null  null
Mixed-Signal DSP Controller with CAN
ADSP-21992
Dual 16-bit auxiliary PWM outputs
16 general-purpose flag I/O pins
3 programmable 32-bit interval timers
SPI communications port with master or slave operation
Synchronous serial communications port (SPORT) capable of
software UART emulation
Controller area network (CAN) module, fully compliant with
V2.0B standard
Integrated watchdog timer
Dedicated peripheral interrupt controller with software
priority control
Multiple boot modes
Precision 1.0 V voltage reference
Integrated power-on-reset (POR) generator
Flexible power management with selectable power-down
and idle modes
2.5 V internal operation with 3.3 V I/O
Operating temperature ranges of –40⬚C to +85⬚C and –40⬚C
to +125⬚C
FEATURES
ADSP-2199x, 16-bit, fixed-point DSP core with up to 160
MIPS sustained performance
48K words of on-chip RAM, as 32K words on-chip 24-bit program RAM, and 16K words on-chip, 16-bit data RAM
External memory interface
Dedicated memory DMA controller for data/instruction
transfer between internal/external memory
Programmable PLL and flexible clock generation circuitry
enables full-speed operation from low speed
input clocks
IEEE JTAG Standard 1149.1 test access port supports on-chip
emulation and system debugging
8-channel, 14-bit analog-to-digital converter system, with up
to 20 MSPS sampling rate (at 160 MHz core clock rate)
3-phase 16-bit center based PWM generation unit with 12.5
ns resolution at 160 MHz core clock (CCLK) rate
Dedicated 32-bit encoder interface unit with companion
encoder event timer
CLOCK
GENERATOR/PLL
JTAG
TEST AND
EMULATION
ADSP-219x
4K ⫻ 24
PM ROM
16K ⫻ 16
DM RAM
32K ⫻ 24
PM RAM
DSP CORE
ADDRESS
I/O
BUS
EXTERNAL
MEMORY
INTERFACE
(EMI)
PM ADDRESS/DATA
DATA
CONTROL
DM ADDRESS/DATA
I/O REGISTERS
SPI
PWM
GENERATION
UNIT
ENCODER
INTERFACE
UNIT
(AND EET)
SPORT
TIMER 0
AUXILIARY
PWM
UNIT
TIMER 1
FLAG
I/O
TIMER 2
WATCHDOG
TIMER
INTERRUPT
CONTROLLER
(ICNTL)
CONTROLLER AREA
NETWORK (CAN)
ADC
CONTROL
POR
MEMORY DMA
CONTROLLER
PIPELINE
FLASH ADC
VREF
Figure 1. Functional Block Diagram
Rev. A
Information furnished by Analog Devices is believed to be accurate and reliable.
However, no responsibility is assumed by Analog Devices for its use, nor for any
infringements of patents or other rights of third parties that may result from its use.
Specifications subject to change without notice. No license is granted by implication
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One Technology Way, P.O. Box 9106, Norwood, MA 02062-9106 U.S.A.
Tel: 781.329.4700
www.analog.com
Fax: 781.326.3113
©2007 Analog Devices, Inc. All rights reserved.
ADSP-21992
TABLE OF CONTENTS
General Description ................................................. 3
Power Supplies ................................................... 14
DSP Core Architecture ........................................... 3
Booting Modes ................................................... 14
Memory Architecture ............................................ 5
Instruction Set Description .................................... 14
Bus Request and Bus Grant ..................................... 6
Development Tools .............................................. 15
DMA Controller ................................................... 7
Designing an Emulator-Compatible DSP Board .......... 16
DSP Peripherals Architecture .................................. 7
Additional Information ........................................ 16
Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) Port ......................... 7
Pin Function Descriptions ........................................ 17
DSP Serial Port (SPORT) ........................................ 8
Specifications ........................................................ 20
Controller Area Network (CAN) Module ................... 9
Operating Conditions ........................................... 20
Analog-to-Digital Conversion System ........................ 9
Electrical Characteristics ....................................... 23
Voltage Reference ................................................. 9
Absolute Maximum Ratings ................................... 30
PWM Generation Unit ......................................... 10
ESD Caution ...................................................... 30
Auxiliary PWM Generation Unit ............................ 10
Timing Specifications ........................................... 30
Encoder Interface Unit ......................................... 10
Power Dissipation ............................................... 50
Flag I/O (FIO) Peripheral Unit ............................... 11
Test Conditions ..................................................... 51
Watchdog Timer ................................................ 11
Output Disable Time ............................................ 51
General-Purpose Timers ....................................... 11
Output Enable Time ............................................ 51
Interrupts ......................................................... 11
Example System Hold Time Calculation ................... 51
Peripheral Interrupt Controller .............................. 12
Pin Configurations ................................................. 52
Low Power Operation .......................................... 12
Outline Dimensions ................................................ 57
Clock Signals ..................................................... 13
Ordering Guide ..................................................... 59
Reset and Power-On Reset (POR) ........................... 13
REVISION HISTORY
8/07—Rev. 0 to Rev. A
Added RoHS part number to Ordering Guide ............... 59
Rev. A |
Page 2 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
GENERAL DESCRIPTION
The ADSP-21992 is a mixed-signal DSP controller based on the
ADSP-2199x DSP core, suitable for a variety of high performance industrial motor control and signal processing
applications that require the combination of a high performance
DSP and the mixed-signal integration of embedded control
peripherals, such as analog-to-digital conversion with communications interfaces such as CAN. Target applications include
industrial motor drives, uninterruptible power supplies, optical
networking control, data acquisition systems, test and measurement Systems, and portable instrumentation.
The ADSP-21992 integrates the fixed-point ADSP-2199x family-based architecture with a serial port, an SPI-compatible port,
a DMA controller, three programmable timers, general-purpose
programmable flag pins, extensive interrupt capabilities, onchip program and data memory spaces, and a complete set of
embedded control peripherals that permits fast motor control
and signal processing in a highly integrated environment.
The ADSP-21992 architecture is code compatible with previous
ADSP-217x-based ADMCxxx products. Although the architectures are compatible, the ADSP-21992, with ADSP-2199x
architecture, has a number of enhancements over earlier architectures. The enhancements to computational units, data
address generators, and program sequencer make the
ADSP-21992 more flexible and easier to program than the previous ADSP-21xx embedded DSPs.
Indirect addressing options provide addressing flexibility—premodify with no update, pre- and post-modify by an immediate
8-bit, twos complement value and base address registers for easier implementation of circular buffering.
The ADSP-21992 integrates 48K words of on-chip memory
configured as 32K words (24-bit) of program RAM, and 16K
words (16-bit) of data RAM.
• Operate the embedded control peripherals (ADC, PWM,
EIU, etc.).
DSP CORE ARCHITECTURE
• 6.25 ns instruction cycle time (internal), for up to
160 MIPS sustained performance (6.67 ns instruction cycle
time for 150 MIPS sustained performance and 10.0 ns
instruction cycle time for 100 MIPS sustained
performance).
• ADSP-218x family code compatible with the same easy to
use algebraic syntax.
• Single cycle instruction execution.
• Up to 1M words of addressable memory space with 24 bits
of addressing width.
• Dual-purpose program memory for both instruction and
data storage.
• Fully transparent instruction cache allows dual operand
fetches in every instruction cycle.
• Unified memory space permits flexible address generation,
using two independent DAG units.
• Independent ALU, multiplier/accumulator, and barrel
shifter computational units with dual 40-bit accumulators.
• Single cycle context switch between two sets of computational and DAG registers.
• Parallel execution of computation and memory
instructions.
• Pipelined architecture supports efficient code execution at
speeds up to 160 MIPS.
Fabricated in a high speed, low power, CMOS process, the
ADSP-21992 operates with a 6.25 ns instruction cycle time for a
160 MHz CCLK, with a 6.67 ns instruction cycle time for a
150 MHz CCLK, and with a 10.0 ns instruction cycle time for a
100 MHz CCLK. All instructions, except two multiword
instructions, execute in a single DSP cycle.
The flexible architecture and comprehensive instruction set of
the ADSP-21992 support multiple operations in parallel. For
example, in one processor cycle, the ADSP-21992 can:
• Generate an address for the next instruction fetch.
• Fetch the next instruction.
• Perform one or two data moves.
• Update one or two data address pointers.
• Perform a computational operation.
These operations take place while the processor continues to:
• Register file computations with all nonconditional, nonparallel computational instructions.
• Powerful program sequencer provides zero overhead looping and conditional instruction execution.
• Architectural enhancements for compiled C code
efficiency.
• Architecture enhancements beyond ADSP-218x family are
supported with instruction set extensions for added registers, ports, and peripherals.
The clock generator module of the ADSP-21992 includes clock
control logic that allows the user to select and change the main
clock frequency. The module generates two output clocks: the
DSP core clock, CCLK; and the peripheral clock, HCLK. CCLK
can sustain clock values of up to 160 MHz, while HCLK can be
equal to CCLK or CCLK/2 for values up to a maximum 80 MHz
peripheral clock at the 160 MHz CCLK rate.
The ADSP-21992 instruction set provides flexible data moves
and multifunction (one or two data moves with a computation)
instructions. Every single word instruction can be executed in a
single processor cycle. The ADSP-21992 assembly language uses
• Receive and transmit data through the serial port.
• Receive or transmit data over the SPI port.
• Access external memory through the external memory
interface.
Rev. A |
• Decrement the timers.
Page 3 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
DAG1
DAG2
4 4 16 4 4 16
PROGRAM
SEQUENCER
BLOCK2
CACHE
64 24-BIT
BLOCK3
DATA
ADDRESS 24 BIT
DATA
ADDRESS 24 BIT
ADDRESS 16 BIT
DATA
DATA
ADDRESS 16 BIT
ADSP-219x DSP CORE
BLOCK0
BLOCK1
INTERNAL MEMORY
FOUR INDEPENDENT BLOCKS
JTAG
TEST AND
EMULATION
6
EXTERNAL PORT
PM ADDRESS BUS
I/O ADDRESS 18
24
ADDR BUS
MUX
20
DM ADDRESS BUS 24
DMA CONNECT
DMA ADDRESS 24
PM DATA BUS
DATA
REGISTER
FILE
MULT
DATA BUS
MUX
DMA DATA 24
PX
24
16
DM DATA BUS 16
I/O DATA
INPUT
REGISTERS
RESULT
REGISTERS
16 16-BIT
16
I/O PROCESSOR
I/O REGISTERS
(MEMORY-MAPPED)
BARREL
SHIFTER
ALU
CONTROL
STATUS
BUFFERS
EMBEDDED
CONTROL
PERIPHERALS
AND
COMMUNICATIONS
PORTS
DMA CONTROLLER
SYSTEM INTERRUPT
CONTROLLER
PROGRAMMABLE
FLAGS (16)
TIMERS
(3)
3
Figure 2. Block Diagram
an algebraic syntax for ease of coding and readability. A comprehensive set of development tools supports program
development.
The block diagram (Figure 2) shows the architecture of the
embedded SHARC core. It contains three independent computational units: the ALU, the multiplier/accumulator (MAC), and
the shifter. The computational units process 16-bit data from
the register file and have provisions to support multiprecision
computations. The ALU performs a standard set of arithmetic
and logic operations; division primitives are also supported. The
MAC performs single cycle multiply, multiply/add, and multiply/subtract operations. The MAC has two 40-bit accumulators,
which help with overflow. The shifter performs logical and
arithmetic shifts, normalization, denormalization, and derive
exponent operations. The shifter can be used to efficiently
implement numeric format control, including multiword and
block floating-point representations.
Register usage rules influence placement of input and results
within the computational units. For most operations, the data
registers of the computational units act as a data register file,
permitting any input or result register to provide input to any
unit for a computation. For feedback operations, the computational units let the output (result) of any unit be input to any
unit on the next cycle. For conditional or multifunction instructions, there are restrictions on which data registers may provide
inputs or receive results from each computational unit. For
more information, see the ADSP-2199x DSP Instruction Set
Reference.
A powerful program sequencer controls the flow of instruction
execution. The sequencer supports conditional jumps, subroutine calls, and low interrupt overhead. With internal loop
counters and loop stacks, the ADSP-21992 executes looped code
with zero overhead; no explicit jump instructions are required
to maintain loops.
Two data address generators (DAGs) provide addresses for
simultaneous dual operand fetches (from data memory and program memory). Each DAG maintains and updates four 16-bit
address pointers. Whenever the pointer is used to access data
(indirect addressing), it is pre- or post-modified by the value of
one of four possible modify registers. A length value and base
address may be associated with each pointer to implement automatic modulo addressing for circular buffers. Page registers in
the DAGs allow circular addressing within 64K word boundaries of each of the 256 memory pages, but these buffers may not
cross page boundaries. Secondary registers duplicate all the primary registers in the DAGs; switching between primary and
secondary registers provides a fast context switch.
Efficient data transfer in the core is achieved with the use of
internal buses:
• Program memory address (PMA) bus
• Program memory data (PMD) bus
• Data memory address (DMA) bus
• Data memory data (DMD) bus
• Direct memory access address bus
• Direct memory access data bus
Rev. A |
Page 4 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
The two address buses (PMA and DMA) share a single external
address bus, allowing memory to be expanded off-chip, and the
two data buses (PMD and DMD) share a single external data
bus. Boot memory space and I/O memory space also share the
external buses.
Program memory can store both instructions and data, permitting the ADSP-21992 to fetch two operands in a single cycle, one
from program memory and one from data memory. The DSP
dual memory buses also let the embedded SHARC core fetch an
operand from data memory and the next instruction from program memory in a single cycle.
MEMORY ARCHITECTURE
0x00 0000
0x00 3FFF
0x00 4000
0x00 7FFF
0x00 8000
0x00 BFFF
0x00 C000
BLOCK 0: 16K 24-BIT PM RAM
BLOCK 1: 16K 24-BIT PM RAM
BLOCK 2: 16K 16-BIT DM RAM
PAGE 0 (64K) ON-CHIP
(0 WAIT STATE)
RESERVED (16K)
0x00 FFFF
0x01 0000
EXTERNAL MEMORY
(4M–64K)
PAGES 1 TO 63 BANK 0
(OFF-CHIP) MS0
0x40 0000
The ADSP-21992 provides 48K words of on-chip SRAM memory. This memory is divided into three blocks: two 16K × 24-bit
blocks (Blocks 0 and 1) and one 16K × 16-bit block (Block 2). In
addition, the ADSP-21992 provides a 4K × 24-bit block of program memory boot ROM (that is reserved by ADI for boot load
routines). The memory map of the ADSP-21992 is illustrated in
Figure 2.
As shown in Figure 2, the three internal memory RAM blocks
reside in memory page 0. The entire DSP memory map consists
of 256 pages (Pages 0 to 255), and each page is 64K words long.
External memory space consists of four memory banks
(Banks3–0) and supports a wide variety of memory devices.
Each bank is selectable using unique memory select lines
(MS3–0) and has configurable page boundaries, wait states, and
wait state modes. The 4K words of on-chip boot ROM populates
the top of Page 255, while the remaining 254 pages are addressable off-chip. I/O memory pages differ from external memory in
that they are 1K word long, and the external I/O pages have
their own select pin (IOMS). Pages 31–0 of I/O memory space
reside on-chip and contain the configuration registers for the
peripherals. Both the ADSP-2199x core and DMA capable
peripherals can access the entire memory map of the DSP.
NOTE: The physical external memory addresses are limited by
20 address lines, and are determined by the external data width
and packing of the external memory space. The Strobe signals
(MS3-0) can be programmed to allow the user to change starting page addresses at runtime.
EXTERNAL MEMORY (4M)
PAGES 64 TO 127 BANK 1
(OFF-CHIP) MS1
EXTERNAL MEMORY (4M)
PAGES 128 TO 191 BANK 2
(OFF-CHIP) MS2
EXTERNAL MEMORY
(4M–64K)
PAGES 192 TO 254 BANK 3
(OFF-CHIP) MS3
0x80 0000
0xC0 0000
0xFF 0000
0xFF 0FFF
0xFF 1000
0xFF FFFF
BLOCK 3: 4K 24-BIT
PM ROM
UNUSED ON-CHIP
MEMORY (60K)
PAGE 255
(INCLUDES ON-CHIP BOOT ROM)
Figure 3. Core Memory Map at Reset
Internal (On-Chip) Memory
The unified program and data memory space of the
ADSP-21992 consists of 16M locations that are accessible
through two 24-bit address buses, the PMA, and DMA buses.
The DSP uses slightly different mechanisms to generate a 24-bit
address for each bus. The DSP has three functions that support
access to the full memory map.
• The DAGs generate 24-bit addresses for data fetches from
the entire DSP memory address range. Because DAG index
(address) registers are 16 bits wide and hold the lower
16 bits of the address, each of the DAGs has its own 8-bit
page register (DMPGx) to hold the most significant eight
address bits. Before a DAG generates an address, the program must set the DAG DMPGx register to the appropriate
memory page. The DMPG1 register is also used as a page
register when accessing external memory. The program
must set DMPG1 accordingly, when accessing data variables in external memory. A “C” program macro is
provided for setting this register.
• The program sequencer generates the addresses for
instruction fetches. For relative addressing instructions, the
program sequencer bases addresses for relative jumps, calls,
and loops on the 24-bit program counter (PC). In direct
addressing instructions (two word instructions), the
instruction provides an immediate 24-bit address value.
The PC allows linear addressing of the full 24-bit
address range.
• For indirect jumps and calls that use a 16-bit DAG address
register for part of the branch address, the program
sequencer relies on an 8-bit indirect jump page (IJPG)
Rev. A |
Page 5 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
register to supply the most significant eight address bits.
Before a cross page jump or call, the program must set the
program sequencer IJPG register to the appropriate memory page.
The ADSP-21992 has 4K words of on-chip ROM that holds
boot routines. The DSP starts executing instructions from the
on-chip boot ROM, which starts the boot process. For more
information, see Booting Modes on Page 14. The on-chip boot
ROM is located on Page 255 in the DSP memory space map,
starting at address 0xFF0000.
255) are available for external peripheral devices. External I/O
pages have their own select pin (IOMS). The DSP instruction set
provides instructions for accessing I/O space.
0x00::0x000
ON-CHIP
PERIPHERALS
16-BITS
PAGES 0 TO 31
1024 WORDS/PAGE
2 PERIPHERALS/PAGE
0x1F::0x3FF
0x20::0x000
External (Off-Chip) Memory
Each of the off-chip memory spaces of the ADSP-21992 has a
separate control register, so applications can configure unique
access parameters for each space. The access parameters include
read and write wait counts, wait state completion mode, I/O
clock divide ratio, write hold time extension, strobe polarity,
and data bus width. The core clock and peripheral clock ratios
influence the external memory access strobe widths. For more
information, see Clock Signals on Page 13. The off-chip memory spaces are:
• External memory space (MS3–0 pins)
• I/O memory space (IOMS pin)
• Boot memory space (BMS pin)
All of these off-chip memory spaces are accessible through the
external port, which can be configured for 8-bit or 16-bit
data widths.
OFF-CHIP
PERIPHERALS
16-BITS
PAGES 32 TO 255
1024 WORDS/PAGE
0xFF::0x3FF
Figure 4. I/O Memory Map
Boot Memory Space
Boot memory space consists of one off-chip bank with 254
pages. The BMS memory bank pin selects boot memory space.
Both the ADSP-2199x core and DMA capable peripherals can
access the DSP off-chip boot memory space. After reset, the
DSP always starts executing instructions from the on-chip
boot ROM.
External Memory Space
External memory space consists of four memory banks. These
banks can contain a configurable number of 64K word pages. At
reset, the page boundaries for external memory have Bank0
containing pages 1 to 63, Bank1 containing pages 64 to 127,
Bank2 containing pages 128 to 191, and Bank3 containing pages
192 to 254. The MS3-0 memory bank pins select Banks 3-0,
respectively. Both the ADSP-2199x core and DMA capable
peripherals can access the DSP external memory space.
0x01 0000
OFF-CHIP
BOOT MEMORY
16-BITS
PAGES 1 TO 254
64K WORDS/PAGE
0xFE 0000
All accesses to external memory are managed by the external
memory interface unit (EMI).
Figure 5. Boot Memory Map
I/O Memory Space
BUS REQUEST AND BUS GRANT
The ADSP-21992 supports an additional external memory
called I/O memory space. The I/O space consists of 256 pages,
each containing 1024 addresses. This space is designed to support simple connections to peripherals (such as data converters
and external registers) or to bus interface ASIC data registers.
The first 32K addresses (I/O pages 0 to 31) are reserved for onchip peripherals. The upper 224K addresses (I/O pages 32 to
The ADSP-21992 can relinquish control of the data and address
buses to an external device. When the external device requires
access to the bus, it asserts the bus request (BR) signal. The (BR)
signal is arbitrated with core and peripheral requests. External
bus requests have the lowest priority. If no other internal
request is pending, the external bus request will be granted. Due
to synchronizer and arbitration delays, bus grants will be provided with a minimum of three peripheral clock delays. The
ADSP-21992 will respond to the bus grant by:
• Three-stating the data and address buses and the MS3–0,
BMS, IOMS, RD, and WR output drivers.
• Asserting the bus grant (BG) signal.
Rev. A |
Page 6 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
The ADSP-21992 will halt program execution if the bus is
granted to an external device and an instruction fetch or data
read/write request is made to external general-purpose or
peripheral memory spaces. If an instruction requires two external memory read accesses, the bus will not be granted between
the two accesses. If an instruction requires an external memory
read and an external memory write access, the bus may be
granted between the two accesses. The external memory interface can be configured so that the core will have exclusive use of
the interface. DMA and bus requests will be granted. When the
external device releases BR, the DSP releases BG and continues
program execution from the point at which it stopped.
The bus request feature operates at all times, even while the DSP
is booting and RESET is active.
The ADSP-21992 asserts the BGH pin when it is ready to start
another external port access, but is held off because the bus was
previously granted. This mechanism can be extended to define
more complex arbitration protocols for implementing more
elaborate multimaster systems.
DMA CONTROLLER
The ADSP-21992 has a DMA controller that supports automated data transfers with minimal overhead for the DSP core.
Cycle stealing DMA transfers can occur between the
ADSP-21992 internal memory and any of its DMA capable
peripherals. Additionally, DMA transfers can be accomplished
between any of the DMA capable peripherals and external
devices connected to the external memory interface. DMA
capable peripherals include the SPORT and SPI ports, and ADC
control module. Each individual DMA capable peripheral has a
dedicated DMA channel. To describe each DMA sequence, the
DMA controller uses a set of parameters—called a DMA
descriptor. When successive DMA sequences are needed, these
DMA descriptors can be linked or chained together, so the completion of one DMA sequence autoinitiates and starts the next
sequence. DMA sequences do not contend for bus access with
the DSP core, instead DMAs “steal” cycles to access memory.
All DMA transfers use the DMA bus shown in Figure 2 on
Page 4. Because all of the peripherals use the same bus, arbitration for DMA bus access is needed. The arbitration for DMA
bus access appears in Table 1.
DSP PERIPHERALS ARCHITECTURE
The ADSP-21992 contains a number of special purpose, embedded control peripherals, which can be seen in the functional
block diagram on Page 1. The ADSP-21992 contains a high performance, 8-channel, 14-bit ADC system with dual-channel
simultaneous sampling ability across four pairs of inputs. An
internal precision voltage reference is also available as part of
the ADC system. In addition, a 3-phase, 16-bit, center-based
PWM generation unit can be used to produce high accuracy
PWM signals with minimal processor overhead. The
ADSP-21992 also contains a flexible incremental encoder interface unit for position sensor feedback; two adjustable frequency
auxiliary PWM outputs, 16 lines of digital I/O; a 16-bit watchdog timer; three general-purpose timers, and an interrupt
controller that manages all peripheral interrupts. Finally, the
ADSP-21992 contains an integrated power-on-reset (POR) circuit that can be used to generate the required reset signal for
device power-on.
The ADSP-21992 has an external memory interface that is
shared by the DSP core, the DMA controller, and DMA capable
peripherals, which include the ADC, SPORT, and SPI communication ports. The external port consists of a 16-bit data bus, a
20-bit address bus, and control signals. The data bus is configurable to provide an 8- or 16-bit interface to external memory.
Support for word packing lets the DSP access 16- or 24-bit
words from external memory regardless of the external data
bus width.
The memory DMA controller lets the ADSP-21992 move data
and instructions from between memory spaces: internal-toexternal, internal-to-internal, and external-to-external. On-chip
peripherals can also use this controller for DMA transfers.
The embedded SHARC core can respond to up to 17 interrupts
at any given time: three internal (stack, emulator kernel, and
power-down), two external (emulator and reset), and 12 userdefined (peripherals) interrupts. Programmers assign each of
the 32 peripheral interrupt requests to one of the 12 userdefined interrupts. These assignments determine the priority of
each peripheral for interrupt service.
The following sections provide a functional overview of the
ADSP-21992 peripherals.
SERIAL PERIPHERAL INTERFACE (SPI) PORT
Table 1. I/O Bus Arbitration Priority
DMA Bus Master
Arbitration Priority
SPORT Receive DMA
0—Highest
SPORT Transmit DMA
1
ADC Control DMA
2
SPI Receive/Transmit DMA
3
Memory DMA
4—Lowest
The serial peripheral interface (SPI) port provides functionality
for a generic configurable serial port interface based on the SPI
standard, which enables the DSP to communicate with multiple
SPI-compatible devices. Key features of the SPI port are:
• Interface to host microcontroller or serial EEPROM.
• Master or slave operation (3-wire interface MISO, MOSI,
SCK).
• Data rates to HCLK 4 (16-bit baud rate selector).
• 8- or 16-bit transfer.
• Programmable clock phase and polarity.
• Broadcast Mode–1 master, multiple slaves.
• DMA capability and dedicated interrupts.
Rev. A |
Page 7 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
• PF0 can be used as slave select input line.
• PF1–PF7 can be used as external slave select output.
SPI is a 3-wire interface consisting of 2 data pins (MOSI and
MISO), one clock pin (SCK), and a single slave select input
(SPISS) that is multiplexed with the PF0 Flag I/O line and seven
slave select outputs (SPISEL1 to SPISEL7) that are multiplexed
with the PF1 to PF7 flag I/O lines. The SPISS input is used to
select the ADSP-21992 as a slave to an external master. The
SPISEL1 to SPISEL7 outputs can be used by the ADSP-21992
(acting as a master) to select/enable up to seven external slaves
in a multidevice SPI configuration. In a multimaster or a multidevice configuration, all MOSI pins are tied together, all MISO
pins are tied together, and all SCK pins are tied together.
During transfers, the SPI port simultaneously transmits and
receives by serially shifting data in and out on the serial data
line. The serial clock line synchronizes the shifting and sampling of data on the serial data line.
In master mode, the DSP core performs the following sequence
to set up and initiate SPI transfers:
• Enables and configures the SPI port operation (data size
and transfer format).
DSP SERIAL PORT (SPORT)
The ADSP-21992 incorporates a complete synchronous serial
port (SPORT) for serial and multiprocessor communications.
The SPORT supports the following features:
• Bidirectional: The SPORT has independent transmit and
receive sections.
• Double buffered: The SPORT section (both receive and
transmit) has a data register for transferring data words to
and from other parts of the processor and a register for
shifting data in or out. The double buffering provides additional time to service the SPORT.
• Clocking: The SPORT can use an external serial clock or
generate its own in a wide range of frequencies down to
0 Hz.
• Word length: Each SPORT section supports serial data
word lengths from three to 16 bits that can be transferred
either MSB first or LSB first.
• Selects the target SPI slave with the SPISELx output pin
(reconfigured programmable flag pin).
• Defines one or more DMA descriptors in Page 0 of I/O
memory space (optional in DMA mode only).
• Enables the SPI DMA engine and specifies transfer direction (optional in DMA mode only).
• In nonDMA mode only, reads or writes the SPI port
receive or transmit data buffer.
The SCK line generates the programmed clock pulses for simultaneously shifting data out on MOSI and shifting data in on
MISO. In DMA mode only, transfers continue until the SPI
DMA word count transitions from 1 to 0.
In slave mode, the DSP core performs the following sequence to
set up the SPI port to receive data from a master transmitter:
• Enables and configures the SPI slave port to match the
operation parameters set up on the master (data size and
transfer format) SPI transmitter.
• Defines and generates a receive DMA descriptor in Page 0
of memory space to interrupt at the end of the data transfer
(optional in DMA mode only).
• Enables the SPI DMA engine for a receive access (optional
in DMA mode only).
• Starts receiving the data on the appropriate SCK edges after
receiving an SPI chip select on the SPISS input pin (reconfigured programmable flag pin) from a master.
In DMA mode only, reception continues until the SPI DMA
word count transitions from 1 to 0. The DSP core could continue, by queuing up the next DMA descriptor.
Rev. A |
The slave mode transmit operation is similar, except the DSP
core specifies the data buffer in memory space, generates and
relinquishes control of the transmit DMA descriptor, and
begins filling the SPI port data buffer. If the SPI controller is not
ready on time to transmit, it can transmit a “zero” word.
• Framing: Each SPORT section (receive and transmit) can
operate with or without frame synchronization signals for
each data-word; with internally generated or externally
generated frame signals; with active high or active low
frame signals; with either of two pulse widths and frame
signal timing.
• Companding in hardware: Each SPORT section can perform A law and μ law companding according to CCITT
recommendation G.711.
• Direct memory access with single cycle overhead: Using the
built-in DMA master, the SPORT can automatically receive
and/or transmit multiple memory buffers of data with an
overhead of only one DSP cycle per data-word. The onchip DSP, via a linked list of memory space resident DMA
descriptor blocks, can configure transfers between the
SPORT and memory space. This chained list can be
dynamically allocated and updated.
• Interrupts: Each SPORT section (receive and transmit)
generates an interrupt upon completing a data-word transfer, or after transferring an entire buffer or buffers if DMA
is used.
• Multichannel capability: The SPORT can receive and transmit data selectively from channels of a serial bit stream that
is time division multiplexed into up to 128 channels. This is
especially useful for T1 interfaces or as a network communication scheme for multiple processors. The SPORTs also
support T1 and E1 carrier systems.
• DMA Buffer: Each SPORT channel (Tx and Rx) supports a
DMA buffer of up to eight 16-bit transfers.
Page 8 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
• SPORT operates at a frequency of up to one-half the clock
frequency of the HCLK.
• SPORT: Capable of UART software emulation.
CONTROLLER AREA NETWORK (CAN) MODULE
ADSP-21992 CAN module represents only the controller part of
the interface. The network I/O of this module is a single transmit line and a single receive line, which communicate to a line
transceiver.
ANALOG-TO-DIGITAL CONVERSION SYSTEM
The ADSP-21992 contains a controller area network (CAN)
module. Key features of the CAN module are:
The ADSP-21992 contains a fast, high accuracy, multiple input
analog-to-digital conversion system with simultaneous sampling capabilities. This analog-to-digital conversion system
permits the fast, accurate conversion of analog signals needed in
high performance embedded systems. Key features of the ADC
system are:
• Conforms to the CAN V2.0B standard.
• Supports both standard (11-bit) and extended (29-bit)
identifiers.
Supports data rates of up to 1 Mbps (and higher).
• 14-bit pipeline (6-stage pipeline) flash analog-to-digital
converter.
• 16 configurable mailboxes (all receive or transmit).
• Dedicated acceptance mask for each mailbox.
• Data filtering (first 2 bytes) which can be used for acceptance filtering.
• Error status and warning registers.
• 8 dedicated analog inputs.
• Dual-channel simultaneous sampling capability.
• Programmable ADC clock rate to maximum of HCLK 4.
• First channel ADC data valid approximately 375 ns after
CONVST (at 20 MSPS).
• Transmit priority by identifier.
• Universal counter module.
• All 8 inputs converted in approximately 725 ns (at
20 MSPS).
• Readable receive and transmit counters.
The CAN module is a low baud rate serial interface intended for
use in applications where baud rates are typically under 1 Mbps.
The CAN protocol incorporates a data CRC check, message
error tracking and fault node confinement as means to improve
network reliability to the level required for control applications.
The CAN module architecture is based around a 16-entry mailbox RAM. The mailbox is accessed sequentially by the CAN
serial interface or the host CPU. Each mailbox consists of eight
16-bit data words. The data is divided into fields, which includes
a message identifier, a time stamp, a byte count, up to 8 bytes of
data, and several control bits. Each node monitors the messages
being passed on the network. If the identifier in the transmitted
message matches an identifier in one of its mailboxes, then the
module knows that the message was meant for it, passes the data
into its appropriate mailbox, and signals the host of its arrival
with an interrupt.
The CAN network itself is a single, differential pair line. All
nodes continuously monitor this line. There is no clock wire.
Messages are passed in one of four standard message types or
frames. Synchronization is achieved by an elaborate sync
scheme performed in each CAN receiver. Message arbitration is
accomplished one bit at a time. A dominant polarity is established for the network. All nodes are allowed to start
transmitting at the same time following a frame sync pulse.
As each node transmits a bit, it checks to see if the bus is the
same state that it transmitted. If it is, it continues to transmit. If
not, then another node has transmitted a dominant bit so the
first node knows it has lost the arbitration and it stops transmitting. The arbitration continues, bit by bit until only one node is
left transmitting.
The electrical characteristics of each network connection are
very stringent so the CAN interface is typically divided into two
parts: a controller and a transceiver. This allows a single controller to support different drivers and CAN networks. The
Rev. A |
Page 9 of 60 |
• 2.0 V peak-to-peak input voltage range.
• Multiple convert start sources.
• Internal or external voltage reference.
• Out of range detection.
• DMA capable transfers from ADC to memory.
The ADC system is based on a pipeline flash converter core, and
contains dual input sample-and-hold amplifiers so that simultaneous sampling of two input signals is supported. The ADC
system provides an analog input voltage range of 2.0 V p-p and
provides 14-bit performance with a clock rate of up to
HCLK 4. The ADC system can be programmed to operate at
a clock rate from HCLK⁄4 to HCLK⁄30, to a maximum clock rate
of 20 MHz (at 160 MHz CCLK rate).
The ADC input structure supports eight independent analog
inputs; four of which are multiplexed into one sample-and-hold
amplifier (A_SHA) and four of which are multiplexed into the
other sample-and-hold amplifier (B_SHA).
At the 20 MHz sampling rate, the first data value is valid
approximately 375 ns after the convert start command. All eight
channels are converted in approximately 725 ns.
The core of the ADSP-21992 provides 14-bit data such that the
stored data values in the ADC data registers are 14 bits wide.
VOLTAGE REFERENCE
The ADSP-21992 contains an on-board band gap reference that
can be used to provide a precise 1.0 V output for use by the
analog-to-digital system and externally on the VREF pin for
biasing and level shifting functions. Additionally, the ADSP21992 may be configured to operate with an external reference
applied to the VREF pin, if required.
August 2007
ADSP-21992
PWM GENERATION UNIT
• Separate auxiliary PWM synchronization signal and associated interrupt (can be used to trigger ADC convert start).
Key features of the 3-phase PWM generation unit are:
• Separate auxiliary PWM shutdown signal (AUXTRIP).
• 16-bit, center-based PWM generation unit.
• Programmable PWM pulse width, with resolutions to
12.5 ns (at 80 MHz HCLK Rate).
• Single/double update modes
• Programmable dead time and switching frequency.
• Twos complement implementation which permits smooth
transition into full ON and full OFF states.
• Possibility to synchronize the PWM generation to an external synchronization.
• Special provisions for BDCM operation (crossover and
output enable functions).
The ADSP-21992 integrates a 2-channel, 16-bit, auxiliary PWM
output unit that can be programmed with variable frequency,
variable duty cycle values and may operate in two different
modes, independent mode or offset mode. In independent
mode, the two auxiliary PWM generators are completely independent and separate switching frequencies and duty cycles may
be programmed for each auxiliary PWM output. In offset mode
the switching frequency of the two signals on the AUX0 and
AUX1 pins is identical. Bit 4 of the AUXCTRL register places
the auxiliary PWM channel pair in independent or offset mode.
• Wide variety of special switched reluctance (SR)
operating modes.
The auxiliary PWM generation unit provides two chip output
pins, AUX0 and AUX1 (on which the switching signals appear),
and one chip input pin, AUXTRIP, which can be used to shut
down the switching signals—for example, in a fault condition.
• Output polarity and clock gating control.
ENCODER INTERFACE UNIT
• Dedicated asynchronous PWM shutdown signal.
The ADSP-21992 incorporates a powerful encoder interface
block to incremental shaft encoders that are often used for position feedback in high performance motion control systems.
• Multiple shutdown sources, independently for each unit.
The ADSP-21992 integrates a flexible and programmable, 3phase PWM waveform generator that can be programmed to
generate the required switching patterns to drive a 3-phase voltage source inverter for ac induction (ACIM) or permanent
magnet synchronous (PMSM) motor control. In addition, the
PWM block contains special functions that considerably simplify the generation of the required PWM switching patterns for
control of the electronically commutated motor (ECM) or
brushless dc motor (BDCM). Tying a dedicated pin, PWMSR,
to GND, enables a special mode, for switched reluctance
motors (SRM).
• Quadrature rates to 53 MHz (at 80 MHz HCLK rate).
• Programmable filtering of all encoder input signals.
• 32-bit encoder counter.
• Variety of hardware and software reset modes.
• Two registration inputs to latch EIU count value with corresponding registration interrupt.
• Status of A/B signals latched with reading of EIU
count value.
• Alternative frequency and direction mode.
The six PWM output signals consist of three high side drive pins
(AH, BH, and CH) and three low side drive signals pins (AL, BL,
and CL). The polarity of the generated PWM signals may be set
via hardware by the PWMPOL input pin, so that either active
HI or active LO PWM patterns can be produced.
The switching frequency of the generated PWM patterns is programmable using the 16-bit PWMTM register. The PWM
generator is capable of operating in two distinct modes, single
update mode or double update mode. In single update mode the
duty cycle values are programmable only once per PWM period,
so that the resultant PWM patterns are symmetrical about the
midpoint of the PWM period. In the double update mode, a second updating of the PWM registers is implemented at the
midpoint of the PWM period. In this mode, it is possible to produce asymmetrical PWM patterns that produce lower harmonic
distortion in 3-phase PWM inverters.
AUXILIARY PWM GENERATION UNIT
Key features of the auxiliary PWM generation unit are:
• 16-bit, programmable frequency, programmable duty cycle
PWM outputs.
• Single north marker mode.
• Count error monitor function with dedicated error
interrupt.
• Dedicated 16-bit loop timer with dedicated interrupt.
• Companion encoder event (1⁄T) timer unit.
The encoder interface unit (EIU) includes a 32-bit quadrature
up-/downconverter, programmable input noise filtering of the
encoder input signals and the zero markers, and has four dedicated chip pins. The quadrature encoder signals are applied at
the EIA and EIB pins. Alternatively, a frequency and direction
set of inputs may be applied to the EIA and EIB pins. In addition, two north marker/strobe inputs are provided on pins EIZ
and EIS. These inputs may be used to latch the contents of the
encoder quadrature counter into dedicated registers,
EIZLATCH and EISLATCH, on the occurrence of external
events at the EIZ and EIS pins. These events may be programmed to be either rising edge only (latch event) or rising
edge if the encoder is moving in the forward direction and falling edge if the encoder is moving in the reverse direction
(software latched north marker functionality).
• Independent or offset operating modes.
• Double buffered control of duty cycle and period registers.
Rev. A |
Page 10 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
The encoder interface unit incorporates programmable noise
filtering on the four encoder inputs to prevent spurious noise
pulses from adversely affecting the operation of the quadrature
counter. The encoder interface unit operates at a clock frequency equal to the HCLK rate. The encoder interface unit
operates correctly with encoder signals at frequencies of up to
13.25 MHz, at the 80 MHz HCLK rate, corresponding to a maximum quadrature frequency of 53 MHz (assuming an ideal
quadrature relationship between the input EIA and EIB signals).
The EIU may be programmed to use the north marker on EIZ to
reset the quadrature encoder in hardware, if required.
Alternatively, the north marker can be ignored, and the encoder
quadrature counter is reset according to the contents of a maximum count register, EIUMAXCNT. There is also a “single
north marker” mode available in which the encoder quadrature
counter is reset only on the first north marker pulse.
The encoder interface unit can also be made to implement some
error checking functions. If an encoder count error is detected
(due to a disconnected encoder line, for example), a status bit in
the EIUSTAT register is set, and an EIU count error interrupt is
generated.
The encoder interface unit of the ADSP-21992 contains a 16-bit
loop timer that consists of a timer register, period register, and
scale register so that it can be programmed to time out and
reload at appropriate intervals. When this loop timer times out,
an EIU loop timer timeout interrupt is generated. This interrupt
could be used to control the timing of speed and position control loops in high performance drives.
The encoder interface unit also includes a high performance
encoder event timer (EET) block that permits the accurate timing of successive events of the encoder inputs. The EET can be
programmed to time the duration between up to 255 encoder
pulses and can be used to enhance velocity estimation, particularly at low speeds of rotation.
FLAG I/O (FIO) PERIPHERAL UNIT
The FIO module is a generic parallel I/O interface that supports
16 bidirectional multifunction flags or general-purpose digital
I/O signals (PF15–PF0).
WATCHDOG TIMER
The ADSP-21992 integrates a watchdog timer that can be used
as a protection mechanism against unintentional software
events. It can be used to cause a complete DSP and peripheral
reset in such an event. The watchdog timer consists of a 16-bit
timer that is clocked at the external clock rate (CLKIN or crystal
input frequency).
In order to prevent an unwanted timeout or reset, it is necessary
to periodically write to the watchdog timer register. During
abnormal system operation, the watchdog count will eventually
decrement to 0 and a watchdog timeout will occur. In the system, the watchdog timeout will cause a full reset of the DSP core
and peripherals.
GENERAL-PURPOSE TIMERS
The ADSP-21992 contains a general-purpose timer unit that
contains three identical 32-bit timers. The three programmable
interval timers (Timer0, Timer1, and Timer2) generate periodic
interrupts. Each timer can be independently set to operate in
one of three modes:
• Pulse waveform generation (PWM_OUT) mode.
• Pulse width count/capture (WDTH_CAP) mode.
• External event watchdog (EXT_CLK) mode.
Each Timer has one bidirectional chip pin, TMR2-TMR0. For
each timer, the associated pin is configured as an output pin in
PWM_OUT mode and as an input pin in WDTH_CAP and
EXT_CLK modes.
INTERRUPTS
The interrupt controller lets the DSP respond to 17 interrupts
with minimum overhead. The DSP core implements an interrupt priority scheme as shown in Table 2. Applications can use
the unassigned slots for software and peripheral interrupts. The
peripheral interrupt controller is used to assign the various
peripheral interrupts to the 12 user assignable interrupts of the
DSP core.
Table 2. Interrupt Priorities/Addresses
All 16 FLAG bits can be individually configured as an input or
output based on the content of the direction (DIR) register, and
can also be used as an interrupt source for one of two FIO interrupts. When configured as input, the input signal can be
programmed to set the FLAG on either a level (level sensitive
input/interrupt) or an edge (edge sensitive input/interrupt).
The FIO module can also be used to generate an asynchronous
unregistered wake-up signal FIO_WAKEUP for DSP core wake
up after power-down.
The FIO lines, PF7–PF1 can also be configured as external slave
select outputs for the SPI communications port, while PF0 can
be configured to act as a slave select input.
The FIO lines can be configured to act as a PWM shutdown
source for the 3-phase PWM generation unit of the
ADSP-21992.
Rev. A |
Page 11 of 60 |
IMASK/
IRPTL
Vector Address
Emulator (NMI)
—Highest Priority
NA
NA
Reset (NMI)
0
0x00 0000
Power-Down (NMI)
1
0x00 0020
Loop and PC Stack
2
0x00 0040
Emulation Kernel
3
0x00 0060
User Assigned Interrupt
(USR0)
4
0x00 0080
Interrupt
August 2007
ADSP-21992
IMASK/
IRPTL
Vector Address
loop stack is eight levels deep, and the status stack is 16 levels
deep. To prevent stack overflow, the PC stack can generate a
stack level interrupt if the PC stack falls below three locations
full or rises above 28 locations full.
User Assigned Interrupt
(USR1)
5
0x00 00A0
The following instructions globally enable or disable interrupt
servicing, regardless of the state of IMASK.
User Assigned Interrupt
(USR2)
6
0x00 00C0
User Assigned Interrupt
(USR3)
7
0x00 00E0
User Assigned Interrupt
(USR4)
8
0x00 0100
User Assigned Interrupt
(USR5)
9
0x00 0120
User Assigned Interrupt
(USR6)
10
0x00 0140
User Assigned Interrupt
(USR7)
11
0x00 0160
User Assigned Interrupt
(USR8)
12
0x00 0180
User Assigned Interrupt
(USR9)
13
0x00 01A0
User Assigned Interrupt
(USR10)
14
0x00 01C0
User Assigned Interrupt
(USR11)
—Lowest Priority
15
0x00 01E0
Table 2. Interrupt Priorities/Addresses (Continued)
Interrupt
• Ena Int
• Dis Int
At reset, interrupt servicing is disabled.
For quick servicing of interrupts, a secondary set of DAG and
computational registers exist. Switching between the primary
and secondary registers lets programs quickly service interrupts,
while preserving the state of the DSP.
PERIPHERAL INTERRUPT CONTROLLER
The peripheral interrupt controller is a dedicated peripheral
unit of the ADSP-21992 (accessed via I/O mapped registers).
The peripheral interrupt controller manages the connection of
up to 32 peripheral interrupt requests to the DSP core.
For each peripheral interrupt source, there is a unique 4-bit
code that allows the user to assign the particular peripheral
interrupt to any one of the 12 user assignable interrupts of the
embedded ADSP-2199x core. Therefore, the peripheral interrupt controller of the ADSP-21992 contains eight 16-bit
interrupt priority registers (Interrupt Priority Register 0 (IPR0)
to Interrupt Priority Register 7 (IPR7)).
Each interrupt priority register contains four 4-bit codes; one
specifically assigned to each peripheral interrupt. The user may
write a value between 0x0 and 0xB to each 4-bit location in
order to effectively connect the particular interrupt source to
the corresponding user assignable interrupt of the
ADSP-2199x core.
There is no assigned priority for the peripheral interrupts after
reset. To assign the peripheral interrupts a different priority,
applications write the new priority to their corresponding control bits (determined by their ID) in the interrupt priority
control register.
Interrupt routines can either be nested with higher priority
interrupts taking precedence or processed sequentially. Interrupts can be masked or unmasked with the IMASK register.
Individual interrupt requests are logically ANDed with the bits
in IMASK; the highest priority unmasked interrupt is then
selected. The emulation, power-down, and reset interrupts are
nonmaskable with the IMASK register, but software can use the
DIS INT instruction to mask the power-down interrupt.
The interrupt control (ICNTL) register controls interrupt nesting and enables or disables interrupts globally.
The IRPTL register is used to force and clear interrupts. Onchip stacks preserve the processor status and are automatically
maintained during interrupt handling. To support interrupt,
loop, and subroutine nesting, the PC stack is 33 levels deep, the
Rev. A |
Writing a value of 0x0 connects the peripheral interrupt to the
USR0 user assignable interrupt of the ADSP-2199x core while
writing a value of 0xB connects the peripheral interrupt to the
USR11 user assignable interrupt. The core interrupt USR0 is the
highest priority user interrupt, while USR11 is the lowest priority. Writing a value between 0xC and 0xF effectively disables the
peripheral interrupt by not connecting it to any ADSP-2199x
core interrupt input. The user may assign more than one
peripheral interrupt to any given ADSP-2199x core interrupt. In
that case, the burden is on the user software in the interrupt vector table to determine the exact interrupt source through
reading status bits.
This scheme permits the user to assign the number of specific
interrupts that are unique to their application to the interrupt
scheme of the ADSP-2199x core. The user can then use the
existing interrupt priority control scheme to dynamically control the priorities of the 12 core interrupts.
LOW POWER OPERATION
The ADSP-21992 has four low power options that significantly
reduce the power dissipation when the device operates under
standby conditions. To enter any of these modes, the DSP executes an IDLE instruction. The ADSP-21992 uses the
Page 12 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
configuration of the PD, STCK, and STALL bits in the PLLCTL
register to select between the low power modes as the DSP executes the IDLE instruction. Depending on the mode, an IDLE
shuts off clocks to different parts of the DSP in the different
modes. The low power modes are:
• Idle
• Power-down core
• Power-down core/peripherals
• Power-down all
Idle Mode
When the ADSP-21992 is in idle mode, the DSP core stops executing instructions, retains the contents of the instruction
pipeline, and waits for an interrupt. The core clock and peripheral clock continue running.
To enter idle mode, the DSP can execute the IDLE instruction
anywhere in code. To exit idle mode, the DSP responds to an
interrupt and (after two cycles of latency) resumes executing
instructions.
type and should be specified by the crystal manufacturer. A parallel resonant, fundamental frequency, microprocessor grade
crystal should be used for this configuration.
If a buffered, shaped clock is used, this external clock connects
to the DSP CLKIN pin. CLKIN input cannot be halted, changed,
or operated below the specified frequency during normal operation. This clock signal should be a TTL-compatible signal.
When an external clock is used, the XTAL input must be left
unconnected.
The DSP provides a user-programmable 1⫻ to 32⫻ multiplication of the input clock, including some fractional values, to
support 128 external to internal (DSP core) clock ratios. The
BYPASS pin, and MSEL6–0 and DF bits, in the PLL configuration register, decide the PLL multiplication factor at reset. At
runtime, the multiplication factor can be controlled in software.
To support input clocks greater that 100 MHz, the PLL uses an
additional bit (DF). If the input clock is greater than 100 MHz,
DF must be set. If the input clock is less than 100 MHz, DF must
be cleared. For clock multiplier settings, see the ADSP-2199x
DSP Hardware Reference Manual.
The peripheral clock is supplied to the CLKOUT pin.
Power-Down Core Mode
When the ADSP-21992 is in power-down core mode, the DSP
core clock is off, but the DSP retains the contents of the pipeline
and keeps the PLL running. The peripheral bus keeps running,
letting the peripherals receive data.
To exit power-down core mode, the DSP responds to an interrupt and (after two cycles of latency) resumes executing
instructions.
Power-Down Core/Peripherals Mode
When the ADSP-21992 is in power-down core/peripherals
mode, the DSP core clock and peripheral bus clock are off, but
the DSP keeps the PLL running. The DSP does not retain the
contents of the instruction pipeline. The peripheral bus is
stopped, so the peripherals cannot receive data.
All on-chip peripherals for the ADSP-21992 operate at the rate
set by the peripheral clock. The peripheral clock (HCLK) is
either equal to the core clock rate or one half the DSP core clock
rate (CCLK). This selection is controlled by the IOSEL bit in the
PLLCTL register. The maximum core clock is 160 MHz for the
ADSP-21992BST, 150 MHz for both the ADSP-21992BBC and
ADSP-21992YBC, and 100 MHz for the ADSP-21992YST. The
maximum peripheral clock is 80 MHz for the ADSP-21992BST,
75 MHz for both the ADSP-21992BBC and ADSP-21992YBC,
and 50 MHz for the ADSP-21992YST—the combination of the
input clock and core/peripheral clock ratios may not exceed
these limits.
To exit power-down core/peripherals mode, the DSP responds
to an interrupt and (after five to six cycles of latency) resumes
executing instructions.
CLKIN
XTAL
ADSP-2199x
Power-Down All Mode
When the ADSP-21992 is in power-down all mode, the DSP
core clock, the peripheral clock, and the PLL are all stopped.
The DSP does not retain the contents of the instruction pipeline. The peripheral bus is stopped, so the peripherals cannot
receive data.
To exit power-down core/peripherals mode, the DSP responds
to an interrupt and (after 500 cycles to restabilize the PLL)
resumes executing instructions.
CLOCK SIGNALS
The ADSP-21992 can be clocked by a crystal oscillator or a buffered, shaped clock derived from an external clock oscillator. If a
crystal oscillator is used, the crystal should be connected across
the CLKIN and XTAL pins, with two capacitors connected as
shown in Figure 6. Capacitor values are dependent on crystal
Rev. A |
Figure 6. External Crystal Connections
RESET AND POWER-ON RESET (POR)
The RESET pin initiates a complete hardware reset of the
ADSP-21992 when pulled low. The RESET signal must be
asserted when the device is powered up to assure proper initialization. The ADSP-21992 contains an integrated power-on reset
(POR) circuit that provides an output reset signal, POR, from
the ADSP-21992 on power-up and if the power supply voltage
falls below the threshold level. The ADSP-21992 may be reset
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August 2007
ADSP-21992
from an external source using the RESET signal, or alternatively, the internal power-on reset circuit may be used by
connecting the POR pin to the RESET pin. During power-up
the RESET line must be activated for long enough to allow the
DSP core’s internal clock to stabilize. The power-up sequence is
defined as the total time required for the crystal oscillator to stabilize after a valid VDD is applied to the processor and for the
internal phase-locked loop (PLL) to lock onto the specific crystal frequency. A minimum of 512 cycles will ensure that the PLL
has locked (this does not include the crystal oscillator
start-up time).
The RESET input contains some hysteresis. If an RC circuit is
used to generate the RESET signal, the circuit should use an
external Schmitt trigger.
The master reset sets all internal stack pointers to the empty
stack condition, masks all interrupts, and resets all registers to
their default values (where applicable). When RESET is
released, if there is no pending bus request, program control
jumps to the location of the on-chip boot ROM (0xFF0000) and
the booting sequence is performed.
POWER SUPPLIES
The ADSP-21992 has separate power supply connections for the
internal (VDDINT) and external (VDDEXT) power supplies. The
internal supply must meet the 2.5 V requirement. The external
supply must be connected to a 3.3 V supply. All external supply
pins must be connected to the same supply. The ideal power-on
sequence for the DSP is to provide power-up of all supplies
simultaneously. If there is going to be some delay in power-up
between the supplies, provide VDD first, then VDD_IO.
BOOTING MODES
The ADSP-21992 supports a number of different boot modes
that are controlled by the three dedicated hardware boot mode
control pins (BMODE2, BMODE1, and BMODE0). The use of
three boot mode control pins means that up to eight different
boot modes are possible. Of these only five modes are valid on
the ADSP-21992. The ADSP-21992 exposes the boot mechanism to software control by providing a nonmaskable boot
interrupt that vectors to the start of the on-chip ROM memory
block (at address 0xFF0000). A boot interrupt is automatically
initiated following either a hardware initiated reset, via the
RESET pin, or a software initiated reset, via writing to the software reset register. Following either a hardware or a software
reset, execution always starts from the boot ROM at address
0xFF0000, irrespective of the settings of the BMODE2,
BMODE1, and BMODE0 pins. The dedicated BMODE2,
BMODE1, and BMODE0 pins are sampled at hardware reset.
The particular boot mode for the ADSP-21992 associated with
the settings of the BMODE2, BMODE1, BMODE0 pins is
defined in Table 3.
Table 3. Summary of Boot Modes
Boot Mode
BMODE2
BMODE1
BMODE0
Function
0
0
0
0
Illegal–Reserved
1
0
0
1
Boot from External 8-Bit Memory over EMI
2
0
1
0
Execute from External 8-Bit Memory
3
0
1
1
Execute from External 16-Bit Memory
4
1
0
0
Boot from SPI ≤ 4K Bits
5
1
0
1
Boot from SPI > 4K Bits
6
1
1
0
Illegal–Reserved
7
1
1
1
Illegal–Reserved
Rev. A |
Page 14 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
INSTRUCTION SET DESCRIPTION
The ADSP-21992 assembly language instruction set has an algebraic syntax that was designed for ease of coding and
readability. The assembly language, which takes full advantage
of the unique architecture of the processor, offers the following
benefits:
• SHARC assembly language syntax is a superset of and
source code compatible (except for two data registers and
DAG base address registers) with ADSP-21xx family syntax. It may be necessary to restructure ADSP-21xx
programs to accommodate the unified memory space of
the ADSP-21992 and to conform to its interrupt
vector map.
plexity, this capability can have a significant influence on the
design development schedule by increasing productivity. Statistical profiling enables the programmer to nonintrusively poll
the processor as it is running the program. This feature, unique
to VisualDSP++, enables the software developer to passively
gather important code execution metrics without interrupting
the real-time characteristics of the program. Essentially, the
developer can identify bottlenecks in software quickly and efficiently. By using the profiler, the programmer can focus on
those areas in the program that impact performance and take
corrective action.
Debugging both C/C++ and assembly programs with the
VisualDSP++ debugger, programmers can:
• View mixed C/C++ and assembly code (interleaved source
and object information)
• The algebraic syntax eliminates the need to remember
cryptic assembler mnemonics. For example, a typical arithmetic add instruction, such as AR = AX0 + AY0, resembles
a simple equation.
• Insert breakpoints
• Set conditional breakpoints on registers, memory,
and stacks
• Every instruction, but two, assembles into a single, 24-bit
word that can execute in a single instruction cycle. The
exceptions are two dual word instructions. One writes
16- or 24-bit immediate data to memory, and the other is
an absolute jump/call with the 24-bit address specified in
the instruction.
• Multifunction instructions allow parallel execution of an
arithmetic, MAC, or shift instruction with up to two
fetches or one write to processor memory space during a
single instruction cycle.
• Program flow instructions support a wider variety of conditional and unconditional jumps/calls and a larger set of
conditions on which to base execution of conditional
instructions.
• Trace instruction execution
• Perform linear or statistical profiling of program execution
• Fill, dump, and graphically plot the contents of memory
• Perform source level debugging
• Create custom debugger windows
The VisualDSP++ IDDE lets programmers define and manage
DSP software development. Its dialog boxes and property pages
let programmers configure and manage all of the SHARC development tools, including the color syntax highlighting in the
VisualDSP++ editor. This capability permits programmers to:
• Control how the development tools process inputs and
generate outputs
• Maintain a one-to-one correspondence with the command
line switches of the tool
DEVELOPMENT TOOLS
The ADSP-21992 is supported with a complete set of
CROSSCORE™ software and hardware development tools,
including Analog Devices emulators and VisualDSP++™ development environment. The emulator hardware that supports
other SHARC DSPs also fully emulates the ADSP-21992.
The VisualDSP++ project management environment lets programmers develop and debug an application. This environment
includes an easy to use assembler (which is based on an algebraic syntax), an archiver (librarian/library builder), a linker, a
loader, a cycle-accurate instruction-level simulator, a C/C++
compiler, and a C/C++ runtime library that includes DSP and
mathematical functions. A key point for these tools is C/C++
code efficiency. The compiler has been developed for efficient
translation of C/C++ code to DSP assembly. The DSP has architectural features that improve the efficiency of compiled C/C++
code.
The VisualDSP++ debugger has a number of important features. Data visualization is enhanced by a plotting package that
offers a significant level of flexibility. This graphical representation of user data enables the programmer to quickly determine
the performance of an algorithm. As algorithms grow in com-
Rev. A |
The VisualDSP++ Kernel (VDK) incorporates scheduling and
resource management tailored specifically to address the memory and timing constraints of DSP programming. These
capabilities enable engineers to develop code more effectively,
eliminating the need to start from the very beginning, when
developing new application code. The VDK features include
threads, critical and unscheduled regions, semaphores, events,
and device flags. The VDK also supports priority-based, preemptive, cooperative, and time-sliced scheduling approaches. In
addition, the VDK was designed to be scalable. If the application
does not use a specific feature, the support code for that feature
is excluded from the target system.
Because the VDK is a library, a developer can decide whether to
use it or not. The VDK is integrated into the VisualDSP++
development environment, but can also be used via standard
command line tools. When the VDK is used, the development
environment assists the developer with many error-prone tasks
and assists in managing system resources, automating the generation of various VDK-based objects, and visualizing the
system state, when debugging an application that uses the VDK.
Page 15 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
VCSE is Analog Devices technology for creating, using, and
reusing software components (independent modules of substantial functionality) to quickly and reliably assemble software
applications. The user can also download components from the
Web, drop them into the application and publish component
archives from within VisualDSP++. VCSE supports component
implementation in C/C++ or assembly language.
communications ports and embedded control peripherals, refer
to the ADSP-2199x Mixed Signal DSP Controller Hardware Reference Manual.
Use the Expert Linker to visually manipulate the placement of
code and data on the embedded system, view memory utilization in a color-coded graphical form, easily move code and data
to different areas of the DSP or external memory with the drag
of the mouse, and examine runtime stack and heap usage. The
Expert Linker is fully compatible with existing linker definition
file (LDF), allowing the developer to move between the graphical and textual environments.
Analog Devices DSP emulators use the IEEE 1149.1 JTAG test
access port of the ADSP-21992 processor to monitor and control the target board processor during emulation. The emulator
provides full speed emulation, allowing inspection and modification of memory, registers, and processor stacks. Nonintrusive
in-circuit emulation is assured by the use of the processor JTAG
interface—target system loading and timing are not affected by
the emulator.
In addition to the software and hardware development tools
available from Analog Devices, third parties provide a wide
range of tools supporting the SHARC processor family. Hardware tools include SHARC DSP PC plug-in cards. Third-party
software tools include DSP libraries, real-time operating systems, and block diagram design tools.
DESIGNING AN EMULATOR-COMPATIBLE DSP
BOARD
The Analog Devices family of emulators are tools that every
DSP developer needs to test and debug hardware and software
systems. Analog Devices has supplied an IEEE 1149.1 JTAG test
access port (TAP) on each JTAG DSP. The emulator uses the
TAP to access the internal features of the DSP, allowing the
developer to load code, set breakpoints, observe variables,
observe memory, and examine registers. The DSP must be
halted to send data and commands, but once an operation has
been completed by the emulator, the DSP system is set running
at full speed with no impact on system timing.
To use these emulators, the target board must include a header
that connects the DSP JTAG port to the emulator.
For details on target board design issues including mechanical
layout, single processor connections, multiprocessor scan
chains, signal buffering, signal termination, and emulator pod
logic, see the EE-68: JTAG Emulation Technical Reference on the
Analog Devices website (www.analog.com)—use site search on
“EE-68.” This document is updated regularly to keep pace
with improvements to emulator support.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
This data sheet provides a general overview of the ADSP-21992
architecture and functionality. For detailed information on the
ADSP-21992 embedded DSP core architecture, instruction set,
Rev. A |
Page 16 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
PIN FUNCTION DESCRIPTIONS
ADSP-21992 pin definitions are listed in Table 4. All
ADSP-21992 inputs are asynchronous and can be asserted asynchronously to CLKIN (or to TCK for TRST).
floating internally. PWMTRIP has an internal pull-down, but
should not be left floating to avoid unnecessary PWM
shutdowns.
Unused inputs should be tied or pulled to VDDEXT or GND,
except for ADDR21–0, DATA15–0, PF7–0, and inputs that have
internal pull-up or pull-down resistors (TRST, BMODE0,
BMODE1, BMODE2, BYPASS, TCK, TMS, TDI, PWMPOL,
PWMSR, and RESET)—these pins can be left floating. These
pins have a logic level hold circuit that prevents input from
The following symbols appear in the Type column of Table 4:
G = ground, I = input, O = output, P = power supply,
B = bidirectional, T = three-state, D = digital, A = analog,
CKG = clock generation pin, PU = internal pull-up,
PD = internal pull-down, and OD = open drain.
Table 4. Pin Descriptions
Name
A19–A0
D15–D0
RD
WR
ACK
BR
BG
BGH
MS0
MS1
MS2
MS3
IOMS
BMS
CLKIN
XTAL
CLKOUT
BYPASS
RESET
POR
BMODE2
BMODE1
BMODE0
TCK
TMS
TDI
TDO
TRST
EMU
VIN0
VIN1
VIN2
VIN3
VIN4
VIN5
VIN6
VIN7
ASHAN
Type
D, OT
D, BT
D, OT
D, OT
D, I
D, I, PU
D, O
D, O
D, OT
D, OT
D, OT
D, OT
D, OT
D, OT
D, I, CKG
D, O, CKG
D, O
D, I, PU
D, I, PU
D, O
D, I, PU
D, I, PD
D, I, PU
D, I
D, I, PU
D, I, PU
D, OT
D, I, PU
D, OT, PU
A, I
A, I
A, I
A, I
A, I
A, I
A, I
A, I
A, I
Function
External Port Address Bus
External Port Data Bus
External Port Read Strobe
External Port Write Strobe
External Port Access Ready Acknowledge
External Port Bus Request
External Port Bus Grant
External Port Bus Grant Hang
External Port Memory Select Strobe 0
External Port Memory Select Strobe 1
External Port Memory Select Strobe 2
External Port Memory Select Strobe 3
External Port IO Space Select Strobe
External Port Boot Memory Select Strobe
Clock Input/Oscillator Input/Crystal Connection 0
Oscillator Output/Crystal Connection 1
Clock Output (HCLK)
PLL Bypass Mode Select
Processor Reset Input
Power on Reset Output
Boot Mode Select Input 2
Boot Mode Select Input 1
Boot Mode Select Input 0
JTAG Test Clock
JTAG Test Mode Select
JTAG Test Data Input
JTAG Test Data Output
JTAG Test Reset Input
Emulation Status
ADC Input 0
ADC Input 1
ADC Input 2
ADC Input 3
ADC Input 4
ADC Input 5
ADC Input 6
ADC Input 7
Inverting SHA_A Input
Rev. A |
Page 17 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
Table 4. Pin Descriptions (Continued)
Name
BSHAN
CAPT
CAPB
VREF
SENSE
CML
CONVST
CANRX
CANTX
PF15
PF14
PF13
PF12
PF11
PF10
PF9
PF8
PF7/SPISEL7
PF6/SPISEL6
PF5/SPISEL5
PF4/SPISEL4
PF3/SPISEL3
PF2/SPISEL2
PF1/SPISEL1
PF0/SPISS
SCK
MISO
MOSI
DT
DR
RFS
TFS
TCLK
RCLK
EIA
EIB
EIZ
EIS
AUX0
AUX1
AUXTRIP
TMR2
TMR1
TMR0
AH
AL
BH
BL
CH
CL
Type
A, I
A, O
A, O
A, I, O
A, I
A, O
D, I
D, I
D, OT
D, BT, PD
D, BT, PD
D, BT, PD
D, BT, PD
D, BT, PD
D, BT, PD
D, BT, PD
D, BT, PD
D, BT, PD
D, BT, PD
D, BT, PD
D, BT, PD
D, BT, PD
D, BT, PD
D, BT, PD
D, BT, PD
D, BT
D, BT
D, BT
D, OT
D, I
D, BT
D, BT
D, BT
D, BT
D, I
D, I
D, I
D, I
D, O
D, O
D, I, PD
D, BT
D, BT
D, BT
D, O
D, O
D, O
D, O
D, O
D, O
Function
Inverting SHA_B Input
Noise Reduction Pin
Noise Reduction Pin
Voltage Reference Pin (Mode Selected by State of SENSE)
Voltage Reference Select Pin
Common-Mode Level Pin
ADC Convert Start Input
Controller Area Network (CAN) Receive
Controller Area Network (CAN) Transmit
General-Purpose IO15
General-Purpose IO14
General-Purpose IO13
General-Purpose IO12
General-Purpose IO11
General-Purpose IO10
General-Purpose IO9
General-Purpose IO8
General-Purpose IO7/SPI Slave Select Output 7
General-Purpose IO6/SPI Slave Select Output 6
General-Purpose IO5/SPI Slave Select Output 5
General-Purpose IO4/SPI Slave Select Output 4
General-Purpose IO3/SPI Slave Select Output 3
General-Purpose IO2/SPI Slave Select Output 2
General-Purpose IO1/SPI Slave Select Output 1
General-Purpose IO0/SPI Slave Select Input 0
SPI Clock
SPI Master In Slave Out Data
SPI Master Out Slave In Data
SPORT Data Transmit
SPORT Data Receive
SPORT Receive Frame Sync
SPORT Transmit Frame Sync
SPORT Transmit Clock
SPORT Receive Clock
Encoder A Channel Input
Encoder B Channel Input
Encoder Z Channel Input
Encoder S Channel Input
Auxiliary PWM Channel 0 Output
Auxiliary PWM Channel 1 Output
Auxiliary PWM Shutdown Pin
Timer 0 Input/Output Pin
Timer 1 Input/Output Pin
Timer 2 Input/Output Pin
PWM Channel A HI PWM
PWM Channel A LO PWM
PWM Channel B HI PWM
PWM Channel B LO PWM
PWM Channel C HI PWM
PWM Channel C LO PWM
Rev. A |
Page 18 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
Table 4. Pin Descriptions (Continued)
Name
PWMSYNC
PWMPOL
PWMTRIP
PWMSR
AVDD (2 pins)
AVSS (2 pins)
VDDINT (6 pins)
VDDEXT (10 pins)
GND (16 pins)
Type
D, BT
D, I, PU
D, I, PD
D, I, PU
A, P
A, G
D, P
D, P
D, G
Function
PWM Synchronization
PWM Polarity
PWM Trip
PWM SR Mode Select
Analog Supply Voltage
Analog Ground
Digital Internal Supply
Digital External Supply
Digital Ground
Rev. A |
Page 19 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
SPECIFICATIONS
Specifications subject to change without notice.
OPERATING CONDITIONS
Table 5. Recommended Operating Conditions—ADSP-21992BBC
Parameter
VDDINT
VDDEXT
AVDD
CCLK
HCLK1, 2
CLKIN3
TJUNC4
TAMB
Conditions
Internal (Core) Supply Voltage
External (I/O) Supply Voltage
Analog Supply Voltage
DSP Instruction Rate, Core Clock
Peripheral Clock Rate
Input Clock Frequency
Silicon Junction Temperature
Ambient Operating Temperature
Min
2.375
3.135
2.375
0
0
0
Typ
2.5
3.3
2.5
–40
Max
2.625
3.465
2.625
150
75
150
140
+85
Unit
V
V
V
MHz
MHz
MHz
⬚C
⬚C
1
The HCLK frequency may be made to appear at the dedicated CLKOUT pin of the device. For low power operation, however, the CLKOUT pin can be disabled.
The peripherals operate at the HCLK rate, which may be selected to be equal to CCLK or CCLK2, up to a maximum of a 75 MHz HCLK for the ADSP-21992BBC.
3
In order to attain the correct CCLK and HCLK values, the input clock frequency or crystal frequency depends on the internal operation of the clock generation PLL
circuit and the associated frequency ratio.
4
The maximum junction temperature is limited to 140°C in order to meet all of the electrical specifications. It is ultimately the responsibility of the user to ensure that
the power dissipation of the ADSP-21992 (including all dc and ac loads) is such that the maximum junction temperature limit of 140°C is not exceeded.
2
Table 6. Recommended Operating Conditions—ADSP-21992YBC
Parameter
VDDINT
VDDEXT
AVDD
CCLK
HCLK1, 2
CLKIN3
TJUNC4
TAMB
Conditions
Internal (Core) Supply Voltage
External (I/O) Supply Voltage
Analog Supply Voltage
DSP Instruction Rate, Core Clock
Peripheral Clock Rate
Input Clock Frequency
Silicon Junction Temperature
Ambient Operating Temperature
Min
2.375
3.135
2.375
0
0
0
–40
1
Typ
2.5
3.3
2.5
Max
2.625
3.465
2.625
150
75
150
140
+125
Unit
V
V
V
MHz
MHz
MHz
⬚C
⬚C
The HCLK frequency may be made to appear at the dedicated CLKOUT pin of the device. For low power operation, however, the CLKOUT pin can be disabled.
The peripherals operate at the HCLK rate, which may be selected to be equal to CCLK or CCLK 2, up to a maximum of an 75 MHz HCLK for the ADSP-21992YBC.
3
In order to attain the correct CCLK and HCLK values, the input clock frequency or crystal frequency depends on the internal operation of the clock generation PLL
circuit and the associated frequency ratio.
4
The maximum junction temperature is limited to 140°C in order to meet all of the electrical specifications. It is ultimately the responsibility of the user to ensure that
the power dissipation of the ADSP-21992 (including all dc and ac loads) is such that the maximum junction temperature limit of 140°C is not exceeded.
2
Rev. A |
Page 20 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
Table 7. Recommended Operating Conditions—ADSP-21992BST
Parameter
VDDINT
VDDEXT
AVDD
CCLK
HCLK1, 2
CLKIN3
TJUNC4
TAMB
Conditions
Internal (Core) Supply Voltage
External (I/O) Supply Voltage
Analog Supply Voltage
DSP Instruction Rate, Core Clock
Peripheral Clock Rate
Input Clock Frequency
Silicon Junction Temperature
Ambient Operating Temperature
Min
2.375
3.135
2.375
0
0
0
Typ
2.5
3.3
2.5
–40
Max
2.625
3.465
2.625
160
80
160
140
+85
Unit
V
V
V
MHz
MHz
MHz
⬚C
⬚C
1
The HCLK frequency may be made to appear at the dedicated CLKOUT pin of the device. For low power operation, however, the CLKOUT pin can be disabled.
The peripherals operate at the HCLK rate, which may be selected to be equal to CCLK or CCLK2, up to a maximum of a 80 MHz HCLK for the ADSP-21992BST.
3
In order to attain the correct CCLK and HCLK values, the input clock frequency or crystal frequency depends on the internal operation of the clock generation PLL
circuit and the associated frequency ratio.
4
The maximum junction temperature is limited to 140°C in order to meet all of the electrical specifications. It is ultimately the responsibility of the user to ensure that
the power dissipation of the ADSP-21992 (including all dc and ac loads) is such that the maximum junction temperature limit of 140°C is not exceeded.
2
Table 8. Recommended Operating Conditions—ADSP-21992YST
Parameter
VDDINT
VDDEXT
AVDD
CCLK
HCLK1, 2
CLKIN3
TJUNC4
TAMB
Conditions
Internal (Core) Supply Voltage
External (I/O) Supply Voltage
Analog Supply Voltage
DSP Instruction Rate, Core Clock
Peripheral Clock Rate
Input Clock Frequency
Silicon Junction Temperature
Ambient Operating Temperature
Min
2.375
3.135
2.375
0
0
0
–40
1
Typ
2.5
3.3
2.5
Max
2.625
3.465
2.625
100
50
100
140
+125
Unit
V
V
V
MHz
MHz
MHz
⬚C
⬚C
The HCLK frequency may be made to appear at the dedicated CLKOUT pin of the device. For low power operation, however, the CLKOUT pin can be disabled.
The peripherals operate at the HCLK rate, which may be selected to be equal to CCLK or CCLK2, up to a maximum of an 50 MHz HCLK for the ADSP-21992YST.
3
In order to attain the correct CCLK and HCLK values, the input clock frequency or crystal frequency depends on the internal operation of the clock generation PLL
circuit and the associated frequency ratio.
4
The maximum junction temperature is limited to 140°C in order to meet all of the electrical specifications. It is ultimately the responsibility of the user to ensure that
the power dissipation of the ADSP-21992 (including all dc and ac loads) is such that the maximum junction temperature limit of 140°C is not exceeded.
2
Rev. A |
Page 21 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
Table 9. Electrical Characteristics—ADSP-21992BBC
Parameter
VIH
VIH
VIL
VOH
Conditions
High Level Input Voltage1
High Level Input Voltage2
High Level Input Voltage1, 2
High Level Output Voltage3
VOL
Low Level Output Voltage3
IIH
High Level Input Current4
IIH
High Level Input Current5
IIH
High Level Input Current6
IIL
Low Level Input Current
IIL
Low Level Input Current
IIL
Low Level Input Current
IOZH
Three-State Leakage Current7
IOZL
Three-State Leakage Current7
CI
CO
IDD-PEAK
IDD-TYP
IDD-IDLE
IDD-STOPCLK
IDD-STOPALL
IDD-PDOWN
IAVDD
IAVDD-ADCOFF
Input Pin Capacitance
Output Pin Capacitance
Supply Current (Internal)8, 9
Supply Current (Internal)8
Supply Current (Idle)8
Supply Current (Power-Down)8, 10
Supply Current (Power-Down)8, 11
Supply Current (Power-Down)8, 12
Analog Supply Current13
Analog Supply Current12
Test Conditions
@ VDDEXT = Maximum
@ VDDEXT = Maximum
@ VDDEXT = Minimum
@ VDDEXT = Minimum,
IOH = –0.5 mA
@ VDDEXT = Minimum,
IOL = 2.0 mA
@ VDDINT = Maximum,
VIN = 3.6 V
@ VDDINT = Maximum,
VIN = 3.6 V
@ VDDINT = Maximum,
VIN = 3.6 V
@ VDDINT = Maximum,
VIN = 0 V
@ VDDINT = Maximum,
VIN = 0 V
@ VDDINT = Maximum,
VIN = 0 V
@ VDDINT = Maximum,
VIN = 3.6 V
@ VDDINT = Maximum,
VIN = 0 V
fIN = 1 MHz
fIN = 1 MHz
1
Min
2.0
2.2
Typ
Max
VDDEXT
VDDEXT
0.8
Unit
V
V
V
V
0.4
V
10
μA
150
μA
10
μA
10
μA
10
μA
150
μA
10
μA
10
μA
325
275
250
125
40
30
65
15
pF
pF
mA
mA
mA
mA
mA
mA
mA
mA
2.4
10
10
190
155
145
60
12
6
46
5
Applies to all input and bidirectional pins.
Applies to input pins CLKIN, RESET, TRST.
3
Applies to all output and bidirectional pins.
4
Applies to all input only pins.
5
Applies to input pins with internal pull-down.
6
Applies to input pins with internal pull-up.
7
Applies to three-stateable pins.
8
The IDD supply currents are affected by the operating frequency of the device. The guaranteed numbers are based on an assumed CCLK = 150 MHz, HCLK = 75 MHz
for the ADSP-21992BBC. IDD refers only to the current consumption on the internal power supply lines (VDDINT). The current consumption at the I/O on the VDDEXT
power supply is very much dependent on the particular connection of the device in the final system.
9
IDD-PEAK represents worst-case processor operation and is not sustainable under normal application conditions. Actual internal power measurements made using typical
applications are less than specified. Measured at VDDINT = maximum.
10
IDLE denotes the current consumption during execution of the IDLE instruction. Measured at VDDINT = maximum.
11
IDD-PDOWN represents the processor operation in full power-down mode with both core and peripheral clocks disabled. Measured at VDDINT = maximum.
12
IAVDD represents the power consumption of the analog system. Measured at AVDD = maximum.
13
The responsibility lies with the user to ensure that the device is operated in such a manner that the maximum allowable junction temperature is not exceeded.
2
Rev. A |
Page 22 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
ELECTRICAL CHARACTERISTICS
Table 10. Electrical Characteristics—ADSP-21992YBC
Parameter
VIH
VIH
VIL
VOH
Conditions
High Level Input Voltage1
High Level Input Voltage2
High Level Input Voltage1, 2
High Level Output Voltage3
VOL
Low Level Output Voltage3
IIH
High Level Input Current4
IIH
High Level Input Current5
IIH
High Level Input Current6
IIL
Low Level Input Current
IIL
Low Level Input Current
IIL
Low Level Input Current
IOZH
Three-State Leakage Current7
IOZL
Three-State Leakage Current7
CI
CO
IDD-PEAK
IDD-TYP
IDD-IDLE
IDD-STOPCLK
IDD-STOPALL
IDD-PDOWN
IAVDD
IAVDD-ADCOFF
Input Pin Capacitance
Output Pin Capacitance
Supply Current (Internal)8, 9
Supply Current (Internal)8
Supply Current (Idle)8
Supply Current (Power-Down)8, 10
Supply Current (Power-Down)8, 11
Supply Current (Power-Down)8, 12
Analog Supply Current13
Analog Supply Current12
Test Conditions
@ VDDEXT = Maximum
@ VDDEXT = Maximum
@ VDDEXT = Minimum
@ VDDEXT = Minimum,
IOH = –0.5 mA
@ VDDEXT = Minimum,
IOL = 2.0 mA
@ VDDINT = Maximum,
VIN = 3.6 V
@ VDDINT = Maximum,
VIN = 3.6 V
@ VDDINT = Maximum,
VIN = 3.6 V
@ VDDINT = Maximum,
VIN = 0 V
@ VDDINT = Maximum,
VIN = 0 V
@ VDDINT = Maximum,
VIN = 0 V
@ VDDINT = Maximum,
VIN = 3.6 V
@ VDDINT = Maximum,
VIN = 0 V
fIN = 1 MHz
fIN = 1 MHz
1
Min
2.0
2.2
Typ
Max
VDDEXT
VDDEXT
0.8
Unit
V
V
V
V
0.4
V
10
μA
150
μA
10
μA
10
μA
10
μA
150
μA
10
μA
10
μA
325
275
250
125
40
30
65
15
pF
pF
mA
mA
mA
mA
mA
mA
mA
mA
2.4
10
10
190
155
145
60
12
6
46
5
Applies to all input and bidirectional pins.
Applies to input pins CLKIN, RESET, TRST.
3
Applies to all output and bidirectional pins.
4
Applies to all input only pins.
5
Applies to input pins with internal pull-down.
6
Applies to input pins with internal pull-up.
7
Applies to three-stateable pins.
8
The IDD supply currents are affected by the operating frequency of the device. The guaranteed numbers are based on an assumed CCLK = 150 MHz, HCLK = 75 MHz
for the ADSP-21992YBC. IDD refers only to the current consumption on the internal power supply lines (VDDINT). The current consumption at the I/O on the VDDEXT
power supply is very much dependent on the particular connection of the device in the final system.
9
IDD-PEAK represents worst-case processor operation and is not sustainable under normal application conditions. Actual internal power measurements made using typical
applications are less than specified. Measured at VDDINT = maximum.
10
IDLE denotes the current consumption during execution of the IDLE instruction. Measured at VDDINT = maximum.
11
IDD-PDOWN represents the processor operation in full power-down mode with both core and peripheral clocks disabled. Measured at VDDINT = maximum.
12
IAVDD represents the power consumption of the analog system. Measured at AVDD = maximum.
13
The responsibility lies with the user to ensure that the device is operated in such a manner that the maximum allowable junction temperature is not exceeded.
2
Rev. A |
Page 23 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
Table 11. Electrical Characteristics—ADSP-21992BST
Parameter
VIH
VIH
VIL
VOH
Conditions
High Level Input Voltage1
High Level Input Voltage2
High Level Input Voltage1, 2
High Level Output Voltage3
VOL
Low Level Output Voltage3
IIH
High Level Input Current4
IIH
High Level Input Current5
IIH
High Level Input Current6
IIL
Low Level Input Current
IIL
Low Level Input Current
IIL
Low Level Input Current
IOZH
Three-State Leakage Current7
IOZL
Three-State Leakage Current7
CI
CO
IDD-PEAK
IDD-TYP
IDD-IDLE
IDD-STOPCLK
IDD-STOPALL
IDD-PDOWN
IAVDD
IAVDD-ADCOFF
Input Pin Capacitance
Output Pin Capacitance
Supply Current (Internal)8, 9
Supply Current (Internal)8
Supply Current (Idle)8
Supply Current (Power-Down)8, 10
Supply Current (Power-Down)8, 11
Supply Current (Power-Down)8, 12
Analog Supply Current13
Analog Supply Current12
Test Conditions
@ VDDEXT = Maximum
@ VDDEXT = Maximum
@ VDDEXT = Minimum
@ VDDEXT = Minimum,
IOH = –0.5 mA
@ VDDEXT = Minimum,
IOL = 2.0 mA
@ VDDINT = Maximum,
VIN = 3.6 V
@ VDDINT = Maximum,
VIN = 3.6 V
@ VDDINT = Maximum,
VIN = 3.6 V
@ VDDINT = Maximum,
VIN = 0 V
@ VDDINT = Maximum,
VIN = 0 V
@ VDDINT = Maximum,
VIN = 0 V
@ VDDINT = Maximum,
VIN = 3.6 V
@ VDDINT = Maximum,
VIN = 0 V
fIN = 1 MHz
fIN = 1 MHz
1
Min
2.0
2.2
Typ
Max
VDDEXT
VDDEXT
0.8
Unit
V
V
V
V
0.4
V
10
μA
150
μA
10
μA
10
μA
10
μA
150
μA
10
μA
10
μA
350
300
275
150
50
35
65
15
pF
pF
mA
mA
mA
mA
mA
mA
mA
mA
2.4
10
10
300
240
225
90
20
7
49
7
Applies to all input and bidirectional pins.
Applies to input pins CLKIN, RESET, TRST.
3
Applies to all output and bidirectional pins.
4
Applies to all input only pins.
5
Applies to input pins with internal pull-down.
6
Applies to input pins with internal pull-up.
7
Applies to three-stateable pins.
8
The IDD supply currents are affected by the operating frequency of the device. The guaranteed numbers are based on an assumed CCLK = 160 MHz, HCLK = 80 MHz
for the ADSP-21992BST. IDD refers only to the current consumption on the internal power supply lines (VDDINT). The current consumption at the I/O on the VDDEXT
power supply is very much dependent on the particular connection of the device in the final system.
9
IDD-PEAK represents worst-case processor operation and is not sustainable under normal application conditions. Actual internal power measurements made using typical
applications are less than specified. Measured at VDDINT = maximum.
10
IDLE denotes the current consumption during execution of the IDLE instruction. Measured at VDDINT = maximum.
11
IDD-PDOWN represents the processor operation in full power-down mode with both core and peripheral clocks disabled. Measured at VDDINT = maximum.
12
IAVDD represents the power consumption of the analog system. Measured at AVDD = maximum.
13
The responsibility lies with the user to ensure that the device is operated in such a manner that the maximum allowable junction temperature is not exceeded.
2
Rev. A |
Page 24 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
Table 12. Electrical Characteristics—ADSP-21992YST
Parameter
VIH
VIH
VIL
VOH
Conditions
High Level Input Voltage1
High Level Input Voltage2
High Level Input Voltage1, 2
High Level Output Voltage3
VOL
Low Level Output Voltage3
IIH
High Level Input Current4
IIH
High Level Input Current5
IIH
High Level Input Current6
IIL
Low Level Input Current
IIL
Low Level Input Current
IIL
Low Level Input Current
IOZH
Three-State Leakage Current7
IOZL
Three-State Leakage Current7
CI
CO
IDD-PEAK
IDD-TYP
IDD-IDLE
IDD-STOPCLK
IDD-STOPALL
IDD-PDOWN
IAVDD
IAVDD-ADCOFF
Input Pin Capacitance
Output Pin Capacitance
Supply Current (Internal)8, 9
Supply Current (Internal)8
Supply Current (Idle)8
Supply Current (Power-Down)8, 10
Supply Current (Power-Down)8, 11
Supply Current (Power-Down)8, 12
Analog Supply Current13
Analog Supply Current12
Test Conditions
@ VDDEXT = Maximum
@ VDDEXT = Maximum
@ VDDEXT = minimum
@ VDDEXT = Minimum,
IOH = –0.5 mA
@ VDDEXT = Minimum,
IOL = 2.0 mA
@ VDDINT = Maximum,
VIN = 3.6 V
@ VDDINT = Maximum,
VIN = 3.6 V
@ VDDINT = Maximum,
VIN = 3.6 V
@ VDDINT = Maximum,
VIN = 0 V
@ VDDINT = Maximum,
VIN = 0 V
@ VDDINT = Maximum,
VIN = 0 V
@ VDDINT = Maximum,
VIN = 3.6 V
@ VDDINT = Maximum,
VIN = 0 V
fIN = 1 MHz
fIN = 1 MHz
1
Min
2.0
2.2
Typ
Max
VDDEXT
VDDEXT
0.8
Unit
V
V
V
V
0.4
V
10
μA
150
μA
10
μA
10
μA
10
μA
150
μA
10
μA
10
μA
250
210
180
100
40
35
65
15
pF
pF
mA
mA
mA
mA
mA
mA
mA
mA
2.4
10
10
190
155
145
60
12
6
46
5
Applies to all input and bidirectional pins.
Applies to input pins CLKIN, RESET, TRST.
3
Applies to all output and bidirectional pins.
4
Applies to all input only pins.
5
Applies to input pins with internal pull-down.
6
Applies to input pins with internal pull-up.
7
Applies to three-stateable pins.
8
The IDD supply currents are affected by the operating frequency of the device. The guaranteed numbers are based on an assumed CCLK = 100 MHz, HCLK = 50 MHz
for the ADSP-21992YST. IDD refers only to the current consumption on the internal power supply lines (VDDINT). The current consumption at the I/O on the VDDEXT
power supply is very much dependent on the particular connection of the device in the final system.
9
IDD-PEAK represents worst-case processor operation and is not sustainable under normal application conditions. Actual internal power measurements made using typical
applications are less than specified. Measured at VDDINT = maximum.
10
IDLE denotes the current consumption during execution of the IDLE instruction. Measured at VDDINT = maximum.
11
IDD-PDOWN represents the processor operation in full power-down mode with both core and peripheral clocks disabled. Measured at VDDINT = maximum.
12
IAVDD represents the power consumption of the analog system. Measured at AVDD = maximum.
13
The responsibility lies with the user to ensure that the device is operated in such a manner that the maximum allowable junction temperature is not exceeded.
2
Rev. A |
Page 25 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
Table 13. Peripherals Electrical Characteristics—ADSP-21992BBC
Parameter
ANALOG-TO-DIGITAL CONVERTER
AC Specifications
SNR
SNRD
THD
CTLK
CMRR
PSRR
Accuracy
INL
DNL
No Missing Codes
Zero Error1
Gain Error1
Input Voltage
VIN
CIN
Conversion Time
FCLK
tCONV
VOLTAGE REFERENCE
Internal Voltage Reference3
Output Voltage Tolerance
Output Current
Load Regulation4
Power Supply Rejection Ratio
Reference Input Resistance
POWER-ON RESET
VRST
VHYST
Description
Min
Typ
Signal-to-Noise Ratio1
Signal-to-Noise and Distortion1
Total Harmonic Distortion1
Channel-Channel Crosstalk1
Common-Mode Rejection Ratio1
Power Supply Rejection Ratio1
68
66
72
71
–80
–80
–82
0.05
±0.6
±0.5
12
1.25
0.5
Integral Nonlinearity1
Differential Nonlinearity1
Input Voltage Span
Input Capacitance2
Max
Unit
–66
–66
–66
0.2
dB
dB
dB
dB
dB
%FSR
±2.0
±1.25
2.5
1.5
2.0
10
ADC Clock Rate
Total Conversion Time All 8 Channels
0.94
–2
–2
Reset Threshold Voltage
Hysteresis Voltage
0.98
40
100
+0.5
+0.5
8
1.4
1
V
pF
18.75
773
MHz
ns
1.02
V
mV
μA
mV
mV
kΩ
+2
+2
2.1
50
LSB
LSB
Bits
%FSR
%FSR
V
mV
In all cases, the input frequency to the ADC system is assumed to be <100 kHz.
Analog input pins VIN0 to VIN7.
3
These specifications are for operation of the internal voltage reference so that SENSE = REFCOM, with the default 1.0 V operating mode.
4
Operation with full 0.1 mA load current. For optimal operation, it is recommended to buffer the VREF output voltage before using it in other parts of the system.
2
Rev. A |
Page 26 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
Table 14. Peripherals Electrical Characteristics—ADSP-21992BST
Parameter
ANALOG-TO-DIGITAL CONVERTER
AC Specifications
SNR
SNRD
THD
CTLK
CMRR
PSRR
Accuracy
INL
DNL
No Missing Codes
Zero Error1
Gain Error1
Input Voltage
VIN
CIN
Conversion Time
FCLK
tCONV
VOLTAGE REFERENCE
Internal Voltage Reference3
Output Voltage Tolerance
Output Current
Load Regulation4
Power Supply Rejection Ratio
Reference Input Resistance
POWER-ON RESET
VRST
VHYST
Description
Min
Typ
Signal-to-Noise Ratio1
Signal-to-Noise and Distortion1
Total Harmonic Distortion1
Channel-Channel Crosstalk1
Common-Mode Rejection Ratio1
Power Supply Rejection Ratio1
68
68
72
71
–78
–80
–74
0.05
±0.6
±0.5
12
1.25
0.5
Integral Nonlinearity1
Differential Nonlinearity1
Input Voltage Span
Input Capacitance2
Max
Unit
–68
–66
–66
0.2
dB
dB
dB
dB
dB
%FSR
±2.0
±1.25
2.5
1.5
2.0
10
ADC Clock Rate
Total Conversion Time All 8 Channels
0.94
–2
–2
Reset Threshold Voltage
Hysteresis Voltage
0.98
40
100
+0.5
+0.5
8
1.4
1
V
pF
20
725
MHz
ns
1.02
V
mV
μA
mV
mV
kΩ
+2
+2
2.1
50
LSB
LSB
Bits
%FSR
%FSR
V
mV
In all cases, the input frequency to the ADC system is assumed to be <100 kHz.
Analog input pins VIN0 to VIN7.
3
These specifications are for operation of the internal voltage reference so that SENSE = REFCOM, with the default 1.0 V operating mode.
4
Operation with full 0.1 mA load current. For optimal operation, it is recommended to buffer the VREF output voltage before using it in other parts of the system.
2
Rev. A |
Page 27 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
Table 15. Peripherals Electrical Characteristics—ADSP-21992YBC
Parameter
ANALOG-TO-DIGITAL
CONVERTER
AC Specifications
SNR
SNRD
THD
CTLK
CMRR
PSRR
Accuracy
INL
DNL
No Missing Codes
Zero Error1
Gain Error1
Input Voltage
VIN
CIN
Conversion Time
FCLK
tCONV
VOLTAGE REFERENCE
Internal Voltage Reference3
Output Voltage Tolerance
Output Current
Load Regulation4
Power Supply Rejection Ratio
Reference Input Resistance
POWER-ON RESET
VRST
VHYST
Description
Min
Typ
Signal-to-Noise Ratio1
Signal-to-Noise and Distortion1
Total Harmonic Distortion1
Channel-Channel Crosstalk1
Common-Mode Rejection Ratio1
Power Supply Rejection Ratio1
68
66
72
71
–80
–80
–82
0.05
±0.6
±0.5
12
1.25
0.5
Integral Nonlinearity1
Differential Nonlinearity1
Input Voltage Span
Input Capacitance2
Max
Unit
–66
–66
–66
0.2
dB
dB
dB
dB
dB
%FSR
±2.0
±1.25
2.5
1.5
2.0
10
ADC Clock Rate
Total Conversion Time All 8 Channels
0.94
–2
–2
Reset Threshold Voltage
Hysteresis Voltage
0.98
40
100
+0.5
+0.5
8
1.4
1
V
pF
18.75
773
MHz
ns
1.02
V
mV
μA
mV
mV
kΩ
+2
+2
2.1
50
LSB
LSB
Bits
%FSR
%FSR
V
mV
In all cases, the input frequency to the ADC system is assumed to be <100 kHz.
Analog input pins VIN0 to VIN7.
3
These specifications are for operation of the internal voltage reference so that SENSE = REFCOM, with the default 1.0 V operating mode.
4
Operation with full 0.1 mA load current. For optimal operation, it is recommended to buffer the VREF output voltage before using it in other parts of the system.
2
Rev. A |
Page 28 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
Table 16. Peripherals Electrical Characteristics—ADSP-21992YST
Parameter
ANALOG-TO-DIGITAL CONVERTER
AC Specifications
SNR
SNRD
THD
CTLK
CMRR
PSRR
Accuracy
INL
DNL
No Missing Codes
Zero Error1
Gain Error1
Input Voltage
VIN
CIN
Conversion Time
FCLK
tCONV
VOLTAGE REFERENCE
Internal Voltage Reference3
Output Voltage Tolerance
Output Current
Load Regulation4
Power Supply Rejection Ratio
Reference Input Resistance
POWER-ON RESET
VRST
VHYST
Description
Min
Typ
Signal-to-Noise Ratio1
Signal-to-Noise and Distortion1
Total Harmonic Distortion1
Channel-Channel Crosstalk1
Common-Mode Rejection Ratio1
Power Supply Rejection Ratio1
68
68
72
71
–80
–80
–82
0.05
±0.6
±0.5
12
1.25
0.5
Integral Nonlinearity1
Differential Nonlinearity1
Input Voltage Span
Input Capacitance2
Max
Unit
–68
–66
–66
0.2
dB
dB
dB
dB
dB
%FSR
±2.0
±1.25
2.5
1.5
2.0
10
ADC Clock Rate
Total Conversion Time All 8 Channels
0.94
–2
–2
Reset Threshold Voltage
Hysteresis Voltage
0.98
40
100
+0.5
+0.5
8
1.4
1
V
pF
12.5
1160
MHz
ns
1.02
V
mV
μA
mV
mV
kΩ
+2
+2
2.1
50
LSB
LSB
Bits
%FSR
%FSR
V
mV
In all cases, the input frequency to the ADC system is assumed to be <100 kHz.
Analog input pins VIN0 to VIN7.
3
These specifications are for operation of the internal voltage reference so that SENSE = REFCOM, with the default 1.0 V operating mode.
4
Operation with full 0.1 mA load current. For optimal operation, it is recommended to buffer the VREF output voltage before using it in other parts of the system.
2
Rev. A |
Page 29 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
ABSOLUTE MAXIMUM RATINGS
Parameter
Internal (Core) Supply Voltage1 (VDDINT)
External (I/O) Supply Voltage1 (VDDEXT)
Input Voltage1, 2 (VIL – VIH)
Output Voltage Swing1, 2 (VOL – VOH)
Load Capacitance1 (CL)
Core Clock Period1 (tCCLK)
Core Clock Frequency1 (fCCLK)
Peripheral Clock Period1 (tHCLK)
Peripheral Clock Frequency1 (fHCLK)
Storage Temperature Range1 (TSTORE)
Lead Temperature (5 seconds)1 (TLEAD)
Rating
–0.3 V to +3.0 V
–0.3 V to +4.6 V
–0.5 V to +5.5 V
–0.5 V to +5.5 V
200 pF
6.25 ns
160 MHz
12.5 ns
80 MHz
–65⬚C to +150⬚C
85⬚C
1
Stresses greater than those listed above may cause permanent damage to the device. These are stress ratings only;
functional operation of the device at these or any other conditions greater than those indicated in the operational
sections of this specification is not implied. Exposure to absolute maximum rating conditions for extended periods
may affect device reliability.
2
Except CLKIN and analog pins.
ESD CAUTION
ESD (electrostatic discharge) sensitive device.
Charged devices and circuit boards can discharge
without detection. Although this product features
patented or proprietary circuitry, damage may occur
on devices subjected to high energy ESD. Therefore,
proper ESD precautions should be taken to avoid
performance degradation or loss of functionality.
TIMING SPECIFICATIONS
This next section contains timing information for the external
signals of the DSP. Use the exact information given. Do not
attempt to derive parameters from the addition or subtraction
of other information. While addition or subtraction would yield
meaningful results for an individual device, the values given in
this data sheet reflect statistical variations and worst cases. Consequently, parameters cannot be added meaningfully to derive
longer times.
Timing requirements apply to signals that are controlled by circuitry external to the processor, such as the data input for a read
operation. Timing requirements guarantee that the processor
operates correctly with other devices.
Switching characteristics specify how the processor changes its
signals. No control is possible over this timing; circuitry external to the processor must be designed for compatibility with
these signal characteristics. Switching characteristics indicate
what the processor will do in a given circumstance. Switching
characteristics can also be used to ensure that any timing
requirement of a device connected to the processor (such as
memory) is satisfied.
Rev. A |
Page 30 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
Clock In and Clock Out Cycle Timing
Table 17 and Figure 7 describe clock and reset operations. Combinations of CLKIN and clock multipliers must not select
core/peripheral clocks in excess of 160 MHz/80 MHz for the
ADSP-21992BST, 150 MHz/75 MHz for both the
ADSP-21992BBC and ADSP-21992YBC, and 100 MHz/50 MHz
for the ADSP-21992YST, when the peripheral clock rate is one-
half the core clock rate. If the peripheral clock rate is equal to the
core clock rate, the maximum peripheral clock rate is 80 MHz
for the ADSP-21992BST, 75 MHz for ADSP-21992BBC and
ADSP-21992YBC, and 50 MHz for the ADSP-21992YST. The
peripheral clock is supplied to the CLKOUT pins.
When changing from bypass mode to PLL mode, allow 512
HCLK cycles for the PLL to stabilize.
Table 17. Clock In and Clock Out Cycle Timing
Parameter
Min
Max
Unit
200
ns
Timing Requirements
tCK
CLKIN Period1, 2
10
tCKL
CLKIN Low Pulse
4.5
ns
tCKH
CLKIN High Pulse
4.5
ns
tWRST
RESET Asserted Pulse Width Low
200tCLKOUT
ns
tMSS
MSELx/BYPASS Stable Before RESET Deasserted Setup
40
μs
tMSH
MSELx/BYPASS Stable After RESET Deasserted Hold
1000
ns
tMSD
MSELx/BYPASS Stable After RESET Asserted
200
ns
tPFD
Flag Output Disable Time After RESET Asserted
10
ns
5.8
ns
Switching Characteristics
tCKOD
CLKOUT Delay from CLKIN
0
tCKO
CLKOUT Period3
12.5
1
In clock multiplier mode and MSEL6–0 set for 1:1 (or CLKIN = CCLK), tCK = tCCLK.
In bypass mode, tCK = tCCLK.
3
CLKOUT jitter can be as great as 8 ns when CLKOUT frequency is less than 20 MHz. For frequencies greater than 20 MHz, jitter is less than 1 ns.
2
Rev. A |
Page 31 of 60 |
August 2007
ns
ADSP-21992
tCK
CLKIN
tCKL
tCKH
tWRST
RESET
tPFD
tMSD
tMSS
tMSH
MSEL6–0
BYPASS
DF
tCKOD
tCKO
CLKOUT
Figure 7. Clock In and Clock Out Cycle Timing
Rev. A |
Page 32 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
Programmable Flags Cycle Timing
Table 18 and Figure 8 describe programmable flag operations.
Table 18. Programmable Flags Cycle Timing
Parameter
Min
Max
Unit
Timing Requirement
tHFI
Flag Input Hold Is Asynchronous
3
ns
Switching Characteristics
tDFO
Flag Output Delay with Respect to CLKOUT
7
ns
tHFO
Flag Output Hold After CLKOUT High
6
ns
CLKOUT
tDFO
tHFO
PF
(OUTPUT)
FLAG OUTPUT
tHFI
PF
(INPUT)
FLAG INPUT
Figure 8. Programmable Flags Cycle Timing
Rev. A |
Page 33 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
Timer PWM_OUT Cycle Timing
Table 19 and Figure 9 describe timer expired operations. The
input signal is asynchronous in “width capture mode” and has
an absolute maximum input frequency of 40 MHz.
Table 19. Timer PWM_OUT Cycle Timing
Parameter
Min
Max
Unit
12.5
(232 –1) cycles
ns
Switching Characteristic
tHTO
1
Timer Pulse Width Output1
The minimum time for tHTO is one cycle, and the maximum time for tHTO equals (232 –1) cycles.
HCLK
tHTO
PWM_OUT
Figure 9. Timer PWM_OUT Cycle Timing
Rev. A |
Page 34 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
External Port Write Cycle Timing
Table 20 and Figure 10 describe external port write operations.
The external port lets systems extend read/write accesses in
three ways: wait states, ACK input, and combined wait states
and ACK. To add waits with ACK, the DSP must see ACK low
at the rising edge of EMI clock. ACK low causes the DSP to wait,
and the DSP requires two EMI clock cycles after ACK goes high
to finish the access. For more information, see the External Port
chapter in the ADSP-2199x DSP Hardware Reference.
Table 20. External Port Write Cycle Timing
Parameter
Min
Max
Unit
Timing Requirements1, 2
tAKW
ACK Strobe Pulse Width
tDWSAK
ACK Delay from XMS Low
12.5
ns
0.5tEMICLK – 1
ns
Switching Characteristics
tCSWS
Chip Select Asserted to WR Asserted Delay
0.5tEMICLK – 4
ns
tAWS
Address Valid to WR Setup and Delay
0.5tEMICLK – 3
ns
tWSCS
WR Deasserted to Chip Select Deasserted
0.5tEMICLK – 4
ns
tWSA
WR Deasserted to Address Invalid
0.5tEMICLK – 3
ns
tWW
WR Strobe Pulse Width
tEMICLK –2 + W3
ns
tCDA
WR to Data Enable Access Delay
tCDD
WR to Data Disable Access Delay
tDSW
0
ns
0.5tEMICLK – 3
0.5tEMICLK + 4
ns
Data Valid to WR Deasserted Setup
tEMICLK + 1 + W3
tEMICLK + 7 + W3
ns
tDHW
WR Deasserted to Data Invalid Hold Time; E_WHC4, 5
3.4
ns
tDHW
WR Deasserted to Data Invalid Hold Time; E_WHC4, 6
tEMICLK +3.4
ns
tWWR
WR Deasserted to WR, RD Asserted
tHCLK
ns
1
tEMICLK is the external memory interface clock period. tHCLK is the peripheral clock period.
These are timing parameters that are based on worst-case operating conditions.
3
W = (number of wait states specified in wait register) tEMICLK.
4
Write hold cycle memory select control registers (MS 3 CTL).
5
Write wait state count (E_WHC) = 0
6
Write wait state count (E_WHC) = 1
2
Rev. A |
Page 35 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
tCSWS
tWSCS
MS3–0
IOMS
BMS
A21–0
tWW
tAWS
tWSA
WR
tWWR
tAKW
ACK
tCDD
tCDA
tDSW
tDHW
tDWSAK
D15–0
RD
Figure 10. External Port Write Cycle Timing
Rev. A |
Page 36 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
External Port Read Cycle Timing
Table 21 and Figure 11 describe external port read operations.
For additional information on the ACK signal, see the discussion on Page 35.
Table 21. External Port Read Cycle Timing
Parameter1, 2
Min
Max
Unit
Timing Requirements
tAKW
ACK Strobe Pulse Width
tRDA
RD Asserted to Data Access Setup
tEMICLK – 5+W3
ns
tADA
Address Valid to Data Access Setup
tEMICLK + W3
ns
tSDA
Chip Select Asserted to Data Access Setup
tEMICLK + W3
ns
tSD
Data Valid to RD Deasserted Setup
5
ns
tHRD
RD Deasserted to Data Invalid Hold
0
ns
tDRSAK
ACK Delay from XMS Low
tHCLK
ns
0.5tEMICLK – 1
ns
Switching Characteristics
tCSRS
Chip Select Asserted to RD Asserted Delay
0.5tEMICLK – 3
ns
tARS
Address Valid to RD Setup and Delay
0.5tEMICLK – 3
ns
tRSCS
RD Deasserted to Chip Select Deasserted Setup
0.5tEMICLK – 2
ns
tRW
RD Strobe Pulse Width
tEMICLK –2 + W3
ns
tRSA
RD Deasserted to Address Invalid Setup
0.5tHCLK – 2
ns
tRWR
RD Deasserted to WR, RD Asserted
tHCLK
ns
1
tEMICLK is the external memory Interface clock period. tHCLK is the peripheral clock period.
These are timing parameters that are based on worst-case operating conditions.
3
W = (number of wait states specified in wait register) tEMICLK.
2
Rev. A |
Page 37 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
MS3–0
IOMS
BMS
tRSCS
tCSRS
A21–0
tRW
tARS
tRSA
RD
tDRSAK
tRWR
tAKW
ACK
tCDA
tSD
D15–0
tRDA
tADA
tSDA
WR
Figure 11. External Port Read Cycle Timing
Rev. A |
Page 38 of 60 |
August 2007
tH R D
ADSP-21992
External Port Bus Request/Grant Cycle Timing
Table 22 and Figure 12 describe external port bus request and
bus grant operations.
Table 22. External Port Bus Request and Grant Cycle Timing
Parameter1, 2
Min
Max
Unit
Timing Requirements
tBS
BR Asserted to CLKOUT High Setup
4.6
ns
tBH
CLKOUT High to BR Deasserted Hold Time
0
ns
Switching Characteristics
1
2
tSD
CLKOUT High to xMS, Address, and RD/WR Disable
tSE
CLKOUT Low to xMS, Address, and RD/WR Enable
tDBG
0.5tHCLK + 1
ns
0
4
ns
CLKOUT High to BG Asserted Setup
0
4
ns
tEBG
CLKOUT High to BG Deasserted Hold Time
0
4
ns
tDBH
CLKOUT High to BGH Asserted Setup
0
4
ns
tEBH
CLKOUT High to BGH Deasserted Hold Time
0
4
ns
tHCLK is the peripheral clock period.
These are timing parameters that are based on worst-case operating conditions.
Rev. A |
Page 39 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
CLKOUT
tBS
tBH
BR
tSD
tSE
tSD
tSE
tSD
tSE
MS3–0
IOMS
BMS
A21–0
WR
RD
tDBG
tEBG
tDBH
tEBH
BG
BGH
Figure 12. External Port Bus Request and Grant Cycle Timing
Rev. A |
Page 40 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
Serial Port Timing
Table 23 and Figure 13 describe SPORT transmit and receive
operations, while Figure 14 and Figure 15 describe SPORT
frame sync operations.
Table 23. Serial Port1, 2
Parameter
Min
Max
Unit
External Clock Timing Requirements
tSFSE
TFS/RFS Setup Before TCLK/RCLK3
3
4
ns
4
ns
tHFSE
TFS/RFS Hold After TCLK/RCLK
tSDRE
Receive Data Setup Before RCLK3
1.5
ns
tHDRE
Receive Data Hold After RCLK3
4
ns
tSCLKW
TCLK/RCLK Width
0.5tHCLK –1
ns
tSCLK
TCLK/RCLK Period
2tHCLK
ns
Internal Clock Timing Requirements
tSFSI
TFS Setup Before TCLK4; RFS Setup Before RCLK3
4
ns
tHFSI
TFS/RFS Hold After TCLK/RCLK3
3
ns
tSDRI
Receive Data Setup Before RCLK3
2
ns
5
ns
tHDRI
3
Receive Data Hold After RCLK
External or Internal Clock Switching Characteristics
tDFSE
TFS/RFS Delay After TCLK/RCLK (Internally
Generated FS)4
tHOFSE
TFS/RFS Hold After TCLK/RCLK (Internally
Generated FS)4
14
3
ns
ns
External Clock Switching Characteristics
tDDTE
Transmit Data Delay After TCLK4
tHDTE
Transmit Data Hold After TCLK4
13.4
4
ns
ns
Internal Clock Switching Characteristics
tDDTI
Transmit Data Delay After TCLK4
tHDTI
Transmit Data Hold After TCLK4
4
tSCLKIW
TCLK/RCLK Width
0.5tHCLK – 3.5
0.5tHCLK + 2.5
ns
0
12.1
ns
13
ns
13.4
ns
ns
Enable and Three-State Switching Characteristics5
tDTENE
tDDTTE
Data Enable from External TCLK4
4
Data Disable from External TCLK
4
tDTENI
Data Enable from Internal TCLK
tDDTTI
Data Disable from External TCLK4
0
13
ns
12
ns
10.5
ns
External Late Frame Sync Switching Characteristics
tDDTLFSE
Data Delay from Late External TFS with MCE =1, MFD=06, 7
tDTENLFSE
Data Enable from Late FS or MCE =1, MFD=06, 7
3.5
1
ns
To determine whether communication is possible between two devices at clock speed n, the following specifications must be confirmed: 1) frame sync delay and frame
sync setup-and-hold, 2) data delay and data setup-and-hold, and 3) SCLK width.
2
Word selected timing for I2S mode is the same as TFS/RFS timing (normal framing only).
3
Referenced to sample edge.
4
Referenced to drive edge.
5
Only applies to SPORT.
6
MCE =1, TFS enable, and TFS valid follow tDDTENFS and tDDTLFSE.
7
If external RFSD/TFS setup to RCLK/TCLK > 0.5tLSCK, tDDTLSCK and tDTENLSCK apply; otherwise, tDDTLFSE and tDTENLFS apply.
Rev. A |
Page 41 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
DATA RECEIVE-INTERNAL CLOCK
DATA RECEIVE-EXTERNAL CLOCK
SAMPLE
EDGE
DRIVE
EDGE
DRIVE
EDGE
SAMPLE
EDGE
tSCLKIW
tSCLKW
RCLK
RCLK
tDFSE
tHOFSE
tSFSI
tDFSE
tHOFSE
tHFSI
RFS
tSFSE
tHFSE
tSDRE
tHDRE
RFS
tSDRI
tHDRI
DR
DR
NOTE: EITHER THE RISING EDGE OR FALLING EDGE OF RCLK OR TCLK CAN BE USED AS THE ACTIVE SAMPLING EDGE.
DATA TRANSMIT-INTERNAL CLOCK
DATA TRANSMIT-EXTERNAL CLOCK
SAMPLE
EDGE
DRIVE
EDGE
DRIVE
EDGE
SAMPLE
EDGE
tSCLKIW
tSCLKW
TCLK
TCLK
tDFSE
tHOFSE
tSFSI
tDFSE
tHOFSE
tHFSI
TFS
tSFSE
tHFSE
TFS
tHDTI
tDDTI
tHDTE
tDDTE
DT
DT
NOTE: EITHER THE RISING EDGE OR FALLING EDGE OF RCLK OR TCLK CAN BE USED AS THE ACTIVE SAMPLING EDGE.
DRIVE
EDGE
DRIVE
EDGE
TCLK (EXT)
TFS (“LATE,” EXT)
TCLK/RCLK
tDDTEN
tDDTTE
DT
DRIVE
EDGE
TCLK (INT)
TFS (“LATE,” INT)
DRIVE
EDGE
TCLK/RCLK
tDDTIN
tDDTTI
DT
Figure 13. Serial Port
Rev. A |
Page 42 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
EXTERNAL RFS WITH MCE = 1, MFD = 0
DRIVE
SAMPLE
DRIVE
RCLK
tHOSFSE/ I
tSFSE/ I
RFS
tDDTE/ I
tHDTE/ I
tDTENLFSE
DT
1ST BIT
2ND BIT
tDDTLFSE
LATE EXTERNAL TFS
DRIVE
SAMPLE
DRIVE
TCLK
tHOSFSE/ I
tSFSE / I
TFS
tDDTE / I
tHDTE/ I
tDTENLFSE
1ST BIT
DT
2ND BIT
tDDTLFSE
Figure 14. Serial Port—External Late Frame Sync (Frame Sync Setup > 0.5tSCLK)
Rev. A |
Page 43 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
EXTERNAL RFS WITH MCE = 1, MFD = 0
DRIVE
SAMPLE
DRIVE
RCLK
tSFSE/ I
tHOFSE/ I
RFS
tDDTE / I
tHDTE/ I
tDTENLFSE
1ST BIT
DT
2ND BIT
tDDTLFSE
LATE EXTERNAL TFS
DRIVE
SAMPLE
DRIVE
TCLK
tHOFSE/ I
tSFSE/ I
TFS
tDDTE/ I
tHDTE/ I
tDTENLFSE
1ST BIT
DT
2ND BIT
tDDTLFSE
Figure 15. Serial Port—External Late Frame Sync (Frame Sync Setup < 0.5tHCLK)
Rev. A |
Page 44 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
Serial Peripheral Interface Port—Master Timing
Table 24 and Figure 16 describe SPI port master operations.
Table 24. Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) Port—Master Timing
Parameter
Min
Max
Unit
Timing Requirements
tSSPID
Data Input Valid to SCLK Edge (Data Input Setup)
8
ns
tHSPID
SCLK Sampling Edge to Data Input Invalid (Data In Hold)
1
ns
Switching Characteristics
tSDSCIM
SPISEL Low to First SCLK Edge
2tHCLK –3
ns
tSPICHM
Serial Clock High Period
2tHCLK –3
ns
tSPICLM
Serial Clock Low Period
2tHCLK –3
ns
tSPICLK
Serial Clock Period
4tHCLK –1
ns
tHDSM
Last SCLK Edge to SPISEL High
2tHCLK –3
ns
tSPITDM
Sequential Transfer Delay
2tHCLK –2
ns
tDDSPID
SCLK Edge to Data Output Valid (Data Out Delay)
0
6
ns
tHDSPID
SCLK Edge to Data Output Invalid (Data Out Hold)
0
5
ns
Rev. A |
Page 45 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
tSPICHM
SPISEL
(OUTPUT)
tSDSCIM
tHDSM
tSPICLK
tSPICLM
tSPITDM
SCLK
(CPOL = 0)
(OUTPUT)
tSPICLM
tSPICHM
SCLK
(CPOL = 1)
(OUTPUT)
tDDSPID
MOSI
(OUTPUT)
tHDSPID
MSB
tSSPID
CPHA = 1
LSB
tHSPID
tSSPID
LSB
VALID
MSB
VALID
MISO
(INPUT)
tDDSPID
MOSI
(OUTPUT)
CPHA = 0
MISO
(INPUT)
tHDSPID
MSB
tSSPID
tHSPID
LSB
tHSPID
MSB
VALID
LSB
VALID
Figure 16. Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) Port—Master Timing
Rev. A |
Page 46 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
Serial Peripheral Interface Port—Slave Timing
Table 25 and Figure 17 describe SPI port slave operations.
Table 25. Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) Port—Slave Timing
Parameter
Min
Max
Unit
Timing Requirements
tSPICHS
Serial Clock High Period
2tHCLK
ns
tSPICLS
Serial Clock Low Period
2tHCLK
ns
tSPICLK
Serial Clock Period
4tHCLK
ns
tHDS
Last SPICLK Edge to SPISS Not Asserted
2tHCLK
ns
tSPITDS
Sequential Transfer Delay
2tHCLK + 4
ns
tSDSCI
SPISS Assertion to First SPICLK Edge
2tHCLK
ns
tSSPID
Data Input Valid to SCLK Edge (Data Input Setup)
1.6
ns
tHSPID
SCLK Sampling Edge to Data Input Invalid (Data In Hold)
2.4
ns
Switching Characteristics
tDSOE
SPISS Assertion to Data Out Active
0
8
ns
tDSDHI
SPISS Deassertion to Data High Impedance
0
10
ns
tDDSPID
SCLK Edge to Data Out Valid (Data Out Delay)
0
10
ns
tHDSPID
SCLK Edge to Data Out Invalid (Data Out Hold)
0
10
ns
Rev. A |
Page 47 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
SPISS
(INPUT)
tSPICHS
tSPICLS
tSPICLS
tSDSCI
tSPICHS
tSPICLK
tHDS
SCLK
(CPOL = 0)
(INPUT)
SCLK
(CPOL = 1)
(INPUT)
tDSOE
tDDSPID
MISO
(OUTPUT)
MOSI
(INPUT)
tDSOE
MISO
(OUTPUT)
tDSDHI
LSB
tSSPID
tHSPID
tHSPID
MSB
VALID
LSB
VALID
tDDSPID
tDSDHI
LSB
MSB
CPHA = 0
MOSI
(INPUT)
tDDSPID
MSB
tSSPID
CPHA = 1
tHDSPID
tSSPID
MSB
VALID
tHSPID
LSB
VALID
Figure 17. Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) Port—Slave Timing
Rev. A |
Page 48 of 60 |
August 2007
tSPITDS
ADSP-21992
JTAG Test and Emulation Port Timing
Table 26 and Figure 18 describe JTAG port operations.
Table 26. JTAG Port Timing
Parameter
Min
Max
Unit
Timing Requirements
tTCK
TCK Period
tSTAP
TDI, TMS Setup Before TCK High
4
ns
tHTAP
TDI, TMS Hold After TCK High
4
ns
tSSYS
System Inputs Setup Before TCK Low1
4
ns
tHSYS
System Inputs Hold After TCK Lowa
5
ns
tTRSTW
TRST Pulse Width2
20
ns
4tTCK
ns
Switching Characteristics
tDTDO
TDO Delay from TCK Low
tDSYS
System Outputs Delay After TCK Low3
0
1
System outputs = DATA15–0, ADDR21–0, MS3–0, RD, WR, ACK, CLKOUT, BG, PF15–0, DT, TCLK, RCLK, TFS, RFS, BMS.
50 MHz maximum.
3
System inputs = DATA15–0, ADDR21–0, RD, WR, ACK, BR, BG, PF15–0, DR, TCLK, RCLK, TFS, RFS, CLKOUT, RESET.
2
tTCK
TCK
tSTAP
tHTAP
TMS
TDI
tDTDO
TDO
tSSYS
SYSTEM
INPUTS
tDSYS
SYSTEM
OUTPUTS
Figure 18. JTAG Port Timing
Rev. A |
Page 49 of 60 |
August 2007
tHSYS
8
ns
22
ns
ADSP-21992
POWER DISSIPATION
• Maximum peripheral speed CCLK = 80 MHz, HCLK =
80 MHz
Total power dissipation has two components, one due to internal circuitry and one due to the switching of external output
drivers. Internal power dissipation is dependent on the instruction execution sequence and the data operands involved.
• External data memory writes occur every other cycle, a rate
of 1/(4tHCLK), with 50% of the pins switching
• The bus cycle time is 80 MHz (tHCLK = 12.5 ns)
The external component of total power dissipation is caused by
the switching of output pins. Its magnitude depends on:
The PEXT equation is calculated for each class of pins that can
drive as shown in Table 27.
• Number of output pins that switch during each cycle (O)
A typical power consumption can now be calculated for these
conditions by adding a typical internal power dissipation with
the following formula.
• The maximum frequency at which they can switch (f)
• Their load capacitance (C)
• Their voltage swing (VDD)
P TOTAL = P EXT + P INT
and is calculated by the formula below.
where:
PEXT is from Table 27.
P EXT = O × C × V DD × f
2
The load capacitance includes the package capacitance (CIN of
the processor). The switching frequency includes driving the
load high and then back low. Address and data pins can drive
high and low at a maximum rate of 1/(2tCK). The write strobe
can switch every cycle at a frequency of 1/tCK. Select pins switch
at 1/(2tCK), but selects can switch on each cycle. For example,
estimate PEXT with the following assumptions:
• A system with one bank of external data memory—
asynchronous RAM (16-bit)
PINT is IDDINT 2.5 V, using the calculation IDDINT listed in
Power Dissipation.
Note that the conditions causing a worst-case PEXT are different
from those causing a worst-case PINT. Maximum PINT cannot
occur while 100% of the output pins are switching from all ones
to all zeros. Note also that it is not common for an application to
have 100% or even 50% of the outputs switching
simultaneously.
• One 64K 16 RAM chip is used with a load of 10 pF
Table 27. PEXT Calculation Example
Pin Type
No. of Pins
% Switching
C
f
VDD2
= PEXT
Address
15
50
10 pF
20 MHz
10.9 V
= 0.01635 W
MSx
1
0
10 pF
20 MHz
10.9 V
= 0.0 W
WR
1
10 pF
40 MHz
10.9 V
= 0.00436 W
Data
16
10 pF
20 MHz
10.9 V
= 0.01744 W
CLKOUT
1
10 pF
80 MHz
10.9 V
= 0.00872 W
= 0.04687 W
50
Rev. A |
Page 50 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
TEST CONDITIONS
The DSP is tested for output enable, disable, and hold time.
OUTPUT DISABLE TIME
Output pins are considered to be disabled when they stop driving, go into a high impedance state, and start to decay from their
output high or low voltage. The time for the voltage on the bus
to decay by ΔV is dependent on the capacitive load, CL, and the
load current, IL. This decay time can be approximated by the
following equation.
C L ΔV
t DECAY = ------------IL
The output disable time tDIS is the difference between
tMEASURED and tDECAY as shown in Figure 19. The time tMEASURED is the interval from when the reference signal switches to
when the output voltage decays ΔV from the measured output
high or output low voltage. The tDECAY is calculated with test
loads CL and IL, and with ΔV equal to 0.5 V.
tMEASURED
tENA
VOH (MEASURED)
VOH (MEASURED) – V 2.0V
VOL (MEASURED) + V 1.0V
VOL (MEASURED)
OUTPUT ENABLE TIME
Output pins are considered to be enabled when they have made
a transition from a high impedance state to when they start driving. The output enable time tENA is the interval from when a
reference signal reaches a high or low voltage level to when the
output has reached a specified high or low trip point, as shown
in the Output Enable/Disable diagram (Figure 19). If multiple
pins (such as the data bus) are enabled, the measurement value
is that of the first pin to start driving.
EXAMPLE SYSTEM HOLD TIME CALCULATION
OUTPUT STARTS
DRIVING
HIGH IMPEDANCE STATE.
TEST CONDITIONS CAUSE THIS VOLTAGE
TO BE APPROXIMATELY 1.5V
Figure 19. Output Enable/Disable
IOL
TO
OUTPUT
PIN
1.5V
50pF
IOH
Figure 20. Equivalent Device Loading for AC Measurements (Includes All
Fixtures)
Rev. A |
1.5V
Figure 21. Voltage Reference Levels for AC Measurements (Except Output
Enable/Disable)
tDECAY
OUTPUT STOPS
DRIVING
1.5V
To determine the data output hold time in a particular system,
first calculate tDECAY using the equation at Output Disable Time
on Page 51. Choose ΔV to be the difference between the output
voltage of the ADSP-21992 and the input threshold for the
device requiring the hold time. A typical ΔV will be 0.4 V. CL is
the total bus capacitance (per data line), and IL is the total leakage or three-state current (per data line). The hold time will be
tDECAY plus the minimum disable time (i.e., tDATRWH for the
write cycle).
REFERENCE
SIGNAL
tDIS
INPUT
OR
OUTPUT
Page 51 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
PIN CONFIGURATIONS
Table 28 identifies the signal for each CSP_BGA ball number.
Table 29 identifies the CSP_BGA ball number for each signal
name. Table 30 identifies the signal for each LQFP lead.
Table 31 identifies the LQFP lead for each signal name. Table 4
on Page 17 describes each signal.
Rev. A |
Page 52 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
Table 28. 196-Ball CSP_BGA Signal by Ball Number
Ball No.
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
A7
A8
A9
A10
A11
A12
A13
A14
B1
B2
B3
B4
B5
B6
B7
B8
B9
B10
B11
B12
B13
B14
C1
C2
C3
C4
C5
C6
C7
C8
C9
C10
C11
C12
C13
C14
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
D7
Signal
nc
DR
DT
RFS
VIN4
BSHAN
VIN0
VIN1
VIN3
PF0/SPISS
PF4/SPISEL4
PF6/SPISEL6
PF7/SPISEL7
nc
SCK
RCLK
TCLK
TFS
VIN6
ASHAN
VIN2
SENSE
CAPB
PF1/SPISEL1
PF5/SPISEL5
PF8
PF9
PF13
BR
RD
MISO
MOSI
VIN7
VIN5
CAPT
VREF
CML
PF2/SPISEL2
PF10
PF11
PF12
PF14
A18
A19
IOMS
ACK
AVDD
AVDD
AVSS
Ball No.
D8
D9
D10
D11
D12
D13
D14
E1
E2
E3
E4
E5
E6
E7
E8
E9
E10
E11
E12
E13
E14
F1
F2
F3
F4
F5
F6
F7
F8
F9
F10
F11
F12
F13
F14
G1
G2
G3
G4
G5
G6
G7
G8
G9
G10
G11
G12
G13
G14
Signal
AVSS
PF3/SPISEL3
AUXTRIP
VDDEXT
AUX1
AUX0
PF15
A16
A17
WR
GND
VDDEXT
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
GND
EIA
EIB
EIS
A14
A15
BG
GND
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
VDDINT
EIZ
TMR2
XTAL
A12
A13
BGH
VDDINT
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
GND
TMR1
CONVST
CLKOUT
Rev. A |
Ball No.
H1
H2
H3
H4
H5
H6
H7
H8
H9
H10
H11
H12
H13
H14
J1
J2
J3
J4
J5
J6
J7
J8
J9
J10
J11
J12
J13
J14
K1
K2
K3
K4
K5
K6
K7
K8
K9
K10
K11
K12
K13
K14
L1
L2
L3
L4
L5
L6
L7
Page 53 of 60 |
Signal
A10
A11
MS3
GND
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
VDDEXT
TMR0
POR
RESET
A8
A9
BMS
VDDEXT
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
GND
TMS
TCK
TDI
A6
A7
MS0
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
VDDINT
EMU
TRST
TDO
A4
A5
MS1
VDDEXT
VDDINT
VDDEXT
VDDINT
August 2007
Ball No.
L8
L9
L10
L11
L12
L13
L14
M1
M2
M3
M4
M5
M6
M7
M8
M9
M10
M11
M12
M13
M14
N1
N2
N3
N4
N5
N6
N7
N8
N9
N10
N11
N12
N13
N14
P1
P2
P3
P4
P5
P6
P7
P8
P9
P10
P11
P12
P13
P14
Signal
VDDINT
VDDEXT
VDDEXT
GND
BMODE2
BMODE1
CLKIN
A2
A3
MS2
GND
VDDEXT
GND
VDDEXT
CANRX
CL
AL
PWMPOL
PWMTRIP
BYPASS
BMODE0
A0
A1
D13
D11
D9
D7
D5
D3
D1
CH
AH
nc
PWMSYNC
PWMSR
nc
D15
D14
D12
D10
D8
D6
D4
D2
D0
BL
BH
CANTX
nc
ADSP-21992
Table 29. 196-Ball CSP_BGA Ball Number by Signal
Signal
A0
A1
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
A7
A8
A9
A10
A11
A12
A13
A14
A15
A16
A17
A18
A19
ACK
AH
AL
ASHAN
AUXTRIP
AUX1
AUX0
AVDD
AVDD
AVSS
AVSS
BG
BGH
BL
BH
BMODE0
BMODE1
BMODE2
BMS
BR
BSHAN
BYPASS
CAPB
CAPT
CANRX
CANTX
CH
CL
CLKIN
Ball No.
N1
N2
M1
M2
L1
L2
K1
K2
J1
J2
H1
H2
G1
G2
F1
F2
E1
E2
D1
D2
D4
N11
M10
B6
D10
D12
D13
D5
D6
D7
D8
F3
G3
P11
P12
M14
L13
L12
J3
C1
A6
M13
B9
C7
M8
P13
N10
M9
L14
Signal
CLKOUT
CML
CONVST
D0
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
D7
D8
D9
D10
D11
D12
D13
D14
D15
DR
DT
EIA
EIB
EIS
EIZ
EMU
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
IOMS
MISO
MOSI
MS0
MS1
MS2
MS3
Ball No.
G14
C9
G13
P10
N9
P9
N8
P8
N7
P7
N6
P6
N5
P5
N4
P4
N3
P3
P2
A2
A3
E12
E13
E14
F12
K12
E4
E11
F4
G11
H4
J11
K4
K5
K6
K7
K8
K9
K10
L11
M4
M6
D3
C3
C4
K3
L3
M3
H3
Rev. A |
Signal
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
PF0/SPISS
PF1/SPISEL1
PF2/SPISEL2
PF3/SPISEL3
PF4/SPISEL4
PF5/SPISEL5
PF6/SPISEL6
PF7/SPISEL7
PF8
PF9
PF10
PF11
PF12
PF13
PF14
Page 54 of 60 |
Ball No.
A1
A14
E6
E7
E8
E9
E10
F5
F6
F7
F8
F9
F10
G5
G6
G7
G8
G9
G10
H5
H6
H7
H8
H9
H10
J5
J6
J7
J8
J9
J10
N12
P1
P14
A10
B10
C10
D9
A11
B11
A12
A13
B12
B13
C11
C12
C13
B14
C14
August 2007
Signal
PF15
POR
PWMPOL
PWMSYNC
PWMSR
PWMTRIP
RCLK
RD
RESET
RFS
SCK
SENSE
TCK
TCLK
TDI
TDO
TFS
TMR0
TMR1
TMR2
TMS
TRST
VDDEXT
VDDEXT
VDDEXT
VDDEXT
VDDEXT
VDDEXT
VDDEXT
VDDEXT
VDDEXT
VDDEXT
VDDINT
VDDINT
VDDINT
VDDINT
VDDINT
VDDINT
VIN0
VIN1
VIN2
VIN3
VIN4
VIN5
VIN6
VIN7
VREF
WR
XTAL
Ball No.
D14
H13
M11
N13
N14
M12
B2
C2
H14
A4
B1
B8
J13
B3
J14
K14
B4
H12
G12
F13
J12
K13
D11
E5
H11
J4
L4
L6
L9
L10
M5
M7
G4
L5
L7
L8
K11
F11
A7
A8
B7
A9
A5
C6
B5
C5
C8
E3
F14
ADSP-21992
Table 30. 176-Lead LQFP Signal by Lead Number
Lead No.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
Signal
nc
nc
VDDEXT
RCLK
SCK
MISO
MOSI
RD
WR
ACK
BR
BG
BGH
IOMS
BMS
MS3
GND
VDDEXT
MS2
MS1
MS0
GND
VDDINT
A19
A18
A17
A16
A15
A14
A13
GND
VDDEXT
A12
A11
A10
A9
A8
A7
A6
A5
GND
nc
nc
nc
Lead No.
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
Signal
VDDEXT
A4
A3
A2
A1
A0
D15
D14
D13
D12
D11
GND
VDDEXT
GND
VDDINT
D10
D9
D8
D7
D6
D5
GND
VDDINT
D4
D3
D2
D1
D0
CANRX
GND
VDDEXT
CL
CH
BL
BH
AL
AH
CANTX
nc
PWMSYNC
PWMPOL
PWMSR
PWMTRIP
GND
Rev. A |
Lead No.
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
Page 55 of 60 |
Signal
nc
nc
VDDEXT
BYPASS
BMODE0
BMODE1
BMODE2
nc
GND
VDDINT
EMU
TRST
TDO
TDI
TMS
TCK
POR
RESET
CLKIN
XTAL
CLKOUT
CONVST
TMR0
GND
VDDEXT
TMR1
TMR2
EIS
GND
VDDINT
EIZ
EIB
EIA
AUXTRIP
AUX1
AUX0
PF15
PF14
PF13
PF12
GND
nc
nc
nc
August 2007
Lead No.
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
150
151
152
153
154
155
156
157
158
159
160
161
162
163
164
165
166
167
168
169
170
171
172
173
174
175
176
Signal
VDDEXT
PF11
PF10
PF9
PF8
PF7/SPISEL7
PF6/SPISEL6
PF5/SPISEL5
PF4/SPISEL4
GND
VDDEXT
PF3/SPISEL3
PF2/SPISEL2
PF1/SPISEL1
PF0/SPISS
GND
VDDINT
AVSS
AVDD
nc
VREF
CML
CAPT
CAPB
SENSE
VIN3
VIN2
VIN1
VIN0
ASHAN
BSHAN
VIN4
VIN5
VIN6
VIN7
AVSS
AVDD
DT
DR
RFS
TFS
TCLK
GND
nc
ADSP-21992
Table 31. 176-Lead LQFP Lead Number by Signal
Signal
A0
A1
A10
A11
A12
A13
A14
A15
A16
A17
A18
A19
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
A7
A8
A9
ACK
AH
AL
ASHAN
AUX0
AUX1
AUXTRIP
AVDD
AVDD
AVSS
AVSS
BG
BGH
BH
BL
BMODE0
BMODE1
BMODE2
BMS
BR
BSHAN
BYPASS
CANRX
CANTX
Lead No.
50
49
35
34
33
30
29
28
27
26
25
24
48
47
46
40
39
38
37
36
10
81
80
162
124
123
122
151
169
150
168
12
13
79
78
93
94
95
15
11
163
92
73
82
Signal
CAPB
CAPT
CH
CL
CLKIN
CLKOUT
CML
CONVST
D0
D1
D10
D11
D12
D13
D14
D15
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
D7
D8
D9
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
GND
DR
DT
EIA
EIB
Lead No.
156
155
77
76
107
109
154
110
72
71
60
55
54
53
52
51
70
69
68
65
64
63
62
61
17
22
31
41
56
58
66
74
88
97
112
117
129
142
148
175
171
170
121
120
Rev. A |
Signal
EIS
EIZ
EMU
IOMS
MISO
MOSI
MS0
MS1
MS2
MS3
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
nc
PF0/SPISS
PF1/SPISEL1
PF10
PF11
PF12
PF13
PF14
PF15
PF2/SPISEL2
PF3/SPISEL3
PF4/SPISEL4
PF5/SPISEL5
PF6/SPISEL6
PF7/SPISEL7
PF8
PF9
POR
PWMPOL
PWMSR
PWMSYNC
Page 56 of 60 |
Lead No.
116
119
99
14
6
7
21
20
19
16
1
2
42
43
44
83
89
90
96
130
131
132
152
176
147
146
135
134
128
127
126
125
145
144
141
140
139
138
137
136
105
85
86
84
August 2007
Signal
PWMTRIP
RCLK
RD
RESET
RFS
SCK
SENSE
TCK
TCLK
TDI
TDO
TFS
TMR0
TMR1
TMR2
TMS
TRST
VDDEXT
VDDEXT
VDDEXT
VDDEXT
VDDEXT
VDDEXT
VDDEXT
VDDEXT
VDDEXT
VDDEXT
VDDINT
VDDINT
VDDINT
VDDINT
VDDINT
VDDINT
VIN0
VIN1
VIN2
VIN3
VIN4
VIN5
VIN6
VIN7
VREF
WR
XTAL
Lead No.
87
4
8
106
172
5
157
104
174
102
101
173
111
114
115
103
100
3
18
32
45
57
75
91
113
133
143
23
59
67
98
118
149
161
160
159
158
164
165
166
167
153
9
108
ADSP-21992
OUTLINE DIMENSIONS
15.00
BSC SQ
DETAIL B
14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
J
K
L
M
N
P
13.00
BSC
1.00 BSC
1.85
1.70
1.55
TOP VIEW
1.00 BSC
DETAIL A
13.00 BSC
BOTTOM VIEW
0.75
0.70
0.65
1.10
1.00
0.90
0.55
NOM
0.70
0.60
0.50
BALL
DIAMETER
0.20
MAX BALL
COPLANARITY
1.10
1.00
0.90
0.57
0.52
0.47
SEATING PLANE
DETAIL A
DETAIL B
DIMENSIONS SHOWN IN MILLIMETERS
NOTES:
1. THE ACTUAL POSITION OF THE BALL GRID IS WITHIN 0.25 OF ITS IDEAL POSITION RELATIVE TO THE
PACKAGE EDGES.
2. THE ACTUAL POSITION OF EACH BALL IS WITHIN 0.10 OF ITS IDEAL POSITION RELATIVE TO THE
BALL GRID.
3. DIMENSIONS COMPLY WITH JEDEC STANDARD MO-192 VARIATION AAE-1 WITH THE EXCEPTION OF
MAXIMUM HEIGHT.
4. CENTER DIMENSIONS ARE NOMINAL.
Figure 22. 196-Ball CSP_BGA (BC-196-2)
Rev. A |
Page 57 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
0.75
0.60
0.45
26.20
26.00 SQ
25.80
1.60
MAX
133
132
176
1
PIN 1
24.20
24.00 SQ
23.80
TOP VIEW
(PINS DOWN)
1.45
1.40
1.35
0.15
0.05
SEATING
PLANE
0.20
0.09
7°
3.5°
0°
0.08 MAX
COPLANARITY
89
44
45
VIEW A
VIEW A
ROTATED 90° CCW
88
0.50
BSC
LEAD PITCH
0.27
0.22
0.17
DIMENSIONS SHOWN IN MILLIMETERS
176-LEAD LOW PROFILE QUAD FLAT PACKAGE [LQFP] ST-176
NOTES:
1. ACTUAL POSITION OF EACH LEAD IS WITHIN 0.08 OF ITS IDEAL POSITION,
WHEN MEASURED IN THE LATERAL DIRECTION.
2. CENTER DIMENSIONS ARE NOMINAL.
3. DIMENSIONS COMPLY WITH JEDEC STANDARD MS-026-BGA
Figure 23. 176-Lead LQFP (ST-176)
Rev. A |
Page 58 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
ORDERING GUIDE
Model
Temperature Range1 Instruction Rate Operating Voltage Package Description Package Option
ADSP-21992BBC
–40⬚C to +85⬚C
150 MHz
2.5 Int. V/3.3 Ext. V
196-Ball CSP_BGA
BC-196-2
ADSP-21992YBC
–40⬚C to +125⬚C
150 MHz
2.5 Int. V/3.3 Ext. V
196-Ball CSP_BGA
BC-196-2
ADSP-21992BST
–40⬚C to +85⬚C
160 MHz
2.5 Int. V/3.3 Ext. V
176-Lead LQFP
ST-176
ADSP-21992BSTZ2
–40⬚C to +85⬚C
160 MHz
2.5 Int. V/3.3 Ext. V
176-Lead LQFP
ST-176
ADSP-21992YST
–40⬚C to +125⬚C
100 MHz
2.5 Int. V/3.3 Ext. V
176-Lead LQFP
ST-176
1
2
Referenced temperature is ambient temperature.
Z = RoHS Complaint Part
Rev. A |
Page 59 of 60 |
August 2007
ADSP-21992
©2007 Analog Devices, Inc. All rights reserved. Trademarks and
registered trademarks are the property of their respective owners.
D03163-0-8/07(A)
Rev. A |
Page 60 of 60 |
August 2007
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