Sulzer PC 242 User Guide


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Sulzer PC 242 User Guide | Manualzz

Pump Controller Type ABS PC 242

PC 242

2012.04.04 14 :11 :30

0.60m

38.3 l/s

18.7 l/s

22.4 A

1

0.0 A

2

EN User Guide SW 1.48

www.sulzer.com

Pump controller type ABS PC 242, User guide SW 1.48

Copyright © 2014 Sulzer. All rights reserved.

This manual, as well as the software described in it, is furnished under license and may be used or copied only in accordance with the terms of such license. The content of this manual is furnished for informational use only, is subject to change without notice, and should not be construed as a commitment by Sulzer. Sulzer assumes no responsibility or liability for any errors or inaccuracies that may appear in this book.

Except as permitted by such license, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, recording, or otherwise, without the prior written permission of Sulzer.

Sulzer reserves the right to alter specifications due to technical developments.

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Pump controller type ABS PC 242, User guide SW 1.48

CONTENTS

About this guide, audience and concepts 1

1 Overview 3

1.1 The PC 242 panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3

1.2 Personal alarm, and how to reset it . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5

2

3

Make your settings 7

2.1 Select language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7

2.2 Overview of settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7

2.3 System settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8

2.4 Pump pit settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9

2.5 Pump 1 and 2 settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13

2.6 Common settings for pump 1 and pump 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15

2.7 Analogue logging . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16

2.8 Settings for trend curves. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16

2.9 Settings for analogue inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17

2.10 Settings for digital inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18

2.11 Settings for digital outputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19

2.12 Settings for pulse channels. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20

2.13 Communication settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21

Daily operation 23

3.1 Manual control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23

3.2 Alarm list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23

3.3 Show status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24

3.4 Trend curves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24

4 Appendix 25

4.1 Pump capacity and In/Outflow of the pit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .25

4.2 Pit shape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26

4.3 Overflow flow calculation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27

4.3.1 How to calculating overflows by using constants and exponents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28

4.4 Pump reversing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28

4.4.1 Other settings regarding Pump Reversing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29

4.5 Pump alternation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29

4.6 Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30

4.6.1 Communication ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30

4.6.2 Com.port (screw terminals 22-26) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30

4.6.3 Service port (9-pols D-Sub in the front) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30

4.6.4 Modem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30

4.6.5 Alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31

4.7 Aquaprog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32

4.7.1 How to set up Aquaprog. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32

4.8 Cross reference table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33

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Pump controller type ABS PC 242, User guide SW 1.48

5

Technical data and EMC compatibility 34

5.1 Technical data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34

5.2 Electromagnetic compatibility. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34

6 Accessories 35

6.1 Pump controller. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35

6.2 Accessories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35

IV

Pump controller type ABS PC 242, User guide SW 1.48

ABOUT THIS GUIDE, AUDIENCE AND CONCEPTS

This guide describes the pump control units PC 242. PC 242 has a graphical display where you can see and control all aspects of the pumps and the conditions in the pit. These pump controller can either be used stand-alone or communicate all values and conditions to a central supervisory and operating system, such as

AquaWeb from Sulzer.

Audience This guide is intended for system administrators and operators of PC 242 pump controller.

Prerequisites This guide assumes that you already are acquainted with those pumps you are set to control and have the sensor connected to PC 242.

The system administrator must also know the following:

1. The pump controller can either use an analogue level- sensor, which measures the water level in the pit, for precise control over start and stop levels, or it can use simple float switches placed at start and stop levels.

□ Float switches can be used in addition to an analogue level-sensor, as a backup, and as an additional alarm input.

□ An analogue level-sensor has several advantages over float switches: it is more robust (can not get stuck or be mechanically jammed); it is more accurate; it is more flexible (you can easily change the start and stop levels); you can get readings of the water level in the pit, the inflow, overflow and the pump capacity; you can optimize the pump performance in various ways, including exercising, alternative stop levels, tariff control etcetera.

□ It is also possible to employ an alternative stop level, usually a lower level than normal, which is effective once after a number of pump starts.

This can be useful if it is desirable to “completely” empty the pit once in a while.

2. You need to know if the pump(s) should be exercised in case of long idle periods. If the installation has two pumps or more, you need to decide if the pumps should alternate.

3. If the electricity has daily varying tariffs, you must know the times of high/low tariffs.

4. You must know how overflow will be measured; if it will be measured using both an overflow sensor (to detect the start of the overflow) and a level sensor (to measure the actual flow), you must know the parameters (exponents and constants) to be entered as settings so that the overflow can be accurately measured by a calculation in PC 242.

5. You need to know which alarm class, A-alarm or B-alarm (see

Glossary and conventions ), to assign each alarm.

6. You must know how the unit should communicate—via a modem or via a fixed line, and any details that may require.

7. You should have a plan that includes such issues as: which alarm class

(A-alarm or B-alarm) to assign each alarm; if pumps should alternate; if they should be exercised in case of long idle periods, etc.

Installation guide There is a separate installation guide, see reference

[1]

below.

NOTE! The default settings are listed in the Installation Guide

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1

About this guide, audience and concepts

Reading guide Start by reading

Chapter 1 Overview on page 3

. It describes the general functionality, the graphical display (PC 242), the meaning and usage of the buttons, pass codes etc.

The system administrator must ensure that all settings according to Chapter 2

Make Your Settings

are suitable for your application. For PC 242, these settings are accessed directly via menu items in the graphical display.

Most settings in Chapter 2

only apply to the system administrator, but the following also apply to those who only operate the controller: language selection, date and time settings, units, backlight timeout, pass codes, start/stop levels.

Chapter 3 Daily Operation (PC 242) on page 23 covers the topics needed for the

regular daily operation of PC 242.

Related literature (1) Advanced Pump Controller PC 242, Installation Guide

(included both on the CD and as a multilingual printed booklet)

(2) COMLI/Modbus PC 242 (included on the CD)

(3) AquaProg 4 (for configuring pump controllers)

(4) AquaVision 6 (a supervisory and operating system for pump stations)

Glossary and conventions To designate a menu item in a hierarchy, an angle bracket is used to separate the levels. Example: Settings > System means the menu item you reach by first choosing the menu item Settings, which has a number of submenus, where you choose the menu item System. Text in blue (like blue) indicates a hypertext link. If you read this document on a computer, you can click on the item and you will be taken to the link destination.

Alarm class: The alarm class can be either A-alarm or B-alarm. A-alarms are those that require immediate action, so operational staff in the field should be alerted regardless of the time of day. B-alarms are less important, but should be taken care of during normal work hours.

Pump exercising: Long idle periods in a corrosive contaminated environment are not good for pumps. As a countermeasure, they can be “exercised” at regular intervals, which will reduce corrosion and other detrimental effects.

Digital In means a signal that is either on or off (high or low), where high is anything between 5 and 34 volts DC, and low is anything below 2 volts.

Digital Output means a relay that may either be normally closed or normally

open.

Analogue Inputs are for sensors, and these inputs sense current in the range

4–20mA or 0–20mA.

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Pump controller type ABS PC 242, User guide SW 1.48

PC 242

2012.04.04 14 :11 :30

0.60m

38.3 l/s

18.7 l/s

22.4 A

1

0.0 A

2

1 OVERVIEW

PC 242 is a control unit for two pumps. PC 242 has a graphical display where you can see and control all aspects of the pumps and the conditions in the pit. This pump controller can either be used stand-alone or communicate all values and conditions to a central supervisory and operating system, such as AquaWeb from

Sulzer.

The unit includes all the means necessary for communicating all values and conditions to a central supervisory and operating system.

Communication methods include:

□ Analogue modem

□ GSM modem

□ GPRS modem

□ Fixed connection over radio or cable

□ Fix IP TCP Listen

Alarms may be sent to the central supervisory system or sent as SMS to a mobile phone. When the PC 242 communicates via a modem, four phone numbers can be defined, which are attempted in sequence until it successfully can deliver the alarm or until an attempt limit is reached. These attempts are all configurable for various conditions, such as the alarm class. As an example: if it fails to deliver an alarm to the central supervisory system, it can send an SMS to a mobile phone, but only if the alarm class is an A-alarm.

If the PC 242 is setup for alarm handling via SMS direct to a mobile phone and not via a SCADA system, the alarm will be sent out when the alarm trips. No SMS will be sent out when the alarm is acknowledged or returned to normal status.

Alarms accumulate in an alarm log, and they can be acknowledged either remotely or locally on the controller.

In the following, we describe the panel of PC 242 (

Section 1.1

) including its but-

tons and light indicators:

1.1 The PC 242 panel

The default (top-level) view of the display on the PC 242 dynamically shows the operating status of the pumps and conditions in the pit, displaying just about everything you need to know about the current situation.

Figure 1-1

shows the symbols and explains their meanings. The unit will always revert to this view after

10 minutes of inactivity in any other view (such as showing menus).

Time & Date / Alarm text 2012.04.04 14 :11 :30

0.60m

38.3 l/s Overflow sensor

18.7 l/s

22.4 A

1

0.0 A

2

Height of water in pit

Outward flow from pit

High-level float switch

Current consumption for pump 2

Shows operation status (animated)

Pump number 2

Low-level switch

Inward flow to pit

Height of water level (animated)

Figure 1-1 The display on the PC 242 dynamically shows the status of the pumps, displaying just about everything you need to know. The alarm symbol and text will only show when there really is an alarm, and in that case a red light will blink on the right side of the panel.

The overflow and high/low-level sensors will be coloured red when they are triggered. The

Triangle in the pump will be green and rotate while the pump operates normally, whereas it will be red in failure conditions and yellow when it is idle.

If any values are negative, that indicates a failure in the sensor or the communication with the sensor.

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3

Overview

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To the right of the display, there are six buttons with which you navigate in menus and control settings.

Figure 1-2 shows the layout and explains the functions of the

buttons

Up

Left/Backward Right/Forward

Alarm

Escape/Cancel Enter

Down

Figure 1-2 You navigate in the menus by the arrow buttons. You go “into” a menu item by pressing either the Right/Forward button or the Enter button. You confirm an operation with the Enter button. The Escape button will cancel the current operation or take you directly to the overview image of the pump pit.

The green light indicates that the unit is powered. The Rx and Tx will only light during communication (receive and transmit respectively). The red Alarm indicator will blink whenever there is an unacknowledged alarm (the display tells you the type of the alarm). When the alarm is acknowledged, the light turns steady red and remains so until the cause disappears.

Button functions □ either the Up or Down arrow button.

□ You go “into” a menu item by pressing either the Right/Forward button or the

Enter button.

□ You confirm (or perform/execute) an operation with the Enter button. When the top-level view of the display shows that there is an alarm, pressing the

Enter button will bring up a prompt to acknowledge the alarm, and if you press Enter once more, it will be acknowledged.

□ To cancel the current operation, or leave the menus and go back to overview image of the pump pit, press the Escape button.

Light indicators To the right of the buttons, there are four light indicators that show:

□ A green light indicates that the unit is powered.

□ Tx will light when transmitting data to the modem.

□ Rx will light when it is receiving data from the modem.

□ The Alarm indicator will blink whenever there is an unacknowledged alarm, and the display will tell you the type of the alarm. When the alarm is acknowledged, the light will turn steady red and remains so until the cause disappears.

Main menu

shows the Main Menu, which you reach from the overview image by pressing either the Up or Down arrow:

Main Menu

Manual Control

Alarm List

Show Status

Settings

Trend Curves

Select Language

Esc  

 Name of menu }

Menu items

}

These symbols show what navigation buttons are “active”in the current view.

Figure 1-3 The top-level menu of the PC 242 graphical display.

How to adjust the contrast The contrast of the display can be adjusted by the following procedure:

□ Brighter: Hold down the Right/Forward button and push the Escape button.

□ Darker: Hold down the Left/Backward button and push the Escape button.

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Pump controller type ABS PC 242, User guide SW 1.48

How to enter values and strings Use the Up/Down buttons to step a value or a letter up or down. For values/ strings longer than one digit/character, use the Left/Right buttons to move the insertion point to the desired field so you can change its value with the Up/Down buttons etc.

Pass codes There are three security levels:

1. Daily operations, such as acknowledging an alarm or stopping a pump, do not require any pass code or authorization.

2. Operational settings, such as setting the start or stop levels for the pump, require a pass code at the level of Operator;

3. Configuration settings that affect the basic functionality or access, such as setting the date format, require a pass code at the level of System.

The factory default pass codes are 1 and 2 respectively, but the codes can be changed under the menu item Settings > System. Whenever a pass code for

Operator is requested, you may supply either the pass code for Operator or

System.

1.2 Personal alarm, and how to reset it

When the pump station is manned, a personal alarm can be issued if the maintenance person hasn’t shown activity within a certain period of time. For details about settings related to this, see

Section 2.3 System settings on page 8 (assign-

ing Alarm Type, Alarm Delay and Max Time to Reset), Section 2.10 Settings for digital inputs

on page 18 (assigning Staff in Station to a Digital In), and Section

2.11 Settings for digital outputs on page 19 (assigning Personal Alarm Ind to

one of Digital Out 4 or 5).

After the specified Max Time to Reset, the assigned Digital Out relay is activated so a visual or audio signal can alert the maintenance person that the alarm timer must be reset. If the alarm timer is not reset within Alarm Delay, a personal alarm is sent out.

To reset the timer, just push any button on the pump controller.

5

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Overview

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Pump controller type ABS PC 242, User guide SW 1.48

2 MAKE YOUR SETTINGS

The procedure to make these settings is described for PC 242, which has a graphical interface (see Section 1.2 on page 5).

Main Menu

Manual Control

Alarm List

Show Status

Settings

Trend Curves

Select Language

Esc   

2.1 Select language

1. Choose the menu item Select Language and press Enter twice.

2. Enter the pass code Operator (default is 1). Press Enter.

3. Scroll to the language of your choice by using the Up/Down buttons.

4. Press Enter and then the Left/Backward arrow.

2.2 Overview of settings

The menu item Settings has 12 submenus with a large number of settings that need to be entered by the system administrator, although they all have sensible default values. The following are the 12 submenus:

1. System ( Table 2-1 in Section 2.3

on page 8)

2. Pump Pit (

Table 2-2 in Section 2.4

on page 9))

3. Pump 1 ( Table 2-3 in Section 2.5

on page 13)

4. Pump 2 (

Table 2-3 in Section 2.5

on page 13)

5. Common P1-P2 (

Table 2-4 in Section 2.6

on page 15)

6. Analogue Logging (

Table 2-5 in Section 2.7

on page 16)

7. Trend Curves (

Table 2-6 in Section 2.8

on page 16)

8. Analogue Inputs (

Table 2-7 in Section 2.9

on page 17)

9. Digital Inputs ( Table 2-8 in Section 2.10

on page 18)

10. Digital Outputs (

Table 2-9 in Section 2.11

on page 19)

11. Pulse Channels (

Table 2-10 in Section 2.12

on page 20)

12. Communication (

Table 2-11 in Section 2.13

on page 21)

All settings require a pass code for System except some settings under the submenu System and the start/stop levels under submenus Pump 1 and Pump 2, which only require a pass code for Operator.

Each of the 12 submenus are described in separate tables. The exact procedure how the tables should be interpreted is exemplified below for the settings under

the menu item Settings > System > System Alarms > Power Fail in Table 2-1 .

1. Choose the menu item Settings and press Enter.

1. The topmost menu item System will be selected. Press Enter again.

1. Select the menu item System Alarms by using the Up/Down buttons, press

Enter.

1. Select the menu item Power Fail, press Enter.

1. Select the menu item Alarm Type, press Enter and enter the pass code for

System. Choose one of {Inactive, B-Alarm, A-Alarm} and press Enter.

1. Select the menu item Alarm Delay, press Enter and give the pass code for

System. Set the number of seconds and press Enter

The pass code will be remembered for a few seconds, so in step 5 above, you may not need to enter the pass code. How the buttons on the panel are used is described in

Chapter 1 Overview

on page 3.

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7

Make your settings

System

Submenu

System

Alarms

__

2.3 System settings

Table 2-1 shows the complete list of system settings.

Table 2-1 System settings, under the menu item ‘Settings > System’

Submenu Setting

Select Language

Pass code Comment

Operator Same as the setting described in

Section 2.1

Date Format

Set Date

Set Time

Select Units

Backlight Timeout

Value

Select a language

(YYYY.MM.DD,

DD.MM.YYYY,

MM.DD.YYYY)

Date

Time

(Metric units,

US units)

Minutes

System

Operator

System

Metric: m, m 2 , m 3 , l/s (liters/s), bar, mm, °C

US: ft, ft 2 , gal, GPM (gal/min), °F

If you enter a value of 0, the backlight will always be on.

Operator

Power Fail

Low Supply

Voltage

Level Graphics Range

Alarm Type

Alarm Delay

Alarm Type

Alarm Delay

Alarm Limit

Hysteresis

Alarm Type

NV Checksum Error

Alarm Delay

Personal

Alarm

Change Pass code

Alarm Type

Alarm Delay

Max Time to Reset

Operator

System m, ft

(Inactive,

B-Alarm, A-Alarm)

Seconds

(Inactive,

B-Alarm, A-Alarm)

Seconds

Volts

Volts

(Inactive,

B-Alarm, A-Alarm)

Seconds

(Inactive,

B-Alarm, A-Alarm)

Seconds

Hours and minutes

Integer

Integer

System

Operator

System

NV Checksum Error is issued if the checksum for the non-volatile memory indicates error. Alarm stays active until power is switched off-on.

After this time, the maintenance person must reset the timer (by pushing any button), or a Personal

Alarm is sent out after Alarm Delay.

For Operator access. The code may be 1 to 4 digits long. The factory default code is 1.

For System (administrator) access. The code may be 1 to 4 digits long. The factory default code is 2.

History/Alarm Reset

All History Log

All Alarms

{Cancel, Reset}

{Cancel, Reset}

System

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Pump controller type ABS PC 242, User guide SW 1.48

Pump Pit

2.4 Pump pit settings

Table 2-2 shows the complete list of settings under the submenu Pump Pit.

Table 2-2 Pump pit settings, under ‘Settings > Pump Pit’

Pass code Comment Submenu Submenu

Level Sensor Type

Setting

Select Type

Max No. Pumps Running Select Pumps Running

Value

{Analogue Sensor,

Start/Stop Float}

{2 Pumps, Max

1 Pump}

System

System

Min Relay Interval Min Time Seconds System

To minimize power surges or spikes caused by pumps starting or stopping simultaneously, there should always be a minimum time between two relays switching states.

Alternation

Normal

Alternation

Asymmet.

Alternation

Runtime

Alternation

Alt. Function

Alternation After

Primary Pump

No. Stops to Altern.

{OFF, Normal,

Asymmetrical}

{Each Pump Stop,

Both Pumps Stopped}

{Pump 1, Pump 2}

Integer

Runtime Alternation {ON, OFF, }

System

Will switch only after a certain number of stops of the primary pump.

In addition to the normal or asymmetrical alternation, you can set the controller to switch pump when that pump has been running continuously for a certain period of time.

Alternat. Stop Level

Start on Fast Change

Meas.

Parameters

After Cont. Runtime.

Hours and minutes

Alternat. Stop Level

After No Starts

Stop Level

Stop Delay

Start Function

Start Level Change

Per

Stop Function

Stop Level Change

Per

Calculate Inflow

Pit Shape

Emptying/Filling

{OFF, ON} value m, ft

Seconds

{OFF, ON} m, ft

Minutes

{OFF, ON} m, ft

Minutes

{OFF, ON}

{Rectangular, Conical}

{Emptying Pit,

Filling Pit}

Inflow Calc Interval Seconds

System

System

System

If the level increases at least Start Level Change during the time period Per, then one pump will start. If the level continues to increase that much, the next pump will start.

If the level decreases more than Stop Level

Change during the time period Per, then one pump will stop. If the level continues to decrease that much, the other pump will stop.

Is the pump filling or emptying the pit?

Time interval between measurements.

Station Flow

Percentage

100 % means that 2 pumps deliver twice as much as a single pump. 50 % means that 2 pumps deliver not more than a single pump.

Pit Area

Flow Compen.

2 Pumps

Level 0

Area 0

Level 9

Area 9

Fixed at 0 m, ft m 2 , ft 2

… m, ft m 2 , ft 2

System

You can specify the shape of the pit by specifying the area at 10 different levels from the bottom of the pit, level 0, to the top, level 9.

EN

9

Make your settings

Submenu

Calc. Pump Capacity

Overflow

Submenu

Exponent &

Constant

Setting

Function

Min Level P.Cap Calc

Start Delay

Calculation Time

Stop Delay

Value

{OFF, ON} m, ft

Seconds

Seconds

Seconds

Overflow Detect

{OFF, Overflow Sensor,

Level Limit}

Pass code

System

Overflow Calculation

Comment

For submersed pumps, set Min Level P.Cap Calc to be the top of the pump — it improves accuracy.

Calculation starts after Start Delay, when pump flows are stabilized, and goes on for Calculation

Time.Stop Delay does not affect pump capacity calculation, but the calculation of the inflow is inhibited during Stop Delay after the pump stops as the flow stabilizes.

To detect overflow, an overflow sensor is much more accurate than a threshold from the level sensor. By setting parameters (exponents and constants) the overflow can also be accurately measured by a calculation. “Lock on Inflow” simly uses the historical value of inflow.

Exponent 1

Constant 1

Exponent 2

Constant 2

{Lock on Inflow,

Exp. & Constant}

Number

Number

Number

Number

System

Overflow = h e1 c

1

+ h e2 c

2

[m

3

/s or ft

3

/s] h = height of water. [m or ft]

Overflow

Level

Level Limit m, ft

The level at which overflow is expected. Note: not as accurate as using an overflow switch.

Pump 1 Backup Start

Pump 2 Backup Start

{OFF, ON}

{OFF, ON} Backup Running

Pit Alarms

High Level

Low Level

High-Level

Float

Low-Level

Float

High Inflow

Running Time

Alarm Type

Alarm Delay

Alarm Limit

Hysteresis

Alarm Type

Alarm Delay

Alarm Limit

Hysteresis

Alarm Type

Seconds

{Inactive, B-Alarm,

A-Alarm}

Seconds m, ft m, ft

{Inactive, B-Alarm,

A-Alarm}

Seconds m, ft m, ft

{Inactive, B-Alarm,

A-Alarm}

Block al. if pumps OK

Alarm Delay

Alarm Type

Alarm Delay

Alarm Type

Alarm Delay

Alarm Limit

Hysteresis

{NO, YES}

Seconds

{Inactive, B-Alarm,

A-Alarm}

Seconds

{Inactive, B-Alarm,

A-Alarm}

Seconds

Liters/second, GPM

Liters/second, GPM

System

If the normal control via start and stop levels fails, this may act as an emergency backup:

If the high-level float triggers, pumps 1 and/or 2 may be set to start running for a period of

Running Time.

System

YES: Block alarm if pumps running

NO: No blocking of alarm

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10

Pump controller type ABS PC 242, User guide SW 1.48

Submenu

Pit Alarms

Pump

Blocking

Submenu

Low Inflow

Backup Start

Remote

Blocking

High Pressure

Low Pressure

Overflow

Alarm

Pressure

Blocking

Drain Pump

Running

Sensor Error

Motor Protect. DO 6

Both Pumps

Blocked

Remote

Blocking

Low-Level

Float

Pressure

Blocking

Block on

Leakage

Setting

Alarm Type

Alarm Delay

Alarm Limit

Hysteresis

Alarm Type

Alarm Delay

Alarm Type

Alarm Delay

Alarm Type

Alarm Delay

Alarm Limit

Hysteresis

Alarm Type

Alarm Delay

Alarm Limit

Hysteresis

Alarm Type

Alarm Delay

Alarm Type

Alarm Delay

Alarm Type

Alarm Delay

Alarm Type

Alarm Delay

Alarm Type

Alarm Delay

Alarm Type

Alarm Delay

Remote Blocking

Block Timeout

Low-Level Float

Pressure Blocking

Block Delay

Block Pressure

Block Timeout

Block on Leakage

Block Delay

Value

{Inactive, B-Alarm,

A-Alarm}

Seconds

Liters/second, GPM

Liters/second, GPM

{Inactive, B-Alarm,

A-Alarm}

Seconds

{Inactive, B-Alarm,

A-Alarm}

Seconds

{Inactive, B-Alarm,

A-Alarm}

Seconds bar, ft bar, ft

{Inactive, B-Alarm,

A-Alarm}

Seconds bar, ft bar, ft

{Inactive, B-Alarm,

A-Alarm}

Seconds

{Inactive, B-Alarm,

A-Alarm}

Seconds

{Inactive, B-Alarm,

A-Alarm}

Seconds

{Inactive, B-

Alarm, A-Alarm

Seconds

{Inactive, B-

Alarm, A-Alarm

Seconds

{Inactive, B-

Alarm, A-Alarm

Seconds

{OFF, ON}

Seconds

{OFF, ON}

{OFF, ON}

Seconds bar, ft

Seconds

{OFF, ON}

Seconds

Pass code

System

System

Comment

The pressure threshold for the alarm is set in the menu below for Pump Blocking.

A value of zero for Block Timeout means that the blocking will never timeout.

Note: Pressure Blocking may be used when a pressure sensor is installed on the outflow side; when it indicates too high pressure for the pump, it can be blocked. A value of zero for Block Time-

out means that the blocking will never time out.

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11

Make your settings

Submenu Submenu

Setting

Stop Pump during Mix

Mixer Time

Start Count Interval

This menu follows the setting of

DO 6 in

Table 2-9, which may be set to one of the menus on the right.

Mixer Control

Cleaning

Control

Timer Interval

Max Level

Min Level

Flush At

Drain Pump

Control

Level-Sensor Check

Tariff Control

Flushing Time

No. Starts to Flush

Start Delay

Stop Delay

At High-Level Float

Level at High Float

Max Deviation +/–

At Low-Level Float

Level at Low Float

Max Deviation +/–

Level Change Check

Level Change Time

Peak Monday through Peak

Sunday

Min Level Change +/–

Tariff Control

Lead Time

Pump Down Level

Peak Time 1 On

Peak Time 1 Off

Peak Time 2 On

Peak Time 2 Off

Value

{NO, YES}

Seconds

Integer

Hours and minutes m, ft m, ft

{Pump Start,

Pump Stop}

Seconds

Integer

Seconds

Seconds

{OFF, ON} m, ft m, ft

{OFF, ON} m, ft m, ft

{OFF, ON}

Seconds m, ft

{OFF, ON}

Minutes m, ft

Hours and minutes

Hours and minutes

Hours and minutes

Hours and minutes

Pass code

System

System

System

Comment

The mixer is either started after Start Count Interval pump starts, or after Timer Interval. Entering zero disables the corresponding trigger.

If max > min level, this is the window where the mixer may run. If max < min level, the mixer may only run outside that window.

Slave contact to Digital In type Drain Pump Float

Checks that the level sensor is functioning properly. Checks can be made at high float, at low float and to ensure that the output varies.

At high/low float, a sensor alarm can be issued if the level sensor gives a value that is not within

Max Deviation from the specified level of the high/ low float.

To ensure that values vary, see below:

A sensor alarm can be issued if the level sensor does not change its output value at least Min

Level Change in the time period Level Change

Time.

If tariff control is used, you can set the pumps to start emptying the pit Lead Time before high tariff starts. In this case, it will empty the pit down to

Pump Down Level (or to a stop level, whichever is triggered first).

For each day of the week, you can specify two time periods of high tariff (by specifying its On and

Off times).

Level Above Sea Level m, ft System

If the display of current levels should be absolute levels above sea, enter the level of the pump pit above sea level.

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12

Pump controller type ABS PC 242, User guide SW 1.48

Pump 1

Pump 2

2.5

Pump 1 and 2 settings

Table 2-3 shows the complete list of settings under the submenus Pump 1 and Pump 2.

Table 2-3 Pump 1 and 2 settings, under ‘Settings > Pump 1’ and ’Settings > Pump 2’’

Submenu

Pump Alarms

Submenu

Relay Control

Start/Stop Levels

Running Indication

Time Settings

Pump Capacity

No Run

Indication

Fallen Motor

Protect

Motor Prot

Reset Err

High Motor

Current

Low Motor

Current

Leakage

High

Temperature

Low Pump

Capacity

Setting

Pump Connected?

Start Level

Stop Level

Random Start

Range+–

Start Level H.Tariff

Stop Level H.Tarriff

Select Type

Current Threshold

Threshold-On Delay

Threshold-Off Delay

Value

{NO, YES} m, ft m, ft m, ft m, ft m, ft

{OFF, Digital Input,

Motor Current}

Amperes

Seconds

Seconds

Max Cont. Runtime Hours and minutes

Pass code

System

Operator

Comment

If a pump is not connected, the relay is still operating according to start/stop levels.

Note: These levels are only used during low-tariff times if tariff control in used.

The start level is randomized ± this range around

Start Level.

System

System

System

During high-tariff times, these levels are used as the start and stop levels.

The means/sensor by which a pump is regarded as running.

Pump is regarded as running above threshold.

To suppress spikes and noise, triggered thresholds from sensors can be required to persist for a certain time before a state change is accepted.

Pumps are stopped when Max Cont. Runtime is reached. The timer is reset each time a start level is reached.

An alarm is issued if the measured capacity is below this threshold.

Low Capacity Limit Liters/second, GPM

Alarm Type

Alarm Delay

Alarm Type

Alarm Delay

Alarm Type

Alarm Delay

Alarm Type

Alarm Delay

Alarm Limit

Hysteresis

Alarm Type

Alarm Delay

Alarm Limit

Hysteresis

Alarm Type

Alarm Delay

Alarm Type

Alarm Delay

Alarm Limit

Hysteresis

Alarm Type

Alarm Delay

Alarm Limit

Hysteresis

{Inactive, B-Alarm,

A-Alarm}

Seconds

{Inactive, B-Alarm,

A-Alarm}

Seconds

{Inactive, B-Alarm,

A-Alarm}

Seconds

{Inactive, B-Alarm,

A-Alarm}

Seconds

Amperes

Amperes

{Inactive, B-Alarm,

A-Alarm}

Seconds

Amperes

Amperes

{Inactive, B-Alarm,

A-Alarm}

Seconds

{Inactive, B-Alarm,

A-Alarm}

Seconds

°C, °F

°C, °F

{Inactive, B-Alarm,

A-Alarm}

Seconds

Liters/second, GPM

Liters/second, GPM

System

Requires a leakage sensor in the pump.

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13

Make your settings

Submenu

Pump Alarms

Submenu

Pump Not in Auto

Pump Error

Max Cont.

Runtime

Pump Alarm

Blocked

Block Pump on Alarm

Dry Run Detect

Setting

Alarm Type

Alarm Delay

Alarm Type

Alarm Delay

Alarm Type

Alarm Delay

Alarm Type

Alarm Delay

High Motor Current

Low Motor Current

Fallen Motor Protect

High Temperature

Low Pump Capacity

Leakage

No Run Indication

Pump Error

Low Current Block

Block Delay

Block Current

Block Timeout

Value

{Inactive, B-Alarm,

A-Alarm}

Seconds

{Inactive, B-Alarm,

A-Alarm}

Seconds

{Inactive, B-Alarm,

A-Alarm}

Seconds

{Inactive, B-Alarm,

A-Alarm}

Seconds

{NO, YES}

{NO, YES}

{NO, YES}

{NO, YES}

{NO, YES}

{NO, YES}

{NO, YES}

{NO, YES}

{OFF, ON}

Seconds

Amperes

Seconds

Pass code

System

System

System

Comment

If setting is NO, the pump will only be blocked as long as the cause for the alarm persists.

If setting is YES, the pump will be blocked until the alarm is acknowledged.

To detect that the pump is running dry, a threshold on low current is used.

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Pump controller type ABS PC 242, User guide SW 1.48

2.6 Common settings for pump 1 and pump 2

Common P1-P2 

Table 2-4 shows the complete list of settings you can make under the submenu Common P1-P2.

Table 2-4 Common settings for pump 1 and pump 2, under ‘Settings > Common P1-P2’

Submenu

Motor Prot Auto Reset

Pump Exercising

Pump Reversing

Log Pump Events

Setting

Reset Motor Prot. P1

Reset Motor Prot. P2

Pulse Time

Delay Time

Max No. Attempts

Exercise P1

Value

{NO, YES}

{NO, YES}

Seconds

Seconds

Integer

{NO, YES}

Exercise P2 {NO, YES}

Max Standstill Time Hours and minutes

Running Time

Start If Level >

Start If Level <

Reversing P1

Reversing P2

Rev. On Pump Fail

Rev. On Fallen M.Prot.

Start Rev. Delay

Rev. Run Time

Max No. Attempts

Stop Second Pump

Pump Relay

When Rev.

Log Pump Events

Seconds m, ft m, ft

{NO, YES}

{NO, YES}

{NO, YES}

{NO, YES}

Seconds

Seconds

Integer

{NO, YES}

{ON, OFF}

{NO, YES}

Pass code

System

System

System

System

Comment

Pulse Time is the duration of the reset pulse.

Delay Time is used for two purposes:

(1) the cooling time before a new reset is attempted;

(2) the counter for Max No. Attempts is reset when the pump has been running for Delay Time.

This is used to “exercise” the pumps if they have been standing still for Max Standstill Time.

If ‘Start If Level >‘ is lower than ‘Start If Level <‘, this is the window where the pump(s) may run.

In the opposite case, the pump(s) may only run outside that window. When the condition is met, the pump(s) will run for Running Time.

15

EN

Make your settings

Analogue Logging

Submenu

Log Channel 1 through

Log Channel 8

2.7 Analogue logging

Table 2-5 shows the complete list of settings you can make under the submenu

Analogue Logging.

Table 2-5 Analogue logging, under ‘Settings > Analogue Logging’

Setting

Log Signal

Log Interval

Log Function

Value

{Closed,

Level in Pump Pit,

Inflow,

Outflow,

Motor Current P1,

Motor Current P2,

Pressure/Optional,

Temperature P1,

Temperature P2,

Overflow Level,

Overflow Flow,

Pump Capacity P1,

Pump Capacity P2,

Pulse Channel 1,

Pulse Channel 2,

Supply Voltage}

Minutes

{Closed,

Actual Value,

Average Value,

Min Value,

Max Value}

Pass code

System

Comment

A total of 8 analogue channels whose outputs you can choose from the list.

Pressure/Optional is intended for either a pressure sensor or an optional user defined sensor.

Pulse Channel 1 and Pulse Channel 2 are used for rain and energy values.

Trend Curves

Submenu

Trend Curve 1 through

Trend Curve 4

2.8 Settings for trend curves

 Table 2-6 shows the complete list of settings you can make under the submenu

Trend Curves.

Table 2-6 Settings for trend curves, under ‘Settings > Trend Curves’

Setting

Sample Time

Trend Signal

Max Value

Min Value

Value

Seconds

{Closed,

Level in Pump Pit,

Inflow,

Outflow,

Motor Current P1,

Motor Current P2,

Pressure/Optional

Temperature P1

Temperature P2

Overflow Level,

Overflow Flow,

Pump Capacity P1,

Pump Capacity P2}

Any number

Any number

Pass code

System

System

Comment

A total of 4 trend curves you can choose from the list.

The maximum and minimum values are used to set the scales of the graphs.

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16

Pump controller type ABS PC 242, User guide SW 1.48

Analogue Inputs

2.9 Settings for analogue inputs

 Table 2-7 shows the complete list of settings you can make under the submenu

Analogue Inputs.

Table 2-7 Settings for analogue inputs, under ‘Settings > Analogue Inputs’

Submenu

AI 1 Level Sensor

AI 2 Current P1

AI 3 Current P2

AI 4 Pressure/

Option

Submenu

Settings

AI 5 Temperature P1

AI 6 Temperature P2

Setting

Signal Range

Scaling 0% =

Scaling 100% =

Zero Offset

Filter Constant

Signal Range

Scaling 0% =

Scaling 100% =

Deadband

Filter Constant

Signal Range

Scaling 0% =

Scaling 100% =

Deadband

Filter Constant

Function

Designation

No. of Decimals

Unit

Signal Range

Scaling 0% =

Scaling 100% =

Filter Constant

AI 4 High Alarm

AI 4 Low Alarm

Sensor Type

Filter Constant

Pt100 Cable Offset

Sensor Type

Filter Constant

Pt100 Cable Offset

Seconds

{Back-Pressure,

Free choice}

String

Integer

String

{4-20 mA,

0-20 mA} bar, ft, user bar, ft, user

Seconds

Alarm Type: {Inactive,

B-Alarm, A-Alarm}

Alarm Delay: Seconds

Alarm Limit: Value

Hysteresis: Value

Alarm Type: {Inactive,

B-Alarm, A-Alarm}

Alarm Delay: Seconds

Alarm Limit: Value

Hysteresis: Value

{PTC, Pt100}

Seconds

°C, °F

{PTC, Pt100}

Seconds

Value

{4-20 mA,

0-20 mA} m, ft m, ft m, ft

Seconds

{4-20 mA,

0-20 mA}

Amperes

Amperes

Amperes

Seconds

{4-20 mA,

0-20 mA}

Amperes

Amperes

Amperes

°C, °F

Pass ode

System

Comment

Pressure/Option is intended for either a pressure sensor or an optional user defined sensor.

Only available for Free choice, i.e when an optional user defined sensor is used.

Only available for Free choice, i.e when an optional user defined sensor is used.

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17

Make your settings

Digital Inputs

Submenu

Digital In 1 to

Digital In 12

Digital In 13 and

Digital In 14

2.10 Settings for digital inputs

 Table 2-8 shows the complete list of settings you can make under the submenu

Digital Inputs. The default configuration for the digital inputs are is listed in the

Installation Guide.

Table 2-8 Settings for digital inputs, under ‘Settings > Digital Inputs’

Setting

Function

Value i

{OFF,

Run Indicator P1,

Run Indicator P2,

Manual Start P1,

Manual Start P2,

P1 Not in Auto,

P2 Not in Auto,

Start Float P1,

Start Float P2,

Stop Float P1-P2,

P1 Pump Fail;

P2 Pump Fail,

Low-Level Float,

Power Fail,

Drain Pump Float,

Staff in Station,

Alarm Reset,

High-Level Float,

Overflow Sensor,

Motor Prot. P1,

Motor Prot. P2,

Motor Prot. DO 6,

Alarm Input}

Sub setting Value Pass code Comment

There is a total of 14 digital (on/off) input channels. The first 12 ones can be chosen from a list of 20 functions.

However, we recommend to keep the default configuration, which is listed in the Installation Guide.

Staff in Station is used for personal alarm; a switch is usually connected to the light switch to indicate that a person is currently working in the vicinity of the pit.

Not in Auto is usually a signal from a manual switch that disconnects the pump completely from being controlled from this unit.

Manual Start may be connected to a manual switch — its function will be identical to that of starting the pump by using the menu (see

Section 3.1

Manual Control on page 23.

)

System

Norm. Open/Closed {NO, NC}

NO stands for Normally Open.

NC stands for Normally Closed.

Alarm Type

Inactive

A-alarm

B-alarm

Alarm Delay Seconds

Alarm Settings

Alarm Text String

Only used when a digital input is set as function Alarm Input:

Custom design text of 18 characters

Function

{Same as

Digital In 1 – 12 above with additional functions:

Pulse Ch.1,

Pulse Ch.2}

Norm. Open/Closed {NO, NC} i The same value may not be assigned to two different Digital In.

NO stands for Normally Open.

NC stands for Normally Closed.

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18

Pump controller type ABS PC 242, User guide SW 1.48

Digital Ouputs

Submenu

Digital Out 1 to

Digital Out 5

2.11 Settings for digital outputs

Table 2-9 hows the complete list of settings you can make under the submenu

Digital Outputs. The default configuration for the digital outputs are is listed in the Installation Guide.

Table 2-9 Settings for digital outputs, under ‘Settings > Digital Outputs’

Setting

Function

Norm. Open/Closed

Value i

{OFF,

Pump Relay P1,

Pump Relay P2,

Not Ackn. Alarm,

Active Alarm,

Reset M.Prot P1

Pump Fail P1,

Reset M.Prot P2,

Pump Fail P2,

Modem Supply,

Remote Control,

Personal Alarm Ind,

Reset M.Prot P1+P2,

Alarm Alert,

Reversing Relay P1,}

Reversing Relay P2,

Active A-alarm

Active B-alarm,

Not Ackn. A-alarm,

Not Ackn. B-alarm}

Pass code

System

{NO, NC}

Comment

There is a total of 22 digital (on/off) output channels. The first five ones can be chosen from a list of 19 functions.

Digital out 6 has additional function as; Mixer,

Cleaner and drain (only one of those functions can be selected). However, we recommend keeping the default configuration, which is listed in the

Installation Guide.

NO stands for Normally Open.

NC stands for Normally Closed.

Digital Out 6

Function

{Same as

Digital Out 1 – 5 above with additional functions:

Mixer Control,

Cleanser Control,

Drain Pump Control}

Norm. Open/Closed {NO, NC}

NO stands for Normally Open.

NC stands for Normally Closed i The same value may not be assigned to two different Digital In.

19

EN

Make your settings

Pulse Channels

2.12 Settings for pulse channels

Table 2-10 shows the complete list of settings you can make under the submenu

Pulse Channels.

Table 2-10 Settings for pulse channels, under ‘Settings > Pulse Channels’

Submenu

Settings Ch.1 and

Settings Ch.2

Setting

Function Ch.1

Function Ch.2

1 Pulse =

Alarm High

Precipitation/

Alarm High Power

Alarm Delay

Alarm Limit

Hysteresis

Value

{Precipitation,

Energy}

{Precipitation,

Energy} mm or kWh inch or kWh

{Inacactive,

B-Alarm,

A-Alarm}

Seconds l ⁄ (s . ha),

Inch/h or kW l ⁄ (s . ha)

Inch/h or kW

Pass code Comment

The menus adapt to the choice you made for the function of channel 1 and channel 2.

l⁄(s . ha) is: litres per second and hectare, which equals 0.36 mm per hour.

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20

Pump controller type ABS PC 242, User guide SW 1.48

Communication

Submenu

Protocol

Service Port

2.13 Communication settings

Table 2-11 shows the complete list of settings you can make under the submenu

Communication.

Table 2-11 Communication settings, under ‘Settings > Communication’

Communication Port

Setting

Protocol

Cross Ref. Table

Baudrate

Station ID

Station Name

Baudrate

Parity

Handshake

Comli/Modbus ID

Comli/Modbus Timeout

Modem Connected

Modem Init

Hayes Before Calling

Hayes After Discon.

Sign. Before Answer

Modem PIN Code

Modem PUK Code

Value

{Modbus, Comli}

Integer

String

{OFF,

300,

600,

1 200,

2 400,

4 800,

9 600,

19 200,

38 400,

57 600,

115 200}

{OFF, ON}

{OFF,

300,

600,

1 200,

2 400,

4 800,

9 600,

19 200,

38 400,

57 600,

115 200}

{None, Odd, Even}

{OFF, ON}

Integer

Seconds

{NO, Analogue,

GSM, GPRS modem CA 521,

Fix IP TCP Listen}

{Cancel, Init}

String

String

Integer

String

String

Pass code

System

System

System

Comment

See Appendix 4.7

Modem is not needed for fixed line connections.

Default: ATH0E0V1Q0S0=1

Default: Q0&W

Minimum 1 for call up modem

Modem

SMSC Serv-

Center No.

String

System

Leave blank to use the default SIM-card.

Otherwise, it must be in international format (but the leading ‘+’ character may be omitted).

GPRS APN

GPRS APN Cont.

GPRS Heart Beat

GPRS Remote

IP Addr.

GPRS TCP-IP Port

GPRS User Name

GPRS Password

GPRS SMS backup

String

String

Minutes

String

Integer

String

String

{OFF, ON}

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21

Make your settings

Submenu

Modem

Alarm Call Up

Call Attempt 1 through

Call Attempt 4

Setting

SMS backup number

GPRS Event log

HB operator scan

Max No. Calls/

Alarms

Interval Call Attemp

Call Up Acknowledge.

Alarm Ackn.

Reg 333.

Connect ID-String

Phone Number

Value

{OFF, ON}

{OFF, ON}

Integer

Seconds

{No

Acknowledgement,

Ring Signal,

Write to Reg. 333,

All Data Com}

{NO, YES}

String

Pass code Comment

Phone no to SMS receiver

System

System

The maximum number of attempts to call. It cycles through Call Attempt 1-4 (see settings below) until

Max No. Calls/Alarms is reached.

The time between call attempts.

This is for the local indication. If YES, it is acknowledged when the central system has taken care of the alarm.

String

Call Attempt 1-4 assume that a modem is connected. Not needed for fixed line connections. For

SMS, the GSM number must be in international format (but the leading ‘+’ character may be omitted).

Type of alarm receiver. If OFF, it skips to the next

Call Attempt in the list.

Alarm Receiver

Cond. for Alarm Call

Parallel Call

Timeout Alarm Ackn.

Send ID-String

ID-String Delay

{OFF, Central System,

SMS GSM (PDU)}

{A-Alarm On,

A-Alarm On/Off,

A+B-Alarm On,

A+B-Alarm On/Off}

{NO, YES}

Seconds

{NO, YES}

Seconds

System

A call is attempted only if the condition is true. On/

Off indicates whether the alarm goes on or off.

Example: A+B-Alarm On/Off means either A or B alarm that either goes on or off.

Parallel call, calls all the numbers in Attemps 1 - 4

directly. See Appendix 4.6.5

The time until it skips this attempt and tries the next one.

The time between the start of the connection until the ID-String is being sent (if set to YES).

EN

22

Pump controller type ABS PC 242, User guide SW 1.48

3 DAILY OPERATION

Manual Control,

Alarm List

Show Status,

Trend Curves

For the daily operation, when settings do not need to be changed, there are only four menus you need to care about, in addition to the top-level view that graphically displays the current conditions. The four menus are: Manual Control, Alarms

List, Show Status, Trend Curves, and they are each described in the following sections

When the top-level view of the display shows that there is an alarm (see Chapter

1 Overview on page 3), pressing the Enter button will bring up a prompt to acknowledge the alarm, and if you press Enter once more, it will be acknowledged.

Main Menu

Manual Control

Alarm List

Show Status

Settings

Trend Curves

Select Language

Esc  

3.1

Manual control

The menu item Manual Control is used to start and stop pumps, reset the motor protection, start the cleaner, and remove any remote blocking of the pumps.

Table 3-1 shows the complete list of manual operations you can do.

Menu

Manual

Control

Table 3-1 Manual Control

Setting

Start/Stop P1

Start/Stop P2

Reset Motor Prot. P1

Reset Motor Prot. P2

Reversing P1

Reversing P2

DO 6 Mixer/

Cleaner/Drain

Remote Blocking

Comment

Start/stop with the Enter button. (Applicable when the level is within the configured start/stop levels.)

Reset with the Enter button.

Reversing start with the Enter button.

Depending on the setting of DO 6. Start/stop the mixer/cleaner/drain pump with the Enter button.

If the pump has been blocked from a remote centre, you can inhibit (remove) that remote blocking by pressing the Enter button.

Main Menu

Manual Control

Alarm List

Show Status

Settings

Trend Curves

Select Language

Esc  

3.2

Alarm list

Table 3-2 shows the contents under the menu item Alarm List.

Table 3-2 Alarm List

Submenu

Unackn.

Alarms

Active

Alarm

All Events

Value

Shows a list of unacknowledged alarms.

Comment

Press Enter to acknowledge the selected alarm.

A list of active alarms is shown in reverse chronological order.

A list of all events is shown in reverse chronological order.

Events are: start/stop of pump, when an alarm goes on, when it is acknowledged, and when the alarm goes off.

EN

23

Daily operation

Main Menu

Manual Control

Alarm List

Show Status

Settings

Trend Curves

Select Language

Esc  

3.3

Show status

Table 3-3 shows the complete list of information under the menu item

Show Status.

Submenu

Pump Pit

Pump 1/

Pump 2

Overflow

System

Back-Pressure

/Free choice

Precipitation

Ch.1/

Energy Ch.2

Submenu

GPRS Modem

-

Pumped

Volume

-

Running Time

No. of Starts

Pump Capacity

-

Overflow Time

Overflow

Volume

No. of

Overflows

-

-

Accumulated Value

Table 3-3 Show Status

Value

PC 242 Version

Option

Supply Voltage

Status, IP Address

Level

Inflow

Outflow

Total

Today

Day 1 - Day 7

Motor Current

Temperature

Total

Today

Day 1 - Day 7

Total

Today

Day 1 - Day 7

Last Sample

Nominal

Avg. Today

Avg. Day 1 –

Avg. Day 7

Overflow Level

Overflow Flow

Total

Today

Day 1 – Day 7

Total

Today

Day 1 – Day 7

Total

Today

Day 1 – Day 7

Back-Pressure/

Free choice

Current value

Total

Today

Day 1 – Day 7

Comment

If sensors are connected.

Depending on the setting of

AI 4 in

Table 2-7 on page 17.

There’s a menu each for channel 1 and 2 respectively, and they may be either for precipitation or energy depending on your choice

in Table 2-10

on page 20.

Main Menu

Manual Control

Alarm List

Show Status

Settings

Trend Curves

Select Language

Esc  

3.4

Trend curves

Entering into this menu item will show a graph over the last 100 samples according to your settings in

Table 2-6 on page 16. Pressing the Down button will show

a legend for the curves, i.e. the interpretation of the colours, and also the latest values. Pressing the Up button will remove the legend box.

EN

24

Pump controller type ABS PC 242, User guide SW 1.48

4 APPENDIX

4.1 Pump capacity and In/Outflow of the pit

General

By entering the shape and size of the pump pit (Pump pit settings) together with

an accurate level measuring device, the unit will at all times know the momentary volume in the pit.

A new pump capacity calculation is performed every time the pump starts alone with no other pump running. If one or more pumps are already running, the controller will use the existing nominal pump capacity for the outflow calculation.

Inflow is calculated at a preset interval. Outflow is recalculated every second and the values are presented and updated according to the parameters set.

Calculation

When one pump starts alone:

- The actual inflow value when the pump starts is temporarily stored and the indicated inflow value frozen.

- The outflow value is now ramped up for a configurable time frame. “Start delay”

- The pump capacity is calculated during a configurable time frame. “Calculation Time”

- The inflow indication lock is released. The inflow is now a function of pump capacity and level.

- The outflow is ramped down for a configurable time frame after pump stop.

“Stop delay”

Calculation rules

- The level must be over “Min Level for Calculation”

- The level must be under “Max Level for Calculation”

- The level after calculation must be lower than when the calculation started.

Presentation of the Pump Capacity calculation

The pump capacity is presented as a Nominal and Last Sample value.

Nominal

- The nominal value is re-calculated to point 1 and filtered by taking median value of last 5 samples.

Last Sample

- As it sounds, the last calculation, unfiltered!

25

EN

Appendix

4.2

Pit shape

The continuous flow measurement is based on the fact that the PC 242 can calculate the volume by measuring the level difference during a set calculation time.

For this calculation is to exact it is necessary that the area /level should be always known. This can be achieved by setting the level and area for all level where the pit changes shape, up to 9 break points + the area at zero point can be set.

Rectangular Cone Cone

Figure 4-1 Example of pit shapes.

To get a correct calculation at all levels even the pit shape has to be set as the calculation is different for different geometrical shapes. A shape that ends in a point is set as conical, if it ends as a wedge (2 parallel sides) it is set as rectangular shape, see figure above.

Example for area calculation:

Rectangle Circel

A = L * W

A = Area

L = Length

W = Width

Ex.

A = ?

L = 2.20 Meter

W = 1.75 meter

A = 2.2 * 1.75

A = 3.85 m 2

A = pi * r 2 Ex.

A = Area

pi = 3.14...

A = ?

D = 2.50 meter

R = Radius = D/2 R = 2.5 / 2 = 1.25 m

A = 3.14 * (1.25) 2

A = 4.91 m 2

EN

26

4.2

Pit shape

The continuous flow measurement is based on the fact that the PC 242 can calculate the volume by measuring the level difference during a set calculation time.

For this calculation is to exact it is necessary that the area /level should be always known. This can be achieved by setting the level and area for all level where the pit changes shape, up to 9 break points + the area at zero point can be set.

Rectangular Cone Cone

Figure 4-1 Example of pit shapes.

To get a correct calculation at all levels even the pit shape has to be set as the calculation is different for different geometrical shapes. A shape that ends in a point is set as conical, if it ends as a wedge (2 parallel sides) it is set as rectangular shape, see figure above.

Example for area calculation:

Rectangle Circel

Pump controller type ABS PC 242, User guide SW 1.48

4.3

Overlow flow calculation

There are three methods that can be used to measure and calculate

overflow flow:

1. Use a conventional flow meter.

Advantage:

Drawbacks:

In most cases for standard PLC-systems this will increase the accuracy on the measurement.

Expensive and on sensors that only measure the overflow can dirt and mud dry on it, when the pit is operating in normal conditions. The sensor has to be cleaned regularly to ensure correct measurements.

2. Use the same sensor that is used for the level measurement in the pit and a weir and start the flow measurement on analogue set point.

Advantage:

Drawbacks:

The investment cost is low and the sensor will not need to be cleaned regularly.

The system must have a very good resolution on the input to be able to measure the overflow correctly and a very accurate 0-point otherwise the measurement is wrong.

3. Use the same level sensor that is used for the level measuring in the pit and a weir, and use a level switch to start the overflow measurement.

Advantage: The Investment cost is low and the sensor needs not to be cleaned regularly.

The accuracy of the 0-point is not affecting the measurements due to that the switch is used as a 0-point.

Drawbacks: The analogue input needs to have a very good resolution to be able to measure the signal. The PC 242 has no problem with this in ex. a sensor with the range of 10 meters the PC 242 has the resolution of < 0.7 mm.

The third method is preferred and used in the PC 242.

A digital input indicates if an overflow is occurring independent of what the level signal shows. The PC 242 locks this actual level and the PC 242 starts calculating the overflow level / flow from this value.

This means that the level is measured with a very high accuracy with a right 0 - point. If an exact flow measurement is needed a weir or channel should be used.

Inflow

Overflow

A = L * W

A = Area

L = Length

W = Width

Ex.

A = ?

L = 2.20 Meter

W = 1.75 meter

A = 2.2 * 1.75

A = 3.85 m 2

A = pi * r 2 Ex.

A = Area

pi = 3.14...

A = ?

D = 2.50 meter

R = Radius = D/2 R = 2.5 / 2 = 1.25 m

A = 3.14 * (1.25) 2

A = 4.91 m 2

The PC 242 program has all the functions available for calculating flow in weirs and channels. The overflow is measured separately for each pump pit. Number of overflows, overflow time and overflow level and the flow are logged.

The levels sensor is used as the actual level signal when the switch is activated it sets the 0 - point for the flow measurement. If no level switch is connected to the

PC 242 the 0- point for the overflow can be set in “Settings / Pump Pit / Calc.

Overflow / Overflow Detect “manually. Overflow will be registered when the level exceeds pre-set overflow level on the usual level sensor.

Note! This set point has no function if a digital input (Overflow switch) is set for overflow indication in the pump pit.

A delay can be set to prevent disturbances and that waves trigger the switch.

After this delay the flow measurement starts and the time of the overflow is

EN

27

Appendix

EN recorded. A counter keeps track of how many times the pit has overflowed.

The overflow time is only trigged when the level is higher than the stored ( set )

0- point . If a float sensor is used for a pump pit, which has no level sensor, the overflow time counts all the time the float is active.

The overflow alarm will stop after the float goes back to normal and the stop delay to avoid errors in the counter and to compensate for the start delay.

Note! Overflow alarm and counter is only detected if alarm is enabled.

Ext. Flow meters with pulse output can be used for measure the overflow. This flow meter has to be connected to one of the two digital inputs (D:in13 or D:in14) which is set up as an Input Pulse Channel X. And there are only Digital In 13 and Digital In 14 which can act as a pulse channels. Further setting has to be done in Settings / Pulse Channels. PC 242 can then add and calculate digital pulses from sensors.

4.3.1

How to calculating overflows by using constants and exponents

- In Settings / Pump Pit / Overflow/ you can type in the constant and exponents manually.

There are two different exponents and two constants which can be set in PC 242 and it’s depending on manufactures and nature of the weirs. Those constants shall normally be provided by the manufactures. If you don’t have the e2 and c2 values, you can put e2 and c2 to 0 (zero), only use the left side of the equation.

For the basic weir types are c2 constant set to 0 (zero).

Overflow = h e1 c

1

+ h e2 c

2

[m

3 /s

]

Type of Weir Exp Constant

0.373

Thompson 30 °

Thompson 45 °

Thompson 60 °

2.5

2.5

2.5

0.569

0.789

Thompson 90 ° 2.5

1.368

Straight weir 1 m 1.5

1.76

For other width on straight weirs, multiply the constant with the width in meters.

Ex. C = b * 1.76 (b in meters)

Note! If ”Locked on inflow” is chosen, it assume overflow be the last calculation of inflow in the pit minus the capacity of the pumps who are running.

4.4

Pump reversing

You can reverse pumps in case of Pump Fail and Fallen Motor-protection.

- In Settings / Common P1-P2 / Pump Reversing and Settings / Common P1-

P2 / Auto reset motor.

This are the options there events can trig pump reversing.

Reverse on Pump Fail.

Reverse cycle start when digital input signal Pump Fail goes active.

The signal must go back to inactive state before the pump start reversing

If not reversing cycle is aborted.

Reverse on Fallen Motor-protector.

Reverse cycle start when the digital input signal Motor Protector goes active.

Motor protector will be reset before the pump start reversing.

You must enable auto reset motor protector function for the pump.

Set the cold down time and pulse time in the auto reset menu.

If the motor protector reset fails reversing cycle is aborted.

28

Pump controller type ABS PC 242, User guide SW 1.48

4.4.1

Other settings regarding Pump Reversing:

In menu Settings / Common P1-P2 / Pump Reversing

- Set [ Reversing Pump x] to [Yes].

- Set [ Start Rev. Delay]. The time to hold the pump in off position before the start of pump reversing

- Set [ Rev. Run Time]. The reversing run time.

- Set [ Max No. Attempts]. After the reversing the pump will start again.

If the pump fails again, a new reversing cycle will begin. Here you set max number of attempts.

- Set [ Stop Second Pump]. If you want the other pump to stop before reversing the first one

- Set [ Pump Relay When Rev.] Indicate how the pump relay shall act during the reversing (ON or OFF).

4.5

Pump alternation

PC 242 has three different methods in order to alternate pumps.

1. Normal alternation

Pumps are started alternately according to a rotating schedule. The pump that started first in the pump cycle, next time will be started last. In this way the running time is divided equally between alternating pumps.

One can choose between that alternate at each pump stop or when all pumps are stopped.

Alternate at each pump stop method is to prefer if the normal inflow to the pit is so high that the pumps don’t have the capacity to emptying it. If alternate when all pumps stop method is selected in this situation this could arises some problems since at least one pump always is running and therefore no alternation is done. Alternation criteria all pumps stop never occur.

Alternate when all pumps stop method is to prefer if the pumps has the capacity to emptying the pit at normal inflow. Then all pumps stop and the start/stop levels alternate.

2. Asymmetrical alternation

The difference against normal alternation is that the pumps are divided in to two alternating pumps, primary and secondary pump. Normally the primary pump starts numbered times. After an adjustable number of pump stops of the in primary pump, the secondary pump starts. The stop counter reset and at next pump cycle primary pump starts first again. This is for secure that the pumps don’t reach the end of life time at the same time.

If the primary pump does not have the capacity to pump down and the pit level continue to increase, the secondary pump will be started independent of the stop counter.

3. Runtime alternation

As addition to above can the pumps alternate related to continuous run time.

At exceeded maximum run time the pump will stop and an alternative pump will be started. The pump will only stop if the secondary pump is ready to run.

EN

29

Appendix

4.6

Communication

The first thing witch has to be set, is the Protocol. You can choose between

Modbus RTU, Modbus TCP or Comli.

- Settings / Communication / Protocol

Other protocol could be available if there is an external converter from Modbus or

Comli to requested protocol.

4.6.1

Communication ports

There are two RS232 ports for communication, one RS232 at the screw terminals

(screw 22 – 26) and one D-Sub9F in the front. Only the port at the screw terminal has full modem support (except power supply).

4.6.2

Com port (screw terminals 22 – 26)

This port is design for modem communication and has protocol Modbus RTU,

Modbus TCP or Comli. Other protocol such as TCP/IP can be used by using modem which converts the signal. Default this port has Modbus RTU, baud rate:

115200, parity: None, handshake: Off, and Protocol ID: 1. Message Time Out: 2 s

Optional: Station name.

On this port there are possibilities to change the properties of baud rate (300 –

115200), protocol ID (1 – 255) and station ID (1 – 65535), Parity (None, Odd,

Even) and handshake (on/off) as well. Necessary for AquaWeb concept is the

Station ID set correctly and that the protocol ID is set to 1!

4.6.3

Service port (9-pols D-Sub in the front)

This port follows “ Com Port” in protocol and has always protocol ID 1. There is however possibilities to change the properties of baud rate separate from Com

Port. This port is consider to be used for download configuration and updating the firmware by using Aquaprog. To connect this port to a computer, you need a strait cable DB9F-DB9M.

4.6.4

Modem

Only the port at the screw terminals (Com Port) is supporting modem.

There are a number of different modems which can be used on PC 242. Normally is a CA 521 connected to the PC 242 which calls by GSM to a SCADA trigged by an event or that a SCADA calls up for catching log values. If PC 242 is connected to AquaWeb, then shall the CA 521 be working as a GPRS modem. It’s also possible to connect a TCP/IP or analogue modem.

TCP/IP modem For fixed TCP/IP line. Communication through RS232 to external IP modem. This just like a direct line and in the settings under Settings – Communication – Modem – Modem Connected in the PC 242 shall be [No].

Analogue modem For fixed telephone line. Signals before answer, minimum 1.Hayes settings normally works with default. Settings under Communication – Modem – Modem

Connected in the PC 242 shall be [Analogue]

GSM modem For GSM connection e.g. CA 521.Signals before answer, minimum 1.Hayes settings normally works with default. Set PIN code if SIM card is equipped with one.

Settings under Communication – Modem – Modem Connected in the PC 242 shall be set to [GSM Modem].

Note! The PIN code can be deleted with a cell phone.

EN

30

Pump controller type ABS PC 242, User guide SW 1.48

GPRS modem Based on internal TCP/IP stack in Cinterion (former Siemens) GSM/GPRS modules. All data access is via the Hayes commands defined by Cinterion.

Most common is dynamic IP adressing. GPRS default is that the pump controller connects to TCP server in Sulzer AquaWeb system. If Scada system should connect to station see TCP-server section.

Communication via GSM and GPRS uses the same network. If subscription allows, both can be used one at a time.

Set PIN code if SIM card is equipped with one (deleted on AquaWeb SIM cards).

Note! The PIN code can be disabled with a cell phone.

Heart beat interval 30 min (default). Can be adjusted but can raise costs if set to low.

Server TCP port; Must be the same as in GPRS Server (default 2000 for

AquaWeb).

Servers IP address; The Public/global IP (normally in fire wall/router) address to the

GPRS Server must be a static IP address.

APN is provided by SIM card supplier. GPRS APN part 1 and GPRS part 2. If APN string is long it can be divided between the two parts. (Default is AquaWeb APN).

SMS fallback: 0046708728550 for AquaWeb only!

Settings under Communication – Modem – Modem Connected in the PC 242 shall be set to [ GPRS Modem CA 521].

Set GPRS User name and Password if demanded from subscription provider.

GPRS Event Log and Heart beat operator scan for error search only. Default off.

TCP-Server If you have a SIM card subscription with a fixed IP address, then you can connect the station by GPRS on a local network by using CA 521 and set the function in modem settings to FIX IP TCP LISTEN – TCP-server

FIX IP TCP LISTEN demands a SIM with fixed IP address from the provider on the station so that an external SCADA can contact remotely.

Settings under Communication – Modem – Modem Connected in the PC 242 shall be set to [ FIX IP TCP LISTEN].

Other types of modem Profibus gateway, radio modems etc.

Connect CA 521 according to Figure 4-4 to the Com port on PC 242.

3 4

3

4

Figure 4-2 Connect PC 242 to 9-pole D-sub. Cable can be ordered, item no 433020588.

4.6.5

Alarms

There are mainly two ways to handle alarms from PC 242; through modem or direct communication. Most common is a GPRS/GSM modem solution. The alarms can be transferred to a SCADA system or as a SMS to a mobile phone.

When using the GSM functionality to send SMS, there are possibilities to set up four attempts to call out. These attempts can be set as parallel calls; call multiple numbers in a sequence. Or as back up call; call first number in the attempt list and then wait for acknowledgement before trying with same number again in total three times, and then call next number in the attempt list. As soonest as the substation gets an acknowledgement of an alarm call out; it will terminate the outgoing calls. Alarm will be sent out at ON/OFF state and A-alarms or A+B-alarms depending of settings

EN

31

Appendix

4.7

Aquaprog

Aquaprog is Windows based software specially made for setting and monitoring of Sulzer substations. Communication with the controller is established via RS

232 or Modem (analogue or GPRS) connection between substation and computer.

Features

□ Configuring substation PC 242

□ Checking and acknowledging alarms

□ Checking events

□ Collecting log data

□ Showing the display and LED of the substation

□ Showing the status of the in- and outputs of the substation

□ Collecting and sending the configuration data of the substation

□ Substation software upgrade

4.7.1

How to set up Aquaprog

It assumes that the readers are all ready familiar to Aquaprog on the basic level.

Therefore there is no closer explanation about Aquaprog in detail.

PC 242 is communicates default with Modbus RTU and has Comli ID 1 and

Station ID 1. The baud rate is 115200, 8 data bits and No Parity.

Start to create a new substation and follow the text below.

EN

Figure 4-3 Create a new substation in Aquaprog

1. Give your station a name

2. Choose “Type of substation” – PC242V1xx

3. Comli ID is critical for Aquaprog, default is 1. If there is wrong station ID –

Aquaprog can handle that, but not wrong Comli ID. If you use the Service

Port –then it’s always Comli ID = 1.

4. Setup your com.port and the properties according to your substation

5. Modbus is default

6. Press OK

After this is set, you can call the substation and change the properties as normal.

32

Pump controller type ABS PC 242, User guide SW 1.48

4.8

Cross reference table

Cross reference is available in firmware 1.42 or later and in Aquaprog version 4.90 or later.

Cross reference table can be set-up in Aquaprog to optimize the data flow in

Comli/Modbus to the supervision system. Register 0-254 (telegram type 0 and

2) can be defined to hold preferred data by a cross reference table and can be set for data for any register. See further information in Comli/Modbus Register

Manual.

There are possibility for certain rescaling of data, for ex. Running time in seconds can be rescaled to minutes with the factor 60. The scale factor can be between

0-32767. With the factor 0 no rescaling is done.

Certain supervision systems only handle positive values when using the Comli protocol. Settings can be selected for 2-compl. +/-32767 or pure integers

0-65535. If positive numbers are used will 0 be returned for negative values.

The extended Comli telegram (max 65535 reg.) is not affected by the cross reference.

Together with the cross reference table there is a possibility to set an individual scale factor between 0 and 32767, for each position in the cross-reference list.

When reading data, the value is divided with corresponding scale factor.

When writing data the value will be multiplied with corresponding scale factor.

Scale factor is ignored when set to 0.

For data in double registers (32 bits), the highest register number should be used together with scale factors. Writing to the highest double register number will also set data in the lower register number if scale factor is set. If scale factor is set to zero, each register is handled individually.

Many registers allow negative values (signed 2-complement data). This can cause some systems to treat negative data as large positive numbers (ex. –1 is read as

65535 by the system). To avoid this to cause problems there is a possibility to individually set cross reference registers to only positive data. Negative values will give zero readout.

Note! Cross reference table are only available to set up in Aquaprog. In the menus of

PC 242 you have possibility to activate or deactivate the table.

IO-bits IO 0-255 can be redirected to any IO number when cross reference table is enabled. IO-bit 0-255 is also available in register 312-327. With cross reference enabled this is useful in systems that optimize data screens into single messages.

To activate the cross reference table in menu:

– Settings / Communication / Protocol / Register Cross Ref; Set to ON [or

OFF]

By using Aquaprog you can also save and download your cross reference table to other PC 242 units.

EN

33

Technical data and EMC compatibility

5 TECHNICAL DATA AND EMC COMPATIBILITY

EN

5.1

Technical data

Ambient operating temperature

Ambient storage temperature

Degree of protection

Housing material

Mounting

Flame rated

Pullution degree

Humidity

Dimensions

Power supply

Power consumption

Max load Digital-Out relays

Installation catagory

Digital-Input voltage

Digital-Input resistance

Max pulse rate on Digital In 13 and 14

Analogue Input

Temperature sensor

Analogue-Input resolution

Log capacity

Telemetry interface

–20 to +70° C (–4 to +158° F)

–30 to +80° C (–22 to +176° F)

IP 20 or NEMA: Type 1

PPO and PC

DIN Rail 35 mm

V0 (E45329)

2

0–95 % RH non-condensing

H x W x D: 86 x 160 x 60 mm

(3.39 x 6.30 x 2.36 inch)

9–34 V DC SELV or Class 2

< 4 W

250 VAC 4 A Max 100 VA resistive load

CAT II

5–34 V DC

10 kohm

500 Hz

0–20 or 4–20 mA

PTC or Pt100

16 bits for Level sensor; 10 bits for other AI

8 channels for 15 days (plus current day).

RS-232

5.2

Electromagnetic compatibility

Description

Electrostatic discharge immunity (ESD)

Standard

EN 61000-

4-2

Class

4

4

Level

15 kV

8 kV

Remarks

Air discharge

Contact discharge

Fast transient/burst immunity (Burst)

EN 61000-

4-4

4 4 kV

Surge immunity

1.2 / 50 µs (Surge)

EN 61000-

4-5

4

4

4 kV

CMV

2 kV

NMV

Immunity to RF-field induced disturbances in conductors

Immunity to radiated RF fields

EN 61000-

4-6

EN 61000-

4-3

3

3

10 V

10 V/m

150 kHz –

80 MHz

80 MHz – 1 GHz

Immunity to voltage dips and variations

EN 61000-

4-11 i Performance criteria A is normal performance within the specification limits.

Performance criteria B is temporary degradation or loss of function or performance which is self-recoverable.

Criteria i

A

A

A

A

A

A

A

B

34

Pump controller type ABS PC 242, User guide SW 1.48

6 ACCESSORIES

6.1

Pump controller

Article Description

12700001 PC 242, 2-pump controller with LCD colour display

6.2

Accessories

Article Description

28007000 Power supply / battery charger 27.2 VDC 1.2A DIN rail mount

47000000 Lead accumulator 1 2 V 4 Ah

39000041 Lead accumulator holder for 2 pieces 47000000

17000664

MD 124 DIN rail mount pressure sensor 4–20 mA / 0–3.5 meter water column

28000011 CA 521 GSM–GPRS modem

43320588 9-pole RS232 male modem cable

28000011 9-pole RS232 PC cable M-F

35

EN

2014 Copyright © Sulzer

Sulzer Pump Solutions Ireland Ltd., Clonard Road, Wexford, Ireland

Tel. +353 53 91 63 200, Fax +353 53 91 42 335, www.sulzer.com

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