MDS | MX-2100 | MDS NETview MS™ Quick Start

MDS NETview MS™
NETWORK MANAGEMENT SOFTWARE
Software Version 3.x
MDS 05-2973A01, Rev. C
OCTOBER 2004
Installation
Operation
Guide
Installation and
& Operation
Guide
Microwave Data Systems Inc.
MDS NETview MS™ Quick Start
MDS NETview software provides a central console from which an MDS radio network and associated IP-connected devices can be viewed in a hierarchal map perspective. NETview monitors
the network for fault and performance information, and allows various maintenance tasks to be
performed on MDS radios. Because NETview provides a client/server interface, multiple users
can connect to the application simultaneously to perform network management.
Below are the basic steps for installing NETview and preparing it for usewith your network.
Online help is also provided with the program. To access the online help file, simply select Help
from the top menu bar.
1.
Check computer and radio equipment for compatibility with NETview.
• The MDS NETview program is intended to operate on a Windows 2000, NT 4.0 or Windows XP
platform. The entire NETview package can run on a single PC or multiple PCs using the client/
server interface.
• The NETview server and NETview client both require the Java Runtime Environment (JRE) to
operate. (The JRE is provided on the NETview CD.)
• The program is designed primarily to service MDS IP-capable radios, such as the MDS iNET,
entraNET and MDS LEDR Series. However, it is not limited to MDS products; any IP-based node
may be monitored.
2.
Install the software in the following order: 1) JRE, 2) the three servers, and 3) the two clients.
• A single CD is supplied that includes all necessary program files. (Prerequisite: JRE 1.3 and a
TFTP Server must already be installed for executing the binaries and downloading/uploading configuration files to/from a device.)
• A CD browser guides the user through the installation process. Insert the disk and follow the onscreen prompts and dialog boxes to install the program elements in the desired directories. When
installation is complete, the MDS NETview server and client programs appear on the Start menu.
3.
Launch the program and create a system map.
• First time users will be prompted to create a system map following login. A network map is a graphical representation of the associated IP-connected devices in a hierarchal map perspective. Select
a name for the map and ensure that you are in edit mode by verifying that Lock Map is displayed in
the File menu.
• To add a Network element, simply click on an icon at the left side of the screen, and drag it over to
the map area.
• You will be prompted for an IP address and SNMP community string password (optional) for the
new element. After a connection to the new element is tested (automatically) , it is placed onto the
map area. (If the connection fails, a dialog box allows you to delete it or keep it despite the connection failure.) Network elements can be “wired” together on the map to illustrate their position within
the network. For MDS radios, enter “public” for the SNMP community string.
4.
Select a system to monitor via the NETview screen.
• Device icons are highlighted with colors to indicate operating status as follows: Clear (no color)–No
alarms detected; Blue–Information; Green–Warning; Yellow–Minor alarm; Orange–Major alarm;
Red–Critical alarm.
• Click a device icon to view data for that unit. If the unit has associated devices, you can view their
data also, by clicking the respective icons that will appear under the main radio.
• Many additional polling modes and viewing options are available. Consult online help for details.
CONTENTS
1.0 INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................................. 1
1.1 Problem Detection & Logging ........................................................................................................ 1
1.2 Types of Users ............................................................................................................................... 2
1.3 Hierarchal Map Views .................................................................................................................... 3
Understanding NETview’s “Layers” ........................................................................................... 4
1.4 Obtaining Device-Specific Data ..................................................................................................... 4
1.5 TrapTracker for Windows™ (TTW) ................................................................................................. 5
1.6 Online Help .................................................................................................................................... 6
2.0 INSTALLATION ..................................................................................................................... 7
2.1 Computer Requirements ............................................................................................................... 7
NETview Server’s PC................................................................................................................ 7
NETview Client’s PC ................................................................................................................. 8
2.2 Software Included on the CD ......................................................................................................... 8
2.3 Installing NETview ......................................................................................................................... 9
Installation Steps....................................................................................................................... 9
2.4 Connecting the PC to the Radio Network .................................................................................... 11
3.0 LAUNCHING THE SOFTWARE.......................................................................................... 12
3.1 Initial Login—Required for First Time Users ................................................................................ 12
3.2 Establishing a User Account ........................................................................................................ 12
4.0 Building a Network Map ...................................................................................................... 15
4.1 Creating Submaps ....................................................................................................................... 21
4.2 Exporting Existing Maps .............................................................................................................. 22
5.0 USING NETview SOFTWARE ............................................................................................ 23
5.1 Launching the Program ............................................................................................................... 23
5.2 NETview Tasks ............................................................................................................................ 23
Online Help ............................................................................................................................. 23
Viewing Alarms on Network Maps .......................................................................................... 24
Viewing Event Logs................................................................................................................. 26
Polling a Selected Node/Device for Connectivity .................................................................... 27
“Is Alive Polling” Feature (Periodic Connectivity Check) ......................................................... 28
Opening a Telnet Session with a Device ................................................................................. 30
Opening a Web Server Session with a Device........................................................................ 31
Viewing Performance Statistics............................................................................................... 32
Transparent Radio Health Check
(For radios connected to an MDS gateNET proxy) ................................................................. 36
Downloading New Firmware for MDS Products ...................................................................... 37
Uploading/Downloading Configuration Files ........................................................................... 39
Changing Your Password ........................................................................................................ 40
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Loading Maps ......................................................................................................................... 41
Viewing Options ...................................................................................................................... 43
Right-Click Features................................................................................................................ 44
Modify Double-Click Action .....................................................................................................47
Trap Management ................................................................................................................... 47
6.0 TRAPTRACKER PROGRAM .............................................................................................. 49
6.1 TrapTracker Components ............................................................................................................. 49
6.2 Managing TrapTracker Functions ................................................................................................. 50
Exporting Traps to Non-SNMP Host Programs ....................................................................... 50
Setting Up a TrapTracker Alert ................................................................................................ 50
Maintaining the TrapTracker Database .................................................................................... 52
7.0 APPENDIX A—
Property settings for Server and Client ....................................................................................... 53
7.1 Server Property Settings ............................................................................................................. 53
7.2 Client Property Settings ............................................................................................................... 54
8.0 APPENDIX B—
Batch File Settings for Server and Client .................................................................................... 56
8.1 Server Batch File Settings ........................................................................................................... 56
8.2 Client Batch File Settings ............................................................................................................ 57
9.0 APPENDIX C—
Terms and Abbreviations ............................................................................................................ 58
BER......................................................................................................................................... 58
BERT....................................................................................................................................... 58
Bit ............................................................................................................................................ 58
bps .......................................................................................................................................... 58
CMP ........................................................................................................................................ 58
Console Port ........................................................................................................................... 58
dBm......................................................................................................................................... 58
Decibel .................................................................................................................................... 58
DRAM ..................................................................................................................................... 58
DSP......................................................................................................................................... 59
FPGA ...................................................................................................................................... 59
G.821 ...................................................................................................................................... 59
IP............................................................................................................................................. 59
JDBC....................................................................................................................................... 59
JRE ......................................................................................................................................... 59
JVM ......................................................................................................................................... 59
kbps ........................................................................................................................................ 59
MDSnv .................................................................................................................................... 59
Mbps ....................................................................................................................................... 59
MIB.......................................................................................................................................... 59
Network Element..................................................................................................................... 59
Network Map ........................................................................................................................... 60
NMS ........................................................................................................................................ 60
ODBC...................................................................................................................................... 60
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OID.......................................................................................................................................... 60
PSOS ...................................................................................................................................... 60
Raw Service Channel ............................................................................................................. 60
RSSI........................................................................................................................................ 60
SNMP...................................................................................................................................... 60
SNR ........................................................................................................................................ 60
SRAM...................................................................................................................................... 60
TCP/IP .................................................................................................................................... 60
Telnet....................................................................................................................................... 60
TFTP ....................................................................................................................................... 61
TMN ........................................................................................................................................ 61
Trap ......................................................................................................................................... 61
UDP ........................................................................................................................................ 61
Copyright Notice
This Installation and Operation Guide and all software described herein are Copyright 2004 by Microwave Data Systems Inc. All rights reserved. Microwave Data Systems Inc. reserves its right to correct any errors and omissions in
this manual.
MDS Quality Policy Statement
We, the employees of Microwave Data Systems, are committed to understanding and exceeding our customer’s needs
and expectations.
• We appreciate our customers’ patronage. They are our business.
• We promise to serve them and anticipate their needs.
• We are committed to providing solutions that are cost effective, innovative and reliable, with consistently
high levels of quality.
We are committed to the continuous improvement of all of our systems and processes, to improve product quality and
increase customer satisfaction.
ISO 9001 Registration
Microwave Data Systems adheres to the internationally-accepted ISO 9001 quality system standard.
Manual Revisions
While every reasonable effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of this manual, product improvements may result
in minor differences between the manual and the product shipped to you. If you have additional questions or need an
exacs specification for a product, please contact our Customer Service Team using the information at the back of this
guide. In addition, manual updates can often be found on the MDS Web site at www.microwavedata.com.
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1.0 INTRODUCTION
MDS NETview MS™ is a Windows®-based program for remote management, control, and diagnosis of MDS wireless products and associated IP-connected devices. It provides a central console from which
entire networks can be monitored for fault and performance information. It can also be used to perform various maintenance tasks, including
downloads of new firmware or configuration files for MDS radios.
NETview is a client/server based program that allows multiple users (up
to 10) to simultaneously connect to its server and perform network management. Figure 1 illustrates a typical multi-user layout. The program
may be used from any location in a network, including authorized access
via the Internet.
While the program is optimized for use with new-generation MDS products—such as the LEDR II, MDS iNET 900®, MDS entraNET®, it also
supports other types of IP devices that communicate via industry-standard protocols including SNMP, TFTP, Telnet and Web server access.
Invisible place holder
Technician #1 PC
System
Administrator's PC
Ethernet
NETview MS Server
Radio Center PC
Technician #2 PC
Figure 1. NETview is a Client/Server based application. This allows
multiple users to connect to its server for network management.
1.1 Problem Detection & Logging
NETview helps users detect system problems and correct them before
they become a threat to network operations. When problems are found,
alerts are generated and displayed on the console screen. Alert messages
can also be sent to remote maintenance personnel via e-mail or
Internet-capable pagers. Should a trip to a field site become necessary,
personnel will often know the likely cause of the problem and can prepare accordingly by bringing the correct service equipment or spares.
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All SNMP traps from NETview are sent to the TrapTracker Viewer Z?1
database (included with the NETview program suite) for historical
archiving. Users can access this data at any time to examine the events
leading up to a failure or change in network performance.
1.2 Types of Users
The NETview program is aimed at two primary users—SCADA/telemetry personnel at small to mid-sized organizations, and large-scale users
in the Telecommunications industry. For SCADA/telemetry users, the
program provides a stand-alone tool for essential, centralized network
management functions with minimal cost and training requirements.
For large-scale users with hundreds, or even thousands of radios
deployed, NETview offers a tool that can be integrated with existing
network management products, such as HP Openview and TeMIP. In
these cases, NETview will complement the generic functions of these
products with MDS-specific applications.
For all users, NETview adds value by reducing network downtime and
minimizing the need to send technicians out to the field. NETview also
provides a rich set of tools specifically tailored for monitoring and controlling MDS radios.
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LA
N
CO
M1
CO
M2
PW
R
LINK
Figure 2. Two examples of radios that are compatible with
NETview—LEDR II (left) and MDS iNET 900 Transceiver. The
program also functions with other IP-connected equipment.
NOTE: While NETview provides valuable assistance in monitoring
the performance of radio systems, it is not intended to be a
substitute for calibrated test equipment.
1.
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1.3 Hierarchal Map Views
A key feature of NETview is its hierarchal map structure. Using realistic
icons, routing lines and other symbols, the program displays the
topology of a communications network in a graphical format. This
allows users to gain a quick understanding of a system’s layout at a
glance. Figure 3 shows a typical network map created with the program.
The appearance of maps is fully configurable using NETview’s built-in
tools.
NOTE: There may be slight differences between the screens shown
here and those displayed in the NETview MS program, due to
product changes made after the release of this publication.
Network maps can contain multiple layers of linked “submaps” represented by a unique icon on higher level maps. This hierarchal structure
allows a virtually unlimited number of nodes (or radios) to be monitored
through a single submap icon and is a very powerful feature of the program.
Submaps are opened by simply double-clicking the icon that represents
them. By following the maps and submaps, users can navigate all the
way down to individual radios or other IP nodes to obtain device-specific data.
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Figure 3. Sample Network Map
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Understanding NETview’s “Layers”
For a better understanding of NETview’s layering concept, it may be
helpful to think of the various maps, sub-maps and individual icons as
familiar geographic entities (World, continents, countries, states, and so
on). A comparison of these terms in relation to the NETview program is
offered in Table 1. While not all systems will require this many layers
of mapping structure, NETview offers the scalability to accommodate a
wide range of network architectures.
Table 1. Comparison of NETview vs. Geographic Terms
NETview Item
Geographic Equivalent
Overall User Map
World
Individual Networks
Continents
Backbones
Countries
Spurs
States
Systems
Counties
Subsystems
Towns
Individual Radios/IP Devices
Houses
1.4 Obtaining Device-Specific Data
NETview allows viewing key configuration and performance data for
IP-reachable devices on a network, whether they be MDS radios or other
“generic” IP devices. To access device information, you simply
double-click the icon of interest.
In addition, the program supports new-generation MDS products such
as the MDS LEDR II, MDS iNET 900 and MDS entraNET transceivers
that include a built-in web server. The web server provides access to
radio-specific data in a familiar web browser format, such as Internet
Explorer or Netscape Navigator. A web browser can be launched from
within NETview and provides a powerful management tool for network
administrators and maintainers. Several radio parameters can be
changed online by authorized users. For security, a password is required
to make most changes. Figure 4 shows an example of a web browser
screen containing data for an MDS LEDR radio.
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Figure 4. Typical Browser Screen
1.5 TrapTracker for Windows™ (TTW)
Working in conjunction with NETview, the TrapTracker for Windows
program (included with the NETview program suite) has the capability
to detect and store “traps” or “events” initiated by MDS radios. The
traps are defined in an MDS enterprise-specific MIB (Management
Information Base) file that provides a standard method for delivering
alarms and permitting access to management information. Network
events include alarms, logins, reboot commands and other information
useful to administrators and maintainers who need to resolve system difficulties.
Prior to the release of NETview, users had to sort through hundreds, if
not thousands, of SNMP codes from their radios to obtain the meaning
of a trap. NETview simplifies this process by highlighting the node’s
name field with an appropriate background color denoting the severity
of an alarm. (See Viewing Alarms on Network Maps on Page 24.) Additionally, with TrapTracker Viewer, the alarm is displayed in a historical
format that can be shared with other management systems using database tools such as ODBC. No knowledge of the raw SNMP codes is necessary to use this feature. Figure 5 shows a sample screen from the
TrapTracker Viewer.
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Figure 5. TrapTracker for Windows (TTW) Viewer Screen
1.6 Online Help
NETview includes built-in help to assist you in understanding the functions of various menu buttons and screen items. The help files may be
accessed from most screens by selecting Help from the top menu bar or
by clicking the rectangular Help button at the bottom of a screen, as
applicable. The main help files include an index tool (Figure 6) to assist
you in finding a specific help topics.
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Figure 6. Help File Index
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2.0 INSTALLATION
2.1 Computer Requirements
NETview’s software elements are designed to run on the Windows®
2000 or NT 4.0 operating systems. The computer must include adequate
resources for running and storing the programs and their associated data
files.
NETview Server’s PC
The server PC is where the NETview Server program resources are
stored and “served up” to client users. The requirements for this PC are
more demanding than for the NETview Client’s PC because the server
is doing the work of running the core application and handling requests
from client users. Table 2 summarizes the server PC requirements.
Note that their are three server application programs that must be run on
the server PC; TFTP Server, SNMP Server, and MDSnv (NETview)
Server.
Table 2. PC System Requirements for NETview Server
System Item
Preferred
Minimum
Processor
600 MHz or faster Pentium®
processor
400 MHz Pentium®
processor
Operating System
Memory (RAM)
256 Megabytes (MB)
128 MB
Video
1024 x 768
24-bit high color
SVGA (800 x 600)
high-color 16-bit display
Sound
Sound card desirable (for
alert sounds)
The program may be run
without a sound card
Hard Drive Space
<———— 400 MB for program operation ————>
CD-ROM Drive
Required for initial installation of the server program.
Network Connection
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<——— Microsoft® Windows® 2000, or NT 4.0 ———>
Connection to network (direct, or via web)
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NETview Client’s PC
The NETview Client PCs require only a subset of the full NETview program suite to be installed. The requirements for this computer are not as
demanding as those given for the NETview Server PC above. Table 3
lists the operating requirements for client computers running NETview.
Table 3. PC System Requirements for NETview Client
System Item
Preferred
Minimum
Processor
333 MHz or faster Pentium®
processor
166 MHz Pentium®
processor
Operating System
Microsoft® Windows® 2000, NT 4.0, or XP
Memory (RAM)
64 Megabytes (MB)
32 MB
Video
SVGA (800 x 600) high-color
16-bit display
256 colors—Some
degradation in display
quality will result
Sound
Sound card desirable (for
alert sounds)
The program may be run
without a sound card
Hard Drive Space
<————— 100 MB for program operation —————>
CD-ROM Drive
Network Connection
Required for initial installation of the client program.
Connection to network (direct, or via web)
2.2 Software Included on the CD
The factory-supplied NETview CD contains all files necessary for
installing the program on server and client PCs. The files consist of several software elements, some of which are only used when installing on
a server PC. Below is a list of all program elements included on the disk:
• Java Runtime Environment (JRE)—Needed to run the program on both server and client PCs.
• SNMP TrapTracker for Windows—Used to install the Simple
Network Management Protocol (SNMP) TrapTracker for Windows Manager and Viewer programs. Both elements are
required for server PCs, but only the viewer is optionally
required for client PCs.
• NETview Server—Required only on the server PC.
• NETview Client—For installation on any PC that requires the
NETview console, including the server PC, if desired.
• MDS TFTP Server—Trivial File Transfer Protocol server.
Required only on the server PC.
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2.3 Installing NETview
This section explains how to install the NETview program resources on
server and client PCs. The software resources to be installed will depend
on the type of PC on which the program is installed. The only decision
you will need to make is choosing whether to install either the client or
server packages, or both.
It is also possible to install the full NETview MS program on a single
PC that will act as both a client and server. This common arrangement
provides full NETview MS functionality, including the ability to serve
the application to additional client PCs, either now or in the future.
NOTE: If re-installing or upgrading to a newer version of NETview,
the program’s installer utility will sense a previous installation
and perform an uninstall routine, asking if you wish to keep the
current map database.
In order for the server’s database to be preserved when
upgrading or re-installing NETview, Microsoft Access 2000
or later, must be installed on the host computer.
Installation Steps
In the steps below, you will determine which software elements are
required for a particular installation depending on whether it is for a
client or server PC.
Follow these steps to install the NETview program:
a. Start Windows and close any applications that may be running
on your PC.
b. Insert the NETview CD into the computer’s CD-ROM drive.
After a short time, the disk should begin to run automatically.
If it does not, choose Run from the computer’s Start menu, type
the letter of the CD drive you are using, followed by a colon,
backslash (\), and the word “setup.” Example: d:\setup.
c. When NETview MS Installer’s opening screen appears
(Figure 7), click on INSTALL SOFTWARE.
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Figure 7. NETview Opening Screen
d. The installation screen (Figure 8) appears with a choice of two
software applications to install; MDSnv Client, or MDSnv Server.
Click once on the desired title to begin the installation.
• The first title, MDSnv Client, installs the Java Runtime Engine
(JRE)—unless JRE is already installed, TrapTracker for Windows, and the core NETview MS client application.
• The second title, MDSnv Server, installs the Java Runtime
Engine (JRE)—unless JRE is already installed, MDS NETview Server application, MDS Trivial File Transfer Protocol
(TFTP) server, NETview MS client application, and TrapTracker for Windows (Manager and Viewer).
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Figure 8. NETview Installation Screen
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e. Follow the remaining prompts and dialog boxes to finish the
installation. During the installation process, various software
elements will be automatically installed depending on whether
the installation is for a client or a server.
f. When the installation is complete, click Done on the installation
screen. The NETview MS program will appear on the computer’s Start menu. Optionally, you may create a shortcut for the
program by right-clicking on the program name and selecting
Create Shortcut.
NOTE: When the program resources are first installed, a README file
appears on the screen. This file contains important release
notes and other data, including information about the initial
username and password. This file should be reviewed before
using the program.
2.4 Connecting the PC to the Radio Network
With the NETview software installed on the computer, you are ready to
connect the PC to the radio network so that it can be used to manage the
enterprise. This is typically a straightforward process, requiring only an
Ethernet cable connection between the rear panel of the PC and the LAN
connector on the radio or gateway device (i.e., MDS gateNET). Figure 9
shows a typical cabling arrangement.
Additional detail/verification to be supplied.
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Figure 9. Typical Cabling Arrangement for NETview PC
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3.0 LAUNCHING THE SOFTWARE
Launch the NETview MS program by selecting it from the Windows
Start menu, or by double-clicking a shortcut icon. Follow the instructions below to log into the program and create a user account.
3.1 Initial Login—Required for First Time Users
NETview requires a login/authentication process before any program
functions can be accessed. This provides security against unauthorized
users, and allows individual privilege levels to be set in a multi-user
environment.
When the program is first launched, the Login screen (Figure 10)
appears, with entry boxes for a username and password. Enter the factory default username (Admin) and password (Admin) into each box.
(Passwords and usernames are case sensitive.)
These default credentials are intended for initial login only and should
be changed before leaving the computer. See Establishing a User
Account below for instructions on how to do this.
Figure 10. User Login Screen
Click OK to log in. A new NETview window opens with a menu bar at
the top of the screen.
If this is the first time you are accessing the program, a message appears
stating that “No default map is found” and you are asked to define one
to use. See “Building a Network Map” on Page 15 to create a network
map and define it as your default selection. Even if you are not yet ready
to build a map, you must select some map (even a new, blank one) in
order to edit users or perform other program functions.
3.2 Establishing a User Account
NOTE: After the creation of a personal user account and password, it
is strongly recommended that the password for the Admin user
account be changed, or the account deleted altogether. This
prevents unauthorized users from gaining access to the
program.
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Follow the steps below to create a user account for yourself and any
other users that require access to the NETview program.
a. Select File>>User Maintenance>>Add New User from the top menu
bar as shown in Figure 11).
Figure 11. Add New User Menu Selection
b. When the Add User screen appears (Figure 12), enter a desired
user name (up to 64 characters) and password (up to 16 characters). Remember, passwords and usernames are case sensitive.
TIP: For enhanced security, consider using a misspelled word for your
password. This helps guard against sophisticated hackers who may
use a database of common words (e.g., a dictionary file) to determine a password. Making your password as long as possible (up to
16 characters), and including one or more numbers will further
improve its security.
Figure 12. Add New User Screen
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c. Open the drop-down User Type list, and highlight the privilege
level that will be assigned to the new account as listed below:
• Administrator—All user privileges and features are granted.
• Operator—Has privilege to perform any NETview server
operation on existing network elements, but may not modify
network maps or user accounts other than their own.
• Read-only User—This is the most restrictive setting. The user
may view network management data, but cannot change maps
or object properties, upgrade firmware, or perform any other
program modifications.
d. Click OK. A confirmation message appears indicating that the
new account has been added to the list of users. Repeat the above
steps for any additional user accounts that need to be created.
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4.0 BUILDING A NETWORK MAP
This section explains how to create a network map of your system using
NETview’s built-in tools. Network maps provide a graphical overview
of the system being monitored, and are essential to the operation of the
program. No control or monitoring can be performed without first creating a network map.
HINT:
Prior to creating a network map in the NETview program, it is
recommended that the layout of the system be drawn on paper
for use as a planning aid—especially if it is a large system that
includes sub-networks or links to other systems. The drawing
should clearly identify all units in the network, their IP
addresses and their relation to other pieces of equipment.
a. Verify that the map is unlocked. To do this, select File from the
top menu bar and view the lock status. If the Lock Map command
appears, the map is currently unlocked. If Unlock Map is displayed, select it (or enter Ctrl-K on the keyboard) to unlock the
map.
b. With the map unlocked, select File>>Load to display the Load
Map screen (Figure 13).
c. Click New Map. A dialog box appears for entering a name for the
new map. Enter the desired name and click OK.
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Figure 13. Load Map Screen
d. A new screen appears that is ready for map building (see
Figure 14). Note that the left side of the screen contains a palette
of network elements (icons). These icons are used to represent
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the types of equipment that can be monitored with the program,
and they provide useful symbols for building new network
maps.
Table 4 shows a sampling of available icons and explains their
meanings. You can view the complete set of images in the Icons
folder of the Server directory. A small “thumbnail” view of each
image may be seen by clicking once on a filename. Image files
supplied with the NETview program have the prefix“builtin” in
their filenames.
In addition to the images supplied with NETview, you may also
install customized icons for display on maps. Custom image files
must first be installed in the Icons folder of the Server directory.
Then, from within the map screen, you can right-click an existing
icon and select a new image. (Edit>>Change Icon on the top menu
bar may also be used for this purpose.)
Figure 14. Map Building Screen
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Table 4. Available Network Elements
Network Element Symbol
Explanation of Symbol
MDS LEDR II radio. These units are typically used in
point-to-point voice and data networks.
MDS iNET or MDS entraNET Series transceiver.
These units are typically used in wireless IP/Ethernet
applications, but also support serial I/O data. (Two
types of symbols are available—one for Access
Points (APs), and another for Remote units.)
Generic IP element. This icon is available for
identifying IP-connected devices that are not
represented by a product-specific icon. This could be
a Remote Telemetry Unit (RTU), networked PC,
printer, or any other IP device not represented by a
unique NETview icon.
Submap icon. Indicates a link to subordinate network
map that has been created with the program.
MDS gateNET IP Proxy. This device is used to link a
non-IP radio device or system, such as an MDS
serial-based SCADA network, to the NETview MS
program. It provides cross-platform compatibility
between IP-based and serial-based wireless
networks. For more information on the MDS
gateNET product, refer to publication 05-6083A01,
the instruction manual for this product.
NETview offers a “Discover Radios” feature that
automatically finds radios connected to a gateNET
device and places them on the map. For more
information, see Auto-Discovery of Radios (MDS
gateNET) on Page 20 of this manual.
MDS transparent (serial-based, non-IP) remote
transceiver, such as MDS x710, MDS 9810 or
TransNET 900 radio. This icon works in conjunction
with the gateNET device mentioned above.
Insert MUX icon
Digital Multiplexer, such as the MDS MX-2100.
Insert MDS 5800/AB Full
Access icon
MDS 5800 or AB Full Access point-to-point radio
operating on 5.8 GHz.
Insert Network Junction
icon
Network Junction device.
MDS transparent master station, such as an MDS
4790 or 9790 series radio. This icon works in
conjunction with the gateNET device mentioned
above.
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Table 4. Available Network Elements (Continued)
Network Element Symbol
Explanation of Symbol
Router Hub. This device interfaces with other
networks, acting as a gateway for moving traffic from
one IP network to another.
IP-based “webcam” camera. These devices are
commonly used with MDS radios to convey IP-based
video traffic.
Wired link. Represents a hardwire (cabled) link
between pieces of equipment on the map. This
pictorial image is used only to document the network
layout.
Wireless link. Indicates a wireless (over-the-air) link
between pieces of equipment on the map. This
pictorial image is used only to document the network
layout.
e. There are two ways to add network elements (icons) to the blank
map area—Manual and Automatic. These procedures are
described below:
Manual Entry of
Network Elements
You can manually add elements by dragging the desired icons
from the left side of the screen to the blank map area. As each
item is dragged to the map, a dialog box (Figure 15) appears
requesting entry of the unit’s IP address and SNMP Read Community String. The Community String is an optional entry.
When used, the typical entries for MDS radios are Read: public,
Write: private, Trap: public. Enter the requested information and
click OK.
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Figure 15. IP Address Entry Screen
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The connection to the new element is tested, and if successful, it
is placed onto the map area. If the connection fails, a dialog box
asks whether you wish to delete the item or keep it despite a connection failure.
Automatic Entry of
Network Elements
You can automatically scan the network for available radios and
other IP devices to place on the map. To do this, you must first
unlock the map (File>>Unlock Map), then select File>>Find New Elements. The Find Nodes screen (Figure 16) appears.
Figure 16. Find Nodes Screen
Enter the IP range to be scanned, the SNMP community string
(if applicable), the desired timeout setting (short, medium, long)
and click the Start button. The program begins searching the network for available devices and lists them on the screen as they
are found. A progress bar shows the percentage of the search
completed. The search may take a considerable amount of time,
depending on the size of your network.
When the search is finished, you may either select the devices
you wish to add and click Add Selected, or add all listed elements
by clicking Add All. Icons for the selected units are immediately
placed on the screen.
NOTE: An asterisk (*) may be used as a “wild card” in the IP range to
scan an entire subnet, or a smaller range can be scanned by
using a syntax such as 1-10.
f. Arrange the network elements as desired and connect the units
together using the dashed line icon for over-the-air links or the
solid line icon for hardwired links. Figure 17 shows an example
of a completed network map.
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g. Select File>>Lock Map when you are finished building the network
map. This hides the palette of icons at the left side of the screen
and allows the map to occupy the full screen space.
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Figure 17. Example of a Completed Network Map
Auto-Discovery of
Radios (MDS gateNET)
MDS gateNET devices typically have several radios connected to them.
Once a gateNET icon has been placed on the map (with the map
unlocked), you can perform an automatic scan of the device to see what
radios are connected and add them to the map. Do this by selecting the
gateNET icon and choosing Edit>>Discover Radios from the top menu bar.
The program searches for connected radios and places them on the map
as shown in Figure 18.
For more information on the MDS gateNET product, refer to publication 05-6083A01, the instruction manual for this product.
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TO BE SUPPLIED
Figure 18. Auto-Discovery Results for MDS gateNET Device
4.1 Creating Submaps
A submap is used to represent an associated network that is linked to a
higher level map icon. This might be required if your main network
includes secondary or tertiary layers (“spurs”) that carry data on a separate wireless network.
For example, suppose you have a top-level network of several MDS
iNET radios exchanging telemetry and control data in a utility application. One of these radios is linked to a LEDR point-to-point radio that
carries the data to a distant location for processing. In this case, the
LEDR radios would be properly represented by a submap in NETview’s
hierarchy.
A submap is simply another network map that you create with the program and associate to a specific submap icon. Double-clicking a submap
icon brings the new map to the forefront, and makes it the active NETview screen. A virtually unlimited number of sub-networks may be created by placing additional submap links into existing map frames.
To create a submap and link it to a higher level map, proceed as follows:
a. Create and save a network map that illustrates the sub-network.
(Section 4.0 gives map building instructions.) Lock the newly
created map.
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a. Return to the top level map (the map that will contain the link to
the submap) and drag a Submap icon onto the current frame. You
will be prompted to associate an existing map name to this new
element.
b. Select the map that you created in Step a and click the Load button.
c. A dialog box appears requesting a name for the submap icon.
Enter the desired name and click OK. The submap icon is then
placed on the screen and may be positioned and wired to other
equipment as desired.
Double-clicking the icon opens up the submap for viewing or
editing.
4.2 Exporting Existing Maps
Existing maps may be exported from the NETview program. For more
information, see Exporting Existing Maps on Page 22 of this manual.
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5.0 USING NETVIEW SOFTWARE
This section describes how NETview can be used for monitoring and
configuring the devices on your network. It covers the most common
tasks performed with the program and provides guidance on tailoring
NETview to meet the needs of your system.
NOTE: The following assumes that the software has been properly
installed, a valid user account has been established, and at least
one network map has been created and saved with the
program. Procedures for installation and setup of the program
are given in Sections 2.0 through 4.0 of this manual.
5.1 Launching the Program
a. Select MDS NETview from the computer’s Start menu and log in
with your username and password.
b. If you’ve previously defined a default map for viewing, it will be
presented on the screen. If not, select File>>Load and highlight
the name of the desired map. Click Load to view the map.
c. With a network map displayed on the screen, you may proceed
in one of several directions, depending on the task(s) you wish to
perform. Section 5.2 describes the use of common NETview features and directs you to the pages in this manual where more
detailed information can be found.
5.2 NETview Tasks
This section is organized in a task-oriented format. Table 5 lists
common tasks that NETview users need to perform, and references the
appropriate headings where you will find step-by-step instructions.
With a network map
displayed, you can
proceed in one of
several directions.
Table 5 on Page 24
lists common program
tasks.
MDS 05-2973A01, Rev. C
Online Help
The NETview program includes built-in help files to assist users in
understanding the functions of various buttons and screen items. The
help files are accessible from most screens by selecting Help from the top
menu bar or by clicking the Help button at the bottom of a screen, as
applicable.
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Table 5. NETview Program Functions
Program Settings
& Configuration
Network/Node Checks
and Operations
Program Task or Function
Refer to...
View alarms on Network Maps
Page 24
View Event Logs
Page 26
Poll a selected node/device for IP and SNMP connectivity
Page 27
Enable “Is Alive” Polling (periodic connectivity check)
Page 28
Open a Telnet session with a device
Page 30
Open a web server session with a device
Page 31
View Performance Statistics (Radio & Interface)
Page 32
Download new firmware to a radio
Page 37
Upload/Download configuration files to a radio
Page 39
Managing Traps
Page 47
Check the status of transparent radios connected to an
MDS gateNET proxy
Page 36
Changing your password
Page 40
Loading maps, defining default map, creating new maps
Page 41
Set viewing options
Page 43
Right-click features
Page 44
Modifying double-click action
Page 47
Managing Traps
Page 47
Viewing Alarms on Network Maps
One of the most common tasks performed with the program is simply
viewing a network map for alarm indications. This section explains how
to detect, interpret and investigate alarms reported by the program.
In addition to viewing alarms, Netview allows you to view Event information (SNMP traps) via the Tools>>Get Event Log menu, or by launching
the TrapTracker viewer program accessible from the Traps menu. Event
information is displayed in a plain language format and does not require
any knowledge of the “raw” SNMP codes issued by the radio or device.
For more information, refer to Viewing Event Logs on Page 26.
NOTE: Old alarms are not retained when a new NETview client is
launched on another PC. Rather, the current state of the
network is displayed. Each time you log on or change to a new
map view, the program checks to see whether the nodes in the
current map are responding. Unresponsive nodes are flagged
with a critical alarm. This provides an instant view of network
status when logging in.
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Alarm Indications
The first indication of trouble on the network will be a color change on
a network element name (see Figure 37) and an alert sound emitted by
the PC (if sound is enabled on your computer). No highlighting (clear)
indicates no detected problems, or that a problem was later matched by
a “Clear” trap of the same severity, indicating that the problem was
resolved.
When NETview receives an SNMP trap from the TrapTracker Manager,
it converts it to a color change on the appropriate node’s text label. If the
alarmed node resides on a submap the color change is “propagated up”
the network hierarchy so that it is visible on the top-level map.
Alarm indications are color-coded in accordance with the MIB definitions of the particular radio or device. Refer to the manual for the device
for more information on a particular alarm or event indication. NETview’s color indications and their meanings are as follows:
• Red (Critical Alarm)—Device inoperative/Link down.
• Orange (Major Alarm)—Degraded unit performance, but operation may still be possible.
• Yellow (Minor Alarm)—Reports an anomaly that usually does
not affect unit operation but should be investigated.
• Green (Warning)—Early notice of a potential problem that
should be investigated.
• Blue (Information)— Reports routine events, such as user
log-in, command assertion, or result from a device self-test.
• Clear (no color)—No alarms detected.
Invisible place holder
Figure 19. Example of Alarmed Device
Checking for alarms
MDS 05-2973A01, Rev. C
To view a particular network map for alarms, proceed as follows:
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25
a.
Select File>>Load and highlight the map that you wish to view.
Click the Load button and the map will appear.
b. Observe the network elements shown on the map. Normally,
these icons will appear without any highlighting color just as
they appear in the icon palette used to construct maps. However,
if an alarm occurs for a particular device, the icon becomes highlighted with a color and a sound is played (if sound is enabled).
NETview’s color indications are listed on Page 25.
c. For more information on an alarm, simply double click a
color-highlighted icon. This allows you to navigate further into
the network to locate the device that is alarmed and determine
the cause for the alarm. Several double-clicks may be required to
reach submaps that are nested far below the top-level map.
Alarm Precedence
The color of the highest-severity event always takes precedence in NETview. For example, if an Information, Minor Alarm and a Critical Alarm
all came in for a node, its color would be red (Critical). Likewise, if various elements in a submap were reporting Critical, Minor and Information level events, the submap icon at the higher level map would be red.
If a later “Information” trap (blue) came in, it would not affect the display—the node/submap would still be red. The color indicates the
highest severity among all the events in that area, not the severity of the
most recent event.
“Clear” events clear the color changes for the specified severity of an
event and lower. That is, if an Information trap is pending on a node, and
a Minor-Clear event comes in for that node, it will clear the Information
event. Likewise, a Critical-Clear event clears everything.
Viewing Event Logs
Network events are logged by NETview, allowing you to review them
at any time. This may be helpful in understanding the events that led up
to a malfunction or other network difficulty. Follow these steps to view
the Event Log for a node or device:
a. Highlight the node of interest by single-clicking its icon.
b. Select Tools>>Get Event Log from the top menu bar.
c. The Event Log Screen (Figure 20) displays a history of radio
events, including user actions, alarms, logins, and re-boots.
HINT:
26
You may also view an Event Log by highlighting a node and
entering the keyboard shortcut Ctrl+Alt+E.
MDS NETview MS™ User’s Guide
MDS 05-2973A01, Rev. C
Invisible place holder
Figure 20. Sample Event Log Screen
NOTE: Old traps are not retained when a new NETview client is
launched on another PC. Rather, the current state of network
traps is displayed. Each time you log on or change to a new
map view, the program checks to see whether the nodes in the
current map are responding. Unresponsive nodes are flagged
with a critical trap. This provides an instant view of network
status upon log-in.
Polling a Selected Node/Device for Connectivity
To test a specific node or device for IP and SNMP connectivity, highlight it by clicking once on its icon, and then select Tools>>Poll Selected
Node. A results screen appears (Figure 21) showing whether or not the
poll was successful. Click OK to acknowledge the results.
Figure 21. Poll Node Results Screen
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“Is Alive Polling” Feature (Periodic Connectivity Check)
NETview’s Is Alive Polling feature takes the worry out of having an
unresponsive node go undiscovered for an extended time. It automatically performs a connectivity check for each desired node at
user-defined intervals. The default polling interval is 60,000 milliseconds (1 minute). A new Multi-Ping feature allows for efficient polling
checks on networks with a very large number of operating nodes.
To enable Is Alive Polling for a node, proceed as follows:
a. Highlight a desired node on the network map and perform a
right mouse click. The pop-up screen shown in Page 28 appears.
Invisible place holder
Figure 22. Right-Click Pop-Up Screen
b. Select Attributes from the menu. When the Attributes screen
appears, click the Is Alive Poll box at the bottom of the screen to
activate polling (see Figure 23).
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Invisible place holder
Figure 23. Attributes Screen with “Is Alive” Polling Enabled
c. Determine the polling interval you wish to use. The default setting is 60,000 milliseconds (1 minute) designed to suit most networks. If desired, the setting may be changed on the server as
follows:
• On NETview version 2.2 and higher, the polling interval may
be changed using the File>>Modify Properties menu (keyboard
shortcut: Ctrl + P). Page 29 shows a sample of the Modify
Properties screen.
Select Poll Interval (msecs) in the server’s Property Name list and
enter the desired poll interval in the Value box. The value must
be expressed in milliseconds. Click Save.
Invisible place holder
Figure 24. Modify Properties Screen
• On pre-version 2.2 programs, the polling interval may changed
by accessing the <KeepAlivePollInterval> parameter in the
<mdsserver> file of the server’s application directory.
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Opening a Telnet Session with a Device
MDS radios, such as the MDS iNET, entraNET and LEDR Series, can
be interrogated and controlled via a Telnet session. Once logged in, specific commands contained in the transceiver manuals may be issued.
This method of control—also known as a Command Line Interface
(CLI)—is not as graphically oriented as a web server connection, however, it offers a powerful tool for advanced users and maintenance personnel who need to communicate remotely with a radio and issue
specific commands.
Follow these steps to establish a Telnet session with an MDS radio via
NETview:
a. Highlight the device that you wish to connect with by clicking
once on its icon.
b. Select Tools>>Telnet to bring up the Telnet login screen as shown
in Figure 25.
Invisible place holder
Figure 25. Telnet Login Screen
c. Enter your password. The Telnet Session screen shown in
Figure 26 appears.
NOTE: If the wrong password is entered three times in a row, a
5-minute penalty lockout occurs, after which time the password may be entered again.
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Invisible place holder
Figure 26. Telnet Session Screen
d. At the command prompt, you may enter a radio command from
those listed in the radio’s instruction manual. Press ENTER to
invoke the command.
e. The Telnet screen displays a response to each command.
Opening a Web Server Session with a Device
Many MDS radios, including the MDS iNET, entraNET and LEDR
Series, contain a built-in web server that provides a convenient way to
interact with the radio using a familiar web browser such as Internet
Explorer or Netscape Navigator. Some non-MDS devices may also support this capability. Follow the steps below to launch a web browser session with a connected device.
a. Double-click the network element (or highlight it and select
Tools>>Connect To WebServer). You will be prompted to enter your
username and password for login.
b. Enter your login information and click OK. Upon successful
entry, a browser screen similar to Figure 27 appears with information specific to the device you are monitoring.
The screen presents detailed status and configuration data for the
connected device. For MDS radios, the type of information displayed depends on the selection made at the left side of the
screen. Simply click on a title to display its information.
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Figure 27. Sample Web Browser Screen (MDS LEDR Radio Shown)
c. To modify data shown on the screen (authorization required),
click the Modify button and enter your username and password.
d. Upon successful entry, you may highlight the information
field(s) to be changed and enter new information. Consult the
radio manual for guidance on setting radio parameters.
NOTE: As a security precaution, the browser screen should be closed
immediately after you finish your session. This prevents unauthorized access to the radio network.
Viewing Performance Statistics
The NETview program can collect and display statistical quality data for
a monitored radio and its data interface. When selected, this function
polls the specified radio and presents the data in a table format for easy
review.
Interface Statistics
To view interface statistics, highlight a node on the network map,
and select Tools>>Performance>>Interface Statistics from the menu bar.
When the Statistics screen appears (Figure 30), choose the type of
interface you wish to monitor from the drop-down menu at the top
left of the screen, then click the Start Polling button to begin data collection. The screen displays packet statistics on a continually
updated basis for both Received and Transmitted data. Click the
Stop Polling button to end polling.
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Optionally, you may generate a graphical chart of the interface statistics by clicking the Chart button at the bottom of the screen. This
changes the appearance of the screen to a view similar to the one
shown in Figure 29. Charting is an effective, visual way to show
trends in data performance.
Invisible place holder
Figure 28. Interface Statistics Screen
Invisible place holder
Figure 29. Interface Statistics Screen—with Chart View
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TIP:
Radio Statistics
You may also view Interface Statistics by highlighting a node
and entering the keyboard shortcut Ctrl+Alt+C.
To view radio statistics, highlight a node on the network map, and
select Tools>>Performance>>Radio Statistics from the menu bar.
When the Radio Statistics screen appears (Figure 30), click the Start
Polling button to begin data collection. The screen lists key operating
parameters on a continually updated basis, including: received signal strength indication (RSSI) in dBm, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR)
in decibels, and RF power output in dBm. Some radio models will
also display their internal chassis temperature. Click the Stop Polling
button to end polling.
TIP:
You may also view Radio Statistics by highlighting a node and
entering the keyboard shortcut Ctrl+Alt+R.
Invisible place holder
Figure 30. Radio Statistics Screen
Optionally, you may generate a graphical chart of radio statistics by
clicking the Chart button at the bottom of the screen. This changes
the appearance of the screen to a view similar to Figure 31. Statistical charting is often an effective, visual way to show trends in radio
performance.
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Invisible place holder
Figure 31. Radio Statistics Screen—with Chart View
Impact Graphing with
NETview
Critical parameters, such as RSSI, output power, and the temperatures
of radios are recorded in a database and may be viewed as described
above in Viewing Performance Statistics. These functions also allow for
generating a small, basic chart at the bottom of the Statistics screens for
easier viewing (see Figure 31).
In many cases, a larger graphical display of the data will provide a more
useful format that is easier to interpret and share with others. Third party
applications, such as Microsoft Access, Microsoft Excel and Crystal
Reports may be used to extract the data from the database and display it
in a variety of ways. While each of these tools offers graphing/charting
capability, MDS has extensively tested Crystal Reports with NETview
and it is recommended for graphing of performance data.
Figure 32 shows a sample chart produced with Crystal Reports using
data from MDS NETview. This is one of many formats possible with the
program. The documentation provided with your charting application
will provide detailed instructions on importing database files and displaying them in the desired format.
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NETview’s online help file contains more information about charting
with specific applications. In the help index, select one of the “Charting
in...” entries to view this information. In addition, a supplemental file,
NETview Charting Instructions, is included on the NETview CD, and
will prove helpful in understanding how data may be extracted and used
for charting in external applications.
Invisible place holder
Figure 32. Sample Chart Created with Crystal Reports
Transparent Radio Health Check
(For radios connected to an MDS gateNET proxy)
Transparent radios are units that pass data over the air without altering
it in any way. The data applied at the transmitting end is available at the
receiving end in exactly the same format. These radios are designed to
pass serial data (e.g. RS-232), as opposed to IP-based protocols used by
some newer-generation MDS radios. Examples of MDS Transparent
radios are the TransNET transceiver, MDS x710 transceiver, x790
master station or x810 spread spectrum transceiver.
NETview’s Transparent Radio Health Check offers a quick way to
check the status of these radios when they are connected to an MDS
gateNET Proxy device. For more information on this device, refer to
MDS publication 05-6083A01.
To perform a health check for radios connected via a gateNET proxy,
proceed as follows:
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1. Click once on a gateNET Proxy device icon.
2. Choose Tools>>Perfomance>>Transparent Radio Health Check from the
top menu bar. The Transparent Radio Network Status Check screen
appears.
3. Press the Get Status button to check the status of all radios connected to the selected gateNET.
4. A screen similar to Figure 33 appears showing the networks/radios
that were detected. Double-click folders to view the radios associated with a particular network.
5. To view diagnostics for a particular transceiver, select it, and the
click the Show Diagnost... button.
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Figure 33. Transparent Radio Health Check Sample Screen
Downloading New Firmware for MDS Products
From time to time, Microwave Data Systems releases new software
code for its products. This code can be downloaded into existing devices
to take advantage of engineering improvements, or to add new functionality to equipment. The latest firmware for each product type may be
downloaded free from the MDS web site at www.microwavedata.com.
This section describes the steps that an operator or system administrator
can use to download new firmware code into an MDS product.
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NOTE: MDS products keep two images of firmware in memory. This
enables online downloads of firmware, without affecting
current operation. Once the download is complete, you can
make the new file active by clicking the Reboot New Image
button on the Download screen.
a. Highlight the device that you wish to load with new firmware.
b. Select Tools>>Configuration>>Update Firmware from the top menu
bar. The screen shown in Figure 34 appears, listing the firmware
files available for download, and the currently loaded firmware.
Invisible place holder
Figure 34. Download New Firmware Screen
• The Firmware Files Available for Download area lists files contained
in the server application directory, \tftp folder. This location is
typically defaulted to C:\Program Files\Microwave Data Systems\MDSnv Server\tftp.
• The Currently loaded firmware area displays the revision and
active status of each firmware image in the radio.
c. Select a file from the list of available firmware files and click
Download to Unit.
d. Click the Status of Download button to monitor the progress of the
file transfer.
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NOTE: The Status of Download button is not available on MDS LEDR
radios. For these models, view the download status from the
TFTP interface at the Server computer. Additionally, LEDR
radios typically require a longer download time than other
MDS models.
e. When the transfer is complete, you may proceed with one of two
actions:
• Leave the new firmware stored in the unit, but in an inactive
state.
• Invoke the new firmware immediately by clicking the Reboot
New Image button.
Uploading/Downloading Configuration Files
Configuration files determine how a unit operates when it is placed in
service. Settable items such as carrier frequency, modulation type, data
speed, and RF output level are all defined in a unit’s configuration file.
NETview allows you to upload or download configuration files for specific MDS models including the MDS iNET, entraNET and LEDR
series. This section describes the steps that an operator or system administrator can use to transfer configuration files.
Benefits of Uploading
a Configuration File
A configuration file from a known-working unit can be uploaded via
NETview and stored for possible later re-use. In this way, inadvertent
errors made during programming or troubleshooting can be corrected,
and the unit can be returned to an operational state. This situation could
occur if a number of changes have been made to the device and the operator is unsure which setting may have caused a problem. It is recommended that a configuration file be uploaded and stored for each unit
operating in the network, in case it is needed later.
To download/upload configuration files proceed as follows:
a. Highlight the device that you wish to download/upload configuration files to.
b. Select Tools>>Configuration>>Configuration Files from the top menu
bar. The screen shown in Figure 35 appears, listing the configuration files available for download to the unit.
• The Configuration files available for download area lists files contained in the server application directory \tftp folder. This location typically defaults to C:\Program Files\Microwave Data
Systems\MDSnv Server\tftp.
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Figure 35. Download/Upload Configuration Files Screen
c. To download a specific configuration file to the radio, select the
file from the list and click Download to Unit.
To upload a configuration file from a radio, click Upload from
The file will be saved under the name and directory you
enter in the dialog box.
Unit.
Changing Your Password
Personal passwords are an important safeguard against network security
breaches. It is highly recommended that you establish a unique password for your user account and change it periodically to protect the network from unauthorized access.
TIP: For enhanced security, consider using a misspelled word for your
password. This helps guard against sophisticated hackers who may
use a database of common words (e.g., a dictionary file) to determine a password. Making your password as long as possible (up to
16 characters), and including one or more numbers will further
improve its security.
Follow these steps to change your password:
a. Select File>>User Maintenance>>Change Password. This brings up
the Change Password screen (Figure 36).
b. Enter your existing password in the Old password field.
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c. Enter your new password (16 characters max.) in the New password field, and re-enter it in the Retype password field for confirmation. Note that passwords and usernames are case sensitive.
d. Click OK to make the new password active.
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Figure 36. Change Password Screen
Loading Maps
The NETview program can store numerous map configurations in its
server database. This allows multiple systems to be represented,
depending on which one is selected at the time of viewing. The steps
below explain how to load an existing map, define a particular map as
your default selection, create a new map, and export existing maps.
Loading an existing
map
To load a map that has already been created and stored on the NETview
server, proceed as follows:
a. Select File>>Load from the top menu bar. The Load Map screen
appears with a list of available maps (Figure 37).
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Figure 37. Load Map Screen
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b. Select a map from the list by single-clicking it. The system saves
the selected map to the user’s configuration for auto-loading
every time the NETview program is launched.
Optional: To define this map as your default selection, click the
box at the bottom of the screen labeled Make this your default map.
c. Click the Load button to load the selected map. The map will be
brought up on the screen.
Creating a New Map
Follow these steps to create a new map for use with NETview:
NOTE: Maps must be unlocked before they can be constructed. To
check the lock status, select File from the top menu bar and
view the selections. If the Lock Map command appears, the map
is currently unlocked. If Unlock Map is displayed, select it (or
enter Ctrl-K on the keyboard) to unlock the map.
a. Select File>>Load from the top menu bar. This brings the Load
Map screen (Figure 38) to the forefront.
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Figure 38. Load Map Screen
b. Click New Map. A dialog box appears for entering a name for the
new map. Enter the desired name and click OK. A new screen
appears that is ready for map building (Figure 39).
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Figure 39. Map Building Screen
c. Drag the appropriate icons onto the screen from the palette at the
left hand side. Detailed map building instructions are provided in
Section 4.0, Building a Network Map (beginning on Page 15).
Exporting Existing
Maps
Text to be supplied.
Viewing Options
The View menu, accessible from the top menu bar, (see Figure 40) contains viewing options that may be selected with a mouse click, or by
using keyboard function keys. Table 6 lists the available options and
their keyboard equivalents.
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Figure 40. View Options Menu
Table 6. View Menu Options
Menu Item
Description
Keyboard
Shortcut
Zoom In
Enlarges the screen view
F1
or plus key (+)
Zoom Out
Shrinks the screen view, but may
allow more items to be seen when
working with larger maps
F2
or minus key (-)
Zoom Normal
Sets the screen size to the default
setting
F3
Goto Parent Map
Changes the view to the top level
map
Alt + left arrow
Goto Submap
Changes the view to an underlying
map which is subordinate to the
parent map
Alt + right arrow
Right-Click Features
Right-clicking on an active network map brings up a the menu shown in
Figure 41. The available menu items depend on where you click, and
whether the map is locked or unlocked. Here is a breakdown of the functions:
• With the map unlocked, right-clicking on a node (IP device)
gives access to all of the menu items.
• Right-clicking on a wireless connection line (dashed) or a wired
connection line (solid) gives access to all menu items except View
most recent trap.
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• Right-clicking on a blank area of the screen provides access to
two menu items: New Node and New Connection.
Figure 41. Right-Click Menu
New Node
The New Node selection provides a convenient way to add a new IP
device to an existing network map. A drop-down list of node types
appears, from which you can select the appropriate entry. After
making a selection, you will be prompted for an IP address and
optional Community String. This prompt screen is identical to the
one shown in Section 4.0, Building a Network Map (beginning on
Page 15). Refer to this section for complete entry information.
New Connection
This item allows you to add a new wired or wireless connection to
the network map.
Delete
This item allows you to delete a network element from the map.
Before deletion, a dialog box appears (Figure 42) asking if you
wish to delete the item from the current map only, or delete it from
all maps (full delete). Choose the desired action and then click OK.
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Figure 42. Delete Action Dialog Box
Attributes
The Attributes screen (Figure 43) is available when you right-click
on a network map device or connection line. It lists a variety of
device/line specific items, many of which can be edited by clicking
into an entry field and entering new information, or by selecting
from a drop-down list.
The figure shows the typical information presented for an MDS
iNET radio. The attributes displayed for a connection line are: Display Name, Name, Type, Speed, Protocol.
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Figure 43. Attributes Screen for MDS Radio
View most recent trap
This selection is used to query a device for its most recent trap
information. It is useful for determining what caused a color change
on a device and learning the specifics of the trap. Figure 44 shows a
sample Trap Details screen.
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Figure 44. Trap Details Screen
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Change Icon
The Change Icon selection provides a convenient way to select a new
image for a device or node on the network map. The available icons
are presented in a scrollable list and include images for MDS radios
and other IP equipment, plus symbols (arrows, rectangles and circles) that can be used on the map.
Modify Double-Click Action
Using the File>>User Maintenance>>Modify Double Click menu, you may
specify what action will be performed when double-clicking on a network element (icon). The default setting for a double-click is Connect to
Webserver, but a variety of other actions may be set, if desired. See
Figure 45 for a view of the Double-Click Action screen.
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Figure 45. Modify Double-Click Screen
Trap Management
NETview provides a variety of trap handling options that can be defined
from the Traps menu on the top menu bar (see Figure 46). The following
is a description of each selection on the Traps menu:
•
View most recent trap brings up a new screen with details about the
most recent trap received, including the trap name, time
received, severity and other parameters.
• The Stop receiving traps selection shuts off all trap processing.
When selected, the title of this selection changes to Activate trap
processing. Click on this new title to restore trap processing
•
Acknowledge traps brings up a submenu where you can choose to
acknowledge traps for the selected node(s), or all nodes.
• The Clear traps selection brings up a submenu where you can
choose to clear traps for the selected node(s), or all nodes.
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Launch TrapTracker brings up a submenu where you can choose to
launch TrapTracker for the selected node(s), or all nodes.
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• The Trap Sounds selection brings up a submenu where you can
choose to play an alert sound for every trap received, play a
sound only if a color change occurs, or turn sound off altogether.
For more information on trap handling between NETview and the TrapTracker program, refer to the paragraph titled TRAPTRACKER PROGRAM on Page 49.
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Figure 46. Trap Management Menu
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6.0 TRAPTRACKER PROGRAM
The NETview CD includes a separate application called TrapTracker.
This program is a software-only solution for managing and logging critical events reported by network devices. The multi-threaded architecture of the program guarantees consistent performance and the ability to
receive hundreds of thousands of SNMP traps without loss. NETview
registers with the TrapTracker Server to exchange trap and alert information.
NOTE: Additional details on TrapTracker’s features and capabilities
are contained in the online documentation provided with the
program.
6.1 TrapTracker Components
TrapTracker consists of two main elements—a Manager (or Server) and
a Viewer. The Manager receives and logs all SNMP trap information
from network devices and logs them into the TrapTracker database via
its built-in Manager Service (called TTReceiver). It also includes a console that can be used to monitor events in real time and configure user
preferences (alert types and trap severity, for example). A sample console screen is shown in Figure 47.
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Figure 47. Sample TrapTracker Console Screen
NOTE: The TrapTracker Manager program must be installed prior to
installing the NETview application.
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The TrapTracker Viewer is a Java-based component that is linked to the
TrapTracker Manager. It displays real-time or historical SNMP events
in a user-friendly environment. The viewer allows selecting devices and
creating reports on demand, and provides the option of local or remote
monitoring. Figure 48 shows a sample TrapTracker Viewer screen.
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Figure 48. Sample TrapTracker Viewer Screen
6.2 Managing TrapTracker Functions
Exporting Traps to Non-SNMP Host Programs
TrapTracker’s Open Database Connectivity (ODBC) compliance
allows for retrieving alarm trap information for SCADA Host programs
that do not support SNMP functionality. This retrieval is possible
because the TrapTracker database uses a standard Microsoft Access
format.
The table of all traps received can be accessed by navigating to: Program
Files\Prism Microsystems\Common\issdb.mdb. You may also view the traps
from TrapTracker’s user interface by invoking the Show Trap History
option. This selection provides a plain-text report.
Setting Up a TrapTracker Alert
The MDS gateNET collects diagnostic data on its connected radios at a
settable interval and stores this information in an internal memory
buffer. The buffer needs to be periodically retrieved and cleared by the
network management system.
NETview includes a Diagnostics Collection Process, which collects the
performance data from a gateNET device and makes this data available
to users. The collection process is triggered by the “Database Full” trap
from the gateNET. This ensures that the data is collected as soon as the
gateNET buffer is nearing its configured capacity, and before it is
flushed out.
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The Database Full trap triggers the collection process by means of an
Alert configured in the TrapTracker application at the time of installation. TrapTracker for Windows (TTW) is a component of the NETview
program, and is dedicated to processing, storing and viewing the SNMP
traps generated throughout the managed network.
Follow the steps below to create an Alert in the TrapTracker application:
1. Start the TrapTracker Manager console by double-clicking the
TrapTracker icon on the desktop, or by selecting
Start>>Programs>>iSMARTset>>TrapTracker>>TrapTracker Viewer.
2. Click the Alerts button on TrapTracker’s console toolbar. The Alert
window appears.
3. On the Alert window, click Add. The Alert Configuration window
appears.
4. On the Alert Configuration window, perform the following steps:
a. Enter the Alert Description (e.g., Poll gateNET).
b. Leave Source IP Address set to All.
c. In the Generic field, select enterpriseSpecific.
d. In the Enterprise field, select mdsGateNETV1Traps.
e. In the Traps field, select mdsGateNETInformEventSetV1.
f. In the Match In VarBinds field, enter the value 57.
g. In the Actions field, select Custom. The Configure Action window
should appear. (If it does not, click on Edit and select Custom Tab.)
h. In the Configure Action window, click Browse and navigate to the
MDS NETview server installation directory (typically C:\Program
Files\Microwave Data Systems\MDSnv Server). Select MDSGateNetPDC.exe, click Open and then click OK on the Configure Action window.
i. Click OK on the Alert Configuration window and then click Close
on the Alerts window
5. Close the TrapTracker Manager console.
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Maintaining the TrapTracker Database
Purging the Database
NETview has an automatic database purge feature for SNMP traps, to
prevent the database from growing too large. The default purge time is
30 days, but it can be set to occur at any number of days to suit your
needs.
To set the number of days between purges, proceed as folows:
1. Select File>>Modify Properties.
2. Click the button for Server.
3. Click the drop-down arrow in the Property Name window and
select TTW Traps Table history size (days).
4. Enter the number of days in the Value window and click Save.
5. A confirmation window appears. If you approve the displayed
value, click OK to set the new parameter.
Freeing Unused
Memory Space
In some cases, deleting old records from the database may not be enough
to keep the mdb file size from growing too large. This is because the
mdb file size does not decrease after records are deleted. The database
retains the unused memory space in the mdb file, and the space is not
available for re-use until the memory space is manually compacted.
Follow these steps to manually compact the database memory:
1. Open the Windows Services control window and stop the TTReceiver
service.
2. Go to C:\Program Files\Prism Microsystems\Common and open
issdbv3.mdb in Microsoft Access.
3. In Microsoft Access, select Tools>>Database Utilities>>Compact and
Repair Database.
4. Close Microsoft Access and restart the TTReceiver service.
TIP: As an alternative, you may also compact the database using the
iSmartSet console. Do this by stopping the TTReceiver service
and opening the iSmart program:
Start>>Programs>>iSmartSet>>iSmartSet Console
When the iSmart console opens, select Tools>>Database Maintenance
from the top menu bar to compact the database. Be sure to restart
the TTReceiver service when you are done.
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7.0 APPENDIX A—
PROPERTY SETTINGS FOR
SERVER AND CLIENT
7.1 Server Property Settings
Open mdsserver.properties file from installation folder and define the following properties as appropriate:
DataSource –This is the name of the data source of Map JDBC database.
This is the data source name you defined in previous section prefixed by
jdbc:odbc:. (Example: DataSource=jdbc:odbc:CMPDb;)
TopologyPort –
The Topology port is the port at which MDSServer
receives MDSCMP Client requests for map based GUI actions.
FileServerPort – File server port is the port at which MDSServer receives
MDSCMP Client requests for file-based requests, which will download/upload configuration files to/from the device.
NodeDiscoveryPort –This is the port at which MDSServer receives MDS
Client requests for auto-discovery of nodes based on guessed IP
addresses.
PerformancePort – The Performance Port is the port at which MDSServer
receives MDS Client requests for performance statistics requests.
TimeOut – This is the timeout of connection channel between MDS
Client and MDS Server. This should be chosen carefully, as it will affect
how fast a node will be discovered. Too large a value increases response
times and too short a value would return a failure notice. An optimal
value should be chosen based on typical field response times.
tftpDir –
This is the folder on the server from which the TFTP server
downloads files from and uploads files to a device.
tftpPort – The port on which the TFTP Server is “listening.” This port
should not be changed normally unless your TFTP server is port configurable.
fileUploadDelay – This is a delay factor which controls how much time to
wait while uploading an event log file. The proper setting depends on
how large the file is.
KeepAlivePollInterval -The interval of polling for node connectivity is
determined by this parameter in the <mdsserver> file in the server application directory. The default setting is 60,000 milli-seconds (1 minute).
A typical properties file is shown in Figure 49 below:
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Figure 49. Typical Server Properties File
7.2 Client Property Settings
Open mdscmp.properties file from installation folder and define the following properties as appropriate:
–This should be equal to the DNS name of the server or IP
address of the MDS Server.
MDSServer
TopologyPort –
Topology port is the port at which the MDSServer
receives MDSCMP Client requests for map based actions. This number
should be same as TopologyPort setting in mdsserver.properties file.
– File server port is the port at which the MDSServer
receives MDSCMP Client requests for file-based requests, which will
download/upload configuration files to/from the device. This number
should be same as FileServerPort setting in mdsserver.properties file.
FileServerPort
NodeDiscoveryPort –
is the port at which the MDSServer receives
MDSCMP Client requests for auto discovery of nodes based on guessed
IP addresses. This number should be same as NodeDiscoveryPort setting
in mdsserver.properties file.
PerformancePort – is the port at which the MDSServer receives
MDSCMP Client requests for performance statistics requests. This
number should be same as PerformancePort setting in mdsserver.properties file.
TimeOut – This is the timeout of connection channel between MDSCMP
Client and MDS CMP Server. This value should be chosen carefully, as
it affects how fast a node will be discovered. Too large a value would
increase response times and too short a value would return a failure
notice. An optimal value should be chosen based on typical field
response times.
Browser – This is the complete path along with file name to the folder
containing the browser executable
HomePage
– The default web page to display if user does not select a
node.
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Figure 50 shows a typical properties file:
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Figure 50. CMP Properties File
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8.0 APPENDIX B—
BATCH FILE SETTINGS FOR
SERVER AND CLIENT
8.1 Server Batch File Settings
To open the MDSServer, launch the batch file mdssvr.bat in the NETview installation folder. This file sets several shell environment variables and loads the JVM supplied by the Java Runtime Environment
(JRE) 1.3, which in turn loads MDSServer.
If you installed the MDS server in the recommended folder, you only
need to modify JAVA_HOME variable.
With the mdssvr.bat file open, set the following as appropriate:
JAVA_HOME
– This points to the JRE 1.3 full folder path, explained pre-
viously.
Example: D:\Program Files\Javasoft\jre\1.3
– This points to the folder in which the MDS Server is
installed. Typically, this is the folder in which this batch file is located.
INSTALL_DIR
USER_DIR –
This is the folder, which the JVM executable will use as a
default folder. Typically it is same as INSTALL_DIR.
Figure 51 shows a typical batch file:
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Figure 51. Typical Batch File
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8.2 Client Batch File Settings
To open the MDSClient, launch the batch file mdscmp.bat in the NETview installation folder. This file sets several shell environment variables and loads the JVM supplied by JRE 1.3. This, in turn, loads
MDSClient.
If you installed MDS client in the recommended folder you need only
modify the JAVA_HOME variable.
With the mdscmp.bat file open, set the following as appropriate:
JAVA_HOME
– This points to the JRE 1.3 full folder path, explained pre-
viously.
Example: D:\Program Files\Javasoft\jre\1.3
INSTALL_DIR – This points to the folder in which MDS Client is installed.
Typically this is the folder in which this batch file is located.
USER_DIR – This is the folder which the JVM executable will use as a
default folder. Typically, it is same as INSTALL_DIR.
Figure 52 shows a typical CMP batch file:
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Figure 52. Typical CMP Batch File
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9.0 APPENDIX C—
TERMS AND ABBREVIATIONS
If you are new to IP-based network management tools, some of the
terms used in this guide may be unfamiliar to you. The following glossary defines many of these terms, and will prove helpful in understanding the operation of NETview and its interaction with IP devices.
BER
Bit-error rate. See also BERT.
BERT
Bit-error rate test. The results of a BERT are normally expressed as a
ratio (power of 10) of the number of bits received in error compared to
the total number received.
Bit
Binary digit. The smallest unit of digital data, usually represented by a
one or a zero. Eight bits usually comprise a byte.
bps
Bits-per-second. A measure of the information transfer rate of digital
data across a communication channel.
CMP
Core Management Package. This refers to the essential elements of the
NETview application. It is also the abbreviation used by the NETview
server to report error conditions. CMP is equivalent to MDSnv.
Console Port
The radio port used to manage, control and monitor a local radio through
an ASCII-based protocol interface.
dBm
Decibels relative to one milliwatt. An absolute unit used to measure
signal power, as in received signal strength, or RF power output.
Decibel
A measure of the ratio between two signal levels. Frequently used to
express the gain or loss of a system.
DRAM
Dynamic Random Access Memory.
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DSP
Digital Signal Processing. Advanced circuit technique used to optimize
radio performance, primarily in the areas of modulation and demodulation.
FPGA
Field-Programmable Gate Array
G.821
The ITU standard by which data transmission quality is measured. The
analysis considers available vs. unavailable time of a communications
circuit.
IP
Internet Protocol
JDBC
Java Database Connectivity
JRE
Java Runtime Environment
JVM
Java Virtual Machine
kbps
Kilobits-per-second
MDSnv
An abbreviation used to designate the NETview server application.
Mbps
Megabits-per-second
MIB
Management Information Base. A database of objects that can be monitored by a network management system using SNMP.
Network Element
A Network Element is a graphical representation of an IP device on the
network map. The device can be an MDS radio, remote telemetry unit
(RTU), or any other IP-based element.
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Network Map
A graphical representation of a communications network, showing all
IP-connected devices. A network map may also include links to sub-networks or other related equipment.
NMS
Network Management System
ODBC
Open Database Connectivity standard
OID
Object Identifier (SNMP)
PSOS
Pioneer Server Operating System
Raw Service Channel
The radio channel used to provide network management.
RSSI
Received Signal Strength Indication. Expressed in dBm.
SNMP
Simple Network Management Protocol
SNR
Signal-to-noise ratio. Expressed in decibels (dB).
SRAM
Static Random Access Memory
TCP/IP
Transmission Control Protocol / Internet Protocol—A “guaranteed
delivery” protocol used to set up a connection between two devices,
with acknowledgement signals (ack/nack) and retries if the data is not
received properly. Requires more overhead than UDP (see below) but is
important for many mission-critial applications.
Telnet
Part of the TCP/IP suite of Internet protocols. Enables a user to log on
to a remote computer and enter commands as if using a text-based terminal. Also known as a Command-Line Interface (CLI).
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TFTP
Trivial File Transfer Protocol. A standard network protocol used to send
and receive files between two devices.
TMN
Telecommunications Managed Networks—A set of industry-wide standards for network management.
Trap
An asynchronous event and alarm indication generated by means of
SNMP. The trap is transmitted by a connection-less protocol called
UDP.
UDP
User Datagram Packets—A basic, connection-less protocol offering low
overhead requirements, but no acknowledgemnent signals or retry capability. Operates in a “broadcast” mode, where a message is sent once to
a recipient without regard to whether the message was received correctly. Incomplete messages are discarded by the recipient with no
request for a resend.
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IN CASE OF DIFFICULTY...
If you have problems, comments or questions pertaining to the NETview MS program, please
contact MDS using one of the methods listed below:
Phone: 585 241-5510
FAX: 585 242-8369
E-Mail: techsupport@microwavedata.com
Web: www.microwavedata.com
Microwave Data Systems Inc.
175 Science Parkway
Rochester, NY 14620
General Business: +1 585 242-9600
FAX: +1 585 242-9620
Web: www.microwavedata.com
A product of Microwave Data Systems Inc.
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