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Dialogic® DSI Signaling Servers
SGW Mode User Manual
www.dialogic.com
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Publication Date: August 2008
Document Number: 05-2304-005
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Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
Contents
1
Overview .................................................................................................................. 9
1.1
General Description............................................................................................. 9
1.2
Related Information ...........................................................................................10
1.3
Applicability ......................................................................................................10
1.4
Hardware Overview............................................................................................10
1.4.1 Part Numbers .........................................................................................11
1.5
Connectivity......................................................................................................11
1.6
User Interface ...................................................................................................11
1.7
Configuration and Program Storage ......................................................................11
1.8
IP Security........................................................................................................12
1.9
Functional Summary ..........................................................................................12
1.9.1 Signaling ...............................................................................................12
1.9.2 Configuration Model ................................................................................13
1.9.3 Cross Connections ..................................................................................13
1.9.4 Monitoring .............................................................................................13
1.9.5 Remote Data Centers ..............................................................................13
1.9.6 Alarm Log..............................................................................................14
1.9.7 Diagnostic Log Files ................................................................................14
1.9.8 M3UA Backhaul Operation ........................................................................14
1.9.9 M2PA Longhaul Operation ........................................................................15
1.9.10 Default Routing ......................................................................................15
1.9.11 Resilience ..............................................................................................16
2
Specification ............................................................................................................17
2.1
Hardware Specification .......................................................................................17
2.2
Software Licenses ..............................................................................................18
2.2.1 Software Licenses for the SS7G31 and SS7G32 Signaling Servers .................18
2.2.2 Software Licenses for the SS7G21 and SS7G22 Signaling Servers .................18
2.3
Capabilities .......................................................................................................18
2.3.1 Dialogic® DSI SS7G31 and SS7G32 Signaling Servers Protocol Capabilities ....18
2.3.2 Dialogic® DSI SS7G21 and SS7G22 Signaling Server Protocol Capabilities ......19
3
Licensing, Installation and Initial Configuration.......................................................21
3.1
Software Licensing.............................................................................................21
3.1.1 Purchasing Software Licenses ...................................................................21
3.1.2 Temporary Licenses.................................................................................22
3.2
Installing the Signaling Gateway ..........................................................................22
3.2.1 Connecting a VT100 Terminal ...................................................................22
3.2.2 IP Configuration .....................................................................................23
3.2.3 Software Download .................................................................................24
3.2.4 Installing Software Licenses .....................................................................25
3.2.5 License Update from Remote Data Center ..................................................25
3.2.6 Changing System Operation Mode.............................................................26
3.2.7 Configuration Procedure ..........................................................................26
4
Operation.................................................................................................................27
4.1
General ............................................................................................................27
4.2
Log On/Off Procedure .........................................................................................27
4.3
Command Character Set and Syntax ....................................................................28
4.4
Command Formats.............................................................................................28
4.5
Command Entry ................................................................................................29
4.6
Dangerous Commands .......................................................................................29
4.7
Changing Configuration Data ...............................................................................29
4.8
Command Responses .........................................................................................29
4.9
FTP Access........................................................................................................30
4.10 Backing Up System Software...............................................................................31
3
Contents
4.11
4.12
4.13
4.14
4.15
4.10.1 Software Backup to a Remote Data Center .................................................31
Updating System Software ..................................................................................31
4.11.1 Software Update from a Remote Data Center..............................................32
4.11.2 Software Update from Portable Media ........................................................32
4.11.3 Software Update from Startup ..................................................................32
Backing Up Configuration Data ............................................................................33
4.12.1 Configuration Backup to Remote Data Center .............................................33
Updating Configuration Data ...............................................................................33
4.13.1 Configuration Update from a Remote Data Center .......................................33
4.13.2 Configuration Update from Portable Media..................................................34
4.13.3 Configuration Update from Startup............................................................34
Creating a System Archive ..................................................................................35
Restoring System Archive ...................................................................................35
5
Parameter Definitions ..............................................................................................37
5.1
Parameter Table ................................................................................................37
5.2
Remote Operations ............................................................................................46
5.3
Signaling Gateway Timers ...................................................................................46
5.3.1 Signaling Gateway-Specific Timers ............................................................46
5.3.2 MTP3-Specific Timers ..............................................................................47
5.3.3 SCTP-Specific Timers...............................................................................48
5.4
Dialogic® DSI Network Interface Board Types ........................................................48
6
Command Definitions ...............................................................................................49
6.1
Command Groups ..............................................................................................49
6.2
Command Notation ............................................................................................49
6.3
Command Attributes ..........................................................................................49
6.4
Alarm Commands ..............................................................................................50
6.4.1 ALCLS – Alarm Class Set..........................................................................50
6.4.2 ALCLP – Alarm Class Print ........................................................................50
6.4.3 ALFCP – Alarm Fault Code Print ................................................................51
6.4.4 ALLIP – Alarm List Print ...........................................................................51
6.4.5 ALLOP – Alarm Log Print ..........................................................................52
6.4.6 ALREI – Alarm Reset Initiate ....................................................................53
6.4.7 ALTEI – Alarm Test Initiate .......................................................................53
6.4.8 ALTEE – Alarm Test End ...........................................................................54
6.5
Configuration Commands ....................................................................................55
6.5.1 CNBOI – Configuration Board Initiate.........................................................56
6.5.2 CNBOE – Configuration Board End.............................................................56
6.5.3 CNBOP – Configuration Board Print ...........................................................57
6.5.4 CNBUI – Configuration Back Up Initiate .....................................................57
6.5.5 CNMOI – Configuration Monitor Initiate ......................................................58
6.5.6 CNMOE – Configuration Monitor End ..........................................................58
6.5.7 CNMOP – Configuration Monitor Print.........................................................59
6.5.8 CNOBP – Display TRAP Configuration .........................................................59
6.5.9 CNOBS – Set TRAP Configuration ..............................................................60
6.5.10 CNPCI – Configuration PCM Initiate ...........................................................61
6.5.11 CNPCC – Configuration PCM Change ..........................................................62
6.5.12 CNPCE – Configuration PCM End ...............................................................62
6.5.13 CNPCP – Configuration PCM Print ..............................................................62
6.5.14 CNRDI – Configuration Remote Data Center Initiate ....................................63
6.5.15 CNRDC – Configuration Remote Data Center Change ...................................63
6.5.16 CNRDE – Configuration Remote Data Center End.........................................64
6.5.17 CNRDP – Configuration Remote Data Center Print .......................................64
6.5.18 CNSMC – Change SNMP Manager Configuration ..........................................65
6.5.19 CNSME – End SNMP Manager Configuration ................................................65
6.5.20 CNSMI – Set SNMP Manager Configuration .................................................65
6.5.21 CNSMP – Display SNMP Manager Configuration ...........................................66
6.5.22 CNSNS – Configuration SNMP Set .............................................................67
6.5.23 CNSNP – Configuration SNMP Print............................................................67
6.5.24 CNSWP – Configuration Software Print.......................................................68
6.5.25 CNSYS – Configuration System Set ...........................................................68
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Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
6.6
6.7
6.8
6.9
6.10
6.11
6.5.26 CNSYP – Configuration System Print..........................................................69
6.5.27 CNTDS – Configuration Time and Date Set .................................................70
6.5.28 CNTDP – Configuration Time And Date Print ...............................................71
6.5.29 CNTOS – Configuration Timeout Value Set..................................................71
6.5.30 CNTOP – Configuration Timeout Value Print ................................................72
6.5.31 CNTPE – Configuration Network Time Protocol Server End ............................72
6.5.32 CNTPI – Configuration Network Time Protocol Server Initiate ........................72
6.5.33 CNTPP – Configuration Network Time Protocol Print .....................................73
6.5.34 CNTSP – Configuration Timeslot Print ........................................................73
6.5.35 CNUPI – Configuration Update Initiate .......................................................74
6.5.36 CNUSC – Change SNMP v3 User Configuration ............................................75
6.5.37 CNUSE – End SNMP v3 ............................................................................75
6.5.38 CNUSI – Set SNMP v3 .............................................................................76
6.5.39 CNUSP – Display SNMP v3 .......................................................................76
6.5.40 CNXCI – Configuration Cross Connect Initiate .............................................77
6.5.41 CNXCE – Configuration Cross Connect End .................................................77
6.5.42 CNXCP – Configuration Cross Connect Print ................................................78
SS7 Signaling Commands ...................................................................................79
6.6.1 C7LSI – CCS SS7 Link Set Initiate.............................................................79
6.6.2 C7LSC – CCS SS7 Link Set Change ...........................................................80
6.6.3 C7LSE – CCS SS7 Link Set End.................................................................80
6.6.4 C7LSP – CCS SS7 Link Set Print................................................................81
6.6.5 C7RTI – CCS SS7 Route Initiate ................................................................81
6.6.6 C7RTC – CCS SS7 Route Change...............................................................82
6.6.7 C7RTE – CCS SS7 Route End ....................................................................82
6.6.8 C7RTP – CCS SS7 Route Print...................................................................83
6.6.9 C7SLI – CCS SS7 Signaling Link Initiate.....................................................83
6.6.10 C7SLC – CCS SS7 Signaling Link Change ...................................................84
6.6.11 C7SLE – CCS SS7 Signaling Link End.........................................................85
6.6.12 C7SLP – CCS SS7 Signaling Link Print........................................................85
IP Commands ...................................................................................................86
6.7.1 IPEPS – Set Ethernet Port Configuration.....................................................86
6.7.2 IPEPP – Display Ethernet Port Configuration ...............................................87
6.7.3 IPGWI – Internet Protocol Gateway Initiate ................................................87
6.7.4 IPGWE – Internet Protocol Gateway End ....................................................88
6.7.5 IPGWP – Internet Protocol Gateway Print ...................................................88
MML Commands ................................................................................................89
6.8.1 MMLOI – MML Log Off Initiate...................................................................89
6.8.2 MMLOP – MML Log Off Print......................................................................89
6.8.3 MMLOS – MML Log Off Set .......................................................................90
6.8.4 MMPTC – MML Port Change ......................................................................90
6.8.5 MMPTP – MML Port Print ..........................................................................90
Maintenance Commands .....................................................................................92
6.9.1 MNBLI – Maintenance Blocking Initiate ......................................................92
6.9.2 MNBLE – Maintenance Blocking End ..........................................................93
6.9.3 MNINI – Maintenance Inhibit Initiate .........................................................94
6.9.4 MNINE – Maintenance Inhibit End .............................................................94
6.9.5 MNRSI – Maintenance Restart System Initiate ............................................95
Measurement Commands....................................................................................96
6.10.1 MSC7P – Measurements SS7 Print.............................................................96
6.10.2 MSEPP – Measurement Ethernet Port Print .................................................97
6.10.3 MSLCP – Measurement of License Capability Print .......................................98
6.10.4 MSPCP – Measurements PCM Print ............................................................99
6.10.5 MSSLP – Measurements SIGTRAN Link Print ............................................. 100
6.10.6 MSSYP – Measurements System Print ...................................................... 100
Remote Data Center Commands ........................................................................ 102
6.11.1 RDCRI – Remote Data Center Continuous Record Initiate ........................... 102
6.11.2 RDCRC – Remote Data Center Continuous Record Change .......................... 103
6.11.3 RDCRE – Remote Data Center Continuous Record End ............................... 103
6.11.4 RDCRP – Remote Data Center Continuous Record Print .............................. 104
6.11.5 RDPDI – Remote Data Center Periodic Data Initiate ................................... 104
6.11.6 RDPDE – Remote Data Center Periodic Data End ....................................... 105
6.11.7 RDPDP – Remote Data Center Periodic Data Print ...................................... 105
6.11.8 RDPRI – Remote Data Center Periodic Report Initiate................................. 106
6.11.9 RDPRC – Remote Data Center Periodic Report Change ............................... 106
5
Contents
6.12
6.13
6.14
7
6
6.11.10RDPRE – Remote Data Center Periodic Report End..................................... 107
6.11.11RDPRP – Remote Data Center Periodic Report Print.................................... 107
Signaling Gateway Commands........................................................................... 108
6.12.1 SGDPI – Signaling Gateway Destination Point Initiate ................................ 108
6.12.2 SGDPC – Signaling Gateway Destination Point Change ............................... 109
6.12.3 SGDPE – Signaling Gateway Destination Point End .................................... 109
6.12.4 SGDPP – Signaling Gateway Destination Point Print ................................... 109
6.12.5 SGIRI – Signaling Gateway Incoming Route Initiate................................... 110
6.12.6 SGIRC – Signaling Gateway Incoming Route Change ................................ 111
6.12.7 SGIRE – Signaling Gateway Incoming Route End....................................... 111
6.12.8 SGIRP – Signaling Gateway Incoming Route Print...................................... 111
6.12.9 SGRKI – Signaling Gateway Routing Key Initiate ....................................... 112
6.12.10SGRKE – Signaling Gateway Routing Key End ........................................... 113
6.12.11SGRKP – Signaling Gateway Routing Key Print .......................................... 113
SIGTRAN Commands........................................................................................ 114
6.13.1 SNALI – SIGTRAN Application Server List Initiate ...................................... 114
6.13.2 SNALE – SIGTRAN Application Server List End .......................................... 115
6.13.3 SNALP – SIGTRAN Application Server List Print ......................................... 115
6.13.4 SNRAI – SIGTRAN Remote Application Server Initiate ................................ 116
6.13.5 SNRAE – SIGTRAN Remote Application Server End .................................... 116
6.13.6 SNRAP – SIGTRAN Remote Application Server Print ................................... 117
6.13.7 SNNAI – SIGTRAN Network Appearance Initiate ........................................ 117
6.13.8 SNNAE – SIGTRAN Network Appearance End ............................................ 118
6.13.9 SNNAP – SIGTRAN Network Appearance Print ........................................... 118
6.13.10SNSLI – SIGTRAN Signaling Link Initiate .................................................. 119
6.13.11SNSLC – SIGTRAN Signaling Link Change................................................. 120
6.13.12SNSLE – SIGTRAN Signaling Link End ...................................................... 120
6.13.13SNSLP – SIGTRAN Signaling Link Print..................................................... 121
Status Commands ........................................................................................... 122
6.14.1 STALP – Status Alarm Print .................................................................... 122
6.14.2 STRAP – Status Remote Application Server Print ....................................... 123
6.14.3 STBOP – Status Board Print.................................................................... 124
6.14.4 STCRP – Status C7 Route Print ............................................................... 124
6.14.5 STC7P – Status C7 Link Print.................................................................. 125
6.14.6 STDDP – Status Disk Drive Print ............................................................. 126
6.14.7 STEPP – Status Ethernet Port Print .......................................................... 127
6.14.8 STIPP – Status IP Print .......................................................................... 127
6.14.9 STLCP – Status Licensing Print................................................................ 128
6.14.10STPCP – Status PCM Print ...................................................................... 129
6.14.11STRDP – Status Remote Data Center Print ............................................... 130
6.14.12STSLP – Status SIGTRAN Link Print ......................................................... 131
6.14.13STSYP – Status System Print .................................................................. 132
6.14.14STTPP – Network Time Protocol Status Print ............................................. 133
Configuration Overview ......................................................................................... 135
7.1
System, Hardware and Signaling Configuration .................................................... 135
7.1.1 System Configuration ............................................................................ 135
7.1.2 Boards and PCMs .................................................................................. 136
7.2
Signaling Configuration..................................................................................... 137
7.2.1 SS7 Configuration ................................................................................. 137
7.2.2 High Speed Signaling Links Configuration ................................................. 138
7.2.3 SS7 M2PA Operation ............................................................................. 138
7.2.4 M3UA Configuration .............................................................................. 139
7.3
Routing Configuration....................................................................................... 140
7.4
Management and Operations ............................................................................. 141
7.5
Default Routing ............................................................................................... 141
7.5.1 Configuring Default Routing ................................................................... 142
7.6
Resilience ....................................................................................................... 143
7.6.1 IP Port Bonding .................................................................................... 143
7.6.2 Dual Resilient Operation ........................................................................ 143
7.6.3 Multihoming ......................................................................................... 146
7.7
Hard Disk Management .................................................................................... 146
7.7.1 SS7G21 and SS7G22 Hard Disk Drives .................................................... 146
Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
7.7.2
SS7G31 and SS7G32 Hard Disk Drive RAID Array ..................................... 146
8
Alarm Fault Code Listing ........................................................................................ 149
9
Remote Data Center Operation............................................................................... 153
9.1
Local Data Centers........................................................................................... 153
9.2
Continuous Records ......................................................................................... 153
9.3
Periodic Reporting............................................................................................ 153
9.3.1 C7 Link Traffic Measurements ................................................................. 153
9.3.2 PCM Traffic Measurements ..................................................................... 153
9.3.3 SIGTRAN Link Traffic Measurements ........................................................ 154
9.3.4 Ethernet Port Traffic Measurements ......................................................... 154
9.3.5 System Measurements .......................................................................... 154
9.4
RDC File Formats ............................................................................................. 154
9.4.1 Alarm Record File Format....................................................................... 154
9.4.2 Ethernet Port Measurements File Format .................................................. 155
9.4.3 PCM Measurements File Format .............................................................. 155
9.4.4 SS7 Link Measurements File Format ........................................................ 156
9.4.5 SIGTRAN Link Measurements File Format ................................................. 156
9.4.6 System Measurements File Format .......................................................... 157
9.5
RDC Configuration and Usage ............................................................................ 157
9.5.1 RDC Initialization .................................................................................. 157
9.5.2 Continuous Records .............................................................................. 157
9.5.3 Periodic Reports.................................................................................... 158
9.5.4 Software Update................................................................................... 159
9.5.5 Configuration Backup ............................................................................ 159
9.5.6 Configuration Update ............................................................................ 159
9.5.7 Software Option Installation ................................................................... 159
10
Signaling Server SNMP........................................................................................... 161
10.1 Overview ........................................................................................................ 161
10.1.1 DSMI SNMP ......................................................................................... 161
10.1.2 DK4032 SNMP ...................................................................................... 161
11
Worked Configuration Examples ............................................................................ 165
11.1 Backhaul Configuration ..................................................................................... 165
11.2 M2PA Longhaul Configuration ............................................................................ 166
11.3 Dual Resilient Configuration .............................................................................. 167
11.3.1 SG 1 Configuration................................................................................ 167
11.3.2 SG 2 Configuration................................................................................ 168
12
Network Time Protocol .......................................................................................... 169
13
Command Summary ............................................................................................... 171
Glossary................................................................................................................. 175
Figures
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
M3UA Backhaul Configuration.....................................................................................15
M2PA Longhaul Configuration .....................................................................................15
Dual Resilient Configuration .......................................................................................16
Multiple IP Networks ............................................................................................... 135
Physical Configuration ............................................................................................. 136
SS7 Signaling Example............................................................................................ 137
M2PA Example ....................................................................................................... 138
M3UA Backhaul Example ......................................................................................... 139
Routing Configuration Example................................................................................. 140
System Using Default Routing .................................................................................. 142
Dual Resilient Operation .......................................................................................... 145
7
Contents
12
13
14
Example Back-Haul Configuration ............................................................................. 165
M2PA Longhaul Configuration ................................................................................... 166
Example Dual Resilient Configuration ........................................................................ 167
Tables
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
Command Rejection Responses ..................................................................................30
System Files Stored in the syslog Subdirectory .............................................................35
Parameter Definitions................................................................................................37
Remote Operation Types............................................................................................46
Signaling Gateway Specific Timers ..............................................................................46
MTP3 ITU Timers ......................................................................................................47
MTP3 ANSI Timers ....................................................................................................47
SCTP-Specific Timers ................................................................................................48
Dialogic® DSI Network Interface Board Types...............................................................48
Alarm Fault Codes .................................................................................................. 149
Revision History
Date
Part Number
Issue
Description of Changes
Information updated to include the Dialogic ® DSI SS7G31 and
SS7G32 Signaling Servers and licensing.
August 2008
05-2305-005
5
June 2008
05-2305-005-01
5-01
September 2007
05-2304-004
4
Updates for brand changes, web sites, and other minor corrections.
Trial release version. Information updated to include the Dialogic ®
DSI SS7G31 and SS7G32 Signaling Servers and licensing.
December 2005
05-2304-003
3
Updates to include support for resilient IP connectivity, additional
measurement and status commands (STSYP, MSSYP and MSEPP) and
other minor enhancements and corrections.
May 2005
05-2304-001
2
Supports the first production release.
March 2005
05-2304-001-01
1
Field Trial release.
Note: The current issue of this guide can be found at:
http://www.dialogic.com/support/helpweb/signaling
8
Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
Chapter 1: Overview
1.1
General Description
The Dialogic® DSI SS7G21, SS7G22, SS7G31 and SS7G32 Signaling Servers (hereafter, sometimes referred
to as “Signaling Server(s)”), with an SGW Mode software license installed and enabled, operate as Dialogic®
DSI Signaling Gateways (hereafter sometimes referred to as "Signaling Gateway(s)"). They provide an
interface between SS7 and IP networks, allowing SS7 information to be carried over IP to either IP resident
signaling points and applications (for example, a soft switch) or to another Signaling Gateway. IETF SIGTRAN
protocols are used to help to ensure interoperability with third party equipment.
Each Signaling Server may be purchased as one of several equipment types. The SS7G21 and SS7G22
equipment types use the same chassis and operate with the same software, but use different signaling
boards. The SS7G31 and SS7G32 equipment types use different chassis supporting different numbers of
signaling boards, but use the same software. See Section 1.4, “Hardware Overview” on page 10 for a
description of the Signaling Server hardware.
The Signaling Gateway uses the SIGTRAN M3UA protocol to "backhaul" SS7 signaling messages to IP
resident Application Servers, removing the need for Application Hosts to have dedicated SS7 MTP services or
hardware. Application Servers using the Signaling Gateway may be part of a single point code or multiple
point codes.
The Signaling Gateway M3UA architecture uses open standards interfaces, providing flexibility, scalability and
resilience. It is easy to add or reconfigure M3UA Application Servers and Signaling Gateways to address
demands for new services or increased capacity.
The Signaling Gateway also supports SIGTRAN M2PA protocol to talk to other Point Codes over IP links,
rather than TDM. M2PA may be used to connect within the central office, or for longhaul links over IP.
The SS7G21 and SS7G22 Signaling Servers are shipped in Signaling Unit Interface (SIU) Mode. To enable
SGW functionality, order a SS7SBG20SGW license.
The SS7G31 and SS7G32 Signaling Servers are shipped in TEST Mode - without any operation mode license
installed. To enable SGW functionality, order either a SS7SBG30SGWU,SS7SBG30SGWL or SS7SBG30SGWJ
license. See Section 2.2, “Software Licenses” on page 18 for more information about the available licenses,
and Section 3, “Licensing, Installation and Initial Configuration” on page 21 for information about license
purchase, installation and operation.
A Signaling Server with the SGW Mode license installed and enabled is referred to as a “Signaling Gateway”
throughout this manual.
The Signaling Server, if equipped with the SIU Mode software license, operates as a Signaling Interface Unit
(SIU), providing an interface to SS7 networks for a number of distributed application platforms via TCP/IP
LAN. In this mode, the unit implements the SS7 Message Transfer Part (MTP) and a number of User Parts
(ISUP, SCCP, TCAP, MAP, IS41 and INAP). Refer to the Dialogic® DSI Signaling Servers SIU Mode User
Manual for details of this operation mode.
The Signaling Server, if equipped with the DSC Mode software license, operates as a Digital Signaling
Converter providing signaling conversion between pairs of network-side or access-side telephony protocols.
Refer to the Dialogic® SS7G21 and SS7G22 Signaling Servers DSC Mode User Manual for details of this
operation mode. DSC Mode operation is not available on the SS7G31 or SS7G32 products.
Refer to section Section 3, “Licensing, Installation and Initial Configuration” on page 21 for procedures about
the purchase and installation of software option licenses. Refer to Chapter 3, “Licensing, Installation and
Initial Configuration” on page 21 for procedures required to configure the Signaling Server for SGW Mode
operation.
9
Chapter 1 Overview
1.2
Related Information
This user manual, together with the Dialogic® SS7G21 and SS7G22 Signaling Servers Hardware Manual (052300-xxxx) and the Dialogic® DSI SS7G31 and SS7G32 Signaling Servers Hardware Manual (05-2630-xxxx)
form the documentation set for the SGW mode of operation of a Signaling Server. These hardware manuals
address hardware-specific aspects of the product including: installation, specification, module replacement
and a full description of the hardware modules. This user manual describes the user interface, together with
applicable parameters and configuration commands.
Current software and documentation supporting Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server products is available on the
web at:
http://www.dialogic.com/support/helpweb/signaling.
The product data sheet is available at:
http://www.dialogic.com/support/helpweb/signaling.
For more information on Dialogic® SS7 products and solutions, visit:
http://www.dialogic.com/support/helpweb/signaling.
When used for M3UA backhaul operation, the Signaling Gateway may operate with an ASP operating either a
Dialogic® M3UA Application Server or an Application Server provided by a third party vendor. See the
Dialogic® SS7 Protocols Programmer’s Manual for SIGTRAN Host Software for documentation on the
configuration and use of a Dialogic® M3UA Application Server.
1.3
Applicability
This manual is applicable to SS7G21 and SS7G22 with software version 5.14 and SS7G31 and SS7G32
products with software version 1.00.
This manual is not applicable if the Signaling Server is operating as a Signaling Interface Unit (SIU) or as a
DSC Protocol Converter (DSC). See the Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SIU Mode User Manual and the
Dialogic® SS7G2x Signaling Server DSC Mode User Manual for descriptions use of these modes of operation.
1.4
Hardware Overview
The Signaling Gateway may be purchased as one of the following equipment types:
•
An SS7G21 is a 2U Signaling Server and may be purchased with one, two, or three Dialogic® DSI SPCI2S
Network Interface Boards (where each board provides four SS7 links, two T1/E1 interfaces and two V.11
serial ports per board) or one, two or three Dialogic® DSI SPCI4 Boards (where each board provides four
SS7 links and four T1/E1 interfaces per board).
•
An SS7G22 is a 2U Signaling Server and may be purchased with one, two or three Dialogic® DSI SS7HDP
Network Interface Boards (where each board provides 64 SS7 links and four T1/E1 interfaces per board)
with a system maximum of 128 SS7 links.
•
An SS7G31 is a 1U Signaling Server and may be purchased with one Dialogic® DSI SPCI4 Network
Interface Board, (with 4 SS7 links and 4 T1/E1 interfaces), or one Dialogic® DSI SS7HDP Board, (with 64
SS7 links and 4 T1/E1 interfaces or 2 HSL links).
•
An SS7G32 is a 2U Signaling Server and may be purchased with one, two or three SS7HDP Boards (with
64 links and 4 T1/E1 interfaces per board or 2 HSL links per board) with a system maximum of 192 LSL
SS7 links or 6 HSL SS7 links.
When T1 or E1 is selected, the Signaling Gateway may be configured to pass the bearer channels from one
PCM port to another, effectively “dropping out” the signaling in line.
The SS7G31 and SS7G32 support two hard disks configured as a RAID 1 array. Refer to Section 7.7, “Hard
Disk Management” on page 146 for details. See Chapter 2, “Specification” for a definition of the capabilities
of the system.
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Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
1.4.1
Part Numbers
For the SS7G21 and SS7G22 products, refer to the Dialogic® SS7G21 and SS7G22 Signaling Servers
Hardware Manual for a list of the ordering codes and definitions of all of the hardware variants.
For the SS7G31 and SS7G32 products, refer to the Dialogic® DSI SS7G31 and SS7G32 Signaling Servers
Product Data Sheet (navigate from http://www.dialogic.com/products/signalingip_ss7components/
signaling_servers_and_gateways.htm) for a list of the ordering codes and definitions of the hardware
variants.
1.5
Connectivity
TDM SS7 signaling can interface to the Signaling Gateway using balanced 1544 kbit/sec (T1) balanced
connections in accordance with G.733 or 2048 kbit/sec (E1) connections in accordance with G.703. SS7
signaling can also be presented on a V.11 (56/64 kbit/sec) synchronous serial interface.
MP2A signaling used for communication between paired Signaling Gateways can be received at the conveter
using 4 x 1 Gbit/sec RJ45 Ethernet interfaces.
1.6
User Interface
The Signaling Gateway provides serial port and telnet connections for configuration and management. All
ports provide identical functionality and operate using text-based MML (Man Machine Language) commands
in accordance with CCITT recommendations.
The serial and telnet ports allow you to configure the Signaling Gateway for operation and to carry out
subsequent modifications to the configuration. They allow you to read the current status of the various
signaling entities and to view the current active alarms and a history of past alarm events.
The Signaling Gateway provides two levels of SNMP support:
•
Basic V1 SNMP functionality which uses the DK4032 MIB and reports counts of current alarms to an
SNMP manager.
•
Enhanced SNMP functionality which offers SNMP V1, V2c and V3 SNMP. Enhanced SNMP supports SNMP
traps and event reporting using the DSMI MIB.
See Chapter 10, “Signaling Server SNMP” for more information.
The Signaling Gateway has alarm indicators on the front panel and alarm relays for connection to an
integrated management system.
1.7
Configuration and Program Storage
All configuration data is stored on hard disk and is automatically recovered after system restart.
Configuration data may optionally be backed up to a remote computer, previously backed-up configurations
can be reloaded.
The SS7G31 and SS7G32 products include two hard disks configured in a RAID array. Refer to Section 7.7,
“Hard Disk Management” on page 146 for details.
All operating software is stored on hard disk and is automatically initiated after system restart. The operating
software can be updated either by reading a new software release from FTP, USB device or CDROM. In both
cases, software update is initiated by MML command. See Section 4.11, “Updating System Software” on
page 31 for details. Following a software update, the Signaling Gateway automatically uses the saved
configuration data so that there is no need to reenter the configuration parameters.
11
Chapter 1 Overview
1.8
IP Security
The Signaling Gateway offers a number of security features to protect it from unwarranted access on its IP
interface. It is recommended that you always enable the optional password protection on the management
interface port and on the FTP server port (if used).
For additional security, the Signaling Gateway is also equipped to support telnet and FTP access using a
Secure Shell (SSH).
Unused ports are disabled to increase security against unintentional or malicious interference.
Additional security may be gained by separating management and signaling IP traffic. This can be achieved
by configuring specific Ethernet ports for traffic and utilizing other Ethernet ports for system management.
It should be understood that while the Signaling Gateway has been designed with security in mind, it is
recommended that Signaling Gateway accessibility over IP be restricted to as small a network as possible. If
the unit is accessible by third parties, the use of a third-party firewall should be considered.
1.9
Functional Summary
The functional summary is described in the following topics:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
1.9.1
Signaling
Configuration Model
Cross Connections
Monitoring
Remote Data Centers
Alarm Log
Diagnostic Log Files
M3UA Backhaul Operation
M2PA Longhaul Operation
Dual Operation
Default Routing
Resilience
Signaling
The Signaling Gateway supports the Message Transfer Part (MTP) in accordance with ITU Recommendations
Q.700, Q.704 and Q.707 and ANSI operation in accordance with ANSI T1.111.
When a link set contains two or more signaling links, the Signaling Gateway supports load sharing and the
full changeover and changeback procedures in accordance with ITU-T Q.704.
The Signaling Gateway supports up to 256 TDM SS7 signaling links allowing the Signaling Gateway to
interface over TDM to a maximum of 64 other signaling points.
The Signaling Gateway supports up to 256 M2PA SS7 signaling links, allowing the Signaling Gateway to
interface over IP to a maximum of 256 other signaling points.
The Signaling Gateway can have a presence in up to six separate IP subnets.
M2PA is supported in accordance with the IETF SS7 MTP2-User Peer-to-Peer Adaptation Layer specification.
SCTP is supported in accordance with IETF RFC 2960 and RFC 3309 Stream Control Transmission Protocol.
The Signaling Gateway supports communication with up to 256 Application Servers Processes (ASPs) for
backhaul operation over M3UA.
M3UA is supported in accordance with the IETF RFC 3332 SS7 MTP3 User Adaptation Layer.
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Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
1.9.2
Configuration Model
MTP data messages are considered to arrive at either an MTP3 link set or an M3UA SIGTRAN link. The link
set or M3UA SIGTRAN link identifies the network and SS7 format of the message. MTP3 link sets can exist
above a TDM MTP2 signaling link or a signaling link utilizing a M2PA SIGTRAN link for communication over IP.
The decision as to how to process the data message is performed by the incoming route. The incoming
route is identified by the network and domain (either MTP or IP) from which a message arrives.
The incoming route then determines whether the message requires further analysis of the data prior to
destination selection by looking up a routing key table or whether a destination can immediately be
selected.
If the Signaling Gateway determines that a routing key table be looked up, the data from the data message
is compared with routing keys in a routing key table. If a match is found, and the destination for that routing
key is in service, that destination is used. Otherwise, if the incoming route also has a destination associated
with it, that default destination is used. If no routing key table is associated with it, the default destination is
used.
A destination can route a data message to either an Remote Application Server (RAS) or to MTP (MTP
over MTP2 or MTP over M2PA). Selection of whether MTP or IP routing is used is determined by the
availability of the data messages point code in the MTP or IP domain and whether MTP or IP has priority.
If MTP routing is selected, the data message is sent out on an MTP SS7 route that matches the point code of
the data message. It is possible to configure MTP3 with a default route for use when it is undesirable to
preconfigure all routes that are used.
See Chapter 7, “Configuration Overview” for a more detailed configuration discussion and Chapter 11,
“Worked Configuration Examples” for some examples.
1.9.3
Cross Connections
The Signaling Gateway allows you to set up cross connections (semi-permanent connections) between an
incoming timeslot on one PCM port and an outgoing timeslot on any PCM port. These connections can either
be simplex or duplex.
1.9.4
Monitoring
The Signaling Gateway allows you to monitor TDM signaling links by dropping a copy of the signaling to a
spare PCM port. This allows for a protocol analyzer to be left connected to one PCM port and gives you the
ability to control remotely which signaling links are monitored. Each monitored signaling link requires two
timeslots on the spare PCM port, one to monitor the send direction and the other for the receive direction.
1.9.5
Remote Data Centers
The Signaling Gateway supports the transfer of software updates, configuration files, alarm reports and
periodic measurements over Ethernet to/from a remote location, the Remote Data Center (RDC).
Multiple RDCs can be configured by specifying an IP address and a user name and password for the Signaling
Gateway to use to “logon” to the RDC.
Data transfer to the RDC uses the File Transfer Protocol (FTP).
Measurement reports are made on a configurable periodic basis.
Optionally, since it can be configured as an FTP server, the Signaling Gateway itself can be configured to act
as an RDC, thus allowing RDC operation to be performed locally on the Signaling Gateway itself.
See Chapter 9, “Remote Data Center Operation” for a more detailed description of the capabilities and
configuration of an RDC.
13
Chapter 1 Overview
1.9.6
Alarm Log
The Signaling Server is able to detect a number of events or alarm conditions relating to either the hardware
or the operation of the protocols. Each alarm condition is assigned a severity/class (3 = Critical, 4 = Major,
5 = Minor) and a category and ID, which give more detail about the alarm. There are a number of
mechanisms described below, by which these conditions can be communicated to management systems, and
ultimately to the system operator (see Chapter 8, “Alarm Fault Code Listing” for a full list of alarm types, and
their reporting parameters):
•
Active alarms are indicated on the front panel of the Signaling Server, (except SS7G31), with three LEDs
identifying severity; CRT, MJR, MNR.
•
Active alarms may be indicated remotely from the Signaling Server, (except SS7G31), when the alarm
relay outputs are connected to a remote management system.
•
Alarm events, configuration changes and system status may be reported to an SNMP manager(s). Refer
to Chapter 10, “Signaling Server SNMP”.
•
A system operator can obtain a listing of the current alarm status (ID, class, fault title, occurrence time
and title) using the ALLIP management terminal command described in Section 6.4.4, “ALLIP” on
page 51.
•
A system operator can access a log of the current and previous alarms using the ALLOP management
terminal command described in Section 6.4.5, “ALLOP” on page 52. The Alarm Log has the capacity for
up to 200 entries, each entry detailing the ID, title, alarm class, fault title, occurrence time, status
(active or cleared), and cleared time (if appropriate). If a new fault occurs when the log is full, the oldest
entry that is either cleared, of lower class, or equal class is overwritten, in that order of preference. The
operator may request a display of the log at any time and may remove entries that have cleared status.
•
The alarm log may also be reported to a Remote Data Center (RDC). See Section 9, “Remote Data
Center Operation” on page 153 for the configuration and operation of an RDC and for the format of the
alarm log records.
1.9.7
Diagnostic Log Files
Upon restart, the Signaling Server generates a number of diagnostic files. These files may aid the support
channel in the analysis of severe errors, such as an unexpected system restart or particular alarms. The text
files, restart_gct.log, restart_top.log, restart_sensor.log, restart_ip.log and restart_disk.log can be
recovered from the syslog directory using FTP protocol as described below.
ftp 123.123.123.123
user siuftp
password siuftp (or the ftppwd as set by the CNSYS command)
cd syslog
ascii
get restart_gct.log
get restart_top.log
get restart_sensor.log
get restart_ip.log
get restart_disk.log
bye
1.9.8
M3UA Backhaul Operation
The Signaling Gateway can use the SIGTRAN protocol M3UA to “backhaul” SS7 information to an IP resident
Remote Application Server (RAS) operating on one or more Application Server Processes (ASPs). Examples
of Application Servers are Media Gateway Controllers or IP resident databases. In both cases, the Application
Server can operate as a Signaling End Point (SEP), where SS7 User Part Protocols, such as SCCP or ISUP,
operate above a M3UA layer on the host.
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Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
Figure 1. M3UA Backhaul Configuration
SS7 Links
M3UA Links
ASP1
SEP
Signaling
Server
Application
Server (AS)
ASP2
1.9.9
M2PA Longhaul Operation
The Signaling Gateway is capable of replacing TDM SS7 links with signaling links operating over IP, providing
the equivalent functionality to MTP Layer 2 by using the SIGTRAN M2PA protocol. One use of M2PA signaling
links would be for the low cost longhaul of signaling traffic possibly involving SS7/SS7 protocol conversion.
Two Signaling Gateways would be required, one either side of the IP connection translating between M2PA
<-< MTP2. See Chapter 11, “Worked Configuration Examples” for an M2PA Longhaul configuration example.
Figure 2. M2PA Longhaul Configuration
MTP2
Signaling
Links
SEP
SG1
SG2
M2PA
Signaling
Links
MTP2
Signaling
Links
SEP
Bearer
Channels
1.9.10
Default Routing
The Signaling Gateway may be configured to use default routing. This is designed to allow greater routing
flexibility. See Section 6.5, “Configuration Commands” on page 55 for further information regarding default
routing.
15
Chapter 1 Overview
1.9.11
Resilience
1.9.11.1
IP Resilience
The Signaling Servers support up to 6 IP ports. These ports may be configured with IP addresses in separate
IP networks to allow greater IP resilience on the Signaling Gateway. IP addresses are configured using the
IPEPS command, while the IPGWI command allows you to configure the default IP gateway for the unit or
additional gateways.
As the Signaling Gateway supports static, rather than dynamic IP routing, the Signaling Gateway may not be
configured with different IP addresses within the same IP network. Instead, resilience between two IP ports
within the same network can be achieved by using IP port bonding, which allows two physical IP ports to be
bonded together in an active/standby configuration under a single IP address. See Section 7.6.1, “IP Port
Bonding” on page 143 for more information.
1.9.11.2
Dual Operation
The Signaling Gateway may be configured as part of a Dual-Resilient pair; that is, two Signaling Server units
appearing to the network as a single point code. If the SS7 network loses accessibility of one unit, the point
code status remains unaffected.
Figure 3 shows a dual resilient system with two Signaling Server products connected to an STP in the SS7
network and an M3UA ASP. To achieve this configuration, the following additions to the normal configuration
must be made:
1. The configuration of an inter-unit link set. This has the same DPC and OPC. This link set may consist of
MTP2 links, M2PA links or a combination of both.
2. Each C7Route must be configured to use a preferred link set LS1 and a backup link set LS2.
3. Each Signaling Server must be configured with a C7Route to the other Signaling Server using only LS2.
Note: Since both units have C7Links that are part of the same link set (from the perspective of the
adjacent point code), care must be taken in the assignment of SLCs.
Figure 3. Dual Resilient Configuration
LS1
Signaling
Server 1
M3UA Links
PC 1
PC 3
ASP
STP
PC 2
Signaling
Server 1
LS2
Inter-unit
Linkset
(shown as M2PA)
PC 1
See Chapter 7, “Configuration Overview” for a more in depth discussion of Dual Resilient configuration.
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Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
Chapter 2: Specification
2.1
Hardware Specification
Details of the Signaling Gateway hardware specification are given in the Dialogic® SS7G21 and SS7G22
Signaling Servers Hardware Manual and the Dialogic® DSI SS7G31 and SS7G32 Signaling Servers Hardware
Manual.
The Dialogic® DSI SS7G31, SS7G32, SS7G21 and SS7G22 Signaling Servers physically identify Ethernet
ports in different ways. Below is a mapping between the Ethernet ports as it is identified in software, and the
physical port as it is identified in its respective Hardware Manual:
Dialogic® DSI SS7G21 and SS7G22 Signaling Servers
Ethernet ports number in the range 1 to 4, where:
- ETH=1 corresponds to physical port ENET 1.
- ETH=2 corresponds to physical port ENET 2.
- ETH=3 corresponds to physical port ENET LNK A.
- ETH=4 corresponds to physical port ENET LNK B.
Dialogic® DSI SS7G31 Signaling Servers
Ethernet ports number in the range 1 to 4, where:
- ETH=1 corresponds to physical port 1.
- ETH=2 corresponds to physical port 2.
- ETH=3 corresponds to physical port 3.
- ETH=4 corresponds to physical port 4.
Dialogic® DSI SS7G32S Signaling Servers
Ethernet ports number in the range 1 to 6, where:
- ETH=1 corresponds to physical port 1.
- ETH=2 corresponds to physical port 2.
- ETH=3 corresponds to physical port ACT/LNK A (bottom).
- ETH=4 corresponds to physical port ACT/LNK B (bottom).
- ETH=5 corresponds to physical port ACT/LNK A (top).
- ETH=6 corresponds to physical port ACT/LNK B (top).
17
Chapter 2 Specification
2.2
Software Licenses
This section identifies which licensable capabilities can be purchased for Signaling Server SGW Mode
operation.
For information relating to the purchase, installation and activation of software licenses, see Chapter 3,
“Licensing, Installation and Initial Configuration”.
2.2.1
Software Licenses for the SS7G31 and SS7G32 Signaling Servers
The following SS7G30 licenses can be purchased for SGW mode.
Item Market Name
Description
SS7SBG30SGWU
16 MTP links, 16 M3UA links, 16 M2PA links. Up to 154 Kilobytes/sec throughput on SIGTRAN links
- equivalent to 16 Low speed TDM links at 0.6 Erlangs. Includes DSMI SNMP
SS7SBG30SGWL
64 MTP links, 64 M3UA links, 64 M2PA links. Up to 615 Kilobytes/sec throughput on SIGTRAN links
- equivalent to 64 Low speed TDM links at 0.6 Erlangs. Includes DSMI SNMP
SS7SBG30SGWJ
192 MTP links, 256 M3UA links, 256 M2PA links. Up to 2460 Kilobytes/sec throughput on SIGTRAN
links - equivalent to 256 Low speed TDM links at 0.6 Erlangs. Includes DSMI SNMP
Throughput limit on a SGW license is available to either M3UA or M2PA. If both M3UA and M2PA are configured, then the
available throughout allowance will be shared between the protocols such that the combined throughput does not exceed that
which is specified by the license.
2.2.2
Software Licenses for the SS7G21 and SS7G22 Signaling Servers
The following SS7G20 licenses can be purchased for SGW mode.
Item Market Name
Description
SS7SBG20SGW
Enable SGW functionality supporting up to 200 M3UA links
SS7SBG20M2PA
32 M2PA links
2.3
Capabilities
This section identifies key capabilities of the Signaling Server. The capabilities of a Signaling Server is
dependent on the number and type of signaling boards installed as defined by the product variant as well as
which software licenses installed.
Use of Signaling Servers in dual pairs increases the capacity of the overall system while still acting as a single
SS7 point code. The numbers given in this section are for a single Signaling Server.
Dialogic® DSI SS7G31 and SS7G32 Signaling Servers Protocol Capabilities
2.3.1
Feature or Protocol
Dialogic
Boards
18
®
DSI Network Interface
SS7G31 Capabilities
SS7G32 Capabilities
Up to 1 SPCI4 board or up to 1 SS7HDP
board
Up to 3 SS7DHP boards or up to 3 SPCI4
boards
Portable Media Device
USB
USB
PCM per board
4 per SPCI4 or 4 per SS7HDP
4 per SS7HDP or 4 per SPCI4
V.11 ports per board
none
none
Ethernet interface
4
6
SS7 links per board
4 per SPCI4 or 64 per SS7HDP
4 per SPCI4 or 64 per SS7HDP
HSL links per board
2 per SS7HDP
2
M3UA links
256
256
M2PA links
256
256
SS7 linksets
64
64
SS7 links
256
256
SS7 routes
4096
4096
Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
Feature or Protocol
SS7G31 Capabilities
SS7G32 Capabilities
Remote application servers
256
256
M3UA routes
256
256
Network contexts
4
4
2.3.2
Dialogic® DSI SS7G21 and SS7G22 Signaling Server Protocol Capabilities
Feature or Protocol
SS7G21 Capabilities
SS7G22 Capabilities
Up to 3 Dialogic® DSI SPCI2S boards or
up to 3 Dialogic® DSI SPCI4 boards
Up to 3 Dialogic® DSI SS7HDP boards
Portable Media Device
CDROM
CDROM
PCM per board
2 per SPCI2S or 4 per SPCI4
4 per SS7HDP
V.11 ports per board
2 per SPCI2S
none
Ethernet interface
4
4
SS7 links per board
4 per SPCI2S or 4 per SPCI4
64 per SS7HDP
HSL links per board
none
2 per SS7HDP
M3UA links
200
200
M2PA links
32
32
Network Interface Boards
SS7 linksets
64
64
SS7 links
128
128
SS7 routes
4096
4096
Remote application servers
200
200
M3UA routes
200
200
Network contexts
4
4
19
Chapter 2 Specification
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Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
Chapter 3: Licensing, Installation and Initial Configuration
3.1
Software Licensing
Functional capabilities and signaling protocols are activated on the Signaling Server through the use of
software licenses. The following section provides information on the purchase of software licenses as well as
information relating to temporary operation of the Signaling Server without software licenses.
The full set of software licenses supported on the Signaling Server for SIU mode are identified in Section 2.2,
“Software Licenses” on page 18.
3.1.1
Purchasing Software Licenses
You should place an order using your normal sales channel, quoting the item market name for the software
option required.
At this point in the process, there is no need to know details of the specific Signaling Server on which the
option is to be installed (the target Signaling Server).
The order ships through the normal supply channels and you receive a paper License Certificate. The
certificate contains the full license terms for using the Signaling Server software option and a unique License
ID that is needed to activate the license.
When the License Certificate is received, you should first read the full terms of the software license:
•
If you do not agree with the software license terms, you must contact your sales channel for a refund
and must not activate the software license.
•
If you agree to the software license terms, you can continue with the process following.
The next stage is to identify the Signaling Server on which the software option is to be activated. To do this,
it is necessary to obtain the UNIT ID for the Signaling Server, which is obtained by executing the CNSYP MML
command on the target Signaling Server.
Once you have the License ID and the UNIT ID, the license can be activated on the Signaling Server. License
Activation is the process of submitting the License ID and UNIT ID so that a License File can be generated
and sent for installation on the target Signaling Server.
The License Activation process is web-based and the License File is sent by email.
You perform License Activation by visiting the web site:
http://membersresource.dialogic.com/ss7/license/license.asp (or an alternative URL if listed on the License
Certificate).
You are asked to provide the following basic information:
•
•
•
•
Name
Company
Country
Email address (this is used to send the License File)
You are then asked for the following information about the Signaling Server:
•
•
•
Operating System - Enter “Signaling Server”.
Host ID - Enter the UNIT ID.
User Machine Identification (a string, typically the Signaling Gateway name, used by you to identify the
Signaling Server).
You must list the License ID (taken from the License Certificate) for each protocol that is to be licensed on
the target Signaling Server.
Once all this information has been entered, the form should be submitted. You receive confirmation that
their request has been submitted. Subsequently, you receive your License File by email.
21
Chapter 3 Licensing, Installation and Initial Configuration
3.1.2
Temporary Licenses
A temporary software license can be issued for a spare or backup signaling server in the event that an
existing server encounters a problem that requires the unit to be repaired or replaced. Alternatively, a new
permanent license, based on the licenses from the failed unit, can be issued for a spare signaling server.
The process for obtaining a temporary license file is almost identical to that of activating a new license. On
the web based activation form, the License IDs should be prefixed with the following 4 characters: BAK-.
For example, if the license ID on the certificate is G20-ISUP-785-9187, the license ID specified on the web
form for the corresponding temporary license would be BAK-G20-ISUP-785-9187. The Host ID entered on
the form is that of the replacement system on which the license will be installed.
A temporary license file will be sent to the email address you specify during license activation. A temporary
license will allow operation of a spare/backup unit for a period of 30 days from date of issue, after which it
will be impossible to restart the system software.
3.2
Installing the Signaling Gateway
Caution: The Signaling Gateway should only be installed by suitably qualified service personnel. Important
safety and technical details, required for installation, are given in the Dialogic® SS7G21 and
SS7G22 Signaling Servers Hardware Manual and the Dialogic® DSI SS7G31 and SS7G32
Signaling Servers Hardware Manual.
In order to complete the installation of the Signaling Gateway unit, follow the steps below:
1. Connect a VT100 terminal to the unit (see Section 3.2.1).
2. Set the IP addresses of the unit (see Section 3.2.2).
3. Download software from the Dialogic website (see Section 3.2.3).
4. Install any additional software option licenses that may have been purchased (see Section 3.2.4 and
Section 3.2.5).
5. Change the system type to act as a SIGTRAN Signaling Gateway (see Section 3.2.6).
6. Apply the configuration to the unit (see Section 3.2.7).
3.2.1
Connecting a VT100 Terminal
A VT100 compatible terminal can be connected, using a DKL29 cable, to the serial port (COM2) on the rear of
the unit. After pressing the carriage return (Enter) key, the Signaling Gateway interface prompt is displayed.
Default serial port settings are 9600 baud, 8 data bits, 1 stop bits and no parity bits.
The output on the VT100 screen is similar to one of the following:
SS7G20(SIU) logged on at 2004-01-20 14:52:29
<
to indicate SIU operation
OR
SS7G20(SGW) logged on at 2004-01-20 14:52:29
<
to indicate SGW operation
OR
SS7G20(DSC) logged on at 2004-01-20 14:52:29
<
to indicate DSC operation.
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Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
3.2.2
IP Configuration
The Signaling Gateway is configured with a default IP address of 192.168.0.1. If this address is not unique,
or not suitable for the existing network configuration, it is necessary to change this value to a unique IP
address in the Ethernet network to which it is connected. Instructions for making this change are given
below.
Using the VT100-compatible terminal, the IP address is set by entering the system configuration command,
IPEPS. For example, to set the IP address to 123.124.125.126, the following command should be entered:
IPEPS:ETH=1,IPADDR=123.124.124.126;
It is also possible to configure a subnet mask if the unit is a member of a subnet. The default subnet mask is
255.255.255.0. To set the subnet mask to a different value, the following command should be used (the
example here sets a subnet mask of 255.255.255.192):
IPEPS:ETH=1,SUBNET=255.255.255.192;
The management interface also allows an IP default gateway address to be specified using the GATEWAY
parameter on the IPGWx command (see Section 6.7, “IP Commands” on page 86).
This is set by default to 0.0.0.0, indicating that no default gateway is present. For example, to set the
gateway address to 123.124.125.250, the following command is used:
IPGWI:IPGW=DEFAULT,GATEWAY=123.124.124.250;
The current settings can be displayed by entering the IPEPP and the IPGWP command.
After changes using the IPEPS or IPGWI commands new IP parameters are initialized with immediate effect.
If the IP address used to login to the unit for the telnet session is changed, you are automatically logged out
of the session. However, you can log in again without delay using the new IP address.
The Ethernet connection should be verified by attempting to “ping” the SGW from a computer connected to
the same Ethernet network, using the following command:
ping 123.124.125.126
If the Signaling Gateway has been configured correctly, it responds to the ping and the host machine displays
a message confirming communication with the Signaling Gateway (the exact format and response of this
message is operating system dependant).
If ping fails, you should check that the IP address was entered correctly and that there is no fault with the
cabling to the Signaling Gateway.
Once the ping command shows that the Ethernet connection is valid, it should be possible to access the
management interface previously used on the VT100 compatible terminal via telnet. This is achieved by
establishing a telnet session to port 8100 or 8101.
Note: It is not possible to telnet to the standard telnet port 23.
For example, on a typical host console, the following command starts a telnet session to a Signaling Gateway
with an IP address of 123.124.125.126:
telnet 123.124.125.126 8100
The telnet terminal displays the MML interface prompt:
SS7G20(SGW) logged on at 2004-01-20 14:52:29
<
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Chapter 3 Licensing, Installation and Initial Configuration
An optional password can be set to control remote access to the MML. This is done using the CNSYS
command:
CNSYS:PASSWORD=password,CONFIRM=password;
If set, a user opening a telnet session to the MML is prompted to enter a password, for example:
SS7G20(SGW) logged on at 2004-01-20 14:52:29
password:
Password access can be removed by specifying “null” values for the PASSWORD and CONFIRM parameters,
that is:
CNSYS:PASSWORD=,CONFIRM=;
For additional security, the units support the use of Secure Shell (SSH) tunnelling for telnet and secure FTP
operation. The user should use the CNSYS command to restrict telnet access to "telnet via SSH tunnelling"
only. For example:
CNSYS:SECURE=Y;
Note: The unit does not provide a Secure Shell session connection. Your SSH client may need additional
configuration to allow SSH tunnelling without a session connection.
Once activated, a future user is required to set up an SSH tunnel prior to telnet access. For a client on a
Linux or Solaris like operating system, login for telnet using the ssh application. The ssh application should be
invoked using a shellscript of the following form:
#!/bin/sh
ssh -l siuftp -C -f $1 -L 2323:$1:8101 sleep 5
telnet localhost 2323
3.2.3
Software Download
Current information and software downloads for the Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server products can be found at
the following URL:
http://www.dialogic.com/support/helpweb/signaling
The product leaves the factory with fully-functional software installed. We recommend you check the above
URL for any recent revisions, and install them before putting the product into service.
Since it is possible to source units from multiple supply channels, we recommend that each is checked to
verify that all units in a delivery are at the same software revision.
Follow the steps below:
1. Check the current software version running in the system using the CNSWP command.
2. Check the latest distribution file from the “Signaling Gateway” section on the SS7 Products download
web site:
http://www.dialogic.com/support/helpweb/signaling
3. If a download is required, store the distribution file in an empty directory on the hard drive of the
downloading machine.
4. Follow the steps detailed in Section 4.11, “Updating System Software” on page 31 in order to carry out
the update of the system software.
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Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
3.2.4
Installing Software Licenses
This section describes how additional licenses are installed on the Signaling Server. Each Signaling Server is
licensed to run specific components of the protocol stack. The STLCP command provides a printout that
shows which components are licensed on a particular unit. Each unit is uniquely identified by a unit identity
value, which is displayed as the UNITID parameter in the CNSYP command output.
The License File, purchased as described in this chapter, is a simple text file. The contents of the file are
similar to the following:
FEATURE SGW_U_G30 dialogic 1.000 permanent uncounted \
HOSTID=000e0de513c4 SIGN="00ED 17C4 1197 F91E E36F D5F5 9371 \
1600 2CC9 8AF4 82C9 3AF5 F1C6 9329 B5CD"
Normal operation of the license update procedure uses MML to update the system’s purchasable licenses with
the file taken directly from a Remote Data Center (RDC).
The procedure to install licenses from system start is as follows:
1. Rename the purchased license file to sgw.lic.
2. Establish an FTP session (see Section 4.9, “FTP Access” on page 30).
3. Set the FTP transfer mode to “ASCII”, since the license file is a text file.
4. Transfer the software license to the Signaling Gateway by typing the command “put sgw.lic sgw.lic”.
Note: The Signaling Gateway uses a case-sensitive file system. Therefore, it is necessary to specify
sgw.lic in lowercase.
5. Terminate the FTP session by entering “quit” or “bye”.
6. Establish an MML session and restart the unit by typing the following command:
MNRSI:RESTART=SOFT,SYSTYPE=SGW;
The machine then boots and completes the upgrade. Once the upgrade is complete, the machine is
accessible via MML.
7. Check the licenses using the STLCP command.
Note: If the licensing upgrade fails, the unit restores the previous licensing level.
3.2.5
License Update from Remote Data Center
The procedure to perform a license update from the a Remote Data Center (RDC) is as follows:
1. The user should enter:
CNUPI:DTYPE=LICENSE,RDC=<rdc id>,DIRECTORY=<subdirectory>;
to request that the license be updated from a RDC where the license file is stored in a subdirectory in the
ftproot.
2. Once you have confirmed that the license should be updated, the license file is transferred to the
Signaling Gateway without further interaction with the user. The unit indicates that the file has been
successfully transferred by displaying the “EXECUTED” response to the CNUPI command.
3. Establish an MML session and restart the unit by typing the following command:
MNRSI:RESTART=SOFT;
The machine then boots and completes the upgrade. Once the upgrade is complete, the machine is
accessible via MML.
4. Check the licenses using the STLCP command.
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Chapter 3 Licensing, Installation and Initial Configuration
3.2.6
Changing System Operation Mode
By default, the Signaling Gateway is shipped configured to operate in TEST mode. Once an SGW license has
been applied, the system must be restarted using the MNRSI MML command requesting that the unit operate
in SGW mode. Connect a VT100 terminal to identify the mode of operation (See Section 3.2.1, “Connecting a
VT100 Terminal” on page 22).
The MNRSI restart command should be used to restart the system in a different mode. MNRSI should be
used together with the mode in which the Signaling Gateway is expected to operate in after restart. For SGW
operation this is:
MNRSI:RESTART=SOFT,SYSTYPE=SGW;
3.2.7
Configuration Procedure
Once the system architecture and protocol configuration is known, it is necessary to set this configuration
within the Signaling Gateway. Configuration is achieved using MML commands as described in Chapter 6,
“Command Definitions”. An overview of configuration is provided in Chapter 7, “Configuration Overview” and
example configurations are described in Chapter 11, “Worked Configuration Examples”.
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Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
Chapter 4: Operation
4.1
General
The Signaling Gateway can be configured from either serial port 2 (COM2, on the rear panel) or by using
telnet over the Ethernet interface. The serial port can be configured over a range of baud rates and parity.
The default configuration for the port is 9600 bits/s, 8 data bits, 1 stop bit, and no parity. Serial port 1
(COM1, on the front panel) is not supported on the Signaling Server. Flow control can be set to either NONE
or XON/XOFF on the terminal used to communicate with the serial interface of the Signaling Server.
The commands that make up the Signaling Gateway Man-Machine Interface Language (MML) are based on
the CCITT blue book recommendations Z.311 to Z.317.
In the following description, input text, numerals and characters that you are expected to enter are shown in
bold text and responses displayed on the screen are shown in fixed width text. Syntax elements that are
further defined are shown in angle brackets, for example, <time of day>.
4.2
Log On/Off Procedure
To initiate a dialog with the Signaling Gateway, the operator must “log on” to one of the MML interfaces.
To log on to the serial port when it is configured to use DTR/DSR, the connected terminal should assert DSR.
The Signaling Gateway asserts DTR in response and you can then enter into a dialog with the Signaling
Gateway. The session is ended by operator command to the Signaling Gateway, or by the terminal
deasserting DSR or at the expiry of an auto log off timer. The Signaling Gateway deasserts DTR in response
to any one of these three. To log on again, DSR must first be deasserted.
To log on to the serial port when it is not configured to use DTR/DSR, the carriage return key should be
entered. The session is ended by operator command to the Signaling Gateway or at the expiry of an auto log
off timer.
The two telnet connections provided are accessed using a standard telnet utility. Only ports 8100 and 8101
can be used. The default port 23 should not be used.
If a password is specified for the system, when logging on, the password is required before being allowed to
continue. If an incorrect password is entered, the system again prompts for a password. If an incorrect
password is entered three times, the port is disconnected. For safety, the password is never required on the
serial port.
When the connection is established, a message consisting of the system identity followed by:
logged on at <calendar date> <time of day>
is displayed, followed by the command prompt, which is the less than symbol (<). The logon session is
ended either by operator command or at the end of an auto log off time out.
The system maintains two timers during the log on session: an “auto log off warning” timer and a “auto log
off” timer. Both are restarted each time a new command is input. When the auto log off warning time out
expires, an auto log off warning message is output to the terminal and any partially entered command is
discarded. The system then outputs a command prompt to the terminal. If no command is input before the
auto log off time out expires, the log on session is ended. The duration of both these timers is userconfigurable and can even be disabled completely.
When log off is initiated, a message consisting of the system identity followed by:
logged off at <calendar date> <time of day>
is output to the operator’s terminal. The Signaling Gateway then initiates the appropriate procedure to end
the connection to the operator’s terminal.
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Chapter 4 Operation
4.3
Command Character Set and Syntax
The only characters used for commands and parameters are:
•
The letters A to Z and a to z, referred to as <letter>. The case of characters in command names and
parameter names is not significant.
•
•
The digits 0 to 9, referred to as <digit>
•
The DEL (Delete) character or the BS (Backspace) character is used to delete characters on the current
line.
•
The CAN character (Ctrl X) is used as an abort character.
- (hyphen), CR (FE5), SP (space), $(dollar), & (ampersand), * (asterisk),
: (colon), ; (semicolon) / (solidus), . (full stop/period) and = (equals sign)
It is possible to indicate several simple values for the same parameter by grouping parameter arguments
using the operators & or &&. For example, 3&6 indicates the simple parameter arguments 3 and 6. A
sequence of consecutive simple parameter arguments is indicated by writing the lower and upper simple
parameter arguments separated by &&, hence 4&&8 indicates the simple parameter arguments 4, 5, 6, 7
and 8.
Comments are allowed in command input, and can appear in any position on the command line. A comment
is defined as a character string enclosed between the separators /* (solidus asterisk) and */ (asterisk
solidus), where the character string can contain any characters except the format effector characters (HT –
Horizontal Tab, LF – Line Feed, VT – Vertical Tab, FF – Form Feed and CR – Carriage Return) and the
sequence */.
4.4
Command Formats
To allow easy command recognition and familiarization, all the commands share a common five character
format:
XXYYZ
where:
•
•
•
XX = Command group
YY = Function within group
Z = Operation code
The following operation codes are used:
•
•
•
•
•
C = Change
E = End
I = Initiate
P = Print
S = Set
Note: The term “print” refers to output to the serial port in use for the dialog procedure.
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Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
4.5
Command Entry
Each character entered is echoed to the operator’s terminal. The BS (backspace) or DEL (delete) character
can be used to delete characters entered within the current line. This causes the Signaling Gateway to output
the sequence BS space BS. On a visual display terminal, this has the effect of deleting the last character
entered from the display.
Commands can be entered whenever the command prompt has been output. Commands are terminated by
a semicolon (;) followed by CR. Commands may exceed one line on the terminal, but may not exceed 100
characters.
If a command takes parameters, a colon is used to separate the command from the parameters. A comma
(,) is used to separate multiple parameters.
To ensure correct operation of the character deletion, the maximum number of characters entered on a
single command line should be no greater than the number of characters that can be displayed on a single
line of the terminal (to prevent text “wrap around”). If a command is longer than one line, each line before
the last should be terminated with a complete parameter value followed by a comma and CR. The command
can then continue on the next line. If you wish to specify more parameters than can be entered on a single
initiate command, you should use the initiate command to enter mandatory parameters, then use a change
command to specify additional parameters.
A partially entered command can be aborted using the CAN character. The system outputs an indication that
the command has been aborted, followed by a prompt for new command input. The CAN character can also
be used to abort an output listing on the operators terminal.
4.6
Dangerous Commands
Commands that affect the Signaling Gateway operation are considered DANGEROUS commands. If a
DANGEROUS command is entered, the Signaling Gateway outputs the following on a new line:
Are you sure? [Y/N]
The operator must enter Y followed by CR to continue the execution of the command. Any other valid input
character apart from SP or CR, followed by CR, causes the command to be aborted.
4.7
Changing Configuration Data
Many configuration commands require that certain other commands have been entered first (for example to
block a link before removing a boards configuration). These rules are described on a per-command basis as
prerequisites.
4.8
Command Responses
The Signaling Gateway does not, in general, produce output unless it is in response to an operator command.
The only exception to this is the auto log off warning message and the log off message (when log off is
initiated automatically).
The auto log off warning message is as follows:
WARNING: Auto log off imminent!
When a syntactically correct command has been issued to the Signaling Gateway, acceptance is indicated by
the Command Executed output as follows:
EXECUTED
An invalid command is not acted upon. The Signaling Gateway indicates command rejection by issuing one of
the responses in Table 1. Only the first error detected in a command is indicated.
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Chapter 4 Operation
Table 1. Command Rejection Responses
Response
4.9
Reason for Rejection
CONFIGURATION EXCEEDS
LICENSE LIMITS
The entity being configured exceeds the limits of the license installed
on the system.
EXTRA PARAMETERS
Too many parameters have been entered.
GENERAL ERROR
Command unable to execute due to an external error (for example, a
missing or write-protected CDROM).
ILLEGAL COMMAND
The command is invalid for the mode of operation.
INCONSISTENT DATA
The values of parameters are inconsistent with each other or with data
already entered into the system.
INCONSISTENT PARAMETER
The parameters input are not valid together for the command.
INTERNAL ERROR
Command failed to complete due to internal error.
INVALID INDICATOR
This command contains a ‘format character’ (‘:’, ‘;’, etc.) that is not
valid for this command.
INVALID INFORMATION GROUPING
The type of information grouping used in the input of the parameter
value is not valid.
INVALID INFORMATION UNIT
The value entered for a parameter is not valid for that parameter.
INVALID PARAMETER NAME
A parameter name has been entered that is not valid for this command.
MISSING DATA
A parameter has no data.
MISSING PARAMETER
A required parameter has not been input.
NO SYSTEM RESOURCES
The requested command cannot be executed due to unavailable system
resources.
RANGE ERROR
The value assigned to a numeric parameter is outside the valid range.
UNACCEPTABLE COMMAND
The command is valid but not in the current state of the equipment (for
example, changing a signaling link configuration without blocking).
UNKNOWN COMMAND
The command is not recognized.
UNKNOWN SEPARATOR
The character used to separate two parameters is not recognized.
FTP Access
The Signaling Gateway supports FTP server operation allowing you to perform maintenance operations, such
as software, license and configuration update without the use of MML as well as providing access to locally
stored continuous records and periodic reports.
An FTP session should be established between the remote machine and the Signaling Gateway by entering
the appropriate command on the remote machine's keyboard, for example:
ftp 123.124.125.125
The FTP server can be activated or deactivated using the FTPSER parameter on the CNSYS command.
The appropriate user name and password to use depends on whether the FTPPWD option has been set to Y
using the CNSYS MML command.
When FTPPWD = Y, FTP access must use the fixed user name “siuftp” in conjunction with the normal MML
access password as configured by setting the CNSYS parameter PASSWORD.
Access to the Signaling Gateway using other user accounts except “siuftp” is denied. Note also that access is
denied if FTPPWD = Y, but there is no MML password.
When FTPPWD=N, no FTP access is permitted. Access with “siuftp” or any other user account is disabled.
Therefore, you are strongly advised to activate FTP password security.
The state of FTPPWD can be viewed using the CNSYP command.
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Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
For additional security, the Signaling Gateway supports the use of Secure Shell (SSH) access for FTP
operation. The user should use the CNSYS command to allow only secure FTP access to the unit, for
example:
CNSYS:SECURE=Y;
For a client on a UNIX operating system, the command sequence to log in for FTP access using the sftp
application is:
sftp -l ftp@<IP Address>
The user is also prompted to enter the password for the siuftp login account.
The secure connection to a unit can also be established from Windows® operating system using the
appropriate SSH software.
4.10
Backing Up System Software
The user can backup a binary copy of the Signaling Gateway software for restoration later.
4.10.1
Software Backup to a Remote Data Center
The procedure to perform a software backup to an Remote Data Center (RDC) is as follows:
1. The user should enter:
CNBUI: RDC=<rdc id>, DTYPE=SOFTWARE,
DIRECTORY=<subdirectory>,FILE=<filename>;
to request that the software be backed up to an RDC where the software file <filename.tgz> is stored in
a subdirectory in the ftproot.
Note: The user should not use a filename of “sgw” when backing up to the local RDC.
The unit indicates that the configuration has been successfully backed up by displaying the “EXECUTED”
response to the CNBUI command.
4.11
Updating System Software
The configuration data, stored in non-volatile memory, is not affected by a software update.
Normal operation of the software update procedure uses MML to update the software. While a software
update can take place while phone calls are in progress, the new software is not activated until the system is
restarted.
On completion of the software update, you must perform a system restart. MML commands are restricted to
the following “safe” mode commands: CNSYS, CNUPI, CNBUI and STRDP commands, as well as the alarm
log and configuration print commands.
If you abort the software update or the software update process fails, the system alarm “SW mismatch” is
activated and you are restricted to “safe” mode commands. If you restart the system in this state, the
system restarts in “safe” mode running limited configuration only software.
Note: Prior to performing a system upgrade, it is recommended that you make a backup of the system
configuration using the procedures specified in Section 4.12, “Backing Up Configuration Data” on
page 33.
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Chapter 4 Operation
4.11.1
Software Update from a Remote Data Center
The procedure to perform a software update from a Remote Data Center (RDC) is as follows:
1. The user should enter:
CNUPI:DTYPE=SOFTWARE,RDC=<rdc id>,
DIRECTORY=<subdirectory>,FILE=<filename>;
to request that the software be updated from a RDC where the software update files are stored in a
subdirectory in the ftproot.
Note: The directory and filename are optional and when not used the system looks for the file sgw.tgz in
the ftproot directory. If <filename> is specified, it should be specified without an extension.
2. Once you have confirmed that the software should be upgraded, the distribution file is transferred to the
Signaling Gateway without further interaction with the user. The unit indicates that the file has been
successfully transferred by displaying the “EXECUTED” response to the CNUPI command.
3. On completion, you should restart the system by executing the MNRSI command.
4.11.2
Software Update from Portable Media
The following procedure assumes that a CD-ROM or USB drive with the updated software has already been
created. Perform the software update as follows:
1. Insert the CD or USB into the Signaling Server.
2. Enter the following command:
CNUPI:DTYPE=SOFTWARE,DIRECTORY=<subdirectory>,FILE=<filename>;
to request that the software be updated from the media.
Note: The directory and filename are optional and when not used the system looks for the file sgw.tgz in
the root directory.
3. Prompts are displayed asking first if you are certain that you wish to upgrade the software and then to
insert the portable media.
The software is uploaded from the distribution portable media to the Signaling Gateway. The unit
indicates that all files have been successfully transferred by displaying the “EXECUTED” response to the
CNUPI command.
Following installation, the CD will be ejected from the CD-ROM drive to prevent the updates being
overwritten in subsequent restarts.
4. The user should restart the system by entering the MML command MNRSI.
4.11.3
Software Update from Startup
You are also able to update the software from system start. Installation of software from system start is not
normal operating procedure and should only be used if you are unable to install software via MML. A failed
installation of software from system start can result in the system failing to operate. The procedure to install
software from system start using either FTP or portable media is as follows:
Software Update from Startup Using FTP
1. Rename the software distribution to sgw.tgz.
2. Establish an FTP session (see Section 4.9, “FTP Access” on page 30).
3. Set the FTP transfer mode to “Binary”, since the software file is a binary file.
4. Transfer the software to the Signaling Gateway by typing the command “put sgw.tgz sgw.tgz”.
Note: The Signaling Gateway uses a case-sensitive file system. Therefore, it is necessary to specify
sgw.tgz in lowercase.
5. Terminate the FTP session by entering “quit” or “bye”.
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6. Establish an MML session and restart the unit by typing the MNRSI command.
The machine then boots and completes the upgrade. Once the upgrade is complete, the machine is
accessible via the MML.
7. Check the software version using the CNSWP command.
Software Update from Startup Using a CD or USB Drive
1. Insert the portable media into the Signaling Server.
2. Restart the system.
The new software is installed and started automatically.
4.12
Backing Up Configuration Data
You can backup a binary copy of the Signaling Gateway configuration for restoration later.
4.12.1
Configuration Backup to Remote Data Center
The procedure to perform a configuration backup to an RDC is as follows:
1. You should enter:
CNBUI:RDC=<rdc id>, DTYPE=CONFIG,
DIRECTORY=<subdirectory>,FILE=<filename>;
to request that the configuration be backed up to an RDC where the configuration file <filename.CF3> is
stored in a subdirectory in the ftproot.
Note: You should not use a filename of “SDC” when backing up to the local RDC.
The unit indicates that the configuration has been successfully backed up by displaying the “EXECUTED”
response to the CNBUI command.
4.13
Updating Configuration Data
Valid configuration data can be stored by the Signaling Gateway at a Remote Data Center (RDC) using the
CNBUI command (see Section 4.12), on portable media (USB or CD) or on a remote machine accessible via
FTP. This configuration data can then be restored as described in the following subsections.
4.13.1
Configuration Update from a Remote Data Center
The procedure to perform a configuration update from a Remote Data Center (RDC) is as follows:
1. You should enter:
CNUPI:DTYPE=CONFIG,RDC=<rdc id>,
DIRECTORY=<subdirectory>,FILE=<filename>;
to request that the configuration be updated from a RDC where the configuration update file
<filename.CF3> is stored in a subdirectory in the ftproot.
Note: The directory and filename are optional and when not used the system looks for the SDC.CF3 file
in the ftproot directory.
The unit indicates that the configuration has been successfully transferred by displaying the “EXECUTED”
response to the CNUPI command.
2. You should then restart the system by entering the MML command MNRSI.
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Chapter 4 Operation
4.13.2
Configuration Update from Portable Media
The procedure for a configuration update from a CD or USB device using MML is as follows:
1. You should enter:
CNUPI:DTYPE=CONFIG, DIRECTORY=<subdirectory>,FILE=<filename>;
to request that the configuration file be updated from CD or USB.
Note: The directory and filename are optional and when not used the system looks for the SDC.CF3 file
in the CD or USB root directory.
The configuration file is uploaded from CD or USB. The unit indicates that the configuration has been
successfully updated by displaying the “EXECUTED” response to the CNUPI command.
Following updates, the CD will be ejected from the CD-ROM drive to prevent updates being overwritten
on subsequent restarts.
2. You should then restart the system by entering the MML command MNRSI.
4.13.3
Configuration Update from Startup
You is also able to install a previously backed-up system configuration from system start.
Note: Installation of configuration from system start is not normal operating procedure and should only
be used if you are unable to install configuration via MML. A failed installation of configuration
from system start can result in the complete loss of system configuration.
The procedures to install configuration from system start using either FTP or CD are described below.
Configuration Update from Startup using FTP
1. Rename the binary configuration file to SDC.CF3.
2. Establish an FTP session (see Section 4.9, “FTP Access” on page 30).
3. Set the FTP transfer mode to “Binary”, since the configuration file is a binary file.
4. Transfer the configuration to the Signaling Gateway by entering the command “put SDC.CF3 SDC.CF3”.
Note: The Signaling Gateway uses a case-sensitive file system. Therefore, it is necessary to specify
SDC.CF3 in uppercase.
5. Terminate the FTP session by entering “quit” or “bye”.
6. Establish an MML session and restart the unit by typing the MNRSI command.
The machine then boots and completes the upgrade. Once the upgrade is complete, the machine is
accessible via the MML.
Configuration Update from Startup using CD or USB
1. Insert the CD or USB containing the configuration file SDC.CF3 into the Signaling Server.
2. Restart the system.
The new configuration is installed and started automatically.
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4.14
Creating a System Archive
A system archive comprising the binary configuration file, installed software licenses and current software
binary distribution file can be created on the Signaling Server portable media (CDROM or USB device) and
later used to restore the system to current working status.
As the Signaling Server starts up a copy is created of the following system files which are stored in the syslog
subdirectory of the siuftp account.
Table 2. System Files Stored in the syslog Subdirectory
File
sgw.tgz
Description
A binary file containing the current software distribution on the system.
sgw.lic
A text file containing the current software licenses active on the system, if present.
modcap
A binary file containing a software license allowing SS7G2x operating software to function on this particular
system.
config.CF1
A binary configuration file containing dynamically configurable data that is common to all modes of operation. IP
address configuration and parameters set by the CNSYS command would for example be stored in this file.
config.txt
The text configuration file for a SIU, if present.
SDC.CF3
The binary configuration file for a SGW, if present.
SDC.CF4
The binary configuration file for a DSC, if present.
The files can be recovered from the syslog directory using FTP as described below:
ftp 192.168.0.1user siuftppassword ********cd syslog
asciiget config.txtget sgw.licbinget sgw.tgzget sgw.licget modcapget config.CF1get SDC.CF3get
SDC.CF4bye
To create the archive all the files can be transferring to an ISO9660 format CD or USB device. To check that
the archive media device has been created without error - return the device to the unit and enter the
following command:
CNUPI:DTYPE=SYSKEY;
If this command returns ‘EXECUTED’, then the media contains a valid software license.
4.15
Restoring System Archive
The Signaling Server is restored to the archived software, configuration and licensing states when the
archive portable media device is placed in the appropriate drive and the system is re-booted.
On re-boot, the system will restore all files from the portable media device to the system. Configuration files
from the portable media will overwrite any in the SIUFTP directory.
Note: Once the system has been restored you must ensure that the portable media device is removed
from the unit, otherwise on subsequent re-boot the system will reinstall the archive files.
If the user changes dynamically configurable data on the system using MMI (i.e., MMI commands are
described in this manual with the attribute ‘CONFIG’), a new configuration backup can be added to the syslog
directory in the siuftp account. To do this without restarting the system, enter the following command:
CNBUI:DTYPE=SYSCFG;CNBUI:DTYPE=CONFIG;
Following this command, a new CD archive should be created following the procedures identified in
Section 4.14, “Creating a System Archive” on page 35.
Note: The user can also re-install any of the previously backed-up system files (identified in
Section 4.14, “Creating a System Archive” on page 35), or install a new text configuration file
using FTP rather than from portable media. In this case, files can transferred to the unit by FTP.
35
Chapter 4 Operation
36
Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
Chapter 5: Parameter Definitions
5.1
Parameter Table
Table 3 lists parameters and details the possible values.
All numeric parameters are entered and output in decimal notation.
<text character> is either <lower case letter>, <upper case letter>, <digit>, $, or -. The use of quotation
marks to delimit text strings is not required.
Table 3. Parameter Definitions
Name
Description
Range
ALP
Sequential reference number of an entry
in the Alarm Log
1 to 9999
AUTH
V3 SNMP Authentication encryption
protocol - used to ensure that V3 SNMP
requests have not be modified during
transit.
Set to SHA or MD5
AUTHPASS
SNMP V3 User account Authentication
password.
8 to 12
BCIC
The circuit identification code of an SS7
circuit that is the base CIC of a CIC
Range
0 to 4095
BPOS
Board position number (for signaling
boards)
1 to 3
BRDTYPE
Dialogic® DSI Network Interface Board
type descriptor, in the format:
xxxxxx-y-z
where:
• xxxxxx = board type
• y = number of signaling links
configured on the board
• z = number of PCM ports on the
board
See Section 5.4, “Dialogic® DSI Network
Interface Board Types” on page 48.
One of the following:
• SPCI2S-4-2
• SPCI2S-8-2
• SPCI4-4-4
• SPCI4-8-4
• SS7HDP-64-4
BUILDOUT
The
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
buildout type:
0 - Setting for E1 devices.
1 - T1 short haul 0 - 110 ft.
2 - T1 short haul 0 - 110 ft.
3 - T1 short haul 110 - 220 ft.
4 - T1 short haul 220 - 330 ft.
5 - T1 short haul 330 - 440 ft.
6 - T1 short haul 440 - 550 ft.
7 - T1 short haul 550 - 660 ft.
8 - T1 long haul LB0 (-0dB)
9 - T1 long haul LB0 (-7.5dB)
10 - T1 long haul LB0 (-15dB)
11 - T1 long haul LB0 (0dB
TR62411)
0 to 11
C7LINK
Logical reference for an SS7 signaling
link
1 to 256
C7RT
Logical reference of an SS7 route
1 to 4096
CLA
Alarm class number. One of:
• 0 = Unreported (the alarm is logged,
but it does not trigger an alarm relay
and is not included in SNMP output.
• 5 = Minor (triggering the MNR alarm
LED and relay)
• 4 = Major (triggering the MJR alarm
LED and relay)
• 3 = Critical (triggering the CRT
alarm LED and relay)
0, 3, 4, 5
Notes
Must be set if the AUTH
parameter is set.
Default =
• 0 for E1
• 1 for T1
37
Chapter 5 Parameter Definitions
Table 3. Parameter Definitions (Continued)
Name
Range
CODE
Fault code of a system alarm
1 to 256
CONFIRM
Confirmation of a password used to
provide password control access to MML
0 to 12 <text character>
CONTACT
Label identifying person/group
responsible for the Signaling Server.
Maximum 24 characters
CRTYPE
The type of continuous record:
• ALARM – alarms that have been
reported to the alarm log
ALARM
DATE
Calendar date, in the format:
xxxx-yy-zz
where:
• xxxx – 4 digit year
• yy – 2 digit month
• zz – 2 digit day
xxxx – 1990 to 2037
yy – 01 to 12
zz – 01 to 31
DBITS
Number of data bits on V.24 port
7 or 8
DEST
Signaling Gateway Destination Point ID
1 to 512
DIRECTORY
Directory name on a remote data center.
0 to 12
<text character>
DISCARD
Whether data can be discarded
Y or N
DOMAIN
Domain
One of:
• IP
• MTP
DOWN
SNMP object transition state.
One of:
• All
• Create
• Change
• Destroy
• None
DPC
SS7 destination point code
0 to 16777215
DTYPE
The type of saving/loading operation to
be performed from a remote data center.
See Section 5.2, “Remote Operations” on
page 46.
One of:
• SOFTWARE
• CONFIG
• LICENSE
DUPLEX
Specifies whether a connection is duplex
(Y) or simplex (N).
Y or N
END
Specifies whether the Signaling
Gateway’s end of the SIGTRAN link is
acting as either a client (C) or a server
(S).
C or S
ENGINE
V3 SNMP Identifies the Engine part of the
remote SNMP entity (manager).
Max 24 hexadecimal digits
EQU
Signaling processor hardware identifier
in the format:
x-y
where:
• x = board position (BPOS)
• y = signaling link within the board.
ETH
38
Description
•
Ethernet port number
x – 1 to 3
y – 1 to 64
1 to 6
Notes
e.g admin@email.com
Default = 8
Default = N
Traps will be generated
if set to All, Create,
Change or Destroy.
Traps will not be
generated if set to
NONE.
Default = Change
Default = N
V.11 links can only use
processors 1 and 2.
HSL links can only use
x-1 or x-33
Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
Table 3. Parameter Definitions (Continued)
Name
Description
Range
Notes
PCM frame format:
• G704 – Normal E1 format described
in G.704
• CRC4 – Normal E1 format with CRC4
checksum generation
• CRC4C – Normal E1 format with
CRC4 checksum generation.
Compatible with non-CRC4
operation.
• SF – 12 frame multiframe (D3/D4)
• ESF – 24-frame multiframe
• CRC6 – ESF format with CRC6
checksum generation
• CRC4G706 – CRC4 G.706 compatible
mode
• UNS - Unstructured High Speed Link
NOTE: Out of CRC4-multiframe, E-Bits
are transmitted as zeroes.
One of:
• G704
• CRC4
• CRC4C
• SF
• ESF
• CRC6
• CRC4G706
FILE
File name on a Remote Data Center
(RDC)
0 to 12
<text character>
FTPPWD
FTP Password enabled parameter. Set to
Y to enable ftp password protection, or N
to disable password protection.
Y or N
Default = Y
FTPSER
Indicates whether the Signaling Gateway
can act as a ftp server or not. Set to Y to
enable the ftp server, or N to disable the
ftp server.
Y or N
Default = Y
GATEWAY
An IP gateway used to reach other
networks when the destination is not on
the local sub-net. Specified using dot
notation, that is, www.xxx.yyy.zzz
www – 0 to 255
xxx – 0 to 255
yyy – 0 to 255
zzz – 0 to 255
Default = 0.0.0.0
1 to 65535
Default =
• 2905 for M3UA
SNLINKs.
• 3565 for M2PA
SNLINKs.
FF
HPORT
HSL
IMPAIR
INACTIVE
INHIBIT
Host SCTP port
High Speed Link mode
Default =
• G704 for E1
• SF for T1
UNS - can only be
specified on SS7HDP
signaling boards.
N – The SS7 link is not an
HSL Link.
Y – The SS7 link is an HSL
link with 12 bit sequence
numbers.
SQ7 - SS7 link is an HSL
link with 7 bit sequence
numbers.
SNMP object transition state.
One of:
• All
• Create
• Change
• Destroy
• None
SNMP object transition state.
One of:
• All
• Create
• Change
• Destroy
• None
Invoke/revoke MTP3 management
inhibiting of an SS7 signaling link
Y or N
Traps will be generated
if set to All, Create,
Change or Destroy.
Traps will not be
generated if set to
NONE.
Default = Change
Traps will be generated
if set to All, Create,
Change or Destroy.
Traps will not be
generated if set to
NONE.
Default = Change
Default = N
39
Chapter 5 Parameter Definitions
Table 3. Parameter Definitions (Continued)
Name
Range
Notes
IPADDR
Internet Protocol (IP) address of the
Signaling Gateway Ethernet port 1
specified using dot notation, that is,
www.xxx.yyy.zzz
www – 0 to 255
xxx – 0 to 255
yyy – 0 to 255
zzz – 0 to 255
IPGW
Logical reference for an Internet Protocol
Gateway
DEFAULT or value 1 to 31
IPNW
IP network identifier specified using dot
notation, that is, www.xxx.yyy.zzz
www – 0 to 255
xxx – 0 to 255
yyy – 0 to 255
zzz – 0 to 255
IR
Logical reference for a incoming route
1 to 32
ITS
The input timeslot in a cross connection
(in the case of a duplex cross connection,
this is also the output timeslot for the
reverse direction). The format is:
xx-y-zz
where:
• xx = board position (BPOS)
• y = PCM within a board
• zz = timeslot
xx – 1 to 3
y – 1 to 4
zz – 1 to 31
LABEL
Text label.
0 to 12
<text character>
LC
PCM line coding
One of:
• HDB3
• AMI
• B8ZS
Default =
• HDB3 for E1
• B8ZS for T1
LINES
Number of MML lines per page
10 to 99
Default = 25
LOCATION
Label identifying the location of the unit.
Max 24 characters.
LSH
Load share across link sets
Y to N
Default = N
LS
Logical reference of an SS7 link set,
which can contain a number of signaling
links
1 to 64
LS1
Primary link set associated with an SS7
route
1 to 64
LS2
Secondary linkset associated with an
SS7 route
1 to 64
LSSIZE
Maximum number of SS7 links allowed in
the link set. The link set size is used to
determine the load sharing algorithm
used across the link set.
1 to 16
M3UASHARE
The percentage of licensed throughput to
be allocated to the M3UA protocol.
Throughput capacity not allocated to
M3UA will be allocated to M2PA.
M56K
40
Description
56kbits signaling mode:
• 0 - 64 kbits/s used
• 1 - 56kbits/s enabled (bit 8 not
used)
• 2 - 48kbits/s enabled (bits 7 and 8
not used)
• 3 - Recover clock from V.11 interface
• 4 - Transmit clock to V.11 interface
Default = 0.0.0.0
Default = 0.0.0.0
Blank (no value) or 1 to 99
After a change to the
M3UASHARE parameter,
the system should be
restarted so that the
change takes effect.
0 to 4
Default = 0
M56K modes 3 and 4
can only be set on
boards with SIGTYPE =
SS7
For framed HSL, the
valid M56K modes are
0(64k), 1(56k) and
2(48k). These values
are used to identify the
data rate, which is
applied to all timeslots
on the link. For
unstructured HSL links,
the M56K parameter
must be set to 0.
Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
Table 3. Parameter Definitions (Continued)
Name
Description
Range
MASK
IP network mask specified using dot
notation, that is, www.xxx.yyy.zzz
www – 0 to 255
xxx – 0 to 255
yyy – 0 to 255
zzz – 0 to 255
MINREC
The minimum number of records held by
the Signaling Gateway before transfer
100 to 200
MNGR
Logical identifier for an SNMP manager.
1 to 32
NA
Network appearance
0 to 2147483647
NASP
Number of ASP required in load sharing
mode
0 to 32
NC
Signaling Gateway SS7 network context
1 to 4
NI
Network Indicator for an SS7 link set
0 to 3
OBJECT
Identifier of a table within a Signaling
Server Group Object.
Notes
Default = 0
Refer to Dialogic® DSI
Signaling Servers SNMP
User Manual
(U05EPP01) for MIB
details.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
1 - Management Group
2 - System Group
3- Platform Group
4 - IP Group
5- Board Group
6 - SS7 Group
7 SIGTRAN Group
8 - Access Group.
Refer to Dialogic® DSI
Signaling Servers SNMP
User Manual
(U05EPP01) for MIB
details.
OBJGRP
Identifier of the Signaling Server Group
Object in the DSMI MIB.
OPC
SS7 Originating Point Code
0 to 16777215
OTS
The output timeslot in a cross connection
(in the case of a duplex cross connection,
this is also the input timeslot for the
reverse direction). The format is:
xx-y-zz
where:
• xx = board position (BPOS)
• y = PCM within a board
• zz = Timeslot
xx – 1 to 3
y – 1 to 4
zz – 1 to 31
PAGE
The page of data to be printed
1 to 10
Default = 1
PARITY
Parity option on V.24 port.
Affects transmit parity only, parity is
ignored on receive.
One of:
• ODD
• EVEN
• NONE
Default = NONE
PASSWORD
Used to specify the password for either
remote login access or to provide
password control for Signaling Gateway
MML
0 to 12
<text character>
PCM
PCM interface on a board in the format:
xx-y
where:
• xx = board position (BPOS)
• y = PCM within a board
xx – 1 to 3
y – 1 to 4
PCMD
Application Server Point Code mode:
• ANY – If any Application Server is in
service then the Point Code the
Application Server exists within is
considered to be up.
• ALL – Only when all the Application
Servers within a Point Code are in
service will the Point Code they exist
within be considered to be up.
One of:
• ANY
• ALL
41
Chapter 5 Parameter Definitions
Table 3. Parameter Definitions (Continued)
Name
PCMTYPE
The type of PCM in use
Range
Notes
One of:
• T1
• E1
PCR
Preventive Cyclic Retransmission
Y or N
Default = N
PER
Personality configuration
0 to 255
Default = 0
PERIOD
A period of time in the format:
xx:yy:zz
where:
• xx = 2 digit hour
• yy = 2 digit minute
• zz = 2 digit second
xx – 00 to 23
yy – 00 to 59 (yy must be
00, when xx is 23)
zz – 00 to 59 (zz must be
00, when xx is 23)
V24 port identifier
NOTE: Port 1 is not physically
accessible.
1 to 4
PORT
SNMP destination port for SNMP traps.
Default =162
PPORT
The SCTP port associated with the peer
on a SIGTRAN link
1 to 65535
Default =
• 2905 for M3UA
SNLINKs
• 3565 for M2PA
SNLINKs
PRIV
SNMP V3 Privacy encryption protocol.
One of:
• DES
• AES
PRIVPASS
SNMP V3 User account Privacy password.
Must be set if the PRIV parameter is
used.
8 to 12
PRTYPE
The type of periodic report:
• MSC7 – periodic reporting of traffic
measurements for CCS SS7 links.
• MSPCM – periodic reporting of traffic
measurements for PCMs.
• MSSL – periodic reporting of traffic
measurements for SIGTRAN links.
• MSEP – periodic reporting of
Ethernet port measurements.
• MSSY – periodic reporting of System
measurements.
One of:
• MSC7
• MSSL
• MSPCM
• MSEP
• MSSY
Mode for serial port
One of:
• NONE
• DTRDSR
• TELNET
PTMODE
42
Description
One of:
• All
• Create
• Change
• Destroy
• None
QUIESCE
SNMP object transition state.
RANGE
CIC range
0 to 4095
RAS
Logical reference for a SIGTRAN Remote
Application Server
1 to 200
RC
The routing context of a SIGTRAN link
within an Application Server
0 to 2147483647
RCOM
Read only Community String. The
Signaling Server SNMP agent will silently
discard received PDUs that have a
community string not identical to this
value.
A maximum 12
alphanumerical characters.
RDC
Remote Data Center (RDC) identifier
1 to 4
Must be set if the PRIV
parameter is used.
Default =
• DTRDSR for ports
1 and 2
• TELNET for ports
3 and 4
Traps will be generated
if set to All, Create,
Change or Destroy.
Traps will not be
generated if set to
NONE.
Default = Change
Default value = 'public'
Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
Table 3. Parameter Definitions (Continued)
Name
Description
Range
Notes
RDC1
First choice RDC for a continuous record
or periodic report
1 to 4
RDC2
Second choice RDC for a continuous
record or periodic report.
Zero indicates no RDC is assigned.
0 to 4
RECORD
The identifier for a continuous data
collection record
1 to 6
REPORT
The identifier for a periodic data
collection report
1 to 5
RESET
Performs a reset operation
Y or N
Specifies the type of restart operation,
which can be one of the following:
• NORMAL - The system undergoes a
full system restart, resetting the
hardware, operating system and
signaling software. This is the
default behavior. NORMAL resets
should be used for software upgrade
or for maintenance events.
• SOFT - The system restarts the
application software. Prior to a soft
restart, the signaling boards are
reset. SOFT resets may be used for a
more rapid system restart after
updating the system configuration or
licenses. However, if a new software
distribution is to be installed, the
system performs a NORMAL restart.
• HALT - The system shuts down
without a subsequent restart.
Caution: Once the system has been
halted, the only way to restart the
unit is by physically pressing the
Power switch on the front panel of
the chassis.
One of:
• NORMAL
• SOFT
• HALT
SNMP object transition state.
One of:
• All
• Create
• Change
• Destroy
• None
RKI
Routing Key Index
An identifier for either a complete routing
key or part of a routing key.
1 to 512
RKTAB
Routing Key Table
A table of particular routing keys.
1 to 8
RTPRI
Destination route priority
One of:
• NONE
• MTP
RTS
A timeslot within a PCM interface on a
board used for monitoring information
received by the monitored object. The
format is:
xx-y-zz
where:
• xx = board position (BPOS)
• y = PCM within a board
• zz = timeslot
xx – 1 to 3
y – 1 to 4
zz – 1 to 31
SBITS
Number of stop bits on V.24 port
1 to 2
Default = 1
SECURE
Secure operation. When active offers a
higher level of security. The use of the
parameter is command specific. See the
CNSYS and SNSLI command descriptions
for more information.
Y or N
Default = N
RESTART
Default = 0
Default = N
Traps will be generated
if set to All, Create,
Change or Destroy.
Traps will not be
generated if set to
NONE.
Default = Change
Default = NONE
43
Chapter 5 Parameter Definitions
Table 3. Parameter Definitions (Continued)
Name
Description
SEQ
Sequence number
SG
Reserved
SI
Reserved
SIGTYPE
Type of software loaded onto signaling
board
SS7
SLC
Signaling link code uniquely identifying a
signaling link within a link set
0 to 15
SNMP
Notes
1 to 32
Whether SNMP should be active on the
system
SNMP version running of the system
44
Range
Set to DK4032, DSMI or
NONE
SNRT
Reserved
SNTYPE
The type of operation of the SIGTRAN
link
One of:
• SGM3UA
• M2PA
SNLINK
Logical reference for a SIGTRAN link
1 to 256
SPEED
The speed of an Ethernet port.
The values 10, 100, 100 select 10 MHz,
100 MHz and 1 GHz respectively. An “H”
appended to the value indicates halfduplex operation; values without the
appended “H” are full-duplex operation.
One of:
• AUTO
• 10
• 100
• 1000
• 10H
• 100H
SRTX
Number of times a packet of SIGTRAN
information can be retransmitted before
determining that the SIGTRAN link has
gone out of service
2 to 10
SS7MD
SS7 signaling mode:
• ITU14 – ITU operation with 14 bit
Point Code
• ITU16 – ITU operation with 16 bit
Point Code
• ITU24 – ITU operation with 24 bit
Point Code
• ANSI – ANSI operation with 24 bit
Point Code
One of:
• ITU14
• ITU16
• ITU24
• ANSI
STS
A timeslot within a PCM interface on a
board used for monitoring information
sent by the monitored object. The format
is:
xx-y-zz
where:
• xx = board position (BPOS)
• y = PCM within a board
• zz = timeslot
xx – 1 to 3
y – 1 to 4
zz – 1 to 31
SUBNET
Subnet mask for the network to which
the Signaling Gateway is connected
specified using dot notation, that is,
www.xxx.yyy.zzz
www – 0 to 255
xxx – 0 to 255
yyy – 0 to 255
zzz – 0 to 255
Default =
255.255.255.0
SYNCPRI
The priority the PCM is given to provide
clock synchronization:
• 0 – Indicates never provide clock
synchronization
• 1 – Highest priority that PCM should
provide clock synchronization
• 32 – Lowest priority, that is, other
PCMs have precedence
0 to 32
Default = 0
SYSID
System identity
0 to 12
<text character>
SYSREF
The system reference number
0 to 999
Default = AUTO
Default = 0
Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
Table 3. Parameter Definitions (Continued)
Name
Description
Range
Notes
SYSTYPE
The type of system to be run
One of:
• SGW
• DSC
• SIU
TCOM
SNMP Trap Community String
Max 12 alphanumerical
characters
TFORMAT
Format of SNMP trap to be dispatched to
the SNMP manager
TIME
Time of day in the format:
xx:yy:zz
where:
• xx – 2 digit hour
• yy – 2 digit minute
• zz – 2 digit second
xx – 00 to 23
yy – 00 to 59
zz – 00 to 59
TLO
Auto log off time (in minutes)
1 to 60
Default = 30
TLOW
Log off warning time (in minutes)
0 to 60
Default = 25
TMSEC
Timer values in milliseconds associated
with a timer number (resolution is
100ms)
100 to 10000 (in integer
multiples of 100)
TO
Signaling system dependent timer
number.
As specified in the particular signaling
system’s list of timers.
1 to 999
TS
A timeslot within a PCM interface on a
board in the format:
xx-y-zz
where:
• xx = board position (BPOS)
• y = PCM within a board
• zz= Timeslot
xx – 1 to 3
y – 1 to 4
zz – 1 to 31
TSEC
Timer values in seconds associated with
a timer number
1 to 3000
TTYPE
Timer Type
See Section 5.3, “Signaling Gateway
Timers” on page 46 for definitions of
Signaling Gateway “CONV” specific
timers.
One of:
• MTP3
• MTP3A
• SCTP
• CONV
UP
SNMP object transition state.
•
•
•
1 - SNMP V1
2 - SNMP V2
3 - SNMP V2 INFORM
One of:
• All
• Create
• Change
• Destroy
• None
Traps will be generated
if set to All, Create,
Change or Destroy.
Traps will not be
generated if set to
NONE.
Default = Change
45
Chapter 5 Parameter Definitions
Table 3. Parameter Definitions (Continued)
Name
Range
Notes
User name
0 to 12
<text character>
SNMP V3 Logical identifier for an SNMP
user account.
1 to 32
WARNING
SNMP object transition state.
One of:
• All
• Create
• Change
• Destroy
• None
Traps will be generated
if set to All, Create,
Change or Destroy.
Traps will not be
generated if set to
NONE.
Default = Change
WCOM
Read/Write Community String. The
Signaling Server SNMP agent will silently
discard received PDUs that have a
community string not identical to this
value.
A maximum 12
alphanumerical characters.
Default value =
'private'.
USER
5.2
Description
Remote Operations
Table 4 gives the possible remote operation types.
Table 4. Remote Operation Types
DTYPE
Description
SOFTWARE
Selecting this operation allows the user to upload a new software version.
CONFIG
Selecting this operation allows the user to upload a previously backed up version of the
configuration.
LICENSE
Selecting this operation allows the user to upload new software licenses.
5.3
Signaling Gateway Timers
5.3.1
Signaling Gateway-Specific Timers
Table 5 shows the Signaling Gateway specific timers. Timers for specific protocols are given in subsequent
tables in this section.
Table 5. Signaling Gateway Specific Timers
T0
5
7
46
Range
(seconds)
5 to 20
2 to 10
Default
(seconds)
Description
7
Wait for board response guard timer. This timer starts when internal
messages are sent to a signaling board and stopped when an
acknowledgement is received. On timer expiry, it reports an error. If the
internal message sent to a board related to setting up a speech path for a
call, then the call is released using internal token 135.
3
MML wait for maintenance confirmation timer. The timer is started when a
MML maintenance request is performed. It is stopped when a confirmation
from the remote site to the maintenance request is received. On timer
expiry, a confirmation to the request is internally generated allowing
further MML commands to be entered.
Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
5.3.2
MTP3-Specific Timers
MTP3 ITU timers are given in Table 6.
Table 6. MTP3 ITU Timers
TO
Range
(milliseconds)
Default
(milliseconds)
1
500 to 1200
1000
2
700 to 2000
1500
Waiting for changeover acknowledgement
Description
Delay to avoid message mis-sequencing on changeover
3
500 to 1200
1000
Time controlled diversion-delay to avoid mis-sequencing on
changeback
4
500 to 1200
1000
Waiting for changeback acknowledgement (first attempt)
5
500 to 1200
1000
Waiting for changeback acknowledgement (second attempt)
Delay to avoid message mis-sequencing on controlled rerouting
6
500 to 1200
1000
10
30 to 60 sec.
45 sec.
12
800 to 1500
1200
Waiting for uninhibit acknowledgement
13
800 to 1500
1200
Waiting for force uninhibit
14
2000 to 3000
3000
Waiting to start signaling route set congestion test
Delay to avoid oscillation of initial alignment failure and link
restart
Waiting to repeat signaling route set test message
17
800 to 1500
1000
22
180 to 360 sec.
270 sec.
Local inhibit test timer
23
180 to 360 sec.
270 sec.
Remote inhibit test timer
24
N/A
N/A
Reserved
MTP3 ANSI timers are given in Table 7.
Table 7. MTP3 ANSI Timers
TO
Range
(milliseconds)
1
500 to 1200
1000
Delay to avoid message mis-sequencing on changeover
2
700 to 2000
1500
Waiting for changeover acknowledgement
3
500 to 1200
1000
Time controlled diversion-delay to avoid mis-sequencing on
changeback
4
500 to 1200
1000
Waiting for changeback acknowledgement (first attempt)
5
500 to 1200
1000
Waiting for changeback acknowledgement (second attempt)
6
500 to 1200
1000
Delay to avoid message mis-sequencing on controlled rerouting
10
30 to 60secs
45 sec.
12
800 to 1500
1200
Waiting for uninhibit acknowledgement
13
800 to 1500
1200
Waiting for force uninhibit
14
2000 to 3000
3000
Waiting to start signaling route set congestion test
17
800 to 1500
1000
Delay to avoid oscillation of initial alignment failure and link
restart
21
N/A
N/A
22
180 to 360 sec.
270 sec.
Local inhibit test timer
NOTE: This timer is referred to as timer T20 in the ANSI
specification.
23
180 to 360 sec.
270 sec.
Remote inhibit test timer
NOTE: This timer is referred to as timer T21 in the ANSI
specification.
24
N/A
N/A
Default
(milliseconds)
Description
Waiting to repeat signaling route set test message
Reserved
Reserved
47
Chapter 5 Parameter Definitions
5.3.3
SCTP-Specific Timers
SCTP-specific timers are given in Table 8.
Table 8. SCTP-Specific Timers
5.4
TO
Range
(milliseconds)
Default
(milliseconds)
1
100 to 500
500
2
100 to 60000
2000
Maximum retransmission timeout (RTO)
3
T1 to T2
1000
Retransmission timeout RTO initial value
4
100 to 3000
1000
SCTP Heartbeat timer
Description
Minimum retransmission timeout (RTO)
Dialogic® DSI Network Interface Board Types
Table 9 shows the Dialogic® DSI Network Interface Board types.
Table 9. Dialogic® DSI Network Interface Board Types
BRDTYPE
48
Description
SPCI2S-4-2
Signaling Server network interface board with 4 signaling links configured and 2 PCMs.
Used when configuring signaling boards with a SIGTYPE of SS7.
SPCI4-4-4
Signaling Server network interface board with 4 signaling links configured and 4 PCMs.
Used when configuring signaling boards with a SIGTYPE of SS7.
SS7HDP-64-4
Signaling Server network interface board with 64 signaling links configured and 4 PCMs.
Used when configuring signaling boards with a SIGTYPE SS7.
Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
Chapter 6: Command Definitions
6.1
Command Groups
The commands are broken down into a number of command groups as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
6.2
Alarm Commands
Configuration Commands
SS7 Signaling Commands
IP Commands
MML Commands
Maintenance Commands
Measurement Commands
Remote Data Center Commands
Signaling Gateway Commands
SIGTRAN Commands
Status Commands
Command Notation
The following conventions are used in the command definitions:
•
•
•
Items in square brackets [ ] are optional.
•
The sequence of three dots … is used to indicate that a number of values can be entered, linked by the &
or && operator.
6.3
Items separated by a vertical bar | are alternatives, only one of which can be used.
Curly brackets { } are used to designate a group of optional items of which at least one must be
selected.
Command Attributes
The following symbols are used to indicate command attributes:
•
•
CONFIG - The command affects configuration data.
PROMPT - A “DANGEROUS” command, which must be confirmed by the operator.
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Chapter 6 Command Definitions
6.4
Alarm Commands
The alarm commands include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
ALCLS - Alarm Class Set
ALCLP - Alarm Class Print
ALFCP - Alarm Fault Code Print
ALLIP - Alarm List Print
ALLOP - Alarm Log Print
ALREI - Alarm Reset Initiate
ALTEI - Alarm Test Initiate
ALTEE - Alarm Test End
6.4.1
ALCLS – Alarm Class Set
Synopsis
This command assigns an alarm class value to a specified fault code(s).
The alarm class (CLA) is used to determine whether the alarm is classed as Minor, Major or Critical and in
turn governs the alarm LED, relay and SNMP alarm that are activated when the condition exists.
Each alarm code (CODE) has a factory-set default class. See Chapter 8, “Alarm Fault Code Listing” for the
factory default for each alarm code.
Syntax
ALCLS:CLA=,CODE=…;
Prerequisites
None
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
ALCLS:CLA=3,CODE=20;
6.4.2
ALCLP – Alarm Class Print
Synopsis
This command gives a printout of the fault codes belonging to a particular alarm class. If the CLA parameter
is omitted, all fault codes are printed out.
Syntax
ALCLP[:CLA=];
Prerequisites
None
Attributes
None
50
Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
Examples
ALCLP:CLA=3;
ALCLP:CLA=4;
ALCLP:CLA=5;
ALCLP;
Output Format
Alarm Fault Codes
CODE CLA TITLE
11 4Processor1 fail
EXECUTED
6.4.3
ALFCP – Alarm Fault Code Print
Synopsis
This command gives a printout of the alarm class of the specified fault code(s).
The alarm class (CLA) is used to determine whether the alarm is classed as Minor, Major or Critical and in
turn governs the alarm LED, relay and SNMP alarm that are activated when the condition exists.
Each alarm code (CODE) has a factory-set default class. See Chapter 8, “Alarm Fault Code Listing” for the
factory default for each alarm code.
Syntax
ALFCP[:CODE=…];
Prerequisites
None
Attributes
None
Examples
ALFCP;
ALFCP:CODE=8;
Output Format
Alarm Fault Codes
CODE
CLA
8
4
EXECUTED
6.4.4
TITLE
In-band AIS
ALLIP – Alarm List Print
Synopsis
This command gives a printout of all ACTIVE fault codes stored in the system’s alarm log.
Each fault code (CODE) is associated with an alarm class (CLA) which may be Minor, Major or Critical. The
alarm class in turn governs which alarm LED, relay or SNMP alarm is activated when the condition exists.
The command provides an indication of the time that the alarm occurred (OCCURRED), the alarm class (CLA
indicating either a System, PCM or signaling failure) as well as an alarm code specific identifier (ID) and
diagnostic field (DIAG).
See Chapter 8, “Alarm Fault Code Listing” for the definitions of the alarm code specific parameters.
Note: The meaning of the ID field depends on the alarm code and is described in Chapter 8, “Alarm
Fault Code Listing”.
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Chapter 6 Command Definitions
Syntax
ALLIP;
Prerequisites
None
Attributes
None
Examples
ALLIP;
Output Format
SYSTEMIDENT1 Alarm
ALP CODE ID DIAG
107
1 103
0
74
1 104
0
EXECUTED
6.4.5
List (active alarms) 1996-12-01 00:00:54
CLA OCCURRED
CLEARED
5 A 2001-10-30 10:54:48
4 A 2001-10-30 10:54:27
TITLE
PCM loss
PCM loss
ALLOP – Alarm Log Print
Synopsis
This command gives a printout of the alarm log. If no code or class is entered, the whole log is output.
Each fault code (CODE) is associated with an alarm class (CLA) which may be Minor, Major or Critical. The
alarm class in turn governs which alarm LED, relay or SNMP alarm that is activated when the condition
exists.
The command provides and indication of the time the alarm occurred (OCCURRED) and, if it has done so, the
time the alarm cleared (CLEARED). The output from the command indicates, the alarm class (CLA indicating
either a System, PCM or signaling failure) as well as an alarm code specific identifier (ID) and a diagnostic
field (DIAG). The C or A character in the CLA field indicates the current status as either A (active) or C
(cleared).
See Chapter 8, “Alarm Fault Code Listing” for definitions of the alarm code specific parameters.
Syntax
ALLOP[:CODE=…];
ALLOP[:CLA=…];
Prerequisites
None
Attributes
None
Examples
ALLOP:CODE=20;
ALLOP:CLA=1&&2;
ALLOP;
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Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
Output Format
SYSTEMIDENT1 Alarm
ALP CODE ID DIAG
107
1 103
0
74
1 104
0
EXECUTED
Log
CLA
5 A
4 A
1996-12-01 00:00:54
OCCURRED
CLEARED
TITLE
2001-10-30 10:54:48 2001-10-30 10:54:53 PCM loss
2001-10-30 10:54:27 2001-10-30 10:59:53 PCM loss
Note: The C or A character in the CLA field indicates the current status as A (active) or C (cleared). The
meaning of the ID field depends on the alarm code and is described in Chapter 8, “Alarm Fault
Code Listing”.
6.4.6
ALREI – Alarm Reset Initiate
Synopsis
This command removes alarms that have cleared from the alarm log.
Attempts to remove commands that do not have the status CLEARED are rejected.
If parameter ALP is omitted, all alarms with status CLEARED are removed.
Syntax
ALREI[:ALP=];
Prerequisites
None
Attributes
None
Examples
ALREI:ALP=100;
ALREI;
6.4.7
ALTEI – Alarm Test Initiate
Synopsis
The command generates an active test alarm of the specified class, which is entered in the alarm log.
Alarm tests can be useful for validating the operation of hardware such as LEDS and alarm relays, as well as
ensuring proper communication with an SNMP manager without impacting the operation of the system.
Syntax
ALTEI:{[CLA=5]|[CLA=4]|[CLA=3]};
Prerequisites
•
Only one test alarm can be active at any one time. Test alarms can only be generated for classes 3
(critical), 4 (major) and 5 (minor).
Attributes
None
Examples
ALTEI:CLA=3;
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Chapter 6 Command Definitions
6.4.8
ALTEE – Alarm Test End
Synopsis
Clears a test alarm.
Syntax
ALTEE;
Prerequisites
•
The alarm test must already have been initiated.
Attributes
None
Examples
ALTEE;
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Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
6.5
Configuration Commands
The configuration commands include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
CNBOI - Configuration Board Initiate
CNBOE - Configuration Board End
CNBOP - Configuration Board Print
CNBUI - Configuration Back Up Initiate
CNMOI - Configuration Monitor Initiate
CNMOE - Configuration Monitor End
CNMOP - Configuration Monitor Print
CNOBP - Display TRAP Configuration
CNOBS - Set TRAP Configuration
CNPCI - Configuration PCM Initiate
CNPCC - Configuration PCM Change
CNPCE - Configuration PCM End
CNPCP - Configuration PCM Print
CNRDI - Configuration Remote Data Center Initiate
CNRDC - Configuration Remote Data Center Change
CNRDE - Configuration Remote Data Center End
CNRDP - Configuration Remote Data Center Print
CNSMC - Change SNMP Manager Configuration
CNSME - End SNMP Manager Configuration
CNSMI - Set SNMP Manager Configuration
CNSMP - Display SNMP Manager Configuration
CNSNS - Configuration SNMP Set
CNSNP - Configuration SNMP Print
CNSWP - Configuration Software Print
CNSYS - Configuration System Set
CNSYP - Configuration System Print
CNTDS - Configuration Time and Date Set
CNTDP - Configuration Time And Date Print
CNTOS - Configuration Timeout Value Set
CNTOP - Configuration Timeout Value Print
CNTPE - Configuration Network Time Protocol Server End
CNTPI - Configuration Network Time Protocol Server Initiate
CNTPP - Configuration Network Time Protocol Print
CNTSP - Configuration Timeslot Print
CNUPI - Configuration Update Initiate
CNUSC - Change SNMP v3 User Configuration
CNUSE - End SNMP v3
CNUSI - Set SNMP v3
CNUSP - Display SNMP v3
CNXCI - Configuration Cross Connect Initiate
CNXCE - Configuration Cross Connect End
CNXCP - Configuration Cross Connect Print
55
Chapter 6 Command Definitions
6.5.1
CNBOI – Configuration Board Initiate
Synopsis
This command defines a new board on the system.
The user should specify the board position (BPOS) within the unit, the physical type of the board (BRDTYPE)
and the signaling type (SIGTYPE), which identifies the software that will run on the board.
See Section 7.1.2, “Boards and PCMs” on page 136 for a more detailed description of board configuration.
Syntax
CNBOI:BPOS=,BRDTYPE=,SIGTYPE=;
Prerequisites
•
•
•
No board has already been defined for the specified board position.
A board must physically exist for the board position and be licensed for the Signaling Gateway.
If you are using a Dialogic® DSI SS7HDP Network Interface Board, it must have a signaling type of SS7.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
CNBOI:BPOS=1,BRDTYPE=SPCI4-4-4,SIGTYPE=SS7;
CNBOI:BPOS=1,BRDTYPE=SPCI2S-4-2,SIGTYPE=SS7;
CNBOI:BPOS=3,BRDTYPE=SS7HDP-64-4,SIGTYPE=SS7;
6.5.2
CNBOE – Configuration Board End
Synopsis
This command deassigns a board from a board position.
Syntax
CNBOE:BPOS=;
Prerequisites
•
•
•
•
A board has been defined for the specified board position.
No signaling processor on the board has been allocated to a signaling link.
No PCM on the board is configured.
The board has been blocked.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
CNBOE:BPOS=3;
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Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
6.5.3
CNBOP – Configuration Board Print
Synopsis
This command gives a print out of all configured boards.
Syntax
CNBOP;
Prerequisites
None
Attributes
None
Examples
CNBOP;
Output Format
Board Configuration
BPOS BRDTYPE
SIGTYPE
1
SPCI2S-4-2 SS7
3
SPCI2S-4-2 SS7
EXECUTED
6.5.4
CNBUI – Configuration Back Up Initiate
Synopsis
This command backs up either the configuration data or the current software distribution to a Remote Data
Center (RDC).
A filename (FILE) should be entered on the command line without a suffix. The command automatically
reads the filename with a suffix. The command determines the suffix from the DTYPE parameter. For
example, if the user specifies FILE=CFG and DTYPE=CONFIG, the full filename would be CFG.CF4.
The file suffix and default filename for each DTYPE is as follows:
•
•
For DTYPE=CONFIG, the filename suffix is .CF3. If a filename is not specified, the default is “SDC”.
For DTYPE=SOFTWARE, the filename suffix is .tgz. If a filename is not specified, the default is “sgw”.
Optionally, the file may be backed up to a subdirectory (DIRECTORY) of the account on the RDC.
Note: During execution of this command, the system may not respond for up to three minutes while
the command is being executed.
Syntax
CNBUI:RDC=,DTYPE=,[FILE=,][DIRECTORY=,];
Prerequisites
•
•
•
The RDC should be initiated and not blocked.
The DTYPE can only be CONFIG or SOFTWARE.
If the RDC is the “local” RDC, a FILE name of SDC or SGW is not allowed.
Attributes
None
Examples
CNBUI:RDC=1,DTYPE=CONFIG,FILE=SDC;
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Chapter 6 Command Definitions
6.5.5
CNMOI – Configuration Monitor Initiate
Synopsis
This command initiates the monitoring of an object on the Signaling Gateway. An object is currently a
C7LINK.
For signaling, the STS monitors information sent from the EQU of the signaling link and the RTS monitors
information received by the signaling link.
Syntax
CNMOI:C7LINK=,STS=,RTS=;
Prerequisites
•
•
If specified, the C7LINK has already been initiated and must have a TS and EQU.
•
The PCM on which RTS exists must have already been initiated and RTS must be within the correct range
for the PCM type (0 to 31 for E1 and 1 to 24 for T1 PCMs).
•
•
•
STS is not already assigned elsewhere on the system for output.
The PCM on which STS exists must have already been initiated and STS must be within the correct range
for the PCM type (0 to 31 for E1 and 1 to 24 for T1 PCMs).
RTS is not already assigned elsewhere on the system for output.
A signaling link can only be monitored once.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
CNMOI:C7LINK=1,STS=3-3-15,RTS=5-3-16;
6.5.6
CNMOE – Configuration Monitor End
Synopsis
This command ends the monitoring of an object. An object is currently only an signaling link.
Syntax
CNMOE:C7LINK=;
Prerequisites
•
The C7LINK is being monitored.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
CNMOE:C7LINK=1;
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Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
6.5.7
CNMOP – Configuration Monitor Print
Synopsis
This command is used to obtain a print out of the objects being monitored. An object is currently only a
signaling link.
For signaling, the STS monitors information sent from the EQU of the signaling link and the RTS monitors
information received by the signaling link.
Syntax
CNMOP;
Prerequisites
None
Attributes
None
Examples
CNMOP;
Output Format
Monitoring Configuration
C7LINK STS
RTS
1
3-3-1 3-3-2
3
3-3-3 3-3-4
EXECUTED
+++
6.5.8
CNOBP – Display TRAP Configuration
Synopsis
This command displays the current TRAP configuration. The entire TRAP configuration for all available objects
will be displayed if no object group is specified. The list of available objects will depend on the current system
mode configuration (i.e. SIU, DSC or SG). If the objgrp parameter is specified, CNOBP will display settings
for only that object group. The CNOBS command allows the TRAP configuration to be changed.
Syntax
CNOBP[:OBJGRP=];
Prerequisites
The DSMI-based SNMP agent must be enabled.
Attributes
None.
Examples
CNOBP;
CNOBP:OBJGRP=3;
59
Chapter 6 Command Definitions
Output Format
Configuration SNMP Traps
OBJGRP OBJECT UP
DOWN
1
1
CHANGE
CHANGE
1
2
CHANGE
CHANGE
1
3
CHANGE
CHANGE
2
1
CHANGE
CHANGE
2
2
CHANGE
CHANGE
2
3
CHANGE
CHANGE
2
4
CHANGE
CHANGE
3
1
CHANGE
CHANGE
3
2
CHANGE
CHANGE
3
3
CHANGE
CHANGE
3
4
CHANGE
CHANGE
3
5
CHANGE
CHANGE
4
1
CHANGE
CHANGE
5
1
CHANGE
CHANGE
5
2
CHANGE
CHANGE
6
1
CHANGE
CHANGE
6
2
CHANGE
CHANGE
6
3
CHANGE
CHANGE
7
1
CHANGE
CHANGE
7
2
CHANGE
CHANGE
7
3
CHANGE
CHANGE
EXECUTED
6.5.9
INACTIVE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
IMPAIR
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
RESTART
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
QUIESCE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
WARNING
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CHANGE
CNOBS – Set TRAP Configuration
Synopsis
This command allows a user to determine the conditions under which an SNMP TRAP will be generated for a
particular DSMI object.
Essentially, a TRAP can be generated:
•
•
•
•
"When any row within an object changes state (CHANGE)
"When a new row (with a particular state) is created within an object (CREATE)
"When a row (with a particular state) is destroyed within an object (DESTROY)
"When any combination of the above occur (ALL), or when an event occurs that affects the alarm
condition of the object, but does not necessarily change the state.
TRAPs can also be completely disabled (NONE).
Possible states that a DSMI object can transition into are:
UP
Operational and available
DOWN
Not available
INACTIVE
Operational but not available
IMPAIR
Operational and available but encountering service-affecting condition (e.g. congestion).
RESTART
Unavailable but will soon be available
QUIESCE
Operational but in the process of shutting down/being removed
WARNING
Operational and available but encountering a non service-affecting condition
Only one state's TRAP configuration can be configured per single invocation of this command.
The CNOBP command displays the current TRAP configuration for each object.
These TRAP messages are sent to SNMP managers, which are defined with the CNSMI command. The default
setting for all object states is CHANGE.
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Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
Syntax
CNOBS:OBJGRP=,OBJECT=[,UP=]|[,DOWN=]|[,INACTIVE=]|[,IMPAIR=]|[,RESTART=]|[,QUIESCE=,]|[,WARNING=];
Prerequisites
The DSMI-based SNMP agent must be enabled.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
CNOBS:OBJGRP=7,OBJECT=2,DOWN=all;
This will cause a TRAP to be generated whenever an SS7 link is created in the Down state, or destroyed while
in the Down state or when the link enters the Down state.
6.5.10
CNPCI – Configuration PCM Initiate
Synopsis
This command configures a PCM (PCM) for T1 or E1 operation (PCMTYPE) on a board such that it is available
for signaling or voice. The command optionally configures the PCM to be used as a potential synchronization
source for the system (SYNCPRI). The command also allows the frame format (FF) and line code (LC) to be
configured. See Section 7.1.2, “Boards and PCMs” on page 136 for a more detailed description of PCM
configuration.
Syntax
CNPCI:PCM=,PCMTYPE=,[SYNCPRI=,][FF=,][LC=,][IDLE=][BM=][BUILDOUT=,] [UNS=,];
Prerequisites
•
•
•
The board on which the PCM exists has been initiated.
•
•
•
For a PCMTYPE of T1, the LC can be set to AMI or B8ZS and the FF can be set to SF, ESF or CRC6.
•
The PCM has not already been initiated.
For a PCMTYPE of E1, the LC can be set to HDB3 and the FF can be set to G704, CRC4, CRC4C or
CRC4G706.
An FF of CRC4G706 can only be set on a board type of SS7HDP.
The BUILDOUT parameter can only have a value of 0 for E1 and a value of 1 for T1s on boards of a type
other than SS7HDP.
A frame format of UNS can only be specified for PCMs on SS7HDP signaling boards.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
CNPCI:PCM=1-1,PCMTYPE=E1,SYNCPRI=1;
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Chapter 6 Command Definitions
6.5.11
CNPCC – Configuration PCM Change
Synopsis
This command allows changes to the configuration of a PCM.
Syntax
CNPCC:PCM=,{[PCMTYPE=,]|[SYNCPRI=,][FF=,][LC=,][IDLE=][BM=][BUILDOUT=,]};
Prerequisites
•
•
The PCM has already been initiated.
•
•
•
•
For a PCMTYPE of T1, the LC can be set to AMI or B8ZS and the FF can be set to SF, ESF or CRC6.
For a PCMTYPE of E1, the LC can be set to HDB3 and the FF can be set to G704, CRC4, CRC4C or
CRC4G706.
An FF of CRC4G706 can only be set on a Dialogic® DSI SS7HDP Network Interface Board.
The frame format (FF) value cannot be changed to or from UNS using this command - use CNPCI.
The BUILDOUT parameter can only have a value of 0 for E1 and a value of 1 for T1s on boards of a type
other than SS7HDP.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
CNPCC:PCM=1-1,SYNCPRI=3;
6.5.12
CNPCE – Configuration PCM End
Synopsis
This command ends the configuration of a PCM such that it is unavailable for voice or signaling.
Syntax
CNPCE:PCM=;
Prerequisites
•
•
No timeslot on the PCM has been assigned to voice, signaling monitoring or cross connections.
The board on which the PCM exists has been blocked.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
CNPCE:PCM=1-1;
6.5.13
CNPCP – Configuration PCM Print
Synopsis
This command gives a printout of all the configured PCMs.
Syntax
CNPCP;
Prerequisites
None
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Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
Attributes
None
Examples
CNPCP;
Output Format
PCM Configuration
PCM
PCMTYPE LC
1-2
E1
HDB3
2-2
E1
HDB3
3-1
T1
B8ZS
EXECUTED
6.5.14
FF
G704
G704
SF
SYNCPRI
6
1
2
IDLE
2A
2A
2A
BUILDOUT
0
0
7
CNRDI – Configuration Remote Data Center Initiate
Synopsis
This command is used to configure Remote Data Center (RDC) so that data from periodic report or
continuous recording can be transferred to that location. The connection itself is established when the RDC is
unblocked.
An RDC is an account, with an FTP logon name (USER) and password (PASSWORD) on a remote system
(IPADDR) operating as an FTP server. No proprietary software is required to run on the remote system.
Note: If an RDC has previously been ended, but a file transfer was already in progress, subsequent
CNRDIs using that RDC fail with “NO SYSTEM RESOURCES” until the file transfer has completed.
To configure the Signaling Gateway to act itself as an RDC, the user must specify a local address (127.0.0.1)
together with the “siuftp” account name and password.
Note: Local operation functions only if the ftp server on the system is active.
Syntax
CNRDI:RDC=,IPADDR=,USER=,PASSWORD=,[LABEL=,];
Prerequisites
•
•
The RDC is not already initiated.
The IP address is not already in use.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
CNRDI:RDC=1,IPADDR=255.123.0.124,USER=JOHN,PASSWORD=BAZZA123;
6.5.15
CNRDC – Configuration Remote Data Center Change
Synopsis
This command is used to change the configuration of a Remote Data Center (RDC).
Syntax
CNRDC:RDC=,{[IPADDR=,][USER=,][PASSWORD=,][LABEL=,]};
Prerequisites
•
•
•
The RDC is already initiated and blocked.
If specified, the IP address is not already in use.
Remote data operation must be allowed by the system.
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Chapter 6 Command Definitions
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
CNRDC:RDC=1,IPADDR=194.192.184.77,USER=JOHN,PASSWORD=BAZZA23;
6.5.16
CNRDE – Configuration Remote Data Center End
Synopsis
This command is used to end a Remote Data Center (RDC).
Syntax
CNRDE:RDC=;
Prerequisites
•
•
•
The RDC is already initiated.
The RDC is blocked.
The RDC is not attached to a continuous record or periodic report.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
CNRDE:RDC=1;
6.5.17
CNRDP – Configuration Remote Data Center Print
Synopsis
This command is used to print out the Remote Data Center parameters.
The password is not printed.
Syntax
CNRDP;
Prerequisites
None
Attributes
None
Examples
CNRDP;
Output Format
Remote Data Centre Configuration
RDC IPADDR
USER
1
194.192.184.33
JOHN
2
127.0.0.1
siuftp
EXECUTED
64
PASSWORD
********
********
LABEL
PRIMARY
Local
Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
6.5.18
CNSMC – Change SNMP Manager Configuration
Synopsis
This command allows the administrator to alter an SNMP manager's configuration. The parameters and the
associated values are as per the CNSMI command.
Syntax
CNSMC:MNGR={,IPADDR=|,TFORMAT=|,PORT=|,TCOM=|,USER=|,ENGINE=|,LABEL=};
Prerequisites
The DSMI-based SNMP agent must be enabled.
The manager must already have been defined with the CNSMI command.
If an SNMP v3 user is specified, the user must already be defined.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
CNSMC:MNGR=1,IPADDR=192.168.220.222;
6.5.19
CNSME – End SNMP Manager Configuration
Synopsis
This command removes an SNMP manager definition from the list of configured SNMP managers. The
command takes a single parameter, MNGR, which identifies the particular manage to remove.
Syntax
CNSME:MNGR=;
Prerequisites
The DSMI-based SNMP agent must be enabled.
The manager must already have been defined with the CNSMI command.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
CNSME:MNGR=1;
6.5.20
CNSMI – Set SNMP Manager Configuration
Synopsis
This command allows the administrator to define up to 32 TRAP destinations (i.e. remote SNMP manager
stations). Each manager is defined by its IP address (IPADDR). Additionally, the type of TRAP to be
dispatched to the SNMP manager is specified with the TFORMAT parameter. The following values are
supported:
1
An SNMP v1 TRAP is sent
2
An SNMP v2 TRAP is sent
3
An SNMP v2 INFORM is sent
65
Chapter 6 Command Definitions
The PORT parameter allows the user to configure a destination port which is different to the default standard
SNMP TRAP port (162).
If the remote SNMP (v1 or v2c) manager has been configured to only recognize TRAPs received with a
community string, the TCOM parameter accommodates that value.
If an SNMP v3 TRAP is to be issued, then the USER parameter value is used. The USER parameter is used to
specify a user, which has been defined with the CNUSI command. Furthermore, it will also be necessary to
configure an engine identifier, which has been configured on the remote SNMP manager. The engine identifier
is configured with the ENGINE parameter.
Finally, the LABEL parameter is used to specify an optional string identifier for the manager.
Syntax
CNSMI:MNGR=,IPADDR=,TFORMAT=[,PORT=][,TCOM=][,USER=][,ENGINE=][,LABEL=];
Prerequisites
The DSMI-based SNMP agent must be enabled. If an SNMP v3 TRAP is required, the user referenced by the
USER parameter must exist.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
This is an example for setting up a simple SNMP v2 TRAP receiver/manager:
CNSMI:MNGR=1,IPADDR=192.168.1.22,TFORMAT=2;
This next example shows how an SNMP v3 TRAP receiver/manager would be created. The first step is to
define the user with the CNUSI command:
CNUSI:USER=1,AUTH=MD5,AUTHPASS=abcdefgh,LABEL=user1;
EXECUTED
The next step is to define the manager which references the user which has just been defined:
CNSMI:MNGR=2,IPADDR=192.168.1.222,USER=1,ENGINE=1122334455;
EXECUTED
6.5.21
CNSMP – Display SNMP Manager Configuration
Synopsis
This command displays the currently configured SNMP managers. If a MNGR value is specified, only that
manager is displayed.
Syntax
CNSMP [:MNGR=];
Prerequisites
The DSMI-based SNMP agent must be enabled.
Attributes
None.
Examples
CNSMP;
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Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
Output Format
Configuration SNMP Manager
MNGR IPADDR
PORT TFORMAT TCOM
1
192.168.220.192
162 1
EXECUTED
6.5.22
USER
0
ENGINEID
LABEL
CNSNS – Configuration SNMP Set
Synopsis
This command is used to select an SNMP agent or to disable SNMP. Changing the SNMP parameter with the
CNSNS command will require a system restart for the changes to take effect. The SNMP parameter value can
be one of three values. Setting the SNMP value to DK4032 will activate the legacy SNMP support. Setting the
SNMP value to DSMI will activate the enhanced, DSMI-based agent if there is a valid license on the server.
Finally, SNMP can be disabled altogether by specifying a value of NONE.
Note: When the DSMI-based SNMP agent is enabled initially, the RCOM string is assigned a value of
'public' and the WCOM string a value of 'private'. Unlike the legacy SNMP agent (SNMP=DK4032),
there is no support for SNMP requests without a community string.
Syntax
CNSNS:SNMP=,[RCOM=,CONFIRM=],[WCOM=,CONFIRM=];
Prerequisites
Before DSMI SNMP functionality can be activated, the unit must be equipped with a license supporting DSMI
SNMP functionality.
Example
CNSNS:SNMP=DSMI,RCOM=rcomstring,CONFIRM=rcomstring;
6.5.23
CNSNP – Configuration SNMP Print
Synopsis
This command displays the current SNMP mode, including the read and, where applicable, the write
community string. The current SNMP agent, however, does not support write access. The output of this
command can be used to determine which, if any, SNMP agent is currently activated on the Server. In the
case of the enhanced DSMI-based agent, the SNMP setting will be DSMI. In the case of the legacy SNMP
support, the value is DK4032. Additionally, if SNMP is not currently activated, a value of NONE will be
displayed.
Syntax
CNSNP;
Prerequisites
None
Attributes
None
Example
CNSNP;
Output Format
SNMP Configuration
SNMP DSMI
RCOM ********
WCOM ********
EXECUTED
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Chapter 6 Command Definitions
6.5.24
CNSWP – Configuration Software Print
Synopsis
This command is used print out the version numbers of the software operating on the main CPU and
signaling boards within a Signaling Gateway. The command also displays the library version numbers for
each protocol configured on the unit.
Syntax
CNSWP;
Prerequisites
None
Attributes
None
Output Format
Software Configuration
SS7G20
V3.02
Board Codefiles
SYS
SPCI V1.16
Protocol Libraries
MTP3 CPU
V5.01
MTP2 SPCI V5.03
EXECUTED
6.5.25
CNSYS – Configuration System Set
Synopsis
This command is used to enter the system identity string, personality setting, system reference number, and
to turn on and off certain features and signaling systems on the Signaling Gateway.
The user can specify whether they wish to allow ftp access to the Signaling Gateway by using the FTPSER
parameter. The Signaling Gateway can act as an ftp server to allow update of configuration, software and
purchasable licenses. For security, it is recommended that ftp server access is switched off when the user
does not need to execute these functions. The user can disable FTPSER by setting the parameter to N.
Activation or deactivation of the ftp server takes immediate effect.
The user can specify whether they wish to restrict access to the Signaling Gateway so that it operates only
over secure shell (SSH) by using the SECURE parameter. By default, there is no restriction allowing the use
normal telnet and ftp access. The user can enable SECURE operation by setting the parameter to Y. Activation
or deactivation of SECURE operation takes immediate effect.
When a password is specified, all new MML sessions apart from serial port 2 (COM2) require a password
before entry.
The personality parameter is used to select customer-specific, non-standard operating functionality for the
Signaling Gateway. To achieve the standard operating functionality, the personality should be set to the
default value (that is, zero). Unless otherwise notified, all customers should select the standard operating
functionality.
The M3UASHARE parameter determines the percentage of the licensed throughput capacity allocated to the
M3UA protocol - the remainder being allocated to M2PA.
For example, on a system equipped with the SS7SBG30SGWJ software license which allows up to 2460
Kilobytes/sec throughput, if the M3UASHARE parameter is set to a value of 25, then M3UA is allocated 615
(25%) Kilobytes/sec, and M2PA is allocated the remaining capacity. If M3UASHARE is blank then the total
licensed capacity can be used by either M3UA or M2PA - but not both.
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Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
When M3UASHARE is blank only M3UA links or only M2PA links can be unblocked, but not both types. Before
M3UASHARE can be set to 'blank' (i.e a value is removed), all SIGTRAN links must be blocked.
Following changes to the M3UASHARE parameter, the system RESTART REQUIRED alarm is invoked and the
system should be restarted before the changes can take effect.
See Section 7.1.1, “System Configuration” on page 135 for a more detailed description of system
configuration.
Syntax
CNSYS:{[SYSID=,]|[SYSREF=,]|[PER=,]|[SECURE=,]|[FTPSER=,]|[FTPPWD=,]|
[GATEWAY=,]|[CONTACT=,]|[LOCATION=,][M3UASHARE=,]}
CNSYS:PASSWORD=,CONFIRM=,
Prerequisites
•
When changing the personality or activating/deactivating signaling protocols, all boards and groups
within the system must be blocked.
•
A password, if provided, must be confirmed using the CONFIRM parameter to ensure that the password
has not been mistyped.
•
•
•
The user cannot enter a PER parameter value that already exists in the system.
Before M3UASHARE can be unset, i.e., M3UASHARE=; all SIGTRAN links must be blocked.
After changes to the M3UASHARE parameter, the system must be reset before changes will become
effective.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
CNSYS:SYSID=STATION1,PER=2;
CNSYS:M3UASHARE=60;
CNSYS:M3UASHARE=;
6.5.26
CNSYP – Configuration System Print
Synopsis
Software options not licensed on the unit do not appear in the list. Most of these configuration items are set
using the CNSYS command, which also contains more details of other options. The “Password” value shows
“********” if a password is set and blank if a password is not set.
Syntax
CNSYP;
Prerequisites
None
Attributes
None
Examples
CNSYP;
69
Chapter 6 Command Definitions
Output Format
System Configuration
UNITID:
001e0dc74896
SYSID:
LDXCentre
SYSREF:
0
LOCATION:
Room5
CONTACT:
admint@email.com
PASSWORD:
FTPPWD:
N
FTPSER:
Y
SECURE:
N
PER:
0
M3UASHARE
EXECUTED
Note: The protocol and mode parameters are only present if licensed. When a protocol or mode is
active, the parameter shows the value “Y”, and when inactive, the parameter shows the value
“N”.
6.5.27
CNTDS – Configuration Time and Date Set
Synopsis
This command is used to specify the date (DATE) and time (TIME) as used by the system. This command can
also activate or deactivate Network Time Protocol (NTP) on the system. System time is used by the Signaling
Server to indicate the time an alarm occurred or cleared and to provide timestamps for such things as
measurements and data records. The command also allows an OFFSET from UTC to be specified to allow the
system to report the correct local time, when synchronized with an NTP time server.
Note: The system will not automatically adjust for daylight savings time changes.
See:
•
•
The CNTDP command to verify the time and date settings.
The CNTPI command to add NTP servers to the configuration.
Syntax
CNTDS:[DATE=,][TIME=,][NTP=,][OFFSET=];
Prerequisites
•
•
The OFFSET value must be specified in hours and optionally 0 or 30 minutes, in the range -14 to +12.
e.g.
Montreal, CANADA
-5:00
Parsippany, USA
-5:00
Fordingbridge, UNITED KINGDOM
0:00
Renningen, GERMANY
+1:00
New Delhi, INDIA
+5:30
Beijing, CHINA
+8:00
Sydney, AUSTRALIA
+10:00
The unit must be restarted in order for the new OFFSET value to take effect.
The date cannot be changed if periodic reports or continuous records are configured.
Attributes
CONFIG - The command affects configuration data.
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Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
Example
CNTDS:DATE=2001-10-03,TIME=18:32:21,NTP=Y,OFFSET=+5:30;
EXECUTED
6.5.28
CNTDP – Configuration Time And Date Print
Synopsis
This command is used to print out the system date and time, whether NTP is active and to display the
OFFSET from UTC configured. See the CNTDS command for setting the time and date, UTC OFFSET and
activating NTP.
Syntax
CNTDP;
Prerequisites
None.
Attributes
None.
Example
CNTDP;
Configuration Time and Date
DATE
TIME
NTP OFFSET
2001-10-03 09:04:02 Y
+5:30
6.5.29
CNTOS – Configuration Timeout Value Set
Synopsis
This command is used to change the value of a timer for a particular signaling system.
The user should specify the timer type (TTYPE), the timer itself (TO) and time to which it should be set,
expressed in either seconds (TSEC) or milliseconds (TMSEC).
Note: Some signaling system timer values are not changeable.
See the CNTOP command to verify timer values. See Section 5.3, “Signaling Gateway Timers” on page 46 for
the definition of signaling system specific timers.
Syntax
CNTOS:TTYPE=,TO=,{TSEC=|TMSEC=};
Prerequisites
None
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
CNTOS:TTYPE=MTP3,TO=7,TSEC=30;
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Chapter 6 Command Definitions
6.5.30
CNTOP – Configuration Timeout Value Print
Synopsis
This command is used to print the value of either a single timer or all the timers for a particular protocol
module. (Refer to CNTOS command to set timer values.)
Syntax
CNTOP:TTYPE=,[TO=,];
Prerequisites
None
Attributes
None
Examples
CNTOP:TTYPE=MTP3;
Output Format
Timeout Values:
TTYPE TO
TSEC
MTP3
1
60
MTP3
2
360
MTP3
3
120
MTP3
4
360
MTP3
5
5
MTP3
6
5
MTP3
7
3
MTP3
10
60
EXECUTED
6.5.31
TMSEC
CNTPE – Configuration Network Time Protocol Server End
Synopsis
This command is used to remove an NTP Server from the configuration of the system.
Syntax
CNTPE:NTPSER;
Prerequisites
The specified NTPSER must already be configured.
Attributes
CONFIG - The command affects configuration data.
Example
CNTPE:NTPSER=1;
6.5.32
CNTPI – Configuration Network Time Protocol Server Initiate
Synopsis
This command is used to add an NTP server to the configuration of the system. The NTP service should be
activated using the CNTDS command.
Syntax
CNTPI:NTPSER=,IPADDR=,[LABEL=];
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Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
Prerequisites
The specified NTPSER must not already be configured.
The IPADDR may not be used more than once and may not identify any of the configured system IP
addresses.
Up to 16 NTP servers may be configured.
Attributes
CONFIG - The command affects configuration data.
Example
CNTPI:NTPSER=1,IPADDR=192.168.0.1,LABEL=NTPSERV1;
6.5.33
CNTPP – Configuration Network Time Protocol Print
Synopsis
This command is used to display the configuration of the Network Time Protocol software on the unit.
Syntax
CNTPP;
Prerequisites
None.
Attributes
None.
Example
CNTPP;
Configuration of NTP Servers
NTPSER IPADDR
LABEL
1
192.168.0.1
NTP server 1
2
192.168.0.2
NTP server 2
EXECUTED
6.5.34
CNTSP – Configuration Timeslot Print
Synopsis
This command is used to print the configuration of all timeslots on a PCM.
A timeslot on a PCM can be allocated to signaling, voice, cross connect, or monitoring or it can be
unallocated. Data is printed for a timeslot when it is acting as an outgoing timeslot.
A timeslot can act as an outgoing timeslot for the following types:
•
•
•
•
SIG - Carries signaling information. It forms a duplex connection.
OTS - Acts as an outgoing timeslot for a cross connection. It may form a duplex connection.
STS - The outgoing timeslot monitoring the send direction of an object.
RTS - The outgoing timeslot monitoring the receive direction of an object.
Note: An object is currently only a signaling link.
For signaling, the STS monitors information sent from the EQU of the signaling link and the RTS monitors
information received by the signaling link.
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Chapter 6 Command Definitions
Syntax
CNTSP:PCM=;
Prerequisites
None
Attributes
None.
Examples
CNTSP:PCM=3-3;
Output Format
PCM Timeslot
TS
TYPE
3-3-22 SIG
3-3-24 OTS
3-3-25 RTS
3-3-25 STS
EXECUTED
6.5.35
Configuration
C7LINK ITS
6
4-4-4
7
8
CNUPI – Configuration Update Initiate
Synopsis
This command is used to update configuration data, software or a license on the Signaling Gateway. The
operation involves reading files containing either configuration data, software or a license from a Remote
Data Center (if specified) or portable media (CD or USB) and loading it into memory. Optionally, the file may
be read from a subdirectory (DIRECTORY) of the account on the RDC.
A FILE name should be entered on the command line without a suffix. The command automatically reads the
file name with a suffix. The command determines the suffix by use of the DTYPE parameter. For example, the
file CFG.CF3 for a DTYPE of CONFIG would be entered as CFG.
The filename suffix for DTYPE=CONFIG is .CF3.
The filename suffix for DTYPE=SOFTWARE is .tgz.
The filename suffix for DTYPE=LICENSE is .lic.
If not specified, the default filename for a DTYPE=CONFIG is “SDC”.
If not specified, the default filename for a DTYPE=SOFTWARE is “sgw”.
If not specified, the default filename for a DTYPE=LICENSE is “sgw”.
Note: During execution of this command, there system may not respond for up to 3 minutes while the
command is being executed.
Syntax
CNUPI:DTYPE=,RDC=,[DIRECTORY=,][FILE=,];
Prerequisites
•
If the RDC is specified, it should be initiated and not blocked.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
CNUPI:RDC=1,DTYPE=CONFIG,DIRECTORY=AUTH,FILE=CFG;
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6.5.36
CNUSC – Change SNMP v3 User Configuration
Synopsis
This command allows the configuration of a previously registered SNMP v3 user to be changed. The USER
parameter identifies the user account to modify.
The parameters and associated values are as per the CNUSI command, with the additional parameters PRIV
and PRIVPASS. Supported PRIV parameter values are DES and AES. As with the AUTHPASS parameter value,
the privacy password value (PRIVPASS) must be between 8 and 24 characters long. Also, it is not possible to
configure or modify the PRIVPASS value for a user without also specifying the PRIV value. It is, however,
possible to modify the PRIV or AUTH values without additionally specifying a corresponding password.
Syntax
CNUSC:USER=[,AUTH=|,AUTHPASS=|,PRIV=|,PRIVPASS=|,LABEL=};
Prerequisites
The DSMI-based SNMP agent must be enabled.
The SNMP v3 user must already have an entry in the list of configured SNMP v3 users.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
CNUSC:USER=3,AUTH=SHA;
6.5.37
CNUSE – End SNMP v3
Synopsis
This command removes an SNMP v3 user's configuration entry. The command takes a single parameter,
USER, which identifies the user to be removed.
Syntax
CNUSE:USER=;
Prerequisites
The DSMI-based SNMP agent must be enabled.
The user must be present in the list of configured SNMP v3 users.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
CNUSE:USER=3;
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Chapter 6 Command Definitions
6.5.38
CNUSI – Set SNMP v3
Synopsis
This command allows the administrator to create SNMP v3 user accounts that are recognized by the local
server. It also allows the administrator to define SNMP v3 user accounts for use in conjunction with SNMP v3
TRAP destinations/managers.
A user is defined with an integer user identifier (USER), optional authentication (AUTH/AUTHPASS) and a
label (LABEL), which serves as the username. The USER and LABEL parameters are mandatory. Supported
AUTH values are SHA and MD5. The password must have a minimum length of 8 characters, and a maximum
length of 24 is enforced. The AUTH and AUTHPASS parameters must be specified together. In other words, it
is not possible to configure an AUTHPASS value without having also specified the AUTH value.
Note that only the authentication attributes can be defined with the CNUSI command. If a user requires
privacy (encryption) parameters to be applied, the CNUSC command is used to configure them.
Syntax
CNUSI:USER=[,AUTH=,AUTHPASS=],LABEL=;
Prerequisites
•
The DSMI-based SNMP agent must be enabled.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
CNUSI:USER=3,AUTH=MD5,AUTHPASS=user3pass,LABEL=user3;
6.5.39
CNUSP – Display SNMP v3
Synopsis
This command displays the current list of configured SNMP v3 users. The passwords are hidden. If a USER
value is specified with the command, only that user's details are displayed.
Syntax
CNUSP[:USER=];
Prerequisites
The DSMI-based SNMP agent must be enabled.
Attributes
None.
Examples
CNUSP;
Output Format
Configuration SNMP Users
USER AUTH AUTHPASS PRIV
1
MD5
******** NONE
2
SHA
******** NONE
EXECUTED
76
PRIVPASS
LABEL
user1
user2
Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
6.5.40
CNXCI – Configuration Cross Connect Initiate
Synopsis
This command initiates a cross connect path across the Signaling Gateway between 2 PCM timeslots; the
incoming timeslot (ITS) and the outgoing timeslot (OTS). If DUPLEX is not set to Y, a simplex cross connect
is initiated from ITS to OTS.
Syntax
CNXCI:OTS=,ITS=,[DUPLEX=];
Prerequisites
•
The PCM on which the OTS exists must have already been initiated and the OTS must be within the
correct range for the PCM type (0 to 31 for E1 and 1 to 24 for T1 PCMs).
•
The PCM on which the ITS exists must have already been initiated and the ITS must be within the correct
range for the PCM type (0 to 31 for E1 and 1 to 24 for T1 PCMs).
•
•
OTS is not already assigned elsewhere on the system for output.
ITS is not already assigned elsewhere on the system for input.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
CNXCI:OTS=1-1-16,ITS=2-1-16,DUPLEX=Y;
6.5.41
CNXCE – Configuration Cross Connect End
Synopsis
This command ends a Cross Connect connection across the converter.
Syntax
CNXCE:OTS=,[DUPLEX=,];
Prerequisites
•
•
The OTS must already be initiated as an OTS in a Cross Connect connection path.
If DUPLEX=Y is specified, a duplex connection must already exist for the specified OTS.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
CNXCE:OTS=1-1-16;
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Chapter 6 Command Definitions
6.5.42
CNXCP – Configuration Cross Connect Print
Synopsis
This command is used to obtain a printout of Cross Connect connection path(s).
Syntax
CNXCP:PCM=;
CNXCP:OTS=;
CNXCP;
Prerequisites
None
Attributes
None
Examples
CNXCP:PCM=1-2;
CNXCP:OTS=1-1-16;
CNXCP;
Output Format
Path Configuration
OTS
ITS
DUPLEX
1-1-16 2-1-16 Y
EXECUTED
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6.6
SS7 Signaling Commands
The SS7 signaling commands include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
C7LSI - CCS SS7 Link Set Initiate
C7LSC - CCS SS7 Link Set Change
C7LSE - CCS SS7 Link Set End
C7LSP - CCS SS7 Link Set Print
C7RTI - CCS SS7 Route Initiate
C7RTC - CCS SS7 Route Change
C7RTE - CCS SS7 Route End
C7RTP - CCS SS7 Route Print
C7SLI - CCS SS7 Signaling Link Initiate
C7SLC - CCS SS7 Signaling Link Change
C7SLE - CCS SS7 Signaling Link End
C7SLP - CCS SS7 Signaling Link Print
6.6.1
C7LSI – CCS SS7 Link Set Initiate
Synopsis
This command is used to initiate the SS7 link set (LS) between the point code of the unit, the Originating
Point Code (OPC), and an adjacent point code, the Destination Point Code (DPC). The user should specify the
maximum number of links in the link set (LSSIZE), the SS7 Signaling mode (SS7MD), which identifies the
point code size and mode of operation, and the Network Context (NC) the link set exists within.
See Section 7.2, “Signaling Configuration” on page 137 for a more detailed description of the SS7 Signaling
configuration.
This command is used to initiate the SS7 link set. Note that the DPC (Destination Point Code) is the adjacent
Point Code for the link set.
Syntax
C7LSI:LS=,OPC=,DPC=,LSSIZE=,NI=,SS7MD=,NC=,;
Prerequisites
•
•
The SS7 link set has not already been initiated.
•
•
•
•
The NC/DPC combination must be different for all link sets.
The SS7MD associated with a NC cannot be different to an SS7MD associated with the same NC
anywhere else in the system.
If SS7MD indicates 14-bit Point Code, OPC and DPC must be less than or equal to 16383.
If SS7MD indicates 16-bit Point Code, OPC and DPC must be less than or equal to 65535.
Only one OPC can exist within a network context.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
C7LSI:LS=1,NC=1,OPC=1,DPC=2,LSSIZE=2,SS7MD=ITU14,NI=0;
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Chapter 6 Command Definitions
6.6.2
C7LSC – CCS SS7 Link Set Change
Synopsis
This command allows changes to the configuration of an SS7 link set.
Syntax
C7LSC:LS=,{[OPC=,][DPC=,][LSSIZE=,][NC=,][NI=,]};
Prerequisites
•
•
The SS7 link set has already been initiated.
All configured SS7 links must be blocked.
Note: After blocking, an SS7 link cannot be unblocked until all the boards processing the SS7 signaling
are blocked and then unblocked.
•
•
•
•
•
•
The LSSIZE cannot be set to less than the number of links attached to the link set.
DPC must be different across link sets.
If SS7MD indicates a 14-bit Point Code, OPC and DPC must be less than or equal to 16383.
Only one OPC can exist within a network context.
The NC/DPC combination must be different for all link sets.
The NC/OPC combination must be different for all link sets.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
C7LSC:LS=1,OPC=1,DPC=2,LSSIZE=2;
6.6.3
C7LSE – CCS SS7 Link Set End
Synopsis
This command is used to end the SS7 link set.
Syntax
C7LSE:LS=;
Prerequisites
•
•
There should be no signaling links attached to the link set.
All configured SS7 links within the system must be blocked.
Note: After blocking, an SS7 link cannot be unblocked until all the boards processing the SS7 signaling
are blocked and then unblocked.
•
There are no C7 Routes using this link set.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
C7LSE:LS=1;
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Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
6.6.4
C7LSP – CCS SS7 Link Set Print
Synopsis
This command obtains a printout of the attributes for the SS7 link set. If no link is specified, the values for all
link sets are shown.
Syntax
C7LSP:[LS=,];
Prerequisites
None
Attributes
None
Examples
C7LSP;
Output Format
CCS SS7 Link Set
LS
NC
OPC
1
1
1
2
2
2
EXECUTED
6.6.5
DPC
3
4
NI
2
0
LSSIZE
2
2
SS7MD
ITU14
ANSI
C7RTI – CCS SS7 Route Initiate
Synopsis
This command is used to initiate an SS7 Route (C7RT) to a Destination Point Code (DPC) within a Network
Context (NC). An SS7 Route utilizes one (LS1) or two (LS2) link sets which route via adjacent point codes to
reach the eventual destination (DPC).
On a per network context basis, a default MTP route may be specified. On a per network context basis, traffic
for all point codes not known to the Gateway are routed to the default route. A default route can be specified
by setting the DPC value on the route to DFLT.
See Section 7.2, “Signaling Configuration” on page 137 for a more detailed description of the SS7 signaling
configuration.
Syntax
C7RTI:C7RT=,DPC=,LS1=,NC=,[LS2=,][LSH=,][LABEL=,];
Prerequisites
•
•
•
•
The NC must be the same as the NC of the underlying link sets.
•
•
Only one default Route can be configured per Network Context.
The DPC/NC combination must be unique.
The link set specified has already been initiated.
If the route is to an adjacent point code, then all links in the linkset to that point code must be either
inhibited or blocked.
If a default route is specified, a network context cannot be configured with a DPC of 0.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
C7RTI:C7RT=1,LS1=1,DPC=130,LABEL=ROUTE130;
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Chapter 6 Command Definitions
6.6.6
C7RTC – CCS SS7 Route Change
Synopsis
This command is used to change the attributes of an SS7 Route. The DPC parameter in this command
supports an extra value ‘DFLT’. When a route is specified as default, messages destined for DPCs within the
network context that have not been configured by the system is sent to the default route.
Syntax
C7RTC:C7RT=,NC=,[DPC=,][LS1=,][LS2=,][LSH=,][LABEL=,];
Prerequisites
•
•
•
•
•
•
If specified, LS2 must have same SS7MD, NI, NC, and OPC as LS1.
•
•
Only one default route can be configured per network context.
If specified, LS1 must have same SS7MD, NI, NC, and OPC as LS2.
The specified route has already been initiated.
Any link set specified has already been initiated.
The DPC/NC combination (associated with the route’s link sets) must be different for each route.
If changing any parameter other than the LABEL, all SS7 signaling links must be blocked.
Note: After blocking, an SS7 link cannot be unblocked until all the boards processing the SS7 signaling
are blocked and then unblocked.
If a default route is specified, a network context cannot be configured with a DPC of 0.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
C7RTC:C7RT=1,NC=1,LS1=2;
6.6.7
C7RTE – CCS SS7 Route End
Synopsis
This command is used to end an SS7 Signaling Route.
Syntax
C7RTE:C7RT=,NC=;
Prerequisites
•
All SS7 signaling links must be blocked.
Note: After blocking an SS7 link cannot be unblocked until all the boards processing the SS7 signaling
are blocked and then unblocked.
•
The specified route and NC combination has already been initiated.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
C7RTE:C7RT=1,NC=1;
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6.6.8
C7RTP – CCS SS7 Route Print
Synopsis
This command shows the attributes of the specified SS7 Route or range of routes within a network context.
If no route or network context is specified, the values for all routes are shown.
Syntax
C7RTP;
C7RTP:NC=;
C7RTP:C7RT=,NC=;
Prerequisites
None
Attributes
None
Examples
C7RTP;
Output Format
CCITT SS7 Signaling
C7RT
NC DPC
1
1 2
2
1 3
3
1 DFLT
1
2 66
EXECUTED
6.6.9
Route Configuration
LS1
LS2
LSH
1
3
Y
2
4
N
5
N
12
13
N
LABEL
LONDON
EDINBURGH
DEFAULT
BATH
C7SLI – CCS SS7 Signaling Link Initiate
Synopsis
This command is used to initiate a SS7 Signaling Link (C7LINK).
The command allows the user to specify the signaling processor (EQU), Signaling Timeslot (TS) as well as
which SS7 linkset (LS) the link belongs to. The user may alternatively specify an M2PA SIGTRAN link
(SNLINK) instead of a processor and timeslot for communication of SS7 information. This command is also
used to configure HSL links.
See Section 7.2, “Signaling Configuration” on page 137 for a more detailed description of the SS7 signaling
configuration.
Syntax
C7SLI:C7LINK=,LS=,SLC=,EQU=,TS=,[M56K=,][PCR=,];
C7SLI:C7LINK=,LS=,SLC=,SNLINK=;
C7SLI:C7LINK=,LS=,SLC=,EQU=, M56K=,[PCR=,];
Prerequisites
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
The specified link has not already been initiated.
The specified PCM time slot is not already assigned elsewhere in the system.
The PCM on which the timeslot exists has been initiated.
The board on which the EQU exists has been initiated.
The timeslot is a valid timeslot for the PCM type (up to 31 for an E1 PCM and 24 for a T1 PCM).
The signaling processor specified by the EQU parameter must be equipped with a valid board type and
not already assigned to a link.
The link set has already been initiated.
The board position specified by EQU must be blocked.
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Chapter 6 Command Definitions
•
If M56K is set to 3 or 4, the TS cannot be specified and if M56K is not set to 3 or 4, EQU must be
specified.
•
•
•
•
•
•
Only EQU signaling processors 1 and 2 can be used if M56K is 3 or 4.
If an SNLINK is present, the EQU, TS, M56K and PCR cannot be present.
If an SNLINK is specified, its SNTYPE must be M2PA.
If an SNLINK is specified, it must be initiated, blocked and cannot be associated with any other SS7 link.
Either a SNLINK or EQU must be present.
SS7 links can use signaling processors 1 to 4 on a Dialogic® DSI SPCI4 or SPCI2S Network Interface
Board or 1 to 64 on a Dialogic® DSI SS7HDP Network Interface Board.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
C7SLI:C7LINK=4,EQU=3-1,TS=3-3-17,LS=1,SLC=5;
C7SLI:C7LINK=5,SNLINK=1,LS=2,SLC=0;
C7SLI:C7LINK=2,EQU=1-33,TS=1-2-0,LS=1,SLC=1,M56K=0,HSL=Y
6.6.10
C7SLC – CCS SS7 Signaling Link Change
Synopsis
This command is used to change the attributes of an SS7 signaling link.
Syntax
C7SLC:C7LINK=,{[EQU=,][SNLINK=,][TS=,][M56K=,][PCR=,]};
Prerequisites
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
The specified link has already been initiated.
The specified PCM time slot is not already assigned elsewhere in the system.
The PCM on which the timeslot exists has been initiated.
If specified, the board on which the EQU exists has been initiated.
If specified, the PCM on which the timeslot exists has been initiated.
The timeslot is a valid timeslot number for the PCM type (up to 31 for a E1 PCM and 24 for a T1 PCM).
The signaling processor specified by the EQU parameter must be equipped with a valid board type and
not already assigned to a link.
•
•
All links within the link set must be blocked.
•
If M56K is set to either 1 or 2, all links on the same board for which M56K is set to 1 or 2 must also use
the same M56K value (that is, only one mode of 56kbits/s operation is supported on any board at one
time. However, it is possible for some links to operate at 64kbits/s, while others operate at 56kbits/s).
•
The signaling processor specified by the EQU parameter must be equipped with a valid board type and
not already assigned to a link.
•
All links within the link set must be blocked.
If the EQU, PCR or M56K parameters are specified the link must be blocked and C7 links EQU board must
be blocked. To change the other parameters on the C7 link, the link must be inhibited.
Note: After blocking, an SS7 link cannot be unblocked until all the boards processing the SS7 signaling
are blocked and then unblocked.
84
•
If the EQU, PCR or M56K parameters are specified, the link must be blocked and the C7 link’s EQU board
must be blocked. To change the other parameters on the C7 link, the link must be inhibited.
•
If M56K is set to 3 or 4, the TS cannot be specified and if M56K is not set to 3 or 4, the EQU must be
specified.
•
•
Only EQU signaling processors 1 and 2 can be used if M56K is 3 or 4.
If an SNLINK is present, the EQU, TS, M56K and PCR cannot be present.
Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
•
•
•
•
If an SNLINK is specified, it’s SNTYPE must be M2PA.
If an SNLINK is specified, it must be initiated, blocked and cannot be associated with any other SS7 link.
The command cannot change between SNLINK and EQU type C7LINKs.
SS7 links can use signaling processors 1 to 4 on a Dialogic® DSI SPCI4 or SPCI2S Network Interface
Board or 1 to 64 on a Dialogic® DSI SS7HDP Network Interface Board.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
C7SLC:C7LINK=4,EQU=2-3,TS=3-3-16,M56K=1;
6.6.11
C7SLE – CCS SS7 Signaling Link End
Synopsis
This command is used to end an SS7 signaling link.
Syntax
C7SLE:C7LINK=;
Prerequisites
•
•
The signaling link must be blocked.
The signaling link must not be monitored.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
C7SLE:C7LINK=1;
6.6.12
C7SLP – CCS SS7 Signaling Link Print
Synopsis
This command is used to obtain a printout of the attributes of SS7 signaling link(s). If no link is specified, all
initialized links are output.
Syntax
C7SLP:[C7LINK=…];
Prerequisites
None
Attributes
None
Examples
C7SLP:C7LINK=1;
C7SLP;
Output Format
Signaling Link Configuration
C7LINK EQU
TS
SNLINK
1
1-1
1-3-16
2
1-2
2-3-16
3
1
4
2
EXECUTED
LS
1
1
2
2
SLC
0
1
0
1
M56K
0
0
0
0
PCR
N
N
N
N
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Chapter 6 Command Definitions
6.7
IP Commands
The IP commands include:
•
•
•
•
•
IPEPS - Set Ethernet Port Configuration
IPEPP - Display Ethernet Port Configuration
IPGWI - Internet Protocol Gateway Initiate
IPGWE - Internet Protocol Gateway End
IPGWP - Internet Protocol Gateway Print
6.7.1
IPEPS – Set Ethernet Port Configuration
Synopsis
This command is used to configure Ethernet ports.
The SGW supports resilient IP connectivity when the user configures a team of two ports in an active/
standby role. Three IP bonding teams can be created from the six ethernet ports available. A bonding team,
assigned a single IP address, consists of a primary (active) port and a secondary (standby) port. The
secondary port IP address should be set to one of the following values:
•
•
•
•
•
•
STANDBY1 - The configured IP address acts as the standby port in a team with ETH1.
STANDBY2 - The configured IP address acts as the standby port in a team with ETH2.
STANDBY3 - The configured IP address acts as the standby port in a team with ETH3.
STANDBY4 - The configured IP address acts as the standby port in a team with ETH4.
STANDBY5 - The configured IP address acts as the standby port in a team with ETH5.
STANDBY6 - The configured IP address acts as the standby port in a team with ETH6.
Syntax
IPEPS:ETH=, {[SPEED=,] [IPADDR=,][SUBNET=,] [SCTP=]};
Prerequisites
None.
Limitations
Up to 2 IP ports configured with an IP address may be associated with SCTP.
Attributes
CONFIG.
Examples
IPEPS:ETH=1,SPEED=100;
IPEPS:ETH=2,IPADDR=123.124.125.126,SCTP=Y;
IPEPS:ETH=3,IPADDR=100.1.1.10,SUBNET=255.255.1.1;
IPEPS:ETH=4,IPADDR=STANDBY2;
The SCTP parameter indicates that the port can be used for SCTP communication.
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6.7.2
IPEPP – Display Ethernet Port Configuration
Synopsis
This command displays the Ethernet port configuration. An Ethernet port speed displayed with an H indicates
it is half-duplex, otherwise it is full-duplex.
Syntax
IPEPP;
Prerequisites
None.
Attributes
None.
Examples
IPEPP;
Output Format
<ipepp;
ETH SPEED
1
AUTO
2
AUTO
3
AUTO
4
AUTO
EXECUTED
IPADDR
172.28.148.109
200.2.2.1
0.0.0.0
0.0.0.0
6.7.3
SUBNET
255.255.255.0
255.255.255.0
255.255.255.0
255.255.255.0
SCTP
Y
Y
Y
N
IPGWI – Internet Protocol Gateway Initiate
Synopsis
This command allows the user to specify a route (IPGW) to a IP network (IPNW) via an IP gateway
(GATEWAY) for a range of IP addresses within that network as defined by a network mask (MASK).
Syntax
IPGWI:IPGW=DEFAULT,GATEWAY=;
IPGWI:IPGW={1..31},MASK=,GATEWAY=,IPNW=;
Prerequisites
•
•
The IP gateway ID has not been initiated.
Two gateways cannot have overlapping IP addresses.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
IPGWI:IPGW=1,MASK=255.255.255.0,GATEWAY=194.192.185.1,
IPNW=128.66.1.0;
IPGWI:IPGW=DEFAULT, GATEWAY=123.124.125.1;
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Chapter 6 Command Definitions
6.7.4
IPGWE – Internet Protocol Gateway End
Synopsis
This command removes an IP route via an IP gateway.
Syntax
IPGWE:IPGW=;
Prerequisites
•
The IP gateway ID has already been initiated.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
IPGWE:IPGW=1,;
6.7.5
IPGWP – Internet Protocol Gateway Print
Synopsis
This command prints out routes via IP gateways.
Syntax
IPGWP:[IPGW=];
Prerequisites
•
If specified, the gateway ID should already have been initiated.
Attributes
None
Examples
IPGWP;
Output Format
IP Gateway Configuration
IPGW MASK
GATEWAY
IPNW
1
255.255.255.0
143.123.202.122 128.66.1.0
2
255.255.255.0
111.155.153.111 143.44.174.0
EXECUTED
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6.8
MML Commands
The MML commands include:
•
•
•
•
•
MMLOI - MML Log Off Initiate
MMLOP - MML Log Off Print
MMLOS - MML Log Off Set
MMPTC - MML Port Change
MMPTP - MML Port Print
6.8.1
MMLOI – MML Log Off Initiate
Synopsis
This command ends the current logon session and allows a new session to be used on the port. It does not
affect other MML sessions.
Syntax
MMLOI;
Prerequisites
This command ends the current logon session and allows a new session to be used on the port. It does not
affect other MML sessions.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
MMLOI;
6.8.2
MMLOP – MML Log Off Print
Synopsis
This command prints the current logon time-out parameters.
Syntax
MMLOP:[PORT=];
Prerequisites
None
Attributes
None
Examples
MMLOP;
MMLOP:PORT=1;
Output Format
Log on timeouts
PORT
TLO TLOW
1
30
25
2
25
20
3
25
30
4
25
35
EXECUTED
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Chapter 6 Command Definitions
6.8.3
MMLOS – MML Log Off Set
Synopsis
This command sets the current log-on time-out (TLO) and timeout warning (TLOW) parameters. If TLOW is
set to zero, the automatic time-out is disabled. If port (PORT) is omitted, the command applies to all ports.
Syntax
MMLOS:{[TLO=,][TLOW=,]}[PORT=,];
Prerequisites
None
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
MMLOS:TLO=35;
MMLOS:TLOW=19;
6.8.4
MMPTC – MML Port Change
Synopsis
This command sets the data input/output parameters for serial and telnet data ports.
Note: Only serial port 2 (COM2) is accessible by the user.
Syntax
MMPTC:PORT=,{[BAUD=,][DBITS=,][PARITY=,][SBITS=,][LINES=,][PTMODE=,]};
Prerequisites
•
•
No user must be logged on to the port affected.
For the telnet ports, only the LINES parameter can be changed.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
MMPTC:PORT=2,BAUD=300;
MMPTC:PORT=2,SBITS=2;
6.8.5
MMPTP – MML Port Print
Synopsis
This command gives a printout of the attributes of the serial port. Where the PORT parameter is omitted, the
printout is provided for all ports. The connected port executing this command is marked with a “*”.
Note: Only serial port 2 (COM2) is accessible by the user.
Syntax
MMPTP[:PORT=];
Prerequisites
None
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Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
Attributes
None
Examples
MMPTP:PORT=1;
MMPTP;
Output Format
Serial Port Configuration
PORT
BAUD
DBITS
SBITS
PARITY
LINES
PTMODE
CONNECTED
1
2
NONE
EVEN
20
8
DTRDSR
NONE
*
3
25
TELNET
4
EXECUTED
25
TELNET
9600
1200
8
7
1
2
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Chapter 6 Command Definitions
6.9
Maintenance Commands
The maintenance commands include:
•
•
•
•
•
MNBLI - Maintenance Blocking Initiate
MNBLE - Maintenance Blocking End
MNINI - Maintenance Inhibit Initiate
MNINE - Maintenance Inhibit End
MNRSI - Maintenance Restart System Initiate
6.9.1
MNBLI – Maintenance Blocking Initiate
Synopsis
This command initiates blocking for boards, signaling links, remote data centers, SIGTRAN links and
SIGTRAN Application Servers. A blocking command removes from use the board, link, route or server
covered by the command, it also removes their configuration data from the lower levels of the Signaling
Gateway and only configuration management maintains knowledge of their existence.
Possible grouping are:
•
•
•
•
•
SS7 signaling links
Boards
Remote Data Centers (RDCs)
SIGTRAN signaling links
SIGTRAN Remote Application Servers
If the grouping being blocked is already in the blocked state, no action is taken.
If a C7 link has been inhibited, the inhibiting is removed as part of the blocking action.
Syntax
MNBLI:C7LINK=…;
MNBLI:BPOS=…;
MNBLI:RDC=…;
MNBLI:SNLINK=…;
MNBLI:RAS=…;
Prerequisites
•
•
•
The item being blocked has been initiated.
•
An SNLINK of SNTYPE M2PA can only be blocked if its associated C7LINK is either blocked or inhibited.
When blocking a board, all SS7 links on the board must already be blocked.
If this is the last RDC to be blocked, then it cannot be blocked until all continuous records and periodic
reports are ended.
Attributes
CONFIG,PROMPT
Examples
MNBLI:SNLINK=12;
MNBLI:C7LINK=4;
Output Format
Blocking C7LINK 1
Blocking C7LINK 2
EXECUTED
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6.9.2
MNBLE – Maintenance Blocking End
Synopsis
This command ends the blocked condition of boards, signaling links, remote data centers, SIGTRAN links and
SIGTRAN Application Servers and brings them into service. The command restores configuration data to the
lower levels of the Signaling Gateway and brings the timeslots into service. Possible groupings are:
•
•
•
•
•
SS7 signaling links
Boards
Remote Data Centers (RDCs)
SIGTRAN signaling links
SIGTRAN Application Servers
Note: If an RDC has previously been blocked but a file transfer was already in progress, subsequent
MNBLE commands which use that RDC fail with “NO SYSTEM RESOURCES” until the file transfer
is complete.
Syntax
MNBLE:C7LINK=…;
MNBLE:BPOS=…;
MNBLE:RDC=…;
MNBLE:SNLINK=…;
MNBLE:RAS=…;
Prerequisites
•
•
The item being unblocked has been initiated and is currently blocked.
•
An SS7 link with a signaling processor (EQU) cannot be unblocked until all the boards processing the SS7
signaling are blocked and then unblocked.
•
An SS7 link cannot be unblocked if it is on a C7 route that has more than one link set and those link sets
have either different OPCs, SS7MDs, NCs or NIs.
•
•
•
An RAS cannot be unblocked unless it has a SNLINK attached.
•
All the underlying SNLINKs of a RAS must have a mapping of an NA into an NC or a default NC matching
the RAS NC.
•
•
A C7LINK cannot be unblocked if an associated SNLINK is blocked.
•
If the M3UASHARE parameter is blank only M3UA links or only M2PA links can be unblocked. If
M3UASHARE has a value between 1-99 then all SIGTRAN links types can be unblocked.
When unblocking an SS7 link with a signaling processor (EQU), both the board containing the signaling
processor and the board containing the signaling timeslot must already be unblocked.
An M3UA SNLINK must have a default NC or a mapping of an NA into an NC.
An M3UA SNLINK must have a mapping of an NA into an NC or a default NC matching the RAS NC the
SNLINK is attached to.
A network facing M2PA C7LINK can only be unblocked if the Signaling Gateway is licensed for M2PA
operation.
Note: M2PA can be used for DUAL operation without a license.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
MNBLE:C7LINK=4;
Output Format
Unblocking C7LINK 1
EXECUTED
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Chapter 6 Command Definitions
6.9.3
MNINI – Maintenance Inhibit Initiate
Synopsis
This command initiates the inhibiting of SS7 signaling. When specified without the INH parameter, the C7
signaling link is deactivated and no further signaling is allowed. When specified with INHIBIT =Y, the SS7 link
inhibit message is sent over the signaling link. The command is also used to deactivate a hard disk drive
prior to removal.
Important: In order to maintain RAID array hard disk drive integrity, you should follow the correct
procedure detailed in Section 7.7, “Hard Disk Management” on page 146.
Syntax
MNINI {[:C7LINK=,] [INHIBIT=,] [DRIVE=,]};
Prerequisites
•
•
When specified without the INHIBIT parameter, the SS7 links have been initiated and are uninhibited.
The disk drive must be active and not in the 'RESTARTING' state.
Attributes
CONFIG, PROMPT
Examples
MNINI:C7LINK=5;
MNINI:DRIVE=1;
Output Format
Inhibiting C7LINK 23
Inhibiting C7LINK 31
EXECUTED
6.9.4
MNINE – Maintenance Inhibit End
Synopsis
This command ends the inhibiting of C7 links. The C7 link is activated and signaling is allowed to proceed.
When specified without the INHIBIT parameter, the C7 signaling link is activated and signaling is allowed to
proceed. When specified with INHIBIT =N, the SS7 link uninhibit message is sent over the signaling link. The
command is also used to activate a previously deactivated hard disk drive.
Important: In order to maintain RAID array hard disk drive integrity, you should follow the correct
procedure detailed in Section 7.7, “Hard Disk Management” on page 146.
Syntax
MNINE {[C7LINK=,] [INHIBIT=,] [DRIVE=,]};
Prerequisites
•
•
When specified without the INHIBIT parameter, the SS7 links have been initiated and are inhibited.
The disk drive must be in the ‘INACTIVE’ state.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
MNINE:C7LINK=5;
MNINE:DRIVE=1;
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Output Format
Uninhibiting C7LINK 23
Uninhibiting C7LINK 31
EXECUTED
6.9.5
MNRSI – Maintenance Restart System Initiate
Synopsis
This command restarts the entire system. All current logon sessions are terminated.
If a software update disk is present on a CD or USB, then the software update procedure commences.
If no software update disk is present, but a CD or USB containing a configuration dump is present, this
configuration is loaded into memory and the system restarts.
In all other cases, no change to the system configuration occurs and the state of all links is automatically
restored.
If RESET is set to Y, all configuration data is removed.
If SYSTYPE is set, the systems operating mode changes after restart. Possible operation modes are:
•
•
•
DSC – Digital Signaling Conveter
SGW – SIGTRAN Signaling Gateway
SIU – Signaling Interface Unit
Syntax
MNRSI:[RESTART=,][RESET=Y,][SYSTYPE=,];
Prerequisites
•
SYSTYPE can only be set to system types that have been licensed for the unit. See the CNSYP command.
Attributes
PROMPT
Examples
MNRSI;
MNRSI:RESET=Y;
MNRSI:SYSTYPE=SGW;
MNRSI:RESTART=SOFT;
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Chapter 6 Command Definitions
6.10
Measurement Commands
The measurement commands include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
MSC7P - Measurements SS7 Print
MSEPP - Measurement Ethernet Port Print
MSLCP - Measurement of License Capability Print
MSPCP - Measurements PCM Print
MSSLP - Measurements SIGTRAN Link Print
MSSYP - Measurements System Print
6.10.1
MSC7P – Measurements SS7 Print
Synopsis
This command prints traffic measurements for SS7 signaling links. The measurements are cumulative
between system startup and the next time the measurements are reset.
The fields have the following meanings:
•
•
•
C7LINK - SS7 signaling Link.
OOSDUR - Duration that the link was not in service. This field is not currently supported.
RXNACK - Number of negative acknowledgements received.
Note: RXNACK is not applicable for M2PA SS7 links and is set to 0. See the MSSLP command
description for SNLINK measurements.
•
•
•
•
•
RXMSU - Number of message signaling units octets received.
RXOCT - Number of SIF and SIO octets received.
TXMSU - Number of message signaling units octets transmitted.
TXOCT - Number of SIF and SIO octets transmitted.
RTXOCT - Octets retransmitted.
Note: RTXOCT is not applicable for M2PA SS7 links and is set to 0. See the MSSLP command description
for SNLINK measurements.
•
•
NCONG - Congestion counter.
•
•
•
•
•
•
ALIGN - Number of failed signaling link alignment attempts
PERIOD - Time since measurements on the route were last reset. Specified in hours, minutes and
seconds.
SUERR - Number of signal units in error
TBUSY - Duration of local busy condition
TCONG - Duration of link congestion
NDISCARD - Number of MSUs discarded due to congestion
NEVENT - Number of congestion events leading to MSU discard
Syntax
MSC7P:[PAGE=,][C7LINK=,][RESET=,];
Prerequisites
•
96
If specified, the SS7 signaling link must be initiated and unblocked.
Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
Attributes
None
Examples
MSC7P:C7LINK=1;
MSC7P;
Output Format
SS7 Link Traffic Measurements (Page 1 of 2)
C7LINK OSSDUR RXNACK RXMSU RXOCT TXMSU
TXOCT
1
0
0
188
4136
188
4136
2
0
0
188
4136
188
4136
3
0
0
0
0
0
0
EXECUTED
RTXOCT
0
0
0
SS7 Link Traffic Measurements (Page 2 of 2)
C7LINK ALIGN SUERR TBUSY TCONG NDISCARD
1
0
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
0
3
92
0
0
0
0
EXECUTED
PERIOD
00:46:39
00:46:39
00:46:39
6.10.2
NEVENT
0
0
0
NCONG
0
0
0
PERIOD
00:46:39
00:46:39
00:46:39
MSEPP – Measurement Ethernet Port Print
Synopsis
This command prints the traffic measurements for each Ethernet port on the system taken over a period of
time. The meaning of each field in the output is as follows:
The meaning of each field in the output is as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
ETH - Ethernet port number.
RXKBTYE - Number of kilobytes of data received (in kilobytes)
RXPKT - Number of packets of data received
RXERR - Number of receive errors detected
RXDROP - Number of received packets dropped by the device driver during the measurement period
TXKBTYE - Number of kilobytes of data transmitted (in kilobytes)
TXPKT - Number of packets of data transmitted
TXERR - Number of transmit errors detected
TXDROP - Number of transmit packets
PERIOD - The period over which the measurement was taken
RXFIFO - The number of FIFO buffer errors received
RXFRAME - The number of packet framing errors received
RXCOMP - The number of compressed packets received
RXMULT - The number of multicast frames received
TXFIFO - The number of FIFO buffer error transmitted
TXCOLLS - The number of collisions detected on the transmit side
TXCARRIER - The number of carrier losses detected on the transmit side
TXCOMP - The number of compressed packets transmitted
Note: Values are reset using the RESET parameter. MSEPP:RESET=Y; resets the measurement values
to 0.
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Chapter 6 Command Definitions
Syntax
MSEPP:[RESET=,][PAGE=,];
Prerequisites
None.
Attributes
None.
Examples
MSEPP:RESET=YES,PAGE=2;
MSEPP;
Output Format
Ethernet Port Measurements (Page
ETH RXKBYTE RXPKT RXERR RXDROP
1
0
0
0
0
2
96324
135705 0
4204E5
3
0
0
0
0
4
3760
3273
0
33615
EXECUTED
1 of 2)
TXKBYTE
0
28169
0
12503
Ethernet Port Measurements (Page
ETH RXFIFO RXFRAME RXCOMP RXMULT
1
0
0
0
0
2
0
0
0
0
3
0
0
0
0
4
0
0
0
0
EXECUTED
2 of 2)
TXFIFO TXCOLLS
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
6.10.3
TXPKT
0
4444
0
3455
TXERR
0
0
0
0
TXDROP
0
0
0
0
TXCARRIER
0
0
0
0
PERIOD
16:34:41
16:34:41
16:34:41
16:34:41
TXCOMP
0
0
0
0
PERIOD
16:34:41
16:34:41
16:34:41
16:34:41
MSLCP – Measurement of License Capability Print
Synopsis
This command prints the traffic measurements for each license on the system capable of supporting
throughput licensing.
The meaning of each field in the output is as follows:
•
CAPABILITY - A licensable capability of the system. This may be a protocol license or an operating
mode license. A capability may have been purchased as a software license, shipped as part of the system
or bundled as part of another license. If a capability is either not active on the system or doesn't provide
measurements then it will not be displayed.
•
•
•
•
•
RXDATA - The amount of data received in Kilobytes during the measurement period.
•
•
•
CONGESTION - The number of times the license has exceeded its throughput threshold.
TXDATA - The amount of data transmitted in Kilobytes during the measurement period.
RXPEAK - The peak received data rate in Kilobytes/s averaged over a rolling thirty second time window.
TXPEAK - The peak transmit data rate in Kilobytes/s averaged over a rolling thirty second time window.
PEAK - The peak data rate for both transmitted and received data in Kilobytes/s averaged over a rolling
thirty second time window
ENFORCEMENT - The number of times the unit has enforced the license throughput limit.
PERIOD - Time since measurements on the route were last reset. Specified in hours, minutes and
seconds.
Note: Values are reset using the RESET parameter. MSEPP:RESET=Y; resets the measurement values
to 0.
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Syntax
MSLCP:[RESET=,];
Prerequisites
None.
Attributes
None.
Examples
MSLCP;
MSLCP:RESET=Y;
Output Format
Software License Capability Traffic Measurements
CAPABILITY RXDATA TXDATA RXPEAK TXPEAK PEAK CONG
M3UA
4204E5 3212E4 154
456
923 1
EXECUTED
6.10.4
ENFORCE PERIOD
1
01:33:33
MSPCP – Measurements PCM Print
Synopsis
This command prints traffic measurements for PCMs. The measurements are cumulative between system
startup and the next time the measurements are reset.
The fields have the following meanings:
•
•
•
•
•
•
PCM - PCM on a board
FMSLIP - Frame Slip count
OUTSYN - Out-sync transitions
ERRSEC - Errored Seconds count
SEVSEC - Severely Errored seconds count
PERIOD - Time since measurements on the route were last reset. Specified in hours, minutes and
seconds
Syntax
MSC7P:[C7LINK=,][RESET=,];
Prerequisites
•
If specified, the PCM must be initiated and on an unblocked board.
Attributes
None
Examples
MSPCP:PCM=5-1;
MSPCP;
Output Format
PCM Traffic Measurements
PCM
FMSLIP OUTSYN ERRSEC
3-3
57
60
23
3-4
12
35
33
4-4
53
55
4
EXECUTED
SEVSEC
1
4
0
PERIOD
23:00:00
01:00:00
01:00:00
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Chapter 6 Command Definitions
6.10.5
MSSLP – Measurements SIGTRAN Link Print
Synopsis
This command prints traffic measurements for SIGTRAN signaling links. The measurements are cumulative
between system startup and the next time the measurements are reset.
The fields have the following meanings:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
SNLINK - SIGTRAN signaling link
RXCK - Number of data chunks received
TXCK - Number of data chunks transmitted
RTXCK - Number of data chunks re-transmitted
NOOS - Number of times a SIGTRAN link has either been aborted or shutdown
OSDUR - Duration that the link was not in service
PERIOD - Time since measurements on the route were last reset. Specified in hours, minutes and
seconds
Syntax
MSSLP:[SNLINK =,][RESET=,];
Prerequisites
•
If specified, the SIGTRAN signaling link must be an initiated and unblocked.
Attributes
None
Examples
MSSLP:SNLINK=1;
MSSLP;
Output Format
SIGTRAN Link Traffic Measurements
SNLINK RXCK TXCK RTXCK OSDUR NOOS
1
54
6330 23
0
0
2
21
12
345
0
0
3
12
53
500
0
0
EXECUTED
6.10.6
PERIOD
05:00:00
05:00:00
05:00:00
MSSYP – Measurements System Print
Synopsis
This command prints out system related measurements for load and congestion taken over a period of time.
The fields in the output have the following meanings:
•
•
NOVLD - The number of periods of congestion (overload) during the measurement period.
•
LOADAVG - The average load on the system (based on the UNIX load average) measurement taken over
the measurement period.
•
PERIOD - The period the measurement was taken over.
MAXLOAD - Maximum load average measurement taken over one minute (based on the UNIX load
average).
Note: Values are reset using the RESET parameter. MSSYP:RESET=Y; resets the measurement values
to 0.
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Syntax
MSSYP:[RESET=,];
Prerequisites
None
Attributes
None
Examples
MSSYP;
Output Format
System Measurements
NOVLD
0
MAXLOAD
28.81%
LOADAVG
2.28%
PERIOD
18:36:55
EXECUTED
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Chapter 6 Command Definitions
6.11
Remote Data Center Commands
The Remote Data Center (RDC) commands include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
RDCRI - Remote Data Center Continuous Record Initiate
RDCRC - Remote Data Center Continuous Record Change
RDCRE - Remote Data Center Continuous Record End
RDCRP - Remote Data Center Continuous Record Print
RDPDI - Remote Data Center Periodic Data Initiate
RDPDE - Remote Data Center Periodic Data End
RDPDP - Remote Data Center Periodic Data Print
RDPRI - Remote Data Center Periodic Report Initiate
RDPRC - Remote Data Center Periodic Report Change
RDPRE - Remote Data Center Periodic Report End
RDPRP - Remote Data Center Periodic Report Print
6.11.1
RDCRI – Remote Data Center Continuous Record Initiate
Synopsis
This command initiates a continuous record collection for which collected data is transferred via Ethernet to a
Remote Data Center (RDC).
The period is the maximum amount of time allowed before the transfer of a block of continuous records must
be performed.
The minimum number of records that must be collected before the transfer of records can be performed
should be specified.
The label is used as the directory name on the Remote Data Center (RDC) that the files are written to.
Syntax
RDCRI:RECORD=,CRTYPE=,PERIOD=,MINREC=,RDC1=,LABEL=,[RDC2=,];
Prerequisites
•
•
•
•
•
•
The record has not already been initiated.
The Signaling Gateway must have an IPADDR.
If the record is an alarm record, an alarm record must not already exist.
RDC1 must already be initiated.
If specified, RDC2 must already be initiated.
If specified, RDC2 must not equal RDC1.
Limitations
•
Before transfer to a RDC can take place, the directory (represented by the label) must exist on the
remote site.
•
PERIOD must be in the range 30 seconds to 30 minutes.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
RDCRI:RECORD=1,CRTYPE=ALARM,PERIOD=00:05:00,MINREC=100,
RDC1=1,LABEL=ALARM;
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6.11.2
RDCRC – Remote Data Center Continuous Record Change
Synopsis
This command changes the parameters for a continuous record collection for which collected data is
transferred via Ethernet to a Remote Data Center (RDC).
The period is the maximum amount of time allowed before the transfer of a block of continuous records must
be performed.
The label is used as the directory name on the RDC that the files are written to.
Syntax
RDCRC:RECORD=,[PERIOD=,][MINREC=,][RDC1=,][RDC2=,][LABEL=];
Prerequisites
•
•
•
•
The record must already be initiated.
If specified, RDC1 must already be initiated.
If specified, RDC2 must already be initiated
If specified, RDC2 must not equal RDC1.
Limitations
•
Before transfer to a RDC can take place, the directory (represented by the label) must exist on the
remote site.
•
PERIOD must be in the range 30 seconds to 30 minutes.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
RDCRC:RECORD=1,PERIOD=00:05:00,MINREC=100,
RDC1=1,LABEL=ALARM;
6.11.3
RDCRE – Remote Data Center Continuous Record End
Synopsis
This command ends a continuous record.
If DISCARD is set to Y, any data associated with the continuous record is discarded. If DISCARD is not set to
Y, and if there is data awaiting transfer, the end continuous record is rejected.
Syntax
RDCRE:RECORD=,[DISCARD=Y];
Prerequisites
•
•
The report has already been initiated.
There is no continuous data associated with the continuous record.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
RDCRE:RECORD=1;
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Chapter 6 Command Definitions
6.11.4
RDCRP – Remote Data Center Continuous Record Print
Synopsis
This command prints data relating to a continuous record for which collected data is transferred to a Remote
Data Center (RDC).
Syntax
RDCRP;
Prerequisites
None
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
RDCRP;
Output Format
Remote Data Centre Continuous Record
RECORD CRTYPE
PERIOD
MINREC RDC1 RDC2 LABEL
1
ALARM
00:05:00
100
2
1
ALARM
EXECUTED
6.11.5
RDPDI – Remote Data Center Periodic Data Initiate
Synopsis
This command attaches an SS7 link (C7LINK), SIGTRAN link (SNLINK) or PCM (PCM) to a periodic report.
Syntax
RDPDI:REPORT=,[C7LINK=|SNLINK=|PCM=];
Prerequisites
•
•
•
•
The report has already been initiated.
The specified SS7 link has already been initiated.
SS7 links can only be specified for MSC7 reports.
An association between the report and the SS7 link has not already been initiated.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
RDPDI:REPORT=1,C7LINK=1&&8;
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6.11.6
RDPDE – Remote Data Center Periodic Data End
Synopsis
This command ends the attachment between an outgoing route and a report.
Syntax
RDPDE:REPORT=,[C7LINK= | SNLINK=| PCM=];
Prerequisites
•
•
The report has already been initiated.
An association between the report and the SS7 link has already been initiated.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
RDPDE:REPORT=1,C7LINK=1;
6.11.7
RDPDP – Remote Data Center Periodic Data Print
Synopsis
This command prints the outgoing routes associated with a periodic data collection report.
The command prints a list of report elements depending on the type of the report.
Syntax
RDPDP:REPORT=;
Prerequisites
•
The periodic report has been initiated.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
RDPDP:REPORT=1;
Output Format
Remote Data Centre Periodic Data
REPORT C7LINK
1
1
1
2
1
3
1
5
1
8
EXECUTED
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Chapter 6 Command Definitions
6.11.8
RDPRI – Remote Data Center Periodic Report Initiate
Synopsis
This command initiates a report collection period for which data is collected and transferred over Ethernet to
a Remote Data Center (RDC).
Reports for outgoing route traffic measurements can be specified.
The label is used as the directory name on the RDC that the files are written to.
The period is the interval between which data is collected. It is rounded to the nearest 5-minute interval.
Data can be added or deleted from the periodic report using the RDPDI or RDPDE commands.
Syntax
RDPRI:REPORT=,PRTYPE=,PERIOD=,LABEL=,RDC1=,[RESET=,][RDC2=,];
Prerequisites
•
•
•
•
The report has not already been initiated.
If specified, RDC2 cannot have the same value as RDC1.
RDC1 must already have been initiated.
If specified, RDC2 must already be initiated.
Limitations
Before transfer to an RDC can take place, the directory (represented by the label) must exist on the remote
site.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
RDPRI:REPORT=1,PRTYPE=MSC7,PERIOD=01:00:00,RDC1=1,LABEL=SS7;
6.11.9
RDPRC – Remote Data Center Periodic Report Change
Synopsis
This command changes parameters relating to a report collection period for which data is collected and
transferred over Ethernet to a Remote Data Center (RDC).
Reports for outgoing route traffic measurements can be specified.
The label is used as the directory name on the RDC that the files are written to.
The period is the interval between which data is collected. It is rounded to the nearest 5 minute interval.
Data can be added or deleted from the periodic report using the RDPDI or RDPDE commands.
Syntax
RDPRC:REPORT=,[PERIOD=,][LABEL=,][RDC1=,][RDC2=,][RESET=,];
Prerequisites
•
•
•
•
106
The report must already be initiated.
If specified, RDC2 cannot have the same value as RDC1.
If specified, RDC1 must already be initiated.
If specified, RDC2 must already be initiated.
Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
Limitations
Before transfer to an RDC can take place, the directory (represented by the label) must exist on the remote
site.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
RDPRC:REPORT=1,PERIOD=01:00:00,RDC1=1,LABEL=SS7;
6.11.10
RDPRE – Remote Data Center Periodic Report End
Synopsis
This command ends a periodic report.
Syntax
RDPRE:REPORT=;
Prerequisites
•
•
The report has already been initiated.
There is no periodic data associated with the periodic report.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
RDPRE:REPORT=1;
6.11.11
RDPRP – Remote Data Center Periodic Report Print
Synopsis
This command prints data relating to a periodic report collection period for which collected data is transferred
to a Remote Data Center (RDC).
Syntax
RDPRP;
Prerequisites
None
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
RDPRP;
Output Format
Remote Data Centre Periodic Report Configuration
REPORT PRTYPE PERIOD
RESET RDC1 RDC2 LABEL
1
MSC7
01:00:00 Y
1
2
SS7
EXECUTED
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Chapter 6 Command Definitions
6.12
Signaling Gateway Commands
The Signaling Gateway commands include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
SGDPI - Signaling Gateway Destination Point Initiate
SGDPC - Signaling Gateway Destination Point Change
SGDPE - Signaling Gateway Destination Point End
SGDPP - Signaling Gateway Destination Point Print
SGIRI - Signaling Gateway Incoming Route Initiate
SGIRC - Signaling Gateway Incoming Route Change
SGIRE - Signaling Gateway Incoming Route End
SGIRP - Signaling Gateway Incoming Route Print
SGRKI - Signaling Gateway Routing Key Initiate
SGRKE - Signaling Gateway Routing Key End
SGRKP - Signaling Gateway Routing Key Print
6.12.1
SGDPI – Signaling Gateway Destination Point Initiate
Synopsis
This command initiates routing to a destination point identified by a routing key or incoming route.
Destination selection either selects an Remote Application Server (RAS) or attempts to route to the MTP or IP
side on a priority basis. If an Application Server is not configured, the Signaling Gateway attempts to find a
route to the Destination Point Code (DPC) of the received message over MTP or IP. The user can configure
whether to route the message via MTP or IP if the Point Code is available over both by setting the RTPRI
parameter.
A destination can either be a route (MTP or IP or a combination of both) or a Application Server. If both MTP
and IP routes are specified, the default priority indicates which route to the Point Code should be selected
first if available. MTPONLY and IPONLY state that no attempt to other domain should be made if the routes
through these domains are unavailable.
Syntax
SGDPI:DEST=,RTPRI=,[LABEL=,];
SGDPI:DEST=,RAS=,[LABEL=,];
Prerequisites
•
•
•
•
•
The destination point has not already been initiated.
An RAS, if specified, must serve only 1 destination.
If an RAS is specified, it must be initialized.
RTPRI cannot be set to NONE if an RAS is not present.
NONE is the only value allowed for RTPRI if an RAS is present.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
SGDPI:DEST=1, RAS=1;
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6.12.2
SGDPC – Signaling Gateway Destination Point Change
Synopsis
This command changes parameters on the Signaling Gateway destination point.
Syntax
SGDPC:DEST=,[RTPRI=,][RAS=,][LABEL=,];
Prerequisites
•
•
•
•
•
•
The destination point has already been initiated.
If an RAS is specified, it must serve only one destination.
If an RAS is specified, it must be initialized.
RTPRI cannot be set to NONE if an RAS is not present.
NONE is the only value allowed for RTPRI if RAS is present.
If an RAS is specified, there cannot be any routing key in the system with a destination to this RAS, not
having or not matching the NC/DPC parameters with the RAS NC/DPC.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
SGDPC:DEST=1, RAS=1;
6.12.3
SGDPE – Signaling Gateway Destination Point End
Synopsis
This command ends a Signaling Gateway destination point.
Syntax
SGDPE:DEST=;
Prerequisites
•
•
The destination ID has already been initiated.
The destination ID is not used elsewhere in the system.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
SGDPE:DEST=1;
6.12.4
SGDPP – Signaling Gateway Destination Point Print
Synopsis
This command prints the configuration of routing parameters on a SS7 Signaling Gateway.
Syntax
SGDPP:[DEST=];
Prerequisites
•
The destination ID has already been initiated.
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Chapter 6 Command Definitions
Attributes
None
Examples
SGDPP;
Output Format
SS7 Routing Key Configuration
DEST RTPRI
RAS LABEL
1
NONE
1
AS1
2
IP
SGW2
3
MTP
DEST3
EXECUTED
6.12.5
SGIRI – Signaling Gateway Incoming Route Initiate
Synopsis
This command initiates an incoming route on a Signaling Gateway. The incoming route is selected by the
network and domain (TDM or SIGTRAN) that a data message came from. The network is specified on an SS7
link set on the TDM side and a SIGTRAN link on the SIGTRAN side.
An incoming route can either go directly to a destination or perform analysis of the received message to
determine a destination. If analysis fails, or the destination determined by analysis is not available, the
incoming route can use the destination associated with it as a default destination.
For RKTAB, DEST, NC, and DOMAIN, a value of “null” is supported. “null” indicates a wildcard value and
means any value. “null” is the default value for an RKTAB/DEST entry.
Note: The value “null” cannot be used for these parameters elsewhere in the system unless explicitly
specified in the command.
Syntax
SGIRI:IR=,[NC=,][DOMAIN=,]{[RKTAB=,][DEST=,]}[LABEL=,];
Prerequisites
•
•
•
•
If specified, the destination index exists.
Either an RKTAB or DEST must exist.
The incoming route does not already exist.
The NC/DOMAIN combination has not already been specified nor does it form a superset or subset of an
existing NC/DOMAIN combination
Note: This check takes into account one or more routing elements marked as a wild card.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
SGIRI:IR=1, DOMAIN=IP,RKI=1;
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6.12.6
SGIRC – Signaling Gateway Incoming Route Change
Synopsis
This command changes the configuration of a Signaling Gateway incoming route.
For RKTAB/DEST, a value of “null” is supported. “null” indicates a wildcard value and means any value. “null”
is the default value for an RKTAB/DEST entry.
Note: The value “null” cannot be used for these parameters elsewhere in the system unless explicitly
specified in the command.
Syntax
SGOPC:IR=,[RKTAB=,][DEST=,][LABEL=];
Prerequisites
•
•
•
•
The incoming route already exists.
If specified, the destination index exists.
The NC/DOMAIN combination has already been initiated.
Either an RKTAB or DEST must exist.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
SGIRC:IR=1,DEST=5;
6.12.7
SGIRE – Signaling Gateway Incoming Route End
Synopsis
This command ends the configuration of a Signaling Gateway incoming route.
Syntax
SGIRE:IR=;
Prerequisites
•
The incoming route already exists.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
SGIRE:IR=1;
6.12.8
SGIRP – Signaling Gateway Incoming Route Print
Synopsis
This command prints the configuration of a Signaling Gateway incoming route.
Syntax
SGIRP:[IR=];
Prerequisites
•
If specified, the IR has already been initiated.
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Chapter 6 Command Definitions
Attributes
None
Examples
SGIRP;
Output Format
Signaling Gateway Incoming Route Configuration
IR NC DOMAIN
RKTAB DEST LABEL
1 1 TDM
1
ORIG1
2 1 SIGTRAN 1
ORIG1
3 2
2
ORIG2
4 3 TDM
3
ORIG3
EXECUTED
6.12.9
SGRKI – Signaling Gateway Routing Key Initiate
Synopsis
This command initiates a routing key or partial routing key to determine a destination identifier. The
destination identifier is then used to select the outgoing destination. The Signaling Gateway compares the
routing keys with a data message in an attempt to find a data match. If a match is found, the destination
identifier is then used to select a route to an eventual destination.
The user can define a number of different tables of routing keys. In the routing model, the incoming route
identifies which routing table to use.
Apart from the routing key index and routing key table, the routing key elements are optional and can be
wildcarded with a null string.
A routing key is defined as a combination of NC//NI/SI/OPC/DPC/BCIC/RANGE.
For DPC, OPC, NI, SI, NC, BCIC and RANGE, a value of “null” is supported. “null” indicates a wildcard value
and means any value. “null” is the default value for a routing key entry.
Note: The value “null” cannot be used for these parameters elsewhere in the system unless explicitly
specified in the command.
Syntax
SGRKI:RKI=,RKTAB=,[NC=,][OPC=,][NI=,][SI=,][DPC=,][RANGE=,BCIC=,]DEST=;
Prerequisites
•
•
The routing key ID has not already been specified.
The routing key combination has not already been specified nor does it form a superset or subset of an
existing routing key.
Note: This check takes into account one or more routing elements marked as a wild card.
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
112
The destination ID has already been initiated.
If SI is set to SCCP, the BCIC/RANGE parameters cannot be specified.
If one of BCIC/RANGE are specified, the other must be specified.
For circuit related keys, the CIC ranges specified for an NC/OPC/NI/DPC combination must not overlap
existing ranges for that combination.
If an OPC or DPC are specified, the NC cannot be wildcarded.
BCIC cannot be negative.
If the routing key has a destination to an RAS, the NC/DPC parameters are required and must match
with the RAS NC/DPC.
Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
SGRKI:RKI=1,RKTAB=,NC=1,OPC=55,DPC=33,DEST=1;
6.12.10
SGRKE – Signaling Gateway Routing Key End
Synopsis
This end configuration of a routing key or a particular subset of routing keys.
Syntax
SGRK:RKI=;
Prerequisites
•
The routing key combination has already been specified.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
SGRKE:RKI=1,NC=1,OPC=55,DPC=33;
6.12.11
SGRKP – Signaling Gateway Routing Key Print
Synopsis
This command prints the configuration of Routing Keys.
Syntax
SGRKP:[RKI=,][RKTAB=,][DEST=,];
Prerequisites
None
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
SGRKP;
Output Format
Routing Key Analysis configuration
RKI RKTAB NC NI SI OPC
DPC
1
1
1 2
2
194
2
1
2 2
2
133
3
1
3 2
1332
BCIC RANGE DEST
0
32
2
3
43
EXECUTED
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Chapter 6 Command Definitions
6.13
SIGTRAN Commands
The SIGTRAN commands include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
SNALI - SIGTRAN Application Server List Initiate
SNALE - SIGTRAN Application Server List End
SNALP - SIGTRAN Application Server List Print
SNRAI - SIGTRAN Remote Application Server Initiate
SNRAE - SIGTRAN Remote Application Server End
SNRAP - SIGTRAN Remote Application Server Print
SNNAI - SIGTRAN Network Appearance Initiate
SNNAE - SIGTRAN Network Appearance End
SNNAP - SIGTRAN Network Appearance Print
SNSLI - SIGTRAN Signaling Link Initiate
SNSLC - SIGTRAN Signaling Link Change
SNSLE - SIGTRAN Signaling Link End
SNSLP - SIGTRAN Signaling Link Print
6.13.1
SNALI – SIGTRAN Application Server List Initiate
Synopsis
This command attaches a list of SIGTRAN links to a Remote Application Server (RAS). The SIGTRAN links
provide the SCTP associations to reach the RAS.
See Section 7.2, “Signaling Configuration” on page 137 for a more detailed description of SIGTRAN signaling
configuration.
Syntax
SNALI:RAS=,SEQ=,SNLINK=;
Prerequisites
•
•
•
•
•
The RAS has already been initiated.
•
•
A SNLINK cannot be attached to more than 32 RASs.
The specified SIGTRAN link has already been initiated.
A SIGTRAN link cannot be specified in more than one hunt sequence position for this server.
The server/hunt sequence combination must not already be initiated.
The SIGTRAN links attached to the server must be M3UA and their peers be able to process RASs (that
is, not act as Signaling Gateways).
The SNTYPE of the SNLINK cannot be M2PA.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
SNALI:RAS=1,SEQ=1,SNLINK=1;
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6.13.2
SNALE – SIGTRAN Application Server List End
Synopsis
This command ends a relationship between an Remote Application Server (RAS) and a SIGTRAN link.
Syntax
SNALE:RAS=,SEQ=;
Prerequisites
•
•
The RAS sequence combination has already be initiated.
The last entry in a list of SIGTRAN links attached to a RAS cannot be removed unless the RAS is blocked.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
SNALE:RAS=,SEQ=;
6.13.3
SNALP – SIGTRAN Application Server List Print
Synopsis
This command reports the relationship between a SIGTRAN Remote Application Server (RAS) and SIGTRAN
links.
Syntax
SNALP;
SNALP:RAS=;
SNALP:SNLINK=;
Prerequisites
•
The server/hunt sequence combination has already be initiated.
Attributes
None
Examples
SNALP;
Output Format
Application Server List Configuration
RAS
RAS LABEL SEQ SNLINK SNLINK LABEL
1
AS1
1
1
ASP1
1
AS1
2
2
ASP2
2
AS2
1
3
ASP3
EXECUTED
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Chapter 6 Command Definitions
6.13.4
SNRAI – SIGTRAN Remote Application Server Initiate
Synopsis
This command initiates an adjacent Remote Application Server (RAS). A RAS is a logical entity representing
an SS7 end point that can process either circuit-related or non circuit-related signaling. The end point is
represented by a routing context which uniquely identifies a routing key combination of SIO/DPC/OPC and
CIC range.
See Section 7.2, “Signaling Configuration” on page 137 for a more detailed description of SIGTRAN signaling
configuration.
Syntax
SNRAI:RAS=,DPC=,RC=,NC=,[PCMD=,][NASP=,][LABEL=,];
Prerequisites
•
•
•
•
The RAS has not already been initiated.
No other RAS can use the routing context.
No more than 32 RASs can be configured with the same DPC/NC combination.
All RASs within the same DPC/NC combination must have the same PCMD value.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
SNRAI:RAS=1,DPC=555,RC=1,NC=1;
6.13.5
SNRAE – SIGTRAN Remote Application Server End
Synopsis
This command ends a Remote Application Server (RAS).
Syntax
SNRAE:RAS=;
Prerequisites
•
•
•
•
The server has already be initiated.
There are no SIGTRAN links attached to the server.
The server is not part of a destination.
The server must be blocked.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
SNRAE:RAS=1;
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6.13.6
SNRAP – SIGTRAN Remote Application Server Print
Synopsis
This command prints information relating to a SIGTRAN Remote Application Server (RAS).
Syntax
SNRAP:[RAS=];
Prerequisites
•
If specified, the RAS has already be initiated.
Attributes
None
Examples
SNRAP;
Output Format
SIGTRAN Application Server Configuration
RAS DPC
NC RC
PCMD NASP LABEL
1
55
1
5
ANY 0
AS1
2
44
2
44
ANY 2
AS2
EXECUTED
6.13.7
SNNAI – SIGTRAN Network Appearance Initiate
Synopsis
This command initiates a relationship between a Network Context and a Network Appearance on a per
SIGTRAN link basis.
See Section 7.2, “Signaling Configuration” on page 137 for a more detailed description of SIGTRAN signaling
configuration.
Syntax
SNNAI:NC=,SNLINK=,SS7MD=,NA=;
Prerequisites
•
•
The SNLINK has been already initiated.
•
•
•
There is a one-to-one relation between NC and NA on a SNLINK.
The SS7MD associated with the NC cannot be different to a SS7MD associated with a NC anywhere else
in the system.
The NC cannot be the default value for this SNLINK.
The SNTYPE of the SNLINK cannot be M2PA.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
SNNAI:NC=1,SNLINK=1,SS7MD=ITU14,NA=63;
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Chapter 6 Command Definitions
6.13.8
SNNAE – SIGTRAN Network Appearance End
Synopsis
This command ends a relationship between an NC and NA on a per SNLINK basis.
Syntax
SNNAE:SNLINK=,NC=;
Prerequisites
•
•
•
•
•
The NC has already been initiated.
The SNLINK has already been initiated.
There is a configured relationship between NC and NA in this SNLINK.
There are no unblocked RASs using this SNLINK and NC combination.
If the SNLINK is unblocked, there are NA mapping in other Network Contexts for the SNLINK.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
SNNAE:SNLINK=1,NC=1;
6.13.9
SNNAP – SIGTRAN Network Appearance Print
Synopsis
This command gives a printout of the relationship between Network Contexts (NCs) and Network
Appearances (NAs) on a per SNLINK basis.
Syntax
SNNAP:[NC=,][SNLINK=,];
Prerequisites
•
If specified, the NC or SNLINK has already be initiated.
Attributes
None
Examples
SNNAP;
Output Format
SIGTRAN Network Appearances
NC SNLINK SS7MD NA
1
1
ITU14 63
2
2
ITU14 64
EXECUTED
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6.13.10
SNSLI – SIGTRAN Signaling Link Initiate
Synopsis
This command initiates a SIGTRAN link. A SIGTRAN link (SNLINK) provides an SCTP association to an
adjacent Application Server Process or Signaling Gateway specified by one (IPADDR) or two (IPADDR2) IP
addresses as well as the host (HPORT) and peer (PPORT) SCTP port. The user should specify the type of
SIGTYPE link (SNTYPE) and which IP end (END) the Signaling Gateway is acting as.
For M2PA, the SIGTRAN link is associated with a SS7 link by the C7SLI command.
For M3UA, a default SS7 mode (SS7MD) and network context (NC) can be specified. This allows the user to
designate an SS7 format and mode of operation to a link. If the user requires the SNLINK to exist in multiple
networks, the user should not specify a default network context nor an SS7 mode, instead they should
associate it with a Network Appearance using the SNNAI command prior to unblocking.
If two IP addresses are specified, the first IP address is used until it proves unreliable, in which case the
second IP address is used.
When SECURE is set to Y, the SIGTRAN link does not come into service on unblocking if it receives messaging
from a peer that has an IP address not associated with the SIGTRAN link.
Note: Normal operation for M2PA would be to set one end to client and the other end to server. The
signaling gateway provides the ability for both ends to operate as client; however in this case,
the SECURE parameter must be set to Y.
See Section 7.2, “Signaling Configuration” on page 137 for a more detailed description of SIGTRAN signaling
configuration.
Syntax
SNSLI:SNLINK=,SNTYPE=,IPADDR=,END=,[SS7MD=,NC=,]
[IPADDR2=,][HPORT=,][PPORT=,][SRTX=,][LABEL=,][SECURE=,];
Prerequisites
•
•
•
The SIGTRAN link has not already been initiated.
•
•
•
The END can only be Client (C) or Server (S).
•
If the SNTYPE is M2PA, SS7MD, and NC cannot be specified.
An IP address of 0.0.0.0 cannot be specified.
The IPADDR, HPORT, and PPORT combination must not be the same as that of a previously configured
SNLINK.
Both NC and SS7MD parameters must either be present or both parameters must not be present.
The SS7MD associated with an NC cannot be different to a SS7MD associated with the same NC
anywhere else in the system.
Limitations
None
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
SNSLI:SNLINK=1,SNTYPE=SGM3UA,END=S, IPADDR=193.112.111.123;
SNSLI:SNLINK=2,SNTYPE=M2PA,END=C,IPADDR=193.112.111.123,
IPADDR2=192.112.111.123;;
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Chapter 6 Command Definitions
6.13.11
SNSLC – SIGTRAN Signaling Link Change
Synopsis
This command changes parameters on a SIGTRAN link. A SIGTRAN link provides an SCTP association to an
adjacent SIGTRAN server.
If two IP addresses are specified, the first IP address is used until it proves unreliable in which case the
second is used.
An IP address of 0.0.0.0 indicates that the parameter is not configured.
When SECURE is set to Y, the SIGTRAN link does not come into service on unblocking if it receives messaging
from a peer that has an IP address not associated with the SIGTRAN link.
Note: Normal operation for M2PA would be to set both ends to client.
Syntax
SNSLC:SNLINK=,END=,[IPADDR=,][IPADDR2=,][HPORT=]
[PPORT=,][SRTX=,][LABEL=,][SECURE=,];
Prerequisites
•
•
The SIGTRAN link has already been initiated and is blocked.
The END can only be Client (C) or Server (S).
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
SNSLC:SNLINK=1, PPORT=2905;
6.13.12
SNSLE – SIGTRAN Signaling Link End
Synopsis
This command ends the configuration of parameters on a SIGTRAN signaling link.
Syntax
SNSLE:SNLINK=;
Prerequisites
•
•
•
•
The SIGTRAN link has already been initiated and is blocked.
The SIGTRAN link cannot be ended if it is attached to a Remote Application Server (RAS).
There cannot be any NC/NA mapping configured on the SNLINK.
The SNLINK cannot be ended if it is associated with a C7LINK.
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
SNSLE:SNLINK=1;
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6.13.13
SNSLP – SIGTRAN Signaling Link Print
Synopsis
This command prints the configuration of SIGTRAN signaling links.
Syntax
SNSLP:[SNLINK=][PAGE=,];
Prerequisites
•
If specified, the SNLINK link has already been initiated.
Attributes
None
Examples
SNSLP:SNLINK=1;
Output Format
Page 1 of 2 SIGTRAN Signaling Link Configuration
SNLINK SNTYPE SG END NC
SS7MD IPADDR
IPADDR2
LABEL
1
SGM3UA
S
1
ITU14 194.192.184.111 194.192.198.120 ASP1
2
SGM3UA
S
2
ANSI 111.143.134.122 111.111.123.100 ASP2
EXECUTED
Page 2 of 2 SIGTRAN Signaling Link Configuration
SNLINK HPORT PPORT SRTX SECURE LABEL
1
2905 2905 2
N
Dual
EXECUTED
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Chapter 6 Command Definitions
6.14
Status Commands
The status commands include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
STALP - Status Alarm Print
STRAP - Status Remote Application Server Print
STBOP - Status Board Print
STCRP - Status C7 Route Print
STC7P - Status C7 Link Print
STDDP - Status Disk Drive Print
STEPP - Status Ethernet Port Print
STIPP - Status IP Print
STLCP - Status Licensing Print
STPCP - Status PCM Print
STRDP - Status Remote Data Center Print
STSLP - Status SIGTRAN Link Print
STSYP - Status System Print
STTPP - Network Time Protocol Status Print
6.14.1
STALP – Status Alarm Print
Synopsis
This command requests an alarm status report summary. The interpretation of the ID field in the listing is
dependent on the alarm type (see Chapter 8, “Alarm Fault Code Listing”).
The fields have the following meanings:
•
•
•
•
•
•
SYS - The number of system alarms
PCM - The number of PCM alarms
SIG - The number of signaling alarms
CLA5 - The number of minor alarms
CLA4 - The number of major alarms
CLA3 - The number of critical alarms
Syntax
STALP;
Prerequisites
None
Attributes
None
Examples
STALP;
Output Format
Alarm Status
SYS PCM SIG CLA5 CLA4 CLA3
1
0
1
2
0
0
EXECUTED
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6.14.2
STRAP – Status Remote Application Server Print
Synopsis
This command provides the status of SIGTRAN servers. It also provides the status of a link when it is serving
the Remote Application Server (RAS).
Definitions of the RAS status:
•
•
•
•
BLOCKED - The RAS is blocked.
AVAILABLE - The RAS is available.
UNAVAILABLE - The RAS is unavailable.
INSUFF_ASP - The RAS is available but it has insufficient ASPs active as configured in SNRAP (only valid
for load sharing).
Definitions of the ASP within the server:
•
•
•
DOWN - The link attached to the server is down.
ACTIVE - The link attached to the server is active.
INACTIVE - The link attached to the server is inactive.
Definitions of TRMD (Traffic Mode):
•
•
•
LS - Load sharing mode
OR - Override mode
BC - Broadcast mode
Syntax
STRAP:[RAS =…];
Prerequisites
None
Attributes
None
Examples
STRAP:RAS=1;
Output Format
Application Server Status
RAS RAS STATUS
SNLINK
1
AVAIlABLE
1
2
AVAILABLE
2
2
AVAILABLE
3
3
BLOCKED
EXECUTED
ASP STATUS
ACTIVE
DOWN
INACTIVE
TRMD ASP ID
LS
LS
LS
RAS LABEL
AS1
AS2
AS2
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Chapter 6 Command Definitions
6.14.3
STBOP – Status Board Print
Synopsis
This command requests a status report of boards on the system. Possible status values are:
•
•
•
•
INACTIVE - The board is not in operation.
RESETTING - The board is undergoing a reset.
ACTIVE - The board is operational.
FAILED - The board has failed and is out of service.
Syntax
STBOP:[BPOS=…];
Prerequisites
•
If specified, the board should have already been initiated.
Attributes
None
Examples
STBOP:BPOS=1;
Output Format
Board Status
BPOS STATUS
Active
Failed
Blocked
EXECUTED
6.14.4
STCRP – Status C7 Route Print
Synopsis
This command shows the status of the specified SS7 route or range of routes within a network context. If no
route or network context is specified, then the values for all routes are shown.
The command indicates whether a route is available or unavailable as well as indicating which routsets within
the route are available or unavailable. The command also provides the congestion state of the route.
Possible ROUTE STATUS values are:
•
•
•
•
Available
Unavailable
Available - The route is available for traffic to the remote point code of the route.
Unavailable - The route is unavailable for traffic to the remote point code of the route.
Possible CONG LEVEL values are:
•
•
0 no congestion
1, 2 or 3 indicating the level of congestion
Possible LS1 STATUS and LS2 STATUS values are:
•
•
Available - The linkset on the route is available for traffic to the adjacent point code.
Unavailable - The linkset on the route is unavailable for traffic to the adjacent point code.
Syntax
STCRP;
STCRP:NC=;
STCRP:C7RT=,NC=;
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Prerequisites
None
Attributes
None
Examples
STCRP;
Output Format
CCITT SS7 Route Status
C7RT NC DPC
ROUTE STATUS CONG LEVEL LS1 STATUS
1
1 1
Available
0
Available
2
1 2
Available
0
Unavailable
64
4 99
Unavailable 0
Unavailable
EXECUTED
6.14.5
LS2 STATUS
LABEL
Available
STC7P – Status C7 Link Print
Synopsis
This command requests a status report of the SS7 signaling links or SS7 link sets.
L2 STATUS - Possible values are:
•
•
•
•
•
•
In service
Out of service
Proc outage
Aligned rdy
Init align
Align not rdy
L3 STATUS - Possible values are:
•
•
•
•
•
Available
Unavailable
Congested
Deactivated (the link has been deactivated)
Blocked (the link is blocked)
L3 BLOCKING STATUS - Possible values are:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
INHR - The link is remotely inhibited
INHL - The link is locally inhibited
BLKR - The link is remotely blocked
COIP - Changeover is in progress
CBIP - Changeback is in progress
LIIP - Local link inhibiting is in progress
LUIP- Local link uninhibiting is in progress
Syntax
STC7P:[PAGE=…][C7LINK=…];
STC7P:[PAGE=…][LS=…];
Prerequisites
None
125
Chapter 6 Command Definitions
Attributes
None
Examples
STC7P;
Output Format
CCS SS7 Signalling Link
C7LINK LS
EQU
1
1
1-3
2
1
1-4
3
2
3-3
4
2
3-4
EXECUTED
Status (Page 1 of 2)
TS
SNLINK L2 STATUS
1-3-16
1-4-16
IN SERVICE
3-3-16
INITIAL ALIGN
3-4-16
OUT OF SERVICE
CCS SS7 Signalling Link
C7LINK L2 STATE
1
2
IN SERVICE
3
INITIAL ALIGN
4
OUT OF SERVICE
EXECUTED
Status (Page
L3 STATE
BLOCKED
AVAILABLE
UNAVAILABLE
DEACTIVATED
6.14.6
2 of 2)
L3 BLOCKING STATUS
---- ---- ---- ------- ---- ---- ------- ---- ---- ------- ---- ---- ----
L3 STATUS
BLOCKED
AVAILABLE
UNAVAILABLE
DEACTIVATED
-------------
---LIIP
-------
-------------
STDDP – Status Disk Drive Print
Synopsis
This command displays the status of all hard disk drives within the RAID array.
Note: This command is not available for the Dialogic® DSI SS7G21 and SS7G22 Signaling Servers.
Syntax
STDDP;
Prerequisites
None.
Attributes
None.
Example
STDDP;
Output Format
STDDP;
Disk Drive Status
DRIVE STATUS
0
UP
1
UP
EXECUTED
The STATUS field will display one of the following values:
126
•
UP – The disk drive is operational. If the disk forms part of a RAID array then all the RAID devices on this
drive are in an 'active sync state'.
•
DOWN– The disk drive is non operational. If the disk forms part of a RAID array then one or more of the
Raid devices on this drive is faulty.
•
RESTARTING – One or more of the raid devices on this drive is synchronizing with another Raid device.
The disk is considered 'non operational' until synchronization is complete.
Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
•
INACTIVE – The drive is not configured as part of the RAID array and therefore is not in use. This may be
due to user action through MMI, the drive not being physically present at startup or a failed drive being
removed by the operating software at startup from the RAID array.
Caution: Before replacing a failed drive, the drive must first be taken out of service using the MNINI
command. Once the replacement drive is in place, the disk can be restored to service using the
MNINE command. See Section 7.7, “Hard Disk Management” on page 146.
6.14.7
STEPP – Status Ethernet Port Print
Synopsis
This command provides the status of Ethernet ports on the system. The parameters output are:
•
•
•
•
•
ETH - The Ethernet port identity.
PARTNER - Identifies the other port member of a port bonding team.
SPEED - The speed of the Ethernet port (10 / 100 / 1000).
DUPLEX - Whether the port is FULL or HALF Duplex.
STATUS - Whether the port is UP or DOWN. If the port is in a team, and it is “up”, the status indicates
instead whether the port is ACTIVE or in STANDBY.
Syntax
STEPP;
Prerequisites
None
Attributes
None
Examples
STEPP;
Output Format
ETH PARTNER
1
2
3
4
4
3
EXECUTED
6.14.8
SPEED DUPLEX STATUS
DOWN
100
FULL
UP
1000 FULL
ACTIVE
1000 FULL
STANDBY
STIPP – Status IP Print
Synopsis
This command sends four ICPM (Internet Control and Management Protocol) Echo Request frames to the
specified remote IP address and measures the maximum round trip time, similar to the standard Unix ping
command. SEND shows the number of frames transmitted. RECV shows the number of replies received and
MAXRTD shows the maximum delay between sending a frame and receiving a reply, in milliseconds. The
measurement is accurate to 10ms, hence any value less than 10ms is displayed as ‘<10’. If the destination
IP address is not reachable, RECV is shown as 0 and MAXTP as ‘-‘.
Syntax
STIPP:IPADDR=;
Prerequisites
None
127
Chapter 6 Command Definitions
Attributes
None
Examples
STIPP:IPADDR=173.132.23.3;
Output Format
IP Status
IPADDR
193.195.185.16
EXECUTED
6.14.9
SEND
4
RECV
4
MAXRTD
20
STLCP – Status Licensing Print
This command prints the status of each license on the system.
The meaning of each field in the output is as follows:
•
CAPABILITY — A licensable capability of the system. This may be a protocol license or an operating mode
license. A capability may have been purchased as a software license, shipped as part of the system or
bundled as part of another license.
•
STATUS — Status of the capability on the system where:
— NONE — This capability is not present. It requires a software license.
— INACTIVE — The license is present but not running for software reasons e.g. The license is for a
different mode of operation or the capability is dependant on another capability that is not active.
— DEACTIVATED — The license is present but not running due to configuration reasons (it has been
user deactivated in CNSYS).
— ACTIVE — The license is active.
— ERROR — This capability cannot be activated as it depends on a software license which his not
present (e.g. TCAP is present but SCCP is not).
— RESTART — The license is present but requires a system restart to allow activation.
— CONGESTED — The throughput congestion level has been reached for the capability.
— ENFORCED — The licensed traffic rate has been exceeded for a extended period and the system is
now limiting traffic to the licensed rate for the capability.
•
•
•
LINKS — The licensed number of links for the capability. Blank means not applicable.
•
CREDIT — The current throughput account credit if applicable. The throughput account credit is
expressed as a % of the maximum account credit.
LICRATE — The licensed throughput rate in Kilobytes/s for the capability. Blank means not applicable.
SHARERATE — the allocated throughput determined by the value of the M3UASHARE parameter. Blank
means that M3UASHARE is also blank.
Note: The maximum account credit is the licensed throughput rate * 30. The throughput account credit
is decremented each time traffic passes through the system. The throughput account is
incremented every second by the value of the licensed throughput rate. If the licensed
throughput is exceeded for a sustained period of time the credit available will drop. When the
credit drops to 50% of the maximum throughput credit a congestion alarm will fire. When the
credit drops to 0% (i.e. there is no credit left) throughput enforcement will occur limiting
throughput to the licensed rate. Throughput enforcement will be maintained until the account
credit returns to 75% or above of the maximum throughput credit.
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Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
Syntax
STLCP;
Prerequisites
None.
Attributes
None.
Examples
STLCP;
Output Format
stlcp;
Software License Capability Status
CAPABILITY
STATUS
LINKS
LICRATE SHARERATE
SIU
INACTIVE
SGW
ACTIVE
DSC
NONE
SCTP
ACTIVE
M2PA
ACTIVE
256
2460
M3UA
ACTIVE
256
2460
MTP
ACTIVE
192
SNMP
DEACTIVATED
EXECUTED
6.14.10
CREDIT
1844
616
75
25
STPCP – Status PCM Print
Synopsis
This command requests a status report of the PCMs. The PCM status is one of the following:
•
•
•
•
OK - Normal operational state
•
AIS - Alarm indication signal. The remote side sends all ones indicating that there is an error condition,
or it is not initialized.
•
•
BER > 1:10^3 - The PCM is encountering a Bit Error Rate (BER) of 10^3.
PCM Loss - No signal sensed on the PCM input
Sync Loss - Loss of frame alignment since no frame synchronization has been received
RAI - Remote alarm indication. The remote end indicates that is it is OK, but also indicates that it is
detecting an error condition.
BER > 1:10^5 - The PCM is encountering a BER of 10^5.
The Clock Status field is one of the following:
•
•
OK - The board is detecting a valid PCM signal which could potentially be used for synchronization.
•
Active - The board is detecting a valid PCM signal which is currently providing synchronization for the
Signaling Gateway.
•
•
Not OK – The input to the board is not currently suitable for use as a synchronization source.
Standby - The board is detecting a valid PCM signal which will be used for synchronization in the event of
failure of the active clock source.
Fault - A fault has been detected on the board which prevents it being used as a synchronization source.
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Chapter 6 Command Definitions
Syntax
STPCP;
Prerequisites
None
Attributes
CONFIG
Examples
STPCP;
Output Format
PCM Status
PCM SYNCPRI
1-3 1
1-4 2
2-3 3
2-4 4
3-3 1
3-4 1
EXECUTED
6.14.11
PCM Status
PCM Loss
SYNC Loss
AIS
RAI
OK
OK
Clock
Fault
Not OK
Not OK
OK
Active
OK
STRDP – Status Remote Data Center Print
Synopsis
This command requests a status report for the Remote Data Centers (RDCs). The status can be one of the
following:
•
•
•
•
OK - The RDC is available to receive data.
Initiating - Initiating connection to the RDC.
Failed - The RDC is not available to receive data.
Blocked - The RDC is user blocked from receiving data.
File transfer is to the lowest numbered available RDC.
Note: If the system does not have an IPADDR, then status indicates OK for communication with the
RDC; however, no data can be transferred.
Syntax
STRDP;
Prerequisites
None
Attributes
None
Examples
STRDP;
Output Format
Remote Data Centre Status
RDC IPADDR
RDCSTAT
1
25.03.203.52
Initiating
2
102.03.211.140
OK
EXECUTED
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6.14.12
STSLP – Status SIGTRAN Link Print
Synopsis
This command requests the status of a SIGTRAN link.
Definitions for the status of the peer signaling process (SP):
•
•
•
BLOCKED - The signaling link is blocked.
UNAVAILABLE - The signaling link is unavailable.
AVAILABLE - The signaling link is available.
Note: The SP STATUS is blank for M2PA SNLINKs. Layer 2 status is provided by the STC7P command.
Definitions for SCTP Status are:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
CONFIGURING - Association is being configured.
COOKIE_WAIT - Association is waiting for a cookie.
COOKIE_ECHOED - Association has echoed a cookie.
CLOSED - Association is closed.
INITIATING - Association is initiating.
ESTABLISHED - Association is established.
SHUTDOWN_PENDING - Association is pending shutdown.
SHUTDOWN_SENT - Association has sent shutdown.
SHUTDOWN_RECEIVED - Association has received shutdown.
SHUTDOWN_ACK_SENT - Association has shutdown.
Definitions of the status of Links IP Addresses are:
•
•
•
INACTIVE - Network address is inactive.
ACTIVE - Network address is available for data transfer.
BLOCKED - Network address is blocked.
The Retransmission TimeOut (RTO) is a time between 500 and 6000 milliseconds where SCTP waits before
retransmitting an octet to an IP address. The timeout dynamically changes based on line conditions and
provides an indication on the quality of the connection to that IP address.
Syntax
STSLP:[SNLINK=…];
Prerequisites
•
If specified, the SIGTRAN link should already have been initiated.
Attributes
None
Examples
STSLP:SNLINK=1;
Output Format
Page 1 of 2 SIGTRAN Signaling Link Status
SNLINK SP STATUS
SCTP STATUS LABEL
1
AVAILABLE
ESTABLISHED
2
BlOCKED
EXECUTED
Page 1 of 2 SIGTRAN Signaling Link Status
SNLINK IPADDR STATUS IPADDR RTO IPADDR2 STATUS IPADDR2 RTO LABEL
1
ACTIVE
500
ACTIVE
1500
2
BlOCKED
EXECUTED
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Chapter 6 Command Definitions
6.14.13
STSYP – Status System Print
Synopsis
This command provides a summary of the load, uptime and alarms on the system. The meaning of each field
in the output is as follows:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
CPU - A string identifying the CPU type and speed
MEMORY - The amount of RAM in the system
UPTIME - The length of time the application software has been running
NRESTART - The number of times the system has restarted since factory installation
LOADAVG1 - The UNIX load average measurement taken over one minute
LOADAVG5 - The UNIX load average measurement taken over five minutes
LOADAVG15 - The UNIX load average measurement taken over 15 minutes
ALMSYS - The number of system alarms
ALMPCM - The number of PCM alarms
ALMSIG - The number of signaling alarms
ALMCLA1 - The number of minor alarms
ALMCLA2 - The number of major alarms
ALMCLA3 - The number of critical alarms
Syntax
STSYP;
Prerequisites
None
Attributes
None
Examples
STSYP;
Output Format
System Status
CPU
2 X Intel(R) Xeon(TM) CPU 2.4GHz
MEMORY
1024MB
UPTIME
01:04:43
NRESTART
307
LOADAVG1
1.48%
LOADAVG5
1.49%
LOADAVG15
1.45%
ALMSYS
0
ALMPCM
9
ALMSIG
4
ALMCLA1
0
ALMCLA2
13
ALMCLA3
0
EXECUTED
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6.14.14
STTPP – Network Time Protocol Status Print
Synopsis
This command is used to display the status of the Network Time Protocol servers configured on the unit.
Syntax
STTPP;
Prerequisites
None.
Attributes
None.
Example
STTPP;
Status of NTP Servers
NTPSER IPADDR
STATUS
1
192.168.0.1
SYSPEER
-0.025477 NTPSERV2
EXECUTED
3
STRATUM OFFSET
LABEL
-0.025594 NTPSERV1
2
192.168.0.2
ACTIVE
4
Description
Meaning of fields in the print command:
•
Status
Status
Description
INACTIVE
The NTP service is disabled.
UNREACHABLE
The NTP server is unreachable.
REJECT
The NTP server has been rejected by the server selection algorithm.
ACTIVE
NTP time information is being received from this server.
SYSPEER
NTP has selected this server to synchronize to.
•
Stratum
The NTP Stratum value reported by the NTP server.
•
Offset
The difference in seconds between the clock (UTC) as configured on the unit and the UTC time as
reported by the NTP server.
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Chapter 7: Configuration Overview
This section provides an overview of the various components that are used in the configuration of a Signaling
Gateway and how these components relate to each other. The Signaling Gateway configuration is described
in the following categories:
•
System, Hardware and Signaling Configuration – The configuration of system Ethernet addresses,
signaling boards and PCMs.
•
•
•
•
•
•
Signaling Configuration – The transmission of messages on the SS7 and IP side.
Routing Configuration – The route SS7 messages take through the gateway.
Management and Operations – Bringing entities in and out of service and monitoring system status.
Default Routing – Allocation of a default route to MTP.
Resilience – Two Signaling Gateways acting as a single Point Code.
Hard Disk Management.
7.1
System, Hardware and Signaling Configuration
7.1.1
System Configuration
Each Signaling Gateway contains four or six (depending on equipment type) Ethernet ports allowing it to
communicate with four or six separate IP networks. The Ethernet interface is used for the transfer of SS7
signaling information over IP, for telnet communication with the management interface and the transfer of
files (such as those for software update and configuration backup) using ftp between the Signaling Gateway
and a remote server. By default the SCTP value on this 4th port (ETH 4) is set to N preventing the port from
use for SIGTRAN traffic - this is configurable using the IPEPS command.
A Signaling Gateway can be given a presence within an IP network using its first Ethernet port configured
with an IP Address (IPADDR) and a Subnet Mask (SUBNET). If the Signaling Gateway is communicating with
a destination that is not on the local subnet, a default IP gateway (GATEWAY) can be configured.
Additional IP networks are configured on the remaining Ethernet ports using the IPEPS command and
additional gateway set with the IPGWI command.
Figure 4. Multiple IP Networks
Signaling
Gateway
First IP
Network
193.145.185.149
193.145.185.151
173.132.73.122
Default IP
Gateway
Second IP
Network
IP Gateway
173.132.73.21
Figure 4 demonstrates the Signaling Gateway configured to exist in multiple IP networks. Example MML for
the above configuration is:
IPEPS:ETH=1,IPADDR=193.145.185.151,SUBNET=255.255.255.0,SCTP=Y;
IPEPS:ETH=2,IPADDR=173.132.73.122,SUBNET=255.255.255.0,SCTP=Y;
IPGWI:IPGW=1,GATEWAY=193.145.195.149;
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Chapter 7 Configuration Overview
7.1.2
Boards and PCMs
A Signaling Gateway contains a number of SS7 signaling boards located in individual board positions (BPOS).
Signaling boards are managed using the CNBOx commands.
A Dialogic® DSI SS7 Network Interface Board can terminate up to two PCM (PCM) trunks for connection to
either a Signaling End Point (SEP) or Signaling Transfer Point (STP). When configuring the PCM, the user can
specify whether it should act as E1 or T1 as well as its frame format (FF) and line code (LC). The
configuration of a PCM also determines whether the port signal is to be used as the external clock
synchronization source of the Signaling Gateway. Each PCM can be assigned a synchronization priority
(SYNCPRI) specifying the priority it has within the Signaling Gateway to receive the external clock for the
system. The PCM in the system with the lowest numbered synchronization priority that is active and in
service provides the clocking source for the Signaling Gateway. If the current PCM providing clock for the
system goes out of service, the PCM with the next highest clock priority that is in service provides clock for
the Signaling Gateway. If a PCM’s synchronization priority is set to 0, that PCM never provides clock for the
system.
PCMs are managed using the CNPCx commands.
Figure 5. Physical Configuration
PCM 1-3
E1
Primary
Clock
Source
PCM 2-3
PCM 1-4
E1
Secondary
Clock
Source
PCM 2-4
PCM 3-3
PCM 3-4
T1
Tertiary
Clock
Source
Figure 5 demonstrates a Signaling Gateway configured with three boards and six PCMs, four E1 and two T1
connect to primary, secondary and tertiary clock sources. Example MML for the above configuration is:
CNBOI:BPOS=1,BRDTYPE=SPCI2S-4-2,SIGTYPE=SS7;
CNBOI:BPOS=2,BRDTYPE=SPCI2S-4-2,SIGTYPE=SS7;
CNBOI:BPOS=3,BRDTYPE=SPCI2S-4-2,SIGTYPE=SS7;
CNPCI:PCM=1-3,PCMTYPE=E1,SYNCPRI=1;
CNPCI:PCM=2-3,PCMTYPE=E1,SYNCPRI=1;
CNPCI:PCM=1-4,PCMTYPE=E1,SYNCPRI=2;
CNPCI:PCM=2-4,PCMTYPE=E1,SYNCPRI=2;
CNPCI:PCM=3-3,PCMTYPE=T1,SYNCPRI=3;
CNPCI:PCM=3-4,PCMTYPE=T1,SYNCPRI=3;
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7.2
Signaling Configuration
7.2.1
SS7 Configuration
A Link Set (LS) is the set of signaling links between an Originating Point Code (OPC) on the Signaling
Gateway and an adjacent Destination Point Code (DPC). When specifying a link set the user can specify the
MTP type and point code size (SS7MD), the SS7 Network Identifier (NI) and the logical network (NC) it
belongs in. Link sets are managed using the C7LSx commands.
An SS7 Route (C7RT) identifies the link sets that are used to reach an eventual Destination Point Code
(DPC). Two SS7 routes cannot have the same DPC within the same network. An SS7 route utilizes link sets
(LS1 and LS2) to adjacent points to reach an eventual destination. An adjacent point can be a Signaling
Transfer Point (STP), where SS7 information is forwarded on into the SS7 network, or the eventual
destination. SS7 routes are managed using the C7RTx commands.
SS7 MTP2 Operation
An SS7 signaling link (C7LINK) processor (EQU) receives and transmits SS7 signaling information over a
timeslot (TS) on an E1 or T1 bearer or a serial V.11 interface. An SS7 Signaling link is identified uniquely
within an SS7 link set by the Signaling Link Code (SLC). Signaling links are managed using the C7SLx
commands.
Figure 6. SS7 Signaling Example
Signaling
Gateway
STP1
PC2
PC 1
SEP 1
PC5
STP2
PC3
SEP 2
PC4
Figure 6 demonstrates a Signaling Gateway routing to two SS7 Signaling End Points (SEP). The first SEP is
reached by a pair of STPs, while the second SEP is reached directly from the Signaling Gateway. Example
MML for the above configuration is:
C7LSI:LS=1,OPC=1,DPC=2,SS7MD=ITU14,LSSIZE=2,NI=2,NC=1;
C7LSI:LS=2,OPC=1,DPC=3,SS7MD=ITU14,LSSIZE=2,NI=2,NC=1;
C7LSI:LS=3,OPC=1,DPC=4,SS7MD=ITU14,LSSIZE=2,NI=2,NC=1;
C7SLI:C7LINK=1,LS=1,EQU=2-1,TS=1-3-16,SLC=0;
C7SLI:C7LINK=2,LS=1,EQU=3-1,TS=2-3-16,SLC=1;
C7SLI:C7LINK=3,LS=2,EQU=2-2,TS=1-4-16,SLC=0;
C7SLI:C7LINK=4,LS=2,EQU=3-2,TS=2-4-16,SLC=1;
C7SLI:C7LINK=5,LS=3,EQU=2-3,TS=3-3-16,SLC=0;
C7SLI:C7LINK=6,LS=3,EQU=3-3,TS=3-4-16,SLC=1;
C7RTI:C7RT=1,NC=1,DPC=2,LS1=1,LABEL=STP1;
C7RTI:C7RT=2,NC=1,DPC=3,LS1=2,LABEL=STP2;
C7RTI:C7RT=3,NC=1,DPC=4,LS1=3,LABEL=SEP2;
C7RTI:C7RT=4,NC=1,DPC=5,LS1=1,LS2=2,LABEL=SEP1;
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7.2.2
High Speed Signaling Links Configuration
The Signaling Gateway supports HSL in accordance with ITU Q.703 Annex A. Two HSL links are configurable
on a Dialogic® DSI SS7HDP Network Interface Board using processor (EQU) values of x-1 or x-33 (x is the
board position).
The timeslot on the C7SLx TS parameter must be set to 0 for a HSL link, that is the timeslot for a HSL link
must be set to x-y-0 (x is the board position, y is the PCM value).
Only an HSL link can be configured on an unstructured PCM, and a T1 HSL link must be received on the same
board as it is processed. Additionally, an SS7 link cannot be changed from HSL to LSL or from LSL to HSL. A
timeslot (TS) can only be associated with a structured HSL link if it is not associated with a signaling link,
cross connect, monitoring or circuit group.
The following commands demonstrate HSL board, PCM and signaling link configuration.
cnboi:bpos=1,brdtype=ss7hdp-64-4,sigtype=ss7;
cnpci:pcm=1-1,pcmtype=e1,ff=uns;
cnpci:pcm=1-2,pcmtype=e1;
c7lsi:ls=1,nc=1,opc=10,dpc=20,ni=2,lssize=2,ss7md=itu14;
c7sli:c7link=1,equ=1-1,ts=1-1-0,ls=1,slc=0,m56k=0,hsl=y;
c7sli:c7link=2,equ=1-33,ts=1-2-0,ls=1,slc=1,m56k=0,hsl=y;
7.2.3
SS7 M2PA Operation
The Signaling Gateway is capable of replacing TDM SS7 links with signaling links operating over IP providing
the equivalent functionality to MTP layer 2 by using the SIGTRAN M2PA protocol. Typically M2PA signaling
links would be used when the Signaling Gateway is either offering longhaul over IP operation between two
SEPs, or when two Signaling Gateways are acting as a single Point Code and the inter Signaling Gateway SS7
link is provided by M2PA over IP.
For M2PA operation, rather than associating an EQU or TS with an SS7 signaling link (C7LINK), the SS7 link
is instead associated with a SIGTRAN link (SNLINK) defined to be of type M2PA. The SIGTRAN link is used to
identify a SCTP Association as being used for M2PA operation.
Figure 7. M2PA Example
TDM
Signaling
SEP
PC 1
IP
Signaling
SG
PC3
193.145.185.151
SEP
PC 2
193.145.185.154
Figure 7 shows an example of a Signaling Gateway connected to a SEP on the TDM side and a SEP on the IP
side.
Example MML for the SIGTRAN M2PA part of the above configuration is:
SNSLI:SNLINK=1,SNTYPE=M2PA,END=C,IPADDR=194.192.185.11,
HPORT=3565,PPORT=3565,LABEL=SEP2-1;
SNSLI:SNLINK=2,SNTYPE=M2PA,END=C,IPADDR=194.192.185.11,
HPORT=3566,PPORT=3566,LABEL=SEP2-2;
C7LSI:LS=2,OPC=3,DPC=2,LSSIZE=2,SS7MD=ITU14,NC=1,NI=2;
C7SLI:C7LINK=3,SNLINK=1,LS=2,SLC=0;
C7SLI:C7LINK=4,SNLINK=2,LS=2,SLC=1;
C7RTI:C7RT=2,NC=1,DPC=2,LS1=2;
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7.2.4
M3UA Configuration
The Signaling Gateway employs M3UA to “backhaul” SS7 information to an SS7 resident application. The
Signaling Gateway uses the Stream Control Transmission Protocol (SCTP) to provide a reliable transport
protocol operating on top of IP. The relationship between the SCTP node on the Signaling Gateway and a
peer node is known as an “association”. The Signaling Gateway employs the M3UA protocol to support the
transport of any SS7 MTP3 user signaling (for example, ISUP and SCCP messages) over IP using the services
of SCTP.
In backhaul operation, the Signaling Gateway communicates over an SCTP association using M3UA to an
Application Server Process (ASP). An ASP is a host computer serving as an active or backup process of an
Application Server (for example, part of a distributed virtual switch or database). Examples of ASPs are
processes (or process instances) of MGCs, IP SCPs or HLRs. An ASP is an SCTP endpoint and may be
configured to process signaling traffic within more than one Application Server.
A SIGTRAN link (SNLINK) identifies both the SCTP Association and the peer ASP that uses the Association.
The user can configure the Peer IP addresses (IPADDR, and optionally IPADDR2, a second IP address for
resilience), a host port (HPORT) and a peer port (PPORT). The user can also configure the SIGTRAN link to
act as an IP client or IP server (END), the network the SIGTRAN link exists in (NC) and the Point Code format
that the SIGTRAN link uses (SS7MD). SIGTRAN links are managed using the SNSLx commands.
A Remote Application Server (RAS) is the logical entity serving a specific “routing key”. An example of an
Application Server is a virtual switch element handling all call processing for a unique range of PSTN trunks,
identified by an SS7 DPC/OPC/CIC range. Another example is a virtual database element, handling all HLR
transactions for a particular SS7 DPC/OPC/SCCP SSN combination.
The Application Server contains a set of one or more unique SNLINKs of which one or more is normally
actively processing traffic. There is a 1:1 relationship between an Application Server and a specific “routing
key”. The user can configure an Application Server’s Destination Point Code (DPC) of the routing key as well
as the Routing Context (RC) that uniquely identifies the routing key to the peer host application across the
SIGTRAN link.
Application Servers are managed using the SNRAx commands and are associated to SIGTRAN links using the
SNALx commands.
Figure 8. M3UA Backhaul Example
AS1
PC 2
CICS 1-128
ASP 1
193.145.185.152
Signaling
Gateway
AS2
PC 2
CICS 129-256
193.145.185.151
ASP 2
193.145.185.153
AS3
PC 3
CICS 1-128
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Chapter 7 Configuration Overview
Figure 8 demonstrates a Signaling Gateway communicating over SIGTRAN links with two ASPs. ASP 1 is
running two AS instances, AS1 processes CICs 1 to 128 in PC 2, and AS2 processes CICs 129 to 256 also in
PC 2. ASP 2 is also running two AS instances, AS3 processes CICs 1 to 128 in PC 3 and AS2 processes CICs
129 to 256 also in PC 2. Note that AS2 is running on ASP1 and ASP2. The two ASPs could be load sharing
processing for the AS or one could be active, while the other standby. The configuration of load sharing is
performed by the ASPs. Example MML for the above configuration is:
Linkparatext: SNLINK=1, SNTYPE=SGM3UA,
SS7MD=ITU14, NC=1, LABEL=ASP1;
Linkparatext: SNLINK=2, SNTYPE=SGM3UA,
SS7MD=ITU14, NC=1, LABEL=ASP2;
Linkparatext:RAS=1, NC=1, DPC=2, RC=1,
Linkparatext:RAS=2, NC=1, DPC=2, RC=2,
Linkparatext:RAS=3, NC=1, DPC=3, RC=3,
Linkparatext:RAS=1, SEQ=1, SNLINK=1;
Linkparatext:RAS=2, SEQ=1, SNLINK=1;
Linkparatext:RAS=2, SEQ=2, SNLINK=2;
Linkparatext:RAS=3, SEQ=1, SNLINK=2;
7.3
END=S, IPADDR=193.145.185.152,
END=S, IPADDR=193.145.185.153,
LABEL=AS1;
LABEL=AS2;
LABEL=AS3;
Routing Configuration
The routing model for the Signaling Gateway can be broken into three parts; incoming route selection,
routing key processing and destination selection.
An Incoming Route (IR) identifies the side from which signaling data originates. MTP messages are
considered to arrive from either the MTP domain over an SS7 link set (LS) using MTP2 or M2PA SS7 links
(C7LINK) or the SIGTRAN IP domain over a M3UA SIGTRAN link (SNLINK). The SS7 link set or M3UA
SIGTRAN link identifies the network (NC) and SS7 format (SS7MD) of the message. The IR configuration
either explicitly identifies a destination or a routing key table (RKTAB) that is used to identify a destination
(DEST). Incoming routes are managed using the SGIRx commands.
If the Signaling Gateway determines that a Routing Key Table (RKTAB) should be looked up, data from the
message is compared with routing keys components (such as NC, SI, NI, OPC, DPC, CICs) in a routing key
table. If a match is found and the Destination Point (DEST) for that routing key combination is in service, the
routing key’s Destination Point is used otherwise if the incoming route also had a Destination Point
associated with it, then that default destination is used. Routing keys are managed using the SGRKx
commands.
A Destination Point (DEST) can route a message to a Remote Application Server (RAS) or to MTP (using
MTP2 or M2PA SS7 links) for routing based on Point Code. MTP routing can be selected by specifying an
RTPRI of MTP. RAS routing can be selected by specifying an RTPRI of NONE and identifying the RAS that the
messages should be routed to. Destinations are managed using the SGDPx commands.
Note: In many configurations, routing key analysis is not required and the user can configure an
Incoming Route to go directly to a Destination without having to explicitly provide routing key
information, such as Destination Point Codes, for every eventual destination.
Figure 9. Routing Configuration Example
Application
Server
Signaling Gateway
DEST1
IR1
AS1
RK1
DPC 2
CICs 1 to 128
C7RT 1
LS
IR2
DPC 3
DEST2
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Figure 9 demonstrates example relationships between entities in the routing model. Relationships with full
lines indicate that there is an explicit relationship between the entities (that is, one entity selects the other).
Relationships with dotted lines indicate that the relationship is implicit, for example, if data arrives on a
SIGTRAN link over M3UA, it is implicitly coming from the SIGTRAN IP domain and similarly if data arrives on
an SS7 link set, it is implicitly arriving from the MTP domain.
Note: A message arriving from M2PA is considered as arriving from the MTP domain.
This example identifies two incoming routes, IR 1 from SIGTRAN IP and IR 2 from the MTP side. IR 1 and
IR 2 go to the Routing Key Table 1 for routing key analysis. If the analysis fails, or the destination found by
the analysis (Application Server AS1) is out of service, the Signaling Gateway discards messages from IR 1.
The Signaling Gateway however attempts to route messages from IR 2 to Destination 2 only discards those
messages if the SS7 route C7RT 1 is also out of service.
This example identifies two incoming routes, IR 1 from SIGTRAN IP and IR 2 from the MTP side. IR 1 goes to
Routing Key Table 1 for routing key analysis. IR 2 also goes to Routing Key Table 1 for analysis, however, if
analysis fails, or the destination found by analysis (either a MTP or SIGTRAN IP route or Application Server)
is out of service, it attempts to route to Destination 2.
The routing key table has one entry as follows:
•
The entry that routes all SS7 messages with DPC 2 and CICs 1 to 128 to Destination 1.
There are two Destinations:
•
•
Destination 1 routes to Application Server 1.
Destination 2 routes all messages to the MTP side.
Example MML for the routing part of the above configuration is as follows:
Note: The Destinations Point are configured first, followed by the Routing Key Tables, and then finally
the Incoming Routes.
SGDPI:DEST=1,RTPRI=NONE,RAS=1;
SGDPI:DEST=2,RTPRI=MTP;
SGRKI:RKI=1,RKTAB=1,DPC=2,BCIC=1,RANGE=128,NC=1,DEST=1;
SGIRI:IR=1,NC=1,DOMAIN=IP,RKTAB=1;
SGIRI:IR=2,NC=1,DOMAIN=MTP,RKTAB=1,DEST=2;
7.4
Management and Operations
Entities such as boards, SS7 links, SIGTRAN links and Application Servers after configuration are considered
to be in the “blocked” state. The configuration exists in the system for these entities, but these entities are
not considered to be active. To activate an entity, the MNBLI command should be used. To temporally
deactivate an entity, the MNBLE command should be used.
The status of entities such as boards, SS7 links, SIGTRAN links and Application Servers can be examined
using the STxxx set of commands.
Alarms that occur on the Signaling Gateway can be view using the ALLOP and ALLIP commands.
7.5
Default Routing
The Signaling Gateway offers a Default Routing service. This service allows the Signaling Gateway to onward
route MTP Message Signal Units (MSUs) with unknown Destination Point Codes (DPCs). It also provides a
mechanism for Signaling Network Management messages to be generated for unknown Point Codes.
Figure 10 shows a typical system that uses Default Routing. The SPCs with Point Codes 1, 2 and 3 can each
communicate with many Point Codes within the MTP Network not all of which the Dialogic® DSI Signaling
Server has been configured to know about. The Signaling Server connects to two STPs that have been
explicitly configured to know about more Point Codes than the Signaling Server.
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7.5.1
Configuring Default Routing
Default Routing is configured using the C7RTI command with the DPC parameter set to “DFLT”. An additional
route is configured with the LS1 and LS2 parameters identifying the link sets to the STPs and the PC set to
DFLT.
Routing MSUs
When the Default Route is configured, on receipt of an MSU for an unknown DPC, the message is sent out on
an available link set in the Default Route or discarded.
Route Set Test
SEPs send the Signaling Gateway RST messages for unknown Point Codes. The Signaling Server regenerates
these messages and sends them to the STPs that responds to the Signaling Gateway with appropriate SNM
messages.
Transfer Prohibited/Transfer Allowed
On receipt of TFA or TFP from one of the STPs in the Default Route, the Signaling Gateway regenerates and
broadcasts these to all SEPs not in the Default Route.
Figure 10. System Using Default Routing
SPC
PC=?
Unknown Network
STP
STP
Signaling
Gateway
SPC
PC=1
SPC
PC=3
SPC
PC=2
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7.6
Resilience
7.6.1
IP Port Bonding
The Signaling Gateway allows the user to configure a resilient IP connection across an IP port bonding team
of two ports in an active/standby configuration. On the Dialogic® DSI SS7G21, SS7G22 and SS7G31
Signaling Servers, up to two port bonding teams may be created using the four Ethernet ports on the SGW.
The Dialogic® DSI SS7G32 Signaling Server has 6 Ethernet ports, allowing up to three port bonding teams.
Each team has a single IP address configured with a primary (active) and secondary (standby) port. Any IP
port on the system may be the primary port in a team and any port may be the secondary port. The primary
port is a port configured with the IP address of the team and the secondary port is a port configured with a
string to associate it with the primary port.
If the system detects that the Primary port has failed, it passes the primary’s MAC and Layer 3 address to
the failover (secondary) adapter, enabling it to act as the active port in the team. On the restoration of the
primary port, the secondary port is removed from service and the primary port resumes control of its MAC
and IP addresses.
The subnet mask of a secondary IP address in a team is ignored. Data loss may occur between the actual
failure of an IP connect and the detection of that failure and subsequent switching to the standby port. All
adapters in a team should be connected to the same hub or switch with Spanning Tree (STP) set to off.
Whenever teaming is activated, or deactivated, MMI sessions using those ports are reset. An IP address may
not be teamed with:
•
•
•
itself
an IP address of 0.0.0.0
another IP address already acting as a primary or standby in an IP team
Once configured the status of Ethernet ports in a bonded team may be checked using the STEPP command
(see Section 6.14.7 on page 127).
7.6.2
Dual Resilient Operation
Two Signaling Gateways have the ability to work in conjunction with one another to realize a single SS7
signaling point where the operation of the Message Transfer Part (MTP) is distributed. Failure (or planned
maintenance) of one or other of the Signaling Gateways operating in “Dual Mode” therefore does not result
in a loss of SS7 signaling capability.
The use of the dual functionality does introduce some restrictions that are described below. The user is
responsible for ensuring that these restrictions are acceptable, otherwise the dual mode of operation may
not be applicable.
7.6.2.1
Overview of Dual Resilience
The dual Signaling Gateway solution assumes that each Signaling Gateway has one (or more) signaling links
facing the network.
The ability for each of the Signaling Gateways to communicate with each other is addressed by adding an
additional link set (containing one or two links, for example LS2 in Figure 11, “Dual Resilient Operation” on
page 145) between the two platforms. This link set is used to convey network status and management
messages between the two halves of the system and to pass signaling traffic as necessary.
On each Signaling Gateway, there is (a minimum of) two link sets, one connected to the adjacent signaling
point and the other connected to the other half of the dual pair. Each MTP route is configured so that the
primary link set is the link set connected to the adjacent signaling point and the secondary link set is the link
set connected to the partner Signaling Gateway. Load sharing across these link sets is disabled.
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The link set between the two halves of the dual Signaling Gateway is configured so that the originating and
destination point codes are identical.
Under normal circumstances, messages that have been determined for the SS7 network are routed directly
over the link set that connects to the adjacent signaling point. Under failure conditions, when the link to the
adjacent signaling point is not available, the traffic messages are sent instead on the secondary link set to
the partner Signaling Gateway. On receipt of these messages, the partner Signaling Gateway recognizes that
the message is not destined for itself and transfers the message to its network-facing link set.
The signaling that takes place between each half of the dual Signaling Gateway system makes use of two
reserved Network Indicator values in the Sub-Service Field, these values designated “National - Reserved”
and “International - Reserved” must therefore not be used for signaling either to or from the network.
The link set between the two halves of the dual pair now becomes a key element in the system, and to avoid
a single point of failure, this link set should contain at least two signaling links. Where possible, these links
should be located on different signaling boards.
7.6.2.2
Configuration
Each half of the dual configuration needs to be configured separately using existing configuration techniques
and noting the following.
The additional link set between the two Signaling Gateways should have the local point code and the
adjacent point code set to the same value.
Each route to a destination signaling point should be configured to use the network link set as the primary
link set and the inter Signaling Gateway link set as the secondary link set. Load sharing must be disabled.
When connecting to a pair of adjacent STPs, each STP must have a route declared on each Signaling
Gateway and in all cases the inter-Signaling Gateway link set must be specified as the secondary link set.
A route must be configured to the other half of the dual Signaling Gateway system, this must use the interSignaling Gateway link set as the only link set.
In addition, the link set between the two halves of the dual Signaling Gateway system must be designated as
a “special” link set. The method of achieving this depends on the equipment and configuration tools in use as
follows:
Use the C7LSI command to initiate a link set with the same values for the OPC and DPC parameters and the
value of the DUAL parameter set to zero.
7.6.2.3
M2PA Inter Unit Signaling Links
The Signaling Gateway supports the use of M2PA SIGTRAN links for inter Signaling Gateway communication.
M2PA SS7 links use the SCTP IP protocol to transmit signaling data. The use of IP links between the units
(rather than TDM SS7 links) allows the systems to be able to present a greater number of TDM links and
PCMs to face the SS7 network. In addition, since the Signaling Gateway supports two IP ports and M2PA
supports IP multihoming, resilience between the units can be gained using redundant IP networks rather
than the two SS7 boards that would be required to offer the same level of resilience.
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7.6.2.4
Example
Figure 11 is an example of a DUAL resilient configuration using M2PA links for the resilient links between
units.
Figure 11. Dual Resilient Operation
LS1
SG 1
PC 2
NC 1
194.192.185.11
192.195.185.11
SEP1
PC 1
NC 1
LS2
Inter Unit
Linkset
(shown as M2PA)
SG 2
PC 2
NC 1
194.192.185.12
192.195.185.12
On Signaling Gateway 1, configure the IP addresses as follows and restart:
IPEPS:ETH=1,IPADDR=194.192.185.11;
IPEPS:ETH=2,IPADDR=192.192.185.11;
On Signaling Gateway 1, configure the link sets as follows:
C7LSI:LS=1,OPC=2,DPC=1,LSSIZE=2,SS7MD=ITU14,NI=2,NC=1;
C7LSI:LS=2,OPC=2,DPC=2,LSSIZE=2,SS7MD=ITU14,NI=2,NC=1;
On Signaling Gateway 1, configure the SIGTRAN link as follows:
SNSLI:SNLINK=1,SNTYPE=M2PA,IPADDR=194.192.185.12,
IPADDR2=192.195.185.12,END=C;
On Signaling Gateway 1, configure the signaling links as follows:
C7SLI:C7LINK=1,EQU=1-1,TS=1-1-1,LS=1,SLC=0;
C7SLI:C7LINK=2,SNLINK=1,LS=2,SLC=0;
On Signaling Gateway 1, configure the SS7 routes as follows:
C7RTI:C7RT=1,DPC=1,LS1=1,LS2=2,NC=1,LABEL=SEP1;
C7RTI:C7RT=2,LS1=2,DPC=2,NC=1,LABEL=INTERLINK;
On Signaling Gateway 2, configure the IP addresses as follows and restart:
IPEPS:ETH=1,IPADDR=194.192.185.12;
IPEPS:ETH=2,IPADDR=192.192.185.12;
On Signaling Gateway 2, configure the link sets as follows:
C7LSI:LS=1,OPC=2,DPC=1,LSSIZE=2,SS7MD=ITU14,NI=2,NC=1;
C7LSI:LS=2,OPC=2,DPC=2,LSSIZE=2,SS7MD=ITU14,NI=2,NC=1;
On Signaling Gateway 2, configure the SIGTRAN link as follows:
SNSLI:SNLINK=1,SNTYPE=M2PA,IPADDR=194.192.185.11,
IPADDR2=192.195.185.11,END=C;
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On Signaling Gateway 2, configure the signaling links as follows:
C7SLI:C7LINK=1,EQU=1-1,TS=1-1-1,LS=1,SLC=1;
C7SLI:C7LINK=2,SNLINK=1,LS=2,SLC=0;
On Signaling Gateway 2, configure the SS7 routes as follows:
C7RTI:C7RT=1,DPC=1,LS1=1,LS2=2,NC=1,LABEL=SEP1;
C7RTI:C7RT=2,LS1=2,DPC=2,NC=1,LABEL=INTERLINK;
Linkset 1 is configured for both Signaling Gateways and has a destination point code of the SS7 switch.
Linkset 2 is a special linkset that has the same OPC and DPC. It is used to route messages destined for CICs
on the partner Signaling Gateway.
C7 route 1 is used to route calls from the Signaling Gateways to the SS7 switch, if LS1 is not available, the
signaling is routed via the partner Signaling Gateway using LS2. This is the C7 route assigned to circuit
groups.
7.6.3
Multihoming
An inherent property of the SCTP layer on the Signaling Gateway that is used in SIGTRAN Signaling (for
example, SS7 over M2PA) is that it supports IP multihoming. IP multihoming allows the SIGTRAN signaling
link SCTP association to be configured to communicate with multiple IP addresses in an active/standby
relationship. Multihoming offers a SIGTRAN signaling link significantly greater resilience since the link can be
configured with multiple IP addresses to operate over separate Ethernet ports within wholly separate IP
networks. IP ports and local IP addresses on the Signaling Gateway may be configured using the IPEPS
command (see page 86). SIGTRAN links may be configured to communicate with multiple remote IP
addresses using the SNSLI command (see page 119).
7.7
Hard Disk Management
7.7.1
SS7G21 and SS7G22 Hard Disk Drives
Backup and restoration of the SS7G2x environment can be used in conjunction with the spare hard drive to
restore a system to full operation in the event of hard disk failure. A backup may also be useful to take a
snapshot of a known working system prior to significant change, or for diagnostics purposes providing files to
the support channel for further investigation in the event of problems occurring on their system.
For more information about backing up SS7G2x hard drives, see Section 4.14, “Creating a System Archive”
on page 35.
Note: The SS7G2x spare hard disk, SS7G20SHDD, is an orderable product containing the operating
system for the SS7G2x. The SS7G20SHDD is system neutral and requires a backed-up system
license to bind it to a particular SS7G2x. The SS7G20SHDD will not function without a valid
system license. If you want to take up the additional redundancy offered by a spare hard disk
you must ensure that you have an archive of at least the system license prior to any potential
failure of a hard disk.
7.7.2
SS7G31 and SS7G32 Hard Disk Drive RAID Array
The SS7G31 and SS7G32 systems are equipped with 2 mirrored hard disk drives configured in RAID 1 array
(Redundant Array of Independent Disks). These disks will remain synchronized, ensuring that an up-to-date
copy of all data on the disk drives (such as the operating system software, Dialogic® DSI signaling software,
system licenses and configuration files) will be maintained on both disks. In the event of failure of a single
drive, the Signaling Server will continue to support all the capabilities of the Signaling Server. When the
failed disk drive is replaced with a unformatted disk drive, following the procedure below, the Signaling
Server will mirror the operating software and data onto the new drive.
In the event of hard disk failure, the system will alarm, identifying the disk as unavailable. On the SS7G31
systems, the disk drive must be deactivated using the MNINI command (see Section 6.9.3 on page 94)
before the unit is shut down, and the hard drive removed and replaced. For the SS7G32 the disk drive must
be deactivated but the unit does not require to be shut down.
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Refer to hard disk drive removal instructions in the Dialogic® DSI SS7G31 and SS7G32 Signaling Servers
Hardware Manual. Once the disk has been replace and, in the case of the SS7G31, the system restarted the
replacement drive should be activated using the MNINE command (see Section 6.9.4 on page 94), at which
time the system will perform a synchronization function copying all software to the newly installed disk drive.
The 'disk unavailable' alarm will persist until both disk drives are synchronized. The disk unavailable alarm
will persist even if a failed disk drive is removed and not replaced.
Spare hard disk drives for the SS7G31 and SS7G32 system are available as on orderable part. Refer to the
Dialogic® DSI SS7G31 and SS7G32 Signaling Servers Product Data Sheet (navigate from http://
www.dialogic.com/products/signalingip_ss7components/signaling_servers_and_gateways.htm) for part
number information.
Important: Although the RAID management software has been designed to be robust it is important to
follow the removal and replacement procedures described above in order to ensure RAID array
hard disk drive integrity.
Warning:
USB storage devices should not be connected to the Signaling Server during hard disk drive
removal and replacement. Verify that all attached USB storage devices are removed before
performing HDD removal, replacement and re-activation.
Disk drive replacement should be performed during a scheduled maintenance period and, for the SS7G32,
which supports hot swap, during a period of light traffic. re-synchronization of disk drives subsequent to
replacement can take between 5-10 minutes, depending on the conditions and load under which the
Signaling Server is operating. The Signaling Server should not be restarted during this period and MMI
activity should be limited to checking the status of the re-synchronization. The status of the disk drives can
be identified using the STDDP command (see Section 6.14.6 on page 126). A status of UP indicates that a
drive is fully operational, a status of DOWN indicates either that the disk is faulty or otherwise unable to
Synchronize. A status INACTIVE indicates that is has been deactivated by the user, a status of RESTARTING
indicates that it is attempting to synchronize but the operation is not yet complete.
If the server is restarted through power loss or user action while synchronization is in progress the
synchronizing disk will be in an indeterminate state and on restart may cause the server to fail to boot. In
such an event the disk should be removed from the server and any formatting on the disk manually
removed. The disk should be re-installed on the server and the system booted. To restart synchronization
the user should deactivate (MNINI) and the re-active (MNINE) the disk. On the SS7G32 the disk does not
need to be re-formatted instead the user should simply boot without the disk, insert it when the system is
operational and re-activate synchronization using MNINI/MNINE.
If a disk drive remains in the 'DOWN' state after attempting re-activation, either the replacement drive is
faulty or it has previously been formatted (RAID will only function with unformatted drives). In the case of
the SS7G32, RAID mirroring may also fail and the disk remain 'DOWN' due to the action of the hot-swap. If
this occurs the Server should be restarted and synchronization re-activated using MNINI/MNINE.
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Chapter 8: Alarm Fault Code Listing
A system operator can obtain a listing of the current alarm status (class, category and ID) of a Dialogic® DSI
Signaling Server using the ALLIP management terminal command described in Section 6.4.4, “ALLIP” on
page 51 or a log of current and cleared alarms using the ALLOP management terminal command described in
Section 6.4.5, “ALLOP” on page 52. Table 10 details the possible alarm types accessed by the ALLIP
command. Alarm status/events may also be accessed/reported by front panel LEDs, relay connections and
SNMP, as described in Section 1.9.6, “Alarm Log” on page 14.
Note: The meaning of individual event codes (in particular, the coding of the DIAG field) may be
changed in subsequent releases of the Signaling Gateway software without prior notification.
Table 10. Alarm Fault Codes
Severity
(LED)
Critical
(CRT)
CODE
11
Name
Event Description
CATEGORY
ID
Class †
DIAG
Link set fail
All signaling links in an SS7 signaling link set
have failed. Usually due to incorrect
configuration (Point Codes or signaling
timeslots), connectivity fault or inactive
signaling terminal at the remote end.
SIG
LS
3
0
SYS
BPOS
3
0
Critical
(CRT)
12
Board failure
The Signaling Gateway has detected a fault
with a signaling processor. This may either be
due to a faulty signaling processor board or
due to the Signaling Gateway performing a
controlled shutdown of a signaling processor
following persistent overload of the processor
in order to prevent the overload affecting the
remainder of the system. Usually due to faulty
board (which can be confirmed by changing
SS7 links to an alternative processor board
using the C7LSC command) or unusual
signaling conditions which may be due to
incorrect configuration or a mismatch of
configuration between the Signaling Gateway
and the remote end. This alarm condition can
only be cleared by manual intervention, the
user should block and unblock the affected
board.
Note that a Processor Fail entry always
appears in the alarm log when a board is
unblocked, this condition is identified by an
event with identical Occurred and Cleared
times.
Critical
(CRT)
14
Self Test fail
The Signaling Gateway has detected a self
test failure which prevents normal operation.
SYS
0
3
0
Critical
(CRT)
18
Alarm Test 3
This event indicates that the user has invoked
the alarm test for alarm class 3 using the
ALTEI command.
SYS
0
3
0
SYS
0
3
0
Critical
(CRT)
32
Overload
The Signaling Gateway has detected the onset
of an internal overload condition. This is
usually due either to exceptionally high traffic
rates or failure conditions causing additional
invocation of maintenance procedures. During
overload the Signaling Gateway will continue
to operate as normal. Should the condition
occur on a frequent basis (for example, during
the busy hour every day) the condition should
be reported to your support representative.
Critical
(CRT)
41
All RDC fail
Failure of communication with all remote data
centers. Continuous records are written to
hard disk or discarded as appropriate. Periodic
report data is discarded.
SYS
0
3
0
Hard disk fail
Interaction with the hard disk is no longer
possible. No further use of the hard disk is
attempted until the system is restarted. The
most likely cause is a physical failure of the
hard disk drive.
SYS
0
3
Diagnostic
code
Critical
(CRT)
46
† The “Class” column provides the initial default setting of the alarm class for each fault code. The alarm class for any particular alarm code
is configurable using the ALCLS command and can be viewed using the ALCLP command. Changing the alarm class for an event type changes
the Severity indicated by the LEDs and/or relays.
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Chapter 8 Alarm Fault Code Listing
Table 10. Alarm Fault Codes (Continued)
Severity
(LED)
CODE
Name
Event Description
CATEGORY
ID
Class †
DIAG
PSU failure
The system has detected that one or more
power supplies have failed. The system is able
to operate with the loss of a single power
supply but the power supply must be replaced
at the earliest possible opportunity.
SYS
PSU ID
3
0
72
Fan failure
The system has detected a failure of one or
more or its cooling fans leading to an
inadequate cooling supply. The faulty fan(s)
should be replaced immediately.
SYS
0
3
0
Critical
(CRT)
76
CPU warning
The system has detected that one or more of
the CPUs is likely to fail.
SYS
3
Critical
(CRT)
77
CPU failure
The system has detected that one or more of
the CPUs has failed.
SYS
3
Critical
(CRT)
78
Memory failure
The system has detected that one or more of
its memory modules has failed.
SYS
3
Major
(MJR)
1
PCM loss
Loss of signal at PCM input port
PCM
PCM
4
0
Major
(MJR)
2
AIS
PCM input port contains the Alarm Indication
Signal (all ones on all timeslots)
PCM
PCM
4
0
Major
(MJR)
3
Frame sync
loss
Loss of frame alignment on PCM port
PCM
PCM
4
0
Major
(MJR)
4
Frame slip
A frame slip occurred on the PCM port. This
alarm event is given for each occurrence of a
frame slip.
PCM
PCM
4
0
Remote alarm
PCM port is receiving a Remote Alarm
Indication. This usually indicates that the
remote end is either failing to achieve frame
alignment or that it is experiencing a high bit
error rate on the received signal.
PCM
PCM
4
0
BER > 1:10^5
The input PCM signal contains a Bit Error Rate
(BER) in excess of 1 in 100,000 as measured
on the frame alignment pattern. This is
usually due to faulty cabling or a faulty PCM
board at the remote end.
PCM
PCM
4
0
PCM
PCM
4
0
Critical
(CRT)
63
Critical
(CRT)
Major
(MJR)
Major
(MJR)
5
6
Major
(MJR)
7
BER > 1:10^3
The input PCM signal contains a Bit Error Rate
(BER) in excess of 1 in 1000 as measured on
the frame alignment pattern. This is usually
due to faulty cabling or a faulty PCM board at
the remote end.
Major
(MJR)
9
C7 link fail
An SS7 signaling link has failed. Usually due
to incorrect configuration (signaling timeslot),
connectivity fault or inactive signaling
terminal at the remote end.
SIG
C7LINK
4
0
SYS
0
4
0
Major
(MJR)
15
Fan warning
The system has detected either the failure of
one of the cooling fans or that a fan is likely to
fail. The cooling will remain adequate during
this condition but the fan should be replaced
at the next convenient opportunity.
Major
(MJR))
17
Alarm Test 2
This event indicates that the user has invoked
the alarm test for alarm class 2 using the
ALTEI command.
SYS
0
4
0
Major
(MJR)
20
Temperature
The internal temperature is outside a preset
threshold indicating either an internal fault or
failure of the cooling arrangements.
Inspection should take place immediately.
SYS
CPU ID
4
0
Sync failure
None of the PCM ports that have been
configured as possible clock sources contain a
valid PCM signal. Under these conditions the
Signaling Gateway will generate
synchronisation using a local oscillator.
PCM
0
4
0
Major
(MJR)
33
† The “Class” column provides the initial default setting of the alarm class for each fault code. The alarm class for any particular alarm code
is configurable using the ALCLS command and can be viewed using the ALCLP command. Changing the alarm class for an event type changes
the Severity indicated by the LEDs and/or relays.
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Table 10. Alarm Fault Codes (Continued)
Severity
(LED)
CODE
Name
Event Description
CATEGORY
ID
Class †
DIAG
Major
(MJR)
35
PCM error ind
Diagnostic event relating to the PCM
functionality. Persistent events of this type
should be reported to your support
representative.
NONE
4
Major
(MJR)
36
PCM event ind
Diagnostic information relating to PCMs.
NONE
4
Major
(MJR)
39
System restart
req
The user has changed configuration
parameters that require the system to be
restarted before they can take effect. The
alarm will persist until the system is restarted.
SYS
0
4
0
SIG
RDC
4
0
Major
(MJR)
40
RDC failure
Failure of communication with a remote data
center. Usually due to incorrect configuration
(IP address, username or password),
connectivity fault or inactive equipment at the
remote end.
Major
(MJR)
42
RDC err ind
Diagnostic event relating to the transfer of
data to an RDC. Persistent events of this type
should be reported to your support
representative.
NONE
CR send fail
The Signaling Gateway is unable to transfer
information to an RDC for a Continuous
Record. Possible problems include: no RDCs
available, directory does not exist on RDC for
this CR, write failure on RDC. If the problem
clears, this alarm will persist until any records
saved on the hard disk during the failure have
been successfully transferred to an RDC.
NONE
RECORD
4
Diagnostic
code
PR send fail
The Signaling Gateway is unable to transfer
information to an RDC for a Periodic Report.
Possible problems include: no RDCs available,
directory does not exist on RDC for this PR,
write failure on RDC. If the problem clears,
then the alarm will clear at the next successful
transfer of data for the Periodic Report.
NONE
REPORT
4
Diagnostic
code
RECORD
4
Major
(MJR)
Major
(MJR)
44
45
4
Major
(MJR)
47
Hard disk full
The hard disk drive capacity for a Continuous
Record has reached its limit. Either there is no
more space on the hard disk drive to store
data, or this continuous record has the
maximum amount of data stored for it on the
hard drive. In both cases, records is discarded
until an RDC recovers and all stored records
are transferred from the Signaling Gateway.
The alarm will then clear.
Major
(MJR)
50
Board cong
A board has reached a congestion threshold.
Boards repeatedly entering congestion
indicate a need to increase the dimensioning
of the switch.
SYS
BPOS
4
Major
(MJR)
53
PCM mismatch
The PCMTYPE setting is inconsistent with the
hardware settings on the board.
SYS
PCM
4
0
Major
(MJR)
61
Software
mismatch
The system has only partially been upgraded
and a full software update is required. The
system is running in ‘safe’ mode running
limited management software. No circuits
have been brought into service.
SYS
0
4
0
Major
(MJR)
62
C7 link Cong
A SS7 signaling link is encountering
congestion.
SIG
C7LINK
4
0
SYS
0
4
0
SIG
SNLINK
4
0
Major
(MJR)
64
Power warning
The system has detected that the voltage on
one or more power rails is out of range. This is
usually due to either a faulty power supply
module or a faulty board causing excessive
current consumption.
Major
(MJR)
65
Assoc fail
A SIGTRAN signaling link has failed. Usually
due to incorrect configuration (connectivity
fault or inactive signaling at the remote end.
† The “Class” column provides the initial default setting of the alarm class for each fault code. The alarm class for any particular alarm code
is configurable using the ALCLS command and can be viewed using the ALCLP command. Changing the alarm class for an event type changes
the Severity indicated by the LEDs and/or relays.
151
Chapter 8 Alarm Fault Code Listing
Table 10. Alarm Fault Codes (Continued)
Severity
(LED)
CODE
Name
Event Description
CATEGORY
ID
Class †
DIAG
Major
(MJR)
66
NIF event ind
Diagnostic event relating to the Nodal
Interworking Function. Persistent events of
this type should be reported to your support
representative.
NONE
4
Major
(MJR)
67
NIF err ind
Diagnostic event relating to the Network
Interface Function. Persistent events of this
type should be reported to your support
representative.
NONE
4
Major
(MJR)
68
SNRT unavail
Reserved
SIG
NC
4
0
Major
(MJR)
69
C7RT unavail
One or more SS7 routes are unavailable
SIG
NC
4
0
Major
(MJR)
70
RAS unavail
One or more SIGTRAN Application Servers are
unavailable
SIG
NC
4
0
Major
(MJR)
71
RAS under res
One or more SIGTRAN Application Servers are
available but have insufficient number of ASP
(load sharing mode only)
SIG
NC
4
0
Major
(MJR)
73
M2PA event ind
Diagnostic event relating to the M2PA protocol
layer. Persistent events of this type should be
reported to your support representative.
NONE
4
Major
(MJR)
74
M2PA err ind
Diagnostic event relating to the M2PA protocol
layer. Persistent events of this type should be
reported to your support representative.
NONE
4
Major
(MJR)
81
Hard Disk
Drive Failure
A RAID 1 hard disk drive is unavailable or out
of synchronisation with the other disk of the
RAID array
SYS
drive ID
Minor
(MRN)
16
Alarm Test 1
This event indicates that the user has invoked
the alarm test for alarm class 1 using the
ALTEI command.
SYS
0
5
0
Minor
(MRN)
19
System Restart
This event indicates the time at which a
system restart occurred.
SYS
0
5
0
Minor
(MRN)
34
New sync
source
The Signaling Gateway has selected a new
PCM as the clock synchronization source.
PCM
PCM
5
Minor
(MRN)
79
Default alarm
The system has detected a low priority low
level alarm condition. The user should contact
their support contact for further information.
SYS
5
† The “Class” column provides the initial default setting of the alarm class for each fault code. The alarm class for any particular alarm code
is configurable using the ALCLS command and can be viewed using the ALCLP command. Changing the alarm class for an event type changes
the Severity indicated by the LEDs and/or relays.
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Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
Chapter 9: Remote Data Center Operation
The Remote Data Center (RDC) service allows the transfer of data between the Dialogic® DSI Signaling
Gateway and a remote computer located at a remote management center. Data is transferred over a local or
wide area network using the ftp protocol.
Up to four different RDCs can be configured and each report can be configured to use two RDC's (one as the
primary RDC and the other as the backup RDC). This provides continuity of service in case the connection to
the primary RDC fails.
The RDC uses the ftp file transfer mechanism to exchange data with the remote site. The remote site requires
only an industry standard ftp server to handle the file transfer and does not require any proprietary software
on the remote computer. The Signaling Gateway “logs on” to the remote computer using a user-configured
user name and password.
Two categories of report are made to the RDC, Continuous Records and Periodic Reports. In each case, there
are several report types as detailed below.
The data transferred for each report type is stored in a different directory on the remote system using a new
file for each day's information. The directory name is user configurable.
9.1
Local Data Centers
As the Signaling Gateway can act as an ftp server, the Signaling Gateway itself can act as a “Remote Data
Center”’ locally storing files and providing RDC services. Configuration in the manner is particularly useful as
a backup when loss of communication with normal RDCs occur.
When the unit is configured to store continuous records and periodic reports locally, the user is responsible
for the management of the file space used on the Signaling Gateway. If the file system becomes full, the
Signaling Gateway is no longer able to back up files locally. A full file system has no other impact on the
operation of the Signaling Gateway and the user is able to correct the problem by removing files from within
the “siuftp” account.
9.2
Continuous Records
Continuous records provide the capability to transfer records to an RDC on a continuous basis in near real
time. The minimum number of records collected prior to transfer and the maximum time interval before the
transfer is attempted are configured by the user. This allows the user complete control over when records are
transferred to the remote data center, within system limits.
Continuous recording can be configured to support the occurrence and clearing of alarms to an RDC. The
records are formatted as a comma separated variable (CSV) text file.
9.3
Periodic Reporting
Periodic reports can be configured to support the transfer to an RDC of data at user-defined intervals,
typically allowing, for example, hourly reports of traffic measurements on a per SS7 link basis. The reports
are formatted as a CSV file.
9.3.1
C7 Link Traffic Measurements
Measurements collected on a per CCS SS7 signaling basis can be transferred periodically to the RDC. These
measurements can optionally be reset at the expiry of each interval.
9.3.2
PCM Traffic Measurements
Measurements collected on a per PCM basis can be transferred periodically to the RDC. These measurements
can optionally be reset at the expiry of each interval.
153
Chapter 9 Remote Data Center Operation
9.3.3
SIGTRAN Link Traffic Measurements
Measurements collected on a per SIGTRAN link basis can be transferred periodically to the RDC. These
measurements can optionally be reset at the expiry of each interval.
9.3.4
Ethernet Port Traffic Measurements
Measurements collected on performance data associated with Ethernet ports can be transferred periodically
to the RDC. These measurements can optionally be reset at the expiry of each interval.
9.3.5
System Measurements
Measurements collected on system performance data can be transferred periodically to the RDC. These
measurements can optionally be reset at the expiry of each interval.
9.4
RDC File Formats
This section specifies the file formats for records that are sent from the Signaling Gateway to a Remote Data
Center (RDC). As shown in the examples, the records are provided in CSV (Comma Separated Variable) text
file format.
9.4.1
Alarm Record File Format
10,11,1,0,3,A,2001-01-01,00:00:35,,,Linkset fail
11,9,1,0,2,A, 2001-01-01,00:00:35,,,C7 link fail
2,44,1,3,2,C, 2001-01-01,00:00:28, 2001-01-01,00:00:36,CR send fail
11,9,1,0,2,C, 2001-01-01,00:00:35, 2001-01-01,00:00:36,C7 link fail
10,11,1,0,3,C, 2001-01-01,00:00:35, 2001-01-01,00:00:36,Linkset fail
Field
Example
Range
Description
1
ALP
10
1 to 9999
Sequence reference number
of an entry in the alarm log
2
CODE
11
1 to 999
Fault code of a system alarm
3
ID
1
0 to 9999
Identifier for alarm (usage
depends on the alarm code)
4
DIAG
0
0 to 9999
Diagnostic of the alarm (usage
depends on the alarm code)
5
CLA
3
3,4,5
Alarm class number
6
ACTIVE
C
A or C
Indication whether the alarm
is Active or Cleared
7
DATE OCCURRED
1970-01-01
yyyy-mm-dd
Date the alarm occurred
8
TIME OCCURED
00:00:35
hh:mm:ss
Time the alarm occurred
9
DATE CLEARED
1970-01-01
yyyy-mm-dd
Date the alarm cleared
10
TIME CLEARED
00:00:36
hh:mm:ss
Time the alarm cleared
Linkset fail
Up to 12 text
characters
Title of the alarm
11
154
Title
TITLE
Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
9.4.2
Ethernet Port Measurements File Format
2005-11-16,14:40:01,1,265,2016,0,0,0,0,0,0,119,1136,0,0,0,0,0,0,2077
2005-11-16,14:40:01,4,4664602,3448084,0,0,0,0,0,0,1183455,1809415,0,0,0,0,0,0,2077
2005-11-16,14:45:01,1,301,2368,0,0,0,0,0,0,145,1379,0,0,0,0,0,0,2377
2005-11-16,14:45:01,4,10220775,7212808,0,0,0,0,0,0,1270164,3077831,0,0,0,0,0,0,2377
Field
9.4.3
Field
Example
Range
Description
2005-11-16
yyyy-mm-dd
Date when measurements collected
1
Date
2
Time
14:40:01
hh:mm:ss
Time when measurements collected
3
ETH
1
1 to 4
Ethernet port number
4
RXKBYTE
10220775
0 to 4294967295
Number of kilobytes of data received
(in kilobytes)
5
RXPKT
7212808
0 to 4294967295
Number of packets of data received
6
RXERR
0
0 to 4294967295
Number of receive errors detected
Number of received packets dropped by the
device driver
7
RXDROP
0
0 to 4294967295
8
RXFIFO
0
0 to 4294967295
The number of FIFO buffer errors received
0
0 to 4294967295
The number of packet framing errors
received
9
RXFRAME
10
RXCOMP
0
0 to 4294967295
The number of compressed packets received
11
RXMULT
0
0 to 4294967295
The number of multicast frames received
12
TXKBYTE
1270164
0 to 4294967295
Number of kilobytes of data transmitted
(in kilobytes)
13
TXPKT
3077831
0 to 4294967295
Number of packets of data transmitted
PCM Measurements File Format
2001-12-31,13:07:25,600,1-1,5,50,20,500
2001-01-01,01:01:00,86400,1-2,90,1000,1000,1000
2001-11-22,19:07:38,3600,2-1,1,0,0,0
Field
Title
Example
Range
Description
1
Date
2001-12-31
yyyy-mm-dd
Date when measurements
collected
2
Time
13:07:25
hh:mm:ss
Time when measurements
collected
3
Period
600
0:4294967295
Duration of measurement
period in seconds
4
PCM
3-1
x: 1 to 3
y: 1 to 4
PCM: x-y
board id – port id.
5
Frame Slip counter
50
0 to 4294967295
Number of frame slips
occurred.
6
Out of synchronism
transitions
1000
0 to 4294967295
Number of out-sync
transitions.
7
Errored Seconds
counter
20
0 to 4294967295
Number of Errored Seconds
occurred.
8
Severely Errored
Seconds counter
500
0 to 4294967295
Number of Severely Errored
Seconds.
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Chapter 9 Remote Data Center Operation
9.4.4
SS7 Link Measurements File Format
2001-12-31,13:07:25,600,3,1000,56,513,502,20,6512,6502,10
2001-01-01,01:01:00,86400,2,5000,10,1000,1000,10,1000,1000,0
2001-11-22,19:07:38,3600,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0
Field
Example
Range
Description
1
Date
2001-12-31
yyyy-mm-dd
Date when measurements
collected
2
Time
13:07:25
hh:mm:ss
Time when measurements
collected
3
Period
600
0 to 4294967295
Duration of measurement
period in seconds
4
SS7 Link
3
0 to 32
SS7 Link Number.
5
In Service
1000
0 to 4294967295
Duration of the link INSERVICE state.
6
Negative ACK
56
0 to 4294967295
Number of negative
acknowledgement received.
NOTE: Not applicable for
M2PA SS7 links and
is set to 0. See
SIGTRAN Link
measurements.
7
Octects Transmitted
513
0 to 4294967295
Number of octetcs
transmitted.
8
Octects Received
502
0 to 4294967295
Number of octetcs received.
9
Octets
Retransmitted
20
0 to 4294967295
Number of octetcs
retransmitted.
NOTE: Not applicable for
M2PA SS7 links and
is set to 0. See
SIGTRAN Link
measurements.
10
MSU Transmitted
6512
0 to 4294967295
Number of MSU
transmitted.
11
MSU Received
6502
0 to 4294967295
Number of MSU received.
0 to 4294967295
Number of congestion
events occurred.
12
9.4.5
Title
Congestion Counter
10
SIGTRAN Link Measurements File Format
2001-12-31,13:07:25,600,2,886,888,5,0,0
2001-01-01,01:01:00,86400,5,5000,6000,1000,1000,65
2001-11-22,19:07:38,3600,1,0,0,0,0,0
Field
156
Title
Example
Range
Description
1
Date
2001-12-31
yyyy-mm-dd
Date when measurements
collected
2
Time
13:07:25
hh:mm:ss
Time when measurements
collected
3
Period
600
0 to 4294967295
Duration of measurement
period in seconds
4
SIGTRAN Link
2
0 to 32
SIGTRAN Link Number.
5
Chunks Received
886
0 to 4294967295
Number of chunks received
in the link.
6
Chunks Transmitted
888
0 to 4294967295
Number of chunks
transmitted in the link.
7
Chunks
Retransmitted
5
0 to 4294967295
Number of chunks
retransmitted in the link.
8
Number of times out
of service.
0
0 to 4294967295
Duration in abort and
shutdown states.
9
Out of service
duration.
0
0 to 4294967295
Duration of the link out of
service since last reset.
Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
9.4.6
System Measurements File Format
2005-11-16,14:40:01,0,231,155,8462
2005-11-16,14:45:01,0,368,159,8762
2005-11-16,14:50:01,0,380,164,9062
Field
9.5
Field
Example
Range
Description
1
Date
2005-11-16
yyyy-mm-dd
Date when measurements collected
2
Time
14:40:01
hh:mm:ss
Time when measurements collected
3
NOVLD
0
0 to 65535
The number of periods of congestion
(overload) during the measurement period
4
MAXLOAD
380 (3.8%)
0 to 10000
Maximum load average measurement taken
over 1 minute (based on the UNIX load
average) multiplied by 100
5
LOADAVG
164 (1.64%)
0 to 10000
The average load on the system (based on
the UNIX load average) measurement taken
over the measurement period multiplied by
100
6
PERIOD
9062
0 to 4294967295
Duration of measurement period in seconds
RDC Configuration and Usage
This section provides a guide to the configuration of the Signaling Gateway for RDC operation, the text
demonstrates by example, the man machine language (MML) commands and parameters required to invoke
those services that transfer data to and from the RDC.
9.5.1
RDC Initialization
Initialize the RDC using the CNRDI command:
CNRDI:RDC=1,IPADDR=123.123.123.12,USER=ANONYMOUS,PASSWORD=ANONYMOUS,
LABEL=MYWORKSTN;
Unblock the RDC using the MNBLE command:
MNBLE:RDC=1;
Check the status of the RDC with the STRDP command:
STRDP;
9.5.2
Continuous Records
Continuous records, once created, are automatically transferred to the hard drive of the RDC. The user can
configure the transfer interval ranging from 30 seconds to 24 hours. A different directory should be specified
for each record type.
A file is created on the RDC during the first transfer for each record type during any 24 hour period beginning
at midnight. Filenames are unique, identifying the date of transfer in the form YYYYMMDD.
Alarm Data
As alarms are generated, they are stored in the alarm logs on the converter. A record of these alarms can
also be transferred to an RDC.
The following examples describe how a continuous record of type ALARM is initialized:
RDCRI:RECORD=3,CRTYPE=ALARM,PERIOD=00:30:00,MINREC=100,RDC1=1,
LABEL=ALARMS;
The RDCRI command creates record number 3 that is of type ALARM. The contents of the record is
transferred to the RDC when either the period or minrec, (minimum number of records), conditions are met.
RDC number 1 is the primary RDC; no secondary RDC has been identified. Records are transferred to the
ALARMS directory on the RDC.
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Chapter 9 Remote Data Center Operation
9.5.3
Periodic Reports
Periodic reports, once created, are periodically transferred to the RDC. The user can configure the transfer
interval ranging from five minutes to 24 hours. Each report type should be collected in a different directory.
A file is created on the RDC during the first transfer for each report type during any 24 hour period beginning
at midnight. Filenames are unique, identifying the date of transfer in the form YYYYMMDD.
Periodic report data can optionally be reset, (all values to zero), following each file transfer.
SS7 Signaling Link Traffic Measurements
Traffic measurement data can be generated for each SS7 signaling link.
The following examples describe how a periodic report is first created before SS7 Links (C7LINK) are selected
as the collection points:
RDPRI:REPORT=1,PRTYPE=MSC7,PERIOD=01:00:00,RDC1=4,
RESET=Y,LABEL=C7LINK;
The RDPRI command creates report number 1 that is of type MSC7. The contents of the report is transferred
to the RDC once each period.
RDC number 4 is the primary RDC; no secondary RDC is identified in the example. Reports are transferred to
the C7LINK directory on the RDC. Because the RESET parameter has been set to ‘Y’, data for each SS7 link
associated with this report is reset following each file transfer.
Once the periodic report has been initialized, existing SS7 links can be dynamically associated with it using
the RDPDI command or removed with the RDPDE command, for example:
RDPDI:REPORT=1,C7LINK=2&3;
RDPDE:REPORT=1,C7LINK=3;
The RDPDI command identifies SS7 links 2 and 3 as collection points for report 1. The RDPDE command
removes SS7 link 3 from the report.
PCM Traffic Measurements
Periodic reports conveying PCM performance data can be configured using the RDPRI command. PCMs are
associated with the report using the RDPDI command. PCMs can be removed from the report using the
RDPDE command.
The PRTYPE parameter should be MSPCM.
SIGTRAN Link Traffic Measurements
Periodic reports conveying SIGTRAN link performance data can be configured using the RDPRI command.
SIGTRAN Links (SNLINK) are associated with the report using the RDPDI command. SIGTRAN Links can be
removed from the report using the RDPDE command.
The PRTYPE parameter should be MSSL.
Ethernet Port Traffic Measurements
Periodic reports conveying Ethernet performance data can be configured using the RDPRI command. ETH
ports are associated with the report using the RDPDI command. ETH ports can be removed from the report
using the RDPDE command.
The PRTYPE parameter should be MSEP.
System Measurements
Periodic reports conveying system performance data can be configured using the RDPRI command. There are
no associated data types for use with this command.
The PRTYPE parameter should be MSSY.
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Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
9.5.4
Software Update
See Section 4.11.1, “Software Update from a Remote Data Center” on page 32 for example MML that
upgrades the Signaling Gateway software from an RDC.
9.5.5
Configuration Backup
See Section 4.12.1, “Configuration Backup to Remote Data Center” on page 33 for example MML that
upgrades the Signaling Gateway configuration from an RDC.
9.5.6
Configuration Update
See Section 4.13.1, “Configuration Update from a Remote Data Center” on page 33 for example MML that
upgrades the Signaling Gateway configuration from an RDC.
9.5.7
Software Option Installation
See Section 3.2.5, “License Update from Remote Data Center” on page 25 for example MML that installs
software options onto the Signaling Gateway from an RDC.
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Chapter 9 Remote Data Center Operation
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Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
Chapter 10: Signaling Server SNMP
10.1
Overview
The Signaling Server supports two distinct SNMP offerings:
•
•
A basic offering supporting a simple SNMP MIB: DK4032 SNMP. (See Section 10.1.2)
An extended SNMP offering comprehensive support for status and traps, Distributed Structure
Management Information (DSMI) SNMP. On SS7G21 and SS7G22 systems DSMI SNMP requires the
purchase of the SS7SBG20SNMP software license. On the SS7G31 and SS7G32 systems the DSMI SNMP
license is included with the purchased SGW license. (See Section 10.1.1.)
SNMP operation is disabled by default.
Activating SNMP
SNMP support can be activated for:
•
•
Basic SNMP, by setting the CNSNS MMI command's SNMP parameter to DK4032.
Extended SNMP operation (if licensed) by setting the CNSNS MMI command's SNMP parameter to DSMI.
The server should be restarted using the MNRSI command to activate the SNMP agent.
10.1.1
DSMI SNMP
DSMI SNMP functionality allows the configuration of V1 (RFC 1157), V2c (RFC 1901) or V3 (RFC 2571) SNMP
traps notifying external SNMP managers of alarm conditions and configuration state changes for the objects
supported on the MIB.
For all objects represented within the DSMI MIB — and these include platform hardware components as well
as configuration aspects — the MIB will maintain current object state and alarm conditions affecting the
object.
SNMP traps can be configured on a per-object basis such that the remote SNMP manager is notified
whenever the object is created, destroyed or the object state changed. Traps can also be configured to notify
the manager of all events affecting the object. SNMP traps identify the event affecting the object — be it an
alarm indication or configuration state change — and an event severity level.
For details of the DSMI SNMP MIB, supported alarms, SNMP traps and configuration refer to the Dialogic®
DSI Signaling Servers SNMP User Manual. (U05EPP01).
10.1.2
DK4032 SNMP
DK4032 SNMP supports an SNMP version 1 managed agent to allow a remote management platform to
interrogate the current alarm status of the Signaling Server. Variables are supported from the MIB II system
branch and from an enterprise MIB. The MIB provides read-only access to all variables.
The MIB II system branch provides basic information about managed node, that is, the Signaling Server. The
Enterprise-specific branch of the MIB provides information as to the number of outstanding alarms, grouped
by Category and Class (see Chapter 8, “Alarm Fault Code Listing”).
You should then use your SNMP manager to communicate with Signaling Server, using the SNMP UDP port
161.
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Chapter 10 Signaling Server SNMP
The MIB is shown in full below:
------------------------
--------------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------------- --The DataKinetics 4032 MIB
----------------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------------- -Management Information Base for SNMP Network Management on DataKinetics
products.
Copyright 1999-2008, Dialogic Corporation. All Rights Reserved.
The information in this document is subject to change without notice.
Enterprise number is 4032.
-----Issue
-----2
3
------
---------- ---Date
By
---------- ---08-Jul-02 GNK
26-Mar-08 EWT
---------- ----
------------------------------------------Changes
------------------------------------------- First published release
- Alarm classes change to ITU values
-------------------------------------------
-----
DK-GLOBAL-REG DEFINITIONS ::= BEGIN
IMPORTS
enterprises
OBJECT-TYPE
FROM RFC1155-SMI
FROM RFC1155-SMI;
--- The DataKinetics enterprise node
-datakinetics
OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { enterprises 4032 }
-- ------------------------------------------------------------------------- The MIB version stands alone at the top level
-dkMibVer OBJECT-TYPE
SYNTAX INTEGER
ACCESS read-only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
"The current version of the MIB running on the agent. Currently
the following values are recognised
0 - Pre-release
1 - Pre-release
2 - First published release"
::= { datakinetics 1 }
-- ------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------------------------------------------------- Top level nodes within DK4032 MIB.
-dkSysInfo
OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { datakinetics 2 }
-- ------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------------------------------------------------- The system information branch
-dkSysAlarms
OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { dkSysInfo 4 }
-- ------------------------------------------------------------------------- The Alarms branch
-dkAlrmCategory
OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { dkSysAlarms 1 }
dkAlrmPcm OBJECT-TYPE
SYNTAX INTEGER
ACCESS read-only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
"The number of active PCM alarms"
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Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
::= { dkAlrmCategory 1 }
dkAlrmSig OBJECT-TYPE
SYNTAX INTEGER
ACCESS read-only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
"The number of active signalling alarms"
::= { dkAlrmCategory 2 }
dkAlrmSys OBJECT-TYPE
SYNTAX INTEGER
ACCESS read-only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
"The number of active system alarms"
::= { dkAlrmCategory 3 }
dkAlrmClass
OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { dkSysAlarms 2 }
dkClass1 OBJECT-TYPE
SYNTAX INTEGER
ACCESS read-only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
"The number of active Class 5 alarms"
::= { dkAlrmClass 1 }
dkClass2 OBJECT-TYPE
SYNTAX INTEGER
ACCESS read-only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
"The number of active Class 4 alarms"
::= { dkAlrmClass 2 }
dkClass3 OBJECT-TYPE
SYNTAX INTEGER
ACCESS read-only
STATUS mandatory
DESCRIPTION
"The number of active Class 3 alarms"
::= { dkAlrmClass 3 }
END
-- ------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Chapter 11: Worked Configuration Examples
11.1
Backhaul Configuration
The following is an example of a Signaling Gateway working in a “backhaul” configuration. The Signaling
Gateway is connected to a single Signaling End Point (SEP) on the TDM side. On the IP side there is a single
Remote Application Server (RAS) that processes circuit-related messages. The RAS exists on two ASPs for
resilience. On the SS7 side, boards 2 and 3 are used to terminate two SS7 E1 PCMs. Each PCM carries 1
timeslot with SS7 signaling. The Point Code of the gateway equipment is 1, which is the same as that of the
application server.
Figure 12. Example Back-Haul Configuration
ASP 1
Signaling
Gateway
SEP
NC 1
PC 2
193.145.185.152
AS1
NC 1
PC 1
CIC 1-4095
PC 1
193.145.185.151
LS 1
ASP 2
193.145.185.153
The set of commands required to configure the system is as follows:
CNSYS:SYSID=THISSITE,IPADDR=193.145.185.151;
MNRSI;
CNBOI:BPOS=2,BRDTYPE=SPCI2S-4-2,SIGTYPE=SS7;
CNBOI:BPOS=3,BRDTYPE=SPCI2S-4-2,SIGTYPE=SS7;
CNPCI:PCM=2-3,PCMTYPE=E1,SYNCPRI=1;
CNPCI:PCM=3-3,PCMTYPE=E1,SYNCPRI=1;
C7LSI:LS=1,OPC=1,DPC=2,LSSIZE=2,SS7MD=ITU14,NC=1,NI=2;
C7SLI:C7LINK=1,EQU=2-1,TS=2-3-16,LS=1,SLC=0;
C7SLI:C7LINK=2,EQU=3-1,TS=3-3-16,LS=1,SLC=1;
C7RTI:C7RT=1,NC=1,DPC=2,LS1=1;
SNSLI:SNLINK=1,SNTYPE=SGM3UA,END=S,SS7MD=ITU14,NC=1,
IPADDR=193.145.185.152,LABEL=ASP1;
SNSLI:SNLINK=2,SNTYPE=SGM3UA,END=S,SS7MD=ITU14,NC=1,
IPADDR=193.145.185.153,LABEL=ASP2;
SNRAI:RAS=1,NC=1,DPC=1,RC=1,LABEL=AS1;
SNALI:RAS=1,SEQ=1,SNLINK=1;
SNALI:RAS=1,SEQ=2,SNLINK=2;
SGDPI:DEST=1,RAS=1,RTPRI=NONE,LABEL=AS1;
SGDPI:DEST=2,RTPRI=MTP,LABEL=TDM_SEP;
SGRKI:RKI=1,RKTAB=1,NC=1,DPC=1,BCIC=1,RANGE=4095,DEST=1;
SGRKI:RKI=2,RKTAB=1,NC=1,DPC=2,DEST=2;
SGIRI:IR=1,RKTAB=1,NC=1,DOMAIN=MTP;
SGIRI:IR=2,RKTAB=1,NC=1,DOMAIN=IP;
MNBLE:BPOS=2&&3;
MNBLE:SNLINK=1&&2;
MNBLE:C7LINK=1&&2;
MNBLE:RAS=1;
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11.2
M2PA Longhaul Configuration
The following is an example of a Signaling Gateway offering the longhaul of SS7 signaling over M2PA. The
Signaling Gateway is connected to a Signaling End Point (SEP) on the TDM side and an SEP on the IP side.
Each SEP treats the Signaling Gateway as an STP to reach its destination SEP. On the TDM side, board 1 is
used to terminate two SS7 E1 PCMs with clock being taken from SEP 1. Each PCM carries 1 timeslot with SS7
signaling to SEP 1. On the SIGTRAN IP side, two M2PA associations are used to convey two SS7 signaling
links to SEP 2. The Point Code of the gateway equipment is 3; the SEPs are Point Codes 1 and 2 respectively.
Note: Potentially, routing keys are not required in this scenario, in that you could simply configure a the
incoming route to go directly to the TDM destination. Routing keys are present since they allow
the Signaling Gateway to validate the DPC in the received data message.
Figure 13. M2PA Longhaul Configuration
SEP1
NC 1
PC 1
Signaling
Gateway
NC 1
PC 3
SEP2
NC 1
PC 2
194.192.185.11
194.192.185.111
The set of commands required to configure the system is as follows:
CNSYS:SYSID=SGW1,IPADDR=194.192.185.111;
MNRSI;
CNBOI:BPOS=1,BRDTYPE=SPCI2S-4-2,SIGTYPE=SS7;
CNBOI:BPOS=2,BRDTYPE=SPCI2S-4-2,SIGTYPE=SS7;
CNPCI:PCM=1-3,PCMTYPE=E1,SYNCPRI=1;
CNPCI:PCM=2-3,PCMTYPE=E1,SYNCPRI=1;
SNSLI:SNLINK=1,SNTYPE=M2PA,END=C,IPADDR=194.192.185.11,
HPORT=3565,PPORT=3565,LABEL=SEP2-1;
SNSLI:SNLINK=2,SNTYPE=M2PA,END=C,IPADDR=194.192.185.11, HPORT=3566,PPORT=3566,LABEL=SEP2-2;
C7LSI:LS=1,OPC=3,DPC=1,LSSIZE=2,SS7MD=ITU14,NC=1,NI=2;
C7LSI:LS=2,OPC=3,DPC=2,LSSIZE=2,SS7MD=ITU14,NC=1,NI=2;
C7SLI:C7LINK=1,EQU=1-1,TS=1-3-16,LS=1,SLC=0;
C7SLI:C7LINK=2,EQU=2-1,TS=2-3-16,LS=1,SLC=1;
C7SLI:C7LINK=3,SNLINK=1,LS=2,SLC=0;
C7SLI:C7LINK=4,SNLINK=2,LS=2,SLC=1;
C7RTI:C7RT=1,NC=1,DPC=1,LS1=1;
C7RTI:C7RT=2,NC=1,DPC=2,LS1=2;
SGDPI:DEST=1,RTPRI=MTP,LABEL=SEP1-2;
SGRKI:RKI=1,RKTAB=1,NC=1,DPC=1,DEST=1;
SGRKI:RKI=2,RKTAB=1,NC=1,DPC=2,DEST=1;
SGIRI:IR=1,NC=1,RKTAB=1;
MNBLE:BPOS=1&2;
MNBLE:SNLINK=1&2;
MNBLE:C7LINK=1&&4;
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11.3
Dual Resilient Configuration
Figure 14. Example Dual Resilient Configuration
LS1 towards
SS7 Network
SG 1
PC 2
NC 1
M3UA IP
Links
195.193.185.11
IP Host
PC 2
NC 1
SEP
1
PC 1
NC1
LS2 Inter SG
M2PA over IP
Linkset
195.193.185.111
SG 2
PC 2
NC 1
195.193.185.12
The following configuration commands are for SG1 and SG2, where SG1 and SG2 are in DUAL operation and
SG1, SG2 and the IP host are acting as a single Point Code. Note the configuration of LS2 between the two
SGs and the use of this link set for routes to the SS7 network.
Note: While this example shows a linkset with M2PA SS7 links over IP between the two Signaling
Gateways, the linkset could equally contain SS7 links utilizing timeslots on a PCM between the
two Signaling Gateways.
11.3.1
SG 1 Configuration
CNSYS:SYSID=SS7G2x 1,IPADDR=194.192.185.11;
CNBOI:BPOS=1,BRDTYPE=SPCI2S-4-2,SIGTYPE=SS7;
CNPCI:PCM=1-3,PCMTYPE=E1,SYNCPRI=1;
C7LSI:LS=1,OPC=2,DPC=1,LSSIZE=2,SS7MD=ITU14,NC=1,NI=2;
C7LSI:LS=2,OPC=2,DPC=2,LSSIZE=2,SS7MD=ITU14,NC=1,NI=2;
C7RTI:C7RT=1,DPC=1,LS1=1,LS2=2;
C7RTI:C7RT=2,DPC=2,LS1=2;
SNSLI:SNLINK=1,SNTYPE=M2PA,END=C,IPADDR=194.192.185.12,
LABEL=INTER-SG;
C7SLI:C7LINK=1,EQU=1-1,TS=1-3-16,LS=1,SLC=0;
C7SLI:C7LINK=2,SNLINK=1,LS=2,SLC=0;
SNSLI:SNLINK=2,SNTYPE=SGM3UA,END=S,SS7MD=ITU14,NC=1,
IPADDR=194.192.185.111,LABEL=IP Host;
SNRAI:RAS=1,NC=1,DPC=2,RC=1,LABEL=IP Host;
SNALI:RAS=1,SEQ=1,SNLINK=2;
SGDPI:DEST=1,AS=1,LABEL=IP Host;
SGDPI:DEST=2,RTPRI=MTP,LABEL=SS7 Net;
SGRKI:RKI=1,RKTAB=1,NC=1,DPC=2,DEST=1;
SGRKI:RKI=2,RKTAB=1,NC=1,DPC=1,DEST=2;
SGIRI:IR=1,RKTAB=1,NC=1;
MNBLE:BPOS=1;
MNBLE:SNLINK=1&2;
MNBLE:C7LINK=1&&2;
MNBLE:RAS=1;
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Chapter 11 Worked Configuration Examples
11.3.2
SG 2 Configuration
CNSYS:SYSID=SS7G2x 2,IPADDR=194.192.185.12;
CNBOI:BPOS=1,BRDTYPE=SPCI2S-4-2,SIGTYPE=SS7;
CNPCI:PCM=1-3,PCMTYPE=E1,SYNCPRI=1;
C7LSI:LS=1,OPC=2,DPC=1,LSSIZE=2,SS7MD=ITU14,NC=1,NI=2;
C7LSI:LS=2,OPC=2,DPC=2,LSSIZE=2,SS7MD=ITU14,NC=1,NI=2;
C7RTI:C7RT=1,DPC=1,LS1=1,LS2=2;
C7RTI:C7RT=2,DPC=2,LS1=2;
SNSLI:SNLINK=1,SNTYPE=M2PA,END=C,IPADDR=194.192.185.11,
LABEL=INTER-SG;
C7SLI:C7LINK=1,EQU=1-1,TS=1-3-16,LS=1,SLC=0;
C7SLI:C7LINK=2,SNLINK=1,LS=2,SLC=0;
SNSLI:SNLINK=2,SNTYPE=SGM3UA,END=S,SS7MD=ITU14,NC=1,
IPADDR=194.192.185.111,LABEL=IP Host;
SNRAI:RAS=1,NC=1,DPC=2,RC=1,LABEL=IP Host;
SNALI:RAS=1,SEQ=1,SNLINK=2;
SGDPI:DEST=1,RAS=1,LABEL=IP Host;
SGDPI:DEST=2,RTPRI=MTP,LABEL=SS7 Net;
SGRKI:RKI=1,RKTAB=1,NC=1,DPC=2,DEST=1;
SGRKI:RKI=2,RKTAB=1,NC=1,DPC=1,DEST=2;
SGIRI:IR=1,RKTAB=1,NC=1;
MNBLE:BPOS=1;
MNBLE:SNLINK=1&2;
MNBLE:C7LINK=1&&2;
MNBLE:RAS=1;
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Chapter 12: Network Time Protocol
The Network Time Protocol, NTP, allows synchronization of the internal system clock with an external time
source thus providing greater accuracy for system alarm events and SNMP trap notifications.
NTP can be activated using the CNTDS (set time and date) command, while up to 16 remote NTP servers can
be configured using the CNTPI command. The current status of the NTP servers can be identified using the
STTPP command.
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Chapter 13: Command Summary
Alarm Commands
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
ALCLS - Alarm Class Set
ALCLP - Alarm Class Print
ALFCP - Alarm Fault Code Print
ALLIP - Alarm List Print
ALLOP - Alarm Log Print
ALREI - Alarm Reset Initiate
ALTEI - Alarm Test Initiate
ALTEE - Alarm Test End
Configuration Commands
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
CNBOI - Configuration Board Initiate
CNBOE - Configuration Board End
CNBOP - Configuration Board Print
CNBUI - Configuration Back Up Initiate
CNMOI - Configuration Monitor Initiate
CNMOE - Configuration Monitor End
CNMOP - Configuration Monitor Print
CNOBP - Display TRAP Configuration
CNOBS - Set TRAP Configuration
CNPCI - Configuration PCM Initiate
CNPCC - Configuration PCM Change
CNPCE - Configuration PCM End
CNPCP - Configuration PCM Print
CNRDI - Configuration Remote Data Center Initiate
CNRDC - Configuration Remote Data Center Change
CNRDE - Configuration Remote Data Center End
CNRDP - Configuration Remote Data Center Print
CNSMC - Change SNMP Manager Configuration
CNSME - End SNMP Manager Configuration
CNSMI - Set SNMP Manager Configuration
CNSMP - Display SNMP Manager Configuration
CNSNS - Configuration SNMP Set
CNSNP - Configuration SNMP Print
CNSWP - Configuration Software Print
CNSYS - Configuration System Set
CNSYP - Configuration System Print
CNTDS - Configuration Time and Date Set
CNTDP - Configuration Time And Date Print
CNTOS - Configuration Timeout Value Set
CNTOP - Configuration Timeout Value Print
CNTPE - Configuration Network Time Protocol Server End
CNTPI - Configuration Network Time Protocol Server Initiate
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Chapter 13 Command Summary
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
CNTPP - Configuration Network Time Protocol Print
CNTSP - Configuration Timeslot Print
CNUPI - Configuration Update Initiate
CNUSC - Change SNMP v3 User Configuration
CNUSE - End SNMP v3
CNUSI - Set SNMP v3
CNUSP - Display SNMP v3
CNXCI - Configuration Cross Connect Initiate
CNXCE - Configuration Cross Connect End
CNXCP - Configuration Cross Connect Print
CCS SS7 Signaling Commands
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
C7LSI - CCS SS7 Link Set Initiate
C7LSC - CCS SS7 Link Set Change
C7LSE - CCS SS7 Link Set End
C7LSP - CCS SS7 Link Set Print
C7RTI - CCS SS7 Route Initiate
C7RTC - CCS SS7 Route Change
C7RTE - CCS SS7 Route End
C7RTP - CCS SS7 Route Print
C7SLI - CCS SS7 Signaling Link Initiate
C7SLC - CCS SS7 Signaling Link Change
C7SLE - CCS SS7 Signaling Link End
C7SLP - CCS SS7 Signaling Link Print
IP Commands
•
•
•
•
•
IPEPS - Set Ethernet Port Configuration
IPEPP - Display Ethernet Port Configuration
IPGWI - Internet Protocol Gateway Initiate
IPGWE - Internet Protocol Gateway End
IPGWP - Internet Protocol Gateway Print
MML Commands
•
•
•
•
•
MMLOI - MML Log Off Initiate
MMLOP - MML Log Off Print
MMLOS - MML Log Off Set
MMPTC - MML Port Change
MMPTP - MML Port Print
Maintenance Commands
•
•
•
•
•
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MNBLI - Maintenance Blocking Initiate
MNBLE - Maintenance Blocking End
MNINI - Maintenance Inhibit Initiate
MNINE - Maintenance Inhibit End
MNRSI - Maintenance Restart System Initiate
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Measurement Commands
•
•
•
•
•
•
MSC7P - Measurements SS7 Print
MSEPP - Measurement Ethernet Port Print
MSLCP - Measurement of License Capability Print
MSPCP - Measurements PCM Print
MSSLP - Measurements SIGTRAN Link Print
MSSYP - Measurements System Print
Remote Data Center Commands
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
RDCRI - Remote Data Center Continuous Record Initiate
RDCRC - Remote Data Center Continuous Record Change
RDCRE - Remote Data Center Continuous Record End
RDCRP - Remote Data Center Continuous Record Print
RDPDI - Remote Data Center Periodic Data Initiate
RDPDE - Remote Data Center Periodic Data End
RDPDP - Remote Data Center Periodic Data Print
RDPRI - Remote Data Center Periodic Report Initiate
RDPRC - Remote Data Center Periodic Report Change
RDPRE - Remote Data Center Periodic Report End
RDPRP - Remote Data Center Periodic Report Print
Signaling Gateway Commands
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
SGDPI - Signaling Gateway Destination Point Initiate
SGDPC - Signaling Gateway Destination Point Change
SGDPE - Signaling Gateway Destination Point End
SGDPP - Signaling Gateway Destination Point Print
SGIRI - Signaling Gateway Incoming Route Initiate
SGIRC - Signaling Gateway Incoming Route Change
SGIRE - Signaling Gateway Incoming Route End
SGIRP - Signaling Gateway Incoming Route Print
SGRKI - Signaling Gateway Routing Key Initiate
SGRKE - Signaling Gateway Routing Key End
SGRKP - Signaling Gateway Routing Key Print
SIGTRAN Commands
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
SNALI - SIGTRAN Application Server List Initiate
SNALE - SIGTRAN Application Server List End
SNALP - SIGTRAN Application Server List Print
SNRAI - SIGTRAN Remote Application Server Initiate
SNRAE - SIGTRAN Remote Application Server End
SNRAP - SIGTRAN Remote Application Server Print
SNNAI - SIGTRAN Network Appearance Initiate
SNNAE - SIGTRAN Network Appearance End
SNNAP - SIGTRAN Network Appearance Print
SNSLI - SIGTRAN Signaling Link Initiate
SNSLC - SIGTRAN Signaling Link Change
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•
•
SNSLE - SIGTRAN Signaling Link End
SNSLP - SIGTRAN Signaling Link Print
Status Commands
•
•
•
•
•
•
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•
•
•
•
•
•
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STALP - Status Alarm Print
STRAP - Status Remote Application Server Print
STBOP - Status Board Print
STCRP - Status C7 Route Print
STC7P - Status C7 Link Print
STDDP - Status Disk Drive Print
STEPP - Status Ethernet Port Print
STIPP - Status IP Print
STLCP - Status Licensing Print
STPCP - Status PCM Print
STRDP - Status Remote Data Center Print
STSLP - Status SIGTRAN Link Print
STSYP - Status System Print
STTPP - Network Time Protocol Status Print
Dialogic® DSI Signaling Server SGW Mode User Manual Issue 5
Glossary
ASP
Application Server Process. A process instance of an Remote Application Server
(RAS). An ASP serves as an active or backup process of an Application Server (for
example, part of a distributed virtual switch or database). Examples of ASPs are
processes (or process instances) of MGCs, IP SCPs or IP HLRs. An ASP contains an
SCTP endpoint and may be configured to process signaling traffic within more than
one Application Server.
AIS
Alarm Indication Signal
ANSI
American National Standards Institute
BER
Bit Error Rate
CCITT
Consultative Committee on International Telegraphy and Telephony
CCS
Common Channel Signaling
CIC
Circuit Identification Code
CPU
Central Processing Unit
DC
Direct Current
DSC
Digital Signaling Converter
DSI
Distributed Signaling Interface
DSMI
Dialogic® / Distributed Structured Management Information
DSR
Data Set Ready
DTE
Data Terminal Equipment
DTR
Data Terminal Ready
FTP
File Transfer Protocol
IETF
Internet Engineering Task Force
IP
Internet Protocol
ITU
International Telecommunication Union
LIU
Line Interface Unit
M2PA
MTP 2 Peer to Peer Adaptation Layer
M3UA
MTP3 User Adaptation Layer
MML
Man-Machine Interface Language
MTP
Message Transfer Part (of SS7 signaling)
NTP
Network Time Protocol
PCM
Pulse Code Modulation
PSU
Power Supply Unit
RAS
Remote Application Server. A logical entity serving a specific Routing Key. An example
of a RAS is a virtual switch element handling all call processing for a unique range of
PSTN trunks, identified by an SS7 SIO/DPC/OPC/CIC_range. Another example is a
virtual database element, handling all HLR transactions for a particular SS7 DPC/OPC/
SCCP_SSN combination. The RAS contains a set of one or more unique Application
Server Processes (ASPs), of which one or more is normally actively processing traffic.
Note that there is a 1:1 relationship between an RAS and a Routing Key.
RDC
Remote Data Center
SCTP
Stream Control Transmission Protocol
SGW
Signaling Gateway
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Chapter 14 Glossary
SIGTRAN
Signaling Transport
SIU
Signaling Interface Unit
SNMP
Simple Network Management Protocol
SS7
Signaling System Number 7
SSH
Secure Shell
STP
Signaling Transfer Point
SEP
Signaling End Point
SNM
Signaling Network Management
TDM
Time-Division Multiplexing
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