MicroVAX 3100 Model 90 Troubleshooting and Diagnostic Information

MicroVAX 3100 Model 90 Troubleshooting and Diagnostic Information
MicroVAX 3100
Model 90
Troubleshooting and Diagnostic
Information
Order Number: EK–A0607–TI. B01
December 1993
This manual describes the troubleshooting procedures and diagnostic commands that you can use to solve basic problems with the MicroVAX 3100
Model 90 system.
Revision Information:
Digital Equipment Corporation
Maynard, Massachusetts
This manual supersedes EK–A0607–TI. A01
December 1993
Digital Equipment Corporation makes no representations that the use of its products in the
manner described in this publication will not infringe on existing or future patent rights, nor do
the descriptions contained in this publication imply the granting of licenses to make, use, or sell
equipment or software in accordance with the description.
Possession, use, or copying of the software described in this publication is authorized only
pursuant to a valid written license from Digital or an authorized sublicensor.
© Digital Equipment Corporation 1993. All Rights Reserved.
The postpaid Reader’s Comments forms at the end of this document request your critical
evaluation to assist in preparing future documentation.
The following are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation: Digital, MicroVAX, OpenVMS,
RX, ThinWire, VAX, VAX DOCUMENT, and the DIGITAL logo.
S2452
This document was prepared using VAX DOCUMENT Version 2.1.
Contents
Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
v
1 Troubleshooting and Diagnosing Problems
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.3.1
1.3.2
1.3.3
1.3.4
1.3.5
1.4
Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Using the Troubleshooting Table .
Diagnostic Tests and Commands .
Power-Up Tests . . . . . . . . . . .
Diagnostic Tests and Utilities
Power-Up Error Messages . . .
Configuration Display . . . . . .
Error Display . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Contacting Digital Services . . . . .
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1–1
1–2
1–9
1–10
1–13
1–18
1–21
1–23
1–24
Successful Power-Up Test Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Diagnostic Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Status LED Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1–10
1–13
1–25
Basic Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Option Card Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MicroVAX 4000-100A Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1–3
1–15
1–16
Index
Figures
1–1
1–2
1–3
Tables
1–1
1–2
1–3
iii
Preface
This manual describes the troubleshooting procedures and diagnostic
commands that you can use to solve basic problems with the MicroVAX™ 3100
Model 90 system.
Audience
This manual is intended for people who have some experience with computers.
Structure of This Manual
This manual has one chapter and an index.
Additional Information
See the MicroVAX 3100 Model 90 Operator Information manual for the list of
associated and related documents.
v
Conventions
The following conventions are used in this manual:
vi
Convention
Description
MONOSPACE
Text displayed on the screen is shown in monospace type.
italic type
Italic type emphasizes important information and indicates the
complete titles of manuals.
boldface type
Boldface type in examples indicates user input. Boldface type in text
indicates the first instance of terms defined in the text.
Note
A note contains information that is of special importance to the user.
Warning
A warning contains information to prevent personal injury.
1
Troubleshooting and Diagnosing Problems
This chapter describes the troubleshooting procedures and diagnostic commands that
you can use to solve basic problems with the MicroVAX 3100 Model 90 system. It
contains information on the following:
•
Troubleshooting
•
Diagnostic tests and commands
•
Contacting Digital™ Services
It also lists the information that you must give to your Digital Services
representative and where to find this information.
1.1 Troubleshooting
If a problem occurs, you must first make sure that all the cables, loopback
connectors, and terminators are correctly connected and that the connectors
are not damaged, for example, the pins may be broken or short-circuited.
Follow these steps:
1. Shut down the operating system following the procedures described in the
operating system documentation.
2. Turn off the console terminal and all the peripheral devices, such as
printers and modems.
3. Turn off all the expansion boxes.
4. Turn off the system unit.
5. Check that the following cables, if installed, are correctly connected at both
ends and that the connectors are not damaged:
•
Console terminal cable (linking the console terminal to the system unit)
•
Console terminal power cord
•
System unit power cord
Troubleshooting and Diagnosing Problems 1–1
•
Expansion box SCSI cables
•
Expansion box power cords
•
ThinWire™ Ethernet cable or standard Ethernet cable
6. Check that the following terminators, if installed, are correctly connected
and are not damaged:
•
SCSI terminators
•
ThinWire Ethernet terminator (T-connector and two terminators)
•
Standard Ethernet loopback connector
If you have correctly followed steps 1 to 5, the on/off switches on all
the components are set to the off (O) position, and you have solved any
problems caused by incorrectly connected cables or terminators.
7. Set the on/off switches on the following equipment to the on ( | ) position in
the following order:
a. Expansion boxes
b. Peripherals
c.
Console terminal
d. System unit
The system responds with the power-up test display. If it does not, see
Section 1.2.
1.2 Using the Troubleshooting Table
Table 1–1 suggests the corrective actions for certain system problems. If you
have a problem with the system, follow these steps:
1. Write down the symptoms of the problem.
2. Check the Symptom column in Table 1–1 for a match.
3. Check the causes of the symptom in the Possible Cause column. If the
column lists more than one possible cause, check the possible causes and
their suggested solutions in the order listed.
4. Follow the advice in the Suggested Solution column.
5. See Section 1.4 if the problem persists.
1–2 Troubleshooting and Diagnosing Problems
Table 1–1 Basic Troubleshooting
Symptom
Possible Cause
Suggested Solution
The power cord is not
connected. The power cord
may be faulty. The power
socket may not be working.
The system breaker or wall
outlet may have blown.
Make sure that all the power cords
are connected correctly at both
ends. Try a known good power cord
or test the power socket with an
appliance that works.
The overload protection
circuitry of the power
supply may have shut down
because of an abnormal
condition on the power line.
Turn the system off and then turn
it back on.
The power supply unit
(PSU) is faulty.
Contact your Digital Services
representative.
The terminal cable is not
correctly connected.
Make sure that all the cables are
connected at both ends.
The terminal cable is not
connected to the correct
MMJ port.
Check the MMJ port to which the
terminal cable is connected. If this
port is not MMJ port 3, remove the
terminal cable and connect it to
MMJ port 3.
The power cord is not
connected. The power cord
may be faulty. The wall
outlet may not be working.
Make sure that all the power cords
are connected correctly at both
ends. Try a known good power cord
or test the power socket with an
appliance that works.
The terminal fuse may have
blown.
Replace the blown terminal fuse.
See the terminal documentation.
The terminal settings may
be incorrect.
See the MicroVAX 3100 Model 90
Operator Information manual for
the list of correct terminal settings.
See the terminal documentation for
information on how to set up the
terminal.
System Problems
The system unit fan is off
or the power light is off.
The power-up display does
not show after 20 seconds.
(continued on next page)
Troubleshooting and Diagnosing Problems 1–3
Table 1–1 (Cont.) Basic Troubleshooting
Symptom
Possible Cause
Suggested Solution
The port to which the
terminal connects may be
faulty.
Try connecting the terminal to
another system. If this solution
works, the port to which the
terminal was connected is faulty.
If the terminal still does not
operate, it is faulty. In either
case, contact your Digital Services
representative.
The terminal cable may be
faulty.
Connect the terminal cable and
the terminal to another system.
If the connected terminal works,
the DZ circuitry or MMJ connector
is faulty. Otherwise, the cable
is faulty. Contact your Digital
Services representative.
The power-up display
contains question marks.
A diagnostic error has
occurred.
See Section 1.4.
The power-up test display
contains unexpected
characters.
The terminal settings are
incorrect or the DZ circuitry
is faulty.
Make sure the terminal settings
are correct, then run the powerup test again. If the terminal is
set correctly, contact your Digital
Services representative.
The system fails to boot the
operating system.
The system defaults are
incorrectly set.
Set the system defaults as
described in the OpenVMS Factory
Installed Software User Information
document, then try to boot the
system again. If the system still
fails to boot, contact your Digital
Services representative.
System Problems
(continued on next page)
1–4 Troubleshooting and Diagnosing Problems
Table 1–1 (Cont.) Basic Troubleshooting
Symptom
Possible Cause
Suggested Solution
RRD42 Compact Disc Drive Problems
The drive does not accept
the caddy.
The eject button fails to
eject the caddy.
The disc is upside-down in
the caddy or it is not placed
correctly in the caddy.
Remove the disc from the caddy
and reinsert it properly.
A caddy is already present.
Eject the caddy and replace it with
a new one.
The eject button is disabled
by software.
Reenable the eject button or
manually eject the caddy.
The system does not have
power.
Set the system unit on/off switch to
the on ( | ) position and press the
eject button again.
The RRD42 compact disc
drive is faulty.
If you want to eject the caddy
manually, see MicroVAX 3100
Model 90 Operator Information
for instructions. If the problem
persists, contact your Digital
services representative.
(continued on next page)
Troubleshooting and Diagnosing Problems 1–5
Table 1–1 (Cont.) Basic Troubleshooting
Symptom
Possible Cause
Suggested Solution
The TZ30 green LED
flashes rapidly.
The drive mechanism is
faulty or the tape cartridge
is damaged.
Press and release the unload button
to clear the fault. If the LED
continues to flash, do not try to
remove the tape cartridge or use
the tape drive. Contact your Digital
Services representative.
The TZ30 does not operate.
The drive does not contain
a tape cartridge.
Insert the tape cartridge and slide
the lever from the UNLOCK to the
LOCK position.
The operate lever does not
slide.
The tape cartridge is in use.
Wait for the green LED to turn
on and try again. If the problem
persists, do not use the drive.
Contact your Digital Services
representative.
The operate lever does not
lock.
The tape cartridge is not
inserted correctly.
Reinsert the tape cartridge. If
the problem persists, contact your
Digital Services representative.
TZ30 Tape Drive Problems
The tape does not load.
Press and release the unload
button. Wait for the green LED
to turn on before sliding the lever
and removing the tape. If the
LED flashes, contact your Digital
Services representative.
The system cannot write to
the tape.
The write-protect switch
is in the write-protect
position.
If the write-protect LED is on,
remove the tape, reset the switch
and try writing to the tape again. If
the problem persists, contact your
Digital Services representative.
The data read from the tape
cartridge is corrupted.
The tape drive head may be
dirty.
See the MicroVAX 3100 Model 90
Operator Information manual for
information on how to clean the
drive head.
The tape does not eject.
The tape is not rewound.
The operate lever is in the
lock position.
Follow the procedure for removing a
tape from the TZ30 described in the
MicroVAX 3100 Model 90 Operator
Information manual.
(continued on next page)
1–6 Troubleshooting and Diagnosing Problems
Table 1–1 (Cont.) Basic Troubleshooting
Symptom
Possible Cause
Suggested Solution
TLZ06 Cassette Tape Drive Problems
The system cannot write to
the cassette tape.
The write-protect switch
is in the write-protect
position.
If the write-protect LED is on,
remove the tape, reset the switch
and try writing to the tape again. If
the problem persists, contact your
Digital Services representative.
The cassette tape is not
loaded.
Load the cassette tape.
The write-protect LED
flashes.
The tape drive heads are
dirty or the tape is worn.
Clean the drive heads (see the
MicroVAX 3100 Model 90 Operator
Information manual). If the
problem persists, use a new tape.
The data read from the
cassette tape is corrupted.
The tape drive heads may
be dirty.
See the MicroVAX 3100 Model 90
Operator Information manual for
information on how to clean the
drive heads.
TZK10/TZK11 Quarter Inch Cartridge (QIC) Tape Drive Problems
The data read from the QIC
tape is corrupted.
The drive head is dirty.
Clean the drive head. See the
MicroVAX 3100 Model 90 Operator
Information manual.
The system cannot write to
the QIC tape.
The write-protect switch
is in the write-protect
position.
Remove the QIC tape, reset the
switch and try to write to the
QIC tape again. If the problem
persists, contact your Digital
Services representative.
The system cannot read
from or write to the QIC
tape.
The QIC tape may be faulty.
Remove the QIC tape. If the amber
LED turns off when you remove
the QIC tape, the tape is probably
faulty. Try a different QIC tape.
If the amber LED stays on or if
the problem persists, contact your
Digital Services representative.
(continued on next page)
Troubleshooting and Diagnosing Problems 1–7
Table 1–1 (Cont.) Basic Troubleshooting
Symptom
Possible Cause
Suggested Solution
RX™26 Diskette Drive Problems
The system cannot read
from or write to the
diskette.
The diskette is not
formatted.
Format the diskette.
The diskette is not correctly
inserted.
Eject the diskette. Try to insert the
diskette again.
The diskette is faulty.
Try a different diskette.
The diskette drive is faulty.
Contact your Digital Services
representative.
The diskette density is
incorrect.
The RX26 accepts only highdensity (HD) or extra-density (ED)
diskettes.
The diskette drive head
may be dirty.
See the MicroVAX 3100 Model 90
Operator Information manual for
information on how to clean the
diskette drive head.
The system can read
from but cannot write to
a diskette.
The write-protect switch
is in the write-protect
position.
Eject the diskette and reset the
switch. Try writing to the diskette
again.
The diskette does not eject.
The diskette is incorrectly
positioned in the drive.
Gently press the diskette with your
finger and reposition it. Press the
eject button again.
RZ-Series SCSI Disk Drive Problems
An installed drive does not
work.
The Configuration display
does not show a SCSI
device.
Two SCSI identifiers are set
to the same number.
Reset each SCSI ID to a unique
number.
Drive cables not properly
connected.
Check the cable connections.
SCSI device is not properly
terminated.
Check for a SCSI 50-pin terminator.
Two SCSI identifiers are set
to the same number.
Reset each SCSI ID to a unique
number.
1–8 Troubleshooting and Diagnosing Problems
1.3 Diagnostic Tests and Commands
There are a number of diagnostic tests and commands that can help you to
isolate a problem with the system unit. These tests and commands are as
follows:
•
Power-up tests
•
Diagnostic tests and utilities1
•
Configuration display1
•
Error display1
The following sections describe these tests and commands.
1
You can use these tests and commands in privileged console mode only if the console
security feature is enabled and the password is set. See the MicroVAX 3100 Model 90
Customer Technical Information manual for information on the console security
feature.
Troubleshooting and Diagnosing Problems 1–9
1.3.1 Power-Up Tests
The system runs the power-up tests each time you turn on the system. After
successful completion of tests, the system will either enter Console mode or
proceed to automatic bootstrap, depending on the HALT action selected by
the user. If HALT action is Default, Halt, or Restart, then the system enters
console mode. If HALT action is Reboot or Restart_reboot, then the system
proceeds to boot. The following example shows a typical display for a system
that passes all tests and then enters console mode.
Figure 1–1 Successful Power-Up Test Display
KA50-A V2.3, VMB 2.14
Performing normal system tests.
74..73..72..71..70..69..68..67..66..65..64..63..62..61..60..59..
58..57..56..55..54..53..52..51..50..49..48..47..46..45..44..43..
42..41..40..39..38..37..36..35..34..33..32..31..30..29..28..27..
26..25..24..23..22..21..20..19..18..17..16..15..14..13..12..11..
10..09..08..07..06..05..04..03..
Tests completed.
>>>
Central Processing Unit (CPU) Name, Firmware Version Number, and
Virtual Memory Boot (VMB) Version Number
Read-Only Memory (ROM) Based Diagnostics Countdown
Status Message
Console Prompt
The following example shows a typical display for a system that passes all
tests and then enters automatic bootstrap.
KA50-A V2.3, VMB 2.14
Performing normal system tests.
74..73..72..71..70..69..68..67..66..65..64..63..62..61..60..59..
58..57..56..55..54..53..52..51..50..49..48..47..46..45..44..43..
42..41..40..39..38..37..36..35..34..33..32..31..30..29..28..27..
26..25..24..23..22..21..20..19..18..17..16..15..14..13..12..11..
10..09..08..07..06..05..04..03..
Tests completed.
Loading system software.
(BOOT/R5:0 EZA0)
2..
-EZA0
1..0..
1–10 Troubleshooting and Diagnosing Problems
Note
The operating system messages start here, i.e. VMS ..........
If the power-up tests encounter an error, one of the following actions occurs:
For minor errors:
•
If HALT action is set to a boot condition (that is reboot or
restart_reboot), and if a minor error occurs, the system displays an
abbreviated error message and continues to boot as normal.
•
If HALT action is set to Default, Halt or Restart, then the system
enters console mode.
•
The only errors defined as minor are errors in memory that cause pages
to be marked bad in the memory bitmap. There must be enough good
memory left to allow an attempt to bootstrap.
For severe errors:
•
The system always enters console mode regardless of HALT action after
it attempts to complete all tests possible.
The following example shows a system with a memory error that only affected
one set of memory out of two sets. Because some memory is still usable, the
system proceeds to automatic bootstrap if the HALT action is set to a boot
condition.
KA50-A V2.3, VMB 2.14
Performing normal system tests.
74..73..72..71..70..69..68..67..66..65..64..63..62..61..60..59..
58..57..56..55..54..53..52..51..50..49..48..47..46..45..44..43..
42..41..40..39..38..37..36..35..34..33..32..
? Test_Subtest_40_06 Loop_Subtest=00 Err_Type=FF
DE_Memory_count_pages.lis
31..30..29..28..27..26..25..24..23..22..21..20..19..18..17..16..
15..14..13..12..11..10..09..08..07..06..05..04..03..
16 MB RAM, SIMM Set (0A,0B,0C,0D) present
Memory Set 0: 04000000 to 04FFFFFF, 16MB, 0 good pages, 32768 bad pages
64 MB RAM, SIMM Set (1E,1F,1G,1H) present
Memory Set 1: 00000000 to 03FFFFFF, 64MB, 131072 good pages, 0 bad pages
Total of 80MB, 131072 good pages, 32768 bad pages, 136 reserved pages
Troubleshooting and Diagnosing Problems 1–11
Tests completed.
Loading system software.
(BOOT/R5:0 EZA0)
2..
-EZA0
1..0..
? Test_Subtest_40_06 Loop_Subtest=00 Err_Type=FF
DE_Memory_count_pages.lis
16 MB RAM, SIMM Set (0A,0B,0C,0D) present
Memory Set 0: 04000000 to 04FFFFFF, 16MB, 0 good pages, 32768 bad pages
64 MB RAM, SIMM Set (1E,1F,1G,1H) present
Memory Set 1: 00000000 to 03FFFFFF, 64MB, 131072 good pages, 0 bad pages
Total of 80MB, 131072 good pages, 32768 bad pages, 136 reserved pages
Operating system messages start here; i.e. VMS ......
Abbreviated error message for memory error
Memory errors normally cause the results of a SHOW MEMORY display to
occur after the tests are completed and before continuing. SHOW MEMORY is
the most useful command to determine which memory SIMMs are bad when
memory errors occur.
1–12 Troubleshooting and Diagnosing Problems
1.3.2 Diagnostic Tests and Utilities
The diagnostic tests and utilities are similar to the power-up tests except that
the power-up tests enable you to test all the devices in the system, whereas the
diagnostic tests and utilities enable you to test single devices and the functions
of single devices.
Figure 1–2 shows a list of diagnostic tests obtained by entering the following
command:
>>> T 9E
Figure 1–2 Diagnostic Tests
Test
# Address Name
Parameters
___________________________________________________________________________
20052200 SCB
20055850 De_executive
30 2006A53C Memory_Init_Bitmap *** mark_Hard_SBEs ******
31 2006AB34 Memory_Setup_CSRs *********
32 2005D148 NMC_registers
**********
33 2005D324 NMC_powerup
**
34 2005E6D8 SSC_ROM
***
35 2005FB90 B_Cache_diag_mode bypass_test_mask *********
37 20061590 Cache_w_Memory
bypass_test_mask *********
40 2006B5E0 Memory_count_pages SIMM_set0 SIMM_set1 Soft_errs_allowed *****
41 20068CEC Board_Reset
*
42 20061880 Chk_for_Interrupts **********
46 200610C4 P_Cache_diag_mode bypass_test_mask *********
47 2006AD04 Memory_Refresh
start_a end incr cont_on_err time_seconds *****
48 2006B028 Memory_Addr_shorts start_add end_add * cont_on_err pat2 pat3 ****
4A 2006A23C Memory_ECC_SBEs
start_add end_add add_incr cont_on_err ******
4B 2006940C Memory_Byte_Errors start_add end_add add_incr cont_on_err ******
4C 20069BA0 Memory_ECC_Logic start_add end_add add_incr cont_on_err ******
4D 20068FE8 Memory_Address
start_add end_add add_incr cont_on_err ******
4E 20069188 Memory_Byte
start_add end_add add_incr cont_on_err ******
4F 2006B7F4 Memory_Data
start_add end_add add_incr cont_on_err ******
51 2005803C FPA
**********
52 20058530 SSC_Prog_timers
which_timer wait_time_us ***
53 20058818 SSC_TOY_Clock
repeat_test_250ms_ea Tolerance ***
54 20057C18 Virtual_Mode
********
55 20058E6C Interval_Timer
*****
56 2006507C SHAC_LPBCK
From_bus To_bus passes *******
58 20065D24 SHAC_RESET
dssi_bus port_number time_secs not_pres *
59 20062778 SGEC_LPBCK_ASSIST time_secs **
(continued on next page)
Troubleshooting and Diagnosing Problems 1–13
Figure 1–2 (Cont.) Diagnostic Tests
5C 20062D10 SHAC
SHAC_number *********
5F 200619B8 SGEC
loopback_type no_ram_tests ******
62 20058B1C console_QDSS
mark_not_present selftest_r0 selftest_r1 *****
63 20058CA4 QDSS_any
input_csr selftest_r0 selftest_r1 ******
80 2005D3C0 CQBIC_memory
bypass_test_mask *********
81 200596CC Qbus_MSCP
IP_csr ******
82 200598AC Qbus_DELQA
device_num_addr ****
83 2005A85C QZA_Intlpbck1
controller_number ********
84 2005BF1C QZA_Intlpbck2
controller_number *********
85 20059A9C QZA_memory
incr test_pattern controller_number *******
86 20059F44 QZA_DMA
Controller_number main_mem_buf ********
90 20058494 CQBIC_registers
*
91 20058410 CQBIC_powerup
**
99 2005DC4C Flush_Ena_Caches dis_flush_VIC dis_flush_BC dis_flush_PC
9A 20063FB0 INTERACTION
pass_count disable_device *******
9B 20068E48 Init_memory
**
9C 2006631C List_CPU_registers *
9D 2006C250 Utility
Flags *********
9E 2005903C List_diagnostics script_number *
9F 200681CC Create_A0_Script **********
C1 20057888 SSC_RAM_Data
*
C2 20057A78 SSC_RAM_Data_Addr *
C5 200589E8 SSC_registers
*
D0 20060C70 V_Cache_diag_mode bypass_test_mask *********
D2 2005DE90 O_Bit_diag_mode
bypass_test_mask *********
DA 2006139C PB_Flush_Cache
**********
DB 2005E850 Speed
print_speed *********
DC 2006C060 NO_Memory_present *
DD 2005F0DC B_Cache_Data_debug start_add end_add add_incr *******
DE 2005EC64 B_Cache_Tag_Debug start_add end_add add_incr *******
DF 2005E2A8 O_BIT_DEBUG
start_add end_add add_incr seg_incr ******
E0 2006D4D4 SCSI
environment reset_bus time_s *******
E1 2006D7CC SCSI_Utility
environment util_nbr target_ID lun ******
E2 2006DA2C SCSI_MAP
bypass_test addr_incr_data_tst ********
E4 2006DFC8 DZ
environment *********
E8 2006E1DC SYNC
environment *********
E9 2006E2B4 SYNC_Utility
environment *********
EC 2006E398 ASYNC
environment *********
F0 2006D638 SCSI_option
environment reset_bus time_s *******
F1 2006D900 SCSI_Opt_Utility environment util_nbr target_ID lun ******
F2 2006DA40 SCSI_MAP_Option
bypass_test addr_incr_data_tst ********
Scripts
# Description
(continued on next page)
1–14 Troubleshooting and Diagnosing Problems
Figure 1–2 (Cont.) Diagnostic Tests
A0
A1
A3
A4
A6
A7
A8
A9
B2
B5
BF
User defined scripts
Powerup tests, Functional Verify, continue on error, numeric countdown
Functional Verify, stop on error, test # announcements
Loop on A3 Functional Verify
Memory tests, mark only multiple bit errors
Memory tests
Memory acceptance tests, mark single and multi-bit errors, call A7
Memory tests, stop on error
Extended tests plus BF, then loop
Extended tests, then loop
DZ, SYNC, ASYNC with loopbacks
Load & start system exerciser
100 Customer mode, 2 passes
101 CSSE mode, 2 passes
102 CSSE mode, continous until ^C
103 Manuf mode, continous until ^C
104 Manuf TINA mode, continous until ^C
105 Manuf mode, 2 passes
106 CSSE mode, select tests, continous until ^C
107 Manuf mode, select tests, continous until ^C
Note
Tests 101 through 107 are reserved for use by Digital Services.
The tests and utilities shown in Table 1–2 are for option cards which may or
may not be present, depending upon the options you ordered.
Table 1–2 Option Card Tests
Test
No.
Name
Usage
E8
SYNC
Synchronous COMM option card (DSW41/42)
E9
SYNC_Utility
Synchronous COMM option card (DSW41/42)
EC
ASYNC
Asynchronous option card (DHW41/42)
F0
SCSI_option
SCSI option card for 2nd SCSI bus B (KZDDA)
F1
SCSI_Opt_
Utility
SCSI option card for 2nd SCSI bus B (KZDDA)
F2
SCSI_MAP_
Option
SCSI option card for 2nd SCSI bus B (KZDDA)
Troubleshooting and Diagnosing Problems 1–15
Note
The following available tests are not used on the MicroVAX 3100
Model 90; they are used only on the MicroVAX 4000 Model 100A, and
are listed here to avoid confusion when you see them in the diagnostic
test listing (Figure 1–2).
Table 1–3 MicroVAX 4000-100A Tests
Test
No.
Name
Usage
56
SHAC_LPBCK
Not used on 3100, SHAC option only
58
SHAC_RESET
Not used on 3100, SHAC option only
5C
SHAC
Not used on 3100, SHAC option only
62
console_QDSS
Not used on 3100, QBUS systems only
63
QDSS_any
Not used on 3100, QBUS systems only
81
Qbus_MSCP
Not used on 3100, QBUS systems only
82
Qbus_DELQA
Not used on 3100, QBUS systems only
83
QZA_Intlpbck1
Not used on 3100, QBUS systems only
84
QZA_Intlpbck2
Not used on 3100, QBUS systems only
85
QZA_memory
Not used on 3100, QBUS systems only
86
QZA_DMA
Not used on 3100, QBUS systems only
To run the diagnostic tests, enter either TEST or T followed by the test number.
You can specify optional parameters for some tests, but you would not do so
normally. If you decide to specify optional parameters, then the following
conditions apply:
•
Each test uses up to 10 parameters, no more than 7 may be inputted on
command line.
Most of these parameters are assigned values automatically by the system.
These parameters are indicated by an asterisk (*) in the parameters
column of Figure 1–2.
•
If a parameter can be assigned a value, the name of the parameter is
shown in the parameters column in Figure 1–2.
1–16 Troubleshooting and Diagnosing Problems
You can use test 9E with the test number as a parameter to show a list of
legal parameters and valid values for the test number. For example, enter
T 9E 30 to show a list of legal parameters and valid values for test number
30 (Memory_Init_Bitmap).
•
There is a dependency between some tests.
•
Failures can occur if dependencies between tests are not followed.
•
Any parameter not entered is given a default value. Enter T 9E nn, where
nn is test number to show defaults. During power-up testing or execution
of any script of tests (A0 to BF), the values of parameters are determined
by the script, not defaults.
•
You may dump the contents of a script by entering T 9E nn, where nn is
a script to dump. Scripts are always in range of A0 to BF (or 0 for the
power-up script).
You must enter three zeros (0) as place holders for the three parameters that
occur before the user-specified parameter, mark_hard_SBEs. The last value (1)
is a parameter. You can then specify the mark_hard_SBEs parameter in the
Memory_Init_Bitmap test as follows:
>>> T 30 0 0 0 1
The resulting messages differ, depending on the function of the test or utility.
However, most failing tests cause the system to display error messages similar
to the following:
>>> T 5F 1
? Test_Subtest_5F_18 Loop_Subtest=0E Err_Type=FF DE_SGEC.lis
Vec=010C Prev_Errs=0000 P1=00000001 P2=00000000 P3=827DFF03 P4=00000000
P5=00000000 P6=00000000 P7=00000000 P8=00000001 P9=00000000 P10=00000000
r0=00000054 r1=000082E2 r2=00000001 r3=000082FA r4=00008230 r5=00000040
r6=000082E2 r7=20008000 r8=00008000 r9=20140758 r10=13000001 r11=2014044B
EPC=2005721A dser=0000 cesr=00000000 icsr=01 pcsts=F800 pcctl=FC13
cctl=00000007 bcetsts=03A0 bcedsts=0400 cefsts=00019200 nests=00
mmcdsr=00C6C600 mesr=00006000
>>>
Write down the error messages before you contact your Digital Services
representative.
Troubleshooting and Diagnosing Problems 1–17
1.3.3 Power-Up Error Messages
The following are examples of some error messages at power-up.
Example 1
This is a typical example of a failed test. In this case, test E8 failed testing a
SYNC (COMM) option.
KA50-A V2.3, VMB 2.14
Performing normal system tests.
74..73..72..71..70..69..68..67..66..65..64..63..62..61..60..59..
58..57..56..55..54..53..52..51..50..49..48..47..46..45..44..43..
42..41..40..39..38..37..36..35..34..33..32..31..30..29..28..27..
26..25..24..23..22..21..20..19..18..17..16..15..14..13..12..11..
10..09..
? Test_Subtest_E8_03 Loop_Subtest=00 Err_Type=FF DE_SYNC.lis
Vec=0000 Prev_Errs=0001 P1=09000001 P2=00000000 P3=00000000 P4=00000000
P5=00000000 P6=00000000 P7=00000000 P8=00000000 P9=00000000 P10=00000000
Stat=0112 FRU=20 LED=00 Ext_Stat 00090014 00EE001D 00020002 0000EFCE 00000000
20040000 7FDEDFFF 00000000
dser=0000 cesr=00000000 intmsk=00 icsr=01 pcsts=F800 pcctl=FC13 cctl=00000021
bcetsts=0000 bcedsts=0000 cefsts=00019220 nests=00 mmcdsr=01111000
mesr=00006000
08..07..06..05..04..03..
Normal operation not possible.
>>>
Example 2
This example represents a case where an additional set of memory SIMMs was
added and one of the four SIMMs for the set was not the same type of SIMM
as the others. In this example SIMM 1H was either not installed or incorrectly
installed.
KA50-A V2.3, VMB 2.14
Performing normal system tests.
74..73..72..71..70..69..68..67..66..65..64..63..62..61..60..59..
? Test_Subtest_31_05 Loop_Subtest=00 Err_Type=FF DE_Memory_Setup_CSRs.lis
Vec=0000 Prev_Errs=0000 P1=00000000 P2=01000000 P3=00000001 P4=00010000
P5=2101801C P6=00000007 P7=80000003 P8=0000CF4A P9=00000001 P10=2006B8D8
r0=00000002 r1=21018000 r2=00000008 r3=81000000 r4=00000001 r5=01000000
r6=2006EB77 r7=21018048 r8=00000000 r9=20140758 r10=00000000 r11=FFFFFFFF
dser=0000 cesr=00000000 intmsk=00 icsr=01 pcsts=FA00 pcadr=FFFFFFF8 pcctl=FC13
cctl=00000020 bcetsts=0360 bcedsts=0F00 cefsts=00019200 nests=00
mmcdsr=01FE6600 mesr=00000000
1–18 Troubleshooting and Diagnosing Problems
58..57..56..55..54..53..52..51..50..49..48..47..46..45..44..43..
42..41..40..39..38..37..36..35..34..33..32..31..30..29..28..27..
26..25..24..23..22..21..20..19..18..17..16..15..14..13..12..11..
10..09..08..07..06..05..04..03..
16 MB RAM, SIMM Set (0A,0B,0C,0D) present
Memory Set 0: 00000000 to 00FFFFFF, 16MB, 32768 good pages, 0 bad pages
Error: SIMM Set 1 (1E,1F,1G,1H)
SIMM_1E = 64MB
SIMM_1F = 64MB
SIMM_1G = 64MB
SIMM_1H = 00MB ??
Total of 16MB, 32768 good pages, 0 bad pages, 104 reserved pages
Normal operation not possible.
Indicates no memory SIMM installed here or SIMM not correctly installed.
Example 3
This example represents a case where one SIMM of a set was bad. In this
example, SIMM 1G was bad or incorrectly installed.
KA50-A V2.3, VMB 2.14
Performing normal system tests.
74..73..72..71..70..69..68..67..66..65..64..63..62..61..60..59..
58..57..56..55..54..53..52..51..50..49..48..47..46..45..44..43..
42..41..40..39..38..37..36..35..34..33..32..
? Test_Subtest_40_06 Loop_Subtest=00 Err_Type=FF
DE_Memory_count_pages.lis
31..30..29..28..27..26..25..24..23..22..21..20..19..18..17..16..
15..14..13..12..11..10..09..08..07..06..05..04..03..
16 MB RAM, SIMM Set (0A,0B,0C,0D) present
Memory Set 0: 04000000 to 04FFFFFF, 16MB, 32768 good pages, 0 bad pages
Error: SIMM Set 1 (1E,1F,1G,1H)
SIMM_1E = 64MB
SIMM_1F = 64MB
SIMM_1G = 64MB ?? SIMM_1H = 64MB
Memory Set 1: 00000000 to 03FFFFFF, 64MB, 0 good pages, 131072 bad pages
Total of 80MB, 32768 good pages, 131072 bad pages, 136 reserved pages
Tests completed.
Troubleshooting and Diagnosing Problems 1–19
Example 4
This example represents a case where one SIMM of a set is missing or
incorrectly installed. In this case, only one set of SIMMs was installed. Since
one was missing, there is no usable memory for testing to run to completion.
SIMM 1D is missing here.
KA50-A V2.3, VMB 2.14
Performing normal system tests.
74..73..72..71..70..69..68..67..66..65..64..63..62..61..60..
? Test_Subtest_DC_87 Loop_Subtest=00 Err_Type=FF DE_NO_Memory_present.lis
Vec=0000 Prev_Errs=0000 P1=EF42EF42 P2=00000000 P3=00000000 P4=00000000
P5=00000000 P6=7F337F7F P7=00000000 P8=0000EF42 P9=00000001 P10=2006B8D8
r0=00000002 r1=21018000 r2=00000008 r3=00000007 r4=03FFFFE0 r5=80000000
r6=FFFFFFFF r7=00000000 r8=00000000 r9=20140758 r10=FFFFFFFE r11=FFFFFFFF
dser=0000 cesr=00000000 intmsk=00 icsr=01 pcsts=FA00 pcadr=FFFFFFF8 pcctl=FC13
cctl=00000020 bcetsts=0360 bcedsts=0F00 cefsts=00019200 nests=00
mmcdsr=00666640 mesr=00000000
Error: SIMM Set 0 (0A,0B,0C,0D)
SIMM_0A = 16MB
SIMM_0B = 16MB
SIMM_0C = 16MB
Total of 0MB, 0 good pages, 0 bad pages, 0 reserved pages
Normal operation not possible.
1–20 Troubleshooting and Diagnosing Problems
SIMM_0D = 00MB ??
1.3.4 Configuration Display
The configuration display shows the system configuration and the error
messages that were detected while the most recent power-up tests, diagnostic
tests, and utilities were running. If you add expansion boxes to the system
and do not run the power-up tests or appropriate diagnostic test or utility,
the configuration display does not recognize the reconfiguration. Enter the
following command to see the configuration display:
>>> SHOW CONFIG
If the system does not detect any errors in the most recent power-up tests
or diagnostic utilities, it responds with a configuration display similar to the
following:
KA50-A V2.3, VMB 2.14
08-00-2B-33-CF-C9
80MB
TstNbr DevNam
------ -------0
CPU_BD
A8
MEM
E4
DZ
E0
SCSI
5F
F0
NI
SCSI_B
0
E8
QBUS
COMM
EC
ASYNC
Info
-------------------------OK
OK
OK
OK
3-RZ24L 6-Adapter 7-RRD42
OK
OK
0-RZ23L 6-Adapter
OK
OK
DSW41/42 2 CHANNEL V4.10-7b
OK
DHW41/2 V1.6
Test Utility Number Column
Device Mnemonic Column
Device Status Column
SCSI IDs and SCSI Device Names
The test numbers listed identify the normal test or script number to run
to verify the device listed. There are additional tests and utilities for some
devices. Test 0 calls the power-up script.
Troubleshooting and Diagnosing Problems 1–21
Note
The lines for F0, E8 and EC display only if the applicable option is
present.
If the system detects errors in the most recent power-up tests and diagnostic
utilities, it responds with a configuration display similar to the following:
KA50-A V2.3, VMB 2.14
08-00-2B-2B-16-91
80MB
TstNbr DevNam
------ -------0
CPU_BD
A8
MEMORY
E4
DZ
E0
SCSI
5F
E8
NI
COMM
EC
ASYNC
Info
-------------------------OK
OK
?? 001 0048
OK
3-RZ24L 6-Adapter 7-RRD42
OK
OK
DSW41/42 2 CHANNEL V3.11-47
OK
DHW41/2 V1.6
>>>
Error Information—Write down this information before you contact your
Digital Services representative.
1–22 Troubleshooting and Diagnosing Problems
1.3.5 Error Display
You can use the error display to display certain errors detected during the last
power-up test or diagnostic utility. To see the error display, enter the following
command:
>>> SHOW ERROR
The system responds with a display similar to the following:
?? 001
CPU_BD 0000
B_Cache Test_35 Subtest_33 Loop_sub_27 Error_type_FF
NVAX Test_54 Subtest_00 Loop_sub_01 Error_type_FF
?? 001
DZ 0030
010 0001 00000031 00000020 00000000 00000002 00000000 0000F1F0
Test_E4 Subtest_02 Loop_sub_00 Error_type_FF
?? 020
COMM 0112
005 0014 001E001E 0F0F0311 01010002 00000000 0008001E 80000002 00000000
Write down this information before you contact your Digital Services
representative.
Troubleshooting and Diagnosing Problems 1–23
1.4 Contacting Digital Services
Warning
Only authorized service personnel should service the MicroVAX 3100
Model 90.
If you have followed the procedures in this chapter but the problem remains
unsolved, your Digital Services representative can help you. Before you place
your call, follow these steps:
1. Write down a description of the problem, including the error messages and
the number of the tests or utilities that failed.
2. Look at the status LED display on the back of the system unit and write
down the numbers of the LEDs that are lit (see Figure 1–3).
3. List the steps you took to correct the problem as well and their results.
4. Write down the serial and model numbers of the system unit and any
connected peripheral devices. These numbers are usually printed on a
label on the back of the device.
1–24 Troubleshooting and Diagnosing Problems
Figure 1–3 Status LED Display
1
3
2
OPAO
1
MLO-012035
Status LED Display
Troubleshooting and Diagnosing Problems 1–25
Index
C
D
Cables
checking connections, 1–13
checking the console terminal cable, 1–1
checking the Ethernet cables, 1–2
checking the expansion box power cords,
1–2
checking the expansion box SCSI cables,
1–1
checking the system unit power cord, 1–1
checking the terminal power cord, 1–1
troubleshooting, 1–1
Configuration display
error information, 1–22
use of, 1–21
with errors, 1–22
without errors, 1–21
Connections
checking SCSI terminators, 1–2
checking standard Ethernet loopback
connector, 1–2
checking ThinWire Ethernet terminator,
1–2
Console security feature, 1–9
Console terminal
checking cable, 1–1
checking power cord, 1–1
turning off, 1–1
turning on, 1–2
Device mnemonics, 1–21
Device status, 1–21
Diagnostic commands, 1–9
Diagnostic tests, 1–9
Diagnostic tests and utilities, 1–13
listing, 1–13
not applicable, 1–16
option cards, 1–15
optional parameters, 1–16
running, 1–16
typical error display, 1–17
Digital Services
contacting, 1–24
E
Error display
use of, 1–23
Error information
in configuration display, 1–22
Ethernet
checking cable, 1–2
Expansion boxes
addition, 1–21
checking power cord, 1–2
checking SCSI cables, 1–1
turning off, 1–1
turning on, 1–2
Index–1
F
R
Fan
troubleshooting, 1–3
Field Services
See Digital Services
RRD42
caddy fault, 1–5
compact disc drive, 1–5
eject button fault, 1–5
troubleshooting, 1–4
RRD42 compact disc drive
troubleshooting, 1–4
RX26
disk format error, 1–7
diskette drive, 1–7
diskette insertion error, 1–8
eject error, 1–8
head cleaning, 1–8
troubleshooting, 1–7
write-protect error, 1–8
RZ-series
SCSI disk drive, 1–8
RZ-series SCSI disk drive
drive not functional, 1–8
not on configuration display, 1–8
troubleshooting, 1–8
L
Loopbacks
checking, 1–1
checking connections, 1–2
standard Ethernet, 1–1
O
Operating system software
troubleshooting, 1–3
P
Peripherals
turning off, 1–1
turning on, 1–2
Power cord
troubleshooting, 1–3
Power-up
error messages, 1–18
example 1, 1–18
example 2, 1–18
example 3, 1–19
example 4, 1–20
Power-up display
troubleshooting, 1–3
Power-up tests, 1–21
Halt action variables, 1–10
minor errors, 1–11
severe errors, 1–11
successful display, 1–10
unsuccessful display, 1–11
use of, 1–10
Privileged console mode, 1–9
Index–2
S
SCSI device names, 1–21
SCSI IDs, 1–21
SCSI terminators, 1–2
Security password, 1–9
SHOW CONFIG command
use of, 1–21
SHOW ERROR command
use of, 1–23
Standard Ethernet, 1–2
Status LED display, 1–24
location, 1–25
System unit
checking power cord, 1–1
troubleshooting, 1–3
turning off, 1–1
turning on, 1–2
T
Terminal
troubleshooting, 1–3
Terminators
checking, 1–1
checking connections, 1–2, 1–13
SCSI, 1–2
ThinWire Ethernet, 1–1
Test utility numbers, 1–21
Tests
diagnostic, 1–21
ThinWire Ethernet, 1–2
TLZ06
QIC tape drive, 1–6
troubleshooting, 1–6
Troubleshooting, 1–1 to 1–8
RRD42, 1–4
RX26, 1–7
RZ-series SCSI disk drive, 1–8
system unit, 1–3
table, 1–2
terminal, 1–3
TLZ06, 1–6
TZ30, 1–5
TZK10, 1–7
TZK11, 1–7
TZ30
green LED, 1–6
head cleaning, 1–6
operate lever faults, 1–6
tape drive, 1–5
troubleshooting, 1–5
unload button, 1–6
write-protect error, 1–6
TZK10
amber LED, 1–7
head cleaning, 1–7
QIC tape drive, 1–7
troubleshooting, 1–7
write-protect error, 1–7
TZK11
QIC tape drive, 1–7
troubleshooting, 1–7
U
Utilities
diagnostic, 1–21
W
Write-protect switch
RX26, 1–8
TZ30, 1–6
TZK10, 1–7
Index–3
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