QE-1 Encoder

QE-1 Encoder
MODEL QE-1 ANI
ENCODER
UNIVERSAL ANI – EMERGENCY IDENTIFICATION
ENCODER
GE Star® COMPATIBLE
Instruction Manual
Rev 031029
© 2003 – Cimarron Technologies Corp., Escondido, CA,
USA.
All rights reserved. No part of this manual may be reproduced in any way without the express written permission of
Cimarron Technologies Corporation.
QE-1 ANI Encoder Module Instruction Manual
© 2003 Cimarron Technologies Corporation
All rights reserved
Cimarron Technologies Inc.
934 S. Andreasen Suite G
Escondido, CA 92029 USA
Voice
FAX
Email
Web
: 760-738-3282
: 760-480-0233
: [email protected]
: www.cimtechcorp.com
Cimarron Technologies Corporation is a licensee of the Motorola MDC-1200 Protocol technology.
GE-STAR is a registered trademark of General Electric Corporation
Manual revision QE-1 031029
Table of Contents
C H A P T E R
1
FEATURES ..................................................................................... 6
What Is the QE-1.......................................................................................................................................... 6
Capabilities.................................................................................................................................................... 6
Specifications ................................................................................................................................................ 7
C H A P T E R
2
INSTALLATION .............................................................................. 8
Typical Radio Installation ........................................................................................................................... 8
Quick Start Installation ............................................................................................................................... 9
Radio Connections...................................................................................................................................... 10
Physical Installation ................................................................................................................................... 11
Deviation Adjustment ................................................................................................................................ 12
Pad Information ......................................................................................................................................... 12
Jumper Information................................................................................................................................... 12
Jumper Definitions ..................................................................................................................................... 13
Aux I/O Output........................................................................................................................................... 13
Jumper J1 Configuration........................................................................................................................... 13
Time out timer applications...................................................................................................................... 14
Radio PTT sense high but KEY to ground ............................................................................................... 14
Channel Busy/Channel Acquired.............................................................................................................. 14
C H A P T E R
3
PROGRAMMING........................................................................... 15
Programming .............................................................................................................................................. 15
Programming Alternatives (via QPF-2 Programmer)............................................................................... 15
C H A P T E R 4 OPERATION ................................................................................................... 21
ANI-ID Message ......................................................................................................................................... 21
Stuck-MIC ID Message.............................................................................................................................. 21
Emergency ID Message.............................................................................................................................. 21
Man-Down ID Message.............................................................................................................................. 22
Status Messages .......................................................................................................................................... 22
Canned Messages........................................................................................................................................ 22
C H A P T E R
5
TECHNICAL INFORMATION ....................................................... 23
GE Star Format Selections......................................................................................................................... 23
GE Star Message Descriptions .................................................................................................................. 24
Trunking Operation ................................................................................................................................... 25
C H A P T E R
6
TROUBLESHOOTING..................................................................... 26
Installation Hints ........................................................................................................................................ 26
Isolating System Problems......................................................................................................................... 26
Equipment Problems.................................................................................................................................. 26
Radio Keys and Stays Keyed.................................................................................................................... 26
Radio Keys up but stays Keyed only for Duration of ANI....................................................................... 26
Radio Randomly Keys up and sends out EM’s or MD’s.......................................................................... 26
ID Decoded is not the Same as Programmed ........................................................................................... 27
When PTT button is pressed, unit continuously sends ANI ..................................................................... 27
Pod Not Found Error when programming ................................................................................................ 27
Data Found Corrupt Error when programming ........................................................................................ 27
CHAPTER 7 PRODUCT SUPPORT .......................................................................................... 29
INDEX............................................................................................................................................ 30
C H A P T E R
Features
1
What Is the QE-1
The Cimarron Technologies' Model QE-1, ANI/Emergency ID Encoder can
be programmed to operate in all known variations of GE Star® signaling.
The unit provides Automatic Numeric Identification (ANI) of a specific
radio transmitter each time the microphone press-to-talk (PTT) switch is
activated and is capable of transmitting three other data messages. The
three additional messages are typically coded as "Stuck-Mic", "Emergency",
and "Man-Down" but can be preprogrammed for any valid GE Star®
message.
The Model QE-1 can also be used as a monitoring or alarm transmission
module by programming status and "canned" messages and interpreting
them as sensor inputs at the decoding site.
The QE-1 operates on 5 VDC and is programmed by the Cimarron QPF-2 PC
Programmer.
Capabilities
• Identify every transmission source
• Reduce nuisance and obscene transmissions
• Emergency and Man-Down situations instantly identified
• Microphone monitoring mode
• Trunking compatible
• Stuck microphone identification
• Time-Out-Timer with alert tone
• ANI identification at beginning, End or Both
• Audible Man-Down alert
In order to realize these capabilities the QE-1 must be correctly installed and
programmed. Some features may require additional equipment not
supplied. The QE-1 is not programmed when received from the factory.
The model QPF-2 programmer and ANIPROG software is required to
program the unit for operation.
Page 6
Specifications
Data Format
Modulation Type
Rate
ID Range
ID Locations
Messages
programmable
Sidetone
Burst Length
Preamble Length
Attack Delay
Outputs
GE Star®
PSK (Phase Shift Key)
400 bps on 1600hz carrier
0001 to 9999 in 16 different formats
PTT ANI at Beginning, End or Both
PTT
Emergency – many programmable modes
ManDown – triggered by external mercury tilt switch – many modes
Stuck Mic – triggered when PTT is active continuously for 1 minute
1 KHz during transmission of data.
Programmable for 1½, 2 ½, 3 ½, or 4 ½ messages.
16, 24, 32, or 48 bits programmable.
125, 325, 625, or 1300 mS programmable.
KEY – HiZ to Low. Open collector with 100 mA sink.
Audio Inhibit – HiZ to Low. Open collector with 100 mA sink.
Tone Control – Many voltage levels possible via Jumpers.
Sidetone – 1 Khz
Data Out – Capacitively coupled.
Idle: >1 Megohm impedance.
Encode: adjustable 100 mV to 5 V P-P
Aux I/O – Logic level.
Inputs
Emergency – Logic level with 39Kohm pull-up to +5vdc
ManDown – Logic level with 39Kohm pull-up to +5vdc
PTT – 0 to +12vdc with 50mS debounce
Channel Busy – Logic level with 39Kohm pull-up to +5vdc
Aux I/O – Logic level.
Programming
Caution: Do not exceed +5vdc on any logic level point!
Use Cimarron’s QPF-2 PC based programmer and software.
Radio Interface
11 wires (26 ga. teflon). Wires are nominally 6” in length.
Supply Voltage
5.0 regulated.
Supply Current
Temperature
3.5 mA standby, 35 mA encoding when connected to +12vdc.
Operating: -30oC to +70oC (-22oF to +158oF).
Humidity
0% to 90% (non-condensing).
Dimensions
13.7mm x 23.7mm x 2.5mm.
Page 7
C H A P T E R
Installation
2
Typical Radio Installation
Page 8
Quick Start Installation
Before a QE-1 will work in a radio, the device must be programmed. The Cimarron QPF-2
programming pod (with red programming guide) is used in conjunction with the “ANIPROG”
programming software. This software is delivered in two 3.5” disks and must be installed onto
your computer hard drive. The software is not compatible with Windows 3.1 or earlier operating
systems and must be run in Windows. The installation setup routine is on disk 1 and all running
programs must be terminated before installation. Once installed, you can run ANIPROG via the
Start button/Programs/ANIPROG. It will open with a gray screen like in figure 1. Select Edit
and then select QE/QE-1. The programming screen like in figure 2 will appear. It is very
important that you load default parameters before selecting customer desires. Do this by clicking
on the Load Defaults button Two times. Once defaults are loaded, go through the tabs making
selections required for your installation.
Figure 1
Figure 2
The QPF programming pod should be connected to COM1 with a fully populated serial cable.
Hold the QE-1 onto the QPF as shown in figure 3 and press the Write button. Remember that
you must load new QE-1’s with defaults before they will work. If you are just changing ID’s on
a QE-1 that has been in service, read the device first, change the ID and then write back to the
device.
Once the device has been programmed, it can be installed into the target radio. Figure 4 shows a
simplified radio block diagram and generic installation points for the QE-1 interface wires. It is
very important to adjust transmit data deviation before placing the radio back into service. As
the data insertion point will be affected by the radio limiter, data deviation should be adjusted so
it is just below that of voice deviation.
Figure 3
Figure 4
Page 9
Radio Connections
Signal
Color
Description
A+
Red
Positive supply voltage to the QE-1. Regulated 5.0 VDC.
AAud Inhib
Black
White
KEY
Brown
PTT
Yellow
Sidetone
Orange
Emergency
Green
Man-Down
Blue
Aux I/O
Gray
Supply ground.
Audio Inhibit Output – This line is used to disable the
microphone during data transmission time. This is an open
collector output and is at high impedance when idle and sinks to
within 1 volt of system ground (300 mA max) during data
transmission. Usually interfaced to Mic High.
Key Output. This line keys the radio when required by the QE-1.
It can be isolated from the PTT input line (see below) by
removing Jumper J1. This is an open collector output and is
high impedance when idle and sinks to within 1 volt of system
ground when active. It should be connected to a point on the
radio which when grounded will key the radio.
PTT input. This line is used by the QE-1 to detect when the
radio has been keyed. The signal is not buffered before being
sent to the microprocessor and must never exceed 5VDC. As
shipped, a signal above 2.5 VDC is interpreted as unkeyed. A
level below 2.5 VDC is interpreted as keyed.
Capacitively coupled 1 Khz 5 Vpp signal output, to be interfaced
to the radio audio amplifier input. A point should be selected
that is not affected by the radio volume control. The QE-1
microprocessor activates this tone line under the following
circumstances.
If programmed for tone on PTT, this line will be active for the
duration of the transmitted ANI data. This gives the operator
audible notice when the ANI burst is finished and un-clipped
speech is possible.
If programmed for tone on Emergency or Man-Down, this line
will be active as described in the applicable sections.
Emergency message input from external switch. This line is
normally pulled high and grounding it activates the emergency
condition. The sense can be reversed by programming the QE1 as desired. If the switch is greater than 6” from the QE-1,
greater RF immunity can be obtained by keeping this line
grounded and removing the ground via a N/C switch to activate
the emergency. In this case, the sense would be programmed
for Normally Closed. This line can alternately be used as a
status or canned message.
Man-Down message input from external sensor or switch. This
line is normally pulled high and grounding it activates the ManDown condition. The sense can be reversed by programming
the QE-1 as desired. Like the Emergency line, this line can also
be used as a status message or canned message.
Auxiliary input/output. Can be programmed to perform one of
the following four functions.
1. Transmit Control. Idle state is +5 VDC. Active state occurs
during all data burst transmissions. When active, it sinks a
maximum 10 mA to within 1 volt of system ground. Typically
used to control a transmitter CTCSS, turning it off during ANI
transmissions.
Page 10
Chan Busy
Violet
Data Out
Wh/Blk
2. Home Control. Similar to Transmit control but can be
programmed active only during Emergency or Man-Down data
transmissions. Typically used to change the radio channel to a
“Home” channel before sending the Emergency or Man-Down
message.
3. Tone Control. Idle state is +5 VDC. Active during sidetone
outputs. When active, it sinks a maximum 10 mA to within 1 volt
of system ground. Used to enable receiver audio circuits to allow
amplification of the Sidetone signal.
4. Data Inhibit Control. An input to the QE-1 microprocessor.
Will put the QE-1 to “sleep” when active. Active state is
programmable for logic 1 or 0.
Channel Busy input. Provides the QE-1 the status of the
interfaced radio. When in conventional mode, the line should be
interfaced to a COS or squelch line which changes state when
receiving. This effects the manner in which the QE-1 handles
the Emergency and Man-Down transmissions.
Capacitor coupled ANI data output. To be connected to the
radio transmitter microphone audio, between the pre-emphasis
filter and the limiter. The output is adjustable from 0.0 to 4.5
Vpp.
Physical Installation
Find a location in the radio for the Model QE-1, preferably away from the
transmitter output amplifier stage. Locate the interface points for the QE-1
interface wiring, cut the wires to the correct size and solder them to the
radio interface points and the associated pads on the back of the QE-1.
Place the insulating sleeve over the QE-1 module.
MD (BLU)
EM (GRN)
GND (BLK)
+5vdc (RED)
AuxI/O (GRY)
DO(WH/BLK)
Inhib (WHT)
CHBsy (VIO)
KEY (BRN)
Sidetone
(ORG)
PTT (YEL)
Page 11
Deviation Adjustment
While repeatedly keying the radio into a service monitor, adjust VR1 (10 K
Ohm potentiometer) so data deviation is just below voice deviation.
Attaching Jumper J2 will increase the QE-1 output level.
Potentiometer
VR1. Output
level adjust
Pad Information
There are eleven pads on the back of the QE-1 to solder radio interface
wires. Wire color is described as well as pad signal definition.
Jumper Information
The QE-1 is supplied with jumper J1 installed. To install any other jumpers,
use a fine tip soldering iron and solder a small single strand of wire
between the jumper pads to create a solder bridge. To remove J1, use a
sharp fine tip “Xacto” blade. Slice at an angle to undercut the circuit trace.
Do not cut straight down or damage to the circuit could result.
J2
J3
J4
J5
J1
J6
Page 12
Jumper Definitions
Jumper
Usage
J1
PTT/KEY jumper. Install to connect PTT and Key lines.
J2
Data Output level boost.
Install jumper M = Data Output 0 to 5vpp
Remove jumper M = Data Output 0 to 150mVpp
Aux I/O output configuration jumpers, see the table
below for information
J3, J4, J5,
J6
J-3
Out
Out
In
In
Jumper Selection
J-4
J-5
Out
Out
In
Out
In
Out
Out
In
J-6
In
Out
Out
Out
Aux I/O Output
Inactive
Active
Low
+5vdc
HiZ
Low
+5vdc
Low
HiZ
+5vdc
Aux I/O Output
This mult-purpose output is very handy for controlling various circuits in a
radio. The above table defines the many functions it provides. Refer to the
Inactive/Active columns for the desired output then set the jumpers
accordingly.
Jumper Examples
Example #1:
Simple ANI. PTT and KEY are the same point in the
radio resting at +5vdc and going to an active low when keyed, no Time Out
Timer, no Sidetone.
Install: J1. (as supplied, J1 is a circuit trace) Remove all other jumpers. (As
supplied, no other jumpers are made)
Example #2:
Simple ANI with Sidetone. PTT and KEY are the same
point in the radio resting at +5vdc and going to an active low, no Time Out
Timer. Radio audio amp control signal needs ground to turn it on. QE-1
must not load down the logic circuit when not sending ANI, so a High
Impedance is needed at rest.
Install: J1 and J4. (J1 is installed as supplied)
Jumper J1 Configuration
Of all of the jumpers on the QE-1, this jumper will cause the most confusion.
This jumper connects the PTT and KEY lines together. Most applications
will require J1 to be installed. As shipped from the factory, jumper J1 is a
circuit board trace connecting the PTT pad with the KEY pad. Extreme care
must be taken when removing this jumper. With a sharp “xacto blade”
scrape away the trace with a flat sideways motion. Do not attempt to cut
straight down or circuit board damage will result. When installed, the KEY
wire is not needed. The PTT wire now serves the dual function of PTT and
KEY.
Page 13
Time out timer applications
Jumper J1 is removed on applications which require the QE-1 to serve as the
transmit Time Out Timer (TOT). In this configuration, the radio keying
function is routed through the QE-1. When the user pushes the PTT switch
on the radio, the request goes to the QE-1. The QE-1 will immediately key
or un-key the radio as requested by the user. If the PTT is held too long, the
TOT will un-key the radio even if the user holds the PTT active. Once the
user releases the radio PTT switch, the QE-1 TOT is reset and operation
returns to normal.
Radio PTT sense high but KEY to ground
If the interface requires the QE-1 to detect when the radio is keyed by the
presence of a voltage above 2.5 VDC, remove jumper J1 and program the
PTT Input for ActHigh input sense. In this situation, also interface the
Brown “KEY” wire to a point in the radio which goes to ground when
keying the radio.
Channel Busy/Channel Acquired
In conventional mode, the Channel Busy line (Violet wire) is only used to
qualify critical message transmissions. If emergency message repeat is
programmed for 5 times, the only transmissions that will count towards the
5 repeats are messages sent while the channel busy line is inactive. So if a
radio channel is busy when the operator presses the emergency button, the
QE-1 will immediately attempt to send out the message. It will continue to
send out emergency messages every 10 seconds until it has sent out five that
were transmitted when the channel was not busy.
In trunking mode, channel busy becomes “Channel Acquired”. This line is
interfaced to a point in a trunking radio that changes state when granted
access. The line is programmable for input sense (active high or active low).
Some trunking radios have channel acquired logic which pulses while
attempting to be granted access and then remain in a state showing access is
granted. For this reason, the line is also programmable to set the debounce
time so that pulsing is ignored. The unit will not transmit data until the
specified time period has been exceeded
Page 14
C H A P T E R
Programming
3
Programming
Programming Alternatives (via QPF-2 Programmer)
ANI ID MESSAGE
TRANSMIT TIME: Beginning, End, or Both.
BEGINNING BURST LENGTH: 1½, 2½, 3½, or 4½ messages.(GE Star® only)
END BURST LENGTH: 1½, 2½, 3½, or 4½ messages.(GE Star® only)
MESSAGE TYPE: Any other in lieu of ANI ID. (GE Star® only)
SIDETONE:
Produces audible 1 KHz alert tone via receiver speaker during
transmission of ANI-ID data burst.
EMERGENCY ALARM MESSAGE
MESSAGE TYPE:
Can be programmed to any message type in lieu of the Emergency code.
BURST MODE:
Single Message:
The message is transmitted only once when the channel is clear.
Generally used if the message is programmed as a Status or
Canned Message.
Repeat Message:
W/PTT ANI-ID, W/Out Monitor Mic: The Emergency message is
transmitted 5 times and only when the channel is clear.
W/PTT EM-ID, W/Out Monitor Mic: Transmits Emergency every
10 seconds, even if the Channel is busy. The transmitter is unkeyed during the 10 Second pauses. A count is made of clear
Channel transmissions. After a count of 5 clear channel
transmissions, the Emergency cycle is concluded. Voice can be
used during the 10 Sec pauses.
This protocol increases the probability of an early decode and
increases the reliability of decoding at the dispatch decoder.
Continuous Cycle:
Regardless of PTT alternative or whether the channel is busy or
clear, the Emergency Message is transmitted every 10 seconds
with un-keyed pauses between transmissions until power is
removed from the radio.
PTT INITIATED MESSAGE:
Page 15
Normal PTT ANI-ID Message:
During a Repeat or Continuous cycle, each activation of the PTT
input results in a normal ANI-ID Message.
Emergency Cycle PTT EM-ID Message:
During an Emergency Repeat or Continuous cycle, each PTT
switch actuation will result in the transmission of an additional
Emergency Message in lieu of the ANI ID Message.
Continuous PTT EM-ID Message:
After an Emergency cycle is initiated, each PTT actuation will
result in an additional Emergency Message until power is removed
from the radio.
INPUT POLARITY:
The Emergency switch input is programmable for either a normally open (N.O.) or
normally closed (N.C.) switch.
MONITOR OPEN MICROPHONE MODE:
During the Emergency Repeat Cycle the radio is keyed continuously with an open
microphone between the five, ten-second spaced Emergency Bursts. NOTE: As
the radio is keyed between data bursts, the Channel/Busy circuit will not be
operative, and the PTT input is not monitored. A total of five Emergency bursts will
be transmitted.
If the Monitor Open Microphone Mode is selected in conjunction with the
Continuous Emergency Cycle, the activated radio will first continuously transmit
microphone audio between five Emergency bursts (Channel/Busy inoperative, PTT
input not monitored). The unit then provides unkeyed pauses between Emergency
bursts until a count of five clear channel bursts is made (Channel busy operative
and PTT is monitored). The unit then reverts to continuously transmitting between
five Emergency bursts, and alternates between these modes until power is
removed.
This mode of operation will provide 40 seconds of open-mike monitoring, followed
by at least 40 seconds in which emergency bursts with un-keyed pauses will be
transmitted, thereby alternately allowing open-microphone monitoring, and possible
voice transmissions between bursts on the radio channel.
LOCAL AUDIBLE ALERT TONE:
Tone output is applied to the radio receiver's audio circuit. Programmable On/Off.
If On, causes a 1 second tone each time the Emergency Burst is transmitted. If
Off, no tone is sounded during the Emergency Mode.
MAN-DOWN ALARM MESSAGE:
MESSAGE TYPES:
Emergency Message:
For decoders which cannot recognize the Unique Man-Down code
the unit may be programmed to transmit the Emergency code
during the Man-Down cycle.
Unique Man-Down Message:
The unit can be programmed to transmit a unique "Man-Down"
message in lieu of the Emergency Message. NOTE: The
Page 16
decoder-display must be capable of recognizing the unique
message.
Other Message Codes:
May be programmed to be any message type in lieu of
Emergency or unique Man-Down codes.
NOTE: If the Emergency and Man-Down inputs are to be used for other messages
or as a combination of status (or canned message) and an Emergency, be advised
that initiation of the Man-Down input will preempt any message transmissions from
the Emergency input. Therefore, if a status (or canned message) and an
Emergency are to be used, program the status (or canned) for the Emergency
input and the Emergency message for the Man-Down input.(GE Star® only)
BURST MODE:
Single Message:
The message is transmitted only once. Used if the message is
programmed as a Status or Canned Message.
Repeat Message:
W/PTT ANI-ID, W/Out Monitor Mic: The man-down message is
transmitted 5 times and only when the channel is clear.
W/PTT MD-ID, W/Out Monitor Mic: Transmits man-down every 10
seconds, even if Chan is busy. Transmitter is un-keyed during 10
Sec. pauses. A count is made of clear Channel transmissions.
After a count of 5, the man-down cycle is concluded. Voice can
be used during 10 Sec pauses.
This protocol increases the probability of an early decode and
increases the reliability of decoding at the dispatch decoder.
Continuous Cycle:
Regardless of whether the channel is busy or clear, the ManDown Message is transmitted every 10 seconds with un-keyed
pauses between transmissions until power is removed from the
radio.
PTT INITIATED MESSAGE:
Normal PTT ANI-ID Message:
During a Repeat or Continuous cycle, each activation of
the PTT input results in a normal ANI-ID Message.
Man-Down Cycle PTT MD-ID Message:
During a Man-Down Repeat or Continuous cycle, each
PTT switch actuation will result in the transmission of an
additional Man-Down Message in lieu of the ANI ID
Message.
Continuous PTT MD-ID Message:
Page 17
After the Man-Down state is entered, all further PTT
closures will result in a Man-Down Message until power is
removed from the radio.
INPUT POLARITY: The input is programmable for either a N.O. or N.C. switch.
MONITOR OPEN MICROPHONE MODE:
During the Man-Down Repeat Cycle the radio is keyed continuously with
an open microphone between the five, ten-second spaced Man-Down
Bursts. NOTE: As the radio is keyed between data bursts, the
Channel/Busy circuit will not be operative, and the PTT input is not
monitored. A total of five Man-Down bursts will be transmitted.
If the Monitor Open Microphone Mode is selected in conjunction with the
Continuous Man-Down Cycle, the activated radio will first continuously
transmit microphone audio between five Man-Down bursts (Channel/Busy
inoperative, PTT input not monitored). The unit then provides unkeyed
pauses between Man-Down bursts until a count of five clear channel
bursts is made (Channel busy operative and PTT is monitored). The unit
then reverts to continuously transmitting between five Man-Down bursts,
and alternates between these modes until power is removed.
This mode of operation will provide 40 seconds of open-mike monitoring,
followed by at least 40 seconds in which Man-Down bursts with unkeyed
pauses will be transmitted, thereby alternately allowing open-microphone
monitoring, and possible voice transmissions from other units between
data bursts on the radio channel.
MAN-DOWN INITIATION PERIODS: Eight (8) initiation time periods are programmable:
Initiation Time
.05 Sec.
5.0
5.0
10.0
10.0
10.0
10.0
10.0
Tone Time
N/A
1 Sec.
1
1
1
1
1
1
Pause Time
N/A
2 Sec.
5
10
20
30
45
60
The first selection would be used if the Man-Down input is used to initiate a status or
canned message.
LOCAL AUDIBLE ALERT TONE:
Output is applied to radio receiver audio circuit. Programmable On/Off.
STUCK-MIC TRANSMISSION:
MESSAGE TYPES:
ANI-ID Message:
For decoder/display units which do not recognize the Unique Stuck-Mic
code, the ANI ID code may be programmed for the Stuck-Mic cycle.
Page 18
Unique Stuck-Mic Message:
A unique "Stuck-Mic" message code may be transmitted in lieu of the ANI
ID Message code. NOTE: The decoder-display in use must be
compatible with the unique message code.
Other Message Codes:
May be programmed to be any message type in lieu of ANI ID or unique
Stuck-Mic codes.
STUCK-MIC PROTOCOL:
The Stuck-Mic protocol is disabled during the Emergency and Man-Down
cycles.
Ten-Second Repeat:
The Stuck-Mic message is transmitted every 10 seconds until
either the PTT switch is released or power is removed from the
radio. If the tone output is interfaced to the radio receiver's audio
circuit, a one second tone will be sounded each time the ANI burst
is transmitted.
Time-Out-Timer:
If the PTT line is wired through the identifier, the unit may be
programmed such that after 60 seconds of continuous keying the
unit will transmit one digital message, the PTT line will be opened,
and if the tone output is applied to the receiver's audio circuit, an
audible tone will be sounded for one second. The PTT line will
remain open until the PTT switch is released, an Emergency or
Man-Down mode is entered, or power is removed from the radio.
BURST LENGTH
In general, the longer the burst length the higher the probability of
decoding a digital message, thereby resulting in better reliability of
data transfer. However, a long burst for beginning ANI ID may
cut-off a voice syllable. A compromise can be made by using a
short burst for a "beginning" ANI-ID and a long burst for an "end"
ANI-ID.
The burst length is independently programmable for ANI ID at
beginning, ANI ID at end, and one setting for Emergency, ManDown, and Stuck Mic.
ANI-ID BURST LENGTH:
The Burst Length may be independently
programmed for beginning and end ANI-ID to 1½,
2½, 3½, or 4½ messages.
BURST LENGTH FOR ALL OTHER MESSAGES:
Either 3½ or 4½ messages as a group.
ATTACK DELAY
The attack delay provides time for a transmitter to reach full power
and for all system audio circuits to open prior to transmission of
data. Programmable to 125, 325, 625, or 1300 milliseconds.
PREAMBLE LENGTH
Page 19
The message preamble aids in bit synchronization. Shorter
preambles are used in good signal conditions, while longer
preambles allow synchronization in marginal signal conditions.
Programmable for 16, 24, 32, or 40 preamble bits.
BUSY/CLEAR CHANNEL INPUT
INPUT SENSE: Input sense for Channel Busy, programmable for
logic Hi or Low.
MULTI-FUNCTION I/O
CTCSS CONTROL OUTPUT:
Controls a radio transmitter's CTCSS Encoder "On-Off" to provide
"digital muting" in some systems. It can also be used Idle state is
+5 ± 0.1 VDC at 39 K Ohm impedance. Active state occurs during
all data burst transmissions and sinks up to 10 ma from a 5 volt
source to within 1 Volt of ground.
ALTERNATE CHANNEL OUTPUT:
Provides an output which can change the radio channel in some
transceivers during Emergency and Man-Down data
transmissions. Idle state is +5 ±0.1VDC at 39 K Ohm impedance.
Active state sinks up to 10 ma from a 5 Volt source to within 1 Volt
of ground.
SIDETONE CONTROL OUTPUT:
Provides an output for transceivers which require a signal to
enable the receiver's audio circuits. Idle state is +5 ±0.1VDC at 39
K Ohms impedance. Active state occurs during sidetone outputs
and sinks up to 10 ma from a 5 Volt source to within 1 Volt of
ground.
INHIBIT DATA ENCODE INPUT:
The signal for this input is typically taken from the radio
transceiver's channel selector or channel switch (when possible)
in order to inhibit data transmissions when in a simplex "Talk
Around" mode or on a channel which does not accommodate
data. Can also be used to hold ANI data transmissions when a
scrambling module is installed in the radio. Input provides pullup (+5 ±0.1 VDC) and is programmable to accommodate either
an active high or active low input to inhibit data encoding.
Page 20
CHAPTER 4
Operation
ANI-ID Message
ANI (Automatic Numeric Identification) provides for digital identification
of a transmission initiated by a transmitter's microphone switch ("Press-ToTalk" or "PTT" switch). This "digital burst" can occur when the switch is
first pressed, or when the switch is released, or at both times. The burst
time for most identifiers is approximately 1/3 second and, if transmitted
upon pressing the PTT switch, may obliterate the first one or two syllables
of spoken speech. To overcome this annoyance, the Model QE-1 is
programmable to produce the burst either at the beginning or at the end of
the voice transmission, or (better yet) at both times. If programmed for both
times, typically the burst at the beginning is programmed to be short, while
the burst at the end is programmed to be longer and therefore more reliable.
Although the probability of decoding the short burst is decreased, under
average signal conditions the probability is still quite high.
To further guard against voice-syllable clipping, the user may program a
"PTT Sidetone". When programmed and interfaced to receiver audio, this
feature will provide an audible tone during the beginning transmission of
the ANI-ID burst to alert the operator that data is being transmitted.
Stuck-MIC ID Message
When a mobile or portable radio is inadvertently keyed due to a stuck
microphone switch, it generally means that the radio frequency is unusable
for communications. Unfortunately, this activity is sometimes deliberately
caused by a field operator. By incorporating a Stuck-Mic-ID Message in the
Model QE-1's repertory, each time a microphone switch is held closed for
more than a minute either the offending unit's identification is transmitted
and a local tone is sounded every ten seconds, or the unit can be
programmed to transmit the unit's ID once, sound a local tone, and then
automatically open the key line until the microphone switch is released.
Emergency ID Message
The Emergency-ID message is generally used by law enforcement, security
agencies, and fire departments to automatically signal a life-threatening
situation where it is difficult, impossible, or impractical to use voice. The
emergency message is also frequently used by business and industrial users
to signal a critical situation, such as a mechanical failure, over or under
temperature (pressure, etc.), or extraordinary event.
The Model QE-1 allows for programming the burst length, and whether the
message should be a single burst, repeated five times at ten second
intervals, or repeated continuously at ten second intervals. In addition,
during the emergency cycle the microphone of the sending radio can be
monitored, and in the continuous mode can alternate between monitoring
and allowing the channel to be used for voice communications. This, too, is
a unique benefit of the Model QE-1.
Page 21
Man-Down ID Message
The Man-Down ID message is primarily for use by law enforcement,
security agencies, and fire departments. However it also finds uses in
business and industry where individuals can be overcome by toxic fumes,
lack of oxygen, etc.
The Man-Down ID is generally initiated by closure of a mercury switch
located within a hand-held radio when the radio is continuously tipped
greater than 60 degrees from vertical. To guard against false "man-down"
transmissions an initial pause of a few seconds during which the closure
must be constant is provided. After this duration a short tone is produced
via the radio's speaker. A second pause follows the tone to allow the radio
to be placed in an upright position (in the event no actual "man-down" is
occurring). Following the second pause the "Man-Down-ID" data burst is
transmitted in the same manner as the "Emergency-ID", and depending
upon programming, providing either a single, repeat, or continuous burst
transmission. The Man-Down mode also can include the microphone
monitoring alternative. Transmission of a unique coding for the Man-Down
message (in lieu of a general Emergency coding), and multiple choices of
initiation, tone, and final pause times are special features of the Model QE-1.
Status Messages
Status messages typically relate to the status of the field unit, such as "In
Service", "Out Of Service", "On Break", etc. The format can include up to
eight of these messages, and their coding configurations can be interpreted
as having any meaning at the decoding site. The QE-1 is capable of
transmitting two status messages (or a combination of two status and
canned messages) in lieu of the Man-Down and Emergency.
Canned Messages
"Canned" messages handle such communications as "Request-To-Talk",
"Priority-Request-To-Talk", "Repeat Last Transmission", "Repeat Address",
"10-4", "Roger", and other routine requests and responses. The format can
include several of these messages, and their coding configurations can be
interpreted as having any meaning at the decoding site. The QE-1 is
capable of transmitting two canned messages (or a combination of two
status and canned messages) in lieu of the Man-Down and Emergency.
Page 22
C H A P T E R 5
Technical Information
GE Star Format Selections
T1, T2 and S1 are individual bits of the GE-STAR binary message. The
differences in formats relate to the functions and/or identification values
assigned to the Tag Bits (T1 and T2) and the first bit of the "status" group
(S1). T1 and T2 can be used for extended ID's over 4095 or for mobile and
portable recognition.
Format
A
*B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M-P
Description
IDs to 2047 (1st 11 bits).
IDs to 9999 (14 bit ID)
IDs to 9999 (14 bit ID)
IDs to 9999 (14 bit ID)
IDs to 4095 (12 bit ID, T2 =
"0")
IDs to 4095 (12 bit ID, T2 =
"1")
IDs to 8191 (13 bit ID, T2 =
"0")
IDs to 8191 (13 bit ID, T2 =
"1")
IDs to 4095 (12 bit ID),
Tags="00"
IDs to 4095 (12 bit ID),
Tags="01"
IDs to 4095 (12 bit ID),
Tags="10"
IDs to 4095 (12 bit ID),
Tags="11"
IDs to 2047 (11 bit ID)
T1
T2
S1
X
8
4
4
2
X
4
8
2
M0
X
2
2
8
X
Comments
T1, T2, and S1 ignored
Expanded-ID STAR #1.
GE-STAR #3.
Compatible with GE-STAR #4
GE-STAR #1. T2 = "0" for Mobile.
2
P1
X
GE-STAR #1. T2 = "1" for Portable.
4
M0
2
GE-STAR #2. T2 = "0" for Mobile.
4
P1
2
GE-STAR #2. T2 = "1" for Portable.
S0
S0
2
System "0"
S0
S1
2
System "1".
S1
S0
2
System "2".
S1
S1
2
System "3".
X
Identical to I - L with capability only to
program IDs to max of 2047.
8=8192, 4=4096, 2=2048, X=ignore
When programming the QE-1 with the QPF-2 programming pod and
ANIPROG software, you will need to select the appropriate GE Star®
format in the format options tab. Nearly all existing systems have moved to
format B which allows 9999 ID’s. If you pick the wrong format, the decoded
ID could be different from the programmed ID. The above table will assist
you in isolating the problem.
Page 23
GE Star Message Descriptions
The GE Star bits designated S2, S3, S4 and M1 through M4 are used to code
various messages. You have the ability to enable manual editing and access
(and change) the values of the messages assigned to PTT, Emergency, ManDown and others. The table below describes the Star code and the
corresponding message that can be decoded and displayed (depending on
equipment being used to decode data bursts) at the base end of the
communications system:
STAR CODE
000-0000
001–0000
010-0000
011-0000
100-0000
101-0000
110-0000
111-0000
000-0001
000-0010
000-0011
000-0100
000-0101
000-0110
000-0111
000-1000
000-1001
000-1010
000-1011
000-1100
000-1101
000-1110
000-1111
100-1010
101-1010
Page 24
DEFINITION
Status 0
Status 1
Status 2
Status 3
Status 4
Status 5
Status 6
Status 7
ANI ID and Sel Call Ack
Interrogate Ack
Request to talk
Canned Message C
Canned Message D
Taxi Bid
Emergency
Call Cancel Ack
Stuck Microphone
Open Mic Monitor Ack
Canned Message F
Canned Message G
Canned Message H
Canned Message J
Man-Down
Radio Disable Ack
Radio Enable Ack
Trunking Operation
In LTR trunking mode, we will not transmit until we know that the user has
been given permission. When the QE-1 is placed in Trunking mode, the
channel busy (ChBsy) line becomes Channel Acquired (ChAqr In) and in
ANIPROG software under Transmit Options tab, the Attack Delay timer
grays out and the Trunk Select Debounce timer becomes available. Here are
a couple of scenarios.
Emergency
The radio operator has just pressed the emergency button. The QE-1
activates the radio PTT line and watches the Channel Busy line. It holds off
modulating data until the Ch Bsy has become active and remained active
for the duration of the time set in the trunk select debounce timer. It then
sends out the data and unkeys the radio.
PTT at beginning
The user has just keyed up the radio to speak, he waits for the go-ahead
beep from the radio speaker, and we start monitoring the Ch Bsy line. Once
the line becomes active and stays active for the duration of the trunk select
debounce timer, we send the PTT ANI data and the radio sends the goahead beep to the speaker so the user can begin talking.
PTT at end
The user has keyed the radio, received the go-ahead beep and has sent his
voice message. The QE-1 detects that the radio unkeyed and we rekey it
and wait for the Ch Bsy line to become active and remain active for the
duration of the time set in the trunk select debounce timer. The QE-1 then
sends out the PTT ANI data and unkeys the radio.
In this timing chart, the distance between green lines is 100mS and between
brown lines is 200mS. Trunk select debounce time is set for 200mS and channel
busy input is set for trunk available when high.
Page 25
C H A P T E R 6
Troubleshooting
Installation Hints
The QE-1 must be programmed with your desires before it will work in
your system. The device does not contain an operational program
personality as it is shipped from the factory.
The QE-1 will be keying the associated transmitter and injecting audio into
the radio. This point should be after preemphasis. It is very important to
adjust data out using VR1 to ensure the correct deviation level. The
deviation level should be just marginally below that of voice. Keep in mind
that most transmitters have limiter circuitry. Limiter circuits ensure that the
radio will never over-deviate and violate FCC rules. The limiter does this
by clipping the transmit audio. The output of the QE-1 must be adjusted to
a point just below where limiter clipping occurs. If the limiter is allowed to
function, the data will be distorted.
Isolating System Problems
Today’s modern communication systems take advantage of many available
resources. Voters, repeaters, various trunking protocols, scramblers and
innumerable other devices make passing data substantially more difficult
than it was in the “Simplex” days.
Timing is very important. If you have system problems, the first place to
spend your energies is with timing issues. Check attack delay in repeater
systems. Start with a long delay that gives you 100% decode and then
shorten it up.
If you have trunking system problems using the QE-1, review the trunking
information located on page 25 of this manual.
Equipment Problems
Radio Keys and Stays Keyed
If the radio sends ANI data and then stays keyed even after releasing the
PTT button, verify the condition of jumper J1 on the QE-1 and the
programming parameter “Key follows PTT”. If you have “Key Follows
PTT” enabled or jumper J1 connected when they should not be, this
symptom could occur.
Radio Keys up but stays Keyed only for Duration of ANI
This symptom is also caused by incorrect conditions on the “Key follows
PTT” parameter and QE-1 jumper J1.
Radio Randomly Keys up and sends out EM’s or MD’s
This symptom usually occurs when the QE-1 has been subjected to pressure
inside a closed radio. If the space is tight, constant pressure on the QE-1
microprocessor will cause pin 1 or pin 20 to pop up from the circuit board.
This effectively removes the pull-up resistor from the line and the
microprocessor detects that the line has transitioned low. The QE-1
interprets this as a Man-Down or an emergency and it sends out the
appropriate message. This symptom can be intermittent depending on the
severity of the solder crack on the pin. Reflowing pins 1 and 20 usually
cures the problem.
Page 26
ID Decoded is not the Same as Programmed
This occurs when the unit is in GE Star® mode and the QE-1 “format” is not
set the same as the decoder. See page 23 for details.
When PTT button is pressed, unit continuously sends ANI
Ensure that you have “Reverse Burst Detect” enabled on the QE-1. This is
found under the “Transmit Options” tab of the ANIPROG programming
software. Some radios, when unkeyed, rekey and send out a “reverse
burst” of CTCSS tone. The QE-1 detects this as a new occurrence of PTT,
holds the radio keyed and sends out PTT ANI. When the QE-1 unkeys, the
radio again keys up to send out a reverse burst, and the QE-1 again detects
this as a new occurrence of PTT. Enabling “Reverse Burst Detect” on the
QE-1 or disabling “Squelch Tail Removal” in the radio will cure this
symptom.
Pod Not Found Error when programming
Check the voltage of the 9V battery on the programming pod. It must be at
least 9.0VDC. Also, turn the pod over and locate the “Active” LED on the
back of the circuit board. This LED should illuminate only when the
software is attempting to read or write to the pod. If the light never turns
on, verify that the cable being used is attached to the correct COM port of
the computer, and that the cable is fully populated (pin 1 to pin 1 through
pin 9 to pin 9). Ensure that no other software has captured the computer
COM port refusing to release the resource to ANIPROG.
Data Found Corrupt Error when programming
Check the voltage of the 9V battery on the programming pod. It must be at
least 9.0 VDC. Clean the spring contacts of the POD and the programming
pads of the QE-1 with alcohol and try again. If the program still fails, click
the override button and then try again.
Page 27
Page 28
CHAPTER 7
Product Support
If you have any questions or comments about Cimarron products, please
make use of our technical support hotline at (760) 738-3285.
Cimarron Technologies Corporation
934 South Andreasen Drive, Suite G
Escondido, CA 92029
Technical Support Hot-Line (760) 738-3285
[email protected]
www.cimtechcorp.com
WARRANTY
Cimarron Technologies Corporation warrants this product to be free from defects in material and
workmanship for a period of three years from date of shipment. If a malfunction occurs due to defective
material or workmanship, the product will be repaired or replaced (Cimarron's discretion) without charge if
returned to the factory
This warranty does not apply to any failure or damage caused by accident, neglect, unreasonable use, improper
installation, or to alterations or modifications to the unit. Nor does the warranty extend to damage incurred by force
majeure (natural causes) such as lightning, fire, floods, or other such catastrophes, nor to damage caused by
environmental extremes, power surges and/or transients
Cimarron Technologies Corporation makes no other warranty, either expressed or implied, with respect to this product.
Cimarron Technologies Corporation specifically disclaims the implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a
particular purpose. Some states or provinces do not allow limitations on how long an implied warranty lasts, so the
above limitation or exclusion may not apply to you.
The remedies provided herein are customer's sole and exclusive remedies. In no event shall Cimarron Technologies
Corporation be liable for any lost profits, direct, indirect, special, incidental, or consequential damages, whether based
on contract, tort, or any other legal theory.
Page 29
INDEX
M
A
Man-Down, 10, 22
microphone monitoring, 22
A minus, 10
A+, 10
ANIPROG, 6, 9
attack delay, 19
Attack delay, 26
Aud Inhib, 10
Automatic numeric identification, 21
Aux I/O, 10
Data inhibit control, 10
Home control, 10
Tone control, 10
Transmit control, 10
P
Physical installation, 11
Pod not found, 27
Programming, 9
Programming alternatives, 15
PTT, 10
PTT sidetone, 21
Q
C
QPF-2, 6, 9
Quick Start Installation, 9
Canned messages, 22
Capabilities, 6
Channel busy, 14
Channel Busy, 11
R
Radio connections, 10
Repeaters, 26
Reverse burst detect, 27
D
Data deviation, 9, 12, 26
Data found corrupt, 27
Data Out, 11
Defaults, 9
S
Sidetone, 10
Status messages, 22
Stuck-Mic, 21
System problems, 26
E
Emergency, 10, 21
T
F
Tag bits, 23
Technical Information, 23
Technical support, 29
Time out timer, 14
Timing, 26
Tone control output, 13
Trunk select debounce, 25
Trunking mode, 14, 25
Typical radio installation, 8, 9
Features, 6
G
GE Star format selections, 23
GE Star message descriptions, 24
I
Installation hints, 26
V
Voice-syllable clipping, 21
K
KEY, 10
Key follows PTT, 26
W
WARRANTY, 29
Page 30
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