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Workstation Imaging
The following sections provide information on Novell® ZENworks® for Desktops (ZfD) 4/SP1/
4.0.1 Workstation Imaging procedures and features.
Š Chapter 39, “Common Imaging Deployment Strategies,” on page 439
Š Chapter 40, “Preparing an Imaging Server,” on page 443
Š Chapter 41, “Setting Up Workstations for Imaging,” on page 445
Š Chapter 42, “Setting Up Imaging Policies,” on page 457
Š Chapter 43, “Performing Basic Imaging Operations,” on page 461
Š Chapter 44, “Setting Up Disconnected Imaging Operations,” on page 465
Š Chapter 45, “Preparing Images,” on page 469
Š Chapter 46, “Multicasting Images,” on page 475
Š Chapter 47, “Imaging Utilities and Options,” on page 479
Š Chapter 48, “Supported Ethernet Cards,” on page 505
Š Appendix D, “Documentation Updates,” on page 513
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Common Imaging Deployment Strategies
The following overview sections present possible approaches to deploying Novell® ZENworks®
for Desktops imaging services for some common enterprise scenarios. Use the following sections
to determine which procedures (documented in subsequent sections) to perform and in what order:
Š “Installing a Standard Image Before Deploying New Workstations” on page 439
Š “Enabling Existing Workstations for Future Reimaging” on page 440
Š “Reimaging Corrupted Workstations” on page 440
Š “Restoring Lab or Classroom Workstations to a Clean State” on page 441
Installing a Standard Image Before Deploying New Workstations
As new computers are purchased, before deploying them you can install a standard software
platform and enable the computer for future unattended reimaging.
1. Create a model workstation of each type that you’ll deploy, and create an image of each on a
ZENworks for Desktops Workstation Imaging server. For more information, see “Manually
Taking an Image of a Workstation” on page 462. These images should include the Imaging
Agent and either the Novell ClientTM or ZENworks for Desktops Management Agent.
ZENworks for Desktops lets ZENworks work with or without an installation of the Novell
Client on the workstation. If your setup does not require the client, then the Management
Agent must be installed. For more information, see Installing the ZfD Management Agent on
a Workstation in the ZENworks for Desktops 4.0.1 Installation Guide.
2. Create imaging boot diskettes or CDs that point to the ZENworks for Desktops Workstation
Imaging server where the model images are stored (not required if you are using Preboot
Services). For more information, see “Preparing an Imaging Boot Device or Method” on
page 445.
3. Create a policy for unregistered workstations that specifies which image to put on a new
machine, depending on its hardware. For more information, see “Defining an Imaging Policy
for Unregistered Workstations (Server Policy)” on page 457.
4. If you are using Preboot Services, install ZENworks for Desktops Preboot Services (PXE
Support) on your imaging server. For more information, see ZENworks for Desktops 4
Preboot Services PXE-on-Disk User Guide.
As each new computer comes in, do the following:
1. If you are using Preboot Services, check to see if the workstation is PXE capable. Enable PXE
if it isn’t enabled by default. For more information, see “Preboot Services (PXE)” on
page 445.
2. Physically connect the workstation to the network. If you are using Preboot Services, boot it
from the Imaging/Preboot Services server. If you are not using Preboot Services, boot it with
the imaging boot diskettes or CD and install the ZENworks for Desktops Workstation Imaging
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(Linux*) partition. For more information, see Step 6 on page 454 of “Enabling a Workstation
for Auto-Imaging Operations” on page 452.
3. Reboot from the ZENworks for Desktops imaging partition (not required if you are using
Preboot Services).
4. Let the computer be auto-imaged by the policy.
5. After deploying the machine, register it as a Workstation object in Novell eDirectoryTM. For
more information, see “Automatic Workstation Import and Removal” on page 59.
Enabling Existing Workstations for Future Reimaging
With minimal disruption to users, you can enable existing workstations for possible future
reimaging.
This might need to be phased in by local administrators. Each administrator could do the
following:
1. Upgrade each workstation to the latest Novell Client, using Automatic Client Update. Or,
install the ZENworks for Desktops Management Agent. ZENworks for Desktops lets
ZENworks work with or without an installation of the Novell Client on the workstation. If
your setup does not require the client, then the Management Agent must be installed. For more
information, see Installing the ZfD Management Agent on a Workstation in the ZENworks for
Desktops 4.0.1 Installation Guide.
2. Install the ZENworks for Desktops Imaging Agent on each workstation by distributing an
Application object. For more information, see Step 4 on page 453 of “Enabling a Workstation
for Auto-Imaging Operations” on page 452.
3. Register each workstation as a Workstation object in eDirectory. For more information, see
“Automatic Workstation Import and Removal” on page 59.
4. If the workstations are PXE capable, make sure PXE is enabled (see “Preboot Services
(PXE)” on page 445) and make sure that ZENworks for Desktops Preboot Services (PXE
Support) has been installed on your imaging server (see ZENworks for Desktops 4 Preboot
Services PXE-on-Disk User Guide). Or, prepare a few sets of imaging boot diskettes or CDs
that users can use when they run into trouble (see “Preparing an Imaging Boot Device or
Method” on page 445). These devices could point to an imaging server that contains the same
clean images used for new computers.
5. If a user runs into trouble, use the strategy for reimaging corrupted workstations.
Reimaging Corrupted Workstations
Without data loss or undue disruption to users, you can fix workstations that have become
misconfigured or corrupted.
1. Create a policy for registered workstations. Use the same image-selection logic as the policy
for new (unregistered) workstations. For more information, see “Defining an Imaging Policy
for Registered Workstations (Workstation Policy)” on page 459.
2. When a computer needs to be fixed, have the user back up (to the network) any files that he
or she wants to keep.
3. Flag the Workstation object in eDirectory to receive an image the next time it boots. For more
information, see “Triggering an Unattended Imaging Operation” on page 461.
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4. Have the user reboot. If it’s an older workstation (without a ZENworks for Desktops
Workstation Imaging (Linux) partition), the user should boot with the imaging boot diskettes
or CD. If it’s a newer workstation (with a ZENworks for Desktops imaging partition or PXEenabled), the user should boot from the ZENworks for Desktops imaging partition or Imaging/
Preboot Services server. If you are using Preboot Services, make sure ZENworks for Desktops
Preboot Services (PXE Support) has been installed on your imaging server. For more
information, see ZENworks for Desktops 4 Preboot Services PXE-on-Disk User Guide.
5. Restore any user files that were backed up in Step 2.
Restoring Lab or Classroom Workstations to a Clean State
After each lab session, you can restore every workstation to a clean state, removing any changes
or additions made during the session.
1. Create an image of a clean model workstation and store it on a ZENworks for Desktops
Workstation Imaging server. For more information, see “Manually Taking an Image of a
Workstation” on page 462. The image should include the Imaging Agent and either the Novell
Client or ZENworks for Desktops 4 Management Agent. ZENworks for Desktops lets
ZENworks work with or without an installation of the Novell Client on the workstation. If
your setup does not require the client, then the Management Agent must be installed. For more
information, see Installing the ZfD Management Agent on a Workstation in the ZENworks for
Desktops 4.0.1 Installation Guide.
2. Create imaging boot diskettes or CDs that point to the ZENworks for Desktops Workstation
Imaging server where the clean image is stored. For more information, see “Preparing an
Imaging Boot Device or Method” on page 445. If you are using Preboot Services and the
workstations are PXE capable, make sure PXE is enabled. For more information, see “Preboot
Services (PXE)” on page 445.
3. If you are using Preboot Services, make sure ZENworks for Desktops Preboot Services (PXE
Support) has been installed on your imaging server. For more information, see ZENworks for
Desktops 4 Preboot Services PXE-on-Disk User Guide.
4. Create a policy for unregistered workstations that specifies the clean image to restore. Choose
the option to always force down the same base image. For more information, see “Defining
an Imaging Policy for Unregistered Workstations (Server Policy)” on page 457.
Deploy each lab computer as follows:
1. Physically connect the workstation to the lab network. If you are using Preboot Services, boot
it from the Imaging/Preboot Services server. If you are not using Preboot Services, boot it with
the imaging boot diskettes or CD and install the ZENworks for Desktops Workstation Imaging
(Linux) partition. For more information, see Step 6 on page 454 of “Enabling a Workstation
for Auto-Imaging Operations” on page 452.
2. Reboot from the ZENworks for Desktops imaging partition (not required if you are using
Preboot Services).
3. Reboot from the ZENworks for Desktops imaging partition (not required if you are using
Preboot Services).
4. At the end of each lab session, reboot each computer and let it be auto-imaged by the policy.
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Preparing an Imaging Server
The following are the requirements for the imaging server:
Requirement
Explanation
A fixed IP address
When you connect to the imaging server during a workstation imaging operation, you must do so using
the fixed IP address or DNS name of the imaging server.
Enough space to
store a workstation
image
Unless you use compression (which is enabled by default) for your workstation images, they are nearly
the same size as the data on the workstation hard disk, which could be hundreds of MB.
The Imaging and
Automatic
Workstation Import
components of ZfD
installed
These software components enable the server to act as an imaging server and to register workstations
in NDS® or Novell® eDirectoryTM for auto-imaging (unattended) operations. If you have already done a
typical ZfD installation on the server, the server is ready to act as an imaging server. If not, use the
following steps to install the needed components:
1. Make sure your server meets the requirements specified in Preparing for the ZfD Server Installation
in the ZENworks for Desktops 4.0.1 Installation Guide guide.
2. Run the ZfD installation program (winsetup.exe) either on your server (Windows NT/2000/XP) or from
a Windows workstation with a drive mapped to your server (NetWare®).
3. When prompted for the NDS or eDirectory tree to install to, choose the tree that your server is in.
4. When prompted for the components to install, choose Automatic Workstation Import and Imaging.
5. When prompted for the import/removal role, choose Import.
6. If you are installing Preboot Services (PXE), select this component when prompted.
7. When the installation is done, restart your server.
If you want to store an image locally (on a CD, hard disk or Jaz* drive) rather than on an imaging
server, see “Using a CD” on page 465 and “Using a Hard Disk or Jaz Drive” on page 466 in
Chapter 44, “Setting Up Disconnected Imaging Operations,” on page 465.
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Setting Up Workstations for Imaging
The following sections cover procedures to prepare workstations for imaging. The procedures that
are applicable to you depend on your imaging deployment strategy. For more information, see
Chapter 39, “Common Imaging Deployment Strategies,” on page 439.
Š “Preparing an Imaging Boot Device or Method” on page 445
Š “Preparing a Workstation for Imaging” on page 451
Š “Imaging a Server” on page 455
Preparing an Imaging Boot Device or Method
The Novell® ZENworks® for Desktops (ZfD) imaging engine that performs the actual imaging of
the workstation is a Linux application. Therefore, the workstation must be temporarily booted to
Linux while the imaging is performed.
Unless you use Preboot Services, you need to prepare a boot device that has the Linux kernel, ZfD
Workstation Imaging engine, and network drivers installed. The boot method you use can be any
of the following:
Š “Preboot Services (PXE)” on page 445
Š “Diskettes” on page 446
Š “CD” on page 448
Š “Hard-Disk Partition” on page 448
This section also contains information about adding Linux drivers to your boot device or method,
and information about booting to Linux with a non-English keyboard. For these topics, see
“Additional Information About Booting to Linux” on page 449.
Preboot Services (PXE)
PXE (Preboot Execution Environment) is an industry-standard protocol that allows a workstation
to boot up and execute a program from the network before the workstation operating system starts.
PXE uses DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) and TFTP (Trivial File Transfer
Protocol). The PXE environment is loaded from either the NIC in flash memory or read-only
memory, or in the same memory as the system BIOS.
ZfD 4 Preboot Services uses PXE to find out if there is imaging work specified for a workstation
and to provide the workstation with the files necessary to boot to the ZfD imaging environment.
Before you can use Preboot Services, you need to do the following:
Š Install the ZfD 4 Imaging and Preboot Services (PXE Support) components on your imaging
server.
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Š Enable PXE on the workstation
Š Have a standard DHCP server, either on your imaging server or on another network server.
For information about requirements, installation, deployment, and administration of Preboot
Services, see the ZfD 4 ZENworks for Desktops 4 Preboot Services Installation and Configuration
Guide guide. You can access this guide during the ZfD 4 installation by clicking Installation >
Preboot Services Documentation.
If You Have Previously Installed a ZfD Workstation Imaging (Linux) Partition
If you decide to use Preboot Services but have previously installed a ZfD imaging partition on the
workstation, you can disable or delete the partition. You can disable (and enable) the ZfD imaging
partition when you boot to Linux using any imaging boot device or method. You can delete the
ZfD imaging partition only when you are putting an image on the workstation using standard
imaging, and only when you boot the workstation from an imaging boot device or method other
than the ZfD imaging partition.
IMPORTANT: After you have deleted the ZfD imaging partition, you need to make sure that the image you
put on the workstation was made on a computer without a ZfD imaging partition. Otherwise, the wrong MBR
(Master Boot Record) is restored, and the computer will fail to boot. In addition, if you remove the ZfD imaging
partition from a Windows NT 4, Windows 2000, or Windows XP machine, Windows will no longer be able to
boot. You should only remove the ZfD imaging partition if you are going to restore an image to the workstation.
Diskettes
Imaging boot diskettes are an easy device to prepare. Four diskettes are required, five if you need
to image computers that have non-English keyboards.
Creating Imaging Boot Diskettes
1 Format four high-density diskettes, or use preformatted blank diskettes. If you need the
imaging boot diskettes to include support for booting your test workstation with a non-English
keyboard, you’ll need a fifth diskette.
2 Browse to the zenworks\imaging folder in your ZfD installation (on the imaging server) and
run zimgboot.exe.
TIP: You can also start zimgboot.exe in ConsoleOne® by clicking Tools > ZENworks Utilities > Imaging
> Create or Modify Boot Diskette.
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3 On the screen that appears, near the bottom under Imaging Proxy Server Address, enter either
the fixed IP address or the full DNS name of your imaging server.
4 For the other fields and options on the screen, keep the default settings unless you have a
specific reason to change a setting, such as to include support for a non-English keyboard.
Click Help for details on specific settings.
5 Click Create Boot Disk 1 > insert the first diskette > click OK.
6 When the first diskette has been created, click Create Boot Disk 2 > insert the second diskette
> click OK.
7 When the second diskette has been created, click Create Boot Disk 3 > insert the third diskette
> click OK.
8 When the third diskette has been created, click Create Boot Disk 4 > insert the fourth diskette
> click OK.
9 If you need the imaging boot diskettes to include support for a non-English keyboard: When
the fourth diskette has been created, click Create Language Disk > insert the fifth diskette >
click OK. Otherwise, skip this step. For more information, see “Booting with a Non-English
Keyboard” on page 451.
10 When the last (fourth or fifth) diskette has been created, click Close.
After you have created the diskettes, you can customize them for the particular imaging tasks for
which you will use them, such as one set of diskettes for connecting to a server that holds Windows
2000 images, another set for connecting to a server that holds Windows NT 4 images, and another
set for installing ZfD Workstation Imaging (Linux) partitions. To customize the diskettes, edit the
settings.txt file on the fourth diskette as explained in Chapter 47, “Imaging Utilities and Options,”
on page 479.
When you boot a workstation using imaging boot diskettes, you are prompted when to insert the
second, third, and fourth diskettes, and when to insert the language diskette (if you created one).
NOTE: You can also use the Imaging Boot Disk Creator (zimgboot.exe) to create a diskette that contains Linux
utilities. See the Help in the Boot Disk Creator for more information.
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CD
If you have CD-burning software, you can create an imaging boot CD for performing imaging
operations. This is a bit harder than preparing imaging boot diskettes, but you have more room to
store any custom files that you might want to add, such as images and Linux device drivers.
Preparing an Imaging Boot CD
If you have CD-burning software, you can use the bootcd.iso image available on the ZfD
Workstation Imaging server to create an imaging boot CD.
To create an imaging boot CD:
1 In a temporary working area, create a settings.txt file containing the settings you want for the
imaging bootup process. For more information, see Chapter 47, “Imaging Utilities and
Options,” on page 479.
2 Use the Add Linux Drivers button in the Imaging Boot Disk Creator (zimgboot.exe) to copy
the Linux drivers to a diskette. Copy the a:\drivers directory from the diskette to the temporary
working area mentioned above.
For more information about adding Linux drivers, see the online help for the Imaging Boot
Disk Creator or see “Using Zimgboot.exe to Add Linux Drivers” on page 484.
3 In the temporary working area, add any ZfD image files you want to store on the CD.
4 Use your CD-burning software to burn the bootcd.iso image onto the CD. This image is
located in the zenworks\imaging folder in your ZfD installation (on the imaging server).
5 Use your CD-burning software to add the contents of your temporary working area to the root
of the CD, including the settings.txt file, any Linux network drivers, and any ZfD image files.
IMPORTANT: Adding these files makes the CD a multisession CD. To boot a workstation from such a
CD, the CD drive must support multisession CDs. For example, in our testing, we successfully booted an
HP* vectra VL, a Compaq* Prosignia, and a Dell Optiplex, but some other workstations failed, including
an IBM* PC 300PL, a Dell Dimension XPS T450, and an IBM clone with an Intel* motherboard.
If you can’t create a multisession CD or you are using a drive that does not support multisession CDs and
you don’t need to store the image or Linux drivers on the CD, you can still create an imaging boot CD.
Create the CD from the bootcd.iso file as in Step 4 on page 448. Also create imaging boot diskettes as
explained in “Creating Imaging Boot Diskettes” on page 446. Boot the workstation using the CD. When
you are prompted for settings.txt, insert the fourth imaging boot diskette in the diskette drive.
6 Use your CD-burning software to finalize the CD.
For information on how to use the CD to perform disconnected imaging operations, see “Setting
Up Disconnected Imaging Operations” on page 465.
Hard-Disk Partition
If you want to set up a computer for unattended imaging operations and are unable to use Preboot
Services (PXE), you must create a ZfD Workstation Imaging (Linux) partition on the hard disk. If
you make the partition big enough, you can even store an image of the computer’s hard disk, which
can be useful if (for example) the computer becomes misconfigured or corrupted.
To create a ZfD imaging partition, you must first create imaging boot diskettes and boot the
computer from them. Then, proceed with Step 5 of “Enabling a Workstation for Auto-Imaging
Operations” on page 452.
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Additional Information About Booting to Linux
The following sections contain additional information:
Š “Adding Linux Device Drivers” on page 449
Š “Booting with a Non-English Keyboard” on page 451
Adding Linux Device Drivers
If you need to, you can add Linux device drivers to your boot device or method.
Š “Obtaining Linux Drivers” on page 449
Š “Adding Linux Drivers to Your Boot Device or Method” on page 449
Obtaining Linux Drivers
To obtain a Linux driver for your particular hardware, you should visit the Web site of the hardware
vendor and check for a download location.
There are also some other Web sites where you can obtain drivers:
Š Network drivers can be downloaded from the Scyld Computing Corporation* (http://
www.scyld.com). Click Network Drivers.
Š PCMCIA drivers can be downloaded from the Linux PCMCIA Information Page (http://
pcmcia-cs.sourceforge.net).
You can also get additional Linux drivers at the ZENworks Cool Solutions Web Community (http:/
/www.novell.com/coolsolutions/zenworks/features/a_linux_drivers_zw.html).
To learn more about drivers, including the loading parameters you need to specify, see the Linux
Documentation Project (http://www.linuxdoc.org) and visit the following HOWTO (http://
www.linuxdoc.org/HOWTO/HOWTO-INDEX/howtos.html) sites:
Š Hardware
Š PCMCIA
Š SCSI
Š Ethernet
Adding Linux Drivers to Your Boot Device or Method
Diskettes
For information, see “Using Zimgboot.exe to Add Linux Drivers” on page 484.
CD
For information, see “Preparing an Imaging Boot CD” on page 448.
Hard-Disk Partition
It is unlikely that you will need to add Linux drivers if you are using a ZfD Workstation Imaging
partition. If you want to update the Linux drivers, however, follow this procedure:
1 Boot the workstation using imaging boot diskettes, an imaging boot CD, or if it is PXE-
enabled, boot it from the Imaging/Preboot Services server.
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2 Enter manual at the boot prompt or select Start ZENworks Imaging in Maintenance Mode
from the PXE menu.
3 Enter the following to mount the hard drive:
mount /dev/hda1 /mnt/harddisk
4 Enter the following to mount the diskette that contains the driver files:
mount /dev/fd0 /mnt/floppy
5 Enter the following to copy the files to the appropriate directory on the ZfD imaging partition:
cp /mnt/floppy/*.o /mnt/harddisk/lib/modules/2.4.3/drivers/net
6 Type reboot > press Enter.
Preboot Services (PXE)
To add Linux drivers for use with Preboot Services, you must have a working Linux workstation
capable of mounting a loop device. Red Hat* 7 has this ability compiled in the distribution kernel.
1 On the TFTP server on your Imaging/Preboot Services server, locate the linux.2 file in
\public\zenworks\imaging\tftp. Make a backup copy of this file.
2 On the Linux workstation, create a working directory for linux.2.
3 Using a transfer method such as FTP, transfer linux.2 to the directory created in Step 2.
4 Enter the following to rename linux.2 to linux.gz:
mv linux.2 linux.gz
5 Enter the following to extract linux.gz:
gzip -d linux.gz
This will replace the linux.gz file with a file named linux. This file is a MINIX file system that
can be mounted and changed.
6 Enter the following to create a mount point:
mkdir /mnt/loop
7 Enter the following to mount the file system:
mount -o loop linux /mnt/loop
8 Copy the driver files to the appropriate directory in the /mnt/loop directory structure.
9 Enter the following to unmount the updated file system:
umount /mnt/loop
10 Enter the following to zip the file:
gzip --v9c linux
11 Enter the following to rename the file:
mv linux.gz linux.2
12 Using a transfer method such as FTP, transfer linux.2 to the TFTP server.
Another method of modifying Linux drivers for use with Preboot Services is to use a build script.
This allows knowledgeable Linux users to maintain a build area where modifications can be made
and new Preboot Services files can be created with a single script. These build scripts are released
"as is" and are not supported by Novell or Novell Technical Support. They can be found at the
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ZENworks Cool Solutions Web Community (http://www.novell.com/coolsolutions/zenworks/
features/a_linux_scripts_zw.html) and include their own documentation.
Booting with a Non-English Keyboard
If you will image computers that have non-English keyboards, the imaging boot device or method
must include additional language support, in the form of a language diskette. (When booting a
computer from the imaging device or method, you will be prompted for this diskette.) For
information on preparing this diskette, see the online help in the “Imaging Boot Disk Creator
(Zimgboot.exe)” on page 483.
If the Language/Country drop-down list in the Imaging Boot Disk Creator utility doesn’t have the
keyboard language you need, you can close the utility and reconfigure it to support the additional
language. This assumes you can find Linux keyboard support files somewhere on the Web.
Adding Support for Another Keyboard Language
1 Get the Linux .gz files that contain the keyboard mappings, fonts, and Unicode* mappings for
the language that you want to add.
2 From the folder containing the zimgboot.exe file, browse to the bootdisk folder > copy the .gz
files for the new language to the following subfolders:
Š
The keyboard map file goes in the keymaps folder.
Š
The font file goes in the consolefonts folder.
Š
The Unicode map file goes in the consoletranS folder.
3 Add a section to the zimglang.ini file using the format illustrated for German in “Imaging
Bootup Languages (Zimglang.ini)” on page 488.
3a For the bracketed section heading, specify the language or country name that you want
shown in the Imaging Boot Disk Creator utility.
3b In the KEYMAP, FONT, and ACM parameters, specify the names and locations (relative
to the bootdisk folder) of the keyboard map, font, and Unicode map files, respectively.
4 Save your changes to the zimglang.ini file.
5 Restart the Imaging Boot Disk Creator utility and verify that the new language appears in the
Language/Country drop-down list.
Preparing a Workstation for Imaging
This section contains the following information:
Š “Workstation Requirements” on page 451
Š “Enabling a Workstation for Auto-Imaging Operations” on page 452
Workstation Requirements
This section gives the requirements for using a network-connected Windows workstation.
It is possible (but usually not as convenient) to image a workstation without connecting to the
network. It is also possible to image non-Windows computers, but such operations can’t be fully
automated through NDS® or Novell eDirectoryTM and the images can only be raw, bit-by-bit
images of the entire hard disk, as opposed to customizable, file-by-file images of the data.
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The following are the requirements for this workstation:
Workstation Must Have
Because
A supported Ethernet
card
The workstation must connect with the imaging server to store or retrieve the images. This connection
is made when the workstation is under the control of the ZfD Workstation Imaging engine (which is a
Linux application), not when the workstation is running under Windows. Therefore, make sure the
workstation has a supported Ethernet card. For more information, see Chapter 48, “Supported
Ethernet Cards,” on page 505.
Windows 98, NT 4,
2000, or XP installed
Unattended operations are currently supported only on 32-bit Windows platforms.
50 MB free disk space Unless you are using Preboot Services, unattended operations require a ZfD Workstation Imaging
(Linux) partition to be installed on the workstation hard disk, so that the imaging engine can gain control
on bootup. The default partition size is 100 MB, and the minimum partition size is 50 MB. It is
permissible for the 50 MB free space to be inside an existing partition. This partition is not required if
you are performing manual imaging operations.
Standard hardware
architecture
NEC* PC98 architecture is not supported.
PXE enabled
If you are using ZfD Preboot Services, PXE must be enabled either in the BIOS or through a PXE boot
disk. See “Preboot Services (PXE)” on page 445 for more information.
Enabling a Workstation for Auto-Imaging Operations
The following procedure explains how to register the workstation as an object in your NDS or
eDirectory tree, install a ZfD Imaging Agent on the workstation, and install a permanent ZfD
Workstation Imaging (Linux) partition on the hard disk.
This procedure needs to be performed only once prior to performing auto-imaging (unattended)
operations. It is not a prerequisite to performing manual imaging operations.
Complete this procedure if you are not using Preboot Services (PXE). If you have enabled PXE on
the workstation and have installed ZfD 4 Preboot Services on your imaging server, this procedure
is not a prerequisite to performing unattended imaging operations. For more information, see
“Preboot Services (PXE)” on page 445.
1 If you haven’t already done so, install the Novell ClientTM on the workstation. For more
information, see Overall Software Requirements in ZENworks for Desktops 3.2 Getting
Started Guide of the ZfD 3.2 documentation.
ZfD 4 lets ZENworks work with or without an installation of the Novell Client on the
workstation. If your setup does not require the Client, then the ZfD Management Agent must
be installed. For more information, see Installing the ZfD Management Agent on a
Workstation in the ZENworks for Desktops 4.0.1 Installation Guide guide.
2 If you haven’t already done so, register the workstation as an object in your NDS or
eDirectory tree that contains the ZfD Workstation Imaging server.
When you boot a Windows workstation from an imaging device or method and allow the
bootup process to proceed in auto-imaging mode, the imaging engine runs on the workstation
and contacts a ZfD Workstation Imaging server. In order for the workstation to be imaged, you
must first either define an NDS or eDirectory policy for the ZfD Workstation Imaging server
(for more information, see “Defining an Imaging Policy for Unregistered Workstations
(Server Policy)” on page 457), or you must register the workstation as an object.
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For more information on registering the workstation as an object, see “Automatic Workstation
Import and Removal” on page 59.
You don’t need to complete all the tasks mentioned in the instructions. Just create a server
policy package that contains a minimal workstation import policy (use the defaults for
naming, groups, and limits), and then associate the server package with the container where
you want the Workstation object to be created. Then, configure the workstation to
communicate with the import service on the imaging server, and reboot the workstation.
Before proceeding with the next step, check your NDS or eDirectory tree to make sure the
Workstation object was created.
3 Set a flag in the Workstation object that triggers the imaging operation you want.
For more information, see “Triggering an Unattended Imaging Operation” on page 461.
4 Install the ZfD Imaging Agent on the workstation.
When you put a new base image on a Windows workstation, the workstation receives the same
identification data as the computer from which the image was taken, including such settings
as the IP address and computer (NETBIOS) name. To work around this, you can install the
ZfD Imaging Agent on the target workstation before reimaging it. This saves the workstation’s
current identity settings to an area on the hard disk that’s safe from reimaging. When the
workstation reboots after being reimaged, the agent restores the original settings.
IMPORTANT: The Imaging Agent does not save or restore any Windows NT/2000/XP Domain
information. If you change a workstation’s domain and then restore an image, the workstation will receive
whatever domain is embedded in the new image.
The ZfD Imaging Agent has already been installed on the workstation if in Step 1 you did a
custom Novell Client installation and chose the Imaging Services option. If this is the case,
skip to Step 5. Or, you can choose to install the Imaging Agent by running the ZISD-9x or
ZISD-NT application object on the workstation (for more information, see Chapter 21,
“Distributing Applications to Users and Workstations,” on page 207). Otherwise, proceed
with Step 4a to install the ZfD Imaging Agent.
4a Browse to the zenworks\imaging folder in your ZfD installation (on the imaging server).
4b Complete the steps that correspond to the type of workstation:
Workstation Type
Steps
Windows 98
1. Copy ziswin.exe, zislib16.dll, and zislib32.dll to the novell\zenis
folder.
2. Run ziswin.exe from the novell\zenis folder.
3. Run regedit.exe and browse to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE >
Software > Microsoft > Windows > CurrentVersion > RunServices.
4. Add the string value ZENwork Imaging Service and set it to the
filename and path of the ziswin.exe file. For example,
c:\novell\zenis\ziswin.exe
5. Save the changes and close regedit.
Windows NT 4 or
2000
1. Copy ziswin.exe and ziswinr.dll (in the nls\english subfolder or the
appropriate language subfolder) to your winnt\system32 folder.
2. From a command prompt, change to your winnt\system32 folder >
type ziswin -install > press Enter.
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Workstation Type
Steps
Windows XP
1. Copy ziswin.exe and ziswinr.dll (in the nls\english subfolder or the
appropriate language subfolder) to your windows\system32 folder.
2. From a command prompt, change to your windows\system32 folder
> type ziswin -install > press Enter.
4c Reboot the workstation.
5 Take an image of the workstation as instructed in “Manually Taking an Image of a
Workstation” on page 462.
IMPORTANT: Do this even if you have taken an image of the workstation previously. This ensures that
the new image captures the changes you made in the preceding steps.
6 When the image has been created, reboot the workstation with the first imaging boot diskette
(or other imaging boot device) > type install at the boot prompt > press Enter.
This starts the process of creating the ZfD imaging partition in the first partition slot. It also
destroys all existing partitions, even if slot 1 is empty and available. By default, the ZfD
imaging partition size will be 100 MB.
If the ZfD imaging partition already exists, it will be upgraded, and your existing Windows
partitions will be left intact. For information on updating Linux device drivers in your harddisk partition, see “Adding Linux Drivers to Your Boot Device or Method” on page 449.
7 If prompted, reinsert the first imaging boot diskette > press Enter.
8 (Optional) When the ZfD imaging partition has been created and the bash prompt reappears,
type img dump > press Enter.
This displays a list of the partition slots on the workstation. Unless you were upgrading your
ZfD imaging partition, each partition slot should be empty and none should be active. The ZfD
imaging partition is hidden from the list, so the number of partition slots in the list should be
one less than before.
or
Type img to display a menu > select Dump > No Geometry.
9 At the bash prompt, restore the image you took in Step 5. Use the img restorep command or
select Restore an Image > Proxy Image from the menu as instructed in Step 7 of “Manually
Putting an Image on a Workstation” on page 463.
10 (Optional) When the image has been restored and the bash prompt reappears, use the img
dump command to redisplay the list of the partition slots on the workstation.
or
Type img to display a menu > select Dump > No Geometry.
You should now see information about the Windows partitions that were restored and
activated. There should still be one less partition slot than before because the ZfD imaging
partition is still hidden (and will continue to be).
11 At the bash prompt, type lilo.s > press Enter.
12 When the bash prompt reappears, remove the diskette and reboot the workstation.
The workstation should boot to Windows. If the bash prompt reappears, enter the lilo.s
command again and reboot a second time.
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From this point on, whenever the workstation is rebooted, the imaging engine will gain control and
check the imaging server to see if an imaging operation should be performed. If you have not
configured the Workstation object (in NDS or eDirectory) to trigger an unattended imaging
operation, the imaging engine will simply exit and automatically reboot the workstation to
Windows.
Imaging a Server
In addition to imaging workstations, it is also possible to image servers. However, you should use
caution. If you restore an old image of a server with NDS, eDirectory, or Active Directory replicas
into a tree that has been active since the image was made, all the objects in the server’s replicas
might be very old. It might take a great deal of time before the directory is able to update the
replicas. You might also experience difficulty mapping a drive to this server.
If you are considering taking images of servers as an alternative to backing up the servers, the
recommendation is to use backup software rather than Workstation Imaging.
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Setting Up Imaging Policies
The following sections explain how to set up policies for Novell® ZENworks® for Desktops (ZfD)
imaging services, and how to select general imaging server settings. The procedures that are
applicable to you depend on your imaging deployment strategy. (See Chapter 39, “Common
Imaging Deployment Strategies,” on page 439.)
Š “Defining an Imaging Policy for Unregistered Workstations (Server Policy)” on page 457
Š “Defining an Imaging Policy for Registered Workstations (Workstation Policy)” on page 459
Š “Allowing Overwriting Filenames and Restricting Save Location of Image Files (Imaging
Server Settings)” on page 460
Defining an Imaging Policy for Unregistered Workstations (Server
Policy)
If a Windows workstation hasn’t been registered as a Workstation object in NDS® or Novell
eDirectoryTM and you boot that workstation from an imaging device or method in auto-imaging
mode, the imaging server is contacted and checks its Imaging Server Policy in NDS or eDirectory
to determine which image to put down on the workstation.
If the base image specified by the policy is the same as the base image currently on the workstation
(as reported by the imaging engine), the imaging server doesn’t send any new images to put down
on the workstation, unless the policy specifies to force down the base image again. If the policy
specifies to force down the base image, or if the base image currently on the workstation is
different than the base image specified by the policy, the imaging server sends down the new base
image and any add-on images specified by the policy, and the imaging engine puts these images
down on the workstation.
WARNING: If you configure an Imaging Server Policy to send an add-on image only (no base image) to a
workstation, the workstation receives the add-on image, but it will also reboot and bring down the image again,
resulting in a reboot/imaging loop.
In addition, if the imaging engine reports to the imaging server that data is missing from the
workstation’s image-safe area, the imaging server obtains the missing data from the Imaging
Server Policy and sends it to the imaging engine, which then saves the data to the image-safe area.
To define the Imaging Server Policy for one or more imaging servers:
1 Prepare the various workstation images that the policy can prescribe. For details, see Chapter
45, “Preparing Images,” on page 469.
2 If a Server Package hasn’t already been created to hold the policies for the target imaging
servers, create one as instructed in Chapter 9, “Creating Policy Packages and Setting Up
Policies,” on page 83.
3 Right-click the Server Package > click Properties.
4 Enable the Imaging Server policy > click Properties.
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5 Follow this step if you are using Preboot Services:
If you are using Preboot Services but previously booted workstations from a ZfD Workstation
Imaging (Linux) partition, you can select to disable the ZfD imaging partition on the General
Imaging Partition property page. The partition is not removed with this option.
Use the General PXE Settings property page to specify the availability of the PXE menu,
which displays when you boot a PXE-enabled workstation. Click Help for details.
If you want to specify a different image when using Preboot Services, rather than the default
image that is defined, specify the image file and pathname.
6 On the Image Selection Rules page, click Add > select a Workstation Image object (for more
information, see “Creating a Workstation Image Object” on page 471) > use the drop-down
fields and operators to specify the conditions under which the selected image should be used
(click Help for details) > click OK.
Repeat this step as many times as needed to specify the particular images that should be used
under different conditions.
These rules will be used by your imaging server to determine which image to put on
workstations during unattended imaging operations. The various hardware configuration data
specified in the rules are compared against the actual hardware configuration data detected by
the Workstation Imaging engine on the workstation. To see this data for a particular
workstation, boot it with the imaging boot diskettes in manual mode and issue the img info
command or enter img > select Information from the menu.
Take care to choose rules that apply only to the unregistered workstations you want imaged.
Otherwise, an image could be unintentionally pushed to another workstation.
7 Repeat the previous step as needed to provide rules that will cover all the workstations
serviced by the target imaging servers.
8 (Optional) If you want the imaging server to force down the base image determined by this
policy even if it’s the same as the base image currently on the workstation, select the check
box on the bottom of the page.
WARNING: Use this option with care, because putting down a base image destroys all data that was
added to the workstation since the last base image was put down. In most scenarios, you’ll want to use
this option only temporarily while a specific workstation is being imaged and not generally for all
workstations, unless this policy is designed for a lab environment where you want the workstations to be
reimaged every time they reboot. If you select this option as a temporary measure, be sure to deselect it
after the specific imaging task is done.
9 On the Image-safe Data tab, fill in the IP Configuration, Windows Networking, and DNS
Settings pages.
These pages supply image-safe data values that might be missing on the workstations that are
serviced by the target imaging servers. For details on these pages, click Help.
10 Click OK to save the policy.
11 On the Associations page, add the containers and/or server objects that represent the target set
of imaging servers.
12 Click OK to save the association.
Remember that the policy won’t actually be consulted by the associated imaging servers unless the
client requesting the imaging operation is an unregistered workstation that has been booted in autoimaging mode.
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Defining an Imaging Policy for Registered Workstations
(Workstation Policy)
If a Windows workstation has been registered as a Workstation object in NDS or eDirectory and
you boot that workstation from an imaging device or method in auto-imaging mode, the imaging
server is contacted and checks the Workstation object to see if the administrator has flagged it to
receive an image. If this is the case and the administrator hasn’t specified which image to use, the
imaging server consults the Workstation Imaging Policy associated with the Workstation object to
determine which image to send down.
To define the Workstation Imaging Policy for one or more workstations:
1 Prepare the various workstation images that the policy can prescribe. For details, see Chapter
45, “Preparing Images,” on page 469.
2 If a Workstation Package hasn’t already been created to hold the policies for the target
workstations, create one as instructed in Chapter 9, “Creating Policy Packages and Setting Up
Policies,” on page 83.
3 Right-click the Workstation Package > click Properties.
4 Enable the Workstation Imaging policy > click Properties.
5 Follow this step if you are using Preboot Services:
If you are using Preboot Services but previously booted workstations from a ZfD Workstation
Imaging (Linux) partition, you can select to disable the ZfD imaging partition on the General
Imaging Partition property page. The partition is not removed with this option.
Use the General PXE Settings property page to specify the availability of the PXE menu,
which displays when you boot a PXE-enabled workstation. Click Help for details.
If you want to specify a different image when using Preboot Services, rather than the default
image that is defined, specify the image file and pathname.
6 On the Image Selection Rules property page, click Add > select a Workstation Image object
(for more information, see “Creating a Workstation Image Object” on page 471) > use the
drop-down fields and operators to specify the conditions under which the selected image
should be used (click Help for details) > click OK.
Repeat this step as many times as needed to specify the particular images that should be used
under different conditions.
These rules will be used by your imaging server to determine which image to put on
workstations during unattended imaging operations. The various hardware configuration data
specified in the rules are compared against the actual hardware configuration data detected by
the Workstation Imaging engine on the workstation. To see this data for a particular
workstation, boot it with the imaging boot diskettes in manual mode and issue the img info
command or enter img > select Information from the menu.
Take care to choose rules that apply only to the workstations you want imaged. Otherwise, an
image could be pushed to another workstation unintentionally.
7 Click OK to save the policy.
8 On the Associations page, add the container, Workstation Group, or Workstation objects that
represent the target set of workstations.
9 Click OK to save the association.
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Remember that the policy won’t actually be consulted by the imaging server unless you (or another
administrator) flags a Workstation object to receive an image on the next boot.
Allowing Overwriting Filenames and Restricting Save Location of
Image Files (Imaging Server Settings)
Most of the rules that comprise an Imaging Server Policy apply only when the imaging server is
servicing a request to auto-image a workstation. Such rules aren’t in force when the imaging server
is servicing a manual (command line or menu) imaging request.
However, the following two aspects of the Imaging Server Policy are actually imaging server
settings that always apply, including when the imaging server is servicing an automatic imaging
request, when the imaging server is servicing a manual imaging request, when a registered
workstations are booting up, and when unregistered workstations are booting up:
Š Whether to allow the creation of new image files that overwrite existing image files on the
server
Š Whether to restrict the creation of new image files on the server to specific areas
To define these general behaviors for one or more imaging servers:
1 If a Server Package hasn’t already been created to hold the policies for the target imaging
servers, create one as instructed in Chapter 9, “Creating Policy Packages and Setting Up
Policies,” on page 83.
2 Right-click the Server Package > click Properties.
3 Enable the Imaging Server Policy > click Properties.
4 Fill in the items on the Security tab. Click Help for details.
5 Click OK to save the policy.
6 On the Associations page, add the containers and/or server objects that represent the target set
of imaging servers.
7 Click OK to save the association.
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Performing Basic Imaging Operations
The following sections provide instructions for these basic imaging operations:
Š “Triggering an Unattended Imaging Operation” on page 461
Š “Manually Taking an Image of a Workstation” on page 462
Š “Manually Putting an Image on a Workstation” on page 463
These instructions assume that you have already prepared the imaging server (see Chapter 40,
“Preparing an Imaging Server,” on page 443), prepared workstations for imaging (see Chapter 41,
“Setting Up Workstations for Imaging,” on page 445), and set up imaging policies (Chapter 42,
“Setting Up Imaging Policies,” on page 457).
Triggering an Unattended Imaging Operation
The following procedure explains how to set a flag in the Workstation object that says to take or
put an image on the workstation the next time it is booted, and then verify that the imaging
operation occurs as expected.
1 If the imaging operation that you want to trigger is to put an image on the workstation, do the
following. Otherwise, skip this step.
1a If you haven’t already done so, create the image to be put on the workstation. Make sure
to store it on your imaging server. For more information, see “Manually Taking an Image
of a Workstation” on page 462.
1b In ConsoleOne®, create a Workstation Image object in your NDS® or Novell®
eDirectoryTM tree. Configure the object to point to the image file that is to be put on the
workstation. For more information, see “Creating a Workstation Image Object” on
page 471. For details on pointing to the image file, click Help in the Image File Location
dialog box.
2 In ConsoleOne, right-click the Workstation object > click Properties.
3 On the ZENworks Imaging Configuration page, do either of the following:
Š
To take an image of the workstation the next time it boots, check the first check box >
click the browse button next to the available field > select your imaging server and the
path and filename under which to store the new image > check the Use Compression
check box and select a compression option if you want to use compression (click Help
for details) > click OK.
Š
To put an image on the workstation the next time it boots, check the Put an Image on This
Workstation on Next Boot check box > check the box that says to use an image other than
the effective policy image or multicast session > click the browse button next to the
available field > select the Workstation Image object you created in Step 1b > click OK.
IMPORTANT: Be sure that the imaging server storing the image or the workstation receiving the image
has enough disk space for the image. Otherwise, you will receive a "Failed to write to proxy" error.
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4 Click OK to save the imaging configuration settings.
After the imaging operation has been performed on the workstation, ZfD will clear these
imaging configuration settings automatically so that the imaging operation won’t keep
recurring.
5 Verify that the imaging operation occurs as expected when you reboot the workstation.
Manually Taking an Image of a Workstation
The following procedure explains how to take an image of the workstation by booting from an
imaging device or method and entering a particular imaging command. The image will be stored
on your imaging server. (If you want to store an image locally rather than on an imaging server,
see “Using a CD” on page 465 and “Using a Hard Disk or Jaz Drive” on page 466 in Chapter 44,
“Setting Up Disconnected Imaging Operations,” on page 465.)
Be sure that your imaging server has enough disk space for the image. Otherwise, you will receive
a "Failed to write to proxy" error.
1 Boot the workstation using imaging boot diskettes, an imaging boot CD, or if it is PXE-
enabled, boot it from the Imaging/Preboot Services server.
2 Enter manual at the boot prompt or select Start ZENworks Imaging in Maintenance Mode
from the PXE menu.
3 (Optional) At the bash prompt, type img dump > press Enter.
or
Type img to display a menu > select Dump > No Geometry.
This displays a list of the partition slots on the workstation. For your reference, note the
number and type of partitions and which one is active.
4 To take an image of the workstation, you have two choices:
Š
You can enter a command at the bash prompt using the following format:
img makep serverIPaddr_or_DNSname //uncpath/newimg.zmg [comp=comp
level]
The makep parameter stands for "make on proxy," or in other words, create an image and
store it on the imaging (proxy) server. The IP address or DNS name should be that of your
imaging server, and the UNC path specifies the location and filename where the new
image is to be stored. comp level is the amount of compression used when creating the
image. Specify any number from 0-9. 0 means no compression. 1 is the same as Optimize
for Speed and is used by default if you do not specify this parameter. 6 is the same as
Balanced. 9 is the same as Optimize for Space. (Optimize for Speed takes the least
amount of time but creates the largest image file. Optimize for Space creates the smallest
image file but might take a significant amount of time. Balanced is a compromise
between compression time and image file size.)
For example:
img makep 137.65.95.127 //xyz_srv/sys/imgs/cpqnt.zmg comp=6
IMPORTANT: Make sure to use forward slashes in the UNC path as shown above. Backslashes
aren’t recognized by Linux. Alternatively, you can use backslashes and enclose the entire UNC path
in quotes. The path you specify must exist on your imaging server.
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Š
You can type img to display a menu > select an Image > Proxy Image. Type the IP
address or DNS name of your imaging (proxy) server. Type the UNC path and filename
where the new image is to be stored on the imaging (proxy) server. Select a compression
option. (Optimize for Speed takes the least amount of time but creates the largest image
file. Optimize for Space creates the smallest image file but might take a significant
amount of time. Balanced is a compromise between compression time and image file
size.) Specify any advanced parameters, such as xpartition. If you want, specify
additional information in the Description (a description of the image), Machine Name
(the computer on which the image is being stored), Author (the name of the person
entering this information), and Comments (any additional comments) fields.
For details on this and other related img command parameters, see “Imaging Engine (Img:
Command Line and Menu)” on page 488.
Depending on the amount of data on the hard disk, the image might take several minutes to
create. If the screen goes blank, just press any key. (Linux enters a screen-saving mode after
a few minutes.)
5 When the image has been created and the bash prompt reappears, remove any diskettes from
the drive and reboot the workstation.
6 (Optional) Verify that the image file was created on your imaging server. You might also want
to check its size.
Manually Putting an Image on a Workstation
The following procedure explains how to put an image on the workstation by booting from an
imaging device or method and entering a particular imaging command. The image will be
retrieved from your imaging server.
Be sure that the workstation receiving a new image has enough disk space for the image.
Otherwise, you will receive a "Failed to write to proxy" error.
1 If you haven’t already done so, create the image that you will put on the workstation, as
instructed in “Manually Taking an Image of a Workstation” on page 462.
Make sure the image is of the same type of workstation (same hardware configuration) and is
stored on your imaging server. You can use a previous image of the same workstation.
IMPORTANT: If you are putting an image on a workstation without a ZfD Workstation Imaging (Linux)
partition, make sure the image was made on a workstation without a ZfD imaging partition. Otherwise, the
wrong MBR (Master Boot Record) is restored, and the workstation will fail to boot.
2 (Optional) Boot the workstation from a Windows startup disk and run fdisk to remove all
partitions from the hard disk.
TIP: Running FDISK is not required, but it is recommended for purposes of comparing the workstation’s
partitions before and after the imaging operation.
3 Boot the workstation using imaging boot diskettes, an imaging boot CD, or if it is PXE-
enabled, boot it from the Imaging/Preboot Services server.
4 Enter manual at the boot prompt or select Start ZENworks Imaging in Maintenance Mode
from the PXE menu.
5 If you are prompted for a language diskette, insert it > press Enter.
6 (Optional) At the bash prompt, type img dump > press Enter.
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This displays a list of the partition slots on the workstation. For your reference, note the
number and type of partitions and which one is active. If you removed all partitions using
FDISK, each slot should be empty and none should be active.
or
Type img to display a menu > select Dump > No Geometry.
7 To put the new image on the workstation, you have two choices:
Š
You can enter a command at the bash prompt using the following format:
img restorep serverIPaddr_or_DNSname //uncpath/newimg.zmg
The restorep parameter stands for "restore from proxy," or in other words, retrieve an
image from the imaging (proxy) server and put it on this workstation. The IP address or
DNS name should be that of your imaging server, and the UNC path specifies the location
and filename where the image is to be retrieved from. For example:
img restorep 137.65.95.127 //xyz_srv/sys/imgs/cpqnt.zmg
IMPORTANT: Make sure to use forward slashes in the UNC path as shown above. Backslashes
aren’t recognized by Linux. Alternatively, you can use backslashes and enclose the entire UNC path
in quotes. The server portion of the path must be the name of your imaging server.
Š
You can type img to display a menu > select Restore an Image > Proxy Image. Type the
IP address or DNS name of the imaging (proxy) server. Type the UNC path and filename
where the image is to be retrieved from. Specify any advanced parameters, such as sfileset
or apartition:ppartition.
For details on this and other related img command parameters, see “Imaging Engine
(Img: Command Line and Menu)” on page 488.
Depending on the size of the image, it might take several minutes to put the image down.
Images actually take slightly longer to put down than they do to take. If the screen goes blank,
just press any key. (Linux enters a screen-saving mode after a few minutes.)
8 (Optional) When the image has been put down and the bash prompt reappears, type img
dump > press Enter.
or
Type img to display a menu > select Dump > No Geometry.
As before, this displays a list of the partition slots on the workstation. You should now see
information about the new partitions that were created and activated by the image that you just
put down.
9 At the bash prompt, type lilo.s > press Enter.
10 Remove any diskettes from the drive and reboot the workstation. Verify that it boots to the
operating system that was installed by the new image.
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Setting Up Disconnected Imaging Operations
Disconnected imaging operations are inherently manual in the sense that they don’t involve the
network and thus can’t be automated through NDS® or Novell® eDirectoryTM.
To perform a disconnected imaging operation on a computer, you must have a storage device to
hold the image that will be created or put down, and that storage device must be locally accessible
to the imaging engine (in Linux) when you boot the computer from the imaging device. The
following sections explain how to set up and perform disconnected operations using different
storage devices:
Š “Using a CD” on page 465
Š “Using a Hard Disk or Jaz Drive” on page 466
Using a CD
Because a CD is read-only, you can only use it as the storage medium for an image that will be put
down, not for an image that will be created. The steps to put down an image from a CD depend on
whether the CD is the imaging boot CD or some other (non-bootable) CD.
To put down an image from the imaging boot CD:
1 Use your CD-burning software to put the source image on the imaging boot CD. See
“Preparing an Imaging Boot CD” on page 448 for details.
2 Boot the target computer from the CD and type manual at the boot prompt.
If the computer fails to boot, see Can't Boot a Workstation from the Imaging Boot CD in
Troubleshooting Workstation Imaging in the ZENworks for Desktops 4 Troubleshooting
Guide guide.
3 At the Linux prompt, type img dump to view the available partitions. Note the partition
number of the imaging boot CD.
or
Type img to display a menu > select Dump > No Geometry.
4 To put down the image, you have two choices:
Š
You can use a command of the following format:
img restorelpNumber /path/image.zmg
where pNumber is the partition number of the imaging boot CD and path and image are
the image path and filename from the root of the imaging boot CD.
Š
You can type img to display a menu > select Restore an Image > Local Image. Select
Local Linux File System (because the image resides on the imaging boot CD, which is
the current local Linux file system). Type the image path and filename. Specify any
advanced parameters, such as sfileset or apartition:ppartition.
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For details on these and other related img command parameters, see “Imaging Engine (Img:
Command Line and Menu)” on page 488.
5 When the imaging is done, remove the CD and do the following to boot the computer with the
new image:
5a At the Linux prompt, type lilo.s > press Enter.
5b Press Ctrl+Alt+Delete.
If the computer doesn’t boot to the new operating system (that is, if the Linux prompt
reappears), enter the lilo.s command again and reboot the computer a second time.
To put down an image from another (non-bootable) CD:
1 Use your CD-burning software to burn the source image onto a CD.
2 Boot the target computer from a ZfD Workstation Imaging device and type manual at the
boot prompt. Insert the second, third, and fourth diskettes if you are prompted for them.
3 Insert the CD that contains the source image.
4 At the Linux prompt, enter cdrom.s to mount the CD.
This mounts the CD to /mnt/cdrom.
5 To put down the image, you have two choices:
Š
You can use a command of the following format:
img restorel /mnt/cdrom/path/image.zmg
where path and image are the path and filename of the image relative to the root of the
CD.
Š
You can enter img to display a menu > select Restore an Image > Local Image. Select
Local Linux File System (because the image resides on the imaging boot CD, which is
the current local Linux file system). Type the image path and filename. Specify any
advanced parameters, such as sfileset or apartition:ppartition.
For details on other related command parameters, see “Imaging Engine (Img: Command Line
and Menu)” on page 488.
6 When the imaging is done, remove the imaging device (if applicable) and do the following to
boot the computer with the new image:
6a At the Linux prompt, type lilo.s > press Enter.
6b Press Ctrl+Alt+Delete.
If the computer doesn’t boot to the new operating system (that is, if the Linux prompt
reappears), enter the lilo.s command again and reboot the computer a second time.
Using a Hard Disk or Jaz Drive
When you boot a computer from a ZfD Workstation Imaging device, you can create an image on,
or put down an image from, any primary FAT16 or FAT32 partition on an IDE or SCSI hard drive
or Iomega* Jaz drive. You can also use the local ZfD Workstation Imaging (Linux) partition if one
is installed. Any target partition must have sufficient space.
When you create an image, the partition where you will store the image is itself excluded from the
image. When you put down an image, the source partition will not itself be altered.
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To create an image on a hard disk or Jaz drive:
1 Boot the source computer from a ZfD Workstation Imaging boot device and enter manual at
the boot prompt. Insert the second, third, and fourth diskettes if you are prompted for them.
2 At the Linux prompt, enter img dump to view the available partitions.
or
Enter img to display a menu > select Dump > No Geometry.
Note the number of the FAT partition where you’ll store the new image.
3 To create the new image, you have two choices:
Š
You can use a command of the following format:
img makel[pNumber] /path/image.zmg [comp=comp_level]
where pNumber is the number of the partition to store the image in, and comp_level is the
amount of compression used when creating the image. Specify any number from 0-9. 0
means no compression. 1 is the same as Optimize for Speed and is used by default if you
do not specify this parameter. 6 is the same as Balanced. 9 is the same as Optimize for
Space. (Optimize for Speed takes the least amount of time but creates the largest image
file. Optimize for Space creates the smallest image file but might take a significant
amount of time. Balanced is a compromise between compression time and image file
size.) Path and image are the path and filename of the new image relative to the partition
root. If you omit the partition number, the local ZfD imaging partition is used.
Š
You can type img to display a menu > select Make an Image > Local Image. Select the
partition to store the image in, or Local Linux File System to store the image in the local
ZfD imaging partition. Type the image path and filename. Select a compression option.
(Optimize for Speed takes the least amount of time but creates the largest image file.
Optimize for Space creates the smallest image file but might take a significant amount of
time. Balanced is a compromise between compression time and image file size.) Specify
any advanced parameters, such as xpartition. If you want, specify additional information
in the Description (a description of the image), Machine Name (the computer on which
the image is being stored), Author (the name of the person entering this information), and
Comments (any additional comments) fields.
For details on other related img command parameters, see “Imaging Engine (Img: Command
Line and Menu)” on page 488.
To put down an image from a hard disk or Jaz drive:
1 Boot the target computer from a ZfD Workstation Imaging boot device and enter manual at
the boot prompt. Insert the second, third, and fourth diskettes if you are prompted for them.
2 At the Linux prompt, enter img dump to view the available partitions.
or
Enter img to display a menu > select Dump > No Geometry.
Note the number of the FAT partition where the source image is stored.
3 To put down the image, you have two choices:
Š
You can use a command of the following format:
img restorel[pNumber] /path/image.zmg
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where pNumber is the number of the partition where the source image is stored, and path
and image are the image path and filename relative to the partition root. If you omit the
partition number, the local ZfD imaging partition is used.
Š
You can type img to display a menu > select Restore an Image > Local Image. Select
Local Linux File System if the image is stored in the local ZfD imaging partition, or select
the partition where the image is stored. Type the image path and filename. Specify any
advanced parameters, such as sfileset or apartition:ppartition.
For details on other related img command parameters, see “Imaging Engine (Img: Command
Line and Menu)” on page 488.
4 When the imaging is done, remove the imaging device (if applicable) and do the following to
boot the computer with the new image:
4a At the Linux prompt, type lilo.s > press Enter.
4b Press Ctrl+Alt+Delete.
If the computer doesn’t boot to the new operating system (that is, if the Linux prompt
reappears), enter the lilo.s command again and reboot the computer a second time.
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Preparing Images
Novell® ZENworks® for Desktops (ZfD) provides tools for creating and compressing images of
computer hard disks as well as images of specific add-on applications or file sets. ZfD also
provides tools for customizing such images and for making images available to auto-imaging
operations through NDS® or Novell eDirectoryTM. The following sections explain how to perform
these tasks.
Š “Creating a Workstation (Base) Image” on page 469
Š “Creating an Add-On Image” on page 469
Š “Customizing an Image” on page 470
Š “Making an Image Available for Auto-Imaging” on page 471
Creating a Workstation (Base) Image
A base image is an image of all the partitions and data on a source computer’s storage devices,
such as hard disks and Jaz drives. Normally, such an image is prepared with the intent to
completely replace the contents of a target computer’s storage devices.
The overall process to create a base image is:
1. Boot the source computer from an imaging device or method.
2. Run the ZfD Workstation Imaging engine to take an image of the computer.
You can do this manually or automatically. In manual mode, you interrupt the bootup process
and issue an imaging command at the Linux prompt. For more information, see “Manually
Taking an Image of a Workstation” on page 462. In automatic mode, you set a flag in the
computer’s Workstation object using ConsoleOne® and then let the bootup process proceed
without interruption. For more information, see “Triggering an Unattended Imaging
Operation” on page 461.
Creating an Add-On Image
An add-on image is an archived collection of files that will be applied to an existing Windows
installation on a target computer. This is sometimes referred to as application overlay. The existing
partitions and files on the target computer are left intact, except for any files that the add-on image
might update.
An add-on image typically corresponds to an application or utility, or simply to a set of data files
or configuration settings. There are two ways to create an add-on image, each resulting in a
different kind of add-on image:
Š Produce the add-on image from an Application object
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You do this in ConsoleOne by using the Imaging property page (on the Common tab) of the
Application object. For details, click Help on that property page.
An add-on image created in this manner is not fully installed on the target computer until after
the computer reboots from being imaged and Application Launcher/Explorer starts up and
runs the new Application object. Deploying the image is essentially another way to distribute
an Application object.
Š Drag files into a new image archive using Image Explorer
You do this by starting Image Explorer, dragging files and folders from an existing Windows
installation into the new image archive, and saving the archive to a file with a .zmg extension.
For more information, see “Image Explorer (Imgexp.exe)” on page 479.
Generally, an add-on image created in this manner doesn’t require any post-processing on the
target computer. It is simply a set of files that are copied to the appropriate locations on the
hard disk, much like what happens when you unzip a WinZip archive. One exception is that
the add-on image can contain Windows registry (.reg) files that will be applied to the registry
automatically when the computer reboots after being imaged, if the Imaging Agent is installed
on the computer. For more information, see “Customizing an Image” on page 470.
Customizing an Image
After you have created a base or add-on image as explained in the previous sections, you can
customize it using the Image Explorer utility. Specifically, you can:
Š Compress the image
You can compress an image (including images created by previous versions of ZfD) by 4060% of the original file size. There are three compression options. Optimize for Speed takes
the least amount of time but creates the largest compressed image file. This option is used by
default when an image is created. Optimize for Space creates the smallest image file but might
take a significant amount of time. Balanced is a compromise between compression time and
image file size.
(You can also use the options on the ZENworks Imaging Configuration property page for the
workstation object in ConsoleOne to specify compression options if you do not want the
default, Optimize for Speed.)
Š Purge deleted files
Excluded or hidden files and folders can be completely removed from an open image. This
saves space in the image if you no longer want to include the files.
Š Exclude individual files and folders from the image
In doing this, you create variants of the image by specifying which of ten possible filesets
(variants) to exclude a given file or folder from. The variants exist merely as internal attributes
of the same image archive.
WARNING: Do not exclude .bpb files from a base image or the workstation won’t be able to boot the new
operating system after receiving the image.
Š Add files and folders to the image
By default, any file or folder you add is included in all variants. To change this, you must
explicitly exclude the file or folder from one or more variants.
Š Add Windows registry (.reg) files
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The registry settings contained in the .reg files that you add are applied after the image is put
down and the target computer reboots to Windows, if the Imaging Agent has been installed on
the computer.
As with any other file or folder that you add, a .reg file is included in all variants of the image
unless you explicitly exclude it from one or more variants.
For information on starting Image Explorer, see “Image Explorer (Imgexp.exe)” on page 479. For
information on how to complete the above tasks after you have started the utility, see the online
help in the utility.
Making an Image Available for Auto-Imaging
When you boot a computer from an imaging device or method and allow the bootup process to
proceed in auto-imaging mode, the imaging operation that is performed on the computer is
determined by policies and settings that you define in NDS or eDirectory.
In order to make an image available to such operations, you must expose it as a Workstation Image
object in NDS or eDirectory. Otherwise, when you define imaging policies and settings in NDS or
eDirectory, you won’t have any way to refer to the image.
Creating a Workstation Image object also allows you to combine a base image and one or more
add-on images into a single entity that can be put down on target computers. You can specify a
standard image file to put down, or you can create a script to further customize your imaging
operation. You can also specify that a particular variant of an image be used. The sections that
follow give instructions for performing these tasks.
Š “Creating a Workstation Image Object” on page 471
Š “Associating an Add-On Image with a Base Image” on page 472
Š “Using a Variant of an Image” on page 472
Creating a Workstation Image Object
1 Create the base image that the Workstation Image object will refer to. For more information,
see “Creating a Workstation (Base) Image” on page 469.
Although it isn’t typical, you can create a Workstation Image object that refers only to one or
more add-on images. However, if you want a base image to be put down in the same operation
as the add-on images, you should include both types of images in the Workstation Image
object.
2 Copy the image file to a ZfD Workstation Imaging server that is accessible as a server object
in your NDS or eDirectory tree.
3 In ConsoleOne, open the NDS or eDirectory tree and browse to the container where you want
to create the Workstation Image object.
4 Right-click the container > click New > Object > select Workstation Image from the list of
object classes > click OK.
5 Enter a name for the new object.
Example: Dell NT4 Image
6 Click Define Additional Properties > OK.
7 Click Use Standard Imaging.
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or
Click Use Scripted Imaging > specify the script you want to use. See the online help for
examples of how you can use scripts. Skip to Step 10.
8 Under Base Image File, click the browse button next to the field > select the imaging server
where the image resides > select or specify the path and filename of the image > click OK.
For details on selecting or specifying the path and filename, click Help in the Image File
Location dialog box.
If the Workstation Image object will consist only of add-on images, leave the Base Image File
field blank, and skip to Step 5 of “Associating an Add-On Image with a Base Image” on
page 472.
9 If you are using Preboot Services but formerly booted from ZfD Workstation Imaging (Linux)
partitions on workstations, you can delete the ZfD imaging partition at the same time you put
down an image. To do so, select the Delete the ZENworks Imaging Partition, If It Exists,
When Bringing Down The Base Image check box. You can delete the ZfD imaging partition
only when the workstation is booted from an imaging boot device or method other than the
ZfD imaging partition.
10 Click OK to save the Workstation Imaging object.
Associating an Add-On Image with a Base Image
1 Create the add-on image that you will associate with the base image. For more information,
see “Creating an Add-On Image” on page 469.
2 Copy the image file to a ZfD Workstation Imaging server that is accessible as a server object
in your NDS or eDirectory tree.
You might want to copy the add-on image to the same location as the base image.
3 In ConsoleOne, open the NDS or eDirectory tree and browse to the Workstation Image object
that refers to the base image. If you haven’t created this object yet, do so as instructed in
“Creating a Workstation Image Object” on page 471.
4 Right-click the object > click Properties.
5 Under Add-on Image Files, click the Add button > select the imaging server where the add-
on image resides > select or specify the path and filename of the image > click OK.
For details on selecting or specifying the path and filename, click Help in the Image File
Location dialog box.
You can associate more than one add-on image with a base image. The add-on images will be
put down after the base image in the order listed on this page.
6 Click OK to save the Workstation Imaging object.
Using a Variant of an Image
As explained in “Customizing an Image” on page 470, you can exclude individual files and folders
from any of 10 possible filesets (variants) of an image. The variants exist merely as internal
attributes of the same image archive.
Because creating an image of a workstation can take a fair amount of time, it is more efficient in
some cases to just create an image of a few workstations and customize those images to get all the
variants you need. Even though the variants do not all exist as separate, physical image files, you
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can access them as though they were. How you do this depends on whether you are performing a
manual or automated imaging operation, as explained below.
Type of imaging operation
How to specify the variant to use
Automatic (NDS or
eDirectory-based)
In the Workstation Image object, specify the number of the variant in
the Use File Set field. All NDS or eDirectory policies and settings that
specify that Workstation Image object will use the specified variant.
You can create multiple Workstation Image objects that point to the
same base image but to different variants.
Manual (command-line or
menu)
Use the s parameter on the img restore command. For example, to
specify variant number 3:
img restorel dellnt4.zmg s3
or
You can enter img at the bash prompt to display a menu > select
Restore an Image > Local Image. Specify sfileset (for example, s3) in
the Advanced Parameters field.
For details, see “Imaging Engine (Img: Command Line and Menu)” on
page 488.
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Multicasting Images
Novell® ZENworks® for Desktops (ZfD) Imaging software includes an imaging multicast
capability. The following sections explain what this is, why you might want to use it, and the
overall procedure for using it.
Š “Introduction to Multicasting” on page 475
Š “Multicast Procedure” on page 476
Introduction to Multicasting
The following topics are covered in this section:
Š “What Is Multicasting?” on page 475
Š “Why Use Multicast?” on page 475
What Is Multicasting?
To multicast an image is to take an image of one computer (the master), immediately send it over
the network to multiple other computers (the participants), and put it down simultaneously on
those computers. You can specify a workstation as the session master, or you can specify an image
file that you have previously saved and customized.
If the session master is a workstation, a base image is taken of all the partitions on the hard disks
and other storage devices (such as Jaz drives) of that workstation.
Before the image is put down on the participating computers, all existing partitions are removed
from the hard disks and writable storage devices of those computers.
NOTE: For multicasting to work properly, the routers and switches on the network must have multicast
features configured. Otherwise, multicast packets might not be routed properly.
(Historical note: In versions of ZfD prior to ZfD 3.2, the master had to be a Linux workstation,
which formerly restricted multicasting to exact "cloning" of the workstation.)
Why Use Multicast?
Multicasting is the way to use ZfD Workstation Imaging services for mass reimaging with the least
amount of overhead. It is useful if you have one computer with a clean software configuration that
you want to duplicate on several other machines, or if you have a single image that you want to set
up on multiple machines.
With multicasting, all you need is a physical network with modern routers and switches. (If you
will be setting up multicasting by visiting each computer, you will also need imaging boot
diskettes, an imaging boot CD, or the computers must be PXE-enabled.) The computers that will
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be imaged must be physically connected to the network. They can be computers with existing
operating systems of any kind, or they can be new computers with no operating system installed.
Limitations
One significant limitation of using multicast without installing any ZfD software is that it results
in a set of computers that have duplicate network identities—the IP addresses, Computer
(NETBIOS) names, Workgroup memberships, and Security Identifiers (Windows NT/2000/XP
only) are all the same and will cause conflicts if deployed on the network without change.
For a handful of computers, this might not be a problem. But for a larger number, if the computers
have Windows, you should install the ZfD Imaging Agent on them before doing the multicast. (See
Step 4 of “Enabling a Workstation for Auto-Imaging Operations” on page 452.) The Imaging
Agent saves the computer’s network identity settings before the multicast session and restores
them afterwards.
Multicast Procedure
There are a couple of ways to conduct a multicast session. You can:
Š Define an automatic session and the participating computers in ConsoleOne®
Š Physically visit each computer yourself and start the multicast sessions one at a time. Starting
with ZfD 4, you can start the manual session from the imaging server.
Defining an Automatic Session
1 (Optional) Install the ZfD Imaging Agent on each of the participating computers.
See “Why Use Multicast?” on page 475 for the reasons and for further instructions.
2 In ConsoleOne, right-click the Server object > click Properties > the ZENworks Imaging tab.
3 Click Add > type a name for the multicast session > click OK.
4 On the Multicast Session Settings page, specify the Master Image Source.
You can specify an image file or a master workstation.
A workstation cannot be the master if it is being used as a master in another multicast session
or if it explicitly participates in any other session.
5 Decide how many participating workstations you want to have booted up before the multicast
session begins. Specify this number in the Clients Have Joined text box.
The default if you do not specify a number is 5 workstations.
6 If not enough workstations have booted up to fulfill the Clients Have Joined requirement, the
multicast session will begin if a participating workstation boots up and a certain amount of
time passes without another participating workstation booting up. Specify this amount of time
in the Minutes Have Elapsed Since a New Client Has Joined text box.
The default if you do not specify a time is 15 minutes.
7 To delete the session after it has finished, select the last check box.
8 On the Multicast Session Participation page, click Add Workstation under Include the
Following Workstations to explicitly add the workstation objects that you want to include in
this multicast session.
or
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To create rules to select the workstations you want to participate in this multicast session, click
Add Rule under Include Machines Which Meet Any of These Criteria.
Click Help on the Participation page for more information.
9 Click OK to return to the ZENworks Imaging Multicast Sessions page.
10 The check box next to the multicast session name is automatically selected, showing that the
session is enabled. If you want to disable a multicast session, deselect the check box next to
the session name.
11 If multiple multicast sessions are defined that use rules to select participating workstations, it
is possible that a workstation could qualify to participate in more than one session. If this
occurs, the first enabled session in this list for which the workstation qualifies takes
precedence over the other enabled sessions. If you want to change the position of a session in
the list, select the multicast session name > click Move Up or Move Down.
12 Click OK.
Physically Visiting Each Computer
1 (Optional) Install the ZfD Imaging Agent on each of the participating computers.
See “Why Use Multicast?” on page 475 for the reasons and for further instructions.
2 Create a set of imaging boot diskettes or an imaging boot CD for each person who will assist
with the multicast session, or enable PXE on the participating computers.
If you don’t know how to do this, see “Preparing an Imaging Boot Device or Method” on
page 445.
3 At each computer, including the master computer (unless you will be starting the multicast
session from the imaging server), access a Linux prompt by using the imaging boot diskettes,
imaging boot CD, or if it is PXE-enabled, boot it up.
4 Enter manual at the boot prompt or select Start ZENworks Imaging in Maintenance Mode
from the PXE menu.
5 To identify each participating computer in the multicast session, you have two choices:
Š
You can enter the following command at the bash prompt of every computer:
img session name
where name is any string that uniquely identifies this multicast session from other
multicast sessions that might be in progress on the network. Use the same session name
on each of the participating computers in this multicast session. You can specify any
multicast session, including one that originates from the proxy server (as long as you
specify the session name used by the proxy server).
Example: img session doug
The img session command can take other parameters that allow you to designate the
master computer and the imaging start time beforehand. See “Imaging Engine (Img:
Command Line and Menu)” on page 488 for details.
Š
You can type img at the bash prompt to display a menu > select Multicast Session > select
Client if this is a participating computer or Master if this is the session master. Fill in the
Session Name, Number of Clients (applies only to the session master), and Timeout
(applies only to the session master) fields. See “Imaging Engine (Img: Command Line
and Menu)” on page 488 for details.
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6 Start the multicast session from the master computer or from the imaging server. If you start
the session from the master computer, the session master must be a workstation. If you start
the session from the imaging server, the session master must be a previously saved image file.
To start the multicast session from the master computer, at the master computer, type m > press
Enter. At the master computer, after all the other computers have registered as participants,
type g > press Enter.
The imaging engine begins creating the image of the master computer and the image is sent
to and put down on each participating computer. Any problems are reported back and
displayed on the master computer.
or
To start the multicast session from the imaging server, load the imaging server (imgserv.nlm
or .dll or .dlm) > select Manually Start Multicast > specify the full path to the image file you
want to multicast > specify session parameters > select Yes to start the multicast session.
The image is sent to and put down on each participating computer.
At the imaging server, select Multicast Sessions to see how many clients have registered and
how many the session is still waiting for. For example, 3/2 means 3 clients have registered and
2 more need to register before the session can begin. You can delete any session listed, even
if it is in progress, by selecting the session name > pressing Delete.
7 At each participating computer, when the imaging is done, do the following to boot the
computer with the new operating system:
7a At the Linux prompt, type lilo.s > press Enter.
7b Press Ctrl+Alt+Delete.
If the computer doesn’t boot to the new operating system (that is, if the Linux prompt
reappears), enter the lilo.s command again and reboot the computer a second time.
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Imaging Utilities and Options
The following sections provide reference information on Novell® ZENworks® for Desktops (ZfD)
Imaging utilities, commands, configuration settings, and log formats.
Š “Image Explorer (Imgexp.exe)” on page 479
Š “Imaging Agent (Ziswin.exe)” on page 480
Š “Image-Safe Data Viewer and Editor (Zisview and Zisedit)” on page 481
Š “Imaging Boot Disk Creator (Zimgboot.exe)” on page 483
Š “Imaging Bootup Parameters (Settings.txt)” on page 486
Š “Imaging Bootup Languages (Zimglang.ini)” on page 488
Š “Imaging Engine (Img: Command Line and Menu)” on page 488
Š “Imaging Server (Imgserv.nlm or .dll or .dlm)” on page 500
Š “Imaging Server Log (Zimglog.xml)” on page 501
Image Explorer (Imgexp.exe)
Use the Image Explorer utility at a Windows workstation to view or customize workstation images
or to create add-on images.
Imgexp.exe is located in the zenworks\imaging folder in your ZfD installation (on the imaging
server).
Using the Image Explorer
To start the Image Explorer as a standalone utility (from Windows), double-click the imgexp.exe
file. There are no command line parameters. To start the utility from ConsoleOne®, click Tools >
ZENworks Utilities > Imaging > Image Explorer.
After starting the utility, you can create a new add-on image or open an existing workstation image.
You can compress an image. You can browse and view the Windows partitions, folders, and files
in the open image. You can customize the image by adding or excluding individual files and
folders and by adding Windows registry (.reg) files that will be applied after the image is put down.
You can associate these customizations with any of ten possible variants of the image. You can
purge deleted and hidden files from an image. For information on how to perform these tasks, see
the online help in the utility.
IMPORTANT: Do not exclude .bpb files from a base image or the workstation won’t be able to boot the new
operating system after receiving the image.
NOTE: Non-Windows partitions, such as NetWare® partitions, are visible when you open an image, but their
contents are not.
Images larger than 4 GB stored on a NetWare server cannot be opened by Image Explorer.
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Imaging Agent (Ziswin.exe)
The Imaging Agent is an extension to the Windows bootup procedure on a workstation. It runs
before any network communications are established. It enables you to:
Š Make an existing Windows workstation safe for reimaging
When you install the Imaging Agent on an existing Windows workstation, it saves certain
workstation-unique data (such as the IP address and Computer name) to an area on the hard
disk that is safe from reimaging. After the workstation is reimaged and Windows reboots, the
agent restores the data from the image-safe area so the workstation can communicate on the
network using the same identity as before.
Š Automatically assign a network identity to a brand new workstation
A new workstation (with no Windows operating system) doesn’t have a network identity
established yet. You can define network identity information for such a workstation in an NDS
or Novell® eDirectoryTM policy and apply it when the workstation receives its first Windows
image. In this scenario, the Windows image is put down (including the Imaging Agent) on the
workstation and the identity information from the NDS or eDirectory policy is written to the
image-safe area on the hard disk. When the workstation reboots, the Imaging Agent reads the
data from the image-safe area and applies it to the Windows installation, thus establishing the
workstation’s network identity automatically.
Before you install the Imaging Agent on a workstation, the files that comprise it are available in
the zenworks\imaging folder in your ZfD installation (on the imaging server). After you install the
Imaging Agent on a workstation, it is located either in the Windows system folder or in
novell\zenis on the drive where Windows is installed.
Installing the Imaging Agent
To install the Imaging Agent so that it runs automatically each time Windows starts, follow the
instructions in Chapter 41, “Setting Up Workstations for Imaging,” on page 445.
The data that the Imaging Agent saves to (or restores from) the image-safe area includes the
following:
Š Whether a static IP address or DHCP is used
Š If a static IP address is used:
Š IP address
Š Subnet mask
Š Default gateway (router)
Š Computer (NETBIOS) name
Š Workgroup that the workstation belongs to, if any
Š If the workstation has been registered in NDS or eDirectory:
Š Distinguished name of the Workstation object
Š Context of the Workstation object
Š NDS or eDirectory tree that the Workstation object belongs to
On a workstation that has just received a new Windows NT/2000/XP base image, in addition to
restoring the above data, the agent also locates and modifies all instances of the Security Identifier
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(SID). This ensures that the workstation has a SID that is unique from other workstations that
might receive the same image.
IMPORTANT: The Imaging Agent does not save or restore any Windows NT/2000/XP Domain information. If
you change a workstation’s domain and then restore an image, the workstation will receive whatever domain
is embedded in the new image.
Image-Safe Data Viewer and Editor (Zisview and Zisedit)
After booting a workstation from an imaging device, you can enter zisedit and zisview at
the Linux bash prompt to edit and view the image-safe data for that workstation.
Image-Safe Data Viewer
The image-safe data viewer (zisview) displays the following information about the workstation:
Category
Information
Image-safe Data
Š Version
The version number of the Imaging Agent (ziswin)
Š Just imaged
If this is set to False, the Imaging Agent (ziswin) will
read data from the Windows registry and write it to the
image-safe data store. If this is set to True, the
Imaging Agent will read data from the image-safe data
store and write it to the Windows registry.
Š Last image a script
Shows whether or not the last image was restored
using a script
Š Last image restored
The name of the last base image that was restored to
the workstation
Workstation Identity Information
Š Workstation Object
The distinguished name of this computer’s
workstation
Š Preferred Tree
The NDS or Novell eDirectory tree containing the
workstation object
Š NetBIOS Name
The NetBIOS name for the workstation
Š Workgroup
The Microsoft network workgroup of the workstation
Š Windows SID
The Windows Security ID of the workstation
Š Workstation ID
The workstation identification number
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Category
Information
Production IP Information
Š Uses DHCP or Static IP Address
If an IP address is being used, this shows the IP
address, gateway, and subnet mask.
Production DNS Information
Š DNS Servers
The number of DNS nameservers used for DNS name
resolution
Š DNS Suffix
The DNS context of the workstation
Š DNS Hostname
The DNS local hostname of the workstation
To use zisview, enter any of the following commands at the Linux bash prompt:
Command
Explanation
zisview
Displays all image-safe data
zisview -z field
Displays information about a specific field or fields. field is
one or more field names separated by a space. field is not
case-sensitive. All of the following are valid field names:
JustImaged
ScriptedImage
LastBaseImage
ObjectDN
Tree
NetBIOSName
WorkGroup
SID
WorkstationID
DHCP
IP
Gateway
Mask
DNSServerCount
DNSSuffix
DNSHostName
zisview -s
Creates a script that can be used to generate environment
variables that contain all the image-safe data fields
zisview -h
Displays help for zisview
Image-Safe Data Editor
Use the image-safe data editor (zisedit) to change, clear, or remove information from the
workstation’s image-safe data.
To use zisedit, enter any of the following commands at the Linux bash prompt:
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Command
Explanation
zisedit
This displays a screen showing all of the image-safe data
fields. You can add or change any of the information in the
fields.
zisedit field=new_information
You can change the information for one field using this
syntax, where field is any valid field name and
new_information is the information you want this field to
contain. field is not case sensitive.
For example, enter zisedit Mask=255.255.252.0 to
enter this information in the subnet mask field.
All of the following are valid field names:
JustImaged
ScriptedImage
LastBaseImage
ObjectDN
Tree
NetBIOSName
WorkGroup
SID
WorkstationID
DHCP
IP
Gateway
Mask
DNSServerCount
DNSSuffix
DNSHostName
zisedit -c
Clears all image-safe data fields
zisedit -r
Removes all image-safe data fields
zisedit -h
Displays help for zisedit
Imaging Boot Disk Creator (Zimgboot.exe)
Use the Imaging Boot Disk Creator at a Windows workstation to create or update imaging boot
diskettes, so you can boot computers to perform imaging tasks. Also use this utility to create a PXE
boot disk to be used with a computer that cannot be PXE enabled, and to create a diskette which
contains Linux utilities.
IMPORTANT: You can update imaging boot diskettes only in the sense that the same physical diskettes can
be reused. When updating the second, third, and fourth diskettes or the optional language diskette, you must
reformat the diskette before updating it. The first diskette can be reused without reformatting.
Zimgboot.exe is located in the zenworks\imaging folder in your ZfD installation (on the imaging
server). It is also accessible from the Tools menu of ConsoleOne.
This section includes the following information:
Š “Starting the Imaging Boot Disk Creator” on page 484
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Š “Using Zimgboot.exe to Add Linux Drivers” on page 484
Š “Using Zimgboot.exe to Create a Language Disk” on page 485
Š “Using Zimgboot.exe to Create a Utility Disk” on page 485
Š “Using Zimgboot.exe to Create a PXE Disk” on page 486
Starting the Imaging Boot Disk Creator
To start the boot disk creator as a standalone utility (from Windows), double-click the
zimgboot.exe file. There are no command line parameters. To start the utility from ConsoleOne,
click Tools > ZENworks Utilities > Imaging > Create or Modify Boot Diskette.
TIP: If the Imaging Boot Disk Creator fills up too much of your screen, change your screen resolution to a
setting greater than 800 X 600.
For the overall process to create imaging boot diskettes, see “Creating Imaging Boot Diskettes” on
page 446. When creating the diskettes, you can configure various aspects of the imaging bootup
process, including:
Š How to communicate on the IP network, if necessary
Š How automated the imaging bootup process should be
Š Which imaging server to contact during automated operations
Š How large the imaging ZfD Workstation Imaging (Linux) partition on the hard disk should be,
if one will be created
Š Which language support (English or otherwise) to load for the keyboard
For details on these and other configuration options, see the online help (click the Help menu or
press F1) in the utility. The configuration settings you make in the utility are saved to the
settings.txt file on the fourth imaging boot diskette. You can edit this file after creating the diskettes
if needed. For details on the format of this file, see “Imaging Bootup Parameters (Settings.txt)” on
page 486.
If you need to create imaging boot diskettes to boot with a non-English keyboard but the language
you need isn’t listed in the utility, see “Imaging Bootup Languages (Zimglang.ini)” on page 488.
Using Zimgboot.exe to Add Linux Drivers
Use the Add Linux Drivers function to specify the Linux drivers you want to place on the fourth
boot diskette (if space allows) or on an additional Linux drivers diskette.
Using this function, you can search for and add the network path to Linux driver files that you have
created or downloaded. The dialog box helps you to build a drivers list and categorize it by driver
type (SCSI, Block, Network, PCMCIA, and Miscellaneous). You can also remove unwanted
drivers from the list. This master list of driver files can be added to a diskette that you can specify
later.
The Add Linux Drivers function also lets you specify the drivers you want to load by default. You
do this by selecting the name of a driver on the master list and then clicking the Load button. This
moves the driver name to the default load list, where you can change the load order of the default
drivers and further specify their individual loading parameters.
When your load list is ready, you can use a function in zimgboot.exe to copy the additional Linux
drivers to a diskette. All of the driver files are stored in different subdirectories of the \drivers
directory on the diskette:
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Š Network drivers are stored in \drivers\net
Š PCMCIA drivers are stored in \drivers\pcmcia
Š Block drivers are stored in \drivers\block
Š SCSI drivers are stored in \drivers\scsi
Š Miscellaneous drivers are stored in \drivers\misc
These drivers can also be added to an imaging boot CD, hard-disk partition, or for use with Preboot
Services. For more information, see “Preparing an Imaging Boot CD” on page 448 and “Adding
Linux Drivers to Your Boot Device or Method” on page 449.
Obtaining Linux Drivers
To obtain a Linux driver for your particular hardware, visit the Web site of the hardware vendor
and check for a download location.
There are also some other Web sites where you can obtain drivers:
Š Network drivers can be downloaded from the Scyld Computing Corporation (http://
www.scyld.com). Click Network Drivers.
Š PCMCIA drivers can be downloaded from the Linux PCMCIA Information Page (http://
pcmcia-cs.sourceforge.net).
You can also get additional Linux drivers at the Novell ZENworks Cool Solutions Web
Community (http://www.novell.com/coolsolutions/zenworks/features/a_linux_drivers_zw.html).
To learn more about drivers, including the loading parameters you need to specify, see the Linux
Documentation Project (http://www.linuxdoc.org) and visit the following HOWTO (http://
www.linuxdoc.org/HOWTO/HOWTO-INDEX/howtos.html) sites:
Š Hardware
Š PCMCIA
Š SCSI
Š Ethernet
Using Zimgboot.exe to Create a Language Disk
If you use the Boot Disk Creator to create boot diskettes, and if you choose a non-English keyboard
in the Language/Country field of the Boot Disk Creator dialog box, you can click Create Language
Disk to create a language diskette that will be used to boot the workstation with the imaging
diskettes in the non-English language you chose. The diskette you use must be an empty,
formatted, high-density diskette. Do not reuse an old imaging diskette unless you reformat it first.
Using Zimgboot.exe to Create a Utility Disk
You can use the Boot Disk Creator to create a diskette that contains Linux utilities such as df
(shows disk usage), fdisk, less, more, host (performs DNS lookups in order to convert DNS names
to IP addresses), ldd (shows shared library dependencies), pico (text editor), sed (stream file
editor), and touch (changes file time stamps). These utilities are not needed to perform imaging,
but they may be useful to you for debugging purposes when imaging is booted to manual or
maintenance mode.
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To create the utility disk, insert an empty, formatted, high-density diskette and click Create Utility
Disk. When created, the utility disk will contain a tar file, utility.tgz. To decompress the file and
extract it to the root file system, enter utility.s at the linux bash prompt.
Using Zimgboot.exe to Create a PXE Disk
You can use the Boot Disk Creator to create a PXE boot diskette that will allow you to use PXE
on a workstation that is not PXE-enabled. Click Create PXE Disk to launch PXE-on-Disk. You
will need one empty, formatted, high-density diskette.
If you are running ConsoleOne from a NetWare imaging server, the Create a PXE Disk button is
disabled because the ZfD installation program does not copy PXE-on-Disk files to a NetWare
server. You will need to copy the PXE-on-Disk files to a Windows workstation.
For more information, see the ZENworks for Desktops 4 Preboot Services Installation and
Configuration Guide guide.
Imaging Bootup Parameters (Settings.txt)
The settings.txt file contains parameters that control how the imaging boot-up process occurs.
Settings.txt is installed to the root of the imaging boot device (CD, hard-disk partition, the fourth
diskette, or on the Imaging/Preboot Services server).
Settings.txt Parameters
Settings.txt is a plain text file that contains various parameters, each on a separate line. Each
parameter has the general format of PARAMETER=value. Lines that begin with a pound sign (#)
are comments and are ignored during the imaging bootup process.
The format and function of each parameter in the settings.txt file are described in the table below.
Parameter
Specifies
PROMPT
Whether to prompt for each configuration setting when you boot a computer from the imaging
device. If you leave this parameter commented out or set it to No, the computer boots using the
configuration settings specified in settings.txt and you can’t override the settings during bootup
unless you type config at the boot prompt before the Linux operating system begins to load.
If you set this parameter to Yes, you are automatically prompted for each configuration setting
during bootup.
PARTITIONSIZE
The number of megabytes to allocate to the ZfD Workstation Imaging (Linux) partition if you
choose to create one locally on a computer when you boot the computer from the imaging
device. The default size is 100 MB. The minimum partition size is 50 MB. The maximum size
allowed is 2048 MB (2 GB). If you plan to store an image in the ZfD imaging partition, such as
to enable the computer to be restored to a certain state without connecting to the network, you
might want to specify a larger size on this parameter.
Example: PARTITIONSIZE=500
IPADDR
The IP address used by a computer to communicate on the network when you boot the
computer from the imaging device, if a static IP address is needed.
Example: IPADDR=137.65.95.126
If you want DHCP to be used, leave this and the next two parameters commented out.
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Parameter
Specifies
GATEWAY
The IP address of the gateway (router) to be used by the computer, if the computer is using a
static IP address.
Example: GATEWAY=137.65.95.254
If DHCP is being used, leave this parameter commented out.
NETMASK
The subnet mask to be used by the computer, if the computer is using a static IP address.
Example: NETMASK=255.255.252.0
If DHCP is being used, leave this parameter commented out.
DNSDOMAINSUFFIX
The list of DNS domain suffixes to be used to identify connections used by this computer. Use
a space to separate entries.
Example: DNSDOMAINSUFFIX=example.novell.com example.xyz.org
If DHCP is being used, leave this parameter commented out.
DNSNAMESERVER
The list of DNS name servers, by IP address, to use for resolving DNS domain names used on
this computer. Use a space to separate entries.
Example: DNSNAMESERVER=123.45.6.7 123.45.6.9
If DHCP is being used, leave this parameter commented out.
PROXYADDR
The IP address or full DNS name of the imaging (proxy) server to connect to when you boot a
computer from the imaging device in auto-imaging mode.
Examples:
PROXYADDR=137.65.95.127
PROXYADDR=imaging.xyz.com
This parameter is used to set the PROXYADDR environment variable in Linux when the
computer is booted from the imaging device. The imaging engine then reads this variable to
determine which server to contact if it’s running in automatic mode. Whether it’s running in
automatic or manual mode, the imaging engine attempts to log the imaging results to the server
specified in this variable.
MANUALREBOOT
Whether you must reboot a computer manually after it was booted from the imaging device in
automatic mode. (If the computer was booted from the imaging device in manual mode, you
must always reboot the computer manually.)
If you boot a computer from the imaging device and you let the bootup process proceed in
automatic mode, the imaging engine starts up and checks the imaging server to see if an
imaging operation should be performed on the computer. If so, it performs the imaging
operation and then quits. If not, it quits without doing anything.
What happens next depends on how you set this parameter. If you leave it commented out or
set it to No, you are prompted to remove the imaging device (if necessary) and press any key
to reboot the computer to the native operating system. If you set this parameter to Yes, the
computer doesn't reboot automatically but instead displays the Linux prompt, allowing you to
perform additional imaging-related tasks using the Linux menu or at the command line. This is
helpful if you want to do things like check the current partition information or the image-safe
data before booting to the native operating system.
Example: MANUALREBOOT=YES
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Parameter
Specifies
LANGDISK
Whether to prompt for a language diskette when you boot a computer from the imaging device.
Set this parameter to Yes only if the computer has a non-English keyboard and you have
created a language diskette to support that keyboard as explained in the online help for the
Imaging Boot Disk Creator (Zimgboot.exe) utility. If you need to support a language that’s not
listed in the Imaging Boot Disk Creator utility, see “Imaging Bootup Languages (Zimglang.ini)”
on page 488.
Example: LANGDISK=YES
LOADDDITIONALDRIVERS
Whether to prompt for a diskette with a /drivers directory containing additional Linux device
drivers. This is a way to add drivers that might not be included, or to update existing drivers.
Example: LOADADDITIONALDRIVERS=YES
The location of the driver on the diskette depends on the type of driver. For example, a network
driver would be in /drivers/kernel/drivers/net.
There might also be a drivers.conf in the /drivers directory on the diskette that will be used to
configure the drivers in a specific way. For more information about adding or updating drivers,
see “Adding Linux Device Drivers” on page 449.
Imaging Bootup Languages (Zimglang.ini)
The zimglang.ini file defines the non-English keyboards that are supported for the imaging bootup
process. You can create language diskettes for each of these languages using the Imaging Boot
Disk Creator (Zimgboot.exe) utility. You can add support for additional languages to this file as
explained in Chapter 41, “Setting Up Workstations for Imaging,” on page 445.
Zimglang.ini is located in the zenworks\imaging folder in your ZfD installation (on the imaging
server).
Using Zimglang.ini
This is a standard Windows .ini format file. Each section of the file defines the keyboard support
for a single language, including the keyboard mappings, fonts, and Unicode mappings to use. For
example, the German keyboard is defined like this:
[German]
keymap=keymaps/de.kmap.gz
Font=consolefonts/iso01.f16.psf.gz
ACM=consoletrans/iso01.acm.gz
You can add support for additional languages to this file as explained in Chapter 41, “Setting Up
Workstations for Imaging,” on page 445.
Imaging Engine (Img: Command Line and Menu)
After booting a computer from an imaging device, use the img command at the Linux bash prompt
to do any of the following:
Š Take an image of the computer’s hard disks
Š Put down an image on the computer’s hard disks
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Š View or manipulate the computer’s hard-disk partitions
Š View the computer’s hardware configuration or image-safe data
Š Display a menu from which you can also perform all of these tasks
The imaging engine is installed to the bin folder on the imaging boot device. If the imaging boot
device is diskettes or a CD, the bin folder is actually archived in the root.tgz file, which is expanded
during the imaging bootup process. If the imaging boot method is Preboot Services, the imaging
engine is downloaded to the computer during bootup.
Because the imaging engine is a Linux application, the command syntax is case-sensitive. The
overall syntax is:
img [mode]
where mode is any of the modes described in the sections below.
NOTE: Each mode can be abbreviated to the first letter of its name. For example, img dump can be
abbreviated img d.
Š “Help Mode” on page 489
Š “Auto Mode” on page 490
Š “Make Mode” on page 490
Š “Restore Mode” on page 493
Š “Dump Mode” on page 496
Š “Partition Mode” on page 496
Š “ZENPartition Mode” on page 497
Š “Information Mode” on page 498
Š “Session (Multicast) Mode” on page 499
Displaying the Menu for img Commands
To access a menu from which to perform all of these tasks, enter img with no parameters.
Help Mode
Use Help mode to get information about the img command if you don’t have this documentation
available.
To use the Help mode:
1 Enter img to display a menu > select Help > a mode name.
or
Enter the following:
img [help [mode]]
where mode is the mode whose command syntax you want help with.
Example
Explanation
img help
Displays a short description of each mode.
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Example
Explanation
img help m
Displays information on how to use the Make mode.
img help p
Displays information on how to use the Partition mode.
Auto Mode
Use Auto mode to image the computer automatically, based on any applicable NDS or eDirectory
policies and settings. The imaging engine runs in this mode if you let the imaging bootup process
proceed without interruption, or if you type the command below at the Linux prompt.
To use the Auto mode:
1 Enter img to display a menu > select Auto.
or
Enter the following:
img auto
In this mode, the imaging engine queries the imaging server specified in the PROXYADDR
environment variable for any work to do. The imaging server checks the relevant NDS or
eDirectory policies and settings to determine what imaging tasks should be performed (if any),
such as taking or putting down an image. It then instructs the imaging engine to perform those
tasks. If any tasks involve storing or retrieving images on other imaging servers, the imaging server
refers the imaging engine to those servers to complete those tasks. After the imaging engine has
completed its work, it communicates the results to the original imaging server, and the results are
logged on that server.
For information on configuring the NDS or eDirectory policies and settings that control what
happens in this mode, see Chapter 42, “Setting Up Imaging Policies,” on page 457.
Make Mode
Use the Make mode to take an image of the computer and store it in a specified location. Normally,
all partitions on hard disks and other storage devices (such as Jaz drives) are included in the image,
but there are some exceptions noted below.
The image size will correspond roughly to the size of the data in the Windows partitions plus the
entire size of any non-Windows partitions (such as NetWare partitions). Linux partitions and
Compaq configuration partitions are always excluded. The data from Windows partitions is stored
in an intelligent, file-by-file format so you can customize it later using the Image Explorer
(Imgexp.exe) utility. Non-Windows partitions are stored in a raw, bit-by-bit format that cannot be
customized.
The syntax of this mode depends on whether you will store the image locally or on an imaging
(proxy) server, as explained in the subsections below:
Š “Make Locally” on page 491
Š “Make on Proxy” on page 492
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Make Locally
Use the Make Locally mode to take an image of the computer and store it in a partition on a local
(writable) device, such as a hard disk or Jaz drive. For more information, see Chapter 44, “Setting
Up Disconnected Imaging Operations,” on page 465.
To use the Make Locally mode:
1 Enter img to display a menu > select Make an Image > Local Image. Select the partition to
store the image in, or Local Linux File System to store the image in the local ZfD Workstation
Imaging (Linux) partition. Type the image path and filename. If you are using compression,
select a compression option. (Optimize for Speed takes the least amount of time but creates
the largest image file. Optimize for Space creates the smallest image file but might take a
significant amount of time. Balanced is a compromise between compression time and image
file size.) Specify any advanced parameters, such as xpartition. If you want, specify additional
information in the Description (a description of the image), Machine Name (the computer on
which the image is being stored), Author (the name of the person entering this information),
and Comments (any additional comments) fields.
or
Enter the following:
img makel[pNumber] filepath [comp=comp level] [xpartition]
Parameter
Specifies
makel[pNumber]
The partition number (as displayed by img dump) of the local partition to store the image in. It must be
a primary FAT16 or FAT32 partition. This partition is excluded from the image that’s created.
If you omit the partition number from this parameter, the image is stored in the local ZfD imaging partition.
filepath
The image filename, including a .zmg extension and the complete path from the root of the partition. The
directories in the path must exist. If the file already exists, it will be overwritten.
[comp=comp level]
comp level is the amount of compression used when creating the image. Specify any number from 0-9.
0 means no compression. 1 is the same as Optimize for Speed and is used by default if you do not
specify this parameter. 6 is the same as Balanced. 9 is the same as Optimize for Space. See the
paragraph in Step 1 on page 491 for more information.
xpartition
The partition number (as displayed by img dump) of a local partition to exclude from the image. You can
repeat this parameter as needed to exclude multiple partitions.
If you omit this parameter, all partitions are included in the image except the one where the image will
be stored.
Example
Explanation
img makel8 /imgs/dellnt.zmg
Takes an image of all partitions except the one in slot 8 and saves the image to
imgs/dellnt.zmg in the partition in slot 8. (Assumes slot 8 contains a primary FAT16
or FAT32 partition.)
img makel /imgs/dellnt.zmg
Takes an image of all partitions and saves it to imgs/dellnt.zmg in the ZfD imaging
partition. (Assumes the ZfD imaging partition has been installed.)
img makel /imgs/dellnt.zmg x2 x3
Takes an image of all partitions except those in slots 2 and 3 and saves the image
to imgs/dellnt.zmg in the ZfD imaging partition. (Assumes the ZfD imaging
partition has been installed.)
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Make on Proxy
Use the Make on Proxy mode to take an image of the computer and store it on an imaging (proxy)
server. For more information, see “Manually Taking an Image of a Workstation” on page 462.
To use the Make on Proxy mode:
1 Enter img to display a menu > select Make an Image > Proxy Image. Type the IP address or
DNS name of your imaging server. Type the UNC path and filename where the new image is
to be stored on the imaging (proxy) server. If you are using compression, select a compression
option. (Optimize for Speed takes the least amount of time but creates the largest image file.
Optimize for Space creates the smallest image file but might take a significant amount of time.
Balanced is a compromise between compression time and image file size.) Specify any
advanced parameters, such as xpartition. If you want, specify additional information in the
Description (a description of the image), Machine Name (the computer on which the image is
being stored), Author (the name of the person entering this information), and Comments (any
additional comments) fields.
or
Enter the following:
img makep address filepath [comp=comp level] [xpartition]
Parameter
Specifies
address
The IP address or DNS name of the imaging server to store the image on.
filepath
The image filename, including a .zmg extension and the complete path in UNC style. The directories in
the path must exist. If the file already exists, the imaging server won’t overwrite it unless you enable this
behavior in the imaging server’s policy in NDS or eDirectory. (See “Allowing Overwriting Filenames and
Restricting Save Location of Image Files (Imaging Server Settings)” on page 460.) If no folders are
specified in the path, the image is created at the root of the volume or drive where the ZfD Workstation
Imaging server software is installed.
IMPORTANT: Because Linux doesn’t recognize backslashes, you must use forward slashes in the
UNC path or enclose the entire path in quotes.
[comp=comp level]
comp level is the amount of compression used when creating the image. Specify any number from 0-9.
0 means no compression. 1 is the same as Optimize for Speed and is used by default if you do not
specify this parameter. 6 is the same as Balanced. 9 is the same as Optimize for Space.
xpartition
The partition number (as displayed by img dump) of a local partition to exclude from the image. You can
repeat this parameter as needed to exclude multiple partitions.
If you omit this parameter, all partitions are included in the image.
Example
Explanation
img makep 137.65.95.127 //xyz_server/sys/imgs/dellnt.zmg
Takes an image of all partitions and saves it to
sys/imgs/dellnt.zmg on xyz_server. (Assumes
137.65.95.127 is the IP address of xyz_server.)
img makep img.xyz.com //xyz_server/sys/imgs/dellnt.zmg x2 x3 Takes an image of all partitions except those in
slots 2 and 3 and saves the image to sys/imgs/
dellnt.zmg on xyz_server. (Assumes
img.xyz.com is the DNS name of xyz_server.)
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Restore Mode
Use the Restore mode to retrieve an image from a specified location and put it down on the
computer.
Normally, if the image to be put down is a base image (one created previously by the imaging
engine), all existing partitions except Linux and Compaq configuration partitions are removed
from all local writable devices (such as hard disks and Jaz drives) before the new image is put
down. When the image is put down, the sizes of the original partitions from which the image was
taken are preserved if possible. If there’s insufficient space, the last partition is shrunk to fit unless
this would result in data loss, in which case the imaging engine denies the requested operation. If
there’s extra space left after all partitions in the image have been restored to their original sizes,
that space is left unpartitioned.
If the image to be put down is an add-on image (one produced from an Application object or
created by the Image Explorer (Imgexp.exe) utility), or if it’s a base image and you specify the
apartition:ppartition parameter, none of the existing physical partitions are removed. Instead, the
appropriate partitions are merely updated with the files from the image. The update process does
not remove any existing files or overwrite any existing files of the same names if they are newer.
NOTE: Restoring add-on images over 4 GB in size is not supported by ZfD Workstation Imaging.
The syntax of this mode depends on whether you will retrieve the image from a local device or
from an imaging (proxy) server, as explained in the subsections below:
Š “Restore from Local” on page 493
Š “Restore from Proxy” on page 494
Restore from Local
Use the Restore from Local mode to retrieve an image from a local device and put it down on the
computer. For more information, see Chapter 44, “Setting Up Disconnected Imaging Operations,”
on page 465.
To use the Restore from Local mode:
1 Enter img to display a menu > select Restore an Image > Local Image. Select Local Linux
File System if the image is stored in the local ZfD Workstation Imaging (Linux) partition, or
select the partition where the image is stored. Type the image path and filename. Specify any
advanced parameters, such as sfileset or apartition:ppartition.
or
Enter the following:
img restorel[pNumber] filepath [sfileset]
[apartition:ppartition]
Parameter
Specifies
restorel[pNumber]
The partition number (as displayed by img dump) of the local partition to retrieve the image from. It must
be a primary FAT16 or FAT32 partition. This partition will not be changed by the imaging operation.
If you omit the partition number from this parameter, the image is retrieved from the local ZfD imaging
partition.
filepath
The filename of the image to retrieve, including the .zmg extension and the complete path from the root
of the partition.
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Parameter
Specifies
sfileset
The number of the image fileset (variant) to put down. Valid values are 1 through 10. For information on
creating variants of an image, see Chapter 45, “Preparing Images,” on page 469.
If you omit this parameter, fileset 1 is used.
apartition:ppartition
A mapping between a partition in the image archive (apartition) and a target physical partition on the
local machine (ppartition). Use this parameter to selectively restore a specific part of the image to a
specific local partition.
IMPORTANT: If you use this parameter, none of the existing local partitions are removed, and only the
target local partition is updated. The update process does not remove any existing files or overwrite any
existing files of the same names if they are newer. If you want to remove all existing files from the target
partition before updating it, first use img pd and img pc to delete and recreate the partition.
For apartition, use the partition number displayed for the source partition in the Image Explorer
(Imgexp.exe) utility. For ppartition, use the partition number displayed by img dump for the target
partition. The target partition must be a Windows partition. You can repeat this parameter as needed to
request multiple selective restorations in a single operation. In doing so, you can apply multiple parts of
the image to a single local partition, but you can’t apply the same part of an image to multiple local
partitions in a single operation.
Example
Explanation
img restorel8 /imgs/dellnt.zmg
Removes all existing local partitions except the one in slot 8, retrieves
the image from imgs/dellnt.zmg in slot 8, and puts down the partitions
and contents of that image on the available local writable devices.
(Assumes there’s sufficient local space and that slot 8 contains a
primary FAT16 or FAT32 partition.)
img restorel /imgs/dellnt.zmg
Removes all existing local partitions, retrieves the image from imgs/
dellnt.zmg in the ZfD imaging partition, and puts down the partitions and
contents of that image on the available local writable devices (assuming
there’s sufficient space).
img restorel /imgs/dellnt.zmg s2
Removes all existing local partitions, retrieves the image from imgs/
dellnt.zmg in the ZfD imaging partition, and puts down the partitions and
contents of variant 2 of that image on the available local writable
devices (assuming there’s sufficient space).
img restorel /imgs/dellnt.zmg a2:p1 a3:p1 Retrieves the image from imgs/dellnt.zmg in the ZfD imaging partition,
updates local partition 1 with the data from partitions 2 and 3 of that
image, and leaves the other local partitions unchanged. (Assumes
there’s sufficient space in local partition 1.)
Restore from Proxy
Use the Restore from Proxy mode to retrieve an image from an imaging (proxy) server and put it
down on the computer. For more information, see “Manually Putting an Image on a Workstation”
on page 463.
To use the Restore from Proxy mode:
1 Enter img to display a menu > select Restore an Image > Proxy Image. Type the IP address
or DNS name of the imaging (proxy) server. Type the UNC path and filename where the
image is to be retrieved from. Specify any advanced parameters, such as sfileset or
apartition:ppartition.
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or
Enter the following:
img restorep address filepath [sfileset]
[apartition:ppartition]
Parameter
Specifies
address
The IP address or DNS name of the imaging server to retrieve the image from.
filepath
The filename of the image to retrieve, including the .zmg extension and the complete path in UNC style.
IMPORTANT: Because Linux doesn’t recognize backslashes, you must use forward slashes in the
UNC path or enclose the entire path in quotes.
sfileset
The number of the image fileset (variant) to put down. Valid values are 1 through 10. For information on
creating variants of an image, see Chapter 45, “Preparing Images,” on page 469.
If you omit this parameter, fileset 1 is used.
apartition:ppartition
A mapping between a partition in the image archive (apartition) and a target physical partition on the
local machine (ppartition). Use this parameter to selectively restore a specific part of the image to a
specific local partition.
IMPORTANT: If you use this parameter, none of the existing local partitions are removed, and only the
target local partition is updated. The update process does not remove any existing files or overwrite any
existing files of the same names if they are newer. If you want to remove all existing files from the target
partition before updating it, first use the Partition Mode to delete and recreate the partition.
For apartition, use the partition number displayed for the source partition in the Image Explorer
(Imgexp.exe) utility. For ppartition, use the partition number displayed by img dump for the target
partition. The target partition must be a Windows partition. You can repeat this parameter as needed to
request multiple selective restorations in a single operation. In doing so, you can apply multiple parts of
the image to a single local partition, but you can’t apply the same part of an image to multiple local
partitions in a single operation.
Example
Explanation
img restorep 137.65.95.127 //xyz_server/sys/
imgs/dellnt.zmg
Removes all existing local partitions, retrieves the image from
sys/imgs/dellnt.zmg on xyz_server, and puts down the
partitions and contents of that image on the available local
writable devices. (Assumes there’s sufficient local space and
that 137.65.95.127 is the IP address of xyz_server.)
img restorep img.xyz.com //xyz_server/sys/imgs/
dellnt.zmg s2
Removes all existing local partitions, retrieves the image from
sys/imgs/dellnt.zmg on xyz_server, and puts down the
partitions and contents of variant 2 of that image on the
available local writable devices. (Assumes there’s sufficient
local space and that img.xyz.com is the DNS name of
xyz_server.)
img restorep img.xyz.com //xyz_server/sys/imgs/
dellnt.zmg a2:p1
Retrieves the image from sys/imgs/dellnt.zmg on xyz_server,
updates local partition 1 with the data from partition 2 of that
image, and leaves the other local partitions unchanged.
(Assumes there’s sufficient space in local partition 1 and that
img.xyz.com is the DNS name of xyz_server.)
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Dump Mode
Use the Dump mode to view information about the storage devices and partitions on the computer.
To use the Dump mode:
1 Enter img to display a menu > select Dump > select No Geometry or Show Geometry.
or
Enter the following:
img dump [geo]
Parameter
Specifies to
dump
List the existing partitions on all local writable devices, such as hard disks and Jaz drives. For each partition, the
type, size, and slot number of the partition are given.
NOTE: Linux and Compaq configuration partitions are not listed.
geo
Display additional information about the geometry (cylinders, heads, and sectors) and capacity of each storage
device, including read-only devices such as CD drives.
Example
Explanation
img dump
Lists the current partitions on all local writable devices.
img dump geo
Lists all storage devices, their geometry and capacity, and the current partitions on the writable devices.
Partition Mode
Use the Partition mode to create, delete, or activate (make bootable) a partition on the computer.
To use the Partition mode:
1 Enter img to display a menu > select Partition > select an operation. See the table below for
more information.
or
Enter the following:
img poperation
where operation is one of the following:
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Operation
Specifies to
pcpNumber type [size]
[cluster=clusterSize]
Create a new partition, where:
Š pNumber is the number of the partition slot (as displayed by img dump) to create the partition in
Š type is a keyword, FAT12, FAT16, FAT32, NTFS, or Extended, or a numerical value for the
partition type, for example 0x0C (hexadecimal) or 11 (decimal)
If you are creating an extended partition, you can create a logical drive inside of the extended
partition. See the next table for an example.
Š size is a valid size for the partition type in MB
If you omit this parameter, the largest valid size for the partition type is used, given the available
unpartitioned space on the drive.
Š clusterSize is the cluster size for an NTFS partition. This parameter is not valid for any other
partition type.
Don’t use this parameter unless you have a specific reason to do so. It must be a power of 2
(2, 4, 8, 16, ...128). If you omit this parameter, the imaging engine uses a reasonable cluster
size for the NTFS partition size.
The new partition is also formatted enough to be recognizable by other operating systems, but you
must put a base image in the partition before Windows can store any files in it.
pdpNumber
Delete the partition from slot number pNumber. Use img dump to get the slot number.
papNumber
Activate (make bootable) the partition in slot number pNumber. Use img dump to get the slot
number.
Example
Explanation
img pc1 fat16
Creates a FAT16 partition in slot 1 using all the available unpartitioned space on the drive.
img pc5 fat32 5671
Creates a FAT32 partition in slot 5 using 5,671 MB on the drive.
img pd3
Deletes the partition from slot 3.
img pa5
Activates (makes bootable) the partition in slot 5. (Assumes a partition exists in that slot.)
img pc2 extended 2500 Creates an extended partition with a 2000 NTFS logical drive and a 500 MB FAT16 logical drive.
img pc2 NTFS 2000
cluster=1
img pc2 fat16 500
ZENPartition Mode
Use the ZENPartition mode to enable, disable, or remove the installed ZfD Workstation Imaging
(Linux) partition.
To use the ZENPartition mode:
1 Enter img to display a menu > select ZENPartition > read the text that displays > select
Continue > select an operation > OK.
or
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Enter the following:
img zenPartition operation
where operation is enable, disable, or remove.
2 Enter lilo.s to make this change effective.
IMPORTANT: If you remove an installed ZfD imaging partition, you must immediately restore a base image
with a valid non-LILO MBR (Master Boot Record). If you do not, the computer will not be able to boot properly.
Information Mode
Use the Information mode to view the following:
Š Information about the hardware devices on the computer
This information is detected during the imaging bootup process. If the imaging engine runs in
auto-imaging mode, this information is sent to the imaging server to help determine which
image to put on the computer, if necessary.
Š The data currently stored in the image-safe area on the computer
This data is saved by the Imaging Agent during each Windows session to ensure that it can be
restored after the computer is reimaged. If the computer is new and doesn’t have Windows
yet, an initial set of data is supplied from an NDS or eDirectory policy via the imaging server
to the imaging engine when the first base Windows image is put down. (For more information,
see “Defining an Imaging Policy for Unregistered Workstations (Server Policy)” on
page 457.)
Š Name of the base image that was last put down on the computer
To use the Information mode:
1 Enter img to display a menu > select Information > select All, Hardware, or ZISD. See the
table below for details.
or
Enter the following:
img info [zisd]
Parameter
Specifies to
info
List the detected hardware devices on the computer, including:
Š CPU chipset
Š Video adapter
Š Network adapter
Š MAC address
Š Sound card
Š Hard drive controller
Š Hard disk capacity
Š RAM
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Parameter
Specifies to
zisd
List the data currently stored in the image-safe area on the computer. The items that comprise this data are listed
in “Imaging Agent (Ziswin.exe)” on page 480.
In addition to the image-safe data, the last base image that was put down on the computer is also listed.
Example
Explanation
img info
Lists the detected hardware devices on the computer.
img info zisd
Lists the ZfD image-safe data currently stored on the computer and the last base image that was put down.
Session (Multicast) Mode
Use the Session (Multicast) mode to take an image of one computer and put it down on multiple
other computers simultaneously over the network in a single operation without NDS/eDirectory or
ZfD server involvement. For more information, see Chapter 46, “Multicasting Images,” on
page 475.
For multicasting to work, each participating computer must boot from an imaging device and run
the imaging engine in this mode, as explained below. The computer from which the image is taken
is called the master, and the computers that receive the image are called participants. (Sometimes
participants are referred to as slaves.) Starting in ZfD 4, you can start the multicast session from
the imaging server. If you start the session this way, you specify an image file for multicasting
rather than a workstation as the session master.
NOTE: For multicasting to work properly, the routers and switches on the network must have multicast
features configured. Otherwise, multicast packets might not be routed properly.
To use the Session (Multicast) mode:
1 Enter img to display a menu > select Multicast Session > select Master or Client. Fill in the
Session Name, Number of Clients, and Timeout fields. See the table below for details.
or
Enter the following:
img session name [master|client] [clients=count [t=minutes]]
Parameter
Specifies
name
The name of the multicast session. Each computer joining the session uses the same value for this parameter.
NOTE: The name must be unique among concurrent multicast sessions. It is hashed by the imaging engine
to produce a Class D (temporary) IP address for the multicast session. To facilitate troubleshooting (wire
sniffing), all ZfD Workstation Imaging multicast addresses start with 231. For example, the session name doug
produces the multicast address 231.139.79.72.
master|client
That this computer is the session master or a session client.
If you omit this parameter, the imaging engine waits for a user on one of the computers to press m to designate
that computer as the master, or for the imaging session to be started from the imaging server by selecting
Manually Start Multicast > providing the required information > selecting Yes.
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Parameter
Specifies
clients=count
The number of participating computers that must register with the master before imaging will begin. The option
only applies for session masters.
If you omit this parameter, the imaging engine waits for the master user to press g. After imaging has begun,
any participating computers attempting to register are denied.
t=minutes
The number of minutes the master computer will wait for the next participant to register before starting the
imaging process without reaching count registered participants. The option only applies for session masters.
If you omit this parameter, the imaging process won’t start until count is reached or the master user presses g.
After that, any participants attempting to register are denied.
Example
Explanation
img session doug
Starts a multicast session named doug. Each successive computer that issues this same
command before the imaging begins joins the session. Imaging doesn’t start until one of the users
presses m to designate himself as master and presses g to start the imaging, or the imaging
session is started from the imaging server by selecting Manually Start Multicast > providing the
required information > selecting Yes.
img session doug m
Starts a multicast session named doug and designates this computer as the master. Each
successive computer that issues img session doug before the imaging begins joins the session
as a participant. Imaging doesn’t start until the master user presses g.
img session doug c=5
Starts a multicast session named doug. Each successive computer that issues img session
doug before the imaging begins joins the session. Imaging doesn’t start until one of the users
presses m to designate himself as master, or until the imaging session is started from the imaging
server by selecting Manually Start Multicast > providing the required information > selecting Yes.
Five other computers must also register as participants before the session begins.
img session doug c=5
t=20
Starts a multicast session named doug. Each successive computer that issues img session
doug before the imaging begins joins the session. Imaging doesn’t start until one of the users
presses m to designate himself as master, or until the imaging session is started from the imaging
server by selecting Manually Start Multicast > providing the required information > selecting Yes.
Either five other computers must register as participants or more than 20 minutes must elapse
between any consecutive participant registrations, whichever occurs first, and then the session will
begin.
Imaging Server (Imgserv.nlm or .dll or .dlm)
The imaging server is a software component of the ZfD server. It enables imaging clients
(computers that are booted from an imaging device) to connect with the network to receive
imaging services, including:
Š Storage or retrieval of an image on a server
Š Automatic imaging based on an NDS/eDirectory policy or setting
Š Logging of the results of an imaging operation
Š A multicast imaging session
The imaging server modules are located on a NetWare server in sys:\system or on a Windows
server in the folder where NDS or eDirectory is installed (such as c:\novell\nds).
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Using the Imaging Server
In most environments, the imaging server starts automatically when you reboot the server after
installing ZfD. With NDS eDirectory 8.5 on Windows, you must start the imaging server manually
as follows: from the folder where NDS is installed, double-click ndscons.exe > select the
imgsrv.dlm service > click Start. You might also want to click Startup to configure the service to
start automatically each time the server reboots.
Use the imaging server for the following:
Š “Viewing Information About Imaging Requests” on page 501
Š “Starting a Manual Multicast Session” on page 501
Viewing Information About Imaging Requests
After the imaging server has started, you can view information about the status and results of the
imaging requests that it has received from imaging clients. A statistical summary of these requests
is shown on the server console (NetWare) or in a window accessible from the system tray
(Windows). The statistics shown on this screen are explained below. All statistics are reset to zero
if you restart the imaging server.
Statistic
Specifies
Update Requests
The number of imaging requests of any kind that have been received by the imaging server since it was
started. This includes requests that failed, were denied, or were referred to other imaging servers (see
Client Referrals below). Information about each of these requests, such as the source, type, date/time,
and results, is logged on the imaging server as explained in “Imaging Server Log (Zimglog.xml)” on
page 501.
Images Sent
The number of images that the imaging server has sent to imaging clients since the imaging server was
started. This includes only images that were retrieved from this imaging server. See Client Referrals
below for more information.
Images Received
The number of new images that have been received and stored on the imaging server since it was
started. This includes images that were received through client referrals as explained below.
Client Referrals
The number of client requests that have been referred (redirected) by the imaging server to other imaging
servers since this imaging server was started. Such referrals are made only when the client is running in
auto-imaging mode and the imaging server determines from NDS or eDirectory that the image to be
created or retrieved is on a different imaging server.
IMPORTANT: If a client is running in manual imaging mode and it requests to store or retrieve an image
on a different imaging server, the request is denied and an error is returned to the client. Referrals are
currently supported only when the client is running in auto-imaging mode.
Starting a Manual Multicast Session
On the server console (NetWare) or in a window accessible from the system tray (Windows), you
can start a manual multicast session, see any sessions in progress, and delete sessions. For more
information, see “Physically Visiting Each Computer” on page 477 in Chapter 46, “Multicasting
Images,” on page 475.
Imaging Server Log (Zimglog.xml)
Zimglog.xml is a chronological record of all the imaging requests that have been received by the
imaging server since it was installed and first started, including requests merely to log information
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about imaging operations serviced elsewhere. For each imaging request, the imaging server logs
information such as the source, type, date/time, and results of the request.
Zimglog.xml is created on a NetWare server in sys:\system or on a Windows server at the root of
the drive where NDS or eDirectory is installed (such as c:\).
Viewing the Log File
This is an XML format file. The oldest imaging request is logged at the top of the file and the most
recent at the bottom. The file continues to grow unless you trim it manually (using a text editor)
or delete it. It isn’t cleared if you restart the imaging server.
Each imaging operation is entered in the log as a group of lines. For example, the log file shown
below has two entries: one describing a successful upload operation and another describing a
failed download operation. (An upload is the taking of a client image and storing it on the imaging
server or other available (local) medium. A download is the retrieval of a client image from the
imaging server or local medium and putting it down on the client.)
<ZENImageLog>
<CN=CV7PB00:C0:4F:DC:2A:B5.O=sales>
<Tree>XYZ</Tree>
<Status>Success</Status>
<Operation>Upload</Operation>
<ImageType>Base Image</ImageType>
<ImagePath>\\XYZ_SERVER\sys\imgs\dell_nt.zmg</ImagePath>
<Timestamp>Thur Nov 22 13:10:05 2001
</Timestamp>
</CN=CV7PB00:C0:4F:DC:2A:B5.O=sales>
<CN=CV7PB00:C0:4F:DC:2A:B5.O=sales>
<Tree>XYZ</Tree>
<Status>Failure</Status>
<ErrorMessage>Unable to find an image to download</ErrorMessage>
<Operation>Download</Operation>
<Timestamp>Thur Nov 22 13:13:17 2001
</Timestamp>
</CN=CV7PB00:C0:4F:DC:2A:B5.O=sales>
</ZENImageLog>
The table below describes the various XML elements that comprise the log entries shown above.
Each element has an opening and closing tag, such as <tree> and </tree>. The outermost element
contains all the other elements in the entry.
XML Element
Specifies
Outermost_Container
The distinguished NDS or eDirectory name of the workstation that requested the imaging operation.
This name is read by the imaging engine from the workstation’s image-safe data. If the workstation
name isn’t found (for example, if the workstation hasn’t been registered as an object in NDS or
eDirectory), the name of the imaging server that serviced the request is given instead (for example,
XYZ_SERVER).
Tree
The NDS or eDirectory tree containing the workstation or server specified in the Outermost_Container
element.
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XML Element
Specifies
Status
Whether the requested imaging operation succeeded or failed.
ErrorMessage
The reason why the requested imaging operation failed, if applicable.
Operation
Whether the requested imaging operation was an upload or download attempt. An upload is the taking
of a client image and storing it on the imaging server or other available (local) medium. A download
is the retrieval of a client image from the imaging server or local medium and putting it down on the
client.
NOTE: Occasionally, you might see an entry in the log that omits the Operation element. Such an
entry is typically a follow-up to the previous operation. For example, you might see an entry indicating
that a download operation was successful, but the next entry (time-stamped a few seconds later and
specifying no operation) might indicate that the imaging server failed to get image-safe data from NDS
or eDirectory. In this case you could assume that the client that just received the download didn’t have
its own image-safe data, and so the imaging server was trying to get that data from NDS or eDirectory
to apply it to the client.
ImageType
Whether the image that was created or retrieved is a base image or an add-on image. With a base
image, all existing partitions and data are removed before the image is put down. With an add-on
image, the existing partitions are left intact and are merely augmented with additional data.
ImagePath
The full path and filename of the image that was created, retrieved, or requested.
Timestamp
The time when the results of the requested imaging operation were logged by the imaging server,
including the week day, month, date, 24-hour time (including seconds), and year.
Imaging Utilities and Options
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Supported Ethernet Cards
The following sections list the Ethernet cards that are supported by Novell® ZENworks® for
Desktops (ZfD) for performing network-connected imaging operations on workstations and laptop
computers. If your workstation or laptop computer doesn’t have one of these cards, you must
supply your own Ethernet driver as explained in “Using Zimgboot.exe to Add Linux Drivers” on
page 484.
Š “Ethernet Cards for a Workstation” on page 505
Š “Ethernet Cards for a Laptop Computer (PCMCIA)” on page 506
Ethernet Cards for a Workstation
The following Ethernet cards are supported for standard desktop (non-laptop) workstations:
Š 3C501
Š Etherlink* II, 3c503, 3c503/16
Š Etherlink plus 3c505
Š Etherlink-16 3c507
Š Etherlink III, 3c509 / 3c509B
Š 3c515
Š 3c590/3c595, 3c592/3c597, 3c900/3c905/3c905B
Š AMD* Lance (7990, 79C960/961/961 A, Pcnet-ISA), AT1500, HP-J2405A, HP-Vectra* On
Board Ethernet, NE1500, NE2100
Š AT2450, AMD 79C965 (Pcnet-32), AMD 79C970/970A (Pcnet-PCI), AMD 79C971, AMD
79C974
Š HP 27245A
Š HP EtherTwist*, PC Lan+ (27247, 27252A)
Š HP 10/100 VG Any Lan Cards (27248B, J2573, J2577, J2585, J970, J973)
Š EtherExpress*
Š EtherExpress Pro/10
Š EtherExpress Pro 10/100 B
Š NE 1000, NE 2000
Š NE2000-PCI
Š Racal* Interlan ni5010, ni5210, ni6210
Š SMC* ultra, SMC EtherEZ(8146)
Supported Ethernet Cards
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Š SMC Ultra32
Š SMC 9000/ SMC 91c92/4
Š SMC 91c100
Ethernet Cards for a Laptop Computer (PCMCIA)
The following Ethernet cards are supported for laptop (PCMCIA) computers:
Driver
Cards
3c589_cs
Š 3Com* 3c589, 3c589B, 3c589C, 3c589D
Š 3Com Megahertz 3CCE589E, 3CXE589D, 3CXE589EC
Š Farallon* EtherWave, EtherMac
fmvj18x_cs (x86, ppc)
Š CONTEC C-NET(PC)C
Š Eagle NE200 Ethernet
Š Eiger Labs EPX-10BT, EPX-ET 10BT, EPX-ET 10TZ
Š Fujitsu* FMV-J181, FMV-J182A, FMV-J183
Š Fujitsu Towa LA501, FMV-1080, FM50N-183
Š Hitachi* HT-4840-11 EtherCard
Š NextCom NC5310
Š RATOC REX-9822, REX-5588A/W, REX-R280
Š TDK LAC-CD02x, LAK-CD021, LAK-CD022A, LAK-CD021AX,
LAK-CD021BX
nmclan_cs
Š New Media EthernetLAN
Š New Media LiveWire* (not LiveWire+)
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Driver
Cards
pcnet_cs (A-D)
Š Accton* EN2212, EN2216 EtherCard
Š Accton SOHO BASIC EN220
Š Addtron Ethernet
Š AIBrain EPCM-T
Š Allied Telesis CentreCOM CE6001, LA-PCM, LA-PCM V2
Š AmbiCom AMB8002, AMB8002T, AMB8010
Š AnyCom* ECO Ethernet
Š Apollo* RE450CT
Š Argosy EN210
Š Arowana RE 450 Ethernet
Š Asante* FriendlyNet (newer cards seem not to work)
Š AST 1082 Ethernet
Š Atelco ethernet
Š Billionton LNT-10TB, LNT-10TN
Š California Access LAN Adapter
Š CeLAN* EPCMCIA
Š CNet CN30BC, CN40BC Ethernet
Š Compex/ReadyLINK Ethernet Combo
Š Compex LinkPort Ethernet
Š COMPU-SHACK BASEline Ethernet
Š Connectware LANdingGear Adapter
Š Corega* Ether PCC-T, PCM-T
Š CyQ've ELA-010 10baseT
Š Danpex* EN-6200P2 Ethernet
Š Datatrek NetCard
Š Dayna* Communications CommuniCard E
Š Digital* DEPCM-AA, PCP78-AC Ethernet
Š Digital EtherWORKS* Turbo Ethernet
Š D-Link* DE-650, DE-660
Š DynaLink L10C Ethernet
Supported Ethernet Cards
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Driver
Cards
pcnet_cs (E-K)
Š Edimax Technology Ethernet Combo
Š EFA InfoExpress 205, 207 Combo
Š Eiger Labs EPX-ET10T2 Combo
Š ELECOM Laneed LD-CDWA, LD-CDX, LD-CDNIA, LD-CDY,
LD-CDF
Š EP-210 Ethernet
Š Epson* Ethernet
Š EtherPRIME Ethernet
Š Explorer NE-10000 Ethernet
Š EZLink 4109 Ethernet
Š Fiberline FL-4680
Š Gateway 2000* Ethernet
Š Genius ME3000II Ethernet
Š Grey Cell Ethernet
Š GVC NIC-2000P Ethernet Combo
Š Hamlet LM560
Š Hawking PN650TX
Š Hypertec HyperNet
Š IBM CreditCard Ethernet Adapter
Š IC-Card Ethernet
Š Infotel IN650ct Ethernet
Š IO DATA PCLA/T, PCLA/TE
Š Katron PE-520 Ethernet
Š KingMax Technology EN10-T2 Ethernet
Š Kingston* KNE-PCM/M, KNE-PC2, KNE-PC2T
Š KTI PE-520 Plus
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Driver
Cards
pcnet_cs (L-R)
Š LANEED LD-CDW Ethernet
Š LanPro EP4000A
Š Lantech Ethernet
Š Level One EPC-0100TB
Š Linksys EtherCard, EC2T Combo
Š Logitec* LPM-LN10T, LPM-LN10BA, LPM-LN20T Ethernet
Š Longshine ShineNet LCS-8534TB Ethernet
Š Macnica ME-1 Ethernet
Š Maxtech* PCN2000 Ethernet
Š Melco LPC-TJ, LPC-TS, LPC-T, LPC2-T
Š Microdyne* NE4200 Ethernet
Š Midori LANNER LT-PCMT
Š NDC Instant-Link
Š NEC PC-9801N-J12
Š Network General Sniffer*
Š New Media LanSurfer
Š Novell/National NE4100 InfoMover*
Š OvisLink Ethernet
Š Panasonic* CF-VEL211P-B
Š Planet SmartCOM 2000, 3500, ENW-3501-T, ENW-3502-T
Š Pretec Ethernet
Š PreMax PE-200 Ethernet
Š Proteon* Ethernet
Š Psion Gold Card Ethernet
Š Relia RE2408T Ethernet
Š Reliasys 2400A Ethernet
Š RPTI EP400, EP401, 1625B Ethernet
Supported Ethernet Cards
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Driver
Cards
pcnet_cs (S-Z)
Š SCM* Ethernet (not SMC)
Š Sky Link Express
Š SMC 8022 EZCard-10
Š Socket Communications EA LAN Adapter
Š Socket Communications LP-E Ethernet
Š Socket Communications LP-E CF+ Ethernet
Š SOHOware* ND5120-E Ethernet
Š SuperSocket RE450T
Š Surecom* Ethernet
Š SVEC PN605C
Š Thomas-Conrad* Ethernet
Š TRENDnet Ethernet
Š Trust Ethernet Combo
Š UNEX NexNIC MA010
Š Volktek NPL-402CT Ethernet
smc91c92_cs
Š Farallon Enet
Š Megahertz XJ10BT, XJ10BC, CC10BT Ethernet
Š New Media BASICS Ethernet
Š OSITECH* Four of Diamonds
Š SMC 8020BT EtherEZ (not EliteCard)
xirc2ps_cs
Š Compaq Ethernet Adapter
Š Xircom* CreditCard CE2, CE IIps, RE-10
3c574_cs Fast Ethernet (10/
100baseT) adapters
510
Š 3Com 3c574TX, 3CCFE574BT, 3CXFE574BT, 3CCSH572BT,
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Driver
Cards
pcnet_cs Fast Ethernet (10/
100baseT) adapters
Š Abocom LinkMate FE1000
Š AnyCom ECO Ethernet 10/100
Š Apollo Fast Ethernet
Š COMPU-SHACK FASTline 10/100
Š Corega FastEther PCC-TX
Š D-Link DFE-650
Š EXP ThinLan 100
Š Fiberline Fast Ethernet
Š Hamlet FE1000 10/100
Š IO DATA PCET/TX
Š KTI KF-C16
Š Laneed LD-10/100CD
Š Level One FPC-0100TX
Š Linksys PCMPC100 EtherFast, PCM100H1 HomeLink 10/100
Š Logitec LPM-LN100TX
Š Melco LPC2-TX
Š Microcom* TravelCard 10/100
Š Micronet EtherFast Adapter
Š NetGear FA410TXC
Š New Media LiveWire 10/100
Š Planex FNW-3600T
Š ZONET Fast Ethernet
smc91c92_cs Fast Ethernet
(10/100baseT) adapters
Š Argosy EN220
Š Dynalink L100C
Š Lantech FastNet/TX
Š Ositech Seven of Diamonds
Š Melco/SMC LPC-TX
Š WiseCom WC-PC400
xirc2ps_cs Fast Ethernet (10/ NOTE: Some of these cards seem to misbehave at either 10baseT,
100baseT, or both. The driver doesn’t seem to know how to configure
100baseT) adapters
the transceiver correctly.
Š Accton* Fast EtherCard-16
Š Compaq Netelligent 10/100
Š Intel EtherExpress PRO/100 16-bit
Š Toshiba IPC5008A, Advanced Network 10/100
Š Xircom CreditCard CE3-100, CE3B, RE-100
3c575_cb Fast Ethernet (10/
100baseT) adapters
Š 3Com 3c575TX, 3CCFE575BT, 3CXFE575BT, 3CCFE575CT,
3CXFE575CT
Supported Ethernet Cards
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Driver
Cards
epic_cb Fast Ethernet (10/
100baseT) adapters
Š Ositech Seven of Spades CardBus
tulip_cb Fast Ethernet (10/
100baseT) adapters
Š Accton EN2220 CardBus
Š Allied Telesyn AT-2800
Š AmbiCom AMB8100
Š Apollo FE2000
Š Asante FriendlyNET CardBus
Š Compex Linkport TX
Š D-Link DFE-660TX
Š Genius MF3000 (some might not work)
Š Kingston KNE-CB4TX
Š Laneed LD-10/100CB
Š LevelOne FPC-0101TX 10/100Mbps CardBus
Š Linksys PCMPC200 EtherFast CardBus
Š OvisLink LFS PCM 32
Š SMC EZ CardBus 10/100 Ethernet (some might not work)
Š SVEC FD606 10/100 Ethernet
Š TDK NetworkFlyer LAK-CB100X, LAK-CB100AX CardBus
Š UMAX Technologies UMAX250
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Documentation Updates
This section lists updates to the Workstation Imaging part of the ZENworks for Desktops
Administration guide that have been made since the initial release of Novell® ZENworks® for
Desktops 4. The information will help you to keep current on documentation updates and, in some
cases, software updates (such as a Support Pack release).
The information is grouped according to the date when the ZENworks for Desktops Administration
guide was updated and republished:
Š “April 23, 2003 (Version 4 SP1/4.0.1)” on page 513
April 23, 2003 (Version 4 SP1/4.0.1)
The following updates were made to the Workstation Imaging part of the ZENworks for Desktops
Administration guide:
Location
Change
“Imaging Boot Disk Creator
(Zimgboot.exe)” on
page 483
Added information in three additional headings: Using Zimgboot.exe to
Create a Language Disk, Using Zimgboot.exe to Create a Utility Disk,
and Using Zimgboot.exe to Create a PXE Disk.
Documentation Updates
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