ATI Technologies | FireGL X3-256 | User`s guide | ATI Technologies FireGL X3-256 User`s guide

Silicon Graphics Prism™ Visualization System
User’s Guide for Power & Team Scalable
Configurations
Document Number 007-4701-003
CONTRIBUTORS
Written by Mark Schwenden and Eric Zamost
Illustrated by Chrystie Danzer
Additional contributions by Dick Brownell, Mark Cabrales, Josh Grossman, Eric Kunze, Matt Marchese, Jim Passint, Keith Rich, Victor Riley, Armando
Serrato, Dave Shreiner, Andrew Spray, and Lyle Stoll.
COPYRIGHT
© 2005, Silicon Graphics, Inc. All rights reserved; provided portions may be copyright in third parties, as indicated elsewhere herein. No permission is granted
to copy, distribute, or create derivative works from the contents of this electronic documentation in any manner, in whole or in part, without the prior written
permission of Silicon Graphics, Inc.
LIMITED RIGHTS LEGEND
The electronic (software) version of this document was developed at private expense; if acquired under an agreement with the USA government or any
contractor thereto, it is acquired as "commercial computer software" subject to the provisions of its applicable license agreement, as specified in (a) 48 CFR
12.212 of the FAR; or, if acquired for Department of Defense units, (b) 48 CFR 227-7202 of the DoD FAR Supplement; or sections succeeding thereto.
Contractor/manufacturer is Silicon Graphics, Inc., 1500 Crittenden Lane, Mountain View, CA 94043.
TRADEMARKS AND ATTRIBUTIONS
Silicon Graphics, SGI, the SGI logo are registered trademarks and NUMAlink and Silicon Graphics Prism are trademarks of Silicon Graphics, Inc., in the
United States and/or other countries worldwide.
ATI and Radeon are registered trademarks, and FireGL is a trademark, of ATI Technologies, Inc.
Intel and Itanium are trademarks or registered trademarks of Intel Corporation and its subsidiaries in the United States and other countries.
Linux is a registered trademark of Linus Torvalds.
XFree86 is a trademark of The XFree86 Project, Inc.
XWindows is a trademark of MIT.
All other trademarks mentioned herein are the property of their respective owners.
Record of Revision
Version
Description
001
October 2004
First Release
002
February 2005
Added Prism Team configurations (routed NUMAlink)
Added Multi-Xserver configuration instructions
Added additional rack-handling instructions
Added description of optional IO9 card
003
May 2005
Added FireGL X3-256 card
Removed references to optional L2 controller
Updated XF86Config section
007-4701-003
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Contents
Contents
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. xv
Important Information
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Chapter Descriptions .
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Related Publications .
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Conventions
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Product Support
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Reader Comments .
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Getting Started with the Silicon Graphics Prism.
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XG2N and Compute Modules
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Internal Components .
Safety Precautions .
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Safety Measures .
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Quick Start Information .
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Positioning and Power for Your Silicon Graphics Prism .
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NUMAlink Cabling for a Silicon Graphics Prism .
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Optional SGI ImageSync Cabling .
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Connecting a Monitor
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Connecting a Keyboard and Mouse
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Connecting the Multi-Port Serial Cable
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Contents
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Connecting an L1 System Console .
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Power-On the System .
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Verifying System Connections .
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Powering Off Manually .
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System Overview and Options .
Physical Features .
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Functional Architecture
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System Components
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Base Compute Module
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XG2N Graphics Module .
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CPU Expansion Module .
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CMPX Module .
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Router Module .
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Router Module Front Panel Components .
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Router Module Rear Panel Components .
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SGI TP900 Storage Module .
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2Gb SGI TP9100 Optional Storage System .
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Power Components
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SGI Racks for Silicon Graphics Prism
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Optional Devices
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Optional IO9 PCI Card
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Optional Tape Devices
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Optional DM8 Audio Board .
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Board Installation .
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Cables and Connectors .
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Functional Features .
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Troubleshooting Tips.
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Configurations and Cabling .
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System Configurations.
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NUMAlink Cabling in Ring Topologies .
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Optional USB Extender
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Storage Expansion .
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007-4701-003
Contents
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NUMAlink Cabling in Routed Systems .
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Minimum Routed Configuration
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Maximum Routed Configuration .
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Installing and Removing Customer-Replaceable Units .
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Safety Instructions .
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Accessing the System’s Internal Components .
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Opening the Cover
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007-4701-003
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Removing the Optional Chassis Rail
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Removing the PCI/PCI-X Support Bracket
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Reinstalling the PCI/PCI-X Support Bracket .
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Reinstalling the Optional Chassis Rail .
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Closing the Cover .
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PCI and PCI-X Cards .
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Rules for Card Installation and Removal .
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Installing a PCI or PCI-X Card .
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Removing a PCI or PCI-X Card .
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Replacing an XG2N Graphics Card .
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Installing a Disk Drive
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Removing a Disk Drive .
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Removing and Replacing Power Supplies .
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Removing and Replacing Memory DIMMs
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Memory DIMM Group Placement and Guidelines
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Installing a DIMM Group
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Removing a DIMM
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L1 Controller Display .
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Troubleshooting .
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Troubleshooting Chart
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L1 Controller Error Messages
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Reading Power Supply Status LEDs.
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Customizing the XF86Config File
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Contents
Configuring a System for Stereo .
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Example “Device” Section for Stereo .
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Sample Stereo Mode Entries .
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Example “Monitor” Section for Stereo .
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Example “Screen” Section for Stereo
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Configuring a System for Full Scene Anti-Aliasing
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Example “Device” Section for Full Scene Anti-Aliasing .
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Configuring a System for Dual-Channel Operation
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Example “Device” Section for Dual Channel .
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Example “Device” Section to Enable Overlay Planes .
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Enabling Overlay Planes .
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Configuring Monitor Positions .
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Example “ServerLayout” Section for Four Monitors in a Line .
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Example “ServerLayout” Section for Four Monitors in a Square
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Example “Device” Section for Use With Two Analog Monitors.
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Configuring a System for Multiple Xservers
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Creating a Multi-Seat XF86Config File .
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Identifying Event Devices
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Example “ServerLayout” Sections for Three Xservers
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Pointing X to the New XF86Config-Nserver File .
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Example /etc/X11/gdm/gdm.conf Servers Section for Three Xservers
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Technical Specifications .
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Compute Module Specifications .
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CMPX Module Specifications .
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Router Module Specifications .
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Rack Specifications .
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SGI TP900 Storage Module Specifications .
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Non-proprietary I/O Port Specifications
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Compute Module .
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Configuring a System for External Genlock or Framelock
Configuring Monitor Types .
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164
XG2N Module Connectors
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166
007-4701-003
Contents
CMPX Module
B.
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.168
SGI TP900 Storage Module .
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.169
DB-9 Serial Connector
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.170
RJ-45 Connector .
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.172
External Multi-port Serial Adapter Connector
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.173
USB Type A Connector .
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.175
USB Type B Connector .
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.176
Installing Silicon Graphics Prism Modules Into a Rack
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.177
Choosing Locations Within a Rack .
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.177
Programming L1 Rack and Slot Numbers .
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.178
Using Silicon Graphics Prism Modules with a Rack .
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.179
.179
Rackmounting with Optional Slide Rails .
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Determining Module Space Requirements.
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.180
Slide Rail Mounting Hardware .
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.181
Preparing the Optional Slide Rail Assemblies .
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.182
Preparing the Module
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.185
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Determining Where to Attach the Slide Rail in the Rack
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.186
Attaching the Slide Rail to the Rack
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.187
Installing Clip Nuts in Rack Rails .
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.190
Installing the Module in the Rack .
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.191
Adjusting the Position of the Rackmounted Module
Removing a Rail-Mounted Module from a Rack .
C.
007-4701-003
.
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.193
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.194
Installing Rack Systems .
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.197
Pre-Installation Activities .
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.198
Site Plan Verification .
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.198
Tools Required
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.198
Power Receptacle Verification .
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.199
Unloading and Moving System Equipment
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.202
Unloading the Equipment from the Truck .
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.202
Inspecting the Shipping Crate .
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.205
Transporting the Shipping Crate
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.205
Removing a Short Rack from the Shipping Crate .
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.206
.
.
ix
Contents
D.
Removing a Tall Rack from the Shipping Crate.
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208
Positioning and Leveling a Single-Rack System
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211
Positioning and Leveling Multiple Racks
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213
Regulatory Specifications and Safety Information
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217
Manufacturer’s Regulatory Declarations
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217
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217
CE Notice and Manufacturer's Declaration of Conformity
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217
Electromagnetic Emissions
System Model Number
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218
FCC Notice (USA Only) .
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218
Industry Canada Notice (Canada Only)
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219
VCCI Notice (Japan Only)
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219
Chinese Class A Regulatory Notice.
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219
Korean Class A Regulatory Notice .
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219
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220
Electrostatic Discharge
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220
Laser Compliance Statements .
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221
Lithium Battery Statement
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222
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223
Shielded Cables
Index.
x
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.
007-4701-003
Figures
Figures
Figure 1-1
007-4701-003
Rear View of XG2N Graphics Module with FireGL X2PRO-256
(Showing First Module Pipe Numbering) . . . . . . .
.
3
Figure 1-2
Pipe Numbering of Additional XG2N Graphics Modules with FireGL
X2PRO-256 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Figure 1-3
Rear View of XG2N Graphics Module with FireGL X3-256 (Showing
First Module Pipe Numbering) . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Figure 1-4
Pipe Numbering of Additional XG2N Graphics Modules with FireGL
X3-256 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Figure 1-5
Silicon Graphics Prism XG2N and Compute Module Front Panel
Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.
5
Figure 1-6
Silicon Graphics Prism Compute Module Rear Panel With ImageSync 7
Figure 1-7
Silicon Graphics Prism XG2N Module Internal View .
.
.
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.
Figure 1-8
Example Connection of a Non-Racked System to Power .
.
.
. 13
Figure 1-9
Connection Example of a Racked System to Power
.
.
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.
. 14
Figure 1-10
NUMAlink Cabling in a Two-module System .
.
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. 15
Figure 1-11
Cabling Example of SGI ImageSync Card to Graphics .
.
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. 17
Figure 1-12
Connecting the USB Keyboard and Mouse to the System Compute
Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Figure 1-13
Multi-port Adapter Serial Cable .
.
. 20
Figure 1-14
Connecting a Serial Terminal to the Base Compute Console Port
. 21
Figure 2-1
Example of Silicon Graphics Prism Rack Systems .
. 29
Figure 2-2
Front and Rear Views of Base Compute Module with IO10 PCI Card 34
Figure 2-3
Front and Rear Views of XG2N Module .
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. 35
Figure 2-4
Front and Rear Views of CPU Expansion Module .
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. 37
Figure 2-5
Front and Rear Views of CMPX Option Module
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. 39
Figure 2-6
Router Functional Block Diagram
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. 41
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8
xi
Figures
xii
Figure 2-7
Front View of the Router Module .
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. 42
Figure 2-8
Rear View of Router Module .
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. 43
Figure 2-9
SGI TP900 Storage Module.
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. 45
Figure 2-10
2Gb SGI TP9100 Storage System .
.
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. 47
Figure 2-11
Unit Numbering Within Racks
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. 49
Figure 2-12
Optional Slide Rails .
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. 50
Figure 2-13
Shelf Rails
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. 50
Figure 2-14
Front Views of Short and Tall Racks .
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. 51
Figure 2-15
DM8 Interface Panel and Connectors .
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. 54
Figure 2-16
Keyboard and Mouse Connected via Optional USB Extender .
.
. 58
Figure 3-1
Two-Module Ring Topology Example
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. 63
Figure 3-2
Three-Module Ring Topology Example .
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. 63
Figure 3-3
Four-Module Ring Topology Example
.
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. 64
Figure 3-4
Minimum Routed Configuration Conceptual Diagram.
.
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.
. 66
Figure 3-5
Module Ordering in Minimum Routed Configuration .
.
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.
. 67
Figure 3-6
Maximum Routed Configuration Conceptual Diagram
.
.
.
. 69
Figure 3-7
Module Ordering in Maximum Routed Configuration .
.
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.
. 70
Figure 4-1
Opening the System Cover.
.
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. 74
Figure 4-2
Removing an Optional Chassis Rail .
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. 76
Figure 4-3
Removing the Lower PCI/PCI-X Support Bracket .
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.
. 77
Figure 4-4
Replacing the Lower PCI/PCI-X Support Bracket .
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.
. 78
Figure 4-5
Replacing the Chassis Rail .
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. 79
Figure 4-6
Closing the System Cover .
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.
. 80
Figure 4-7
PCI and PCI-X Card Slots in the Base Compute Module
.
.
.
. 81
Figure 4-8
Removing the Blanking Plate .
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.
. 84
Figure 4-9
Installing the Card and Retaining Screw .
.
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.
. 85
Figure 4-10
Removing the Retaining Screw and Extracting the Card .
.
.
. 88
Figure 4-11
Replacing a Blanking Plate .
.
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.
. 89
Figure 4-12
Removing the XG2N Graphics Card Bracket
.
.
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.
. 92
Figure 4-13
Remove XG2N Graphics Board Assembly
.
.
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.
. 93
Figure 4-14
Synchronization Cable Connection on Underside of Graphics Board. 94
Figure 4-15
Installing the Graphics Card and Retaining Screws .
.
.
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.
. 95
Figure 4-16
Replacing the PCI/PCI-X Support Bracket .
.
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. 96
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.
007-4701-003
Figures
007-4701-003
Figure 4-17
Disk Drive Locations .
.
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. 98
Figure 4-18
Installing a Disk Drive .
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.
.100
Figure 4-19
Removing a Disk Drive
.
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.102
Figure 4-20
Power Supplies Location .
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.103
Figure 4-21
Removing a Power Supply
.
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.
.105
Figure 4-22
Installing the Power Supply .
.
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.
.106
Figure 4-23
Layout of Slots and DIMM Memory Groups
.
.
.
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.
.108
Figure 4-24
DIMM Locations (XG2N Module Shown, Others Similar).
.
.
.110
Figure 4-25
Inserting a DIMM .
.
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.
.111
Figure 4-26
Removing a DIMM .
.
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.
.113
Figure 4-27
L1 Controller Display on Base Compute Module .
.
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.
.114
Figure 4-28
Removing the L1 Controller Display Panel .
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.
.116
Figure 4-29
Installing an L1 Controller Display Panel
.
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.118
Figure 5-1
Full Support Sequence .
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.130
Figure 5-2
Four Monitors in a Line
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.143
Figure 5-3
Four Monitors in a Square.
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.144
Figure A-1
Rear Panel of Compute Module .
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.165
Figure A-2
DVI-I Connector Pinout
.
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.
.166
Figure A-3
Non-Proprietary Connectors on Rear Panel of CMPX Module
.
.168
Figure A-4
Non-Proprietary Connectors on Rear Panel of TP900 Module
.
.169
Figure A-5
DB-9 Serial Connector Pin Assignments .
.
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.
.170
Figure A-6
RJ-45 Connector Pin Assignments
.
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.
.172
Figure A-7
Pin Number Locations for 36-pin MDR Connector .
.
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.
.173
Figure A-8
Pin Number Locations for USB Type A Connector .
.
.
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.
.175
Figure A-9
Pin Number Locations for USB Type B Connector .
.
.
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.
.176
Figure B-1
Removing the Chassis Rail from the Slide Rail .
.
.
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.
.182
Figure B-2
Attaching the Rear Mounting Bracket to the Slide Rail
.
.
.
.184
Figure B-3
Attaching Optional Chassis Rails to the Module Chassis .
.
.
.185
Figure B-4
Mounting-hole Pattern of Rack Vertical Rails .
.
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.
.186
Figure B-5
Placing the Bar Nuts on the Rack Rails .
.
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.
.188
Figure B-6
Attaching the Slide Rail to the Rack .
.
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.
.189
Figure B-7
Installing Clip Nuts in Rack Rails
.
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.
.190
Figure B-8
Pressing the Safety Latches
.
.
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.
.192
.
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.
xiii
Figures
xiv
Figure B-9
Securing the Module to the Rack .
.
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.
193
Figure B-10
Releasing the Safety Latches
.
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.
195
Figure B-11
Releasing the Slide Latches.
.
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.
196
Figure C-1
30-amp Single-phase Power Receptacle for North American Sites
200
Figure C-2
32-amp Single-phase Power Plug for International Sites
.
.
.
201
Figure C-3
Dimensions of Tall Rack Shipping Crate .
.
.
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.
.
203
Figure C-4
Dimensions of Short Rack Shipping Crate
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
204
Figure C-5
Removing a Short Rack from the Shipping Crate
.
.
.
.
.
207
Figure C-6
Removing a Tall Rack from the Shipping Crate .
.
.
.
.
.
210
Figure C-7
Leveling Bolts
.
.
.
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.
211
Figure C-8
Seismic Tie-down Attachment Points .
.
.
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.
212
Figure C-9
Leveling Bolts
.
.
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.
213
Figure C-10
Joining Locations
.
.
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.
215
Figure D-1
VCCI Notice (Japan Only) .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
219
Figure D-2
Chinese Class A Regulatory Notice .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
219
Figure D-3
Korean Class A Regulatory Notice
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
219
.
.
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.
.
.
.
007-4701-003
Tables
Tables
007-4701-003
Table 3-1
Silicon Graphics Prism Power System Configuration Ranges .
.
. 60
Table 3-2
Silicon Graphics Prism Team System Configuration Ranges .
.
. 61
Table 3-3
Bisection Bandwidth of Ring Topology .
.
.
.
.
.
.
. 62
Table 3-4
Minimum Routed Configuration Cable Chart .
.
.
.
.
.
. 66
Table 3-5
Maximum Routed Configuration Cable Chart .
.
.
.
.
.
. 68
Table 5-1
Troubleshooting Chart.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.122
Table 5-2
L1 Controller Messages
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.125
Table 5-3
L1 Controller Hexadecimal Boot Error Codes .
.
.
.
.
.
.127
Table 5-4
LED Status and Power Supply Condition
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.129
Table 5-5
Input Video Formats (Framelock)
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.142
Table 5-6
Options for Monitor Layout .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.145
Table A-1
Environmental Specifications .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.156
Table A-2
Bandwidth Characteristics of the Compute Module
.
.
.
.
.157
Table A-3
General Features of the Compute Module .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.157
Table A-4
Compute Module Physical Specifications
.
.
.
.
.
.
.158
Table A-5
Bandwidth Characteristics of the CMPX Module .
.
.
.
.
.159
Table A-6
CMPX Module Specifications .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.159
Table A-7
Router Port Specifications .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.160
Table A-8
Router Technical Specifications .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.160
Table A-9
Short Rack Specifications (with Skins) .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.161
Table A-10
Tall Rack Specifications
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.161
Table A-11
TP900 Storage Module Specifications
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.162
Table A-12
Compute Module Connectors.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.164
Table A-13
DVI-I Connector Signals and Pins
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.166
Table A-14
CMPX Module Connectors
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.168
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
xv
Tables
xvi
Table A-15
DB-9 Serial Connector Pin Assignments .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
171
Table A-16
Ethernet Connector Pin Assignments .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
172
Table A-17
Multi-port Serial Adapter Pinouts.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
173
Table A-18
Pin Assignments for USB Type A Connector
.
.
.
.
.
.
175
Table A-19
Pin Assignments for USB Type B Connector .
.
.
.
.
.
.
176
Table B-1
Rackmounting Space Requirements for Modules
.
.
.
.
.
180
Table B-2
Slide Rail Rackmounting Hardware .
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
181
Table C-1
Installation Tools
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
198
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
007-4701-003
About This Guide
This guide provides an overview of the Silicon Graphics Prism Visualization System
components and describes how to set up and operate this system.
The most basic Silicon Graphics Prism consists of a base compute module combined with
an extensible graphics 2-processor capable node module (XG2N module). Larger
systems use a base compute module, XG2N module(s), and other optional modules that
are rackmounted together. The following optional modules are available:
•
A CPU expansion module provides zero, one or two additional 64-bit Intel
processors and up to 24 GB of memory. No PCI or disk options are available in this
module.
•
A CPU, memory and PCI/PCI-X expansion (CMPX) module provides zero, one or
two optional processors, up to 24 GB of memory, and four PCI and PCI-X card slots.
•
A Router module provides eight NUMAlink-4 ports and functions as a high-speed
switch to route network packets between base compute, XG2N, CPU expansion,
and CMPX modules.
•
The SGI TP900 storage module provides additional disk storage to the system. For
detailed information about this module, see SGI Total Performance 900 Storage System
User’s Guide (007-4428-00x). Note than an optional SCSI PCI card is required to use
this option in a Silicon Graphics Prism.
This guide is written for owners, system administrators, and users of the Silicon Graphics
Prism. It is written with the assumption that the reader has a good general knowledge of
computer graphics and computer operations.
007-4701-003
xvii
About This Guide
Important Information
Your SGI system support engineer (SSE) should perform the addition or replacement of
parts, cabling, and service of your Silicon Graphics Prism, with the exception of the
following tasks that you may perform yourself:
•
Installing your system in a rack.
•
Cabling the system modules to each other.
•
Using your system console to enter commands and perform system functions such
as powering on and powering off.
•
Using the On/Off, reset, and non-maskable interrupt (NMI) switches on the front
panel of your system.
•
Removing and replacing XG2N graphics boards.
•
Installing and removing PCI and PCI-X cards.
Caution: Exception: Because the installation and removal of an IO10 PCI card, which
installs in the lowermost slot, is more complicated and can cause damage to your
system if not performed properly, it can only be installed and removed by a trained
SGI system support engineer.
•
Installing and removing disk drives.
•
Installing and removing power supplies.
•
Installing and removing DIMMs.
•
Installing and removing the L1 controller display.
Warning: To ensure your safety and protect your system, do not add or replace
any components that this guide does not designate as customer replaceable.
Contact your SGI system support engineer (SSE) to install any hardware
components that are not designated as customer replaceable in this guide.
xviii
007-4701-003
About This Guide
Chapter Descriptions
The following topics are covered in this guide:
007-4701-003
•
Chapter 1, “Getting Started with the Silicon Graphics Prism,” provides introductory
information, instructions for cabling, and quick start operation of the Silicon
Graphics Prism.
•
Chapter 2, “System Overview and Options,” provides a general overview of the
Silicon Graphics Prism and its topology. This chapter also includes a quick
description of the various components and modules that can be part of a Silicon
Graphics Prism.
•
Chapter 3, “Configurations and Cabling,”
•
Chapter 4, “Installing and Removing Customer-Replaceable Units,” describes how
to install and remove the following customer-replaceable units (CRUs):
–
PCI and PCI-X cards
–
Graphics boards
–
Disk drives
–
Power supplies
–
Memory (DIMMs)
–
L1 system controller display
•
Chapter 5, “Troubleshooting,” describes how to troubleshoot your system by using
the L1 controller and your system LEDs. Information on reconfiguring the system’s
XF86Config file for changes in hardware usage is included.
•
Appendix A, “Technical Specifications,” contains environmental and physical
specifications for the Silicon Graphics Prism, as well as pin assignments for
non-proprietary connectors for the various modules that can be part of a Silicon
Graphics Prism.
•
Appendix B, “Installing Silicon Graphics Prism Modules Into a Rack,” provides
instructions for rack mounting modules with optional slide rails.
•
Appendix C, “Installing Rack Systems,” provides instructions for installing a
pre-assembled rack system.
•
Appendix D, “Regulatory Specifications and Safety Information,” contains
regulatory specifications and safety information for the Silicon Graphics Prism.
•
An index completes this guide.
xix
About This Guide
Related Publications
This section lists various information sources and explains how to access them. The
following SGI publications relate to the Silicon Graphics Prism:
•
SGI L1 and L2 Controller Software User’s Guide (007-3938-00x) (available online). This
guide describes the L1 and L2 controller functions, commands, and error messages
that you may need to operate and maintain your system.
•
SGI Total Performance 900 Storage System User’s Guide (007-4428-00x) (optional). This
guide describes the optional SGI TP900 storage module, which provides additional
storage for the Silicon Graphics Prism.
•
SGIconsole Hardware Connectivity Guide (007-4340-00x) (optional). This guide
describes how to connect an optional SGIconsole to SGI systems. You can use an
optional SGIconsole to manage and monitor multiple Silicon Graphics systems.
•
SGI Altix 350 User’s Guide (007-4660-00x). This guide contains detailed information
on many of the same optional modules that you may use with your Silicon Graphics
Prism.
You can obtain SGI documentation, release notes, or man pages in the following ways:
•
See the SGI Technical Publications Library at http://docs.sgi.com. Various formats
are available. This library contains the most recent and most comprehensive set of
online books, release notes, man pages, and other information.
•
SGI ProPack for Linux documentation, and all other documentation included in the
RPMs on the distribution CDs can be found on the CD titled “SGI ProPack vX.X for
Linux - Documentation CD.” To access the information on the documentation CD,
open the index.html file with a web browser. Because this online file can be updated
later in the release cycle than this document, you should check it for the latest
information.
•
The release notes, which contain the latest information about software and
documentation in this release, are on the SGI ProPack for Linux Documentation CD
in the root directory, in a file named README.TXT.
Note: There are no command line grelnotes or relnotes available on an SGI
Linux system. The InfoSearch tool is not available with Linux.
xx
007-4701-003
About This Guide
Conventions
The following conventions are used throughout this document:
Convention
Meaning
Command
This fixed-space font denotes literal items such as commands, files,
routines, path names, signals, messages, and programming language
structures.
variable
The italic typeface denotes variable entries and words or concepts
being defined. Italic typeface is also used for book titles.
user input
This fixed-space font denotes literal items that the user enters in
interactive sessions. Output is shown in nonbold, fixed-space font.
[]
Brackets enclose optional portions of a command or directive line.
...
Ellipses indicate that a preceding element can be repeated.
man page(x)
Man page section identifiers appear in parentheses after man page
names.
GUI element
This font denotes the names of graphical user interface (GUI)
elements such as windows, screens, dialog boxes, menus, toolbars,
icons, buttons, boxes, fields, and lists.
Product Support
SGI provides a comprehensive product support and maintenance program for its
products, as follows:
007-4701-003
•
If you are in North America, contact the Technical Assistance Center at
1 (800) 800 4SGI or contact your authorized service provider.
•
If you are outside North America, contact the SGI subsidiary or authorized
distributor in your country.
xxi
About This Guide
Reader Comments
If you have comments about the technical accuracy, content, or organization of this
document, contact SGI. Be sure to include the title and document number of the manual
with your comments. (Online, the document number is located in the front matter of the
manual. In printed manuals, the document number is located at the bottom of each
page.)
You can contact SGI in any of the following ways:
•
Send e-mail to the following address:
techpubs@sgi.com
•
Use the Feedback option on the Technical Publications Library website:
http://docs.sgi.com
•
Contact your customer service representative and ask that an incident be filed in the
SGI incident tracking system.
•
Send mail to the following address:
Technical Publications
SGI
1500 Crittenden Lane, M/S 535
Mountain View, California 94043
SGI values your comments and will respond to them promptly.
xxii
007-4701-003
Chapter 1
1. Getting Started with the Silicon Graphics Prism
The Silicon Graphics Prism Visualization System platform is a high-performance
highly-scalable system running the SGI Linux + ProPack operating system. The platform
is available in a number of configurations to meet your visualization and compute
requirements.
This chapter introduces the two primary modules used in the system, and provides an
abbreviated overview (quick start) on how to begin using your system. The following
chapters elaborate on various topics relating to larger systems, configuration and cabling
questions, component replacement and upgrades, basic troubleshooting, rack mounting,
and connector functionality.
007-4701-003
1
1: Getting Started with the Silicon Graphics Prism
XG2N and Compute Modules
The most basic Silicon Graphics Prism uses two modules:
•
A graphics 2-processor and memory capable node module (called an XG2N
module).
•
A base compute module that provides base I/O as well as processors and memory.
The XG2N module is a 2U rack mountable enclosure which, in addition to the two
high-performance graphics pipes, adds to the host system a node board with two CPUs
and four, eight, or twelve memory DIMMs. This module connects as an integral part of
the system’s compute/memory fabric. Though it contains CPUs and memory, the XG2N
module does not have boot I/O functionality, and therefore may not be used as a
standalone system.
The rear panel of the XG2N module with FireGL X2PRO-256 is shown in Figure 1-1 on
page 3. The rear panel of the XG2N module with FireGL X3-256 is shown in Figure 1-3 on
page 4.
The XG2N module is a node-connected module, and therefore connects to the host
system using NUMAlink, either directly or through an optional NUMAlink module
(router). This way the XG2N module becomes an integral part of the system, and can
contain both CPUs and memory, in addition to graphics output capabilities. Note that
NUMAlink routers may be available only with specific system configurations. Check
with your SGI sales or service representative for information on available configurations.
Each XG2N module contains two graphics pipes, each capable of supporting two display
devices. In systems with only two pipes, the pipe and channel designations are defined
as in Figure 1-1 and Figure 1-3. In systems with more than one XG2N graphics module
the pipes are numbered as shown in Figure 1-2 and Figure 1-4.
2
007-4701-003
XG2N and Compute Modules
Left channel
Right channel
Bus 2
slot 1
(Pipe 1)
REPEAT
IS2
IS1
L1 PORT
Power connector
NUMALINK 1
NUMALINK 0
CONSOLE
Bus1
slot 1
(Pipe 0)
USB-B L1 port
L1 console port
NUMAlink 0
connector
Figure 1-1
NUMAlink 1
connector
StereoSync
connector
Rear View of XG2N Graphics Module with FireGL X2PRO-256 (Showing First
Module Pipe Numbering)
Pipe n+1, left channel
Pipe n+1, right channel
Pipe n+1
Repeat
CONSOLE
L! Port
IS2
NUMALINK 0
IS1
Pipe n
NUMALINK 1
Pipe n, left channel
Pipe n, right channel
Figure 1-2
007-4701-003
Pipe Numbering of Additional XG2N Graphics Modules with FireGL X2PRO-256
3
1: Getting Started with the Silicon Graphics Prism
Left channel
Right channel
Bus 2, slot 1
(Pipe 1)
REPEAT
IS2
IS1
Bus1, slot 1
(Pipe 0)
L1 PORT
NUMALINK 0
CONSOLE
Power connector
NUMALINK 1
USB-B L1 port
NUMAlink 0
connector
L1 console port
Figure 1-3
NUMAlink 1
connector
StereoSync
connector
Rear View of XG2N Graphics Module with FireGL X3-256 (Showing First Module
Pipe Numbering)
Pipe n+1, left channel
Pipe n+1, right channel
Pipe n+1
REPEAT
IS2
IS1
Pipe n
L1 PORT
NUMALINK 0
CONSOLE
NUMALINK 1
Pipe n, left channel
Pipe n, right channel
Figure 1-4
4
Pipe Numbering of Additional XG2N Graphics Modules with FireGL X3-256
007-4701-003
XG2N and Compute Modules
Front Panel Controls
This section describes the front panel controls and indicators of the XG2N and compute
modules as shown in Figure 1-5.
L1 controller display
2
TM
Failure LED
Reset
Service-required LED
Power button
with LED
Figure 1-5
NMI
Silicon Graphics Prism XG2N and Compute Module Front Panel Controls
The front panels of the modules have the following controls:
•
L1 controller display. A liquid crystal display (LCD) that shows status and error
messages generated by the L1 controller.
Note: Refer to the SGI L1 and L2 Controller Software User’s Guide (007-3938-00x) for
more information on the L1 controller.
•
007-4701-003
Status LEDs. The front panel has the following LEDs:
–
Power-button LED. This green LED illuminates when the internal components
are on.
–
Service-required LED. This amber LED illuminates to indicate that an item is
not functioning properly (for example, a fan is off), but the system is still
operating.
–
Failure LED. This red LED illuminates to indicate that a failure has occurred
and the system or module has shut down.
5
1: Getting Started with the Silicon Graphics Prism
6
•
Power button. Press this button to power on the individual module. Alternatively,
you can power on all the system modules at once from an optional system console.
•
Reset button. Press this button to reset the internal processors and ASICs. The reset
will cause a memory loss.
•
NMI button. Pressing this button issues a non-maskable interrupt command to a
module. When the system hangs, you can send the affected module an NMI
interrupt. The interrupt goes to PROM and causes the CPU state to be captured for
that module. This information is saved in flash PROM and in the system log, and
can assist SGI technicians in debugging system hangs and customer problems.
007-4701-003
XG2N and Compute Modules
Compute Module Rear Panel Items
Figure 1-6 shows a view of the rear panel of a Silicon Graphics Prism compute module.
PCI/PCI-X slots:
Bus 2, slot 2
(with USB)
Bus 2, slot 1
PCI 4
PCI 3
Bus 1, slot 2
(with ImageSync)
Bus 1, slot 1 (with IO10)
PCI 2
CONSOLE
NUMALINK 0
L1 PORT
CPU
NUMALINK 1
PCI 1
Power
connector
L1 port
NUMAlink connector
CONSOLE
port
Multi-port serial connector
NUMAlink connector
Ethernet port
Figure 1-6
Silicon Graphics Prism Compute Module Rear Panel With ImageSync
The rear panel of the module has the following items:
•
AC power input. This connector connects the graphics module to an AC power
outlet.
•
Console port. This DB-9 serial port (console and diagnostic port) enables you to
connect a system console to the L1 controller on the graphics module.
•
L1 port (USB type B). This universal serial bus (USB) type B connector connects the
graphics module L1 controller to an optional L2 controller.
•
NUMAlink connectors. These NUMAlink connectors are used to connect base
compute, XG2N, CPU expansion, or CMPX modules to each other or to optional
router modules. These connections are made with a NUMAlink cable at 3.2 GB/s in
each direction.
•
NUMAlink LEDs. Each NUMAlink connector has a yellow LED and a green LED
(both located to the right of the NUMAlink connector). These LEDs provide
information about this specific NUMAlink connection:
–
007-4701-003
The yellow LED illuminates when this module and the module to which this
port is connected are both powered on.
7
1: Getting Started with the Silicon Graphics Prism
–
The green LED illuminates when a link has been established to another module
through this NUMAlink connector.
Internal Components
Figure 1-7 shows an internal view of the XG2N module.
Figure 1-7
8
Silicon Graphics Prism XG2N Module Internal View
007-4701-003
Safety Precautions
Safety Precautions
Before you install a Silicon Graphics Prism, you should familiarize yourself with the
safety precautions discussed in the following subsections:
•
“Hazard Statements” on page 9
•
“ESD Precautions” on page 10
•
“Safety Measures” on page 11
Hazard Statements
During the installation of the computer system, be alert for hazard advisory statements
with icons, which signify the following:
•
Caution Indicates a potentially hazardous situation that, if not avoided, can result
in minor or moderate injury. A caution statement also alerts you to unsafe practices
that can result in equipment damage and/or data corruption. A caution message is
accompanied by an icon as shown in the following example:
!
•
Caution:
Warning indicates a potentially hazardous situation that, if not avoided, could
result in death or serious injury. A warning message is accompanied by icon as
shown in the following example:
Warning:
007-4701-003
9
1: Getting Started with the Silicon Graphics Prism
ESD Precautions
Observe electrostatic discharge (ESD) precautions during the entire installation process
to eliminate possible ESD damage to the equipment. Wear an SGI-approved wrist strap
when you handle an ESD-sensitive device. Connect the wrist strap cord directly to earth
ground.
!
10
Caution: Observe all ESD precautions. Failure to do so can result in damage to the
equipment.
007-4701-003
Safety Precautions
Safety Measures
Observe the following safety measures when you install the system:
•
Use caution when you remove the system from the shipping crate. Failure to handle
the system carefully can result in personal injury or property damage.
Warning: Ensure that the shipping crate is positioned close to its destination
before you unpack the crate.
Warning: Employ a minimum of two people to lift the module or modules off
the shipping pallet, to move the module(s) from one location to another, and to
install the module(s) in a rack. Otherwise, someone could be seriously injured.
•
Do not move the system while it is connected to power.
Warning: Keep fingers and conductive tools away from high-voltage areas.
Failure to follow these precautions will result in serious injury or death. The
high-voltage areas of the system are indicated with high-voltage warning labels.
•
Ensure that a qualified electrician has properly installed the power receptacles.
•
Set all circuit breakers to the OFF (O) position before you plug in the system power
cord.
Warning: Use the following guidelines to prevent the rack from toppling over.
Otherwise, people could be seriously injured and/or equipment could be
damaged.
Follow these guidelines to prevent the rack from toppling over:
007-4701-003
•
Make sure that only one module is extended out of the rack at one time.
•
Install all equipment in the lowest available position in the rack.
•
Ensure that the tip tray is bolted to the front of the rack.
11
1: Getting Started with the Silicon Graphics Prism
Quick Start Information
The following sections and illustrations are intended to guide a knowledgeable user
through the installation, setup, and simple configuration of a basic Silicon Graphics
Prism visualization system. For more detailed information on system components or
maintenance, go on to the chapter that covers your detailed requirements.
Positioning and Power for Your Silicon Graphics Prism
Depending on the system ordered, your visualization system may have been shipped as
two or more individual modules, or pre-mounted in a rack.
If the system was shipped as a number of individual chassis, they may be placed on a flat
surface, as shown in Figure 1-8 on page 13, or placed in a rack. For instructions on
mounting modules in a rack see Appendix B, “Installing Silicon Graphics Prism Modules
Into a Rack,”.
If your system was shipped pre-mounted in a rack, see Appendix C, “Installing Rack
Systems,” for important information regarding unloading, unpacking, and installing a
rack system.
Warning: Follow the guidelines in “Safety Measures” on page 11 and Appendix C,
“Installing Rack Systems,” to avoid damage to equipment, injury, or death.
Plug your system into a suitable power outlet, as shown in Figure 1-8 (for non-racked
chassis) or Figure 1-9 (for racked chassis). Refer to Appendix A, “Technical
Specifications,” for detailed power requirements for the system modules.
12
007-4701-003
Quick Start Information
XG2N graphics module
Base compute module
Figure 1-8
007-4701-003
Example Connection of a Non-Racked System to Power
13
1: Getting Started with the Silicon Graphics Prism
CMPX module
(optional)
XG2N graphics
module
XG2N graphics
module
Base compute
module
CHA
NNE
L1
TP900 storage module (optional)
CHA
NNE
L2
I.D.
RANG
E
OU
TPU
GO T
OD
FAU
LT
CHA
Power
source
NNE
Power
distribution
unit (PDU)
L1
CHA
NNE
L2
I.D.
RANG
E
OU
TPU
GO T
OD
FAU
LT
Components within rack
Figure 1-9
14
Connection Example of a Racked System to Power
007-4701-003
Quick Start Information
NUMAlink Cabling for a Silicon Graphics Prism
If your system was shipped from SGI with the modules already mounted in a rack and
the NUMAlink cables pre installed, you should proceed to “Optional SGI ImageSync
Cabling” on page 16 to continue.
This section describes the NUMAlink cabling for the basic configuration. For additional
NUMAlink cabling information, see “System Configurations” on page 60.
Figure 1-10 shows a system with a base compute module and one XG2N graphics
module.
REPEAT
IS2
XG2N
module
IS1
L1 PORT
NUMALINK 1
NUMALINK 0
CONSOLE
NUMAlink 0
NUMAlink 1
PCI 4
PCI 3
PCI 2
CONSOLE
L1 PORT
NUMALINK 0
CPU
Base compute
module
NUMALINK 1
PCI 1
NUMAlink 0 NUMAlink 1
Figure 1-10
007-4701-003
NUMAlink Cabling in a Two-module System
15
1: Getting Started with the Silicon Graphics Prism
Optional SGI ImageSync Cabling
If your system was shipped from SGI with the modules already mounted in a rack and
the SGI ImageSync (IS) cables pre-installed, you should proceed to the next section,
“Connecting a Monitor” on page 18, and continue with the setup.
Note: When using an ImageSync card a monitor must be connected to the left channel
of the first pipe to which the ImageSync card is cabled.
If your system did not come with SGI ImageSync cables pre installed, use the following
steps to install them:
1.
Connect the DB9 connector on the IS card in your base compute module to the SGI
ImageSync DB9 connector (labeled IS1) located above the NUMAlink 1 connector on
the back of the XG2N using an SGI ImageSync DB9-to-DB9 cable.
2. Daisy-chain the SGI ImageSync cable from this first XG2N to any additional
graphics modules in your system by connecting an ImageSync DB9-to-DB9 cable
from the Repeat connector (located above the NUMAlink 0 connector) and routing it
to the ImageSync connector (labeled IS1) on the back of the next XG2N graphics
module, as shown in Figure 1-11.
Note: Figure 1-11 is intended only to show an example of how the ImageSync cables
connect. Your system may be configured differently.
!
16
Caution: Although the image sync subsystem uses DB9 connectors, these connectors,
whether on the ImageSync card or on the XG2N modules, are not serial ports.
Connecting a serial device to these connectors may cause damage to both the ImageSync
devices and the serial devices.
007-4701-003
Quick Start Information
REPEAT
IS2
XG2N
module
IS1
L1 PORT
NUMALINK 1
NUMALINK 0
CONSOLE
NUMAlink 0
REPEAT
NUMAlink 1
IS2
XG2N
module
IS1
L1 PORT
NUMALINK 1
NUMALINK 0
CONSOLE
NUMAlink 0
NUMAlink 1
PCI 4
PCI 3
PCI 2
CONSOLE
L1 PORT
NUMALINK 0
CPU
Base compute
module
NUMALINK 1
PCI 1
NUMAlink 0
Figure 1-11
007-4701-003
NUMAlink 1
Cabling Example of SGI ImageSync Card to Graphics
17
1: Getting Started with the Silicon Graphics Prism
Connecting a Monitor
Select the monitor on which you want the Linux OS console to appear, and connect this
monitor to the left channel of pipe 0 on your graphics module. The connector for the left
channel of pipe 0 is located in the lower left section of the PCI graphics area on the back
of your primary system graphics module. See Figure 1-1 for reference.
If you have a single XG2N graphics module, pipe 0 will be located in that module.
If you have multiple XG2N graphics modules, pipe 0 will typically be in the XG2N
module located directly above the base compute module. The Silicon Graphics Prism
platform comes with a choice of optional monitor types and sizes.
!
Caution: Ensure that the electrical rating on the monitor label matches the outlet voltage
range (100–120 VAC or 220–240 VAC) before you plug in the monitor.
If you use a monitor in locations that do not have the appropriate outlets, contact your
SGI system support engineer (SSE) before plugging in the monitor power cable.
Plug in and turn on your monitor or display as described in the documentation that
accompanies your monitor.
18
007-4701-003
Quick Start Information
Connecting a Keyboard and Mouse
Connect a USB keyboard and a USB mouse to your system, as shown in Figure 1-12. The
USB port closest to the side of the chassis is port 1.
Note: Some system configurations may be limited to the use of one keyboard and mouse
set. Check with your SGI sales or service representative if you have questions regarding
the use of multiple keyboards and mice with your system.
Figure 1-12 shows the USB PCI card in bus 2, slot 2 (the top PCI slot) of the base module,
which is the preferred location for this card. Some configurations may have the USB card
in a different PCI slot in the host system.
Note: If your keyboard/mouse pair will be further than 10 feet (3 meters) away from the
USB ports on the system, please refer to the section “Optional USB Extender” on page 57
for details about how to connect these devices through a USB extender.
Keyboard
Base compute module
USB type A
connectors
Mouse
Figure 1-12
007-4701-003
Connecting the USB Keyboard and Mouse to the System Compute Module
19
1: Getting Started with the Silicon Graphics Prism
Connecting the Multi-Port Serial Cable
A multi-port serial cable that converts the serial output on the IO10 board into four DB-9
serial cables is included with each base compute module containing an IO10.
Figure 1-13 shows an example connection.
Note: Leave the multi-port serial adapter cable unplugged if you are not using it for
optional serial connections.
Figure 1-13
20
Multi-port Adapter Serial Cable
007-4701-003
Quick Start Information
Connecting an L1 System Console
Connect a serial terminal to the Level 1 console connector on the base compute module
as shown in Figure 1-14.
Base compute
module
DB-9
connector
Serial terminal
DB-9 serial port
connector (L1 console)
Figure 1-14
007-4701-003
Connecting a Serial Terminal to the Base Compute Console Port
21
1: Getting Started with the Silicon Graphics Prism
Power-On the System
If your Silicon Graphics Prism does not have a a local system console, you can manually
power it on and off by using the power buttons. To power on your system or an
individual module manually, follow these steps:
1.
If the monitors and other peripherals are equipped with voltage select switches,
verify that they are set for the appropriate AC voltage and plug them in. Note that
they are normally plugged into power sources outside a rack system.
2. Turn on the circuit breaker switch of the PDU if applicable.
3. Press the power buttons on each of the modules that you want to power on in the
following order:
a.
For the optional TP900 storage module, press the rear-panel power button to
ON (I).
b.
Power on all the XG2N graphics modules.
c.
Power on any optional compute expansion or CMPX modules.
d. Power on the base (system) compute module last.
To boot the system from the L1 interface you must have a console connected to the system
via the console port on the base compute module. The serial connection parameters are:
•
38400 baud
•
1 stop bit
•
no parity
Use the following command at the L1 prompt to bring up all the system modules:
001c01-L1> * power up
If the system does not boot, recheck all power, and cable connections to be sure they are
properly plugged in. See Chapter 5, “Troubleshooting,” for additional trouble shooting
tips and L1 messaging.
To contact the SGI Customer Service Center, call 1-800-800-4SGI, or visit
http://www.sgi.com/support/customerservice.html. From outside the United States
contact your local SGI sales office.
22
007-4701-003
Quick Start Information
Verifying System Connections
Once your Silicon Graphics Prism Visualization System is installed in a rack (or
otherwise situated), is cabled together via NUMAlink, and is powered on, you should
verify that all modules are being seen by Linux + ProPack. To do this, follow these steps:
1.
From a Linux prompt, type hinv <Enter>
2. To verify the connection of all the graphics modules check the output for lines
similar to the following examples:
VGA compatible controller: ATI Technologies Inc Radeon R350 NG [FireGL X2] (rev xxx). on
pci11.01.0
Display controller: ATI Technologies Inc Radeon R350 [FireGL X2] (Secondary) (rev xxx). on
pci11.01.1
VGA compatible controller: ATI Technologies Inc Radeon R350 NG [FireGL X2] (#2) (rev xxx).
on pci12.01.0
Display controller: ATI Technologies Inc Radeon R350 [FireGL X2] (Secondary) (#2) (rev xxx).
on pci12.01.1
3. To verify all graphics boards in the system are seen, count the number of entries in
the output similar to the example output in step 2. Each two-line entry represents
one graphics pipe.
4. If the output does not show all the graphics pipes present, recheck all power, and
cable connections to be sure they are properly plugged in. See Chapter 5,
“Troubleshooting,” for additional trouble shooting tips and L1 messaging.
To confirm the presence of the graphics boards in the system using a Linux
command-line, use the following:
1.
Enter /sbin/lspci from a Linux prompt.
2. Check the output for information similar to the following:
11:01.0 VGA compatible controller: ATI Technologies Inc Radeon R350 NG [FireGL X2] (rev
xx)
11:01.1 Display controller: ATI Technologies Inc Radeon R350 [FireGL X2] (Secondary) (rev
xx)
12:01.0 VGA compatible controller: ATI Technologies Inc Radeon R350 NG [FireGL X2] (rev
xx)
12:01.1 Display controller: ATI Technologies Inc Radeon R350 [FireGL X2] (Secondary) (rev
xx)
007-4701-003
23
1: Getting Started with the Silicon Graphics Prism
3. If the output does not show all the graphics pipes present, recheck all power, and
cable connections to be sure they are properly plugged in. See Chapter 5,
“Troubleshooting,” for additional trouble shooting tips and L1 messaging.
24
007-4701-003
Quick Start Information
Powering Off Manually
To power off your system manually, follow these steps:
!
Caution: If you power off the system before you halt the operating system, you can lose
data.
1.
Shut down the operating system by entering the following command:
# init 0
2. Press the power buttons or power switches on each of the modules that you want to
power off. You may power off the modules in any order:
•
To power off the TP900 storage module, press the power button on its rear
panel to the OFF (O) position.
To power off the base compute, XG2N, expansion compute, or CMPX module, press the
power button on the front panel of each module.
007-4701-003
25
Chapter 2
2. System Overview and Options
This chapter provides an overview of the physical and architectural aspects of your
Silicon Graphics Prism platform. System configurations and components are described
and illustrated. This chapter includes the following sections:
007-4701-003
•
“Physical Features” on page 28
•
“Functional Architecture” on page 30
•
“System Components” on page 33
•
“Power Components” on page 48
•
“SGI Racks for Silicon Graphics Prism” on page 49
•
“Optional Devices” on page 52
27
2: System Overview and Options
Physical Features
The Silicon Graphics Prism platform is the latest advancement in the SGI NUMAflex
approach to Linux based modular visualization and computing. It is designed to deliver
maximum sustained performance in a compact system footprint. Independent scaling of
graphics pipes, computational power, I/O bandwidth, and in-rack storage lets you
configure a system to meet your unique visualization and computational needs.
The system can be expanded from a two-module system with two graphics pipes, up to
48 GB of memory, and 4 PCI/PCI-X slots to a higher-performance system that contains
16 processors, 192 GB local DIMM memory, and 28 PCI/PCI-X slots. Note that many of
the available PCI/PCI-X slots may be used to support I/O, USB, ImageSync, or optional
audio or SCSI cards needed for the system.
For most configurations, the visualization system is housed in one 17U rack or one 39U
rack as shown in Figure 2-1; however, for small system configurations, the system
modules can be placed on a table top.
Systems that are housed in 17U racks have a maximum weight of approximately 610 lb
(277 kg). The maximum weight of systems that are housed in 39U racks is approximately
1,366 lb (620 kg). The racks have casters that enable you to remove the system from the
shipping container and roll it to its placement at your site.
Check with your SGI service representative for additional physical planning information
or documentation that may be available.
For more information about the technical specifications of your system and individual
modules, see Appendix A, “Technical Specifications,” in this manual.
28
007-4701-003
Physical Features
39U rack
17U rack
2
TM
2
TM
Figure 2-1
007-4701-003
Example of Silicon Graphics Prism Rack Systems
29
2: System Overview and Options
Functional Architecture
The Silicon Graphics Prism is based on the SGI NUMAflex architecture, which is a
shared-memory system architecture that is the basis of SGI HPC servers and
supercomputers. The NUMAflex architecture is specifically engineered to provide
technical professionals with superior performance and scalability in a design that is easy
to deploy, program, and manage. It has the following features:
Shared access of processors, memory, and I/O. The Super Hub (SHub) ASICs and the
NUMAlink interconnect functions of the NUMAflex architecture enable applications to
share processors, memory, and I/O devices.
•
Each Super-Hub (SHUB) ASIC in the system acts as a memory controller between
processors and memory for both local and remote memory references.
•
The NUMAlink interconnect channels information between all the modules in the
system to create a single contiguous memory in the system of up to 192 GB and
enables every processor in a system direct access to every I/O slot in the system.
Together, the SHub ASICs and the NUMAlink interconnect enable efficient access to
processors, local and remote memory, and I/O devices without the bottlenecks
associated with switches, backplanes, and other commodity interconnect technologies.
System scalability. The NUMAflex architecture incorporates a low-latency,
high-bandwidth interconnect that is designed to maintain performance as you scale
system computing, I/O, and storage functions. For example, the computing dimension
in some system configurations can range from 4 to 16 processors in a single system image
(SSI).
Efficient resource management. The NUMAflex architecture is designed to run complex
models and, because the entire memory space is shared, large models can fit into
memory with no programming restrictions. Rather than waiting for all of the processors
to complete their assigned tasks, the system dynamically reallocates memory, resulting
in faster time to solution.
30
007-4701-003
Functional Architecture
A Silicon Graphics Prism system contains a combination of the following modules:
•
Base compute module. All Silicon Graphics Prism systems include at least one base
compute module that contains the following components:
–
A node board with two Intel Itanium 2 processors (each processor has
integrated L1, L2, and L3 caches), between 2 GB and 24 GB of local memory,
and a SHUB ASIC (the crossbar between the processors, local memory, the
network interface, and the I/O interface).
–
Four PCI/PCI-X slots
–
One four-port USB card that comes factory-installed in the top PCI/PCI-X slot
–
One IO10 PCI card that comes factory-installed in the lowermost PCI/PCI-X
slot
Note: See “Optional IO9 PCI Card” on page 53 for information about the
optional IO9 card.
Note: Each system or partition requires a minimum of base I/O card. The
standard card providing this base I/O functionality is an IO10 PCI card.
Additional IO10 cards are required if you want additional serial ATA hard drives
and/or DVD-ROM drives in additional modules. These cards must reside in
additional base compute modules (no more than one card per module).
The IO10 card has real-time interrupt input and output ports, an Ethernet port,
and a multi-port serial adapter connector. The IO10 card is also needed to
support a base module’s serial ATA disk drive(s), and DVD-ROM.
Note: The RT interrupt input and RT interrupt output functionality of the IO10
PCI card is not supported under SGI Linux + ProPack.
007-4701-003
–
A bootable hard drive
–
A DVD-ROM drive
31
2: System Overview and Options
•
•
•
•
XG2N graphics module. All systems contain at least one graphics module that has
the following components:
–
A node board with zero or two Intel Itanium 2 processors (each processor has
integrated L1, L2, and L3 caches), between 0 GB and 24 GB of local memory,
and a SHUB ASIC (the crossbar between the processors, local memory, the
network interface, and the I/O interface).
–
Two graphics pipes
CPU Expansion module. Like the base compute module, the CPU module contains
a node board and local memory. This module is different from the base compute
module, however, in the following ways:
–
It has zero, one, or two CPUs (the base compute module must have two CPUs)
–
It does not contain PCI/PCI-X slots, hard drives, or a removable media device.
CMPX module. Like the base compute module, the CMPX module contains a node
board and local memory. This module is different from the base compute module,
however, in the following ways:
–
It has zero, one, or two CPUs (the base compute module must have two CPUs)
–
It does not contain an IO10 PCI card, hard drives, or a removable media device.
Router module. The router module is an eight-port optional router that functions as
a high-speed switch to route network packets between modules through the
NUMAlink interconnect fabric.
When the system consists of a base compute module and XG2N graphics module only, it
may contain a maximum of 4 processors and a maximum of 48 GB of memory. To increase
the number of graphics pipes, processors, and/or memory in the system, the base
compute module can connect to additional XG2N, CPU expansion and/or CMPX
modules via direct NUMAlink or through router modules.
32
007-4701-003
System Components
System Components
This section briefly describes the standard and optional modules of a Silicon Graphics
Prism, in the following subsections:
•
“Base Compute Module” on page 33
•
“XG2N Graphics Module” on page 35
•
“CPU Expansion Module” on page 36
•
“CMPX Module” on page 38
•
“Router Module” on page 40
Base Compute Module
The base compute module is a 2U AC-powered device that consists of the following:
•
Two Intel Itanium 2 processors (each with integrated L1, L2, and L3 caches)
•
Between 2 GB and 24 GB of local DIMM memory (4, 8, or 12 DIMMs)
•
One to four PCI/PCI-X cards
Note: At least one base compute module comes factory-installed with a base I/O
card in the bottom PCI/PCI-X slot and a four-port USB card in the upper slot. This
base I/O card is typically an IO10 card, but may optionally be an IO9 card (described
in “Optional IO9 PCI Card” on page 53).
•
One or two sled-mounted serial ATA disk drives (at least one disk drive is required
in the system). The serial ATA disk drive(s) and the DVD-ROM require an IO10
card.
•
DVD-ROM
Each base compute module also contains an L1 controller that provides the following:
007-4701-003
•
Controls and sequences power
•
Controls and monitors the environment
•
Initiates a reset
•
Stores identification and configuration information
33
2: System Overview and Options
Figure 2-2 shows the front and rear views of a base compute module.
2
TM
Front view
Rear view
Figure 2-2
34
Front and Rear Views of Base Compute Module with IO10 PCI Card
007-4701-003
System Components
XG2N Graphics Module
The XG2N graphics module (see Figure 2-3) is a 2U AC-powered device that consists of
the following:
•
Two graphics pipes
•
Zero or two Intel Itanium 2 processors (each with integrated L1, L2, and L3 caches)
•
Between 0 GB and 24 GB of local DIMM memory (4, 8, or 12 DIMMs)
•
One L1 controller that provides the following services:
–
Controls and sequences power
–
Controls and monitors the environment
–
Initiates a reset
–
Stores identification and configuration information
2
TM
Front view
Rear view
Figure 2-3
007-4701-003
Front and Rear Views of XG2N Module
35
2: System Overview and Options
CPU Expansion Module
The CPU expansion module is a 2U AC-powered device that consists of the following:
•
Zero, one, or two Intel Itanium 2 processors (each with integrated L1, L2, and L3
caches)
•
Between 2 GB and 24 GB of local DIMM memory (4, 8, or 12 DIMMs)
•
One L1 controller that provides the following services:
–
Controls and sequences power
–
Controls and monitors the environment
–
Initiates a reset
–
Stores identification and configuration information
Figure 2-4 shows the front and rear views of a CPU expansion module.
36
007-4701-003
System Components
2
TM
Front view
Rear view
Figure 2-4
007-4701-003
Front and Rear Views of CPU Expansion Module
37
2: System Overview and Options
CMPX Module
The CMPX module (see Figure 2-5) is a 2U AC-powered module that offers:
38
•
Zero, one, or two Intel Itanium 2 processors (each with integrated L1, L2, and L3
caches)
•
Between 2 and 24 GB of local DIMM memory (4, 8, or 12 DIMMs)
•
Four PCI/PCI-X slots
•
One L1 controller that provides the following services:
–
Controls and sequences power
–
Controls and monitors the environment
–
Initiates a reset
–
Stores identification and configuration information
007-4701-003
System Components
2
TM
Front view
Rear view
Figure 2-5
007-4701-003
Front and Rear Views of CMPX Option Module
39
2: System Overview and Options
Router Module
The optional router module (sometimes called an R-brick) is an eight-port 2U-high
module that functions as a high-speed switch to route network packets between base
compute, XG2N, CPU expansion, and CMPX modules. This creates a NUMAlink-4
interconnect fabric (as opposed to the ring topology normally used in smaller system
configurations). The optional router is generally only used when there are four and eight
modules interconnected as a single system image.
The section “NUMAlink Cabling in Routed Systems” on page 65 details the cable
connection points used in a system with a router.
The key component within the module is the router chip, an SGI custom-designed ASIC.
The router chip is an eight-port crossbar that connects any input-link channel to any of
the seven possible output-link channels (ports).
The router has the following features:
•
Eight NUMAlink-4 channels
•
One USB port for system controller support
•
One L1 controller and LCD display
•
One 9-pin console connector
•
Two hot-pluggable cooling fans (not customer replaceable)
Figure 2-6 shows a block diagram of the router.
40
007-4701-003
System Components
Port 7
Port 8
G
Port 6
F
Port 5
E
H
NL4
Router
ASIC
D
A
Port 1
B
Port 2
C
Port 4
Port 3
LVDS
LVDS
LVDS
LVDS
L2 host
(Type A USB connector)
System
control board
LVDS
LVDS
LVDS
LVDS
USB
L1 console
(DB9 connector)
Figure 2-6
007-4701-003
Router Functional Block Diagram
41
2: System Overview and Options
Router Module Front Panel Components
The router module contains the following front panel items (as shown in Figure 2-7):
•
L1 display. The L1 display is a 55.7 mm X 32 mm backlit liquid crystal display
(LCD) that displays system messages. It displays two lines with a maximum of 12
characters on each line.
•
On/Off switch with LED. Press this button to turn on the router internal
components. You can also turn on the router internal components at a system
console.
•
Three LEDs:
•
–
Power-button LED. This green LED illuminates when the router internal
components are on and turns off when they are off.
–
Service-required LED. This amber LED illuminates to indicate that an item is
broken or not operating properly (for example, a fan is off), but the router is still
operating.
–
Failure LED. This red LED illuminates to indicate that a system failure has
occurred and the router is down.
Fans. Two hot-pluggable fans provide N+1 redundant cooling.
L1 controller display
Failure LED
Service-required LED
Power button
with LED
Figure 2-7
42
Front View of the Router Module
007-4701-003
System Components
Router Module Rear Panel Components
The router module has the following rear panel items (see Figure 2-8):
•
PWR (power) connector. This connects the router to the power outlet (120V or
220V, autosensing).
•
NUMAlink connectors. These NUMAlink connectors connect the router to the
Prism compute or graphics modules to form an interconnect fabric.
•
L1 port connector. This connects the internal USB hub of the router to an optional
console/controller. The internal USB hub can receive the USB signals from the
controller via this port and distribute these signals to the L1 of the router.
•
Console connector. This serial port provides optional connection to a terminal for
system control purposes.
•
Link connector LEDs. Each NUMAlink connector has two LEDs, as follows:
–
The yellow LED illuminates to indicate that both the router and the module to
which this NUMAlink port is connected are powered on.
–
The green LED illuminates when a link has been established between the router
and the module to which it is connected through this NUMAlink port.
Port H
Console
ELEC RATING
100-240VAC
50-60nz
1.0-0.6A
FUSE 250V-6.3A
Port A
H
8
1
A
G
7
2
B
F
6
3
C
E
5
4
D
CONSOLE
L1 USB
AC IN
Power
connector
Figure 2-8
007-4701-003
L1 USB
Port E
Port D
Rear View of Router Module
43
2: System Overview and Options
Storage Expansion
A base compute module contains an IO10 base I/O card and two disk-drive bays. You
can add additional storage to the system as follows:
•
For a SCSI (small computer system interface) JBOD (just a bunch of disks) solution,
SGI offers the TP900 storage module. With the addition of an optional SCSI PCI
card, the TP900 can be connected to base compute modules or CMPX expansion
modules.
•
For a Fibre Channel solution that supports both JBOD and RAID configurations,
SGI offers the 2Gb SGI TP9100 storage system.
•
The Silicon Graphics Prism also supports a number of tape devices; check with your
SGI sales or support representative for available options.
The various storage devices are discussed in the subsections that follow.
44
007-4701-003
System Components
SGI TP900 Storage Module
The TP900 storage module, shown in Figure 2-9, is a 2U-high 8-drive storage system that
provides compact, high-capacity, high-availability JBOD storage. The enclosure
backplane connects the 8 drives on one SCSI bus. As an option, the storage module can
also be configured on two SCSI buses (2 strings of 4 drives).
This storage module has the following features:
•
It mounts in a standard 19-inch rack; it is available in factory-installed
configurations.
•
It uses SCSI Parallel Interface 3 (SPI-3) capable Low Profile (1-inch high) 3.5-inch
disk drives.
•
Its drive carriers accept SGI-qualified 10,000- or 15,000-RPM SCSI disk drives.
For more information about the TP900 storage module, see SGI Total Performance 900
Storage System User’s Guide (007-4428-00x).
Front view
Rear view
Figure 2-9
007-4701-003
OUTPUT
GOOD
OUTPUT
GOOD
FAULT
FAULT
SGI TP900 Storage Module
45
2: System Overview and Options
2Gb SGI TP9100 Optional Storage System
The 2Gb SGI TP9100, shown in Figure 2-10, is an affordable, entry-level RAID storage
array that is easily expandable and comes in either a deskside tower or a rackmounted
configuration. You can start with a basic JBOD configuration and later add RAID
controllers, or you can start with a RAID configuration.
The 2Gb SGI TP9100 storage system connects to base compute and/or CMPX modules
via an optional Fibre Channel PCI card. For more information about the SGI TP9100
storage system, see SGI Total Performance 9100 (2 Gb TP9100) Storage System User’s Guide
(007-4522-00x).
46
007-4701-003
System Components
Rackmounted configuration
Deskside tower configuration
sgi
sgi
sgi
Figure 2-10
007-4701-003
2Gb SGI TP9100 Storage System
47
2: System Overview and Options
Power Components
The Silicon Graphics Prism platform can contain the following power components:
•
One or two power distribution units (PDUs). The second PDU is added to the
system only when more than 10 AC power receptacles are needed within the rack.
The PDU inputs AC voltage from an external power receptacle and it can output
AC voltage to the base compute modules, XG2N graphics modules, CPU expansion
modules, CMPX modules, router modules, and TP900 storage modules.
See Figure 1-9 on page 14 for an example.
48
007-4701-003
SGI Racks for Silicon Graphics Prism
SGI Racks for Silicon Graphics Prism
The system is offered in two rack types: a short rack and a tall rack. The racks are
measured in standard rack units (U); one U is equal to 1.75 in. (4.45 cm). The short rack
is a 17U rack (see Figure 2-11). The tall rack is a 39U rack (see Figure 2-14).
Each component within the rack is identified by the lowest U number that it occupies.
For example, the top (XG2N) module shown in Figure 2-11 is described as being located
in U12.
XG2N graphics module
Base compute module
Figure 2-11
007-4701-003
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Unit Numbering Within Racks
49
2: System Overview and Options
Both rack types are industry-standard 19-inch racks, and they support two types of
mounting rails (shelf rails or optional slide rails) that hold the modules within the rack.
For example, the base compute, XG2N, CPU expansion, and CMPX modules can use
shelf rails or optional slide-mounting rails (see Figure 2-12). The optional TP900 storage
modules always use shelf rails, which are two parallel L-shaped mounting rails within
the rack (see Figure 2-13).
9
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
2
TM
Slide rail
Figure 2-12
Optional Slide Rails
Shelf rails
19 in.
Figure 2-13
50
Shelf Rails
007-4701-003
SGI Racks for Silicon Graphics Prism
Both short and tall racks, as shown in Figure 2-14, have front and rear doors that have
keylocks to prevent unauthorized access to the system. The racks also have cable
entry/exit areas at the bottom of the racks. The 39U racks have cable management
hardware in the rear.
Both rack types are mounted on four casters, two of which are swivel casters. The casters
enable the rack to be rolled out of a shipping crate and to its placement at your site.
Warning: Follow the guidelines in “Safety Measures” on page 11 and Appendix C,
“Installing Rack Systems,” to avoid damage to equipment, injury, or death.
The base of each rack has seismic tie-down attachment points. The base of the tall rack
also has leveling pads.
39U rack
17U rack
2
TM
2
TM
Figure 2-14
007-4701-003
Front Views of Short and Tall Racks
51
2: System Overview and Options
Optional Devices
This section describes some of the optional devices available for the Silicon Graphics
Prism system, in the following subsections:
52
•
“Optional IO9 PCI Card” on page 53
•
“Optional Tape Devices” on page 53
•
“Optional DM8 Audio Board” on page 54
•
“Optional USB Extender” on page 57
007-4701-003
Optional Devices
Optional IO9 PCI Card
If you do not wish to use the IO10 base I/O card in your system, an optional IO9 PCI card
is required for base I/O functionality. Each system must contain at least one base I/O PCI
card for base I/O functionality within the system. This PCI card must reside in bus 1, slot
1 (the bottom slot) of the lowest base compute module in the system. The IO9 PCI card
has the following connectors:
•
External VHDCI 68-pin SCSI connector
•
10/100/1000BaseT Ethernet connector
•
Real-time interrupt output (RTO) and real-time interrupt input (RTI) connectors
Note: The RT interrupt input and RT interrupt output functionality of the IO9 PCI
card is not supported under SGI Linux + ProPack.
The optional IO9 card also contains an IOC-4 ASIC that supports the following features:
•
One IDE channel for the DVD-ROM
•
NVRAM and time-of-day clock
Optional Tape Devices
The Silicon Graphics Prism supports optional or third-party tape drives. For current tape
solutions for your system visit:
http://sales.corp.sgi.com/products/storage/tape.html
or check with your SGI sales or service representative.
007-4701-003
53
2: System Overview and Options
Optional DM8 Audio Board
The DM8 is a half-size PCI expansion board that provides audio expansion via the PCI
bus. It connects to consumer and professional audio and video equipment via
industry-standard interfaces. Note that not all connector functionality is supported
under Linux. The DM8 interface panel is shown in Figure 2-15.
Surround
L/R
Front L/R
Phones
Surround
Center L/R
Mic in
Line in
Center/
Subwoofer
Figure 2-15
DM8 Interface Panel and Connectors
Board Installation
Your DM8 audio board is tested for operation in specific SGI visualization systems.
Select SGI Linux based systems support use of a single DM8 audio board (check with
your SGI sales or support representative for functional confirmation). It is recommended
that it not be removed and installed in other SGI systems.
SGI Linux based visualization systems support only one DM8 option board. Under most
circumstances you should always leave the DM8 installed in the original
factory-configured slot. If it does become necessary to either move or replace the board,
use the information on removing and replacing PCI cards in your system user’s guide for
step-by-step instructions. If you don’t have the printed user guide handy, it is available
on the Internet in the SGI Technical Publications Library at the following location:
http://docs.sgi.com
Proceed to the next sections for information on cabling, verifying functionality, and basic
operation.
54
007-4701-003
Optional Devices
Cables and Connectors
The DM8 audio board has the following connectors on it’s rear panel as shown from left
to right in Figure 2-15 on page 54:
•
Surround Center L/R (silver) a line-level output connector for powered surround
Center Left and Right channel speakers (not supported under Linux).
•
Surround L/R (black) a line-level output that can connect to powered Surround
Left and Right speakers (not supported under Linux).
•
Center/Subwoofer (orange) a line-level output that can connect to powered Center
and Subwoofer speakers (not supported under Linux).
•
Front L/R Phones (green) a jack that connects to powered Left and Right speakers.
If you are using a basic two-speaker stereo setup, this is the jack you will use. This is
also the jack to use for stereo headphones.
•
Line In (blue) a stereo line-level input intended for recording into an audio
recording program.
•
Mic In (pink) a mic input for connecting a mono microphone for recording,
videophone, or voice-recognition applications. This jack is a three-conductor
TRS-type jack for condenser (two-conductor) and electret (three-conductor) type
microphones.
Functional Features
The DM8 PCI audio board has the following functional features:
Line outs:
•
Dynamic range of 106 dB (typical, -60 dB input, a-weighted)
•
Maximum line output level of 1.26 Vrms (+2 dBV)
•
Frequency response of +0.8/-3.0 dB, 20Hz to 80 kHz
Line in:
•
Dynamic range of 105 dB (a-weighted)
Mic in:
007-4701-003
•
Dynamic range of 90 dB (a-weighted)
•
Maximum input level of 1.45 Vrms (3.2 dBV)
55
2: System Overview and Options
Sampling frequencies (in kHz):
•
Supports sampling frequencies 8, 11.025 16, 22.05, 32, 44.1, or 48kHz
Audio playback formats:
•
Output formats supported are:
•
24-bit linear PCM/48kHz playback capability for Linux systems
•
24-bit linear PCM/48kHz recording capability for Linux systems
Connector features:
•
Analog connector for powered speakers (headphone jack)
•
Stereo 1/8-inch mini analog line input
•
Mono 1/8-inch mini analog microphone input (with electret mic power)
Troubleshooting Tips
Use the following information to help correct any functional problems with the DM8
audio PCI option board:
If the sound is distorted or a channel is not producing sound, try the following:
•
Check all cable connections between the audio card and speakers
•
Confirm that any powered speakers are powered on
If the audio is not working at all, try these solutions:
•
Reboot the system
•
Reseat the PCI audio card
If none of these solutions solve the problem, contact your SGI customer support
representative or local service provider for additional help.
56
007-4701-003
Optional Devices
Optional USB Extender
You can plug the keyboard and mouse directly into the USB connectors of a compute
module (see “Connecting a Keyboard and Mouse” on page 19), or you can use an
optional USB extender that allows you to place the keyboard and mouse up to 328.68 feet
(100 m) from the compute module, see Figure 2-16 on page 58.
Note: The local extender (LEX) receives AC power from the system power source or
power distribution strip (PDS) in the rack. A 6-ft. (1.82-m) adapter cable connects the
extender’s power adapter to the PDU. The REX requires AC power from a source within
a 6-ft. (1.82-m) range from the keyboard/mouse connection point.
007-4701-003
57
2: System Overview and Options
Power
distribution
unit (PDU)
USB ports
9.84 ft (3 m)
USB type B
connector
LEX
RJ45
connector
ST
HO
1
6-ft
(1.82 m)
adapter cable
K
LIN
Power
adapter
WER
PO
30 ft (9.1 m)
REX
USB type A
connectors
Keyboard
RJ45
connector
Mouse
USB Type A connector
USB Type B connector
Figure 2-16
58
Keyboard and Mouse Connected via Optional USB Extender
007-4701-003
Chapter 3
3. Configurations and Cabling
This chapter describes the configuration ranges of the Silicon Graphics Prism Power and
Team Systems and provides NUMAlink cabling instructions.
007-4701-003
59
3: Configurations and Cabling
System Configurations
The minimum and maximum ranges of the configurable items for the Silicon Graphics
Prism Power Systems (ring topology) are listed in Table 3-1, and for the Silicon Graphics
Prism Team Systems (router topology) are listed in Table 3-2.
Table 3-1
Silicon Graphics Prism Power System Configuration Ranges
Configuration
Minimum
Configuration
Maximuma
Compute/expansion modules
1
3
Graphics modules
1
2
Processors
4
8
2 GB
96 GB
1 serial ATA disk
6 serial ATA disks
4
16
Storage device
None
Customer configurable
17U short rack
None
1
39U tall rack
None
1
Optional L2 controller
None
1
Memory capacity
Internal disk storage
Internal PCI/PCI-X slotsb
a. Maximum configurations and peak performance will change over time based on new technology available;
check with your SGI sales or service representative for the latest available options and configurations.
b. Each base compute module has four internal PCI/PCI-X slots; however, one slot is required for the base IO
PCI card, one for the ImageSync card, and one for USB. Therefore, the number of available slots in the base
compute module is reduced.
60
007-4701-003
System Configurations
Table 3-2
Silicon Graphics Prism Team System Configuration Ranges
Configuration
Minimum
Configuration
Maximuma
Compute/expansion modules
1
5
Graphics modules
2
4
NUMAlink modules (routers)
2
2
Processors
8
16
8 GB
192 GB
1 serial ATA disk
10 serial ATA disks
4
28
Storage device
None
Customer configurable
17U short rack
None
1
39U tall rack
None
2
Optional L2 controller
None
1
Memory capacity
Internal disk storage
Internal PCI/PCI-X slotsb
a. Maximum configurations and peak performance will change over time based on new technology available;
check with your SGI sales or service representative for the latest available options and configurations.
b. Each base compute module has four internal PCI/PCI-X slots; however, one slot is required for the base IO PCI
card, one for the ImageSync card, and one for USB. Therefore, the number of available slots in the base compute
module is reduced.
007-4701-003
61
3: Configurations and Cabling
NUMAlink Cabling in Ring Topologies
The basic Silicon Graphics Prism uses a type of network configuration that is referred to
as a ring topology. As the name implies, the network connection between the base
compute module, graphics module, and optional CPU expansion or CMPX modules
forms a ring. A message is passed around the ring until it reaches its destination. The data
flow of this ring topology flows in both directions, enabling the modules to have direct
connection to two other modules and providing an alternative path if a connection fails
between two modules.
The Silicon Graphics Prism system may also be configured in routed configurations,
which are described in “NUMAlink Cabling in Routed Systems” on page 65.
The bisection bandwidth per node depends on the number of modules on the ring, as
well as what type of modules they are; the bisection bandwidth per node is greatest when
there are only two modules on the ring. See Table 3-3.
Table 3-3
62
Bisection Bandwidth of Ring Topology
Module Count
Bisection Bandwidth
2
3.2 GB/s/node
3 (with 2 pipes)
2.13 GB/s/node
3 (with 4 pipes)
1.83 GB/s/node
4 (with 2 pipes)
2.13 GB/s/node
4 (with 4 pipes)
1.6 GB/s/node
007-4701-003
NUMAlink Cabling in Ring Topologies
Figure 3-1 provides an example of the two-module ring topology.
XG2N graphics module
2
1
2
Repeat
CONSOLE
L! Port
IS2
IS1
NUMAlink NUMAlink
NUMALINK 1
NUMALINK 0
Base compute module
PCI 4
PCI 3
1
CONSOLE
L1 PORT
NUMAlink NUMAlink
NUMALINK 0
PCI 2
NUMALINK 1
CPU
PCI 1
Two-Module Ring Topology Example
Figure 3-1
Figure 3-2 shows an example of a three-module ring topology.
XG2N graphics module
1
3
2
3
Repeat
CONSOLE
L! Port
IS2
IS1
NUMAlink NUMAlink
NUMALINK 1
NUMALINK 0
XG2N graphics module
2
Repeat
CONSOLE
L! Port
IS2
IS1
NUMAlink NUMAlink
NUMALINK 1
NUMALINK 0
Base compute module
PCI 4
PCI 3
1
CONSOLE
L1 PORT
NUMAlink NUMAlink
NUMALINK 0
CPU
PCI 2
NUMALINK 1
PCI 1
Figure 3-2
007-4701-003
Three-Module Ring Topology Example
63
3: Configurations and Cabling
Figure 3-3 shows an example of a four-module ring topology.
CPU expansion or CMPX module
4
NUMAlink NUMAlink
XG2N graphics module
1
2
4
3
3
Repeat
CONSOLE
L! Port
IS2
IS1
NUMAlink NUMAlink
NUMALINK 1
NUMALINK 0
XG2N graphics module
2
Repeat
CONSOLE
L! Port
IS2
IS1
NUMAlink NUMAlink
NUMALINK 1
NUMALINK 0
Base compute module
PCI 4
PCI 3
1
CONSOLE
L1 PORT
NUMAlink NUMAlink
NUMALINK 0
CPU
PCI 2
NUMALINK 1
PCI 1
Figure 3-3
64
Four-Module Ring Topology Example
007-4701-003
NUMAlink Cabling in Routed Systems
NUMAlink Cabling in Routed Systems
This section describes the NUMAlink cabling for systems containing routers.
Prism systems containing routers will have between four and eight base compute, XG2N,
CPU, or CMPX modules, as well as two routers. This section provides cabling details for
the smallest configuration (four modules, two routers) and largest configuration (eight
modules, two routers). Other configurations are similar to the ones shown.
007-4701-003
65
3: Configurations and Cabling
Minimum Routed Configuration
This section describes a minimum routed configuration, having four base compute,
XG2N, CPU, or CMPX modules. Table 3-4 details the NUMAlink cabling for this
configuration, Figure 3-4 provides a conceptual diagram, and Figure 3-5 shows a
representative module ordering.
Minimum Routed Configuration Cable Chart
Table 3-4
Router (a) Cables
Router (b) Cables
Router (a), port A to module 1, port NL-0
Router (b), port A to module 1, port NL-1
Router (a), port B to module 2, port NL-0
Router (b), port B to module 2, port NL-1
Router (a), port C to module 3, port NL-0
Router (b), port C to module 3, port NL-1
Router (a), port D to module 4, port NL-0
Router (b), port D to module 4, port NL-1
H
G
F
E
R (a)
A
B
F
D
E
4
C
G
H
R (b)
D
C
B
A
3
2
1
Figure 3-4
66
Minimum Routed Configuration Conceptual Diagram
007-4701-003
NUMAlink Cabling in Routed Systems
CMPX module
Router module
Router module
XG2N module
XG2N module
Base compute module
Figure 3-5
007-4701-003
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Module Ordering in Minimum Routed Configuration
67
3: Configurations and Cabling
Maximum Routed Configuration
This section describes a maximum routed configuration, having eight base compute,
XG2N, CPU, or CMPX modules. Table 3-5 details the NUMAlink cabling for this
configuration, Figure 3-6 provides a conceptual diagram, and Figure 3-7 shows a
representative the module ordering.
Table 3-5
68
Maximum Routed Configuration Cable Chart
Router (a) Cables
Router (b) Cables
Router (a), port A to module 1, port NL-0
Router (b), port A to module 1, port NL-1
Router (a), port B to module 2, port NL-0
Router (b), port B to module 2, port NL-1
Router (a), port C to module 3, port NL-0
Router (b), port C to module 3, port NL-1
Router (a), port D to module 4, port NL-0
Router (b), port D to module 4, port NL-1
Router (a), port E to module 1, port NL-0
Router (b), port E to module 1, port NL-1
Router (a), port F to module 2, port NL-0
Router (b), port F to module 2, port NL-1
Router (a), port G to module 3, port NL-0
Router (b), port G to module 3, port NL-1
Router (a), port H to module 4, port NL-0
Router (b), port H to module 4, port NL-1
007-4701-003
NUMAlink Cabling in Routed Systems
8
7
6
H
G
F
E
R (a)
A
B
F
5
D
C
E
H
R (b)
D
4
G
C
B
A
3
2
1
Figure 3-6
007-4701-003
Maximum Routed Configuration Conceptual Diagram
69
3: Configurations and Cabling
39
38
37
36
35
34
33
32
31
30
29
28
27
26
25
24
23
22
21
20
19
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Figure 3-7
70
CMPX module
CMPX module
CMPX module
XG2N module
Router module
Router module
XG2N module
XG2N module
XG2N module
Base compute module
Module Ordering in Maximum Routed Configuration
007-4701-003
Chapter 4
4. Installing and Removing Customer-Replaceable
Units
This chapter provides safety instructions to follow when using and maintaining your
system. It also describes how to install and remove customer-replaceable units (CRUs).
This information is covered in the following sections:
007-4701-003
•
“Safety Instructions” on page 72
•
“Accessing the System’s Internal Components” on page 74
•
“PCI and PCI-X Cards” on page 81
•
“Replacing an XG2N Graphics Card” on page 91
•
“Disk Drives” on page 98
•
“Removing and Replacing Power Supplies” on page 103
•
“Removing and Replacing Memory DIMMs” on page 107
•
“L1 Controller Display” on page 114
71
4: Installing and Removing Customer-Replaceable Units
Safety Instructions
Before you perform any type of maintenance to your system, read the following safety
instructions:
72
•
Follow all warnings and instructions marked on the product and noted in this and
other documentation included with the product.
•
Unplug this product from the wall outlet before you clean it. Do not use liquid
cleaners or aerosol cleaners. Use a damp cloth for cleaning.
•
Do not use this product near water.
•
Do not place this product or components of this product on an unstable cart, stand,
or table. The product may fall, causing serious damage to the product.
•
Perforation openings on the cabinet and components are provided for ventilation,
reliable operation, and protection from overheating of the product. These
ventilation holes must not be blocked or covered. This product should never be
placed near or over a radiator or heat register, or in a built-in installation unless
proper ventilation is provided.
•
This product should be operated with the type of power indicated on the marking
label. If you are not sure of the type of power available, consult your dealer or local
power company.
•
Do not allow anything to rest on the power cord. Do not locate this product where
people will walk on the cord.
•
Do not use extension cords with your SGI system.
•
Never push objects of any kind into this product through cabinet holes because they
may touch dangerous voltage points or short out parts that could result in a fire or
electric shock.
•
Never spill liquid of any kind on the product.
•
Do not attempt to service this product yourself except as noted in this guide.
Opening or removing covers of internal components may expose you to dangerous
voltage points or other risks. Refer all servicing to qualified service personnel.
•
Unplug this product from the wall outlet and refer servicing to qualified service
personnel under the following conditions:
–
If the power cord or plug is damaged or frayed.
–
If the product has been exposed to rain, water, or other type of liquid.
007-4701-003
Safety Instructions
–
If the product does not operate normally when the operating instructions are
followed.
Note: Adjust only those controls that are covered by the operating instructions,
because improper adjustment of other controls may result in damage and will
often require extensive work by a qualified technician to restore the product to
normal condition.
007-4701-003
–
If the product has been dropped or if the cabinet has been damaged.
–
If the product exhibits a distinct change in performance, which indicates a need
for service.
•
Only qualified service personnel should replace the soldered lithium battery (or
batteries) in the Silicon Graphics Prism platform. Please see Appendix D,
“Regulatory Specifications and Safety Information” for more information.
•
Use only the proper type of power supply cord set (provided with the system) for
this unit.
73
4: Installing and Removing Customer-Replaceable Units
Accessing the System’s Internal Components
Many of the procedures in this chapter require the removal of the top cover, a frame rail,
or a support bracket in order to access the internal components you are removing or
replacing. This section describes how to remove and replace these items.
Opening the Cover
Use the following steps to open the cover:
1.
To remove the module’s top cover and access the internal system components,
remove the ten Phillips screws as shown in Figure 4-1.
2. Lift the hinged cover into the fully open position.
Figure 4-1
74
Opening the System Cover
007-4701-003
Accessing the System’s Internal Components
Removing the Optional Chassis Rail
If you are installing a card in one of the two lower-most card slots (or the bottom card, in
the case of an XG2N module), you will need to remove the optional chassis rail. To do
this, unscrew the five Phillips screws, as shown in Figure 4-2. (If you are not installing a
card into one of the lower-most card slots, or your module is not slide-rail mounted, you
will not need to perform this step.)
!
007-4701-003
Caution: The module may or may not have a factory-installed IO10 card, which
always comes installed in the lowermost slot. To prevent damage to your system,
only a trained SGI service support engineer can install or remove an IO10 card.
75
4: Installing and Removing Customer-Replaceable Units
Figure 4-2
76
Removing an Optional Chassis Rail
007-4701-003
Accessing the System’s Internal Components
Removing the PCI/PCI-X Support Bracket
If you are accessing one of the two lower-most card slots (or the bottom card, in the case
of an XG2N module), you must remove the lower PCI/PCI-X support bracket that covers
the two lower-most slots. To do this remove the four Phillips screws, as shown in
Figure 4-3. (If you are not installing a card into one of the lower-most card slots you will
not need to perform this step.)
Figure 4-3
007-4701-003
Removing the Lower PCI/PCI-X Support Bracket
77
4: Installing and Removing Customer-Replaceable Units
Reinstalling the PCI/PCI-X Support Bracket
If you removed the PCI/PCI-X support bracket, replace it and screw in the four Phillips
screws, as shown in Figure 4-4
Figure 4-4
78
Replacing the Lower PCI/PCI-X Support Bracket
007-4701-003
Accessing the System’s Internal Components
Reinstalling the Optional Chassis Rail
If you removed the optional chassis rail, replace it and screw in the five Phillips screws,
as shown in Figure 4-5
Figure 4-5
007-4701-003
Replacing the Chassis Rail
79
4: Installing and Removing Customer-Replaceable Units
Closing the Cover
Use the following steps to close the cover:
1.
Close the hinged cover on the system and screw in the ten Phillips screws to secure
the cover, as shown in Figure 4-6.
Figure 4-6
80
Closing the System Cover
007-4701-003
PCI and PCI-X Cards
PCI and PCI-X Cards
Your base compute module and various optional modules in your system support PCI
and PCI-X cards. The following instructions, which describe how to install and remove a
PCI or PCI-X card from system base compute module, can be used to install and remove
PCI and PCI-X cards from the base compute, CPU expansion, or CMPX module. For
specific information on removing or replacing XG2N graphics cards, see “Replacing an
XG2N Graphics Card” on page 91.
Figure 4-7 shows the location of the PCI and PCI-X card slots in the base compute
module.
For an updated list of supported PCI and PCI-X cards, see SGI Supportfolio at
http://support.sgi.com.
This section describes the following:
•
“Rules for Card Installation and Removal” on page 82
•
“Installing a PCI or PCI-X Card” on page 83
•
“Removing a PCI or PCI-X Card” on page 87
PCI/PCI-X slots:
PCI 4
PCI 3
PCI 2
CONSOLE
L1 PORT
NUMALINK 0
CPU
NUMALINK 1
PCI 1
Figure 4-7
007-4701-003
Bus 2, slot 2
(with USB)
Bus 2, slot 1
Bus 1, slot 2
(with ImageSync)
Bus 1, slot 1 (with IO10)
PCI and PCI-X Card Slots in the Base Compute Module
81
4: Installing and Removing Customer-Replaceable Units
Rules for Card Installation and Removal
When installing or removing PCI or PCI-X cards from your system, be aware of the
following rules:
!
•
If you operate PCI and PCI-X cards on the same bus at the same time, the PCI-X
card will run in PCI mode.
•
If you place cards of different speeds on the same bus, the highest-speed card will
run at the speed of the slower card. For example, if you have a 100 MHz-capable
card in one slot of a bus and a 33 MHz card on the second slot of the same bus, both
cards will run at 33 MHz.
•
When deciding to install a PCI or PCI-X card, be aware that if an IO10 card (a PCI
card that runs at 66 MHz) is installed in your module (in the lowermost slot), and if
you want to install a card in the slot immediately above the IO10, the slot will
operate only in PCI mode at a speed no faster than 66 MHz.
•
Note the following caution when installing or removing a card:
Caution: Electronic equipment can be irreparably damaged by electrostatic
discharge (ESD). Always follow these preventive measures when you handle a
system component:
- Remove a component from its antistatic bag only when you are ready to install it.
- If you handle a component before installation, do not place it on surfaces that
produce ESD (carpeting, for example) or near devices that create static electricity.
- Attach a static wrist strap to a grounded connection on your system when you
install or remove a component.
82
007-4701-003
PCI and PCI-X Cards
Installing a PCI or PCI-X Card
To install a PCI or PCI-X card, follow these steps:
1.
Power off the Silicon Graphics Prism platform. For power off instructions, see
“Powering Off Manually” on page 25.
2. Disconnect all of the cables at the rear of the module.
Warning: Components may be hot. To avoid injury, allow the components to cool
for approximately five minutes before you proceed with these instructions.
3. If your module is rackmounted, remove the two screws that secure the module to
the front rails of the rack. If the module is mounted with shelf rails, remove the
screws at the rear. If your module is not rackmounted, proceed to step 5.
4. If the module is mounted with the optional slide rail kit, pull the module from the
rack until it is stopped by the safety latches. If the module uses shelf rails, two
people should lift the unit from the rack and place it on a stable work surface.
5. Open the top cover as described in “Opening the Cover” on page 74.
6. If you are installing a card into the top two PCI/PCI-X slots, you can install it
without completely removing the module from the rack (optional slide rails only).
Note: If you are removing a card from one of the two lower slots (bus 1, slot 1, or bus
1, slot 2), you must remove the module from the rack. For detailed instructions, see
“Removing a Rail-Mounted Module from a Rack” on page 194.
7. Make sure that you read “Safety Instructions” on page 72, and “Rules for Card
Installation and Removal” on page 82 before beginning your card installation.
8. If you are installing a card in one of the two lower-most card slots, you also need to
remove the optional chassis rail, as described in “Removing the Optional Chassis
Rail” on page 75. (If you are not installing a card into one of the lower-most card
slots or your module is not slide-rail mounted, proceed to step 9.)
!
007-4701-003
Caution: The module may or may not have a factory-installed IO10 card, which
always comes installed in the lowermost slot. To prevent damage to your system,
only a trained SGI service support engineer can install or remove an IO10 card.
83
4: Installing and Removing Customer-Replaceable Units
9. If you are installing a card in one of the two lower-most card slots, you must remove
the lower PCI/PCI-X support bracket that covers the two lowermost slots, as
described in “Removing the PCI/PCI-X Support Bracket” on page 77.
10. If a blanking plate covers the slot that is needed for the installation, remove the
retaining screw, as shown in Figure 4-8, and the blanking plate.
Figure 4-8
84
Removing the Blanking Plate
007-4701-003
PCI and PCI-X Cards
11. Insert the card into the slot by pushing the card into the connector until it is
properly seated and install the retaining screw, as shown in Figure 4-9. If you have
installed the card into one of the upper two slots, proceed to step 13.
Figure 4-9
Installing the Card and Retaining Screw
12. If you have installed a card in one of the two bottommost card slots, replace the
lower PCI/PCI-X support bracket as described in “Reinstalling the PCI/PCI-X
Support Bracket” on page 78.
13. If you removed the optional chassis rail, replace it as described in “Reinstalling the
Optional Chassis Rail” on page 79.
14. Close the top cover as described in “Closing the Cover” on page 80.
15. If you removed the module from the rack, perform the following substeps. (If you
have not removed the module from the rack, proceed to step 16.)
007-4701-003
a.
Fully extend the left and right slide rails from the rack until they lock into place.
b.
This step requires two people. With one person holding each side of the
module, align the chassis rails of the module with the slide rails of the rack.
c.
Slide the chassis rails into the slide rails until the chassis rails are stopped by the
safety latches.
85
4: Installing and Removing Customer-Replaceable Units
16. Press the safety latches on both sides of the module and slide the module into the
rack.
17. Install the two screws that secure the module to the front rails of the rack. For shelf
mounted units, install the two screws at the rear of the module.
18. Install all of the cables at the rear of the module.
19. Power on the Silicon Graphics Prism platform. For power on instructions, see
“Power-On the System” on page 22.
86
007-4701-003
PCI and PCI-X Cards
Removing a PCI or PCI-X Card
To remove a PCI or PCI-X card, follow these steps:
1.
Power off the Silicon Graphics Prism platform. For powering off instructions, see
“Powering Off Manually” on page 25.
2. Disconnect all of the cables at the rear of the module.
Warning: Components may be hot. To avoid injury, allow the components to cool
for approximately five minutes before you proceed with these instructions.
3. Remove the two screws that secure the module to the front rails of the rack.
4. If the module is mounted on shelf rails, remove the two screws at the rear of the
unit.
5. If your system uses optional slide rails, pull the module from the rack until it is
stopped by the safety latches, then press the latches to release the unit.
6. Use two people to move the module from the rack to a sturdy non-static surface.
Note: If you are removing a PCI or PCI-X card from one of the two lower slots (bus
1, slot 1, or bus 1, slot 2), you must remove the module from the rack. For detailed
instructions, see “Removing a Rail-Mounted Module from a Rack” on page 194.
7. Open the top cover as described in “Opening the Cover” on page 74.
8. Make sure that you read “Safety Instructions” on page 72, and “Rules for Card
Installation and Removal” on page 82, before installing the card.
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4: Installing and Removing Customer-Replaceable Units
9. If you are removing a card from one of the two lower-most card slots, you also need
to remove the optional chassis rail, as described in “Removing the Optional Chassis
Rail” on page 75. (If you are not removing a card from one of the lower-most card
slots or your module is not slide-rail mounted, proceed to step 10.)
!
Caution: The module may or may not have a factory-installed IO10 card, which
always comes installed in the lowermost slot. To prevent damage to your system,
only a trained SGI service support engineer can install or remove an IO10 card.
10. If you are removing a card from one of the two lower-most card slots, you must
remove the lower PCI/PCI-X support bracket that covers the two lowermost slots,
as described in “Removing the PCI/PCI-X Support Bracket” on page 77.
11. Unscrew the retaining screw from the card that you will remove, and extract the
card, as shown in Figure 4-10. Place the card on an ESD-safe surface.
Figure 4-10
88
Removing the Retaining Screw and Extracting the Card
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PCI and PCI-X Cards
12. If you are replacing the card that you have removed, reference the instructions in
“Installing a PCI or PCI-X Card” on page 83. If you are not replacing the card that
you have removed, proceed to the next step.
13. Place a blanking plate to cover the slot where you removed the card, and screw in
the retaining screw, as shown in Figure 4-11. After installing the blanking plate, if
you have removed a card from one of the two lowermost slots, proceed to the next
step. Otherwise, proceed to step 14.
Figure 4-11
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Replacing a Blanking Plate
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4: Installing and Removing Customer-Replaceable Units
14. If you have removed a card from one of the two bottommost card slots, replace the
lower PCI/PCI-X support bracket as described in “Reinstalling the PCI/PCI-X
Support Bracket” on page 78.
15. If you removed the optional chassis rail, replace it as described in “Reinstalling the
Optional Chassis Rail” on page 79.
16. Close the top cover as described in “Closing the Cover” on page 80.
17. If your system uses optional slide rails and you removed the module from the rack,
follow these substeps; if not, go on to step 19.
a.
Fully extend the left and right slide rails from the rack until they lock into place.
b.
This step requires two people. With one person holding each side of the
module, align the chassis rails of the module with the slide rails of the rack.
c.
Slide the chassis rails into the slide rails until stopped by the safety latches.
18. Press the safety latches on both sides of the module, and slide it into the rack.
19. For modules mounted on shelf rails, use two people to slide the unit into the rack.
20. Install the two screws that secure the module to the front rails of the rack. For shelf
mounted units, secure the two screws at the back.
21. Install all of the cables at the rear of the module.
22. Power on the Silicon Graphics Prism platform. For powering on instructions, see
“Power-On the System” on page 22.
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Replacing an XG2N Graphics Card
Replacing an XG2N Graphics Card
To replace a graphics card, follow these steps:
1.
Power off the Silicon Graphics Prism platform. For power off instructions, see
“Powering Off Manually” on page 25.
2. Disconnect all of the cables at the rear of the module.
Warning: Components may be hot. To avoid injury, allow the components to cool
for approximately five minutes before you proceed with these instructions.
3. If your module is rackmounted, remove the two screws that secure the module to
the front rails of the rack. If the module is mounted with shelf rails, remove the
screws at the rear also. If your module is not rackmounted, proceed to step 6.
4. If the module is mounted with the optional slide rail kit, pull the module from the
rack until it is stopped by the safety latches. Otherwise, two people should lift the
unit from the rack and place it on a stable work surface.
5. Remove the module (using two people) from the optional slide rails by depressing
the safety latches and sliding the module outward. Place it on a stable work surface.
6. Open the top cover as described in “Opening the Cover” on page 74.
7. Make sure that you read “Safety Instructions” on page 72, before beginning removal
of a graphics card.
8. When removing and replacing a graphics card, you may need to remove an optional
chassis rail by unscrewing the five Phillips screws (as described in “Removing the
Optional Chassis Rail” on page 75).
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4: Installing and Removing Customer-Replaceable Units
9. Remove the lower PCI/PCI-X support bracket by unscrewing the four Phillips
screws, as shown in Figure 4-12.
Figure 4-12
Removing the XG2N Graphics Card Bracket
10. Undo and remove the two screws that hold the card to the back panel, as shown in
Figure 4-13.
!
Caution: Each graphics card has a 7-pin synchronization cable connected from the PCI
riser board to the underside of the graphics card. Be careful not to pull the graphics card
away from the board too far as you remove it.
11. Pull the card gently out of the main connector on the riser board until it is clear of
the back panel and main connector.
12. Carefully rotate the board over and disconnect the 7-pin keyed synchronization
cable from the bottom of the graphics board (it attaches the graphics card assembly
to the PCI riser board). See Figure 4-14 on page 94.
13. Place the graphics card on an ESD-safe surface or in a protective bag.
92
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Replacing an XG2N Graphics Card
Rotate board upward
Figure 4-13
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Remove XG2N Graphics Board Assembly
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4: Installing and Removing Customer-Replaceable Units
Figure 4-14
Synchronization Cable Connection on Underside of Graphics Board
To install a new XG2N graphics card, use the following steps:
1.
Place the board close to the graphics connector on the riser board and tilt it up until
you can see the connector location for the 7-pin synchronization cable.
2. Gently insert the 7-pin synchronization cable into the connector on the bottom of the
replacement graphics card (see Figure 4-14). The connector is keyed and will only
insert in the proper orientation. You should hear or feel a slight snap as the
connector is seated.
3. Insert the card into the slot the old graphics card was removed from by pushing the
card into the connector until it is properly seated and installing the back panel
retaining screws, as shown in Figure 4-15.
Be careful not to snag the 7-pin synchronization cable between the graphics card
and the riser board connector when you install the new card.
94
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Replacing an XG2N Graphics Card
Rotate board downward
Figure 4-15
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Installing the Graphics Card and Retaining Screws
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4: Installing and Removing Customer-Replaceable Units
4. Replace the lower PCI/PCI-X support bracket and screw in the four Phillips screws,
as shown in Figure 4-16.
Figure 4-16
Replacing the PCI/PCI-X Support Bracket
5. Replace the optional chassis rail (if applicable) as described in “Reinstalling the
Optional Chassis Rail” on page 79.
6. Close the top cover as described in “Closing the Cover” on page 80.
7. If your system uses optional slide rails, follow substeps a-d; otherwise go to step 8.
a.
Fully extend the left and right slide rails from the rack until they lock into place.
b.
This step requires two people. With one person holding each side of the
module, align the chassis rails of the module with the slide rails of the rack.
c.
Slide the chassis rails into the slide rails until the chassis rails are stopped by the
safety latches.
d. Press the safety latches on both sides of the module, and slide the module into
the rack.
96
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Replacing an XG2N Graphics Card
8. For modules mounted on shelf rails, use two people to slide the unit into the rack.
9. Install the two screws that secure the module to the front rails of the rack. For shelf
mounted units, secure the two screws at the back.
10. Install all of the cables at the rear of the module.
11. Power on the Silicon Graphics Prism platform. For powering on instructions, see
“Power-On the System” on page 22.
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4: Installing and Removing Customer-Replaceable Units
Disk Drives
Each base compute module contains one or two sled-mounted serial ATA disk drives
(see Figure 4-17).
Disk drives
Figure 4-17
98
Disk Drive Locations
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Disk Drives
Installing a Disk Drive
To install a disk drive, follow these steps:
1.
Open the bezel door as far as it will open. Position the drive assembly so that it
engages the bay guide rails and, with the locking handle fully swung open, gently
push the drive into the bay until the locking handle engages with left side of the bay
opening, as shown in Figure 4-18A.
Note: If you have only one disk drive in your system, it should be located in the
bottom-most slot.
2. Swing the locking handle towards the chassis until the locking handle engages the
latch, as shown in Figure 4-18B and Figure 4-18C.
3. Close the bezel door, as shown in Figure 4-18D.
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4: Installing and Removing Customer-Replaceable Units
A
B
C
D
2
TM
Figure 4-18
100
Installing a Disk Drive
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Disk Drives
Removing a Disk Drive
To remove a disk drive, follow these steps:
1.
If you are replacing the system drive, you must first power off the Silicon Graphics
Prism platform. For instructions to power off the Silicon Graphics Prism platform,
see “Powering Off Manually” on page 25.
If you are replacing a data drive, ensure that the drive has spun down before you
remove it.
2. Open the bezel door located on the left side of the front panel of the module, as
shown in Figure 4-19A. (Make sure that you open the door as far as it will open.)
3. Remove the drive by depressing the locking handle with your forefinger
(Figure 4-19B). Then swing open the locking handle away from the chassis until the
handle disengages the drive connector from the backplane connector (see
Figure 4-19C).
Note: If you will have only one disk drive, it should be located in the bottom-most
slot.
4. Carefully slide the drive out of the bay (see Figure 4-19D) and gently place it on a
flat ESD-safe surface. (Do not use the handle to pull the drive out of the bay.)
5. If you are replacing the disk drive, proceed to “Installing a Disk Drive” on page 99.
(After you have replaced the disk drive, return to step 8 for instructions to power on
your module.) If you are not replacing the disk drive, proceed to the next step.
6. Close the bezel door.
7. Power on the Silicon Graphics Prism platform as described in “Power-On the
System” on page 22.
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4: Installing and Removing Customer-Replaceable Units
A
B
2
TM
D
C
Figure 4-19
102
Removing a Disk Drive
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Removing and Replacing Power Supplies
Removing and Replacing Power Supplies
Each module in a Silicon Graphics Prism system can contain one or two sled-mounted
power supplies (see Figure 4-20). For information on determining the operational status
of a power supply, see “Reading Power Supply Status LEDs” on page 129.
Note: The XG2N graphics module always requires two power supplies; no redundant
power is available. The system must be shut down prior to power supply replacement.
2
TM
Power supplies
Figure 4-20
Power Supplies Location
To replace a power supply, follow these steps:
1.
If you are replacing a power supply in an XG2N module, power off the Silicon
Graphics Prism platform as described in the section “Powering Off Manually” on
page 25. The XG2N module always uses two supplies. There is no redundant power
supply option available.
2. Remove the power supply to be replaced, as follows:
a.
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Swing open the bezel door located on the right side of the module front panel.
With a Phillips screw driver, unscrew the two screws on the screen cover as
shown in Figure 4-21A.
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4: Installing and Removing Customer-Replaceable Units
b.
Swing open the screen cover as shown in Figure 4-21B.
c.
Disengage the power supply from the power supply bay by pushing the
interior release button to the right and pulling up and out on the green-colored
handle lock as shown in Figure 4-21C.
d. Gently pull out the power supply from the chassis until it clears the power
supply bay as shown in Figure 4-21D. Place the power supply on an ESD-safe
surface.
Caution: When pulling out the power supply from the chassis, make sure not to
disturb the power supply fan’s ribbon cable.
3. Install the replacement power supply, as follows:
a.
Position the power supply in the slot and with the power supply handle pulled
up (fully opened), gently push the power supply into the bay as shown in
Figure 4-22A.
Caution: When installing the power supply, make sure that the power supply
does not clip or pinch the power supply fan’s ribbon cable.
b.
Push in and down on the green-colored handle and snap the power supply into
place as shown in Figure 4-22B.
c.
After you have installed the power supply, swing the screen cover until it closes
as shown in Figure 4-22C.
Caution: When closing the screen cover, make sure that the cover does not clip
or pinch the power supply fan’s ribbon cable.
d. Screw in the two Phillips screws that you had removed as shown in
Figure 4-22D, and close the bezel door.
4. Power on the Silicon Graphics Prism platform, as described in “Power-On the
System” on page 22.
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Removing and Replacing Power Supplies
A
B
Ribbon cable
Bezel door
D
C
Figure 4-21
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Removing a Power Supply
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4: Installing and Removing Customer-Replaceable Units
A
B
Ribbon cable
C
D
Screen cover
Bezel door
Figure 4-22
106
Installing the Power Supply
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Removing and Replacing Memory DIMMs
Removing and Replacing Memory DIMMs
This section provides guidelines for DIMM selection and installation, followed by
instructions to install and remove DIMMs.
Memory DIMM Group Placement and Guidelines
Memory is contained on cards that are referred to as DIMMs (dual inline memory
modules). Each base compute, XG2N, CPU expansion, or CMPX module can contain
four, eight, or twelve DIMMs installed in DIMM slots located on the module’s node
board.
These twelve DIMM slots are organized into three groups of four DIMMs each, as shown
in Figure 4-23 on page 108.
DIMMs are installed one per DIMM slot, and must be installed in groups of four.
Follow these guidelines when installing DIMM groups:
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•
Memory is increased or decreased in four-DIMM group increments only.
•
Each of the four DIMMs that make up a DIMM group must be the same memory
size and speed; however, different groups of DIMMs can differ in memory size.
•
The first four DIMMs (group 0) must be in place for the base compute module to
operate properly.
•
Mixing DIMM groups with different access speeds will cause the memory bus to
default to the speed used for the slowest group.
•
The maximum bus speed for a completely full set of DIMM memory slots (three
installed groups), defaults to 100 MHz or 133 MHz, depending on the type of
DIMMs installed.
•
The DIMMs used in the Silicon Graphics Prism platform modules are not
compatible with DIMMs used in the Origin 200, Origin 350 series, SGI 3000 series,
SGI 2000 series, Onyx systems, Fuel, Octane or Tezro systems.
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4: Installing and Removing Customer-Replaceable Units
Group 0
Group 1
Group 2
Figure 4-23
!
Layout of Slots and DIMM Memory Groups
Caution: Electronic equipment can be irreparably damaged by electrostatic discharge
(ESD). Always follow these preventive measures when you handle a system component:
- Remove a component from its antistatic bag only when you are ready to install it.
- If you handle a component before installation, do not place it on surfaces that produce
ESD (carpeting, for example) or near devices that create static electricity.
- Attach a static wrist strap to a grounded connection on your system when you install
or remove a component.
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Removing and Replacing Memory DIMMs
Installing a DIMM Group
To install a DIMM group, follow these steps:
1.
Power off the Silicon Graphics Prism platform. For powering off instructions, see
“Powering Off Manually” on page 25.
2. Disconnect all of the cables at the rear of the module.
Warning: Components may be hot. To avoid injury, allow the components to cool
for approximately five minutes before you proceed with these instructions.
3. Remove the two screws that secure the module to the front rails of the rack. For
shelf-mounted modules, remove the two screws at the rear of the unit.
4. With shelf-mounted rails, use two people to slide the module out and move it to a
stable work surface. With optional slide rails, pull the module from the rack until it
is stopped by the safety latches.
5. Open the top cover as described in “Opening the Cover” on page 74.
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4: Installing and Removing Customer-Replaceable Units
Module
DIMM slots
Figure 4-24
DIMM Locations (XG2N Module Shown, Others Similar)
6. Install the DIMMs, as follows (see Figure 4-24 and Figure 4-25):
Note: If you need to find the correct locations in which to install the DIMMs, make
sure to read the introductory material in “Removing and Replacing Memory
DIMMs” on page 107.
a.
Ensure the ejector latches are in the open position (leaning away from the slot).
b.
Hold the DIMM only by its edges and remove it from its antistatic package.
c.
Align the bottom edge of the DIMM with the keyed socket.
d. Insert the bottom edge of the DIMM into the socket, and then press down
evenly on the DIMM until it seats correctly. Use extreme care when you install a
DIMM. If you apply too much pressure, you can damage the socket.
e.
When the DIMM is fully seated in the connector, the ejector latches snap into
place flush with each end of the DIMM, see Figure 4-25.
7. Close the top cover as described in “Closing the Cover” on page 80.
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Removing and Replacing Memory DIMMs
8. If using optional slide rails, press the safety latches on both sides of the module and
slide the module into the rack. For shelf-mounted units, use two people to slide the
module back into the rack.
9. Install the two screws that secure the module to the front rails of the rack. If shelf
rails are used, install the two rear screws.
10. Install all of the cables at the rear of the module.
11. Power on the Silicon Graphics Prism platform as described in “Power-On the
System” on page 22.
Figure 4-25
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Inserting a DIMM
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4: Installing and Removing Customer-Replaceable Units
Removing a DIMM
To remove a DIMM, follow these steps:
1.
Power off the Silicon Graphics Prism platform. For powering off instructions, see
“Powering Off Manually” on page 25.
2. Disconnect all of the cables at the rear of the module.
Warning: Components may be hot. To avoid injury, allow the components to cool
for approximately five minutes before you proceed with these instructions.
3. Remove the two screws that secure the module to the front rails of the rack. For
shelf-mounted modules, remove the two screws at the rear of the unit.
4. With shelf-mounted rails, use two people to slide the module out and move it to a
stable work surface. With optional slide rails, pull the module from the rack until it
is stopped by the safety latches.
5. Open the top cover as described in “Opening the Cover” on page 74.
6. Remove the DIMM, as follows (see Figure 4-24 and Figure 4-26):
Note: For guidelines on removing or replacing the DIMMs, make sure to read the
introductory material in “Removing and Replacing Memory DIMMs” on page 107
and see Figure 4-23 on page 108.
a.
Push out and down on the two ejector latches (located at each end of the DIMM
socket) to disengage the DIMM from its connector.
b.
Carefully grasp the DIMM and pull it up and out of the guide rails.
Note: Hold the DIMM only by its edges. Be careful not to touch its components
or gold edge connectors.
c.
Place the DIMM on an ESD-safe surface.
7. If you are installing a new DIMM, proceed to “Installing a DIMM Group” on
page 109. If you are not installing a new DIMM, proceed to the next step.
8. Close the top cover as described in “Closing the Cover” on page 80.
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Removing and Replacing Memory DIMMs
9. If using optional slide rails, press the safety latches on both sides of the module and
slide the module into the rack. For shelf-mounted units, use two people to slide the
module back into the rack.
10. Install the two screws that secure the module to the front rails of the rack. If shelf
rails are used, install the two rear screws.
11. Install all of the cables at the rear of the module.
12. Power on the Silicon Graphics Prism platform as described in “Power-On the
System” on page 22.
Figure 4-26
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Removing a DIMM
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4: Installing and Removing Customer-Replaceable Units
L1 Controller Display
The L1 controller, which is used to monitor and manage the base compute module of the
Silicon Graphics Prism platform, has a display located on the front panel as shown in
Figure 4-27. Every Silicon Graphics Prism platform module is factory- shipped with an
L1 controller display. Note that the optional TP900 mass storage module is an exception
and does not have an L1.
This section describes how to replace an L1 controller display panel for a base compute
module. (You can also use these instructions to replace an L1 controller display panel for
an XG2N, CPU expansion, or CMPX module.)
L1 controller display
2
TM
Figure 4-27
L1 Controller Display on Base Compute Module
To replace an L1 controller display, follow these steps:
1.
Power off the system as described in “Powering Off Manually” on page 25.
2. Disconnect all of the cables at the rear of the module.
Warning: Components may be hot. To avoid injury, allow the components to cool
for approximately five minutes before you proceed with these instructions.
3. Remove the two screws that secure the module to the front rails of the rack. For
shelf-mounted modules, remove the two screws at the rear of the unit.
4. With shelf-mounted rails, use two people to slide the module out and move it to a
stable work surface. With optional slide rails, pull the module from the rack until it
is stopped by the safety latches.
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L1 Controller Display
5. Open the top cover as described in “Opening the Cover” on page 74.
6. On the front panel of your system, remove the front bezel by unscrewing the two
Phillips screws holding the bezel to the chassis, as shown in Figure 4-28A.
7. Holding the L1 display cover with one hand, unscrew the single Phillips screw
holding the L1 display cover to the chassis, as shown in Figure 4-28B. Gently
unhook and pull away the L1 display cover from the chassis.
8. Unscrew the two Phillips screws holding the L1 controller display panel to the L1
display protective cover, as shown in Figure 4-28C.
9. Gently disconnect the L1 controller cable from the connector on the L1 controller
display, as shown in Figure 4-28D.
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4: Installing and Removing Customer-Replaceable Units
A
B
Hook slots
2
TM
C
D
Figure 4-28
116
Removing the L1 Controller Display Panel
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L1 Controller Display
10. Connect the L1 controller cable to the connector on the new L1 controller display,
making sure that the red stripe is to your left, as shown in Figure 4-29A.
11. Align the two screw holes on the L1 controller display with the holes on the L1
display protective cover, and screw in the two Phillips screws, as shown in
Figure 4-29B.
12. Hook in the L1 display protective cover onto the slots on the front chassis and,
holding the L1 display cover up against the front chassis, screw in the Phillips
screw, as shown in Figure 4-29C.
13. Replace the front bezel onto the front chassis of the system by screwing in the two
Phillips screws holding the bezel to the chassis, as shown in Figure 4-29D.
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4: Installing and Removing Customer-Replaceable Units
A
B
Red stripe
D
A
C
Hook slots
2
TM
Figure 4-29
Installing an L1 Controller Display Panel
14. Close the top cover as described in “Closing the Cover” on page 80.
15. If using optional slide rails, press the safety latches on both sides of the module and
slide the module into the rack. For shelf-mounted units, use two people to slide the
module back into the rack.
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L1 Controller Display
16. Install the two screws that secure the module to the front rails of the rack. If shelf
rails are used, install the two rear screws.
17. Install all of the cables at the rear of the module.
18. Power on the Silicon Graphics Prism platform as described in “Power-On the
System” on page 22.
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Chapter 5
5. Troubleshooting
This chapter provides the following sections to help you troubleshoot your system:
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•
“Troubleshooting Chart” on page 122
•
“L1 Controller Error Messages” on page 124
•
“Reading Power Supply Status LEDs” on page 129
•
“SGI Electronic Support” on page 130
•
“Customizing the XF86Config File” on page 133
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5: Troubleshooting
Troubleshooting Chart
Table 5-1 lists recommended actions for problems that can occur on your system. For
problems that are not listed in this table, use the SGI Electronic Support system to help
solve your problem or contact your SGI system support engineer (SSE). More
information about the SGI Electronic Support system is provided later in this chapter.
Table 5-1
Troubleshooting Chart
Problem Description
Recommended Action
The system will not power on.
Ensure that the power cord of the PDU is seated
properly in the power receptacle.
Ensure that the PDU circuit breaker is on.
If the power cord is plugged in and the circuit breaker
is on, contact your SSE.
An individual module will not power on. View the L1 display; see Table 5-2 if an error message
is present.
If the L1 controller is not running, contact your SSE.
Check the connection between the module and its
power source.
The system will not boot the operating
system.
Contact your SSE.
The amber service-required LED
illuminates on a module.
View the L1 display of the failing module; see
Table 5-2 for a description of the error message.
The failure LED illuminates on a module. View the L1 display of the failing module; see
Table 5-2 for a description of the error message.
The green or yellow LED of a NUMAlink Ensure both ends of the NUMAlink cable are seated
port is not illuminated.
properly and the destination module is powered on.
122
The PWR LED of a populated PCI slot is
not illuminated.
Reseat the PCI card.
The fault LED of a populated PCI slot is
illuminated (on).
Reseat the PCI card. If the fault LED remains on,
replace the PCI card.
The system status LED of the TP900 is
amber.
Contact your SSE.
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Troubleshooting Chart
Table 5-1
007-4701-003
Troubleshooting Chart (continued)
Problem Description
Recommended Action
The power status LED of the TP900 is
amber.
Contact your SSE to replace the power supply
module. The power supply module also has an amber
LED that indicates a fault.
The cooling status LED of the TP900 is
amber.
Contact your SSE to replace the cooling module. The
cooling module also has an amber LED that indicates
a fault.
The amber LED of a disk drive is on.
Replace the disk drive.
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5: Troubleshooting
L1 Controller Error Messages
Table 5-2 lists error messages that the L1 controller generates and displays on the L1
display. This display is located on the front of the base compute, compute expansion,
XG2N, and CMPX modules. For serial-number related errors, check with your service
provider for documentation on prevention and solutions.
The serial number error messages listed at the end of Table 5-2 are messages that will
come across the L1 console (at the L1 or optional L2 prompt). The log being referenced is
the L1 log. Users can get the contents by using the log command from an L1 prompt, or
l1 log command from an optional L2 prompt.
Actions that could cause serial number error messages include:
•
Moving a base compute, XG2N, expansion, or CMPX module from one system to
another.
•
Replacing the interface board of a system module.
•
L1 NVRAM memory failure.
•
Incorrect serial number setting on an optional L2 system controller.
Note: In Table 5-2, a voltage warning occurs when a supplied level of voltage is below
or above the nominal (normal) voltage by 10 percent. A voltage fault occurs when a
supplied level is below or above the nominal voltage by 20 percent.
124
007-4701-003
L1 Controller Error Messages
Table 5-2
L1 Controller Messages
L1 System Controller Message
Message Meaning and Action Needed
Internal voltage messages:
ATTN: x.xV high fault limit reached @ x.xxV
30-second power-off sequence for the module.
ATTN: x.xV low fault limit reached @ x.xxV
30-second power-off sequence for the module.
ATTN: x.xV high warning limit reached @
x.xxV
A higher than nominal voltage condition is
detected.
ATTN: x.xV low warning limit reached @ x.xxV A lower than nominal voltage condition is
detected.
ATTN: x.xV level stabilized @ x.xV
A monitored voltage level has returned to
within acceptable limits.
Fan messages:
ATTN: FAN # x fault limit reached @ xx RPM
A fan has reached its maximum RPM level. The
ambient temperature may be too high. Check to
see if a fan has failed.
ATTN: FAN # x warning limit reached @ xx
RPM
A fan has increased its RPM level. Check the
ambient temperature. Check to see if the fan
stabilizes.
ATTN: FAN # x stabilized @ xx RPM
An increased fan RPM level has returned to
normal.
Temperature messages: low alt.
ATTN: TEMP # advisory temperature reached
@ xxC xxF
The ambient temperature at the module’s air
inlet has exceeded 30 ºC.
ATTN: TEMP # critical temperature reached
@ xxC xxF
The ambient temperature at the module’s air
inlet has exceeded 35 ºC.
ATTN: TEMP # fault temperature reached
@ xxC xxF
The ambient temperature at the module’s air
inlet has exceeded 40 ºC.
Temperature messages: high alt.
ATTN: TEMP # advisory temperature reached
@ xxC xxF
007-4701-003
The ambient temperature at the module’s air
inlet has exceeded 27 ºC.
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5: Troubleshooting
Table 5-2
L1 Controller Messages (continued)
L1 System Controller Message
Message Meaning and Action Needed
ATTN: TEMP # critical temperature reached
@ xxC xxF
The ambient temperature at the module’s air
inlet has exceeded 31 ºC.
ATTN: TEMP # fault temperature reached @
xxC xxF
The ambient temperature at the module’s air
inlet has exceeded 35 ºC.
Temperature stable message:
ATTN: TEMP # stabilized @ xxC/xxF
The ambient temperature at the module’s air
inlet has returned to an acceptable level.
Power off messages:
Auto power down in xx seconds
The L1 controller has registered a fault and is
shutting down. The message displays every
five seconds until shutdown.
Base module appears to have been powered
down
The L1 controller has registered a fault and has
shut down.
Serial number messages:
126
Brick Serial Number mismatch
See L1 log for details.
System Serial Number mismatch
See L1 log for details.
Invalid System Serial Number format
See L1 log for details.
No assigned System Serial Number
See L1 log for details.
007-4701-003
L1 Controller Error Messages
Under certain circumstances a system software or hardware error can occur prior to the
graphics console's ability to display information. In this case you can see the error only
on the L1 controller panel or from an optional system console connected to the Console
serial port on the back of the system. In these cases an error message is displayed on the
L1 display of the form <geoid> ERR <error code> or <geoid> POD <error code>. Most of the
time, these errors indicate a serious problem and customer service should be called
(please provide the error code to the service representative). See Table 5-3 for a partial list
of the L1 Hexadecimal boot error codes.
Table 5-3
007-4701-003
L1 Controller Hexadecimal Boot Error Codes
Error code
Message Meaning or Action Needed
0x80
The unit has no DIMM memory — insure that DIMM group 0 is fully populated. See
the information in “Removing and Replacing Memory DIMMs” on page 107.
0x81
Write to system controller timed out.
0x82
Request for system reset failed.
0x83
Local master arbitration failed.
0x84
No memory available to allocate hardware configuration structure.
0x85
Can’t initialize klconfig.
0x87
Disabled by environment variable.
0x88
Call to unimplemented chip specific function.
0x89
System controller communication initialization failed.
0x8b
Nasid assignment failed
0x8c
Route calculation failed.
0x8d
Critical system controller transaction failed.
0xb0
PAL early self test failed.
0xb1
SAL entered with invalid function code.
0xb2
SAL invoked for firmware recovery.
0xb3
SAL_RESET called with bad parameters.
0xb4
main () returned
0xb5
PAL_CACHE_INFO failed looking for cache to reload.
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5: Troubleshooting
Table 5-3
128
L1 Controller Hexadecimal Boot Error Codes (continued)
Error code
Message Meaning or Action Needed
0xb6
Cache preloading PAL call failed.
0xb7
Scratch area overflowed the CPU’s caches.
0xb8
PAL_MEM_FOR_TEST failed.
0xb9
Bad address calculated for PAL_TEST_PROC
0xba
PAL_COPY_INFO failed.
0xbb
Bad PAL shadow address calculated
0xbc
PAL_COPY_PAL failed.
0xbd
SDA transfer area overflowed.
0xbe
No PROM segment (eg. EFI) found.
0xbf
PROM segment (eg. EFI) exited.
0xc0
Out of SAL->EFI handoff memory.
0xc1
Cache tests failed.
0xc2
Error flashing PROM.
0xc3
Could not write new value to cr.lid
0xd8
This unit has illegal DIMM population. Check and replace memory, see “Removing
and Replacing Memory DIMMs” on page 107.
0xf0
Waiting for primary lock.
007-4701-003
Reading Power Supply Status LEDs
Reading Power Supply Status LEDs
Use the LED located on the front (towards the top) of the power supply to read the
condition of the power supply. Table 5-4 shows the LED status and the power supply
condition that LED status indicates. See “Removing and Replacing Power Supplies” on
page 103 for information on removing and replacing a power supply.
Table 5-4
LED Status and Power Supply Condition
LED Status
Power Supply Condition Indicated
Off
If your system has one power supply, it indicates that the power supply is not
receiving AC power. If your system has two power supplies, the LED on both
power supplies would be Off, and it would indicate that both power supplies
are not receiving AC power. Power supplies will not be receiving AC power
because either the module is not plugged into power, or an electrical fuse has
blown.
Amber
Indicates a fault condition for one of the following reasons:
- In a system where you have two power supplies, one of the power supplies is
not receiving AC power.
- The voltage limit has been exceeded.
- The temperature limit has been exceeded.
- The current limit has been exceeded.
007-4701-003
Blinking Green
The power supply is receiving AC power, but the main primary DC power has
not yet activated.
Green
The power supply is operating properly.
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5: Troubleshooting
SGI Electronic Support
SGI Electronic Support provides system support and problem-solving services that
function automatically, which helps resolve problems before they can affect system
availability or develop into actual failures. SGI Electronic Support integrates several
services so they work together to monitor your system, notify you if a problem exists,
and search for solutions to the problem.
Figure 5-1 shows the sequence of events that occurs if you use all of the SGI Electronic
Support capabilities.
1
Customer's system
Implement
solution
2
6
e-mail
3
Supportfolio
Online
5
Page or e-mail
alert
View the case
solutions
SGI customer and
SGI support engineer
SGI global
customer support
center
4
SGI Knowledgebase
Figure 5-1
130
Full Support Sequence
007-4701-003
SGI Electronic Support
The sequence of events can be described as follows:
1.
Embedded Support Partner (ESP) monitors your system 24 hours a day.
2. When a specified system event is detected, ESP notifies SGI via e-mail (plain text or
encrypted).
3. Applications that are running at SGI analyze the information, determine whether a
support case should be opened, and open a case if necessary. You and SGI support
engineers are contacted (via pager or e-mail) with the case ID and problem
description.
4. SGI Knowledgebase searches thousands of tested solutions for possible fixes to the
problem. Solutions that are located in SGI Knowledgebase are attached to the
service case.
5. You and the SGI support engineers can view and manage the case by using
Supportfolio Online as well as search for additional solutions or schedule
maintenance.
6. Implement the solution.
Most of these actions occur automatically, and you may receive solutions to problems
before they affect system availability. You also may be able to return your system to
service sooner if it is out of service.
In addition to the event monitoring and problem reporting, SGI Electronic Support
monitors both system configuration (to help with asset management) and system
availability and performance (to help with capacity planning).
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5: Troubleshooting
The following three components compose the integrated SGI Electronic Support system:
SGI Embedded Support Partner (ESP) is a set of tools and utilities that are embedded in
the operating system. ESP can monitor a single system or group of systems for system
events, software and hardware failures, availability, performance, and configuration
changes, and then perform actions based on those events. ESP can detect system
conditions that indicate potential problems, and then alert appropriate personnel by
pager, console messages, or e-mail (plain text or encrypted). You also can configure ESP
to notify an SGI call center about problems; ESP then sends e-mail to SGI with
information about the event.
SGI Knowledgebase is a database of solutions to problems and answers to questions
that can be searched by sophisticated knowledge management tools. You can log on to
SGI Knowledgebase at any time to describe a problem or ask a question. Knowledgebase
searches thousands of possible causes, problem descriptions, fixes, and how-to
instructions for the solutions that best match your description or question.
Supportfolio Online is a customer support resource that includes the latest information
about patch sets, bug reports, and software releases.
The complete SGI Electronic Support services are available to customers who have a
valid SGI Warranty, FullCare, FullExpress, or Mission-Critical support contract. To
purchase a support contract that allows you to use the complete SGI Electronic Support
services, contact your SGI sales representative. For more information about the various
support contracts, see the following website:
http://www.sgi.com/support/customerservice.html
For more information about SGI Electronic Support, see the following website:
http://www.sgi.com/support/es
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Customizing the XF86Config File
Customizing the XF86Config File
The following sections provide information about customizing the XF86Config file for
various special configurations.
Configuring a System for Stereo
This section describes how to configure a system to display stereo images.
Stereo sync is supported only on systems using ImageSync boards.
Note: Simultaneously running stereo and full scene anti-aliasing can require more
graphics-card memory than is available, and thus may not always work correctly.
Note: Stereo may be enabled on either channel of a pipe, but may not be enabled on both
channels simultaneously.
1.
Create a copy of the XF86Config file to be customized for stereo:
# cp /etc/X11/XF86Config /etc/X11/XF86Config.Stereo
2. Edit the XF86Config.Stereo file to include the following line at the end of each
“Device” section:
Option "Stereo"
"1"
Option "StereoSyncEnable" "1"
(see the “Example “Device” Section for Stereo” on page 134).
3. Edit the new XF86Config.Stereo file to include the appropriate stereo modes in
the “Monitor” section:
a.
Create an appropriate mode (see “Sample Stereo Mode Entries” on page 135).
b.
Add that mode to the “Monitor” section of your XF86Config.Stereo file (see
the “Example “Monitor” Section for Stereo” on page 135).
Note: “Mode” and “Modeline” are two alternative formats used to present the same
information.
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5: Troubleshooting
4. Ensure that the monitor supports the high horizontal sync rate setting. Refer to the
documentation for the monitor to determine the horizontal sync rate. Modify the
HorizSync setting in the “Monitor” section of the XF86Config.Stereo file. For
example:
HorizSync
22-105
5. Modify the “Screen” section so that you use the appropriate mode setting. For
example:
Modes
"1280x1024@96"
(see the “Example “Screen” Section for Stereo” on page 135).
6. Make a backup copy of the default /etc/X11/gdm/gdm.conf file:
# cp /etc/X11/gdm/gdm.conf /etc/X11/gdm/gdm.conf-old
7. Edit the /etc/X11/gdm/gdm.conf file to use the new XF86Config.Stereo file
you created:
Replace the line:
command=/usr/X11R6/bin/X
with:
command=/usr/X11R6/bin/X -xf86config /etc/X11/XF86Config.Stereo
8. Save the gdm.conf file and reboot the system to restart graphics in stereo mode.
Note that a stereo sync signal will not be present until you run a stereo application. One
such application is ivview. If your system has ivview installed, you can use it to test
the stereo configuration by running:
ivview /usr/share/data/models/X29.iv
and right click to activate the stereo setting on the preferences panel.
Example “Device” Section for Stereo
Section "Device"
Identifier "SGI SG-0"
Driver
"fglrx"
BusId
"PCI:23:0:0"
# === QBS Management ===
Option "Stereo"
"1"
Option "StereoSyncEnable" "1"
EndSection
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007-4701-003
Customizing the XF86Config File
Sample Stereo Mode Entries
Modeline "1024x768@96" 103.5 1024 1050 1154 1336 768 771 774 807
Modeline "1280x1024@96" 163.28 1280 1300 1460 1600 1024 1027 1033 1063
Modeline "1024x768@100" 113.309 1024 1096 1208 1392 768 769 772 814
Modeline "1024x768@120" 139.054 1024 1104 1216 1408 768 769 772 823 +hsync +vsync
Modeline "1280x1024@100" 190.960 1280 1376 1520 1760 1024 1025 1028 1085 +hsync +vsync
Mode "1280x1024_96s_mirage"
DotClock
152.928
HTimings
1280 1330 1390 1500
VTimings
1024 1026 1030 1062
EndMode
Example “Monitor” Section for Stereo
Section "Monitor"
Identifier "Stereo Monitor"
HorizSync
30-96
# multisync
VertRefresh 50-160
# multisync
Modeline "1024x768@96" 103.5 1024 1050 1154 1336
EndSection
768 771 774 807
Example “Screen” Section for Stereo
Section "Screen"
Identifier
"Screen SG-0"
Device
"SGI SG-0"
Monitor
"Stereo Monitor"
DefaultDepth
24
SubSection
"Display"
Depth
24
Modes
"1280x1024@96"
EndSubSection
EndSection
007-4701-003
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5: Troubleshooting
Configuring a System for Full Scene Anti-Aliasing
This section describes how to configure a system for global or per-window full scene
anti-aliasing.
Note: Simultaneously running stereo and full scene anti-aliasing can require more
graphics-card memory than is available, and thus may not work correctly.
1.
Create a copy of the XF86Config file to be customized for full scene anti-aliasing:
# cp /etc/X11/XF86Config /etc/X11/XF86Config.AntiAlias
Note: Automatically-generated XF86Config files should contain the customized
multi-sample positions shown in on page 137. If these values are not already
present, adding them will significantly improve the quality of your output.
2. Edit the new XF86Config.AntiAlias file to include the following line at the end
of each “Device” section:
Option "FSAAScale" “X”
where X is 1, 2, 4, or 6 (see the example “Device” section on page 137).
Note: Per-window full scene anti-aliasing is accomplished by setting “FSAAScale”
to 1. The anti-aliasing level may then be set by the appropriate selection of visuals.
Global anti-aliasing is accomplished by setting “FSAAScale” to 2, 4, or 6. In this case,
the setting will apply to all OpenGL windows, regardless of the visual being
displayed.
3. Make a backup copy of the default /etc/X11/gdm/gdm.conf file:
# cp /etc/X11/gdm/gdm.conf /etc/X11/gdm/gdm.conf-old
4. Edit the /etc/X11/gdm/gdm.conf file to use the new XF86Config.AntiAlias
file you created:
Replace the line:
command=/usr/X11R6/bin/X
with:
command=/usr/X11R6/bin/X -xf86config /etc/X11/XF86Config.AntiAlias
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Customizing the XF86Config File
5. Save the gdm.conf file:
6. Restart graphics:
# <CTRL> <ALT> <BKSPC>
Example “Device” Section for Full Scene Anti-Aliasing
Section "Device"
Identifier "SGI SG-0"
Driver
"fglrx"
BusId
"PCI:23:0:0"
# === FSAA Management ===
Option "FSAAScale"
Option "FSAADisableGamma"
Option "FSAACustomizeMSPos"
Option "FSAAMSPosX0"
Option "FSAAMSPosY0"
Option "FSAAMSPosX1"
Option "FSAAMSPosY1"
Option "FSAAMSPosX2"
Option "FSAAMSPosY2"
Option "FSAAMSPosX3"
Option "FSAAMSPosY3"
Option "FSAAMSPosX4"
Option "FSAAMSPosY4"
Option "FSAAMSPosX5"
Option "FSAAMSPosY5"
EndSection
007-4701-003
"1"
"no"
"yes"
"0.250000"
"0.416666"
"0.083333"
"0.083333"
"0.416666"
"0.750000"
"0.750000"
"0.916666"
"0.583333"
"0.250000"
"0.916666"
"0.583333"
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5: Troubleshooting
Configuring a System for Dual-Channel Operation
To configure a system for dual-channel operation, follow the steps in this section.
Note: If any pipes managed by an X server have their second channel enabled, then
every pipe managed by that X server must have its second channel enabled.
Note: Both channels on a pipe must have the same display resolution.
1.
Create a copy of the XF86Config file to be customized for dual-channel operation:
# cp /etc/X11/XF86Config /etc/X11/XF86Config.DualChannel
2. Edit the new XF86Config.DualChannel file to include the following line at the
end of each “Device” section:
Option "DesktopSetup" mode
where mode is one of the following:
"0x00000100" [this mode clones the managed area]
"0x00000200" [this mode scales the managed area by 2 horizontally]
"0x00000300" [this mode scales the managed area by 2 vertically]
(see the example “Device” section on page 139).
Note: All pipes managed by the same X server must be set to the same mode.
3. When using monitors or monitor cables which do not conform to the VESA Display
Data Channel (DDC) standard, append the following entry in the “Device” section
to enable proper display configuration:
Option "NoDDC" "on"
4. Make a backup copy of the default /etc/X11/gdm/gdm.conf file:
# cp /etc/X11/gdm/gdm.conf /etc/X11/gdm/gdm.conf-old
5. Edit the /etc/X11/gdm/gdm.conf file to use the new
XF86Config.DualChannel file you created:
Replace the line:
command=/usr/X11R6/bin/X
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007-4701-003
Customizing the XF86Config File
with:
command=/usr/X11R6/bin/X -xf86config /etc/X11/XF86Config.DualChannel
6. Save the gdm.conf file:
7. Restart graphics:
# <CTRL> <ALT> <BKSPC>
Example “Device” Section for Dual Channel
Section "Device"
Identifier "SGI SG-0"
Driver
"fglrx"
BusId
"PCI:23:0:0"
Option
"DesktopSetup" "0x00000200"
EndSection
007-4701-003
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5: Troubleshooting
Enabling Overlay Planes
To enable overlay planes, follow these steps:
Note: The option to enable overlay planes only applies to the first channel on the pipe.
1.
Edit the /etc/X11/XF86Config file to include the following line in each “Device”
section for which you want overlay planes enabled:
Option "OpenGLOverlay"
"On"
2. Log out from the desktop, then log back in.
Example “Device” Section to Enable Overlay Planes
Section "Device"
Identifier "SGI SG-0"
Driver
"fglrx"
BusId
"PCI:23:0:0"
Option
"OpenGLOverlay" "On"
EndSection
140
007-4701-003
Customizing the XF86Config File
Configuring a System for External Genlock or Framelock
External genlock and framelock may be used on systems with at least one optional
ImageSync board.
To configure your system to receive an external genlock or framelock signal you must run
the setmon command with the appropriate options.
Before running setmon, use printenv DISPLAY to ensure that the DISPLAY
environment variable is set to the local system (for example, :0.0). If it is not, use setenv
DISPLAY :0.0 to change it (substituting other numbers for :0.0 if appropriate).
To set the system for genlock, execute the following command:
# setmon -ppipenumber -g graphicsformat
where pipenumber is the pipe to which this setting should be applied, and
graphicsformat is one of the timings (modes) listed in the “Monitor” section of the
/etc/X11/XF86Config file.
To set the system for framelock, execute the following command:
# setmon -ppipenumber -Lvideoformat
graphicsformat
where pipenumber is the pipe to which this setting should be applied,
videoformat is the input video format to be used as a framelock source, and
graphicsformat is one of the framelock-certified timings (modes) listed in the “Monitor”
section of the /etc/X11/XF86Config file that is compatible with the chosen input
video format (Table 5-5 on page 142 provides a list of compatible formats).
Note: The default behavior of setmon is to load the new format for the current session
only and to prompt for input to determine if the format should be saved as the default.
To save the new format as the default you must be logged in as root.
For more information about the setmon command, see the setmon man page (man
setmon).
Note: Framelock-certified timings will include an “f” appended to their name (i.e.,
“1280x1024_5994f” is certified for NTSC (525 line) video timing).
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5: Troubleshooting
Table 5-5
142
Input Video Formats (Framelock)
Input Video Format (Framelock Source)
Format Name
Compatible Graphics Formats
525 line at 59.94Hz (NTSC)
525
1280x1024_5994f
(or use the alias NTSC) 1920x1154_5994f
625 line at 50Hz (PAL)
625
(or use the alias PAL)
1280x1024_50f
1920x1154_50f
720-line progressive-scan at 59.94Hz
720p_5994
1920x1154_5994f
720-line progressive-scan at 60Hz
720p_60
1280x1024_60f
1920x1154_60f
1920x1200_60f
1080-line progressive-scan at 25Hz
1080p_25
1280x1024_50f
1920x1154_50f
1080-line interlaced at 25Hz
1080i_25
1280x1024_50f
1920x1154_50f
1080-line progressive-scan at 29.97Hz
1080p_2997
1920x1154_5994f
1080-line interlaced at 29.97Hz
1080i_2997
1920x1154_5994f
1080-line progressive-scan at 30Hz
1080p_30
1280x1024_60f
1920x1154_60f
1920x1200_60f
1080-line interlaced at 30Hz
1080i_30
1280x1024_60f
1920x1154_60f
1920x1200_60f
007-4701-003
Customizing the XF86Config File
Configuring Monitor Positions
When an X-Server is managing multiple monitors, it needs to know their relative
positions in order to properly handle cursor cross-over locations.
The monitor positions are specified in the “ServerLayout” section of the
/etc/X11/XF86Config file as follows:
Each screen is listed, followed by a list of the screens above, below, to the left, and to the
right of it (in that order). Figure 5-2 and the following subsection show an example of
four monitors arranged in a line.
Programs started by clicking on an icon appear on the screen from which you invoked
them. Note that once a program has been launched, it is not possible to move it from one
screen to another.
SG-0
Figure 5-2
SG-1
SG-2
SG-3
Four Monitors in a Line
Example “ServerLayout” Section for Four Monitors in a Line
Section "ServerLayout"
Identifier "Four-in-a-Line"
Screen "Screen SG-0"
""
""
Screen "Screen SG-1"
""
""
Screen "Screen SG-2"
""
""
Screen "Screen SG-3"
""
""
InputDevice "Mouse1" "CorePointer"
InputDevice "Keyboard1" "CoreKeyboard"
EndSection
007-4701-003
""
"Screen
"Screen
"Screen
"Screen
SG-0"
SG-1"
SG-2"
SG-1"
"Screen SG-2"
"Screen SG-3"
""
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5: Troubleshooting
Figure 5-3 and the subsection following it show an example of four monitors arranged in
a square.
SG-0
SG-1
SG-2
SG-3
Figure 5-3
Four Monitors in a Square
Example “ServerLayout” Section for Four Monitors in a Square
Section "ServerLayout"
Identifier "Four-in-a-Square"
Screen "Screen SG-0"
""
"Screen SG-2"
Screen "Screen SG-1"
""
"Screen SG-3"
Screen "Screen SG-2"
"Screen SG-0"
""
Screen "Screen SG-3"
"Screen SG-1"
""
InputDevice "Mouse1" "CorePointer"
InputDevice "Keyboard1" "CoreKeyboard"
EndSection
144
""
"Screen SG-1"
"Screen SG-0"
""
""
"Screen SG-3"
"Screen SG-2"
""
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Customizing the XF86Config File
Configuring Monitor Types
The system graphics cards support both analog and digital monitors. The type of monitor
connected to each graphics card is specified in the “Device” sections of the
/etc/X11/XF86Config file.
Table 5-6 lists the allowable options for the MonitorLayout line. If the line is not present,
both channels default to AUTO.
Table 5-6
Options for Monitor Layout
Monitor Type
Meaning
AUTO
Automatically select monitor type (default)
TMDS
Digital monitor
CRT
Analog monitor
NONE
No monitor
The format is:
Option
"MonitorLayout" "channel1type, channel2type"
where channel1type is the type (AUTO, TMDS, CRT or NONE) of monitor attached to
channel 1 (the left DVI-I connector) for this pipe, and
channel2type is the type (AUTO, TMDS, CRT or NONE) of monitor attached to channel 2
(the right DVI-I connector) for this pipe.
Example “Device” Section for Use With Two Analog Monitors
Section "Device"
Identifier "SGI SG-0"
Driver
"fglrx"
BusId
"PCI:23:0:0"
Option
"MonitorLayout" "CRT, CRT"
EndSection
007-4701-003
145
5: Troubleshooting
Configuring a System for Multiple Xservers
Multiple Xservers allows specific subsets of the keyboards, pointing devices, and
monitors attached to a Silicon Graphics Prism system to each be managed by a different
Xserver.
Note: The use of multiple Xservers requires ProPack™ 3, Service Pack 4 or a later release
of the software.
This section describes a relatively simple configuration. Much more complex
configurations are possible, however, and may be accomplished by extending the
instructions provided here.
Note: When configuring multiple seats, the best method is to first attach all devices
(keyboards, pointing devices, and monitors) and configure the system with a single
Xserver. Once this is done, the configuration may be modified to assign individual
subsets of these devices to be managed by separate Xservers.
Configuring a system for multi-seat operation involves the following steps, each
described in a separate subsection below:
1.
Identify the correct event devices (that is, keyboards and pointing devices) for each
seat.
2. Create and edit an XF86Config-Nserver file for the desired configuration.
3. Point X to the newly-created XF86Config-Nserver file.
146
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Customizing the XF86Config File
Identifying Event Devices
An “event device” is a keyboard or pointing device. All event devices connected to the
system are listed at boot time on lines beginning with the string “input.” These boot
messages may be displayed at a Linux command prompt using the dmesg command.
The output from the dmesg command can be quite long, and therefore is usually filtered
with a grep command. For example:
# dmesg
input0:
input1:
input2:
input3:
input4:
input5:
input6:
| grep ^input
USB HID v1.10
USB HID v1.00
USB HID v1.00
USB HID v1.10
USB HID v1.00
USB HID v1.00
USB HID v1.00
Keyboard [NOVATEK Generic USB Keyboard] on usb1:4.0
Mouse [Logitech N43] on usb1:5.0
Mouse [Logitech N43] on usb1:6.0
Keyboard [NOVATEK Generic USB Keyboard] on usb1:7.0
Keyboard [SILITEK USB Keyboard and Mouse] on usb1:9.0
Mouse [SILITEK USB Keyboard and Mouse] on usb1:9.1
Mouse [Logitech N43] on usb1:10.0
All input devices detected during boot-up will have device nodes created for them in the
/dev/input directory as follows:
•
Each keyboard will have an associated event* device node.
•
Each pointing device will have both an associated event* device node and an
associated mouse* device node.
The mapping of devices to nodes is by number (that is, input0 maps to event0, input1
maps to event1, and so on). The first input that is a pointing device gets mapped to
mouse0, the next input that is a pointing device gets mapped to mouse1, and so on.
The dmesg output shown above would therefore create the following mapping:
input0:
input1:
input2:
input3:
input4:
input5:
input6:
event0
event1,
event2,
event3
event4
event5,
event6,
mouse0
mouse1
mouse2
mouse3
This mapping can then be used to edit the XF86Config-Nserver file, as described in the
next subsection, “Creating a Multi-Seat XF86Config File” on page 148.
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147
5: Troubleshooting
Creating a Multi-Seat XF86Config File
A multiple-Xserver configuration requires a customized XF86Config file containing a
separate ServerLayout section for each Xserver you will be running.
Note: The original ServerLayout section (always identified as “Main Layout”) is
typically left unchanged, allowing the system to easily be reconfigured as a
single-Xserver system.
Creating a New XF86Config File
Start out by creating a new XF86Config file. The easiest way to do this is to simply make
a copy of the system’s regular XF86Config file, as follows:
# cp /etc/X11/XF86Config /etc/X11/XF86Config-Nservers
(where N is the number of servers you will be configuring).
148
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Customizing the XF86Config File
Configuring the Input Devices
Next, configure the input devices as follows:
1.
Copy the section beginning:
Section "InputDevice"
Identifier "Keyboard1"
and insert a duplicate copy (or copies) below the existing section, until there is one
copy for each keyboard (including the original copy in this count).
2. Edit all the keyboard InputDevice sections, in each one changing the driver from
“keyboard” to “evdev” and adding an Option line identifying the appropriate event
device (in this example, “/dev/input/event0”). The resulting InputDevice
sections will look something like the following:
Section "InputDevice"
Identifier "Keyboard1"
Driver "evdev"
Option "Device" "/dev/input/event0"
# ...
EndSection
Note: See “Identifying Event Devices” on page 147 for instructions on how to
determine the appropriate event device for each section.
Note: You may assign any number of keyboards to a single Xserver, but no keyboard
may be assigned to more than one Xserver.
3. Copy the section beginning:
Section "InputDevice"
Identifier "Mouse1"
and insert a duplicate copy (or copies) below the existing section, until there is one
copy for each pointing device (including the original copy in this count).
4. Edit all the mouse InputDevice sections, changing the Option “Device” line from
the default “/dev/input/mice” to one identifying the appropriate event device
(in this example, “/dev/input/mouse0”). The resulting InputDevice sections will
look something like the following:
Section "InputDevice"
Identifier "Mouse1"
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149
5: Troubleshooting
Driver "mouse"
Option "Device" "/dev/input/mouse0"
# ...
EndSection
Note: See “Identifying Event Devices” on page 147 for instructions on how to
determine the appropriate event device.
Note: You may assign any number of pointing devices to a single Xserver, but no
pointing device may be assigned to more than one Xserver.
150
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Customizing the XF86Config File
Configuring the New ServerLayout Sections
In this new XF86Config-Nservers file, perform the following steps:
1.
Copy the section beginning:
Section “ServerLayout”
Identifier “Main Layout”
and insert a duplicate copy (or copies) below the existing section, until there is one
copy for each Xserver you will have (do NOT include the original “Main Layout”
copy in this count).
2. While leaving the original ServerLayout section identified as “MainLayout,” give
each new ServerLayout section a new name. For example, the first server might be
named “Layout0”:
Identifier “Layout0”
the next “Layout1,” and so on.
3. Within each new Server Layout section, disable (delete or comment out) every
screen that will not be used in that layout:
#
Screen "Screen SG-0"
Screen "Screen SG-1"
""
""
""
""
""
"Screen SG-1"
"Screen SG-0"
""
Note: You may assign any number of screens to a single Xserver, but no screen may
be assigned to more than one Xserver.
4. Edit each Server Layout section to make sure than no remaining uncommented
screen lists as adjacent another screen that will be managed by a different Xserver:
#
Screen "Screen SG-0"
Screen "Screen SG-1"
""
""
""
""
""
""
"Screen SG-0"
""
5. Within each Server Layout section, change the input devices to the correct ones for
that Xserver. For example, the first Xserver might use:
InputDevice “Mouse1” “CorePointer”
InputDevice “Keyboard1” “CoreKeyboard”
6. Save the XF86Config-Nservers file.
For an example ServerLayout section from an XF86Config-3server file, see
“Example “ServerLayout” Sections for Three Xservers” on page 152. In this example, the
first two Xservers manage one screen each, while the third Xserver manages two screens.
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151
5: Troubleshooting
Example “ServerLayout” Sections for Three Xservers
# **********************************************************************
# ServerLayout sections.
# **********************************************************************
Section "ServerLayout"
Identifier "Main Layout"
Screen "Screen SG-0"
""
""
Screen "Screen SG-1"
""
""
Screen "Screen SG-2"
""
""
Screen "Screen SG-3"
""
""
InputDevice "Mouse1" "CorePointer"
InputDevice "Keyboard1" "CoreKeyboard"
EndSection
Section "ServerLayout"
Identifier "Layout0"
Screen "Screen SG-0"
""
""
InputDevice "Mouse1" "CorePointer"
InputDevice "Keyboard1" "CoreKeyboard"
EndSection
Section "ServerLayout"
Identifier "Layout1"
Screen "Screen SG-1"
""
""
InputDevice "Mouse2" "CorePointer"
InputDevice "Keyboard2" "CoreKeyboard"
EndSection
Section "ServerLayout"
Identifier "Layout2"
Screen "Screen SG-2"
""
""
Screen "Screen SG-3"
""
""
InputDevice "Mouse3" "CorePointer"
InputDevice "Keyboard3" "CoreKeyboard"
EndSection
152
""
"Screen
"Screen
"Screen
"Screen
SG-0"
SG-1"
SG-2"
""
""
""
""
SG-1"
"Screen SG-2"
"Screen SG-3"
""
""
"Screen SG-3"
"Screen SG-2"
""
007-4701-003
Customizing the XF86Config File
Pointing X to the New XF86Config-Nserver File
Once you have created the new XF86Config-Nserver file, the last step is to tell X to
use the new layouts it contains, rather than the default server layout. To do so, perform
the following steps:
1.
Make a backup copy of the default single-server /etc/X11/gdm/gdm.conf file:
# cp /etc/X11/gdm/gdm.conf /etc/X11/gdm/gdm.conf-old
2. Edit the /etc/X11/gdm/gdm.conf file to use the new server layouts you defined
in the XF86Config file:
In the [servers] section, comment out the standard server, then add the new
server layouts you will be using:
#0=Standard
0=Layout0
1=Layout1
2=Layout2
3. Define each new server layout. For example:
[server-Layout0]
name=Layout0 server
command=/usr/X11R6/bin/X :0 -xf86config /etc/X11/XF86Config.3server -layout Layout0
flexible=true
For an example of a multi-Xserver [servers] section, see “Example
/etc/X11/gdm/gdm.conf Servers Section for Three Xservers” on page 154.
4. Save the gdm.conf file and reboot the system.
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153
5: Troubleshooting
Example /etc/X11/gdm/gdm.conf Servers Section for Three Xservers
[servers]
#0=Standard
0=Layout0
1=Layout1
2=Layout2
[server-Standard]
name=Standard server
command=/usr/X11R6/bin/X
flexible=true
[server-Layout0]
name=Layout0 server
command=/usr/X11R6/bin/X :0 -xf86config /etc/X11/XF86Config.3server -layout Layout0
flexible=true
[server-Layout1]
name=Layout1 server
command=/usr/X11R6/bin/X :1 -xf86config /etc/X11/XF86Config.3server -layout Layout1
flexible=true
[server-Layout2]
name=Layout2 server
command=/usr/X11R6/bin/X :2 -xf86config /etc/X11/XF86Config.3server -layout Layout2
flexible=true
154
007-4701-003
Appendix A
A. Technical Specifications
This appendix contains technical specification information about your system, as
follows:
007-4701-003
•
“Environmental Specifications” on page 156
•
“Compute Module Specifications” on page 157
•
“CMPX Module Specifications” on page 159
•
“Router Module Specifications” on page 160
•
“SGI TP900 Storage Module Specifications” on page 162
•
“Non-proprietary I/O Port Specifications” on page 163
•
“XG2N Module Connectors” on page 166
155
A: Technical Specifications
Environmental Specifications
Table A-1 lists the environmental specifications of the Silicon Graphics Prism.
Table A-1
156
Environmental Specifications
Characteristic
Specification
Temperature,
operating
+5 ºC (+41 ºF) to +35 ºC (+95 ºF) (up to 1500 m [5,000 ft])
+5 ºC (+41 ºF) to +30 ºC (+86 ºF) (1500 m to 3000 m [5,000 ft to 10,000 ft])
Temperature,
non-operating
-40 ºC (-40 ºF) to +60 ºC (+140 ºF)
Humidity
10% to 95% RH, noncondensing
Altitude
Sea level to 40,000 ft (12,000 m) (nonoperating)
Sea level to 10,000 ft (3,000 m) (operating)
007-4701-003
Compute Module Specifications
Compute Module Specifications
Table A-2 lists the bandwidth characteristics of the compute module.
Table A-2
Bandwidth Characteristics of the Compute Module
Characteristic
Peak Bandwidth
Sustainable Bandwidth
NUMAlink channel
6.4 GB/s full duplex
~2.8 GB/s each direction
3.2 GB/s each direction
Main memory
Up to 10.8 GB/s
Up to 10.8 GB/s
Front Side Bus (FSB)
6.4 GB/s
~6.4 GB/s
Table A-3 summarizes the general features of the compute module.
Note: The expansion compute module does not include an optional IO10 PCI card.
Table A-3
007-4701-003
General Features of the Compute Module
Feature
Base Compute Module
Expansion Compute Module
NUMAlink ports
2 (3.2 GB/s each direction)
2 (3.2 GB/s each direction)
Serial console port
1
1
L1 port
1
1
RT interrupt input port
1 (not functional under Linux)
RT interrupt output port
1 (not functional under Linux)
Ethernet port
1 10BaseT/100BaseT/1000BaseT
Serial RS232/422 (4 ports)
4 serial ports (external)
serial ATA port (internal)
2 serial ATA
3.5-in. drive bay
1 or 2
64-bit Intel processor
2
0, 1, or 2
157
A: Technical Specifications
Table A-3
General Features of the Compute Module (continued)
Feature
Base Compute Module
Expansion Compute Module
Memory
up to 24 GB
up to 24 GB
Expansion slot
2 PCI-X
4 PCI-X
Note: Power consumption in the XG2N module is slightly higher (approximately 563
watts) than in the base compute module. The XG2N always requires use of two power
supplies at all times. Otherwise, the basic physical and electrical specifications are the
same.
Table A-4 lists the physical specifications for the compute module.
Table A-4
Compute Module Physical Specifications
Characteristic
Specification
Height
3.44 in. (8.74 cm)
Width
17.06 in. (43.33 cm)
Depth
27 in. (68.58 cm) (with bezel)
Weight
50 lb (22.7 kg) maximum configurationa
Noise
6.0 Bells sound power, up to 30 ºC
Heat dissipation
1315 Btu/hr maximum
Input power
120 - 240 VAC
a. Weight will vary depending on whether the system has one or two power supplies, on the amount of DIMMs
installed, and on whether you have one or two disk drives in your system.
158
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CMPX Module Specifications
CMPX Module Specifications
Table A-5 lists the bandwidth characteristics of the CMPX module.
Table A-5
Bandwidth Characteristics of the CMPX Module
Characteristic
Peak Bandwidth
Sustainable Bandwidth
NUMAlink channel
6.4 GB/s full duplex
3.2 GB/s each direction
~2.8 GB/s each direction
Main memory
Up to 10.8 GB/s
Up to 10.8 GB/s
Front Side Bus (FSB)
6.4 GB/s
~6.4 GB/s
Table A-6 lists the specifications for the CMPX module.
Table A-6
CMPX Module Specifications
Characteristic
Specifications
Height
3.44 in. (8.80 cm)
Width
17.06 in. (43.36 cm)
Depth
27 in. (68.58 cm) (with bezel)
Weight
50 lb (22.7 kg) maximum configurationa
Input voltage
120 - 240 VAC
a. Weight will vary slightly depending on whether the module has processors, one or two power supplies, on
the number of DIMMs installed, and on PCI cards in the unit.
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159
A: Technical Specifications
Router Module Specifications
Table A-7 lists the specifications of each of the 8 router ports.
Table A-7
Router Port Specifications
Port
Quantity
Peak Transfer Rate
NUMAlink
8
3.2 GB/s each direction
L1
1
12 Mbits/s
Table A-8 lists the technical specifications of the router.
Table A-8
160
Router Technical Specifications
Characteristic
Specification
Height
3.3 in. (83.82 mm)
Width
17.38 in. (441.45 mm)
Depth
27.5 in. (698.50 mm)
Weight
20 lb (9.1 kg)
Heat dissipation
205 Btu/hr maximum
Input power
60 W
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Rack Specifications
Rack Specifications
The Silicon Graphics Prism modules can be housed in optional short (17U) or tall (39U)
racks.
Note: One “U” is 1.75 in. (4.45 cm).
Table A-9 lists the specifications of the short rack.
Table A-9
Short Rack Specifications (with Skins)
Characteristic
Specification
Height
36.06 in. (916 mm)
Width
25.38 in. (645 mm)
Depth
40.63 in. (1032 mm)
Weight (maximum)
610 lb (277 kg)
Shipping weight (maximum)
685 lb (312 kg)
Table A-10 lists the specifications of the tall rack.
Table A-10
007-4701-003
Tall Rack Specifications
Characteristic
Specification
Height
75.82 in. (1925.83 mm)
Width
23.62 in. (599.95 mm)
Depth
41.25 in. (1048 mm)
Weight (maximum)
1,366 lb (620 kg)
Shipping weight (maximum)
1,547 lb (702 kg)
161
A: Technical Specifications
SGI TP900 Storage Module Specifications
Table A-11 lists the specifications of the SGI TP900 storage module.
Table A-11
TP900 Storage Module Specifications
Characteristic
Specification
Height
3.37 in. (85.7 mm)
Width
17.6 in. (447 mm)
Depth
21.46 in. (545 mm)
Input power
100 - 254 VAC (~175 W)
Weight:
162
Maximum configuration
48.5 lb (22 kg)
Empty enclosure
14.3 lb (6.5 kg)
007-4701-003
Non-proprietary I/O Port Specifications
Non-proprietary I/O Port Specifications
This section provides pin assignment information for the non-proprietary connectors on
the following components:
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•
Compute module (base and expansion)
•
XG2N module
•
CMPX module
•
TP900 storage module
163
A: Technical Specifications
Compute Module
Table A-12 lists the non-proprietary connectors that are located on the rear panel of the
compute module (see Figure A-1). The third column of the table indicates where you can
find the pin assignments for these connectors.
Table A-12
Compute Module Connectors
Port
Connector
Pin Assignments
Optional PCI serial portsa
DB-9
See Figure A-5 on page 170
Console port
DB-9
See Figure A-5 on page 170
Ethernet portb
RJ-45
See Figure A-6 on page 172 and
Table A-16 on page 172
External serial port
IEEE 1284 36-pin MDR
multi-port serial adapter
See Figure A-7 on page 173 and
Table A-17 on page 173
RT interrupt input and
output portsc
Stereo jack
Not supported under Linux
L1 port
USB type B
See Figure A-9 on page 176 and
Table A-19 on page 176
a. Optional serial ports are available on a PCI card.
b. These connectors are available only when the compute module has an IO10 PCI card.
c. These connectors are not functionally supported under SGI Linux + ProPack.
164
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Non-proprietary I/O Port Specifications
PCI 4
PCI 3
PCI 2
CONSOLE
L1 PORT
NUMALINK 0
CPU
NUMALINK 1
PCI 1
Power
connector
L1 port
NUMAlink connector
NUMAlink connector
CONSOLE
port
Figure A-1
Multi-port serial
connector
Ethernet port
Rear Panel of Compute Module
Note: The RT interrupt input and RT interrupt output functionality of the IO10 PCI card
is not supported under SGI Linux + ProPack.
007-4701-003
165
A: Technical Specifications
XG2N Module Connectors
The XG2N module contains two graphics pipes, each capable of supporting two display
devices. The graphics connector and pinouts are shown in Figure A-2 and Table A-13.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
C1
C2
C3
C4
C5
Figure A-2
DVI-I Connector Pinout
The console and L1 connectors on the XG2N module are the same as the compute
module.
Table A-13
166
DVI-I Connector Signals and Pins
Pin
Function
Pin
Function
1
T.M.D.S.a Data 2-
16
Hot Plug Detect
2
T.M.D.S. Data 2+
17
T.M.D.S. Data 0-
3
T.M.D.S. Data 2/4 Shield
18
T.M.D.S. Data 0+
4
T.M.D.S. Data 4-
19
T.M.D.S. Data 0/5 Shield
5
T.M.D.S. Data 4+
20
T.M.D.S. Data 5-
6
DDC Clock
21
T.M.D.S. Data 5+
7
DDC Data
22
T.M.D.S. Clock Shield
8
Analog Vertical Sync
23
T.M.D.S. Clock+
9
T.M.D.S. Data 1-
24
T.M.D.S. Clock-
10
T.M.D.S. Data 1+
11
T.M.D.S Data 1/3 Shield
C1
Analog Red Video Out
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Non-proprietary I/O Port Specifications
Table A-13
DVI-I Connector Signals and Pins
Pin
Function
Pin
Function
12
T.M.D.S. Data 3-
C2
Analog Green Video Out
13
T.M.D.S. Data 3+
C3
Analog Blue Video Out
14
+5V Power
C4
Analog Horizontal Sync
15
Ground (for +5V)
C5
Analog Common Ground
a. Transition Minimized Differential Signaling
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167
A: Technical Specifications
CMPX Module
Table A-14 lists the non-proprietary connectors that are located on the rear panel of the
optional CMPX module (see Figure A-3). The third column of the table indicates where
you can find the pin assignments for these connectors.
CMPX Module Connectors
Table A-14
Port
Connector
Pin Assignments
Console port
DB-9
See Figure A-5 on page 170
L1 port
USB type B
See Figure A-9 on page 176 and Table A-19 on page 176
PCI 4
PCI 3
PCI 2
CONSOLE
L1 PORT
NUMALINK 0
CPU
NUMALINK 1
PCI 1
L1 port
CONSOLE
port
Figure A-3
168
Non-Proprietary Connectors on Rear Panel of CMPX Module
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Non-proprietary I/O Port Specifications
SGI TP900 Storage Module
Figure A-4 shows the two SCSI port connectors on the rear panel of the TP900 storage
module.
Note that your system will need an optional SCSI PCI card installed to interface with the
TP900 storage option module.
SCSI port connectors
Figure A-4
007-4701-003
OUTPUT
GOOD
OUTPUT
GOOD
FAULT
FAULT
Non-Proprietary Connectors on Rear Panel of TP900 Module
169
A: Technical Specifications
DB-9 Serial Connector
Figure A-5 shows and Table A-15 lists the DB-9 serial connector pin assignments. This
connector is used for the console port of the base compute, XG2N, CPU expansion,
CMPX, and router modules, and the console and modem ports of the optional L2
controller.
!
Caution: Although the image sync subsystem also uses DB9 connectors, these
connectors, whether on the ImageSync card or on the XG2N bricks, are not serial ports.
Connecting a serial device to these connectors may cause damage to both the ImageSync
devices and the serial devices.
Pin 2
Receive
data
(RD)
Pin 3
Pin 1
Transmit
Data carrier
data (TD)
detect (DCD)
(not used)
Pin 6
Data set
ready (DSR)
(not used)
170
Pin 5
Ground
Pin 9
Ringing indicator (RI)
(not used)
Pin 7
Request to
send (RTS)
Figure A-5
Pin 4
Data terminal
ready (DTR)
(not used)
Pin 8
Clear to
send (CTS)
DB-9 Serial Connector Pin Assignments
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Non-proprietary I/O Port Specifications
Table A-15
007-4701-003
DB-9 Serial Connector Pin Assignments
DB-9 Connector Pin
Pin Assignment
1
Data carrier detect (DCD) (not used)
2
Receive data (RD)
3
Transmit data (TD)
4
Data Terminal Ready (DTR) (not used)
5
Ground
6
Data set ready (DSR) (not used)
7
Request to send (RTS)
8
Clear to send (CTS)
9
Ringing indicator (RI) (not used)
171
A: Technical Specifications
RJ-45 Connector
Figure A-6 shows the pin locations for the RJ-45 connector on the IO10 PCI card and the
L2 controller. Table A-16 shows the pin assignments for the RJ-45 connector.
Pin 4
Pin 5
Pin 3
Pin 6
Pin 2
Pin 7
Pin 1
172
Pin 8
Figure A-6
RJ-45 Connector Pin Assignments
Table A-16
Ethernet Connector Pin Assignments
Assignment
1000BaseT
Ethernet Pinouts
Pin
Assignment
1
Transmit +
1
Transmit/Receive 0+
2
Transmit –
2
Transmit/Receive 0–
3
Receive +
3
Transmit/Receive 1+
4
Not used
4
Transmit/Receive 2+
5
Not used
5
Transmit/Receive 2–
6
Receive –
6
Transmit/Receive 1–
7
Not used
7
Transmit/Receive 3+
8
Not used
8
Transmit/Receive 3–
10/100BaseT
Ethernet Pinouts
Pin
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Non-proprietary I/O Port Specifications
External Multi-port Serial Adapter Connector
Figure A-7 shows the connector pin locations for the multi-port serial adapter connector
located on the IO10 PCI card.
18
1
36
19
Figure A-7
Pin Number Locations for 36-pin MDR Connector
Table A-17 lists the pin assignments for the multi-port serial adapter connector.
Table A-17
007-4701-003
Multi-port Serial Adapter Pinouts
Pin
Assignment
Pin
Assignment
1
GND
19
S0 DSR
2
S0 DCD
20
S0 RTS
3
S0 RXD
21
S0 CTS
4
S0 TXD
22
S0 RI
5
S0 DTR
23
GND
6
S1 DSR
24
S1 DCD
7
S1 RTS
25
S1 RXD
8
S1 CTS
26
S1 TXD
9
S1 RI
27
S1 DTR
10
GND
28
S2 DSR
11
S2 DCD
29
S2 RTS
12
S2 RXD
30
S2 CTS
13
S2 TXD
31
S2 RI
173
A: Technical Specifications
Table A-17
174
Multi-port Serial Adapter Pinouts (continued)
Pin
Assignment
Pin
Assignment
14
S2 DTR
32
GND
15
S3 DSR
33
S3 DCD
16
S3 RTS
34
S3 RXD
17
S3 CTS
35
S3 TXD
18
S3 RI
36
S3 DTR
007-4701-003
Non-proprietary I/O Port Specifications
USB Type A Connector
Figure A-8 shows the USB type A connector that is used for USB ports 1 through 4 of the
optional L2 controller that connects to the compute and/or CMPX modules.
1
2
Figure A-8
3
4
Pin Number Locations for USB Type A Connector
Table A-18 lists the pin assignments.
Table A-18
007-4701-003
Pin Assignments for USB Type A Connector
Signal
Color
Pin Number
VCC
Red
1
-Data
White
2
+Data
Green
3
Ground
Black
4
175
A: Technical Specifications
USB Type B Connector
Figure A-9 shows the USB type B connector that is used for the USB L1 port of the
compute module, XG2N module and the CMPX module. Table A-19 lists the pin
assignments.
176
4
3
1
2
Figure A-9
Pin Number Locations for USB Type B Connector
Table A-19
Pin Assignments for USB Type B Connector
Signal
Color
Pin Number
VCC
Red
1
-Data
White
2
+Data
Green
3
Ground
Black
4
007-4701-003
Appendix B
B. Installing Silicon Graphics Prism Modules Into a
Rack
Depending on how you purchased your Silicon Graphics Prism visualization system, you may
need to install one or more modules in a rack or move modules within a rack. This Appendix
describes:
•
“Choosing Locations Within a Rack” on page 177.
•
“Using Silicon Graphics Prism Modules with a Rack” on page 179.
•
“Rackmounting with Optional Slide Rails” on page 179.
•
“Removing a Rail-Mounted Module from a Rack” on page 194
Choosing Locations Within a Rack
The rack locations for your XG2N and other modules will be partially determined by cable lengths
and routings.
Since the Silicon Graphics Prism is a highly-configurable system, it is not practical to list every
possible configuration. For valid configurations not shown in Chapter 3, “Configurations and
Cabling” consult your SGI sales or support representative.
For power connection examples, see “Positioning and Power for Your Silicon Graphics Prism” on
page 12.
007-4701-003
177
B: Installing Silicon Graphics Prism Modules Into a Rack
Programming L1 Rack and Slot Numbers
Each module in a system contains a Level 1 controller (L1). This controller should be programmed
with the location of the brick in which it is installed. Programming the L1 with the correct rack
and slot numbers allows for easier system maintenance and diagnostics, and is necessary for
predictable operation of the system.
When a module is connected to AC power, the L1 display will indicate its position by displaying
a string of the form XXXyZZ (for example, “001c12”).
Decode this string as follows:
“XXX” is the rack number (in this example, rack 001)
“y” is the module type (in this case, c indicates a compute module)
“ZZ” is the “U” number within that rack, counting from the bottom (in this case, slot 12).
If the position indicated on an L1 display is not correct, you should correct it as follows:
1.
Connect a serial terminal to the console port on the brick in question.
2. Display the current location setting in the L1:
001c12-L1> brick
rack: 001 slot: 12 partition: 0 type: C source: EEPROM
Enter the new rack number:
001c12-L1> brick rack 1
brick rack set to 001
3. Enter the new slot number:
001c12-L1> brick slot 7
brick slot set to 07
4. Verify the newly entered information:
001c12-L1> brick
rack: 001 slot: 07 partition: 0 type: C source: EEPROM
If other bricks need to be changed, repeat steps 1 through 4 for each additional brick.
178
007-4701-003
Using Silicon Graphics Prism Modules with a Rack
Using Silicon Graphics Prism Modules with a Rack
This section describes how to install or remove a module in a rack using slide rails.
This rackmounting information is found in the following sections:
•
“Rackmounting with Optional Slide Rails” on page 179
•
“Removing a Rail-Mounted Module from a Rack” on page 194
Rackmounting with Optional Slide Rails
This section describes how to rackmount modules with slide rail assemblies and includes the
following topics:
007-4701-003
•
“Determining Module Space Requirements” on page 180
•
“Slide Rail Mounting Hardware” on page 181
•
“Preparing the Optional Slide Rail Assemblies” on page 182
•
“Preparing the Module” on page 185
•
“Determining Where to Attach the Slide Rail in the Rack” on page 186
•
“Attaching the Slide Rail to the Rack” on page 187
•
“Installing Clip Nuts in Rack Rails” on page 190
•
“Installing the Module in the Rack” on page 191
•
“Adjusting the Position of the Rackmounted Module” on page 193
179
B: Installing Silicon Graphics Prism Modules Into a Rack
Determining Module Space Requirements
Table B-1 specifies the space requirements when rackmounting a module in a 19-inch rack.
Table B-1
Rackmounting Space Requirements for Modules
Height
3.44 inches (8.74 cm)
Width
17.06 inches (43.33 cm)
Depth
27 inches (68.58 cm) (with bezel)
Weight
50 lb. (22.7 kg) maximum configurationa
Required front clearance for module
8.25 inches (20.96 cm)
Required rear clearance for module
10 inches (25.40 cm)
Required side clearance for module
right side: 6 inches (15.24 cm)
left side: none required
Required front clearance for rack
36 inches (91 cm)
Required rear clearance for rack
36 inches (91 cm)
a. Weight will vary depending on configuration of memory, PCI cards, and disks.
180
007-4701-003
Using Silicon Graphics Prism Modules with a Rack
Slide Rail Mounting Hardware
Table B-2 lists the hardware that you will use to mount each module in a 19-inch rack.
Table B-2
Slide Rail Rackmounting Hardware
Hardware Type
007-4701-003
Qty
Usage
Slide rail assembly (includes chassis rail) 2
Allows the module to slide in and out of rack.
(The left and right slides are identical.)
2-inch rear mounting bracket
2
Mounts the slide rails to the rear rack rails.
(The left and right brackets are identical.)
10-24 x 1/4-inch Phillips screw
10
Secures the chassis rails to the module.
10-32 x 1/2-inch Phillips screw
Shoulder washer
Bar nut
8
8
4
Secures the slide rails to the rack rails.
10-32 x 1/2-inch Phillips screw
Bar nut
4
2
Secures the slide rails to their mounting brackets.
10-32 clip nut
2
Provides a threaded hole for fastening the module front
panel to the rack rails.
10-32 x 1/2-inch Phillips screw
2
Fastens the module front panel to the clip nut.
181
B: Installing Silicon Graphics Prism Modules Into a Rack
Preparing the Optional Slide Rail Assemblies
The slide rail assembly consists of a chassis rail and a slide rail. You need to remove the chassis
rail from the slide rail so that you can install a mounting bracket to the slide rail and attach the
chassis rail to the module (see “Preparing the Module” on page 185). To remove the chassis rail
from the slide rail, follow these steps:
1.
Remove the two slide rail assemblies and the rear mounting brackets from the shipping
container.
2. Extend each slide rail assembly until the safety latch snaps into place.
3. Press the safety latch and remove the chassis rail from the slide rail, as shown in Figure B-1.
Safety latch
Slide rail
Safety latch
Chassis rail
Figure B-1
182
Removing the Chassis Rail from the Slide Rail
007-4701-003
Using Silicon Graphics Prism Modules with a Rack
4. Place one of the mounting brackets on the back of the slide rail as shown in Figure B-2.
Adjust the position of the mounting bracket on the slide rail according to the depth of the
rack.
5. Place a bar nut next to the mounting bracket. Secure the mounting bracket to the slide rail by
inserting two 10-32 x 1/2-inch screws through the assembly and into the bar nut as shown in
Figure B-2.
6. Repeat steps 4 and 5 to attach a mounting bracket to the other slide rail.
007-4701-003
183
B: Installing Silicon Graphics Prism Modules Into a Rack
Rear mounting
bracket
Bar nut
Slide rail
Figure B-2
184
Attaching the Rear Mounting Bracket to the Slide Rail
007-4701-003
Using Silicon Graphics Prism Modules with a Rack
Preparing the Module
To attach the chassis rails to the module, follow these steps:
1.
Place the module on a flat, stable surface.
2. Using four 10-24 x 1/4-inch screws, attach one of the chassis rails to the right side of the
module chassis. Ensure that the rail is installed in the correct direction (see Figure B-3).
!
Caution: Use only the 1/4-inch (0.64 cm) length screws. Longer screws damage internal
components in the module.
3. Using five 10-24 x 1/4-inch screws, attach the second rail to the left side of the module
chassis. Again, ensure that the rail is installed in the correct direction.
2
TM
Figure B-3
007-4701-003
Attaching Optional Chassis Rails to the Module Chassis
185
B: Installing Silicon Graphics Prism Modules Into a Rack
Determining Where to Attach the Slide Rail in the Rack
The module requires two units (2U) of space within the rack (one unit is equivalent to 1.75 inches
[44.5 cm]). To determine where you should install the slide rails in the rack, you must count
mounting holes. Each U contains three mounting holes; therefore, in the 2U of space that the
module occupies, there are six mounting holes. The bottom hole of the 2U space is hole 1. The top
mounting hole in the 2U space is hole 6. See Figure B-4.
Note: A module in the rack is identified by the lowest U number that it occupies. For example,
in Figure B-4 the module resides in U5 (the fifth unit within the rack).
8
8
7
7
6
6
2
5th hole
TM
5
5
4
4
3
3
2
2
1
1
2U
2nd hole
6th hole
1st hole
Figure B-4
2U
Mounting-hole Pattern of Rack Vertical Rails
To determine how many mounting holes you must count, use the following formula:
3 x (the lowest U number that the module will occupy) - 2.
For example, when you want to install the module in locations U9 and U10, count 25 mounting
holes (3 x 9 - 2) starting from the bottom of the rack. The 25th hole is the first mounting hole of U9.
186
007-4701-003
Using Silicon Graphics Prism Modules with a Rack
Attaching the Slide Rail to the Rack
To attach the slide rail to the rack, follow these steps:
Tip: The slide rails must be level in the rack. To ensure that you install the slide rails correctly,
carefully count the mounting holes on all of the rack rails (the two front rails and the two rear
rails).
1.
Locate eight 10-32 x 1/2-inch Phillips screws, eight shoulder washers, and four bar nuts.
2. Place one of the bar nuts inside the rack and align it with the second and third holes of the
selected 2U of space (see Figure B-5).
Note: The holes in the bar nuts are not centered. The bar nuts need to be placed in such a way
that the holes are closest to the inside edge of the rack rails. See Figure B-5.
3. Insert two screws with shoulder washers through the rack rail to hold the bar nut in place.
The screws should not be tightened at this point.
4. Repeat steps 2 and 3 to install the remaining three bar nuts on the other three rack rails (front
and rear of rack).
007-4701-003
187
B: Installing Silicon Graphics Prism Modules Into a Rack
6
Barnut
5
2U of space
4
3
2
1
Inside edge
6
5
4
3
2
1
Figure B-5
188
Placing the Bar Nuts on the Rack Rails
007-4701-003
Using Silicon Graphics Prism Modules with a Rack
5. Insert the front and rear brackets of one of the slide rails between the rack rails and the bar
nuts, as shown in Figure B-6.
6. Tighten the screws on the front- and rear-end of the rails. Do not tighten firmly at this point,
because all screws will be firmly tightened once the module is installed in the rack.
7. Repeat steps 5 and 6 to attach the second slide rail to the other side of the rack.
7
7
6
6
5
5
Tighten
screws
4
4
3
3
2
2
Bar nut
1
1
Rack rail
Slide rail assembly
Figure B-6
007-4701-003
Attaching the Slide Rail to the Rack
189
B: Installing Silicon Graphics Prism Modules Into a Rack
Installing Clip Nuts in Rack Rails
Clip nuts secure the modules to the rack. To install the clip nuts, slide the clip nuts over the fifth
hole of the selected 2U of space on each of the front rails. See Figure B-7 for details.
8
5th hole
7
6
2U space
5
4
3
6
2
1
5
Figure B-7
190
Installing Clip Nuts in Rack Rails
007-4701-003
Using Silicon Graphics Prism Modules with a Rack
Installing the Module in the Rack
To install the module in the rack, follow these steps:
Note: Step 2 requires two people.
1.
Fully extend the left and right slide rails from the rack until they lock into place.
2. With one person holding each side of the module, align the chassis rails of the module with
the slide rails of the rack.
3. Slide the chassis rails into the slide rails until the chassis rails are stopped by the safety
latches.
4. Press the safety latches on both sides of the module to fully seat the chassis rails into the
slide rails (see Figure B-8).
5. Firmly tighten all screws (the eight screws that secure the slide rails to the rack rails).
007-4701-003
191
B: Installing Silicon Graphics Prism Modules Into a Rack
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
Slide rail extended,
locked in place
2
TM
Safety latch
6
Safety latch
5
4
3
2
1
2
TM
Push
latches
Figure B-8
192
Pressing the Safety Latches
007-4701-003
Using Silicon Graphics Prism Modules with a Rack
6. Secure the module to the rack by inserting a 10-32 x 1/2-inch Phillips screw in the top hole
of each chassis ear (see Figure B-9).
01
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
2
TM
1
10-32 x 1/2-inch screws
Figure B-9
Securing the Module to the Rack
Adjusting the Position of the Rackmounted Module
Once the module is installed in the rack, you can adjust the position of the module in the rack (up
and down, side-to-side). To adjust the position of the module, loosen the front mounting screws,
adjust the module to the desired position, then tighten the mounting screws.
!
007-4701-003
Caution: Do not lift the module by its bezel; it is not designed to handle the weight of the module.
Instead, use the chassis ears to move the module (see Figure B-9).
193
B: Installing Silicon Graphics Prism Modules Into a Rack
Removing a Rail-Mounted Module from a Rack
To remove a module from a rack, follow these steps:
1.
Power off the module.
2. Disconnect all of the cables at the rear of the module.
Warning: Components may be hot. To avoid injury, allow the components to cool for
approximately five minutes before you proceed with these instructions.
3. Remove the two screws that secure the module to the front rails of the rack.
4. Carefully pull the module from the rack until it is stopped by the safety latches.
5. With one person holding each side, release the safety latches on both sides of the module and
pull the module out of the slide rail (see Figure B-10).
6. Place the module on a flat, stable surface.
194
007-4701-003
Using Silicon Graphics Prism Modules with a Rack
6
Safety latch
5
4
3
2
1
Push
latches
6
5
4
3
2
1
Slide rail extended,
locked in place
Safety latch
Figure B-10
007-4701-003
Releasing the Safety Latches
195
B: Installing Silicon Graphics Prism Modules Into a Rack
7. To slide the slide rails back into the rack, push down on the slide latches as shown in
Figure B-11.
Note: Before you reinstall a module into the rack, fully extend the slide rails from the rack
until they lock into place.
Slide latch
Figure B-11
196
Releasing the Slide Latches
007-4701-003
Appendix C
C. Installing Rack Systems
This Appendix describes how to install a rack that already has your system modules rack-mounted
and cabled together. The following information is provided:
•
“Pre-Installation Activities” on page 198
•
“Unloading and Moving System Equipment” on page 202
•
“Removing a Short Rack from the Shipping Crate” on page 206
•
“Removing a Tall Rack from the Shipping Crate” on page 208
•
“Positioning and Leveling a Single-Rack System” on page 211
•
“Positioning and Leveling Multiple Racks” on page 213
After you have completed installing your rack, return to “Positioning and Power for Your Silicon
Graphics Prism” on page 12 to continue your installation.
007-4701-003
197
C: Installing Rack Systems
Pre-Installation Activities
Perform the following pre-installation activities:
•
Perform site verifications (see “Site Plan Verification” on page 198)
•
Gather appropriate tools to complete the installation (see “Tools Required” on page 198)
•
Ensure that the correct power receptacle is installed and properly wired (see “Power
Receptacle Verification” on page 199)
Note: You can perform the pre-installation activities days or weeks before you receive your
system.
Site Plan Verification
Ensure that all site requirements are met before your system arrives. If you have questions about
the site requirements or you would like to order full-size floor templates for your site, contact a
site planning representative by e-mail (site@sgi.com) or by telephone (+1 715 726 2820).
Tools Required
Table C-1 lists the tools that you need in order to complete the installation.
Table C-1
198
Installation Tools
Tool
Part Number Purpose
13-mm wrench
7260744
Adjust the leveling pads.
13-mm socket (3/8-in. drive)
7260726
Remove bracket bolts from tall rack shipping crate.
19-mm socket (3/8-in. drive)
9470618
Remove bolts from short rack shipping crate.
Extension, 6-in. (3/8-in. drive)
7260655
Used with ratchet and sockets.
Ratchet, reversible (3/8-in. drive)
7260755
Used with extension and sockets.
Level, 9-in.
9470556
Level the rack.
007-4701-003
Pre-Installation Activities
Power Receptacle Verification
Ensure that a qualified technician installs the correct power receptacles. Your Silicon Graphics
Prism system uses one or two single-phase power receptacles. For North American sites, the
single-phase receptacle is a 30-amp, 200- to 240-volt receptacle that has two phase sockets and
one ground socket. For international sites, the single-phase receptacle is a 32-amp, 200-volt
receptacle that has one phase socket, one neutral socket, and one ground socket. Note that the
ground pin is slightly longer than the other two pins on the North American plug.
For North American sites, follow these steps to ensure that a single-phase power receptacle is
properly wired:
1.
Set the voltmeter to a high AC voltage range.
2. Check the voltage between socket X and socket Y (see Figure C-1). The meter should read
between 200 and 240 VAC.
3. Check the voltage between socket X and the ground socket. The meter should read
approximately 120 VAC.
4. Check the voltage between socket Y and the ground socket. The meter should read
approximately 120 VAC.
5. Check the voltage between the ground socket and an earth-ground location. The meter
should read 0 VAC.
6. Change the voltmeter to a low-resistance setting.
7. Measure between the ground socket and an appropriate earth-ground location and ensure that
resistance is less than 1 ohm.
8. Repeat steps 1 through 7 for any additional single-phase power receptacles.
!
007-4701-003
Caution: If a voltage reading is incorrect, or if the resistance measured in step 7 is more than 1
ohm, contact a site-approved electrician. Do not proceed with the installation.
199
C: Installing Rack Systems
Pole X
Power cord
connector
Ground pole
Pole Y
Socket Y
Ground
socket
Socket X
Receptacle
Figure C-1
30-amp Single-phase Power Receptacle for North American Sites
For international sites, follow these steps to ensure that a single-phase power receptacle is properly
wired:
1.
Set the voltmeter to a high AC voltage range.
2. Check the voltage between socket 1 and socket 2 (see Figure C-2). The meter should read
between 200 and 240 VAC.
3. Check the voltage between socket 1 (line) and the ground socket. The meter should read
between 200 and 240 VAC.
Note: The ground pin is slightly larger in diameter than the other two pins.
4. Check the voltage between socket 2 (neutral) and the ground socket. The meter should read
approximately 0 VAC.
5. Check the voltage between the ground socket and an earth-ground location. The meter
should read 0 VAC.
6. Change the voltmeter to a low-resistance setting.
200
007-4701-003
Pre-Installation Activities
7. Measure between the ground socket and an appropriate earth-ground location and ensure that
resistance is less than 1 ohm.
8. Repeat steps 1 through 7 for any additional single-phase power receptacles.
!
Caution: If a voltage reading is incorrect, or if the resistance measured in step 7 is more than 1
ohm, contact a site-approved electrician. Do not proceed with the installation.
Pin 2 (neutral)
Pin 1 (line)
Ground pin
Socket 1
(line)
Figure C-2
007-4701-003
Power cord
connector
Ground socket
Socket 2
(neutral)
Receptacle
32-amp Single-phase Power Plug for International Sites
201
C: Installing Rack Systems
Unloading and Moving System Equipment
Your Silicon Graphics Prism rack system arrives at the site in cardboard shipping crates.
For a short rack system, the documentation carton and the accessories carton are packed with the
system. The documentation carton contains the system manuals as well as warranty and licensing
information. The accessories carton contains the I/O, peripheral, and system cables, and any
additional connectors or tools that are required for a specific configuration. Any PC, workstation,
or terminal is shipped in a separate carton.
For a tall rack system, the system documentation; accessories; and any PC, workstation, or
terminal arrive in separate cartons.
This section describes how to unload and transport the system to its designated location, as
follows:
•
“Unloading the Equipment from the Truck” on page 202
•
“Inspecting the Shipping Crate” on page 205
•
“Transporting the Shipping Crate” on page 205
Unloading the Equipment from the Truck
If your loading dock is the same height as the transportation vehicle, use a pallet jack to unload
the system from the transportation vehicle. The pallet jack should have 48-in. tines or forks.
Follow any instructions that are printed on the packing crates.
If the loading dock is not the same height as the vehicle, you must provide a forklift or another
approved method to unload the system. You can use a platform or ramp to obtain the desired level
as long as the ramp incline does not exceed a ratio of one unit vertical to six units horizontal. For
more information on site requirements, contact site planning by e-mail (site@sgi.com) or by
telephone (+1 715 726 2820).
Warning: Use two or more people to prevent computer equipment from rolling off the
transportation vehicle. Failure to do so could result in serious damage to the computer
equipment.
202
007-4701-003
Unloading and Moving System Equipment
If your site does not have a loading dock, arrange for a forklift to unload the system from the
transportation vehicle. Ensure that two or three people are available to help unload the equipment.
Move all crates slowly and carefully.
Figure C-3 shows the lift openings and dimensions of a tall rack shipping crate. This figure also
shows where to position the pallet jack.
Side view
End view
81.5
(2070.1 mm)
50.5
(1524 mm)
40
(1016 mm)
51.25
(1301.75 mm)
Pallet jack position
Figure C-3
007-4701-003
Dimensions of Tall Rack Shipping Crate
203
C: Installing Rack Systems
Figure C-4 shows the lift openings and dimensions of a short rack shipping crate. This figure also
shows where to position the pallet jack.
Side view
End view
42.75
(1068 mm)
29.25
(743 mm)
48.75
(1238 mm)
Pallet jack position
Figure C-4
204
Dimensions of Short Rack Shipping Crate
007-4701-003
Unloading and Moving System Equipment
Inspecting the Shipping Crate
After the system is unloaded from the truck, follow these steps before you unpack it:
1.
Ensure that the crates and cartons arrive unopened.
2. Inspect the shipping crate for signs of external damage such as dents, holes, crushed corners,
and water marks.
3. Ensure that the tilt watch has not been tripped.
4. If the crate is damaged, file a damage claim with the carrier immediately. In addition, notify
your local Customer Support Center (CSC) for any missing, incorrect, or damaged items.
For CSC contact information, see http://www.sgi.com/support/supportcenters.html.
Transporting the Shipping Crate
Use a pallet jack with forks that are 48 in. (122 cm) long or longer to transport the shipping crate
to the designated location. See Figure C-3 and Figure C-4 for the crate dimensions and location to
position the pallet jack. For system weight and dimensions, contact site planning by e-mail
(site@sgi.com) or by telephone (+1 715 726 2820).
If the crate does not fit through all access doors, you may need to partially disassemble the crate.
!
007-4701-003
Caution: If the system shipping or storage environment is significantly colder than the
environment in which it will be installed [40 ºF (22 ºC) or greater disparity], leave the rack in its
shipping crate for at least 24 hours at room temperature before you start the installation. This
acclimation prevents damage to the equipment that could result from thermal shock and
condensation.
205
C: Installing Rack Systems
Removing a Short Rack from the Shipping Crate
Warning: Be careful when you unpack and move the short rack system. Ensure that the
rack remains on a level surface and that the rack weight remains evenly distributed across
the four casters. If you must lift the casters over an obstacle, such as a door threshold, use
proper lifting techniques and employ a minimum of two people.
!
Caution: Do not subject the rack to any unnecessary shocks or vibration while you unpack and
install the system.
See Figure C-5 as you follow these steps; the numbered illustrations correspond to the numbered
steps.
1.
Ensure that the temperature of the rack is acclimated to the environment in which you are
installing it.
2. Remove the crate cover.
3. Lift the ramp out of the crate and set it aside.
4. Remove the documentation carton, accessories carton, and cardboard packing material.
5. Lift the sidewalls of the crate up and over the system.
6. Remove the four bolts that secure the rack to the crate. You must reach underneath the crate
and feel for the bolts.
7. Align the holes in the edge of the ramp with the pegs in the base of the crate. Ensure that the
ramp is secure.
8. Remove the gate pins from the left and right ends of the gate. Then remove the gate.
9. Pull the rack down the ramp.
Warning: The maximum weight of the short rack is 610 lbs (277 kg). Use caution when
you roll the rack down the ramp.
206
007-4701-003
Removing a Short Rack from the Shipping Crate
Peg
Figure C-5
007-4701-003
Removing a Short Rack from the Shipping Crate
207
C: Installing Rack Systems
Removing a Tall Rack from the Shipping Crate
Warning: In its maximum configuration, a tall rack system weighs approximately 1,366
lb (620 kg). Use caution when you unpack and move this rack. Ensure that the rack remains
on a level surface and that the rack weight remains evenly distributed across the four casters.
To unpack a tall rack, you will need the following tools:
•
Extension, 6-inch, 3/8-in. drive
•
13-mm standard 3/8-in. drive socket
•
Ratchet, reversible, 3/8-in. drive
See Figure C-6 as you follow these steps; the numbered illustrations correspond to the numbered
steps.
1.
Ensure that the temperature of the rack is acclimated to the environment in which you are
installing it and that the system crate is in a stable, upright position.
2. Remove the bands that secure the crate.
Note: Brace the wooden ramp as you remove the horizontal band that surrounds the crate and
the wooden ramp. The ramp moves freely after you remove this band.
3. Place the ramp so that the three holes in the edge of the ramp align with the pegs in the base
of the pallet deck.
4. Remove the cardboard cover, the two cardboard sidewalls, and the foam cushion.
5. Remove the bolts that secure the rack to the pallet deck, as follows:
a.
Remove the top four bolts from the rear mounting bracket; do not remove the bottom
bolts.
b.
Remove the four bolts that secure the front mounting bracket and tip tray to the bottom
of the pallet deck. Set the tip tray aside.
c.
Remove the top four bolts from the front mounting bracket. Set the mounting bracket
aside.
6. Use two people to roll the rack out of the crate and down the ramp.
208
007-4701-003
Removing a Tall Rack from the Shipping Crate
Warning: Use extreme caution when you roll the tall rack down the ramp. Personal injury
and system damage could result if the rack becomes unbalanced or gains too much
momentum when it rolls down the ramp.
7. Bolt the tip tray to the front of the rack before you move the rack to its designated location.
This tray prevents the rack from tipping while you move the rack.
007-4701-003
209
C: Installing Rack Systems
Cardboard
cover
Foam
cushion
4
3
2
Cardboard
sidewalls
Pegs
Ramp
5a
5b
5c
Tip tray
Bolt
Rear mounting
bracket
Front mounting
bracket
6
Bolt
Front mounting bracket
7
Tip tray
Figure C-6
210
Removing a Tall Rack from the Shipping Crate
007-4701-003
Positioning and Leveling a Single-Rack System
Positioning and Leveling a Single-Rack System
!
Caution: To avoid ESD damage to the electronic components, be sure to position the rack before
you remove the ESD bag that covers the rack assembly.
To position and level a single-rack system, follow these steps:
1.
Grasp the rear of the rack and roll the rack to its designated location.
2. Remove the ESD bag.
3. If you are installing a tall rack, adjust the leveling bolts, as shown in Figure C-7, until the
rack is level.
Figure C-7
Leveling Bolts
4. Ensure that the circuit breaker on the power distribution unit is in the OFF (O) position. Then
connect the power cord to a grounded power outlet. Plugging in the power cord grounds the
rack.
007-4701-003
211
C: Installing Rack Systems
5. Secure the rack with seismic tie-downs if you are installing the system in an earthquake
zone.
Note: Tall and short racks have four threaded holes that are located at the bottom of the rack
(see Figure C-8). Use these holes to secure the seismic tie-downs. SGI does not supply the
seismic tie-downs.
Top view of short rack
Top view of tall rack
Seismic tie-down attachment points
Casters
Leveling pads
Figure C-8
212
Seismic Tie-down Attachment Points
007-4701-003
Positioning and Leveling Multiple Racks
Positioning and Leveling Multiple Racks
!
Caution: To avoid ESD damage to the electronic components, be sure to position the racks before
you remove the ESD bags that cover the rack assemblies.
To position and level multiple racks, follow these steps:
1.
Grasp the rear of each rack and roll the rack to its designated location.
2. Remove the ESD bags.
3. Adjust the leveling bolts of rack 001, as shown in Figure C-9, until the rack is level.
Figure C-9
Leveling Bolts
4. Using the leveling bolts of rack 002, adjust rack 002 so that the joining holes of rack 002
align with the joining holes of rack 001. See Figure C-10.
5. Using the provided straps, screws, and washers, bolt the racks together in the four designated
locations shown in Figure C-10.
6. If your system has additional racks, repeat steps 4 and 5 until all of the racks are bolted
together.
7. Ensure that the circuit breakers on the power distribution units are in the OFF (O) position.
Then connect the power cords to grounded power outlets. Plugging in the power cords
grounds the racks.
007-4701-003
213
C: Installing Rack Systems
8. Secure the racks with seismic tie-downs if you are installing the system in an earthquake
zone.
Note: Tall racks have four threaded holes that are located at the bottom of the rack (see Figure C-8
on page 212). Use these holes to secure the seismic tie-downs. SGI does not supply the seismic
tie-downs.
214
007-4701-003
Positioning and Leveling Multiple Racks
Joining holes of
location 4
Location 3
Location 2
Location 1
Strap
Washer
Screw
Figure C-10
007-4701-003
Joining Locations
215
Appendix D
D. Regulatory Specifications and Safety Information
This appendix presents regulatory information that may be important to the operation of
your Silicon Graphics Prism.
Manufacturer’s Regulatory Declarations
The Silicon Graphics Prism products conform to several national and international
specifications and European Directives listed on the “Manufacturer’s Declaration of
Conformity.” The CE insignia displayed on each device is an indication of conformity to
the European requirements.
!
Caution: Each SGI system has several governmental and third-party approvals, licenses,
and permits. Do not modify this product in any way that is not expressly approved by
SGI. If you do, you may lose these approvals and your governmental agency authority
to operate this device.
System Model Number
The CMN (model) number for each system is printed on the system label on the unit.
CE Notice and Manufacturer's Declaration of Conformity
The “CE” symbol indicates compliance of the device to directives of the European
Community. A “Declaration of Conformity” in accordance with the standards has been
made and is available from SGI upon request.
007-4701-003
217
D: Regulatory Specifications and Safety Information
Electromagnetic Emissions
This section provides the contents of electromagnetic emissions notices for various
countries.
FCC Notice (USA Only)
This equipment complies with Part 15 of the FCC Rules. Operation is subject to the
following two conditions:
•
This device may not cause harmful interference.
•
This device must accept any interference received, including interference that may
cause undesired operation.
Note: This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A
digital device, pursuant to Part 15 of the FCC Rules. These limits are designed to provide
reasonable protection against harmful interference when the equipment is operated in a
commercial environment. This equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio
frequency energy and, if not installed and used in accordance with the instruction
manual, may cause harmful interference to radio communications. Operation of this
equipment in a residential area is likely to cause harmful interference, in which case you
will be required to correct the interference at your own expense.
If this equipment does cause harmful interference to radio or television reception, which
can be determined by turning the equipment off and on, you are encouraged to try to
correct the interference by using one or more of the following methods:
•
Reorient or relocate the receiving antenna.
•
Increase the separation between the equipment and receiver.
•
Connect the equipment to an outlet on a circuit different from that to which the
receiver is connected.
Consult the dealer or an experienced radio/TV technician for help.
!
218
Caution: Changes or modifications to the equipment not expressly approved by the
party responsible for compliance could void your authority to operate the equipment.
007-4701-003
Manufacturer’s Regulatory Declarations
Industry Canada Notice (Canada Only)
This Class A digital apparatus meets all requirements of the Canadian
Interference-Causing Equipment Regulations.
Cet appareil numérique német pas de perturbations radioélectriques dépassant les
normes applicables aux appareils numériques de Classe A préscrites dans le Règlement
sur les interferences radioélectriques établi par le Ministère des Communications du
Canada.
VCCI Notice (Japan Only)
Figure D-1
VCCI Notice (Japan Only)
Chinese Class A Regulatory Notice
Figure D-2
Chinese Class A Regulatory Notice
Korean Class A Regulatory Notice
Figure D-3
007-4701-003
Korean Class A Regulatory Notice
219
D: Regulatory Specifications and Safety Information
Shielded Cables
The Silicon Graphics VSL product is FCC compliant under test conditions that include
the use of shielded cables between the system and its peripherals. Your system and any
peripherals that you purchase from SGI have shielded cables. Shielded cables reduce the
possibility of interference with radio, television, and other devices. If you use any cables
that are not from SGI, ensure that they are shielded. Telephone cables do not require
shielding.
Optional monitor cables supplied with your system use additional filtering molded into
the cable jacket to reduce radio frequency interference. Always use the cable that is
supplied with your system. If your monitor cable becomes damaged, obtain a
replacement cable from SGI.
Electrostatic Discharge
SGI designs and tests its products to be resistant to the effects of electrostatic discharge
(ESD). ESD is a source of electromagnetic interference and can cause problems ranging
from data errors and lockups to permanent component damage.
It is important that you keep all the covers and doors, including the plastics, in place
while you are operating the system. The shielded cables that came with the system and
its peripherals should be installed correctly, with all thumbscrews fastened securely.
An ESD wrist strap may be included with some products, such as memory or PCI
upgrades. Use the wrist strap when you install these upgrades to prevent the flow of
static electricity; it is designed to protect your system from ESD damage.
220
007-4701-003
Laser Compliance Statements
Laser Compliance Statements
The DVD-ROM drive in this computer is a Class 1 laser product. The DVD-ROM
drive-classification label is located on the drive.
Warning: Invisible laser radiation when open. Avoid exposure to beam.
Warning: Attention: Radiation du faisceau laser invisible en cas d’ouverture. Evitter
toute exposition aux rayons.
Warning: Vorsicht: Unsichtbare Laserstrahlung, Wenn Abdeckung geöffnet, nicht
dem Strahl aussetzen.
Warning: Advertencia: Radiación láser invisible al ser abierto. Evite exponerse a los
rayos.
Warning: Advarsel: Laserstråling vedåbning se ikke ind i strålen
Warning: Varo! Lavattaessa Olet Alttina Lasersåteilylle
Warning: Varning: Laserstrålning når denna del år öppnad ålå tuijota
såteeseenstirra ej in i strålen.
Warning: Varning: Laserstrålning nar denna del år öppnadstirra ej in i strålen.
007-4701-003
221
D: Regulatory Specifications and Safety Information
Warning: Advarsel: Laserstråling nar deksel åpnesstirr ikke inn i strålen.
Lithium Battery Statement
Warning: Only qualified service personnel should replace the soldered lithium
battery (or batteries) in the SGI system.
Warning: Advarsel!: Lithiumbatteri - Eksplosionsfare ved fejlagtig håndtering.
Udskiftning må kun ske med batteri af samme fabrikat og type. Léver det brugte
batteri tilbage til leverandøren.
Warning: Advarsel: Eksplosjonsfare ved feilaktig skifte av batteri. Benytt samme
batteritype eller en tilsvarende type anbefalt av apparatfabrikanten. Brukte batterier
kasseres i henhold til fabrikantens instruksjoner.
Warning: Varning: Explosionsfara vid felaktigt batteribyte. Anvãnd samma
batterityp eller en ekvivalent typ som rekommenderas av apparattillverkaren. Kassera
anvãnt batteri enligt fabrikantens instruktion.
Warning: Varoitus: Päristo voi räjähtää, jos se on virheellisesti asennettu. Vaihda
paristo ainoastaan laitevalmistajan suosittelemaan tyyppiin. Hävitä käytetty paristo
valmistajan ohjeiden mukaisesti.
Warning: Vorsicht!: Explosionsgefahr bei unsachgemäßen Austausch der Batterie.
Ersatz nur durch denselben oder einen vom Hersteller empfohlenem ähnlichen Typ.
Entsorgung gebrauchter Batterien nach Angaben des Herstellers.
222
007-4701-003
Index
Numbers
17U rack install, 206-207
39U rack install, 208-210
A
AC power input, 7
adding or replacing
disk drives, 98
PCI cards, 73
adding or replacing memory, 107
analog monitors, 145
B
bandwidth
compute node, 157
battery statements, 222
C
Chinese Class A regulatory notice, 219
compute module
connector pin assignments, 164
general features, 157
rear panel items, 7
compute node
bandwidth, 157
007-4701-003
connector
LINK, 7
connector pin assignment
compute module, 164
DB9, 170
RJ-45, 172
TP900 storage module, 169
USB type A, 175
USB type B, 176
console port, 7
customer service, xxi
D
DB9
connector pin assignments, 170
digital monitors, 145
DIMMs
adding or replacing, 107
installation, 109-111
removal, 112-113
disk drives
adding or replacing, 98
installation, 99
removal, 101
disk storage
TP900, 45
TP9100, 46
DM8 audio board, 54
dual-channel
223
Index
configuring, 138
E
electromagnetic emissions, 218
electrostatic discharge
regulatory notice, 220
Embedded Support Partner (ESP), 132
ESD precautions, 10
ESP, 132
expansion
storage
TP900, 45
TP9100, 46
I
Industry Canada Notice (Canada only), 219
install
disk drive, 99
memory, 109-111
PCI/PCI-X card, 83-86
short rack, 206-207
tall rack, 208-210
internal view of XG2N, 8
I/O ports, 7
IO10 base I/O card, 44, 53
IO9 base I/O card, 53
K
F
Failure LED, 5
FCC notice (USA only), 218
Fibre Channel disks, 44
framelock
configuring, 141
front panel controls & indicators, 5
front panel LEDs, 5
full scene anti-aliasing
configuring, 136
G
Genlock
configuring, 141
keyboard extender, 57
Knowledgebase, 132
Korean Class A regulatory notice, 219
L
L1 console port, 7
L1 controller, 5
L1 controller display, 5
L1 port (USB type B), 7
laser compliance statements, 221-222
LEDs, front panel, 5
leveling pads, 51
LINK connector, 7
M
H
hazard advisory statements, 9
224
manufacturer’s declaration of conformity, 217
manufacturer’s regulatory declarations, 217
007-4701-003
Index
memory
adding or replacing, 107
installation, 109-111
removal, 112-113
monitor positions, 143
monitor types (digital and analog), 145
MonitorLayout, 145
Multi-port serial adapter, 173
N
NMI button, 6
non-racked chassis, 12
NUMAlink
cables, 15
connector, 7
LED, 7
O
overlay planes
configuring, 140
P
PCI/PCI-X card
installation, 83-86
removal, 87-90
PDUs, 48
port specifications
router module, 160
ports, rear panel, 7
Power button, 6
power distribution units, 48
power receptacles, 11, 199-201
Power Systems, 60
007-4701-003
Power-button LED, 5
product support, xxi
R
rack
locations, 177
numbers, 178
short install, 206-207
tall install, 208-210
types, 51
rack examples
17U and 39U, 51
rack, short
specifications, 161
rack, tall
specifications, 161
rackmounting bricks, 179
R-brick (router module), 40
rear panel of the XG2N, 2
regulatory declarations
manufacturer, 217
regulatory specifications, 217
CE notice and Manufacturer’s declaration of
conformity, 217
Chinese Class A regulatory notice, 219
electromagnetic emissions, 218
electrostatic discharge, 220
FCC notice (USA) only, 218
Industry Canada notice (Canada only), 219
Korean Class A regulatory notice, 219
manufacturer’s regulatory declarations, 217
shielded cables, 220
VCCI notice (Japan only), 219
remove
disk drive, 101
memory, 112-113
PCI/PCI-X card, 87-90
225
Index
Reset button, 6
ring topology, 60, 62
RJ-45
connector pin assignments, 172
router module
block diagram, 41
features, 40
front panel components, 42
overview, 40
port specifications, 160
rear panel components, 43
technical specifications, 160
router topology, 60
S
safety, 72-73
safety measures, 11
SCSI disks, 44
server model number, 217
Service-required LED, 5
setmon command, 141
SGI Knowledgebase. See Knowledgebase
shielded cables
regulatory notice, 220
short rack install, 206-207
site requirements, 198
slot number (rack), 178
space requirements, 180
specifications
environmental, 156
short rack, 161
tall rack, 161
TP900 storage module, 162
Status LEDs, 5
stereo images
configuring, 133
226
storage expansion
TP900, 45
TP9100, 46
Supportfolio Online, 132
system rack
17U, 49
39U, 49
T
tall rack install, 208-210
tape devices, 53
tape drives, 53
Team Systems, 60
technical specifications
router module, 160
technical support, xxi
TP900 storage module, 45
connector pin assignments, 169
specifications, 162
TP9100, 46
troubleshooting
problems and recommended actions, 122
U
USB type A
connector pin assignments, 175
USB type B
connector pin assignments, 176
V
VCCI notice (Japan only), 219
007-4701-003
Index
X
XF86Config file
configuring for dual-channel, 138
configuring for external framelock, 141
configuring for external Genlock, 141
configuring for full scene anti-aliasing, 136
configuring for overlay planes, 140
configuring for stereo, 133
configuring monitor types, 145
XG2N module description, 2
007-4701-003
227
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