annrep12

annrep12
Research Institute Leiden Observatory
(Onderzoekinstituut Sterrewacht Leiden)
Annual Report
Sterrewacht Leiden
Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences
Leiden University
Niels Bohrweg 2
2333 CA Leiden
Postbus 9513
2300 RA Leiden
The Netherlands
http://www.strw.leidenuniv.nl
Cover:
During the past 10 years, characterization of exoplanet atmospheres has been
confined to transiting planets. Now, thanks to a particular observational technique
and to a novel data analysis designed by astronomers of Leiden Observatory, it is
possible to study the atmospheres of planets that do not transit, which represent
the majority of known exoplanets. The first of its kind now to be characterized is
τ Boötis b (artist impression on the cover). Due to the very high resolution of the
CRIRES spectrograph at the VLT, it was possible to detect molecular absorption
from CO at 2.3 micron in the dayside spectrum of this planet, and to measure the
Doppler shift due to its motion along the orbit. This yielded the planet mass and
the orbital inclination, which were unknown before. Recently, using this technique
also CO from 51 Pegasi b (the first planet discovered around a main-sequence
star), and HD 189733 b were successfully detected. Ultimately, using groundbased high-resolution spectroscopy on the next-generation of telescopes (such as
E-ELT) biomarkers may be detected in terrestrial planets orbiting M-dwarfs.
An electronic version of this annual report is available on the web at
http://www.strw.leidenuniv.nl/research/annualreport.php
Production Annual Report 2012:
A. van der Tang, E. Gerstel, A.S. Abdullah, K.M. Maaskant, J. Brinchmann, M.
Kazandjian, J. Lub, J. Katgert-Merkelijn, H.J.A. Röttgering
ii
STERREWACHT LEIDEN
Excecutive
(Directie Onderzoeksinstituut)
Director
H.J.A. Röttgering
Director of Studies
P.P. v.d.Werf
Institute Manager
E. Gerstel
Directeur
Opleidings Directeur
Supervisory Council
(Raad van advies)
Prof. Dr. Ir. J.A.M. Bleeker (Chair)
Dr. B. Baud
Drs. J.F. van Duyne
Prof. Dr. K. Gaemers
Prof. Dr. C. Waelkens
iii
Instituutsmanager
Contents
1 Review of major events
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2 Research
2.1 Proto-planetary disks and exo-planets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.1.1 A disintegrating, rocky planet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.1.2 The atmosphere of a non-transiting hot Jupiter . . . . . . .
2.1.3 The warm gas atmosphere of disks revealed by Herschel . .
2.1.4 A 30 AU radius CO gas hole in the transitional disk around
Oph IRS 48 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.1.5 First detection of near-infrared line emission from organics
in disks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.1.6 Deuterium enhancement in the disk around TW Hya . . . .
2.1.7 The kinematics of material around a massive young star . .
2.2 Protostars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2.1 Water in star-forming regions with Herschel (WISH) . . . .
2.2.2 Imaging warm water in deeply embedded protostars . . . .
2.2.3 The CO ladder in low-mass protostars . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2.4 Detection of the simplest sugar in a solar-type protostar
with ALMA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.2.5 Methanol masers as probes of high-mass star-formation . .
2.2.6 Small scale outflows in high mass star forming regions . . .
2.2.7 Fragmentation of protostellar clumps in Orion . . . . . . . .
2.3 Stars and compact objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.3.1 GAIA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.3.2 The variability of a nearby brown dwarf binary . . . . . . .
2.3.3 Stellar compact objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.3.4 Galactic Wolf-Rayet stars . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.3.5 The stars responsible for nebular He II emission . . . . . . .
2.4 Nearby galaxies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.4.1 Diagnostics for mechanical heating in star-burst environments
2.4.2 CO maps and the CO/FIR correlation in the SINGS galaxy
sample . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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2.4.3 Dense Gas in M33 (HerM33es) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.4.4 The kinematics of the nuclear regions of Andromeda . . . .
2.4.5 Nearby starburst galaxies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.4.6 Molecular gas in (Ultra)luminous infrared galaxies . . . . .
Distant galaxies and clusters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.5.1 Colliding massive clusters: probing particle acceleration in
Mpc-sized shocks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.5.2 First LOFAR observations at very low frequencies of clusterscale non-thermal emission: the case of Abell 2256 . . . . .
2.5.3 Characterising the hosts of nearby radio galaxies . . . . . .
2.5.4 The first large Hα+[O ii] double-blind study at z ∼ 1.5 . . .
2.5.5 The 11 Gyr evolution of star-forming galaxies from HiZELS
2.5.6 The Properties of the Star-Forming Interstellar Medium at
z=0.8-2.2 from HiZELS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.5.7 The clustering of Hα emitters at z = 2.23 . . . . . . . . . .
2.5.8 Clustering around high-redshift radio galaxies . . . . . . . .
2.5.9 High redshift submillimetre galaxies . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.5.10 Surveys for High-z Galaxies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.5.11 The star formation rate functions of the Universe in the
first 1–2 billion years . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.5.12 Gravitational weak lensing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Theoretical studies of galaxies and large scale structures . . . . . .
2.6.1 Simulating the formation of disc galaxies . . . . . . . . . . .
2.6.2 Simulating galactic outflows with thermal supernova feedback
2.6.3 Properties of gas in and around galaxy haloes . . . . . . . .
2.6.4 Neutral Hydrogen Optical Depth near Star-forming Galaxies
2.6.5 Cold accretion flows and the nature of high column density
H I absorption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.6.6 The filling factor of intergalactic metals . . . . . . . . . . .
2.6.7 Disentangling galaxy environment and host halo mass . . .
2.6.8 Rest-frame ultraviolet line emission from the intergalactic
medium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.6.9 The evolution of low-mass galaxies, an unsolved problem . .
Computational astrophysics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.7.1 AMUSE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The Raymond and Beverly Sackler Laboratory Astrophysics . . .
Instrumentation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.9.1 Improved APP coronographs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.9.2 ASSIST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.9.3 Allegro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
History of science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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CONTENTS
3 Eduction, popularization and social events
3.1 Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2 Degrees awarded in 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.1 Ph.D. degrees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.2 Master degrees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.2.3 Bachelor degrees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.3 Academic courses and pre-university programmes
3.3.1 Courses taught by Observatory staff . . . .
3.3.2 Pre-university programme . . . . . . . . . .
3.3.3 Contact.VWO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.4 Popularization and media contacts . . . . . . . .
3.5 Universe Awareness programme . . . . . . . . . .
3.6 Astronomy for Development . . . . . . . . . . . .
3.7 The Leidsch Astronomisch Dispuut F. Kaiser . . .
3.8 Vereniging van Oud-Sterrewachters . . . . . . . .
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I Observatory staff
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II Committee membership
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II.1 Observatory Committees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
II.2 University Committees (non-Observatory) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
III Science policy functions
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IV Workshops, colloquia and lectures
IV.1 Workshops . . . . . . . . . . . . .
IV.2 Endowed Lectures . . . . . . . . .
IV.3 Scientific Colloquia . . . . . . . .
IV.4 Student Colloquia . . . . . . . . .
IV.5 Colloquia given outside Leiden . .
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V Grants
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VI Observing time
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VII Scientific publications
VII.1 Ph.D. Theses . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
VII.2 Publications in refereed journals . . .
VII.3 Publications of non-refereed journals .
VII.4 Popular Articles . . . . . . . . . . . .
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Chapter
1
Review
of
major events
Chapter
Review
of
major events
1
It is my pleasure to report that 2012 was another excellent year for the observatory. The best proof of this is the many exciting scientific results produced by
our staff, postdocs, PhD and master students. We are particularly proud of the
excellent PhD theses that represent a significant fraction of the scientific work
which is being carried out at the observatory. This year, 9 graduate students can
be congratulated on the successful defence of their Ph.D. theses. The scientific
studies at the observatory encompass the entire history of the Universe, from local
exo-planets up to the most distant galaxies. In Chapter 2 of this annual report the
year’s highlights are presented in full. Although any limited and personal selection
will be biased, it is nevertheless gratifying to mention here a few very noteworthy
results.
Matteo Brogi, Ignas Snellen, Jayne Birkby and colleagues have shown that the
giant planet orbiting the star τ Boötis has an atmosphere. Using extremely high
spectral resolution spectroscopy they detected carbon monoxide - the greenhouse
gas that in our atmosphere has such a profound influence on the temperature at
the Earth’s surface. Analysis of the observed signal led to the unexpected and
surprising conclusion that the temperature in the atmosphere of this exo-planet
decreases towards higher altitudes.
The new Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) is now in operation, and the Allegro team, headed by Remo Tilanus and Michiel Hogerheijde,
is playing an important role in helping Dutch observers make efficient use of this
powerful facility. A highlight from the ‘van Dishoeck team’ was the ALMA observations of gas surrounding IRAS 16293-2422, a young Sun-like star. In the
1
Chapter 1. Review of major events
spectra they discovered the imprint of sugar molecules, showing that essential
building blocks of life can be formed around young stars.
Much progress has also been made in studying the distant Universe. Rychard
Bouwens, Ivo Labbé and Marijn Franx have led several projects to study the most
distant galaxies. The pinnacle was the discovery of the most distant object known,
with the - as astronomers sometimes jokingly say - telephone number MACS0647JD. This baby galaxy was observed when the Universe was only 3 per cent of its
present age of 13.7 billion years.
Concerning awards and prizes, 2012 was a truly exceptional year. In the Nieuwe
Kerk in The Hague, on Friday 7 September, Xander Tielens was awarded a Spinoza
prize, the highest scientific award in the Netherlands, in recognition of his pioneering research into polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in space. These PAHs
are conglomerates of hundreds of organic molecules, are found in many locations
in the near and far Universe, and are of paramount importance in shaping the
formation of planets, stars and galaxies. The Royal Netherlands Academy of Sciences (KNAW) awarded an Academy Professorship to Ewine van Dishoeck. The
KNAW Academy Professorship is intended as a lifetime achievement award for
researchers who have demonstrated that they are amongst the absolute top of
their scientific field. As a recognition of her scientific impact, Ewine was made
Leiden University’s first Faculty Professor. In this position she will be a visible
spokesperson for science in general in Leiden. On March 26, George Miley was
honoured with a knighthood in the Order of the Netherlands Lion (Ridder in de
Orde van de Nederlandse Leeuw). The honour was awarded by the Mayor of
Leiden, Henri Lenferink, on behalf of Queen Beatrix, in recognition of George’s
outstanding academic career and his efforts to use astronomy for global capacity
building.
Ignas Snellen has been very active in the emerging field of exo-planet research.
His NWO-VICI project “Atmospheres of extra-solar planets: bridging the gap
towards Earth-like planets” was granted. This will enable him to carry out a large
research project to detect many more transiting exo-planets and to characterise
their atmospheres. Two NWO-M grants were also awarded. Koen Kuijken’s grant
will make the KIDS survey possible - a survey of about 8 % of southern sky.
Making use of the weak lensing technique, the exceptional image quality of the
survey will enable accurate mapping of the distribution of the enigmatic dark
matter in the Universe. Paul van der Werf, in collaboration with Akira Endo
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Chapter 1. Review of major events
of the Technical University of Delft, received his grant to develop DESHIMA,
a revolutionary new sub-millimetre spectrograph. The heart of the instrument
is based on developments in nanotechnology that allow ultra-sensitive detectors
to be created. In addition, the ‘technologiestichting’ STW approved funding for
the transfer of astronomical technology to other sciences. Based on ideas first
realised with the Dutch Open Telescope (DOT), Christoph Keller and his team
will develop and build lightweight towers with a stable platform for astronomical,
meteorological and civil-engineering measurements. Finally, David Sobral was
awarded a VENI grant to study large samples of star forming galaxies to further
understand how these objects form and evolve.
An important and very pleasant endeavour all of us are involved in is bringing the
results of astronomy research to the attention of the general public. Many lectures
have been delivered at schools and at a range of public events. A good example
of our outreach activities was the extensive press coverage of the spectacular work
by the Hubble Space Telescope to obtain the deepest images of the extragalactic
sky. Vincent Icke presented these results on ‘De Wereld Draait Door’ daily show,
while Ivo Labbé appeared on the ‘Pauw en Witteman’ the daily news show. While
the originality and enthusiasm of Vincent’s presentation style are well known, Ivo’s
crystal clear performance on national television was a revelation. To quote a NOVA
press officer: “A new star is born”. Another highlight was the special on VPRO
television on ALMA, with Leiden astronomers Ewine van Dishoeck and Tim van
Kempen. Rumour has it that as a special tribute to Leiden it was broadcast on
October 3. A fascinating project that combines outreach, techniques developed
for astronomy and citizen science is ISPEX. ISPEX is a small device that is clicked
onto an iPhone and enables you to make measurements of the small particles in
the atmosphere. For this very innovative idea Frans Snik, Christoph Keller and
their team won the Academic Year prize, a nationwide contest to bring science to
the general public.
This year’s Oort lecture was given by Sandra Faber, professor at the University
of California. Her lively account of our present understanding of the evolution
of galaxies captivated the large audience. We were also very honoured by the
visit of Brian Schmidt, the 2011 Nobel Laureate for Physics. His well attended
Sackler lecture told the story of his surprising discovery that the expansion of the
Universe is accelerating. The old observatory continues to play an important role
in our outreach program. A particular highlight was its beautiful, and popular,
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Chapter 1. Review of major events
exhibition celebrating 50 years of ESO, which displayed many magnificent pictures
of the Universe taken with ESO telescopes.
In 2012 Jan Lub, Vincent Icke, Frank Israel and Walter Jaffe officially retired.
These sterrewachters have, over many years, played an important role in making
the observatory such a success story. Jan, Vincent, Frank and Walter will remain
active members of the observatory. We thank them all for their past, present and
future contributions.
Both Ignas Snellen and Paul van der Werf were promoted to full professor. As they
have made many scientific contributions and been very active in helping to run the
observatory, these promotions are well deserved. We were happy to welcome Niek
Doelman (TNO) as a new affiliate professor. Niek’s expertise in control loops
and adaptive optics will be extremely useful for many projects, including those
related to the E-ELT. In 2012 the move of Christoph Keller’s group from Utrecht
to the observatory was completed. Their knowledge of how to build complex and
innovative instrumentation will be a permanent boost to our ambition to play an
important role in this area.
Finally, for me personally 2012 was special. In August I had the privilege of
taking over the directorship from Koen Kuijken. There are three reasons why this
transition was relatively smooth. First, thanks to Koen’s excellent organisational
skills, combined with his personal touch, the institute was (and I hope still is...)
in good shape. During the transition period Koen gave me all the help I needed.
And even now - every time I enter Koen’s office he is staring at his fantastic
KIDS images with a big smile - he is always available for good advice. Second, we
have an excellent supporting staff. With enormous energy, Evelijn Gerstel does
a fantastic job in managing the institute and Erik Deul’s group does a great job
running all our computing infrastructure. I also greatly appreciate the help I get
from Jeanne in running my daily life in my new position. Third, the award of an
A-ERC grant will greatly help me to continue my scientific adventures. And it is
these adventures that are the ultimate raison d’être for our beautiful institute.
Huub Röttgering
Scientific Director.
4
Chapter
2
Research
Chapter
Research
2.1
2.1.1
2
Proto-planetary disks and exo-planets
A disintegrating, rocky planet
The star KIC 12557548 observed by the exoplanet-hunting Kepler satellite exhibits
a very strange behaviour: At very regular intervals of 15.7 hours, the light from
this star decreases by up to ∼ 1%. In contrast to normal exoplanet transits, the
transit depth is highly irregular. Early in 2012 a US-based group led by Saul
Rappaport qualitatively explained the observations in terms of a disintegrating,
rocky planet that has a trailing dust tail created and constantly replenished by
thermal surface erosion. The variability of the transit depth is then a consequence
of changes in the tail’s size.
Based on a discussion of the Rappaport et al. paper in the exoplanet journal club,
Sterrewacht members Brogi, Keller, de Juan Ovelar, Kenworthy and Snellen together with colleagues de Kok at SRON and Min at UvA quantitatively modelled
the observed, average transit light curve and were able to reproduce the observations down to minute details (Fig. 2.1). The brightening in flux just before the
beginning of the transit is explained by forward scattering, and an asymmetry
in the transit light curve shape is easily reproduced by an exponentially decaying
distribution of optically thin dust, with a typical grain size of 0.1 µm. This quantitative analysis supports the hypothesis that the transit signal is due to a variable
dust tail, most likely originating from a disintegrating object. KIC 12557548b.
This work opens the exciting possibility to directly study solid (and/or molten)
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Chapter 2. Research
Figure 2.1: A disintegrating, rocky planet.
material from the surface and/or inside of a rocky exoplanet. If this exoplanet has
been losing mass for a substantial amount of time, we may indeed see the very
core of an originally much larger planet.
2.1.2
The atmosphere of a non-transiting hot Jupiter
Brogi, Snellen, Birkby and colleagues were the first in the world to detected the
atmosphere of a non-transiting hot Jupiter. The giant planet orbiting τ Bootis was
among the first extrasolar planets to be discovered through the reflex motion of its
host star. It is one of the brightest known and most nearby planets with an orbital
period of just a few days. Over the course of more than a decade, measurements
of its orbital inclination have been announced and refuted, and have subsequently
remained elusive until now. The team detected carbon monoxide absorption in the
thermal day-side spectrum of τ Bootis b. At a spectral resolution of R ∼ 100, 000,
the change in the radial velocity of the planet was traced over a large range in
phase, revealing an orbital inclination of i = 44.5 ± 1.5 degrees and a true planet
mass of 5.95 ± 0.28MJupiter . This result extends atmospheric characterisation to
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Chapter 2. Research
non-transiting planets. The strong absorption signal points to an atmosphere
with a temperature that is decreasing towards higher altitudes. This is in stark
contrast to the temperature inversion invoked for other highly irradiated planets,
and supports models in which the absorbing compounds believed to cause such
atmospheric inversions are destroyed by the ultraviolet emission from the active
host star.
2.1.3
The warm gas atmosphere of disks revealed by Herschel
The surface layers of disks are heated by the UV radiation from the young star
resulting in high gas temperatures > 1000 K. However, this gas temperature structure has never been tested before. Herschel-PACS has detected high-J CO lines
in the atmospheres of protoplanetary disks for the first time, together with the
[C ii] and [O i] lines. Bruderer (MPE), in collaboration with van Dishoeck, Doty
(Denison) and Herczeg (KIAA), developed a new series of thermo-chemical models
coupled with radiative transfer to analyse these data. Given a density structure
of the disk, the model computes the temperature, excitation, and chemical abundance of species. The sensitivity to various disk parameters has been studied. A
model of the disk around the Herbig Be star HD 100546 is able to reproduce the
CO ladder only for a warm atmosphere with Tgas Tdust . The low-J lines of
CO, observable from the ground, are dominated by the outer disk with a radius
of several 100 AU, while the high-J CO observable with Herschel-PACS are dominated from regions within some tens of AU. When combined with ground-based
APEX-CHAMP+ data on [C textsci], all principal forms of carbon can be studied.
The data indicate a low abundance of volatile carbon in the disk, perhaps due to
transformation of solid CO into more complex species in the embedded phase.
2.1.4
A 30 AU radius CO gas hole in the transitional disk
around Oph IRS 48
The physical processes leading to the disappearance of disks around young stars
are not well understood. A subclass of transitional disks with large inner dust
holes provides a crucial laboratory for studying disk dissipation processes. Brown
(Harvard/MPE), Pontoppidan (StScI), van Dishoeck and co-workers studied the
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Chapter 2. Research
A0 star Oph-IRS 48, which has a 30 AU radius hole previously measured from
dust continuum imaging at 18.7µm. VLT-CRIRES high-resolution (R ∼ 100, 000)
spectra of the CO rovibrational bands at 4.7µm peak off-source at 30 AU. The gas
is thermally excited to a rotational temperature of 260 K and is also strongly UV
pumped, showing a vibrational excitation temperature of ∼ 5000K. The kinematics
and excitation of the gas indicate that the CO emission arises from the dust hole
wall. Surprisingly, PAH molecules appear to be located inside this hole.
2.1.5
First detection of near-infrared line emission from
organics in disks
Bast, in collaboration with Mandell (Goddard), van Dishoeck and others, obtained
high-resolution VLT-CRIRES spectroscopy of bright T Tauri stars to reveal the
first detections of simple organic molecules, HCN and C2 H2 , at near-infrared wavelengths. Advanced data reduction techniques developed by Mandell were needed
to achieve a dynamic range of ∼ 500 at 3µm. Stringent upper limits were also
obtained for two other molecules thought to be abundant in the inner disk, CH4
and NH3 . The line profiles suggest that the emission has both a Keplerian and
non-Keplerian component arising from < 1AU, as observed previously for CO
emission. LTE slab models and disk radiative transfer models are used to determine abundance ratios and compared with disk chemical models.
2.1.6
Deuterium enhancement in the disk around TW Hya
Hogerheijde’s research focuses on protoplanetary disks aroud Solar-type stars as
well as disks that surround their higher mass counterparts. Together with scientists from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics and the University of
Virginia, Hogerheijde presented evidence for multiple pathways for deuterium enhancement inside the disk around TW Hya. Understanding how the disk material
can become enriched in deuterium is important accurately reading the cometary
record of the Solar System’s formation. This publication is the second paper ever
that appeared in the refereed literature using data from the newly commissioned
Atacama Large Millimeter / submillimeter Array (ALMA).
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2.1.7
The kinematics of material around a massive young
star
PhD student Wang, together with Hogerheijde and van der Tak (Groningen) published a detailed analysis of the kinematics of the material around the massive
young star AFGL 2591. Unlike the disks around low-mass stars which show wellbehaved Keplerian rotation, the motions in this disk fall well below what is needed
to orbit the star, suggesting that magnetic fields may play an important role in
the dynamics. At the same time, some tracers show outward motions, suggesting
that the upper layers of the disk are eroded by the stellar radiation and wind.
Extending this research to another region of massive star formation, W3 IRS5,
Wang et al. find a very different mode of star formation, one where a small cluster
of objects is forming and where just two massive stars are in the process of dispersing the entire cloud core. Other objects embedded in this core are destined to
have their growth stunted and remain low-mass stars. Together, these two studies
illustrate the complex ways in which massive star formation proceeds, and the
many physical processes that affect the distribution of stellar masses that result.
2.2
2.2.1
Protostars
Water in star-forming regions with Herschel (WISH)
WISH is a Herschel-HIFI guaranteed time program designed to probe the physical
and chemical structures of young stellar objects using water and related molecules
and to follow the water abundance from collapsing clouds to planet-forming disks
(PI: van Dishoeck). It involves a collaboration between 70 scientists in Europe,
USA and Canada and includes Kristensen, Mottram, Yildiz, San Jose Garcia and
Harsono in Leiden and Karska and Bruderer at MPE. In 2012 a total of 12 WISH
papers were published.
A 2012 highlight was the first detection of water vapor in a core just prior to
collapse, led by Caselli (Leeds). Pre-stellar cores provide the original reservoir of
material from which future planetary systems are built, but few observational constraints exist on the formation of water and its partitioning between gas and ice in
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the densest cores. Thanks to the high sensitivity of HIFI, the first detection of water vapour has been obtained toward a dense cloud on the verge of star formation,
L1544. The high-resolution line shows an inverse P-Cygni profile, characteristic
of gravitational contraction. To reproduce the observations, water vapour has to
be present in the cold and dense central few thousand AU of L1544, where most
species are expected to freeze-out onto dust grains. The observed amount of water
vapour within the core can be maintained by far-UV photons locally produced by
the impact of galactic cosmic rays with H2 molecules. Such FUV photons irradiate the icy mantles, liberating water vapour in the core centre in a process that
has been quantified through experiments in the Sackler laboratory and through
molecular dynamics models by Arasa, with Kroes (LIC) and van Dishoeck.
Karska (MPE/Leiden), in collaboration with van Dishoeck, Kristensen, Herczeg
(KIAA) and others finished her far-infrared Herschel-PACS spectral survey of 18
low-mass protostars. Water is detected in all objects, including the high-excitation
63.3µm line in 7 sources, and has a typical excitation temperature of ∼ 150K. CO
transitions from J=14–13 up to 49–48 show two distinct temperature components
on Boltzmann diagrams with rotational temperatures of ∼ 350K and ∼ 700K.
Emission from both Class 0 and I sources is usually spatially extended along the
outflow direction but with a pattern depending on the species and the transition.
The H2 O line fluxes correlate strongly with those of the high-J CO lines, as well
as with the bolometric luminosity and envelope mass. They correlate less strongly
with OH and not with [O i] fluxes, suggesting two different physical components.
The H2 O and CO emission likely arises in non-dissociative (irradiated) shocks
along the outflow walls with a range of pre-shock densities, whereas [O i] and
some of the OH emission probe dissociative shocks in the inner envelope. The
total far-infrared cooling is dominated by H2 O and CO, with [O i] increasing with
protostellar evolution.
2.2.2
Imaging warm water in deeply embedded protostars
Water is present during all stages of star formation: as ice in the cold outer parts of
protostellar envelopes and dense inner regions of circumstellar disks, and as gas in
the envelopes close to the protostars, in the upper layers of circumstellar disks and
in regions of powerful outflows and shocks. As a complement to WISH, Persson
and Jørgensen (Copenhagen), in collaboration with van Dishoeck, have used the
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IRAM PdB interferometer to image the warm gas-phase water abundance in the
innermost hundred AU of three deeply embedded low-mass protostars The paraH2 18 O line at 203 GHz (Eu = 203.7K) is one of the few water lines that can be
observed from the ground. Compact H2 18 O emission is detected toward all three
sources. A scenario is presented in which the origin of the emission from warm
water is in a flattened disk-like structure dominated by inward motions rather
than rotation. The gas-phase water abundance varies between the sources, but is
generally much lower than a canonical abundance of 10−4 , suggesting that most
water (> 96%) is frozen out on dust grains at these scales.
2.2.3
The CO ladder in low-mass protostars
Young stars interact vigorously with their surroundings, as is evident from the
highly rotationally excited CO (up to Eu = 6000K) seen by Herschel in even
low-luminosity embedded protostars. The detection of CO lines up to J=49–48
opens up an entirely new window on using this molecule as a probe of the physical
structure. A spectacular example is provided by the PACS 55–200µm spectral
scan of NGC 1333 IRAS4B, analysed by Herczeg (MPE/KIAA), in collaboration
with Karska, van Dishoeck, Bruderer (MPE) and others from the WISH team (see
Fig. 2.2). Another highlight is the first complete PACS + SPIRE spectrum from
55–670µm of a low-mass protostar, Serpens SMM1, obtained by Goicoechea, Cernicharo (both Madrid) and WISH co-workers. Multi-component radiative transfer
models allow to quantify the contribution of the different temperature components suggested by the CO rotational ladder (Thot ∼ 800K, Twarm ∼ 300K and
Tcool ∼ 150K). High gas densities (> 5 × 106 cm−3 ) are found for the warm and
hot components. H2 O/CO is close to unity in the warm/hot gas, but much lower
in the colder gas. Fast dissociative J-shocks (> 60 km/s) as well as lower velocity
non-dissociative shocks (< 20 km/s) are needed to explain both the atomic fine
structure lines and the hot CO and H2 O lines. Observations also show the signature of UV radiation and thus, most observed species likely arise in UV-irradiated
shocks. The lower energy CO lines are associated with the cool entrained outflow
gas, also probed by HIFI by Yildiz and collaborators.
Visser (Michigan), in collaboration with Kristensen, Harsono, Bruderer, van Dishoeck
and others constructed a model that reproduces these observations quantitatively.
The model consists of a spherical envelope with a power-law density structure
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Figure 2.2: Left: The Herschel/PACS and Spitzer-IRS continuum-subtracted
spectra of the low-mass protostar NGC 1333 IRAS 4B, with bright emission
in many H2 O, CO, OH and atomic or ionised lines indicated. The inset shows
the combined spectrum including the continuum. Right: CO rotational ladder
showing the warm and hot CO components (Herczeg et al. 2012).
and a bipolar outflow cavity. Three heating mechanisms are considered: passive
heating by the protostellar luminosity, ultraviolet irradiation of the outflow cavity
walls, and small-scale C-type shocks along the cavity walls. Most of the model
parameters are constrained from independent observations; the two remaining free
parameters are the protostellar UV luminosity and the shock velocity. Line fluxes
are calculated for CO and H2 O and compared to Herschel data and complementary
ground-based data. The bulk of the gas in the envelope, heated by the protostellar
luminosity, accounts for 3–10% of the CO luminosity summed over all rotational
lines, and is best probed by the low-J lines. The UV-heated gas and the C-type
shocks, probed by CO 10–9 and higher-J lines, contribute 20–80% each. The model
fits show a tentative evolutionary trend: the CO emission is dominated by shocks
in the youngest source and by UV-heated gas in the oldest one. The total H2 O
line luminosity in all cases is dominated by shocks (> 99%).
2.2.4
Detection of the simplest sugar in a solar-type protostar with ALMA
Glycolaldehyde (HOCH2 COH) is the simplest sugar and an important intermediate in the path toward forming more complex biologically relevant molecules.
Using ALMA science verification data, Jørgensen (Copenhagen) and collaborators including van Dishoeck, obtained the first detection of this molecule around
a solar-type young star, the protostellar binary IRAS 16293-2422 (Fig. 2.3). The
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Figure 2.3: ALMA spectra toward both components of the IRAS 162932422 protostellar binary showing the detection of glycolaldehyde. Fits from
LTE models of the methyl formate and glycolaldehyde emission are overplotted.
Note the much narrower lines toward source B and the inverse P-Cygni profiles
showing red-shifted absorption indicating infall (Jørgensen et al. 2012).
glycolaldehyde lines have their origin in warm (200–300K) gas close to the individual components of the binary. Glycolaldehyde co-exists with its isomer, methyl
formate (HCOOCH3 ), which is a factor 10–15 more abundant toward the two
sources. In the 690 GHz data obtained with the Dutch-built Band 9, all transitions show redshifted absorption profiles toward one component in the binary
indicative of infall. The abundance ratios are consistent with laboratory experiments of the photochemistry of methanol-containing ices carried out in the Sackler
laboratory. The order of magnitude increase in line density in these early ALMA
data illustrates its huge potential to reveal the full chemical complexity associated
with the formation of solar system analogs.
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2.2.5
Methanol masers as probes of high-mass star-formation
Van Langevelde worked on measuring the outflows in methanol maser sources
in collaboration with Bartkiewicz (Torun, Pl). Water masers observed with the
European VLBI Network (EVN) seem to trace outflow structures perpendicular
to the methanol structures. Similar findings obtained on thermal methanol were
used to prepare for ALMA observations. Additionally, together with Vlemmings
(Onsala) and Surcis (JIVE), progress has been made in observing a statistically
significant sample of sources with outflows and detected magnetic fields through
the Zeeman splitting of methanol masers. Possibilities were explored to make
laboratory measurements of the methanol Lande factors, necessary for interpreting
the Zeeman splitting measurements quantitatively.
Following up on parallax measurements of star-forming regions in Cygnus, Van
Langevelde joined the Bessel programme that aims to measure the kinematics of
the Galactic spiral structure, by methanol maser parallax observations. Preparations were made to start a large-scale programme on the Very Long Baseline
Array (VLBA). In addition some effort was made to explore measuring the inner
Galaxy masers with Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) telescopes under
construction in Africa.
2.2.6
Small scale outflows in high mass star forming regions
High mass star formation is not nearly as well understood as the formation processes involved in forming stars like the sun. A lot of progress has been made recently through direct comparisons between observations and simulations. Recently
Peters (ITA Heidelberg), Klaassen and collaborators created simulated ALMA
observations from 3D models of high mass star forming regions which included
ionization feedback from the forming high mass stars. These models made specific predictions about small scale outflows which should be seen in these regions.
These ionisation driven outflows occur on very small scales, and have a different
powering source to the large scale outflows generally seen in star forming regions
of all masses. This type of outflow, as predicted by models, was also seen in the
high mass star forming region K3-50A.
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K3-50A is a very large high mass star forming region with no evidence for a large
scale molecular outflow. However, high resolution CARMA observations reveal
a small scale velocity gradient in the molecular gas. This velocity gradient is
along the same direction as that of the ionised gas which appears to be in a large
scale ionised outflow. These new observations suggest that the ionised outflow is
entraining a small scale molecular one, as predicted by models.
2.2.7
Fragmentation of protostellar clumps in Orion
In 2012, a group led by van Kempen investigated the fragmentation of protostellar clumps NGC 2071 and L1641 in Orion, using submillimeter interferometry and
Spitzer photometry. They found that fragmentation is strongly constrained. The
comparison of two seemingly very similar sources on large scales and in the infrared, showed wildly different results at the small scales. The first clump, L1641,
was forming a single, heavier protostar while the other, NGC 2071 with the same
circumstellar mass as L1641, was forming a cluster of low-mass protostars. Such
diversity has large implications for the evolution of very young stars, in particular
the energetics.
2.3
2.3.1
Stars and compact objects
GAIA
The Gaia group in Leiden, led by Brown, is involved in the preparations for the
data processing for ESA’s Gaia mission. Scheduled for launch in 2013, Gaia aims
at providing a stereoscopic census of the Milky Way by measuring highly accurate
astrometry (positions, parallaxes and proper motions), photometry and radial velocities for 1 billion stars and other objects to 20th magnitude. The main activities
in 2012 were:
1) Brown and Busso continued their work on the development of the data processing software for the photometric instrument of Gaia in collaboration with groups
in Rome, Teramo, Cambridge, and Barcelona. The photometric data for Gaia will
be collected through low dispersion spectrophotometry with prisms and the group
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in Leiden is responsible for developing the algorithms that extract the spectra from
the raw data.
2) Busso and Brown participated in an operations rehearsal for the Gaia mission.
In this rehearsal the Gaia commissioning phase was simulated and Busso and
Brown took part as so-called ‘payload experts’, examining the processed telemetry
and passing judgement on the Gaia photometric instrument health.
3) In order for Gaia to reach its astrometric accuracy goals the highest quality
for the attitude knowledge of the spacecraft is needed. It is thus important to
incorporate a complete physical understanding of the dynamics of a continuously
rotating space platform into the attitude modelling for Gaia. In this context
Risquez developed detailed simulations of Gaia’s attitude, incorporating all of the
relevant physical effects. This model was developed in collaboration with van
Leeuwen (Cambridge) and Keil (Bremen). Risquez closed off his work on the
Gaia attitude model with a paper describing an analysis of the capabilities and
limitations of the Gaia attitude reconstruction, focusing on the effects on the
astrometry of bright (V . 11) stars and the implications of employing cubic Bsplines in the modelling of the attitude measurements. From this work the final
noise in the attitude reconstruction for Gaia is estimated to be ≈ 20 µas, and
the main source of noise will be the Micro-Propulsion System. However its effect
on the astrometric performance will be limited, adding up to 7 µas RMS to the
parallax uncertainties. This is larger than the 4 µas from previous estimations
and would affect the performance for the brightest (V . 11) stars.
2.3.2
The variability of a nearby brown dwarf binary
Matthew Kenworthy concluded a study on the infra-red variability of one of the
nearest brown dwarf binaries, Gliese 569B. Understanding this system is challenging, and even the number of stars in the system is still being debated. Periodic
variations in the brightness of the binary system imply rapid rotation rates for
these stars, and further observations will confirm the inclinations of the stars with
respect to each other.
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2.3.3
Stellar compact objects
Stellar compact objects — such as white dwarfs and neutron stars — can generate
the strongest gravitational field we know of. For this reason conditions are extreme
in the vicinity of these objects, leading to a variety of highly energetic phenomena,
such as X-ray and gamma-ray radiation, high frequency oscillation, fast winds
and relativistic jets. These objects, however, are extremely interesting in their
own right: matter can be degenerate and relativistic, densities can be higher than
nuclear, and magnetic fields can be far greater than we can generate on Earth.
Since we cannot reproduce such conditions in laboratories, our knowledge of the
behaviour of matter in these extreme situations is still approximate, calling for
further combined observational and theoretical efforts.
Dr. E. M. Rossi with collaborator Dr. S. Dall’Osso (HUJI, Jerusalem) has been
investigating the reaction of the compact stellar interior to the extreme gravitational tidal interaction, arising when compact objects are in binaries. The first
paper in a series on the topic focused on double neutron stars. These systems will
be the main target of near future gravitational wave detectors.
As we observe in the moon-earth system, tidal interactions in binaries can lead to
angular momentum exchange. The presence of viscosity is generally regarded as
the condition for such transfer to happen, however, neutron stars are considered
almost inviscid bodies. Dr. Rossi and collaborator show that there is a dynamical
mechanism that can cause a persistent torque between the binary components,
even for inviscid bodies. This preferentially occurs at the final stage of the coalescence, when the orbit shrinks by gravitational waves on a timescale shorter
than the viscous timescale. They find that the total orbital energy transferred to
the secondary is quite remarkable: a few 0.001 of its binding energy. Furthermore
they show that this persistent torque induces a differential rotation within the
star, which is a highly excited energy state. The free energy associated with this
non-equilibrium state can be around 1047 erg just prior to coalescence.
The next step is to investigate the fate of this substantial accumulated energy.
One possibility is that fluid instabilities would lead to a burst of gravitational
waves. Alternatively, a preexisting magnetic field could be substantially amplified,
recycling and old neutron star into a highly magnetic one, known as magnetar. A
magnetar-like luminous flare prior to coalescence would be the expected signature.
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2.3.4
Galactic Wolf-Rayet stars
Wolf-Rayet stars are very hot massive stars with a large mass loss, close to the
end of their lifetime. They are enshrouded in dense and extended envelopes, and
show an emission spectrum, with sub-class WC stars showing amongst others very
prominent emission lines of carbon. Van Genderen, Veijgen and van der Hucht
(SRON, Utrecht) analyzed archival multi-colour photometric (Walraven VBLUW,
Strömgren uvby, and Bessel UBV) data of the variable WC9-type Wolf-Rayet star
WR 103 = HD 164270, observed over a time interval of eleven years.
WR 103 turned out to be stochastically variable (continuum light and emission
lines). Its continuum variability is exceptional, as the continuum radiation of
other WC9 stars is almost photometrically stable. In this respect WR 103 resembles WN8-type stars. The time scale of the light and colour variations hovers
between a few hours to a few days, with light amplitudes of ∼ 0.1 magnitude in
the visual, to 0.2 magnitude in the ultraviolet. Stellar (multi-mode) pulsations are
likely the cause. Models of hot massive stars, like Wolf-Rayet stars, offer a possible source of instability: a sub-photospheric convection zone. Their pulsations
propagate through many layers of wind with decreasing density. Hence, possible
periodic variations are altered rapidly by the wind, and before they reach the region where the continuum light is emitted, they become stochastic. And, of course
this stochastic nature remains up to larger radii in the wind, where the emission
lines are formed.
It is shown that, to a certain extent, the accurate photometry, is able to differentiate between continuum and emission line variations and to quantify them. As a
result, we discovered a flux-enhancement lasting for three days of the C iii emission
lines by at least 10%. Such strong spectroscopic flare-like events are very seldom
observed in Wolf-Rayet stars. So far the one of WR 103 has the longest duration
ever observed.
2.3.5
The stars responsible for nebular He II emission
PhD student Shirazi and Brinchmann searched the Sloan Digital Sky Survey
(SDSS) database of galaxy spectra to assemble the largest sample of galaxies with
nebular He iiλ4686 emission. This recombination line can only form when there
is a source of radiation with significant output at energies in excess of 54.4 eV.
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Current models for massive star evolution predict that only Wolf-Rayet stars are
sufficiently hot to emit this radiation so the characteristic signatures of these stars
ought to be detected at the same time as nebular He ii is seen.
What Shiraz & Brinchmann found in galaxies with metal content about half that
of the sun was indeed that Wolf-Rayet signatures always were seen when nebular
He ii was seen. However at lower metallicities, fewer and fewer galaxies showed
Wolf-Rayet signatures together with the He ii emission lines. They also showed
that in low metallicity galaxies the He ii emission line was much weaker than
predicted in models of single star evolution.
The latter problem can likely be solved by including the effect of binarity and/or
rotation in the calculation of stellar evolution. These two processes allow more
abundant lower mass stars to evolve to the Wolf-Rayet state and thus more energetic ionising would be produced.
But the former problem — the lack of Wolf-Rayet stars in low metallicity galaxies
with nebular He ii emission — is harder to resolve. It is also in conflict with the
proposed solution of the first problem. At the moment no satisfactory solution
can be given and work continues on understanding this discrepancy.
2.4
2.4.1
Nearby galaxies
Diagnostics for mechanical heating in star-burst environments
Observations of the CO molecule in various transitions in the central regions of
other galaxies have revealed that much of the dense gas surrounding the nuclei of
these galaxies has a high kinetic temperature, of the order of 100 K or more. Such
high temperatures over large volumes are hard to explain invoking only excitation
by UV photons. Instead they may be caused by the dissipation of turbulent energy
fuels by shocks in the central volume.
Kazandjian, Meijerink, Pelupessy, Israel, and Spaans (Groningen, NL) are involved
in a program to study this process quantitatively and numerically. As a first step,
they determined whether, and to what extent, mechanical heating should be taken
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into account in the frequently-used photon-dominated region (PDR) models, and
explored the effect of dissipated turbulence on the thermal and chemical properties
of PDRs. To this end, they modelled clouds as one-dimensional semi-infinite slabs,
and solved the thermal and chemical equilibrium using the Leiden PDR-XDR code.
They found that in a steady-state treatment, mechanical heating plays a major
role in determining the kinetic temperature of the gas in molecular clouds. In
particular in high-energy environments such as found in star-burst galaxies and
galaxy centres, model gas temperatures are underestimated by at least a factor of
two if mechanical heating is ignored. The models constructed by Kazandjian and
colleagues show that the implied column densities of CO, HCN and H2 O increase
as a function of mechanical heating. In high-density regions (typically 105 cm−3 )
the integrated HNC/HCN column density ratio decreases by a factor of at least
two, and the similar HCN/HCO+ ratio has a strong dependence on mechanical
heating with boosts of up to three orders of magnitude.
Kazandjian et al. concluded that the effects of mechanical heating cannot be ignored in studies of the molecular gas excitation above a threshold that is easily
reached in galaxy centers, and even in star-forming disks. If in such environments
mechanical heating effects are ignored, derived gas column densities may be underestimated by as much as a few orders of magnitude. They established that
mechanical heating already has non-negligible effects when it is as low as one per
cent of the UV heating in a PDR. In a follow-up study, these results are pursued
to yield quantitative diagnostic line ratios.
2.4.2
CO maps and the CO/FIR correlation in the SINGS
galaxy sample
As part of the JCMT Nearby Galaxies Legacy Survey (NGLS), Wilson, Warren
(both McMaster Univ., Canada), Israel, and a large numbers of international
collaborators mapped an HI-selected sample of 155 galaxies in the J=3–2 line of CO
with the HARP instrument on the James Clerk Clerk Maxwell Telescope in Hawaii.
The galaxies spanned all morphological types, and were limited to distances less
than 25 mega-parsec. They presented an atlas and analysis of the CO J=3–2 maps
for the 47 galaxies in the NGLS that are also part of the Spitzer Infrared Nearby
Galaxies Survey (SINGS). The team found a wide range of molecular gas mass
fractions in the galaxies in this sub-sample. They explored the correlation of the
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far-infrared luminosity, which traces star formation, with the CO luminosity, which
traces the molecular gas mass. In a comparison of the NGLS sample with merging
galaxies at low and high red-shift which had also been observed in the CO J=3–2
line, they showed that the correlation of far-infrared and CO luminosity exhibits
a significant trend with luminosity. This trend is consistent with a molecular gas
depletion time which is more than an order of magnitude shorter in the merger
galaxies than in nearby normal galaxies. They also noted a strong correlation of
the far-infrared to CO(3–2) luminosity ratio with the atomic to molecular gas mass
ratio. This correlation suggests that some of the far-infrared emission originates
from dust associated with atomic gas and that its contribution is particularly
important in galaxies where most of the gas is in the atomic phase.
2.4.3
Dense Gas in M33 (HerM33es)
In an attempt to better understand the emission of molecular tracers of the diffuse and dense gas in giant molecular clouds, and the influence that environmental
factors (metallicity, optical extinction, spatial density, far-UV field intensity, and
star-formation rate) have on these tracers, Buchbender, Kramer, Gonzalez-Garcia
(all IRAM-Granada, Spain), Israel, and several other members of the HerM33es
team, observed the Local Group galaxy M33 with the IRAM 30m telescope. They
detected molecular line emission from HCN, HCO+ , 12 CO, and 13 CO in six giant molecular clouds (GMCs) along the major axis of M33 at a linear resolution
of about 115 pc, and out to a radial distance of 3.5 kpc. Optical, far-infrared,
and sub-millimeter data from Herschel and other observatories complement these
observations. To interpret the observed molecular line emission, Buchbender and
co-workers created two grids of models of photon-dominated regions (PDRs), at
solar sub-solar metallicities. The observed HCO+ /HCN line ratios were found to
be quite high, ranging from 1.1 to 2.5. Similarly high ratios have been observed in
the Large Magellanic Cloud. The HCN/CO ratio varies between 0.4% and 2.9%
in the disk of M33. The 12 CO/13 CO line ratio varies between 9 and 15 similar to
variations found in the diffuse gas and the centres of GMCs of the Milky Way. By
stacking all spectra, the team also detected very weak HNC and C2 H emission.
The resulting HCO+ /HNC and HCN/HNC ratios of 8 and 6, respectively, lie at
the high end of ratios observed in a large set of (ultra-)luminous infrared galaxies.
HCN abundances are lower in the sub-solar metallicity PDR models, while HCO+
abundances are enhanced. For HCN this effect is more pronounced at low optical
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Figure 2.4: Kinematics of of the nucleus of Andromeda’s nucleus is demonstrated: The left panel shows the rotation curve and the right panel the line
of sight velocity dispersion. The solid (dotted) curves are the kinematics with
(without) counter-rotation. The super-massive black-hole is at the origin. The
main impact of counter-rotation is the improved asymmetry of the line of sight
velocity dispersion curve. All other models, dashed dotted being the best of
those, fail to reproduce the asymmetry in the line of sight velocity dispersion.
extinctions. The observed HCO+ /HCN and HCN/CO line ratios are naturally explained by sub-solar PDR models having relatively low optical extinctions between
4 and 10 mag, and moderately high densities between 3000 and 30 000 cm−3 . The
FUV field strength only has a small effect on the modeled line ratios. However,
it was also found that the line ratios are almost equally well reproduced by the
solar-metallicity models, which indicates that variations in metallicity only play a
minor role in influencing these particular line ratios.
2.4.4
The kinematics of the nuclear regions of Andromeda
Kazandjian with Touma (American University of Beirut) have studied the motions
of stars around the super-massive black hole in the nucleus of the Andromeda
galaxy. Super-massive black holes lurk in the centres of galaxies. They dominate
and structure dynamics in their sphere of influence — a sphere in which asymmetric
stellar dynamical features can at once be excited and safely sheltered. Such, in
particular, is the case of the double-peaked lopsided nucleus of the Andromeda
galaxy, with a fainter peak lying close to Andromeda’s central black hole, and a
brighter peak off-centre from it. It is strongly believed that Andromeda’s lopsided
nucleus signals a disk of stars revolving on eccentric Keplerian orbits with nearly
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aligned apsides. A self-consistent stellar dynamical origin for this apparently longlived alignment has so far been lacking, with indications that cluster self-gravity
is capable of sustaining such lopsided configurations if and when stimulated by
external perturbations.
Kazandjian and Touma showed that unstable counter-rotating nuclear stellar clusters saturate into uniformly precessing, thick, eccentric disks of apo-apse aligned
stars. These disks are the first self-organised examples of three dimensional lopsided, slowly precessing, stellar disks around super-massive black holes. They are
in close qualitative agreement with Keplerian disk models of Andromeda’s double
nucleus, and can readily reproduce salient observed features of Andromeda’s lopsided, double nucleus (see Fig. 2.4). Given on one hand the strong likelihood of
counter-rotating (CR hereafter) excitations in galactic centres, and on the other
the robustness and efficiency of the proposed mechanism, we suggest that lopsided
stellar disks are natural features of stellar clusters dominated by super-massive
black holes. More generally, the proposed mechanism can be deployed to customise triaxial equilibrium configurations with which to model observed kinematics of stellar black hole nuclei (the Milky Way’s included), to improve estimates of
the mass of the black hole within, and to address fundamental questions regarding
the statistical mechanics of self-gravitating systems around super-massive black
holes.
2.4.5
Nearby starburst galaxies
Van der Werf worked with Rosenberg and Israel to derive a quantitative relation
between the [FeII] 1.26 micron emission and the supernova rate in nearby starburst
galaxies. This was done using a pixel-pixel analysis of SINFONI data cubes.
Using Brγ equivalent width and luminosity as the only observational inputs into a
Starburst99 model, supernova rate at each pixel and thus maps of supernova rates
were derived. These were then compared morphologically and quantitatively to the
[FeII] 1.26 luminosity, revealing a strong linear and morphological correlation exists
between supernova rate and [FeII] 1.26 on a pixel-to-pixel basis. This relation is
valid for normal star-forming galaxies but breaks down for extreme ultraluminous
galaxies. The supernova rates derived are in good agreement with the radio derived
supernova rates, which underlines the strength of using [FeII] emission as a tracer
of supernova rate.
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2.4.6
Molecular gas in (Ultra)luminous infrared galaxies
Van der Werf completed with Papadopoulos (MPIfR, Bonn) his extensive analysis
of multi-line observations of the molecular gas in local (ultra)luminous infrared
galaxies. Simple comparisons of their available CO spectral line ladders show
a surprisingly wide range of average interstellar medium (ISM) conditions, with
most of the surprises found in the high-excitation regime. These take the form of
global CO ladders dominated by a very warm (Tkin > 100 K) and dense (n > 104
cm−3 ) gas phase, involving galaxy-sized (few 109 M ) gas mass reservoirs under
conditions that are typically found only for ∼1-3% of mass per typical SF molecular cloud in the Galaxy. Strong supersonic turbulence and high cosmic ray energy
densities rather than far-ultraviolet/optical photons or supernova remnant induced
shocks from individual star formation sites can globally warm the large amounts of
dense gas found in these merger-driven starbursts and easily power their extraordinary CO line excitation. This exciting possibility can now be systematically
investigated with Herschel and the Atacama Large Milimeter Array (ALMA). As
expected for an IR-selected (and thus SF rate selected) galaxy sample, only few
cold CO ladders are found, and for fewer still a cold low/moderate-density and
gravitationally bound state (i.e. Galactic type) emerges as the most likely one.
The rest remain compatible with a warm and gravitationally unbound low-density
phase often found in ULIRGs.
The total molecular gas masses were estimated via the explicitly calculated X(CO)
= M(H2)/L(CO) factors. One-phase radiative transfer models of the global CO
spectral line ladders yield an X(CO) distribution with X(CO)∼(0.6 ± 0.2) M
(K km s−1 pc2 )−1 over a significant range of average gas densities, temperatures,
and dynamic states. The latter emerges as the most important parameter in
determining X(CO), with unbound states yielding low values and self-gravitating
states yielding the highest ones. Nevertheless, in many (U)LIRGs where available
higher-J CO lines (J = 3-2, 4-3, and/or J = 6-5) or HCN line data from the
literature allow a separate assessment of the gas mass at high densities (≥104
cm−3) rather than a simple one-phase analysis, we find that near-Galactic X(CO)
values become possible. In the highly turbulent molecular gas in ULIRGs, a highdensity component will be common and can be massive enough for its high X(CO)
to dominate the average value for the entire galaxy. Using solely low-J CO lines
to constrain X(CO) in such environments (as has been the practice up until now)
may have thus resulted in systematic underestimates of molecular gas mass in
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ULIRGs, as such lines are dominated by a warm, diffuse, and unbound gas phase
with low X(CO) but very little mass. Only well-sampled high-J CO SLEDs (J =
3-2 and higher) and/or multi-J observations of heavy rotor molecules (e.g., HCN)
can circumvent such a bias, and the latter type of observations may have actually
provided early evidence of it in local ULIRGs. The only way that the global X(CO)
of such systems could be significantly lower than Galactic is if the average dynamic
state of the dense gas is strongly gravitationally unbound. This is an unlikely
possibility that must nevertheless be examined, with lines of rare isotopologues of
high gas density tracers being very valuable in yielding (along with the lines of the
main isotopes) such constraints. For less IR-luminous, disk-dominated systems,
the galaxy-averaged X(CO) deduced by one-phase models of global SLEDs can
also underestimate the total molecular gas mass when much of it lies in an starformation-quiescent phase extending beyond a central star-forming region. This
is because such a phase (and its large X(CO)) remains inconspicuous in global
CO SLEDs. Finally, detailed studies of a subsample of galaxies find ULIRGs with
large amounts (∼109 M ) of very warm (≥100 K) and dense gas (>105 cm−3 ),
which could represent a serious challenge to photon-dominated regions as the main
energy portals in the molecular ISM of such systems.
2.5
2.5.1
Distant galaxies and clusters
Colliding massive clusters: probing particle acceleration in Mpc-sized shocks
Galaxy clusters grow by mergers with other clusters and galaxy groups. These
mergers create shock waves within the intracluster medium (ICM) that can accelerate particles to extreme energies. In the presence of a weak magnetic field,
this leads to large (∼ Mpc) regions of diffuse radio emission. Such regions have
been classified into two main groups: relics and halos. Cluster relics are large
elongated diffuse structures at the periphery of clusters. Often they are highly
polarised. Cluster radio halos are located at the centres of clusters, their diffuse
morphologies following that of the X-ray emission.
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van Weeren, Röttgering and others reported the discovery of large-scale diffuse radio emission in the galaxy cluster MACS J1752.0+4440 (z= 0.366). Using Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) observations they found that the cluster
hosts a double radio relic system as well as a 1.65 Mpc radio halo covering the
region between the two relics. The relics are diametrically located on opposite
sides of the cluster centre. The NE and SW relics have sizes of 1.3 and 0.9 Mpc,
respectively. The relative sizes of the relics suggest a mass ratio of the merging
clusters of about 2:1.The relatively flat spectral indices suggest that the relics trace
shock waves with relatively high Mach numbers of around 3.5-4.5.
Van Weeren, Röttgering and others studied the cluster 1RXS J0603.3+4214 (z =
0.225) and found that it hosts a large bright 1.9 Mpc radio relic, an elongated 2
Mpc radio halo, and two fainter smaller radio relics . The large radio relic has a
spectacular linear morphology and a clear spectral index gradient from the front
of the relic towards the back, in the direction towards the cluster center. Parts
of this relic are highly polarized with a polarization fraction of up to 60%. The
XMM-Newton observations clearly show a violent cluster-cluster merging event.
As double mergers naturally give rise to curved traveling shock fronts, the linear
morphology is puzzling. A way to explain this morphology is to invoke a triple
merger event. Brüggen (Hamburg), van Weeren and Röttgering carried out hydrodynamical N-body AMR simulations of a number of triple merger events. A
scenario that resulted in a 2 Mpc linear shock started with two equal mass clusters
with an an initial relative velocity of 1500 km s−1 whose cores collide 1.3 Gyr after
the start of the simulation. Before core passage a less massive third cluster grazes
the southern cluster and loses some of its gas and dark matter. As it then heads
north, this third cluster drives a second major shock into the ICM that merges
with the previous shock to form a fairly flat shock front. In projection this shock
front has a morphology similar to the Toothbrush relic.
2.5.2
First LOFAR observations at very low frequencies
of cluster-scale non-thermal emission: the case of
Abell 2256
Abell 2256 is one of the best known examples of a galaxy cluster hosting largescale diffuse radio emission that is unrelated to individual galaxies. It contains
both a giant radio halo and a relic, and a number of head-tail sources and smaller
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Figure 2.5: LOFAR image of the cluster Abell 2256 at 60-65 MHz. The
resolution is 25 arcsec and the noise level is 10 mJy/beam.
diffuse steep-spectrum radio sources. The origin of radio halos and relics is still
being debated, but over the last years it has become clear that the presence of
these radio sources is closely related to galaxy cluster merger events. On behalf of
the LOFAR collaboration, van Weeren and Röttgering presented the results from
the first LOFAR observations of Abell 2256 between 18 and 67 MHz. The images
are the deepest ever obtained at frequencies below 100 MHz (See Figure 2.5 )
Both the radio halo and the giant relic are detected in the image at 63 MHz, and
the diffuse radio emission remains visible at frequencies as low as 20 MHz. The
observations confirm the presence of a previously claimed ultra-steep spectrum
source to the west of the cluster center, suggesting that this source is an old part
of a head-tail radio source in the cluster. For the radio relic they find a relatively
flat radio spectrum which could indicate that the efficiency of particle acceleration
at the shock substantially changed in the last ∼ 0.1 Gyr due to an increase of the
shock Mach number. In an alternative scenario, particles are re-accelerated by
some mechanism in the downstream region of the shock, resulting in the relatively
flat integrated radio spectrum. In the radio halo region they find indications of
low-frequency spectral steepening which may suggest that relativistic particles are
accelerated in a rather inhomogeneous turbulent region.
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2.5.3
Characterising the hosts of nearby radio galaxies
Low luminosity radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN) are generally found in
massive red elliptical galaxies, where they are thought to be powered through
gas accretion from their surrounding hot halos in a radiatively inefficient manner. These AGN are often referred to as “low-excitation” radio galaxies (LERGs).
When radio-loud AGN are found in galaxies with a young stellar population and
active star formation, they are usually high-power radiatively-efficient radio AGN
(“high-excitation”, HERG). Using a sample of low-redshift radio galaxies identified
within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), Janssen, Röttgering, Brinchman and
Best (Edinburgh) determined the fraction of galaxies that host a radio-loud AGN,
fRL , as a function of host galaxy stellar mass, M∗ , star formation rate, color, radio
luminosity and excitation state (HERG/LERG). The results are interpreted that
the presence of cold gas in a LERG enhances its probability to become a luminous
radio-loud AGN compared to LERGs in a red elliptical galaxy. They speculate
that feedback of the enhanced AGN activity in blue galaxies is responsible for the
reduced probability of green galaxies to host a LERG.
2.5.4
The first large Hα+[O ii] double-blind study at z ∼ 1.5
By combining narrow-band filter observations from both the Subaru Telescope
and the UKIRT telescope, Sobral and collaborators have been able to obtain clean
panoramic maps of parts of the distant universe about 9 billion years ago. This
dual mode of surveying faint galaxies provides a powerful technique for selecting
and studying star-forming galaxies during their formation and evolution. The
dual-line technique takes advantage of a unique combination of the capabilities of
the 8.2 m Subaru Telescope and the 3.8 m UKIRT to view very distant galaxies
over wide areas. The combined Subaru-UKIRT survey uses two filters: a narrowband filter on the Subaru Telescope to look for oxygen emission lines and another
narrow-band filter on UKIRT to look for hydrogen emission lines, and yields a
panoramic view of the distant universe about 9 billion years ago that one survey
alone could not provide.
They have found 190 distant galaxies seen simultaneously through their hydrogen
and oxygen lines and were able to derive how much star formation was occurring
in the universe 9 billion years ago. The results reveal that the overall population
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of star-forming galaxies has been continuously decreasing their star formation
activity for the last 11 billion years. The findings from this research also contribute
greater details to our general understanding of how galaxies form and evolve. For
the first time, they allow a comparison of dust extinction (i.e., the amount of
light absorbed by dust) affecting typical star-forming galaxies today and those
that existed 9 billion years ago. Contrary to past assumptions, dust extinction
has similar effects on both distant young galaxies, which are much more active,
and local ones. This result is very important for accurate measurement of star
formation rates at early epochs in the Universe.
2.5.5
The 11 Gyr evolution of star-forming galaxies from
HiZELS
Sobral and colleagues used deep data from UKIRT, Subaru and the VLT to select
large, robust samples of Hα emitters atz = 0.40, 0.84, 1.47 and 2.23 (corresponding
to look-back times of 4.2, 7.0, 9.2 and 10.6 Gyrs) in a uniform manner over ∼
2deg2 in the COSMOS and UDS fields. The deep multi-epoch Hα surveys reach
∼ 3M /yr out to z = 2.2 for the first time, while the wide area and the coverage
over two independent fields allow to greatly overcome cosmic variance.
These data were used to determine the Hα luminosity function and its evolution
across these redshifts. This is the first time Hα has been used to trace SF activity
with a single homogeneous survey at z = 0.4–2.23. Overall, the evolution seen in
Hα is in good agreement with the evolution seen using inhomogeneous compilations
of other tracers of star formation, such as FIR and UV, jointly pointing towards
the bulk of the evolution in the last 11 Gyrs being driven by a strong luminosity
increase from z ∼ 0 to z ∼ 2.2. The faint-end slope is found to be −1.60±0.08 over
z = 0–2.23, showing no evolution. The characteristic luminosity of SF galaxies,
L∗ , evolves significantly as log[L∗ (z)] = 0.45z + log[L∗ (z = 0)].
The uniformity of this analysis allowed Sobral and co-workers to derive the Hα star
formation history of the Universe, for which the simple parametrisation log(SFRD) =
−2.1/(1 + z) is a good approximation for z < 2.23. Both the shape and normalisation of the Hα star formation history are consistent with the measurements of the
stellar mass density growth, confirming that our Hα analysis traces the bulk of
the formation of stars in the Universe up to z ∼ 2.2. The star formation activity
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over the last ∼ 11Gyrs is responsible for producing ∼ 95% of the total stellar mass
density observed locally today.
2.5.6
The Properties of the Star-Forming Interstellar Medium
at z=0.8-2.2 from HiZELS
In two papers, Sobral and co-workers presented adaptive-optics-assisted, spatially
resolved spectroscopy of a sample of nine H-alpha-selected galaxies at z = 0.84–
2.23 drawn from the HiZELS narrow-band survey. These galaxies have starformation rates of 1–27M /yr and are therefore representative of the typical highredshift star-forming population. The ∼kpc-scale resolution observations show
that approximately half of the sample have dynamics suggesting that the ionised
gas is in large, rotating disks. The velocity fields of the galaxies were modelled
to infer the inclination-corrected, asymptotic rotational velocities. We use the absolute B-band magnitudes and stellar masses to investigate the evolution of the
B-band and stellar mass Tully-Fisher relationships. By combining this sample with
a number of similar measurements from the literature, we show that, at fixed circular velocity, the stellar mass of star-forming galaxies has increased by a factor 2.5
between z = 2 and z = 0, whilst the rest-frame B-band luminosity has decreased
by a factor ∼ 6 over the same period. Together, these demonstrate a change in
mass-to-light ratio in the B-band of ∆(M/LB )/(M/LB )z=0 ∼ 3.5 between z = 1.5
and z = 0, with most of the evolution occurring below z = 1.
They also use the spatial variation of [N ii]/Hα to show that the metallicity of
the ionised gas in these galaxies declines monotonically with galactocentric radius, with an average ∆(log O/H)/∆R = −0.027 ± 0.005 dex/kpc. This gradient
is consistent with predictions for high-redshift disk galaxies from cosmologically
based hydrodynamic simulations.
The data were further used to demonstrate that within the interstellar medium
of these galaxies, the velocity dispersion of the star-forming gas (σ) follows a
1/n
scaling relation σ ∝ ΣSFR + constant (where ΣSFR is the star formation surface
density and the constant includes the stellar surface density). By assuming the
disks are marginally stable (Toomre Q = 1) they show that this follows from the
Kennicutt–Schmidt relation (ΣSFR = AΣngas ), and derive best fit parameters of n =
2
−4
1.34 ± 0.15 and A = 3.4+2.5
−1.6 × 10 M /yr/kpc , consistent with the local relation
and implying cold molecular gas masses of Mgas = 109−10 M and molecular gas
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fractions Mgas /(Mgas + M∗ ) = 0.3 ± 0.1, with a range of 10-75%. These values
confirm the high gas fractions for high-redshift star-forming galaxies, independent
of the CO to H2 conversion factor.
They also identify eleven ∼kpc-scale star-forming regions (clumps) within their
sample and show that their sizes are comparable to the wavelength of the fastest
growing unstable mode. The luminosities and velocity dispersions of these clumps
follow the same scaling relations as local H ii regions, although their star formation
densities are a factor 15 ± 5 times higher than typically found locally. We discuss
how the clump properties are related to the disk, and show that their high masses
and luminosities are a consequence of the high disk surface density.
2.5.7
The clustering of Hα emitters at z = 2.23
Sobral and co-workers presented a clustering analysis of 370 high-confidence Hα
emitters (HAEs) at z = 2.23. The HAEs are detected in the Hi-Z Emission Line
Survey (HiZELS), a large-area blank field 2.121µm narrowband survey using the
United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) Wide Field Camera (WFCAM). Averaging the two-point correlation function of HAEs in two ∼ 1 degree scale fields
(United Kingdom Infrared Deep Sky Survey/Ultra Deep Survey [UDS] and Cosmological Evolution Survey [COSMOS] fields) they found a clustering amplitude
equivalent to a correlation length of r0 = 3.7 ± 0.3 Mpc/h for galaxies with star
formation rates of > 7M /yr. The data are well-fitted by the expected correlation function of Cold Dark Matter, scaled by a bias factor: ΩHAE = b2 ΩDM where
b = 2.4+0.1
−0.2 . The corresponding ’characteristic’ mass for the halos hosting HAEs is
log(Mh /[M /h]) = 11.7 ± 0.1.
The results were compared to the latest predictions from the semi-analytic GALFORM model and the authors found broad agreement with the observations, with
GALFORM predicting a HAE correlation length of ∼ 4Mpc/h. Motivated by this
agreement, they exploited the simulations to construct a parametric model of the
halo occupation distribution of HAEs, and used this to fit the observed clustering. The best-fitting halo occupation distribution can adequately reproduce the
observed angular clustering of HAEs, yielding an effective halo mass and bias in
agreement with that derived from the scaled ΩDM fit, but with the relatively small
sample size the current data provide a poor constraint on the halo occupation
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distribution. These results support the broad picture that ”typical” (∼ L∗ ) starforming galaxies have been hosted by dark matter haloes with Mh < 1012 M /h
since z ∼ 2, but with a broad occupation distribution and clustering that is likely
to be a strong function of luminosity.
2.5.8
Clustering around high-redshift radio galaxies
Rigby, Röttgering, Miley and collaborators used the SPIRE instrument on the Herschel Space Observatory to search for z > 2 protoclusters by observing 26 powerful
high-redshift radio galaxy (HzRG) fields at far-infrared wavelengths. Targeting
HzRGs is an efficient tool for selecting these overdense regions which will eventually grow into today’s massive clusters. Indeed, the statistics of radio galaxy
environment luminosity functions are consistent with every brightest cluster galaxy
having gone through an evolutionary phase, with radio-selected protoclusters being typical ancestors of local galaxy clusters. Studying them is therefore a powerful
tool for tracing the emergence of large scale structure and studying the evolution
of galaxies in dense environments.
Examination of the environment within 3.5 arcmin of the central HzRG in each
field, revealed that on average they contain a higher density of galaxies than the
background at the longest wavelength. This analysis was repeated for galaxies
identified by their SPIRE colours as lying close to the redshift of the HzRG (and
therefore within the protocluster). 32% of the fields showed a far-infrared excess
in source numbers, and there is a tentative trend for the most powerful HzRGs
to host the strongest galaxy overdensities. Extending the search out to higher
radii shows that these potential protoclusters are generally contained within 4
arcmin (∼ 6 co-moving Mpc at z = 2), which is in agreement with simulations
and previous work.
2.5.9
High redshift submillimetre galaxies
Van der Werf collaborated with Smail and Swinbank (Durham), Weiss (MPIfR)
and Walter (MPIA) on further analysis of the LESS (LABOCA Extended Chandra Deep Field-South Survey) data, and follow-up of these with ALMA. The
ALMA data identify the counterparts to these previously unidentified submillimetre sources and serendipitously detect bright emission lines in their spectra
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which were shown most likely to be [CII] 157.74 micron emission yielding redshifts
of z=4.42 and 4.44. The ratio of L[CII]/LFIR in these SMGs is much higher than
seen for similarly far-infrared-luminous galaxies at z=0, which is attributed to the
more extended gas reservoirs in these high-redshift ultraluminous infrared galaxies. Using the volume probed by the ALMA survey, it was shown that the bright
end of the [CII] luminosity function evolves strongly between z=0 and 4.4, reflecting the increased interstellar medium cooling in galaxies as a result of their higher
star formation rates. These observations demonstrate that even with short integrations, ALMA is able to detect the dominant fine-structure cooling lines from
high-redshift ULIRGs, measure their energetics and spatially resolved properties
and trace their evolution with redshift.
Van der Werf also worked with Gonzalez-Nuevo (Trieste) and the Herschel-ATLAS
team to develop a method for selecting strongly gravitationally lensed submillimeter galaxies: the Herschel-ATLAS Lensed Objects Selection (HALOS). HALOS
will allow the selection of up to 1000 candidate strongly lensed galaxies over the
full H-ATLAS survey area. Applying HALOS to the H-ATLAS Science Demonstration Phase field (∼ 14.4 deg2 ) yielded 31 candidate objects, whose candidate
lenses were identified in the VIKING near-infrared catalog. Using the available
information on candidate sources and candidate lenses they tentatively estimated
a ' 72% purity of the sample. The redshift distribution of the candidate lensed
sources is close to that reported for most previous surveys for lensed galaxies,
while that of candidate lenses extends to redshifts substantially higher than found
in the other surveys.
Van der Werf also worked with Harris (University of Maryland) and the H-ATLAS
team to obtain the first blind redshifts of candidate lensed high-z galaxies based
on measurements of the carbon monoxide ground state rotational transition (CO J
= 1-0) with the Zpectrometer ultrawideband spectrometer on the 100 m diameter
Green Bank Telescope. The sample comprises 11 galaxies with redshifts between
z=2.1 and 3.5 from a total sample of 24 targets identified by Herschel-ATLAS
photometric colors from the SPIRE instrument. Nine of the CO measurements
are new redshift determinations, substantially adding to the number of detections
of galaxies with rest-frame peak submillimeter emission near 100 micron. The CO
detections confirm the existence of massive gas reservoirs within these luminous
dusty star-forming galaxies. Corrected for magnification, most galaxy luminosities
are consistent with an ultraluminous infrared galaxy classification, but three are
candidate hyper-LIRGs with luminosities greater than 1013 L .
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2.5.10
Surveys for High-z Galaxies
Patel, Fumagalli and Franx studied high redshift galaxies using the 3D-HST grism
survey. In his survey spectra are taken with the Hubble Space Telescope of more
than 10.000 galaxies. In their first paper, Fumagalli studied the increase in the
Hα equivalent width with look back time. They found a clear increase towards
higher redshift, proportional to (1 + z)1.8 . A simple model could fit the observed
results, and predicts very high equivalent widths at z=8 (of 400 Å). Nelson et al
used this survey to study the Halpha sizes of galaxies, and found that the Halpha
sizes are systematically larger than the continuum light sizes.
Wake, van Dokkum and Franx studied the colors of galaxies in the Sloan Digital
Sky Survey and found that velocity dispersion is the best ”predictor” of color,
better than stellar mass, surface mass density, or morphology.
Muzzin, Franx and collaborators worked on the UltraVista survey, a deep survey
co-lead by Franx to take deep Near-IR imaging of the cosmos field. Muzzin et al.
constructed a deep catalogue, and found a multiply lensed red galaxy. This lensed
galaxy has no star formation, and is at a redshift of about 2.4 This provides a very
high resolution image of the very compact galaxy.
Weinmann and collaborators studied the evolution of the mass function for galaxies
with masses around 3 109 . She found that almost all models predict the wrong
evolution with redshift: the data show gradual evolution from high redshift to 0,
whereas the models show a nearly flat mass function at a redshift of 1. The models
have a basic problem, which is likely insufficient feedback to stop star formation
at higher redshift.
2.5.11
The star formation rate functions of the Universe
in the first 1–2 billion years
Taking advantage of published determinations on the prevalence of galaxies 1 to
2 billion years after the Big Bang and estimates of the dust extinction in these
galaxies based on galaxy colors in the ultraviolet, PhD student Renske Smit and
staff member Rychard Bouwens presented the first ever determinations of the star
formation rate functions for galaxies in the first one to two billion years of the
universe (Fig. 2.6). These star formation rate functions indicate a much more
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Figure 2.6: The star formation rate density of the universe as a function of
cosmic time (upper horizontal axis) and cosmological redshift (lower horizontal
axis). A recent search for gravitationally lensed galaxies behind lower redshift
galaxy clusters allowed staff member Rychard Bouwens to derive the first meaningful measurement of the star formation rate density 550 million years after the
Big Bang. This measurement is indicated with the large blue circle at redshift
(”z”) of 9 (corresponding to a time 0.55 Gyr after the Big Bang).
rapid build-up of galaxies in the early universe than is indicated by studies of the
prevalence of galaxies in the ultraviolet. These star formation rate functions are
especially useful to astrophysicists who run very sophisticated simulations of the
universe, since they provide them with physical observables against which they
can compare their simulation results. The paper that Renske Smit and Rychard
Bouwens published on this topic is already attracting significant attention.
Bouwens and Smit have also been taking advantage of the huge quantity of Hubble
Space Telescope observations taken in and around ∼ 20 massive galaxy clusters
to explore the properties of galaxies present at the earliest epochs of the universe.
Deep Hubble Space Telescope observations have been obtained as part a very large,
2-month Hubble program called CLASH. Rychard Bouwens used observations from
this program to conduct a systematic search for galaxies just 550 million years after
the universe in ∼ 20 massive galaxy clusters and discovered just 3 candidates
(Fig. 2.7). The 3 candidates compared with some ∼ 18 candidates at a slightly
later epoch of the birth of the universe, indiocating a substantial drop in the rate
at which the universe is forming stars just 550 million years after the Big Bang.
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Figure 2.7: Images of three galaxies (one per row) that likely emitted their
light just 550 million years after the Big Bang. The images are 6.6 arcsec on a
side. The different columns correspond to the images we have of these galaxies
in different wavelength channels, from bluest wavelength images on the left to
the reddest wavelength images on the right. Galaxies that emitted their light
near the beginning of the universe are only detected at the reddest wavelengths.
What was noteworthy about this drop in the star formation rate was that it was
even larger than one would have expected from an extrapolation of results later
in the universe.
PhD student Renske Smit has also been involved in a comprehensive effort to study
light from older stars in galaxies at very early times based on lensing from the same
set of ∼ 20 clusters as Bouwens had used for his analysis. To obtain information
on the older stars, Smit is using images from the Spitzer Space Telescope which
can view distant galaxies at much redder wavelengths than is possible with the
Hubble Space Telescope. She uses the combined flux information from the Hubble
and Spitzer Space Telescope to determine what the average galaxy in the universe
looks like 600 to 900 million years after the Big Bang and also to infer what the
likely properties of these galaxies are. She has already succeeded in demonstrating
on the basis of her study that galaxies in this era are building up stellar mass for
their star formation rate much faster than galaxies at later epochs of the universe.
Her study has also shown quite unequivocally that nebular emission lines are very
prominent in the spectra of galaxies in the early universe.
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2.5.12
Gravitational weak lensing
Hoekstra, Semboloni, Kuijken in collaboration with the rest of the CFHTLenS
team completed the weak lensing analysis of data obtained as part of the CFHT
Legacy Survey. This resulted in a number of papers constraining cosmological parameters with more sophisticated analyses, while providing also more challenging
tests of the measurements. Highlights include the first large-scale tomographic
measurements and tests of the laws of gravity using lensing together with measurements of redshift space distortions. This work is also a nice benchmark for the
Kilo Degree Survey which is now in full operation, and covers the main science
goals of Euclid, which was selected for adoption by ESA in June.
Hoekstra is one of the coordinators for the weak lensing science of Euclid, and
work continued on refining requirements and flowing these down to algorithm
developments. With his collaborators, Hoekstra also finished the analysis of the
Canadian Cluster Comparison Project and published results on the weak lensing
and X-ray masses. Hoekstra also completed the weak lensing analysis for a sample
of clusters discovered by the South Pole Telescope, and these measurements form
the basis of the mass calibration needed for the cosmological interpretation of these
data.
2.6
Theoretical studies of galaxies and large scale
structures
2.6.1
Simulating the formation of disc galaxies
McCarthy (Birmingham), Schaye, Crain and collaborators examined the rotation rates, sizes and star formation (SF) efficiencies of a representative population of simulated disc galaxies. Over the wide galaxy stellar mass range,
9.0 < log 10[M∗ (M )] < 10.5, the simulations reproduce the observed Tully-Fisher
relation, the rotation curves of disc galaxies in bins of stellar mass, the masssize relation of disc galaxies, the optical rotation to virial circular velocity ratio
and the SF efficiencies of disc galaxies as inferred from stacked weak lensing and
stacked satellite kinematics observations. They also reproduce the specific star
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formation rates of L∗ galaxies but predict too low levels of SF for low-mass galaxies, which is plausibly due to the finite resolution of the simulations. At higher
stellar masses the simulated galaxies are too concentrated and have too high SF
efficiencies, which may reflect the neglect of feedback from accreting supermassive
black holes in these simulations. They concluded that it is possible to generate a
representative population of disc galaxies that reproduces many of the observed
trends of local disc galaxies using standard numerical hydrodynamic techniques
and a plausible implementation of the ”subgrid” astrophysical processes thought
to be relevant to galaxy formation.
2.6.2
Simulating galactic outflows with thermal supernova
feedback
Cosmological simulations make use of sub-grid recipes for the implementation
of galactic winds driven by massive stars because direct injection of supernova
energy in thermal form leads to strong radiative losses, rendering the feedback
inefficient. Dalla Vecchia (MPE) and Schaye argued that the main cause of the
catastrophic cooling is a mismatch between the mass of the gas in which the
energy is injected and the mass of the parent stellar population. Because too
much mass is heated, the temperatures are too low and the cooling times too
short. They used analytic arguments to estimate, as a function of the gas density
and the numerical resolution, the minimum heating temperature that is required
for the injected thermal energy to be efficiently converted into kinetic energy.
They proposed and tested a stochastic implementation of thermal feedback that
uses this minimum temperature increase as an input parameter and that can be
employed in both particle-based and grid-based codes. They used hydrodynamic
simulations to test the method on models of isolated disc galaxies and found that
the thermal feedback strongly suppresses the star formation rate and can drive
massive, large-scale outflows (Fig. 2.8).
2.6.3
Properties of gas in and around galaxy haloes
Van de Voort and Schaye used cosmological simulations to study the properties
of gas inside and around galaxy haloes as a function of radius and halo mass.
They found that the properties of cold- and hot-mode gas, which they separated
40
Chapter 2. Research
Figure 2.8: Face- (left) and edge-on (right) projections of the disc gas distribution in two simulations employing thermal supernova feedback. Images are 45
kpc/h on a side and the colour coding is logarithmic in density. A velocity field
vector length of 1/32 the side of the images corresponds to 400 km/s. Feedback
from star formation drives a strong bi-conical outflow and blows bubbles in the
disc.
depending on whether the temperature has been higher than 105.5 K while it was
extragalactic, are clearly distinguishable in the outer parts of massive haloes. The
differences between cold- and hot-mode gas resemble those between inflowing and
outflowing gas. The cold-mode gas is mostly confined to clumpy filaments that
are approximately in pressure equilibrium with the diffuse, hot-mode gas. Besides
being colder and denser, cold-mode gas typically has a much lower metallicity and
is much more likely to be infalling. However, the spread in the properties of the
gas is large, even for a given mode and a fixed radius and halo mass, which makes
it impossible to make strong statements about individual gas clouds. Metal-line
cooling causes a strong cooling flow near the central galaxy, which makes it hard
to distinguish gas accreted through the cold and hot modes in the inner halo.
Stronger feedback results in larger outflow velocities and pushes hot-mode gas to
larger radii. The gas properties evolve as expected from virial arguments, which
can also account for the dependence of many gas properties on halo mass. They
argued that cold streams penetrating hot haloes are observable as high column
density H i Lyman-α absorption systems in sightlines near massive foreground
galaxies.
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Chapter 2. Research
2.6.4
Neutral Hydrogen Optical Depth near Star-forming
Galaxies
Rakic, Schaye, Steidel (Caltech) and Rudie (Caltech) studied the interface between
galaxies and the intergalactic medium by measuring the absorption by neutral hydrogen in the vicinity of star-forming galaxies at z = 2.4. Their sample consisted
of 679 rest-frame UV-selected galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts that have impact parameters < 2 (proper) Mpc to the line of sight of one of the 15 bright,
background QSOs. They presented the first two-dimensional maps of the absorption around galaxies (Fig. 2.9), plotting the median Ly-α pixel optical depth as
a function of transverse and line-of-sight separation from galaxies. The median
optical depth, and hence the median density of atomic hydrogen, drops by more
than an order of magnitude around 100 kpc, which is similar to the virial radius of
the halos thought to host the galaxies. The median remains enhanced, at the > 3σ
level, out to at least 2.8 Mpc (i.e. > 9 comoving Mpc). The mean galaxy overdensity around absorbers increases with the optical depth and also as the length scale
over which the galaxy overdensity is evaluated is decreased. They clearly detected
two types of redshift space anisotropies. On scales < 200 km/s, or < 1 Mpc, the
absorption is stronger along the line of sight than in the transverse direction. This
”finger of God” effect may be due to redshift errors, but is probably dominated
by gas motions within or very close to the halos. On the other hand, on scales
of 1.4–2.0 Mpc the absorption is compressed along the line of sight (with > 3σ
significance), an effect that they attributed to large-scale infall (i.e., the Kaiser
effect).
2.6.5
Cold accretion flows and the nature of high column
density H I absorption
Simulations predict that galaxies grow primarily through the accretion of gas that
has not gone through an accretion shock near the virial radius and that this cold
gas flows towards the central galaxy along dense filaments and streams. There is,
however, little observational evidence for the existence of these cold flows. Van de
Voort, Schaye, Altay (Durham) and Theuns (Durham) used a simulation to study
the contribution of cold flows to the observed z = 3 column density distribution of
neutral hydrogen, which their simulation reproduces. They found that nearly all
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Chapter 2. Research
Figure 2.9: Median H i Ly-α absorption as a function of transverse and lineof-sight distance from hzi = 2.4 star-forming galaxies. Absorption is clearly enhanced close to galaxies, out to at least 2 proper Mpc (pMpc) in the transverse
direction, but only out to ≈ 1.5 pMpc along the line of sight. This anisotropy
suggests large-scale infall of gas. On the other hand, on small scales the absorption declines more rapidly in the transverse direction than in the line-of-sight
direction.
of the H i absorption arises in gas that has remained colder than 105.5 K, at least
while it was extragalactic. In addition, the majority of the H i is falling rapidly
towards a nearby galaxy. Although very little of the H i in Lyman limit systems
resides inside galaxies, these absorbers are closely related to star formation: most
of their H i either will become part of the interstellar medium before z = 2 or
has been ejected from a galaxy at z > 3. Cold accretion flows are critical for the
success of our simulation in reproducing the observed rate of incidence of damped
Lyman-α and particularly that of Lyman limit systems. They therefore concluded
that cold accretion flows exist and have already been detected in the form of high
column density H i absorbers.
2.6.6
The filling factor of intergalactic metals
Observations of quasar absorption-line systems reveal that the z = 3 intergalactic
medium (IGM) is polluted by heavy elements down to H i optical depths 10.
What is not yet clear, however, is what fraction of the volume needs to be enriched
43
Chapter 2. Research
by metals and whether it suffices to enrich only regions close to galaxies in order
to reproduce the observations. Booth, Schaye, Delgado, and Dalla Vecchia (MPE)
used gas density fields derived from large cosmological simulations, together with
synthetic quasar spectra and imposed model metal distributions, to investigate
what enrichment patterns can reproduce the observed median optical depth of C iv
as a function of H i. Their models can only satisfy the observational constraints if
the z = 3 IGM was primarily enriched by galaxies that reside in low-mass (total
halo mass < 1010 M ) haloes that can eject metals out to distances > 102 kpc.
Galaxies in more massive haloes cannot possibly account for the observations as
they are too rare for their outflows to cover a sufficiently large fraction of the
volume. Galaxies need to enrich gas out to distances that are much greater than
the virial radii of their host haloes. Assuming the metals to be well mixed on
small scales, their modelling requires that the fractions of the simulated volume
and baryonic mass that are polluted with metals are, respectively, > 10 per cent
and > 50 per cent in order to match observations.
2.6.7
Disentangling galaxy environment and host halo mass
The properties of observed galaxies and dark matter haloes in simulations depend
on their environment. The term ’environment’ has, however, been used to describe
a wide variety of measures that may or may not correlate with each other. Popular measures of environment include, for example, the distance to the Nth nearest
neighbour, the number density of objects within some distance or, for the case of
galaxies only, the mass of the host dark matter halo. Haas, Schaye, and JeesonDaniel (MPA) used results from the Millennium Simulation and a semi-analytic
model for galaxy formation to quantify the relations between different measures
of environment and halo mass. They showed that the environmental parameters
used in the observational literature are in effect measures of halo mass, even if they
are measured for a fixed stellar mass. They demonstrated that the distance to the
Nth nearest neighbour becomes insensitive to halo mass if it is constructed from
dimensionless quantities. This can be achieved by scaling the minimum luminosity/mass of neighbours to that of the object that the environment is determined
for and by reducing the distance to a length-scale associated with either the neighbour or the galaxy under consideration. Their results will help future studies to
disentangle the effects of halo mass and external environment on the properties of
galaxies and dark matter haloes.
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Chapter 2. Research
2.6.8
Rest-frame ultraviolet line emission from the intergalactic medium
Rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) emission lines offer the exciting possibility to directly
image the gas around high-redshift galaxies with upcoming optical instruments.
Bertone (UCSC) and Schaye used a suite of simulations to predict the nature and
detectability of emission lines from the intergalactic medium (IGM) at 2 ≤ z ≤ 5.
The brightest H i Ly-α emission arises exclusively in highly overdense gas, but
the highest surface brightness emission from high-ionisation metal lines traces a
much wider range of overdensities. Bright metal-line emission traces gas with
temperatures close to the peak of the corresponding emissivity curve. While H i
Ly-α, He ii Hα, C iii, Si iii and Si iv are excellent probes of cold accretion flows and
the colder parts of outflows, C iv, N v , O vi and Ne viii are powerful tracers of the
diffuse warm-hot IGM and galactic winds. Several rest-frame UV emission lines
from the high-redshift IGM will become detectable in the near future, possibly
starting with the Cosmic Web Imager, which is already operating on Palomar.
The Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer, which will be commissioned in 2014 on
the Very Large Telescope, and the proposed Keck Cosmic Web Imager have the
potential to revolutionise studies of the interactions between high-redshift galaxies
and their environment.
2.6.9
The evolution of low-mass galaxies, an unsolved problem
Models of galaxy formation and evolution predict that low-mass galaxies should
form early, and have relatively low star formation rates today. Weinmann, Oppenheimer, Crain and international collaborators showed that these basic predictions
are at odds with new observational results. They used a variety of different models of galaxy formation, hydrodynamical and semi-analytical, to demonstrate that
all these models show a consistent mis-match with observational results. This
indicates that there is a fundamental unsolved problem in the field of galaxy formation, regarding the evolutionary history of low-mass galaxies, indicating that
our understanding of the evolution of those galaxies is still incomplete. They also
45
Chapter 2. Research
Figure 2.10: The evolution in the number density of low-mass galaxies with
masses around log(M/M ) = 9.5 as a function of redshift in several semianalytical and hydrodynamical models (lines) and according to observations
(data points).
showed that the observations of star formation rates and the evolution of the stellar mass function are internally consistent, indicating that the problem does not
lie in an incorrect interpretation of observations.
2.7
Computational astrophysics
The research group for Computational Astrophysics Leiden (CAstLe) aims at
studying the universe by means of simulation. The specific areas of research in
astrophysics include the evolution of binary (and higher order multiple) stars, the
dynamical evolution of dense stellar systems and of galactic nuclei. From a computational point of view the research group aims at simulation environments for
solving the equations for gravitational dynamics, stellar structure and evolution,
hydrodynamics and radiative transfer. Calculations are performed on computers
built by the research group, graphical processing units, supercomputers and grid
environments.
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Chapter 2. Research
In collaboration with Evghenni Gaburov (SARA) we made a new implementation
and improved performance of a super efficient gravitational N-body tree-code that
is specifically designed for the graphics processing unit (GPU).The code is publicly
available at: http://castle.strw.leidenuniv.nl/software.html. All parts of
the tree-code algorithm are executed on the GPU. the algorithms are presented for
parallel construction and traversing of sparse octrees. The gravitational tree-code
outperforms tuned CPU code during the tree-construction and shows a performance improvement of more than a factor 20 overall, resulting in a processing rate
of more than 2.8 million particles per second. In their recent presentation of the
Kepler GPU Architecture NVIDIA CEO Jen-Hsun Huang adopted this code to
demonstrate1 . the enormous speed of the GPU.
Pelupessy and Jänes presented new methods for the integration of gravitational
N-body systems. The new methods take advantage of the hierarchies present in
astrophysical N-body systems to accelerate the time stepping in the simulation
while conserving energy to high precision.
Pelupessy and Portegies Zwart investigated the formation of planets around binary
stars. They found that the binary driven density enhancement at the inner edge
of the circumbinary disk explains the orbital configuration of planetary systems
around binary stars such as discovered by the Kepler mission (Fig. 2.11).
2.7.1
AMUSE
On December 6th, version 7.1 of the AMUSE software package (van Elteren, Pelupessy, de Vries and Portegies Zwart) was released. This release included 35 astrophysical codes, amongst which codes for gravitational dynamics, stellar evolution,
hydrodynamics and radiative transfer, in a comprehensive framework for computational astrophysics. This release included new options for couplings amongst the
aforementioned domains.
The first major AMUSE result was published in MNRAS in 2012. In this paper
Pelupessy & Portegies Zwart studied the evolution of embedded clusters. The
equations of motion of the stars in the cluster are solved by direct N-body integration while taking the effects of stellar evolution and the hydrodynamics of the
1
The presentation can be seen on YouTube:
aByz-mxOXJM
47
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=
Chapter 2. Research
Figure 2.11: The formation of the circumbinary planet Kepler 34: Circumbinary disk and stability analysis. This figure shows the correspondence of the
distribution protoplanetary disk material in the semi-major axis-eccentricity
plane (grey shading) and the planet (symbol with error bars) as well as the
region of dynamical instability (red stars).
natal gas content into account. The gravity of the stars and the surrounding gas
are coupled self-consistently to allow the realistic dynamical evolution of the cluster. While the equations of motion are solved, a stellar evolution code keeps track
of the changes in stellar mass, luminosity and radius. The gas liberated by the
stellar winds and supernovae deposits mass and energy into the gas reservoir in
which the cluster is embedded. They examined cluster models with 1000 stars, but
varied the star formation efficiency (between 0.05 and 0.5), cluster radius (0.1–1.0
pc), the degree of virial support of the initial population of stars (0–100 per cent)
and the strength of the feedback. They found that the degree of mass segregation
in open clusters such as the Pleiades is not the result of secular evolution but a
remnant of its embedded stage.
48
Chapter 2. Research
Figure 2.12: The Sackler laboratory for Astrophysics
2.8
The Raymond and Beverly Sackler Laboratory Astrophysics
In 2012 a number of technological breakthroughs have been realized in the Sackler
Laboratory for Astrophysics. Two new ultra-sensitive detection techniques were
developed that will change the way optical spectroscopic studies of molecules of
astrophysical interest can be performed; os-BBCEAS (optomechanical shutterbroad band cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy) allows to search for diffuse
interstellar band carriers covering large spectral ranges in very short times – on
the order of a few seconds — and CESAS (cavity enhanced self absorption spectroscopy) makes it possible to study light-emitting matter even without the need
for an external light source. The latter technique will also have applications in
pure applied sciences, e.g., combustion, flame and plasma research. The conceptual simplicity of both techniques combined with high detection sensitivity (better
than one part per billion) over extended spectral ranges makes them ideal for spectral laboratory surveys.
Another ultra-precise cavity enhanced technique (cw-CRDS) has been extended to
the infrared and has been used to record fully rovibrationally resolved transitions of
astrophysically relevant molecular transients. The first results show that molecular
data are accurate enough to be used for an (in)direct interpretation of ALMA data.
Also, in 2012, a new atom beam line was added to an experiment capable of studying atom addition reactions in interstellar ice analogues, making the new setup one
49
Chapter 2. Research
of the most complete setups for this type of studies worldwide. Chemical reactions upon bombardment with different atoms can be studied in one run. Research
topics covered the formation of water in space, the production of hydroxylamine,
known to be a precursor molecule in the generation of amino-acids as well as the
H/D ratio in ice formation (H2 O vs. HDO). The latter helps to interpret the
cosmochemical origin of e.g., water on Earth.
Furthermore a new mobile setup — iPOP (Instrument for Photodynamics of
PAHs) became operational. This setup (constructed within a collaborative project
with Prof. Tielens) combines ion-trapping and time-of-flight mass spectrometry to
study the long term photobehaviour of PAHs upon light excitation. The setup is
mobile and will be used at large beam line facilities, such as SOLEIL and FELIX.
Finally a new experimental concept was developed to study the porosity decrease
upon thermal annealing of interstellar ices, combining frequency stabilised interferometry and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The results show that
interstellar ice — known to be amorphous, and assumed to be compact — keep
a substantial degree of porosity upon heating. This is important particularly for
surface induced chemical reactions, as with the increase of available surface area
also the efficiency of solid state reactions in the inter- and circumstellar matter
increases.
The many results of the laboratory group have not remained unnoticed. As a
consequence the Sackler Laboratory has been asked to act as scientific host for
IAU297 ”The diffuse interstellar bands” (2013) and the Faraday Discussions 168
”Solid State Astrochemistry” (2014).
2.9
2.9.1
Instrumentation
Improved APP coronographs
Matthew Kenworthy’s research is concerned with the direct detection and characterization of planets around nearby stars. Coronagraphs help cut down the glare
of a bright star next to a fainter planet, and in research led by graduate student
Tiffany Meshkat, the Apodizing Phase Plate (APP) coronagraph on the VLT is
carrying out surveys around stars that may harbour gas giant planets, including
50
Chapter 2. Research
famous stars such as Fomalhaut. In parallel with this observational work, laboratory development of a new type of APP coronagraph that can work over very
broad ranges of wavelengths demonstrated the feasibility of this technology. Kenworthy’s graduate student, Gilles Otten, worked with Frans Snik on the testing
of the Vector APP that shows promise of increasing the collected flux from faint
companions. Additional sensitivity can be achieved with point spread function
reconstruction, and work with Johanan Codona (U. Arizona) is showing results
both in the laboratory and on the sky, with a paper published in 2013.
2.9.2
ASSIST
ASSIST, the Adaptive Secondary Setup and Instrument Stimulator, is the testbed
for ESOs Very Large Telescope Adaptive Optics Facility. ASSIST was developed
by NOVA and designed, build and tested by Stuik and team over the last 10 years
at Leiden Observatory. ASSIST allows for the testing and calibration of Adaptive
Optics instruments and the Deformable Secondary Mirror for Unit Telescope 4
under conditions (seeing, natural guide stars and laser guide stars) that are present
at the VLT at Paranal Chile, without having to use valuable on-sky telescope
time. In 2011 and early 2012 ASSIST was built up at ESO and in October 2012
ASSIST passed preliminary Acceptance at ESO. This milestone effectively means
that ASSIST had been fully delivered to ESO.
2.9.3
Allegro
The year 2012 was a turning point for the ALMA Regional Center node in the
Netherlands, Allegro, hosted by Leiden Observatory and coordinated by Hogerheijde.
In this year, science observing with the ALMA array started in earnest, and data
for a first set of projects was processed, calibrated, and analysed by Allegro staff.
They worked closely with the Principal Investigators of the projects to verify the
data quality and enhance the scientific analysis of the products. This resulted
in several papers using ALMA data with Leiden staff as (co) author, describing,
e.g., warm gas in the outflow of the embedded young stars IRAS 16293-2422, the
detection of a simple sugar molecule in the same object, and infalling motions in
the surrounding gas. The staff of Allegro was strengthened by the return of van
51
Chapter 2. Research
Kempen from a two-year tour of duty with ALMA commissioning in Chile and
the appointment of Tilanus as program manager.
2.10
History of science
D. van Delft holds a part-time appointment as professor in the history of science
at Leiden Observatory. His research in 2012 focussed on the Leiden cryogenic
laboratory, W.J. de Haas and Paul Ehrenfest. Van Delft is supervising three
PhD-projects: ”Op weg naar Urenco: Jacob Kistemaker en zijn laboratorium
voor massaspectrografie 1945–1960” (together with Van Lunteren), ”Ruska and
the early history of the electron microscope” and ”ASML and high tech innovation
in the Netherlands” (together with Van Lente, Utrecht University).
52
Chapter
3
Education
popularization
and social events
3.1
Chapter
Eduction,
popularization
and social events
3
Education
Teaching and training of students is a major priority of Leiden Observatory. In
2012, 51 freshmen started their studies in astronomy. Of this number, 13 (25,5%)
were women, and 18 (35%) pursued a combined astronomy/physics or astronomy/mathematics/computer science degree. The Observatory registered a total
number of 91 BSc students at the end of the year, of which 39 (42%) aimed at a
combined astronomy/physics degree or astronomy/mathematics degree; 23% of all
BSc students is female. There were 30 MSc students, including 12 (40%) women.
Out of 30, 10 (33%) were from abroad. Several students from the applied physics
department of Delft Technical University took courses from the Leiden astronomy curriculum as part of the requirements for a minor in astronomy. Seventeen
students passed their propedeutical exam, of which twelve completed the requirements within the nominal one year. There were 17 BSc exams, and 11 MSc exams.
Pen continued as the education coordinator taking care of the daily tasks. Hoekstra continued as BSc study adviser. In September Portegies Zwart stepped down
as the MSc study adviser and Schaye took over. In addition to counseling by
the student adviser, incoming students were assigned to small groups meeting at
regular intervals with a staff mentor (Linnartz, Hogerheijde, Kuijken, Portegies
Zwart) and a senior student mentor. In the tutor programme, physics and astronomy freshman students were provided on a voluntary but regular basis with
55
Chapter 3. Eduction, popularization and social events
coaching by senior students.
As part of the introductory astronomy course, students were taken to the Artis
Planetarium in Amsterdam for a lesson in coordinate systems, time and constellations in the sky (Snellen). As part of the second-year training in practical
astronomy, 9 honors students were offered the opportunity to take part in a specially arranged observing trip to the Isaac Newton Telescope on La Palma, Canary
Islands (Hoekstra, Israel and Otten).
The astronomy curriculum is monitored by the Education committee (Opleidingscommissie), which advises the Director of Studies on all relevant matters, and
which was chaired by Röttgering. Under the authority of the Education Committee, the lecture course monitoring system was continued. In this system, students
provide feedback to lecturers during and after the course. The quality of curriculum and exams is the responsibility of the board of Examiners (Examencommissie)
chaired by Lub. Admission to the master-curriculum for students without a BSc
in astronomy from a Netherlands university requires a recommendation by the Admissions committee (Toelatingscommissie) chaired by Schaye and having Portegies
Zwart and Brandl as members.
3.2
3.2.1
Degrees awarded in 2012
Ph.D. degrees
A total of 9 graduate students successfully defended their Ph.D. theses in 2012
and were awarded their Ph.D. degree. They are:
Name:
Graduation Date:
Supervisor:
Thesis title:
Current position:
M. Velander
20-06-2012
Kuijken
Studying Dark Matter: Haloes with Weak Lensing
Postdoctoral Fellow,Oxford,United Kingdom
56
Chapter 3. Eduction, popularization and social events
Name:
Graduation Date:
Supervisor:
Thesis title:
Current position:
R. Martinez Galarza
19-06-2012
Brandl
Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy of Starbursts:
from Spitzer-IRS to JWST-MIRI
Postdoc Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, USA
Name:
Graduation Date:
Supervisor:
Thesis title:
Current position:
E. van Uitert
29-05-2012
Kuijken
Weak Gravitational Lensing in the RCS2
Postdoc Argelander Institut fur Astronomie, Bonn, Germany
Name:
Graduation Date:
Supervisor:
Thesis title:
Current position:
F. van de Voort
28-03-2012
Schaye
The Growth of Galaxies and their Gaseous Haloes
University of California at Berkeley, USA
Name:
Graduation Date:
Supervisor:
Thesis title:
Current position:
A-M. Madigan
16-02-2012
Kuijken/co: Levin/Hopman
Secular Stellar Dynamics near Massive Black Holes
Postdoc Leiden Observatory, Leiden, The Netherlands
Name:
Graduation Date:
Supervisor:
Thesis title:
Current position:
M. van Hoven
15-02-2012
Kuijken/co: Levin/Hopman
Seismology of Magnetars
Name:
Graduation Date:
Supervisor:
Thesis title:
Current position:
O. Rakic
07-02-2012
Schaye/Steidel/De Zeeuw
The Intergalactic medium near High-Redshift Galaxies
Postdoc Max Planck Institut fur Astronomie, Heidelberg, Germany
57
Chapter 3. Eduction, popularization and social events
Name:
Graduation Date:
Supervisor:
Thesis title:
E. Kuiper
24-01-2012
Röttgering/Miley
Growing up in the City:
a Study of Galaxy Cluster Progenitors z > 2
Current position:
Name:
Graduation Date:
Supervisor:
Thesis title:
Current position:
3.2.2
L. Vermaas
11-01-2012
Israel/Van der Werf
Spectroscopy and Nuclear Dynamics of Starburst Galaxies
Topdesk Software, Delft, The Netherlands
Master degrees
The following 11 students were awarded Masters degrees in 2012:
Name
Date
Margriet van der Laan 13-1-2012
Arthur Bakker
26-6-2012
Tjibaria Pijloo
28-8-2012
David Huijser
28-8-2012
Maria Drovdoskaya
28-8-2012
Jeroen Franse
28-8-2012
Axel Buddendiek
28-8-2012
Siebe Weersma
28-8-2012
Ricardo Herbonnet
30-8-2012
Sascha Zeegers
27-11-2012
Present Position
travelling
software developer bij de NCIM-groep
PhD Nijmegen
Phd Auckland
PhD Leiden
PhD Leiden
PhD Duitsland
Finance
PhD Leiden
PhD Leiden (applying)
58
Chapter 3. Eduction, popularization and social events
3.2.3
Bachelor degrees
The following 16 students were awarded BSc degrees in 2012:
Name
Rinse Heinsbroek
Atze de Vries
Joris Voorn
Bernie Lau
Geert Talens
Roman Tatch
Robert Feld
Joris Hanse
Yorick Bonnema
Arthur Jakobs
Date
25-01-12
10-05-12
13-07-12
26-07-12
26-07-12
26-07-12
26-07-12
26-07-12
26-07-12
26-07-12
Martin de Valois
Leandra Swiers
Thomas Warmerdam
Steven Duivenvoorden
Chris Lemmens
Merel van t Hoff
13-08-12
15-08-12
23-08-12
24-08-12
29-08-12
30-08-12
Present Position
MSc Programme, Astronomy
?
MSc Programme, Astronomy
MSc Programme, Astronomy
MSc Programme, Astronomy
MSc Programme, Astronomy
?
MSc Programme, Astronomy
?
travelling, afterwards
MSc Programme, Astronomy
MSc Programme, Astronomy
MSc Programme, Astronomy
MSc Programme, Astronomy
MSc Programme, Astronomy
MSc Programme, Astronomy
MSc Programme, Astronomy
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Chapter 3. Eduction, popularization and social events
3.3
3.3.1
Academic courses and pre-university programmes
Courses taught by Observatory staff
Bachelor course title
Introduction to astrophysics
Astronomy lab 1
Planetary systems
Modern astronomical research
Stars
Astronomy lab 2
Observational techniques 1
Radiative processes
Python cursus
Bachelor research project
Semester
1
2
2
3
4
4
5
5
5
5-6
Teacher
H. Linnartz
I. Snellen
M. Hogerheijde
M. Kenworthy
X. Tielens
H. Hoekstra
B. Brandl
E. Rossi
E. Deul
P. van der Werf & C. Keller
Master course title
IAC 2012: Galaxies, Structure,
dynamics and evolution of galaxies
Stellar structure and evolution
Origin and evolution of the universe
Interstellar matter
Large Scale Structure & Galaxy Formation
Stellar dynamics
Computational astrophysics
Detection of Light
Radio Astronomy
Semester
7, 8, 9, 10
Teacher
M. Franx
7,
7,
7,
7,
8,
8,
8,
8,
9,
9,
9,
9,
10
10
10
10
J. Schaye
K. Kuijken
P. van der Werf
J. Brinchmann
7,
7,
7,
7,
8,
8,
8,
8,
9,
9,
9,
9,
10
10
10
10
V. Icke
S. Portegies Zwart
M. Kenworthy
M. Garrett
3.3.2
Pre-university programme
LAPP-Top, the Leiden Advanced Pre-University Programme for Top Students,
is aimed at enthusiastic and ambitious high-school students from the 5th and
6th grade. Candidates are selected on the basis of their high-school grades and
their enthusiasm to participate, as shown by a letter of motivation. Students that
60
Chapter 3. Eduction, popularization and social events
are selected then take part in 6 to 8 meetings from January till May, following
the programme of their own choice. The Sterrewacht has been participating in the
LAPP-TOP programme since its start in 2001. In that pilot year 5 students participated, growing to 6 (2002/3), 11 (2003/4), 33 (2004/5), 17 (2005/6), 27 (2006/7),
16 (2007/8), 20 (2008/9), 10 (2009/10) , 25 (2010/11) and 26 (2011/12). The
astronomy LAPP-TOP programme was developed by Van der Werf from 2002 onward. From 2005-2008 the project was coordinated by Snellen. From 2008-2009 it
was coordinated by Franx. Since 2010 the project has been coordinated by Lub.
In eight sessions the following subjects were covered:
Course title
Extrasolar planets
The Milky Way and other galaxies
Practicum I
Building moleculs and planets in the universe
Black Holes
Practicum II
Cosmology
Excursion to the radio telescopes in
Westerbork and Dwingeloo
Teacher
I. Snellen
J. Schaye
A. Brown
E. van Dishoeck
P. van der Werf
V. Icke
H. Hoekstra
After successfully completing the programme participants have been awarded a
certificate from the University of Leiden. High-school students are allowed to use
this project to achieve credits for their final exams.
3.3.3
Contact.VWO
Contact.VWO has been in existence since May 2007. Buisman and Van der Hoorn
(physics teachers in secondary schools) both work one day a week for the Physics
and Astronomy Departments in order to intensify the contacts between secondary
schools and the university. Van der Hoorn organizes twice yearly a production and
mailing of posters and organizes three times an informative meeting for physics
teachers, starting at 5 p.m. and featuring a lecture on modern developments in
physics or astrophysics, an informal dinner with extensive networking between
teachers and university workers, and after-dinner subjects dealing with the change
61
Chapter 3. Eduction, popularization and social events
from secondary school to university study. Buisman is concerned with school
classes (programmes for whole-day visits as well as individual help(assisting ¿50
pupils with practical work). He also has organized a training session for the
module Measuring in Star Systems (Meten aan Melkwegstelsels) which is part
of the school curriculum track Nature, Life and Technology (Natuur, Leven en
Technologie). Contact.VWO answers requests for assistance by school pupils or
teachers. Buisman also has an appointment for half a day a week as local coordinator of the HiSPARC project, but although related, this is not a part of
the activities of Contact.VWO. Contact.Vwo works in cloth cooperation with the
Regionaal Steunpunt Leiden, directed by Ludo Juurlink. Further information:
http://www.physics.leidenuniv.nl/edu/contactpuntvwo/index.asp
Date
19 jan
03 feb
15 feb
02
14
09
15
Mar
mar
May
may
29 Jun
13 nov
10
13
08
30
oct
Oct
Nov
Nov
Activities at Leiden University in 2012 for teachers
Meeting with teachers: visit of the renovated Oude Leidse Sterrewacht
Instituutsdag for pupils visiting CERN afterwards (preparation)
Visit Hogeschool Zeeland with a delegation of faculteit W&N.
Theme: Materials
VLC: Exoplanets
Meeting with pupils & teachers: Einsteins Birthday
Leo Kanner: Exoplanets
Meeting with teachers: theme: Relation between experimental and
theoretical physics
RGS Slingerbos-levant: Exoplanets
Meeting with teachers: theme: Astrophysics: the molecular universe by Alexander Tielens
Educational Seminar Astronomy
Stedelijk Gym: Exoplanets
Visser t Hooft: Exoplanets
Bonaventura: Exoplanets
62
Chapter 3. Eduction, popularization and social events
3.4
Popularization and media contacts
van der Burg
Venus en Jupiter bijna op een lijn, diverse kranten (ANP), Maart 12 idem, Radio
5, Maart 13
idem, TV NED2 Tijd voor Max, Maart 13
Een gigantisch heelal gedomineerd door donkere materie, Publiekslezing, Leiden,
Juni 29
Knappe kop leidt vaak eenzaam bestaan, krant Spits, Juli 5
UFO’s boven Zuid-Holland?, TV Omroep West, Augustus 16
De radio telescoop SKA pathfinder, BNR nieuwsradio, Oktober 5
Een gigantisch heelal gedomineerd door donkere materie, Publiekslezing, Leiden,
November 8
Het belang van de maan bij het ontstaan van (complex) leven op aarde, Radio 5,
November 15
Voyager 1 in een nieuwe zone van het zonnestelsel, BNR nieuwsradio, December 5
van Kempen
Twice-weekly column on ALMA on www.astronomie.nl
Assistance and appearance on an episode on ALMA of Labyrinth (NTR/VPRO)
Kuijken
Gravitational Lensing: Studying the Dark Universe with Light Rays, public lecture, Leiden Natuurkundig Genootschap, January 19
Sterrenkunde, les voor basisschoolleerlingen, Montessorischool Oegstgeest, September 6
Astronomy (in the Netherlands), lecture for Brazilian government delegation,
Oude Sterrewacht, September 10
The Euclid Mission, Dutch Space company, Leiden; October 23
63
Chapter 3. Eduction, popularization and social events
van Lunteren
Frederik Kaiser en Nederlandse sterrenkunde van de negentiende eeuw, Rotary
Club Delft, February 15
De tragikomische geschiedenis van de meter, Ouderdag Leidsche Fles, Leiden, April
21
Wetenschap als spiegel van de maatschappij, Woensdagavondgezelschap, Utrecht,
October 3
De Fundamental Physics Group en de quantum revival, NNGC-Congres, Leiden,
October 27
Paul Ehrenfest en de moderne fysica, Natuurkundig Gezelschap, Utrecht, November 6
Maaskant
Sterrenkundige ‘live’ voorstellingen in het planetarium van Artis, Amsterdam (hele
jaar door o.a. museumnacht, ZOOmeravonden, kinderfeestjes).
van der Marel
Schijven met gaten: de geboortewieg van planeten, Sterrenkijkdagen, Leiden,
March 4
Chemie in de ruimte, KNVWS Arnhem, Arnhem, November 21
Portegies-Zwart
Leidse weer en sterrenkunde vereniging, Leiden, 24 Jan
VARA Radio 18 May
VPRO Radio 16 September
Presentation new Book of Ed van den Heuvel, Amsterdam 16 Mei 2013
Lecture at basisschool ter Cleeff, group 1, 5 and 7
Röttgering
Press releases on LOFAR
64
Chapter 3. Eduction, popularization and social events
3.5
Universe Awareness programme
A child’s early years are widely regarded to be the most important for their
development and the formation of their value systems (see article: Too Young
to Learn? http://www.unawe.org/about/audience/). Universe Awareness is an
IAU-endorsed programme that exploits the inspirational aspects of astronomy to
awaken the imagination of young children between 4 and 10 years, and excite in
them an early curiosity about science and technology. The goals are twofold: to
encourage children to develop an interest in science and technology and utilise the
unique perspective of astronomy to help broaden their minds, thereby stimulating
a sense of global citizenship and tolerance while they are still forming their value
systems.
An important goal of the UNAWE programme is to create an international network
that will provide a platform for sharing ideas, best practices and resources between
educators around the world. Since 2012, UNAWE is now active in 54 countries
around the world, with a total of 16 new national programmes beginning last year
alone. The global UNAWE network now consists of well over 600 astronomers,
teachers and other educators.
The National Project Managers (NPMs) for each of these countries are tasked
with running workshops that will give primary school teachers the training and
confidence to bring astronomy and space science topics to the classroom, and
organizing activities to inspire their local communities. Last year a total of 2869
teachers were trained by the programme and 124 491 children reached through
UNAWE activities.
Furthermore the NPMs are tasked with developing innovative new educational
resources for engaging young children in astronomy and space science. Several of
these resources are already being used in classrooms across the world, including
Universe in a Box (http://unawe.org/resources/universebox/) a new educational
toolkit for educators and Space Scoop (http://unawe.org/kids/) a regular astronomy news service for kids which is available in 19 different languages. In 12, 67
new Space Scoops were published making Space Scoop the world’s biggest and
best resource for astronomy news for children.
65
Chapter 3. Eduction, popularization and social events
3.6
Astronomy for Development
As Vice President of the International Astronomical Union, Miley continued to
lead the implementation of the IAU Strategic Plan 2010 - 2020 Astronomy for the
Developing World. This Plan foresees a substantial expansion of programmes and
funding, together with a large increase in the number of volunteers. Building on
the IYA model, the focus will be on a demand-driven coherent mix of sustainable
activities. As stated in the Plan, the large expansion and strategic approach requires a more suitable organisational structure and the creation of a small IAU
Office of Astronomy for Development (OAD) to coordinate and manage the implementation of the Plan. This office, a joint venture between the IAU and the
South African National Research Foundation hosted by the South African Astronomical Observatory in Cape Town began work in 2011, with Kevin Govender as
Director and Miley as Chair of its Steering Committee and of the IAU Extended
Development Oversight Committee.
During 2012, the OAD made considerable progress in establishing the structures
foreseen in the Plan. Three Task Forces were formed, namely Universities +
Research, Schools + Children and Public Outreach. Following a Call for Proposals,
IAU Regional Nodes of the OAD were created in East Asia and South East Asia
and as envisaged in the Plan, additional nodes are expected to come into operation
during the next few years. The Task Forces, regional nodes together with 400 OAD
volunteers will guarantee a demand-driven portfolio of activities. It is expected
that fund-raising activities for an expansion of the activities will begin in 2013.
Miley gave several talks to committees in the European Parliament about the
importance of astronomy for capacity building and development, particularly in
Africa and together with Govender (OAD; Cape Town) organised a Special Session
at the IAU General Assembly in Beijing in August 2012.
3.7
The Leidsch Astronomisch Dispuut F. Kaiser
L.A.D. ’F. Kaiser’ has organized several activities in 2012 to encourage the contacts
between Astronomy students from different years. Examples are movienights and
dinners. Furthermore, over 50 people (bachelor, master and PhD students and a
few staff members) participated in our annual soccer tournament on June 22nd.
66
Chapter 3. Eduction, popularization and social events
At the end of August, Joris Hanse and Bart Bijvoets left the board. The new
board (as of September 1st) consists of Chris Lemmens and Jeroen van Gorsel.
The new board continues the organization of activities for all Astronomy students
in 2013. In addition, it will resume its popular avondje sterrewacht in the Old
Observatory, just like L.A.D. ’F. Kaiser’ did in the past.
3.8
Vereniging van Oud-Sterrewachters
The ’Vereniging van Oud-Sterrewachters’ (VO-S; http://www.vo-s.nl) is the official association of Sterrewacht/Observatory (ex-)affiliates. It has been in existence
for over 15 years now and has seen another active year. As usual, the 150 members
were offered a variety of activities. The activities included a social drink prior to
the Oort Lecture and an annual meeting. This year, the annual meeting was held
at the Kapteyn Institute in Groningen. The attending members where given a tour
of the laboratories where the detectors for the ALMA observatory are prepared.
The day was ended with a visit to the University Museum in the city Groningen.
VO-S members also received a newsletters with Sterrewacht news and were offered
an electronic member dictionary.
Further information: http://www.vo-s.nl/
67
Appendix
I
Observatory
staff
Appendix
Observatory
staff
I
(As on December 31, 2012)
Names, e-mail addresses, room numbers, and telephone numbers of all
current personnel can be found on the Sterrewacht website:
http://www.strw.leidenuniv.nl/people
Telephone extensions should always be preceded by (071) 527 ... (from
inside The Netherlands) or by +3171527 ... (from abroad)
Full Professors
E.F. van Dishoeck
M. Franx
C.U. Keller
K.H. Kuijken
H.V.J. Linnartz
F.H. van Lunteren
S.F. Portegies Zwart
H.J.A. Röttgering
J. Schaye
I.A.G. Snellen
A.G.G.M. Tielens
P.P. v.d. Werf
P.T. de Zeeuw
(UL (o.5) / VU (0.3), Teijler’s hoogleraar)
(0.0, DG ESO)
71
Appendix I. Observatory staff
Affiliate Professors
D. van Delft*
(0.0, Stichting tot beheer Museum Boerhaave, Museum Boerhaave)
(0.0, J.H. Oortfonds)
(0.0, J.H. Oortfonds)
(0.0)
(0.0, Universiteit van Amsterdam)
N.J. Doelman
C.W.M. Fridlund**
M.A. Garrett***
W.J. Jaffe
* Director Museum Boerhaave
** Staff scientist ESTEC / ESA
*** Director ASTRON
Associate Professors, Assistant Professors, senior researchers
R.J. Bouwens
B.R. Brandl
J. Brinchmann
A.G.A. Brown
M. Haverkorn*
(0.0)
H. Hoekstra
M.R. Hogerheijde
W.J. Jaffe
(0.0)
M.A. Kenworthy
H.J. van Langevelde**
(0.0)
I.F.L. Labbé
Y. Levin***
(0.0)
J. Lub
(0.0)
R.S. Le Poole
(0.0)
E.M. Rossi
R. Stuik
R.P.J. Tilanus
(0.0)
* Staff Radboud University Nijmegen
** Director JIVE, Dwingeloo
*** Monash University Melbourne, Australia
72
Appendix I. Observatory staff
Emeriti
A.M. van Genderen
H.J. Habing
I. van Houten-Groeneveld
V. Icke
F.P. Israel
K. Kwee
G.K. Miley
(0.0)
(0.0)
(0.0)
Postdocs and Project Personnel and longterm visiting scientists
F.C.M. Bettonvil
(0.0 ASTRON)
J.L. Birkby
NWO-VC
J.B. Bossa
EU- IEF
G. Busso
NOVA
M. Cacciato
NWO-VI
A. Candian
NWO
L.R. Carlson
EU-ERC
R.A. Crain
NWO-VC
B.A. Devecchi
EU-ERC
N. Drost
(0.0, E-science Center, NWO)
S. Giodini
NWO-VI
A.K. van Elteren
NWO-M
I.R. Guerra Aleman
NWO-SPINOZA
J.S. Guss
NWO-VI
B. Holwerda
guest (ESTEC)
R.H. Hammerschlag
guest
A.N. Heays
UL
J. Holt
NWO SPINOZA
S. Ioppolo
UL
M. Iwasawa
NWO-M
E.M. Helmich
NWO-M
N. Irisarri Mendez
NWO-M
J.T.A. de Jong
NWO-M
A. Juhasz
NWO-ALLEGRO
J.K. Katgert-Merkelijn
guest
T.A. van Kempen
NOVA
P.D. Klaassen
NWO-ALLEGRO
73
Appendix I. Observatory staff
V.A. Korkiakoski
L.E. Kristensen
A.F. Loenen
A. Madigan
T.P.K. Martinsson
G.S. Mathews
S.L. McGee
J.A. Meisner
R. Meijerink
J.C. Mottram
A.V. Muzzin
B.D. Oppenheimer
S.G. Patel
F.I. Pelupessy
A. Petrignani
D.A. Rafferty
F.L. Rafferty
M. Raicevic
E.E. Rigby
D. Risquez Oneca
M. Rodenhuis
P.M. Rodrigues Dos Santos Russo
K.J. Rosdahl
E. Schmalzl
M. Schmalzl
W.C. Schrier
E. Semboloni
D.R. Serrano Goncalves Sobral
M. Shiraki Fuji
F. Snik
S. Taylor Muzzin
S. v.d. Tol
L. Venema
M. Viola
N. de Vries
A.J. Walsh
C. Walsh
STW
UL
NOVA
NWO-VI
NOVA
EU-ERC
NWO-VC
NOVA
(0.0, RUG)
NWO-VC
NWO-SPINOZA
NWO-VI
EU-ERC
NWO-M
EU ERC
NOVA
NOVA
NWO VC
NWO-TOP
NOVA
STW
EU-EUNAWE
EU-ERC
NOVA
NOVA
EU-EUNAWE
EU-ERC
NWO-VI
guest (JSPS grant)
NWO-ESFRI-ELT
NWO-SPINOZA
NOVA
guest (ASTRON)
NWO-VC, EU-ERC
NWO-M
NWO-VI
EU-ERC
74
Appendix I. Observatory staff
R.J. van Weeren
S.M. Weinmann
D. Zhao
J. Zhen
J.E. van Zwieten
NOVA
EU-ERC
NWO-VI
ERC
guest (Science&Technology, ASTRON)
Promovendi
A.S. Abdullah
H.E. Andrews Mancilla
J. Bedorf
T.C.N. Boekholt
J. de Boer
M. Brogi
R.F.J. v.d. Burg
D.P. Caputo
D.J. Carton
Y. Cavecchi
N. Clementel
S.H. Cuylle
M.P. van Daalen
M. De Juan Ovelar
E. Di Gloria
M.N. Drozdovskaya
A. Elbers
E.C. Fayolle
G. Fedoseev
J. Franse
M. Fumagalli
G. Goncalves Ferrari
K.M. Guss
A.S. Hamers
D.S. Harsono
G. van Harten
S. Heikamp
E. v.d. Helm
R.T.L. Herbonnet
M. Iacobelli
EU-ERC
EU-ERC
NWO
NWO-VI
NWO-VI
NOVA
NWO-VI
NWO-VI
NWO-VC
NOVA/UL (Amsterdam)
NWO-VC
EU-ITN-LASSIE
UL
NWO-ESFRI-ELT
NWO-VI
UL
ASTRON
NOVA
NWO-VI
NWO (LION)
EU-ERC
guest
NOVA, UL
NWO-VI
NOVA-SRON-UL
UU
NWO-ESFRI-ELT
NOVA
EU-ERC
NWO/UL
75
Appendix I. Observatory staff
M.P.H. Israel
T. Karalidi
M. Kazandjian
F. Koehlinger
F. Krause
S. Krijt
M.A. Kulkarni
A.L.M. Lamberts
X. Li
N. Lopez Gonzaga
K.M. Maaskant
N. v.d. Marel
C.A. Martinez Barbosa
J.R. Martinez Galarza
T.R. Meshkat
L.K. Morabito
M. Mosleh
S.V. Nefs
B.B. Ochsendorf
G.P.P.L. Otten
D.M. Paardekooper
B. Pila Diez
W.M. de Pous
A. Rahmati
A.J. Richings
S. Rieder
A.J. Rimoldi
M.J. Rosenberg
M. Sadatshirazi
F.J. Salgado Cambiazo
I. San Jose Garcia
J. v.d. Sande
H. Schwarz
C. Shneider
C.J. Sifon Andalaft
R. Smit
C.M.S. Straatman
ASTRON, UL
(0.0) SRON
UL
NWO
EU-ERC
UL
NWO ESFRI-ELT
NWO-Astrochemie
NWO-Astrochemie
NWO-VC
NOVA
NOVA
EU-ITN-GREAT
NOVA
UL / EU-IG
NWO-TOP
UL
NWO-VC
EU-ERC
NWO-ESFRI-ELT
NWO-VI
NOVA
NWO-SPINOZA
NOVA
EU-ITN-COSMOCOMP
NWO
NWO-VI
NOVA
UL
EU-ERC
EU-ITN-LASSIE
NOVA
EU-ITN-LASSIE
NWO-VI
EU-ERC
NWO-VC
NWO-SPINOZA
76
Appendix I. Observatory staff
A.H. Streefland
A. Stroe
D. Szomoru
M.L. Turner
M.B.M. Velander
M. Velliscig
S. Verdolini
F. v.d. Voort
K. Wang
M.P.M. Weiss
T.I.M. van Werkhoven
W.L. Williams
U. Yildiz
FOM/UL
NWO-TOP
EU-ERC
NWO-ITN-COSMOCOMP
NWO-M
EU-ITN-COSMOCOMP
UL
NWO-VI
NOVA
UL/Teylers stichting
STW
UL-ASTRON
UL
Support Staff
J.C. Drost
E. Gerstel
A.N.G. Pen-Oosthoek
N. Strookman
G.A. v.d. Tang
L. v.d. Veld
Management assistant
Institute Manager
Programme Coordinator BSc and MSc
Assistant Programme Coordinator
Secretary
Secetary
Computer Staff
E.R. Deul
D.J. Jansen
N. Verbeek
A. Vos
Manager Computer group
Scientific Programmer
Programmer
Programmer
NOVA office
W.H.W.M. Boland
E.F. van Dishoeck
C.W.M. Groen
J.T. Quist
Managing Director
Scientific Director
Financial Controller
Management Assistant
77
Appendix
II
Committee
membership
Appendix
Committee
membership
II.1
II
Observatory Committees
Directorate
(Directie onderzoekinstituut)
H.J.A. Röttgering (director of research)
P.P. van der Werf (director of studies)
E. Gerstel (institute manager)
Observatory management team
(Management Team Sterrewacht)
H.J.A. Röttgering (chair)
E.R. Deul
J. Drost (minutes)
I. Snellen (outreach)
E. Gerstel (chair)
F.P. Israel
P.P. van der Werf (advisor)
Supervisory council
(Raad van Advies)
J.A.M. Bleeker (chair)
B. Baud
J.F. van Duyne
K. Gaemers
C. Waelkens
Research committee
(Onderzoek-commissie OZ)
M. Franx (chair)
A.G.A. Brown
M. Hogerheijde
W. Jaffe
P.P. van der Werf
81
Appendix II. Committee membership
Research institute scientific council
(Wetenschappelijke raad onderzoekinstituut)
B. Brandl
H.V.J. Linnartz
A.G.A. Brown
F. van Lunteren
E.R. Deul
S. Portegies Zwart
E.F. van Dishoeck
H.J.A. Röttgering
M. Franx (chair)
J. Schaye
H. Hoekstra
I. Snellen
M. Hogerheijde
R. Stuik
C.U. Keller
A.G.G.M. Tielens
K.H. Kuijken
P.T. de Zeeuw
R. Bouwens
J. Brinchmann
M. Kenworthy
E. Rossi
F.P. Israel
V. Icke
R.S. Le Poole
G.K. Miley
W. Jaffe
J. Lub
D. van Delft
N. Doelman
M. Garret
M. Haverkorn
H.J. van Langevelde
Institute council
(Instituutsraad)
E. Deul (chair)
J. Drost
W.J. Jaffe
H. Hoekstra
M. Hogerheijde
T. Pijloo
E. van Uitert
Astronomy education committee
(Opleidingscommissie OC)
H.V.J. Linnartz (chair)
E. van Dishoeck
M. Franx
C.U. Keller
J. van de Sande
G. de Wit
J. Hoeijmakers
S. Khalafinejad
A. Pietrow
M.C. Segers
M. Sunder
82
Appendix II. Committee membership
Astronomy board of examiners
(Examencommissie)
J. Lub (chair)
J. Aarts (Physics)
J. Brinchmann
F.P.Israel
I. Snellen
Oort Scholarship Committee
B. Brandl
S. Portegies Zwart
J. Schaye
Mayo Greenberg Prize committee
G. Miley (chair)
E.F. van Dishoeck
E. Gerstel
H.V.J. Linnartz
J. Lub
PhD admission advisory committee
E. Rossi (chair)
R. Bouwens
MSc admission advisory committee
J. Schaye (chair)
B. Brandl
S. Portegies Zwart
Graduate student review committee
(Promotie begeleidingscommissie)
A.G.G.M. Tielens (chair)
B. Brandl
J. Brinchmann
H. Linnartz
M. Franx
Colloquium committee
J. Brinchmann
M. Kenworthy
Computer committee
R. Bouwens (chair)
R. Crain
M. Schmalzel
R. Stuik
S. Portegies Zwart
Library committee
W.J. Jaffe (chair)
F.P. Israel
J. Lub
83
Appendix II. Committee membership
Public outreach committee
I. Snellen (chair)
M. van Daalen
R. Smit
J. van de Sande
R. van der Burg
Social committee
E. Fayolle
T. Meshkat
M. Rosenberg
A. van der Tang
II.2
N. van der Marel
R. Meijerink
I. Snellen
F. Snik
University Committees (non-Observatory)
Brown
Member, Faculteitsraad
van Dishoeck
Member, Raad van Toezicht, Leiden Institute of Physics (LION)
Franx
Director, Leids Kerkhoven Bossche Fonds
Director, Leids Sterrewacht Fonds
Director, Oort Fonds
Organizer, Oort professor workshop
Member, School of Science Science Committee (WECO)
Kuijken
Chairman, Board of Directors Leids Sterrewacht Fonds
Chairman, Board of Directors Oort Fonds
Member, Board of Directors Leids Kerkhoven Bosscha Fonds
Member, curatorium Teylers Professorship on History of Science
Member, Lorentz Chair appointment committee (Physics)
84
Appendix II. Committee membership
van Langevelde
Chairman, Board of directors Leids Kerkhoven Bosscha Fonds
Member, Board of directors Leids Sterrewacht Fonds
Member, Board of directors Jan Hendrik Oort Fonds
Linnartz
Member, FMD/ELD user committee
van Lunteren
Scientific Board Scaliger Institute
Historical Committee of Leiden University
Studium Generale Committee Leiden University
Writer-in-residence Committee Leiden University
Röttgering
Chair, Education Committee Astronomy
Member, Joint Education Committee Physics and Astronomy
Member, Curatorium of the professorship at Leiden University “Experimental Astroparticle physics”
Schaye
Member, astronomy program board, Lorentz Center
Snellen
Member, LUF International Study Fund (LISF) committee
Member, PR committee, Faculty of Science
van der Werf
Organist of the Academy Auditorium
85
Appendix
III
Science policy
functions
Appendix
Science policy
functions
III
Brandl
PI, METIS (mid-IR instrument for the E-ELT)
Deputy co-PI MIRI (mid-IR instrument for the JWST)
co-I KINGFISH Herschel Open Time Nearby Galaxies Key Project
Member, NOVA Instrument Steering Committee (ISC)
Member, DAG (Turkish 4m telescope) advisory board
Member, ESFRI board
Member, METIS Chopper CDR review board
Member, METIS cooler review board
Member, METIS immersed grating review
Brown
Chair, Gaia Data Processing and Analysis Consortium
Member, Gaia Science Team
Vice President, IAU Commission 8
Member, IAU Commission 37
Member, EU Marie-Curie ITN Gaia Research for European Astronomy Training
(GREAT)
Member, Steering Committee ESF-RNP Gaia Research for European Astronomy
Training (GREAT)
van Dishoeck
Scientific Director, Netherlands Research School for Astronomy (NOVA)
Co-Editor, Annual Reviews of Astronomy & Astrophysics
Member, SRON Board
89
Appendix III. Science policy functions
Member, Gebiedsbestuur Exacte Wetenschappen (GB-E)
Member, National Committee on Astronomy (NCA)
Member, MPIA-Heidelberg Fachbeirat
Member, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics review committee
Member, Herschel-HIFI Science team
Co-PI, European JWST-MIRI consortium
President, IAU Division H
Vice-President, IAU Commission 14
President, IAU Working Group on Astrochemistry
Coordinator, Herschel-HIFI WISH Key Program
Franx
Coordinator, Nova network 1 science team
Organizer and lecturer, National Astronomy course
Member, Young Academy selection committee
Member, KNAW sectie physics and astronomy
Member, James Webb Space Telescope Science Working Group
Member, NIRSPEC Science Team
Member, MUSE Science Team
Member, IAU commission 28 Organizing committee
Hoekstra
Member, Science Advisory Committee, Isaac Newton Group
Euclid Consortium Coordinator
Lead Weak Lensing Group
Member Euclid Consortium Coordination Group
Member Euclid Consortium Calibration Working group
Member Euclid Consortium Membership committee
Member Euclid Consortium Editorial Board
Hogerheijde
Member, ALMA
Member, ALMA
Member, ALMA
Project Scientist
Science Advisory Committee
European Science Advisory Committee
European Regional Center Coordinating Committee
for CHAMP+/Netherlands
90
Appendix III. Science policy functions
Co-coordinator, JCMT Gould Belt legacy Survey
Secretary/treasurer, Board of Directors Leids Kerkhoven-Bosscha Fonds
Secretary/treasurer, Board of Directors Leids Sterrewacht Fonds
Secretary/treasurer, Board of Directors Jan Hendrik Oort Fonds
Keller
Chair of the Board, Isaac Newton Group of Telescopes
Chair, Science Advisory Committee, Kiepenheuer Institute for Solar Physics,
Freiburg, Germany
Chair of the Board, Olga Koningfonds, The Netherlands
Member, E-ELT Project Science Team, ESO
Member, Foundation of the Kiepenheuer Institute for Solar Physics, Freiburg,
Germany
Member, Scientific Committee of the Istituto Ricerche Solari Locarno (IRSOL)
Locarno, Switzerland
Kenworthy
Member, NRF/NWO workshop on defining ”Astronomy and Enabling Technologies for Astronomy”
Kuijken
Scientific Delegate from the Netherlands, ESO Council
Member, Scientific Strategy Working Group, ESO Council
Chair, ESO contact committee
Member and Chair (until November 2012), NOVA Board
Member and Vice-chair, Netherlands Committee for Astronomy
Co-editor, Strategic Plan for Astronomy in the Netherlands 2011-2020
PI, ESO KiDS Survey
PI, OmegaCAM project
Co-I, ESO VIKING Public Survey
Co-I, Planetary Nebulae Spectrograph project
Board Member, Physics Society Diligentia (the Hague)
Board Member, Kapteyn Fonds (Groningen)
Member, European Research Council Starting Grants Panel
91
Appendix III. Science policy functions
Linnartz
Chair, ’SPIN’ chair for Molecular Laboratory Astrophysics, LCVU
Editor, CAMOP (Comments on Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics / Physica
Scripta)
Chair, LOC and co-chair SOC IAU297 The diffuse interstellar bands
Chair, LOC and co-chair SOC FD168 Solid state astrochemistry
External advisor, RSC/RAS Astrophysical Chemistry Group
Member, European Task Force for Laboratory Astrophysics
Research coordinator, FP7 ITN ’LASSIE’ (Laboratory Astrochemical Surface Science In Europe)
Theme coordinator NWO-EW/CW ’DAN’ (Dutch Astrochemistry Network)
Workgroup leader, FOM group FOM-L-027
Member, NWO-CW ’Spectroscopy and Theory’
Member, NWO-FOM ’COMOP” (Condensed Matter and Optical Physics)
Member, HRSMC research school
Lub
Member Board Astronomy and Astrophysics
Penningmeester Nederlandse Astronomenclub
van Langevelde
Member, Consortium board of directors European VLBI Network
Member, RadioNet Board and Executive Board
Coordinator, NEXPReS (Novel EXploration Pushing Robust e-VLBI Systems),
board and management team
Member, European SKA Consortium
Member, NOVA Instrumentation Steering Committee
Member, Dutch URSI committee
Member, SKA klankbordgroep NL
Member, Allegro steering committee
van Lunteren
Education and Research Board Huizinga Institute, Research School for Cultural
History
92
Appendix III. Science policy functions
Miley
Vice President, International Astronomical Union (Education and Development)
Chair, IAU Extended Development Oversight Committee
Chair, Steering Committee, IAU Office of Astronomy for Development (OAD)
International Coordinator, EU Universe Awareness FP7 Project
Chair, LOFAR Research Management Committee
Chair, LOFAR Survey Science Group, Highest Redshift Objects
Trustee, Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI- managing body of US National Radio
Astronomy Observatory)
Member, Executive Committee International Astronomical Union
Member, Advisory Panel on Astronomy to the South African Minister for Science
and Technology
Member, European Research Council, Selection of Advanced Grant Awardees
Member, UK South Eastern Universities Physics Network (SEPNET) Scientific
Advisory Committee
Member, Board of Governors of the LOFAR Foundation
Member, Core Team, LOFAR Surveys Key Project
Portegies-Zwart
Member of the Scientific Steering Committee, PRACE
International review commision board, ESF
Member of the science advisory board, GAIA
AMUSE progress representative, NOVA ISC
External advisor, Quatar NSF, Quatar national science foundation
Member, IAU Division VII Galactic System
Member, IAU Division VII Commission 37 Star Clusters & Associations
Röttgering
Key researcher NOVA research school
Member, ASTRON Science Advisory Committee
Member, Science team MID-infrared Interferometric instrument for VLTI (MIDI)
Member, XMM Large Scale Structure Survey Consortium
PI, DCLA (Development and Commissioning of LOFAR for Astronomy) project
for the scientific preparation of science with LOFAR at 4 partaking Netherlands
universities
PI, LOFAR surveys: Opening up a new window on the Universe
93
Appendix III. Science policy functions
Member,
Member,
Member,
Member,
Member,
Member,
Member,
LOFAR’s NL-LAC, national LOFAR steering committee
Spitzer warm legacy survey project SERVS
Euclid consortium board
Herschel H-ATLAS survey
SCUBA-2 legacy surveys review panel
Board LOFAR International Telescope
Extra-galactic science team SPICA/SAFARIMember, NOVA Board
Schaye
Member of the steering committee, Virgo Consortium for cosmological supercomputer simulations
Co-Investigator, MUSE (Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer)
Key researcher, NOVA (the Dutch research school for astronomy)
Member, MUSE science team
Member, LOFAR Epoch of Reionization science team
Member, EUCLID cosmological simulations working group
Member, Editorial Board, Scientific Reports
Member, Scientific Organizing Committee, ”The picture of galaxy evolution painted
with Lyman alpha”, Rome, Italy
Member, Scientific Organizing Committee, ”COSMOCOMP Workshop”, Trieste,
Italy
PI, OWLS collaboration (OverWhelmingly Large Simulations)
PI, EAGLE collaboration (Evolution and Assembly of GaLaxies and their Environments)
Snellen
Member, PLATO consortium
Member, ESA ECHO science study team
Member, METIS consortium
Board member, Nederlandse Astronomen Club
Member, Telescope Allocation Committee, NASA Hubble Space Telescope - cycle19
Member, NWO Rubicon Committee
94
Appendix III. Science policy functions
Tielens
Member KNAW, sectie Physics and Astronomy
van der Werf
Member, James Clerk Maxwell Telescope Board
Principal Investigator, SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey
Principal Investigator, Herschel Comprehensive ULIRG Emission Survey
Co-investigator, HIFI
Co-investigator, MIRI
Member, METIS Science Team
Member, STFC Herschel Oversight Committee
Member, TAMASIS Network
Project Scientist, AMKID submillimeter camera
95
Appendix
IV
Workshops,
colloquia
and lectures
IV.1
Appendix
Workshops,
colloquia
and lectures
IV
Workshops
Most of the workshops were held in the Lorentz Center, an international center which coordinates and hosts workshops in the sciences. In 2012 the Leiden
astronomers contributed to the following workshops there:
Feb 27 - Mar 2
Exciting CO in the Local and High-Redshift Universe
Organizers: Bergin, van Dishoeck, Kristensen, Loenen, Meijerink, Ossenkopf,
Röllig, Visser
Mar 26 - 30
Astronomy to Inspire and Educate Young Children: EU Universe Awareness Workshop
Organizers: Bailey, Govender, Madsen, Manxoyi, Miley, Odman, Pacini, Quirrenbach, Ros, Russo, Scorza
June 4 - 15
Studies of Star and Planet Forming Regions with Herschel
Organizers: van Dishoeck, Evans
99
Appendix IV. Workshops, colloquia and lectures
July 23 - 27
Gas, Stars, and Black Holes in the Galaxy Ecosystem
Organizers: Miley, Overzier, Wild
Aug 6 - 10
The Dynamic Nature of Baryons in Halos
Organizers: Bregman, Bullock, Crain, Oppenheimer, Putman, Tumlinson
Sep 10 - 14
Compact Binaries in Globular Clusters
Organizers: Benacquista, Heinke, Knigge, Pooley, Portegies Zwart, Voss
Oct 22 - 26
How to Find Our Nearest Neighbors
Organizers: Fridlund, Kenworthy, Malbet, Oppenheimer, Quirrenbach, Stapelfeldt,
Traub
IV.2
Endowed Lectures
May 10 (University Auditorium)
Oort Lecture Cosmology: it really makes you wonder
Organizers: Sandra Faber (LICK observatory, University of California, santa Cruz,
USA)
Dec 18 (De Sitter Lecture Hall)
Sackler Lecture Type Ia Supernovae, The Accelerating Cosmos and
Dark Energy
Organizers: Brian Schmidt (Australian National University, School of Astronomy
and Astrophysics, Canberra, Australia)
100
Appendix IV. Workshops, colloquia and lectures
Dec 19 (University Auditorium)
Public Lecture The Accelerating Universe
Organizers: Brian Schmidt (Australian National University, School of Astronomy
and Astrophysics, Canberra, Australia)
IV.3
Scientific Colloquia
Date
Speaker (affiliation)
01/05/13 Liesbeth Vermaas (Leiden Observatory)
01/19/13 Vanessa Hill (Observatoire de la
Cte d’Azur)
01/25/13 George Sonneborn (Goddard
Space Flight Center NASA)
01/26/13 Coryn Bailer-Jones (Max Planck
Institute for Astronomy, Heidelberg)
01/31/13 Maarten van Hoven (Leiden Observatory)
02/02/13 Luis A. Aguilar (Instituto de Astronomia, UNAM, Mexico)
02/06/13 Chuck Steidel (Caltech)
Title
Spectroscopy and nuclear dynamics of starburst galaxies [PhD colloquium]
Stellar chemistries in the MilkyWay and its satellites as probe of
galaxy assembly
SN 1987A: The Supernova of the
Century
Patterns in astronomical impacts
on the Earth: Testing the claims
Seismology of Magnetars (PhD
colloquium)
Detecting substructure in the
galactic stellar halo with Gaia
Lyman Alpha and Lyman Continuum Emission from High-z
Galaxies
02/09/13 Sandy Faber (Lick Observatory) Emerging Principles of Galaxy
Formation
02/16/13 Roman Teyssier (CEA Saclay)
Galaxy formation: the role of
feedback from small to large
scales
02/23/13 Steve Eales (School of Physics Twelve billion years of star forand Astronomy, Cardiff Univer- mation in galaxies ? the Herschel
sity)
perspective so far
101
Appendix IV. Workshops, colloquia and lectures
03/01/13 Freeke van de Voort (Leiden Ob- Feeding galaxies and their
servatory)
gaseous haloes (PhD Colloquium)
03/08/13 Leen Decin (KU Leuven)
Chemical enrichment of the ISM
through the mass loss of evolved
stars
03/22/13 Juan Rafael Martinez Galarza Infrared Spectroscopy of Star(Leiden Observatory)
bursts: From Spitzer-ORS to
JWST-MIRI (PhD colloquium)
03/29/13 Eugene Chiang (UC Berkeley)
Close-in Planets:
From Hot
Jupiters to Super Mercuries
04/19/13 Sylvain Veilleux (University of Galactic Winds and Their CosMaryland)
mological Implications
04/26/13 Imke de Pater (University of Cal- What Wonderful Worlds: Explorifornia, Berkeley)
ing our Solar System
05/03/13 Adam Deller (ASTRON)
Mapping the Galactic neighbourhood with microarcsecond astrometry
05/10/13 Suzanne Aigrain (Oxford Univer- From exoplanet atmospheres to
sity)
starspots: using Gaussian processes to model astrophysical
time-series data
05/24/13 Nicole Nesvadba (Institut dAs- Winds and turbulence: The two
trophysique Spatiale, Centre Uni- faces of AGN feedback
versitaire d’Orsay)
05/30/13 Jeanette Bast (Leiden Observa- Hot Chemistry and Physics in
tory)
Planet Forming Zones of Disks
(PhD colloquium)
05/31/13 David Hogg (New York Univer- Finding the dark matter
sity)
06/07/13 Max Pettini (University of Cam- In Search of Near-Pristine Gas at
bridge)
Intermediate Redshifts
06/14/13 Giovanni Strazzulla (INAF ? Os- Ion Irradiation Induced Effects on
servatorio Astrofisico di Catania) Airless Bodies in the Solar System
102
Appendix IV. Workshops, colloquia and lectures
06/21/13 Joe Hennawi (MPIA, Heidelberg)
06/28/13
09/27/13
10/04/13
10/11/13
10/18/13
11/01/13
11/08/13
11/15/13
11/22/13
11/29/13
12/06/13
12/13/13
Quasars Probing Quasars: Circumgalactic Gas in Absorption
and Emission
Karl Gordon (STScl)
Extragalactic Dust Mass Determinations in the Optical and Infrared: Dust Emissivity Variations
Brad Gibson (University of Cen- Spirals with Supercomputers:
tral Lancashire)
Have We Finally Got it Right?
Mark Wyatt (Institute of Astron- Signatures of planets and of
omy, University of Cambridge)
planet formation in debris disks
Meghan Gray (University of Not- STAGES: Galaxy Evolution and
tingham)
Environment
Glenn van de Ven (Max Planck A mixed origin of the Milky
Institute for Astronomy, Heidel- Way?s thick disk
berg)
Nick Cox (Leuven)
New developments towards identifying the diffuse interstellar
band carriers
Michele Cappellari (University of Galaxy scaling relations, dark
Oxford)
matter and the variation of the
stellar IMF
Lucio Mayer (ETH Zurich)
Realistic spiral galaxies and no
missing satellites in simulations of
the CDM Universe: the combined
role of star formation modeling
and resolution
Barbara Catinella (MPA Garch- HI and star formation properties
ing)
of massive galaxies
Karoliina Isokoski (Leiden Obser- The physics and chemistry of invatory)
terstellar ice (PhD colloquium)
Phil Uttley (Astronomical Insti- Signals from the noise: how to detute Anton Pannekoek)
code black hole variability
Melvyn Davies (Lund Observa- The Dynamical Evolution of Extory)
oplanet Systems
103
Appendix IV. Workshops, colloquia and lectures
IV.4
Student Colloquia
Date
Speaker
02/20/13 Siebe Weersma
06/04/13 Tjibaria Pijloo
Title
Cooling in nearby active galaxies
Statistically probing the influence
of AGN on their host galaxies
with COSMOS
Looking for a Dark Matter Decay
Signal
Spitzer and Herschel Study of
RCW49
Shear Nulling after PSF Gaussianization (SNAPG): A New
Shape Measurement Algorithm
for Weak Lensing
Finding
Protoclusters
With
SPIRE
Feasibility of transit spectroscopy
of nearby debris disks
Activity Level of Solar-Type
Stars in CoRoT and Kepler Field
and Its Impact on Planetary Detection
Molecules to Diagnose Young
Stellar Objects: The LOMASS
Database
A new Polarimetric Investigation
of the Atmosphere of Venus
Modeling the CO-ladder of NGC
4418: AGN or starburst galaxy?
06/18/13 Jeroen Franse
06/22/13 Maria Drozdovskaya
06/29/13 Axel Buddendiek
09/03/13 Ricardo Herbonnet
09/17/13 Sascha Zeegers
09/25/13 Carla Natario
09/26/13 Jaya Ramchandani
09/27/13 Lars Einarsen
10/01/13 Vincent Oomen
104
Appendix IV. Workshops, colloquia and lectures
IV.5
Colloquia given outside Leiden
Brandl
To See or not to See: Zooming in on Starbursts, Department of Astronomy, University of Vienna; January 23
Idem, NRAO, Charlottesville; March 29
Idem, STScI, Baltimore; April, 2
METIS - the Mid-infrared E-ELT Imager and Spectrograph, NAC Meeting, Ameland; May 24
Idem, SPIE Meeting, Amsterdam; July 6
Idem, MOS workshop, Amsterdam; October 25
Idem, SRON Colloquium Series, Utrecht; November 2
Idem, RAS Special Meeting, London; November 8
Bossa
Mass-analytical tool for reactions in interstellar ices (MATRIICES), Colloque SFE
2012, France; November 12
Bouwens
Galaxy Build-up and Evolution at z≥7: Results from ultra-deep WFC3/IR observations over the HUDF, GOODS, and CANDELS fields, Garching, Germany;
January 30
The Build-up and Evolution of Galaxies in the First 2 Gyr of the Universe, Strasbourg, France; April 23
Idem, Kyoto, Japan; May 24
New Results on Galaxy Build-up, Faint-end Slopes, and the Role of Galaxies in
Reionizing the Universe from the CANDELS+HUDF09+IUDF programs, Rome,
Italy; July 2
Early Results from the Cluster Lensing and Supernovae Survey with Hubble,
Rome, Italy; July 5
Build-up of Galaxies in the First 3 Gyr of the Universe, Santa Cruz, USA; August
13
Using HST+Spitzer to characterize the Build-up of Galaxies in the Early Universe,
Beijing, China; August 27
105
Appendix IV. Workshops, colloquia and lectures
Characterizing the Build-up of stellar mass using MUSE and Spitzer/IRAC Observations, Satillieu, France; October 3
Systematic Searches for z 9 Galaxies within CLASH, Bilbao, Spain; October 17
Brown
Gaia status and data release scenario, Galaxy Modelling with a Gaia mock catalogue, Barcelona, Spain; February 29
Gaia Early data releases and thoughts on data access facilities, Dynamics Meets
Kinematic Tracers,Ringberg Castle, Germany; April 13
Gaia archive preparation, EWASS, Rome, Italy; July 4
Gaia mission overview and early data releases, Science with 4MOST, Potsdam,Germany;
November 13
van der Marel
Mind the gap: Cold gas in transitional disks, ETH, Zurich, Switzerland; January
24
Idem, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, USA; June 19
Idem, PUC, Santiago, Chile; August 31
Idem, ALMA SCO, Santiago, Chile; September 7
Idem, KIAA, Beijing, China; September 24
Planet formation in action: Resolved gas and dust images of a transitional disk
and its cavity, NOVA Network 2 meeting, Groningen, the Netherlands; December
7
Triggered planet formation in action: Resolved gas and dust images of a transitional disk and its cavity, First Science with ALMA conference, Puerto Varas,
Chile; December 14
van Dishoeck
VLT-CRIRES survey of protostars and disks around T Tauri stars: from physics
to chemistry,ETH, Zurich, Switzerland; January 23
Water in space: from interstellar clouds to planet-forming disks, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; January 27
Idem, Cornell University, Ithaca, USA; March 26
Idem, California Institute of Technology, USA; April 25 (Greenstein lecture)
Idem, University of California, Santa Cruz, USA; April 28
106
Appendix IV. Workshops, colloquia and lectures
Idem, University of Copenhagen, Denmark; May 23
Idem, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden; May 24
Idem, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics, Beijing, China; August 16
Idem, Institut fur Astrophysik, Gottingen, Germany; November 6
A WISH come true: water in star-forming regions with Herschel, Universitat Sternwarte, Munich, Germany; January 25
Idem,Institute for molecules and materials, Nijmegen; April 13
Idem,Universiteit van Amsterdam, Netherlands; October 31
Molecular processes between the stars,Dalian Institute for Chemical Physics, Dalian,
China; August 23
Building stars, planets and the ingredients for life between the stars, Cornell University, USA; March 27 (University lecturer)
Idem, Institute for Complex Molecular Systems, Eindhoven; October 4
Idem, Physikalisches Institut, Cologne, Germany; October 19
Sweet results from ALMA,Joint ALMA Office, Santiago, Chile; December 19
Idem, Paranal Observatory, Paranal, Chile; December 27
Hoekstra
The dark side of the Universe, TU Eindhoven, February 16
Weak lensing by large-scale structure, Joint Astronomy Colloquium, Garching,
Germany, June 21
Cosmology & More with Euclid, NIKHEF, Amsterdam, September 28
Iacobelli
RM-Synthesis at 2m wavelength of the Fan region: Unveiling screen and bubbles,
Chalmers University of Technology Gothenburg , Sweden; May 29
Turbulence in the diffuse Galactic synchrotron emission. Imaging the Galactic
foreground with LOFAR, Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands; 4 December
Keller
Sterrekundig Instituut Utrecht: The Last Years, 370 years of Astronomy in Utrecht,
Noordwijkerhout,The Netherlands; April 2
The Show Must Go On: The recent past and future of the Utrecht Instrumentation Group, 370 years of Astronomy in Utrecht, Noordwijkerhout,The Netherlands;
107
Appendix IV. Workshops, colloquia and lectures
April 5
Extremely Fast Focal-Plane Wavefront Sensing for Extreme Adaptive Optics,
SPIE, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; July 5
Integrated High-Resolution Observations through Turbulence, Smart Optical Systems Annual Conference, Leiden, The Netherlands; October 31
Kenworthy
Looking for Close Companions in the Fomalhaut System, ESO Santiago, Chile;
March 8
Finding the NCP Aberrations with Focal Plane Wavefront Sensing, ESO Santiago,
Chile; March 09
An Extrasolar Protoplanetary Ring System Caught in Transit?, Groningen, Netherlands; March 19
Thermal Imaging of Extrasolar Planets, Lund Observatory, Sweden; April 12
Exoplanet Imaging Challenges with the APP Coronagraph, ASTRON, Netherlands; September 27
VLT Coronagraphy, Lorentz Center Workshop, Netherlands; October 22
AO Instrumentation, ACAO Summer School, South Africa; December 06
Real Life Experience with AO, ACAO Summer School, Sutherland, South Africa;
December 07
van Kempen
ALMA Calibration using quasars: Why we need a Calibrator Database, Joint
ALMA Offices, Santiago, Chile; June 1
Klaassen
Gas Dynamics in High-Mass Star Forming Regions, ESA, Noordwijk; October 26
Ionized and Molecular Gas in a few High-Mass Star Forming Regions, ALMA observatory, Santiago; August 30
Gas Dynamics in the Ionized and Molecular gas in and around HII regions, Dwingeloo
observatory; May 3
Kristensen
Feedback from low-mass protostars - some like it hot, From atoms to pebbles:
108
Appendix IV. Workshops, colloquia and lectures
Herschel’s view of star and planet formation, Grenoble, France; March 21
Water vapor around young low-mass protostars, European week of astronomy and
space science, Rome, Italy; July 2
WISH: Water in star-forming regions with Herschel, Studies star and planet forming regions with Herschel, Leiden Lorentz Center, the Netherlands; June 11
Kuijken
KiDS: the Kilo-Degree Survey, SNOWPAC conference, University of Utah, USA;
March 22
VST Surveys, at Southern Cross Conference: Surveys: a Vintage Decade, Hunter
Valley, Australia; June 6
Dwarf Spheroidal Kinematics: a MICADO science case, at MICADO Science day,
Groningen, Netherlands; June 19
Local Dark Matter, at: Dark Attack 2012 conference, Ascona physics center,
Switzerland; July 16
KiDS: the Kilo-Degree Survey, Benasque physics Center, Spain; August 14
Idem, GAMA conference, Durham, UK; September 20
Idem, ESO Surveys Science workshop, Garching, Germany; October 17
van Langevelde
Masers in star formation, IAU Symposium 287: Cosmic masers - from OH to H0,
Stellenbosch, South Africa; January 31
The Future of VLBI, Resolving the SKY 2012, Manchester, UK; April 20
VLBI in Europe, mm-VLBI with ALMA workshop, Garching, Germany; June 26
Zooming in on star formation with radio telescopes, Frontiers of star formation,
Noordwijk; August 17
JIVE: what’s next?, 11th EVN symposium, Bordeaux, France; October 11
Astronomy with e-VLBI, VLBI technology workshop, Haystack Obs., USA; October 22
Linnartz
Wavelength dependent formation of molecules in space, University of Nottingham;
January
The formation of complex molecules in space the laboratory perspective, University of Nijmegen; March
109
Appendix IV. Workshops, colloquia and lectures
Chem-ice-try, pathways towards molecular complexity in space, MOLECXII, University of Oxford; September
Idem, 2nd national conference on laboratory and molecular astrophysics, Sevilla;
November
CRYOPAD and OASIS; Shining light on interstellar ices, Meudon Workshop on
laboratory based solid state research, Meudon; November
Shining light on interstellar ices; pathways towards molecular complexity in space,
Bonn; November
van Lunteren
Isaac Newton and the Scientific Revolution, Utrecht Summerschool : Revolutions
in Science, Utrecht August 27
History of the Quantum Revolution, Utrecht Summerschool : Revolutions in Science?,Utrecht August 30
Lavoisier en de Chemische Revolutie, Woudschoten Chemie Conferentie, Zeist,
November 2 Paul Ehrenfest and the dilemmas of modernity, Annual Meeting of
the History of Science Society, San Diego, November 17
Miley
Wonderful radio galaxies: Dinosaurs of the early Universe, Woltjer Lecture, EAS,
Rome, Italy; July 4
KAstronomy for capacity building, Workshop on Science for poverty alleviation,
Sheraton Hotel, Brussels, Belgium; September 18
A Gonzaga boy’s adventure in the wonderful Universe, Gonzaga College, Dublin,
Ireland; November 29
Wonderful radio galaxies: Dinosaurs of the early Universe, Trinity College, Dublin,
Ireland; November 30
Astronomy for Development: Implementation of the IAU Strategic Plan (IAU GA
Special Session 11, Beijing, China; August 27
Astronomy for capacity building, AERAP Workshop, EU Parliament, Brussels,
Belgium; November 15
Mottram
The Lifetimes of Massive Young Stellar Objects and Compact HII regions, UK
and German National Astronomical Meeting, Manchester, UK; March 29th
110
Appendix IV. Workshops, colloquia and lectures
Herschel water observations: revealing envelope dynamics in low-mass protostars,
Origins of Stars and their Planetary Systems, Hamilton, Canada; June 14th
Splashing around in the dark: Water in motion in star forming regions with Herschel, Leiden Observatory Science Day; September 13
Pelupessy
The formation and early evolution of stellar clusters, Sexten centre for Astrophysics, Sexten, Italy; July 26
Rigby
Observing protoclusters with Herschel (and LOFAR), Nice, France; May 15
Rosdahl
Simulating extended Lyman-alpha emission from cold accretion streams, COSMOCOMP workshop, Trieste, Italy; September 6
Röttgering
LOFAR meeting Imaging the Low Frequency Radio Sky with LOFAR, Snellius
centre Leiden, Jan 14-18
LOFAR data reduction workshop, Meudon, France, Jan 30-Feb 2
Herschel observations of protoclusters of galaxies, and the path to SPICA, at SPICA/SAFARI science meeting, Groningen, the Netherlands, March 13-15.
LOFAR and the origin and evolution of galaxies and clusters, colloquium at Mount
Stromlo, Canberra, March 28
LOFAR and the origin and evolution of galaxies and clusters, colloquium at
CSIRO, Sydney, March 29
LOFAR and the origin and evolution of galaxies and clusters, colloquium at Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Monteporzio, Italy, April 22
LOFAR surveys of the radio sky: probing shocks and magnetic fields in galaxy
cluster, at Galaxy Clusters as Giant Cosmic Laboratories, ESAC, Madrid, Spain,
May 21-23
LOFAR Cluster meeting, Nice, France, May 14-16
How the SKA Pathfinders Complement Each Other, at Exploring the Radio Continuum Universe with SKA Pathfinders, CSIRO, Sydney, May 30 - June 1
111
Appendix IV. Workshops, colloquia and lectures
LOFAR and the origin and evolution of galaxies and clusters, Nottingham, UK,
June 20
XXL cluster meeting, Meudon, France, July 9-12
LOFAR and the Ionosphere - the longer story, LOFAR busy week, Munich, July
28
LOFAR and the origin and evolution of galaxies and clusters, MPIA, Munich, July
26
Herschel and LOFAR observations and the study of proto-clusters, Growing-up at
high redshift: from proto-clusters to galaxy clusters, European Space Astronomy
Centre (ESAC) ESA, Villanueva de la Canada, Madrid, Spain, Sept 10-13
Testing the cold versus hot accretion paradigm, at SPICA/SAFARI science meeting, Leuven, Belgium, September 27
Observations of relativistic electrons in galaxy clusters, Nature’s particle accelerators, Annapolis, Maryland, USA, Oct 22-25
LOFAR - Opening up a New Window on the Universe, Goddard Space Flight
center, Greenbelt, Maryland USA, 23 October
Schaye
Gas around Galaxies Heidelberg Joint Astronomical Colloquium, Heidelberg, Germany; January 10
Outflows in Numerical Simulations, at Gas Flows in Galaxies, STScI, Baltimore,
USA; May 8
Implementation and consequences of outflows in cosmological simulations, invited
review at Disc Galaxy Formation in a cosmological context, Heidelberg, Germany;
May 18
‘Natural’ disks: What is the secret?, at Theory Goes out on a Limb: Predictions
for z 1 Galaxies, Leiden; May 14
Feedback: Metal-Fueling the IGM, at Whereabouts, Physical State and Metallicity of the Missing Baryons in the Local Universe, Cervia-Milano Marittima, Italy;
May 28
Theoretical Studies of the IGM/CGM connection, at UV Astronomy, HST and
Beyond, Kauai, USA; June 20
The effects of baryon physics on the distribution of matter, at The quest for dark
energy, when theory meets simulations, Ringberg, Germany; June 27
Self-regulated growth of galaxies and supermassive black holes, at Gas, Stars, and
Black Holes in the Galaxy Ecosystem, Leiden; July 24
112
Appendix IV. Workshops, colloquia and lectures
The physics determining CGM dynamics, at The Dynamic Nature of Baryons in
Halos, Leiden; August 6
Gas around galaxies, Astron colloquium, Dwingeloo; October 25
Schmalzl
ALMA: Gearing up for Cycle 1, ASTRON Dwingeloo, The Netherlands; 27 June
Idem, SRON/RU Groningen, The Netherlands; 28 June
Water Chemistry in Protostellar Envelopes: From Herschel to ALMA, SRON/RU
Groningen, The Netherlands; December 7
Schneider
Constraining the thermal electron and cosmic ray densities in M51 via the degree
of polarization, Erbacher Hof, Mainz, Germany; July 9-13
Sobral
Invited Seminar, University of Concepcion, Chile
Caltech Astronomy Colloquium, Caltech, Pasadena, US
Seminar, University of California - Riverside, US
Colloquium, Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, US
Subaru Seminar, Subaru Telescope, Hilo, Hawaii, US
Colloquium, CAAUL, Lisbon, PT
Seminar, IAC Tenerife, Spain
Contributed Talk, Stellar Populations across Cosmic Times, Subaru-IAP, Paris,
France
Invited Talk, UKIDSS 2012 Workshop, IfA, University of Edinburgh, UK
Snellen
Exoplanet Atmospheres, Astron Dwingeloo
idem, University of Amsterdam, February 2
MASCARA, SPIE Amsterdam, July 1
idem, MPE Munich, November 13
Ground-based High-resolution spectroscopy of exoplanets, MPE Munich, November 15
idem, Cambridge, September 14
113
Appendix IV. Workshops, colloquia and lectures
van der Werf
Fingerprinting (Ultra)luminous infrared galaxies; National Astronomy Meeting,
Manchester, United Kingdom; March 27
Star formation and molecular gas in (Ultra)Luminous InfraRed Galaxies; Cosmicray induced phenomenology in star-forming environments Sant Cugat del Valles,
Spain; April 17
Fingerprinting (Ultra)luminous infrared galaxies; University of British Columbia,
Vancouver, Canada; June 28
The Veil of Orion; The Orion Nebula: a laboratory for the study of star formation
and gaseous nebulae, 2nd NCAC Symposium, Warsaw, Poland; July 16
DESHIMA; NOVA Instrumentation Day, Utrecht; September 25
Weinmann
A fundamental problem in low-mass galaxy evolution?, MPIA, Heidelberg, Germany; July 12
The evolution of galaxies below M∗: theory vs. observations, ETH, Zurich,
Switzerland; March 21
A fundamental problem in low-mass galaxy evolution, Quantum Universe Workshop II, Groningen; April
Yildiz
High-J CO and O2 in Low-Mass Star Forming Regions with Herschel, NASA/JPL,
Pasadena, USA; November 20
High-J CO and O2 in Low-Mass Star Forming Regions with Herschel and Turkish mm-Telescope Project, Caltech Cahill Center for Astronomy & Astrophysics,
Pasadena, USA; November 19
Star Formation with sub-/mm astronomy and National Radiotelescope, 18th Turkish National Astronomy Congress, Malatya, Turkey; August 28
Journey of Turkish Membership to ESO, 18th Turkish National Astronomy Congress,
Malatya, Turkey; August 29
Survey of APEX-CHAMP+ High-J CO Observations of LowMass Young Stellar
Objects, Science with the APEX Telescope Conference, Ringberg Castle, Germany; February 12-15
114
Appendix
V
Grants
Appendix
Grants
V
Only major grants above e20.000,Bossa / Linnartz
FP7-PEOPLE-2011-IEF, NATURALISM (novel analysis toward understanding
the molecular complexity in the interstellar medium)
e192,000
Bouwens
Vrij-competitie, NWO, Characterizing the build-up of stars in galaxies in the early
universe using gravitational lensing and the Hubble+Spitzer Space Telescopes
e218,682
van Dishoeck
Advanced ERC, EU, ’Astrochemistry and the origin of planetary systems’
e2,500,000
Academy professorship, KNAW
e1,000,000
Keller
STW. Open Technologieprogramma, Light-weight towers with stable platform for
astronomical, meteorological and civil-engineering measurements
e1,091,300
PEP, NSO, SPEX2Earth, a multi-angle spectropolarimeter for aerosol and cloud
characterization
e334,000
117
Appendix V. Grants
Kuijken
NWO-M, NWO: Producing the KiDS Survey
e792,000
Vrije Competitie, NWO: KiDS: Studying the Dark Universe with Light Ray
e221,000
Netwerk 1 AiO, NOVA: Group Galaxy Lensing from GAMA, VIKING and KiDS
e200,000
Sobral
NWO Veni grant
e250,000
Röttgering
Advanced ERC grant: A new window on the Universe: The formation and evolution of galaxy clusters and proto-clusters NewClusters
e2,500,00
Snellen
NWO VICI Grant, ’Atmospheres of Extrasolar Planets: bridging the gap towards
Earth-like planets’
e1,500,000
Snik
Academische Jaarprijs, 2012, Team iSPEX
e100,000
Tielens
NWO Spinoza
e2,500,000
118
Appendix
VI
Observing time
Appendix
Observing time
VI
Bouwens
Spitzer/IRAC, Quantifying the Stellar Mass Density of the Universe out to z∼
9 − 10: Ultra-Deep Spitzer Observations of Two Highly Magnified z ∼ 9 − 10
Galaxies, 55 hrs
van der Marel
JCMT, Completing the SEDs: constraining disk properties of cold disks, 21 hrs
APEX, Completing the SEDs: constraining disk properties of transitional disks,
28 hrs
WHT, Properties of stars with planet-forming disks: evaluating disk dissipation
mechanisms, 5 nights
VLT, Determining the hole size of transitional disk candidates, 3 hrs
van Dishoeck
ALMA Cycle 1, Quantifying gas inside dust cavities in transitional disks, 4.0 hr
Kenworthy
VLT, Transmission Spectroscopy of Fomalhaut’s Debris Disk, 8 hrs
VLT, Constraining the nature of a ringed extrasolar disk system with SAM and
NaCo, 8 hrs
Klaassen
VLA, Accretion Dynamics and HII regions, 40 hrs
121
Appendix VI. Observing time
Kristensen
JCMT, Chemical inventory of low-mass protostars: H2CO and CH3OH in Class
I sources in Ophiuchus, 17hrs
JCMT, HDO/H2O toward low-mass protostars in Serpens (resubmission), 26hrs
SMA, Probing small-scale UV heating in Ser SMM1 with HCN/CN emission, 1
track
VLT, Using VLT-CRIRES to constrain protostellar wind conditions and chemistry, 5 hrs
Kuijken
VLT Survey Telescope, the KiDS survey, 500 hrs
Linnartz
VLT-UVES, A search for C3 and C4 in the diffuse interstellar medium; 8 hrs
McGee
VLT, ”The timescale of environmental change: Halpha imaging of galaxy groups
at z=0.4”, 26.7 hrs WHT, ”Unveiling Herschel/SPIRE - selected protoclusters in
the optical”, 3 nights
Mottram
ALMA, The infall rate of massive young stellar objects, 2.6 hrs
JCMT, Investigating the properties of the dense gas around WILL survey embedded YSOs, 31 hrs
JCMT, A survey of molecular clouds and star formation in the new Outer ScutumCentaurus Arm, 34 hrs
JCMT, Mapping molecular clouds and star formation in the new Outer ScutumCentaurus Arm, 46 hrs
Ochsendorf
VLT/X-shooter, Tracing the ejecta of RCrB stars with molecules, 4 hrs
122
Appendix VI. Observing time
Portegies-Zwart
ORCL TITAN, Virtual Galaxy, 220,000 hrs
ESCC Hector, Virtual Galaxy, 200,000 hrs
Rigby
GMRT, Understanding the formation and evolution of protoclusters, 20 hrs
Röttgering
INT, La Palma, Oct 13-22
WSRT, 50*12hours
GMR, 16 hours
Herschel, 22 hours
Schaye
VLT, Gas around galaxies in absorption, 31 hrs
Sobral
VLT, The role of the environment at z∼1 with a super-cluster, 35 hrs
WHT/ING, The nature and evolution of luminous Ha emitters at z∼0.8-2.2, 4
nights
CFHT, The widest, contiguous narrow band survey at z 1-9, 7 nights
INT/ING, The widest survey for Lyman-alpha emitters and blobs at z∼3, 6 nights
ESO/NTT, The nature and evolution of luminous Ha emitters at z∼0.8-2.2, 4
nights
TNG, The nature of bright Ha emitters at z∼1.5, 5 nights
WSRT, Shock and Awe: Do cluster collisions change the history of cluster galaxies?, 520 hrs
INT/ING, Shock and Awe: Do cluster collisions change the history of cluster
galaxies?, 10 nights
ESO/VISTA,Re-ionisation beacons: a wide NB survey for Lya emitters, 36 hrs
Subaru, The mass-metallicity relation and sSFR for galaxies at z > 1, 2 nights
123
Appendix VI. Observing time
Van der Werf
ALMA: H2O in high redshift galaxies, 7 hours highest priority
Jansky Very Large Array: 13CO and C18O in a lensed high redshift galaxy, 28
hours
James Clerk Maxwell Telescope: The SCUBA-2 Lensing survey (S2LS), 24 hours
James Clerk Maxwell Telescope: Imaging the reddest Herschel-selected SMGs and
the environments they signpost at z > 5, 24 hours
Yildiz
JCMT, Separating the truly embedded sources, 4 hrs
124
Appendix
VII
Scientific
publications
Appendix
Scientific
publications
VII.1
VII
Ph.D. Theses
A total of 9 graduate students successfully defended their Ph.D. thesis in 2012 and
were awarded their Ph.D. degree. They are in order of date:
M. Velander
R. Martinez Galarza
E. van Uitert
F. van de Voort
A-M. Madigan
M. van Hoven
O. Rakic
E. Kuiper
L. Vermaas
Studying Dark Matter: Haloes with Weak Lensing
Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy of Starbursts: from SpitzerIRS to JWST-MIRI
Weak Gravitational Lensing in the RCS2
The Growth of Galaxies and their Gaseous Haloes
Secular Stellar Dynamics near Massive Black Holes
Seismology of Magnetars
The Intergalactic medium near High-Redshift Galaxies
Growing up in the City: a Study of Galaxy Cluster Progenitors z > 2
Spectroscopy and Nuclear Dynamics of Starburst Galaxies
127
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
VII.2
Publications in refereed journals
Aalto, S., and 7 co-authors, including van der Werf, P.; Detection of HCN,
HCO+ , and HNC in the Mrk 231 molecular outflow. Dense molecular gas in the
AGN wind; A&A; 2012; 537; A44
Acke, B., and 35 co-authors, including Fridlund, M., Hogerheijde, M. R.;
Herschel images of Fomalhaut. An extrasolar Kuiper belt at the height of its dynamical activity; A&A; 2012; 540; A125
Adams, S. M., and 6 co-authors, including Hoekstra, H.; The Environmental
Dependence of the Incidence of Galactic Tidal Features; AJ; 2012; 144; 128
Amiri, N., and 3 co-authors, including van Langevelde, H. J.; VLBA SiO
maser observations of the OH/IR star OH 44.8-2.3: magnetic field and morphology; A&A; 2012; 538; A136
Anders, P., and 3 co-authors, including Portegies Zwart, S.; How well do
STARLAB and NBODY compare? II. Hardware and accuracy; MNRAS; 2012;
421; 3557
Aresu, G., and 5 co-authors, including Meijerink, R.; Far-ultraviolet and X-ray
irradiated protoplanetary disks: a grid of models. II. Gas diagnostic line emission;
A&A; 2012; 547; A69
Bahé, Y. M., and 3 co-authors, including Crain, R. A.; The competition between confinement and ram pressure and its implications for galaxies in groups
and clusters; MNRAS; 2012; 424; 1179
Bartelmann, M., and 3 co-authors, including Viola, M.; Calibration biases
in measurements of weak lensing; A&A; 2012; 547; A98
Bartkiewicz, A., and 2 co-authors, including van Langevelde, H. J.; Milliarcsecond structure of water maser emission in two young high-mass stellar objects
associated with methanol masers; A&A; 2012; 541; A72
Bédorf, J., and 2 co-authors, including Portegies Zwart, S.; A sparse octree gravitational N-body code that runs entirely on the GPU processor; Journal
of Computational Physics; 2012; 231; 2825
Beirão, P., and 40 co-authors, including Brandl, B. R.; A Study of Heating and Cooling of the ISM in NGC 1097 with Herschel-PACS and Spitzer-IRS;
ApJ; 2012; 751; 144
128
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
Berné, O., and Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Formation of buckminsterfullerene
(C60) in interstellar space; Proceedings of the National Academy of Science; 2012;
109; 401
Bertin, M., and 9 co-authors, including Fayolle, E. C., Linnartz, H.; UV
photodesorption of interstellar CO ice analogues: from subsurface excitation to
surface desorption; PCCP; 2012; 9929; 14
Bertone, S., and Schaye, J.; Rest-frame ultraviolet line emission from the intergalactic medium at 2 ≤ z ≤ 5; MNRAS; 2012; 419; 780
Bezanson, R., and 2 co-authors, including Franx, M.; Evolution of Quiescent
and Star-forming Galaxies since z ∼ 1.5 as a Function of their Velocity Dispersions; ApJ; 2012; 760; 62
Bildfell, C., and 11 co-authors, including Hoekstra, H.; Evolution of the red
sequence giant to dwarf ratio in galaxy clusters out to z ∼ 0.5; MNRAS; 2012;
425; 204
Birkby, J., and 19 co-authors, including Snellen, I.; Discovery and characterization of detached M dwarf eclipsing binaries in the WFCAM Transit Survey;
MNRAS; 2012; 426; 1507
Bı̂rzan, L., and 6 co-authors, including Rafferty, D. A., Röttgering, H. J. A.;
The duty cycle of radio-mode feedback in complete samples of clusters; MNRAS;
2012; 427; 3468
Bjerkeli, P., and 14 co-authors, including van Dishoeck, E. F.; H2 O line mapping at high spatial and spectral resolution. Herschel observations of the VLA
1623 outflow; A&A; 2012; 546; A29
Boccaletti, A., and 29 co-authors, including Snik, F., Rodenhuis, M.; SPICES:
spectro-polarimetric imaging and characterization of exoplanetary systems. From
planetary disks to nearby Super Earths; Experimental Astronomy; 2012; 34; 355
Bonafede, A., and 8 co-authors, including van Weeren, R.; Discovery of radio
haloes and double relics in distant MACS galaxy clusters: clues to the efficiency
of particle acceleration; MNRAS; 2012; 426; 40
Bond, N. A., and 36 co-authors, including van der Werf, P.; The Infrared
Properties of Sources Matched in the WISE All-sky and Herschel ATLAS Surveys; ApJ; 2012; 750; L18
129
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
Booth, C. M., and 3 co-authors, including Schaye, J.; The filling factor of
intergalactic metals at redshift z= 3; MNRAS; 2012; 420; 1053
Bossa, J.-B., and 3 co-authors, including Isokoski, K., Linnartz, H.; Thermal
collapse of porous interstellar ice; A&A; 2012; 545; A82
Bourne, N., and 44 co-authors, including Rigby, E. E., Werf, P. v. d.;
Herschel-ATLAS/GAMA: a census of dust in optically selected galaxies from stacking at submillimetre wavelengths; MNRAS; 2012; 421; 3027
Bouwens, R. J., and 10 co-authors, including Franx, M., Labbé, I., Smit,
R.; UV-continuum Slopes at z ∼ 4-7 from the HUDF09+ERS+CANDELS Observations: Discovery of a Well-defined UV Color-Magnitude Relationship for z >=
4 Star-forming Galaxies; ApJ; 2012; 754; 83
Bouwens, R. J., and 9 co-authors, including Labbé, I., Franx, M.; Lowerluminosity Galaxies Could Reionize the Universe: Very Steep Faint-end Slopes to
the UV Luminosity Functions at z >= 5-8 from the HUDF09 WFC3/IR Observations; ApJ; 2012; 752; L5
Bowler, R. A. A., and 12 co-authors, including Holt, J.; Discovery of bright z
∼ 7 galaxies in the UltraVISTA survey; MNRAS; 2012; 426; 2772
Bradley, L. D., and 9 co-authors, including Bouwens, R. J., Smit, R.;
Through the Looking Glass: Bright, Highly Magnified Galaxy Candidates at z
∼ 7 behind A1703; ApJ; 2012; 747; 3
Bradley, L. D., and 8 co-authors, including Bouwens, R. J.; The Brightest of Reionizing Galaxies Survey: Constraints on the Bright End of the z ∼ 8
Luminosity Function; ApJ; 2012; 760; 108
Braine, J., and 9 co-authors, including Israel, F. P., van der Werf, P.; Spectrally resolved C II emission in M 33 (HerM33es). Physical conditions and kinematics around BCLMP 691; A&A; 2012; 544; A55
Braithwaite, J., and Cavecchi, Y.; A numerical magnetohydrodynamic scheme
using the hydrostatic approximation; MNRAS; 2012; 427; 3265
Brammer, G. B., and 29 co-authors, including Franx, M., Fumagalli, M.,
Patel, S., Labbé, I., Muzzin, A.; 3D-HST: A Wide-field Grism Spectroscopic
Survey with the Hubble Space Telescope; ApJS; 2012; 200; 13
Brammer, G. B., and 19 co-authors, including Labbé, I., Franx, M., Fumagalli, M., Patel, S.; 3D-HST Grism Spectroscopy of a Gravitationally Lensed,
130
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
Low-metallicity Starburst Galaxy at z = 1.847; ApJ; 2012; 758; L17
Brandl, B. R., and 4 co-authors, including Rosenberg, M., van der Werf,
P. P.; High resolution IR observations of the starburst ring in NGC 7552. One
ring to rule them all?; A&A; 2012; 543; A61
Brogi, M., and 6 co-authors, including Keller, C. U., de Juan Ovelar, M.,
Kenworthy, M. A., Snellen, I. A. G.; Evidence for the disintegration of KIC
12557548 b; A&A; 2012; 545; L5
Brogi, M., and 5 co-authors, including Snellen, I. A. G., Birkby, J.; The
signature of orbital motion from the dayside of the planet τ Boøtis b; Nature;
2012; 486; 502
Brown, J. M., and 4 co-authors, including van Dishoeck, E. F.; Matryoshka
Holes: Nested Emission Rings in the Transitional Disk Oph IRS 48; ApJ; 2012;
758; L30
Brown, J. M., and 3 co-authors, including van Dishoeck, E. F.; A 30 AU
Radius CO Gas Hole in the Disk around the Herbig Ae Star Oph IRS 48; ApJ;
2012; 744; 116
Bruderer, S., and 3 co-authors, including van Dishoeck, E. F.; The warm
gas atmosphere of the HD 100546 disk seen by Herschel. Evidence of a gas-rich,
carbon-poor atmosphere?; A&A; 2012; 541; A91
Brüggen, M., and 2 co-authors, including van Weeren, R. J., Röttgering,
H. J. A.; Simulating the toothbrush: evidence for a triple merger of galaxy clusters; MNRAS; 2012; 425; L76
Brüggen, M., and 3 co-authors, including Röttgering, H.; Magnetic Fields,
Relativistic Particles, and Shock Waves in Cluster Outskirts; Space Sci. Rev.;
2012; 166; 187
Bruni, G., and 8 co-authors, including Holt, J.; The central structure of Broad
Absorption Line QSOs: observational characteristics in the cm-mm wavelength
domain; Journal of Physics Conference Series; 2012; 372; 012031
Bruni, G., and 8 co-authors, including Holt, J.; Radio spectra and polarisation properties of a bright sample of radio-loud broad absorption line quasars;
A&A; 2012; 542; A13
Bryan, S. E., and 5 co-authors, including Schaye, J.; Influence of baryons
on the orbital structure of dark matter haloes; MNRAS; 2012; 422; 1863
131
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
Buckle, J. V., and 33 co-authors, including Hogerheijde, M. R.; The JCMT
Legacy Survey of the Gould Belt: mapping 13 CO and C18 O in Orion A; MNRAS;
2012; 422; 521
Bussmann, R. S., and 37 co-authors, including Rigby, E., Van der Werf,
P. P.; A Detailed Gravitational Lens Model Based on Submillimeter Array and
Keck Adaptive Optics Imaging of a Herschel-ATLAS Submillimeter Galaxy at z
= 4.243; ApJ; 2012; 756; 134
Cacciato, M., and 4 co-authors, including Hoekstra, H.; On combining galaxy
clustering and weak lensing to unveil galaxy biasing via the halo model; MNRAS;
2012; 426; 566
Cacciato, M., and 2 co-authors; Evolution of violent gravitational disc instability in galaxies: late stabilization by transition from gas to stellar dominance;
MNRAS; 2012; 421; 818
Camera, S., and 7 co-authors, including Röttgering, H.; Impact of redshift
information on cosmological applications with next-generation radio surveys; MNRAS; 2012; 427; 2079
Candian, A., and 4 co-authors; Spatial distribution and interpretation of the
3.3 µm PAH emission band of the Red Rectangle; MNRAS; 2012; 426; 389
Canovas, H., and 4 co-authors, including Rodenhuis, M., Keller, C. U.;
Constraining the circumbinary envelope of Z Canis Majoris via imaging polarimetry; A&A; 2012; 543; A70
Cappellari, M., and 24 co-authors, including de Zeeuw, P. T.; Systematic
variation of the stellar initial mass function in early-type galaxies; Nature; 2012;
484; 485
Cappetta, M., and 38 co-authors, including Birkby, J. L., Snellen, I.; The
first planet detected in the WTS: an inflated hot Jupiter in a 3.35 d orbit around
a late F star; MNRAS; 2012; 427; 1877
Carlson, L. R., and 4 co-authors; Identifying young stellar objects in nine Large
Magellanic Cloud star-forming regions; A&A; 2012; 542; A66
Caselli, P., and 13 co-authors, including Yı́ldı́z, U. A., Kristensen, L. E.,
van Dishoeck, E. F.; First Detection of Water Vapor in a Pre-stellar Core; ApJ;
2012; 759; L37
132
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
Cassano, R., and 5 co-authors, including Röttgering, H. J. A.; Radio halos in future surveys in the radio continuum; A&A; 2012; 548; A100
Chen, X., and 7 co-authors, including Schmalzl, M.; Submillimeter Array and
Spitzer Observations of Bok Globule CB 17: A Candidate First Hydrostatic Core?;
ApJ; 2012; 751; 89
Christie, H., and 17 co-authors, including Hogerheijde, M.; CO depletion
in the Gould Belt clouds; MNRAS; 2012; 422; 968
Christodoulou, L., and 33 co-authors, including Kuijken, K.; Galaxy And
Mass Assembly (GAMA): colour- and luminosity-dependent clustering from calibrated photometric redshifts; MNRAS; 2012; 425; 1527
Cieza, L. A., and 8 co-authors, including Mathews, G. S.; Submillimeter Array Observations of the RX J1633.9-2442 Transition Disk: Evidence for Multiple
Planets in the Making; ApJ; 2012; 752; 75
Ciotti, L., and 2 co-authors, including de Zeeuw, P. T.; Separable triaxial
potential-density pairs in modified Newtonian dynamics; MNRAS; 2012; 422; 2058
Coe, D., and 45 co-authors, including Bouwens, R.; CLASH: Precise New Constraints on the Mass Profile of the Galaxy Cluster A2261; ApJ; 2012; 757; 22
Combes, F., and 20 co-authors, including Israel, F., Tilanus, R. P. J., van
der Werf, P.; Dust and gas power spectrum in M 33 (HERM33ES); A&A; 2012;
539; A67
Combes, F., and 22 co-authors, including van der Werf, P.; A bright z =
5.2 lensed submillimeter galaxy in the field of Abell 773. HLSJ091828.6+514223;
A&A; 2012; 538; L4
Congiu, E., and 11 co-authors, including Fedoseev, G., Ioppolo, S., Linnartz, H.; NO Ice Hydrogenation: A Solid Pathway to NH2 OH Formation in
Space; ApJ; 2012; 750; L12
Congiu, E., and 10 co-authors, including Ioppolo, S., Lamberts, T., Linnartz, H.; NO ice hydrogenation; a solid pathway to NH2 OH formation in space;
ApJL; 2012; 750; L12
Coppin, K. E. K., and 24 co-authors, including van der Werf, P. P.; HerschelPACS observations of [O I]63 µm towards submillimetre galaxies at z ∼ 1; MNRAS; 2012; 427; 520
133
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
Crocker, A., and 26 co-authors, including de Zeeuw, P. T.; The ATLAS3D
project - XI. Dense molecular gas properties of CO-luminous early-type galaxies;
MNRAS; 2012; 421; 1298
Croxall, K. V., and 32 co-authors, including Brandl, B. R.; Resolving the
Far-IR Line Deficit: Photoelectric Heating and Far-IR Line Cooling in NGC 1097
and NGC 4559; ApJ; 2012; 747; 81
Cuylle, S. H., and 4 co-authors, including Linnartz, H.; Lyα-induced charge
effects of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons embedded in ammonia and ammonia:water ice; MNRAS; 2012; 423; 1825
Cuylle, S., and 2 co-authors, including Linnartz, H.; UV/VIS spectroscopy
of C60 embedded in water ice; CPL, 2012; 550 79.
Dale, D. A., and 41 co-authors, including Brandl, B. R.; Herschel Far-infrared
and Submillimeter Photometry for the KINGFISH Sample of nearby Galaxies;
ApJ; 2012; 745; 95
Dalla Vecchia, C., and Schaye, J.; Simulating galactic outflows with thermal supernova feedback; MNRAS; 2012; 426; 140
Davé, R., and 2 co-authors, including Oppenheimer, B. D.; An analytic model
for the evolution of the stellar, gas and metal content of galaxies; MNRAS; 2012;
421; 98
Davis, T. A., and 26 co-authors, including de Zeeuw, P. T.; Gemini GMOS
and WHT SAURON integral-field spectrograph observations of the AGN-driven
outflow in NGC 1266; MNRAS; 2012; 426; 1574
Decin, L., and 15 co-authors, including Tielens, A. G. G. M.; The enigmatic nature of the circumstellar envelope and bow shock surrounding Betelgeuse
as revealed by Herschel. I. Evidence of clumps, multiple arcs, and a linear bar-like
structure; A&A; 2012; 548; A113
de Gasperin, F., and 94 co-authors, including Bı̂rzan, L., Miley, G., Rafferty, D., Röttgering, H., van der Tol, S., van Weeren, R. J., Bell, M.,
Bell, M. R., Garrett, M.; M 87 at metre wavelengths: the LOFAR picture;
A&A; 2012; 547; A56
de Juan Ovelar, M., and 5 co-authors; Can habitable planets form in clustered environments?; A&A; 2012; 546; L1
134
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
Delbo’, M., and 7 co-authors, including Busso, G., Brown, A.; Asteroid spectroscopy with Gaia; Planet. Space Sci.; 2012; 73; 86
De Lucia, G., and 4 co-authors, including Weinmann, S.; The environmental
history of group and cluster galaxies in a Λ cold dark matter universe; MNRAS;
2012; 423; 1277
de Mooij, E. J. W., and 10 co-authors, including Brogi, M., Nefs, S. V.,
Snellen, I. A. G., van der Werf, P. P.; Optical to near-infrared transit observations of super-Earth GJ 1214b: water-world or mini-Neptune?; A&A; 2012;
538; A46
den Herder, J.-W., and 158 co-authors, including Hoekstra, H., Röttgering,
H., Schaye, J., van de Voort, F., Weisskopf, M.; ORIGIN: metal creation
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Devecchi, B., and 4 co-authors, including Rossi, E. M., Portegies Zwart,
S.; High-redshift formation and evolution of central massive objects - II. The census of BH seeds; MNRAS; 2012; 421; 1465
Dicken, D., and 11 co-authors, including Holt, J.; Spitzer Mid-IR Spectroscopy
of Powerful 2 Jy and 3CRR Radio Galaxies. I. Evidence against a Strong StarburstAGN Connection in Radio-loud AGN; ApJ; 2012; 745; 172
Doeleman, S. S., and 32 co-authors, including Tilanus, R. P. J.; Jet-Launching
Structure Resolved Near the Supermassive Black Hole in M87; Science; 2012; 338;
355
Driver, S. P., and 42 co-authors, including Kuijken, K.; Galaxy And Mass
Assembly (GAMA): the 0.013 < z < 0.1 cosmic spectral energy distribution from
0.1 µm to 1 mm; MNRAS; 2012; 427; 3244
Duffy, A. R., and 5 co-authors, including Schaye, J.; Modelling neutral hydrogen in galaxies using cosmological hydrodynamical simulations; MNRAS; 2012;
420; 2799
Dunham, M. M., and 5 co-authors, including van Kempen, T. A.; Revealing
the Millimeter Environment of the New FU Orionis Candidate HBC722 with the
Submillimeter Array; ApJ; 2012; 755; 157
Espada, D., and 5 co-authors, including Israel, F.; Disentangling the Circumnuclear Environs of Centaurus A: Gaseous Spiral Arms in a Giant Elliptical Galaxy;
ApJ; 2012; 756; L10
135
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
Farr, W. M., and 8 co-authors, including Portegies Zwart, S.; PSDF: Particle
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Fedele, D., and 7 co-authors, including van Dishoeck, E. F.; Warm H2 O and
OH in the disk around the Herbig star HD 163296; A&A; 2012; 544; L9
Ferrarese, L., and 51 co-authors, including Hoekstra, H.; The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS). I. Introduction to the Survey; ApJS; 2012;
200; 4
Fischer, C. E., and 4 co-authors, including Keller, C. U., Snik, F.; Unusual
Stokes V profiles during flaring activity of a delta sunspot; A&A; 2012; 547; A34
Fleuren, S., and 40 co-authors, including Rigby, E. E., Werf, P. v. d.;
Herschel-ATLAS: VISTA VIKING near-infrared counterparts in the Phase 1 GAMA
9-h data; MNRAS; 2012; 423; 2407
Fedoseev, G., and 5 co-authors, including Ioppolo S., Lamberts, T., Zhen,
J., Linnartz, H.; Efficient surface formation route of interstellar hydroxylamine
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Foster, C., and 39 co-authors, including Kuijken, K.; Galaxy And Mass Assembly (GAMA): the mass-metallicity relationship; A&A; 2012; 547; A79
Fu, H., and 50 co-authors, including van der Werf, P.; A Comprehensive View
of a Strongly Lensed Planck-Associated Submillimeter Galaxy; ApJ; 2012; 753;
134
Fuente, A., and 13 co-authors, including van Kempen, T., van Dishoeck,
E., Yıldız, U., Kristensen, L.; The abundance of C18 O and HDO in the envelope and hot core of the intermediate mass protostar NGC 7129 FIRS 2; A&A;
2012; 540; A75
Fujii, M. S., and 2 co-authors, including Portegies Zwart, S. F.; The Formation of Young Dense Star Clusters through Mergers; ApJ; 2012; 753; 85
Fumagalli, M., and 14 co-authors, including Patel, S. G., Franx, M., Labbe,
I.; Hα Equivalent Widths from the 3D-HST Survey: Evolution with Redshift and
Dependence on Stellar Mass; ApJ; 2012; 757; L22
Gaburov, E., and 2 co-authors, including Levin, Y.; Magnetically Levitating
Accretion Disks around Supermassive Black Holes; ApJ; 2012; 758; 103
136
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
Galametz, A., and 9 co-authors, including Miley, G.; The Mid-infrared Environments of High-redshift Radio Galaxies; ApJ; 2012; 749; 169
Geach, J. E, and 8 co-authors, including Sobral, D.; The clustering of Hα
emitters at z=2.23 from HiZELS; MNRAS; 2012; 426; 679-689
Genel, S., and 2 co-authors, including Cacciato, M.; On the effect of cosmological inflow on turbulence and instability in galactic discs; MNRAS; 2012;
425; 788
Genel, S., and 9 co-authors, including Oppenheimer, B. D.; Short-lived Starforming Giant Clumps in Cosmological Simulations of z ∼ 2 Disks; ApJ; 2012;
745; 11
Giodini, S., and 8 co-authors; The galaxy stellar mass function of X-ray detected groups. Environmental dependence of galaxy evolution in the COSMOS
survey; A&A; 2012; 538; A104
Goicoechea, J. R., and 10 co-authors, including Kristensen, L. E., van
Dishoeck, E. F.; The complete far-infrared and submillimeter spectrum of the
Class 0 protostar Serpens SMM1 obtained with Herschel. Characterizing UVirradiated shocks heating and chemistry; A&A; 2012; 548; A77
Gondoin, P., and 9 co-authors, including Fridlund, M.; From CoRoT 102899501
to the Sun. A time evolution model of chromospheric activity on the main sequence; A&A; 2012; 548; A15
González, V., and 6 co-authors, including Bouwens, R. J., Labbé, I., Franx,
M.; The Rest-frame UV-to-optical Colors and Spectral Energy Distributions of z
∼ 4-7 Galaxies; ApJ; 2012; 755; 148
González-Nuevo, J., and 41 co-authors, including van der Werf, P., Rigby,
E.; Herschel-ATLAS: Toward a Sample of ∼1000 Strongly Lensed Galaxies; ApJ;
2012; 749; 65
Goulding, N. T., and 13 co-authors, including Birkby, J., Nefs, S.; J-band
variability of M dwarfs in the WFCAM Transit Survey; MNRAS; 2012; 427; 3358
Graham, M. L., and 9 co-authors, including Hoekstra, H.; The Type II Supernova Rate in z ∼ 0.1 Galaxy Clusters from the Multi-Epoch Nearby Cluster
Survey; ApJ; 2012; 753; 68
Gratier, P., and 9 co-authors, including van der Werf, P. P.; Giant molecular clouds in the Local Group galaxy M 33?; A&A; 2012; 542; A108
137
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
Griffin, R. F., and Stroe, A.; Photoelectric Radial Velocities, Paper XX 45
Years’ Monitoring of the Radial Velocities of the Redman K Stars; Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy; 2012; 33; 245
Groves, B., and 2 co-authors, including Brinchmann, J.; The Balmer decrement of Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies; MNRAS; 2012; 419; 1402
Haas, M. R., and 2 co-authors, including Schaye, J.; Disentangling galaxy
environment and host halo mass; MNRAS; 2012; 419; 2133
Haddad, M. A., and 3 co-authors, including Zhao, D., Linnartz, H.; Spinorbit splitting and lifetime broadening in the A2 ∆ electronic state of l-C5H; C-J.
Chem. Phys.; 2012; 25; 129
Harris, A. I., and 31 co-authors, including van der Werf, P. P., Rigby, E.;
Blind Detections of CO J = 1-0 in 11 H-ATLAS Galaxies at z = 2.1-3.5 with the
GBT/Zpectrometer; ApJ; 2012; 752; 152
Hassall, T. E., and 93 co-authors, including Bell, M. E., Bell, M. R., Garrett, M. A., de Jong, A., Röttgering, H., van Weeren, R. J.; Wide-band
simultaneous observations of pulsars: disentangling dispersion measure and profile
variations; A&A; 2012; 543; A66
Herczeg, G. J., and 11 co-authors, including Kristensen, L. E., van Dishoeck,
E. F., Yıldız, U. A.; Water in star-forming regions with Herschel: highly excited
molecular emission from the NGC 1333 IRAS 4B outflow; A&A; 2012; 540; A84
Herpin, F., and 9 co-authors, including van Dishoeck, E. F., Kristensen,
L.; The massive protostar W43-MM1 as seen by Herschel-HIFI water spectra:
high turbulence and accretion luminosity; A&A; 2012; 542; A76
Heymans, C., and 21 co-authors, including Hoekstra, H., Kuijken, K., Semboloni, E., Velander, M.; CFHTLenS: the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope
Lensing Survey; MNRAS; 2012; 427; 146
Heymans, C., and 6 co-authors, including Hoekstra, H.; The impact of high
spatial frequency atmospheric distortions on weak-lensing measurements; MNRAS;
2012; 421; 381
Hickox, R. C., and 14 co-authors, including van der Werf, P.; The LABOCA
survey of the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South: clustering of submillimetre
galaxies; MNRAS; 2012; 421; 284
138
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
High, F. W., and 85 co-authors, including Hoekstra, H.; Weak-lensing Mass
Measurements of Five Galaxy Clusters in the South Pole Telescope Survey Using
Magellan/Megacam; ApJ; 2012; 758; 68
Hildebrandt, H., and 18 co-authors, including Kuijken, K., Hoekstra, H.,
Velander, M., Semboloni, E.; CFHTLenS: improving the quality of photometric redshifts with precision photometry; MNRAS; 2012; 421; 2355
Hobbs, G., and 23 co-authors, including Levin, Y.; Development of a pulsarbased time-scale; MNRAS; 2012; 427; 2780
Hoekstra, H., and 3 co-authors; The Canadian Cluster Comparison Project:
weak lensing masses and SZ scaling relations; MNRAS; 2012; 427; 1298
Holden, B. P., and 3 co-authors, including Franx, M.; A Constant Limiting
Mass Scale for Flat Early-type Galaxies from z ∼ 1 to z = 0: Density Evolves but
Shapes Do Not; ApJ; 2012; 749; 96
Holl, B., and 3 co-authors, including Brown, A. G. A.; The impact of CCD
radiation damage on Gaia astrometry - II. Effect of image location errors on the
astrometric solution; MNRAS; 2012; 422; 2786
Honda, M., and 16 co-authors, including Maaskant, K., Tielens, A. G. G. M.;
Mid-infrared Imaging of the Transitional Disk of HD 169142: Measuring the Size
of the Gap; ApJ; 2012; 752; 143
Hu, S.-M., and 7 co-authors; The v = 3 <– 0 S(0)-S(3) Electric Quadrupole
Transitions of H2 near 0.8 µm; ApJ; 2012; 749; 76
Huang, S., and 3 co-authors, including Brinchmann, J.; The Arecibo Legacy
Fast ALFA Survey: The Galaxy Population Detected by ALFALFA; ApJ; 2012;
756; 113
Huang, S., and 5 co-authors, including Brinchmann, J.; Gas, Stars, and Star
Formation in ALFALFA Dwarf Galaxies; AJ; 2012; 143; 133
Ivison, R. J., and 16 co-authors, including Röttgering, H. J. A.; Gas-rich
mergers and feedback are ubiquitous amongst starbursting radio galaxies, as revealed by the VLA, IRAM PdBI and Herschel; MNRAS; 2012; 425; 1320
Jalali, B., and 6 co-authors, including de Zeeuw, P. T.; A Dynamical N-body
model for the central region of ω Centauri; A&A; 2012; 538; A19
Janson, M., and 9 co-authors, including Schmalzl, E.; The AstraLux Large
139
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
M-dwarf Multiplicity Survey; ApJ; 2012; 754; 44
Janssen, R. M. J., and 3 co-authors, including Röttgering, H. J. A., Brinchmann, J.; The triggering probability of radio-loud AGN. A comparison of high
and low excitation radio galaxies in hosts of different colors; A&A; 2012; 541; A62
Jee, M. J., and 6 co-authors, including Hoekstra, H.; A Study of the Dark
Core in A520 with the Hubble Space Telescope: The Mystery Deepens; ApJ;
2012; 747; 96
Jeffers, S. V., and 7 co-authors, including Rodenhuis, M., de Juan Ovelar,
M., Keller, C. U.; Direct imaging of a massive dust cloud around R Coronae
Borealis; A&A; 2012; 539; A56
Jeong, H., and 15 co-authors, including de Zeeuw, P. T.; The SAURON project
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MNRAS; 2012; 423; 1921
Jiang, F., and 3 co-authors, including Franx, M.; A Nearby Analog of z ∼
2 Compact Quiescent Galaxies with a Rotating Disk; ApJ; 2012; 749; L10
Jørgensen, J. K., and 5 co-authors, including van Dishoeck, E. F., Schmalzl,
M.; Detection of the Simplest Sugar, Glycolaldehyde, in a Solar-type Protostar
with ALMA; ApJ; 2012; 757; L4
Juhász, A., and 14 co-authors; The 2008 Outburst of EX Lup - Silicate Crystals
in Motion; ApJ; 2012; 744; 118
Karalidi, T., and 5 co-authors, including Snik, F., Keller, C. U.; Observing the Earth as an exoplanet with LOUPE, the lunar observatory for unresolved
polarimetry of Earth; Planet. Space Sci.; 2012; 74; 202
Karalidi, T., and 2 co-authors; Looking for the rainbow on exoplanets covered
by liquid and icy water clouds; A&A; 2012; 548; A90
Karalidi, T., and Stam, D. M.; Modeled flux and polarization signals of horizontally inhomogeneous exoplanets applied to Earth-like planets; A&A; 2012; 546;
A56
Kazandjian, M. V., and 4 co-authors, including Meijerink, R., Pelupessy,
I., Israel, F. P.; Diagnostics of the molecular component of photon-dominated
regions with mechanical heating; A&A; 2012; 542; A65
140
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
Keller, C. U., and Stam, D. M.; Planetary science: In search of biosignatures; Nature; 2012; 483; 38
Kenworthy, M. A., and Scuderi, L. J.; Infrared Variability of the Gliese 569B
System; ApJ; 2012; 752; 131
Ker, L. M., and 4 co-authors, including Rigby, E. E., Röttgering, H. J. A.;
New insights on the z–α correlation from complete radio samples; MNRAS; 2012;
420; 2644
Kim, S., and 30 co-authors, including Rigby, E., van der Werf, P.; SPITZERIRAC Identification of HERSCHEL-ATLAS SPIRE Sources; ApJ; 2012; 756; 28
Kitching, T. D., and 27 co-authors, including Viola, M.; Image analysis for
cosmology: results from the GREAT10 Galaxy Challenge; MNRAS; 2012; 423;
3163
Klaassen, P. D., and 2 co-authors; Looking for outflow and infall signatures
in high-mass star-forming regions; A&A; 2012; 538; A140
Kobayashi, S., and 3 co-authors, including Rossi, E. M.; Ejection and Capture
Dynamics in Restricted Three-body Encounters; ApJ; 2012; 748; 105
Kocsis, B., and 2 co-authors, including Portegies Zwart, S.; Mapping the
Galactic Center with Gravitational Wave Measurements Using Pulsar Timing;
ApJ; 2012; 752; 67
Krajnović, D., and 22 co-authors, including de Zeeuw, P. T.; The ATLAS3D
project - XVII. Linking photometric and kinematic signatures of stellar discs in
early-type galaxies; MNRAS; 2012; 278
Kristensen, L. E., and 24 co-authors, including van Dishoeck, E. F., Yıldız,
U. A., San Jose-Garcia, I., Harsono, D., Hogerheijde, M. R., van Kempen, T. A.; Water in star-forming regions with Herschel (WISH). II. Evolution
of 557 GHz 110 -101 emission in low-mass protostars; A&A; 2012; 542; A8
Kruger, A. J., and 6 co-authors, including Moerchen, M. M.; Gas and Dust
Absorption in the DoAr 24E System; ApJ; 2012; 760; 88
Kruijssen, J. M. D., and 5 co-authors, including Pelupessy, F. I., Portegies Zwart, S. F., Icke, V.; Formation versus destruction: the evolution of the
star cluster population in galaxy mergers; MNRAS; 2012; 421; 1927
Kuiper, E., and 4 co-authors, including Miley, G. K., Röttgering, H. J. A.;
141
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
A z ∼ 3 radio galaxy and its protocluster: evidence for a superstructure?; MNRAS; 2012; 425; 801
Kurczynski, P., and 11 co-authors, including van der Werf, P.; Panchromatic
Estimation of Star Formation Rates in BzK Galaxies at 1 < z < 3; ApJ; 2012;
750; 117
Lablanche, P.-Y., and 24 co-authors, including de Zeeuw, P. T.; The ATLAS 3D project - XII. Recovery of the mass-to-light ratio of simulated early-type
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Lebreton, J., and 20 co-authors, including Mathews, G. S.; An icy Kuiper
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Lee, J. C., and 9 co-authors, including Labbé, I.; A Dual-Narrowband Survey for Hα Emitters at Redshift of 2.2: Demonstration of the Technique and
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Le Floc’h, E., and 7 co-authors, including Brandl, B.; The First Infrared Study
of the Close Environment of a Long Gamma-Ray Burst; ApJ; 2012; 746; 7
Levin, Y., and Lyutikov, M.; On the dynamics of mechanical failures in magnetized neutron star crusts; MNRAS; 2012; 427; 1574
Li, M., and 12 co-authors, including Zhao, D.; Bulk Flow of Halos in ΛCDM
Simulation; ApJ; 2012; 761; 151
Lidman, C., and 19 co-authors, including Muzzin, A., Hoekstra, H.; Evidence for significant growth in the stellar mass of brightest cluster galaxies over
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Liseau, R., and 38 co-authors, including van Dishoeck, E. F., Yıldız, U. A.;
Multi-line detection of O2 toward ρ Ophuichi A; A&A; 2012; 541; A73
Loveday, J., and 33 co-authors, including Kuijken, K.; Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA): ugriz galaxy luminosity functions; MNRAS; 2012; 420; 1239
Lu, R.-S., and 21 co-authors, including Tilanus, R. P. J.; Resolving the Inner
Jet Structure of 1924-292 with the Event Horizon Telescope; ApJ; 2012; 757; L14
Luhman, K. L., and 7 co-authors, including Labbé, I.; Confirmation of One of
the Coldest Known Brown Dwarfs; ApJ; 2012; 744; 135
Lundgren, B. F., and 20 co-authors, including Franx, M., Fumagalli, M.,
142
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
Labbé, I., Patel, S.; Large-scale Star-formation-driven Outflows at 1 < z < 2 in
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Lupu, R. E., and 52 co-authors, including Rigby, E.; Measurements of CO
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Lützgendorf, N., and 9 co-authors, including de Zeeuw, P. T.; High-velocity
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2012; 543; A82
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Michalowski, M.J., and and 21 co-authors, including Garrett, M. A.; The
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Malbet, F., and 51 co-authors, including Brown, A. G. A., Röttgering,
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Mamajek, E. E., and 7 co-authors, including Kenworthy, M. A.; Planetary
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Mandell, A. M., and 6 co-authors, including Bast, J., van Dishoeck, E. F.;
First Detection of Near-infrared Line Emission from Organics in Young Circumstellar Disks; ApJ; 2012; 747; 92
Martı́nez-Galarza, J. R., and 3 co-authors, including Brandl, B.; Ongoing
143
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
Massive Star Formation in NGC 604; ApJ; 2012; 761; 3
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Mauduit, J.-C., and 83 co-authors, including Grossi, M., Rottgering, H. J. A.;
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Mauduit, J.-C., and 83 co-authors, including Grossi, M., Rottgering, H. J. A.;
The Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS): Survey Definition and Goals; PASP; 2012; 124; 714
McCarthy, I. G., and 6 co-authors, including Schaye, J., Crain, R. A.; Rotation rates, sizes and star formation efficiencies of a representative population of
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McCarthy, I. G., and 5 co-authors, including Crain, R. A., Schaye, J.; Global
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McCracken, H. J., and 20 co-authors, including Franx, M., Holt, J.; UltraVISTA: a new ultra-deep near-infrared survey in COSMOS; A&A; 2012; 544;
A156
Mechtley, M., and 14 co-authors, including Röttgering, H.; Near-infrared
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Melchior, P., and Viola, M.; Means of confusion: how pixel noise affects shear
estimates for weak gravitational lensing; MNRAS; 2012; 424; 2757
Melnick, G. J., and 17 co-authors, including van Dishoeck, E. F.; Herschel
Search for O2 toward the Orion Bar; ApJ; 2012; 752; 26
Mendes, M. B., and 18 co-authors, including Petrignani, A.; Cold Electron
Reactions Producing the Energetic Isomer of Hydrogen Cyanide in Interstellar
144
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
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Messineo, M., and 3 co-authors, including Habing, H.; Near- and mid-infrared
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Mimoun, D., and 29 co-authors, including Röttgering, H.; Farside explorer:
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2012; 33; 529
Min, M., and 3 co-authors, including Keller, C. U.; The effects of disk and
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Moerchen, M.; Astronomy: Warm dust makes a fast getaway; Nature; 2012;
487; 45
Mookerjea, B., and 21 co-authors, including Israel, F., van der Werf, P.;
The Herschel M 33 extended survey (HerM33es): PACS spectroscopy of the star
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Moran, S. M., and 16 co-authors, including Brinchmann, J.; The GALEX
Arecibo SDSS Survey. V. The Relation between the H I Content of Galaxies and
Metal Enrichment at Their Outskirts; ApJ; 2012; 745; 66
Mosleh, M., and 8 co-authors, including Franx, M., Bouwens, R. J., Labbe,
I.; The Evolution of Mass-Size Relation for Lyman Break Galaxies from z = 1 to
z = 7; ApJ; 2012; 756; L12
Mottram, J. C., and Brunt, C. M.; A cluster of outflows in the Vulpecula
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Muzzin, A., and 16 co-authors, including Labbé, I., Franx, M., Holt, J.,
Szomoru, D., van de Sande, J.; A Strongly Lensed Massive Ultracompact
Quiescent Galaxy at z ∼ 2.4 in the COSMOS/UltraVISTA Field; ApJ; 2012; 761;
142
Muzzin, A., and 17 co-authors, including Hoekstra, H., Franx, M.; The
Gemini Cluster Astrophysics Spectroscopic Survey (GCLASS): The Role of Environment and Self-regulation in Galaxy Evolution at z ∼ 1; ApJ; 2012; 746; 188
Nefs, S. V., and 18 co-authors, including Birkby, J. L., Snellen, I. A. G.;
Four ultra-short-period eclipsing M-dwarf binaries in the WFCAM Transit Survey;
MNRAS; 2012; 425; 950
145
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
Nefs, S. V., and 2 co-authors, including Snellen, I. A. G.; Minimizing follow-up
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Neistein, E., and 3 co-authors, including Schaye, J.; Hydrodynamical simulations and semi-analytic models of galaxy formation: two sides of the same coin;
MNRAS; 2012; 421; 3579
Nelson, E. J., and 15 co-authors, including Franx, M., Fumagalli, M., Patel,
S., Labbe, I.; Spatially Resolved Hα Maps and Sizes of 57 Strongly Star-forming
Galaxies at z ∼ 1 from 3D-HST: Evidence for Rapid Inside-out Assembly of Disk
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Nicholas, B. P., and 6 co-authors, including Walsh, A. J.; A 7 mm line survey
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sources; MNRAS; 2012; 419; 251
Nikola, T., and 11 co-authors, including Tielens, A.; Mid-IR FORCAST/SOFIA Observations of M82; ApJ; 2012; 749; L19
Noble, A. G., and 13 co-authors, including Hoekstra, H.; Submillimetre source
counts in the fields of high-redshift galaxy clusters; MNRAS; 2012; 419; 1983
Nowak, M. A., and 12 co-authors, including Levin, Y.; Chandra/HETGS Observations of the Brightest Flare Seen from Sgr A*; ApJ; 2012; 759; 95
Nuza, S. E., and 4 co-authors, including van Weeren, R. J.; How many radio
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Multiple Pathways to Deuterium Enhancements in Protoplanetary Disks; ApJ;
2012; 749; 162
Oesch, P. A., and 9 co-authors, including Bouwens, R. J., Franx, M., Labbé,
I.; The Bright End of the Ultraviolet Luminosity Function at z ∼ 8: New Constraints from CANDELS Data in GOODS-South; ApJ; 2012; 759; 135
Oesch, P. A., and 9 co-authors, including Bouwens, R. J., Labbé, I., Franx,
M.; Expanded Search for z ∼ 10 Galaxies from HUDF09, ERS, and CANDELS
Data: Evidence for Accelerated Evolution at z > 8?; ApJ; 2012; 745; 110
Olczak, C., and 4 co-authors, including Portegies Zwart, S.; The Evolution of
Protoplanetary Disks in the Arches Cluster; ApJ; 2012; 756; 123
146
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
Ollivier, M., and 55 co-authors, including Fridlund, M.; Transiting exoplanets
from the CoRoT space mission. XXII. CoRoT-16b: a hot Jupiter with a hint of
eccentricity around a faint solar-like star; A&A; 2012; 541; A149
Oppenheimer, B. D., and 4 co-authors; The intergalactic medium over the
last 10 billion years - II. Metal-line absorption and physical conditions; MNRAS;
2012; 420; 829
O’Sullivan, E., and 10 co-authors, including Hoekstra, H.; A Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope/Chandra view of IRAS 09104+4109: a type 2 QSO in a
cooling flow; MNRAS; 2012; 424; 2971
Pacifici, C., and 3 co-authors, including Brinchmann, J.; Relative merits of
different types of rest-frame optical observations to constrain galaxy physical parameters; MNRAS; 2012; 421; 2002
Padovani, M., and 11 co-authors, including Hogerheijde, M., Juhasz, A.;
Adaptable radiative transfer innovations for submillimetre telescopes (ARTIST).
Dust polarisation module (DustPol); A&A; 2012; 543; A16
Papadopoulos, P. P., and 5 co-authors, including van der Werf, P. P.; The
molecular gas in luminous infrared galaxies - I. CO lines, extreme physical conditions and their drivers; MNRAS; 2012; 426; 2601
Papadopoulos, P. P., and 4 co-authors, including van der Werf, P.; Erratum:
”The Molecular Gas in Luminous Infrared Galaxies. II. Extreme Physical Conditions and their Effects on the X co Factor” <A href=”/abs/2012ApJ...751...10P”>(2012,
ApJ, 751, 10)</A>; ApJ; 2012; 758; 71
Papadopoulos, P. P., and 4 co-authors, including van der Werf, P.; The
Molecular Gas in Luminous Infrared Galaxies. II. Extreme Physical Conditions
and Their Effects on the X co Factor; ApJ; 2012; 751; 10
Patel, S. G., and 5 co-authors, including Franx, M.; The UVJ Selection of
Quiescent and Star-forming Galaxies: Separating Early- and Late-type Galaxies
and Isolating Edge-on Spirals; ApJ; 2012; 748; L27
Peeters, E., and 3 co-authors, including Tielens, A. G. G. M.; The 15-20
µm Emission in the Reflection Nebula NGC 2023; ApJ; 2012; 747; 44
Peletier, R. F., and 17 co-authors, including de Zeeuw, P. T.; The SAURON
project - XX. The Spitzer [3.6] - [4.5] colour in early-type galaxies: colours, colour
gradients and inverted scaling relations; MNRAS; 2012; 419; 2031
147
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
Pelupessy, F. I., and 2 co-authors, including Portegies Zwart, S.; N-body
integrators with individual time steps from Hierarchical splitting; New A; 2012;
17; 711
Pelupessy, F. I., and Portegies Zwart, S.; The evolution of embedded star
clusters; MNRAS; 2012; 420; 1503
Persson, M. V., and 2 co-authors, including van Dishoeck, E. F.; Subarcsecond resolution observations of warm water toward three deeply embedded lowmass protostars; A&A; 2012; 541; A39
Peters, T., and 4 co-authors, including Klaassen, P. D.; Are Molecular Outflows around High-mass Stars Driven by Ionization Feedback?; ApJ; 2012; 760;
91
Pierini, D., and 30 co-authors, including Giodini, S.; First simultaneous optical/nearinfrared imaging of an X-ray selected, high-redshift cluster of galaxies with GROND.
The galaxy population of XMMU J0338.7 + 0030 at z = 1.1; A&A; 2012; 540; A45
Pijloo, J. T., and 2 co-authors, including Caputo, D. P., Portegies Zwart,
S. F.; Asymmetric supernova in hierarchical multiple star systems and application
to J1903+0327; MNRAS; 2012; 424; 2914
Pineda, J. E., and 11 co-authors, including van Kempen, T. A.; The first
ALMA view of IRAS 16293-2422. Direct detection of infall onto source B and
high-resolution kinematics of source A; A&A; 2012; 544; L7
Popesso, P., and 42 co-authors, including Patel, S.; The evolution of the star
formation activity per halo mass up to redshift ∼1.6 as seen by Herschel; A&A;
2012; 537; A58
Postman, M., and 44 co-authors, including Bouwens, R.; The Cluster Lensing
and Supernova Survey with Hubble: An Overview; ApJS; 2012; 199; 25
Prod’homme, T., and 3 co-authors, including Brown, A. G. A.; The impact of CCD radiation damage on Gaia astrometry - I. Image location estimation
in the presence of radiation damage; MNRAS; 2012; 419; 2995
Purcell, C. R., and 21 co-authors, including Walsh, A. J.; The H2 O Southern
Galactic Plane Survey: NH3 (1,1) and (2,2) catalogues; MNRAS; 2012; 426; 1972
Quadri, R. F., and 3 co-authors, including Franx, M.; Tracing the Starformation-Density Relation to z ∼ 2; ApJ; 2012; 744; 88
148
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
Raccanelli, A., and 13 co-authors, including Röttgering, H.; Cosmological
measurements with forthcoming radio continuum surveys; MNRAS; 2012; 424;
801
Rakic, O., and 3 co-authors, including Schaye, J.; Neutral Hydrogen Optical Depth near Star-forming Galaxies at z ∼ 2.4 in the Keck Baryonic Structure
Survey; ApJ; 2012; 751; 94
Ramos Almeida, C., and 8 co-authors, including Holt, J.; Are luminous radioloud active galactic nuclei triggered by galaxy interactions?; MNRAS; 2012; 419;
687
Rawle, T. D., and 17 co-authors, including van der Werf, P. P.; Discovery of ”Warm Dust” Galaxies in Clusters at z ∼ 0.3: Evidence for Stripping of
Cool Dust in the Dense Environment?; ApJ; 2012; 756; 106
Rawle, T. D., and 14 co-authors, including van der Werf, P. P.; The Relation
between Cool Cluster Cores and Herschel-detected Star Formation in Brightest
Cluster Galaxies; ApJ; 2012; 747; 29
Ricca, A., and 4 co-authors, including Tielens, A. G. G. M.; The Infrared
Spectroscopy of Compact Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Containing up to
384 Carbons; ApJ; 2012; 754; 75
Richichi, A., and 3 co-authors, including Moerchen, M.; A Catalog of Near-IR
Sources Found to be Unresolved with Milliarcsecond Resolution; ApJS; 2012; 203;
33
Richichi, A., and 5 co-authors, including Moerchen, M.; An investigation of
binary stars in the Pleiades with high contrast and spatial resolution; A&A; 2012;
541; A96
Risquez, D., and 2 co-authors, including Brown, A. G. A.; Dynamical attitude model for Gaia; Experimental Astronomy; 2012; 34; 669
Roelfsema, P. R., and 98 co-authors, including de Jonge, A., Tielens, A. G. G. M.,
Yıldız, U.; In-orbit performance of Herschel-HIFI; A&A; 2012; 537; A17
Röllig, M., and 8 co-authors, including Israel, F.; [CII] gas in IC 342; A&A;
2012; 542; L22
Rosenberg, M. J. F., and 2 co-authors, including van der Werf, P. P., Israel,
F. P.; [FeII] as a tracer of supernova rate in nearby starburst galaxies; A&A; 2012;
540; A116
149
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
Rosenberg, M. J. F., and 4 co-authors, including Tielens, A. G. G. M.;
Coupled blind signal separation and spectroscopic database fitting of the midinfrared PAH features (Corrigendum); A&A; 2012; 537; C5
Rowlands, K., and 40 co-authors, including van der Werf, P., Rigby, E. E.;
Herschel-ATLAS/GAMA: dusty early-type galaxies and passive spirals; MNRAS;
2012; 419; 2545
Russo, P.; Editorial; Communicating Astronomy with the Public Journal; 2012;
12; 2
Rygl, K. L. J., and 8 co-authors, including van Langevelde, H. J., Torstensson, K. J. E.; Parallaxes and proper motions of interstellar masers toward the
Cygnus X star-forming complex. I. Membership of the Cygnus X region; A&A;
2012; 539; A79
Sales, L. V., and 7 co-authors, including Schaye, J., Crain, R. A.; The origin
of discs and spheroids in simulated galaxies; MNRAS; 2012; 423; 1544
Salgado, F., and 12 co-authors, including Tielens, A. G. G. M.; First Science Results from SOFIA/FORCAST: The Mid-infrared View of the Compact H
II Region W3A; ApJ; 2012; 749; L21
Sand, D. J., and 10 co-authors, including Hoekstra, H.; The Multi-Epoch
nearby Cluster Survey: Type Ia Supernova Rate Measurement in z ∼ 0.1 Clusters
and the Late-time Delay Time Distribution; ApJ; 2012; 746; 163
Sandstrom, K. M., and 14 co-authors, including Israel, F. P., Tielens, A. G. G. M.;
The Spitzer Spectroscopic Survey of the Small Magellanic Cloud (S4 MC): Probing the Physical State of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in a Low-metallicity
Environment; ApJ; 2012; 744; 20
Santangelo, G., and 10 co-authors, including van Dishoeck, E. F., Kristensen, L. E.; The Herschel HIFI water line survey in the low-mass proto-stellar
outflow L1448; A&A; 2012; 538; A45
Scannapieco, C., and 22 co-authors, including Crain, R. A., Schaye, J.;
The Aquila comparison project: the effects of feedback and numerical methods on
simulations of galaxy formation; MNRAS; 2012; 423; 1726
Serra, P., and 25 co-authors, including de Zeeuw, P. T.; The ATLAS3D project
- XIII. Mass and morphology of H I in early-type galaxies as a function of environment; MNRAS; 2012; 422; 1835
150
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
Sesana, A., and 3 co-authors, including Devecchi, B.; Halo millisecond pulsars ejected by intermediate-mass black holes in globular clusters; MNRAS; 2012;
427; 502
Seymour, N., and 32 co-authors, including Miley, G., Röttgering, H.; Rapid
Coeval Black Hole and Host Galaxy Growth in MRC 1138-262: The Hungry Spider; ApJ; 2012; 755; 146
Shirazi, M., and Brinchmann, J.; Strongly star forming galaxies in the local Universe with nebular He IIλ4686 emission; MNRAS; 2012; 421; 1043
Sicilia, D., and 4 co-authors, including Ioppolo, S.; Nitrogen oxides and carbon
chain oxides formed after ion irradiation of CO:N2 ice mixtures; A&A; 2012; 543;
A155
Siemiginowska, A., and 9 co-authors, including Holt, J.; Deep Chandra XRay Imaging of a nearby Radio Galaxy 4C+29.30: X-Ray/Radio Connection;
ApJ; 2012; 750; 124
Simha, V., and 5 co-authors, including Oppenheimer, B. D.; Testing subhalo abundance matching in cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations; MNRAS; 2012; 423; 3458
Simpson, J. M., and 25 co-authors, including van der Werf, P. P.; The
evolutionary connection between QSOs and SMGs: molecular gas in far-infrared
luminous QSOs at z ∼ 2.5; MNRAS; 2012; 426; 3201
Singh, K., and 102 co-authors, including Bell, M., Garrett, M., de Jong,
A.; Optimized trigger for ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray and neutrino observations
with the low frequency radio array; Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics
Research A; 2012; 664; 171
Skibba, R. A., and 26 co-authors, including Carlson, L. R., Israel, F.; The
Spatial Distribution of Dust and Stellar Emission of the Magellanic Clouds; ApJ;
2012; 761; 42
Smit, R., and 6 co-authors, including Bouwens, R. J., Franx, M., Labbé,
I.; The Star Formation Rate Function for Redshift z ∼ 4-7 Galaxies: Evidence
for a Uniform Buildup of Star-forming Galaxies during the First 3 Gyr of Cosmic
Time; ApJ; 2012; 756; 14
Smith, D. J. B., and 40 co-authors, including van der Werf, P., Rigby,
E. E.; Herschel-ATLAS: multi-wavelength SEDs and physical properties of 250
151
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
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Sobral, D., and 5 co-authors; Star formation at z=1.47 from HiZELS: an H>α+[O
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Soto, M., and 2 co-authors, including Kuijken, K.; 3-dimensional kinematics in low foreground extinction windows of the Galactic bulge. Radial velocities
for six bulge fields: procedures and results; A&A; 2012; 540; A48
Spitler, L. R., and 15 co-authors, including Labbé, I., Straatman, C. M. S.;
First Results from Z -FOURGE: Discovery of a Candidate Cluster at z = 2.2 in
COSMOS; ApJ; 2012; 748; L21
Stott, J. P., and 18 co-authors, including Schaye, J.; The XMM Cluster Survey:
the interplay between the brightest cluster galaxy and the intracluster medium via
AGN feedback; MNRAS; 2012; 422; 2213
Stroe, A., and 2 co-authors, including Snellen, I. A. G., Röttgering, H. J. A.;
A stringent upper limit to 18 cm radio emission from the extrasolar planet system
τ Boøtis; A&A; 2012; 546; A116
Surcis, G., and 3 co-authors, including van Langevelde, H. J.; EVN observations of 6.7 GHz methanol maser polarization in massive star-forming regions;
A&A; 2012; 541; A47
Suzuki, N., and 65 co-authors, including Hoekstra, H.; The Hubble Space
Telescope Cluster Supernova Survey. V. Improving the Dark-energy Constraints
above z > 1 and Building an Early-type-hosted Supernova Sample; ApJ; 2012;
746; 85
Swinbank, A. M., and 21 co-authors, including van der Werf, P.; An ALMA
survey of submillimetre galaxies in the Extended Chandra Deep Field-South: detection of [C II] at z = 4.4; MNRAS; 2012; 427; 1066
Swinbank, A. M., and 7 co-authors, including Sobral, D., Crain, R. A.;
The properties of the star-forming interstellar medium at z = 0.84-2.23 from
HiZELS: mapping the internal dynamics and metallicity gradients in high-redshift
disc galaxies; MNRAS; 2012; 426; 935
Swinbank, A. M, and 5 co-authors, including Sobral, D.; The Properties of
the Star-forming Interstellar Medium at z = 0.8-2.2 from HiZELS: Star Formation
and Clump Scaling Laws in Gas-rich, Turbulent Disks; ApJ; 2012; 760; 130
Szabó, G. M., and 6 co-authors, including Juhász, A., Hogerheijde, M. R.;
152
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
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AU Distance; ApJ; 2012; 761; 8
Szomoru, D., and 2 co-authors, including Franx, M.; Sizes and Surface Brightness Profiles of Quiescent Galaxies at z ∼ 2; ApJ; 2012; 749; 121
Tadhunter, C. N., and 6 co-authors, including Holt, J., Rose, M.; PKS
0347+05: a radio-loud/radio-quiet double active galactic nucleus system triggered
in a major galaxy merger; MNRAS; 2012; 427; 1603
Tasse, C., and 25 co-authors, including van der Tol, S., van Weeren, R. J.,
Bı̂rzan, L., Rafferty, D., Röttgering, H.; LOFAR calibration and wide-field
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Tepper-Garcı́a, T., and 5 co-authors, including Schaye, J.; Absorption signatures of warm-hot gas at low redshift: broad H I Lyα absorbers; MNRAS; 2012;
425; 1640
Thom, C., and 12 co-authors, including Oppenheimer, B. D.; Not Dead Yet:
Cool Circumgalactic Gas in the Halos of Early-type Galaxies; ApJ; 2012; 758; L41
Tilling, I., and 21 co-authors, including Meijerink, R.; Gas modelling in the
disc of HD 163296; A&A; 2012; 538; A20
Tinetti, G., and 134 co-authors, including Snellen, I.; EChO. Exoplanet characterisation observatory; Experimental Astronomy; 2012; 34; 311
Toonen, S., and 2 co-authors, including Portegies Zwart, S.; Supernova Type
Ia progenitors from merging double white dwarfs. Using a new population synthesis model; A&A; 2012; 546; A70
Trenti, M., and 10 co-authors, including Bouwens, R. J.; Overdensities of
Y-dropout Galaxies from the Brightest-of-Reionizing Galaxies Survey: A Candidate Protocluster at Redshift z ∼ 8; ApJ; 2012; 746; 55
Tristram, K. R. W., and 7 co-authors, including Jaffe, W.; The complexity
of parsec-scaled dusty tori in AGN; Journal of Physics Conference Series; 2012;
372; 012035
Turner, M. L., and 7 co-authors; The ACS Fornax Cluster Survey. VI. The
Nuclei of Early-type Galaxies in the Fornax Cluster; ApJS; 2012; 203; 5
Umetsu, K., and 47 co-authors, including Bouwens, R.; CLASH: Mass Distribution in and around MACS J1206.2-0847 from a Full Cluster Lensing Analysis;
153
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
ApJ; 2012; 755; 56
van Daalen, M. P., and 2 co-authors; The effects of halo alignment and shape
on the clustering of galaxies; MNRAS; 2012; 424; 2954
van de Voort, F., and Schaye, J.; Properties of gas in and around galaxy
haloes; MNRAS; 2012; 423; 2991
van de Voort, F., and 3 co-authors, including Schaye, J.; Cold accretion flows
and the nature of high column density H I absorption at redshift 3; MNRAS; 2012;
421; 2809
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van Hoven, M., and Levin, Y.; Magnetar oscillations - II. Spectral method;
MNRAS; 2012; 420; 3035
van Kampen, E., and 46 co-authors, including Rigby, E., van der Werf,
P.; Herschel-ATLAS/GAMA: spatial clustering of low-redshift submm galaxies;
MNRAS; 2012; 426; 3455
van Kempen, T. A., and 4 co-authors; The Small-scale Physical Structure
and Fragmentation Difference of Two Embedded Intermediate-mass Protostars in
Orion; ApJ; 2012; 751; 137
van Uitert, E., and 5 co-authors, including Hoekstra, H.; Constraints on the
shapes of galaxy dark matter haloes from weak gravitational lensing; A&A; 2012;
545; A71
van Weeren, R. J., and 84 co-authors, including Röttgering, H. J. A., Rafferty, D. A., Bı̂rzan, L., van der Tol, S., Miley, G. K., Kuijken, K., Bell,
M. E., Bell, M. R., Garrett, M. A.; First LOFAR observations at very low
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2012; 543; A43
van Weeren, R. J., and 6 co-authors, including Röttgering, H. J. A.; The
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154
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
van Weeren, R. J., and 7 co-authors, including Röttgering, H. J. A.; Diffuse
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Vasta, M., and 9 co-authors, including van Dishoeck, E. F., Kristensen,
L.; Water emission from the chemically rich outflow L1157; A&A; 2012; 537; A98
Vazza, F., and 5 co-authors, including van Weeren, R.; Why are central radio
relics so rare?; MNRAS; 2012; 421; 1868
Verhoeff, A. P., and 9 co-authors, including Tielens, A. G. G. M.; A mid-IR
study of the circumstellar environment of Herbig Be stars; A&A; 2012; 538; A101
Visser, R., and 8 co-authors, including Kristensen, L. E., van Dishoeck,
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Wake, D. A., and 2 co-authors, including Franx, M.; Revealing Velocity Dispersion as the Best Indicator of a Galaxy’s Color, Compared to Stellar Mass, Surface
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Wakelam, V., and 33 co-authors, including van Dishoeck, E. F.; A KInetic
Database for Astrochemistry (KIDA); ApJS; 2012; 199; 21
Walsh, A., and 2 co-authors, including Zhao, D., Linnartz, H.; Cavity enhanced plasma self absorption spectroscopy; APL, 2012; 101; 09111.
Wang, K.-S., and 2 co-authors, including Hogerheijde, M. R.; Kinematics of
the inner thousand AU region around the young massive star <ASTROBJ>AFGL
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Weinmann, S. M., and 6 co-authors, including Oppenheimer, B. D., Crain,
R. A.; A fundamental problem in our understanding of low-mass galaxy evolution; MNRAS; 2012; 426; 2797
Whitaker, K. E., and 6 co-authors, including Franx, M., Labbé, I.; A Large
Population of Massive Compact Post-starburst Galaxies at z > 1: Implications for
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745; 179
Whitaker, K. E., and 3 co-authors, including Franx, M.; The Star Formation Mass Sequence Out to z = 2.5; ApJ; 2012; 754; L29
Wilson, C. D., and 57 co-authors, including Israel, F. P., Tilanus, R. P. J.,
van der Werf, P.; The JCMT Nearby Galaxies Legacy Survey - VIII. CO data
155
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
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Xilouris, E. M., and 26 co-authors, including Israel, F., Tilanus, R. P. J.,
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2012; 543; A74
Yıldız, U. A., and 7 co-authors, including Kristensen, L. E., van Dishoeck,
E. F., van Kempen, T. A., Hogerheijde, M. R., van der Marel, N.; APEXCHAMP+ high-J CO observations of low-mass young stellar objects. III. NGC
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A86
Zhao, D., and 2 co-authors, including Linnartz , H.; The electronic spectrum
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Zaroubi, S., and 19 co-authors, including Schaye, J.; Imaging neutral hydrogen
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425; 2964
Zheng, W., and 35 co-authors, including Bouwens, R.; A magnified young
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Zitrin, A., and 47 co-authors, including Bouwens, R.; CLASH: New Multiple
Images Constraining the Inner Mass Profile of MACS J1206.2-0847; ApJ; 2012;
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Zitrin, A., and 24 co-authors, including Bouwens, R.; CLASH: Discovery of
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2012; 747; L9
156
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
VII.3
Publications of non-refereed journals
Agócs, T., and 3 co-authors, including Korkiakoski, V.; Optimizing optical
systems with active components; Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Conference Series; 2012; 8450;
Amiaux, J., and 29 co-authors, including Brinchmann, J., Hoekstra, H.;
Euclid mission: building of a reference survey; Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Conference Series; 2012; 8442;
Amiri, N., and 3 co-authors, including van Langevelde, H. J.; VLBA SiO
maser observations of the OH/IR star OH 44.8-2.3: magnetic field and morphology; IAU Symposium; 2012; 287; 54
Amiri, N., and 3 co-authors, including van Langevelde, H. J.; VLBA SiO
maser maps of the star OH 44.8-2.3 (Amiri+, 2012); VizieR Online Data Catalog;
2012; 353; 89136
Aacute, and 13 co-authors, including Juhász, A.; Spatially resolved far-infrared
imaging of bright debris disks: studying the disk structure and the stirring mechanism; From Atoms to Pebbles: Herschel’s view of Star and Planet Formation; 2012;
Andrei, R. M., and 6 co-authors, including Korkiakoski, V. A., Keller,
C. U., Doelman, N.; Linear analytical solution to the phase diversity problem
for extended objects based on the Born approximation; Society of Photo-Optical
Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Conference Series; 2012; 8447;
Andrei, R. M., and 5 co-authors, including Korkiakoski, V. A., Keller,
C. U., Doelman, N.; Bilinear solution to the phase diversity problem for extended objects based on the Born approximation; Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Conference Series; 2012; 8447;
Arsenault, R., and 50 co-authors, including Stuik, R.; ESO adaptive optics facility progress report; Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)
Conference Series; 2012; 8447;
157
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
Bacon, R., and 76 co-authors, including Brinchmann, J., Schaye, J., Stuik,
R.; News of the MUSE; The Messenger; 2012; 147; 4
Baig, I., and 9 co-authors, including Kristensen, L.; Potential Triassic and
Jurassic CO2 Storage Reservoirs in the Skagerrak Area; EGU General Assembly
Conference Abstracts; 2012; 14; 13818
Bartkiewicz, A., and van Langevelde, H. J.; Masers in star forming regions;
IAU Symposium; 2012; 287; 117
Basu-Zych, A., and 5 co-authors, including Bouwens, R.; X-ray Study of
Galaxy Evolution from Infancy to Mid-Life: What the Deepest X-ray Stacking
of 1<z< 4 Star-forming Galaxies Reveals; American Astronomical Society Meeting Abstracts; 2012; 219; #111.07
Bédorf, J., and 2 co-authors, including Portegies Zwart, S.; Bonsai: A GPU
Tree-Code; Astronomical Society of the Pacific Conference Series; 2012; 453; 325
Birzan, L., and 5 co-authors, including Rafferty, D., Rottgering, H.; The
Duty Cycle of Radio Mode Feedback; Galaxy Clusters as Giant Cosmic Laboratories; 2012; 4
Bizzocchi, L., and 27 co-authors, including Grossi, M., Rottgering, H.; Ultra Steep Spectrum Radio Sources in the Lockman Hole: SERVS Identifications
and Redshift Distribution at the Faintest Radio Fluxes; Square Kilometre Array:
Paving the Way for the New 21st Century Radio Astronomy Paradigm; 2012; 97
Boogert, A. C. A., and 8 co-authors, including van Dishoeck, E.; Ices and
the Extinction Curve in the Quiescent Medium of Isolated Dense Cores; American
Astronomical Society Meeting Abstracts; 2012; 219; #349.21
Brandl, B. R., and 16 co-authors, including Molster, F., Stuik, R., Schmalzl,
E., Meisner, J., Snellen, I.; METIS: the thermal infrared instrument for the
E-ELT; Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Conference
Series; 2012; 8446;
Brandl, B. R., and 4 co-authors, including Rosenberg, M., van der Werf,
P. P.; SINFONI data cube of NGC 7552 (Brandl+, 2012); VizieR Online Data
158
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
Catalog; 2012; 354; 39061
Brown, J., and 6 co-authors, including van Dishoeck, E.; Dust and Gas Depletion in the Disk around Herbig Ae Star Oph IRS 48; American Astronomical
Society Meeting Abstracts; 2012; 220; #506.01
Brown, A.; Early Gaia data releases and thoughts on data access facilities; Dynamics Meets Kinematic Tracers; 2012;
Brown, A. G. A.; Astrometric surveys: Solving the Milky Way puzzle with Gaia;
European Physical Journal Web of Conferences; 2012; 19; 9002
Brown, A. G. A.; Science from Gaia: How to Deal with a Complex BillionSource Catalogue and Data Archive; Astrostatistics and Data Mining; 2012; 17
Bruderer, S., and 3 co-authors, including van Dishoeck, E. F.; Warm gas
atmospheres of the protoplanetary disks seen by Herschel: Gas rich and carbon
poor?; From Atoms to Pebbles: Herschel’s view of Star and Planet Formation;
2012;
Buchbender, C., and 15 co-authors, including Israel, F. P., van der Werf,
P.; Dense Gas in M33 (Buchbender+, 2013); VizieR Online Data Catalog; 2012;
354; 99017
Burtscher, L., and 3 co-authors, including Jaffe, W. J.; Observing faint targets
with MIDI at the VLTI: the MIDI AGN large programme experience; Society of
Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Conference Series; 2012; 8445;
Busso, G., and 2 co-authors; The GAIA photometric data processing; Society of
Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Conference Series; 2012; 8442;
Caillier, P., and 40 co-authors, including Stuik, R.; The MUSE project face
to face with reality; Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)
Conference Series; 2012; 8449;
Cappellari, M., and 22 co-authors, including de Zeeuw, P. T.; ATLAS3D
project. VII. (Cappellari+, 2011); VizieR Online Data Catalog; 2012; 741; 61680
159
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
Caputo, D. P., and Dolan, R.; Searching for Data: Swarming Agent Method;
Astronomical Society of the Pacific Conference Series; 2012; 453; 349
Carlson, L. R., and 4 co-authors; YSOs in 9 LMC star forming regions (Carlson+, 2012); VizieR Online Data Catalog; 2012; 354; 29066
Caux, E., and 17 co-authors, including Tielens, A. G. G. M., van Dishoeck,
E.; TIMASSS. I. (Caux+, 2011); VizieR Online Data Catalog; 2012; 353; 29023
Cavecchi, Y., and 3 co-authors, including Levin, Y.; Thermonuclear explosions
on neutron stars; IAC Talks, Astronomy and Astrophysics Seminars from the Instituto de Astrofı́sica de Canarias; 2012; 308
Chiar, J. E., and Tielens, A. G. G. M.; The Structure of Carbon in the Interstellar Medium; American Astronomical Society Meeting Abstracts; 2012; 220;
#134.13
Coccato, L., and 12 co-authors, including Kuijken, K.; Kinematics and stellar
populations in the outer halos of early type galaxies; IAC Talks, Astronomy and
Astrophysics Seminars from the Instituto de Astrofı́sica de Canarias; 2012; 301
Comerón, F., and 5 co-authors, including Kuijken, K.; High-speed Bandwidth
between Europe and Paranal: EVALSO Demonstration Activities and Integration
into Operations; The Messenger; 2012; 147; 2
Cortesi, A., and 13 co-authors, including Kuijken, K.; Planetary Nebula Spectrograph survey (Cortesi+, 2013); VizieR Online Data Catalog; 2012; 354; 99115
Cropper, M., and 26 co-authors, including Hoekstra, H.; VIS: the visible imager for Euclid; Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Conference Series; 2012; 8442;
Cunningham, C. R., and 5 co-authors, including Molster, F., Kenworthy,
M. A., Snik, F.; Innovative technology for optical and infrared astronomy; Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Conference Series; 2012;
8450;
160
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
Dalton, G., and 42 co-authors, including Mottram, C., Stuik, R.; WEAVE:
the next generation wide-field spectroscopy facility for the William Herschel Telescope; Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Conference Series; 2012; 8446;
Davies, R. L., and 11 co-authors, including Franx, M.; Commission 28: Galaxies; Transactions of the International Astronomical Union, Series A; 2012; 28; 255
de Jong, R. S., and 85 co-authors, including Boland, W.; 4MOST: 4-metre
multi-object spectroscopic telescope; Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Conference Series; 2012; 8446;
de Juan Ovelar, M., and 6 co-authors, including van Werkhoven, T., Snik,
F., Keller, C.; Modeling the instrumental polarization of the VLT and E-ELT
telescopes with the M&m’s code; Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Conference Series; 2012; 8449;
Dempsey, J. T., and 17 co-authors, including Tilanus, R. P. J.; A new era
of wide-field submillimetre imaging: on-sky performance of SCUBA-2; Society of
Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Conference Series; 2012; 8452;
Doeleman, S. S., and 32 co-authors, including Tilanus, R. P. J.; 1.3mm VLBI
detections of M87 (Doeleman+, 2012); VizieR Online Data Catalog; 2012; 210;
33801
Doty, S. D., and 5 co-authors, including Kristensen, L., van Dishoeck, E.;
The Role of Irradiated and Shocked Cavity Walls on Observations of Protostellar
Regions; American Astronomical Society Meeting Abstracts; 2012; 220; #333.14
Doty, S. L., and 3 co-authors, including van Dishoeck, E. F.; The Effects Of
Grain Surface Chemistry In Evolving High-mass Star Forming Regions; American
Astronomical Society Meeting Abstracts; 2012; 220; #333.15
Eidelsberg, M., and 13 co-authors, including Heays, A. N.; Oscillator Strengths
and Predissociation Rates for Rydberg Complexes in 12 C16 O Between 92.9 and 93.4
NM; 67th International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy; 2012;
161
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
Einarsen, L. J., and 7 co-authors, including Rodenhuis, M., Snik, F., Keller,
C. U.; Multiwavelength imaging polarimetry of Venus at various phase angles;
EGU General Assembly Conference Abstracts; 2012; 14; 8670
Ellerbroek, L. E., and 4 co-authors, including Maaskant, K. M.; The Star
Formation History of RCW 36; Astronomical Society of the Pacific Conference
Series; 2012; 464; 351
Emsellem, E., and 23 co-authors, including de Zeeuw, P. T.; ATLAS3D
project. III. (Emsellem+, 2011); VizieR Online Data Catalog; 2012; 741; 40888
Endo, A., and 12 co-authors, including van der Werf, P. P.; Development of
DESHIMA: a redshift machine based on a superconducting on-chip filterbank; Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Conference Series; 2012;
8452;
Ermolli, I., and 16 co-authors, including Bettonvil, F.; Data handling and control of the European Solar Telescope; Memorie della Societa Astronomica Italiana
Supplementi; 2012; 19; 380
Evans, D. W., and 9 co-authors, including Brown, A.; Commission 8: Astrometry; Transactions of the International Astronomical Union, Series A; 2012; 28; 21
Fayolle, E. C., and 4 co-authors, including Linnartz, H.; Laboratory H2 O:CO2
ice desorption: entrapment and its parameterization with an extended three-phase
model; EAS Publications Series; 2012; 58; 327
Ferrari, C., and 23 co-authors, including Bı̂rzan, L., Rafferty, D. A., Röttgering,
H. J. A., van der Tol, S., van Weeren, R. J.; First LOFAR results on galaxy
clusters; SF2A-2012: Proceedings of the Annual meeting of the French Society of
Astronomy and Astrophysics; 2012; 677
Ferruit, P., and 24 co-authors, including Franx, M.; NIRSpec, the Near-IR
Multi-Object Spectrograph for JWST; American Astronomical Society Meeting
Abstracts; 2012; 219; #241.25
162
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
Filho, M. E., and 3 co-authors, including Brinchmann, J.; Optically faint radio
sources: reborn AGN?; IAU Symposium; 2012; 284; 231
Fujii, M. S., and 3 co-authors, including Iwasawa, M., Portegies Zwart, S.;
N-body Simulations of Star Clusters, Black Holes, and Their Host Systems using
BRIDGE; Astronomical Society of the Pacific Conference Series; 2012; 453; 211
Fumagalli, M., and 5 co-authors; Optical spectrum of the blazar PKS 0447-439
(Fumagalli+, 2012); VizieR Online Data Catalog; 2012; 354; 59068
Fumagalli, M.; Exploring The Gas Cycle In High-redshift Galaxies: A Joint
Effort Of Theory And Observations; American Astronomical Society Meeting Abstracts; 2012; 219; #322.04
Furniss, A., and 5 co-authors, including Fumagalli, M.; Elevated Optical Luminosity for Gamma-ray Blazar BL Lacertae; The Astronomer’s Telegram; 2012;
4155; 1
Gaburov, E., and 2 co-authors, including Portegies Zwart, S.; Sapporo: Nbody simulation library for GPUs; Astrophysics Source Code Library; 2012;
Gallazzi, A., and 4 co-authors, including Brinchmann, J.; Charting the evolution of the ages and metallicities of massive galaxies since z = 0.7; IAU Symposium;
2012; 284; 465
Gavazzi, G., and 7 co-authors, including Fumagalli, M.; Halpha3. Catalog and
SFR in Virgo cluster (Gavazzi+, 2012); VizieR Online Data Catalog; 2012; 354;
59016
Giodini, S.; The smaller the better: X-ray groups as cosmic laboratories; Galaxy
Clusters as Giant Cosmic Laboratories; 2012; 18
Gonzalez, V., and 4 co-authors, including Bouwens, R., Labbe, I.; The Stelar
Mass Growth of Galaxies between z 8 and z 4; American Astronomical Society
Meeting Abstracts; 2012; 219; #129.03
Graham, M., and 5 co-authors, including Hoekstra, H.; The Rate of Core
Collapse Supernovae in Galaxy Clusters; American Astronomical Society Meeting
163
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
Abstracts; 2012; 219; #108.06
Gratier, P., and 9 co-authors, including van der Werf, P. P.; Giant molecular clouds in M33 (Gratier+, 2012); VizieR Online Data Catalog; 2012; 354; 29108
Groen, D., and 2 co-authors, including Rieder, S., Portegies Zwart, S. F.;
High performance cosmological simulations on a grid of supercomputers; Acta Cosmologica; 2012; 161
Heggie, D. C., and 2 co-authors, including Portegies Zwart, S.; McScatter:
Three-Body Scattering with Stellar Evolution; Astrophysics Source Code Library;
2012;
Heiner, J., and 12 co-authors, including Martin, T., Israel, F.; The 1D planeparallel PDR model and its application; IAC Talks, Astronomy and Astrophysics
Seminars from the Instituto de Astrofı́sica de Canarias; 2012; 316
Herpin, F., and 9 co-authors, including van Dishoeck, E. F., Kristensen, L.;
Herschel-HIFI water spectra of W43-MM1 (Herpin+, 2012); VizieR Online Data
Catalog; 2012; 354; 29076
Hoekstra, H.; Measuring masses using weak gravitational lensing; Galaxy Clusters as Giant Cosmic Laboratories; 2012; 24
Hogerheijde, M. R., and 14 co-authors, including Kristensen, L., Yı́ldı́z,
U. A., van Dishoeck, E. F.; Herschel observations of cold water vapor and
ammonia in protoplanetary disks; From Atoms to Pebbles: Herschel’s view of Star
and Planet Formation; 2012;
Huang, S., and 5 co-authors, including Brinchmann, J.; Gas, Stars and Star
Formation in ALFALFA Dwarf Galaxies; American Astronomical Society Meeting
Abstracts; 2012; 219; #441.23
Iacobelli, M., and 2 co-authors, including Haverkorn, M., Katgert, P.; Rotation Measure synthesis of WSRT obs. (Iacobelli+, 2013); VizieR Online Data
Catalog; 2012; 354; 99056
164
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
Iserlohe, C., and 4 co-authors, including Brandl, B.; Diamond milling of metal
mirrors with optical surface quality; Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Conference Series; 2012; 8450;
Johns-Krull, C. M., and 9 co-authors, including Keller, C., Snik, F., Rodenhuis, M.; HARPS spectropolarimetry of classical T Tauri stars; American
Institute of Physics Conference Series; 2012; 1429; 43
Karalidi, T., and 5 co-authors, including Snik, F., Keller, C. U.; Observing
the Earth as an exoplanet; EGU General Assembly Conference Abstracts; 2012;
14; 10571
Keller, C. U., and 5 co-authors, including Korkiakoski, V., Doelman, N.;
Extremely fast focal-plane wavefront sensing for extreme adaptive optics; Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Conference Series; 2012;
8447;
Kerber, F., and 23 co-authors, including Moerchen, M.; VISIR upgrade overview
and status; Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Conference Series; 2012; 8446;
Kleijn, G. V., and 5 co-authors, including de Jong, J. T. A., Kuijken, K.;
Astro-WISE for KiDS Survey Production and Quality Control; Astronomical Society of the Pacific Conference Series; 2012; 461; 237
Kobayashi, S., and 2 co-authors, including Rossi, E. M.; Hyper Velocity Stars
and the Restricted Parabolic 3-Body Problem; Twelfth Marcel Grossmann Meeting on General Relativity; 2012; 993
Köhler, R., and Jaffe, W.; MIA+EWS: MIDI data reduction tool; Astrophysics
Source Code Library; 2012;
Korkiakoski, V., and 7 co-authors, including Keller, C. U., Doelman, N.;
Potential of phase-diversity for metrology of active instruments; Society of PhotoOptical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Conference Series; 2012; 8450;
Korkiakoski, V., and 5 co-authors, including Keller, C. U., Doelman, N.;
Experimental validation of optimization concepts for focal-plane image processing
165
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
with adaptive optics; Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)
Conference Series; 2012; 8447;
Kress, M., and 3 co-authors, including Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Chemical Kinetics of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Protoplanetary Disks; American
Astronomical Society Meeting Abstracts; 2012; 220; #331.05
Kristensen, L. E., and 12 co-authors, including van Dishoeck, E. F., Mottram, J. C., Harsono, D., Hogerheijde, M. R., San Jose-Garcia, I., Yı́ldı́z,
U. A.; Feedback from low-mass protostars onto their surroundings: some like it
hot; From Atoms to Pebbles: Herschel’s view of Star and Planet Formation; 2012;
Kuijken, K.; KIDS (Invited); Science from the Next Generation Imaging and
Spectroscopic Surveys, ESO Garching, 15-18 October 2012
Online at: http://www.eso.org/sci/meetings/2012/surveys2012/program.html, id.39;
2012;
Kurczynski, P., and 12 co-authors, including van der Werf, P.; Extremely
High Sfrs In Z 2 Galaxies: Multiwavelength Estimation Vs. Halpha Spectroscopy;
American Astronomical Society Meeting Abstracts; 2012; 219; #202.07
Lagarde, S., and 12 co-authors, including Jaffe, W. J., Bettonvil, F. C.;
MATISSE: concept, specifications, and performances; Society of Photo-Optical
Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Conference Series; 2012; 8445;
Leisenring, J. M., and 15 co-authors, including Eisner, J., Kenworthy, M.;
On-sky operations and performance of LMIRcam at the Large Binocular Telescope; Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Conference Series; 2012; 8446;
Lemke, R., and 9 co-authors, including Kuijken, K.; EVALSO, a high-bandwidth
communication infrastructure to efficiently connect the ESO Paranal and the Cerro
Armazones Observatories to Europe: demonstration activities and start of operations; Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Conference
Series; 2012; 8451;
Lopez, B., and 81 co-authors, including Jaffe, W., Bettonvil, F.; Perspective
of imaging in the mid-infrared at the Very Large Telescope Interferometer; Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Conference Series; 2012;
166
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
8445;
Luetzgendorf, N., and 6 co-authors, including de Zeeuw, P. T.; NGC 2808
central kinematics (Luetzgendorf+, 2012); VizieR Online Data Catalog; 2012; 354;
29129
Lützgendorf, N., and 8 co-authors, including de Zeeuw, T.; The Search for
Intermediate-mass Black Holes in Globular Clusters; The Messenger; 2012; 147;
21
Mamajek, E. E., and 7 co-authors, including Kenworthy, M. A.; Planetary
Construction Zones in Occultation: Eclipses by Circumsecondary and Circumplanetary Disks and a Candidate Eclipse of a Pre-Main Sequence Star in Sco-Cen;
American Astronomical Society Meeting Abstracts; 2012; 219; #404.04
Mawet, D., and 28 co-authors, including Oppenheimer, B.; Review of smallangle coronagraphic techniques in the wake of ground-based second-generation
adaptive optics systems; Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)
Conference Series; 2012; 8442;
McCracken, H. J., and 19 co-authors, including Franx, M., Holt, J.; UltraVISTA Catalogue Release DR1 (McCracken+, 2012); VizieR Online Data Catalog;
2012; 354; 49156
McDermid, R. M., and 24 co-authors, including de Zeeuw, P. T.; The starformation histories of early-type galaxies from ATLAS3D ; IAU Symposium; 2012;
284; 244
McMillan, S., and 3 co-authors, including Portegies Zwart, S., van Elteren,
A.; Simulations of Dense Stellar Systems with the AMUSE Software Toolkit; Astronomical Society of the Pacific Conference Series; 2012; 453; 129
Mechtley, M., and 14 co-authors, including Röttgering, H.; WFC3 Imaging
Of z=6 Quasars: Examining The Host Galaxies Of AGN In The Early Universe;
American Astronomical Society Meeting Abstracts; 2012; 219; #243.17
167
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
Meisner, J. A., and 2 co-authors, including Jaffe, W. J., Le Poole, R. S.;
The Nova Fringe Tracker: a second-generation cophasing facility for up to six telescopes at the VLTI; Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)
Conference Series; 2012; 8445;
Meyer, M., and 5 co-authors, including van Houten-Groeneveld, I.; Comet
P/1960 S1 = P/2012 TB36 (van houten-lemmon).; Central Bureau Electronic Telegrams; 2012; 3270; 1
Miley, G.; The IAU Astronomy for Development Programme; Organizations,
People and Strategies in Astronomy Vol. 1, Edited by Andre Heck, Venngeist,
Duttlenheim (2012) pp. 93-111; 2012; 93
Milvang-Jensen, B., and 12 co-authors, including Franx, M.; VISTA NB118
narrow-band observations: First results; Science from the Next Generation Imaging and Spectroscopic Surveys, ESO Garching, 15-18 October 2012 Online at:
http://www.eso.org/sci/meetings/2012/surveys2012/program.html, id.34; 2012;
Molinaro, R., and 6 co-authors, including Lub, J.; A new determination of the
Period-Radius relation for Classical Galactic Cepheids. ; Memorie della Societa
Astronomica Italiana Supplementi; 2012; 19; 205
Mulders, G., and 3 co-authors, including Maaskant, K.; Locating dust crystals
in protoplanetary disks with Herschel PACS; From Atoms to Pebbles: Herschel’s
view of Star and Planet Formation; 2012;
Najita, J. R., and 5 co-authors, including van Dishoeck, E.; Spitzer Spectroscopy of Gas in T Tauri Disks; American Astronomical Society Meeting Abstracts; 2012; 219; #314.04
Olczak, C., and 6 co-authors, including Portegies Zwart, S.; Dynamics in
Young Star Clusters: From Planets to Massive Stars; Astronomical Society of the
Pacific Conference Series; 2012; 453; 241
Oliva, E., and 54 co-authors, including Stuik, R.; The design of the MOONSVLT spectrometer; Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)
Conference Series; 2012; 8446;
168
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
Oliveira, I., and 3 co-authors, including van Dishoeck, E. F.; Tracing the
Evolution of Dust in Protoplanetary Disks – The First Steps of Planet Formation;
LPI Contributions; 2012; 1667; 6006
Ott, J., and 11 co-authors, including van der Werf, P.; Cm and mm Survey
of Molecular Absorption Lines in Centaurus A; American Astronomical Society
Meeting Abstracts; 2012; 219; #349.26
Otten, G. P., and 2 co-authors, including Kenworthy, M. A.; Laboratory
demonstration and characterization of phase-sorting interferometry; Society of
Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Conference Series; 2012; 8446;
Paalvast, S. L., and 6 co-authors, including Brandl, B., Molster, F.; Development of a 2D precision cryogenic chopper for METIS; Society of Photo-Optical
Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Conference Series; 2012; 8450;
Patel, S., and 5 co-authors, including Franx, M.; The UVJ Selection of Quiescent and Star Forming Galaxies: Separating Early and Late-Type Galaxies and
Isolating Edge-on Spirals; American Astronomical Society Meeting Abstracts; 2012;
219; #229.01
Pineda, J. E., and 11 co-authors, including van Kempen, T. A.; IRAS 162932422 ALMA maps (Pineda+, 2012); VizieR Online Data Catalog; 2012; 354; 49007
Portegies Zwart, S., and 3 co-authors, including Pelupessy, I., van Elteren,
A.; Multi-physics Simulations using a Hierarchical Interchangeable Software Interface; Astronomical Society of the Pacific Conference Series; 2012; 453; 317
Portegies Zwart, S. F., and Verbunt, F.; SeBa: Stellar and binary evolution;
Astrophysics Source Code Library; 2012;
Portegies Zwart, S. F.; Roche: Visualization and analysis tool for Roche-lobe
grometry of evolving binaries; Astrophysics Source Code Library; 2012;
Postman, M., and 44 co-authors, including Bouwens, R.; CLASH sources for
MACS1149.6+2223 (Postman+, 2012); VizieR Online Data Catalog; 2012; 219;
90025
169
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
Rigby, E. E., and 7 co-authors, including Rottgering, H. J. A.; CENSORS
+ other 1.4GHz sources (Rigby+, 2011); VizieR Online Data Catalog; 2012; 741;
61900
Risquez, D., and 2 co-authors, including Brown, A. G. A.; Reconstruction
of the attitude of the Gaia spacecraft; Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation
Engineers (SPIE) Conference Series; 2012; 8449;
Rodenhuis, M., and 6 co-authors, including de Juan Ovelar, M., Keller,
C. U.; The extreme polarimeter: design, performance, first results and upgrades;
Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Conference Series;
2012; 8446;
Rodenhuis, M., and 2 co-authors, including Keller, C. U.; A spectro-polarimetric
integral field spectrograph for EPICS-EPOL; Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Conference Series; 2012; 8446;
Rosenberg, M. J. F., and 2 co-authors, including van der Werf, P. P., Israel,
F. P.; NGC253 near-infrared H2 emission (Rosenberg+,; VizieR Online Data Catalog; 2012; 355; 9012
Rosenberg, M. J. F., and 2 co-authors, including van der Werf, P. P., Israel, F. P.; [FeII] as a tracer supernova rate; Journal of Physics Conference
Series; 2012; 372; 012068
Rottgering, H.; LOFAR and the origin and evolution of galaxies and clusters;
Galaxy Clusters as Giant Cosmic Laboratories; 2012; 50
Rouyet, L., and 5 co-authors, including Kristensen, L.; Characterization of
large instabilities displacements using Ground-Based InSAR; EGU General Assembly Conference Abstracts; 2012; 14; 6617
Rubin, R. H., and 6 co-authors, including Tielens, A. G. G. M.; SOFIA observations of the planetary nebula NGC 7009; IAU Symposium; 2012; 283; 67
Schipani, P., and 11 co-authors, including Kuijken, K.; The VST alignment:
strategy and results; Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)
170
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
Conference Series; 2012; 8444;
Schmalzl, E., and 10 co-authors, including Meisner, J., Brandl, B., Molster, F.; An end-to-end instrument model for the proposed E-ELT instrument
METIS; Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Conference
Series; 2012; 8449;
Shirazi, M., and Brinchmann, J.; Emission-line galaxies from SDSS DR7 (Shirazi+, 2012); VizieR Online Data Catalog; 2012; 742; 11043
Smit, J. M., and 13 co-authors, including Snik, F., van Harten, G., Keller,
C. U.; SPEX2Earth, a novel spectropolarimeter for remote sensing of aerosols
and clouds; EGU General Assembly Conference Abstracts; 2012; 14; 14166
Smith, I. A., and 3 co-authors, including Tilanus, R. P. J.; GRB 120729A:
JCMT SCUBA-2 sub-mm observation.; GRB Coordinates Network; 2012; 13554;
1
Smith, I. A., and 3 co-authors, including Tilanus, R. P. J.; GRB 120724A:
JCMT SCUBA-2 sub-mm observation.; GRB Coordinates Network; 2012; 13519;
1
Smith, I. A., and 3 co-authors, including Tilanus, R. P. J.; GRB 120422A:
JCMT SCUBA-2 sub-mm observation.; GRB Coordinates Network; 2012; 13259;
1
Smith, I. A., and 3 co-authors, including Tilanus, R. P. J.; GRB 120404A:
JCMT SCUBA-2 sub-mm observation.; GRB Coordinates Network; 2012; 13233;
1
Snellen, I. A. G., and 8 co-authors, including Stuik, R., Bettonvil, F., Kenworthy, M., Otten, G., le Poole, R.; Ground-based search for the brightest
transiting planets with the Multi-site All-Sky CAmeRA: MASCARA; Society of
Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Conference Series; 2012; 8444;
Snik, F., and 10 co-authors, including Heikamp, S., de Boer, J., Keller,
C. U., van Harten, G.; iSPEX: everybody can measure atmospheric aerosols
171
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
with a smartphone spectropolarimeter; EGU General Assembly Conference Abstracts; 2012; 14; 13035
Snik, F., and 10 co-authors, including Heikamp, S., de Boer, J., Keller,
C. U., van Harten, G.; iSPEX: the creation of an aerosol sensor network of
smartphone spectropolarimeters; EGU General Assembly Conference Abstracts;
2012; 14; 12974
Snik, F., and 6 co-authors, including Otten, G., Kenworthy, M.; The vectorAPP: a broadband apodizing phase plate that yields complementary PSFs; Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Conference Series; 2012;
8450;
Snik, F., and 5 co-authors, including van Harten, G.; Design of a full-Stokes
polarimeter for VLT/X-shooter; Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Conference Series; 2012; 8446;
Stuetzel, J., and 10 co-authors, including Petrignani, A.; Dissociative Recombination of Astrophysically Relevant Polyatomic Ions; American Astronomical Society Meeting Abstracts; 2012; 220; #209.07
Stuik, R., and 10 co-authors, including Brandl, B., Molster, F.; Designing
the METIS adaptive optics system; Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Conference Series; 2012; 8447;
Stuik, R., and 11 co-authors, including Boland, W., Molster, F.; Deploying
the testbed for the VLT adaptive optics facility: ASSIST; Society of Photo-Optical
Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Conference Series; 2012; 8447;
Surcis, G., and 3 co-authors, including van Langevelde, H. J.; High resolution
magnetic field measurements in high-mass star-forming regions using masers; IAU
Symposium; 2012; 287; 69
Swinbank, M., and 24 co-authors, including van der Werf, P.; An ALMA Survey of Submillimetre Galaxies in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South: First
Results; The Messenger; 2012; 149; 40
172
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
Tabatabaei, F. S., and 11 co-authors, including Israel, F.; Variation in the dust
spectral index across M33; IAU Symposium; 2012; 284; 125
ter Horst, R., and Stuik, R.; Manufacturing and testing of a convex aspherical
mirror for ASSIST; Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE)
Conference Series; 2012; 8450;
Theulé, P., and 6 co-authors, including Bossa, J. B.; Kinetic studies on lowtemperature solid-state reactions in interstellar ices; EAS Publications Series;
2012; 58; 363
Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Chemical and physical properties of interstellar dust;
IAU Symposium; 2012; 284; 72
Torstensson, K. J. E., and 6 co-authors, including van Langevelde, H. J.,
Kristensen, L. E.; Methanol masers and millimetre lines: a common origin in
protostellar envelopes; IAU Symposium; 2012; 287; 146
van Boekel, R., and 33 co-authors, including Snellen, I.; The Exoplanet Characterization Observatory (EChO): performance model EclipseSim and applications; Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Conference Series; 2012; 8442;
van Dishoeck, E. F.; Laboratory Astrophysics as Key to Understanding the
Universe; American Astronomical Society Meeting Abstracts; 2012; 220; #101.01
van Dishoeck, E. F., and 16 co-authors; Division VI / Commission 34 / Working Group Astrochemistry; Transactions of the International Astronomical Union,
Series A; 2012; 28; 236
van Dishoeck, E. F.; Water in Star-forming Regions with Herschel (WISH):
recent results and trends; From Atoms to Pebbles: Herschel’s view of Star and
Planet Formation; 2012;
van Houten, C. J., and 4 co-authors, including van Houten-Groeneveld, I.;
Comet P/1960 S1 = P/2012 TB36 (van Houten-Lemmon); Central Bureau Electronic Telegrams; 2012; 3270; 1
173
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
Van Langevelde, H. J.; Future of VLBI; Proceedings of the meeting ”Resolving
The Sky - Radio Interferometry: Past, Present and Future”. April 17-20,2012.
Manchester, UK.
Published online at http://pos.sissa.it/cgi-bin/reader/conf.cgi?confid=163, id.48;
2012;
van Werkhoven, T. I. M., and 4 co-authors, including Rodenhuis, M.,
Keller, C. U.; FOAM: the modular adaptive optics framework; Society of PhotoOptical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Conference Series; 2012; 8447;
Velander, M., and CFHTLenS Collaboration; Galaxy Dark Matter Halo
Constraints in the CFHTLenS; American Astronomical Society Meeting Abstracts;
2012; 219; #130.07
Wahlgren, G. M., and 9 co-authors, including van Dishoeck, E. F.; Commission 14: Atomic and Molecular Data; Transactions of the International Astronomical Union, Series A; 2012; 28; 339
Walsh, A. J., and 21 co-authors; H2 O Southern Galactic Plane Survey (HOPS)
(Walsh+,; VizieR Online Data Catalog; 2012; 741; 61764
Walton, N. A., and 8 co-authors, including Brown, A. G. A.; Gaia: Mapping
The Milky Way; Astronomical Society of the Pacific Conference Series; 2012; 458;
419
Wardlow, J. L., and 25 co-authors, including van der Werf, P. P.; LESS photometric redshift survey (Wardlow+, 2011); VizieR Online Data Catalog; 2012;
741; 51479
Williams, W. L., and 2 co-authors, including Rottgering, H. J. A.; Two-meter
Radio Mini Survey I. (Williams+, 2013); VizieR Online Data Catalog; 2012; 354;
99055
Young, L. M., and 23 co-authors, including de Zeeuw, P. T.; ATLAS3D
project. IV. (Young+, 2011); VizieR Online Data Catalog; 2012; 741; 40940
174
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
Zhai, C., and 23 co-authors, including Oppenheimer, B.; A first order wavefront estimation algorithm for P1640 calibrator; Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Conference Series; 2012; 8447;
Zhou, Q., and 12 co-authors, including Marti, K.; U-Pb Dating of Zircons and
Phosphates in Lunar Meteorites, Acapulcoites and Angrites; Lunar and Planetary
Inst. Technical Report; 2012; 43; 1554
VII.4
Popular Articles
D. van Delft
• History and significance of the discovery of superconductivity by Heike Kamerlingh Onnes in 1911, Physica C 479, pp. 30-35
• De eerste telescoop, vpro gids 37, p. 21
• Meten = Weten ¿ Welvaart, Idee, Mr. Hans van Mierloo Stichting, Cctober
2012, pp. 10-13
• Les particules Majorana de Leo Kouwenhoven, Septentrion, 4, 2012, pp.
88-90
• Liquid files, Straatgras, Natuurhistorisch Museum Rotterdam, 24, pp. 44-45
• Voorwoord, in Esther van Gelder (Ed.), Bloeiende kennis. Groene ontdekkingen in de Gouden Eeuw (Hilversum: Verloren 2012), p. 6
E. van Dishoeck
• Zesduizend oceanen (National Geographics, January, p.40)
• Astrochemie (Chemische feitelijkheden, no. 67, 281, May)
• De grootste doorbraken in de wetenschap (De Groene Amsterdammer, 136,
21, May)
• Ooit was ons zonnestelsel niets meer dan een wolk (C2W, 108, 10, June)
• Altijd speuren naar levensteken in het heelal (Leidsch Dagblad, September
12)
• ALMA-telescoop ‘proeft’ suiker bij jonge dubbelster (NRC, October 6)
175
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
• Interview (Leidse Stijl, October)
• Large water reservoirs at the dawn of stellar birth (ESA Sci Tech note +
SRON press release, October 9)
C.U. Keller
• C.U.Keller, F.Snik, Het ware gezicht van exoplaneten, Zenit, September
2012, 33-39
H. Linnartz
• Linnartz; Monthly column in the ’Vreelandbode’
F. van Lunteren
• California Dreamin: grondslagen en geschiedenis van de quantumfysica in
het hippietijdperk, Academische Boekengids 93, July 2012, 13-15.
• Galilei en de wisselvalligheden van het lot, Physicus, Oktober 2012, 22-24.
N. van der Marel
• Spitzer Space Telescope: een blik in de geboortewieg van sterren en planeten,
Eureka #38, October 2012
J. Rosdahl
• J. Rosdahl, J. Blaizot, Extended Lya emission from cold accretion
• streams, MNRAS, Vol 431, June 2012, 344-366 NOTE: Published before my
arrival to Sterrewacht...
M. Schmalzl
• M. Schmalzl, Centaurus A in neuem Licht, Sterne und Weltraum, November
2012, 31
• M. Schmalzl, Der Planetenentstehung auf der Spur, Sterne und Weltraum,
July 2012, 20
176
Appendix VII. Scientific publications
• M. Schmalzl, Protoplanetare Scheibe mit gigantischem Wasserreservoir, Sterne
und Weltraum, February 2012, 22
• M. Schmalzl, Kometen als kosmische Wasserlieferanten?, Sterne und Weltraum, January 2012, 28
• (”Sterne und Weltraum” is a German astronomical journal for the general
public)
D. Sobral
• - Press release: ”Cosmic GDP crashes 97% as star formation slumps”, Covered by e.g.: NYTimes, TIME, Wired, NBC, CBS, http://www.ras.org.uk/newsand-press/219-news-2012/2187-cosmic-gdp-crashes-97-as-star-formation-slumps
• - Press release: ”Time-Traveling with One Method”
• - Press release: “Mapping Galaxy Formation in Dual Mode”, NAOJ/Subaru
Telescope and a handful of follow-up articles
• - EU Commission: selected as one of ”EU Contest for Young Scientists
success stories”
• - Public lecture: ”A Universe in Crisis”, Lisbon’s Astronomical Observatory,
Lisbon, PT
• - Public lecture: All You Ever Wanted to Know About the Universe”, Secundary School, Casquilhos, PT
Weinmann
• Weinmann, ”Vom raetselhaften Leben und Sterben der Welteninseln”, Neue
Zuercher Zeitung, October 2012, p. 54
U. Yildiz
• E. Tuncel, U. Yildiz, APEX Telescope: First Precursor to ALMA, Tubitak
Bilim ve Teknik Dergisi, December 2012, Vol: 541, Pages: 38-42
177
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