Philips | CDI740/00 | Volume 5, No. 6, November/December 1996

The Interactive
Engineer
ie
Volume 5, Number 6, November/December 1996
6
Editorial
IE editorial staff
2
MediaMogul Click
Peter Boots
2
OOPS
Peer Custers & IE Editorial Staff
3
OS-9 command shell and
emulation
Peter Boots
4
Internet & CD-i
■ Editorial
Despite the rumours in the professional
literature,the professional market is getting stronger
for CD-i. It is true that DVD is gaining importance
and we all will have to take this fact into account,
but the only standardised alternative at the moment
is still the CD-i platform.
A new topic are the Internet applications,in full
exploitation since the introduction of the ‘Internet
toolkit’. This results in a great demand for ‘Hybrid’
Internet solutions.
Stefan Maris
5
Determining the real IP
address of the 605 Player
Also promising in Europe is the Spanish market:
six thousand players were sold for professional
applications there in just one month recently.
Peter Boots
5
DV plane shift - 605 IMPEG
DVC
Patrick De Jong
6
605 CD-i Ethernet self
check
Peter Boots
6
Index volume 5 1996
Ie editorial staff
7
Training
PIMC Training & Customers Suppor t
8
How to contact PIMC
Ie editorial staff
In Eastern Europe,particularly in Russia there is
great interest in CD-i. It is a platform far less
expensive than a similar PC solution, an important
fact for these emerging markets. In Asia and Thailand
in particular, there are projects under way to utilise
CD-i for Internet access using the Internet toolkit.
Ie editorial staff
■ MediaMogul Click
If the standard MediaMogul ‘click’sound keeps
boring you or is not the sound for your
application,simply change it!
Unfortunately it isn’t documented by what the
h0/AUDIO/click.cmono or
/h2/CDIMAGES/click.cmono audio file must be
replaced. When keeping a few rules in mind,this
job is fairly easy to do.
First of all you need some knowledge of the
Macintosh,the AudioMedia II sound card with the
Sound Designer II program and the AudioStack
conversion utility. Other sound capture devices
and/or other sound editing program will also do
the job,but only this setup was tested.
Open the sound file -or directly digitise the
sound from within the application- containing the
soundfragment that will be used as new ‘click’and
highlight (or select) the new ‘click’in the sound
file. The length of the selected part should be at
least 180 ms and not exceed 210 ms. If the
original file or capture is in stereo,select only a
portion in either the left or right channel,but not
both. Then copy the selected portion to the
‘clipboard’ by pressing C on the keyboard.
Open a new Sound Designer file (or a new file
in an other application) as MONO, 16 Bit,Sound
Designer II and paste the clipboard into the new
file. Apply filtering, compression,etc.as desired.
The peak amplitude of the sound file should be 36 dB below maximum (0 dB or 100%) to prevent
undue distortion when converting to CMONO.
Correct the amplitude of the ‘click’if necessary. It
is also recommended to fade out a small part
(±10%) of the trailing end to prevent a ‘pop’
caused by a sudden digital silence at the end of
the file. Finally, check the sound by playing it in
‘loop’mode and save the file when the result fits
your needs.
Now open AudioStack,select the sound just
saved file and convert it to CMONO. The resulting
CMONO file should be around 2390 bytes. If it is
substantially larger (like 3000 bytes or more), go
back to your sound editing program, reduce the
‘click’to less than 213 ms and convert it again to a
CMONO file.
started before it will load the new click.cmono
file. If you want to replace a ‘click’in an existing
application, replace the click.cmono file in
/h0/CDIMAGES and any other build directory with
the new click.cmono audio file. In this case the
title must be re-mastered -at minimum- or rebuilt
from ‘cdbuild’to include the new click file.
Peter Boots
■ OOPS
Unfortunately, the survey of 'CD-i players on
the market',on page 4-5 of IE5 contained some
outdated information. Philips Media Systems Product Management was so kind to correct our
information lag. We apologize for the possible
misunderstandings this could have caused.
Anyway, you'll have to update the items in the
table by the items below:
CDI605, etc.:
production stopped (even for CDI605T)
CDI450, etc.:
production stopped (only re-route of stock and
re-build of one version into another for
projects)
CDI210F4, etc.:
production stopped (only re-route of stock and
re-build of one version into another for
projects)
CDI740/00, etc.:
development finalised,but not yet released for
market introduction
CDI370:
in production
For your information: a new model -the
CDI490- will be introduce:it is a facelift of CDI470
with 32kB NVRAM. Market introduction
scheduled end of Q1 1997.
The last thing to do is replacing the
h0/AUDIO/click.cmono or
/h2/CDIMAGES/click.cmono audio file with the
new file. Remember MediaMogul must be re-
2
Volume 5, Number 6, November/December 1996
We’ll keep you informed.
Peer Custers & IE Editorial Staff
■ OS-9 command shell and
emulation
This file is the CD-i application on the CD-disc.
Type this name behind the $-prompt on the
terminal exactly as shown,including its path and
terminate the name with a &-character (for
example: /cd/CDI/MY_SCRIPT.MM0&). The &character forces the application to start in
background. The $-prompt will return while the
application starts to play on the CD-i screen.
While debugging a CD-i application,it can be
useful to retain the access to the OS-9 commands
like MFREE, MDIR=, PROCS or others. This
allows you to trace memory related problems (and
a lot of others) while emulating a title.
The PROCS OS-9 command is very helpful
while debugging an application. This command
displays the processes currently running both in
foreground and background. While debugging,it
is interesting to know how many copies of a
module are in memory and which priority it has.
At any time,there should only be ONE copy of
each module in memory. Duplicates can cause
sluggish or erratic operation and are usually the
result of multiple “Call_bg” to a MediaMogul
Plugin module. Another interesting parameter is
the priority of a process. The priority value
indicates the relative amount of processor time
the module or process consumes. A module with
a high priority uses a large percentage of the
processor’s capacity and will slow down the other
processes.
To access the OS-9 shell, you’ll need to
connect a terminal,or a Mac/PC running terminal
emulation software,to the CD-i player. Connect
the terminal to port 3 of the 605 CD-i player and
power up the player. Be sure that the switch
‘EXTERNAL/INTERNAL’,at the back of the 605
CD-i player, is set to INTERNAL.
Starting from the power-on Philips screen, first
click on the ‘SETTINGS’icon and then on the
‘SYSTEM’icon. The system will respond with a $prompt on the terminal screen.
Type now the following commands on the
terminal:
chx /h0/cmds
chd /cd
dir -e /cd/CDI
The next table shows the screen on the
terminal when invoking PROCS:
Locate in this directory listing a file ending
with the .MMO suf fix (use CNTRL-S and CNTRL-Q
to pause/continue the display if necessary). (➶)
Id Pid
2
6
3
6
4
0
>>>vid
5
2
6
0
7
2
8
4
9
4
>>>vid
10 11
11
0
12
0
13
0
14
0
15
0
16 10
Grp.Usr Prior
0.0
128
0.0
256
0.0
128
Mem.Siz Sig
445.71k 503
28.76k
0
19.76k
0
S
a
s
w
CPU.Time
2.78
0.14
2.32
Age
1:14
1:14
1:14
Module &
videopro
audiopro
optshell
I/O
<>>>nil
<>>>nil
<term
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
128
128
128
128
128
26.51k
10.51k
14.70k
104.21k
7.10k
0
0
0
0
0
s
s
s
s
s
1.24
0.25
0.00
2.86
11.52
1:14
1:14
1:14
1:14
1:14
inputpro <>>>nil
statepro <>>>nil
filepro <>>>nil
browser <term >>>nil
cdishell <term
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
128
128
128
128
128
128
128
6.64k
22.20k
11.96k
2.00k
2.00k
11.96k
18.01k
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
w
e
e
e
s
e
*
3.24
3.97
0.63
3.02
0.29
0.14
0.44
0:01
0:01
1:14
1:14
1:14
1:14
0:00
shell <>>>pks00
telnetdc <pks00
telnetd <>>>nil
ifman
sockman
ftpd <>>>nil
procs <>>pks00 >dd
The figures in this ta ble are useful to trace
‘heavy’modules,slowing down the overall
performance of an application.
amount of free RAM on the system:
Another useful command is MFREE. Typing
MFREE on the terminal returns the current (➶)
Adding the option -e to the MFREE command
returns a detailed map of memory segmentation:
Current total free RAM: 3667.94 K-bytes
Volume 5, Number 6, November/December 1996
3
Segment
Address Size.of Segment
----------------------------------$A80000
$80000
512.00 K-bytes
$6029C0
$1B0
0.42 K-bytes
$6175F0
$8C0
2.18 K-bytes
$61A270
$2AC0
10.68 K-bytes
$61F800
$2D6560 2905.34 K-bytes
$90B9B0
$30
0.04 K-bytes
$92FF90
$40
0.06 K-bytes
$932D70
$F0
0.23 K-bytes
$934680
$A0
0.15 K-bytes
$9348B0
$E0
0.21 K-bytes
$9360E0
$10
0.01 K-bytes
$9361F0
$20
0.03 K-bytes
$9369F0
$50
0.07 K-bytes
$936A70
$80
0.12 K-bytes
$937BF0
$10
0.01 K-bytes
$9A3CC0
$10
0.01 K-bytes
$9A3DE0
$B0
0.17 K-bytes
$9A3F30
$A0
0.15 K-bytes
$9A41B0
$10
0.01 K-bytes
$9A49E0
$40
0.06 K-bytes
$9E0540
$10
0.01 K-bytes
$9E0DE0
$10
0.01 K-bytes
$9EE870
$10
0.01 K-bytes
$9F8040
$10
0.01 K-bytes
$9FFCC0
$10
0.01 K-bytes
$80500
$1FA10
126.51 K-bytes
$FDC80
$19A0
6.40 K-bytes
$3D2A
$1D6
0.45 K-bytes
$4000
$197E0
101.96 K-bytes
$5FCA0
$1E0
0.46 K-bytes
Total RAM at startup indicates the grand total
of RAM installed on the mother board, expansion
card and DV card present at startup.
To calculate the amount of RAM used by your
title,subtract the Current total free RAM reported
by MFREE while the application is running,from
the Current total free RAM reported just before
you started the .MM0 file.
According the Green Book,a base-case CD-i
player must have two segments of at least 480 Kb
free, resulting in a Current total free RAM of 960
Kb (for a 1 Mb base-case). Some base-case players
will have more than 960 kB free as their OS-9
kernel use less RAM from the 1024Kb (1 Mb). A
DV cartridge adds another 1024 Kb of RAM,
bringing the Current total free RAM to 1980 Kb.
The script2disc modules, plugins and their
required buffers must fit in the Current total free
RAM:960 Kb for a base case player or 1980Kb for
a DV cartridge equipped one. It is thus important
not to exceed these limits during the development
of a title on a 605 CD-i machine (usually with a lot
of memory). An intelligent use of the sticky
attribute for modules will reduce the momentary
memory usage of the application but increase the
time needed to load/unload the modules in
4
memory. Another memory hogs include any
plugin that must allocate memory for sound maps
(like talking menus) or video (like QHY zoom).
Reducing number or size of the sound maps or
image byte counts can help to reduce the memory
consumption of the application.
Peter Boots
■ Internet & CD-i
A few users of the ‘CD-i Internet toolkit’
reported some interesting items to be aware of
when developing Internet applications. As this
Internet topic is fairly new, we don’t aim to give a
complete overview of what’s possible and what
not. Therefore,all hints that makes life easier are
welcome.
First of all, we have to realise that a CD-i
browser is NOT the same as a browser running
under Windows™ or MacOS™. An inherent
difference between CD-i and other platforms is
the screen resolution. Computer screens -not
counting the happy few still owning an EGA video
card-usually have a (much) higher resolution than
a TV screen. As most websites are developed for a
VGA- or SVGA-equivalent screen,this results in a
different graphical interpretation of characters and
pictures on a CD-i screen. It also causes a
relatively slow decoding of full featured webpa ges,
certainly when the page contains graphics. The
conclusion of all this would be that Netscape™
alike applications on CD-i will probably not have
the same success as Netscape™.
On the other hand,building an application
where all CD-i specific data is on disc and variable
data (pricing,ordering info,name & address,…) is
available on-line solves all resolution and decoding
speed problems. This approach opens a way to
dedicated but fast ‘information retrieval systems’
with the navigating system locally on disc and the
variable information scattered all over the world.
A less efficient approach would be to store the
HTML tree on disc. This approach,however, will
slow down the ISO filesystem when a great
number of files are involved.
Volume 5, Number 6, November/December 1996
Stefan Maris
■ Determining the real IP
address of the 605 Player
The ispmode module in the startnet script,
used to establish the Ethernet backbone for the
605 CD-i player, doesn’t report the correct IP
address of the player. The IFSTAT module of the
605 player, however, can be used as work around
to determine the actual IP address of the machine.
The origin of this incorrect behaviour is the
way the ispmode module reads the address
parameters. It only reads the address parameter
supplied when editing the startnet script. The
new address is copied to the le0 module in
memory which maintains the ENTIRE IP address.
In reality, the network software only uses the first
three octets from the le0 address and reads the
expansion board switches to fill in the fourth
octet. It is thus possible for the le0 address value
to differ from the actual address value. For
example: suppose the ispmode line in startnet is
set to address 192.7.45.100,which is then copied
to the le0 module in memory. If the expansion
board switches were accidentally set to 110,the
REAL address of the CD-i player would
be192.7.45.110 and not 192.7.45.100 as reported
by the startnet script.
The line of interest is in boldface and holds
the correct IP address of the player. Compare the
last octet here (the actual switch setting) with the
last octet from the ispmode line in startnet. When
all setting are correct,those two addresses should
match. If they don’t, change the switch settings,
restart startnet and check the addresses again with
the ifstat -a command.
Peter Boots
■ DV plane shift - 605
IMPEG DVC
To overcome this problem,use the IFSTAT
module -located in the 605 ROMS- to determine
the ACTUAL IP address of the player. This module
extracts the first three octets from le0 and then
reads the last octet from the switch settings.
First you’ll have to start a shell on an external
terminal connected to the 605 CD-i player (see the
‘OS-9 command shell and emulation’article in this
issue) and then type the following command after
the $-prompt:
run: startnet.
run: ifstat -a
ifdev(0).if_addr.port = 0
ifdev(0).if_devnam = le0
ifdev(0).if_dvrnam = am7990
ifdev(1).if_next = 009f63d0
ifdev(1).if_prev = 009f4f60
ifdev(1).if_mtu = -1
ifdev(1).if_flags = 00a0
ifdev(1).if_subnet = 0
ifdev(1).if_addr = 127.0.0.1
ifdev(1).if_addr.family_type =
ifdev(1).if_addr.port = 0
ifdev(1).if_devnam = lo0
ifdev(1).if_dvrnam = ifloop
If you are developing a CD-i title on a 605(T)
using an IMPEG DVC, you could encounter some
positioning problem between the normal video
planes (Plane A and Plane B) and the DV plane.
The problem shows up as a shift between the
alignment of the video planes and the DV plane.
With an IMPEG DVC on the 605(T),the
Backdrop (DV) plane is shifted approximately 8
pixels horizontally to the left in comparison to the
Basecase planes (Plane A and Plane B).
The typical screen ifstat -a puts on the
terminal screen is as follows:
This problem, however, is not noticed neither
with a VMPEG DVC nor on consumer players with
IMPEG DVC.
ifdev(0).if_next = 009f52b0
ifdev(0).if_prev = 009f63d0
ifdev(0).if_mtu = 1500
ifdev(0).if_flags = 0022
ifdev(0).if_subnet = 0
ifdev(0).if_addr = 192.7.45.118
ifdev(0).if_addr.family_type = 2
Trying to correct this error in the
development stage would transport the shift
between the planes to the consumer.
Patrick De Jong
Volume 5, Number 6, November/December 1996
5
■ 605 CD-i Ethernet self
check
The line Name (192.7.45.17:user):_
prompts you to login. Login with the name of
super. When the system responds with
Password (192.7.45.17:super):
Most Ethernet machines (really,TCP/IP
protocol) are able to FTP to itself in a sort of
loopback test. The 605 CD-i player also supports
this method of verifying the system. This test
method can be especially useful to detect a faulty
machine in a network where several 605 CD-i
player are connected. To run the self test, a
terminal must be connected to the player.
Starting from the power-on Philips screen, first
click on the ‘SETTINGS’icon and then on the
‘SYSTEM’icon. The system will respond with a $prompt on the terminal screen.
Type the following commands on the
terminal:
chx/h0/CMDS
chd/h0
startnet
and wait until the $-prompt returns on the
terminal screen.
To establish an FTP connection to itself type
the following command on the terminal:
type user behind the prompt.
The system will respond with Connected
to 192.7.45.17 followed by status messages
whereafter the ftp> prompt appears on the
screen.. If you get the message Login failed
you probably typed the name or password
incorrectly. Retry the login by typing user at the
“ftp>”prompt. It will ask for your name (super)
and password (user) again.
You can type a ?-sign after the ftp> prompt to
get on-line assistance or download the FTP
document from the BBS.
If previous commands worked correctly, the
605 CD-i player is working fine. All the hardware,
drivers and required support files for FTP are in
place and working. If the 605 CD-i player passes
its self test,but can’t establish a connection with
another machine,the problem is MOST likely to
be found on one of the other machines in the
network or with the physical connections
between them.
Peter Boots
ftp machine_address
where: machine_address is the address of
your 605 (e.g.192.7.45.17)
In response to the ftp command,the following
(or a similar response) should appears on the
terminal screen :
220 OS-9 ftp server V1.0 ready
Herewith a chronological list, followed by an
alphabetical list of topics in the 1996 issues of
Interactive Engineer. Volume 5, number 2 has not
been published.
Name (192.7.45.17:user): _
Chronological list
connected to 192.7.45.17
When these lines appear on the terminal
screen,it means that the connection was
successful. If you’ve gotten this far, the basic
hardware and software drivers are installed and
running properly. When you get a Connection
failed or similar message on the terminal
screen, you’ll have to check the address of the CDi player and the startnet script. Also check if there
is a password file in /h0/SYS directory and if
idbgen was executed.
6
■ Index volume 5 1996
Volume 5 - Number 1
Volume 5, Number 6, November/December 1996
Mediamogul 2.2:Making a multiplatform Disc
#P1
Milia '96:CD-i Developers Seminar #P4
Positioning DV with Balboa 2.1 #P4
Creating a loop in a Video CD #P5
CD-i Player System versions #P6
New CD-i players #P6
CD-i Training Courses #P7
Chocolate #P8
Volume 5 - Number 3
Encoding and production #P2
Training #P5
MediaMogul™ and Script2Disc #P5
MediaMogul™ Plug-Ins #P6
Access to the Line Control Tables #P9
Authoring board versus playback board #P9
Using soundmaps in Balboa #P10
Serial connections #P11
Volume 5 - Number 4
RS232 Sample code #P2
Direct Line Control Table access #P8
More on Balboa and soundmaps #P9
CD-i Internet toolkit #P9
UltraC and fpu crashes #P12
Volume 5 - Number 5
Building VCD compliant disc #P2
CD-i player types #P6
Which DV cartridge is in a 605? #P6
DV with concatenated video streams crashes
#P7
The CSD file and DV cartridges #P7
Volume 5 - Number 6
MediaMogul Click #P2
OOPS #P2
OS-9 command shell and emulation #P3
Internet & CD-i #P4
Determining the IP address of the 605 Player
#P5
DV plane shift - 605 IMPEG DVC #P5
605 CD-i Ethernet self check #P6
Index volume 5 1996 #P6
Training #P7
Alphabetical list
605 CD-i Ethernet self check #
#V5N5P6
Access to the Line Control Tables
#V5N3P9
Authoring board versus playback board
#V5N3P9
Building VCD compliant disc
#V5N5P2
CD-i Internet toolkit
#V5N4P9
CD-i Player System versions
#V5N1P6
CD-i player types
#V5N5P6
CD-i Training Courses
#V5N1P7
Chocolate
#V5N1P8
Creating a loop in a Video CD
#V5N1P5
Determining the IP address of the 605 Player
#V5N5P5
Direct Line Control Table access
#V5N4P8
DV plane shift - 605 IMPEG DVC
#V5N5P5
DV with concatenated video streams crashes
#V5N5P7
Encoding and production
#V5N3P2
Index volume 5 1996
#V5N5P6
Internet & CD-i
#V5N5P4
Mediamogul 2.2:Making a multiplatform Disc
#V5N1P1
MediaMogul Click
#V5N6P2
MediaMogul™ and Script2Disc
#V5N3P5
MediaMogul™ Plug-Ins
#V5N3P6
Milia ‘96:CD-i Developers Seminar #V5N1P4
More on Balboa and soundmaps
#V5N4P9
New CD-i players
#V5N1P6
OOPS
#V5N5P2
OS-9 command shell and emulation #V5N5P3
Positioning DV with Balboa 2.1
#V5N1P4
RS232 Sample code
#V5N4P2
Serial connections
#V5N3P11
The CSD file and DV cartridges
#V5N5P7
Training
#V5N3P5
Training
#V5N5P7
UltraC and fpu crashes
#V5N4P12
Using soundmaps in Balboa
#V5N3P10
Which DV cartridge is in a 605?
#V5N5P6
■ Training
The Multimedia Training Service of PIMC plans
the following training courses in 1997:
CD-i Programming With MediaMogul™
Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Apr.
May.
Jun.
Jul.
Aug.
Sep.
Oct.
Nov.
Dec.
21-23
25-27
25-27
22-24
27-29
24-26
22-24
26-28
23-25
28-30
25-27
16-18
‘97
‘97
‘97
‘97
‘97
‘97
‘97
‘97
‘97
‘97
‘97
‘97
Price:BEF 75.000
Volume 5, Number 6, November/December 1996
7
CD-i Programming With Balboa
Jan.
Feb.
Mar.
Apr.
May.
Aug.
Nov.
07-10
11-14
11-14
08-11
13-16
05-08
04-07
‘97
‘97
‘97
‘97
‘97
‘97
‘97
Price:BEF 100.000
This training schedule is preliminary and might be
subject to change.
All courses will be held in Hasselt,Belgium.
Hasselt is easily accessible by car or by train.
The MediaMogul™ and Balboa courses are
recommended to be followed shortly before
customers receive those packages.
■ How to contact
PIMC
• PIMC SUPPORT EMAIL
from Internet:support@pimc.be
from CompuServe:
INTERNET:support@pimc.be
• MAILSERVER
from Internet:mailserv@pimc.bc
from CompuServe:
INTERNET:mailserv@pimc.be
• PIMC SUPPORT PHONE
For detailed information and/or to obtain a
booking form,please contact your local distributor or
PIMC:
PIMC
Helpdesk,Training & Customer Support
Maastrichterstraat 63
B-3500 Hasselt
Belgium
Tel.: +32 11 242546
Fax: +32 11 242273
Email: support@pimc.be
PIMC Training & Customers Support
+32 11 242546
• PIMC SUPPORT FAX
+32 11 242273
• PIMC SUPPORT MAILING
ADDRESS
Philips Interactive Media Centre
Support
Maastrichterstraat 63
B-3500 Hasselt
Belgium
• EDITORIAL
from Internet:ie@pimc.be
from CompuServe:
INTERNET:ie@pimc.be
The Interactive Engineer
is a publication of Philips Interactive Media
Its purpose is to provide up-to-date information on CD-i technology to all
supported developers and PIM software engineers.
Copyright © 1996 Philips Interactive Media, Inc.
All rights reserved
Not to be reproduced without the express written permission of Philips
Interactive Media
ie
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