Hazard Mitigation Plan

Hazard Mitigation Plan
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
CHAPTER ONE
Section 1 -Promulgations
Resolution Number 02-05
Concerning the Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
Whereas, areas of Mason County are vulnerable to the human and economic costs of
natural disasters, and
Whereas, the Mason County governing body realizes the importance of reducing or
eliminating those vulnerabilities for the overall good and welfare of the community, and
Whereas, Mason County has been an active participant in the Mason County Hazard
Mitigation Task Force, which has established a comprehensive, coordinated planning
process to eliminate or decrease these vulnerabilities, and
Whereas, Mason County representatives and staff have identified, justified, and
prioritized a number of proposed projects and programs needed to mitigate the
vulnerabilities of unincorporated areas of Mason County to the impacts of future
disasters, and
Whereas, these proposed projects and programs have been incorporated into the initial
edition of the Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan that has been prepared and issued
for consideration and implementation by the communities and jurisdictions of Mason
County,
Now therefore, be it resolved on this 11th day of January, 2005 that,
1.
Mason County hereby accepts and approves its designated portion of the Mason
County Hazard Mitigation Plan,
2.
The agency personnel of Mason County are requested and instructed to pursue
available funding opportunities for implementation of the proposals designated
therein,
3.
The agencies and organizations within Mason County will, upon receipt of such
funding or other necessary resources, seek to implement the proposals
contained in its section of the strategy, and
4.
Mason County will continue to participate in the updating and expansion of the
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan in the years ahead, and
5.
Mason County will further seek to encourage the businesses, industries and
community groups operating with Mason County to also participate in the
updating and expansion of the Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan in the years
ahead.
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
So resolved,
Tim Sheldon, Commissioner
Dated 1/11/05
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Chapter One
Section 1 - Promulgations
Mason County Commission
City of Shelton
Squaxin Island Tribal Council
Mason General Hospital
Mason County Fire Protection District 2
Mason County Fire Protection District 5
Section 2 - Introduction
Background
Government
Section 3- Purpose of Pl~n and Organizational Structure
Definition
Purpose of Plan
Task Force
Section 4 - Bylaws
Section 5 - Evaluation, Update and Maintenance of Plan
Section 6- Review of Facilities
Critical Facilities
Confidential Critical Facilities
Essential Facilities
Hazards
Section 7- Proposed Mitigation Initiatives
Chapter Two - Mitigation Planning Process
2
13
14
16
20
21
26
30
Chapter Three - Risk Assessment
31
Chapter Four- Mitigation Strategy
39
Chapter Five - Mitigation Plan Maintenance Procedures
45
Appendix
A - Members of the Standing Committees, Steering
Committee, and Task Force
B - Minutes for Task Force meetings
C - Plans on File
D - Hazard Identification and Vulnerability Analysis
(HIVA) for Mason County
E - Hazard Identification and Vulnerability Analysis
(HIVA) for City of Shelton
F - Press releases
47
49
85
86
104
123
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Resolution Number _ _ __
Concerning the Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
Whereas, the City of Shelton is vulnerable to the human and economic costs of natural
disasters, and
Whereas, the City of Shelton's governing body recognizes the importance of reducing or
eliminating those vulnerabilities for the overall good and welfare of the community, and
Whereas, the City of Shelton has been an active participant in the Mason County Hazard
Mitigation Task Force, which has established a comprehensive, coordinated planning·process to
eliminate or decrease these vulnerabilities, and
Whereas, the City of Shelton's representatives and staff have identified, justified, and prioritized
a number of proposed projects and programs needed to mitigate the vulnerabilities of the City of
Shelton to the impacts of future disasters, and
Whereas, these proposed projects and programs have been incorporated into the initial edition
of the Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan that has been prepared and issued for
consideration and implementation by the communities of Mason County,
Now therefore, be it resolved on this
day of
, 2004, that
1 . The City of Shelton's governing body hereby accepts and approves its designated
portion of the Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan,
2. The agency personnel of the City of Shelton are requested and instructed to pursue
available funding opportunities for implementation of the proposals designated
therein,
3. The City of Shelton will, upon receipt of such funding or other necessary resources, seek
to implement the proposals in its section of the strategy, and
4. The City of Shelton will further seek to encourage the businesses, industries and
community groups operating within and/or for the benefit of the City of Shelton to
also participate in the updating and expansion of the Mason County Hazard
Mitigation Plan in the years ahead.
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
So resolved,
John }arrant, Mayor
Dawn Pannell, Commissioner of Public Works
Dick Taylor, Commissioner of Finance
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Resolution Number---- of the Squaxin Island Tribal Council
Concerning the Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
Whereas, the facilities, operations and personnel of the Squaxin Island Tribe are vulnerable to
the human and economic costs of natural disasters, and
Whereas, the Squaxin Island Tribal. Council recognizes the importance of reducing or
eliminating these vulnerabilities for the overall good and welfare of the Tribal members and the
surrounding community, and
Whereas, the Squaxin Island Tribe has been an active participant in the Mason County Hazard
Mitigation Task Force, which has established a comprehensive, coordinated planning process to
eliminate or decrease these vulnerabilities, and
Whereas, the Squaxin Island Tribe's representatives and staff have identified and justified one
proposed project needed to mitigate the vulnerabilities of the Tribe to the impacts of future
disasters, and
Whereas, this proposed project has been incorporated into the initial edition of the Mason
County Hazard Mitigation Plan that has been prepared and issued for consideration and
implementation by the communities of Mason County and the Squaxin Island Tribe,
Now therefore, be it resolved on this
day of
, 2004, that
1. The Squaxin Island Tribal Council hereby accepts and approves of its designated portion
of the Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan,
2. The directors and staff of the Squaxin Island Tribe are requested and instructed to
pursue available funding opportunities for implementation of the proposal designated
therein,
3. The Squaxin Island Tribe will; upon securing such funding or other necessary resources,
seek to implement the proposal contained in its section of the strategy, and
4. The Squaxin Island Tribe will continue to participate in the updating and expansion of the
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan in the years ahead, and
5. The Squaxin Island Tribe will further encourage other businesses, industries, and
community groups within Mason County to also participate in supporting the Mason
County Hazard Mitigation Plan in the years ahead.
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
So resolved,
David Lopeman, Council Chair
Andy Whitener, Council Vice-Chair
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Resolution Number ____ of Mason County Public Hospital District 1
Concerning the Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
Whereas, the facilities, operations and personnel of Mason General Hospital are vulnerable to
the human and economic costs of natural disasters, and
Whereas, the Board of Commissioners of Mason County Public Hospital District 1 recognizes
the importance of reducing or eliminating these vulnerabilities for the overall good and welfare of
the staff and operations of the Hospital and the surrounding community, and
Whereas, representatives of Mason County Public Hospital District 1 have been active
participants in the Mason County Hazard Mitigation task Force, which has established a
comprehensive, coordinated planning process to eliminate or decrease these vulnerabilities.
Now therefore, be it resolved this
day of
, 2004, that
1. The Board of Commissioners of Mason County Public Hospital District 1 hereby accepts
and approves its designated portion of the Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan,
2. Representatives of Mason General Hospital will continue to participate in the updating
and expansion of the Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan in the years ~head, and
3. The Board of Commissioners of Mason County Public Hospital District 1 will encourage
other businesses, industries, and community groups within Mason County to also
participate in supporting the Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan in the years
ahead.
So resolved,
Nancy Trucksess, President
Bill McComb, Commissioner
Donald Wilson, Commissioner
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Resolution Number _ _ _ of Mason County Fire Protection District #2
Concerning the Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
Whereas, the facilities, operations and personnel of Mason County Fire Protection District #2
are vulnerable to the human and economic costs of natural disasters, and
Whereas, the commissioners of Fire Protection District 2 recognize the importance of reducing
or eliminating these vulnerabilities for the overall good and welfare of the District and
surrounding community, and
Whereas, representatives of Fire Protection District #2 have been active participants in the
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Task Force, for the overall good and welfare of the District and
the surrounding community, and
Whereas, the District's representatives have identified and justified one proposed project
needed to mitigate the vulnerabilities of the District to the impacts of future disasters, and
Whereas, this proposed project has been incorporated into the initial edition of the Mason
County Hazard Mitigation Plan that has been prepared and issued for consideration and
implementation by the communities of Mason County and Mason County Fire Protection District
#2,
Now therefore, be it resolved on this
day of
, 2004, that
1. The commissioners of Mason County Fire Protection District #2 hereby accept and
approve of the District's designated portion of the Mason County Hazard Mitigation
Plan,
2. The commissioners and staff of Fire Protection District #2 are requested and instructed
to pursue available funding opportunities for implementation of the proposal
designated therein,
3. The Fire District Protection #2 commissioners will, upon securing funding or other
necessary resources, seek to implement the proposal contained in its section of the
strategy, and
4.
Representatives of Fire District #2 will continue to participate in the updating and
expansion of the Mason County Hazard Mitigation plan in the years ahead, and
5. Representatives of Fire Protection District #2 will further encourage other businesses,
industries, and community groups within Mason County to also participate in
supporting the Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan in the years ahead.
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
So resolved,
Jim LeBlanc, Commissioner Chair
Gene McTee, Commissioner
Peter Merrill, Commissioner
Kelley Mcintosh, Commissioner
William Hunt, Commissioner
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Resolution Number ____ of Mason County Fire Protection District #5
Concerning the Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
Whereas, the facilities, operations and personnel of Mason County Fire Protection District #5
are vulnerable to the human and economic costs of natural disasters, and
Whereas, the commissioners of Fire protection District #5 recognize the importance of reducing
or eliminating these vulnerabilities for the overall good and welfare of the District and
surrounding community, and
Whereas, representatives of Fire Protection District #5 have been active participants in the
Mason county Hazard Mitigation Task Force, for the overall good and welfare of the District and
the surrounding community, and
Whereas, the District's representatives have identified and justified one proposed project
needed to mitigate the vulnerabilities of the District to the impacts of future disasters, and
Whereas, this proposed project has been incorporated into the initial edition of the
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan that has been prepared and issued for consideration and
implementation by the communities of Mason County and Mason County Fire Protection District
#5,
Now therefore, be it resolved on this
day of
, 2004, that
1. The commissioners of Mason County Fire Protection District #5 hereby accept and
approve of the District's designated portion of the Mason County Hazard Mitigation
Plan,
2. The commissioners and staff of Fire Protection District #5 are requested and instructed
to pursue available funding opportunities for implementation of the proposal
designated therein,
3. The Fire Protection District #5 commissioners will, upon securing funding or other
necessary resources, seek to implement the proposal contained in its section of the
strategy, and
4. Representatives of Fire District #5 will continue to participate in the updating and
expansion of the Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan in the years ahead, and
5. Representatives of Fire Protection district 35 will further encourage other businesses,
industries, and community groups within Mason County to also participate in
supporting the Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan in the years ahead.
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
So resolved,
. Del Griffey, Commissioner Chair
Tommy 0. Taylor, Commissioner
Lorne C. Hauser, Commissioner
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Section 2 - Introduction
Background
Mason County is 967 square miles in size surrounded by the majestic Olympic Mountains to the
west, and situated along the shores of southern Puget Sound on the Kitsap Peninsula. Mason
County has blue skies above and forest greenery almost everywhere you look. The banks of
Hood Canal are a popular draw for all types of water recreation -shellfish gathering, fishing,
boating, scuba diving and swimming.
The county was created from Thurston County on March 13, 1854 under the Indian name,
Sawamish. It was renamed January 3, 1864 to honor Charles H. Mason, the first secretary of
the Washington Territory and acting governor during the Indian Wars.
There are a number of small communities in the county with one incorporated city, Shelton,
called Sheltonville until 1888, when the county seat was moved there from Oakland. Shelton is
6.1 square miles and a population within the city limits of 8,500.
The total population of the County is approximately 52,000 but that number swells to 100,000 or
more during the summer months. Nearly every form of recreation from mountain climbing to
skydiving is available, making it truly a four-season recreation and vacation destination. It is
within two hours of the Seattle-King County metropolitan area which makes it a popular location
for summer homes as well as tent-camping and RV'ing.
Temperatures average 77.6° F. during the summer months with infrequent highs into the 90's,
and 31.7° F. in January; winter lows occasionally reach 10° F., usually for very short periods.
Annual rainfall averages 65 inches with 120 inches not unusual near the foothills of the Olympic
Mountains.
Within Mason County there are two sovereign and federally recognized Native American Tribes.
The Skokomish Reservation is located along Hood Canal while the Squaxin Island Reservation
is on the south border of the county and extends into Thurston County.
Government
The county is governed by a Board of Commissioners while Shelton is led by a City
Commission. Each of the tribes is governed by its Tribal Councils as sovereign nations.
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Section 3 - Purpose of the Plan and Organizational Structure
Definition of Hazard Mitigation
"Hazard" is defined as a source of danger; "mitigation" is to cause to become less harsh or
hostile. Taken together hazard mitigation is any action taken to eliminate or reduce the risk to
human life,· property, and the environment as posed by a hazard.
Strategies as identified in this plan are viewed as appropriate and effective methods to deal with
long~term mitigation objectives. Once accepted by the county's governing bodies, proposed
mitigation initiatives will be further reviewed for funding and implementation by the appropriate
lead agency.
Purpose of the Plan
The purpose of the Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan is to protect the citizens and critical
infrastructure from natural hazards. Methods to achieve the purpose included raising public
awareness, locating resources for reducing loss, and moving toward building a safer
community.
The Plan is based on the Mason County and City of Shelton's Hazard Identification Vulnerability
Analysis (HIVA) that considers risks to which the county if vulnerable. Mitigation strategies as
presented in this Plan are recommendations only; they must be approved and funded prior to
implementation.
Task Force
The Mason County Emergency Management Council was formed as the Task Force under the
name "Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan Committee" in December 2002. The Task Force
has met semi-monthly or monthly, as needed, throughout the planning process and will continue
to meet on a regular basis to update the Hazard Mitigation Plan on a regular basis.
The Task Force was formed and continues to be led by members of city and county
government, representatives of the Tribes, members of various organizations, and interested
citizens. Standing Committees were formed for specialized projects. They are the public
Information and the Planning Committees. (See Appendix A.)
Task Force Responsibilities
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Oversee the entire planning process
Prioritize facilities identified as critical, essential, and hazards
Select mitigation recommendations
Review recommendations and updates to mitigation strategies
Develop short and long term goals
Integrate mitigation strategies with all phases of the Comprehensive Emergency
Management Plan
Oversee implementation of committee decisions
Coordinate methodology for implementation of input from the public and elected
officials
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Section 4- Bylaws
Article I. Purpose of the Task Force
The purpose of the Mason County Mitigation Task Force is to decrease the vulnerability of the
citizens, government, businesses and institutions of Mason County to future human, economic,
and environmental costs of natural disasters. The Task Force will develop, monitor, implement,
and maintain a comprehensive plan for hazard mitigation intended to accomplish this purpose.
Article II. Membership
Participation in the Task Force is voluntary by all entities. Membership in the Task Force is
open to all jurisdictions, organizations, and individuals supporting its purposes.
Article Ill. Organizational Structure
The organizational structure of the Task Force shall consist of a Steering Committee, two
permanent subcommittees, and other temporary subcommittees as deemed necessary by the
Task Force.
A The Steering Committee
The Task Force shall be guided by a Steering Committee consisting of designated
representatives of the following:
• One representative from the government of Mason County, the City of Shelton,
and one each from the Skokomish and Squaxin Island Tribes
• One representative from organizations and associations representing key
business, industry, and community interest groups of Mason County,
and
• Other such individuals appointed by a majority vote of the Steering Committee
Members of the Steering committee will be designated by formal resolution, appointment, or
other action to serve as the official representative and spokesperson for the jurisdiction or
organization regarding the activities and decisions of the Task Force. To maintain good
standing, members of the Steering Committee must not have more than two unexcused
absences from meetings during the period of a year.
B. Subcommittees
The Task Force shall have two permanent subcommittees: Planning and Public Information.
Membership of the permanent subcommittees is unlimited and is open to all interested
jurisdictions, organizations, and individuals.
Temporary subcommittees may be established at any time for special purposes by the chair
of the Task Force, and their membership designated at that time.
Membership in the subcommittees is not restricted. There are no requirements for individuals
to maintain good standing as members of a permanent or temporary subcommittee.
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
•
Establish committees
o Investigate implementation ability and limitations for proposed mitigation
strategies
o Provide a vehicle for bringing forward community concerns
o Investigate possible mitigation funding sources
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
C. Program Staff
Mason County, and other agencies as so designated by the Steering Committee, will serve
as the program staff for the Task Force, and assist in the coordination and support of the
Task Force functions.
Article IV. Officers
Any member of the Task Force in good standing is eligible for election as an officer. The Task
Force will have a chair elected by majority vote of a quorum of the members. The Task Force
will also elect by majority vote a vice-chair. Representatives of both local governments, the
Tribes, and any participating private sector organizations will be eligible for election as on
officer. Each will serve a term of one year and be eligible for re-election for an unlimited number
of terms.
The chair will preside at each meeting of the Task Force, as well as establish temporary
subcommittees and assign personnel to them. The vice-chair will fulfill the duties and
responsibilities of the chair in his or her absence.
The chair of each permanent or temporary subcommittee will be designated from the members
in good standing or the Task Force by its chair, and will serve at the pleasure of the chair.
Article V. Responsibilities
A. Steering Committee
The Steering Committee will be responsible for oversight and coordination of all actions and
decisions of the Task Force, and is solely responsible for formal actions in the name of the Task
Force, including the release of reports, development of resolutions, issuance of position papers,
and similar activities. The Steering Committee makes assignments to the subcommittees,
coordinates their work, and takes action on their recommendations.
B. Subcommittees
The permanent subcommittees have the following responsibilities:
Planning- to identify, analyze, and monitor the hazards threatening Mason
County and the vulnerabilities of the community to those hazards, as well as to
assist in the definition of actions to mitigate the impacts of the hazards; to define
structural and non-structural actions needed to decrease the human, economic,
and environmental impacts of disasters, and to prepare for consideration and action by
the Task Force a strategy for implementation of those initiatives in both the pre- and
post-disaster time frame; to define the general financial vulnerability of the community to
the impacts of disasters; to assist with identification of initiatives to minimize
vulnerabilities; and to seek funding sources for all priority mitigation initiatives identified
in the mitigation strategy developed by theTask Force.
Public information -to secure public input and comment on the efforts of the Task
Force; to inform the public about the activities of the Task Force; to conduct public
information and education programs regarging hazard mitigation; to assist with
conducting public hearings; and. to promote public acceptance of the strategy developed
by the Task Force.
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
C. Program Staff
Technical, clerical and other types of support activities to the Task Force and subcommittees
will be provided through Mason County or other agency or organizational staff as designated by
the Task Force. The Task Force will also designate an agency of Mason County to serve as the
legal representative and agent of the Task Force, and to be empowered under County statutes
to accept and disburse funds, enter into contracts, hire staff, and take such other actions as
necessary in support of, or for the benefit of, the Task Force. Other jurisdictions and
organizations may also provide such service on a voluntary basis upon request of the chair.
Article VI. Actions by the Task Force
A. Authority for Actions
Only the Task Force has the authority to take final actions in the name of the Task Force.
Actions by subcommittees or program staff are not considered as final until affirmed by vote of
the Task Force.
B. Meetings, Voting and Quorum
Meetings of the Task Force and its subcommittees will be conducted in accordance with
Robert's Rules of Order. Regular meetings of the Task Force will be scheduled the second and
fourth Wednesdays of each month. Subcommittees will meet as deemed necessary, at the
discretion of their chairperson.
All final actions and decision made in the name of the Task Force will be by affirmative vote of a
quorum of members. A quorum shall be 50 percent of the members of the Task Force in good
standing at the time of the vote. Each member of the Task Force will have one vote. Voting by
proxy, written or otherwise, is not permitted.
C. Special Vote
Special votes may be taken under emergency situations or when there are other extenuating
circumstances that are judged by both the chair and the vice-chair of the Task Force to not be
delayed until the next regularly scheduled meeting. Special votes may be taken by telephone,
email and/or first class mail, and shall be in accord with all applicable statutes for such actions.
D. Public Hearings
When required by statute or the policies of Mason County, or when deemed necessary by the
Task Force, a public hearing regarding actions under consideration for implementation by the
Task Force will be held.
E. Documentation of Actions
All meetings and other forms of action by the Task Force and permanent and temporary
subcommittees will be documented and made available for inspection by the public.
Article VII. Adoption and Amendments to the Bylaws
The Bylaws of the Task Force may be adopted and/or amended by a two-thirds majority vote of
the members in good standing of the Task Force. All proposed changes of the bylaws would be
provided to each member of the Task Force not less than ten ( 10) working days prior to such a
vote.
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Article VIII. Dissolution of the Task Force
The Task Force may be dissolved by affirmative vote of two-thirds of the members of the Task
Force in good standing at the time of the vote following thirty (30) days' written notice to all
participating members of the Task Force, by order of a court of competent jurisdiction, and/or by
instruction of the Mason County governing bodies. At the time of dissolution, all remaining
documents, records, equipment and supplies belonging to the Task Force will be transferred to
Mason County for disposition.
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Section 5- Evaluation. Update. and Maintenance of the Plan
The Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan will be evaluated on an annual basis, after every
major emergency disaster that impacts any area of the county to determine effectiveness of the
strategies in place and pending. Every five years the Plan will be updated and forwarded to the
Washington State Emergency Management Division, Hazard Mitigation Officer, for review and
then forwarded to the Federal Emergency Management Agency, Region X Officer per the
requirements of the Disaster Mitigation Act 2000. Thi$ procedure will be followed unless
directed otherwise by Washington State EMD or FEMA.
During the review process, the Task Force will facilitate the review with the Planning Committee.
The committee or the Task Force as a group will review current strategies to determine their
relevance to changing situations within Mason County as well as State and Federal policy
changes. The committee will also review the recommended implementation process of each
mitigation strategy identified.
After the annual review process the Task Force, through the Division of Emergency
Management, will develop a written report describing its findings. This annual report will be sent
to the governing bodies of participating organizations that developed the plan.
DATE
~une 2005
~une 2006
Uune 2007
Uune 2008
~uly 2008-December 2008
March 2009
May2009
~CTIVITY TO BE COMPLETED
~nnual review; develop and submit
~nnual review; develop and submit
findings
findings
~nnual review; develop and submit findings
~nnual review; develop and submit findings
~-year update review
Review completed; revised plan promulgated
by_g_overning bodies
Plan sent to State Mitigation Officer for
review.
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Section 6 - Review of Facilities
In reviewing the facilities in unincorporated Mason County (to be identified throughout the Plan
as "County"), the City of Shelton (to be identified throughout the Plan as "City"), Squaxin Island
and Skokomish Tribes (to be identified throughout the Plan as "Tribes") and the Special Taxing
Districts (to be identified throughout the Plan as "SPD's"), the Task Force first looked at the
types of facilities that could be considered "critical" to the citizens. These included a broad
spectrum including:
0
Assisted living facilities, rehabilitation centers, group homes and special population living
centers
• Communication centers including towers
• large employers
• Critical community suppliers; i.e., grocery stores (including "Mom and Pop" stores
serving a relatively small population of the county), and pharmacies
• Emergency Operations Centers or pre-designated command centers
• Fire, rescue, and police stations
• Energy facilities including power station, switchyards, transmission lines, gas lines, and
fuel storage areas
• Government offices
• Facilities identified as having hazardous materials present
• Major roads and waterways designated as transportation routes, evacuation routes, and
primary access/egress routes
• Physicians' offices, clinics, mental health and counseling centers
0
Museums, cultural centers, and historical sites
• Public works facilities including equipment storage yards
• Religious facilities
0
Schools and libraries
• Airports, marine ports, and bus and train stations
• Waste water facilities including sewer lines, lift stations, and treatment plants, as well as
intakes and pipelines
It was determined the best approach was to divide these facilities into those considered "critical"
to day-to-day living, those "essential" but not absolutely necessary, and "hazards". State and
federal highways as well as the Washington Correction Center were removed from the list since
they are overseen by outside agencies. Some facilities are sensitive in nature and so are
designated "confidential".
Essential facilities included those where certain activities are housed, i.e., fire and law
enforcement sub-stations where emergency vehicles may be housed but those vehicles could
continue to function from any location. For example Mason County is protected in rural areas
by unmanned fire stations containing one or more response apparatus, but the station itself is
not critical to the response.
Following are the facilities as identified. They are listed by jurisdiction and for simplicity they are
listed in alphabetical order, not to be misconstrued as order of importance.
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
CRITICAL FACILITIES
Mason County
Alderbrook Water System
Belfair Water District
Harstene Retreat Water System
Hood Canal Water System
Hoodsport Water System
Lake Arrowhead Water System
Mason County Fire District 1 - one station
Mason County Fire District 2 - three stations
Mason County Fire District 3 - one station
Mason County Fire District 4 - one station
Mason County Fire District 5 - two stations
Mason County Fire District 6 - one station
Mason County Fire District 12 - one station
Mason County Fire District 13 - one station
Mason County Fire District 18 - one station
Mason County Shop
North Mason Medical Center
Pirates Cove Water System
PUD #1 Operations Center
PUD #3 Operations Center
Tiger Lake Terrace Tracts Water System
Union Water System
View Ridge Heights Water System
City of Shelton
City of Shelton Civic Center
City of Shelton Fire Department
City of Shelton Police Department
Mason County Courthouse
Mason General Hospital
Squaxin lsland.Tribe
Little Creek hotel
New Kamilche Sewage Collectionrrreatment System
Squaxin Administration Building
Squaxin Island Tribal Water Distribution/Storage System
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
CONFIDENTIAL CRITJCAL FACILITIES
Mason County
Benson Radio Tower
Bloomfield ·rower
Division of Emergency Management Emergency Operations Center
FireComm
Kamilche Peak Transmitter
PUD #3 Warehouse - Belfair
Union Heights Tower
Union Heights Towerrrransmission Site
City of Shelton
Angleside Radio Tower
Angleside Water Tank
Birch Street Water Tank
Capital Hill Water Tank
City of Shelton Emergency Operations Center
City of Shelton Sewage Pump St~tion!Force Main
City of Shelton Sewage Treatment Plant
City of Shelton Shop
City of Shelton Water Pump Station
Deep Wells 1, 2, and 3
Mountain View Water Tank
Public Safety Answering Point
PUD #3 Main Building
PUD #3 Operations Center/EOC
PUD #3 Warehouse - Shelton
Squaxin Island Tribe
Kamilche Water Distribution System
ESSENTIAL FACILITIES
Mason County
AT&T Cellular Towers
Belfair Assembly of God Church
Belfair Baptist Church
Cingular Wireless Cellular Phone Tower
Fair Harbor Marina
Gospel Lighthouse
Grapeview School District
Hood Canal Community Church
Hood Canal School District
Hoodsport Timberland Library
LDS Church
Mary M. Knight School District
Mason County Christian School
Mason county Fire District 2, Station 2~6
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Mason County Fire District 8
Mason County Fire District 11
Mason County Fire District 16
Mason County Fire District 17
Mason County Garbage
North Mason School District
North Mason Timberland Library
Pioneer School District
Port of Allyn Administration Building
Port of Allyn Dock
Port of Allyn Dock North Shore Dock
Prince of Peace Catholic Church
Qwest Telecommunications
Seventh Day Adventist School
Southside School District
Sprint Cellular Phone Tower
St. Hugh Episcopal Church
Taylor Shellfish
United Methodist Church
City of Shelton
City of Shelton Sewage Lift Station - Cascade
City of Shelton Sewage Treatment Lift Station
Diversion Dam
Olympic College Shelton
Olympic Highway north
PUD #3 Substation - Grove Street
Railroad Avenue
Shelton Springs
Shelton School District
Wallace Kneeland Blvd
Squaxin Island Tribe
Sally Selvidge Health Clinic.
Squaxin Island Maintenance Center
Squaxin Island Tribal Center
HAZARDS
Mason County
Anderson Dam
Bennettsen Lake Dam
Buck Lake Dam
Christine Lake Dam
Cranberry Lake Stormwater Detention Dam
Cushman Dam #1
Cushman Dam #1 - Spillway Headworks
Cushman Dam #2
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Fawn Lake Dam
Haven Lake Dam
Lake Limerick Dam
Lakeland Village Pond #1
leprechaun Lake Dam
Little Twin lakes Dam
Melbourne Lake Dam
Natural Gas Line
Rosand Dam
Timberlake Dam
Trask Lake Dam
Uddenberg Lake Dam
West Lake Dam
City of Shelton
City of Shelton Flood Control Structure - 7th and Laurel
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Section 7 - Proposed Mitigation Initiatives
The Task Force elected to break down the proposed mitigation initiatives as high, medium, and
low costs, and high, medium, and low benefits to the citizens and guests of the communities of
Mason County. High cost is over $1 ,000,000.00, moderate is $200,000.00 to $1,000,000.00,
and low is under $100.000.00. Approximate costs have been included here when known.
Specific costs will be available as funding sources are sought.
The facilities are listed in the order or priority.
Mason County
1. ACTION:
FireComm- This operation will soon be consolidated with SheiComm, and the existing
physical location will serve as a backup communications facility to provide redundancy in
these capabilities for the County. For the short term upgrade of this facility the cost will
be moderate, estimated at between $700,000.00 and $1 ,000,000.00; long term the costs
also fall in the moderate range at approximately $800,000.00, which includes
improvements to all repeaters. The benefits are high in all situations.
HAZARD:
Earthquake, windstorm, ice storm
LEAD AGENCY:
Mason County Fire Protection District 5 Commissioners, City of Shelton
Commissioners, Mason County Commissioners
TIMELINE:
1-2 years
FUNDING SOURCE:
Federal and State grants, operating budgets, E-911 taxes
2. ACTION:
Division of Emergency Management- The existing facility is leased and most of the
facility is of World War II vintage. The buildings have not been seismically retrofitted.
The best mitigation choice is to build a new facility. Cost and benefit would be high.
HAZARD:
Earthquake, windstorm
LEAD AGENCY:
Mason County Sheriff
TIMELINE:
5-10 years
FUNDING SOURCE:
Federal and state grants, operating budget, local taxing authority
3. ACTION:
Mason County Fire District 2, Station 2-1 - The facility provides communications, a
community shelter, and houses paramedic teams that provide advance life support to
citizens in the North Mason area. Seismic retrofitting is needed. Cost will be moderate,
but benefit high.
26
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
HAZARD:
Earthquake, windstorm
LEAD AGENCY:
Masoq County Fire Protection District 2 Commissioners
TIMEUNE:
2-5 years
FUNDING SOURCE:
Federal and State grants, operating budget, local taxing authority
ACTION:
Mason County Fire District 5, Station 5-3 - This facility is comprised of a number of
small structures including what were originally an A-frame cabin and an old mobile
home. The facility needs to be relocated. Cost will be high; benefit to the communities
served will also be high.
HAZARD:
Earthquake, windstorm
LEAD AGENCY:
Mason County Fire Protection District 5 Commissioners
TIMELINE:
2-5 years
FUNDING SOURCE:
Federal and State grants, operating budget, local taxing authority
4. ACTION:
Mason County Shop - Plans are already in place to relocate this facility. Cost will be
high at approximately two million dollars, but the benefit is also high. Equipment
maintained by the employees in this facility is important to the work done by county
employees on a daily basis, but vital during times of emergencies.
HAZARD:
Earthquake
LEAD AGENCY:
Mason County Commissioners
TIMELINE:
2-5 years
FUNDING SOURCE:
Federal and State grants, operating budget, local taxing authority
City of Shelton
ACTION:
Mason General Hospital - Poor drainage presents risk of damage or loss to the
electrical vault; if this were to occur, the hospital would have to be closed. This is the
only hospital in the county. The ventilation system cannot be adjusted so treatment of
some patients puts others at serious risk. Plans are in place to renovate and retrofit for
earthquake safety. Cost and benefit are both high.
HAZARD:
Earthquake, flood
LEAD AGENCY:
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Mason County Public Hospital District 1 Commissioners
TIMELINE:
2-5 years
FUNDING SOURCE:
Federal and State grants, operating budget, local taxing authority
1. ACTION:
Sewage Pump Station/Force Main - The force main currently runs under
Goldsborough Creek, a salmon-enhancement creek. The force main needs to either be
el.evated or buried deeper. Cost is high at approximately two million dollars; benefit is
high.
HAZARD:
Earthquake, flood, riverbed erosion
LEAD AGENCY:
City of Shelton Commissioners
TIMELINE:
1-2 years
FUNDING SOURCE:
Federal and State grants, operating budget, regional planning authority, local taxing
authority
3. ACTION:
Shelton Fire Department- The staff offices and resident quarters are currently housed
in modular buildings adjacent to the building where the response apparatus is housed.
That building is not to be occupied due to health and safety concerns. Cost, estimated
at two to six million dollars, is high. The benefit is also high.
HAZARD:
Earthquake, flood, environmental encroachment
LEAD AGENCY:
City of Shelton Commissioners
TIMELINE:
2-5 years
FUNDING SOURCE:
Federal and State grants, operating budget, local taxing authority
4. ACTION:
Mason County Courthouse -The computer system containing all county records is
located in this old building. A redundant system is needed. Cost will be low and benefits
high.
HAZARD:
Earthquake
LEAD AGENCY:
Mason County Commissioners
TIMELINE:
5-10 years
FUNDING SOURCE:
Federal and State grants, operating budget, local taxing authority
28
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Squax.in Island Tribe
1. ACTION:
Kamilche Water System - The existing water system is inadequate to provide effective
water flow to the hotel and casino; this could have serious consequences in the event of
a fire. Land for a new system has been acquired west of the Little Creek Casino;
another possible site is on the east side of that facility, across the freeway. Cost and
benefit are high.
HAZARD:
Earthquake, fire
LEAD AGENCY:
Squaxin Island Tribal Council
TIMELINE:
2-5 years
FUNDING SOURCE:
Federal and State grants, operating budget
Based on funding limitations of Mason County and the jurisdictions therein, the Task Force feels
that incorporating maintenance and mitigation strategies is the most efficient and effective use
of funds as they become available.
Mason Connty Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
CHAPTER TWO
Mitigation Planning Process
Mitigation is any sustained action taken to reduce or eliminate long-term risk to people and
property from the affects of both natural and man-made hazards. An efficiently planned and
managed hazard mitigation program can be a powerful resource in the combined effort by the
County, State, and Federal governments to end the cycle of repetitive disaster damage. The
purpose of this Mitigation Plan is to ensure that the opportunity to take mitigation measures to
protect lives and property from future disasters is enhanced by providing the
County/City/Tribes/SPDs with a long-term structured process for identifying mitigation goals and
opportunities, for implementing the most effective mitigation measures, and for involving and
educating the public regarding mitigation.
The Planning Process
Mason County has developed a local Hazard Mitigation Plan through a collaborative process,
involving County and City personnel, Tribal representatives, local business owners and county
residents. The planning process took place over the course of several months beginning in
September 2002, with a meeting between County and City personnel and interested
jurisdictions, to initiate this planning process, which was conducted at the PUD Auditorium in the
City of Shelton (please see Appendix A for all meeting agendas, minutes, and attendance lists).
Information on the series of meetings held with Planning Team was published in the local
newspaper. The first of these meetings was held on December 22, 2002, at the Mason County
Division of Emergency Management building in Shelton, Washington. In attendance at the first
planning meeting were law enforcement and fire district representatives, planning, building and
public works representatives, members of the Mason General Hospital Safety Committee,
American Red Cross coordinator, and City of Shelton and County emergency management
professionals, as well as representatives from the business community. From these meetings,
the Hazard Mitigation Plan Task Force was formed to review, comment, and direct the planning
process (please see Appendix A for list of the Steering Committee Members). Additional
meeting, ongoing from December 2002 to the present, were conducted to develop a draft plan.
Additionally, draft-planning progress was published in the Shelton/Mason County Journal (see
Appendix F). The draft Plan was available to the entire planning committee in April, 2004 . Minor
changes were made to the draft Plan as a result of that meeting, and the Plan was adopted. A
final Hazard Mitigation Plan was then prepared for presentation to Washington State
Emergency Management Division.
·
30
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
CHAPTER THREE
Risk: Assessment
The purpose of this Risk Assessment is to provide information on various large-scale hazards,
both natural and technological, that could affect the Mason County as a whole. The Risk
Assessment serves as a basis for emergency management planning, as a justification for
necessary preparedness-related budgeting and expenditures, and as a foundation for mitigation
and recovery policy decisions.
The Risk Assessment will allow Mason County, the City of Shelton, Squaxin and Skokomish
Tribes, and special protection districts to establish program goals and priorities proportional with
the need for protection. Decisions for creating new preparedness and mitigation initiatives, for
modifying existing programs, and for evaluating progress toward achieving mitigation goals
should be based upon the Risk Assessment and reflected in the City/County!Tribes/SPDs'
development plans. Finally, the Risk Assessment can identify areas needing further research
on hazards or on the application of technical solutions to mitigate their effects.
This analysis covers hazards most threatening to the County/City!Tribes/SPDs as determined
by history, geologic projections, and social and technological trends. There are no unique
hazards identified for the entities represented in Mason County.
Risk Assessment builds on three concepts:
•
A hazard is a possible source of danger or harm to people, property, or the environment.
Hazard identification is the process of recognizing the various dangers present that
could threaten a jurisdiction and its residents;
•
Vulnerability is the degree of susceptibility to injury or harm. Vulnerability analysis
assesses the relative degree of risk presented by hazards threatening a community;
•
The Risk Assessment identifies poteRtial dangers within or near a community and
estimates the community's susceptibility to harm from those hazards.
Identifying Hazards
Mason County is subject to a number of hazards that are addressed in the Hazard Mitigation
Plan as supported by the Hazard Identification Vulnerability Analysis for both the County and
City (Appendix D and E). Those hazards identified in the HIVAs were reviewed by the Planning
Committee members, in addition to research in historical documents, analysis of National
Weather Service records, and a review of risk assessments prepared by Washington State
Emergency Management Division. In addition, initial data from these documents was also used
to determine those hazards that present the greatest risk to this the County.
Hazards are identified in the Mason County HIVA and City of Shelton HIVA (Appendix D and E).
31
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Mason County Hazard MltlgaUon Pl•n
October 2004
The following are federal disaster declarations tor Mason County.
FEDERAL DISASTER DECLARATIONS
Mason County
. EV!NT
U1.
. l
Jan 1971
JanJ972 ·
. l
328 .·
Heavv RainslFloodine
Heavy Rains/Floodine
414
Severe StortnsiFloodinsz
.Dec 1971
54$
,.
;
.
Jan t~l ··
.....
·•····
,·
. '
·.
813
.. 896.
. Severe StolT11$1'SlidesiFioocis
Severe StormsiF'Ioodinst
Severe Storrtl$/Floodirte
Sev~StomulfloOdinst.
!naugural Oav Storm
Flooding/Windstorm·
Flooding
·Nov 1995.
Feb 1996
llS2
Heavv Rairt$ifloodmsz
.· l36l
t499
:J
l
T
Sen:re Storms, flooding
Profiling HQard Events
The Mitigation Plan has identified a number of natural and man-made hazards that could affect
Mason County. These hazards are discussed in both the County and City HIVAs, with details of
the past history, susceptibility of County hazard effects, scope and extent of severity, and
particular circumstances of the County that contribute to the severity of hazard effects.
Earthquakes
Mason County, located In the Puget Sound region of Washington State, Is vulnerable to
damage from earthquakes throughout the County. As part of the Puget Sound area, Mason
County is vulnerable to three different types of earthquakes. Damage and loss are variable with
each type of earthquake.
32
32
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Profiling Hazard Events
The Mitigation Plan has identified a number of natural and man-made hazards that could affect
Mason County. These hazards are discussed in both the County and City HIVAs, with details of
the past history, susceptibility of County hazard effects, scope and extent of severity, and
particular circumstances of the County that contribute to the severity of hazard effects.
Earthquakes
Mason County, located in the Puget Sound region of Washington State, is vulnerable to damage
from earthquakes throughout the County. As part of the Puget Sound area, Mason County is
vulnerable to three different types of earthquakes. Damage and loss are variable with each type
of earthquake.
The Mason County and City of Shelton Hazard Identification and Vulnerability Assessments
(HIVAs) define an earthquake as a naturally induced shaking of the ground, caused by the
fracture and sliding of rock within the earth's crust; the movement of the tectonic plates is one of
the principle causes of earthquakes. In Western Washington, the primary plates of concern are
the North American Plate and the subducting Juan de Fuca Plate. The first type of earthquake
occurs along the Cascadia Subduction Fault, resulting from the convergence of the two faults.
An earthquake resulting from movement along this zone would be considered a great quake.
There have been no recorded "great" earthquakes along this fault since historic records began
for this area, but there is evidence that one occurred in 1700; other subduction zones around
the world similar to the zone off Washington State have had earthquakes with magnitudes of 8
or greater. Estimates suggest that this type of earthquake occurs approximately, every 500
years. This type of quake could cause catastrophic damage from Vancouver B.C. to Northern
California and trigger tsunamis off the coast. This type of earthquake event would be followed
by strong aftershocks. The entire state is vulnerable to damage from this type of earthquake.
Occurrence intervals range from every 550 years to every one hundred years.
The second type of earthquake occurs deep within the Juan de Fuca Plate, between 25 - 100
kilometers beneath the Earth's surface. This type of earthquake occurs approximately every 35
years in the Puget Sound region, the most recent being the Nisqually Quake that occurred on
February 28, 2001 and measured 6.8 on the Richter scale. Prior to that, an earthquake of this
type occurred in 1965 with a magnitude 6.5, and in 1949 with a magnitude 7.1. This type of
deep earthquake is not typically followed by aftershocks. Mason County and the City of Shelton
suffered some damage due to the recent Nisqually Quake
Shallow earthquakes are the third type of earthquake common to the region. These earthquakes
occur within the North American plate to depths up to 30 kilometers. Shallow earthquakes are
the most common type of earthquake to occur within the region. Most shallow earthquakes are
relatively small, but there is potential in the region for a major shallow quake, capable of causing
major damage throughout the Puget Sound region.
Damage and vulnerability to earthquakes largely depends on the magnitude, depth, and location
of the epicenter. Damage from earthquakes is largely caused by strong ground shaking;
secondary effects such as landslides, subsidence, liquefaction and seiches can also cause
considerable damage. Ground and soil conditions can amplify or minimize the effects of groundshaking on a particular site. Soft soils are particularly at risk. Soft soil areas include floodplains,
wetlands and valley areas.
33
Mason Connty Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Based upon information in the Hazard Risk Analysis prepared by the Washington Emergency
Management Division, the likelihood of a major earthquake is "high" and the potential for
significant damage is also "high." Numerous small earthquakes, causing no damage, occur on
an almost daily basis.
Flooding
A flood is an inundation of normally dry land resulting from the rising and overflowing of a body
of water. It is a natural, geologic process that shapes the landscape, but can be exacerbated by
development and other human activities. Floodplain locations are most at risk to riverine or
stream flooding.
Creeks running through Shelton can cause storm water run~off drains to back up, flooding lowlying areas.
Mason County is subject to flooding by several of its rivers. Those include the Satsop, the
Tahuya, the Union, and the Skokomish Rivers. Flooding in the first three rivers can effectively
cut off pockets of residents due to mudslides and water over the roadways. The Skokomish
River is referred to by the National Weather Service as the "flashiest river in Washington, where
a teaspoon of rain can result in flooding". The Skokomish causes closure of U S Highway 101 ,
the main north-south route through the County, at least once annually. Threat to citizens and
damage to homes located in the Skokomish Valley has been mitigated in the past by elevation
of homes and acquisition of property in seriously affected areas.
See following page for Skokomish River
Comprehensive Flood Hazard
Management Plan Map
34
Mason Connty Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
' ()reek
--·Road
Eil
Wetland
--
l&udFiat
- - ElevatiOn ConiQur Qn feet)
'=".2...""=r"'...;:.'r~f"..':J"
.............
...
~/
i!. ;itt.
.....
FLOOD
FRINGE
I
...
~.
I
I
_...
!e
..
I
I
I
Fogu«~
4.
SPLIT FlOOOWAY
35
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Close monitoring of the rivers in addition to emergency notification systems keep citizens aware
when heavy rain is forecast.
An example of the problems encountered occurred in October 2004 when eight inches of rain
fell in a twenty-four hour period. US Highway 101 was closed at Skokomish Valley Road and
children were photographed swimming in the grassy play area of a park in downtown Shelton.
Effects associated with flooding can include loss of life, damage to structures, and loss or
damage to roads and utilities. Flood damages in Mason County have exceeded damages by all
other natural hazards occurring in the state (County HIVA). Secondary hazards associated with
flooding include electrocution, structural collapse, hazardous materials incidents, and fire.
Landslides
A landslide is the downslope movement of land, rock and soils. Landslides can be caused by a
number of factors including change in slope gradient, increasing land load, shocks or vibrations
from events such as an earthquake, changes in ground water content or movement, changes in
vegetation (this includes changes in type of vegetation or removal of vegetation from the slope),
and urban development in the rural areas of the County.
Mason County's young geologic history makes much of the areas hill slopes vulnerable to
landslide hazards. The soil covering much of the area was left behind by Ice Age glaciers. There
are several layers to the soil: the top layer is a mix of rock, clay, dirt and sand, underneath is a
layer of very permeable sand on top of an impermeable layer of clay. When conditions are right
and water permeates the sand and reaches the impermeable clay and builds up, sliding occurs.
Many of the local slopes follow this pattern and hence are vulnerable to landslide hazards.
Homes and property on, above, and below slopes are vulnerable to damage from landslides.
Landslide records do not indicate significant historic slides in Mason County, but there are many
areas with a grade above 15%, the minimum grade that defines a landslide hazard area. Many
of the slopes in Mason County have a high vulnerability to slides. The area is most vulnerable to
landslides in the winter months following periods of heavy precipitation. While landslides can
occur independently, they are generally a secondary, or related, hazard to other events
including heavy rainstorms, snow or winter storms, and earthquakes.
The most recent landslide to occur in Mason County occurred on February 28, 2001 as a result
of the Nisqually Earthquake. A section of Hwy 101 collapsed, impeding vehicle movement from
Thurston County into Mason County which is a secondary route for commercial traffic to the
state capital in the City of Olympia. A re-route was established through the small community of
McCleary, which created traffic congestion in McCleary and Grays Harbor County. For
additional landslide impacts refer to Appendix 0, Mason County HIVA.
Some of the typical effects of landslides include damage or destruction of portions of roads and
railroads, sewer and water lines, homes and public buildings. Landslides, even small-scale
36
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
slides, are expensive due to cleanup costs including removal of debris from roadways, drains, or
reservoirs. Costs associated with landslides also include: support for road embankments,
vehicle and building damage, personal injury and damage to utility systems, among many
others. Improvements, including but not limited to placement of culverts have alleviated some
of the problems on the road near Tahuya on the north shore of Hood Canal and Highway 101
north of Hoodsport. Due to impact of heavy rain, snow and windstorms the County's
vulnerability remains is high.
Winter Storms
Winter storms will affect the entire County and wind, snow, ice and hail are not uncommon
occurrences for the region, impacting a broad area depending on the severity of the storm.
The most recent severe storm to impact the area occurred following Christmas 1996 and
continued through January 1997 where large amounts of snow fell across the region, followed
by a rapid drop in temperatures that caused a severe ice storm. Trees fell and branches
snapped under the weight of the snow and ice. Power lines snapped, and many residents were
. without power for several days. PUD 1 and 3 had a large number of customers without power,
and called in power company employees from other regions to assist with getting service
restored.
Throughout January 1997, heavy rain fell on top of more than one foot of snow resulting in
major flooding.
Winter storms are the most common widespread occurrence for the region. General effects
include interruptions to power and other utilities. Isolation is a hazard during winter storms,
especially. to the at~risk and vulnerable older population. High snow accumulations are a
common occurrence in the Olympic Mountains where even a small amount of snow can cause
interruption and immobility.
For additional historical data refer to the county and city HIVA's (Appendix D).
Wildland Fires
Fires are most likely to occur during the dry season, normally mid-May through October.
Wildland fires are most often started by humans; ignition is usually cigarettes, fireworks, and
outdoor burning. Such fires may also be started by lightning strikes. Mason County has a
moderate to high risk for such fires.
Hazardous Materials Release
Mason County has one of the highest probabilities in Washington State for being the scene of a
significant hazardous materials release. Hazardous materials are transported over or near
numerous bodies of waters, wetlands, environmentally-sensitive areas, and through numerous
population centers. This is directly related to the high level of diverse industrial facilities and
transportation routes in the County (Mason County HIVA).
A hazardous materials release may occur at a fixed site or during transport of a product. Mason
County has a high volume of hazardous materials traveling through the County limits. The
Washington State Department of Transportation reported that several transportation incidents
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
·
resulting in the accidental release of hazardous materials occurred between 1987 and 1989
(Mason County HIVA). Mason County has not had any significant railroad incidents in recent
years.
Additionally, a natural disaster such as an earthquake or a flood may cause hazardous
materials releases, and during a natural disaster the numbers of hazardous materials releases
can be expected to increase in number.
In addition to known hazardous materials, there are also unknowns that may have an impact on
County/City/Tribai!SPDs operations. Illegal drug labs and dumping create another item of
concern for the County/City/Tribes/SPDs.
A hazardous materials incident may occur slowly or without warning, but require immediate
response from County/City/Tribai/SPDs first responders. While most spills are minor and can be
handled by County personnel, there is potential within the County for a more significant event
requiring assistance from outside jurisdictions, especially in evacuation of downwind residents
or the creation of a sheltering place.
Terrorism/Civil Disturbance
Terrorism has been defined by the Federal Bureau of Investigation as "The unlawful use of force
or violence against persons or property to intimidate or coerce a government; the civilian
population; or any segment of it, in furtherance of political or social objectives." The devastation
which occurred at the World Trade Center in New York and the Alfred P. Murrah building in
Oklahoma City points to the need to plan for potential threats within our own communities
(Mason County HIVA).
Washington State, and therefore Mason County,/is vulnerable to terrorist activity. Terrorism can
be state-sponsored or the outgrowth of a frustrated, extremist fringe of polarized and/or minority
groups of people, for example:
• Ethnic, separatists, and political refugees
• Left wing radical organizations
• Right wing racists, anti*authority survivalist groups
• Extremist issue-oriented groups such as animal rights, environmental, religious,
antiabortionists (Washington State Emergency Management Division).
Communities are vulnerable to terrorist incidents and many have highly visible and vulnerable
targets. These critical facilities, sites, systems, and special events in the community are usually
located near routes with easy transportation access. Potential vulnerable sites in Mason County
include: government institutions, water supply sources, power distribution systems,
communications terminals, and financial institutions. Sanderson Field is the location of the local
airport and lies just north of the Shelton city limits off U S Highway 101, a major north-south
route through the county.
The Washington State Emergency Management Division suggests that while the likelihood of an
attack against United States interests is high, Washington State is at a relatively moderate risk
to terrorism. Recent reports, corroborated through multiple intelligence sources, suggest an
increased likelihood that the AI-Qaeda terrorist network may attempt to attack Americans in the
United States or abroad. After major combat activity is concluded in Iraq, a terrorist attack is
38
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
likely to demonstrate that they are still a capable force and their struggle continues. Additionally,
press reports indicate AI-Qaeda may be close to producing a biological weapon (Washington
State Emergency Management Division)
http://emd.wa.gov/3-map/a-p/hiva/update-analysis/update-analysis.htm
Assessing Vulnerability: Identifying Assets
County/CityfTribai/SPDs infrastructures and capital facilities may be vulnerable to a variety of
hazards. The following table presents a list of critical facilities and infrastructure as identified in
the County's Comprehensive Plan.
Mason County Infrastructure and Capital Facilities (Refer to Chapter One, Section 7.)
39
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
CHAPTER FOUR
Mitigation Strategy
Through a series of planning meetings, the County/City/Tribes/SPD's Hazard Mitigation Plan
Task Force identified goals that will guide the implementation of the Hazard Mitigation Plan.
The goals listed were those that were determined to best minimize impacts of disasters. It is
important to note that budget and fiscal constraints may have significant impact on the
County/City/Tribes/SPDs' ability to initiate new mitigation activities and even to continue current
actions over the long term.
Proposed Mitigation Goals, Objectives and Actions
Goal1 - to protect aquifers used by the County/City/Tribes/SPD's water supply systems from
contamination by hazardous materials and other hazard effects.
Objectives:
a. Protect the groundwater resources of the County/City/Tribes/SPD's
b. Provide a means of regulating specific land uses within aquifer protection areas
c. Provide a means of establishing safe construction practices for projects built within an
aquifer protection area
d. Protect the County/City/Tribes/SPD's drinking water supply systems from impacts by
facilities that store, handle, treat, use, transport, or produce substances that possess
a hazard to water quality
e. Reduce the effects of actual contamination of potable water sources.
Actions:
a. Continue to implement aquifer protection practices
b. Complete risk assessments for water systems and implement specific measures as
appropriate.
Goal 2 - minimize public and private losses due to flood conditions in specific areas.
Objectives:
a. Protect human life and health
b. Minimize expenditure of public money and costly flood control projects
c. Minimize the need for rescue and relief efforts associated with flooding and generally
undertaken at the expense of the general public
d. Minimize damage to public facilities and utilities such as water and gas mains, electric,
telephone and sewer lines, streets, and bridges located in areas of special flood
hazard
e. Help maintain a stable tax base by providing for the sound use and development of
areas of special flood hazard so as to minimize future flood blight areas
f. Ensure that those who occupy flood hazard areas assume responsibility for their actions.
Actions:
a. Continue to enforce, maintain and update area usage regulations
b. Develop criteria for and conduct hazard-susceptibility assessments of business and
public facilities (baseline and changed conditions)
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
c. Enhance drainage system maintenance
d. Avoid/reduce instances of non-underground extensions of utility lines which may create
debris dams during floods
e. Evaluate goals and practices regarding habitat protection and flood mitigation
f. Maintain and enhance County/City flood hazard reduction planning
g. Continue to offer the County warning system.
Goal 3 - minimize damage due to natural hazards.
Objectives:
a. Protect the public against avoidable losses due to maintenance and replacement of
public facilities, property damage, subsidy cost of public mitigation of avoidable
impacts, and costs for public emergency rescue and relief operations
b. Reduce hazards created by failure of the structural environment (i.e., buildings, bridges,
highways, and utility lines)
c. Reduce impacts of disaster on fragile environments/facilities:
• Hospitals, nursing homes, etc
• Day care centers
• Assistance clinics
• Halfway houses
• Special populations requiring public assistance
d. Reduce the risks to the County/City/Tribes/SPDs from development occurring on
unstable slopes
e. Reduce the risk to the County/City/Tribes/SPDs from damage caused to existing
resources in known unstable areas
f. Control erosion and sediment run-off from development.
Actions:
a. Conduct hazard-susceptibility assessments of business and public facilities
b. Identify, assess, and maintain critical transportation routes within the County/
City/Tribes/SPDs
c. Develop objective criteria and conduct seismic preparedness and retrofit of
critical public and private facilities
d. Re-enforce utility infrastructure and connections
e. Implement slope stabilization measures in steep/unstable areas
f. Develop HAZUS Loss Estimation tool kit to identify and assess vulnerabilities to
earthquake damage.
Goal 4 .... minimize impacts on critical habitats and wetlands from natural or man-made
disasters.
Objectives:
a. Maintain and promote diversity of species and habitat within the
County/City/Tribes/SPDs
b. Help maintain air and water quality and control erosion
c. Enhance and maintain the capacity for critical habitat and wetland areas to serve as ·
mitigation buffers for floods
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
d. Reduce the impact of preventable maintenance and replacement of public facilities
needed when wetland function is impaired through disaster impact
e. Reduce costs associated with repair of downstream properties resulting from erosion
and flooding due to the loss of water storage capacity provided by wetlands.
Actions:
a. Assess vulnerability of critical habitat and wetland areas to disaster damage
b. Determine capacity for critical habitat and wetland areas to serve as mitigation buffers
for floods.
c. Incorporate habitat and wetland mitigation enhancements into drainage
maintenance programs
d. Evaluate goals and practices regarding habitat protection and flood mitigation.
Goal 5 - minimize the impact of technological or man-made disasters on the
County/City/Tribes/SPDs (i.e., hazardous materials incidents, terrorist attack, civil disturbances,
etc.).
Objectives:
a. Reduce the City/County/Tribes/SPDs risk of exposure to hazardous materials
release/incidents
b. Ensure that the County/City/Tribes/SPDs government has reliable communications and
information management systems
c. Reduce risk to critical public and private facilities.
Actions:
a. Robust systems
• Retrofit critical facilities for blast resistance and resistance to forced entry
• Protect utility lifelines (water, power, communications, etc.) by concealing, burying, or
encasing
• Develop backup control center capabilities
b. Security/safety:
• Develop Buffer Zone Protection Plans, and incorporate those protective measures
most effective to mitigate identified threats
• Ensure adequate site lighting
·
Locate critical assets (people, activities, systems) away from entrances, vehicle
circulation and parking, and loading and maintenance areas
• Separate high-risk and low-risk activities; separate high-risk activities from public
areas
System redundancy
• Implement separate emergency and normal power systems; ensure that backup
power systems are periodically tested under load
• Ensure provision of primary and backup fuel supplies; provide secure storage
• Install exterior connections for emergency power
• Enhance communication and information management capabilities by updating
telecommunications capabilities of County/City government offices, creating
redundant/backup capability for landline telephone systems, and developing
off-site backup of information technology systems
•
c.
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
d. Enhanced emergency response
• Maintain access (ingress and egress) for emergency responders includihg large fire
apparatus, and for resident evacuation
• Develop and maintain comprehensive emergency response and recovery plans
• Conduct regular evacuation and security drills
• Regularly evaluate emergency equipment readiness and adequacy
• Develop backup control center capabilities.
Goal 6- enhance the County/Cityffribes/SPDs capabilities for gathering, organizing, and
displaying spatial data regarding hazards, vulnerabilities, critical facilities, and vital statistics.
Objectives:
a. Enhance the capability to access and synthesize City, County and. State gao-spatial
hazard data
b. Increase the ease with which County/City/Tribes/SPDs gee-spatial hazard data can
be accessed and used.
Actions:
a. Maintain comprehensive hazard maps
b. Create critical facilities data base information for use in future mitigation strategies
c. Obtain and integrate HAZUS Loss Estimation tool and ArcViewGIS with existing
County/City/Tribes/SPDs GIS gee-spatial programs.
Identification and Analysis of Mitigation Measures
The Mason County Task Force has identified several hazard mitigation projects that would
benefit the County/City/Tribes/SPDs, and they have been formalized in the Mason County
Hazard Mitigation Plan. These were identified in the meetings of the Hazard Mitigation Plan
Task Force, which included input from multiple venues. The Task Force chose to focus on
mitigation measures in the areas of
•
•
•
•
Aquifer protection - protection of the County/City/Tribes/SPDs water sources from
impacts of construction, development, hazardous materials releases or infiltration
Flooding - protection of residents, structures, and the tax base from the effects of flood
damage
Earthquakes/landslides - reduction of losses from seismic events and landslides to life
and property, fragile environments and facilities, and the County/Cityffribes/SPDs
tax base
Technological hazards (including terrorism) -reduction in the County/City/Tribes/SPDs
vulnerabilities to technological hazards and enhancement of security of critical
facilities.
In addition, the Task Force agreed to enhance the County/Cityffribes/SPDs capabilities to
access, manipulate, and display gao-spatial data in order to foster and maintain mitigation
planning and implementation over the long term.
Implementation of Mitigation Measures
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
The Hazard Mitigation Plan Task Force examined the various mitigation measures identified
and decided -for reasons of budgetary constraints and efficiency -to place the highest priority
on mitigation actions that were already underway through normal County/Cityffribes/SPDs
operations or prior development initiatives. These include continued implementation and
articulation of aquifer protection planning, continued enforcement of existing guidelines and
other applicable portions of the County/Cityffribes/SPDs codes to enhance drainage system
maintenance, and increased attention to the effectiveness of existing emergency response
capability.
The Task Force determined that concentrating on these activities would afford the
County/Cityffribes/SPDs time to investigate funding sources, to identify specific high-value
actions in the other priority categories, and to establish a reasonable implementation
framework for later actions. It would also afford an opportunity for the County/Cityffribes/SPDs
to conduct preliminary actions (i.e., development of criteria and protocols for conducting hazardsusceptibility assessments, developing objective criteria for seismic retrofit) to support later
mitigation programs.
Hazard Mitigation Measures - Priority Ranking
The Task Force identified the critical facilities of the County/Cityffribes/SPDs. These critical
facilities are listed in Chapter 1, Section 6 and were developed using the Mitigation 20120
software. ·The mitigation projects are identified in Chapter 1, Section 7 and were prioritized
using the vulnerability and risk assessment and population affected methodology of the
Mitigation 20120 software.
The prioritization of the mitigation projects identified in Chapter 1, Section 7 demonstrates an
understanding by the Task Force, that in order to mitigate the effects of identified hazards
on these critical facilities and the impact to our communities, funding for these mitigation
initiatives will be achieved through a combination of Federal and State grants, local operating
budgets, and state and local taxing authority. The Task Force- balancing considerations of life
safety, number of people affected, and cost-effectiveness -determined that actions in the "high"
· category would bring the most immediate benefit to the County/Cityffribes/SPDs in mitigating
dis.aster effects. Actions in the "medium" and "low" categories will bring long-term benefits as
the County/Cityffribes/SPDs are able to afford to commit resources for their implementation and
to integrate these actions into the County/Cityffribes/SPDs operations as presented in Chapter
1, Section 7. Actions in these categories will be re-examined and re-evaluated as part of the
Plan review cycle described in Chapter 1, Section 5.
A new cost-benefit analysis was not conducted for those projects and activities already
underway. Specific cost-benefit analysis will be conducted on a case-by-case basis as future
actions are evaluated for inclusion into the County/Cityffribes/SPDs' budget processes. All
projects considered for implementation will have a benefit-to-cost ratio of at least 1.0 before
being considered for additional prioritization using the established criteria. Funding sources for
new projects are unknown at present.
Hazard mitigation measures identified in the Plan and already in progress will continue to be
funded through the current County/Cityffribes/SPDs' budget processes. The
County/Cityffribes/SPDs will investigate and seek grant support for hazard mitigation measures
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
from FEMA, other federal agencies, Washington State Emergency Management Division, and
other funding sources.
45
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
CHAPTER FIVE
Mitigation Plan Maintenance Procedures
Monitoring, Evaluating, and Updating the Plan
The Mason County Task Force has developed a process for regularly reviewing and updating
the Hazard Mitigation Plan. The Hazard Mitigation Plan Task Force will hold a meeting in May,
and Task Force members will be responsible for overseeing the progress of the mitigation
actions in the Plan.
The Hazard Mitigation Task Force will periodically conduct a formal assessment of the Hazard
Mitigation Plan following a schedule described below. The Task Force will report:
• The goals and objectives addressing current and expected conditions.
• . How the nature or magnitude of risks has changed.
• . OJrrent resources that are appropriate for implementing the plan.
• When there are implementation problems, such as technical, political, legal or
coordination issues with other agencies.
• Th~ outcomes have occurred as expected.
• The agencies and other partners have participated as proposed.
The Task Force will review the results of the Plan assessment, identify corrective actions, and
recommend to the County/City!fribes/SPDs what actions are necessary to bring the Mitigation
Plan back into conformance with the stated goals and objectives.
The County/City/Tribai/SPDs emergency management personnel will then update and make
changes to the plan before submitting it to the Task Force members and the State Hazard
Mitigation Program Manager. If no changes are necessary, the State Hazard Mitigation Officer
will be given a justification for this determination.
The initial Hazard Mitigation Plan assessment and review will be conducted 2 years after the
Plan has been formally adopted by the County/City!fribai/SPDs governing authorities.
Thereafter, the Hazard Mitigation Plan will be conducted every 5 years to coincide with the
review of the City/County!fribes/SPDs' Comprehensive Plans. The Hazard Mitigation Task
Force has chosen this cycle and process in order to provide a sufficient time horizon for
mitigation actions to take effect and show results.
Implementation through Existing Programs
The City/County/Tribes/SPDs rely on comprehensive land use planning, capital improvements
planning, and building codes to guide and control development. After the
City/County!fribes/SPDs officially adopt the Hazard Mitigation Plan, these existing mechanisms
will, as appropriate, include and integrate mitigation strategies identified in the Plan.
After adoption of the Mitigation Plan, the City/County!fribes/SPDs will address hazards in their
comprehensive plans and land use regulations. Specifically, one of the goals in the Mitigation
Plan is to protect life and property from natural disasters and man-caused hazards. The
County/City!fribes/SPDs will review their comprehensive plans and land use policies, analyze
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
any plan amendments, and provide technical assistance in implementing these requirements.
The capital improvement planning that occurs in the future will also contribute to the goals in the
Hazard Mitigation Plan. The capital improvement planners will strive to secure high-hazard
areas for low risk uses. Within six months of the formal adoption of the Mitigation Plan, the
mitigation activities listed in chapter 3 will be incorporated into the process of existing planning
mechanisms.
Ensuring Public Involvement
The City/County/Tribes/SPDs are committed to invite involvement of the public directly in the
continual reshaping and updating of the Hazard Mitigation Plan. The Hazard Mitigation Plan
Task Force members are responsible for oversight of the plan. Although the members of this
Task Force represent the public to some extent, the public will be able to directly comment on
and provide feedback about the plan.
Copies of the plan will be catalogued and kept on hand at the Timberland Regional Library
branches within the City/County. The existence and location of these copies will be publicized in
the Shelton-Mason County Journal and the local radio station. Contained in the plan will be the
addresses and phone numbers of Emergency Management staff responsible for keeping track
of public comments on the plan.
In addition, copies of the plan and any proposed changes will be posted on the
City/County/Tribes/SPDs' websites. These sites will also contain an email address and phone
number to which people can direct their comments or concerns. Information will also be
disseminated through information provided to the local media.
A public meeting may be held after each review of the plan by the Hazard Mitigation Plan Task
Force. This meeting will provide the public a forum for which they can express concerns,
opinions, or ideas about the plan. The County/City/Tribes/SPDs emergency management will
publicize and host this meeting, and any up-dates will be posted on the
City/County/Tribes/SPDs' websites allowing for additional public input.
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Appendix A
MEMBERS OF THE TASK FORCE
Standing Committees:
Steering Committee
Wesley Johnson, Mason County Commissioner Chair
Herb Baze, Mason County Commissioner
Jayni Kamin, Mason County Commissioner
John Tarrant, City of Shelton Mayor and Commissioner of Public Safety
Richard Taylor, City of Shelton Commissioner of Finance
Dawn Pannell, City of Shelton Commissioner of Public Works
Steve Whybark, Mason County Sheriff and Emergency Management Director
Jim Ghiglione, City of Shelton Fire Chief and Emergency Management Director
Public Information
Debbie Riley, Mason County Pubtic Health Services Environmental Health
Manager
Bonnie Knight, Port of Allyn Executive Director
Tim McKern, Mason County Fire District 5 Assistant Chief
Bob Burbridge, Mason County Fire District 4 Assistant Chief
Planning
Steve Swarthout, Mason County Fire Marshal
William Tabor, Mason County Public Works Interim Director
Larry Waters, Mason County Community Development Building Department
Inspector
Steve Kutz, Mason County Public Health Director
Sandi Loertscher, Mason County Division of Emergency Management
Administrative Coordinator
Jim Ghiglione, City of Shelton Fire Chief and Emergency Management
Director
Vance Aeschleman, American Red Cross Coordinator
James Spurgeon, Skokomish Indian Tribe Department of Public Safety
Chief
Michael Evans, Squaxin lsi. Indian Tribe Police Department Lieutenant
Jim Peters, Squaxin lsi. Tribe Natural Resources Director
Michael Poier, Squaxin lsi. Indian Tribe Community Development Director
Task Force
Mason County:
Wesley Johnson, Mason County Commissioner Chair
Herb Baze, Mason County Commissioner
Jayni Kamin, Mason County Commissioner
Steve Whybark, Mason County Sheriff and County Emergency Management Director
Howard Armfield, Mason County Sheriff's Office Chief Deputy
Bob Fink, Mason County Community Development Planning Department Manager
Larry Waters, Mason County Community Development Building Department Inspector
Steve Kutz, Mason County Public Health Services Director
Debbie Riley, Mason County Public Health Services Environmental Health Manager
Steve Swarthout, Mason County Fire Marshal
Gary Yando, Mason County Utilities and Waste Management Director (retired)
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Sandi Loertscher, Mason County Division of Emergency Management Administrative
Coordinator
Sandi Kvarnstrom, Mason County Division of Emergency Management
Planning/Training Coordinator
William Tabor, Mason County Public Works Interim Director
Bonnie Knight, Port of Allyn Executive Director
John Williams, Port of Allyn Maintenance Supervisor
Ken Boad, Mason County Fire District #2 Assistant Chief
Bob Burbridge, Mason County Fire District #4 Assistant Chief
Richard Knight, Mason County Fire District #5 chief
Tim McKern, Mason County Fire District #5 Assistant chief
Aaron Espey, Mason County Medic One Director
.
Gregory Metzcus, Washington Corrections Center Safety Manager
Terry Mihailov, Mason Transit Liaison/Citizen
Vance Aeschleman, American Red Cross Coordinator
City of Shelton
John Tarrant, City of Shelton Mayor and Commissioner of Public Safety
Dawn Pannell, City of Shelton Commissioner of Public Works
Dick Taylor, City of Shelton Commissioner of Finance
Jim Ghiglione, Shelton Fire Dept Chief and City Emergency Management Director
Dave Salzer, Shelton Fire Department Assistant Chief
Terry Davenport, Shelton Police Department Chief
Dave Ecklund, Shelton Police Department Lieutenant
David Pearch, Mason General Hospital Safety Officer
Diane Stillman, Mason General Hospital Chief Operating Officer
Mike Akin, Public Safety Answering Point Director
·
Skokomish Indian Tribe*
James Spurgeon, Department of Public Safety Chief
Everett Tyrell, Department of Public Safety
Squaxin Island Tribe
Brian Thompson, Planning Department Director
Michael Poier, Community Development Director
Michael Evans, Squaxin Island Police Lieutenant
Jim Peters, Natural Resources Director
*Skokomish Tribe is represented on the Emergency Management Council; however, they
developed their hazard mitigation plan independently.
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Appendix B
EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT COUNCil MINUTES
September 27,2002
(This document is not intended to be
a verbatim transcript)
Introduction:
Marty Best will be introduced and he will tell us what we're up to, what we're going to be doing,
what we need to be doing. We may have an extension coming for the deadline on this. They
originally said that we were looking at November 1, 2003 for a final, in-place mitigation plan. The
feds may be extending that but we haven't got an official word on that. This process does take a
long time; it takes a lot of involvement from all of the different departments and agencies
throughout the county and input from the public and so we want to get started on this and be
able to complete it and be ready to ask for money when we need it.
Marty Best: I want to thank you for taking time out on such a wonderful Friday. My name is
Marty Best and I am the Deputy State Coordinating Officer for Mitigation. I'm also the
Governor's authorized representative for mitigation for the Nisqually earthquake. In October of
2000, President Clinton signed a law known as the Disaster Mitigation Act of 2000. In that Act it
requires some new planning on both the state and local level and on February 26 of this year,
FEMA issued their interim final regulation, which outlines all the particular requirements of both
the state and local. When I say local, that's fire districts, special purpose districts, cities, towns
and counties and there is a required planning to be eligible to apply for mitigation funds.
I'd like to introduce Lori Purget. She's a Program Coordinator with our Mitigation Program. She's
been working with me for five years.
For all disasters after November 1, local tribal governments, applicants, subgrantees, anyone
who wants to apply for funds must have a plan. I was at the NEMA conference, which is the
National Emergency Management Association conference, when FEMA announced their intent
to extend this November 1, 2003 deadline to November 1, 2004 for both the state and local
plans. We're very grateful for that; _we haven't seen it in writing yet but we anticipate that to be a
fact because quite frankly, in the amount of time that we have left and what we need to get
done, we are hearing from county commissioners and city commissioners around the state that
this can't be done. One thing we want to stress is that this is an all hazard comprehensive plan.
When we sent out the notice about the planning requirements, we sent it to the Mason County
EOC because it's at the county, city manager level, and because it encompasses not only
emergency management but encompasses land use planning, building department, road
department, the entire aspect of all local government. It also requires a lot of public involvement
in the development of the planning.
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
What is mitigation? Mitigation are those actions taken by government to reduce the impacts of
the next future disaster; whether it's flooding, an earthquake, a wind storm. Our program has
helped Mason County acquire quite a few homes out in the Skokomish Valley. I'm very grateful
for that because I don't have certain individuals calling me anymore every time the water gets
slightly up to the road. I'm very grateful for that because they had me on speed dial and they
even found me when I was in Eastern Washington on my cell phone. So without this plan you
would not be eligible for future hazard mitigation grant program funds. The state has always had
a requirement to plan in order to receive federal disaster assistance, but FEMA only held the
state hostage to the mitigation plan. Effective with this law, if we do not have an adopted plan
then the state, including all of you, would not be eligible for public assistance, which is the repair
and restoration of all your damaged facilities and also for mitigation. That's a change for us.
Right now I see hazard mitigation for locals and subgrantees but it's my personal opinion having
met with FEMA and listened to discussion that eventually I believe that it is their intent to apply
this to local governments. This is if you don't have this plan, it may be five years or it may be ten
years down the road, you may not be eligible for other disaster assistance in the future.
Let's talk about mitigation; avoiding development in vulnerable areas. If you have a known
floodway or floodplain, don't build there; land use planning. If you have a known liquefaction
zone slightly off of Railroad and Cota, you shouldn't be building there. We are susceptible to
earthquakes here but we need to be looking at land use planning. This should be identified as
part of your overall approach to minimizing the effects. If you're doing a county wide regional
plan what should be looked at is what you can give your decision makers; information, tools, at
the county level to help them make wise decisions about what to fund and where to build. It
brings together your growth management planning activities along with your critical areas
ordinance. It brings together the flood plan we already have for the Skokomish Valley. It brings
together the things you already have so you're not starting from scratch.
We tell everybody to sit down with your county, sit down with your department heads and look at
this and see what you already have. A lot of this material that's listed in this law is already here.
The local plans are a representation of your commitment to reduce the hazards in Mason
County and has a fairly strong history of doing so. This serves as a guide for the decision
makers and it also serves as a basis for us at the state to make recommendations for funding.
One of the things that we have to do at the state now is to take all of the local plans and roll up
your priorities into the state plan. That's one of the reasons we were able to lobby hard for an
extension on the deadline because within the State of Washington there are no communities
that have an approved plan that meets this criteria and from what understand there's no one in
the country that has one that meets this criteria. This is even talking about North Carolina who
has a very aggressive planning program.
What are the benefits? It helps you pre-identify projects and activities that will save lives and
property and help reduce your vulnerability. It facilitates post-disaster funding and it
demonstrates your public involvement. Isn't it better to have a county plan so that when funding
becomes available to buy that home out versus risking first responders to go in there and try to
rescue someone that shouldn't be in there in the first place? It also reduces your cost.
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Where do you start? Mason County has a fairly good history of open public involvement with the
flood plan and GMA process and this is an essential element of the mitigation plan as the
federal requirement. There's an opportunity for the community to participate and make
comments on the development of your plan. It provides an opportunity for Shelton, Allyn, Belfair
and other communities to participate and make comments. Disasters to not pay any attention to
geographical boundaries. The disaster does not stop within the city boundaries of Shelton and it
does not care if you live in Allyn or Belfair or the North Mason County. A disaster is going to hit
the whole community.
Marty Best: Begin by reviewing what you already have. You've already thought a lot about these
things but you just haven't put it in writing. If it floods down on First and Railroad what are you
going to do about it? let's put in bigger culverts. One of the things it stresses is that you have to
document the entire planning process. One of the things we're doing at the state level is that
we're acquiring a software program called Mitigation 2020. We've already purchased it and
' we're getting it out to ail 39 counties and what it does it's an interactive Microsoft Office Suite
program that allows you to incorporate things. It allows you to put all your data in and walk you
through the process.
Especially the documentation of your meetings. We should have that to the counties in the next
few months.
A risk assessment. That's kind of obvious but to some communities there are various
understanding of the term. A risk assessment that provides a factual basis for the proposed
strategies to reduce the risks. You must provide sufficient information to enable you to justify
how you prioritize. The Skokomish Valley: you know you have repetitive flood damage, you
have the history of the damage and you know where they are in relationship to the river or up in
the avulsion zone. That data would be the basis for your information. You have to have a
description of the type, location and extent of natural hazards. This is flooding, earthquake, ice
storm. You shall include information on all your previous occurrence of natural hazards, whether
the president declared them or not. Slides on Highway 3: that's an on-going challenge to us
each winter. Describe your vulnerability to the hazard. Then you will have an overall summary of
each hazard and its impact to the community. Whether it's flooding, wind storm, ice storm. This
is one of the shoulds: "The types and numbers of existing and future buildings, infrastructures,
and critical facilities located in identified hazard areas." Another thing we're doing at the state
working with DNR is that we're funding a project to do a National Earthquake Hazards
Reduction Program; a soils liquefaction map of the entire state. We hope to have that done by
next September to show each community what your particular earthquake hazards are. You
already have your flood maps. You should have an estimate of the dollar losses. A lot of folks
here have been around and they know what kind of damage they've had. We also have a
program called Hazards Identification US; it's for earthquakes and the model should be out later
this year. It will help you estimate what your particular losses are in a particular area. A general
description of your land use. Your GMA feeds right into this. Your critical areas ordinance. Your
capital improvement plans. Do you need a storm water treatment plan? Do you need a new
sewer plan? Where will you locate these?
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
The mitigation strategy. This is where you take all the bits and pieces, all the public involvement,
risk assessment, vulnerability assessment and you bring it together and decide what to do about
it. You'll find fotks_that want to be bought out, or elevated, some may want new roads and the
Mitigation 2020 software witl heip you prioritize based upon the risk and the vulnerability and it
will actually give you a score so as you bring your pieces together you can rank your projects
and it will print it out for you.
I
Description of your goals to reduce long term vulnerabilities. At a state level the goal might be
are we going to reduce flood damages? The way we're going to do that is stress acquisition of
repetitive flood damaged homes. We have homes in the state that have had flood insurance
claims that are equal or greater than the value of the house. It doesn't make sense to continue
pouring tax dollars and funds into those homes.
Marty Best: The cost of disasters. Why do we want a mitigation plan? The projects that we have
funded over the last ten or eleven years just in the State of Washington, for every dollar we
spend we can document a reduction in future damages of about $3.00. Since Mt. St. Helens,
the State of Washington, including the Nisqually earthquake, we've had almost $500,000,000.00
in direct damages just for the programs that emergency management administers. That's just
repair and restoration and mitigation and individual assistance. You marry that up with the
federal highways and the Corps of Engineers, that's a billion dollars in direct damages. That
doesn't count insurance costs, that doesn't count loss of revenue, it doesn't count those other
intangibles that effect a disaster. What can Mason County do with this portion of a one billion
dollars that could have been spent somewhere else? What could we do with the roads or the
school systems, or replacing fire stations? That's a lot of money to put somewhere else other
than just repairing things. We need to identify the comprehensive range of what you want to do.
Seismic retrofits. What do you do? We're doing a lot of projects involving fire stations that are
seismically vulnerable so that in the event of the next earthquake they don't fall down and they
can respond to the community. An action plan describing how you prioritize. It's not because the
commissioner lives there and that's why you want to do it.
Where do we want to put our money? In a time of diminishing resources and increasing need
you have to have a prioritization process to decide the benefits. The benefit of planning is
reducing the impacts to your first responders, reducing the cost of the disaster and helping you
recover faster after the disaster. Normally after a disaster those small businesses that close
their doors that are impacted, about 80% of them don't corne back. That's tax revenue to your
community.
What is the method of how you're going to monitor it? How are you going to evaluate and
update the plan? Locals and subgrantees only need to update their plan every five years. The
state has to do it every three years. This should be an ongoing process. We don't want to see a
document that's produced and stuck on a shelf because it doesn't do the commissioners any
good. We need something that is evolving. Maybe the road department through a public works
trust fund loan redid some roads and you've dug better culverts, well, that's now lower on your
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
list of priorities. That's how it remains ongoing.
How do you incorporate the requirements of your mitigation planning into other plans? This is
something that we have been talking about at the state level for the last eleven years. It's been
hard to sell mitigation because too often it sounds like litigation and people don't want to deal
with lawyers. When you're doing your road plan and you have culverts to blow out every winter
it should be in your capital improvement plan to put in bigger culverts. That's mitigation. That's
reducing the impacts of the next flood. Highway 3 is a good example. Maybe we need to do the
Bypass; maybe we need to just get rid of that road because why are we continuing to spend
money on that? If you could take the mitigation concept and put it into your building design
plans, your residential development codes, other things that would help you prepare. If your
building code requires that when you remodel you have to strap your hot water heater to the
wall. Just those little things that are cost effective. It not only reduces damage during an
earthquake but it also provides a useful source of water after the earthquake if the water lines
are broke.
How will you continue to involve the public? Some communities that have done a flood control
assistance plan have already e4stablished a community advisory council. Use that as your
format and add on someone with expertise to expand that out. Emergency management folks
don't have to do all the work. They may be facilitating but using other groups into it and help
prioritize. The state is looking at adopting the International Building Codes. Communities can
adopt stricter building codes.
How are you going to incorporate that into your planning process? We have been a proponent
· of mitigation planning for some time, but when this came out and we took a look at it my boss
asked what would it take to do this? I said to give me ten years and twenty million dollars.
Washington DC has no understanding of what it's like to be out in the community after a flood or
after an earthquake. One of the things that we looked at is the way the law is written every
single potential applicant right now is legally required to have their own plan if they want to apply
for funds. I sat down with FEMA and committed that I had to have 4,000 plans on your desk by
next June. They said to do regional plans; this is a home rule state. Some counties don't talk to
each other. They're not going to force them to do the plan together. So we have multiple plans.
We recommend, however, that you facilitate a regional plan. It cuts the cost, it keeps my work
load down and it's a better product for you. If you do a multi-jurisdictional plan, with the county
and the city and fire districts and school districts, each one must assess your own particular
risks where they are different from the lead agency. So if you have the same risks as the
county, then you really don't have anything different. You have to identify actions that your
particular district or community wants to do. The reason why that works is that while you're part
of the county process, you're also eligible to apply independently for the funding. So you want to
make sure that that particular priority of your district or community is in that particular part of the
plan so that when the funding opportunities become available you can say that you adopted
Mason County's plan and in a certain section you have talked about your
priorities and then you're covered. Utah is doing six plans for the entire state. New Jersey is
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
looking at thousands of plans.
Marty Best: On the back of this flyer we have a list of resources. FEMA is producing several
documents and how-to guides. I want to point out that the law addresses natural hazards. This
does not preclude you from looking at other hazards, such as man-made hazards. If you had
the resources and time I would encourage you to do so. What we're looking at is terrorism which
is a man-made hazard or another hazard and they should be looked at under your mitigation
umbrella along with earthquakes, floods and fires. I mention this because there's also a lot of
money out there for homeland defense and homeland security. You have to identify your critical
facilities.
Why do two plans? If you could find a way to marry up the activities to reduce your planning
efforts - you could just reference it in your plans. Chapter 7 of the how-to guides deals with manmade hazards.
A lot of these documents you can register off of our web page at FEMA. Gov or the
Washington State Emergency Page which is WSEM\.com. Once again, using your best
available data; use your GMA documents, land use planning and this will set you up quite well.
We now have some time for some questions.
Audience: In this process, say we have a plan and have it all put together, if we have a disaster
is FEMA going to come in $nd say that you've identified the problems with your fire department
but you didn't identify the problem you might have with this beam and consequ~ntly we're going
to throw this out. Who is going to determine what the plan actually is?
Marty Best: At the first iterations we're not looking for a Cadillac plan. We're looking at
something that you as a local decision maker can use. If you come to me with a plan that has
been adopted and you've got all the elements there, I'm not going to come back and challenge
you and say that you missed something.
Audience: We were told that with our GMA plan; that it was our plan and as it turns out it's not
our plan at all but we wish it could be.
Marty Best: All I can say is based upon my work with FEMA I believe that if you come to us with
a project that you have identified it and here is what it is, we're going to press on with that.
Audience: Doesn't the plan that you're talking about go to you as a part of the state plan that
would then have to be approved back in Washington DC?
Marty Best: They're all approved at the region; they don't go back to DC. There are actually two
things; when your plan comes to us, we'll take a look at it and make sure ifs complete and then
send it off to the region for their approval. Not having the local plans does not cause the state
plan to be ineligible; we just have to address how we're going to incorporate local plans as they
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
become available.
Audience: Couldn't hear question from audience.
Marty Best: The way I look at it is given a particular hazard we have an ice storm and you may
or may not have some ice related mitigation opportunities but the money becomes available.
The way we've run the program is that the disaster funding mechanism does not limit you to
what you have applied for. With flood disasters, we have funded earthquake projects and with
the earthquake we have funded flood related projects. You may find a new event and you just
do an addendum to your plan and write it up as a cover memo by saying 'as the result of an ice
storm we have identified this as a risk and here's our vulnerability' and you put it in the
application. But by the same token, you may not find something but our priority is seismically
retrofitting fire stations or moving people out of the flood plain. I believe there is a lot of flexibility
to it. I don't see them coming back and saying "thou shalt do 1,2,3."
Audience: I'm trying to understand the implications of this on land use. The city and the county
have comp plans that identify areas where different things could occur and if we have a
development scope that would allow the kind of development to occur in an identified hazard
area, is that going to be contrary as to how the federal government may view the impact of the
disaster?
Marty Best: In this process, though, it actually brings it together that the decision makers have
taken a look at it not only from a development prospective but they're also now thinking about it
from a disaster mitigation aspect. A lot of times you look at stormwater development and you're
in a floodplain; what are you going to do about it? They're going to bring in fill and bring in one
foot above base flood elevation and do a hydraulic study and determine that this amount of fill is
going to do limited impact downstream. It's a logical process. FEMA isn't going to come in and
say that you built it poorly but you can give them the analysis of why you did it that way. They
don't want people building in areas without taking some mitigation efforts.
Audience: Vulnerability assessment. We're Mary M. Knight School District and I have no idea if
the building could sustain a quake. Am I obligated to have engineering studies or do I just say
we're vulnerable?
Marty Best: It's back to the best available data. Perhaps the county engineer or structural
engineer could come by and say yes or no. I know that your susceptible to wind storms and
hazards; that's why we helped pay for the generators so you could be a place of refuge. But
once again, we don't know of any fault lines out there but we do know that we're susceptible to
zone quakes. Take a look at it; how much damage did you have from the Nisqually? I would use
that as a benchmark. But they're not requiring you to go out and do a detailed Seismic Analysis
of your facitities.
Purget: You're going to be doing some remodeling a section of the 3 building. Have an
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
engineer look at the structurals of it and you could put that in your action plan. If you're going to
be remodeling or adding on and that you will be having an engineer look at how sound it is.
Audience: FEMA will only provide you funds to return something to the way it was prior to what
the disaster did.
Marty Best: I have to strongly agree with you and I have brought this up in a polite and tactful
way. In past disasters we have always said that FEMA will repair to pre-disaster condition or to
adopted current codes and standards. However, in this earthquake someone has changed the
rules and it isn't us. We have been in intense dialogue with the feds in this issue because what
they're doing now isn't what they did before. It is to the detriment to the recovery of the State of
Washington. I can't ask you to lobby but if you happen to address that to other elected officials
that would be good. Part of the rationale is that some of the earthquakes that happened in other
parts of the country, FEMA was paying for stuff that was not even related. For us the pendulum
went back. It used to be that if you had a damaged wall they could take a look at the whole
building. In this earthquake they're saying they can only look at that wall. Even though the
structural integrity of the other three walls might be impacted. We'll mitigate the crack in the one
wall. It's coming back to haunt us.
Here's another reason why I think mitigation planning is so critical and it's ~omething we've been
watching over the last several years and we're seeing even more of it now. Congress has been
on FEMA big time about reducing the costs of disasters. That means let's shift the costs. The
1990's were the decade of natural reduction. Mother nature said phooey and we had more of
the costliness disasters in the history of the nation. We got clobbered. Earthquake projects take
longer to do and FEMA wants to condense that. The costs of disasters do not go away; the
impacts are there and it's just a matter of who is going to pay for them. If you have a good
mitigation plan and if you don't build in hazardous areas or if you do build there you've done it
right, or if you've identified things to help you recover after an event faster then you've already
prioritized and everybody wins. The best way to avoid a hazard is to not build there. Land use
planning helps us reduce the impacts of future mistakes. Understanding that we don't know
everything that we're susceptible to and something may come up but we just do it with the best
available data.
Audience: FEMA is playing with a double-edged sword because they're telling you in the maps
that they're providing you that you can build within certain areas along rivers as long as you
build to a standard that raises the house above a 100-year flood.
Marty Best: First of all, the flood maps were designed initially for insurance purposes; they
weren't really designed for land use planning. However, they have grown into that use. Their
initial concept was that the communities would take the data and update them as they went. But
that hasn't happened because it costs too much money. There is a
FEMA Initiative for $300,000,000.00 to update maps. We desperately need them. You're right;
in one hand they insure people to stay in harms way.
Audience: So where do we go from here?
57
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Marty Best: The first thing I suggest is to sit down with this flyer and get a task force and
analyze what you already have. Identify what you have and get an initial strategy of where you
go from there. Identify where the shortfalls are and identify where the strengths are and build
from there. We are available as much as we can. You're fortunate because I only live about two
miles from here. We'll come to your public meetings and answer any questions you may have. It
behooves us to put as much time in to help you to get a good plan because it's going to help us
in the long run.
Audience: Couldn't hear question from audience ..
Marty Best: Right now ~f they truly extend the deadline you pre-identify some projects. You will
not be hindered or hampered by the lack of not having an adopted plan. Let's say they did not
extend the deadline, November 1, 2003 comes, and a disaster hits on November 2, 2003 and
you don't have a plan and you want to put forth a project, you still can but you agree to do a
plan concurrently with the project. That's actually written into law. I don't believe that FEMA is
going to stop good mitigation steps from going forward unless there's some kind of really
egregious problem. From the Nisqually earthquake, we've had approximately $22,000,000.00 in
funds and during the two rounds we've received probably $600,000,000.00 in potential projects.
So the need is out there.
Audience: Do you prioritize by jurisdiction or do you prioritize by the needs?
Marty Best: By jurisdiction. The reason you do that is that the county may not want to apply for
mitigation funds but you want to because you've already got yours prioritized. Thank you very
much and we hope we've answered your questions.
Final Closing:
Mike Frank: We do have a vulnerability assessment already updated for this year. So we will get
a copy of that out to everybody based on our sign-in sheet. I'm Mike Frank and I am the Deputy
Director for the Division of Emergency Management under the Sheriff's office and the Sheriff is
our Director. We will be facilitating this process for the commissioners and we will want
volunteers to be part of this planning process as we continue on. I think it would behoove all of
us from the different jurisdictions that are involved to have somebody volunteer. We'll get this
vulnerability assessment out to you and you can review that and we'll start getting back to you
to develop a plan of attack. We developed the vulnerability assessment based on previous
assessments in the past but this is a broader involvement and we want any updated information
from each of the jurisdictions. I will be your point of contact or Sandi at OEM. Even though they
are talking about an extension we are going to shoot for this November 1, 2003 deadline. Thank
you all for being here. Meeting adjourned.
Decernber11,2002
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Meeting called to order by Mike Frank of OEM. He opened with the statement, "Let's back up a
little." The reason for this is based on the recent addition of a software program that will assist
the county in the process of the plan.
Following the opening remarks Mike reviewed the bylaws of the proposed 20120 Task Force.
These bylaws were out of the software. Mike asked the questions about the direction of this
work group. It was decided that the committee does not need a formal piece but consensus
with· an was important. The consensus was that Mike was doing a great job as chair. Along
with the consensus would be in the form of a thumb up I down I middle.
Discussion about the committee make-up and question about "Do we have all the players
here?" Sandi L referred us back to Article Ill, Section A- committee make-up. In these
proposed bylaws it talks about two subcommittees. In that subcommittee was a public
information group which would be tasked with going out to other Ports, fire districts, and other
city and county agencies to seek input and invite them to future meetings.
Each entity that receives monies from federal sources must complete a plan.
It was noted that the overall responsibility of this group falls back on the County Commissioners.
• City group members to encourage other City officials to attend and give input
• Mike Frank to talk to County officials about the same
Question from the group about potential funding of this project? Mike stated that we were late
and nothing is available at.this time. We will look into future funding sources for the project.
Question about potential for a part-time staff person to help with the project. In the beginning of
this project that was in the plan. As we move forward in this, monies are gone for that position.
It is noted that the software company stated that it would take an 8-hour-per-day person to do all
the data entry.
A need for a laptap was brought up. We need one to put software on as we only can have one
license. In addition we can use it for PowerPoint presentations around the county. A member
of the group was going to look into a laptap, and it was mentioned that we have a number of
projectors in the county for these presentations.
Mike reviewed the jurisdiction profile; these must be completed by at least 1) City of Shelton,
and 2) unincorporated Mason County.
Committee assignments:
Public Information Committee:
Bob Burbridge, Chair
Tim McKern, Debbie Riley, Bonnie Knight (plus other members of County and City.
Planning Committee:
Dave SalzeriSteve Swarthout, Chairs
Larry Waters, Bob Fink, Steve Kutz, Mike Frank, representative from Red Cross,
Roxie Hildreth from Mason General Hospital, and representative from Public
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Works.
Meetings to stay to one hour.
Public Information Committee to send out future meeting notices.
Email meeting notices a few days before meetings.
Meeting adjourned 0903.
Next meeting: January 151h at 0830.
Attendees:
Bob Fink, Dawn Pannell, Debbera Coker, Larry Waters, Steve Swarthout, Bob Burbridge, Terry
Mihaifov, Steve Kutz, Debbie Riley, Jerry Hauth, Bonnie Knight, Tim McKern, John Williams.
Dave Salzer, Vance Aeschleman, Mike Frank, Sandi Loertscher.
March 12, 2003
Meeting called to order by Chair Mike Frank of OEM.
Introductions were done as we had several new team members.
County Commissioner Herb Baze and City of Shelton Mayor John Tarrant were present and
addressed the group. The focus of this discussion was a need for a LEPC Committee. This
committee advises the City and County Commissioners on matters that are before OEM. The
Hazard mitigation Committee is currently doing just that. In
addition this is a regular meeting and is a natural fit to combine this meeting into the LEPC. Law
requires a LEPC Committee. Commissioner Baze handed out the application for everyone to
complete and turn in.
Chair Frank then reviewed the purpose of the LEPC and the OAC Committees. He also
explained that this should not require more meetings. After a long discussion it was decided to
continue with the review of the Goals and Objectives.
A subcommittee is to work on the resolution that the City and County Commissions will adopt.
In this will include the role of the LEPC and merger of bylaws of this committee and the LEPC.
The committee will meet and send out a draft resolution to committee members prior to the next
meeting.
The meeting ~lan for this committee is every two weeks from 0830-1130. Next two meetings
are March 26 h and April gth.
Bylaws of this group were tabled until the next meeting or until resolution with Commission is
complete.
Boundaries of the Hazard Mitigation Plan will be the Fire Districts. Some of the Hazard
Mitigation Committee members met with the County Fire Chiefs. They informed them of the
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
progress and how items were going to be divided up. They were also invited to attend. We will
continue with communication with all fire and EMS entities.
The group then started at Goals and Objectives #6-10. Only questions was that of a need for a
definition page? That will be looked at later. A draft copy of these goals and objectives will be
sent out.
Meeting adjourned at 1130.
Attendees:
Bob Fink, Larry Waters, Steve Swarthout, Bob Burbridge, Teny Mihailov, Herb Baze, Debbie
Riley, Jerry Hauth, Bonnie Knight, Tim McKern, John Williams, Dave Salzer, Vance
Aeschleman, John Tarrant, Dave Eklund, Bill Tabor, Sandi Loertscher, Mike Frank, and Aaron
Espy.
March 26,2003
Meeting called to order of Chair Mike Frank of OEM.
The following were items on the AGENDA for this meeting:
• Finish Goals and Objectives
• Press release
• Bylaws of the Committee
• Jurisdiction profile
• Homeowners survey
• Meeting time change for April glh meeting
The bylaws committee handed out Chapter 2.19 of the Mason County Plan. In addition to a flow
sheet <:>f projection for the committee structures as they relate to OEM and Mason County. It
was decided to send this back to committee for review and find tune more. In addition they will
get with the City of Shelton and try to reach common terminology.
After a long discussion it was decided to have an EMC Council followed by the rest of the
committee below in a circle. This keeps everything in the middle and equal. This breakdown
will be reviewed again next meeting.
Discussion about the City and County Plan. How do they work together? Can we have just one
plan? The City and County created their plans based on Federal funding. Each plan has they
place in the county. The bottom line is both the City and County will work as one in the event of
a major event.
Red Cross had some questions about the current DAC and its role. They have some insight as
to what is done in Thurston County. It was pointed out that the DAChas a different mix of team
members. This was the main thought for a circle approach tot the committee structure.
Review of the proposed press release. Copies were distributed and input given. This is the
final draft and it goes in the paper next week. In addition Mike Frank showed a few more press
61
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
releases that are in the 20/20 plan. Reviewed the proposed Goals and Objectives for the
Hazard Mitigation Plan. This product will be emailed to all members, and we need to send it
back with comments. The final draft will be approved at the April 9 meeting.
Chair
•
•
•
•
Mike Frank handed out the following items for review and discussion at future meetings:
Jurisdiction profile
Neighborhood characterization form
Survey of homeowners
Critical facility types
Discussion on how to get some of these out to citizens and get them back. Possible
suggestions of a tri-fold handout with tear-off survey. More discussion at next meeting.
Meeting adjourned 11 :27
Attendees:
Bob Fink, Larry Waters, Bob Burbridge, Terry Mihailov, Bonnie Knight, Tim McKern, John
Williams, Dave Salzer, Vance Aeschleman, Dave Eklund, Sandi Loerlscher, Mike Frank, Jayni
Kamin, Wes Johnson, Aaron Espy.
Next meeting: April 9th. NOTE TIME CHANGE: Meeting is from 1pm until3pm.
April 9, 2003
Meeting called to order by Chair Mike Frank of DEM.
The following were items on the AGENDA for this meeting:
• Review of Goals and Objectives for "final Draft"
• Bylaws of the Committee
• Jurisdiction profile
• Critical facility types
Review of the draft goals and objectives: after long discussion it was decided to send them
back out by email and adopt at next meeting.
Bob Fink handed out a draft committee plan; this will go to the County and City Commissions
for their comments. In addition some minor changes were made. This is to be sent out by
email and a final draft at next meeting. In addition Bob and Mike will work with the county and
city to adjust policy on these programs.
Jurisdiction profiles were discussed and areas that need to complete these are the fire districts.
This is based on the fact it was decided to use fire district as boundaries. A committee was
formed to review the jurisdiction profiles questions. Steve Swarthout would like to see more
questions. The committee is Steve Swarthout, Bob Burbridge, and Tim McKern. This will also
be presented at the County Fire Chief's meeting Monday 4/14.
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Question to committee members: if you do not have a binder with committee handouts, let
Mike know and they will make one up.
Meeting adjourned 1500.
Attendees:
Bob Fink, Larry Waters, Terry Mihailov, Tim McKern, John WH/iams, Vance Aeschleman, Les
Watson, Mike Frank, Aaron Espy, Bill Tabor, Steve Swarthout
Next meeting Apri123rd- 0830-1130.
April 23, 2003
Mike Frank reviewed the process the group had gone through over the past six months in
developing a recommendation for a revised committee structure. Bob Fink explained the
function/definition of a Disaster Assistance Committee "DAC". It is basically whatever the local
organizations decide it will be.
It was recommended that a committee, to be known as the Mason County Emergency
Management Council (MCEMC), be established which would incorporate the duties,
roles & responsibilities of the Local Emergency Planning Council (LEPC), Disaster Assistance
Council (DAC), and the Hazardous Material Management Committee(?}, as well as other
emergent needs and requirements. County and City of Shelton Commissioners and the
Emergency Management Directors from both agencies would direct it.
The revised structure as proposed by the committee was reviewed and accepted and will be
recommended to Mason County Commissioners. and the City of Shelton.
The proposed final version of the Goals & Objectives was reviewed and minor changes were
made. MOTION made by Jerry Hauth, SECONDED by Bonnie Knight to accept the Goals &
Objectives as modified. MOTION CARRIED. Copies will be distributed at the next meeting.
Bob Fink will contact the City of Shelton for approval of the new structure and if they concur he
will work with them to develop the necessary documentation, rules & regulations.
A grant application for $50 thousand has been submitted to purchase equipment, provide staff
to visit communities, and gather data required for the jurisdictional profile.
A land use map is available from the county to assist with the profile.
It was noted that the Comprehensive Plan for the Tribes may be different from the county and
should be considered separately. Schools also are mandated to provide a plan directly to the
state but it was agreed that both, while maintaining their autonomy, should be involved in the
MCEMC since they are an integral part of the whole. Simpson Timber and other large entities
will also be contacted to take part in the overall plan.
Mike will contact the schools, will contact Simpson, Bonnie will contact the other port districts,
and Brian? Will contact the Tribes.
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
After much discussion it was agreed that for organizational purposes the jurisdictional profile
would use fire districts as "neighborhoods" since they cover the entire county, there are clear
boundaries and most are already aware of the hazards in their area.
Steve Swarthout is working with the districts to get their support and concurrence. Steve and
Dave Salzer are evaluating the home survey forms.
MOTION was made by Steve Kutz to have the four legal jurisdictions represented in the plan:
Mason County, City of Shelton, and both Tribes if they want to participate. MOTION was
SECONDED and PASSED.
All members were given the assignment to read the critical factors and be ready to discuss them
at the next meeting. The committee agreed that it would be necessary to meet twice a month
on the 2"d & 4th Wednesdays until the committee structure and
foundation work is complete. Meetings will be from 8:30 to 11 :30 am or until the work
scheduled for that meeting is accomplished.
The next meeting is May 14th, 8:30- 11:30 am.
Present:
Mike Frank, OEM, Sandy Loertscher, OEM; Jerry Hauth, MC Public Works; Bonnie Knight &
John Williams, Port of Allyn; Steve Kutz, MC Public Health, Vance Aesch/eman, Red Cross;
Aaron Espy, Mason County Medic One;
Meeting was adjourned.
May 14,2003
DEM-0830
Meeting called to order by Chair Mike Frank of OEM
The following were items on the AGENDA for this meeting
• Review of minutes of previous meeting with (1) change.
• History of the Committee
• Role of the US Forrest Service and Simpson Timber
• Handout Goals and Objectives for mitigation 20/20 Task Force
• Review Committee Structure
• Review and suggest changes to following forms :
+ Jurisdiction Profile
• Homeowner Survey
• Neighborhood Characterization
Introduction- New Team Members
Chair Frank reviewed the Hazard Mitigation 20/20 plan and the four areas this plan is divided
into. City of Shelton, Mason County unincorporated, and two Indian Tribes.
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Johnny Stephens from the US Forest Service and Larry Gill from Simpson Timber were in
attendance. Both of these entities had a hazard plan in place. These entities are important to
the county plan. Keeping them involved will help them with future funding from FEMA.
Chair Frank reviewed the LEPC I DAC Board that formed in 1985. County Commissioners
reviewed and made a change in restructure to form the Emergency Management Council.
Bob Fink reviewed the Council structure. He is waiting for the City of Shelton to give input to the
proposed change. A report will follow at the next meeting.
Steve Swarthout reviewed the survey of homeowners, Jurisdiction Profiles, recommended
changes. Also established that the boundaries would be the Fire Districts, US Forest Service,
etc.
The Homeowners survey to be mass mailed due to lack of staffing, Possible Homeowners
Association.
The neighborhood characterization form needs to be in commercial and residential form.
(A recommendation for the following)
Homeowner survey, not to be sent out and information in form to be included in the jurisdiction
profiles.
We reviewed jurisdiction profiles of the Fire Districts. We are looking for the following in that
profile.
Neighborhood Characterization
Critical Facilities
These are reports that each Fire District must be completed. Steve S to go out to each Fire
District to help with these forms. The FMO is also getting more info for the database.
A review of "What is a critical facility" I Location.
A question to the US Forest service about creating a separate plan? Johnny Stephens to go
back to leaders with an answer.
Simpson Role - They will fit into critical facilities and other plan.
Meeting adjourned 1030
Attendees:
Bob Fink, Larry Waters, Tim McKern, John Williams, Mike Frank, Dave Eklund, Shelley
Hutchinson, Steve Kutz, Bill Tabor, Steve Swarthout, Larry Gill, Johnny Stephens, David
Shephard, Phil Carpenter.
Next Meeting May, 28th 0830-1030
May 28,2003
DEM-0830
Meeting called to order by Chair Mike Frank of DES
65
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
The following were items on the AGENDA for this meeting
+ Jurisdiction Profile- Related Forms (Steve S)
+ Review Committee Structure (Bylaws Committee)
+ Outside Entity roles
+ Update on Pre~Disaster MitigC;ltion Grant (PDM)
Chair Frank reviewed the PDM grant and Tim McKern read the letter from Washington State
EMD. Our grant was reviewed and was sent on to FEMA for a recommendation to fund. In
addition a discussion followed on the use of these funds. The equipment role and management
of this grant process.
The bylaws committee has met and is moving forward the proposed draft plan for the EMC.
Chair Frank has met with City and County officials and all are in agreement with
the plan. The next phase is a proposed draft resolution to go the County and City for adoption. A
draft resolution will be reviewed at the next meeting. The question came up about the role of the
chair and it was decided to leave it as it is.
The Homeowners survey was brought up and what role it had on the plan. The only question
that came up was the need for data as it relates to Insurance and the number of homeowners in
Mason County that have insurance. This would help with the plan, as it would have the greatest
effect on the community. A suggestion that we contact the Washington State Insurance
Commissioner and see what data they have. Sandi L called and is waiting for a call back from
that office.
Jurisdiction Profile- Related Forms (Steve S)- A report from this committee explained that the
related forms are not complete. The committee to review and take to the next Mason County
Fire Chief's Meeting. A report at the next meeting.
Agenda for next meeting
*Update on the committee structure
*Jurisdiction Committee report
*City of Shelton report with the neighborhoods identified
*Insurance Commissioners report
Meeting adjourned 1030
Attendees:
Bob Fink, Larry Waters, Tim McKern, John Williams, Mike Frank, Dave Eklund, Shelley
Hutchinson, Steve Kutz, Steve Swarthout, Larry Gill, Phil Carpenter. Sandi Loertscher
Next Meeting June 11, 2003 0830-1030
June 11, 2003 Minutes
Meeting called to order by Chair Mike Frank of OEM
66
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
The following were items on the AGENDA for this meeting:
o Update on the committee structure
o Jurisdiction Committee report
o City of Shelton report with the neighborhoods identified
o Insurance Commissioner's report
Committee Reports
By-laws Committee handed out a draft Emergency Management Amendments Code Chapter
2.19. This was reviewed with recommendation to take back and make suggestions. This will be
Old Business at next meeting for approval. We will also e-mail this to those not here today. Bob
Fink will send to Tim fore-mailing. Question about the response from City of Shelton. Bob and
Dave Salzer will work on the City plan to this. In addition remember that this will have to go
through the public approval process as all others have gone.
Jurisdiction Profile Committee advised the group that at a most recent Fire Chiefs' meeting that
all Fire Districts are very supportive of this concept. Steve Swarthout will be going out to the Fire
District to assist with data requested.
Old Business
City of Shelton reported that they have a map that defines the neighborhood breakdown. They
are willing to bring a copy to share and put in the Mitigation 20/20 plan.
Sandi L reported that in her research of the Insurance Commissioners Office, they have limitedto-no data as it relates to insurance coverage. Sandi is working with local insurance agents to
find other data. A question about earthquake insurance data. Sandi to review and report at next
meeting.
Update on the Grant that we are receiving. OEM has received a draft contract and will go into
effect in July. Sandi K has been added to another day. Along with the possibility of getting an
AmeriCorp person. What is needed now from all members is the hours and mileage to attend
these meetings. This is be turned into a dollar amount. The reason for this is for our in-kind
match, which is $12,700. We can use volunteer hours and mileage to attend the meetings as in. kind match. This will start on July 1, 2003.
New Business
Committee make-up was discussed. The question about PUD attending, and do we have all the
players here. As we have topics that may have an interest or need a reference than other
communtty groups/entities may be invited.
Chair brought up the Summit GIS Company will develop a map of Mason County if needed.
There will be a fee for this. Possible grant monies can be used for this.
We will need a press release as soon as the resolution is complete. That committee will be
working on a draft soon after next meeting.
Meeting adjourned at 0930.
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
AGENDA for next meeting
o Bylaws Committee final review of Code Chapter 2.19
o Earthquake insurance data
o Jurisdictional profiles
Next meeting June 25, 2003, 0830-1030 at OEM.
Attendees:
Bob Fink, Larry Waters, Tim McKern, John Williams, Mike Frank, Dave Eklund, Shelley
Hutchinson, Steve Kutz, Sandi Loertscher, Vance Aeschleman, Debbie Riley, Bill Tabor, Bonnie
Knight
June 25,2003
OEM -0830
Meeting called to order by Sandi Loertscher of OEM.
It was announced that Mike Frank has resigned and Sandi Loertscher has been appointed to
direct the Division of Emergency Management. Sandi suggested that Jim Ghiglione take over as
chair of the committee since he is City of Shelton emergency manager.
The following were items on the AGENDA for this meeting:
o By-laws Committee Report
o Terrorism Assessment Training- July 16, 2003
o Press Release
o Future Meeting Timelines
Committee Reports
By-laws Committee: Bob Fink presented the final draft of the proposed membership and
organizational form for the new Emergency Management Committee to consolidate the various
emergency committees within the county. Final changes should be referred to Bob. The
information has been sent to all committee members for comments.
Jim Ghiglione announced the Terrorism Assessment training that will occur in Thurston County
in July 16. He proposed that he and Sandi Land Sandi K would represent the various entities in
the county at the training.
Since there was no one present from the information committee, Jim G. will put together a press
release on activities of the committee.
It was agreed that future meetings would be held to an hour to accommodate different
schedules and work demands.
Next meeting July 9th -0830-0930 at OEM
Meeting adjourned 0930.
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
July 9, 2003
DEM-0830
Meeting called to order by Sandi Loertscher of OEM
The following were items on the AGENDA for this meeting:
o Committee Reports
o Grant Update
o Terrorism Assessment Training
o Plan Timeline
Committee Reports
Bylaws Committee: Bob Fink advised the group that the hearing for the proposed changes in
July 22.
Jurisdiction Profile Committee: No report
Public Information Committee: No report
(Note: When hearing is complete a status press release will be put in the paper.)
Old Business
City of Shelton handed in their Jurisdictional Profiles.
Sandi L reported that in her further research of the insurance companies, it was found if they are
mortgaged, the must have insurance. There are 25-30% that have insurance. Most do not have
flood insurance.
Sandi L also mentioned that all Grants would go through OEM and the Region 3 Homeland
Security programs. Also a long discussion about the 9 regions and how they fit with the other
EMS and Fire Regions.
Update on the grant we are getting. Along with a possible Ready*Corps person to assist with
the project. OEM has a draft contract but they want to wait until a signed contract is in hand.
New Business
Sandi handed out Pre-Disaster Mitigation Competitive projects. These are just ideas for projects
to take on. We were asked to review and bring back ideas to next meeting.
A Time line for the All Hazard Mitigation Plan was completed.
o
WORK PLAN ITEMS
Starting date for planning cycle
MILESTONE DATE
9/27/2002
69
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
Complete Jurisdiction Profile
Complete facility/neighborhood vulnerability assessments
Submit Mitigation Initiatives
Final Steering Committee review/approval of proposed
Initiatives
Submit Final Plan to jurisdictions/organizations for
approval
Scheduled ending date for planning cycle
Plan submitted to State for review
9/1/2003
11/1/2003
1/1/2004
2/1/2004
3/1/2004
4/30/2004
6/1/2004
Meeting adjourned 0930
Next meeting July 23rd -0830-0930
Attendees:
Bob Fink, Larry Waters, Tim McKern, Dave Eklund, Shelly Hutchinson, Steve Kutz, Sandi
Loertscher, Vance Aeschleman, Debbie Riley, Bill Tabor, Bonnie Knight, Jim Ghiglione, Sandi
Kvamstrom, Terry Mihat7ov.
July 23, 2003
OEM -0830
Meeting called to order by Jim Ghiglione
Approval of minutes: Corrections mentioned and approved
The following were items on the AGENDA for this meeting
o Committee Reports
o Grant Update
o Terrorism Assessment Training
o Plan Timeline
o City of Shelton Jurisdictional Profiles
o EOP Plans review and update
Committee Reports
Bylaws Committee: Bob Fink stated the hearing for the proposed changes to resolution was last
night (July 22, 2003.) Input would be forwarded to the Sheriff.
Jurisdiction Profile Committee: Steve Swarthout reported that the Fire Districts would be
receiving additional copies for them to complete and return.
Public Information Committee: No Report
(Note) Need a press release for the Equipment Grant we are going to receive. Needs to be
complete
Old Business:
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
City of Shelton has submitted their Jurisdictional Profiles; however, there are questions yet to
be answered.
Ready Corps program: Sandi L reported that they have interviewed a person that worked in
Thurston County. She will be a great asset to the team.
Long Discussion about regional OEM plan I equipment. Concern over who will take the lead for
the equipment. Sandi L mentioned that the entities that are earmarked for these items must let
her know if they are not wanted.
New Business:
Terrorism Assessment meeting in Thurston County; Jim Ghiglione, Sandi Loertscher, and Sandi
Kvarnstrom attended. Some committee members have homework prior to the next meeting.
Sandi L handed out a 2001 Vulnerability Assessment. This has not changed much and any
changes will be addressed at the next meeting.
Attendees:
Bob Fink, Larry Waters, Tim McKern, Shelly Hutchinson, Steve Kutz, Sandi Loertscher, Vance
Aeschleman, Bill Tabor, Jim Ghig/ione, Sandi Kvarnstrom, Terry Mihailov, Jayni Kamin, Steve
Swarthout
August 13, 2003
OEM -0830
Meeting called to order by Sandi Loertscher
Approval of minutes: approved after one change (City of Shelton has submitted)
The following were items on the AGENDA for this meeting
CJ Committee Reports
CJ Grant Update
CJ Plan Timeline
CJ Region 3 Meeting Agenda review
Committee Reports
Bylaws Committee: Bob Fink stated the hearing for the proposed changes to resolution
extended to August 19, 2003
Jurisdiction Profile Committee: Steve Swarthout reported that the Fire Districts would be
receiving additional copies. Sandi K reported she has a few back but it against a short timeline
to put them into the plan. Steve S suggested a fill out your profiles night at OEM. This might get
the Fire Districts to bring them in.
Public Information Committee: Welcome back Bob Burbridge!!!!!
(Note) Need a press release for the Equipment Grant we have received. Needs to be complete.
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Old Business:
Terrorism Assessment information was discussed and those entities that had homework on this,
i.e., EMS, Fire, Law Enforcement, turned them in.
New Business:
Region 3 Meeting Agenda was discussed a length. Jim G, Sandi L, and Sandi K will be
attending at noon today. There is concern as to the mission and movement of this committee.
The attendees asked for input and direction. It was decided to have this on the Agenda for each
of our meetings. After long discussion it was decided to ask for
continued input into the committee and not to add more members to the Region 3 committee.
Attendees:
Bob Fink, Tim McKern, Steve Kutz, Sandi Loertscher, Vance Aeschleman, Jim Ghiglione,
Sandi Kvamstrom, John Tarrant, Steve Swarthout, Bob Burbridge, Dave Eklund, Bonnie Knight,
Todd Barr, Debbie Riley
Next Meeting August 2th, 2003 0830 DEM
August 27, 2003
Meeting called to order by Sandi Loertscher
Approval of minutes; approved after change that Sandi chaired the meeting of August 13.
The following were items on the AGENDA for this meeting
IJ Region 3 meeting review
IJ Committee reports
Sandi opened with a review of the Region 3 meeting. The following were topics that were
discussed
• Council membership - it was decided to leave the current membership as is and to have
a representative from each county to make up a subcommittee. In addition two work
committees have been formed
1. training/exercise
2. equipment
• Interlocal agreements - a draft agreement was handed out with a recommendation back
to this committee at the next meeting
• Administrative cost reimbursement - Sandi handed out a contract face sheet
• If anyone wants to present something to Region 3 committee they must submit it
through the local DEM office
• Sandi went over the sub-grants that were approved
• Bylaws were handed out in draft form with input and recommendation back to next
meeting
• We need one representative from each County jurisdiction to serve on the following
committees
1. Training/Exercise
Bob Burbridge
Tim McKern
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
2. Equipment
Mike Akin
Public Information Committee - we need a press release on the grant we received and we need
. updates to go to the County and City officials
Attendees:
Tim McKern, Steve Kutz, Sandi Loertscher, Vance Aeschleman, Sandi Kvamstrom, Jdhn
Tarrant, Steve.Swarthout, Bob Burbridge, Dave. Eklund, Bonnie Knight, Debbie Riley, Larry
Waters
Next Meeting September 10th, 2003 0830 OEM
September 10,2003
DEM-0830
Meeting was called to order by Jim Ghiglione
Introductions: Aaron Espy, Larry Waters, Amber Bachus, Richard Night, Steve Whybark, Terry
Davenport, Mike Akin, Steve Kutz, Sandi Loertscher, Vance Aeschleman, Jim Ghiglione, Sandi
Kvarnstrom, Bob Burbridge, Dave Eklund, Bonnie Knight and Debbie Riley.
Minutes were approved
Reports:
Public Information Committee - copies of the proposed press release were handed out.
Request was made for corrections, additions or deletions.
Status of neighborhood profiles- Sandi K reported that it was going well. The city is done; the
county is almost done.
Jurisdictional profiles from the Tribes - Sandi K reported that profiles are still needed from both
Tribes
Critical facilities profiles - clinics have been added, electronic copies will be available as an
addendum to the plan.
August 27th Region 3 meeting - ali-day workshop at Griffin Fire Station
• The outcomes and bylaws were handed out
• The minutes from the August 13th meeting were handed out
• Sandi L went over the makeup and purpose of the council and reminded the committee
that all interlocal agreement changes are due by October 31 for December final
approval
• Subcommittee assignments were made
1. Planning/policy- Bonnie Knight and Aaron Espy
2. Training/exercise - Bob Burbridge and Tim McKern
3. Equipment - Richard Knight, Mike Akin and possibly Jim Robinson
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
•
In a discussion about John Taylor's position with the Region, the committee agreed that
his position should be similar to other contract positions rather than a Thurston
County employee. The original belief was that Thurston County would be a conduit
for the money and the person would be allowed to do what we (all of the
jurisdictions) needed him to do. This has not been the case. The committee wants
the person in this position to be accountable to the Council for his work product, not
to a peer in Thurston County, and if Thurston County's structure cannot allow this to
happen, they should look to housing him in another location. Bonnie Knight made a
motion that the four jurisdictions from Mason County should pursue getting John's
position renegotiated in the next contract to be accountable to the Region 3 Council
and be moved to a location that allows him to meet the needs of all of the members
of the Council. Steve Kutz seconded the motion. Motion carried unanimously.
Citizen Corps -Amber Bachus was introduced. Amber will be working with schools and other
established groups and large events.
Discussion about pending federal changes including new licensing requirements by the FCC
were discussed. It was pointed out that all new licenses and renewals must be for narrow band
after 2004.
Next meeting September 24, 2003
September 24, 2003
Meeting called to order by Sandi Loertscher
Approval of minutes: approved after change
(Richard Knight is on the equipment sub committee)
The following were items on the AGENDA for this meeting
1:1 Committee Reports
1:1 Status of Neighborhood Profiles
1:1 Status of Jurisdictional Profiles from Tribes
1:1 Status of Critical Facilities Profiles
1:1 Review of Goals and Objectives for 20/20 Mitigation Plan
1:1 Review of September 1oth Region Ill meeting
1:1 WA State Homeland Security Institute
Committee Reports:
Public Information Committee: A press release went out and was printed. There were some
concerns about the direction the article went. It was decided that all press releases will go
through the Sheriff first and he will send them to the press in the future.
Sandi K reported that the Neighborhood Profiles are just about complete.
All Jurisdictional profiles are complete with the exceptions of the Tribes.
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Critical Facilities profiles still pending we have a number of them in and still have a few more to
get.
It was noted that the EOP plan has been updated and DEM is sending them out in disk form.
Anyone wanting one and they have not been delivered in about two weeks contact DEM.
Old Business
Sandi L handed out the Goals and Objectives for the Mitigation 20/20 plan. She would like the
committee to review this and compare it to past copies. This will be discussed at next meeting.
New Business
Region 3 Meeting of September 10 was discussed at length. Some key items that were
discussed:
·
+ John Taylor will remain in place as the RERC until March 2004. This is a positive move for
Mason County. John has provided a number of reports for the County along with reviewing
EOPplans.
+ John will be contacting the Sub-Committee members for a meeting. Those committees will
be Training I Exercise, Equipment, Plans I Policy.
+ The other big item is the creation of the WA State Homeland Security Institute. This will be a
program of creating classes for the region on various homeland security issues.
+ Our attendance and input in these Region meeting have been very helpful.
On Friday September 26th Sandi L and USGC will meet with the County Commissioners to
discuss the Earthquake Fault in Mason County. The outcome of this meeting will be discussed
at next meeting
Attendees:
Bob Fink, Tim McKern, Steve Kutz, Sandi Loertscher, Vance Aeschleman, Jim Ghiglione,
Sandi Kvarnstrom, Steve Swarthout, Bob Burbridge, Dave Eklund, Bonnie Knight, Debbie Riley,
Mike Akin, Terry Davenport, Bill Tabor, Mike Evans, Steve Whybark
Next Meeting: October 8th, 2003 0830 DEM
October 8, 2003
Meeting called to order by Jim Ghiglione.
Approval of minutes: approved.
The following were items on the AGENDA for this meeting
a Committee Reports
a Status of Neighborhood Profiles
a Status of Jurisdictional Profiles from Tribes
a Status of Critical Facilities Profiles
a Goals and Objectives for 20/20 Mitigation Plan
a Review and Recommendation for potential hazards
75
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
o
o
o
o
o
Review of October 81h Region Ill meeting
Mason County qualifies for Citizen Corps funding
Sub-Committee reports
Jurisdictional Request for Reimbursement
lnterlocal Agreement and Bylaws revision
Committee Reports
Public Information Committee: No info at this time. A plan for future press releases was
discussed. Along with this was the inclusion of the Sheriff into the approval process.
Sandi K reported that the Neighborhood Profiles are just about complete. Jim G asked to send
the info in electronic form to him and he will bring it to the Chiefs meeting.
The Tribes have not turned anything in yet, Sandi to continue to work with them on a finished
product.
All Jurisdictional profiles are complete with the exceptions of the Tribes ..
Critical Facilities profiles still pending we have a number of them in and still have a few more to
get.
Old Business
The mitigation 20/20 goals and objectives were discussed along with a review of Potential
Hazards list. The following were a list of potential hazards in no order of importance:
Earthquake, Dam Failure, Epidemic I Bio-Terrorism, Forest Fire I Wildfire, Landslide/Erosion,
and Storm.
Several members attended a meeting where it was discovered that several earthquake faults
were found. There were several other faults that are being looked into. This information will be
an asset to the committee planning.
New Business
October 81h Region Ill meeting
o
o
o
o
Mason County qualifies for Citizen Corps funding
Sub-Committee Reports: All Committees have meetings planned for next few weeks.
Report at next meeting.
Jurisdictional Request for Reimbursement- $5571 to Mason County
lnterlocal Agreement and Bylaws Revisions
Attendees:
Bob Fink, Tim McKern, Steve Kutz, Sandi Loertscher, Vance Aeschleman, Jim Ghiglione, Sandi
Kvamstrom, Steve Swarthout, Bonnie Knight, Debbie Riley, Mike Akin, Bill Tabor, Steve
Whybark, Roxie Hildreth, Larry Waters
Next Meeting October 22nd, 2003 0830 DEM
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
October 22, 2003
(No minutes on file for October 22)
November 12, 2003
Meeting called to order by Jim Ghiglione.
Introductions.
We had a presentation from Applied Digital Mapping. This was a program that was previously
presented at the County Chief's last month. This type of program has great merit. There were
many facets of this program. The entire county can use the program. Pre-Fire, Critical Facilities,
Emergency Management etc.
Some of the tools for this type of system are already complete. OEM has the critical Facilities
along with a regulatory reform of GSAB 34.
This is a new technology for the future.
Cost is $4900 plus a cost of $100 payable to DNR that has the aerial photos that are 7x7-sq.
mile.
Jim G reviews and brought the presentation together. He mentioned homeland security monies
that are available for such a project.
Jim G reconvened the meeting with Sandi K handing out the critical facilities list. She asked that
we review this and comment back on them. Those agencies that have not submitted them were
asked to do so as quickly as possible.
Jim G reviewed the Region 3 items that were going to be discussed. Only comment back to
Region 3 is the fact that they need to give more notice for sub-committee meetings along with
cancellations.
Attendees:
Tim McKern, Steve Kutz, Sandi Loertscher, Jim Ghiglione, Sandi Kvarnstrom, Steve Swarthout,
Bonnie Knight, Debbie Riley, Mike Akin, Bill Tabor, Steve Whybark, Steve Swarthout, Mark
Weston, Linda Arnold, Ed Pierson, Terry Davenport, Fred Cook, Dick Taylor, John Tarrant
Next Meeting November 26, 2003 0830 OEM
November 26, 2003
Meeting called to order by Sandi L
Approval of Previous Minutes
77
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Sandi K reported we are still moving forward with the critical facilities from the Fire Districts. We
need this info ASAP. The end of this process is near. If your critical facility is not listed it may
not be eligible for funding in the future.
We have lost our Mason General representatives to this committee. This is an important group
to this committee. We will continue to ask the hospital for a representative.
We are getting $500 more for Citizen's Groups
Region Ill -The sub-committee are meetings and the future looks like they are going to hire (2)
coordinators, Coastal- Pacific I Grays Harbor Inland- Mason, Thurston, Lewis. In addition to
hire a Training and Exercise Coordinator along with a Admin Asst. This is in the planning
process based on funding that appears to be coming down to the State.
Report from the Equipment and Training Sub-Committee: They are moving forward with a grant
application for training and equipment funds. In addition they are putting a primary goal for the
first year of bringing everyone up to WMD awareness level. The next goal after that this year will
be a needs assessment for counties that have equipment with no one trained to use it. The
committee's will meet in January to finalize the forms and assessment that is going out.
Question and answers about this mitigation 20/20 plan and it's status.
No December meetings unless needed. Next meeting in January 14, 0830
Attendees:
Vance Aeschleman, Bob Burbridge, Dave Eklund Tim McKern, Sandi Loertscher, Sandi
Kvarnstrom, Steve Swarthout, Debbie Riley, Bill Tabor, Steve Whybark, Steve Swarthout, Terry
Davenport,
Next Meeting January 14, 2004 0830 DEM
January 14, 2004
Meeting called to order by Jim Ghiglione.
Jim introduced Martin Best frdm Washington State EMD; he is responsible for hazard mitigation
grants, planning and much more. Introductions were complete.
Region '3 reports
o Training and exercise - the committee met in December and the focus of that meeting
was a recommendation to bring all fire responders up to the WMD
awareness level. In addition a long discussion was held about the current equipment
that all counties have and the need for training on that equipment.
o Equipment - met in December as well. The focus of this committee was a grant request
that was handed out.
o Policy and procedure -they have met regularly and are assisting with the focus of the
group.
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Overall comments by committee members were that communication from Region on meetings
was limited at best. It was asked for OEM to forward any notices of meetings that appear on the
website.
·
Region 3 is moving on with hiring two geographical coordinators (inland and coastal), a training
coordinator and an administrative assistant.
Sandi K handed out the next phase of the Mitigation Plan; we have three forms that need to.be
reviewed and started. We will discuss these at the next meeting. They are to be completed by
February 11 1h. The forms go along with the critical facilities list that we provided. They are:
a Hazard Identification and Risk Estimation
a Facility Vulnerability Assessment
a Neighborhood Vulnerability Assessment
Comments from the group were the need for the P/R committee to continue with news releases
about the committee's plan and performance issues.
Attendees:
Vance Aeschleman, Bob Burbridge, Dave Eklund, Tim McKern, Sandi Loertscher, Sandi
Kvarnstrom, Steve Swarthout, Bill Tabor, Terry Davenport, Larry Waters, Martin Best, Diane
Stillman, Bonnie Knight, Tammi Clark, Mike Akin, Steve Kutz, Aaron Espy, Bob Fink
Next meeting January 28, 2004 - 0830 at OEM
January 28, 2004
Meeting called to order by Jim Ghiglione.
Introductions were completed. Guests were Martin Best and John Taylor, Region 3 Program
Manager.
Sandi K reviewed the handouts from the last meeting. She asked for any questions and
reminded all entities that they are due back completed at the next meeting.
There was some concern from the committee about involvement with others that are not
involved. We must keep things moving and hope that others can see what accomplishments
are being made and they will get on-board as well.
John Taylor reviewed the Region 3 plan and where it is going. John recommended that we
compile a list of needed data from those entities not involved. Region 3 may help
with this process. He also mentioned that schools are now in the plan for committee
involvement, and it is important to get participation from all districts.
John handed out the Region 3 Grant and Survey application. This is due back to the Region by
February 15th.
John stated that Region would have a total of five people on board by February 16. John is to
be the program manager, They are using CEMP's as guides to help develop annexes and work
with all hazards in addition to working with law enforcement and fire on grants. Marty brought
up that the Mitigation Plan is not in the CEMP.
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
All plans up to and including mitigation, CEMP, and assessments are all managed by OEM and
the Region.
Region 3 Training and Exercise- will be meeting around February 25 to discuss the grants.
Region 3 Equipment -this committee will be meeting jointly with the training and exercise
committee.
Region 3 Policy and Procedures- they have met regularly and are assisting with the focus of
thee group.
Committee members are encouraged to review updates on the website.
John Taylor stated Region 3 would be provided a storage unit for the equipment that is being
stored at DEM for the fire service. This storage is until training has occurred and the equipment
can be used.
It was recommended to start the next meeting at 0800 due to long meetings. Everyone agreed.
Attendees:
Vance Aeschleman, Dave Eklund, Tim McKern, Sandi Loertscher, Sandi Kvarnstrom, Steve
Swarthout, Bill Tabor, Terry Davenport, Larry Waters, Marty Best, Diane Stillman, Bonnie
Knight, Mike Evans, John Taylor.
Next meeting February 11, 2004.
February 11, 2004
Meeting called to order by Jim Ghiglione.
AIC Ken Boad from Mason District 2 put on a PowerPoint presentation about their CRT
program. District 2 is requesting money through the Region 3 CERT funds. He will also be
putting this presentation on at the Region 3 meeting today.
Region 3 - The training and Exercise and Equipment Committees will meeting on Feb 25 to
review the grant applications that are being turned in to Region 3.
After a brief discussion it was decided to go back to 0830 start times for the meetings.
We had a work session to review the critical facilities and make adjustments to this list. This
would take some of the proposed critical facilities and make them essential or hazard facilities.
This work session took some time and will be ongoing.
Marty best gave a brief overview of the Mitigation 20/20 program. He stated this has some
good points but needs some work. He reviewed what is needed for the new plan.
At future meetings we will be having work sessions like this to bring closure to our plan needs.
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Attendees:
Dave Eklund, Tim McKern, Sandi Loertscher, Sandi Kvarnstrom, Steve Swarthout, Bill Tabor,
Larry Waters, Martin Best, Diane Stillman, Mike Akin, Bob Fink, Jim Ghiglione, Steve Kutz.
Next meeting will be February 25, 2004-0830 at OEM.
February 25, 2004
Call to Order: by Sandi L at 0830
Sandi opened by reviewing how Region 3 functions and requests for all hazards equipment and
training to go through OEM for this equipment.
Sandi L handed out a project 20/20 timeline. And the fact that we are behind.
Region 3 Sub Committees: Sandi K asked that all committees need to bring back Mason County
specifics from those committees back to this committee.
Concern from committee that we have equipment stored in a leaky building and why can we not
get it fixed.
Equipment: Joint meeting on Feb 25 for all committees to review grant request.
Training and Exercise: Joint meeting on Feb 25 for all committees to review grant request.
Polices and Procedures: Joint meeting on Feb 25 for all committees to review grant request.
Old Business
Critical Facilities Sandi K handed out the revised Critical Facilities List. Then Sandi went down a
reviewed the critical facilities. Note that cell towers are essentials not critical. This based on the
fact that we have limited control over them,
Mitigation 20/20 Plan: Sandi L handed out timeline and this will continue to be a high
Priority at future meetings.
Attendees:
Tim McKern, Sandi Loertscher, Sandi Kvarnstrom, Richard Knight Larry Waters, Mike Akin,
Ken Boad, Steve Kutz, Debbie Riley, Jim Ghiglione, Greg Metzcus, Everett Tyrell, Howard
Armfield, Steve Whybark, Vance Aeschleman, Bob Burbridge,
March 10, 2004
Call to Order
Sandi K opened the meeting (work session) she reviewed the past few meetings and the critical
facilities realignment to essential/ hazards.
Larry Waters have reviewed some of the critical facilities and will forward information back to
Sandi K for input. In addition Larry will give input to the risk level reviews.
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Mason Connty Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
A letter is being drafted to all the critical facilities letting them know that they are listed with
county as this. This letter will advise them if they have a concern and want to be considered
critical from essential they will need to attend future meetings.
The remainder of the meeting was a discussion about risk levels for facilities and
neighborhoods.
This process is an important part of the planning tool. Sandi K will enter this data and get back
to us with the remainder of information that is required in the program.
Attendees:
Dave Eklund Tim McKern, Sandi Loertscher, Sandi Kvarnstrom, Steve Swarthout, Bonnie
Knight. Larry Waters, Martin Best, Mike Akin, Mike Evans, Jim Ghiglione, Steve Whybark, Ken
Boad, Vance Aeschleman, Diane Stillman Marty Best
Next Meeting March 24, 2004 0830 OEM
March 24, 2004
Call to Order by Sandi K
Announcements:
June 22 there is a Region 3 tabletop from 9-4 starting from local level to the region. More info
at later meetings.
No Vulnerability assessments for PUD 1 or 3
US I state highways - should coordinate with other agencies.
Sandi K handed out the guideline that State OEM uses for review of local hazard mitigation
plan.
Sandi K handed out updated Critical Facilities by jurisdictions.
Sandi K opened today work project with Hazard Identification and Risk Estimation this is only for
the County and the City ,two tribes.
Region 3 Sub Committees:
Equipment: Next meeting is the 19 April.
Training and Exercise: No report
Polices and Procedures: No report
Attendees:
Tim McKern, Sandi Loertscher, Sandi Kvarnstrom, Steve Swarthout, Bonnie Knight, Larry
Waters, Martin Best, Mike Akin, Dave Salzer, Dick Taylor, Ken Boad, Bob Fink, Steve Kutz,
Debbie Riley.
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
No meeting on Apri114. Next meetings for April are 4/21 and 4/28 at 0830.
Sandi K needs to Hazard Identification and Risk Estimation back to her by email by April
9.
April 21, 2004
Call to Order by Sandi K
Announcements:
• Region 3 Homeland Security has received a proposal from Lewis I Thurston County for a
new plan for distribution of grant funds. This is a more local control plan. This plan will be
reviewed and voted on today at the 1200 Region 3 meeting.
• Region 3 Table top is June 22
• There is a decontamination equipment class to be held in May. Agencies need to get names
to Sandi L ASAP.
Region 3 Sub Committees: All Committee meetings were postponed until action on the funds
distribution plan is voted on.
New Business
Mike Akin asked for an lnteroperability Communication Committee to be formed. He is going to
send out letters to all parties interested in serving on this committee.
Sandi K distributed and reviewed Hazard Identification and risk estimation for City of Shelton
and Squaxin. The Counties is pending and will be reviewed at the April 28th meeting.
Sandi K distributed the Characterization of Proposed Mitigation Initiatives for the Mitigation
20/20 plan. After discussion it was decided to review this and work on at the April 28 meeting.
Sandi K distributed scores by jurisdiction and all facilities vulnerability scores.
It was decided by the committee due to short timeline for completion of the plan that the meeting
of April 28th will start at 0830 and will be a work session to last until complete. Lunch will be
provided. ( Sandi K needs to have confirmation by Monday August 26 noon so she can order
you lunch.)'
MEETING Reminder: April 28, 2004 0830- Complete (lunch Included). Note: Please call Sandi
K by 1200 Monday 4126. Every agency must be there. This is a very important meeting please
plan to attend or send a decision maker.
Attendees:
Tim McKern, Sandi Loertscher, Sandi Kvarnstrom, Richard Knight, Larry Waters, Mike
Akin, Ken Boad, Steve Kutz, Debbie Riley, Jim Ghiglione, Greg Metzcus, Everett Tyrell,
Howard Armfield, Steve Whybark, Vance Aeschleman, Bob Burbridge. May 12, 2004
Call to Order .by Jim Ghiglione @0837
83
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Announcements:
Sandi L mentioned that any agencies that have a request for Region 3 must go through OEM.
Nothing goes direct .to Region 3. Sandi L is concerned that all requests go through OEM and
this council. There are a number of cities that want on the Region 3 council. The group has
concerns with this proposal. Sandi L brought up a concern about proposed CERT programs.
The Red Cross has a training plan for the CERT program. In the future the Red Cross can
assist in this training.
The tabletop exercise will be on June 22 at OEM. Orientation Meeting is May 18 @ OEM.
Region 3 Sub Committees: No Meetings for any Committee
Old Business
Critical Facilities - Completed
Mitigation 20/20 Plan: Sandi K had little to say 0fi/OW); plan is being completed. We are no
longer using the 20/20 plan and are moving forward with a complete plan.
Public Education (News Release): Bob Burbridge will be getting one together for us and will
forward on to the committee.
New Business: The month of May will continue on the regular every other week meeting. In
June we may go to once a month. It appears our timelines have slowed down.
Attendees:
Tim McKern, Vance Aeschleman, Mike Akin, Bob Burbridge, Rob Fink, Diane Stillman, Sandi
Kvarnstrom, Sandi Loertscher, Steve Swarthout, David Pearch, Greg Metzcus.
Next Meeting May 26, 2004
May 26,2004
Call to Order by Jim Ghiglione @ 0830
Announcements:
The Draft Agenda of the Mitigation plan was discussed. This plan is due to State OEM by Friday
of next week. The mitigation plan should be complete for now. We will review this annually and
every 5 years for complete review. Mayor Tarrant thanked all for the hard work. All entities feel
very conformable with the process.
Sandi L discussed the Region 3 web sites, which includes the WMD awareness on-line training.
This training will be about 4 hours on-line. We are also looking into a class for the larger
departments so we can mass instruct WMD awareness.
Region 3 Sub Committee reports::
Equipment- None
Training and Exercise - Meeting June 2 at Mason County OEM time - 1000 At this meeting
they will be discussing the table top set for June 22 and the Big event planned for March 2005.
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Sandi reviewed the training requested by Mason County a total of 2256 will be trained in WMD.
Question about timeline for completion of this project is March 31, 2005.
Polices and Procedures - None
Old Business - None
New Business - None
Attendees:
Vance Aeschleman, Mike Akin, Joel Mentor, Ken Boad, Dave Eklund, Jim Ghiglione, Sandi
Kvarnstrom, Sandi Loertscher, Tim McKern, Debbie Riley, Steve Swarthout, John Tarrant, Larry
Waters, Gary Metzcus, Dave Pearch.
Next Meeting June 9, 2004
85
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
AppendixC
PLANS ON FILE
Mason County
Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan with Terrorism Annex
Washington State Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan
Robert T. Stafford Emergency Assistance and Disaster Relief Act
City of Shelton
Comprehensive Emergency Management Plan with Terrorism Annex
Squaxin Indian Tribe
Emergency Action Plan
Skokomish Indian Tribe
Emergency Action Plan
86
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
VULNERABILITY
Mason County is not in close proximity to a fixed nuclear site. The possibility of some type of
nuclear exchange does exist. Mason County would not be considered a target area but is
located close to targeted areas. There are no fallout shelters and little indoor space to place
refugees. Mitigation efforts on the local level would involve having written material available on
fallout shelters and have individuals trained in radiological monitoring.
Nuclear accidents/incidents involving facilities in Kitsap County or the transportation of materials
through Mason County could have an impact on the communities in near proximity to them.
Emergency plans and procedures need to address the county's response and recovery
activities, regardless of the probability of such occurrence.
TERRORISM
Terrorism is defined as the use of force or violence against persons or property violating the
criminal laws of the United States for purposes of intimidation, coercion, or ransom. Terrorists
often use threats to create fear among the public; try to convince citizens that their government
is powerless to prevent terrorism; and try to get publicity for their causes.
A terrorist attack can take several forms depending on the technological means available to the
terrorist, the nature of the political issue motivating the attack, and the points of weakness of the
terrorist targets. Bombings are the most frequently used terrorist method in the United States.
Other possibilities include attacks upon transportation facilities, utilities or other public services,
or incidents involving chemical or biological agents. The Federal Bureau of Investigation
categorizes terrorism in the United States as one of two types: domestic or international
terrorism.
Domestic terrorism involves groups or individuals whose terrorist activities are directed at
elements of our government or population without foreign direction, such as the Oklahoma City
bombings and the series of domestic attacks and bank robberies in 1995 in Spokane by a militia
group.
International terrorism involves groups or individuals whose terrorist activities are foreign based
and/or directed by countries or groups outside the United States or whose activities transcend
national boundaries, such as the attack on the World Trade Center in 1993, and the recent
attack on New York's Twin Towers and on the Pentagon.
IMPACT
The impact of terrorism can vary significantly from massive loss of life and property damage to
nuisance service interruptions. Threatened services include power, water supply, public
transportation, communications and public safety.
VULNERABILITY
The type of terrorist act would determine vulnerability. This could include a large portion of the
population or infrastructure with the destruction of a major power distribution line, a pipeline, or
the contamination of a municipal well or a small segment with a bomb threat to a business or
10
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
environment that can harm population, animals, and food supplies.
Hazardous chemicals are used for a variety of purposes and are regularly transported through
Mason County. Ammonia is used as a refrigerant, in agriculture, and in wastewater treatment.
Chlorine is used in wastewater treatment, water systems, swimming pools, and in the paper
industry. Propane is widely used as a fuel. U.S. Highway 101 is the transportation corridor for
transportation of hazardous materials to the rest of the Olympic Peninsula. State Highway 3 and
Burlington Northern provide the transportation routes for, to, and from Kitsap County.
Hazardous materials include those used in manufacturing, household chemicals, crude oil,
petroleum products, pesticides, paints, medical waste, fertilizers, etc.
IMPACT
Major spills and accumulations from minor spills or unsafe disposal could cause long-term
damage to resources such as water, forests, or beaches. Spills could cause population
evacuation, unsafe working or living conditions, unemployment or economic impact.
VULNERABILITY
Virtually every household and business in the county stores and uses varying amounts and
kinds of hazardous chemicals.
Hazardous chemical shipments, bulk users, wholesalers and retailers are managed in
accordance with federal and state law. They must submit an annual Tier II report as to type of
hazardous materials on their premises. (See Attachment I)
Chemical spills, primarily oil and fuel spills, occur in Mason County on both land and water.
Ha?:ardous material spills are a regular occurrence in Mason County. The smaller spills are
most often petroleum products or illegally disposed of household materials. The increase in the
number of methamphetamine related incidents in the County indicate an increase in this activity
and the threat this poses to emergency responders, the community and the environment.
Small amounts of non-regulated chemicals usually in the form of household materials are
routinely disposed of by dumping them into the environment through waste collection systems
or directly into the ground or water.
The potential for a catastrophic spill of bulk hazardous chemicals exists. Due to the lack of a
Class A Hazardous Materials Response Team, the county is placed at moderate risk in the
event of a major spill.
NUCLEAR
Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and the Naval Submarine Base at Bangor are both located in
Kitsap County. Puget Sound Naval Shipyard stores spent fuel rods and decommissioned
nuclear submarines. The Submarine Base at Bangor is the home of the Trident submarine, a
nuclear powered submarine.
10
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
A failure at the Cushman Dam would result in extensive property damage and loss of life.
Tacoma City Light, the owners and operators of the dam and hydroelectric project, carefully
monitor the dam and maintain updated emergency plans as well as hold emergency exercises.
Local authorities are responsible for warning and evacuation should a breach occur.
A breach in Anderson Dam at Lakeland Village could create a threat to approximately 25
residences downstream.
Casad Dam in Kitsap County could affect residents along the Union River if there was a breach
to this dam.
VULNERABILITY
Mason County is vulnerable to dam failure. To assure dam safety, the State Department
of Ecology inspects all dams. in Mason County and requires safety plans from the owner of each
dam in the county.
History indicates a low probability of dam failure in Mason County. The failure of a high hazard
dam would threaten an important segment of the county suggesting moderate vulnerability.
Because the major dams within the county are well maintained and operated provides no
reason to anticipate a compromise in the structural integrity other than from a major natural
disaster or from terrorist actions there is a low risk assigned.
MASON COUNTY DAMS
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
Anderson Lake Dam
Bennettsen Lake Dam
Buck Lake Dam
Christine Lake Dam
Cranberry Lake Stormwater Detention Dam
Cushman Dam #1
Cushman Dam #1 - Spillway Head works
Cushman Dam #2
Fawn Lake Dam
Haven Lake Dam
Lakeland Village Pond No. 1
Leprechaun Lake Dam
Lake Limerick Dam
Little Twin Lakes Dam
Melbourne Lake Dam
Rosand Dam
Timberlake Dam
Trask Lake Dam
Uddenberg Dam
West Lake Dam
HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENT
Chemical hazards are created when there is a release of toxic agents into the atmosphere and
10
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Mason County experienced some ash fall but no reported loss.
IMPACT
Ash fall from the eruption of Mount St. Helens ranged from non-existent to light in Mason
County. It did not cause any significant damage. It is unknown if an eruption of Mount Rainier
would have a direct impact upon the County, but it could cause a major disruption to
transportation of supplies if the main corridors of transportation were affected.
VULNERABILITY
Mason County is at low risk for significant threat from volcanic eruption.
Man-Made Hazards:
CIVIL DISORDER
Civil disturbance or unrest is the result of individuals or groups within the population feeling their
needs or "rights" are not being met by society, a segment of it, or the current political system.
Civil unrest spans a variety of actions including labor unrest, strikes, civil disobedience,
demonstrations, riots and rebellion. Events that could trigger these actions include racial
tension, unemployment, unpopular political actions, and a decrease in the supply of essential
goods or services.
Mason County has experienced no significant incidents of local civil disorder or disturbance.
IMPACT
There is little likelihood of significant impact in the County.
VULNERABILITY
History suggests a low probability of occurrence and low vulnerability.
DAM FAILURE
Dam failure may be caused by flooding, earthquakes, poor construction, lack of maintenance
and repair, improper operation, or acts of vandalism or terrorism.
IMPACT
Dam failure could result in loss of life and damage to property including structures,
transportation routes, utilities, agriculture and aquaculture. Depending on location, dam failure
could result in a lowered tax base, lack of power profits or other significant economic loss.
Mason County has twenty (20) dams that are listed with the State Department of Ecology.
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
water 30 feet of more in height. Debris can be deposited up to 1000 feet inland. A large tsunami
can cross the entire Pacific in 24 hours.
There is some debate as to whether or not a tsunami could be generated in the Puget Sound by
a local or offshore earthquake.
High waves, usually caused by wind and storm activity have battered the Puget Sound in the
past and must also be considered a hazard to Mason County.
IMPACT
Much of Mason County is surrounded by water. Although there is no record of tsunami activity in
the South Puget Sound area, the Pacific Coast has been threatened several times. A strong
earthquake below either Puget Sound or Hood Canal could cause damaging waves, which
could impact residences built along the shorelines. The most significant damage would be
similar to those created during abnormally high tides in the region.
VULNERABILITY
Mason County is at low risk for significant threat from these events.
VOLCANOS/ASH FALL
Mount Rainier is the most dangerous volcano in the Cascade Range because of the large
population and the huge area and volume of ice and snow on its slopes that could melt to
generate debris flows during a catastrophic eruption. Each of the five major rivers, the Carbon,
White Cowlitz, Nisqually and the Puyallup flows westerly. Each, with the exception of the
Cowlitz, empties into Puget Sound near Tacoma. The Cowlitz flows into the Columbia River and
then into the Pacific Ocean. Much of the lowland to the east of Tacoma and the south of Seattle
is formed of pre-historic debris from Mount Rainier.
Volcanic eruptions can cause damage in Mason County primarily by ash fall. The probability of
ash fall depends on wind direction and the volcanic source of the eruption causing the ash fall.
Most of the dangers are to persons in the near vicinity of the volcano. Other dangers, such as
mudflows and ash fall, may exist miles downstream and down wind. The most recent was the
1980 volcanic eruption of Mount St. Helens in the Cascade Mountain Range. This eruption
claimed 57 lives and cost approximately one billion dollars in damage.
In the last 515 years, Mount St Helens is known to have produced 4 major explosive eruptions
(each with at least 1 cubic kilometer of eruption deposits) and dozens of lesser eruptions. Prior
to its latest eruption, there were more than 10,000 earthquakes in the vicinity, hundreds of small
steam-blast explosions, and the outward growth of the volcano's entire northern flank by more
than 80 meters. A magnitude 5.1 earthquake struck beneath the volcano at 8:32A.M. on May
18, setting in motion the devastating eruption. Within seconds of the earthquake, the volcano's
north flank slid away in the largest landslide in recorded history. The explosion swept across the
landscape as fast as 1,1 00 kilometers per hour. Temperatures were as high as 300 degrees
Celsius within the blast. A gigantic plume of ash reached 19 kilometers into the sky and
approximately 490 tons of ash was carried across 57,000 square kilometers of the Western
United States.
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
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The path of these lows determines their effect locally. The more southerly ones bring heavy
rains while the northerly ones bring cold air and the potential for snow and ice. Any winter storm,
regardless of its trajectory, can create high winds. Winds above 30 miles per hour can cause
widespread damage and those above 50 miles per hour can be devastating.
IMPACT
Since 1972 Mason County has experienced fifteen severe storms. Twelve lead to Federal
Disaster Declarations. Most of these events were a combination of wind, heavy rain, snow or ice
and the accompanying flooding. The most recent event that impacted all of Mason County was
the ice and windstorm of December 1996.
High winds can cause widespread damage to trees and power lines and interrupt transportation,
communications, and power distribution. Prolonged heavy rains cause ground saturation, rivers
and streams to rise, and result in flooding and landslides.
Ice storms occur when rain falls out of a warm atmospheric layer into a cold one near the
ground. The rain freezes on contact with cold objects including the ground, trees, structures,
and power lines, causing buildings to collapse and power lines to snap. Isolated residents
without power are more likely to be impacted due to power outages and the time it takes to
restore power. Some rural residences were without power for over two weeks during the ice
storm of 1996.
VULNERABILITY
The entire county is vulnerable to the effects of a storm. There is a very high probability and
risk of a storm impacting Mason County again. Historical damage and cumulative costs of
destructive storms indicates a high vulnerability.
TSUNAMI/ HIGH WAVES I SEICHES
Tsunamis are sea waves generated by seismic activity, underwater volcanic eruptions, meteor
impacts, or landslides. Every enclosed body of water has a number of natural resources. If you
sit in a partially full tub of water and rock back and forth you will find that at the right time you
can easily get the waves to grow until they overflow the bathtub. The resonant oscillation of the
water is a "seiche". A seiche can occur not only on the southern portion of Hood Canal or Puget
Sound but also on lakes, reservoirs, or any other enclosed body of water.
During the Northridge earthquake of 1994, swimming pools all over Southern California
overflowed. During the Anchorage earthquake in 1964, swimming pools as far away as Puerto
Rico were set into oscillation. This quake also caused a serious tsunami along the Washington
coast, resulting in $105,000 in damage, which is based on 1964-dollarvalue.ln 1994, a tsunami
warning was issued for the Washington coast due to a magnitude 8.1 earthquake off Russia's
Kurillslands.
Large Pacific Ocean tsunamis have wave crest to wave crest distances of 60 miles apart and
can travel at speeds of 450 to 600 miles per hour in the open ocean. As the waves reach the
shallow water of the shoreline, the waves are slowed which forces the water to form walls of
97
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Landslides are influenced by' human activity (mining and construction of buildings and
highways) and natural factors (geology, precipitation, and topography).
The identification of dormant slides areas is important as earthquakes or unusually wet winters
can reactivate them. High land movement areas can be identified on or at the base of slopes; in
or at the base of minor drainage hollows; at the base or top of an old fill slopes, at the base or
top of a steep cut slope.
Erosion refers to the gradual removal of soil through wind or water action. Erosion may be
induced or increased by failure to use ground covers to protect soil from wind or drainage
systems to allow good dispersal of storm water. Slopes on waterfront can also be severely
undercut by normal water flow, wave action, or large waves produced by storms.
IMPACT
Mason County experiences landslides every year with most of them causing much less damage
than others. The areas that typically hand landslides are along U. S. Highway 101, North shore
Road, Trails Road, and U. S. Highway 106.
Severe slides may affect travel routes to the extent that economic loss results. This loss can be
particularly severe on tourists and businesses dependent upon recreational type activities.
Uncontrolled water flow frequently causes erosion, which in turn can cause landslides. The
effects of erosion are usually much less dramatic than landslides, but the final results may be
more costly.
VULNERABILITY
Mason County is subject to soil erosion due to wind, water and flooding at all times of the year.
Mason County continues to be impacted by landslides and erosion issues with each new winter
storm. Soil erosion continues to occur during wind and rainstorms.
The most significant effects of landslides are the disruption of transportation and the destruction
of property.
Mason County has identified slide hazard areas and required geo-technical investigation and
preventative improvements before development can take place on top of or below slopes
subject to sliding.
Mason County remains highly vulnerable to landslides due to the impact of rain, snow, and
windstorms.
STORM
Destructive storms come in several forms: wind, rain, ice, snow or a combination. Any winter
storm can pack high winds and heavy rain causing widespread damage. High winds of short
duration, such as tornadoes and strong gusts from thunderstorms, can also be destructive
though generally not as widespread.
Nearly all destructive local storms occur from November through April when the jet stream is
over the west coast of the United States and Pacific low-pressure systems are more frequent.
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
humans. Form of ignition is usually cigarettes, fireworks and outdoor burning. Wildland fires
started by heat spark ember cause the largest dollar loss, followed by debris burning and
cigarettes. Loss per incident for debris fires is three times higher than any other fire cause.
IMPACT
All areas of Mason County have the potential for fires. The impact of a major fire would be
significantly increased by the loss of the vegetation, which helps prevent landslides, runoff and
flooding. There would be loss to property owners, the logging industry, wildlife and wildlife
habitat, watersheds and the community infrastructure. There would be an immediate impact
upon the economy due to loss of jobs and reduction of tax revenue.
VULNERABILITY
Mason County has a moderate to high risk for a forest fire occurring. The increase in population,
increased recreational activities, large amounts of public and private forestland and the
changing climate all increase the potential for a forest fire/wildfire.
HEAT WAVES
A heat wave is characterized by five or more consecutive days of unusually hot weather. The
National Weather Service considers hot weather for Mason County to be 90 degrees or higher.
There has not been a heat wave in Mason County. The unpredictable weather of recent history
and the possibility of global warming suggest the possibility in the near future. The heat waves
that hit the Chicago area during July of 1995 were responsible for more than 450 deaths and
numerous heat-related injuries. Several extra refrigeration facilities had to be rented by hospitals
in the area whose morgues were full due to the fatalities.
IMPACT
Most residences in Mason County do not have air conditioning because of the mild marine
climate. Senior citizens, infants and those who are ill would be most susceptible to heat and its
effects. Those living alone without a caregiver would be even more susceptible.
VULNERABILITY
Due to the mild marine climate there is a low probability for or risk of a heat wave in Mason
County.
LANDSLIDE/EROSION
The term "landslide" refers to the downward movement of a slope or masses of rock, soil or
other debris under the force of gravity. Slides.range in size from thin masses of soil a few yards
wide to deep-seated bedrock slides. The form of initial failure commonly categorizes slides, but
they may travel in a variety of forms along their paths. This travel rate may range in velocity
from a few inches per month to many feet per second, depending largely on slope, material and
water content.
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
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Floods may result in loss of life as well as damage to residences, business establishments,
public buildings, roads and bridges, utilities, agricultural land, fish and shellfish habitats, stream
banks and flood control structures.
Gravel and silt build-up from logging activities and natural causes increase the possibility of
flooding as the streams fill with silt and debris, which divert their course.
The Tahuya River is creating problems for individuals who own summer homes along that river.
The debris that is carried by the river during flooding and the increased water flow are eroding
the banks of the river.
·
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers indicated after the 1996-1997 winter storm that the
frequency of a groundwater flood disaster is approximately every 25 years. The winter storm
created the first widespread groundwater-flooding event since 1972.
VULNERABILITY
Flood vulnerability is the likelihood of something to be damaged by a flood. Generally, it is
measured by how much something will be damaged as a percentage of its replacement value.
There are tw<;> things that determine vulnerability to a flood. The first is the tendency of physical
things to get damaged. The second is the potential loss of function from losing certain elements
of a community because of a flood.
Mason County will always be vulnerable to flooding, especially in the areas surrounding the
major rivers. Because mitigation efforts in the form of buyouts and the elevation of homes along
the Skokomish River, the monetary impact to both the property owners and the taxpayers has
been basically eliminated. Flooding along this river has become more of a nuisance than a
major threat.
Mason County experiences flooding every year, which indicates there is a very high probability
of it continuing. Because a large percentage of the county's population chooses to live along
water bodies and the population continues to grow, the county is exposed to more impact due to
this category of disaster. The increased frequency of flooding, the potential for the major rivers
to flood simultaneously, plus the county's record for property damage put it at a level of high
risk.
FOREST FIRES/WILDFIRE
A forest fire is considered to be any uncontrolled burning within a forested area and uncontrolled
and hard to extinguish burning in grassland, brush or woodland.
Fires are most likely to occur during the local dry season, which is normally from mid-May
through October or any time during prolonged dry seasons. The impact from these fires is
dependent upon weather, fuel, and ignition factors. They are usually extinguished while still
small, but can spread to over 100,000 acres and require thousands of fire personnel several
weeks to extinguish
Wildland fires responded to by city and county fire departments are most often started by
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
environment, which is not favorable to many of the world's most contagious diseases; our low
population density; clean water and food supplies; effective sanitation; availability of inoculations
and monitoring provided by public health officials. This does not make the county immune to the
potential for a disease outbreak.
IMPACT
During the influenza epidemic in 1918-1919, an estimated 20 million people died. The polio
epidemic in 1946 killed approximately 25,000 people in the United States. The Legionnaire's
Disease outbreak in Philadelphia claimed 30 lives. Due to our mobile society and the threat of
terrorism there is growing concern that no one will be safe from the spread of diseases.
VULNERABILITY
Everyone is vulnerable to an epidemic. There could be short or long term impact and massive
loss of life. Devastating impact on the economy and on essential public safety and health
services would be an issue.
Mason County has a low probability of a major outbreak but because the potential is so great
there is a moderate risk for an epidemic.
FLOODING
Flooding is the most common hazard occurring in Mason County. Heavy, prolonged rain in the
fall, winter or spring months often results in saturated ground and high stream flows. Unusually
warm temperatures may cause the snow pack to melt quickly, running off to overflow and fill
streambeds. The three rivers in the county, which cause the most problem, are the Skokomish,
Tahuya and Satsop. The county can expect two to five or more flooding events during the
typical year.
Some floods are termed "flash floods" as they build quickly, move swiftly and carry debris in a
raging torrent. The Skokomish River is now considered to be a "flash flood" river due to the build
up of debris and silt in the riverbed.
Tidal flooding is also possible along the inland water. Extremely high tides accompanied by low
atmospheric pressure, runoff or wind can cause tidal flooding along Hood Canal.
Groundwater flooding occurs when the water table is high and there is persistent heavy rain.
Water collects in any natural depression when the soil can no longer absorb the water.
IMPACT
The Skokomish Valley and the Skokomish Indian Reservation are subject to periodic flooding
from the Skokomish River accompanied by tidal floods at the river's mouth. This river is
dammed upstream, posing special problems if Tacoma Public Utilities must release water at
their hydroelectric project when the river is at or near flood stage. The problem is compounded if
there are exceptionally high tides during this time. Careful monitoring by Tacoma Public Utilities
with warnings through dispatch, local fire services and the Mason County Division of Emergency
Management are necessary to warn the residents of flood danger.
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
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VULNERABILITY
Mason County has a high probability to experience another damaging earthquake within the
next 25 years. Since 1870 there have been 6 earthquakes, which have been magnitude 6.0 or
greater. Population and development have increased and without mitigation efforts we can
expect higher loss due to greater exposure. Mason County is at high risk for earthquake
damage.
IWashinQton State Sh:mificant Earthquakes
rnme
PST)
Date
Location
December 14, 1872
North Cascades
l2140
December 12, 1880
Puget Sound
l2040
~pril 30, 1882
!Olympia
area
l2248
November 29, 1891
1521
Puget Sound
March 6, 1893
1703
Southeast Washington
Uanuarv 3, 1896
Puget Sound
l2215
March 16, 1904
~020
!Olympics, Eastside
Uanuary 11 , 1909
1549
Puget Sound
~ugust 18, 1915
0605
North Cascades
Uanuary 23, 1920
Puget Sound
l2309
Uuly 17, 1932
l2201
Central Cascades
Uulv 15, 1936
November 12, 1939
~pril29, 1945
February 14, 1946
~pril13, 1949
~uaust 5, 1959
April 29, 1965
February 13, 1981
April 13, 1990
January 28, 1995
May 2, 1996
June 23, 1997
July 2, 1999
February 28, 2001
~308
~346
1216
1914
1155
1944
Kl728
~209
12133
1911
l2104
1113
1743
1054
!Southeast Washington
Puget Sound
Central Cascades
Puget Sound
Puget Sound
Northwest Cascades
Puget Sound
South Cascades
Deming
17.6 km NNE of Tacoma
10.2 km ENE of Duvall
5.5 km NE of Bremerton
8.2 km N of Satsop
17.6 km NE of Olympia
Depth
Kml
Shallow
Deep
Shallow
Mi:!_gnitude
7.4
5.5
p.O
5.0
f4.9
5.7
5.3
Deep
~.0
~.6
Shallow
~.2
Shallow
Deep
§_.7
§_.7
5.5
5.5
f40
~.3
~4
r?' .1
@_5
~3
7
5
16
7
7.4
41
§2.4
§/5
5.5
p.O
5.0
5.3
~.9
5/1
6.8
EPIDEMIC
Epidemics are outbreaks of disease that affect, or threaten to affect, a significant portion of a
population in a relatively short period of time. Although usually referring to human contagious
disease, epidemics can also affect domestic and wild animals and crops. Epidemic diseases are
usually introduced into an area from remote regions and inflict devastation because there is no
natural or induced immunity.
There has been no epidemic reported in Mason County. This is probably due to our
92
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
environment, which is not favorable to many of the world's most contagious diseases; our low
population density; clean water and food supplies; effective sanitation; availability of inoculations
and monitoring provided by public health officials. This does not make the county immune to the
potential for a disease outbreak.
IMPACT
During the influenza epidemic in 1918-1919, an estimated 20 million people died. The polio
epidemic in 1946 killed approximately 25,000 people in the United States. The Legionnaire's
Disease outbreak in Philadelohia claimed 30 lives. Due to our mobile societv and the threat of
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
VULNERABILITY
Mason County has a high probability to experience another damaging earthquake within the
next 25 years. Since 1870 there have been 6 earthquakes, which have been magnitude 6.0 or
greater. Population and development have increased and without mitigation efforts we can
expect higher loss due to greater exposure. Mason County is at high risk for earthquake
damage.
Washington State Significant Earthquakes
fTime
ItPST)
Date
Location
North Cascades
December 14, 1872
~140
December 12, 1880
Puget Sound
~040
Mril30, 1882
!Olympia
area
~248
November 29, 1891
1521
Puget Sound
March 6, 1893
1703
Southeast Washington
January 3, 1896
PugetSound
~215
March 16, 1904
!Olympics, Eastside
~020
January 11 , 1909
Puget Sound
1549
t.ugust 18, 1915
North Cascades
P605
.J_anuary23, 1920
Puget Sound
~309
July 17, 1932
Central Cascades
~201
July 15, 1936
November 12, 1939
April29, 1945
February 14 1946
April 13, 1949
August 5, 1959
April29, 1965
February 13, 1981
April 13, 1990
January 28, 1995
May 2, 1996
June 23, 1997
July 2, 1999
February 28, 2001
~308
~346
1216
1914
1155
1944
P728
~209
~133
1911
~104
1113
1743
1054
~outheast Washington
PugetSound
~entral Cascades
Puget Sound
PugetSound
Northwest Cascades
Puget Sound
~outh Cascades
Deming
17.6 km NNE of Tacoma
10.2 km ENE of Duvall
~-5 km NE of Bremerton
8.2 km N of Satsop
17.6 km NE of Olympia
Depth
'Km)
Shallow
Magnitude
7.4
Deep
~.5
~.0
Shallow
~-0
f4..9
1
~.7
5.3
Deep
Shallow
Shallow
Deep
40
54
35
63
7
5
16
7
7.4
41
52.4
~.0
~.6
5.5
5.2
~.7
5.7
~.5
~.3
7.1
p/5
6.5
5.0
~.0
~.3
4.9
6/1
6.8
EPIDEMIC
Epidemics are outbreaks of disease that affect, or threaten to affect, a significant portion of a
population in a relatively short period of time. Although usually referring to human contagious
disease, epidemics can also affect domestic and wild animals and crops. Epidemic diseases are
usually introduced into an area from remote regions and inflict devastation because there is no
natural or induced immunity.
There has been no epidemic reported in Mason County. This is probably due to our
92
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Mason County has a high probability of experiencing drought conditions. An extended period of
drought for the area is low due to the marine climate. Actual drought conditions have been
limited even during extended dry spells. As the county continues to grow and the natural
resources are more heavily impacted there may be an increase in vulnerability. Mason County
is at moderate risk to experience drought conditions for an extended period of time.
EARTHQUAKES
Earthquakes are one of nature's most damaging hazards. An earthquake is a sudden motion or
trembling that is caused by a release of strain accumulated within or along the edge of the
earth's tectonic plates. The severity of these effects is dependent on the amount of energy
released from the fault or epicenter. They usually occur without warning and after just a few
seconds can cause massive damage and extensive amount of casualties.
Each year, since 1980, the Pacific Northwest Seismograph Network has recorded an average of
more than a thousand earthquakes in the Pacific Northwest. The three most damaging
earthquakes in Washington State occurred in 1949, a 7.1 magnitude earthquake near Olympia;
1965, a magnitude 6.5 quake between Seattle and Tacoma, which killed 15 people and caused
more than $200 million in damage in several counties; and 2001 ,a magnitude 6.5 quake
northeast of Olympia, which caused damage estimated to be in excess of $1 billion.
There is a possibility of three different types of earthquake threats to Mason County. A number
of earthquakes have occurred within the downward thrusting Juan de Fuca Plate. Many are
located beneath Puget Sound. Seismologists speculate that an earthquake within this plate
could be as large as magnitude 7.5. The second type is the shallow earthquake under the
Puget Sound basin within the overlying North American Plate. Historically, the most damaging
events occur at depths of 15 to 60 miles in the subduction plates. These are the least likely to
occur but they could reach magnitude 9+. An earthquake of this magnitude would probably be
located off the coast and has the potential of causing considerable damage hundreds of miles
away from the epicenter.
Earthquakes cause damage by strong ground shaking and by the secondary effects of ground
failures and tsunamis. The strength of ground shaking generally decreases with the distance
from the earthquake source. Shaking can be much higher when earthquake waves are
intensified by bedrock and then pass through softer earth materials such as sediment. Olympia
is a good example of this amplification occurring and the ground shaking was much stronger
there than in other areas.
Ground failure caused by earthquakes includes fault rupture, ground cracking, landslides, rock
falls, liquefaction and uplift. Faults do not often rupture through to the surface. Unstable ground
is mostly at risk of the other effects. Any of these failures will affect structures above or below
them.
IMPACT
The damage could range from minimal to catastrophic, depending on the magnitude of the
earthquake and the degree of preparedness. Damage could range from minimal structural
damage to extreme loss of life and destruction of property.
91
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Earthquakes
Epidemics
Floods
Forest Fires/Wildfires
Heat Waves
landslides
Severe Storms
Tsunami, High Tides, Seiches
Volcanoes
Man-Made Hazards:
Civil Disorder
Dam Failure
Hazardous Materials Incident
Nuclear Incidents
Terrorism
A. Natural Hazards:
DROUGHT
A drought is defined as "a period of abnormally dry weather sufficiently prolonged and severe
enough to reduce soil moisture, water and snow levels to drop below the minimum levels
necessary to sustain animal, plant and economic systems."
IMPACT
Western Washington has been affected during 11 drought periods since 1902. Three of these
were during extended dry periods: Aprii1934-March 1937, October 1976-September 1977 and
October 1991-September 1994. This indicates an interval of occurrence of less than 10 years.
The possibility of drought exists in Mason County. Normally, yearly rainfall is about 66 inches in
the lower elevations while it may be 200 inches or more in the higher etevations of the Olympic
Forest. However, several consecutive, hot, dry summer months can create parched and tinder
dry conditions.
During periods of drought municipal systems and private wells experience reduced water
availability. This is mostly the result of declining aquifer levels. Water tables also experience
noticeable decline. Residents are then notified to conserve. Brown lawns, water rationing, and
having to ask for water in restaurants have done more to make people aware of the potential for
drought in this state than have the problems of farmers and loggers in the past.
Potential impacts can be decreased ability to provide hydroelectric power; impact upon fish
resources; shutdown and loss in the timber industry; potential for wildfires; closures to
recreational areas. Problems are created for municipal and private water supplies.
VULNERABILITY
90
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
County is a recreational area, the population during summer weekends can approach 100,000.
A. ECONOMY
The top employer in Mason County as of 2000 is Simpson Timber Company with 845
employees and the Washington Corrections Center and the Shelton School District are in
second place with 650 employees each. The average household income in 1997 was $35,419,
compared to the state average of $41,715.
B. TRANSPORTATION
U.S. Highway 101 is the County's major north/south highway. This scenic route skirts the Hood
Canal on its western banks and then circles the Olympic Peninsula. State Highway 3 connects
Shelton and Belfair and into Kitsap County.
The County is also bisected north/south by the Burlington Railroad. This railroad line services
Kitsap County. Simpson Timber Company has a railroad line which travels east/west through
the County.
Because of the easy access to the salt water there are numerous small marinas throughout the
County.
Sanderson Air Field is located just north of Shelton's city limits. This airfield provides services
primarily to the private aviation community.
Northwest Pipeline Corporation has a natural gas pipeline that parallels US Highway 101 as it
enters Mason County from Thurston County. A feeder line branches off this pipeline just
southwest of Shelton and then crosses to State Highway 3 which it then parallels until it reaches
Kitsap County.
IV.
HAZARDS
Mason County, due to its location and geological features, is vulnerable to the damaging effects
of major natural and technological hazards. Events may occur at any time and may create
varying degrees of damage and economic hardship to individuals, businesses and the
governmental departments in Mason County.
Potential and actual hazards are shown in the attached sections. The sections are divided into
natural and technological hazards. The hazards are listed alphabetically under each division;
no inference should be made as to severity or probability of occurrence.
A POTENTIAL HAZARDS FOR MASON COUNTY
Potential All Hazards for Mason County is arranged in two categories: Natural hazards and
Man-made Hazards. A list of those events, within their categories are presented below:
Natural Hazards:
Drought
89
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
in the Olympic Mountains and flows through the County before reaching the Great Bend of the
Hood Canal. The Hamma Hamma River runs east near the Mason/Jefferson boundary before
reaching the Hood Canal. The Satsop River, which is in the southwestern portion of the County,
flows into Grays Harbor and eventually the Pacific Ocean.
Two hundred thirty beautiful lakes dotMason County. The most popular are lake Cushman,
Mason lake, Timberlakes, Spencer Lake, Lake limerick, and lake Isabella. Earthen dams are
commonplace in Mason County. The lake Cushman hydroelectric project has two large,
concrete dams supporting the Tacoma Public Utilities power plants at Lake Cushman and near
Hoodsport.
Elevations range from sea level to 6,000 feet in the majestic Olympic Mountains. Mason
County's topography was heavily influenCed by glacial activity. After the ice retreated, the more
mountainous areas in the county's interior evolved into dense forestland.
Much of the native vegetation consists of conifers, maples, alder and evergreen shrubs that
make up the under story. Soil conditions include wetlands, the fertile delta-like farmlands of the
Skokomish Valley, rocky mountainous conditions, and poor soils with varying proportions of
sand, gravel, loam, and clay.
C.
CLIMATE
Mason County enjoys a moderate marine climate with an average temperature in January of
31.7 degrees Fahrenheit and in July of 77.6 F.
During the winter rainfall is usually light to moderate. Rainfall which is intense or which lasts for
several hours will create flooding which is Mason County's major cause for local disaster.
The average yearly rainfall is 64 inches. The months of October through March provide the most
precipitation. July is normally the driest month. Average snowfall is 8.2 inches at the lower
elevations and up to 44 inches in the lake Cushman area.
Ill.
DEMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS
The total population of Mason County for the year 2000 is 49,405 with a growth rate of 28.9%
since the 1990 census. The city of Shelton is the only incorporated city in the county and has a
population of 8, 154, as of the year 2000.
Most population growth takes place in the rural, unincorporated areas of Mason County with
Belfair and numerous lakeside developments attracting many newcomers. Mason County
The total population of Mason County for the year 2000 is 49,405 with a growth rate of 28.9%
since the 1990 census. The city of Shelton is the only incorporated city in the county and has a
population of 8, 154, as of the year 2000.
Most population growth takes place in the rural, unincorporated areas of Mason County with
Belfair and numerous lakeside developments attracting many newcomers. Mason County
serves as a bedroom community with many residents commuting to Bremerton, Olympia,
Tacoma, and even the Seattle area. The county also attracts many retirees. Since Mason
88
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Appendix D
HAZARD IDENTIFICATION VULNERABILITY ANALYSIS (HIVA)
FOR
MASON COUNTY
I.
INTRODUCTION
The Hazard Identification Vulnerability Analysis (HIVA) is an element of an All Hazard mitigation
effort allowing emergency managers to set goals according to the public need for protection.
This document enhances public and private agency understanding and awareness, influencing
the adoption of hazard mitigation programs. The findings revealed in the Hazard Vulnerability
Analysis also serve as a basis for preparedness as well as influencing effective response and
recovery programs.
This analysis covers hazards most threatening to Mason County as determined by history,
geologic projections and social and technological trends. There are no hazards unique to the
County, the Skokomish and Squaxin Indian Tribes, or Mason County Fire Protection District 2
and 5.
II.
GEOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS
A.
GEOGRAPHY
Mason County is located in Western Washington on the southeastern portion of the Olympic
peninsula. Shelton, the County seat, is 25 air miles southwest of Seattle, Washington, 15 air
miles northwest of Olympia, WA, and 53 air miles northeast of the Pacific Ocean beaches at
Westport, WA. Geographically, Mason County is divided into four sections: The City of Shelton
and adjacent areas south, east and northeast; The communities of Belfair and Tahuya in the
north; the upper Hood Canal areas around the community of Hoodsport; and the west and
southwest areas around the Matlock community. Based on this geographical makeup, floods,
slides, liquefaction, and/or severe storms could isolate portions of the county for several days.
Mason County has fourteen fire districts in the unincorporated county, four port districts, six
school districts and a conservation district. There are two tribal areas: the Skokomish
Reservation along the southwestern Hood Canal and the Squaxin Reservation in the south
county.
B.
TOPOGRAPHY
The total area of Mason County is 1,051 square miles, with 961 square miles of land and 90
square miles of water. It ranks twenty~ninth in size among Washington counties. The saltwater
area, which makes up most of Mason County's 90 square miles of water, includes portions of
Puget Sound and Hood Canal. Two thirds of Hood Canal is in Mason County. The Skokomish,
Hamma Hamma, Tahuya, and the east fork of the Satsop constitute the major rivers in the
county. The Skokomish is the longest and most powerful river in Mason County. It begins high
87
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
government agency.
Mason County receives bomb threats at county facilities and schools periodically, but is at low
risk for a terrorist attack.
10
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
ATTACHMENT I
SARA TITLE Ill FACILITIES
2002
TIER TWO REPORTS
CRK000022930
Shelton
CRK000048380
Shelton
CRK000003750
Shelton
CRK000042640
Elm a
WAD988501557
Shelton
WAD988522272
Shelton
CRK000007040
Hoodsport
WA0000137604
Shelton
CRK000042280
Shelton
CRK000042160
Shelton
WAT540011061
Hoodsport
WAD000641282
Belfair
WAT540011400
Shelton
AM. TWR Kamilche
9 Ml South of Shelton
Sulfuric Acid
WSDOT
W. 633 Dayton- Airport Rd.
Fuels
Tacoma DPU Cushman
1451 HWY 101
Fuels
3914 Fish Hatchery Rd.
Bingham Crk. Hatchery
Fuel/Formalin
WA. State Patrol
631 Dayton Airport Rd.
Fuel
Shelton City Shop
1000 W. Pine St.
Fuel
FerreiiGas
19920 HWY. 101
Propane
E. 3620 Johns Prairie Rd.
Central Shop
Antifreeze/Lube Oil
CMS-2Asphalt Emulsion/
CRS-2 Asphalt Emulsion/
Coherex/Fuels
Courthouse
419 North 4TH Street
Fuels
Jarrell's CV Marina
220 E. Wilson Rd
Fuel/Propane
Hoodsport COO
121 Schoolhouse Hill Rd.
Lead/Sulfuric Acid
23650 St. Route 3
Belfair Co PE 26099
Lead/Sulfuric Acid
Shelton CO
522 W. Railroad Ave.
Lead/Diesel/Sulfuric Acid
10
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
AppendixE
HAZARD IDENTIFICATION VUlNERABiliTY ANAlYSIS (HIVA)
FOR
CITY OF SHElTON
I.
INTRODUCTION
The Hazard Identification Vulnerability Analysis (HIVA) is an element of an All Hazard mitigation
effort allowing emergency managers to set goals according to the public need for protection.
This document enhances public and private agency understanding and awareness, influencing
the adoption of hazard mitigation programs. The findings revealed in the Hazard Vulnerability
Analysis also serve as a basis for preparedness as well as influencing effective response and
recovery programs.
This analysis covers hazards most threatening to City of Shelton as determined by history,
geologic projections and social and technological trends.
II.
GEOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS
A.
GEOGRAPHY
City of Shelton is located in Western Washington on the southeastern portion of the Olympic
peninsula. Shelton, the County seat, is 25 air miles southwest of Seattle, Washington, 15 air
miles northwest of Olympia, WA, and 53 air miles northeast of the Pacific Ocean beaches at
Westport, WA. City of Shelton is positioned 47.21 degrees north of the equator and 123.10
degrees west of the prime meridian.
City of Shelton has one fire department and one police department. In the surrounding areas of
unincorporated Mason County there is a port district, five school districts and a conservation
district. There are two tribal areas: the Skokomish Reservation along the southwestern Hood
Canal north of Shelton and the Squaxin Island Reservation south of Shelton.
B.
TOPOGRAPHY
The total area of City of Shelton is 10.56 square kilometers, with 9.799 square kilometers of
land and .761 square kilometers of water. It is the only incorporated city in Mason County. We
are located on Oakland Bay and are connected to the Puget Sound via Hammersly Inlet.
Goldsborough Creek is the only main "river'' that runs through town into the Oakland Bay.
However there are two more creeks; Canyon Creek flows into Shelton Creek which drains into
Hammersly Inlet. Elevations range from sea level to approximately 225 feet on the surrounding
hillside neighborhoods. City of Shelton's topography was heavily influenced by glacial activity.
After the ice retreated, the more mountainous areas in the county's interior evolved into dense
forestland.
10
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Much of the native vegetation consists of conifers, maples, alder and evergreen shrubs that
make up the understory. Soil conditions include wetlands, and poor soils with varying
proportions of sand, gravel, loam, and clay.
C.
CLIMATE
City of Shelton enjoys a moderate marine climate with an average temperature in January of
31.7 degrees Fahrenheit and in July of 77.6 degrees Fahrenheit.
During the winter rainfall is usually light to moderate. Rainfall which is intense or which last for
several hours will create flooding which is the City of Shelton's major cause for local disaster.
The average yearly rainfall is 64 inches. The months of October through March provide the.most
precipitation. July is normally the driest month. Average snowfall is 8.2 inches in town and up to
44 inches in the higher elevations north of the City.
Ill.
DEMOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS
The City of Shelton is the only incorporated city in Mason County and has a population of 8,422,
as of the year 2000. The total population of Mason County for the year 2002 is 49,405 with a
growth rate of 28.9% since the 1990 census.
Most population growth is taking place in the rural, unincorporated areas surrounding the City of
Shelton, however, a significant amount of this growth is taking place within the City limits and
our Urban Growth Area (UGA), identified in our Comprehensive Plan and in line with the Growth
Management Act (GMA). The City of Shelton serves as a bedroom community with many
residents commuting to Bremerton, Olympia, Tacoma, and even the Seattle area. The county
also attracts many retirees. Since Mason County is a recreational area, being the gateway to
the Olympic Peninsula, the population during summer weekends could approach 100,000.
A
ECONOMY
Timber products is the leading industry in the City of Shelton. This is closely followed by the
Washington Corrections Center and the Shelton School District. The average household income
in 1997 was $34,852, compared to the state average of $41,715.
B.
TRANSPORTATION
U.S. Highway 101 is the City's major north/south highway. This scenic route skirts the Hood
Canal on its western banks and then circles the Olympic Peninsula. State Highway 3 runs
through the City and connects Shelton, Belfair and Kitsap County.
The City of Shelton is also bisected north/south by the Burlington Railroad. This railroad line
services Kitsap County, the Bremerton Naval Shipyard, Bangor Submarine Base and Keyport
Naval Testing Facility. Simpson Timber Company, also, has a railroad line which travels
east/west through the City.
10
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
The City of Shelton's location on Hammersly Inlet includes a small marina just outside the City,
allowing access to the Puget Sound.
Sanderson Air Field is located just north of Shelton's city limits. This airfield provides services
primarily to the private aviation community. It is owned and operated by the Port of Mason
County and includes industrial occupancies.
Northwest Pipeline Corporation has a natural gas pipeline that parallels US Highway 101 as it
enters Mason County from Thurston County. A feeder line branches off this pipeline just
southwest of the City of Shelton and then crosses to State Highway 3 which it then parallels
until it reaches Kitsap County.
IV.
HAZARDS
The City of Shelton, due to its location and geological features, is vulnerable to the damaging
effects of major natural and technological hazards. Events could occur at any time and could
create varying degrees of damage and economic hardship to individuals, businesses and the
departments within City Government.
Potential and actual hazards are shown in the attached sections. The sections are divided into
natural and technological hazards. The hazards are listed alphabetically under each division;
therefore, no inference should be made as to severity or probability of occurrence.
POTENTIAL HAZARDS FOR THE CITY OF SHELTON
Potential Hazards for the City is arranged in two categories; Natural hazards and Man-Made
Hazards. A list of those events, within their categories are presented on the following pages:
Natural Hazards:
Drought
Earthquakes
Floods
Forest/Urban Interface Fires
Heat Waves
Landslides
Severe Storms
Tsunami, High Tides, Seiches
Volcanoes
Man-Made Hazards:
Civil Disorders
Dam Failure
Hazardous Materials Incidents, includes both chemical and biological
Nuclear Incidents
Search and Rescue Emergencies
Terrorism and/or Civil Disorders
10
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Explosions, including catastrophic fire
Natural Hazards:
DROUGHT
A drought is defined as "a period of abnormally dry weather sufficiently prolonged and severe
enough to reduce soil moisture, water and snow levels to drop below the minimum levels
necessary to sustain animal, plant and economic systems."
IMPACT
Western Washington has been affected during 11 drought periods since 1902. Three of these
were during extended dry periods: Aprii1934·March 1937, October 1976-September 1977,
October 1991-September 1994, and October 2000-September 2001. This indicates an interval
of occurrence of less than 10 years.
The possibility of drought exists in the City of Shelton. Normally, yearly rainfall is about 66
inches in the lower elevations while it could be 200 inches or more in the higher elevations of
the Olympic Forest. However, several consecutive, hot, dry summer months can create
parched and tinder dry conditions.
During periods of drought, municipal systems and private wells experience reduced water
availability. This is mostly the result of declining aquifer levels. Water tables also experience
noticeable decline. Residents are then notified to conserve. Brown lawns, water rationing, and
having to ask for water in restaurants have done more to make people aware of the potential for
drought in this state than have the problems of farmers and loggers in the past.
Potential impacts can be decreased ability to provide hydroelectric power; impact upon fish
resources; shutdown and loss in the timber industry; potential for wildfires; closures to
recreational areas. Problems are created for municipal and private water supplies.
VULNERABILITY
The City of Shelton has a high probability of experiencing drought conditions. An extended
period of drought for the area is low due to the marine climate. Actual drought conditions have
been limited even during extended dry spells. As the city continues to grow and expand into our
UGA and the natural resources are more heavily impacted there could be an increase in
vulnerability. Our City is at moderate risk to experience drought conditions for an extended
period of time.
EARTHQUAKES
Earthquakes are one of nature's most damaging hazards. An earthquake is a sudden motion or
trembling that is caused by a release of strain accumulated within or along the edge of Earth's
tectonic plates. The severity of these effects is dependent on the amount of energy released
10
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
from the fault or epicenter. They usually occur without warning and after just a few seconds can
cause massive damage and extensive amounts of casualties.
Each year, since 1980, the Pacific Northwest Seismograph Network has recorded an average of
more than a thousand earthquakes in the Pacific Northwest.
The three most damaging earthquakes in Washington State occurred in 1949 a 7.1 magnitude
quake near Olympia; 1965 a magnitude 6.5 quake between Seattle and Tacoma, which killed 15
people and caused more than $200 million in damage in several counties; and 2001 a
magnitude 6.5 quake northeast of Olympia, which caused an estimated to be in excess of $1
billion.
There is a possibility of three different types of earthquake threats to the City of Shelton. A
number of earthquakes have occurred within the downward thrusting Juan de Fuca Plate. Many
are located beneath Puget Sound Seismologists speculate that an earthquake within this plate
could be as large as magnitude 7.5. The second type is the shallow earthquake under the
Puget Sound basin within the overlying North American Plate. Historically, the most damaging
events occur at depths of 15 to 60 miles in the subduction plates. These are the least likely to
occur but they could reach magnitude 9+. An earthquake of this magnitude would probably be
located off the coast and has the potential of causing considerable damage hundreds of miles
away from the epicenter.
Earthquakes cause damage by strong ground shaking and by the secondary effects of ground
failures and tsunamis. The strength of ground shaking generally decreases with the distance
from the earthquake source. Shaking can be much higher when earthquake waves are
intensified by bedrock and then pass through softer earth materials such as sediment. Olympia
is a good example of this amplification occurring and the ground shaking was much stronger
there than in other areas.
Ground failure caused by earthquakes includes fault rupture, ground cracking, landslides,
rockfalls, liquefaction and uplift. Faults do not often rupture through to the surface. Unstable
ground is mostly at risk of the other effects. Any of these failures will affect structures above or
below them.
IMPACT
The damage could range from minimal to catastrophic, depending on the magnitude of the
earthquake and the degree of preparedness. Damage could range from minimal structural
damage to extreme loss of life and destruction of property.
VULNERABILITY
The City of Shelton has a high probability to experience another damaging earthquake within
the next 25 years. Since 1870 there have been 6 earthquakes that have been magnitude 6.0 or
greater. Population and development have increased and without mitigation efforts we can
expect higher loss due to greater exposure. City of Shelton is at high risk for earthquake
damage.
!Washington State Significant Earthquakes
10
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
·
October 2004
Date
December 14, 1872
December 12, 1880
~pril 30, 1882
November 29, 1891
March 6, 1893
~anuary 3, 1896
March 16, 1904
~anuary 11 , 1909
~ugust 18, 1915
January 23, 1920
July 17, 1932
July 15, 1936
November 12, 1939
April 29, 1945
February 14, 1946
~pril13, 1949
~ugust 5, 1959
~pril29, 1965
February 13, 1981
~pril13, 1990
~anuary 28, 1995
May 2, 1996
~une 23, 1997
~uly 2, 1999
February 28, 2001
ITime
PSD
~140
~040
12248
1521
1703
12215
12020
1549
0605
~309
~201
~308
~346
1216
1914
1155
1944
P728
2209
2133
1911
2104
1113
1743
1054
Location
North Cascades
Puget Sound
~lympia area
PugetSound
$outheast Washington
Puget Sound
Olympics, Eastside
Puget Sound
/North Cascades
Puaet Sound
!Central Cascades
!Southeast Washington
Puget Sound
!Central Cascades
Puget Sound
Puget Sound
Northwest Cascades
Puget Sound · "
South Cascades
Demina
17.6 km NNE of Tacoma
10.2 km ENE of Duvall
5.5 km NE of Bremerton
8.2 km N of Satsop
17.6 km NE of Olympia
Depth
'Km)
Shallow
1
Deep
Shallow
Deep
Shallow
Shallow
Deep
~0
54
35
Magnitude
17.4
5.5
~.0
~.0
~.9
~.7
5.3
~.0
5.6
5.5
5.2
5.7
5.7
5.5
~.3
17.1
~3
~/5
17
5.5
5.0
5.0
5.3
5
16
17
17.4
141
52.4
~.9
5/1
6.8
EPIDEMIC
Epidemics are outbreaks of disease that affect, or threaten to affect, a significant portion of a
population in a relatively short period of time. Although usually referring to human contagious
disease, epidemics can also affect domestic and wild animals, crops and shellfish. Epidemic
diseases are usually introduced into an area from remote regions and inflict devastation
because there is no natural or induced immunity.
There has been no epidemic reported in the City of Shelton. This is probably due to our
environment, which is not favorable to many of the world's most contagious diseases; our low
population density; clean water and food supplies; effective sanitation; availability of inoculations
and monitoring provided by public health officials. This does not make the county immune to the
potential for a disease outbreak.
IMPACT
During the influenza epidemic in 1918-1919, an estimated 20 million people died. The polio
epidemic in 1946 killed approximately 25,000 people in the United States. The Legionnaire's
Disease outbreak in Philadelphia claimed 30 lives. Due to our mobile society and the threat of
terrorism there is growing concern that no one will be safe from the spread of diseases.
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Mason Connty Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
VULNERABILITY
Everyone is vulnerable .to an epidemic. There could be short or long term impact and massive
loss of life. Devastating impact of the economy and on essential public safety and health
services would be an issue.
The City of Shelton has a low probability of a major outbreak but the potential is great that there
is a moderate risk for an epidemic.
FLOODING
Flooding is the most common hazard occurring in the City of Shelton. Heavy, prolonged rain in
the fall, winter or spring months often results in saturated ground and high stream flows. The
three rivers/creeks in the City of Shelton, which cause the most problem, are Goldsborough,
Shelton Creek, and Canyon Creek. The city can expect two to five or more flooding events
during the typical year.
Some floods are termed "flash floods" as they build quickly, move swiftly and carry debris in a
raging torrent. The three rivers/creeks that directly impact the City of Shelton are not considered
significant threats of flash flooding.
Tidal flooding is also possible along the inland water. Extremely high tides accompanied by low
atmospheric pressure, runoff or wind can cause tidal flooding along Hammersly Inlet.
Groundwater flooding occurs when the water table is high and there is persistent heavy rain.
Water collects in any natural depression when the soil can no longer absorb the water.
IMPACT
The Shelton Downtown Business Core and Neighborhood are subject to periodic flooding from
the Goldsborough, Shelton and Canyon Creeks accompanied by tidal surges at the creek's
mouth.
Floods could result in loss of life as well as damage to residences, business establishments,
public buildings, roads and bridges, utilities, agricultural land; fish and shellfish habitats, stream
banks and flood control structures.
Gravel and silt build-up from logging activities and natural causes increase the possibility of
flooding as the streams fill with silt and debris, which divert their course.
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers indicated after the 1996-1997 winter storm that the
frequency of a groundwater flood disaster is approximately every 25 years. The winter storm
created the first widespread groundwater-flooding event since 1972.
VULNERABILITY
Flood vulnerability is the likelihood of something to be damaged by a flood. Generally, it is
11
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
measured by how much something will be damaged as a percentage of its replacement value.
There are two things that determine vulnerability to a flood. The first is the tendency of physical
things to get damaged. The second is the potential loss of function from losing certain elements
of a community because of a flood.
The City of Shelton is vulnerable to flooding, especially in the areas surrounding the three
creeks. Because mitigation efforts in the form of stormwater projects and the elevation of homes
in the flood plains of the three creeks, the monetary impact to both the property owners and the
taxpayers is being reduced. Flooding along these creeks is more of a nuisance rather than a
major threat.
The City of Shelton experiences flooding every year, which indicates there is a probability of it
continuing. Because a percentage of the City's business population choose to live along water
bodies and the population continues to grow expanding the City's impervious surfaces, the City
is exposed to impact due to this category of disaster. The increased frequency offlooding, the
potential for the three creeks to flood simultaneously, plus the City's record for property damage
put it at a level of moderate risk.
FOREST FIRES/WILDFIRE
A forest fire is considered as any uncontrolled burning within a forested area and uncontrolled
and hard to extinguish burning in grassland, brush or woodland.
Fires are most likely to occur during the local dry season, which is normally from mid-May
through October or any time during prolonged dry seasons. The impact from these fires is
dependent upon weather, fuel, and ignition factors. They are usually extinguished while still
small, but can spread to over 100,000 acres and require thousands of fire personnel several
weeks to extinguish.
Wildland fires responded to by city and county fire departments are most often started by
humans. Form of ignition is usually cigarettes, fireworks and outdoor burning. Wildland fires
started by heat spark ember caused the largest dollar loss, followed by debris burning and
cigarettes. Loss per incident for debris fires is three times higher than any other fire cause.
IMPACT
The City of Shelton has the potential for fires. The impact of a major fire would be significantly
increased by the loss of the vegetation that helps prevent landslides, runoff and flooding. There
would be loss to property owners, the logging industry, wildlife, wildlife habitat, watersheds and
the community infrastructure. There would be an immediate impact upon the economy due to
loss of jobs reduction of tax revenue.
VULNERABILITY
The City of Shelton has a moderate to high risk for a forest fire occurring. The increase in
population, increased recreational activities, large amounts of public and private forestland and
the changing climate all increase the potential for a forest fire/wildfire.
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
HEAT WAVES
A heat wave is characterized by five or more consecutive days of unusually hot weather. The
National Weather Service considers hot weather for the City of Shelton to be 90 degrees or
higher.
There has not been a significant event of heat waves in our City. The unpredictable weather of
recent history and the possibility of global warming suggest the possibility in the near future. The
heat waves that hit the Chicago area during July of 1995 were responsible for more than 450
deaths and numerous heat-related injuries. Several extra refrigeration facilities had to be rented
by hospitals in the area whose morgues were full due to the fatalities.
IMPACT
Most residences in the City of Shelton do not have air conditioning because of the mild marine
climate. Senior citizens, infants and those who are ill would be most susceptible to heat and its
effects. Those living alone without a caregiver would be even more susceptible.
VULNERABILITY
Due to the mild marine climate there is a low probability for or risk of a heat wave in the City of
Shelton.
LANDSLIDE /EROSION
The term landslide refers to the downward movement of a slope and masses of rock, soil or
other debris under the force of gravity .. Slides range in size from thin masses of soil a few
yards wide to deep-seated bedrock slides. The form of initial failure commonly categorizes
slides, but they could travel in a variety of forms along their paths. This travel rate could range
in velocity from a few inches per month to many feet per second, depending largely on slope,
material and water content.
Landslides are influenced by human activity (mining and construction of buildings and
highways) and natural factors (geology, precipitation, and topography).
The identification of dormant slide areas is important; earthquakes or unusually wet winters can
reactivate them. High land movement areas can be identified on or at the base of slopes; in or
at the base of minor drainage hollows; at the base or top of an old fill slope; at the base or top of
a steep cut slope.
Erosion refers to the gradual removal of soil through wind or water action. Erosion could be
induced or increased by failure to use ground covers to protect soil from wind or drainage
systems to allow good dispersal of storm water. Slopes on waterfront can also be severely
undercut by normal water flow, wave action or large waves produced by storms.
IMPACT
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
The City has not experienced major landslides within-the past 25 years.
Severe slides in the City, but more importantly in Mason County, could affect travel routes to the
extent that economic foss results. This loss can be particularly severe on tourists and
businesses dependent upon recreational type activities.
Uncontrolled water flow frequently causes erosion, which in turn can cause landslides.
The effects of erosion are usually much less dramatic than landslides, but the final results could
be more costly.
VULNERABILITY
The City of Shelton is subject to soil erosion due to wind, water and flooding at all times of the
year. We are minimally impacted by landslides and erosion issues with each new winter storm.
Soil erosion continues to.occur during wind and rainstorms.
The most significant effects of landslides are the disruption of transportation and the destruction
of property.
The City has identified slide hazard areas and required geo-technical investigation and
preventative improvements before development can take place on top of or below slopes
subject to sliding.
High winds have caused extensive damage through the county in past years. The most noted
storm was the "Columbus Day " (hurricane type) storm of 1962. Severe winds also occurred
during the Inauguration Day storm of 1993.
The City of Shelton remains moderately vulnerable to landslides due to the impact of rain, snow
and windstorms.
STORM
Destructive storms come in several forms: wind, rain, ice, snow and a combination. Any winter
storm can pack high winds and heavy rain causing widespread damage. High winds of short
duration, such as tornadoes and strong gusts from thunderstorms, can also be destructive
though generally not as widespread.
Nearly all of the destructive local storms occur from November through April when the jet stream
is over the United States West Coast and Pacific low-pressure systems are more frequent. The
path of these lows determines their effect locally. The more southerly ones bring heavy rains
while the northerly ones bring cold air and the potential for snow and ice. Any winter storm,
regardless of its trajectory, can create high winds. Winds above 30 miles per hour can cause
widespread damage and those above 50 miles per hour can be devastating.
IMPACT
Since 1972 the City of Shelton has experienced fifteen severe storms. Twelve lead to Federal
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Disaster Declarations. Most of these events were a combination of wind, heavy rain, snow or ice
and the accompanying flooding.
The most recent event that impacted the City was the ice and windstorm of December 1996.
High winds can cause widespread damage to trees and power lines and interrupt transportation,
communications, and power distribution. Prolonged heavy rains cause ground saturation, rivers
and streams to rise, and result in flooding and landslides.
Ice storms occur when the rain falls out of a warm atmospheric layer into a cold one near the
ground. The rain freezes on contact with cold objects including the ground, trees, structures,
and power lines, causing buildings to collapse and power lines to snap.
Isolated residents without power are more likely to be impacted due to power outages and the
time it takes to restore power. Some rural residences were without power for over two weeks
during the ice storm of 1996.
VULNERABILITY
The entire county is vulnerable to the effects of a storm. There is a very high probability and
risk of a storm impacting the City of Shelton again. Historical damage and cumulative costs of
destructive storms indicates a high vulnerability.
TSUNAMI/ HIGH WAVES I SEICHES
Tsunamis are sea waves generated by seismic activity, underwater volcanic eruptions, meteor
impacts, or landslides. Every enclosed body of water has a number of natural resources. If you
sit in a partially full tub of water and rock back and forth you will find that at the right time you
can easily get the waves to grow until they overflow the bathtub. The resonant oscillation of the
water is a "seiche". A seiche can occur not only on the southern portion of Hood Canal or Puget
Sound but also on lakes, reservoirs, or any other enclosed body of water.
During the Northridge earthquake of 1994, swimming pools all over Southern California
overflowed. During the Anchorage earthquake in 1964, swimming pools as far away as Puerto
Rico were set into oscillation. This quake also caused a serious tsunami along the Washington
Coast, resulting in $105,000 in damage, which is based on 1964 dollars value. In 1994, a
tsunami warning was issued for the Washington coast due to a magnitude earthquake of 8. 7, off
Russia's Kuril Islands.
Large Pacific Ocean tsunamis have wave crest to wave crest distances of 60 miles and apart
and can travel at speeds of 450 to 600 miles per hour in the open ocean. As the waves reach
the shallow water of the shoreline, the waves are slowed which forces the water to form walls of
water 30 feet of more in height. Debris can be deposited up to 1000 feet inland. A large tsunami
can cross the entire Pacific in 24 hours.
There is some debate as to whether or not a tsunami could be generated in the Puget Sound by
a local or offshore earthquake.
11
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
High waves, usually caused by wind and storm activity have battered the Puget Sound in the
past and must also be considered a hazard to the City of Shelton.
IMPACT
The City of Shelton borders the Puget Sound on the northeast side. Although there is no record
of tsunami activity in the South Puget Sound area, the Pacific Coast has been threatened
several times. A strong earthquake below either Puget Sound or Hood Canal could cause
damaging waves, which could impact residences built along the shorelines. The most significant
damage would be similar to those created during abnormally high tides in the region.
VULNERABILITY
The City of Shelton is at low risk for significant threat from these events.
VOLCANOS/ASH FALL
Mount Rainier is the most dangerous volcano in the Cascade Range because of the large
population and the huge area and volume of ice and snow on its slopes that could melt to
generate debris flows during a catastrophic eruption. Each of the five major rivers, the Carbon,
White, Cowlitz, Nisqually and the Puyallup flows westerly. Each, with the exception of the
Cowlitz, empties into Puget Sound near Tacoma. The Cowlitz flows into the Columbia River and
then into the Pacific Ocean. Much of the lowland to the east of Tacoma and the south of Seattle
is formed of pre-historic debris from Mount Rainier.
Volcanic eruptions can cause damage in the City of Shelton primarily by ash fall. The
probability of ash fall depends on wind direction and the volcanic source of the eruption causing
the ash fall. Most of the dangers are to persons in the near vicinity of the volcano. Other
dangers, such as mudflows and ash fall, could exist miles downstream and down wind. The
most recent was the 1980 volcanic eruption of Mount St. Helens in the Cascade Mountain
Range. This eruption claimed 57 lives and cost approximately one billion dollars in damage.
ln the last 515 years, Mount St Helens is known to have produced 4 major explosive eruptions
(each with at least 1 cubic kilometer of eruption deposits) and dozens of lesser eruptions. Prior
to its latest eruption, there were more than 10,000 earthquakes in the vicinity, hundreds of small
steam-blast explosions, and the outward growth of the volcano's entire northern flank by more
than 80 meters. A magnitude earthquake of 5.1 struck beneath the volcano at 8:32A.M. on May
18, setting in motion the devastating eruption. Within seconds of the earthquake, the volcano's
north flank slid away in the largest landslide in recorded history. The explosion swept across the
landscape as fast as 1,100 kilometers per hour. Temperatures were as high as 300 degrees
Celsius within the blast. A gigantic plume of ash reached 19 kilometers into the sky and
approximately 490 tons of ash was carried across 57,000 square kilometers of the Western
United States.
The City of Shelton experienced some ash fall but no reported loss. In the past 200 years this
volcano has erupted three times.
11
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2604
IMPACT
Ash fall from the eruption of Mount St. Helens was non-existent to light in the City. It did not
cause any significant damage. It is unknown if an eruption of Mount Rainier would have a direct
impact upon the City, but it could cause a major disruption to transportation of supplies if the
main corridors of transportation were affected.
VULNERABILITY
The City of Shelton is at low risk for significant threat from volcanic eruption.
Man-Made Hazards:
CIVIL DISTURBANCE
Civil disturbance or unrest is the result of individuals or groups within the population feeling their
needs or "rights" are not being met by society, a segment of it, or the current political system.
Civil unrest spans a variety of actions including labor unrest, strikes, civil disobedience,
demonstrations, riots and rebellion. Events that could trigger these actions include racial
tension, unemployment, unpopular political actions, and a decrease in the supply of essential
goods or services.
The City of Shelton has experienced no significant incidents of local civil disorder or
disturbance.
IMPACT
There is little likelihood of significant impact in the City.
VULNERABILITY
History suggests a low probability of occurrence and low vulnerability.
DAM FAILURE
Flooding, earthquakes, poor construction, lack of maintenance and repair, improper operation,
or acts of vandalism or terrorism could cause Dam failure.
IMPACT
Major impact to the City of Shelton would be accommodating large numbers of displaced
residents and impact other local services. Dam failure could result in loss of life and damage to
property including structures, transportation routes, utilities, agriculture and aquaculture.
Depending on location,
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Dam failure could result in a lowered tax base, lack of power profits or other significant
economic loss.
A failure at the Cushman Dam would result in extensive property damage and loss of life.
Tacoma City Light, the owners and operators of the dam and hydroelectric project, carefully
monitor the dam and maintain updated emergency plans as well as hold emergency exercises.
Local authorities are responsible for warning and evacuation should a breach occur.
A breach in Anderson Dam at Lakeland Village could create a threat to approximately 25
residences downstream.
Casad Dam in Kitsap County could affect residents along the Union River if there was a breach
to this dam.
VULNERABILITY
Mason County is vulnerable to dam failure and therefore creating an impact to the City of
Shelton. To assure Dam safety, the State Department of Ecology inspects all dams in Mason
County and requires safety plans from the owner of each dam in the County.
History indicates a low probability of dam failure in Mason County. The failure of a high hazard
dam would threaten an important segment of the County suggesting moderate vulnerability.
Because the major dams within the County are well maintained and operated provides no
reason to anticipate a compromise in the structural integrity other than from a major natural
disaster or from terrorist actions there is a low risk assigned.
MASON COUNTY DAMS
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
Anderson Lake Dam
Bennettsen Lake Dam
Buck Lake Dam
Christine Lake Dam
Cranberry Lake Storm Water Detention Dam
Cushman Dam #1
Cushman Dam #1 -Spillway Headworks
Cushman Dam #2
Fawn Lake Dam
Haven Lake Dam
Lakeland Village Pond No. 1
Leprechaun Lake Dam
Lake Limerick Dam
Little Twin Lakes Dam
Melbourne Lake Dam
Rosand Dam
Timberlake Dam
Trask Lake Dam
Uddenberg Dam
West Lake Dam
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS
Chemical hazards are created when there is a release of toxic agents into the atmosphere and
environment that can harm population, animals, and food supplies.
Hazardous chemicals are used for a variety of purposes and are regularly transported through
the City of Shelton. Ammonia is used as a refrigerant, in agriculture, and in wastewater
treatment. Chlorine is used in wastewater treatment, water systems, swimming pools, and in the
paper industry. Propane is widely used as a fuel. U.S. Highway 101 is the transportation corridor
for transportation
of hazardous materials to the rest of the Olympic Peninsula. State Highway 3 and Burlington
Northern provide the transportation routes to and from Kitsap County and the Bremerton Naval
Base.
Hazardous materials include those used in manufacturing, household chemical, crude oil,
petroleum products, pesticides, paints, medical waste, fertilizers, etc.
IMPACT
Major spills and accumulations from minor spills or unsafe disposal could cause long-term
damage to resources such as water, forests, or beaches. Spills could cause population
evacuation, unsafe working or living conditions, unemployment or economic impact.
VULNERABILITY
Virtually every household and business in the county stores and uses varying amounts and
kinds of hazardous chemicals.
Hazardous chemical shipments, bulk users, wholesalers and retailers are managed in
accordance with federal and state law. They must submit an annual Tier II report as to type of
hazardous materials on their premises. (See Attachment I)
Chemical spills, primarily oil and fuel spills, occur in the City of Shelton on both land and water.
Hazardous material spills are a regular occurrence in the City. The smaller spills are most often
petroleum products or illegally disposed of household materials. The increase in the number of
methamphetamine related incidents in the City and County indicate an increase in this activity
and the threat this poses to emergency responders, the community and the environment.
Small amounts of non-regulated chemicals usually in the form of household materials are
routinely disposed of by dumping them into the environment through waste collection systems
or directly into the ground or water.
The potential for a catastrophic spill of bulk hazardous chemicals exists. Due to the lack of a
Class A Hazardous Materials Response Team, the city is placed at moderate risk in the event of
a major spill.
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
ATTACHMENT I
SARA TITLE Ill FACILITIES
2002
TIER TWO REPORTS
CRK000022930
CRK000048380
CRK000004750
CRK000042640
WAD988501557
WAD988522272
CRK000007040
WA0000137604
CRK000042280
CRK000042160
WAT540011061
AM TWR Kamilche
9 mi south of Shelton
Sulfuric Acid
WSDOT
633 W Dayton-Airport Rd
Fuels
Tacoma DPU Cushman
1451 Highway 101
Fuels
Bingham Crk Hatchery
3914 Fish Hatchery Rd
Fuels/Formalin
Washington State Patrol
631 Dayton-Airport Road
Fuel
1000 West Pine
Shelton City Shop
Fuel
19920 Highway 101
Ferrell Gas
Propane
Central Shop
3620 E. Johns Prairie Road
Antifreeze/Lube Oil/
CMS-2 Asphalt Emulsion/
CRS-2 Asphalt Emulsion/
Coherex/Fuels
Courthouse
419 North 4th Street
Fuels
220 E Wilson Road
Jarrell's Cove Marina
Fuel/Propane
121 Schoolhouse Hill Rd
Hoodsport COO
12
Shelton
Shelton
Shelton
Elm a
Shelton
Shelton
Hoodsport
Shelton
Shelton
Shelton
Hoodsport
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
WAD00641282
WAT540011400
Lead/Sulfuric Acid
Belfair Co PE 26099
23650 St Route 3
Lead/Sulfuric Acid
Shelton CO
522 West Railroad Ave
Lead/Diesel/Sulfuric Acid
SERVICE STATIONS
Bob's Hoodsport Auto and Towing
Fuel
Chevron
Fuel
Jarrell's Cove Marina
Fuel
NOW Convenience Store-Shell
Fuel
12
Belfair
Shelton
24151 North Highway 101
Hoodsport
661 East Pine Street
Shelton
Harstene Island
Shelton
1528 Olympic Highway So
Shelton
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
TERRORISM
Terrorism is defined as the use of force or violence against persons or property violating the
criminal laws of the United States for purposes of intimidation, coercion, or ransom. Terrorists
often use threats to create fear among the public; try to convince citizens that their government
is powerless to prevent terrorism; and try to get publicity for their causes.
A terrorist attack can take several forms depending on the technological means available to the
terrorist, the nature of the political issue motivating the attack, and the points of weakness of the
terrorist targets. Bombings are the most frequently used terrorist method in the United States.
Other possibilities include attacks upon transportation facilities, utilities or other public services,
or incidents involving chemical or biological agents. The Federal Bureau of Investigation
categorizes terrorism in the United States as one of two types: domestic or international
terrorism.
Domestic terrorism involves groups or individuals whose terrorist activities are directed at
elements of our government or population without foreign direction, such as the Oklahoma City
bombings and the series of domestic attacks and bank robberies in 1995 in Spokane by a militia
group.
International terrorism involves groups or individuals whose terrorist activities are foreign based
and/or directed by countries or groups outside the United States or whose activities transcend
national boundaries, such as the attack on the World Trade Center in 1993, and the recent
attack on New York's Twin Towers and on the Pentagon.
IMPACT
The impact of terrorism can vary significantly from massive loss of life and property damage to
nuisance service interruptions. Threatened services include power, water supply, public
transportation, communications, and public safety.
VULNERABILITY
The type of terrorist act would determine vulnerability. This could include a large portion of the
population or infrastructure with the destruction of a major power distribution line, a pipeline, or
the contamination of a municipal well or a small segment with a bomb threat to a business or
government agency.
City of Shelton receives bomb threats at county facilities and schools periodically, but is at low
risk for a terrorist attack.
NUCLEAR INCIDENTS
Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and the Naval Submarine Base at Bangor are both located in
Kitsap County. Puget Sound Naval Shipyard stores spent fuel rods and decommissioned
nuclear submarines. The Submarine Base at Bangor is the home of the Trident submarine, a
nuclear powered submarine.
VULNERABILITY
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
The City of Shelton is not in close proximity to a fixed nuclear site. The possibility of some type
of nuclear exchange does exist.
The City of Shelton would not be considered a target area but is located close to targeted areas~
There are no fall out shelters and little indoor space to place refugees. Mitigation efforts on the
local level would involve having written material available on fall out shelters and have
individuals trained in radiological monitoring.
Nuclear accidents/incidents involving facilities in Kitsap County or the transportation of materials
through Mason County could have an impact on the communities in near proximity to them.
Emergency plans and procedures need to address the county's response and recovery
activities, regardless of the probability of such occurrence.
12
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Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October2004
County commission roundup:.
Sit t I +c..r~ J't.:u..v•r, e.!
o/-fS.·tJ3
Sheriff's office gets grant
for natural hazards plan
The Washington State Military
Department and the Federal
Emergency Management Agency
have awarded a $50.000 grant to
the Mason County Division of
Emergency Management. These
funds will allow the Emergency
Management Council to develop a
Natural Iiazards Mitigation l'l.a.n.
Mason County Sheriff Steve Whybark stated in a press release.
The plan includes the development and doeum.entation of a vul·
nerabilitY assessment. the development and prioritization of a
mitigation strategy. the development and documentation of a
plan maintenance process. and a
plan review every five yean. The
council meets twice a month to
assure that the county's hazard
mitigation plan is established by
November 1. 2004. Whybark con·
tinued in the press release.
This council works with each
local fire jurisdiction to gather in·
formation for neighborhood pro·
files. Currently. department rep·
resentatives from city and county
governments along with port au·
thorities, local fire districts.
schools. the Americ:lll Red Cross,
and the hospital district make up
this counciL The committee is
looking for additional representatives from community organizations, religious groups and the
county at large. Whybark added.
, quirements for the ~orth Bay and
Case Inlet Wastewater Facilities
Construction Project have been
satisfactorily completed. With
that in mind the county accepts
$5,000,000 from the Centennial
Clean Water Fund Program to·
ward the project.
• Approved and signed the
agreement with Tire Disposal and
Recycling, Incorporated for the
removal and recycling of tires collected at the Mason County Solid
Waste Facility and drop box sta·
tions.
• AuthoriZed a ·contract with
Mason County Washington State
University Cooperative Extension
and Mason County Drug Abuse
Prevention to provide $10,555 for
the extension to implement the
prevention program "Strength·
ening Families" in four locations
between September 2003 and
June2005.
• Approved an Adopt-a-Road
agreement with the Lost Lake
Trash Pickers for Frosty Lane
and a mile and a half of Lost
Lake Road.
• Approved an agreement with
the United States Geological Sur·
vey, U.S. Department of the Interior for gaging stations in the
Skokomish River basin. The coun·
ty's annual cost is S3,190.
• Approved a resolution stating the county's intention to con·
demn certain property to aUow
for the widening and realignment
of Old Olympic Highway.
• Postponed a scheduled discussion regarding the need for in·
terim measures or alternatives to
address signs in the county, in·
eluding billboards, while the planning processes to .review certain
sign standards proceed.
MASO~
COUNTY
Emergency agency
gets $50,000 grant
The Mason Countv Division of
Emergency Managemenr has
~een awarded a SSO.OOO gram
trorn the state and the Federal
Emergency MJJ!agerneru .A,gencv.
The iunds will be used to J~­
":elop a Natur:1! Hazards Micig:~­
non Plan. which will include vulnerability' assessment. Jevelooment of a mitigation stratero:
velopment o( a plan process and
a plan review every tive years.
The plan is scheduled to be
established by Nov. l, 2004.
• To volunteer to be a member
ot the committee or tor more in·
formation. caU the Division of
Emergency Management at 360-
ln other busine>s on Tuesday.
September 16. the :\Iason County
C<>mmission:
• Received word that aU re·
de-
~~~~~--'1.2=-··
12
7
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Press release
Representatives from many different disciplines with Mason County are gathering
monthly to assure that a County Hazard Mitigation Plan is established by Nov 1st 2004.
The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has require that all state and local
jurisdictions develop and begin to institute the plan by 2004 if they wish to receive future
disaster recovery or mitigation funds. Mitigation are those actions taken by a government
or citizen to reduce the impacts of the next future disaster, whether its flooding, an
earthquake or winter storm.
Currently. department heads from city and county government along with representatives
from some of the county's port authorities and local fire districts are undertaking this
mammoth task of gathering the information that is require just to begin this process of
developing the All Hazards Mitigation Plan. A start has been made, but involvement
from other entities within the county is needed. School districts, business and community
organizations. religious groups in short the public needs to be invoked. In order for this
plan to be effective. the entire community needs to be involved. We, the community.
need to gather the bits and pieces to identify pre-disaster projects and activities that will
help reduce our community's vulnerability to disaster that in tum will save lives and
property. In the business community alone about 80°·o of the small businesses that close
their doors because of the effects of a disaster, never re-open. The effects of poor
planning can have lasting effects on the prh·ate sector as well. The cost of rebuilding can
be astronomical.
In a time of diminishing resources and increasing need it.is incumbant upon all of us to
be apart of the process of making our community safer for our families. friends and
neighbors. The benetits of planning is two.fold it helps us prepare to lessen the effects of
a disaster and it guarantees that monies and resources will be there to aid in a speedy
recovery. Mason County cannot afford to be unprepated for the future. Any questions
or comments should be addressed to the Division of Emergency Management at
427-i535.
12
R
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Appendix F
PRESS RELEASES
September 16, 2003
TO:
KMAS, KRXY, SHELTON-MASON COUNTY JOURNAL, THE OLYMPIAN,
SHELTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, NORTH MASON CHAMBER OF
COMMERCE, CITY OF SHELTON, ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL, THE SUN
RE:
Mason County Emergency Management Council Receives a Grant to
Complete Hazard Mitigation Plan
The Mason County Division of Emergency Management has been awarded a $50,000
grant from the Washington State Military Department and the Federal Emergency
Management Agency. The funds will allow the Emergency Management Council to
develop a Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan.
The plan includes the development and documentation of a vulnerability assessment,
the development and prioritization of a mitigation strategy, the development and
documentation of a plan maintenance process, and a plan review every five years. The
Mason County Emergency Management Council meets twice a month to assure that the
County's Hazard Mitigation Plan is established by November 1, 2004.
The Mason County Emergency Management Council is working with each local fire
jurisdiction to gather information for neighborhood profiles. Currently, the council is
made up of department representatives from city and county governments along with
port authorities, local fire districts, schools, the American Red Cross, and the hospital
district. The committee is looking for additional representatives from community
organizations, religious groups and the county at large.
To volunteer to be part of the. Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan process or for answers to
any questions you might have, please contact the Division of Emergency Management
at (360) 427-7535.
Steve Whybark, Mason County Sheriff
12
4
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
Mason County Hazard Mitigation Plan
October 2004
County working
on secret plan
for emergencies
By ANDY COCHRAN
Also listed are firefighters, firstand REBECCA WELLS
aid and health professionals, rep·
A hearing on a proposal to re· resentatives of the media, and
name the disaster assistance community groups.
During the public hearing Aucouncil and the director of emergency management, create a gun 19, Ray Hanson of Union
countywide emergency manage- asked if the county had a plan to
. ment planning team, and assign deal with emergencies .
When commissioners respondappropriate duties has bee~ con·
ed that suCh a plan ·was'in place.':
tinued again. .
The hearing &fore the Mason Hanson asked if the public. ha~
County Commission was llrst"con- aceess to the plan. Commissioners
tinued from July 22. then post· said that. no, the public was not
poned on August 19, to Septem- allowed to see the plan because it
ber 9 and yet again to Tuesday, deals with county and city facili·
October 21. Robert· Fink, a plan- ties and offering them to the pub·
ner with the department of com- lie would be a security breach. .
At the September 9 continuamunity development. asked for
the delay so the various agencies tion of the public hearing, Harvey
involved could continue "ad· Wamaca. of Shelton, asked commissioners to identifY who would
ditional information gathering.~
The county and the City of head up the team, but the comShelton have been working with missioners responded to him just
local entities to develop a compre- as they did to Hanson.
According to commissioners.
hensive plan to deal with multi·
pie types of disasters. Officials there is another plan to mitigate
would respond differently, for ex- hazards that is being assembled
ample. to an earthquake than right now. Sandi Loertscher ot
they would to a tire or a major the Mason County Office of Emerloss of power such as the recent gency Management, says the plan
East Coast blackout. Fink ex- will hopefully be finished by June
2004. At that time, it will be subplained in a staff report.
As of the July 19 meeting, the mitted to the state for review,
proposed amendments to the ex- then sent back to the county for
isting plan involved naming the corrections. and then on to the
members of the emergency man- federal Office of Homeland Securagement planning team. includ· ity for another round of scrutiny.
ing the county fire marshal and
ONCE BOTH of those offices
assis1:ant director of the Mason have given it their stamp of apCounty Sheriff's Office division of proval. the plan will be available
emergency management. who will to the public.
act as chair of the team.
Loertscher savs her office
OTHER MEMBERS could be hopes to release the plan to the
the directors of the Mason County public early in 2005. A copy of
departments of public works. this document is available for
health services and community public review at the William G.
development as well as the the Reed Public Librarv. 710 West
city's fire chief and chief of police. Alder Street. Shelton:
12
!1
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