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DEPOSIT.
The Dress You Wear
and
How to Make It
By
Mary Jane Rhoe
Illustrated
G. P. Putnam's Sons
New York
Gbe
and London
flmfcfeetbocfter
1918
press
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Copyright, 191
BY
MARY JANE RHOE
NOV -4 1913
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There is no question in my mind about this
text being a very practical
and helpful
one.
The author tested out every one of its lessons
in
our class rooms before deciding to publish
them
in
book form.
therefore, theories
She
is
not offering,
and unused
plans, merely
hoping that everything
work out
will
all
right.
There
is
certainly a need for such a
Mrs. Rhoe's.
book as
Oral instruction in dressmaking
and plain sewing
is
not sufficient where one
desires the best possible results.
The student
needs to listen to the oral instruction given
by the
teacher, but she learns her sewing
problems quicker and better
if
she has the
opportunity when alone to read and re-read
her teacher's printed directions and explanations.
The matter
in the
book
is
presented so
simply that our evening school students had
no trouble
in understanding its directions.
iii
This statement means
much when we
many evening
who do not have
con-
sider that
school students are
adults
the opportunity to
complete even the eighth grade when in
school.
The simple
presentation causes no
lack of interest, however, on the part of the
more advanced student.
strongly to
all
who
use
guesses and predictions.
this case is
The
it.
text appeals
These are not
Our knowledge
in
born of experience.
Frank H. Arnold
Principal Lewis
& Clark Evening School
Spokane, Washington
PREFACE
This book
intended
is
principal
and important
making.
It offers
evening and
in
are
now
to
present
details
of
the
dress-
a concise system for use
vocational schools,
which
so thoroughly established, so that
may
students
receive in their study hours
the very essence of the
art.
The author has
endeavored to make the lessons so plain, so
practical,
girl,
and
so condensed that the
as well as the
may advance
woman
of
young
mature years
rapidly.
It will solve
problems for the home dress-
maker and the busy Madame in her shop.
Dressmaking is one of the most interesting
studies, also
we have
We
one of the most important that
to-day.
should be individual in our dress, yet
there are rules set
by Dame Fashion
to which
VI
Preface
we must conform
in order to
be modern
;
this
requires a thorough knowledge of the art.
The
consciousness of an appropriate and
becoming costume develops ease
On
manner.
of
the other hand, poorly fitted and im-
perfectly
garments
made
clothes
cause
or
shoddy
cheap
embarrassment and
self-
consciousness.
Over-dress
is
always bad
The knowledge
sions
is,
of dress for different occa-
therefore,
necessary to every
taste.
not only valuable but
woman, and
it is
the hope
of the author that this small volume, the
result of
much
experience, will prove of true
value and assistance to
its readers.
ivi.
Spokane, 1918.
J.
R.
SUGGESTIONS TO TEACHERS
It
not necessary to follow to the letter
is
the order of teaching as given here, but
have found
for the
it
we
desirable to produce a system
advanced
class in
dressmaking by
which students can be given examinations
and receive
This
is
credits as in other school work.
an incentive to
faithful
and con-
tinued attendance to reach a required stand-
ard of efficiency.
It
has been arranged for the evening class
by giving the first half of the last period to
The change at this time rests
class work.
and
relieves those not used to the work.
Recitations, written or oral,
made
and samplers
of all the different stitches, pockets,
covering cord for ornamental purposes, shirring on cord, flat shirring, tucked shirring,
smocking, buttonholes, eyelets, loops,
The
etc.
following lesson to be given should be
viii
Suggestions to Teachers
assigned and discussed with students to give
an opportunity for home study.
Give as much time to
managed, as a large
class
more
to
satisfaction
class
work
as can be
can be handled with
teacher and student
after these details are understood
class.
by the
CONTENTS
CHAPTER
Nap
I
Contents
PAGE
Fitting a Skirt
Questions
....
....
.
CHAPTER
Basting
33
III
34
To Prevent Twisting of Two-Piece
Sleeve
35
Basting Velvets and Silks
36
Bias or Diagonal Basting
37
Padding Stitch
.
38
.
38
Running Stitch
Back Stitch
39
Combination Stitch
40
Questions
4i
.
CHAPTER
Tailors' Tacks
Over-Handing
IV
.....
.....
—
Tailors' Fell Stitch
To Sew in Lining
Over-Casting
......
42
43
44
45
French Seam
46
Hemming
47
Contents
Cat-Stitch or Catch-Stitch
XI
Contents
Xll
PAGE
Arrow-Head
76
Plackets
77
Cutting Bias
80
Shirring Bias Bands
82
Bands and Straps
83
Milliners' Folds
86
Questions
.
CHAPTER
Couching
VII
....
Covering Cord
89
9i
.
Shirring over Cord
93
.
Marking for Hooks and Eyes
95
Circular Yokes
96
Tucking Circular Skirt
Questions
....
CHAPTER
97
102
VIII
Getting the Length of the Skirt
Basting in a Sleeve
Tailors' Seams
.
.106
.....
Bound Open Welt
.
.
.
.
.
.
103
108
.108
Contents
Contents
xiv
PAGE
To
Take Shine off Worn Garments, or
.128
from Pressing
.
Finishing Top of Skirt
.
.
.
.
.129
Questions
133
CHAPTER
XII
Lines
134
Combining Colors
.
.
137
.
Putting Canvas in Front of Coat
.
137
Miscellaneous
143
About Basting
145
Cleaning Black Silk
Glossary
.
.
.
.147
......
151
Course of Study for Evening Dress.161
making Class
.
.
.
The Dress You Wear
The Dress You Wear
CHAPTER
I
Nap
All wool
so that the
materials with nap should be cut
nap runs down.
All silk materials with nap, such as velvet
and plushes, with the exception
velvet should be cut so the
panne
If
velvets, the
of
panne
nap runs up.
In
nap runs down.
cut so that the nap of one piece of the
material runs
the effect
is
up and another piece runs down
a light and a dark shade.
Velvets and plushes should be brushed so
the nap stands out.
To determine which way
material right side up on
the nap runs,
work
table,
lay-
with the
hand brush the material lengthwise
to the
The Dress You Wear
2
then
right,
to
the
When
left.
brushing
against the nap the material will feel rough,
and when brushing with the nap the material
is
smooth.
Right Side of Material
To determine
the right side of goods in
serge or diagonal weaves, the twill runs to the
right
on the right side
of material.
side in double-fold material
inside.
side
This
is
The right
usually folded
done to protect the right
is
from becoming
or soiled
by
to hold the cloth
up
shelf
worn
handling while in the store.
Another good
to the light
will
test
is
and look across
have a rough
look,
it,
the wrong side
and usually some un-
finished ends or small knots are to be seen.
Suitable Material for Extreme Figures
Tall, slender figures
may wear
plaids, fig-
ured or plain materials, also designs that
The Dress You Wear
tend to shorten the
3
such as numerous
figure,
flounces, ruffles, overskirts, etc., while short,
stout
figures
checks,
should
wear
stripes,
and plain materials made
small
in designs
to bring out the full height.
It is also
important to
select colors
becom-
ing to the individual regardless of the prevail-
ing style.
Selection of Material for
Soft,
Gowns and
Suits
light-weight materials are required
for fancy-draped gowns,
tailored dresses
and
heavy materials
for
suits.
Shrinking
It is absolutely necessary that
goods be
shrunken and sponged before being made up.
First,
procure a piece of heavy, unbleached
muslin a yard wide and one-half yard longer
than the material, wring muslin out as dry
as possible after dipping in
warm
water, lay
The Dress You Wear
4
smoothly on
leaving
it
on
table, placing material
top,
folded through the center so right
sides face each other.
Leave muslin one-
half yard to fold over material covering first
two to four hours,
unroll,
and press thoroughly dry on wrong
side of
Leave
roll.
in roll
goods.
Taking Measures
Neck measure should be taken
or lower part of neck.
up
under
the
arms
at base
Bust measure close
over
full
part
back and about one inch above the
part of bust.
This measure
is
of
full
to be easy.
Waist measure, draw tape tight around the
waist.
Front, from lower part of tape around the
neck to center of tape at waistline.
Chest measure in
line
with highest outer
point of shoulder, half-way between shoulder
and
full
part of bust.
as wide as can be worn.
Have
this
measure
The Dress You Wear
Width
of back, take
measure as
5
in chest,
half-way between top of shoulder and bust
line, also
as wide as can be worn.
Underarm, from waistline well up under
the arm.
Sleeve measurements, length of sleeve outside over
elbow with elbow bent.
Inside length, with
arm
in natural position
hanging down.
Hand
measure, around largest part of hand
over thumb.
Skirt measure,
around the hips seven inches
from waistline, not
tight,
but easy.
Front, from waistline to floor.
Side,
from waistline over
fullest
part of
hips to floor.
Back, from waistline to floor and not too
close to figure.
Altering and Testing Patterns
Become
using
familiar with the pattern before
it.
Measure from neck
line in front to perfora-
The Dress You Wear
TO LENGTHEN WAIST PATTERN
tions for waistline,
inches for blouse
if
allowing two or three
desired.
The Dress You Wear
part
Measure underarm from lowest
of
armhole to waistline perforations.
In
shirtwaist
and
in
shirtwaist
effects
The Dress You Wear
ALTERATION FOR SLOPING SHOULDERS
always leave waistline longer than in onepiece dresses, with belt or high waistline, also
two inches larger at bust than measure taken.
The Dress You Wear
ALTERATION FOR SQUARE SHOULDERS
Test chest and shoulder widths, especially
for
round shoulders, and
little
if
wider across shoulders.
necessary cut a
The Dress You Wear
10
ALTERATION FOR EXTREME FULL BUST
If
pattern proves too long lay in a fold
half-way
between
waistline
and armhole
The Dress You Wear
ii
TO SHORTEN WAIST OF PATTERN
deep enough
to
relieve
the
unnecessary
length.
For extremely
full bust, especially in
Prin-
across bust within
cess dresses, slash pattern
12
The Dress You Wear
ALTERATION FOR FULL ROUND SHOULDERS
one and one-half inches of armhole
(this
The Dress You Wear
13
ALTERATION FOR EXTREME SMALL BUST AND
FLAT SHOULDERS
should be done after pattern
is
pinned up
The Dress You Wear
14
ALTERATION FOR EXTREME SMALL BUST AND
FLAT SHOULDERS
and
tried
on the
figure).
Adjust pattern to
The Dress You Wear
15
waistline correctly which will leave open space
at bust.
Slip
under the edges of
slash, an-
other piece of paper, pin to pattern on both
edges of slash to give necessary room for
bust.
This same alteration
is
sometimes neces-
sary in the back in case of round shoulders.
This alteration also prevents a draw under
the
arm caused by the
garment
large bust lifting the
in front.
In case of extremely small bust or
shoulders take a fold in pattern to
fit
flat
figure.
Alteration of Sleeve Pattern
The most common
difficulty is the sleeve
that pulls on the back seam from the elbow
up and frequently under the arms, strongly
enough to tear the sleeve from the armhole
before the garment
case the sleeve
up,
is
is
half
worn
out.
In this
too short from the elbow
causing this pull
when
the elbow
is
used.
Test pattern by pinning up and trying on
The Dress You Wear
16
of sleeve pinned in pattern for the dress, then
place the
if
hand on the opposite shoulder and
this is easily
there
is
done the sleeve
is
correct.
If
a pull from shoulder to elbow, cut
upper part longer than pattern.
from elbow to shoulder
elbow of sleeve
is
If
too long
in this position
when
also in proper position lay
fold in pattern sufficient to take out unneces-
sary length.
Sleeve
may
be shortened or lengthened
below the elbow, but
elbow of pattern
is
first
be sure that the
in correct position
on the
arm.
In pinning sleeve into armhole the highest point in sleeve top should
be placed at
highest point in armhole at shoulder, and
lowest point at underarm at lowest point in
armhole.
Alteration of Skirt Pattern
Many
waistline
of our skirt patterns are cut for high
which allows from two and one-half
to three inches
above the waist.
The Dress You Wear
The normal
waistline
is
17
always marked in
the front gore usually by two small perforations.
Take measure
as
instructed
previously
from normal waistline which
located
is
by
tying a narrow tape around the waist snug.
It naturally adjusts itself to the smallest part
of waist
which
is
the proper waistline.
Measure from waistline to
also over full part of hip
floor in front,
and back (allowing
tape to be farther from figure in back than
sides
and
and always take measure
front)
to
floor.
Take from
this
measure the number
of
inches from the floor you wish your skirt to
be, allowing for
skirt, if it is to
depth of
hem
be hemmed.
in
If
bottom
only a
too long the bottom of the pattern
turned up two inches, but
if
more
is
of
little
may
be
required
put a fold through the center of the pattern,
remember the
like
a tuck.
fold takes out twice its
If
at the bottom.
pattern
is
width
too short lengthen
8
The Dress You Wear
1
After pinning on material for cutting, use
and lay
skirt rule
alongside edge of
rule
to extend the required
pattern, allowing
it
number
and mark both edges
of inches
down
pattern from end of pattern
end
to
This gives
of extra length while in position.
you
of
the correct line for the additional length.
Measure from lower edge
number
required
enough
of inches
around,
all
four inches with
connecting
of pattern the
make
to
mark every
three
draw a
tailors' chalk,
or
line
This gives you
marks.
these
long
the correct length, also keeping the circular
shape of skirt at the bottom.
Measure around
part of hips seven
full
This measure should
inches below waistline.
be easy
like
graceful
if
it
but
if
skirt pattern
amply
large as
too small
If skirt
may
A
skirt is
never
too tight around the hips.
Measure
ing
bust measure.
it is
proves
it is
around
easy to
hips, leav-
fit
in a little,
not easily altered.
much
too large a tiny fold
be taken in center of pattern, again
The Dress You Wear
remembering the
fold
19
takes out twice
its
width and, as you are always using one-half
same amount
of pattern, the
will
come out
of the opposite gore for the other side
of
skirt.
If
the
as
your pattern
amount
many
is
in half,
too small around divide
then divide the half into
parts as you have gores, adding to
each gore the required amount to
For example:
rect size.
A
make
skirt of
cor-
seven
gores would have three gores on each side
and the front gore with seam
Therefore,
if
skirt
in center back.
was seven inches too small
there would be one inch to add to each gore
in
width adding one-half inch on each side
of pattern.
This
is
given as an example of
extreme case to make the alteration
plain.
In adding to or taking from the width of
pattern
make
the same alteration the
full
length of pattern to keep the outline and
shape of skirt correct.
should be
If
made
Any other alterations
in the fitting of the garment.
length of back and hip seem too long
The Dress You Wear
20
after skirt is correct
by
should be lifted a
at the
is
fitted
back.
and a
little
little
front measure,
back when
it
skirt
taken from the top in
This will prevent a
flat
look in the
back and also a pouching out at the bottom
in front.
.
Questions
i.
How
should the nap of the material run
on woolen material ?
2.
on
How
should the nap of the material run
materials such as velvet and plushes ?
silk
How should the nap of the material run on
3.
panne velvet?
Give suggestions as to finding right side of
4.
materials.
5.
What
able for
6.
colors
7.
materials would you suggest suitslender figures?
tall,
What
care should be taken in selecting
?
What
materials are
draped gowns?
What
suitable
for tailored
for
fancy-
gowns and
suits ?
8
9.
10.
How do we prepare material before cutting
Bust?
back ?
11.
taken?
12.
?
Describe method of shrinking cloth.
Where should the neck measure be taken ?
Waist?
Chest?
Front?
Width
of
Underarm ?
What two
Where
What
is
is
sleeve
the
the
measures
should be
hand measure taken?
first
ing a pattern?
21
step required in study-
.
The Dress You Wear
22
13.
About what
difference
is
there between
the normal and high waistline?
how to test the entire pattern.
should you change a pattern for
For round shoulders ? For flat bust ?
14.
Describe
15.
How
full
bust ?
For
flat
16.
shoulders?
What
causes a sleeve to pull on the back
seam from the elbow up?
How would you test a
17.
18.
Describe
how
sleeve pattern?
to pin a sleeve in the arm-
hole.
How do we take skirt measures?
How would you shorten a skirt pattern?
2
How would you lengthen a skirt pattern ?
22.
How would you make a pattern smaller
How larger
around hips
19.
20.
1
?
?
23.
Give example of enlarging a seven-gored
skirt.
24.
Is it
necessary to
make
alterations full
length of skirt ?
How would you correct a
back and hips are too long?
25.
of
skirt
if
length
CHAPTER
II
Equipment
It
is
as necessary that a
home dressmaker
has the proper tools to work with as a carpenter.
Without them one
ous ways and
is
handicapped
in vari-
liable to find the
work a
is
discouraging task.
In these days of advancement and progress,
even the
that there
is
learning
a limit to endurance, and
home
and duties should be made a pleasure and
life
all
is
Home woman
work done
in a business-like
This, one of the
home
studies
way.
and economic
feature of the housewife's accomplishments,
sewing, has been
much
of a task because of
lack of knowledge on the subject, also lack of
equipment.
This sewing work-shop
23
is
as necessary to
The Dress You Wear
24
the worker as the kitchen
is
to the cook.
Surgeons, doctors, and nurses make equipment
the
consideration.
first
of old dull shears
Yet we take a pair
and cut uneven edges
in
good material and get along as best we can,
which
is all
wrong.
Let us have everything necessary to turn
out good work in our
parlors, so that our
work
home dressmaking
will
not look home-
made.
Dress form.
Skirt guage.
Shears (9 or 10 inches long).
of needles (No. 7).
Paper
Basting cotton (No. 60).
Skirt
tailors'
Tape
rule 48 inches long, bought at a
supply house.
line.
Pins, with
Emery
good points.
bag.
Tracing wheel.
Tailors' chalk.
Beeswax.
.
The Dress You Wear
Tailors' punch,
25
bought at hardware store or
supply house (for buttonholes).
Tailors' cushions (2 sizes).
tailors'
Press cloth.
Sponge.
Whisk broom.
Two
pressing irons
(12
pounds and 6
pounds)
Sewing table.
Sewing machine.
Sewing room to be light and
airy.
Dress Form
To make
that
is
in
a dress form satisfactory, one
form and
figure like yourself,
one
that you can really put your dress on and see
the lines and general effect just as you look,
is
not expensive.
You
only need to buy a
cheap form and need not pay over four
dollars
and
fifty
cents or five
dollars for
same.
It
should be at least one size smaller than
your own bust measure for
this reason
:
Your
The Dress You Wear
26
form and
this
form
will
bust on a dress form
is
not be just alike (the
usually large).
A lining should be made of drilling or some
The
material that will not stretch.
lining
should be as long as the body of the form and
should be cut in at least six sections and fitted
very snug.
hips
If it
make
just far
wrinkles at waistline over
a small crosswise fold extending
enough and
just
out wrinkles and stitch
deep enough to take
It
flat.
should
fit
Pad form wherever necessary
like a glove.
with wadding, such as tailors use in coats, to
make
it fit
smooth and be
like
your own
natural form.
This
time and a careful ad-
will require
justment and re-adjusting as you
get
correct by
it
lining
If
is filled
just putting
until
out.
hips are rather large,
abdomen
is
round,
out.
fill
will not
wadding on
large,
fill
if
them out;
if
shoulders are
made a complete dupliwhen finished. Then, in
This form can be
cate of yourself
out;
fill
The Dress You Wear
27
making a gown, you may be able
to see the
effect
and where change
in line or style
be especially beneficial to your
Skirts
may be hung and
you have form
etc.,
figure.
length taken
Measure
finished.
would
when
bust, hips,
and compare with your measures.
Put
a small tape around waist to get correct waist-
same as
line the
yourself.
to get correct waistline on
Leave the tape there
for future use
in fitting, etc.
Pinning Seams
All
before Basting
seams should be pinned before basting
to avoid having one side fulled in the basting.
Without pinning, the
toward you
side of the
will ease in
and cause
When fitting in waists and
first,
seam held
trouble.
coats pin waistline
then pin from waistline to shoulder and
from waistline to bottom of garment.
In
skirts lay
both edges to be basted smoothly
on work
table, edges even.
While
in this
position pin edges about three inches apart,
The Dress You Wear
28
placing pins, the heads toward the outer edge
of seams, the points into materials.
done before basting and
If this is carefully
the stitching
will
is
straight, a careful pressing
The seam
complete a perfect seam.
should look as straight as
glued.
if
Material Required for a Garment
First, the design
should be carefully con-
sidered which should be controlled
we need
this special
garment
for street, special dress, or for
Whether
for.
all
by what
around wear.
Then, the money we can afford to put in
is
it,
another consideration.
Never dress beyond your means.
If care-
fully planned and bought one's wardrobe
need not cost so much.
To be
economical do not buy conspicuous
material or use extreme styles.
One
rial
or
two garments a year
of
good mate-
and well made means better dressed than
five or six
cheap half -made
affairs.
The Dress You Wear
When you have
is
29
decided what your design
to be procure your pattern, read
instructions, pin pattern up, try
make
it
the
all
on and
necessary alterations.
do not buy
Select material but
until
you
how much you will need, then
neither buy too much nor too little.
find out just
you
will
Although
it is
buy a
wise to
enough and have some
little
more than
left to alter
your dress
later on.
To determine how much
material
needed measure a space on the
work
table
terial
you are
of
pattern
floor
is
or
with chalk the width of ma-
on
to use, then place all pieces
this.
Be
sure to notice
if
the material has a nap to lay pattern on
so
nap runs
all
one way, as we have already
learned the importance
lesson,
then buy material.
or shrink
it
of,
in
a previous
Have it shrunken
yourself as taught in previous
lesson.
In wool goods never pay any attention to
the salesman who says
it
has been sponged and
"
;
The Dress You Wear
30
shrunken, as you are liable to meet with
much trouble by so
A
doing.
always shrinks his material no
tailor
matter what any one says.
Now
you are
ready to proceed with cutting and making
Never
your garment.
rush.
A student of a fine, high-class tailor in New
York, where no suit or dress was made in his
establishment for less than one hundred dol-
was trying to hurry. She was little more
than a child and this had been her ambition
lars,
to
make
She had
beautiful tailored
watched the
tailors
hands
and
flew,
suits.
windows and
work and how
of course she
must do the same.
tailor
gowns and
often looked in the
fast their
thought she
But the kind-faced
old
saw how nervously she was trying to
hurry and realized what a mistake she was
making.
lady,
we
He came
and
said: "Little
how well our work
how much we can do.
try here to see
can be done; not
Be master
first,
to her
of
your work, sure of yourself
then practice speed.
The Dress You Wear
The beauty of
rial
is
31
the garment, whether mate-
expensive or cheap,
is
in the
con-
struction.
Fitting a Skirt
When
front
a skirt
is
and center
ready to
of
fit,
pin center of
back where they belong
on the person.
gored skirt see that seams are straight
If
from hip
line to waistline.
If
in seams, be careful to pin the
sides
If
will
one hip is larger than the other, noticeably
not look crooked.
skirt is being fitted.
fit
seams on both
and the same seams.
pad the small hip a
so,
too large pin
easily
band or
little
A
skirt should
enough to be eased
belting,
it
so the person
Pin in padding while
will
always
slightly into the
hang much more
gracefully.
If
person
necessary to
is
very slender
lift
skirt in
it is
sometimes
back and
slightly
to the sides to prevent the skirt from swing-
The Dress You Wear
32
ing front
and pouching out or having a saggy
look in the back.
Remove
skirt,
make
all
necessary changes, pin and baste to band or
belting,
and try on again.
If correct
the length
may be taken.
try to get the length until the fitting
plete
and
skirt to position
on band.
Never
is
com-
Questions
In home dressmaking
1.
have proper equipment ?
In what
2.
assist
3.
way
is
it
necessary to
does the proper equipment
?
Name
the articles required in the
home
dressmaking equipment.
What kind of a dress form would you sug4.
gest buying?
Explain how to pad a dress form to fit the
5.
person.
6.
what
If
is
the fitted cover wrinkles at the hip,
the remedy?
7.
How
8.
Is it necessary to pin
9.
do you mark the waistline?
seams before basting?
In fitting waists and coats where should
you begin
to pin?
10.
Describe
11.
In
how
selecting
to pin a skirt.
material
what should be
considered ?
12.
Would you prefer one or two good garments to many gaudy ones ?
economical?
can you determine the amount of
material needed?
Is it necessary to shrink goods?
15.
16.
Describe how to fit a skirt.
13.
Is conspicious material
14.
How
3
33
CHAPTER
III
Basting
All seams should be carefully pinned before
basting (see subject for pinning).
Long seams
in skirts should
be basted
fiat
BASTING
on
table, the
same as
for pinning.
If
you
prefer to hold material while basting, keep
straight.
Do
curve
any way
it
in
side held
not hold
as
towards you
it
by
over the finger or
so doing the curved
will
34
it
be eased
in,
even
The Dress You Wear
35
a careful pinning, and when finished
after
the seam will look as
if
one side was gath-
ered.
In princess dresses, long semi-fitted coats,
basques, and tight linings, after pinning as
taught in article on pinning, baste from waist-
up and from waistline down, and the
line
garment
will
Do
otherwise.
and never
not twist as
it is
liable to
do
not take stitches too long
pull basting too tight, as
it
has a
tendency to draw the whole seam.
To Prevent Twisting of Two-Piece
Sleeve
In basting a two-piece or coat sleeve, baste
inside
seam
first,
then lay on work table with
upper or larger section underneath
—smooth
About three inches from
top, fold
out
flat.
the upper section over to the under part of
sleeve just
where
it
comes naturally and
pin also about three inches from the bottom
;
fold
and
pin.
Continue pinning from both
ends of sleeve to within two and one-half
The Dress You Wear
36
gather whatever fullness
inches of elbow,
comes
in that space
sleeve;
Then
and
on the upper side
adjust the gathers, pin, and baste.
lay sleeve flat on table in
if
of
it
draws or
will
same position
not stay in correct
shape you have not made the
first
joining
correct.
Pay no
attention to whether the ends
come
out even in top or bottom of sleeve, but
join
back section to under section so as to
leave upper and under of sleeve
smooth while pinning
in
lie flat
place,
and
then the
sleeve will not twist.
Basting Velvets and Silks
Cotton thread leaves a mark when used
in basting silks
should use
and
velvets, therefore,
silk thread.
you
Clip bastings every
four or five inches, sometimes closer, as pulling a long basting in fine sheer material, especially silks,
make
is
liable to tear the
a bad mark.
goods or
The Dress You Wear
37
Bias or Diagonal Basting
This
is
used to baste the outside and lining
together where the lining
the outside a
little
is
eased
in,
leaving
tighter than the lining.
BIAS OR DIAGONAL BASTING
The
stitches are
to one
from three-fourths
of
an inch
and one-half inches long and from one
inch to
two inches apart.
Take
stitches
toward you and usually crosswise of goods
which leaves a diagonal thread between the
stitches.
shorter,
The
stitches
according
necessity of
it
to
may
be longer or
material
used
and
being held firmly to lining
while the finish of the garment
is
in progress.
The Dress You Wear
38
Padding
This stitch
is
coat collars. It
used by
is
The work
is
tailors
on
lapels
and
the same as diagonal or bias
basting only the stitch
half inch long
Stitch
is
not more than one-
and one-half inch apart.
done on the canvas side of the
garment and barely catching the material
of
the right side.
Running
A
running stitch
length,
is
Stitch
made by
small stitches.
With
taking evencareful prac-
RUNNING STITCH
tice it
can be done rapidly from which
derives
its
name.
Keep edges
of
it
seam even
The Dress You Wear
by pinning
39
sew an
seam putting needle in and out
of material, making space and stitch of even
(see subject of pinning),
even, straight
length.
Back
Stitch
In the back stitch, the under stitch
the length of the upper stitch.
is
twice
Bring needle
BACK STITCH
up through material a
stitch ahead, then set
needle one-half length of the under stitch
back
of
where the under
stitch
came
out, then
again bring needle up through material one
stitch
ahead and
set needle for
second stitch
The Dress You Wear
40
back to meet the
stitch is
first
upper
stitch.
used where a strong seam
is
This
required.
Combination Stitch
This
is
used in sewing by hand where a
firm running stitch
is
not strong enough and
every third or fourth of your running stitch
is
a back stitch.
Questions
1.
What
2.
How
should be done before basting?
should you baste long seams in a
skirt?
3.
Where should you begin pinning
in princess dresses,
the seams
long semi-fitted coats, and
tight linings?
4.
5.
6.
Should basting be pulled tight?
Describe how to baste
What kind of thread
a two-piece sleeve.
should be used in
basting silk or velvet?
7.
Describe the padding stitch.
8.
For what
9.
How
is
bias basting used?
did the running stitch derive
name?
10.
Describe the back stitch.
11.
Describe the combination stitch.
4i
its
CHAPTER
IV
Tacks
Tailors'
Tailors' tacks are valuable to tailors and
dressmakers in marking both sides
garment so they
may
be exactly
TAILORS
of
alike.
a
In
TACKS
putting in tucks or plaits, first-class work
cannot be done without them.
42
The
stitches
The Dress You Wear
43
should be taken through both thicknesses
them
marking
cloth
of
alike
on
both
sides.
To make
we use a double thread
Take two short stitches
the stitch
of basting cotton.
then leave a space a
longer than
little
required for the two short stitches.
is
In this
space leave a loop of the double thread two
inches
long.
stitches,
then
continue until
fles,
loop
all
finished.
to
as
described
marking
bands, pockets,
necessary
is
Then take two more
for
short
and
plaits,
so
ruf-
seams, or whatever
have
marking
done
it
is
Gently separate the edges of the
material by pulling apart the mark-stitching or tailors' tacks, clip thread, being careful
not to clip the goods, and separate the
sides.
Over-Handing
Use over-handing to sew two edges
gether, usually the selvage
is
used.
to-
The Dress You Wear
44
Take
stitches small
and
close together, over
to the
and over the seam, point needle
left.
OVERHANDING
Do
not draw thread too tight as
it
will cause
the seam to pucker.
When seam
is
opened
it
should
smooth with no ridge on wrong
1
Tailors
The
Fell Stitch
fell stitch is
— To
Sew
lie flat
and
side.
in
Lining
used to sew in linings in
coats
and wherever an edge should be held
close
and
made by
stitches are not to show.
This
is
bringing the threads up through the
lining at the very edge.
Then
in outside material as close to
comes
out of lining as
short
stitch
in material
it
place needle
where needle
can be placed.
Take
about one-eighth of an inch
but not
through to right
side.
The Dress You Wear
45
Again bring needle out through the edge of
lining, reset as before.
too tight as
the lining
is
it
Do
not draw thread
will cause little dents
where
caught.
Over-Casting
This stitch
used to keep raw edges from
Trim seam even and the width
raveling.
is
is
it
to be finished, take a slant stitch pointing
OVERCASTING
needle toward left shoulder.
soft
Loose- woven,
material will require a deeper stitch
than firm,
stitch
close- woven material.
may
An average
be about one-eighth of an inch
The Dress You Wear
46
deep and one- third of an inch apart.
Keep
depth of stitches and space even.
French Seam
Make
a narrow seam on the right side of
material as narrow as material will allow.
FRENCH SEAM
In
fine- woven, firm
material the seam
may
be narrower than in large thread, loose- woven
goods.
Trim
off all loose
threads or rough edges,
turn seam, crease in seam where stitching
is
done, baste deep enough to cover entirely the
first
seam and
stitch again.
This finish
be used on light-weight material.
may
The Dress You Wear
47
Hemming
Turn edge
to be
to one-fourth of
hem
of
desired.
as even width
hem.
to your
hemmed from
an inch, then turn width
It
should be even in width
and even
The
stitches
mean
success
stitches are taken
slant, pointing needle
On
one-eighth
toward the
on a
left.
point of needle take up two or three
threads of material, catching the edge of
hem
same time.
at
Cat-Stitch or Catch-Stitch
This
is
a cross-stitch used as a finish to raw
edge where material
finish
is
required.
running stitch
is
Take small
flat
;
smooth
stitch
like
cross-thread by working from
you, alternate stitches
to the
heavy and
first
to the right then
left.
Stitches should be in straight rows, one
row on edge to be covered, the other
off
the edge.
just
The Dress You Wear
48
Feather -Stitch
Feather or brier stitching
in place of
It
is
may
hemming
is
sometimes used
or to hold tucks in place.
be done in single or double stitch and
very pretty as a finishing.
To make
TOP
the feather-stitch have a knot in
— CAT-STITCH
end of thread.
material, bring
thumb
of left
BOTTOM
—FEATHER-STITCH
Bring needle up through
thread forward
and place
hand on thread, take
stitch
placing needle about one-fourth of an inch
to the right of where
through the material.
it
was brought up
Take
slanting stitch
about one-fourth inch long and bring needle
The Dress You Wear
49
up half-way between and one-fourth inch
it was placed at first, bring
from where
up
stitch
over
down by thumb)
first
to
thread
the
continue
then
the right,
is
may
slant
the
to
always work toward you.
stitches
(thread
Two
held
stitch
left
or
and
more
be taken the same slant and
very effective.
Fagoting
Fagoting
is
one of the prettiest stitches
used in dressmaking.
of lace, insertion,
folds.
Two
It is
used to join edges
narrow ribbon,
folds of satin or silk
silk or satin
may be joined
with fagoting and the top fold sewed on a
skirt as
The
ornamental trimming.
lace, fold, or
ribbon should be finished
and basted on paper the width apart
desired,
then insert the needle from the under side
of
each edge bringing
it
out over the thread,
as in the feather-stitch, giving a double twist
which makes
it
firm.
50
The Dress You Wear
The Dress You Wear
51
Buttonhole
A nice closing is an ornament to a garment
and good buttonholes help to make the successful closing.
The hem in which the buttonhole is to be
made should be not less than one inch wider
The
than the buttonhole to be worked.
straighter the edge of the buttonhole
the
more
successful
it
can be made.
is
cut,
Begin
at the upper right-hand side of buttonhole.
Stitches should be even distance apart
uniform depth.
and
The depth depends on the
firmness of the material; just deep enough
to hold firm
and not tear
out.
Stitches should be close
enough to keep
purled edge firm and tight which makes
it
strong and durable.
Mark top and bottom buttonhole.
the space between according to the
of buttons to be used.
and cut
straight,
Divide
number
Use buttonhole shears
even edge for buttonhole.
Bring needle up through starting point which
The Dress You Wear
52
is
the upper right-hand corner,
take
the
double thread extending from the eye of the
needle and wind around needle, pull needle
through and draw the thread down snug.
The
front end of
worked round
like
buttonhole should
be
an eyelet; the back end
should be finished with bar by taking three
or
more
stitches over each other at the
end
of
buttonhole.
Tailored Buttonhole
In
tailors'
buttonhole the stitch
is
made the
same as in the plain buttonhole in previous
lesson.
The
difference
is
in the preparation of but-
tonhole for working.
Determine the number
of buttons to
be
used, find the distance they are to be apart
and with the
line
tailors'
chalk
where each buttonhole
place a button on this
line
mark a
is
straight
to be worked,
and mark with the
chalk each side of the button to find the cor-
The Dress You Wear
rect length of buttonhole.
53
The buttonhole
should be one-sixteenth of an inch longer than
the width of but-
ton
the
allow
to
button to
through
slip
easily.
Baste through
all
thicknesses
on
materials
of
the
chalk line, use
small
stitches
to
hold material firm.
Stitch each side of
basting just far
enough
that
apart
when
tonhole
is
so
TAILORED BUTTONHOLE
the but-
cut on basting and chalk
working the stitch
will
line, in
be taken just over the
stitching.
Use buttonhole punch and punch round
hole in outer edge of buttonhole, then cut
with sharp shears the length marked for the
opening.
Use heavy
linen thread in needle,
54
The Dress You Wear
then twist and double thread which gives a
cord to work over.
Put knot
one stitch one-eighth of
in thread, take
an inch back
of
buttonhole, bring needle up at edge of buttonhole, hold this cord in place at
edge of but-
tonhole, hold in place with left
work over
after
it
all
work with
around.
silk twist is
hand and
Pull cord snug
complete.
needle through material and fasten.
Put
.
Questions
i
.
2.
For what are
tailors' tacks used ?
Describe the stitch used in making
tailors'
tacks.
3.
For what
4.
Describe the stitch.
5.
What
over-handing used?
is
stitch
used to
is
sew lining
in
coats ?
6.
Describe the stitch.
7.
What
stitch
used to keep raw edges from
is
raveling ?
8.
What
kind of material requires a deep
stitch.
9.
Describe
how
to
make
a French seam.
10.
Describe the hemming.
1 1
For what
12.
Describe
how
13.
is it
14.
For what
For what
15.
Describe
how
16.
What
17.
Describe
is
is
is
the cat-stitch used ?
to
make
the feather-stitch.
used ?
fagoting used ?
to fagot.
the use of the buttonhole?
how
to
also a tailored buttonhole.
55
make a
buttonhole,
CHAPTER V
Eyelets
Eyelets
are usually used where lacing
is
required for the closing of a garment.
Punch a hole with a bobkin, holding work
EYELETS
LOOPS
in left hand, overcast, taking stitches close
together to prevent the hole closing.
A
very pretty eyelet
is
made by
using the
buttonhole-stitch and drawing the purl to the
outer edge.
French Knots
The French knots
and
also used
are used as a decoration
on sheer material
56
in place of
The Dress You Wear
57
beading where beads seem too heavy or on
washable garments.
If
the French knot
made
beads are
nicely, while
drop
is
right
liable to
it
washes
break and
off.
Bring needle through to the right side of
goods, take a tiny back-stitch, wind thread
two, three, or four times around needle just
above the point and with thumb
hold the thread
Draw
terial.
which
is still
wound
of left
hand
needle close to
ma-
needle through the material,
in the back-stitch just taken.
Hold thread
to
form knot tight against
material while drawing the thread through.
Take another
close to
stitch of
two or three threads
knot and the knot
The number
of
will
threads
wash
nicely.
wound around
needle depend on the size of knot required.
Loops
Loops made of threads are sometimes
necessary in closing a dress of soft material
such as chiffon, lace, net,
etc.
The Dress You Wear
58
Make
a bar by taking two or three stitches
directly over each other
and the length
of the
loop desired.
Use buttonhole twist or coarse thread
and make buttonhole-stitch working over the
bar,
drawing purled edge to outer edge
Sewing on Buttons
I
wonder how many
of us
sew buttons on
correctly?
SEWING ON BUTTONS
Use
as coarse thread as the material of the
garment being made
coarser than
is
will allow,
used to
make
but always
the garment.
The Dress You Wear
Take two
59
or three stitches to fasten end
of thread, place button
and bringing needle
through one hole of button, lay across button
the button
a pin,
if
use a
match or something
is
small;
if
a large button,
as large, allow-
ing thread to pass over the pin or match.
After button
is
sewed on remove pin or match
and pull button away from garment as
as possible
far
and wind thread around under
button to form a shank, which allows the
buttonhole to close nicely under the button,
otherwise the buttonhole spreads and gets
out of shape.
Covering Molds
Cut the cover round and a
little
larger than
the button, but not large enough to quite
come together on the underside
or
it will
be
bunchy underneath.
Gather cover
all
around at the edge, place
button in center, draw up gathering string
and overhand together or nearly
The
stitches
so.
and open space may be cov-
The Dress You Wear
6o
ered by a small piece of silk
hemmed
under-
neath.
Smocking
The honeycomb
design
is
the one generally
used.
The
success of smocking depends on the
marking, being precisely the same distance
IMfM
nniJiriTir
I
pfi],
ill
ii
SMOCKING
apart both lengthwise and crosswise, and
as in all other stitches, the
perfect the stitches the
more even and
more
artistic is
our
finished work.
Nearly
all
fashion magazines
sell
patterns
The Dress You Wear
61
with the spaces accurately marked for smock-
A regular
ing.
is
desk ruler one foot in length
the most convenient for marking.
may
fourths of an inch apart.
fine the
It is
of
ment
It
smocking to be used
always wise to
some
make
depends on how
is
to be.
a small piece out
of the pieces left in cutting the gar-
as
smocking
you can
if
easily
change the
you wish, while
garment and change the
may
Dots
be made one-fourth, one-half, or three-
size
if
size of
you mark the
afterwards you
ruin the material.
Allow about four times the width of material
as smocking desired
when complete.
The Dress You Wear
62
marked
First baste
piece to be smocked,
taking a tiny stitch of not more than four
Have
threads in each dot.
a knot in thread
and break the thread at the end of each row
of dots,
When
leaving a long end not fastened.
basting
of thread
and
is
finished take all long ends
pull
up as
The marked smocking
Fashion
stitch
usually
in gathers.
will
decides
and what kind
Sometimes thread
form tucks.
what kind
of thread to
is
of
be used.
from
of different color
material used and French knots are often
used to ornament where plaits are fastened
together.
Hold material the
right side
bring needle up through
first
toward you,
dot at right-hand
top corner, fasten the next plait to this by
two
stitches
way
side
over
left directly
Put needle through material to
each other.
wrong
from right to
and take next
fastening the
dots farther
same
stitch in the
plaits together
down skipping every
begin again, skipping the
same
first
two
other dot,
dot at top for
The Dress You Wear
63
second row and use the second and third
plaits fastening together firmly skipping
every
other one as before, only opposite to those
fastened in
quired width
first
is
Continue until
plait.
re-
obtained.
Sewing on Beads
Beads are always more or
less
used to
decorate sheer, fancy gowns and blouses.
Materials
generally
used are
Georgette
crepe, net, voile, chiffon, marquisette,
light-weight cr&pe de chine
when
and
sufficiently
sheer to be able to trace the lines of the design
through
is
also used.
The pattern should be placed under the
Smooth out both pattern and
material.
material, baste together to hold
sewing beads on.
firm while
The thread should be
sometimes
color of material.
Purse
used as
heavier than sewing
it is
a
little
silk is
Sew beads on about the width
the
of
silk.
a bead
apart.
There are three methods: Beads
may
be
The Dress You Wear
64
strung
first
(placing
them
in a dish, thrust the
needle through them; you are sure to pick
up
and following the
several beads at a time)
outline of the design use the couching-stitch
and take a
between each bead; the
stitch
running-stitch
also
is
few
taking a
used,
threads of material between each bead.
The most
stitch
secure
method
is
to take a back-
and bring the needle point out the
tance of space between the beads,
slip
dis-
needle
through the next bead and take a tiny backagain
stitch
to
secure
the
bead and as
before bring the needle up through the
terial
the space
tinue until
all
thread tight as
between beads and con-
Do
are sewed on.
it
ma-
will
cause
all
not draw
your work to
pucker.
For small pieces such as ends
and
scarfs,
hat bands,
etc.,
of ribbons
embroidery hoops
are quite necessary.
French knots when made
in a small
knot
using the colored silks to represent the beads
on material where beads seem to be heavy,
The Dress You Wear
65
can scarcely be told from the beads and
launder nicely.
Tailors' Pockets
One
of the comforts
a tailored dress or coat
at present
and
and conveniences
is
in
the pocket, and just
we are allowed pockets
of all kinds
sizes.
We
two
will give in this lesson
styles
of
pockets which are always used.
The pockets with a lap, which is used in
coats. The lap is made first, lined, stitched,
and pressed, leaving the edge unfinished that
Have
stitches to the coat.
coat where pocket opening
place
is
marked on
to be,
which
is
about four inches from the waistline and a
little in
front of the
underarm seam usually
two or three inches.
size of coat
pocket.
This depends on the
and most convenient place
for the
Baste unfinished edges of lap to
upper side of mark for pocket with right side
of lap
lining
toward
coat, cut
one inch larger
all
two pieces
of coat
around than pocket
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66
is
Baste one to lower side of mark for
to be.
pocket, stitch pocket piece using one-eighth
of
an inch seam just the length of mark
pocket,
cut
for
Turn lower
wrong side, turn
pockets.
for
slit
piece of pocket through to
pocket lap down and seam on wrong side up,
baste, using small stitches to hold snug, press
and
stitch
on coat close to edge of seam above
pocket lap.
Turn pocket
piece (already stitched
turned through
of
seam
lowing
to
fill
it
slit
to
wrong
side)
and
over edge
at lower side of pocket opening, al-
to extend over edge of
space
left
seam enough
by turning seam
in lap up,
baste and stitch through from right side of
coat,
leaving long ends of thread.
stitching pull threads through to
and
tie.
After
wrong
side
Place the other pocket piece on the
seam already turned up on wrong
side, fell
firmly to seam, baste pocket together, stitch,
and
press.
Another pocket
and one-piece
is
used in coats and skirts
tailored dresses.
It
can be
The Dress You Wear
made
different
in
down,
straight
ways
—straight
crosswise,
67
up and
slanting
or
a
graceful curve, not quite as strong a curve
TAILORED POCKET NO,
as a half-moon
I
and higher at the front
of
pocket than the back.
Draw
pocket
line
is
with chalk whatever style the
to be.
Cut a piece
four and one-half inches wide.
of bias
If
about
pocket
is
curved cut bias piece five and one-half inches
The Dress You Wear
68
wide and long enough to extend one inch over
at each
end of mark for pocket.
Mark pocket line strong with tailors'
chalk,
TAILORED POCKET NO. 2
lay bias piece over
it
and
this will cause the chalk
slap with the hand,
mark
to
come
on the bias piece enough so you can
curve.
off
see the
Place again on line for pocket on coat,
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69
and baste the length the pocket is to be;
draw a chalk line crosswise at both ends of
pocket and stitch the bias using one-eighth
of
an inch seam on each
chalk
ing
line,
side.
Stitch just to
being careful to have each stitch-
come out exactly
opposite.
Leave long thread to draw through and
to
make ends
of stitching firm.
tie
It is still
better to back-stitch at the ends of pocket,
take three or four machine stitches then raise
presser foot, replace work, start again just
where you
started
without breaking
first
thread, stitch to other end of pocket, back
up
again three or four stitches, and stitch again
to the
end the second time which leaves the
corners of pockets strong, pull bastings, cut the
line for
pocket through the coat, turn facing
through to wrong side and seam back from
the opening on both sides of pocket.
Allow facing to form a cord on each side
pocket just enough of the loose facing to
the space
left
of
fill
by the seam but no more than
;
the eighth of an inch on each side as that
70
The Dress You Wear
was the width of seam.
Baste in position turn-
ing corners neatly, overhand edges in center
TAILORED POCKET NO. 3
together and press, cut pocket out of lining
the length and width desired and sew to
facing on long side, allow top of pocket to
lie
back toward top
of coat
and while
in this
position stitch through from the right side of
The Dress You Wear
the coat at edge of cord formed
Leave long ends
of thread at
71
by
facing.
each end of
pocket, pull through and tie or thread in
needle and fasten securely.
Turn down top piece of pocket on the lower
and stitch all around the edges,
piece, baste,
press pocket again
and work arrow-head
or
crow-foot at each end of pocket.
All outside pockets should be put in coat
before the lining goes
in.
Bound Buttonhole
The edges of a bound buttonhole are finished
the same as the pocket above, the only
ence
is
wide,
Fell
the facing
is
differ-
not more than two inches
and are turned under on wrong
down
side.
neatly.
Patch Pocket
Dame
sizes
Fashion uses patch pockets of
and kinds
for
all
ornamental purposes, as
well as useful ones.
These pockets should be very carefully
72
The Dress You Wear
made, edges cut and turned even and smooth,
stitching straight or the pocket will prove
anything but ornamental.
The top
Sometimes
in
hemmed, bound, or lined.
using two harmonious colors for
is
a gown, the pocket
may be
with the trimming material.
lined or
bound
Questions
Where
are eyelets used?
5.
how to make an eyelet.
For what are French knots used?
Describe how to make a French knot.
For what are loops used?
6.
Describe
how
to
7.
Describe
how
to sew on buttons.
2.
3.
4.
8.
9.
Describe
make
a loop.
Describe how to cover button molds.
Explain the marking and stitching
smocking.
Describe
10.
how
to
make a
tailors'
in
pocket
with a lap and one without a lap.
Describe the three ways of sewing on
11.
beads.
12.
How
should you
make
a bound button-
hole?
13.
Describe
how to make
73
a patch pocket.
CHAPTER
VI
Crow-Foot
The
crow-foot
is
ornamental as well as
useful in plain tailored gowns.
make a
end
of
It is
used to
corner of a pocket strong and at the
an inverted plait where it terminates at
the waistline in a coat or part
skirt; it is also
in various
way down
used as an ornamental
ways according
the
finish
to the prevailing
styles.
Make
a triangle the desired
garment with
tailors' chalk,
from point to point with a
the center.
Use rope
size
on the
drawing the
slight curve
line
toward
silk or twist.
Bring needle up through material at outer
point then take stitch at next point, taking
only two or three threads of material at
first
Take stitch toward you, turn work in
left hand outward from left to right which will
stitch.
74
The Dress You Wear
seem at
first
75
backwards, but which causes
the ends to cross and forms the crow-foot.
CROW-FOOT
Continue these same stitches taking them
very close together and each one a thread or
two longer
until the center is reached,
and
The Dress You Wear
76
you
will find
you have formed a pretty crow-
foot with a surprisingly pretty center.
Arrow-Head
The arrow-head
is
used for the same pur-
pose as the crow-foot.
It is just a
choice as to which one
diagram
is
made
matter of
The
preferred.
is
the same.
Bring needle up through at base of arrow-
head to the
of pocket
left of
where
it is
to cover the end
or plait or seam, take stitch as for
crow-foot at outer point of arrow-head, put
needle
down through
under material, bringing
point just inside the
right
at
it
point
out again at
first stitch.
stitch at outer point outside
and
and
left
Again take
just
under
the top stitch and two or three threads wider
across as for crow-foot.
Again put needle
down through material just inside last stitch
The stitch at outer point is taken
as before.
from right to left, then down through at
right point
which crosses the thread.
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77
Plackets
The
finish of a placket
depends on the
TAILORED PLACKET
fabric
from which
it is
made
also the style of
the garment.
A
well-made placket
is
of the
utmost im-
The Dress You Wear
78
The continuous
portance.
for material
such as thin
is
used
net,
lace,
placket
silks,
chiffon, etc.
Make
ing one
placket thirteen inches long, cut fac-
and one-half inches wide and twenty-
six inches
long on lengthwise of material.
Pin and baste the entire length of both
sides of placket,
seam on wrong
narrow seam
around placket.
ings, clip
all
seam
of placket
side.
Stitch
Pull bast-
clear to stitching at lower
The
where facing turns.
end
outer
edge should be turned in a seam width and
folded over to just cover the machine stitching of
seam
careful to
just
have
made and
fell
stitches invisible
down, being
on right
side.
Placket facing should extend about one-
wrong
side
turning right side back at top, allowing
left
half of
an inch.
Turn through
to
side to extend out for fly or underlap.
Close
with snap fasteners about one inch apart,
marking where fasteners are to be placed on
both sides of facing before beginning to sew
them
on.
The Dress You Wear
79
This should be very carefully done as any
marks may
variation in these
spoil the looks
Always press placket before
of the closing.
sewing on fasteners.
heavy
In
Cut one
placket.
make
material
strip of material
seam to wrong
tailored
one and
and thirteen and one-
one-half inches wide
half inches long,
the
sew to
left side of placket,
face with
side,
silk,
sewing
facing to outer edge of under facing or
turn back and
tailor's fell-stitch as
Cut
strip of silk
and
face
up
at
bottom
tailors'
apart.
side, press,
it lies
of placket,
for
pin placket
smoothly, turn wrong
right side facing to fly
but not to the
skirt.
hooks and eyes or snaps with
chalk on one side of placket one inch
Make marks
lay flat on
times.
one and one-half inches wide
and sew the
Mark
using
given in previous lesson.
back right
carefully so
side out
down over seam
fell
fly,
work
heavy, close placket,
table, slap
with hand several
This will cause the chalk marks to
mark the
other side, leaving marks for hooks
The Dress You Wear
80
and eyes or snaps
directly
opposite each
other.
In thirteen inch placket you can place the
first
snap or hook and eye close to the bottom,
close tight
with pinchers or place blotter on
top after fastening this one or hooking
hit
with
iron.
hammer
lightly, letting it lie
This will close
and your placket
it
so
will still
it
on
it,
flat
will not unfasten
be long enough and
never tear out at the bottom.
Where hooks and eyes
are used they should
be covered where they are sewed on with
narrow
is
silk or bias
heavy
all
cut from
silk.
If
material
silk or light-weight wool facing
be made of the goods, cutting
fly
may
double
width, three inches, and right side facing one
and one-half
inches.
Cutting Bias
The
cutting of bias
is
so important
cannot be too careful, whether for
milliner's folds, or the uses previously
tioned.
we
ruffles,
men-
The Dress You Wear
If bias is
imperfect
unevenly cut our work must be
when
finish begins
81
finished.
This
why "The
is
with the beginning."
CUTTING BIAS
The
rial
selection of suitable design
and mate-
with nap running correctly, together with
correct cutting in every particular
worked
stitches all unite in
cessful,
smart garment.
and nicely
making the
suc-
In cutting the bias unfold material, place
smoothly on cutting
table, use a
yard stick or
The Dress You Wear
82
better
still
tailors' skirt rule
a
which
is
forty-
made of good, hard
The yard sticks
edge.
eight inches long and
is
wood with straight
given away for advertising are seldom straight
enough to cut by.
With
skirt rule
mark five inches from right-
hand corner on selvage edge, also five inches
from same corner on cut edge with tailors'
chalk or pencil.
Draw
line across material
Mark
connecting these marks.
this line the
width
again from
of bias desired
tinue until sufficient bias
and con-
is cut.
Shirring Bias Bands
This
is
very pretty trimming that
Fashion frequently favors and
sorry to see
Cut
more.
bias
it
two and one-half inches wide
Turn under
a
Dame
are never
return.
ruffle,
or
one-half inch on each
side and shirr over cord.
full as
we
which
space to be covered.
is
Gather about as
one and one-half the
Gathered bands are
The Dress You Wear
83
sometimes put on in different designs similar
to the illustration shown here.
SHIRRING BIAS BANDS
Bands and Straps
Trimming bands and straps of many kinds,
both crosswise and bias of various widths
are used
by our fashion
designers at different
times for ornamental purposes.
Bands
are usually used on tailored skirts
and coats
suited
to
as they retain the plain simplicity
the
garment.
They
are
made
The Dress You Wear
84
usually from one inch to five inches in width.
The wider
are used only on skirts
be cut the shape of the
and should
skirt.
Pin gores of skirt pattern together, lay
BIAS FOLD NO.
flat
on cutting
table,
I
measure up even
tance from the bottom of the skirt and
every four or five inches
the
band
is
dis-
mark
around where
all
Connect these
to be applied.
marks, then mark again above this line the
width
under
of
band,
connecting
marks.
Slip
skirt pattern a plain piece of paper,
trace lines
through on
pattern, cut on traced
to
lines
paper,
remove
and you have
a correct pattern for a perfect fitting band.
The Dress You Wear
Lay
85
center front of pattern on fold of
material
when
cutting.
Straps of wool material up to three inches
wide finished
may be
edges are turned in
place
cut on true bias.
if
the skirt
After
circular,
is
band on padded pressboard, dampen
wet sponge on wrong side, then
lightly with
with hot iron stretch one edge a
laying bias
and press
band
dry.
Bias facing
in circular position
It will retain
when used
for
or at back of neck in waists
little
by
on board
the shape.
bottom
may
of skirt
be shaped
the same way.
In
medium weight
goods, bands are usu-
with cambric or crinoline to give
ally lined
firmness.
Material such as taffeta, satin,
etc.,
may
be
cut double the width, folding both edges at
the top or
if
one wishes to economize they
may be lined as well.
When bands are stitched
stitch the
for
on both edges,
same direction on both
sides of fold,
no matter how firm they are basted
if
The Dress You Wear
86
stitched to the right on upper edge, then in
opposite
chine
direction
on lower edge, the ma-
crowds the band enough to make
numerous
little
wrinkles that
may
press out
but they come back.
THE MATERIAL IN THE ORIGINAL MODEL FOR THIS
FOLD WAS BIAS, SAME AS IN FOLD I
The beauty
and
in all strap
fold
trimming
depends on even width of fold or strap,
straight edges,
and
straight stitching.
Milliners' Folds
Milliners' folds are very
nicely
made.
ornamental when
The Dress You Wear
The width
is
87
determined by the use made
A pretty medium
of the fold.
width
is
made by
turning the
top edge one-half
to
three-
fourths of an inch, then turn
lower edge to one-eighth of
an inch of the top.
This must be straight and
and perfectly smooth
even,
when
finished.
\
Other wide folds for
etc.,
skirts,
can be made the same
way by
cutting bias the de-
sired
width and the lower edge
may
be turned even with the
top.
For wide
inches,
skirt
folds, three or four
when made
of silk for
trimming, fold through
center, turn
both raw edges
together and stitch one-eighth
inch from top edge.
.
Questions
1
For what
2.
What
3.
4.
may
the crow-foot be used ?
shape?
Describe how to make an arrow-head.
Upon what does the finish of a placket
is its
depend?
5.
How long
6.
Suggest some fitting places to use bias.
should a placket be ?
8.
Explain how to cut bias strips.
Describe shirring bias bands.
9.
For what are bands and straps used?
7.
10.
Explain
how
to press a bias
band
to
skirt or neck.
n.
Describe
how
to
make
88
milliners' folds.
fit
CHAPTER
VII
Couching
This
is
an over-stitch used to hold cor-
any
silk
or cord used to follow an outline in
em-
onation
braid,
rattail
braid,
or
broidery.
The
stitches should not
be farther apart
than one-fourth inch, close enough to hold
the threads or cords from springing out be-
tween them.
Several threads of contrasting colors
be used with pleasing
effect
twisted slightly in laying
When
it
may
but should be
on the
outline.
joining or starting the braid or
silk,
punch a hole through the material and fasten
in place.
To press when finished turn right side
down on well-padded pressboard and press
slowly with moderately hot iron.
89
90
The Dress You Wear
91
Covering Cord
In covering cord for ornamental purposes
use a good sizable cord, say one-half to threefourths of an inch as the cord does not appear
when covered
as large
Soft wool
weight
is
may
desired.
also
as before.
be used
if
lightness of
Cut material on true bias
one inch to one and a half inches wide, this
depends on the
size of
cord to be covered.
Place cord in center of bias strip on right side
of material tight
around cord and take a
needle's length of fine running-stitches.
This
determines the width of material required to
cover the cord.
Draw
cord out of material, then baste the
length of strip keeping the same width of
material as was used to cover the cord at the
beginning.
Use small
basting-stitch, stitch
on
machine to make firm, being careful not to get
the casing too large or too small
best to
make
a small piece
first
(it is
always
before begin-
ning the trimming piece), pull basting, trim
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92
COVERING CORD
seam
to an even width, being careful not to
cut so close that where cord
tear out.
is
put in
it
will
Use tape needle and wind and sew
The Dress You Wear
93
with strong thread to the end of the tape
needle as the cord
too large to go in the
is
eye of the needle.
Sew
made
the
to
edge of seam in casing just
the
inches between
is
done.
in the edge of the
from raw edge
at
and end
needle
where the sewing
clear
allowing
cord,
side of
least
of
Take
six
casing
stitches
machine stitching
seam and sew very
firm.
Turn tape needle back and
insert in the
end
of casing, the casing will turn right side out
over the cord as you continue to run needle
in
through casing.
Shirring over Cord
Material should be marked where cord
to be placed either
by
is
tracing, tailors' chalk,
or mark-stitch (never use tracing wheel on
silk),
place cord on
directly
With
wrong
side of material
under marking.
left
hand hold material
tight
around
94
The Dress You Wear
cord and sew
by hand using a
fine
running-
SHIRRING OVER CORD
Hold cord firmly in left hand and
with right hand push material back on cord
stitch.
The Dress You Wear
95
Do
until desired fullness is obtained.
not
draw up running-stitch.
In shirring yokes or waists or skirts a number of rows of cord
may be used.
Marking for Hooks and Eyes
When
sewing on hooks and eyes, or snap
fasteners, place
Place right
and
them about one inch
left sides of
right side outside.
and bottom,
Lay
of
flat
upper
They should be even top
also at waistline.
on work
piece,
same time with
done they
apart.
garment together
will
table, turn
back the edge
and mark both pieces
tailors' chalk.
If
at the
accurately
be precisely opposite and when
fasteners are on, the closing will be
smooth
and even.
Round
eyes should extend out about one-
eighth of an inch.
Hooks should
from the edge one-eighth
placket or closing that
is
of
set
back
an inch, for a
just to meet.
The Dress You Wear
96
Circular Yokes
Circular yokes are occasionally very fashionable.
A
yoke should be cut and
stock collar
and
is
to be
worn
it
and
fitted;
also should
if
be cut
some cheap material, such as
fitted in
lining cambric.
From
the fitted yoke cut a paper yoke and
stock and baste together.
These yokes and
bias folds,
Bias folds or lace
of
made
narrow
may be basted on
one-half inch apart
the yoke
collars are
two kinds
of lace,
lace,
etc.
the paper
and fagoted together, or
may be made
of net
and
lace medal-
lions appliqued on.
Net, hand embroidered,
To make
kinds
is
also pretty.
the narrow lace yoke of two
of lace,
Valenciennes and cluny, in
al-
ternate rows, begin at the bottom of collar
where
it
joins
to top, then
the yoke, baste from there
outer edge of yoke allowing
the edges to overlap just enough to hold.
The Dress You Wear
Stitch through paper, press,
and
97
tear paper
away.
Tucking Circular Skirt
Tucks
sometimes a
in skirts are
task, especially in circular skirts
difficult
where the
lower part of the material used in tuck
fuller
is
than the upper?
Before the bottom can be finished the
placket should be made,
and the
skirt should
all
seams
finished,
be finished with band or
belting at the top.
Tucks require twice
their length.
Find out the inches necessary for the
quired
number
carefully or
full
be used, pin very
mark and baste the
in one place at
the
of tucks to
amount
re-
least half-way
material
up the
all
skirt
to be used in tucks to get
it
out of the way.
Put
skirt on, turn
up even around the bot-
tom, length of finished
Baste
all
skirt.
around bottom where the
skirt
The Dress You Wear
98
turns for hem, then find the shortest place in
material
If
left at
bottom
for the
hem.
tucks are to graduate, being larger at
TUCKING CIRCULAR SKIRTS
the bottom and decrease in size towards the
top, the
the
first
hem
tuck as there
tucks; that
one-half
should be as
is,
if
inches,
the
first
Mark
the
wider than
difference in the
tuck
is
four and
the next tuck three
one-half inches, then the
and one-half
is
much
hem
and
should be five
inches.
hem
all
around from where the
The Dress You Wear
skirt is
99
turned and basted at the bottom.
With tape measure
or a piece of cardboard
with notch cut in five and one-half inches
as a mark.
Use
tailors'
chalk to
mark
with.
can be bought in different colors and
It
brushes
rial
off,
Cut
leaving no trace.
off
mate-
above mark, leaving only one-fourth inch
to turn under for finish.
Turn under on chalk
silk
line
and gather, using
thread the shade of the material or any
thread the dress
is
to be
made with
so this
thread will not have to be removed.
fine running-stitch, stitches to
and
right
on edge
hem
of
as
Use
be very small,
you are
to stitch
through your gathering thread.
Draw up
this thread to adjust the fullness
and pin the hem
at top until
place and gathers
be for
hem
to
are
lie flat
it is
in
proper
where they should
and smooth,
baste,
and
press.
Let out the goods for tucks and measure,
first
the distance the tucks are to be apart,
then the width of tuck as the double material
The Dress You Wear
ioo
in tuck covers its
neath
it
so
width in material under-
add to the space between the tucks
the width of tuck.
If
tuck
is
four and one-half inches wide
space between tucks to be two inches,
first
notch
six
and one-half
be the lower part of the
inches,
first
mark
which
tuck.
and
will
Make
another notch four and one-half inches above
the six and one-half inch notch; this line
will
be the lower edge
of
tuck after tuck
is
finished.
One more notch
still
is
four and one-half inches
above the notch
what
Use running-stitch and
the top of the tuck.
as in the
it
for the center, or
to be lower edge of finished tuck, will be
hem, thread the color
need not be removed.
and
of material so
Use running-stitch
stitches very small.
Run
this thread all
around the
line six
and
one-half inches above the hem, turn on next
line
and baste the same
turned in bottom of
Lay
skirt
as
where hem
is
'
skirt.
on work-table, folding on basting
The Dress You Wear
that
is
to be lower edge of tuck, allowing top
part of skirt to
skirt.
The
full
fall
toward hem inside the
or larger part on top,
draw up gathering thread
to lay flat
if it
down
looks right;
and pin them, then
manner
if
now
so as to allow tuck
and smooth, pin
position, turn tuck
see
IOI
all
around to
to inspect
work and
not, re-adjust gathers
baste.
for balance of tucks
Proceed
and you
in like
will find
the result most charming and satisfactory.
Questions
1.
For what
2.
Describe "Covering Cord."
3.
4.
is
the couching-stitch used?
Describe "Shirring over Cord."
far apart should hooks and eyes or
How
fasteners be placed?
5.
Explain
how
to
mark
for
hooks and eyes
or fasteners.
6.
7.
8.
Explain how to make a circular yoke.
Give directions for tucking a circular skirt.
Explain how to finish the top of a skirt.
102
CHAPTER
VIII
Getting the Length of the Skirt
After a
skirt
has been properly finished at
the top, hooks and eyes on and can be put on
firmly as
ways
it
will
be worn, there are two good
to get the length.
One
on the
is
to use a yard stick, placing one end
floor as far
hangs away from
from the
the figure,
in front
you near the
side back, set
little
but keep
and front
same distance
a
feet as the skirt
farther from the feet,
side,
it
then as
your yard
and
still
the
a
stick
little
farther across the back.
This will be guaged by the fullness in the
skirt,
side
a circular skirt has
more
back and back, causing
fullness to the
it
to stand far-
away from the figure where the greater
amount of fullness is and also to be shorter the
ther
farther its stands away.
103
The Dress You Wear
104
If
the yard stick
from the
will
kept the same distance
is
feet all around, the
back of the
skirt
Allow
appear shorter than the front.
the yard stick to rest against the figure at the
Move
top and place a pin at that point.
the
yard stick two or three inches and pin again
at top, continue until
around the
Try
you have pinned
skirt.
to stand in a natural
while this
all
is
of the figure
and
erect position
movement
being done as every
changes the adjustment at the
bottom.
Remove
the skirt, place
and place yard
it
on work-table,
stick with small
the top and the same
number
numbers
of inches
at
above
the line of pins that were just put in at the
top of the
skirt, as
you wish your
skirt to
be shortened at the bottom, then mark with
tailors'
chalk at the bottom of the yard stick
every three inches
skirt
it is
up.
up on
all
this line
around the
skirt,
turn
and pin at edge where
turned, again at edge of material turned
The Dress You Wear
Try
skirt
on to see
if it is
just
105
even around
the bottom.
Always try
skirt is being
to keep one position while the
turned up as
it
will
not hang
even unless you do.
Another way to turn up a
skirt
even
is
to
use a skirt guage and chalk or turn and pin
all
around while the
guage around
inches apart.
skirt
skirt
is
on,
moving
skirt
and pinning about three
After the skirt
is
pinned up
even baste on lower edge, find the narrowest
place in material for hem, then measure at
this point, allowing
well under.
bottom
enough to turn raw edge
With tape
line
measure from
of skirt, this distance all
skirt, cut off all
around the
extra material above
mark
except enough to turn raw edge under.
Turn on chalk
line,
use running-stitch, take
small stitches, and run gathering thread
around at edge where the
chalk
turned on
Draw thread up where it is necesmake it fit the skirt, pin to place and
line.
sary to
baste.
skirt is
all
io6
The Dress You Wear
Press with
damp
press cloth and stitch.
After stitching press again on right side (see
subject of pressing).
Basting in a Sleeve
Run
gathering thread
sleeve, hold sleeve
all
abound top
of
toward you, place sleeve
BASTING IN A SLEEVE
;
The Dress You Wear
107
so that center of lowest point of sleeve
is
pinned to lowest point of armhole under arm
and center
of highest point of sleeve to center
of highest point of armhole.
Adjust gathers so that sleeve
in all
around but a
be eased
will
stronger at top than
little
remainder of sleeve.
If
sleeve
large
is
should be eased in
it
under arm and about half-way up the armhole,
then the balance gathered in across the
top and half-way
down
the sides.
It is
very
important that the sleeve be held toward you
while the
Try
work
sleeve
is
being done.
on before stitching as
times necessary to
make
and shoulders are not
it is
a change as
some-
all
arms
just alike.
In real round shoulders the top of the sleeve
has to set farther forward than in straight
shoulders.
When
fitting
elbow comes
the
in the
sleeve
see
that
right place, also
the
that
the center of top of sleeve at highest point
on top.
The Dress You Wear
108
The finish
Tailor's
Seams
of tailored
seams
differ
according
to style adopted.
Even, straight stitching
is
absolutely nec-
essary in tailoring which can be done with
practice than the student will at
less
first
suppose.
Concentration while you work,
is
of the
utmost importance.
Bound Open Welt
Allow one-half to three-fourths of an inch
seam, pin, baste, and stitch seam in regular
way.
Remove basting,
rial,
trim
off
one side of mate-
turn the wide side over the trimmed edge,
turning outer edge under the same as a hem,
keep
it
smooth and even.
Baste and stitch on outer edge.
is
for unlined garments.
the edges are
left
raw.
This finish
In lined garments
The Dress You Wear
Strap
109
Seam
Strap seams are frequently used in the finish
of unlined coats
made
of silk, linen, or wool.
STRAP SEAM
If
coat
is
unlined baste so raw edges of
seam come on
right side.
After stitching trim seams
off to
one-fourth
The Dress You Wear
no
of
Cut strap one and
an inch and press open.
wide,
inches
one-half
under,
either
fold
edges
leaving finished
strap
cross-wise or bias,
three-fourths of an inch wide,
baste,
and
Place center
press.
of strap over center of seam,
pin, baste,
and
stitch.
Lined coats are also finished
with straps, only when lined,
the raw edges of the seams are
on the wrong
side of the gar-
ment, and the straps
made,
pressed,
and center of strap over
seam on
right side of garment.
Suit
skirts
should have
in
tailor
work
the
same
finish
and trimming as the
coat.
Imitation Strap
Seam
This finish
garments.
is
especially
good
for unlined
The Dress You Wear
in
Mark-stitch seam as usual, lap seam placing mark-stitching directly over each other,
pin and baste on mark-stitching, turn edges
IMITATION STRAP SEAM
of
seam under and baste on both wrong and
right side of garment.
where
it is
Stitch
seam at edge
Be
particular to
turned under.
have turning even.
Press before stitching.
Questions
1.
What must
ting the length
be done to a skirt before get-
?
2.
Describe how to get the length of a skirt
with a yard stick.
Describe how to get the length of a skirt
3.
with a skirt gauge.
Describe how to pin and baste in a sleeve.
4.
How does the finish of tailored seams
5.
differ?
6.
How
can one become proficient in stitch-
ing?
7.
Is
the
stitching
of
tailored
seams im-
portant ?
8.
9.
10.
Describe a welt seam.
Describe a strap seam.
Describe an imitation strap seam.
112
CHAPTER IX
Slot
Allow
and
Seam
one and a half inch seam.
baste, press
Cut a piece
Pin
seam open.
of material
on the crosswise of
SLOT SEAM
goods three inches wide, lay
flat
underneath
with center of three-inch piece over center
of same.
8
113
U4
The Dress You Wear
Pin and baste one-fourth to one-half inch
from the edge, turn garment to right
mark one inch
side,
or the desired width of slot
seam from center and
stitch.
Press and pull bastings?
Occasionally slot seams have two stitchings
each side of the
slot.
Raw Edge Lap Seam
This seam
is
usually used on heavy matc-
RAW EDGE LAP SEAM
The Dress You Wear
115
those that do not ravel like
rial especially
melton, beaver, and other thick, firm cloth.
sometimes used for broadcloth.
It is
seams as
Mark-stitch
the
placing
usual
mark-stitchings
seam,
lap
directly
each other, pin, and baste seam.
over
Baste seam
again at outer edge and again on markstitching
on opposite
making space between
side of mark-stitching,
stitching one-half inch
or more.
As Fashion
a fickle goddess and changes
is
almost while our gowns are being made,
it is
necessary to note what style of seam finish
in use
know
and adopt
all
it.
This
is
why we
is
should
the different seam finishings and be
ready for our
This seam
fickle friend.
is
a
Fell
Seam
fell,
hemmed down
to hide
a raw edge.
Trim
off
stitching,
one edge of the seam close to the
turn under the other edge, press
The Dress You Wear
n6
with thumb, baste, and hem.
This
is
used
in
FELL SEAM
making up wash goods and other
rial,
including
light
mate-
silk.
Matching Flowers and Stripes
In flowers note
if
there
is
an up and down to
the flower; stems usually run down.
As
in plaids,
if
goods
is
wide and can be
folded see that the flowers are exactly
posite before cutting.
op-
The Dress You Wear
narrow material cut one-half
If
ment, then lay
117
of the gar-
cut pieces on material for
all
the other half of dress, right sides together,
being careful that flowers
direction
all
run the same
and come opposite the flowers
in the
pieces already cut.
Stripes should also be carefully cut.
comes
sure the center of a stripe
Be
in the center
back, also center front of the garment, and
stripes
on right and
left side
match
also
where
the joining comes in gored skirts.
It is well to cut front gore first,
then place
pattern of next gore and lay front gore by
to see
if
the stripes match.
pattern until. they do match.
like
manner
If not,
it
move
Continue in
until all gores are cut.
Matching Plaids
When
plaid material
double, be sure
plaid so that
it is
all
is
wide enough to cut
folded in the center of a
plaids
match
as they face
each other in the folded material.
If
necessary to cut single, after the right
The Dress You Wear
n8
side is cut, place all cut pieces
rial
right sides
In this
one
If
on the mate-
together, plaids matching.
way no two
pieces will ever be cut for
side.
a one-piece dress the crosswise plaids
should match at waistline in front, back, and
under arm.
In cutting a waist match plaids at bust
line.
In matching plaids at seams
it is
sometimes
necessary to place piece over one-half or
full
width of a plaid to have the stripes match
correctly.
More
material
is
always required in plaid,
figures, flowered or material
with nap, than
plaid material with no nap.
In plaids cut front of skirt or waist, then
lay cut pieces on material against pattern as
it is
lain
match.
on
If
for next gore
and
see
if
plaids
they do not, move pattern until
they do match.
Questions
1.
Describe a slot seam.
2.
What
materials are suitable for
raw edge
lap seams?
3.
Describe a raw edge lap seam.
4.
What good
learning
all
seam
reason would you suggest for
finishings?
5.
Describe a
6.
How should
fell
seam.
a skirt be pinned on the figure
in the first of the fitting ?
7.
In case hips are not alike
how may
the
defect be remedied?
8.
Should a
skirt
be a
trifle
larger
around at
the waistline than belting?
9.
How would you prevent a skirt from swing-
ing front ?
10.
When
are
you ready to get the correct
length of a skirt?
11.
Describe
how
to
match
flowers
stripes in cutting a garment.
12.
Describe
how
to
match
119
plaids.
and
CHAPTER X
Cutting a Garment so as Not
for
Always
to
Have Two Pieces
One Side
cut with right side of material
facing each other.
If
material
is
cut single, cut
lay
narrow and
all
it is
necessary to
the pieces for one side, then
them on material
right sides together
and
cut for the other side.
This will always give you right and
side of all pieces cut,
which
is
left
absolutely
necessary or both sleeves would be for one
arm and the whole
dress for one side.
Length of Skirt for Girls at Different Ages
This
is
quite a problem to the mother and
also to the girls themselves.
here will vary in older
girls
The
rule given
from thirteen
years of age, according to their growth and
development.
120
The Dress You Wear
From
three to five years the dress should
just cover the knee.
growth
121
may
The
child of average
continue this length until eleven
or twelve years old, then the dress should be
two inches
At
she
longer.
fourteen,
may
still
if
she
is
very small for her age,
wear the same length but
if
well
developed the skirt should just cover the
top of the calf or largest part of the leg in
the back.
If
unusually
tall
the skirt
may
be an inch or two longer.
At
fifteen
it
should be two inches longer,
and from sixteen to eighteen the
skirt should
be to the top of the shoe, unless the prevailing
fashion determines the length of dresses to be
as short as they are at present;
may
wear whatever length
viding
it
is
is
if
so,
she
the style, pro-
becoming and her mother
is
willing.
Acid Test for Cloth
To
test silk boil the
same
in five per cent
solution of caustic potash for fifteen minutes.
The Dress You Wear
122
If
the silk
tically
like
is
pure the fabric will be prac-
destroyed leaving but a small residue
paper ashes,
If
there
is
cotton in
it,
the cotton will remain.
Another excellent
test is to
remove the
threads which form the warp and the woof.
Keep
these separately and test
them
hydrochloric or sulphuric acid.
pure
If
in strong
they are
the threads will dissolve within two
silk
minutes.
If
there
is
either wool or cotton in the fabric
the threads will remain unaffected.
Pure woolens are adulterated even more
than
silk
because they are in greater de-
mand, and
also because they are quite easy
to imitate.
Many
a yard of cloth sold as "pure wool"
contains from thirty to sixty per cent cotton.
Blankets sold as "half wool" have frequently
been found to contain only ten per cent of
pure wool.
There are machines to-day which cleverly
wrap wool around cotton thread and the
The Dress You Wear
finished
being
123
product has every appearance of
''all
wool."
Another method
ing cotton cloth
threads upon
its
of adulteration is
by tak-
and " felting" short woolen
surface
by means
of heat,
moisture, and pressure.
A
purchaser
may
be fully convinced from
appearance and feeling of cloth that
wool, but the only safe
samples and make
tests.
Immerse the samples
oil
of vitriol for
it is all
method is to take home
of so-called
wool in
about two minutes.
This
destroy the cotton but the wool will
will
not be affected.
Another
fifty
test is to
moisten a sample with
This
per cent nitric acid.
wool yellow but the cotton
Use the same
color.
do
for woolens.
linen
it
will
If
Imitation
of printing
will
is
turn the
retain
tests for linens as
the sample
not be affected by
but any cotton that
will
in
it
will
oil
is
its
you
genuine
of vitriol,
be destroyed.
damask is made to-day by means
upon the surface with a sort of
124
The Dress You Wear
transparent mucilage the designs.
By
im-
mersing a sample in hot boiling water and
allowing
it
to boil several minutes the design
will disappear.
Questions
1.
How
should you fold material in cutting
so both pieces of garment will not be cut for one
side?
2.
In case material is too narrow to fold what
would you suggest to prevent cutting two pieces
for one side?
What length is suitable for girls from three
3.
to five years to wear their skirts ?
Should all girls of thirteen years of age
4.
wear skirts the same length ?
5.
a
Who
is
best fitted to decide the length of
girl's skirt?
6.
What
girls of
7.
8.
is
the usual length approved of for
fourteen?
Suggest an acid test for silk.
Suggest ways that wool may be adulter-
ated.
9.
10.
How may we test wool
How may we test linen?
?
125
CHAPTER XI
Pressing
Pressing
is
not ironing.
In pressing after
sponging always press with the threads of
material lengthwise, this helps to keep material
smooth and
straight, in
good shape
for
cutting.
All outside seams should be pressed before
stitching, such as plaits in skirts,
hems, fac-
ings, cuffs, collars, etc.
It will
it is
be very noticeable how much easier
to stitch.
After stitching press again over the stitching,
otherwise there will be an unfinished
look where stitching
is
This pressing
done.
over the stitching should be done on the right
side,
using press cloth which should be a
piece of
heavy unbleached muslin,
one yard with no dressing on
126
it.
If
at least
you
find,
The Dress You Wear
you have bought
after
have
sticks to the iron,
it
it,
it
gets
127
and
stiff
laundered to take
out the dressing, then your press cloth
ready
for use.
over a
damp
Nearly
all
pressing
is
is
done
press cloth.
In some cases, with such material as broadcloth,
is
two thicknesses
of the
dry press cloth
put next the material, then the
cloth on top.
damp
press
This steams the material
stead of wetting
it
in-
and does not take the luster
off.
Too much
stress
importance of
A
pressing
should weigh at least twelve pounds;
iron
the weight
Do
and
cannot be applied to the
good pressing.
is
quite important.
not take hold of a seam ahead of iron
on
pull
stretch the
it
to straighten
seam
it
out or you will
in pressing.
Open the seam but allow material to remain
smooth
in a natural position.
In semi-fitted dresses and coats the
crosswise wrinkles that are apt to
come
little
in the
gores between the seams at waist line, can
The Dress You Wear
128
be removed by dampening the seam with a
wet sponge and stretch with a pressing iron
from two inches above to two inches below the
Do
waistline.
it
not have the iron too hot so
will scorch (try it
make
Do
on a piece
of material to
sure you will not burn your garment).
not
move
the iron
all
the time as in
ironing.
Be
sure
it
will
not burn, then
let it rest
you think the material is pressed dry
underneath. Always press material until
until
thoroughly dry, then
move
iron one length
ahead.
To Take Shine
off
Worn Garments,
or
from
Pressing
To remove
the shine caused
by
pressing
the following suggestions will prove helpful.
When
the garment
oughly pressed there
is
finished
is liable
and thor-
to be a gloss or
shine on places where heavy pressing
This
may
brushing.
be removed
is
done.
by steaming and
The Dress You Wear
Dip one end
dry as
of
129
of press cloth in water, using
you can wring
it;
place one thickness
dry sponge cloth over the material, then
damp cloth, having the pressing iron very
Move quickly back and forth over the
hot.
the
wet muslin two or three times, remove, have
whisk broom ready, and while steaming brush
briskly
and you will
find the
mark
of pressing
gone.
In serge and other hard twill material that
become shiny with wear,
process does not remove
it
if
the
steaming
satisfactory, use
a fine sandpaper and ruff the material a
This shine
caused by
is
material,
which
worn
smooth.
off
is
all fiber
nap, being pressed
little.
ends of
down
or
Finishing Top of Skirt
After the skirt
the seams
by
is
fitted
and stitched
finish
binding, notching, or overcast-
ing.
Put upper and under facing on placket as
taught in subject on plackets, press, and
The Dress You Wear
130
inspect
7
}
our work to be sure
it is
correctly
done.
Now we
band
are ready to put the skirt on the
or belt.
into the
band
A skirt should always be eased
or belting, as
natural fitting skirt.
I
it
gives an easy
do not mean a gath-
ered skirt but the skirt should be a
larger than the
onto
it,
band
little
or belting so as to ease
the belting a
little
tighter than the
skirt.
If
the belting
is
used
it
should be
made
just the size of the waist unless very wide,
like three inches,
inch larger and
then
it
should be about one
little darts,
about four or
five
in the bottom
Take up as small a seam as can be'
by machine and graduate to a point about one
on a side, should be taken
of the
belting.
and one-half inches from the edge.
makes the
keeps
it
belting large
from slipping too
line at the
bottom.
belt with a
hem.
enough to
lap.
Do
This
enough at top and
far
below the waist-
Finish the ends of the
not have belting large
The Dress You Wear
131
Put hooks and eyes on allowing round eyes
to extend out one-eighth inch
set
and hooks to
back from the edge the same distance.
This
will
The
bring the belting just to meet but
Close and pin placket.
not lap.
right side of the belting should
the hooks on, the
plackets
left side
the eyes, as
from right to
close
left.
placket closed and pinned to place
Place belting so the
come
left side
have
all
Leave
full length.
with eyes on
will
to the edge or extension of under side of
placket.
Find center of front and back of
center of front
skirt, also
and back of belting, pin centers
together, allowing the skirt to extend onehalf inch
above the
front to center
the skirt
if it
fit
belting.
back easing
if it
in front while
pins at back
and
in a little to
have
Fit the skirt again to see
nicely.
hangs well and
bottom
Pin from center
lift
swings front at the
on the figure remove
the skirt a
little
to
correct the trouble.
The
lifting of
the skirt
may make
it
a
little
The Dress You Wear
132
too large at waistline and you
to take
it
The
in at the top again.
one-half inch of material left at the
may
top of skirt
wrong
may be obliged
side
be turned over belting to
and basted down.
Stitch skirt
through the belting and material from right
Finish raw edge
by
frayed edges even width
all
side close to the edge.
trimming
off
around.
If
and
material
is
light weight, turn
cat-stitch or
fell.
If
heavy
under edge
it
should be
covered with a piece of bias in cotton or
and edges
felled to belting.
should extend beyond
side of placket
The
silk
bias piece
the belting on the right
where the
skirt laps.
.
Questions
1.
In pressing should
we move
the iron with
the crosswise or lengthwise thread?
2.
Should outside seams be pressed before
stitching?
3.
Is it
necessary to press again after stitch-
ing?
4.
On which
side should this last pressing be
done?
5.
What kind
of cloth
would you suggest
for
a "press cloth?"
6.
Give directions for pressing broadcloth.
7.
Is pressing
necessary to a perfect finish of a
garment ?
8.
9.
What weight should a pressing iron be?
How may wrinkles at waistline be success-
removed ?
How would you suggest removing the
shine in serge and other hard twill materials?
fully
10.
1 1
What
12.
Give directions for finishing the top of a
causes the shine ?
skirt.
133
CHAPTER
XII
Lines
The lines
artistic
of a
becoming
collar to the
I
am
gown mean
from the top of the
effect
bottom
gracefulness and
of the
hem.
pleased to note that there are few,
yet some
of
them
still
exist,
who
think
if
they can only keep the waist a certain number
of inches
and quote
how much
bottom
it
often, that
no matter
fat bulges out over the top
of the corset they are
still
slender
and
and
girlish.
This type of
woman wants
her dresses
all
fitted tight, especially across the bust and
around the
look small,
hips, believing she
when she
is
outgrown
her clothes,
herself
only emphasizing the
She looks as
fact that she is stout.
what she wishes
makes
if
she had
drawing attention to
to conceal.
134
The Dress You Wear
One can never look
135
well in a tight corset
with the flesh bulging above and below.
A
a
gown
her customer
if
corseted, because
piece
of
she
work that
She
tablishment.
make
modiste will refuse to
first-class
not properly
is
would
send
would
could
hurt
not
out
her
a
es-
make good
lines.
No gown
or suit
is
ever stylish or smart
unless becoming.
Loose,
comfortable-fitting, graceful
lines
conceal while tightness emphasizes.
It is as essential for the stout
woman
to
dress loosely as the extremely small figure,
the designs should be entirely different but
both types would be improved.
We
elderly
have
all
woman
noticed the middle-aged
with clothing too tight
large arms, short neck,
and abdomen
truding.
This unsightliness
to
corseting
tight
makes an
and the
exhibit of
thinks to conceal.
is
;
or
her
pro-
usually due
tight
clothing
what the poor woman
The Dress You Wear
136
No gown maker
a
should attempt to build
gown on such a foundation.
I
once read an article on dress from one
of our great
European designers which
He said
never forgotten.
did not
buy
my
:
spoil
If
my
designs
fitting,
making
gowns or wear
tight, or
have
"I'd rather people
than to mutilate them by poor
them too
I
wearing hats or shoes that
them."
you
on the
see
an exceptional, smart costume
street, notice hat, gloves,
and shoes
form part of the whole costume and look as
if
they were a part of it then look again and you
;
will see that the
person wearing the gown has
correct lines underneath, or
if
not correct,
they have been carefully and artistically
concealed by the
A
well-made,
fitting.
good-fitting
important and should be the
corset
first
is
all
consid-
eration.
There are some things that we cannot
afford
and some things we cannot afford to
go without.
The Dress You Wear
137
Combining Colors
In combining colors nature never makes a
mistake.
The
usual, pleasing combinations that the
French produce are a careful study
art in
A
combining
of nature's
colors.
walk through your own flower garden,
the park or woods in summer, will furnish
all
the color hints you could desire.
I
have heard
it said,
a weaver in trying to
reproduce a piece of beautiful moss on his
loom found he had produced
velvet.
Putting Canvas in Front of Coat
All linen canvas
will
soft linen
stiff
must be shrunken.
You
need a yard and a half to two yards of
canvas of good weight, but not
with dressing, the amount depends on
the length of coat.
Cut the
This
is
linen for facing
on a four-inch
bias.
done by placing the pattern for facing
on the linen with one end of front edge of
The Dress You Wear
138
pattern four inches from the edge of linen,
PINNING CANVAS IN FRONT OF COAT
giving a four-inch slant from top to bottom
on front edge of
linen.
Linen facing should be cut as wide as coat
facing
is
to be.
Place linen on work-table, then coat front
on top with front edges, neck, and shoulder
even, pin across at neck and shoulder, pins
The Dress You Wear
139
Place one hand on
about two inches apart.
garment where pins are holding coat firmly
on
table,
with the other hand brush coat down
tight over linen, pin again about four inches
below the
first
same process
tinue
the
coat.
You
slack
is
This
is
pinning across facing.
will find
when
the bottom of
to
finished the linen
and coat material
as
it
should be, as
well as linings in coats
Con-
tight
all
on
linen.
interlinings as
must be easy or
slack
inside.
Leave coat front
linen
in
same
position
with
underneath and baste together using
the diagonal or bias basting as taught in pre-
vious lesson, basting from top to bottom,
row
first
(taking the stitches toward you), the
second row from bottom to top, and continue
back and forth until the linen
is
firmly basted
on.
Remove
pins,
crease edge
by turning a
seam's width, basting and pressing the entire
length of front edge across top of revere.
Pull bastings
and tape front
of coat.
The Dress You Wear
140
The tape should be narrow
linen tape about
BASTING AND TAPING FRONT OF COAT
one-fourth inch wide and well shrunken before using.
Pin tape from top to bottom of coat so
will
it
be snug on the linen about the same
as the material or nearly so.
Pin edge of
tape on crease just made a seam's width
from the edge, place tape inside the crease
The Dress You Wear
as the linen outside
is
to be cut
141
away
before
stitching.
Baste tape.
The part
that turns over for
the revere should be caught to the material
by numerous rows
the padding-stitch.
of
Just catch into the coat.
Pin tape on the
turning for revere.
This tape should
line of
be a
little
tight to prevent stretching.
coat on and
tape a
If
if
little
coat swings back at bottom pin
tighter in front of coat.
coat swings too far over
and should be loosened a
Now
Try
little
it is
too tight
at front edge.
sew, using overhand-stitch, over and
over the edge of tape, placing needle close to
tape for each stitch and not through to show
on right side of material.
Pin facing on, placing the right side to right
side of coat.
Pin this on so
it is
a
little easier
than the coat material, baste on outer edge
of tape, cut
tape,
and
away canvas on
outside of the
stitch the edges of coat
together one-eighth of
edge of tape and linen.
and facing
an inch beyond the
THE LINING OF THE COAT
I 42
The Dress You Wear
Pull basting, cut
away
143
one-half of the
seam
on one edge, which should be the edge of the
coat proper.
Press seam open
flat.
Turn both edges
of
have edge
flat
and smooth
and the narrow edge
off
fac-
on tape and canvas being careful
ing) over
to
seam (but not the
should
lie
of
in the turning,
seam you
just turned
underneath the wide side of
full-
width seam.
Turn
Cat-stitch firmly to linen.
crease in line of stitching,
of coat, also seam.
and baste the
facing,
and baste along edge
Hold work
in left
hand
entire facing over the linen,
using the diagonal basting as you did to baste
the linen to front of coat, only this time you
hold the work over the
rolling to
hand
left
have the facing basted
slightly
in easy.
Miscellaneous
Stitch against the pile in velvets, plushes,
and corduroy, and seams are
less noticeable.
The Dress You Wear
144
Clip basting every three or four inches and
remove as soon as
In
stitching is done.
velvets, broadcloths,
silks,
and many
other materials a long basting pulled out
is liable
make
to
holes
even tear the
or
material.
To put
on a dress or
collar
center back
of
garment and
coat,
find
pin to-
collar,
gether at this point then pin from the center
back to the right end and from the center
back to the
left,
come cut even
and
in front
center back carefully.
When
if
the collar does not
you did not locate the
Try
cutting a garment,
of material
comes
again.
if
no seam or fold
back
directly in front or
waist or skirt, the centers should be
by mark-stitching
of waist and skirt
in
marked
or tracing the full length
as
it is
necessary in fitting
to place centers in correct position on the
figure, also in joining waist, skirt,
have centers meet
correctly.
and
belt to
The Dress You Wear
A careful
145
and painstaking beginning brings
successful ending.
A
little
marking,
extra
notches, reading
all
observing
instructions that
all
come
with the pattern, as they are important,
save so
much
trouble later on in the
will
making
of the garment.
About Basting
A New
York
tailor, at
the head of a large
establishment, gave the estimate of the time
consumed
coat,
by a
in the proper basting of a lady's
first-class
workman, to be twenty
hours' work, while the machine stitching could
be done in one hour, yet the average dress-
maker thinks basting a waste
such dressmakers
will
of time.
try thorough
If
bast-
ing with a short needle, basting with short
stitches,
seen
about one-fourth inch long
(I
have
them from an inch to an inch and a
half
much
im-
long) they will be able to notice
provement
in their
own work.
The Dress You Wear
146
This
is
why it
a tailored
woman cannot make
why they are called
said a
is
also
suit,
"dressmaker's coats."
There are
many women
business that do
in
the tailoring
work equal to the best done
by men, but they
are never out of a position,
or are doing a profitable business themselves,
so
we only hear about
the less successful
ones.
It is as
important in good dressmaking to
do thorough, painstaking work as in
tailoring,
therefore never slight your basting.
Press cushions are
of
made about
the shape
an egg, only not quite so rounding on top
and about
fifteen inches long,
one-half inches wide.
and seven and
They may be
stuffed
with saw-dust, cork, or light-colored woolens,
cut in small pieces.
This pad
is
quite neces-
sary in pressing curved seams; also a
pad
about one-third or one-half the
size,
smaller,
The Dress You Wear
that will
shoulder
fit
in the
when
147
upper part of sleeve and
pressing.
All braid should be shrunk before using.
Cleaning Black Silk
Use the kitchen table that has no
Lay
Brush out and dust material.
table,
tea
have ready
for use
Lay
and a sponge.
table,
finish.
flat
some strong cold
piece of silk flat on
brush or rub lightly with sponge, wet
The
in cold tea.
silk will cling to
rub lightly on both
hand, and leave
need pressing
Soap bark
it
new.
will look like
if
is
sides,
smooth out with the
on the table
Do
left to
the table;
until dry.
not press;
it
will
It
not
thoroughly dry.
fine to use in
washing
all
wool
materials, especially in black or colors, as
will
it
not take out the color or injure the fabric.
To remove machine
silk,
on
oil,
especially
from
place a blotter under and over the
oil
The Dress You Wear
148
spot, place a
leave
it
moderately hot iron on top and
The
there.
oil will
be drawn out
into the blotter.
made
Buckles are sometimes used,
same material
of the
as the dress to catch
drapery or hold material in place.
up a
To make
foundation, draw and cut a pattern the size
and
style
you
Cut out
wish.
of cardboard.
First cover the cardboard with a bit of sheet
wadding, then the material
may
be wound,
plaited, or gathered on.
Foundations
and
if
bend
not
stiff
in shape.
may
also
be made in buckram
enough wired, then they
They
will
are sometimes covered
with beads or other trimmings.
Selvages are liable to draw.
them away or
clip
Either cut
the edges to prevent bad
results.
To
prevent thread knotting or snarling
while sewing, after you have broken
off
the
The Dress You Wear
149
thread from the spool, hold ends tight in both
hands and stretch before using.
In stitching thin
silk,
chiffons,
crepe de
chine, etc., that are liable to pucker while the
stitching
of
is
being done, place a narrow strip
paper under the material and pay no spe-
cial
attention to
it
only to see that
over the feed and stitch as
Basting
is
if it
it
remains
were not there.
to hold material firmly in place
while the fitting and stitching
If carelessly
is
being done.
basted with too long, crooked
stitches, the material will not hold well in
place while stitching
result is
is
being done and the
anything but satisfactory.
We
will
have work that looks home-made instead
of
professional.
When
tight lining
dresses, use the
best grade
necessary, for sheer
heavy net which
drapery, department,
The
is
is
or
is
sold in the
dry-goods stores.
strong and does not stretch.
The Dress You Wear
150
To
correct
round shoulders
ing, rather snug, across the
fit
a tight lin-
back through the
shoulders and armhole, rather high and close
in front.
The
this is being done.
lining will not be real comfortable to
wear at
it
Stand erect while
you
first
but
will get
if
you
used to
to an erect position.
will
it
continue to wear
and get accustomed
GLOSSARY
Accordian Plaiting, laid in plaits, like the bellows of an accordian, by machinery, then
steamed and dried to retain this position.
Ajour (a zhur), an aperature made by joining
two
pieces together.
Albatross
(al
ba
tross), a fine
wool material.
Albert Cloth, each side of a different color.
Allover, design extending over entire material.
Antique (an tek), ancient style.
Applique (a pie ka), a separate design applied to
the garment it is to adorn.
Apron (a pron), outside garment to protect dress.
Arabesque (ar a besk), an outlined ornamentation in cords, stitchery, or applied pieces.
Armure
mur), a fancy weave with small raised
(ar
design.
Astrakhan
(as tra kan), a long pile, closely curled
surface to represent the fur of the Astrakhan
goat.
Basket weave, woven as a basket weave.
Basque (bask), a tight-fitting waist which extends below the waistline, worn by Basque
peasants of France.
151
Glossary
152
(ba test), a cotton material slightly
heavier than lawn; French word for lawn.
Batiste
Batting, cotton or wool prepared in sheets for
interlining.
Bayadere (ba ya der), a material having stripes
running from selvage to selvage.
Beaver (be ver), a thick woolen cloth tne wrong
side of which is finished with soft, thick nap.
Bedford Cord, a closely woven material having
a corded surface, used for women's wear.
Beige (beg), an undyed wool.
Bengaline, a plain, round corded weave, covered
with silk or wool.
Bertha, a ruffle, or cape.
Bias, goods cut on long side of a right-angled
triangle.
Bishop Sleeve, used in a bishop's robe, and thus
named.
Blind-stitch, a stitch not showing.
Blouse, a loose waist dropping over the belt.
Bobbinet, an open lace.
Bodice, a tight-fitting waist or girdle.
le ro), a Spanish jacket.
Border, trimming usually on edge of material.
Boucle (boo cl), a woolen material with little
Bolero (bo
tufts
on surface.
Bouffant (boo fant), full of puffy effect.
Bourette (boo ret), a material on which appears
rough threads.
Glossary
153
Bradenburg, a fastening for military jacket.
Bretelle, a sort of cape.
Brilliantine, a mohair with glossy surface.
Broadcloth, a
fine,
Brocatelles (bro
glossy woolen.
ka
tels),
a coarse fabric of silk
or wool with figured design.
Broche (bro sha), brocade which has an embroidery
Brussels
but
effect.
New, a
plain net
now made
made
first in
Brussels
in other countries.
Buckram, a coarse material,
linen or cotton used
for stiffening.
Buckskin, soft as dogskin with more defined twill.
Butcher's Linen, a plain fabric of linen used for
dress purposes.
Cabochous (ca bo shous), a jet, glass, steel, or
pearl ornament used in dress or millinery.
Cambric, a fabric used for lining in linen or
cotton.
Camel's Hair, a fabric made from the hair of the
camel or goat, soft and silky.
Canton Flannel, a twilled fabric with nap on one
or both sides, used for interlinings of coats
and for underwear.
Canvas, a coarse-threaded cotton or linen fabric
used for stiffening in collars, cuffs, and coat
fronts.
Challis (shally), a soft woolen or woolen
fabric.
and
silk
Glossary
154
Chambray (sham
bra), a fine, soft cotton
ma-
terial.
Champagne (sham
pan), ecru with golden tint.
Chantilly (shan te ye), a town in France once
noted for the manufacture of
lace.
Chenille (she nel), a thick velvet}^, corded material of silk
or worsted.
Cheviot (chev i ut) a material of the cheviot wool
,
woven
diagonally.
Chic (shek), smart
style.
Chiffon (shif fon), a thin soft silk material usually crepe-like in appearance.
Chiffon Velour, velvets of the lightest and softest kind.
Corduroy, a material woven
in ribs
with pile like
velvet, usually of cotton.
Corselet (korslet),
body
dress.
Cravat, a neck-cloth.
Crepe (krap), a fabric made
of
raw
silk
with
crinkled appearance.
Crepe de Chine (krap de shen), a crimped
made
raw
fabric,
with soft finish.
Cretonne (kre ton), a cotton material with large
of
silk,
floral designs.
Damask,
to decorate with flowers
and
rich de-
signs in the weaving.
Decolette (day col tay),
Denim, a
origin.
coarse,
gown
cut low in neck.
cotton drilling of uncertain
Glossary
155
Dimity, a stout, cotton corded fabric.
Doeskin, a firm woolen cloth with a firm soft
surface.
Drapelles, very light clothes.
Drilling, a heavy, twilled fabric of linen or cotton.
Drop
Skirt, an underskirt, used in place of lining.
Duchesse (duch es), a twilled satin fabric with
smooth surface.
Ecru (e cru), a color unbleached in linen, cotton,
or
silk.
Empiecement, a piece set in.
Empire, fashionable dress during reign of Napoleon I, taken from Greek costumes.
Eolienne, a fabric made of silk or wool, very sheer.
Epaulette (ep pau
let), military shoulder trimming.
Esprit, the same as Point d'Spree, a singled or
clustered dotted bobbinet.
(Esprit means a
spirit).
Eton, a short sleeveless jacket.
Eyelet, a round hole worked in garment for
lacing.
Faeonne
(fa
son nay), ornamental.
Faille (fal) or (fa y), a soft silk.
Farmers' Satin, a cotton lining of high luster.
Festooned, a draping in curves.
Fichu
(fe shoo),
a three-cornered piece thrown
and draping in
across the shoulders crossing
front.
Glossary
156
Filet
(fi
lay), a
square mesh net.
Flannel, a soft-textured cloth with light nap.
Flannelet, a soft material resembling flannel used
for underwear.
Foulard (Fu lard), twilled soft silk.
French Gathers, one short and one long
stitch.
heavy silk or wool
threads fastened to a narrow band.
Fringe, beads, chenille, or
Frogs, ornamental braid-fastenings for coat.
Gaberdine (gab ar den), a coarse frock or loose
upper garment formerly worn by Jews.
(Webster).
Galatea, a lustrous, strong heavy material of
cotton.
Gauntlet Cuff, one flaring at top.
Georgette Crepe, a sheer crepe-like silk.
Gigo (jig o), mutton-leg sleeve.
Gingham, a fabric woven in checks or stripes
nearly alike on both sides.
Girdle, fitted belt at waist.
Glace, a thin, shiny
silk.
Grosgrain (gro grain),
silk with luster.
a
stout
double-corded
Gros Jersey (gro Jersey;, a textile fabric of
heavy quality and close weave.
Guimpe (gimp), yoke and sleeves attached to
an underbody, worn with a sleeveless lownecked dress.
Guipure, corded silk trim.
Glossary
157
Habit, a skirt without plaits, plain across the
back.
Habutai, a Japanese
Homespun,
cloth
silk.
woven by hand
or an imitation
of such cloth.
Honoton Lace, made by stitching braid upon lace.
Illusion,
a plain delicate
lace,
used for dresses,
scarfs, veils, etc.
Jabot (zha bo), or (jab o),, neck ornament.
Jupe Cloche or Jupe Tonneau, a cloth, especially
for auto riding.
Khaki (kak
ke), a tan cloth of cotton used es-
pecially in
army
wear.
Landsdowne, a very beautiful
silk
and wool
material.
Lapel, the revere of a garment.
La
Petite, small.
Lawn, a very fine linen or cotton fabric with an
open texture, the same as used in the sleeves
of a bishop's gown.
Liberty Crepe, soft crepe material.
Lingerie (long zhe re), garments made of sheer
material.
Maline, a soft gauzy
Marabou,
soft
silk.
down.
Medallion, a design of lace appliqued to a gar-
ment.
»
Melton, thick, smooth woolen cloth used for
tailored garments.
Glossary
158
Mercerized, a chemical process of hardening the
threads to produce a shiny
effect.
Meroir, the glossy effect from ironing
silk.
Messaline, soft dress silk fabric.
Modiste, a fashionable dressmaker.
Mohair, a fabric made from the hair of the Angora goat; a glossy material.
Moire (mwa
re) or
(mwar), a watered
silk.
Motif, a design in lace, beads, or embroidery.
Mouseline de
and soft.
an easy unceremonious
Soire, a silk muslin, fine
Negligee (neg
li
zha),
attire.
Organdie, a thin transparent cotton.
Oriental Lace, an elegant lace
made on
a schiffle
machine.
Ottaman, a heavy, corded silk usually used for
wraps and coats.
Oxford, a wool fabric in dark gray mixtures.
Pagoda, a Grecian sleeve.
Panel, a narrow lengthwise piece of material used
in princess dresses and skirts.
Panne (pan), long nap velvet, pressed down and
extremely lustrous.
Pannier, side draperies.
Passe (pas
sa),
out of style and date.
Passementerie, beaded trimming.
Pastel Shades, soft colorings.
Peplum, a short
of waist.
flary skirt or flounce
on bottom
Glossary
Persian
Lamb,
fur of
159
baby lambs.
Picot (pe co) an ornamental finish for collars and
,
cuffs,
Pongee,
machine made.
silk in
natural color.
a good wearing silk,
woolen, linen, or cotton.
Postillion, a kind of basque.
Poplin,
combined with
Raglan, a large coat, formerly worn by Lord
Raglan'of England.
Reding-gote, an outside garment or polonaise
opened down the front.
Rep, a corded weave extending crosswise.
Revere, lapel.
Ruche, a strip of material gathered in the center
or on the edge and fastened to a band.
Sateen, a lustrous, soft cotton material.
Selesia,
a closely woven, fine lining material.
Selvage, edge of material, finished.
Serge, a material in wool
woven
diagonally.
Shantung, a heavy pongee silk of natural colors.
Silkaline, a mercerized cloth, light weight.
Stole, ornamental material worn each side of
front.
Suede (swade), undressed leather.
Sylvette
(sil
vet), sport cloth.
Taffeta, a light-weight silk alike on both sides.
Taillurs (ta lurs), frock with
Tailored, without
outline.
frills
matching
coat.
or furbelows, plain in
Glossary
160
Tap, a mass of tow ready to put on a distaff.
Taupe (top), dark gray.
Torchon, a bobbinet lace of simple pattern.
Tricot (tre ko), a soft slightly ribbed cloth.
Tunic, an overcoat.
Valenciennes (va len
si
enz), a
narrow edging
of
lace.
Valour (ve
lur),
similar to plush,
French for
velvet.
Velveteen, velvet in cotton.
Venetian, a wool material with twilled surface.
Voile (vwal), a loosely woven material in silk,
wool,
Volant, a
and cotton.
ruffle.
Warp, lengthwise thread of material.
Woof, crosswise or filling thread.
Worsted, twisted thread spun from woolen.
Zephyr, called zephyr gingham, silky appearance
with warp coarser than woof.
Zibeline, a hairy wool material.
COURSE OF STUDY
FOR
.
EVENING DRESSMAKING CLASS
first
First
month
Week:
Lesson
I.
Organization and Lecture, attend-
and advancement.
Lesson II. Materials.
Lesson III. Nap, demonstration and lecture.
Lesson IV. Right side of material, individual
ance, punctuality,
instruction.
Second Week:
Lesson V. Suitable material for extreme figures,
demonstration and lecture.
Lesson VI. Shrinking materials, demonstration
and individual
instruction.
Demonstration of bad effects
making up materials without shrinking.
Lesson VIII. Review.
Lesson VII.
ii
161
of
1
62
Course of Study
— Evening Class
Third Week:
Taking measures, demonstration
and individual instruction.
Lesson X. Taking measures, continued.
Lesson XL Taking measures, concluded.
Lesson XII. Alteration of patterns, demonstration and lecture.
Lesson IX.
Fourth Week:
Lesson XIII.
figures,
Alteration of patterns for extreme
demonstration and individual in-
struction.
Lesson XIV. Alteration of sleeve pattern,
demonstration and individual instruction
(changing two-piece coat sleeve pattern to a
bishop sleeve).
Lesson XV. Cutting and shaping cuffs, demonstration
and individual
Lesson XVI.
instruction.
Questions.
second month
First
Lesson
Week:
XVII. Alteration of waist patterns, deand cutting collars, demonstration
signing
and individual
Lesson XVIII.
Lesson XIX.
continued,
instruction.
Alteration of skirt patterns.
Alteration
cutting
of
yokes,
skirt
patterns,
circular
skirts,
Course of Study
—Evening Class
circular bands, circular flounces
163
from seven
gore foundation.
Lesson XX. Making a plaited skirt from a
seven gore foundation, lecture, questions.
Second Week:
Lesson XXI. How to add length to a skirt,
and how to enlarge a skirt, demonstration
and individual instruction.
Lesson XXII. To change style of pattern,
demonstration and lecture.
Lesson XXIII. Style of pattern for different
figures, demonstration and individual instruction.
Lesson
XXIV.
Examination.
Third Week:
Lesson XXV. Equipment, the necessity of,
with object lesson.
Lesson XXVI. Dress form, making lining and
individual instruction.
Lesson XXVII. Lining making, continued.
Lesson XXVIII. Lining making, concluded.
Fourth Week:
Lesson
XXIX.
Pinning before basting, demhow to keep one side
onstration showing
of
seam from puckering.
164
Course of Study
— Evening Class
Lesson XXX. Material required for a garment,
demonstration and lecture.
Lesson XXXI. Amount of material, demonstration
Lesson
and individual
XXXII.
instruction.
Review.
THIRD MONTH
Week:
Lesson XXXIII.
First
care
Lecture on thoroughness and
(being thoroughly competent
means
that you are master and have no reason to
worry over your work).
Lesson XXXIV. Fitting a skirt, demonstration
and
Lesson
lecture.
XXXV.
Basting and review on pinning,
individual instruction.
Lesson
XXXVI.
Questions.
Second Week:
Lesson
XXXVII.
To
prevent twisting of two
piece sleeve, demonstration.
Lesson
XXXVIII.
lecture
Basting velvets and
silks,
and demonstration.
Lesson XXXIX. Diagonal basting and padding stitch, demonstration, and individual
instruction.
Lesson XL.
Review.
Course of Study— Evening Class
Third Week:
Lesson XLI. Running-stitch,
back-stitch,
165
com-
bination-stitch, individual instruction.
Lesson XLII.
Tailors' fell-stitch
and over-cast-
ing, individual instruction.
Lesson XLIII.
Tailors' tacks, overhanding, in-
dividual instruction.
Lesson XLIV.
Questions.
Fourth Week:
Lesson XLV. French seam and hemming,
in-
dividual instruction.
Lesson XLVI.
Cat -stitch
or
catch -stitch,
feather-stitch, individual instruction.
Lesson XLVII.
Fagoting,
individual
instruc-
tion.
Lesson XLVIII.
Examination.
fourth month
Week:
Lesson XLIX.
First
Buttonhole, lecture, their pur-
poses, ornamental and necessary.
Lesson L. Buttonhole and buttonhole-stitch,
demonstration and individual instruction.
Lesson LI. Buttonhole and buttonhole-stitch,
concluded.
1
66
Course of Study— Evening Class
Lesson LII. Tailors' buttonhole and stitch,
demonstration and individual instruction.
Working over cord.
Second Week:
Lesson LIII. Tailors' buttonhole, concluded.
Lesson LIV. Eyelets and loops, demonstration
and individual instruction.
Lesson LV. Eyelets and loops, concluded.
Lesson LVI. Review.
Third Week:
Lesson
LVI I.
French knots, demonstration and
individual instruction.
Sewing on buttons, demonstraand individual instruction.
Lesson LIX. Covering button molds, demonstration and individual instruction.
Lesson LVIII.
tion
Lesson LX.
Review.
Fourth Week:
Lesson LXI. Smocking and marking material
for smocking.
Lesson LXII. Smocking, continued.
Lesson LXIII. Smocking, concluded.
Lesson LXIV. Questions.
Course of Study — Evening Class
fifth
First
Lesson
Week:
LXV.
167
month
Beads, three methods of sewing
on, individual instruction.
Lesson LXVL Tailors' pockets, finished by
drawing facing through, and individual
instruction.
Lesson LXVII.
Pockets, continued and ques-
tions.
Lesson LXVIII. Pockets, with
down, individual instruction.
lap
turned
Second Week:
Lesson LXIX. Small pockets, like vest pocket
with lap turned up, demonstration and
individual instruction.
Lesson LXX. Pockets, continued.
Lesson LXXI. Pockets, concluded.
Lesson LXXII. Examination.
Third Week:
Bound buttonholes, demonand individual instruction.
Lesson LXXIV. Patch pockets, demonstration
and individual instruction.
Lesson LXXV. Crow-foot, demonstration and
Lesson LXXIII.
stration
individual instruction.
Lesson
LXX VI.
Crow-foot, concluded.
1 68
Course of Study— Evening Class
Fourth Week:
LXXVII.
Arrow-head, demonstration
Lesson
and individual
instruction.
Lesson LXXVIII. Continuous placket, demonstration and individual instruction.
Continuous placket, conLesson LXXIX.
cluded.
Lesson
LXXX.
Questions.
SIXTH MONTH
Week:
Lesson LXXXI.
First
tion
Lesson
Lesson
Lesson
Tailors' plackets, demonstra-
and individual
LXXXTI.
LXXXIII.
LXXXIV.
instruction.
Tailors' plackets, continued.
Tailors' plackets, concluded.
Review.
Second Week:
Lesson
LXXXV.
bias bands,
Cutting bias and shirring
demonstration and individual
instruction.
Lesson
LXXXVI.
Shirring bias bands,
con-
cluded.
Lesson
LXXXVII.
and individual
Lesson
Bias bands, demonstration
instruction.
LXXXVIII.
Bias bands, concluded.
Course of Study
—Evening Class
169
ihird Week:
Lesson LXXXIX. Bias and crosswise straps,
demonstration and individual instruction.
Lesson XC. Milliners' folds, demonstration and
individual instruction.
Lesson XCI.
Bands, straps, and
folds, con-
cluded.
Lesson XCII.
Questions.
Fourth Week:
XCII I. Couching, demonstration by
Lesson
hand and machine.
XCIV. Covering cord, demonstration
and individual instruction.
Lesson
Lesson
XCV.
tion
Shirring over cord, demonstra-
and individual
Lesson XCVI.
instruction.
Examination.
seventh month
First
Lesson
Week:
XCVI I.
and
eyes,
Marking
for
demonstration
sewing on hooks
and individual
instruction.
Lesson XCVIII.
tion
Circular
and individual
yokes,
demonstra-
instruction.
Lesson XCIX. Circular yokes, continued.
Lesson C. Circular yokes, concluded.
170
Course of Study
—Evening Class
Second Week:
Lesson CI. Making a tight fitting (lace or net)
yoke with high fitted collar attached to
fitted lining, demonstration and individual
instruction.
Lesson CII. Lesson CI. continued.
Lesson CIII. Lesson CI. concluded.
Lesson CIV. Review.
Third Week:
Tucking circular skirts, demonand individual instruction.
Lesson CVI. Tucking circular skirts concluded.
Lesson CV.
stration
Lesson CVII.
tion
Review,
and
demonstra-
Finishing top of skirt, demon-
Lesson CVIII.
stration
fitting a skirt,
lecture.
and
lecture.
Questions.
Fourth Week:
Lesson CIX. Getting the
length of a skirt,
demonstration and lecture on position and
use of skirt ruler.
Lesson CX.
Putting the
hem
in a skirt
basting in sleeve, demonstration and
and
in-
dividual instruction.
Lesson CXI. Bound open welt seam and strap
seam, demonstration and individual instruction.
Lesson CXII.
Questions.
Course of Study— Evening Class
171
eighth month
First
Week:
Lesson CXIII. Imitation strap seam and
seam, demonstration and individual
slot
in-
struction.
Lesson CXIV. Raw edge lap seam and
seam, demonstration, and individual
fell
in-
struction.
Lesson CXV. Review.
Lesson CXVI. Matching flowers and stripes
and matching plaids, demonstration and
individual instruction.
Questions.
Second Week:
Lesson CXVII. Cutting a garment so as to not
have two pieces for one side, and length of
girl's skirts for different ages, lecture.
Lesson CXVIII. Pressing and to take shine off,
demonstration and individual instruction.
Lesson CXIX. Finishing the top of skirt, lecture.
Lesson
CXX.
Examination.
Third Week:
Lesson
CXXI.
Lines,
lecture
and
class
discuss lines.
Lesson CXXII.
Combining
colors, lecture.
to
172
Course of Study— Evening Class
Lesson CXXIII. Putting canvas in front of
incoat, demonstration, and individual
struction.
Lesson CXXIV. Putting tape in front of coat,
demonstration and individual instruction.
Fourth Week:
Lesson CXXV. Review of Lesson CXXIII.
Lesson CXXVI. Review of Lesson CXXIV.
Lesson CXXVII. Questions.
Lesson CXXVIII. Review.
ninth month
First
Week:
Lesson
Lesson
Lesson
Lesson
CXXIX.
CXXX.
Study
of Glossary.
Miscellaneous.
CXXXI. Study of Glossary.
CXXXII. Miscellaneous.
Second Week:
Lesson
Lesson
Lesson
Lesson
CXXXIII.
Study
CXXXIV.
Miscellaneous.
CXXXV.
CXXX VI.
of Glossary.
Review.
Questions.
Third Week:
Lesson
Lesson
CXXXVII. Study of Glossary,
CXXXVIII. Miscellaneous.
Course of Study
Lesson
Lesson
CXXXIX.
CXL.
—Evening Class
Review.
Questions.
Fourth Week:
Lesson CXLI. Study of Glossary.
Lesson CXLI I. Miscellaneous.
Lesson CXLIII. Examination.
Lesson CXLIV. Closing.
173
—
1000 Shorter Ways
Around the House
A
Handbook
Home, Its Building,
Its Management
of the
Furnishing,
Its
By
Mae
12°.
Croy
Savell
$1.50 net.
By
mail, $1.65
" Indispensable to the good housekeeper.
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is
sup-
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The book embraces everything from the erection and furnishing of the home to its maintenance, according to the highest standards of
comfort, cleanliness, and order. For every
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Omaha
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G. P. Putnam's Sons
New York
London
1000 Things a Mother
Should Know
By
Mae
Author of "
Savell
Croy
1000 Shorter Ways Around the House,"
12°.
Information
$1.50
is
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medical care, hygiene and sick-room suggestions, are a valuable supplement to the chapters dealing with the treatment of the child
when in health. Arranged under appropriate
headings and comprehensively indexed.
lent suggestions offered.
G. P. Putnam's Sons
New York
London
—
—
—
——
Putnam's Homemaker Series
By OLIVE GREEN
Each, i6mo.
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Net, $1.00.
By
mail, $1.10
No more unique or welcome gift for a brain-fagged
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London
—
— —
—
—— —
——
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