DZ | Sienna | User`s manual | DZ Sienna User`s manual

Price: $20.00
DZ CompanY • LOVELAND, COLORADO
Page
DZKit
USER’S MANUAL
SIENNA
HF RECEIVER/Transceiver
Page 2
DZ COMPANY CONTACT INFO
Orders, parts, phone assistance ..................................................................... (970) 667-2254
Email orders ............................................................................................... sales@dzkit.com
Email technical support ......................................................................... support@dzkit.com
Web site ....................................................................................................... www.dzkit.com
Mail:
DZKit
710 Grove Ct.
Loveland, CO 80537
YOUR DZKIT 90-DAY FULL WARRANTY
During your first ninety (90) days of ownership, DZ Company will replace or repair free of charge—as soon as
practical—any parts which are defective, either in materials or workmanship. You can obtain parts directly from
DZ Company by writing us, emailing us or telephoning us. And we’ll pay shipping charges to get those parts to
you—anywhere in the world.
We warrant that during the first ninety (90) days of ownership, our products, when correctly assembled,
calibrated, adjusted and used in accordance with our printed instructions, will meet published specifications.
You will receive free consultation (except for the cost of your long distance phone call) on any problem you may
encounter in the assembly or use of your DZKit product. Just drop us a line, email us, give us a call, or visit our
website and click on “Support”. That will give you access to free on-line support and a discussion group. Sorry,
we cannot accept collect calls.
Our warranty, both expressed and implied, does not cover damage caused by the use of corrosive solder,
defective tools, incorrect assembly, misuse, fire, customer-made modifications, floods or acts of God, nor does it
include reimbursement for customer assembly or setup time. The warranty covers only DZKit products and is
not extended to non-DZ allied equipment or components used in conjunction with our products or uses of our
products for purposes other than as advertised.
If you are ever dissatisfied with our service—warranty or otherwise– or our products, please write or email the
president, Brian Wood, W0DZ, and he will make certain your problems receive prompt, personal attention.
THE DZ COMPANY, LLC
LOVELAND, CO 80537
Page 3
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Operation
Of the
Sienna HF Receiver/Transceiver
DZ COMPANY
LOVELAND, COLORADO
Copyright © 2013
The DZ Company, LLC
All rights reserved
11/20/2014 ….…………………………………Sienna
Introduction ....................................... 4
Back Panel ......................................... 6
Front Panel ......................................... 8
Basic Operation ............................... 14
The Receiver .................................... 20
The Transmitter................................ 32
The Antenna Tuner .......................... 40
External Amplifiers.......................... 42
The Menu ......................................... 43
Appendix A: APP Connectors ......... 58
Appendix B: External Keypad......... 60
Appendix C: RS-232C Commands . 62
Appendix D: Balanced Mic usage ... 89
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Introduction
Your new Sienna HF Receiver/
Transceiver represents the perfect
integration of computers and radio. It’s not just a radio, and,
with its companion Sedona, not
just a PC. In fact, if you don’t
like PCs, you don’t have to have
one!
which is a necessary side effect
of down-conversion radios.
At 70MHz, it is not currently possible to have narrow crystal filters) - they are just too expensive. But Inrad manufactures an
excellent 6-pole crystal filter
for the Yaesu FT-1000MP that SienSome “software-defined radina also uses. At 4.5kHz, it is
os” (SDR) require you to have a
still excellent for good AM copy,
PC, either internal or external,
while providing much better blockbecause after converting the radio ing dynamic range than you would
spectrum into digital samples,
get with a wider filter.
that data is passed over a high
speed link to a PC for processing. Sienna is also one of the only raSedona’s PC is totally optional,
dios on the market with a combecause we know that some of you
pletely separate transmitter and
like PCs and some do not.
receiver. There are no shared components or oscillators. Thus, full
Sienna uses a triple conversion
-duplex operation, such as that
receiver. By “up-converting” the
used in satellite operation, is
entire 0-54 MHz spectrum to 70
possible. Full duplex also allows
MHz, it becomes possible to easily you to monitor your signal. A sepfilter out the mixing products,
arate transmitter and receiver and
resulting in excellent image reit also allows true cross-band/
jection. In addition, there are no cross-mode operation.
dead spots in the shortwave bands,
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Modularity is another of Sienna’s
features. The chassis has six compartments — power, receiver,
transmitter, 100W amp, control and
auxiliary. This affords excellent
shielding and also provides easily
serviceable components. Should the
transmitter ever need service, it
can be removed without disturbing
anything else.
Cooling in Sienna is also important. Two central fans pull air
in from the front sides, cooling
the display and controller chips,
passing it across the transmitter,
amplifier and DC power distribution boards, and exhausting it out
the back. Thermistors regulate the
fan speeds.
Finally, a lot of attention has
been paid to ergonomics. Sienna’s
controls are grouped by function,
and dual functionality is used
sparingly and carefully. The most
common controls are on the front
panel, while the ones used less
often are in the first level menu
(which is always on the display—
AGC, NB, VOX/PTT, Antenna selections). Other less often used
functions are in a very simple
menu system. An external 12-button
keypad is supported (and built-in
to Sedona), which allows easy access to memories, CW buffers and
one-button-per-band bandswitching.
Sedona’s internal PC adds all the
features of a PC (logging, web
connectivity, USB, rig control,
digital modes, mic processing,
etc.) that are often handled in
other rigs by the use of expensive
“rig interface” boxes. With Sedona’s internal PC, you don’t have
nearly the mess of external wires
that you would have with an external PC, making portable operations
much more convenient. And in a
matching case to Sienna!
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Back Panel
1
2
13
3
4
5
6
14
7
15
8
9
10
11
16
12
17
1. Keypad. Connect a 12-button keypad such as the Yaesu FH-2 to this
connector. See Appendix B for details on how to build your own.
This allows you to change bands with a single keypress, use the
memory features, and select a band directly instead of using band
up or down controls. This connects directly to Sedona or to a aesu
FH-1 or FH-2 keypad.
2. Key. The manual and paddle jacks are connected in parallel with
those on the front panel and are both active simultaneously so that
you do not have to turn the keyer off to use a straight key or external keying device.
3. Audio. Line-in and Line-out are stereo 600 ohm audio inputs and
outputs that can be connected to the sound card on a PC or other
audio devices. Line level is nominally 200mVrms.
4. 455KHz IF Out. This is a large bandwidth output centered at 455KHz
that can be connected to a spectrum analyzer or panadapter to view
signals on the current receive band.
5. RX Antenna. This BNC connector allows you to run the receiver from
an antenna that is not connected to the transmitter. It is protected from static by a gas discharge tube, but not against high transmitter power. Maximum input power is 1mW (0dBm).
6. ALC In (RED). This phono connector allows 0 to –5VDC input from an
external linear amplifier to control the output level of the internal 100W amp. Higher negative voltages produce lower output power.
7. PTT In (GREEN). This phono connector provides a push-to-talk input
that is wired in parallel with the PTT pin in the front panel mic
connector. Ground the input to enable the transmitter. It is pulled
up internally to 5V with a 1K resistor.
8. Mic In (BLUE). Unbalanced audio from this phono connector is mixed
with the front panel microphone connector or with the internal line
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signal from the Line In connector. The input impedance is about 10K
ohms.
9. Antenna A. This SO-239 connector is the main transmit/receive antenna. It is protected from static discharge by a gas discharge
tube.
10.Antenna B. This SO-239 connector is a secondary antenna. A menu
item lets you select antenna A or B. It is protected from static
discharge by a gas discharge tube.
11.GND. This is chassis ground. Connect this to a good earth ground.
12.DC In. These Anderson Powerpole connectors are the main DC Input.
Connect these to a clean source of DC voltage from 11-15VDC. The
transmitter will operate from 12-15V. The receiver can operate over
the full range.
13.RS-232C I/O. Connect this serial port to a PC, or to another Sienna.
14.Exhaust holes. These holes serve as exhaust for the internal fan.
Do not block these holes.
15.Linear. 8-pin mini-DIN connects to linear amplifier
16.Exhaust plate. This bracket provides exhaust for the fan that cools
the DC power distribution board and optional 100W amplifier. Do not
block the exhaust holes.
17.Fuse. This 25A fuse is inline between the main power input and the
optional 100W amplifier. If the amplifier is not installed, this
opening can be replaced with a hole cover, or used to bring cables
in and out if you wish to use the compartment to hold a battery or
other device.
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Front Panel Controls
4
12
5
6
13
1
2
7
10 11
8
3
9
1. RF Gain (RFG or Radio Frequency Gain). This control overrides the
automatic gain control (AGC) of the Receiver’s Intermediate Frequency (IF) amplifiers. In its CW (clockwise) position, the AGC has
full control over the gain. As you rotate the control counter
clockwise (CCW), it reduces the available gain. This control is
usually left in the CW position unless extremely strong signals are
present. It can also be used to reduce sensitivity so that only
stronger signals are heard, which can help during contests.
2. Preamp1. This switch activates the first of two available RF amplifiers. On lower frequencies, below 10MHz, this amplifier is often
not needed. Above 10MHz, it is not needed when band conditions are
excellent. It is useful for pulling out very weak signals on a fading band.
3. Pre2/Atten. This switch activates the second of two available RF
amplifiers only if the Preamp1 switch (see previous item) is
pushed. If Preamp1 is off, this button serves as a 10dB attenuator.
If you use the attenuator and then push the Preamp1 button, the attenuator is disengaged and both preamps are turned on. You should
only need both preamps to pull out very weak signals, as this much
RF gain increases distortion on strong signals.
4. Headphone volume. This control adjusts the gain of the headphone
audio amplifier. It can be adjusted separately from speaker volume.
5. Headphone jack. Plug low impedance stereo headphones into this
3.5mm minijack connector.
6. AF Gain (AFG or Audio Frequency Gain). This control adjusts the
gain of the speaker audio amplifier. Speaker volume can be adjusted
separately from the headphone volume.
7. Mute. This button mutes all sources, both the internal receiver and
any audio from the line in jack.
8. Dual. This button activates dual receive. In this mode, input from
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the stereo Line In jack on the back panel is fed to the speakers,
and the internal receiver is fed only to the right speaker. This
allows you to listen to one receiver in each ear. In order to feed
a mono source such as a receiver to the left channel only, you must
connect the left channel to the external receiver but not the
right. This can be done by using a mono minijack plug in the stereo
minijack.
9. FM Squelch/NB Thresh. In FM mode, this control sets the level at
which FM signals are quieted (squelched). In other modes, this control sets the noise blanker threshold if the noise blanker is
turned on.
10.Adjust. This control consists of a rotary pulse generator (RPG) and
a pushbutton switch. The function of the RPG and the switch depend
on the 8-position switch immediately below it (11).
11.Multipurpose switch. This switch selects up to 8 different modes
for the RPG control that is above it (10). In the CCW position, it
enables the RPG to change which IF filter is selected. Pushing the
RPG knob switches back and forth between the 9MHz and 455KHz filters, and a * is placed next to the currently selected set in the
display. The width of the trapezoids in the display changes to give
a visual indication of the bandwidth of the selected filter. Note:
when you change bands or modes, the previously saved filter is automatically selected. In position 2, the switch allows the 9MHz or
455KHz passband (whichever is selected) to be shifted right or left
50Hz per detent. Position 3 selects the notch filter when the adjust button is pushed. Position 4 is reserved for future use. Position 5 allows the pushbutton to start or stop scanning functions.
Position 6 of the switch accesses the CW buffers (which are set in
menu options). The rotary control selects one of the ten buffers,
and the pushbutton starts the buffer. Position 7 is for memory
buffers. Rotating the RPG selects a memory, and the pushbutton then
moves it into VFO A. Position 8 is the “Birdcage”, labeled “BC”. In
this position, rotating the Adjust knob shifts the 1st IF left or
right by 50Hz per click. Pushing the button resets all IF shifts to
0. The birdcage is very useful for removing spurious receiver mixing products (“birdies”) that are present in all superhet receivers.
12.Microphone jack. This connector is wired for a Yaesu compatible microphone. An external adapter is required for use with other microphones.
13.Mic Gain. This control adjusts the microphone gain. Use it with the
ALC meter indication on transmit to keep from overmodulating the
final amplifier.
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25
14
15
16
17
26
28
32
27
29
18
30
19
31
20
23
21
22
24
14.Proc/CW Spot. In SSB mode, this button activates the RF speech processor. In CW mode, this button disables the transmitter and allows
the keyer (internal or external) to be used as a SPOT control. To
use this function, press the key and turn the Pitch control (20)
until the sidetone frequency matches that of the received signal.
This assures that you are transmitting on the same frequency as the
station you wish to communicate with. CW SPOT mode can also be used
for code practice, since no signal will emanate from the transmitter. It is useful to press the Mute button in this mode too, to
eliminate receiver noise. You do not need to change the RF Power
control when using CW SPOT.
15.Proc Level. This control adjusts the compression level. Use on SSB
with the Compression scale on the meter to keep speech compression
less than 10 dB.
16.Tuner. This button activates the optional internal Antenna Tuner.
The tuner memory saves up to 30 settings and allocates them into
32kHz of spectrum from 0 to 30MHz on a per-antenna basis (A or B
antenna). If a band segment on a particular antenna has never been
tuned, then if this switch is on, the first time you transmit on
that band segment, a tuning operation will occur and the settings
will be memorized. When the switch is off, the tuner is bypassed. A
menu option allows you to reset the tuner settings or force a tune
operation on a band segment that was alreadt tuned. In that menu,
you can also see what the tuner selected, and change the inductance
and capacitance manually.
17.RF Power. This control adjust the transmitter power level from 0 to
11.8W (118W if the 100W amp is present and enabled). Note that this
is “requested” power. Actual power is measured in real-time by the
ALC (Automatic Level Control) firmware and will be as close as possible to this value. If the “ALC Threshold” menu setting is “0”,
the display reads “P-Rel” which means that the RF Power control is
a relative, uncalibrated value.
18.Sidetone Volume. In CW mode, this control adjusts the volume of the
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CW sidetone. Sidetone volume is also affected by the main speaker
and headphone volume controls.
19.Dot Weight. This screwdriver-adjustable pot sets the ratio of dots
to spaces for the internal keyer.
20.Pitch. In CW mode, this control sets both the CW pitch (tone) and
the receiver passband. Use with the CW SPOT button (14) to zero
beat the transmitter to that of a received signal.
21.Dash Weight. This screwdriver-adjustable pot sets the ratio of
dashes to spaces for the internal keyer.
22.Speed. In CW mode, this control adjusts the speed of the internal
keyer from 5-65WPM.
23.Full Break-In. In CW mode, this button activates full break-in.
This means that the drop-out time after you release the key is
changed from that used for Semi-Break-in to a much faster value,
allowing you to hear between the dots as you send. This is often
used to avoid stepping on another operator’s toes by transmitting
at the same time. However, some operators find it unsettling to
listen to the receiver while transmitting. The value of drop-out
time is settable in a menu item for both Semi and Full break-in
modes. Default is 1 second for Semi break-in and 10ms for Full
break-in.
24.Key jacks. These jacks are both active at the same time. You can
plug a straight key or external keying device into the manual key
input and paddles into the other. Thus, there is no need to turn
the keyer off when switching to another keying device such as a PC.
25.Menu. This button activates the menu. See the detailed description
of menu selections starting on page 16.
26.Page/Mode. If the menu button is NOT lit, this button allows the
small tuning knob to cycle through all available modes (CWUSB,
CWLSB, USB, etc.). If the menu button IS lit, this button allows
the small tuning knob to cycle through all the available pages in
the menu. When menu is first selected, the button comes on by default to allow you to quickly find the desired page. Once you find
it, rotating the large tuning knob turns it off. To go to another
page, press the Page/Mode button again.
27.Fast/Lock. This button changes the rate at which the tuning knobs
change the frequency. If enabled in a menu item, it also causes the
dials to lock after a period of inactivity.
28.Clear. This button clears a RIT (Receiver Incremental Tuning) or
XIT (Transmit Incremental Tuning) offset. If XIT and RIT are both
off, this button enables SPLIT mode, which allows you to set the
transmitter frequency and mode independently of the receiver. The
display shows the current setting of VFO B, which is used only for
the transmitter. In SPLIT mode, pressing the A>B (XIT) button copies the displayed frequency (VFO A) into VFO B. Pressing A<>B (RIT)
swaps the VFO frequencies and modes.
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29.XIT. Transmit Incremental Tuning. With RIT and SPLIT off, this allows the small tuning knob to be used to adjust the transmitter
frequency up to 16MHz from the receive frequency. The mode (USB,
LSB, etc.) is not changed. See (27) for an alternative mode for
this button. If the BAND button is pushed, this button changes
bands to the next higher band.
30.RIT. Receiver Incremental Tuning. With RIT and SPLIT off, this allows the small tuning knob to be used to adjust the receiver frequency up to 16MHz from its original frequency. The mode (USB, LSB,
etc.) is not changed. See (27) for an alternative mode for this
button. If the BAND button is pushed, this button changes bands to
the next lower band.
31.BAND. In this mode, the large tuning knob is used to change bands.
There are five VFO A frequencies per band; when you change bands,
the last used VFO A frequency is used. If you have connected an external keypad such as the Yaesu FH-1 to the Keypad input on the
back panel, you can also change bands directly without pushing the
BAND button. There are 10 bands (160-80-60-40-30-20-17-15-12-10)
and five VFOs each per band. The value of each is shown as bbb-vv,
such as 160-1. When the BAND mode is selected, the XIT and RIT buttons can be used as band up/down functions. They are labeled with
yellow up and down arrows corresponding to the yellow BAND text as
a visual reminder.
32.Large and small tuning knobs. These knobs are used to change frequency when not in MENU or BAND modes. When RIT and XIT and SPLIT
are not on, the large knob is used for fine tuning and the small
knob for coarse tuning. The FAST button changes the rate of both
knobs. In MENU mode, the large knob selects a menu item on the current page and the small knob changes its value. In BAND mode, the
large knob changes bands and the small knob selects VFO A memory 15 (and you will see the number change that is located right above
the “kHz” in the display). When RIT or XIT or SPLIT are on, the
small knob changes the increment or SPLIT frequency and the large
knob changes the receive frequency.
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33 34 35 36 37 38 39
40
41
42
44
45
43
33.Main frequency display. This always displays the current receive
frequency. If in transceive mode (i.e., the RIT/XIT and SPLIT are
not enabled), it is also the transmit frequency.
34.Mode. CW(USB), CW(LSB), USB, LSB, AM, FM,DIG(USB), DIG(LSB).
35.Dial Lock active.
36.EEPROM Write. Dot appears for 1 second after memory has been saved
37.Band-VFO. Band (160,80,60,40,30,20,17,15,12,10) - VFO (1,2,3,4,5)
38.IF Filters. Shows selected 9MHz and 455kHz filter bandwidths
39.Selected Tx Meter function.
40.Transmit frequency in XIT or SPLIT mode
41.Original transceive frequency when RIT is enabled.
42.Current memory frequency and mode (enabled through keypad)
43.RF Power output level (Watts), set by RF Power control (17).
44.Transmit meter. Shows transmit voltages, currents, etc.
45.Receive meter (S-meter). Shows received signal strength in all but
FM mode. In FM, shows relative signal strength.
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Basic Operation
Unlike many modern transceivers/receivers that have a multitude of
buttons and knobs which look flashy but which you seldom use, Sienna
has four simple modes of use, each giving you more and more flexibility, without cluttering up the front panel. These are:
1. Functions used most often have dedicated buttons and knobs
2. Functions used less frequently are in easily-accessed menus, with
the more commonly used items always visible
3. Functions requiring a lot of “horsepower” have rudimentary front
panel access but are best accessed via a PC or external keypad,
such as use of the many memories
4. An external 12-button keypad compatible with the Yaesu FH-1 or FH-2
provides direct band selection and easy memory and CW buffer usage
REMOTE CONTROL
If your Sienna has no front panel, all functions are accessed via the
RS-232 port, for which a simple terminal emulator program such as Hyperterm can be used. More elaborate programs are available, such as
Ham Radio Deluxe or DXLab Suite, that are compatible with multiple radios. We also plan to offer a simple program that is tuned for use
with Sienna. It is still instructive for the “front-panel-less” user
to become familiar with the front panel functionality, since most RS232 commands were designed to emulate front panel controls.
Many PCs no longer have RS-232 ports, but converter cables from RS-232
to USB are easy to obtain. Sienna works fine with these adapters.
Please refer to the command listing in Appendix C of this manual for
details on the available commands.
CONTROL GROUPS
Controls are grouped into four sections: Receiver, Transmitter, Tuning
and Keyer. Only one set of controls in the Receiver group actually affects the transmitter, and that is the multifunction 8-position switch
and the “adjust” knob/switch above it. These controls access the filter selection, IF shift, memory, and scanning for the receiver, and CW
buffers for the transmitter.
The Tuning section consists of the main tuning knob, the secondary
tuning knob and the five buttons adjacent to the secondary tuning
knob. These provide rapid tuning modes, band changes, RIT, XIT and
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SPLIT functions and a dial lock function.
Keyer controls allow complete access to the keyer, including QSK (full
break-in) operation, dot and dash weighting, volume, speed and pitch.
The pitch control along with the SPOT control (in the transmitter control section) is also useful for zero-beating signals on CW.
THE MULTI-FUNCTION SWITCH AND ADJUST KNOB
The receiver group has an 8-position switch and above it, a rotary
pulse generator (RPG) that has 32 steps per revolution. The RPG also
has a pushbutton switch built into it. These two controls work together to give you an amazing amount of functionality in a small space.
The switch selects a function: Filters (top position, 1), IF shift
(2), IF Notch (3), reserved (4), scanning (5), memory (6), and CW
buffers (7). Position 8 (BC) is the “Birdcage”, and allows you to
shift the first IF back and forth to eliminate birdies in the receiver. More detail about these functions is found in the section on how
to use the receiver.
METERING
There are two meters. The left meter shows transmit functions including final amplifier voltage and current, driver current, SWR, forward
and reflected power, RF compression and ALC. The right meter shows Sunits from 0 to 9 (calibrated at approximately 6dB per unit, with S9 =
-73dBm = 50 microvolts) and in dB above S9, up to 45 dB over 9 (-28
dBm). In FM, the S-meter shows a relative signal strength indication.
Since the transmit meter has multiple scales, it is helpful to know
which one is selected. A menu option lets you select this, and the
chosen selection is shown in the upper right corner of the vacuum
fluorescent display (VFD) along with an arrow pointing toward the meter, such as “Fwd Pwr ->”.
MENU
The menu is accessed by pressing the MENU button. (Remote control commands are available for most menu functions, except those that relate
to use of the front panel itself, such as display brightness.)
The menu consists of two sections. The mode (e.g., “USB”) and all
functions along the bottom row (AGC, Noise Blanker, PTT/VOX, Antenna
and RF Power) are always displayed. These are things you are likely to
need to change most often, so they are easily accessible no matter
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what else is showing on other menu pages. (RF Power is accessed using
the RF Power control rather than a menu item.)
The second menu section is a series of “pages” consisting of up to
five lines of parameters.
To edit or view a parameter, press the MENU button. Notice that the
“PAGE/MODE” button also lights up, indicating that paging is active.
This means that when you rotate the small tuning knob either direction, different pages will be displayed on the right half of the display. Once you have located the page containing a parameter you wish
to change, rotating the large tuning knob will select one of those
items and highlight it. When you rotate the large knob, you will also
notice that the PAGE/MODE light goes out, indicating that you are now
able to edit entries on that page. Once you have selected an item, you
can then change its value by turning the small tuning knob.
If you wish to go to another page once you have edited an entry on the
existing page, simply press the PAGE/MODE button to re-enable paging.
To exit menu mode, press the MENU button again.
Why is the PAGE/MODE button called this? If you are not in MENU mode
and you push just this button, you can change just the mode of the radio (CWUSB, CWLSB, USB, LSB, etc.) by turning the small tuning knob.
Push this button again to turn it off. This is a faster way to change
modes than going into the menu, although both methods can be used.
Menus are described in detail in a separate chapter.
DIAL LOCK
One of the menu settings allows the tuning knobs to be
“locked” (meaning that turning them will have no affect on frequency)
after a period of inactivity. When enabled, the FAST/LOCK button turns
this feature on. This function is doubled up with the FAST tuning control since it is likely that if you are tuning fast, you aren’t going
to need to lock the dial. Thus, even if dial lock is active, pressing
the FAST/LOCK button puts you into FAST tuning mode first. Press the
FAST/LOCK button again to deactivate the lock function.
10-SECOND RULE FOR SAVING THE CURRENT STATE
Page 17
The radio constantly monitors parameters that must be saved in nonvolatile (i.e., permanent) memory when the radio is turned off. However, when you are actively using the radio, it is unnecessary (and undesirable) for the microprocessor to save the current state information to its memory constantly. Anytime something that must be saved
is changed, a 10 second timer is started. If nothing else changes
within that time, all changed state information is written to memory.
The timer is re-started if anything does change within that 10 seconds. If the timer “times out”, and any of the memory locations has
changed data in it, a small dot appears for one second in the display
above the “z” in “kHz” to indicate that state information has been
saved.
As a result, if you turn off the radio before
the current settings to be stored, it may not
quency or mode you last used. Be sure to wait
the display before turning off the rig unless
longer than that.
waiting 10 seconds for
return to the exact freuntil you see the dot in
it has been idle for
KEYPAD
The 12-button keypad operation is described in Appendix B. Although
there are many fast ways to change bands and there is front panel access to the CW buffers and memories, some like to go from band to band
with a single button push or access memories and CW buffers more easily. This keypad is easy to make yourself, or you can buy the one made
by Yaesu. The functionality of the buttons is not identical to that of
Yaesu rigs though, so you may want to remove the overlay and make your
own. The DZKit Sedona has a compatible keypad built in.
FIRMWARE UPDATES
A utility program is provided on the flash drive included with all
kits called “Megaload”. Install it, then connect Sienna’s RS-232 port
to the computer. Run Megaload, putting the “sienna_rev_xxxxx.hex” file
in the top box. If the EEPROM data also needs updating, put the
“sienna_rev_xxxxx.eep” file in the second box. (Replace “xxxxx” with
the revision code, such as B0221). Downloading a new EEPROM file will
reset all cal constants to default, so be sure you have written down
all cal constants for your radio so they can be restored! These files
can be found on the DZKit web site or we can email them to you. Just
ask for the latest version!
Once Megaload is running, select the Com port and baud rate (9600).
Leave all checkboxes unchecked. Once it’s all set up, Megaload should
Page 18
report in the Status box, “Ready. Waiting for target”. Go into the
menu and find the page with the firmware rev info. At the bottom is a
line that reads “Re-program uP:”. Change it from No to Yes. Wait about
10 seconds, and the download should start automatically. When done,
Sienna will re-start. If you have never connected Sienna to the PC before, it is wise to do so first and run a terminal emulator like Hypertrm just to make sure you can talk to it to verify cable connec-
Megaload, ready to download. Note that the Target information is shown
as “xxxx”. Once you start the download (see next page), the processor
information is read from Sienna into Megaload and displayed as shown
in the picture on the next page.
Page 19
Once you have set up Megaload and
connected Sienna to the PC, go into Sienna’s setup menu and locate
this page. Select “Re-program uP:”
and change “No” to “Yes”. Wait 10
seconds, and the download, as
shown below, will start.”
As data is downloaded to Sienna, the page number of the binary file is
reported in the Messages box. If no EEPROM file is specified, the message “No eeprom file… Open file first!” appears in the Status box. If
you chose not to download it, this is OK. Otherwise specify the
“sienna_rev_xxxx.eep” file in the 2nd box at the top, and that data
will also be downloaded.
Page 20
The Receiver
A quick tutorial on receiver theory
Sienna uses a triple conversion receiver with three intermediate frequencies (IFs): 70.455 MHz, 9.0 MHz and 455 kHz. By “up-converting”
the entire 0-30 MHz spectrum to 70.455-100.455 MHz, many spurious byproducts of the mixing process are eliminated.
For example, if you are listening at 14.0 MHz, the VFO frequency is
set to 70.455 + 14.0 MHz = 84.455 MHz. This means that the first RF
mixer will generate outputs at the sum and difference of the two frequencies (84.455 +/- 14.0 MHz): 70.455 MHz (the difference) and 98.455
MHz (the sum). The first IF filter (called a “roofing” filter) only
passes a small portion (less than 5 kHz) of spectrum around 70.455
MHz, so the sum product at 98.455 MHz and other mixing products are
completely eliminated.
As it turns out, a 154.91 MHz signal would also create an output at
70.455 MHz (154.91—84.455). This is called the “image” frequency. Because the up-converted spectrum is so high in frequency, such signals
are easily filtered out by RF bandpass and low pass filters before the
signal can reach the mixer, resulting in excellent image rejection.
The small downside to this is that narrow filters cannot be used at
70.455 MHz because they would be very expensive. Sienna uses a 4.5 kHz
roofing filter standard, which provides excellent performance when
combined with the many filters available at the 2nd and 3rd IF.
Controls
Since Sienna can be built either with or without a front panel, the
following descriptions refer to the front panel functions and then
call out the equivalent remote control command, in brackets, such as
[MD] for the mode command. Refer to the RS-232 command chapter for details on the command structure.
When using the front panel, there are a number of parameters that can
only be set in the menu. Such parameters are referred to with a prefix
of MENU and the parameter in quotation marks, such as MENU: “AGCSlow”.
Page 21
Major receiver functions include:
Frequency (including “band”, VFO’s within a band, incremental tuning,
memory usage, split mode, tuning rate, resolution)
Mode (AM, CW, SSB, etc.)
IF Filter selection (at both the 2nd and 3rd IF)
IF Shift (at both the 2nd and 3rd IF)
Noise Blanker
IF Notch filter
Preamp, Attenuator and Passive Signal Boost™
Automatic Gain Control (AGC)
RF Gain
Audio Gain (headphone and speaker volume)
Scanning
Antenna selection
DSP (with the optional embedded PC)
FM squelch
S-meter
Using the multi-function switch and rotary “Adjust” knob
As mentioned earlier, there are two controls in the receiver section
on the front panel that work together to provide some important functionality. The 8-position multifunction switch and the Adjust knob
above it work as follows:
Filters [FW, FX, FY]: Use this first position of the switch to select
IF filters. The currently selected filter for the 2nd and 3rd IF is
shown as a trapezoid in the display, and an asterisk is shown next to
the currently selected IF. To change the filter to a different slot
(as defined in the filter definition menus), rotate the Adjust knob
left or right. Push the Adjust knob to select the other IF.
IF Shift [IS]: As with position 1, select either IF by pushing the Adjust knob. Turn the knob to slide the selected filter right or left.
The overlap between the two trapezoids is an approximate graphical
representation of the resulting bandwidth. Position 2 allows the shift
to be set in 50 Hz increments per step of the Adjust knob.
IF Notch: Position 3 activates the 455kHz IF Notch function when the
Adjust knob is pushed. A graphical representation of a notch is displayed, and the notch can be slid left and right by turning the knob.
Scanning [SC, SI, SP, SS, ST, SV]: Position 5 enables the receiver
scanning function. Push the Adjust knob to start scanning, as defined
Page 22
in a menu page. If the scan increment is set to “chn”, scanning starts
at the selected memory channel and stops at the end memory channel,
then cycles back to the start channel. If the scan increment is a number, the frequency is incremented by the selected amount (MENU: “Freq
inc(Hz)” = 10 Hz, 100 Hz, 1 kHz, 10 kHz, 15 kHz, 20 kHz, 25 kHz or 50
kHz) until the frequency in VFOB is reached. (Use the SPLIT function
to set VFO B.) At each new frequency, the length of time that the receiver will wait for a signal is called the Dwell time, and this can
be set to 100 ms, 250 ms, 500 ms, 1 sec, or 5 seconds (MENU: “Dwell
(ms)”). While the receiver waits for a signal, the minimum strength of
the signal that will cause scanning to stop can be set to S5, S6, S7,
S8 or S9 (MENU: “Scan trip”). Press the Adjust button again to restart scanning. Since memory channels cannot have IF filter information saved with them, set the filter bandwidth appropriately for the
signals that you desire to be detected, e.g., narrow for CW, wider for
phone. When you exit scan mode by rotating the Adjust switch to any
other position, the original VFO frequency is restored.
Memory [MC, MR, MW]: Position 6 enables memory recall of the 84 predefined memories. Rotate the Adjust knob to view memories, then push the
Adjust knob to copy that memory into VFO A. Once copied into VFO A,
that VFO cannot be restored to its previous value without using the
tuning controls. Switching the multi-function switch to another position cancels memory mode, and if the pushbutton was not pushed, restores VFO A to its previous setting. These memories cannot be changed
using the front panel controls. Only the external keypad and RS-232
commands can be used for this. The memories are pre-programmed with
the ARRL bandplan from 1.8 MHz through 29.7 MHz. When using memories,
the VFO number (1-5) above the “kHz” in the display changes to “M” to
remind you that you are listening on a memory channel and not a VFO.
CW Buffers [KY]: Position 7 enables the transmission of CW buffers 1
through 10, which are defined in two menu pages (MENU: “Msg1” “Msg10”). Rotate the knob to select a buffer and press the Adjust knob
to start transmission. Pressing the key cancels the transmission. See
the menu pages for a detailed explanation.
Birdcage [Not available via remote control]: Position 8 allows you to
shift the 1st IF at 70.455MHz left or right 50 Hz per click of the Adjust knob. This is very useful in eliminating any internally generated
mixing products (“birdies”) without impacting the readability of the
received signal at all. Pushing the adjust button resets this IF offset to 0 (and also any offsets you may have selected with the 2nd and
3rd IF shift functions).
Page 23
Changing the frequency
[FA, FB, RU, RD, RC, XU, XD, XC]
There are several displayed frequencies depending upon use of Split,
RIT and XIT modes. It helps to remember that the large font that is
always in the display is ALWAYS the receive frequency. It is also the
transmit frequency unless you are using RIT or XIT or Split.
When Sienna is powered on for the first time, the frequency is set to
14.000 MHz. You can change the frequency in the following ways:
•
•
•
Turn the large knob for fine tuning steps. If the resolution is set
to 10 Hz, the display will step by 10 Hz as you rotate it. You can
change the resolution to 1 Hz in a menu option.
Turn the small tuning knob (to the right of the large one) for
coarse resolution. If the resolution is set to 10 Hz, the display
will step by 100 Hz as you rotate it.
Press the FAST button to multiply the step size by 10 for both of
the tuning knobs.
Changing “bands”
Sienna’s memory is divided into 10 “bands” of 5 VFO memories each.
Although these 50 memories are initially partitioned by band segments
familiar to amateur radio operators and shortwave listeners (160, 80,
60, 40, 30, 20, 17, 15, 12 and 10 Meters), the actual contents of any
of the 50 memories can be set to any frequency. This can be confusing
if one of the VFOs commonly used for, say, 40M is changed to a frequency on 20M, so the selected band is shown in the display along with
the VFO (1-5) within that band (e.g., 160-2). You can reset the VFO
memories to factory defaults using the menu option “Default mem:” (see
page 51). Re-downloading the firmware will also do this. See page 17.
Bands can be changed in any of four ways:
•
Press the BAND button and rotate the small tuning knob to select
one of the five VFO memories on that band. The parameters that are
saved with each of the VFO selections are:
frequency
mode (CW, USB, etc.)
noise blanker settings
agc
filter selection
Page 24
mode
transmit antenna
receive antenna
preamp/attenuator
•
•
•
Press the BAND button and rotate the large tuning knob to step from
band to band. The last used VFO setting (1-5) on that band will be
selected.
Press the desired band button on the 12-button keypad. (See Appendix B)
Press the BAND button and then press the Up or Down arrow buttons
(same as XIT and RIT). Note that pressing BAND disables RIT and/or
XIT if they were enabled. This is because it is assumed that if you
are changing bands, you will need to re-analyze the need for RIT or
XIT. If you change your mind. Simply turn off the BAND function and
re-activate RIT and/or XIT. The values will not have changed.
MENU has precedence over the BAND button. Although the BAND state is
remembered while you are in MENU mode, the band cannot be changed
while the menu is active.
Shortwave and AM broadcast band listening
When listening to the AM broadcast or shortwave bands, it is helpful
to allocate the first or last of the five VFOs per “band” to the desired frequencies that are closest to those of a chosen band. Thus,
when one of those is selected, the VFO number and band (e.g., “160-1”)
in the display can serve as a reminder that you are on a shortwave
frequency. For example, set VFO 1, which normally defaults to 1800
kHz, to an AM broadcast band station, e.g., 1280 kHz. Leave the other
four VFO memories set within the 160M band.
Direct frequency entry [FA, FB]
When entering frequencies directly using remote control (via the FA
command), only the currently selected VFOA is used. The remote control
commands do not provide access to all 50 VFO memories since a PC can
easily handle this functionality itself.
Changing modes [MD]
Once you have selected the frequency that you want to listen to, you
must then select the operating mode — CW, SSB, AM, FM or Digital. In
the CW and SSB modes, you can listen to either sideband — USB or LSB.
To change modes, press the Page/Mode button and then rotate the small
tuning knob. When finished, press the Page/Mode button again. You can
Page 25
also change the mode by pressing the MENU button, rotating the large
knob until the mode is highlighted and then change it by turning the
small tuning knob.
Receiver Incremental Tuning (RIT) [RC, RD, RT, RU]
RIT (and transmit incremental tuning, XIT, discussed in the transmitter section) is typically used for three purposes:
1. To tune in a signal that is slightly off frequency without changing
your transmit frequency
2. To work DX stations that are listening on a different frequency
than the one on which they are transmitting
3. To monitor other frequencies before returning to your operating
frequency
Unless you are using Split mode (discussed in the transmitter section), press RIT to turn on Receiver Incremental Tuning. The display
shows the original transceive frequency in a smaller font below the
large frequency display.
Since the frequency that is shown in the smaller font is the original
transmit and receive frequency, it is prefaced with “T:” (which means
original “Transceive” frequency). If it differs from the current frequency and you want them the same, press CLEAR [RC].
Rotating the small tuning knob then changes the incremental receive
frequency (the larger numbers in the display).
To restore the main display to the original frequency, press the RIT
button again, which turns it off.
Adjusting the large tuning knob changes the original transceive frequency (small display) AND the incremental receive frequency (large
display). If you do this, then turn off the RIT, you will see that the
large frequency display stays the same, and if you then press RIT
again, the new frequency has been copied to the RIT frequency. This
can be confusing. Remember to use the small tuning knob for RIT.
Using the Noise Blanker [NB, NT]
The noise blanker circuit is designed to reduce repetitive pulse type
noise such as that caused by electric fences, lightning crashes and
automobile ignitions. It is not designed to handle very low level signals. This function is turned on and off by selecting NB On or NB Off
Page 26
in the “always present” menu items along the bottom of the display.
The signal threshold can be changed by turning the “NB Thr/FM Squ”
knob. Three fixed, retriggerable pulse widths of 30us, 66us and 2ms
can be selected. The display will indicate “off","med","long", or
"max". The 4 “off” states are needed because the pulse width can be
changed by remote control without turning the blanker on. So, off
means off/fast, off2 means off/med, off3 means off/long and off4 means
off/max. Displaying this much information in the small segment reserved for the noise blanker would have been distracting, so we chose
to use “off” instead. When using the blanker from the front panel, ignore the various “off” indications and just select one of the “on”
pulse widths.
A noise blanker works by turning off the received signal if a large
pulse is detected. This “chopping” causes unavoidable intermodulation
distortion. Do not be dismayed if you hear this distortion. It is normal. It is because of this that noise blankers can be turned on and
off. Leave the blanker off when not in use.
Selecting antennas [AR, AN]
Sienna is equipped with two main antennas, A and B, and one Receiveonly antenna. The main antennas are routed through the low pass filters and the solid-state transmit/receive switch on the transmitter or
the 100W amplifier if it is installed. There is a little loss in that
signal path because of these circuits, but the filtering provides some
reduction of unwanted higher frequencies entering the receiver.
The receive antenna is routed through a 55 MHz low pass filter, which
affords some filtering of unwanted VHF/UHF signals, but not shortwave
frequencies. If intermod gives you problems, we recommend use of external bandpass filters.
It is essential that the receive antenna be used when operating the
radio in Full Duplex mode (transmitter and receiver active at the same
time), but it can be used at any time. When you select Full Duplex
mode, the receive antenna is automatically selected and the “Rx-x”
section of the display is changed to “FDpx”.
A typical use for the receive antenna would be with a Beverage antenna, which is no good for transmitting, but which is great for reducing
noise on the lower frequency amateur bands.
The antenna switch is selected in the main menu. The receiver can be
connected to either the selected transmit antenna (A or B) or the re-
Page 27
ceive antenna. This is indicated in the display as Rx-R for the receive antenna, or Rx-T for the transmit antenna. The transmit antenna
is displayed as Tx-A or Tx-B.
Controlling received signal strength
[AG, AH, GT, PA, RA, SB]
There are several controls that affect how loud a signal can get:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Preamps
Attenuator
RF Gain
AF Gain (audio volume)
Passive Signal Boost™ (PSB™)
Automatic Gain Control (AGC)
Parametric Equalizer gain
Preamp1 is activated by pressing the Preamp1 button, providing about
10dB of wideband RF gain. A second preamp with an additional 10dB of
gain can be activated by pressing the Pre2/Atn button. Above 14MHz, it
is common to use at least one preamp. But despite the fact that all
signals sound louder, it is not always necessary to use the preamps.
Preamps can add some distortion and create intermod if nearby strong
signals are present.
To activate a 10dB attenuator, press the Pre2/Atn button without Preamp1 being on.
The attenuator is most often needed for strong, local AM broadcast
stations.
Sienna is equipped with a very good Automatic Gain Control system, but
some operators prefer direct control over the gain. To disable the
AGC, enter the main menu and select AGC-Off [GT]. Then use the RF gain
control to reduce the gain of the receiver manually. RF Gain can be
used even while the AGC is on, in which case it lowers the sensitivity
of the IF amplifiers.
Sienna is also equipped with a circuit that disables the RF bandpass
filters, called Passive Signal Boost [SB]. This circuit allows more RF
spectrum to enter the receiver, so it increases the noise floor somewhat, but it also provides about 5dB additional RF gain (actually,
lack of loss). It can be useful on a fading band to hear a very weak
signal.
Page 28
The audio gain controls (one for the headphones and one for the speakers) affect the amount of audio reaching your ears. There is plenty of
gain there to cause distortion on loud signals, but there are times
when weak signals need to be cranked as high as possible. Just remember that with the controls all the way clockwise, a sudden strong signal could hurt your ears, so be careful!
The 3-band parametric equalizer is always in the circuit, so you can
change the gain and frequency response of the treble, mid-range and
bass frequencies. Experiment with the settings to see what sounds best
to your ears. If you want to see the various available curves for the
ST TDA7418 chip, see the datasheet that is on the flash drive that is
shipped with Sienna.
Eliminating Unwanted Signals [IS, FX, FY, MD]
When someone decides to tune up on or near the frequency on which you
are operating, or if you come across an internally-generated mixing
product (called a “birdie”, present in all superheterodyne receivers),
it is helpful to have ways of eliminating them.
Sienna has several “anti-QRM” mechanisms:
1. 8 selectable IF filters
2. IF shift
3. Alternate sideband CW filters
4. IF Notch filter
The easiest way to eliminate interference is to select a set of IF
filters that won’t let as much bandwidth through. On SSB, about the
lowest usable bandwidth is 1800 Hz. Voice content is mostly contained
between 300 and 3000 Hz, so some high frequency content will be lost,
but it is a good compromise between readability and interference rejection. On CW, 250 Hz or 400 Hz filters work remarkably well. Another
choice is to use wider filters with steeper “skirts” (lower shape factors). For example, Sienna comes with a 4-pole SSB filter that is 2400
Hz wide. You can remove that one and install a 10-pole filter in its
place. The increased selectivity can help eliminate nearby signals.
One way to narrow the filters without buying new ones is to slide the
2nd and 3rd IF filters against each other, effectively narrowing the
bandwidth. The resulting shape factor is not as good, but the tighter
bandwidth can help. This is done by selecting switch position 2 on the
8-position switch, and then rotating the “Adjust” knob left or right.
The adjust knob moves the filter by 50 Hz per step. (The Adjust knob
has 32 steps per revolution.) Push the Adjust knob to select either
the 9 MHz (2nd IF) filter or the 455 kHz (3rd IF) filter. In addition,
Page 29
you can select position 8 (the “birdcage”) and shift the 1st IF back
and forth 50 Hz per click. This often eliminates the occasional internally generated spurious mixing product (“birdie”) without bothering
the received signal noticeably.
On CW, you can select either the upper or lower sideband on which to
listen to the signal. If an interfering signal is too close on one
sideband, it may not be audible on the other. Simply select CW(USB) or
CW(LSB) as the mode. Note however that if you have not zero-beated the
received signal, the tone of the signal may change.
Activating the IF Notch by selecting switch position 3 and pushing the
Adjust knob allows you to slide a notch filter near the operating frequency by turning the adjust knob. Up to 30dB (5 S-units) of attenuation can be applied to nearby interfering heterodynes.
Zero-beating a signal
The purpose of zero beating a signal is to make sure that you transmit
on the same frequency as the station you are communicating with. When
a signal is tuned in properly, it is in the center of the 3rd IF filter passband and the audio frequency is the same as whatever the CW
Pitch control is set to. (You can see the pitch frequency in a menu.)
For example, if you have the pitch set to 600 Hz, and you tune in a CW
signal such that its frequency is 600 Hz, then when you transmit, your
transmitter will be on the same frequency as that signal. If you then
switch back and forth from CW(USB) to CW(LSB), you will hear no difference in the frequency of the signal. Pick a CW Pitch frequency that
is pleasing to your ear. That’s the same frequency that will be used
by the Sidetone when you transmit.
Zero-beating can be done by ear, by simply flipping the mode back and
forth from CW(USB) to CW(LSB) and adjusting the frequency until the
pitch is identical. It can also be done by pressing the SPOT/PROC control in the transmitter section of the front panel and then pressing
the key, which activates the Sidetone but not the transmitter. Adjust
the receiver frequency until the two tones are the same — i.e., the
“beat frequency” is 0 Hz. When they are close to the same, you can
clearly hear a beat note, as the two audio frequencies mix together to
produce a low frequency “warble”.
FM reception
To receive an FM signal, simply select FM mode, then use the FM
Squelch control to mute the receiver when no signal is present. The
Noise Blanker is not needed in FM mode, since FM inherently eliminates
Page 30
AM signals such as pulse interference. That is why the NB Threshold
control is shared with FM. In FM mode, you must also enable the FM
circuits by enabling IFOut/FM in the menu. See menu photo below.
Although Sienna is an HF Receiver/Transceiver, it does have a transverter output, allowing it to be used on VHF bands where FM is more
prevalent. See the section on transverters for more information.
Line In
Stereo sources can be played through Sienna’s rear panel Line In minijack. To enable it, select the Menu Option “Spkr Source” and set it to
Line.
Use of an External Secondary Receiver
When the DUAL button on the front panel is pushed, the internal receiver audio is routed only to the left channel of the speaker and
headphones. Any audio coming from the Line-In right channel is fed to
the right channel of the speakers and headphones. This way, you can
listen to two receivers at the same time. You also get a completely
separate set of controls for the secondary receiver. Many rigs double
up the receiver controls or use dual concentric knobs to let you control an internal secondary receiver, but the complexity quickly gets
overwhelming and causes confusion. The DZKit approach is to give you
dual audio switching, but to let you control a secondary receiver separately.
The DUAL button is only part of the story though. You also need frequency tracking, a way to share one antenna, and mute during transmit.
In order for the master Sienna to program the frequency of the slave,
the RS-232 output of the master must be connected to the RS-232 of the
slave. Since both of these are female DB-9 connectors with the same
pinout, you need an adapter cable as shown below. In the master Sienna
menu shown below, turn on the “Ext Rx track” function:
A typical PC serial cable is “straight-through”,
with male on one side and female on the other,
so two adapters are required — a null modem to
reverse the leads, and a male-to-male (straightthrough) to adapt the female to a male.
Page 31
This causes the master to send its frequency out to the slave whenever
the receive frequency is changed. (The “FA” command is used for this.)
Note that the slave should first be set to the same band. It is not
essential, but may be confusing if the slave is on 40M when it is commanded to change frequency to one on 20M. The displayed band information does not change. You can then change the slave frequency as
usual with its controls. The slave Sienna must have this function off.
The master can also feed its selected receive antenna (Main A or B, or
the receive antenna) out to the slave receiver. To do this, turn on
the “Rx Ant Out” function shown above. This allows one antenna to be
shared between the two rigs. This antenna signal is removed during
transmit if the main A or B antennas are used, just as it is with the
master, to prevent front end overload of the receiver from the transmitter output. Connect the “Rx Ant Out” connector on the master to the
main A or B or “Rx Ant In” connector on the slave and select that antenna on the slave. Enabling this splitter causes a 3dB loss in front
end receiver sensitivity, so it should only be enabled when actually
in use.
You can also allow a slave Sienna to mute itself while the master is
transmitting. To do this, connect the LRXENO (Low-true, Receive Enable
Output) of the master to the LRXENI (Input) of the slave. This is an
open collector output with a 10K pullup resistor to the internal 5V
supply, loaded on the RXBPF board. If your receiver requires different
signal levels, you can change jumper JP1 on that board to the position
marked “Ext” and feed an external voltage, up to 7.5V, into pin 1 of
the DIN connector on the rear panel marked “Ext Rx Ctrl”. However,
note that the input pin cannot go higher than 5.5V.
Sienna also features something not found on most rigs — a separate set
of band data outputs just for the receiver. This allows you to remotely select external bandpass filters or antennas based only on the receive frequency. This is essential when operating cross-band, since
you may want to use different antennas.
The pinout of the DIN connector is similar to that of the transmitter
(see drawing on page 42):
pin 1: 5-30VDC, fused
pin 2: LRXENO. (Output) Low (0V) when the transmitting
pin 3: Ground
pin 4: BAND A — Open Collector, High Voltage capable output
pin 5: BAND B — Open Collector, High Voltage capable output
pin 6: BAND C — Open Collector, High Voltage capable output
pin 7: BAND D — Open Collector, High Voltage capable output
pin 8: LRXENI. (Input) Low (0V) to cause receiver to mute
Page 32
The Transmitter
Sienna’s transmitter is controlled via the following front panel functions (relevant RS-232 commands shown in brackets):
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Microphone (mic) gain [MG]
Parametric equalizer setup
RF speech processor on/off and CW spot [PR]
RF speech processor level [PL]
RF power [PC]
Split — Separate transmitter and receiver frequencies and modes [FT]
XIT — Transmitter incremental tuning
On/Off [XT] — Transmitter incremental tuning
Clear [XC] — Resets XIT offset to 0
Down 10 HZ [XD] — Changes XIT frequency offset –10 Hz
Up 10 HZ [XU] — Changes XIT frequency offset +10 Hz
Keyer controls
• Volume [Not adjustable from RS-232]
• Pitch [PT]
• Speed [KS]
• Dot Weight [Not adjustable from RS-232]
• Dash weight [Not adjustable from RS-232]
• Full/Semi break-in (QSK) [DF, QS, SD]
In addition, there are quite a few calibration constants and other parameters accessible only via the menu or the RS-232 port which are discussed in the following paragraphs.
Menu labels are shown in quotes. RS-232 commands are shown in brackets.
Calibration constants:
“DspFrq=TXVFO” [CF] - VFO is set to display frequency
“Tx IF Shf (USB)” — Tx IF Shift for USB [CU]
“Tx IF Shf (LSB)” — Tx IF Shift for LSB [CL]
“Open Tx” — Transmitter enabled outside of license limits [CO]
“Tx Drv CW/FM” [CC] — Drive level, one per band
“Tx Drv AM/SB” [CD] — Drive level, one per band
“Mic Gain cal” [CM] — Mic preamp gain (15—55dB)
ALC:
“Tx ALC” [AL] — Enables or disables automatic level control
Audio routing:
“Tx Audio” (MIC/LINE) [AT] — Selects mic or line input
Page 33
“PC Audio” [AP] — Enables PC Line out as line source
VOX/PTT:
“AntiVOX Gain” [VA] — Reduces VOX sensitivity
“VOX Dly (10ms)” [VD] — Delay after audio stops for T->R in 10
millisecond increments
“VOX Gain” [VG] — Trip point for Voice Operated Transmit
“MOX”, “VOX”, “PTT”, “VOXC”, “PTTC” — MOX/VOX/PTT FUNCTION [VX]
“PTT-RF (ms)” [TR] — Delay in milliseconds after RF ceases
before PTT is released
Keyer related:
“SBI Dly (10 ms)” [SD] — Delay after last key press before
receiver is re-enabled, in 10 millisecond increments
up to 255 (2.55 seconds)
“FBI Dly (ms)” [DF] — Delay after last key press before
receiver is re-enabled, in 1 millisecond increments
up to 255
“Keyer Mode” [KM] — Iambic A, B or Ultimatic modes
“Farnsworth” [FN] — Speed at which to change to Farnsworth mode
(CW buffers only)
“Keying” [KY] — RS-232 only command to send CW
10 CW buffers are accessible in the menu and activated by
position 7 on the 8-position switch or via the external
keypad
Frequency control:
SPLIT [FT] — Allows separate use of transmitter and receiver
XIT ON/OFF [XT] — Transmitter incremental tuning
XIT CLEAR [XC] — Resets XIT offset to 0
XIT DN 10 HZ [XD] — Changes XIT frequency offset –10 Hz
XIT UP 10 HZ [XU] — Changes XIT frequency offset +10 Hz
Miscellaneous:
“FM Dev” [DV] - Deviation to be used on FM
“ESSB” [ES] — Enhanced SSB (uses a 5kHz filter on SSB modes)
“License Class” [LC] — Allows you to set privileges based on op
erating class (Novice, Technician, General, Advanced or Ex
tra). Non-U.S. users should select “E” for Extra class
privileges. An “Out of Band” message appears if you try to
transmit outside your selected privileges.
“Mic Bias” [MB] — Enables 9V to mic connector
“Amp” [PW] — Defines which amps are in use
“Full Duplex” [FD] — Puts rig in full duplex mode
Transmitter Parametric Equalizer (2 menu pages of setups)
Page 34
Balanced Microphone and Unbalanced Line inputs
The audio amplifier section of Sienna’s transmitter consists of components that have very low total harmonic distortion (THD < .01%) and no
crossover distortion (which means there is no glitch when audio signals cross 0V going positive or negative). This, along with the balanced mic input cabling and preamp, results in extremely clean and
noise-free audio going into the RF sections.
The front panel Mic gain knob adjusts the audio drive from the microphone or, if selected via a menu option (“Tx Audio” [AT]), the line
input. It operates in all phone modes. The balanced mic preamp gain
(“Mic Gain Cal” [CM]) can be set independently via menu option. It
defaults to a value of 255, which is the highest possible gain. If
high output mics are used, this value should be lowered so that the
mic gain control on the front panel provides appropriate range as it
is adjusted from low to high.
The mic audio is mixed with the back panel Line input (one of the
three phono connectors at the back of the transmitter board). The line
input can thus introduce noise into your transmitted audio signal if
it is not clean. It is meant as an “either-or” input — i.e., you would
typically use either the front panel balanced mic input or the back
panel Line input. But if your Line input is quiet, you can use both
together. The menu option called Tx Audio is set to Mic for either of
these inputs.
Other mic controls [DN, UP, MB, FS]
The 8-pin front panel mic connector allows mics with push buttons to
control the frequency. The pinout is compatible with some Yaesu microphones:
UP
9V
DOWN
FAST
GROUND
PTT
MIC AUDIO/GND
MIC AUDIO
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
A switch closure to ground on the UP or DOWN pins changes the frequen-
Page 35
cy by 10 Hz if the resolution is set to 10 Hz, or by 1 Hz if the resolution is set to 1 Hz. If the FAST input is also grounded, the frequency is changed by 100 Hz or 10 Hz depending on the resolution.
Resolution is not settable via RS-232 commands — the minimum increment
is always 10 Hz unless manually set via the front panel (menu item
“Disp Res”). The “Fine Step” command is equivalent to the FAST function. (Fine Step actually means that the FAST button is OFF.)
Mic Bias (pin 2)
Electret microphones require a positive voltage to bias them. This
voltage can be turned on and off via menu setting “Mic Bias” [MB]. The
pin is pulled to 9V through a 4.7K ohm resistor, and is bypassed to
ground with a .1uF capacitor.
Balanced mic connections
Pins 7 and 8 are mic audio connections. Most Yaesu compatible microphone cables connect pin 7 to ground, with the mic audio on pin 8, the
center conductor. If you wish to use a balanced microphone (which typically has an XLR connector), you will need to re-wire the cable or
use Heil’s CC-1-XLR-YB balanced cable. See Appendix D.
Digital modes
When you want to transmit digital modes, those signals (usually PC
sound card outputs) must be fed into either the transmitter’s back
panel “Mic” phono jack or the “Line In” stereo mini-jack on the back
panel, located above the optional PC. If you have the internal PC, its
sound card output is mixed with the Line In input to provide the
transmitted audio. For any of these cases, the menu option called Tx
Audio [AT] is set to Line. If you are using the internal PC, you must
also enable its sound card output by selecting “PC Audio” [AP] in the
menu.
Although USB and LSB are commonly used for transmitting digital data,
Sienna has a special digital mode available, called DIGUSB and DIGLSB.
These settings use the same information that is used when the mode is
USB or LSB, respectively, but also override the selected Tx Audio and
PC Audio menu settings to use Tx Audio = Line. If you are using the
internal PC, you will also want to manually select PC Audio = On [AP].
Page 36
RF Speech Processor [PL, PR]
The RF speech processor compresses microphone audio by amplifying it
at its IF (10.7 MHz) and then clipping the waveform. The resulting
signal has many harmonics in it, so it is then passed through a filter, which restores the original signal purity. The result though, is
a signal with much more “punch”, since low signal levels are increased
in amplitude.
The level of compression generated by the RF speech processor, when
enabled in SSB mode by pressing the Proc/Spot button [PR], can be
changed by turning the Proc Level [PL] control. When this function is
off, the gain of the Processor amplifier is set to the value given by
a calibration constant (MENU: “Tx Proc Cal”) [CP]. It is possible to
set this constant such that the processor is effectively always on, so
it should be set such that no clipping occurs when the processor is
turned off.
Speech processor level in dB can be viewed on the transmit meter by
selecting “RF Proc” in the meter selection menu (MENU: “Meter”) [RM].
Full Duplex [FD]
Most transceivers have historically saved cost by using some circuitry
for both transmitting and receiving. This makes it impossible to use
the radio in “full duplex”, meaning the ability to transmit and receive at the same time. Lack of full-duplex can also cause extra delays during the switchover from transmit to receive that make high
speed QSK (full break-in) difficult.
The transmitter section of Sienna is completely independent of the receiver. When you select main antenna A or B, however, you force Sienna
to operate in half-duplex mode, since the antenna, the transmitter’s
low pass filters and the transmit/receive (T/R) switch become shared
components. In order to operate in full-duplex mode, the Receive antenna must be used. To make this easier, when full-duplex mode is selected (MENU: “Full Duplex”), the Receive antenna is automatically selected. The receiver is left on (un-muted) during transmissions. If
you are listening on or near your operating frequency, you will hear
your own transmissions, quite possibly requiring use of the attenuator
and reduced RF Gain to prevent overload. It is a handy way to monitor
your own signal though.
Full-duplex is most often used when working cross-mode or cross-band,
which is quite common when communicating through satellites.
Page 37
It is the independent transmitter design in Sienna that makes very
high speed QSK on CW possible. Turnaround time from transmit to receive is only 10 ms, about half the length of a dit at 60 wpm. Sienna
can thus “hear between the dits” at up to about 70 wpm. A circuit in
the receiver and the sidetone generator on the controller prevent audible clicks that can happen when audio circuits are suddenly turned
on or off, which also contributes to Sienna’s smooth QSK.
RF Power [PC]
Modern transceivers use broadband amplifiers, so there is no need to
tune the transmitter at different frequencies. However, the nature of
a transmitter is that the internal gain of the various stages changes
with operating frequency. An Automatic Level Control (ALC) algorithm
in the main microprocessor firmware adjusts the power level by changing the gain of one low level amplifier so that the measured power
output remains constant. The ALC can be defeated by turning it off in
a menu (Tx ALC) [AL]. This can allow you to generate more than the
12.7 Watts that the software limits the ALC range to, but it means
that the RF Power setting is not accurate. ALC is normally turned off
during transmitter calibration as explained in the assembly manual.
Since there are several stages of amplification and many frequency
bands to cover, the overall gain varies from band to band. The transmitter’s driver stage can be calibrated so that only the minimum necessary power reaches the power amplifiers. This provides better accuracy at lower power levels. This gain calibration is explained in the
assembly manual in the Transmitter Installation and Test section. The
“Tx Drv AM/SB” [CD] and “Tx Drv CW/FM” [CC] menu settings are used for
this purpose. These settings are saved on a per band basis. The value
shown in the menu display (or returned via the RS-232 port) will be
different depending upon the current band.
Transmitter IF Shift [CU, CL]
Just as the receiver allows you to slide filters around for best receive performance, the transmitter’s IF filter can be moved around
with respect to the local oscillator, allowing you to fine tune the
audio response to your liking. Normally, for SSB operation, the local
oscillator is placed at one edge of the crystal filter passband. By
moving the oscillator frequency, you can enhance either the low frequency components or the higher frequency components of your audio
signal. Be careful though! If the IF is shifted too far to the low
frequencies, the suppressed carrier could bleed through, or even part
Page 38
of the unwanted sideband. Always listen to your transmitted signal on
a monitor receiver (or enable full duplex and listen on Sienna) before
making big changes to the default IF shifts. The shift is set in the
menu options “Tx Shf (USB)” [CU] or “Tx Shf (LSB)” [CL].
VFO A and VFO B (Split mode)
Split mode operation allows the transmitter to be used on a different
frequency and a different mode than the receiver. RIT and XIT are also
useful for this, and with Sienna’s +/-16MHz range on RIT and XIT,
there is less need for Split operation. But if you want to, say,
transmit on SSB at 14.2 MHz and listen on CW at 14.04 MHz, split mode
is what should be used.
Sienna has two main VFOs for use in split mode. VFO B is only used in
Split mode operation, and in that mode, it is always the transmit frequency. Split mode is activated by pressing the Clear/Split button to
the upper left of the small tuning knob. When activated, two things
happen:
1. The display shows the contents of VFO B in small font below the
larger VFO A. Both frequency and mode are shown. The small tuning
knob changes this frequency.
2. The definition of the XIT and RIT controls changes. XIT becomes
“Copy VFO A to VFO B” and RIT becomes “Swap VFO A with VFO B.
When you want to transmit on a different frequency or with a
mode, you should first set VFO A to that frequency and mode,
press the Split button, then the “A>B” button. This sets VFO
desired frequency and mode. You can then change VFO A to the
receive frequency and mode. When you key the transmitter, it
to the displayed VFO B frequency. Also see the [FT] command.
different
then
B to the
desired
will go
Use of Transverters (operation on VHF/UHF bands)
Using a transverter with Sienna is easy! If the transverter can accept
up to 13 Watts without difficulty, you can disable the 100 Watt amplifier (if present) and just use the main antenna (A or B) to drive it.
If it can accept a few watts without damage, you can also simply reduce the RF Power level.
When using a transverter, the receiver output from the transverter
must be connected to Sienna’s receive antenna input, and you must select the receive antenna as the source for the receiver (Rx->R antenna
selection) [AR].
Finally, the radio must be set to the 10 Meter band. A 2 MHz slice of
spectrum can then be used with your transverter. The transmitter will
Page 39
transmit and receive on 28-29.7 MHz, so the transverter must use these
frequencies for its IF. Since you may want to display the actual frequency, the menu option "Xverter Freq:" can be used to change the
leading digits of the display from 28 or 29 to 50, 52, 54, 144, 146,
22, 224, 420, 422, 424, 426, 428, 430, 432, 434, 436, 438, 440, 442,
444, 446 or 448.
Operation on 6M.
Sienna was originally designed to use transverters for all VHF and UHF
operation. However, with later models, it is possible to receive on 6.
First, set the frequency to 28MHz. Then enable the transverter function in menu 8 and select either 50 or 52 MHz. Enable the receive antenna (Rx-R). Antennas A and B cannot be used for 6M reception. It may
also be helpful to enable the 1.8MHz High Pass Filter in menu 11. A
low-level RF output prior to the amplifiers is available at the back
panel for connection to a 6M amplifier.
Transmitter Incremental Tuning (XIT) [XC, XD, XT, XU]
Sienna is equipped with a XIT function and a RIT function. RIT changes
the receiver frequency and XIT changes the transmit frequency. The
clear button [XC] clears the XIT offset, making the transmit and receive frequencies the same.
When XIT is on, the XIT light is lit and a “X:” appears in the display
along with the frequency. The “X” is a clue that the displayed frequency is the actual transmit frequency. As you turn the small tuning
knob, this frequency will change. Some transceivers show only the offset, which can be confusing and lead you to accidentally transmit
somewhere other than where you intended. Since you can clearly see
both the receive frequency and the transmit frequency (and if RIT is
also on, the original transceive frequency), you are less likely to
accidentally transmit on the wrong frequency.
You can use either RIT or XIT or SPLIT, depending on which mode is
most comfortable for you. The thing to remember is that the large display is ALWAYS the actual receiver frequency and the “X:” (if XIT is
on) is ALWAYS the transmitter frequency. If “T:” is visible, it means
that RIT is on and so the actual receiver frequency may be different
from the original receiver frequency and that the original receiver
frequency will be restored once the RIT function is turned off.
OPERATING HINT: XIT is very handy for working DX that is listening
“up” or “down” from their frequency. If you want to “tail end” the
station the DX last worked by transmitting on that frequency, turn on
RIT *and* XIT, clear the offset, adjust the small knob to the frequency of the station being worked by the DX, then turn off RIT.
Page 40
Transmit Audio Equalization
You can tailor the speech characteristics of your microphone by adjusting the transmitter’s parametric equalizer. You can change the
center frequency and gain of the treble band, and the Q, center frequency and gain of the midrange and bass bands.
The chip used is a TDA7418 made by STMicroelectronics, Inc. A
datasheet for this part is included on the flash drive. Experiment
with the values in the menu to hear the effects. The transmitter parameters are in the setup menu so they can’t be accidentally changed
when you are trying to adjust the receiver’s equalizer.
The Antenna Tuner
The antenna tuner in Sienna is a simple LC network in which the capacitance and the inductance can be varied, and the capacitor can be
placed on the transmitter or antenna side of the inductor:
The inductor can be varied from 22nH (nanoHenries) to 10uH
(microHenries) (or shorted out) and the capacitor can be varied from
10 to 1200 pF (or removed from the circuit).
Tuner memory divides the HF spectrum into 906 “chunks” by dividing the
current frequency by 32768. When the transmit frequency is within one
of those chunks, the L and C values that are found to tune it, along
with the antenna (A or B) are saved in one of 30 memory locations. For
example, if you are operating on 14.020 MHz, the chunk number is
int(14020000/32768) = 427.
Page 41
This chunk actually contains tuner data for the range 13959169 to
14024703 Hz. Chunk 428 handles 14024704 to 14057471 Hz, and so on. The
tuner saves the chunk number and the L and C values that worked on the
given antenna (A or B) in the first available memory location. If
memory fills up, entries are overwritten, which will cause new tuning
cycles to start on previously tuned frequencies.
The tuner algorithm lowers the power level, then it tries combinations
of L and C and measures the resulting reflected power looking for a
dip. If a successful tune occurs (a dip is found), a “smiley face” appears in the display for 2 seconds. If not, a “frowny face” appears
and the tuner components will revert to the bypass state.
The tuner is enabled by pushing the TUNER button [AC] so that the LED
is lit. The menu allows you to select manual or automatic modes. If
the auto-tuner is selected, pressing the key in CW mode or the PTT
switch in phone modes will cause a tuning cycle to start if one is
needed. You can set the SWR threshold at which the tuner will quit
trying or let it try for a “best match”. There are 30 memories that
keep track of the most recently used frequencies where the tuner was
used. If you try to use a frequency that is not within a memory chunk
of a stored frequency, or on a different antenna than is currently
stored in memory, the tuner initiates a tuning cycle automatically
when the key is pressed or the PTT switch is pressed.
The tuner can also be forced to run a tune cycle on a frequency that
has already been stored by setting the command function in the menu to
“Clr this mem” [TF]. The memory can also be cleared to force the tuner
to relearn all frequencies, which is useful if antennas are changed
(CMD: “Clr all mem”) [TM].
The binary value of inductance and capacitance that was found (0-127),
and whether the capacitor was on the transmitter side or the antenna
side is reported in a menu (MENU: “Capacitor: ” [TC], “Inductor:
” [TL] and “C side” [TC]).
In manual mode, you can change the values if desired. Those values
will be reset if you re-enable the auto-tuner. Sometimes the human
brain can do a better job of figuring out what values make the rig
match the antenna better than a simple algorithm can do. When you’re
happy with the results, store them in the Autotuner memory (CMD: “Sto
this mem”). The command “takes” when you exit the menu.
The tuner is intended to be used with coaxial lines, not open wire or
ladder line. It is only capable of matching the impedance to whatever
it sees at the rig’s antenna connector, which may be quite different
from what it would see at the antenna. Highly capacitive or inductive
lines or antennas may make it difficult for the tuner to find a match.
Page 42
External amplifiers
Sienna’s antenna A or B connectors can be connected to an external
linear amplifier. Other connections are via the ALC phono connector
and 8-pin DIN connector on the back panel. Connections are as follows:
DIN connector:
pin 1: 11-15VDC (raw input voltage), 250 mA max current (fused*)
pin 2: TXGND. Solid state connection to ground when Tx active
pin 3: Ground
pin 4: BAND A — Open Collector, High Voltage capable output
pin 5: BAND B — Open Collector, High Voltage capable output
pin 6: BAND C — Open Collector, High Voltage capable output
pin 7: BAND D — Open Collector, High Voltage capable output
pin 8: TXINH. Voltages greater than 6V prevent Sienna from
transmitting. (Sienna INPUT)
Note: Open collector outputs are internally pulled to +5V via 10K resistors. If you need to use higher voltages, remove resistors R3, 5, 6
and 7 from the TxBPF board.
* The fuse is soldered to the bottom of the transmitter board. If you
have no voltage here, check the fuse and replace it if necessary.
BAND Data
DCBA
0000
0001
0010
0011
0100
0101
0110
0111
1000
1001
(0 = 0V, 1 = 5V):
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
=
5-5.5MHz
0-2.5MHz
2.5-5MHz
5.5-7.5MHz
7.5-12MHz
12-16MHz
16-20MHz
20-22MHz
22-28MHz
28-30MHz
(60 M)*
(160 M)
(80 M)
(40 M)
(30 M)
(20 M)
(17 M)
(15 M)
(12 M)
(10 M)
* The 60 Meter band selection is different than that used by Yaesu
since the definitions occurred before 60 M was opened to amateur use.
Page 43
ALC phono connector: Amplifier ALC output, 0 to –5V. (Sienna INPUT)
It is not necessary to use the ALC input. The purpose of this input is
to allow the amplifier to regulate the power level of Sienna to maintain a constant signal level. However, this can cause the transmitted
IMD to be worse due to the “AMing” effect of changes to the RF power.
As a result, some prefer to do this manually. If you want to enable
use of the external ALC, select menu option “Tx/Amp” and select “Int
100W+Ext”. If you prefer to let Sienna’s ALC control the signal, select “Int 100W”.
When wiring cables, it is always a good idea to make sure you understand which direction you are looking into connectors so that voltages
are not placed in the wrong spots. On the DIN connector, measure the
voltage on what you think is pin 1 to be sure you understand whether
it is on the right or left bottom of the connector.
The MENU System
To activate Sienna’s menu, press the MENU button. PAGE/MODE will come
on automatically. Rotate the small tuning knob to select a page, then
the large tuning knob to select an item, then rotate the small tuning
knob to change its value.
To advance pages after you have changed a value, press PAGE/MODE, then
rotate the small knob.
Page 44
Menu Page 1
Defaults are shown in bold, italic
Band-SubBand: 20-1. Shows which band
and one of five sub-bands have been
selected.
Large numbers: Receive frequency
(Transceive frequency if RIT/
XIT/SPLIT are not in use)
X: Current transmit frequency
T: Original transmit frequency when
RIT is enabled
Mode: CW(USB), CW(LSB), USB, LSB,
AM, FM, DIG(USB), DIG(LSB). Available on all menu pages. Note: the
mode can also be changed by pressing
PAGE/MODE when not in MENU mode and
rotating the small tuning knob.
ble on all menu pages.
Tx: Transceive antenna: Tx-A = antenna A; Tx-B = antenna B. Available
on all menu pages.
Antenna Tuner: (See menu 10)
Note: “P-xxxx” is the RF power setting and is updated by the RF Power
control on the front panel. If ALC
Threshold is Off (see menu 19), the
power number is replaced with “PRel”, indicating that the control is
uncalibrated and the knob controls
relative power level.
Menu Page 1:
AGC: Auto, Slow, Fast, Off. Auto
sets the AGC decay time based on
mode: FM: Off; CW: Fast; USB, LSB,
Digital, AM: Slow. Available on all
menu pages.
Meter: Fwd Pwr, Refl Pwr, SWR, PA
Curr, Dvr Curr, PA Volts, RF Comp,
ALC. Selects value shown on Tx Meter.
NB: Noise Blanker on/off. Available
on all menu pages
Meter light: Off, Low1, Low2, Low3,
Med1, Med2, Med3, High. Selects meter backlight brightness.
PTT: MOX, PTT, VOX, PTTC, VOXC. Manually Operated Transmit, Push-totalk, Voice operated transmit. Without the “C” suffix, a key closure in
CW mode activates the transmitter.
PTTC enables PTT in voice and CW
modes. VOXC enables VOX in phone
modes, PTT in CW mode. PTTC and VOXC
in CW mode requires the PTT line to
be activated before the transmitter
is enabled. MOX turns on the transmitter. Available on all menu pages.
Disp res (Hz): 1, 10. Selects displayed frequency resolution to 1 or
10Hz. Displayed resolution may not
actually change until you adjust the
frequency.
Rx: Receive antenna: Rx-T = uses
transmit antenna (A or B); Rx-R =
uses receive antenna input. Availa-
Full Duplex: Off, On. When turned
on, receiver is not muted during
transmission.
PSB: Off, On. Passive Signal
BoostTM. When on, bypasses RF bandpass filters to provide about 5dB
more sensitivity in the RF path. Applies PER VFO!
Page 45
Menu Page 2
Menu Page 3
PTT-RF (ms): 1-20. Sets time delay between activation of the
transmitter and generation of actual RF signal. Useful if delays
are needed when connecting external power amplifiers.
Pitch (Hz): Sidetone Pitch value
in Hz. Active only in CW mode.
Spkr Source: Rcvr, Line: Selects
either the internal receiver or
the Line-In audio. If Line is selected, it is automatically disabled at power-on for 60 seconds
to give an external PC time to
boot.
Enhanced SSB: Off, On. If enabled, the transmitter’s wide
bandwidth filter is used in SSB
mode. Receiver bandwidth is unaffected and must be selected manually with the filter controls.
Tx Audio: Mic, Line: Enables mic
input from front or back panel.
Line Enables line input from PC
(automatically selected when mode
is set to Digital)
Lock Timer: Off, 10s, 30s, 60s.
When FAST button is on, time delay before tuning knobs are
locked if they are not touched
during that time.
Power save: Off, 15min, 30min,
60min. When active, reduces power
consumption when you want to
leave the radio on but are not
planning to use it for an extended period. If no controls are
touched for this period of time,
the radio will go into power save
mode. All controllable devices
will be turned off, including the
oscillators and display. Push any
button to reactivate controls.
Speed (wpm): Keyer speed value in
words per minute. Active only in
CW mode.
FM Dev (kHz): 2.0, 4.0, 5.0. Selects frequency deviation magnitude of carrier in FM mode.
License Class: E, A, G, T, N. Entering your license class allows
the control firmware to disable
the transmitter if you attempt to
operate outside your operating
privileges. The message “Out of
Band!” appears in the display
when the transmitter is turned
on. This message appears for all
license classes if transmission
is attempted outside of legal amateur bands. Customizable for
different services and countries
via firmware download.
Page 46
Menu Page 4
Menu Page 5
VPA (V): Power Amplifier Voltage
reading in Volts. Also output to
analog meter when PA Volts function is selected.
SWR: SWR reading. Also output to
analog meter when SWR function is
selected.
IPA (A): 100W Power Amp current
reading in Amps. Also output to
analog meter when PACurr function
is selected.
IDv (A): 10W transmitter current
reading in Amps. Also output to
analog meter when Dvr Curr function is selected.
Cmp (dB): RF Speech compression
in decibels. Also output to analog meter when RF Comp function
is selected.
ALC (V): ALC reading in Volts.
Also output to analog meter when
ALC function is selected. When
external amp provides the ALC,
this is the negative of that input voltage. When transmitting in
SSB, keep the meter in the green
zone to reduce distortion.
Fwd (W): Forward power reading in
Watts. Also output to analog meter when Fwd Pwr function is selected.
Ref (W): Reflected power reading
in Watts. Also output to analog
meter when Refl Pwr function is
selected.
Page 47
Menu Page 6
VOX Gain: 0-255. Default: 40.
Adjusts level at which VOX trips.
This is a calculated value based
on sampled audio.
VOX sens: 0-255. Default 100.
This is a hardware gain setting
on the transmitter board. The
level of signal reaching the audio sampling software is affected
by this control.
AntiVOX Gain: 0-255. Default:
40. Adjusts level at which noise
from speakers causes VOX trip.
VOX Dly (10 ms): 0-255. Default:
250. Time delay after VOX trips
before transmitter turns off. Because the increments are 10 ms,
the range is 0 to 2.55 seconds.
Mic Bias: Off, On. Turning this
on places 9V (low current) on one
of the microphone connector pins
to allow use of electret or other
powered microphones.
Menu Page 7
Tx/Amp:
None: No amp or Tx
Int 10W: Tx installed
Int 100W: Tx & amp installed
Int 100W+Ext: Tx and 100W amp
installed AND external linear is
in use. This item enables the external ALC input from the Linear
connector on the back panel.
Keyer Mode:
IambA: Iambic mode A
IambB: Iambic mode B
Ultim: Ultimatic mode
Iambic modes mean that when both
paddles are depressed, dits and
dahs alternate automatically.
There are slight timing differences with A and B modes. Ultimatic mode means that whichever
paddle is pressed last dominates.
SBI Dly (10ms): 0-255. Default:
100 (1 second). Time delay after
keying signal is removed before
transmitter turns off (CW mode
only).
FBI Dly (ms): 0-255. Default:
10. Time delay after keying signal is removed before transmitter
turns off when Full Break-in button is on (CW mode only).
Page 48
Menu Page 8
Xverter Freq:
(Rig must be set to 10M band for
this selection to be enabled.)
Off: Display is normal
Numeric (e.g., 50): The 28 is
replaced with the number selected
DTR=PTT: No, Yes. When on, allows
Data Terminal Ready (DTR) signal
on RS-232C port to act as a PTT
signal.
Baud rate: 9600, 14400, 19200,
28800, 57600, 115200. Sets RS232C baud rate. 8-bits, no parity.
Handshake: None, CTS/RTS. Set
this to agree with the terminal
emulator settings in the PC you
have connected. CTS/RTS is a
hardware handshake using RS-232
control lines. It is used to prevent buffer overflows when exchanging data with the PC. If you
use handshaking, you will not be
able to use the RTS line as a
keying signal for CW.
Turnon disp: Off, Msg1. If set
to Msg1, the first CW buffer will
be displayed for 5 seconds when
the rig is turned on.
Menu Page 9
Scan trip: S5, S6, S7, S8, S9.
Sets the trip threshold for scan
to stop. Any detected signal
above this S-meter level will
stop a scan.
Scan start: 0-84. Memory number
to use as a scan starting point.
Scan stop: 0-84. Memory number to
use as a scan stopping point.
Scan continues at “Scan start”
memory once this one is reached.
Freq inc(Hz): chn, 10, 100, 1k,
10k, 15k, 20k, 25k, 50k. If set
to “chn”, the memory channels defined by “Scan start” and “Scan
stop” are used. If set to a numeric value, the scan starts at
the current VFO setting and increments by the value specified
until the frequency in VFOB is
reached, and then it starts over
at VFOA’s frequency.
Dwell (ms): 100, 250, 500, 1000,
5000. Length of time the scan
pauses at each frequency to look
for a signal.
In scan mode, “SCAN” appears:
Page 49
Menu Page 10
When the auto-tuner is enabled by pressing the Tuner button, an “LC” symbol
appears on the bottom row of the display
(see above). If the capacitor bank is on
the antenna side of the inductor, the
top symbol appears, otherwise the middle
symbol appears. If the auto-tuner is
selected (“Tuner:” not set to “Manual”),
an “A” is added to the symbol as shown
in the bottom picture above. When selected and enabled, pressing the key or
keying the mic’s PTT line starts a tune
cycle. The 100W amp, if present, is bypassed, and a preset power level of
about 5W is selected. The tuner attempts
to find a match by minimizing the SWR.
When done, it saves the settings in
memory. The current settings for the
band and frequency you are on are also
visible. The tuner reports success by
replacing the LC symbol with a smiley
face for a short time. Failure shows a
sad face. A long tune cycle can be
aborted by pressing the Tuner button.
If “Best match” is selected, the tune
cycle is fastest but will settle for the
best SWR it can get without trying all
possible combinations of L and C. If a
specific SWR is selected, tuning will
continue until that SWR is reached,
which can take quite a while with some
antennas.
The binary values of the inductance and
capacitance (0-127), as well as the side
(Ant or Tx) that achieved the best match
is shown in this menu. If the tuner mode
is set to Manual, you can manually
change these values.
The “Cmd” line allows you to clear the
current memory, store the values in the
current memory, or clear all memory.
Memory store and clear commands do not
occur until the menu is exited.
Menu Page 11
Tx Controls: Enab, Disab. If enabled, all transmitter controls
are enabled. If disabled, the RF
Power, Speech Processor and Mic
Gain controls are inoperative.
This may be desirable in multi-op
situations where the rig owner
does not want controls changed.
Rx Ant Out: Off, On. Selected
receive antenna (Main A/B or Rx
Ant) is routed to Rx Ant Out connector. There is a 3dB loss associated with this split, so it
should be enabled only when in
use.
IF Out/FM: Disable, Enable. When
not in use, the panadapter outputs (9MHz, 455kHz IF Out connectors) can be disabled to avoid
any chance of noise being picked
up by receiver circuitry. This
also disables the FM receive
mode, so if FM receive is desired, this must be turned on.
Ext Rx track: Off, On. When
turned on, the RS-232 port sends
out an “FA” command with the current frequency whenever it is
changed. This allows a secondary
receiver to track the receive
frequency of the main receiver.
See page 30 for details on RS-232
interconnects between the rigs.
Page 50
Menu Page 12
Menu Page 13
Msg1-Msg10: CW Buffers
The text shown in
stored in the ten
ed by setting the
Adjust knob until
Adjust knob in to
the displays above are the default messages that are
CW buffers built-in to the Sienna. They are activatmulti-function switch to CWBuf, then rotating the
the desired message appears in the display. Push the
start the selected message.
The buffers are 12 characters long. The end of a buffer is shown as a
“<“ symbol. This allows you to end the buffer in a space, so that when
more than one buffer is selected, they do not run together.
To edit a buffer, select the desired buffer with the large knob, then
rotate the small knob to change the first character. Push the Adjust
knob to advance to the next position. When you have entered all the
characters you want to be in the buffer, make the last character the
“<“ symbol unless you use all 12 characters.
The first buffer, Msg1, can be enabled to be displayed for a few seconds when the rig is first turned on (Turnon disp, Menu 8).
The RS-232 command “KY” replaces the text in Msg1 and Msg2 and then
sends one or both buffers.
To send CW buffers from the front panel, select switch position 5 on
the Multifunction switch, push the Adjust button to put the currently
selected buffer in the display, rotate the Adjust knob to the desired
buffer, then push the Adjust button to start transmission. While one
buffer is transmitting, you can rotate the knob to select another
buffer and push the Adjust button again. That buffer will be sent as
soon as the first one completes. Any number of buffers can be strung
together in this way.
Page 51
Menu Page 14
Menu Page 15
Receiver Parametric Equalizer Controls and Setup menus on/off
Sienna’s receiver is equipped with a 3-band parametric equalizer. This
is similar to a graphic equalizer, but has more flexibility. You control more than just the gain of the frequency bands. You can also control the Q and the center frequency of the band.
“Q” simply means how fast the center frequency rolls off to the nearby
audio spectrum.
The gain numbers for all frequency ranges can be set from 0 to 31,
where 15 is flat (no gain, no attenuation), attenuation increases from
0 to 15dB as the value is decreased. Gain increases from 0 to +15dB as
the value increases from 15 to 31.
The bass center frequency can be set to one of four values: 60, 80,
100 and 200 Hz. The Q can be set to one of four values: 1.00, 1.25,
1.50 and 2.00.
The midrange center frequency can be set to one of four values: 500,
1000, 1500 and 2500 Hz. The Q can be set to one of four values: 0.50,
0.75, 1.00 and 1.25.
The treble center frequency can be set to one of four values: 10k,
12.5k, 15k and 17.5k Hz. Although it may seem that such high values
would not affect an audio signal with a max bandwidth of only 6kHz, it
does make a noticeable difference. Also, since stereo audio sources
can be played on Sienna, this gives you the ability to adjust audio
over the entire 20-20kHz audio spectrum.
Increasing the bass response at any of the four frequencies can increase the fullness of the audio.
The “Setup Menus” can be turned off because once set, these rarely
need to be changed, so it allows you to see only the menu options that
make sense for normal operation.
Page 52
Menu Page 16 (Setup menu Page 1)
Menu Page 17 (Setup menu Page 2)
Roof: 70.000MHz, 70.455MHz. Defines the filter bandwidth for
the roofing filter that is soldered into the receiver board.
455KHz-1: 20K, 5800. Defines the
filter bandwidth for the filter
soldered into non-removable slot
#1 of the 3rd IF filter group.
9MHz-1: 6000. This filter is not
changeable. If installed, it must
be the 6kHz AM filter (Inrad
2311) in slot 1. The filter adjust knob allows you to select
this filter even if it is not installed, but no receiver audio
will be heard. A jumper can be
used if desired.
455KHz-2: 20K, 5800, 2800, 2600,
2100, 2000, 1800, 1000, 500, 400,
300, 250, 125, none. Defines
filter bandwidth for the filter
installed in removable slot #2 of
the 3rd IF filter group.
9MHz-2: 6000, 2800, 2400, 2100,
1800, 1000, 400, 250, none. Defines filter bandwidth for the
filter installed in removable
slot #2 of the 2nd IF filter
group.
9MHz-3: 6000, 2800, 2400, 2100,
1800, 1000, 400, 250, none. Defines filter bandwidth for the
filter installed in removable
slot #3 of the 2nd IF filter
group.
9MHz-4: 6000, 2800, 2400, 2100,
1800, 1000, 400, 250, none. Defines filter bandwidth for the
filter installed in removable
slot #4 of the 2nd IF filter
group.
455KHz-3: 20K, 5800, 2800, 2600,
2100, 2000, 1800, 1000, 500, 400,
300, 250, 125, none. Defines
filter bandwidth for the filter
installed in removable slot #3 of
the 3rd IF filter group.
455KHz-4: 20K, 5800, 2800, 2600,
2100, 2000, 1800, 1000, 500, 400,
300, 250, 125, none. Defines
filter bandwidth for the filter
installed in removable slot #4 of
the 3rd IF filter group.
1.8MHz HPF: Off, On. When enabled, adds a 1.8MHz high pass
filter inline with the antenna
(on receive). This can be used to
eliminate interference from
strong local AM broadcast band
stations. It adds several dB of
loss though, which reduces receiver sensitivity, so it should
only be used if broadcast band
interference is a problem.
Page 53
Menu Page 18 (Setup menu Page 3)
Menu Page 19 (Setup menu Page 4)
RFG Cal (F): 0-255. Default:
22. This is a calibration function that sets the AGC voltage on
the receiver’s final IF stage
when the AGC decay is set to
FAST.
DspFrq=TXVFO: Off, On. When on,
sets TXVFO to same frequency as
display instead of adding the Tx
IF to it, allowing the TXVFO to
be used as a +10dBm signal generator for setup and diagnostic
purposes.
RFG Cal (S): 0-255. Default:
12. This is a calibration function that sets the AGC voltage on
the receiver’s final IF stage
when the AGC decay is set to
SLOW.
Open Tx: Off, On. Allows Tx local oscillators to run when frequency is outside amateur bands.
Used during calibration ONLY.
AGC CW: 0-255. Default: 150.
This is a calibration function.
It sets the gain of the AGC loop
for CW modes.
AGC SSB: 0-255. Default: 150.
This is a calibration function.
It sets the gain of the AGC loop
for SSB modes.
S-Mtr cal: 0-255. Default: 147.
Sets prescaler for antilog amp.
Used during calibration.
TCXO Tweak: 0-255. Default:
128. Adjusts TCXO frequency +/16 Hz per increment. Should be
used as a coarse adjustment, with
the pot on the control board used
for fine adjustment.
Mic Gain cal: 0-255. Default:
255. Sets gain of balanced mic
preamp. High output mics require
lower values.
SSB ALC Thr: 0 to 255. Default: 5.
0=Off. Audio level threshold below
which no ALC action occurs. Keeps
ALC from activating during pauses in
speech. If set to 0, disables ALC
action in all modes. Nonzero values
are ignored in CW, AM or FM modes.
Page 54
Menu Page 20 (Setup menu Page 5)
Menu Page 21 (Setup menu Page 6)
Tx Drv CW/FM: 0-40. Default:30.
Value varies by band. Sets driver
gain in CW and FM modes. There is
one entry for each of the 10
transmit bands.
Sienna’s transmitter is equipped
with a 3-band parametric equalizer identical to the one in the
receiver. You control more than
just the gain of the frequency
bands. You can also control the Q
and the center frequency of the
band.
Tx Drv AM/SB: 0-40. Default:30.
Value varies by band. Sets predriver gain in SSB and AM modes.
There is one entry for each of
the 10 transmit bands.
Tx Proc Cal. 0-40. Default:20.
Sets gain of RF pre-driver when
speech processor is off. This directly affects available power in
SSB mode, so should be set as
high as possible without causing
RF clipping to occur.
Tx Shf(USB): 0-255. Default:
160. Sets the amount of offset
in the transmitter’s TXBFO oscillator to optimize audio bandwidth
for USB mode. (125 represents
“0”, and the value given is plus
or minus 16Hz per increment above
or below this).
Tx Shf(LSB): 0-255. Default:
101. Optimizes audio bandwidth
for LSB mode. (125 represents
“0”, and the value given is plus
or minus 16Hz per increment above
or below this).
“Q” simply means how fast the
center frequency rolls off to the
nearby audio spectrum.
The gain numbers for all frequency ranges can be set from 0 to
31, where 15 is flat (no gain, no
attenuation), attenuation increases from 0 to 15dB as the
value is decreased. Gain increases from 0 to +15dB as the value
increases from there.
The treble center frequency can
be set to one of four values:
10k, 12.5k, 15k and 17.5k Hz.
Although these may not seem to
affect an audio signal with audio
bandwidth of only 6kHz max, but
it does make a noticeable difference.
The midrange center frequency can
be set to one of four values:
500, 1000, 1500 and 2500 Hz. The
Q can be set to one of four values: 0.50, 0.75, 1.00 and 1.25.
Page 55
Menu Page 22 (Setup menu Page 7)
Menu Page 23 (Setup menu Page 8)
The bass center frequency can be
set to one of four values: 60,
80, 100 and 200 Hz. The Q can be
set to one of four values: 1.00,
1.25, 1.50 and 2.00.
FM/VOX Zero: 0-255. Default:
128. When transmitting FM, the
measured AC audio voltage is used
to calculate the deviation frequency. The software assumes that
the resting level is 2.5V, which
corresponds to the halfway point
in the measurement. If the voltage is above or below this point,
due to component tolerances for
example, the FM carrier frequency
will be off slightly. Use this
value to compensate for the voltage error to get the FM frequency
correct. Applies to VOX also.
The equalizer has an internal amp
that whose gain gain also be
changed. This is controlled by
the Tx Eq Gain setting (0-127).
These controls are best left to
the factory settings, but can be
changed to help compensate for
the response of your microphone.
Such tests can be done on the air
so you can judge what sounds best
to others.
Rx DDS enab: - - - - to 1234.
This is a diagnostic function
that allows any of the receiver’s
local oscillators to be selectively turned on or off.
Tx DDS enab: - - to VB. This is a
diagnostic function that allows
any of the transmitter’s local
oscillators (TXBFO or TXVFO) to
be selectively turned on or off.
Notch cal: 0-255. Default 153.
This adjusts the center frequency
of the receiver notch filter.
AGC AM: 0-255. Default: 180.
This is a calibration function.
It sets the gain of the AGC loop
for AM mode.
Page 56
Menu Page 24 (Setup menu Page 9)
Prc1: This is the current revision
of installed firmware (software that
is programmed into the non-volatile
microprocessor memory) in the main
microprocessor. When you call for
support, we will ask you for this
value. Check www.dzkit.com periodically for downloadable updates. This
processor is programmable via the RS
-232 port using the “Megaload” software shipped on the Sienna Flash
Drive.
Prc2: This is the current revision
of installed firmware in the Keyer/
Mic/Keypad microprocessor. When you
call for support, we will ask you
for this value. This processor is
programmable by the factory or via
an Atmel uP programmer, but cannot
be programmed via the RS-232 port.
Default mem: No, Yes. Resets all VFO
memories to factory default without
impacting cal constants.
Re-program uP: No, Yes. Selecting
Yes on this option will cause the
microprocessor to enter a mode in
which it expects data to be downloaded into it over the RS-232C
port. Once selected, you must either
download new data using the utility
software provided on the PC or you
must turn off power. The radio will
not respond to controls until power
is cycled. If you select this by accident, simply turn the radio off
and then back on. No harm will have
been done.
Page 57
Page 58
Appendix A: Anderson Power Pole Connectors
ASSEMBLY INSTRUCTIONS
1. Strip wire to 5/16” (Figure 1) taking care to avoid nicking or
cutting of wire strands. Do not bend or twist strands too sharply.
5/16”
Figure 1.
TERMINATION
Melt rosin flux tin solder into contact well, do not solder-dip
contacts or overload the joint with solder. Solder flow should not
extend beyond contact wall. On all models, care should be taken that
no solder adheres to contact surfaces. See Figure 2.
CONTACT INSERTION
Insert contact and wire into the housing from the rear (See Figure 3).
Position contact as shown (See Figure 4) and push forward so that
contact slips under the barrier and snaps over the end of the
retaining spring (See Figure 5). Tug slightly to make sure contact is
locked in place.
CONTACT REMOVAL
Switch off power first. Select a screwdriver of appropriate size.
Depress spring at front of housing and pull wire out. Place one of the
forward prongs of the tool between the contact
and spring using a rotary motion. Continue
rotation while pulling on the wire until the
prong causes disengagement of contact from the
spring. Withdraw contact from rear of housing
(See Figure 6)
Page 59
Page 60
Appendix B: External Keypad Wiring
Page 61
Notes:
1. Nominal resistor values are shown. Closest 5% value is OK.
2. Voltages are values at the output when noted button is pushed, and
while connected to the rig, which pulls up to 5V through a 4.7K resistor.
3. Do not push more than one button at a time.
4. This is identical to the Yaesu FH-1 and FH-2 remote keypad.
Button functions:
Function 1
(Memory)
SW1
SW2
SW3
SW4
SW5
SW6
SW7
SW8
SW9
SW10
SW11
SW12
Function 2
A>B
A<>B
SPLIT
M>A
ignored
A>M
RCL
STO
DUAL
MUP
MDN
Function 2
(Direct Band Entry)
1.8
3.5
7.0
10.1
14.0
18.068
21.0
24.89
28.0
5.5
Function 3
Function 1
Function 3
(CW Buffer)
Send buffer 1
Send buffer 2
Send buffer 3
Send buffer 4
Send buffer 5
Send buffer 6
Send buffer 7
Send buffer 8
Send buffer 9
Send buffer 10
ignored
Function 2
Pressing SW1 switches to Function 2 mode. Once in Function 2 mode,
pressing SW11 goes to Function 3, and pressing SW12 returns to Function 1. Once in Function 3, SW11 is ignored, and Function 2 returns
back to Function 2.
Store/Recall (STO/RCL) is a single scratchpad memory that is not saved
when power is turned off. It wakes up set to WWV at 5.0 MHz.
Function2 selects the last used VFO (1-5) on the noted band.
Page 62
Appendix C: RS-232 Commands
RS-232 Port
Note: Many modern PCs no longer have RS-232
ports. You can use a USB to RS-232 converter instead, such as the one shown below:
Page 63
When running Sienna from an external PC connected to the female DB-9
connector on the back panel, here is the pinout:
DB-9 pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
Signal Name (DTE)
NC
RXD Receive data (from Sienna to PC)
TXD Transmit data (from PC to Sienna)
DTR Data Terminal Ready [ PTT ] (from PC)
GND Ground
NC
RTS Request to Send [ Key ] (from PC)
CTS Clear to Send (to PC)
NC
The baud rate defaults to 9600, although menu settings go up to
115200. The data format is 8-bits, no parity, and is fixed and unchangeable. The RTS/CTS lines form EITHER a hardware handshake OR RTS
can be used as a CW keying line controlled by the PC and DTR can be
set up as a PTT. Default is no hardware handshake, DTR does not control PTT, and RTS does not control the CW key.
Problems with RS-232C are almost always related to getting pins 2 and
3 backwards, setting the baud rate incorrectly or using a null modem
adapter when none is called for.
Command syntax follows this convention:
1. All control commands are two characters long followed by variable
length parameters followed by a ‘;’
2. There are two types of commands: SET and READ. Set commands are
usually echoed back by Sienna. Read commands echo back the 2-letter
command followed by requested data in various formats, followed by
a ‘;’
3. An unrecognized command is returned as ‘?;’
4. Although the syntax follows that defined by the Kenwood command
structure, only partial functionality will be had by selecting a
particular Kenwood radio from a typical rig control program because
Sienna has many functions that operate differently.
Page 64
ANTENNA TUNER CONTROL:
Set: AC xx;
xx = 00: Antenna tuner thru (bypassed)
xx = 11: Antenna tuner in-line (enabled)
Read: AC;
Response: AC0xx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
AUDIO GAIN (Speaker volume)
Set: AGxxx;
xxx = 000 to 255
Read: AG;
Response: AGxxx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
AUDIO GAIN (Headphone volume)
Set: AHxxx;
xxx = 000 to 255
Read: AH;
Response: AHxxx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
TXALC
Set: ALx;
x = 0: Disables transmit ALC
x = 1: Enables transmit ALC
Read: AL;
Response: ALx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
ANTENNA NUMBER
Set: ANx;
x = 1: Selects main antenna A
x = 2: Selects main antenna B
Read: AN;
Response: ANx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
PC AUDIO
Set: APx;
x = 0: Disables audio from PC and LineIn
x = 1: Enables audio from PC and LineIn
Read: AP;
Response: APx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
RECEIVE ANTENNA
Set: ARx;
x = 1: Selects transmit antenna
x = 2: Selects receive antenna
Read: AR;
Response: ARx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
TX AUDIO
Set: ATx;
x = 0: Transmitter uses Mic input
x = 1: Transmitter uses Line input
Read: AT;
Response: ATx;
Note: Valid in AM, SSB and digital modes. Overridden in FM/CW to
“Line”. Read response indicates the actual state.
Page 65
BAUD RATE
Set: BRx
x = 0: 9600
3: 57600
1: 19200
4: 115200
2: 38400
Read: BR;
Response: BRx;
Note: Baud rate defaults to 9600. Changes will not take effect until
the next power-on. Be sure to wait 10 seconds before turning power off
to be sure the new value is saved in internal memory.
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
CAL TX Drive for CW/FM (Adjusts transmitter’s Drive power level)
Set: CCyyy;
xxx = 0-255
(default value varies by band)
Set frequency before setting value
Read: CC;
Response: CCxxx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
CAL TX Drive for AM/SSB (Adjusts transmitter’s Drive power level)
Set: CDyyy;
xxx = 0-255
(default value varies by band)
Set frequency before setting value
Read: CD;
Response: CDxxx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————CAL
TX Processor (Adjusts transmitter’s RF Proc level when off)
Set: CPyyy;
xxx = 0-255
(default value = 252)
Read: CP;
Response: CPxxx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————CAL
DspFrq=TXVFO
(Sets TXVFO to display frequency to allow test of IF
Filter and RxBPF boards)
Set: CFx;
x = 0: Off
x = 1: On
Read: CF;
Response: CFx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
CAL AGC
(Sets cal constants to adjust AGC gain for AM)
Set: CAyyy;
(default value = 180)
yyy = 0-255
Read: CA;
Response: CAyyy;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
CAL AGC
(Sets cal constants to adjust AGC gain for CW/SSB)
Set: CByyy;
(default value = 150)
yyy = 0-255
Read: CB;
Response: CByyy;
Page 66
CAL TX IF SHIFT (Moves Tx IF up or down for best audio response)
Set: CUxxx;
xxx = 0-255 (USB)
(Default = 125; higher == shift up xx Hz)
Set: CLxxx;
xxx = 0-255 (LSB)
(Default = 190; higher == shift up xx Hz)
Read: CU; or CL;
Response: CUxxx; or CLxxx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
Cal Mic Gain
(Adjust gain of mic preamp)
Set: CMxxx;
x = 0-255 (Default 255 = max gain)
Note: Mic gain is set by a digitally controlled 2.8K ohm potentiometer
that is in series with a 4.7 ohm resistor in each lead. The wiper resistance is about 50 ohms. Thus the resistance can vary from approx 60
ohms (CM = 255, approx. 55dB gain) to 2860 ohms (CM = 000, approx.
15dB gain). Gain of the preamp is given by:
Resistance
4700
1100
330
100
32
10
Voltage gain
3.2
10
31.3
100
314
1000
Gain (dB)
10
20
30
40
50
60
Read: CM;
Response: CMxxx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
CAL RF GAIN
(Adjust S-meter for 0 with no signal)
Set: CRxxxyyy; xxx = AGC Fast = 0-255 (default value = 22)
yyy = AGC Slow = 0-255 (default value = 12)
Read: CR;
Response: CRxxxyyy;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
Cal S-Meter
(Adjust S-meter for S9 signal)
Set: CSxxx;
x = 0-255
Read: CS;
Response: CSxxx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
Page 67
Open Tx
Set: COx;
x = 0: Off
x = 1: On
Read: CO;
Response: COx;
Note: This command allows the Transmit oscillators to stay on even
when the display frequency is outside ham bands. (Does not function
when rig is keyed. Only used for calibration purposes.)
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
CAL TCXO
(Default = 128; higher == frequency increase in Hz)
Set: CXyyy;
xxx = 0-255
Read: CX;
Response: CXxxx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
FULL BREAK-IN DELAY
Set: DFxxx;
xxx = 000-255 ms (000 and 001 both cause 1ms delay)
Read: DF;
Response: DFxxx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
MIC DOWN
(Same as pushing microphone Down button)
Moves frequency down 1Hz or 10 Hz depending on
resolution
Set: DN;
(No Read commands, no responses)
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
DTR=PTT
Set: DTx;
x = 0: DTR does not trigger PTT
x = 1: DTR triggers PTT
Read: DT;
Response: DTx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
DUAL RECEIVE
Set: DUx;
x = 0: Off
x = 1: On
Read: DU;
Response: DUx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
FM DEVIATION
Set: DVx;
x = 0: +/-2.0kHz
x = 1: +/-4.0kHz
x = 2: +/-5.0kHz
Read: DV;
Response: DVx;
Page 68
ENHANCED SSB
Set: ESx;
(Transmit filter set to 6kHz)
x = 0: ESSB Off
x = 1: ESSB On
Read: ES;
Response: ESx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
VFO A
Set: FAxxxxxxxxxxx;
xxxxxxxxxxx = Frequency in Hz (11 characters)
Read: FA;
Response: FAxxxxxxxxxxx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
VFO B
Set: FBxxxxxxxxxxx;
xxxxxxxxxxx = Frequency in Hz (11 characters)
Read: FB;
Response: FBxxxxxxxxxxx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
FULL DUPLEX
(receiver not silenced during transmissions)
Set: FDx;
x = 0: Normal mode (Full Duplex off)
x = 1: Full duplex on
Read: FD;
Response: FDx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
FILTER INFORMATION
(Used by panadapters)
Read: FI;
Response: FIxxxxx; xxxxx = last five digits of BFO frequency
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
FARNSWORTH CW MODE
Set: FNxx
xx = 00: Off
xx = 01-05 — 5wpm spacing
xx = 06-20 — 6-20wpm spacing
Read: FN;
Response: FNxx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
SELECT RECEIVE VFO (also cancels full duplex)
Set: FRx; x = 0: VFO A
x = 1: VFO B ( swaps A & B, but does not force split mode)
x = 2: Memory channel (performs M > A)
Read: FR;
Response: FR0; (VFO A is always active)
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
SELECT TRANSMIT VFO (SPLIT)
Set: FTx;
x = 0: VFO A
x = 1: VFO B
(forces SPLIT mode)
Read: FT;
Response: FTx;
Page 69
FINE STEP
Set: FSx;
x = 0: Off
x = 1: On
(turns on FAST mode)
(turns off FAST mode, default)
Read: FS;
Response: FSx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
FILTER WIDTH
Set: FWxxxx;
Sienna returns/sets only the 9MHz filters unless extended mode ("SE1")
is enabled.
In normal mode (default or “SE0”), The settings are as follows:
SSB/AM/FM: 0000 = 2.4kHz [SET slot 2, RSP if slot 2,3 or 4], 0001 =
6kHz [slot 1] (Note that in FM mode, the value is meaningless because
fixed +/-10kHz FM filters are used, which do not occupy any “slots”.)
CW/DIG: 04xx = 400Hz [slot 4], 1xxx = 1800Hz [slot 3], 2xxx = 2.4kHz
[SET slot 2, RSP if slot 2 or 1]
Extended Sienna format:
SET/RSP fmt: kkMM, where kk is the desired slot of the 455kHz filter
(0-3) and MM is the slot of the 9MHz filter (0-3)
Example: FW0100 selects slot 2 (01) of the 455 and slot 1 (00) of the
9M filters
"FW;" returns FW0100 if slot 2 of the 455 and slot 1 of the 9M filters
are selected
Read: FW;
Response: FWxxxx;
Note: FW is maintained for compatibility with Kenwood radios. However,
it is far easier to use the following two commands to select a slot
for each IF. New implementations of rig control software should use FX
and FY instead of FW. See IX and IY for information on what is installed in slots 1-4 for each IF.
Page 70
FILTER WIDTH, 455kHz IF
Set: FXx;
x = Slot number (1, 2, 3, 4)
Read: FX;
Response: FXx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
FILTER WIDTH, 9MHz IF
Set: FYx;
x = Slot number (1, 2, 3, 4)
Read: FY;
Response: FYx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
AGC TIME CONSTANT
Set: GTxxx;
xxx = 000: Auto
xxx = 002: Fast
xxx = 004: Slow
xxx = 006: Off
Read: GT;
Response: GTxxx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
RS232 HANDSHAKE
Set: HSx;
x = 0: Off (RTS can be used as a key input)
x = 1: CTS/RTS (Disables RTS as key input)
Read: HS;
Response: HSx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
IDENTIFICATION
Read: ID;
Response: ID710;
The Sienna ID is 710
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
INFORMATION
Read: IF;
Response: IFfffffffffffheeeegiiiirx mmtMFsS000 ;
where:
f = 11 characters of frequency in Hz
heeee = “
” [SE0 mode]
heeee = XIT offset in Hz (h = ‘+’ or ‘-’) [SE1 mode]
giiii = RIT offset in Hz (g = ‘+’ or ‘-’)
r = 0: RIT off; r = 1: RIT on
x = 0: XIT off; x = 1: XIT on
mm = current memory channel (1-85)
M = mode ( 1: LSB, 2: USB, 3: CWLSB,
4: FM, 5: AM, 6: DIGLSB,
7: CWUSB, 9: DIGUSB)
F = 0: VFO A; 1 = VFO B; 2 = MEM
s = 0: Scan off; 1 = Scan on
S = 0: Split off; 1 = Split on
Note: if RIT and XIT are both on, only RIT is returned in iiii
Page 71
FILTER INSTALLATION
Set:
ROOFING FILTER
IRx; x = 0: 70.000MHz, 1 = 70.455MHz
Note: The standard roofing filter is 15kHz, centered at
70.000MHz. The optional Inrad filter is 4.5kHz, centered at
70.455MHz.
455kHz FILTERS:
IXxbbb; b = 0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,a,b,c,d (see below)
Params are in slot order, 1,2,3,4
x must be 0 or 1; other slots can be any value
9MHz FILTERS:
IYyccc; c = 0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8 (see below)
Params are in slot order, 1,2,3,4
y must be 0. Other slots can be any value
Params b and c represent bandwidths of available crystal and mechanical filters.
b: 0=20k, 1=5800, 2=2800, 3=2600, 4=2100, 5=2000, 6=1800, 7=1000
8=500, 9=400, a=300, b=250, c=125, d=none
c: 0 = 6000, 1=2800, 2=2400, 3=2100, 4=1800, 5=1000, 6=400, 7=250,
8 = none
Read: IR; or IX; or IY;
Response: IRx; or IXxbbb; or IYyccc
Example:
IR1;IX0268;IY0246 Means:
Slot
Slot
Slot
Slot
Roofing filter = 70.455MHz
455kHz filters
9MHz filters
1:
20kHz
6000Hz
2:
2800Hz
2400Hz
3:
1800Hz
1800Hz
4:
Empty
400Hz
Page 72
IF SHIFT
Set: ISpxxxx;
xxxx = selected IF shift frequency in Hz
p: If positive, can be + or ‘ ’ (space), else ‘-’
SE0 mode: Shifts the selected 9MHz IF filter.
SE1 mode: Shifts the selected 455kHz IF filter.
Read: IS;
Response: ISpxxxx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
KEYER MODE
Set: KMx;
x = 0: Iambic A
x = 1: Iambic B
x = 2: Ultimatic
Read: KM;
Response: KMx;
Note: Iambic keying means that when both paddles are pressed, the output alternates between dits and dahs. Ultimatic keying means that when
both paddles are pressed, the last one to be pressed takes over.
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
KEYER SPEED
Set: KSxxx;
xxx = 005 to 063 (words per minute)
Read: KS;
Response: KSxxx;
Note: If a front panel is present, the value displayed in the “Speed”
menu setting is the value set by the front panel control. When the KS
command is issued, it assumes control of the speed until the speed
control knob is changed, but the displayed value remains the same.
Page 73
CW KEYING
Set: KY <24 chars>;
Read: KY;
Response: KYx; x = 0: Keyer ready
x = 1: Keyer not ready
You must wait until you read a “KY0;” response before sending a new
buffer. There is a space after the KY in the set command. This space
is not transmitted.
Note: Sienna’s 10 CW buffers are 12 chars long, so the message is
placed in buffers 1 and 2 if it is longer than 12 characters, and they
are concatenated. If the buffer is less than 12 characters OR greater
than 12 but less than 24, use a ‘<’ to signify the end of the buffer,
which allows trailing spaces (which will be transmitted) to be inserted. Leading spaces are ignored.
Note: Message buffer 1 can be enabled in a menu option to be displayed
when power is first turned on. If this option is on, whatever message
was last output to CW buffer 1 will be displayed. This allows you to
use the KY command to initialize this turn-on display buffer.
Recognized punctuation:
? , . / - = + ( : ; ! @ ) $ ' _
Special standardized characters that can be used:
+ = AR (end of message)
( = KN (invitation to transmit, only to station being worked)
& = AS (wait)
The following are not defined by any standards but are allowed:
# = SK (end of work)
% = SN (understood)
* = KA (starting signal)
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
LICENSE CLASS (U.S. users only)
Set: LCx;
x = 0: Extra (full U.S. privileges)
x = 1: Advanced
x = 2: General
x = 3: Technician
x = 4: Novice
Read: LC;
Response: LCx;
Note: For non-U.S. users, a different frequency table must be downloaded. Please contact DZKit for information on how to do this.
Page 74
FREQUENCY LOCK
Set: LKx;
x = 0: Dial is not locked
x = 1: Dial is locked
Read: LK;
Response: LKx;
Note: Sienna’s built-in timer is ignored when you issue a SET command,
and the dial is locked or unlocked immediately.
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
FREQUENCY LOCK TIMER (time until dial locked if no commands received)
Set: LTx;
x = 0: Off
x = 1: 10 sec
x = 2: 30 sec
x = 3: 60 sec
Read: LT;
Response: LTx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
MIC BIAS
Set: MBx;
x = 0: Mic Bias off
x = 1: Mic Bias on (9V)
Read: MB;
Response: MBx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
MEMORY CHANNEL
Set: MC xx;
xx = 01 to 85 (leading space must be present)
Read: MC;
Response: MC xx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
MODE
Set: MDx;
x = mode ( 1: LSB, 2: USB, 3: CWUSB,
4: FM, 5: AM, 6: DIGUSB,
7: CWLSB, 9: DIGLSB) [ 0, 8 not used ]
Read: MD;
Response: MDx;
Note: If SPLIT *is not* enabled, this command returns or sets the RECEIVE *and* TRANSMIT modes. If SPLIT *is* enabled, the transmit mode
is unaffected.
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
MIC GAIN
Set: MGxxx;
xxx = 000 to 255
Read: MG;
Response: MGxxx;
Page 75
MEMORY READ (Read only)
Read: MRxxyy;
xx = ignored
yy = Memory Channel (00-84)
Response: MRx yyfffffffffffm0000 ;
note trailing space before ‘;’
x = ignored
yy = channel (00-84)
f = frequency in Hz
m = mode (see MD command)
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
MEMORY WRITE (Write only)
Set: MWx yyfffffffffffm0000 ;
Same format as MR
Note: The memory function works differently than for the Kenwood TS570. In the TS-570, writing and reading memory allow you to create and
read start and stop numbers for the memory scanning function. In the
Sienna, scans are handled separately by the SC, SI, SP, SS, ST and SV
commands. The memory can be used simply to access common frequencies,
or it can be used with the scanning function as start/stop numbers as
well as allowing a start on one memory and a frequency increment instead of a stop number.
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
MUTE RECEIVER
Set: MUx;
x = 0: Mute off
x = 1: Mute on
Read: MU;
Response: MUx;
Page 76
NOISE BLANKER
Set: NBx;
x = 0: NB off
x = 1: NB on
Read: NB;
Response: NBx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
NOISE BLANKER THRESHOLD
Set: NTxxx;
x = 000-255
This command is identical to NT, since the
noise blanker and FM squelch use the same
control.
Read: NT;
Response: NTxxx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
NOISE BLANKER PULSE WIDTH
Set: NWx;
x = 0: 29us blanking time
x = 1: 66us
x = 2: 2ms
Read: NW;
Response: NWx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
PREAMPS
Set: PAx; x = 0: Preamp 1 and 2 off, SET does not affect attenuator
x = 1: Preamp 1 on, SET turns off attenuator
x = 2: Preamp 1 and 2 on, SET turns off attenuator
Read: PA;
Response: PAx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
RF POWER
Set: PCxxx;
xxx = 000 to 100 Watts
Read: PC;
Response: PCxxx;
Note: If the internal 100W amplifier is not installed, this value is
limited to 11 Watts. Higher values will return an error.
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
POWER SAVE DELAY TIMER
(time to power-save mode
if no commands received)
Set: PD;
Read: PD;
Response: PDx;
x
x
x
x
=
=
=
=
0:
1:
2:
3:
Off
15 min
30 min
60 min
Page 77
RF SPEECH PROCESSOR LEVEL
Set: PLxxx;
xxx = 000 to 255
Read: PL;
Response: PLxxx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
TURNON DISPLAY
Set: PMx;
x = 0: no turnon message
x = 1: turnon message = CW Message buffer #1
Read: PM;
Response: PMx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
RF SPEECH PROCESSOR/CW SPOT
Set: PRx;
x = 0: Processor/CW Spot off
x = 1: Processor/CW Spot on
Read: PR;
Response: PRx;
Note: In CW mode, this command turns the SPOT function on or off. If
SPOT is on, keying the rig outputs the Sidetone without transmitting.
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
POWER SWITCH
Set: PSx;
x = 0: Power Off
x = 1: Power On
This is actually a “Power Save” mode. When PS0 is received, the display is turned off, DDS chips are placed in a power-save mode, all relays are de-energized, speakers are disabled, and the PTT line is disabled to prevent accidental activation of the transmitter or amplifier. However, the PC, if present, is left on, and some other monitoring
functions are also enabled. The fans also continue to run. This saves
about 2 Amps of DC input current. Pressing any button on the front
panel or sending the PS1 command reactivates the unit.
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
CW PITCH
Set: PTxx;
xx = 00 (400 Hz) to
xx = 12 (1000 Hz) (50 Hz steps)
Read: PT;
Response: PTxx;
Note: These are approximate numbers and should not be used for precise
calculations. Sienna’s pitch control actually has finer granularity
than what is available through this command.
Page 78
TRANSMITTER/AMPLIFIER SELECTION
Set: PWx;
x = 0: No transmitter or amplifier present
x = 1: 10W transmitter only
x = 2: 10W Tx, internal 100W amp
x = 3: 10W Tx, internal 100W amp and external amp
Read: PW;
Response: PWx;
Notes:
1. PW0 can be used even if the transmitter and amplifier are present
and will disallow all attempts to transmit.
2. PW1 can be used even if the 100W amp is installed to limit power to
10W. In this state, the 10W transmitter is routed to the amplifier,
but is switched directly to the amplifier’s output filters.
3. PW3 instructs the unit to enable ALC input from an external amplifier.
4. Selection of PW0 requires power to be cycled before it takes effect.
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
QSK (Full/Semi Break-In)
Set: QSx;
x = 0: Semi break-in
x = 1: Full break-in
Read: QS;
Response: QSx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
RF ATTENUATOR
Set: RAxx;
xx = 00: off, SET does not affect preamps
xx = 01: attenuator on, SET turns off preamps
Read: RA;
Response: RAxx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
RIT CLEAR
Set: RC;
(resets only RIT to 0)
(No Read or Response)
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
RIT DOWN 10Hz
Set: RD;
(No Read or Response)
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
FIRMWARE MAIN uP REVISION (Read Only)
Read: RF;
Response: RFx.yy.zz
Main uP firmware revision code, e.g. “A.01.21”
Page 79
RF GAIN
Set: RGxxx;
xxx = 000 to 255 (higher number = more rf gain)
Read: RG;
Response: RGxxx;FIRMWARE KEYER uP REVISION (Read Only)
Read: RK;
Response: RKx.yy.zz
Keyer firmware revision code, e.g. “A.01.00”
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
PROGRAM MAIN uP (Set only)
Set: RP;
(Jump to boot code; download expected)
(No Read or Response)
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
RIT UP 10Hz
Set: RU;
(No Read or Response)
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
READ METER
Set: RMx;
x = 1: SWR (scale yyyy: 0000 = 1:1, 0008 = 5:1
x = 2: COMP (scale yyyy: 0000 = 0dB, 0008 = 15dB)
x = 3: ALC (scale yyyy: 0000 = 0V, 0008 = 4.1V)
x = 4: VPA (scale yyyy: 0000 = 0V, 0200 = 20.0V)
x = 5: IPA (scale yyyy: 0000 = 0A, 0030 = 30.0A)
x = 6: IDV (scale yyyy: 0000 = 0A, 0030 = 3.0A
x = 7: FWD (scale yyyy: 0000 = 1.0:1, 0050 = 5.0:1
x = 8: REV (scale yyyy: 0000 = 1.0:1, 0050 = 5.0:1
Read: RM;
Response: RMxyyyy;
yyyy = 0000 to 0200
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
RIT
Set: RTx;
x = 0: RIT off
x = 1: RIT on
Read: RT;
Response: RTx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
RECEIVE MODE
Set: RX;
Response: RX;
Note: This command releases the internal forced override of the transmit control line. If the mic PTT or CW key are on, the transmitter is
still allowed to transmit.
Page 80
PASSIVE SIGNAL BOOST (bypasses receive bandpass filters)
Set: SBx;
x = 0: PSB off
x = 1: PSB on
Read: SB;
Response: SBx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
SCAN
Set: SCx;
x = 0: Scan off
x = 1: Scan on
Read: SC;
Response: SCx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
SCAN INCREMENT
Set: SIx;
x = 0: Next memory channel
x = 1: 10Hz
x = 2: 100Hz
x = 3: 1kHz
x = 4: 10kHz
x = 5: 15kHz
x = 6: 20kHz
x = 7: 25kHz
Read: SI;
Response: SIx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
SEMI BREAK-IN DELAY TIME
Set: SDxxxx;
xxxx = 0010 to 2550 ms (2.55 seconds)
(Least significant digit is ignored)
Read: SD;
Response: SDxxxx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
SIENNA EXTENDED COMMAND MODE
Set: SEn;
n = 0: Off (default)
n = 1: On
Read: SE;
Response: SEn;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
TRANSMIT MODE
Set: TX;
Response: TX;
Note: This command forces the PTT and key lines to be overridden internally, turning on the transmitter.
Page 81
S-METER READING
Read: SM;
Response: SMxxxx;
xxxx = 0000 to 0015
Note: Relative values. 0008 = S9, 0015 = 60dB over S9
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
SCAN STOP FREQUENCY
Set: SPxx;
x = 00-84 (memory number)
Read: SP;
Response: SPxx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
FM SQUELCH LEVEL
Set: SQxxx;
xxx = 000 to 255
This command is identical to NT, since the
noise blanker and FM squelch use the same
control.
Read: SQ;
Response: SQxxx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
SCAN START FREQUENCY
Set: SSxx;
x = 00-84 (memory number)
Read: SS;
Response: SSxx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
SCAN DWELL TIME
Set: STx;
x = 0: 100 ms
x = 1: 250 ms
x = 2: 500 ms
x = 3: 1 sec
x = 4: 5 sec
Read: ST;
Response: STx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
SCAN TRIP LEVEL
Set: SVx;
x = 0: S5
x = 1: S6
x = 2: S7
x = 3: S8
x = 4: S9
Read: SV;
Response: SVx;
Page 82
TUNER CAPACITANCE (Read only)
Read: TC;
Response: TCsxxxx;
s = 0: Tx side
s = 1: Antenna side
xxxx = 0000 to 9999 pF
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
TUNER FORCE RETUNE ON CURRENT MEMORY
Set: TFx;
x = 0: Off
x = 1: Retune
(No Responses)
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
TUNER INDUCTANCE (Read only)
Read: TL;
Response: TLxxxx;
xxxx = 0000 to 9999 nH
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
TUNER MEMORY CLEAR
Set: TMx;
x = 0: Off
x = 1: Clear Tuner Memory
(No Responses)
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
PTT-RF DELAY
(time from PTT to RF out)
Set: TRxxx;
xxx = 001 to 030 ms
Read: TR;
Response: TRxxx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
MIC UP
Set: UP;
Same as pushing microphone Up button
Moves frequency up 1Hz or 10 Hz depending on
resolution
(No responses)
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
ANTIVOX GAIN
Set: VAxxx;
xxx = 001 to 255
Read: VA;
Response: VAxxx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
VOX DELAY TIME
Set: VDxxxx;
xxxx = 0010 to 2550 ms (2.55 seconds)
(Least significant digit is ignored)
Read: VD;
Response: VDxxxx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
VOX GAIN
Set: VGxxx;
xxx = 000 to 255
Read: VG;
Response: VGxxx;
Page 83
VOX FUNCTION
Set: VXx;
x
x
x
x
x
=
=
=
=
=
0
1
2
3
4
=
=
=
=
=
PTT
VOX
PTT
VOX
MOX
PHONE, NORMAL CW
PHONE, NORMAL CW
PHONE, CWPTT
PHONE, CWPTT
(Manually Operated Switch)
Read: VX;
Response: VXx;
Note: CWPTT means that in addition to an input from the key, the PTT
line must be activated before CW transmission can occur. MOX turns on
the transmitter immediately.
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
XIT
Set: XTx;
x = 0: XIT off
x = 1: XIT on
Read: XT;
Response: XTx;
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
XIT CLEAR
Set: XC;
(resets only XIT to 0)
(No Read or Response)
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
XIT DOWN 10Hz
Set: XD;
(No Read or Response)
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
XIT UP 10Hz
Set: XU;
(No Read or Response)
———————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————————
TRANSVERTER DISPLAY — Changes first 3 digits of VFOA frequency
Set: XVxx; xx = 00: off 01: 50
02: 52
03: 54
04: 144 05: 146
06: 222 07: 224 08: 420 09: 422 10: 424 11: 426
12: 428 13: 430 14: 432 15: 434 16: 436 17: 438
18: 440 19: 442 20: 444 21: 446 22: 448
Read: XV;
Response: XVxx;
Note: VFO A Frequency must be between 28MHz and 30MHz.
Page 84
RS-232 COMMAND QUICK REFERENCE
RECEIVER-SPECIFIC COMMANDS
AG
AUDIO GAIN
AH
HEADPHONE GAIN
AR
RECEIVE ANTENNA
DU
DUAL RECEIVE
FI
LAST 5 DIGITS OF BFO SETTING
FW
FILTER WIDTH
FX
455kHz FILTER SLOT
FY
9MHz FILTER SLOT
GT
AGC TIME CONSTANT
IS
IF SHIFT
MU
MUTE RECEIVER
NB
NOISE BLANKER ON/OFF
NT
NOISE BLANKER THRESHOLD
NW
NOISE BLANKER PULSE WIDTH
PA
PREAMPS
RA
RF ATTENUATOR
RC
RIT CLEAR
RD
RIT DOWN 10 HZ
RG
RF GAIN
RT
RIT ON/OFF
RU
RIT UP 10 HZ
SB
PASSIVE SIGNAL BOOSTTM
SM
S-METER
SQ
FM SQUELCH LEVEL
TRANSMITTER-SPECIFIC COMMANDS
AL
TXALC
AT
TX AUDIO (MIC/LINE)
DF
FULL BREAK-IN DELAY
DV
FM DEVIATION
ES
ENHANCED SSB TRANSMISSION
FN
FARNSWORTH CW MODE
KM
KEYER MODE
KS
KEYER SPEED
KY
CW KEYING
LC
LICENSE CLASS
MB
MIC BIAS
MG
MIC GAIN
PC
TRANSMITTER RF POWER CONTROL
PL
RF SPEECH PROCESSOR LEVEL
PR
RF SPEECH PROCESSOR/CW SPOT
Page 85
PT
PW
QS
SD
TR
VA
VD
VG
VX
XC
XD
XT
XU
CW PITCH
POWER SELECTOR (TX/AMP/EXT)
QSK
SEMI BREAK-IN DELAY
PTT-RF DELAY
ANTIVOX GAIN
VOX DELAY TIME
VOX GAIN
VOX FUNCTION
XIT CLEAR
XIT DN 10 HZ
XIT ON/OFF
XIT UP 10 HZ
ANTENNA TUNER COMMANDS
AC
ANTENNA TUNER CONTROL
TC
TUNER CAPACITANCE
TF
TUNER FORCE RETUNE
TL
TUNER INDUCTANCE
TM
TUNER MEMORY CLEAR
TRANSCEIVER COMMANDS
AN
ANTENNA NUMBER
AP
PC AUDIO
DN
MIC DOWN
FA
VFO A FREQUENCY
FB
VFO B FREQUENCY
FD
FULL DUPLEX
FT
TRANSMIT
FR
RECEIVE
FS
FINE FREQUENCY TUNING STEP
LK
FREQUENCY LOCK
LT
FREQUENCY LOCK TIMER
MD
MODE
PD
POWER SAVE DELAY TIMER
PS
POWER SWITCH
RM
READ METER
RX
RECEIVE
TX
TRANSMIT
UP
MIC UP
XV
TRANSVERTER FREQUENCY PREFIX
Page 86
MEMORY AND
MC
MR
MW
SC
SI
SP
SS
ST
SV
SCANNING COMMANDS
MEMORY CHANNEL
MEMORY READ
MEMORY WRITE
SCAN ON/OFF
SCAN INCREMENT
SCAN STOP MEMORY NUMBER
SCAN START MEMORY NUMBER
SCAN DWELL TIME
SCAN TRIP VALUE
CALIBRATION COMMANDS
CA
CAL AGC-AM
CB
CAL AGC-SSB/CW
CC
CAL TX DRIVE CW/FM
CD
CAL TX DRIVE AM/SSB
CF
DSPFRQ=TXVFO
CL
CAL TX IF SHIFT FOR LSB
CM
CAL MIC PREAMP GAIN
CO
CAL TX (OPEN TX OUTSIDE LICENSE LIMIT)
CP
CAL PROC LEVEL
CR
CAL RF GAIN
CS
CAL S-METER
CU
CAL TX IF SHIFT FOR USB
CX
CAL TCXO
INFORMATION COMMANDS
ID
IDENTIFICATION
IF
INFORMATION
PM
POWER-ON MESSAGE
RF
FIRMWARE REVISION—MAIN uP
RK
FIRMWARE REVISION—KEYER uP
SETUP COMMANDS
BR
BAUD RATE
DT
DTR=PTT
HS
RS232 HANDSHAKE
IR
ROOFING FILTER INSTALL
IX
455kHz FILTER INSTALL
IY
9MHz FILTER INSTALL
RP
PROGRAM MAIN uP
SE
SIENNA EXTENDED MODE
Page 87
ALPHABETICAL COMMAND LIST
AC
AG
AH
AL
AN
AP
AR
AT
BR
CA
CB
CC
CD
CF
CL
CM
CO
CP
CR
CS
CU
CX
DF
DN
DT
DU
DV
ES
FA
FB
FD
FI
FN
FR
FS
FT
FW
ANTENNA TUNER CONTROL
AUDIO GAIN-SPKR
AUDIO GAIN—HEADPHONES
TXALC
ANTENNA NUMBER
PC AUDIO
RECEIVE ANTENNA
TX AUDIO
BAUD RATE
CAL AGC AM
CAL AGC SSB/CW
CAL TX DRIVE CW/FM
CAL TX DRIVE AM/SSB
DSPFRQ=TXVFO
CAL LSB TX IF SHIFT
CAL MIC PREAMP GAIN
CAL TX (OPEN TX OUTSIDE LICENSE LIMIT)
CAL PROC LEVEL
CAL RF GAIN
CAL S-METER and RF POWER
CAL USB TX IF SHIFT
CAL TCXO
FULL BREAK-IN DELAY
MIC DOWN
DTR=PTT
DUAL RECEIVE
FM DEVIATION
ENHANCED SSB TRANSMISSION
VFO A FREQUENCY
VFO B FREQUENCY
FULL DUPLEX
LAST 5 DIGITS OF BFO FREQUENCY
FARNSWORTH CW MODE
RECEIVE
FINE FREQUENCY TUNING STEP
TRANSMIT
FILTER WIDTH
Page 88
FX
FY
GT
HS
ID
IF
IR
IS
IX
IY
KM
KS
KY
LC
LK
LT
MB
MC
MD
MG
MR
MU
MW
NB
NT
NW
PA
PC
PD
PL
PM
PR
PS
PT
PW
QS
RA
455kHz SLOT SELECTION
9MHz SLOT SELECTION
AGC TIME CONSTANT
RS232 HANDSHAKE
IDENTIFICATION
INFORMATION
ROOFING FILTER INSTALL
IF SHIFT (RECEIVER)
455kHZ FILTER INSTALL
9MHz FILTER INSTALL
KEYER MODE
KEYER SPEED
CW KEYING
LICENSE CLASS
FREQUENCY LOCK
FREQUENCY LOCK TIMER
MIC BIAS ON/OFF
MEMORY CHANNEL
MODE
MIC GAIN
MEMORY READ
MUTE RECEIVER
MEMORY WRITE
NOISE BLANKER ON/OFF
NOISE BLANKER THRESHOLD
NOISE BLANKER PULSE WIDTH
PREAMPS
RF POWER CONTROL
POWER SAVE DELAY TIMER
RF SPEECH PROCESSOR LEVEL
POWER-ON MESSAGE
RF SPEECH PROC/CW SPOT
POWER SWITCH
CW PITCH
POWER SELECT (TX/AMP/EXT)
QSK
RF ATTENUATOR
RC
RD
RF
RG
RK
RM
RP
RT
RU
RX
SB
SC
SI
SD
SE
SM
SP
SQ
SS
ST
SV
TC
TF
TL
TM
TR
TX
UP
VA
VD
VG
VX
XC
XD
XT
XU
XV
RIT CLEAR
RIT DOWN 10 HZ
FIRMWARE REVISION—MAIN uP
RF GAIN
FIRMWARE REVISION—KEYER uP
READ METER
PROGRAM MAIN uP
RIT ON/OFF
RIT UP 10 HZ
RECEIVE MODE
PASSIVE SIGNAL BOOSTTM
SCAN ON/OFF
SCAN INCREMENT
SEMI BREAK-IN DELAY
SIENNA EXTENDED MODE
S-METER
SCAN STOP MEMORY NUMBER
FM SQUELCH LEVEL
SCAN START MEMORY NUMBER
SCAN DWELL TIME
SCAN TRIP VALUE
TUNER CAPACITANCE
TUNER FORCE RETUNE
TUNER INDUCTANCE
TUNER MEMORY CLEAR
PTT-RF DELAY
TRANSMIT
MIC UP
ANTIVOX GAIN
VOX DELAY TIME
VOX GAIN
VOX FUNCTION
XIT CLEAR
XIT DOWN 10 HZ
XIT ON/OFF
XIT UP 10 HZ
TRANSVERTER FREQUENCY PREFIX
Page 89
Appendix D: Balanced Mic Usage
The front panel 8-pin microphone connector can be used for balanced or
unbalanced microphones using pins 7 and 8. If an unbalanced mic is
used, pin 7 should be used for ground and the center pin, pin 8, used
for the audio. If a balanced (XLR) mic is used, either pin can be connected to L or R. The ground pin, if used, should be connected to pin
5.
A very good microphone to use with Sienna is the Heil PR-781. It has
an XLR connector. The standard interface cable for Yaesu radios is
called the CC-1-XLR-Y. This cable can be used as is without problems,
but will not take advantage of the balanced input capabilities in Sienna. Use the following procedure to re-wire the cable for balanced
operation. Heil also now offers a CC-1-XLR-YB which is balanced.
Slide the shell & plastic ring
away from the 8-pin connector
Unsolder pin 7 from the connector
and cut the shield wire off of it
Place heatshrink tubing over the
black wire and apply heat
Re-solder the black wire to pin 7
Page 90
Replace the plastic ring and position shield and drain wire facing back
Re-attach the shell and tighten
screws
Remove XLR shell and plastic cover
Unsolder all wires
Remove short from pin 3 to pin 1,
then resolder all three wires: +
to 2, - to 3, shield to 1
Re-attach shell and cover
Page 91
Page 92
DZ COMPANY
LOVELAND, COLORADO
UNIQUE electronic equipment in kit form
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