RB-500 User Guide
802.11g Wireless Outdoor Bridge
User’s Guide
Preliminary Version
Aug 4, 2004
Trademark Notice
Trademarks appearing in this user’s guide are the property of their respective owners.
Disclaimer
This document is provided as-is, without warranty of any kind, either expressed or implied, including, but
not limited to, warranty of fitness for a particular purpose. The products described and the information
given herein are subject to change without notice. This document could contain technical inaccuracies
and/or typographical errors.
Notice Concerning Radio-frequency Interference
The device described in this user’s guide is designed in accordance with worldwide regulations governing
electromagnetic emissions. Operation is subject to the following two conditions:
1. this device may not cause harmful interference, and
2. this device must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired
operation.
Changes or modifications to the device not expressly approved by the manufacturer could void your
authority to operate the device.
Notice Concerning Radio-frequency Exposure
This equipment emits radio-frequency energy in the same band as microwave ovens, and is typically used
with an antenna that concentrates that energy in a particular plane or direction. Observe the following
precautions during installation and use:
1. Do not touch the antenna or allow persons to enter its radiation field at close range when it is in
operation.
2. Install the antenna and the associated electronics so that —
● the clearance between the antenna and any person’s body (including all extremities) meets
regulations concerning radio-frequency exposure in the country of use;
● the antenna, supporting structure, and associated electronics are grounded and protected from
lightning and static electricity in accordance with local electrical codes.
Radio links should be planned by an experienced radio technician. Antennas should be mounted, and all
equipment connected, by an experienced installer in accordance with national regulations, local codes, and
professional best practices.
Packing List
Your 802.11g Wireless Outdoor Bridge package should contain the following items:
● One 802.11g wireless outdoor bridge
● Mounting accessories: two U-bolts, four nuts, and four lock washers
● One roll of PVC waterproofing tape
● One antenna cable 30 centimeters (11.8 inches) long, with a round N-type male connector at each
end
● One category 5 Ethernet cable 25 meters (82 feet) long, with an RJ-45 plug at one end and a mini
weathertight plug at the other
● One power-over-Ethernet DC injector
● One AC power adapter for the DC injector
● One CD-ROM containing this manual and a utility (KickStart) for finding the bridge on the LAN
and preparing it for configuration
Inspect all items carefully. If any item is missing or appears damaged, contact the supplier as soon as
possible.
Content
Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................... 5
About the Bridge ..................................................................................................................................... 5
About this User’s Guide .......................................................................................................................... 8
Glossary........................................................................................................................................................... 9
Overview of Bridge Setup............................................................................................................................. 11
1.
Plan the link. ................................................................................................................................ 11
2.
Install the mast. ............................................................................................................................ 11
3.
Configure the bridge. ................................................................................................................... 11
4.
Mount the antenna on the mast. ................................................................................................... 11
5.
Mount the bridge on the mast. ..................................................................................................... 12
6.
Make connections in the following order: ................................................................................... 12
7.
Complete antenna alignment........................................................................................................ 12
Installing and Using KickStart ...................................................................................................................... 13
Using KickStart ..................................................................................................................................... 15
Bridge Configuration..................................................................................................................................... 19
User Mode ............................................................................................................................................. 19
Bridge Table.......................................................................................................................................... 19
Counter Panel ........................................................................................................................................ 20
Device Security Panel ........................................................................................................................... 20
Administrator Mode ...................................................................................................................................... 21
Basic Panel ............................................................................................................................................ 21
Encryption Panel ................................................................................................................................... 22
TCP/IP Panel ......................................................................................................................................... 23
Bridge Tool Panel.................................................................................................................................. 24
Device Security Panel ........................................................................................................................... 25
Device Restart Panel ............................................................................................................................. 25
Restore Defaults Panel .......................................................................................................................... 26
Firmware Upgrade Panel....................................................................................................................... 26
Appendix A: Technical Support.................................................................................................................. 28
Appendix B: Limited Warranty................................................................................................................... 29
Hardware ............................................................................................................................................... 29
Software ................................................................................................................................................ 29
Limited Warranty Service Procedure .................................................................................................... 29
Warning................................................................................................................................................. 29
Service After Warranty Period .............................................................................................................. 29
Return for Credit ................................................................................................................................... 30
Limitation of Liability ........................................................................................................................... 30
Appendix C: Specifications......................................................................................................................... 31
Appendix D: Channels and Regulations ..................................................................................................... 32
Introduction
Congratulations on acquiring a fine wireless networking product, and thank you for taking the time to read
this user’s guide.
This introduction contains vital information for both the bridge’s owner/operator — who may or may not
be knowledgeable about radio and networking technology — and link planning and installation personnel,
who are expected to be competent, experienced radio and networking technicians.
Technical terms are avoided in this part of the user’s guide. Important technical terms that do appear can be
found in the glossary immediately following the introduction. (The glossary is limited to a single page for
easier digestion and reference, and is not meant to be exhaustive.)
About the Bridge
Bridge Basics: Your 802.11g wireless outdoor bridge is a transparent (or “learning”) remote bridge. It is
used together with one to sixteen other identical bridges to link widely separated LANs. The LANs
become “segments” of the larger network. To the machines and users of the LANs, the larger network
appears to be a single wired LAN.
The bridges do this as follows:
● Each bridge first examines traffic on its own LAN to learn the identities of the local end nodes. These
are entered in the bridge’s station table and marked as local. Depending on the number of nodes and
level of activity on the LAN, this listening stage can last from a few seconds to almost a minute.
● The bridge then starts forwarding to its partner bridge(s) all packets addressed to unknown
destinations, and filtering (that is, not transmitting over the bridge link) all LAN traffic with known
local destinations.
● A bridge receiving a forwarded packet adds the identity and location of the originating end node to
its station table.
Soon each bridge “knows” where all or most of the end nodes are, and can reliably (1) filter all traffic
between local end nodes, and (2) forward directly to the correct partner bridge any communication
addressed to a non-local end node.
Your bridge can “remember” the identities and locations of up to 1,024 end nodes. It continually
updates its station table in response to machines joining and leaving the network. All of this is
automatic, and therefore “transparent” to the machines and users of the network.
Wireless Capabilities: The bridge’s radio interface complies with IEEE standard 802.11g. This gives it the
ability to work at speeds up to 54 Mpbs in the license-free band between 2.4 and 2.5 GHz. While
regulations strictly limit transmission power in this band, link distances of up to several hundred meters
(yards), or — with high-gain directional antennas — several kilometers (or several miles) are possible.
The bridge automatically adjusts its communication speed according to the quality of the radio link.
Link distance or site conditions may not allow sustained 54-Mbps operation. In such cases, you can
often obtain better performance by lowering the maximum communication speed. This is done through
the bridge’s configuration interface, discussed further on.
The range and speed that can be achieved at a given installation depend on many factors, including
antenna placement, interference levels, the local topography, and the size, type, and placement of any
structures in the area. A competent radio technician can give a good estimate of expected performance
after carrying out a thorough survey of the site.
Security: The bridge will accept wireless connections only from identical bridges. It comes set to recognize
such bridges automatically; however, you can, if you wish, set it to recognize only the particular bridge
or bridges that you want it to link up with.
To prevent snooping on wireless links, communications between bridges can be “scrambled” using 64-,
128-, or 256-bit Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) encryption.
To prevent tampering with bridge settings from stations on the linked LANs, the bridge’s “KickStart”
function and browser-based configuration interface can be protected with separate user-assigned
passwords.
Configuration Interface: Bridge configuration — that is, initial adjustment of bridge settings — is done
through a Web browser running on a machine connected to the same LAN as the bridge. This is
typically done before the bridge is mounted and connected to the antenna.
IMPORTANT: While the factory settings will allow automatic link-up between bridges, these
settings provide no security for bridge links or the bridges themselves.
Before putting bridges into operation, configure them for secure operation. Proper
configuration will also make it much easier to monitor and manage the bridges during
operation, which is also done through the browser-based configuration interface.
The configuration interface is a series of “Web pages” residing in the bridge. For the browser to be able
to access these pages, the bridge and the station running the browser must have compatible IP address
settings.
The bridge comes preset to use an IP address of 192.168.1.1 and a subnet mask of 255.255.0.0. The
easiest way to change these settings is by running KickStart, a utility provided on the CD-ROM
included with the bridge.
KickStart must be installed on a station running Microsoft® Windows 98 SE or later. The station should
be connected to the LAN and configured for TCP/IP networking.
KickStart will use a special discovery protocol to find the bridge and display its IP address. If the
address is already suitable for normal communication with the station, KickStart will offer to start the
station’s default browser and make it link to the configuration interface in the bridge. If the address
needs to be changed, KickStart will let you change it and then link to the configuration interface.
(As an alternative to connecting the bridge and the station to the LAN, you can connect them to each
other using a crossover Ethernet cable. As an alternative to using KickStart, you can first give the
station IP settings compatible with those of the bridge, for example 192.168.1.2/255.255.0.0.)
Link Topologies: The bridge can be used on a “point-to-point” link or in a “mesh” topology.
● A point-to-point link consists of two bridges providing a simple two-ended wireless link between a
pair of LANs.
On a point-to-point link, the bridges are typically used with directional antennas. Antenna gain must
be carefully matched with link distance, and the antennas must be carefully aimed at each other.
● A mesh topology is created when bridges are used to link three or more LANs.
A mesh topology must be carefully planned so that every bridge can communicate directly with
every other bridge by radio. If bridge A and bridge C can both “talk” to bridge B but they cannot
“hear” each other, they will sometimes transmit at the same time. Their LANs will not be linked at
all, and performance on all links to bridge B will be seriously degraded.
In a mesh topology, the bridges are typically used with omnidirectional antennas. An “omni,”
depending on its gain, has a radiation pattern resembling anything from a doughnut (low gain) to a
very thin pancake (high gain). If high-gain omnis are used, the antennas may have to be carefully
aligned in height. It may be possible to use wide-beam directional antennas in some cases.
These topologies are illustrated below. The oval and circles represent the antennas’ approximate
radiation patterns as seen from above. The point-to-point link is implemented with high-gain directional
dish antennas, and the mesh topology with omnidirectional dipole antennas.
These topologies can be combined. On mesh network ABC, network C might have two bridges, one
part of the mesh and the other providing a point-to-point link to network D. This requires careful
planning to avoid interference and to comply with regulations regarding antenna separation.
Power Options: The bridge complies with IEEE standard 802.3af, Power over Ethernet (PoE). It receives
its power through otherwise unused wires in the cable that connects it to the LAN. You can use the
supplied DC power injector or a fully 802.3af-compliant power hub or power switch.
The DC power injector is not weatherproof and must be mounted indoors. The PoE connection, like the
Ethernet data connection, must not go through more than 100 meters (328 feet) of Ethernet cabling.
Other Features
● Spanning Tree Algorithm. The bridge supports IEEE standard 802.3d, the “spanning tree” algorithm
and communication protocol. The linked bridges will cooperate with each other to reduce the
chances of packets being sent around in endless loops and degrading network performance.
● 802.11b/g Protection. IEEE 802.11g and 802.11b devices operate in the same frequency band, and
could cause serious interference to each other if used in the same location without a “protection”
mechanism. The bridge can detect when the possibility of such interference exists. It will adjust its
manner of operation to make the 11b devices aware of it, thus preventing simultaneous
transmissions on the 11b and 11g networks.
● Firmware Upgradability. New firmware code giving the bridge enhanced capabilities may become
available from time to time. This code can be downloaded to the bridge through the browser-based
configuration interface, as described in this user’s guide.
● DHCP Client Function. The bridge can get its IP settings from a Dynamic Host Configuration
Protocol (DHCP) server on the LAN. This function can be enabled through the browser-based
configuration interface. Note that under some circumstances, the server might assign the bridge
different IP addresses at different times, and you will then have to use KickStart to find the bridge if
you wish to link to it for monitoring or management.
About this User’s Guide
This user’s guide (1) describes physical installation of the bridge in broad outline, (2) provides technical
information needed by planning and installation personnel, and (3) explains bridge configuration and
management in substantial detail. It is hoped that this guide will ease the tasks of configuring the bridge,
setting up the link(s), and monitoring and managing the bridge during operation.
Glossary
Readers whose backgrounds are in fields unrelated to computers and networking are urged to read this page
carefully from top to bottom. IEEE 802.11b/g channels and operating modes are illustrated on the next page.
LAN: Local area network. A system for interconnecting a group of digital devices through short to
medium-length two-way communication links. Also, two or more devices connected by such a system.
WLAN: Wireless LAN. A LAN (or portion of a LAN) that relies on radio links.
IEEE: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. A professional society that, in addition to other
activities, develops networking and communications standards. IEEE Project 802 develops LAN standards.
IEEE 802.11x: The IEEE WLAN standards, developed by Committee 802.11 and working groups within it.
Includes Standard 802.11 and addenda such as 802.11b and 802.11g, which define later improvements.
SSID: Service Set Identifier. An operator-assigned name that identifies a WLAN.
BSSID: Basic Service Set Identifier. A machine-assigned value that identifies a WLAN or part of a WLAN.
AP: Access point. A device that links wireless stations to a wired LAN (and each other).
Infrastructure mode: A WLAN operating mode in which stations communicate only through an AP.
Ad hoc mode: A WLAN operating mode in which stations communicate only with each other.
Client: A machine that uses the services of another machine. Because stations on an infrastructure-type
WLAN use the services of an AP, they are often referred to as wireless clients.
ISM (industrial, scientific, and medical) bands: Frequency bands set aside around the world for licensefree operation of potentially interference-generating equipment and low-power communication systems.
Channel: A cluster of frequencies used simultaneously to carry a signal. IEEE 802.11b/g channels overlap
each other (which can result in interference) except where the channel numbers differ by 5 or more.
Roaming: Travel between different APs’ coverage areas while remaining connected to the same WLAN.
The APs must use the same SSID and security settings, but different channels if their coverage areas overlap.
Packet: Material to be transferred from one digital device to another, plus information needed to effect the
transfer, assembled into one unit according to the rules of a hardware-independent communication protocol.
Frame: Material to be transferred from one digital device to another, plus information needed to effect the
transfer, assembled into one unit according to the rules of the communication hardware.
Mbps: Megabits (millions of 1s and 0s) per second. Also written Mb/s, Mbit/s, and Mbits/sec.
Byte: A cluster or string of bits of the smallest size normally used to hold a character of text. Now 8 bits on
most computers. While “byte” is often used to mean “8 bits,” networking specialists prefer the term “octet.”
Throughput: The rate at which material that a user wants transferred (as opposed to machine-generated
“overhead” such as addressing and control information) is successfully transferred over a link.
Hexadecimal: Base 16 numeric notation. In “hex” the letters a through f (in upper or lower case) represent
the values we normally refer to as ten through fifteen. Twelve is written as 0c, sixteen as 10 (“hex one-oh”).
ASCII: American Standard Code for Information Interchange. A code that assigns values to letters and
other elements of text so they can be handled by computers. Often used to mean any plain digitized text.
MAC (medium access control) address: A factory-set value that uniquely identifies a networking device.
Also called MAC ID. An AP uses its MAC address as the BSSID of its portion of the WLAN.
IP (Internet Protocol) address: A set of values (example: 192.168.4.133) of the type used to identify a
machine or network on the Internet. Often automatically assigned to a wireless station after it connects.
IEEE 802.11b/g channels are illustrated below. Note that not all channels are available in all countries.
The bridge is set at the factory to use only the channels available in the country it will be sold in. Channel
availability in the major regulatory regions is as follows:
North America: Channels 1–11
Most of Europe: Channels 1–13
Japan: Channels 1–14
Spain: Channels 10 and 11
The figure below illustrates ad hoc mode (left), infrastructure mode (center), and infrastructure mode with
roamability (right). The shading of the “waves” is meant to emphasize that on any wireless network —
including wireless bridge links — only one device can transmit at a time.
Your bridge and its partner bridge(s) work in a manner similar to ad hoc mode. The alternative (when IEEE
standards are followed) is to have one central bridge (like an AP on an infrastructure WLAN) and
“satellite” bridges that communicate through it (as stations communicate entirely through the AP on an
infrastructure WLAN). This is suitable if the Internet connection and all the servers are on the LAN
connected to the central bridge. Ad hoc operation is more suitable where services are distributed among the
LANs.
Overview of Bridge Setup
Carry out the following procedures to set up a bridge link:
1. Plan the link.
This must be done with the help of a competent radio technician. The technician will carry out a site
survey and do the extensive calculations necessary to determine the best antenna type, location, and
height.
2. Install the mast.
This also requires specialized knowledge and skills. The mast must be sturdy, wind- and corrosionresistant, protected from lightning strikes, and in compliance with local building and electrical codes.
3. Configure the bridge.
Instructions on configuring the bridge make up the bulk of this user’s guide. This should be done before
installation. During configuration, the bridges will be able to link to each other without antennas if they
are placed close together. The main considerations for configuration are outlined below.
● Link Security. There are three measures you can take to help make a bridge link secure:
Replace the bridges’ factory-set SSID with one of your own choosing. Bridges that will link to each
other must use the same SSID. A nonsense string giving no information about the network is best.
Set the bridges to use WEP encryption. They must be set to the same key length and use the same
key or keys. If 64-bit encryption is used, up to four keys can be defined (make sure they are in the
same order on each bridge), and different bridges can have different “default key” (that is, transmit
key) settings. Consider using 256-bit encryption, which not many wireless devices support.
Instead of letting the bridges recognize each other automatically, manually enter in each unit’s
bridge table the MAC address(es) of the bridge(s) it will link up with. Each bridge’s MAC address
can be found on the back of the bridge, on a label marked “MAC ID.”
● Channel Setting. The bridges to be linked must be set to use the same frequency channel. This may
have to be carefully chosen to avoid interference between the bridge link(s) and other wireless
networks in the area. The technician doing the site survey might recommend a particular channel.
● Transmission Speed. If the link is very long or local electromagnetic conditions are poor, the bridges
might operate more efficiently if their maximum transmission speed is reduced from 54 Mbps.
During antenna alignment, the bridges can be set for a very low maximum speed to aid initial linkup,
and then gradually set for higher speeds as the alignment is fine-tuned.
● Bridge Security. Replace the bridge’s factory-set KickStart password when you first run KickStart.
Replace the browser-based configuration interface’s factory-set “admin mode” password during
configuration. Each password should be unique.
● Bridge Naming. Each bridge has a “device name” setting. You can set this to a descriptive string
that tells you, for example, the location of the bridge. This makes it easier to identify the bridges
when they are installed and operating and you need to monitor performance or adjust settings.
4. Mount the antenna on the mast.
This can be dangerous work and should be done by an experienced installer.
5. Mount the bridge on the mast.
This can be dangerous work and should be done by an experienced installer.
6. Make connections in the following order:
a. Connect the bridge to the antenna. Use only the antenna cable included with the bridge. If installing
an overvoltage protector (also called a lightning arrestor), complete the ground connection. Then
seal all connection points with several layers of waterproofing tape.
b. Mount the DC injector indoors, but do not make any connections to it.
c. Connect the weatherproof Ethernet cable to the bridge and thoroughly seal the connection with
several layers of waterproofing tape.
d. Connect the weatherproof Ethernet cable to the jack on the DC injector marked ODU (“outdoor
unit”). Make sure rainwater cannot run along the cable and into the DC injector.
e. Connect the Ethernet cable from the switch or hub to the jack on the DC injector marked RJ-45.
f. Plug the power adapter into an AC outlet, and then plug its output cord into the jack on the DC
injector marked DC 12V.
A rough illustration of these connections appears below. Note that the supplied antenna cable has
identical round, threaded connectors at its ends, not the kinds of connectors shown in the illustration.
7. Complete antenna alignment.
This can require cooperation between the antenna installer and a network technician. Typically, the
technician will replace the DC injector’s LAN connection with a crossover connection to a laptop
computer, and measure link performance while the installer adjusts the aim of the antenna.
Installing and Using KickStart
The KickStart utility will find your 802.11g Wireless Outdoor Bridge (and any identical bridges) on the
LAN, regardless of whether their IP settings are suitable for the LAN or not. It will let you adjust any
bridge’s IP settings that need adjustment, and then it will offer to start up your default Web browser and
link to the bridge for configuration.
KickStart is provided on a CD-ROM included with the bridge. It must be installed on an IBM-type
microcomputer running Microsoft® Windows 98 SE or later. The computer must be connected to the LAN
and set up for TCP/IP networking.
Installing KickStart
Install KickStart as follows:
1. Power up the computer and wait for the “desktop” display to appear.
It is strongly recommended that no other programs be running during software installation.
2. Insert the CD-ROM and wait for the installation startup window to appear.
This typically takes fifteen to thirty seconds. The window will contain commands resembling Web links.
3. Click the command to install KickStart.
If the operating system’s Autorun feature is turned off and the startup window does not appear, open the
Start menu, choose Run, browse to the KickStart directory on the disc, and select and run Setup.
After a brief progress display, a window titled Welcome will appear.
4. Click Next.
A message for users of early (pre-SE) Windows 98 and Windows NT 4.0 will appear. If the station is
running either of these products, read the message carefully. It is reproduced in full below. If the system
needs upgrading, you must exit Setup, carry out the upgrade, and start again.
It is assumed in the remaining instructions that you are willing to accept all of the setup program’s
default settings.
5. Click Next, and then continue clicking Next until a Finish button appears.
The sequence of windows that will appear during this process is shown below.
6. Click Finish.
A shortcut icon for running KickStart will appear on your desktop. A new folder, WLAN, will be added
to the Start menu’s Programs section, and it will lead to commands for running and uninstalling
KickStart.
Using KickStart
Launch and operate KickStart as follows:
1. Double-click the KickStart shortcut icon, or choose the KickStart command from the Start menu.
A window explaining KickStart’s purpose will appear.
2. Click Next.
KickStart’s main window will appear, and a search for compatible devices will begin.
After a few seconds, information about the bridges found will appear. (If none are found, click Refresh.)
NOTE: Because all new bridges are set to the same IP address, it is best not to connect them
to the same LAN for configuration at the same time, as was done to create the example above.
Also, you should avoid leaving the factory-set IP address unchanged, even if it is suitable for
your network. Many devices today come preset to this address for easier configuration, so it
should be regarded as a reserved address.
3. Change the KickStart password of any bridge that still has the factory-set password.
The factory-set password is admin. To replace it, click the bridge’s entry with the mouse’s secondary
button (usually the button furthest from your body) and choose the Change Password command that
pops out.
In the window that appears, type the current password once and the new password twice. A KickStart
password can be up to 20 characters long. Click OK when done.
The password will be saved on the bridge, and a message indicating success will appear. Click OK to
return to the main KickStart window.
4. Move the highlighting to the entry for the bridge that you want to configure, and then click Next.
Two things can happen:
● If KickStart finds the bridge’s IP address suitable for starting the configuration process, it will
immediately offer to start up your default browser and make it link to the bridge’s configuration
interface. The Set IP dialog box shown below will not appear. Go directly to step 5.
● If KickStart finds that the bridge’s IP address needs to be changed, the Set IP dialog box shown
below will appear.
The message at the bottom and the color of the “IP settings suitability indicator” tell you that the
bridge’s IP settings must be changed to allow full communication with the computer.
IP addressing is a complicated subject beyond the scope of this user’s guide. Consult the network
administrator if unsure about how to complete the following procedure.
Find an unused IP address on the subnet the devices are attached to, and type it in. Then type in the
full TCP/IP network’s subnet mask. Make sure the “suitability indicator” turns green. If you want
the bridge’s configuration interface to be accessible from outside the linked LANs, type the IP
address of the appropriate router or other gateway into the Default Gateway box.
Finally, click in the Password box, type the bridge’s current KickStart password, and click OK.
KickStart will indicate that it is ready to start your browser and point it to the bridge’s configuration
interface.
5. Click Finish to start the browser (user mode), Previous to search again, or Cancel to simply quit.
Clicking Previous will take you back to step 2. Clicking Cancel will close KickStart without starting
the browser. Clicking Finish will start up the computer’s default browser and make it link to the
bridge’s configuration interface. This interface is explained in the following chapter.
Bridge Configuration
User Mode
User Mode provides the status of outdoor unit. User can only read the parameter of outdoor unit. When you
log on the device, you have no need to input the user name and password. Just place the enter key.
There are two ways to get into enter the User Mode.
1. Follow the kick start wizard
2. Type the IP address of outdoor unit (The default value is 192.168.1.1).
The following figure shows the status summary of outdoor unit which includes device name, model name,
SSID, current channel, MAC address, regulation domain, .firmware and hardware version. It is a good idea
to write down this information; you will be asked to supply it if the outdoor unit needs service.
Bridge Table
The Bridge Table shows the MAC address(es) of any outdoor unit(s) currently linked wirelessly with this
unit. The Refresh Time is the number of seconds between automatic searches for bridges. Click Update to
send the setting to the bridge and initiate an immediate search.
Counter Panel
The bridge keeps count of successful and failed wireless transfers, as well as octet and error
counts. The Refresh Time is the number of seconds between automatic updates of the counter
display. Click Update to send the setting to the bridge and update the display immediately.
Device Security Panel
Under the default (factory) setting, no password is required for logging onto the bridge in user
mode. Use this panel to change, create, or delete a user mode password (0-20 characters,
spaces allowed, if a user mode password already exists, you must supply to make any changes.
Administrator Mode
Clink the ‘Admin Mode’ on the last figure to switch from User Mode into Administrator Mode.
Enter the Username- admin, and Password- 1234. Then, you can enter the Admin Mode. (Refer
to next figure)
In the Admin Mode use the links at the left to
View and change bridge settings
Check important settings and attributes, and monitor bridge operation
Reboot the bridge (this is required to make most configuration changes take effect)
Restore the bridge’s factory settings
Load new firmware code into the bridge
Switch to “user mode” (in which you can view but not change bridge settings
Basic Panel
Under the configuration panel, the basic setup panel can adjust identity and radio settings. A device
name (0-20 chars., spaces allowed) is for your own use. To link up, bridges must use the same
SSID (1-32 chars., spaces allowed) and channel (and both should be for bridge use only).
This device supports 11, and 13 channels which depends on the regulatory domain.
Encryption Panel
From the drop down menu, it has WEP Disabled and WEP Enabled.
When the WEP Enabled is been chosen, parameters ( Key lengths, types, key numbers) can be selected.
TCP/IP Panel
Use this panel to adjust the bridge’s Internet Protocol (IP) settings. These allow administrative
access over the LAN. The bridge can obtain IP settings from a DHCP server, in which case the
settings may change from time to time. Alternatively, you can input fixed IP settings yourself.
Bridge Tool Panel
The bridge can “auto-learn” the MAC address(es) of the bridge(s) it will link with, or you can input
the address(es) by hand. Auto-learning works only if the bridges are set for the same SSID and
channel. A bridge’s MAC address is on a label marked “MAC ID” on the bottom of the bridge.
Manually insert the MAC numbers of Bridges when the Auto Learning is disabling.
Device Security Panel
Passwords (0-20 chars. each, spaces allowed) control Web-based access to bridge settings. The
administrator password (default ‘1234’) is the one checked for when ‘admin’ is given as the user
name at log-on time. Initially no password exists for ‘user’ log-ons; you can set one here if you
like.
The description and use of Status (Summary、 Bridge、Counters Panel), please refer to the User Mode.
(See the Page 19~20)
Device Restart Panel
The bridge must be restart to ensure that all configuration changes are applied. Some settings, even if saved
and reported by the bridge as its current settings, do not take effect until the bridge is restarted.
After press the restart function, please wait for few seconds.
Restore Defaults Panel
Use this panel to restore the bridge’s factory settings. The bridge will restart itself and come back
on line with an IP address of 192.168.1.1. Use the KickStart program to resume managing the
bridge.
Firmware Upgrade Panel
New firmware code giving the bridge enhanced capabilities may become available from time to
time. Use this panel to send the contents of a firmware file to the bridge. The bridge will install the
code in place of its current code and then restart itself. Be careful not to interrupt this process. Be
motioned, the process of firmware upgrade should not be interrupted.
Appendix A: Technical Support
If you encounter a problem that cannot be solved, call your networking equipment supplier for help. Have
the following information ready before you make the call:
•
Full product name and, if possible, firmware version number
•
Version numbers of all software products included in the package
•
Network type and configuration, and any recent configuration changes
•
Actions that led to the situation that prompted the call
If it appears that a return or exchange will be required, you may be asked to provide the serial number of
the product.
Support personnel may ask you to try to reproduce the problem. They may also ask you to run some simple
tests using diagnostic tools included with the system. Proper preparation on your part can greatly reduce the
amount of time needed to solve the problem.
Appendix B: Limited Warranty
Hardware
The manufacturer warrants its products to be free of defects in workmanship and materials, under normal
use and service, for a period of 12 months from the date of purchase from the manufacturer or its
authorized reseller, and for the period of time specified in the documentation supplied with each product.
Should a product fail to be in good working order during the applicable warranty period, the manufacturer
will, at its option and expense, repair or replace it, or deliver to the purchaser an equivalent product or part
at no additional charge except as set forth below. Repair parts and replacement products are furnished on an
exchange basis and will be either reconditioned or new. All replaced products and parts will become the
property of the manufacturer. Any replaced or repaired product or part has a warranty of ninety (90) days or
the remainder of the initial warranty period, whichever is longer.
The manufacturer shall not be liable under this warranty if its testing and examination disclose that the
alleged defect in the product does not exist or was caused by the purchaser’s or any third party’s misuse,
neglect, improper installation or testing, unauthorized attempt at repair or modification, or any other cause
beyond the range of the intended use, or by accident, fire, lightning, or other hazard.
Software
Software and documentation materials are supplied “as is,” without warranty as to their performance,
merchantability, or fitness for any particular purpose. However, the media containing the software is
covered by a 90-day warranty that protects the purchaser against failure within that period.
Limited Warranty Service Procedure
Any product (1) received in error, (2) received in a defective or non-functioning condition, or (3) exhibiting
a defect under normal working conditions, can be returned to the manufacturer by following these steps:
1. Prepare the following in printed or electronic form:
•
Dated proof of purchase
•
Product model number and quantity
•
Product serial number
•
Precise reason for return
•
Your name, address, email address, phone number, and fax number
2. Inform the distributor or retailer.
3. Ship the product back to the distributor/retailer with freight charges prepaid. The purchaser must
pay the cost of shipping from the distributor/retailer to the manufacturer. Any package sent C.O.D.
(Cash On Delivery) will be refused.
Charges: Usually, RMA (Returned Material Authorization) items will be returned to the purchaser via
airmail, prepaid by the manufacturer. If any item is returned by another carrier, the purchaser will pay the
difference. A return freight and handling fee will be charged to the purchaser if the manufacturer
determines that the product is not defective or that the damage was caused by the user.
Warning
The manufacturer is not responsible for the integrity of any data on storage equipment (hard drives, tape
drives, floppy diskettes, etc.). We strongly recommend that our customers back their data up before sending
such equipment in for diagnosis or repair.
Service After Warranty Period
After the warranty period expires, all products can be repaired for a reasonable service charge. The
shipping charges to and from the manufacturer’s facility will be borne by the purchaser.
Return for Credit
In the case of a DOA item (an item that is “dead on arrival”) or a shipping error, a return for credit will
automatically be applied to the purchaser’s account, unless otherwise requested.
Limitation of Liability
All expressed and implied warranties of a product’s merchantability, or of its fitness for a particular
purpose, are limited in duration to the applicable period as set forth in this limited warranty, and no
warranty will be considered valid after its expiration date.
If this product does not function as warranted, your sole remedy shall be repair or replacement as provided
for above. In no case shall the manufacturer be liable for any incidental, consequential, special, or indirect
damages resulting from loss of data, loss of profits, or loss of use, even if the manufacturer or its authorized
distributor/dealer has been advised of the possibility of such damages, or for any claim by any other party.
Appendix C: Specifications
Standards compliance
IEEE 802.11b, IEEE 802.11g
Frequency band
2400.0 to 2483.5 MHz (Japan)
2400.0 to 2483.5 MHz (North America and Europe)
Transmitter power
802.11b: 17 dBm (typical)
802.11g: 12 dBm (typical)
Receiver sensitivity*
11 Mbps: 8% PER, -82 dBm (typical)
54 Mbps: 10% PER -68 dBm (typical)
* Minimum receiver input power level at which a packet error ratio (PER) of less than the indicated percentage can
be maintained, given a packet length of 1024 bytes and conditions of 20° to 30° C.
Input Power
Input voltage 12V DC; external power supply included (input
voltage 100V to 240V AC)
Data rates
1, 2, 5.5, 6, 9, 11, 12, 18, 24, 36, 48 and 54 Mbps with auto
fallback; special user-selectable 22 Mbps option
RF spreading scheme
Direct-sequence spread-spectrum (DSSS)
Encoding and modulation
methods
BPSK, QPSK, CCK, OFDM, and PBCC
Security
64- and 128-bit Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP) encryption
Special user-selectable 256-bit WEP option
Dimensions (L × W × H)
165 × 135 × 55 mm
Environmental requirements
Operating temperature: -20° to 70° C
Storage temperature:
-30° to 80° C
Appendix D: Channels and Regulations
The following table lists the IEEE 802.11b transmission channels and provides important notes on
regulations regarding channel use.
Channel
Start, Center, and
End Frequencies (MHz)
Non-overlapped
Channels
Notes
1
2401
2412 2423
6-14
1
2
2406
2417 2428
7-14
1
3
2411
2422 2433
8-14
1
4
2416
2427 2438
9-14
1
5
2421
2432 2443
10-14
1
6
2426
2437 2448
1, 11-14
1
7
2431
2442 2453
1, 2, 12-14
1
8
2436
2447 2458
1-3, 13, 14
1
9
2441
2452 2463
1-4, 14
1
10
2446
2457 2468
1-5, 14
11
2451
2462 2473
1-6
12
2456
2467 2478
1-7
2
13
2461
2472 2483
1-8
2
14
2473
2484 2495
1-10
3
Notes:
1. Not used where the regulations of Spain or France are in effect.
2. Not used where the regulations of Spain or North America are in effect.
3. Used only where the regulations of Japan are in effect.
An illustration of IEEE 802.11b channel distribution and overlap appears below.
Wireless networking channels in the 2.4-GHz frequency band
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