Stratix II devices, Altera's next-generation high-density FPGAs, are based on the award-winning Stratix device architecture. Stratix II devices provide new and enhanced features that significantly improve device performance and resource utilization.

Stratix II devices, Altera's next-generation high-density FPGAs, are based on the award-winning Stratix device architecture. Stratix II devices provide new and enhanced features that significantly improve device performance and resource utilization.
White Paper
Architectural Differences Between Stratix II and Stratix Devices
Introduction
Stratix® II devices, Altera's next-generation high-density FPGAs, are based on the award-winning Stratix device
architecture. Building on the innovations that made Stratix FPGAs an instant success, Stratix II devices provide new
and enhanced features that significantly improve device performance and resource utilization.
This white paper explains the differences between Stratix II and Stratix features. For detailed descriptions of each
feature, see the Stratix II Device Handbook, Stratix Device Handbook, and related documentation at
www.altera.com/literature.
Features
Table 1 compares the features offered by the Stratix II and Stratix architectures.
Table 1. Stratix II & Stratix Features Comparison
Features
Stratix II
Stratix
Process
90-nm, all layer copper SRAM process
0.13-µm, all layer copper SRAM process
VCCINT
1.2 V
1.5 V
VCCPD
Used to power the 3.3-V/2.5-V buffer
N/A
available on the configuration input pins and
JTAG pins
ALMs
6,240 to 71,760
LEs
15,600 to 179,400 (1)
10,570 to 79,040
Maximum RAM bits
9,383,040
7,427,520
TriMatrix™ memory blocks
Yes
Yes
High-speed DSP blocks
Yes
Yes
Q1.15 format rounding and saturation
support
Yes
N/A
N/A
Global clock networks
Up to 16
Up to 16
Regional clock networks
Up to 32
Up to 16
Fast clock networks
N/A
Up to 8
PLLs
Up to 12
Up to 12
High-speed differential I/O support
Up to 152 channels with DPA circuitry for
1-Gbps performance
Up to 116 channels with 80 channels
optimized for 840-Mbps performance
High-speed networking and
RapidIO™, UTOPIA IV, NPSI,
communications bus standards support
HyperTransport™ technology, 10G Ethernet
XSBI, SPI-4 Phase 2 (POS-PHY Level 4),
and SFI-4
RapidIO, UTOPIA IV, CSIX, HyperTransport
technology, 10G Ethernet XSBI, SPI-4 Phase
2 (POS-PHY Level 4) and SFI-4
High-speed external memory support
DDR and DDR2 SDRAM, RLDRAM II, QDRII DDR and DDR2 SDRAM, RLDRAM II, QDR
SRAM, and SDR SDRAM
and QDRII SRAM, SDR SDRAM, and ZBT
SRAM
Design security using configuration
bitstream encryption
Yes. Using the AES algorithm
Remote configuration upgrade support Yes
N/A
Yes
Note to Table 1:
(1) Density expressed as equivalent LEs. One ALM provides the logic capacity of 2.5 four-input look-up table (LUT)-based LEs.
Logic Array Blocks
Stratix II and Stratix devices feature a similar logic array block (LAB) architecture. However, Stratix II LABs are
built from different building blocks. Each Stratix II LAB consists of eight adaptive logic modules (ALMs), equivalent
WP-STXIIARDF-1.1
January 2006, ver. 1.1
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Architectural Differences Between Stratix II and Stratix Devices
Altera Corporation
to 20 logic elements (LEs), while each Stratix LAB contains 10 LEs. Table 2 compares the elements found in Stratix
II and Stratix LABs.
Table 2. Stratix II & Stratix LAB Elements Comparison
LAB Elements
Stratix II
Stratix
8 ALMs; equivalent to 20 LEs
10 LEs
LE carry chain
Yes
Yes
LAB control signals
Yes
Yes
Local interconnect
Yes
Yes
Register chain connection lines
Yes
Yes
LUT chain
N/A
Yes
Shared arithmetic chain
Yes
N/A
Number of modules or elements in each
LAB
LAB Interconnect
The LAB local interconnect found in both Stratix II and Stratix devices drives LEs within the same LAB. Sources for
the LAB local interconnect consist of row and column interconnects as well as outputs from LEs within the same
LAB. The Stratix II direct link connection allows the neighboring LABs; M512, M4K, or M RAM TriMatrix memory
blocks; or digital signal processing (DSP) blocks from the left and right to drive an LAB's interconnect. Each Stratix
II ALM can drive 24 other ALMs through fast local and direct link interconnects, while Stratix LEs drive 30 other
LEs through the same connections.
LAB Control Signals
The Stratix II and Stratix LAB control signal blocks are similar, yet there are three clock signals and three clock
enable signals in Stratix II devices, compared with only two of each signal in Stratix devices. With the increased
number of clock and clock enable signals, there are a total of 11 LAB control signals in Stratix II devices, while
Stratix devices have a total of 10. Stratix II devices do not support the add/sub control signal, while Stratix devices
do. Table 3 compares the LAB control signals in Stratix II and Stratix devices.
Table 3. Stratix II & Stratix LAB Control Signals Comparison
LAB Control Signals
Number of clock signals
Number of clock enable signals
Stratix II
Stratix
3 (1)
2
3
2
Number of asynchronous clear signals
2
2
Number of synchronous clear signals
1
1
Number of asynchronous preset/load signals
1
1
Number of synchronous load preset/load signals
1
1
1
Number of add/sub control signals
Total number of control signals
11
10
Note to Table 3:
(1) The three clock signals are derived from two different sources. See the Stratix II Device Handbook for more information.
Adaptive Logic Module
The basic building block of logic in the Stratix II architecture, the ALM, provides faster performance and more
efficient logic utilization, as compared with Stratix LEs. Table 4 compares the components of Stratix II ALMs with
Stratix LEs.
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Altera Corporation
Architectural Differences Between Stratix II and Stratix Devices
Table 4. Stratix II ALMs & Stratix LEs Comparison
Component
Stratix II ALMs
Inputs
Stratix LEs
Up to 8
4
Logical outputs
Up to 2 combinational and 2 registered outputs
1 combinational and 1 registered output
Programmable registers
2
1
Number of dedicated full adders
2
N/A
Carry chain
Yes
Yes
Shared arithmetic chain
Yes
N/A
Register chain
Yes
Yes
Register packing
Yes
Yes
f
For more information on the efficiencies of the Stratix II ALM and its comparison to previous
architectures, see the Logic Structure Comparison between Stratix II & Virtex-Based Architectures white
paper.
MultiTrack Interconnect
In the Stratix II and Stratix architectures, the MultiTrack™ interconnect structure connects ALMs or LEs, TriMatrix
memory blocks, DSP blocks, and device I/O pins. The interconnects include row- and column based routing
resources, summarized in Tables 5 and 6, respectively. R8 and C8 routing resources are not available in Stratix II
devices.
Table 5. Stratix II & Stratix Row-Based Routing Resources Comparison
Resources
Stratix II
Stratix
Direct Link interconnects between LABs and adjacent blocks
Yes
Yes
R4 interconnects traversing 4 blocks to the right and left
Yes
Yes
R8 interconnects traversing 8 blocks to the right and left
N/A
Yes
R24 row interconnects for high-speed access across the length of the device
Yes
Yes
Table 6. Stratix II & Stratix Column-Based Routing Resources Comparison
Resources
Stratix II
Stratix
LUT chain interconnects within an LAB
N/A
Yes
Shared arithmetic chain interconnects within an LAB
Yes
N/A
Register chain interconnects within an LAB
Yes
Yes
Carry chain interconnects within an LAB and from LAB to LAB
Yes
Yes
C4 interconnects traversing a distance of 4 blocks in up and down direction
Yes
Yes
C8 interconnects traversing a distance of 8 blocks in up and down direction
N/A
Yes
C16 interconnects for high-speed vertical routing through the device
Yes
Yes
TriMatrix Memory
Stratix II devices feature the TriMatrix memory architecture introduced in Stratix devices and include the following
enhancements:
■
■
■
Byte enable
Pack mode
Address clock enable
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Architectural Differences Between Stratix II and Stratix Devices
■
Altera Corporation
Register clears
All Stratix II TriMatrix memory blocks support “asynchronous clear” at the output registers only.
Byte Enable
The byte enable feature in Stratix II and Stratix devices differs in the following ways:
■
■
■
All Stratix II TriMatrix memory blocks support byte enable, whereas Stratix devices support this feature in only
M4K and M-RAM blocks.
The Stratix II byte enable feature masks specific bytes, nibbles, and bits of data to be written, whereas in Stratix
devices the feature only masks a specific byte.
Stratix II devices do not have a clear port to the byte enable registers. Asserting the clear port of the byte enable
registers in Stratix devices, however, drives the byte enable signal to their default high level.
Stratix II devices enable byte write for various data widths, depending on memory type, as shown in Table 7.
Table 7. Byte Enable Data Width for Stratix II Devices
TriMatrix Memory Block Type
Byte Enable Data Width
M512
x1, x2, x4, x8, x9, x16, x18
M4K
x1, x2, x4, x8, x9, x16, x18, x32, x36
M-RAM
x8, x9, x16, x18, x32, x36
Pack Mode
Stratix II devices offer pack mode support, which allows a design to implement two single-port memory blocks in a
single M4K or M-RAM block under the following conditions:
■
■
Each of the two independent block sizes is equal to or less than half of the M4K or M4K block size.
Each of the single-port memory blocks is configured in single-clock mode.
Address Clock Enable
M4K and M-RAM memory blocks in Stratix II devices support the clock enable signal, which holds the previous
address value while the signal is enabled. When the memory blocks are configured in dual-port mode, each port has
an independent address clock enable.
f
See the Stratix II Device Handbook for more information on address clock enable functionality.
Register Clears
Stratix II devices support register clears at only the output registers in all TriMatrix memory blocks. Stratix M4K and
M512 memory blocks, however, allow asynchronous clears on both input and output registers. Table 8 compares the
register clears support in Stratix II and Stratix devices.
Table 8. Stratix II & Stratix Devices Register Clears Support Comparison
Memory Blocks
Stratix II
Stratix
M512
Output registers only
M4K
Output registers only
Input and output registers
M-RAM
Output registers only
Output register only
4
Input and output registers
Altera Corporation
Architectural Differences Between Stratix II and Stratix Devices
DSP Blocks
Each Stratix II device has two to four columns of DSP blocks that efficiently implement multiplication,
multiply-accumulate (MAC), and multiply-add functions, representing a two to four times increase over Stratix
devices in DSP bandwidth for equivalent logic densities. Stratix devices have only two columns of DSP blocks.
Q1.15 Format Rounding & Saturation Support
The multipliers in Stratix II devices support rounding and saturation on the Q1.15 input format. Similarly, the
accumulator in Stratix II DSP blocks can be initialized to any value and supports rounding and saturation on the
Q1.15 input format. This feature simplifies the porting of DSP-processor-based designs using fixed-point numbers to
FPGAs.
Dynamic Input Support
Stratix II devices feature dynamic input support that allows designers to dynamically select whether a particular
multiplier operand is fed by regular data input or by the dedicated shift register input using the sourcea and
sourceb signals. A logic value 1 on the sourcea signal selects dedicated scan-chain to feed data A; a logic value
0 selects regular data input to feed data A.
Adder & Output Block
Both the adder and output blocks in a DSP block of Stratix II and Stratix devices can be configured as:
■
■
■
An accumulator that can be optionally loaded
A one-level adder
A two-level adder with dynamic addition/subtraction control on the first-level adder
The final stage of a Stratix DSP block can be configured as a 36-bit multiplier. Apart from this mode, Stratix DSP
blocks support 9x9-bit and 18x18-bit complex multiplier modes.
The accumulator (a new feature in Stratix II devices) can be initialized or preloaded with a non-zero value using the
accum_sload signal and the accum_sload_upper_data bus with one clock cycle latency. Preloading the
accumulator is done by adding the result of the multiplier with the value specified on the
accum_sload_upper_data bus.
Operational Modes
The DSP blocks in both Stratix II and Stratix devices can be used in any of the four basic operational modes,
depending on the application requirements. Table 9 shows the operational modes and the number of multipliers that
can be implemented in a single DSP block in Stratix II and Stratix devices.
Table 9. DSP Block Operational Modes in Stratix II & Stratix Devices
Operational Modes
Simple Multiplier
9x9
18 x 18
Eight multipliers with eight product outputs Four multipliers with four product outputs
36 x 36
One multiplier
Multiply Accumulator
Two 34-bit multiply-accumulate blocks (1) Two 52-bit multiply-accumulator blocks
-
Two-Multiplier Adder
Four two-multiplier adder (Two 9x9-bit
complex multiplier)
Two two-multiplier adder (Two 18x18-bit
complex multipliers)
-
Four-Multiplier Adder
Two four-multiplier adder
One four-multiplier adder
-
Note to Table 9:
(1) This feature is only available in Stratix devices.
In addition to the operational modes shown in Table 9, Stratix II devices support mixed modes and mixed multiplier
sizes in the same DSP block. For example, half of a DSP block can implement one 18x18 bit multiplier in
multiply-accumulator mode, while the other half of the DSP block implements four 9x9 bit multipliers in simple
multiplier mode.
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Architectural Differences Between Stratix II and Stratix Devices
Altera Corporation
PLLs
The Stratix II enhanced and fast phase-locked loops (PLLs) inherit most of the features found in Stratix device PLLs,
and contain additional features, including:
■
■
■
■
■
Counter cascading
Enhanced lock detect circuit
PLL reconfiguration
Reconfigurable bandwidth
Phase shift stepping using the PLL reconfiguration scan chain
f
See the Stratix II Device Handbook for more information on PLLs and clock networks.
Counter Cascading
The Stratix II enhanced PLLs support counter cascading of the post-scale counters to facilitate larger (>512) counter
sizes. This is implemented by feeding the output of one counter into the input of the next counter in a cascade chain.
When cascading counters to implement a larger division of the high-frequency VCO clock, the cascaded counters
behave as one counter with the product of the individual counter high/low settings. This feature is available with
enhanced PLL only.
Enhanced Lock Detect Circuit
The lock output indicates that the PLL has locked onto the reference clock. Without any additional circuitry, the lock
signal may toggle as the PLL begins tracking the reference clock. A designer may need to gate the lock signal for use
as a system control. Either a gated lock signal or an ungated lock signal from the locked port can drive the logic array
or an output pin.
The Stratix II PLLs include a programmable counter that holds the lock signal low for a user-selected number of input
clock transitions. This allows the PLL lock signal to stabilize before enabling the lock signal. The designer can use
the Quartus® II software version 4.0 and later to set the 20-bit counter value. The device resets and enables both the
counter and the PLL simultaneously upon power-up and/or assertion of pllenable. Both the enhanced PLLs and
fast PLLs support this feature.
PLL Reconfiguration
In Stratix II devices, both enhanced and fast PLLs support real-time PLL reconfiguration, while in Stratix devices,
only enhanced PLLs support this feature. The PLL components that are configurable in real-time and supported in
both Stratix II and Stratix devices include the following:
■
■
■
Pre-scale counter (N)
Feedback counter and VCO phase tap selection (M, Δφ M)
Post-scale output counters and VCO phase tap selection (C0-C5, Δφ C0-C5)
The following real time-configurable PLL components are supported in Stratix II devices only:
■
■
The charge pump current, loop filter components can be dynamically adjusted to facilitate on-the-fly
reconfiguration of PLL bandwidth.
Phase-shift stepping is supported, which allows 45° phase shift (of the VCO) stepping using the scanwrite
signal.
Clock Networks
The Stratix II clock networks differ from Stratix clock networks in the following ways:
■
6
Dynamic clock power down mode is supported
Altera Corporation
■
■
■
Architectural Differences Between Stratix II and Stratix Devices
Dynamic clock source selection is supported
The number of regional clocks increased to 32 (from 16 in Stratix devices)
Fast clock networks are not available
Dynamic Clock Power Down Mode
Stratix II devices support dynamic clock network enable/disable, so that the clock networks that are not being used
can easily be turned off, reducing the overall power consumption on the device. The Stratix II clock networks can be
powered down by both static and dynamic approaches. When power down is enabled, all the logic fed by the clock
net is in an off-state.
Static Power Down
The unused global and regional clock networks are automatically powered down through configuration bit settings in
the configuration file. The Quartus II software handles this function.
Dynamic Power Down
The dynamic power down control feature is applied on GCLK and RCLK clock networks, and to pll_out pins. It
allows the internal logic to control power down/up synchronously on GCLK and RCLK networks. This function is
independent of the PLL and is applied directly on the clock network.
Dynamic Clock Source Selection
The clock source selection of Stratix II global clocks select block can be controlled either statistically or dynamically.
The user has the option of statically selecting the clock source by using the Quartus II software to set specific
configuration bits in the configuration file (SRAM Object File [.sof] or Programmer Object File [.pof]) or controlling
the selection dynamically by using internal logic to drive the multiplexer select inputs.
When selecting statically, the clock source can be set to any of the inputs to the select multiplexer. When selecting the
clock source dynamically, the user can select one of the following:
■
■
■
■
Between two PLL outputs (such as the C0 or C1 outputs from one PLL)
Between two PLLs (such as the C0/C1 clock output of one PLL or the C0/C1 c1ock output of the other PLL)
Between two clock pins (such as CLK0 or CLK1)
Between a combination of clock pins or PLL outputs. For the regional clock select block, the clock source
selection can only be controlled statically using configuration bits. Any of the inputs to the clock select
multiplexer can be set as the clock source.
I/O Capabilities
The I/O capabilities of Stratix II devices are well-designed to ensure that the high performance ALMs, embedded
memory, high-bandwidth DSP blocks, and extensive routing resources are fully utilized. The following features have
significant differences as compared with Stratix devices:
■
■
■
■
I/O standard support
Programmable output drive strength for voltage-referenced I/O standards
On-chip termination for the HyperTransport I/O standard
External memory interface
f
See the Stratix II Device Handbook for more information on Stratix II I/O blocks.
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Architectural Differences Between Stratix II and Stratix Devices
Altera Corporation
I/O Standard Support
Table 10 compares the I/O standards supported in Stratix II and Stratix devices.
Table 10. Stratix II and Stratix I/O Standard Differences
I/O Standard (1)
Stratix II
Stratix
AGP 1x
N/A
Yes
AGP 2x
N/A
Yes
SSTL-3 class I
N/A
Yes
SSTL-3 class II
N/A
Yes
Differential SSTL-2 class I
Yes (2)
N/A
Differential SSTL-2 class II
Yes (2)
(3)
Differential SSTL-18 class I
Yes (2)
N/A
Differential SSTL-18 class II
Yes (2)
N/A
1.8-V differential HSTL class I
Yes (2)
N/A
1.8-V differential HSTL class II
Yes (2)
N/A
1.5-V differential HSTL class I
Yes (2)
(4)
1.5-V differential HSTL class II
Yes (2)
(4)
GTL
N/A
Yes
GTL+
N/A
Yes
CTT
N/A
Yes
PCML
N/A
Yes
Notes to Table 10:
(1) Only those I/O standards with differing support in Stratix II and Stratix devices are included in this table. For a full list of supported I/O
standards, see the Stratix II Device Handbook and Stratix Device Handbook.
(2) Supports both input and output. See the Stratix II Device Handbook for more information.
(3) Available as differential SSTL-2 support on the output clock only. See the Stratix Device Handbook for more information.
(4) Available as differential 1.5-V HSTL support on either input or output clock only. See the Stratix Device Handbook for more information.
Programmable Drive Strengths
Stratix II devices allow designers to determine the output buffer drive strengths not only for single-ended I/O
standards, but also for voltage-referenced I/O standards. Table 11 summarizes the options available.
Table 11. Stratix II and Stratix Programmable Drive Strengths Summary
I/O Standard
Stratix II Ioh/Iol Current Strength Stratix Ioh/Iol Current Strength
Setting (mA) (1)
Setting (mA) (1)
3.3-V LVTTL
24, 20, 16, 12, 8, 4
24, 16, 12, 8, 4
3.3-V LVCMOS
24, 20, 16, 12, 8, 4
24, 12, 8, 4, 2
2.5-V LVTTL/LVCMOS
16, 12, 8, 4
16, 12, 8, 2
1.8-VLVTTL/LVCMOS
12, 10, 8, 6, 4, 2
12, 8, 2
1.5-V LVCMOS
8, 6, 4, 2
8, 4, 2
SSTL-2 class I
12, 8
N/A
SSTL-2 class II
24, 20, 16
N/A
SSTL-18 class I
10, 8, 6, 4
N/A
SSTL-18 class II
18, 16, 8
N/A
HSTL-18 class I
12, 10, 8, 6, 4
N/A
HSTL-18 class II
18, 16
N/A
HSTL-15 class I
12, 10, 8, 6, 4
N/A
HSTL-15 class II
20, 18, 16
N/A
Note to Table 11:
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Altera Corporation
(1)
Architectural Differences Between Stratix II and Stratix Devices
The table shows the available settings for column I/Os only. See the Stratix II Device Handbook and Stratix Device Handbook for more
information on row I/O settings.
On-Chip Termination for HyperTransport I/O Standard
Stratix II devices offer the 100- Ω differential HyperTransport termination resistor for HyperTransport technology
using on-chip differential termination. The designer can choose to turn on this feature to reduce board space
utilization. The differential termination for LVDS is supported in both Stratix II and Stratix devices.
f
See the Stratix II Device Handbook for more information on this feature.
External Memory Interface
The Stratix II external memory interface support differs from the Stratix external memory interface support in the
following ways:
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
■
A PLL output can be used as the input reference clock to the delay-locked loop (DLL).
The shifted DQS signal can go into the logic array.
The DLL in Stratix II devices has more phase-shift options than in Stratix devices. It also has the option to add
phase offset settings.
The DLL has been enhanced to offer low jitter mode.
DQS logic blocks with each DQS pin helps fine tune the phase shift.
The DQS delay settings can be routed from the DLL into the logic array. The designer can also bypass the DLL
and send the DQS delay settings from the logic array to the DQS logic block.
Stratix II devices support DQSn pins.
The DQS/DQ groups now support x4, x9, x18, and x36 modes.
Stratix DQS pins have been enhanced with the DQS postamble circuitry for Stratix II.
f
See the Stratix II Device Handbook for more information on external memory interfaces.
Configuration Support
Stratix II devices support the active serial (AS) configuration scheme using serial configuration devices (for example,
EPCS4, EPCS16, and EPCS64 devices). Stratix II devices also offer the following features that are not supported in
Stratix devices:
■
■
Configuration data decompression to reduce configuration file storage
Design security using data encryption to protect designs
f
See the Stratix II Device Handbook for more information on configuration support.
Device Configuration Data Decompression
This feature allows the compressed configuration data to be stored in configuration devices or other memory. Stratix
II devices support decompression in the fast passive parallel (FPP) when using a MAX® II device/microprocessor +
flash, and the AS and passive serial (PS) configuration schemes.
Design Security Using Data Encryption
Stratix II devices are the industry's first FPGAs with the ability to decrypt a configuration bitstream using the
Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) algorithm. When the design security feature is enabled, a Stratix II device
must be configured with a configuration file that was encrypted using the same 128-bit security key.
New Power Supply in Stratix II Devices
Stratix II devices also offer a new power supply, VCCPD, which must be connected to 3.3 V to power the 3.3 V/2.5-V
buffer available on the configuration input pins and JTAG pins. VCCPD applies to all the JTAG pins (TCK, TMS, TDI,
TDO, and TRST) and the following configuration pins: nCONFIG, DCLK (when used as an input), nIO_PULLUP
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Altera Corporation
Architectural Differences Between Stratix II and Stratix Devices
DATA[7..0], RUnLU, nCE, nCEO, nWS, nRS, CS, nCS, and CLKUSR. The VCCSEL pin allows the VCCIO setting
(of the banks where the configuration inputs reside) to be independent of the voltage required by the configuration
inputs.
Therefore, when selecting the VCCIO, the VIL and VIH levels driven to the configuration inputs do not have to be a
concern. The configuration input pins (nCONFIG, DCLK [when used as an input], nIO_PULLUP, DATA[7..0],
RUnLU, nCE, nWS, nRS, CS, nCS, and CLKUSR) have a dual buffer design: a 3.3-V/2.5-V input buffer and a
1.8-V/1.5-V input buffer. The VCCSEL input pin selects which input buffer is used. The 3.3-V/2.5-V input buffer is
powered by VCCPD, while the 1.8-V/1.5-V input buffer is powered by VCCIO.
Conclusion
FPGA performance reaches new heights with the Stratix II device family. Built on a new and innovative logic
structure, Stratix II devices are the industry's fastest and highest-density FPGAs. Extending the possibilities of FPGA
design, Stratix II devices allow designers to meet the high-performance requirements of today's advanced systems
without having to resort to developing costly ASICs. Based on award-winning Stratix device family architecture,
Stratix II devices are outfitted with a powerful set of system-level features and incorporate many significant
enhancements and new capabilities.
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http://www.altera.com
Copyright © 2005 Altera Corporation. All rights reserved. Altera, The Programmable Solutions Company, the stylized Altera logo, specific device
designations, and all other words and logos that are identified as trademarks and/or service marks are, unless noted otherwise, the trademarks and service
marks of Altera Corporation in the U.S. and other countries. All other product or service names are the property of their respective holders. Altera products
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semiconductor products to current specifications in accordance with Altera's standard warranty, but reserves the right to make changes to any products and
services at any time without notice. Altera assumes no responsibility or liability arising out of the application or use of any information, product, or service
described herein except as expressly agreed to in writing by Altera Corporation. Altera customers are advised to obtain the latest version of device
specifications before relying on any published information and before placing orders for products or services.
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