[-1] = {"/netstation/AppBase" nil
x.x.x.x nfs "/netstation/Appbase" unix 3 30 1024 1024}
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
where x.x.x.x is your server IP address.
Save your change.
Start the IBM Network Station Manager in your browser.
Select the Startup tab.
Select Menus.
Scroll down to the Java Application menu items.
Add the menu item label.
Chapter 2. Installing and Configuring an IBM Network Station on OS/2 Warp Server
37
9. In the Application (class) Name field, type the class name, for example,
application.
10. In the Class Path field, type /netstation/AppBase.
11. Select Finish.
Before You Continue . . .
v Verify that the Network Parameters, configured in the Setup Utility of each
Network Station, are compatible with your boot method. For example, to serve IP
addresses to an IBM Network Station through a DHCP server, you need to set
the IP Address From field in the Setup Utility to Network.
v Verify that your DHCP server, NFS or TFTP server, and HTTP server are started.
See “Verifying Network Servers and Services” on page 34.
v Verify that you excluded any statically addressed devices in your DHCP
addressing range.
v If you use DHCP and you have a router between your IBM Network Stations and
your boot server, verify that the router handles DHCP requests.
v For more information about IBM Network Station Manager client tasks, refer to
“Chapter 3. Logging On and Working With IBM Network Station Manager
Applications” on page 39.
v For more information about IBM Network Station Manager administrator tasks,
refer to “Chapter 4. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program” on
page 55.
38
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Chapter 3. Logging On and Working With IBM Network Station
Manager Applications
Logging On . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Roam Button . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
After You Log In . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with the 5250 Emulation Application . . .
Learning About the 5250 Emulation Function . .
Eliminating the 5250 Emulator New Session Dialog
Accessing Help . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with the 3270 Application . . . . . . .
Learning About the 3270 Emulation Function . .
Eliminating the 3270 Emulator New Session Dialog
Accessing Help . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with the NC Navigator Browser . . . . .
Learning About NC Navigator Browser Functions .
Creating NC Navigator Directory Buttons . . .
Learning About NC Navigator Mail Functions . .
Learning About NC Navigator News Functions . .
Accessing Help . . . . . . . . . . . . .
JAVA Virtual Machine . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting an Application . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting an Applet . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with the Time Zone Environment Variable
Learning About Printer Datastreams . . . . . . .
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54
Logging On
After you power on your IBM Network Station network computer, the login screen
appears. Figure 9 shows the initial login screen. You can sign on by typing your
user ID and password in the appropriate entry box.
Note: The mouse pointer must be inside the window to make the window active.
Figure 9. Network Station Login Screen
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
39
Roam Button
The Roam button allows a user to log in to a server other than the server that is
displayed on the login screen.
To log in to a server other than the server name that is displayed on the login
screen, take the following steps:
1. Click the Roam button on the login screen. A screen similar to the one that is
shown in Figure 10 appears.
2. Type in the name or IP address of the host where your user ID account is
established and click OK. Your personal desktop will appear on the Network
Station that you are using.
Figure 10. Network Address Screen used for Roaming
For more information about roaming and working with multiple servers, see “Taking
Advantage of Multiple Server Environments” on page 17.
After You Log In
Whether you log in as usual or log in using the Roam button, your regular set of
Network Station applications appear.
Figure 11 shows the Network Station Menu bar, which contains the applications
available to select. The applications will appear on your screen if the IBM Network
Station Manager program specified them to autostart. See “Chapter 4. Using the
IBM Network Station Manager Program” on page 55 for more information. If no
applications autostart, you can select an application from the Menu bar. Available
default application buttons are 5250, 3270, and NC Navigator (a browser).
Figure 11. Network Station Menu Bar
The buttons within the Menu bar are as follows:
v Log out
Clicking Log out logs you off the Network Station.
v Hide or Show
Clicking Hide makes the Menu bar float out of view when you move the mouse
pointer off the Menu bar. To retrieve the Menu bar, move your mouse pointer to
the very bottom of your screen. (If you clicked the Move to top button, go to the
40
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
very top of the screen instead.) The Hide button or Show button is useful if the
Menu bar covers part of an application window. Click the Show button to display
the Menu bar.
v Move to top or Move to bottom
Clicking Move to top moves the Menu bar to the top of the screen. The Move to
top button changes to read Move to bottom after the Menu bar moves to the
top. Clicking the Move to bottom moves the Menu bar back to the bottom.
v Other buttons
Other buttons on the Menu bar represent applications you can use.
v Lock screen
The Lock screen button allows you to lock the screen when you leave the
workstation. Clicking the Lock screen button enables a prompt for the password.
Note: You can control the presentation of buttons on the Menu bar. In your
environment, you may or may not want users to have access to various
applications (for example, additional 5250 sessions). The IBM Network
Station Manager program allows you the flexibility of controlling access to
various applications through Menu Bar Options. See “Working with Menu Bar
Options” on page 76 for more information about working with Menu Bar
Options.
Working with the 5250 Emulation Application
The 5250 application provides access to an AS/400 system. How each 5250
session is presented on the Network Station depends on how you configured the
session using the IBM Network Station Manager program.
If, using the IBM Network Station Manager program, the 5250 session was set to
autostart, a 5250 session appears on your Network Station as shown in Figure 12.
Figure 12. 5250 Session Display
Chapter 3. Logging On and Working With IBM Network Station Manager Applications
41
If you click the 5250 button within the Network Station Menu bar, a New 5250
Session window appears. See Figure 13.
Figure 13. New 5250 Session Dialog Box
Note: You can use the name of the system or the IP address of the system to
connect to or start a session. To use a system name, you must set up name
translation (using the Domain Name Server (DNS)) information in your
TCP/IP configuration.
Depending on the volume of network traffic, it can take from several seconds to a
minute to see the sign-on display.
Learning About the 5250 Emulation Function
5250 emulation provides AS/400 system users with greater function than they
normally receive if they use only a nonprogrammable work station (NWS) to access
the system. This additional function is available by clicking various pull-down
options from the 5250 Menu bar. See Figure 14.
Figure 14. 5250 Emulation Session with Expanded Pull-downs
42
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Pull-downs are available to allow you to quickly access 5250 emulation functions.
See Figure 14 on page 42. For example, multi-session support (Command
pull-down), font selection by session (Option pull-down), screen print (Print
pull-down), and online help (Help) information.
The following list shows additional 5250 emulation support:
v Keyboard remapping1
v
v
v
v
v
Color mapping (basic and advanced)1
Record/playback capability1
Autostart of playback file (from the Record/playback function)1
Auto-logon1
User customized keypads1
v Enter/Field Exit key locations (you can specify your choice of keys to be used for
the Enter and Field Exit keys)
v Multiple screen size support (for example: 24 X 80, 27 X 132)
v Office Vision/400 controller text assist
v Cut, copy, paste function1
v Hotspot support
v Cursor style options (Cursor style options are block, underscore, blink, and no
blink.)
v Rule line support
v Row indicator and column indicator
v Customizable window title1
v Column separator function
All the 5250 emulation functions have shipped defaults. Those functions that are
managed by the IBM Network Station Manager program also have IBM-supplied
defaults. See “Appendix C. IBM Network Station Manager Program Shipped Default
Settings” on page 147 for a listing of all 5250 emulation defaults controlled by the
IBM Network Station Manager program.
Accessing the online 5250 Emulation Help (by clicking the Help button) provides
more information about how to make each of these 5250 Emulation functions work.
Eliminating the 5250 Emulator New Session Dialog Box for Japanese
Users
The IBM network Station Manager program (by default) displays a New Session
Dialog box coupled with a Language ID Selection Dialog box for Japanese users.
The New Session Dialog box and Language ID Selection box are shown in
Figure 15 on page 44 and Figure 16 on page 44.
1. The IBM Network Station Manager program controls these 5250 Emulation functions. See “Chapter 4. Using the IBM Network
Station Manager Program” on page 55 for more information. The online help information in the IBM Network Station Manager
program provides more information along with all default settings.
Chapter 3. Logging On and Working With IBM Network Station Manager Applications
43
Figure 15. Japanese New Session Dialog Box
Figure 16. Language ID Selection Dialog Box
These dialog boxes are presented because the IBM Network Station Manager
program needs to know which language ID to use. Japanese users have two
language options: Japanese Extended Katakana and Japanese Extended Latin.
Having to choose the language option makes Japanese users go through the extra
steps of selecting their host and language ID.
These extra steps (New Session Dialog box and Language ID Selection Dialog box)
can be eliminated by adding the LANGID parameter value to the 5250 Startup
configurations. Figure 17 shows the configuration information needed to eliminate
the New Session Dialog box and Language ID Selection Dialog box.
Figure 17. Network Station Manager Program with 5250 -LANGID used.
Following is an example of the -LANGID coding for the two language options:
Japanese Extended Katakana:
Japanese Extended Latin:
-LANGID JA_JP.IBM930
-LANGID JA_JP.IBM939
Notes:
1. You can configure the LANGID parameter in either the Program or Menu
functions of Startup.
2. You must type the parameter values in uppercase.
44
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Accessing Help
You can access help for the 5250 Emulator or your AS/400 session.
For 5250 emulator help, click Help in the emulator’s Task bar. To access help for
AS/400, sign on to AS/400 and press F1.
Working with the 3270 Application
The 3270 application provides access to a System/390. How a 3270 session is
presented on the Network Station depends on how you configured the session
using the IBM Network Station Manager program.
If you have set the 3270 session to autostart, a 3270 session appears on the
screen of your Network Station. See Figure 18.
Figure 18. 3270 Session Display
If the 3270 session is configured not to autostart, and you click the 3270 button on
the Menu bar, a New 3270 Session window appears. See Figure 19.
Figure 19. New 3270 Session Dialog Box
Chapter 3. Logging On and Working With IBM Network Station Manager Applications
45
Note: You can use the system’s name or IP address to log on. To use a system
name, you must set up name translation information (using the Domain
Name Server (DNS)) in your TCP/IP configuration.
Depending on the volume of network traffic, it can take from several seconds to a
minute for the Host Login Session screen to appear.
Learning About the 3270 Emulation Function
3270 emulation provides users with greater function than they normally receive
using a 3270 nonprogrammable work station (NWS) to access a System/390. This
additional function is available by clicking various pull-down options from the 3270
Menu bar. See Figure 20:
Figure 20. 3270 Emulation Session with Expanded Pull-downs
Figure 20 shows the pull-downs that are available to allow you to quickly access
3270 emulation functions such as the following:
v Multi-session support (Command pull-down)
v Font selection by session (Option pull-down)
v Print support (Print pull-down)
v Edit support (Edit pull-down)
v Online help (Help) information
The following list shows some of the 3270 emulation support:
v Keyboard remapping2
v Color mapping2
v Record/playback2
2. The IBM Network Station Manager program controls these 3270 emulation functions. See “Chapter 4. Using the IBM Network
Station Manager Program” on page 55 for more information. Also, the online help information in the IBM Network Station Manager
program provides information along with all default settings for 3270 emulation.
46
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
v Autostart of playback file (from the Record/playback function)2
v Auto-logon2
v User customized keypads2
v Graphics support2
v Choosing an Enter key location2
v Screen size support (for example: 24 x 80, 32 x 80, 43 x 80, and 27 x 132)2
v Cut/Copy/Paste function2
v Auto action (hotspot support)
v Cursor style options (The cursor style options are block or underscore and blink
or no blink.)2
v Rule line2
v Row and column indicator2
v Customizable window title2
All the 3270 emulation functions have shipped defaults. Those functions that are
managed by the IBM Network Station Manager program also have IBM-supplied
defaults. See “Appendix C. IBM Network Station Manager Program Shipped Default
Settings” on page 147 for a listing of all 3270 emulation defaults controlled by the
IBM Network Station Manager program.
Accessing the 3270 emulation Help (clicking the Help button) provides more
information about how to make each of these 3270 emulation functions work.
Eliminating the 3270 Emulator New Session Dialog Box for Japanese
Users
The IBM Network Station Manager program (by default) displays a New Session
Dialog box and a Language ID Selection Dialog box for Japanese users. The New
Session Dialog box and Language ID Selection box are shown in Figure 21 and
Figure 22 on page 48.
Figure 21. Japanese New Session Dialog Box
Chapter 3. Logging On and Working With IBM Network Station Manager Applications
47
Figure 22. Language ID Selection Dialog Box
These dialog boxes are presented because the IBM Network Station Manager
program needs to know which language ID to use. Japanese users have two
language options: Japanese Extended Katakana and Japanese Extended Latin.
Having to choose the language option makes Japanese users go through the extra
steps of selecting their host and language ID.
These extra steps (New Session Dialog box and Language ID Selection Dialog box)
can be eliminated by adding the LANGID parameter value to the 3270 Startup
configurations. Figure 23 shows the configuration information needed to eliminate
the New Session Dialog box and Language ID Selection Dialog box.
Figure 23. Network Station Manager Program with 3270 -LANGID used.
Following is an example of the -LANGID coding for the two language options:
Japanese Extended Katakana:
Japanese Extended Latin:
-LANGID JA_JP.IBM930
-LANGID JA_JP.IBM939
Notes:
1. You can configure the LANGID parameter in either the Program or Menu
functions of Startup.
2. You must type the parameter values in uppercase.
Accessing Help
You can access help for the 3270 Emulator or your Host session.
You can access 3270 emulator help by clicking Help in the emulator tool bar. In
general, to access help for the 3270 application, place your mouse pointer inside
the Host session window and press F1.
Working with the NC Navigator Browser
You can use NC Navigator to access the Internet and the IBM Network Station
Manager program. See “Chapter 4. Using the IBM Network Station Manager
Program” on page 55 for more information.
48
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
If you configured the NC Navigator session to autostart, a NC Navigator session will
appear on the screen of your Network Station. See Figure 24.
Figure 24. NC Navigator Browser Session Display
If you did not configure NC Navigator to autostart, and you click the NC Navigator
button within the Menu bar, an NC Navigator session will appear. Depending on the
volume of network traffic, you can expect it to take from several seconds to a
minute for the NC Navigator screen to appear.
Some of the NC Navigator functions have defaults that are managed by the IBM
Network Station Manager program. For example, you can configure proxies,
SOCKS, mail servers, and news servers by using the IBM Network Station Manager
program. See “Working with Your Network Proxies” on page 88 for more
information.
Many of the NC Navigator functions, including those functions that are managed by
the IBM Network Station Manager program, have shipped or IBM-supplied defaults.
See “Appendix C. IBM Network Station Manager Program Shipped Default Settings”
on page 147 for a listing of all NC Navigator defaults controlled by the IBM Network
Station Manager program.
Learning About NC Navigator Browser Functions
The NC Navigator browser has many capabilities to help you manage Internet
access and quick connection to the IBM Network Station Manager program. These
Chapter 3. Logging On and Working With IBM Network Station Manager Applications
49
functions and others are available by clicking various pull-down options from the
browser Menu bar. See Figure 25.
Figure 25. NC Navigator Browser with Extended Pull-downs
Figure 25 shows the pull-downs that are available to allow you to quickly access NC
Navigator functions. For example:
v Multiple NC Navigator session support (New Web Browser in the File pull-down)
v E-mail (Netscape Mail in the Window pull-down)
v Font selection by user (General Preferences in the Option pull-down)
v Online help (Help) information
Creating NC Navigator Directory Buttons
Directory buttons provide quick access to frequently used URLs.
The directory buttons appear (when configured) below the URL input field of the NC
Navigator.
50
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Use the Network Station Manager program to administer the directory buttons. See
Figure 58 on page 87 for additional information.
Learning About NC Navigator Mail Functions
NC Navigator mail has many capabilities to help you read and manage E-mail
messages. These functions, and others, are available by clicking various pull-down
options from the NC Navigator Mail menu bar. See Figure 26.
Figure 26. NC Navigator Mail with Extended Pull-downs
Figure 26 shows the pull-downs that are available to allow you to quickly access NC
Navigator functions. For example:
v Reply to mail (Reply in the Message pull-down)
v News reader (Netscape News in the Window pull-down)
v Online help (Help) information
Chapter 3. Logging On and Working With IBM Network Station Manager Applications
51
Learning About NC Navigator News Functions
NC Navigator news has many capabilities to help you read and manage newsgroup
messages. These functions and others are available by clicking various pull-down
options from the NC Navigator Mail menu bar. See Figure 27.
Figure 27. NC Navigator News with Extended Pull-downs
Figure 27 shows the pull-downs that are available to allow you to quickly access NC
Navigator functions. For example:
v Reply to news message (Reply in the Message pull-down)
v E-mail (Netscape Mail in the Window pull-down)
v Online help (Help) information
Accessing Help
You can access help for the NC Navigator by using the Help menu option. The help
includes a Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) section and an addendum for
last-minute changes.
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For NC Navigator help, place your mouse pointer in the NC Navigator Menu bar
and click Help.
JAVA Virtual Machine
You can set up Java applets and applications by using the IBM Network Station
Manager program. You can configure applets and applications to autostart on your
workstation, or configure them as menu items (buttons in the Menu bar).
Note: Only a single Java application can run within the Network Station and, if
running, also precludes applets from running in both the desktop and the
browser. Many applets can run simultaneously.
Starting an Application
You must install applications on the file system of the server.
Notes:
1. Only a single Java application can run on the Network Station. No Java applets
can run if a Java application is running. However, you can run many Java
applets simultaneously.
2. You must use the IBM Network Station Manager program to run a Java
application. You can set the Java application to autostart, or (if a button exists
for the application) you can click the button).
Starting an Applet
You can install Applets on the file system of your boot host, or downloaded from a
remote system with a Universal Resource Locator (URL). You can load the applet
by specifying tags on an HTML page.
You can run applets three different ways:
v By creating a button on the Menu bar for an applet
v By creating a button for a browser URL
v By starting a browser and then loading an HTML page which contains an applet
You manage configuration of the applet through parameter tags within the HTML file
(the applet vendor determines the specific parameter names). Applets that load
from the file system of your boot host should be well-known and trusted applets (the
source of the applet is reliable). There are no security restrictions for Applets
running on the local file system. The applet may write to files and communicate with
other machines. Writing to other machines may be desirable if you are saving your
spreadsheet. However, writing to other machines could be a problem if a malicious
applet erased your files.
Working with the Time Zone Environment Variable
The TZ environment variable is important in the sending and receiving of mail,
running applications, and time-stamping documents. Setting the TZ environment
variable becomes even more important when you work across multiple time zones.
You should set the time zone (TZ) environment variable by using the Network
Station Manager program.
Chapter 3. Logging On and Working With IBM Network Station Manager Applications
53
See “Setting the Time Zone (TZ) Environment Variable” on page 78 for an example.
Learning About Printer Datastreams
You need to know the datastream your default applications (applications shipped
with the IBM Network Station Manager licensed program) produce. Knowing which
datastream the applications produce allows you to choose a printer capable of
processing and printing the files your applications create. Table 13 shows the
supported datastreams for each application.
Table 13. Applications and Datastreams
Default Application Name
PostScript Datastream
PCL Datastream
5250 Session
X
X
3270 Session
X
X
NC Navigator
X
Lotus eSuite WorkPlace
X
Each platform (OS/2, AS/400, Microsoft NT, RS/6000, OS/390, VM/ESA) has a
process for managing printers. See “Configuring Printers on OS/2 Warp Server” on
page 35 for information on how OS/2 Warp Server manages printers for use with
Network Stations.
Use the IBM Network Station Manager program to administer printers for your
Network Station users.
“Chapter 4. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program” on page 55 contains
two examples about using printers with Network Stations:
1. “Configuring a Local Area Network Attached Printer” on page 73
2. “Configuring a Network Station-Attached Printer for Other Users” on page 74
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IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Chapter 4. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
IBM Network Station Manager Program - an Overview . . . . . . . . . .
IBM Network Station Manager Program Flow . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Who Can Use the IBM Network Station Manager Program? . . . . . . .
System Administrators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Individual End Users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with IBM Network Station Manager Program Defaults . . . . . .
IBM Network Station Manager Program Defaults - Example . . . . . .
Working with System-Wide Defaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with Workstation Defaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with Group Defaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with Individual User Defaults . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starting the IBM Network Station Manager Program Using a Browser . . . .
Working with the IBM Network Station Manager Program Setup Tasks Examples. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing your Desktop Style to Lotus eSuite WorkPlace . . . . . . . .
Changing Your Desktop Background . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Updating the Boot Monitor Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Overriding the Network Station Boot Setting . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Updating the Domain Name Server (DNS) Configuration on the Network
Station . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring a Local Area Network Attached Printer . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring a Network Station-Attached Printer for Other Users . . . . .
Working with Menu Bar Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hiding the Menu Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Customizing the Menu Bar Buttons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Menu Bar Options Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting the Time Zone (TZ) Environment Variable . . . . . . . . . . .
Automatically Starting a 5250 Session on a Network Station . . . . . . .
Configuring a Local (ICA) Client Session Menu Button for a Network Station .
Implementing ICA Load Balancing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Configuring a Terminal Session for a Network Station . . . . . . . . .
Using Debug Log in a Terminal Session . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing Your Icon Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Disabling the Control Menu for a 5250 Session . . . . . . . . . . .
Enabling the 5250 or 3270 Emulator for Euro Currency Support . . . . .
Changing the Screen Size of a 3270 Session . . . . . . . . . . . .
Enabling Java Applets for NC Navigator . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Creating Directory Buttons for NC Navigator . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working with Your Network Proxies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Changing the Menus and Messages Language Type . . . . . . . . .
Assigning Group Settings to a User . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IBM Network Station Manager Program Education . . . . . . . . . .
Accessing and Using How To Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Additional IBM Network Station Manager Program Examples . . . . . . .
Setting Up an AIX Session Using the IBM Network Station Manager
Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
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Setting Up a Microsoft Windows NT Session Using the IBM Network Station
Manager Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94
IBM Network Station Manager Program - an Overview
The IBM Network Station Manager program is a browser-based application
program. This application program allows you to perform the setup tasks and
management tasks that are associated with the following:
v All IBM Network Station Network Computers or all Network Station users
v A group of Network Stations users
v A specific (one) Network Station or Network Station user
Figure 28 shows the main screen of the IBM Network Station Manager program.
The left-most frame of the screen contains a selection list of the Setup Tasks. Setup
Tasks are selected functions of various applications that are managed with the IBM
Network Station Manager program. For example, 5250 and 3270 emulation
sessions, NC Navigator sessions, and Lotus eSuite WorkPlace.
Figure 28. Network Station Manager Program Main Screen
Figure 29 on page 57 provides an expanded list of Setup Tasks that you can
manage with the IBM Network Station Manager program:
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IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Figure 29. Setup Tasks Supported by the IBM Network Station Manager Program
IBM Network Station Manager Program Flow
Figure 30 on page 58 provides a graphical view of how the IBM Network Station
Manager program flows. Take a moment to study Figure 30 on page 58; it highlights
the differences between the defaults and setup tasks that a system administrator
and end user can work with.
Chapter 4. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
57
Figure 30. IBM Network Station Manager Program Flow
Who Can Use the IBM Network Station Manager Program?
Figure 30, shows that both system administrators and individual end users can
access and use the program.
The special authorities defined on the Host server determine the level of function a
user can access.
System Administrators
System administrators have full use of the program. System administrators can
work at a level that is either system-wide, for a specific group, for a specific user, or
for a workstation. For example, an administrator could specify that all Network
Station users have one 5250 emulation session available and that one particular
user could have an additional 5250 emulation session.
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IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
For information about how to sign on to the IBM Network Station Manager program,
see “Starting the IBM Network Station Manager Program Using a Browser” on
page 64.
Figure 31 shows the screen a system administrator sees after signing onto the IBM
Network Station Manager program. Look at the range of functions that are
presented in the Setup Tasks frame.
Note: This screen can vary in how it appears depending on the Web browser you
are using.
Figure 31. System Administrator Level
Figure 32 on page 60 compares these functions to the range of functions that are
available to individual end users.
Individual End Users
End users also have access to the IBM Network Station Manager program.
However, the functions that an end user can work with are limited.
Figure 32 on page 60 shows the screen that an end user would see after signing on
to the IBM Network Station Manager program. Look at the range of functions that
are presented in the Setup Tasks frame.
Chapter 4. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
59
Figure 32. End-User Level
As you can see, the program’s flexibility allows broad system-wide settings
management by the administrator and individual settings management by the end
user.
Working with IBM Network Station Manager Program Defaults
There are four levels of defaults. They are:
v IBM-supplied defaults. The IBM-supplied defaults provide settings that are
supported by the IBM Network Station Manager program.
You can not change IBM-supplied defaults. You can override IBM-supplied
defaults by using the IBM Network Station Manager program feature of System
defaults or User level defaults.
See “Appendix C. IBM Network Station Manager Program Shipped Default
Settings” on page 147 for a complete list of all IBM-supplied default values for the
IBM Network Station Manager program.
v System defaults. You can use system defaults to change settings for all users or
all workstations. System defaults take precedence over IBM-supplied defaults.
v Group defaults. You can use group defaults to change settings for all users that
are in a specific group. Group defaults take precedence over system-wide
defaults and IBM-supplied defaults.
v User defaults. You can use user defaults to change settings for an individual
user. User defaults take precedence over IBM-supplied defaults, system defaults,
and group defaults.
v Workstation defaults. You can use workstation defaults to change settings for
workstations. Workstation defaults take precedence over IBM-supplied defaults
and System Defaults.
Note: Settings work differently in the Startup function of Setup Tasks. For
Programs, Menus, and Environment Variables, the IBM-supplied,
System-specified, and User-specified, are additive. However, for the same
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environment variable, the value set at the user level takes precedence over
the value set at the system or IBM-supplied levels. (The values for a given
environment variable are not additive.) Any settings that are specified at the
system or user level are added to those that are specified in the
IBM-supplied default settings.
For example, every Network Station user has one 5250 session specified as
the IBM-supplied default. If the administrator used the System defaults
function to assign all users an additional 5250 session, then all users would
have two 5250 sessions available. If the administrator then used the User
level defaults to assign USERXYZ another 5250 session, then USERXYZ
would have three 5250 sessions. The origin of these sessions would be one
each from IBM-supplied defaults, System defaults, and User defaults.
IBM Network Station Manager Program Defaults - Example
This example uses the Desktop background setting. You can locate the Desktop
background setting in the Workstations function of Hardware Setup Tasks.
The IBM-supplied setting for Desktop background is the IBM bitmap.
At this point, the administrator sets all Desktop backgrounds to dark red. Using the
IBM Network Station Manager program, the administrator applies the change by
working through the System Defaults level. This change, to the color dark red,
overrides the IBM-supplied value of the IBM bitmap for Desktop background.
After viewing the color of dark red, a user determines that dark red is too difficult to
look at for long periods of time. The user then requests his Desktop background
color be changed to green. The user can either change the Desktop background
color or request the administrator to do it.
The administrator can make the change by selecting the Hardware Setup Task,
Workstations, User defaults and specify the user ID of the person who is requesting
the change. The administrator can then scroll to the Desktop background field,
specify green, and then click Finish to apply the change. This change, to a User
default setting, overrides the IBM-supplied default and the administrator set System
Default value of dark red.
Notes:
1. If a user changes the background setting, they go directly to the Hardware and
Workstation settings panel. You will bypass the Default selection panel.
2. To see the Desktop background change, you must log off and then log on to the
workstation.
Working with System-Wide Defaults
Figure 33 on page 62 is representative of the panel that appears when a selection
occurs from the Setup Tasks frame. This example uses the Workstation Defaults
panel.
Chapter 4. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
61
Figure 33. Hardware Defaults
As you can see, the Workstation Defaults panel allows you to work with the
following:
v
v
v
v
System defaults for all workstations and users
Workstation defaults for a particular workstation
Workstation defaults for a specific group
Workstation defaults for a particular user
Note: The Workstation Defaults panel is unique in that it allows you to specify
settings for workstations in addition to specific groups or users.
System defaults have settings that are not available when working with an individual
user, a specific group, or specific workstation.
Working with Workstation Defaults
You may configure each Network Station using either DHCP, BOOTP, or NVRAM.
You can identify each Network Station by TCP/IP hostname, IP address, or MAC
address. If TCP/IP hostname is entered it must exactly match what the Network
Station is told that its hostname is (lower case). BOOTP or DHCP tell each Network
Station their hostname. Only include the hostname option specified on the Network
Station’s client statement in BOOTP or DHCP. If you specify a separate domain
name option in BOOTP or DHCP, do not include that in the workstation name. You
must type MAC addresses separated by colons (for example, 00:00:e5:80:7c:8f).
You must type IP addresses as dotted decimals (for example, 9.1.2.3).
Tips on Identifying or Referring to your Network Station: Following are some
tips for addressing your Network Station:
IP addressing
You can use the IP address when you are booting the Network Station
using NVRAM, BOOTP, or DHCP. When you use the IBM Setup Utility you
can type the IP address you configured using DHCP, BOOTP, or NVRAM.
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IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
However, be aware that the Network Station’s IP address may change on
every boot if you use the address pool feature of DHCP.
TCP/IP hostname
You can use the TCP/IP host name when you are booting the Network
Station using BOOTP or DHCP. It is unlikely that the Network Station knows
its hostname when it boots using NVRAM. Type the hostname you
configured into DHCP or BOOTP as instructed above. By using the TCP/IP
hostname or IP address you can replace a Network Station and have the
new Network Station pick up the old Network Station’s configuration. You
would set up the new Network Station with the old Network Station’s
hostname or IP address.
MAC address
You can use the MAC address when you are booting the Network Station
using NVRAM, BOOTP, or DHCP. The MAC address is tied to the physical
Network Station and will not change if your network is reconfigured. The
MAC address only changes if you decide to reprogram it on the Network
Station. The MAC address can be found using the IBM Setup Utility and by
selecting F2.
Using the Workstation Browse Button: The Workstation Browse button, when
clicked, provides a list of all workstations configured using the IBM Network Station
Manager program.
Working with Group Defaults
Use group defaults to add or change settings on a group-by-group basis.
Any group that you want to work with must already exist on the host server. You
can not create groups by using the IBM Network Station Manager program. The
user must already be in the group.
To get started, do the following:
v Click Select User’s Group from the Setup Tasks frame.
v Type the name of the user whom you want to inherit a particular group’s settings
and click Next.
v Type the name of the group and click Next.
Note: If you do not know a group name, click the Browse button and a list of
groups is presented for you to choose from.
Working with Individual User Defaults
Use user defaults to change settings on a user-by-user basis, one user at a time.
Using user defaults gives you flexibility that allows customization of individual
sessions.
From any of the Default panels, select User defaults, type the user ID name, and
press the Next button.
Note: If you do not know a user ID name, you can click a Browse button for a list
of users.
Chapter 4. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
63
Working with Settings
Settings are fields that you see after you have selected the defaults (System,
Workstation, Group, or User) that you want to use. For example, Figure 34 shows
the Standard Desktop Settings fields for Screen colors, Icon preferences, Fonts,
and Window focus.
Figure 34. Desktop Manager Settings Fields
Figure 34 shows that Standard Desktop settings that are being worked with from
the System Defaults level. Choosing System Defaults settings changes applies
changes to ALL users.
Starting the IBM Network Station Manager Program Using a Browser
To best understand and learn how the IBM Network Station Manager program
works, you should sign on and follow the examples in this chapter.
To start working with the IBM Network Station Manager program, power on your
Network Station. Click NC Navigator from the Menu bar on your Network Station.
See Figure 35.
Figure 35. IBM Network Station Menu Bar
Notes:
1. You can also use the following Web browsers to sign on to the IBM Network
Station Manager program:
v Netscape 4.0 or later:
– Microsoft Windows 95
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IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
– Microsoft Windows NT
– AIX
– OS/2
v Microsoft Internet Explorer 4.0 or later
2. To access the IBM Network Station Manager program using NC Navigator, click
the Directory pull-down and select IBM Network Station Manager for (Your
Server Name). Your server name is the name of the system where your
Network Stations get their boot file.
The NC Navigator browser appears. See Figure 36.
Figure 36. NC Navigator Browser
Click the Directory pull-down and select IBM Network Station Manager for (Your
Server Name). See Figure 37 on page 66.
Chapter 4. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
65
Figure 37. NC Navigator Browser with Directory Pull-down
The IBM Network Station Manager sign on screen appears:
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IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Figure 38. Sign on Screen
Note: An alternative way to reach the sign-on screen is to enter the following
case-sensitive URL in your browser’s URL field:
http://yourservername/networkstation/admin
Where yourservername is the Host name or TCP/IP address.
If you are using a VM/ESA system, the URL you specify depends on the
location of the Network Station Manager program. Use the following URL if
the Network Station Manager program is in the root directory of the server:
http://yourservername:port/admin.htm
Use the following URL if the Network Station Manager program is located in
a subdirectory of the root directory of the server:
http://yourservername:port/nsmhtml/admin.htm
Type your user ID and password, then click Sign on.
The main screen of the IBM Network Station Manager appears.
Chapter 4. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
67
Figure 39. System Administrator Level
Working with the IBM Network Station Manager Program Setup Tasks Examples
Note: You must be a system administrator to work with these examples.
Figure 39 shows that radio buttons represent Setup Tasks and text in the left-most
frame of the screen.
Clicking on any radio button or text presents a panel from which you select a set of
defaults you want to work with.
When working with these examples, select User defaults and use your own user
ID. Then, when you are finished with the examples, you can see the results on your
workstation.
To see the changes you make using the IBM Network Station Manager program,
you must log off and then log on to your workstation.
Notes:
1. Not shown in most examples are the main panel and the Default selection
panel.
2. See “Additional IBM Network Station Manager Program Examples” on page 91
for information about working with remote programs, such as AIX sessions and
WinCenter Pro for PC applications.
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IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Changing your Desktop Style to Lotus eSuite WorkPlace
Notes:
1. Lotus eSuite WorkPlace is not available for VM/ESA and OS/2 systems.
2. You must use an IBM Network Station Series 1000 with 64 MB of memory to
run Lotus eSuite WorkPlace.
3. This example, when complete, changes your desktop style from Standard
desktop with menu bar (the default) to Lotus eSuite WorkPlace with menu bar.
Complete the following steps to change your desktop style:
__ 1. From the Setup Tasks frame, click Startup and then click Menus.
__ 2. Select User defaults and type in your user ID (USER001 in this example).
Click Next to continue.
__ 3. In the Desktop and Menu Bar Options section, click the Desktop Style list
box and select Lotus eSuite WorkPlace with menu bar support. See
Figure 40.
Figure 40. Desktop Style Selection
__ 4. Click Finish to apply the change.
Changing Your Desktop Background
You may have requirements for providing different desktop backgrounds; for
example, your company logo. Complete the following steps to see how to change
desktop backgrounds:
__ 1. From the Setup Tasks frame, click Hardware and then click Workstations.
__ 2. Select User defaults, and type in your user ID (USER001 in this example).
See Figure 41 on page 70.
Chapter 4. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
69
Figure 41. Workstation Defaults Panel with User Defaults Selected
__ 3. In the bottom frame, click Next to continue.
The Workstation Settings frame appears as shown (scrolled-down) in
Figure 42.
Figure 42. Hardware Settings Example
__ 4. Scroll to Desktop background and select Tiles (bitmap).
__ 5. Click Finish to apply the change.
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IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Tips for working with the screen saver fields and the desktop background
fields:
1. You can use your own bitmaps for a screen saver or your desktop background.
2. Place the bitmap in a directory where the IBM Network Station Manager
program can find it. For AS/400, place these bitmaps in:
/QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation/SysDef/
Updating the Boot Monitor Code
Update your boot monitor code to ensure that the boot monitor code on your
Network Stations matches the boot monitor code on your boot server. Updating the
boot monitor code provides access to the latest function of the IBM Network Station
Manager licensed program. You must update any Network Station that has a boot
monitor code version less than 3.0.0.
You may want to alert your users that a warning message will appear, on their
workstation, during the boot monitor code update. The warning indicates not to
power off the workstation during the update. To power off the workstation could
cause physical damage to the workstation.
You do not have to use the update boot monitor function if you are working with
Microsoft Windows NT. Microsoft Windows NT performs the boot monitor code
update automatically.
__ 1. From the Setup Tasks frame, click Hardware and then click Workstations.
__ 2. Select System defaults or Workstation defaults, and type in the
workstation name or click the Browse button for a list of configured Network
Stations .
__ 3. In the bottom frame, click Next to continue.
__ 4. Scroll to the Update to boot monitor installed on the boot server field. Select
Update. See Figure 43.
Figure 43. Updating the Boot Monitor
__ 5. Click Finish to apply the change.
Chapter 4. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
71
Overriding the Network Station Boot Setting
__ 1. From the Setup Tasks frame, click Hardware and then click Workstations.
__ 2. Select System defaults or Workstation defaults, and type in the
workstation name or click the Browse button for a list of configured Network
Stations .
__ 3. In the bottom frame, click Next to continue.
__ 4. Scroll to the Enable boot using BOOTP or DHCP field as shown in Figure 44.
Figure 44. Overriding the Network Station Boot Setting
__ 5. Click the Drop boxThe possible choices are:
Default from terminal
Selecting this choice means the boot is determined by the value set in
the IBM Network Station Setup Utility under the Set Network Parameters
function. The value can be either Network or NVRAM.
Yes
Selecting this choice means the boot method is Network.
This means that the boot method is either DHCP or BOOTP and is
determined on how you configured the Network Stations.
No
Selecting this choice means the boot method is NVRAM.
The Network Station boots from the server specified in the Boot Host IP
Address field in the Set Network Parameters function in the IBM Network
Station Setup Utility.
__ 6. Click Finish to apply the change.
Updating the Domain Name Server (DNS) Configuration on the
Network Station
You can use the Network Station Manager program to update the DNS information
on a Network Station.
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IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
The domain name server (DNS) or host name table on the host keeps track of all
hosts in a particular domain. You can also store this information on the Network
Station.
There are two fields from which to select DNS support. They are:
v DNS Configuration from BOOTP or DHCP server
If you select this field, the Network Station gets its DNS and domain name
configuration from a BOOTP or DHCP server.
You must use BOOTP or DHCP to configure your Network Stations. DHCP
allows you to specify the IP address of your domain name server. DHCP also
resolves BOOTP requests from Network Stations.
You must use DHCP to configure your Network Stations. DHCP allows you to
specify the IP address of your domain name server. DHCP also resolves BOOTP
requests from Network Stations.
v DNS Configuration created by Network Station Manager
If you select this field, the Network Station gets its DNS and domain name
configuration from a file created by Network Station Manager. The Network
Station Manager copies the DNS and domain name configuration of the server
where it is running to the file. The Network Station reads this file on its next boot
to pick up the DNS and domain name.
In addition, if you select this field, the Network Station Manager copies the Host
table from the server where it is running to the configuration file. The Host table
contains names and their corresponding IP addresses. The Host table
information is also picked up by the Network Station on its next boot. Placing
Host table information on the Network Station allows the Network Station to
resolve network names when there is no DNS.
You can update the file on the Network Station when changes occur to the DNS,
domain name, or Hosts table. You do this by checking the Update Network
Station Manager DNS file field.
Placing the Host Table information on the Network Station allows network name
resolution to occur on the Network Station rather than on the Host Table on the
server.
Configuring a Local Area Network Attached Printer
Local Area Network (LAN)-attached printers are printers not necessarily attached to
a Network Station or other devices. They typically have their own host name or IP
address.
__ 1. From the Setup Tasks frame, click Hardware and then click Printers.
__ 2. Select User defaults, and type in your user ID (USER001 in this example).
__ 3. In the bottom frame, click Next to continue.
__ 4. Scroll to Printer List. For all users, you must define LAN-attached printers as
remote printers. Therefore, scroll (if necessary) to the Remote Printer Server
section. Fill out the Remote Printer Server section with the following
information:
Remote Printer Server
The Host name or IP address of the LAN-attached printer.
Queue Name
The name of the queue associated with the LAN-attached printer.
Chapter 4. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
73
Some LAN-attached printers require queues for their configuration, and
some LAN-attached printers do not. If the LAN-attached printer has a
queue name associated with it, place that name in the Queue Name
field. Leave the Queue Name field blank if you do not have a queue
associated with the LAN-attached printer.
When you make print requests, the Print Selector List displays the queue
name. The Print Selector List displays the @ sign that is followed by
either the host name or the IP address. If you did not use a queue name
the Print Selector List displays a @ sign followed by the IP address. For
example, in the queue name field could be @ 10.1.12.34.
Stream Type
The type of printer data stream the LAN-attached printer supports.
Description
You can type anything in this field. Important information to put in the
Description field could be the physical location of the printer.
Figure 45 shows you how to describe a LAN-attached printer.
Figure 45. Configuring a LAN-attached Printer
__ 5. Click Finish to apply the change.
When you type information in the Remote Print Server section, that information
constructs fields in the Print Selector List. The Print Selector List appears when
users request a print action. The Queue Name and Description fields are the most
useful fields. You can use the Queue Name to identify the print queue and the IP
address. Description can be anything you typed in when configuring the printer. The
physical location of the printer may be something users need to know.
Configuring a Network Station-Attached Printer for Other Users
Complete the following steps to configure a Network Station-attached printer:
__ 1. From the Setup Tasks frame, click Hardware and then click Printers.
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IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
__ 2. Select User defaults, and type in your user ID (USER001 in this example).
__ 3. Scroll to Printer List. Your Network Station-attached printer is considered a
remote printer for all users except users to whose Network Station the printer
is attached. Therefore, scroll (if necessary) to the Remote Print Server
section. Fill out the Remote Printer Server section with the following
information:
Remote Printer Server
The Host name or IP address of the Network Station to which the printer
is attached.
Queue Name
The name of the queue associated with the Network Station-attached
printer.
Stream Type
The type of printer data stream the Network Station-attached printer
supports.
Description
You can type anything in this field. Important information to put in the
Description field could be the physical location of the printer.
You can configure a Network Station-attached printer. See Figure 46.
Figure 46. Configuring a Network Station-Attached Printer as a Remote Printer for Other
Users
In the example where a locally-attached printer is configured as a remote
printer for other users, you must pay close attention to the following:
Queue name field
On locally attached printers the Queue name is, by default, either
PARALLEL1 or SERIAL1. When you configure a locally attached printer
for others use, the Print Selector List contains a queue name of either
Chapter 4. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
75
PARALLEL1 or SERIAL1 for that printer. The resulting Print Selector
Lists for a user could then contain two Queue name entries, each
reading PARALLEL1.
Description field
In this example, where a user’s Print Selector List could have two
identical Queue name entries, the Description field can determine which
printer to choose.
__ 4. Click Finish to apply the change.
Working with Menu Bar Options
This example discusses default Menu bar buttons, hiding Menu bar buttons, and
customizing Menu bar buttons.
__ 1. From the Setup Tasks frame, click Startup, click Menus, and select System
defaults. In the bottom frame, click Next to continue.
The Desktop and Menu Bar Options frame appears. See Figure 47.
Figure 47. Startup Settings Example Working With Desktop and Menu Bar Options
__ 2. Scroll to the Buttons to appear on standard desktop when menu bar is
enabled field.
__ 3. The Menu bar options that are shipped from IBM. See Figure 47.
__ 4. Make any changes that are appropriate for your working environment.
If you do not change the Menu bar options fields, each of your Network
Station users will have a fully populated Menu bar displayed on their
workstation. Fully populated means the Menu bar on each workstation has
the following buttons:
v Log out
v Hide
v Move to top or Move to bottom
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IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
v Lock screen
v 5250
v 3270
v NC Navigator (browser)
__ 5. Click Finish to apply the change.
Hiding the Menu Bar
Using the IBM Network Station Manager program, you can hide the presence of the
Menu bar from your Network Station users.
You may have situations in which you do not want the Menu bar to be available.
For example, you may not want anyone to be able to log out or end any
applications that may be running on the Network Station. Or you might not want to
provide an opportunity for someone to lock the screen. You may have a Network
Station publicly available, and if the Lock Screen button is available, anyone could
lock the screen with a password known only to them.
You can hide the Menu bar from all Network Station users by making the Desktop
style field value Standard desktop without menu bar. See Figure 48.
Figure 48. Hiding the Menu Bar
Customizing the Menu Bar Buttons
You can customize the Menu bar, selectively specifying values for the Menu bar
options.
For example, Figure 49 on page 78 shows the fields and their values that would
exclude the following Menu bar buttons:
v Log out - The value changes to No.
v Lock - The value changes to No.
Chapter 4. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
77
v Buttons for 5250, 3270, and NC Navigator. You receive these buttons with the
IBM Network Station Manager program. The check box is now deselected.
Figure 49. Customizing the Menu Bar Buttons
Menu Bar Options Summary
If you hide the Menu bar (using System defaults, Group defaults, or User defaults),
only applications that are specified to automatically start appear on the workstations
of users. You manage automatically starting applications in Setup Tasks using the
Programs function.
The User level (individual user preferences) does not support enabling or disabling
the shipped menu bar buttons for 5250, 3270, or browser buttons.
If you have created customized Menu bar settings but have hidden the Menu bar,
no buttons from the customization are available.
Setting the Time Zone (TZ) Environment Variable
Setting the TZ environment variable is important when working across multiple time
zones and in particular if you use Java applications.
You must be aware of the following requirements:
v All characters must be typed in upper case
v The time zone value on your server must be set correctly
v You must use standard time (for example, Central Standard Time (CST) not
Central Daylight Time (CDT)
Complete the following steps to set the TZ environment variable:
__ 1. From the Setup Tasks frame, click Startup, click Environment Variable, and
select User defaults. In the bottom frame click Next to continue.
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IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
__ 2. The Environment Variable Settings frame appears. See Figure 50 .
Figure 50. Setting the Time Zone (TZ) Environment Variable
__ 3. Scroll to Environment Variables. This setting, when completed, sets the time
zone environment variable. Complete the following fields:
Environment Variable
Type TZ. TZ means time zone.
Value
Type CST. This means Central Standard Time. Following are other
possible values for the TZ environment variable:
Hours From Greenwich
Mean Time (GMT)
Value
Description
0
GMT
Greenwich Mean Time
+1
ECT
European Central Time
+2
EET
Eastern European Time
+2
ART
(Arabic) Egypt Standard Time
+3
EAT
Eastern African Time
+3.5
MET
Middle East Time
+4
NET
Near East Time
+5
PLT
Pakistan Lahore Time
+5.5
IST
India Standard Time
+6
BST
Bangladesh Standard Time
+7
VST
Vietnam Standard Time
+8
CTT
China Taiwan Time
+9
JST
Japanese Standard Time
+9.5
ACT
Australia Central Time
+10
AET
Australia Eastern Time
+11
SST
Solomon Standard Time
+12
NST
New Zealand Standard Time
Chapter 4. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
79
Hours From Greenwich
Mean Time (GMT)
Value
Description
-11
MIT
Midway Islands Time
-10
HST
Hawaii Standard Time
-9
AST
Alaska Standard Time
-8
PST
Pacific Standard Time
-7
PNT
Phoenix Standard Time
-7
MST
Mountain Standard Time
-6
CST
Central Standard Time
-5
EST
Eastern Standard Time
-5
IET
Indiana Eastern Standard Time
-4
PRT
Puerto Rico and US Virgin Islands
Time
-3.5
CNT
Canada Newfoundland Time
-3
AGT
Argentina Standard Time
-3
BET
Brazil Eastern Time
-1
CAT
Central African Time
__ 4. Click Finish to apply the change.
Automatically Starting a 5250 Session on a Network Station
You can automatically start a 5250 session (sign on display) on a Network Station.
This eliminates using the default 5250 button on the Menu bar. Using the 5250
button requires you to specify the host or IP address before the 5250 sign on
screen is available. Complete the following steps to automatically start a 5250
session on a Network Station:
__ 1. From the Setup Tasks frame, click Startup, click Programs, and select User
defaults. In the bottom frame click Next to continue.
__ 2. The Programs Settings frame appears. See Figure 51.
Figure 51. Automatically Starting a 5250 Session on an IBM Network Station
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IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
__ 3. Scroll to 5250 Sessions to Autostart. This setting, when completed,
automatically starts a 5250 session for you when you sign on to your
workstation. Complete the following fields:
AS/400 system
Type the name or TCP/IP address of the AS/400 from which your
workstation receives its boot file.
Session title
Type in a text string that represents your 5250 session, for example,
5250#2. This text string will appear in the Title bar of your 5250 session.
This field is optional, and you do not need a value. However, if you work
with multiple 5250 sessions, the title helps the session.
Other fields
Use the default settings.
__ 4. Click Finish to apply the change.
Configuring a Local (ICA) Client Session Menu Button for a Network
Station
Note: Independent Computing Architecture (ICA) is a general-purpose presentation
services protocol. You can use ICA to access Microsoft Windows applications
from a Network Station or PC client.
Complete the following steps to configure a local (ICA) client session Menu button:
__ 1. From the Setup Tasks frame, click Startup, click Menus, and select User
defaults. In the bottom frame, click Next to continue.
__ 2. The Menu Contents frame appears (scrolled forward to Local Program Menu
Items). SeeFigure 52.
Figure 52. Starting a Local Client Session on an IBM Network Station
__ 3. This setting, when completed, creates a menu button that, when clicked,
starts the specified Local program. Complete the following fields:
Menu item label
The text you type in this field appears in the menu button on your
Network Station.
Program to run
Type the name of the local program that runs when you click the Menu
button.
Chapter 4. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
81
Parameters
In this field you can use parameters that can be passed to the local
program. Following is a list of parameters and their descriptions:
-h(ost)
Identifies the PC server the ICA client connects to. This is a required
parameter.
-ti(tle) Specifies the text to be displayed by the window manager. The text
string must be enclosed with quotation marks. For example, -ti ’ICA
Client’.
-c(olor)
Specifies the number of colors the ICA client may use. This value
can be either 16 or 256.
-g(ometry)
Specifies the position (location) on the display where the window is
placed. The value is expressed in the form: width x height.
-ca(ache)
Specifies the size of the memory cache for video display. The
possible choices are: 0, 512, 1024, 2048 (default), 3072, 4096, and
8192.
-(w)orkdir
The directory specified becomes the logged on user’s default
directory on the PC server. You must insert additional slashes into
the directory name (for example, \users\sdh must be specified as
\\users\\sdh).
-domain
Specifies the domain that is automatically entered into the PC Login
menu.
-username
Specifies the user name that is automatically entered into the PC
Login menu.
-password
Specifies the password that is automatically entered into the PC
Login menu.
-lb
Specifies to turn on load balancing for this connection.
- -en(cryption)
Turns off the simple encryption protocol driver (The -en parameter
has nothing to do with Secure ICA option pack).
Note:
The encryption parameter must have two consecutive dashes
preceding the en. It is also must be the last parameter specified. You
must insert additional slashes into the directory name (for example,
\users\sdh must be specified as \\users\\sdh).
__ 4. Click Finish to apply the change.
Implementing ICA Load Balancing
You implement load balancing by specifying the -lb parameter in the Other
parameters field of the Local (ICA) Client Session configuration. Load balancing
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IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
provides the client access to a quantity or ’FARM’ of PC servers in a PC server
network. The load balancing function determines which PC server is doing the least
amount of work. When the Local (ICA) client that requests an application be served,
the client receives it from the PC server identified as performing the least amount of
work.
Configuring a Terminal Session for a Network Station
Terminal sessions, when configured, provide the function to have a X session on
your Network Station. Complete the following steps to configure a X session:
__ 1. From the Setup Tasks frame, click Startup, click Programs, and select User
defaults. In the bottom frame click Next to continue.
__ 2. The Program Contents frame appears (scrolled forward to Terminal
Sessions). SeeFigure 53.
Figure 53. Starting a Terminal (X ) Session on an IBM Network Station
__ 3. This setting, when completed, allows the user to initiate a X session on the
Network Station.
__ 4. Click Finish to apply the change.
Note: You can use the Menus function of Startup to give users a Menu bar button.
Clicking that Menu bar button allows them to type in the name of the host to
which they want to Telnet.
Choose a name for the Menu item label and leave the Host field blank. Click
Finish to complete the task. The next time the user logs on the Network
Station they will have a button that, when clicked, prompts for the remote
host name.
Using Debug Log in a Terminal Session
The debug log can assist in isolating problems in a Terminal Session. Use the
following steps to setup a debug log:
1. From the Setup Tasks frame, click Startup, click Menus. In the bottom frame
click Next to continue.
Chapter 4. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
83
2. Scroll forward to Terminal Sessions.
3. In the Other Parameters field type:
-xrm '"NCDterm*logDirectory: <directory_name>"'
4. The directory must already exist. Make sure to type the single quote mark
followed by the double quote mark where indicated.
5. Following is a complete example that shows the debug log being created in the
user’s directory:
-xrm '"NCDterm*logDirectory:
/QIBM/UserData/NetworkStation/users/${USER}"'
Changing Your Icon Location
Complete the following steps to change icon locations:
__ 1. From the Setup Tasks frame, click Desktop, click Standard Desktop, and
select User defaults. In the bottom frame, click Next to continue.
__ 2. The Standard Desktop Settings frame appears. See Figure 54.
Figure 54. Desktop Settings Example
__ 3. Scroll to Icon preferences. In the Icon location field, select Top left.
__ 4. Click Finish to apply the change.
Disabling the Control Menu for a 5250 Session
Disabling the Control Menu prevents users from accessing the 5250 emulator
functions available through the Control pull-down.
__ 1. From the Setup Tasks frame, click 5250 and select User defaults. In the
bottom frame, click Next to continue.
__ 2. The 5250 Settings appear. See Figure 55 on page 85.
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IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Figure 55. 5250 Setting Example
__ 3. Scroll to the Allow use of section.
__ 4. In the Control menu drop box, select No to disable the Control menu. (The
default is Yes, meaning that you can use the Control menu).
By disabling use of the Control menu, your 5250 sessions will not have the
Control pull-down displayed for use.
__ 5. Click Finish to apply the change.
Enabling the 5250 or 3270 Emulator for Euro Currency Support
5250 or 3270 emulation can support access to the Euro currency symbol. Follow
the steps below to implement the Euro currency support:
__ 1. From the Setup Tasks frame, click Startup. Click Menus or Programs(this
example uses Menu Items) and click your choice of default. In the bottom
frame, click Next to continue.
__ 2. Scroll to either the 3270 or 5250 Menu Items (this example uses 5250 Menu
Items) section.
__ 3. The 5250 Menu Items appear.
__ 4. Type in the values for Menu Item Label, AS/400 or OS/390 system name,
and -EURO in the Other parameters field.
Note: The Other parameter value of -EURO must be typed in upper case
characters.
__ 5. Click Finish to apply the change.
Changing the Screen Size of a 3270 Session
Your organization may have requirements for varying 3270 session screen sizes.
Complete the following steps to change screen sizes of your 3270 emulation
sessions:
Chapter 4. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
85
__ 1. From the Setup Tasks frame, click 3270 and select User defaults. In the
bottom frame, click Next to continue.
__ 2. The 3270 Settings panel appears. See Figure 56.
Figure 56. 3270 Settings Example
__ 3. Scroll to the Screen size field. Select 24 x 80.
This action changes your 3270 session screen size from 32 x 80 (the
default) to 24 x 80.
__ 4. Click Finish to apply the change.
Enabling Java Applets for NC Navigator
Java applets can add function to your browser sessions if your browsers are
allowed to run them. Complete the following steps to enable Java applets on your
browser:
__ 1. From the Setup Tasks frame, click Internet, click NC Navigator, and select
User defaults. In the bottom frame, click Next to continue.
__ 2. The NC Navigator Settings frame appears. See Figure 57 on page 87.
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IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Figure 57. NC Navigator Browser - Enabling Java Applets
__ 3. Scroll to the Security section. In the Enable Java Applets field, select Yes as
the value.
Selecting this value enables Java applets to run on user001’s workstation.
__ 4. Click Finish to apply the change.
Creating Directory Buttons for NC Navigator
Directory buttons provide quick access to specified URLs. As administrator, you can
control the creation and access to directory buttons. Complete the following steps:
__ 1. From the Setup Tasks frame, click Internet, click NC Navigator, and select
one of the available defaults. In the bottom frame, click Next to continue.
__ 2. The NC Navigator Settings frame appears. See Figure 58.
Figure 58. NC Navigator Browser - Creating Directory Buttons
__ 3. Scroll to the Navigator directory button definition section.
__ 4. Type in the values you want to use for each directory button. In this example
Figure 58 shows:
Name Button1
URL
http://yourbusiness.com
Chapter 4. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
87
Fly-over help
URL or name for YourBusiness
__ 5. Click Finish to apply the change.
Working with Your Network Proxies
Following are Network proxies you can work with when using the IBM Network
Station Manager program:
v File Transfer Protocol (FTP)
v HTTP
v GOPHER
v Security
v SOCKS
v Outgoing mail (Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP))
v Incoming mail (POP3)
v News (NNTP)
__ 1. From the Setup Tasks frame, click Internet, click Network, and select User
defaults. In the bottom frame, click Next to continue.
__ 2. Scroll to the Proxy section.
__ 3. The Network Settings frame appears. See Figure 59.
Figure 59. Working with Your Network Proxies
The values in Figure 59 are examples only. You must know the names, (and
in some cases port numbers) to be used for these proxies. If you do not
know the names, you may have to work with your network administrator or
your network service provider.
__ 4. Click Finish to apply the change.
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IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Changing the Menus and Messages Language Type
There may be times when you want to have some users work in a language other
than the primary language of the host. Complete the following steps to change the
language for messages and menus:
__ 1. From the Setup Tasks frame, click Language, and then select User defaults
using user ID user001. In the bottom frame, click Next to continue.
__ 2. The Language Settings frame appears. See Figure 60.
Figure 60. Changing the Menus and Messages Language Type
__ 3. Scroll to the LC_MESSAGES field. In the LC_MESSAGES field, select
SV_SE (Swedish in Sweden) as the value.
Selecting this value makes all menus, and messages appear in Swedish for
user001.
Note: If you change the LANG parameter values, the keyboard mapping
language for a user’s keyboard should also be the same. You can find
the keyboard mapping language parameter in the Workstations
function under the Hardware Setup Task.
__ 4. Click Finish to apply the change.
Assigning Group Settings to a User
Note: A user must belong to the group before you can specify that the user inherit
that group’s settings. Also, the group must have settings before you can
assign those settings to a user.
You create groups on the Host server. Associating users with groups is also
done on the Host server.
Chapter 4. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
89
__ 1. From the Setup Tasks frame, click Select User’s Group. Type in user001 in
the For which user do you want to select a group field. See Figure 61.
Figure 61. Selecting a User to be Associated with a Group
__ 2. In the bottom frame, click Next to continue.
The Select Group for user001 panel appears. See Figure 62.
Figure 62. Selecting a Group to Use for Defaults
__ 3. Click the Group to use for defaults for this user drop box. Select the
group whose settings you want user001 to inherit. In this example that is
GROUPX.
When user001 logs on next time, user001 will have any settings configured
for GROUPX.
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IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
__ 4. Click Finish to apply the change.
IBM Network Station Manager Program Education
You should provide some hands-on education, similar to what you just experienced,
for your users of the Network Stations.
Practice choosing and applying settings within the various Setup Tasks to build
skills among your users.
Accessing and Using How To Help
The IBM Network Station Manager program contains a How To help category.
The How To category is organized by the tasks you can perform while using the
IBM Network Station Manager program. For example, it contains instructions about
how to create 5250 sessions, change your desktop to Lotus eSuite WorkPlace, and
configure NC Navigator sessions.
How To help can be accessed by clicking the Help button at any time. Figure 63
shows a view of the Help Contents where How To... is located.
Figure 63. Finding How To Help
Additional IBM Network Station Manager Program Examples
Following are examples that use the IBM Network Station Manager program:
v Setting up an AIX session on your IBM Network Station by using Remote
Program support
v Setting up a Microsoft Windows NT session on your IBM Network Station by
using Remote Program support
Chapter 4. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
91
Setting Up an AIX Session Using the IBM Network Station Manager
Program
Complete the following steps to set up an AIX session using the IBM Network
Station Manager program:
__ 1. Verify that the user ID and password on the Host system match the user ID
and password on the authentication server.
__ 2. You must create a .rhosts file on the AIX server. This file must contain the
Network Station’s name and the name that the user logs into AIX with. This
file resides on the AIX server under the user’s directory. An example for a
user ID of user001 would be:
Location and name of file
/home/user001/.rhosts
Contents of .rhosts file
NWS1.mycompany.ABC.com user001
The .rhosts file can contain multiple lines. Each line should have one
Network Station name and one user name on it. If a user will be working
from more than one Network Station, create an entry for each Network
Station. Following is an example of the contents of an .rhosts file that
allows user001 to sign on to multiple Network Stations:
Location and name of file
/home/user001/.rhosts
Contents of .rhosts file
NWS1.mycompany.ABC.com user001
NWS2.mycompany.ABC.com user001
NWS2.mycompany.ABC.com user001
If you want to allow user001 to sign-on to any Network Station, the path
name and contents of the .rhosts file would be as follows:
Location and name of file
/home/user001/.rhosts
Contents of .rhosts file
+ user001
__ 3. On the RS/6000, run the following command:
CHMOD 600 .rhosts
Running the CHMOD command changes the access permissions to the
.rhosts file. Changing the access permissions allows checking of the .rhosts
file to verify that a user (user001 in this example) is listed in the .rhosts file.
__ 4. You can verify that the access permissions worked by running the following
command:
ls -al .rhosts
You should see -rw - - - - - - - 1 user001 system.
__ 5. Sign on to the IBM Network Station Manager program.
__ 6. From Setup Tasks, click Startup, then click Menu.
__ 7. From Program Defaults, click User defaults.
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IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
If you are setting this up for someone else, type the user ID of that user or
click Browse to select the user ID.
__ 8. Click Next to continue.
__ 9. Scroll ahead to Remote Programs Menu Items and type in the information.
See Figure 64.
Figure 64. Remote Program Example for AIX
Where:
Menu item label
This text string appears in the Menu bar on the Network Station.
Remote host
The name or IP address of the AIX server.
Program to run
This identifies the program to run on the AIX server.
Optional parameters
-display is an AIX requirement that causes the program to display on
the Network Station rather than on the remote host. ${IP} is an
IBM-supplied environment variable that is replaced with the IP address
of the Network Station. -lang C is an AIX requirement that is used by
programs such as Netscape on AIX.
The required parameters for AIX-Session are:
-display
${IP}:0
__ 10. Click Finish to apply the AIX remote program setting.
__ 11. Log off and then log on your Network Station. The Menu bar should have a
button labeled AIX-Session. See Figure 65.
Figure 65. Menu Button for Remote Program Example for AIX
__ 12. Click AIX-Session. A window opens with your X-station session.
From the Aixterm window, you can run additional programs.
Chapter 4. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
93
Setting Up a Microsoft Windows NT Session Using the IBM Network
Station Manager Program
Complete the following steps to set up a Microsoft Windows NT session by using
the IBM Network Station Manager program:
__ 1. Verify that you have a Microsoft Windows NT machine in your network that
has the WinCenter Pro application loaded on it.
__ 2. Verify that the user has a valid user profile and password on the Microsoft
Windows NT server. When you request a session from the Microsoft
Windows NT server (for the IBM Network Station), the user must sign on.
__ 3. Sign on to the IBM Network Station Manager program.
__ 4. From Setup Tasks, click Startup, then click Menu.
__ 5. From Program Defaults, click User defaults.
If you are setting this up for someone else, type that user’s ID or click
>Browse to select the user ID.
__ 6. Click Next to continue.
__ 7. Scroll ahead to Remote Programs Menu Items and type in the information.
See Figure 66.
Figure 66. Remote Program Example for Microsoft Windows NT
Where:
Menu item label
This text string appears in the Menu bar on the Network Station.
Remote host
The name or IP address of the Microsoft Windows NT server.
Program to run
This identifies the program to run on the Microsoft Windows NT server.
Optional parameters
-display is a WinCenter Pro requirement that causes the program to
display on the Network Station rather than on the remote host. ${IP} is
an IBM-supplied environment variable that gets replaced with the IP
address of the Network Station.
The required parameters for WinCenter Pro are:
-display
${IP}:0
__ 8. Click Finish to apply the WinCenter Pro remote program setting.
__ 9. Log off and then log on your Network Station. The Menu bar should have a
button labeled WinCenter Pro. See Figure 67 on page 95.
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IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Figure 67. Menu Button for Remote Program Example for Microsoft NT
__ 10. Click WinCenter Pro and a window opens with your WinCenter session.
Chapter 4. Using the IBM Network Station Manager Program
95
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IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Chapter 5. Working with User Services
Accessing User
Console . . .
Login . . . .
Terminals . .
WindowMgr . .
Utilities . . .
Setup . . . .
Statistics . . .
Services .
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User services are programs that provide administrators with tools to manage the
IBM Network Station’s environment. You can work with User Services whenever you
want, including when an application is running. Following are a list of User Services:
v Console
v Login (The Login User Service is not available.)
v Terminals (The Terminals User Service is not available.)
v
v
v
v
WindowMgr
Utilities
Setup (The Setup User Service is not available.)
Statistics
Accessing User Services
Access User Services by pressing the Shift, Alt, and Home keys all at the same
time.
Figure 68 shows the User Services window with all the service programs that are
displayed within the menu bar.
Figure 68. User Services Window
Console
This function provides a menu bar option (Console) for handling messages.
Figure 69 on page 98 shows the tools available through the Console services
option.
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
97
Figure 69. User Services: Console View
Click the button by Messages to display messages that record Network Station
activity.
The list below contains the name of the tool and a description of its function.
Clear Messages
Selecting this option clears all the current messages from the console
display.
Rescan Messages
Selecting this option refreshes messages in the console window. Messages
that are not displayed appear in the refreshed window.
Close Selecting this option closes the console function of User Services.
Login
The Login services option is disabled. The IBM Network Station Manager licensed
program provides a login capability.
Terminals
The Terminal services option is disabled. The IBM Network Station Manager
Program provides terminal or workstation management.
WindowMgr
Figure 70 shows the tools available through the WindowMgr services option.
Figure 70. User Services: Window Manager View
The list below contains the name of the tool and a description of its function:
98
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Builtin Window Manager
Selecting this option starts the Builtin Window Manager (an OSF or
Motif-style). Deselecting this option ends the Builtin Window Manager.
The Builtin Window Manager function provides you with the ability to size,
move, and make active (clicking) all the windows open on your monitor.
Utilities
Figure 71 shows the tools available through the Utilities services option.
Figure 71. User Services: Utilities View
The list below contains the name of the tool and a description of its function.
Refresh Screen
Selecting this option refreshes the active window.
Blank Screen
Selecting this option starts the screen-saver program.
Lock Screen
Selecting this option locks the screen after prompting for a password. The
Lock Screen function keeps anyone without the password from using the
workstation.
Rescan Font Path
Selecting this option refreshes any font changes that are provided by the
system administrator.
For example, if the font used is so large, you can not display an entire 5250
session, have the administrator provide a smaller font. Select the smaller
font by clicking the Option pull-down, clicking Font, and selecting the
smaller font.
Another use of fonts would be to make your windows smaller. Using smaller
fonts enables several full windows on a screen.
Note: The 5250 Emulation program provides multiple fonts. From the 5250
Tool bar, select the Option pull-down and click Fonts.
Test Network
Selecting this option runs the network test, similar to the Transmission
Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) command PING.
Chapter 5. Working with User Services
99
Setup
The Setup services option is disabled.
Statistics
Figure 72 shows the tools available through the Statistics services option.
Figure 72. User Services: Statistics View
The list below contains the name of the tool and a description of its function within
the statistics services function.
Show version
Selecting this option displays version numbers and other information about
the current state of the IBM Network Station.
Show Memory
Selecting this option displays information about free and installed memory
in the IBM Network Station.
Show Connections
Selecting this option displays information about all the current X clients that
are connected to the IBM Network Station.
Show Statistics
Selecting this option displays statistics that pertain to the IBM Network
Station.
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IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Chapter 6. Working With the IBM Network Station Setup Utility
Accessing the IBM Network Station Setup Utility . . . . . . . . .
IBM Network Station Setup Utility Tasks . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Monitor Resolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working With the Blanking Pedestal . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting the Startup Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selecting a Keyboard Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using Verbose Diagnostic Messages . . . . . . . . . . . .
Working With MAC Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Default MAC Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
User-Configurable MAC Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . .
Resetting an IBM Network Station to the Factory Defaults. . . . .
Viewing the Boot PROM Version of an IBM Network Station . . . .
Configuring an IBM Network Station to Boot from the Network Setting
Configuring an IBM Network Station to Boot from the NVRAM Setting
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This chapter contains information about using the Setup Utility of the IBM Network
Station network computer, hereafter referred to as the Network Station. The Setup
Utility menu allows you to View or Set (change) configuration settings that relate to
a particular IBM Network Station. The Setup Utility is primarily a tool for
administrators to find and correct problems on the network. You can use the IBM
Network Station Manager to restrict a user’s privileges in the Setup Utility.
Accessing the IBM Network Station Setup Utility
Access the Setup Utility by carrying out the following steps:
1. Power on the Network Station.
2. When the NS0500 Search for Host System message appears on the black
screen, press the Escape key.
3. If password control is active, you must enter the case-sensitive administrator
password.
Note: You can specify the administrator password through the IBM Network
Station Manager in the Hardware setup tasks under Miscellaneous
Settings.
The following screen appears:
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
101
SCRN02
F2
F3
F4
F5
F6
F7
=
=
=
=
=
=
IBM Network Station
Setup Utility
View Hardware Configuration
Set Network Parameters
Set Boot Parameters
Set Configuration Parameters
Set Monitor Parameters
Set Language Parameters
F10 = Set Verbose Diagnostic Messages Disabled
Enter=Reboot
Notes:
1. If the administrator has not set the password in the IBM Network Station
Manager, any user can access the configuration settings in the IBM Setup
Utility.
2. If you attempt the password three times without success, you can only view the
hardware configuration.
3. If you changed the administrator password by using IBM Network Station
Manager, you must boot the Network Station up to the Login window. This
enables the new administrator password at the system unit.
Users who are granted limited access by the administrator in IBM Network Station
Manager do not see the complete screen shown above. They see only the first
option, which allows only for viewing the hardware configuration.
IBM Network Station Setup Utility Tasks
You can find information about Setup Utility tasks in Table 14 and Table 15 on
page 103, in the text-based instructions which follow, or in both sources.
Table 14 and Table 15 on page 103 divide Setup Utility tasks into two categories:
Tasks that deal with configuration settings and tasks that deal with appearances.
The tables point you to the steps you need to take to perform each task. You can
reach many of the required screens simply by pressing one key, and many of the
tasks consist of a single keystroke. When the task is more complicated or bears
explanation, the tables direct you to the text-based instructions in the remainder of
the chapter.
Note: For specific instructions about configuring a Network Station to boot from
NVRAM settings, refer to “Configuring an IBM Network Station to Boot from
the NVRAM Setting” on page 108.
Table 14. Common Configuration Tasks in Setup Utility
Configuration Item
To View
To Set
Network Station IP Address
F3, select NVRAM.
F3, select NVRAM.
Subnet Mask
F3, select NVRAM.
F3, select NVRAM.
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IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Table 14. Common Configuration Tasks in Setup Utility (continued)
Configuration Item
To View
To Set
Default MAC Address
See “Finding the Default MAC
Address” on page 105.
N/A.
User-configurable MAC Address
See “Viewing the
User-Configurable MAC Address”
on page 106.
See “Specifying a
User-Configurable MAC Address”
on page 106.
Gateway IP Address
F3, select NVRAM.
F3, select NVRAM.
IP Addressed From (Is NVRAM or a Network
setting being used to boot?)
F3.
F3.
Table 15. Common Appearance Tasks in Setup Utility
Appearance Item
To View
To Set
Keyboard Language
F7.
F7. See “Selecting a Keyboard
Language” on page 104.
Monitor Resolution
F6.
F6. See “Setting Monitor
Resolution”.
Verbose Diagnostic Messages (activity and
messages displayed during boot)
F10.
F10. See “Using Verbose
Diagnostic Messages” on
page 105.
Blanking Pedestal
F6.
See “Working With the Blanking
Pedestal”.
Setting Monitor Resolution
You can change the resolution of the monitor that is attached to a Network Station
to improve a screen image that is not clear.
CAUTION:
Setting a resolution that is not supported by your monitor can permanently
damage the monitor.
Note: For the best video image, you should power on the monitor before you start
the logic unit.
__ 1. Enter the Setup Utility by powering on the Network Station and pressing the
Escape key after the NS0500 Search for Host System message displays
during system startup.
__ 2. Press the F6 key.
__ 3. Press the F2 key.
__ 4. Select a new monitor resolution by using the Up and Down arrow keys.
__ 5. After selecting your resolution, press Enter.
__ 6. Test the resolution by pressing Enter again. A properly resolved monitor
clearly displays the resolution setting in the center of a full-screen grid.
Working With the Blanking Pedestal
The Blanking Pedestal allows you to increase the contrast between black and white
on your monitor. To activate the Blanking Pedestal, carry out the following
instructions:
__ 1. Enter the Setup Utility by pressing the Escape key after the NS0500 Search
for Host System message displays during system startup.
Chapter 6. Working With the IBM Network Station Setup Utility
103
__ 2. Press F6.
__ 3. Press the F9 key to enable or disable the Blanking Pedestal. The F9 key
acts as a toggle switch.
Once you have enabled the Blanking Pedestal, your display changes immediately.
Selecting the Startup Language
The first time you start a Network Station, a screen prompts you to select a Startup
Language. The Startup Language is the language that the Network Station uses in
its own interface. For example, the screens that you see in the Setup Utility appear
in the language that you select. The Startup Language is not the same as the
keyboard language or the language that the IBM Network Station Manager interface
uses. For information about setting the keyboard language for a Network Station,
see “Selecting a Keyboard Language”.
To change the Startup Language after the first time the Network Station is started,
complete the following steps:
__ 1. Enter the Setup Utility by pressing the Escape key after the NS0500 Search
for Host System message displays during system startup.
__ 2. Press F7, Set Language Parameters.
__ 3. Press F3, Select Startup Language.
__ 4. Select the language of your choice.
__ 5. Press Enter. The language that you see on screen changes immediately.
Selecting a Keyboard Language
Warning: You should use the IBM Network Station Manager program to change
keyboard languages. If you change the language in the Setup Utility, you
might specify a different language than what is in the IBM Network
Station Manager. The value in the IBM Network Station Manager
overrides any value in the Setup Utility.
You can select a keyboard language to use with this Network Station. Selecting a
different language changes the mapping of keys. By changing the mapping of keys,
you could cause a different character to display when a certain key is pressed.
To select a keyboard language, carry out the following steps:
__ 1. Enter the Setup Utility by powering on the Network Station and pressing the
Escape key after the NS0500 Search for Host System message displays
during the startup process.
__ 2. In the main Setup Utility screen, press the F7 key.
__ 3. Press the F2 key to select a keyboard language.
__ 4. Use the Up and Down arrow keys to select a language from the options
displayed.
__ 5. Press Enter to save your selection.
104
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Using Verbose Diagnostic Messages
You have the choice of whether or not to monitor boot activity from the boot host on
an individual Network Station. When you enable Verbose Diagnostic Messages in
Setup Utility, messages appear on the monitor during the boot process as files are
loaded.
__ 1. Enter the Setup Utility by powering on the Network Station and pressing the
Escape key after the NS0500 Search for Host System message displays
during the startup process.
__ 2. Press the F10 key to change the status of Verbose Diagnostic Messages.
The F10 key acts as a toggle switch. Verbose Diagnostic Messages are
currently disabled when the display reads ″F10 = Set Verbose Diagnostic
Messages Disabled.″ When the display reads, ″F10 = Set Verbose
Diagnostic Messages Enabled, it means that Verbose Diagnostic Messages
are currently enabled.
Working With MAC Addresses
You use a MAC address (which is an alpha-numeric value) to identify a computer.
Network Stations can have two kinds of MAC addresses: Default MAC addresses,
and user-configurable MAC addresses.
Default MAC Addresses
The default MAC address is a unique identifier that corresponds permanently to a
particular Network Station. The Network Station receives its default MAC address in
the factory where the machine is manufactured. The default MAC address does not
change, even when you specify a user-configurable MAC address.
Finding the Default MAC Address: You can find the default MAC address by
viewing the MAC address label in the Network Station packaging. See Figure 5 on
page 7 for guidance.
On a new Network Station which has no user-configurable MAC address, you can
view the default MAC address in the Setup Utility. To do so, carry out the following
steps:
__ 1. Enter the Setup Utility by pressing the Escape key after the Search for Host
System message displays during the startup process.
__ 2. Press the F2 key to view the MAC address.
Note: Remember, that the default MAC address will only appear here if no
user-configurable MAC address is active. See “Recovering the Default
MAC Address” for information about recovering the default MAC
address once you have specified a user-configurable MAC address.
Recovering the Default MAC Address: Once you have entered a
user-configurable MAC address, you can reset the MAC address to the default by
carrying out the following steps:
__ 1. Enter the Setup Utility by restarting the Network Station and pressing the
Escape key after the Search for Host System message displays during
system startup.
__ 2. In the Setup Utility, press Control+Alt+Shift+F1.
Chapter 6. Working With the IBM Network Station Setup Utility
105
__ 3. On the command line, type the following command: ma default.
__ 4. To return to the Setup Utility, type SE and press the Enter key or type RS to
restart the Network Station.
User-Configurable MAC Addresses
You may wish to configure your own MAC addresses for Network Stations. By
configuring your own MAC addresses, you can create a sequence of identifiers that
has meaning to you as an administrator. Your own MAC addresses will be more
memorable than the randomly produced default MAC addresses that reside in the
Network Stations.
By configuring a MAC address, you do not permanently delete or overwrite the
default MAC address. You can retrieve it from the memory of the Network Station at
any time. For instructions about how to reset the default MAC address, see
“Recovering the Default MAC Address” on page 105.
If you are using DHCP in your network to dynamically allocate IP addresses, you
should not configure your own MAC addresses. User-configurable MAC addresses
are most useful for the kind of tracking and close administrative scrutiny that are
usually associated with small, static, stable networks.
The user-configurable MAC address must follow the conventions of the default MAC
address. It must consist of 12 digits, in pairs that are sectioned off by colons. When
you create a user-configurable address, you can use the numbers 0 through 9 and
the letters A through F. The first digit in the MAC address must always be 4, 5, 6, 7,
8, C, D, E, or F. After the first digit, you may enter any values you wish, as long as
they follow the conventions that have already been discussed.
Specifying a User-Configurable MAC Address:
__ 1. Enter the Setup Utility by restarting the Network Station and pressing the
Escape key after the Search for Host System message displays during
system startup.
__ 2. In the Setup Utility, press Control+Alt+Shift+F1.
__ 3. On a Network Station command line, type the following command: ma
XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX, where XX:XX:XX:XX:XX:XX is your user-configurable MAC
address.
__ 4. To return to the Setup Utility, type SE and press the Enter key or type RS to
restart the Network Station.
Viewing the User-Configurable MAC Address: You can view the active MAC
address on an IBM Network Station by carrying out the following steps:
__ 1. Enter the Setup Utility by restarting the Network Station and pressing the
Escape key after the Search for Host System message displays during
system startup.
__ 2. In the Setup Utility, press Control+Alt+Shift+F1.
__ 3. On a Network Station command line, type the following command: ma.
__ 4. Press Enter.
__ 5. To return to the Setup Utility, type se and press Enter.
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IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Resetting an IBM Network Station to the Factory Defaults
Even if you have already configured your Network Station, you may wish to clear all
of the settings and restore the factory defaults. To do this, carry out the following
steps:
__ 1. Enter the Setup Utility by restarting the Network Station and pressing the
Escape key after the Search for Host System message displays.
__ 2. In the Setup Utility, press Ctrl+Alt+Shift+F1.
__ 3. Type nv to enter the NVRAM utility. Press Enter.
__ 4. Type l to load the default values. Press Enter.
__ 5.
__ 6.
__ 7.
__ 8.
Type s to save the new values. Press Enter.
Type y to verify that you want to save the values. Press Enter.
Type q to quit the NVRAM utility.
To return to the Setup Utility, type se and press Enter.
Viewing the Boot PROM Version of an IBM Network Station
You may want to ensure that you have a certain version of boot PROM (also called
the boot monitor) loaded on your Network Station. You can learn what version you
have currently installed on your Network Station by carrying out the following steps:
__ 1. Enter the Setup Utility by powering on the Network Station and pressing the
Escape key after the Search for Host System message displays.
__ 2. Press F2, View Hardware Configuration.
The Boot Monitor version appears as the third categorized item. The Boot Monitor
version is the same thing as the boot PROM version.
Configuring an IBM Network Station to Boot from the Network Setting
For your Network Stations to boot using BOOTP or DHCP, you must set each logic
unit to Network in the Setup Utility. Network is the factory default setting. You can
also set this value in the IBM Network Station Manager. For more information about
setting boot preferences in the IBM Network Station Manager, see “Overriding the
Network Station Boot Setting” on page 72. To change or verify the Network Station’s
boot setting, carry out the following steps:
__ 1. Enter the Setup Utility by powering on the Network Station and pressing the
Escape key after the Search for Host System message displays during the
startup process.
__ 2. Press F3, Set Network Parameters.
__ 3. On the line IP Addressed from, use the right and left arrow keys to highlight
Network.
__ 4. Once you have highlighted Network on the IP Addressed from line, you must
configure the following parameters:
v DHCP IP Addressing Order
v BOOTP IP Addressing Order
Choose whether you want DHCP or BOOTP to be the primary boot method
of this Network Station. For guidance in making that decision, refer to “Boot
Methods” on page 12. If you want to use both DHCP and BOOTP, type 1
next to your first choice and 2 next to your second choice. If you want to use
only one boot method, type 1 beside your selection. Type D for ″Disabled″
beside the method that you do not want to use.
Chapter 6. Working With the IBM Network Station Setup Utility
107
__ 5. If you have an Ethernet Network Station, choose the appropriate Ethernet
standard for your network/
__ 6. Press Enter to save your changes.
__ 7. Your individual Network Station is now ready to boot using the Network
setting. However, you must make sure that you have configured your server
to process boot requests from BOOTP or DHCP clients. To configure your
server to use BOOTP or DHCP, refer to your platform-specific installation
chapter of this book.
Configuring an IBM Network Station to Boot from the NVRAM Setting
This section contains information about setting up a Network Station to boot from
the NVRAM setting.
Note: If you make an error during the following procedure, recover the default
information that you have overwritten by pressing F11.
__ 1. Enter the Setup Utility by powering on the Network Station and pressing the
Escape key after the Search for Host System message displays during the
startup process.
__ 2. Press F3, Set Network Parameters.
__ 3. On the line IP Addressed from, use the right and left arrow keys to highlight
NVRAM.
__ 4. On the lines beneath IP Addressed from, fill in the requested information
concerning your network’s topology. Refer to your network topology diagram
for your network’s configuration information.
Notes:
a. To replace existing text, you must backspace to delete the text and then
type your values. You cannot type over existing values.
b. Do not press Enter at the end of a line. Instead, use the arrow keys to
move from one line to the next. Press Enter only when you are finished
with the whole screen.
Table 16. Boot and Configuration Parameters for NVRAM Booting. Table 16 explains the configuration items and
refers you to the sample values for Figure 3 on page 5.
Configuration Item
Description
Network Station IP Address
The IP address for this individual IBM Network Example 2 = 192.168.1.2 or
Network Station.
192.168.1.3
First Boot Host IP Address
The IP address of the primary server
that you will use to boot this Network
Station.
Network Example 2 = 192.168.1.4
Second Boot Host IP Address
The server that you will use to boot
this IBM Network Station should the
first boot host fail. If you have no
backup server, you may enter the
value 0.0.0.0 or the same IP address
as that of the first boot host.
Network Example 2 = 0.0.0.0
Third Boot Host IP Address
The server that you will use to boot
this individual Network Station should
the first and second boot hosts fail. If
you have no third boot host, you may
enter 0.0.0.0 or the same IP address
as that of your first or second boot
host.
Network Example 2 = 0.0.0.0
108
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Value for Network Examples
Table 16. Boot and Configuration Parameters for NVRAM Booting (continued). Table 16 on page 108 explains the
configuration items and refers you to the sample values for Figure 3 on page 5.
Configuration Item
Description
Value for Network Examples
First Configuration Host IP Address
Network Example 2 = 0.0.0.0
The IP address of the server from
which the Network Station downloads
its workstation configuration
information. This may or may not be
the same server as the boot host.
See “Taking Advantage of Multiple
Server Environments” on page 17, for
information. If you do not specify a
configuration host, the Network
Station goes to the boot host as a
default configuration server. If you do
not want to specify a separate
configuration host, you may enter
0.0.0.0 or the IP address of the boot
host.
Second Configuration Host IP
Address
The IP address of the configuration
host that you want the Network
Station to use should the first
configuration host fail. If you do not
want to specify a second
configuration host, you may enter
0.0.0.0 or the IP address of the first
configuration host.
Network Example 2 = 0.0.0.0
Gateway IP Address
The IP address of the principle router
of the Network Station’s network.
Network Example 2 = 192.168.1.1
Subnet Mask
See “Subnets and Subnet Masks” on
page 8 for a discussion of subnet
masks. If the Network Station will
never need to access anything that
does not reside on its subnet, you
can use the value 0.0.0.0.
Network Example 2 = 255.255.255.0
Broadcast IP Address
Network Example 2 = 192.168.1.255
The broadcast IP address is the
address that is used to communicate
with every host on the network. For
Class C networks whose subnet
mask is 255.255.255.0, the broadcast
address is the first three portions of
the network address with 255 in the
final portion.
__ 5. Press Enter to save your changes.
__ 6. You must now specify the proper paths for the Network Station to follow to
reach its boot and configuration files. From the Setup Utility main screen,
press F4, Set Boot Parameters. Go to the next step for information about
what parameters to enter.
__ 7. Specify the boot parameters that are explained in Table 17 on page 110.
Make sure that you use forward slashes, as indicated in the table. If you use
backslashes, the Network Station may not boot. Type in the values that are
specified for your platform.
Chapter 6. Working With the IBM Network Station Setup Utility
109
Notes
v Directory, file, and protocol values are case-sensitive.
v You can access the default values for the OS/390 and OS/400
platforms by deleting the ones that appear on the screen and then
pressing Enter. The proper values take effect even though they do
not appear on screen.
Table 17. Boot Parameters for NVRAM Booting
Boot Parameter Description
Platform
Type this value
Boot File
OS/2
kernel
OS/390
kernel
VM
kernel
OS/400
kernel
AIX
kernel
NT
kernel
OS/2
/nstation/prodbase/
OS/390
/usr/lpp/nstation/standard/
VM
/QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation/
OS/400
/QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation/
AIX
/usr/netstation/
NT
/nstation/prodbase/
OS/2
/netstation/prodbase/
OS/390
/usr/lpp/nstation/standard/
VM
/../VMBFS:VMSYSU:QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation/
OS/400
/QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation/
AIX
/usr/netstation/
NT
/netstation/prodbase/
TFTP Boot
Directory
NFS Boot
Directory
The file that contains the
operating system for the
Network Station.
The path that the Network
Station uses to access the
Boot File in the boot server
when using TFTP to
download the operating
system.
The path that the Network
Station uses to access the
Boot File from the boot
server when using NFS to
download the operating
system.
__ 8. Specify the Boot Host Protocol
In the Set Boot Parameters display, you can specify the order of the boot
protocols for the Network Station. The supported protocols are:
v TFTP
v NFS
v Local
Use the numbers 1 through 3 for the boot host protocol order or use a D to
disable the protocol. The Local boot host protocol is for booting from a flash
card only. The Network Station will attempt to use the first protocol and if
unsuccessful, it will attempt to use the next if specified.
__ 9. Press Enter to save your changes.
Note: If you have made a mistake and you want to recover the default boot
parameter values, backspace over the current values and restart the
Network Station.
__ 10. Press F5, Set Configuration Parameters.
110
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
__ 11. Enter your network’s configuration information by using Table 18.
Table 18. Configuration Parameters for NVRAM Booting
Configuration Parameter
Description
Platform
Type this value
Configuration file
The name of the file that
contains the Network
Station’s configuration
information.
OS/2
standard.nsm
OS/390
standard.nsm
VM
standard.nsm
OS/400
standard.nsm
AIX
standard.nsm
NT
standard.nsm
OS/2
/netstation/prodbase/configs/
OS/390
/usr/lpp/nstation/standard/StationConfig/
VM
/QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation/configs/
OS/400
/QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation/configs/
AIX
/usr/netstation/configs/
NT (NFS)
/netstation/prodbase/configs/
The path name that the
second configuration host
uses to locate the
configuration file of the
Network Station. If you
have not configured a
second configuration host,
you may leave this line
blank.
OS/2
/netstation/prodbase/configs/
OS/390
/usr/lpp/nstation/standard/StationConfig/
VM
/QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation/configs/
OS/400
/QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation/configs/
AIX
/usr/netstation/configs/
NT (NFS)
/netstation/prodbase/configs/
The protocol that the
Network Station uses to
access its configuration files
from the configuration host.
Use the left and right arrow
keys to change the host
protocols. The available
protocols are NFS,
RFS/400, Local, Default,
and TFTP.
Note: You can also specify
a second Configuration
Host Protocol. The Network
Station will use the second
host protocol if the first host
protocol fails.
OS/2
First: NFS
OS/390
First: NFS
VM
First: NFS
OS/400
First: TFTP
AIX
First: NFS
NT
First: NFS
First Configuration Directory The path name that the
configuration host uses to
locate the configuration file
of the Network Station.
Second Configuration
Directory
Configuration Host Protocol
Note: It is recommended that you not enter a configuration file on the F5
Setup screen. The Network Station normally searches for its
configuration file based on its TCP/IP hostname, IP address, or MAC
address. If you enter a configuration file you prevent the Network
Station from performing this search.
If you do not plan to configure a Network Station individually then
you should type standard.nsm as the configuration file on the F5
screen. This causes the Network Station to read the standard
configuration file without taking extra time to search for its individual
file.
Chapter 6. Working With the IBM Network Station Setup Utility
111
__ 12. Press Enter to save your changes.
__ 13. If you have not yet done so, you must install the IBM Network Station
Manager software on the servers in your network. Refer to your platform’s
installation chapter of this book for instructions.
End of Procedure.
112
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Appendix A. Problem Resolution
Problem Resolution Tables . . . .
Common Error Situations. . . .
PANIC Mode at an IBM Network
Error Codes . . . . . . . .
PC Server Error Situations . . .
OS/400 Error Situations . . . .
AIX Error Situations . . . . . .
OS/390 Error Situations . . . .
VM/ESA Error Situations . . . .
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113
113
123
123
125
130
136
140
140
Problem Resolution Tables
This appendix contains information to help you resolve error situations. Error
situations that are specified in Table 19 are common across all server platforms.
Other error situations are specific to individual operating systems. If you do not find
the error in Table 19, refer to the table of contents above for the operating system
on your server.
If you are unable to solve the problem, request software service for your Network
Station. Refer to your local telephone listings to contact your IBMhelpcenter. In the
United States, call 1-800-237-5511 for software service. For hardware problems,
refer to the IBM Network Station Setup and Use book (SA41-0036) that is shipped
with individual Network Stations.
Common Error Situations
The following error situations are common across all Network Station platforms.
Table 19. Common Problem Resolution Table
Symptom
What you should do
BOOTP Problems
BOOTP table cannot be read This problem may occur if the information in your BOOTP
table is incorrect. Verify the accuracy of your BOOTP
settings in your BOOTP table.
You may need to restore the BOOTP table from a backup
copy.
Browser Problems
Error message 404 - file not
found
This error indicates a URL that is not entered correctly.
Verify the spelling and case sensitivity of the URL you used
to access the IBM Network Station Manager licensed
program.
If the spelling and case of the URL are correct, you can
check the directives specified in the HTTP server
configuration. Directives are statements in the HTTP server
configuration that allow access to the HTTP server.
Color Problems
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
113
Table 19. Common Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
Colors appear incorrectly in
applications
Color capabilities are fixed at 256 available colors. Some
applications use as many colors as possible, thus leaving no
colors for additional applications. Try to start other
applications before starting an application that uses a large
number of colors. Applications that do not use 256 colors
may have to be changed to use 256 color support.
Cursor Problems
Busy cursor (cursor seems
The first time you open an application from the Network
busy trying to perform a task) Station menu bar, the cursor stays busy until the application
finishes loading. Additional requests for another session of
the same application show the cursor being busy for only 3
seconds. Depending on network traffic, the application may
take longer than 3 seconds to appear. The application is
loading; however, the cursor is not busy for more than 3
seconds.
Cursor in wrong position
within an application
When you leave one application to go to another application
using the mouse, the cursor may not be at the same position
when you return. The cursor probably repositioned itself to
the place where you clicked the mouse to restart the
application. You can reposition the cursor using the
directional arrow keys.
DHCP Problems
Duplicate address conflict
You may have a duplicate address conflict when DHCP
pings the network if a device (such as a printer, server, or
other workstation) with a static Internet Protocol (IP) address
is off. This occurs only if the static IP address is within the
range of DHCP addresses in your DHCP configuration.
Explicitly exclude the static IP address from your DHCP
address range to resolve the duplicate address conflict.
Rogue DHCP server
If you have two DHCP servers in your network, ensure the
ranges of IP addresses in the servers do not overlap.
Migration problems from
BOOTP to DHCP
When you completely migrate from BOOTP to DHCP, disable
BOOTP on the server.
DHCP broadcasts do not
pass through entire network
Check the relay agent configuration in all of your routers and
gateways.
Suspected class problem in
DHCP configuration
DHCP needs correct class values in the DHCP configuration.
If the classes are corrupt for any reason, you need to restore
the classes from a backup.
Timing problems when
BOOTP and DHCP run at
the same time
BOOTP requires two packets for each transmission and
DHCP requires four. This presents possible timing problems
if both run at the same time.
BOOTP and DHCP may begin communication
simultaneously, but BOOTP establishes protocol before
DHCP. BOOTP assigns a permanent IP address, which
DHCP does not recognize due to the delay. DHCP tries to
assign the BOOTP-allocated address which presents
duplicate address conflicts.
Disable BOOTP on the server.
Environment Variables - Java Applet Viewer
114
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Table 19. Common Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
Environment variable not
replaced
Environment variables cannot be used when you work with
properties in the Java Applet Viewer section of the IBM
Network Station Manager licensed program. The property
value is not replaced with the Environment Variable value.
For example, if you declared name=${IP} in the properties
box, you might expect to get the Internet Protocol (IP)
address of the Network Station user. Instead, you get ${IP}.
Host Unknown or Unknown Host Message
Host Unknown message
appears on the Network
Station
This message could appear for several reasons:
v You specified a wrong system name or IP address in the
program or menu functions of Startup Tasks in the IBM
Network Station Manager program.
v You specified a wrong system name or IP address in a
3270 or 5250 session.
v Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)
names do not resolve in the menu functions of Startup
Tasks in the IBM Network Station Manager program.
v You specified the wrong server host name in the language
panel or it cannot be resolved.
v The hostnames in the NC Navigator Options Network
preferences or Network panel are incorrect or they cannot
be resolved.
v The remote print server on the Printers panel is incorrect
or it cannot be resolved.
You should validate the system name or IP address.
You should also access the Hardware-Workstation Setup
Task and specify the correct Domain Name Server (DNS) to
use. This configures the Network Station DNS so that the
DNS resolves host names into IP addresses.
You may configure a DNS using DHCP or have the Network
Station Manager configure your DNS. If you choose DHCP,
ensure that option 6 is correct for the Network Station. If you
choose to let the Network Station Manager configure the
DNS, Network Station Manager uses the server DNS
information. Verify that the server DNS is correct for the
Network Station and press Update Network Station
Manager DNS file to refresh the DNS configuration.
You must power down your Network Station and power on
your Network Station for the name information to become
available.
IBM Network Station Manager Program
Changed hardware Network
Station settings not being
applied
Some changes require the Network Station to be restarted
before they take effect. If you restart the Network Station and
the changes are still not applied, use the IBM Setup Utility,
Select F5 (Set Network Parameters) and make sure the IP
Addressed from parameter value is Network. See
“Chapter 6. Working With the IBM Network Station Setup
Utility” on page 101 for more information.
Changed keyboard setting
has not been applied
Restart your Network Station in order for the changed
keyboard setting to take effect.
Appendix A. Problem Resolution
115
Table 19. Common Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
Changes made to 5250, or
3270 have not been applied
Log out and log back in for changes to take effect.
Inactive navigational buttons
in Help
In Help text, the navigational buttons (Back and Next) are
not active until you have linked to other topics. Once you
have moved, by linking other topics, you establish a history
of that movement. The buttons use this history to determine
whether the Back and Next buttons can be used.
Microsoft Internet Explorer
windows are displayed
behind the main window
In the IBM Network Station Manager program, if you request
help or a list of users or terminals, a popup window contains
the requested information. Internet Explorer may open the
popup window behind the larger main window from which
you made the request. To find the popup, you may need to
move or minimize the larger window.
Pulldown box does not stay
open to accept hardware
setting changes
Try one of the following three options:
v If you are running a browser in a Windows environment,
change the screen size to something other than 640 X
480.
v Try resizing your current window and then open the
pulldown again.
v Try scrolling the window to change the initial position of
the pulldown. This may make room to display more of the
pulldown list.
Resizing the NC Navigator
window causes problems
When you run IBM Network Station Manager from NC
Navigator on a Network Station and you resize the window,
you go back to the main IBM Network Station Manager
screen.
After signing on, on your server, increase the memory cache
setting for the NC Navigator browser to a value greater than
the default 1K (1000).
Resizing the Netscape
window causes problems
If you resize the Netscape window while the IBM Network
Station Manager program is being loaded, Netscape may
stop the load and you will not get a sign-on screen. You
must close the IBM Network Station Manager browser
window and restart the program; wait until after the logon
screen is displayed before you resize the window.
After signing on, resizing the Netscape window may cause
the server name or name of the user whose defaults you are
displaying to disappear. If cache is set to 0, resizing the
window may cause unpredictable results.
Update of boot monitor has
not been applied
Restart your Network Station in order for the updated boot
monitor to take effect.
Java Problems
116
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Table 19. Common Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
If the Java applet or application does not start, examine the messages that are displayed in
the User Services console. These should give an indication of any problems that are found
by the Java Virtual Machine (JVM) in running the program. In addition, you can determine
whether the JVM is loaded by noting a change in the amount of memory currently being
used, as found in User Services Statistics. See “Chapter 5. Working with User Services” on
page 97, for more information.
The following Java error messages describe the error and give problem resolution
information.
Cannot find class
or
Class not found
The JVM cannot find the class file requested by the Java
applet or application. If the error is returned while you are
running a Java application, inspect the class path that is
specified in the startup programs or menus. Confirm that the
directories with program class files are in the class path and
that they have the correct format. Also ensure that the name
in the Network Station Manager’s Application (Class) Name
field does not contain the .class file name extension.
If the classes are provided in a zip file, the fully qualified zip
file name must explicitly appear within the class path. In
addition, due to differences in the file systems, the classes
may not be found since they are referred to in a
case-sensitive manner. It may be possible to rename the
class to the name that is indicated in the console message.
Some systems use mount points with different names than
the actual directory structure leading to the class file. If you
use a server with mount points, ensure the mount point
name is correct in the class path specification.
For an applet, the codebase portion of the applet tag within
the HTML file lists the locations where classes are found.
Also check the file access permissions on the directories and
files to make sure that users are allowed to read the files.
IO exception while reading (a Ensure that you specified a valid HTML file name as the
file name)
startup program or menu URL name in the IBM Network
Station Manager licensed program. Also ensure that the file
is readable by the user.
IO exception while reading (a An HTTP address rather than a file system location was
remote server name)
passed to the applet viewer. AppletViewer is essentially a
browser that needs to have a defined proxy server and port
before it can load HTTP files. To do this, you need to set the
HTTP proxy or Socks Host parameter by using the IBM
Network Station Manager licensed program. Select the
Internet Setup Task and then the Network section.
If you are loading the applet from your host server, you do
not need to use an HTTP address. Instead, you can simply
fill in the local path and HTML file name.
Launcher Shutdown Monitor
If your applet does not start and the next message in the
console is Launcher Shutdown Monitor, ensure that you
specified a valid HTML file name as the startup program or
menu URL name in the IBM Network Station Manager
licensed program. Also ensure that the file is readable by the
user.
Appendix A. Problem Resolution
117
Table 19. Common Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
Out of memory
The Network Station may not have enough memory to run
the application or applet. Possible causes include the
following:
v Other applications are using memory, and not enough
memory is left for the Java application or applet to run.
v The stack size and heap size parameters need to be
adjusted. The stack and heap sizes can be set with the
IBM Network Station Manager licensed program. For
applications, the parameters are set in the Startup Tasks
(programs or menus) section. For an applet, the
parameters are set in the Internet Tasks (Applet Viewer
section).
Unusable class name (name) Check the name in the Application (Class) Name field in the
startup program or menu section in the IBM Network Station
Manager licensed program. Do not include a path or the
.class file name extension in this field.
Other
If you do not see any messages in the User Services
Console window that explain your problem, activate Verbose
Diagnostic Messages by using the IBM Network Station
Manager licensed program. For applications, Verbose
messages can be set in the Startup Tasks (programs or
menus) section. For an applet, Verbose messages can be
set in the Internet Tasks (AppletViewer section). Additional
messages are displayed when your application or applet is
run.
The following Java error conditions are not related to specific Java error messages:
Applet cannot read
Properties or get a Security
Exception while trying to read
the System Properties
Applets may only read properties which are explicitly allowed
by the system configuration. A property can be configured to
be accessible by defining a new property of the form .applet
and assigning it a value of true. This may be done through
the Network Station Manager licensed program in the
AppletViewer configuration section. The default properties
that may be read by an applet are as follows:
v java.vendor
v java.version
v java.vendor.url
v java.class
v os.name
v os.version
v os.arch
v file.separator
v path.separator
v line.separator
If the class sun.applet.AppletViewer is used to view applets,
the accessible property list differs from above and depends
on the property file defined within your home directory.
Cannot close Java error
message box
118
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Scroll to the end of the error message box and click OK.
Table 19. Common Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
Cursor does not appear in
text field
The Java Abstract Window Toolkit (AWT) is designed to
create a development environment independent of the
underlying windowing mechanisms. These classes use the
native window calls to do the work, but provide a uniform
interface to programmers. However, Java Abstract Window
Toolkit cannot hide all the differences. Thus appearances
may change from one Java Virtual Machine on one platform
to another Java Virtual Machine on a different platform.
or
Window layout (for example,
button positions) appears
different from the way it
appears when the applet is
run on another platform
Data written to a file does not Make sure the Java applet or application closes the file to
appear in the file
force all data to be written to the file.
Text does not appear or is a
different style
Check the font sizes and styles. They may need to be
changed to a different setting. Not all fonts are available on
all Java Virtual Machines.
Keystrokes
Unwanted keystrokes appear If the screen saver comes on while you are in an application
in applications
and you press a key to end the screen saver, that keystroke
appears in your application. Remove the unwanted
keystroke.
Language Problems
Wrong language appears on
the Network Station when
you power on the logic unit
You must reset the keyboard language to your language
from the Setup Utility.
v Power on the Network Station.
v When the NS0500 Search for Host System message
appears, press the Escape key to start the Setup Utility.
v Press F1 (if necessary).
v Enter your password (if necessary).
v Press F7.
v Press F3 to select language.
v Choose one of the following options for the appropriate
language:
– 1 for English (US)
– 2 for French
– 3 for German
– 4 for Italian
– 5 for Japanese
– 6 for Spanish
v Press Enter three times to save your selection and restart
the Network Station.
Login Problems
Appendix A. Problem Resolution
119
Table 19. Common Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
This problem normally occurs when the required.nsm file
Network Station displays a
could not be read during power on.
light blue screen and the
Network Station does not log
If you boot from NVRAM check the following items to correct
in properly
this problem:
v Make sure that the Configuration line in the F5 screen is
accurate.
v On an AS/400, OS/390, and Virtual Machine (VM) server,
the Network Station automatically looks for the
required.nsm file if the Configuration File value is blank.
Note: If you need to enter the required.nsm file manually,
make sure that the path and the file name are entered
correctly.
v Ensure the accuracy of the Configuration Directory.
v Select the correct Configuration Host Protocol.
If you boot from DHCP, look for the correct configuration
information in “Taking Advantage of Multiple Server
Environments” on page 17.
Host xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx (IP
address) not responding to
ICMP Echo error message
followed by NS0090 Press a
key to continue message
This error message indicates that two devices in your
network are trying to use the same IP address. Verify that
the IP address you assigned to the Network Station is not
used by a different device in your network.
If all of your IP addresses are assigned to Network Stations
(or other devices using a media access control (MAC)
address, the error will be NS0600 IP address xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx
in use by (MAC address) xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx. This error
message also indicates a conflict in which two devices try to
use the same IP address.
120
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Table 19. Common Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
Login stops at NS0500
Search for Host System
message
There are several reasons this message appears:
v Your server may not be running.
v Your network cable connections may not be tight.
If you are running IBM Operating System/400 Version 3
(OS/400), OS/390, or VM, you may need to reset the
NVRAM to the factory defaults if you boot from NVRAM.
Following the NVRAM reset, you must reenter the NVRAM
values for the Network Station and power off and power on
the Network Station.
v When the NS0500 Search for Host System message
appears, press the Escape key.
v From the Setup Utility screen, press the following keys at
the same time: (left)Ctrl - (left)Alt - (left)Shift - F1, to start
the Boot Monitor command prompt.
v Type NV to start the NVRAM Utility.
v Type L to load factory defaults.
v Type S to save factory defaults.
v Type Y to confirm save.
v Type Q to exit the NVRAM Utility.
v Type SE to restart the Setup Utility.
v Re-enter the correct NVRAM values in the Setup Utility.
v Press Enter to restart your Network Station.
Monitor Problems
Display image too large to fit
on monitor
Your Network Station may be set to automatically detect
which monitor you are using. For autodetect to work
correctly, you must power on the monitor before you power
on the Network Station.
Network Station Directory Problem
Appendix A. Problem Resolution
121
Table 19. Common Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
File not found
When the Network Station reads files, it sends information to
the message area of the console. This information includes
the path of the file being read. This is useful to figure out
why the Network Station is not finding its files.
The Network Station uses a local-remote file table to search
for files. The Network Station looks for the file in the local
area first, and then uses the table to map to the network
directory. In the console message area, sometimes the path
is the local path and sometimes it is the remote path.
The local path is the path in the local directory structure on
the Network Station. The remote path is the path exported
by the server to the Network Station.
For example, on an AS/400 server, /netstation/prodbase/ is a
local Network Station client path. The corresponding remote
server directory is /QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation.
Sometimes the console message log records
/netstation/prodbase/ and sometimes it shows
/QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation when searching for a file.
Each platform-specific problem resolution table contains a
file structure for your server operating system. See Local
and Remote File Structure on page 128 for NT. See Local
and Remote File Structure on page130 for AS/400. Use
these maps to determine where missing files are.
Out of Memory Problems
’Out of Memory’ message
appears
When applications load in Network Station memory, they use
a block of available free memory large enough to start the
application. After an application closes, its memory frees up,
but this freed block may not be large enough for an
additional application.
When you calculate memory requirements, you may find that
you have enough memory to run a number of applications,
but there may not be a large enough block of unallocated
memory to start an additional application. Power off and
power on your Network Station to clear all random access
memory (RAM). Start your applications in order of largest to
smallest memory requirement.
If this process does not work, you may need to upgrade your
Network Station RAM to run all of your applications.
PANIC Appears on Your Network Station
P A N I C appears on your
Network Station and you are
given a > cursor
or
The Network Station operating system stopped
unexpectedly.
See “PANIC Mode at an IBM Network Station” on page 123
for more information about recovering from a PANIC
situation.
Screen turns reverse video
(mostly black) and you are
given a > cursor
Resource File Does Not Exist Error
122
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Table 19. Common Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
Error messages Resource
file does not exist and
Unable to open resource
appear in the console log,
but your Network Station
network operates normally.
The Network Station Manager licensed program source code
operates on multiple operating system platforms. Due to this
complexity, the licensed program will occasionally make
multiple searches throughout your network to find Network
Station hardware and Network Station servers.
The Network Station Manager licensed program does this to
identify which type of server operating system you are using.
Some of the searches succeed because they are designed
for your operating system. Searches for other operating
systems do not succeed.
Every time the Network Station Manager licensed program
unsuccessfully searches for a different operating system, it
records a Resource file does not exist and Unable to open
resource console log error message.
Screen Flashes
Screen flashing or crackling
sound
Screen flashes, along with some crackling sounds, can occur
when you are logging out of the Network Station. The
flashing does not harm hardware or applications.
PANIC Mode at an IBM Network Station
When the Network Station operating system stops unexpectedly, a PANIC error
condition occurs. The PANIC situation sends you out of the normal graphical user
interface to the boot monitor command prompt.
To recover from a PANIC, simply power off your Network Station and power it back
on.
Occasionally, a PANIC error situation persists. If this occurs, contact IBM support for
help in determining the cause of the recurring PANIC error condition.
Error Codes
This table lists error codes that are found while powering on your system.
Table 20. Network Station Error Codes
Message
Number
Message Description
Status and or Recovery
NS0070
Boot Monitor Resolution
Shows the boot monitor screen
resolution. Go to the IBM Network
Station Setup Utility to change
resolution settings.
NS0080
Server Resolution
Shows the server screen
resolutions. Go to the IBM Network
Station Setup Utility to change
resolution settings.
Appendix A. Problem Resolution
123
Table 20. Network Station Error Codes (continued)
NS0090
Press a key to continue
Note: Message is displayed with
yellow text.
NS0091
No input device detected. Startup
will continue in 1 minute.
Note: Message is displayed with
yellow text.
NS0200
NVRAM checksum error
Look for other Network Station
messages on the screen to assist
in problem determination. Record
the message number and refer to
this table. Press a key to go to the
IBM Network Station Setup Utility
and take appropriate action to
correct the problem.
If no keyboard or mouse is
detected, the startup process will
continue in one minute. If the
message is displayed when
keyboard and mouse are
connected, you may need to
replace the Network Station.
Bad NVRAM settings. Use the NV
utility Boot Monitor command
prompt to return to the default
settings.
To reach the Boot Monitor
command prompt (>), press the
Escape key after the Network
Station displays the NS0500
Search for Host System message
during the startup sequence.
Then, press (Left)Alt - (Left)Ctrl (Left)Shift - F1 from the IBM
Network Station Setup Utility.
Type NV and press Enter. Then, in
the order that they are listed, use
NV command functions: L, S, Y
(yes), and then Q.
Type RS and press enter to reboot
the system.
124
NS0240
Keyboard status timeout
Keyboard error. Ensure that your
keyboard cable connections are
tight.
NS0250
Keyboard BAT failure
Keyboard error. Ensure that your
keyboard cable connection is tight.
NS0260
Keyboard initialization timeout
Keyboard error. Ensure that your
keyboard cable connection is tight.
NS0270
Mouse status timeout
Mouse error. Ensure that your
mouse cable connection is tight.
NS0280
Resolution is not supported on this
hardware
Choose a different monitor
resolution.
NS0500
Search for Host System...
NS0503
Host IP addresses are all 0.0.0.0
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Invalid IP address of 0.0.0.0 is
configured. Correct the IP address
and retry.
Table 20. Network Station Error Codes (continued)
NS0505
Host not responding to ICMP Echo
Server not found. Check the server
IP address settings. Correct if
necessary and retry.
NS0570
Connection cancelled by user
User pressed the Esc key to cancel
the kernel download. Press Enter to
reboot.
NS0580
File cyclic redundancy check (CRC) A damaged kernel file was
data error
downloaded.
NS0590
Check network connection
Your token-ring or Ethernet cable is
not connected, not functional, or not
active.
NS0610
Searching for Subnet Mask
n/a
NS0620
Invalid IP address 0.0.0.0
An invalid IP address of 0.0.0.0 is
configured. Correct the IP address
and retry.
NS0630
Boot Server IP address = 0.0.0.0
An invalid boot server IP address of
0.0.0.0 is configured. Correct the
boot server IP address and retry.
NS0660
Illegal Block Size
Server problem. The server is
responding with an illegal block size
less than 128 bytes or greater than
8192 bytes.
NS0670
Illegal Option
Server problem. The server is
returning an option that is not valid.
NS0700
Twinax timeout, unable to contact
host
To correct this problem try the
following items:
v Ensure the twinaxial cable
connection is good.
v Check the workstation controller.
v Run Wrap test. If test fails,
replace the Network Station.
NS0710
Twinax timeout, host connection
lost
Try the following:
v Ensure that the twinaxial cable
connection is good.
v Check the workstation controller.
NS0711
Station address in use
Select a different address that is
not currently used by an active
device on that port.
NS0720
No twinaxial activity detected
Check to see if the cable is
properly connected to the Network
Station and the workstation
controller.
NS0850
Twinaxial hardware failed
Replace the Network Station.
PC Server Error Situations
The errors in this table are specific to a PC Server that runs the Microsoft Windows
NT operating system.
Appendix A. Problem Resolution
125
Table 21. PC Server Problem Resolution Table
Symptom
What you should do
Boot Problems
Extremely slow client boot
times
If you use graphics-intensive Open GL three dimensional
screen savers, you may experience extremely slow boot
times.
Select a different screen saver for your PC Server or disable
the screen saver.
Unable to log in as
administrator while roaming
from an AS/400 server to a
PC Server
If you are roaming from an AS/400 server to an PC Server,
the PC Server only accepts 10 character administrator
userids. An AS/400 server userid can be 12 characters. You
need to select an AS/400 server userid of 10 characters or
less.
DHCP Problems
DHCP changes do not seem
to take effect
You need to stop DHCP services and restart DHCP services
for the changes to take effect.
DHCP Configuration Utility
Error message: Multiple
instances of the
Configuration Utility cannot
be run while running the
DHCP Configuration Utility
If the DHCP Configuration Utility ends abnormally, it may
leave some registry entries, which prevent you from starting
the utility again.
From a command line, type tcpcfg -f. This command clears
the unwanted registry and allows you to start the
configuration tool.
Installation Problems
Generic error message: An
Several error conditions can occur during installation of the
unrecoverable error occurred IBM Network Station Manager licensed program. They are:
during setup.
Cannot find location of eNod install or Wedge install
You can install the licensed program using the NSM CD
or perform the install from the Internet. (This may
require you to reinstall your operating system.)
Required PTF not installed on AS/400 Integration with
Windows NT Server product
The PTF SF49608 fixes a registry compatibility problem
with the Wedge install.
After apply the this PTF, try the installation again.
Not enough space on your Install disk
You need at least 500 MB of free space on your hard
drive to install the Network Station Manager licensed
program.
The install drive is not formatted for NTFS
You must select an install drive that is formatted for
NTFS. You may start setup again and choose another
NTFS formatted drive. You may also convert your drive
to the NTFS file system.
Unable to rename NSMAdmin and NSMUser groups
Delete the groups NSMAdminTemp and NSMUserTemp.
Then recreate all users to the NSMAdmin and NSMUser
groups.
126
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Table 21. PC Server Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
Error message: An error
occurred while configuring
eNetwork On-Demand
Server.
The install program could not configure the eNetwork
On-Demand (eNOD) server. Perform the following steps and
configure eNOD manually.
You may also configure eNOD to run on a stand-alone
DHCP server without installing the Network Station Manager
licensed program code.
If you need to manually install eNOD services, perform the
following steps:
1. Insert your IBM Network Station Manager licensed
program CD for PC Server into your CD-ROM drive.
2. Select the Start button.
3. Select Run.
4. Enter the following information in the data entry box
where X is your CD-ROM drive letter.
5. X:\ntnsm\en\products\enod\tcpip\setup.exe
6. Select Ok.
7. Follow the steps in the Installation wizard.
Error Message: An error
occurred while installing the
NC Navigator (North
American).
This error only pertains to the North American version of the
Network Station Manager licensed program.
The installation program could not install the NC Navigator.
You need to manually install NC Navigator from a North
American Network Station Manager licensed program CD.
Error message: An error
The installation program did not create some or all of the
occured while trying to create following directories:
the user directory for the IBM v \..\nstation\userbase
Network Station Manager.
v \..\nstation\userbase\groups
v \..\nstation\userbase\sysdef
v \..\nstation\userbase\home
v \..\nstation\userbase\users
v \..\nstation\AppBase
The installation program did not create some or all of the
following base permissions:
v \nstation = NSMAdmin, Administrators, SYSTEM = Full
Control, NSMUser = Change
v \nstation\userbase\home = NSMAdmin, Administrators,
SYSTEM = Full Control, NSMUser = Change
v \nstation\userbase\users = NSMAdmin, Administrators,
SYSTEM = Full Control, NSMUser = Change
Error message: This machine You must run Windows NT Server 4.0 or Windows Terminal
does not have Windows NT Server 1.0 to operate the Network Station Manager licensed
Server 4.0 or Windows
program.
Terminal Server 1.0 installed.
Install one of these operating systems and try the setup
again.
Appendix A. Problem Resolution
127
Table 21. PC Server Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
Error message: This program The Network Station Manager licensed program installation
requires a monitor with VGA requires screen resolution of 640 x 480 or greater.
or better resolution.
Reset your screen resolution to a minimum 640 x 480
resolution by performing the following steps:
1. Select the Start button.
2. Select Settings.
3. Select Control Panel.
4. Double click on Display in the control panel dialog box.
5. Select the Settings tab.
6. On Desktop Area slider bar, left click and hold the left
button down.
7. Drag the slider bar to the right until the screen resolution
is greater than 640 x 480.
8. Select Ok.
After you make these changes, try your setup again.
Error message: Unable to
create one of the IBM
Network Station Manager
user groups.
The installation program could not create one or more IBM
Network Station Manager licensed program user groups. You
will need to create these user groups manually.
Error message: Unable to
install the NDIS Intermediate
Driver 3.0.
The install shield setup could not properly install the NDIS
Intermediate Driver 3.0. You need to manually install this
driver to complete your Network Station Manager licensed
program installation.
Error message: Unable to
load InServe.dll for
installation and configuration
of the Network Station
Manager.
Your installation requires the InServe.dll that could not be
loaded into memory. Reboot your PC Server and try to run
the installation again.
Error message: Unable to
obtain the Domain Controller
name.
The install shield could not find the Domain controller for
your Windows NT server name.
Ensure that your Windows NT server Domain name is
correct. Try the setup again.
Internet Explorer Problem
Microsoft Internet Explorer
windows are displayed
behind the main window
If you request help or a list of users and terminals in the IBM
Network Station Manager program, a popup window opens
that contains the requested information. Internet Explorer
may open the popup window behind the larger main window
from which you made the request. To find the popup, you
may need to move or minimize the larger window.
Local and Remote File Structure
128
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Table 21. PC Server Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
Missing file
You have to understand the path used to send files to the
client (Network Station) to locate what seems to be a
missing file. The floating install root ({float} in the examples
below) is whatever directory you choose. For example,
c:\nstation\prodbase\ or c:\nstation\userbase\ means the
floating install root is c:.
Client path is the path client applications use.
Remote NFS alias is the path exported by the NFS server.
Each NFS alias points to an NTFS directory on the server.
NTFS directory is located on the server.
The following information shows the path relationships
between the client, remote (NFS alias), and the NTFS
directory:
Client path = Remote NFS alias = NTFS directory on
server
/netstation/prodbase/ = /netstation/prodbase/ =
{float}\prodbase\
/netstation/prodbase/configs/ = /netstation/prodbase/configs/
= {float}\prodbase\configs\
/netstation/prodbase/SysDef/ = netstation/prodbase/SysDef/
= {float}\prodbase\SysDef\
/netstation/userbase/ = /netstation/userbase/ =
{float}\userbase\
/netstation/homebase/users/userid/ =
/netstation/userbase/home/userid/ =
{float}\userbase\home/userid\
Network Interface Card Problem
Incompatible network
interface card drivers
If you install an older network interface card (NIC) and NIC
driver in your PC Server, you may experience problems.
Generally, the IBM Intermediate Support Driver works best
with NIC drivers that use NDIS 3.0 or later. If you experience
problems after you load the IBM Intermediate Support Driver,
try to find a miniport NIC driver for your PC Server NIC.
Install this new driver before you try to isolate other
networking problems.
The following drivers have known problems:
v Replace the NIC driver AMDPCN.SYS with
PCNTN4M.SYS from AMD on an IBM PC 325. Download
Disk 2 for the updated driver from the AMD web site at
the following URL: http://www.amd.com/
v Driver IBMENIIN.SYS will not work properly when
controlling the Ethernet/A adapter for MCA. There is
currently no updated driver.
Windows NT Associated Processor Problems
Appendix A. Problem Resolution
129
Table 21. PC Server Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
A generic error message
appears when you try to run
the IBM Network Station
Manager on a Windows NT
Associated Processor
installed in an AS/400 server
Your Windows NT Associated Processor creates a virtual
token-ring network with the AS/400 server. At the time of this
writing, the IBM DHCP driver does not work with this virtual
network in your AS/400 server.
Contact IBM service to request a PTF to correct this IBM
DHCP problem.
You may also try using Microsoft DHCP to correct this
problem. Uninstall IBM DHCP and install Microsoft DHCP.
OS/400 Error Situations
The errors in this table are specific to an AS/400 server that runs the IBM Operating
System/400 (OS/400) operating system.
Table 22. OS/400 Problem Resolution Table
Symptom
What you should do
IBM Network Station Manager Program
IBM Network Station
Manager program will not
start
This could be because the Retain Server Security Data
QRETSVRSEC) system value was not set to 1.
To verify, from any AS/400 system command line, type:
DSPSYSVAL QRETSVRSEC. The value will be displayed. If the
value is not 1, you can change it using the following
command from any AS/400 command line: CHGSYSVAL
SYSVAL(QRETSVRSEC) VALUE('1').
User Defaults browse button
does not work
To activate the browse button do the following:
1. Enter WRKLIB QYTC
2. In front of the QYTC library, enter option 12 to work with
objects
3. Locate the QYTCMCLS object.
4. Enter option 2.
5. Press F6 to add new users.
6. Add a line where user=QTMHHTP1 and object
authority=*USE.
IBM Setup Assistant Problems
Task 5000 of the IBM Setup
Assistant does not complete
successfully
In task 5000, if you selected to end TCP/IP, it is possible that
all of the server jobs might not have ended before task 5000
starts TCP/IP. If this is the case, you will receive the
message that task 5000 did not complete successfully.
You can select task 5000 again, choose not to end TCP/IP,
and press Enter to start the required servers. At this time all
of the server jobs should have had time to end so that the
start is successful.
Local and Remote File Structure
130
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Table 22. OS/400 Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
Missing file
Use this local and remote file structure map and symbolic
links used map to find missing files.
Client side = Server side
/netstation/prodbase/ = /QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation/
/netstation/prodbase/configs =
/QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation/configs/
/netstation/prodbase/SysDef/ =
/QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation/SysDef/
/netstation/homebase/ =
/QIBM/UserData/NetworkStation/users/’userid’/
’userid’ corresponds to the current User ID logged into the
system.
You may also want to check that the symbolic links on the
AS/400 are correct.
Directory A links to Directory B
/QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation/configs links to
/QIBM/UserData/NetworkStation/StationConfig/
/QIBM/UserData/NetworkStation/StationConfig/standard.nsm
links to
/QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation/StationConfig/standard.nsm
/QIBM/UserData/NetworkStation/StationConfig/required.nsm
links to
/QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation/StationConfig/required.nsm
/QIBM/UserData/NetworkStation/StationConfig/control.nsm
links to
/QIBM/ProdData/NetworkStation/StationConfig/control.nsm
Login Problems
Appendix A. Problem Resolution
131
Table 22. OS/400 Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
Communication error in a
Network Station dialog box
and Network Station users
cannot log in
This error message indicates a variety of communication
errors. If you receive this message, check the console. If you
see Error 17, typically this indicates that your authentication
server login daemon is down. Follow the corrective action
below:
or
Determine if the Network Station login daemon on your
Catch-all for comm error in a AS/400 authentication server is running by one of the
Network Station dialog box
following two methods:
and Network Station users
v From the AS/400 console, type NETSTAT *CNN.
cannot log in
v Look for an active local port 256.
If local port 256 is active, the Network Station login daemon
is running.
OR
v For V3R7 to V4R2, type the command CALL QYTCUSVR
('STRTCPSVR ') on the console.
v For V4R3 or higher, use Operations Navigator to
STRTCPSVR.
Login is successful but no
applications appear on the
task bar
Restart the QServer subsystem on the AS/400 server. Enter
the QPWFSERVSD command.
System hangs at NS0500
Search for Host System
message
For twinaxial Network Stations, vary on the device or the
workstation controller.
’Unable to connect to
Login Server, See System
Administrator’ message
appears at login.
There may be a problem with your network. The
authentication server may be down or there is something
wrong with the authentication server. You may need to
restart the authentication server on your AS/400. Verify IP
addresses and names in the authentication server.
Migration Problems
Unable to determine list of
files for migration
The list of files in the ’directory name’ directory could not be
determined. If this directory contains any files, the files have
not been migrated as required by the current version of the
IBM Network Station Manager licensed program. They may
be unusable by the IBM Network Station Manager licensed
program.
Correct the error and run the migration again by issuing the
command CALL PGM(QYTCMIMP).
Unable to migrate file
The file ’old file name’ could not be migrated to the file ’new
file name’. This migration is required by the current version
of the IBM Network Station Manager licensed program.
These files may not be usable by the IBM Network Station
Manager licensed program. The problem occurred either
accessing the file ’old file name’ or creating or updating the
file ’new file name’.
Correct the error and run the migration program again by
issuing the command CALL PGM(QYTC/QYTCMIMP).
132
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Table 22. OS/400 Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
Unable to retrieve list of
users
The list of users with IBM Network Station Manager licensed
program files could not be retrieved. The user level files
have not been migrated and are not compatible with the
current version of the IBM Network Station Manager licensed
program.
Correct the error and run the migration program again by
issuing the command CALL PGM(QYTC/QYTCMIMP).
Unable to delete file
The file ’file name’ could not be deleted. This file has been
successfully migrated or is no longer needed by the current
version of the IBM Network Station Manager. The failure of
the deletion will have no effect on the operation of the IBM
Network Station Manager licensed program.
Correct the error and delete the file using the Remove Link
(DEL) command.
Migration problem did not
complete successfully
The program to migrate the IBM Network Station Manager
licensed program files as required by the current version of
the IBM Network Station Manager licensed program did not
complete successfully. One or more files may not be usable
by the IBM Network Station Manager licensed program.
Correct the error and run the migration program again by
issuing the command CALL PGM(QYTC/QYTCMIMP).
Error occurred while
determining the national
language ID and locale
The IBM Network Station Manager licensed program was
determining the correct national language ID and locale
when the error occurred. The feature code was ’feature
code’. This was caused by a software problem.
Use the Work with Problems WRKPRB) command to collect the
appropriate information and contact IBM Support to report
this error. This message and any previous messages have
been written to the job log of ’job number’.
Unable to determine the
national language version of
the system
The IBM Network Station Manager licensed program was in
the process of determining the national language version of
the system when the error occurred. The national language
version is determined by using the QLANGID system value.
The IBM Network Station Manager licensed program uses
the system national language version to establish the
language used on the Network Station before a user logs in.
The IBM Network Station Manager licensed program has
defaulted to United States English as the language of the
Network Stations.
If you wish to reset this value, see “Selecting the Startup
Language” on page 104.
No Login Window
Appendix A. Problem Resolution
133
Table 22. OS/400 Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
No Login window on monitor
- User Services window
appears instead
The most likely cause is an incorrect entry for this Network
Station in the BOOTP table.
Another possible cause is that the default configuration file
on the server has been corrupted or deleted. The default
configuration file, standard.nsm, is located in the /configs
subdirectory of the directory indicated in the hd tag of the
BOOTP table entry. You may need to reinstall the IBM
Network Station Manager licensed program.
OS/400 Console Error and Log Messages
While configuring and running IBM Network Station Manager licensed program on your
server, several messages are sent to the console and to the log. These messages record
several server events such as invalid passwords, Portable Operating System Interface for
Computer Environments (POSIX) messages, and startup information.
The error messages below help you resolve common IBM Network Station Manager errors.
NSM9505, NSM9507,
NSM9508, NSM9509,
NSM9510, and NSM9511
File transfer and network
errors
This series of errors indicates network transmission
problems.
Try some or all of the following to diagnose and correct
these errors:
v Ensure cable connections are tight.
v Vary on all networking bridges, routers, gateways,
switches, workstation controllers, and other hardware.
v Ensure that Ethernet and token-ring lines are configured
and operating properly.
v Ensure that frame sizes are correct on all networking
bridges, routers, gateways, switches, workstation
controllers and other hardware.
NSM9530 Exiting abnormally, Refer to the error code ’xx’ in your error message and take
error code: xx
appropriate corrective action.
v Error 3: Malloc failed. You may need to free up some
server memory.
v Error 5: Listen failed on socket. Check the preceding error
message to correct the problem.
v Error 6: Accept failed. Check the preceding error message
to correct the problem.
v Error 7: Server data error. The server could not read your
configuration file. Verify the accuracy of the configuration
file and retry.
You may need to restart the network authentication server to
correct the errors listed above.
NSM9537 Memory allocation
failed
There is not enough free memory on your server for the
Network Station Manager licensed program to operate.
Check your storage pool allocations and allocate more
memory for your server storage pool.
134
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Table 22. OS/400 Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
NSM9549 Error retrieving
server data
The server needs a working Network Station configuration
file. The configuration file is either corrupt, the configuration
file is unusable, or the configuration file is not found.
Verify that all configuration files are not corrupt.
Verify accuracy of configuration file information and
configuration file syntax.
Look in the displayed path to figure out where the
configuration file should be.
Printer Problems
Printer not available to other
applications
The AS/400 system locks the printer if someone started a
printer writer to that printer. To release the printer and make
it available, run the End Printer Writer (ENDPRTWTR) command
for that printer on the AS/400 system.
Program Temporary Fix (PTF) Problems
PTFs not working
If the PTFs being installed are for the IBM Network Station
Manager for AS/400 product, you may have to restart the
IBM Network Station Manager system unit. This causes a
new software download to the system unit. The new
downloaded software contains the program fixes for the
Network Station.
Problem communicating using Host names
Some Network Stations
unable to communicate with
some Hosts using the Host
names table
The IBM Network Station Manager licensed program checks
the authority level of the person making the Host Table
updates. You need to make sure the person who adds
names to the Host Table has all object authority (*ALLOBJ) .
If you have authorities less than *ALLOBJ you can update
the Host table but the changes are not passed to the
Network Station.
Twinaxial Problems
Network Station does not
boot
If you are using BOOTP with twinaxial Network Stations, the
twinaxial Network Station defines itself in the BOOTP table.
If the twinaxial Network Station does not boot, you need to
apply PTF SF47202.
No twinaxial activity detected Ensure that the cable is plugged into the Network Station
and the twinaxial workstation controller.
Appendix A. Problem Resolution
135
Table 22. OS/400 Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
Twinaxial timeout
Ensure that the twinaxial cable is plugged into the Network
Station and the twinaxial workstation controller. Replace the
cable if necessary.
or
Unable to connect to host
Ensure that the workstation controller is powered on and the
workstation controller is varied on.
If you suspect bad Network Station hardware, run the Wrap
test to determine if your Network Station hardware is bad.
To run the Wrap test, do the following:
v Restart the Network Station.
v At the NS0500 Search for Host System message, press
the escape key.
v Press (left)Alt - (left)Ctrl - (left)Shift - F1.
v Enter EX.
v Enter 1.
v Enter 5.
v Press the Enter key to test one iteration or type E to loop
until error.
If the message returned during the Wrap test says ’the wrap
test was not successful’, contact your local IBM your
Network Station.
Station address in use
Change the twinaxial address to one not assigned to an
active device on that port.
To change the twinaxial address from the individual Network
Station do the following:
v Restart your Network Station.
v At the NS0500 Search for Host System message, press
the escape key.
v Press F8.
v Enter an address value between 0 and 6.
v Press the Enter key.
v Restart the Enter key to restart your logic unit.
AIX Error Situations
The errors in this table are specific to an RS/6000 server that runs the AIX
operating system.
Table 23. AIX Problem Resolution Table
Symptom
What you should do
BOOTP in Debug Mode
136
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Table 23. AIX Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
Logging errors in debug
mode to diagnose BOOTP
problems
If you start BOOTP from inetd, you will log the BOOTP
startup events for your server and Network Station. This
information is useful to debug BOOTP problems.
Start debug mode by performing the following steps:
1. Enter vi /etc/inetd.conf
2. Place a # character in column one in front of bootps.
3. Save the changed file.
4. Enter refresh -s inetd
5. Enter ps -ef | grep bootp
6. Find the PID, and use kill <pid_no>
7. Start bootpd in debug mode by entering bootpd -d -d -d
-d -s /etc/bootptab
Power on the Network Station and look for errors on the
RS/6000 screen where you started bootpd in debug mode
from.
After you finish debugging, turn off the bootpd program by
entering pressing Ctrl - C. Remove the # character in front of
bootpd in the /etc/inetd.conf file. Enter refresh -s inetd to
refresh.
Fonts Missing
Missing fonts
The fonts.dir file on your server font directories may not
accurately reflect the correct number of fonts.
To solve this problem perform the following tasks:
1. On the font server, change to the main font directory by
typing cd /usr/netstation/pcf
2. Change into the 100dpi subdirectory by typing cd 100dpi
3. Look at the size of the fonts.dir file by typing ls -l
fonts.dir
4. Run the mkfontdir command by typing mkfontdir
5. Look at the size of the new fonts directory by typing ls -l
fonts.dir
6. Change to the /misc subdirectory by typing cd ../misc
7. Run the mkfontdir command by typing mkfontdir
8. Power down the Network Station
9. Power on the Network Station
Keyboard Mapping problem in XDM
Appendix A. Problem Resolution
137
Table 23. AIX Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
Keyboard map does not work XDM assumes that the Network Station is a local graphics
under XDM
terminal because it is not an xstation. The keyboard is
remapped for a graphic terminal.
Set the XSTATION environment variable to the display name
by adding the following lines in the /usr/lib/X11/xdm/Xsession
file before any executable code:
if [ -z ″$EXT_NCD_SETUP″ ]
Then enter this string:
export XSTATION=′echo $DISPLAY | cut -f1 - d\;′
fi
Note: You need to use accent grave marks (′) in the export
command above. The commands above check to see if your
device is a Network Station and then the XSTATION variable
displays the Network Station name.
Power down your Network Station and power on your
Network Station for the changes to take effect.
Network Traffic
Network traffic when CDE
dtterm is in focus
When a CDE tterm session is in focus, you will see network
traffic. This is due to the default tterm cursor that blinks in
your CDE tterm window. Each time it blinks, it sends a
request to the RS/6000.
You may change to aixterm as your standard window or
change the default tterm cursor to reduce this network traffic
by performing the following steps:
1. Select Options from the dtterm menu bar.
2. Select Global.
3. In the Global window change the blinking cursor
selection box to Disabled.
Note: You may also wish to change the cursor blink rate
from this window.
No DNS Entry
No DNS Entry for server
error message appears
Add the following line at the bottom of the /etc/httpd.conf file
to solve this problem:
HostName host.full.domain.path
No Login Window
No Login window on monitor
- User Services window
appears instead
The most likely cause is an incorrect entry for this Network
Station in the BOOTP table. Verify that you entered a
forward slash ’/’ at the end of your boot directory entry.
A corrupt default configuration file also may cause this
problem. The default configuration file, standard.nsm, is
located in the /configs subdirectory of the directory indicated
in the hd tag of the BOOTP table entry. You may need to
reinstall the IBM Network Station Manager licensed program.
NVRAM Setting Reverts to Network setting
138
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Table 23. AIX Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
NVRAM setting only works
for initial boot and NVRAM
setting reverts to Network
setting
When you set an individual Network Station to boot via
NVRAM, the settings may only take effect for the first time
you power on your Network Station. You need to modify
required.nsm to repeatedly boot from NVRAM.
Change the ip-use-address-discovery variable in your
required.nsm file to one of the following values:
v true for network setting
v false for NVRAM setting
Change the value to true to boot via the Network setting and
change the value to false to boot via NVRAM.
PANIC situation in AIX
PANIC caused by missing
If you are using IBM Network Station Browser code and your
$HOME environment variable Network Station PANICs, you may not have the $HOME
environment variable set on the Network Station. This
variable should be set automatically when you run the
/usr/netstation/bin/Xstartup.ibm8361 script through CDE.
Verify the environment variable by performing the following
steps:
v Press the Pause key to start the Console Monitor
v Select Setup
v Select User Setup
v Select Environment Variables
v Verify your $HOME environment variable
If the $HOME environment variable is not set, run the
Xstartup.ibm8361 script again.
Printing Problems
Stairstep, misaligned
printouts
In the UNIX operating system, the lines in files end in line
feeds without carriage returns. Some print queues add a
carriage return to the end of each line feed. This is what
causes the misaligned, stairstep printing.
Format your print file locally and print remotely.
OR
Prepend a command to the print file to add the carriage
returns if your printer requires them. For a PCL printer this
command is ESC&k2G. Create the ESC character in vi by
pressing Ctrl - V and then the ESC key.
Program Manager Problems
Error message 403 error,
access denied by rule
appears
Verify all of your permissions.
Verify the accuracy of your name servers.
Verify the spelling of the URL for the
http://../NetworkStation/Admin
Appendix A. Problem Resolution
139
Table 23. AIX Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
Resizing the Netscape
window when using AIX
causes loss of data input on
IBM Network Station
Manager program panels
Do not resize the window after you have entered data.
Resizing the window resets the values.
Unable to find messages
Ensure that your locale values such as LANG, NLSPATH
and so on are set correctly for the Network Station Manager
licensed program and the HTTPD server.
Syslogd to Resolve AIX Network Station Manager Problems
Use syslogd to record
system events when
debugging problems
Use the syslogd command to collect information on problem
situations including booting, ftp, nfs, and so forth.
Add the following line to the /etc/syslog.conf file:
*.debug /usr/spool/mqueue/syslog.out
This line collects system events and it records them in the
file syslog.out. Read the syslog.out file messages to
diagnose problems.
OS/390 Error Situations
The errors in this table are specific to the OS/390 operating system.
Table 24. OS/390 Problem Resolution Table
Symptom
What you should do
Browser problems
The IBM Network Station
Browser will not start
You may have deleted the IBM Network Station Manager for
the OS/390 licensed program and then reinstalled it.
In deleting the licensed program, some of the files that
support the IBM Network Station Browser were also deleted.
Reinstall the IBM Network Station Browser licensed program.
Program Manager Problems
IBM Network Station
Manager program will not
start
Check to see if the ICS server is running and configured
properly.
VM/ESA Error Situations
The errors in this table are specific to the VM/ESA operating system.
Table 25. VM/ESA Problem Resolution Table
Symptom
What you should do
No Login Window
140
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Table 25. VM/ESA Problem Resolution Table (continued)
Symptom
What you should do
No Login window on monitor
- User Services window
appears instead
The most likely cause is an incorrect entry for this Network
Station in the BOOTP table.
Another possible cause is that the default configuration file
on the server has been corrupted or deleted. The default
configuration file, standard.nsm, is located in the /configs
subdirectory of the directory indicated in the hd tag of the
BOOTP table entry. A reinstallation of the IBM Network
Station Manager licensed program may be required.
Network Station Manager Debug Tool
Any problem that occurs in
the Network Station
Manager.
After a problem occurs, specify a user ID on the DEBUG
statement (DEBUG: userid) in the NSM SETUP file. Then,
rerun the problem. Debug files will be sent to the user ID
specified on the DEBUG statement. The debug files contain
information that will help you solve the problem that
occurred. See the Program Directory for Network Station
Manager Release 3 for VM/ESA for information about the
NSM SETUP file.
Appendix A. Problem Resolution
141
142
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Appendix B. National Language Support
Locale Information . .
DBCS Unique Support .
Input Methods . . .
Printers . . . . .
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143
144
144
145
Locale Information
Table 26 lists all of the possible locales that are supported by the IBM Network
Station Manager.
Table 26. Locale Information
Locale ID
Language / Locale
AR_AA
Arabic / Arabic Speaking
BE_BY
Byelorussia / Belarus
BG_BG
Bulgarian / Bulgaria
CA_ES
Catalan / Spain
CS_CZ
Czech / Czech Republic
DA_DK
Danish / Denmark
DE_CH
German / Switzerland
DE_DE
German / Germany
EL_GR
Greek / Greece
EN_GB
English / UK
EN_US
English / US
ES_ES
Spanish / Spain
ES_LA
Spanish / Latin America
ET_EE
Estonian / Estonia
FI_FI
Finnish / Finland
FR_BE
French / Belgium
FR_CA
French / Canada
FR_CH
French / Switzerland
FR_FR
French / France
IW_IL
Hebrew / Israel
HR_HR
Croatian / Croatia
HU_HU
Hungarian / Hungary
IS_IS
Icelandic / Iceland
IT_CH
Italian / Switzerland
IT_IT
Italian / Italy
JA_JP
Japanese / Japan
KO_KR
Korean / Korea
LT_LT
Lithuanian / Lithuania
LV_LV
Latvian / Latvia
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
143
Table 26. Locale Information (continued)
Locale ID
Language / Locale
MK_MK
Macedonian / Macedonia
NL_BE
Dutch / Belgium
NL_NL
Dutch / Netherlands
NO_NO
Norwegian / Norway
PL_PL
Polish / Poland
PT_BR
Portuguese / Brazil
PT_PT
Portuguese / Portugal
RO_RO
Romanian / Romania
RU_RU
Russian / Russia
SQ_AL
Albanian / Albania
SR_SP
Serbian Cyrillic / Serbia
SV_SE
Swedish / Sweden
TH_TH
Thai / Thailand
TR_TR
Turkish / Turkey
UK_UA
Ukranian / Ukraine
VI_VN
Vietnamese / Vietnam
ZH_CN
Chinese / PRC (Simplified)
ZH_TW
Chinese / ROC (Traditional)
DBCS Unique Support
Input Methods
The IBM Network Station supports the following double-byte input methods:
v Chinese (Simplified)
– PinYin
– English to Chinese
– Intelligent ABC
v Chinese (Traditional)
– Tsang-Jye
– Phonetic Symbols
v Japanese
– Kana to Kanji Conversion
– Romanji to Kana Conversion
v Korean
– ASCII
– Hangul
– Hanja
144
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Printers
The following printer data streams can be printed to an IBM Network Station locally
attached printer:
Printer Data Stream
Chinese
(Simplified)
Chinese
(Traditional)
Japanese
Korean
x
Adobe PostScript (PS) Level
2
Epson ESC/P
x
x
x
x
IBM Pages
x
x
x
x
IBM PS55 (5575/5577)
x
x
x
x
HP PCL
x
x
x
x
Canon LIPS
x
NEC PC-PR 201
x
Appendix B. National Language Support
145
146
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Appendix C. IBM Network Station Manager Program Shipped
Default Settings
The following tables contain all of the IBM Network Station Manager default
settings. The settings are in the same order as found in the Setup Tasks frame of
the IBM Network Station Manager program.
Table 27. IBM Network Station Workstation Default Settings
Workstation Default Settings
Item:
Default Value:
Mouse settings:
v Mouse button configuration
v Right-handed
v Mouse pointer speed
v Medium
Keyboard settings:
v Keyboard Repeat rate
v Medium
v Keyboard Repeat delay
v Medium delay
v Keyboard mapping language
v Default from terminal
Monitor settings:
v Minutes before screen saver turns on
v 10
v Screen saver
v IBM bitmap
v Minutes before monitor standby
v 20
v Minutes before monitor suspend
v 40
v Minutes before monitor power down
v 60
v Desktop background
v IBM bitmap
Local Services settings:
v Allow remote X clients
v No
Boot Parameters settings:
v Language to be used during boot sequence
v English
v Number of times to try reloading operating system
v 0
v Update to boot monitor installed on the boot server
v No update except on Windows
NT server
Miscellaneous settings:
v Allocate memory to speed window refresh
v No
Table 28. IBM Network Station Printer Default Settings
Printer Default Settings
Item:
Default Value:
Print Client settings:
v Maximum LPR buffer size
v 10%
Print Server settings:
v Maximum LPD buffer size
v 10%
v Stream jobs if buffer overflows
v Yes
v Remote systems allowed to print on this IBM
Network Station
v All systems
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
147
Table 29. IBM Network Station Startup Menu Contents Default Settings
Startup Menu Contents Default Settings
Item:
Default Value:
Desktop and Menu Bar option settings:
v Desktop style
v Standard desktop with menu bar
Buttons to appear on standard desktop when menu
bar is enabled:
v Log out
v Yes
v Hide
v Yes
v Top/Bottom
v Yes
v Lock
v Yes
Table 30. IBM Network Station Standard Desktop Setting Default Values
Standard Desktop Setting Default Values
Item:
Default Value:
Screen colors:
v Background color for window frame in focus
v Mint green
v Background color for window frame not in focus
v Gray
v Foreground color for all window frames
v Black
Icon preferences:
v Icons placed
v On desktop
v Icon location
v Bottom left
Fonts:
v Font size for icons and menus
v 12
Window focus
Windows become active by clicking
on the window
Table 31. 5250 Default Settings
5250 Default Settings
Item:
Default Value:
Key remapping capability
Disabled
Default keyboard file for:
v PC Keyboard (101 keys)
v None
v PC Keyboard (102 keys)
v None
v 5250 Keyboard (122 keys)
v None
Color Settings:
v Color customization capability
v Basic
v Default color scheme
v None
v Additional color schemes to make available
v None
Record/Playback Settings:
148
v Record/Playback capability
v Enabled
v Playback sequences to make available
v None
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Table 31. 5250 Default Settings (continued)
5250 Default Settings
Item:
Default Value:
Allow Use of Settings:
v Command menu
v Yes
v Option menu
v Yes
v Print menu
v Yes
v Miscellaneous preferences
v Yes
v New Session window
v Yes
v Edit menu
v Yes
v Control menu
v Yes
v Help menu
v Yes
v Font menu list
v Yes
v Pop-up keypad
v Yes
Screen settings:
v Screen size
v 27 rows, 132 columns
v Column separators
v Disabled
v Image/Fax Display
v Disabled
Table 32. 3270 Default Settings
3270 Default Settings
Item:
Default Value:
Key remapping capability
Disabled
Default keyboard file for:
v PC Keyboard (101 keys)
v None
v PC Keyboard (102 keys)
v None
Color Settings:
v Color customization capability
v Basic
v Default color scheme
v None
v Additional color schemes to make available
v None
Record/Playback Settings:
v Record/Playback capability
v Enabled
v Playback sequences to make available
v None
Allow Use of:
v Command menu
v Yes
v Option menu
v Yes
v Help menu
v Yes
v Miscellaneous preferences
v Yes
v New Session window
v Yes
v Edit menu
v Yes
v Print menu
v Yes
v Graphics
v No
v Font Menu list
v Yes
v Pop-up keypad
v Yes
Appendix C. IBM Network Station Manager Program Shipped Default Settings
149
Table 32. 3270 Default Settings (continued)
3270 Default Settings
Item:
Default Value:
Miscellaneous settings:
v Screen size
v 32 X 80
v Key for Enter function
v Control key
v Telnet 3270 port to connect to
v 23
Table 33. Internet Network Default Settings
Internet Network Default Settings
Item:
Default Value:
Web server port on the boot host
80
Applet launcher port
5555
Table 34. NC Navigator Browser Defaults
NC Navigator Browser Defaults
Item:
Default Value:
Proxy configuration
Manual proxies obtained from
Internet Network panel
Security Settings:
v Enable JavaScript
v Yes
v Enable Java Applets
v No
v Enable SSL 2
v Yes
v Enable SSL 3
v Yes
Network Settings:
v Maximum memory cache
v 1024 KB
v Maximum TCP/IP connections
v 4
v Network buffer size
v 32 KB
Table 35. Java Applet Viewer Settings
Java Applet Viewer Settings
Item:
Default Value:
Verbose mode
Off
Verify classes
Remote only
Maximum heap size
3 MB
JAVA stack size
256 KB
Native code stack size
32 KB
Garbage collection:
v Verbose
v Off
v Only when needed
v Off (garbage collection runs as
an asynchronous thread in
parallel with other threads)
NOTE: The Java Applet Viewer setting defaults are also the defaults for the Java
Applications found on the Startup Programs and Menus screens.
150
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Table 36. Language Default Settings
Language Default Settings
Item:
Default Value:
Format to use for dates, currency, numbers, and
messages
Default from server
Appendix C. IBM Network Station Manager Program Shipped Default Settings
151
152
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Appendix D. Serial Port Printer Connection
If you are connecting a serial port printer to a Network Station, you should use one
of the following:
v A 9 (female) to 25 (male) pin cable (Cable AR or equivalent) through a
db25-db25 null modem interposer (Cable E or equivalent).
v A 9 (female) to 25 (male) pin null modem cable (electrically equivalent to the
description in Table 39 on page 154).
For additional information about cable characteristics, please see Adapters,
Devices, and Cable: Information for Micro Channel Bus Systems (SA23-2764).
Using a 9 to 25 pin cable through a db25-db25 null modem interposer
Cable AR (recommended)
This Serial Port cable (Async Cable EIA-232) is for systems that have a nine pin
serial port connector.
Table 37. Pin-out for Modem (Non-Interposer) Cable
Pin no. (9 Pin)
Female
Signal Name (9 Pin)
Pin No. (25 Pin)
Male
Signal Name (25 Pin)
1
Data Carrier Detect
8
Data Carrier Detect
2
Receive Data
3
Receive Data
3
Transmit Data
2
Transmit Data
4
Data Terminal Ready
20
Data Terminal Ready
5
Signal Ground
7
Signal Ground
6
Data Set Ready
6
Data Set Ready
7
Request to Send
4
Request to Send
8
Clear to Send
5
Clear to Send
9
Ring Indicator
22
Ring Indicator
Cable E Interposer (recommended)
Table 38. Pin-out for Cable E, Printer/Terminal Interposer-EIA-232
System End Connector
Socket (Female)
Signal
Device End Connector Pin
(Male)
1
Shield Ground
shell
2
TxD
3
3
RxD
2
4
RTS
5
5
CTS
4
6,8
DSR, CD
20
7
Signal Ground
7
20
DTR
6,8
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
153
Using a 9 to 25 Pin Null Modem Cable
The hardware interface uses the 9 pin D-shell female connector and pin
assignments defined for RS-232-C. The voltage levels are EIA only. Current loop
interface is not available. There are two identical connectors.
Table 39. Pin-out for Terminal (Interposer Cable)
154
Pin No. (9 Pin)
Female
Signal Name (9 Pin)
Pin No. (25 Pin)
Male
Signal Name (25 Pin)
1
Data Carrier Detect
20
Data Terminal Ready
2
Receive Data
2
Transmit Data
3
Transmit Data
3
Receive Data
4
Data Terminal Ready
6
Data Set Ready
5
Signal Ground
7
Signal Ground
6
Data Set Ready
20
Data Terminal Ready
7
Request to Send
5
Clear to Send
8
Clear to Send
4
Request to Send
9
Ring Indicator
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Appendix E. Notices
This information was developed for products and services offered in the U.S.A. IBM
may not offer the products, services, or features discussed in this document in other
countries. Consult your local IBM representative for information on the products and
services currently available in your area. Any reference to an IBM product, program,
or service is not intended to state or imply that only that IBM product, program, or
service may be used. Any functionally equivalent product, program, or service that
does not infringe any IBM intellectual property right may be used instead. However,
it is the user’s responsibility to evaluate and verify the operation of any non-IBM
product, program, or service.
IBM may have patents or pending patent applications covering subject matter
described in this document. The furnishing of this document does not give you any
license to these patents. You can send license inquiries, in writing, to:
IBM Director of Licensing
IBM Corporation
500 Columbus Avenue
Thornwood, NY 10594
U.S.A.
For license inquiries regarding double-byte (DBCS) information, contact the IBM
Intellectual Property Department in your country or send inquiries, in writing, to:
IBM World Trade Asia Corporation
Licensing
2-31 Roppongi 3-chome, Minato-ku
Tokyo 106, Japan
The following paragraph does not apply to the United Kingdom or any other
country where such provisions are inconsistent with local law:
INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MACHINES CORPORATION PROVIDES THIS
PUBLICATION “AS IS” WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESS
OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES
OF NON-INFRINGEMENT, MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A
PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Some states do not allow disclaimer of express or
implied warranties in certain transactions, therefore, this statement may not apply to
you.
This information could include technical inaccuracies or typographical errors.
Changes are periodically made to the information herein; these changes will be
incorporated in new editions of the publication. IBM may make improvements and/or
changes in the product(s) and/or the program(s) described in this publication at any
time without notice.
Any references in this information to non-IBM Web sites are provided for
convenience only and do not in any manner serve as an endorsement of those
Web sites. The materials at those Web sites are not part of the materials for this
IBM product and use of those Web sites is at your own risk.
Licensees of this program who wish to have information about it for the purpose of
enabling: (i) the exchange of information between independently created programs
and other programs (including this one) and (ii) the mutual use of the information
which has been exchanged, should contact:
IBM Corporation
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
155
Software Interoperability Coordinator
3605 Highway 52 N
Rochester, MN 55901-7829
U.S.A.
Such information may be available, subject to appropriate terms and conditions,
including in some cases, payment of a fee.
The licensed program described in this information and all licensed material
available for it are provided by IBM under terms of the IBM Customer Agreement,
IBM International Program License Agreement, or any equivalent agreement
between us.
Any performance data contained herein was determined in a controlled
environment. Therefore, the results obtained in other operating environments may
vary significantly. Some measurements may have been made on development-level
systems and there is no guarantee that these measurements will be the same on
generally available systems. Furthermore, some measurement may have been
estimated through extrapolation. Actual results may vary. Users of this document
should verify the applicable data for their specific environment.
Information concerning non-IBM products was obtained from the suppliers of those
products, their published announcements or other publicly available sources. IBM
has not tested those products and cannot confirm the accuracy of performance,
compatibility or any other claims related to non-IBM products. Questions on the
capabilities of non-IBM products should be addressed to the suppliers of those
products.
All statements regarding IBM’s future direction or intent are subject to change or
withdrawal without notice, and represent goals and objectives only.
This information is for planning purposes only. The information herein is subject to
change before the products described become available.
This information contains examples of data and reports used in daily business
operations. To illustrate them as completely as possible, the examples include the
names of individuals, companies, brands, and products. All of these names are
fictitious and any similarity to the names and addresses used by an actual business
enterprise is entirely coincidental.
COPYRIGHT LICENSE:
This information contains sample application programs in source language, which
illustrates programming techniques on various operating platforms. You may copy,
modify, and distribute these sample programs in any form without payment to IBM,
for the purposes of developing, using, marketing or distributing application programs
conforming to the application programming interface for the operating platform for
which the sample programs are written. These examples have not been thoroughly
tested under all conditions. IBM, therefore, cannot guarantee or imply reliability,
serviceability, or function of these programs. You may copy, modify, and distribute
these sample programs in any form without payment to IBM for the purposes of
developing, using, marketing, or distributing application programs conforming to
IBM’s application programming interfaces.
If you are viewing this information softcopy, the photographs and color illustrations
may not appear.
156
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Trademarks
The following terms are trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation
in the United States, or other countries, or both:
AIX
Application System/400
AS/400
Client Access
DB2
eNetwork
400
IBM
IBM Network Station
InfoColor
InfoPrint
Information Assistant
IPDS
Micro Channel
MVS
NetView
Network Station
On-Demand Server
OpenEdition
Operating System/400
OS/2
OS/390
OS/400
RS/6000
S/390
System/390
VM/ESA
Warp Server
Workplace
WorkSpace On-Demand
Lotus is a trademark of Lotus Development Corporation in the United States and
other countries.
TME10 and Tivoli are trademarks of Tivoli Systems Inc. in the United States and
other countries.
Microsoft, Windows, Windows NT, and the Windows 95 logo are registered
trademarks of Microsoft Corporation.
Java and HotJava are trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc.
UNIX is a registered trademark in the United States and other countries licensed
exclusively through X/Open Company Limited.
Other company, product, and service names may be trademarks or service marks
of others.
Appendix E. Notices
157
158
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
Index
Numerics
3270
application, working with 45
changing screen size 85
default settings 149
Japanese users
eliminating the 3270 emulator new session dialog
box 47
printer datastreams 54
5250
application, working with 41
automatically starting 80
default settings 148
Japanese users
eliminating the 5250 emulator new session dialog
box 43
printer datastreams 54
A
address
IP 7
MAC 6
AIX
problem resolution 136
trouble shooting 136
applets, java 53
starting an applet 53
application
3270 45
5250 41
Java virtual machine 53
NC Navigator browser 48
NC Navigator mail 51
NC Navigator news 52
application printer datastreams
AS/400
problem resolution 130
trouble shooting 130
authentication server role 17
49
C
class, IBMNSM DHCP 20
configuring 26
basic printer scenarios 35
DDNS server 30
DHCP for load balancing 31
DHCP on Warp Server 27
DHCP server 28
Netscape Navigator 2.02 for OS/2 26
printer administration techniques 36
printers 35
starting the DHCP server 28
TCP/IP support for the server system 27
console, user services 97
creating directory buttons for NC Navigator 50
customizing menu bar buttons 77, 78
D
54
B
base code server role 17
boot
from NVRAM 108
from the network 107
methods 12
monitor 2
monitor code, updating 71
override the Network Station boot setting
PROM
updating 71
viewing the version 107
sequence 2
BOOTP
boot method 13
© Copyright IBM Corp. 1998
BOOTP (continued)
server role 17
browser, NC Navigator
72
datastreams, printer 54
DBCS (double byte character set) unique support
DDNS Server 30
debug log, for a terminal session 83
default settings 147
group defaults 63
individual user defaults 63
on Workstation 62
system wide 61
desktop
background
changing 69
using an XBM file 69
manager, default settings 148
style, changing 69
determining DHCP classes 20
DHCP
boot method 13
class, IBMNSM 20
configuration changes 34
configuring and starting the DDNS server 30
configuring the DHCP server 28
configuring the server system 27
load balancing 31
server role 17
starting the DHCP server 28
directory buttons
creating 50
enabling for NC Navigator 87
domain name server, updating 72
144
159
E
emulator
3270 45
5250 41
environment variable, time zone (TZ)
eSuite, printer datastreams 54
example
LAN network 4
load balancing 18
roaming user 17
53
F
factory defaults, resetting a Network Station to the
107
G
Gateway IP address
setting in Setup Utility 103
viewing in Setup Utility 103
group
adding 33
adding a user to 33
H
hardware default settings 147
hide, menu bar 77
Hide Menu button 40
how to
access the Setup Utility 101
assign group settings to a user 89
automatically start a 5250 session on a Network
Station 80
change menu bar settings 76
change the language for menus and messages 89
change the screen size of a 3270 session 85
change your desktop background 69
change your desktop style to Lotus eSuite
WorkPlace 69
change your icon location 84
configure a LAN-attached printer 73
configure a Microsoft Windows NT session on a
Network Station 94
configure a Network Station-attached printer for other
users 74
configure a Network Station to boot from the Network
setting 107
configure a Network Station to boot from the NVRAM
setting 108
configure a terminal session for a Network Station
83
configure an AIX session on a Network Station 92
configure an ICA client session menu button for a
Network Station 81
configure printers 35
create directory buttons for NC Navigator 87
customize menu bar buttons 77
disable the control menu for a 5250 session 84
enable Java applets for NC Navigator 86
160
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
how to (continued)
enable the 5250 or 3270 emulator for Euro currency
support 85
help 91
hide the menu bar 77
login 39
override the Network Station boot setting 72
recover the default MAC address 105
reset a Network Station to the factory defaults 107
resolve problems 112
run Java applications and applets 37
select a keyboard language 104
select a startup language 104
set the Gateway IP address in Setup Utility 103
set the monitor resolution 103
set the Network Station IP address 102
set the subnet mask in Setup Utility 102
set the time zone (TZ) environment variable 78
specify a user-configurable MAC address 106
update the boot monitor code 71
update the DNS configuration on the Network Station
72
use the Roam button 40
use verbose diagnostic messages 105
view a user-configurable MAC address 106
view the Boot PROM version of a Network Station
107
view the default MAC address 105
view the Gateway IP address in Setup Utility 103
view the Network Station’s IP address 102
view the subnet mask in Setup Utility 102
work with Setup Utility 101
work with the blanking pedestal 103
work with your network proxies 88
I
IBM Network Station Manager program
adding IBM Network Stations 32
attended installation 24
attended uninstallation 26
CID-enabled command-line support 24
CID-enabled program support 24
CID installation 24
CID uninstallation 26
configuring 26
creating directory buttons 50
default settings 147
examples
assigning group settings to a user 89
automatically starting a 5250 session on an IBM
Network Station 80
changing Desktop background 69
changing desktop style to Lotus eSuite WorkPlace
69
changing menu bar settings 76
changing the language of menus and messages
89
changing the screen size of a 3270 session 85
changing your icon location 84
configuring a LAN-attached printer 73
IBM Network Station Manager program (continued)
examples (continued)
configuring a Network Station attached printer for
others 74
configuring a terminal session for a Network
Station 83
configuring an local ICA client session menu
button for a Network Station 81
creating directory buttons for NC Navigator 87
disabling the control menu for a 5250 session 84
enabling Java applets for NC Navigator 86
enabling the 5250 or 3270 emulator for Euro
currency support 85
override the Network Station boot setting 72
setting proxies 88
setting the time zone (TZ) environment variable
78
setting up a Microsoft Windows NT session 94
setting up an AIX session 92
updating the boot monitor code 71
updating the DNS configuration on the Network
Station 72
help 91
installing and configuring on OS/2 Warp Server 23
overview 56
prerequisite hardware 23
prerequisite software 23
problem determination 123
starting 64
types of installation 23
unattended installation 24
unattended uninstallation 26
uninstallation 26
working with defaults 60
IBMNSM DHCP class 20
ICA client
configuring 81
load balancing 82
ICA protocol 15
icon location, changing 84
input methods, DBCS 144
installing 23
attended 24
installation command 24
unattended (CID) 24
Internet network default settings 150
introduction 1
IP address 7
J
Java
applet viewer, default settings 150
applets, enabling for NC Navigator 86
defined 14
running applications and applets 37
virtual machine 53
L
LAN-attached printer, configuring 73
LAN network examples 4
LAN Server Administration
adding a group 33
adding a user 32
adding users to groups 33
modifying a user 33
language
default settings 151
keyboard, setting 104
startup, setting 104
support 143
type, changing 89
load balancing
example 18
load balancing, local (ICA) client sessions
local ICA client
configuring 81
load balancing 82
locale information 143
Lock Screen button 41
login
Network Station 39
82
M
MAC address 6
recovering the default MAC address 105
specifying a user-configurable MAC address 106
viewing a user-configurable MAC address 106
viewing the default MAC address 105
mail, NC Navigator 51
menu bar
changing 76
customizing menu bar buttons 77
hiding 77
menu bar buttons
Hide or Show 40
Lock screen 41
Move to bottom 41
Move to top 41
MetaFrame 15
Microsoft Windows NT
problem resolution 125
setting up a session using the IBM Network Station
Manager program 94
trouble shooting 125
monitor
setting resolution 103
working with the blanking pedestal 103
Move to Bottom button 41
Move to Top button 41
multi-user Windows server 15
multiple server environments 17
N
K
keyboard language, selecting
national language support
143
104
Index
161
NC Navigator
browser
function 49
working with 48
default settings 150
mail function 51
news function 52
printer datastreams 54
network class 8
network server
verifying 34
network service
verifying 34
Network Station
common error situations 113
configure an attached printer 74
error codes 123
how does it work 2
IP address, setting 102
IP address, viewing 102
logging on 39
memory requirements 16
problem resolution 112
understanding 1
what is it 1
news, NC Navigator 52
NFS 14
NVRAM
boot method 12
how to boot from 108
problem determination 123
O
OS/2 Warp Server
adding
a group 33
a user 32
IBM Network Stations to 32
users to groups 33
configuring
DHCP for load balancing 31
DHCP server 28
printers 35
TCP/IP support 27
configuring and starting the DDNS server 30
configuring DHCP 27
installing and configuring Network Station on 23
modifying a user 33
printer administration techniques 36
running Java Applications and applets 37
starting the DHCP server 28
verifying network servers and services 34
OS/390
problem resolution 140
trouble shooting 140
OS/400
problem resolution 130
trouble shooting 130
162
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
P
PANIC mode 123
PC Server
problem resolution 125
trouble shooting 125
PCL datastream 54
PostScript datastream 54
power-on sequence 2
prerequisite
software and hardware 23
printer
configure a LAN-attached printer 73
configure a Network Station-attached printer for other
users 74
datastreams 54
DBCS 145
problem determination 114
serial port connection 153
problems
AIX PANIC situation 139
bootp in debug mode in AIX 136
BOOTP Problems 113
browser 113
color 113
communicating using Host names 135
cursor 114
DHCP 114
DHCP changes on a PC Server 126
DHCP configuration on a PC Server 126
domain name server (DNS) 135
environment variables 114
host table 135
host unknown error message 115
IBM Network Station Manager program 115
installing the IBM Network Station Manager licensed
program 126
Java 116
keyboard mapping problem on AIX 137
keystrokes 119
language 119
local and remote AS/400 server file structure 130
local and remote NT server file structure 128
logging into an AS/400 server 131
login 119
migrating 132
missing fonts on AIX 137
monitor 121
network interface card on a PC Server 129
Network Station directory 121
network traffic on AIX 138
no DNS entry for AIX server 138
no login window on AIX 138
no login window on OS/400 133
NVRAM settings on AIX 138
OS/390 browser problems 140
OS/400 console error and log messages 134
out of memory 122
PANIC mode 122
PC Server slow boot times 126
printing on OS/400 135
printing with AIX 139
problems (continued)
program manager on AIX 139
program manager on OS/390 140
PTFs on OS/400 135
syslogd to troubleshoot AIX problems 140
twinaxial 135
using IBM Setup Assistant on OS/400 130
using Internet Explorer on a PC Server 128
using the IBM Network Station Manager program on
OS/400 130
VM/ESA Login Problems 140
Windows NT Associated Processor on a PC Server
129
proxies, specifying for a network 88
R
Roam button 40
roaming user example 17
roles, server 17
RS/6000
problem resolution 136
trouble shooting 136
S
screen saver, using an XBM file 69
separation of servers 17
serial port printer connection 153
server environments, multiple 17
Setup Assistant
problems 130
Setup Utility
accessing 101
tasks 102
working with 101
Show Menu button 40
SNMP
agent 3
startup language, selecting 104
statistics, user services 100
subnet mask 8
setting in Setup Utility 102
viewing in Setup Utility 102
subnets 8
T
U
understanding the Network Station
uninstalling 26
attended 26
unattended (CID) 26
updating, Boot PROM code 71
user
adding 32
adding to a group 33
modify 33
user services
accessing 97
console 97
statistics 100
utilities 99
Windowmgr 98
working with 97
utilities, user services 99
1
V
verbose diagnostic messages, using 105
VM/ESA
problem resolution 140
trouble shooting 140
VM/ESA DEBUG tool 141
VTxxx, configuring a terminal session 83
W
WinCenter 15
WinCenter Pro, setting up a session using the IBM
Network Station Manager program 94
Windowmgr (window manager), user services 98
Windows application server
configuring 81
load balancing 82
Windows applications on the Network Station 15
WinFrame 15
X
X window, configuring a terminal session
X11 protocol 15
XBM file
for desktop background 69
for screen saver 69
83
TCP/IP networks 3
terminal
configuration server role 17
session
configure 83
debug log 83
TFTP 14
time zone, environment variable
environment variable, time zone 78
time zone (TZ), environment variable 53
trouble shooting 112
Index
163
164
IBM Network Station Manager 3.0
IBMR
Printed in the United States of America
on recycled paper containing 10%
recovered post-consumer fiber.
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