DATAPROCESS | ST 230 | Programming guide

ST230
Programming guide
Firmware version:
ST230 B5.3
DATAPROCESS EUROPE.p.A.
20082 Binasco (MI)
Viale dell'Artigianato, 19
Tel. 02 900221
Fax.02 90091353
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CONTENTS
Connection to external devices
Communication protocol
Network operation
Optocoupled interface
Commands for printer control
Control characters
Printable characters
Slash sequences
//
/!
/#
/@
/$&%nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn
/Awrc
/Bthhhc..ce
/C
/Dfpppllld..d
/Exxxxyyyy
/Ffhv
/Gxxxxyyyy
/Hssss
/I0
/I1nv..vmppss
/I2ssssnnc..c
/I3ssssthhhc..ce
/I4ssssbbbllll
/Jhhss
/Kpdet
/Ldlllltt
/Mwwwwhhhhttt
/Nssssoooo
/Onnnn
/Psss
/Qbbbllllg..g
/Roc
/Sc
/Tn
/Umm
/Uddffffffff
/Vssffeppp
/Wnnnn
/Xiiippp
/Yc..c
/Z
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Return codes
page 32
Buffer status
Sensors status
Printer status
Font EPROM
page 36
Character maps
Small font
Normal font
Big font
Symbols font
Pictures font
Standard fonts example
Macro EPROM
page 37
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Macro linker
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Built-in macros
page 41
TABLE "A"
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CONNECTION TO EXTERNAL DEVICES
The printer is equipped with a 9 pin, “D” type, female connector located on the rear
panel, through which a bidirectional RS232 asynchronous communication can be
established with external devices (typically a Personal Computer or other equipment
with compatible interface).
Pin numbers and functions are the following:
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
not used
input, received data (RxD)
output, transmitted data (TxD)
not used
ground (GND)
not used
output, request to send (RTS)
input, clear to send (CTS)
not used
Communication speed is selectable through front panel in set-up mode (the value
is permanently stored in non-volatile memory) and the baud rates corresponding to
the “BR” parameter shown in the “status label” are the following:
0 = 38400 bits/second
1 = 19200 “ “
2 = 9600 “ “
3 = 4800 “ “
4 = 2400 “ “
5 = 1200 “ “
6 = 600
“ “
7 = 300
“ “
The other communication parameters are fixed and have the following values:
8 data bits
no parity
2 stop bits (transmitted, 1 is enough to receive)
COMMUNICATION PROTOCOL
The receive channel is interrupt-driven and incoming characters are temporarily
stored in a 65535 bytes input buffer (First In - First Out) from which they are
subsequently fetched by the Command Interpreter.
At switch-on, the RTS line remains inactive (negative level) until the printer has
completed the initialization phase, that takes several seconds, after which RTS
goes active (positive level) to indicate that the machine is ready to receive data.
The RTS line normally stays active, even if the machine is currently printing or
processing previously received commands, until the number of characters in the
buffer increases above 60000 (either because communication speed is faster than
processing speed or because the printer is OFF-LINE or printing and thus it is not
processing at all), at which time RTS goes inactive to indicate that the printer cannot
accept data any more. RTS goes active again when the number of characters in the
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buffer decreases under 50000.
The margin of 5535 characters is provided to avoid loss of data in case that the
transmitter does not stop immediately upon detection of the high-to-low transition
of the RTS and an hysteresis of 10000 characters is provided to avoid transmitter
overhead when working in buffer saturation conditions.
An XOFF character (ASCII DC3, code 13 hex, 19 dec) is sent by the printer when
RTS goes low and at every character received while there are more than 60000
characters in the buffer (RTS already low), while an XON (ASCII DC1, code 11 hex,
17 dec) is sent when RTS goes high. This standard XON/XOFF protocol allows even
simple 3-wires connections, using only RxD, TxD and GND, leaving open CTS and
RTS.
If a framing error is detected in the received data, the BEL character (ASCII code
7) is transmitted to inform the external device that received characters may have
been lost. This generally indicates a noisy transmission line.
The transmit channel is also buffered with a 4096 character output buffer, but the
flow of data from the printer to the external device is controlled only by the CTS line:
the XON/XOFF protocol has not been implemented on the transmit channel
because it would interfere with the received data.
When the CTS line is held at a positive voltage by the external computer, the data
contained in the transmit buffer (if any) are sent on the serial line, while holding the
CTS negative, transmission is inhibited and the data generated by the printer during
operation are accumulated into the buffer. This means that the printer can operate
even if the external computer is temporary busy (over 500 labels can be printed in
this condition before the printer stops for buffer full). The CTS line is checked
between each character transmitted and thus transmission is immediately stopped
when it goes negative.
The CTS line should be permanently tied to a positive level if the external device
cannot process messages sent by the printer, to avoid hang-on of the printer itself
(it may also be left open, as it is internally pulled-up).
Note: due to the fact that the machine is normally ready to receive, at least until the
buffer is almost full, even while it is printing, there may an interference between the
two activities (printing and receiving) at high baud rates (above 9600 baud) and/or
at high print speeds (above /V0505....), consisting of a more or less visible
truncation of the last portion of the printed label. To avoid this interference, it is
possible to configure the machine (/$&% command) so that it keeps the line busy
(RTS low, XOFF sent) during printout of each label, getting ready (RTS high, XON
sent) only for a short time between two labels.
NETWORK OPERATION
The behavior of the printer when it is configured for network operation (NA>00) is
basically the same described in the previous section, with some variations,
described in this section (please note that the printer can work in this mode only if
equipped with the optionally available network adapter that replaces the standard
RS232 connector).
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The transmission medium for the ST230 network is a coaxial cable (typically the
“thin” Ethernet 50 ohm type, RG58 or equivalent) with BNC connectors and “T”
junctions linking together the computer, equipped with the appropriate interface on
the serial port, and up to 15 printers, each galvanically insulated from the others,
within maximum distances of several hundred meters.
Due to the half-duplex nature of the network, a master-slave communication
protocol has been implemented, where the computer (master) is always the
originator of any activity on the line and the printers (slaves) send data only when
requested.
The RTS and CTS lines are no more used for data-flow control, which now relies
only on the XON/XOFF mechanism: RTS activates the 5 MHz modem carrier
(carrier ON when RTS is at positive level), while CTS detects the presence or
absence of the carrier (carrier ON when CTS is at negative level). It’s responsibility
of the application program running on the external computer to check the presence
of the CTS (indicating that the line is free), then set the RTS before starting
transmission and reset it after the last character has been sent. Please note that the
network interface adapter automatically echoes back any character transmitted:
this must be kept in mind when designing the software driver.
Each printer connected on the network must have a unique network address
(indicated by the “NA=xx” field printed on the status label), ranging from 01 to 15,
that currently represent the maximum number of printers that can be connected to
the same network. Set-up of the network address is possible only through the front
panel of the printer, in a way similar to selection of baud rate and character map (see
the section describing SET-UP mode).
When operating in network mode (00<NA<16), the printer is by default inactive after
switch-on (it does not send any character and ignores received data) until it
recognizes the appropriate activation sequence composed of an ASCII control
character whose code is equal to its address plus 16 (codes 11 to 1F hex, 17 to 31
dec), followed by US-US-NAK (codes 1F-1F-15 hex, 31-31-21 dec).
When the printer recognizes its own activation sequence, it first sends all the
characters currently contained in its transmit buffer (transmission is triggered by the
low-to-high transition of the CTS line, indicating that the master has switched off its
carrier), terminating them with an EOT (ASCII code 4), then it enables the receive
buffer and begins behaving like a normal, non-networked printer, with the only
difference that any status information produced during printing (or when a status
request is processed) is buffered and it is not automatically transmitted until another
activation sequence is received. If the transmit buffer is empty when the activation
sequence is received, only the EOT is transmitted.
When the printer recognizes the activation sequence addressed to another printer,
it inhibits the receive buffer and ignores all subsequent incoming characters until
the next activation sequence addressed to itself.
This master-slave architecture requires a periodic polling of all the printers on the
network, particularly of those that are printing, to avoid saturation of their transmit
buffers, whose size (4 Kbytes) allows an autonomy of about 500 labels, after which
the machine suspends operation. Furthermore, when sending a lot of data to the
same machine and/or working in spooling mode, it is necessary to periodically
interrupt transmission and resend an activation sequence to the printer, allowing it
to notify possible overflows of the receive buffer by sending back XOFF characters.
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OPTOCOUPLED INTERFACE
The printer may be optionally equipped with an additional connector (9-pin, male,
“D” type) located on the back panel beside the power transformer, which carries
some optocoupled Input/Output signals useful to interface the machine to external
devices (typically industrial PLCs I/O pins or relays).
Pin numbers and functions are the following:
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
+ READY output signal (collector of NPN optocoupled transistor)
– READY output signal (emitter of NPN optocoupled transistor)
+ START input signal (anode of optocoupler’s diode)
– START input signal (cathode of optocoupler’s diode)
GROUND (non optocoupled)
+ 5 VDC (non optocoupled, 100 mA max)
+ PRINT output signal (collector of NPN optocoupled transistor)
– PRINT output signal (emitter of NPN optocoupled transistor)
+ 22 VDC (non optocoupled, 500 mA max)
Output signals are directly connected to collector and emitter of BD679 transistors
(darlington) which may safely carry a current up to 200 mA and stand a voltage up
to 30 VDC, while the input signal current is limited by a 2.2 KOhm series resistor,
which allows input voltages in the range of 10 to 30 VDC, resulting in direct
compatibility with standard 24V industrial PLCs.
The READY signal indicates the normal working condition (printer ON-LINE) when
the transistor is ON and, viceversa, it indicates that the machine, for any reason, is
not operating (printer OFF-LINE) when the transistor is OFF. See the section
describing printer error codes (Return Messages/Printer Status) for detailed
information about the possible error situations in which the machine may go OFFLINE.
The START input signal may be used to trigger the printing phase or the application
phase, according to current printer configuration, which also determines the active
polarity (see the description of the /K command for further details). This signal is
physically in parallel with the one coming from the optional label dispensing
photosensor
The PRINT signal is activated (transistor ON) at the beginning of the printing phase
of each label, as soon as the stepper motor starts moving, and is deactivated
(transistor OFF) at the end of the cycle, which includes the cutting or application
phase, if the printer is equipped with the optional cutter or applicator and they are
enabled. This signal is also activated if a single cut or application cycle is requested
with the /! command.
The +5 VDC and +22 VDC pins, together with the GROUND pin, are provided to
ease interfacing of external circuits requiring a limited amount of power, directly
supplied by the printer, with no need for an external power supply. This is specially
useful when relais are used to buffer the READY and PRINT signals and provide
clean contacts to the external world.
Note: the +22 VDC pin carries out the printhead supply voltage, which has a nominal
value of 22 volts, but it may vary in the range of 16 to 25 volts, depending on current
printhead temperature and power setting (the nominal value is obtained at 25°C with
power setting of 730 mW for the 6 dots/mm and 580 mW for the 8 dots/mm).
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COMMANDS FOR PRINTER CONTROL
The Command Language adopted to control operation of the ST230 is proprietary
(i.e. it is not compatible with that of any other commercially available printer) and
uses various combinations of ASCII characters, sometimes mixed with binary (8 bit)
data, to define all the commands that the printer recognizes.
There are two separate Command Interpreters in the ST230: the main one
processes data contained in the receive buffer as a serial stream of characters (or
bytes) and sequentially executes the required actions, the secondary one only
recognizes a limited number of commands (sequences of 4 consecutive control
codes) and it operates in real-time, as soon as the characters are received and
before they are placed into the buffer.
The following sections describe the commands recognized by the printer, dividing
them in three groups: control characters, printable characters and slash sequences.
CONTROL CHARACTERS
The printer ignores all control characters received (ASCII codes in the range 00 to
1F hex, 0 to 31 dec) except the following ones:
ENQ Enquiry (05 hex, 5 dec): it is interpreted as a status request and forces the
printer to send out a message containing information about the current status of the
machine (for more details see the section concerning return codes).
BS
Back Space (08 hex, 8 dec): it moves the cursor back on the last character
entered, to allow overtyping (typically used for accented letters not available in the
standard character set).
LF
Line Feed (0A hex, 10 dec): it moves the cursor down, with respect to the
current printing direction, of an amount determined by the current value of the
interline parameter.
FF
Form Feed (0C hex, 12 dec): it prints one label with the current contents of the
buffer (equivalent to /W0001). It can be disabled with the /$&% command.
CR
Carriage Return (0D hex, 13 dec): it moves the cursor left, with respect to the
current printing direction, to the initial position set by the last /E command.
The printer also recognizes some sequences of 4 consecutive control characters
representing commands that are executed immediately instead of being buffered
and then sequentially processed by the command interpreter. The sequences are
the following:
VT-US-US-NAK (0B-1F-1F-15 hex, 11-31-31-21 dec)
It puts the printer busy, resetting the RTS line negative and sending an XOFF.
The printer goes back automatically ready (setting RTS positive and sending an
XON) as soon as all the pending commands have been processed and completed
(receive buffer empty). This command sequence is very useful whenever it is
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necessary to disable the input buffer.
SO-US-US-NAK (0E-1F-1F-15 hex, 14-31-31-21 dec)
It clears all the data currently stored in the receive buffer (if any).
SI-US-US-NAK (0F-1F-1F-15 hex, 15-31-31-21 dec)
It aborts the printing session in progress (if any) after completion of the current
label. If the printer is waiting for variable data during a printing session, this
is aborted without printing the next label. If other data are present in the
receive buffer, the machine goes on processing them after having aborted the
current printing session. This command can also be used to abort processing
a pending command sequence, immediately setting the machine ON LINE.
DLE-US-US-NAK (10-1F-1F-15 hex, 16-31-31-21 dec)
It emulates the operation of the ON LINE key, allowing to put the machine ONLINE/OFF-LINE and also to pause/resume a printing session.
Furthermore, any sequence starting with a control code in the range DC1 to US (11
to 1F hex, 17 to 31 dec) followed by US-US-NAK (1F-1F-15 hex, 31-31-21 dec)
is interpreted as an activation code if the printer is working in network mode and the
character code equals the machine’s addres plus 16 (see the appropriate section
for more details).
Note: the choice to use 4-character sequences for these commands derives from
the consideration that, even if there is a high probability to encounter such codes
embedded in the binary data associated to the /Q, /D and /Y commands, it is very
unlikely (although not impossible) to find them exactly combined as in these
sequences, thus avoiding, in practice, that the real-time Command Interpreter
executes undesired commands when analyzing incoming characters during reception
of bit-mapped graphics in binary format, fonts or character maps. These control
codes have been selected because they do not interfere with the main Command
Interpreter, that simply ignores them.
PRINTABLE CHARACTERS
The printer interprets all codes between 20 hex (32 dec) to FF hex (255 dec) as
printable characters, except code 2F hex (47 dec), corresponding to the “forward
slash” character, that is interpreted as a header for command sequences (the
double slash sequence is used to print the slash character).
Assuming that no remapping of the character codes is performed, the 96 characters
from SPACE (20 hex, 32 dec) to DEL (7F hex, 127 dec), corresponding to the
standard ASCII codes, are mapped in the EPROM fonts, while the 128 characters
from 80 hex (128 dec) to FF hex (255 dec), corresponding to the extended ASCII
codes, are mapped in the RAM fonts.
There are 32 additional positions available in the EPROM fonts (128 characters per
font size in total), corresponding to the ASCII control codes, that are only accessible
through the /S command or by remapping them to other codes through the /Y
command.
Characters mapped in RAM fonts are user-defined: they are initially blank and can
be used only after their dot patterns have been downloaded from external computer
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or from a macro stored on EPROM (or disk), through the /D command.
A specific command (/T) is also available to access characters mapped in RAM
fonts through standard ASCII codes, in case the external computer cannot handle
extended ASCII codes.
Some fonts (small, normal, big, symbols) contain a total of 256 characters each (128
mapped in EPROM and 128 in RAM). The “pictures” font contains only 20
characters (10 in EPROM and 10 in RAM), corresponding to the numeric ASCII
characters (codes 30 to 39 hex, 48 to 57 dec) and to the extended ASCII codes B0
to B9 hex (176 to 185 dec). The “magnum” and “mega” fonts contain only 128
characters, mapped in RAM, that can be accessed either through standard or
extended ASCII code.
Characters are drawn in the printable area (640 or 896 dots wide, depending on the
printhead used, and 2300 dots high) at the current cursor position, taking as a
reference point the lower left corner of upper case characters for the “small”,
“normal”, “big”, “magnum” and “mega” fonts, or the lower left corner of the matrix for
“symbols” and “pictures” fonts).
Character size, orientation and drawing mode depend on the current values of the
parameters controlled by the /F and /R commands.
If part of the character goes out of the printable area it is either truncated (top or
bottom) or wrapped around to the other side (left or right).
After drawing, the cursor is automatically moved in the appropriate direction
(according to the selected print orientation) of an amount determined by the the
“pitch” parameter, that has a default value for every font size and that can be altered
through the /X command.
Character spacing is the same for all characters in case of EPROM fonts (fixed
spacing), but it can be different for every character in case of RAM fonts (proportional
spacing) if the appropriate character width tables are loaded through the /D
command.
Note: see the description of the above mentioned commands and the section
dedicated to the font EPROM for additional details about fonts and their structure.
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SLASH SEQUENCES
//
The // command allows printout of the “slash” character.
Note: the “slash” character code is interpreted as a command header only when the
machine is normally processing commands and printable characters. When the
printer is processing characters from the external computer to fill a barcode string
(if applicable) or variable text field (created with a /I2 command), the “slash” is
interpreted as a printable character and thus it should not be sent twice.
/!
The /! command allows to perform a single cut or application cycle without moving
the paper, if the printer is equipped with the optional cutter or label applicator.
/#
The /# command allows to eject a blank label (or a predefined amount of paper)
without affecting the current contents of the memory. From the point of view of paper
movement, it is equivalent to a sequence /C/W0001, but it does not clear the
memory, thus allowing to resume printing without resending the whole label a
second time.
/@
The /@ command resets all internal counters associated to variable data (if any) to
their initial value. It must be used, if multiple printouts of the same label (containing
variable data with update step greater than 1) are required and it must be placed
immediately before the second and subsequent /Wnnnn commands.
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/$&%nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn
The /$&% command stores into the non-volatile memory the current values of
several parameters and allows selective locking of the functions available through
the front panel of the machine and configuration of some operation modes.
It must be followed by 16 numeric characters (only “0” and “1” are allowed), each
of which controls one of the functions (0=enable, 1=disable), in the following order:
I
II
III
IV
V
VI
VII
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
XIV
XV
XVI
label calibration (SET-UP mode)
print energy/speed adjustment (SET-UP mode)
operation mode setting (SET-UP mode)
baud rate selection (SET-UP mode)
character map selection (SET-UP mode)
left margin adjustment (SET-UP mode)
direct/transfer selection (OFF-LINE mode)
ribbon economization (OFF-LINE mode)
macro selection (OFF-LINE mode)
reset label counter (OFF-LINE mode)
print copy of last label (OFF-LINE mode)
print “status label” at power-on
alternate access to SET-UP (OFF-LINE mode)
receive data during print (ON-LINE mode)
return messages and recognition of Form Feed (ON-LINE mode)
currently not used
The following parameters are stored into the non- volatile memory through this
command:
front panel and functions locks (/$&%)
operation modes (/K)
print speed and energy (/J and /V)
label photosensor sensitivity (/P)
label offset and origin (/H and /G)
cutter/applicator parameters (/N)
baud rate, character map and network address
The contents of the non-volatile memory are used as default values when the
machine is switched on and most of them can be altered by the operator through the
front panel in SET-UP mode (to change defaults) or through the appropriate
commands from external computer (temporary setting unless “frozen” by this
command).
Note: the non-volatile memory uses EEPROM technology and is guaranteed to
stand several thousands of programming cycles, however, to avoid exceeding this
number in a short time, care should be taken to use this command only when
effectively necessary.
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/Awrc
The /A command sets the attributes of the barcode: thickness of the bars and
presence/absence of human readable characters and guard bar.
It must be followed by three parameters, each consisting of a single digit, having the
following meaning:
w
width of the narrow element in dots, equivalent to 1/6 or 1/8 of mm depending
on the printhead used (allowed values: 1 to 8)
r
width ratio between the wide and narrow elements of the barcode, meaningful
only for Code 39, Interleaved 2/5 and Codabar (allowed values: 1 = ratio 2:1, 2 =
ratio 2.5:1, 3 = ratio 3:1)
c
flag for the presence of the characters under the bars and for the presence of
the guard bar on top of the bars, according to the following table:
c value
0
1
2
3
characters
no
yes
no
yes
guard bar
no
no
yes
yes
These settings are temporary and they are lost when the machine is switched off.
If the characters under the barcode are enabled, the font used to print them depends
on the bar width parameter: if w=1 then the small font is used, if w=2 or 3 then normal
font, if w=4, 5, 6, 7 or 8 then big font. Expansion factors are both set to 1.
/Bthhhc..ce
The /B command inserts a barcode placed with its upper left corner in the position
set with the last /E command and according to the direction set with the last /R
command.
It must be followed by two parameters, then by the string to be encoded and finally
by a terminator, as follows:
t
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type of the barcode, one digit, allowed values are the following:
0
EAN13
1
EAN8
2
UPC-A
3
CODE39
4
INTERLEAVED 2/5
5
CODABAR
6,7
ADD-ON for EAN/UPC (2 and 5 digits respectively)
A,B,C CODE128, character sets A, B and C respectively
a,b,c EAN128, character sets A, B and C respectively
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hhh
height of the bars expressed in dots, equivalent to 1/6 or 1/8 of mm
depending on the printhead used, three digits (allowed values: 008
to 999)
c..c
character string to be encoded, variable length (1 to 40 characters)
according to the rules of the selected barcode type (all characters
valid for the selected barcode type are accepted: the first invalid
character acts as a terminator)
e
terminator of the string: it may be any character that is invalid for the
selected barcode type (typically a Carriage Return, except for
CODE128/EAN128 set A, where the CR is a valid character).
The following is a short description of the rules that apply to the different types of
barcode available:
EAN13
Valid characters are the 10 digits (0 to 9). If 12 digits are entered, the
checksum is calculated and placed in 13th position. If 13 digits are
entered, the checksum is cross-checked with the 13th digit and the
code is printed only if they match. If any other number of digits is
entered, the barcode is not printed.
EAN8
Same rules as EAN13, but with 7 or 8 digits.
UPCA
Same rules as EAN13, but with 11 or 12 digits.
CODE39
Valid characters are the 26 upper case letters (A to Z), the 10 digits
(0 to 9), the space and the following other characters: - . $ / + % * @
The asterisk (*) is used as delimiter of the string and should be placed
either at its beginning (start character) and at its end (stop character).
However the code is printed even if the asterisk is omitted, because
some special applications may require a code without delimiters. The
“at” symbol (@) is used to indicate the modulo-43 checksum and, if
required, it should be placed at the end of the string, immediately
before the ending delimiter. The maximum length of the string is
limited to 40 characters.
INT.2/5
Valid characters are the 10 digits (0 to 9). Due to the structure of this
barcode, only an even number of digits (2 to 40) can be encoded. If
an odd number of digits is entered, then an extra digit is automatically
added at the end, representing a checksum calculated according to
the ITF rules. Appropriate delimiters are automatically placed at the
beginning and at the end of the string.
CODABAR
Valid characters are the 10 digits (0 to 9) and the following other
characters: A B C D a b c d t n * e $ + - . / :
The first three groups of four characters are normally used as
delimiters and produce the same encodation (i.e.: A=a=t, B=b=n,
etc.), however the code is printed even without any start and/or stop
character. The last group of 6 characters may be used for including
additional non-numeric information into the string, whose maximum
length is 40 characters. No checksum calculation is performed.
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ADD-ON
These codes can only be used in combination with EAN-13, EAN-8
or UPC-A and allow to extend the number of digits encoded in the
main symbol by 2 or 5 digits. The ADD-ON must always be placed to
the right of the main symbol, leaving the appropriate space between
them, so that the scanner will decode the combination of the two. Valid
characters are the 10 digits (0 to 9). A check digit is automatically
added and placed in the barcode, but it does not take space and it is
not displayed.
CODE128
This code has a rather complex structure and recognizes three
different character sets, allowing to encode the entire set of 128 ASCII
characters: set A includes ASCII codes from 0 to 95, set B includes
ASCII codes from 32 to 127, while set C allows double density
encodation of numeric characters (a pair of digits is treated as a single
character). The maximum string length is 40 characters. Delimiters
(start and stop character) and checksum are automatically placed in
the barcode, being integral part of its structure. The printer recognizes
also some other special function codes, that are not part of the ASCII
character set, sometimes used to instruct the reader to perform set
switching and other actions:
EAN128
ST 230
extended ASCII code
function
128
129
130
131
132
133
FNC 3
FNC 2
SHIFT
SET C
SET B
SET A
This is a variation of the CODE128, following exactly the same rules
described above. The difference consists in the automatic placement
of a special function code (FNC1) immediately after the start character:
this means that the EAN128 is always a little bit longer than an
equivalent CODE128.
PROGRAMMING GUIDE
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/C
The /C command clears the printing area, removing all variable fields and resetting
the following parameters to their default value:
font = normal
source = EPROM (fixed spacing)
horizontal expansion = 1
vertical expansion = 1
interline = 20
pitch = 12
horizontal cursor position = 0
vertical cursor position = 14
rotation = 0
mode = 0 (black)
barcode thickness = 2
barcode ratio = 2 (2.5 to 1)
barcode string/guard = 1 (string present, guard bar absent)
This command should be normally placed at the beginning of any label formatting
command sequence, to prepare a white background on which to draw all the
elements composing the label.
/Dfpppd..d
/Dfpppllld..d
The /D command allows downloading of the contents of a character matrix for one
of the 128 (10 for pictures font) positions of a RAM font, or the contents of its
character spacing table.
It must be followed by two or three parameters and then by the appropriate number
of data bytes, as follows:
f
font identifier, single digit (allowed values: 0=small, 1=normal, 2=big,
3=symbols, 4=pictures, 5=magnum, 6=mega);
ppp
position of the matrix in the font, three digits, representing the decimal
value of the extended ASCII code used to access that character,
assuming no remapping (allowed values: 128 to 255 for all fonts
except the pictures font that accepts only 176 to 185, 999 is a special
value identifying the character spacing table);
lll
this parameter applies only to the magnum and mega fonts (it must
be omitted for the other ones) and indicates the number of data bytes
that follow: this number may vary because these two fonts support
data compression to reduce the amount of memory space and
download time required. If lll=000
then the number of bytes
defaults to the maximum for that font.
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d..d
data bytes representing the dot patterns used to build up the character
matrix (9 bytes for the small font, 36 for the normal, 108 for the big, 128
for the symbols, 1600 for the pictures, up to 490 for the magnum and
up to 1440 for the mega). In the special case of character code 999,
the data bytes represent the default spacing, in dots, for the characters
of that RAM font (always 128 bytes for any font).
The character matrixes defined with this command are temporary and they are lost
when the machine is switched off.
The amount of memory reserved to store RAM fonts is 64 Kbytes, allocated as
follows:
1152 bytes for the small font
4608 bytes for the normal font
13824 bytes for the big font
16384 bytes for the symbols font
16000 bytes for the pictures font
The remaining 13568 bytes are allocated dynamically on a character-by-character
basis, starting from the top, to store the magnum and mega fonts. The memory size
required for these two fonts varies according to the number of characters dowloaded
and to their average size and complexity, due to the data compression technique
adopted for them. In case that a full set of 128 characters is downloaded for both
fonts, the pictures, symbols and, possibly, part of the big RAM fonts may be
overlapped and thus they could not be used at the same time with the magnum and
mega fonts. Furthermore, when a magnum or mega font is downloaded a second
time to use a different font style, the space previously occupied is not automatically
released: previous fonts must be explicitly unloaded by using the /Y command
(see).
Note: see the section describing the structure of the EPROM fonts for further details
about bit and byte mapping within the character matrix.
/Exxxxyyyy
The /E command sets the position of the cursor, that will be used as a reference
for subsequent drawing of any object in the bitmap.
It must be followed by two parameters, each consisting of 4 digits, having the
following meaning:
xxxx
horizontal position in dots (allowed values: 0000 to 0639 or 0000 to
0895 depending on the printhead used);
yyyy
vertical position in dots (allowed values: 0000 to 2299).
This setting is temporary and it is lost when the machine is switched off.
Note: the upper limits mentioned above are valid only in case that the origin is set
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to the upper left corner of the available printing space (both origin coordinates at
0000), otherwise they must be decreased of the amount assigned to the corresponding
coordinate of the origin.
/Ffhv
The /F command selects font and size of the characters drawn in the bitmap after
it has been issued.
It must be followed by three single digit parameters identifying the desired font and
the associated expansion factors, according to the following:
f
font identifier, (allowed values: 0=small, 1=normal, 2=big, 3=symbols,
4=pictures, 5=magnum, 6=mega);
h
horizontal expansion factor (allowed values: 1 to 9, see note);
v
vertical expansion factor (allowed values: 1 to 9, see note).
These selections are temporary and they are lost when the machine is switched off.
The following table shows the geometric characteristics of the fonts (all values are
in dots):
Font identifier
0
1
2
3
4
5
Matrix width
Matrix height
Character width
Character height
Default pitch
Default interline10
8
9
5
7
6
20
16
18
10
14
12
40
24
36
20
28
24
32
32
32
n.a.
n.a.
32
80
160
80
n.a.
n.a.
160
70
56
70
39
52
56
100
6
96
120
67
72
96
Actual size in millimeters of the printed characters can be obtained by multiplying
the given character sizes (typically referred to the upper case letter “M”) for the
selected expansion factors, then dividing by 6 or 8 according to the printhead used.
Note: expansion factors are referred to the character matrix, independently from its
orientation, and a limitation is imposed on the expansion occurring in the paper
width direction, where only values of 1 to 8 are correctly recognized (9 is considered
as 8).
/Gxxxxyyyy
The /G command sets the origin of the coordinates for cursor positioning.
It must be followed by two parameters, each consisting of four digits, with the
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following meaning:
xxxx
horizontal position in dots (allowed values: 0000 to 0639 or 0000 to
0895 depending on the printhead used);
yyyy
vertical position in dots (allowed values: 0000 to 2299).
These settings are temporary and they are lost when the machine is switched off,
unless they are stored into non-volatile memory with the /$&% command.
Note: when this command is executed, the cursor position is reset to the new origin
and all subsequent positionings with the /E command will be relative to it.
/Hnnnn
The /H command sets the amount of paper feed (label offset) performed after
detection of the edge of a new label, if the machine is working in “label” mode, or after
the last printed line, if the machine is working in “paper” mode.
It must be followed by a four-digits parameter whose unit of measure is the dot (1/
6 or 1/8 of mm depending on the printhead used) and whose value should be
experimentally found to obtain the desired result by increasing or decreasing the
default value calculated by the machine or adjusted by the operator in SET-UP
mode.
This parameter can be adjusted either to obtain the best positioning for label
dispensing or for best usage of label area (allowing to print even on the first few
millimeters), or simply to set the spacing between a printout and the next one when
working on continuous paper.
By setting the label offset parameter, the user can override the value calculated by
the printer during the label calibration (FEED key in SET-UP mode): this means that,
in case several different label formats are used, once the correct offset has been
defined for each of them, it is no more necessary to recalibrate the printer every time
the format is changed, if the appropriate value is set with this command for every
label.
This setting is temporary and it is lost when the machine is switched off, unless it is
stored into non- volatile memory with the /$&% command.
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/I0
/I1nv..vmqqss
/I2ssssnnc..c
/I3ssssthhhc..ce
/I4ssssbbbllll
The /I command inserts a variable field starting at the current cursor position.
The single digit parameter (allowed values: 0 to 4) immediately following the /I
command specifies the type of variable field and determines the format of the
following parameters, as follows:
/I0 It does not require any further parameter and is used to insert the printing head
temperature expressed in degrees centigrades (Celsius), formatted using four
characters: tens, units, decimal point, tenths (nn.n). The printhead temperature is
read before printing each label and its value is automatically updated.
/I1 It is used to insert a numerator, which is a self-modifying numeric text field,
formatted using n numeric characters (1 digit, 1 to 6), whose starting value is v..v
(1 to 6 digits, 0 to 999999), changing of qq (2 digits, 01 to 99) every ss labels (2
digits, 01 to 99), while m controls update direction (0,2=increment, 1,3=decrement)
and printout of leading zeroes (0,1=printed, 2,3=blanked).
/I2 It is used to insert a “remote” text field, represented by the string c..c,
composed of nn characters (2 digits, 01 to 99) that the external computer will have
to send to the printer every ssss labels printed (4 digits, 0001 to 9999).
/I3 It is used to insert a “remote” barcode field, whose contents c..c will have
to be sent by the external computer every ssss labels printed (refer to the
description of the /B command for details about the t, hhh and c..c parameters).
/I3 It is used to insert a “remote” graphics field, whose contents will have to be
sent by the external computer every ssss labels (refer to the description of the /
Q command for details about the bbb and llll parameters).
There is the possibility to insert up to 99 of these variable fields in a label, intermixed
in any way.
These settings are temporary and they are lost when the machine is switched off.
If variable fields defined as “remote” (/I2, /I3 and /I4) have been included in
the label, the external computer, immediately after having issued the print command,
must send the actual contents of these fields, formatted according to the specified
length or size parameters, exactly in the same order in which they were entered in
the label and following the sequence determined by their respective update step
and avoiding to include any extra character (separators, CR+LF sequences, etc.).
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Remember, however, that barcode field strings must always be terminated with an
extra character, as they would normally be in the /B command.
The printer remains waiting for data from the external computer (contents of variable
fields cannot be included in a “macro”) and prints a label only when all required
characters (or bytes) have been received.
The computer may even send the complete set of variable data needed for a whole
print batch in one shot, as they are automatically buffered by the printer and fetched
when needed, at a rate determined by the print speed: this means that the computer
does not necessarily have to remain busy feeding the printer for the whole duration
of the print batch (unless the total size of the variable data largely exceeds the buffer
size). In this case, however, is necessary to take all the precautions to avoid
potential interferences due to characters sent while printing is in progress (see the
description of the /V command for further details).
Note: in case of variable text fields (/I2), the BackSpace control character (ASCII
code 8) is also recognized to allow printing of accented lower case letters not
included in the fonts with the sequence: accent+BS+letter (this 3-characters
sequence counts for just 1 character in the length of the field).
/Jhhss
The /J command sets the printhead and stepper motor duty cycles, that influence
print speed, print quality and compression or expansion of the printed text in the
paper feed direction.
It must be followed by two parameter, each consisting of two digits, having the
following meaning:
hh
printhead cycle period expressed in clock pulses (allowed values: 09 to 63);
ss
paper feed stepping period expressed in clock pulses (allowed values: 03 to
99);
The duration of the clock pulses is determined by the first 2 parameters of the /V
command, respectively for normal printing and for fast feeding over blank areas.
The hh parameter represents the total number of clock pulses that make up one
printhead cycle, including loading, heating and cooling phases, while the third
parameter of the /V command controls the duration of the heating phase only.
Paper feed speed is inversely proportional to the ss parameter and the aspect ratio
(compression or expansion in the paper feed direction) is determined by the ratio
of hh over ss, that should be about 3 for the 6 dots/mm printhead and about 2.15
for the 8 dots/mm one to allow square boxes really look square when printed.
Different ratios may be used in special cases to obtain a compressed or expanded
printout (useful to adjust barcode densities to match given values when printing
barcodes rotated at 90º or 270º ).
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The following table lists the paper speeds (in mm/s) corresponding to the lowest
values of the ss parameter for all the possible values of the clock speed (first and
second parameter of the /V command):
ss 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13
clock 04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
98
130
162
194
216
242
278
298
73
97
121
146
162
182
208
224
58
78
97
116
129
146
166
179
49 42 36 32
65 55 49 43
81 69 61 54
97 83 73 65
108 92 81 72
121 104 91 81
139 119 104 92
149 128 112 99
29
39
49
58
65
73
83
90
26
35
44
53
59
66
76
81
24
32
40
49
54
61
69
75
22
30
37
45
50
56
64
69
These settings are temporary and they are lost when the machine is switched off,
unless they are stored into non-volatile memory with the /$&% command.
/Kpdet
The /K command defines the operation mode of the printer.
It must be followed by four single digit parameters, having the following meaning:
p
paper/label feed mode selection (allowed values: 0 = continuous paper, 1 =
die-cut labels or punched tags, 3=labels or tags with black marks);
d
label dispensing photodetector (allowed values: 0 to 7, see table)
e
ribbon economization (allowed values: 0 = disable, 1 = enable);
t
direct thermal/thermal transfer selection (allowed values: 0 = direct thermal,
1 = thermal transfer).
When the direct/transfer selection is changed, the appropriate set of speed-energy
parameters is automatically retrieved from the non-volatile memory, overwriting the
current values of the /J and /V parameters. If the printing power varies from
previous setting, a delay of about 3 seconds is inserted to recalculate an internal
table.
The ribbon presence photosensor is automatically disabled when the direct thermal
print mode is selected.
The d parameter controls operation of the optional label dispensing photosensor,
which allows to start printout of the next label in a printing session only when the
previous one has been removed. The photodispenser signal may alternatively be
generated by an external device if the machine is equipped with the optional
interface connector (usually when the printer is integrated in the label applicator).
In either case, the following table shows the possible values of d and their meaning:
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d value
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
dispenser
disabled
enabled
disabled
enabled
disabled
enabled
disabled
enabled
check
disabled
disabled
enabled
enabled
disabled
disabled
enabled
enabled
polarity
active
active
active
active
active
active
active
active
low
low
low
low
high
high
high
high
When the photodispenser is installed, the additional check may be enabled to
ensure that the label has been correctly peeled off the support paper and stands in
front of the photosensor before being removed, while the polarity may be selected
according to the type of photosensor mounted on the machine.
When the pneumatic label applicator is installed, the label dispensing signal is
usually generated by an external photosensor mounted on the conveyor line,
detecting the transit of the package to be labeled. In this case, dispenser disabled
means that the signal directly triggers the air blow, the piston being already out in
application position with a printed label, while dispenser enabled means that the
signal triggers the printout of the label, that is then immediately applied. If the check
is enabled, the printer verifies that the signal has changed state before proceeding
with the next label, stopping operation and generating an error message if the
previous package is still present or the next one arrives too early.
These settings are temporary and they are lost when the machine is switched off,
unless they are stored into non-volatile memory with the /$&% command.
Note: when ribbon economization is enabled, the rewinder must be in operation
(either the internal rewinder or the optional external one), otherwise paper feed
cannot be performed, because the print head is raised to stop the ribbon.
/Ldlllltt
The /L command allows drawing of line segments, starting from the current position
of the cursor.
It must be followed by three parameters, having the following meaning:
d
direction in which the segment will be drawn, one digit (allowed
values: 0=right, 1=down, 2=left, 3=up);
llll
length of the segment in dots, four digits (allowed values: 0008 to the
distance from the border in the selected direction, max 0640 or 0896
horizontal, depending on the printhead used, and 2300 vertical);
tt
thickness of the segment in dots, two digits (allowed values: 01 to 99).
The direction parameter of this command overrides the currently selected print
rotation (first parameter of the /R command), while the color of the lines drawn
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depends on the current drawing mode (second parameter of the /R command): if
mode=0 then color is black, if mode=1 then color is white, if mode=3 then color is
the opposite of that of the background.
Note: the cursor position is updated to the opposite corner of the segment, to allow
easy drawing of complex shapes without having to reposition it each time.
/Mwwwwhhhhttt
The /M command allows drawing of rectangular “boxes”, with the upper left corner
in the position set by the last /E command.
It must be followed by three parameters, having the following meaning:
wwww
width of the box in the paper width direction, four digits (allowed
values: 0008 to the distance from the right border, max 0640 or 0896
dots, depending on the printhead used);
hhhh
height of the box in the paper feed direction, four digits (allowed
values: 0008 to the distance from the bottom border, max 2300 dots);
ttt
thickness of the box sides, measured towards the center, three digits
(allowed values: 001 to 999).
The currently selected print orientation (first parameter of the /R command) is
ignored, but the drawing mode (second parameter of the /R command) follows the
rules already described for the /L command.
/Nssssoooo
The /N command sets the mode of operation of the cutting device or the label
applicator that may be optionally installed on the machine.
It must be followed by two 4-digits parameters, having the following meaning:
ssss
cutting step or applicator times (allowed values: -999 to -111 and
0000 to 9999)
oooo
back feeding offset (reserved for future use)
If ssss=0000 the cutter (or the applicator) is disabled.
Positive values enable the cutter and define the number of labels printed before the
next cut is performed.
Negative values enable the applicator and define the delay times to allow the piston
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to move down (second digit) or up (third digit), while the first digit (the one
immediately after the minus sign) represents the scaling factor expressed in tenths
of second (i.e. -168 and -234 both mean 0.6s for piston down and 0.8s for piston up).
These settings are temporary and they are lost when the machine is switched off,
unless they are permanently stored in non-volatile memory through the /$&%
command.
/Onnnn
The /O command sets the amount of white space in the paper feed direction above
which speed optimization and (if enabled) ribbon economization will be performed.
It must be followed by a four-digits parameter representing the number of contiguous
blank dot lines (allowed values: 0032 to 9999).
This setting is temporary and it is lost when the machine is switched off.
By default, a value corresponding to about 4 mm (0026 for the 6 dots/mm printhead
and 0032 for the 8 dots/mm one) is assumed when the machine is switched on or
when the /Z command is issued. This distance is the minimum amount of paper/
ribbon feed necessary to bring the last printed line out of the printhead to allow the
ribbon to detach from the paper, thus avoiding possible jams due to the ribbon
remaining stuck on the paper.
/Psss
The /P command allows to set the sensitivity value of the label photosensor to
correctly detect the gap between labels, or the notch, black mark or other variation
in opaqueness that may be used to keep the paper feed mechanism synchronized
with a predefined step.
It must be followed by a three digit parameter that represents the threshold level at
which the photosensor circuit switches (allowed values: 000 to 255, each unit
represents approximately 20 mV measured at the output of the photosensor).
The label gap photosensor works by detecting the amount of infrared light passing
through the material (it is not a reflective device) and transforms it in a voltage
ranging from 0 (opaque like metal) to 5 volts (transparent like air).
Reliable detection of the gap requires that the signal change (contrast) due to the
gap itself is greater than the signal change due to optical dishomogeneities of the
labels (specially if they are preprinted) or of the backing paper.
The label calibration procedure (activated by pressing the FEED key in SET-UP
mode) attempts to automatically find the correct value of the switching threshold by
measuring the transparence of the label and assuming that the backing paper gives
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a signal which is at least 1.5 times + 400 mV greater (or that the black mark gives
a signal less than half). Although these assumptions are valid in the majority of
cases, there are special situations in which this is not true and the automatic
calibration procedure fails or gives erratic label positioning (typically in case of
preprinted labels or when there is very little contrast between the label and the
backing paper).
When the automatic calibration cannot find a valid value for the sss parameter,
then it is possible to force it using the /P command, generally decreasing the
calculated value to compensate for a reduced contrast (thick/dark silicon papers or
thin/clear labels). Remember however that in extreme cases (i.e. transparent
labels) there is not enough contrast and thus the signal must be generated by a
black mark that may be printed on the rear side of the backing paper.
This setting is temporary and it is lost when the machine is switched off, unless it
is stored into the non-volatile memory through the /$&% command.
/Qbbbllllg..g
The /Q command allows download of a rectangular block of bit-mapped graphics
and to insert it with its upper left corner at the position set by the last /E command.
It must be followed by two parameters defining the size of the bit-map and then by
the binary data representing its contents, as follows:
bbb
number of bytes (groups of 8 adjacent dots) that compose every
single line of the bit-map, three digits (allowed values: 001 to 080 or
001 to 112 depending on the printhead used);
llll
number of dot lines that compose the graphics block, four digits
(allowed values: 0001 to 2300).
g..g
stream of bbb x llll bytes that define the bit-map, formatted in a
way similar to downloaded fonts: every bit represent a single dot
(1=printed, 0=blank, MSB left, LSB right), bytes in a line are ordered
from left to right and lines are ordered from top to bottom.
An alternative format for this command allows download of graphics data expressed
in hexadecimal notation instead than in binary one (slower but useful when the
external computer cannot handle 8-bit binary data): in this case the bbb parameter
must be negative (-01 to -99), a CR+LF sequence must follow the llll parameter
and then the specified number of lines must follow, each composed of the specified
number of hex character pairs expressing the value of the bytes and terminated with
a CR+LF sequence.
The block is automatically truncated if it exceeds the right and/or the bottom margin
of the printable area.
Parameters of the /R command (rotation and print mode) are ignored in case of
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graphics blocks, that are always printed with rotation 0 (none) and mode 2 (reverse):
this means that, if rotation of the picture is required, it must be performed externally,
before downloading of the graphics data to the ST230 and that, if the graphics block
is overprinted on an existing black background (i.e. a “filled box” created with a
previously issued /M command), the image appears in “reverse” like a photographic
negative.
/Roc
The /R command sets the orientation and the color in which subsequent characters,
barcodes and lines/boxes will be drawn.
It must be followed by two single digit parameters having the following meaning:
o
orientation (allowed values: 0 = normal, 1 = 90° clockwise rotation, 2 = 180°
cw rotation, 3 = 270° cw rotation);
c
drawing color with respect to the existing background (allowed values:
0=black, 1=white, 2=reverse).
Rotation and color are ignored when printing bit-mapped graphics with the /Q
command (in this case no rotation and reverse are assumed); rotation set by the o
parameter is also ignored by the box (/M) and line (/L) commands.
Color 0 (black) should be used in normal cases where black items must be printed
on a white background. Color 2 (reverse) should be used when white items must be
printed on a black background: in this case the background must be previously
created (for example, the /M command may be used to draw a solid box). Color 1
(white) should be used only in special cases when drawing white lines on black
backgrounds, to avoid the problems existing at the intersections if color 2 is used.
These settings are temporary and they are lost when the machine is switched off.
/Sc
The /S command is used to print the characters/symbols located in the first 32
positions of a font, corresponding to the ASCII control codes. These symbols are
taken from EPROM (positions 0 to 31) except when magnum or mega fonts are
selected or the /T1 command was issued, in which case they are taken from RAM
(positions 128 to 159).
It must be followed by a single character parameter that can be any standard ASCII
code, whose binary value is masked to leave only the five least significant bits, thus
allowing access to the first 32 positions of the active half of the selected font.
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An alternative way to access the first 32 position of the fonts is to remap them on
extended ASCII codes by selecting one of the international character maps
(typically the IBM map, which is also set by default from factory) or by defining a
custom map by means of the /Y command.
/Tn
The /T command swaps RAM fonts and EPROM fonts, allowing either access to
user-defined characters (RAM fonts) through standard ASCII codes or fast switching
between a “standard” and an “alternate” font, depending on how RAM fonts are
managed.
It must be followed by a single digit parameter that can be 0 (standard ASCII codes
access EPROM fonts and extended ASCII codes access RAM fonts) or 1 (viceversa).
When swapping is activated (/T1 has been issued), the character position,
obtained after translation of the received ASCII character code through the current
character map, is altered by inverting its most significant bit (XORed with 80hex,
128dec), thus exchanging the upper and lower 128 positions of the fonts (respectively
the RAM and EPROM based portion of the fonts).
The command acts at the same time on all font sizes and is temporary, its effect
being lost when the machine is switched off.
Note: this command is ignored when the magnum or mega font is selected, because
these fonts are only based in RAM (they have no EPROM counterpart, unlike the
others). In this case the characters may be accessed either through standard or
extended ASCII codes.
/Umm
/Uddffffffff
The /U command is used to execute a predefined sequence of commands (a
“macro” command) stored in EPROM or on disk (if the printer is equipped with disk
interface).
It must be followed by a 2-characters parameter that, depending on its value, may
be followed by a further 8-characters parameter, having the following meaning:
mm
macro number, 2 digits (allowed values: 00 to 99). If 00 is selected,
then the “status label” is printed, else the corresponding macro
located in the dedicated macro EPROM is executed (if it exists).
dd
disk drive identifier, 2 characters (allowed values: A: or B:). Disk “A:”
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refers to the internal ROM disk located in the program EPROMs, that
contains some factory-defined macros. Disk “B:” refers to the diskette
currently present in the disk drive (assuming the machine is equipped
with the optional disk drive and interface card).
f..f
macro name, 8 characters (allowed values: any valid DOS file name,
with no extension). Of course, only names corresponding to existing
files in the selected drive will be considered valid, otherwise no action
is performed. If the disk file name is shorter than 8 characters, the
macro name must be left-justified and right-padded with blanks.
Macro number 99, if present in the macro EPROM, is automatically executed when
the machine is switched on, just after having printed the “status label” (if enabled)
and before entering the ON-LINE mode: it may be typically used to fill RAM fonts with
predefined custom fonts, so that they are immediately available with no need to
download them from serial line.
/Vssffeppp
The /V command allows set-up of parameters controlling the internal print clock
speed and the nominal amount of energy (black level) used during print.
It must be followed by four parameters having the following meaning:
ss
standard clock speed used during print, two digits (allowed values: 04 to 08,
see table);
ff
fast clock speed used when skipping over white spaces, two digits (allowed
values: 02 to 11, see table);
e
energy level of the printhead, one digit (allowed values: 3 to 7 for the 6 dots/
mm printhead, 2 to 6 for the 8 dots/mm): it represents the number of clock
pulses per cycle in which the printhead is activated and allows coarse setting
of the black level;
ppp power level of the printhead in milliwatts, three digits (allowed values: 550 to
850 for the 6 dots/mm printhead, 400 to 700 for the 8 dots/mm): it determines
the nominal printhead driving voltage at 25º C and allows fine setting of the
black level.
The ss and ff parameters come with a default factory setting of 05 and 06
respectively. Changing these values requires some experience and knowledge
about the possible limitations and risks concerned. Their effect is to change the
internal print clock speed, and thus the width of clock pulses, according to the
following table:
ss or ff value: 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11
pulse width (µs): 400 300 200 150 120 100 90 80 70 65
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The printhead cycle time (the time it takes to print one single line of dots) is obtained
by multiplying the pulse width by the first parameter of the /J command; the
printhead pulse duration is obtained by multiplying the pulse width by the e
parameter.
By setting the ss and ff parameters at values higher than the default ones, it is
possible to print at higher speeds, if some degradation of print quality can be
tolerated, but this has an important side effect: if data are sent to the machine while
it is printing, there is an interference (more or less visible depending on print speed
and data rate) consisting in the elongation in the paper feed direction and partial
truncation of the printed text. This is due to the limited processing power of the
internal microprocessor and to the choice of giving priority to the serial line, in order
to avoid loss of data, even in the worst case.
For the above mentioned reason, it is advisable to limit the clock speed to safe
values (4 to 5 for print and 5 to 6 for fast feed) and avoid high baud rates when the
machine is used in spooling mode or when “remote” variable fields are present,
possibly using the lowest values for the /J parameters in order to partially recover
print speed.
An alternative way to avoid this problem is to configure the printer so that it sets the
line busy during the printing phase (see the /$&% command), provided that the
external device sending data to the machine quickly stops transmission as soon as
the RTS line goes high and the XOFF is emitted.
These settings are temporary and they are lost when the machine is switched off,
unless they are stored into non-volatile memory with the /$&% command.
/Wnnnn
The /W command starts the printout of a number of labels specified by the fourdigits parameter nnnn, ranging from 0001 to 9999.
During printing, the machine cannot process further commands, but is able to
receive and store them into a buffer, until it gets full (64 Kbytes max): new commands
will be processed as soon as the printing session is completed and the printer is
back ON-LINE. See the description of the /V command for details about speed
limitations when sending data while the machine is printing.
The printing session can be suspended at the end of the current label by pressing
the “ON LINE” key and then restarted by pressing the same key again. Abortion is
possible, after suspension, with the key-sequence: HEAD LIFT, FEED, HEAD LIFT,
ON LINE.
There is also the possibility to suspend or to abort a printing session, at the end of
the current label, from the external computer using respectively the character
sequence: DLE US US NAK (codes 10 1F 1F 15 hex, 16 31 31 21 dec) or SI
US US NAK (codes 0F 1F 1F 15 hex, 15 31 31 21 dec).
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/Xiiippp
The /X command is used to change the value of the “interline”, that is the amount
the cursor is moved down (with respect to the current printing direction) every time
the LF command is issued and the value of the “pitch”, that is the amount the cursor
is moved right (with respect to the currently selected printing direction) every time
a new character is entered.
It must be followed by two parameters, each consisting of three digits, with the
following meaning:
iii interline change, measured in dots (allowed values: -99 to 999);
ppp pitch change, measured in dots (allowed values: -99 to 999).
Interline and pitch are set to default values every time a font is selected, according
to the character size (see the description of the /F command) and they can be
subsequently modified through this command, by adding or subtracting the desired
number of dots.
The pitch correction works either for fixed spacing fonts and for proportional spacing
ones.
These settings are temporary and they are lost when the machine is switched off,
furthermore, they are reset to default values every time the /F command is issued
to change the font.
Note: the values entered with this command are automatically multiplied by the
horizontal and vertical expansion factors set by the last font selection command.
/Yb..b
The /Y command is used to download a user-defined character map that replaces
the default map or the language dependent map selected during printer SET-UP.
It is also used to release the memory area used by the magnum and mega fonts.
It must be followed by 256 binary values (codes from 00 to FF hex, 0 to 255 dec) that
define the correspondence between the ASCII codes of printable characters and the
physical position of the associated dot matrix in the font. The character map is
common for all fonts.
This setting is temporary and it is lost when the machine is switched off.
Note: see the section concerning the structure of the font EPROM for further details.
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/Z
The /Z command resets the following parameters to the current set-up value stored
in non-volatile memory:
label origin,
label offset,
label photosensor sensitivity,
paper/label mode,
photodispenser mode,
ribbon economization,
print mode (thermal transfer or direct thermal),
clock speed during printing and fast feed,
printhead energy and power,
printhead and stepper motor duty cycles,
cutting device parameters.
The following other parameters are reset to their default values:
barcode width = 2 (narrow elements 2 dots wide),
barcode ratio = 2 (2.5:1 for C39, I2/5, Codabar),
characters under barcode = enabled,
guard bar on top of barcode = disabled,
minimum optimization distance = 26 or 32 dots.
This command is automatically executed every time the machine is switched on.
RETURN CODES
The printer can send to the external device several messages to inform it about its
status.
These messages may be sent automatically during data reception (buffer status),
during command processing or printing (printer status), or they may be sent only
upon request (sensors status).
The machine can be configured with the /$&% command to inhibit transmission of
any message except those related to buffer status, to avoid undesired interferences
when it is connected to a device (spooler) that does not expect to receive any data
back from the printer other than XON/XOFF codes.
BUFFER STATUS
The ASCII control characters DC1 (code 11 hex, 17 dec) and DC3 (code 13 hex,
19 dec), better known as XON and XOFF, are sent by the machine to inform the
external device about the status of the internal 64 Kbytes receive buffer, thus
allowing data-flow control even without physical connection of the RTS line from the
printer.
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An XOFF character is sent when the RTS line goes from high to low, indicating that
the receive buffer is almost full (more that 60000 bytes present) and every time any
extra character is received in this condition.
An XON character is sent every time RTS goes from low to high (this happens also
when the printer is switched on, after the inizialization phase), indicating that space
is available in the receive buffer (less than 50000 bytes present).
The machine can go busy (RTS low, XOFF emitted) and ready (RTS high, XON
emitted) also during print, respectively before and after each label is printed, and
when it passes from ON-LINE to OFF-LINE and viceversa, but only if this mode has
been selected by setting to 1 the 14th digit of the /$&% command. Another situation
in which the machine goes busy is when it receives the VT-US-US-NAK
command sequence: in this case it goes back ready as soon as the receive buffer
is completely empty.
If a framing error is detected in the received data, the BEL character (ASCII code
7) is transmitted to inform the external device that received characters may have
been lost. This generally indicates a noisy transmission line.
See the section “Connection to external devices” for further details about the status
of the RTS line and the communication protocol.
SENSORS STATUS
Every time the ASCII control character ENQ (code 5) is processed, the printer sends
a status message consisting of an upper case letter “S”, followed by five consecutive
numeric characters (format Sprdcf), followed by a CR/LF sequence.
The message informs the external device about the possibility to successfully start
a printing session and the meaning of the characters composing it is the following:
ST 230
S
header of the status message,
p
status of the photosensor detecting the end of the label roll (0=normal,
1=end),
r
status of the photosensor detecting the end of the thermal transfer
ribbon (0=normal, 1=end),
d
status of the photosensor for label dispensing (0=no label, 1=label
present),
c
status of the sensor detecting cover open and/or print head lifted
(0=normal, 1=open/lifted),
f
flag indicating the power-on status and type of printhead installed
(0=first status message after power-on, 1=printhead with 6 dots/mm,
2=printhead with 8 dots/mm).
PROGRAMMING GUIDE
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The ENQ is processed in real time (and thus the message is immediately sent out
when ENQ is received) only if the printer is ON-LINE and it is not printing or
processing a previous command (receive buffer empty), otherwise it is buffered and
executed later, like any other command processed by the Main Command Interpreter.
PRINTER STATUS
The ASCII control characters DC2 (code 12 hex, 18 dec) and DC4 (code 14 hex,
20 dec) are sent by the printer every time in enters respectively the ON-LINE (also
at switch-on) and OFF-LINE mode, indicating wether the machine can or cannot
process commands and characters received from the external computer.
The machine switches between ON-LINE and OFF-LINE modes when the operator
presses the ON LINE key on the front panel and also goes OFF-LINE when a nonrecoverable error occurs during a printing session. If the 14th digit of the /$&%
command has been set to 1, XON and XOFF characters are also sent together with
DC2 and DC4.
The ASCII control character NAK (code 15 hex, 21 dec) is sent by the printer every
time the Command Interpreter processes a command containing a syntax error
(wrong characters, parameters out of range, etc.), when the name of a file that does
not exists is specified in the /UA: or /UB: command, or when a disk error occurs
during execution of a /UB: command.
The ASCII control character SYN (code 16 hex, 22 dec) is sent by the printer every
time the Command Interpreter processes a drawing command resulting in a
character, line or graphics block going partially or totally out of the printing area.
The ASCII control character ACK (code 6) is sent by the printer when the Command
Interpreter processes a print command (either a /Wnnnn or the FF control
character) and indicates the start of a printing session.
Every time a label is printed, or should be printed, during a printing session, a
message is sent out to indicate either the start, the end and the result of the
operation. The “status label” and copies printed with the FEED key, however, do not
generate any message.
The message is a string of 6 characters (format Prnnnn) followed by a CR+LF
sequence (8 characters in total), where the upper case letter “P” is sent just before
the paper motor starts moving and the rest of the message is sent when the printing
cycle of the single label has been completed. If the cutter or the applicator are
installed and enabled, the printing cycle includes their activation after the label has
been printed. If, for any reason, the label has not been printed, the rest of the
message immediately follows the “P”.
The four-digits field nnnn indicates the number of labels still remaining to be
printed (value ranging from 0000 to 9999), while the single-digit field r indicates the
result of the print operation, according to the following:
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r=0
the label has been successfully printed and the printing session
continues normally, unless the label counter reaches 0000, in which
case the printing session is terminated (the message P00000 may
be interpreted by the external computer as the regular completion of
the print command);
r=1
before printing the label, the photosensor has detected the end of the
roll of labels: the printing session is suspended and the printer goes
OFF-LINE;
r=2
before printing the label, the photosensor has detected the end of the
thermal transfer ribbon (only if the machine is working in thermal
transfer mode): the printing session is suspended and the printer
goes OFF-LINE;
r=3
before printing the label, the photosensor has detected that the
previous label has not yet been taken away (only if the photodispenser
is enabled): the printer remains waiting and continues sending this
message until the label is removed; this happens also if, instead of
reading the photodispenser, the machine waits for the external
START signal;
r=4
during printing, the photodispenser has detected that the label has
not been correctly dispensed (it has followed the silicon paper or it is
simply missing): the printing session is suspended after completion
of the current label and the printer goes OFF-LINE (this message can
be generated only if the photodispenser is currently enabled with the
additional dispensing check); when the applicator is installed, this
message may indicate that the START signal was issued at the wrong
time;
r=5
during printing, the ON-LINE key has been pressed, indicating that a
manual stop is requested, or the DLE-US-US-NAK command
sequence has been received: the printing session is suspended at
the completion of the current label and the printer goes OFF-LINE;
r=6
before printing the label, the temperature sensor has detected an
excessive temperature of the printhead (above 58°C): the printer
waits a few seconds and then automatically tries to restart the printing
session;
r=7
before printing the label, the cover/open or the head/lift microswitch
(that can be optionally installed on the machine) has detected that
either the cover is open or the print head is not in contact with the
paper (if the head was lifted using the mechanical handle): the
printing session is suspended and the printer goes OFF-LINE;
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r=8
after having printed the label, if the edge of the next one is not found
within 2600 dots from the top of the previous one (about 454 mm for
the 6 dots/mm printhead and 325 mm for the 8 dots/mm one), the
motor stops, the END PAPER/RIB led is turned on and the printer
goes OFF-LINE; this message can also be generated, when the
machine is equipped with the optional cutting device, if the blade gets
blocked because of a paper jam or because of excessive thickness
of the material; another situation in which this error message can be
sent is when the machine is equipped with the applicator and its
vacuum sensor has not detected the presence of the label under the
plate;
r=9
after having printed the label, if the SI-US-US-NAK command
sequence was received from the RS232 line, the printing session is
terminated before having completed the number of labels initially
requested and the machine remains ON-LINE, ready to process
further commands; this message is also generated when the “abort”
is manually issued with the key sequence ON LINE, HEAD LIFT,
FEED, with the only difference that, in this case, the message does
not start with the “P” (just the “9” followed by the four digits of the label
counter is sent).
FONT EPROM
The printed circuit board of the ST230, version B, provides 4 sockets to accomodate
up to 4 EPROMs: the fourth socket (the one closest to the big electrolytic capacitors
of the power supply) is dedicated to the font EPROM.
The data in the font EPROM have the following structure (addresses are hexadecimal,
sizes in decimal):
0000 +————————————+
|
9 character maps
0900 +————————————+
|
small font
0D80 +————————————+
|
normal font
1F80 +————————————+
|
big font
5580 +————————————+
|
symbols font
9580 +————————————+
|
pictures font
D400 +————————————+
|
reserved for
|
future use
|
FFFF +————————————+
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|
2304 bytes
|
1152 bytes
|
4608 bytes
| 13824 bytes
| 16384 bytes
| 16000 bytes
|
| 11264 bytes
|
Page 36
Each of the first 4 fonts (small, normal, big, symbols) contains 128 character
matrixes, the first 32 of which are accessible through the /S command, the other 96
are directly accessible through the ASCII code of the character to be printed
(provided that no remapping is performed).
The fifth font (pictures) contains only 10 matrixes, corresponding to the ASCII
numeric characters “0” to “9” (codes 48 to 57 dec, 30 to 39 hex).
A font editing program (FE230) is available from Leptons Italia S.p.A. for creation
of new fonts and/or customization of existing ones.
CHARACTER MAPS
To allow easy adaptation of the printer to different national languages, a set of
special characters (accented letters and other symbols) is included in the standard
font EPROM, located in the first 32 positions of each of the first three fonts (small,
normal and big). The character maps offer 9 different alternatives for matching the
physical position of any of the 128 characters of the EPROM fonts to any ASCII code,
other than the straightforward 1 to 1 (used when no map is selected).
The “code-to-position” translation mechanism is based on a character map located
in RAM memory, consisting of a 256 bytes table that can be redefined using the /
Y command. The code (0 to 255 dec, 0 to FF hex) of a printable character (either
a direct standard or extended ASCII code, or modified through the /S command)
is used as a displacement in this table to fetch the effective position of the dot matrix
inside the font (EPROM font if position is 0 to 127, RAM font if position is 128 to 255).
When the printer is switched on, the character map is initialized to the straightforward
sequence 0 to 255 (this means that character code and its position in the font are
identical and no translation is performed) if no map is selected, otherwise, if a
number greater than zero has been selected in SET-UP mode (the value is
permanently stored in non-volatile memory), the corresponding map is copied from
the font EPROM into RAM memory and becomes the active map (it can always be
mofified with the /Y command).
The following table shows the correspondence between character position in the
font and ASCII code adopted for the 9 maps contained in the standard EPROM (for
positions not listed in the table and codes marked ---, the code is equal to the position
itself):
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Pos.
M.1
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
127
91
92
93
————126
—123
124
124
-—
—-—
-—
-—
-—
-—
-—
-—
-—
-—
-—
—-—
-—
—-—
-—
-—
-—
-—
M.2
———93
91
92
——————125
123
124
———-—
-—
-—
-—
-—
-—
-—
———---—
——-—
M.3
91
92
94
93
——64
——123
124
126
125
—-—
—-—
—-—
-—
-—
-—
-—
-—
—96
——-—
-—
——-—
M.4
-—
-—
-—
-—
——————————-—
—-—
---—
-—
-—
-—
-—
-—
—96
—126
125
91
-—
—-—
M.5
M.6
M.7
M.8
M.9
-—
—142
-—
———153
————154
——-—
-—
143
————146
————157
————144
————225
————165
————132
————148
————129
————134
————145
——-—
—155
————135
——-—
—168
——-—
—164
——-—
—133
——-—
-—
138
-—
—-—
-—
151
——-—
—141
——-—
—128
——-—
—140
————149
——123
—248
————130
————161
——-—
—230
——-—
—173
——-—
35
156
-—
———232
——-—
—176
-—
—-
Map 1 = German
Map 2 = Danish/Norwegian
Map 3 = Swedish/Finnish
Map 4 = Spanish
Map 5 = French
Map 7 = IBM PC
Map 8 = not used
Map 9 = not used
SMALL FONT
Each character matrix uses 9 sequential bytes: it is 1 byte wide and 9 bytes high.
The upper row of dots corresponds to the first byte and so on. The leftmost dots
correspond to the most significant bits, “ones” are printed dots, “zeroes” are blank
dots (the typical binary representation of the bytes matches the appearance of the
dots when printed). Typically an upper case character is 7 dots high and 5 dots wide
and is aligned with the upper left corner of the 9 by 8 box (default horizontal spacing
for this font is 6 dots) and the lower 2 dot lines are used for descenders of lower case
letters.
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NORMAL FONT
Each character matrix uses 36 sequential bytes: it is 2 bytes wide and 18 lines high.
The byte sequence is “by row” (bytes 1 and 2 are respectively the left-hand and righthand halfs of the upper line of dots, and so on) and bits within bytes follow the same
rules as described for the small font. Typically an upper case character is 14 dots
high and 10 dots wide and is aligned with the upper left corner of the 18 by 16 box
(default horizontal spacing for this font is 12 dots) and the lower 4 dot lines are used
for descenders of lower case letters.
BIG FONT
Each character matrix uses 108 sequential bytes: it is 3 bytes wide and 36 lines high.
Byte and bit mapping as above. Typically an upper case character is 28 dots high
and 20 dots wide and is aligned with the upper left corner of the 36 by 24 box (default
horizontal spacing for this font is 24 dots) and the lower 8 dot lines are used for
descenders of lower case letters.
SYMBOLS FONT
Each character matrix uses 128 sequential bytes: it is 4 bytes wide and 32 lines high.
Byte and bit mapping as above. Typically symbols tend to be aligned to the lower
left corner of the 32 by 32 box, if their size is significantly smaller than the box itself
(default horizontal spacing for this font is 32 dots). Only positions 0 to 28 are
currently filled with symbols in the standard EPROM, all the others are blank.
PICTURES FONT
Each character matrix uses 1600 sequential bytes: it is 20 bytes wide and 80 lines
high. Byte and bit mapping as above. Default horizontal spacing for this font is 160
dots.
STANDARD FONTS EXAMPLE
Table "A" inserted at page 57 , includes standard example of fonts and symbols
MACRO EPROM
The printed circuit board of the ST230, version B, provides 4 sockets to accomodate
up to 4 EPROMs: the first socket (the one closest to the quartz crystal and RS232
connector) is dedicated to the user-defined macros.
Generally speaking, a “macro”, or “macro command”, consists of a sequence of
commands and/or printable characters, following exactly the same syntax previously
described for commands received from external computer, that has been “frozen”
and permanently stored in the EPROM. Needless to say, macros are an extremely
powerful tool to allow easy handling of demo labels, masks, logos (either by using
graphics commands or by composing mosaics with pieces taken from the symbols/
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pictures font), etc.
These macros may be accessed either through the /U command (when printer is
ON-LINE) and through the THERM TRANSF key (when printer is OFF-LINE) after
having pressed the HEAD LIFT key.
The macro EPROM has the following structure (addresses are hexadecimal, sizes
in decimal):
0000 +————————————+
|
macro pointers
0100 +————————————+
|
|
|
resident macros
|
|
FFFF +————————————+
|
256 bytes
|
|
| 65280 bytes
|
|
As macros have different lengths, to let the machine know at which address in the
EPROM a macro starts, a pointers table is used, holding the 99 addresses of the
99 possible macros relative to the beginning of the EPROM (2 bytes each, least
significant byte first, only the first 198 of the 256 bytes available are actually used).
Every macro must be terminated with an EOT control character (ASCII code 4).
MACRO LINKER
To automate the creation of a customized version of the EPROM, a utility program
(Macro Linker) named ML230.EXE is available upon request from Leptons Italia
S.p.A., for IBM PC and compatibles, that links together all the macros supplied by
the user (created using any available ASCII text editor or the dedicated Leptons
label editor, LW230), automatically filling the macro pointers table and placing the
EOTs at the end of each macro.
The program generates a file named ST230MAC.INT that is ready to be downloaded
into any EPROM programmer compatible with the Intel data format.
Each macro must be stored in a separate ASCII file, located in the current directory
of the disk and named MACRO#.230, where the parameter “#” indicates the macro
number and consists of 1 or 2 ASCII digits, with no leading zeroes (for example:
MACRO1.230, ..., MACRO9.230, MACRO10.230, ..., MACRO99.230).
The total number of macros is variable from 1 to 99 and they don’t need to be
numbered sequentially: missing macros are automatically replaced by an empty
one (a single EOT).
Macro 99, if present in the EPROM, is automatically executed every time the
machine is switched-on and so it may be used for a custom initialization of the
printer.
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MACRO LINKER
To automate the creation of a customized version of the EPROM, a utility program
(Macro Linker) named ML230.EXE is available upon request from Leptons Italia
S.p.A., for IBM PC and compatibles, that links together all the macros supplied by
the user (created using any available ASCII text editor or the dedicated Leptons
label editor, LW230), automatically filling the macro pointers table and placing the
EOTs at the end of each macro.
The program generates a file named ST230MAC.INT that is ready to be downloaded
into any EPROM programmer compatible with the Intel data format.
Each macro must be stored in a separate ASCII file, located in the current directory
of the disk and named MACRO#.230, where the parameter “#” indicates the macro
number and consists of 1 or 2 ASCII digits, with no leading zeroes (for example:
MACRO1.230, ..., MACRO9.230, MACRO10.230, ..., MACRO99.230).
The total number of macros is variable from 1 to 99 and they don’t need to be
numbered sequentially: missing macros are automatically replaced by an empty
one (a single EOT).
Macro 99, if present in the EPROM, is automatically executed every time the
machine is switched-on and so it may be used for a custom initialization of the
printer.
BUILT-IN MACROS
An additional set of predefined macros is also available, containing several print
samples and some proportionally spaced fonts. These macros are stored in the
program EPROMs (located on the two central sockets) and can be accessed either
through serial line with the /UA:nnnnnnnn command, where nnnnnnnn
represents the macro name, and through front panel with the RIBBON ECONOM
key in OFF-LINE/HEAD-LIFT mode. Only the 10 macros from MACRO-A (1
keypress) to MACRO-J (10 keypresses) can be executed manually, the others
(proportional fonts) can only be activated by the /U command from external
computer.
Listing of these macros are included in the following pages together with printed
examples.
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Macro name: MACRO-A
It prints two copies of a demo label that also includes the printhead temperature,
using the currently set parameters. Here follow the listing and a printed sample:
/C
/E00800085/M03400060030
/E00800085/M03400060030
/E00000150/M05000040020
/E00000200/M02100110003
/E00000320/L0050004
/E02300320/L1013004
/E00050060/F143LEPTONS/F211 ITALIA
/E01400130/R02/F211* ST230 *
/E01050160/R01/M02920020010
/E01070177/R00/F111THERMAL TRANSFER PRINTER
/E00600225/F022STOCK no.
/E00100270/F2211770
/E00300295/F111Temp.= /I0
/E00200425/R30/F121LOT.
/E00550420/F21124
/E02400335/R00/F021PROD.CODE
/E03000450/F244A1
/E02700210/A230/R00/B3090*1770*
/E00700420/A230/R30/B413024
/W0002
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Macro name: MACRO-B
It prints two copies of a simple demo label using the currently set parameters. Here
follow the listing and a printed sample:
/C
/E00800085/M03400060030
/E00050060/R00/F212LEPTONS ITALIA S.p.A.
/E01850130/R02/F211ST230
/E00500200/A211/B3100*ASDF1234*
/W0002
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Macro name: MACRO-C
It prints two copies of a demo label including a three-digit sequential number drawn
with the biggest characters size available from the standard EPROM fonts, using the
currently set parameters. Here follow the listing and a printed sample:
/C
/E00000280/F289/I1300000101
/W0002
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Macro name: MACRO-D
It prints two copies of a demo label that mimics the so-called AIAG label (reduced
version of the ODETTE label), used in the automotive industry, using the currently
set parameters. Here follow the listing and a printed sample:
/D0160...binary data...
(download small font)
/C
/E00240000/M06120869002
/E04550000/L1086902
/E02850000/L1086902
/E01640000/L1086902
/E00850521/L1034902
/E04550372/L2017002
/E02850521/L2026102
/R10
/F012/T1
/E06180006PART No.
(P)
/E04360006QUANTITY
(Q)
/E04360378PURCHASE ORDER
(A)
/E02670006SUPPLIER
(V)
/E02670526ENG. CHANGE LEVEL
(2P)
/E01450006SERIAL No.
(S)
/E01450526DESCRIPTION
/E00670526MFG DATE
/E05640114/F232/T01234567890
/E05510046/A230/B3085*P1234567890*
/E03880086/F222123456
/E03820046/A230/B3085*Q123456*
/E03880515/F2121234567890
/E03820418/A230/B3085*A1234567890*
/E02480114/F2111234567890
/E02420046/A230/B3073*V1234567890*
/E02480686/F211ABC
/E02420566/A230/B3073*2PABC*
/E01270114/F2111234567890
/E01150046/A230/B3073*S1234567890*
/E00970629/F222GEAR
/E00420629/F21113-12-90
/W0002
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Macro name: MACRO-E
This macro simply consists of the command /W9999, that will continuously print
the last label printed (it will reprint the “status label” or it will simply feed the paper
if nothing is present in the memory of the printer).
Macro name: MACRO-F
It prints two copies of a complex demo label that also includes proportionally spaced
fonts and bit-mapped graphics, using the currently set parameters. Here follow the
listing (bynary data of download fonts and graphics are not actually displayed) and
a printed sample:
/Y...binary data...
(download char. map to reset mega
font)
/D0160...binary data...
(download small font)
/D2160...binary data...
(download big font)
/D6176273...binary data...
(download mega font)
/C
/E00340345/Q0240120...binary data...
(download ST230
logo)
/E03910315/Q0220185...binary data...
(download flower
logo)
/E00010001/R02/M05760543003
/E00040087/R02/L0023902
/E00040172/R02/L0023902
/E00040230/R02/L0023902
/E00040236/R02/L0024302
/E02440004/R02/L1022802
/E02480004/R02/L1023402
/E00060007/R02/M02320076042
/E00120073/R02/F222/X000-02/T0LW23O
/E00050165/R02/F411/X000-80/T001
/E00180200/R02/F311/X000-02/T0#&-*024
/E00180229/R02/F311/X000-02/T0@ACcghZ
/E01810150/R02/F011/T1LABELEX
ST230
/E02620298/R02/F011/T1Thermal
Transfer
Printer
/E03720452/R32/F211/X000-01/T1Label Editor for LABELEX ST230
/E00120525/R02/F212/T1Leptons Italia
/E02100525/R02/F211/T1S.p.A.
/E03300529/R02/F211/T1Via Meccanica, 5
/E02800496/R02/F211/T120083 Gaggiano (MI)
/E04040019/R12/F612/T1LW230/E02600265/R32/A221/T0/
B404808012345678907
/E00330253/R02/A223/T0/B00578012345678907
/E03110457/R22/A121/T0/B3114*ST*
/E02480282/R00/M00910046002
/W0002
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Macro name: MACRO-G
It prints two copies of a demo label including several types of barcodes, using the
default parameters stored in the non- volatile memory of the machine. Here follow
the listing and a printed sample:
/Z/C
/E00200040/R00/A211/B0130222222222222
/E04000045/R10/A211/B11305555555
/E00200200/R00/A221/B41301234567890
/E04000200/R10/A211/B3130*ABCD*
/E04200045/R00/A211/B5050a1234b
/E05500160/R10/A431/B41001234
/W0002
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Macro name: MACRO-H
It prints a demo label showing all the possible vertical expansions of the same
character, using the currently set parameters. Here follow the listing (please note
that all the /F commands are on the same line, that has been broken here only for
readability) and a printed sample:
/C
/E00000280/F211A/F212A/F213A/F214A/F215A/F216A/F217A/F218A
/F219A/F218A/F217A/F216A/F215A/F214A/F213A/F212A/F211A
/W0001
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Macro name: MACRO-I
It prints two copies of a demo label particularly useful to demonstrate the functionment
of the speed and ribbon optimization. Ribbon saving can be directly switched from
the front panel in OFF-LINE mode. Here follows the listing:
/C
11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111
22222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222222
33333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333333
/W0002
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Macro name: MACRO-J
It prints two copies of a demo label consisting of 20 lines of 50 small characters each,
using the currently set parameters. Here follow the listing and a printed sample:
/C/F011
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
/W0002
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Macro name: MAPIBM
This macro contains the /Y command followed by the character map corresponding
to the MAP #7 of the font EPROM (IBM PC international character set). It may be
used either to force this character set independently of what map is selected by
default, or to release the memory space taken by the magnum and mega fonts.
Macro name: MAPSTD
As above, but corresponding to the MAP #0 of the font EPROM (no character
translation performed).
Macro names:
F8X8T
F8X16T
These two macros download respectively a “small” and a “normal” proportionally
spaced RAM fonts containing the characters shown in the following printed
example:
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Macro names:
HELV4B
HELV7B
HELV14B
HELV24B
These four macros download respectively a “normal”, “big”, “magnum” and “mega”
proportionally spaced RAM fonts containing the characters shown in the following
printed examples:
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Macro names:
CHART4
CHART7
CHART14
These three macros download respectively a “normal”, “big” and “magnum”
proportionally spaced RAM fonts containing the characters shown in the following
printed examples:
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TABLE "A"
EXAMPLE OF STANDARD FONTS - SYMBOLS AND PICTURES
SMALL FONT
NORMAL FONT
BIG FONT
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SYMBOLS
PICTURES
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