Clarion | AUTOPC 310C | Play list manager

US006721489B1
(12) United States Patent
(10) Patent N0.:
Benyamin et al.
(54)
US 6,721,489 B1
(45) Date of Patent:
PLAY LIST MANAGER
6,084,581 A *
Apr. 13, 2004
7/2000 Hunt
6,320,111 B1 * 11/2001 KiZaki
(75) Inventors: Daniel Benyamin, Oakland, CA (US);
Dannie C. Lau, Santa Clara, CA (US);
Brendan T- Dowling, Malibu, CA (Us)
OTHER PUBLICATIONS
Excerpts from WWW.empeg.com, 1999.
Clarion AutoPC 310C OWner’s Manual, Clarion Co. Ltd.,
(73) Assignee: PhatNoise, Inc., Los Angeles, CA (US)
(*)
_
_
Nt
0 ice:
_
_
1998_
_
RCA LYRA User’s Guide, RD2201/2202/2204, 1999.
Sb
u Jec tt 0 any d 1sc l a1mer, tht
e ermo fth 1s
patent is extended or adjusted under 35
* Cited by eXaIIliner
U'S'C' 154(k)) by 0 days'
Primary Examiner—Robert Chevalier
(21) Appl. No.: 09/521,874
(57)
(22)
A play list manager is disclosed that can be used to create
Filed:
Mar. 8, 2000
(51) Int. Cl.7 ......................... .. H04N 5/91; G11B 27/00
(52)
(58)
(56)
and update pla-y hSt-S' The play hsts can be. uséd for audio
_
"""""""" " 386/46’ 386/55
_
ABSTRACT
information, visual information, or a combination of audio
and visual information. The user of the play list manager
Fleld of Search ............................ .. 386/46, 1, 4, 6,
Creates a play list and Speci?es Certain Criteria for automa?_
386/52> 55> 69> 68> 83> 104> 105> 106> 125;
369/3001; 360/13; H04N 5/91; G11B 27/00
cally adding tracks to the play list. When a neW track is
added to the environment, the system tests Whether the
track’s properties satisfy the criteria for the play list. If so,
References Cited
US PATENT DOCUMENTS
the neW track is automatically added to the play list. In one
alternative, a user can select a prede?ned play list, Whose
criteria has already been created. Upon selection of the
5,173,888 A
5390927 A
2
12/1992 An
......................... .. 369/33
prede?ned play list, the play list manager accesses each
2/1995 Henml et a1‘
track and adds the track to the play list if the track’s
"""""""""" " 369/32
6,016,522 A
1/2000 Rossum ..................... .. 710/52
6,055,478 A
4/2000 Heron ...................... .. 701/213
properties satisfy the criteria for the prede?ned play list.
51 Claims, 16 Drawing Sheets
receive one click
1718~/~
.
selection
1720
7
search for next track
track found?
1724
access track properties
criteria
satisfied?
automatically add
track to play list
U.S. Patent
Apr. 13, 2004
Sheet 1 0f 16
US 6,721,489 B1
Internet
Internet
server
128
130
I126
monitor
124
f
[122
[120
com uter
docking
disk
p
station
cartridge
102
f
[104
music
head
server
unit
1H I
t
t
t
t
106
108
110
112
Fig. 1
U.S. Patent
Apr. 13, 2004
Sheet 2 0f 16
US 6,721,489 B1
Fig. 2
140
/
/'122
144
‘
:142
Flg. 3
[142
swltch f
f144
150
l
f
IDE
__
connector
USB <n> ‘DE
156
‘I58
U.S. Patent
Apr. 13, 2004
Sheet 3 0f 16
US 6,721,489 B1
174
x
1zof4‘rdk
178
17°
/
176
Fig. 4
102
204
202
Fig. 5
U.S. Patent
Apr. 13, 2004
Connector
—|
Sheet 4 0f 16
~ 322
US 6,721,489 B1
F '9 ' 6
|
Reprogramrnable ~ 330
glue |og|c
/32D
/'340
~ 330
Controller
Power
\342
switch
Processor
~ 332
~ 302
[300
boot
ROM
RAM
\ 304
\ 306
IDE
Glue Logic
\ 308
IDE Connector
D/A
~ 324
Audio Connector
~ 326
\ 310
U.S. Patent
Apr. 13, 2004
acquire music
Sheet 5 0f 16
US 6,721,489 B1
~ 402
v
store music on cartridge ~ 404
v
receive power
N 602
I
remove cartridge from
dock
V
N
loadv
~
~ 408
boot OS
~ 606
insert cartrdige into music
server
l
operate head unit
I
~ 410
read Start ?le
N 412
firmware update
y
head unit sends
l
commands
sequence
v
1
music server provides
N 414
music
head unit provides music ~ 416
Fig. 7
~ 608
execute music player
program
Flg ' 9
N 612
N 614
U.S. Patent
Apr. 13, 2004
load boot program
Sheet 6 6f 16
US 6,721,489 B1
~ 542
v
-
request firmware
F '9 ' 8
-
~ 548
version
V
receive ?rmware
N 550
}
version
request new firmware ~ 554
552
‘
is there an
receive new firmware ~ 556
update?
t
no
decrypt and store
new firmware
~ 558
V
receive flag
N 570
572
cartridge
yes
change‘?
v
.
.
send previous location ~ 574
execute state machine ~ 578
send list 1, track 1
and 0 Seconds
~ 576
U.S. Patent
Apr. 13, 2004
receive request for
firmware version
i
i
Sheet 7 0f 16
US 6,721,489 B1
~ 722
read firmware version
from disk
~ 724
send firmware version to
controller
~ 726
728
request for update?
yes
read firmware from disk ~ 740
i
send firmware to
I 1O
~ 742
contioller
program glue logic
~ 744
U.S. Patent
Apr. 13, 2004
Sheet 8 0f 16
US 6,721,489 B1
Fig. 11
814
812
assign
310
1
0 e
ok
(2)
816
830
no
command
818
820
840
) $
13
14
12
6
E)
15
got
got
got
forward
reverse
button
864
866
868
no
status
play
870
got
source
872
U.S. Patent
Apr. 13,2004
US 6,721,489 B1
Sheet 9 0f 16
930
/
Fig. 12
send flag to controller
932
/
v
receive starting location
934
/
r
start music player
"
no
936
message received?
from controller
938
v/
from player
respond to message from
960
end of track or
controller
Plat/"5t
end of playlist'?
962
/
970
r
/
play next track
play ?rst track of next
964
r
/
send text information to
controller
972
V
/
send text information to
controller
v
playlist
<
U.S. Patent
Apr. 13, 2004
Sheet 10 0f 16
US 6,721,489 B1
Fig. 1 3
1200
/
1202
1204
1206
/
devices
play lists
tracks
1212
1208
/
1210
/
/
one
buttons
Cm!‘
playlist
browser
buttons
F'Q- 1 5
Fig. 14
select "create play list" ~1302
v
name playlist
Create play list
~1250
v
~1304
r
acquire tracks
~1252
I
manually add tracks
~1306
add tracks to play list
~1254
add criteria
~1308
select device
~1256
V
automatically add tracks ~1310
V
synchronize
~1258
U.S. Patent
Apr. 13, 2004
Sheet 11 0f 16
US 6,721,489 B1
receive one click
1718‘,
selection
1720
\
:t
L
1350M
audio data
1352M
tag
1354~I~
1356v~
title
artist
1358M
1360v~
album
year
1362w
1364M
comment
genre
search for next track
track found?
1724
access track properties
Fig. 16
criteria
satisfied?
automatically add
track to play list
Fig. 20
no
U.S. Patent
Apr. 13,2004
US 6,721,489 B1
Sheet 12 0f 16
store track
~1402
l
detect new track
~1404
l
Fig. 17
access play lists
~1406
V
choose first play list
V
~1408
1410
criteria
satisfied?
yes
1412
no
v
/
automatically
add track to play list
more play lists?
choose next play list
__J
~1416
U.S. Patent
Apr. 13, 2004
Sheet 13 0f 16
US 6,721,489 B1
1530
.
/
Flg ' 1 8
access device properties
i
request for new device ~1502
1532
/
edit properties
lg
display dialog box of
known devices
~15O4
1506
known or new
known
device?
have firmware?
device info template
E
1522
browse for firmware
update firmware’?
\
1510
prepare to load firmware ~1512
U.S. Patent
Apr. 13, 2004
Sheet 14 0f 16
1600
US 6,721,489 B1
Fig. 19
/
receive request to
synchronize
1616
1602
r
/
.
new device config
.
access GUI device f||e(s)
1604
v
yes 1618
/
access stored device
?le(s)
no
info?
/
d t
d
up a e
.
f.
. f
evice con lg in o
1606
/
v
remove tracks from
device
1608
r
/
add tracks to device
l
1610
/
yes
1624
/
add new firmware
change flag
l
1612
/
update play list files on
device
no
1614
r
/
update play list config
files on device
add new OS
U.S. Patent
Apr. 13, 2004
US 6,721,489 B1
Sheet 15 0f 16
1704
Internet
Internet
_
server
disc
changer
\1 3O
128
102a
_
music server
Fig. 21
l
[126
H
monitor
124
l
l
7;
Z
108
110
112
docking
station
acquire music
~1902
v
store music on disk
cartridge
~19O4
v
insert disk cartridge into ~1906
server
v
receive selection of music
source
“A908
v
play selected music
I
106
[122
computer
Fig. 23
i
~1910
I120
disk
cartridge
U.S. Patent
Apr. 13, 2004
Connector
Sheet 16 0f 16
US 6,721,489 B1
~ 322
1804
1806
—
Glue logic
~ 330
1808
320a
1802 \
7
[340
f 332
Controller
Power
——
switch
\342
l
_
Processor
~ 302
Control
/ 1810
Panel
[300
IDE
58?;
RAM
\304
D/A
Glue Logic
\ 308
\306
3
\. 324
IDE Connector
10
1816
1814\
t
uner
[1812 /-1818 /-182O
audio
switch
preamp!
equalizer
am H. :
pl ‘er I
Fig. 22
US 6,721,489 B1
1
2
PLAY LIST MANAGER
a play list and speci?es certain criteria for automatically
CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED
APPLICATIONS
adding tracks to the play list. When a neW track is added to
the environment, the system tests Whether the track’s prop
erties satisfy the criteria for the play list. If so, the neW track
is automatically added to the play list. In one alternative, a
This Application is related to the following Applications:
AUDIO/VISUAL SERVER, by Dannie C. Lau, et al.,
user can select to create or update a prede?ned play list
Whose criteria has already been created. Upon selection of
the prede?ned play list, the play list manager accesses each
track and automatically adds the track to the play list if the
?led the same day as the present application, Ser. No.
09/521,182; and
VEHICLE SOUND SYSTEM, by Dannie C. Lau, et al.,
track’s properties satisfy the criteria for the prede?ned play
list. In one embodiment, after a play list is created and tracks
are added, the tracks on the play list are automatically
?led the same day as the present application, Ser. No.
09/521,186.
played.
Each of these related Applications are incorporated herein
One embodiment of the present invention includes the
by reference.
15 steps of comparing a set of one or more properties of a ?rst
track to criteria of a ?rst play list and automatically adding
the ?rst track to the ?rst play list if the properties of the ?rst
track satisfy the criteria of the ?rst play list. One embodi
ment includes detecting that the ?rst track is available such
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
1. Field of the Invention
The present invention is directed to a system for manag
ing play lists.
that the step of comparing is performed automatically in
response to the step of detecting. Another embodiment of the
present invention includes comparing properties for a ?rst
track to play list criteria for a plurality of play lists and
automatically adding the ?rst track to each of the play lists
2. Description of the Related Art
Digitally stored music continues to gain popularity.
Rather than drive to a store, consumers are doWnloading
music from the Internet and playing music on a computer or
on a digital music player. An eXample of a digital music
25
having play list criteria satis?ed by the properties for the ?rst
player is the Rio digital music player from Diamond Mul
track. Thus, the method can be used to create or update one
timedia. This music player includes a ?ash memory for
play list or multiple play lists. In another embodiment, the
storing music and electronics for playing the music. One
advantage of digital music is that the storage medium is
present invention includes receiving a request to generate a
Writeable. Thus, the user can choose What songs to play and
Which tracks from a set of tracks have properties satisfying
play list having prede?ned play list criteria, determining
the play list criteria and automatically adding to the play list
the tracks having properties satisfying the play list criteria.
The present invention can be implemented using
Write those songs to the music player’s storage medium. On
the other hand, audio compact discs are not Writeable. In
addition to the versatility offered by digital music, there is a
huge variety of music available to be doWnloaded through
the Internet. With the acceptance of a standard for com
35
pressed audio ?les, digital music has soared in popularity.
Users of digital music technology can acquire large
processor readable storage medium. Examples of an appro
priate processor readable storage medium include a ?oppy
disk, a hard disk, CD-ROM, memory or IC, ?ash memory,
amounts of digital music ?les. In order to manage these ?les,
play lists are created. For eXample, a play list may be a list
of songs to be played by a music player. Play lists alloWs
etc. In one embodiment, the hardWare used to implement the
present invention includes an output device (eg a monitor,
users to group their songs according to Whatever method the
a printer, speakers, etc.), an input device (eg a keyboard,
user desires and plays the tracks referenced by the play list
on a music player.
One problem that has been associated With play lists is the
enormous effort needed to manage play lists. As the user
45
acquires large amounts of ?les, managing the play list
becomes dif?cult. A user may have multiple or hundreds of
play lists. Additionally, the user may have hundreds or
thousands of music ?les. The effort to move a large number
can be implemented on a desktop computer, netWork server,
as part of a Web page on the Internet, another type of
computing platform, a head unit, a server, an audio device,
a visual device, or any other device suitable for using the
Furthermore, as users doWnload neW ?les, the user must
remember to add the neW tracks to one or more play lists.
This tWo step approach—(1) doWnloading music ?les and
lists—is cumbersome. Therefore, many users stop using
play lists.
Thus, there is a need for an improved means for managing
play lists.
pointing device, etc.), a processor, an input interface and a
processor readable storage medium. The input interface
alloWs the processor to communicate With a disk drive,
netWork or other device for entering data into the hardWare.
The processor readable storage medium stores program code
capable of programming the processor to perform the steps
to implement the present invention. The present invention
of ?les into the appropriate play lists is time consuming.
(2) moving the doWnloaded ?les to one or more play
softWare, hardWare or a combination of softWare and hard
Ware. When all or portions of the present invention are
implemented in softWare, that softWare can reside on a
55
present invention.
These and other objects and advantages of the present
invention Will appear more clearly from the folloWing
detailed description in Which the preferred embodiment of
the invention has been set forth in conjunction With the
draWings.
SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
The present invention, roughly described, provides for a
play list manager than can be used to create and update play
lists. The play lists can be used for audio information, visual
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
FIG. 1 is a block diagram of one embodiment of the
present invention.
FIG. 2 is the side vieW of the dock of the present
information or a combination of audio and visual informa 65 invention.
FIG. 3 is a schematic diagram of the dock of the present
tion. In one embodiment, a play list stores the names of
tracks to be played. The user of the play list manager creates
invention.
US 6,721,489 B1
4
3
FIG. 4 is a cut away overhead vieW of a removable hard
the audio/visual server, music server 102 appears to act like
a disc changer. Music server 102 is in communication With
head unit 104. In one embodiment, head unit 104 is a
disk drive.
FIG. 5 is the perspective vieW of the server of the present
invention.
FIG. 6 is a block diagram of the components of the server
of one embodiment of the present invention.
FIG. 7 is a How chart describing the operation of the
standard automobile stereo head unit Which is adapted to
communicate With a disc changer. Connected to head unit
104 are speakers 106, 108, 110 and 112 for providing music
to the user. FIG. 1 also shoWs removable disk cartridge 120
Which can be connected to music server 102 or docking
present invention.
FIG. 8 is a How chart describing the start up process for
the controller.
FIG. 9 is a How chart describing the start up process for
the processor.
station 122 (also called a dock).
10
computer 124. In other embodiments, docking station 122
can connect to a parallel port, serial port, ?re Wire connec
FIG. 10 is a How chart describing the ?rmWare update
sequence performed by the processor.
15
docking station can be a separate entity on a netWork
communicating to computer 124 over a netWork.
FIG. 1 shoWs a monitor 126 connected to computer 124.
the processor for playing audio/visual data.
FIG. 13 depicts the graphical user interface for the soft
Computer 124 is a standard personal computer knoWn in the
Ware used on a computer to manage play lists and load tracks
on the hard disk drive.
art. For eXample, computer 124 includes a processor, a
memory in communication With the processor, a hard disk
drive in communication With the processor, a USB port, a
25
Internet server 130 is provided via the Internet for doWn
neW interface program code to be loaded on the server of the
loading tracks, doWnloading information about tracks, stor
ing information about tracks and doWnloading ?rmWare. In
present invention.
35
the computer.
FIG. 20 is a How chart describing the process for gener
ating a one click play list.
FIG. 21 is a block diagram of an alternative embodiment
one embodiment of the system of FIG. 1, the tracks are
songs.
In general, the embodiment shoWn in FIG. 1 operates as
folloWs. A user Will insert disk cartridge 120 into docking
station 122. Using the GUI on computer 124, the user Will
doWnload tracks from the Internet (including Internet server
130) to the hard disk of computer 124. The doWnloading of
music can also be done Without using the GUI of the present
invention. After the tracks are on disk cartridge 120, disk
cartridge 120 is removed from docking station 122 and
of the present invention.
FIG. 22 is a block diagram of the components of an
alternative embodiment of the music server.
FIG. 23 is a How chart describing the operation of an
alternative embodiment of the present invention.
serial port, a parallel port, a netWork interface (e.g. netWork
card or modem), a keyboard and a pointing device. The
keyboard, pointing device and monitor 126 are used to
provide and interact With a graphical user interface (GUI) so
that a user can add tracks to music server 102. Computer 124
is connected to Internet 128 via a modem, LAN or other
means. In one embodiment of the present invention, an
FIG. 17 is a How chart describing the method for auto
matically adding tracks to a play list.
FIG. 18 is a How chart describing the method of selecting
FIG. 19 is a How chart describing the process of synchro
niZing data betWeen the hard disk drive and the softWare on
tion or other interface. In other embodiments, docking
station 122 communicates With computer 124 using a Wire
less connection, including infrared, RF, etc. Alternatively,
FIG. 11 is a state diagram for the controller.
FIG. 12 is a How chart describing a process performed by
FIG. 14 is a How chart describing the process of acquiring
tracks, managing tracks and adding tracks to a device.
FIG. 15 is a How chart describing the process of creating
a play list.
FIG. 16 is a block diagram depicting an ID3 tag.
Docking station 122 is connected to computer 124. In one
embodiment, docking station 122 connects to a USB port of
45
DETAILED DESCRIPTION
inserted into music server 102. In one embodiment, music
server 102 and head unit 104 are mounted in an automobile.
More speci?cally, music server 102 may be mounted in the
trunk of a car and head unit 104 is mounted in the dash
While the preferred embodiment of the invention is
described in regard to an in-vehicle audio system, the
board. After disk cartridge 120 is inserted into music server
102, a user can use head unit 104 to access tracks on disk
present invention can also be used in other conteXts and With
cartridge 120 and play those tracks through speakers 106,
other types of audio/visual data. For purposes of this patent,
audio/visual includes audio alone, visual alone, or a com
108, 110 and 112.
bination of audio and visual. EXamples of audio data include
music, speech or other sounds. EXamples of visual data
FIG. 2 is a side vieW of docking station 122. On the top
of docking station 122 is an opening 140 for receiving disk
cartridge 120. In one embodiment, disk cartridge 120 is
include video, animation, slide shoW, teXt, still images, etc.
55
inserted into opening 140 in a vertical orientation. FIG. 2
also shoWs tWo Wires connected to docking station 122. Wire
142 supplies DC poWer to docking station 122. In one
embodiment, Wire 142 is connected to a ?ve volt regulated
transformer. Wire 144 connects docking station 122 to a
Thus, the present invention can be used as a server for video
data, visual teXt data, speech data, or any other type of
audio/visual data. In one embodiment, the audio/visual data
is grouped into tracks. A track could be a song, a message,
a story, a video, a scene from a video, etc. The term track is
USB port of computer 124.
used, therefore, to refer to a grouping of audio/visual data.
FIG. 1 depicts one embodiment of the present invention.
FIG. 3 is a schematic of the internal components of
docking station 122. Wire 142 is connected to sWitch 150.
SWitch 150 is a mechanical sWitch that is triggered When
FIG. 1 depicts music server 102 Which is one embodiment
of an audio/visual server. Music server 102 emulates a disc
changer. Emulating a disc changer is understood to mean
that music server 102 is not an actual disk changer; hoWever,
based on the input/output data communication to and from
65
disk cartridge 120 is completely and properly inserted into
opening 140. SWitch 150 is connected to IDE controller 152
and USB to IDE interface 154. When sWitch 150 is triggered
US 6,721,489 B1
5
6
(disk cartridge 120 is inserted in docking station 122), power
server 102 is prohibited from Writing to disk cartridge 120.
The directory/microcontroller con?g also includes a button
mapping ?le Which is used to override the function of any
from Wire 142 is provided to IDE connector 152 and USB
to IDE interface 154. USB to IDE interface 154 is also
connected to Wire 144, IDE connector 152, LED 156 and
LED 158. LED 156 indicates Whether docking station 122 is
provides a temperature setting for automatically turning the
button on the head unit. A ?le is also included Which
receiving poWer. LED 158 indicates hard drive activity. In
box off. In one embodiment, music server 102 includes a
one embodiment, USB to IDE interface 154 is an OnSpec
90C36. The purpose of the docking station is to connect the
thermometer and electronics for determining the tempera
ture. If the temperature reaches the setting in the ?le, music
hard disk drive to the computer. Other alternative docking
stations different from that of FIGS. 2 and 3 could also be
used Within the spirit of the present invention. Examples of
server 102 Will automatically turn off. Another ?le in the
10
suitable alternative docks include a cable that connects to
both a computer and the disk drive, a connector that con
nects to both a computer and the disk drive, a drive bay that
is Within or connected to the computer and can receive the
microcontroller con?g directory also includes ?les Which
store a version number for the encrypted microcode and
15
disk drive, etc.
FIG. 4 shoWs an overhead cutaWay vieW of disk cartridge
120. Outer shell 170 protects and houses the components of
disk cartridge 120. In one embodiment, outer shell 170 is
can also be used. In addition to the operating system code,
the/OS directory also stores drivers including the IDE driver,
audio drivers for the digital to analog converter, a driver for
the serial interface betWeen the processor and the controller,
etc. The/OS directory also stores a start up ?le Which
includes start up code performed by processor 302 after
25
receiving poWer.
FIG. 5 shoWs a perspective vieW of music server 102. At
one end of music server 102 is an opening 202 for inserting
disk cartridge 120. The components of music server 102 are
connector 176. In one embodiment, connector 176 is a 44
pin connector. Flexible ribbon cable 174 maps signals from
connector 172 to connector 176. Connector 176 is attached
to hard disk drive 178. In one embodiment, hard disk drive
178 is a 5 gigabyte hard disk drive from Toshiba With a 21/2
inch form factor. Other hard disk drives can also be used. A
hard disk drives utiliZing one or multiple disks can be used.
protected by hinged door 204. When disk cartridge 120 is
inserted in opening 202, door 204 is opened. In one
embodiment, music server 102 Will include metal springs or
high density shock absorbing air pouches inside the outer
Hard disk drives With multiple disks typically have separate
read/Write heads for each disk. In other alternatives, the hard
disk drive can be replaced by other high density disk drives,
code for programming a PLD or FPGA (described beloW).
In the/OS directory, hard disk drive 178 stores the oper
ating system for music server 102. In one embodiment, the
operating system used is LINUX. Other operating systems
made of hard plastic. Metals can also be used. At one end of
outer shell 170 is IDE connector 172. Connected to IDE
connector 172 is a printed circuit board (or a ?exible ribbon
cable) With various circuit elements and Wires. For example,
?exible ribbon cable 174 includes capacitors and resistors
for decoupling. Connected to ?exible ribbon cable 174 is
directory/microcontroller con?g stores the ?rmWare used to
program controller 320 to communicate With head unit 104.
The ?rmWare on hard disk drive 178 is encrypted. The/
35
?ash memory, CDRW or other appropriate storage media. In
one embodiment, the gap betWeen hard disk drive 178 and
outer shell 170 can be ?lled With a shock absorbing sub
box in order to suspend the frame that holds disk cartridge
120.
FIG. 6 shoWs a block diagram of the components of music
server 102. Bus 300 is connected to processor 302, boot
ROM 304, RAM 306 and IDE glue logic 308. Connected to
IDE glue logic 308 is IDE connector 310. IDE connector
310 is used to connect to connector 172 of disk cartridge
stance.
Hard disk drive 178 includes music ?les to be played by
120. RAM 306 is used as memory for processor 302. In one
music server 102. Hard disk drive 178 also includes various
program code and con?guration information. In one
embodiment, RAM 306 includes 16 megabytes of DRAM.
Boot ROM 304 is used to store the code for booting
processor 302. Processor 302 is also connected to controller
embodiment, hard disk drive 178 includes at least ?ve top
level directories: /MP3, /playlist, /playlist con?g,
/microcontroller con?g and /OS. The directory /MP3 con
tains all of the audio ?les. The directory /playlist contains all
320. Music server 102 uses a separate processor and con
45
troller because the communication With the head unit is in
real time, While processor 302 is busy decoding audio and/or
the play list ?les. The drive can store many play lists. Each
visual data. In one embodiment, processor 302 is an EP 7212
play list ?le contains a set of strings. Each string speci?es the
path location to a particular track in the /MP3 directory. The
strings are stored,in the ?le according to the order set up by
the user. The directory /playlist con?g contains ?les that
from Cirrus Logic, Which implements the ARM architecture.
One example of a suitable controller is the Phillips 8051
Microcontroller. Note that other processors and/or control
lers can also be used. Although controller 320 is referred to
include special con?guration information for each play list.
Examples of such special con?guration information includes
as a controller, the terms controller and processor can be
used interchangeably and controller 320 can be referred to as
Whether there should be a pause betWeen tracks, Whether
text output should be enabled, Whether random play should
be enabled, the length of the gap betWeen tracks, informa
tion about repeating tracks in the play list, etc.
The directory /microcontroller con?g includes a series of
?les for con?guring controller 320 (see FIG. 6) to commu
a processor. The reason device 320 is referred to as a
55
The communication betWeen controller 320 and processor
302 includes a serial interface. In some embodiments, there
is also a program signal sent from processor 302 to control
ler 320. Controller 320 includes an internal ?ash memory.
nicate With head unit 104. One ?le is a text ?le With a set of
?ags Which indicate any of the folloWing: disk cartridge
change, other devices connected, head unit text on/off, time
elapsed to be displayed up or doWn, etc. The ?ag indicating
disk cartridge change is a one bit binary value that is
inverted by computer 124 if disk cartridge 120 is connected
to docking station 122 and data is Written to or deleted from
disk cartridge 120. Note that in one embodiment, music
controller rather than a processor is to make the text clearer
to read.
65
The program signal is used by processor 302 to program the
internal ?ash memory of controller 320. Controller 320 is
connected to glue logic 330, Which is connected to connector
322. In one embodiment, connector 322 is a 24 pin centron
ics port. Connector 322 is attached to a cable. The other end
of the cable connects to head unit 104. Many automobile
stereo head units have a disc changer port in the back of the
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