Campbell | NL115 | Instruction manual | Campbell NL115 Instruction manual

INSTRUCTION MANUAL
NL115 Ethernet and
CompactFlash® Module
Revision: 4/15
C o p y r i g h t © 2 0 0 6 - 2 0 1 5
C a m p b e l l S c i e n t i f i c , I n c .
Limited Warranty
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warranty. CSI’s obligation under this warranty is limited to repairing or
replacing (at CSI’s option) defective Products, which shall be the sole and
exclusive remedy under this warranty. The Customer assumes all costs of
removing, reinstalling, and shipping defective Products to CSI. CSI will return
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America. To all other locations, CSI will return such Products best way CIP
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Products which have been subjected to modification, misuse, neglect, improper
service, accidents of nature, or shipping damage. This warranty is in lieu of all
other warranties, expressed or implied. The warranty for installation services
performed by CSI such as programming to customer specifications, electrical
connections to Products manufactured by CSI, and Product specific training, is
part of CSI's product warranty. CSI EXPRESSLY DISCLAIMS AND
EXCLUDES ANY IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY
OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. CSI hereby disclaims,
to the fullest extent allowed by applicable law, any and all warranties and
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Assistance
Products may not be returned without prior authorization. The following
contact information is for US and international customers residing in countries
served by Campbell Scientific, Inc. directly. Affiliate companies handle
repairs for customers within their territories. Please visit
www.campbellsci.com to determine which Campbell Scientific company serves
your country.
To obtain a Returned Materials Authorization (RMA), contact CAMPBELL
SCIENTIFIC, INC., phone (435) 227-9000. After an application engineer
determines the nature of the problem, an RMA number will be issued. Please
write this number clearly on the outside of the shipping container. Campbell
Scientific’s shipping address is:
CAMPBELL SCIENTIFIC, INC.
RMA#_____
815 West 1800 North
Logan, Utah 84321-1784
For all returns, the customer must fill out a “Statement of Product Cleanliness
and Decontamination” form and comply with the requirements specified in it.
The form is available from our web site at www.campbellsci.com/repair. A
completed form must be either emailed to repair@campbellsci.com or faxed to
(435) 227-9106. Campbell Scientific is unable to process any returns until we
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receipt or is incomplete, the product will be returned to the customer at the
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Precautions
DANGER — MANY HAZARDS ARE ASSOCIATED WITH INSTALLING, USING, MAINTAINING, AND WORKING ON OR AROUND
TRIPODS, TOWERS, AND ANY ATTACHMENTS TO TRIPODS AND TOWERS SUCH AS SENSORS, CROSSARMS, ENCLOSURES,
ANTENNAS, ETC. FAILURE TO PROPERLY AND COMPLETELY ASSEMBLE, INSTALL, OPERATE, USE, AND MAINTAIN TRIPODS,
TOWERS, AND ATTACHMENTS, AND FAILURE TO HEED WARNINGS, INCREASES THE RISK OF DEATH, ACCIDENT, SERIOUS
INJURY, PROPERTY DAMAGE, AND PRODUCT FAILURE. TAKE ALL REASONABLE PRECAUTIONS TO AVOID THESE HAZARDS.
CHECK WITH YOUR ORGANIZATION'S SAFETY COORDINATOR (OR POLICY) FOR PROCEDURES AND REQUIRED PROTECTIVE
EQUIPMENT PRIOR TO PERFORMING ANY WORK.
Use tripods, towers, and attachments to tripods and towers only for purposes for which they are designed. Do not exceed design
limits. Be familiar and comply with all instructions provided in product manuals. Manuals are available at www.campbellsci.com or
by telephoning (435) 227-9000 (USA). You are responsible for conformance with governing codes and regulations, including safety
regulations, and the integrity and location of structures or land to which towers, tripods, and any attachments are attached. Installation
sites should be evaluated and approved by a qualified engineer. If questions or concerns arise regarding installation, use, or
maintenance of tripods, towers, attachments, or electrical connections, consult with a licensed and qualified engineer or electrician.
General
• Prior to performing site or installation work, obtain required approvals and permits. Comply
with all governing structure-height regulations, such as those of the FAA in the USA.
• Use only qualified personnel for installation, use, and maintenance of tripods and towers, and
any attachments to tripods and towers. The use of licensed and qualified contractors is highly
recommended.
• Read all applicable instructions carefully and understand procedures thoroughly before
beginning work.
• Wear a hardhat and eye protection, and take other appropriate safety precautions while
working on or around tripods and towers.
• Do not climb tripods or towers at any time, and prohibit climbing by other persons. Take
reasonable precautions to secure tripod and tower sites from trespassers.
• Use only manufacturer recommended parts, materials, and tools.
Utility and Electrical
• You can be killed or sustain serious bodily injury if the tripod, tower, or attachments you are
installing, constructing, using, or maintaining, or a tool, stake, or anchor, come in contact with
overhead or underground utility lines.
• Maintain a distance of at least one-and-one-half times structure height, 20 feet, or the distance
required by applicable law, whichever is greater, between overhead utility lines and the
structure (tripod, tower, attachments, or tools).
• Prior to performing site or installation work, inform all utility companies and have all
underground utilities marked.
• Comply with all electrical codes. Electrical equipment and related grounding devices should
be installed by a licensed and qualified electrician.
Elevated Work and Weather
• Exercise extreme caution when performing elevated work.
• Use appropriate equipment and safety practices.
• During installation and maintenance, keep tower and tripod sites clear of un-trained or nonessential personnel. Take precautions to prevent elevated tools and objects from dropping.
• Do not perform any work in inclement weather, including wind, rain, snow, lightning, etc.
Maintenance
• Periodically (at least yearly) check for wear and damage, including corrosion, stress cracks,
frayed cables, loose cable clamps, cable tightness, etc. and take necessary corrective actions.
• Periodically (at least yearly) check electrical ground connections.
WHILE EVERY ATTEMPT IS MADE TO EMBODY THE HIGHEST DEGREE OF SAFETY IN ALL CAMPBELL SCIENTIFIC PRODUCTS,
THE CUSTOMER ASSUMES ALL RISK FROM ANY INJURY RESULTING FROM IMPROPER INSTALLATION, USE, OR
MAINTENANCE OF TRIPODS, TOWERS, OR ATTACHMENTS TO TRIPODS AND TOWERS SUCH AS SENSORS, CROSSARMS,
ENCLOSURES, ANTENNAS, ETC.
Table of Contents
PDF viewers: These page numbers refer to the printed version of this document. Use the
PDF reader bookmarks tab for links to specific sections.
1. Introduction ................................................................. 1
2. Cautionary Statements ............................................... 1
3. Initial Inspection ......................................................... 2
4. Quickstart .................................................................... 2
4.1
4.2
Physical Setup ...................................................................................... 2
Communicating via Ethernet ................................................................ 3
4.2.1 Step 1: Configure Datalogger........................................................ 3
4.2.2 Step 2: LoggerNet Setup ............................................................... 4
4.2.3 Step 3: Connect ............................................................................. 5
4.3
Programming the Datalogger to Send Data to the NL115.................... 5
4.4
CF Card Data Retrieval ........................................................................ 6
5. Overview ...................................................................... 6
5.1
5.2
5.3
Status LEDs.......................................................................................... 6
Power ................................................................................................... 7
CF Card Data Retention ....................................................................... 7
6. Specifications ............................................................. 7
7. Operation ..................................................................... 9
7.1
TCP/IP Functionality ........................................................................... 9
7.1.1 Communicating Over TCP/IP ....................................................... 9
7.1.1.1 Data Callback ..................................................................... 9
7.1.1.2 Datalogger-to-Datalogger Communication ...................... 10
7.1.2 HTTP Web Server....................................................................... 11
7.1.3 FTP.............................................................................................. 12
7.1.3.1 FTP Server ....................................................................... 12
7.1.3.2 FTP Client ........................................................................ 14
7.1.4 Telnet .......................................................................................... 14
7.1.5 Ping ............................................................................................. 14
7.1.6 Serial Server ................................................................................ 14
7.1.6.1 Serial Input ....................................................................... 15
7.1.6.2 Serial Output .................................................................... 15
7.1.7 TCP ModBus .............................................................................. 15
7.1.8 DHCP .......................................................................................... 15
7.1.9 DNS ............................................................................................ 16
7.2
File Formats ....................................................................................... 16
7.2.1 Data Files .................................................................................... 16
7.2.2 Program Files .............................................................................. 16
7.2.3 Power-up Files (Powerup.ini) ..................................................... 16
7.2.3.1 Creating and Editing Powerup.ini .................................... 17
i
Table of Contents
7.2.3.2 Applications ..................................................................... 18
7.2.3.3 Program Execution .......................................................... 19
7.2.3.4 Example Powerup.ini Files .............................................. 19
7.2.4 Camera Files............................................................................... 20
7.3
Programming ..................................................................................... 20
7.3.1 The CardOut() Instruction .......................................................... 20
7.3.2 Program Examples ..................................................................... 20
7.3.2.1 Ring Mode ....................................................................... 20
7.3.2.2 Fill-and-Stop Mode.......................................................... 21
7.3.2.3 Mixed Modes ................................................................... 21
7.3.3 Table Size and Mode .................................................................. 22
7.4
CF Card Data-Retrieval Details ......................................................... 23
7.4.1 Via a Communication Link ........................................................ 23
7.4.1.1 Fast Storage/Data-Collection Constraints ........................ 23
7.4.2 Transporting CF Card to Computer ............................................ 23
7.4.2.1 Converting File Formats .................................................. 24
7.4.2.2 Reinserting the Card ........................................................ 25
7.4.2.3 Card Swapping ................................................................ 25
Appendix
A. CF Card Maintenance ............................................. A-1
A.1
Formatting CF Card......................................................................... A-1
A.1.1 Windows Explorer.................................................................... A-1
A.1.2 CR1000KD ............................................................................... A-2
A.1.3 LoggerNet File Control ............................................................ A-2
A.2 Checking CF Card Integrity ............................................................ A-3
Figures
4-1.
4-2.
4-3.
6-1.
7-1.
7-2.
7-3.
7-4.
NL115 attached to a CR1000 .............................................................. 2
DevConfig setup .................................................................................. 3
LoggerNet setup .................................................................................. 4
NL115 Ethernet/CompactFlash Module .............................................. 8
Datalogger home page ....................................................................... 11
FTP root directory ............................................................................. 12
FTP CRD directory............................................................................ 13
CardConvert ...................................................................................... 24
7-1.
Powerup.ini Commands .................................................................... 18
Table
ii
NL115 Ethernet and CompactFlash®
Module
1.
Introduction
Campbell Scientific’s NL115 Ethernet/CompactFlash® Module provides two
independent capabilities: (1) it enables 10Base-T Ethernet communications
and (2) stores data on a removable CompactFlash (CF) card. It allows the
datalogger to communicate over a local network or a dedicated Internet
connection via TCP/IP. It also expands on-site data storage and provides the
user with a convenient method of transporting data from the field back to the
office. This small, rugged communication device connects to the 40-pin
peripheral port on a CR1000 or CR3000 datalogger.
This manual describes how to use LoggerNet to connect to your datalogger
with an NL115 attached. You can also use other software packages such as
PC400, RTDAQ, or LoggerLink Mobile Apps for iOS and Android.
Campbell Scientific recommends that only FMJ CF cards be used with the
NL115. For more information on CF cards, see Campbell Scientific’s
application note CF Card Information (3SM-F). Note that it is not necessary to
purchase the FMJ CF cards directly from Campbell Scientific as long as the
FMJ model number matches those shown in the application note.
Before using the NL115, please study:
• Section 2, Cautionary Statements (p. 1)
• Section 3, Initial Inspection (p. 2)
• Section 4. Quickstart (p. 2)
The Quickstart section explains how to quickly begin using an NL115 for
straightforward Ethernet communications and data-storage operations. The
remainder of the manual is a technical reference which describes in detail such
operations as: TCP/IP functionality, file formats, datalogger programming, and
data retrieval.
2.
Cautionary Statements
•
The NL115 is rugged, but it should be handled as a precision scientific
instrument.
•
The 28033 surge suppressor and/or a shielded 10Base-T Ethernet cable
should be used for locations susceptible to power surges and for cable
lengths longer than 9 ft.
•
Always power down the datalogger before installing to or removing the
NL115 from the datalogger.
•
The first time an NL115 is attached to a datalogger, the datalogger’s
memory has to be reorganized to allow room in memory for the IP stack.
To avoid the loss of data, collect your data before attaching the NL115 to a
datalogger.
1
NL115 Ethernet and CompactFlash® Module
•
3.
An NL115 with a serial number less than 10297 requires a firmware
update to function properly when attached to a CR3000 datalogger with a
serial number greater than 6260. This update must be performed by
Campbell Scientific. If you require this firmware update, see the
Assistance section at the front of this manual for information on returning
your NL115 to Campbell Scientific.
Initial Inspection
Upon receipt of the NL115, inspect the packaging and contents for damage.
File damage claims with the shipping company.
4.
Quickstart
This section describes the basics of communicating via Ethernet and storing
and retrieving datalogger data. These operations are discussed in detail in
Section 7, Operation (p. 9).
4.1
Physical Setup
CAUTION
Always power down the datalogger before installing to or
removing the NL115 from the datalogger.
After powering down the datalogger, plug the NL115 into the datalogger
peripheral port (see FIGURE 4-1). Attach Ethernet cable to the 10Base-T port.
If using the 28033 surge protector, connect the other end of the Ethernet cable
to the 28033 and connect another Ethernet cable to the other end of the 28033.
Restore power to the datalogger. Insert formatted CF card. (For instructions
on formatting a CF card, see Appendix A, CF Card Maintenance (p. A-1).)
NOTE
A CF card does not need to be present in order to use the NL115’s
TCP/IP functionality.
FIGURE 4-1. NL115 attached to a CR1000
2
NL115 Ethernet and CompactFlash® Module
4.2
Communicating via Ethernet
4.2.1 Step 1: Configure Datalogger
a.
Connect serial cable from PC COM port to the datalogger RS-232 port.
b.
Open Campbell Scientific’s Device Configuration Utility. Select the
device type of the datalogger (CR1000 or CR3000), the appropriate serial
port, and baud rate. Connect to the datalogger.
c.
Under the TCP/IP tab, input the IP Address, Subnet Mask, and IP
gateway. These values should be provided by your network
administrator.
FIGURE 4-2. DevConfig setup
d.
Press the Apply button to save the changes and then close the Device
Configuration Utility.
NOTE
A temporary IP address may be obtained from a DHCP server.
For more information, see Section 7.1.8, DHCP (p. 15).
NOTE
The NL115 must be connected to the datalogger before
configuring the datalogger with the Device Configuration Utility.
If it is not connected, the TCP/IP settings will not be displayed.
3
NL115 Ethernet and CompactFlash® Module
4.2.2 Step 2: LoggerNet Setup
The next step is to run LoggerNet and configure it to connect to the datalogger
via the Ethernet port.
a.
In LoggerNet’s Setup Screen, press Add Root and choose IPPort. Input
the datalogger’s IP address and port number. The IP address and port
number are input on the same line separated by a colon. (The datalogger’s
default port number is 6785. It can be changed using Device
Configuration Utility or by modifying its value in the Status Table.)
b.
Add a PakBus port and set the desired baud rate.
c.
Add the datalogger (CR1000 or CR3000). Input the PakBus address of
the datalogger.
FIGURE 4-3. LoggerNet setup
4
NL115 Ethernet and CompactFlash® Module
4.2.3 Step 3: Connect
You are now ready to connect to your datalogger using the LoggerNet Connect
Screen.
Datalogger program transfer, table-data display, and data collection are now
possible.
4.3
Programming the Datalogger to Send Data to the NL115
The CardOut() instruction is used in the datalogger program to send data to
the CF card. CardOut() must be entered within each DataTable declaration
that is to store data on the CF card. The file is saved on the card with the name
stationname.tablename and a .DAT extension.
The CardOut() instruction has the following parameters:
StopRing: A constant is entered for the StopRing parameter to specify whether
the DataTable created should be a ring-mode table (0) or a fill-and-stop table
(1).
Size: The Size parameter is the minimum number of records that will be
included in the DataTable. If –1000 is entered, the size of the file on the card
will be the same as the size of the internal table on the datalogger. If any other
negative number is entered, the memory that remains after creating any fixedsize tables on the card will be allocated to this table. If multiple DataTables are
set to a negative number, the remaining memory will be divided among them.
The datalogger attempts to size the tables so that they will be full at the same
time.
In the following example, the minimum batt_voltage and a sample of PTemp
are written to the card each time the data table is called. The StopRing
parameter is 0 for ring mode. This means that once the data table is full, new
data will begin overwriting old data. The size parameter is –1, so all available
space on the card will be allocated to the table.
DataTable(Table1,1,-1)
CardOut(0 ,-1)
Minimum(1,batt_volt,FP2,0,False)
Sample(1,PTemp,IEEE4)
EndTable
CAUTION
To prevent losing data, collect data from the CF card before
sending the datalogger a new or modified program. When
a program is sent to the datalogger using the Send button in
the Connect Screen of LoggerNet or PC400, an attribute is
sent along with the program that commands the datalogger
to erase all data on the CF card from the currently running
program.
5
NL115 Ethernet and CompactFlash® Module
4.4
CF Card Data Retrieval
Data stored on cards can be retrieved through a communication link to the
datalogger or by removing the card and carrying it to a computer with a CF
adapter. With large files, transferring the CF card to a computer may be faster
than collecting the data over a communication link. CF card-data retrieval is
discussed in detail in Section 7.4, CF Card Data-Retrieval Details (p. 23).
5.
CAUTION
Removing a card while it is active can cause garbled data
and can actually damage the card. Always press the
Initiate Removal button and wait for a green light before
removing card.
CAUTION
LoggerNet’s File Control should not be used to retrieve data
from a CF card. Using File Control to retrieve the data can
result in a corrupted data file.
Overview
The NL115 Ethernet/CompactFlash Module enables 10Base-T Ethernet
communication with the datalogger. It also has a slot for a Type I or Type II
CompactFlash (CF) card (3.3 V, 75 mA).
The NL115/CF card combination can be used to expand the datalogger’s
memory, transport data/programs from the field site(s) to the office, upload
power-up functions, and store JPEG images from the CC640 camera. Data
stored on cards can be retrieved through a communications link to the
datalogger or by removing the card and carrying it to a computer. The
computer can read the CF card either with the CF1 adapter or 17752
reader/writer. The CF1 adapter allows the PC’s PCMCIA card slot to read the
CF card; the 17752 reader/writer allows the PC’s USB port to read the CF card.
User-supplied CF adapters may also be used.
CAUTION
5.1
LoggerNet’s File Control should not be used to retrieve data
from a CF card. Using File Control to retrieve the data can
result in a corrupted data file.
Status LEDs
There is one red-green-orange LED (light-emitting diode) and two buttons:
Initiate Removal and eject. The LED indicates the status of the module. The
LED will flash red when the CF card is being accessed, solid green when it is
OK to remove the card, solid orange to indicate an error, and flashing orange if
the card has been removed and has been out long enough that CPU memory
has wrapped and data is being overwritten without being stored to the card.
The Initiate Removal button must be pressed before removing a card to allow
the datalogger to store any buffered data to the card and then power off. The
eject button is used to eject the CF card. Note that if the eject button cannot be
pressed, it may have been disabled by bending it to the right. Straighten and
press the eject button to eject the CF card.
6
NL115 Ethernet and CompactFlash® Module
5.2
Power
The Ethernet/CompactFlash module is powered by 12 Vdc received from the
datalogger through the peripheral port.
Additional power consumption occurs if the Status LED is continuously lit. At
12 Vdc, an additional 1 mA is drawn by the red or green LED; an additional
2 mA is drawn by the orange LED.
5.3
CF Card Data Retention
The module accepts CompactFlash (CF) cards which do not require power to
retain data.
Typically, a CF card can be erased and rewritten a minimum of 100,000 times.
Industrial CF cards, graded for 2,000,000 write cycles, are recommended for
most applications.
6.
Specifications
Datalogger Compatibility:
CR1000, CR3000
Storage Capacity:
Depends on card size (up to 16 GB
supported; to use card size greater than 2
GB, the datalogger operating system must
be OS 25 or greater)
Power Requirements:
12 V supplied through datalogger’s
peripheral port
Current Drain:
19 mA (CR1000 with NL115 attached, no
Ethernet cable attached, not actively
communicating over Ethernet nor
accessing the CF card)
20 mA (CR1000 with NL115, Ethernet
cable attached)
20 mA (CR1000 with NL115
communicating over Ethernet)
43 mA (CR1000 with NL115
communicating over Ethernet and
accessing CF card)
2 mA (Ethernet port has been put to sleep
using the IPNET Power() CRBasic
instruction)
Add 1 mA to current drain if red or green
Status LED is continuously on.
Add 2 mA to current drain if orange Status
LED is continuously on.
Operating Temperature Range:
–25 to 50 °C Standard
–40 to 85 °C Extended
7
NL115 Ethernet and CompactFlash® Module
EMI and ESD Protection:
Meets requirements for a class A device
under European Standards
Application of Council Directive(s):
89/336/EEC as amended by 89/336/EEC
and 93/68/EEC
Standards to which conformity is declared:
EN55022-1; 1995 and EN50082-1: 1992
Cable Requirements:
NOTE
Use a straight-through Ethernet cable
when the cable is run from the hub to the
NL115. Use a crossover Ethernet cable
when the cable is run directly from the
computer to the NL115. Use a shielded
cable and/or the 28033 surge suppressor
when the cable length is more than 9 ft.
The maximum recommended segment length for 10BaseT
networks using CAT5 cable is 100 meters. Segment length is the
length of cable between the NL device and the Ethernet repeater,
hub, switch, or router it is connected to.
Ethernet Speed:
10Base-T (10 Mbps), half-duplex
Typical Access Speed:
200 to 400 kbits s–1
Memory Configuration:
User-selectable for either ring style
(default) or fill-and-stop.
Software Requirements:
LoggerNet 3.2 or later
PC400 1.3 or later
Dimensions:
10.2 x 8.9 x 6.4 cm (4.0 x 3.5 x 2.5 in)
Weight:
154 g (5.4 oz)
FIGURE 6-1. NL115 Ethernet/CompactFlash Module
8
NL115 Ethernet and CompactFlash® Module
7.
Operation
7.1
TCP/IP Functionality
This section describes the main TCP/IP functionality of a datalogger with an
NL115 attached. Additional functionality may be added in the future. For
more information, refer to the Information Services section of the datalogger
manual and CRBasic Editor Help.
7.1.1 Communicating Over TCP/IP
Once the datalogger, the NL115, and LoggerNet have been set up as described
in Sections 4.1, Physical Setup (p. 2), and 4.2, Communicating via Ethernet (p. 3),
communication is possible over TCP/IP. This includes program send and data
collection. These are straightforward operations and are accomplished through
LoggerNet’s Connect Screen. For more information, see the LoggerNet
manual.
Data callback and datalogger-to-datalogger communications are also possible
over TCP/IP, as well as the creation of simple HTML pages to view datalogger
variables using a web browser.
7.1.1.1 Data Callback
The following program is an example of doing data callback over TCP/IP. It
first checks to see if a port to the LoggerNet Server already exists. (The
LoggerNet Server is assumed to be at the default PakBus address, 4094.) If
not, a socket to LoggerNet is opened using the TCPOpen() instruction. The
SendVariables() instruction is then used to send data.
PROGRAM
'
'
'
'
'
'
'
'
'
CR1000
IP_Callback.cr1
LoggerNet server Pak Bus Address assumed = 4094
PC IP address assumed = 192.168.7.231
LoggerNet IPPort "IP Port Used for Call-Back" = 6785
LoggerNet IPPort "Call-Back Enabled" is checked
LoggerNet CR1000 "Call-Back Enabled" is checked
LoggerNet PakBusPort "PakBus Port Always Open" is checked
IP Call-back using auto-discover (-1) neighbor in SendVariables
Public PanelTemperature, BatteryVoltage, Result1, dummy1
Dim Socket as LONG
DataTable (CLBK1,1,1000)
DataInterval (0,0,Sec,10)
Sample (1,PanelTemperature,FP2)
Sample (1,BatteryVoltage,FP2)
EndTable
BeginProg
Scan (5,Sec,6,0)
PanelTemp (PanelTemperature,250)
Battery (BatteryVoltage)
If not Route(4094) then Socket = TCPOpen ("192.168.7.231",6785,0)
9
NL115 Ethernet and CompactFlash® Module
SendVariables (Result1,Socket,-1,4094,0000,100,"Public","Callback",dummy1,1)
CallTable CLBK1
NextScan
EndProg
7.1.1.2 Datalogger-to-Datalogger Communication
Communication between dataloggers is possible over TCP/IP. In order to do
this, a socket must be opened between the two dataloggers using the
TCPOpen() instruction. The socket opened by this instruction is used by the
instructions performing datalogger-to-datalogger communication.
The example program below gets the battery voltage from a remote datalogger
and sends its panel temperature to the remote datalogger. The remote
datalogger is at IP address 192.168.7.125 and port 6785 is used for
communication between the dataloggers. The remote datalogger must have its
battery voltage stored in a public variable, BattVolt. It must also have a Public
variable declared, PTemp_Base. This will be used to store the panel
temperature of the base datalogger.
PROGRAM
'CR1000
'DL-to-Dl_Comms_1.cr1
'Send this program to CR1000 #1
'Remote CR1000 #2 has PBA = 2, IP addr = 192.168.7.125, and port 6785
Public BattVolt,, BattVolt_Remote
Public PTemp
Public Result1, Result2
Dim Socket as LONG
DataTable (Test,1,-1)
DataInterval (0,12,Sec,10)
Minimum (1,BattVolt,FP2,0,False)
EndTable
BeginProg
Scan(2,Sec,0,0)
Socket = TCPOpen("192.168.7.125",6785,0)
BatteryVoltage(BattVolt)
PanelTemp(PTemp,250)
GetVariables (Result1,Socket,-1,2,0000,50,"Public","BattVolt",BattVolt_Remote,1)
SendVariables (Result2,Socket,-1,2,0000,50,"Public","PTemp",PTemp_Base,1)
CallTable(Test)
NextScan
EndProg
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NL115 Ethernet and CompactFlash® Module
7.1.2 HTTP Web Server
Typing the datalogger’s IP address into a web browser will bring up its home
page, as shown in FIGURE 7-1. This default home page provides links to the
current record in all tables, including data tables, the Status table, and the
Public table. Clicking on a Newest Record link will bring up the latest record
for that table. It will be automatically refreshed every 10 seconds. Links are
also provided to the last 24 records in each data table. Clicking on a Last 24
Records link will bring up the last 24 records for that table. The Last 24
Records display must be manually refreshed. In addition, links are provided to
all HTML files, all XML files, and all JPEG files in the datalogger.
FIGURE 7-1. Datalogger home page
If there is a default.html file on the datalogger, this will automatically become
the user-configurable home page.
The WebPageBegin/WebPageEnd declarations and the HTTPOut()
instruction can be used in a datalogger program to create HTML or XML files
that can be viewed by the browser. For more information on using these
instructions, see the datalogger manual or CRBasic Editor Help.
NOTE
FileOpen() and FileWrite() can be used to create HTML pages,
but this requires first writing the file to the datalogger’s USR
drive. It is less convenient, and the page will be only as current as
it is written to the file.
11
NL115 Ethernet and CompactFlash® Module
7.1.3 FTP
7.1.3.1 FTP Server
With an NL115 attached, the datalogger will automatically run an FTP server.
This allows Windows Explorer to access the datalogger’s file system via FTP.
In the FTP world, the “drives” on the datalogger are mapped into directories
(or folders). The “root directory” on the datalogger will include CPU and
possibly USR and/or CRD. The files will be contained in one of these
directories. Files can be pasted to and copied from the datalogger “drives” as if
they were drives on the PC. Files on the datalogger drives can also be deleted
through FTP.
FIGURE 7-2. FTP root directory
12
NL115 Ethernet and CompactFlash® Module
FIGURE 7-3. FTP CRD directory
In order to use FTP, the datalogger’s FTP User Name and FTP Password must
be set. This is done using Device Configuration Utility.
Step 1: Configure Datalogger
NOTE
a.
Connect serial cable from PC COM port to datalogger RS-232 port.
b.
Open Campbell Scientific’s Device Configuration Utility. Select the
device type of the datalogger (CR1000 or CR3000), the appropriate serial
port and baud rate. Connect to the datalogger.
e.
Under the Net Services tab, verify that FTP Enabled is checked. Input the
FTP User Name and FTP Password.
f.
Press the Apply button to save the changes and then close the Device
Configuration Utility.
Using “anonymous” as the user name with no password allows
FTP access without inputting a user name or password.
Step 2: Access File System
a.
The datalogger must be set up for Ethernet communications as explained
in Sections 4.1, Physical Setup (p. 2), and 4.2, Communicating via Ethernet
(p. 3) (Step 1 only).
13
NL115 Ethernet and CompactFlash® Module
b.
NOTE
Open a Windows Explorer window. Enter
ftp://username:password@nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn where nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn is
the IP address of the datalogger.
If the user name is “anonymous” with no password, enter
ftp://nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn where nnn.nnn.nnn.nnn is the IP address
of the datalogger.
7.1.3.2 FTP Client
The datalogger can also act as an FTP Client to send a file to or get a file from
an FTP Server (for example, another datalogger or web camera). This is done
using the FTPClient() instruction. The following program is an example of
using FTPClient() to send a file to another datalogger and get a file from that
datalogger. The first parameter in the instruction is the FTP Server’s IP
address. The second parameter is the FTP username. The third parameter is
the FTP password. The fourth parameter is the local filename. The fifth
parameter is the remote file name. The final parameter is the put/get option: 0
for put and 1 for get. The instruction returns –1 if the instruction was
successful and 0 if it was not.
PROGRAM
' CR1000
' FTPClient.cr1
Public Result1, Result2
BeginProg
Scan (20,Sec,1,1)
Result1 = FTPClient("192.168.7.85","user","password","CRD:pic.jpg","CRD:pic.jpg",0)
Result2 = FTPClient("192.168.7.85","user","password","CRD:file.html","CRD:file.html",1)
NextScan
EndProg
7.1.4 Telnet
Telnetting to the datalogger’s IP address allows access to the same commands
as the Terminal Emulator in the LoggerNet Connect Screen’s Datalogger
menu.
7.1.5 Ping
Pinging the datalogger’s IP address may be used to verify communications.
7.1.6 Serial Server
With an NL115 attached, the datalogger can be configured to act as a serial
server over the 10Base-T port. (A serial server is a device that allows serial
communication over a TCP/IP port.) This function may be useful when
communicating with a serial sensor over an Ethernet.
14
NL115 Ethernet and CompactFlash® Module
7.1.6.1 Serial Input
The TCPOpen() instruction must be used first to open up a TCP socket. An
example of this instruction is shown below. The first parameter in TCPOpen()
is the IP address to open a socket to. “” means to listen on this port rather than
connect. The second parameter is the port number to be used. The third
parameter is buffer size. For a SerialIn() instruction that will use this
connection, it gives a buffer size. The TCPOpen() instruction returns the
socket number of the open connection or ‘0’ if it cannot open a connection.
socket = TCPOpen(“”,6784,100)
Once a socket has been opened with the TCPOpen() instruction, serial data
may be received with a SerialIn() Instruction. An example of this instruction
is shown below. The first parameter is the string variable into which the
incoming serial data will be stored. The second parameter is the socket
returned by the TCPOpen() instruction. The third parameter is the timeout.
The fourth parameter is the termination character. The last parameter is the
maximum number of characters to expect per input. For more information on
this instruction, see the CRBasic Editor Help.
SerialIn(Received,socket,0,13,100)
7.1.6.2 Serial Output
The TCPOpen() instruction must be used first to open up a TCP socket. An
example of this instruction is shown below. The first parameter in TCPOpen()
is the IP address to open a socket to. The second parameter is the port number
to be used. The third parameter is buffer size. The TCPOpen() instruction
returns the socket number of the open connection or ‘0’ if it cannot open a
connection.
socket = TCPOpen(“192.168.7.85”,6784,100)
Once a socket has been opened with the TCPOpen() instruction, serial data
may be sent out with SerialOut(). An example of this instruction is shown
below. The first parameter is the socket returned by the TCPOpen()
instruction. The second parameter is the variable to be sent out. The third
parameter is the wait string. The last parameter is the total number of times the
datalogger should attempt to send the variable. For more information on this
instruction, see the CRBasic Editor Help.
result = SerialOut(socket,sent,"",0,100)
7.1.7 TCP ModBus
With an NL115 attached, the datalogger can be set up as a TCP ModBus
Master or Slave device. For information on configuring the datalogger as a
TCP ModBus Master or Slave, see the ModBus section of the datalogger
manual.
7.1.8 DHCP
The IP address of the datalogger may be obtained through DHCP, if a DHCP
server is available. The DHCP address will be automatically assigned if there
is a DHCP server available and no static IP address has been entered. The IP
address should be available a few minutes after the datalogger has been
15
NL115 Ethernet and CompactFlash® Module
powered up with the NL115 attached and Ethernet cable plugged in. The IP
address can be found with the Device Configuration Utility’s Settings tab
under TCP/IP info. It can also be found using a CR1000KD attached to the
datalogger. Go to Configure, Settings | Settings, scroll down to IP Status and
press the right arrow.
An IP address obtained through DHCP is not static but is leased for a period of
time set by the network administrator. The address may change, if the
datalogger is powered down.
7.1.9 DNS
The datalogger provides a DNS client that can query a DNS server to resolve a
fully qualified domain name. When a DNS server is available, domain names
can be used in place of the IP address in the datalogger instructions.
7.2
File Formats
This section covers the different types of files stored on the CF card.
7.2.1 Data Files
The datalogger stores data on the CF card in TOB3 format. TOB3 is a binary
format that incorporates features to improve reliability of the CF cards. TOB3
allows the accurate determination of each record’s time without the space
required for individual time stamps.
TOB3 format is different than the data file formats created when data are
collected via a communication link. Data files read directly from the CF card
generally need to be converted into another format to be used.
When TOB3 files are converted into another format, the number of records
may be slightly greater or less than the number requested in the data-table
declaration. There is always some additional memory allocated. When the file
is converted, this will result in additional records if no lapses occurred. If more
lapses occur than were anticipated, there may be fewer records in the file than
were allocated.
The CardConvert software included in LoggerNet, PC400, and PC200 will
convert data files from one format into another.
7.2.2 Program Files
The CF card can be used to provide extra program-storage space for the
datalogger. Program files can be copied to the card while it is attached as a
drive on the computer. They can also be sent to the card using LoggerNet’s
File Control. They may also be copied from CPU memory to the card (or from
the card to CPU memory) using the CR1000KD.
7.2.3 Power-up Files (Powerup.ini)
Users can insert a properly-configured CF card into the NL115, cycle through
the datalogger power, and have power-up functions automatically performed.
16
NL115 Ethernet and CompactFlash® Module
Power-up functions of CompactFlash® cards can include:
a)
b)
c)
d)
e)
f)
CAUTION
Sending programs to the CR1000 or CR3000
Setting attributes of datalogger program files
Setting disposition of old CF files
Sending an OS to the CR1000 or CR3000
Formatting memory drives
Deleting data files
Test the power-up functions in the office before going into
the field to ensure the power-up file is configured correctly.
The key to the CF power-up function is the powerup.ini file, which contains a
list of one or more command lines. At power-up, the powerup.ini command
line is executed prior to compiling the program. Powerup.ini performs three
operations:
1) Copies the specified program file to a specified memory drive
2) Sets a file attribute on the program file
3) Optionally deletes CF data files from the overwritten (just previous)
program
Powerup.ini takes precedence during power-up. Though it sets file attributes
for the programs it uploads, its presence on the CF does not allow those file
attributes to control the power-up process. To avoid confusion, either remove
the CF card or delete the powerup.ini file after the powerup.ini upload.
7.2.3.1 Creating and Editing Powerup.ini
Powerup.ini is created with a text editor, then saved as “powerup.ini”.
NOTE
Some text editors (such as WordPad) will attach header
information to the powerup.ini file, causing it to abort. Check the
text of a powerup.ini file with the datalogger keyboard display to
see what the datalogger actually sees.
Comments can be added to the file by preceding them with a single-quote
character ('). All text after the comment mark on the same line is ignored.
Syntax
Syntax allows functionality comparable to File Control in LoggerNet.
Powerup.ini is a text file that contains a list of commands and parameters. The
syntax for the file is:
Command,File,Device
where
Command = one of the numeric commands in TABLE 7-1.
File = file on CF associated with the action. Name can be up to 22
characters.
17
NL115 Ethernet and CompactFlash® Module
Device = the device to which the associated file will be copied
Options are CPU:, USR:, and CRD:. If left blank or with an invalid
option, it will default to CPU:.
TABLE 7-1. Powerup.ini Commands
Command
Description
1
Run always, preserve CF data files
2
Run on power-up
5
Format
6
Run now, preserve CF data files
9
Load OS (File = .obj)
13
Run always, erase CF data files now
14
Run now, erase CF data files now
By using PreserveVariables() instruction in the datalogger CRBasic program,
with options 1 and 6, data and variables can be preserved. The powerup.ini
code is shown below.
EXAMPLE 7-1. Powerup.ini code.
'Command = numeric power-up command
'File = file on CF associated with the action
'Device = the device to which File will be copied.
Defaults to CPU:
'Command,File,Device
13,Write2CRD_2.cr1,CPU:
7.2.3.2 Applications
18
•
Commands 1, 2, 6, 13, and 14 (Run Now and / or Run On Power-up). If a
device other than CRD: drive is specified, the file will be copied to that
device.
•
Commands 1, 2, and 13 (Run On Power-up). If the copy (first application,
above) succeeds, the new Run On Power-up program is accepted. If the
copy fails, no change will be made to the Run On Power-up program.
•
Commands 1, 6, 13, and 14 (Run Now). The Run Now program is
changed whether or not the copy (first application, above) occurs. If the
copy does succeed, the Run Now program will be opened from the device
specified.
•
Commands 13 and 14 (Delete Associated Data). Since CRD:powerup.ini
is only processed at power-up, there is not a compiled program to delete
associated data for. The information from the last-running program is still
available for the datalogger to delete the files used by that program.
NL115 Ethernet and CompactFlash® Module
7.2.3.3 Program Execution
After File is processed, the following rules determine what datalogger program
to run:
1) If the Run Now program is changed, it will be the program that runs.
2) If no change is made to the Run Now program, but the Run on Power-up
program is changed, the new Run on Power-up program runs.
3) If neither the Run on Power-up nor the Run Now programs are changed,
the previous Run on Power-up program runs.
7.2.3.4 Example Powerup.ini Files
Examples 7-2 through 7-7 are example powerup.ini files.
EXAMPLE 7-2. Run Program on Power-up.
'Copy pwrup.cr1 to USR:, will run only when powered up later
2,pwrup.cr1,usr:
EXAMPLE 7-3. Format the USR: Drive.
'Format the USR: drive
5,,usr:
EXAMPLE 7-4. Send OS on Power-up.
'Load this file into FLASH as the new OS
9,CR1000.Std.04.obj
EXAMPLE 7-5. Run Program from CRD: Drive.
'Leave program on CRD:, run always, erase CRD: data files
13,toobigforcpu.cr1,crd:
EXAMPLE 7-6. Run Program Always, Erase CF Data.
'Run always, erase CRD: data files
13,pwrup_1.cr1,crd
EXAMPLE 7-7. Run Program Now, Erase CF Data.
'Copy run.cr1 to CPU:, erase CF data, run CPU:run.cr1, but not if later powered up
14,run.cr1,cpu:
19
NL115 Ethernet and CompactFlash® Module
7.2.4 Camera Files
JPEG images taken by a CC640 digital camera (retired) connected to the
datalogger can be stored to the CF card rather than CPU memory. This is done
by configuring the PakBus setting Files Manager for the datalogger. This can
be done using Device Configuration Utility or PakBus Graph.
7.3
Programming
7.3.1 The CardOut() Instruction
The CardOut() instruction is used to send data to a CF card. CardOut() must
be entered within each DataTable() declaration that is to store data to the CF
card. Data is stored to the card when a call is made to the data table.
CardOut(StopRing, Size)
Parameter
Enter
StopRing
A code to specify if the Data Table on the CF card is fill-and-stop or ring (newest data
overwrites oldest).
Value Result
0
Ring
1
Fill and stop
The size to make the data table. The number of data sets (records) for which to allocate
memory in the CF card. Each time a variable or interval trigger occurs, a line (or row) of
data is output with the number of values determined by the output instructions within the
table. This data is called a record.
Enter –1000 and the size of the table on the card will match the size of the
Note
internal table on the datalogger. Enter any other negative number and all
remaining memory (after creating any fixed-size data tables) will be allocated to
the table or partitioned among all tables with a negative value for size. The
partitioning algorithm attempts to have the tables full at the same time.
Data Type
Constant
Size
Constant
7.3.2 Program Examples
7.3.2.1 Ring Mode
The following program outputs the maximum and minimum of the panel
temperature to the card once a second. The first parameter of the CardOut()
instruction is 0, which sets the table on the card to ring mode. The second
parameter is negative, so all available memory on the card will be allocated to
the data table. Once all available memory is used, new data will begin
overwriting the oldest.
20
NL115 Ethernet and CompactFlash® Module
PROGRAM
'CR1000
Public temp
DataTable
CardOut
Maximum
Minimum
EndTable
(Table1,1,-1)
(0, -1)
(1,temp,FP2,False,False)
(1,temp,FP2,False,False)
BeginProg
Scan(1,SEC,3,0)
PanelTemp(temp,250)
CallTable Table1
NextScan
EndProg
7.3.2.2 Fill-and-Stop Mode
The following program outputs a sample of the panel temperature to the card
once a second. The first parameter of the CardOut() instruction is 1, which
sets the table on the card to fill-and-stop mode. The second parameter (1000)
is the number of records which will be written before the table is full and data
storage stops. Once 1000 records have been stored, data storage to the
specified table on CRD: and CPU: datalogger memory drives will stop.
PROGRAM
'CR1000
Public temp
DataTable (Table1,1,1000)
CardOut (1,1000)
Sample(1,temp,IEEE4)
EndTable
BeginProg
Scan(1,SEC,3,0)
PanelTemp(temp,250)
CallTable Table1
NextScan
EndProg
To restart data storage to the fill-and-stop table, the table must be reset.
To reset a table after a fill-and-stop table has been filled and stopped, either use
the reset button in LoggerNet (LN Connect | Datalogger | Station Status | Table
Fill Times, Reset Tables) or use the CRBasic ResetTable() instruction.
7.3.2.3 Mixed Modes
The following program stores four data tables to the card. The first two tables
will output samples of the panel temperature and battery voltage to the card
once a second. The first parameter of the CardOut() instruction is 1, which
sets the tables on the card to fill-and-stop mode. The second parameter is
1000, so 1000 records will be written to each table before stopping.
21
NL115 Ethernet and CompactFlash® Module
Tables 3 and 4 will output the maximum and minimum of the panel
temperature and battery voltage to the card every five seconds. (The tables will
be called once a second. The DataInterval() instruction causes data to only be
stored every five seconds.) The first parameter of the CardOut() instruction is
0, which sets the tables on the card to ring mode. The second parameter is
negative, so all available memory on the card will be allocated to these tables,
once space for the fixed-size tables has been allocated. The datalogger will
attempt to size the tables so that both will be full at the same time.
PROGRAM
'CR1000
Public temp
Public batt
DataTable (Table1,1,-1)
CardOut (1,1000)
Sample(1,temp,IEEE4)
EndTable
DataTable (Table2,1,-1)
CardOut (1,1000)
Sample(1,batt,IEEE4)
EndTable
DataTable (Table3,1,1000)
DataInterval(0,5,sec,4)
CardOut (0 ,-1)
Maximum (1,temp,FP2,False,False)
Minimum (1,temp,FP2,False,False)
EndTable
DataTable (Table4,1,1000)
DataInterval(0,5,sec,4)
CardOut (0 ,-1)
Maximum (1batt,FP2,False,False)
Minimum (1,batt,FP2,False,False)
EndTable
BeginProg
Scan(1,SEC,3,0)
PanelTemp(temp,250)
Battery(Batt)
CallTable Table1
CallTable Table2
CallTable Table3
CallTable Table4
NextScan
EndProg
7.3.3 Table Size and Mode
The size of each data table in CPU memory is set as part of the DataTable()
instruction and the size of each data table on the CF card is set with the
CardOut() instruction. Because they are set independently, they can be
different. It is important to note that if the CPU memory is set to fill-and-stop
mode, once a table is full, all data storage to the table will stop. No more
records will be stored to the CPU memory or the card.
22
NL115 Ethernet and CompactFlash® Module
7.4
CF Card Data-Retrieval Details
Data stored on CF cards can be retrieved through a communication link to the
datalogger or by removing the card and carrying it to a computer.
7.4.1 Via a Communication Link
Data can be transferred to a computer via a communication link using one of
Campbell Scientific’s datalogger support software packages (for example,
PC200W, PC400, LoggerNet). There is no need to distinguish whether the
data is to be collected from the CPU memory or a CF card. The software
package will look for data in both the CPU memory and the CF card.
The datalogger manages data on a CF card as final-storage table data, accessing
the card as needed to fill data-collection requests initiated with the Collect
button in datalogger support software. If desired, binary data can be collected
using the File Control utility in datalogger support software. Before collecting
data this way, stop the datalogger program to ensure data are not written to the
CF card while data are retrieved. Otherwise, data corruption and confusion
will result.
7.4.1.1 Fast Storage/Data-Collection Constraints
When LoggerNet collects data from ring tables that have filled, there is the
possibility of missing records due to the collection process. LoggerNet uses a
“round-robin” collection algorithm that collects data from multiple tables in
small blocks as it sequences around to all the tables. Collection starts at the
oldest data for each table. When a ring table has filled, the oldest data is
overwritten by current data.
With filled ring tables, as collection begins LoggerNet queries the datalogger
for the oldest data starting with the first table. When this data block is
returned, LoggerNet goes to the next table and so on until all of the tables are
initially collected. By the time LoggerNet makes the second pass requesting
more data from the tables, the possibility exists that some of that data may have
been overwritten, depending on how fast the datalogger is storing data (that is,
data storage rate, number of table values, and number of tables).
Normally, LoggerNet gets ahead of the storing datalogger and the remaining
data is collected without gaps; however, if the datalogger is storing data fast
enough, it is possible to get into an always-behind scenario where LoggerNet
never catches up and the datalogger repeatedly overwrites uncollected data.
The possibility of missing records is greater when collecting data via IP. This
is due to the high demand of IP on processor time. The risk is greatest with a
CR1000 datalogger using IP, because of its slower processor speed relative to
the CR3000.
7.4.2 Transporting CF Card to Computer
With large files, transferring the CF card to a computer may be faster than
collecting the data over a link.
CAUTION
Removing a card while it is active can cause garbled data
and can actually damage the card. Do not switch off the
datalogger power if a card is present and active.
23
NL115 Ethernet and CompactFlash® Module
To remove a card, press the Initiate Removal button on the NL115. The
datalogger will transfer any buffered data to the card and then power off. The
Status LED will turn green when it is OK to remove the card. The card will be
reactivated after 20 seconds if it is not removed.
When the CF card is inserted into a computer, the data files can be copied to
another drive or used directly from the CF card just as one would from any
other disk. In most cases, however, it will be necessary to convert the file
format before using the data.
NOTE
When dealing with large data files, it may be faster to use an
external card reader (such as pn 17752) rather than a PC card slot.
7.4.2.1 Converting File Formats
Files can be converted using LoggerNet’s CardConvert. Go to Data |
CardConvert and click on “Select Card Drive”. Select where the files to be
converted are stored and press OK. Next, click on “Change Output Dir” and
select where you would like the converted files to be stored. Place check
marks next to the files to be converted. A default destination filename is given.
It can be changed by right-clicking with the filename highlighted. Press the
“Destination File Options” button to select what file format to convert to and
other options. Press “Start Conversion” to begin converting files. Green
checkmarks will appear next to each filename as conversion is complete. Refer
to CardConvert online help for more information.
FIGURE 7-4. CardConvert
24
NL115 Ethernet and CompactFlash® Module
7.4.2.2 Reinserting the Card
If the same card is inserted again into the NL115, the datalogger will store all
data to the card that has been generated since the card was removed that is still
in the CPU memory. If the data tables have been left on the card, new data will
be appended to the end of the old files. If the data tables have been deleted,
new ones will be generated.
CAUTION
Check the status of the card before leaving the datalogger.
If a CF card was not properly accepted, the NL115 will flash
orange. In that case, the user needs to reformat and erase
all data contained on the CF card. Formatting or erasing a
CF card might be done on a PC or datalogger. The
procedure for formatting a CF card is explained in Appendix
A, CF Card Maintenance (p. A-1).
7.4.2.3 Card Swapping
When transporting a CF card to a computer to retrieve data, most users will
want to use a second card to ensure that no data is lost. For this method of
collection, use the following steps.
NOTE
1.
Insert formatted card (“CF-A”) in NL115 attached to datalogger.
2.
Send Program containing CardOut() instruction(s).
3.
When ready to retrieve data, press the NL115 Initiate Removal button to
remove the card. The LED will be red while the most-current data is
stored to the card and then turn green. Eject the card while the LED is
green.
4.
Put in the clean card (“CF-B”).
5.
Use CardConvert to copy data from CF-A to PC and convert. The default
CardConvert filename will be TOA5_stationname_tablename.dat. Once
the data is copied, use Windows Explorer to delete all data files from the
card.
Windows98 and WindowsME users need to shift-delete to
completely delete files. Using standard delete may create an
invisible recycle bin on the CF card.
6.
At the next card swap, eject CF-B and insert the clean CF-A.
7.
Running CardConvert on CF-B will result in separate data files containing
records since CF-A was ejected. CardConvert can increment the filename
to TOA5_stationname_tablename_0.dat.
8.
The data files can be joined using a software utility such as WordPad or
Excel.
CardConvert File
CF-A Record Numbers
TOA5_tablename.dat
0-100
TOA5_tablename.dat
TOA5_tablename.dat
CF-B Record Numbers
101-1234
1235-….
25
NL115 Ethernet and CompactFlash® Module
26
Appendix A. CF Card Maintenance
A.1 Formatting CF Card
The CF card can be formatted using 1) Windows Explorer, 2) the CR1000KD,
or 3) LoggerNet File Control.
A.1.1 Windows Explorer
To format card using Windows Explorer:
1) Insert CF card into CF adapter or CF reader.
2) Windows Explorer should identify a drive as a removable disk (F:\).
3) Select that drive and right-click.
4) Choose Format.
A-1
Appendix A. CF Card Maintenance
5) Choose FAT32 under file system, give the card a label, and press Start.
(The datalogger will work with either FAT or FAT32.)
A.1.2 CR1000KD
To format card using the CR1000KD:
1) Insert CF card into NL115.
2) From the main menu of CR1000KD, choose PCCard.
3) Choose Format Card.
4) Choose Yes to proceed.
A.1.3 LoggerNet File Control
To format card using LoggerNet File Control:
1) Insert CF card into NL115.
2) Use LoggerNet to connect to datalogger.
A-2
Appendix A. CF Card Maintenance
3) Choose FileControl under the Tools menu of the Connect Screen.
4) Highlight CRD.
5) Press Format.
6) Press Yes to confirm.
A.2 Checking CF Card Integrity
The Windows Check Disk tool can be used to check the integrity of a CF card.
To access the Check Disk tool:
1) Insert CF card into CF reader.
2) Windows Explorer should identify a drive as removable disk.
3) Select that drive and right-click.
4) Choose Properties.
A-3
Appendix A. CF Card Maintenance
5) Navigate to the Tools tab.
6) Press Check Now.
7) Select both options.
8) Press Start.
A-4
Campbell Scientific Companies
Campbell Scientific, Inc. (CSI)
815 West 1800 North
Logan, Utah 84321
UNITED STATES
www.campbellsci.com • info@campbellsci.com
Campbell Scientific Centro Caribe S.A. (CSCC)
300 N Cementerio, Edificio Breller
Santo Domingo, Heredia 40305
COSTA RICA
www.campbellsci.cc • info@campbellsci.cc
Campbell Scientific Africa Pty. Ltd. (CSAf)
PO Box 2450
Somerset West 7129
SOUTH AFRICA
www.csafrica.co.za • cleroux@csafrica.co.za
Campbell Scientific Ltd. (CSL)
Campbell Park
80 Hathern Road
Shepshed, Loughborough LE12 9GX
UNITED KINGDOM
www.campbellsci.co.uk • sales@campbellsci.co.uk
Campbell Scientific Australia Pty. Ltd. (CSA)
PO Box 8108
Garbutt Post Shop QLD 4814
AUSTRALIA
www.campbellsci.com.au • info@campbellsci.com.au
Campbell Scientific Ltd. (CSL France)
3 Avenue de la Division Leclerc
92160 ANTONY
FRANCE
www.campbellsci.fr • info@campbellsci.fr
Campbell Scientific (Beijing) Co., Ltd.
8B16, Floor 8 Tower B, Hanwei Plaza
7 Guanghua Road
Chaoyang, Beijing 100004
P.R. CHINA
www.campbellsci.com • info@campbellsci.com.cn
Campbell Scientific Ltd. (CSL Germany)
Fahrenheitstraße 13
28359 Bremen
GERMANY
www.campbellsci.de • info@campbellsci.de
Campbell Scientific do Brasil Ltda. (CSB)
Rua Apinagés, nbr. 2018 ─ Perdizes
CEP: 01258-00 ─ São Paulo ─ SP
BRASIL
www.campbellsci.com.br • vendas@campbellsci.com.br
Campbell Scientific Spain, S. L. (CSL Spain)
Avda. Pompeu Fabra 7-9, local 1
08024 Barcelona
SPAIN
www.campbellsci.es • info@campbellsci.es
Campbell Scientific Canada Corp. (CSC)
14532 – 131 Avenue NW
Edmonton AB T5L 4X4
CANADA
www.campbellsci.ca • dataloggers@campbellsci.ca
Please visit www.campbellsci.com to obtain contact information for your local US or international representative.
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