BENSHAW | ENHANCED KEYPAD | User manual | BENSHAW ENHANCED KEYPAD User manual

RediStart
TM
Solid State Starter
2
Control
RB2, RC2, RX2E Models
User Manual
890034-01-02
August 2008
Software Version:
Hardware Version:
810023-01-08
300055-01-05
© 2008 Benshaw Inc.
Benshaw retains the right to change specifications and illustrations in text without prior notification. The contents of this document may
not be copied without the explicit permission of Benshaw.
Important Reader Notice
2
Congratulations on the purchase of your new Benshaw RediStart MX Solid State Starter. This manual contains the information to install and
2
2
program the MX Solid State Starter. The MX is a standard version solid state starter. If you require additional features, please review the
3
expanded feature set of the MX Solid State Starter on page 5.
2
This manual may not cover all of the applications of the RediStart MX . Also, it may not provide information on every possible contingency
2
concerning installation, programming, operation, or maintenance specific to the RediStart MX Series Starters.
The content of this manual will not modify any prior agreement, commitment or relationship between the customer and Benshaw. The sales
contract contains the entire obligation of Benshaw. The warranty enclosed within the contract between the parties is the only warranty that
Benshaw will recognize and any statements contained herein do not create new warranties or modify the existing warranty in any way.
Any electrical or mechanical modifications to Benshaw products without prior written consent of Benshaw will void all warranties and may also
void cUL listing or other safety certifications, unauthorized modifications may also result in product damage operation malfunctions or personal
injury.
2
Incorrect handling of the starter may result with an unexpected fault or damage to the starter. For best results on operating the RediStart MX
starter, carefully read this manual and all warning labels attached to the starter before installation and operation. Keep this manual on hand for
reference.
Do not attempt to install, operate, maintain or inspect the starter until you have thoroughly read this manual and related documents carefully
and can use the equipment correctly.
Do not use the starter until you have a full knowledge of the equipment, safety procedures and instructions.
This instruction manual classifies safety instruction levels under "WARNING" and "CAUTION".
Electrical Hazard that could result in injury or death.
Caution that could result in damage to the starter.
Highlight marking an important point in the documentation.
Please follow the instructions of both safety levels as they are important to personal safety.
DANGER
HAZARD OF ELECTRIC SHOCK, EXPLOSION, OR ARC FLASH
Only qualified personnel familiar with low voltage equipment are to perform work described in this set of instructions.
Apply appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) and follow safe electrical work practices. See NFPA 70E.
Turn off all power before working on or inside equipment.
Use a properly rated voltage sensing device to confirm that the power is off.
Before performing visual inspections, tests, or maintenance on the equipment, disconnect all sources of electric power.
Assume that circuits are live until they have been completely de-energized, tested, and tagged. Pay particular attention to
the design of the power system. Consider all sources of power, including the possibility of backfeeding.
Replace all devices, doors, and covers before turning on power to this equipment.
Failure to follow these instructions will result in death or serious injury.
TRADEMARK NOTICE
Benshaw and
are registered trademarks of Benshaw Incorporated.
UL is a trademark of Underwriters Laboratories, Incorporated.
SAFETY PRECAUTIONS
Safety Precautions
Electric Shock Prevention
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
While power is on or soft starter is running, do not open the front cover. You may get an electrical shock.
This soft starter contains high voltage which can cause electric shock resulting in personal injury or loss of life.
Be sure all AC power is removed from the soft starter before servicing.
Do not connect or disconnect the wires to or from soft starter when power is applied.
Make sure ground connection is in place.
Always install the soft starter before wiring. Otherwise, you may get an electrical shock or be injured.
Operate the switches with dry hands to prevent an electrical shock.
Risk of Electric Shock - More than one disconnect switch may be required to de-energize the equipment before servicing.
Injury Prevention
•
•
•
•
Service only by qualified personnel.
Make sure power-up restart is off to prevent any unexpected operation of the motor.
Make certain proper shield installation is in place.
Apply only the voltage that is specified in this manual to the terminals to prevent damage.
Transportation and Installation
•
•
•
•
•
•
Use proper lifting gear when carrying products, to prevent injury.
Make certain that the installation position and materials can withstand the weight of the soft starter. Refer to the installation information in this
manual for correct installation.
2
If parts are missing, or soft starter is damaged, do not operate the RediStart MX .
Do not stand or rest heavy objects on the soft starter, as damage to the soft starter may result.
Do not subject the soft starter to impact or dropping.
Make certain to prevent screws, wire fragments, conductive bodies, oil or other flammable substances from entering the soft starter.
Trial Run
•
Check all parameters, and ensure that the application will not be damaged by a sudden start-up.
Emergency Stop
•
To prevent the machine and equipment from hazardous conditions if the soft starter fails, provide a safety backup such as an emergency brake.
Disposing of the RediStart MX2
•
Never dispose of electrical components via incineration. Contact your state environmental agency for details on disposal of electrical components
and packaging in your area.
i
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Table of Contents
1 INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
1.1 Additional MX3 Product Features. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
2 TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
2.1 General Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
2.2 Electrical Ratings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
2.2.1
2.2.2
2.2.3
2.2.4
2.2.5
Terminal Points and Functions. .
Measurements and Accuracies . .
List of Motor Protection Features
Solid State Motor Overload. . . .
CT Ratios . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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10
11
11
12
13
2.3 Starter Power Ratings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
2.3.1
2.3.2
2.3.3
2.3.4
2.3.5
2.3.6
2.3.7
2.3.8
2.3.9
Standard Duty (350% for 30 sec) Ratings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Heavy Duty (500% current for 30 sec) Ratings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Severe Duty (600% current for 30 sec) Ratings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Inside Delta Connected Standard Duty (350% for 30 sec) Ratings . . . . . . . . .
RB2 Power Stack Ratings and Protection Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power Stack Input Ratings with Protection Requirements for Separate Bypass .
Power Stack Input Ratings with Protection Requirements for RC No Bypass . .
RB2 Starter Control Power Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RC2 Starter Control Power Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
21
2.4 Dimensions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
2.4.1 RB2 Chassis with Integral Bypass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
2.4.2 RC2 Chassis with no Bypass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
2.5 Environmental Conditions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
2.6 Altitude Derating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
2.7 Approvals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
2.8 Certificate of Compliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
3 INSTALLATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
3.1 Before You Start. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
3.1.1 Inspection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
3.1.2 Installation Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
3.1.3 Safety Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
3.2 Installation Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
3.2.1
3.2.2
3.2.3
3.2.4
3.2.5
Site Preparation . . . . . . . . . .
EMC Installation Guidelines . . .
Use of Power Factor Capacitors .
Use of Electro-Mechanical Brakes
Reversing Contactor. . . . . . . .
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29
29
29
29
29
3.3 Mounting Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
3.3.1 Bypassed Starters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
3.3.2 Non-Bypassed Starters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
3.4 Wiring Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
3.4.1
3.4.2
3.4.3
3.4.4
3.4.5
Wiring Practices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Considerations for Control and Power Wiring.
Considerations for Signal Wiring . . . . . . . .
Meggering a Motor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
High Pot Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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31
31
31
31
31
3.5 Power and Control drawings for Bypassed and Non Bypassed Power Stacks . . . . . . . . . . . 32
ii
TABLE OF CONTENTS
3.6 Power Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
3.6.1
3.6.2
3.6.3
3.6.4
3.6.5
3.6.6
Recommended Incoming Line Protection . . . . . . . .
Recommended Wire Gauges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Power Wire Connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Motor Lead Length . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Compression Lugs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Torque Requirements for Power Wiring Terminations .
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35
35
35
35
36
37
3.7 Current Transformers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
3.7.1 CT Mounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
3.7.2 CT Polarity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
3.8 Control Card Layout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
3.9 Control Wiring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
3.9.1
3.9.2
3.9.3
3.9.4
3.9.5
3.9.6
Control Power . . . . . . . . .
Output Relays . . . . . . . . .
Digital Input Wiring Options
Analog Input . . . . . . . . . .
Analog Output . . . . . . . . .
SW1 DIP Switch . . . . . . . .
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40
40
41
42
42
43
3.10 Remote LCD Keypad/Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
3.10.1 Remote Display. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
3.10.2 Display Cutout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
3.10.3 Installing Display. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
4 KEYPAD OPERATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
4.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
4.2 Standard Keypad and Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
4.3 Viewing Parameter Values for the Standard Keypad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
4.4 Changing Parameter Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
4.5 Messages Displayed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
4.5.1
4.5.2
4.5.3
4.5.4
4.5.5
4.5.6
4.5.7
Power Up . . . . . .
Stopped . . . . . . .
Running. . . . . . .
Alarm Condition. .
Lockout Condition.
Faulted Condition .
Quick Meters . . . .
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49
49
50
50
50
50
50
4.6 Restoring Factory Parameter Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
4.7 Resetting a Fault . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
4.8 Emergency Overload Reset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
4.9 2x16 Remote LCD Keypad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
4.10 Description of the LEDs on the Keypad. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
4.11 Description of the Keys on the Remote LCD Keypad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
4.12 Jump Code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
4.13 Alphanumeric Display . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
4.13.1
4.13.2
4.13.3
4.13.4
4.13.5
4.13.6
Parameter Group Screens
Meter Pages . . . . . . . .
Fault Log Screen . . . . .
Fault Screen . . . . . . . .
Lockout Screen . . . . . .
Alarm Screen . . . . . . .
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55
56
56
57
57
57
4.14 Procedure for Setting Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
iii
TABLE OF CONTENTS
5 PARAMETER GROUPS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
5.1 Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
5.2 LED and LCD Display Parameters Cross Reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
5.3 LED Display Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
5.4 LCD Display Parameters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
5.4.1
5.4.2
5.4.3
5.4.4
5.4.5
5.4.6
5.4.7
Quick Start Group . . . .
Control Function Group
Protection Group . . . .
I/O Group . . . . . . . .
Function Group . . . . .
LCD Fault Group . . . .
LED Fault Group . . . .
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66
67
68
68
70
71
71
6 PARAMETER DESCRIPTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
6.1 Parameter Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
7 THEORY OF OPERATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
7.1 Solid State Motor Overload Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
7.1.1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.1.2 Setting Up The MX2 Motor Overload . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.1.3 Motor Overload Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.1.4 Current Imbalance / Negative Sequence Current Compensation .
7.1.5 Harmonic Compensation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.1.6 Hot / Cold Motor Overload Compensation . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.1.7 Separate Starting and Running Motor Overload Settings . . . . .
7.1.8 Motor Cooling While Stopped . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.1.9 Motor Cooling While Running. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7.1.10 Emergency Motor Overload Reset . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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132
132
134
134
135
135
136
137
138
138
7.2 Motor Service Factor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139
7.3 Acceleration Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
7.3.1
7.3.2
7.3.3
7.3.4
7.3.5
7.3.6
Current Ramp Settings, Ramps and Times . . . . . .
Programming A Kick Current . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TruTorque Acceleration Control Settings and Times
Power Control Acceleration Settings and Times . . .
Open Loop Voltage Ramps and Times . . . . . . . .
Dual Acceleration Ramp Control . . . . . . . . . . .
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140
141
141
143
145
147
7.4 Deceleration Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
7.4.1 Voltage Control Deceleration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
7.4.2 TruTorque Deceleration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
7.5 Braking Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
7.5.1
7.5.2
7.5.3
7.5.4
7.5.5
7.5.6
7.5.7
7.5.8
7.5.9
DC Injection Braking, Standard Duty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DC Injection Braking, Heavy Duty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Braking Output Relay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stand Alone Overload Relay for emergency ATL (Across The Line) operation
DC Injection Brake Wiring Example. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DC Brake Timing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DC Injection Brake Enable and Disable Digital Inputs . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Use of Optional Hall Effect Current Sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DC Injection Braking Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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152
152
152
152
153
154
155
155
156
7.6 Slow Speed Cyclo Converter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
7.6.1 Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 156
7.6.2 Slow Speed Cyclo Converter Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
7.7 Inside Delta Connected Starter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
7.7.1 Line Connected Soft Starter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
7.7.2 Inside Delta Connected Starter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
iv
TABLE OF CONTENTS
7.8 Wye Delta Starter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 160
7.9 Across The Line (Full Voltage Starter) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
7.10 Single Phase Soft Starter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164
7.11 Phase Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165
7.11.1 Master/Slave Starter Configuration:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166
7.12 Current Follower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167
7.13 Start/Stop Control Logic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
7.14 Hand/Off/Auto Selector Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169
7.15 Simplified I/O Schematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170
7.16 Remote Modbus Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
7.16.1 Supported Commands. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
7.16.2 Modbus Register Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
7.16.3 Cable Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
8 TROUBLESHOOTING & MAINTENANCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
8.1 Safety Precautions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
8.2 Preventative Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
8.2.1 General Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
8.2.2 Preventative Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
8.3 General Troubleshooting Charts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175
8.3.1
8.3.2
8.3.3
8.3.4
8.3.5
8.3.6
8.3.7
Motor does not start, no output to motor . . . . . . . . . . . .
During starting, motor rotates but does not reach full speed
Starter not accelerating as desired . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Starter not decelerating as desired. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Motor stops unexpectedly while running . . . . . . . . . . .
Metering incorrect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Other Situations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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175
176
176
177
177
178
179
8.4 Fault Code Table . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
8.5 SCR Testing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
8.5.1 Resistance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
8.5.2 Voltage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
8.5.3 Integral Bypass. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187
8.6 Built In Self Test Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
8.6.1 Standard BIST Tests: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 188
8.6.2 Powered BIST Tests: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 189
8.7 SCR Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 191
8.7.1
8.7.2
8.7.3
8.7.4
8.7.5
8.7.6
Typical Stack Assembly.
SCR Removal. . . . . . .
SCR Installation . . . . .
SCR Clamp . . . . . . . .
Tightening Clamp . . . .
Testing SCR. . . . . . . .
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191
191
191
192
192
192
v
TABLE OF CONTENTS
APPENDIX A ALARM CODES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 194
APPENDIX B FAULT CODES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 196
APPENDIX C SPARE PARTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
APPENDIX D EU DECLARATION OF CONFORMITY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 198
APPENDIX E MODBUS REGISTER MAP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 199
APPENDIX F PARAMETER TABLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207
vi
1
Introduction
1
1 - INTRODUCTION
INTRODUCTION
1
Using this Manual
Layout
This manual is divided into 10 sections. Each section contains topics related to the section. The sections
are as follows:
• Introduction
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Symbols
Technical Information
Installation
Keypad Operation
Parameters
Parameter Description
Applications
Theory of Operation
Troubleshooting & Maintenance
Appendices
There are 2 symbols used in this manual to highlight important information. The symbols appear as the
following:
Electrical Hazard warns of situations in which a high voltage can cause physical injury, death
and/or damage equipment.
Caution warns of situations in which physical injury and/damage to equipment may occur by means
other than electrical.
Highlight mark an important point in the documentation.
DANGER
HAZARD OF ELECTRIC SHOCK, EXPLOSION, OR ARC FLASH
Only qualified personnel familiar with low voltage equipment are to perform work described in this set of instructions.
Apply appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) and follow safe electrical work practices. See NFPA 70E.
Turn off all power before working on or inside equipment.
Use a properly rated voltage sensing device to confirm that the power is off.
Before performing visual inspections, tests, or maintenance on the equipment, disconnect all sources of electric power.
Assume that circuits are live until they have been completely de-energized, tested, and tagged. Pay particular attention to
the design of the power system. Consider all sources of power, including the possibility of backfeeding.
Replace all devices, doors, and covers before turning on power to this equipment.
Failure to follow these instructions will result in death or serious injury.
2
1 - INTRODUCTION
Benshaw Services
General Information
Benshaw offers its customers the following:
• Start-up services
•
•
•
•
On-site training services
Technical support
Detailed documentation
Replacement parts
z NOTE: Information about products and services is available by contacting Benshaw, refer to
page 4.
Start-Up Services
Benshaw technical field support personnel are available to customers with the initial start-up of the
2
RediStart MX . Information about start-up services and fees are available by contacting Benshaw.
On-Site Training Services
Benshaw technical field support personnel are available to conduct on-site training on RediStart MX
operations and troubleshooting.
Technical Support
Benshaw technical support personnel are available (at no charge) to answer customer questions and
provide technical support over the telephone. For more information about contacting technical support
personnel, refer to page 4.
Documentation
Benshaw provides all customers with:
• Operations manual.
•
2
Wiring diagram.
All drawings are produced in AutoCAD© format. The drawings are available on standard CD / DVD or
via e-mail by contacting Benshaw.
2
On-Line Documentation
All RediStart MX documentation is available on-line at http://www.benshaw.com.
Replacement Parts
Spare and replacement parts can be purchased from Benshaw Technical Support.
Software Number
This manual pertains to the software version numbers 810023-01-08.
Hardware Number
This manual pertains to the hardware version numbers 300055-01-05.
Publication History
See page 213.
Warranty
Benshaw provides a 1 year standard warranty with its starters. An extension to the 3 year warranty is
provided when a Benshaw or Benshaw authorized service technician completes the installation and
initial start up. The warranty data sheet must also be signed and returned. The cost of this service is not
included in the price of the Benshaw soft starter and will be quoted specifically to each customers
needs. All recommended maintenance procedures must be followed throughout the warranty period to
ensure validity. This information is also available by going online to register at www.benshaw.com.
3
1 - INTRODUCTION
Contacting Benshaw
Contacting Benshaw
Information about Benshaw products and services is available by contacting Benshaw at one of the
following offices:
Benshaw Inc. Corporate Headquarters
1659 E. Sutter Road
Glenshaw, PA 15116
Phone:
(412) 487-8235
Tech Support: (800) 203-2416
Fax:
(412) 487-4201
Benshaw High Point
EPC Division
645 McWay Drive
High Point, NC 27263
Phone:
(336) 434-4445
Fax:
(336) 434-9682
Benshaw Canada Controls Inc.
Benshaw Mobile
550 Bright Street East
Listowel, Ontario N4W 3W3
Phone:
(519) 291-5112
Tech Support: (877) 236-7429 (BEN-SHAW)
Fax:
(519) 291-2595
CSD Division
5821 Rangeline Road, Suite 202
Theodor, AL 36582
Phone:
(251) 443-5911
Fax:
(251) 443-5966
Benshaw West
Benshaw Pueblo
14715 North 78th Way, Suite 600
Scottsdale, AZ 85260
Phone:
(480) 905-0601
Fax:
(480) 905-0757
Trane Division
1 Jetway Court
Pueblo, CO 81001
Phone:
(719) 948-1405
Fax:
(719) 948-1445
2
Technical support for the RediStart MX Series is available at no charge by contacting Benshaw’s
customer service department at one of the above telephone numbers. A service technician is available
Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. EST.
z NOTE: An on-call technician is available after normal business hours and on weekends by calling
Benshaw and following the recorded instructions.
To help assure prompt and accurate service, please have the following information available when
contacting Benshaw:
• Name of Company
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
4
Telephone number where the caller can be contacted
Fax number of caller
Benshaw product name
Benshaw model number
Benshaw serial number
Name of product distributor
Approximate date of purchase
Voltage of motor attached to Benshaw product
FLA of motor attached to Benshaw product
A brief description of the application
1 - INTRODUCTION
MX2 & MX3 Product Comparison
1.1
3
Additional MX Product Features
2
3
The MX is a standard solid state starter. If you require additional features, please review the expanded feature set of the MX Solid
3
State Starter below. For the additional information on the MX Solid State Starter contact Benshaw.
MX3 Product Features
1
5 Additional Digital Inputs
2
3 Additional 5Amp, Form A Relays
3
Real Time Clock
4
Zero Sequence Ground Fault
5
16 RTD O/L Biasing (Platinum) Remote by RS-485
6
Motor PTC Feedback
7
Preset Slow Speeds (Cyclo-Convertor)
0.1 to 40% Motor Speed
8
99 Event Log
9
Backspin Timer
10
Starts per Hour
11
Time Between Starts
12
PORT (Power Outage Ride-Thru)
13
Squared and S Ramp Profiles
14
Speed Controlled Ramp with Tachometer Feedback
5
1 - INTRODUCTION
Interpreting Model Numbers
2
Figure 1: RediStart MX Series Model Numbers
RB2-1-S-052A-12C
C = Open Chassis
Frame Size
Amp Rating, (0 - 999A)
Fault Level
S = Standard
H = High
Type of Bypass
0 = None (only available with RC)
1 = Integrated
2 = Separate, Definite Purpose (Only with 1000V Starter)
3 = Separate, ATL IEC AC3 Rated
4 = Separate, ATL NEMA Rated (AC4)
Type of Control
2
2 = MX
3
3 = MX
Family of RediStart Starter
B = Bypass
C = Continuous
Example of Model Number: RX2-1S-361A-14C
2
A RediStart starter with bypass, MX control, Integrated Bypass, Standard Fault, 361 Amp unit, Frame 14, open Chassis.
6
1 - INTRODUCTION
General Overview of a Reduced Voltage Starter
General Overview
2
The RediStart MX motor starter is a microprocessor-controlled starter for single or three-phase motors. The
starter can be custom designed for specific applications. A few of the features are:
• Solid state design.
• Reduced voltage starting and soft stopping.
• Closed-loop motor current control, power (kW) control, torque control.
• Programmable motor protection.
• Programmable operating parameters.
• Programmable metering.
Each starter can operate within applied line voltage and frequency values of 100VAC to 600VAC (optional
1000VAC) and 23 to 72Hz.
The starter can be programmed for any motor FLA and all of the common motor service factors. It enables
2
operators to control both motor acceleration and deceleration. The RediStart MX can also protect the motor and
its load from damage that could be caused by incorrect phase order wiring.
The starter continually monitors the amount of current being delivered to the motor. This protects the motor from
overheating or drawing excess current.
Features
The enhanced engineering features of the starter include:
• Multiple frame sizes
• Universal voltage operation
• Universal frequency operation
• Programmable motor overload multiplier
• Controlled acceleration and deceleration
• Phase rotation protection
• Regulated current control
• Electronic motor thermal overload protection
• Electronic over/under current protection
• Single phase protection
• Line-to-line current imbalance protection
• Stalled motor protection
• Programmable metering
• Passcode protected
• Programmable Relays
• Analog output with digital offset and span adjustment
• Analog input with digital offset and span adjustment
• Voltage and Current Accuracy of 3%
• Slow Speed (Cyclo Conversion) 7.1% & 14.3% forward and reverse
• Motor winding (Anti-Condensation)
• Anti-windmilling brake
• DC Injection Braking
7
1 - INTRODUCTION
NOTES:
8
2 Technical Specifications
2 - TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
TECHNICAL
2
SPECIFICATIONS
Technical Specifications
2.1
General Information
The physical specifications of the starter vary depending upon its configuration. The applicable motor current determines the
configuration and its specific application requirements.
Specifications are subject to change without notice.
This document covers the control electronics and several power sections:
2
• MX control card
• RB Power Stacks with Bypass, Integral and Separate
• RC Power Stacks, Continuous operation, NO bypass
Electrical Ratings
2.2
Electrical Ratings
2.2.1
Terminal Points and Functions
Table 1: Terminals
Function
Terminal
Block
Terminal Number
Description
Control Power
TB1
G, ground
N, 120VAC neutral
N, 120VAC neutral
L, 120VAC line
L, 120VAC line
96 – 144 VAC input, 50/60 Hz
45VA required for control card
Relay 1 (R1)
TB2
NO1:Normally Open Contact
RC1:Common
NC1: Normally Closed Contact
Relay Output, SPDT form C
NO Contact (resistive)
5A at 250VAC
5A at 125VAC
5A at 30VDC
1250VA
NC Contact(resistive)
3A at 250VAC
3A at 125VAC
3A at 30VDC
750VA
NO2: Normally Open Contact
RC2: Common Contact
NC2: Normally Closed Contact
Relay Output, SPDT form C
NO Contact (resistive)
5A at 250VAC
5A at 125VAC
5A at 30VDC
1250VA
NC Contact(resistive)
3A at 250VAC
3A at 125VAC
3A at 30VDC
750VA
Relay 2 (R2)
TB2
Relay 3 (R3)
TB2
NO3: Normally Open Contact
RC3: Common Contact
NC3: Normally Closed Contact
10A at 250VAC
10A at 125VAC
10A at 30VDC
2500VA
Digital Inputs
TB3
1: Start
2: DI1
3: DI2
4: DI3
5: Common
120VAC digital input
2500V optical isolation
4mA current draw
Off: 0-35VAC
On: 60-120VAC
Serial Comm
TB4
1: B+
2: A3: COM
Modbus RTU serial communication port.
RS-485 interface
19.2k baud maximum
1500V Isolation
Analog I/O
TB5
1: Ain Power
2: Ain +
3: Ain 4: Common
5: Aout
6: Common
7: Shield
Input:
Voltage or Current
Voltage: 0-10VDC, 67KW impedance
Current: 0-20mA, 500W impedance
Display
10
RJ45
Output:
Voltage or Current
Voltage: 0-10VDC, 120mA maximum
Current: 0-20mA, 500W load maximum
Door Mounted Display Connector
2 - TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
Table 1: Terminals
Terminal
Block
Function
Terminal Number
Description
SCR
J6 to J11
1: Gate
2: Cathode
SCR gate Connections
Phase C.T.
J12
1: CT1
2: CT1
3: CT2
4: CT2
5: CT3
6: CT3
See CT Connector
Wire Gauge: The terminals can support 1- 14 AWG wire or 2-16 AWG wire or smaller.
Torque Rating: The terminals on the control card have a torque rating of 5.0-inch lb. or 0.56Nm. This MUST be followed or damage will occur to the terminals.
Refer to the Control Card Layout on page 39.
2.2.2
Measurements and Accuracies
Table 2: Measurements and Accuracies
Internal Measurements
CT Inputs
Line Voltage Inputs
Conversion: True RMS, Sampling @ 1.562kHz
Range: 1-6400A
Conversion: True RMS, Sampling @ 1.562kHz
Range: 100VAC to 1000VAC 23 to 72 Hz
Metering
Current
Voltage
Watts
Volts-Amps
Watt-Hours
PF
Line Frequency
Ground Fault
Run Time
Analog Input
Analog Output
2.2.3
0 – 40,000 Amps ± 3%
0 – 1250 Volts ± 3%
0 – 9,999 MW ± 5%
0 – 9,999 MVA ± 5%
0 – 10,000 MWh ± 5%
-0.01 to +0.01 (Lag & Lead) ± 5%
23 – 72 Hz ± 0.1 Hz
5 – 100% FLA ± 5% (Machine Protection)
± 3 seconds per 24 hour period
Accuracy ± 3% of full scale (10 bit)
Accuracy ±2% of full scale (12 bit)
z NOTE: Percent accuracy is percent of full scale of the given ranges, Current = Motor
FLA, Voltage = 1000V, Watts/Volts-Amps/Watt-Hours = Motor & Voltage range
List of Motor Protection Features
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
ANSI 19 – Reduced Voltage Start
ANSI 27 / 59 – Adjustable over/under voltage protection (Off or 1 to 40%, time 0.1 to 90.0 sec. in 0.1 sec. intervals,
independent over and under voltage levels)
ANSI 37 – Undercurrent detection (Off or 5 to 100% and time 0.1 to 90.0 sec. in 0.1 sec. intervals)
ANSI 46 – Current imbalance detection (Off or 5 to 40%)
ANSI 47 – Phase rotation (selectable ABC, CBA, Insensitive, or Single Phase)
ANSI 48 – Adjustable up-to-speed / stall timer (1 to 900 sec. in 1 sec. intervals)
ANSI 50 – Instantaneous electronic overcurrent trip
ANSI 51 – Electronic motor overload (Off, class 1 to 40, separate starting and running curves available)
ANSI 51 – Overcurrent detection (Off or 50 to 800% and time 0.1 to 90.0 sec. in 0.1 sec. intervals)
ANSI 51G – Residual Ground fault detection (Off or 5 to 100% of motor FLA)
ANSI 74 – Alarm relay output available
ANSI 81 – Over / Under Frequency
ANSI 86 – Overload lockout
Single Phase Protection
Shorted SCR detection
Mechanical Jam
11
2 - TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
2.2.4
Solid State Motor Overload
2
2
2
The MX control has an advanced I t electronic motor overload (OL) protection function. For optimal motor protection the MX control
has forty standard NEMA style overload curves available for use. Separate overloads can be programmed, one for acceleration and
2
another for normal running operation. The overloads can be individual, the same or completely disabled if necessary. The MX motor
overload function also implements a NEMA based current imbalance overload compensation, user adjustable hot and cold motor
compensation and user adjustable exponential motor cooling.
Figure 2: Commonly Used Overload Curves
10000
Seconds to Trip
1000
100
Class 40
Class 35
Class 30
Class 25
Class 20
10
Class 15
Class 10
Class 5
1
100
150
200
250
300
350
400
450
500
550
600
650
700
Current % (FLA)
The motor overload will NOT trip when the current is less than motor Full Load Amps (FLA) * Service Factor (SF).
The motor overload "pick up" point current is at motor Full Load Amps (FLA) * Service Factor (SF).
The motor overload trip time will be reduced when there is a current imbalance present.
z NOTE: Refer to Theory of Operation, section 7.1 on page 132 for more motor overload details and a larger graph.
Refer to http://www.benshaw.com/olcurves.html for an automated overload calculator.
12
750
800
2 - TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
2.2.5
CT Ratios
Table 3: CT Ratios
CT Ratio
Minimum FLA
(A rms)
Maximum FLA
(A rms)
72:1
(4 wraps 288:1)
4
16
96:1
(3 wraps 288:1)
5
21
144:1
(2 wraps 288:1)
8
32
288:1
15
64
864:1
45
190
2640:1
135
590
3900:1
200
870
5760:1
295
1285
8000:1
410
1800
14400:1
(CT-CT combination)
740
3200
28800:1
(CT-CT combination)
1475
6400
z NOTE: See P78/FUN 03 (CT Ratio) parameter on page 126 for more information.
Starter Power Ratings
2.3
Starter Power Ratings
Each RB2 model starter is rated for three different starting duties. For example, a starter can operate a:
300HP motor for a standard duty start (350% for 30 seconds)
Or
200HP for a heavy duty start (500% for 30 seconds)
Or
150HP motor for a severe duty start (600% for 30 seconds)
Or
450HP motor when connected to the inside delta of a motor for a standard duty start (350% for 30 seconds)
13
2 - TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
2.3.1
Standard Duty (350% for 30 sec) Ratings
Table 4: Standard Duty Horsepower Ratings
Standard Duty
(350% current for 30 seconds, 115% Continuous)
HORSEPOWER RATING
NOMINAL
AMPS
200-208V
230-240V
380-400V
440-480V
575-600V
RB2-1-S-027A-11C
27
7.5
10
15
20
25
RB2-1-S-040A-11C
40
10
15
25
30
40
RB2-1-S-052A-12C
52
15
20
30
40
50
RB2-1-S-065A-12C
65
20
25
40
50
60
RB2-1-S-077A-13C
77
25
30
40
60
75
RB2-1-S-096A-13C
96
30
40
50
75
100
RB2-1-S-125A-14C
125
40
50
75
100
125
RB2-1-S-156A-14C
156
50
60
75
125
150
RB2-1-S-180A-14C
180
60
75
100
150
200
RB2-1-S-180A-15C
180
60
75
100
150
200
RB2-1-S-240A-15C
240
75
100
150
200
250
RB2-1-S-302A-15C
302
100
125
150
250
300
RB2-1-S-361A-16C
361
125
150
200
300
400
RB2-1-S-414A-17C
414
150
150
250
350
400
RB2-1-S-477A-17C
477
150
200
300
400
500
RB2-1-S-515A-17C
515
200
200
300
450
500
RB2-1-S-590A-18C
590
200
250
350
500
600
RB2-1-S-720A-19C
720
250
300
400
600
700
RB2-1-S-838A-20C
838
300
350
500
700
800
MODEL NUMBER
z NOTE: Do not exceed Class 10 overload setting.
14
2 - TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
2.3.2
Heavy Duty (500% current for 30 sec) Ratings
Table 5: Heavy Duty Horsepower Ratings
Heavy Duty
(500% current for 30 seconds, 125% Continuous)
HORSEPOWER RATING
NOMINAL
AMPS
200-208V
230-240V
380-400V
440-480V
575-600V
RB2-1-S-027A-11C
24
7.5
10
15
20
25
RB2-1-S-040A-11C
40
10
15
25
30
40
RB2-1-S-052A-12C
54
15
20
30
40
50
RB2-1-S-065A-12C
54
15
20
30
40
50
RB2-1-S-077A-13C
54
15
20
30
40
50
RB2-1-S-096A-13C
96
30
40
50
75
100
RB2-1-S-125A-14C
125
40
50
75
100
125
RB2-1-S-156A-14C
125
40
50
75
100
125
RB2-1-S-180A-14C
125
40
50
75
100
125
RB2-1-S-180A-15C
180
60
75
100
150
200
RB2-1-S-240A-15C
215
60
75
125
150
200
RB2-1-S-302A-15C
215
60
75
125
150
200
RB2-1-S-361A-16C
252
75
100
150
200
250
RB2-1-S-414A-17C
372
125
150
200
300
400
RB2-1-S-477A-17C
372
125
150
200
300
400
RB2-1-S-515A-17C
372
125
150
200
300
400
RB2-1-S-590A-18C
551
200
200
300
450
500
RB2-1-S-720A-19C
623
200
250
350
500
600
RB2-1-S-838A-20C
623
200
250
350
500
600
MODEL NUMBER
z NOTE: Do not exceed Class 20 overload setting.
15
2 - TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
2.3.3
Severe Duty (600% current for 30 sec) Ratings
Table 6: Severe Duty Horsepower Ratings
Severe Duty
(600% current for 30 seconds 125% Continuous)
HORSEPOWER RATING
NOMINAL
AMPS
200-208V
230-240V
380-400V
440-480V
575-600V
RB2-1-S-027A-11C
24
5
7.5
10
15
20
RB2-1-S-040A-11C
40
10
10
20
30
40
RB2-1-S-052A-12C
45
10
15
25
30
40
RB2-1-S-065A-12C
45
10
15
25
30
40
RB2-1-S-077A-13C
45
10
15
25
30
40
RB2-1-S-096A-13C
77
25
30
40
60
75
RB2-1-S-125A-14C
105
30
40
60
75
100
RB2-1-S-156A-14C
105
30
40
60
75
100
RB2-1-S-180A-14C
105
30
40
60
75
100
RB2-1-S-180A-15C
180
50
60
100
125
150
RB2-1-S-240A-15C
180
50
60
100
125
150
RB2-1-S-302A-15C
180
50
60
100
125
150
RB2-1-S-361A-16C
210
60
75
125
150
200
RB2-1-S-414A-17C
310
100
125
150
250
300
RB2-1-S-477A-17C
310
100
125
150
250
300
RB2-1-S-515A-17C
310
100
125
150
250
300
RB2-1-S-590A-18C
515
150
200
300
450
500
RB2-1-S-720A-19C
515
150
200
300
450
500
RB2-1-S-838A-20C
515
150
200
300
450
500
MODEL NUMBER
z NOTE: Do not exceed Class 30 overload setting.
16
2 - TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
2.3.4
Inside Delta Connected Standard Duty (350% for 30 sec) Ratings
Table 7: Inside Delta Standard Duty Horsepower Ratings
INSIDE DELTA Std Duty
(350% start for 30 seconds 115% Continuous)
HORSEPOWER RATING
NOMINAL
AMPS
200-208V
220-240V
380-415V
440-480V
575-600V
RB2-1-S-125A-14C
180
60
75
100
150
200
RB2-1-S-156A-14C
240
75
100
150
200
250
RB2-1-S-180A-14C
279
75
100
150
200
250
RB2-1-S-180A-15C
279
75
100
150
200
250
RB2-1-S-240A-15C
361
125
150
200
300
400
RB2-1-S-302A-15C
414
150
150
250
350
400
RB2-1-S-361A-16C
515
200
150
250
450
400
RB2-1-S-414A-17C
590
200
250
350
500
600
RB2-1-S-477A-17C
720
250
300
400
600
700
RB2-1-S-515A-17C
800
250
300
500
600
700
RB2-1-S-590A-18C
838
300
350
500
700
800
RB2-1-S-720A-19C
1116
300
350
700
900
800
RB2-1-S-838A-20C
1300
400
500
800
1000
1200
MODEL NUMBER
z NOTE: Do not exceed Class 10 overload setting.
17
18
40
52
65
77
96
125
156
180
180
240
302
361
414
477
515
590
720
838
RB_1_040A11C
RB_1_052A12C
RB_1_065A12C
RB_1_077A13C
RB_1_096A13C
RB_1_125A14C
RB_1_156A14C
RB_1_180A14C
RB_1_180A15C
RB_1_240A15C
RB_1_302A15C
RB_1_361A16C
RB_1_414A17C
RB_1_477A17C
RB_1_515A17C
RB_1_590A18C
RB_1_720A18C
RB_1_838A19C
1116
1299
964
915
798
739
642
560
468
372
279
279
242
194
-
-
-
-
-
-
828
679
592
549
476
415
347
276
207
207
179
144
110
89
75
60
46
31
1494
1283
1052
918
850
738
643
538
428
321
321
278
223
171
137
116
93
71
48
42
42
42
42
42
42
30
30
30
30
18
18
18
10
10
10
10
5
5
65
65
65
65
65
65
65
65
65
65
30
30
30
10
10
10
10
5
5
5 For higher kAIC ratings, consult factory
4 Bus Tab with NEMA 2 hole pattern ½" diameter ¾" apart as defined by NEMA Standard CC1
3 Bus Tab with 1 hole ¼" diameter
2 Power Block wire size #10-#1awg
1 Power Block wire size #12-#4awg
* Rating for Inside Delta Application
27
Unit
Unit
Nominal
115%
Withstand Withstand
Current (A) Current (A)
Rating (KA) Rating (KA)
Inside Delta Inside Delta
Std. Fault5 High. Fault5
Lo a d
2
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
3
3
4
4
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
4
4
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
4
4
4
4
4
4
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
4
Bus Tab4
4
4
4
4
J/T/RK1/RK5
J/T/RK1/RK5
J/T/RK1/RK5
J/T/RK1/RK5
J/T/RK1/RK5
J/T/RK1/RK5
J/T/RK1/RK5
J/T/RK1/RK5
J/T/RK1/RK5
J/T/RK1/RK5
J/T/RK1/RK5
Allowable Fuse
Class
L
L
L
L
L/T
L/T
J/T/RK1/RK5/L
Bus Tab4 J/T/RK1/RK5/L
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
Bus Tab4
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
4
Bus Tab4
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
4
4
4
Bus Tab4
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
Bus Tab4
Bus Tab
4
3
3
Bus Tab
Bus Tab3
Bus Tab3
Power Block2 Bus Tab3
Power Block
Power Block
1
Power Block1 Bus Tab3
L in e
Connection Type
1 4 0 0 /2 0 0 0 *
1 2 0 0 /1 8 0 0 *
1 0 0 0 /1 6 0 0 *
9 0 0 /1 3 0 0 *
8 0 0 /1 2 0 0 *
7 0 0 /1 1 0 0 *
6 0 0 /9 0 0 *
5 0 0 /8 0 0 *
4 0 0 /6 0 0 *
3 0 0 /4 5 0 *
3 0 0 /4 5 0 *
2 5 0 /4 0 0 *
2 0 0 /3 0 0 *
1 5 0 /2 5 0 *
1 2 5 /2 0 0 *
1 1 0 /1 7 5 *
9 0 /1 2 5 *
7 0 /1 0 0 *
4 5 /7 0 *
2 0 0 0 /3 0 0 0 *
1 8 0 0 /2 5 0 0 *
1 4 0 0 /2 0 0 0 *
1 3 0 0 /2 0 0 0 *
1 2 0 0 /1 8 0 0 *
1 0 0 0 /1 6 0 0 *
9 0 0 /1 3 0 0 *
7 0 0 /1 1 0 0 *
6 0 0 /9 0 0 *
4 5 0 /7 0 0 *
4 5 0 /7 0 0 *
3 5 0 /6 0 0 *
3 0 0 /4 5 0 *
2 2 5 /3 5 0 *
1 7 5 /3 0 0 *
1 5 0 /2 5 0 *
1 2 5 /2 0 0 *
1 0 0 /1 5 0 *
6 0 /1 0 0 *
Maximum
Maximum
Circuit
Fuse Size
Breaker Trip
Current (A)
Rating (A)
245
205
165
140
120
103
92
82
75
71
71
66
62
59
56
53.7
51
49.8
49
Running Watt
Loss, After
Bypassed
(W)
2.3.5
RB_1_027A11C
Model Number
115%
Nominal
Current
Current
Rating
(A)
(A)
2 - TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
RB2 Power Stack Ratings and Protection Requirements
40
52
65
77
96
125
156
180
180
240
302
361
414
477
515
590
720
838
RB_2_040A11C
RB_2_052A12C
RB_2_065A12C
RB_2_077A13C
RB_2_096A13C
RB_2_125A14C
RB_2_156A14C
RB_2_180A14C
RB_2_180A15C
RB_2_240A15C
RB_2_302A15C
RB_2_361A16C
RB_2_414A17C
RB_2_477A17C
RB_2_515A17C
RB_2_590A18C
RB_2_720A18C
RB_2_838A19C
964
828
679
592
549
476
415
347
276
207
207
179
144
110
89
75
60
46
31
1299
1116
915
798
739
642
560
468
372
279
279
242
194
-
-
-
-
-
-
1494
1283
1052
918
850
738
643
538
428
321
321
278
223
-
-
-
-
-
-
Consult Factory
30
30
30
30
30
30
18
18
10
10
10
10
10
10
10
5
5
5
Bus Tab4
Bus Tab4
Consault
Factory
5 For higher kAIC ratings, consult factory
Bus Tab
4
4
Bus Tab4
Bus Tab4
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
4
4
Bus Tab
Bus Tab4
4
4
Bus Tab4
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
Bus Tab4
4
4
Bus Tab4
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
4
4
4
4
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
Bus Tab4
4
4
Bus Tab4
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
4
4
3
Bus Tab3
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
Bus Tab3
Bus Tab
3
Power Block
L
L
L
L
L/T
L/T
J/T/RK1/RK5/L
J/T/RK1/RK5/L
J/T/RK1/RK5
J/T/RK1/RK5
J/T/RK1/RK5
J/T/RK1/RK5
J/T/RK1/RK5
J/T/RK1/RK5
J/T/RK1/RK5
J/T/RK1/RK5
J/T/RK1/RK5
Power Block2 Bus Tab3
3
J/T/RK1/RK5
2
J/T/RK1/RK5
Power Block1 Bus Tab3
Lo a d
1 4 0 0 /2 0 0 0 *
1 2 0 0 /1 8 0 0 *
1 0 0 0 /1 6 0 0 *
9 0 0 /1 3 0 0 *
8 0 0 /1 2 0 0 *
7 0 0 /1 1 0 0 *
6 0 0 /9 0 0 *
5 0 0 /8 0 0 *
4 0 0 /6 0 0 *
3 0 0 /4 5 0 *
3 0 0 /4 5 0 *
2 5 0 /4 0 0 *
2 0 0 /3 0 0 *
1 5 0 /2 5 0 *
1 2 5 /2 0 0 *
1 1 0 /1 7 5 *
9 0 /1 2 5 *
7 0 /1 0 0 *
4 5 /7 0 *
2 0 0 0 /3 0 0 0 *
1 8 0 0 /2 5 0 0 *
1 4 0 0 /2 0 0 0 *
1 3 0 0 /2 0 0 0 *
1 2 0 0 /1 8 0 0 *
1 0 0 0 /1 6 0 0 *
9 0 0 /1 3 0 0 *
7 0 0 /1 1 0 0 *
6 0 0 /9 0 0 *
4 5 0 /7 0 0 *
4 5 0 /7 0 0 *
3 5 0 /6 0 0 *
3 0 0 /4 5 0 *
2 2 5 /3 5 0 *
1 7 5 /3 0 0 *
1 5 0 /2 5 0 *
1 2 5 /2 0 0 *
1 0 0 /1 5 0 *
6 0 /1 0 0 *
245
205
165
140
120
103
92
82
75
71
71
66
62
59
56
53.7
51
49.8
49
Running
Maximum
Maximum
Watt Loss,
Allowable Fuse
Fuse Size Circuit Breaker
After
Class
Current (A) Trip Rating (A) Bypassed
(W)
Power Block1 Bus Tab3
L in e
Connection Type
30
30
30
30
30
30
30
18
18
18
18
10
10
10
10
10
10
5
NEMA (AC4)
Unit Withstand
Fault Rating
(KA) 5
4 Bus Tab with NEMA 2 hole pattern ½" diameter ¾" apart as defined by NEMA Standard CC1
3 Bus Tab with 1 hole ¼" diameter
2 Power Block wire size #10-#1awg
1 Power Block wire size #12-#4awg
* Rating for Inside Delta Application
27
RB_2_027A11C
AC3 Unit
Withstand
Fault Rating
(KA) 5
2.3.6
Model Number
115%
Nominal
Nominal
115%
Current
Current
Current (A) Current (A)
Rating
(A)
Inside Delta Inside Delta
(A)
2 - TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
Power Stack Input Ratings with Protection Requirements for Separate Bypass
19
20
40
52
65
77
96
124
125
156
180
240
302
361
477
590
720
840
960
1080
1200
RC_ 0 _040A31C
RC_ 0 _052A31C
RC_ 0 _065A32C
RC_ 0 _077A32C
RC_ 0 _096A33C
RC_ 0 _124A34C
RC_ 0 _125A34C
RC_ 0 _156A34C
RC_ 0 _180A35C
RC_ 0 _240A35C
RC_ 0 _302A35C
RC_ 0 _361A35C
RC_ 0 _477A35C
RC_ 0 _590A36C
RC_ 0 _720A36C
RC_ 0 _840A36C
RC_ 0 _960A37C
RC_-0_1080A-37C
RC_ 0_1200KA38C
1440
1350
1200
1050
900
737
596
421
377
300
225
195
155
155
120
2 Power Block wire size #2 awg max
4 For higher kAIC ratings, consult factory
3 Power Block wire size #2/0 max
96
81
65
50
33.75
1 Power Block wire size #6 awg max
27
85
85
85
85
42
42
42
42
42
42
42
42
42
42
42
42
42
42
42
42
J/600V AC T/RK1
J/600V AC T/RK1
J/600V AC T/RK1
Power Block2 Power Block2
Power Block3 Power Block3
Power Block3 Power Block3
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
Bus Tab
L
L
L
L
L
L
J/600V AC T/RK1
J/600V AC T/RK1
J/600V AC T/RK1
J/600V AC T/RK1
J/600V AC T/RK1
J/600V AC T/RK1
J/600V AC T/RK1
J/600V AC T/RK1
Power Block2 Power Block2
Bus Tab
J/600V AC T/RK1
Power Block1 Power Block1
Bus Tab
J/600V AC T/RK1
Power Block1 Power Block1
Allowable Fuse Class
J/600V AC T/RK1
Lo a d
100kA
50kA
100kA
50kA
60
100
60
100
100kA
50kA
1600
2000
100KA
1600
50KA
100kA
50kA
1600
2000
2000
100kA
100kA
100kA
100kA
100kA
100kA
100kA
100kA
100kA
100kA
100kA
100kA
100kA
1600
1600
1400
800
800
800
600
400
400
350
225
225
225
100kA
100kA
50kA
40
60
225
Short
Circuit
Rating
Maximum Fuse
Current (A)
Current Limiting Circuit Breaker Protected Rating
Power Block1 Power Block1
L in e
Connection Type
400A
600A
800A
1200a
800A
1200A
800A
1200A
CJD63B
CLD63b
CND63B
CND63b
CND63B
CND63b
CND63B
CND63b
HPD63F160
HPD63F160
1200 –
1600A
1200 –
1600A
1200 –
1600A
400A
600A
HPD63F160
400A
CJD63B
CLD63b
400A
250A
225A
225A
225A
225A
125A
100A
100A
60A
60A
Trip Plug
CFD63B
CFD63B
CFD63B
CFD63B
CFD63B
CFD63B
CFD63B
CED63B
CED63B
CED63B
CED63B
CED63B
Catalog
Number
85kA
85KA
85kA
85kA
85kA
85kA
65kA
65kA
65kA
65kA
65kA
65kA
42kA
42kA
42kA
42kA
42kA
42kA
42Ka
42kA
Short
Circuit
Rating
Current Limiting Circuit Breaker
Protected Rating
3045
2445
2145
1845
1520
1240
950
800
645
495
435
360
360
285
240
210
175
145
110
Running
Watt Loss,
After
Bypassed
(W)
2.3.7
RC_ 0 _027A31C
Model Number
Unit
Nominal
Withstand
125%
Current
Fault
Current
(A)
Rating
(kA)4
2 - TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
Power Stack Input Ratings with Protection Requirements for RC No Bypass
2 - TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
2.3.8
RB2 Starter Control Power Requirements
Table 8: RB2 Starter CPT VA Requirements
2.3.9
Model Number
Power
Required
(VA)
Recommended
Min. TX size
Model Number
Power
Required
(VA)
Recommended
Min. TX size
RB2-1-S-027A-11C
74
75
RB2-1-S-240A-15C
243
250
RB2-1-S-040A-11C
74
75
RB2-1-S-302A-15C
243
250
RB2-1-S-052A-12C
111
125
RB2-1-S-361A-16C
243
250
RB2-1-S-065A-12C
111
125
RB2-1-S-414A-17C
441
450
RB2-1-S-077A-13C
111
125
RB2-1-S-477A-17C
441
450
RB2-1-S-096A-13C
111
125
RB2-1-S-515A-17C
441
450
RB2-1-S-125A-14C
131
150
RB2-1-S-590A-18C
441
450
RB2-1-S-156A-14C
243
250
RB2-1-S-720A-19C
441
450
RB2-1-S-180A-14C
243
250
RB2-1-S-838A-20C
243
250
RC2 Starter Control Power Requirements
Table 9: RC2 Starter CPT VA Requirements
Model Number
Power
Required
(VA)
Recommended
Min. TX size
Model Number
Power
Required
(VA)
Recommended
Min. TX size
RC2-1-S-027A-31C
45
75
RC2-1-S-240A-35C
123
150
RC2-1-S-040A-31C
45
75
RC2-1-S-302A-35C
123
150
RC2-1-S-052A-31C
45
75
RC2-1-S-361A-35C
201
250
RC2-1-S-065A-32C
45
75
RC2-1-S-414A-35C
150
200
RC2-1-S-077A-32C
45
75
RC2-1-S-477A-35C
225
350
RC2-1-S-096A-33C
45
75
RC2-1-S-590A-35C
225
350
RC2-1-S-124A-33C
45
75
RC2-1-S-720A-36C
225
350
RC2-1-S-125A-34C
123
150
RC2-1-S-840A-19C
225
350
RC2-1-S-156A-34C
123
150
RC2-1-S-960A-20C
225
350
RC2-1-S-180A-34C
123
150
RC2-1-S-1200A-37C
285
350
21
2 - TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
Mechanical Drawings
2.4
Dimensions
2.4.1
RB2 Chassis with Integral Bypass
Figure 3: RB2 - 27A - 96A
Model
A
B
C
D
E
F
RB2 27-65A
14
10
12.5
8.43
0.84
0.31
RB2 77-96A
15
10
13.5
8.43
0.84
0.31
Figure 4: RB2 125 - 361A
Model
22
A
B
C
D
E
F
RB2 125A
19.5
12.27 13.25
4
0.5
0.31
RB2 156-180A
21.25 12.00 15.25
4
0.5
0.31
RB2 180-302A
22.75 12.16 16.75
4
0.5
0.31
RB2 361A
23.91 13.16 18.63
4.31
0.5
0.31
2 - TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
Figure 5: RB2 414 - 838A
A
B
C
D
E
RB2 414-590A
27.66
18.5
26.25
6
0.31
RB2 720A
29.38
18.5
28
6
0.31
RB2 838A
27.75
26.6
23.5
8.7
0.31
Model
23
2 - TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
2.4.2
RC2 Chassis with no Bypass
Figure 6: RC2 0 - 124A
Model
A
B
C
RC2 27-52A
14
RC2 65-77A
18
10
RC2 96-124A
27
10
D
E
4.69
8-32 TAP
4.375
4.75
¼-20 TAP
5.313
4.75
¼-20 TAP
9.875 3.375
Figure 7: RC2 156 - 590A
24
Model
A
B
C
D
E
RC2 156-180A
18
15
17
13.5
0.3
RC2 240A
24
15
23
13.5
0.5
RC2 302-361A
28
17.25
27
15.75
0.5
RC2 477A
28
20
27
18.5
0.5
RC2 590A
35
20
34
18.5
0.5
2 - TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
Environmental Conditions
2.5
Environmental Conditions
Table 10: Environmental Ratings
Operating Temperatures
-10°C to +40°C (14°F to 104°F)enclosed
-10°C to +50°C (14°F to 122°F)open
Storage Temperatures
-20°C to +70°C (-4°F to 155°F)
Humidity
0% to 95% non condensing
Altitude
1000m (3300ft) without derating
Maximum Vibration
5.9m/s2 (19.2ft/s2 ) [0.6G]
Cooling
RC (Natural convection)
RB (Bypassed)
z NOTE: It is recommended that the starter be powered up once per year, for one hour continuously to avoid deterioration of
electrolytic capacitors and subsequent starter failure.
Altitude Derating
2.6
Altitude Derating
Benshaw's starters are capable of operating at altitudes up to 3,300 feet (1000 meters) without requiring altitude derating. Table 11
provides the derating percentage to be considered when using a starter above 3,300 feet (1000 meters).
Table 11: Altitude Derating
Altitude
Percent Derating (Amps)
3300 Feet
1006 meters
0.0%
4300 Feet
1311 meters
3.0%
5300 Feet
1615 meters
6.0%
6300 Feet
1920 meters
9.0%
7300 Feet
2225 meters
12.0%
8300 Feet
2530 meters
15.0%
9300 Feet
2835 meters
18.0%
For derating above 10,000 feet consult Benshaw Inc.
25
2 - TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
Approvals
2.7
Approvals
2
MX Control Card is UL, cUL Recognized
Certificate of Compliance
2.8
Certificate of Compliance
CE Mark, See Appendix D on page 198.
26
3
Installation
3 - INSTALLATION
INSTALLATI
3
ON
Before You Start
3.1
Before You Start
3.1.1
Inspection
2
Before storing or installing the RediStart MX Series Starter, thoroughly inspect the device for possible shipping damage. Upon receipt:
• Remove the starter from its package and inspect exterior for shipping damage. If damage is apparent, notify the shipping agent and
your sales representative.
• Open the enclosure and inspect the starter for any apparent damage or foreign objects. Ensure that all of the mounting hardware and
terminal connection hardware is properly seated, securely fastened, and undamaged.
• Ensure all connections and wires are secured.
• Read the technical data label affixed to the starter and ensure that the correct horsepower and input voltage for the application has
been purchased.
• The numbering system for a chassis is shown below.
3.1.2
Installation Precautions
Installation of some models may require halting production during installation. If applicable, ensure that the starter is installed when
production can be halted long enough to accommodate the installation. Before installing the starter, ensure:
• The wiring diagram (supplied separately with the starter) is correct for the required application.
• The starter is the correct current rating and voltage rating for the motor being started.
• All of the installation safety precautions are followed.
• The correct power source is available.
• The starter control method has been selected.
• The connection cables have been obtained (lugs and associated mounting hardware).
• The necessary installation tools and supplies are procured.
• The installation site meets all environmental specifications for the starter NEMA/CEMA rating.
• The motor being started has been installed and is ready to be started.
• Any power factor correction capacitors (PFCC) are installed on the power source side of the starter and not on the motor side.
Failure to remove power factor correction or surge capacitors from the load side of the starter will result in serious damage to the starter
that will not be covered by the starter warranty. The capacitors must be connected to the line side of the starter. The up-to-speed (UTS)
contact can be used to energize the capacitors after the motor has reached full speed.
3.1.3
Safety Precautions
To ensure the safety of the individuals installing the starter, and the safe operation of the starter, observe the following guidelines:
• Ensure that the installation site meets all of the required environmental conditions (Refer to Site Preparation, page 29).
• LOCK OUT ALL SOURCES OF POWER.
• Install circuit disconnecting devices (i.e., circuit breaker, fused disconnect or non-fused disconnect) if they were not previously
installed by the factory as part of the package.
• Install short circuit protection (i.e., circuit breaker or fuses) if not previously installed by the factory as part of the package.
• Consult Power Ratings for the fault rating on pages 18-20.
• Follow all NEC (National Electrical Code) and/or C.S.A. (Canadian Standards Association) standards or Local Codes as applicable.
• Remove any foreign objects from the interior of the enclosure, especially wire strands that may be left over from installation wiring.
• Ensure that a qualified electrician installs wiring.
• Ensure that the individuals installing the starter are wearing ALL protective eyewear and clothing.
• Ensure the starter is protected from debris, metal shavings and any other foreign objects.
The opening of the branch circuit protective device may be an indication that a fault current has been interrupted. To reduce the risk of
electrical shock, current carrying parts and other components of the starter should be inspected and replaced if damaged.
28
3 - INSTALLATION
Installation Considerations
3.2
Installation Considerations
3.2.1
Site Preparation
General Information
Before the starter can be installed, the installation site must be prepared. The customer is responsible for:
• Providing the correct power source.
• Providing the correct power protection.
• Selecting the control mechanism.
• Obtaining the connection cables, lugs and all other hardware
• Ensuring the installation site meets all environmental specifications for the enclosure NEMA rating.
• Installing and connecting the motor.
Power Cables
The power cables for the starter must have the correct NEC/CSA current rating for the unit being installed. Depending upon the model,
the power cables can range from a single #14 AWG conductor to four 750 MCM cables. (Consult local and national codes for selecting
wire size).
Site Requirements
The installation site must adhere to the applicable starter NEMA/CEMA rating. For optimal performance, the installation site must meet
the appropriate environmental and altitude requirements.
3.2.2
3.2.3
EMC Installation Guidelines
General
In order to help our customers comply with European electromagnetic compatibility standards, Benshaw Inc. has
developed the following guidelines.
Attention
This product has been designed for Class A equipment. Use of the product in domestic environments may cause radio
interference, in which case the installer may need to use additional mitigation methods.
Enclosure
Install the product in a grounded metal enclosure.
Grounding
Connect a grounding conductor to the screw or terminal provided as standard on each controller. Refer to layout/power
wiring schematic for grounding provision location.
Wiring
Refer to Wiring Practices on page 31.
Filtering
To comply with Conducted Emission Limits (CE requirement), a high voltage (1000V or greater) 0.1 uF capacitor
should be connected from each input line to ground at the point where the line enters the cabinet.
Use of Power Factor Capacitors
Power factor correction capacitors and surge capacitors CAN NOT be connected between the starter and the motor. These devices can
damage the SCRs during ramping. These devices appear like a short circuit to the SCR when it turns on, which causes a di/dt level
greater than the SCR can handle. If used, power factor correction capacitors or surge capacitors must be connected ahead of the starter
and sequenced into the power circuit after the start is completed. A programmable relay can be configured as an up-to-speed (UTS) relay
and then used to pull-in a contactor to connect the capacitors after the motor has reached full speed.
z NOTE: If the motor manufacturer supplies surge capacitors they must be removed before starting.
3.2.4
Use of Electro-Mechanical Brakes
If an electro-mechanical brake is used with the starter, it must be powered from the line side of the starter to ensure full voltage is applied
to the brake during a start so it will properly release. A programmable relay can be configured as a run relay and then used to pull-in a
contactor to power the brake whenever the starter is not providing power to the motor.
3.2.5
Reversing Contactor
If the application requires a reversing contactor, it should be connected on the output side (load) of the soft starter. The contactor must
be closed before starting the soft starter. The soft starter must be off before switching the direction of the reversing contactor. The
reversing contactor must never be switched while the soft starter is operating.
29
3 - INSTALLATION
Mounting Considerations
3.3
Mounting Considerations
3.3.1
Bypassed Starters
Provisions should be made to ensure that the average temperature inside the enclosure never rises above 50°C. If the temperature inside
the enclosure is too high, the starter can be damaged or the operational life can be reduced.
3.3.2
Non-Bypassed Starters
Provisions should be made to ensure that the temperature inside the enclosure never rises above 50°C. If the temperature inside the
enclosure is too high, the starter can be damaged or the operational life can be reduced. As a general rule of thumb, the following
ventilation guidelines can be followed.
Table 12: Ventilation Requirements
Current Range
< 200 amps
200 to 300 amps
301 to 400 amps
401 to 600 amps
601 to 700 amps
> 700 amps
Bottom of Enclosure
Fans or grills depending on enclosure size
2 x 4” grills (12 sq. in.)
1 x 4” fan (115 cfm)
2 x 4” fan (230 cfm)
2 x 6” fan (470 cfm)
Consult factory
Top of Enclosure
2 x 4” grills (12 sq.in.)
2 x 4” grills (12 sq.in.)
2 x 6” grills (28 sq.in.)
2 x 6” grills (28 sq.in.)
Consult Factory
The starter produces 4 watts of heat per amp of current and 26 square inches of enclosure surface is required per watt of heat generation.
Contact Benshaw and ask for the enclosure sizing technical note for more information concerning starters in sealed enclosures. Benshaw
supplies starters under 124 amps non-bypassed, with the heat sink protruding from the back of the enclosure. This allows a small
enclosure size while still maintaining the cooling capability of the starter.
30
3 - INSTALLATION
Wiring Considerations
3.4
Wiring Considerations
3.4.1
Wiring Practices
When making power and control signal connections, the following should be observed:
• Never connect input AC power to the motor output terminals T1/U, T2/V, or T3/W.
• Power wiring to the motor must have the maximum possible separation from all other wiring. Do not run control wiring in the same
conduit; this separation reduces the possibility of coupling electrical noise between circuits. Minimum spacing between metallic
conduits containing different wire groups should be three inches (8cm).
• Minimum spacing between different wiring groups in the same tray should be six inches.
• Wire runs outside an enclosure should be run in metallic conduit or have shielding/armor with equivalent attenuation.
• Whenever power and control wiring cross it should be at a 90 degrees angle.
• Different wire groups should be run in separate conduits.
• With a reversing application, the starter must be installed in front of the reversing contactors.
z NOTE: Local electrical codes must be adhered to for all wiring practices.
3.4.2
Considerations for Control and Power Wiring
Control wiring refers to wires connected to the control terminal strip that normally carry 24V to 115V and Power wiring refers to wires
connected to the line and load terminals that normally carries 208VAC - 600VAC respectively. Select power wiring as follows:
• Use only UL or CSA recognized wire.
• Wire voltage rating must be a minimum of 300V for 230VAC systems and 600V (Class 1 wire) for 460VAC and 600VAC systems.
• Grounding must be in accordance with NEC, CEC or local codes. If multiple starters are installed near each other, each must be
connected to ground. Take care to not form a ground loop. The grounds should be connected in a STAR configuration.
• Wire must be made of copper and rated 60/75°C for units 124 Amps and below. Larger amp units may use copper or aluminum wire.
Refer to NEC table 310-16 or local codes for proper wire selection.
3.4.3
Considerations for Signal Wiring
Signal wiring refers to the wires connected to the control terminal strip that are low voltage signals, below 15V.
• Shielded wire is recommended to prevent electrical noise interference from causing improper operation or nuisance tripping.
• Signal wire rating should carry as high of a voltage rating as possible, normally at least 300V.
• Routing of signal wire is important to keep as far away from control and power wiring as possible.
3.4.4
Meggering a Motor
If the motor needs to be meggered, remove the motor leads from the starter before conducting the test. Failure to comply may damage the
SCRs and WILL damage the control board, which WILL NOT be replaced under warranty.
3.4.5
High Pot Testing
Perform a DC high pot test if it is necessary to verify the insulation of the soft starter. The factory test voltage used is two and a half
times the RMS voltage plus 1000VDC. It is recommended to test equipment that has been in service to 75% of the factory test voltage.
The SCR gate leads must be removed from the control board to perform the high pot test. Remove the twisted red and white wire pairs
labeled from 1 to 6 that connect on the right side of the control card. Failure to comply with the test voltage or removing the gate wiring
may damage the control board which will not be replaced under warranty..
31
3 - INSTALLATION
Power and Control Drawings for Bypassed and Non Bypassed Power Stacks
3.5
Power and Control drawings for Bypassed and Non Bypassed Power Stacks
Figure 8: Power Schematic for RB2 Low HP
BIPC-300055-01
MX2 CARD
stop
reset
START
menu
enter
Starters
32
3 - INSTALLATION
Figure 9: Power Schematic for RB2 High HP
BIPC-300055-01
MX2 CARD
stop
reset
START
menu
enter
Starters
33
3 - INSTALLATION
Figure 10: Power Schematic for RC2
BIPC-300055-01
MX2 CARD
stop
reset
START
menu
enter
Starters
34
3 - INSTALLATION
Power Wiring
3.6
Power Wiring
3.6.1
Recommended Incoming Line Protection
Fuses or Circuit Breaker, refer to pages 18 - 20.
Input Line Requirements
The input line source needs to be an adequate source to start the motor, generally 2 times the rating of the motor FLA. (This may not
apply in some cases such as being connected to a generator).
3.6.2
Recommended Wire Gauges
The wire gauge selection is based on the FLA of the motor. Refer to NEC table 310-16 or CEC Part 1, Table 2 or local code
requirements for selecting the correct wire sizing. Ensure appropriate wire derating for temperature is applied. If more than three current
carrying conductors are in one conduit, ensure NEC table 310.15(B)(2) or CEC Part 1 Table 5C is adhered to. In some areas local codes
may take precedence over the NEC. Refer to your local requirements.
3.6.3
Power Wire Connections
Attach the motor cables:
• Use the T1, T2 and T3 terminals. Use lugs/crimps or terminals (Lugs and Crimps are to be provided by the user).
Attach the power source cables:
• Use the L1, L2 and L3 terminals. Use lugs/crimps or terminals (Lugs and Crimps are to be provided by the user).
3.6.4
Motor Lead Length
The standard starter can operate a motor with a maximum of 2000 feet of properly sized cable between the “T” leads of the starter and
that of the motor. For wire runs greater than 2000 feet contact Benshaw Inc. for application assistance. If shielded cable is used, consult
factory for recommended length.
35
3 - INSTALLATION
3.6.5
Compression Lugs
The following is a list of the recommended crimp-on wire connectors manufactured by Penn-Union Corp. for copper wire.
Table 13: Single Hole Compression Lugs
Wire Size
1/0
2/0
3/0
4/0
250 MCM
300 MCM
350 MCM
400 MCM
450 MCM
Part #
BLU-1/0S20
BLU-2/0S4
BLU-3/0S1
BLU-4/0S1
BLU-025S
BLU-030S
BLU-035S
BLU-040S4
BLU-045S1
Wire Size
500 MCM
600 MCM
650 MCM
750 MCM
800 MCM
1000 MCM
1500 MCM
2000 MCM
Part #
BLU-050S2
BLU-060S1
BLU-065S5
BLU-075S
BLU-080S
BLU-100S
BLU-150S
BLU-200s
Table 14: Two Hole Compression Lugs
Wire Size
1/0
2/0
3/0
4/0
250 MCM
300 MCM
350 MCM
400 MCM
450 MCM
36
Part #
BLU-1/0D20
BLU-2/0D4
BLU-3/0D1
BLU-4/0D1
BLU-025D
BLU-030D
BLU-035D
BLU-040D4
BLU-045D1
Wire Size
500 MCM
600 MCM
650 MCM
750 MCM
800 MCM
1000 MCM
1500 MCM
2000 MCM
Part #
BLU-050D2
BLU-060D1
BLU-065D5
BLU-075D
BLU-080D
BLU-100D
BLU-150D
BLU-200D
3 - INSTALLATION
3.6.6
Torque Requirements for Power Wiring Terminations
Table 15: Slotted Screws and Hex Bolts
Tightening torque, pound-inches (N-m)
Wire size installed in conductor
Hexagonal head-external drive socket
wrench
Slotted head NO. 10 and larger
Slot width-0.047 inch Slot width-over 0.047
(1.2mm) or less and inch (1.2mm) or slot Split- bolt connectors
slot length ¼ inch
length – over ¼ inch
(N-m)
(6.4mm) or less
(6.4mm) or less
Other connectors
(N-m)
AWG or kcmil
(mm2 )
18 – 10
(0.82 – 5.3)
20
(2.3)
35
(4.0)
80
(9.0)
75
8
(8.4)
25
(2.8)
40
(4.5)
80
(9.0)
75
(8.5)
6–4
(13.3 – 21.2)
35
(4.0)
45
(5.1)
165
(18.6)
110
(12.4)
3
(26.7)
35
(4.0)
50
(5.6)
275
(31.1)
150
(16.9)
2
(33.6)
40
(4.5)
50
(5.6)
275
(31.1)
150
(16.9)
1
(42.4)
—
—
50
(5.6)
275
(31.1)
150
(16.9)
1/0 – 2/0
(53.5 – 64.4)
—
—
50
(5.6)
385
(43.5)
180
(20.3)
(8.5)
3/0 – 4/0
(85.0 – 107.2)
—
—
50
(5.6)
500
(56.5)
250
(28.2)
250 – 350
(127 – 177)
—
—
50
(5.6)
650
(73.4)
325
(36.7)
400
(203)
—
—
50
(5.6)
825
(93.2)
375
(36.7)
500
(253)
—
—
50
(5.6)
825
(93.2)
375
(42.4)
600 – 750
(304 – 380)
—
—
50
(5.6)
1000
(113.0)
375
(42.4)
800 – 1000
(406 – 508)
—
—
50
(5.6)
1100
(124.3)
500
(56.5)
1250 – 2000
(635 – 1010)
—
—
—
—
1100
(124.3)
600
(67.8)
z NOTE – For a value of slot width or length not corresponding to those specified above, the largest torque value associated with
the conductor size shall be marked. Slot width is the nominal design value. Slot length is measured at the bottom of the slot.
37
3 - INSTALLATION
Table 16: Tightening Torque for Inside Hex Screws
Socket size across flats
Tightening torque
inches
(mm)
Pound-inches
(N-m)
1/8
(3.2)
45
(5.1)
5/32
(4.0)
100
(11.3)
3/16
(4.8)
120
(13.6)
7/32
(5.6)
150
(16.9)
¼
(6.4)
200
(22.6)
5/16
(7.9)
275
(31.1)
3/8
(9.5)
275
(42.4)
½
(12.7)
500
(56.5)
9/16
(14.3)
600
(67.8)
z NOTE – For screws with multiple tightening means, the largest torque value associated with the conductor size
shall be marked. Slot length shall be measured at the bottom of the slot.
Current Transformers
3.7
Current Transformers
3.7.1
CT Mounting
For starters larger than 124 amps, the CTs are shipped loose from the power stack and need to be mounted on the power wiring. Thread
the incoming lead through the CT with the polarity mark towards the line side. (The polarity marks may be a white or yellow dot, an “X”
on the side of the CT, or the white wire.) Each phase has its own CT. The CT must then be attached to the power wiring, at least three
inches from the power wire lugs, using two tie-wraps.
Figure 11: Typical CT Mounting, Input of Starter
CUSTOMER MUST FASTEN CT
TO POWER WIRE WITH TWO 1/4"
NYLON WRAPS TO PREVENT
MOVEMENT DURING RUNNING
Dot, or X,
White Wire
MUST BE A 3" (MIN.)
SPACE BETWEEN CT
AND TOP OF LUG
FRONT VIEW
3.7.2
SIDE VIEW DETAIL
CT Polarity
The CT has a polarity that must be correct for the starter to correctly measure Watts, kW Hours, Power Factor, and for the Power and
TruTorque motor control functions to operate properly.
Each CT has a dot on one side of the flat surfaces. This dot, normally white in color, must be facing in the direction of the line.
CT1 must be on Line L1, CT2 must be on Line L2, CT3 must be on Line L3.
38
3 - INSTALLATION
Control Card Layout
3.8
Control Card Layout
Figure 12: Control Card Layout
120 VAC
Stack In
(Benshaw Only)
A
Unfused
120 VAC Out
B
Stack
Control
Control
Power
120 VAC
SCR 1
C
Auxiliary
Relays
P52-54
I/O 5-7
SCR 4
D
SCR 2
Digital
Inputs
P48-50
I/O 1-3
E
F
SCR 5
Modbus
Communications
Port P68-71
FUN 10-13
SCR 3
Keypad Port
P65 I/O 18
Analog Input
P55-59
I/O 8-12
G
SCR 6
Analog Output
P60-62
I/O 13-15
CT Inputs
P78
FUN 03
Analog Voltage/Current
Selector Switch SW1
H
Part/Serial #
Res
et
1
2
Para
m
D
eter own
3
Up
Ente
r
4
Software Part #
5
6
39
3 - INSTALLATION
Control Wiring
3.9
Control Wiring
3.9.1
Control Power
The 120VAC control power is supplied to TB1. The connections are as follows:
1 - Ground
2 - Neutral
3 - Neutral
4 - Line (120VAC)
5 - Line (120VAC)
Figure 13: Control Power Wiring Example
TB1
120VAC NEUTRAL
120VAC LIVE
3.9.2
Output Relays
TB2 is for the output relays. The relays connect as follows:
1 - NO1: Relay 1 normally open
2 - RC1: Relay 1 common
3 - NC1: Relay 1 normally closed
4 - NO2: Relay 2 normally open
5 - RC2: Relay 2 common
6 - NC2: Relay 2 normally closed
7 - NO3: Relay 3 normally open
8 - RC3: Relay 3 common
9 - NC3: Relay 3 normally closed
Figure 14: Relay Wiring Examples
TB2
TB2
120VAC LIVE
120VAC NEUTRAL
TRIP
120VAC NEUTRAL
120VAC LIVE
RUN
STOP
TRIP PILOT LIGHT
(RELAY 1 SET TO FLFS - FAULT FAILSAFE)
See Also
40
Relay Output configuration (I/O 05 - 07) on page 112.
RUN & STOPPED PILOT LIGHT
(RELAY 2 SET TO RUN)
3 - INSTALLATION
3.9.3
Digital Input Wiring Options
TB3 is for the digital inputs. The digital inputs use 120VAC. The digital inputs are as follows:
1 - Start: Start Input
2 - DI1: Digital Input 1
3 - DI2: Digital Input 2
4 - DI3: Digital Input 3
5 - Com: 120VAC neutral
Figure 15: Digital Input Wiring Examples
START
TB3
START
STOP
120VAC LIVE
TB3
120VAC LIVE
DI1
DI2
DI3
120VAC NEUTRAL
120VAC NEUTRAL
DIGITAL INPUT WIRING
3-WIRE START / STOP BUTTONS
(DI1 SET TO STOP)
PLC
120VAC LIVE
OUTPUT CONTACT
TB3
STOP
START
TB3
120VAC LIVE
120VAC NEUTRAL
120VAC NEUTRAL
2-WIRE ON / OFF SELECTOR SWITCH
HAND / OFF / AUTO SELECTOR SWITCH
(DI1 SET TO STOP)
TB3
120VAC LIVE
TB3
120VAC LIVE
SLOW SPEED
TRIP
120VAC NEUTRAL
See Also
120VAC NEUTRAL
SLOW SPEED CONTROL BUTTON
EXTERNAL TRIP INPUT
(DI2 SET TO SSPD - SLOW SPEED)
(DI3 SET TO FL - FAULT LOW)
Digital Input configuration (I/O 01 - 03) on page 110.
41
3 - INSTALLATION
3.9.4
Analog Input
The analog input can be configured for voltage or current loop. The input is shipped in the voltage loop configuration unless specified in
a custom configuration. Below TB5 is SW1-1. When the switch is in the on position, the input is current loop. When off, it is a voltage
input. The control is shipped with the switch in the off position. See Figure 18.
z NOTE: The analog input is a low voltage input, maximum of 15VDC. The input will be damaged if control power (115VAC) or line
power is applied to the analog input.
The terminals are as follows:
1 ) +10VDC Power (for POT)
2 ) + input
3 ) - input
4 ) common
7 ) shield
Figure 16: Analog Input Wiring Examples
TB5
TB5
+
(5K-10K ohm)
4-20mA SOURCE
-
POTENTIOMETER
See Also
3.9.5
4-20mA
Analog Input (I/O 08 - 12) on page 113.
Starter Type parameter (FUN 07) on page 124.
Theory of Operation section 7.11, Phase Control on page 165.
Theory of Operation section 7.12, Current Follower on page 167.
Analog Output
The analog output can be configured for Voltage or Current loop. The output is shipped in the Voltage loop configuration unless
specified in a custom configuration. Below TB5 is SW1-2. When the switch is in the off position, the output is current. When on, it is a
Voltage loop output. The control is shipped with the Switch on. See Figure 18.
z NOTE: The analog output is a low voltage output, maximum of 15VDC. The output will be damaged if control power (115VAC)
or line power is applied to it.
The terminals are as follows:
5 - analog output
6 - common
7 - shield
Figure 17: Analog Output Wiring Example
TB5
+
TO METER / ANALOG INPUT CARD
V/I
-
See Also
42
Analog Output configuration (I/O 13 - 15) on page 116.
3 - INSTALLATION
3.9.6
SW1 DIP Switch
The DIP switch on the card changes the analog input and analog output between 0-10V or 0-20mA. The picture below shows how to adjust
the switch to select the desired signal. Switching to the up or top position is ON and switching towards card or down is OFF.
Figure 18: DIP Switch Settings
ANALOG INPUT
SW1-1
ON = 0-20mA
OFF = 0-10V
ANALOG OUTPUT
SW1-2
ON = 0-10V
OFF = 0-20mA
Remote LCD Keypad/Display
3.10
Remote LCD Keypad/Display
The display has a NEMA 13/IP65 service rating. The display is available in 2 versions, a small display as P/N KPMX3SLCD and large
display as P/N KPMX3LLCD.
3.10.1
Remote Display
2
The MX control has one of two types of keypads, either a LED display or a LCD display. As standard, a LED display is permanently
2
mounted on the control board. The LCD keypad is optional and is mounted remotely from the MX Control card via a straight through
2
CAT5 ethernet cable which connects between the MX RJ45 terminal and remote display's RJ45 terminal.
43
3 - INSTALLATION
3.10.2
Display Cutout
Figure 19: Small Display Keypad Mounting Dimensions
Part # : KPMX3SLCD
101.00
[3.98"]
50.50
[1.99"]
31.50
[1.24"]
63.00
[2.48"]
31.50
[1.24"]
50.50
[1.99"]
Figure 20: Large Display Keypad Mounting Dimensions
Part # : KPMX3LLCD
127.00
[5.00"]
63.50
[2.50"]
38.50
[1.52"]
77.00
[3.03"]
38.50
[1.52"]
63.50
[2.50"]
44
3 - INSTALLATION
3.10.3
Installing Display
The remote display is installed as follows:
• Install the gasket onto the display.
• Insert the display through the door cutout.
• Insert the mounting clips into the holes in each side of the display.
• Tighten the mounting clips until they hold the display securely in place. Torque requirements for the display screen is 0.7 NM (6.195
in lbs).
• Plug the cable into the display connector on the MX2 card. See Figure 12 – Control Card Layout on page 39 for the connector
location.
• Route the cable through the enclosure to the display. Observe the wiring considerations as listed in section 3.4.3 on page 31.
• Plug the other end of the cable into the LCD display.
z NOTE: At temperatures less than -20°C, the LCD contrast may be impaired.
Figure 21: Mounting Remote Keypads
CLIP
CLIP
ENCLOSURE DOOR
GASKET
MX² DISPLAY CABLE
MX² DISPLAY
45
3 - INSTALLATION
NOTES:
46
4
Keypad Operation
4 - KEYPAD OPERATION
KEYPAD4 OPERATION
Introduction
4.1
Introduction
2
The MX provides a comprehensive set of parameters to allow the use of the reduced voltage solid state starter in nearly any industrial
application. While the starter can meet the requirements of many applications right out of the box, customization of parameter values to
better suit your particular application is easily accomplished with the standard, on-board, 4-digit, 7-segment LED display/keypad.
2
2
The MX has an optional 2x16 character, back-lit LCD display/keypad that may be mounted remotely from the MX control card. The
remote LCD keypad has the same keys as the standard display with several additional keys including start and stop keys for operation of
the starter from the keypad. When the remote LCD keypad is connected, the local display is disabled.
Standard Keypad and Display
4.2
Standard Keypad and Display
The LED display provides information on starter operation and programming. The 4-digit, 7-segment display shows starter meter
outputs and programming data. Special symbols provide further information about the starter operation (see the following section).
Figure 22: The Standard Keypad and Display
RESET
PARAM
DOWN
UP
ENTER
Viewing Parameter Values for the Standard Keypad
4.3
Viewing Parameter Values for the Standard Keypad
Parameter view mode can be entered by:
1. At the default meter display, press the [PARAM] key to enter parameter mode. "P1" is displayed to indicate
Parameter 1.
2. Use the [UP] and [DOWN] keys to scroll through the available parameters.
3. Pressing the [UP] key from "P 1" advances to parameter "P 2".
4. Pressing the [DOWN] key from "P1" wraps around to the highest parameter.
5. The value of the parameter can be viewed by pressing the [ENTER] key.
6. To view another parameter without changing/saving the parameter, press the [PARAM] key to return to the parameter number display.
To return to the default meter display either:
1. Press the [PARAM] key while in the parameter number display mode.
2. Wait 60 seconds and the display returns to the default meter display.
48
4 - KEYPAD OPERATION
Changing Parameter Values
4.4
Changing Parameter Values
Parameter change mode can be entered by:
1. At the default meter display, press the [PARAM] key to enter parameter mode.
2. Use the [UP] and [DOWN] keys to scroll through the available parameters.
3. The value of the parameter can be viewed by pressing the [ENTER] key.
4. When viewing the parameter value, the parameter can be changed by using the [UP] and [DOWN] keys.
5. To store the new value, press the [ENTER] key. When the [ENTER] key is pressed the value is saved and the display goes back to
parameter # "P_".
To exit parameter change mode without saving the new parameter value either:
1. Press the [PARAM] key to return to the parameter number display.
2. Wait 60 seconds and the display returns to the default meter display.
Messages Displayed
4.5
Messages Displayed
In addition to being able to view and change parameters, various special messages may be displayed during different conditions. Here is
a summary of the possible special messages.
noL
rdY
Acc
Acc2
utS
Phase order meter showing ABC
Accelerating or Kicking
AbC
CbA
SPH
Accelerating or Kicking with ramp 2
oxxx
xxx = overload content.
Up to Speed
P xx
xx = Parameter code.
run
Run - Done with Accel ramp but not yet Up to
Speed
A xx
xx = Alarm code. If the condition persists, a fault
occurs.
dcL
Decelerating Motor
F xx
xx = Fault code.
A OL
Overload Alarm - The motor overload level is
between 90% and 100%
ioc
Instantaneous Over current
F OL
Overload Fault - The motor overload level has
reached 100%
dFLt
Default – Flashes when parameter defaults are
loaded.
L OL
L CP
Control Power Lockout - A start is not allowed
because the control power is too low.
LOC
SSPd
L Ot
SS r
Lock out State
HEAt
ES
FLSH
ProG
rEAd
donE
L dS
dcb
SS F
Heater/Anti-windmill Mode
Overload Lockout - A start is not allowed until
the motor overload level cools below 15%.
L 1 r
No Line
Ready
Slow Speed Motor Operation
Power Stack Over Temperature Lockout
Slow Speed Reverse
Phase order meter showing CBA
Phase order meter showing Single Phase
Energy Saver
In reflash mode
In reflash mode, programming
In reflash mode, verifying
In reflash mode, complete
Disconnect Switch Open
DC Injection Brake Active
Slow Speed Forward
Digital Inputs (Run Enable or Run Disable) are
preventing the starter from running
The following sections provide more detail for some of the conditions that cause special messages to be displayed.
4.5.1
Power Up
2
The software version is displayed as a series of single digits once power has been applied to the MX . If the parameters were being reset
on power up, “dFLt” is flashed on the display for three seconds, and then the software version is displayed.
4.5.2
Stopped
When the starter is not in the run mode, the display shows the status condition of the starter, such as “rdY” (ready), “L OL” (Overload
Lockout), or “noL” (No Line).
49
4 - KEYPAD OPERATION
4.5.3
Running
When running, the display shows the selected meter function. The following meters can be selected using the Meter display parameter
(P79).
Avg. RMS current
Phase 1 RMS current
Phase 2 RMS current
Phase 3 RMS current
Current Imbalance %
GF Current (% FLA)
4.5.4
Avg. Voltage (RMS)
L1-L2 Voltage (RMS)
L2-L3 Voltage (RMS)
L3-L1 Voltage (RMS)
Overload %
Power Factor
KW
KVA
VARS
KWh
MWh
Phase Rotation
Line Frequency
Analog Input %
Analog Output %
Running Time Days
Running Time Hours
Starts
TruTorque %
Power %
Last Start Time
Peak Start Current
Alarm Condition
When an alarm condition exists, the display alternates between displaying the selected meter and the alarm code. The alarm code is
displayed as “A XX”, where XX is the alarm code.
•
•
When a thermal overload alarm condition exists, “A OL” is displayed.
When a no line alarm condition exists, “noL” is displayed.
When the starter is stopped, the selected meter is not displayed.
4.5.5
Lockout Condition
When a lockout condition exists, the display shows the lockout code. The lockout code is displayed as “L XX”: where XX is the lockout
code. Following are the defined lockout conditions and their codes:
• When a motor thermal overload lockout condition exists, “L OL” is displayed.
• When a power stack thermal overload lockout condition exists, “L Ot” is displayed.
• When a low control power lockout condition exists, “L CP” is displayed.
• When either Run Enable or Run Disable input are preventing the starter from running.
When there are multiple lockout codes, each is displayed at 2 second intervals.
4.5.6
Faulted Condition
When a fault condition exists, the display shows the fault code. The exceptions to this are as follows:
• When the fault is thermal overload trip, “F OL” is displayed.
• When the fault is Instantaneous Over current, “ioc” is displayed.
4.5.7
Quick Meters
Although any meter may be viewed by changing the Meter parameter (P79), there are 3 “Quick Meters” that are always available with a
single key press. When the starter is in the normal display mode, the display may be toggled between the information currently displayed
and the following quick meters.
50
Status Meter
Toggle between the programmed meter display and the starter operational status display (rdY, run,
utS, dcL, etc) by pressing the [ENTER] key.
Overload Meter
Toggle between the programmed meter display and the overload content by pressing the [DOWN] key. The
overload is displayed as “oXXX” where XXX is the overload content. For example, when the overload content
is 76 percent, it is displayed as “o 76”.
Phase Order Meter
Toggle between the programmed meter display and the phase order by pressing the [UP] key. The phase order
is displayed as “AbC” or “CbA”.
4 - KEYPAD OPERATION
Restoring Factory Parameter Settings
4.6
Restoring Factory Parameter Settings
To restore ALL parameters to the factory default settings, press and hold the [PARAM] and [ENTER] pushbutton switch on power up.
The display blinks “dFLt”. Parameters unique to the motor starter applications need to be set again to appropriate values before motor
operation.
P76 / FUN05 - Rated RMS Voltage (set to specified equipment rating)
P78 / FUN03 - CT Ratio (set to supplied CTs rating)
P48 / I/O01 - Digital Input #1
P49 / I/O02 - Digital Input #2
P50 / I/O03 - Digital Input #3
P52 / I/O05- Relay #1
P53 / I/O06 - Relay #2
P54 / I/O07 - Relay #3
z NOTE: You must consult the wiring schematic for digital inputs and relay output configuration.
Resetting a Fault
4.7
Resetting a Fault
To reset from a fault condition, press [RESET].
Emergency Overload Reset
4.8
Emergency Overload Reset
To perform an emergency overload reset, press [RESET] and [DOWN]. This sets the motor thermal overload content to 0.
An alternative to this is to use a digital input:
For LED display P48, P49 or P50 EOLr (E OL Reset).
For LCD display: I/O 01, I/O 02 or I/O 03 EOLreset (E OL Reset).
See page 110: I/O Digital Input Configuration for more information.
51
4 - KEYPAD OPERATION
Remote LCD Keypad and Display
4.9
2x16 Remote LCD Keypad
Like the standard keypad, the remote LCD keypad has the same basic functions with enhancements that allow using plain text instead of
codes and a menu structure instead of a straight line of parameters.
Additional keys have been added, such as [START], [STOP], and a [LEFT] arrow for moving the cursor around in the LCD display.
Status indicators have been added, providing additional information for the starter operation.
The remote keypad is NEMA 13/IP65 when mounted directly on the door of an enclosure with the correct gasket.
Figure 23: Remote LCD Keypad
Description of the LEDs on the Keypad
4.10
Description of the LEDs on the Keypad
The keypad provides three LED indicators in addition to the 2x16 character display. The LEDs provide starter status information.
Table 17: Remote Keypad LED Functions
LED
STOP
RUN
ALARM
State
Indication
On
Stopped
Flashing
Faulted
On
Running and up-to-speed
Flashing
Running and not up-to-speed (ramping, decelerating, braking etc).
Flashing
Alarm condition exists. If condition persists, a fault occurs.
z NOTE: By default, the [STOP] key is always active, regardless of selected control source (Local Source and Remote Source
parameters). It may be disabled though using the Keypad Stop Disable (P65 / I/O 18) parameter. For more information refer to the
Keypad Stop Disable (P65 / I/O 18) parameter on page 119.
52
4 - KEYPAD OPERATION
Description of the Keys on the Remote LCD Keypad
4.11
Description of the Keys on the Remote LCD Keypad
The [UP] arrow, [DOWN] arrow, [ENTER] and [MENU] keys on the LCD keypad perform the same functions as the [UP], [DOWN],
[ENTER] and [PARAM] keys on the standard keypad. Three keys have been added, with one of the keys serving a dual function.
Table 18: Function of the Keys on the LCD Keypad
Key
start
enter
menu
stop
reset
Function
•
This key causes the starter to begin the start sequence. The direction is dependent on wiring and phase
selection.
•
In order for this key to work, the Local Source (QST 04) parameter must be set to "Keypad".
•
•
•
Increase the value of a numeric parameter.
Select the next value of an enumerated parameter.
It scrolls forward through a list of parameters within a group (when the last parameter is displayed, it
scrolls to the beginning of the list).
•
•
When a list of faults is displayed, it moves from one fault to the next.
•
•
•
Decrease the value of a numeric parameter.
•
•
When a list of faults is displayed, it moves from one fault to the previous fault.
•
When editing a numeric parameter, the [LEFT] arrow key moves the cursor one digit to the left. If
cursor is already at the most significant digit, it returns to the least significant digit on the right.
•
When in Menu mode, the [LEFT] arrow allows groups to be scrolled through in the opposite direction
of the [MENU] Key.
•
•
•
Allows editing a parameter. Stores the change of a parameter.
•
•
•
[MENU] scrolls between the operate screen and the available parameter groups.
•
•
•
The [STOP/RESET] key halts the operation of the starter (Stop Key).
When the starter is in the Operate Mode, pressing [UP] allows you to change which group of meter
values is monitored.
Select the previous value of an enumerated parameter.
It scrolls backward through a list of parameters within a group (when the first parameter is displayed,
it scrolls to the end of the list).
When the starter is in the Operate Mode, pressing [DOWN] allows you to change which group of
meter values is monitored.
When in Fault History, [ENTER] key scrolls through information logged when a fault occurred.
When an alarm condition exists, [ENTER] scrolls through all active alarms.
When viewing a parameter, pressing [MENU] jumps to the top of the menu.
When a parameter is being edited and [MENU] is pressed, the change is aborted and the parameter’s
old value is displayed.
If a fault has occurred, the [STOP/RESET] key is used to clear the fault.
The [STOP] key may be disabled using the Keypad Stop Disable (I/O 18) parameter, if the control
source (QST 04/QST 05) is not set to "Keypad". The [STOP/RESET] key always halts the operation
of the starter if the control source is set to "Keypad". If the control source (QST 04/QST 05) is not set
to "Keypad".
53
4 - KEYPAD OPERATION
Jump Code
4.12
Jump Code
At the beginning of each parameter group, there is a Jump Code parameter. By changing the value of this parameter and pressing
[ENTER], you can jump directly to any parameter within that group.
Alphanumeric Display
4.13
Alphanumeric Display
The remote LCD keypad and display uses a 32-character alphanumeric LCD display. All starter functions can be accessed by the
keypad. The keypad allows easy access to starter programming with parameter descriptions on the LCD display.
Power UP Screen
On power up, the software part number is displayed for five seconds. Pressing any key immediately changes the display to the operate
screen.
810023-01-08
Operate Screen
The operate screen is the main screen. The Operate screen is used to indicate the status of the starter, if it’s running, what state it’s in,
and display the values of Meter 1 and Meter 2, which are selectable.
The Operate Screen is divided into five sections.
• Sections A and B display status information
• Section C and D displays the meter selected by the Meter 1 and 2 parameters, see FUN 01, 02.
• Section S displays the source for the start command.
Figure 24: Operate Screen
SECTION A
SECTION S
SECTION C
K
n o L
S T O P P E D
SECTION B
I a = 0 .0 A
V a =
0 V
SECTION D
Table 19: Operate Screen Section A
Display
NoL
Ready
Alarm
Run
54
Description
L1, L2, L3 not present
Starter ready to run
A fault condition is present. If it continues, a fault occurs
Starter is running
4 - KEYPAD OPERATION
Table 20: Operate Screen Section B
Display
Stopped
Fault
Heater
Kick
Accel
Kick 2
Accel 2
Run
UTS
Control
Decel
Wye
Slow Spd Fwd
Description
Starter is stopped and no Faults
Starter tripped on a Fault
Starter is on and heating motor
Starter is applying kick current to the motor
Starter is accelerating the load
Starter is applying kick current to the motor in Ramp 2
Starter is accelerating the load in Ramp 2
Starter is in Run mode and Ramp Time has expired
Starter is Up To Speed
Phase Control or Current Follower mode
Starter is decelerating the load
In Wye-delta control indicates motor is accelerating in Wye mode
Preset slow speed forward
Slow Spd Rev
Preset slow speed reverse
Braking
DC Injection Braking.
Lockout
Starter is Locked Out
Table 21: Operate Screen Section S
Display
K
T
S
4.13.1
Description
Keypad Control
Terminal Block Control
Serial Communication Control
Parameter Group Screens
From the operate screen, the parameter group screens are accessed by pressing either the menu or the left arrow keys. The parameter
group screens display the different parameter groups; QST, CFN, PFN, I/O, FUN, FL_.
MMM: PPPPPPPPPP
MI VVVVVVVVVV
MMM:
= Parameter Group
MI:
= Menu Index
PPP:
= Parameter Name
VVV:
= Parameter Value and Units
Refer to Chapter 5 for a listing of the parameters and their ranges.
55
4 - KEYPAD OPERATION
4.13.2
Meter Pages
Although any meter may be viewed by changing the two Meter parameters (FUN 01 & FUN 02), there are 13 “Meter Pages” that are
easily accessed to view all of the meter information. These meter pages are scrolled through by pressing the [UP] or [DOWN] down
arrows from the operate screen.
Current I2 = 0.0A
I1 = 0.0 I3 = 0.0A
RS Gnd Cur= 0%
Voltage V2=
V1= 0 V3=
0V
0V
Lst STt Tim= xx.xs
Pk ST Cur = xx.xA
MWatt Hour =
kWatt Hour =
0
0
Frequency = 60.0H
Phase
= AbC
Watts
VA
0
0
Run Days = xxxx
Run Hours = xx:xx
=
=
Motor PF = 0.00
vars
= 0
Analog In = 0.0%
Analog Out = 0.0%
TruTorque =
Power
=
Starts
0%
0%
=
xxxxx
Overload =
0%
Curr Inbal = 0.0%
z NOTE:
4.13.3
Run Hours
Run Days
kWatt Hours
MWatt Hours
Starts
00:00 – 23:59
0 – 2730 days or 7.5 years
0 – 999
0 – 9999
0 – 65535
Fault Log Screen
2
2
More information regarding each fault is available through the remote MX LCD display than is available through the standard MX
LED display.
FL#: Fault##
NNNNNNNNNNNNN
FL _:
= Fault Log Number. FL1 is the most recent fault and FL9 is the oldest fault.
Fault _ _ = Fault Code
NNN… = Fault Name, or the condition when the fault occurred.
56
4 - KEYPAD OPERATION
Press [MENU] until you get to the FL1 parameter.
Pressing the [UP] and [DOWN] keys navigates through older and newer faults in the log.
Repeatedly pressing the [ENTER] key rotates through the conditions the starter was in when the fault occurred.
4.13.4
Enter Step
1
2
3
4
5
6
Fault Description.
Status when the fault occurred, Run, Stopped, Accel. etc.
The L1 current at the time of the fault.
The L2 current at the time of the fault.
The L3 current at the time of the fault.
L1-2 voltage at the time of the fault.
7
L2-3 voltage at the time of the fault.
8
L3-1 voltage at the time of the fault.
9
kW at the time of the fault.
10
Frequency at the time of the fault.
11
Run time since last run time reset.
Fault Screen
When a Fault occurs, the main screen is replaced with a fault screen. The screen shows the fault number and the name of the fault. The
main status screen is not shown until the fault is reset.
When a fault occurs, the STOP LED flashes.
Fault ##
Fault Name
z NOTE: For a list of the Faults, refer to Appendix B - Fault Codes on page 196.
4.13.5
Lockout Screen
When a lockout is present, one of the following screens will be displayed. The main status screen is not shown until the lockout is
cleared.
The overload lockout displays the overload content
and the time until reset if an overload occurs.
Overload Lockout
96%
XX:XX
The stack over temperature lockout will be displayed
if a stack over temperature is detected
Stack Overload
Lockout
.
The control power lockout will be displayed
if the control power is not within specifications.
Control Power
Lockout
The disconnect open lockout will be displayed if a digital
input is programmed to "disconnect" and the input if off.
Disconnect Open
Lockout
A "Run Enable or Run Disable" digital input is
set and is not true. See digital inputs on page 110
Run Interlock
Lockout
4.13.6
Alarm Screen
When an alarm is present, the word “Alarm” is displayed on the operate screen. Pressing the [ENTER] key displays more information
about the alarm.
Alarm Number
Alarm Name
57
4 - KEYPAD OPERATION
Procedure for Setting Data
4.14
Procedure for Setting Data
Select a parameter that is to be changed. To change Motor FLA from 10 Amps to 30 Amps:
From the main screen:
T Ready Ia= 0.0A
Stopped Va= 480 V
Press [MENU] key and the display shows QST: (Quick Start) screen.
QST: Jump Code
00 1
Press [UP] key once to Motor FLA (QST 01).
QST: Motor FLA
01 10 Amp
Press [ENTER] key once, the cursor starts to flash in the one’s place.
QST: Motor FLA
01 10 Amp
Press [LEFT] key once, the cursor flashes in the ten’s place.
QST: Motor FLA
01 10 Amp
Press [UP] arrow to increase the value, for a value of 30, press twice.
QST: Motor FLA
01 30 Amp
Press [ENTER] to store the value.
QST: Motor FLA
01 30 Amp
Press [UP] arrow to change another parameter in QST.
Press [MENU] to change another parameter in another group.
Press [LEFT] arrow to go back to the main screen
58
5
Parameter Groups
5 - PARAMETER GROUPS
PARAMETER
5
GROUPS
Introduction
5.1
Introduction
2
The MX incorporates a number of parameters that allow you to configure the starter to meet the special requirements of your particular
application. The parameters are organized two ways, depending on the display being used. When the standard, on-board LED display is
used, the parameters are in a single group and numbered P1, P2, P3… etc.
When the remote LCD display is used, the parameters are divided into groups of related functionality, and within the groups the
parameters are identified by a short, descriptive name. The parameters are subdivided into six groups. The groups are QST (Quick
Start), CFN (Control Functions), PFN (Protection Functions), I/O (Input/Output Functions), FUN (Function) and FL1 (Faults) .
The Quick Start Group provides a collection of the parameters that are most commonly changed when commissioning a starter. Many of
the parameters in the Quick Start group are duplicates of the parameters in the other groups.
This chapter lists all of the parameters and their possible values. Section 5.3 lists the parameters in the order in which they appear on the
LED display. Section 5.4 lists them in the order in which they appear on the LCD display. Section 5.2 is a cross-reference between the
two.
60
5 - PARAMETER GROUPS
LED & LCD Display Parameters Cross Reference
5.2
LED and LCD Display Parameters Cross Reference
Parameter
Number
Group
Parameter Name
Page #
Parameter
Number
Group
Parameter Name
Page #
P1
QST 01 Motor FLA
75
P42
PFN 11
Auto Reset Limit
104
P2
QST 02 Motor Service Factor
75
P43
PFN 12
Controlled Fault Stop Enable
105
76
P44
PFN 13
Independent Starting/Running
Overload
106
77
P45
PFN 14
Motor Starting Overload Class
107
108
QST 03
P3
PFN 15
Motor Running Overload Class
P4
QST 04 Local Source
P5
QST 05 Remote Source
QST 06
P6
CFN 03
QST 07
P7
CFN 04
QST 08
P8
CFN 02
78
P46
PFN 16
Motor Overload Hot/Cold Ratio
Initial Current 1
79
P47
PFN 17
Motor Overload Cooling Time
109
Maximum Current 1
80
P48
I/O 01
DI 1 Configuration
110
Ramp Time 1
81
P49
I/O 02
DI 2 Configuration
110
P9
QST 09 Up To Speed Time
82
P50
I/O 03
DI 3 Configuration
110
P10
CFN 01 Start Mode
83
P51
I/O 04
Digital Fault Input Trip Time
111
P11
CFN 08 Initial Voltage/Torque/Power
84
P52
I/O 05
R1 Configuration
112
P12
CFN 09 Maximum Torque/Power
85
P53
I/O 06
R2 Configuration
112
P13
CFN 10 Kick Level 1
86
P54
I/O 07
R3 Configuration
112
P14
CFN 11 Kick Time 1
86
P55
I/O 08
Analog Input Trip Type
113
P15
CFN 14 Stop Mode
87
P56
I/O 09
Analog Input Trip Level
114
P16
CFN 15 Decel Begin Level
88
P57
I/O 10
Analog Input Trip Time
114
P17
CFN 16 Decel End Level
89
P58
I/O 11
Analog Input Span
115
P18
CFN 17 Decel Time
90
P59
I/O 12
Analog Input Offset
116
P19
CFN 18 DC Brake Level
91
P60
I/O 13
Analog Output Function
116
P20
CFN 19 DC Brake Time
92
P61
I/O 14
Analog Output Span
117
P21
CFN20
DC Brake Delay
93
P62
I/O 15
Analog Output Offset
117
P22
CFN 06 Initial Current 2
93
P63
I/O 16
Inline Configuration
118
P23
CFN 07 Maximum Current 2
93
P64
I/O 17
Bypass Feedback Time
118
P24
CFN 05 Ramp Time 2
94
P65
I/O 18
Keypad Stop Disable
119
P25
CFN 12 Kick Level 2
94
P66
I/O 19
Power On Start Selection
119
P26
CFN 13 Kick Time 2
94
P67
FUN 15 Miscellaneous Commands
120
P27
CFN 21 Slow Speed
95
P68
FUN 12 Communication Timeout
121
P28
CFN 22 Slow Speed Current Level
95
P69
FUN 11 Communication Baud Rate
121
P29
CFN 23 Slow Speed Time Limit
96
P70
FUN 10 Communication Address
121
P30
CFN 24 Slow Speed Kick Level
96
P71
FUN 13 Communication Byte Framing
122
P31
CFN 25 Slow Speed Kick Time
97
P72
FUN 09 Energy Saver
122
123
P32
PFN 01
Over Current Level
98
P73
FUN 08 Heater Level
P33
PFN 02
Over Current Time
99
P74
FUN 07 Starter Type
124
P34
PFN 03
Under Current Level
100
P75
FUN 06 Rated Power Factor
125
P35
PFN 04
Under Current Time
100
P76
FUN 05 Rated Voltage
125
P36
PFN 05
Current Imbalance Level
101
P77
FUN 04 Phase Order
126
P37
PFN 06
Residual Ground Fault Level
102
P78
FUN 03 CT Ratio
126
P38
PFN 07
Over Voltage Level
103
P79
FUN 01 Meter 1
127
P39
PFN 08
Under Voltage Level
103
n/a
FUN 02 Meter 2
127
P40
PFN 09
Voltage Trip Time
104
P80
FUN 14 Software Version 1
128
P41
PFN 10
Auto Fault Reset Time
104
P81
FUN 16 Passcode
129
Fault Log
130
P82
FL1
61
5 - PARAMETER GROUPS
LED Display Parameters
5.3
LED Display Parameters
Number
Parameter
Setting Range
Units
RMS Amps
Default
Page
P1
Motor FLA
1 – 6400
10
75
P2
Motor Service Factor
1.00 – 1.99
1.15
75
P3
Motor Running Overload Class
Off, 1 – 40
10
76
P4
Local Source
P5
Remote Source
P6
Initial Motor Current 1
50 – 600
%FLA
100
79
P7
Maximum Motor Current 1
100 – 800
%FLA
600
80
P8
Ramp Time 1
0 – 300
Seconds
15
81
P9
Up To Speed Time
1 – 900
Seconds
20
82
curr
83
PAd: Keypad
tEr: Terminal
SEr: Serial
oLrP:
curr:
tt:
Pr:
77
tEr
Voltage Ramp
Current Ramp
TT Ramp
Power Ramp
78
P10
Start Mode
P11
Initial Voltage/Torque/Power
1 – 100
%
25
84
P12
Maximum Torque/Power
10 – 325
%
105
85
P13
Kick Level 1
Off, 100 to 800
%FLA
Off
86
P14
Kick Time 1
0.1 – 10.0
Seconds
1.0
86
CoS
87
CoS:
SdcL:
tdcL:
dcb:
Coast
Volt Decel
TT Decel
DC Braking
P15
Stop Mode
P16
Decel Begin Level
100 – 1
%
40
88
P17
Decel End Level
99 – 1
%
20
89
P18
Decel Time
1 – 180
Seconds
15
90
P19
DC Brake Level
10 – 100
%
25
91
P20
DC Brake Time
1 – 180
Seconds
5
92
P21
DC Brake Delay
0.1 – 3.0
Seconds
0.2
93
P22
Initial Motor Current 2
50 – 600
%FLA
100
93
P23
Maximum Motor Current 2
100 – 800
%FLA
600
93
P24
Ramp Time 2
0 – 300
Seconds
15
94
P25
Kick Level 2
Off, 100 – 800
%FLA
Off
94
P26
Kick Time 2
0.1 – 10.0
Seconds
1.0
94
P27
Slow Speed
Off, 7.1 14.3
%
Off
95
P28
Slow Speed Current Level
10 – 400
%FLA
100
95
P29
Slow Speed Time Limit
Off, 1 – 900
Seconds
10
96
P30
Slow Speed Kick Level
Off, 100 – 800
%FLA
Off
96
P31
Slow Speed Kick Time
0.1 – 10.0
Seconds
1.0
97
P32
Over Current Trip Level
Off, 50 – 800
%FLA
Off
98
P33
Over Current Trip Delay Time
Off, 0.1 – 90.0
Seconds
0.1
99
P34
Under Current Trip Level
Off, 5 – 100
%FLA
Off
100
P35
Under Current Trip Delay Time
Off, 0.1 – 90.0
Seconds
0.1
100
P36
Current Imbalance Trip Level
Off, 5 – 40
%
15
101
P37
Residual Ground Fault Trip Level
Off, 5 – 100
%FLA
Off
102
P38
Over Voltage Trip Level
Off, 1 – 40
%
Off
103
P39
Under Voltage Trip Level
Off, 1 – 40
%
Off
103
P40
Over/Under Voltage Trip Delay Time
0.1 – 90.0
Seconds
0.1
104
62
5 - PARAMETER GROUPS
Number
Parameter
Setting Range
Units
Page
P41
Auto Fault Reset Time
Off, 1 – 900
Off
104
P42
Auto Reset Limit
Off, 1 – 10
Off
104
P43
Controlled Fault Stop Enable
Off, On
On
105
P44
Independent Starting/Running
Overload
Off, On
Off
106
P45
Motor Starting Overload Class
Off, 1 – 40
P46
Motor Overload Hot/Cold Ratio
0 – 99
P47
Motor Overload Cooling Time
1.0 – 999.9
P48
DI 1 Configuration
P49
DI 2 Configuration
OFF:
StOP:
FH:
FL:
Fr:
diSc:
InLn:
byP:
EoLr:
L-r:
hdIS:
hEn:
rSEL:
SS F:
Seconds
Default
10
107
%
60
108
Minutes
30.0
109
Off
Stop
Fault High
Fault Low
Fault Reset
Disconnect
Inline Cnfrm
Bypass Cnfrm
E OL Reset
Local/Remote
Heat Disable
Heat Enable
Ramp Select
Slow Speed
Forward
Slow Speed Reverse
DC Brake Disable
DC Brake Enable
Run Enable
Run Disable
P50
DI 3 Configuration
SS R:
bdIS:
bEn:
runE
rund
P51
Digital Fault Input Trip Time
0.1 – 90.0
Stop
Off
110
Off
Seconds
OFF:
FLFS:
FLnF:
run:
utS:
AL:
rdyr:
LOC:
OC:
UC:
OLA:
ShFS:
Off
Fault (fail safe)
Fault (non fail safe)
Running
UTS
Alarm
Ready
Locked Out
Over Current
Under Current
OL Alarm
Shunt Trip
(fail safe)
ShnF: Shunt Trip
(non fail safe)
gfLt:
Ground Fault
ES:
Energy Saver
HEAt: Heating
SSPd: Slow Speed
SS F: Slow Speed
Forward
SS r:
Slow Speed Reverse
dcb:
DC Braking
FAn:
Cooling Fan
P52
R1 Configuration
P53
R2 Configuration
P54
R3 Configuration
P55
Analog Input Trip Type
Off:
Lo:
Hi:
P56
Analog Input Trip Level
0 – 100
P57
Analog Input Trip Delay Time
0.1 – 90.0
P58
Analog Input Span
P59
Analog Input Offset
0.1
111
FLFS
Off
112
Off
Disabled
Low Level
High Level
Off
113
%
50
114
Seconds
0.1
114
1 – 100
%
100
115
0 – 99
%
0
116
63
5 - PARAMETER GROUPS
Number
Parameter
Setting Range
P60
Analog Output Function
0: Off (no output)
1: 0 – 100% Curr
2: 0 – 200% Curr
3: 0 – 800% Curr
4: 0 – 150% Volt
5: 0 – 150% OL
6: 0 – 10 kW
7: 0 – 100 kW
8: 0 – 1 MW
9: 0 – 10 MW
10: 0 – 100% Ain
11: 0 – 100% Firing
12: Calibration
P61
Analog Output Span
1 – 125
P62
Analog Output Offset
0 – 99
P63
Inline Configuration
P64
Bypass Feedback Time
P65
Keypad Stop Disable
Default
Page
0: Off
(no output)
116
%
100
117
%
0
117
Off, 1.0– 10.0
Seconds
3.0
118
Off, 0.1 – 5.0
Seconds
2.0
118
On, OFF
On
119
Power On Start Selection
0: Disabled
1: Start after power applied
only
2: Start after fault reset only
3: Start after power applied
and after fault reset
0
119
P67
Miscellaneous Commands
0: None
1: Std. BIST
2: Powered BIST
3: Reset Run Time
4: Reset KWh/MWh
5: Enter Reflash mode
6: Store Parameters
7: Load Parameters
8: Factory Reset
0
120
P68
Communication Timeout
Off, 1 – 120
Seconds
Off
121
P69
Communication Baud Rate
1200, 2400, 4800, 9600,
19200
bps
19.2
121
P70
Communication Address
1 – 247
1
121
P71
Communication Byte Framing
0: Even Parity, 1 Stop Bit
1: Odd Parity, 1 Stop Bit
2: No Parity, 1 Stop Bit
3: No Parity, 2 Stop Bits
0
122
P72
Energy Saver
Off, On
Off
122
P73
Heater Level
Off, 1 – 40
Off
123
nor
124
-0.92
125
480
125
InS
126
P66
Units
%FLA
nor:
Id:
y-d:
Normal
Inside Delta
Wye-Delta / Other
Electro mechanical
PctL: Phase Control
cFol: Current Follow
AtL: Full Voltage ATL
P74
Starter Type
P75
Rated Power Factor
-0.01 (Lag) to 1.00 (Unity)
P76
Rated Voltage
100, 110, 120, 200, 208, 220,
230, 240, 350, 380, 400, 415,
440, 460, 480, 500, 525, 575,
600, 660, 690, 800, 1000,
1140
P77
Phase Order
64
InS:
AbC:
CbA:
SPH:
Insensitive
ABC
CBA
Single Phase
RMS Voltage
5 - PARAMETER GROUPS
Number
P78
Parameter
CT Ratio
P79
Meter
P80
Software Version 1
P81
Passcode
P82
Fault Log
Setting Range
72:1, 96:1, 144:1, 288:1,
864:1, 2640:1, 3900:1,
5760:1, 8000:1, 14400:1,
28800:1
0: Status
1: Ave Current
2: L1 Current
3: L2 Current
4: L3 Current
5: Curr Imbal
6: Ground Fault
7: Ave Volts
8: L1-L2 Volts
9: L2-L3 Volts
10: L3-L1 Volts
11: Overload
12: Power Factor
13: Watts
14: VA
15: VARS
16: kW hours
17: MW hours
18: Phase Order
19: Line Freq
20: Analog Input
21: Analog Output
22: Run Days
23: Run Hours
24: Starts
25: TruTorque %
26: Power %
27: Peak Starting Current
28: Last Starting Duration
Display Only
1FXX - 9FXX
Units
Default
Page
288
126
0
127
810023-01-08
128
Off
129
XFXX
130
65
5 - PARAMETER GROUPS
LCD Display Parameters
5.4
LCD Display Parameters
The 2x16 display has the same parameters available as the LED display, with the exception of two meter parameters instead of one since
two meters may be displayed on the main screen. The parameters are subdivided into five groups. The groups are QST (Quick Start),
CFN (Control Functions), I/O (Input/Output Functions), PFN (Protection Functions) and FUN (Function).
The Quick Start Group provides a collection of the parameters that are most commonly changed when commissioning a starter. Many of
the parameters in the Quick Start group are duplicates of the same parameters in other groups.
2
The MX incorporates a number of parameters that allow you to configure the starter to meet the special requirements of your particular
application.
The parameters are divided into groups of related functionality, and within the groups the parameters are identified by a short, descriptive
name. They are numbered by the group name followed by an index within the group.
This chapter lists all of the parameters and their possible values.
The following shows the menu structure for the LCD display as well as the text that is displayed for the parameters on the display.
5.4.1
Quick Start Group
Number
QST 00
Display
Jump Code
Parameter
Jump to Parameter
Setting Range
Units
1 to 9
RMS
Amps
Default
Page
1
75
10
75
QST 01
Motor FLA
Motor FLA
1 to 6400
QST 02
Motor SF
Motor Service Factor
1.00 to 1.99
1.15
75
QST 03
Running OL
Motor Overload Class Running
Off, 1 to 40
10
76
QST 04
Local Src
Local Source
Terminal
QST 05
Remote Src
Remote Source
Keypad
Terminal
Serial
QST 06
Init Cur 1
Initial Motor Current 1
50 to 600
%FLA
100
79
QST 07
Max Cur 1
Maximum Motor Current 1
100 to 800
%FLA
600
80
QST 08
Ramp Time 1
Ramp Time 1
0 to 300
Seconds
15
81
QST 09
UTS Time
Up To Speed Time
1 to 900
Seconds
20
82
66
77
78
5 - PARAMETER GROUPS
5.4.2
Control Function Group
Number
CFN 00
Display
Jump Code
Parameter
Setting Range
Units
Default
Page
Jump to Parameter
1 to 25
1
83
Current Ramp
83
CFN 01
Start Mode
Start Mode
Voltage Ramp
Current Ramp
TT Ramp
Power Ramp
CFN 02
Ramp Time 1
Ramp Time 1
0 to 300
Seconds
15
81
CFN 03
Init Cur 1
Initial Motor Current 1
50 to 600
%FLA
100
79
CFN 04
Max Cur 1
Maximum Motor Current 1
100 to 800
%FLA
600
80
CFN 05
Ramp Time 2
Ramp Time 2
0 to 300
Seconds
15
94
CFN 06
Init Cur 2
Initial Motor Current 2
50 to 600
%FLA
100
93
CFN 07
Max Cur 2
Maximum Motor Current 2
100 to 800
%FLA
600
93
CFN 08
Init V/T/P
Initial Voltage/Torque/Power
1 to 100
%
25
84
CFN 09
Max T/P
Maximum Torque/Power
10 to 325
%
105
85
CFN 10
Kick Lvl 1
Kick Level 1
Off, 100 to 800
%FLA
Off
86
CFN 11
Kick Time 1
Kick Time 1
0.1 to 10.0
Seconds
1.0
86
CFN 12
Kick Lvl 2
Kick Level 2
Off, 100 to 800
%FLA
Off
94
CFN 13
Kick Time 2
Kick Time 2
0.1 to 10.0
Seconds
1.0
94
Coast
87
CFN 14
Stop Mode
Stop Mode
Coast
Volt Decel
TT Decel
DC Brake
CFN 15
Decel Begin
Decel Begin Level
100 to 1
%
40
88
CFN 16
Decel End
Decel End Level
99 to 1
%
20
89
CFN 17
Decel Time
Decel Time
1 to 180
Seconds
15
90
CFN 18
Brake Level
DC Brake Level
10 to 100
%
25
91
CFN 19
Brake Time
DC Brake Time
1 to 180
Seconds
5
92
CFN 20
Brake Delay
DC Brake Delay
0.1 to 3.0
Seconds
0.2
93
CFN 21
SSpd Speed
Slow Speed
Off, 7.1, 14.3
%
Off
95
CFN 22
SSpd Curr
Slow Speed Current Level
10 to 400
% FLA
100
95
CFN 23
SSpd Timer
Slow Speed Time Limit
Off, 1 to 900
Seconds
10
96
CFN 24
SSpd Kick Curr
Slow Speed Kick Level
Off, 100 to 800
% FLA
Off
96
CFN 25
SSpd Kick T
Slow Speed Kick Time
0.1 to 10.0
Seconds
1.0
97
67
5 - PARAMETER GROUPS
5.4.3
Protection Group
Number
Display
Parameter
Setting Range
Units
Default
Page
PFN 00
Jump Code
Jump to Parameter
1 to 17
1
98
PFN 01
Over Cur Lvl
Over Current Trip Level
Off, 50 to 800
%FLA
Off
98
PFN 02
Over Cur Tim
Over Current Trip Delay Time
Off, 0.1 to 90.0
Seconds
0.1
99
PFN 03
Undr Cur Lvl
Under Current Trip Level
Off, 5 to 100
%FLA
Off
100
PFN 04
Undr Cur Tim
Under Current Trip Delay Time
Off, 0.1 to 90.0
Seconds
0.1
100
PFN 05
Cur Imbl Lvl
Current Imbalance Trip Level
Off, 5 to 40
%
15
101
PFN 06
Gnd Flt Lvl
Residual Ground Fault Trip Level
Off, 5 to 100
%FLA
Off
102
PFN 07
Over Vlt Lvl
Over Voltage Trip Level
Off, 1 to 40
%
Off
103
PFN 08
Undr Vlt Lvl
Under Voltage Trip Level
Off, 1 to 40
%
Off
103
PFN 09
Vlt Trip Tim
Over/Under Voltage Trip Delay
Time
0.1 to 90.0
Seconds
0.1
104
PFN 10
Auto Reset
Auto Fault Reset Time
Off, 1 to 900
Seconds
Off
104
PFN 11
Auto Rst Lim
Auto Reset Limit
Off, 1 to 10
Off
104
PFN 12
Ctrl Flt En
Controlled Fault Stop Enable
Off, On
On
105
PFN 13
Indep S® OL
Independent Starting/Running
Overload
Off, On
Off
106
PFN 14
Starting OL
Motor Overload Class Starting
Off, 1 to 40
10
107
PFN 15
Running OL
Motor Overload Class Running
Off, 1 to 40
10
76
PFN 16
OL H© Ratio
Motor Overload Hot/Cold Ratio
0 to 99
%
60
108
PFN 17
OL Cool Tim
Motor Overload Cooling Time
1.0 to 999.9
Minutes
30.0
109
5.4.4
I/O Group
Number
Display
Parameter
Setting Range
Units
Default
I/O 00
Jump Code
Jump to parameter
1 to 19
1
I/O 01
DI 1 Config
DI 1 Configuration
Stop
I/O 02
DI 2 Config
DI 2 Configuration
I/O 03
DI 3 Config
DI 3 Configuration
Off
Stop
Fault High
Fault Low
Fault Reset
Disconnect
Inline Cnfrm
Bypass Cnfrm
E OL Reset
Local/Remote
Heat Disable
Heat Enable
Ramp Select
Slow Spd Fwd
Slow Spd Rev
Brake Disabl
Brake Enable
Run Enable
Run Disable
I/O 04
Din Trp Time
Digital Fault Input Trip Time
68
0.1 to 90.0
Page
110
Off
110
Off
Seconds
0.1
111
5 - PARAMETER GROUPS
Number
Display
Parameter
I/O 05
R1 Config
R1 Configuration (Relay #1)
I/O 06
R2 Config
R2 Configuration (Relay #2)
Setting Range
Units
Off
Fault FS (Fail Safe)
Fault NFS (Non Fail
Safe)
Running
UTS
Alarm
Ready
Locked Out
Overcurrent
Undercurrent
OL Alarm
Shunt Trip FS
Shunt Trip NFS
Ground Fault
Energy Saver
Heating
Slow Spd
Slow Spd Fwd
Slow SPd Rev
Braking
Cool Fan Ctl
I/O 07
R3 Config
R3 Configuration (Relay #3)
I/O 08
Ain Trp Type
Analog Input Trip Type
Off
Low Level
High Level
I/O 09
Ain Trp Lvl
Analog Input Trip Level
0 to 100
I/O 10
Ain Trp Tim
Analog Input Trip Delay Time
0.1 to 90.0
I/O 11
Ain Span
Analog Input Span
I/O 12
Ain Offset
Default
Page
Fault FS
Off
112
Off
Off
113
%
50
114
Seconds
0.1
114
1 to 100
%
100
115
Analog Input Offset
0 to 99
%
0
116
Off
116
I/O 13
Aout Fctn
Analog Output Function
Off
0 – 100% Curr
0 – 200% Curr
0 – 800% Curr
0 – 150% Volt
0 – 150% OL
0 – 10 kW
0 – 100 kW
0 – 1 MW
0 – 10 MW
0 – 100% Ain
0 – 100% Firing
Calibration
I/O 14
Aout Span
Analog Output Span
1 to 125
%
100
117
I/O 15
Aout Offset
Analog Output Offset
1 to 99
%
0
117
I/O 16
Inline Confg
In Line Configuration
Off, 1.0 to 10.0
Seconds
3.0
118
I/O 17
Bypas Fbk Tim
Bypass / 2M Confirm
Off, 0.1 to 5.0
Seconds
2.0
118
I/O 18
Kpd Stop Dis
Keypad Stop Disable
Enabled, Disabled
Enabled
119
Power On Start Selection
Disabled
Power
Fault
Power and Fault
Disabled
119
I/O 19
Auto Start
69
5 - PARAMETER GROUPS
5.4.5
Function Group
Number
Display
Parameter
Setting Range
Units
Default
FUN 00
Jump Code
Jump to parameter
1 to 16
1
FUN 01
Meter 1
Meter 1
Ave Current
FUN 02
Meter 2
Meter 2
Ave Current
L1 Current
L2 Current
L3 Current
Curr Imbal
Ground Fault
Ave Volts
L1-L2 Volts
L2-L3 Volts
L3-L1 Volts
Overload
Power Factor
Watts
VA
vars
kW hours
MW hours
Phase Order
Line Freq
Analog Input
Analog Output
Run Days
Run Hours
Starts
TruTorque %
Power %
Pk Accel Cur
Last Start T
FUN 03
CT Ratio
CT Ratio
72:1, 96:1, 144:1,
288:1, 864:1, 2640:1,
3900:1, 5760:1,
8000:1, 14400:1,
28800:1
FUN 04
Phase Order
Input Phase Sensitivity
Insensitive
ABC
CBA
Single Phase
Ave Volts
Page
120
127
288:1
126
Insensitive
126
480
125
-0.92
125
FUN 05
Rated Volts
Rated RMS Voltage
100, 110, 120, 200,
208, 220, 230, 240,
350, 380, 400, 415,
440, 460, 480, 500,
525, 575, 600, 660,
690, 800, 1000, 1140
FUN 06
Motor PF
Motor Rated Power Factor
-0.01 (Lag) to 1.00
(Unity)
%
Normal
124
RMS
Voltage
FUN 07
Starter Type
Starter Type
Normal
Inside Delta
Wye-Delta
Phase Ctl
Curr Follow
ATL
FUN 08
Heater Level
Heater Level
Off, 1 to 40
%FLA
Off
123
FUN 09
Energy Saver
Energy Saver
Off, On
Seconds
Off
122
FUN 10
Com Drop #
Communication Address
1 to 247
1
121
bps
19200
121
Seconds
Off
121
FUN 11
Com Baud rate
Communication Baud Rate
1200
2400
4800
9600
19200
FUN 12
Com Timeout
Communication Timeout
Off, 1 to 120
70
5 - PARAMETER GROUPS
Number
Display
Parameter
Setting Range
FUN 13
Com Parity
Communications Byte Framing
FUN 14
Software 1
Software 1 Part Number
FUN 15
Misc Command
Miscellaneous Commands
FUN 16
Passcode
Passcode
5.4.6
Units
Default
Even, 1 Stop Bit
Odd, 1 Stop Bit
None, 1 Stop Bit
None, 2 Stop Bit
Display Only
None
Std BIST
Powered BIST
Reset RT
Reset kWh
Reflash Mode
Store Params
Load Params
Factory Rst
Page
Even, 1 Stop
122
810023-01-08
128
None
120
Off
129
LCD Fault Group
Group
Fault
Number
Fault Description
Starter
State
I1
I2
I3
V1
V2
V3
kW
Hz
Run
Time
FL1
FL2
FL3
FL4
FL5
FL6
FL7
FL8
FL9
5.4.7
LED Fault Group
Group
F1
F2
F3
F4
F5
Fault
Number
Fault Description
Fault
Number
Fault Description
F6
F7
F8
F9
71
5 - PARAMETER GROUPS
NOTES:
72
6
Parameter Description
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
PARAMETER
6
DESCRIPTION
Parameter Descriptions
6.1
Parameter Descriptions
The detailed parameter descriptions in this chapter are organized in the same order as they appear on the LED display. If the remote
LCD display is being used, the table in chapter 5 beginning on page 62 can be used to find the page number of the parameter in this
chapter.
Each parameter has a detailed description that is displayed with the following format.
P__
Parameter Name
LED Display
MMM__
LCD Display
MMM: Parameter
MI
Value
Range
Parameter Value (Default: Constant)
OR
LED
EEE
Description
See Also
LCD
Keypad
The description of the function.
Cross references to related parameters or other chapters.
In the above format, the header box for the parameter contains the P number (as it appears in the menu on the LED display), the
parameter name and the parameter group number (as it appears in the menu on the LCD display).
The LCD Display section shows an example of what actually appears on the remote mounted keypad. The LED display shows an
example of what actually appears on the built in display. The parameter group (represented above by “MMM”) and the (possibly
abbreviated) parameter name are shown on the first line. The parameter group number (represented above by “MI” for “menu index”)
and the parameter’s value and units are shown on the second line.
Some parameters appear in two different menus of the LCD display. This is the case for those parameters that are in the Quick Start
Group. In this case, both LCD menu groups are listed in the header box and two example LCD displays are shown.
For some parameters, the Range section is enough to describe the parameter. For others, there may be an additional Options section to
describe each of the options that a parameter may be set to. The form that the options take may be different for the LED and LCD
displays, so this section shows how the options appear on both displays.
The See Also section lists cross-references to other parameters that may be related as well as references to further detail in other
chapters.
74
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
Jump to Parameter
QST 00
By changing the value of this parameter and pressing [ ENTER ], you can jump directly to any parameter within that group.
P1
Motor FLA
LED Display
QST 01
LCD Display:
QST: Motor FLA
01
10 Amp
Range
Model Dependent, 1 – 6400 Amps RMS (Default 10A)
Description
The Motor FLA parameter configures the motor full load amps and is obtained from the nameplate on the
attached motor.
If multiple motors are connected, the FLA of each motor must be added together for this value.
z NOTE: Incorrectly setting this parameter prevents proper operation of the motor overload protection,
motor over current protection, motor undercurrent protection, ground fault protection and acceleration control.
P2
Motor Service Factor
LED Display
QST 02
LCD Display
QST: Motor SF
02
1.15
Range
1.00 – 1.99 (Default 1.15)
Description
The Motor Service Factor parameter should be set to the service factor of the motor. The service factor is
used for the overload calculations. If the service factor of the motor is not known, then the service factor
should be set to 1.00.
z NOTE: The NEC (National Electrical Code) does not allow the service factor to be set above 1.40. Check
with other local electrical codes for their requirements.
The National Electrical Code, article 430 Part C, allows for different overload multiplier factors depending on
the motor and operating conditions. NEC section 430-32 outlines the allowable service factor for different
motors.
See Also
Theory of Operation section 7.2, Motor Service Factor on page 139.
75
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P3
Motor Overload Class Running
LED Display
QST 03, PFN 15
LCD Display
QST: Running OL
03
10
PFN: Running OL
15
10
Range
Off, 1– 40 (Default 10)
Description
The Motor Running Overload Class parameter sets the class of the electronic overload for starting and
running. If separate starting versus running overload classes are desired, set the independent S\R O/L (P44 /
PFN13) parameter to "On".
The starter stores the thermal overload value as a percentage value between 0 and 100%, with 0% representing
a “cold” overload and 100% representing a tripped overload. See section 7.1, for the overload trip time
versus current curves.
When the parameter is set to "Off", the electronic overload is disabled when up to speed and a separate motor
overload protection device must be supplied.
z NOTE: Care must be taken not to damage the motor when turning the running overload class off or setting
to a high value.
z NOTE: Consult motor manufacturer data to determine the correct motor overload settings.
See Also
76
Independent Starting/Running Overload (P44 / PFN 13) on page 106.
Motor Starting Overload Class (P45 / PFN 14) on page 107.
Motor Overload Hot/Cold Ratio (P46 / PFN 16) on page 108.
Motor Overload Cooling Time (P47 / PFN 17) on page 109.
Relay Output Configuration (P52-54 / I/O 05 - 07) on page 112.
Theory of Operation section 7.1, Solid State Motor Overload Protection on page 132.
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P4
Local Source
LED Display
QST 04
LCD Display
QST: Local Src
04 Terminal
Range
LED
LCD
Keypad
Terminal
Serial
PAd
tEr
SEr
Description
Description
The start/stop control is from the keypad.
The start/stop control is from the terminal strip inputs. (Default)
The start/stop control is from the network.
2
The MX can have three sources of start and stop control; Terminal, Keypad and Serial. Two parameters, (P4
/ QST 04) - Local Source and (P5 / QST 05) - Remote Source, allows the user to change the control source.
If a digital input is programmed as “L-r” (Local / Remote), then that input selects the control source. When
the input is low, the local source is used. When the input is high, the remote source is used. If no digital input
is programmed as “L-r”, then the local/remote bit in the starter control Modbus register selects the control
source. The default value of the bit is Local (0).
See Also
Remote Source (P5 / QST 05) parameter on page 78.
Digital Input Configuration (P45-P50 / I/O 01- I/O 03) parameters on page 110.
Keypad Stop Disable (P65 / I/O 18) parameter on page 119.
Communication Timeout (P68 / FUN 12) parameter on page 121.
Communication Baud Rate (P69 / FUN 11) parameter on page 121.
Communication Address (P70 / FUN 10) parameter on page 121.
z NOTE: By default, the Stop key is always enabled, regardless of selected control source. It may be
disabled though using the P65 / I/O18 - Keypad Stop Disable parameter on page 119.
77
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P5
Remote Source
LED Display
QST 05
LCD Display
QST: Remote SRC
05 Terminal
Range
LED
LCD
Keypad
Terminal
Serial
PAd
tEr
SEr
Description
Description
The start/stop control is from the keypad.
The start/stop control is from the terminal strip inputs. (Default)
The start/stop control is from the network.
2
The MX can have three sources of start and stop control; Terminal, Keypad and Serial. Two parameters, (P4
/ QST 04) - Local Source and (P5 / QST 05) - Remote Source, select the sources of the start and stop control.
If a digital input is programmed as “L-r” (Local / Remote), then that input selects the control source. When
the input is low, the local source is used. When the input is high, the remote source is used. If no digital input
is programmed as “L-r”, then the local/remote bit in the Modbus starter control register selects the control
source. The default value of the bit is Local (0).
See Also
Local Source (P4 / QST 04) parameter on page 77.
Digital Input Configuration (P45-P50 / I/O 01- I/O 03) parameters on page 110.
Keypad Stop Disable (P65 / I/O 18) parameter on page 119.
Communication Timeout (P68 / FUN 12) parameter on page 121.
Communication Baud Rate (P69 / FUN 11) parameter on page 121.
Communication Address (P70 / FUN 10) parameter on page 121.
Modbus Register Map, refer to www.benshaw.com.
Figure 24: Local Remote Source
Local Source
·
Keypad
P48, P49, P50
Modbus Starter Control Register
Local/Remote Bit
78
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P6
LED Display
Initial Motor Current 1
QST 06, CFN 03
LCD Display
QST: Init Cur 1
06
100 %
CFN: Init Cur 1
03
100 %
Range
50 – 600 % of FLA (Default 100%)
Description
The Initial Motor Current 1 parameter is set as a percentage of the Motor FLA (P1 / QST 01) parameter
setting. The Initial Current 1 parameter sets the current that is initially supplied to the motor when a start is
commanded. The initial current should be set to the level that allows the motor to begin rotating within a
couple of seconds of receiving a start command.
To adjust the initial current setting, give the starter a run command. Observe the motor to see how long it
takes before it begins rotating and then stop the unit. For every second that the motor doesn’t rotate, increase
the initial current by 20%. Typical loads require an initial current in the range of 50% to 175%.
If the motor does not rotate within a few seconds after a start command, the initial current should be increased.
If the motor accelerates too quickly after a start command, the initial current should be decreased.
The Initial Current 1 parameter must be set to a value that is lower than the Maximum Current 1 (P7 / QST
07) parameter setting.
See Also
Maximum Current 1 (P7 / QST 07) parameter on page 80.
Ramp Time 1 (P8 / QST 08) parameter on page 81.
Start Mode (P10 / CFN 01) parameter on page 83.
Kick Level 1 (P13 / CFN 10) parameter on page 86.
Kick Time 1 (P14 / CFN 11) parameter on page 86.
Theory of Operation section 7.3.1, Current Ramp Settings, Ramps and Times, on page 140.
79
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P7
LED Display
Maximum Motor Current 1
QST 07, CFN 04
LCD Display
QST: Max Cur 1
07
600 %
CFN: Max Cur 1
04
600 %
Range
100 – 800 % of FLA (Default 600%)
Description
The Maximum Motor Current 1 parameter is set as a percentage of the Motor FLA (P1 / QST 01) parameter
setting. This parameter performs two functions. It sets the current level for the end of the ramp profile. It
also sets the maximum current that is allowed to reach the motor after the ramp is completed.
If the ramp time expires before the motor has reached full speed, the starter holds the current at the maximum
current level until either the UTS timer expires; the motor reaches full speed, or the overload trips.
Typically, the maximum current is set to 600% unless the power system or load dictates the setting of a lower
or higher maximum current.
See Also
80
Initial Current 1 (P6 / QST 06) parameter on page 79.
Ramp Time 1 (P8 / QST 08) parameter on page 81.
Up To Speed Time (P9 / QST 09) parameter on page 82.
Start Mode (P10 / CFN 01) parameter on page 83.
Kick Level 1 (P13 / CFN 10) parameter on page 86.
Kick Time 1 (P14 / CFN 11) parameter on page 86.
Theory of Operation section 7.3.1, Current Ramp Settings, Ramps and Times on page 140.
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P8
LED Display
Ramp Time 1
QST 08, CFN 02
LCD Display
QST: Ramp Time 1
08
15 sec
CFN: Ramp Time 1
02
15 sec
Range
0 – 300 seconds (Default 15)
Description
The Ramp Time 1 parameter is the time it takes for the starter to allow the current, voltage, torque or power
(depending on the start mode) to go from its initial to the maximum value. To make the motor accelerate
faster, decrease the ramp time. To make the motor accelerate slower, increase the ramp time.
A typical ramp time setting is from 15 to 30 seconds.
If the ramp time expires before the motor reaches full speed, the starter maintains the maximum current level
until either the motor reaches full speed, the UTS timer expires, or the motor thermal overload trips.
z NOTE: Setting the ramp time to a specific value does not necessarily mean that the motor will take this
time to accelerate to full speed. The motor and load may achieve full speed before the ramp time expires if
the application does not require the set ramp time and maximum current to reach full speed. Alternatively, the
motor and load may take longer than the set ramp time to achieve full speed.
See Also
Initial Current 1 (P6 / QST 06) parameter on page 79.
Maximum Current 1 (P7 / QST 07) parameter on page 80.
Up To Speed Time (P9 / QST 09) parameter on page 82.
Start Mode (P10 / CFN 01) parameter on page 83.
Kick Level 1 (P13 / CFN 10) parameter on page 86.
Kick Time 1 (P14 / CFN 11) parameter on page 86.
Theory of Operation section 7.3.1, Current Ramp Settings, Ramps and Times on page 140.
81
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P9
Up To Speed Time
LED Display
QST 09
LCD Display
QST: UTS Time
09
20 sec
Range
1– 900 Seconds (Default 20)
Description
The Up To Speed Time parameter sets the maximum time the motor can take to accelerate to full speed. A
stalled motor condition is detected if the motor does not get up-to-speed before the up-to-speed timer expires.
The motor is considered up-to-speed once the current stabilizes below 175 percent of the FLA value and the
ramp time expires.
z NOTE: During normal acceleration ramps, the up-to-speed timer has to be greater than the sum of the
highest ramp time in use and the kick time. The up-to-speed timer does not automatically change to be greater
than the ramp time. If a ramp time greater than the up-to-speed timer is set, the starter will declare an
up-to-speed fault every time a start is attempted.
z NOTE: When the Start Mode (P10 / CFN 01) parameter is set to "Voltage Ramp", the UTS timer acts as
an acceleration kick. When the UTS timer expires, full voltage is applied to the motor. This feature can be
used to reduce motor oscillations if they occur near the end of an open loop voltage ramp start.
z NOTE: When the Starter Type (P74 / FUN 07) parameter is set to "Wye-Delta", the UTS timer is used as
the transition timer. When the UTS timer expires, the transition from Wye starting mode to Delta running
mode takes place if it has not already occurred.
Fault Code 01 - Up to Speed Fault is declared when a stalled motor condition is detected.
See Also
82
Ramp Time 1 (P8 / QST 08) parameter on page 81.
Start Mode (P10 / CFN 01) parameter on page 83.
Kick Time 1 (P14 / CFN 11) parameter on page 86.
Ramp Time 2 (P24 / CFN 05) parameter on page 94.
Kick Time 2 (P26 / CFN 13) parameter on page 94.
Starter Type (P74 / FUN 07) parameter on page 124.
Theory of Operation section 7.3, Acceleration Control on page 140.
Theory of Operation section 7.8, Wye-Delta on page 160.
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
Jump to Parameter
CFN 00
By changing the value of this parameter and pressing [ENTER], you can jump directly to any parameter within that group.
P10
Start Mode
LED Display
CFN 01
LCD Display
CFN: Start Mode
01 Current Ramp
Range
LED
oLrP
curr
tt
Pr
Description
LCD
Voltage Ramp
Current Ramp
TT Ramp
Power Ramp
Description
Open Loop Voltage acceleration ramp.
Current control acceleration ramp. (Default)
TruTorque control acceleration ramp.
Power (kW) control acceleration ramp.
The Start Mode parameter allows the selection of the optimal starting ramp profile based on the application.
The closed loop current control acceleration ramp is ideal for starting most general-purpose motor
applications. Ex: crushers, ball mills, reciprocating compressors, saws, centrifuges, and most other
applications.
The closed loop TruTorque control acceleration ramp is suitable for applications that require a smooth torque
output from the motor during starting. Ex: centrifugal pumps, fans. The Tru Torque is also suitable for belt
driven applications to eliminate belt sequel that commonly occurs near full speed.
The closed loop power control acceleration ramp is ideal for starting applications using a generator or other
limited capacity source.
See Also
Initial Current 1 (P6 / QST 06) parameter on page 79.
Maximum Current 1 (P7 / QST 07) parameter on page 80.
Ramp Time 1 (P8 / QST 08) parameter on page 81.
Initial Voltage/Torque/Power (P11 / CFN 08) parameter on page 84.
Kick Level 1 (P13 / CFN 10) parameter on page 86.
Kick Time 1 (P14 / CFN 11) parameter on page 86.
Theory of Operation section 7.3, Acceleration Control on page 140.
83
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P11
LED Display
Initial Voltage/Torque/Power
CFN08
LCD Display
CFN: Init V/T/P
08
25 %
Range
1 – 100 % of Voltage/Torque/Power (Default 25%)
Description
Start Mode (P10/CFN01) set to Open Loop Voltage Acceleration:
This parameter sets the starting point for the voltage acceleration ramp profile. A typical value is 25%. If the
motor starts too quickly or the initial current is too high, reduce this parameter. If the motor does not start
rotating within a few seconds after a start is commanded, increase this parameter.
Start Mode (P10/CFN01) set to Current Control Acceleration:
Not used when the Start Mode parameter is set to Current control acceleration. Refer to the P6 - Initial
Current 1 (CFN03) parameter to set the initial current level.
Start Mode (P10/CFN01) set to TruTorque Control Acceleration:
This parameter sets the initial torque level that the motor produces at the beginning of the starting ramp
profile. A typical value is 10% to 20%. If the motor starts too quickly or the initial torque level is too high,
reduce this parameter. If the motor does not start rotating within a few seconds after a start is commanded,
increase this parameter. If the value is set too low a “No Current at Run” fault may occur during acceleration.
z NOTE: It is important that the (P75 / FUN06) - Rated Power Factor parameter is set properly so that the
actual initial torque level is the value desired.
Start Mode (P10/CFN01) set to (kW) Power Control Acceleration:
This parameter sets the initial motor power (KW) level that will be achieved at the beginning of the starting
ramp profile. A typical value is 10% to 30%. If the motor starts too quickly or the initial power level is too
high, reduce this parameter. If the motor does not start rotating within a few seconds after a start is
commanded, increase this parameter. If the value is set too low a “No Current at Run” fault may occur during
acceleration.
z NOTE: It is important that the (P75 / FUN06) - Rated Power Factor parameter is set properly so that the
actual initial power level is the value desired.
See Also
84
Initial Current 1 (P6 / QST 06) parameter on page 79.
Ramp Time 1 (P8 / QST 08) parameter on page 81.
Start Mode (P10 / CFN 01) parameter on page 83.
Maximum Torque/Power (P12 / CFN 09) parameter on page 85.
Rated Power Factor (P75 / FUN 06) parameter on page 125.
Theory of Operation section 7.3, Acceleration Control on page 140.
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P12
LED Display
Maximum Torque/Power
CFN 09
LCD Display
CFN: Max T/P
09
105 %
Range
10 – 325 % of Torque/Power (Default 105%)
Description
Start Mode (P10/CFN01) set to Open Loop Voltage Acceleration:
Not used when the Start Mode parameter is set to open-loop voltage acceleration. When in open loop voltage
acceleration mode, the final voltage ramp value is always 100% or full voltage.
Start Mode (P10/CFN01) set to Current Control Acceleration:
Not used when the Start Mode parameter is set to Current control acceleration mode. Refer to the Maximum
Current 1 (P7 / CFN04) parameter to set the maximum current level.
Start Mode (P10/CFN01) set to TruTorque Control Acceleration:
This parameter sets the final or maximum torque level that the motor produces at the end of the acceleration
ramp time. For a loaded motor, the maximum torque value initially should be set to 100% or greater. If the
maximum torque value is set too low, the motor may not produce enough torque to reach full speed and may
stall. On lightly loaded motors, this parameter may be reduced below 100% to produce smoother starts.
z NOTE: It is important that the (P75 / FUN06) - Rated Power Factor parameter is set properly so that the
desired maximum torque level is achieved.
Start Mode (P10/CFN01) set to Power Control Acceleration:
This parameter sets the final or maximum power (KW) consumption level that will be achieved at the end of
the ramp time. For a loaded motor, the maximum power value initially should be set to 100% or greater. If
the maximum power level is set too low, the motor may not produce enough torque to reach full speed and
may stall. On lightly loaded motors, this parameter may be reduced below 100% to provide for smoother
starts.
z NOTE: It is important that the (P75 / FUN06) - Rated Power Factor parameter is set properly so that the
actual maximum power level is achieved.
See Also
Initial Current 1 (P6 / CFN03) on page 79.
Maximum Current 1 (P7 / QST 07) parameter on page 80.
Ramp Time 1 (P8 / QST 08) parameter on page 81.
Start Mode (P10 / CFN 01) parameter on page 83.
Initial Voltage/Torque/Power (P11 / CFN 08) parameter on page 84.
Rated Power Factor (P75 / FUN 06) parameter on page 125.
Theory of Operation section 7.3, Acceleration Control, on page 140.
85
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P13
LED Display
Kick Level 1
CFN 10
LCD Display
CFN: Kick Lvl 1
10 Off
Range
Off, 100 – 800% of FLA (Default Off)
Description
The Kick Level 1 parameter sets the current level that precedes any ramp when a start is first commanded.
The kick current is only useful on motor loads that are hard to get rotating but then are much easier to move
once they are rotating. An example of a load that is hard to get rotating is a ball mill. The ball mill requires a
high torque to get it to rotate the first quarter turn (90°). Once the ball mill is past 90° of rotation, the material
inside begins tumbling and it is easier to turn.
The kick level is usually set to a low value and then the kick time is adjusted to get the motor rotating. If the
kick time is set to more than 2.0 seconds without the motor rotating, increase the kick current by 100% and
re-adjust the kick time.
See Also
P14
LED Display
Start Mode (P10 / CFN 01) parameter on page 83.
Kick Time 1 (P14 / CFN 11) parameter on page 86.
Theory of Operation section 7.3.2, Programming A Kick Current on page 141.
Kick Time 1
CFN 11
LCD Display
CFN: Kick Time 1
11
1.0 sec
Range
0.1 – 10.0 seconds (Default 1.0)
Description
The Kick Time 1 parameter sets the length of time that the kick current level (P13 / CFN 10) is applied to the
motor.
The kick time adjustment should begin at 0.5 seconds and be adjusted by 0.1 or 0.2 second intervals until the
motor begins rotating. If the kick time is adjusted above 2.0 seconds without the motor rotating, start over
with a higher kick current setting.
z NOTE: The kick time adds to the total start time and must be accounted for when setting the UTS time.
See Also
86
Start Mode (P10 / CFN 01) parameter on page 83.
Up To Speed (P9 / QST 09) parameter on page 82.
Kick Level 1 (P13 / CFN 10) parameter on page 86.
Theory of Operation section 7.3.2, Programming a Kick Current on page 141.
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P15
Stop Mode
LED Display
CFN 14
LCD Display
CFN: Stop Mode
14 Coast
Range
LED
CoS
SdcL
tdcL
dcb
Description
LCD
Coast
Volt Decel
TT Decel
DC Brake
Description
Coast to stop. (Default)
Open loop voltage deceleration.
TruTorque deceleration.
DC Braking.
Coast:
A coast to stop should be used when no special stopping requirements are necessary; Example: crushers, balls
mills, centrifuges, belts, conveyor. The bypass contactor is opened before the SCRs stop gating to reduce
wear on the contactor contacts.
Voltage Decel:
In this mode, the starter linearly phases-back the SCRs based on the parameters Decel Begin Level, Decel End
Level, and Decel Time.
TruTorque Decel:
In this mode, the starter linearly reduces the motor torque based on the Decel End Level and Decel Time.
DC Brake:
In this mode the starter provides D.C. injection for frictionless braking of a three phase motor.
2
z NOTE: The MX stops the motor when any fault occurs. Depending on the application, it may be
desirable for the motor to be stopped in a controlled manner (Voltage Decel, TT Decel or D.C. Braking)
instead of being allowed to coast to a stop when this occurs. This may be achieved by setting the Controlled
Fault Stop Enable (P43 / PFN12) parameter to "On". Be aware, however, that not all fault conditions allow
for a controlled fault stop.
See Also
Decel Begin Level (P16 / CFN 15) parameter on page 88.
Decel End Level (P17 / CFN 16) parameter on page 89.
Decel Time (P18 / CFN 17) parameter on page 90.
DC Brake Level (P19 / CFN 18) parameter on page 91.
DC Brake Time (P20 / CFN 19) parameter on page 92.
DC Brake Delay (P21 / CFN 20) parameter on page 93.
Controlled Fault Stop Enable (P43 / PFN 12) parameter on page 105.
Digital Input Configuration (P48-P50 / I/O 01-03) parameters on page 110.
Relay Output Configuration (P52-P54 / I/O 05-07) parameters on page 112.
Theory of Operation section 7.4, Deceleration Control on page 149.
Theory of Operation section 7.5, Braking Controls on page 151.
87
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P16
LED Display
Decel Begin Level
CFN 15
LCD Display
CFN: Decel Begin
15
40 %
Range
1 % – 100% of phase angle firing (Default 40%)
Description
Stop Mode (P15/CFN14) set to Voltage Deceleration:
The voltage deceleration profile utilizes an open loop S-curve voltage ramp profile. The Decel Begin Level
parameter sets the initial or starting voltage level when transferring from running to deceleration. The
deceleration beginning level is not a precise percentage of actual line voltage, but defines a point on the
S-curve deceleration profile.
A typical voltage decel begin level setting is between 30% and 40%. If the motor initially surges (oscillates)
when a stop is commanded, decrease this parameter value. If there is a sudden drop in motor speed when a
stop is commanded, increase this parameter value.
Stop Mode (P15/CFN14) set to TruTorque Deceleration:
Not used when the Stop Mode parameter is set to TruTorque Decel. The TruTorque beginning deceleration
level is automatically calculated based on the motor load at the time the stop command is given.
z NOTE: It is important that the (P75 / FUN06) - Rated Power Factor parameter is set properly so that the
actual deceleration torque levels are the levels desired.
See Also
88
Stop Mode (P10 / CFN 14) parameter on page 87.
Decel End Level (P17 / CFN 16) parameter on page 89.
Decel Time (P18 / CFN 17) parameter on page 90.
Controlled Fault Stop Enable (P43 / PFN 12) parameter on page 105.
Rated Power Factor (P75 / FUN 06) parameter on page 125.
Theory of Operation section 7.4, Deceleration Control on page 149.
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P17
LED Display
Decel End Level
CFN 16
LCD Display
CFN: Decel End
16
20 %
Range
1 – 99 % of phase angle firing (Default 20%)
Description
Stop Mode (P15/CFN14) set to Voltage Deceleration:
The voltage deceleration profile utilizes an open loop S-curve voltage ramp profile. The Decel End Level
parameter sets the ending voltage level for the voltage deceleration ramp profile. The deceleration ending
level is not a precise percentage of actual line voltage, but defines an ending point on the S-curve deceleration
profile.
A typical voltage decel end level setting is between 10% and 20%. If the motor stops rotating before the
deceleration time has expired, increase this parameter value. If the motor is still rotating when the
deceleration time has expired, decrease this parameter value. If the value is set too low a “No Current at Run”
fault may occur during deceleration.
z NOTE: The deceleration end level cannot be set greater than the decel begin level.
Stop Mode (P15/CFN14) set to TruTorque Deceleration:
The decel end level parameter sets the ending torque level for the TruTorque deceleration ramp profile.
A typical TruTorque decel end level setting is between 10% and 20%. If the motor stops rotating before the
deceleration time has expired, increase this parameter value. If the motor is still rotating when the
deceleration time has expired, decrease this parameter value.
See Also
Stop Mode (P15 / CFN 14) parameter on page 87.
Decel Begin Level (P16 / CFN 15) parameter on page 88.
Decel Time (P18 / CFN 17) parameter on page 90.
Controlled Fault Stop Enable (P43 / PFN 12) parameter on page 105.
Theory of Operation section 7.4, Deceleration Control on page 149.
89
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P18
LED Display
Decel Time
CFN 17
LCD Display
CFN: Decel Time
17
15 sec
Range
1 – 180 seconds (Default 15)
Description
The Decel Time parameter sets the time that the deceleration profile is applied to the motor and sets the slope
of the deceleration ramp profile. When in voltage decel mode, this time sets the time between applying the
initial decel level to the final decel level.
z NOTE: If the motor is not up to speed when a stop is commanded, the voltage decel profile begins at the
lower of either the decel begin level setting or at the motor voltage level when the stop is commanded.
Although the profile may be adjusted, the deceleration time remains the same.
When in the TruTorque deceleration mode, the decel time sets the time between when a stop is commanded
and when the decel end torque level is applied.
If the motor stops rotating before the decel time expires, decrease the decel time parameter. If the motor is
still rotating when the decel time expires, increase the decel time parameter.
A typical decel time is 20 to 40 seconds.
z NOTE: Depending on the motor load and the decel parameter settings, the motor may or may not be fully
stopped at the end of the deceleration time.
See Also
90
Stop Mode (P15 / CFN 14) parameter on page 87.
Decel Begin Level (P16 / CFN 15) parameter on page 88.
Decel End Level (P17 / CFN 16) parameter on page 89.
Controlled Fault Stop Enable (P43 / PFN 12) parameter on page 105.
Theory of Operation section 7.4, Deceleration Control on page 149.
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P19
LED Display
DC Brake Level
CFN 18
LCD Display
CFN: Brake Level
18
25 %
Range
10 – 100 % of available brake torque (Default 25%)
Description
When the Stop Mode (P15 / CFN 14) is set to DC brake, the DC Brake Level parameter sets the level of DC
current applied to the motor during braking. The desired brake level is determined by the combination of the
system inertia, system friction, and the desired braking time. If the motor is braking too fast the level should
be reduced. If the motor is not braking fast enough the level should be increased. Refer to Nema MG1, Parts
12 and 20 for maximum load inertia. A Thermistor, Thermostat or RTD MUST be installed to protect the
motor.
DC Brake Function Programming Steps:
1. The DC Brake function may be enabled by setting the stop mode (P15 / CFN 14) to DC Brake.
2. Once this function is enabled, a relay output configuration (P52,53,54 / I/O 05,06,07) must be
used to control the DC brake contactor or 7th SCR gate drive card during braking. It is
recommended to use Relay K3 - (P54 / I/O 07).
z NOTE: Standard braking
- For load inertia less than 6 x motor inertia
z NOTE: Heavy duty braking
- For NEMA MG1 parts 12 and 20 maximum load inertia
z NOTE: When DC injection braking is utilized, discretion must be used when setting up the DC Brake
Level. Motor heating during DC braking is similar to motor heating during starting. Even though the Motor
OL is active (if not set to "Off") during DC injection braking, excessive motor heating could still result if the
load inertia is large or the brake level is set too high. Caution must be used to assure that the motor has the
thermal capacity to handle braking the desired load in the desired period of time without excessive heating.
z NOTE: Consult motor manufacturer for high inertia applications.
z NOTE: Not to be used as an emergency stop. When motor braking is required even during a power outage
an Electro mechanical brake must be used.
See Also
Stop Mode (P15 / CFN 14) parameter on page 87.
DC Brake Time (P20 / CFN 19) parameter on page 92.
DC Brake Delay (P21 / CFN 20) parameter on page 93.
Controlled Fault Stop Enable (P43 / PFN 12) parameter on page 105.
Digital Input (P48-50 / I/O 01-03) parameters on page 110.
Theory of Operation section 7.1, Solid State Motor Overload Protection, on page 132.
Theory of Operation section 7.5.9, DC Injection Braking Control, on page 156.
91
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P20
DC Brake Time
LED Display
CFN 19
LCD Display
CFN: Brake Time
19
5 sec
Range
1 – 180 Seconds (Default 5)
Description
When the Stop Mode (P15 / CFN 14) is set to "DC brake", the DC Brake Time parameter sets the time that
DC current is applied to the motor. The required brake time is determined by the combination of the system
inertia, system friction, and the desired braking level. Increase the brake time if the motor is still rotating when
the braking finishes to minimize unnecessary motor heating.
See Also
Motor Running Overload Class (P3 / QST 03) parameter on page 76.
Stop Mode (P15 / CFN 14) parameter on page 87.
DC Brake Level (P19 / CFN 18) parameter on page 91.
DC Brake Delay (P21 / CFN 20) parameter on page 93.
Controlled Fault Stop Enable (P43 / PFN 12) parameter on page 105.
Theory of Operation section 7.5.9, DC Injection Braking Control, on page 156.
92
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P21
DC Brake Delay
LED Display
CFN 20
LCD Display
CFN: Brake Delay
20
0.2 sec
Range
0.1 – 3.0 Seconds (Default 0.2)
Description
When the Stop Mode (P15, CFN 14) is set to "DC brake", the DC Brake Delay time is the time delay between
when a stop is commanded and the DC braking current is applied to the motor. This delay allows the residual
magnetic field and motor counter EMF to decay before applying the DC braking current. If a large surge of
current is detected when DC braking is first engaged increase the delay time. If the delay before the braking action
begins is too long then decrease the delay time. In general, low horsepower motors can utilize shorter delays while
large horsepower motor may require longer delays.
See Also
Stop Mode (P15 / CFN 14) parameter on page 87.
DC Brake Level (P19 / CFN 18) parameter on page 91.
DC Brake Time (P20 / CFN 19) parameter on page 92.
Theory of Operation section 7.5.9, DC Injection Braking Control, on page 156.
P22
LED Display
Initial Motor Current 2
CFN 06
LCD Display
CFN: Init Cur 2
06
100 %
Range
50 – 600 % of FLA (Default 100%)
Description
The Initial Current 2 parameter is set as a percentage of the Motor FLA (P1 / QST 01) parameter setting when
the second ramp is active. Refer to the Initial Current 1 (P6 / CFN 03) parameter on page 79 for description of
operation.
See Also
Initial Current 1 (P6 / QST 06) parameter on page 79.
Digital Input Configuration (P48-50 / I/O 01-03) parameters on page 110 .
Theory of Operation section 7.3.1, Current Ramp Settings, Ramps and Times on page 140.
Theory of Operation section 7.3.6, Dual Acceleration Ramp Control on page 147.
P23
LED Display
Maximum Motor Current 2
CFN 07
LCD Display
CFN: Max Cur 2
07
600 %
Range
100 – 800 % of FLA (Default 600%)
Description
The Maximum Current 2 parameter is set as a percentage of the Motor FLA (P1 / QST 01) parameter setting,
when the second ramp is active. Refer to the Maximum Current 1 (P7 / CFN 04) parameter on page 80 for
description of operation.
See Also
Maximum Current 1 (P7 / QST 07) parameter on page 80.
Digital Input Configuration (P48 / I/O 01-03) parameters on page 110.
Theory of Operation section 7.3.1, Current Ramp Settings, Ramps and Times on page 140.
Theory of Operation section 7.3.6, Dual Acceleration Ramp Control, on page 147.
93
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P24
LED Display
Ramp Time 2
CFN 05
LCD Display
CFN: Ramp Time 2
05
15 sec
Range
0 – 300 seconds (Default 15)
Description
The Ramp Time 2 parameter sets the time it takes for the starter to allow the current to go from the initial
current to the maximum current when the second ramp is active. Refer to the Ramp Time 1 (P8 / CFN 02)
parameter on page 83 for description of operation.
See Also
Ramp Time 1 (P8 / QST 08) parameter on page 83.
Digital Input Configuration (P48-P50 / I/O 01-03) parameters on page 110.
Theory of Operation section 7.3.1, Current Ramp Settings, Ramp and Times on page 140.
Theory of Operation section 7.3.6, Dual Acceleration Ramp Control, on page 147.
P25
LED Display
Kick Level 2
CFN 12
LCD Display
CFN: Kick Lvl 2
12 Off
Range
Off, 100 – 800% of FLA (Default Off)
Description
The Kick Level 2 parameter sets the current level that precedes any ramp when a start is first commanded
when the second ramp is active. Refer to the Kick Level 1 (P13 / CFN 10) parameter on page 88 for
description of operation.
See Also
Kick Level 1 (P13 / CFN 10) parameter on page 88.
Digital Input Configuration (P48-50 / I/O 01-03) parameters on page 110.
Theory of Operation section 7.3.2, Programming A Kick Current on page 141.
Theory of Operation section 7.3.6, Dual Acceleration Ramp Control on page 147.
P26
LED Display
Kick Time 2
CFN 13
LCD Display
CFN: Kick Time 2
13
1.0 sec
Range
0.1 – 10.0 seconds (Default 1.0)
Description
The Kick Time 2 parameter sets the length of time that the kick current level is applied to the motor when the
second ramp is active. Refer to the Kick Time 1 (P14 / CFN 11) parameter on page 88 for description of
operation.
94
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P27
LED Display
Preset Slow Speed
CFN 21
LCD Display
CFN: SSpd Speed
21 Off
Range
Off, 7.1%, 14.3 % (Default Off)
Description
The Preset Slow Speed parameter sets the speed of motor operation. When set to "Off", slow speed operation
is disabled.
Slow speed operation is commanded by programming one of the digital inputs to either "Slow Speed
Forward" or "Slow Speed Reverse". Energizing the Slow Speed Input when the starter is in idle will initiate
slow speed operation.
z NOTE: When the motor is operating at slow speeds its cooling capacity can be greatly reduced. Therefore,
the running time of the motor at a given current level is dependant on the motor’s thermal capacity. Although
the Motor OL is active (if not set to "Off") during slow speed operation, it is recommended that the motor
temperature be monitored when slow speed is used for long periods of time.
See Also
Slow Speed Current Level (P27 / CFN 22) parameter on page 95.
Slow Speed Time Limit (P29 / CFN 23) parameter on page 96.
Digital Input Configuration (P48-P50 / I/O 01-03) parameters on page 110.
Relay Output Configuration (P52-54 / I/O 05-07) parameters on page 112.
Theory of Operation section 7.6.2, Slow Speed Operation on page 157.
z NOTE: Remote Source (P5 / QST 05) must be set to 'Terminal'.
z NOTE: For Continuous Slow Speed Operation, an RC2 is required.
P28
LED Display
Preset Slow Speed Current Level
CFN 22
LCD Display
CFN: SSpd Curr
22
100 %
Range
10 – 400 % FLA (Default 100%)
Description
The Preset Slow Speed Current Level parameter selects the level of current applied to the motor during slow
speed operation. The parameter is set as a percentage of motor full load amps (FLA). This value should be
set to the lowest possible current level that will properly operate the motor.
See Also
Motor Running Overload Class (P3 / QST 03) parameter on page76.
Slow Speed Time Limit (P29 / CFN 23) parameter on page 96.
Theory of Operation section 7.6.2, Slow Speed Operation on page 157.
95
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P29
LED Display
Slow Speed Time Limit
CFN 23
LCD Display
CFN: SSpd Timer
23
10 sec
Range
Off, 1 – 900 Seconds (Default 10)
Description
The Slow Speed Time Limit parameter sets the amount of time that continuous operation of slow speed may
take place. When this parameter is set to "Off", the timer is disabled. This parameter can be used to limit the
amount of slow speed operation to protect the motor and/or load.
z NOTE: The Slow Speed Time Limit includes the time used for the Slow Speed Kick if kick is enabled.
z NOTE: The Slow Speed Time Limit resets when the motor is stopped. Therefore, this timer does not
prevent the operator from stopping slow speed operation and re-starting the motor, which can result in the
operation time of the motor being exceeded.
z NOTE: When the motor is operating at slow speeds, its cooling capacity can be greatly reduced.
Therefore, the running time of the motor at a given current level is dependant on the motor’s thermal capacity.
Although the Motor OL is active (if not set to "Off") during slow speed operation it is recommended that the
motor temperature be monitored if slow speed is used for long periods of time.
See Also
P30
LED Display
Motor Running Overload Class (P3 / QST 03) parameter on page 76.
Slow Speed Current Level (P28 / CFN 22) parameter on page 95.
Theory of Operation section 7.6.2, Slow Speed Operation on page 157.
Slow Speed Kick Level
CFN 24
LCD Display
CFN: SSpd Kick Cu
24 Off
Range
Off, 100 – 800 % FLA (Default Off)
Description
The Slow Speed Kick Level sets the short-term current level that is applied to the motor to accelerate the
motor for slow speed operation. If set to "Off" the Slow Speed Kick feature is disabled. Slow speed kick can
be used to “break loose” difficult to start loads while keeping the normal slow speed current level at a lower
level.
This parameter should be set to a midrange value and then the Slow Speed Kick Time should be increased in
0.1 second intervals until the kick is applied long enough to start the motor rotating. If the motor does not
start rotating then increase the Slow Speed Kick Level and begin adjusting the kick time from 1.0 seconds
again.
If the motor initially accelerates too fast then reduce the Slow Speed Kick Level and/or reduce the Slow Speed
Kick Time.
See Also
96
Kick Level 1 (P13 / CFN 10) parameter on page 86.
Slow Speed Kick Time (P31 / CFN 25) parameter on page 97.
Theory of Operations section 7.6.2, Slow Speed Operation on page 157.
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P31
LED Display
Slow Speed Kick Time
CFN 25
LCD Display
CFN: SSpd Kick T
25
1.0 sec
Range
0.1 – 10.0 seconds (Default 1.0)
Description
The Slow Speed Kick Time parameter sets the length of time that the Slow Speed Kick current level (P30,
CFN 24) is applied to the motor at the beginning of slow speed operation. After the Slow Speed Kick Level is
set, the Slow Speed Kick Time should be adjusted so that the motor starts rotating when a slow speed
command is given.
If the motor initially accelerates too fast then reduce the Slow Speed Kick Level (P30 / CFN 24) and/or reduce
the Slow Speed Kick Time.
See Also
Slow Speed Kick Level (P30 / CFN 24) parameter on page 96.
Theory of Operations section 7.6.2, Slow Speed Operation on page 157.
97
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
Jump to Parameter
PFN 00
By changing the value of this parameter and pressing [ENTER], you can jump directly to any parameter within that group.
P32
Over Current Trip Level
LED Display
PFN 01
LCD Display
PFN: Over Cur Lvl
01
Off
Range
Off, 50 – 800 % of FLA (Default Off)
Description
If the MX detects a one cycle, average current that is greater than the level defined, an over current alarm
condition exists and any relays programmed as alarm will energize. The over current timer starts a delay time.
If the over current still exists when the delay timer expires, the starter Over Current Trips (F31) and any relay
programmed as fault relay changes state.
2
The Over Current Trip is only active in the UTS state, Energy Saver state, Current follower or while in the
Phase Control mode.
A relay can be programmed to change state when an over current alarm condition is detected.
% Current
Over Cur Lvl
PFN 01/P 32
Current
33
See Also
98
Over Current Time (P33 / PFN 02) parameter on page 99.
Auto Reset Limit (P42 / PFN 11) parameter on page 104.
Controlled Fault Stop Enable (P43 / PFN 12) parameter on page 105.
Relay Output Configuration (P52-P54 / I/O 05-07) parameters on page 112.
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P33
LED Display
Over Current Trip Delay Time
PFN 02
LCD Display
PFN: Over Cur Tim
02
0.1 sec
Range
Off, 0.1 – 90.0 seconds (Default 0.1)
Description
The Over Current Trip Delay Time parameter sets the period of time that the motor current must be greater
than the Over Current Level (P32 / PFN 01) parameter before an over current fault and trip occurs.
If "Off" is selected, the over current timer does not operate and the starter does not trip. It energizes any relay
set to Over current until the current drops or the starter trips on an overload.
A shear pin function can be implemented by setting the delay to its minimum value.
See Also
Over Current Level (P32 / PFN 01) parameter on page 98.
Auto Reset Limit (P42 / PFN 11) parameter on page 104.
Controlled Fault Stop Enable (P43 / PFN 12) parameter on page 105.
Relay Output Configuration (P52-54 / I/O 05-07) parameters on page 112.
99
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P34
Under Current Trip Level
LED Display
PFN 03
LCD Display
PFN: Undr Cur Lvl
03 Off
Range
Off, 5 – 100 % of FLA (Default Off)
Description
If the MX detects a one cycle, average current that is less than the level defined, an under current alarm
condition exists and any relays programmed as alarm will energize. The under current timer starts a delay
time. If the under current still exists when the delay time expires, the starter Under Current Trips (F34) and
any relay programmed as fault relay changes state.
2
The Under Current Trip Level is only active in the UTS state, Energy Saver state, Current follower or while in
the Phase Control mode.
A relay can be programmed to change state when an under current alarm condition is detected.
% Current
Motor Current
34
35
See Also
P35
LED Display
Under Current Time (P35 / PFN 04) parameter on page 100.
Auto Reset Limit (P42 / PFN 11) parameter on page 104.
Controlled Fault Stop Enable (P43 / PFN 12) parameter on page 105.
Relay Output Configuration (P52-54 / I/O 05-07) parameters on page 112.
Under Current Trip Delay Time
PFN 04
LCD Display
PFN: Undr Cur Tim
04
0.1 sec
Range
Off, 0.1 – 90.0 seconds (Default 0.1)
Description
The Under Current Trip Delay Time parameter sets the period of time that the motor current must be less than
the Under Current Trip Level (P34 / PFN 03) parameter before an under current fault and trip occurs.
If "Off" is selected, the under current timer does not operate and the starter does not trip. It energizes any
relay set to Undercurrent until the current rises.
See Also
100
Under Current Trip Level (P34 / PFN 03) parameter on page 100.
Auto Reset Limit (P42 / PFN 11) parameter on page 104.
Controlled Fault Stop Enable (P43 / PFN 12) parameter on page 105.
Relay Output Configuration (P52-54 / I/O 05-07) parameters on page 112.
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P36
Current Imbalance Trip Level
LED Display
PFN 05
LCD Display
PFN: Cur Imbl Lvl
05
15 %
Range
Off, 5 – 40 % (Default 15%)
Description
The Current Imbalance Trip Level parameter sets the imbalance that is allowed before the starter shuts down.
The current imbalance must exist for 10 seconds before a fault occurs.
Current is less than the FLA setting
The equation for the current imbalance is:
% imbalance =
(Iave - Imax)
´ 100%
FLA
Iave = average current
Imax = greatest of: |L1-Iave| or |L2-Iave| or |L3-Iave|
FLA = value programmed into P1
Current is greater than the FLA setting
The equation for the current imbalance is:
% imbalance =
(Iave - Imax)
´ 100%
Iave
Iave = average current
Imax = greatest of: |L1-Iave| or |L2-Iave| or |L3-Iave|
FLA = value programmed into P1
If the highest calculated current imbalance is greater than the current imbalance level for 10 seconds, the
starter shuts down the motor and declares a Fault 37 (Current Imbalance).
% Imbalance
Current Imbl Lvl
PFN 05/P36
Current Imbalance
See Also
Auto Reset Limit (P42 / PFN 11) parameter on page 104.
Controlled Fault Stop Enable (P43 / PFN 12) parameter on page 105.
101
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P37
Residual Ground Fault Trip Level
LED Display
PFN 06
LCD Display
PFN: Resid GF Lvl
06
Off
Range
Off, 5 – 100 % FLA (Default Off)
Description
The Residual Ground Fault Trip Level parameter sets a ground fault current trip or indicate level that can be
used to protect the system from a ground fault condition. The starter monitors the instantaneous sum of the
three line currents to detect the ground fault current.
The ground fault current has to remain above the ground fault level for 3 seconds before the starter recognizes
a ground fault condition. Once the starter recognizes a ground fault condition, it shuts down the motor and
declares a Fault 38 (Ground Fault).
If a programmable relay is set to ground fault (GND), the starter energizes the relay when the condition exists.
A typical value for the ground fault current setting is 10% to 20% of the full load amps of the motor.
z NOTE: This is often referred to as residual ground fault protection. This type of protection is meant to
provide machine ground fault protection only. It is not meant to provide human ground fault protection.
%FLA
Resid GF Lvl
PFN 06/P37
Ground Fault
Current
2
z NOTE: The MX residual ground fault protection function is meant to detect ground faults on solidly
grounded systems. Use on a high impedance or floating ground power system may impair the usefulness of
2
the MX residual ground fault detection feature.
z NOTE: Due to uneven CT saturation effects and motor and power system variations, there may be small
2
values of residual ground fault currents measured by the MX during normal operation.
See Also
102
Auto Reset Limit (P42 / PFN 11) parameter on page 104.
Controlled Fault Stop Enable (P43 / PFN 12) parameter on page 105.
Relay Output Configuration (P52-54 / I/O 05-07) parameters on page 112.
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P38
Over Voltage Trip Level
LED Display
PFN 07
LCD Display
PFN: Over Vlt Lvl
07 Off
Range
Off, 1 – 40 % (Default Off)
Description
If the MX detects a one cycle input phase voltage that is above the Over Voltage Trip Level, the over/under
voltage alarm is shown and the voltage trip timer begins counting. The delay time must expire before the
starter faults. The over voltage condition and the phase is displayed.
2
z NOTE: For the over voltage protection to operate correctly, the rated voltage parameter (P76 / FUN05)
must be set correctly.
z NOTE: The voltage level is only checked when the starter is running.
See Also
Under Voltage Level (P39 / PFN 08) parameter on page 103.
Voltage Trip Time (P40 / PFN 09) parameter on page 104.
Auto Reset Limit (P42 / PFN 11) parameter on page 104.
Controlled Fault Stop Enable (P43 / PFN 12) parameter on page 105.
Rated Voltage (P76 / FUN 05) parameter on page 125.
P39
Under Voltage Trip Level
LED Display
PFN 08
LCD Display
PFN: Undr Vlt Lvl
08
Off
Range
Off, 1 – 40 % (Default Off)
Description
If the MX detects a one cycle input phase voltage that is below the Under Voltage Trip Level, the over/under
voltage alarm is shown and the voltage trip timer begins counting. The delay time must expire before the
starter faults. The under voltage condition and the phase is displayed.
2
z NOTE: For the under voltage protection to operate correctly, the Rated Voltage parameter (P76 / FUN05)
must be set correctly.
z NOTE: The voltage level is only checked when the starter is running.
See Also
Over Voltage Level (P38 / PFN 07) parameter on page 103.
Voltage Trip Time (P40 / PFN 09) parameter on page 104.
Auto Reset Limit (P42 / PFN 11) parameter on page 104.
Controlled Fault Stop Enable (P43 / PFN 12) parameter on page 105.
Rated Voltage (P76 / FUN 05) parameter on page 125.
103
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P40
Over/Under Voltage Trip Delay Time
LED Display
PFN 09
LCD Display
PFN: Vlt Trip Tim
09
0.1 sec
Range
0.1 – 90.0 seconds (Default 0.1)
Description
The Voltage Trip Delay Time parameter sets the period of time that either an over voltage (P38 / PFN 07) or
under voltage (P39 / PFN 08) condition must exist before a fault occurs.
See Also
Over Voltage Level (P38 / PFN 07) parameter on page 103.
Under Voltage Level (P39 / PFN 08) parameter on page 103.
Auto Reset Limit (P42 / PFN 11) parameter on page 104.
Controlled Fault Stop Enable (P43 / PFN 12) parameter on page 105.
P41
Auto Fault Reset Time
LED Display
PFN 10
LCD Display
PFN: Auto Reset
10 Off
Range
Off, 1 – 900 seconds (Default Off)
Description
The Auto Fault Reset Time parameter sets the time delay before the starter will automatically reset a fault.
For the list of faults that may be auto reset, refer to Appendix B - Fault Codes on page 196.
z NOTE: A start command needs to be initiated once the timer resets the fault.
See Also
P42
Auto Reset Limit (P42 / PFN 11) parameter on page 104.
Appendix B - Fault Codes on page 196.
Auto Fault Reset Count Limit
LED Display
PFN 11
LCD Display
PFN: Auto Rst Lim
11 Off
Range
Off, 1 – 10 (Default Off)
Description
The Auto Fault Reset Count Limit parameter sets the number of times that an auto reset may occur. Once the
Auto Reset Limit is reached, faults will no longer be automatically reset.
See Also
Auto Fault Reset Time (P41 / PFN 10) parameter on page 104.
z NOTE: If the maximum reset count has been reached and the starter has locked out, only a user reset will
clear the reset counts.
z NOTE: If a few auto resets have been performed but the count has not reached the limit, the number of
accumulated resets will be cleared after 15 minutes if another fault does not occur.
z NOTE: The count can be always cleared by power cycling the starter.
104
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P43
Controlled Fault Stop Enable
LED Display
PFN 12
LCD Display
PFN: Ctrl Flt En
12
On
Range
Off – On (Default On)
Description
A Controlled Fault Stop Enable can occur if this parameter is "On". The controlled stop will occur before the
starter trips. During a controlled fault stop, the action selected by the Stop Mode parameter is performed
before the starter is tripped. This prevents the occurrence of water hammer etc. in sensitive systems when a
less than fatal fault occurs.
z NOTE: All relays except the UTS relay are held in their present state until the stop mode action has been
completed.
z NOTE: Only certain faults can initiate a controlled fault stop. Some faults are considered too critical and
cause the starter to stop immediately regardless of the Controlled Fault Stop Enable parameter.
Refer to Appendix B - Fault Codes to determine if a fault may perform a controlled stop.
See Also
Stop Mode (P15 / CFN 14) parameter on page 87.
Appendix B - Fault Codes on page 196.
105
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P44
Independent Starting/Running Overload
LED Display
PFN 13
LCD Display
PFN: Indep S/R OL
13
Off
Range
Off – On (Default Off)
Description
If “Off”
When this parameter is “Off” the overload defined by the Motor Running Overload Class (P3 / QST 03/PFN
15) parameter is active in all states.
If “On”
When this parameter is “On”, the starting and running overloads are separate with each having their own
settings. The starting overload class (P45 / PFN 14) is used during motor acceleration and acceleration kick.
The running overload class is used during all other modes of operation.
If both the running overload and the starting overload classes are set to "Off", then the existing accumulated
motor OL% is erased and no motor overload is calculated in any state.
2
If the starting overload class is set to "Off" and the running overload class is set to "On", then the I t motor
overload does NOT accumulate during acceleration kick and acceleration ramping states. However, the
existing accumulated OL% remains during starting and the hot/cold motor compensation is still active. The
OL% is capped at 99% during starting.
Although there is really no reason to do so, the starting overload class could be set to "On" and the running
overload class set to "Off".
See Also
106
Motor Running Overload Class (P3 / QST 03) parameter on page 76.
Motor Starting Overload Class (P45 / PFN 14) parameter on page 107.
Motor Overload Hot/Cold Ratio (P46 / PFN 16) parameter on page 108.
Motor Overload Cooling Time (P47 / PFN 17) parameter on page 109.
Theory of Operation section 7.1.7, Separate Starting and Running Motor Overload Settings on page 136.
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P45
LED Display
Motor Overload Class Starting
PFN 14
LCD Display
PFN: Starting OL
14
10
Range
Off, 1 – 40 (Default class 10)
Description
The Motor Overload Class Starting parameter sets the class of the electronic overload when starting. The
starter stores the thermal overload value as a percentage value between 0 and 100%, with 0% representing a
“cold” overload and 100% representing a tripped overload.
The starting overload class is active during Kicking and Ramping when the Independent Starting/Running
Overload (P44 / PFN 13) parameter is set to “On”.
When the Motor Starting Overload Class parameter is set to "Off", the electronic overload is disabled while
starting the motor.
z NOTE: Care must be taken not to damage the motor when turning the starting overload class off or setting
to a high value.
z NOTE: Consult motor manufacturer data to determine the correct motor OL settings.
See Also
Motor Running Overload Class (P3 / QST 03) parameter on page 76.
Independent Starting/Running Overload (P44 / PFN 13) parameter on page 106.
Motor Overload Hot/Cold Ratio (P46 / PFN 16) parameter on page 108.
Motor Overload Cooling Time (P47 / PFN 17) parameter on page 109.
Relay Output Configuration (P52-P54 / I/O 05-07) parameters on page 112.
Theory of Operation section 7.1, Solid State Motor Overload Protection on page 132.
Motor Overload Class Running
PFN 15
See Quickstart group QST 03 - Motor Overload Class Running on page 76 for details.
107
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P46
Motor Overload Hot/Cold Ratio
LED Display
PFN 16
LCD Display
PFN: OL H/C Ratio
16
60 %
Range
0 – 99% (Default 60%)
Description
The Motor Overload Hot/Cold Ratio parameter defines the steady state overload content (OLss) that is reached
when the motor is running with a current less than full load current (FLA) * Service Factor (SF). This
provides for accurate motor overload protection during a “warm” start.
The steady state overload content is calculated by the following formula.
The rise or fall time for the overload to reach this steady state is defined by the Motor Overload Cooling Time
parameter.
OLss = OL H/C Ratio ´
Current
1
´
FLA
Current Imbalance Derate Factor
The default value of 60% for Motor Overload Hot/Cold Ratio parameter is typical for most motors. A more
accurate value can be derived from the hot and cold locked rotor times that are available from most motor
manufacturers using the following formula.
Max Hot Locked Rotor Time ö
æ
OL H/C Ratio = ç1 ÷ x 100%
è Max Cold Locked Rotor Time ø
z NOTE: Consult motor manufacturer data to determine the correct motor overload settings.
z NOTE: During a warm start the starter would be Class 10, and if it's a cold start, the starter would be a
class 25.
See Also
108
Motor Running Overload Class (P3 / QST 03) parameter on page 76.
Independent Starting/Running Overload (P44 / PFN 13) parameter on page 106.
Motor Starting Overload Class (P45 / PFN 14) parameter on page 107.
Motor Overload Cooling Time (P47 / PFN 17) parameter on page 109.
Relay Output Configuration (P52-54 / I/O 05-07) parameters on page 112.
Theory of Operation section 7.1.6, Hot/Cold Motor Overload Compensation on page 135.
Theory of Operation section 7.1.4, Current Imbalance/Negative Sequence Current Compensation on page 134.
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P47
LED Display
Motor Overload Cooling Time
PFN 17
LCD Display
PFN: OL Cool Tim
17
30.0 min
Range
1.0 – 999.9 minutes (Default 30.0)
Description
The Motor Overload Cooling Time parameter is the time to cool from 100% to less than (<) 1%. When the
motor is stopped, the overload content reduces exponentially based on Motor Overload Cooling Time
parameter.
Refer to the following equation:
5
OL Content = OL Content when Stopped * e CoolingTime
t
So, a motor with a set cooling time of 30 minutes (1800 sec) with 100% accumulated OL content cools to
<1% OL content in 30 minutes.
z NOTE: Consult motor manufacturer data to determine the correct motor cooling time.
See Also
Motor Running Overload Class (P3 / QST 03) parameter on page 76.
Independent Starting/Running Overload (P44 / PFN 13) parameter on page 106.
Motor Starting Overload Class (P45 / PFN 14) parameter on page 107.
Motor Overload Hot/Cold Ratio (P46 / PFN 16) parameter on page 108.
Theory of Operation section 7.1.8, Motor Cooling While Stopped on page 137.
Theory of Operation section 7.1.9, Motor Cooling While Running on page 138.
109
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
Jump to Parameter
I/O 00
By changing the value of this parameter and pressing [ENTER], you can jump directly to any parameter within that group.
P48,49,50
Digital Input Configuration
LED Display
Range
LCD Display
P48
I/O: DI 1 Config
01 Stop
P49
I/O: DI 2 Config
02 Off
P50
I/O: DI 3 Config
03 Off
LED
OFF
StOP
FH
FL
Fr
dISc
InLn
bYP
LCD
Off
Stop
Fault High
Fault Low
Fault Reset
Disconnect
Inline Cnfrm
Bypass Cnfrm
EOLr
E OL Reset
L-r
Local/Remote
hd IS
hEn
rSEL
SS F
SS r
bd lS
bEn
runE
rund
Heat Disable
Heat Enable
Ramp Select
Slow Spd Fwd
Slow Spd Rev
Brake Disabl
Brake Enabl
Run Enable
Run Disable
I/O 01,02,03
Description
Off, Not Assigned, Input has no function. (Default DI 2 & DI 3)
Stop Command for 3-wire control. (Default DI 1)
Fault High, Fault when input is asserted, 120V applied.
Fault Low, Fault when input is de-asserted, 0V applied.
Reset when input asserted, 120V applied.
Disconnect switch monitor.
Inline contactor feedback.
Bypass/2M, bypass contactor feedback, 2M contactor feedback in
full voltage or Wye-delta.
Emergency Motor Overload content reset. After an OL trip has
occurred. Reset when input asserted, 120V applied.
Local/Remote control source, Selects whether the Local Source
parameter or the Remote Source parameter is the control source.
Local Source is selected when input is de-asserted, 0V applied.
Remote Source selected when input asserted, 120V applied.
Heater disabled when input asserted, 120V applied.
Heater enabled when input asserted, 120V applied.
Ramp 2 is enabled when input asserted, 120V applied.
Operate starter in slow speed forward mode.
Operate starter in slow speed reverse mode.
Disable DC injection braking.
Enable DC injection braking.
When High, starter will run. When Low, starter stops.
When High, starter will stop. When Low, starter runs.
Description
I/O parameters 1 - 3 configure which features are performed by the D1 to D3 terminals.
See Also
Local Source (P4 / QST 04) parameter on page 77 .
Remote Source (P5 / QST 05) parameter on page 78.
Bypass Feedback Time (P64 / I/O 17) parameter on page 118.
Heater Level (P73 / FUN 08) parameter on page 123.
Theory of Operation section 7.1.10, Emergency Motor Overload Reset on page 138.
Theory of Operation section 7.3.6, Dual Acceleration Ramp Control on page 147.
Theory of Operation section 7.8, Wye-Delta Operation on page 160.
Theory of Operation section 7.13, Start/Stop Control with a Hand/Off/Auto Selector Switch on page 168.
110
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P51
LED Display
Digital Fault Input Trip Time
I/O 04
LCD Display
I/O: Din Trp Time
04
0 .1 sec
Range
0.1-90.0 Seconds (Default 0.1 Sec)
Description:
The Digital Fault Input Trip Time parameter sets the length of time the Digital input must be high or low
before a trip occurs. This delay time only functions for fault high and fault low.
See Also
Digital Input Configuration (P48-50 / I/O 01-03) parameters on page 110.
111
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P52, 53, 54
Relay Output Configuration
LED Display
LCD Display
I/O: R1 Config
05 Fault FS
P52
I/O: R2 Config
06 Off
P53
I/O: R3 Config
07 Off
P54
Range
I/O 05, 06, 07
LED
OFF
FLFS
LCD
Off
Fault FS
FLnF
run
utS
Fault NFS
Running
UTS
AL
rdYr
LOC
OC
UC
OLA
ShFS
Alarm
Ready
Locked Out
Overcurrent
Undercurrent
OL Alarm
Shunt FS
ShnF
Shunt NFS
g FLt
Ground Fault
Energy Saver
Heating
Slow Spd
Slow Spd Fwd
Slow Spd Rev
Braking
Cool Fan Ctl
ES
HEAt
SSPd
SS F
SS r
dcb
FAn
Description
Off, Not Assigned. May be controlled over Modbus (Default R2 & R3)
Faulted – Fail Safe operation. Energized when no faults present,
de-energized when faulted. (Default R1)
Faulted– Non Fail Safe operation. Energized when faulted.
Running, starter running, voltage applied to motor.
Up to Speed, motor up to speed or transition to for Wye/Delta
Operation.
Alarm, any alarm condition present.
Ready, starter ready for start command.
Locked Out.
Overcurrent Alarm, overcurrent condition detected.
Undercurrent Alarm, undercurrent condition detected.
Overload Alarm.
Shunt Trip Relay – Fail Safe operation, energized when no shunt trip.
fault present, de-energized on shunt trip fault.
Shunt Trip Relay – Non Fail Safe operation, de-energized when no
shunt trip fault present, energized on shunt trip fault.
A Ground Fault trip has occurred.
Operating in Energy Saver Mode.
Motor Heating, starter applying heating pulses to motor.
Starter operating in slow speed mode.
Starter operating in slow speed forward mode.
Starter operating in slow speed reverse mode.
Starter is applying DC brake current to motor.
Heatsink fan control.
Description
I/O parameters 1 - 3 configure which functions are performed by the R1 to R3 relays.
See Also
Up To Speed Time (P9 / QST 09) parameter on page 82.
Over Current Level (P32 / PFN 01) parameter on page 98.
Under Current Level (P34 / PFN 03) parameter on page 100.
Residual Ground Fault Level (P37 / PFN 06) parameter on page 102.
Inline Configuration (P63 / I/O 16) parameter on page 118.
Heater Level (P73 / FUN 08) parameter on page 123.
Energy Saver (P72 / FUN 09) parameter on page 122.
Theory of Operation section 7.1.3, Motor Overload Operation on page 134.
Theory of Operation section 7.8, Wye-Delta Operation on page 160.
Theory of Operation section 7.9, Across The Line (Full Voltage Starter) on page 163.
Appendix B - Fault Codes on page 196.
112
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P55
Analog Input Trip Type
LED Display
I/O 08
LCD Display
I/O: Ain Trp Type
08 Off
Range
LED
OFF
Lo
HI
Description
The analog input is the reference input for a starter configured as a Phase Controller or Current Follower. In
addition, the Analog Input Trip Type parameter allows the user to set a "high" or "low" comparator based on
the analog input. If the type is set to" Low", then a fault occurs if the analog input level is below the trip level
for longer than the trip delay time. If the type is set to "High", then a fault occurs if the analog input level is
above the trip level for longer than the trip delay time. This function is only active when the motor is running.
LCD
Off
Low Level
High Level
Description
Off, Disabled. (Default)
Low, Fault if input signal below preset trip level.
High, Fault if input signal above preset trip level.
This feature can be used in conjunction with using the analog input as a reference for a control mode in order
to detect an open 4-20mA loop providing the reference. Set the Analog Input Trip Type parameter to "Low"
and set the Analog Input Trip Level (P56 / I/O 09) parameter to a value less than (<) 20%.
z NOTE: The DIP switch (SW1) on the card changes the analog input and analog output between 0-10V or
0-20mA. See Figure 18 to see DIP Switch Settings. ANALOG INPUT SW1-1 ANALOG OUTPUT SW1-2.
See Also
Analog Input Trip Level (P56 / I/O 09) parameter on page 114.
Analog Input Trip Time (P57 / I/O 10)parameter on page 114.
Analog Input Span (P58 / I/O 11) parameter on page 115.
Analog Input Offset (P59 / I/O 12) parameter on page 116.
Starter Type (P74 / FUN 07) parameter on page 124.
Theory of Operation section 7.11, Phase Control on page 165.
Theory of Operation section 7.12, Current Follower on page 167.
113
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P56
Analog Input Trip Level
LED Display
I/O 09
LCD Display
I/O: Ain Trp Lvl
09
50 %
Range
0 – 100% (Default 50%)
Description
The Analog Input Trip Level parameter sets the analog input trip or fault level.
This feature can be used to detect an open 4-20mA loop by setting the parameter to "Low" and setting the
parameter to a value less than (<) 20%.
z NOTE: The analog input trip level is NOT affected by the Analog Input Offset or Analog Input Span
parameter settings. Therefore, if the trip level is set to 10% and the Analog Input Trip Type (P55 / I/O 08)
parameter is set to "Low", a fault occurs when the analog input signal level is less than (<) 1V or 2mA
regardless of what the Analog Input and Analog Input Span parameters values are set to.
z NOTE: The DIP switch (SW1) on the card changes the analog input and analog output between 0-10V or
0-20mA. See Figure 18 to see DIP Switch Settings. ANALOG INPUT SW1-1 ANALOG OUTPUT SW1-2.
See Also
Analog Input Trip Type (P55 / I/O 08) parameter on page 113.
Analog Input Trip Level (P56 / I/O 09) parameter on page 114.
Analog Input Span (P58 / I/O 11) parameter on page 115.
Analog Input Offset (P59 / I/O 12) parameter on page 116.
P57
LED Display
Analog Input Trip Delay Time
I/O 10
LCD Display
I/O: Ain Trp Tim
10
0.1 sec
Range
0.1 – 90.0 seconds (Default 0.1)
Description
The Analog Input Trip Delay Time parameter sets the length of time the analog input trip level (P56 / I/O 09)
must be exceeded before a trip occurs.
z NOTE: The DIP switch (SW1) on the card changes the analog input and analog output between 0-10V or
0-20mA. See Figure 18 to see DIP Switch Settings. ANALOG INPUT SW1-1 ANALOG OUTPUT SW1-2.
See Also
114
Analog Input Trip Type (P55 / I/O 08) parameter on page 113.
Analog Input Trip Level (P56 / I/O 09) parameter on page 114.
Analog Input Span (P58 / I/O 11) parameter on page 115.
Analog Input Offset (P59 / I/O 12) parameter on page 116.
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P58
Analog Input Span
LED Display
I/O 11
LCD Display
I/O: Ain Span
11
100 %
Range
1 – 100% (Default 100%)
Description
The analog input can be scaled using the Analog Input Span parameter.
Examples:
For a 0-10V input or 0-20mA input, a 100% Analog Input Span setting results in a 0% input reading with a
0V input and a 100% input reading with a 10V input.
For a 0-5V input, a 50% Analog Input Span setting results in a 0% input reading with a 0V input and a 100%
input reading with a 5V input.
For a 4-20mA input, a 80% Analog Input Span setting and a 20% Analog Input Offset setting results in a 0%
input reading at 4mA and a 100% input reading at 20mA.
z NOTE: The DIP switch (SW1) on the card changes the analog input and analog output between 0-10V or
0-20mA. See Figure 18 to see DIP Switch Settings. ANALOG INPUT SW1-1 ANALOG OUTPUT SW1-2.
z NOTE: Input signal readings are clamped at a 100% maximum.
Example: 4ma = 0% input, 20ma = 100% input
Analog Input
Reading %
100%
0%
20% Ain
Offset
2V / 4mA
See Also
Ain Span = 80%
Input Signal
10V / 20mA
Analog Input Trip Level (P56 / I/O 09) parameter on page 114.
Analog Input Trip Time (P57 / I/O 10) parameter on page 114.
Analog Input Offset (P59 / I/O 12) parameter on page 116.
Starter Type (P74 / FUN 07) parameter on page 124.
Theory of Operation section 7.11, Phase Control on page 165.
Theory of Operation section 7.12, Current Follower on page 167.
115
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P59
Analog Input Offset
LED Display
I/O 12
LCD Display
I/O: Ain Offset
12
0 %
Range
0 – 99% (Default 0%)
Description
The analog input can be offset so that a 0% reading can occur when a non-zero input signal is being applied.
Example: Input level of 2V (4mA) => 0% input. In this case the Analog Input Offset parameter should be set
to 20% so that the 2v (4mA) input signal results in a 0% input reading.
z NOTE: The DIP switch (SW1) on the card changes the analog input and analog output between 0-10V or
0-20mA. See Figure 18 to see DIP Switch Settings. ANALOG INPUT SW1-1 ANALOG OUTPUT SW1-2.
z NOTE: For a 4-20mA input, set the Analog Input Span to 80% and the Analog Input Offset to 20%.
z NOTE: The measured input reading is clamped at 0% minimum.
See Also
Analog Input Trip Level (P56 / I/O 09) parameter on page 114.
Analog Input Trip Time (P57 / I/O 10) parameter on page 114.
Analog Input Span (P58 / I/O 11) parameter on page 115.
Starter Type (P74 / FUN 07) parameter on page 124.
Theory of Operation section 7.11, Phase Control on page 165.
Theory of Operation section 7.12, Current Follower on page 167.
P60
Analog Output Function
LED Display
I/O 13
LCD Display
I/O: Aout Fctn
13 Off
Range
Description
LED
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
LCD
Off
0 – 100% Curr
0 – 200% Curr
0 – 800% Curr
0 – 150% Volt
0 – 150% OL
0 – 10 kW
0 – 100 kW
0 – 1 MW
0 – 10 MW
0 – 100% Ain
11
12
0 – 100% Firing
Calibration
Description
Off, Disabled (Default)
Based on per cycle RMS values
Based on per cycle RMS values
Based on per cycle RMS values
Based on per cycle RMS values
Motor Thermal Overload
Based on filtered V and I values
Based on filtered V and I values
Based on filtered V and I values
Based on filtered V and I values
The output value takes into account the inputs span and offset
settings
Output Voltage to Motor, based on SCR firing angle
Calibration, full (100%) output
The Analog Output Function parameter selects the function of the analog output. The available analog output
function selections and output scaling are shown below. The analog output is updated every 25msec.
z NOTE: The DIP switch (SW1) on the card changes the analog input and analog output between 0-10V or
0-20mA. See Figure 18 to see DIP Switch Settings. ANALOG INPUT SW1-1 ANALOG OUTPUT SW1-2.
See Also
116
Analog Output Span (P61 / I/O 14) parameter on page 117.
Analog Output Offset (P62 / I/O 15) parameter on page 117.
Theory of Operation section 7.11, Phase Control on page 165.
Theory of Operation section 7.12, Current Follower on page 167.
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P61
Analog Output Span
LED Display
I/O 14
LCD Display
I/O: Aout Span
14
100 %
Range
1 – 125% (Default 100%)
Description
The analog output signal can be scaled using the Analog Output Span parameter. For a 0-10V output or
0-20mA output, a 100% scaling outputs the maximum voltage (10V) or current (20mA) when the selected
output function requests 100% output. A scale of 50% outputs 50% voltage/current when the analog output
function requests a 100% output.
z NOTE: The DIP switch (SW1) on the card changes the analog input and analog output between 0-10V or
0-20mA. See Figure 18 to see DIP Switch Settings. ANALOG INPUT SW1-1 ANALOG OUTPUT SW1-2.
z NOTE: For a 4-20mA output, set the Analog Output Span to 80% and the Analog Output Offset (P62 / I/O
15) parameter to 20%.
z NOTE: The output does not exceed 100% (10V or 20mA).
Example: 0% output => 4mA, 100% output => 20ma
Analog
Output
10V /
20mA
Aout Span =
80%
2V / 4mA
Aout Offset
= 20%
0 V / 0mA
Selected Output
value = 0%
See Also
Selected Output
value = 100%
Analog Output Offset (P62 / I/O 15) parameter on page 117.
P62
Analog Output Offset
LED Display
I/O 15
LCD Display
I/O: Aout Offset
15
0 %
Range
0 – 99% (Default 0%)
Description
The analog output signal can be offset using the Analog Output Offset parameter. A 50% offset outputs a
50% output (5V in the 10V case) when 0% is commanded. If the selected variable requests 100% output, the
span should be reduced to (100 minus offset) so that a 100% output request causes a 100% output voltage (x%
offset + (100-x)%span)=100%.
z NOTE: The DIP switch (SW1) on the card changes the analog input and analog output between 0-10V or
0-20mA. See Figure 18 to see DIP Switch Settings. ANALOG INPUT SW1-1 ANALOG OUTPUT SW1-2.
z NOTE: For a 4-20mA output, set the Analog Output Span (P61 / I/O 14) to 80% and the Analog Output
Offset to 20%.
See Also
Analog Output Span (P61 / I/O 14) parameter on page 117.
117
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P63
LED Display
Inline Configuration
I/O 16
LCD Display
I/O: Inline Confg
16
3.0 sec
Range
Off, 0 – 10.0 seconds (Default 3.0)
Description
The Inline Configuration parameter controls the behavior of the No Line warning, No Line fault, and the
Ready relay function.
2
If the Inline Configuration parameter is set to "Off", then the MX assumes that there is no Inline contactor
and that line voltage should be present while stopped. If no line is detected, then a No Line alarm condition
exists and the ready condition does not exist. If a start is commanded, then a No Line fault is declared.
2
If the Inline Configuration parameter is set to a time delay, then the MX assumes that there is an Inline
contactor and that line voltage need not be present while stopped. If no line is detected, then the No Line
alarm condition does not exist and the ready condition does exist. If a start is commanded and there is no
detected line voltage for the time period defined by this parameter, then a “noL” (No Line) fault is declared.
In order to control an inline contactor, program a relay as a Run relay.
z NOTE: This fault is different than over/under voltage trip delay time (P40 / PFN 09) since it detects the
presence of NO line.
See Also
Relay Output Configuration (P52-54 / I/O 05-07) parameters on page 112.
P64
LED Display
Bypass / 2M Feedback Time
I/O 17
LCD Display
I/O: Bpas Fbk Tim
17
2.0 sec
Range
Off, 0.1 – 5.0 seconds (Default 2.0 sec)
Description
The starter contains a built-in dedicated bypass feedback input that is enabled when the dedicated stack relay
is factory programmed to "bypass". The programmable inputs DI 1, DI 2 or DI 3 may also be used to monitor
an auxiliary contact from the bypass contactor(s) or in the case of a wye-delta starter the 2M contactor. The
2
digital input is expected to be in the same state as the UTS relay. If it is not, the MX trips on Fault 48
(Bypass Fault).
The Bypass Confirmation input must be different from the UTS relay for the time period specified by the
parameter before a fault is declared. There is no alarm associated with this fault.
See Also
118
Digital Input Configuration (P48-P50 / I/O 01-03) parameters on page 110.
Theory of Operation section 7.8, Wye-Delta Operation on page 160.
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P65
Keypad Stop Disable
LED Display
I/O 18
LCD Display
I/O: Keypad Stop
18 Enabled
Range
LED
OFF
On
Description
If “Disabled”
When this parameter is set to "Disabled", the keypad [STOP] button is de-activated. This should be done with
caution, as the [STOP] key will not stop the starter.
LCD
Disabled
Enabled
Description
Keypad Stop does not stop the starter
Keypad Stop does stop the starter (Default)
The [STOP] key cannot be disabled if the keypad is selected as the control sources, .
If “Enabled”
When this parameter is set to "Enabled", the keypad [STOP] button is enabled and stops the starter regardless
of the selected control source (P4 / QST 04 or P5 / QST 05) selected as (keypad, terminal or serial).
See Also
Local Source (P4 / QST 04) parameter on page 77.
Remote Source (P5 / QST 05) parameter on page 78.
P66
Auto Start Selection
LED Display
I/O 19
LCD Display
I/O: Auto Start
19 Disabled
Range
LED
0
1
2
3
Description
LCD
Disabled
Description
When Disabled, the Start input must always transition from low to high
for a start to occur. (Default)
Power
When set to Power, a start will occur if the Start input is high while
control power is applied.
Fault
When set to Fault, a start will occur if the Start input is high when a
fault is reset.
Power, Fault When set to Power and Fault, a start will occur if the Start input is
high while control power is applied, and a start will occur if the Start
input is high when a fault is reset.
The Auto Start parameter determines whether or not a transition from low to high is required on the Start input
for a start to occur after either a power up or a fault reset.
119
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
Jump to Parameter
FUN 00
By changing the value of this parameter and pressing [ENTER], you can jump directly to any parameter within that group.
P67
Miscellaneous Commands
LED Display
FUN 15
LCD Display
FUN: Misc Command
15 None
Range
LED
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
Description
The Miscellaneous Commands parameter is used to issue various commands to the MX starter.
LCD
None
Std BIST
Powered BIST
Reset RT
Reset kWh
Reflash Mode
Store Params
Load Params
Factory Rst
Description
No commands (Default)
Built In Self Test with no line voltage applied to the starter
Built In Self Test with line voltage applied to the starter
Reset Run Time Meter
Reset kWh/MWh Meters
Activate Reflash Mode
The current parameter values are stored in non-volatile memory
All parameter are retrieved from non-volatile memory
All parameters are restored to the factory defaults
2
The standard BIST command will put the starter into the unpowered BIST test. See section 8.6.1 on page 188.
The powered BIST command will put the starter into a powered BIST test. See section 8.6.2 on page 189.
The Reset Run Time command resets the user run time meters back to zero (0).
The Reset kWh command resets the accumulated kilowatt-hour and megawatt-hour meters back to zero (0).
2
The Reflash Mode command puts the MX into a reflash program memory mode. The reflash mode can only
2
2
be entered if the MX starter is idle. When the reflash mode is entered, the MX waits to be programmed.
The onboard LED display shows “FLSH”. The remote display is disabled after entering reflash mode. The
2
MX does not operate normally until reflash mode is exited. Reflash mode may be exited by cycling control
power.
The Store Parameters command allows the user to copy the parameters into non-volatile memory as a backup.
If changes are being made, store the old set of parameters before any changes are made. If the new settings do
not work, the old parameter values can be loaded back into memory.
The Load Parameters command loads the stored parameters into active memory.
The Factory Reset command restores all parameters to the factory defaults. These can be found in chapter 5.
120
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P68
Communication Timeout
LED Display
FUN 12
LCD Display
FUN: Com Timeout
12 Off
Range
Off, 1 – 120 seconds (Default Off)
Description
The Communication Timeout parameter sets the time that the starter continues to run without receiving a valid
Modbus request. If a valid Modbus request is not received for the time that is set, the starter declares an F82
(Modbus Time Out). The starter performs a controlled stop.
See Also
Local Source (P4 / QST 04) parameter on page 77.
Remote Source (P5 / QST 05) parameter on page 78.
Stop Mode (P15 / CFN 14) parameter on page 87.
Controlled Fault Stop Enable (P43 / PFN 12) parameter on page 105.
Communication Address (P70 / FUN 10) parameter on page 121.
Communication Baud Rate (P69 / FUN 11) parameter on page 121.
P69
Communication Baud Rate
LED Display
FUN 11
LCD Display
FUN: Com Baudrate
11
19200
Range
1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 19200 bps (Default 19200)
Description
The Communication Baud Rate parameter sets the baud rate for Modbus communications.
See Also
Local Source (P4 / QST 04) parameter on page 77 .
Remote Source (P5 / QST 05) parameter on page 78.
Communication Address (P70 / FUN 10) parameter on page 121.
Communication Timeout (P68 / FUN 12) parameter on page 121.
Communication Byte Framing (P71 / FUN 13) parameter on page 122.
P70
Communication Address
LED Display
FUN 10
LCD Display
FUN: Com Drop #
10
1
Range
1 – 247 (Default 1)
Description
The Communication Address parameter sets the starter’s address for Modbus communications.
See Also
Local Source (P4 / QST 04) parameter on page 77.
Remote Source (P5 / QST 05) parameter on page 78.
Communication Baud Rate (P69 / FUN 11) parameter on page 121.
Communication Timeout (P68 / FUN 12) parameter on page 121.
Communication Byte Framing (P71 / FUN 13) parameter on page 122.
121
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P71
Communication Byte Framing
LED Display
FUN 13
LCD Display
FUN: Com Parity
13 Even, 1 Stop
Range
LED
0
1
2
3
Description
The Communication Byte Framing parameter sets both the parity and number of stop bits.
See Also
Communication Timeout (P68 / FUN 12) parameter on page 121.
Communication Baud Rate (P69 / FUN 11) parameter on page 121.
Communication Address (P70 / FUN 10) parameter on page 121.
LCD
Even, 1 Stop (Default)
Odd, 1 Stop
None, 1 Stop
None, 2 Stop
P72
Energy Saver
LED Display
FUN 09
LCD Display
FUN: Energy Saver
09 Off
Range
On – Off (Default Off)
Description
The Energy Saver feature lowers the voltage applied to a lightly loaded motor. It continues to lower the
voltage until it finds the point where the current reaches its lowest stable level and then regulates the voltage
around this point. If the load on the motor increases, the starter immediately returns the output of the starter to
full voltage.
z NOTE: This function does not operate if a bypass contactor is used.
z NOTE: In general, Energy Saver can save approximately 1000 watts per 100 HP. Consult Benshaw for
further detail.
122
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P73
LED Display
Heater Level
FUN 08
LCD Display
FUN: Heater Level
08 Off
Range
Off, 1 – 25% FLA (Default Off)
Description
The Heater Level parameter sets the level of D.C. current that reaches the motor when the motor winding
heater/anti-windmilling brake is enabled. The motor winding heater/anti-windmilling brake can be used to
heat a motor in order to prevent internal condensation or it can be used to prevent a motor from rotating.
z NOTE: The motor can still slowly creep when the anti-windmilling brake is being used. If the motor has
to be held without rotating, a mechanical means of holding the motor must be used.
The motor winding heater/anti-windmilling brake operation may be controlled by a digital input and by a
heater disable bit in the starter control Modbus register. There are two methods using the digital inputs, either
the input is an enable or disable.
Enabled: When the DI 1, DI 2 or DI 3 inputs are programmed as Heat Enable Inputs, the input may be used to
control when heating/anti-windmilling is applied. The Heater / Anti-Windmill Level parameter must be set,
the starter stopped and this input must be high for heating to occur.
Disabled: When the DI 1, DI 2 or DI 3 inputs are programmed as Heat Disable Inputs, the input may be used
to control when heating/anti-windmilling is applied. The Heater / Anti-Windmill Level parameter must be set
and this input must be low for heating to occur.
If no digital inputs are programmed as heater enabled or disabled, the heater is applied at all times
when the motor is stopped.
The level of D.C. current applied to the motor during this operation needs to be monitored to ensure that the
motor is not overheated. The current level should be set as low as possible and then slowly increased over a
long period of time. While this is being done, the temperature of the motor should be monitored to ensure it is
not overheating.
The Motor should be labeled as being live even when not rotating.
The heater feature should not be used to dry out a wet motor.
z NOTE: When in single phase mode, the heater function is disabled.
z NOTE: When this function is "on", all of the other parameters cannot be programmed until this parameter
is turned "off".
See Also
Digital Input Configuration (P48-50 / I/O 01-03) parameters on page 110.
123
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P74
Starter Type
LED Display
FUN 07
LCD Display
FUN: Starter Type
07 Normal
Range
Description
LED
nor
Id
Y-d
PctL
LCD
Normal
Inside Delta
Wye-Delta
Phase Ctl
cFoL
Curr Follow
AtL
ATL
Description
Normal Reduced Voltage Soft Starter RVSS. (Default)
Inside Delta, RVSS.
Wye Delta.
Open Loop Phase control using external analog input
reference.
Closed Loop Current follower using external analog input
reference.
Across the line. (Full Voltage)
2
The MX has been designed to be the controller for many control applications; Solid State Starter, both
Normal (outside Delta) and Inside Delta, and Electro mechanical starters, Wye Delta, Across the line full
2
voltage starter, Phase Control/Voltage Follower, Current Follower. In each case, the MX is providing the
motor protection and the necessary control for these applications.
z NOTE: For single phase operation, select Normal for the Starter Type parameter, and Single Phase for the
phase order parameter.
See Also
124
Phase Order (P77 / FUN 04) parameter on page 126.
Theory of Operation section 7.8, Wye-Delta Operation on page 160.
Theory of Operation section 7.11, Phase Control on page 165.
Theory of Operation section 7.12, Current Follower on page 167.
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P75
Motor Rated Power Factor
LED Display
FUN 06
LCD Display
FUN: Motor PF
06
-0.92
Range
-0.01 – 1.00 (Default –0.92)
Description
The Rated Power Factor parameter sets the motor power factor value that is used by the MX starter for
TruTorque and Power control calculations and metering calculations.
2
If TruTorque or Power acceleration and/or deceleration control is used, it is very important to properly set this
parameter to the motor's full load rated power factor (usually available on the motor nameplate or from the
motor manufacturer). For a typical induction motor, this value is between 0.80 and 0.95.
If the motor rated Power Factor is not available from either the motor nameplate or the motor manufacturer,
the value can be obtained by viewing the power factor meter.
With the motor running at full name plate current, view the power factor meter either by setting the LED
display's Meter parameter to "PF", or by pressing the [UP] arrow key until the Motor PF meter is displayed
using the LCD display.
The meter value can be entered into the Rated Power Factor parameter.
See Also
P76
LED Display
Meter (P79 / FUN 01) parameters on page 127.
Theory of Operation section 7.3.3, TruTorque Acceleration Control Settings and Times on page 141.
Theory of Operation section 7.3.4, Power Control Acceleration Settings and Times on page 143.
Rated RMS Voltage
FUN 05
LCD Display
FUN: Rated Volts
05
480
Vlt
Range
100, 110, 120, 200, 208, 220, 230, 240, 350, 380, 400, 415, 440, 460, 480, 500, 525, 575, 600, 660, 690, 800,
1000, 1140 (Default 480)
Description
The Rated Voltage parameter sets the line voltage that is used when the starter performs Over and Under line
voltage calculations. This value is the supply voltage, NOT the motor utilization voltage.
See Also
Meter (P79 / FUN 01) parameter on page 127.
Under Voltage Level (P39 / PFN 08) parameter on page 103.
Voltage Trip Time (P40 / PFN 09) parameter on page 104.
zNOTE: The rated RMS voltage must be set properly in order for the starter to operate properly.
125
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P77
Input Phase Sensitivity
LED Display
FUN 04
LCD Display
FUN: Phase Order
04 Insensitive
Range
LED
InS
AbC
CbA
SPH
Description
The Input Phase Sensitivity parameter sets the phase sensitivity of the starter. This can be used to protect the
motor from a possible change in the incoming phase sequence. If the incoming phase sequence does not
match the set phase rotation, the starter displays an Alarm while stopped and faults if a start is attempted.
P78
LED Display
LCD
Insensitive
ABC
CBA
Single phase
Description
Runs with any three phase sequence. (Default)
Only runs with ABC phase sequence.
Only runs with CBA phase sequence.
Single Phase.
CT Ratio
FUN 03
LCD Display
FUN: CT Ratio
03 288:1
Range
72:1, 96:1, 144:1, 288:1, 864:1, 2640:1, 3900:1, 5760:1, 8000:1, 14400:1, 28800:1
Description
The CT ratio must be set to match the CTs (current transformers) supplied with the starter. This allows the
starter to properly calculate the current supplied to the motor.
(Default 288:1)
Only Benshaw supplied CTs can be used on the starter. The CTs are custom 0.2 amp secondary CTs
2
specifically designed for use on the MX starter. The CT ratio is then normalized to a 1A secondary value.
The supplied CT ratio can be confirmed by reading the part number on the CT label. The part number is of
the form BICTxxx1M, where xxx is the CT primary and the 1 indicates the normalized 1 amp.
z NOTE: It is very important that the CT ratio is set correctly. Otherwise, many starter functions will not
operate correctly.
Refer to Table 3 - CT Ratios on page 13.
126
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P79
Meter 1 ,Meter 2
LED Display
FUN 01, 02
LCD Display
FUN: Meter 1
01 Ave Current
FUN: Meter 2
02 Ave Volts
Range
LED
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
Description
For the LED display, this parameter configures which single meter is displayed on the main screen. For the
LCD display, parameters FUN 01 and FUN 02 configure which meters are displayed on the two lines of the
main display screen.
LCD
Status
Ave Current
L1 Current
L2 Current
L3 Current
Curr Imbal
Ground Fault
Ave Volts
L1-L2 Volts
L2-L3 Volts
L3-L1 Volts
Overload
Power Factor
Watts
VA
vars
kW hours
MW hours
Phase Order
Line Freq
Analog In
Analog Out
Run Days
Run Hours
Starts
TruTorque %
Power %
Pk accel Curr
Last Start T
Description
Running State. (LED meter only, Default LED meter)
Average current. (Default LCD Meter 1)
Current in phase 1.
Current in phase 2.
Current in phase 3.
Current Imbalance %.
Residual Ground Fault % FLA.
Average Voltage L-L RMS. (Default LCD Meter 2)
Voltage in, L1 to L2 RMS.
Voltage in, L2 to L3 RMS.
Voltage in, L3 to L1 RMS.
Thermal overload in %.
Motor power factor.
Motor real power consumed.
Motor apparent power consumed.
Motor reactive power consumed.
Kilo-watt-hour used by the motor, wraps at 1,000.
Mega-watt-hour used by the motor, wraps at 10,000.
Phase Rotation.
Line Frequency.
Analog Input %.
Analog Output %.
Running time in days, wraps at 2,730 days.
Running time in Hours and Minutes, wraps at 24:00.
Number of Starts, wraps at 65,536.
TruTorque %.
Power %.
Peak starting current.
Last starting duration.
127
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P80
LED Display
Software 1
FUN 14
LCD Display
FUN: Software PN
14 810023-01-08
Description
2
The Software Part Number parameter displays the MX software version, for hardware BIPC-300055-01-04.
When calling Benshaw for service, this number should be recorded so it can be provided to the service
technician.
In addition to viewing the software version with this parameter, the software version is also displayed on
power up. On the LED display, the software version is flashed one character at a time on power up. On the
LCD display, the software PN is fully displayed on power up.
z NOTE: The seven segment LED in position one will flash the current software version currently in
use when first powered on. The full software part number will flash consecutively (one digit per
second),
For Example: 8...1...0...0...2...3...-...0...1...-...0...8
128
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P81
Passcode
LED Display
FUN 16
LCD Display
FUN: Passcode
16 Off
Description
2
The MX supports a 4-digit passcode. When the passcode is set, parameters may not be changed.
2
The MX provides a means of locking parameter values so that they may not be changed. Once locked, the
parameters values may be viewed on the display, but any attempt to change their values by pressing the [UP]
or [DOWN] keys is ignored.
Viewing the Passcode parameter indicates whether or not the parameters are locked. If they are locked, the
Passcode parameter displays “On”. If they are not locked, the Passcode parameter displays “Off”.
To lock the parameters, press the [ENTER] key while viewing the Passcode parameter. This allows entry of a
4-digit number. Press the [UP] or [DOWN] keys and [ENTER] for each of the four digits. After entering the
fourth digit, the number is stored as the passcode and the parameters are locked.
Once parameters are locked, the same 4-digit number must be re-entered into the Passcode parameter in order
to unlock them. Any other 4-digit number entered will be ignored.
When a passcode is set and an attempt is made to change a parameter through the display/keypad, the [UP]
and [DOWN] keys simply have no effect. When a passcode is set and an attempt is made to change a
2
parameter through Modbus, the MX returns an error response with an exception code of 03 (Illegal Data
Value) to indicate that the register can not be changed.
LED Display
The following steps must be performed to set a passcode using the LED Display:
1. At the default meter display, press the [PARAM] key to enter the parameter mode.
2. Press the [UP] or [DOWN] keys to get to the Passcode parameter (P81 / FUN 16).
3. Press the [ENTER] key. “Off” is displayed to indicate that no passcode is currently set.
4. Press the [UP] or [DOWN] keys and [ENTER] for each digit to be defined, select a value
from 0000 to 9999 starting at the most significant digit.
5. Press the [ENTER] key to set the passcode.
The following steps must be performed to clear a passcode.
1. At the default meter display, press the [PARAM] key to enter the parameter mode.
2. Press the [UP] or [DOWN] keys to get to the Passcode parameter (P81 / FUN 16).
3. Press the [ENTER] key. “On” is displayed to indicate that a passcode is presently set.
4. Press the [UP] or [DOWN] keys and [ENTER] after each digit to select the previously set
passcode value.
5. Press the [ENTER] key. The passcode is then cleared.
129
6 - PARAMETER DESCRIPTION
P82
Fault Log
LED Display
FL1
LCD Display
FL1: Last Fault #
Fault Name
Range
FL1 – FL9
Description
When a fault occurs, the fault number is logged in non-volatile memory. The most recent fault is in FL1 and
the oldest fault is in FL9.
If the starter is equipped with an LCD display, pressing [ENTER] toggles through the Starter data recorded at
the time of the fault. See section 4.13.3 on page 56 for more information.
See Also
130
Fault Codes on page 196.
7
Theory of Operation
7 - THEORY OF OPERATION
THEORY7 OF OPERATION
Motor Overload
7.1
7.1.1
Solid State Motor Overload Protection
Overview
2
2
2
The MX contains an advanced I t electronic motor overload (OL) protection function. For optimal motor protection, the MX has forty
standard NEMA style overload curves (in steps of one) available for use. Separate overload classes can be programmed for acceleration
2
and for normal running operation and individually or completely disabled if necessary. The MX motor overload function also
implements a NEMA based current imbalance overload compensation, adjustable hot and cold motor compensation, and adjustable
exponential motor cooling.
2
CAUTION: If the MX motor overload protection is disabled during any mode of operation, external motor overload protection must be
provided to prevent motor damage and/or the risk of fire in the case of a motor overload.
7.1.2
2
Setting Up The MX Motor Overload
Motor overload protection is easily configured through seven parameters (please refer to the descriptions of each parameter in section 6
of this manual for additional parameter information):
1. Motor FLA (QST 01)
2. Motor Service Factor (QST 02)
3. Motor Running Overload Class (PFN 15)
4. Motor Starting Overload Class (PFN 14)
5. Independent Starting/Running Overload (PFN 13)
6. Motor Overload Hot/Cold Ratio (PFN 16)
7. Motor Overload Cooling Time (PFN 17)
The Motor FLA and Service Factor parameter settings define the motor overload "pickup" point. For example, if the motor service
factor is set to 1.00, the motor overload begins accumulating or incrementing when the measured motor current is >100% FLA (100% *
1.00). The overload will NOT trip if the motor current is <100%. If the motor service factor is set to 1.15, the overload starts
accumulating content when the motor current >115% FLA (100% * 1.15). The overload will NOT trip if the measured motor current is
<115% of rated FLA.
The available overload classes are based on the trip time when operating at 600% of rated motor current. For example, a Class 10
overload trips in 10 seconds when the motor is operating at 600% rated current; a Class 20 overload trips in 20 seconds when the motor
is operating at 600% rated current.
2
The equation for the MX standard overload curves after the "pick-up" point has been reached is:
Time to Trip (seconds) =
132
35 seconds * Class
2
1
æ
ö
ç Measured Current *
÷
Current Imbal Derate Factor ÷ - 1
ç
Motor FLA
çç
÷÷
è
ø
7 - THEORY OF OPERATION
Figure 25: Commonly Used Overload Curves
10000
Seconds to Trip
1000
100
Class 40
Class 35
Class 30
Class 25
Class 20
10
Class 15
Class 10
Class 5
1
100
150
200
250
300
350
400
450
500
550
600
650
700
750
800
Current % (FLA)
z NOTE: In some cases the power stack rating may determine what motor overload settings are available. Each power stack is
designed to support specific motor overload classes. The RB2 power stack is designed for class 10 duty without derating. Refer to the
RB2 for the specific RB2 overload capabilities. Also, in certain heavy duty DC braking applications, the overload settings may be
limited to protect the motor from potential damage during braking.
Visit the web at www.benshaw.com for an automated overload calculator.
133
7 - THEORY OF OPERATION
7.1.3
Motor Overload Operation
Overload Heating
When the motor is operating in the overloaded condition (motor current greater than FLAxSF), the motor overload content accumulates
based on the starter’s operating mode at a rate established by the overload protection class chosen. The accumulated overload content
can be viewed on the display or over the communications network.
Overload Alarm
An overload alarm condition is declared when the accumulated motor overload content reaches 90%. An output relay can be
programmed to change state when a motor overload alarm condition is present to warn of an impending motor overload fault.
Overload Trip
2
The MX starter trips when the motor overload content reaches 100%, protecting the motor from damage. The starter first performs the
2
defined deceleration or DC braking profile before stopping the motor if the controlled fault stop feature of the MX is enabled. The
motor overload trip time accuracy is ± 0.2 seconds or ± 3% of total trip time.
Overload Start Lockout
After tripping on an overload, restarting is prevented and the starter is “locked out” until the accumulated motor overload content has
cooled below 15%.
Current Imbalance / Negative Sequence Current Compensation
2
The MX motor overload calculations automatically compensate for the additional motor heating which results from the presence of
unbalanced phase currents. There can be significant negative sequence currents present in the motor when a current imbalance is
present. These negative sequence currents have a rotation opposite the motor rotation and are typically at two times the line frequency.
Due to the negative sequence currents opposite rotation and higher frequency, these currents can cause a significant increase in rotor
heating.
The overload curves provided by a motor manufacturer are based on balanced motor operation. Therefore, if a current imbalance is
2
present, the MX motor overload compensates for the additional heating effect by accumulating overload content faster and tripping
sooner to protect the motor. The current imbalance compensation also adjusts the Hot / Cold motor protection as described below in
2
section 7.1.6 . The MX derating factor is based on NEMA MG-1 14.35 specifications and is shown in Figure 26.
Figure 26: Overload Derating for Current Imbalance
2
1
0.95
Derating Factor
7.1.4
134
0.9
7 - THEORY OF OPERATION
7.1.5
Harmonic Compensation
2
The MX motor overload calculation automatically compensates for the additional motor heating that can result from the presence of
harmonics. Harmonics can be generated by other loads connected to the supply such as DC drives, AC variable frequency drives, arc
lighting, uninterruptible power supplies, and other similar loads.
7.1.6
Hot / Cold Motor Overload Compensation
If a motor has been in operation for some time, it will have heated up to some point. Therefore, there is typically less overload content
available in the case where a motor is restarted immediately after it has been running when compared to the situation where a motor has
2
been allowed to cool down before restarting. The MX provides adjustable hot motor overload compensation to fully protect the motor
in these cases.
2
If the hot and cold maximum locked rotor times are provided, the MX Hot/Cold Ratio parameter value can be calculated as follows:
If no motor information is available, a Hot/Cold ratio value of 60% is usually a good starting point.
Max Hot Locked Rotor Time ö
æ
OL H/C Ratio = ç1 ÷ x 100%
è Max Cold Locked Rotor Time ø
2
The MX adjusts the actual motor overload content based on the programmed Hot/Cold Ratio set point and the present running current of
the motor so that the accumulated motor overload content accurately tracks the thermal condition of the motor. If the motor current is
constant, the overload content eventually reaches a steady state value. This value is derived as follows:
OLss = OL H/C Ratio ´
Current
1
´
FLA
Current Imbalance Derate Factor
The running OL content is also adjusted based on the derating factor due to the presence of any current imbalances and or harmonics.
If the existing motor overload content is less than the calculated running OL content, the motor overload exponentially increases the
overload content until the appropriate running overload content level is achieved. If the existing motor overload content is greater than
the calculated running OL content level, the overload exponentially cools down or decreases to the appropriate running overload content
level. The rate of the running motor overload heating or cooling is controlled by the Motor Overload Cooling Time parameter.
135
7 - THEORY OF OPERATION
The following diagram illustrates how the current and the Motor Overload Hot/Cold Ratio parameter determines the steady state
overload content. It assumes there is no current imbalance.
Figure 27: Motor Overload H© Ratio Example
100%FLA
Motor
Current
50%FLA
0%FLA
80 %
OL H/C
Ratio
30 %
0%
80 %
Motor
Overload
Content
40 %
30 %
15 %
0%
T0
T1
T2
T3
At time T0, the motor current is 100%FLA and the OL H© Ratio is set at 30%. It is assumed that the motor has been running for some
time and the motor overload content has reached a steady state value of 30% (30% H© Ratio x 100% FLA = 30%).
At time T1, the motor current drops to 50%FLA. The motor overload content exponentially cools to a new steady state value of 15%
(30% H© Ratio x 50% FLA = 15%).
At time T2, the OL H© Ratio is set to 80%. The motor overload content exponentially rises to a new steady state value of 40% (80%
H© Ratio x 50% FLA = 40%).
7.1.7
At time T3 the motor current rises back up to 100%FLA. The motor overload content exponentially rises to a new steady state value of
80% (80% H© Ratio x 100% FLA= 80%).
Separate Starting and Running Motor Overload Settings
If desired, separate overload classes can be programmed for use during starting and during running. The motor overload protection may
also be disabled during starting or during normal running. In order to enable separate overload settings the Independent
Starting/Running Overload parameter needs to be set to "On" to allow independent overload operation. Once set to "On", the individual
Motor Starting Overload Class and Motor Running Overload Class parameters can be set to either "Off" or the desired overload class
settings.
The Motor Starting Overload Class parameter value is used for the motor overload calculations when the starter is starting the motor
(kick mode, acceleration, and running before up-to-speed has been declared). Once the motor has reached full speed and during
deceleration or braking, the Motor Running Overload Class is used for the motor overload calculations. As the motor protection curves
shift from the acceleration curve to the running curve, the accumulated overload content is retained to provide a seamless transition from
one mode of operation to the other.
Disabling the Starting OL function or using a higher OL class for the Starting OL can be useful on extremely high inertial loads such as
large centrifuges or high friction loads that require very long starting periods.
z NOTE: When the Independent Starting/Running Overload (P44 / PFN 13) parameter is set to "OFF", the running OL is used at all
times.
z NOTE: The Hot/Cold motor compensation is still active when either the starting or running overload is disabled. Therefore the
motor overload content may still slowly increase or decrease depending on the measured motor current. However if the motor overload
is disabled, the motor overload content is limited to a maximum of 99%. Therefore, a motor overload trip can not occur.
CAUTION: When both overloads are disabled, the accumulated overload content is set to zero (0%) and the starter does not provide
any motor overload protection. External motor overload protection must be provided to prevent motor damage and/or the risk of fire in
the case of a motor overload.
136
7 - THEORY OF OPERATION
Motor Cooling While Stopped
The Motor Overload Cooling Time parameter is used to adjust the cooling rate of the motor overload. When the motor is stopped and
cooling, the accumulated motor overload content is reduced in an exponential manner.
5
OL Content = OL Content when Stopped * e CoolingTim e
t
When the motor is stopped, the motor overload cools as shown in the following Figure 28.
Figure 28: Motor Cooling While Stopped Curves
M X2 Motor OL Cooling, Motor Stopped
100
90
80
70
Remaining OL Content %
7.1.8
60
50
40
30
330min
20
20 min
12 min
10
15 min
0
0
200
400
600
800
1000
1200
1400
1600
1800
2000
Time (sec)
137
7 - THEORY OF OPERATION
If the motor manufacturer does not specify the motor cooling time, the following approximations for standard TEFC cast iron motors
based on frame size can be used:
Frame Size
Cooling Time
180
30 min
280
60 min
360
90 min
400/440
120 min
500
180 min
Larger frames
Consult
Manufacturer
For motors less than 300hp, another approximation based on allowable motor starts per hour can also be used to set an initial value of the
Motor Overload Cooling Time parameter:
Motor Cooling Time (minutes) »
60 minutes
Starts per hour
The Motor Overload Cooling Time parameter is defined as the time that it takes for the motor to cool from 100% overload content to less
than 1% overload content. Sometimes a motor manufacturer may provide a cooling time constant (t or tau) value. In these cases, the
Motor Overload Cooling Time parameter should be set to five (5) times the specified time constant value.
7.1.9
Motor Cooling While Running
When the motor is running, the Motor Overload Cooling Time parameter and the Motor Overload Hot/Cold Ratio parameter settings
control the motor OL content. If the motor overload content is above the steady state OL running level (See section 7.1.6, Hot / Cold
Motor Overload Compensation for more details) the motor OL exponentially cools to the appropriate steady state OL level. When the
motor is running, the cooling time is adjusted based on the measured current level and current imbalance level at which the motor is
operating.
Cooling Time Running = Cooling Time Stopped *
Measured Running Current
1
*
Motor FLA
Current Imbalance Derate Factor
In all cases, the running motor cooling time is shorter (motor will cool faster) than when the motor is stopped. The faster cooling results
because it is assumed that when a motor is running, cooling air is being applied to the motor.
7.1.10
Emergency Motor Overload Reset
2
The MX has an emergency motor overload reset feature that allows the user to override the overload starter lockout. This resets the
motor overload content to 0%. It does not reset the overload fault.
To perform an emergency overload reset, simultaneously press the [RESET] and [DOWN] buttons on the keypad. An emergency
overload reset may also be performed by applying 120 Volts to a digital input that is configured as an emergency overload reset input or
by setting the emergency overload reset bit in the starter control Modbus register.
CAUTION: This feature should only be used in an emergency. Before an emergency reset is performed the cause of the motor overload
should be investigated to ensure that the motor is capable of restarting without causing undesired motor or load damage. When the
2
emergency motor overload reset is used, the accumulated motor overload content is reset back to zero (0%). Therefore, the MX 's motor
protection functions may not be able to fully protect the motor from damage during a restart after performing an emergency motor
overload reset.
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7 - THEORY OF OPERATION
Motor Service Factor
7.2
General
Motor Service Factor
The Motor Service Factor parameter should be set to the service factor of the motor. The service factor is
used to determine the "pick up" point for the overload calculations. If the service factor of the motor is not
known then the service factor should be set to 1.00.
z NOTE: The NEC (National Electrical Code) does not allow the service factor to be set above 1.40. Check
with other local electrical codes for their requirements.
The National Electrical Code, article 430 Part C, allows for different overload multiplier factors depending on
the motor and operating conditions. NEC section 430-32 outlines the allowable service factor for different
motors as follows:
Motor Overload Multiplier
Service factor 1.15 or more
1.25
Motor temp. rise 40°C or less
1.25
All others
1.15
NEC section 430-34 permits further modifications if the service factor is not sufficient to start the motor:
Motor Overload Multiplier
Service factor 1.15 or more
1.40
Motor temp. rise 40°C or less
1.40
All others
1.30
Although the NEC does not address the effect of the ambient temperature of the motor location, guidance can
be derived by examining NEC limits. If the motor is operating in an ambient temperature that is less than
40°C, then the overload multiplier can be increased while still protecting the motor from exceeding its
maximum designed temperature. The following curve gives the ambient temperature versus the correction
factor.
Example: If a motor operates at 0°C, then a 1.36 correction factor could be applied to the overload multiplier.
This could give a theoretical overload multiplier of 1.36 x 1.25 or 1.70. The highest legal NEC approved
value of overload multiplier is 1.40, so this could be used.
139
7 - THEORY OF OPERATION
Acceleration Control
7.3
Acceleration Control
7.3.1
Current Ramp Settings, Ramps and Times
General
The current ramp sets how the motor accelerates. The current ramp is a linear increase in current from the
initial setting to the maximum setting. The ramp time sets the speed of this linear current increase. The
following figure shows the relationships of these different ramp settings.
Figure 29: Current Ramp
Current
Max
Current
Start command
Kick
Current
Initial
Current
Motor FLA
Time
Kick Time
Ramp Time
Up To Speed Timer
Initial Current
The initial current should be set to the level that allows the motor to begin rotating within a couple of seconds
of receiving a start command.
To adjust the initial current setting, give the starter a run command. Observe the motor to see how long it
takes before it begins rotating and then stop the unit. For every second that the motor doesn't rotate, increase
the initial current by 20%. Typical loads require an initial current in the range of 50% to 175%.
Maximum Current
For most applications, the maximum current can be left at 600%. This ensures that enough current is applied
to the motor to accelerate it to full speed.
The maximum current can also be set to a lower current limit. This is usually done to limit the voltage drop
on the power system or to limit the torque the motor produces to help prevent damage to the driven load.
z NOTE: The motor may achieve full speed at any time during the current ramp. This means that the
maximum current setting may not be reached. Therefore, the maximum current setting is the most current that
could ever reach the motor, and not necessarily the maximum current that reaches the motor.
z NOTE: When setting a current limit, the motor must be monitored to ensure that the current is high
enough to allow the motor to reach full speed under worst case load conditions.
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7 - THEORY OF OPERATION
Ramp Time
The ramp time is the time it takes for the current to go from the initial current to the maximum current. To
make the motor accelerate faster, decrease the ramp time. To make the motor accelerate slower, increase the
ramp time.
If the ramp time expires before the motor reaches full speed, the starter maintains the maximum current level
until either the motor reaches full speed, the Up to Speed time expires, or the motor thermal overload trips.
z NOTE: Setting the ramp time to a specific value does not necessarily mean that the motor will take this
time to accelerate to full speed. The motor and load may achieve full speed before the ramp time expires if
the application does not require the set ramp time and maximum current to reach full speed. Alternatively, the
motor and load may take longer than the set ramp time to achieve full speed.
7.3.2
Programming A Kick Current
General
The kick current sets a constant current level that is applied to the motor before the ramp begins. The kick
current is only useful on motor loads that are hard to get rotating but then are much easier to move once they
are rotating. An example of a load that is hard to get rotating is a ball mill. The ball mill requires a high
torque to get it to rotate the first quarter turn (90°). Once the ball mill is past 90° of rotation, the material
inside begins tumbling and it is easier to turn.
Kick Level
The kick current parameter is usually set to a low value and then the kick time is adjusted to get the motor
rotating. If the kick time is set to more than 2.0 seconds without the motor rotating, increase the kick current
by 100% and re-adjust the kick time.
Kick Time
The kick time adjustment should begin at 0.5 seconds and be adjusted by 0.1 or 0.2 second intervals until the
motor begins rotating. If the kick time is adjusted above 2.0 seconds without the motor rotating, start over
with a higher kick current setting.
7.3.3
General
TruTorque Acceleration Control Settings and Times
TruTorque acceleration control is a closed loop torque based control. The primary purpose of TruTorque
acceleration control is to smoothly start motors and to reduce the torque surge that can occur as an AC
induction motor comes up to speed. This torque surge can be a problem in applications such as pumps and
belt driven systems. In pumping applications, this torque surge can result in a pressure peak as the motor
comes up to speed. In most situations this small pressure peak is not a problem. However in selected cases,
even a small pressure rise can be highly undesirable. In belt driven applications, TruTorque can prevent the
slipping of belts as the motor reaches full speed.
Figure 30: TruTorque Ramp
Motor
Torque
Max Torque
Motor Running
Torque
Start command
Optional Kick
Current
Initial Torque
Time
Kick Time
Ramp Time
Up To Speed Timer
141
7 - THEORY OF OPERATION
TruTorque acceleration control can be very useful for a variety of applications. However it is best used to
start centrifugal pumps, fans, and other variable torque applications. TruTorque generally should not be used
in applications where the starting load varies greatly during the start such as with a reciprocating compressor,
where the starting load is very low, or where the starting load varies greatly from one start to another.
TruTorque control is not recommended for the starting of AC synchronous motors.
Initial Torque
This parameter sets the initial torque level that the motor produces at the beginning of the starting ramp
profile. A typical value is 10% to 20%. If the motor starts too quickly or the initial motor torque is too high,
reduce this parameter. If the motor does not start rotating within a few seconds after a start is commanded,
increase this parameter. If the value is set too low a "No Current at Run" fault may occur.
Maximum Torque
This parameter sets the final or maximum torque level that the motor produces at the end of the acceleration
ramp time. For a loaded motor, the maximum torque value initially should be set to 100% or greater. If the
maximum torque value is set too low, the motor may not produce enough torque to reach full speed and may
stall. On lightly loaded motors, this parameter may be reduced below 100% to produce smoother starts.
If the motor can be started by using the default TruTorque acceleration parameter values or another ramp
profile, the Maximum Torque level can be determined more precisely so that the motor comes up to speed in
approximately the preset ramp time. In this case, while the motor is running fully loaded, display the
TruTorque percent (TT%) meter on the display. Record the value displayed. The Maximum Torque level
should then be set to the recorded full load value of TT% plus an additional 10%. Restart the motor with this
value to verify correct operation.
z NOTE: When setting the Maximum Torque value, the motor must be monitored to ensure that the torque
level is high enough to allow the motor to reach full speed under worst-case load conditions.
z NOTE: Depending on loading, the motor many achieve full speed at any time during the TruTorque ramp.
This means that the Maximum Torque level many never be achieved. Therefore, the maximum torque level is
the maximum TruTorque level that is permitted. However the motor torque may not necessarily reach this
value during all starts.
Ramp Time
When in TruTorque acceleration mode, the ramp time setting is the time it takes for the torque to go from the
initial torque setting to the maximum torque setting. To make the motor accelerate faster, decrease the ramp
time. To make the motor accelerate slower, increase the ramp time.
If the ramp time expires before the motor reaches full speed, the starter maintains the Maximum Torque level
until either the motor reaches full speed, UTS timer expires, or the motor thermal overload protection trips.
z NOTE: Setting the ramp time to a specific value does not necessarily mean that the motor takes that exact
amount of time to accelerate to full speed. The motor and load may achieve full speed before the ramp time
expires if the load does not require the set ramp time or set torque level to reach full speed. Alternately, the
motor and load may take longer than the set ramp time to achieve full speed depending on the parameter
settings and load level.
142
7 - THEORY OF OPERATION
7.3.4
Power Control Acceleration Settings and Times
General
Power control is a closed loop power based acceleration control. The primary purpose of Power controlled
acceleration is to control and limit the power (kW) drawn from the power system and to reduce the power
surge that may occur as an AC induction motor comes up to speed. This power surge can be a problem in
applications that are operated on generators or other limited or "soft" power systems. Power control also
reduces the torque surge that can also occur as an AC induction motor comes up to speed.
Figure 31: Power Ramp
Motor Input
Power
Max Power
Motor Running
Power Level
Start command
Optional Kick
Current
Initial Power
Time
Kick Time
Ramp Time
Up To Speed Timer
Power control acceleration can be very useful for a variety of applications. Power control generally should
not be used in applications where the starting load varies greatly during the start such as with a reciprocating
compressor. Power control is not recommended for starting of AC synchronous motors.
Initial Power
This parameter sets the initial power level that the motor draws at the beginning of the starting ramp profile.
A typical value is usually 10% to 30%. If the motor starts too quickly or the initial power level is too high,
reduce this parameter. If the motor does not start rotating within a few seconds after a start is commanded,
increase this parameter. If this value is set too low a "No Current at Run" fault may occur.
Maximum Power
This parameter sets the final or maximum power level that the motor produces at the end of the acceleration
ramp. For a loaded motor, the maximum power level initially should be set to 100% or greater. If the
maximum power level value is set too low, the motor may not produce enough torque to reach full speed and
may stall. On lightly loaded motors, this parameter may be reduced below 100% to produce smoother starts.
If the motor can be started by using the default Power acceleration parameter values or the Current control
ramp, the Maximum Power level can be determined more precisely so that the motor comes up to speed in
approximately the preset ramp time. In this case, while the motor is running fully loaded, display the Power
percent (KW%) meter on the display. Record the value displayed. The Maximum Power level should then be
set to the recorded full load value of KW% plus an additional 5% to 10%. Restart the motor with this value to
verify correct operation.
z NOTE: When setting the Maximum Power level, the motor must be monitored to ensure that the starting
power is high enough to allow the motor to reach full speed under worst case load conditions.
143
7 - THEORY OF OPERATION
z NOTE: Depending on loading, the motor may achieve full speed at any time during the Power ramp. This
means that the Maximum Power level may not be reached. Therefore, the maximum power level is the
maximum power level that is permitted. However, the motor power may not necessarily reach this value
during all starts.
Ramp Time
When in Power acceleration mode, the ramp time setting is the time it takes for the power to go from the
initial power setting to the maximum power setting. To make the motor accelerate faster, decrease the ramp
time. To make the motor accelerate slower, increase the ramp time.
If the ramp time expires before the motor reaches full speed, the starter maintains the Maximum Power level
until either the motor reaches full speed, the UTS timer expires, or the motor thermal overload protection trips.
z NOTE: Setting the ramp time to a specific value does not necessarily mean that the motor takes that exact
amount of time to accelerate to full speed. The motor and load may achieve full speed before the ramp time
expires if the load does not require the set ramp time or set power level to reach full speed. Alternately, the
motor and load may take longer than the set ramp time to achieve full speed depending on the parameter
settings and load level.
144
7 - THEORY OF OPERATION
7.3.5
Open Loop Voltage Ramps and Times
General
The open loop voltage ramp provides soft starting of a motor by increasing the voltage applied to motor from
the Initial Voltage setting to full (100%) line voltage. The ramp time sets the speed at which the voltage is
increased. Because this is an open loop control profile, the motor current during starting tends to be reduced;
however, the current is not limited to any particular level. This starting mode (old), is not commonly used
except in special circumstances. In most applications, the use of one of the other closed loop starting profiles
is recommended.
Figure 32: Voltage Ramp
Voltage
Full Voltage
Start
command
Optional Kick
Current
Initial Voltage
Time
Kick Time
Ramp Time
Initial Voltage
This parameter sets the initial voltage level that is applied to the motor. To adjust the starting voltage level,
give the starter a run command and observe the motor operation. If the motor starts too quickly reduce the
initial voltage level. If the motor does not start rotating immediately or starts too slowly then increase the
initial voltage level until the motor just starts to rotate when a start command is given. If the initial voltage
level is set too low, a Fault 39 - No Current at Run may occur. In this case increase the initial voltage level to
permit more current to initially flow to the motor.
Ramp Time
The ramp time setting is the time that it takes for the applied voltage to go from the initial voltage level to the
full voltage (100%) level. To make the motor accelerate faster, decrease the ramp time. To make the motor
accelerate slower, increase the ramp time.
145
7 - THEORY OF OPERATION
UTS Timer
When the start mode is set to open-loop voltage ramp acceleration, the UTS Timer acts as an acceleration
kick. When the UTS timer expires, full voltage is applied to the motor. This feature can be used to reduce
motor surging that may occur near the end of an open loop voltage ramp start. If a surge occurs near the end
of the ramp, set the UTS timer to expire at this time and restart the motor. If the surge still occurs, set the UTS
time to a lower time until the surging subsides. If motor surging continues to be a problem, it is recommended
2
that one of the other standard MX closed-loop starting profiles be used.
Figure 33: Effect of UTS Timer on Voltage Ramp
Voltage
Full Voltage
Start
command
Optional Kick
Current
Initial Voltage
Ramp
Time
Kick Time
UTS Time
146
Time
7 - THEORY OF OPERATION
7.3.6
Dual Acceleration Ramp Control
General
Two independent current ramps and kick currents may be programmed. The use of two different starting
profiles can be very useful with applications that have varying starting loads such as conveyors that can start
either loaded or unloaded.
The Current Ramp 1 profile is programmed using the parameters Initial Current 1, Maximum Current 1, and
Ramp Time 1. The Current Ramp 2 is programmed using the parameters Initial Current 2, Maximum Current
2, and Ramp Time 2. Kick Current 1 profile is programmed using the parameters Kick Level 1 and Kick Time
1. Kick Current 2 profile is programmed using the parameters Kick Level 2 and Kick Time 2.
Acceleration Ramp Selection
Current Ramp 2 and Kick Current 2 starting profiles are selected by programming a digital input to the Ramp
Select function and then energizing that input by applying 120 Volts to it. When a digital input is
programmed to Ramp Select, but de-energized, Current Ramp 1 and Kick Current 1 are selected. When no
digital inputs are programmed to the Ramp Select function the Ramp 1 profile is used.
The Ramp Select input only affects the starting profile when using a current ramp profile and during a kick.
The Ramp Select input does not affect the TruTorque ramp, Power ramp, or the Voltage ramp profile (unless
kicking is enabled at the beginning of those ramps).
The following table summarizes which parameters affect the starting profile when a digital input is
programmed to the Ramp Select function and that input is either energized or de-energized.
Ramp Modes
Current Ramp
Ramp Select De-energized
Ramp Select Energized
Initial Current 1
Initial Current 2
Maximum Current 1
Maximum Current 2
Ramp Time 1
Ramp Time 2
Kick Level 1
Kick Level 2
Kick Time 1
Kick Time 2
Initial Voltage/Torque/Power
Maximum Torque/Power
TruTorque Ramp
Ramp Time 1
Kick Level 1
Kick Level 2
Kick Time 1
Kick Time 2
Initial Voltage/Torque/Power
Maximum Torque/Power
Power (KW) Ramp
Ramp Time 1
Kick Level 1
Kick Level 2
Kick Time 1
Kick Time 2
Initial Voltage/Torque/Power
Ramp Time 1
Voltage Ramp
Kick Level 1
Kick Level 2
Kick Time 1
Kick Time 2
147
7 - THEORY OF OPERATION
Changing Ramp Profiles
The selected ramp profile may be changed during starting by changing the Ramp Select input. When the Ramp
Select input changes during ramping, control switches to the other profile as if it were already in progress. It does
not switch to the beginning of the other profile. Refer to the following example below:
z NOTE: Once the motor has achieved an up-to-speed status (UTS), changes to the Ramp Select input have no
effect on the motor operation.
Figure 34: Changing Ramps During Acceleration Example
Ramp Profile 1
Kick Level 1
Maximum Current 1
Initial Current 1
Ramp Time 1
Kick Time 1
Ramp Profile 2
Maximum Current
2
Kick Level 2
Initial Current 2
Ramp Time 2
Kick Time 2
Ramp Select Changed During Start
Ramp 1 Selected
Ramp Time 2
148
Ramp 2 Selected
7 - THEORY OF OPERATION
Deceleration Control
7.4
Deceleration Control
7.4.1
Voltage Control Deceleration
Overview
2
2
The deceleration control on the MX uses an open loop voltage ramp. The MX ramps the voltage down to
decelerate the motor. The curve shows the motor voltage versus the decel setting.
Figure 35: Motor Voltage Versus Decel Level
Beginning Level
This sets the starting voltage of the deceleration ramp. Most motors require the voltage to drop to around 60%
or lower before any significant deceleration is observed. Therefore, a good first setting for this parameter is
35%.
To adjust this parameter, it is necessary to observe the motor operation as soon as a stop is commanded. If the
motor hunts (speed oscillations) at the beginning of the deceleration, then lower the parameter by 5%. If the
motor has a big drop in speed as soon as a stop is commanded, then raise the parameter by 5%.
Some motors are very sensitive to the adjustment of this parameter. If a 5% adjustment changes the motor
from hunting to dropping in speed, then a smaller change of 1% or 2% may be necessary.
Ending Level
This sets the final voltage for the deceleration ramp. In most cases, this parameter can be set to 10% and the
decel time can be used to adjust the deceleration rate. If the motor is coming to a stop too quickly or if the
starter continues to apply current to the motor after the motor has stopped, this parameter can be increased in
5% increments to fix this.
Decel Time
The decel time sets how quickly the motor decelerates. Usually a time of 30 seconds is a good starting point.
To make the motor take longer to decelerate, increase this parameter or to make the motor decelerate quicker,
decrease this parameter.
z NOTE: Deceleration control provides a smoother stop. However, the motor will take longer to stop than if
it was just allowed to coast to stop.
149
7 - THEORY OF OPERATION
7.4.2
TruTorque Deceleration
Overview
TruTorque deceleration control is a closed loop deceleration control. This allows TruTorque deceleration to
be more consistent in cases of changing line voltage levels and varying motor load conditions. TruTorque
deceleration is best suited to pumping and compressor applications where pressure surges, such as water
2
hammer, must be eliminated. The MX linearly reduces the motor's torque to smoothly decelerate the motor
and load. TruTorque deceleration is very easy to use with only two parameters to set.
Figure 36: TruTorque Deceleration
Motor
Torque
Stop command
Motor Torque
Before Stop
Command
End Torque
Level
Time
Decel Time
Ending Level
The Decel End Level parameter sets the ending torque level for the TruTorque deceleration ramp profile.
A typical TruTorque decel end level setting is between 10% and 20%. If the motor stops rotating before the
deceleration time has expired, increase this parameter value. If the motor is still rotating when the
deceleration time has expired, decrease this parameter value.
Decel Time
The decel time sets the ramp time between the motor torque level when stop was commanded and the decel
end torque level.
If the motor stops rotating before the decel time has expired, decrease the decel time parameter. If the motor
is still rotating when the decel time expires, increase the decel time parameter.
150
7 - THEORY OF OPERATION
Braking Controls
7.5
Braking Controls
2
Overview
When the Stop Mode parameter is set to DC Brake, the MX starter provides DC injection braking for fast and
2
frictionless braking of a three-phase motor. The MX starter applies a controlled DC current to the motor in
order to induce a stationary magnetic field that then exerts a braking torque on the motor's rotating rotor. The
braking current level and braking time required depends on the motor characteristics, the load inertia, and the
friction in the system.
2
The MX starter supports two different levels of DC injection braking:
1.Standard Duty Brake - For less than 6 x motor inertia.
2.Heavy Duty Brake - For NEMA specified inertia and two motor current feedback methods:
a) Standard Current Transformers (CTs)
b) Optional Hall Effect Current Sensor (LEM)
The optional Hall Effect Current sensor can be used when a more precise measurement of braking current is
necessary. This can occur if the DC injection braking is applied when the source supply has a very high short
circuit capability (very stiff) or in special instances when more precise braking current control is required.
The appropriate brake type and feedback method is preset from the factory. Please consult Benshaw for more
information if changes need to be made.
Maximum Load Inertia
The following table shows maximum load inertia, NEMA MG1 parts 12 and 20. A thermostat, thermistor or
RTD MUST be installed to protect the motor from overheating.
Speed - RPM
3600
HP
2
3
5
71/2
10
15
20
25
30
40
50
60
75
100
125
150
200
250
300
350
400
450
500
600
700
800
2.4
3.5
5.7
8.3
11
16
21
26
31
40
49
58
71
92
113
133
172
210
246
281
315
349
381
443
503
560
1800
11
17
27
39
51
75
99
122
144
189
232
275
338
441
542
640
831
1017
1197
1373
1546
1714
1880
2202
2514
2815
1200
900
720
600
514
30
44
71
104
137
200
262
324
384
503
620
735
904
1181
1452
1719
2238
2744
3239
3723
4199
4666
5130
6030
-
Inertia (lb-ft2)
60
87
142
208
273
400
525
647
769
1007
1241
1473
1814
2372
2919
3456
4508
5540
6540
7530
8500
9460
-
102
149
242
356
467
685
898
1108
1316
1725
2127
2524
3111
4070
5010
5940
7750
9530
11270
-
158
231
375
551
723
1061
1393
1719
2042
2677
3302
3819
4831
6320
7790
9230
12060
14830
-
228
335
544
798
1048
1538
2018
2491
2959
3881
4788
5680
7010
9180
11310
-
151
7 - THEORY OF OPERATION
7.5.1
DC Injection Braking, Standard Duty
2
2
The MX Standard Duty Braking allows up to approximately 250% FLA current to be applied to the motor. The MX Standard Duty
package consists of an extra braking contactor that shorts Motor Terminals 2 & 3 together while braking, as DC current is applied by the
2
MX starter to provide moderate braking torque.
CAUTION: Contactor MUST NOT short phase T1 and phase T3.
z NOTE: Contactor sizing requires AC1 contactor rating (Motor FLA / 1.6). The three contacts must be paralleled.
7.5.2
DC Injection Braking, Heavy Duty
2
2
The MX Heavy Duty Braking allows up to 400% FLA current to be applied to the motor for maximum braking performance. The MX
th
Heavy Duty braking package includes a freewheel current path between phases 1 and 3 that consists of a fuse and a 7 SCR with gating
2
card. In combination with the applied DC current from the MX starter, the freewheeling current path greatly enhances available braking
torque. When Braking, the stop must be counted as another motor start when looking at the motor starts per hour limit.
z NOTE: Semi-Conductor Fuse and 7th SCR supplied by Benshaw.
7.5.3
Braking Output Relay
To utilize DC injection braking, one of the user output Relays needs to be programmed as a Braking relay. (Refer to the Relay Output
th
Configuration parameters on page 112 for more information). The output of a Braking relay is needed to control the contactor and/or 7
SCR gating control card used during braking.
z NOTE: Verify that the correct output relay is programmed to Braking and that the wiring of this relay is correct. Damage to the
starter can result if the braking relay is not programmed and/or wired properly.
7.5.4
Stand Alone Overload Relay for emergency ATL (Across The Line) operation
Due to the currents being drawn on Line 1 and Line 3 for braking, this stand alone overload relay will cause nuisance current imbalance
trips. For a solution consult factory.
152
7 - THEORY OF OPERATION
7.5.5
DC Injection Brake Wiring Example
Figure 37: DC Injection Brake Wiring Example
BIPC-300055-01
MX2 CARD
stop
reset
START
menu
enter
Starters
153
7 - THEORY OF OPERATION
7.5.6
DC Brake Timing
2
The MX DC injection brake timing is shown below:
Figure 38: DC Injection Brake Timing
DC Brake
Delay Time
DC Brake
Time
Delay after
DC Brake
Brake Relay On
Braking Relay Energized
Brake Relay Off
DC Injection On
Starter SCRs On, DC Current Applied
DC Injection Off
time
Stop
Commanded
Delay to allow
contactor to
close before
applying DC
current
DC Brake
Time
Expired
Braking Relay
opens after a
delay to allow
residual DC
current to decay
After the DC Brake Time has expired, the Braking Relay is held energized to allow the DC current to decay before opening the
freewheel path. This delay prevents a contactor (if used) from having to open significant DC current which greatly prolongs the life of
the contactor. This delay time is based on motor FLA, the larger the motor the longer the delay time. The delay after DC brake time is
approximately:
Motor FLA
Delay after DC Brake Time
10 A
0.4 seconds
100 A
0.8 seconds
500 A
2.3 seconds
1000 A
4.3 seconds
Motor Overload Calculations During DC Injection Braking
2
During DC braking the MX Solid State Motor Overload Protection is fully active. During braking the Running Motor Overload setting
2
is used. The MX adjusts the overload calculations based on whether Standard Duty or Heavy Duty braking is used. The overload
calculations are also adjusted based on whether the standard Current Transformers (CTs) are used for current feedback or if the optional
Hall Effect Current sensor is used for current feedback.
z NOTE: Discretion must be used when DC injection braking. Motor heating during DC injection braking is similar to motor heating
during starting. Although the Motor OL is active (if it has not been intentionally disabled), excessive rotor heating could still result if the
load inertia is very large, braking level is high, or the brake time is set too long. Caution must be used to assure that the motor has the
thermal capacity to brake the desired load in the desired period of time without excessive heating.
154
7 - THEORY OF OPERATION
7.5.7
DC Injection Brake Enable and Disable Digital Inputs
Digital inputs can be programmed to either a Brake Enable or a Brake Disable. In the Brake Enable case the digital input must be
energized for DC braking to occur. The braking will immediately stop if the brake enable is de-energized.
In the Brake Disable case, DC braking will occur unless the Brake Disable digital input is energized. DC braking will cease if the brake
disable is energized. Once DC Braking is stopped due to a digital input state change, no further DC braking will take place and the
starter will return to the idle state.
7.5.8
Use of Optional Hall Effect Current Sensor
The Hall Effect Current Sensor should be located on Phase 1 of the motor output wiring. The sensor should be located so that the sensor
measures both the applied DC current from the starter as well as the freewheel current. The sensor is connected to the analog input of the
2
MX card along with a burden resistor. The analog input must be set to be a 0-10V voltage input for correct operation. The sensor
scaling and burden resistance are factory selected. Please consult factory if changes to either the sensor scaling or burden resistance is
required.
z NOTE: Hall effect current sensor must be used when load inertia exceeds motor manufactures recommended specifications.
155
7 - THEORY OF OPERATION
7.5.9
DC Injection Braking Parameters
Brake Level:
The DC Brake Level parameter sets the level of DC current applied to the motor during braking. The desired
brake level is determined by the combination of the system inertia, system friction, and the desired braking
time. If the motor is braking too fast the level should be reduced. If the motor is not braking fast enough the
level should be increased.
Brake Time:
The DC Brake Time parameter sets the time that DC current is applied to the motor. The desired brake time is
determined by the combination of the system inertia, system friction, and the desired braking level. If the
motor is still rotating faster than desired at the end of the brake time increase the brake time if possible. If the
motor stops before the desired brake time has expired decrease the brake time to minimize unnecessary motor
heating.
Brake Delay:
The DC Brake Delay Time is the time delay between when a stop is commanded and the DC braking current
is applied to the motor. This delay allows the residual magnetic field and motor counter EMF to decay before
applying the DC braking current. If a large surge of current is detected when DC braking is first engaged
increase the delay time. If the delay before the braking action begins is too long then decrease the delay time.
In general, low horsepower motors can utilize shorter delays while large horsepower motor may require longer
delays.
Slow Speed Cyclo Converter
7.6
Slow Speed Cyclo Converter
2
The MX Soft Starter implements a patented Slow Speed algorithm that can be used to rotate a three-phase AC motor, with control of the
stator current, at speeds less than the rated synchronous speed of the motor. The algorithm is used with a standard three-phase six-switch
2
SCR based soft starter. The advantages of the MX starter algorithm over other "jogging" techniques are that: the low speed motor
rotation is done without any additional hardware such as additional mechanical contactors and/or extra SCRs, the peak phase currents are
reduced compared with other jogging techniques, motor heating is minimized, and higher shaft torque can be generated.
7.6.1
Operation
Slow speed forward and reverse operation is achieved by energizing a digital input that has been programmed to either Slow Speed
Forward or Slow Speed Reverse (refer to the Digital Input Configuration parameters on page 110 for more information). The active
Control Source (local or remote source) must be set to terminal. Slow Speed Start/Stop control is not available from the optional LCD
keypad. The starter must be in the idle state in order to enter slow speed operation.
Relay outputs can be programmed to energize during slow speed operation (refer to the Relay Output Configuration parameters on page
112 for more information). This feature can be used to disable mechanical brakes or energize clutches during slow speed operation.
Motor Overload Calculations During Slow Speed Operation
2
During Slow Speed Operation the MX Solid State Motor Overload Protection is fully active. During slow speed operation the Running
Motor overload setting is used.
z NOTE: When the motor is operating at slow speeds its cooling capacity can be greatly reduced. Therefore the running time of the
motor at a given current level is dependant on the motor's thermal capacity. Although the Motor OL is active (if it has not been
intentionally disabled) during slow speed operation it is recommended that the motor temperature be monitored if slow speed is used for
long periods of time.
z NOTE: For Continuous Slow Speed Operation, an RC2 is required.
156
7 - THEORY OF OPERATION
7.6.2
Slow Speed Cyclo Converter Parameters
Slow Speed:
The Slow Speed parameter selects the speed of motor operation when slow speed is selected. When set to
Off, slow speed operation is disabled.
Slow Speed Current Level:
The Slow Speed Current Level parameter selects the level of current applied to the motor during slow speed
operation. The parameter is set as a percentage of motor full load amps (FLA). This value should be set to
the lowest possible current level that will properly operate the motor.
Slow Speed Time Limit:
The Slow Speed Time Limits parameter sets the amount of time that continuous operation of slow speed may
take place. When this parameter is set to OFF the timer is disabled. This parameter can be used to limit the
amount of continuous slow speed operation to protect the motor and/or load.
z NOTE: The Slow Speed Time Limit includes the time used for the Slow Speed Kick if kick is enabled.
z NOTE: The Slow Speed Time Limit resets when the motor is stopped. This timer does not prevent the
operator from stopping and re-starting the motor which can result in the slow speed operation time of the
motor being exceeded.
Slow Speed Kick Level:
The Slow Speed Kick Level sets the short-term current level that is applied to the motor to accelerate the motor for
slow speed operation. The Slow Speed Kick feature is disabled if it is set to off. Slow Speed Kick can be used to
"break loose" difficult to start loads while keeping the operating slow speed current level lower.
This parameter should be set to a midrange value and then the Slow Speed Kick Time should be increased in 0.1
second intervals until the kick is applied long enough to start the motor rotating. If the motor does not start
rotating with the set Slow Speed Kick Level increase the level and begin adjusting the kick time from 1.0 seconds
again.
If the motor initially accelerates too fast then reduce the Slow Speed Kick Level and/or reduce the Slow Speed
Kick Time.
Slow Speed Kick Time:
The Slow Speed Kick Time parameter sets the length of time that the Slow Speed Kick current level is applied to
the motor at the beginning of slow speed operation. After the Slow Speed Kick Level is set, the Slow Speed Kick
Time should be adjusted so that the motor starts rotating when a slow speed command is given.
If the motor initially accelerates too fast then reduce the Slow Speed Kick Level and/or reduce the Slow Speed
Kick Time.
157
7 - THEORY OF OPERATION
Inside Delta Connected Starter
7.7
Inside Delta Connected Starter
There are differences between a line connected soft starter as shown in Figure 39 and the inside delta connected soft starter as shown in
Figure 40 that need to be considered.
By observation of Figure 40, access to all six stator-winding terminals is required for an inside delta application. For a 12-lead motor, all
12 stator terminals must be accessible. In the line connected soft starter of Figure 39, access to only three leads of the stator windings of
the motor is required.
One failed SCR on any phase of the inside delta soft starter results in a single-phase condition. A shunt trip circuit breaker is
recommended to protect the motor in this case. A programmable relay can be configured as a shunt trip relay and can be used to trip the
breaker. When certain faults occur, the shunt trip relay energizes.
The SCR control for an inside delta application is different than the SCR control for a standard soft starter. The Starter Type parameter
needs to be properly set so that the SCRs are gated correctly.
If a circuit breaker is the only means to disconnect the soft starter and motor from the line, then one leg of the motor leads in the inside
delta soft starter is always electrically live when the circuit breaker is closed. This requires caution to ensure these leads of the motor are
not exposed to personnel.
7.7.1
Line Connected Soft Starter
In Figure 39, the power poles of the soft starter are connected in series with the line. The starter current equals the line current.
Figure 39: Typical Motor Connection
158
7 - THEORY OF OPERATION
7.7.2
Inside Delta Connected Starter
An inside delta connected soft starter is shown in Figure 40, where the power poles are connected in series with the stator windings of a
delta connected motor.
Figure 40: Typical Inside Delta Motor Connection
For an inside delta connected motor, the starter current is less than the line current by a factor of 1.55 (FLA/1.55). By comparison of
Figure 39 and Figure 40, the most obvious advantage of the inside delta starter is the reduction of current seen by the soft starter. The
soft starter can be downsized by a factor of 1.55, providing significant savings in cost and size of the starter.
An inside delta soft starter can also be considered for motors with more than 6 leads, including 12 lead dual voltage motors.
NEMA and IEC use different nomenclature for motor terminal markings, for 3 and 6 leaded motors.
NEMA labels motors leads, 1,2,3,4,5,6,
IEC labels motor leads, U1, V1, W1, U2, V2, W2
159
7 - THEORY OF OPERATION
Wye Delta Starter
7.8
Wye Delta Starter
2
When the Starter Type parameter is set to Wye-Delta, the MX is configured to operate an Electro mechanical Wye-Delta (Star-Delta)
2
starter. When in Wye-Delta mode, all MX motor and starter protective functions except bad SCR detection and power stack overload,
are available to provide full motor and starter protection.
A typical closed transition Wye-Delta starter schematic is shown in the following figure.
Figure 41: Wye Delta Motor Connection to the MX
BIPC-300055-01
MX2 CARD
160
2
7 - THEORY OF OPERATION
2
The MX utilizes an intelligent Wye to Delta transition algorithm. During starting, if the measured motor current drops below 85% of
FLA and more than 25% of the Up To Speed timer setting has elapsed, then a Wye to Delta transition occurs. The intelligent transition
algorithm prevents unnecessarily long motor starts which reduces motor heating. If a Wye to Delta transition has not already occurred, a
transition always occurs when the complete Up To Speed Time expires.
2
The MX can operate two configurations of Wye-Delta starters, open transition and closed transition. An open transition starter
momentarily disconnects the motor from the input line during the transition from Wye to Delta operating mode. A closed transition
starter uses resistors that are inserted during the transition so that the motor is never completely disconnected from the input line. The
presence of the resistors in a closed transition starter smooths the transition. A typical closed transition Wye-Delta starter schematic is
shown in Figure 41 on page 160.
The closed transition resistors generally are sized to be in the circuit for a short period of time. To protect the resistors from over
heating, one input should be programmed as a Bypass/2M contact feedback input and the Bypass/2M confirm parameter must be set.
For the Wye-Delta starter mode to operate properly one output relay needs to be programmed to the RUN output function and another
output relay needs to be programmed to the UTS output function. (Refer to the Relay Output Configuration parameters on page 112 for
more information).
Based on the typical closed transition schematic shown in Figure 41, when a start command is given, the starter enters the Wye starting
mode by energizing the relay programmed as RUN.
The transition to Wye (Starting) mode occurs as follows:
1.
Start command is given to the starter.
2.
The RUN relay is energized which energizes the 1S contactor.
3.
When the 1S contactor pulls in, the 1M contactor is energized.
2
The MX starter remains in the Wye mode until either:
1.
The start command is removed.
2.
The Up To Speed Time expires.
3.
The measured motor current is less than 85% of FLA and more than 25% of the Up To Speed Timer
setting has elapsed.
4.
A fault occurs.
When the Up To Speed Time expires, the starter changes from Wye starting mode to the Delta or normal running mode by energizing the
relay programmed as UTS. In Delta mode, the RUN and UTS relays are both energized and the motor is connected in the normal
running Delta configuration.
The transition to Delta (Run) mode occurs as follows:
1.
The UTS relay is energized which energizes the 2S contactor.
2.
When the 2S contactor pulls in, resistors are inserted in the circuit and the 1S contactor is de-energized.
3.
When the 1S contactor drops out the 2M contactor is energized.
2
4.
When the 2M contactor is pulled in, feedback can be sent to the MX control card to confirm that the
transition sequence to Delta is complete.
The starter remains in the Delta or running mode until the start command is removed or a fault occurs.
161
7 - THEORY OF OPERATION
2
Usually the MX intelligent Wye to Delta transition algorithm provides an optimal transition point that minimizes the transient current
and torque surges that can occur. However, the Wye to Delta transition will occur when the Up To Speed Time parameter has expired.
In order to reduce the current surge during the transition from Wye to Delta mode, the Up To Speed Time parameter should be adjusted
so that the transition occurs as close to full speed as possible within the constraints of the load. If the Up To Speed Time is set too short,
the starter will transition too soon and a large current and torque surge will occur. If the Up To Speed Time is set too long, the motor
may not have sufficient torque to continue accelerating when in Wye mode and may stop accelerating at a low speed until the transition
to Delta mode occurs. If this occurs, the start is unnecessarily prolonged and motor heating is increased.
A typical closed transition Wye-Delta starting current profile is shown in Figure 42.
Figure 42: Wye Delta Profile
Wye-Delta Closed Transition Current Profile
600%
500%
% Full
Load
Motor
Current
400%
300%
200%
100%
0%
% speed
100%
Transition from Wye to Delta mode
A digital input can be programmed as a 2M contactor feedback input. This input provides verification that the 2M contactor has fully
closed preventing operation when the transition resistors are still connected in the motor circuit. The use of this feedback is
recommended to prevent the overheating of the transition resistors if the 2M contactor does not close properly. The 2M confirmation trip
time can be adjusted by modifying the Bypass Feedback Time parameter.
z NOTE: When in Wye-Delta mode, the acceleration ramp, kick, and deceleration settings have no effect on motor operation.
z NOTE: When in Wye-Delta mode, the SCR gate outputs are disabled.
162
7 - THEORY OF OPERATION
Across The Line Starter
7.9
Across The Line (Full Voltage Starter)
2
When the Starter Type parameter is set to ATL, the MX is configured to operate an Electro mechanical full voltage or across-the-line
(ATL) starter.
2
In the ATL configuration, the MX assumes that the motor contactor (1M) is directly controlled by an output relay that is programmed to
RUN. Therefore, when a start command is given, the RUN programmed relay energizes the motor contactor, which applies power to the
2
motor. When the MX determines that the motor is at full speed, the up-to-speed (UTS) condition is indicated by energizing the UTS
2
programmed relays. When configured as an ATL starter, all MX motor and starter protective functions, except bad SCR detection and
power stack overload, are available to provide full motor and starter protection.
Figure 43: A Typical ATL Starter Schematic with the MX
2
BIPC-300055-01
MX2 CARD
stop
reset
START
menu
enter
Starters
z NOTE: When in ATL mode, the acceleration ramp, kick, and deceleration parameter settings have no effect on motor operation.
z NOTE: When in ATL mode, the SCR gate outputs are disabled.
163
7 - THEORY OF OPERATION
Single Phase Soft Starter
7.10
Single Phase Soft Starter
There are times a single phase motor may need to be started using a soft starter. This can be accomplished with any 3 phase starter with
the following modifications to the starter.
•
•
•
•
•
Connect Line power to terminals L1 and L3.
Remove gate leads from J8 and J9 and tie off so the leads will not touch anything
Remove gate leads from J6 and reinstall to J8, from J7 and reinstall to J9
Change Input Phase Sensitivity, (P77/FUN 04) to “SPH” Single Phase.
Connect motor to terminals T1 and T3.
Figure 44: Power Schematic for RB2 Integral Bypass Power Stack for Single Phase Operation
BIPC-300055-01
MX2 CARD
stop
reset
START
menu
enter
Starters
164
7 - THEORY OF OPERATION
Phase Control
Phase Control
2
When the Starter Type parameter is set to Phase Control, the MX is configured to operate as a phase controller or voltage follower.
This is an open loop control mode. When a start command is given, the RUN programmed relays energize. The firing angles of the
SCRs are directly controlled based on voltage or current applied to the Analog Input.
Phase control can be used to directly control the voltage applied to motors, resistive heaters, etc. When in Phase Control mode, the phase
2
angle of the SCRs, and hence the voltage applied, is directly controlled based on the analog input signal. The MX reference command
2
can be generated from any 0-10V, 0-20mA or similar source, such as a potentiometer, another MX or an external controller such as a
PLC.
Figure 45: Phase Control Mode
Output Voltage vs Analog Input
100
90
80
70
Output Voltage (%)
7.11
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
0
10
20
30
40
50
60
70
80
90
100
Analog Input (%)
A reference input value of 0% results in no output. A reference input value of 100% results in full (100%) output voltage. The actual
input voltage / current that results in a given output can be adjusted through the use of the Analog Input Offset and the Analog Input
Span parameters.
z NOTE: The power stack must be rated for continuous non-bypassed duty in order to operate in Phase Control mode
continuously, NO BYPASS.
z NOTE: When operating in Phase Control mode, the acceleration ramp, kick, and deceleration settings have no effect
on operation.
z NOTE: When in Phase Control mode the following motor / starter protective functions are available:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Current Imbalance
Over Current
Current while Stopped
Under Current
Over Voltage
Under Voltage
Motor OL
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Ÿ
Residual Ground Fault
Instantaneous Over Current (IOC)
Phase Rotation
Phase Loss
Under Frequency
Over Frequency
165
7 - THEORY OF OPERATION
7.11.1
Master/Slave Starter Configuration:
In the master / slave configuration, one "master" starter can directly control the output of one or more "slave" starters. To utilize the
master / slave configuration, one starter needs to be defined as the "master" starter. The Starter Type parameter of the "master" starter
should be configured appropriately as a Soft Starter (normal or ID), Phase Controller or Current Follower. If configured as a soft starter,
the acceleration and deceleration profiles need to be configured for proper operation.
To configure a master / slave application:
2
1.
The analog output of the master MX control card needs to be connected to the analog input(s) of the slave card(s).
2.
The master MX 's analog output needs to be configured. Set the Analog Output Function parameter to option 10 or "0 - 100% firing".
The Analog Output Span parameter should be set to provide a 0-10V or 0-20 milliamp output to the slave starter(s). Adjust analog
2
output jumper (JP1) to provide either a voltage or a current output. Set the slave MX 's Starter Type parameter to Phase Control and
verify that the Analog Input Offset and Analog Input Span parameters are set to accept the master signal.
3.
The slave MX needs to be provided with a start command from the master MX . A RUN programmed relay from the master MX can
be used to provide the start command to the slaves. The slave(s) Control Source parameters (Local Source and Remote Source)
settings need to be set appropriately.
4.
The slave MX analog input(s) needs to be configured for the appropriate voltage or current input signal type. Set the analog input
jumper (SWI-1) to the desired input type.
2
2
2
For additional master/slave application information, consult the factory.
166
2
2
7 - THEORY OF OPERATION
Current Follower
7.12
Current Follower
2
When the Starter Type parameter is set to Current Follower, the MX is configured to operate as a Closed Loop current follower.
Current Follower mode can be used to control the current applied to motors, resistive heaters, etc. The Current Follower mode uses the
analog input to receive the desired current command and controls the SCRs to output the commanded current. The MX's reference
2
command can be generated from any 0-10V, 0-20mA or 4-20mA source such as a potentiometer, another MX or an external controller
such as a PLC.
Figure 46: Current Follower Mode
A reference input value of 0% results in no output. A reference input value of 100% results in a current output equal to the Motor FLA
setting. The actual voltage or current input that results in a given output can be adjusted through the use of the Analog Input Offset and
Analog Input Span parameters.
z NOTE: The power stack must be rated for continuous non-bypassed duty in order to operate in Current Follower mode.
z NOTE: When operating in Current Follower mode, the acceleration ramp, kick, and deceleration settings have no effect on operation.
z NOTE: The following motor / starter protective functions are available when in Current Follower mode:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Current Imbalance
Over Current
Under Current
Over Voltage
Under Voltage
Over Frequency
Under Frequency
•
•
•
•
•
•
Phase Loss
Phase Rotation
Current while Stopped
Motor OL
Residual Ground Fault
Instantaneous Over Current (IOC)
167
7 - THEORY OF OPERATION
Start/Stop Control with a Hand/Off/Auto Selector Switch
7.13
Start/Stop Control Logic
Often times, a switch is desired to select between local or “Hand” mode and remote or “Auto” mode. In most cases, local control is
performed as 3-wire logic with a normally open, momentary contact Start pushbutton and a normally closed, momentary contact Stop
pushbutton, while remote control is performed as 2-wire logic with a “Run Command” contact provided by a PLC.
2
The MX can perform both 2-wire start/stop logic and 3-wire start/stop logic. With 2-wire logic, the starter starts when a run command
is applied to the Start input. It continues to run until the run command is removed from the Start input. With 3-wire logic, the starter
starts when a start command is momentarily applied to the Start input and continues to run until an input programmed as a Stop input
goes low.
2
The MX automatically determines whether to use 2-wire logic or 3-wire logic by the presence of a high level on a Stop input. If there is
an input programmed as a Stop input, and that input is high when the Start input goes high, then 3-wire start/stop logic is used.
Otherwise, 2-wire start/stop logic is used. This feature eliminates the need for external logic relays often used to “seal in” the momentary
Start and Stop pushbuttons, creating a 2-wire logic signal. The key is to have the Stop input be high when the Hand/Off/Auto switch is
in the Hand position, but be low when the switch is in the Auto position.
CAUTION: It is important that the Stop push button be wired in front of the Start push button, otherwise the starter could be started
when the Stop bush button is pressed and the Start button is pressed.
168
7 - THEORY OF OPERATION
7.14
Hand/Off/Auto Selector Switch
The MX2 has the capability to use a selector switch to change the source of control. A popular use is to switch between using the door
mounted display for Hand operation and using contact input for Auto operation. The following drawing shows how to wire the unit to
allow this operation.
Figure 47: Example of Start/Stop with a Hand/Off/Auto Selector Switch
OFF
TB2
120VAC LIVE
SELECTOR
SWITCH
120VAC NEUTRAL
The following parameters have to be programmed into the starter:
P4: Local Source = Terminal
P5: Remote Source = Keypad
P49: DI2 Configuration = Local/Remote
Hand Position
The starter is switched to use the Remote Source via the selector switch which applies 120VAC to digital input 2. The Remote Source is
programmed to Keypad so the keypad becomes active in this switch position.
Off Position
The starter is switched to use the Local Source via the selector switch which removes 120VAC from digital input 2. The Local Source is
programmed to Terminal so the Start digital input becomes active in the switch position. However, the selector switch also disconnects
control power from customer run contact so that 120VAC can not be applied to the Start digital input meaning the starter cannot be given
a start command.
Auto Position
The starter is switched to use the Local Source via the selector switch which removes 120VAC from digital input 2. The Local Source is
programmed to Terminal so the Start digital input becomes active in this switch position. The selector switch also connects control power
to the customer run contact so that a start can be applied.
169
7 - THEORY OF OPERATION
Simplified I/O Schematics
7.15
Simplified I/O Schematics
Figure 48: Digital Input Simplified Schematic
Figure 49: Analog Input Simplified Schematic
Figure 50: Analog Output Simplified Schematic
170
7 - THEORY OF OPERATION
Remote Modbus Communications
Figure 49: TB4 Connector
B+
ACOM
7.16
Remote Modbus Communications
2
The MX starter provides a Modbus RTU to support remote communication.
The communication interface is RS-485, and allows up to 247 slaves to be connected to one master (with repeaters when the number of
drops exceeds 31). Please refer to Figures 49 and 50 for connection diagrams.
7.16.1
Supported Commands
2
The MX supports the following Modbus commands:
• Read Holding Registers (03 hex)
• Read Input Registers (04 hex)
• Preset Single Register (06 hex)
• Preset Multiple Registers (10 hex)
Up to 64 registers may be read or written with a single command.
7.16.2
Modbus Register Addresses
The Modbus specification defines holding registers to begin at 40001 and input registers to begin at 30001. Holding registers may be
read and written. Input registers may only be read.
2
In the MX , the register maps are identical for both the holding registers and the input registers. For example, the Motor FLA parameter
is available both in holding register 40101 and in input register 30101. This is why the register addresses in the Modbus Register Map
are listed with both numbers (e.g. 30101/40101).
7.16.3
Cable Specifications
2
Good quality twisted, shielded communications cable should be used when connecting to the Modbus port on the MX . The cable
should contain two twisted pairs and have an overall shield. Use one pair of conductors for the A(-) and B(+) signals. Use the other pair
of conductors for the Common signal. The cable should adhere to the following specifications.
• Conductors: 2 twisted pair
• Impedance: 100 Ohm to 120 Ohm
• Capacitance: 16 pF/ft or less
• Shield:
Overall shield or individual pair shields
Examples of cables that meet these specifications are Belden part number 9842 and Alpha Wire part number 6412.
171
7 - THEORY OF OPERATION
7.16.4
Figure 50: Modbus Network Wiring Example
IMPORTANT
DO NOT CREATE STUBS - CABLE
MUST GO TO EACH STARTER.
Right
Wrong
172
8
Troubleshooting
& Maintenance
8 - TROUBLESHOOTING & MAINTENANCE
TROUBLESHOOTING
8
& MAINTENANCE
Safety Precautions
8.1
Safety Precautions
For safety of maintenance personal as well as others who might be exposed to electrical hazards associated with maintenance activities,
the safety related work practices of NFPA 70E, Part II, should always be followed when working on electrical equipment. Maintenance
personnel must be trained in the safety practices, procedures, and requirements that pertain to their respective job assignments.
WARNING: To avoid shock hazard, disconnect main power before working on controller/starter, motor or control devices such as
start/stop pushbuttons. Procedures which require parts of the equipment to be energized during troubleshooting, testing, etc. must be
performed by properly qualified personnel, using appropriate work practices and precautionary measures as specified in NFPA70, Part II.
CAUTION: Disconnect the controller/starter from the motor before measuring insulation resistance (IR) of the motor windings.
Voltages used for insulation resistance testing can cause failure of SCR's. Do not make any measurements on the controller with an IR
tester (megger).
Preventative Maintenance
8.2
8.2.1
Preventative Maintenance
General Information
Preventative maintenance performed on a regular basis will help ensure that the starter continues to operate reliably and safely. The
frequency of preventative maintenance depends upon the type of maintenance and the installation site’s environment.
z NOTE: A trained technician should always perform preventative maintenance.
8.2.2
Preventative Maintenance
During Commissioning:
• Torque all power connections during commissioning. This includes factory wired equipment.
• Check all of the control wiring in the package for loose connections.
• If fans are installed, ensure proper operation
One month after the starter has been put in operation:
• Re-torque all power connections. This includes factory wired equipment.
• Inspect the cooling fans to ensure proper operation.
After the first month of operation:
• Re-torque all power connections every year.
• Clean any accumulated dust from the starter using a clean source of compressed air.
• Inspect the cooling fans every three months to ensure proper operation.
• Clean or replace any air vent filters on the starter every three months.
z NOTE: If mechanical vibrations are present at the installation site, inspect the electrical connections more frequently.
174
8 - TROUBLESHOOTING & MAINTENANCE
General Troubleshooting Charts
8.3
General Troubleshooting Charts
The following troubleshooting charts can be used to help solve many of the more common problems that may occur.
8.3.1
Motor does not start, no output to motor
Condition
Cause
Solution
Display Blank, CPU Heartbeat LED on
MX2 board not blinking.
Control voltage absent.
Check for proper control voltage input.
Verify fuses and wiring.
MX2 control board problem.
Consult factory.
Fault Displayed.
Fault Occurred.
See fault code troubleshooting table for
more details.
Start command given but nothing
happens.
Start/Stop control input problems.
Verify that the start/stop wiring and start
input voltage levels are correct.
Control Source parameters (QST 04-05,
P4-5) not set correctly.
Verify that the parameters are set
correctly.
No line voltage has been detected by the
MX2 when a start command is given.
Check input supply for inline contactor,
open disconnects, open fuses, open circuit
breakers, or disconnected wiring.
NOL or No Line is displayed and a start
command is given, it will fault in F28.
Verify that the SCR gate wires are
properly connected to the MX2 control
board.
On medium voltage systems, verify wiring
of the voltage feedback measurement
circuit.
See fault code troubleshooting table for
more details.
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8.3.2
During starting, motor rotates but does not reach full speed
Condition
Cause
Solution
Fault Displayed.
Fault Occurred.
See fault code troubleshooting table for
more details.
Display shows Accel or Run.
Maximum Motor Current setting
(P7/QST07) set too low.
Review acceleration ramp settings.
Motor loading too high and/or current not
dropping below 175% FLA indicating
that the motor has not come up to speed.
Reduce load on motor during starting.
Motor FLA (P1/QST01) or CT ratio
(P78/FUN03) parameter set incorrectly.
Verify that Motor FLA and CT ratio
parameters are set correctly.
Abnormally low line voltage.
Fix cause of low line voltage.
A mechanical or supplemental brake is
still engaged.
Verify that any external brakes are
disengaged.
Initial current to low.
Increase initial current.
FLA or CT incorrect..
Verify FLA and CT settings.
Motor Hums before turning.
8.3.3
Starter not accelerating as desired
Condition
Cause
Solution
Motor accelerates too quickly.
Ramp time (P8/QST08) too short.
Increase ramp time.
Initial current (P6/QST06) set too high.
Decrease Initial current.
Maximum current (P7/QST07) set too
high.
Decrease Maximum current.
Kick start current (P13/CFN10) too high.
Decrease or turn off Kick current.
Kick start time (P14/CFN11) too long.
Decrease Kick time.
Motor FLA (P1/QST01) or CT ratio
(P78/FUN03) parameter set incorrectly.
Verify that Motor FLA and CT ratio
parameters are set correctly.
Starter Type parameter (P64/FUN07) set
incorrectly.
Verify that Starter Type parameter is set
correctly.
Maximum Motor Current setting
(P7/QST07) set too low.
Review acceleration ramp settings.
Motor loading too high.
Reduce load on motor during starting.
Motor FLA (P1/QST01) or CT ratio
(P78/FUN03) parameter set incorrectly.
Verify that Motor FLA and CT ratio
parameters are set correctly.
Abnormally low line voltage.
Fix cause of low line voltage.
Ramp time to long.
Decrease ramp time.
Motor accelerates too slowly
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8.3.4
Starter not decelerating as desired
Condition
Cause
Solution
Motor stops too quickly.
Decel Time (P18/CFN17) set too short.
Increase Decel Time.
Decel Begin and End Levels (P16/CFN15
and P17/CFN16) set improperly.
Increase Decel Begin and/or Decel
End levels.
Decel time seems correct but motor surges
(oscillates) at beginning of deceleration
cycle.
Decel Begin Level (P16/CFN15) set too high.
Decrease Decel Begin Level until
surging is eliminated.
Decel time seems correct but motor stops
before end of deceleration cycle.
Decel End Level (P17/CFN16) set too low.
Increase Decel End Level until
motor just stops at the end of the
deceleration cycle.
Water hammer still occurs at end of cycle.
Decel End Level (P17/CFN16) set too high.
Decrease Decel End Level until
water hammer is eliminated.
Decel Time (P18/CFN17) too short.
If possible, increase Decel Time to
decelerate system more gently.
Decel begin level to low.
Increase the Decel Begin Level until
drop in speed is eliminated.
Motor speed drops sharply before decel
8.3.5
Motor stops unexpectedly while running
Condition
Cause
Solution
Fault Displayed.
Fault Occurred.
See fault code troubleshooting table for
more details.
Ready Displayed.
Start command lost.
Verify start command input signal is
present or serial communications start
command is present.
Check any permissive that may be wired
into the run command. (Start/Stop)
Display Blank, Heartbeat LED on MX2
card not blinking.
Control voltage absent.
Check for proper control voltage input.
Verify wiring and fuses.
MX2 control card problem.
Consult factory.
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8 - TROUBLESHOOTING & MAINTENANCE
8.3.6
Metering incorrect
Condition
Cause
Solution
Power Metering not reading correctly.
CTs installed or wired incorrectly.
Verify correct CT wiring and verify that
the CTs are installed with all the White
dots towards the input line side.
CT1=L1 CT2=L2 CT3=L3
CT ratio parameter (P78/FUN03) set
incorrectly.
Verify that the CT ratio parameter is set
correctly.
PF Meter not reading correctly.
CTs installed or wired incorrectly.
Verify correct CT wiring and verify that
the CTs are installed with all the White
dots towards the input line side.
Motor Current or Voltage meters
fluctuating with steady load.
Energy Saver active.
Turn off Energy Saver if not desired.
Loose connections.
Shut off all power and check all
connections.
SCR fault.
Verify that the SCRs gate leads are
connected properly and the SCRs are
ok.
Load actually is not steady.
Verify that the load is actually steady
and that there are not mechanical issues.
Other equipment on same power feed
causing power fluctuations and/or
distortion.
Fix cause of power fluctuations and/or
distortion.
Voltage Metering not reading correctly.
In medium voltage systems, Rated
Voltage parameter (P76/FUN05) set
incorrectly.
Verify that Rated Voltage parameter is
set correctly.
Current Metering not reading correctly.
CT ratio parameter (P78/FUN03) set
incorrectly.
Verify that the CT ratio parameter is set
correctly.
CTs installed or wired incorrectly.
Verify correct CT wiring and verify that
the CTs are installed with all the White
dots towards the input line side.CT1=L1
CT2=L2 CT3=L3
CT ratio parameter (P78/FUN03) set
incorrectly.
Verify that the CT ratio parameter is set
correctly.
CTs installed or wired incorrectly.
Verify correct CT wiring and verify that
the CTs are installed with all the White
dots towards the input line side.CT1=L1
CT2=L2 CT3=L3
Ground Fault Current Metering not
reading correctly.
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8.3.7
Other Situations
Condition
Cause
Solution
Motor Rotates in Wrong Direction.
Phasing incorrect.
If input phasing correct, exchange any
two output wires.
If input phasing incorrect, exchange any
two input wires.
Erratic Operation.
Loose connections.
Shut off all power and check all
connections.
Motor Overheats.
Motor overloaded.
Reduce motor load.
Too many starts per hour.
Allow for adequate motor cooling
between starts. Set Hot/Cold ratio higher
or lengthen cooling time.
High ambient temperature.
Reduce ambient temperature or provide
for better cooling. Set OL class lower to
compensate for ambient temperature.
Acceleration time too long.
Reduce starting load and/or review
acceleration ramp settings.
Incorrect motor OL settings.
Review and correct motor OL settings.
Motor cooling obstructed/damaged.
Remove cooling air obstructions. Check
motor cooling fan.
Fan power supply lost.
Verify fan power supply, check fuses.
Fan wiring problem.
Check fan wiring.
Fan failure.
Replace fan.
Voltage/Current output switch(SWI-2)
not set correctly.
Set switch SW1 to give correct output.
Wiring problem.
Verify output wiring.
Analog Output Function parameter (P60/
I/O12) set incorrectly.
Verify that the Analog Output Function
parameter is set correctly.
Analog Output Offset and/or Span
parameters (P61/ I/O13 and P62/ I/O14)
set incorrectly.
Verify that the Analog Output Span and
Offset parameters are set correctly.
Load on analog output too high.
Verify that load on analog output meets
the MX2 analog output specifications.
Ground loop or noise problems.
Verify correct grounding of analog output
connection to prevent noise and/or ground
loops from affecting output.
Keypad cable not plugged in properly or
cable is damaged.
Verify that the remote keypad cable has
not been damaged and that it is properly
seated at both the keypad and the MX2
control card.
Remote display damaged.
Replace remote display.
Passcode is set.
Clear passcode.
Starter is running.
Stop starter.
Modbus is overriding.
Stop communications.
Heater Level (P73 / FUN08) parameter is
"On"
Turn Heater Level (P73 / FUN08)
parameter "Off"
Starter cooling fans do not operate.
(When Present)
Analog Output not functioning properly.
Remote Keypad does not operate
correctly.
Cannot change parameters.
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Fault Code Table
8.4
Fault Code Table
2
The following is a list of possible faults that can be generated by the MX starter control.
Fault Code
Description
Detailed Description of Fault / Possible Solutions
F01
UTS Time Limit Expired
Motor did not achieve full speed before the UTS timer (P9/QST09)
expired.
Check motor for jammed or overloaded condition.
Verify that the combined kick time (P14/CFN11) and acceleration
ramp time (P8/QST08) is shorter than the UTS timer setting.
Evaluate acceleration ramp settings. The acceleration ramp settings
may be too low to permit the motor to start and achieve full speed.
If so, revise acceleration ramp settings to provide more motor
torque during starting.
Evaluate UTS timer setting and, if acceptable, increase UTS timer
setting (P9/QST09).
F02
Motor Thermal Overload Trip
Check motor for mechanical failure, jammed, or overloaded
condition.
Verify the motor thermal overload parameter settings (P3/QST03
and P44-P47/PFN12-PFN16,) and motor service factor setting
(P2/QST02).
Verify that the motor FLA (P1/QST01) and CT ratio (P78/FUN03)
are correct.
If motor OL trip occurs during starting, review acceleration ramp
profile settings.
Verify that there is not an input line power quality problem or
excessive line distortion present.
F03
Slow Speed Timer Limit Expired
Increase Slow Speed Time Limit (P29/CFN23)
F10
Phase Rotation Error, not ABC
Input phase rotation is not ABC and Input Phase Sensitivity
parameter (P77/FUN04) is set to ABC only.
Verify correct phase rotation of input power. Correct wiring if
necessary.
Verify correct setting of Input Phase Sensitivity parameter
(P77/FUN04).
F11
Phase Rotation Error, not CBA
Input phase rotation is not CBA and Input Phase Sensitivity
parameter (P77/FUN04) is set to CBA only.
Verify correct phase rotation of input power. Correct wiring if
necessary.
Verify correct setting of Input Phase Sensitivity parameter
(P77/FUN04).
F12
Low Line Frequency
Line frequency below 23 Hz was detected.
Verify input line frequency.
If operating on a generator, check generator speed governor for
malfunctions.
Check input supply for open fuses or open connections.
Line power quality problem / excessive line distortion..
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Fault Code
Description
Detailed Description of Fault / Possible Solutions
F13
High Line Frequency
Line frequency above 72 Hz was detected.
Verify input line frequency.
If operating on a generator, check generator speed governor for
malfunctions.
Line power quality problem / excessive line distortion.
F14
Input power not single phase
Three-phase power has been detected when the starter is expecting
single-phase power.
Verify that input power is single phase.
Verify that single-phase power is connected to the L1 and L3
inputs. Correct wiring if necessary.
Verify that the SCR gate wires are properly connected to the MX2
control card.
F15
Input power not three phase
Single-phase power has been detected when the starter is expecting
three-phase power.
Verify that input power is three phase. Correct wiring if necessary.
Verify that the SCR gate wires are properly connected to the MX2
control card.
On medium voltage systems, verify wiring of the voltage feedback
measurement circuit.
F21
Low Line L1-L2
Low voltage below the Under voltage Trip Level parameter setting
(P39/PFN08) was detected for longer than the Over/Under Voltage
Trip delay time (P40/PFN09).
Verify that the actual input voltage level is correct.
Verify that the Rated Voltage parameter (P76/FUN05) is set
correctly.
Check input supply for open fuses or open connections.
On medium voltage systems, verify wiring of the voltage
measurement circuit.
F22
Low Line L2-L3
Low voltage below the Under voltage Trip Level parameter setting
(P39/PFN08) was detected for longer than the Over/Under Voltage
Trip delay time (P40/PFN09).
Verify that the actual input voltage level is correct.
Verify that the Rated Voltage parameter (P76/FUN05) is set
correctly.
Check input supply for open fuses or open connections.
On medium voltage systems, verify wiring of the voltage feedback
measurement circuit.
F23
Low Line L3-L1
Low voltage below the Under voltage Trip Level parameter setting
(P39/PFN08) was detected for longer than the Over/Under Voltage
Trip delay time (P40/PFN09).
Verify that the actual input voltage level is correct.
Verify that the Rated Voltage parameter (P76/FUN05) is set
correctly.
Check input supply for open fuses or open connections.
On medium voltage systems, verify wiring of the voltage feedback
measurement circuit.
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Fault Code
Description
Detailed Description of Fault / Possible Solutions
F24
High Line L1-L2
High voltage above the Over voltage Trip Level parameter setting
(P35/PFN07) was detected for longer than the Over/Under Voltage
Trip delay time (P40/PFN09).
Verify that the actual input voltage level is correct.
Verify that the Rated Voltage parameter (P76/FUN05) is set
correctly.
Line power quality problems/ excessive line distortions.
F25
High Line L2-L3
High voltage above the Over voltage Trip Level parameter setting
(P38/PFN07) was detected for longer than the Over/Under Voltage
Trip delay time (P40/PFN09).
Verify that the actual input voltage level is correct.
Verify that the Rated Voltage parameter (P76/FUN05) is set
correctly.
Line power quality problems/ excessive line distortions.
F26
High Line L3-L1
High voltage above the Over voltage Trip Level parameter setting
(P38/PFN07) was detected for longer than the Over/Under Voltage
Trip delay time (P40/PFN09).
Verify that the actual input voltage level is correct.
Verify that the Rated Voltage parameter (P76/FUN05) is set
correctly.
Line power quality problems/ excessive line distortions.
F27
Phase Loss
The MX2 has detected the loss of one or more input or output
phases when the starter was running. Can also be caused by line
power dropouts.
Check input supply for open fuses.
Check power supply wiring for open or intermittent connections.
Check motor wiring for open or intermittent connections.
On medium voltage systems, verify wiring of the voltage feedback
measurement circuit.
Check Gate and Cathode connections to MX2 card.
F28
No Line
No input voltage was detected for longer than the Inline
Configuration time delay parameter setting (P63/ I/O16) when a
start command was given to the starter.
If an inline contactor is being used, verify that the setting of the
Inline Configuration time delay parameter (P53/ I/O16) allows
enough time for the inline contactor to completely close.
Check input supply for open disconnects, open fuses, open circuit
breakers or disconnected wiring.
Verify that the SCR gate wires are properly connected to the MX2
control card.
On medium voltage systems, verify wiring of the voltage feedback
measurement circuit.
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Fault Code
Description
Detailed Description of Fault / Possible Solutions
F30
I.O.C.
(Instantaneous Over current)
During operation, the MX2 detected a very high level of current in
one or more phases.
Check motor wiring for short circuits or ground faults.
Check motor for short circuits or ground faults.
Check if power factor or surge capacitors are installed on the motor
side of the starter.
Verify that the motor FLA (P1/QST01) and CT ratio (P78/FUN03)
settings are correct.
F31
Overcurrent
Motor current exceeded the Over Current Trip Level setting
(P32/PFN01) for longer than the Over Current Trip Delay Time
setting (P33/PFN02).
Check motor for a jammed or an overload condition.
F34
Undercurrent
Motor current dropped under the Under Current Trip Level setting
(P26/PFN03) for longer than the Under Current Trip Delay time
setting (P27/PFN04).
Check system for cause of under current condition.
F37
Current Imbalance
A current imbalance larger than the Current Imbalance Trip Level
parameter setting (P36/PFN05) was present for longer than ten (10)
seconds.
Check motor wiring for cause of imbalance. (Verify dual voltage
and 6 lead motors for correct wiring configuration).
Check for large input voltage imbalances that can result in large
current imbalances.
Check motor for internal problems.
F38
Ground Fault
Ground current above the Ground Fault Trip level setting
(P37/PFN06) has been detected for longer than 3 seconds.
Check motor wiring for ground faults.
Check motor for ground faults.
Megger motor and cabling (disconnect from starter before testing).
Verify that the motor FLA (P1/QST01) and CT ratio (P78/FUN03)
settings are correct.
Verify that the CTs are installed with all the White dots towards the
input line.
In Single phase applications, verify that only two CTs are being
used; that they are installed with all the White dots or Xs in the
correct direction; and that the CTs are connected to the L1 and L3
CT inputs on the MX2 control card.
F39
No Current at Run
Motor current went below 10% of FLA while the starter was
running.
Verify Motor Connections.
Verify the CT wiring to the MX2control card.
Verify that the motor FLA (P1/QST01) and CT ratio (P78.FUN03)
settings are correct.
Check if load is still connected to starter.
Check if motor may have been driven by the load (a regeneration
condition).
Check Gate and Cathode connections to MX2 for loose connections.
Check for inline contactor or disconnect.
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Fault Code
Description
Detailed Description of Fault / Possible Solutions
F40
Shorted / Open SCR
A shorted or open SCR condition has been detected.
Verify that all SCR gate leads wires are properly connected at the
SCR devices and the MX2 control card.
Check all SCRs with ohmmeter for shorts.
Verify that the Input Phase Sensitivity parameter setting
(P77/FUN04) is correct.
Verify that the Starter Type parameter setting (P74/FUN07) is
correct.
Verify the motor wiring. (Verify dual voltage motors for correct
wiring configuration).
F41
Current at Stop
Motor current was detected while the starter was not running.
Examine starter for shorted SCRs.
Examine bypass contactor (if present) to verify that it is open when
starter is stopped.
Verify that the motor FLA (P1/QST01) and CT ratio (P78/FUN03)
settings are correct.
F46
Disconnect Fault
A signal on the disconnect digital input was not present when a start
was commanded.
Verify that disconnect feedback wiring is correct.
Verify that the disconnect is not faulty.
F47
Stack Protection Fault (stack thermal
overload)
The MX2 electronic power stack OL protection has detected an
overload condition.
Check motor for jammed or overloaded condition.
Verify that the CT ratio (P78/FUN03) and burden switch settings
are correct.
Motor load exceeds power stack rating. Consult factory
F48
Bypass /2M Contactor Fault
An incorrect bypass feedback has been detected for longer than the
Bypass Confirm time parameter setting (P64/ I/O17).
Verify that the bypass/2M contactor coil and feedback wiring is
correct.
Verify that the relay connected to the bypass/2M contactor(s) is
programmed as the UTS function.
Verify that the bypass/2M contactor power supply is present.
Verify that the appropriate Digital Input Configuration parameter
has been programmed correctly.
Verify that the bypass contactor(s) are not damaged or faulty.
F49
Inline Contactor Fault
Verify that the appropriate Digital Input Configuration parameter
has been programmed correctly.
Verify that the inline contactor(s) are actually not damaged or
faulty.
F50
Control Power Low
Low control power (below 90V) has been detected while running.
Verify that the control power input level is correct, especially
during starting when there may be significant line voltage drop.
Check control power transformer tap setting (if available).
Check control power transformer fuses (if present).
Check wiring between control power source and starter.
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Fault Code
Description
Detailed Description of Fault / Possible Solutions
F51
Current Sensor Offset Error
Indicates that the MX2 control card self-diagnostics have detected a
problem with one or more of the current sensor inputs.
Verify that the motor FLA (P1/QST01), CT ratio (P78/FUN03) and
burden switch settings are correct.
Verify that no actual current is flowing through any of the starter’s
CTs when the starter is not running.
Consult factory if fault persists.
F54
BIST Fault
The starter has detected a voltage or a current. Remove line power
from input of starter. Disconnect must be open.
F55
BIST CT Fault
Verify CT location, CT1 on L1, CT2 on L2, CT3 on L3. or CTs
are connected backwards (the polarity dot must be facing the supply
line).
F60
External Fault on DI#1 Input
DI#1 has been programmed as a fault type digital input and the
input indicates a fault condition is present.
Verify that the appropriate Digital Input Configuration parameter
has been programmed correctly.
Verify wiring and level of input.
F61
External Fault on DI#2 Input
DI#2 has been programmed as a fault type digital input and input
indicates a fault condition is present.
Verify that the appropriate Digital Input Configuration parameter
has been programmed correctly.
Verify wiring and level of input.
F62
External Fault on DI#3 input
DI#3 input has been programmed as a fault type digital input and
input indicates a fault condition is present.
Verify that the appropriate Digital Input Configuration parameter
has been programmed correctly.
Verify wiring and level of input.
F71
Analog Input Level Fault Trip
Based on the Analog Input parameter settings, the analog input
level has either exceeded or dropped below the Analog Input Trip
Level setting (P56/ I/O 09) for longer than the Analog Input Trip
Delay time (P57/ I/O 010).
Measure value of analog input to verify correct reading.
Verify settings of all Analog Input parameters
(P55-P59/ I/O 08- I/O 12).
Verify correct positioning of input switch (SW1)
(Voltage or Current) on the MX2 control card.
Verify correct grounding of analog input connection to prevent
noise or ground loops from affecting input.
F81
Keypad Communication Fault
Indicates that communication has been lost with the remote keypad.
(This fault normally occurs if the remote keypad is disconnected
while the MX2 control card is powered up. Only connect and
disconnect a remote keypad when the control power is off).
Verify that the remote keypad cable has not been damaged and that
its connectors are firmly seated at both the keypad and the MX2
control card.
Verify that the display interface card (when present) is firmly
attached to MX2 control card.
Route keypad cables away from high power and/or high noise areas
to reduce possible electrical noise pickup.
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F82
Modbus Timeout Fault
Indicates that the starter has lost serial communications. Fault
occurs when the starter has not received a valid serial
communications within the Communication Timeout
parameter (FUN12) defined time.
Verify communication parameter settings (FUN 10 - FUN13).
Check wiring between the remote network and the MX2
control card.
Examine remote system for cause of communication loss
F94
CPU Error - SW Fault
Typically occurs when attempting to run a version of control
software that is incompatible with the MX2 control card
hardware being used. Verify that the software is a correct
version for the MX2 control card being used. Consult factory
for more details.
Fault can also occur if the MX2 control has detected an
internal software problem. Replace card.
F95
CPU Error - Parameter EEPROM
Checksum Fault
The MX2 found the non-volatile parameter values to be
corrupted. Typically occurs when the MX2 is re-flashed with
new software.
Perform a Factory Parameter reset (FUN 15) and then
properly set all parameters before resuming normal operation.
If fault persists after performing a Factory Parameter reset,
replace card.
F96
CPU Error
The MX3 has detected an internal CPU problem. Replace
card.
F97
CPU Error – SW Watchdog Fault
The MX3 has detected an internal software problem. Replace
card.
F98
CPU Error
The MX3 has detected an internal CPU problem. Replace
card.
F99
CPU Error - Program EPROM
Checksum Fault
The non-volatile program memory has been corrupted.
Replace card. Control software must be reloaded in to MX2
control card before normal operation can resume.
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SCR Testing
8.5
SCR Testing
8.5.1
Resistance
The SCRs in the starter can be checked with a standard ohmmeter to determine their condition.
Remove power from the starter before performing these checks.
Ÿ Check from L to T on each phase. The resistance should be over 50k ohms.
Ÿ Check between the gate leads for each SCR (red and white twisted pair).
The resistance should be from 8 to 50 ohms.
z NOTE: The resistance measurements may not be within these values and the SCR may still be good. The checks are to determine if
an SCR is shorted "L" to "T" of if the gate in an SCR is shorted or open. An SCR could also still be damaged even though the
measurements are within the above specifications.
8.5.2
Voltage
When the starter is running, the operation of the SCRs can be confirmed with a voltmeter.
Extreme caution must be observed while performing these checks since the starter has lethal voltages applied while operating.
While the starter is running and up to speed, use an AC voltmeter, check the voltage from "L" to "T" of each phase. The voltage should
be less than 1.5 Volts. If the starter has a bypass contactor, the voltage drop should be less than 0.3 volts.
Using a DC voltmeter, check between the gate leads for each SCR (red and white twisted pair). The voltage should between 0.5 and 2.0
volts.
8.5.3
Integral Bypass
A voltage check from "L" to "T" of each phase of the RediStart starter should be preformed every 6 months to confirm the bypass
contactors are operating correctly.
Extreme caution must be observed while performing these checks since the starter has lethal voltages applied while operating.
While the starter is running and Up to Speed, use an AC voltmeter; check the voltage from "L" to "T" of each phase. The voltage drop
across the contactor contacts should be less than 300mV. If greater that 300mV the integral bypass should be disassembled. It may be
necessary to clean the contact tips or replace the contactor.
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Built-In Self Test Functions
8.6
Built In Self Test Functions
2
The MX has two built in self test (BIST) modes. The first test is the standard self test and is used to test many of the basic functions of
the starter without line voltage being applied. The second test is a line powered test that is used to verify the current transformer’s
locations and connections and to test for shorted SCRs/power poles, open or non-firing SCRs/power poles, and ground fault conditions.
8.6.1
Standard BIST Tests:
(P67 / #7) / FUN 15 - Std BIST
The standard BIST tests are designed to be run with no line voltage applied to the starter. In selected low voltage systems where a
disconnect switch is used, the Disconnect Switch must be opened before starting the standard tests. Standard BIST mode can be initiated
by entering the appropriate value into P67 or FUN 15 - Misc Command user parameter.
CAUTION: In order to prevent back feeding of voltage through the control power transformer (if used), control power must be
2
carefully applied to the MX control card and contactors so that self testing can occur safely. In low voltage applications, the user
must verify that the applied test control power cannot be fed backwards through the system. “Run/Test” isolation switches, test
power plugs, and wiring diagrams are available from Benshaw.
CAUTION: In low voltage systems with an inline/isolation contactor. Before the inline test is performed verify that no line voltage
is applied to the line side of the inline contactor. Otherwise when the inline test is performed the inline contactor will be energized,
applying line voltage to the starter, and a BIST test fault will occur.
The standard BIST tests comprise of:
Programming / Test Instructions:
Step 1
LED Display
Go to P67 and press [ENTER].
Press [UP] button to #1 and press [ENTER].
Powered BIST test will commence.
LCD Display
Go to FUN 15- misc commands and press [ENTER].
Increment up to "Std BIST" and press [ENTER].
Std BIST test will commence.
FUN: Misc Command
15 Std BIST
z NOTE: Designed to run with no line voltage applied to starter.
Step 2– RUN relay test and Inline Feedback Test:
In this test, the RUN assigned relays are cycled on and off once and the feedback from an inline contactor is verified. In order to have a
valid inline contactor feedback, a digital input needs to be set to Inline Confirm and the input needs to be wired to an auxiliary contact
of the inline contactor. The feedback is checked in both the open and closed state. If the feedback does not match the state of the RUN
relay within the amount of time set by the Inline Config parameter an “Inline” fault will occur.
z NOTE: If no digital input is assigned as an Inline Confirm input this test will always pass.
z NOTE: If the Inline Config (I/O 16) parameter on page 118 is set to "Off" this test will be skipped.
LED Display
b ic (inline closed)
b io (inline open)
LCD Display (BIST Mode)
Inline Closed
Inline Open
BIST Mode
Inline Closed
BIST Mode
Inline Open
Step 3– UTS relay test and Bypass Feedback Test:
In this test, the dedicated bypass relay (if assigned) and the UTS assigned relays are cycled on and off once, and the feedback from a
bypass contactor is verified. In order to have a valid bypass contactor feedback, the individual bypass input and any other inputs set to
Bypass Confirm input needs to be wired to an auxiliary contact of the bypass contactor. The feedback is checked in both the open and
closed state. If the feedback does not match the state of the UTS relay within the amount of time set by the Bypass Feedback parameter
a “Bypass/2M Fault” will occur.
188
8 - TROUBLESHOOTING & MAINTENANCE
z NOTE: If one dedicated bypass is set to "fan" and if no digital input are assigned as a Bypass Confirm input, this test will always
pass.
LED Display
b bc (bypass closed)
b bo (bypass open)
LCD Display (BIST Mode)
Bypass Closed
Bypass Open
BIST Mode
Bypass Closed
BIST Mode
Bypass Open
Step 4– Sequential SCR gate firing (L1+, L1-, L2+, L2-, L3+, L3-):
In this test the SCR gate outputs are sequentially fired starting with the L1+ device(s) and ending with the L3- device(s). This test can
be used to verify that the SCR gate leads are connected properly. In LV systems, the gate voltage can be verified using a DC voltage
meter or oscilloscope. The voltage on each red and white wire pair should be between 0.5VDC and 2.0VDC.
LED Display
b 96 (gate 6 on)
b 93 (gate 3 on)
b 95 (gate 5 on)
b 92 (gate 2 on)
b 94 (gate 4 on)
b 91 (gate 1 on)
LCD Display (BIST Mode)
Gate 6 On
Gate 3 On
Gate 5 On
Gate 2 On
Gate 4 On
Gate 1 On
BIST Mode
Gate G ? On
Step 5– Simultaneous SCR gate firing:
In this test the SCR gate outputs are simultaneously fired (all gates on). This test can be used to verify that the SCR gate leads are
connected properly. The gate voltage can be verified using a DC voltage meter or oscilloscope. The voltage on each red and white wire
pair should be between 0.5VDC and 2.0VDC.
Pressing [ENTER] on the keypad at any time will abort the current test in progress and proceed to the next BIST test.
2
During the standard BIST tests if line voltage or phase current is detected, the MX will immediately exit BIST mode and declare a
“BIST Abnormal Exit” fault.
LED Display
b 9A (all gates on)
LCD Display
All Gates On
BIST Mode
All gates on
Step 6
LED Display
b-- (tests completed)
LCD Display
Tests completed
BIST Mode
Tests completed
8.6.2
Powered BIST Tests:
(P67 / #8) / FUN 15 - Powered BIST
The powered BIST tests are designed to be run with normal line voltage applied to the starter and a motor connected. Powered BIST
verifies that the power poles are good, no ground faults exist, CTs are connected and positioned correctly and that the motor is
connected. Powered BIST mode can be entered by entering the appropriate value into the FUN 15- Miscellaneous Command user
parameter.
z NOTE: The powered BIST test is only for use with SCR based reduced voltage soft starters. Powered BIST can not be used with
wye-delta or ATL types of starters.
189
8 - TROUBLESHOOTING & MAINTENANCE
z NOTE: The motor wiring MUST be fully connected before starting the powered BIST tests. Also the motor must be at rest
(stopped). Otherwise the powered BIST tests will not function correctly.
2
z NOTE: Before using the powered BIST test function, the following MX user parameters MUST be set for correct operation of the
powered BIST test: Motor FLA (P1 / QST 01), CT Ratio (P78 / FUN 03), Phase Order (P77 / FUN 04), Rated Voltage (P76 / FUN 05),
and Starter Type (P74 / FUN 07).
The powered BIST tests comprise of:
Programming / Test Instructions:
Step 1
LED Display
Go to P67 and press [ENTER].
Press [UP] button to #2 and press [ENTER].
Powered BIST test will commence.
LCD Display
Go to FUN 15 and press [ENTER].
Increment up to "Powered BIST" and press [ENTER].
Powered BIST test will commence.
FUN: Misc Command
15 Powered BIST
Step 2– Shorted SCR and Ground Fault Test:
2
In this test each power pole is energized individually. If current flow is detected, the MX controller attempts to differentiate whether it
is a shorted SCR/shorted power pole condition or a ground fault condition and either a “Bad SCR Fault” or “Ground Fault” will occur.
LED Display
b 59 -(Gating individual SCRs)
LCD Display (BIST Mode)
Shorted SCR / GF
BIST Mode
Shorted SCR/GF
Step 3– Open SCR and Current Transformer (CT) Test:
In this test, a low-level closed-loop controlled current is selectively applied to various motor phases to verify that the motor is
connected, all SCRs are turning on properly, and that the CTs are wired and positioned properly. If current is detected on the wrong
phase then a “BIST CT Fault” fault will be declared. If an open motor lead, open SCR, or non-firing SCR is detected then a “Bad SCR
Fault” will occur.
z NOTE: When this test is in progress 6 audible humming or buzzing sounds will be heard from the motor.
LED Display
b oc
LCD Display (BIST Mode)
Open SCR / CTs
BIST Mode
Open SCR/CTs
Step 4
LED Display
b-- (tests completed)
LCD Display
Tests completed.
BIST Mode
Tests completed
Pressing [ENTER] on the keypad at any time will abort the current test in progress and proceed to the next BIST test.
z NOTE: If line voltage is lost during the powered tests a “BIST Abnormal Exit” fault will occur.
z NOTE: The powered BIST tests will verify that the input phase order is correct. If the measured phase order is not the same as the
“Phase Order” (FUN 04) parameter a phase order fault will occur.
190
8 - TROUBLESHOOTING & MAINTENANCE
SCR Replacement
8.7
SCR Replacement
This section is to help with SCR replacements on stack assemblies. Please read prior to installation.
8.7.1
8.7.2
Typical Stack Assembly
SCR Removal
To remove the SCR from the heatsink, loosen the two bolts (3) on the loader bar side of the clamp. Do not turn on the nuts (5). The nuts
have a locking ridge that sink into the aluminum heatsink. Do ¼ turns until the SCR comes loose. Remove the SCRs from the heatsink.
z NOTE: Do not loosen nut on indicator washer (6). This will change the clamping pressure of the clamp and the clamp will be
defective.
8.7.3
SCR Installation
•
•
•
Coat the faces of the SCRs to be installed with a thin layer of EJC (Electrical Joint Compound).
Place the SCRs onto the dowel pins. The top SCR will have the cathode to the left and the bottom SCR will have the cathode to the
right. The SCR symbol has a triangle that points to the cathode.
Finger tighten nuts on the bolts.
191
8 - TROUBLESHOOTING & MAINTENANCE
8.7.4
SCR Clamp
Below is an exploded view of a typical SCR clamp. Refer to the Clamp Parts List below for names of the parts being used.
SCR CLAMP PARTS
8.7.5
Item #
Quantity
Description
1
1
Loader Bar
2
2
Insulator cup
3
2
Bolt
4
2
Washer
5
2
6
1 or 2
Serrated nut (larger style clamp has 1
support bar)
Indicator Washer – Quantity dependant
on style of clamp
Tightening Clamp
Finger tighten the clamp. Ensure both bolts are tightened an equal amount so that the loader bar (item 1) is square in the heatsink.
Tighten the bolts equally in 1/8 turn increments until the indicator washer(s) (item 6), which are under the nut(s) in the center of the
loader bar, becomes loose indicating the clamp is tight. On the loader bars with two indicator washers, it may be necessary to tighten or
loosen one side of the clamp to get both indicator washers free.
8.7.6
Testing SCR
After the SCRs have been replaced, conduct the resistance test as defined in section 8.5.
192
Appendices
APPENDIX A - ALARM CODES
ALARM CODES
APPENDIX A
Alarm Codes
2
The following is a list of all MX alarm codes. The alarm codes correspond to associate fault codes. In general, an alarm indicates a
condition that if continued, will result in the associated fault.
194
Alarm
Code
Description
A02
Motor Overload Alarm
A10
Phase Rotation not ABC
A11
Phase Rotation not CBA
A12
Low Line Frequency
A13
High Line Frequency
A14
Input power not single phase
A15
Input power not three phase
A21
Low Line L1-L2
A22
Low Line L2-L3
A23
Low Line L3-L1
A24
High Line L1-L2
A25
High Line L2-L3
A26
High Line L3-L1
A27
Phase Loss
A28
No Line
A31
Overcurrent
A34
Undercurrent
A37
Current Imbalance
Notes
This occurs when the motor thermal content reaches the
90%. The MX2 trips when it reaches 100%. The alarm
continues until the overload trip lockout is reset.
This alarm exists while the MX2 is stopped, line voltage is
detected and phase sensitivity parameter is set to ABC. If a
start is commanded, a Fault 10 occurs.
This alarm exists while the MX2 is stopped, line voltage is
detected and phase sensitivity parameter is set to CBA. If a
start is commanded, a Fault 11 occurs.
This alarm exists when the MX2 has detected a line
frequency below the user defined low line frequency level.
The alarm continues until either the line frequency changes
to be in range or the fault delay timer expires.
This alarm exists when the MX2 has detected a line
frequency above the user defined high line frequency level.
The alarm continues until either the line frequency changes
to a valid frequency or the fault delay timer expires.
This alarm exists while the MX2 is stopped, set to single
phase mode, and line voltage is detected that is not single
phase. If a start is commanded, a Fault 14 occurs.
This alarm exists while the MX2 is stopped, set to a
three-phase mode, and single-phase line voltage is
detected. If a start is commanded, a Fault 15 occurs.
This alarm exists while the MX2 is stopped and low line
voltage is detected. If a start is commanded, a Fault 21
may occur.
This alarm exists while the MX2 is stopped and low line
voltage is detected. If a start is commanded, a Fault 22
may occur.
This alarm exists while the MX2 is stopped and low line
voltage is detected. If a start is commanded, a Fault 23
may occur.
This alarm exists while the MX2 is stopped and high line
voltage is detected. If a start is commanded, a Fault 24
may occur.
This alarm exists while the MX2 is stopped and high line
voltage is detected. If a start is commanded, a Fault 25
may occur.
This alarm exists while the MX2 is stopped and high line
voltage is detected. If a start is commanded, a Fault 26
may occur.
This alarm exists while the MX2 is running and a phase
loss condition is detected, but the delay for the fault has not
yet expired. When the delay expires, a Fault 27 occurs.
This alarm exists while the MX2 needs to be synchronized
or is trying to sync to the line and no line is detected.
This alarm exists while the MX2 is running and the average
current is above the defined threshold, but the delay for the
fault has not yet expired. When the delay expires, a Fault
31 occurs.
This alarm exists while the MX2 is running and the average
current is below the defined threshold, but the delay for the
fault has not yet expired. When the delay expires, a Fault
34 occurs.
This alarm exists while the MX2 is running and a current
imbalance above the defined threshold is detected, but the
delay for the fault has not yet expired. When the delay
expires, a Fault 37 occurs.
APPENDIX A - ALARM CODES
Alarm
Code
Description
A38
Ground Fault
A47
A60
A61
A62
Stack Over temperature Alarm
External Alarm on DI 1 Input
External Alarm on DI 2 Input
External Alarm on DI 3 Input
A71
Analog Input Level Trip Alarm
Notes
This alarm exists while the MX2 is running and a ground
current above the defined threshold is detected, but the
delay for the fault has not yet expired. When the delay
expires, a Fault 38 occurs.
This occurs when the stack thermal rises above 105%.
This occurs when a digital input is in its fault state but
before the fault state has expired.
This alarm exists if the analog input exceeds the defined
threshold, but the delay for the fault has not yet expired.
When the delay expires, a Fault 71 occurs.
195
APPENDIX B - FAULT CODES
FAULT CODES
APPENDIX B
Fault Codes
Fault Code
F00
F01
F02
F03
F10
F11
F12
F13
F14
F15
F21
F22
F23
F24
F25
F26
F27
F28
F30
F31
F34
F37
F38
F39
F40
F41
F46
F47
F48
F49
F50
F51
F54
F55
F60
F61
F62
F71
F81
F82
F94
F95
F96
F97
F98
F99
196
Description
No fault
UTS Time Limit Expired
Motor Thermal Overload Trip
Slow Speed Time Limit Expired
Phase Rotation Error, not ABC
Phase Rotation Error, not CBA
Low Line Frequency
High Line Frequency
Input power not single phase
Input power not three phase
Low Line L1-L2
Low Line L2-L3
Low Line L3-L1
High Line L1-L2
High Line L2-L3
High Line L3-L1
Phase Loss
No Line
I.O.C.
Overcurrent
Undercurrent
Current Imbalance
Ground Fault
No Current at Run
Shorted / Open SCR
Current at Stop
Disconnect Fault
Stack Protection Fault (stack thermal overload)
Bypass/2M Contactor Fault
Inline Contactor Fault
Control Power Low
Current Sensor Offset Error
BIST Fault
BIST CT Fault
External Fault on DI 1 Input
External Fault on DI 2 Input
External Fault on DI 3 Input
Analog Input #1 Level Fault Trip
Keypad Communication Fault
Modbus Timeout Fault
CPU Error – SW fault
CPU Error – Parameter EEPROM Checksum Fault
CPU Error
CPU Error - SW Watchdog
CPU Error
CPU Error – Program EPROM Checksum Fault
Controlled Fault Stop
Y
Y
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
N
N
N
Y
Y
Y
N
N
N
N
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
Y
Y
Y
N
N
N
N
N
N
Shunt Trip Fault
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
Y
N
N
N
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
N
N
N
N
Y
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
N
Y
Y
N
N
Auto-Reset Allowed
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
N
N
N
Y
N
N
Y
N
N
N
Y
Y
Y
Y
N
Y
N
N
N
N
N
N
APPENDIX C - SPARE PARTS
SPARE PARTS
APPENDIX C
Options and Accessories
Description
Part Number
Size
1)
LCD Display (small)
KPMX3SLCD
H=63mm (2.48"), W=101mm (4")
2)
LCD Display (large)
KPMX3LLCD
H=77mm (3.03"), W=127mm (5")
3)
LCD display cable
RI-100008-00
RI-100009-00
3' or 1 meter
6' or 2 meter
4)
Communication Modules
-consult factory
Spare Parts
Description
1)
Part Number
Size
small = KPMX3SLCD
H=63mm (2.48"), W=101mm (4")
large = KPMX3LLCD
H=77mm (3.03"), W=127mm (5")
short = RI-100008-00
long = RI-100009-00
3' or 1m
6' or 2m
LCD Display
2)
LCD Display Cable
3)
Cooling Fans
4)
Stack O/T Switch
5)
Current Transformer (CTs)
CT288:1
CT864:1
CT2640:1
CT5760:1
6)
MX2 card
PC-300055-01-05
7)
DV/DT Board
PC-300048-01-02
8)
Control Power Transformers VA & Voltage specific
9)
Quantity
SCRs
10) Contactors
4" – 6"
3
288:1
864:1
2640:1
5760:1
3
BISCR5016x
BISCR10016x
BISCR13216x
BISCR16116x
BISCR25016x
3 / Starter
BISCR66018x
BISCR88018x
BISCR150018x
6 / Starter
RSC-9-6AC120
RSC-12-6AC120
RSC-18-6AC120
RSC-22-6AC120
RSC-32-6AC120
RSC-40-6AC120
RSC-50-6AC120
RSC-75-6AC120
RSC-85-6AC120
RSC-85/4-6AC-120
RSC-100-4120
RSC-125-4120
RSC-150-4120
RSC-180-4120
RSC-220-4120
RSC-300-4120
RSC-400-4120
RSC-600-4120
RSC-800-4120
APPENDIX D
197
APPENDIX D - EU DECLARATION OF CONFORMITY
EU DECLARATION OF CONFORMITY
EU Declaration of Conformity
According to the EMC – Directive 89/336/EEC as Amended by 92/31/EEC and 93/68/EEC
Product Category:
Motor Controller
Product Type:
Reduced Voltage Solid State Motor Controller
Model Number:
RB2-1-S-027A-11C
RB2-1-S-040A-11C
RB2-1-S-052A-12C
RB2-1-S-096A-13C
RB2-1-S-125A-14C
RB2-1-S-156A-14C
RB2-1-S-240A-15C
RB2-1-S-302A-15C
RB2-1-S-361A-16C
RB2-1-S-515A-17C
RB2-1-S-590A-18C
RB2-1-S-720A-19C
RB2-1-S-065A-12C
RB2-1-S-077A-13C
RB2-1-S-180A-14C
RB2-1-S-414A-17C
RB2-1-S-838A-20C
RB2-1-S-180A-15C
RB2-1-S-477A-17C
RC2-1-S-096A-13C
RC2-1-S-125A-14C
RC2-1-S-156A-14C
RC2-1-S-180A-14C
RC2-1-S-180A-15C
RC2-1-S-240A-15C
RC2-1-S-302A-15C
RC2-1-S-361A-16C
RC2-1-S-414A-17C
RC2-1-S-477A-17C
RC2-1-S-515A-17C
RC2-1-S-590A-18C
RC2-1-S-720A-19C
RC2-1-S-838A-20C
Manufacturer's Name:
Benshaw, Inc.
Manufacturer's Address:
1659 East Sutter Road
Glenshaw, PA 15116
United States of America
The before mentioned products comply with the following EU directives and Standards:
Safety:
UL 508 Standard for Industrial Control Equipment covering devices for starting, stopping,
regulating, controlling, or protecting electric motors with ratings of 1500 volts or less.
Electromagnetic Compatibility:
EN 50081-2 Emissions Radiated/Conducted
EN 55011/05.98+A1:1999
EN 50082-2 Immunity/Susceptibility which includes:
EN 61000-4-2 Electrostatic Discharge
EN 61000-4-3 Radiated RF
EN 61000-4-4 Electrical Fast Transient/Burst
EN 61000-4-6 Injected Currents
The products referenced above are for the use of control of the speed of AC motors. The use in residential and commercial premises
(Class B) requires an optional EMC series filter. Via internal mechanisms and Quality Control, it is verified that these products conform
to the requirements of the Directive and applicable standards.
Glenshaw, PA USA - 1 December 2006
Neil Abrams
Quality Control
Manager
198
APPENDIX E - MODBUS REGISTER MAP
MODBUS
APPENDIX
REGISTER
E MAP
Modbus Register Map
Following is the Modbus Register Map. Note that all information may be accessed either through the Input registers (30000 addresses)
or through the Holding registers (40000 addresses).
Absolute Register Address Description
30020/40020
Starter Control
30021/40021
Starter Status
30022/40022
Input Status
30023/40023
Alarm Status 1
30024/40024
Alarm Status 2
30025/40025
Alarm Status 3
Range
Bit Mask:
Bit 0: Run/Stop
Bit 1: Fault Reset
Bit 2: Emergency Overload Reset
Bit 3: Local/Remote
Bit 4: Heat Disable
Bit 5: Ramp Select
Bit 10: Reserved (Relay 6)
Bit 11: Reserved (Relay 5)
Bit 12: Reserved (Relay 4)
Bit 13: Relay 3
Bit 14: Relay 2
Bit 15: Relay 1
Bit Mask:
Bit 0: Ready
Bit 1: Running
Bit 2: UTS
Bit 3: Alarm
Bit 4: Fault
Bit 5: Lockout
Bit Mask:
Bit 0: Start
Bit 1: DI 1
Bit 2: DI 2
Bit 3: DI 3
Bit Mask:
Bit 0: “A OL” – Motor overload
Bit 1: "A 5" – Reserved (Motor PTC)
Bit 2: "A 6" – Reserved (Stator RTD)
Bit 3: "A 7" – Reserved (Bearing RTD)
Bit 4: "A 8" – Reserved (Other RTD)
Bit 5: “A 10” – Phase rotation not ABC
Bit 6: “A 11” – Phase rotation not CBA
Bit 7: “A 12” – Low Line Frequency
Bit 8: “A 13” – High Line Frequency
Bit 9: “A 14” – Phase rotation not 1PH
Bit 10: “A 15” – Phase rotation not 3PH
Bit 11: “A 21” – Low line L1-L2
Bit 12: “A 22” – Low line L2-L3
Bit 13: “A 23” – Low line L3-L1
Bit 14: “A 24” – High line L1-L2
Bit 15: “A 25” – High line L2-L3
Bit 0: “A 26” – High line L3-L1
Bit 1: “A 27” – Phase loss
Bit 2: “noL” – No line
Bit 3: “A 29” – PORT Timeout (reserved)
Bit 4: “A 31” – Overcurrent
Bit 5: “A 34” – Undercurrent
Bit 6: “A 35” – PF Too Leading (reserved)
Bit 7: “A 36” – PF Too Lagging (reserved)
Bit 8: “A 37” – Current imbalance
Bit 9: “A 38” – Ground fault
Bit 10: “A 47” – Stack overtemperature
Bit 11: “A 53” – Tach Loss (reserved)
Bit 12: “A 60” – DI 1
Bit 13: “A 61” – DI 2
Bit 14: “A 62” – DI 3
Bit 15: "A 63"– Reserved (DI 4)
Bit 0: "A 64" – Reserved (DI 5)
Bit 1: "A 65" – Reserved (DI 6)
Bit 2: "A 66" – Reserved (DI 7)
Bit 3: "A 67" – Reserved (DI 8)
Bit 4: "A 71" – Analog Input #1 Trip
Units
-
-
-
-
-
-
199
APPENDIX E - MODBUS REGISTER MAP
Absolute Register Address Description
Range
Bit 0:
Bit 1:
Bit 2:
Bit 3:
Bit 4:
Bit 5:
Bit 6:
Bit 7:
Bit 8:
Bit 9:
Bit 10:
Bit 11:
Bit 12:
Bit 13
Units
“L OL” – Motor overload
– Reserved - (Motor PTC)
– Reserved - (RTD Stator)
– Reserved - (RTD Bearing)
– Reserved - (RTD Other)
"L rI" – Run Interlock
"L dS" – Disconnect open
"L Ot" – Stack overtemperature
"L CP" – Control Power
Reserved – (RTD Open/Short)
Reserved – (Time between starts)
Reserved – (Backspin)
Reserved – (Starts per hour)
Reserved – (RTD Comm Loss)
30026/40026
Lockout Status
-
30027/40027
30028/40028
30029/40029
Present Fault Code
Average Current
L1 Current
Arms
Arms
30030/40030
30031/40031
30032/40032
30033/40033
30034/40034
30035/40035
30036/40036
30037/40037
30038/40038
30039/40039
L2 Current
Arms
L3 Current
Current Imbalance
Residual Ground Fault Current
Reserved
Average Voltage
L1-L2 Voltage
L2-L3 Voltage
L3-L1 Voltage
Motor Overload
Arms
0.1 %
% FLA
Vrms
Vrms
Vrms
Vrms
%
30040/40040
Power Factor
30041/40041
30042/40042
30043/40043
30044/40044
30045/40045
30046/40046
30047/40047
30048/40048
Watts (lower 16 bits)
Watts (upper 16 bits)
VA (lower 16 bits)
VA (upper 16 bits)
vars (lower 16 bits)
vars (upper 16 bits)
kW hours (lower 16 bits)
kW hours (upper16 bits)
30049/40049
Phase Order
30050/40050
Line Frequency
30051/40051
Analog Input %
30052/40052
30053/40053
-99 to +100
(in 16-bit two’s compliment signed format)
0.01
(in 32-bit unsigned integer format)
W
(in 32-bit unsigned integer format)
VA
(in 32-bit two’s compliment signed integer
format)
var
(in 32-bit unsigned integer format)
kWh
0:
1:
2:
3:
no line
ABC
CBA
SPH
-
230 – 720, or 0 if no line
-1000 to +1000
(in 16-bit two’s compliment signed format)
0.1 Hz
Analog Output %
0 – 1000
0.1 %
Running Time
0 – 65535
hours
30054/40054
Running Time
0 – 59
minutes
30055/40055
30056/40056
30057/40057
30058/40058
30059/40059
30101/40101
30102/40102
Starts
TruTorque %
Power %
Peak Starting Current
Last Starting Duration
Motor FLA
Motor Service Factor
30103/40103
Independent Start/Run Motor Overloads
200
1 – 6400
100 – 199
0: Disabled
1: Enabled
0.1 %
%
%
Arms
0.1 Sec
Arms
0.01
-
APPENDIX E - MODBUS REGISTER MAP
Absolute Register Address Description
30104/40104
Motor Overload Running Enable
30105/40105
Motor Overload Running Class
30106/40106
Motor Overload Starting Enable
30107/40107
30108/40108
30109/40109
30110/40110
Motor Overload Starting Class
Motor Overload Hot/Cold Ratio
Motor Overload Cooling Time
Local Source
30111/40111
Remote Source
30112/40112
Start Mode
30113/40113
30114/40114
30115/40115
30116/40116
30117/40117
30118/40118
30119/40119
30120/40120
30121/40121
Initial Motor Current 1
Maximum Motor Current 1
Ramp Time 1
Initial Motor Current 2
Maximum Motor Current 2
Ramp Time 2
UTS Time
Initial V/T/P
Max T/P
30122/40122
Stop Mode
30123/40123
30124/40124
30125/40125
30126/40126
30127/40127
30128/40128
Decel Begin Level
Decel End Level
Decel Time
DC Brake Level
DC Brake Time
DC Brake Delay
30129/40129
Kick Enable 1
30130/40130
30131/40131
Kick Current Level 1
Kick Time 1
30132/40132
Kick Enable 2
30133/40133
30134/40134
Kick Current Level 2
Kick Time 2
30135/40135
Slow Speed Enable
30136/40136
Slow Speed
30137/40137
Slow Speed Current Level
30138/40138
Slow Speed Time Limit Enable
30139/40139
Slow Speed Time Limit
30140/40140
Slow Speed Kick Enable
30141/40141
30142/40142
Slow Speed Kick Level
Slow Speed Kick Time
Range
0: Disabled
1: Enabled
1 – 40
0: Disabled
1: Enabled
1 – 40
0 – 99
10 – 9999
0: Keypad
1: Terminal
2: Serial
0: Open Loop Voltage Ramp
1: Closed Loop Current Ramp
2: TruTorque Ramp
3: Power Ramp
50 – 600
100 – 800
0 – 300
50 – 600
100 – 800
0 – 300
1 – 900
1 – 100
10 – 325
0: Coast
1: Voltage Decel
2: TruTorqu Decel
3: DC Brake
100 – 1
99 – 1
1 – 180
10 – 100
1 – 180
1 – 30
0: Disabled
1: Enabled
100 – 800
1 – 100
0: Disabled
1: Enabled
100 – 800
1 – 100
0: Disabled
1: Enabled
0: 7.1
1: 14.3
10 – 400
0: Disabled
1: Enabled
1 – 900
0: Disabled
1: Enabled
100 – 800
1 – 100
Units
-
%
0.1 Min
-
% FLA
% FLA
Sec
% FLA
% FLA
Sec
Sec
%
%
%
%
Sec
%
Sec
100 mSec
% FLA
100 mSec
% FLA
100 mSec
%
% FLA
Sec
% FLA
100 mSec
201
APPENDIX E - MODBUS REGISTER MAP
Absolute Register Address Description
30143/40143
Rated RMS Voltage
30144/40144
Input Phase Sensitivity
30145/40145
Motor Rated Power Factor
30146/40146
Overcurrent Enable
30147/40147
Overcurrent Level
30148/40148
Overcurrent Delay Time Enable
30149/40149
Overcurrent Delay Time
30150/40150
Undercurrent Trip Enable
30151/40151
Undercurrent Trip Level
30152/40152
Undercurrent Trip Delay Time Enable
30153/40153
Undercurrent Trip Delay Time
30154/40154
Current Imbalance Trip Enable
30155/40155
Current Imbalance Trip Level
30156/40156
Residual Ground Fault Trip Enable
30157/40157
Residual Ground Fault Trip Level
30158/40158
Over Voltage Trip Enable
30159/40159
Over Voltage Trip Level
30160/40160
Under Voltage Trip Enable
30161/40161
30162/40162
30163/40163
Under Voltage Trip Level
Over/Under Voltage Delay Time
Digital Input Trip Delay Time
30164/40164
Auto Fault Reset Enable
30165/40165
Auto Fault Reset Delay Time
30166/40166
Auto Fault Reset Count Enable
30167/40167
Auto Fault Reset Count
202
Range
0: 100
1: 110
2: 120
3: 200
4: 208
5: 220
6: 230
7: 240
8: 350
9: 380
10: 400
11: 415
12: 440
13: 460
14: 480
15: 500
16: 525
17: 575
18: 600
19: 660
20: 690
21: 800
22: 1000
23: 1140
0: Ins
1: ABC
2: CBA
3: SPH
1 – 100
0: Disabled
1: Enabled
50 – 800
0: Disabled
1: Enabled
1 – 900
0: Disabled
1: Enabled
5 – 100
0: Disabled
1: Enabled
1 – 900
0: Disabled
1: Enabled
5 – 40
0: Disabled
1: Enabled
5 – 100
0: Disabled
1: Enabled
1 – 40
0: Disabled
1: Enabled
1 – 40
1 – 900
1 – 900
0: Disabled
1: Enabled
1 – 900
0: Disabled
1: Enabled
1 – 10
Units
Vrms
% FLA
100 mSec
% FLA
100 mSec
%
% FLA
%
%
100 mSec
100 mSec
Sec
-
APPENDIX E - MODBUS REGISTER MAP
Absolute Register Address Description
30168/40168
Controlled Fault Stop
30169/40169
30170/40170
DI 1 Configuration
DI 2 Configuration
30171/40171
DI 3 Configuration
30172/40172
30173/40173
R1 Configuration
R2 Configuration
30174/40174
R3 Configuration
30175/40175
Analog Input Trip Enable
30176/40176
Analog Input Trip Type
30177/40177
30178/40178
30179/40179
30180/40180
Analog Input Trip Level
Analog Input Trip Delay Time
Analog Input Span
Analog Input Offset
30181/40181
Analog Output Function
30182/40182
30183/40183
Analog Output Span
Analog Output Offset
Range
0: Disabled
1: Enabled
0: Off
1: Stop
2: Fault High
3: Fault Low
4: Fault Reset
5: Disconnect
6: Inline Feedback (F49)
7: Bypass / 2M Feedback (F48)
8: Emergency Motor OL Reset
9: Local / Remote Control
Source
10: Heat Disable
11: Heat Enable
12: Ramp Select
13: Slow Speed Forward
14: Slow Speed Reverse
15: DC Brake Disable
16: DC Brake Enable
17: Run Enable
18: Run Disable
0: Off
1: Fault Fail Safe
2: Fault Non Fail Safe
3: Running
4: Up To Speed
5: Alarm
6: Ready
7: Locked Out
8: Over Current Alarm
9: Under Current Alarm
10: Overload Alarm
11: Shunt Trip Fail Safe
12: Shunt Trip Non Fail Safe
13: Faulted on Ground Fault
14: In Energy Saver Mode
15: Heating
16: Slow Speed
17: Slow Speed Forward
18: Slow Speed Reverse
19: DC Braking
20: Cooling Fan
0: Disabled
1: Enabled
0: Low – Fault below preset level
1: High – Fault above preset level
0 – 100
1 – 900
1 – 100
0 – 99
0: Off (no output)
1: 0 – 100% Current
2: 0 – 200% Current
3: 0 – 800% Current
4: 0 – 150% Voltage
5: 0 – 150% Overload
6: 0 – 10kW
7: 0 – 100kW
8: 0 – 1MW
9: 0 – 10MW
10: 1 – 100% Analog Input
11: 0 – 100% Firing
12: Calibration (full output)
1 – 125
0 – 99
Units
-
-
-
%
100 mSec
%
%
-
%
%
203
APPENDIX E - MODBUS REGISTER MAP
Absolute Register Address Description
30184/40184
Inline Enable
30185/40185
30186/40186
Inline Delay Time
Bypass Feedback Time
30187/40187
Keypad Stop
30188/40188
Modbus Timeout Enable
30189/40189
Modbus Timeout
30190/40190
CT Ratio (x:1)
30191/40191
Auto Start
30192/40192
Energy Saver Enable
30193/40193
Heater / Anti-Windmill Enable
30194/40194
Heater / Anti-Windmill Level
30195/40195
Starter Type
30196/40196
LED Display Meter
204
Range
0: Disabled
1: Enabled
10 – 100
1 – 50
0: Disabled
1: Enabled
0: Disabled
1: Enabled
1 – 120
0: 72:1
1: 96:1
2: 144:1
3: 288:1
4: 864:1
5: 2640:1
6: 3900:1
7
5760:1
8: 8000:1
9: 14400:1
10: 28800:1
0: Disabled
1: Start after power applied
2: Start after fault reset
3: Start after power applied and after
fault reset
0: Disabled
1: Enabled
0: Disabled
1: Enabled
1 – 25
0: Normal (Outside Delta)
1: Inside Delta
2: Wye-Delta
3: Phase Controller
4: Current Follower
5: Across the Line (Full Voltage)
0: Status
1: Ave Current
2: L1 Current
3: L2 Current
4: L3 Current
5: Current Imbalance %
6: Residual Ground Fault
7: Ave. Volts
8: L1-L2 Volts
9: L2-L3 Volts
10: L3-L1 Volts
11: Overload
12: Power Factor
13: Watts
14: VA
15: vars
16: kW hours
17: MW hours
18: Phase Order
19: Line Frequency
20: Analog Input
21: Analog Output
22: Running Days
23: Running Hours
24: Starts
25: TruTorque %
26: Power %
27: Peak Starting Current
28: Last Starting Duration
Units
100 mSec
100 mSec
Sec
-
-
% FLA
-
-
APPENDIX E - MODBUS REGISTER MAP
Absolute Register Address Description
Range
1: Ave Current
2: L1 Current
3: L2 Current
4: L3 Current
5: Current Imbalance %
6: Residual Ground Current
7: Ave. Volts
8: L1-L2 Volts
9: L2-L3 Volts
10: L3-L1 Volts
11: Overload
12: Power Factor
13: Watts
14: VA
15: vars
16: kW hours
17: MW hours
18: Phase Order
19: Line Frequency
20: Analog Input
21: Analog Output
22: Running Days
23: Running Hours
24: Starts
25: TruTorque %
26: Power %
27: Peak Starting Current
28: Last Starting Duration
0: None
1: Standard BIST
2: Powered BIST
3: Reset Run Time
4: Reset kWh
5: Enter Reflash Mode
6: Store Parameters
7: Load Parameters
8: Factory Reset
0: Disabled
1: Enabled
30197/40197
LCD Display Meter 1
30198/40198
LCD Display Meter 2
30199/40199
Misc. Commands
30200/40200
Bypass Feedback Enable
30601/40601 (most recent)
to
30609/40609 (oldest)
Fault Codes
Refer to page 196.
30611/40611 (most recent)
to
30619/40619 (oldest)
System States
0:
1:
2:
3:
4:
5:
6:
7:
8:
9:
10:
11:
12:
13:
14:
15:
16:
17:
30621/40621 (most recent)
to
30629/40629 (oldest)
30631/40631 (most recent)
to
30639/40639 (oldest)
L1 Currents: The current that the load is
drawing from Line 1 when the fault has
occurred.
L2 Currents: The current that the load is
drawing from Line 2 when the fault has
occurred.
Units
Initializing
Locked Out
Faulted
Stopped
Heating
Kicking
Ramping
Slow Speed
Not UTS
UTS
Phase Control / Current Follower
Decelerating
Braking
Wye
PORT
BIST
Shorted SCR Test
Open SCR Test
Arms
Arms
205
APPENDIX E - MODBUS REGISTER MAP
Absolute Register Address
30641/40641 (most recent)
to
30649/40649 (oldest)
30651/40651 (most recent)
to
30659/40659 (oldest)
30661/40661 (most recent)
to
30669/40669 (oldest)
30671/40671 (most recent)
to
30679/40679 (oldest)
30681/40681 (most recent)
to
30689/40689 (oldest)
30691/40691 (most recent)
to
30699/40699 (oldest)
30701/40701 (most recent)
to
30709/40709 (oldest)
Description
L3 Currents: The current that the load is
drawing from Line 3 when the fault has
occurred.
L1-L2 Voltages: The line voltage that is
present between lines 1 and 2 when a fault
occurs.
L2-L3 Voltages: The line voltage that is
present between lines 2 and 3 when a fault
occurs.
L3-L1 Voltages: The line voltage that is
present between lines 3 and 1 when a fault
occurs.
Range
Units
Arms
Vrms
Vrms
Vrms
Kilowatts: The power that the load is
drawing when a fault occurs.
KW
Line Periods: The line period (1/frequency)
that is present when a fault occurs.
microseconds
Run Time Hours: The value of the running
time meter when a fault occurs.
Hours
Diagnostics
These registers provide some diagnostics capabilities for testing and controlling the communications link.
Absolute Register Address
Description
Range
31201/41201
Parameter Changed Flag
0:
1:
31202/41202
Modbus Address
1 – 247
Baud Rate
0:
1:
2:
3:
4:
1200
2400
4800
9600
19200
31204/41204
Byte Framing
0:
1:
2:
3:
1 Stop Bit, Even Parity
1 Stop Bit, Odd Parity
1 Stop Bit, No Parity
2 Stop Bits, No Parity
31205/41205
Modbus Messages Received
-
31206/41206
Scratch
-
31203/41203
206
Not Changed
Changed
Units
-
bps
-
APPENDIX E - MODBUS REGISTER MAP
The control source must be serial for the starter to be started through Modbus. The Run/Stop bit must transition from 0 to 1 for a start to
occur. If the starter stops due to a fault, the action of the starter depends on the state of the AutoStart parameter (P66 – I/O19).
The fault reset bit must transition from 0 to 1 for a fault to be reset.
If any of the programmed digital inputs are programmed as Local/Remote inputs, then the local/Remote bit has no effect.
When the relays are programmed as “Off”, the relay bits may be written in order to control the relays. When the relays are programmed
for any function other than “Off” (Fault, Run, UTS for example), then the relay bits may be read to determine the state of the relays.
Starter Status Register:
0:
Bit 0 – Ready
Bit 1 – Running
Bit 2 –UTS
Bit 3 –Alarm
Bit 4 –Fault
Bit 5 –Lockout
1:
0:
1:
0:
1:
0:
1:
0:
1:
0:
1:
Initializing or
Faulted and Decelerating or
Faulted and Braking or
Faulted and Stopped or
Lockout
Otherwise
Not Running
Running
Not UTS
UTS
No alarm conditions
One or more alarm conditions
No Fault Condition
Fault Condition
Start or Fault Reset not locked out.
Start or Fault Reset locked out. Possible causes are:
Overload Lockout State
Watts, VA, vars, and kW hour Registers:
Meter registers present 32 bit meters in two consecutive 16 bit registers. The least significant 16 bits are in the first register followed by
the most significant 16 bits in the second register.
Reading the least significant register latches data into the most significant register so that the data remains synchronized between the
two.
Starter Control Register
Bit 0 – Run/Stop
Bit 1 – Fault Reset
Bit 2 –Emergency Overload Reset
Bit 3 –Local/Remote
Bit 4 –Heat Disabled
Bit 5 –Ramp Select
Bit 13 – Relay 3
Bit 14 – Relay 2
Bit 15 – Relay 1
0: Stop
1: Start
0: No action
1: Fault Reset
0: No action
1: Emergency Overload Reset
0: Local
1: Remote
0: Heater Enabled
1: Heater Disabled
0: Ramp 1
1: Ramp 2
0: Energize(d)
1: De-energize(d)
Same as above
Same as above
Parameter Registers
For those parameters that can be set either to "Off", or some value within a range (many of the protection parameters, for example) there
are two Modbus registers. One is an "enable" register, and the other sets the value within the range.
PARAMETER
APPENDIX
TABLES
F
207
APPENDIX F - PARAMETER TABLES
Parameter Table
Following is the parameter table for both the LED and LCD Display. The last column is a convenient place to write down parameter
settings.
Quick Start Group
LED
LCD
Parameter
Setting Range
Units
1 – 6400
RMS Amps
P1
QST 01
Motor FLA
P2
QST 02
Motor Service Factor
1.00 – 1.99
P3
QST 03
Motor Running Overload Class
Off, 1 – 40
10
76
P4
QST 04
Local Source
P5
QST 05
Remote Source
P6
QST 06
Initial Motor Current 1
50 – 600
%FLA
100
79
P7
QST 07
Maximum Motor Current 1
100 – 800
%FLA
600
80
P8
QST 08
Ramp Time 1
0 – 300
Seconds
15
81
P9
QST 09
UTS Time / Transition Time
1 – 900
Seconds
20
82
Setting Range
Units
Default
Page
Current
Ramp
83
PAd:
tEr:
SEr:
Keypad
Terminal
Serial
Default
Page
10
75
1.15
75
Setting
77
Terminal
78
Control Function Group
LED
LCD
Parameter
oLrP:
curr:
tt:
Pr:
Voltage Ramp
Current Ramp
TT Ramp
Power Ramp
P10
CFN 01
Start Mode
P8
CFN 02
Ramp Time 1
0 – 300
Seconds
15
81
P6
CFN 03
Initial Motor Current 1
50 – 600
%FLA
100
79
P7
CFN 04
Maximum Motor Current 1
100 – 800
%FLA
600
80
P24
CFN 05
Ramp Time 2
0 – 300
Seconds
15
94
P22
CFN 06
Initial Motor Current 2
50 – 600
%FLA
100
93
P23
CFN 07
Maximum Motor Current 2
100 – 800
%FLA
600
93
P11
CFN 08
Initial Voltage/Torque/Power
1 – 100
%
25
84
P12
CFN 09
Maximum Torque/Power
10 – 325
%
105
85
P13
CFN 10
Kick Level 1
Off, 100 – 800
%FLA
Off
86
P14
CFN 11
Kick Time 1
0.1 – 10.0
Seconds
1.0
86
P25
CFN 12
Kick Level 2
Off, 100 – 800
%FLA
Off
94
P26
CFN 13
Kick Time 2
0.1 – 10.0
Seconds
1.0
94
Coast
87
CoS:
SdcL:
TdcL:
dcb:
Coast
Volt Decel
TT Decel
DC Braking
P15
CFN 14
Stop Mode
P16
CFN 15
Decel Begin Level
100 – 1
%
40
88
P17
CFN 16
Decel End Level
99 – 1
%
20
89
P18
CFN 17
Decel Time
1 – 180
Seconds
15
90
P19
CFN 18
DC Brake Level
10 – 100
%
25
91
P20
CFN 19
DC Brake Time
1-180
Seconds
5
92
P21
CFN 20
DC Brake Delay
0.1-3.0
Seconds
0.2
93
P27
CFN 21
Slow Speed
Off, 7.1, 14.3
%
Off
95
P28
CFN 22
Slow Speed Current Level
10-400
% FLA
100
95
P29
CFN 23
Slow Speed Timer
Off, 1-900
Seconds
10
96
P30
CFN 24
Slow Speed Kick Level
Off, 100-800
% FLA
Off
96
P31
CFN 25
Slow Speed Kick Time
0.1-10.0
Seconds
1.0
97
208
Setting
APPENDIX F - PARAMETER TABLES
Protection Function Group
LED
LCD
Setting Range
Units
Default
Page
P32
PFN 01
Over Current Level
Parameter
Off, 50 – 800
% FLA
Off
98
P33
PFN 02
Over Current Trip Delay Time
Off, 0.1 – 90.0
Seconds
0.1
99
P34
PFN 03
Under Current Trip Level
Off, 5 – 100
% FLA
Off
100
P35
PFN 04
Under Current Trip Delay Time
Off, 0.1 – 90.0
Seconds
0.1
100
P36
PFN 05
Current Imbalance Trip Level
Off, 5 – 40
%
15
101
P37
PFN 06
Residual Ground Fault Trip Level
Off, 5 – 100
%FLA
Off
102
P38
PFN 07
Over Voltage Trip Level
Off, 1 – 40
%
Off
103
P39
PFN 08
Under Voltage Trip Level
Off, 1 – 40
%
Off
103
P40
PFN 09
Over/Under Voltage Trip Delay
Time
0.1 – 90.0
Seconds
0.1
104
P41
PFN 10
Auto Fault Reset Time
Off, 1 – 900
Seconds
Off
104
P42
PFN 11
Auto Reset Count Limit
Off, 1-10
Off
104
P43
PFN 12
Controlled Fault Stop
Off, On
On
105
P44
PFN 13
Independent Starting/Running
Overload
Off, On
Off
106
107
P45
PFN 14
Motor Overload Class Starting
Off, 1 – 40
10
See P3
PFN 15
Motor Overload Class Running
Off, 1 – 40
10
76
P46
PFN 16
Motor Overload Hot/Cold Ratio
0 – 99
%
60
108
P47
PFN 17
Motor Overload Cooling Time
1.0 – 999.9
Minutes
30.0
109
Setting Range
Units
Default
Page
Setting
I/O Group
LED
LCD
Parameter
P48
I/O 01
DI 1 Configuration
P49
I/O 02
DI 2 Configuration
OFF:
StOP:
FH:
FL:
Fr:
diSc:
InLn:
byP:
EoLr:
L-r:
hdIS:
hEn:
rSEL
SS F:
SS r:
BdIS:
P50
I/O 03
DI 3 Configuration
BEn :
runE:
rund:
P51
I/O 04
Digital Fault Input Trip Time
Off
Stop
Fault High
Fault Low
Fault Reset
Disconnect
Inline Cnfrm
Bypass Cnfrm
E OL Reset
Local/Remote
Heat Disable
Heat Enable
Ramp Select
Slow Speed
Forward
Slow Speed
Reverse
DC Brake
Disable
DC Brake
Enable
Run Enable
Run Disable
0.1-90.0
Setting
Stop
Off
110
Off
Seconds
0.1
111
209
APPENDIX F - PARAMETER TABLES
LED
P52
P53
LCD
I/O 05
I/O 06
Parameter
R1 Configuration
R2 Configuration
Setting Range
OFF:
FLFS:
FLnF:
dcb:
FAn:
Off
Fault (fail safe)
Fault (non fail
safe)
Running
UTS
Alarm
Ready
Locked Out
Over Current
Under Current
OL Alarm
Shunt Trip (fail
safe)
Shunt Trip
(non fail safe)
Ground Fault
Energy Saver
Heating
Slow Speed
Slow Speed
Forward
Slow Speed
Reverse
DC Braking
Cooling Fan
OFF:
Lo:
Hi:
Disabled
Low Level
High Level
run:
utS:
AL:
rdyr:
LOC:
OC:
UC:
OLA:
ShFS:
ShnF:
P54
I/O 07
R3 Configuration
GfLt:
ES:
HEAt:
SSpd:
SS F:
SS r:
P55
I/O 08
Analog Input Trip Type
P56
I/O 09
Analog Input Trip Level
0 – 100
P57
I/O 10
Analog Input Trip Time
0.1 – 90.0
P58
I/O 11
Analog Input Span
1 – 100
P59
I/O 12
Analog Input Offset
0 – 99
P60
I/O 13
Analog Output Function
0:
1:
2:
3:
4:
5:
6:
7:
8:
9:
10:
11:
12:
Units
Default
Page
Fault FS
Off
112
Off
Off
113
%
50
114
Seconds
0.1
114
%
100
115
%
0
116
Off
116
OFF (no output)
0 – 100% Curr
0 – 200% Curr
0 – 800% Curr
0 – 150% Volt
0 – 150% OL
0 – 10 kW
0 – 100 kW
0 – 1 MW
0 – 10 MW
0 – 100% Ain
0 – 100% Firing
Calibration
P61
I/O 14
Analog Output Span
1 – 125
%
100
117
P62
I/O 15
Analog Output Offset
0 – 99
%
0
117
P63
I/O 16
Inline Configuration
Off, 1.0 – 10.0
Seconds
3.0
118
P64
I/O 17
Bypass Feedback Time
Off, 0.1 – 5.0
Seconds
2.0
118
P65
I/O 18
Keypad Stop Disable
Enabled
119
Disabled
119
Enabled, Disabled
0:
1:
P66
I/O 19
Power on Start Selection
2:
3:
210
Disabled
Start after Power
applied only
Start after Fault reset
only
Start after power
applied and after
fault reset.
Setting
APPENDIX F - PARAMETER TABLES
Function Group
LED
LCD
Parameter
Setting Range
0:
1:
2:
3:
4:
5:
6:
P79
FUN 01
Meter 1
FUN 02
Meter 2
7:
8:
9:
10:
11:
12:
13:
14:
15:
16:
17:
18:
19:
20:
21:
22:
23:
24:
25:
26:
27:
28:
P78
FUN 03
CT Ratio
72:1, 96:1,144:1, 288:1,
864:1, 2640:1, 3900:1,
5760:1, 8000:1, 14400:1,
28800:1
P77
FUN 04
Input Phase Sensitivity
InS
AbC
CbA
SPH
100, 110, 120, 200, 208,
220, 230, 240, 350, 380,
400, 415, 440, 460, 480,
500, 525, 575, 600, 660,
690, 800, 1000, 1140,
P76
FUN 05
Rated RMS Voltage
P75
FUN 06
Motor Rated Power Factor
Units
Status
Ave Current
L1 Current
L2 Current
L3 Current
Curr Imbal
Residual Ground
Fault
Ave Volts
L1-L2 Volts
L2-L3 Volts
L3-L1 Volts
Overload
Power Factor
Watts
VA
vars
kW hours
MW hours
Phase Order
Line Freq
Analog Input
Analog Output
Run Days
Run Hours
Starts
TruTorque %
Power %
Peak Starting
Current
Last Starting
Duration
Insensitive
ABC
CBA
Single Phase
RMS
Voltage
-0.01 (Lag) – 1.00 (Unity)
Default
Page
Ave Current
127
Ave Volts
127
288
126
Insens.
126
480
125
-0.92
125
Normal
124
P74
FUN 07
Starter Type
Normal
Inside Delta
Wye-Delta / Other
Electro
mechanical
PctL: Phase Control
cFol: Current
Follower
AtL: Full Voltage ATL
P73
FUN 08
Heater Level
Off, 1 – 40
Off
123
P72
FUN 09
Energy Saver
Off, On
Off
122
P70
FUN 10
Communication Address
1 – 247
1
121
1200
2400
4800
9600
19200
bps
19200
121
Off, 1 – 120
Seconds
Off
121
Setting
nor:
Id:
y-d:
P69
FUN 11
Communication Baud Rate
P68
FUN 12
Communication Timeout
%FLA
211
APPENDIX F - PARAMETER TABLES
LED
LCD
Parameter
P71
FUN 13
Communication Byte Framing
P80
FUN 14
Software Version 1
Setting Range
Units
0: Even Parity, 1 Stop bit
1: Odd Parity, 1 Stop bit
2: No Parity, 1 Stop bit
3: No Parity, 2 Stop bits
Default
Page
Even Parity,
1 Stop bit
122
Display Only
P67
FUN 15
Miscellaneous Commands
P81
FUN 16
Passcode
0:
1:
2:
3:
4:
5:
6:
7:
8:
Setting
128
None
Std. BIST
Powered BIST
Reset Run Time
Reset KWh/MWh
Enter Reflash mode
Store Parameters
Load Parameters
Factory Reset
None
120
Off
129
LCD Fault Group
Fault
Group
Starter
Fault Description
Number
I1
I2
I3
V1
V2
V3
kW
State
FL1
FL2
FL3
FL4
FL5
FL6
FL7
FL8
FL9
LED Fault Group
Fault
Group
Fault
Fault Description
Number
Fault Description
Number
F1
F6
F2
F7
F3
F8
F4
F9
F5
212
Hz
Run
Time
Publication History;
Revision
Date
ECO#
00
12/15/06
Initial Release
01
09/10/07
02
08/21/08
Revisions based on
shared review
BENSHAW
615 Alpha Drive
Pittsburgh, PA 15238
Phone: (412) 968-0100
Fax: (412) 968-5415
BENSHAW Canada
550 Bright Street
Listowel, Ontario N4W 3W3
Phone: (519) 291-5112
Fax: (519) 291-2595
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