200AC/DC
inverter
arc welding machine
Operating Manual
Revision: AB
Operating Features:
Issue Date: March 29, 2012
A-11217
Manual No.: 0-5207
WE APPRECIATE YOUR BUSINESS!
Congratulations on your new CIGWELD product. We are proud
to have you as our customer and will strive to provide you with
the best service and reliability in the industry. This product
is backed by our extensive warranty and world-wide service
network. To locate your nearest distributor or service agency call
+1300 654 674, or visit us on the web at www.thermadyne.com.au
This Operating Manual has been designed to instruct you on the
correct use and operation of your CIGWELD product. Your satisfaction
with this product and its safe operation is our ultimate concern.
Therefore please take the time to read the entire manual, especially
the Safety Precautions. They will help you to avoid potential hazards
that may exist when working with this product.
YOU ARE IN GOOD COMPANY!
The Brand of Choice for Contractors and Fabricators Worldwide.
CIGWELD is the Market Leading Brand of Arc Welding Products
for Thermadyne Industries Inc. We are a mainline supplier to major
welding industry sectors in the Asia Pacific and emerging global
markets including; Manufacturing, Construction, Mining, Automotive,
Engineering, Rural and DIY.
We distinguish ourselves from our competition through marketleading, dependable products that have stood the test of time. We
pride ourselves on technical innovation, competitive prices, excellent
delivery, superior customer service and technical support, together
with excellence in sales and marketing expertise.
Above all, we are committed to develop technologically advanced
products to achieve a safer working environment for industry
operators.
!
WARNINGS
Read and understand this entire Manual and your employer’s safety practices before installing,
operating, or servicing the equipment.
While the information contained in this Manual represents the Manufacturer’s best judgement,
the Manufacturer assumes no liability for its use.
Welding Power Supply
Operating Manual Number 0-5207 for:
WeldSkill 200AC/DC Plant
Part Number W1006200
Published by:
CIGWELD Pty Ltd
71 Gower Street
Preston, Victoria, Australia, 3072
www.thermadyne.com.au
Copyright 2012 by
CIGWELD
All rights reserved.
Reproduction of this work, in whole or in part, without written permission of the
publisher is prohibited.
The publisher does not assume and hereby disclaims any liability to any party for any
loss or damage caused by any error or omission in this Manual, whether such error
results from negligence, accident, or any other cause.
Publication Date: March 15, 2012
Revision AB Date: March 29, 2012
Record the following information for Warranty purposes:
Where Purchased:
_____________________________________
Purchase Date:
_____________________________________
Equipment Serial #:
_____________________________________
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SECTION 1:
ARC WELDING SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS AND WARNINGS...................................... 1-1
1.01
1.02
1.03
Arc Welding Hazards........................................................................................ 1-1
Principal Safety Standards............................................................................... 1-5
Declaration of Conformity................................................................................ 1-6
SECTION 2:
INTRODUCTION ...................................................................................... 2-1
2.01
How To Use This Manual................................................................................. 2-1
2.02
Equipment Identification.................................................................................. 2-1
2.03
Receipt of Equipment....................................................................................... 2-1
2.04
Symbol Chart................................................................................................... 2-2
2.05Description...................................................................................................... 2-3
2.06
User Responsibility.......................................................................................... 2-3
2.07
Transporting Methods...................................................................................... 2-3
2.08
Packaged Items............................................................................................... 2-3
2.09
Duty Cycle........................................................................................................ 2-4
2.10Specifications.................................................................................................. 2-5
2.11
Options and Accessories................................................................................. 2-6
SECTION 3:
INSTALLATION, OPERATION AND SETUP......................................................... 3-1
3.01Environment.................................................................................................... 3-1
3.02Location........................................................................................................... 3-1
3.03Ventilation........................................................................................................ 3-1
3.04
Mains Supply Voltage Requirements............................................................... 3-1
3.05
High Frequency Introduction........................................................................... 3-1
3.06
High Frequency Interference............................................................................ 3-2
3.07
Electromagnetic Compatibility......................................................................... 3-2
3.08
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC Power Source Controls, Indicators and Features........ 3-4
3.09
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC - STICK Programming Mode...................................... 3-8
3.10
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC – LIFT TIG and HF TIG Programming Mode ............ 3-10
3.11
Short Circuit Protection While Welding.......................................................... 3-12
3.12
Shielding Gas Regulator Operating Instructions............................................ 3-12
3.13
Setup for TIG (GTAW) Welding...................................................................... 3-15
3.14
Setup for STICK (MMAW) Welding .............................................................. 3-17
SECTION 4:
BASIC WELDING GUIDE ............................................................................. 4-1
4.01
4.02
4.03
4.04
Stick (MMAW) Basic Welding Technique......................................................... 4-1
Stick (MMAW) Welding Troubleshooting....................................................... 4-12
TIG (GTAW) Basic Welding Technique........................................................... 4-14
TIG (GTAW) Welding Problems...................................................................... 4-16
TABLE OF CONTENTS
SECTION 5:
POWER SOURCE PROBLEMS AND ROUTINE SERVICE REQUIREMENTS..................... 5-1
5.01
5.02
5.03
5.04
Basic Troubleshooting..................................................................................... 5-1
Power Source Problems.................................................................................. 5-1
Routine Service and Calibration Requirements................................................ 5-2
Cleaning the Welding Power Source................................................................ 5-4
SECTION 6:
KEY SPARE PARTS.................................................................................... 6-1
6.01
Power Source.................................................................................................. 6-1
APPENDIX: CIRCUIT DIAGRAM............................................................................ A-1
CIGWELD - LIMITED WARRANTY TERMS
TERMS OF WARRANTY – January 2012
WARRANTY SCHEDULE – January 2012
GLOBAL CUSTOMER SERVICE CONTACT INFORMATION
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
SECTION 1:
ARC WELDING SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS AND WARNINGS
!
WARNING
PROTECT YOURSELF AND OTHERS FROM POSSIBLE SERIOUS INJURY OR DEATH. KEEP CHILDREN
AWAY. PACEMAKER WEARERS KEEP AWAY UNTIL CONSULTING YOUR DOCTOR. DO NOT LOSE THESE
INSTRUCTIONS. READ OPERATING/INSTRUCTION MANUAL BEFORE INSTALLING, OPERATING OR
SERVICING THIS EQUIPMENT.
Welding products and welding processes can cause serious injury or death, or damage to other equipment or
property, if the operator does not strictly observe all safety rules and take precautionary actions.
Safe practices have developed from past experience in the use of welding and cutting. These practices must be
learned through study and training before using this equipment. Some of these practices apply to equipment
connected to power lines; other practices apply to engine driven equipment. Anyone not having extensive
training in welding and cutting practices should not attempt to weld.
Safe practices are outlined in the Australian Standard AS1674.2-2007 entitled: Safety in welding and allied
processes Part 2: Electrical. This publication and other guides to what you should learn before operating
this equipment are listed at the end of these safety precautions. HAVE ALL INSTALLATION, OPERATION,
MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR WORK PERFORMED ONLY BY QUALIFIED PEOPLE.
5. Properly install and ground this equipment according to its Owner’s Manual and national, state, and
local codes.
1.01 Arc Welding Hazards
6. Turn off all equipment when not in use. Disconnect
power to equipment if it will be left unattended or
out of service.
WARNING
ELECTRIC SHOCK can kill.
7. Use fully insulated electrode holders. Never dip
holder in water to cool it or lay it down on the
ground or the work surface. Do not touch holders
connected to two welding machines at the same
time or touch other people with the holder or
electrode.
Touching live electrical parts can cause
fatal shocks or severe burns. The electrode
and work circuit is electrically live whenever the output is on. The input power circuit and machine internal circuits are also
live when power is on. In semiautomatic
or automatic wire welding, the wire, wire
reel, drive roll housing, and all metal parts
touching the welding wire are electrically
live. Incorrectly installed or improperly
grounded equipment is a hazard.
8. Do not use worn, damaged, undersized, or poorly
spliced cables.
9. Do not wrap cables around your body.
1. Do not touch live electrical parts.
10.Ground the workpiece to a good electrical (earth)
ground.
2. Wear dry, hole-free insulating gloves and body
protection.
11.Do not touch electrode while in contact with the
work (ground) circuit.
3. Insulate yourself from work and ground using dry
insulating mats or covers.
12.Use only well-maintained equipment. Repair or
replace damaged parts at once.
4. Disconnect input power or stop engine before
installing or servicing this equipment. Lock input
power disconnect switch open, or remove line
fuses so power cannot be turned on accidentally.
13.In confined spaces or damp locations, do not use a
welder with AC output unless it is equipped with a
voltage reducer. Use equipment with DC output.
14.Wear a safety harness to prevent falling if working
above floor level.
15.Keep all panels and covers securely in place.
Manual 0-5207 1-1
GENERAL INFORMATION
WELDSKILL 200 AC/DC INVERTER
2. Wear approved safety glasses. Side shields recommended.
WARNING
ARC RAYS can burn eyes and skin; NOISE
can damage hearing.
Arc rays from the welding process produce
intense heat and strong ultraviolet rays
that can burn eyes and skin. Noise from
some processes can damage hearing.
1. Use a Welding Helmet or Welding Faceshield fitted
with a proper shade of filter (see ANSI Z49.1 and
AS 1674 listed in Safety Standards) to protect your
face and eyes when welding or watching.
3. Use protective screens or barriers to protect others
from flash and glare; warn others not to watch the
arc.
4. Wear protective clothing made from durable,
flame-resistant material (wool and leather) and
foot protection.
5. Use approved ear plugs or ear muffs if noise level
is high.
6. Never wear contact lenses while welding.
Recommended Protective Filters for Electric Welding
Description of Process
Manual Metal Arc Welding - covered
electrodes (MMAW)
Gas Metal Arc Welding (GWAW)
(MIG) other than Aluminium and
Stainless Steel
Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW)
(MIG) Aluminium and Stainless Steel
Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW)
(TIG)
Flux-cored Arc Welding (FCAW) -with
or without shielding gas.
Air - Arc Gouging
Plasma - Arc Cutting
Plasma - Arc Spraying
Plasma - Arc Welding
Submerged - Arc Welding
Resistance Welding
Approximate Range of
Welding Current in Amps
Less than or equal to 100
100 to 200
200 to 300
300 to 400
Greater than 400
Less than or equal to 150
150 to 250
250 to 300
300 to 400
Greater than 400
Less than or equal to 250
250 to 350
Less than or equal to 100
100 to 200
200 to 250
250 to 350
Greater than 350
Less than or equal to 300
300 to 400
400 to 500
Greater than 500
Minimum Shade Number of
Filter(s)
8
10
11
12
13
10
11
12
13
14
12
13
10
11
12
13
14
11
12
13
14
Less than or equal to 400
12
50 to 100
100 to 400
400 to 800
10
12
14
15
8
10
12
14
2(5)
Safety Spectacles or eye
shield
—
Less than or equal to 20
20 to 100
100 to 400
400 to 800
—
—
Refer to standard AS/NZS 1338.1:1992 for comprehensive information regarding the above table.
GENERAL INFORMATION
1-2
Manual 0-5207
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
3. Remove all flammables within 35 ft (10.7 m) of the
welding arc. If this is not possible, tightly cover
them with approved covers.
WARNING
4. Be alert that welding sparks and hot materials from
welding can easily go through small cracks and
openings to adjacent areas.
FUMES AND GASES can be hazardous to
your health.
Welding produces fumes and gases.
Breathing these fumes and gases can be
hazardous to your health.
5. Watch for fire, and keep a fire extinguisher
nearby.
6. Be aware that welding on a ceiling, floor, bulkhead,
or partition can cause fire on the hidden side.
1. Keep your head out of the fumes. Do not breath
the fumes.
7. Do not weld on closed containers such as tanks
or drums.
2. If inside, ventilate the area and/or use exhaust at
the arc to remove welding fumes and gases.
8. Connect work cable to the work as close to the
welding area as practical to prevent welding current from travelling long, possibly unknown paths
and causing electric shock and fire hazards.
3. If ventilation is poor, use an approved air-supplied
respirator.
4. Read the Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs)
and the manufacturer’s instruction for metals,
consumables, coatings, and cleaners.
9. Do not use welder to thaw frozen pipes.
10.Remove stick electrode from holder or cut off
welding wire at contact tip when not in use.
5. Work in a confined space only if it is well ventilated, or while wearing an air-supplied respirator.
Shielding gases used for welding can displace air
causing injury or death. Be sure the breathing air
is safe.
WARNING
6. Do not weld in locations near degreasing, cleaning,
or spraying operations. The heat and rays of the
arc can react with vapours to form highly toxic
and irritating gases.
FLYING SPARKS AND HOT METAL can
cause injury.
7. Do not weld on coated metals, such as galvanized,
lead, or cadmium plated steel, unless the coating
is removed from the weld area, the area is well
ventilated, and if necessary, while wearing an airsupplied respirator. The coatings and any metals
containing these elements can give off toxic fumes
if welded.
1. Wear approved face shield or safety goggles. Side
shields recommended.
Chipping and grinding cause flying metal.
As welds cool, they can throw off slag.
2. Wear proper body protection to protect skin.
WARNING
CYLINDERS can explode if damaged.
Shielding gas cylinders contain gas under
high pressure. If damaged, a cylinder can
explode. Since gas cylinders are normally
part of the welding process, be sure to
treat them carefully.
WARNING
WELDING can cause fire or explosion.
Sparks and spatter fly off from the welding
arc. The flying sparks and hot metal, weld
spatter, hot workpiece, and hot equipment
can cause fires and burns. Accidental contact of electrode or welding wire to metal
objects can cause sparks, overheating,
or fire.
1. Protect compressed gas cylinders from excessive
heat, mechanical shocks, and arcs.
2. Install and secure cylinders in an upright position
by chaining them to a stationary support or equipment cylinder rack to prevent falling or tipping.
1. Protect yourself and others from flying sparks and
hot metal.
3. Keep cylinders away from any welding or other
electrical circuits.
2. Do not weld where flying sparks can strike flammable material.
Manual 0-5207 4. Never allow a welding electrode to touch any
cylinder.
1-3
GENERAL INFORMATION
WELDSKILL 200 AC/DC INVERTER
5. Use only correct shielding gas cylinders,
regulators, hoses, and fittings designed for the
specific application; maintain them and associated
parts in good condition.
6. Turn face away from valve outlet when opening
cylinder valve.
7. Keep protective cap in place over valve except
when cylinder is in use or connected for use.
8. Read and follow instructions on compressed
gas cylinders, associated equipment, and CGA
publication P-1 listed in Safety Standards.
WARNING
MOVING PARTS can cause injury.
The following is a quotation from the General Conclusions Section of the U.S. Congress, Office of
Technology Assessment, Biological Effects of Power
Frequency Electric & Magnetic Fields - Background
Paper, OTA-BP-E-63 (Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, May 1989): “...there is now
a very large volume of scientific findings based on
experiments at the cellular level and from studies
with animals and people which clearly establish that
low frequency magnetic fields and interact with, and
produce changes in, biological systems. While most
of this work is of very high quality, the results are
complex. Current scientific understanding does not
yet allow us to interpret the evidence in a single coherent framework. Even more frustrating, it does not yet
allow us to draw definite conclusions about questions
of possible risk or to offer clear science-based advice
on strategies to minimize or avoid potential risks.”
Moving parts, such as fans, rotors, and belts can cut
fingers and hands and catch loose clothing.
To reduce magnetic fields in the workplace, use the
following procedures.
1. Keep all doors, panels, covers, and guards closed
and securely in place.
1. Keep cables close together by twisting or taping
them.
2. Stop engine before installing or connecting unit.
2. Arrange cables to one side and away from the
operator.
3. Have only qualified people remove guards or
covers for maintenance and troubleshooting as
necessary.
4. To prevent accidental starting during servicing,
disconnect negative (-) battery cable from battery.
3. Do not coil or drape cable around the body.
4. Keep welding power source and cables as far away
from body as practical.
5. Keep hands, hair, loose clothing, and tools away
from moving parts.
ABOUT PACEMAKERS:
The above procedures are among those
also normally recommended for pacemaker wearers. Consult your doctor for
complete information.
6. Reinstall panels or guards and close doors when
servicing is finished and before starting engine.
!
WARNING
This product, when used for welding or
cutting, produces fumes or gases which
contain chemicals know to the State of
California to cause birth defects and, in
some cases, cancer. (California Health &
Safety code Sec. 25249.5 et seq.)
NOTE
Considerations About Welding And The
Effects of Low Frequency Electric and
Magnetic Fields
GENERAL INFORMATION
1-4
Manual 0-5207
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
1.02 Principal Safety Standards
Safety in Welding and Cutting, ANSI Standard Z49.1, from American Welding Society, 550 N.W. LeJeune Rd.,
Miami, FL 33126.
Safety and Health Standards, OSHA 29 CFR 1910, from Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government
Printing Office, Washington, D.C. 20402.
Recommended Safe Practices for the Preparation for Welding and Cutting of Containers That Have Held
Hazardous Substances, American Welding Society Standard AWS F4.1, from American Welding Society, 550
N.W. LeJeune Rd., Miami, FL 33126.
National Electrical Code, NFPA Standard 70, from National Fire Protection Association, Batterymarch Park,
Quincy, MA 02269.
Safe Handling of Compressed Gases in Cylinders, CGA Pamphlet P-1, from Compressed Gas Association,
1235 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 501, Arlington, VA 22202.
Code for Safety in Welding and Cutting, CSA Standard W117.2, from Canadian Standards Association, Standards Sales, 178 Rexdale Boulevard, Rexdale, Ontario, Canada M9W 1R3.
Safe Practices for Occupation and Educational Eye and Face Protection, ANSI Standard Z87.1, from American
National Standards Institute, 1430 Broadway, New York, NY 10018.
Cutting and Welding Processes, NFPA Standard 51B, from National Fire Protection Association, Batterymarch
Park, Quincy, MA 02269.
Safety in welding and allied processes Part 1: Fire Precautions, AS 1674.1-1997 from SAI Global Limited,
www.saiglobal.com.
Safety in welding and allied processes Part 2: Electrical, AS 1674.2-2007 from SAI Global Limited, www.
saiglobal.com.
Filters for eye protectors - Filters for protection against radiation generated in welding and allied operations
AS/NZS 1338.1:1992 from SAI Global Limited, www.saiglobal.com.
Manual 0-5207 1-5
GENERAL INFORMATION
WELDSKILL 200 AC/DC INVERTER
1.03 Declaration of Conformity
Manufacturer and Merchandiser of Quality Consumables and Equipment :
CIGWELD
Address:71 Gower St, Preston
Victoria 3072
Australia
Description of equipment: CIGWELD WeldSkill 200AC/DC INVERTER Power Source and associated accessories.
* Serial numbers are unique with each individual piece of equipment and details description, parts used to
manufacture a unit and date of manufacture.
* The equipment conforms to all applicable aspects and regulations of the ‘Low Voltage Directive’ (Directive
73/23/EU, as recently changed in Directive 93/68/EU and to the National legislation for the enforcement of the
Directive.
National Standard and Technical Specifications
The product is designed and manufactured to a number of standards and technical requirements among them
are:
* AS 60974.10/ IEC 60974-10 EMC Directive applicable to arc welding equipment - generic emissions and
regulations.
* AS 60974.1-2006 /IEC 60974-1 applicable to welding equipment and associated accessories.
* AS1674. Safety in welding and allied processes
* Extensive product design verification is conducted at the manufacturing facility as part of the routine design and manufacturing process, to ensure the product is safe and performs as specified. Rigorous testing is
incorporated into the manufacturing process to ensure the manufactured product meets or exceeds all design
specifications.
CIGWELD has been manufacturing and merchandising an extensive equipment range with superior performance,
ultra safe operation and world class quality for more than 30 years and will continue to achieve excellence.
GENERAL INFORMATION
1-6
Manual 0-5207
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
SECTION 2:
INTRODUCTION
2.01 How To Use This Manual
2.02 Equipment Identification
To ensure safe operation, read the entire manual,
including the chapter on safety instructions and
warnings.
The unit’s identification number (specification or
part number), model, and serial number usually appear on a nameplate attached to the control panel. In
some cases, the nameplate may be attached to the
rear panel. Equipment which does not have a control
panel such as gun and cable assemblies is identified
only by the specification or part number printed on
the shipping container. Record these numbers on the
bottom of page ii for future reference.
Throughout this manual, the words WARNING,
CAUTION, and NOTE may appear. Pay particular attention to the information provided under these headings. These special annotations are easily recognized
as follows:
!
2.03 Receipt of Equipment
WARNING
When you receive the equipment, check it against the
invoice to make sure it is complete and inspect the
equipment for possible damage due to shipping. If
there is any damage, notify the carrier immediately to
file a claim. Furnish complete information concerning
damage claims or shipping errors to the location in
your area listed in the inside back cover of this manual.
A WARNING gives information regarding
possible personal injury.
CAUTION
A CAUTION refers to possible equipment
damage.
Include all equipment identification numbers as
described above along with a full description of the
parts in error.
NOTE
A NOTE offers helpful information concerning certain operating procedures.
Move the equipment to the installation site before
un-crating the unit. Use care to avoid damaging the
equipment when using bars, hammers, etc., to uncrate the unit.
Additional copies of this manual may be purchased
by contacting CIGWELD at the address and phone
number for your location listed in the inside back cover
of this manual. Include the Owner’s Manual number
and equipment identification numbers.
Manual 0-5207 2-1
INTRODUCTION
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
2.04 Symbol Chart
Note that only some of these symbols will appear on your model.
On
Single Phase
Wire Feed Function
Off
Three Phase
Wire Feed Towards
Workpiece With
Output Voltage Off.
Dangerous Voltage
Three Phase Static
Frequency ConverterTransformer-Rectifier
Welding Gun
Increase/Decrease
Remote
Purging Of Gas
Duty Cycle
Continuous Weld
Mode
Percentage
Spot Weld Mode
Circuit Breaker
AC Auxiliary Power
INTRODUCTION
Spot Time
Fuse
Panel/Local
Amperage
Shielded Metal
Arc Welding (SMAW)
Voltage
Gas Metal Arc
Welding (GMAW)
Hertz (cycles/sec)
Gas Tungsten Arc
Welding (GTAW)
Frequency
Air Carbon Arc
Cutting (CAC-A)
Negative
Constant Current
Positive
Constant Voltage
Or Constant Potential
Direct Current (DC)
High Temperature
Protective Earth
(Ground)
Fault Indication
Line
Arc Force
IPM
Inches Per Minute
Line Connection
Touch Start (GTAW)
MPM
Meters Per Minute
Auxiliary Power
Variable Inductance
Receptacle RatingAuxiliary Power
V
t
Preflow Time
t1
t2
Postflow Time
2 Step Trigger
Operation
Press to initiate wirefeed and
welding, release to stop.
4 Step Trigger
Operation
Press and hold for preflow, release
to start arc. Press to stop arc, and
hold for preflow.
t
Burnback Time
Disturbance In
Ground System
Art # A-04937
115V 15A
X
%
Voltage Input
2-2
Manual 0-5207
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
2.05Description
2.07 Transporting Methods
The CIGWELD WELDSKILL 200AC/DC is a single
phase constant current welding inverter capable of
performing MMAW (Stick), GTAW (HF TIG) and GTAW
(Lift TIG) welding processes. The unit is equipped
with digital amperage and voltage meters, and a host
of other features in order to fully satisfy the broad
operating needs of the modern user. The unit is also
fully compliant to Australian Standard AS 60974.1
and IEC 60974.1.
This unit is equipped with a handle for carrying
purposes.
WARNING
ELECTRIC SHOCK can kill. DO NOT TOUCH
live electrical parts. Disconnect input
power conductors from de-energized
supply line before moving the welding
power source.
The WELDSKILL 200AC/DC provides excellent welding performance across a broad range of applications
when used with the correct welding consumables and
procedures. The following instructions detail how
to correctly and safely set up the machine and give
guidelines on gaining the best efficiency and quality
from the Power Source. Please read these instructions
thoroughly before using the unit.
Lift unit with handle on top of case.
2.06 User Responsibility
Use handcart or similar device of adequate capacity.
This equipment will perform as per the information
contained herein when installed, operated, maintained
and repaired in accordance with the instructions provided. This equipment must be checked periodically.
Defective equipment (including welding leads) should
not be used. Parts that are broken, missing, plainly
worn, distorted or contaminated, should be replaced
immediately. Should such repairs or replacements
become necessary, it is recommended that such repairs be carried out by appropriately qualified persons
approved by CIGWELD. Advice in this regard can
be obtained by contacting an Accredited CIGWELD
Distributor.
If using a fork lift vehicle, place and secure unit on a
proper skid before transporting.
!
FALLING EQUIPMENT can cause serious
personal injury and equipment damage.
2.08 Packaged Items
• WELDSKILL 200 AC/DC Inverter Power Source
• Electrode holder with 4m lead
• Work Clamp with 4m lead
• Tig Torch 4m lead with remote current control
• Tig Torch Accessory kit
• Regulator / Flowmeter
• Shielding Gas Hose
This equipment or any of its parts should not be altered from standard specification without prior written
approval of CIGWELD. The user of this equipment
shall have the sole responsibility for any malfunction
which results from improper use or unauthorized
modification from standard specification, faulty
maintenance, damage or improper repair by anyone
other than appropriately qualified persons approved
by CIGWELD.
Manual 0-5207 WARNING
• Shoulder Strap
• Operating Manual
2-3
INTRODUCTION
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
2.09 Duty Cycle
The rated duty cycle of a Welding Power Source, is a statement of the time it may be operated at its rated
welding current output without exceeding the temperature limits of the insulation of the component parts. To
explain the 10 minute duty cycle period the following example is used. Suppose a Welding Power Source is
designed to operate at a 20% duty cycle, 200 amperes at 18.0 volts. This means that it has been designed
and built to provide the rated amperage (200A) for 2 minutes, i.e. arc welding time, out of every 10 minute
period (20% of 10 minutes is 2 minutes). During the other 8 minutes of the 10 minute period the Welding
Power Source must idle and be allowed to cool. The thermal cut out will operate if the duty cycle is exceeded.
Duty Cycle (PERCENTAGE)
100
90
WELDSKILL
200 AC/DC
80
70
60
MMAW (STICK)
50
GTAW (TIG)
40
SAFE OPERATING REGION
(TIG & STICK)
30
20
10
0
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100 110 120 130 140 150 160 170 180 190 200 210 220
Welding Current (AMPS)
A-11218
Figure 2-1: WELDSKILL 200AC/DC Duty Cycle
INTRODUCTION
2-4
Manual 0-5207
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
2.10Specifications
Description
Plant Part Number
Power Source Mass
Power Source Dimensions
Cooling
Welder Type
Australian Standards
Number of Phases
Nominal Supply Voltage
Nominal Supply Frequency
Welding Current Range (DC STICK Mode)
Welding Current Range (DC TIG Mode)
Effective Input Current (I1eff) (note1)
Maximum Input Current (I1max)
Single Phase Generator Requirement
(note2)
STICK (MMAW)
Welding Output, 40ºC, 10 min.
WELDSKILL 200 AC/DC
W1006200
22 kg
H 400mm x W 240mm x D 475mm
Fan Cooled
Inverter Power Source
AS 60974.1-2006 / IEC 60974-1
1
240V +/- 15%
50/60Hz
5 – 170A
5 - 200A
15A
38.8A
10kVA
170A @ 15%, 26.8V
100A @ 60%, 24.0V
80A @ 100%, 23.2V
200A @ 20%, 18.0V
116A @ 60%, 14.6V
90A @ 100%, 13.6V
76V
IP23S
TIG (GTAW)
Welding Output, 40ºC, 10 min.
Open circuit voltage
Protection Class
Table 2-1: WELDSKILL 200AC/DC Specification
NOTE
Note 1: The Effective Input Current should be used for the determination of cable size & supply
requirements.
Note 2: Generator Requirements at the Maximum Output Duty Cycle.
Note 3: Motor start fuses or thermal circuit breakers are recommended for this application. Check
local requirements for your situation in this regard.
Due to variations that can occur in manufactured products, claimed performance, voltages, ratings,
all capacities, measurements, dimensions and weights quoted are approximate only. Achievable
capacities and ratings in use and operation will depend upon correct installation, use, applications,
maintenance and service.
Manual 0-5207 2-5
INTRODUCTION
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
2.11 Options and Accessories
Part Number
W4013602
W4015800
BGSAK2
INTRODUCTION
Description
Tig Torch with 4m lead and remote control
Foot Control with 4m lead
TIG Torch accessory kit
Table 2-2: Options and Accessories
2-6
Manual 0-5207
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
SECTION 3:
INSTALLATION, OPERATION AND SETUP
3.01Environment
These units are designed for use in environments
with increased hazard of electric shock as outlined in
AS60974.1 and AS1674.2
A. Examples of environments with increased hazard
of electric shock are:
1. In locations in which freedom of movement
is restricted, so that the operator is forced
to perform the work in a cramped (kneeling,
sitting or lying) position with physical contact
with conductive parts.
2. In locations which are fully or partially limited
by conductive elements, and in which there
is a high risk of unavoidable or accidental
contact by the operator.
3. In wet or damp hot locations where humidity
or perspiration considerable reduces the
skin resistance of the human body and the
insulation properties of accessories.
B. Environments with increased hazard of electric
shock do not include places where electrically
conductive parts in the near vicinity of the
operator, which can cause increased hazard, have
been insulated.
3.02Location
conditions. For further information please refer
to AS 60529.
H. Precautions must be taken against the power
source toppling over. The power source must
be located on a suitable horizontal surface in the
upright position when in use.
3.03Ventilation
Since the inhalation of welding fumes can be harmful,
ensure that the welding area is effectively ventilated.
3.04 Mains Supply Voltage
Requirements
The Mains supply voltage should be within ± 15%
of the rated mains supply voltage. Too low a voltage
may cause poor welding performance. Too high a
supply voltage will cause components to overheat
and possibly fail.
The Welding Power Source must be:
• Correctly installed, if necessary, by a qualified
electrician.
• Correctly earthed (electrically) in accordance
with local regulations.
• Connected to the correct size power point and
fuse as per the Specifications on page 2-5.
!
Be sure to locate the welder according to the following
guidelines:
Any electrical work must be carried out by
a qualified Electrical Tradesperson.
A. In areas, free from moisture and dust.
B. Ambient temperature between 0° C to 40° C.
C. In areas, free from oil, steam and corrosive
gases.
D. In areas, not subjected to abnormal vibration or
shock.
E. In areas, not exposed to direct sunlight or rain.
F. Place at a distance of 300mm or more from walls
or similar that could restrict natural air flow for
cooling.
G. The enclosure design of this power source meets
the requirements of IP23S as outlined in AS60529.
This provides adequate protection against solid
objects (greater than 12mm), and direct protection
from vertical drops. Under no circumstances
should the unit be operated or connected in a
micro environment that will exceed the stated
Manual 0-5207 WARNING
3-1
3.05 High Frequency Introduction
The importance of correct installation of high frequency
welding equipment cannot be overemphasized.
Interference due to high frequency initiated or
stabilised arc is almost invariably traced to improper
installation. The following information is intended
as a guide for personnel installing high frequency
welding machines.
!
WARNING EXPLOSIVES
The high frequency section of this machine
has an output similar to a radio transmitter.
The machine should NOT be used in the
vicinity of blasting operations due to the
danger of premature firing
INSTALLATION, OPERATION AND SETUP
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
!
assistance of the manufacturer. In some cases this
remedial action may be as simple as earthing the
welding circuit, see NOTE below. In other cases
it could involve constructing an electromagnetic
screen enclosing the Welding Power Source and
the work, complete with associated input filters.
In all cases, electromagnetic disturbances shall
be reduced to the point where they are no longer
troublesome.
WARNING COMPUTER
It is also possible that operation close
to computer installations may cause
computer malfunction.
3.06 High Frequency Interference
Interference may be transmitted by a high frequency
initiated or stabilised arc welding machine in the
following ways.
NOTE
The welding circuit may or may not be
earthed for safety reasons. Changing the
earthing arrangements should only be
authorised by a person who is competent
to assess whether the changes will
increase the risk of injury, e.g. by allowing
parallel welding current return paths which
may damage the earth circuits of other
equipment. Further guidance is given in
IEC 60974-13 Arc Welding Equipment Installation and use (under preparation).
1. Direct Radiation: Radiation from the machine can
occur if the case is metal and is not properly grounded.
It can occur through apertures such as open access
panels. The shielding of the high frequency unit in
the Power Source will prevent direct radiation if the
equipment is properly grounded.
2. Transmission via the Supply Lead: Without
adequate shielding and filtering, high frequency energy
may be fed to the wiring within the installation (mains)
by direct coupling. The energy is then transmitted by
both radiation and conduction. Adequate shielding
and filtering is provided in the Power Source.
B. Assessment of Area
3. Radiation from Welding Leads: Radiated
interference from welding leads, although pronounced
in the vicinity of the leads, diminishes rapidly with
distance. Keeping leads as short as possible will
minimise this type of interference. Looping and
suspending of leads should be avoided wherever
possible.
1. Other supply cables, control cables, signalling
and telephone cables; above, below and
adjacent to the welding equipment.
2. Radio and television transmitters and
receivers.
4. Re-Radiation from Unearthed Metallic Objects:
A major factor contributing to interference is reradiation from unearthed metallic objects close to the
welding leads. Effective grounding of such objects will
prevent re-radiation in most cases.
3. Computer and other control equipment.
4. Safety critical equipment, e.g. guarding of
industrial equipment.
5. The health of people around, e.g. the use of
pacemakers and hearing aids.
3.07 Electromagnetic Compatibility
!
6. Equipment used for calibration and
measurement.
WARNING
7. The time of day that welding or other activities
are to be carried out.
Extra precautions for Electromagnetic
Compatibility may be required when
this Welding Power Source is used in a
domestic situation.
8. The immunity of other equipment in the
environment: the user shall ensure that other
equipment being used in the environment
is compatible: this may require additional
protection measures.
A. Installation and Use - Users Responsibility
The user is responsible for installing and
using the welding equipment according to the
manufacturer’s instructions. If electromagnetic
disturbances are detected then it shall be the
responsibility of the user of the welding equipment
to resolve the situation with the technical
INSTALLATION, OPERATION AND SETUP
Before installing welding equipment, the user shall
make an assessment of potential electromagnetic
problems in the surrounding area. The following
shall be taken into account
3-2
The size of the surrounding area to be considered
will depend on the structure of the building
and other activities that are taking place. The
surrounding area may extend beyond the
boundaries of the premises.
Manual 0-5207
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
C. Methods of Reducing Electromagnetic Emissions
1. Mains Supply
Welding equipment should be connected to the mains supply according to the manufacturer’s
recommendations. If interference occurs, it may be necessary to take additional precautions such as
filtering of the mains supply. Consideration should be given to shielding the supply cable of permanently
installed welding equipment in metallic conduit or equivalent. Shielding should be electrically continuous
throughout its length. The shielding should be connected to the Welding Power Source so that good
electrical contact is maintained between the conduit and the Welding Power Source enclosure.
2. Maintenance of Welding Equipment
The welding equipment should be routinely maintained according to the manufacturer’s recommendations.
All access and service doors and covers should be closed and properly fastened when the welding
equipment is in operation. The welding equipment should not be modified in any way except for those
changes and adjustments covered in the manufacturer’s instructions. In particular, the spark gaps of
arc striking and stabilising devices should be adjusted and maintained according to the manufacturer’s
recommendations.
3. Welding Cables
The welding cables should be kept as short as possible and should be positioned close together, running
at or close to the floor level.
4. Equipotential Bonding
Bonding of all metallic components in the welding installation and adjacent to it should be considered.
However. Metallic components bonded to the work piece will increase the risk that the operator could
receive a shock by touching the metallic components and the electrode at the same time. The operator
should be insulated from all such bonded metallic components.
5. Earthing of the Workpiece
Where the workpiece is not bonded to earth for electrical safety, nor connected to earth because of it’s
size and position, e.g. ship’s hull or building steelwork, a connection bonding the workpiece to earth
may reduce emissions in some, but not all instances. Care should be taken to prevent the earthing of
the workpiece increasing the risk of injury to users, or damage to other electrical equipment. Where
necessary, the connection of the workpiece to earth should be made by direct connection to the
workpiece, but in some countries where direct connection is not permitted, the bonding should be
achieved by suitable capacitance, selected according to national regulations.
6. Screening and Shielding
Selective screening and shielding of other cables and equipment in the surrounding area may alleviate
problems of interference. Screening the entire welding installation may be considered for special
applications.
Manual 0-5207 3-3
INSTALLATION, OPERATION AND SETUP
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
3.08 WELDSKILL 200AC/DC Power Source Controls, Indicators and Features
18
19
5
17
6
MODE
16
200 18.0
AC
DC
Amps
PULSE
Hot
Start
PURGE
Pre
Flow
15
14
Initial
Current
Base
Current
Width
Volts
POWER
FREQ (Hz)
FAULT
PROCESS
Trough
Current
Frequency
7
LIFT TIG
HF TIG
Down
Slope
Crater
Current
STICK
Post
Flow
TRIGGER
8
2T NORMAL
WAVE BALANCE
(ARC FORCE)
AC FREQUENCY
4T LATCH
BACK
200
AC/DC
13
Up
Slope
Peak
Current
VOLTS
SECONDS
PERCENT (%)
9
FORWARD
Inverter
10
WeldSkill
PORTABLE WELDING MACHINE
12
11
8
1
2
3
4
A-11219
Figure 3-1: Controls on Front Panel
20
ON
OFF
21
22
A-11232
Figure 3-2: Rear Panel
INSTALLATION, OPERATION AND SETUP
3-4
Manual 0-5207
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
1. Positive Welding Terminal
Positive Welding Terminal. Welding current flows from the Power Source via heavy duty bayonet type
terminals. It is essential, however, that the male plug is inserted and turned securely to achieve a sound
electrical connection.
2. 8 Pin Control Socket
The 8 pin receptacle is used to connect a trigger switch or remote control to the welding Power Source
circuitry:
To make connections, align keyway, insert plug, and rotate threaded collar fully clockwise. The socket
information is included in the event the supplied cable is not suitable and it is necessary to wire a plug or
cable to interface with the 8 pin receptacle.
Socket Pin
Part Number / Description
1
Not used
2
Trigger Switch Input
3
Trigger Switch Input
4
Not used
5
Remote Control 5k ohm Potentiometers Maximum
6
Remote Control 5k ohm Potentiometers Minimum
7
Remote Control 5k ohm Potentiometer Wiper
8
Not used
Table 3-1: 8 Pin Interconnection Control Plug Configuration
2
1
5
4
3
8
7
6
A-11228
3. Negative Welding Terminal
Negative Welding Terminal. Welding current flows from the Power Source via heavy duty bayonet type
terminals. It is essential, however, that the male plug is inserted and turned securely to achieve a sound
electrical connection
CAUTION
Loose welding terminal connections can cause overheating and result in the male plug being fused in the
terminal.
4. Shielding Gas Outlet
The Shielding Gas Outlet located on the front panel is a 5/8-18 UNF female gas fitting and is utilised for
the connection of a suitable TIG Torch.
5. Power ON Indicator
The POWER ON indicator illuminates when the ON/OFF switch (20) is in the ON position and the correct
mains voltage is present.
6. Thermal Overload Indicator Light
This welding power source is protected by a self resetting thermostat. The indicator will illuminate if the
duty cycle of the power source has been exceeded. Should the thermal overload indicator illuminate the
output of the power source will be disabled. Once the power source cools down this light will go OFF and
the over temperature condition will automatically reset. Note that the mains power switch should remain
in the on position such that the fan continues to operate thus allowing the unit to cool sufficiently. Do not
switch the unit off should a thermal overload condition be present.
Manual 0-5207 3-5
INSTALLATION, OPERATION AND SETUP
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
7. Process Selection Button
The process selection control is used to select the desired welding mode. Three modes are available,
GTAW (LIFT TIG), GTAW (HF TIG) and MMAW (Stick) modes.
Note that when the unit is powered off the mode selection control will automatically default to LIFT TIG mode.
This is necessary so as to prevent inadvertent arcing should an electrode holder be connected to the unit
and mistakenly be in contact with the work piece during power up.
8. Trigger Mode Control Button (HF TIG and LIFT TIG Mode only)
The trigger mode control is used to switch the functionality of the torch trigger between 2T (normal), and
4T (latch mode).
2T Normal Mode
In this mode, the torch trigger must remain depressed for the welding output to be active. Press and hold
the torch trigger to activate the power source (weld). Release the torch trigger switch to cease welding.
A-11220_AB
Figure 3-3
4T Latch Mode
This mode of welding is mainly used for long welding runs to reduce operator fatigue. In this mode the
operator can press and release the torch trigger and the output will remain active. To deactivate the power
source, the trigger switch must again be depressed and realised, thus eliminating the need for the operator
to hold the torch trigger.
Note that when operating in GTAW (HF and LIFT TIG modes), the power source will remain activated until
the selected down slope time has elapsed
AMPS
Peak
Current
Base
Current
Arc Ignited
Initial
Current
Up
Slope
Down
Slope
Crater
Current
Post
Flow
Pre
Flow
Press & hold
Trigger
Arc Terminated
Press & hold
Trigger
Release
Trigger
Release
Trigger
TIME
A-11221
Figure 3-4
INSTALLATION, OPERATION AND SETUP
3-6
Manual 0-5207
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
9. Wave Balance / Arc Force Indicator
This indicator light will illuminate when programming Wave Balance (AC HF TIG mode only) or Arc Force
(STICK mode only).
10.Forward Programming Button
Pressing this button will advance to the next step in the programming sequence.
11.Multifunction Control
The multifunction control knob is used to adjust welding current.
It is also used to adjust parameters when in programming mode.
12.Back Programming Button
Pressing this button will go back to the previous step in the programming sequence.
13.AC frequency Indicator
This indicator light will illuminate when programming AC Frequency (AC HF TIG mode only).
14.Purge Button
Press and hold the PURGE button to purge the gas line in LIFT TIG and HF TIG modes. To PURGE the
shielding gas line in LIFT TIG and HF TIG modes press the PURGE button and release. The indicator will
illuminate and shielding gas will purge for a preset period of 15 seconds. (This cannot be adjusted). To stop
shielding gas from purging within this time press the PURGE button and release and the purge indicator
will extinguish and shielding gas will cease.
15 Pulse Button
Press the PULSE button to toggle Pulse On and OFF in LIFT TIG and HF TIG modes
16.Programming Parameter Indicators
These indicator lights will illuminate when programming.
17.Mode Button
Press the MODE button to toggle AC and DC output in all Process modes
18. Digital Ammeter
The digital amperage meter is used to display both the pre-set current and actual output current of the
power source.
At times of non-welding, the amperage meter will display a pre-set (preview) amperage value. This value
can be adjusted by varying the multifunction control when the Programming Parameter Indicator light
shows BASE CURRENT.
When welding, the amperage meter will display actual welding current.
Should a remote device be connected the maximum setting of the power source will be determined by the
respective front panel control, irrespective of the remote control device setting. As an example, if the output
current on the power source front panel is set to 50% and the remote control device is set to 100%, the
maximum achievable output from the unit will be 50%. Should 100% output be required, the respective
power source front panel control must be set to 100%, in which case the remote device will then be able
to control between 0-100% output.
Manual 0-5207 3-7
INSTALLATION, OPERATION AND SETUP
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
19.Digital Voltmeter / Parameter meter
The digital volt meter is used to display the actual output voltage of the power source. It is also used to
display Parameters in Programming Mode.
Depending on the Programming Parameter selected, the status indictor adjacent to the volt meter will
illuminate to show the units of the programming parameter.
When welding, the volt meter will display actual welding voltage.
20.On / Off Switch
This Switch is located on the rear of the Power Source and turns mains power off and on.
!
WARNING
When the front digital displays are lit, the machine is connected to the Mains supply voltage and
the internal electrical components are at Mains voltage potential
21.Shielding Gas Inlet
The Shielding Gas Inlet is a 5mm nipple suitable for connection of a gas hose to a regulated Shielding Gas
Supply. The Shielding Gas inlet is located on the rear of the Power Source.
22.Cooling Fan
The WeldSkill 200AC/DC is fitted with a cooling fan that will operate continuously when the On/Off switch
on the rear panel is switched to the On position.
3.09 WELDSKILL 200AC/DC - STICK Programming Mode
Press the PROCESS button to select STICK mode.
Press the MODE switch to toggle between AC and DC welding output.
The Programming LED’s are always active. Press FORWARD or BACK to cycle through available programming
functions.
Use the Multi Function Control to adjust the Parameter selected.
While welding the Multi Function Control directly controls the BASE CURRENT
MODE
200 18.0
AC
DC
Amps
PULSE
Hot
Start
PURGE
Initial
Current
Pre
Flow
Up
Slope
Peak
Current
Base
Current
Width
Volts
VOLTS
SECONDS
PERCENT (%)
POWER
FREQ (Hz)
FAULT
PROCESS
Trough
Current
Frequency
HF TIG
Down
Slope
Crater
Current
STICK
Post
Flow
WAVE BALANCE
(ARC FORCE)
AC FREQUENCY
LIFT TIG
TRIGGER
2T NORMAL
4T LATCH
BACK
200
AC/DC
FORWARD
Inverter
WeldSkill
PORTABLE WELDING MACHINE
Press to go forward / go back
between programming status
LED’s
Adjust programming parameter
A-11222
Figure 3-5: Stick Programming Mode
INSTALLATION, OPERATION AND SETUP
3-8
Manual 0-5207
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
Programming Parameter
Hot Start
This parameter operates in all weld modes
except LIFT TIG mode and is used to heat up
the weld zone in TIG modes or improve the
start characteristics for stick electrodes the
peak start current on top of the BASE (WELD)
current.
e.g. HOT START current = 130 amps when
BASE (WELD) = 100 amps & HOT START = 30
amps
Base Current
This parameter sets the TIG WELD current
when PULSE is OFF. This parameter also sets
the STICK weld current.
Adjustment Device
Display
70
Amps
0 to 70A (max 170A weld current)
170
Amps
5 to 170A (DC STICK mode)
10 to 170A (AC STICK mode)
Arc Force (STICK Mode only)
Arc Force is effective when in Manual Arc
Mode only. Arc Force control provides and
adjustable amount of Arc Force (or "dig")
control. This feature can be particularly
beneficial in providing the operator the ability
to compensate for variability in joint fit-up in
certain situations with particular electrodes. In
general increasing the Arc Force control toward
100% (maximum Arc Force) allows greater
penetration control to be achieved.
100
Volts
VOLTS
SECONDS
PERCENT (%)
FREQ (Hz)
0 to 100%
Table 3-2
Manual 0-5207 3-9
INSTALLATION, OPERATION AND SETUP
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
3.10 WELDSKILL 200AC/DC – LIFT TIG and HF TIG Programming Mode
Press the PROCESS button to select LIFT TIG or HF TIG mode.
Press the MODE switch to goggle between AC and DC welding output.
The Programming LED's are always active. Press FORWARD or BACK to cycle through available programming
functions.
Use the Multi Function Control to adjust the parameter selected.
MODE
200 18.0
AC
DC
Amps
PULSE
Hot
Start
PURGE
Up
Slope
Initial
Current
Pre
Flow
Peak
Current
Base
Current
Width
Volts
VOLTS
SECONDS
PERCENT (%)
POWER
FREQ (Hz)
FAULT
PROCESS
Trough
Current
Frequency
HF TIG
Down
Slope
Crater
Current
STICK
Post
Flow
TRIGGER
2T NORMAL
WAVE BALANCE
(ARC FORCE)
AC FREQUENCY
LIFT TIG
4T LATCH
BACK
200
AC/DC
FORWARD
Inverter
WeldSkill
PORTABLE WELDING MACHINE
Press to go forward / go back
between programming status
LED’s
Adjust programming parameter
A-11222
Figure 3-6: LIFT TIG and HF TIG Programming Mode
Programming Parameter
Pre-Flow
This parameter operates in
TIG modes only and is used to
provide gas to the weld zone
prior to striking the arc, once
the torch trigger switch has been
pressed. This control is used to
dramatically reduce weld porosity
at the start of a weld.
Initial Current
This parameter operates in (4T)
TIG modes only and is used to
set the start current for TIG. The
Start Current remains on until the
torch trigger switch is released
after it has been depressed.
Note: The maximum initial current
available will be limited to the set
value of the base current.
INSTALLATION, OPERATION AND SETUP
Adjustment Device
Display
1.0
Volts
VOLTS
SECONDS
PERCENT (%)
FREQ (Hz)
0.0 to 1.0 second
200
Amps
VOLTS
SECONDS
PERCENT (%)
FREQ (Hz)
5 to 200 Amps (DC TIG mode)
30 to 200 Amps (AC LIFT TIG mode)
10 to 200A (AC HF TIG mode)
3-10
Manual 0-5207
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
Up Slope
This parameter operates in (4T)
TIG modes only and is used to
set the time for the weld current
to ramp up, after the torch trigger
switch has been pressed then
released, from INITIAL CUR to
PEAK or BASE current.
Base Current
This parameter sets the TIG
WELD current when PULSE is
OFF. This parameter also sets the
STICK weld current.
15.0
PERCENT (%)
FREQ (Hz)
Volts
0.0 to 15.0 seconds
200
Amps
5 to 200A (DC TIG mode)
30 to 200A (AC LIFT TIG mode)
10 to 200A (AC HF TIG mode)
Peak Current
This parameter sets the PEAK
weld current when in PULSE
mode.
200
Amps
10 to 200A (DC TIG mode)
30 to 200A (AC TIG mode)
Trough Current
The lowest point in the pulse is
called the Trough.
200
Amps
5 to 200A (DC HF TIG mode)
30 to 200A (AC LIFT TIG mode)
10 to 200A (AC HF TIG mode)
Pulse Width
This
parameter
sets
the
percentage on time of the PULSE
FREQUENCY for PEAK weld
current when the PULSE is ON.
Pulse Frequency
This parameter sets the PULSE
FREQUENCY when the PULSE is
ON..
80
Volts
VOLTS
SECONDS
PERCENT (%)
FREQ (Hz)
15 to 80%
200
Volts
VOLTS
SECONDS
PERCENT (%)
FREQ (Hz)
0.5 to 200 Hz
Down Slope
This parameter operates in TIG
modes only and is used to set
the time for the weld current
to ramp down, after the torch
trigger switch has been pressed,
to crater current. This control is
used to eliminate the crater that
can form at the completion of a
weld.
Crater Current
This parameter operates in (4T)
TIG modes only and is used to
set the finish current for TIG.
The CRATER Current remains
ON until the torch trigger switch
is released after it has been
depressed.
Note: The maximum crater
current available will be limited to
the set value of the base current.
Manual 0-5207 VOLTS
SECONDS
25.0
Volts
VOLTS
SECONDS
PERCENT (%)
FREQ (Hz)
0.0 to 25.0 seconds
200
Amps
VOLTS
SECONDS
PERCENT (%)
FREQ (Hz)
5 to 200A (DC TIG mode)
30 to 200A (AC TIG mode)
10 to 200A (AC HF TIG mode)
3-11
INSTALLATION, OPERATION AND SETUP
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
Post Flow
This parameter operates in TIG
modes only and is used to adjust
the post gas flow time once
the arc has extinguished. This
control is used to dramatically
reduce oxidation of the tungsten
electrode.
AC Frequency
This parameter operates in AC
TIG mode only and is used to
set the frequency for the AC weld
current.
Wave Balance
This parameter operates in AC
TIG mode and is used to set the
penetration to cleaning action
ratio for the AC weld current.
Generally WAVE BALANCE is set
to 50% for AC STICK welding.
The WAVE BALANCE control
changes the ratio of penetration
to cleaning action of the AC TIG
welding arc. Maximum weld
penetration is achieved when
the WAVE BALANCE control is
set to 10%. Maximum cleaning
of heavily oxidised aluminium or
magnesium alloys is achieved
when the WAVE BALANCE control
is set to 65%.
60.0
Volts
VOLTS
SECONDS
PERCENT (%)
FREQ (Hz)
0.0 to 60.0 seconds
150
Volts
VOLTS
SECONDS
PERCENT (%)
FREQ (Hz)
15 to 150 Hz
65
VOLTS
SECONDS
PERCENT (%)
FREQ (Hz)
Volts
10 to 65%
Table 3-3
WAVE BALANCE is used for aluminium welding in AC HF TIG or AC LIFT TIG mode
It is used to set the ratio of penetration to cleaning action for the AC TIG welding arc.
Maximum weld penetration is achieved when the WAVE BALANCE is set to 10%. Maximum cleaning of heavily
oxidised aluminium or magnesium alloys is achieved when the WAVE BALANCE is set to 65%.
Wave Balance = 50%
50%
Wave Balance = 10%
10%
(+)
(-)
65%
(+)
(+)
(-)
50%
90%
Balanced with 50% penetration
and 50% cleaning
Wave Balance = 65%
Maximum Penetration and
reduced cleaning
(-)
35%
Maximum Cleaning and
reduced penetration
A-11223
Table 3-4: AC TIG Wave Balance
INSTALLATION, OPERATION AND SETUP
3-12
Manual 0-5207
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
3.11 Short Circuit Protection While Welding
To prolong the useful life of a TIG tungsten electrode, the WeldSkill 200 AC/DC incorporates special circuitry.
In DC LIFT TIG mode, if the tungsten electrode touches the work the welding current is reduced to 40 Amps.
In DC HF TIG mode, if the tungsten electrode touches the work the welding current is reduced to 30 Amps
within 1 second.
In STICK mode, if the electrode touches the work for more than two seconds the welding current is reduced
to 0 Amps.
3.12 Shielding Gas Regulator Operating Instructions
!
WARNING
This equipment is designed for use with welding grade (Inert) shielding gases only.
Shielding Gas Regulator Safety
This regulator is designed to reduce and control high pressure gas from a cylinder or pipeline to the working
pressure required for the equipment using it.
If the equipment is improperly used, hazardous conditions are created that may cause accidents. It is the
users responsibility to prevent such conditions. Before handing or using the equipment, understand and
comply at all times with the safe practices prescribed in this instruction.
SPECIFIC PROCEDURES for the use of regulators are listed below.
1. NEVER subject the regulator to inlet pressure greater than its rated inlet pressure.
2. NEVER pressurize a regulator that has loose or damaged parts or is in a questionable condition. NEVER
loosen a connection or attempt to remove any part of a regulator until the gas pressure has been
relieved. Under pressure, gas can dangerously propel a loose part.
3. DO NOT remove the regulator from a cylinder without first closing the cylinder valve and releasing gas
in the regulator high and low pressure chambers.
4. DO NOT use the regulator as a control valve. When downstream equipment is not in use for extended
periods of time, shut off the gas at the cylinder valve and release the gas from the equipment.
5. OPEN the cylinder valve SLOWLY. Close after use.
User Responsibilities
This equipment will perform safely and reliable only when installed, operated and maintained, and repaired in
accordance with the instructions provided. Equipment must be checked periodically and repaired, replaced,
or reset as necessary for continued safe and reliable performance. Defective equipment should not be used.
Parts that are broken, missing, obviously worn, distorted, or contaminated should be replaced immediately.
The user of this equipment will generally have the sole responsibility for any malfunction, which results from
improper use, faulty maintenance, or by repair by anyone other than an accredited repairer.
CAUTION
Match regulator to cylinder. NEVER CONNECT a regulator designed for a particular gas or gases to
a cylinder containing any other gas.
Manual 0-5207 3-13
INSTALLATION, OPERATION AND SETUP
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
Art: A-05087
Figure 3-7: Fit Regulator to Cylinder
Installation
1. Remove cylinder valve plastic dust seal. Clean the cylinder valve outlet of impurities that may clog
orifices and damage seats before connecting the regulator.
Crack the valve (open then close) momentarily, pointing the outlet away from people and sources of
ignition. Wipe with a clean lint free cloth.
2. Match regulator to cylinder. Before connecting, check that the regulator label and cylinder marking
agree and that the regulator inlet and cylinder outlet match. NEVER CONNECT a regulator designed
for a particular gas or gases to a cylinder containing any other gas.
3. Connect the regulator inlet connection to cylinder or pipeline and tighten it firmly but not excessively,
with a suitable spanner.
4. Connect and tighten the outlet hose firmly and attach down-stream equipment.
5. To protect sensitive down-stream equipment a separate safety device may be necessary if the regulator
is not fitted with a pressure relief device.
Operation
With the regulator connected to cylinder or pipeline, and the adjustment screw/knob fully disengaged, pressurize
as follows:
1. Stand to one side of regulator and slowly open the cylinder valve. If opened quickly, a sudden pressure
surge may damage internal regulator parts.
2. With valves on downstream equipment closed, adjust regulator to approximate working pressure. It is
recommended that testing for leaks at the regulator connection points be carried out using a suitable
leak detection solution or soapy water.
3. Purge air or other unwanted welding grade shielding gas from equipment connected to the regulator
by individually opening then closing the equipment control valves. Complete purging may take up to
ten seconds or more, depending upon the length and size of the hose being purged.
INSTALLATION, OPERATION AND SETUP
3-14
Manual 0-5207
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
Adjusting Flow Rate
Art: A-05088_AB
Figure 3-8: Adjust Flow Rate
With the regulator ready for operation, adjust working flow rate as follows:
1. Slowly turn adjusting screw/knob in (clockwise) direction until the outlet gauge indicates the required
flow rate.
NOTE
It may be necessary to re-check the shielding gas regulator flow rate following the first weld sequence
due to back pressure present within shielding gas hose assembly.
2. To reduce flow rate, allow the welding grade shielding gas to discharge from regulator by opening the
downstream valve. Bleed welding grade shielding gas into a well ventilated area and away from any
ignition source. Turn adjusting screw counter clockwise, until the required flow rate is indicated on the
gauge. Close downstream valve.
Shutdown
Close cylinder valve whenever the regulator is not in use. To shut down for extended periods (more than 30
minutes).
1. Close cylinder or upstream valve tightly.
2. Open downstream equipment valves to drain the lines. Bleed gas into a well ventilated area and away
from any ignition source.
3. After gas is drained completely, disengage adjusting screw and close downstream equipment valves.
4. Before transporting cylinders that are not secured on a cart designed for such purposes, remove
regulators.
3.13 Setup for TIG (GTAW) Welding
A. Select Lift TIG or HF TIG mode with the process selection control (refer to Section 3.08.7 for further
information).
B. Connect the TIG Torch to the negative welding terminal (-). Welding current flows from the power source
via heavy duty bayonet type terminals. It is essential, however, that the male plug is inserted and turned
securely to achieve a sound electrical connection.
C. Connect the work lead to the positive welding terminal (+). Welding current flows from the Power Source
via heavy duty bayonet type terminals. It is essential, however, that the male plug is inserted and turned
securely to achieve a sound electrical connection.
Manual 0-5207 3-15
INSTALLATION, OPERATION AND SETUP
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
CAUTION
Loose welding terminal connections can cause overheating and result in the male plug being fused
in the bayonet terminal.
D. Connect the TIG torch trigger switch via the 8 pin socket located on the front of the power source as shown
below. The TIG torch will require a trigger switch to operate in Lift TIG or HF TIG Mode.
NOTE
If the TIG torch has a remote TIG torch current control fitted then it will require to be connected to
the 8 pin socket. (Refer to section 3.08.2 Remote Control Socket for further information).
E. Fit the welding grade shielding gas regulator/flowmeter to the shielding gas cylinder (refer to Section
3.12) then connect the shielding gas hose from the regulator/flowmeter outlet gas INLET on the rear of
the WeldSkill 200 AC/DC Power Source. Connect the gas hose from the TIG torch to the gas OUTLET on
on the front of the WeldSkill 200 AC/DC Power Source.
!
WARNING
Before connecting the work clamp to the work make sure the mains power supply is switched off.
Secure the welding grade shielding gas cylinder in an upright position by chaining it to a suitable
stationary support to prevent falling or tipping.
MODE
200 18.0
AC
DC
Amps
PULSE
Hot
Start
PURGE
Initial
Current
Pre
Flow
Up
Slope
Base
Current
Peak
Current
Width
Volts
VOLTS
SECONDS
POWER
PERCENT (%)
FAULT
FREQ (Hz)
PROCESS
Trough
Current
Frequency
HF TIG
Down
Slope
Crater
Current
STICK
Post
Flow
TRIGGER
2T NORMAL
WAVE BALANCE
(ARC FORCE)
AC FREQUENCY
LIFT TIG
4T LATCH
BACK
200
AC/DC
FORWARD
Inverter
WeldSkill
PORTABLE WELDING MACHINE
Negative Welding
Terminal (-)
Positive Welding
Terminal (+)
8
Work Lead
A-11224
8 Pin Control Socket
Tig Torch
Figure 3-9: Setup for TIG Welding
INSTALLATION, OPERATION AND SETUP
3-16
Manual 0-5207
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
3.14 Setup for STICK (MMAW) Welding
A. Connect the Electrode Holder lead to the positive welding terminal (+). If in doubt, consult the electrode
manufacturer. Welding current flows from the Power Source via heavy duty bayonet type terminals. It is
essential, however, that the male plug is inserted and turned securely to achieve a sound electrical connection.
B. Connect the work lead to the negative welding terminal (-). If in doubt, consult the electrode manufacturer.
Welding current flows from the power source via heavy duty bayonet type terminals. It is essential, however,
that the male plug is inserted and turned securely to achieve a sound electrical connection.
C. Select STICK mode with the process selection control (refer to Section 3.08.7 for further information)
!
WARNING
Before connecting the work clamp to the work and inserting the electrode in the electrode holder
make sure the mains power supply is switched off.
CAUTION
Remove any packaging material prior to use. Do not block the air vents at the front or rear of the
Welding Power Source.
CAUTION
Loose welding terminal connections can cause overheating and result in the male plug being fused
in the bayonet terminal.
MODE
200 18.0
AC
DC
Amps
PULSE
Hot
Start
PURGE
Initial
Current
Pre
Flow
Up
Slope
Base
Current
Peak
Current
Width
Volts
VOLTS
SECONDS
FAULT
PROCESS
Trough
Current
Frequency
LIFT TIG
HF TIG
Down
Slope
Crater
Current
STICK
Post
Flow
WAVE BALANCE
(ARC FORCE)
AC FREQUENCY
POWER
PERCENT (%)
FREQ (Hz)
TRIGGER
2T NORMAL
4T LATCH
BACK
200
AC/DC
FORWARD
Inverter
WeldSkill
PORTABLE WELDING MACHINE
Negative Welding
Terminal (-)
Positive Welding
Terminal (+)
8
A-11225
Electrode Holder
Work Lead
Figure 3-10: Setup for Manual Arc Welding.
Manual 0-5207 3-17
INSTALLATION, OPERATION AND SETUP
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
This page is left blank intentionally.
INSTALLATION, OPERATION AND SETUP
3-18
Manual 0-5207
WELDSKILL 200 AC/DC INVERTER
SECTION 4:
BASIC WELDING GUIDE
4.01 Stick (MMAW) Basic Welding Technique
Size of Electrode
The electrode size is determined by the thickness of metals being joined and can also be governed by the type
of welding machine available. Small welding machines will only provide sufficient current (amperage) to run
the smaller size electrodes.
For thin sections, it is necessary to use smaller electrodes otherwise the arc may burn holes through the job.
A little practice will soon establish the most suitable electrode for a given application.
Storage of Electrodes
Always store electrodes in a dry place and in their original containers.
Electrode Polarity
Electrodes are generally connected to the ELECTRODE HOLDER with the Electrode Holder connected positive
polarity. The WORK LEAD is connected negative polarity and is connected to the work piece. If in doubt consult
the electrode data sheet or your nearest Accredited CIGWELD Distributor.
Effects of Arc Welding Various Materials
A. High tensile and alloy steels
The two most prominent effects of welding these steels are the formation of a hardened zone in the weld
area, and, if suitable precautions are not taken, the occurrence in this zone of under-bead cracks may result.
Hardened zone and under-bead cracks in the weld area may be reduced by using the correct electrodes,
preheating, using higher current settings, using larger electrodes sizes, short runs for larger electrode
deposits or tempering in a furnace.
Hydrogen controlled Electrodes must be used for this application. Use Ferrocraft 61 or 16TXP for normal
strength (500 MPa) steels, and Alloycraft range for higher strength steels.
B. Austenitic manganese steels
The effect on manganese steel of slow cooling from high temperatures is to embrittle it. For this reason
it is absolutely essential to keep manganese steel cool during welding by quenching after each weld or
skip welding to distribute the heat. Suitable Electrode types are Cobalarc Austex or Cobalarc Mangcraft.
C. Cast Iron
Most types of cast iron, except white iron, are weldable. White iron, because of its extreme brittleness,
generally cracks when attempts are made to weld it. Trouble may also be experienced when welding whiteheart malleable, due to the porosity caused by gas held in this type of iron. Suitable Electrode types are
Castcraft 55 or Castcraft 100.
D. Copper and alloys
The most important factor is the high rate of heat conductivity of copper, making preheating of heavy
sections necessary to give proper fusion of weld and base metal. Suitable Electrode types are Bronzecraft
AC-DC electrodes.
Arc Welding Practice
The techniques used for arc welding are almost identical regardless of what types of metals are being joined.
Naturally enough, different types of electrodes would be used for different metals as described in the preceding
section.
Manual 0-5207 4-1
BASIC WELDING GUIDE
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
Welding Position
The electrodes dealt with in this publication can be used in most positions, i.e. they are suitable for welding in
flat, horizontal, vertical and overhead positions. Numerous applications call for welds to be made in positions
intermediate between these. Some of the common types of welds are shown in Figures 4-5 through 4-12.
Art # A-07687
Figure 4-1: Flat Position, Down Hand Butt Weld
Art # A-07688
Figure 4-2: Flat Position, Gravity Fillet Weld
Art # A-07689
Figure 4-3: Horizontal Position, Butt Weld
Art # A-07690
Figure 4-4: Horizontal-Vertical (HV) Position
Art A-07691
Figure 4-5: Vertical Position, Butt Weld
Art # A-07692
Figure 4-6: Vertical Position, Fillet Weld
BASIC WELDING GUIDE
4-2
Manual 0-5207
WELDSKILL 200 AC/DC INVERTER
Art# A-07693
Figure 4-7: Overhead Position, Butt Weld
Art # A-07694
Figure 4-8: Overhead Position, Fillet Weld
Joint Preparations
In many cases, it will be possible to weld steel sections without any special preparation. For heavier sections
and for repair work on castings, etc., it will be necessary to cut or grind an angle between the pieces being
joined to ensure proper penetration of the weld metal and to produce sound joints.
In general, surfaces being welded should be clean and free of rust, scale, dirt, grease, etc. Slag should be
removed from oxy-cut surfaces. Typical joint designs are shown in Figure 4-9.
Single Vee Butt Joint
Open Square Butt
Joint
Not less than
70°
1.6mm (1/16” ) max
Gap varies from
1.6mm (1/16”) to 4.8mm (3/16”)
depending on plate thickness
1.6mm (1/16”)
Single Vee Butt Joint
Not less than
45°
Double Vee Butt Joint
Lap Joint
Fillet Joint
Not less than
70°
1.6mm (1/16”) max
1.6mm (1/16”)
Tee Joints
(Fillet both sides of the
joint)
Corner Weld
Edge Joint
Plug Weld
Plug Weld
Art # A-07695_AE
Figure 4-9: Typical Joint Designs for Arc Welding
Manual 0-5207 4-3
BASIC WELDING GUIDE
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
Arc Welding Technique - A Word to Beginners
For those who have not yet done any welding, the simplest way to commence is to run beads on a piece of
scrap plate. Use mild steel plate about 6.0mm thick and a 3.2mm electrode. Clean any paint, loose scale or
grease off the plate and set it firmly on the work bench so that welding can be carried out in the downhand
position. Make sure that the work clamp is making good electrical contact with the work, either directly or
through the work table. For light gauge material, always clamp the work lead directly to the job, otherwise a
poor circuit will probably result.
The Welder
Place yourself in a comfortable position before beginning to weld. Get a seat of suitable height and do as
much work as possible sitting down. Don't hold your body tense. A taut attitude of mind and a tensed body
will soon make you feel tired. Relax and you will find that the job becomes much easier. You can add much to
your peace of mind by wearing a leather apron and gauntlets. You won't be worrying then about being burnt
or sparks setting alight to your clothes.
Place the work so that the direction of welding is across, rather than to or from, your body. The electrode
holder lead should be clear of any obstruction so that you can move your arm freely along as the electrode
burns down. If the lead is slung over your shoulder, it allows greater freedom of movement and takes a lot of
weight off your hand. Be sure the insulation on your cable and electrode holder is not faulty, otherwise you
are risking an electric shock.
Striking the Arc
Practice this on a piece of scrap plate before going on to more exacting work. You may at first experience
difficulty due to the tip of the electrode "sticking" to the work piece. This is caused by making too heavy a
contact with the work and failing to withdraw the electrode quickly enough. A low amperage will accentuate it.
This freezing-on of the tip may be overcome by scratching the electrode along the plate surface in the same
way as a match is struck. As soon as the arc is established, maintain a 1.6mm to 3.2mm gap between the
burning electrode end and the parent metal. Draw the electrode slowly along as it melts down.
Another difficulty you may meet is the tendency, after the arc is struck, to withdraw the electrode so far that
the arc is broken again. A little practice will soon remedy both of these faults.
20°
Art # A-07696_AB
1.6 mm (1/16”)
Figure 4-10: Striking an Arc
Arc Length
The securing of an arc length necessary to produce a neat weld soon becomes almost automatic. You will
find that a long arc produces more heat. A very long arc produces a crackling or spluttering noise and the
weld metal comes across in large, irregular blobs. The weld bead is flattened and spatter increases. A short
arc is essential if a high quality weld is to be obtained although if it is too short there is the danger of it being
blanketed by slag and the electrode tip being solidified in. If this should happen, give the electrode a quick
twist back over the weld to detach it. Contact or "touch-weld" electrodes such as Ferrocraft 21 do not stick in
this way, and make welding much easier.
Rate of Travel
After the arc is struck, your next concern is to maintain it, and this requires moving the electrode tip towards
the molten pool at the same rate as it is melting away. At the same time, the electrode has to move along the
plate to form a bead. The electrode is directed at the weld pool at about 20º from the vertical. The rate of travel
has to be adjusted so that a well-formed bead is produced.
BASIC WELDING GUIDE
4-4
Manual 0-5207
WELDSKILL 200 AC/DC INVERTER
If the travel is too fast, the bead will be narrow and strung out and may even be broken up into individual
globules. If the travel is too slow, the weld metal piles up and the bead will be too large.
Making Welded Joints
Having attained some skill in the handling of an electrode, you will be ready to go on to make up welded joints.
A. Butt Welds
Set up two plates with their edges parallel, as shown in Figure 4-11, allowing 1.6mm to 2.4mm gap between
them and tack weld at both ends. This is to prevent contraction stresses from the cooling weld metal
pulling the plates out of alignment. Plates thicker than 6.0mm should have their mating edges bevelled to
form a 70º to 90º included angle. This allows full penetration of the weld metal to the root. Using a 3.2mm
Ferrocraft 21 electrode at 100 amps, deposit a run of weld metal on the bottom of the joint.
Do not weave the electrode, but maintain a steady rate of travel along the joint sufficient to produce a
well-formed bead. At first you may notice a tendency for undercut to form, but keeping the arc length
short, the angle of the electrode at about 20º from vertical, and the rate of travel not too fast, will help
eliminate this. The electrode needs to be moved along fast enough to prevent the slag pool from getting
ahead of the arc. To complete the joint in thin plate, turn the job over, clean the slag out of the back and
deposit a similar weld.
20°-30°
Electrode
Tack Weld
Tack Weld
Art # A-07697_AB
Figure 4-11: Butt Weld
Art # A-07698
Figure 4-12: Weld Build up Sequence
Heavy plate will require several runs to complete the joint. After completing the first run, chip the slag
out and clean the weld with a wire brush. It is important to do this to prevent slag being trapped by the
second run. Subsequent runs are then deposited using either a weave technique or single beads laid down
in the sequence shown in Figure 4-12. The width of weave should not be more than three times the core
wire diameter of the electrode. When the joint is completely filled, the back is either machined, ground or
gouged out to remove slag which may be trapped in the root, and to prepare a suitable joint for depositing
the backing run. If a backing bar is used, it is not usually necessary to remove this, since it serves a similar
purpose to the backing run in securing proper fusion at the root of the weld.
B. Fillet Welds
These are welds of approximately triangular cross-section made by depositing metal in the corner of two
faces meeting at right angles. Refer to Figure 4-4.
A piece of angle iron is a suitable specimen with which to begin, or two lengths of strip steel may be
tacked together at right angles. Using a 3.2mm Ferrocraft 21 electrode at 100 amps, position angle iron
with one leg horizontal and the other vertical. This is known as a horizontal-vertical (HV) fillet. Strike the
arc and immediately bring the electrode to a position perpendicular to the line of the fillet and about 45º
from the vertical. Some electrodes require to be sloped about 20º away from the perpendicular position
to prevent slag from running ahead of the weld. Refer to Figure 4-13. Do not attempt to build up much
larger than 6.4mm width with a 3.2mm electrode, otherwise the weld metal tends to sag towards the base,
Manual 0-5207 4-5
BASIC WELDING GUIDE
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
and undercut forms on the vertical leg. Multi-runs can be made as shown in Figure 4-14. Weaving in HV
fillet welds is undesirable.
45° from
vertical
60° - 70° from line
of weld
Art # A-07699_AB
Figure 4-13: Electrode Position for HV Fillet Weld
Art # A-07700_AB
6
3
5
1
2
4
Figure 4-`14: Multi-runs in HV Fillet Weld
C. Vertical Welds
1. Vertical Up
Tack weld a three feet length of angle iron to your work bench in an upright position. Use a 3.2mm
Ferrocraft 21 electrode and set the current at 100 amps. Make yourself comfortable on a seat in front
of the job and strike the arc in the corner of the fillet. The electrode needs to be about 10º from the
horizontal to enable a good bead to be deposited. Refer Figure 4-15. Use a short arc, and do not attempt
to weave on the first run. When the first run has been completed de-slag the weld deposit and begin
the second run at the bottom. This time a slight weaving motion is necessary to cover the first run and
obtain good fusion at the edges. At the completion of each side motion, pause for a moment to allow
weld metal to build up at the edges, otherwise undercut will form and too much metal will accumulate
in the centre of the weld. Figure 4-16 illustrates multi-run technique and Figure 4-17 shows the effects
of pausing at the edge of weave and of weaving too rapidly.
Art # A-07701
Figure 4-15: Single Run Vertical Fillet Weld
BASIC WELDING GUIDE
4-6
Manual 0-5207
WELDSKILL 200 AC/DC INVERTER
Art # A-07702
Figure 4-16: Multi Run Vertical Fillet Weld
Art # A-07703
Figure 4-17: Examples of Vertical Fillet Welds
2. Vertical Down
The Ferrocraft 21 electrode makes welding in this position particularly easy. Use a 3.2mm electrode at
100 amps. The tip of the electrode is held in light contact with the work and the speed of downward
travel is regulated so that the tip of the electrode just keeps ahead of the slag. The electrode should
point upwards at an angle of about 45º.
3. Overhead Welds
Apart from the rather awkward position necessary, overhead welding is not much more difficult that
downhand welding. Set up a specimen for overhead welding by first tacking a length of angle iron at
right angles to another piece of angle iron or a length of waste pipe. Then tack this to the work bench
or hold in a vice so that the specimen is positioned in the overhead position as shown in the sketch.
The electrode is held at 45º to the horizontal and tilted 10º in the line of travel (Figure 4-18). The tip of
the electrode may be touched lightly on the metal, which helps to give a steady run. A weave technique
is not advisable for overhead fillet welds. Use a 3.2mm Ferrocraft 12XP electrode at 100 amps, and
deposit the first run by simply drawing the electrode along at a steady rate. You will notice that the
weld deposit is rather convex, due to the effect of gravity before the metal freezes.
Art # A-07704
Figure 4-18: Overhead Fillet Weld
Manual 0-5207 4-7
BASIC WELDING GUIDE
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
Distortion
Distortion in some degree is present in all forms of welding. In many cases it is so small that it is barely
perceptible, but in other cases allowance has to be made before welding commences for the distortion that
will subsequently occur. The study of distortion is so complex that only a brief outline can be attempted hear.
The Cause of Distortion
Distortion is caused by:
A. Contraction of Weld Metal:
Molten steel shrinks approximately 11 per cent in volume on cooling to room temperature. This means
that a cube of molten metal would contract approximately 2.2 per cent in each of its three dimensions. In
a welded joint, the metal becomes attached to the side of the joint and cannot contract freely. Therefore,
cooling causes the weld metal to flow plastically, that is, the weld itself has to stretch if it is to overcome
the effect of shrinking volume and still be attached to the edge of the joint. If the restraint is very great,
as, for example, in a heavy section of plate, the weld metal may crack. Even in cases where the weld
metal does not crack, there will still remain stresses "Locked-up" in the structure. If the joint material is
relatively weak, for example, a butt joint in 2.0mm sheet, the contracting weld metal may cause the sheet
to become distorted.
B. Expansion and Contraction of Parent Metal in the Fusion Zone:
While welding is proceeding, a relatively small volume of the adjacent plate material is heated to a very
high temperature and attempts to expand in all directions. It is able to do this freely at right angles to the
surface of the plate (i.e., "through the weld", but when it attempts to expand "across the weld" or "along the
weld", it meets considerable resistance, and to fulfil the desire for continued expansion, it has to deform
plastically, that is, the metal adjacent to the weld is at a high temperature and hence rather soft, and, by
expanding, pushes against the cooler, harder metal further away, and tends to bulge (or is "upset". When
the weld area begins to cool, the "upset" metal attempts to contract as much as it expanded, but, because
it has been "upset" it does not resume its former shape, and the contraction of the new shape exerts a
strong pull on adjacent metal. Several things can then happen.
The metal in the weld area is stretched (plastic deformation), the job may be pulled out of shape by the
powerful contraction stresses (distortion), or the weld may crack, in any case, there will remain "lockedup" stresses in the job. Figures 4-19 and 4- 20 illustrate how distortion is created.
Upsetting
Weld
Art # A-07705_AB
Expansion with
compression
Hot
Hot
Cool
Figure 4-19: Parent Metal Expansion
Art # A-07706_AB
Weld
Permanent Upset
Contraction
with tension
Figure 4-20: Parent Metal Contraction
Overcoming Distortion Effects
There are several methods of minimizing distortion effects.
A.Peening
This is done by hammering the weld while it is still hot. The weld metal is flattened slightly and because of
this the tensile stresses are reduced a little. The effect of peening is relatively shallow, and is not advisable
on the last layer.
BASIC WELDING GUIDE
4-8
Manual 0-5207
WELDSKILL 200 AC/DC INVERTER
B. Distribution of Stresses
Distortion may be reduced by selecting a welding sequence which will distribute the stresses suitably so
that they tend to cancel each other out. See Figures 4-20 through 4-23 for various weld sequences. Choice
of a suitable weld sequence is probably the most effective method of overcoming distortion, although an
unsuitable sequence may exaggerate it. Simultaneous welding of both sides of a joint by two welders is
often successful in eliminating distortion.
C. Restraint of Parts
Forcible restraint of the components being welded is often used to prevent distortion. Jigs, positions, and
tack welds are methods employed with this in view.
D.Presetting
It is possible in some cases to tell from past experience or to find by trial and error (or less frequently, to
calculate) how much distortion will take place in a given welded structure. By correct pre-setting of the
components to be welded, constructional stresses can be made to pull the parts into correct alignment.
A simple example is shown in Figure 4-21.
E.Preheating
Suitable preheating of parts of the structure other than the area to be welded can be sometimes used to
reduce distortion. Figure 4-22 shows a simple application. By removing the heating source from b and c as
soon as welding is completed, the sections b and c will contract at a similar rate, thus reducing distortion.
Art # A-07707
Figure 4-21: Principle of Presetting
Art # A-07708
B
Preheat
C
Preheat
Weld
Dotted lines show effect if no preheat is used
Figure 4-22: Reduction of Distortion by Preheating
Art # A-07709
Figure 4-23: Examples of Distortion
Manual 0-5207 4-9
BASIC WELDING GUIDE
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
3
2
1
Art # A-07710_AB
Block Sequence.
The spaces between the welds are
filled in when the welds are cool.
Figure 4-24: Welding Sequence
4
3
2
1
Art # A-07711_AB
Figure 4-25: Step back Sequence
Art # A-07428_AB
Figure 4-26: Chain Intermittent Welding
Art # A-07713_AB
Figure 4-27: Staggered Intermittent Welding
BASIC WELDING GUIDE
4-10
Manual 0-5207
WELDSKILL 200 AC/DC INVERTER
Electrode Selection Chart
CIGWELD Electrode Selection Chart
Pack
Part No.
Description
Diameter
Satincraft 13
2.5mm
2.5mm
3.2mm
3.2mm
4.0mm
1kg
2.5kg
1kg
2.5kg
5kg
322135
612182
322136
612183
611184
Application
General purpose electrode suitable for all positional
welding and galvanised steel.
Ferrocraft
12XP
2.0mm
2.0mm
2.5mm
2.5mm
3.2mm
3.2mm
4.0mm
1kg
2.5kg
1kg
2.5kg
1kg
2.5kg
5kg
322128
612231
322129
612232
322138
612233
611234
General purpose, Xtra performance electrode
recommended for all positional (inc. Vertical down)
welding of mild and galvanised steel.
WeldSkill GP
2.0mm
2.0mm
2.5mm
2.5mm
2.5mm
3.2mm
3.2mm
3.2mm
4.0mm
1 kg
2.5 kg
1 kg
2.5 kg
5 kg
1 kg
2.5 kg
5 kg
5 kg
WEG1020
WEG2520
WEG1025
WEG2525
WEG5025
WEG1032
WEG2532
WEG5032
WEG5040
User-friendly GP electrode for welding thin section mild
and galvanised steels. Excellent for vertical down fillet
welding applications.
Ferrocraft 16
Twincoat
2.5mm
2.5mm
3.2mm
3.2mm
4.0mm
2.5 kg
5 kg
2.5 kg
5 kg
5 kg
612752
611752
612753
611753
611754
Hydrogen Controlled type offering exceptional AC/DC
performance in all welding positions.
Satincrome
308L-17
2.5mm
3.2mm
4.0mm
2.5 kg
2.5 kg
2.5 kg
611602
611603
611604
Stainless Steel type for 19Cr/10Ni stainless grades
including 201, 202, 301, 302, 303, 304, 304L, 305,
308, etc
Satincrome
309Mo-17
2.5mm
3.2mm
4.0mm
2.5 kg
2.5 kg
2.5 kg
611692
611693
611694
Stainless Steel type for 309 and 309L grades. It is also
suitable for welding of dissimilar welding of other 300
series stainless steels.
Satincrome
316L-17
2.0mm
2.5mm
3.2mm
2.5/3.2mm
4.0mm
2,5 kg
2.5 kg
2.5 kg
Blisterpack
2.5 kg
611661
611662
611663
322215
611664
Stainless Steel type for welding of matching Mo bearing
grades, 316 and 316L.
Weldall
2.5mm
3.2mm
2.5/3.2mm
4.0mm
2.5 kg
2.5 kg
Blisterpack
2.5 kg
611702
611703
322216
611704
High alloy stainless steel type for welding of unknown
steels, repair of die or tool steels and for joining
dissimilar steels. (Not recommended for cast iron).
Castcraft 55
3.2mm
4.0mm
2.5 kg
2.5 kg
611723
611724
For repair and maintenance welding of S.G. cast iron,
meehanites and other cast irons. It produces high
strength weld than Castcraft 100.
Castcraft
100
2.5mm
3.2mm
2.5/3.2mm
4.0mm
2.5 kg
2.5 kg
Blisterpack
2.5 kg
611732
611733
322217
611734
Soft, Ductile Nickel type electrode for repair and
maintenance welding of a wide range of cast irons. It
has better “wetting” action than Castcraft 55.
Table 4-1: CIGWELD Electrode Selection Chart
Further information on CIGWELD electrodes can be found at the website www.thermadyne.com
Manual 0-5207 4-11
BASIC WELDING GUIDE
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
4.02 Stick (MMAW) Welding Troubleshooting
FAULT
CAUSE
1 Welding current
varying
REMEDY
ARC FORCE control knob
is set at a value that
causes the welding current
to vary excessively with
the arc length.
2 A gap is left by
A Welding current too low
failure of the weld B Electrode too large for
metal to fill the
joint.
root of the weld.
C Insufficient gap.
Reduce the ARC FORCE control knob until welding current is reasonably constant while prohibiting the electrode from sticking to the work piece
when you “dig” the electrode into the workpiece.
A Increase welding current.
B Use smaller diameter electrode.
C Allow wider gap.
3 Non-metallic par- A Non-metallic particles may A If a bad undercut is present clean slag bout and
ticles are trapped
be trapped in undercut
cover with a run from a smaller gauge electrode.
in the weld metal.
from previous run.
B Joint preparation too
restricted.
B Allow for adequate penetration and room for
cleaning out the slag.
C Irregular deposits allow
slag to be trapped.
C If very bad, chip or grind out irregularities.
D Lack of penetration with D Use smaller electrode with sufficient current to
slag trapped beneath weld
give adequate penetration. Use suitable tools to
bead.
remove all slag from comers.
E Rust or mill scale is preventing full fusion.
E Clean joint before welding.
F Wrong electrode for posi- F Use electrodes designed for position in which
tion in which welding is
welding is done, otherwise proper control of slag
done.
is difficult.
Art: A-04971
Figure 1-Example of insufficient gap or incorrect sequence
4 A groove has been A Welding current is too
formed in the base
high.
metal adjacent to B Welding arc is too long.
the toe of a weld
and has not been
filled by the weld C Angle of the electrode is
incorrect.
metal (undercut).
D Joint preparation does not
allow correct electrode
angle.
E Electrode too large for
joint.
A Reduce welding current.
B Reduce the length of the welding arc.
C Electrode should not be inclined less than 45° to
the vertical face.
D Allow more room in joint for manipulation of the
electrode.
E Use smaller gauge electrode.
F Insufficient deposit time at F Pause for a moment at edge of weave to allow
edge of weave.
weld metal buildup.
BASIC WELDING GUIDE
4-12
Manual 0-5207
WELDSKILL 200 AC/DC INVERTER
5 Portions of the
A Small electrodes used on A Use larger electrodes and preheat the plate.
weld run do not
heavy cold plate.
fuse to the surface
B Welding current is too low. B Increase welding current.
of the metal or
C Adjust angle so the welding arc is directed more
edge of the joint. C Wrong electrode angle.
into the base metal.
D Travel speed of electrode
is too high.
D Reduce travel speed of electrode.
E Scale or dirt on joint
surface.
E Clean surface before welding.
Art: A-04972
Figure 2: Example of Lack of Fusion
6 Gas pockets or
voids in weld
metal (porosity)
A High levels of sulphur in
steel.
A Use an electrode that is designed for high sulphur steels.
B Electrodes are damp.
B Dry electrodes before use.
C Welding current is too
high.
C Reduce welding current.
D Surface impurities such as D Clean joint before welding.
oil, grease, paint, etc.
E Welding in a windy environment.
E Shield the weld area from the wind.
F Electrode damaged ie flux F Discard damaged electrodes and only use eleccoating incomplete.
trodes with a complete flux coating.
7 Crack occurring in A Rigidity of joint.
weld metal soon
after solidification B Insufficient throat thickcommences
ness.
C Weld current is too high.
A Redesign to relieve weld joint of severe stresses
or use crack resistance electrodes.
B Travel slightly slower to allow greater build up in
throat.
C Decrease welding current.
Art: A-04973
Figure 3: Example of Slag Inclusion
Table 4-2: Welding Problems MMAW (Stick)
Manual 0-5207 4-13
BASIC WELDING GUIDE
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
4.03 TIG (GTAW) Basic Welding Technique
Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) or TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas) as it is commonly referred to, is a welding
process in which fusion is produced by an electric arc that is established between a single tungsten (nonconsumable) electrode and the work piece. Shielding is obtained from a welding grade shielding gas or welding
grade shielding gas mixture which is generally Argon based. A filler metal may also be added manually in some
circumstances depending on the welding application.
A-09658_AB
Work Piece
Can Be Any Commercial
Metal
Gas Cup
Either Ceramic,
High-lmpact or
Water Cooled
Metal
Tungsten Electrode
Non-Consumable
Welds Made With or Without
Addition of Filler Metal
Inert Gas
Shields Electrode
and Weld Puddle
Figure 4-28: TIG Welding Application Shot
Tungsten Electrode Current Ranges
Electrode Diameter
DC Current (Amps)
0.040” (1.0mm)
30-60
1/16” (1.6mm)
60-115
3/32” (2.4mm)
100-165
1/8” (3.2mm)
135-200
5/32” (4.0mm)
190-280
3/16” (4.8mm)
250-340
Table 4-3: Current Ranges for Various Tungsten Electrode Sizes
Guide for Selecting Filler Wire Diameter
Filler Wire Diameter DC Current Range (Amps)
1/16” (1.6mm)
20-90
3/32” (2.4mm)
65-115
1/8” (3.2mm)
100-165
3/16” (4.8mm)
200-350
Table 4-4: Filler Wire Selection Guide
BASIC WELDING GUIDE
4-14
Manual 0-5207
WELDSKILL 200 AC/DC INVERTER
Tungsten Electrode Types
Electrode Type
(Ground Finish)
Welding Application
Features
Colour Code
Thoriated 2%
DC welding of mild
steel, stainless steel
and copper
Excellent arc starting,
Long life, High current
carrying capacity
Red
Zirconated 1%
High quality AC welding of aluminium,
magnesium and their
alloys.
Self cleaning, Long
life, Maintains balled
end, High current carrying capacity.
White
Ceriated 2%
AC & DC welding of
mild steel, stainless
steel, copper, aluminium, magnesium and
their alloys
Longer life, More
stable arc, Easier
starting, Wider current
range, Narrower more
concentrated arc.
Grey
Table 4-5 Tungsten Electrode Types
TIG Welding Filler Rods
Comweld Aust Std
Rod
AWS Std
Part No.
1.6mm
Part No.
2.4mm
Part No.
3.2mm
Type/Application
LW1
LW1-6
Supersteel
R4
R6
R2
ER70S-4
ER70S-6
ER70S-2
321411
321417
321370
—
—
—
—
—
—
For mild-medium strength steels.
Pipes, tubing, roll cages, etc.
CrMo1
CrMo2
RB2
RB3
ER80S-B2
ER90S-B3
—
—
321379
321383
—
—
For welding of high strength Cr-Mo
steels used at elevated temperatures.
308L
309L
316L
R308L
R309L
R316L
ER308L
ER309L
ER316L
321406
321403
321400
321407
321404
321401
—
—
—
For stainless steels. Stainless pipes,
tubing, architectural uses, etc.
Table 4-6 TIG Welding Filler Rods
Base Metal
Thickness
DC Current DC Current
for Mild for Stainless
Steel
Steel
Tungsten
Electrode
Diameter
Filler Rod
Diameter (if
required)
Argon Gas
Flow Rate
Litres/min
Joint Type
0.040”
1.0mm
35-45
40-50
20-30
25-35
0.040”
1.0mm
1/16”
1.6mm
5-7
Butt/Corner
Lap/Fillet
0.045”
1.2mm
45-55
50-60
30-45
35-50
0.040”
1.0mm
1/16”
1.6mm
5-7
Butt/Corner
Lap/Fillet
1/16”
1.6mm
60-70
70-90
40-60
50-70
1/16”
1.6mm
1/16”
1.6mm
7
Butt/Corner
Lap/Fillet
1/8”
3.2mm
80-100
90-115
65-85
90-110
1/16”
1.6mm
3/32”
2.4mm
7
Butt/Corner
Lap/Fillet
3/16”
4.8mm
115-135
140-165
100-125
125-150
3/32”
2.4mm
1/8”
3.2mm
10
Butt/Corner
Lap/Fillet
1/4”
6.4mm
160-175
170-200
135-160
160-180
1/8”
5/32”
3.2mm
4.0mm
Table 4-7 Welding Rate
10
Butt/Corner
Lap/Fillet
Manual 0-5207 4-15
BASIC WELDING GUIDE
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
TIG Welding is generally regarded as a specialised process that requires operator competency. While many of
the principles outlined in the previous Arc Welding section are applicable a comprehensive outline of the TIG
Welding process is outside the scope of this Operating Manual. For further information please refer to www.
thermadyne.com.au or contact CIGWELD.
4.04 TIG (GTAW) Welding Problems
FAULT
CAUSE
REMEDY
1 Excessive bead build up or
poor penetration or poor
fusion at edges of weld.
Welding current is too
low
Increase weld current and/or faulty joint
preparation.
2 Weld bead too wide and
flat or undercut at edges
of weld or excessive burn
through.
Welding current is too
high
Decrease weld current.
3 Weld bead too small or
insufficient penetration or
ripples in bead are widely
spaced apart.
Travel speed too fast
Reduce travel speed.
4 Weld bead too wide or
excessive bead build up or
excessive penetration in
butt joint.
Travel speed too slow
Increase travel speed.
5 Uneven leg length in fillet
joint
Wrong placement of
filler rod
Re-position filler rod.
6 Electrode melts or oxidises A Torch lead connected
when an arc is struck.
to positive welding
terminal.
A Connect torch lead to negative welding
terminal.
B No gas flowing to weld- B Check the gas lines for kinks or breaks
ing region.
and gas cylinder contents.
C Torch is clogged with
dust or dirt.
C Clean torch.
D Gas hose is cut.
D Replace gas hose.
E Gas passage contains
impurities.
E Disconnect gas hose from the rear of
Power Source then raise gas pressure
and blow out impurities.
F Gas regulator turned
off.
F Turn on.
G The electrode is too
small for the welding
current.
G Increase electrode diameter or reduce the
welding current.
H Power source is set for H Set Power Source to LIFT TIG or HF TIG
STICK welding.
mode.
BASIC WELDING GUIDE
4-16
Manual 0-5207
WELDSKILL 200 AC/DC INVERTER
7 Dirty weld pool
A Electrode contaminated A Clean the electrode by grinding off the
by contact with work
contaminates.
piece or filler rod material.
B Work piece surface has B Clean surface.
foreign material on it.
C Gas contaminated with C Check gas lines for cuts and loose fitting
air.
or change gas cylinder.
8 Poor weld finish
9 Arc start is not smooth.
Inadequate shielding
gas.
Increase gas flow or check gas line for
gas flow problems.
A Tungsten electrode is A Select the right size tungsten electrode.
too large for the weldRefer to Table 4-3 CIGWELD Tungsten
ing current.
Electrode Selection Chart.
B The wrong electrode
is being used for the
welding job.
B Select the right tungsten electrode type.
Refer to Table 4-5 CIGWELD Tungsten
Electrode Selection Chart.
C Gas flow rate is too
high.
C Select the right rate for the welding job.
Refer to Table 4-7.
D Incorrect shielding gas D Select the right shielding gas.
is being used.
E Poor work clamp con- E Improve connection to work piece.
nection to work piece.
10 Arc flutters during TIG
welding.
Manual 0-5207 Tungsten electrode is
too large for the welding current.
4-17
Select the right size tungsten electrode.
Refer to Table 4-3 CIGWELD Tungsten
Electrode Selection Chart.
BASIC WELDING GUIDE
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
This page is left blank intentionally.
BASIC WELDING GUIDE
4-18
Manual 0-5207
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
SECTION 5:
POWER SOURCE PROBLEMS AND ROUTINE SERVICE
REQUIREMENTS
5.01 Basic Troubleshooting
!
WARNING
There are extremely dangerous voltage and power levels present inside this product. Do not attempt
to open or repair unless you are a qualified electrical tradesperson and you have had training in
power measurements and troubleshooting techniques.
If major complex subassemblies are faulty, then the Welding Power Source must be returned to an accredited CIGWELD Service Provider for repair. The basic level of troubleshooting is that which can be
performed without special equipment or knowledge. Refer also to section 4 for solving welding problems.
5.02 Power Source Problems
FAULT
1 Mains supply voltage is
ON, power indicator is
illuminated however unit
will not commence welding
when the torch trigger
switch is depressed.
2 Mains supply voltage is
ON. Indicator light is not lit
and welding arc cannot be
established.
3 Fault Indicator is illuminated
and unit will not commence
welding when the torch
trigger switch is depressed.
4 Welding output continues
when torch trigger released
5 Welding output voltage
is present when the
torch trigger switch is
depressed but arc cannot be
established.
6 Welding output voltage is
not present when torch
trigger depressed
7 TIG electrode melts when
arc is struck.
8 Arc flutters during TIG
welding.
9 No HF output in HF mode
CAUSE
A Power source is not in the
correct mode of operation.
B Faulty torch trigger.
REMEDY
A Set the power source to the
correct mode of operation with
the process selection switch.
B Repair or replace torch trigger
switch/lead.
A Primary control fuse is blown.
B Broken connection in primary
circuit.
A Replace primary control fuse.
B Have an Accredited CIGWELD
Service Provider check primary
circuit.
Duty cycle of power source has
Leave the power source
been exceeded.
switched ON and allow it to
cool. Note that fault indicator
must be extinguished prior to
commencement of welding.
A Trigger mode selection is in 4T A Change to 2T (NORMAL) mode
(LATCH) mode
B Torch trigger leads shorted
B Repair or replace Torch / trigger
lead
Poor or no work lead contact.
Clean work clamp area and ensure
good electrical contact.
Faulty trigger switch / lead
Repair or replace Torch / trigger
lead
TIG torch is connected to
the (+) VE terminal.
Tungsten electrode is too
large for the welding current.
HF Circuit faulty
Connect the TIG torch to the (-)
VE terminal.
Select the correct size of tungsten
electrode.
Have an Accredited CIGWELD
Service Provider check HF circuit.
Table 5-1: Power Source Problem
Manual 0-5207 5-1
POWER SOURCE PROBLEMS AND ROUTINE SERVICE REQUIREMENTS
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
5.03 Routine Service and Calibration Requirements
!
WARNING
There are extremely dangerous voltage and power levels present inside this Inverter Power Source.
Do not attempt to open or repair unless you are an accredited CIGWELD Service Provider. Disconnect the Welding Power Source from the Mains Supply Voltage before disassembling.
Routine Inspection, Testing & Maintenance
The inspection and testing of the power source and associated accessories shall be carried out in accordance
with Section 5 of AS 1674.2 - 2007: Safety in Welding and Allied Processes-Part 2 Electrical. This includes an
insulation resistance test and an earthing test to ensure the integrity of the unit is compliant with CIGWELD
original specifications.
If equipment is to be used in a hazardous location or environments with a high risk of electrocution as outlined
in AS 1674.2 - 2007, then the above tests should be carried out prior to entering this location.
A. Testing Schedule
1. For transportable equipment, at least once every 3 months; and
2. For fixed equipment, at least once every 12 months.
The owners of the equipment shall keep a suitable record of the periodic tests and a system of tagging,
including the date of the most recent inspection.
A transportable power source is deemed to be any equipment that is not permanently connected and fixed
in the position in which it is operated.
B. Insulation Resistance
Minimum insulation resistance for in-service CIGWELD Inverter Power Sources shall be measured at a
voltage of 500V between the parts referred to in Table 5-2 below. Power sources that do not meet the
insulation resistance requirements set out below shall be withdrawn from service and not returned until
repairs have been performed such that the requirements outlined below are met.
Components to be Tested
Minimum Insulation
Resistance (MΩ)
Input circuit (including any connected control circuits) to welding circuit
(including any connected control circuits)
5
All circuits to exposed conductive parts
2.5
Welding circuit (including any connected control circuits) to any auxiliary
circuit which operates at a voltage exceeding extra low voltage
10
Welding circuit (including any connected control circuits) to any auxiliary
circuit which operates at a voltage not exceeding extra low voltage
1
1
Separate welding circuit to separate welding circuit
Table 5-2: Minimum Insulation Resistance Requirements: CIGWELD Inverter Power Sources
C.Earthing
The resistance shall not exceed 1Ω between any metal of a power source where such metal is required
to be earthed, and 1. The earth terminal of a fixed power source; or
2. The earth terminal of the associated plug of a transportable power source
POWER SOURCE PROBLEMS AND ROUTINE SERVICE REQUIREMENTS 5-2
Manual 0-5207
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
Note that due to the dangers of stray output currents damaging fixed wiring, the integrity of fixed wiring
supplying CIGWELD welding power sources should be inspected by a licensed electrical worker in accordance with the requirements below 1. For outlets/wiring and associated accessories supplying transportable equipment - at least once
every 3 months; and
2. For outlets/wiring and associated accessories supplying fixed equipment - at least once every 12
months.
D. General Maintenance Checks
Welding equipment should be regularly checked by an accredited CIGWELD Service Provider to ensure that:
1. Flexible cord is of the multi-core tough rubber or plastic sheathed type of adequate rating, correctly
connected and in good condition.
2. Welding terminals are in suitable condition and are shrouded to prevent inadvertent contact or short
circuit.
3. The Welding System is clean internally, especially from metal filing, slag, and loose material.
E.Accessories
Accessory equipment, including output leads, electrode holders, torches, wire feeders and the like shall be
inspected at least monthly by a competent person to ensure that the equipment is in a safe and serviceable
condition. All unsafe accessories shall not be used.
F.Repairs
If any parts are damaged for any reason, it is recommended that replacement be performed by an accredited CIGWELD Service Provider.
Power Source Calibration
A.Schedule
Output testing of all CIGWELD Inverter Power Sources and applicable accessories shall be conducted at
regular intervals to ensure they fall within specified levels. Calibration intervals shall be as outlined below 1. For transportable equipment, at least once every 3 months; and
2. For fixed equipment, at least once every 12 months.
If equipment is to be used in a hazardous location or environments with a high risk of electrocution as
outlined in AS 1674.2 - 2007, then the above tests should be carried out prior to entering this location.
B. Calibration Requirements
Where applicable, the tests outlined in Table 5-3 below shall be conducted by an accredited CIGWELD
service provider.
Testing Requirements
Output current (A) to be checked to ensure it falls within applicable CIGWELD power source specifications
Output Voltage (V) to be checked to ensure it falls within applicable CIGWELD power source specifications
Accuracy of digital meters to be checked to ensure it falls within applicable CIGWELD power source specifications
Table 5-3: Calibration Parameters
Periodic calibration of other parameters such as timing functions are not required unless a specific fault
has been identified.
Manual 0-5207 5-3
POWER SOURCE PROBLEMS AND ROUTINE SERVICE REQUIREMENTS
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
C. Calibration Equipment
All equipment used for Power Source calibration shall be in proper working condition and be suitable for
conducting the measurement in question. Only test equipment with valid calibration certificates (NATA
certified laboratories) shall be utilized.
5.04 Cleaning the Welding Power Source
!
WARNING
There are dangerous voltage and power levels present inside this product. Do not attempt to open
or repair unless you are a qualified electrical tradesperson. Disconnect the Welding Power Source
from the Mains Supply Voltage before disassembling.
To clean the Welding Power Source, open the enclosure and use a vacuum cleaner to remove any accumulated
dirt, metal filings, slag and loose material. Keep the shunt and lead screw surfaces clean as accumulated foreign
material may reduce the welders output welding current.
POWER SOURCE PROBLEMS AND ROUTINE SERVICE REQUIREMENTS 5-4
Manual 0-5207
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
SECTION 6:
KEY SPARE PARTS
6.01 Power Source
15
7
5
8
6
2
3
11
10
4
1
12 13
12
14
16
9
A-11226
Figure 6-1
Manual 0-5207 6-1
KEY SPARE PARTS
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
Item
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
13
Part Number
W7005500
W7005502
W7005503
W7005504
W7005505
W7005506
W7005507
W7005508
W7005509
W7005512
W7003033
W7005513
W7003036
14
15
16
17
W7005514
W7005515
W7003076
704461
12
KEY SPARE PARTS
WeldSkill 200AC/DC Spare Parts
Description
PCB display
PCB HF
PCB aux power supply
PCB primary inverter
PCB AC output drive
PCB control
PCB secondary rectifier
PCB EMC filter
Coil coupling
Fan assembly
Gas solenoid assembly
Dinse Socket 50mm²
Control socket 8 pin, (Note that 8 pin control plug part number is
UOA706900)
Gas outlet, front panel
Switch On/Off
CT, output
Dinse plug male 50mm² (not shown)
Table 6-1
6-2
Manual 0-5207
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC INVERTER
A-11227
APPENDIX: CIRCUIT DIAGRAM
Manual 0-5207 A-1
APPENDIX
CIGWELD - LIMITED WARRANTY TERMS
LIMITED WARRANTY: CIGWELD Pty Ltd, A Thermadyne Company, hereafter, “CIGWELD” warrants to customers of its authorized distributors hereafter “Purchaser” that its products will be free of defects in workmanship
or material. Should any failure to conform to this warranty appear within the time period applicable to the
CIGWELD products as stated below, CIGWELD shall, upon notification thereof and substantiation that the
product has been stored, installed, operated, and maintained in accordance with CIGWELD’s specifications,
instructions, recommendations and recognized standard industry practice, and not subject to misuse, repair,
neglect, alteration, or accident, correct such defects by suitable repair or replacement, at CIGWELD’s sole
option, of any components or parts of the product determined by CIGWELD to be defective.
CIGWELD MAKES NO OTHER WARRANTY, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED. THIS WARRANTY IS EXCLUSIVE AND
IN LIEU OF ALL OTHERS, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO ANY WARRANTY OF MERCHANTABILITY OR
FITNESS FOR ANY PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
LIMITATION OF LIABILITY: CIGWELD SHALL NOT UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES BE LIABLE FOR SPECIAL,
INDIRECT OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES, SUCH AS, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, LOST PROFITS AND BUSINESS
INTERRUPTION. The remedies of the Purchaser set forth herein are exclusive and the liability of CIGWELD
with respect to any contract, or anything done in connection therewith such as the performance or breach
thereof, or from the manufacture, sale, delivery, resale, or use of any goods covered by or furnished by CIGWELD whether arising out of contract, negligence, strict tort, or under any warranty, or otherwise, shall not,
except as expressly provided herein, exceed the price of the goods upon which such liability is based. No
employee, agent, or representative of CIGWELD is authorized to change this warranty in any way or grant any
other warranty.
PURCHASER’S RIGHTS UNDER THIS WARRANTY ARE VOID IF REPLACEMENT PARTS OR ACCESSORIES
ARE USED WHICH IN CIGWELD’S SOLE JUDGEMENT MAY IMPAIR THE SAFETY OR PERFORMANCE OF ANY
CIGWELD PRODUCT. PURCHASER’S RIGHTS UNDER THIS WARRANTY ARE VOID IF THE PRODUCT IS SOLD
TO PURCHASER BY NON-AUTHORIZED PERSONS.
The warranty is effective for the time stated below beginning on the date that the authorized distributor delivers
the products to the Purchaser. Notwithstanding the foregoing, in no event shall the warranty period extend
more than the time stated plus one year from the date CIGWELD delivered the product to the authorized
distributor.
TERMS OF WARRANTY – January 2012
1. The Trade Practices Act 1974 (Commonwealth) and similar State Territory legislation relating to the supply
of goods and services, protects consumers’ interests by ensuring that consumers are entitled in certain
situations to the benefit of various conditions, warranties, guarantees, rights and remedies (including warranties as to merchantability and fitness for purpose) associated with the supply of goods and services.
A consumer should seek legal advice as to the nature and extent of these protected interests. In some
circumstances, the supplier of goods and services may legally stipulate that the said conditions, warranties, guarantees, rights and remedies are limited or entirely excluded. The warranties set out in Clause 2
shall be additional to any nonexcludable warranties to which the Customer may be entitled pursuant to any
statute.
2. Subject to Clause 3. CIGWELD gives the following warranties to the Customer:
Insofar as they are manufactured or imported by CIGWELD, goods will upon delivery be of merchantable
quality and reasonably fit for the purpose for which they are supplied by CIGWELD.
CIGWELD will repair or, at its option, replace those of the goods which, upon examination, are found by
CIGWELD to be defective in workmanship and/or materials.
CIGWELD reserves the right to request documented evidence of date of purchase.
3. The Warranty in Clause 2;
Is conditional upon:
The Customer notifying CIGWELD or our Accredited Distributor in writing of its claim within seven (7) days
of becoming aware of the basis thereof, and at its own expense returning the goods which are the subject
of the claim to CIGWELD or nominated Accredited Distributor/Accredited Service Provider. The goods being
used in accordance with the Manufacturer’s Operating Manuals, and under competent supervision.
Does not apply to:
Obsolete goods sold at auction, second-hand goods and prototype goods.
Breakdown or malfunction caused by accident, misuse or normal wear and tear.
Repairs or replacement made other than by CIGWELD or Accredited Service Providers, unless by prior
arrangement with CIGWELD.
Replacement parts or accessories which may affect product safety or performance and which are not
manufactured, distributed or approved by CIGWELD.
4. CIGWELD declares that, to the extent permitted by law, it hereby limits its liability in respect of the supply of
goods which are not of a kind ordinarily acquired for personal, domestic or household use or consumption
to any one or more of the following (the choice of which shall be at the option of CIGWELD).
The replacement of the goods or the supply of equivalent goods.
The repair of goods.
The payment of cost of replacing the goods or acquiring equivalent goods.
The payment of the cost of having goods repaired.
5. Except as provided in Clauses 2 to 4 above, to the extent permitted by statute, CIGWELD hereby excludes
all liability for any loss, damage, death or injury of any kind whatsoever occasioned to the Customer in
respect of the supply of goods including direct, indirect, consequential or incidental loss, damage or injury
of any kind.
WARRANTY SCHEDULE – January 2012
These warranty periods relate to the warranty conditions in clause 2. All warranty periods are from date of
sale from the Accredited Distributor of the equipment. Notwithstanding the foregoing, in no event shall the
warranty period extend more than the time stated plus one year from the date CIGWELD delivered the product
to the Accredited Distributor. Unless otherwise stated the warranty period includes parts and labour. CIGWELD
reserves the right to request documented evidence of date of purchase.
WELDSKILL 200AC/DC POWER SOURCE
Original main power magnetics.
Original main power rectifiers, printed circuit boards and power switch
semiconductors.
All other circuits and components including, but not limited to, relays, switches,
contactors, solenoids, fans and electric motors.
ACCESSORIES
TIG torch, electrode holder lead and work lead.
TIG torch consumable items.
Gas regulator/flowmeter (excluding seat assembly, pressure gauges, elastomer
seals and “O” rings).
Regulator seat assemblies and pressure gauges.
Elastomer seals and “O” rings used in the equipment.
WARRANTY PERIOD
PARTS
LABOUR
1 Year
1 Year
1 Year
1 Year
1 Year
1 Year
WARRANTY PERIOD
3 Months
NIL
1 Year
6 Months
3 Months
Please note that the information detailed in this statement supersedes any prior published data produced by
CIGWELD.
GLOBAL CUSTOMER SERVICE CONTACT INFORMATION
CIGWELD, Australia
71 Gower Street
Preston, Victoria
Australia, 3072
Telephone: 61-3-9474-7400
Fax: 61-3-9474-7391
Email: enquiries@thermadyne.com.au
Thermadyne USA
2800 Airport Road
Denton, Tx 76207 USA
Telephone: (940) 566-2000
800-426-1888
Fax: 800-535-0557
Email: sales@thermalarc.com
Thermadyne, China
RM 102A
685 Ding Xi Rd
Chang Ning District
Shanghai, PR, 200052
Telephone: 86-21-69171135
Fax: 86-21-69171139
Thermadyne Asia Sdn Bhd
Lot 151, Jalan Industri 3/5A
Rawang Integrated Industrial Park - Jln Batu Arang
48000 Rawang Selangor Darul Ehsan
West Malaysia
Telephone: 603+ 6092 2988
Fax : 603+ 6092 1085
Thermadyne Canada
2070 Wyecroft Road
Oakville, Ontario
Canada, L6L5V6
Telephone: (905)-827-1111
Fax: 905-827-3648
Thermadyne Italy
OCIM, S.r.L.
Via Benaco, 3
20098 S. Giuliano
Milan, Italy
Tel: (39) 02-98 80320
Fax: (39) 02-98 281773
Thermadyne Europe
Europe Building
Chorley North Industrial Park
Chorley, Lancashire
England, PR6 7Bx
Telephone: 44-1257-261755
Fax: 44-1257-224800
Thermadyne International
2070 Wyecroft Road
Oakville, Ontario
Canada, L6L5V6
Telephone: (905)-827-9777
Fax: 905-827-9797
PT. Thermadyne Utama Indonesia
Jl. Angsana II Blok AE No. 28
Delta Silicon I, Cikarang - Sukaresmi
Bekasi, 17550
Indonesia
Tel: +62 21 8990 6095
Fax: +62 21 8990 6096 / 1867
http://www.thermadyne.com
Asia Pacific Regional Headquarters
71 Gower Street
Preston, Victoria, Australia, 3072
Telephone: +61 3 9474 7400
+61 3 9474 7391
FAX:
Email: enquiries@thermadyne.com.au
www.thermadyne.com.au
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