Apple | AppleVision monitors | Specifications | Apple AppleVision monitors Specifications


Developer Note
AppleVision 1710AV and 1710
Displays

Developer Press
 Apple Computer, Inc. 1995
This document was created with FrameMaker 4.0.4P2
 Apple Computer, Inc.
 1995, Apple Computer, Inc.
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This document was created with FrameMaker 4.0.4P2
Contents
Figures and Tables
Preface
vii
About This Note
ix
Conventions Used in This Note
List of Abbreviations
x
Other Reference Material
x
For More Information
xi
Chapter 1
ix
Overview of the AppleVision 1710AV
and 1710 Displays 1
Hardware Overview
2
Operating Modes
5
Front Panel Controls
6
I/O Connections
8
Speakers and Microphone
9
Specifications
10
Macintosh Software Overview
11
Compatibility Issues
11
CPU Compatibility
12
Video Card Compatibility
12
Operating System Compatibility
13
Opportunities for Developers
13
Software Opportunities
13
Hardware Opportunities
14
New Display Connections Specifications
14
Background Information
14
Designing Cards and Drivers for a New Generation of Displays
Designing Smart Displays
16
Designing Display Data Channel (DDC) Displays
16
Tips for Developers
17
Chapter 2
Hardware Interface
15
19
Video Port and Connector
20
ADB Port and Connector
22
Other I/O Ports and Connectors
ADB Ports
23
Sound Ports and Adapter
23
23
iii
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Chapter 3
Application Program Interface
25
ContrastEngine Component
27
Overview
27
ContrastEngine Component Functions
28
ContrastEngineGetBrightnessRange
28
ContrastEngineGetBrightness
28
ContrastEngineSetBrightness
28
ContrastEngineGetContrastRange
29
ContrastEngineGetContrast
29
ContrastEngineSetContrast
29
GeometryEngine Component
30
Overview
30
GeometryEngine Component Functions
31
GeometryEngineGetOverscan
31
GeometryEngineSetOverscan
31
VPTEngine Component
31
Overview
31
White Point
32
Virtual Photometry Technology (VPT)
32
Ambient Light
33
VPTEngine Component Data Types
33
Tristim (XYZ)
33
CIE1976 (u’v’)
34
CIE1960 (uv)
34
CIE1931(xy)
34
Kelvin
35
VPTGamma
35
VPTEngine Component Functions
35
VPTEngineCalibrateDisplay
36
VPTEngineCalibrated
36
VPTEngineGetLastCalTime
36
VPTEngineGetTargetWhitePoint
37
VPTEngineGetActualWhitePoint
37
VPTEngineGetWhitePointDrive
38
VPTEngineGetReflectedAmbientLight
38
VPTEngineGetDirectAmbientLight
39
VPTEngineGetActualGammaCurveTable
39
VPTEngineGetActualGamut
40
VPTEngineRGBToTristim
40
VPTEngineTristimToRGB
41
Glossary
iv
43
Index
45
v
vi
Figures and Tables
Chapter 1
Chapter 2
Chapter 3
Overview of the AppleVision 1710AV and 1710 Displays
1
Figure 1-1
Figure 1-2
Figure 1-3
Figure 1-4
Figure 1-5
Figure 1-6
Figure 1-7
Front view of the AppleVision 1710AV Display
4
Right side and rear panel of the AppleVision 1710AV Display
4
Front view of the AppleVision 1710 Display
5
Right side and rear panel of the AppleVision 1710 Display
5
Front panel audio and video controls
7
AppleVision display I/O ports
9
Contrast and brightness panel
14
Table 1-1
Table 1-2
Table 1-3
Table 1-4
Supported screen resolutions
3
Environmental specifications
10
AC power requirements
10
CPU configurations supporting the AppleVision display
Hardware Interface
19
Figure 2-1
Figure 2-2
Figure 2-3
Figure 2-4
Display-to-CPU interface
20
Video connector pin designations
ADB connector pin designations
Adapter for audio ports
23
Table 2-1
Table 2-2
Video connector signal assignments
ADB connector signal assignments
Application Program Interface
Figure 3-1
12
21
22
21
22
25
Simplified view of the AV Architecture
26
vii
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viii
P R E F A C E
About This Note
The AppleVision 1710AV and 1710 Displays Developer Note describes design
features of the AppleVision 1710AV Display, a new Apple audio/video
display, and of the AppleVision 1710, a similar display with video capabilities
only.
This note assumes that you are familiar with the functionality of and
programming requirements for Apple Macintosh computers.
The note consists of three chapters, a glossary, and an index.
■
Chapter 1, “Overview of the AppleVision 1710AV and 1710 Displays,”
gives a hardware overview which includes information about the display’s
operating modes; gives a software overview; discusses CPU, video card,
and operating system compatibility; provides connection specifications for
the displays; and concludes with tips for developers.
■
Chapter 2, “Hardware Interface,” describes the hardware interface for the
video port, the ADB ports, and the sound ports.
■
Chapter 3, “Application Program Interface,” discusses those architectural
components that developers can currently access.
Conventions Used in This Note
0
The following conventions are used throughout this note.
Note
This type of note contains information of general interest.
◆
IMPORTANT
A note like this contains important information that you should read
before proceeding. ▲
▲
WARNING
A warning like this directs your attention to something that could
damage software or hardware or that could result in loss of data. ▲
Terms shown in boldface type in the first reference are terms defined in the
glossary.
A special font, Courier, is used for characters that you type, or for lines of
program code. It looks like this.
ix
This document was created with FrameMaker 4.0.4P2
P R E F A C E
List of Abbreviations
0
This developer note contains the following abbreviations.
CIE
Commission International d’Eclairage (International
Commission on Illumination)
CRT
cathode ray tube
dB
decibel
DDC
display data channel
HDTV
high-density television
ICC
International Color Consortium
LED
light emitting diode
MPCD
mean perceptible color difference
OSD
on-screen display
RAM
random access memory
RMS
root mean square
SPL
sound pressure level
VESA
Video Electronics Standards Association
VGA
video graphics adapter
VPT
Virtual Photometry Technology
VRAM
video RAM
Other Reference Material
0
Apple Developer Press publishes a variety of books and technical notes
designed to help third-party developers to design hardware and software
products that are compatible with Apple computers. Readers should be
familiar with the following documents that can be found in electronic form in
the latest Reference Library edition of the Developer CD Series:
x
■
AV Architecture Developer Note. This note is a companion to the AppleVision
1710 and 1710AV Displays Developer Note, and you should refer to both
books for a thorough understanding of the AppleVision displays. The note
gives an overview of AV Architecture concepts and AV applications
software. It provides detailed information about the architecture’s Panel,
Engine, Port, and Device Components, and gives an overview of Device
Manager Component features as they relate to the AV Architecture.
■
Display Device Driver Guide, Device Support for the Display Manager Developer
Note describes device support for the Macintosh Display Manager.
P R E F A C E
■
Designing PCI Cards and Drivers for Power Macintosh Computers,
# R0650LL/A, describes the Macintosh implementation of the Peripheral
Component Interconnect (PCI) local bus. Chapter 11 of this book is of
particular interest to developers working with AppleVision displays and
the AV Architecture.
Inside Macintosh is a collection of books, organized by topic, that describe the
system software of Macintosh computers. Readers should also be familiar
with the following publications that can be found in the Inside Macintosh CD.
■
Inside Macintosh: QuickTime
■
Inside Macintosh: More Macintosh Toolbox
■
Inside Macintosh: Devices documents the last version of the Device Manager
before it was enhanced to support PowerPC native drivers.
■
Inside Macintosh: Advanced Color Imaging
You should also refer to the third edition of Designing Cards and Drivers for the
Macintosh Family, published by the Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Inc.
Most of the publications listed are available from APDA. Refer to the next
section for the APDA address and phone numbers.
For More Information
0
APDA offers convenient worldwide access to hundreds of Apple and
third-party development tools, resources, and information for anyone
interested in developing applications on Apple platforms.
To order products or to request a complimentary copy of the APDA Tools
Catalog, contact
APDA
Apple Computer, Inc.
P.O. Box 319
Buffalo, NY 14207-0319
Telephone
1-800-282-2732 (United States)
1-800-637-0029 (Canada)
716-871-6555 (International)
Fax
716-871-6511
AppleLink
APDA
America Online
APDAorder
CompuServe
76666,2405
Internet
APDA@applelink.apple.com
xi
P R E F A C E
For the latest specifications and information about the Display Data Channel
(DDC) contact
VESA
2150 North First Street, Suite #360,
San Jose, CA 95131-2020
xii
Telephone
408-435-0333
Fax
408-435-8225
C H A P T E R
Figure 1-0
Listing 1-0
Table 1-0
1
Overview of the
AppleVision 1710AV and
1710 Displays
This document was created with FrameMaker 4.0.4P2
1
C H A P T E R
1
Overview of the AppleVision 1710AV and 1710 Displays
The AppleVision 1710AV and 1710 Displays are multiple-resolution color displays with
extensive software control features. They extend the traditional display concept and
provide customers with an affordable step up to a high-quality multimedia input/
output (I/O) device.
The AppleVision 1710AV Display has both audio and video capabilities. It reemphasizes
Apple’s commitment to the integration of sound input and sound output with a desktop
computer, and it is designed to take advantage of today’s multimedia applications, such
as PlainTalk voice control, text-to-speech technology, and hands-free telephony, as well
as emerging MovieTalk technologies for video conferencing. It has a built-in
PlainTalk-compatible microphone, integrated stereo speakers, and enhanced audio and
I/O capabilities.
The AppleVision 1710 Display shares all the video capabilities of the AppleVision
1710AV. However, it does not have audio capabilities.
Chapter 1 of this note provides an overview of the AppleVision 1710AV and 1710
Displays. It includes the following information:
■
a general description of the AppleVision display hardware, including I/O connectors,
controls, display specifications, and power requirements
■
an overview of the display software elements
■
information about compatible computers, video cards, and operating systems
■
a discussion of hardware and software opportunities available to developers
■
display connection specifications, including an overview of design techniques used to
develop cards and drivers for the new displays, to design smart displays, and to
design displays with Display Data Channel (DDC) capabilities that allow them to
function with PC-compatible computers
Note
The information in this chapter applies to both the AppleVision 1710AV
Display and the 1710 Display, unless otherwise indicated. ◆
Hardware Overview
The AppleVision 1710AV and 1710 Displays are new 17-inch RGB (red, green, blue)
multiple-resolution displays. Both displays have the following features:
2
■
EPA Energy Star compliance
■
a standard Macintosh power input cable
■
two ADB (Apple Desktop Bus) ports to connect ADB devices such as keyboard
and mouse
■
easily accessible controls to change video brightness, contrast, color depth, and
resolution
■
front panel controls for the on-screen display (OSD)
Hardware Overview
1
C H A P T E R
1
Overview of the AppleVision 1710AV and 1710 Displays
The AppleVision 1710AV has the following additional features:
■
an output port for headphones or external speakers
■
an input port for an external microphone or other sound source
■
a built-in microphone, with PlainTalk capability and a light-emitting diode (LED)
indicator
■
a built-in stereo speaker system
■
easily accessible controls to adjust sound volume, to mute sound, to adjust bass and
treble, and to enable or disable the microphone
Both displays feature true multiple-scan capability. Table 1-1 lists some of the resolutions
supported.
IMPORTANT
The AppleVision displays are not limited to the timing modes listed in
Table 1-1. The displays will synchronize over timing ranges 50-120 Hz
for vertical refresh, and 28-82 kHz for horizontal scan. ▲
Table 1-1
Supported screen resolutions
Mode
Pixel resolution
Vertical refresh
rate
Horizontal scan
rate
VGA
640 × 480
60 Hz
31.5 kHz
Macintosh
640 × 480
66.67 Hz
34.97 kHz
VESA
800 × 600
60.31 Hz
37.9 kHz
VESA
800 × 600
75 Hz
46.9 kHz
Macintosh
832 × 624
74.55 Hz
49.7 kHz
Macintosh
1024 × 768
74.93 Hz
60.24 kHz
VESA
1024 × 768
60 Hz
48.4 kHz
VESA
1280 × 1024
60 Hz
64.3 kHz
VESA
1280 × 1024
75.03 Hz
79.98 kHz
The displays are ergonomically designed with an integral tilt-and-swivel base. They
interface by means of a video cable with existing Macintosh computers and with
PC-compatible computers. Chapter 2, “Hardware Interface,” provides information about
interfacing with the displays. Figure 1-1 and Figure 1-2 show front and rear views of the
AppleVision 1710AV Display. Figure 1-3 and Figure 1-4 show front and rear views of the
AppleVision 1710 Display.
Hardware Overview
3
C H A P T E R
1
Overview of the AppleVision 1710AV and 1710 Displays
Figure 1-1
Front view of the AppleVision 1710AV Display
Ports for ADB
and sound input
Ports for ADB and
sound output
Bezel panel
with controls
Left stereo speaker
Right stereo speaker
Controls
Figure 1-2
Right side and rear panel of the AppleVision 1710AV Display
Display cable
(includes display
connector and
ADB connector)
ADB port
Sound
output
port
Video and
ADB cable
Power
cord
Sound input
Sound output
Video
connector
4
Hardware Overview
Sound
cable
ADB connector
C H A P T E R
1
Overview of the AppleVision 1710AV and 1710 Displays
Figure 1-3
Front view of the AppleVision 1710 Display
ADB port
ADB port
Bezel panel
with controls
Figure 1-4
Right side and rear panel of the AppleVision 1710 Display
ADB port
Power input
Power cord
Video and ADB cable
Video connector
ADB connector
Operating Modes
1
AppleVision displays have a feature that allows them to work in two different modes,
depending on whether or not the AppleVision software is present. These modes are
Remote and Local.
Hardware Overview
5
C H A P T E R
1
Overview of the AppleVision 1710AV and 1710 Displays
When the display is first powered up, it is in Local mode. If it is connected to a
PC-compatible computer, it remains in Local mode. If it is connected to a Macintosh
computer, but the Macintosh AppleVision software is not installed, it also remains in
Local mode. If the display is connected to a Macintosh computer with the AppleVision
software installed, the software puts the display into Remote mode by sending a series of
ADB messages to the display. The display then remains in Remote mode.
In Local mode, the computer does not control the display. When the user presses control
buttons on the front of the display, the display handles these actions and makes the
required changes to its settings. In addition, when one of the video front panel buttons is
pressed, the on-screen display (OSD) appears to provide visual feedback on the changes
being made.
Remote mode allows the AppleVision Setup application to control the settings of the
display. In addition, the OSD does not appear on the screen. Instead, when any front
panel buttons are pressed, the information about which button was pressed is sent to the
Macintosh over the ADB cable. The Macintosh then commands the display to change its
settings appropriately. If the AppleVision Setup application is open when the buttons on
the display are pressed, the application reflects the changes caused by the buttons as
those changes are made.
Front Panel Controls
1
The AppleVision 1710AV Display controls are located on the front bezel of the display, as
shown in Figure 1-1 on page 4. The AppleVision 1710 Display controls are shown in
Figure 1-3 on page 5. Figure 1-5 shows details of these controls. The AppleVision 1710
Display does not have audio capabilities, so the audio controls shown on the lower panel
(Figure 1-5) are not present.
The buttons on the front panels of the displays control the various functions
electronically through the main processor and related system software, when the
displays are in Remote mode. In Local mode, screen brightness and contrast, audio
volume, and the microphone are affected directly by these controls. Refer to the previous
section, “Operating Modes,” for further information on this subject.
6
Hardware Overview
C H A P T E R
1
Overview of the AppleVision 1710AV and 1710 Displays
Figure 1-5
Front panel audio and video controls
Open AppleVision Setup or
select DOS or
Windows panel
Select the
setting
Contrast
control
Brightness
control
Power
Move between
control rows
Select one of the
panel functions
Sound
Navigating
buttons
Bass volume control
Treble volume control
Microphone on/off
Volume control
Mute button
There are three groups of controls on the AppleVision 1710AV Display’s front panel. The
AppleVision 1710 Display has two groups of controls.
Both displays have a group of buttons in the upper left corner of the panel. These
buttons perform different functions, depending on whether the display is operating with
a Macintosh computer with AppleVision software, or with a PC-compatible computer.
■
When you are using the display with a Macintosh computer with AppleVision
software installed, pressing any one of the five buttons in the upper left corner of the
panel launches the AppleVision Setup control panel if it is present in the Control
Panels folder.
■
When you are using the display with a PC-compatible computer, the buttons enable
you to select DOS and Windows panels. If you press any one of the buttons, it opens
the on-screen control panels. From these panels you can change the display’s setup.
The first two buttons select among the three main menus: Geometry, Tools, and
Convergence. Geometry is the default that opens up first.
The third (center) button allows you to select among the different topics under each
menu. For example, in the Geometry menu, you can choose Width, Height,
Pincushion, Vertical Shift, Horizontal Shift, or Rotate. In the Tools menu, you can
chose Color Temperature, Overscan, or Scan Rate. (You can only display the scan
rate when you select Scan Rate. You cannot adjust the scan rate, as the display
adjusts to the scan rate coming from the video card.) In the Convergence menu,
n
n
Hardware Overview
7
C H A P T E R
1
Overview of the AppleVision 1710AV and 1710 Displays
you can select Vertical and Horizontal. The panels displayed when you select the
different panels do not look the same as the panels used for the Macintosh
computer.
n
The fourth and fifth buttons allow you to select the value for the different topics, so
that you can adjust Width, Height, and so forth. If you press the + button, the value
increases, and if you press the – button, the value decreases.
Both displays have a group of buttons on the upper right corner of the panel. These
buttons are used in both Macintosh and PC configurations.
■
Contrast control. There are two contrast control buttons. The one with the up arrow
increases contrast. The one with the down arrow decreases contrast. The control
process is continuous.
■
Brightness control. There are two brightness control buttons. The one with the up
arrow increases brightness. The one with the down arrow decreases brightness. The
control process is continuous.
■
Power on and off. This button turns power to the display on and off. Power to the
display comes on only when the video signal is present.
The buttons on the lower panel are present only on AppleVision 1710AV Displays. They
are used in both Macintosh and PC configurations to control the audio functions of the
display.
■
Bass control. These buttons adjust bass. The one with the up arrow increases bass. The
one with the down arrow decreases bass.
■
Treble control. These buttons adjust treble. The one with the up arrow increases treble.
The one with the down arrow decreases treble.
■
Microphone on and off. This button turns the internal microphone on and off. An
amber light above the button comes on when the microphone is on.
■
Volume. These buttons increase or decrease the overall volume of the sound output.
The one with the up arrow increases volume. The one with the down arrow decreases
volume.
■
Mute button. The first time you press it, sound is muted, the second time, sound is
turned on again. You can also turn sound on again by pressing the increase volume
button.
For detailed information about the controls, you should refer to the User’s Guides for the
AppleVision 1710AV Display and the AppleVision 1710 Display.
I/O Connections
1
The AppleVision 1710AV (Figure 1-2 on page 4) and 1710 (Figure 1-4 on page 5) Displays
have I/O connections on the back panel and also on the side panels.
Both displays have the following connections:
■
8
The video and ADB cable is permanently attached to the rear panel of the display.
There are two connectors at the end of this cable. One is a DB-15 video connector. The
other is a standard ADB connector. Both connectors plug into the back panel of the
Macintosh computer. If you are using the AppleVision display with a PC-compatible
Hardware Overview
C H A P T E R
1
Overview of the AppleVision 1710AV and 1710 Displays
computer, you will not use the ADB connector at all. To connect the display to the
computer, connect the video connector to a PC adapter, and then plug the PC adapter
into the PC video port.
■
There is a standard power connector that plugs into the back of the display.
The AppleVision 1710AV Display also has the following sound connection:
■
The sound cable is also permanently attached to the rear panel of the display. It is a
split cable with two connectors, one for sound input and the other for sound output.
You plug these connectors into your computer if you want to use the built-in
microphone and speakers on the AppleVision 1710AV Display.
Both displays have the following ADB ports on the side panels:
■
The ADB ports, on the left and right side panels, enable you to connect a mouse or a
keyboard to either side of the display.
The AppleVision 1710AV has the following sound ports on the side panels:
■
The sound output port, on the right side panel of the display, is a line-level output
that supports headphones and external speakers. Plugging in a sound output device
to this port does not automatically disable the built-in speakers. You may select an
option from the Sound panel that allows you to disable the speakers when the
headphones are plugged in.
■
The sound input port, on the left side panel, allows you to connect an external
microphone or other line-level sound source, such as a CD or cassette player, to the
display.
Figure 1-6 shows the relative positions of the ports on the side panels.
Figure 1-6
AppleVision display I/O ports
Connectors on left side
4
2
Connectors on right side
3
4
1
ADB
port
2
Sound
in
Sound
out
The AppleVision 1710 Display
has only the ADB ports
3
1
ADB
port
Chapter 2, “Hardware Interface,” provides the interface specifications for these
connectors.
Speakers and Microphone
1
The features described in this section are available only with the AppleVision 1710AV
Display.
■
The integral stereo speakers feature a ported (bass reflex) chamber design. They have
a response close to high fidelity, and deliver 92 dB SPL (sound pressure level) at 1
kHz, at 0.5 meters. The frequency response is 70Hz to 20 kHz, ± 6dB.
Hardware Overview
9
C H A P T E R
1
Overview of the AppleVision 1710AV and 1710 Displays
■
The headphone/speakers jack has an output level of 1.75 Vpp into a 4-ohm load, and
2 Vpp into a 10-kohm load.
■
The integral microphone is a directional microphone, optimized for use with speech
recognition programs. It is particularly effective in noisy office environments.
■
The display accepts an audio input signal of up to 4 Vpp (line level, low sensitivity),
or as low as 20 mVpp (microphone level, high sensitivity) without clipping the signal.
Specifications
1
Table 1-2 lists the environmental specifications for the display.
Table 1-2
Environmental specifications
Item
Specification
Temperature
10° to 40° C (50° to 104° F) — operating
0° to 60° C (32° to 140° F) — storage
-40˚ to 60˚ C (-4˚ to 140˚ F) — shipping
Relative humidity
10% to 80% noncondensing — operating
5% to 90% noncondensing — storage
5% to 95% noncondensing — shipping
Operating altitude
0 to 10,000 feet (0 to 3048 meters)
Shipping altitude
0 to 35,000 feet (0 to 10,670 meters)
Table 1-3 lists the AC power requirements for the display.
Table 1-3
10
AC power requirements
Category
Requirement
AC input range
100–200 volts AC, auto select
Input surge voltage
3 kV
Input line transient
immunity
RF level of 3 volts/meter, from 26 MHz to 1 GHz
Peak inrush current
40 amps peak, all load and line conditions
Input line frequency
50– 60Hz, single phase
Line drop out immunity
20 milliseconds (minimum), 90 VRMS input,
maximum load
Input power under
maximum load
130 watts (maximum), all line and load conditions
Specifications
C H A P T E R
1
Overview of the AppleVision 1710AV and 1710 Displays
Table 1-3
AC power requirements (continued)
Category
Requirement
Minimum input/output
power efficiency
75%, all line conditions, maximum load
Line voltage transient
response
±10% instantaneous variation in average input line
voltage, applied for 100 ms, with no visible effects of
transient in display
Load regulation
Adequate for proper operation of display-related
circuitry under all conditions
Macintosh Software Overview
1
The software that ships with the AppleVision 1710AV and 1710 Displays provides the
software interface between the user and the display when the display is connected to a
Macintosh computer system.
The software performs the following functions:
■
It provides basic geometry control for a variety of screen functions, such as brightness
and contrast, pincushioning, overscan, and so forth.
■
It provides basic sound control for a variety of functions such as volume and bass,
and treble levels. This applies only to the AppleVision 1710AV Display.
■
It provides support for Virtual Photometry Technology (VPT), with the capability of
creating white point, ColorSync profiles, ambient light settings, and compensating
for CRT aging.
■
It gives quick access to frequently used control functions through the Control Strip.
■
It supports energy saving with the Energy Saver.
An application interface specific to the displays is part of the software package. This is
the AppleVision Setup application program, and it resides in the Control Panels folder.
Compatibility Issues
1
This section deals with AppleVision compatibility issues, in terms of the CPUs, video
cards, and versions of the Macintosh operating system that support the AppleVision
displays.
Macintosh Software Overview
11
C H A P T E R
1
Overview of the AppleVision 1710AV and 1710 Displays
CPU Compatibility
1
Table 1-4 lists the CPUs that support the AppleVision displays. The CPUs listed have
been tested in AppleVision configurations.
Table 1-4
CPU configurations supporting the AppleVision display
Powerbook
Quadra, Centris, Performa
Power Macintosh
280*
605
6100/60
280c*
610
6100/60AV
520
630
6300
520c
630 DOS compatible
7100/66
540
650
7100/66AV
540c
660AV
7100/80
700
7100/80AV
800
7200
840AV
7500
900
8100/80
950
8100/80AV
8100/110
8100/110AV
8500
9500
Power Macintosh
upgrade card
* With Mini Dock and Duo Dock II
Video Card Compatibility
1
In addition to the on-board video provided by the CPUs listed in Table 1-4, plug-in video
cards, such as the NuBus 24AC video card, also support AppleVision displays. For
additional information about supporting the AppleVision displays using plug-in video
cards, refer to “New Display Connections Specifications” on page 14.
Apple video cards 8.24, 8.24GC, and 4.8 do not support the AppleVision displays. In
addition, plug-in video cards that do follow the new guidelines defined in the “Graphics
Drivers” section of Designing PCI Cards and Drivers for Macintosh Computers do not
support the displays.
12
Compatibility Issues
C H A P T E R
1
Overview of the AppleVision 1710AV and 1710 Displays
Operating System Compatibility
1
You should use System 7.5 or later with the AppleVision display. If you run earlier
versions of the operating system, QuickTime delays the loading of the AppleVision INIT.
You may have renamed AppleVision INIT with a name that begins with a letter later
than Q (QuickTime). This means that the INIT installs after QuickTime, and QuickTime
moves the AppleVision components, delaying booting.
Opportunities for Developers
1
This section discusses the opportunities for developers working with the AppleVision
1710AV and 1710 Displays to develop software and hardware.
Software Opportunities
1
The AppleVision 1710AV and 1710 Displays are the first of a new generation of Apple
displays. They allow unprecedented control of the computer display from Macintosh
software, and feature excellent integration with the Display Manager and system
software. The software shipped with the display is noteworthy because it takes full
advantage of Apple’s new AV Architecture (described in the AV Architecture Developer
Note) and it can be used on all CPUs listed in Table 1-4.
If you are developing software, you can access the engine layer of the AppleVision
software, find engines for smart displays, and control the features of those displays
directly. For example, a game developer might want to switch into overscan mode to
take advantage of the full screen area of the display.
The application layer consists of application software that can find and display panels.
There are currently two applications capable of finding and displaying AppleVision 1710
panels. They are the Sound & Displays application that ships with all new Power
Macintoshes, and the AppleVision Setup application that ships with the AppleVision
display.
When you install the AppleVision extension in the Extensions folder, these applications
are enabled to show the panels that provide control of the Applevision displays. In
addition, the AppleVision extension provides similar control over the AudioVision 14
Display. Figure 1-7 shows the brightness and contrast panel from the AppleVision Setup
application.
Opportunities for Developers
13
C H A P T E R
1
Overview of the AppleVision 1710AV and 1710 Displays
Figure 1-7
Contrast and brightness panel
Hardware Opportunities
1
Using the guidelines outlined in “New Display Connections Specifications,” third-party
graphics device developers can develop plug-in video cards that offer compatibility with
this new generation of displays.
New Display Connections Specifications
1
This section details important new standards for Apple Macintosh display connections,
and you should refer to it if you are planning and designing new Macintosh video
hardware and software products.
The AppleVision 1710AV and 1710 Displays are the first Apple displays to combine
smart-display technology and Multiple Scan technology. Because of innovations in the
AppleVision 1710 displays, Apple is making some important revisions to its standards
for communication between CPUs and displays. These revisions, outlined in the
following sections, are important to third parties who produce displays, video output
devices, and video drivers.
Note
In the context of this developer note, a smart display is one that can be
controlled by the Macintosh computer and that, in the case of the
AppleVision displays, communicates with computer by means of the
ADB cable. ◆
Background Information
In the past, graphics drivers sensed the type of display attached to the video card by
means of three sense lines on the video cable. These lines were encoded to produce a
hardware sense code algorithm. With three sense lines, the number of displays that
could be identified was limited to seven, plus the instance where no displays were
connected.
14
New Display Connections Specifications
1
C H A P T E R
1
Overview of the AppleVision 1710AV and 1710 Displays
All video cards had to know the sense codes of all displays connected. Once the sense
code was determined, the graphics driver trimmed its list of available timing modes to
those that it calculated were possible. Before System 7.1.2, and the introduction of the
Display Manager, all functional sResources not disabled by the PrimaryInit were always
shown in the Monitors control panel. There was no way to find out which timings had
been trimmed, and no way to tell which timing corresponded to a functional sResource.
When the Display Manager was introduced, Apple added two new video driver status
calls: cscGetConnection and cscGetModeTiming. These calls allow the Monitors
control panel to show only those modes that are marked as valid. The Monitors panel
does this by means of the DMCheckDisplayMode call, which in turn calls
cscGetConnection and cscGetModeTiming. Using this method, video cards can
have untrimmed functions sResources that correspond to invalid timing modes and do
not show up in the Monitors control panel.
You may view the sense code as returning the default timings supported by the display.
With Display Manager 2.0, smart displays, like the AppleVision 1710AV and 1710, can
enable and disable timings returned by the video driver. The video driver does not have
to know which timings are supported by a smart display, since the display itself makes
the finals decision as to whether it can support a particular timing.
DMCheckDisplayMode gets the video driver’s best estimate of the supported timings,
by means of the safe and valid bits; calls the smart display with this information; the
smart display looks at the timing constant returned by the cscGetModeTiming call,
and then modifies the valid and safe bits. The video driver is not notified of changes
made by the smart display.
Designing Cards and Drivers for a New Generation of Displays 1
The AppleVision 1710 displays are multiple-scan displays. As such, they would
normally use one of the three Type 6 Extended Sense Codes. However, these new 17-inch
displays support any possible resolution that falls within the timing range of 28-82 kHz
horizontal scan and 50-120 Hz vertical refresh. It is thus clear that the current Type 6
Extended Sense Codes are insufficient to cover all the possible variations of resolutions
supported by these new multiple-scan displays.
The AppleVision 1710 displays, therefore, rely on a new strategy, in which the Display
Manager, rather than the graphics driver, makes timing mode decisions. This strategy is
outlined in Designing PCI Cards and Drivers for Power Macintosh Computers. Refer to the
Chapter 11, “Graphics Drivers,” and the section “Display Timing Modes,” to see how
Apple is revising its strategy for timing modes.
Of particular importance in this new strategy is the requirement that the graphics driver
report, as available, all timing modes supported by the current graphics card hardware.
This allows the software shipped by the display manufacturer to report independently
the timing modes it supports, and allows the Display Manager to provide the point
where these two sets of timing modes intersect.
The AppleVision 1710 displays return the RGB 13” Type 6 (“straight 6”) sense code as a
safe choice when the display is connected to a Macintosh computer that does not have
New Display Connections Specifications
15
C H A P T E R
1
Overview of the AppleVision 1710AV and 1710 Displays
the new Display Manager. This also allows the Macintosh to display stable on-screen
video early in the boot process. There is also another reason for using this sense code, as
described in “Designing Display Data Channel (DDC) Displays” on page 16.
Because the AppleVision 1710 displays, and other future displays from third parties, will
rely on this new strategy, all PCI cards as well as Nubus cards intended to support these
multiple-scan displays must follow the guidelines outlined in Designing PCI Cards and
Drivers for Power Macintosh Computers. These changes in the Display Manager work with
PCI drivers on all Power Macintosh computers and with Nubus drivers on all
color-capable Macintosh computers running System 7.5.
Designing Smart Displays
1
If you are designing a smart display, that is a display where the Macintosh computer can
control some functions of the display via the ADB cable, serial port, or other
communications method, the display should include as one of its functions the
capability of independently “wiggling” or toggling the value of the sense lines. This is
done by means of a call to the display’s Port Component wiggle selectors, so that the
Display Manager can establish the connection between the Port Component and the
gDevice associated with the display. (Refer to the AV Architecture Developer Note for more
information.) If the display cannot implement wiggling, the Sound & Displays control
panel will show two display ports (one for the graphics device, one for the display)
rather than one combined port, and it will be up to the developer to determine which
gDevice is used by the display, if this information is needed.
Note
In some Apple publications, the term “tagging” is used instead of the
term “wiggling.” ◆
Designing Display Data Channel (DDC) Displays
1
The AppleVision 1710 display is the first Apple display that provides compatibility with
Windows 95 Plug-and-Play via the Display Data Channel (DDC) standard. This standard
allows host systems to get information from the monitor, and to configure the
information correctly for the display adapter being used. DDC is expected to become
increasingly important in the Macintosh world, and may eventually replace the ADB
port and the serial port as the preferred methods of communicating with smart displays.
For compatibility with future Macintosh graphics devices, you should follow the
standard set by the AppleVision 1710 displays when you are designing displays.
Specifically, the AppleVision 1710 displays implement both DDC1 and DDC2B standards
through a scheme that maintains compatibility with the Macintosh sense-code-detection
mechanism.
In AppleVision 1710 displays, a 24LC21 serial EEPROM is used to implement DDC, and
sense line 1 (pin 10) on the video cable is used for serial data (SDA), while sense line 2
(pin 7) on the video cable is used for the serial clock (SCL).
16
New Display Connections Specifications
C H A P T E R
1
Overview of the AppleVision 1710AV and 1710 Displays
The displays return the RGB 13” Type 6 (“straight 6”) sense code. (Refer to Macintosh
New Technical Notes HW30 Sense Lines for more information.) This sense code specifies
that sense line 0 is connected to ground, and that sense lines 1 and 2 are unconnected.
These sense lines, therefore, may be conveniently used by DDC, subject to the following
restrictions:
■
When they are powered up, the displays start in DDC1 mode. The 24LC21 serial
EEPROM is ready to clock out one bit of data on sense line 1 (SDA), whenever an
edge transition occurs on VSYNC. However, no data is being clocked at this stage,
since VSYNC starts after sense determination. This is an important sequence, because
if data were being clocked out during sense determination, the Macintosh computer
would probably get an incorrect sense reading.
■
The computer reads the Type 6 (straight 6) sense of the display. It then goes through a
process to determine the level of the Extended Type 6 sense line. As part of this
process, the Macintosh pulls sense line 2 low to check if sense lines 1 or 0 are wired to
sense line 2. It pulls sense line 1 low to check if sense lines 2 or 0 are wired to sense
line 1. At this moment, the 24LC21 EEPROM, detecting that sense line 1 (SDA) is
being pulled low externally, automatically switches to DDC2B mode. In this mode, the
24LC21 waits for sense line 2 (SCL) to go low to clock out the first data bit. However,
on a graphics device that does not support DDC2B, nothing happens, since sense line
2 has already been pulled low to check for the extended sense code. A graphics device
that does support DDC2B is now free to clock out the DDC data.
IMPORTANT
This scheme does not allow “hot-plugging” of video cables. That is, it
does not allow you to plug in the video cable after the Macintosh has
booted. Be sure to shut down the display before plugging in the video
cable or unplugging it. ▲
The video cable pinouts are listed in Table 2-1 on page 21.
Tips for Developers
1
This section contains miscellaneous information to assist software developers who are
supporting smart displays.
IMPORTANT
You do not need to know that a smart display, such as the AppleVision
1710 is attached to your computer. The AppleVision 1710 looks like a 13”
RGB display to the video card, and the card does not need to know that
it is anything different. If you support invalid timing modes for any
sense code, you should add them. The display will adjust the timings to
match the timings it supports. ▲
IMPORTANT
You do not need to add new functional sResources.
▲
You should note the following items:
■
Support wiggling (tagging). Wiggling is part of the cscGetConnection call. It is
documented in Chapter 11 of Designing PCI Cards and Drivers.
New Display Connections Specifications
17
C H A P T E R
1
Overview of the AppleVision 1710AV and 1710 Displays
■
Do not trim invalid functional sResources. If your video card does not have a
programmable ROM, you will need to put the trimmed sResources back in when you
patch your driver. These timing modes may be enabled by the display.
■
Trim duplicate timings. If your card has different functional sResources with the same
timing, you should trim all but one of the functional sResources for each timing mode.
■
Trim functional sResources that your hardware cannot support. For example, if your
video card does not have enough VRAM to support a functional sResource, trim that
sResource rather than marking it invalid. The timing mode represented by that
sResource is not one you would want the display to enable.
■
Implement cscGetConnection and cscGetModeTiming for all timing modes. You
should mark any timing mode that is not supported by the sense code as invalid and
unsafe. When you do this, the display may override the decision.
■
Allow the display to switch to invalid timing modes. Some invalid timing modes may
be validated by the display, and you should allow the switch, even though you may
be unaware of their validity.
■
If you do not recognize a sense code, mark all timing modes invalid, and program the
hardware with the Apple 13” timing modes. This allows a smart display to come in as
an unknown timing mode and enable the modes it supports.
Be particularly alert to the following situations:
18
■
Some drivers use the kAllModesValid or kAllModesSafe calls from
scsGetConnection, rather than implementing cscGetModeTiming for all timings.
If you add a group of invalid modes, you should not mark them as valid in the
cscGetConnection call.
■
If your video card is intended to work on systems that were released before the
Display Manager was introduced, you need to check for the Display Manager before
enabling invalid timings. Otherwise, the user will see the invalid timings in the
Monitors control panel.
■
If your video card supports additional standard timings that do not have constants in
Video.h, contact Apple Developer Support.
New Display Connections Specifications
C H A P T E R
Figure 2-0
Listing 2-0
Table 2-0
2
Hardware Interface
This document was created with FrameMaker 4.0.4P2
2
C H A P T E R
2
Hardware Interface
This chapter describes the hardware interface for the AppleVision 1710AV and 1710
Displays. Both displays provide an interface for the video connector and the ADB ports
and connector. The AppleVision 1710AV Display also provides an interface for the sound
input port and the sound output port.
Figure 2-1 gives an overview of the display interface.
Figure 2-1
Display-to-CPU interface
CPU
ADB
connector
Video
connector
ADB port for mouse
or keyboard
ADB port for mouse
or keyboard
Sound input port for
microphone or other
sound source
Sound output port
for speakers or
headphones
Z
Sound input and output ports
available on the AppleVision 1710 AV Display
Video Port and Connector
2
The video port connection is made through a standard DB-15 connector. Figure 2-2
shows the pin designations for the connector, and Table 2-1 lists the signal assignments.
The video cable is captive at the display end, and you cannot remove it. The video
connector plugs into the video port on the back of the Macintosh computer. If you are
connecting the display to a PC-compatible computer, you need a PC adapter that
connects to the video cable and then plugs into the video port on the PC. The video cable
is part of a dual cable that accommodates both video and ADB features. The ADB
features and connector are not used in PC applications.
20
Video Port and Connector
C H A P T E R
2
Hardware Interface
Figure 2-2
8
7
15
Table 2-1
Video connector pin designations
6
14
5
13
4
12
3
11
2
10
1
9
Video connector signal assignments
Pin
number
Output signal
1
Red video ground
2
Red video
3
Not used
4
ID 1 or DDC return
5
Green video
6
Green video ground
7
ID 2 or DDC SCL
8
Not used
9
Blue video
10
ID 3 or DDC SDA
11
VSYNC return
12
VSYNC
13
Blue video ground
14
HSYNC return
15
HSYNC
Shell
Shield ground
Abbreviations:
ID
DDC
SCL
SDA
VSYNC
HSYNC
Identification
display data channel
serial clock
serial data
vertical synchronization
horizontal synchronization
Video Port and Connector
21
C H A P T E R
2
Hardware Interface
ADB Port and Connector
2
The ADB cable is part of the dual video and ADB cable. This cable transfers ADB
information between the display and the CPU, enabling you to connect ADB devices
directly to the display if you wish. The ADB connector is a standard miniature DIN
(MD-4) connector. It has four signal pins and an outer shield that functions as chassis
ground. Figure 2-3 shows the pin designations for the ADB connector, and Table 2-2 lists
the signal assignments.
Note
This ADB cable is used to transfer control data between the Macintosh
computer and the display. It is not used in PC applications. ◆
Figure 2-3
4
2
Table 2-2
22
ADB connector pin designations
3
1
The outer shield is
connected to chassis
ground
ADB connector signal assignments
Pin
number
Signal name
Description
1
ADB
Bidirectional data bus for input and output; transfers
audio (AV display only) and video control data between
the CPU and the display
2
POWER ON
Enables power to be turned on from the keyboard
3
+5VDC
+5 V power
4
GND
Logic ground
Outer
shield
None
Chassis ground
ADB Port and Connector
C H A P T E R
2
Hardware Interface
Other I/O Ports and Connectors
2
Both the AppleVision 11710AV and 1710 Display have an ADB port on both side panels.
These ports allow you to connect a mouse or keyboard directly to the left side of the
display
The AppleVision 1710AV display also has the following sound ports:
■
a sound input port, on the left panel, allows you to connect an external microphone or
other sound source to the display
■
a sound output port, on the right panel, allows you to connect speakers or
headphones to the display
ADB Ports
2
The ADB ports are standard connectors. For ADB port specifications see “ADB Port and
Connector” on page 22.
Note
The ADB ports on the side panels of the display are used to connect
ADB devices, like the mouse and keyboard. The ADB I/O cable is used
to transfer audio and video control data between the Macintosh
computer and the display. ◆
Sound Ports and Adapter
2
The sound ports are found only on the AppleVision 1710AV Display. The sound output
port is used for headphones or external speakers. The sound input port accepts sound
inputs from a microphone or any appropriate sound source. These ports are both stereo
ports, but they use single ministereo audio connectors. You must make sure that the
connector you use for audio input or output is compatible with your sound equipment.
For example, if you are connecting to a device that uses dual (RCA-type) connectors for
stereo sound, use a “Y” adapter to connect the stereo ports of the sound source or
speakers to the display’s single-connector stereo port. Figure 2-4 shows the sound
adapter configuration.
Figure 2-4
Adapter for audio ports
Audio R
Audio
L and R
Sound source or
speakers/headphones
Display
Audio input or
output cable
Audio L
Other I/O Ports and Connectors
23
C H A P T E R
2
Hardware Interface
24
Other I/O Ports and Connectors
C H A P T E R
Figure 3-0
Listing 3-0
Table 3-0
3
Application Program
Interface
This document was created with FrameMaker 4.0.4P2
3
C H A P T E R
3
Application Program Interface
The AppleVision 1710AV and 1710 Displays use a new Macintosh framework known as
the AV Architecture. This architecture allows you to access all kinds of audio and video
(AV) devices, such as displays, speakers, volume controls, CD players, and so forth. The
is described in detail in the AV Architecture Developer Note.
The AV Architecture is made up of four basic groups of components: the Panel
Components, the Engine Components, the Port Components, and the Device
Components. The AV Architecture Developer Note describes these components in detail,
and explains the relationships between them. Figure 3-1 shows a simplified view of the
architecture and its components.
Figure 3-1
Simplified view of the AV Architecture
AV application
AppleVision Setup
AV Architecture
Panel Component
For every panel needed
in the human interface
Engine Component
For each function or
set of related
functions of each port
Port Component
For every input or
output element in
the desktop device
Hardware
abstraction
layer
Device Component
For every desktop
device
Macintosh
Toolbox
Drivers
Desktop audio
and/or video device
The AV application used with the AppleVision displays to implement the architecture is
known AppleVision Setup. The panels and windows that comprise the applications are
based on AV Architecture components, many of which are proprietary. This chapter
provides you with information that is useful if you want to modify certain
non-proprietary component functions. For information on how to use the AppleVision
Setup panels, you should refer to the User’s Guides for the AppleVision displays.
26
C H A P T E R
3
Application Program Interface
The functions you can modify include:
■
Contrast Engine Component functions
■
Geometry Engine Component functions
■
VPT Engine Component functions
To get a more complete understanding of the AppleVision API and the underlying
architectural components, you should read the AV Architecture Developer Note. The
Component Manager is also critical to your understanding of the information in this
chapter, and you can find detailed information about the Component Manager in Inside
Macintosh: More Macintosh Toolbox, Chapter 6.
ContrastEngine Component
3
This section describes the component functions contained in the ContrastEngine
Component. It is assumed that you are already familiar with the Component Manager
and, more specifically, with the AV Architecture to which the ContrastEngine component
belongs.
Overview
3
AppleVision displays have the ability to change contrast and brightness under the
control of the Macintosh computer to which they are connected. The ContrastEngine
component provides access to the contrast and brightness features of the AppleVision
displays, and your application can use this interface to control contrast and brightness
settings.
Like other engines belonging to the AV Architecture, the ContrastEngine component is
based on Component Manager components. The ContrastEngine component has the
following component description:
componentType = ‘avec’
Indicates that the component is a video panel.
componentSubType = ‘cont’
Identifies the specific engine.
componentManufacturer = ‘appl’
Identifies Apple Computer, Inc. as the manufacturer.
ContrastEngine Component
27
C H A P T E R
3
Application Program Interface
ContrastEngine Component Functions
3
This section describes the ContrastEngine Component functions that control brightness
and contrast.
ContrastEngineGetBrightnessRange
3
This function returns the allowable range of brightness settings for the AppleVision
displays. The values returned here can be used to ensure that your application does not
attempt to set an invalid brightness value.
pascal ComponentResult
ContrastEngineGetBrightnessRange( ComponentInstance
engineComponent, short* min, short* max )
engineComponent
min, max
A valid instance of the ContrastEngine component.
Values returned to the caller indicating the range of allowable
settings for brightness.
ContrastEngineGetBrightness
3
This function returns the current brightness setting for the AppleVision displays.
pascal ComponentResult
ContrastEngineGetBrightness( ComponentInstance engineComponent,
short* brightness )
engineComponent
brightness
A valid instance of the ContrastEngine component.
A value returned to the caller indicating the current brightness
setting.
ContrastEngineSetBrightness
This function allows your application to set the brightness level for the AppleVision
displays.
pascal ComponentResult
ContrastEngineSetBrightness( ComponentInstance engineComponent,
short brightness )
engineComponent
brightness
28
A valid instance of the ContrastEngine component.
A value passed by your application indicating the desired
brightness setting for the display.
ContrastEngine Component
3
C H A P T E R
3
Application Program Interface
ContrastEngineGetContrastRange
3
This function returns the allowable range of contrast settings for the AppleVision
displays. The values returned here can be used to ensure that your application does not
attempt to set an invalid contrast value.
pascal ComponentResult
ContrastEngineGetContrastRange( ComponentInstance engineComponent,
short* min, short* max )
engineComponent
min, max
A valid instance of the ContrastEngine component.
Values returned to the caller indicating the range of allowable
settings for contrast.
ContrastEngineGetContrast
3
This function returns the current contrast setting for the display.
pascal ComponentResult
ContrastEngineGetContrast( ComponentInstance engineComponent,
short* contrast )
engineComponent
brightness
A valid instance of the ContrastEngine component.
A value returned to the caller indicating the current brightness
setting.
ContrastEngineSetContrast
3
This function allows your application to set the contrast level for the display.
pascal ComponentResult
ContrastEngineSetContrast( ComponentInstance engineComponent,
short contrast )
engineComponent
brightness
A valid instance of the ContrastEngine component.
A value passed by your application indicating the desired
brightness setting for the display.
ContrastEngine Component
29
C H A P T E R
3
Application Program Interface
GeometryEngine Component
3
This section describes those GeometryEngine component functions that can be used by
the developer. It is assumed that you are already familiar with the Component Manager
and, more specifically, with the AV Architecture to which the GeometryEngine
component belongs.
Overview
3
The GeometryEngine component, at present, provides developers with access to the
overscan feature of the AppleVision displays. Using this feature, your application can
programmatically control the overscan setting.
If you implement the overscan feature on your display, the edges of the image area go as
far as they can to the edge of the screen without distorting the image. If you turn on
overscan, you cannot make any changes to other Geometry selections, such as height/
width adjustment. Normally, you would not use the overscan feature. However, you
might want to turn the feature on to view full-screen digital video, or total immersion
games. You can also use the feature any time you want to shield the user from details of
the computer operation.
Like other engines belonging to the AV Architecture, the GeometryEngine component is
based on Component Manager components. The GeometryEngine component has the
following component description:
componentType = ‘avec’
Indicates that the component is a video panel.
componentSubType = ‘geoe’
Identifies the specific engine.
componentManufacturer = ‘appl’
Identifies Apple Computer, Inc. as the manufacturer.
30
GeometryEngine Component
C H A P T E R
3
Application Program Interface
GeometryEngine Component Functions
3
This section describes the GeometryEngine Component functions used to implement
overscanning.
GeometryEngineGetOverscan
3
This function allows your application to determine if overscan is currently on or off.
pascal ComponentResult
GeometryEngineGetOverscan ( ComponentInstance engineComponent,
short *overscan )
engineComponent
overscan
A valid instance of the GeometryEngine component.
A value returned to your application indicating whether the
overscan function is currently on or off.
GeometryEngineSetOverscan
3
This function allows your application to decide whether overscan should be turned on
or off.
pascal ComponentResult
GeometryEngineSetOverscan ( ComponentInstance engineComponent,
short overscan )
engineComponent
overscan
A valid instance of the GeometryEngine component.
A value passed by your application indicating the desired state of
the overscan setting.
VPTEngine Component
3
This section describes those VPTEngine component functions that can be used by the
developer. It is assumed that you are already familiar with the Component Manager
and, more specifically, with the AV Architecture to which the VPTEngine component
belongs. The section also supplies information on topics associated with the VPTEngine
component.
Overview
3
The VPTEngine component provides access to the color calibration features of the
AppleVision displays.
VPTEngine Component
31
C H A P T E R
3
Application Program Interface
The colors shown on different displays may vary because of minor variances that occur
during manufacture. If you are using multiple displays, you will want the colors on all
displays to be as closely matched as possible.
AppleVision displays have the ability to correct for manufacturing variances through a
process called Virtual Photometry Technology, or VPT. Using VPT, the AppleVision
displays can be set to a wide variety of white points and can correct for CRT aging, and
for ambient light conditions. Refer to the following sections, “White Point,” “Virtual
Photometry Technology (VPT),” and “Ambient Light,” for background information on
these subjects.
Normally, the VPTEngine component is used by the Accurate Color panel that is in the
software provided with AppleVision displays. The information presented in this section
is for applications that need specific information about the current color characteristics of
the displays. The information returned by thisVPTEngine component interface is unique
to the particular AppleVision display being used. It does not supply so-called “nominal”
values that may or may not reflect reality.
Like other Engine Components that belong to the AV Architecture, the VPTEngine
component is based on the Component Manager. The VPTEngine component has the
following component description:
componentType = ‘avec’
Indicates that the component is a video panel.
componentSubType = ‘vpte’
Identifies the specific engine.
componentManufacturer = ‘aapl’
Identifies Apple Computer, Inc. as the manufacturer.
componentFlags = cmpWantsRegisterMessage
Makes sure the component is suitable for the machine.
White Point
3
The image on your display is a combination of red, green, and blue signals. All lights,
including display light, have a white point, which is the measure of the color content of
the light. The AppleVision displays allow you to change the intensity (or white point) of
the R (red), G (green), and B (blue) signals. White point is measured in degrees Kelvin,
and it sets the foundation for the other colors on your display. If you have a high white
point, colors have a bluish tinge. If you have a low white point, colors have a slightly
reddish tinge.
Virtual Photometry Technology (VPT)
3
VPT is a proprietary Apple technique used to calculate a theoretical white point. It does
this by measuring the currents for the R, G, and B electron guns, while displaying a
white screen. The current values are correlated to factory calibration data that is
programmed into the display during production. An extremely accurate white point can
be determined by compensating for the aging affects of the display. The current sensing
32
VPTEngine Component
C H A P T E R
3
Application Program Interface
circuitry also allows the host CPU to calculate the observed color of any pixel on the
screen.
Ambient Light
3
Ambient light is the light surrounding your display, and it makes a difference to the way
colors appear on the screen. Ambient light may be normal window light, sunlight,
incandescent light, fluorescent light, and so on. To get a true color rendering, you should
first set the white point for the display and then correct for ambient light.
VPTEngine Component Data Types
3
This section describes the data structures unique to the VPTEngine component. They are
Tristim (XYZ), CIE1976 (u’v’), CIE1960 (uv), CIE1931 (xy), Kelvin, and
VPTGamma.
These data structures define the “color space ” of the display. Over the years, a number
of notations for colors have been developed. Most of these notations are considered to be
color spaces because they define absolute three-dimensional spaces where colors reside.
The standard RGB notation used on the Macintosh (and on many other computers) is not
a real color space because it has no absolute representation. In other words, if R, G, and B
are all set to maximum, you usually get white. However, these settings do not define
exactly the shade of white you get, since there are many definitions of white.
The Commission International de l’Eclairage, also known as the International
Commission on Illumination, and referred to in this developer note as the CIE
Committee, has created some of the most useful color standards. These are the color
space standards referenced in the following sections.
Tristim (XYZ)
3
This data structure is used to represent the Tristimulus color space. This color space was
first defined in 1931 by the CIE committee.
typedef struct Tristim
{
doubleX;
doubleY;
doubleZ;
} Tristim;
X, Y, Z
Standard elements of the Tristimulus (XYZ) notation.
VPTEngine Component
33
C H A P T E R
3
Application Program Interface
CIE1976 (u’v’)
3
This data structure is used to represent the color space defined by the CIE committee in
1976.
typedef struct CIE1976
{
doubleuPrime;
doublevPrime;
doublefL;
} CIE1976;
uPrime, vPrime Coordinates in the standard CIE 1976 (u’v’) notation.
fL
Foot Lamberts, a standard unit that describes luminance.
CIE1960 (uv)
3
This data structure is used to represent the color space defined by the CIE committee in
1960.
typedef struct CIE1960
{
doubleu;
doublev;
doublefL;
} CIE1960;
u, v
fL
Coordinates in the standard CIE 1960 (uv) notation.
Foot Lamberts, a standard unit that describes luminance.
CIE1931(xy)
3
This data structure is used to represent the color space defined by the CIE committee in
1931. Do not confuse it with the Tristimulus format, also defined by the CIE in 1931.
typedef struct CIE1931
{
doublex;
doubley;
doublefL;
} CIE1931;
x, y
fL
34
Coordinates in the standard CIE 1931 (xy) notation.
Foot Lamberts, a standard unit that describes luminance.
VPTEngine Component
C H A P T E R
3
Application Program Interface
Kelvin
3
This data type represents Kelvin degrees, a simple unit of measuring a very narrow
range of colors.
typedef long Kelvin;
VPTGamma
3
This data structure is used by the VPTEngine component to represent a gamma table. A
gamma curve defines the relationship between the color intensity (chrominance) of the
screen and the light intensity (luminance) of the screen. With a low gamma curve, colors
may look washed out to the user, while a high gamma curve provides more contrast. The
human eye can determine subtle changes in color, but does not register these changes in
a linear way. Color systems are linear and continuous. A linear gamma curve ensures
that the display produces the correct luminance levels on each primary color channel,
and matches the user’s nonlinear color expectations to the display’s linear color devices.
typedef struct VPTGamma
{
unsigned shortred[256];
unsigned shortgreen[256];
unsigned shortblue[256];
} VPTGamma, *VPTGammaPtr, **VPTGammaHdl;
red, green, blue
Arrays containing the gamma curve for each electron gun of the
display.
VPTEngine Component Functions
3
This section describes the VPTEngine components functions associated with
■
calibration
■
white-point settings
■
ambient-light settings
■
gamma-curve settings
■
color gamut identification
■
translating standard RGB QuickDraw colors to Tristimulus color values, and vice
versa
VPTEngine Component
35
C H A P T E R
3
Application Program Interface
VPTEngineCalibrateDisplay
3
This function allows the caller to force the display to go through a calibration cycle. Your
application probably will not need to call this function, since the software included with
the AppleVision display causes the display to be recalibrated automatically every two
weeks or so.
pascal VPTEngineResult
VPTEngineCalibrateDisplay( VPTEngineComponent engineComponent
engineComponent
A valid instance of the VPTEngine component.
Supplementary Information
Calling this function causes the entire Macintosh system to stop whatever it is doing and
spend several moments recalibrating the display. During this time, the entire screen
flashes black, white, and several other colors.
VPTEngineCalibrated
3
This function allows your application to determine whether or not the display is
currently in a calibrated state.
pascal VPTEngineResult
VPTEngineCalibrated( VPTEngineComponent engineComponent,
Boolean* calibrated )
engineComponent
calibrated
A valid instance of the VPTEngine component.
Set to true if the display is in a calibrated state.
Supplementary Information
In general, the only time this function will return false for the calibrated parameter
is when the AppleVision software finds itself with no preference file on the startup drive
and has not yet asked the user to recalibrate. This brief interval usually lasts about 15
minutes (the amount of time it takes the display to warm up fully) but for color-critical
applications, this function should be called before relying on the information provided
through the VPTEngine component interface.
VPTEngineGetLastCalTime
This function returns the date & time (represented as the number of seconds elapsed
since midnight, January 1, 1994) that the display was last calibrated.
pascal VPTEngineResult
VPTEngineGetLastCalTime( VPTEngineComponent engineComponent
unsigned long* lastCalTime )
36
VPTEngine Component
3
C H A P T E R
3
Application Program Interface
engineComponent
lastCalTime
A valid instance of the VPTEngine component.
The date and time of the most recent calibration.
VPTEngineGetTargetWhitePoint
3
This function allows your application to determine the user-set white point for the
display. The user-set white point differs from the actual white point achieved by the
display’s calibration process.
pascal VPTEngineResult
VPTEngineGetTargetWhitePoint( VPTEngineComponent engineComponent,
CIE1931* whitePoint )
engineComponent
whitePoint
A valid instance of the VPTEngine component.
A structure that is passed back to the caller containing the target
white point for the display.
Supplementary Information
For most uses, the target white point and the actual white point should be fairly
interchangeable, although it is better to use the actual white point for maximum color
accuracy.
VPTEngineGetActualWhitePoint
3
This function allows your application to determine the actual white point achieved by
the display’s calibration process. This differs from the target white point, described
above, and includes the effects of ambient light on the display’s image surface.
pascal VPTEngineResult
VPTEngineGetActualWhitePoint( VPTEngineComponent engineComponent,
CIE1931* whitePoint )
engineComponent
whitePoint
A valid instance of the VPTEngine component.
A structure that is passed back to the caller containing the actual
measured white point for the display.
Supplementary Information
For most uses, the target white point and the actual white point should be fairly
interchangeable, although it is better to use the actual white point for maximum color
accuracy. In the event that the AppleVision display is unable to match the white point
requested by the user perfectly, the white point returned by this function will closely
reflect the white point being emitted by the display.
VPTEngine Component
37
C H A P T E R
3
Application Program Interface
VPTEngineGetWhitePointDrive
3
This function allows your application to determine the white point drive currently being
emitted from the display. This differs from the actual white point in that the white point
drive does not include the effects of ambient light, even if the user has indicated that
ambient light is present.
pascal VPTEngineResult
VPTEngineGetWhitePointDrive( VPTEngineComponent engineComponent,
CIE1931* whitePointDrive )
engineComponent
A valid instance of the VPTEngine component.
whitePointDrive
A structure that is passed back to the caller containing the measured
white point drive for the display.
Supplementary Information
White point drive is the color of white that would be emitted by the display if it were
placed in a dark room with no ambient light. Since the effects of ambient light can cause
significant shifts in the colors viewed by the user, your application should probably use
the VPTEngineGetActualWhitePoint function, which takes into account the effects
of ambient light.
VPTEngineGetReflectedAmbientLight
3
This function allows your application to determine the amount of ambient light being
reflected back at the user from the face of the display. The user determines the amount of
light being reflected, by means of the Accurate Color control panel.
pascal VPTEngineResult
VPTEngineGetReflectedAmbientLight( VPTEngineComponent
engineComponent, CIE1931* reflectedAmbientLight )
engineComponent
A valid instance of the VPTEngine component.
reflectedAmbientLight
A structure that is passed back to the caller containing the color and
intensity of the ambient light being reflected back at the user from
the face of the display.
▲
WARNING
Since the information returned by this function is essentially determined
by the user (with the help of the Accurate Color control panel), your
application should be cautious about assuming the information is
absolutely accurate. ▲
38
VPTEngine Component
C H A P T E R
3
Application Program Interface
VPTEngineGetDirectAmbientLight
3
This function allows your application to determine the amount of ambient light falling
on the surface of the display. The user determines the amount of light using the Accurate
Color control panel.
pascal VPTEngineResult
VPTEngineGetDirectAmbientLight( VPTEngineComponent
engineComponent,
CIE1931* directAmbientLight )
engineComponent
A valid instance of the VPTEngine component.
directAmbientLight
A structure that is passed back to the caller containing the color and
intensity of the ambient light falling on the surface of the display.
▲
WARNING
Since the information returned by this function is essentially determined
by the user (with the help of the Accurate Color control panel), your
application should be cautious about assuming the information is
absolutely accurate. ▲
VPTEngineGetActualGammaCurveTable
3
This function gives your application access to a table representing the measured gamma
curve of this monitor.
pascal VPTEngineResult
VPTEngineGetActualGammaCurveTable( VPTEngineComponent
engineComponent,
VPTGammaPtr actualGamma )
engineComponent
actualGamma
A valid instance of the VPTEngine component.
A structure that is passed back to the caller containing the color and
intensity of the ambient light falling on the surface of the display.
Supplementary Information
The gamma curve table returned by this function is the system gamma curve table. In
other words, the data returned represents the overall gamma curve produced by the
combination of the particular display and the video output device to which it is attached.
This differs from the gamma correction, which is not available from the VPTEngine
component. Gamma correction is the technique that adjusts the gamma curve to
compensate for the loss of detail in dark objects.
VPTEngine Component
39
C H A P T E R
3
Application Program Interface
VPTEngineGetActualGamut
3
This function allows your application to determine the gamut the display is capable of
reproducing.
pascal VPTEngineResult
VPTEngineGetActualGamut( VPTEngineComponent engineComponent,
Tristim* red,
Tristim* green,
Tristim* blue )
engineComponent
red
green
blue
A valid instance of the VPTEngine component.
A structure that is passed back to the caller containing the color and
intensity of the brightest red the display is capable of reproducing.
A structure that is passed back to the caller containing the color and
intensity of the brightest green the display is capable of reproducing.
A structure that is passed back to the caller containing the color and
intensity of the brightest blue the display is capable of reproducing.
Supplementary Information
The gamut is the entire range of colors that can be represented by a given device. For
displays, the gamut can be defined as the area enclosed by three points in a color space,
since there are three electron guns (R, G, and B) in the display.
VPTEngineRGBToTristim
This function allows your application to translate a standard RGB QuickDraw color into
an equivalent Tristimulus color value for the display. In effect, it allows your application
to translate an RGB QuickDraw color into a real color space.
pascal VPTEngineResult
VPTEngineRGBToTristim( VPTEngineComponent engineComponent,
RGBColor* theColor,
Tristim* theTristim )
engineComponent
theColor
theTristim
40
A valid instance of the VPTEngine component.
A structure passed to this function containing an RGB QuickDraw
color.
A structure that is passed back to the caller containing the
equivalent Tristimulus color value.
VPTEngine Component
3
C H A P T E R
3
Application Program Interface
Supplementary Information
RGB QuickDraw colors are essentially arbitrary. It is somewhat difficult to say what
actual color will be produced when a particular RGB QuickDraw color value is
displayed.
VPTEngineTristimToRGB
3
This function allows your application to translate a Tristimulus color value into the
equivalent RGB QuickDraw value for the display.
pascal VPTEngineResult
VPTEngineTristimToRGB( VPTEngineComponent engineComponent,
Tristim* theTristim,
RGBColor* theColor )
engineComponent
theTristim
theColor
A valid instance of the VPTEngine component.
A structure passed to this function containing the coordinates of a
color represented in the Tristimulus color space.
A structure that is passed back to the user containing the equivalent
RGB QuickDraw Color.
VPTEngine Component
41
C H A P T E R
3
Application Program Interface
42
VPTEngine Component
Glossary
ambient light This is the light surrounding
your display. It may be normal window light,
sunlight, incandescent light, fluorescent light,
and so on. The ambient light makes a difference
in the way colors appear on the screen.
chrominance This component of the picture
information contains only the color and no
picture detail.
CIE (Commission International de
l’Eclairage) CIE is the International
Commission on Illumination. The standards
defined by the CIE are specified in terms of the
year they were created. For example, the 1931
CIE color model is the standard created in 1931.
ColorSync This is a system extension that
provides color-conversion capabilities and
improves color consistency. ColorSync translates
the colors used on one device, such as the
AppleVision 1710AV Display, so that they match
the colors displayed on another display, or
printed on a color printer.
ColorSync profile This is the profile for the
display that is automatically installed as part of
the display software. You can create a ColorSync
profile that describes the white point setting for
each individual display. You can use this profile
with any display that supports Apple’s
ColorSync color matching system.
Energy Saver Energy Saver 1.1 is an energy
conservation control panel that allows you to tell
the display to conserve energy after a specified
period of inactivity. If you turn on Energy Saver,
the screen dims when the keyboard or mouse has
been inactive for a specified period of time. You
can access the Energy Saver panel from Control
Panels in the Apple () menu.
Energy Star When the display detects the loss
of certain signals from the CPU, it goes into a
low-energy sleep mode. The U.S. Environmental
Protection Agency recently initiated a
certification program called Energy Star to
recognize products that support this
power-saving mode. The EPA Energy Star logo
on the display indicates that it complies with the
EPA’s Energy Star program.
fixed-frequency displays Also known as
single-mode displays, these displays are capable
of supporting only one frequency or resolution.
The Apple RGB 13” display is an example of this
type of display. See also multiple-scan displays.
gamma correction This is a technique that
adjusts the gamma curve to compensate for the
loss of detail in dark objects.
gamma curve This is the relationship between
color intensity (chrominance) and light
(luminance). With a low gamma curve, colors are
washed out. With a high gamma curve, colors
have more contrast.
gamut The full range of colors the display can
produce on the screen. Sometimes referred to as
the color gamut.
Kelvin A temperature scale used in scientific
applications. Used to measure white point in the
color display.
luminance This component of the picture
information is responsible for detail, shapes, and
shadings.
MovieTalk Apple’s trademark for a network
protocol designed to handle audio and video
data streams efficiently. It is part of QuickTime
Conferencing. The MovieTalk protocol
establishes a set of rules for setting up,
maintaining, and breaking down a connection
and for delivering media data. It consists of a
media stream protocol and a connection control
channel protocol. The MovieTalk protocol is
platform and media independent.
multiple-scan displays These displays can
support a range of frequencies and resolutions,
for example the AppleVision 1710AV and 1710
Displays. See also fixed-frequency displays.
43
This document was created with FrameMaker 4.0.4P2
G L O S S A RY
over scan Overscan moves the screen image as
close to the edges of the screen as possible
without distorting the image. This setting is
useful when you are using the AppleVision
displays to view videos.
pincushioning This term describes distortions
of the screen image, where the sides of the image
either bulge out to create convex pincushioning,
or are pulled in to create concave pincushioning.
smart displays These displays have features,
such as brightness and contrast, that can be
controlled from the host computer. The
AudioVision 14 display was Apple’s first smart
display.
Virtual Photometry Technology (VPT) A
technique used to calculate a theoretical white
point by measuring the currents for the R (red), G
(green), and B (blue) electron guns while
displaying a white screen. The current values are
correlated to factory calibration data
programmed into the monitor during
production. An extremely accurate white point
can be determined by compensating for the aging
affects of the display. The current sensing
circuitry also allows the host CPU to calculate the
observed color of any pixel on the screen.
white point The image on your display is a
combination of red, green, and blue signals. All
lights, including display light, have a white
point, which is the measure of the color content
of the light. The AppleVision 1710 displays allow
you to change the intensity, or white point of the
R, G, and B signals. White point is measured in
degrees Kelvin, and it sets the foundation for the
other colors on your display. At a high white
point, colors have a slightly bluish tinge, while at
a low white point, they have a slightly reddish
tinge.
wiggling Refers to a process of changing, or
toggling, the level of the display’s sense line, to
alert the computer to the fact that the display is
present. The level of the sense line is changed
from 0 to 1 or from 1 to 0, and then back to its
original level. In some Apple publications, the
term tagging is used instead of wiggling.
44
Draft. Preliminary, Confidential. 1995 Apple Computer, Inc. 11/20/95
Index
A
abbreviations x
Accurate Color panel 32, 38, 39
AC power specifications 10
actual white point 37
adapter for audio port 23
ADB connector 8
interface 22
pin designations 22
signal assignments 22
ADB port 9, 23
ambient light 32, 33, 37, 38, 43
APDA addresses xi
AppleVision extension 13
AppleVision extensions 13
AppleVision Setup application 11, 13, 26
Application Program Interface 26 to 41
applications
AppleVision Setup 11, 13
Sound & Displays 13
audio
cable 9
controls 6
input 9
output 9
ports 23
audio input level, headphones/speakers 10
audio output level, headphones/speakers 10
audio/video integration 2
automatic calibration 36
AV Architecture 26, 31
AV components 26
B
bass level control 8
brightness control 8
C
CIE 43
CIE1931(xy) data structure 34
CIE1960(uv) data structure 34
CIE1976(u’v’) data structure 34
CIE Committee 33, 34
color
calibration 31
content 32
space 33
ColorSync 43
ColorSync profile 43
Commission International de l’Eclairage 33, 43
communications between CPU and display 14
compatibility
CPU 12
operating system 13
video cards 12
Component Manager 31, 32
connectors
ADB 8
video 8
contrast control 8
ContrastEngine Component 27 to 29
ContrastEngineGetBrightness function 28
ContrastEngineGetBrightnessRange function 28
ContrastEngineGetContrast function 29
ContrastEngineGetContrastRange function 29
ContrastEngineSetBrightness function 28
ContrastEngineSetContrast function 29
controls
audio 6
bass level 8
brightness 8
contrast 8
front panel 6
microphone on/off 8
mute button 8
power on/off 8
treble level 8
video 6
volume 8
conventions ix
CPU compatibility 12
CPU-display communication 14
CPU interface configurations 20
calibration
cycle 36
time 36
chrominance 43
IN-45
This document was created with FrameMaker 4.0.4P2
I N D E X
D
data structures
CIE1931(xy) 34
CIE1960(uv) 34
CIE1976(u’v’) 34
Kelvin 35
Tristim(XYZ) 33
data types, VPTEngine Component 33
DB-15 connector 8
Display Data Channel (DDC)
modes
DDC1 17
DDC2B 17
sense lines
serial clock (SCL) 16
serial data (SDA) 16
standards 16
Display Data Channel (DDC) standards 16
Display Manager 13, 15, 16
DOS controls 7
VPTEngineGetLastCalTime 36
VPTEngineGetReflectedAmbientLight 38
VPTEngineGetTargetWhitePoint 37
VPTEngineGetWhitePointDrive 38
VPTEngineRGBToTristim 40
VPTEngineTristimToRGB 41
VPTGamma 35
G
gamma correction 39, 43
gamma curve 35, 39, 43
gamut 40, 43
GeometryEngine Component 30 to 31
GeometryEngineGetOverscan function 31
GeometryEngineSetOverscan function 31
graphics driver 15
graphics drivers 14, 15
H
E
Energy Saver 43
Energy Star 2, 43
Engine Components
Contrast 27
Geometry 30
VPTEngine 31
environmental specifications 10
Extensions folder 13
F
front panel controls 6
functions
ContrastEngineGetBrightness 28
ContrastEngineGetBrightnessRange 28
ContrastEngineGetContrast 29
ContrastEngineGetContrastRange 29
ContrastEngineSetBrightness 28
ContrastEngineSetContrast 29
GeometryEngineGetOverscan 31
GeometryEngineSetOverscan 31
VPTEngineCalibrated 36
VPTEngineCalibrateDisplay 36
VPTEngineGetActualGamut 40
VPTEngineGetActualWhitePoint 37
VPTEngineGetDirectAmbientLight 39
VPTEngineGetGammaCurveTable 39
IN-46
hardware interface 20
hardware overview 2
horizontal scan range 3, 15
hot plugging 17
I
IBM PC controls 7, 8
Convergence 7
Geometry 7
Height 7
Horizontal Shift 7
Pincushion 7
Rotate 7
Tools 7
Vertical Shift 7
Width 7
input level 10
inputs, audio 9
integrated audio/video 2
integrated microphone 10
integrated speakers 9
interfaces
configurations 20
display to CPU 20
hardware 20
software 11
interface specifications
I N D E X
ADB connector 22
video connector 21
International Commission on Illumination 33
I/O
cable 8
connections 8
ports 9, 23
K
Kelvin color temperature 43
Kelvin data structure 35
P
PCI
cards 16
drivers 16
PlainTalk 2
Port Components 16
ports
ADB 23
audio 23
video 20
power cable 9
power on/off control 8
PowerSurge 3
PrimaryInit 15
proprietary component functions 26
L
local mode 5, 6
luminance 43
Q
QuickDraw 40, 41
QuickTime 13
M
microphone 10
microphone on/off 8
Monitors control panel 15
MovieTalk 2, 43
Multiple Scan technology 14
mute button 8
R
recalibration 36
reference material x
remote mode 5, 6
resolution 3
resolutions supported 3
N
Nubus
cards 16
drivers 16
O
on-screen display (OSD) 6
operating modes
local 5, 6
remote 5, 6
operating system compatibility 13
output level, headphones/speakers 10
outputs, audio 9
overscan 30, 44
S
screen resolution 3
sense-code-detection mechanism 16
sense codes 14, 15
smart displays 14, 16, 17
software 11
software interface 11
sound
cable 9
input 9
output 9
Sound & Displays application 13
speaker design 9
speakers 9
specifications
AC power 10
environmental 10
microphone 10
IN-47
I N D E X
speakers 9
sResources 15, 18
T
tagging 16, 17, 44
target white point 37
telephony 2
text-to-speech 2
timing modes 3, 15
treble level control 8
trimming timing 15
Tristim(XYZ) data structure 33
Tristimulus color space 33
Tristimulus color value 40, 41
Type 6 Extended Sense Codes 15, 17
V
vertical refresh range 3, 15
video
conferencing 2
connector 8
controls 6
port 20
video card compatibility 12
video connector
pin designations 21
signal assignments 21
video display 5
video driver 15
video port 21
Virtual Photometry Technology (VPT) 11, 32, 44
voice
recognition 2
technology 2
volume control 8
VPTEngineCalibrated function 36
VPTEngineCalibrateDisplay function 36
VPTEngine Component 31 to 41
data types 33
functions 35
VPTEngineGetActualGamut function 40
VPTEngineGetActualWhitePoint function 37
VPTEngineGetDirectAmbientLight function 39
VPTEngineGetGammaCurveTable function 39
VPTEngineGetLastCalTime function 36
VPTEngineGetReflectedAmbientLight
function 38
VPTEngineGetTargetWhitePoint function 37
VPTEngineGetWhitePointDrive function 38
IN-48
VPTEngineRGBToTristim function 40
VPTEngineTristimToRGB function 41
VPTGamma function 35
W
white point 32, 37, 38, 44
wiggling 16, 17, 44
Windows 95 Plug-and-Play 16
Windows controls 7
I N D E X
IN-49
T H E
A P P L E
P U B L I S H I N G
S Y S T E M
This Apple manual was written, edited,
and composed on a desktop publishing
system using Apple Macintosh
computers and FrameMaker software.
Proof pages and final pages were created
on the Apple LaserWriter Select. Line art
was created using Adobe Illustrator.
PostScript , the page-description
language for the LaserWriter, was
developed by Adobe Systems
Incorporated.
Text type is Palatino and display type is
Helvetica. Bullets are ITC Zapf
Dingbats. Some elements, such as
program listings, are set in Apple Courier.
WRITER
Joyce D. Mann
DEVELOPMENTAL EDITORS
John Hammett
ILLUSTRATOR
Sandee Karr
Thanks to
Ross Lemcke, Jesse Devine, Ian Hendry,
Ingrid VanCleemput, and Lisa Kelly,
Special thanks to
Mark Taylor
This document was created with FrameMaker 4.0.4P2
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