We are a leading New Zealand , with an internationally recognised excellence.

We are a leading New Zealand , with an internationally recognised excellence.
ANNUAL REPORT 2007
We are a leading New Zealand
research university, with an
ethos of problem solving and
internationally recognised excellence.
Contents
1
MISSION STATEMENT
2
REPORT FROM THE CHANCELLOR
6
REPORT FROM THE VICE-CHANCELLOR
14
YEAR IN REVIEW
24
2007 COUNCIL
26
2007 OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY
27
DIRECTORY
28
FINANCIAL REVIEW 2007
32
SUMMARY FACTS AND FIGURES
33
STATEMENT OF RESPONSIBILITY
34
AUDIT REPORT
37
STATEMENT OF ACCOUNTING POLICIES
43
INCOME STATEMENT
44
STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY
45
BALANCE SHEET
46
STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS
48
NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
72
MASSEY UNIVERSITY MISSION
72
STATEMENT OF SERVICE PERFORMANCE
151
APPENDICES:
151
STUDENTS
155
STAFF
159
RESEARCH AND OTHER CONTRACT FUNDING
Massey University is
driven by a spirit of
community relevance
and engagement,
while maintaining
intellectual
independence.
MASSEY UNIVERSITY
Mission Statement
Massey University is committed to meeting the needs of New Zealand and New Zealanders, enhancing
access to university study for diverse populations, preparing students for life-long learning, and meeting
international standards of excellence in research and teaching. Massey University is an integrated
multi-campus institution of higher learning that creates new knowledge and understanding; synthesises,
applies and disseminates knowledge; develops advanced learning and scholarly abilities for a national
and international student body; and promotes free and rational inquiry. We offer high-quality learning
experiences that empower people and their communities to prosper in an increasingly knowledgedependent and technologically advanced world.
Massey University is driven by a spirit of community relevance and engagement, while maintaining
intellectual independence. We will use our multi-campus structure to meet the needs of our constituent
regional communities, while our flexible delivery and distance (extramural) education capabilities give a
national and international reach to our educational programmes.
Massey University recognises and respects the significance of mana whenua within its regions and
the range of Mäori organisations contributing to Mäori development and advancement. We have
demonstrated our commitment to Mäori development by providing Mäori academic leadership, research
opportunities and educational qualifications that assist in the achievement of Mäori aspirations.
Our integrated academic structures and organisational arrangements enable and support interdisciplinary
and cross-disciplinary research and academic programmes. We pride ourselves on the relevance of our
programmes; on our openness to students of diverse backgrounds spanning age, geographic location,
educational background, ethnicity and culture; on the support we provide for our students; and on the
relationship we have built with our alumni.
1
REPORT FROM THE
Chancellor
I am pleased to report the positive outcome of the 2007 year for Massey University. As noted in the
previous year’s Annual Report, the University commenced the year with a number of challenges including
the need to re-establish a strong financial position. Elsewhere in this report details are given of a surplus
for the year well ahead of that originally budgeted, and at $9m much closer to the financial goals the
University has set for itself, and the minimum requirements generally regarded as being acceptable within
the university sector. While this positive outcome was assisted in part by some one-off contributions not
previously recognised in the University’s financial reports, it also occurred as a result of a substantial
improvement in the University’s financial management and planning.
Activity levels within the University largely went according to plan. Domestic enrolments were on target
assisted by a further increase in postgraduate student participation. In keeping with past years, and trends
throughout the sector, international student enrolments were at lower levels than originally forecast, but
nevertheless continue to make a significant contribution to the University’s financial outcome and most
importantly to its international profile.
This year’s financial improvement is of course assisted by the decision of the Tertiary Education
Commission (TEC) late in 2006 to grant an exemption from the fees maxima regime. This enabled the
University to significantly close the adverse gap that previously existed in domestic fees. Notwithstanding
this correction domestic fees remain amongst the lowest within New Zealand universities.
The year coincided with the completion of the University’s strategic positioning within the tertiary sector.
During the past few years there has been a planned reduction in the number of domestic students as subdegree programmes have been largely removed from the portfolio, and greater focus given to traditional
undergraduate and increasingly post graduate programmes. This has resulted in comparatively marked
reductions in the number of domestic students, principally on the Wellington campus. It should also be
noted that students previously enrolled by Massey in our Conservatorium of Music are now reported
independently within the New Zealand School of Music programmes currently consolidated within Victoria
University. Students continue to be based on Massey University’s Wellington campus pending the planned
development of a new School facility within Wellington’s central business district.
2
It is pleasing to be able to note that while overall the level of international participation has reduced on
the back of a major reduction in Chinese student enrolments there has been a noticeable increase in
the level of international students enrolled across all three campuses from the Middle East, Southern
Asia and increasingly, North America. This broadening base of international contribution is particularly
encouraging and bodes well for the future.
The underlying financial position of Massey remains very sound and will continue to improve
notwithstanding the unsatisfactory financial contributions that the University has experienced over the
past two years. As reported in greater detail within the financial review, the University has an asset base
of almost $1 billion with only a small portion of this funded by specific borrowings. With $50 million cash
reserves Massey is adequately placed to maintain its investment programme across all three campuses to
ensure students and other stakeholders are provided with the appropriate level of facilities and technology
that their programmes require. During 2008 the long overdue start to a major expansion of library and
study space at the Auckland campus will commence and it will be closely followed by a major upgrade in
Wellington.
The University last revalued its land and buildings as at 1 January 2006 and intends to complete a further
revaluation as at 31 December 2008. We do not believe that more frequent valuation is warranted or would
add value for the reader of this Annual Report. Our auditors are of the opinion that property values have
increased by a material amount in the two years since the last revaluation was undertaken and have
accordingly issued a qualified audit opinion in relation to land and building valuation. We respectfully
disagree with the stance taken by our auditors in this matter. In the main, University property will be
retained in the long term and has limited value for other than educational use. There are also potential
restrictions on title to some land which mean that it would be difficult to obtain full market value in the
event of sale.
I take this opportunity of expressing support for the change of focus in the tertiary sector brought about
by the new approach to tertiary funding. The shift and emphasis away from the “bums on seats” model is
welcomed. The targeted approach in provision of academic programmes throughout the tertiary sector
is long overdue. However, as is often the case, the change of focus is to some degree an over-reaction
and potentially inhibits the ability of universities to continue to be creative and innovative in responding
to opportunities, and meeting the requirements in what has to be recognised as a rapidly changing
international tertiary and research environment. Under the new regime, all universities will in effect
have to set a cap on programmes for domestic students. This will expand the number of programmes
which essentially will now have to be provided under forms of limited entry. Potentially domestic
students seeking enrolment within the university sector will find that they are denied entry. The change
of focus also fails to address the long-recognised inadequate levels of funding provided to New Zealand
universities, particularly when benchmarked internationally. While this is evident on all per capita
measurements, it is particularly frustrating that the level of investment made by the government in the
broad science-based sectors is particularly out of line within Massey. The level of government funding
3
when combined with student fee contributions barely covers the direct costs of academic support, thereby
requiring the University’s continued investment in infrastructure and technical support to be made from
other sources. Given New Zealand’s continued reliance upon its agriculture-based economy this lack of
financial support is particularly ironic.
Much of the focus during 2007 within the University centred upon the introduction of the new investment
plan process, replacing the previous structure of university charters and profiles. This process closely
paralleled the strategic approach that Massey had been taking in defining its academic offerings both
regionally and nationally. As earlier noted, this change of approach will impose potential restrictions
on the number of domestic students able to be enrolled over the next three years, which is contrary to
the strategic vision that the University has developed. As an example, Massey has long recognised the
comparative substantial low level of engagement in sciences. Notwithstanding the financial barriers
earlier referred to, Massey has recognised the necessity to develop an environment which will ensure
the further development of academic capability and performance and encourage the attraction of more
students into this essential sector. It would be particularly disappointing if this strategic objective was
not to be recognised within government policy. In addition, Massey is almost unique with its development
of extramural distance learning programmes. For a variety of reasons students participating within this
sector of tertiary study have declined during the past few years. In response Massey has set for itself the
objective of providing further encouragement and support to ensure that students, whose only means of
access to university study is by this process, are able to be encouraged and supported and accordingly
ensure higher completion levels are achieved. This has been recognised as being particularly important
within the Mäori and Pasifika communities.
The third area where Massey recognises it has a strategic objective to support growth centres upon the
responsibility that Massey accepts to be the university of the North Shore. This region is rapidly expanding
and increased levels of student participation from both school leavers and new migrants will continue to
require further investment, which will likewise put pressure on the arbitrary domestic enrolment ceilings
currently being imposed.
As the year concludes it is appropriate to acknowledge the contribution that the Vice-Chancellor,
Professor Judith Kinnear, has made to Massey University during her five-year term. Her focus on
academic development and encouragement of investment in infrastructure to support academic
excellence warrants particular mention. This academic leadership was a contributing factor to Massey’s
improvement in the most recent Performance-Based Research Fund round, where not only did Massey
improve its overall position, but more importantly was ranked number one in a larger number of disciplines.
Areas of traditional strength in agriculture, food and biological sciences, and veterinary studies, were
joined by such emerging areas as design, nursing, public health and finance. Fine arts will shortly join this
select group.
4
It is also appropriate to acknowledge the recent decision made by Council to appoint the Hon Steve
Maharey as Vice-Chancellor. Mr Maharey, a past student and academic at Massey, and a previous
Minister of Education, has developed an intimate knowledge of the tertiary environment and has shown
strong leadership in reshaping the education sector. Equally impressive is his obvious passion for the
University. The announcement of his appointment has been widely endorsed and all within the University
look forward to his taking up his appointment in mid 2008. Pending his arrival Council has appointed
Professor Ian Warrington as Acting Vice-Chancellor.
2008 will bring further new challenges and opportunities for Massey University. Many strategically
important decisions had to be made in 2007. These ranged from matters of an essentially fiscal nature,
through to the development of a clear direction for Massey with its multi-campus positioning and unique
distance learning responsibilities. I have been pleased to lead a cohesive and unified Council that has
provided broad support to the University during a period of significant change. 2008 has seen three new
faces around the Council table with all three student positions changing. It is particularly important to
note that it was the end of a era when we farewelled the longest-serving Council member, Extramural
Students’ Society representative, Liz Hawes, who had served on the University Council since April 1999.
Her contribution, along with that of all student members on Council, has been invaluable and Council was
pleased that her contribution in supporting New Zealand students will be able to be continued in her new
role as Co-President of the New Zealand Union of Students’ Associations.
As we move into 2008 we do so in a positive financial position. However this strength is totally overshadowed by the significant resource that Massey University has within its staff. This capability,
experience and commitment, when aligned with the financial resources available provides an overall
environment that gives Council the confidence that Massey University will successfully meet all its
challenges and ensure that in 2008, and the years beyond, it will continue to make a significant contribution
to the economic, social and cultural growth of New Zealand.
Nigel Gould
Chancellor
Massey University
5
REPORT FROM THE
Vice-Chancellor
The 2007 year provided many challenges, including some of particular significance for the future of
Massey University. One key challenge lay in securing improved outcomes from the Performance-Based
Research Fund (PBRF) which provides an increasing component of our funding from the Tertiary Education
Commission (TEC). The quantum of funding received is determined principally (60 per cent) by staff quality
evaluation scores. Outcomes of the second PBRF round announced in May 2007 identified that, relative
to the first round, Massey’s quality evaluation score increased by 45 per cent owing to an increased
proportion of quality-ranked researchers, including a 52 per cent increase in the number of A-ranked
researchers. This achievement reflects both a remarkable commitment by Massey academic staff and the
implementation of a University-wide quality assurance plan.
Another important challenge was the preparation and submission of bids for the second round of nationally
funded Centres of Research Excellence (CoREs). Each CoRE has a number of key partner institutions which
contribute to the critical mass of outstanding researchers in each domain, and Massey’s involvement in
these, either as the host institution or as a partner institution, is one major signal of our research standing
and our commitment to research training. It was most pleasing that Massey’s Riddet Centre: Advancing
Knowledge in Foods and Biologicals was the only new CoRE to be funded in this round and that the Allan
Wilson Centre for Molecular Ecology and Evolution, an existing CoRE hosted by Massey University, secured
ongoing funding. Massey University is also a partner in three other existing CoREs that received further
funding; namely, the MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology; the National
Centre for Advanced Bio-Protection Technologies, and the National Centre for Growth and Development.
A third key challenge for Massey lay in the financial domain. For 2006 we had reported an end-of-yeardeficit, and accordingly, during 2007 all academic and administrative units worked constructively and
cooperatively in order to achieve an agreed end-of-year surplus. The positive financial outcome detailed in
this annual report reflects the commitment of senior managers and their staff to achieve an agreed goal.
Another significant challenge for Massey in 2007 arose in relation to the education reforms and their
consequent changes in funding announced by the TEC in the Tertiary Education Strategy 2007 – 12. The
previous funding model, based on enrolment numbers, was unpredictable and open ended; in contrast, the
new funding model to be introduced for 2008 is premised on managed change and planned growth. and
entails engagement with various stakeholders, both local and national. In moving from a sole reliance on
student numbers, the new funding model will be of benefit in that our student numbers have declined owing
6
“Massey’s proud record of
recognition at a national level
for excellence in teaching.”
to factors including the national downturn in international undergraduate students, particularly from China,
and the impact of the buoyant New Zealand economy. In response to the education reforms, universities
were required during 2007 to develop a document Investing in a Plan, which inter alia identified academic
priorities and quality assurance mechanisms and forecast student numbers. It is pleasing to report that, as
a first step, Massey’s investment plan was approved in full by the TEC Board of Commissioners for a period
of three years, the maximum possible.
As will be apparent from the remainder of this report, these were just some of many Massey highlights for
2007.
Teaching in a research-informed environment and undertaking research training in a research-active
environment are the two pillars of university activity. On the teaching side, Massey’s commitment
to excellence in teaching was acknowledged in the success of various initiatives, including Massey
University in 2007 becoming the host institution for New Zealand’s first Centre for Tertiary Teaching
Excellence: Ako Aotearoa. This government-funded centre will receive $20 million over five years and is
dedicated to assisting New Zealand tertiary education organisations and educators to deliver the best
possible outcomes for students through research, development, provision of policy advice and acting as an
information repository and resource for the support of effective teaching.
The teaching role of our academic staff was again acknowledged through the annual Vice-Chancellor’s
Teaching Excellence Awards, with four staff recognised in 2007 for their commitment to excellence in
teaching. Awards for Sustained Excellence in Teaching were made to Dr Bryan Walpert, School of English
and Media Studies; Dr Tracy Riley, School of Curriculum and Pedagogy; and Dr Andrew Martin, Department
of Management; and the award for Excellence in First-Year Teaching was made to Dr Sharon Stevens,
School of English and Media Studies. Again this year, two of these Massey awardees, Dr Bryan Walpert,
and Dr Tracy Riley, were nominated for National Teaching Excellence Awards for Sustained Excellence
and won awards. In doing so, they continued Massey’s proud record of recognition at a national level for
excellence in teaching.
The Vice-Chancellor’s 2007 Symposium entitled Teachers Still Matter: The Magic of Teaching, was held
on each campus in December, with the focus of the symposium being on the importance of teaching, the
enjoyment obtained from teaching, and the satisfaction gained by staff and students from engagement in
productive, positive and successful teaching and learning experiences. We were delighted to welcome
back, as this year’s guest speaker, Professor Iain Hay of Flinders University in Adelaide, Australia.
Professor Hay, a former Massey staff member, won the Australian Prime Minister’s award for university
teaching in 2006.
As part of a continuing focus on further advancing distance education and e-learning at Massey University
a new position of Director of Distance Education was established, with Associate Professor Mark Brown
being appointed, and Dr Terry Stewart, an academic with outstanding credentials in e-learning, was
7
appointed to the new position of Teaching Fellow. Both appointees are based in the Centre for Academic
Development and E-Learning, formerly the University Training and Development Unit, and will make major
contributions to policies, procedures and staff training in these areas.
Accreditation by external associations, national and international, is an important component to ensure
the maintenance of quality, relevance and currency of courses of study in professional domains offered
by Massey. A major milestone for Massey in 2007 was the reaccreditation of the Bachelor of Veterinary
Sciences (BVSc) degree by the American Veterinary Medical Association – noting that Massey is just
one of only eight non-US universities to have this accreditation – and the Australasian Veterinary Boards
Council. This degree is also accredited by the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association and graduates are
able to obtain registration from the British Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons. Other examples include:
the Bachelor of Nursing (BN) programme reaccredited by the Nursing Council of New Zealand, and also
accredited in Australia under CER (Closer Economic Relations Trade Agreement), with graduates able to
apply for registration in the United Kingdom, Ireland, the United States, Canada and a range of Middle East
countries; and the Bachelor of Medical Laboratory Science (BMLSc), reaccredited by the New Zealand
Medical Laboratory Science Board. This programme is also accredited in Australia, and graduates are
able to obtain registration as biomedical scientists in the United Kingdom.
On the research front, Massey University’s ongoing commitment to focused excellence in research and
research training was acknowledged internationally and nationally. In the latest PBRF results mentioned
above, Massey achieved the third-highest number of research-active staff in the sector, ranked in the top
three in 13 subject areas, achieved quality scores above the sector average in 19 subject areas, and ranked
first in Design, Nursing and Veterinary Studies and Large Animal Science.
The internal pathway for Promotion to Professor, established in 2003, continues to provide an opportunity to
recognise and acknowledge Massey staff who have demonstrated sustained outstanding leadership and
excellence. In 2007, promotions to professor were awarded to:
•
Associate Professor Michael Belgrave, School of Social and Cultural Studies
•
Associate Professor Charles Brennan, Institute of Food Nutrition and Human Health
•
Associate Professor Charles Little, Institute of Fundamental Sciences
•
Associate Professor Richard Haverkamp, Institute of Technology and Engineering
•
Dr Andrew Shilton, Institute of Technology and Engineering
•
Associate Professor William Pomroy, Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical
Sciences.
The title of Distinguished Professor, established in 2004, recognises professorial staff who have achieved
positions of international eminence in their field, with recipients retaining this title for the duration of their
appointment at Massey. This select group numbers no more than 10 at any time, and in 2007 renowned
historian Professor Kerry Howe, School of Social and Cultural Studies, was appointed as a Distinguished
Professor and joins five other Massey academics who have previously received this title through this
channel, namely Distinguished Professors Paul Moughan, David Lambert, David Penny, David Parry and Bill
Tunmer.
8
“Massey publicly
acknowledged its outstanding
academic staff.”
Massey’s research reputation was also enhanced by the international recognition accorded to academic
staff, such as:
•
Professor Al Rowland, Institute of Molecular Biosciences, whose cytogenetic analysis of
the DNA of New Zealand nuclear test veterans made international headlines and was
applauded in the British House of Commons
•
Professor Robert McLachlan, Institute of Fundamental Sciences, named as the recipient
of the prestigious Dahlquist Prize, by the Society for Industrial and Applied Maths, for his
outstanding contribution to geometric integration and composition methods, and the application
of his work in many areas, this being the first time this award has gone to a mathematician from
the Southern Hemisphere
•
Professor Roger Morris, EpiCentre, Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical
Sciences, whose expertise in disease surveillance and modelling was called upon by the
British Department of Environment, Food and Rural Affairs to predict the spread of foot
and mouth disease during the outbreak in August this year
•
Professor Claire Massey, New Zealand Centre for Small and Medium Enterprise (SME)
Research, Department of Management and Enterprise Development, elected VicePresident (Research) of the International Council for Small Business and President of
the Small Enterprise Association of Australia and New Zealand, the first New Zealander
to hold either position.
Again, in 2007, Massey publicly acknowledged its outstanding academic staff at a gala dinner held at the
Banquet Hall, Parliament Buildings, Wellington, where our Teaching Excellence awardees (identified
above) were recognised and where Research Medal Awards were made as follows:
•
Outstanding Individual Researcher: Professor Neil Pearce, Centre for Public Health
Research
•
Outstanding Supervisor: Professor Barry Scott, Institute of Molecular Biosciences
•
Outstanding Research Team: Te Pümanawa Hauora, the Research Centre for Mäori
Health and Development, led by Professor Chris Cunningham
•
2007 Early Career Medals:
-
Dr Ben Marshall, Department of Finance, Banking and Property
-
Dr Ajay Awati, Riddet Centre
-
Dr Glen Pettigrove, School of History, Philosophy and Politics.
During 2007, Massey University continued to build on its research strengths and to enhance knowledge
transfer through various initiatives, including the launch of the New Zealand Institute of Advanced
Study (NZIAS), the appointment of Landcare Research principal scientist Surinder Saggar as the first
joint professorial research fellowship between Massey University and Landcare Research, and the
collaboration with the Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries that has resulted in their funding of two new
research professorships in Biochar (carbon that can be incorporated into soil) and Pyrolysis (processing of
biomass feedstock into biochar). As part of building future research capability, in 2007 Massey continued
its growth in postgraduate research enrolments and had a record number (875) of doctoral candidates. In
9
2007 there were 112 doctoral completions, with 103 of these being PhD degrees – an increase on 85 such
award last year.
On the technology transfer front, Massey’s Riddet Centre led by Professors Paul Moughan and Harjinder
Singh developed an emulsion-based omega-3 micro-encapsulation technology. This world-first technology
will allow omega-3, a fatty acid essential for neurological development in young children and with a
range of important health benefits for adults, to be incorporated into a range of products without the
fishy smell or taste normally associated with omega-3. This breakthrough technology will be taken to the
international consumer market through a partnership between the University, the Riddet Centre, the BioCommerce Centre and Speirs Foods. Speirs Nutritionals Ltd will develop, license and market the omega-3
technology. In July 2007 the $2.7 million Speirs Nutritionals Plant in Marton was officially opened and will
produce the omega-3 emulsion using the Massey technology. Also in late 2007, the Manawatu Investment
Group, a subsidiary of the BioCommerce Centre, committed a seven-figure sum investment into the
commercialisation of Anzode, a Massey-developed revolutionary zinc battery technology.
Investment in infrastructure and facilities in support of teaching, research and research training during
2007 included the following.
•
The Hopkirk Research Institute: This $17 million state-of-the-art research facility opened
in March 2007 on the Palmerston North campus. A collaborative venture between
AgResearch and Massey University, it houses the largest concentration of animal health
scientists in the Southern Hemisphere and will focus on research in areas relevant to the
health and welfare of pastoral livestock, with an emphasis on endemic diseases.
•
The Solexa Genome Analysis System: Commissioned by the Allan Wilson Centre, this is
a next-generation DNA sequencer which will enable scientists to analyse DNA 100 times
faster than previously. The Solexa is intended to become an accredited facility, the only
one in the Southern Hemisphere.
•
The Massey University Manawatu Microscopy and Imaging Centre: This state-of-the-art
facility, opened in August by the Prime Minister, the Right Hon Helen Clark, houses
a range of imaging equipment – light, fluorescence and confocal microscopes, and electron
microscopes, both scanning and transmission – to support research and research training in the
biological and physical sciences.
•
The Massey University Equine and Farm Service wing of the Institute of Veterinary,
Animal and Biomedical Sciences: This $1 million facility at Palmerston North serves
farm and equestrian clients of the Veterinary Teaching Hospital and will enhance the
teaching of veterinary students.
•
The Frasca Truflite Simulator: The acquisition of this new simulator at the Massey
School of Aviation’s Milson Flight Centre in Palmerston North meets an identified need
in pilot training and will enhance the quality of aviation education and training for
students, including a multi-crew competency training module.
10
•
Renovated Student Centre building: The renovated Student Centre building at Turitea,
Palmerston North, was officially opened in February by the Prime Minister, the Right
Hon. Helen Clark.
The Mä[email protected] Strategy has been the key strategy for Mäori development at Massey University. In
2007, in alignment with the tertiary education reforms and in keeping with this strategy, a new strategic
plan was developed: Kia Maia: Key Initiatives for a Mäori Academic Investment Agenda. Mäori research
centres across the University were supported through the activities of Te Mata o Te Tau, The Academy for
Mäori Research and Scholarship. Consistent with the desire to advance scholarship and promote Mäori
research excellence, these activities included the publication of Matariki, a monograph designed as a
forum for Mäori researchers and academics.
The University actively promoted engagement and collaboration internationally and with indigenous
peoples within areas of teaching and research through hosting international visitors including: Stephen
Pompedelli, from Harvard Medical School, who assisted with the analysis of cultural markers in the
Psychiatric Epidemiology study; Dr Marjorie Mau from the Department of Native Hawaiian Health,
University of Hawaii, on a research exchange; and, Dr Keaweaimoku Kaholokula from the Department of
Native Hawaiian Health, University of Hawaii, on a research exchange.
The Pasifi[email protected] Strategy is the key strategy for Pasifika development at Massey University. 2007
was the first year of its implementation and important initial work was completed, including the National
Action Plan 2006 – 09 and the Auckland Campus Action Plan 2007 – 2010. These papers are published in the
Pasifi[email protected] Strategy: Enroute to Cultural Democracy, July 2007. The Pasifi[email protected] Community
Learning Initiative was launched in August 2007 and is being piloted at Northcote College, Glenfield
College and Birkenhead College. The University also hosted the Whenua Research and Academic Pasifika
Network Conference, with presentations from Pacific staff and students, launched a Pasifika Leaders’
Forum series, and opened a new Pasifika Learning Centre at the Wellington campus.
In the staff development area, the Massey University Leadership Development programme was run for
the first time in January 2007. The programme included modules for new and emerging leaders and for
experienced leaders. Massey also participated in the New Zealand Vice-Chancellors’ Committee Women
in Leadership programme run for the first time in 2007. As a follow-on from the International Women
Presidents Forum meeting held in China (May/June 2007), Massey hosted at Palmerston North a Chinese
delegation of Women Leaders for a one-day seminar: Mentoring of Female Faculty and Developing
Leadership Skills for Future.
The national contribution of Massey staff, students and alumni continued to be recognised through honours
and awards. These included individuals receiving 2007 New Year Honours and Queen’s Birthday Honours
and recognition from numerous bodies including the New Zealand Association of Scientists, Royal Society
of New Zealand, Marsden Fund Council, Health Research Council of New Zealand, Cancer Society of New
Zealand, New Zealand Institute of Mathematics and its Applications, Ministry of Research, Science and
11
Technology, Public Relations Institute of New Zealand, Property Institute of New Zealand, New Zealand
Institute of Food Science and Technology, New Zealand Poetry Society, University Sport New Zealand,
New Zealand Dairy Industry, New Zealand Federation of Business and Professional Women, Australian
and New Zealand Applied Mathematical Society, Pacific Island Polynesian Education Foundation, Zonta
Design Awards, Qantas Media Awards, New Zealand Young Farmers, MotorSport Elite Academy, Peugeot
Hokonui Fashion Design Awards, and Dyson Product Design Awards.
Another key milestone was the launch in November 2007 of the inaugural annual Creative Arts Festival
“BLOW Nga hau e wha” (meaning four winds) by Massey’s College of Creative Arts. The festival launch
included the induction of three alumni into a College of Creative Arts Hall of Fame, with the inaugural
inductees being:
•
Richard Taylor, Director of Weta Workshop
•
New York-based fashion designer Rebecca Taylor
•
sculptor and filmmaker Len Lye (awarded posthumously).
Massey was delighted to welcome Olympic track legend and health researcher Associate Professor
Peter Snell, a Massey University Foundation Visiting Fellow in Health and Exercise Science, who, in May
2007, was awarded an Honorary Doctorate from Massey University. Based at the Department of Internal
Medicine at the University of Texas Southwestern, Dr Snell is the Director of the Human Performance
Centre in Dallas and is collaborating with Massey researchers in Public Health and Exercise Science. In
November 2007, at a special graduation session at the Waihi marae, Turangi, an honorary doctorate was
conferred on Tumu Te Heuheu of Ngäti Tüwharetoa, in recognition of his contributions to Mäori education,
world heritage protection, and environmental stability.
Massey is part of an international community of scholars. In 2007, relationships were maintained
and advanced with numerous universities, research institutions and government organisations across the
world, including, the United Kingdom, the United States of America, Mexico, Japan, China, Saudi Arabia,
Pakistan, Thailand, Samoa and India. The following were highlights of our international relationships in
2007.
•
In October 2007 a second tripartite agreement was signed between Massey University
and the prestigious Peking University, China, with the third partner being the University
of Inner Mongolia. This relationship builds on the successful tripartite agreement that
was established in 2006 between Peking University, Massey University and Shihezi
University.
•
Under a memorandum of agreement with Mexico’s Universidad Juarez Autonoma de
Tabasco de Los Estados Unidos Mexanos (UJAT), Massey staff gave workshops in meat
technology and beef supply chain management at UJAT in February 2007.
•
New and renewed student exchange agreements provide opportunities for Massey students to
study in an offshore institution and experience new cultures. During 2007 new agreements were
signed with: Hochschule für Angewandte Wissenschaften Muenchen, Germany; Institut National
12
Polytechnique de Toulouse, France; University of Calgary, Canada; Cornell University, USA;
Clarkson University, USA; and Deakin University, Australia. Agreements were renewed with:
Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, USA; University of Copenhagen, Denmark; and Kumamoto
University, Japan.
In addition during 2007, Massey hosted several international conferences that brought to the University
researchers and scholars from across the globe, including:
•
49th International Association for Vegetation Science Conference (February)
•
Evolution 2007 (June)
•
Chief of Army Seminar Warfighting in a Contemporary Environment (August)
•
Symposium on Insulin Resistance, Diabetes and Vulnerable Populations (October)
•
2nd International Conference on Sensing Technology (ICST’07) (November)
•
4th International Conference on Computational Intelligence (CIRAS’07) (November).
I wish to acknowledge all Massey staff, both the academics who deliver our teaching and research
training mission and the range of general staff who provide essential administrative, technical and other
support, for their efforts, dedication and contribution. Achievement of our mission also depends on our
students and our alumni, our research partners, communities, stakeholders and supporters. Together we
have continued to develop and enhance Massey University, both as a strong national university meeting
the needs of New Zealand and New Zealanders and as part of an international community of scholars.
Over the past five years it has been my privilege to lead Massey University and I wish every success to
Massey in the future.
Professor Judith Kinnear
Vice-Chancellor
Massey University
13
“state-of-the-art Frasca Truflite
light aircraft simulator, acquired
by School of Aviation sets new
standartds in realism”
Year in Review
JANUARY
•
Seventeen Massey staff and alumni receive New Year honours, including Professor Robert
Anderson, Distinguished Professor David Parry and Dr Farah Palmer.
•
The New Zealand School of Music forms an exchange partnership with leading British arts college
Dartington College of Arts in Devon, England.
•
Education researcher Dr Madhumita Bhattacharya becomes the inaugural New Zealand recipient
of a Researcher Exchange Programme award from the British Council.
FEBRUARY
•
Prime Minister Helen Clark officially opens the new Student Centre at the Palmerston North
campus.
•
A two-year research project that will see the University collaborate with manufacturers Navman,
Macpac, Gallagher Group and Tait Electronics is awarded $1 million.
•
Bachelor of Technology graduate Tim Renton becomes the inaugural winner of a design award
for three-dimensional modelling, run by Spatial, of Colorado – a world leader in the creation of
computer-aided design packages.
•
The University receives $9.7 million Innovation and Development Funding to lead three tertiary
education projects: an inter-university Mäori academic network, a synchrotron support
programme, and co-ordination and implementation of e-learning guidelines.
•
A state-of-the-art Frasca Truflite light aircraft simulator, acquired by the School of Aviation, sets
new standards in realism.
•
Electronic media artist Rachael Rakena is selected to exhibit a collaborative installation in the
world’s oldest, most prestigious art exposition – the Venice Art Biennale.
14
MARCH
•
Palmerston North MP Steve Maharey opens the $17 million
state-of-the-art Hopkirk Research Institute, housing the largest
concentration of animal health researchers in the Southern
Hemisphere.
•
Three teams of Massey vulcanologists and students are
dispatched to Mt Ruapehu within minutes of an alarm triggered by an oncoming lahar.
•
An Internet search engine designed by Wellington campus digital media specialist Mark Zeman is
voted one of the world’s top 100 alternative search engines – the only one from New Zealand.
•
For more than 300 university staff, a journey of a million steps starts with the launch of the 10,000
[email protected]: Hikoi-a-Hauora programme. Teams competed over 12 weeks to make the
equivalent of a walk around New Zealand.
•
Six Mäori PhD graduates receive recognition at the National Mäori Academic Excellence awards:
Dr Amohia Boulton, Dr Huia Jahnke, Dr Tanira Kingi, Dr Nicole Coupe, Dr Colin Knox and Dr Lynne
Pere.
•
The veterinary science programme’s international accreditation, which enables Massey-trained
vets to practice in New Zealand, Australia, Britain and North America, is renewed for a further
seven years.
APRIL
•
Vice-Chancellor’s Teaching Excellence Awards are awarded to
Dr Tracy Riley, School of Curriculum and Pedagogy, Dr Bryan
Walpert, School of English and Media Studies (pictured), and Dr
Andy Martin, Department of Management.
•
A record 1181 students graduate in ceremonies in Auckland, an increase of nearly 200 on 2006,
including the first graduates from the Bachelor of Speech and Language Therapy programme.
•
Two social research projects focusing on improving living standards and work opportunities for
New Zealanders receive more than $6.9 million in funding from the Foundation for Research,
Science and Technology.
15
“Olympic legend Peter Snell
is awarded an honorary
doctorate”
•
More than 10 years of research funded by the Foundation for Research, Science and Technology
results in a breakthrough in solar cell technology by the Nanomaterials Research Centre. The
development of synthetic dyes for use in dye-sensitised solar cells will enable New Zealanders to
generate electricity from sunlight at a 10th of the cost of current photoelectric solar cells.
•
A survey by the Department of Marketing rates the Government’s performance, finding public
satisfaction with protecting the environment, fighting unemployment and dealing with security
threats, and dissatisfaction with controlling crime.
•
Nick Albert and Rachael Bell receive Government Top Achiever Scholarships worth more than
$152,000.
MAY
•
New Zealand Olympic legend Peter Snell is awarded an honorary doctorate at the Palmerston
North graduation ceremonies, along with sculptor and former lecturer in the College of Education
Paul Dibble.
•
The University’s share of the PBRF funding pool is increased by $2 million as a result of the 2006
evaluation, from $32.7 million to $34.7 million.
•
An international study led by the Centre of Public Health Research is awarded $140,000 by the
United States National Institutes of Health to investigate risk factors of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.
•
College of Education Associate Professor Mark Brown is seconded to the position of Director of
Distance Education to lead development in the delivery of extramural programmes.
•
The development of portable nuclear magnetic resonance machines by Dr
Robin Dykstra enables scientists to assess the properties of Antarctic sea
ice – and attracts international interest, from the construction sector to the oil
industry.
•
College of Education Pro Vice-Chancellor Professor James Chapman calls for research into
why men are not entering the teaching profession and why the gap between male and female
educational achievement in New Zealand is among the world’s largest.
16
•
A study of the cells of 50 nuclear test veterans by Dr Al Rowland, Institute of Molecular
Biosciences, confirms the veterans suffered genetic damage as a result of radiation.
•
The first graduates of the New Zealand School of Music were among the 600 capped at Wellington
graduation ceremonies.
JUNE
•
The functional foods-focused research group, the Riddet Centre, becomes the latest governmentfunded Centre of Research Excellence.
•
The Government pledges to contribute $11.15 million
to the New Zealand School of Music for a purposebuilt home in Wellington’s Civic Square.
•
Auckland sports science researchers break new ground with the development of a tiny ingestible
capsule capable of measuring core body temperature.
•
A multi-disciplinary research team discover a weak link in human digestion by analysing the work
of a section of living intestine. In a world first, a section of possum intestine is kept alive in a tank.
•
The Health Research Council awards the University $5.6 million for research into Mäori and
children’s health, spinal cord injury, sleep and the mental health of pregnant and new mothers, and
eukaryotic signature proteins.
•
Professor of Animal Welfare Science and Applied Physiology and Bioethics David Mellor and
Emeritus Professor John Codd are honoured in the Queen’s Birthday honours.
•
Dr Peter Coolbear is appointed Director of Ako Aotearoa, the National Centre for Tertiary Teaching
Excellence, a consortium of institutions headed by Massey.
•
Dr Tracy Riley (pictured) and Dr Bryan
Walpert, recipients of the Vice-Chancellor’s
Teaching Excellence awards, go on to win
at the national Tertiary Teaching Excellence
awards – the second year running that
Massey has had two recipients.
17
“University receives $13.6 million in
Foundation for Research, Science
and Technology funding”
•
Lung damage in smokers continues to progress after they have stopped smoking, according to a
study by clinical pharmacology lecturer Dr Felix Ram.
•
The University’s Animal Welfare Science and Bioethics Centre is named a collaborating centre of
the World Organisation for Animal Health.
•
The University joins forces with the Auckland District Health Board to encourage more Mäori to
enter the mental health workforce.
•
A cooling vest for athletes designed by industrial design
graduate Stephen Smith wins him the Dyson Product
Design Award, beating three other Massey graduates
for the $3000 prize.
•
A study by Professor Paul Spoonley finds Mäori attitudes towards immigrants have hardened in
recent years, while New Zealanders generally are ambivalent about the impact of immigration.
JULY
•
The University leaps up in the prestigious annual Shanghai Jiao Tong University ranking of the
world’s top 500 universities, sitting second equal with Otago behind Auckland University.
•
Methamphetamine remains widely available but middle-class drug users may be eschewing P
as its reputation worsens, according to research by the Centre for Social and Health Outcomes
Research and Evaluation (SHORE).
•
The University receives $13.6 million in Foundation for Research, Science and Technology funding
for five research projects: work on biodegradable nanoparticles made by genetically modified
bacteria; economic integration of immigrants; research into the storage, generation and efficiency
of solar cells; a longitudinal study of ageing; and investigation into the nanostructure of foods postingestion.
18
•
A breakthrough by the Riddet Centre that enables
omega-3 in fish oil to be incorporated in foods at high
levels without the smell and taste of fish is one step
closer to market with the opening of a factory by Speirs
Nutritionals in Marton.
•
Professor Ben Jacobsen, Department of Economics and Finance, makes the international top 10 list
of the most downloaded papers from the Social Science Research Network.
•
Professor Robert McLachlan is awarded the prestigious Dahlquist prize, the first time the award
has gone to a mathematician from the Southern Hemisphere.
AUGUST
•
Poor health during childhood is identified as the number one impediment to literacy by a threeyear study of adult literacy and employment conducted by the Department of Communication and
Journalism in partnership with Wanganui community groups.
•
Having friends and doing lots of physical activity were highlighted by boys as enhancing academic
success, according to a study by College of Education lecturer Dr Michael Irwin.
•
Organic dairy cow number 26 attracts
national attention when she gives birth to
triplets – a one-in-500,000 occurrence.
•
While demand for organic food in New Zealand has doubled in the past three years, a study by
commerce lecturer Dr Andrew Murphy finds little consumer awareness about organics, and that
price is still a barrier.
SEPTEMBER
•
Doctorate student Annette Mortensen receives the Supreme Harmony award from the Federation
of Islamic Associations of New Zealand for her interest in improving the lives of immigrants –
including organising swimming sessions for Auckland’s Muslim women.
19
“Mäori Awards... Peti
Kenrick... perceptions of
teaching Mäori students”
•
Prime Minister Helen Clark opens the Manawatu
Microscopy Imaging Centre at the Palmerston North
campus, boosting the biological and physical research
capability in the region.
•
Three PhD students are awarded Top Achiever Doctoral Scholarships: Alistair Clement to study the
geomorphical evolution of the Manawatu coastal plain; Margaret Hartnett for an investigation into
integration of online learning environments, and Jessica Costall for impacts of fragmentation on the
ecological integrity of native lowland forest.
•
A text for students and practising psychologists edited by head of the School of Psychology,
Professor Ian Evans, including papers authored by Massey staff, is published by the New Zealand
Psychological Society.
•
Professor Neil Pearce is awarded the Individual Research Medal; Professor Barry Scott receives
the Medal for best Supervisor; Te Pümanawa Hauora, the Research Centre for Mäori Health and
Development, wins best Team award; while Dr Ben Marshall, Dr Ajay Awati and Dr Glen Pettigrove
receive Early Career Medals.
•
Mäori Awards are given to James Graham, for his research into the role of Te Aute College,
Education lecturer Pani Kenrick for her examination of the provision of a total immersion Mäori
pre-service teaching programme, and doctoral student Peti Kenrick, to study beginning teachers’
perceptions of preparing to teach Mäori students.
OCTOBER
•
The New Zealand Institute for Advanced Study is launched at the Auckland campus, allowing élite
scientists to pursue fundamental scholarships aimed at fostering pure academic research to drive
New Zealand forward.
•
New Zealand’s veterinary and animal science research capability is boosted by $2 million from the
Government’s Building Research Capability in Strategically Relevant Areas fund.
•
A new four-year primary teacher education programme, which aims to better equip teachers for
modern classroom is approved by the Committee on University Academic Programmes and the
Teachers’ Council of New Zealand for launch in 2008.
20
•
The eruption of Mt Ruapehu provides
Dr Shane Cronin and his students the
opportunity to gather data to enhance
predictive models of eruptions being
developed by the Volcanic Risk
Solutions research group.
•
Research into the commercial potential of taewa, Mäori potatoes, led by Nick Roskruge, involves
35 schools in a bid to get young people interested in horticulture.
•
A next-generation DNA sequencer launched at the Allan Wilson Centre for Molecular Ecology and
Evolution on the Palmerston North campus enables scientists to analyse DNA 100 times faster than
previously.
•
Massey alumus and former academic staff member the Hon Steve Maharey is appointed ViceChancellor designate. The Palmerston North Member of Parliament and Minister of Education,
Broadcasting, Research, Science and Technology and Crown Research Institutes will take up the
role next year.
•
The first inductees of the new College of Creative Arts Hall of Fame are honoured in Wellington:
Richard Taylor, director of Weta Workshop; New York-based fashion designer Rebecca Taylor;
and (posthumously) sculptor and film maker Len Lye are all graduates of the college and its
antecedents.
•
A joint initiative between Te Mata o te Tau and the Centre of Disaster Research, the Mäori
Emergency Management Strategy, achieves acclaim and support from government departments
and agencies involved in emergency management.
•
An accelerated lambing programme shows yearround lambing can work – but falling lamb prices
may mean farmers are in no hurry to implement
the scheme.
•
Research into dolphin watching suggests it could disturb the mammals to a point where their
behaviour could be affected.
•
Dr Claire Robinson from the Institute of Communication Design says the Rugby World Cup defeat
will not have a long-term effect on the All Blacks’ brand.
21
“Inaugural recipients of Peter
Snell Doctoral Scholarships
in Public Health and Exercise
Sciences”
NOVEMBER
•
The College of Creative Arts’ inaugural arts festival, Blow, is launched in Wellington, featuring
exhibitions, screenings, fashion shows, lectures and symposia spanning the arts world.
•
The University’s Pasfi[email protected] strategy, the first explicit declaration by a New Zealand
university of its commitment to promoting, cultivating and expanding academic achievement for
Pacificans, is launched.
•
Meihana Durie and Jackson Green become the inaugural recipients of Peter Snell Doctoral
Scholarships in Public Health and Exercise Sciences.
•
Whetu Simon and Margaret Foster receive Te Tipu Putaiao Fellowships worth up to $107,500 each
from the Foundation for Research, Science and Technology.
•
The University Research Medals and Vice-Chancellor’s Teaching Excellence Awards are
presented at a formal dinner at Parliament. Associate Professor Peter Snell is the guest speaker.
•
An automated kiwifruit packing system developed by Dr Rory Flemmer of
the School of Engineering and Technology for Zespri may solve the labour
shortage problems faced by the industry and ensure consumers receive
exactly the grade of fruit they require at the right state of ripeness.
•
The near-human performance of a virtual teacher called Eve, created by
Institute of Information and Mathematical Sciences staff led by Dr Hossein Sarrafzadeh, which
can adapt its response to the emotional state and reactions of those it is “teaching”, attracts the
attention of computer scientists across the world.
•
Professor Peter Lockhart, Institute of Molecular Biosciences, and Professor Paul Rainey, Institute
for Advanced Studies, are elected as fellows of the Academy of the Royal Society.
•
The New Zealand Ergonomics Society honours Professor Tony Vitalis for his services to the
advancement of ergonomics.
22
•
A study into school lunches finds only one in 10 lunch boxes contains food that meets nutritional
guidelines for children – and that 80 per cent of food thrown away is the healthy sandwiches, fruit
and yoghurt they should be eating.
•
A record number of doctorates are awarded among the 470 who graduated at ceremonies in
Palmerston North on 30 November, including 23 PhDs, two DEds and one DBA.
•
Professor Andrew Brodie and Associate Professor Eric Ainscough, Institute of Fundamental
Sciences, are jointly awarded the New Zealand Institute of Chemistry Prize for Excellence in the
Chemical Sciences for their work on transition metal chemistry. Professor Brodie is also awarded
the New Zealand Science and Technology Medal.
•
Ngäti Tüwharetoa paramount chief
Tumu te Heuheu is awarded an honorary
doctorate recognising his contribution
to Mäori education, conservation and
preservation of worldwide heritage at a
special ceremony at the Waihi Marae at
Turangi.
23
2007
The Council
Chancellor
Mrs Elizabeth Hawes, BA,
Mr Nigel J Gould JP, BCA Vict., FCA
PGDipBusAdmin, PGDip Arts
(Appointed by the Massey
(Extramural Students’ Society
University Council on the
President)
nomination of the Vice-Chancellor)
Pro-Chancellor
Professor Ray J Winger, MS,
Mr Stephen Kós QC, LLB (Hons)
PhD Wisc., FNZIFST, FIFST UK,
Well,. LLM Cantab.
MAIFST
(Appointed by the Minister of
(Elected by the Academic Board)
Education)
Vice-Chancellor
Mrs Andrea L Davies, BBS, MBA
Professor J F Kinnear, MSc,
(Elected by permanent members
PhD Melb., BEd LaTrobe,
of the general staff)
GradDipComputerSim. Swinburne
UT., FLS
Dr Susan Baragwanath, BA Otago,
Mr Paul Falloon, BSc
MA London, Dip Ed, DLitt (Honoris
(Massey University Students’
causa), FRGS
Association President)
(Elected by the Court of
Convocation)
Dr Russell Ballard, CNZM, MAgrSc,
Mr Bruce Ullrich OBE, MBA,
PhD Flor., FNZIM
BComm Cant, ACA, FInstD
(Appointed by the Minister of
(Elected by the Court of
Education)
Convocation)
24
Mr Chris Kelly, MVSc, MACVSc
Professor Sylvia Rumball, CNZM,
(Appointed by the Massey
MSc NZ, PhD Auck., FNZIC
University Council on the
(Elected by the Academic Board)
nomination of the Vice-Chancellor)
Professor Ngatata Love JP, BCom,
Dr Colin Anderson, MA Auck.,
BCA (Hons), PhD Well.,
PhD Auck.
ACIS, ANZIM
(Elected by the permanent
(Appointed by the Minister of
members of academic staff)
Education)
Mrs Mavis Mullins, MBA
Mrs Alison Paterson, FCA FInstD
(Appointed by the Massey
(Appointed by the Minister of
University Council on the
Education)
nomination of the Vice-Chancellor)
Ms Veronica Tawhai, BA, MEd (Hons)
(Appointed by the Massey University
Students’ Association and the
Extramural Students’ Society)
25
2007
Officers of the University
Chancellor
Mr Nigel J Gould JP, BCA Vict., FCA
Pro Vice-Chancellor
Mr Stephen Kós QC, LLB (Hons) Well,. LLM Cantab.
Vice-Chancellor
Professor Judith Kinnear, MSc, PhD Melb., BEd LaTrobe, GradDipComputerSim. Swinburne UT., FLS
Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic and Research)
Professor Nigel Long, MSc Auck., PhD Q’ld, FNZPsS
Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Mäori)
Professor Mason H Durie, CNZM, MBChB Otago, DPsych McGill, D.Litt, FRANZCP, FRSNZ
University Registrar
Mr Stuart Morriss, MPP Well., BAgrSc, DipBusStud.
General Manager Strategy and Finance
Mr John Griffiths, BBS (Hons), MCom (Hons) C.Sturt., CA., AFNZIM
Director – Human Resources
Mrs June Dallinger, BA LaTrobe
Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Auckland and International)
Professor John Raine, BE (Hons) Cant., PhD Cant., CEng, FIMechE., FIPENZ, MSAE
Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Palmerston North)
Professor I J Warrington, MHortSc (Hons), DSc, DLitt (Honoris causa), FRSNZ, FNZSHS
Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Wellington)
Professor Andrea McIlroy, BA Well., MBA, PhD, DipTchg
Pro Vice-Chancellors
College of Business: Professor Lawrence C Rose, PhD Texas A & M, FFin
College of Creative Arts: Professor Sally J Morgan, BA (Hons), Sheff Hallam, MA Warw, KASKA
Royal Academy of Fine Arts Antwerp
College of Education: Professor James Chapman, MA Well., PhD Alta., DipTchg, FIARLD
College of Humanities and Social Sciences: Professor Barrie Macdonald, BA (Hons) Well., PhD ANU
College of Sciences: Professor Robert Anderson, ONZM, MAgrSc, PhD C’nell, DDA, FNZIAS
26
Directory
Bankers
Bank of New Zealand
Auditor
Audit New Zealand on behalf of the Auditor-General
Valuer
Quotable Value New Zealand
Legal Advisors
Buddle Findlay, Wellington
Cooper Rapley, Palmerston North
Russell McVeagh, Wellington
Andrea Craven, Palmerston North
Kensington Swan, Wellington
Davenport Harbour Lawyers, Auckland
AJ Park, Wellington
Insurers
Vero Insurance New Zealand Limited
Axiom Risk Insurance Management Limited
QBE Insurance (International) Ltd
Internal Auditor
PricewaterhouseCoopers
27
FINANCIAL REVIEW 2007
Introduction
The 2007 fiscal year has been characterised by the implementation of the University’s Financial Recovery Plan.
This saw the first steps taken in a move towards financial sustainability by the end of 2009, when it is expected
that a 3% return on revenue will be reached. The net operating surplus for the University for the 2007 year,
before one-off items, was $4.1 million, which compares to the budgeted loss of $1.3 million and the 2006 (IFRS
adjusted) loss of $1.6 million. This is a significant turnaround, which required whole-hearted commitment from
senior management and a very significant effort by the entire University. The consolidated result for the year
inclusive of IFRS adjustments was $9.1 million, but as noted above, this does not reflect the ongoing operating
surplus of $4.1 million. There is still a considerable gap of $7.3 million between the $4.1 million operating
surplus and the 3% target of around $11.4 million (based on 2007 revenue).
Student numbers at 19,432 fell short of the target of 19,883 equivalent full time students (EFTS) by 451 EFTS.
The downturn in international enrolments continued unabated, with the pipeline effect of graduating students
also affecting numbers. Domestic student numbers were on forecast, although lower than in 2006. Trends
commented on in the 2006 Financial Review were also seen to be applicable to 2007; high employment affecting
enrolments of extramural students and adverse demographics in the University’s traditional catchment areas for
school leavers.
Income Statement
The University’s consolidated surplus for 2007 ($9.1 million, 2.4% of revenue) compares favourably with last
year’s IFRS-adjusted loss ($1.3 million, -0.4% of revenue). This was $10.4 million better than the budgeted loss
of $1.3 million, while noting the effect of one-off adjustments to the operating surplus. The loss of 451 EFTS as
compared to target affected the final result, but this was alleviated by the impact of the Financial Recovery Plan.
The fall in international students could have adversely affected the final result by as much as $5.5 million if swift
action had not been taken.
While the result, even including IFRS changes, is short of the 3% of Revenue that the Tertiary Advisory
Monitoring Unit (TAMU) of the Tertiary Education Commission recommends, it is a positive step along the way
to a satisfactory surplus for the 2009 year.
The table below sets out several financial measures that TAMU uses to monitor the financial health of tertiary
education organisations.
2007
Measure
Surplus
1
TAMU Targets
University
Group
%
%
%
3.0
2.5
2.4
Operating Surplus 2
1.1
1.1
Cash Cover 3
8.0
15.1
15.2
Return on Assets 4
1.0
0.9
0.9
1
Surplus as a percentage of total revenue.
2
Surplus excluding unusual items as a percentage of total revenue.
3
Liquid funds as a percentage of annual cash outgoings.
4
Surplus as a percentage of assets.
28
Major variances against the budget and last year’s performance are discussed below:
1.
Total Operating Revenue
Revenue increased 5.4% over 2006 and was up on budget by 3.9%. Revenue from government grants was
up on budget and last year due mainly to increases in the PBRF component. This resulted from the first
reassessment of research performance of all tertiary educational institutions, which showed significant
improvement for Massey University. This revenue was also affected by positive performances from the
other two factors of the PBRF, namely external research income and research degree completions.
Inclusion of the unbudgeted Tripartite settlement also contributed to the favourable variance. Other
factors affecting revenue included a lower student fee income (mainly international students),
significantly higher interest income, and better contract and trading sales. The latter represents a
continuation of growth in this area of the University’s activities and includes higher returns from
dairying.
2.
Total Cost of Operations
The University budgeted for a small increase in costs for 2007 over 2006 of 1.3%. In the event, costs
were reasonably well contained and the increase was 2.4%, which included the unbudgeted Tripartite
settlement pay increase. This was due in large part to the efforts of all staff, led by the management team.
Total staff costs were over budget by 2.7%, and above 2006 by 2.9%, partly caused by the unbudgeted
Tripartite agreement. EFTS-related staff costs were over budget by 1.8% and last year by 3.7%. Contract
and trading staff-related costs were over budget by 2.0% and up on 2006 by 6.6%, mainly reflecting
increased volumes of research activity.
3.
Employee Entitlements
The additional amount to be provided for 2007 in respect of long service leave and gratuities is much
smaller than prior years. This reflects the ever present factor of interest rates which have risen as
compared to this time last year and a number of retirements and other resignations which has reduced
the remaining commitment.
4.
Income in Advance
A review of research and associated projects has been undertaken and a one-off gain has been booked
on the University’s accounts this year. This arises from the decision to ensure that all such projects are
valued on a percentage completion approach rather than the previous more conservative approach. It
has been determined that this is an adjustment under the new IFRS rules, which requires restatement of
prior periods, and the 2006 year has been adjusted accordingly for comparative purposes. The effect on
the 2007 year is an increase in surplus of approximately $4.2 million.
Balance Sheet
The University continues to have a strong balance sheet, with assets of nearly $1 billion and interest-bearing
liabilities of only $25.4 million. Note that the two suspensory loans received in late 2006 have now been included
in equity as a result of changes to reporting standards and on receipt of advice from the University’s advisors and
auditors.
1.
Working Capital
As expected, this has deteriorated slightly over the year although not to the extent that was budgeted for.
The budget was 0.65:1 with the actual being 1.1:1 and compared to last year of 1.1:1 (adjusted). Capital
29
expenditure was considerably lower than budget, which led to higher cash reserves being held, thereby
increasing current assets.
2.
Non-current Assets
There have been no significant changes to non-current assets in 2007 apart from an increase in term
investments, which reflects the timing of deposits moving between short-term and long-term maturities.
3.
Non-current Liabilities
The changes here have been in the reclassification of Suspensory Loans received from the Government
in late 2006.
Statement of Cashflows
Cashflows have been better than expected. This has been due mainly to lower capital spending. Cash carried
forward at the end of 2007 is $15.8 million higher than at the start of the year and $23.0 million better than
budget.
1.
Operating Cashflows
Net operating cashflows were better than budget and 2006. This was due to a combination of additional
revenue from PBRF, and interest received, partly off-set by higher payments to staff and suppliers.
2.
Investing Cashflows
These were significantly lower than budgeted and last year. The timing of withdrawals or deposits of
longer-term investments does have an effect on this area but overall has no net effect on the University’s
total cash position and is solely a timing issue. The main area for lower out-flows was the much smaller
capital expenditure for the year. There were some moves made to reduce or delay capital expenditure,
but the lack of large projects being initiated was the main driver.
International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS)
This financial year is the first that is wholly under the new set of standards. 2006 was a transitional year, which
was primarily reported on under NZ GAAP and then translated to NZ IFRS. The process has been a costly
exercise which has not added any value for readers of the University’s financial statements. Indeed, it may
actually impede the easy understanding of the results by adding additional notes and commentary that appear to
serve very little purpose.
An article by the Auditor-General, Mr Kevin Brady, in the November 2007 issue of the New Zealand Chartered
Accountants Journal concluded: “If real changes are not made to the current process, soon, in my view, there
will be increasing calls for separate financial reporting standards for public benefit entities that better meet the
needs of these entities and their users” (Reproduced by permission). This is an area that needs more debate and
discussion and will be of interest to the University, as a public benefit entity, in the years ahead.
30
Conclusion
Massey University has had a satisfactory financial recovery year in 2007. The small operating surplus was a good
turnaround from the loss in 2006, an improvement on the original budget, and marks the first steps on the way
back to an appropriate return on revenue. Further aspects of the Financial Recovery Plan will be implemented
in 2008 and 2009 to ensure that the University continues to be able to reinvest in students, staff and facilities.
T. Sew Hoy
Director – Finance Operations
31
SUMMARY FACTS AND FIGURES
2007
Students
2006
2005
2004
2003
Note
Equivalent full-time students (EFTS)
1
Change over previous year (%)
Total student enrolments
Change over previous year (%)
19,432
20,475
21,850
23,326
23,342
(5.09%)
(6.29%)
(6.33%)
(0.07%)
(8.43)%
35,491
37,022
39,657
41,436
41,662
(10.51%)
(6.64%)
(4.49%)
(0.54%)
4.82%
89.0%
89.4
90.0%
89.1%
87.1%
91.0%
90.1
90.1%
90.1%
89.8%
Examination pass rate - internal student (passed/sat)
- Extramural study (passed/sat)
Staff
College academic staff (full-time equivalent)
1,188
1,214
1,255
1,307
1,283
Student: staff ratio
15.8:1
16.3:1
16.8:1
17.3:1
17.5:1
1,522
1,490
1,574
1,583
1,601
1.28
1.23
1.25
1.21
1.25
$13,356
$12,991
$12,231
$11,827
$10,431
9,053
(1,322)
3,694
14,762
14,282
Return on total assets
0.92%
(0.15%)
0.53%
2.48%
2.44%
Return on total income
2.39%
(0.37%)
1.05%
4.20%
4.40%
Capital expenditure per EFTS
$1,475
$2,165
$2,652
$1,605
$1,846
Short-term liquidity
1.12:1
0.96:1
0.85:1
1.13:1
0.99:1
Total general staff (full-time equivalent)
2
Total general: college academic staff
Financial Performance
Net cost of services per EFTS
Net operating surplus/(deficit) ($000)
Financial Position
Working capital ratio
1.13:1
1.02:1
0.91:1
1.19:1
1.05:1
Debt to equity
2.76%
3.15%
1.31%
1.37%
0.37%
Change in equity
0.77%
0.96%
0.57%
2.61%
8.22%
Notes
1
EFTS funded includes Ministry of Education funded plus full-fee/international, but excludes NZ School
of Music.
2
General staff includes technical and casual and excludes contract and trading.
2006 and 2007 are reported under IFRS; prior years have not been amended.
32
STATEMENT OF RESPONSIBILITY
In the financial year ended 31 December 2007, the Council and management of Massey University were
responsible for:
•
the preparation of the financial statement and the judgements used therein
•
establishing and maintaining a system of internal control designed to provide reasonable assurance as to
the integrity and reliability of financial reporting.
In the opinion of the Council and management of Massey University the financial statements for the financial
year fairly reflect the financial position and operations of Massey University.
N. Gould
Chancellor
I. Warrington
Acting Vice-Chancellor
J Griffi
Griffiths
J.
ths
General Manager, Strategy and Finance
33
AUDIT REPORT
TO THE READERS OF
MASSEY UNIVERSITY AND GROUP’S
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND PERFORMANCE INFORMATION
FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2007
The Auditor-General is the auditor of Massey University (the University) and group. The Auditor-General has
appointed me, David Walker, using the staff and resources of Audit New Zealand to carry out the audit of the
financial statements and statement of service performance of the University and group, on his behalf, for the
year ended 31 December 2007.
Qualified Opinion – Our work was limited because land and buildings were not revalued to fair value at 31 December
2007
As stated in the accounting policies, the University recognises its land and buildings at fair value. The New
Zealand Equivalent to International Accounting Standard No.16 Property, Plant and Equipment (NZ IAS 16)
requires entities that recognise land and buildings at fair value to carry out revaluations with sufficient regularity
to ensure that revalued land and buildings are not included at a value that is materiality different to fair value.
The University engaged an independent valuer to consider and analyse the indicative movement in the fair value
of the University’s land and buildings over the period since they were last revalued. The valuer’s report provides
indicated percentage ranges in valuation movement based on published indices and market land inflation
information. These percentages indicate that there is likely to have been a material increase in the value of land
and buildings. However, the University has not carried out a revaluation and we are unable to determine the
amount of the required adjustment.
In our opinion:
•
Except for the effect of the departure from NZ IAS 16 as outlined above, the financial statements of the
University and group on pages 37 to 71:
-
comply with generally accepted accounting practice in New Zealand; and
-
fairly reflect the University and group’s financial position as at 31 December 2007.
In our opinion:
•
The financial statements of the University and group on pages 37 to 71 fairly reflect the results of
operations and cash flows for the year ended 31 December 2007; and
•
The performance information of the University and group on pages 72 to 150 fairly reflects its service
performance achievements measured against the performance targets adopted for the year ended on
that date.
The audit was completed on 30 April 2008, and is the date at which our opinion is expressed.
34
The basis of our opinion is explained below. In addition, we outline the responsibilities of the Council and the
Auditor, and explain our independence.
Basis of Opinion
We carried out the audit in accordance with the Auditor-General’s Auditing Standards, which incorporate the
New Zealand Auditing Standards. However, the scope of our work was limited because land and buildings were
not revalued.
We planned and performed the audit to obtain all the information and explanations we considered necessary in
order to obtain reasonable assurance that the financial statements and statement of service performance did not
have material misstatements whether caused by fraud or error.
Material misstatements are differences or omissions of amounts and disclosures that would affect a reader’s
overall understanding of the financial statements and statement of service performance. We are unable to
determine whether there are material misstatements in relation to land and buildings that were not revalued
because the scope of our work was limited, as we referred to in our opinion.
The audit involved performing procedures to test the information presented in the financial statements and
statement of service performance. We assessed the results of those procedures in forming our opinion.
Audit procedures generally include:
•
determining whether significant financial and management controls are working and can be relied on to
produce complete and accurate data;
•
verifying samples of transactions and account balances;
•
performing analyses to identify anomalies in the reported data;
•
reviewing significant estimates and judgements made by the Council;
•
confirming year-end balances;
•
determining whether accounting policies are appropriate and consistently applied; and
•
determining whether all financial statement disclosures are adequate.
We did not examine every transaction, nor do we guarantee complete accuracy of the financial statements and
statement of service performance.
We evaluated the overall adequacy of the presentation of information in the financial statements and statement
of service performance. We did not obtain all the information and explanations we required because land and
buildings were not revalued, as explained above.
Responsibilities of the Council and the Auditor
The Council is responsible for preparing financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting
practice in New Zealand. Those financial statements must fairly reflect the financial position of the University
and group as at 31 December 2007. They must also fairly reflect the results of operations and cash flows for
the year ended on that date. The Council is also responsible for preparing performance information that
fairly reflects the service performance achievements for the year ended 31 December 2007. The Council’s
responsibilities arise from the Education Act 1989 and the Crown Entities Act 2004.
35
We are responsible for expressing an independent opinion on the financial statements and statement of service
performance and reporting that opinion to you. This responsibility arises from section 15 of the Public Audit Act
2001 and the Crown Entities Act 2004.
Independence
When carrying out the audit we followed the independence requirements of the Auditor General, which
incorporate the independence requirements of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of New Zealand.
In addition to the audit we have carried out an assignment in the following area:
•
auditing the Chief Executive Officer’s declaration on the Performance Based Research Fund external
research income.
This is compatible with those independence requirements. Other than the audit and this assignment, we have no
relationship with or interests in the University or any of its subsidiaries.
David Walker
Audit New Zealand
On behalf of the Auditor-General
Auckland, New Zealand
Matters relating to the electronic presentation of the audited financial statements
This audit report relates to the financial statements of Massey University and Group for the year ended
30 June 2007 included on Massey’s web site. The University’s Council is responsible for the maintenance
and integrity of the University’s web site. We have not been engaged to report on the integrity of the
University’s web site. We accept no responsibility for any changes that may have occurred to the financial
statements since they were initially presented on the web site.
The audit report refers only to the financial statements named above. It does not provide an opinion on
any other information which may have been hyperlinked to/from these financial statements. If readers of
this report are concerned with the inherent risks arising from electronic data communication they should
refer to the published hard copy of the audited financial statements and related audit report dated 30 April
2008 to confirm the information included in the audited financial statements presented on this web site.
Legislation in New Zealand governing the preparation and dissemination of financial statements may differ
from legislation in other jurisdictions.
36
STATEMENT OF ACCOUNTING POLICIES
for the year ended 31 December 2007
The Reporting Entity
Massey University was established as a university under the Massey University Act 1963 (founding legislation).
These financial statements have been prepared in accordance with the Crown Entity Act 2004 and Section 220
of the Education Act 1989. The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with NZ GAAP. They
comply with New Zealand equivalents to IFRS, and other applicable financial reporting standards, as appropriate
for public benefit entities.
This is the first set of financial statements prepared using NZ IFRS, and comparatives for the year ended 31
December 2006 have been restated to NZ IFRS accordingly. Reconciliations of equity and net surplus/(deficit)
for the year ended 31 December 2006 under NZ IFRS to balances reported in 31 December 2006 financial
statements are detailed in note 34.
The accounting policies set out below have been applied consistently to all periods presented in these financial
statements and in preparing an opening NZ IFRS balance sheet as at 1 January 2006 for the purposes of the
transition to NZ IFRS.
Massey University is not aware of any material adjustment as a result of new standards coming into effect in 2007.
Massey University has not adopted any standards that have been issued but are not yet effective.
Massey University comprises the following areas of significant activity for teaching, research and community
service:
Colleges of
•
Business
•
Creative Arts
•
Education
•
Humanities and Social Sciences
•
Sciences.
The group consists of Massey University and its subsidiaries, Creative Campus Enterprises Limited (100%
owned), Massey University Foundation (100% owned), Massey Ventures Limited (100% owned), and Estendart
Limited and E Centre Limited (both 100% owned by Massey Ventures Limited). New Zealand School of Music
Limited is 50% owned.
Massey University (and its subsidiaries) was established as a tertiary education provider and researcher.
Accordingly, Massey University (and its subsidiaries) have designated themselves as public benefit entities. All
applicable public benefit entity exemptions have been adopted.
All the above-mentioned companies have a balance date of 31 December.
37
Measurement Base
The financial statements have been prepared on a historical cost basis, modified by the revaluation of certain
property, plant and equipment.
Accounting Policies
The following accounting policies which materially affect the measurement of financial performance and
financial position have been applied.
1.
Basis of Consolidation
The Consolidated Financial Statements are prepared from the financial statements of the University and
all subsidiaries as at 31 December 2007 using the purchase method. Corresponding assets, liabilities,
revenues, expenses and cashflows are added together on a line-by-line basis.
Any joint venture the University has an interest in is accounted for using the proportionate method of
consolidation.
Massey University accounts for an investment in an associate in the group financial statement using the
equity method.
2.
Budget Figures
The budget figures are those approved by the Council at the beginning of the financial year.
The budget figures have been prepared in accordance with NZIFRS and are consistent with the
accounting policies adopted by the Council for the preparation of the financial statements.
3.
Allocation of Overheads
Administrative and indirect teaching and research costs are allocated to significant activities on the basis
of total equivalent full-time students (EFTS) in each college. Exceptions to this rule are allocated on the
following basis:
(i)
regional facilities management – by floor space
(ii)
Recreation Centre – by internal full-time students
(iii)
student services – by internal equivalent full-time students
(iv)
annual leave – by general staff numbers for general staff and from academic department
leave records for academic staff.
4.
Revenues
Government grants are recognised as income on entitlement.
Student fees are recognised as income on entitlement.
Trust funds, including donations of a capital nature, are recognised as income when money is received,
or entitlement to receive money is established.
Income for research that is externally funded is recognised in the Cost of Services Summary (see note
3) as “Charges for services” on a percentage of completion basis. Research funds relating to incomplete
portions of externally funded research activities at year end are included in the balance sheet as “Receipts
in advance”.
38
5.
Foreign Currencies
Both the functional and presentation currency of Massey University and its subsidiaries is New Zealand
dollars, rounded to the nearest thousand dollars. Translations in foreign currencies are initially recorded
in the functional currency at the exchange rate ruling at the date of the transaction. Monetary assets
and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies are retranslated at the rate of exchange ruling at the
balance sheet date.
6.
Cash and Cash Equivalents
Cash and cash equivalents represent funds held to meet short-term commitments and include cash in
hand, deposits held at call with the bank, other short-term highly liquid investments and bank overdrafts.
Bank overdrafts are shown within borrowings in current liabilities in the balance sheet.
7.
Trade and Other Receivables
Trade and other receivables are initially measured at fair value and subsequently measured at amortised
cost using the effective interest method, less any provision for impairment.
8.
Inventories
Inventories are valued at the lower of cost (using the first-in first-out basis) or net realisable value. All
consumables are charged direct to expenditure.
9.
Biological Assets
Biological assets are valued at fair value less estimated point of sale costs, and agricultural produce is
valued at fair value less estimated point-of-sale costs at point of harvest. All consumables are charged
direct to expenditure.
10.
Property Plant and Equipment
(i)
Valuation
Asset Category
Valuation By
Frequency
Last Valuation
Land and buildings
Quotable Value New Zealand
Triennially
1 January 2006
Leasehold improvements
Valued at historical cost
Equipment and furniture
Valued at historical cost
Computers and research
Valued at historical cost
equipment
Motor vehicles
Valued at historical cost
Aircraft
Valued at historical cost
Library collection
Valued at historical cost
Land is valued at fair value on the basis of highest and best use.
Buildings (which include land improvements and reticulated services) are valued at depreciated
replacement cost on the basis of highest and best use.
39
Land and buildings were valued by Kerry Stewart FNZIV, FPINZ of Quotable Value New Zealand Limited.
Additions between valuations are recorded at cost.
Capital work in progress is valued on the basis of expenditure incurred and certified gross progress claim
certificates up to balance date.
The level at which individual assets are capitalised as property plant and equipment is $2,000.
(ii)
Depreciation
The depreciation rates used in the preparation of these statements are as follows:
Asset Class
Buildings
Leasehold improvements
Equipment and furniture
Computers and research equipment
Motor vehicles
Aircraft
Library collection (current use)
Depreciation Rate
15 to 100 years
10%
5%–33%
25%
20%–25%
6%
10%
Method
Straight line
Straight line
Straight line
Straight line
Straight line
Straight line
Straight line
Land, permanently retained library collections, art collections and archives are not depreciated.
Leasehold improvements are depreciated based upon their estimated useful life and the term of
lease.
Work in progress is not depreciated. The total cost of a project is transferred to the relevant asset
class upon completion and then depreciated.
(iii)
Crown-owned Assets
Crown owned land and buildings used by Massey University are included as part of Massey
University’s fixed assets. These were first recognised on 31 December 1989. Although legal title
has not been transferred, Massey University has assumed all the normal risks and rewards of
ownership.
(iv)
Impairment
The carrying values of property plant and equipment are reviewed for impairment when events
or changes in circumstances indicate the carrying value may not be recoverable. Massey University
has three cash-generating units, being the three main campuses. Impairment of property plant
and equipment is recognised when:
11.
•
replacement cost is identified as less than net book value
•
the carrying amount exceeds its recoverable amount
•
items of property plant and equipment become obsolete
•
damage occurs to property plant and equipment.
Employee Entitlements
Annual leave for academic and general staff has been accrued. In addition, an accrual has been made for
retirement gratuities for both academic and general staff and long-service leave for general staff. Both
retirement gratuities and long-service leave have been accrued on the following basis.
40
•
Leave and gratuities that have vested in the employee (an entitlement has been established) have
been measured at nominal value using remuneration rates current at reporting date. This is
included as a current liability.
•
Leave and gratuities that have not yet vested in the employee (no entitlement has been
established) have been measured using the present value measurement basis, which discounts
expected future cash outflows. This is treated as a non-current liability.
Duty leave overseas for academic staff has not been accrued as this leave is a commitment subject to
eligibility and is not an entitlement.
Sick leave has not been accrued as the University has a “Wellness Policy”, hence no sick leave is available
to carry forward.
Obligations for contributions to superannuation schemes are accounted for as defined contribution
schemes and are recognised as an expense in the statement of financial performance.
12.
Goods and Services Tax (GST)
The financial statements are prepared on a GST exclusive basis, with the exception of accounts receivable
and accounts payable.
13.
Taxation
Tertiary education institutions are exempt from the payment of income tax as they are treated by the
Inland Revenue Department as charitable organisations. Accordingly, no charge for income tax has been
provided for. Massey University’s subsidiaries are also exempt from paying income tax.
14.
Leases
Finance leases effectively transfer to Massey University substantially all the risks and benefits incidental to
ownership of the leased item. These are capitalised at the lower of fair value of the asset or the present
value of the minimum lease payments. The leased assets and corresponding lease liabilities are disclosed
and the leased assets are depreciated over the period Massey University is expected to benefit from their
use.
Operating lease payments, where the lessor effectively retains substantially all the risks and benefits
of ownership of the leased items, are included in the determination of the operating profit in equal
instalments over the lease term.
15.
Financial Instruments
Massey University classifies its financial assets into the following categories: financial assets at fair
value through profit or loss, loans and receivables, and financial assets at fair value through equity.
Management determines the classification of its investments at initial recognition and re-evaluates this
designation every reporting date. Financial assets are initially measured at fair value, with any transaction
costs being expensed immediately.
The fair value of financial instruments traded in an active market is based on quoted market prices as at
balance date. The quoted market price used is the current mid price.
The category of financial assets is: financial assets at fair value through profit and loss. A financial asset is
classified in this category if acquired principally for the purpose of selling in the short term. Assets in this
41
category are classified as current assets if they are expected to be realised within 12 months of balance
date.
Financial assets in this category include Massey University Foundation’s managed fund .
Loan and receivables.
These are non-derivative financial assets with fixed or determinable payments that are not quoted in an
active market. After initial recognition they are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest
method. Loans to third parties and receivables are classified as trade and other receivables in the balance
sheet. Bank deposits with a maturity of more than 3 months are classified as other financial assets.
Financial assets at fair value through equity.
Financial assets at fair value through equity are those financial assets that are not classified in either of the
above categories. This category encompasses shares held for strategic purposes. After initial recognition
these investments are measured at their fair value.
Massey University’s investment in its subsidiary and associate companies is held at cost.
At the end of each financial year Massey University assesses whether there is any impairment of its
financial assets; any impairment is written off to expenses in the Income Statement.
Borrowings
Borrowings are initially recognised at their fair value. After initial recognition, all borrowings are
measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method.
16.
Trade and Other Payables
Trade and other payables are carried at amortised cost. Due to their short-term nature they are not
discounted. They represent liabilities for goods and services provided to Massey University prior to the
end of the financial year that are unpaid, and arise when Massey University becomes obliged to make
future payments in respect of the purchase of these goods and services. The amounts are unsecured and
usually paid within 30 days of recognition.
17.
Borrowing Costs
Borrowing costs are recognised as an expense in the period in which they are incurred.
18.
Investment Property
Any property held that is not held to meet service delivery objectives is classified as investment property.
Investment property is measured initially at its cost, including transaction costs.
After recognition, Massey University measures all investment property at fair value as determined
annually by Kerry Stewart of Quotable Value New Zealand Limited. Gains or losses arising from a change
in fair value of an investment property are recognised in the Income Statement.
19.
Joint Ventures
A joint venture is a contractual arrangement whereby two parties undertake an economic activity that
is subject to joint control. For a jointly controlled entity Massey University recognises in its financial
statements assets it controls, the liabilities and expenses it incurs, and the share of income that it earns
from the joint venture.
42
INCOME STATEMENT
for the year ended 31 December 2007
University
Budget
2007
($000)
Notes
Government grants
Consolidated
Actual
2007
($000)
Actual
2006
($000)
Actual
2007
($000)
Actual
2006
($000)
1, 3
149,069
160,548
149,791
162,999
151,802
Student fees
3
116,435
107,816
111,103
108,833
111,951
Interest
3
2,823
6,274
4,086
6,244
4,370
Charges for services
3
90,151
95,476
88,751
96,908
89,753
3, 24
1,655
2,972
1,773
2,972
1,775
3, 4
-
1,260
(462)
1,260
(462)
360,133
374,346
355,042
379,216
359,189
212,329
217,976
211,758
221,710
215,281
Trust funds
Other gains/losses
Total Operating Revenue
Staff-related costs
Depreciation
Other direct costs
Finance costs
Trust funds
2, 5
2, 17
32,154
33,075
31,523
33,197
31,624
2,7
114,001
110,369
111,701
111,528
111,936
6
1,881
2,003
569
2,007
585
24
1,070
1,719
1,085
1,721
1,085
361,435
365,142
356,636
370,163
360,511
(1,302)
9,204
(1,594)
9,053
(1,322)
Total Cost of Operations
Net Surplus/(Deficit)
13
The Statement of Accounting Policies and Notes to the Financial Statements form part of and are to be read in
conjunction with these statements.
43
STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY
for the year ended 31 December 2007
University
Budget
2007
($000)
Notes
Consolidated
Actual
2007
($000)
Actual
2006
($000)
Actual
2007
($000)
Actual
2006
($000)
Public equity as at 1 January
839,045
854,343
846,462
854,575
846,422
Equity at 1 January
839,045
854,343
846,462
854,575
846,422
(1,302)
9,204
(1,594)
9,053
(1,322)
-
-
-
-
-
Impairments
-
(2,578)
-
(2,578)
-
Capital funding
-
-
9,475
-
9,475
Net surplus/(loss)
Increases/(decreases) in revaluation
Fair value – shares
Total Recognised Revenues and
Expenses for the Period
Public Equity as at 31 December
23
-
79
-
79
-
(1,302)
6,705
7,881
6,554
8,153
837,743
861,048
854,343
861,129
854,575
The Statement of Accounting Policies and Notes to the Financial Statements form part of and are to be read in
conjunction with these statements.
44
BALANCE SHEET
as at 31 December 2007
University
Consolidated
Notes
Budget
2007
($000)
Actual
2007
($000)
Actual
2006
($000)
Actual
2007
($000)
Actual
2006
($000)
10
27,085
50,043
34,268
51,383
35,548
Trade and other receivables
11
23,748
23,998
27,950
25,399
29,494
Inventories
12
1,000
1,163
1,266
1,254
1,271
Biological
13
3,465
3,580
3,612
3,580
3,612
Other financial assets
14
-
250
24,000
250
24,000
Non-current assets held for sale
15
ASSETS
Current Assets
Cash and cash equivalents
Total Current Assets
-
2,228
-
2,228
-
55,298
81,262
91,096
84,094
93,925
Non-current Assets
Investment property
16
3,000
3,272
3,168
3,272
3,168
Trade and other receivables
11
5,743
12,128
6,069
152
12
Other financial assets
14
8,660
17,928
2,930
28,777
7,834
Biological
13
500
499
547
499
547
Property plant and equipment
17
897,407
868,073
876,388
868,542
876,930
Total Non-current Assets
915,310
901,900
889,102
901,242
888,491
Total Assets
970,608
983,162
980,198
985,336
982,416
29,830
22,644
24,983
23,897
26,404
LIABILITIES AND EQUITY
Current Liabilities
Trade and other payables
18
Borrowings
19
500
377
8,045
377
8,095
Employee entitlements
20
16,200
19,117
14,638
19,177
14,702
Receipts in advance
21
38,846
29,860
35,346
30,625
35,776
85,376
71,998
83,012
74,076
84,977
19
22,489
25,023
17,802
25,023
17,818
Employee entitlements
20
25,000
24,010
23,925
24,025
23,930
Receipts in advance
21
-
1,083
1,116
1,083
1,116
Total Current Liabilities
Non-current Liabilities
Borrowings
Total Non-current Liabilities
Total Liabilities
Public equity
23
Total Liabilities and Public Equity
47,489
50,116
42,843
50,131
42,864
132,865
122,114
125,855
124,207
127,841
837,743
861,048
854,343
861,129
854,575
970,608
983,162
980,198
985,336
982,416
The Statement of Accounting Policies and Notes to the Financial Statements form part of and are to be read in
conjunction with these statements.
45
STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS
for the year ended 31 December 2007
University
Consolidated
Budget
2007
($000)
Actual
2007
($000)
Actual
2006
($000)
Actual
2007
($000)
Actual
2006
($000)
government grants
147,069
160,895
150,973
163,311
152,909
student income
116,435
123,203
132,618
124,195
133,403
Notes
CASHFLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES
Cash was provided from:
other income
90,149
80,757
69,568
84,504
72,059
interest on operating income
2,633
6,017
4,212
6,119
4,457
trust funds
1,655
2,048
482
2,048
482
357,941
372,920
357,853
380,177
363,310
327,197
329,533
321,850
336,893
326,078
1,933
1,912
598
1,925
614
329,130
331,445
322,448
338,818
326,692
28,811
41,475
35,405
41,359
36,618
Cash was applied to:
payments to employees and suppliers
interest paid
Net Cashflow from Operating Activities
8
CASHFLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES
Cash was provided from:
withdrawal of investments
-
9,000
2,007
9,010
2,007
11,800
502
198
502
198
11,800
9,502
2,205
9,512
2,205
purchase of investments
-
228
18,998
6,111
23,786
purchase of fixed assets
50,047
28,608
44,141
28,674
44,338
50,047
28,836
63,139
34,785
68,124
(38,247)
(19,334)
(60,934)
(25,273)
(65,919)
sale of fixed assets
Cash was applied to :
Net Cashflow from Investing Activities
The Statement of Accounting Policies and Notes to the Financial Statements form part of and are to be read in
conjunction with these statements.
46
University
Budget
2007
($000)
Notes
Consolidated
Actual
2007
($000)
Actual
2006
($000)
Actual
2007
($000)
Actual
2006
($000)
Cashflows from Financing Activities
Cash was provided from:
loans repaid
36
-
85
-
85
loans raised
-
-
27,475
232
27,547
911
447
267
483
272
Cash was applied to:
loans repaid
loans raised
Net Cashflow from Financing Activities
Net Increase /(Decrease) in Cash Held
Cash brought forward
Ending Cash Carried Forward
10
-
5,919
368
-
106
(875)
(6,366)
26,925
(251)
27,254
(10,311)
15,775
1,396
15,835
(2,047)
37,396
34,268
32,872
35,548
37,595
27,085
50,043
34,268
51,383
35,548
The Statement of Accounting Policies and Notes to the Financial Statements form part of and are to be read in
conjunction with these statements.
47
NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
for the year ending 31 December 2007
1.
Government Grants
The Ministry of Education provides income to the University by way of a grant, which is based on equivalent fulltime students (EFTS). Funding is provided by means of a tuition subsidy according to different cost categories
for the courses being offered.
2.
•
Cost of Operations
Staff-related costs – includes direct staff-related costs allocated to colleges, support services and regions.
Employee entitlements relating to actuarial calculations are shown separately.
•
Depreciation – includes all depreciation on all assets held by the University.
•
Other direct costs – includes all direct costs of operating and maintaining the University. It also includes the
cost of research, including salaries and wages.
3.
Revenue Disclosure
University
Consolidated
Actual
Actual
Actual
2007
2006
2007
Actual
2006
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
Government grants
Student
129,451
133,756
131,902
135,767
PBRF
31,097
16,035
31,097
16,035
Domestic students
65,711
60,713
66,728
61,561
International students
42,105
50,390
42,105
50,390
Research
59,384
52,349
59,384
52,349
Other
Student fees
Charges for services
36,092
36,402
37,524
37,404
Interest
6,274
4,086
6,244
4,370
Trust funds
2,972
1,773
2,972
1,775
Other gains/losses
1,260
(462)
1,260
(462)
374,346
355,042
379,216
359,189
Total Revenue
4.
Other Gains and (Losses)
University
Consolidated
2007
2006
2007
2006
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
Livestock fair value gains/(losses)
1,313
1,048
1,313
1,048
Forestry fair value gains/(losses)
(48)
(466)
(48)
(466)
33
40
33
40
Gain on disposal of equipment
Gains on changes in fair value of investment property
104
112
104
112
Foreign exchange gains/(losses)
(142)
(1,196)
(142)
(1,196)
Total Gains/(Losses)
1,260
(462)
1,260
(462)
48
5.
Staff-related costs
University
Salaries and wages
Superannuation
Long-service leave and retirement allowance
Consolidated
2007
2006
2007
2006
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
207,169
199,023
210,903
202,546
5,781
4,861
5,781
4,861
127
1,471
127
1,471
Other
4,899
6,403
4,899
6,403
Total
217,976
211,758
221,710
215,281
6.
Finance Costs
University
Consolidated
2007
2006
2007
2006
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
Interest Expenses
2,003
569
2,007
585
Total Finance Costs
2,003
569
2,007
585
7.
Income Statement Disclosures
University
The net surplus is after charging:
Consolidated
2007
2006
2007
2006
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
Audit fees
95
91
147
130
Audit fees for NZ IFRS transition
15
12
41
12
8
45
8
45
173
116
173
116
9
394
12
400
(279)
120
(287)
139
Other services provided by principal auditor
Internal audit fees
Bad debts written off
Increase/ (reduction) in provision for bad debts
Rental expense on operating leases
3,683
3,461
4,275
3,998
Other operating expenses
106,665
107,462
107,159
107,096
Total other expenses
110,369
111,701
111,528
111,936
49
8.
Reconciliation of the Net Surplus on Operations with the Net Cashflows from Operating Activities
University
Surplus /(deficit) on operations
Consolidated
2007
2006
2007
2006
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
9,204
(1,594)
9,053
(1,322)
33,075
31,563
33,197
31,624
Add non-cash items
Depreciation
Asset disposals
Investments
Bad debts
Decrease/Increase In annual leave prov
Total non-cash items
-
40
-
40
(104)
417
(101)
417
-
-
95
-
85
1,436
85
1,436
33,056
33,456
33,276
33,517
Movements in working capital
Decrease/(increase) in prepayments
Decrease/(increase) in trade and other receivables
Decrease /(increase) in stocks
Increase /(decrease) in accounts payable
Incease /(decrease) in receipts in advance
Total movement in working capital
Net Cashflow from Operating Activities
50
8
770
8
770
3,944
(3,008)
4,371
(4,365)
135
(335)
110
(340)
647
1,463
737
3,275
(5,519)
4,653
(6,196)
5,083
(785)
3,543
(970)
4,423
41,475
35,405
41,359
36,618
9.
Shares in Subsidiaries
Name of entity:
Creative Campus Enterprises Limited
Principal activity:
accommodation management
Ownership:
100%
Owner:
Massey University
Contribution:
$82,209 (2006: $43,340)
The fair value of Massey University’s investment in Creative Campus Enterprises Limited as approximated by the
net assets of the company as at 31 December 2007 is $(22,569) ($73,174 as at 31 December 2006).
Name of entity:
Massey Ventures Limited
Principal activity:
holding company
Ownership:
100%
Owner:
Massey University
Contribution:
($314,624) (2006: $93,259)
The fair value of Massey University’s investment in Massey University Ventures Limited as approximated by the
net assets of the company as at 31 December 2007 is $(531,823) ($353,873 as at 31 December 2006).
Name of entity:
Massey University Foundation
Principal activity:
investment
Ownership:
100%
Owner:
Massey University
Contribution:
$238,000 (2006: $217,000)
The fair value of Massey University’s investment in Massey University Foundation as approximated by the net
assets of the company as at 31 December 2007 is $474,000 (2006: $236,000).
10.
Cash and Cash Equivalents
University
Cash at bank and in hand
Consolidated
2007
2006
2007
2006
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
4,320
1,490
5,660
2,770
Short-term deposits with maturities of 3 months or less
45,723
32,778
45,723
32,778
Total cash and cash equivalents
50,043
34,268
51,383
35,548
The carrying value of short-term deposits with maturity dates of three months or less approximates their fair
value. Refer to Note 14 for weighted average effective rates for cash and cash equivalents.
Included in cash at bank and in hand were the following currencies:
United States of America
5,107
2,891
Australia
1,735
1,667
Great Britain
193
220
Euros
321
320
All currencies shown as valued in NZD as at 31 December.
51
11.
Accounts Receivable and Accruals
University
Trade debtors
Other amounts receivable
Related parties receivables
Prepayments
Loans
Loans to related parties
Less provision for doubtful debts
Consolidated
2007
2006
2007
2006
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
14,331
15,226
15,124
15,974
4,456
7,431
5,341
8,899
270
622
6
-
5,692
5,700
5,692
5,700
164
24
164
24
11,976
6,057
-
-
36,889
35,060
26,327
30,597
(763)
(1,041)
(776)
(1,091)
36,126
34,019
25,551
29,506
152
12
152
12
Loans to related parties
11,976
6,057
-
-
Total non-current portion
12,128
6,069
152
12
Current Portion
23,998
27,950
25,399
29,494
Less non-current portion
Loans
Loans to related parties are on call and at 0% interest, and approximate their fair value.
The carrying value of trade and other trade receivables (excluding loans to related parties) approximate their
fair value.
The age of trade debtors overdue, whose payment has not been negotiated, but not impaired, is as follows.
University
Consolidated
2007
2006
2007
2006
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
> 3 Months
2,127
2,280
2,148
2,298
Carrying amount
2,127
2,280
2,148
2,298
As at 31 December 2007 and 2006, all overdue receivables have been assessed for impairment and appropriate
provisions have been applied. Massey University does not hold any collateral as security or other credit
enhancements over receivables that are past due or impaired.
Movements in the provision for impairment of receivables are as follows.
University
At 1 January
Additions made during the year
Receivables written off during the year
At 31 December
52
Consolidated
2007
2006
2007
2006
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
1,041
806
1,091
806
114
1,050
80
1106
(392)
(815)
(395)
(821)
763
1,041
776
1,091
12.
Inventories
University
Consolidated
2007
2006
2007
2006
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
Material and stores
1,163
1,266
1,254
1,271
Total
1,163
1,266
1,254
1,271
The carrying amount of inventories held for distribution that are measured at current replacement cost as at
31 December 2007 amounted to $762,445 (2006 $751,717): The carrying amount of inventories pledged as
securities for liabilities is nil (2006 nil).
13.
Biological Assets
University
Consolidated
2007
2006
2007
2006
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
3,612
3,186
3,612
3,186
217
503
217
503
1,313
1,048
1,313
1,048
(1,562)
(1,125)
(1,562)
(1,125)
3,580
3,612
3,580
3,612
Opening balance
547
1,013
547
1,013
Gains/(losses) arising from changes in fair value
(48)
(466)
(48)
(466)
Closing Balance
499
547
499
547
3,580
3,612
3,580
3,612
499
547
499
547
4,079
4,159
4,079
4,159
Livestock
Opening balance
Increase due to purchase
Gains/(losses) arising from changes in fair value
Decreases due to sales
Closing Balance
Forestry
Current
Non-current
Total
Massey University owns 106 hectares of pinus radiata forest, which are at varying stages of maturity.
No forests have been harvested in this period (2006 nil). Forestry is valued as at 31 December using a model
supplied by an independent valuer. Massey University is not materially exposed to financial risks from changing
timber prices.
14.
Other Financial Assets
University
Consolidated
2007
2006
2007
2006
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
Current Portion
Loans and receivables
Short-term deposits with maturities of 4 - 12 months
250
24,000
250
24,000
Total Current Portion
250
24,000
250
24,000
53
Non-current Portion
Loans and receivables
Fair value through equity – shares
Fair value through income statement – managed fund
14,750
-
15,050
182
2,401
2,320
2,401
2,320
-
-
11,095
4,912
Unlisted shares
167
-
231
420
Shares in subsidiaries
610
610
-
-
17,928
2,930
28,777
7,834
Total Non-current Portion
There were no impairment provisions for other financial assets.
Unlisted shares: No market exists for the unlisted shares and these are shown at cost.
Maturity analysis and effective interest rate:
University
Consolidated
2007
2006
2007
2006
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
Short-term deposits with maturities of 3 months or less
45,723
32,778
45,723
32,778
Weighted average interest rate
8.64%
7.32%
8.64%
7.32%
250
24,000
250
24,000
8.76%
7.67%
8.76
7.67%
Short-term deposits with maturities of 4–12 months
Weighted average interest rate
Term deposits maturing between 1–2 years
Weighted average interest rate
Term deposits maturing after 2 years but less than 5 years
Weighted average interest rate
15.
9,000
-
9,000
-
8.92%
-
8.92%
-
5,750
-
5,750
-
8.64%
-
8.64%
-
60,723
56,778
60,723
56,778
Non-current Assets Held for Sale
University
Consolidated
2007
2006
2007
2006
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
Land
1,117
-
1,117
-
Buildings
1,111
-
1,111
-
Total Non-current Assets Held for Sale
2,228
-
2,228
-
Non-current assets held for sale are:
The Council approved the sale of Ruawharo Campus on 7 July 2006. The site was still used as a campus until
early 2007. The site is under contract subject to approval of certain changes to the zoning of the site being
approved by the local council. The approval process is likely to take some time, and it is hoped that the contract
will become unconditional during the ensuing year.
16.
Investment Property
University
Balance at 1 January
Fair Value gains on valuation
Balance at 31 December
Consolidated
2007
2006
2007
2006
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
3,168
3,056
3,168
3,056
104
112
104
112
3,272
3,168
3,272
3,168
Massey University investment properties are valued annually at fair value, effective 31 December. All investment
properties were valued based on open market evidence.
54
55
1,011,524
1,755
109,873
175
Furniture
Equipment
Implements
106,192
45,730
971,662
Work in progress
-
865,470
45,730
34,125
1,515
471
14
28,112
546
2,039
1,668
549,532
201,718
Carrying
Amount
01 Jan 2006
876,388
55,603
34,379
1,527
395
12
29,830
574
1,760
3,483
546,036
202,789
Carrying
Amount
01 Jan 2007
43,159
9,873
5,970
12
115
-
9,736
180
-
2,093
13,985
1,195
Additions
30,169
(22,314)
5,668
31
200
9
12,470
234
-
48
32,103
1720
Additions
3,297
-
-
-
169
-
2,831
8
165
-
-
124
Disposals at
Cost
3,808
-
-
-
120
-
1,260
-
70
-
1,355
1,003
Disposals at
Cost
Transfers from Work in Progress to the Asset Register were $52,483 (2006: $33,286).
19,926
1,515
54,051
Library
2,609
161
81,761
1,209
-
519
7
-
Accumulated
Depreciation
& Impairment
01 Jan 2006
25,642
Art
3,080
2,039
Aircraft
Vehicles
2,187
549,539
Buildings
Leasehold improvements
201,718
Land
Cost/
Valuation
01 Jan 2006
135,136
55,603
Work in progress
University 2006
-
60,021
Library
-
2,631
163
86,948
1,527
175
Implements
3,026
116,778
Equipment
1,353
Art
1,927
Furniture
114
797
17,488
-
Accumulated
Depreciation
& Impairment
01 Jan 2007
Vehicles
4,280
1,874
Aircraft
563,524
Leasehold improvement
202,789
Cost /
Valuation
01 Jan 2007
Buildings
University 2007
Property, Plant and Equipment
Land
17.
2,579
-
-
-
133
-
2,438
8
-
-
-
-
on Disposals
Depreciation
977
-
-
-
110
-
741
-
7
-
119
-
Depreciation
on Disposals
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Impairment
2,578
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2,578
-
Impairment
31,523
-
5,716
-
155
2
7,625
152
114
278
17,481
-
Depreciation
33,075
-
6,221
-
121
2
7,279
170
101
417
18,764
-
Depreciation
1,011,524
55,603
60,021
1,527
3,026
175
116,778
1,927
1,874
4,280
563,524
202,789
Cost/
Valuation
31 Dec 2006
1,035,307
33,289
65,689
1,558
3,106
184
127,988
2,161
1,804
4,328
591,694
203,506
Cost/
Valuation
31 Dec 2007
135,136
-
25,642
-
2,631
163
86,948
1,353
114
797
17,488
-
Accumulated
Depreciation
& Impairment
31 Dec 2006
167,234
-
31,863
-
2,642
165
93,486
1,523
208
1,214
36,133
-
Accumulated
Depreciation
& Impairment
31 Dec 2007
876,388
55,603
34,379
1,527
395
12
29,830
574
1,760
3,483
546,036
202,789
Carrying
Amount
31 Dec 2006
868,073
33,289
33,826
1,558
464
19
34,502
638
1,596
3,114
555,561
203,506
31 Dec 2007
Carrying
Amount
56
2,222
109,930
175
Furniture
Equipment
Implements
106,370
45,732
972,234
Work in progress
-
865,864
45,732
34,125
1,515
496
14
28,142
881
2,039
1,670
549,532
201,718
Carrying
Amount
01 Jan 2006
876,930
55,665
34,379
1,527
433
12
29,992
849
1,760
3,488
546,036
202,789
Carrying
Amount
01 Jan 2007
43,408
9,933
5,970
12
141
-
9,888
187
-
2,097
13,985
1,195
Additions
30,237
(22,367)
5,668
31
200
9
12,509
309
-
55
32,103
1,720
Additions
3,297
-
-
-
169
-
2,831
8
165
-
-
124
Disposals at
Cost
3,827
9
-
-
120
-
1,260
10
70
-
1,355
1,003
Disposals at
Cost
Transfers from Work in Progress to the Asset Register were $52,604 (2006: $33,475).
19,926
1,515
54,051
Library
2,628
161
81,788
1,341
-
519
7
-
Accumulated
Depreciation
& Impairment
01 Jan 2006
25,642
Art
3,124
2,039
Aircraft
Vehicles
2,189
549,539
Buildings
Leasehold improvements
201,718
Land
Cost /
Valuation
01 Jan 2006
55,665
1,012,345
Work in progress
Consolidated 2006
135,415
60,021
-
2,663
163
86,995
Library
175
Implements
1,527
116,987
Equipment
114
1,552
3,096
2,401
Furniture
Art
1,874
Aircraft
798
17,488
-
Accumulated
Depreciation
& Impairment
01 Jan 2007
Vehicles
4,286
563,524
Leasehold improvements
202,789
Buildings
Cost /
Valuation
01 Jan 2007
Land
Consolidated 2007
2,579
-
-
-
133
-
2,438
8
-
-
-
-
Depreciation
on Disposals
977
-
-
-
110
-
741
-
7
-
119
-
Depreciation
on Disposals
_
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Impairment
2,578
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2,578
-
Impairment
31,624
-
5,716
-
168
2
7,645
219
114
279
17,481
-
Depreciation
33,197
-
6,221
-
135
2
7,307
248
101
419
18,764
-
Depreciation
1,012,345
55,665
60,021
1,527
3,096
175
116,987
2,401
1,874
4,286
563,524
202,789
Cost/
Valuation
31 Dec 2006
1,036,177
33,289
65,689
1,558
3,176
184
128,236
2,700
1,804
4,341
591,694
203,506
Cost/
Valuation
31 Dec 2007
135,415
-
25,642
-
2,663
163
86,995
1,552
114
798
17,488
-
Accumulated
Depreciation
& Impairment
31 Dec 2006
167,635
-
31,863
-
2,688
165
93,561
1,800
208
1,217
36,133
-
Accumulated
Depreciation
& Impairment
31 Dec 2007
876,930
55,665
34,379
1,527
433
12
29,992
849
1,760
3,488
546,036
202,789
Carrying
Amount
31 Dec 2006
868,542
33,289
33,826
1,558
488
19
34,675
900
1,596
3,124
555,561
203,506
Carrying
Amount
31 Dec 2007
Impairment losses of $2,578,000 have been recognised for impairment of operational buildings that were
demolished or removed to make way for future campus developments. Massey University does not have any
financing leases.
Asset values included in the balance sheet as at 31 December 2007 include all land and buildings as occupied
and utilised by Massey University. The exception to this is the land on Riverside Farm (leased from Sydney
Campbell Foundation).
Legal ownership of land and buildings is detailed as follows (at balance sheet values).
i) Massey University owned
ii) Crown owned (includes buildings on Crown-owned land)
18.
2007
2006
2007
2006
Land
Land
Buildings
Buildings
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
107,321
106,674
334,068
329,514
96,185
96,115
221,493
216,522
203,506
202,789
555,561
546,036
Trade and Other Payables
University
Consolidated
2007
2006
2007
2006
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
Trade payables
993
676
1,089
821
Other payables
11,720
15,836
12,638
16,898
9,107
7,743
9,984
8,607
638
650
-
-
Accrued expenses
Amounts due to related parties
Building retentions
Total Trade Payables
186
78
186
78
22,644
24,983
23,897
26,404
Trade and other payables are non-interest bearing and are normally settled on 30 day terms. Therefore the
carrying value of trade and other payables approximates their fair value.
19.
Borrowings
University
Consolidated
2007
2006
2007
2006
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
Loans
377
8,045
377
8,095
Total Current Borrowings
377
8,045
377
8,095
Loans
25,023
17,802
25,023
17,818
Total Non-Current Borrowings
25,023
17,802
25,023
17,818
Current
Non-current
Fixed-rate debt: Massey University debt of $25,399,812 is issued at fixed rates of interest against which the BNZ
holds a registered mortgage over the Albany Campus.
Maturity analysis and effective interest rates:
Less than 1 year
377
8045
377
8,095
Weighted average interest rate
8.01%
6.60%
8.01%
6.60%
Later than 1 year but less than 5 years
25,023
17,802
25,023
17,818
Weighted average interest rate
7.69%
7.90%
7.69%
7.90%
Total Borrowings
25,400
25,847
25,400
25,913
57
Fair value on borrowings:
The fair values of non-current borrowings are as follows.
University
Fair value as at 31 December
Consolidated
2007
($000)
2006
($000)
2007
($000)
2006
($000)
25,021
25,748
25,021
25,798
Fair value of borrowings is calculated using the market rates of interest charged on similar loans as at 31
December.
20.
Employee Entitlements (Parent and Consolidated)
University
Consolidated
2007
2006
2007
2006
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
Accrued pay
718
-
718
-
Annual leave
17,396
13,862
17,456
13,926
Long service leave
1,102
1,185
1,117
1,190
Retirement gratuities
23,911
23,516
23,911
23,516
Total
43,127
38,563
43,202
38,632
Current
19,117
14,638
19,177
14,702
Non-current
24,010
23,925
24,025
23,930
Total
43,127
38,563
43,202
38,632
The long-service leave and retirement gratuities were independently assessed as at 31 December 2007 by Mr P.
Cosseboom FIA, a Fellow of the New Zealand Sociey of Actuaries with Eriksen & Associates.
An actuarial valuation involves the projection, on a year-by-year basis, of the long-service and retirement gratuities
liabilities, based on accrued services, in respect of current employees.
These liabilities are estimated in respect of their incidents according to assumed rates of death, disablement,
resignation and retirement allowing for assumed rates of salary progression. Of these assumptions, the discount,
salary progression and resignation rates are most important. The projected cashflow is then discounted back to
the valuation date at the valuation discounted rates.
Discount rates range from 7.43% to 5.72% for nine years and beyond (2006: 6.35% to 5.42%).
Salary progression allows for a 2.75% increase per year (2006: 2.75%).
The demographic assumptions were based on the experience of the Government Superannuation Fund.
58
21.
Receipts in Advance
University
Consolidated
2007
2006
2007
2006
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
Student fees
12,312
11,563
12,312
11,563
Receipts other
18,631
24,899
19,396
25,329
Total Receipts in Advance
30,943
36,462
31,708
36,892
Current
29,860
35,346
30,625
35,776
1,083
1,116
1,083
1,116
30,943
36,462
31,708
36,892
Non-current
Total Receipts in Advance
The current portion of receipts in advance is expected to be recognised as income during 2008. The carrying
value of current receipts in advance approximates their fair value. The noncurrent portion of receipts in advance
was discounted to net present value and approximates their fair value.
22.
Asset Revaluation Reserves (University)
2007
2006
($000)
($000)
340,083
340,083
(2,578)
-
337,505
340,083
Land & Buildings
Balance 1 January
Movement
Balance 31 December
23.
Public Equity
The University public equity is made up as follows.
Opening
Balance
01.01.07 ($000)
Trust funds
Asset revaluation reserves
Special reserves
Fair value to equity
Movements
($000)
Operating
Surplus/
Deficit
($000)
Closing
Balance
31.12.07
($000)
16,015
-
1,253
17,268
340,083
(2,578)
-
337,505
26,973
-
-
26,973
-
79
-
79
General reserves
471,272
-
7,951
479,223
Total
854,343
(2,499)
9,204
861,048
The consolidated public equity is made up as follows.
Opening
Balance
01.01.07
($000)
Trust funds
Asset revaluation reserves
Special reserves
Fair value to equity
Movements
($000)
16,017
-
340,083
26,973
Operating
Surplus/Deficit
($000)
Closing
Balance
31.12.07
($000)
1,251
17,268
(2,578)
-
337,505
-
-
26,973
-
79
-
79
General reserves
471,502
-
7,802
479,304
Total
854,575
(2,499)
9,053
861,129
59
24.
Trust Funds (University)
Opening
Balance
01.01.07
($000)
Helen Akers Bequest
Movement
($000)
Closing
Balance
31.12.07
($000)
860
(24)
836
MU Common Fund
8,779
1,216
9,995
Sasakawa Foundation
5,740
7
5,747
Delahunty Trust
483
42
525
Norwood Trust
64
5
69
A G East Memorial Trust
24
2
26
Tony Drakeford Memorial Trust
65
5
70
16,015
1,253
17,268
Total Trust Funds
Trust funds (parent and consolidated)
Consolidated
Opening
Balance
01.01.07
($000)
Helen Akers Bequest
Movement
($000)
Closing
Balance
31.12.07
($000)
860
(24)
836
MU Common Fund
8,779
1,216
9,995
Sasakawa Foundation
5,740
7
5,747
Delahunty Trust
483
42
525
Norwood Trust
64
5
69
A G East Memorial Trust
24
2
26
Tony Drakeford Memorial Trust
65
5
70
Other
Total Trust Funds
2
(2)
-
16,017
1,251
17,268
Although these items are trusts, Massey University has control over them and obtains benefits associated with
ownership of them. They have therefore been treated as equity in the Parent and Consolidated Statement of
Financial Position. Details of trust funds are as follows.
Helen Akers Bequest – funds bequeathed from the Estate of Helen Akers to provide scholarships for students.
Massey University Property Foundation – foundation established to support the Department of Finance, Banking
and Property Studies and the real estate industry.
Massey University Common Fund – pool of funds used for holding and paying out scholarships and prize monies to
students.
Sasakawa Foundation – scholarships provided from the Sasakawa Foundation, Japan, for students.
Delahunty Trust – trust fund established to provide research grants to foster primary industry accounting research
to students living in New Zealand.
Norwood Trust – prizes for students for achievements in trade courses.
A G East Memorial Trust – educational scholarships for technical and trade courses.
Tony Drakeford Memorial Trust – educational scholarships for commerce courses.
60
25.
Joint Venture
Massey University’s interest in the New Zealand School of Music (NZSM) joint venture is accounted for as a
jointly controlled entity.
Massey University’s interest in NZSM is as follows:
Consolidated
Current assets
Non-current assets
Current liabilities
Non-current liabilities
2007
2006
($000)
($000)
1,124
717
116
107
(715)
(640)
15
5
Income
3,605
2,981
Expense
3,274
3,052
Joint Venture Commitment and Contingencies
There were no commitments or contingent liabilities arising from Massey University’s involvement in the joint
venture.
26.
Council Members’ Fees Paid During 2007 Year
2007
2006
N. Gould
25,350
19,500
S. Kos
11,200
7,140
R. Ballard
8,960
8,160
A. Paterson
8,960
9,095
E. Hawes
4,000
2,805
P. Falloon
4,320
-
B. Ullrich
4,160
-
N. Love
3,040
2,040
V. Tawhai
4,000
-
S. Baragwanath
3,040
-
C. Kelly
4,000
2,805
M. Mullins
2,720
1,785
J. Clark
-
2,805
R. Hubbard
-
1,275
B. Tipene-Hook
-
E. Gordon
-
Total
83,750
61
2,805
7,140
67,355
27.
Related Party Information
Members of Council
During the year Massey purchased goods and services from, or sold goods and services to, the following.
•
Mr N. Gould, a Councillor of Massey University, is a shareholder and a director of the following
organisations :
-
Byrd Services Limited: sales to Massey University $34,151.50 (2006: $8,437.50); amount owing at year
end nil (2006: $2,812.5)
-
Communications Consultantants Limited: sales to Massey University $6,407.24 (2006: Nil); amount
outstanding at year end nil (2006: nil)
-
Infinity Solutions: sales to Massey University Nil (2006: $276.50); amount outstanding at year end nil
(2006: nil).
•
Professor N. Love, a Councillor of Massey University, is a trustee of the Wellington 10th Trust. Services
were supplied at a cost of $337,500(2006: $337,500) with nil (2006: nil) owing by Massey University at the
end of the year.
•
Land Corp Farming Ltd, of which Mr C. Kelly, a Councillor of Massey University, is CEO, purchased from
Massey University goods and services at a cost of $7,435.00 (2006: Nil); amount owing at year end was nil
(2006: nil).
•
Polybatics Ltd, of which Mr C. Kelly, a Councillor of Massey University, is a director, purchased from
Massey University goods and services at a cost of $14,625.00 (2006: nil); amount owing at year end was nil
(2006: nil)
•
AgITO, of which Mr C. Kelly, a Councillor of Massey University, is a director, purchased from Massey
goods and services at a cost of $721.00 (2006: nil); amount owing at year end was nil (2006: nil).
•
Bioprotection Technologies, of which Mr C. Kelly, a Councillor of Massey University, is a director,
purchased from Massey University goods and services at a cost of $648.00 (2006: nil); amount owing at
year end was nil (2006: nil).
•
Land Corp Farming Ltd, of which Mrs M. Mullins, a Councillor of Massey University, is a director,
purchased from Massey University goods and services at a cost of $7,435 (2006: nil); amount owing at
year end was nil (2006: nil).
All goods were supplied under normal commercial terms.
There were no transactions between Massey University and other Councillors.
62
Key Management Personnel
University
Consolidated
2007
2006
2007
2006
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
3,188,280
2,810,762
3,188,280
2,810,762
139,515
115,620
139,515
115,620
83,750
67,355
114,750
100,355
3,411,545
2,993,737
3,442,545
3,026,737
Remuneration
Short-term employment benefits
Post-employment benefits
Council Fees
Key personnel include the Council, Vice Chancellor and senior executive who report directly to the Vice
Chancellor.
Remuneration
Bands in $000
Number of
Staff
100–109
107
110–119
59
120–129
43
130–139
27
140–149
17
150–159
11
160–169
11
170–179
6
180–189
3
190–199
4
200–209
1
210–219
4
220–229
1
230–239
0
240–249
3
250–259
1
260–269
0
270–279
0
280–289
0
290 and over
0
298
The above table does not include the Vice-Chancellor’s income, which is reported directly to the SCC in their
annual return.
Material Related Party Transactions
Professor J. Chapman, a Pro Vice-Chancellor of Massey University, has an interest in Sterling Human Resources
Ltd, which provided goods and services to Massey Univerity at a cost of $161,912 (2006: $140,620).
The amount outstanding at balance date was nil (2006: nil). All goods were supplied under normal commercial
terms.
There were no other transactions between Massey University and key personnel.
63
The Crown
The Government influences the roles of the University as well as being a major source of revenue.
Creative Campus Enterprises Limited
Massey University charges interest at a wholesale deposit rate of + 1% to Creative Campus Enterprises Limited
on short-term funding. During the year Massey University entered into transactions with Creative Campus
Enterprises Limited. All transactions between the entities were conducted on an arm’s-length basis using
commercial terms.
Massey University charged Creative Campus Enterprises Limited $68,694 (2006: $107,737), including GST
for rental, power, gas, postage and salary of the General Manager. The amount owed to Massey University
by Creative Campus Enterprises Limited at the year end was $10,621 (2006: $14,392), payable under normal
trading terms.
Creative Campus Enterprises Limited charged Massey University $360,191 (2006: $370,891), including GST for
pastoral care services and nil for a contribution (2006: $300,000).
The amount owed to Creative Campus Enterprises Limited by Massey University at the end of the year was
$542,513 (2006: $619,203) being:
-
nil (2006: $70), which is payable on normal trading terms
-
$542,513 (2006: $619,203), comprising funds held by Massey University (largely investments), which
Creative Campus Enterprises Limited administer on behalf of the owners of Te Awhina and Drummond
Street apartments.
Estendart Limited
During the year Massey University entered into transactions with Estendart Limited. All transactions were
conducted on an arm’s-length basis using commercial terms.
Massey University charged Estendart Limited $108,961 (2006: $134,894), including GST for rental, postage,
insurance and fixed asset. The amount owed to Massey University by Estendart Limited at the year end was
$16,175 (2006: $57,320), payable under normal trading terms.
Estendart Limited charged Massey University $107,824 (2006: $151,751), including GST for professional
services.
The amount owed to Estendart Limited by Massey University at the end of the year was $46,252 (2006: $5,962),
payable under normal trading terms.
Massey University Ventures Limited
During the year Massey University entered into no transactions with Massey University Ventures Limited.
Massey University Ventures Limited has a loan from Massey University of $1,361,928 (2006: $1,090,884 ).
Massey University Foundation
During the year Massey University received from Massey University Foundation $494,000 (2006: $235,000),
being a return on funds managed by Massey University Foundation.
New Zealand School of Music (NZSM) Limited
During the year Massey University entered into transactions with NZSM Limited. All transactions were
conducted on an arm’s-length basis using commercial terms.
64
Massey University charged NZSM Limited $2,781,000 (2006: $2,977,000), including GST for rental, postage,
salaries, computing, communication, printing, consumables, payroll and financial services. The amount owed
to Massey University by NZSM Limited at the year end was $425,000 (2006: $1,043,000), payable under normal
trading terms.
NZSM Limited charged Massey University $230,000 (2006: $84,000), including GST for music performance and
other music-related services.
The amount owed to NZSM Limited by Massey University at end of year was $113,000 (2006: $42,000), payable
under normal trading terms.
Massey University provided an equity contribution in cash of nil (2006: $250,000).
E-Centre Limited
During the year Massey University entered into transactions with E-Centre Limited. All transactions were
conducted on an arm’s-length basis using commercial terms.
Massey University charged E-Centre Limited $252,802 (2006: $288,730), including GST for rental, security
and cleaning. The amount owed to Massey University by E-Centre Limited at the year end was $25,280 (2006:
$28,960), payable under normal trading terms.
E-Centre Limited charged Massey University $750 (2006: $187,679), including GST, for NZTE funds,
consumables and contract services.
The amount owed to E-Centre Limited by Massey University at the end of the year was $750 (2006: $3,812),
payable under normal trading terms.
28.
Statement of Commitments
Projected Total
Expenditure
Unspent
Cost of Project
to 31.12.07
Commitment
($000)
($000)
($000)
Total Project Commitments 2007
33,145
18,979
14,166
Total Project Commitments 2006
78,608
70,161
8,447
In addition, the University had operating commitments in respect of service contracts, leases of land, buildings
and equipment, and photocopier rental as follows.
University
Actual
Due not later than 1 year
Due later than 1 year and not later than 5 years
Due later than 5 years
Total
65
Actual
Consolidated
Actual
Actual
2007
2006
2007
2006
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
6,025
6,399
6,236
6,409
11,492
10,985
12,265
11,013
4,823
4,108
5,403
4,108
22,340
21,492
23,904
21,530
29.
Statement of Contingent Liabilities
As at 31 December 2007 Massey University had the following contingent liabilities (University and
Consolidated).
There were 10 employee contractual claims against the University proceeding as at 31 December 2007 (2006: nil
claims). Contingent liability is assessed at $187,500(2006: nil).
Two students have lodged separate claims against the University. The University is defending its position.
Contingent liability is assessed at nil (2006: nil).
30.
Post Balance Date Events
There are no significant post balance date events (2006: nil).
31.
Financial Instrument Risks
Massey University has a series of policies to manage risks associated with financial instruments. Massey University
is risk averse and seeks to minimise exposure from Treasury activities. Massey University has established Councilapproved liability management and investment policies. These policies do not allow any transactions that are
speculative in nature to be entered into.
Market Risk
Credit Risk
Credit risk is the risk that a third party will default on its obligation to Massey University, causing Massey
University to incur a loss. Massey University has no significant concentrations of credit risk as it has a large
number of credit customers, mainly students.
Massey University invests funds only in deposits with registered banks, and its investment policy limits the
amount of credit exposure to any one bank. Investment funds are spread over a number of banks and vary
between short and long term.
Maximum exposures to credit risk at balance date are:
University
Consolidated
2007
2006
2007
2006
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
Bank deposits
65,043
58,268
66,683
59,548
Receivables and prepayments
23,986
27,938
25,387
29,482
3,178
2,930
2,632
2,740
Investments – shares
The above maximum exposures are net of any recognised provision for losses on these financial instruments. No
collateral is held on the above amounts.
Liquidity Risk
Liquidity risk is the risk that Massey University will encounter difficulty raising funds to meet commitments as
they fall due. Prudent liquidity risk management implies maintaining sufficient cash and ensuring the availability
of funding through an adequate amount of committed credit facilities. Massey University aims to maintain
flexibility in funding by keeping committed credit lines available.
66
Massey University aims at having a minimum cash holding of $20million, together with the availability of
undrawn facilities of $30million.
Massey University manages its borrowings in accordance with its funding and financial polices.
The maturity profiles of Massey University’s interest-bearing investments are disclosed in note 14.
Currency Risk
Currency risk is the risk that the value of a financial instrument will fluctuate due to changes in foreign
exchange rates.
Massey University minimises this risk over expenditure by holding funds in the major currencies that it does
business in, in foreign currency accounts. The amount on deposit is determined by the amount that is expected
to be incurred against that currency over the next 12 months. Holdings of foreign currencies are disclosed in
note 10.
Where a one-off major capital expense involving foreign currency is identified, then a review of current trends
and amount held in that currency is undertaken. If appropriate, then forward cover may be undertaken.
Interest Rate Risks
The interest rates on Massey University’s investments are disclosed in note 14 and borrowings note 19.
Fair value interest rate risk
Fair value interest rate risk is the risk that the fair value of a financial instrument will fluctuate due to changes
in market rates. Massey University is limited by statute in its ability to manage this risk. If interest rates on
investments had fluctuated by plus or minus 0.5%, the effect would have been to increase/decrease the surplus
by $420,000. Interest rates on borrowings are fixed and not subject to fluctuation for the duration of the fixed
maturity chosen.
Cashflow Interest Rate Risk
Cashflow interest rate risk is the risk that cashflows from a financial instrument will fluctuate because of changes
in market rates. Borrowings and investments made at variable interest rate risk expose Massey University to
cashflow interest rate risk. Apart from some deposits at call for liquidity purposes, Massey University does not
have any variable interest rates.
Other Price Risk
Other Price risk is the risk that the value of a financial instrument will fluctuate as a result of market changes in
market price. Massey University does not hold any other financial instruments of significance subject to this risk.
32.
Critical Accounting Estimates and Assumptions
In preparing the financial statements Massey University has made estimates and assumptions concerning
the future. These estimates and assumptions may differ from the subsequent actual results. Estimates and
judgements are continually evaluated based on historical experience and other factors, including expectations
or future events that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances. There were no estimates or
assumptions that will have a significant impact on the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities within the next
financial year.
67
33.
Critical Judgements in Applying Massey University Accounting Policies
Management has exercised the following critical judgements in applying Massey University policies for the year
ended 31 December 2007.
Impairment of Trade Receivables
Trade debtors have been reviewed fully and impairments provided as necessary.
Impairment of Property Plant and Equipment
When considering whether any impairment of property plant and equipment existed, the cash-generating
unit for Massey University is taken to be at campus level. At balance date a review was undertaken and no
impairments were disclosed.
Long-service Leave and Retirement Gratuities
In order to assess Massey University’s liability in respect of long-service leave and retirement gratuities, an
actuarial report was prepared by Eriksens Actuarial in accordance with NZ IAS 19. (Refer to Note 20 for
assumptions).
34. Transition to NZ IFRS
Massey University’s financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2007 are the first financial statements
that comply with NZ IFRS. Massey University has applied NZ IFRS in preparing these financial statements.
Massey University’s transition date is 1 January 2006. Massey University prepared its opening NZ IFRS balance
sheet at that date. The reporting date of these financial statements is 30 December 2007. Massey NZ IFRS
adoption date is 1 January 2007.
In preparing these consolidated financial statements in accordance with NZ IFRS 1, Massey University has
applied the mandatory exceptions and certain optional exemptions from full retrospective applications of NZ
IFRS.
Massey University has applied the business combination exemptions in NZ IFRS 1. It has not restated business
combinations that took place prior to the 1 January 2006 transition date.
Massey University elected to apply deemed cost to all classes of property, plant and equipment, except for land
and building, which it will continue to value as required.
Estimates under NZ IFRS as at 1 January are consistent with estimates made for the same date under previous
NZ GAAP.
68
Reconciliation to Equity
The following table shows the changes in equity resulting from NZ GAAP to NZ IFRS as at 1 January 2006 and 31
December 2006.
Reconciliation of Equity
University
Notes
GAAP
1 January
2006
($000)
Variance
($000)
University
IFRS
1 January
2006
($000)
GAAP
31 December
2006
($000)
Variance
($000)
IFRS
31 December
2006
($000)
ASSETS
Current Assets
Cash and cash equivalents
26,372
-
26,372
34,268
-
34,268
Trade and other receivables
25,748
-
25,748
27,950
-
27,950
Inventories
1,357
-
1,357
1,266
-
1,266
Biological
3,186
-
3,186
3,612
-
3,612
Other financial assets
8,500
-
8,500
24,000
-
24,000
Total Current Assets
65,163
-
65,163
91,096
-
91,096
2,082
974
3,056
3,056
112
3,168
5,508
-
5,508
6,069
-
6,069
8,312
-
8,312
2,930
-
2,930
410
603
1,013
417
130
547
Non-current assets
Investment property
1
Trade and other receivables
Other financial assets
Biological
Property, plant and equipment
2
621,182
244,288
865,470
876,348
40
876,388
Total Non-current assets
3, 4
637,494
245,865
883,359
888,820
282
889,102
Total Assets
702,657
245,865
948,522
979,916
282
980,198
LIABILITIES AND EQUITY
Current Liabilities
Cash and bank
Trade and other payables
5
Borrowings
Employee entitlements
Receipts in advance
8
Total Current Liabilities
-
-
-
-
-
-
23,641
-
23,641
24,348
635
24,983
267
-
267
8,045
-
8,045
16,007
-
16,007
14,638
-
14,638
37,624
(5,815)
31,809
42,326
(6,980)
35,346
77,539
(5,815)
71,724
89,357
(6,345)
83,012
Non-current liabilities
Borrowings
6
Employee entitlements
Receipts in advance
7
7,847
-
7,847
27,277
(9,475)
17,802
22,489
-
22,489
23,925
-
23,925
-
-
-
1,106
10
1,116
30,336
-
30,336
52,308
(9,465)
42,843
107,875
(5,815 )
102,060
141,665
(15,810)
125,855
Valuation reserves
101,805
238,278
340,083
346,723
(6,640)
340,083
Other equity
492,977
13,402
506,379
491,528
22,732
514,260
Public equity
594,782
251,680
846,462
838,251
16,092
854,343
Total Liabilites and Public Equity
702,657
245,865
948,522
979,916
282
980,198
Total Non-current Liabilities
Total Liabilites
69
Consolidated
Notes
GAAP
1 January
2006
($000)
Variance
($000)
Consolidated
IFRS
1 January
2006
($000)
GAAP
31 December
2006
($000)
Variance
($000)
IFRS
31 December
2006
($000)
ASSETS
Current Assets
Cash and cash equivalents
26,473
-
26,473
35,548
Trade and other receivables
-
35,548
26,441
-
26,441
29,494
-
29,494
Inventories
1,479
-
1,479
1,271
-
1,271
Biological
3,186
-
3,186
3,612
-
3,612
Other financial assets
13,122
-
13,122
24,000
-
24,000
Total Current Assets
70,701
-
70,701
93,925
-
93,925
2,082
974
3,056
3,056
112
3,168
526
-
526
12
-
12
7,952
-
7,952
7,834
-
7,834
Non-current Assets
Investment property
1
Trade and other receivables
Other financial assets
Biological
2
410
603
1,013
417
130
547
3, 4
621,575
244,288
865,863
876,890
40
876,930
Total Non-current Assets
632,545
245,865
878,410
888,209
282
888,491
Total Assets
703,246
245,865
949,111
982,134
282
982,416
-
-
-
-
-
-
24,095
-
24,095
25,769
635
26,404
305
-
305
8,095
-
8,095
16,091
-
16,091
14,702
-
14,702
Property, plant and equipment
LIABILITIES AND EQUITY
Current Liabilities
Cash and bank
Trade and other payables
5
Borrowings
Employee entitlements
Receipts in advance
8
Total Current Liability
37,625
(5,815)
31,810
42,756
(6,980)
35,776
78,116
(5,815)
72,301
91,322
(6,345)
84,977
7,899
-
7,899
27,293
(9,475)
17,818
22,489
-
22,489
23,930
-
23,930
-
-
-
1,106
10
1,116
Non-current Liabilities
Borrowings
6
Employee entitlements
Receipts in advance
Total Non-current Liabilities
7
30,388
-
30,388
52,329
(9,465)
42,864
108,504
(5,815)
102,689
143,651
(15,810)
127,841
Valuation reserves
101,811
238,272
340,083
346,730
(6,647)
340,083
Other equity
492,931
13,408
506,339
491,753
22,739
514,492
Public equity
594,742
251,680
846,422
838,483
16,092
854,575
Total Liabilites and Public Equity
703,246
245,865
949,111
982,134
282
982,416
Total Liabilites
70
Reconciliation of Surplus for the Year Ended 31 December 2006
University
Notes
Previous
GAAP
31 December
($000)
Transition
Adjustment
($000)
Consolidated
NZIFRS
GAAP
31 December
($000)
Previous
GAAP
31 December
($000)
Transition
Adjustment
($000)
NZIFRS
GAAP
31 December
($000)
Government grants
149,791
-
149,791
151,802
-
151,802
Student fees
111,103
-
111,103
111,951
-
111,951
Interest
Charges for services
7, 8
Trust funds
Other gains/losses
Total Operating Revenue
Staff-related Cost
Depreciation
4
Other direct costs
1, 2, 5
Finance costs
Trust funds
Total cost of operations
Net Surplus/ (Deficit)
4,086
-
4,086
4,370
-
4,370
87,596
1,155
88,751
88,598
1,155
89,753
1,773
-
1,773
1,775
-
1,775
(462)
-
(462)
(462)
-
(462)
353,887
1,155
355,042
358,034
1,155
359,189
211,758
-
211,758
215,281
-
215,281
31,563
(40)
31,523
31,664
(40)
31,624
110,704
997
111,701
110,939
997
111,936
569
-
569
585
-
585
1,085
-
1,085
1,085
-
1,085
355,679
957
356,636
359,554
957
360,511
(1,792)
198
(1,594)
(1,520)
198
(1,322)
Notes
1
Investment property previously shown under property plant and equipment are now shown separately,
hence the opening balance in 2005 of $3,056. Investment property is valued each December at current
market value.
2
Biological assets include forestry, which is valued each December at fair value by a valuer. Forestry was
previously shown under property plant and equipment, hence the opening balance in 2005 of $410.
3
On the date of transition the University had land and buildings revalued, resulting in the large shift from
GAAP to IFRS in January 2006.
4
Under GAAP investment property was maintained under Property Plant and Equipment in 2006 and
depreciated accordingly; under IFRS the depreciation on investment property was reversed.
5
During 2006 a forward cover contract to purchase US$3,000,000 was entered into by Massey University.
This contract was fair valued at the end of December 2006.
6
In late 2006 TEC paid Massey University $9,475,000. Under GAAP this was treated as an interest-free term
loan, but under IFRS it has been moved to equity.
7
In late 2006 a long-term term rental was entered into. Due to the long duration of the lease the revenue
of $10,000 has been added back, annualising the income in line with Massey University’s financial year.
8
Research income in advance was adjusted due to the amended policy that resulted from the adoption of
IFRS.
71
MASSEY UNIVERSITY MISSION
(Excerpt from the Massey University Charter)
1.1 Massey University is committed to meeting the needs of New Zealand and New Zealanders, enhancing
access to university study for diverse populations, preparing students for life-long learning, and meeting
international standards of excellence in research and teaching. Massey University is an integrated
multi-campus institution of higher learning that creates new knowledge and understanding; synthesises,
applies and disseminates knowledge; develops advanced learning and scholarly abilities for a national
and international student body; and promotes free and rational inquiry. We offer high-quality learning
experiences that empower people and their communities to prosper in an increasingly knowledgedependent and technologically advanced world.
1.2 Massey University is driven by a spirit of community relevance and engagement, while maintaining
intellectual independence. We will use our multi-campus structure to meet the needs of our constituent
regional communities, while our flexible delivery and distance (extramural) education capabilities give a
national and international reach to our educational programmes.
1.3 Massey University recognises and respects the significance of mana whenua within its regions and the range
of Mäori organisations contributing to Mäori development and advancement. We have demonstrated our
commitment to Mäori development by providing Mäori academic leadership, research opportunities and
educational qualifications that assist in the achievement of Mäori aspirations.
1.4 Our integrated academic structures and organisational arrangements enable and support interdisciplinary
and cross-disciplinary research and academic programmes. We pride ourselves on the relevance of our
programmes; on our openness to students of diverse backgrounds spanning age, geographic location,
educational background, ethnicity and culture; on the support we provide for our students; and on the
relationship we have built with our alumni.
STATEMENT OF SERVICE PERFORMANCE
PERFORMANCE REVIEW
The Massey University Profile 2007 – 2009 states specific performance indicators and measures under each of the
University’s eight primary aim headings. These are reported on in the Statement of Service Performance. The
Appendices provide additional information and detail on the University’s profile.
PRIMARY AIM HEADINGS
The eight primary aims of Massey University are:
•
Research and Creative Works
•
Teaching and Learning
•
Treaty of Waitangi
•
Students
•
Staff
•
The University and the Wider Community
•
Internationalisation
•
Organisation and Management.
Goals and objectives stated at the beginning of each primary aim section are excerpts from the Massey University
10 Year Plan (Strategic Plan).
72
RESEARCH AND CREATIVE WORKS
GOALS
1.
To advance the reputation and performance of Massey University as a research university of international
standing.
2.
To strengthen our contribution to New Zealand’s economic, social and cultural advancement, through
excellent, accessible and relevant research, scholarship and creative work.
OBJECTIVES
1.
To encourage research, scholarship and creative work in the University’s chosen disciplines in the pursuit of
academic excellence and to recognise and reward outstanding achievement.
2.
To build the overall research capability of the University by :
•
ensuring all campuses and colleges attain and maintain a high proportion of staff who are research active
and qualified doctorally or with the appropriate terminal degree for the discipline
•
providing researchers with infrastructure and support of international standard
•
identifying and nurturing new or emerging areas of research, relevant to our overall strategy
•
promoting collaborative arrangements, innovative research, and technology transfer aimed at improving the
economic performance, social well-being and sustainable development of our regions and New Zealand
•
measuring research excellence, relevance and accessibility through regular, systematic benchmarking
against national priorities and international standards
•
placing a high priority on the commercialisation of intellectual property and the growth of external
research funding from government, industry and international sources
•
increasing the numbers of students undertaking postgraduate research programmes and the level of
scholarship and other support available to them
•
placing a greater emphasis on the professional development of staff who are able to lead and direct research
programmes and research teams and on staff who are willing to work in collaborative research teams
•
establishing at an international standard, four to five Centres of Research Excellence, and to establish at a
national standard, six to ten Centres of Research Excellence
•
ensuring that all research is conducted to the University’s protocols and ethical standards
•
augmenting and enhancing research into all aspects of the environment, across a range of disciplines.
PERFORMANCE 2007
Massey University’s ongoing commitment to focus excellence in research and creative works and researchteaching has been acknowledged through the latest national Performance-Based Research Funding (PBRF)
round, in which we achieved the third highest number of research-active staff in the sector, ranked in the top
three in 13 subject areas, were one of the two universities to improve its national institutional ranking, and came
second in showing the greatest improvement in institution quality score.
The second major research success was marked by the opening of Manawatu Microscopy and Imaging Centre
(MMIC), which was opened by the Prime Minister in August 2007. The University received $1.5 million from the
Innovation and Development Fund for the establishment of the centre.
73
Another highlight for 2007 was the announcement by the Government in June that there was only one addition
to the existing national Centres of Research Excellence – the Riddet Centre hosted by Massey University. New
Zealand’s food industry will be a major recipient of innovation generated from this centre. This reflects the
University’s commitment to world-class research in pursuit of economic development.
Our commitment to growing our research capability has been recognised in the University’s Investment Plan
(developed in 2007), with three key initiatives focusing on research and commercialisation. Over the next
three years the University is committed to extending its research focus on business and land-based disciplines
and continuing to build capability in areas that contribute to New Zealand’s economic and social growth. The
inclusion of these initiatives in the University’s strategic planning documents provides guidance and direction
for the coming years.
Performance Indicators
Target 2007:
Outcome/Progress 2007:
A1
Develop and implement
Achieved – ongoing
college-based research
Highlights:
improvement plans to
The second cycle of planning is now underway. The University’s
support the achievement
internal funding allocations for supporting research are currently
of a targeted research
under review to assist colleges give effect to the research capability
profile of staff.
initiatives set out within their respective College Research Management
Plans. A proposal for a set of new research support mechanisms has
been developed and will be implemented for 2008 after being approved
by Vice-Chancellor’s Executive Committee.
In the College of Creative Arts, staff research plans are developed
annually by all research staff. Planning tools are in place to assist
planning and forecast for potential 2012 PBRF scores.
In the College of Education, research clusters have been established
to assist with the mentoring of staff and to increase the number of
research active staff.
A2
Continue the Advanced
Under review
Degree Award programme
This is now under review and may be changed in order to more
to assist staff to complete
effectively achieve goals set out in the University’s Strategic Policy on
research qualifications,
Research Capability and associated College Research Management
with a view to increasing
Plans.
the proportion of staff who
are doctorally qualified
or hold an appropriate
terminal degree for the
discipline.
74
A3
Continue to encourage
Under review
comprehensive research
This is now under review and may be changed in order to more
endeavour of a high
effectively achieve goals set out in the University’s Strategic Policy on
standard through access
Research Capability and associated College Research Management
to internal research funds,
Plans.
and increased support
for researchers applying
to external research
funds through mentoring
schemes.
A4
Continue to support
Achieved
the Massey University
Highlights:
Research Medals to
The Massey University Excellence in Research & Teaching Awards Gala
celebrate staff success in
Dinner was held on Thursday, 25 October 2007, at the Grand Hall,
research, team research
Parliament Buildings, Wellington.
and research and training,
and to acknowledge new
emerging researchers.
The Research Medals recognise the University’s élite researchers and
their outstanding contributions in their particular disciplines.
Research awards were made for the following:
A5
•
2007 Research Medal Awards:
-
Outstanding Individual Researcher
-
Outstanding Supervisor
-
Outstanding Research Team
•
2007 Early Career Medals.
Build on the University’s
Achieved
current areas of research
Highlights:
strength and excellence
The Graduate Research Fund, which assists postgraduate students, has
by funding of research
been established.
infrastructure and
postgraduate research
scholarships and provision
Funding has been secured to support the development of the Centre of
Excellence for Children’s Literacy at the Auckland campus.
of other resources, in
Positions have been appointed within each college to develop and
a manner consistent
support research activities.
with the University’s
positioning strategy
and campus positioning
strategies therein.
A6
Implement Partnership
Achieved
for Excellence Projects in
Highlights:
the agriculture and equine
The Agriculture & Life Sciences Trust was formed and trustees were
industries, building on the
appointed. A draft strategic plan was prepared, in consultation with all
collaborative opportunities
partners, and the strategic priorities were approved.
with Lincoln University
(in the agriculture
project) and private sector
partners.
75
A7-1
Renew and strengthen
Achieved
research technology
The Hopkirk Research Institute was opened by the Honourable Steve
transfer collaborative
Maharey (Minister for Research, Science & Technology and Minister
initiatives with Crown
of Crown Research Institutes) in March 2007. The Institute houses
Research Institutes and
over 70 research staff from AgResearch and Institute of Veterinary,
economic agencies,
Animal & Biomedical Sciences, who will explore the frontiers of animal
and in particular
health research, particularly in the areas of parasitic diseases, infectious
support AgResearch in
diseases and veterinary public health. This initiative, together with
the establishment of
the Bio-Commerce Centre, provides tremendous opportunities for the
an optimal expanded
development of new research and commercialisation.
presence in Palmerston
North at the Hopkirk
Research Institute.
A7-2
Renew and strengthen
Achieved – ongoing
research technology
Highlights:
transfer collaborative
A Joint Venture Agreement was signed between Massey University,
initiatives with Crown
Speirs Foods, the Riddet Centre, and the BioCommerce Centre to
Research Institutes and
form a consortium called Speirs Nutritionals. The company will
economic agencies, and in
internationally market a new kind of omega3 emulsion that can be
particular continue input
added to other foods without the lingering taste and smell of fish.
to the development of the
Manawatu Bio-Commerce
Centre in collaboration
with Vision Manawatu and
Crown Research Institutes continue to interface with Massey University
through joint research projects and co-supervision of postgraduate
students.
Palmerston North-based
Crown Research Institutes.
A7-3
Renew and strengthen
Achieved – ongoing
research technology
Highlights:
transfer collaborative
Discussion was held with Auckland University and Ministry of Economic
initiatives with Crown
Development staff on collaboration between Massey University Smales
Research Institutes and
Farm and the Auckland Innovation Centre at the Tamaki Campus.
economic agencies and
in particular: -continue
to support the e-Centre
initiative on the Albany
The University’s close relationship with Enterprise North Shore and the
North Shore City Council has developed further through 2007, and the
network of industry partners has increased.
campus in collaboration
with the North Shore
City Council and industry
partners.
76
A7-4
Renew and strengthen
Achieved
research technology
Highlights:
transfer collaborative
The Joint Centre for Disaster Research established with the Institute
initiatives with Crown
of Geological and Nuclear Sciences (GNS) in 2006 now has seven PhD
Research Institutes and
students and in 2007 attracted five research grants directly or through
economic agencies and
GNS.
in particular: -expand
collaborative Creative
Capital initiatives with
Wellington City Council
and Victoria University of
Wellington.
A7-5
A project committee has been set up with representation from Massey
University, Victoria University of Wellington (VUW), New Zealand
School of Music (NZSM) and Wellington City Council to progress the
NZSM building in Civic Square. A spectacular NZSM concert in the
Wellington Town Hall was enthusiastically reviewed.
Renew and strengthen
Achieved
research technology
Highlights:
transfer collaborative
The BRCSS project has established offices on Wellington campus.
initiatives with Crown
Research Institutes and
economic agencies and
in particular: -continue to
The College of Humanities and Social Sciences has provided significant
support for the requirements of this project, especially with the Access
Grid.
host the research network
for Building Research
Capability in the Social
Sciences (BRCSS) in
partnership with five other
tertiary institutions and a
private research agency.
A7-6
Renew and strengthen
Achieved
research technology
Highlights:
transfer collaborative
The relatively new Kiwi Advanced Research and Education Network
initiatives with Crown
(KAREN) has been well utilised, and the University has applied for a
Research Institutes and
number of government grants to build capability in this area to ensure
economic agencies and
the University uses this technology to best advantage.
in particular: -support
the development of New
Zealand’s advanced
research network to
link New Zealand to
international research
communities.
A8
Plan for, and commence
Achieved – ongoing:
establishment of, the
Highlights:
Institute for Advanced
The New Zealand Institute for Advanced Study (NZIAS) was launched
Study to be located on the
during 2007.
Albany Campus.
77
A9
A10
Continue development
Achieved
and strengthening of
Highlights:
the University Graduate
In 2007 the Graduate Research School, in conjunction with the
Research School,
University’s Training and Development Unit (TDU), held supervisor
established in 2004
workshops and “Taking Charge of Your Doctorate.”
to provide support to
workshops for students on each campus. A handbook for Doctoral
University research
Examination Convenors which builds on the Handbook for Doctoral Study,
supervisors and research
has also been printed. It is useful for convenors, supervisors, and
students.
students.
Implement the
Achieved
recommendations of the
Highlights:
institutional research
The focus of this project is now directed at two key institutional
project in the area of
information management systems (Research Information Management
postgraduate (including
System and Student Management System) and associated processes.
research degrees)
The project team is now looking at system changes to give effect to
enrolments, retention and
critical aspects of this project.
completions.
A11
Encourage the
Achieved
development of Mäori
Highlights:
research teams in all
Through the activities of Te Mata o Te Tau, The Academy for Mäori
colleges.
Research and Scholarship, Mäori research centres across the University
have been supported. Activities undertaken include:
•
in partnership with Research Management Services, providing
targeted communications on Mäori research opportunities
•
providing database training on the CoS Research database
•
encouraging cross-university research synergies by coordinating and
supporting Manu Ao (See C 21 in the “Treaty of Waitangi” section).
A12
Complete implementation
Achieved
of the RIMS project,
Highlights:
initiated in 2004 to
The RIMS system has been implemented in Research Management
update and integrate the
Services, the Graduate Research School and the colleges and has
University’s various systems
been integrated with the finance, HR and student systems. Reporting
for the management of
on research activity is now an “all in one” place for the researchers.
research and consultancy
Collection and entry of publication information is now routine, and
activity across the
the RIMS system has been used to successfully send PBRF evidence
University and to provide
portfolios to TEC.
appropriate reporting
mechanisms to support
PBRF implementation.
A13
Review research policy and
Achieved
process in conjunction
Highlights:
with implementation
Key aspects of the University’s new Costing and Cost Recovery Policy
of RIMS (e.g. research
and Approval of Research and Consultancy Proposals Policy are
costing/pricing).
currently being incorporated into RIMS.
78
A14
Complete implementation
Partially achieved
of the University’s
Highlights:
commercialisation
Key initiatives for optimising commercial activities for the benefit of
framework.
the University and the nation have been included in the University
Investment Plan, and they will provide guidance and direction for the
coming years.
Other highlights of initiatives focused
on Research & Creative Works:
The University’s Animal Welfare Science and Bioethics Centre has
been named a collaborating centre of the OIE, the World Organisation
for Animal Health, and will provide expert scientific, bioethical and
educational advice for the OIE and its 169 member countries. The
Centre is the first in New Zealand to be acknowledged as a collaborating
centre, and the only collaborating partner with a sole focus on animal
welfare. The Centre provides practical, science-based and ethical
advice, education and solutions to animal welfare problems and for
bioethical analysis and education.
The University’s Centre for Mobile Computing was officially launched
in Auckland in June. The mission of the Centre is to engage in
leading-edge research to enhance New Zealand’s capability in mobile
computing. This formalises the initiatives of researchers in the Institute
of Information and Mathematical Sciences at the Auckland campus,
who have taken the lead in building New Zealand’s capability in mobile
computing.
The Solexa Genome Analysis system was launched by the Minister for
Research, Science and Technology, the Hon. Steve Maharey, on Friday,
5 October 2007, at the Allan Wilson Centre for Molecular Ecology and
Evolution on the Palmerston North campus. This is a next-generation
DNA sequencer, which will enable scientists to analyse DNA 100 times
faster than previously. The Solexa and the existing ABI3730 sequencer
are complementary, and will allow almost all projects requiring nextgeneration sequencing to take place within New Zealand. The Solexa is
intended to become an accredited facility, the only one in the Southern
Hemisphere, and provides an opportunity to attract clients from across
Australasia.
A joint initiative between Massey University and Landcare Research
has resulted in the appointment of the first joint professorial research
fellowship. Landcare Research principal scientist Surinder Saggar
has been appointed Professor of Environmental Sciences. Professor
Saggar’s area of expertise includes agricultural greenhouse gas
emissions, including mitigation, soil organic matter and nutrient
cycling.
79
The following collaborative research contracts have been secured:
•
the Longitudinal Study, in partnership with Auckland University
and Victoria University of Wellington
•
Healthy Eating – Healthy Action (HEHA), in partnership with
Otago University, Auckland University of Technology and Victoria
University of Wellington
•
Manu Ao, a Te Kahui Amokura sponsored universities-wide Mäori
staff consortium
•
Ngäti Awa evaluation
•
a blues skies research project in whänau communication with the
Families Commission.
Performance Measures
Target
2007
Actual
2007
Actual
2006
Pbrf Quality Academic Staff Profile (Fte)
A Category
89
65
42
B Category
273
284
216
C Category
498
525
431
R Category
59
239
537
919
1,113
1,226
Total
Note: Actual 2007 represents 2006 external evaluation scores, and Actual 2006 represents 2003 external
evaluation scores.
Contract Income Earned from External Sources ($m)
53
56
51
38
41
37
Postgraduate EFTS – Taught (Number of)
2,511
2,381
2,516
Postgraduate EFTS – Research (Number of)
1,453
1,395
1,414
106
112
140
PBRF Wholly Research Doctorate Successful Completions (EFTS)
86
112
140
PBRF Wholly Research Masterate Successful Completions (EFTS)
345
*
382
Note: This excludes internal research income and income derived from subsidaries.
PBRF External Research Income ($m)
Note: This excludes income derived from subsidaries.
Doctorate Completions (Head count)
* Masterate completions for 2007 yet to be finalised while this document is being prepared.
80
TEACHING AND LEARNING
GOAL
To provide tertiary education of a quality and kind that will enhance the capabilities, potential, and intellectual
independence of its students, on a life-long basis, through education both on and off campus.
OBJECTIVES
•
To promote and develop the distinctive nature of Massey University reflected in its extramural programme,
and broaden this to a flexible learning and teaching focus that integrates new technologies into course
delivery for both internal and extramural students.
•
To ensure that all courses, regardless of the campus or mode of delivery, provide students with access to
excellent education of high international standard, supported by effective quality systems and, where
appropriate, with specific international accreditation.
•
To reinforce strong commitment to research-led teaching and scholarship.
•
To provide access for all students to high-quality and appropriate on-line educational services, Library
services, support tools and pedagogy.
•
To place high priority on the first-year experience for our students.
•
To ensure staff continue to have access to high-quality staff development programmes relevant to learning
and teaching.
•
To conduct regular surveys of students, graduates and major employers of graduates and use the resulting
information to improve the relevance and quality of academic programmes, learning support, and services.
•
To foster discussion of environmental issues in the University Community.
PERFORMANCE 2007
Massey University makes a major contribution to accessible research-based university education in New Zealand,
both in its own right and in partnership with other institutions nationally and internationally. This contribution
reflects both our mission and special character. The breadth of academic programmes offered, specialist areas,
and flexible delivery options mean we offer an integrated portfolio of qualifications relevant to the New Zealand
environment. As an institution that prides itself on being student-centred, qualifications are available to students
through arrangements that suit their location and circumstances, and that can be accommodated alongside their
family and employment commitments.
During 2007 the University consolidated plans and strategies within the new Investment Plan (Profile). Distance
education and e-learning were identified as two of the University’s nine strategic priorities, and the appointment
of Directors in each area will ensure implementation of initiatives and the achievement of specified outcomes.
The University continued its commitment to networks of provision in 2007 with the ongoing development
and implementation of positioning strategies for each campus and extramural. Strategic dialogue with other
providers in the Auckland and Wellington regions also continued with the participation of the respective Deputy
Vice-Chancellors.
Massey University is very proud to host Ako Aotearoa (the National Centre for Tertiary Teaching Excellence),
which was launched on 1 November 2007 at the Wellington campus. Internal support for teaching innovation
and excellence continues through the University’s Fund for Innovation and Excellence in Teaching (FIET), a
variety of award programmes, and the yearly Vice-Chancellor’s Symposium, which celebrated “The Magic of
Teaching” in 2007. The University’s success with two awards in the National Tertiary Teaching Excellence Awards
81
also demonstrates the strength of teaching at Massey. The University’s SECAT (Standard Evaluation of Course,
Administration and Teaching) scores have also continued to improve during 2007.
Systems and processes for quality assurance within the learning and teaching environment continue to evolve
through regular strategic reviews and the development of data and information systems. During 2007, 14 reviews
spanning 31 qualifications were carried out in accordance with the University’s Qualification Review Procedures.
Significant progress was also made on the development of systems for high-level analyses of student academic
achievement, evaluation of teaching quality, and appropriate and effective assessment practices remain key areas
of focus with University-wide initiatives ongoing.
Performance Indicators
Target 2007:
Outcome/Progress 2007:
B1
Introduce new
Achieved
qualification offerings over
Qualifications introduced:
the 2007 – 2009 period
as listed in the section
“Qualifications to be
•
Postgraduate Certificate in Business
•
Postgraduate Certificate in Arts.
Delivered” in the Profile
2007 – 2009.
B2
Discontinue the
Achieved
qualification offerings
Qualifications discontinued:
as listed in the section
“Qualifications to be
Discontinued” in the
Profile 2007 – 2009.
B3
•
Higher Diploma of Teaching
•
NZ Diploma of Business
•
Bachelor of Mäori Performing Arts
•
Graduate Diploma in Dance Studies
•
Certificate in Japanese Studies.
Continue the
Achieved
implementation of the
Highlights:
Wellington Campus
The doctoral head count in Wellington campus on 1 October 2007 was
Teaching & Learning
up by 25% to 66 from 1 October 2006, and overall postgraduate EFTS
Development Plan
increased by 17% to 245.
developed in 2005 by
consolidating the Bachelor
of Engineering and
increasing the number
New postgraduate programmes in Health Science and Visual and
Material Culture were approved by Committee for University Academic
Programmes and will be offered from 2008.
and proportion of postgraduate EFTS on campus,
including introduction of
postgraduate programmes
in Engineering and Health
Sciences.
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B4
Develop and implement
Achieved – ongoing
positioning strategies for
Highlights:
Auckland and Palmerston
The Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Auckland & International) continued to
North campuses and
engage with Colleges in the future strategic direction for programmes
Extramural.
at the Albany campus. In 2007 this was focused on the College of
Sciences, and the launching of the New Institute for Advanced Study.
Also at Albany the Speech-Language Therapy Clinic was established.
The College of Humanities & Social Sciences completed the final year
of implementation of their Albany campus review.
Implementation of the Campus Positioning Strategies developed in
2006/2007 is on-going, and is reflected in the University’s Investment
Plan (Profile).
B5
Complete a review of the
Achieved – ongoing
Summer School Strategy.
Highlights:
A further review of the success rates of Summer School students was
carried out in 2007. The procedures in place in the colleges for
the coordination and management of Summer School offerings are
adequate at the present time.
B6
Develop and implement
Achieved – ongoing
a process for targeted
Existing processes for qualification reviews address this objective.
review, and where
warranted, rationalisation
of existing qualification/
paper/offerings where
The five-yearly qualification reviews include consideration of the
alignment between qualifications within the academic portfolio and
they can highlight opportunities for rationalisation.
student demand is low
(in conjunction with
implementation of campus
positioning strategies
above).
B7
Continue to review
Achieved
provider contracting
Highlights:
arrangements and
The policy for subcontracting of teaching was updated.
strengthen as necessary to
ensure quality assurance.
B8-1
Continue strategic
Achieved – ongoing
dialogue with other tertiary
education organisations in
our regions or common T
& L domains to optimise
portfolio provision in the
sector, including Lincoln
University.
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B8-2
Continue strategic
Achieved – ongoing
dialogue with other tertiary
Highlights:
education organisations in
Staff of the College of Education were relocated in December 2006
our regions or common T
from Ruawharo to the Hetley Building, Ruawharo Centre, at Eastern
& L domains to optimise
Institute of Technology (EIT), Hawke’s Bay. There are considerable
portfolio provision in the
advantages and synergies in the relocation. These include a
sector, including Eastern
minimisation of costs (rental and services), maximisation of the
Institute of Technology.
academic environment for Massey staff and students, and closer links
and better collaboration with other providers of tertiary education in
Hawke’s Bay. The Ruawharo site was released for sale.
In August 2007, Massey and EIT renewed an agreement for EIT to
teach Massey’s Graduate Diploma in Teaching (Secondary) programme
on the Taradale campus in Napier. This cooperative agreement with
EIT has enabled this qualification to be offered in Napier for the last
seven years.
B8-3
Continue strategic
Achieved – ongoing
dialogue with other tertiary
Highlights:
education organisations in
Projects have been implemented by the tertiary sector, Palmerston
our regions or common T
North City Council and local businesses to promote the “Student City”
& L domains to optimise
brand of Palmerston North. Collaboration between International
portfolio provision in the
Pacific College (IPC), Universal College of Learning (UCOL) and
sector including Universal
Massey has been coordinated through the Integrated Education
College of Learning
Guardian Group, part of Vision Manawatu.
(UCOL).
B8-4
Continue strategic
Achieved – ongoing
dialogue with other tertiary
Highlights:
education organisations in
The DVC (Wellington) continued to participate in the Tertiary
our regions or common T
Education Cluster.
& L domains to optimise
portfolio provision in the
sector, including Victoria
The NZSM jointly owned by Massey and VUW of Wellington exceeded
its 2007 EFTS target by 12%.
University of Wellington
(VUW).
B8-5
Continue strategic
Achieved – ongoing
dialogue with other tertiary
Highlights:
education organisations in
Wellington campus staff contributed to the regional training strategy
our regions or common T
that was developed by Weltec and Whitireia Polytechnic. Discussions
& L domains to optimise
are underway with Weltec in relation to rationalising Massey’s
portfolio provision in
engineering and IT offerings while ensuring appropriate regional
the sector, including
provision and staircasing.
Wellington Institute of
Technology.
84
B8-6
Continue strategic
Achieved – ongoing
dialogue with other tertiary
Highlights:
education organisations in
The relationship was maintained through Massey’s position on the
our regions or common T
Council of Te Wänanga o Raukawa, and an initiative was begun for
& L domains to optimise
Te Wänanga o Raukawa staff studying for doctoral degrees through
portfolio provision in
Massey.
the sector, including Te
Wänanga o Raukawa.
B8-7
Continue strategic
Achieved – ongoing
dialogue with other tertiary
education organisations in
our regions or common T
& L domains to optimise
portfolio provision in the
sector, including Nelson
Marlborough Institute of
Technology.
B8-8
Continue strategic
Achieved – ongoing
dialogue with other tertiary
Highlights:
education organisations in
Student articulation agreements with NorthTec were further developed.
our regions or common T
& L domains to optimise
portfolio provision in
the sector, including
Northland Polytechnic.
The DVC (Auckland & International) led Massey’s engagement in
discussions with the Tertiary Education Commission, the University of
Auckland, Auckland University of Technology, NorthTec, Unitec, and
MIT in relation to (a) integration of provision of tertiary education
in the Auckland region, and (b) future trades and vocational tertiary
education provision in the north and northwest sectors of Auckland.
B9-1
Maintain current
Achieved – ongoing
programme-based
relationships, including
those with the Ministry of
Defence.
B9-2
Maintain current
Achieved – ongoing
programme-based
relationships, including
those with the Ministry of
Health.
B9-3
Maintain current
Achieved – ongoing
programme-based
relationships, including
those with the Department
of Child, Youth and Family.
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B9-4
B10
Maintain current
Achieved – ongoing
programme-based
Highlights:
relationships, including
Maintained programme-based relationships with the Ministry of
those with the Ministry of
Education, the Teachers Council, the Psychologists Board, and the New
Education.
Zealand Speech Therapists Association.
Continue the systematic
Achieved – ongoing
programme of qualification
Highlights:
reviews to include T & L
Fourteen reviews spanning 31 qualifications were conducted in 2007.
and industry evaluations,
student feedback, and peer
review.
B11
Continue implementation
Partially achieved – ongoing
of the University’s Teaching
Highlights:
and Learning Policy,
Distance education and e-learning have been identified as strategic
including development of
priorities in the University’s new Investment Plan, with development
strategies for e-learning,
goals articulated for e-learning, distance education and teaching
teaching evaluation
evaluation.
enhancing student success
and completion, and
appropriate assessment as
strategic priorities.
B12
Funding to support the implementation of an online, automated
evaluation tool and to support the development of online assessment
and assignment submission has been applied for.
Implement revised student
Partially achieved
and graduate measures of
Highlights:
perceptions of teaching
A revised student satisfaction survey was administered in 2007 and
and programme quality,
included a survey of students who withdrew from their programmes.
including agreed feedback
Enhancements have been made to the way in which the results are
mechanisms to staff and
reported and now allow for individual units to access the results most
students.
pertinent to them.
Deficiencies in the current approach for surveying graduate
outcomes have been identified and a review will be undertaken by
a working group of the New Zealand Vice-Chancellors’ Committee.
Improvements to the national survey process are expected to be
implemented from 2009.
There has been limited progress on the implementation of the
teaching evaluation redevelopment goals. However, the development
of a flexible online survey tool is the subject of a multi-university
funding proposal submitted to the TEC.
The University participated in a pilot of the Student Engagement
Survey, which is being run by the Australian Council for Education
Research. Results are expected late 2007 / early 2008.
86
B13
Continue to progress
Partially achieved
international accreditation
of programmes in the
College of Business by the
Association to Advance
Collegiate Schools of
Business (AACSB).
B14
Seek accreditation status
Partially achieved – ongoing
from the Psychologists
Registration Board for the
Clinical Psychology and
Industrial/Organisational
programmes.
B15
Seek to extend the
Achieved
range of engineering
Massey University continues to consolidate its four-year professional
and technology degree
Bachelor of Engineering degree and extend its major offerings.
majors accredited by the
Institution of Engineers
New Zealand and
recognised internationally
under the Washington
Accord for four-year
degrees and the Sydney
Accord for three-year
degrees.
B16
Develop and implement
Achieved – ongoing
systems and structures to
Highlights:
support student literacy
Papers have been developed in the College of Creative Arts and the
and numeracy with
College of Humanities and Social Sciences to strengthen student
a particular focus on
literacy and numeracy. A number of personnel provided support to
undergraduate degree
students with literacy and numeracy requirements.
students.
87
B17
Continue to integrate new
Achieved – ongoing
technologies across the
Highlights:
curriculum in a systematic
Work is currently underway to define the “e-toolset” which will
manner and implement
comprise the core templates and ICT requirements to facilitate and
adopted projects
advance the use of e-learning in papers and programmes. Preparations
(including those funded
to upgrade the University’s Learning Management System have been
under the e-learning
ongoing during 2006 – 2007 for implementation in 2008 – 2009. A
Collaborative Development
pilot of Moodle, an open-source learning management system, has
Fund).
commenced in the College of Education.
The university is engaged in leading three significant governmentfunded projects that will result in enhanced e-learning delivery. These
are: the e-learning Guideliines project, the Professional Development
in e-learning project and the e-learning Management Resources
project. Each of these projects will contribute to the integration of new
technologies within the Massey curriculum.
Two part-time teaching fellowship positions have been established to
support the integration of eLearning across the University. Work has
commenced on the development of the [email protected] web portal
to enhance instructional design and quality assurance of extramural
materials.
The use of Adobe Connect for extramural students and the Wimba
Voice Tools for language students has been a successful integration of
new technologies.
B18
Implement
Achieved
recommendations from
Highlights:
the First Year Experience
Work continues on the development of tracking mechanisms for
Review, including the
student retention from Year 1 to Year 2. Baseline data is now available
establishment of good
for the evaluation of initiatives in 2008 and 2009.
practice pilots to enhance
T & L performance in
papers and programmes
and across all modes,
The Library has shifted focus from general library tours to subjectfocused seminars targeted to the needs of first-year student
assignments.
internal and extramural.
B19
Continue implementation
Achieved – ongoing
of the Retention Project
See response to B18 above.
targeting high enrolment
first-year papers and
priority student groups,
and including the
capability for generating
better data and analysis
of student retention
and progression and
completion.
88
B20
Continue to recognise
Achieved – ongoing
and nurture teaching
Highlights:
excellence through award
The highly successful Fund for Innovation and Excellence in Teaching
programmes (including
(FIET) continues to promote and support innovation among Massey
the Vice-Chancellor’s
staff members and lead to innovative practice and products. Over
Awards for Excellence in
recent years, the FIET committee has focused on specific areas and
University Teaching, the
encouraged applications to address these areas. The current priority
Fund for Innovation and
area, in line with University policy, is distance education and a number
Excellence in Teaching),
of projects have been funded that address this priority. Overall, the
and sharing of best
FIET fund has sponsored close to 250 projects in its 14-year history.
practice.
Massey’s success in the National Tertiary Teaching Excellence Awards
demonstrate the strength of teaching at Massey. For the last three
years, Massey has won two national awards each year (100% strike rate).
The most recent winners were Dr Tracy Riley and Dr Bryan Walpert.
A key factor in this success is the encouragement given by the ViceChancellor through the promotion of the annual Vice-Chancellor’s
Teaching Excellence Awards and the work of the Teaching Excellence
Committee and the programmes and support provided by the
consultants of CADeL.
B21
Continue to deliver
Achieved – ongoing
professional development
Highlights:
programmes for T & L
A comprehensive services optimisation project is underway that will
staff and also establish
facilitate the definition of functions and development opportunities.
a comprehensive staff
development plan that
reflects the University’s
changing requirements.
Massey’s Training & Development Unit (TDU) runs about 100 courses
over the year, attended by about 2,000 participants. There have been
fewer offerings this year because of the change of focus of the TDU,
which has concentrated more on individual consultancy and working
with small groups in targeted areas. This reflects a maturing of the
level of staff capability and the lower numbers of new staff coming into
the university.
Other highlights of initiatives focused
Ako Aotearoa, the $20 million national tertiary teaching excellence
on Teaching & Learning
centre headed by Massey, was formally launched on the Wellington
campus on 1 November 2007. Dr Peter Coolbear took up his
appointment as the Director of the Centre.
Preparation has begun for the University’s fourth academic audit,
which will be conducted in 2008. The audit will be University-wide and
scoped according to the Investment Plan.
Ongoing implementation of the Unsatisfactory Academic Progress
regulations has resulted in a decline in the number of students being
excluded from the University.
89
The Teaching and Learning Committee progressed the development of
an assessment policy, scheduled for completion in 2008.
Information on student academic achievement in papers has now been
delivered via a multi-year spreadsheet that presents pass rates and grade
distributions for various aspects of the student demographic.
Use of the plagiarism detection product, TurnItIn, has steadily
expanded since it was piloted, with all colleges now utilising the
software in selected papers.
Performance Measures
Undergraduate Qualifications to be Offered (Number of)
Target
2007
Discrete Qualifications Offered
Actual
2007
Actual
2006
116
109
119
Auckland Region
44
38
44
Palmerston North Region
82
76
86
Wellington Region
43
38
51
Extramural Region
69
67
71
108
113
109
Auckland Region
54
53
54
Palmerston North Region
77
80
77
Wellington Region
32
36
36
Extramural Region
56
54
57
Qualifications Offered by Region
Postgraduate Qualifications to be Offered (Number of)
Discrete Qualifications Offered
Qualifications Offered by Region
Target
2007
Qualifications Available on the Web
(Number of complete qualifications)
Actual
2007
8
Academic Evaluation and Assessment
(SECAT scores [Student Evaluation of Course, Administration and Teaching])
Target
2007
Actual
2006
8
Actual
2007
8
Actual
2006
(i) Internal SECAT – Paper
University Mean
4.00
4.01
3.99
College of Business
4.00
4.00
3.98
College of Creative Arts
3.80
3.90
3.94
College of Education
3.90
3.98
3.86
College of Humanities & Social Sciences
4.10
4.19
4.19
College of Sciences
3.92
3.96
3.92
90
Academic Evaluation and Assessment
(SECAT scores)
Target
2007
Actual
2007
Actual
2006
(ii) Internal SECAT – Teacher
University Mean
4.12
4.23
4.19
College of Business
4.00
4.16
4.11
College of Creative Arts
4.20
4.23
4.29
College of Education
4.30
4.43
4.19
College of Humanities & Social Sciences
4.30
4.46
4.42
College of Sciences
4.17
4.20
4.17
Academic Evaluation and Assessment
(SECAT scores)
Target
2007
Actual
2007
Actual
2006
(iii) Extramural SECAT – Paper
University Mean
4.30
4.49
4.60
College of Business
4.30
4.47
4.54
College of Creative Arts
4.80
4.32
4.94
College of Education
4.70
4.49
4.65
College of Humanities & Social Sciences
4.55
4.54
4.64
College of Sciences
4.65
4.51
4.64
Actual
2007
Eligible Papers for Which SECAT Surveys are Completed, by Mode (%)
Actual
2006
Internal
32%
28%
Extramural *
37%
26%
* The criteria for extramural paper assessment were changed in 2006 to align with the internal paper assessment.
Actual
2007*
Overall Graduate Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ Mean Score)*
Actual
2006
-
* Survey not undertaken in 2007.
91
3.85
TREATY OF WAITANGI
GOALS
Demonstrate Massey University’s commitment to being recognised as:
(i) a Mäori-relevant university
(ii) a place where Mäori language and culture can flourish
(iii) a place where Mäori students are likely to graduate
(iv) a university where Mäori will obtain relevant higher degrees
(v) a university which has the teaching and research capacity to make a substantial contribution to positive
Mäori development
(vi) a university that provides academic leadership for Mäori development.
OBJECTIVES
•
To achieve full Mäori participation across the University, including governance and management.
•
To increase enrolment of Mäori undergraduate and postgraduate students.
•
To achieve greater academic success by, and retention of, Mäori undergraduate and postgraduate students.
•
To increase the proportion of Mäori staff.
•
To use the Mäori language appropriately across the University.
•
To foster mutual regard for, and understanding of, academic knowledge and customary Mäori knowledge.
•
To establish effective consultation mechanisms with Mäori both internally and external to the University.
•
To ensure that the University has teaching programmes relevant to the aspirations of Mäori in both content
and delivery.
•
To encourage research into broad issues of Mäori development including policy, resource and community
development.
•
To enable Mäori students to develop dual competencies, thereby adding value to academic programmes and
facilitating greater Mäori participation in te reo Mäori and society generally.
PERFORMANCE 2007
In 2007, the University continued to implement the Mä[email protected] Strategy. Many initiatives moved into the
important maintenance phase of development to imbed recommended practices into Massey’s processes. For
example:
•
there was a focus on supporting Mäori postgraduate students through workshops and writing retreats
•
further research was conducted with Mäori postgraduate students and Mäori undergraduate students new to
Massey to explore trends and patterns in student participation
•
scholarships supporting Mäori academic achievement were maintained, with 30 students successfully
completing their course of study, enabling them to graduate
•
the Mäori Communications Strategy continued to profile Massey in Mäori-focused publications, building
both the Mäori research and teaching reputation of Massey
•
throughout the year the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Mäori) actively participated in a range of government
activities, including offering advice to Te Puni Kökiri in relation to whänau development and Mäori Futures,
to the Ministry of Education on the Futures Programme, and the Families Commission.
92
In addition, new initiatives were supported, including the following:
•
Te Mata o Te Tau, The Academy of Mäori Research and Scholarship, was the co-ordinating body for ManuAo Mäori Academic Network across universities in Aotearoa, this was an New Zealand Vice-Chancellor’s
Committee (NZVCC) and Tertiary Education Commission (TEC) supported initiative. Manu-Ao encourages
collaboration and capability building for Mäori academic staff. A successful series of events, including regular
cross-university seminars, canvassed the range of Mäori research developments across the universities
•
In conjunction with the Office of the DVC (Academic) and the Information Technology Services (ITS),
statistical tools showing retention rates were developed
•
On the Wellington Campus a new Senior Manager (Mäori) was appointed and a new whänau room with
dedicated study facilities was opened
•
A new strategy, Kia Maia, to progress Mäori development at Massey was approved.
The new Tertiary Education Strategy 2007-2012 signalled a refocusing of the tertiary education sector and
highlighted the importance of achieving for Mäori. To demonstrate Massey’s commitment to this direction, a
strategy Kia Maia: Key Initiatives for a Mäori Academic Investment Agenda, the next iteration of the Mä[email protected]
Massey Strategy, was developed. The broad aims of Kia Maia are to align Massey University capabilities with
full Mäori participation in Te Ao Mäori and in a knowledge-based society, and to contribute to Mäori capacity
building through teaching, research, and knowledge transfer.
Building on the Massey distinctiveness – as evidenced by its Mäori student profile, modes and sites of delivery,
Mäori content in academic programmes, the range of applied programmes and Mäori research capability – four
investment goals have been identified:
•
investments in quality academic outcomes for Mäori
•
investments in Mäori professional capability
•
investments in research-led Mäori transformations
•
investments in Mäori engagement.
The four investment goals have been given priority because of their potential to significantly enhance Massey
University’s contribution and to accelerate action where progress is both needed and possible.
KIA MAIA highlights the areas where the University will make significant investments over the five-year period
2008 – 2012 and contains new initiatives for the three years 2008 – 2010.
Performance Indicators
Target 2007:
Outcome/Progress 2007:
C1
As part of the University’s
Partially achieved
overall student recruitment
A strategic focus on recruitment has been signalled in Kia Maia.
strategy, develop a Mäori
Student Recruitment
Strategy.
93
C2
Seek to maintain the
Achieved
current Mäori student
Scholarships were maintained where funding was available. There were
scholarships (Raukura,
about 30 graduates from these scholarships.
Highbury Community
Scholarships, Te Rau
Puawai Bursary Scheme,
Further opportunities to develop the Mäori scholarships offered at
Massey have been explored with the Scholarships Committee.
Landcare Scholarship in
Planning) and develop
a strategy for future
development of Mäori
student scholarships.
C3
Continue to develop
Achieved
baseline data and tools
Highlights:
for tracking the T & L
In partnership with the Office of the DVC (Academic) and ITS, DVC
achievement of Mäori
(Mäori) continued to assist with the development of database tools to
students to support
support student academic success, and with monitoring retention and
the development of
completion rates.
new initiatives aimed at
accelerated T & L course
progression for Mäori
students.
Information on student academic achievement in papers has now been
delivered via a multi-year spreadsheet that presents pass rates and grade
distributions for various aspects of the student demographic, including
for Mäori and Pasifika students.
The Retention Report includes specific analyses of first-year retention
rates for Mäori and Pasifika students.
C4
Propose a strategy to
Not achieved.
enhance the performance
Awaiting the University-wide Strategy.
of Mäori extramural
students to inform
development of the
University’s Extramural
Strategy.
C5
Explore further
Achieved – ongoing
development of Mäori
Highlights:
learning and support
Further development of the Mäori Support Services has also been
services.
signalled as part of the Kia Maia Strategy.
Te Hononga Mai Tawhiti continues to provide valuable support to
Mäori Extramural students through, for example, regional workshops
on exam study skills.
Kiwitea Hall on the Palmerston North campus continues to provide
a whänau-based living option for Mäori students and works in close
collaboration with Kaitautoko Mäori and Kainga Rua (student learning
area ).
94
The annual Student Satisfaction Survey showed increased satisfaction
with Mäori services on the Wellington Campus.
The Auckland campus is developing processes to meet the needs of
postgraduate students through the Rangahau Taura programme. A
postgraduate hui was held on12 October 2007 aiming to bridge a gap
between masterate students and PhD students.
C6
Increase Mäori
Partially achieved – on going
participation in unique
Highlights:
programme offerings such
The number of students in the Bachelor of Mäori Visual Arts has
as Te Aho Tatairangi (the
increased for 2007.
immersion teacher training
degree programme) and
An external programme review of Te Aho Tatairangi was undertaken.
Bachelor of Mäori Visual
Arts.
C7
Develop and implement a
Achieved
Mäori Research Strategy.
Highlights:
Actions have been taken towards increasing the capability and capacity
at Massey for Mäori staff.
(Also see responses to A11 in the “Research & Creative Work” section.)
C8
Continue to develop Te
Achieved
Mata o Te Tau, the inter-
Highlights:
disciplinary Academy
A Director has been appointed to Te Mata o Te Tau.
for Mäori Research and
Scholarship.
Research funding has been secured as part of Te Mata o Te Tau.
see response to additional highlights in the “Research & Creative
Work” section.)
C9-1
Continue to support
Achieved – ongoing
Mäori Research Teams: Te
Pümanawa Hauroa (Health
Development).
C9-2
Continue to support
Achieved – ongoing
Mäori Research Teams: Te
Pütahi-ä-Toi (Language &
Heritage).
C9-3
Continue to support Mäori
Achieved – ongoing
Research Teams: Te Uru
Märaurau (Education,
Policy).
C9-4
Continue to support Mäori
Achieved – ongoing
Research Teams: Whäriki
(Health).
95
(Also
C9-5
Continue to support Mäori
Achieved – ongoing
Research Teams: Te Au
Rangahau (Business).
C9-6
Continue to support
Achieved
Mäori Research Teams:
Centre for Indigenous
Governance and
Development (Indigenous
Development).
C9-7
Continue to support
Achieved – ongoing
Mäori Research Teams: Te
Wähanga Pötaiao (Foods,
Land).
C10
Continue to support senior
Partially achieved – ongoing
Mäori appointments in
Highlights:
the University that will
Te Tumatakuru O’Connell (Ngäti Raukawa, Ngäi Te Rangi, Te Ati Awa,
underpin the T & L
Ngäi Tahu, Airani) has been appointed to the position of Te Kaiwawao.
development plans.
Te Kaiwawao assists in making the University accessible for all Mäori
by offering academic and personal advice that can assist students to
achieve their academic potential.
C11
Establish a Mäori
Partially achieved – ongoing
workforce development
Supported as part of the development of Manu Ao. (See response to
strategy for T & L and
C21 below.)
general staff.
C12
As part of the strategic
Achieved
positioning of the
Highlights:
University, its campuses
As part of the Kia Maia Strategy a Mäori professional development
and extramural, identify
focus has been signalled as a core initiative.
opportunities for the
introduction and ongoing
development of distinctive
qualifications and offerings
that will contribute to
Mäori development
aspirations.
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C13
Actively promote
Achieved – ongoing
engagement and
Highlights:
collaboration
The DVC (Mäori) hosted the following international visitors: Stephen
internationally and with
Pompedelli, from Harvard Medical School, who was assisting with the
indigenous peoples
analysis of cultural markers in the Psychiatric Epidemiology study;
within areas of teaching,
Dr Marjorie Mau from the Department of Native Hawaiian Health,
research and staff/student
University of Hawaii, on a research exchange; and Dr Keaweaimoku
exchanges.
Kaholokula from the Department of Native Hawaiian Health, University
of Hawaii, on a research exchange.
The DVC (Mäori) signed an agreement for hosting postgraduate
psychology students from the University of Hawaii.
C14
Implement a Mäori-
Achieved
language policy for the
University.
C15
Evaluate, and where
Achieved
necessary, plan for
Highlights:
improved cultural,
Kiwitea Hall, a hall of residence on Palmerston North campus, is based
recreational and study
on a kaupapa Mäori philosophy and is located in close proximity to Te
facilities on each campus
Whare Herenga, a dedicated study space. It continues to build on its
over the planning period.
success and popularity, with full occupancy in 2007.
Manawatahi and Te Atawhai have new offices/spaces co-located with
all other students’ associations on Level 2 of the remodelled Students’
Centre on Palmerston North campus.
A new whänau room with dedicated study facilities opened on
Wellington campus.
On Auckland campus, highlights include supporting activities focusing
on Mäori Language week and progressing relationships with iwi.
C16
Continue student support
Achieved
staffing positions on
Mäori positions have been maintained on all campuses and in each
each campus and in each
college.
college.
C17
Continue implementation
Achieved
of the Mäori
A presence in Mäori-focused publications has been maintained.
Communications Strategy
developed by the DVC
(Mäori).
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C18
Explore options for
Achieved
mutually beneficial
Highlights:
relationships between the
On the Auckland campus, the Kaiwhakahaere continues discussions
University and wänanga.
with Te Whare Wänanga o Awanui-a-rangi. Negotiation took place on
a joint venture with Ngäti Awa and it is hoped that Awanui-a-Rangi can
become apart of this venture.
(Also refer to responses to B8-6 in the “Teaching & Learning” section.)
C19
In conjunction with
Achieved
Council, explore ways
to implement the
recommendations from the
Engagement with Mäori
paper. (See also H11 and
F8.)
C20
Develop a process for
Partially achieved
consultation with Mäori,
Current relationships with Mäori communities have been maintained.
both within and external
to the University. (Also see
This has also been signalled as a key focus in the Kia Maia Strategy.
C19, F8 and H11.)
C21
Contribute to TEC,
Achieved
NZVCC and educational
Highlights:
policies for Mäori, over
Advice was offered to Te Puni Kökiri in relation to whänau
the planning period, for
development and Mäori Futures, the Ministry of Education on the
example, through Te Kahui
Futures Programme, and to the Families Commission.
Amokura (NZVCC) and
Hui Taumata Matauranga.
There was ontinued participation in Te Kahui Amokura and
coordination of Manu Ao, a project to build capacity with Mäori
academic staff across all universities.
Other highlights of initiatives focused
on Treaty of Waitangi:
Teaching and Development Unit (TDU) has facilitated four te reo
courses this year for three campuses with about 50 participants in total.
They have been very successful and very well received.
The 2007 Mäori student-focused event “Iwi Creativity” was launched
in June. “Iwi Creativity” celebrates recent creative work by current
fine arts and design students in the College of Creative Arts. It signals
the importance of Mäori student achievement and highlights their
academic endeavour in their chosen discipline.
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Performance Measures
Target
2007
Mäori-centred Courses (papers) (Number of discrete)
Actual
2007
Actual
2006
154
152
173
Mäori-centred Qualifications (Number of discrete)
19
20
20
Courses (Papers) Delivered in Te Reo (Number of)
45
42
45
Target
2007
Training Opportunities for Staff Relating to Treaty of Waitangi, Te Reo, Cultural Awareness
(Number of) *
Staff participating in training opportunities – see above (Number of)*
Actual
2007
Actual
2006
24
4
7
340
62
64
184
136
139
* Combination of low demand and decreased funding have affected the training being delivered.
Mäori Representation Amongst Full-time Equivalent Staff (Number of)
Mäori Student Enrolments (Number of)
Target
2007
Actual
2007
Actual
2006
Mäori students enrolled
3,610
3,384
3,396
EFTS Mäori students
1,825
1,745
1,737
First-year Mäori students (new to Massey)
1,021
1,015
967
EFTS 100 level Mäori students
695
694
632
Mäori postgraduate students
634
896
716
Mäori graduates
375
430
422
Course Completion Rate – Mäori Students (%)
Target
2007
Actual
2007
Actual
2006
College of Business
71%
73%
71%
College of Creative Arts
85%
89%
83%
College of Education
85%
81%
81%
College of Humanities & Social Sciences
65%
67%
68%
College of Sciences
77%
77%
81%
Retention From First Year of Atudy to Second Year of Study – All Undergraduate Programmes (%)
Target
2007
Actual
2007
Actual
2006
Mäori students
56%
52%
49%
Student Services Satisfaction – Mäori Students – Non-Academic Services
(% students rating services good/very good)
75%
72%
73%
Treaty of Waitangi – Policy Statement
Massey University is committed to giving effect to the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi within the policies
and practices of the University, and to recognise the mutual benefits that follow. It will promote full Mäori
participation across the University, maintain the Mäori language as an official language of the University, foster
mutual regard and understanding for academic knowledge and customary Mäori knowledge, recognise and
acknowledge the special status of tangata whenua in the mana whenua of each campus, seek opportunities for
mutually beneficial partnerships with Mäori, and facilitate teaching and research programmes consistent with
Mäori aspirations and processes.
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STUDENTS
GOAL
Distinguish Massey University by the vibrancy of its campuses and student learning experience, its inclusiveness
and its outstanding service to students.
OBJECTIVES
•
To provide a range of academic programmes of excellence that are accessible to different groups
throughout New Zealand are relevant to students, develop students as independent learners, and
significantly enhance the employment opportunities available to graduates.
•
To seek enrolment of high-calibre students and support them in reaching their potential.
•
To provide student support services and a physical environment that will attract students and support
greater academic success and retention.
•
To continue to encourage enrolment from under-represented groups and to support their progress.
•
To be recognised as providing a superb first-year experience for our students and to pursue initiatives that
will enhance the overall student learning experience at Massey University.
•
To ensure through surveys and other research tools that the quality of services matches student expectations
and needs.
PERFORMANCE 2007
Massey University remains student centred, aiming to maximise the flexibility and focus of programmes, and
support in the learning process. We seek to help students reach their intellectual potential with stimulating
teaching, relevant programmes and support services that meet their social and academic needs. In accordance
with our commitment to access, we continue to encourage the enrolment and support of students with
impairment, and to remove barriers that prevent an inclusive environment being created at Massey University.
2007 has seen further enhancement of the services provided by the University to extramural students and those
students in their first year of study. Careers services, interactive support, online enrolment, and services for
learning and writing skills support are now becoming embedded effective practices.
The University continues to invest in student living services with the implementation of the Student
Accommodation Strategy and enhanced provision of IT and information services at each campus. The
redeveloped Student Centre at Palmerston North was opened in February 2007 and is contributing much to
the “Campus Heart”. The achievement of excellence in recently completed accommodation was recognised by
Qualmark, which who gave Halls of Residence Tawa and Miro the highest quality rating for any university-based
student accommodation.
Further improvement of Library facilities and services is planned and/or underway at each campus. Design
plans are being developed for the Wellington campus and have been completed for the Albany library extension.
Refurbishment of the Turitea facility is currently underway.
The University continues to build capacity for monitoring student learning with the ongoing development of
data and information systems, including a specific focus on strategies to support the retention and successful
completion of Mäori and Pasifika students.
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In 2007 the quality of Massey University students and alumni continud to be demonstrated nationally and
internationally. Following are some examples:
2007 Hatherton Award
Dr Celia Webby, a College of Sciences graduate won the 2007 Hatherton Award, from the Royal Society of New
Zealand, for the best scientific paper in physical sciences, earth sciences, mathematical and information sciences
by a PhD student at any New Zealand University.
Government Scholarship
Three Massey PhD students have been awarded the Government’s top scholarships with a value of more than
$280,000.
National Competition – Strategic Skills
Massey College of Business students have won two national competitions in which their strategic skills were pitted
against teams of students from other institutions.
Sportsman of the Year
Mr Moss Burmester, Design student, won the supreme award and was named Sportsman of the Year, at the North
Harbour Sporting Excellence Awards.
“Present around the world” Global Finals
Mr Stephen Irecki, Telecommunications and Network Engineering Honours graduate, has come second in the
“Present around the world” Global finals of IET (Institution of Engineering and Technology).
United States Design Award
Mr Tim Renton, a Bachelor of Technology graduate who majored in product development, has won a United
States design award for his model Toyota GTi race car, which was created using three-dimensional modelling.
Clarence Birdseye Award
Dr James Carson, PhD graduate, won the Clarence Birdseye Award from the International Institute of
Refrigeration, for his research in food science and engineering.
James Harrison Award
Dr Nicholas Smale, PhD graduate, won the James Harrison Award from the International Institute of
Refrigeration, for his work in refrigeration storage and transport.
Exhibition in the Salone Satellite Show
A group of seven Massey industrial design students have been invited to exhibit their furniture designs at the
prestigious annual Salone Satellite Show at the Milan Furniture Fair in April 2007.
National Mäori Academic Excellence Awards
Six Massey Mäori PhD graduates received recognition at the National Mäori Academic Excellence Awards in
March. The recipients were:
•
Dr Amohia Boulton
•
Dr Huia Janke
•
Dr Tanira Kingi
•
Dr Nicole Coupe
•
Dr Colin Know
•
Dr Lynne Pere.
Top Achiever Doctoral Scholarship
Rachael Bell, PhD student in the School of History, Philosophy & Politics, has been awarded a Top Achiever
Doctoral Scholarship of $71,488 from the Government for her project “National History/National Memory: New
Zealand’s Official Histories of WWII”.
101
Nick Albert, PhD student in the Institute of Molecular BioSciences, has been awarded a Top Achiever Doctoral
Scholarship of $81,078 from the Government for his project “Regulation of Anthocyanin Pigment Production in
Petunia”.
New Travel Writer of the Year Award
Terence Wood, Certificate in Arts extramural student, won the New Travel Writer of the Year award at the recent
Cathay Pacific Travel Media Awards, for his story “On Top of the World”, which was written as an assignment for
the travel writing paper at Massey. The award includes a commission to write a travel article for AA Directions
Magazine.
T.M. Cherry Award
Sharleen Harper, PhD student in the Institute of Mathematical Sciences, has won the T.M. Cherry Award
presented by the Australian and New Zealand Applied Mathematical Society at their recent conference in Perth.
Sharleen is the first woman student and the second New Zealander to win this Award since it was introduced
nearly 40 years ago.
Dyson/British Council Design Ambassador Design Awards 2007
Massey University had a clean sweep at the Dyson/British Council Design Ambassador Design Awards 2007 with
all four finalists and the winner coming from Massey. The finalists were:
•
Gus Donaldson, student from the Institute of Design for Industry and the Environment
•
Chris Moors, student from the School of Design (Auckland)
•
Stephen Smith, student from the School of Design (Auckland)
•
Ben Thomsen, student from the School of Design (Auckland).
Stephen Smith, Industrial Design graduate, won the 2007 Dyson Award for his ‘Artic Skin’ design and was also
named that British Council Design Ambassador 2007.
Inaugural National Hills Pet Nutrition Buddy Award
Emily McKeague, Diploma of Veterinary Nursing graduate, won the inaugural national Hills Pet Nutrition Buddy
award for knowledge, aptitude and enthusiasm in pet nutrition.
Scottish International Scholarship
Dana Finnigan, Design graduate, is the New Zealand recipient of the Scottish International Scholarship for 2007,
to study for a Masters in Design Practice at the prestigious Glasgow School of Art, alongside an élite group of
young international designers.
Peter Snell Doctoral Scholarship in Public Health and Exercise Sciences
Associate Professor Peter Snell agreed to allow the University to establish a new scholarship in his name to
support research aimed at keeping New Zealanders well. The PhD topic will be in the disciplines of public
health and exercise science and is hosted by the Research Centre for Mäori Health & Development (RCMHD)
and the Institute for Food Nutrition and Human Health (IFNHH). The scholarships support research aimed
at keeping New Zealanders healthy and provide payment of doctoral fees and an annual stipend. The inaugural
scholarship recipients were as follows:
•
Mr Meihana Durie (Ngäti Kauwhata, Rangitäne, Ngäti Porou, Rongo Whakaata and Ngäi Tahu) is CoDirector of Mäori language studies and health and fitness programme manager at Te Wänanga o Raukawa
in Otaki. His doctorate research explores the relationship between Mäori wellbeing, activities that increase
physical fitness and the role of kawa (conventions, protocols).
•
Mr Jackson Green, who has a Bachelor of Science in Sport and Exercise Science with first-class honours from
Massey and currently teaches sport and exercise science at the Palmerston North campus, will research the
relative importance of body composition and physical activity in the development of insulin resistance for his
doctorate.
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Performance Indicators
Target 2007:
Outcome/Progress 2007:
D1
Continue the establishment
Achieved
and development of
Highlights:
the extramural student
A Director of Distance Education was appointed in 2007, and initial
support portfolio under
focus has been on the identification of redevelopment goals for
the Office of Deputy Vice-
extramural study at Massey. The goals were informed by a comparison
Chancellor, Palmerston
of services and supports at Massey University with those of leading
North to include initial
providers overseas.
benchmarking of our
current activities against
effective practices
internationally.
Massey is recognised for its growing expertise in the delivery of
extramural support services. Regional Registrar (Student Life) Dr
Sandy Shillington has been invited to contribute a chapter titled
“Leading student support services for new times” in the 2006 World
Handbook of Distance Education.
D2
Develop and progress
Partially achieved – ongoing
agreed initiatives for the
See response to B11 in the “Teaching & Learning” section.
effective use of e-learning
at Massey University.
D3
Explore the establishment
Achieved
of a foundation or entry-
Highlights:
level qualification for
Preparations are being made to deliver papers in Communication and
extramural students to
Study Skills extramurally, informed by recent analysis. It is anticipated
enhance access to degree
that these papers will be offered for the first time in this mode in
study for mature learners
semester one 2009.
who require additional
preparation for entrance
and for successful T &
L performance at the
University.
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D4
Continue to invest in
Achieved
the strengths of the
Highlights:
University’s extramural
A position of Careers Consultant for Extramural students (now in its
student support; i.e.
second year) is changing the face of the Careers service for Massey
communication and
(across campuses).
support for extramural
students via OWLL, the
assignments prereading
There have been further enhancements to OWLL (learning and
writing skills support) and to Student Services web development.
service, regional
Increased contact course support has been provided, with positive
orientation, careers and
feedback from extramural students.
study skills programme,
Workshops continue to be provided on-line through “Breeze”.
the distance library
service, provision of a
welcome pack for new
extramural students, the
further development of
ExtraConnect, academic writing CDs, hotlines, regular updates, and
regional and on-campus study skills workshops continue to add value to
the tertiary experience for extramural students.
(See also response to D1 above.)
the Student Services and
Extramural websites,
and via 0800 MASSEY
(in collaboration with
EXMSS).
D5
Provide career counselling
Achieved
for extramural students
Highlights:
through the Student
A position of Careers Consultant for Extramural students (now in its
Counselling Service,
second year) is changing the face of the Careers service for Massey
including delivery of
(across all campuses).
careers and course advice
seminars in the regions
and on the web.
D6-1
A virtual Career Fair was launched (the first of its kind in the Southern
Hemisphere) with over 1,400 students attending, and 800 CVs were
posted.
Incorporate the provision
Achieved
of student facilities in
Highlights:
the Comprehensive
Design plans have been completed for a major library extension at
Development Plans
Auckland campus, including a 150 PC information commons for
for each region and
students.
in particular plan for:
appropriate library,
computer laboratories and
information commons.
Design plans are being developed for a new library at the Wellington
campus with an information commons facility.
Refurbishment of Level 3 of the Turitea Library began in November
2007.
An information commons (with over 90 computers) within the Turitea
Library has been very popular, as demonstrated by high usage.
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D6-2
Incorporate provision
Achieved
of student facilities in
Highlights:
the Comprehensive
Parties interested in tendering to provide an on-campus
Development Plans
accommodation village on the Auckland campus of at least 250 beds
for each region and in
were screened and tenders invited from three participants based on
particular plan for: student
an extensive specification and concept design developed with Opus
accommodation.
International Consultants Ltd. These tenders due were to close in
January 2008.
D6-3
Incorporate provision
Achieved
of student facilities in
Highlights:
the Comprehensive
The redeveloped Student Centre at the Palmerston North campus
Development Plans
was opened by the Right Honourable Helen Clark, Prime Minister,
for each region and
in February 2007. Cafes, food-court-style dining, commercial outlets
in particular plan for:
and co-located students’ associations are all in the “new” Centre. The
the Student Centre
Centre forms another vital element of “Campus Heart” to create a
redevelopment at
vibrant environment and active student community in Palmerston
Palmerston North.
North. The Student Learning Centre was moved to the concourse area
to complete the merge of services located in the “Campus Heart” and
available to students.
D6-4
Incorporate provision
Achieved
of student facilities in
Highlights:
the Comprehensive
Wellington Campus established a Pasifika student room and a new
Development Plans
whänau room with dedicated study facilities.
for each region and
in particular plan for:
appropriate facilities for
Mäori and Pasifika on each
Manawatahi and Te Atawhai have new offices/spaces co-located with
all other students’ associations on Level 2 of the remodelled Students’
Centre on Palmerston North campus.
campus.
D7
Complete implementation
Achieved
of the Student
Accommodation Strategy
for the University.
105
D8
Work with local bodies and
Achieved
other tertiary organisations
Highlights:
to develop or enhance
The DVC (Wellington) is a member of the campaign committee set
off-campus facilities for
up by the NZSM to obtain sufficient funding to build a dedicated
students.
building in Civic Square. The NZSM received a government grant of
$11.15 million and a McCarthy Trust grant of $1.5 million towards its
dedicated building.
The DVC (Palmerston North) continues engagement with IPC,
UCOL, PNCC, Destination Manawatu, and Vision Manawatu, through
channels such as the Integrated Education Guardian Group, to achieve
betterment of many aspects of the city for students.
Massey continued its off-campus leasehold arrangements for students
and staff in Design and Psychology at the Auckland campus. This
situation will continue for another eight years or until facilities are
available on campus.
D9
Continue to develop
Achieved
and enhance the Sports
Highlights:
Academy to support top
The 2007 Academy of Sport for talented and élite-level athletes
athletes while they study
studying at Massey was launched on 14 March. Twenty-nine student
and compete.
athletes are benefiting from their first year in the Academy; three
athletes have been accepted into a second year. Support is provided
to allow each individual athlete to balance their chosen sport
commitments alongside their academic commitments. Academy
athletes participate in a wide variety of team and individual sports,
while also studying towards a wide variety of degrees.
Topical seminars provided to all Academy athletes have covered topics
such as time management, goal setting, nutrition, sport psychology,
massage techniques, sponsorship, injury prevention, fitness testing, and
physical conditioning.
Five Palmerston North campus students and two extramural students
helped make up the 14 Massey students who took part in the World
University Games in Bangkok in August 2007. All students were
supported by Massey as part of their representation.
D10
Continue development of
Achieved
the University Graduate
Highlights:
Research School to provide
The Graduate Research Services have completed the implementation
more effective support
of the Research Masters software for the administration of doctoral
and administration for
students. This has proven to be very effective allowing the School to
postgraduate students.
communicate to students electronically and to improve the efficiency
and timeliness of responses.
Also see response in A9 under “Research and Creative Work”.
106
D11-1
Progress key systems
Achieved
improvement projects
Highlights:
over the planning period,
The Services Optimisation Project is underway, with significant progress
including: the next stage of
made on a review of student administration. A Student Services review
ongoing improvements to
was initiated and a situation analysis draft was prepared.
the Student Management
System (following the
completion of SMS
Renewal stage).
D11-2
Progress key systems
Achieved
improvement projects
Highlights:
over the planning period,
On-line Enrolment Project – Phase 1 was completed with a new on-line
including: implementation
enrolment tool developed and successfully launched. Work is currently
of Student Programme
underway to identify improvements to the SPM tool, which is critical to
Management Tool.
the delivery of improvements aimed at enhancing student selections of
papers and programmes.
D11-3
Progress key systems
Achieved
improvement projects
Highlights:
over the planning period,
The new on-line enrolment tool was developed and successfully
including: enhancement
launched.
of web access to student
services.
D11-4
Progress key systems
Achieved
improvement projects
Highlights:
over the planning period,
Preparations to upgrade the University’s Learning Management System
including: upgrade on-line
have been ongoing during 2006 – 2007 for implementation in 2008 –
learning platform and
2009.
support for students and T
& Ls.
Funding has been secured for a new [email protected] web portal
to enhance instructional design and quality assurance of extramural
materials.
D12
Continue to develop a
Achieved
strategy for Student Service
Highlights:
[email protected]
Continuous improvement plans were developed from the 2007
Student Satisfaction Survey. A Student Management Strategy is being
developed specifically with a focus on service quality.
D13
Continue to strengthen
Achieved
learning support for Mäori
See response to C5 in the “Treaty of Waitangi” section.
students by evaluation
and enhancement of
appropriate mechanisms
on all campuses and for
extramural. (See also C5.)
107
D14
Implement relevant
Achieved
initiatives to support
Highlights:
Pacific Island students
Goal 1: Academic Advancement
as identified in the
•
Two full-time Pasifika Learning Advisers were appointed at the
[email protected] Strategy,
Auckland and Palmerston North campuses, a part-time learning
established in 2005.
adviser was appointed at Wellington, and one full-time National
Liaison Adviser was appointed, located at the Auckland Campus.
•
The [email protected] Community Learning Initiative was launched
in August 2007 and is being piloted at North Shore College,
Glenfield College and Birkenhead College. This initiative aims to
support and encourage cultural learning and excellence within
Pacific communities. The project provides learning and teaching
sites for all families based at the schools.
Goal 2: Professional Development
•
The Whenua Research and Academic Pasifika Network Conference
was held. This conference had presentations from Pacific staff and
students and discussions on how to improve Pacific staff PBRF. A
Pasifika Forum Leaders Forum Series was launched.
Goal 3: Research Capability
•
Research training was conducted for staff and students at Auckland
and Palmerston North campuses.
Goal 4: Cultural Diversity
•
The Directorate participated in the Polynesian Festival in Auckland,
and Palmerston North Pacific Fusion.
Goal 5: Collaborative Partnerships
•
Discussions have been held on staircasing to Massey from Martin
Hautus Institute.
•
Pacific staff have participated in community activities and events,
including Methodist Church Parenting and Education seminars,
Pacific Islands students and families information day for Kelston
Boys High School, and visited Daragaville Pacific communities.
D15
Expand the number of
Achieved – ongoing
prestigious scholarships
Highlights:
that support high-calibre
Students awarded the top Vice-Chancellor Doctoral Scholarships are
students over the planning
actively encouraged and assisted to apply for the Bright Future and
period, including support
other scholarships.
for access to the Fulbright
programme.
Other highlights of initiatives focused
on Student
The University Registrar and Academic Policy Manager are working
with representatives of the Students Federation to “map” student
engagement across the University.
108
Performance Measures
Student Profile by Level of Student (Enrolled, by programme level)
Actual
Students
2007
Non-degree
Actual
EFTS
2007
Actual
Students
2006
Actual
EFTS
2006
2,933
755
3,943
1,144
24,300
14,315
24,515
14,817
Postgraduate (except PhD)
7,212
3,428
7,545
3,559
PhD (doctoral)
1,046
934
1,019
955
35,491
19,432
37,022
20,475
Undergraduate
Total
Actual
2007
Postgraduate EFTS as % of Total EFTS (by programme level)
22.45%
EFTS – Taught, by Region (Number of, by paper campus)
Target
2007
Total
19,883
Auckland Region
Palmerston North Region
Wellington Region
EFTS – Taught, by Mode (Number of, by paper mode)
Extramural
19,432
22.05%
Actual
2006
20,475
4,843
4,730
4,935
11,884
11,655
12,343
3,156
3,047
3,197
Target
2007
Internal
Actual
2007
Actual
2006
Actual
2007
Actual
2006
13,394
13,315
14,001
6,489
6,117
6,473
Note: Figures in all tables above include all students enrolled regardless of funding sources.
EFTS – Funded by Ministry of Education (Number of)
Target
2007
Total
Auckland Region
Palmerston North Region
Wellington Region
Actual
2007
Actual
2006
16,065
16,085
16,411
2,949
3,033
2,979
10,513
10,406
10,886
2,603
2,646
2,546
Note: Figures above are Ministry of Education funded students under funding classification 01.
Equal Educational Opportunities (Number of)
Target
2007
Pasifika students enrolled
Students with disability
Retention from First Year of Study to Second Year of Study – All Undergraduate Programmes (%)
Actual
2007
Actual
2006
994
895
904
1,510
2,447
2,454
Target
2007
Actual
2007
Actual
2006
All students
65%
65%
58%
Pasifika students
58%
53%
49%
Students with disability
61%
70%
68%
Note: Figures in both tables above include all students enrolled regardless of funding sources. Retention figures
above are currently affected by one-year sub-degree programmes and are therefore only useful from a trend
perspective.
109
Overall Student Service Satisfaction – Non Academic Services (% student rating services good/very good)
Target
2007
Actual
2007
Actual
2006
All students
66%
65%
67%
Pasifika students
73%
84%
74%
Students with disability
68%
64%
69%
Course Completion Rate (Paper completion ) (%)
Target
2007
Actual
2007
Actual
2006
All Students
College of Business
85%
86%
86%
College of Creative Arts
90%
93%
92%
College of Education
88%
88%
89%
College of Humanities & Social Sciences
80%
82%
83%
College of Sciences
90%
89%
89%
College of Business
69%
71%
71%
College of Creative Arts
70%
81%
74%
College of Education
70%
66%
76%
College of Humanities & Social Sciences
65%
62%
65%
College of Sciences
75%
72%
75%
College of Business
77%
85%
87%
College of Creative Arts
90%
92%
90%
College of Education
80%
82%
80%
College of Humanities & Social Sciences
70%
73%
76%
College of Sciences
76%
84%
87%
Pasifika Students
Students with Disability
Student Achievement
Actual
2007
Actual
2006
Successful course (paper) completion: internal
89%
89%
Successful course (paper) completion: extramural
91%
90%
Note: Successful course completion is the percentage of students passing assessment by examination or internal
assessment. Actuals do not include Semester 3 results as they were not available at the time of the Annual Report
compilation.
110
Programme Completions, by Type of Qualification (Head count)
Actual
2006
Actual
2005
Doctoral degree
108
109
Masters degree
750
832
Bachelors honours
227
158
Postgraduate diploma
832
945
Postgraduate certificate
46
33
3,183
3,372
Advanced diploma/graduate diploma
742
661
Diploma
375
753
-
1
262
465
16
11
6,541
7,340
Bachelor degree
Advanced trade certificate
Advanced certificate/undergraduate certificate
Certificate
Total
Notes: Figures above are for all qualifications under which students have successfully applied to graduate
between 1 April 2005 and 31 March 2006 – the “2005 Academic Year”. Figures above are for the Ministry of
Education funded and full-fee/international students only.
Actual
2006
Actual
2005
Masters, Honours and Doctoral Completion / Total Programme Completions (%)
16%
15%
All Postgraduate Completion / Total Programme Completions
30%
28%
Please also refer to the head count and EFTS information provided in the “Treaty of Waitangi” and
“Internationalisation” sections.
Equity of Access to Educational Opportunities – Policy Statement
Massey University is committed to providing equity of access to educational opportunities for all current and
prospective students irrespective of their sex, marital status, religious belief, colour, race, ethnic or national
origin, disability, age, political opinion, employment status, family status or sexual orientation. To achieve this
policy objective Massey University will:
(a) encourage enrolment from under-represented groups: specifically Mäori, people with disability, pacific
peoples and women
(b) provide a learning environment that facilitates successful participation by all students, including those with
specific needs
(c) be pro-active in providing access and equitable opportunities for success for groups that are
under-represented
(d) ensure that each student has the opportunity to achieve according to his or her own individual potential
(e) ensure that its processes or procedures are non-discriminatory and pay due consideration to the needs of all
groups of students
(f) monitor its performance against this policy objective.
111
2007 REPORT ON SPECIAL SUPPLEMENTARY GRANTS
Tertiary Students with Disabilities
Approximately 2,792 students with disabilities enrolled at Massey in 2007. There have been a total of 41 students
requiring material in accessible formats during 2007 and we have provided formats for 132 papers. The bulk
of the Special Supplementary Funding Grant: Tertiary Students with Disabilities continued to be spent on
support for individual students, which included salaries for five support persons across the three campuses.
The pool of assistive technology and equipment for external and internal students increased to meet ongoing
demand. Students identifying with sensory impairments and specific learning difficulties increased significantly.
Recruitment publications and materials have been distributed nationally to Secondary Careers Advisers and
community groups.
Mäori and Pacific Peoples
The sole objective of both the Massey University 2007 Special Supplementary Grant (Mäori) and Special
Supplementary Grant (Pacific Peoples) was to increase the participation and achievement of Mäori and Pasifika
students. The Grants were used to provide programmes, services and projects specific to the academic needs of
Mäori and Pasifika students, in line with the Mä[email protected] Strategy and [email protected] Strategy.
112
STAFF
GOAL
To strengthen Massey University as an employer of choice for outstanding academic and general staff.
OBJECTIVES
•
To ensure the University has a culture that attracts and encourages staff, and appropriately values, recognises
and rewards quality performance by staff.
•
To provide development and support that enhances the effectiveness of staff, with students from diverse
cultural backgrounds and needs.
•
To ensure that the responsibilities of the University as an Equal Opportunities Employer are upheld.
•
To encourage staff to develop and maintain links within the University, and also regionally, nationally and
internationally, to enhance teaching, research, and student support services.
•
To value a collegial, devolved approach to decision-making thereby empowering members of the University
community to exercise initiative and responsibility for the development of plans and priorities.
•
To place a high priority on effective and efficient communication with staff in all colleges, campuses,
administrative and service divisions of the University.
PERFORMANCE 2007
Massey University is committed to providing a quality working environment and conditions that encourage all
staff to flourish. The destiny of the University will be determined by the leadership and achievements of our
academic and support staff. The quality and commitment of staff members are the basis of the quality of the
University’s qualifications and research outputs and the excellence of its teaching delivery. We are committed to
implementing future-focused professional development programmes for staff.
The University’s research capability continues to strengthen, and this is reflected in the qualification profile
of our academic staff. The percentage of Massey’s full-time equivalent academic staff holding a doctorate
qualification continues its upward trend and reached 63% (753) at the end of 2007 (up from 60% in 2006).
Initiatives outlined in the “Performance Indicator” section (see E1 below) continue to support the University’s T
& L and research plans and strengthen our staff profile.
The annual Vice-Chancellor’s Teaching Excellence Awards signify Massey’s ongoing commitment to recognising
excellence in teaching in a research-informed and research-led environment. In 2007, four staff were recognised
and awarded for their commitment to excellence in teaching. Two of these Massey awardees, Dr Bryan Walpert,
and Dr Tracy Riley, were nominated for National Teaching Excellence Awards for Sustained Excellence and won
awards. In the six years the national awards have been operating, nine Massey staff have won awards and Massey
is the most successful University in this area.
A new award was introduced by the Vice-Chancellor’s Executive Committee (VCEC) in 2006. This award is for
outstanding service and may be presented to any member of general staff who is deemed worthy of the honour.
In 2007, three staff members have been awarded the Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Outstanding Service. Please
see “Performance Indicators” below for further details.
From a staff development perspective, in 2007, 291 training and development courses were conducted, with 2,552
staff participating across all three campuses. The University also completed the development of a new leadership
programme and conducted nine sessions.
113
The Human Resource Information Systems (HRIS) project continued to progress during the year and reporting
has improved significantly, enabling implementation of a more comprehensive six-monthly management
reporting schedule. The security and integrity of staffing information has also been greatly enhanced.
In 2007 the quality of Massey staff has been further demonstrated by their external recognition in a number of
areas including, the following.
Dahlquist Prize Award
Professor Robert McLachlan, Institute of Fundamental Sciences, has been awarded the international Dahlquist
Prize by the Society for Industrial and Applied Maths, for his outstanding contribution to geometric integration
and composition methods, and the application of his work in many areas, including physics.
Thermo Fisher Scientific Award
Professor Peter Derrick, Institute of Fundamental Sciences, has been awarded the Thermo Fisher Scientific
Award from the Royal Society of Chemistry (UK) for his research on both fundamental and applied aspects of
mass spectrometry, including applications to biochemistry and medicine.
French Medal of Officer of the Legion of Honour
Emeritus Professor John Dunmore, retired Dean of Humanities, has become the first New Zealander ever to be
awarded the French medal of Officer of the Legion of Honour. Professor Dunmore was made a Knight of the
Legion of Honour in 1976, and an Officer of the Order of Academic Palms in 1986.
New Zealand Science and Technology Medal
Professor Andrew Brodie, Institute of Fundamental Sciences, has been awarded a New Zealand Science and
Technology Medal from the Royal Society of New Zealand for his “exceptional contributions to New Zealand
society and culture through activities in the broad fields of science, mathematics, social science and technology.”
J.C. Andrews Award
Professor Ray Winger, Institute of Food, Nutrition & Human Health, has received the prestigious J.C. Andrews
Award at the New Zealand Institute of Food Science and Technology’s award ceremony.
Shorland Medal
Professor David Parry, Institute of Fundamental Sciences, has been awarded the Shorland Medal by the New
Zealand Association of Scientists for his outstanding contribution to biophysics.
Researcher Exchange Programme Award
Dr Madhumita Bhattacharya, School of Curriculum and Pedagogy, is the inaugural New Zealand recipient of a
Researcher Exchange Programme Award from the British Council.
James Cook Research Fellowship
Professor David Lambert, Allan Wilson Centre for Molecular Ecology & Evolution, has been awarded a James
Cook Research Fellowship for sustained excellence in research from the Royal Society of New Zealand.
Selected speaker at the Such Anger, Such Danger: Passchendaele 1917 International Conference
Associate Director Glyn Harper, Director, Centre for Defence Studies, has been selected to speak at the Such
Anger, Such Danger: Passchendaele 1917 international conference being held in Belgium, featuring the world’s
foremost World War I authorities.
114
Property Institute of New Zealand’s Academic Award
Mrs Iona McCarthy, Department of Finance, Property & Banking, won the Property Institute of New Zealand’s
Academic Award for 2007.
Elizabeth Ellen Dalton Award
Dr Aaron Marshall, Postdoctoral Fellow, Institute of Technology & Engineering, was first of three winners of the
Elizabeth Ellen Dalton Award, which recognises emerging leaders in research and science.
Public Relations Institute of New Zealand (PRINZ) Fellowship
Associate Professor Margie Comrie, Department of Communication and Journalism, was awarded a Public
Relations Institute of New Zealand (PRINZ) fellowship, in recognition of her contribution to the New Zealand
PR industry.
Fellow of the National Public Relations Institute
Associate Professor Margie Comrie, Department of Communication and Journalism, has been inducted as a
Fellow of the national Public Relations Institute, in recognition of significant contribution to the industry.
McKenzie Award
The late Professor Roy Nash, previously of the Department of Social and Policy Studies in Education, has been
posthumously awarded the McKenzie Award for educational research: awarded by the New Zealand Association
for Research in Education.
Contribution to Research of Sociology of Education
Citation: Professor Roy Nash, previously of Massey University, made a contribution to research in the broad area
of sociology of education that is unparalleled in New Zealand, and of the highest standing in the international
arena.
Academic Research Prize Award
Professor Andrew Brodie and Associate Professor Eric Ainscough, Institute of Fundamental Sciences, have been
jointly awarded the Academic Research Prize for excellence in research in chemical sciences: awarded by the
New Zealand Institute of Chemistry.
Citation Prize Award
Citation: This Prize has been jointly awarded to Andrew Brodie and Eric Ainscough from Massey University for
their research into the chemistry of the transition metals.
Fellow to the Royal Society of New Zealand
•
Professor Peter Lockhart, Institute of Molecular Biosciences and the Allan Wilson Centre for Molecular
Ecology and Evolution, has been elected as a Fellow to the Royal Society of New Zealand.
•
Professor Paul Rainey, New Zealand Institute of Advanced Studies, has been elected as a Fellow to the Royal
Society of New Zealand.
115
Performance Indicators
Target 2007:
Outcome/Progress 2007:
E1
Pursue targeted staff
Achieved
profiles by college and
Highlights:
campus over the planning
The Human Resources section completed the development of targeted
period to align with T & L
performance standards for all new employees.
and research plans through
recruitment and retention
strategies.
In the colleges, appropriate staffing profiles have been considered and
followed through where possible.
The implementation of College Research Management Plans has been
the key driver for improving the numbers and quality of research-active
staff. The improvement of the quality evaluation score of Massey staff
contributed to an increase of the Performance Based Research Fund
funding in 2007.
E2
Continue the Advance
Not achieved
Degree Award fund to
This is now under review and may be changed in order to more
assist staff to complete
effectively achieve goals set out on the University’s Strategic Policy on
research qualifications with
Research Capability and associated College Research Management
a view to increasing the
Plans.
proportion of staff who are
doctorally qualified or hold
an appropriate terminal
degree for the discipline.
E3
Continue to develop and
Achieved – ongoing
run staff development
CADeL is refocusing its efforts to support goals in the investment
programmes in key
plan related to staff development, and is concentrating its efforts on
areas of strategic priority
engaging with colleges, schools/departments and work groups to
for the University; i.e.
achieve them.
increasing the proportion
of doctorally qualified
staff, particularly on
the Wellington campus,
Five staff on the Wellington Campus received an Advanced Degree
Award so they could progress their studies at masters or doctoral levels.
Also see response to B20 in the “Teaching & Learning” section.
achieving a high level
of research-active staff,
increasing teaching
skills including on-line
capability, best practices in
tertiary assessment, Treaty
of Waitangi and leadership
and management training.
116
E4
Increase the proportion
Not achieved
of Mäori staff over the
While some sections of the University have maintained Mäori staff
planning period.
numbers, others have experienced a decline, largely due to a decrease
in the number of academic staff following a previous voluntary
resignation scheme. There have also been difficulties in appointing
suitably qualified Mäori staff in recent years.
E5
Develop and implement
Partially achieved – ongoing
a management capability
Highlights:
strategy to ensure capability
As part of Management Capability Strategy, new leadership
and capacity of the
programmes were developed and delivered to staff across three
University’s leadership and
campuses in 2007.
management is maintained
and enhanced.
E6
A discussion paper was developed on management remuneration
issues.
Utilise the results of
Achieved – ongoing
periodic satisfaction
Staff satisfaction surveys did not take place in 2007, but they are
surveys to identify needed
scheduled to run in 2008 for both general and academic staff.
changes to enhance the
workplace environment in
various units and across the
University.
E7
Continue to monitor
Achieved – ongoing
the application of staff
Highlights:
workloads policy and
The University Workloads Policy is scheduled for review in 2008.
practice on an ongoing
basis.
E8
Continue to promote
Achieved – ongoing
the University’s web-site
as a tool for effective
communication to, and
information resource for,
staff and management.
E9
Continue development
Achieved
and implementation of the
The Performance Scorecard has been incorporated in the consolidated
Performance Scorecard
performance and risk reporting system.
programme to provide
regular relevant feedback
to staff and managers.
117
E10
Continue commitment to
Achieved – ongoing
performance review and
planning process as one
mechanism for effective
staff development and for
developing performance
expectations.
E11
Pursue prestigious
Achieved
international visitors and
Highlights:
post-doctoral fellowships in
Massey University hosted numerous international visits from institutions
areas of strategic priority.
and individual academics in 2007 across three campuses. These
included:
•
Institute National Polytechnique de Toulouse
•
a group of senior administrators from Sichuan Province China;
Nanjing University of Technology (China); Peking and other
Chinese Universities in relation to distance education
•
MOE International Education Counsellors for South East Asia and
Middle East; Clarkson University (USA).
Associate Professor Glenda Anthony was successful in winning a postdoctoral fellowship in mathematics education.
E12
Continue to recognise
Achieved
outstanding University
Highlights:
teachers through
The establishment of the Vice-Chancellor’s Teaching Excellence
nominations to the
Awards and their linkage with the National Tertiary Teaching
Tertiary Teaching
Excellence Awards has been a major success and continues to showcase
Excellence Awards,
Massey University’s commitment to teaching excellence. In the six
the Vice-Chancellor’s
years the national awards have been operating, nine Massey staff have
Awards for Excellence
won awards and Massey is the most successful University in this area.
in University Teaching
and in recognition for
outstanding research-led
teaching in the annual
The recipients of the Vice-Chancellor’s Teaching Excellence Awards
2007 are as follows:
•
Dr Bryan Walpert from the School of English and Media Studies for
Sustained Excellence in Teaching
promotions round.
•
Dr Tracy Riley from the School of Curriculum and Pedagogy for
Sustained Excellence in Teaching
•
Dr Andrew Martin from the Department of Management for
Sustained Excellence in Teaching
•
Dr Sharon Stevens from the School of English and Media Studies
for Excellence First Year Teaching.
Two of these Massey awardees, Dr Bryan Walpert and Dr Tracy Riley,
were nominated for National Teaching Excellence Awards for Sustained
Excellence 2007 and won awards.
Also see response to B20 in the “Teaching & Learning” section.
118
E13
Continue to recognise
Achieved – ongoing
outstanding staff
performance through
awards, such as conferencerelated travel (at least
two per college and
20 annually), and
further development
opportunities.
E14-1
Strengthen the University’s
Achieved
Human Resources
Highlights:
performance reporting
HRIS reporting has improved markedly in 2007 with a comprehensive
capability by: complete
six-monthly reporting schedule to managers and Council. In addition,
implementation of the
ad hoc reports are regularly produced for management.
University’s HRIS Project;
E14-2
Strengthen the University’s
Achieved
Human Resources
Highlights:
performance reporting
The HRIS project has greatly enhanced the security and integrity of
capability by: continuing
staffing information. Continuous improvements will take place in 2008,
to develop reporting
and regular management reports will be produced through the staff
capability and data storage
portal.
integrity of staffing
information.
E14-3
Strengthen the
Partially achieved
University’s Human
While a datamart is yet to be developed, the current reporting system
Resources performance
is able to integrate information across a number of HR databases and
reporting capability by:
generate reports required by the management.
developing a datamart
that enables Human
Resources reporting which
integrates information
from a number of Human
Resources databases.
E15
Continue to review and
Achieved – ongoing
develop the University’s
The HRIS system will continue to be developed in 2008.
Human Resource systems
and processes, including
payroll, as appropriate.
119
Performance Measures
Target
2007
Staff PRP (Performance Review & Planning) Completion (% of FTE – Full-time Equivalent)
Leadership and Management Training (Hours)
Training and Development Courses (Number of) *
Training and Development Participants (Number of)
Actual
2007
Actual
2006
87%
79%
78%
40
27
21
593
291
426
5,105
2,552
4,007
Note: The above are courses and participants in training offered by the Training & Development Unit,
Information Technology section, and Human Resources section (Health and Safety courses). The lower number
of courses in 2007 is largely due to the newly employed consultancy approach by working with small groups of
staff, and this involvement was not recorded.
Pasifika Representation Amongst Staff (Number of FTE)
38
Target
2007
29
Actual
2007
28
Actual
2006
Gender Balance Amongst Staff (%)
(a) Female Academic Staff
College of Business
35%
37%
36%
College of Creative Arts
50%
45%
44%
College of Education
73%
70%
68%
College of Humanities & Social Sciences
56%
59%
58%
College of Sciences
24%
27%
25%
College of Business
36%
43%
42%
College of Creative Arts
24%
34%
31%
College of Education
54%
64%
62%
College of Humanities & Social Sciences
51%
42%
45%
College of Sciences
48%
36%
39%
(b) Female Academic Staff at Senior Lecturer Level and Above (%)
FTE Academic Staff with a Doctorate (% Full-time Equivalent)
Target
2007
Actual
2007
Actual
2006
College of Business
48%
59%
50%
College of Education
40%
46%
42%
College of Humanities & Social Sciences
66%
65%
64%
College of Sciences
73%
76%
78%
57%
47%
49%
FTE Academic Staff with a Masterate and a Doctorate (Terminal qualification) (% full-time equivalent)
College of Creative Arts
Note: The above staffing statistics are based on data as a snapshot at 31 December 2007, and for permanent and
fixed-term staff only.
120
Equity of Employment Opportunities – Policy Statement
Massey University is committed to upholding its responsibilities as an Equal Opportunities Employer and
creating a workplace that attracts, retains and values diverse employees. To achieve this policy objective Massey
University will:
(a) provide equal opportunities for recruitment, appointment, development and promotion for all current
and prospective employees, regardless of sex, marital status, religious belief, colour, race, ethnic or national
origin, disability, age, political opinion, employment status, family status or sexual orientation
(b) develop and maintain a workplace culture that values and supports diversity
(c) ensure that it provides a safe, supportive and healthy environment for all employees that is conducive to
quality teaching, research and community service
(d) identify and eliminate all aspects of policies and procedures and other institutional barriers that cause or
perpetuate inequality in respect of the employment of any person or group of persons
(e) not tolerate any form of unfair discrimination in the workplace on any ground, including sex, marital status,
religious belief, colour, race, ethnic or national origin, disability, age, political opinion, employment status,
family status or sexual orientation
(f) promote equal employment opportunities as an integral part of University policies and practices
(g) monitor, review and evaluate progress towards achieving equal employment opportunities.
121
THE UNIVERSITY AND THE WIDER COMMUNITY
GOAL
To be an integral, respected and favoured part of our core communities through our role as a creator and
repository of knowledge, a critic and conscience of society, a guardian of culture and a source of expertise and
advice.
OBJECTIVES
•
To contribute to informed/intellectual debate in the wider community.
•
To serve and inform our core communities and be an integral part of those communities.
•
To strengthen links with the University’s graduates, particularly through the Alumni and Friends networks,
recognising them, together with our current students and their families, as our primary ambassadors within
the wider community.
•
To elevate public awareness of the pivotal role Massey University can and does play toward New Zealand’s
economic, social and cultural advancement.
•
To develop and strengthen links with industry and the arts, professional and other sector groups, schools
and other educational institutions, in a systematic manner and to mutual advantage.
•
To develop effective systems to support our interaction with the wider community, particularly in the areas
of government relations, relationship management and public affairs.
•
To play a constructive part in the development and promotion of environmental awareness and best
management practices in the wider community.
PERFORMANCE 2007
In 2007 the University continued to strengthen its connections with its regional and national communities.
The University engaged proactively through formal and informal channels on issues of importance to
New Zealand, and particularly on issues facing the tertiary education sector including: delivery of distance
qualifications, graduate destinations, graduating standards for teachers, whänau development, the provision of
tertiary education in the Auckland region and student support. Individual staff members also made significant
contributions to their respective fields, such as Professor Ian Warrington who was re-elected as the Vice-President
of the International Society of Horticulture.
Commercialisation and business incubators remain a crucial channel to facilitate access to research outcomes.
In Auckland the e-centre incubator company Esphion developed a commercial partnership with CMC Ltd in
India to launch the CMC Technology Export Centre, while the number of businesses in the Palmerston North
BioCommerce Centre increased markedly over the year.
Schools are a key stakeholder in our communities and engagement was enhanced throughout the year via
careers advice days and seminars, open days (which attracted over 4,000 visitors over the three campuses),
scholarship awards ceremonies (including the awarding of 150 High Achiever Scholarships to Year 13 students
across the country), and lecture series targeted at secondary school students. The University continued to
build its relationship with other tertiary providers. For example, the Deputy Vice-Chancellor engaged with the
University of Auckland, Auckland Univeristy of Technology, NorthTec, Manukau Institute of Technology and
the Tertiary Education Commission to discuss the provision of tertiary education in the Auckland region, the
Wellington campus continues to be a key driver of the Wellington education cluster, while in Palmerston North
the University continues to work with the local polytechnic, UCOL, and the city council to promote the city as a
desirable student destination.
122
Each campus illustrated its commitment to its communities through key sponsorships aligned with the
University’s research and teaching strengths. In Auckland these included sponsorship of the North Harbour
sports awards and the National Sponsorship Awards, while in Palmerston North the campus was closely linked to
the internationally acclaimed Da Vinci Machines exhibition at Te Manawa, and the University was showcased as
a major player in the region at the Manawatu Business Awards. Formal links were formed with the North Shore,
Rodney and Waitakere Councils and the Wellington Regional Economic Development agency.
Links between Pasifika students and the University were strengthened with the opening of the new Pasifika
Learning Centre at the Wellington campus, while the Wellington Te Kaiwawao set up a Kaumätua Advisory
Group to work with the campus and developed a working relationship with Mäori service providers in
Wellington.
The dissemination and communication of research with direct relevance to our communities continues to be a
primary focus. This was achieved through multiple channels and media, including through numerous public
research seminars on topics as diverse as education, literacy, public health and diabetes, through to small and
medium-sized business, Mäori development, to war-fighting.
Significant media and public interest was generated in a wide variety of research, from social sciences and
information relating to public health, to our traditional areas of knowledge generation – the land-based
industries.
Highlights included research by the Department of Communication and Journalism that found poor health
during childhood is the number one impediment to literacy, while having friends and doing lots of physical
activity were highlighted as enhancing boys’ academic success by College of Education lecturer Michael Irwin.
College of Education Pro Vice-Chancellor Professor James Chapman responded to growing interest in
educational achievement and called for research into why men are not entering the teaching profession and why
the gap between male and female educational achievement in New Zealand is among the world’s largest. A study
of the cells of 50 nuclear test veterans by Dr Al Rowland, Institute of Molecular Biosciences, which confirmed the
veterans suffered genetic damaged as a result of radiation, attracted international interest as did a report from
the Centre for Social and Health Outcomes Research and Evaluation that showed methamphetamine remains
widely available but middle-class users may be turning away from the drug.
Research into the commercial potential of taewa, Mäori potatoes, led by Nick Roskruge involved 35 schools
across the country, and a study into school lunches that found only one in ten lunch boxes contains food that
meets nutritional guidelines of children and that 80% of food that is thrown away is the healthy sandwiches and
fruit, resonated with parents and schools across the country.
Our ability to meet industry needs was exemplified by the development of an automated kiwifruit packing system
by Dr Rory Flemmer for Zespri, which may solve the labour shortage problems faced by the industry and ensure
consumers receive fruit exactly to their requirements, every time; by the creation of a “virtual teacher” by Dr
Hossein Sarrafzadah and the Institute of Information and Mathematical Sciences, which can adapt its response
to the emotional state and reactions of those at the keyboard of whom it is teaching; while an Internet search
engine design by digital media specialist Mark Zeman was voted one of the world’s top 100 alternative search
engines.
More than 10 years of research funded by the Foundation for Research, Science and Technology resulted in
breakthrough solar cell technology, and the opening of a factory by Speirs Nutritionals in Marton brought
the omega-3 technology developed by the Riddet Centre closer to market. In other areas researchers were
finding solutions to everyday problems, such as the sports science researchers at Auckland who developed a tiny
ingestible capsule capable of measuring core body temperature, and an accelerated lambing programme which
123
found year–round lambing can work. The eruption of Mt Ruapehu enabled Dr Shane Cronin and his students to
gather data to enhance their predictive models of eruptions.
Our ability to generate knowledge that contributes to New Zealand’s economic, social and cultural advancement
continues to be recognised externally through government and other grants. The University-based Riddet
Centre, a research cluster focused on functional foods, became the country’s latest Centre for Research
Excellence, and the University’s second. The Government pledged to contribute over $11 million to the New
Zealand School of Music for a purpose-built home in Wellington, and the Health Research Council awarded $5.6
million for a range of public health research – a key University strength – ranging from Mäori and children’s
health, spinal cord injury, sleep and mental health, to eukaryotic signature proteins. Two social research projects
focusing on improving living standards and work opportunities for New Zealanders received nearly $7 million
in funding from the Foundation for Research, Science and Technology, while an international study led by the
Centre of Public Health Research was awarded $140,000 from the United States National Institutes of Health to
investigate risk factors of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma.
Many staff were recognised externally for their contributions to the wider community. A sample of this
significant recognition included: Professor Robert Anderson, Professor David Parry, Dr Farah Palmer, Professor
David Mellor and Emeritus Professor John Codd, who were honoured in the Queen’s Birthday honours;
Professor Tony Vitalis, who was honoured by the New Zealand Ergonomics Society for his services to the
advancement of ergonomics; Professor Robert McLachlan, who was awarded the prestigious Dahlquist prize; and
Professor Peter Lockhart and Professor Paul Rainey, who were elected as fellows of the Academy of the Royal
Society.
The University also recognised those in its community who make or have made significant contributions:
Richard Taylor, Weta Workshop; New York-based designer Rebecca Taylor; and sculptor filmmaker Len Lye
(posthumously) became the inaugural inductees into the College of Creative Arts Hall of fame; Tuwharetoa
chief Tumu te Heuheu received an honorary doctorate at a special ceremony at Waihi; New Zealand Olympic
legend Dr Peter Snell was awarded an honorary doctorate in Palmerston North; while sculptor Paul Dibble was
recognised for his contribution to the arts.
An important group with whom we maintain a close relationship is our alumni. We do this via three main
channels – the network of alumni chapters across the country and overseas, the Massey University Foundation,
and through direct communication. In 2007 the network of regional chapters in Auckland, Palmerston North
and Wellington further expanded into Hawke’s Bay and Christchurch. These chapters focus on the specific
interests, disciplines year groups, colleges and interests of the alumni residing in those regions. During the
year each chaptered engaged in a range of activities, including evening functions, lectures, celebrations and
discussions on fundraising, enabling our alumni to retain their close relationship with their university. The
network of international chapters was also furthered during 2007 and there are now active chapters in Malaysia,
Singapore and Thailand, with interest from groups to form chapters in China, India, the United States and
Korea. A wide range of specific groups such as veterinarians, agriculture graduates, journalists, teachers and
rugby players gathered over the year, assisted or facilitated by the alumni office.
Direct communication with our alumni was enhanced in 2007 with the introduction of email newsletters
containing information of interest about the university and regional chapter activities, continued improvement
to the Alumni and Development web-site, refinement of the database and the range of apparel and memorabilia,
as well as development of affinity incentives for former students. MASSEY magazine, which features successful
alumni, was found to be well received by alumni in a readership survey.
The Massey University Foundation built on the successes achieved in 2006 and towards its aim of enabling
excellence in the delivery of teaching and research at the University. As well as its significant fundraising
124
activities, the foundation undertakes to facilitate visits to the University of significant international leaders. In
2007 the Foundation organised and obtained funding to support visits from Dr Peter Snell, who returned to
continue his work with the Institute of Food, Nutrition and Human Health, and to receive an honorary doctorate
from the University. The Foundation enabled international curator Claire Doherty to visit Wellington to initiate
work with Litmus, a research centre in the School of Fine Arts, on the development of contemporary, situational
art. “One Day Sculpture”, a project unlike any historical or existing concept staged before in New Zealand, will
be a cumulative series of up to 20 place-responsive artworks realised in locations across New Zealand, starting in
mid-2008.
The Foundation also supported the activities of the Equine Trust, the New Zealand Wildlife Health Centre Trust,
and a series of reading clinics run by Professor Tom Nicholson, from the Centre of Excellence for Research on
Children’s Literacy, in Auckland primary schools. The Foundation supported the activities of the Alistair Betts
Memorial Trust for Agribusiness Excellence seminar series, including a competition for emerging marketers.
Carol O’Sullivan, Grower Liaison Manager, Zespri International Limited, was selected from 38 entrants to
attend the Advanced Marketing Management Programme at the China Europe International Business School in
Shanghai, China, in August 2007.
Performance Indicators
Target 2007:
Outcome/Progress 2007:
F1
Continue to deliver
Achieved
public seminars and
Numerous public seminars were held. These were attended and
hold industry-relevant
participated in by staff, students, industry representatives and the wider
conferences in all colleges
public.
(at least one per college
annually and a total of 10
annually).
Highlights:
Massey University’s inaugural Creative Arts Festival, Blow, was launched
on 2 November 2007. Blow Nga hau e wha (which means four winds)
started with the induction of five alumni into a new College of Creative
Arts Hall of Fame. The hall will recognise students and staff who have,
through art and design, made an outstanding contribution to the
national economy or identity. The Hall of Fame will have a physical
presence in the College’s home, the Museum Building in Buckle
Street. The inaugural inductees were Richard Taylor, Director of
Weta Workshop; New York-based fashion designer Rebecca Taylor; and
(posthumously) sculptor and film maker Len Lye.
A very successful postgraduate workshop was held in Palmerston North
in October 2007 by the College of Education.
In Auckland, the School of Education held a research seminar
series for the public. The seminar series focused on topical issues in
education such as literacy and boys’ educational achievement.
125
Conferences and seminars held during 2007 by the College of
Humanities and Social Sciences included:
F2
•
Insulin Resistance, Diabetes & Vulnerable Populations conference
•
[email protected] conference
•
Summer Shakespeare
•
Literary Evenings Research Series at PN Public Library
•
War-fighting in a Contemporary Environment conference.
Continue to respond
Achieved – ongoing
critically to governmental
Highlights:
and other education-
The University engaged proactively through various formal and
related policy initiatives
informal mechanisms, in response to consultation opportunities, and
through submissions,
through collaborative advocacy (in conjunction with the New Zealand
media releases,
Vice-Chancellors’ Committee), with appropriate government Ministers,
presentations, publications
government departments and funding bodies on policies relating to
and collaborative advocacy
the tertiary education sector, universities, research and scholarship.
based on research and
Examples are given below.
scholarship.
Submissions from the DVC (Academic & Research) were made on a
number of items including:
•
Ministry of Education – Partially Delivered Distance Qualifications
•
Tertiary Education Commission – Data Quality Exercise and the
Future of Short Awards
•
NZQA – Review of NZQA Unit Standards in Open and Distance
Learning
•
NZVCC – Future of the Graduate Destination Survey and the
Records Survey
•
Committee for University Academic Programmes – Register
Outcome Statements.
Submissions were made by staff from the College of Education to the
Teachers Council regarding graduating standards for teachers.
College staff contributed regularly to policy and opinion articles in the
Education Review.
Professor Bill Tunmer was an expert member of a Ministry of Education
Literacy Advisory Group.
Professor James Chapman is a member of the New Zealand Council of
Deans of Education, which lobbies government on matters relating to
pre-service and in-service teacher education.
DVC (Mäori) offered advice to Te Puni Kökiri in relation to whänau
development and Mäori Futures, to the Ministry of Education and to
the Families Commission.
126
DVC (Mäori) continued participation in Te Kahui Amokura and
coordination of Manu Ao, a project to build capacity with Mäori
academic staff across all universities.
The DVC (Auckland & International) contributed to a variety of
government submissions and activities:
•
by leading Massey’s engagement in discussions with the Tertiary
Education Commission, the University of Auckland, Auckland
University of Technology, NorthTec, Unitec, and Manukau Institute
of Technology in relation to (a) integration of provision of tertiary
education in the Auckland region, and (b) future trades and
vocational tertiary education provision in the north and north west
sectors of Auckland
•
as a member of Connect New Zealand Board of Trustees
•
as a Director of Committee for Auckland Ltd and a member of the
Auckland Plus Skills Leadership Group.
Regional Registrar Student Life was appointed as an NZVCC
representative on the cross-agency (Ministry of Education, Inland
Revenue and Ministry for Social Development) General Student
Support National Sector Group.
The DVC (Palmerston North) was re-elected as Vice President of the
International Society of Horticultural Science.
The DVC (Palmerston North) delivered a number of invited
addresses on horticultural education and research at overseas
institutions, including a presentation on the New Zealand perspective
at the “Climate Change and the UK Rural Economy: Impacts and
Opportunities” workshop at St George’s House, Windsor Castle, UK, in
November 2007.
F3
Progress community
Achieved – ongoing
business incubator
Highlights:
initiatives.
The e-centre company, Esphion Ltd. developed its commercial
partnership with CMC Ltd. in India, and launched the CMC
Technology Export Centre (CMCTEC) sponsored by CMC Ltd. A
number of New Zealand high technology companies are now engaged
through CMCTEC to develop channels to market in India.
The Palmerston North campus continues to support the BioCommerce
Centre. The number of businesses incubating in the Centre, including
several from Massey University, increased markedly during the year.
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F4
Establish Massey
Partially achieved – ongoing
University as a premier
Commercialisation has been reconstituted under Research
centre of expertise in
Management Services (RMS).
commercialisation over
the planning period and
in particular conclude one
to three commercialisation
of intellectual property
initiatives per annum.
F5
Grow participation in the
Achieved – ongoing
Technology for Industry
Fellowship programmes.
F6
Strengthen links with
Achieved – ongoing
schools and continue to
Comprehensive careers and recruitment seminars, were delivered.
promote open days and
Open days were held successfully on each of the University’s campuses.
seminars for prospective
secondary school students
and teachers, and where
appropriate, the general
public in all regions.
Highlights:
There was high attendance at open days with over 1,400 visitors
attending the event held in the Wellington campus and over 1,500 in
the Palmerston North campus.
Massey University was a major sponsor of the internationally acclaimed
Da Vinci Machines exhibition at Te Manawa. This exhibition provided
an excellent opportunity for the university to link with its community,
and particularly with local schools.
The offer of 150 Massey High Achiever Scholarships (Academic, Art or
Sport) to secondary schools students lifted the profile of Massey.
This year’s graduation ceremonies at Palmerston North saw honorary
doctorates conferred upon Dr Peter Snell, Paul Dibble and Tumu Te
Heuheu. Dr Snell delivered a free public lecture during Graduation
Week, May 2007.
The DVC (Auckland & International), the Regional Registrar, the PVC
and staff of the College of Business, and other staff visited schools in
Auckland this year, in particular to present Massey academic excellence
and top achiever awards.
The 21st Century Career Pathways in Technology led by Professor Ian
Maddox was an outstanding success again in 2007. It has engaged most
schools on the North Shore.
The School of Fine Arts held its third Fine Art workshop weekend for
fine art and photography students in the Wellington and lower North
Island region.
The DVC (Wellington) lecture series, showcasing leading campus
researchers, attracted audiences of up to 200 at each lecture.
128
F7
Continue to use print and
Achieved – ongoing
electronic publications to
Highlights:
increase public awareness
The reputation of the University was further enhanced through
of Massey University’s
national and international media cover of research and staff
educational, scientific and
achievements achieved by the Communications staff.
cultural developments
and its contribution to the
nation.
Distribution of Massey News continues to increase.
The uptake of media and news releases distributed by the
Communications group increased.
Media continue to choose Massey staff as expert commentators.
A Massey News readership survey found staff and external readers
generally pleased with the content and delivery of the publication.
Hits on the Massey News website continued to increase. The site was
further enhanced with video content and improved capability.
F8
Continue to support
Achieved – ongoing
regionally based advisory
Highlights:
boards and reference
Relationships with Mäori and Pasifika communities and local industry
groups to strengthen
have been maintained.
our relationships with
industry, mana, whänau,
hapü, iwi and other Mäori
organisations and local
Links between Pasifika students and the University were strengthened
with the opening of a new Pasifika Learning Centre at the Wellington
campus in February.
communities and our
The Te Kaiwawao set up a Kaumätua Advisory Group and developed a
understanding of their
working relationship with Mäori service providers in Wellington.
needs. (Also see C12, C18,
DVC (Palmerston North) is a member of the following industry-related
C19 and C20.)
boards:
•
BioCommerce Centre
•
Vision Manawatu Trustee
•
Manfield Park Trust Board.
The Auckland Regional Advisory Board met on three occasions and
presented a report on the future strategic direction of the campus to
VCEC and to Council in April 2007.
F9
Continue to develop
Achieved – ongoing
collaborative relationships
Highlights:
with other tertiary
The DVC (Wellington) and Director Strategy and Projects (DSP)
providers. (See also B9.)
continued to participate in the Tertiary Education Cluster, and the DSP
contributed to the regional training strategy developed by Whitireia
and Weltec.
Student City projects in Palmerston North were embraced by the
tertiary sector, Palmerston North City Council (PNCC), and local
businesses.
129
The University’s collaboration with International Pacific College,
and UCOL has been coordinated through the Integrated Education
Guardian Group, which is part of Vision Manawatu.
The DVC (Auckland & international) led Massey’s engagement in
discussions with the Tertiary Education Commission, the University of
Auckland, Auckland University of Technology, NorthTec, Unitec, and
Manuakau Institute of Technology in relation to (a) integration of
provision of tertiary education in the Auckland region, and (b) future
trades and vocational tertiary education provision in the north and
northwest sectors of Auckland.
F10
Extend linkages with
Achieved
our alumni by way of
Alumni magazine Massey was found to be well received by readers in a
activities, functions and
readership survey.
communications over the
planning period.
Email newsletters to alumni were launched and the website was
enhanced.
Regional alumni chapters held a variety of network meetings
throughout the year, bringing together alumni to network and keep in
touch with their university.
F11
Continue to develop
Achieved
strategic relationships
Highlights:
with key business, central/
In the Wellington region:
local government and
The Director of Strategy & Projects contributed to a joint working
community organisations
meeting of strategy planners from public tertiary institutions and all
in the regions.
local authorities.
The Wellington campus enjoys a good relationship with the Wellington
Regional Economic Development Agency (REDA), which has replaced
Positively Wellington Business.
The Te Kaiwawao has strengthened relationships with Te Puni Kökiri,
the Wellington Tenths Trust, Parliamentary Mäori Services, the Mäori
Language Commission, Wellington City Council Mäori Services and NZ
Translators and Interpreters’ Society.
The School of Fine Arts has established important relationships
with the Wellington City Council, Art in Public Places Fund with the
Wellington City Art Gallery, Te Papa, Adam Art Gallery and the Dowse
museum. The school has a strategic partnership with the Thorndon
Trust and is currently undergoing research projects with the Goethe
Institute and British Council as well as the Wellington International
Festival 2008.
Community organisations including Te Papa, the Dowse, and Pataka
have all been engaged in initial discussion concerning the development
of the School of Visual and Material Culture.
130
Ross Hemera, Kaiwhakaahu and member of the senior management
team, was appointed to the TEC, PBRF panel for Mäori Knowledge and
Development.
The College of Humanities and Social Sciences co-hosted the
Warfighting in a Contemporary Environment Conference with the New
Zealand Army.
Relationships were maintained and developed with Ministry of
Education, TEC and the central government.
In the Palmerston North region:
Relationship development with the International Pacific College was
extended through their proposed use of the Massey Sport and Rugby
Institute for an annual squad of élite student athletes. The first such
visit was hosted in August/September 2007.
Regular meetings were held with the Chief Executive and senior staff
from the PNCC, and Massey senior regional managers.
Engagement with the Fitzherbert Science Centre (FSC) entities has
occurred, in part, though the Bio-Commerce Centre, and through the
regular liaison meeting among all FSC parties.
The Massey Hill Beautification project (a University partnership with
Horizons Regional Council, PNCC and the Trustees of Fergusson Hall)
has made good progress in the control of invasive weeds and landscape
planting on Tennent Drive. Some 6,000 new trees have been planted,
which will enhance this “gateway” landmark at the southern access to
Palmerston North city.
Massey University was a major sponsor of the internationally acclaimed
Da Vinci Machines exhibition at Te Manawa. This exhibition provided
an excellent opportunity for the University to link with its community
and particularly with local schools.
Massey University was the focus for 2007 in the Manawatu Standard
Business Award.
Massey continues its successful cooperative relationship with Horizons
Regional Council, PNCC, Transit and Land Transport New Zealand
arising from the unlimited access bus scheme (free buses). The free
bus initiative received a “highly commended” award in the Energy
Efficiency Conservation Authority Energywise Awards. Support was also
provided to a number of trusts and boards in the region, including:
•
Manfeild Park Trust
•
Science Centre Trust
•
Camellia Trust
•
Sir Victor Davies Trust
•
Massey University Property Foundation Trust
•
Export Education Advisory Board
•
Vision Manawatu Principal Funders
•
Fergusson Hall Board of Trustees.
131
In the Auckland region:
The University has developed two memoranda of understanding: one
with North Shore City Council and Rodney District Council and the
other with Enterprise North Shore.
The E-Centre continues to develop its relationships with the business
community through hosted events on campus such as the North Shore
ICT cluster and Connect New Zealand.
Auckland campus continues to work with Smales Technology Farm
through regular meetings and the provision of the Careers Partnership
programme.
Relationships continue to be strengthened, especially in the area
of literacy, with financial support from the private sector for the
development of remedial reading clinics in the Auckland region. In
addition, there are strong links between some college staff and the
Specific Learning Disabilities Association (SPELD).
F12
Promote and support the
Achieved – ongoing
dissemination of applied
Highlights:
knowledge to industry
The Centre for Research Excellence in Children’s Literacy will inform
and commerce through
practitioners about contemporary methods for improving literacy
the encouragement
learning outcomes in schools.
of consulting business
contracts and revenueearning opportunities
by colleges and research
centres.
Other highlights of initiatives focused
Massey University is one of seven New Zealand universities which have
on the University and the wider
collaborated to develop a new national vacancies web-site for students,
community
graduates and employers (www.nzunicareerhub.ac.nz).
The New Zealand School of Music, a collaboration between Victoria
and Massey Universities, will receive a one-off capital injection of up to
$11.15 million to establish a purpose-built facility in Wellington. The
funding was announced at the School’s inaugural graduation ceremony
in late May by the Tertiary Education Minister, the Hon. Dr Michael
Cullen, and is contingent on a new business case and performance
commitments.
Massey University and UCOL (Universal College of Learning),
Manawatu’s two main tertiary providers, joined forces to give their top
business students closer contact with the business sector. Working with
Vision Manawatu, from July they started business breakfasts, held in
Palmerston North, bringing together students, academics and members
of the business community.
132
The Hulme F1 Concept Supercar, which Massey University was involved
in designing, was invited and sponsored to be part of a design exposure
in the Middle East in June 2007. There were only two cars used – the
Hulme and a car from Italy by Fiorvanti. This provided an opportunity
to raise the international profile of the School of Design and our
engineering students.
2007 New Years Honours and Queen’s Birthday Honours were received
by many Massey staff (current and past) and alumni.
Performance Measures
Target
2007
Courses Offered in Summer Session/Semester Three (Number of)
Actual
2007
263
Target
2007
Research Output Communications (Number of)
Total
Auckland Region
Palmerston North Region
Wellington Region
Actual
2007
Auckland Region
Palmerston North Region
Wellington Region
University wide
Academic Qualifications Offered in Partnership with Other Organisations (Number of)
133
Actual
2006
2,820
2,505
550
630
651
1,600
1,350
1,002
600
450
551
390
301
Target
2007
Total
307
2,750
University wide
Community Communications on Environmental Issues (Number of)
210
Actual
2006
Actual
2007
Actual
2006
2,150
1,860
1,743
700
630
334
1,000
690
870
450
300
278
-
240
261
17
19
20
INTERNATIONALISATION
GOALS
1.
To pursue increased internationalisation and advance Massey University’s standing in the international
community.
2.
To emphasise and enhance Massey University’s presence in the Asia–Pacific region and to strengthen
relationships with Pacific nations and peoples.
OBJECTIVES
•
To value the different contributions that international staff and students make with reference to building
international awareness and goodwill, contribution to scholarship, and involvement in the life of the wider
community.
•
To foster well-chosen international alliances, partnerships and joint ventures.
•
To ensure that all subjects and programmes, regardless of the campus or mode of delivery, provide students
with access to an education of international standard (and, where appropriate, with specific international
accreditation), that will prepare students for life and work within the global community.
•
To increase the opportunities for the University’s students to study overseas and to interact with students
from other countries.
•
To continue to internationalise research activities by forging international linkages and by achieving further
international recognition for research quality.
•
To ensure that international students at Massey University are well supported and that campus life is
reflective of international cultures and values.
•
To develop effective and appropriate international enrolment and programme delivery opportunities in
order to enhance the reputation and strengthen the resources and capacity of the University.
•
To increase the relevance of the University’s teaching and research for the peoples of the Pacific region.
PERFORMANCE 2007
Massey University’s international operations matured further in 2007, with several new agreements for
relationship-based recruitment of groups of international students, further diversification of our international
student market, hosting of a number of prominent academics from overseas universities, ongoing growth in
Study Abroad and Exchange Student enrolments, developing new articulation arrangements with overseas
tertiary institutions, and undertaking new international education and collaborative research initiatives.
Twenty-five new memoranda of understanding or Exchange agreements were concluded in 2007, with:
Universidad Juárez Autónoma de Tabasco de Los Estados Unidos Mexicanos (UJAT), Nanjing University of
Technology, Eastern Illinois University, Fachhochschule München, Osaka Prefecture University, Wollongong
College Auckland (Australia), Institut National Polytechnique de Toulouse, Korea Advanced Institute of Science
and Technology, Sugiyama Jogkuen University, European Business School, International University Schloss
Reichartshausen, L’Université Blaise Pascal, Clermont II, University of Calgary, Universiti Putra Malaysia,
Renmin University of China, CMC Limited (India), Shanxi College of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Akademia
Wychowania Fizycznego (Poland), Hebei University of Technology, Cornell University, Tokyo Kezai University,
King Mongkut’s University of Technology Thonburi (Thailand), Maejo University (Thailand), Clarkson
University (USA), Nakhon Phanom University (Thailand), Nippon Veterinary and Life Science University,
Communication University of China.
134
A cross-college mission to Malaysia in May 2007 secured a significant number of PhD enrolments among
Malaysian University staff funded under the Malaysian Government scholarship scheme. The University
signed a collaboration agreement with Universiti Putra Malaysia, which, like Massey has a strong grounding in
Agricultural Science.
The DVC (Auckland & International) continued to chair the Greater Mekong Sub-region Tertiary Education
Consortium (GMSTEC) in 2007. GMSTEC is developing a business plan that will see greater academic exchange
between the partners and more collaborative bidding for international research funds. Massey is engaging
with GMSTEC partner King MongKuts University of Technology Thonburi on a Master of Food Science and
Technology Management degree programme.
Massey has continued to be the most successful university in securing funds under the Education New Zealand
Export Education Innovation Programme (EEIP) in 2007. EEIP grants were awarded to the College of Sciences
in relation to delivery of the Massey University Bachelor of Food Technology programme in Singapore in
partnership with Singapore Polytechnic, and to the Training and Development Unit in relation to on-line
learning initiatives in our teaching relationship with Wuhan University and Nanjing University of Technology.
International office staff development and systems improvement continued in 2007, with an update of marketing
and communications documentation, and key staff appointments. The Manager International Student
Support – Policy and Compliance, now a permanent appointment, will play a key role in managing risk areas
such as Fed Aid, student insurance, and policy and procedure around student support, particularly for the
increasing numbers of students who need assistance with cultural adaptation. Further work was done to enhance
agent support and performance management, and Massey again passed a successful audit of its USA Fed Aid
administration system. The International policy and Strategy Advisory Committee met four times during the year
and is now focused more on long-term internationalisation strategy.
Performance Indicators
Target 2007:
Outcome/Progress 2007:
G1
Achieved – ongoing
Ensure our qualification
review process
appropriately recognises
that contextual content
(rather than nationally
specific), assessment and
assignments are relevant to
the needs and interests of
international students.
G2
Internationalisation
Not achieved
matters will be reflected
in the University’s
professional development
programme.
135
G3
Encourage staff to
Achieved
pursue opportunities for
Highlights:
international research,
The International Policy and Strategy Advisory Committee operates an
research collaboration
annual strategy session, as part of which it will identify a potential high-
and the presentation
level international research collaboration that will raise the profile of
of research findings at
one of Massey’s strongest research groups.
international conferences.
A significant number of staff have presented papers at international
conferences during 2007, with several staff invited to present keynote
addresses.
G4
Pursue prestigious
Achieved
international visitors and
See response to E11 in the “Staff” section.
post-doctoral fellowships in
areas of strategic priority.
G5
Complete the AACSB
Partially achieved
accreditation process for
the University’s business
school over the planning
period.
G6
Continue to develop
Achieved
international partnerships/
Highlights:
strategic alliances for
A detailed Internationalisation Strategy for the University has been
selected teaching and
developed and is being reviewed annually.
research areas.
A detailed Marketing & Recruitment Operations Plan for 2007 was
developed, which incorporates the Internationalisation Objectives and
Plan of the University.
Clear procedures exist for establishing high-level effective international
partnership arrangements, and all existing agreements are being
evaluated and assessed at the time of renewal.
A strategic partnership in a selected teaching area is reflected in a new
agreement between the College of Business (Finance) and Wuhan
University, China.
An on-shore articulation arrangement was signed between Wollongong
University College, Auckland (Australia) and Massey University.
G7
Continue to build on the
Achieved – ongoing
opportunities afforded
by accreditation of the
University’s Veterinary
programme by the
American Veterinary
Medical Association.
136
G8
Continue to ensure
Achieved
compliance with the Code
Highlights:
of Practice for Pastoral
The University’s annual Internal Audit and Review of its adherence to
Care of International
the Code of Practice for Pastoral Care of International Students has
Students.
been undertaken. The Audit was submitted to and approved by the
Ministry of Education.
G9
Continue to monitor
Achieved
international student
satisfaction through the
use of surveys and work
to enhance services as
appropriate.
G10
Develop further student
Achieved
exchange opportunities for
Highlights:
domestic students.
Five new Student Exchange Agreements have been established in
2007: Institute of Maxillofacial Prosthetists & Technologists, Calgary
University, Cornell University, Clarkson University and Deakin
University.
There has been an increase of 10% in outbound Exchange students
and a 12% decrease in inbound Exchange students. This has allowed
for existing unfavourable reciprocity imbalances to be addressed.
G11
Continue to give priority to
Achieved
development of the Study
Highlights:
Abroad programme.
The Massey Study Abroad programme continues to grow and has
benefited from increased exposure in overseas promotions (particularly
in the USA and Germany) and the development of new third-party
provider partnerships. Study Abroad enrolments in 2007 are 149
compared to 136 in 2006.
Four new Direct Study Abroad agreements have been finalised in 2007.
These are with Eastern Illinois University, European Business School
(Germany), Tokyo Kezai University and BiTS (Germany).
G12
Continue to broaden
Achieved
the diversity of the
Highlights:
University’s international
A range of new marketing strategies have been employed to stimulate
student base and improve
demand in existing and new markets.
the distribution of
international students
across T & L programmes
Markets where diversity has been achieved in 2007 include USA, India,
Malaysia, Singapore, Saudi Arabia, Canada, and Papua New Guinea.
through targeted
marketing strategies.
137
G13
Complete development of
Achieved
the University’s marketing
Highlights:
and promotional tools for
Revision and development of international student information
prospective international
materials and collateral took place during 2007. They included: a
students by reviewing
development of the new International Student Prospectus, update
and upgrading the
of International Student Guide, development of a new Study Abroad
International Office web-
brochure, review and reprint of Application, Programme and Fees
site and international
and Admission information, development of Programme Summary
publications.
Information flyers and development of new display banners.
A major review of the International Office web-site commenced in
2007.
Improvements were made to the Education Agent Newsletter, which is
distributed to contracted education agents and consultants
G14
Investigate and establish,
Achieved – ongoing
where appropriate, the
offshore delivery of
selected qualifications,
including delivery via
extramural mode.
Other highlights of initiatives
Massey University is part of an international community of scholars.
focused on internationalisation:
In 2007 relationships were maintained and advanced with numerous
universities, research institutions and government organisations,
including the United Kingdom, the United States of America, Canada,
Mexico, countries in the European Union, Malaysia, Japan, China,
Saudi Arabia, Pakistan, Thailand, Samoa, India and Scandinavia.
Massey has active international relationships and academic agreements
with other universities and research institutions, many of which provide
study abroad and student exchange opportunities along with research
collaborations. Examples of these include:
•
a second tripartite agreement signed between Massey University and
the prestigious Peking University
•
a memorandum of agreement with Mexico’s Universidad Juárez
Autónoma de Tabasco de Los Estados Unidos Mexicanos (UJAT).
•
A memorandum of understanding signed with Kasetsart University
in Thailand and the Academy for Physical Education, Katowice in
Poland.
138
In 2007 Massey University was host to a number of international
conferences, including:
•
49th International Association for Vegetation Science Conference,
February 2007
•
Evolution 2007, June 2007
•
Chief of Army Seminar “Warfighting in a Contemporary
Environment”, August 2007
•
Symposium on Insulin Resistance, Diabetes and Vulnerable
Populations, October 2007
•
2nd International Conference on Sensing Technology (ICST’07),
November 2007
•
4th International Conference on Computational Intelligence
(CIRAS’07), November 2007.
Performance Measures
Target
2007
Actual
2007
Actual
2006
Exchange Students – To Massey (Number of)
38
47
54
Exchange Students – From Massey (Number of)
27
41
37
Target
2007
Study Abroad Students to Massey University (Number of)
Formal Academic Arrangements with Offshore Institutions (Number of)
EFTS – Full-Fee International
Actual
2007
Actual
2006
152
149
136
71
118
94
Target
2007
Actual
2007
Actual
2006
Total
3,224
2,748
3,409
Auckland Region
1,778
1,592
1,784
Palmerston North Region
984
809
1,042
Wellington Region
462
347
583
Note: These are full-fee international students as per Ministry of Education funding classification 02, 03 and 20.
Student Services Satisfaction – International Students (% students rating services good/very good)
52%
51%
50%
College of Business
94%
93%
94%
College of Creative Arts
90%
91%
88%
College of Education
94%
97%
98%
College of Humanities & Social Sciences
92%
98%
97%
College of Sciences
94%
94%
94%
80%
78%
76%
Course Completion Rate – International Students
Retention from First Year of Study to Second Year of Study – All Undergraduate Programmes %
International Students
139
ORGANISATION AND MANAGEMENT
GOALS
1.
To ensure the University has a sustainable resource base sufficient to pursue its primary aims.
2.
To have management at all levels which is competent, effective and accountable.
3.
To support teaching, learning and research activities, through provision of quality infrastructure, national
shared services and regional support activities.
OBJECTIVES
•
To act as a responsible user of resources, employing management processes and structures appropriate to
the size, purpose and multi-campus nature of the University.
•
To strengthen the University’s financial position through pursuit of higher net revenues and greater
utilisation of assets, and by ensuring the effectiveness of all expenditures.
•
To ensure that the University is managed in such a manner as to safeguard its long-term viability.
•
To ensure that comprehensive planning processes and development strategies are formulated and
implemented for the future continuing benefit of the University.
•
To continue to enhance effective information systems that can support sound and timely decision-making.
•
To continue to develop health and safety management systems that meet statutory (and ACC) standards and
provide for the welfare of staff and students.
•
To monitor the University’s organisational structure to ensure that its activities are carried out in an efficient
and effective manner.
•
To further develop or adopt organisational structures that enhance and promote those areas that have
created the distinctive features of Massey University.
•
To manage the University’s natural environment in a sustainable manner, and to protect, and where
possible, to enhance the environmental quality of its natural resources.
•
To continue to enhance the aesthetic values of the campuses and maintain a stimulating environment for
the work, recreation and cultural activities of staff and students.
PERFORMANCE 2007
Looking back on 2007, one important challenge faced by the University was the tertiary education reforms and
their consequent changes to the tertiary education system as announced by the Tertiary Education Commission
(TEC) in the Tertiary Education Strategy 2007–2012. The changes included a new funding model, which
moved from being based on enrolment numbers to be more focused on managed change and planned growth
in student numbers, along with the requirement to submit a three-year Investment Plan. The University’s
Investment Plan, Investing in Our Future, demonstrates the University’s significant contribution to the nation
and sets out the University’s strategic priorities for the three-year period 2008 – 2010, strategic priorities that
will enable Massey to deliver on the priorities and key shifts identified in the Tertiary Education Strategy. The
University’s Investment Plan was approved in full by the TEC Board of Commissioners in December.
Another significant challenge for the University during 2007 was to improve its financial performance. Through
a range of initiatives and the commitment of its academic and administrative units, Massey has been able to
achieve a surplus for 2007. Coupled with the 2008 projected surplus, this will position the University to move
forward and deliver on the strategic priorities as outlined in the Investment Plan.
The University continues to invest in infrastructure and facilities in support of teaching, research and research
training, with major highlights including: the Hopkirk Research Institute; the Solexa Genome Analysis System;
140
the Massey University Manawatu Microscopy and Imaging Centre: the Massey University Equine and Farm
Service wing of the Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical Sciences; and the renovated Student Centre
building on the Palmerston North campus. (Refer to further detail included in the Performance Indicators
section below, and also refer to the “Research & Creative Works” section.)
University administrative, academic, and information technology systems and processes have continued to be
reviewed and upgraded to ensure that the needs of the University can be met in as cost-effective manner as
possible. Following are some of the highlights during the year:
•
Phase II of the Student Management System project made significant progress, with the new on-line
enrolment system being launched in November 2007.
•
A Service Delivery Optimisation project was commenced in June 2007. The project aims to review the
current end-to-end processes across HR, Finance, Marketing, Student Administration, Student Services, IT
and infrastructure; benchmark against best practice; and develop and implement standardised, simplified
and streamlined processes which deliver efficiencies of support services activities across all three campuses.
•
The HRIS (Human Resource Information System) project is nearing completion and delivering significant
improvements to HR and payroll processes, along with enhanced reporting.
•
Continued progress is being made on the RIMS project to update the University’s research management and
administration systems and processes.
Performance Indicators
Target 2007:
Outcome/Progress 2007:
H1-1
Continue planning and
Achieved
implementing campus
Highlights on the Auckland campus:
development plans
The business case for the Library was approved by Council.
that support core T &
L activities and align
with the Long Term
Financial Strategy. Specific
The sciences buildings on the Oteha Rohe have been modified to
provide accommodation and laboratories for specialised disciplines and
research.
deliverables targeted over
the planning period:
planning for the next
phase of development
at Auckland Campus by
continued refinement
and implementation of a
10-year development plan.
H1-2
Continue planning and
Achieved
implementing campus
Highlights on the Palmerston North campus:
development plans that
The redeveloped Student Centre was opened by The Right Hon. Helen
support core academic
Clark, Prime Minister, in February 2007. Cafes, food-court-style dining,
activities and align with
commercial outlets and co-located students associations are all in the
the Long Term Financial
“new” Centre. The Centre forms another vital element of “Campus
Strategy.
Heart” to create a vibrant environment and active student community
in the heart of the campus.
141
Specific deliverables
The Equine and Farm Services building was opened in February 2007
targeted over the planning
by the Honourable Jim Anderton (Minister of Agriculture). Later in
period: reinvestment
the year the American Veterinary Medical Association signed off on the
at Palmerston North
University’s overall bid for accreditation renewal for the Bachelor of
in accordance with a
Veterinary Science programme.
10-year plan that includes
strategies for future longterm use of Hokowhitu
site, refurbishment and
rationalisation of space in
The new-look Wharerata was launched at a garden party event in March
2007. The major internal refurbishments at this iconic functions centre
include a new bar area, new dining room layout and reinstatement of a
dance floor area.
the College of Sciences,
The Hopkirk Research Institute was opened by the Hon. Steve
and an upgrade of student
Maharey (Minister for Research, Science & Technology and Minister
environment and facilities.
of CRIs) in March 2007. The Institute houses over 70 research staff
from AgResearch and Institute of Veterinary, Animals and Biomedical
Sciences who will explore the frontiers of animal health research,
particularly in the areas of parasitic diseases, infectious diseases, and
veterinary public health.
The Manawatu Microscopy Imaging Centre (MMIC) was opened by the
Right Hon. Helen Clark, Prime Minister, in August 2007. The MMIC
offers light and electron microscopy for staff and students at Massey
University, the neighbouring CRIs and the greater Manawatu region.
College of Education staff were relocated in December 2006 from
Ruawharo to an existing building redeveloped for them at the Eastern
Institute of Technology, Hawke’s Bay. The Ruawharo site was released
for sale.
A number of campus space optimisation projects in keeping with the
strategy document for Consolidation of Space in Palmerston North,
2007–2010, have been successfully executed.
H1-3
Continue planning and
Achieved
implementing campus
The Campus Development Plan, prepared to support the Wellington
development plans
Academic Plan, is being implemented as much as is possible within
that support core T &
budget constraints.
L activities and align
with the Long Term
Financial Strategy.
Specific deliverables
targeted over the planning
period: implementation
of a development
programme for Wellington
Campus to support
the implementation
of the Campu’s T &
L Development Plan,
completed in 2005.
142
H2
Continuing investment
Achieved – ongoing
in IT and Library
infrastructure to support
teaching and research
needs, and administration
systems.
H3
Investment in research
Achieved – ongoing
infrastructure and
See response in A7 in the “Research & Creative Works” section.
advanced research
networks to support areas
of research focus. (Also see
A7.)
H4
Work towards meeting
Achieved – ongoing
energy efficiency targets
Highlights:
as agreed with the Energy
The unlimited access bus scheme (free buses) initiative in Palmerston
Efficiency Conservation
North received a “highly commended” award in the Energy Efficiency
Authority.
Conservation Authority Energywise Awards.
The recycling operation at Palmerston North campus is very extensive
in comparison with other universities and has been commented on
favourably by visiting delegations.
Energy efficiency targets have been met by all three campuses.
H5
Complete the project
Partially achieved
initiated in 2004 to
Highlights:
develop a Strategic Asset
Development of a Strategic Asset Management framework was
Management Plan for
completed by Strategic Project Management Services. An asset
the University along with
condition audit pilot was also undertaken on all three campuses to
systems to maintain it and
validate the framework.
integration with the Long
Term Financial Strategy
process.
H6
Complete the development
Achieved – ongoing
of an Information Services
Strategic Plan and the
implementation of the
Information Technology
Infrastructure Library
framework.
H7
Continue to review
Achieved – ongoing
utilisation of commercial
space in the University and
ensure appropriate return
on investment.
143
H8
Continue implementation
Achieved – ongoing
of Council resolutions
pursuant to its constitution
and self-review process, as
appropriate.
H9
Continue development
Achieved – ongoing
and implementation of the
University’s performance
scorecard for student
and internal service units
with a view to optimising
student/stakeholder
satisfaction while achieving
institutional-level
economies of scale.
H10
Continue implementation
Achieved – ongoing
of the University’s
Performance Reporting
and Risk Management
framework through
enhancement of the
Performance and Risk
Reporting programme and
ongoing identification of
major University strategic
and operating risks and
mitigation strategies.
H11
Explore ways to implement
Achieved
the recommendations
See response to C19 in the “Treaty of Waitangi” section.
from the Engagement
with Mäori paper (in
conjunction with Council).
(See also C19.)
H12
Promote to Government
Achieved – Ongoing
the development of a
Highlights:
policy environment in New
The Vice-Chancellor’s Executive Committee in conjunction with the
Zealand that will support a
New Zealand Vice-Chancellor’s Committee increased political and
quality University sector.
public awareness of the need for greater levels of public investment in
New Zealand’s universities.
See also response to F2 in the “The University and the Wider
Community” section.
144
H13
Monitor the new tertiary
Achieved
funding reforms and
implications for the
University and ensure an
appropriate University
response is developed and
implemented.
H14
Continue to implement
Achieved – ongoing
revised policies and
practices for health and
safety to ensure ongoing
compliance with legislation
and good practice (2007).
H15
Continue implementation
Achieved – ongoing
of a space charging system
and maintaining up-todate space management
systems.
H16-1 Continue with
Achieved – ongoing
administrative systems
Highlights:
and process improvement
A new on-line enrolment system was developed and launched in
initiatives over the
November 2007.
planning period, to
include, but not be limited
to: Student Management
Development of Student Programme Management (SPM) has made
good progress.
System renewal (Phase II).
H16-2 Continue with
Achieved – ongoing
administrative systems
and process improvement
initiatives over the
planning period, to
include, but not be
limited to: Human
Resources and Payroll
systems improvement
(e.g. ImpelHR, HRIS
reporting).
145
H16-3 Continue with
Achieved
administrative systems
Highlights:
and process improvement
A Services Delivery Optimisation project was commenced in June 2007.
initiatives over the
This project will review the current end-to-end processes across HR,
planning period, to
Finance, Marketing, Student Administration, Student Services, IT and
include, but not be limited
infrastructure. The project will then benchmark against best practice
to: empowerment of
and develop and implement standardised, simplified and streamlined
Finance System users via
processes which deliver efficiencies of support service activities across
web-based reporting and
the University.
budgeting tools.
H16-4 Continue with
Achieved – ongoing
administrative systems
Highlights:
and process improvement
The Online Enrolment/Student Programme Management (SPM)
initiatives over the
Project replaced web-enrol in October 2007 with a more robust,
planning period, to
reliable and user-friendly enrolment system. Phase two is underway to
include, but not be
streamline, simplify and automate processes for students and academic
limited to: review of fees
and general staff from prospective status right through to graduation.
administration invoicing
and debtor management
processes.
H16-5 Continue with
Achieved
administrative systems
and process improvement
initiatives over the
planning period, to
include, but not be
limited to: review
financial reporting
requirements in line
with internationalisation
of financial reporting
standards.
H16-6 Continue with
Partially Achieved – ongoing
administrative systems
and process improvement
initiatives over the
planning period, to
include, but not be limited
to: initiate the integration
of reporting from the
University’s various
databases (i.e. HRIS,
Finance One, SMS, etc).
146
H16-7 Continue with
Partially achieved
administrative systems
The Research Management Services (RMS) Business Plan for 2007
and process improvement
included business process improvement as one of its three priorities for
initiatives over the
this year. This priority was reflected in deliverables set for each RMS
planning period, to
team for 2007.
include, but not be limited
to: implementation of
the Research Information
Management System
(RIMS).
H16-8 Continue with
administrative systems
Achieved
Contract Management System roll-out continued in 2007.
and process improvement
initiatives over the
planning period, to
include, but not be limited
to: Contract Management
System improvement.
H16-9 Continue with
Achieved
administrative systems
Highlights:
and process improvement
International student applications and admissions processes have
initiatives over the
been reviewed in 2007. The standard letters of communication were
planning period, to
rationalised and re-written in a more student-friendly style.
include, but not be limited
to: International student
offer, management,
admission and enrolment
processes review.
H16-10 Continue with
Achieved
administrative systems
Highlights:
and process improvement
Contact Management System (Contact Centre) redevelopment and
initiatives over the
upgrade was launched in 2007.
planning period, to
include, but not be limited
to: contact management
system upgrade.
H16-11 Continue with
Achieved
administrative systems
Highlights:
and process improvement
The Web Content Management System is in production.
initiatives over the
planning period, to
include, but not be limited
to: upgrading the Web
Content Management
System.
147
H16-12 Continue with
Achieved – ongoing
administrative systems
and process improvement
initiatives over the
planning period, to
include, but not be limited
to: Staff Satisfaction Survey
automation.
H17
Develop the University
Partially achieved
environmental
management system
(EMS) and consult with
stakeholders prior to
implementation in 2007.
H18
Continue to develop
Achieved
and implement revised
Highlights:
communication and
A campus marketing and communications plan is under development,
recruitment strategy and
aligned with University strategies. It is expected to be completed in
align with the University’s
2008.
Strategic Positioning
Statement. (Also see B4
and C1.)
H19
Actively develop projects
Achieved
to strengthen capability
Highlights:
development and where
The University submitted 13 applications to the TEC’s Encouraging
appropriate apply to
and Supporting Innovation fund. This fund is designed to support
the Innovation and
capability development and linkages to industry.
Development Fund and
other strategic funds
managed by TEC.
H20
Continue to evaluate
Achieved – ongoing
organisational
arrangements within a
multi-campus context with
a view to ensuring optimal
ongoing development of
the qualification profile,
student profile and
research culture universitywide.
148
H21
Continuously monitor and,
Achieved – ongoing
where necessary, align
Highlights:
resource allocation to
The College of Education undertook a review of its activities and
reflect changes in demand
structure. It has aligned these to provide the best teaching and
for University research and
research outcomes with cost efficiency.
teaching programmes and
likely future movements
in those programmes by
continuing to use and
refine a model which aligns
resource allocation with
sector benchmarks and
drives cost efficiencies in
business processes to fund
priority developments.
H22
Implement budget
Partially achieved – ongoing
strategies over the planning
Highlights:
period which are designed
The first phase of the Financial Sustainability Plan has been
to ensure the University’s
implemented.
financial performance is
more in line with TAMU
guidelines.
H23
Maximise commercial
Achieved
revenue earning
Highlights:
opportunities by existing
The new-look Wharerata was launched at a garden party event in
units such as Massey’s
Palmerston North on 11 March 2007. A feature article in the local
farms, MUSAC, Wharerata,
newspaper wrote about the major internal refurbishments at this iconic
the Rugby Institute, the
functions centre.
Conference Centre as
well as improving the
contribution margin from
such activities.
The Sport and Rugby Institute (SRI) is proving to be a facility in
increasing demand. Its client base is no longer exclusively rugbyoriented and includes a variety of notable sporting organisations
such as Swimming NZ. The SRI is a key player in the region’s bid
to host a Rugby 2011 World Cup team and matches. The bid is
being cooperatively prepared by the major sport/tourist/economic
development organisations in the region. A major sponsor for the SRI
is being actively pursued.
The farms have shown an increase in profit each year for the last four
years despite very depressed sheep and beef prices. A buoyant dairy
farming market with good payouts from Fonterra have off-set the
depressed sheep and beef farming market.
Careful management and optimisation of staffing and space at all
three campuses, alongside the rebranding and emphasis of the Centre
for University Preparation and English Language Studies as a quality
tertiary university preparation unit, is paying dividends.
149
Other highlights of initiatives
Opus International Consultants Ltd has won two awards for The
focused on Organisation and
Student Centre (Turitea) from the New Zealand Institute of Architects,
Management
Western Branch, and an Award for Architecture and a Resene Colour
Award. These are the same as awarded for the Hopkirk Research
Institute and have been presented in New Plymouth in November.
McMillan and Lockwood also received a Silver Award for the Student
Centre from the local Master Builders Annual Awards to go with the
Gold they received for the Hopkirk Research Institute.
Performance Measures
Financial Performance Indicators
Actual
2007
Operating surplus to total revenue
Actual
2006
2.39%
-0.37%
113.52%
101.64%
Cash cover – liquidity
(liquid funds to annual cash operating)
32.22%
28.32%
Cash cover – EBITD/int exp
22.05X
52.55X
Working capital ratio
Operating surplus to total assets
0.92%
-0.15%
Total revenue to net assets
44.04%
42.60%
Revenue per funded EFTS
$19,515
$17,543
Operating costs per funded EFTS
$19,049
$17,489
Capital expenditure per funded EFTS
Fixed assets per funded EFTS
Debt to debt plus equity
Change in financial value
$1,476
$2,237
$44,696
$42,997
2.76%
3.15%
0.77%
0.96%
$221,710
$213,810
Revenue from domestic tuition fees (000’s)
$65,711
$60,714
Revenue from international tuition fees (000’s) (full-fee foreign)
$42,105
$50,389
International tuition fees/total revenue
11.10%
14.11%
Salary related expenses (000’s)
Space Utilisation Usable Floor Area m2/EFTS (Equivalent full-time student)
(Excluding residential and farm-related space)
Target
2007
Actual
2007
Actual
2006
University Average
12.06
12.13
11.41
- Auckland Region
6.82
6.82
6.78
- Palmerston North Region
12.12
13.94
12.73
- Wellington Region
12.69
13.84
13.49
University Average
74.38
75.48
71.79
- Auckland Region
67.63
68.56
69.17
- Palmerston North Region
71.30
72.71
68.68
- Wellington Region
92.74
97.06
88.98
Space Utilisation Usable Floor Area m2/FTE (Full-time equivalent staff member)
150
APPENDICES
All information provided in these appendices prior to 1999 excludes the former Wellington Polytechnic.
STUDENT NUMBERS
Note: Figures below are Student head count and include all students enrolled regardless of funding source.
University Totals
Internal
1
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
14,371
14,349
18,611
17,458
18,283
19,506
21,461
21,893
20,640
19,366
18,436
Extramural 1
17,967
18,044
18,959
18,933
19,336
20,239
20,201
19,543
19,017
17,656
17,055
Total
32,338
32,393
37,570
36,391
37,619
39,745
41,662
41,436
39,657
37,022
35,491
% change over previous year
8.3%
0.2%
16.0%
(3.1%)
3.26%
5.65%
4.82%
(0.54%)
(4.49%)
(6.64%)
(4.14%)
Students included in totals above:
International 2
995
1,026
1,132
1,222
1,820
3,445
5,754
6,216
5,790
5,276
4,481
Notes:
1 By student mode.
2 1997–2000 international figures above are not directly comparable to 2001 figures onwards.
3 1997–2000 figures are international full-fee students only; 2001 figures onwards are all international
students regardless of New Zealand residency or funding status.
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'*!%%%
No of Students
'%!%%%
&*!%%%
&%!%%%
*!%%%
%
&..,
&..-
&...
'%%%
'%%&
'%%'
Year
151
'%%(
'%%)
'%%*
'%%+
'%%,
EQUIVALENT FULL-TIME STUDENTS (EFTS)
Internal 1
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
14,221
15,954
16,922
15,625
14,002
13,315
Extramural 1
6,529
6,559
6,404
6,224
6,473
6,117
Total All Students Enrolled Regardless of Funding Sources
21,539
23,342
23,326
21,850
20,475
19,432
% change over previous year
6.62%
8.37%
(0.07%)
(6.76%)
(6.29%)
(5.09%)
2,493
4,341
4,809
4,197
3,412
2,671
Students included in Totals above:
Full-fee/international 2
EFTS Funded by Ministry of Education
3
% change over previous year
Notes:
18,543
18,349
17,840
16,931
16,411
16,085
(0.30%)
(1.04%)
(2.77%)
(5.10%)
(3.74%)
(1.99%)
1 By student mode.
2 These are full-fee international students as per Ministry of Education funding classification
02, 03 and 20.
3 As per Ministry of Education Funding Classification 01.
>ciZgcVa
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'%!%%%
No of Students
&*!%%%
&%!%%%
*!%%%
%
'%%'
'%%(
'%%)
Year
152
'%%*
'%%+
'%%,
STUDENT AGE DISTRIBUTION (HEAD COUNT)
2007
Ethnicity
Gender
New Zealand
Female
Mäori
Male
European
Pasifika
Asian
< 17
17–19
2
35–39
40+
Total
All
376
301
280
622
2,345
7
113
242
157
143
141
243
1,039
3
2
334
785
533
444
421
865
3,384
10
3
1,617
3,516
1,862
1,572
1,418
3,760
13,748
39
Male
4
950
2,134
1,096
862
800
2,039
7,885
22
Total
7
2,567
5,650
2,958
2,434
2,218
5,799
21,633
61
1
Female
45
138
92
83
52
92
502
Male
23
104
63
50
64
89
393
1
Total
68
242
155
133
116
181
895
3
286
1,485
882
304
181
249
3,389
10
299
1,600
992
252
150
214
3,507
10
585
3,085
1,874
556
331
463
6,896
19
Female
2
2
63
237
162
133
137
256
988
3
Male
Female
2
89
260
163
141
136
218
1,009
3
Total
2
152
497
325
274
273
474
1,997
6
Female
2
9
31
52
30
33
257
414
1
4
30
28
28
21
161
272
1
Male
Total
30–34
543
Female
Total
Unspecified
25–29
221
Total
Male
Other
20–24
% Total
Total
2
13
61
80
58
54
418
686
2
Female
9
2,241
5,950
3,426
2,423
2,101
5,236
21,386
60
40
Male
6
1,478
4,370
2,499
1,476
1,312
2,964
14,105
Total
15
3,719
10,320
5,925
3,899
3,413
8,200
35,491
0.04%
10%
29%
17%
11%
10%
23%
%Total
All
Notes:
“% Total All” column and row is the percent of the total year figure: 2007 = 35,491.
Figures above include all students regardless of funding source.
Source: Student data as at 31 December.
153
STUDENT ETHNICITY, MODE AND GENDER (HEAD COUNT)
2007
Mode
New Zealand
Internal
878
466
1,344
Mäori
Extramural
1,467
573
2,040
6
Total
2,345
1,039
3,384
10
Internal
5,837
3,654
9,491
27
Extramural
7,913
4,235
12,148
34
European
21,639
61
221
441
1
Extramural
282
172
454
1
Total
502
393
895
3
2,706
3,029
5,735
16
683
478
1,161
3
3,389
3,507
6,896
19
Internal
520
669
1,189
3
Extramural
468
340
808
2
Total
988
1,009
1,997
6
Internal
142
94
236
1
Extramural
270
174
444
1
412
268
680
2
Internal
10,303
8,133
18,436
52
Extramural
11,083
5,972
17,055
48
Total
21,386
14,105
35,491
Total
Total
4
7,889
Internal
Unspecified
All
220
Extramural
Other
Total
13,750
Total
Asian
Male
Internal
Total
Pasifika
Female
% Total
Ethnicity
% Total all
Notes:
“% Total All” column and row is the percent of the total year figure: 2007 = 35,491.
Figures above include all students regardless of funding sources.
Source: Student data as at 31 December.
154
STAFFING LEVELS
FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT (FTE) STAFF
STAFF FTE
2006
2007
1,214
1,188
517
527
Colleges
Academic1
General 2
Contract & trading
Total Colleges
453
417
2,184
2,132
359
370
Support Services & Administration
Regional services
Vice-Chancellor’s Office
48
55
Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Academic & Research)
145
151
University Registrar
200
175
General Manager (Strategy & Finance)
171
173
Deputy Vice-Chancellor (International)
15
17
Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Mäori)
13
10
Centre for University Preparation and English Language Studies
40
45
Total Support Services & Administration
Total Staff 3
991
995
3,175
3,127
Notes
1
Figures are as at 31 December.
2
The basis for calculating staffing FTEs has changed in 2006 to reflect average FTE numbers for the year.
3
As from 2006, all FTEs relating to the Conservatorium of Music have been transferred to the New
Zealand School of Music and are no longer included within college or University totals.
155
STAFF FTE, BY COLLEGE
College
2002
College of Business
323
326
302
290
282
155
133
123
113
97
1
3
3
4
17
16
107
125
141
146
115
105
41
33
36
36
34
35
Contract & trading
General
0
0
0
0
2
2
145
154
146
125
121
113
64
71
63
51
62
48
Contract & trading
101
111
104
103
110
111
Academic
236
266
265
259
252
244
General
77
65
61
62
55
62
Contract & trading
40
60
72
67
118
115
Academic
385
415
429
422
436
445
General
280
299
302
298
253
284
Contract & trading
Total Colleges
2007
286
Academic
College of Sciences
2006
146
Academic
College of Humanities & Social Sciences
2005
Academic
General
College of Education
2004
General
Contract & trading
College of Creative Arts
2003
Total Academic
Total General
Total Contract & trading
Total FTE
110
110
125
123
206
174
1,159
1,283
1,307
1,255
1,214
1,188
607
623
595
568
517
527
251
284
304
297
453
417
2,016
2,190
2,206
2,120
2,184
2,132
STAFFING RATIOS
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
Funded equivalent full-time students (EFTS)
21,036
22,690
22,649
21,128
19,821
18,755
Total academic staff incl casual academic
1,159
1,283
1,307
1,255
1,214
1,188
Total general staff incl casual general
1,486
1,601
1,583
1,574
1,507
1,522
2005
Ratio of EFTS to
Academic Staff
2005
Ratio of General to
Academic Staff
2006
Ratio of EFTS to
Academic Staff
2006
Ratio of General to
Academic Staff
2007
Ratio of EFTS to
Academic Staff
2007
Ratio of General to
Academic Staff
College of Business
25.8:1
0.41:1
24.5:1
0.39:1
23.0:1
0.35:1
College of Creative Arts
12.5:1
0.24:1
14.2:1
0.30:1
15.9:1
0.33:1
College of Education
17.3:1
0.40:1
15.8:1
0.52:1
16.3:1
0.43:1
College Of Humanities & Social
Sciences
17.3:1
0.24:1
17.4:1
0.22:1
16.9:1
0.25:1
College of Sciences
11.1:1
0.70:1
10.5:1
0.58:1
9.9:1
0.64:1
University Total
16.8:1
1.25:1
16.3:1
1.24:1
15.8:1
1.28:1
College
156
2007 Massey University Staff Head Count Summary: Campus
Auckland
Palmerston North
Wellington
Total
idc
^c\
Zaa
Headcount
%
518
16
2,200
70
435
14
3,153
100
L
6jX`aVcY
EVabZghidcCdgi]
2007 Massey University Staff Head Count Summary: Employment Type
Academic
Contract & trading
General
Technical
Total
Headcount
%
1,267
40
157
5
1,501
48
228
7
3,153
Va
^X
]c
X
IZ
<ZcZgVa
6XVYZb^X
100
8dcigVXi
IgVY^c\
2007 Massey University Staff Head Count Summary: Gender
Headcount
%
Female
1,748
55
Male
1,405
45
3,153
100
Total
BVaZ
;ZbVaZ
2007 Massey University Staff Head Count Summary: Age Group
Headcount
Unspecified
%
18
1
Under 25
151
5
25–40
936
30
40–65
1,952
62
96
3
65
Total
3,153
+*
*
g'
YZ
Jc
'%")%
)%"+*
100
Di
Jc
]Z
2007 Massey University Staff Headcount Summary: Ethnicity
European
Y
[^Z
X^
eZ
h
Jc
he
g:
i]c
^X
Headcount
%
2,270
72
136
4
35
1
280
9
29
1
<g
ZX
^[^
ZY
dj
eh
6h^Vc
Mäori
Pacific peoples
Asian
Other ethnic groups
Unspecified
Total
403
13
3,153
100
EVX^[^XEZdeaZh
B~dg^
157
:jgdeZVc
2007 Massey University Staff Head Count Summary: College, Regions and Division
1,000
900
800
700
600
500
400
300
200
100
0
889
430
366
257
130
238
225
109
11
158
185
64
29
19
177
24
RESEARCH AND OTHER CONTRACT FUNDING
Research and Contract Funding
2007
Total
($000)
Research
Grants /
Projects
($000)
Research
Centres
($000)
Consultancies
($000)
College
College of Business
1,617
College of Creative Arts
College of Education
1,178
Commercial
-isation
Projects
($000)
Teaching
Contracts
($000)
Internal
Research
Allocation
($000)
307
544
231
254
9,656
1,372
1,330
132
59
6,886
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
14,281
5,807
5,796
2,309
College of Sciences
30,863
20,352
7,367
1,461
102
2,435
1,280
940
536
-345
26
2007
59,396
30,220
13,163
6,600
638
6,542
2,233
2006
59,689
28,307
13,246
5,370
447
9,930
2,389
Total Funding Received
2005
54,268
23,959
14,659
4,925
411
8,432
1,882
Total Funding Received
2004
53,725
23,402
14,028
5,542
507
8,636
1,610
Other
Total Funding Received
Total Funding Received
1
68
367
1,581
Total External and Internal Funding
2000
($000)
2001
($000)
2002
($000)
2003
($000)
2004
($000)
2005
($000)
2006
($000)
2007
($000)
External Funding
38,519
39,455
44,588
44,782
52,115
52,386
57,300
57,164
Internal Funding
1,377
1,394
1,277
1,523
1,610
1,882
2,389
2,233
39,896
40,849
45,865
46,305
53,725
54,268
59,689
59,396
Total Funding Received
Total External and Internal Funding
70,000
60,000
50,000
40,000
External Funding
Total Funding Received
30,000
20,000
10,000
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
Year
159
2005
2006
2007
External Contract Funding – Source of Funds
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
New Zealand Government agencies
32,728
36,175
37,517
41,734
42,733
Private and public sector businesses
8,458
11,870
11,420
11,853
10,659
Overseas institutions and agencies
2,493
2,886
2,199
2,316
2,529
Societies and private trusts
954
985
950
689
798
Local bodies
147
162
233
394
170
2
37
67
314
276
44,782
52,115
52,386
57,300
57,164
Other
Total External Funding Received
External Contract Funding – Source of Funds
45,000
40,000
35,000
30,000
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
25,000
20,000
15,000
10,000
5,000
New Zealand
Government Agencies
Private and Public
Sector Businesses
Overseas Institutions
and Agencies
Societies and Private
Trusts
Local Bodies
Other
Source of Funds
Internal Contract Funding – Source of Funds
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
Massey University Postdoctoral Fellowship
625
610
741
942
974
Massey University Research Fund
767
816
764
888
790
Massey University Mäori Award
24
24
8
20
20
Massey University Womens Award
40
43
27
68
46
Massey University Research Fellowship
-
30
24
22
19
Massey University Technical Award
-
28
50
110
173
URC Research Award
Total Internal Research Allocation
65
65
226
361
217
1,523
1,600
1,882
2,389
2,233
160
Internal Contract Funding
1,200
1,000
800
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
600
400
200
Massey University
Postdoctoral
Fellowships
Massey University
Research Funds
Massey University
Maori Awards
Massey University
Womens Award
Massey University
Research
Fellowship
Massey University
Technical Award
URC Research
Award
Source of Funds
External Research Income Qualifying for Performance-Based Research Funding (PBRF)
External Research Income Qualifying for PBRF
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
24,148
31,255
33,598
36,393
38,040
41,428
External Research Income Qualifying for Performance-Based Research Funding (PBRF)
45,000
40,000
35,000
30,000
25,000
20,000
15,000
10,000
5,000
2002
2003
2004
2005
Year
161
2006
2007
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