EDITH COWAN UNIVERSITY

EDITH COWAN UNIVERSITY
EDITH COWAN UNIVERSITY
JOONDALUP CAMPUS
270 Joondalup Drive
JOONDALUP WA 6027
Phone: 13 43 28
Fax: (08) 9300 1257
MOUNT LAWLEY CAMPUS
2 Bradford Street
MOUNT LAWLEY WA 6050
Phone: 13 43 28
Fax: (08) 9370 2910
SOUTH WEST CAMPUS
Robertson Drive
BUNBURY WA 6230
Phone: 13 43 28
Fax: (08) 9780 7800
ECU EMAIL and WEB ADDRESS
[email protected]
www.ecu.edu.au
2
This report is available in PDF format from the ECU
website: www.ecu.edu.au/pr/annualreports.html.
To minimise download times and reduce printing,
the report is provided in chapters, as well as a
single document.
ECU encourages you to use recycled paper and to
print the report and/ or its sections in double-sided
formats.
The Annual Report references other documents
obtainable from the ECU website. If you have
difficulties accessing any of these documents,
or you require the Annual Report in an alternative
format, then please contact [email protected]
Official correspondence relating to the Annual Report
should be addressed to:
Council Secretary
Edith Cowan University
270 Joondalup Drive
JOONDALUP WA 6027
Contents
SECTION 1: OVERVIEW4
Figures and Tables
Statement of Compliance
5
Chancellor’s Foreword
6
Figure 1: ECU Organisational Structure as at
31 December 20129
Vice-Chancellor’s Executive Summary
7
Figure 2: ECU Committees as at 31 December 201210
About ECU
8
Figure 3: Unit and Teaching Satisfaction, 2008-201224
Organisational Structure
9
Figure 4: Graduate Satisfaction, 2007-201125
Committee Structure
10
Governance Structure – Council Membership 2012
11
Work Of The Governing Council
14
SECTION 2A: PERFORMANCE – SUMMARY OF
PERFORMANCE AGAINST FINANCIAL AND KEY
PERFORMANCE INDICATOR TARGETS16
SECTION 2B: PERFORMANCE – REPORT ON
OPERATIONS18
SECTION 2C: PERFORMANCE – REPORT ON KEY
PERFORMANCE INDICATORS36
Report Certification
37
SECTION 3: SIGNIFICANT ISSUES46
SECTION 4: DISCLOSURES
AND LEGAL COMPLIANCE
50
Auditor General’s Statement
51
Certification Of Financial Statements
53
Financial Statements
54
Additional Facts And Statistics
142
Other Financial Disclosures
147
Governance Disclosures
150
Other Legal Requirements
151
Figure 5: Higher Degree by Research Graduate
Satisfaction, 2007-2011
Figure 6: Mid CEQ Mean Scores, 2008-2012
30
145
Table 1: Financial Ratios, 201217
Table 2: Summary of Performance against
KPI Targets17
Table 3: Enrolments by Course Level, 2008-201224
Table 4: Research Block Funding by Category,
2008-2012($m)29
Table 5: Research Funding by Category,
2008-2012 ($m)29
Table 6: Higher Degree by Research Student
Load, 2008-201229
Table 7: Student Load (EFTSL) by Funding
Category, 2008-201233
Table 8: Retention Commencing Bachelor
Pass Students38
Table 9: Undergraduate CEQ Course Satisfaction39
Table 10: Undergraduate CEQ Good Teaching Scale39
Table 11: Domestic Bachelor Course Level
Graduates in Full-time Employment40
Table 12: Undergraduate Share of First Preferences40
Table 13: Teaching-related Expenditure per
Student Load41
Table 14: Research Income ($m)42
Table 15: Higher Degree Research Completions
by level, total number and per 10
Academic FTE43
Table 16: Research and Development Weighted
Publications per 10 Academic FTE44
Table 17: Enrolments by Type of Attendance,
2008-2012142
Table 18: Enrolments by Campus, 2008-2012142
Table 19: Enrolments by Gender, 2008-2012142
Table 20: Enrolments Domestic/International
by Broad Course Level, 2008-2012143
Table 21: Enrolments by Country/Region,
2008-2012143
Table 22: Enrolments by Equity Group,
2008-2012144
Table 23: Student Load (EFTSL) by Broad Field
of Education, 2008-2012144
Table 24: Student Load (EFTSL) by Faculty,
2008-2012145
Table 25: Completions by Course Level,
2007-2011146
Table 26: Library Holdings, 2008-2012146
Table 27: Revenue ($’000), 2008-2012146
Table 28: Major Capital Projects Completed, 2012147
Table 29: Major Capital Projects in Progress, 2012147
Table 30: Academic Staff by Contract Type,
2008-2012148
Table 31: General Staff by Contract Type,
2008-2012148
Table 32: Performance against 2011/12 Injury
Management Targets149
Table 33: Advertising Expenditure, 2012151
3
SECTION 1
overview
4
STATEMENT OF COMPLIANCE
Minister for Education
10th Floor, Dumas House
2 Havelock Street
WEST PERTH WA 6005
14 March 2013
Dear Minister
In accordance with section 61 of the Financial Management Act 2006 (WA), we hereby submit for your information
and presentation to Parliament, the Annual Report of Edith Cowan University for the year ending 31 December 2012.
The Annual Report has been prepared in accordance with the provisions of the Financial Management Act 2006 (WA)
and is made in accordance with a resolution of the University’s Council.
Yours sincerely
The Hon Dr Hendy Cowan
Chancellor
On behalf of the University Council
Edith Cowan University
270 Joondalup Drive
JOONDALUP WA 6027
5
CHANCELLOR’S
FOREWORD
The University Council and the senior management of
the University continue to work together to support the
University in achieving its objectives.
A highlight for Council was the report from the Tertiary
Education Quality and Standards Agency (TEQSA)
Audit conducted late in 2011. The Report, received in
June 2012, identified a number of strengths and these
are outlined within this Annual Report. The quality of
governance and of the work of Council was listed as one
of the commendations:
Edith Cowan University is commended for the strength
of its University Council and leadership team, who
have infused the University community and its partners
with self confidence and a vision that is outwardlooking and sensitive to the needs of the communities
they serve.1
I am grateful for the work of my fellow Council Members
in providing a cohesive and effective governing body that
interacts well with senior management of the University.
A number of key initiatives were progressed during the
year, including planning for the ECU Health Centre, in
which the Wanneroo GP Super Clinic will be housed.
Construction work on the ECU Health Centre will
commence in early 2013. Construction on the Joondalup
Campus was started in the second half of the year on
Building 34. This will provide much needed space for
a range of student amenities and free-up space for
research.
1. Report of an Audit of Edith Cowan University June 2012, TEQSA.
6
The University, its students and staff achieved success in
a number of areas. These achievements are highlighted
within this Annual Report and it has been a pleasure to
hear of these successes at Council meetings throughout
the year.
2012 saw the successful introduction of the Student
Services and Amenities Fee. ECU set the fee at a modest
level to allow the Guild and the University the opportunity
to undertake the necessary negotiations to establish
appropriate consultation mechanisms and to commence
discussions around the priorities for student services.
Council noted the continued high performance of ECU on
measures of student and staff satisfaction. These survey
results are only part of the information gathered by the
University, and regular oversight by Council of a full
range of indicators has confirmed that targets are being
achieved or substantial progress being made towards
achievement.
Importantly, the University achieved its 2012 financial targets.
The budget for 2013 was approved at the December 2012
meeting of Council, and will provide a sound financial basis to
support the strategic goals of the University for 2013.
Council is fortunate to have outstanding community and
business leaders amongst its members. At the end of 2012
Council recognised the contributions of two highly regarded
members; Mr Neil Douglas and Professor Ron Oliver who
each concluded their third term on Council.
It is an honour to continue to serve as Chancellor of ECU and
to work with outstanding students, staff and Council members.
As will be seen from the Annual Report, our students, staff and
graduates continue to achieve great results.
The Hon Dr Hendy Cowan
Chancellor, March 2013
VICECHANCELLOR’S
Executive
SUMMARY
In our 21st year in 2012, I was delighted to receive
notification that ECU was named in the inaugural
Times Higher Education 100 under 50 list of the world’s
best universities less than 50 years of age. This is an
outstanding achievement given the large number of
universities in that age category. It is evidence that our
University is progressing well. We have much of which to
be proud.
During 2012 the findings of the Cycle Two Audit of
ECU, undertaken in late 2011, were reported by the
Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency.
With seven commendations, eight affirmations and six
recommendations, the report of the Audit Panel was
very positive, stating we demonstrated a clear sense of
direction and commitment to ensuring quality in all our
operations. I acknowledge and thank all staff, students,
Council and other committee members, and all of our
stakeholders who were involved in aspects of the audit
process, for their valuable input.
Our strong focus on doing the right thing by our students
continues to be evident with ECU again receiving a
five-star rating in the Good Universities Guide for our
teaching quality and graduate satisfaction. ECU was one
of only five universities in Australia to receive a five-star
rating in both of these categories.
In another student satisfaction survey, the annual
International Student Barometer; ECU’s Graduate
Research School received the highest satisfaction rating
(98 per cent) of the 18 Australian institutions surveyed and
the second highest rating of the more than 100 institutions
surveyed internationally.
Many of our students have excelled during this past year.
Some of the most notable achievements are included
in this Annual Report. On behalf of the whole University
community, I congratulate our students on their individual
and team efforts, nationally and internationally. To those
who graduated in 2012, I encourage you to continue your
association with ECU through our Alumni chapters.
To those who will be continuing their studies, I wish
you every success in achieving your goals.
Our staff are also to be commended for their fine
achievements. Our researchers were awarded four
National Health and Medical Research Council grants
this year – they include Professors Beth Armstrong (who
received grants for two different projects), Donna Cross
and Associate Professor Mel Ziman.
In addition to Professor Donna Cross being the WA
Australian of the Year for 2012, a number of our
University’s community were also recognised in the
Australia Day and Queen’s Birthday Honours lists,
including Professor Caroline Taylor and Professor Colleen
Hayward who were each appointed as Members of the
Order of Australia. Professors Cross and Hayward were
also named WA Ambassadors for Children and Young
People.
More recently, Professor Daniel Galvão was named
the WA Young Tall Poppy Science Award winner for his
research excellence, which focuses on the effects of
exercise on cancer treatment. These achievements by
staff are fine examples of ECU’s commitment to making a
positive difference to our communities.
This year, for the first time, we were able to benchmark
our biennial staff satisfaction survey against 37 other
universities in Australia and New Zealand. Not only was
our response rate the highest (at 78 per cent) over the past
ten years, but the comparison also showed that ECU staff
reported considerably higher levels of engagement and
commitment to their University than their peers in the other
universities. Very significantly, on all 44 benchmarked
items ECU exceeded the average of the 38 Australian/
New Zealand universities taking part in the survey.
We welcomed Emeritus Professor Sally Walker AM,
Secretary-General of the Law Council of Australia as the
Vice-Chancellor’s Distinguished Orator for 2012. Professor
Walker’s superb oration “What it means to be a member of a
profession: opportunities and responsibilities for lawyers to
make a difference” is available on our website.
During 2012 we farewelled our senior colleague, Professor
Tony Watson, after some 37 years at ECU and precursor
institutions, the last nine of which were at a very senior
academic leadership level.
Professor Ron Oliver was appointed to the new position
of Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Teaching, Learning and
International) to further strengthen ECU’s approach to quality
and “Internationalisation”; Mr Scott Henderson commenced
as Vice-President (Corporate Services); Professor Colleen
Hayward AM, was appointed Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Equity and
Indigenous); and two new Pro-Vice-Chancellors/Executive
Deans commenced – Professor Lynne Cohen in Education
and Arts, and Professor Ken Greenwood in Computing,
Health and Science.
From the beginning of 2012, after some years of preparation
we implemented our new policy of “smoke-free” on all parts of
all campuses at ECU. We are very pleased with the success
of this health initiative which has been very widely supported
throughout the University.
It is my pleasure to acknowledge and thank all ECU staff,
students, graduates, committee members and all of our
University stakeholders for their many and varied contributions,
which are not always publicly recognised.
Finally, I express my gratitude to our Council members for their
valuable time, inputs and commitment to our University, and
particularly to our exceptional Chancellor, the Hon Dr Hendy
Cowan, for his leadership, support and ongoing helpfulness to
the ECU community.
Professor Kerry O. Cox
Vice-Chancellor, March 2013
7
About ECU
Edith Cowan University is a large, multi-campus
institution serving communities in Western Australia
and internationally. The University has two metropolitan
campuses at Mount Lawley and Joondalup, and also
serves Western Australia’s South West Region from a
campus at Bunbury, 200 km south of Perth.
Awarded university status in 1991, ECU has since
developed innovative and practical courses across a
wide range of disciplines and has a vibrant research
culture with high quality researchers and research
partners, working at the cutting edge of their fields.
ECU works hard to develop productive and mutually
beneficial partnerships with its varied stakeholders.
ECU has almost 24,000 students at undergraduate
and postgraduate levels. Approximately 4,000 of
these are international students originating from
over 90 countries.
More than 300 courses are offered through four faculties:
zz Business
and Law;
zz Computing,
Health and Science;
zz Education
and Arts, which includes the Western
Australian Academy of Performing Arts (WAAPA); and
zz Regional
Professional Studies.
ECU is committed to breaking down barriers to higher
education through its school and community outreach
activities, multiple entry pathways and flexible learning
options.
8
Purpose, Vision and Values
Purpose
To further develop valued citizens for the benefit
of Western Australia and beyond, through
teaching and research inspired by engagement
and partnerships.
Vision
For our students, staff and graduates to be highly
regarded internationally as ethical and engaged
contributors to more inclusive, sustainable and
prosperous communities.
Strategic Direction
ECU’s strategic direction was reviewed in 2012. Students,
senior staff and Council members were consulted on
possible revisions to the University’s purpose, vision and
strategic priorities, cognisant of ECU’s achievements
and changes in the internal and external environment in
which ECU operates since the document was originally
approved in 2006.
ECU’s revised strategic direction (Edith Cowan
University: Engaging Minds; Engaging Communities.
Towards 2020) was approved by Council at its
13 December 2012 meeting.
Strategic Priorities
Values
zz Integrity
1. To create positive outcomes in our communities
through mutually beneficial engagement.
zz Respect
2. To deliver accessible world-class education and
an enriching student experience.
zz Rational
3. To enhance the personal and professional
outcomes
of graduates.
– behaving ethically and pursuing
rigorous intellectual positions
– valuing individual differences
and diversity
inquiry – motivated by evidence and
reasoning
zz Personal
potential
Excellence – striving to realise
4. To strengthen research capability, capacity,
translation and impact.
5. To enhance organisational resilience,
sustainability
and reputation.
ORGANISATIONAL
STRUCTURE
Vice-President
(Corporate Services)
Mr S Henderson
Finance & Business
Services Centre
(FBSC)
Mr B Francis
Chief Financial Officer
Facilities & Services
Centre (FSC)
Mr B Yearwood
Director
IT Services Centre
(ITSC)
Mrs E Wilson
Chief Information
Officer
Deputy ViceChancellor (Research
and Advancement)
Prof. J Finlay-Jones
Pro-Vice Chancellor
(Health Advancement)
Prof. C Rudd
Office of Research
and Innovation (ORI)
Dr Margaret Jones
Graduate Research
School (GRS)
Prof. J Luca
Dean
Office of
Advancement
Dr A Medhurst
Director
University Council
Vice-Chancellor
Prof. Kerry O. Cox
Pro-Vice Chancellor
(Equity and
Indigenous)
Prof. C Hayward
Deputy Vice
Chancellor
(Academic)
Prof. A Omari
Deputy Vice Chancellor
(Teaching, Learning
and International)
Prof. R Oliver
Human Resources
Service Centre
(HRSC)
Mr R Bernstein
Director
Centre for Learning
and Development
(CLD)
Prof. S Stoney
Head
Office of Legal
Services
Ms J Quinn
General Counsel
Library Services
Centre (LSC)
Mr D Howard
University Librarian
Planning, Quality
and Equity Services
Centre
Mr A Lazzara
Director
Office of Academic
Governance
Mrs G McQuillan
Manager
Marketing &
Communications
Services Centre
Mrs J Tuner
Director
Risk and Assurance
Services Centre
(RASC)
Mr P Draber
Director
Office of Governance
Services
Mrs J Tracey
Director
Student Services
Centre (SSC)
Dr G Jackson
Director
Figure 1: ECU Organisational Structure as at 31 December 2012.
ECU International
(ECUI)
Prof. G Shen
Dean
Pro-Vice Chancellor
(Engagement: Science,
Technology
and Engineering)
Prof. K Greenwood
Faculty of Computing,
Health and Science
(FCHS)
Prof. K Greenwood
Executive Dean
Computer and Security
Science
Pro-Vice Chancellor
(Engagement:
Business, Law
and Government)
Prof. A Islam
Faculty of Business
and Law (FBL)
Prof. A Islam
Executive Dean
Accounting Finance
and Economics
Law and Justice
Engineering
Management
Exercise and Health
Sciences
Marketing, Tourism
and Leisure
Medical Sciences
Centre for Planning
Pro-Vice Chancellor
(Engagement:
Communities)
Prof. L Cohen
Faculty of Education
and Arts (FEA)
Prof. L Cohen
Executive Dean
Communications
and Arts
WA Academy of
Performing Arts
(WAAPA)
Kurongkurl Katitjin
Education
Natural Sciences
Nursing and Midwifery
Psychology and Social
Science
Faculty of Regional
Professional Studies
(FRPS)
Mr R Irvine
Dean
9
Committee
Structure
University Council
Council Executive
Academic Board
Vice Chancellor
Resources Committee
Academic Services Committee
Vice-Chancellor’s Planning
and Management Group
Quality Audit and
Risk Committee
Legislative Sub-commitee
Nominations Committee
Legislative Committee
Remuneration Committee
Governance Committee
Honorary Awards Committee
South West Campus (Bunbury)
Advisory Board
Curriculum Teaching and
Learning Committee
Research and Higher Degrees
Committee
Student Appeals Committee
Human Research Ethics
Committee
Animal Ethics Committee
Figure 2: ECU Committees as at 31 December 2012.
Indigenous Consultative
Committee
Indigenous Employment
Sub-committee
ICT Advisory Group
Occupational Health and
Safety Policy Committee
ECU Foundation Board
10
Disability Access and
Inclusion Sub-commitee
Vice-Chancellor’s Student
Advisory Forum
WA Academy of Performing
Arts Board
Fees Allocation Committee
Equity Committee
Provides advice and
reports for noting
Institutional Bio-safety
Committee
Governance
Structure
Council Membership for 2012
Member
Term
Date term
commenced / ended
Council meetings
attended
Chancellor (ECU Act, section 12(1))
Hon Dr Hendy Cowan
01.01.2011 – 31.12.2013
01.01.2008 – 31.12.2010
01.01.2005 – 31.12.2007
Current
5
Members appointed by the Governor (ECU Act, section 9(1)(a))
Mr Eddie Bartnik
12.06.2012 – 11.06.2015
Term commenced
12.06.2012
4(4)
Mr John Cahill
09.08.2011 – 08.08.2014
Current
6
Ms Leslie Chalmers
27.04.2011 – 26.04.2014
27.04.2008 – 26.04.2011
12.04.2005 – 26.04.2008
Current
6
Hon Dr Hendy Cowan
31.01.2010 – 30.01.2013
01.03.2007 – 30.01.2010
01.03.2004 – 28.02.2007
Current
5
Mr Kempton Cowan
19.12.2012 – 18.12.2015
20.12.2009 – 19.12.2012
20.12.2006 – 19.12.2009
Current
3
Dr Pamela Garnett
20.09.2012 – 19.09.2015
22.09.2009 – 21.09.2012
Current
5
11
Member
Date term commenced /
ended
Term
Council
meetings attended
Member nominated by Minister charged with administration of the School Education Act 1999 (WA)
(ECU Act, section 9(1)(aa))
Dr Norman Ashton
30.08.2011 – 29.08.2014
30.08.2008 – 29.08 2011
30.08.2005 – 29.08.2008
Current
4(5)
Current
6
Chief Executive Officer – ex-officio (ECU Act, section 9(1)(b))
Professor Kerry O. Cox
Ex-officio
Academic Staff – elected (ECU Act, section 9(1)(c))
Associate Professor Ute
Mueller
01.10.2012 – 30.09.2015
16.05.2011 – 31.09.2012
Current
5
Professor Ron Oliver
01.10.2009 – 30.09.2012
01.10.2006 – 30.09.2009
01.10.2002 – 30.09.2006
Term ended 30.09.2012
3(4)
Professor Mark Stoney
01.10.2012 – 30.09.2015
Term commenced
01.10.2012
2(2)
Salaried Staff, Other than Academic Staff – elected (ECU Act, section 9(1)(d))
Ms Valentina Bailey
01.10.2012 – 30.09.2015
01.10.2009 – 30.09.2012
01.04.2009 – 30.09.2009
Current
6
Enrolled Students – elected (ECU Act, section 9(1)(e))
Mr Peter Blakers
10.10.2012 – 09.10.2013
Term commenced
10.10.2011
2(2)
Mr Luke Butler
10.10.2011 – 09.10.2012
Term ended 09.10.2012
1(2)
Ms Nadia Louw
10.10.2012 – 09.10.2013
Term commenced
10.10.2011
2(2)
Mr David Trescuri
10.10.2011 – 09.10.2012
Term ended 09.10.2012
3(4)
Alumni – elected (ECU Act, section 9(1)(f))
12
Mr Henry Heng
20.12.2008 – 19.12.2011
Term ended 19.12.2011
6
Mr Brad McManus
22.12.2011 – 21.12.2014
Current
6
Member
Ms Julien Proud
Term
20.09.2010 – 19.09.2013
01.04.2009 – 19.09.2010
Date term commenced /
ended
Council
meetings attended
Current
Members co-opted by Council (ECU Act, section 9(1)(i))
Ms Janet Curran
20.09.2012 – 19.09.2015
20.09.2009 – 19.09.2012
Current
1(1)
Mr Neil Douglas
18.03.2009 – 17.03.2012
18.03.2006 – 17.03.2009
Term ended 17.03.2012
1(1)
Ms Kelly Hick
18.03.2012 – 17.03.2015
Term commenced
18.03.2012
5
Mr Simon Holthouse
12.09.2010 – 11.09.2013
12.09.2007 – 11.09.2010
Current
5
Ms Denise McComish
(Pro-Chancellor since
25.08.2011)
22.03.2010 – 21.03.2013
22.03.2007 – 21.03.2010
Current
4
Dr Saliba Sassine
17.11.2012 – 16.11.2015
25.08.2011 – 16.11.2012
Current
5
* Council held six regular meeting during the year. The bracketed figures indicate the potential number of attendances for
members whose term of office did not cover the full year,
or who had leave of absence during the year.
**N/A indicates that the member was not a member of a Council Committee or Board during the year.
Additional Council membership information can be viewed at Members of Council.
13
Work of the
Governing Council
ECU’s enabling Act provides that the Council is the
governing authority of the University. The fundamental
responsibilities of the Council are to determine the
strategic direction and governance framework of the
University. The Council is chaired by the Chancellor
and consists of the Vice-Chancellor (ex-officio)
and members drawn from the community and the
University’s alumni, students and staff. Council
members fulfil an important duty for the University
and the community and do so on an honorary basis.
Under the chairmanship of its Chancellor, the Hon Dr
Hendy Cowan, the Council met on seven occasions
during 2012, holding six regular meetings, and one
half-day workshop.
The major activities of Council in 2012 fell into
four categories:
zz strategic
direction of the University;
zz self-governance
zz governance
of the Council;
of the University; and
zz compliance.
Strategic Direction of the University
Major strategic issues considered by Council in
2012 included:
zz Tertiary
Education Quality and Standards Agency
(TEQSA) Audit – Key Outcomes and Action Plan
(the Audit was conducted in October 2011 and the
final report issued in July 2012);
14
zz Final
investment decision to continue with the
Wanneroo GP Super Clinic Project;
zz Report
against the Reconciliation Action Plan,
2011/2012 and a revised Reconciliation Action Plan,
2012/13-2014/15;
zz Student
engagement and support at ECU;
zz Review
of ECU’s strategic direction;
zz ECU’s
new Curriculum Framework
(Curriculum 2012 Project);
zz ECU
Foundation Fundraising Plan;
zz Strategic
Risk Management;
zz Revision
of the key performance indicator
framework; and
zz ECU
Key Actions for 2013.
To inform and enhance Council’s role in shaping the
strategic direction of the University, presentations on
key issues and themes were discussed in the Council’s
meeting program throughout 2012 including:
zz Engagement
zz Progression
zz Enrolment
Functional Plan;
zz Supporting
Financial Sustainability;
zz International
zz Teaching
zz ECU’s
Functional Plan;
rates of alternate entry program students;
Functional Plan;
and Learning Functional Plan;
communication strategy;
zz Graduate
employment outcomes; and
zz Research
and Research Training Functional Plan.
A Council workshop was held in November 2012 and
considered revisions to ECU’s strategic direction and
performance monitoring and reporting under a proposed
new Performance Indicator Framework.
At its December 2012 meeting, Council considered and
approved the Budget for 2013.
Self-governance of the Council
Council’s statement on corporate governance was put in
place in December 2002. The Corporate Governance
Statement assists current and commencing members of
Council, executive management and senior staff of the
University in carrying out their roles. It also helps students
and staff of the broader University community to be kept
informed about governance processes at the University,
and serves a similar purpose for the external community,
including stakeholders such as governments.
ECU’s governing Council has affirmed a commitment
to monitor its performance against the Voluntary
Code of Best Practice for the Governance of
Australian Universities.
Each year Council undertakes a self-evaluation and
in 2012 an online questionnaire asked members to
assess their own performance and that of Council.
An independent reviewer received the responses and
prepared a report for the Chancellor. The report arising
from the 2012 evaluation confirmed that governance
remains robust at ECU, with the skills and expertise of
Council members, the leadership of the Chancellor and
Council’s working relationship with the Vice-Chancellor
highlighted as particular strengths. The work of Council
committees was also considered to be highly effective.
Governance of the University
Key Council activities in 2012 relating to the governance of
the University included:
zz Regular
meetings of Council committees. Reports
from these committees were subsequently provided
to Council to keep it informed of activities across the
academic and operational areas of the University.
zz The
Vice-Chancellor provided mid-year and end-ofyear reports on the performance of the University
against its key performance indicators.
zz In
June and December 2012, the Vice-Chancellor
reported on progress against the Key Actions for 2012,
as previously approved by Council.
zz Amendments
were made to a number of Councilapproved policies;
zz Reviews
of two Statutes were completed and new
Statutes were gazetted;
zz Amendments
Rules; and
were made, as requested, to University
zz All
members of Council were offered professional
development opportunities throughout the year.
Compliance
The 2011 Annual Report was approved by Council
and submitted to the State Minister for Education in
accordance with the required timelines.
The Council’s monitoring of the University, particularly
through the Resources Committee and the Quality, Audit
and Risk Committee, provided assurance to Council that
the University has in place appropriate risk management,
financial and quality controls.
At its August 2012 meeting, Council reviewed TEQSA’s
Provider Threshold Standards as they pertained to
governance and noted that the University complied with
the Standards with one exception – the completion of a
Fit and Proper Person Declaration. Council resolved that
new members be asked to complete the Declaration at the
time of appointment to Council and that current Council
members complete a Declaration before the end of 2012.
These Declarations were completed as required.
The Voluntary Code of Best Practice for the Governance
of Australian Universities (Item 14) requires that
a university should disclose in its annual report its
compliance with the Voluntary Code of Best Practice and
provide reasons for any areas of non-compliance. At its
August 2012 meeting Council confirmed that it continued
to comply with the Voluntary Code of Best Practice
(formerly National Governance Protocols). Council is
satisfied that the University is compliant with the new
Code of Best Practice.
Item 4 of the Voluntary Code of Best Practice (which
deals with procedures for the removal of the Chancellor
or Pro-Chancellor) does not apply, as the University’s
legislation does not contain the relevant provisions.
That notwithstanding, in 2012 the Governance
Committee reviewed the Corporate Governance
Statement and the Council Standing Orders to provide
greater guidance to Council on this issue.
15
SECTION 2A
PERFORMANCE
SUMMARY OF PERFORMANCE AGAINST FINANCIAL
AND KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATOR TARGETS
16
Performance against
Financial Targets
Performance against Key Performance
Indicator Targets
2012 Operating Result
The Key Performance Indicator Report begins on page 36 of this Annual Report and gives detailed information on the
University’s performance against nine Key Performance Indicators (KPIs). These are a sub-set of ECU’s KPI Framework,
which is used by the University for performance monitoring.
The University posted a 2012 operating result of $28 million
for the year, which was an increase of $1 million from the
original budget ($27 million).
2012 Revenue
Table 2: Summary of Performance against KPI Targets
Total revenue for the University in 2012 was $375 million,
which represents an increase of $16 million compared to
original budget ($359 million).
2012 Financial Ratios
Table 1: Financial Ratios, 2012
Actual
Total
Revenue
Operating
Margin
Interest
cover on
borrowings
$375m
Target
Variance / Comment
Above Revenue results
budget achieved budget.
Performance Indicator
Actual
Target
Variance / Comment
Retention (%) – 2011
commencements
76.6
81.0 The retention rate declined by 3.8 percentage points and was 4.4
percentage points below target.
Course Satisfaction (%)
– 2011 survey
96.1
95.0 Performance improved by 1.1 percentage points and was 1.1
percentage points above target. ECU’s graduate Course Satisfaction
is above both the National Average and the State Average.
Quality of Teaching (%)
– 2011 survey
92.5
92.0 Performance improved by 0.1 of a percentage point and was 0.5
percentage points above target. ECU’s Good Teaching satisfaction is
above both the National Average and the State Average.
7%
At least The operating margin is
4% above the target set for
2012.
Graduate Employment (%)
– 2011 survey
70.4
79.0 Performance declined by 5.2 percentage points and was 8.6
percentage points below target. ECU’s Graduate Employment results
are below both the National Average and the State Average.
9x
At least The interest cover on
3x borrowings is above the
target set for 2012.
Share of First Preference (%)
– 2012 Admissions
17.3
16.0 ECU’s share of first preference applications for Bachelor and
Associate Degree courses processed through TISC increased by 0.7
percentage points and was 1.3 percentage points above target.
Liquidity
– Current
Ratio
2.3
Cash
Reserves
(no. of
weeks)
31
Debt to
equity ratio
A summary of performance against targets for the most recent audited data is provided in Table 2 below.
10%
At least The current ratio is
1.0 above the target set
for 2012.
At least 4 The number of week’s
weeks revenue in cash assets
is above the target set
for 2012.
Not more The debt to equity ratio
than 30% is within the target set
for 2012.
The Financial Statements begin on page 50 of this Annual Report.
Teaching-related Expenditure
per Student Load ($/ EFTSL)
– 2012
16,874
16,645 Teaching-related expenditure per student load increased and was
above the target.
Research Income ($m) – 2011
15.754
13.600 ECU’s total research income increased by $3.364m and was
$2.154m above target.
Higher Degree Research
Completions (per 10
Academic Staff FTE) – 2011
Research Publications (per 10
Academic Staff FTE) – 2011
1.5
11.6
2.2 Higher degree research completions per 10 academic staff FTE
increased (1.3 to 1.5), however the result was below Target.
12.8 Weighted Research Publications per 10 Academic Staff FTE
increased slightly (11.3 to 11.6), however the result was below target.
Notes: Actual results are for the most recent data available. Full definitions are provided in the Key Performance Indicator Report.
17
Highlights
SECTION 2b
PERFORMANCE
REPORT ON OPERATIONS
GP Super Clinic
ECU is set to become a major innovator in health following
planning approval in August 2012, for the $22 million,
state-of-the-art Wanneroo GP Super Clinic (part of the
ECU Health Centre). ECU is investing $12 million in the
Super Clinic, with the Australian and Western Australian
governments each contributing $5 million.
Road Safety Chair
Western Australian Road Safety Minister Liza Harvey
announced the appointment of Professor Murray Lampard
as the new Chair of the Road Safety Council. Professor
Lampard was formerly the deputy commissioner of
Western Australian Police and since retiring from the
police service has held the position of Adjunct Professor of
Law and Justice and Security Science at ECU.
Tripartite Agreement on Yanchep
The University continued its discussions with the Tokyu
Corporation and the Yanchep Beach Joint Venture and
in December 2012 a tripartite Heads of Agreement was
signed between ECU and these organisations. The three
parties have agreed to collaborate to develop and deliver
higher education programs for a community of 150,000
people at Yanchep in Perth’s northern metropolitan area.
18
Strategic Priority One:
Engaging and Serving
Our Communities
ECU’s Key Engagement Outcomes in 2012
The University’s governing Council approved three key
actions for this Strategic Priority for 2012. These key
actions were fulfilled with the following outcomes:
Action 1: Implement the Wanneroo GP Super Clinic
agreement to position ECU as a major facilitator of
health care provision in WA.
A 3032 m2 block of land in Wanneroo was purchased in
May 2012. Design, documentation and tender processes
were completed and the building contract awarded in
December 2012. Extensive consultations guided the
development of the plans for the building layout and a
facade design, compatible with the City of Wanneroo’s
new City Centre Planning Guidelines, was agreed.
The ECU Health Centre will house the GP Super Clinic,
pharmacy, medical imaging and pathology facilities.
ECU’s Psychology Clinic will also be co-located and
student clinical placements will use the facilities.
There will also be a floor of commercial leasing.
Negotiations progressed with several potential
GP service providers to deliver the core outcomes
in partnership with ECU.
Construction is scheduled to commence in January 2013
and the planned Practical Completion date for the Super
Clinic is October 2014.
Action 2: Define the metrics that report ECU’s
reputation within the community for engaged
teaching and research and increase mutually
beneficial community and education partnerships.
A web-based mechanism to capture and categorise
engagement activity across the University was developed
in 2012. Its initial focus is on faculty activities, but will be
rolled out across the University in early 2013.
The ECU Enterprise Customer Relationship Management
System, RightNow, was configured to capture and report
on engagement and advancement activities at ECU. The
adjustments to the system will be implemented over the
next twelve to eighteen months.
Action 3: Deliver against the University’s first
Reconciliation Action Plan and renew the plan for
the period 2012-2015.
A review of progress against ECU’s Reconciliation Action
Plan, 2011-2012 (RAP) was undertaken in the first half
of 2012, led by Professor Colleen Hayward, Pro-ViceChancellor (Equity and Indigenous). The review identified
significant progress in the implementation of the RAP
and this was described in a detailed report: Edith Cowan
University Reconciliation Action Plan, 2011-2012 Progress
Report, presented to Council at its May 2012 meeting.
Key achievements from implementation of the RAP
included:
zz establishing
the RAP Working Group with student and
staff representation;
zz embedding
the RAP into ECU’s planning and reporting
frameworks;
zz inscribing
the names of ECU’s 501 known Indigenous
Australian alumni on seven granite pillars at the Mount
Lawley Campus in their honour;
The RAP was subsequently endorsed by Reconciliation
Australia. A formal launch event for the 2012-2015 RAP
was held on 28 May 2012 at ECU’s Mount Lawley Campus.
The Interprofessional Ambulatory
Care (IpAC) Program
This innovative professional learning model
enables students from entry-to-health-professions
the opportunity to gain practical experience
through clinical placements. Students studying
in disciplines such as: clinical psychology; dietics
and nutrition; exercise physiology; nursing and
midwifery; occupational therapy; paramedicine;
speech pathology; and medical students from UWA
attended 5,510 clinical placements in 2012.
The IpAC program is not only beneficial to the
students, but also benefits the wider community
and the industry partners which include: selected
GP practices throughout the northern suburbs;
Commonwealth Rehabilitation Service; Community
Vision; Heart Foundation WA; Joondalup Seniors
Group; Sir Charles Gardiner State Head Injury Unit
and Speech Pathology; Joondalup Health Campus
(Speech Pathology); cardiac referrals from Royal
Perth; Sir Charles Gardiner and Joondalup Health
Campus; Northern Suburbs Stroke Support Group;
and Women’s Healthworks.
zz enhancing
the Joondalup Learning Precinct crossorganisational mentoring program by making provision
for Indigenous Australian mentees; and
zz developing
plans for the Indigenous Cultural Reflective
Space at the Joondalup Campus.
ECU’s second RAP (2012-2015) was developed with input
from internal stakeholders, including ECU’s Indigenous
Consultative Committee, and Reconciliation Australia,
and was approved by Council at its May 2012 meeting.
19
Strategic Focus on Engagement
ECU’s strategic approach to embedding engagement was
affirmed by the Tertiary Education Quality and Standards
Agency’s (TEQSA) Audit in 2011. In its Report of an Audit
of Edith Cowan University, issued in July 2012, the Audit
Panel stated that:
“The University has a comprehensive approach to
embedding engagement in its teaching and research,
rather than considering engagement as an additional
stream of activities. ECU is commended for its
distinctive engagement strategy and acknowledged
for the improvement plans it has in place, such as
developing a more robust set of indicators to measure
engagement and developing a database of partners.”
In 2012 ECU strengthened the University’s strategic
engagement capacity with the appointment of three
new Pro-Vice-Chancellors with engagement within their
portfolio of responsibility. Supported by the Engagement
Unit which reports to Professor Arshad Omari, Deputy
Vice-Chancellor (Academic), the five Pro-ViceChancellors are:
zz Professor
Lynne Cohen, Pro-Vice-Chancellor:
Engagement (Communities);
zz Professor
Ken Greenwood, Pro-Vice-Chancellor:
Engagement (Science, Technology and Engineering);
zz Professor Atique
Islam, Pro-Vice-Chancellor:
Engagement (Business, Law and Government);
zz Professor
Cobie Rudd, Pro-Vice-Chancellor
(Health Advancement); and
zz Professor
Colleen Hayward, Pro-Vice-Chancellor
(Equity and Indigenous).
The Strategic Engagement Advisory Committee (SEAC),
established in August 2012, provides a consultative forum
that advises on the strategic and operational initiatives
developed by the Engagement Unit in support of
ECU’s engagement priorities, as outlined in the
ECU Engagement Functional Plan 2011 - 2013.
20
Key outcomes of the Engagement Unit during
2012 included:
zz Streamlining
of ECU’s articulation process and
formalisation of new articulation arrangements with
Health Industry Training, International Institute of
Business and Technology, and New Horizons Learning
Centre. Amendments were made to articulations with
Polytechnic West; Saleslink Academy; and Southern
Cross Education Institute.
zz The
signing of a Memorandum of Understanding by
each of the Joondalup Learning Precinct partners in
a commitment to share facilities such as conference
rooms, meeting rooms, event facilities, seminars and
professional development workshops.
Engaging with Schools to Build
Aspirations for Higher Education
Principals on campus
In 2012 ECU continued its successful Principals’ Lunch
events. High school principals from across the State
visited the Joondalup and South West campuses for
networking and exchanges of ideas about how the
University can better engage with school students.
New North Initiative
More than 350 teachers from the New North Education
Initiative Collaborative (NNEI) visited ECU for a day of
professional learning in February 2012 which included
presentations by ECU academics and a tour of ECU’s
facilities. The event was part of ECU’s wider Educational
Partnership work with the NNEI and other teachers from
schools in low SES communities, attempting to build the
aspirations of their students.
WACE revision
Working with the Engagement Unit, the School of
Communications and Arts welcomed 150 Year 12
students onto the Mount Lawley Campus for 4 days
of English revision. Students from 40 low SES schools
participated in free workshops to help prepare them for
their final WACE exams. Experienced tutors were on
hand to coach students on topics in the curriculum, study
techniques and tips for exams.
Follow the Dream
The Follow the Dream program co-ordinated by
Mount Lawley Senior High School, helps to build the
aspirations of Indigenous high school students to help
them to reach their full potential. ECU again provided
facilities for homework classes and tutorials to the
Follow the Dream students throughout the school year,
at the same time showing the students how tertiary study
might be a pathway to achieving their goals.
Strategic Priority Two:
Providing Programs
to Meet the Needs
of Our Communities,
in a Supportive and
Stimulating Learning
Environment
work placements in Semester 2, 2012 and this will expand
to six students in 2013. One of the students credited
this work experience to her recent employment with an
Australian Government law enforcement agency.
ECU Students:
In addition to formal study abroad programs, during 2012
many ECU academic staff continued to have ongoing
opportunities to carry out teaching and research with
partner universities in countries including Canada,
China, India, Mexico, Sweden, Singapore and the
United States of America.
Where are they from
ECU’s Key Teaching and Learning
Outcomes in 2012
The University’s governing Council approved three key
actions for this Strategic Priority for 2012. These actions
were fulfilled with the following outcomes:
Action 1: Embed internationalisation into the
curriculum and core business through increasing
study abroad options (student mobility) for
domestic students and through in-bound and
out-bound opportunities for staff and students.
The ECU International Functional Plan, 2011-2013
articulates the University’s priorities and directions for
international activities and operations and details a
number of initiatives to increase opportunities for students
and staff to undertake their learning, teaching and
research activities in international contexts.
A core component of ECU’s new Curriculum Framework
involves developing staff capability and embedding
elements into all undergraduate courses to build students’
international and global outlooks.
142 students from
other countries
259
European students
342
Indian students
791
African students
1,648 students
from other
Asian countries
Funding for study abroad options for ECU students
increased in 2012, and supported inbound and outbound
student mobility activities such as exchanges, study tours,
placements and research collaborations. An example of
this is the work placement arrangement fostered with the
Emirates Group in Dubai. Two ECU students undertook
21
Highlights
Contribution to student learning
Five ECU staff received prestigious Citation Awards
from the Office for Learning and Teaching (part of the
Australian Government’s Department of Education,
Employment and Workplace Relations) in 2012.
Dr Magdalena Wajrak, Dr Sophie Kennedy,
Professor Mark Hackling, Dr Jennifer Lane and
Ms Nanette Hassall were recognised for their
outstanding contribution to student learning.
Paramedicine accreditation
ECU’s Bachelor of Science (Paramedical Science)
degree was granted full accreditation by the Council
of Ambulance Authorities (CAA). The first such
course in Western Australia to receive accreditation,
this is welcome confirmation that ECU’s
paramedicine students are receiving high quality
training and education which meets the requirements
of modern ambulance services.
World-class WAAPA
The Western Australian Academy of Performing
Arts (WAAPA) was named as one of the top 25
performance schools in the English-speaking world
by industry magazine The Hollywood Reporter.
WAAPA was ranked alongside acclaimed institutions
such as The Julliard School in New York and the
London Academy of Music and Dramatic Arts.
Action 2: Improve student experience and retention
through collaboration with the Student Guild and
implementation of the Connect for Success and
Curriculum 2012 projects.
University Statute No 11 – the Student Guild was gazetted
in August 2012, and a new set of University Student Guild
Rules were approved by Council.
All the actions necessary to give effect to the Student
Services and Amenities Fee (SSAF) were undertaken.
A Student Consultation mechanism was established and
approved by Council in accordance with Commonwealth
Guidelines and the 2012 allocations of SSAF revenue were
agreed between the University and the Guild and endorsed
by Vice-Chancellor’s Student Advisory Forum (VCSAF).
The Vice-Chancellor’s Student Advisory Forum met
three times during 2012. Student participation in 2012
was strong, and a number of action items relating to the
improvement of the student experience were put forward
by student members.
The first phase of the Connect for Success program was
implemented in Semester 1, 2012. Approximately 700
students were contacted via email and/or telephone and
offered the opportunity to opt into a case-management
initiative to support their studies. The opt-in rate was
20 per cent, which is in line with take-up rates for similar
programs at other universities.
The implementation of ECU’s new Curriculum Framework
(Curriculum 2012) commenced in Semester 1, 2012 and
includes a number of initiatives and projects relating to the
student experience and retention:
zz On-campus
commencing students undertook a postentry language assessment (PELA). Those students
identified as needing assistance were advised of
opportunities available to them.
zz New
English language advisors were appointed across
all faculties to assist in the provision of language
assistance and support for students.
22
In Semester 2, 2012, students received extensive
feedback within a week of completing the PELA.
University-wide workshops were conducted at the
Joondalup, Mount Lawley and South West campuses,
addressing the most common errors noted in marking
the PELA papers. The workshop content was also made
available online to all students.
Commonwealth funding, through the Structural Adjustment
Fund, was used to create a number of new flexible learning
spaces on each campus. These spaces have been
designed to enable teachers to create more learner-centred
and flexible learning opportunities.
Action 3: Enhance the use of e-learning and increase
flexibility in programs as part of Curriculum 2012.
ECU’s Learning Management System (BlackBoard)
was upgraded in 2012, providing improved useability
and functionality. Learning Analytics was added to the
Blackboard suite of products to provide information on
user activity, course design, student grades and learning
outcome data. A version of BlackBoard for mobile devices
was released in Semester 2, 2012.
An improved BlackBoard professional development
program was also implemented, involving more than 90
sessions, assisting staff to design units that take advantage
of the opportunities in online learning.
An e-portfolio system, PebblePad, was selected and
successfully trialled in Semester 2, 2012. The system will be
available University-wide from 2013. An e-portfolio enables
students and staff to organise and store electronic samples
of their work as evidence of their capabilities. Support
has been provided to develop the resources and training
materials required to assist staff to implement e-portfolios in
their units.
$1.8 million (over 3 years) has been allocated from ECU’s
Strategic Initiative Fund to increase the number of fully
online versions of ECU courses. The project is seeking
to develop at least six fully-online courses by 2014 and
enhance the quality of existing online programs. The
courses involved include:
zz Bachelor
of Communications;
zz Bachelor
of Engineering (Naval Architecture);
zz Bachelor
of Arts;
zz Bachelor
of Science (Sports Science and Football); and
zz Bachelor
of Science (First Year);
zz Bachelor
of Technology (Aeronautical).
zz Bachelor
of Science (Coastal and Environmental);
Diploma of Occupational Health and Safety;
zz Bachelor
of Social Science; and
zz Bachelor
of Business (Marketing).
Student Recruitment
2012 saw the continuation of The Road is Open campaign
with the two television commercials re-edited to provide
greater focus on the University’s five star ratings for
teaching and graduate satisfaction.
Top 5 Most Popular Fields of Study 2012
06
2,3
New Course Offerings in 2012
zz Graduate
3,14
8
ECU continuously improves its course offerings to
maintain currency and respond to the changing needs of
the community it serves. New courses introduced in 2012
included:
3,
50
3,2
32
Enquiries generated through marketing efforts continued
to grow, with a 27 per cent increase in visits to the Future
Students’ website and a 19 per cent growth in enquiries to
the Student Recruitment area through email, phone and
online chat.
Total enrolments declined slightly in 2012, mainly
attributable to a decline in international on-shore and
off-shore bachelor and postgraduate numbers. Table 3
on page 34 shows ECU’s enrolments for the period
7
Digital marketing continued to grow in importance in
2012, and there was significant growth in social media
use: ECU’s Future Students’ Facebook fans grew to over
21,000 (129 per cent increase), Twitter followers grew to
5,517 (65 per cent increase), YouTube video views grew
to 121,600 views (107 per cent increase) and LinkedIn
members grew from 811 members to 1,264 (55 per cent
increase).
Enrolments
2,753
zz Graduate
2008-2012 by course award level. Other enrolment
information (by campus, gender and citizenship) is shown
in the Additional Facts and Statistics section beginning on
page 146.
Certificate in Intelligence;
zz Bachelor
of Engineering (Marine and Offshore
Systems);
zz Bachelor
of Engineering (Ocean Engineering);
23
Table 3: Enrolments by Course Level, 2008-2012
2008
Doctorate by Research
2010
2011
2012
341
385
436
444
441
57
43
39
29
22
130
127
154
164
166
Master by Coursework
2,547
3,029
3,178
2,545
2,227
Postgraduate/Graduate Diploma
1,155
1,197
1,275
1,280
1,301
Postgraduate/Graduate Certificate
728
782
719
690
765
Bachelor Honours
182
168
189
143
139
14,359
14,973
16,412
17,169
16,949
Associate Degree
85
103
113
113
92
Advanced Diploma/Diploma
72
78
46
28
25
Vocational Education and Training
417
465
523
477
492
Enabling and Other
955
924
1,068
782
896
21,028
22,274
24,152
23,864
23,515
Doctorate by Coursework
Master by Research
Bachelor Pass
Total
Gold medal customer service
The Contact Centre, located in the Student Services
Centre, won the Gold Medal in the 2012 National
Customer Service Council Awards. The Centre was the
winner in the Small Enterprise category, receiving the
award for outstanding customer service excellence.
Graduate Satisfaction and Graduate
Outcomes
ECU continued to perform well on measures of teaching
excellence. These measures are derived from the national
Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ) and ECU’s own
online Unit and Teaching Evaluation Instrument (UTEI)
and mid-course CEQ survey.
Student satisfaction with teaching quality and unit content
(as measured by the UTEI) both increased in 2012 and
have steadily increased since 2008.
Figure 3: Unit and Teaching Satisfaction, 2008-2012
Notes: 2012 data is as at 23/01/2013. 2011 data is finalised and differs from the provisional figures reported in the Annual Report for 2011.
65
Retention
zz expansion
60
The retention rate for ECU students who commenced
in 2011 and were retained into 2012 declined compared
with the previous year’s results, and was below target
(see Report on Key Performance Indicators beginning
on page 36).
zz implementation
Strategies utilised in 2012 to improve retention, included:
zz a
Post Entry Literacy Assessment of first year students
assisted in the identification of students’ English
language proficiency and enabled staff to offer
assistance when required;
zz First Year
Co-ordinators in each faculty and school
managed the First Year Experience programs to assist
first year students successfully transition to university;
24
2009
of the Retention and Persistence Transition
Support (RaPTS) peer mentoring support initiative for
all first year students university-wide;
of the Connect for Success (C4S)
initiative which offers specialised services to students
that require additional support to complete their
studies; as part of C4S, Student Connect Officers case
managed specialist support to students; and
zz ECU-funded
scholarships, grants and loans to assist
students in financial difficulty, particularly where there
was a risk of ceasing studies.
55
50
45
Teaching Quality
Unit Content
40
35
Semester/Year
Notes: Mean overall satisfaction is measured on a scale of -100
to +100. The measure includes all ECU student cohorts and all
coursework units.
In the latest CEQ survey results, ECU was ranked 5th
nationally for Overall Course satisfaction. On Good
Teaching satisfaction ECU was ranked 3rd nationally and
for the fourth consecutive year ECU was rated above
all other Western Australian universities. On Generic
Skills satisfaction ECU ranked 4th out of the Australian
universities. ECU has been consistently above the State
and national averages for these indicators and the latest
survey results are the best yet for ECU.
Additional data on course satisfaction and quality of
teaching including comparison with State and national
benchmarks can be found in the Report on Key
Performance Indicators beginning on page 36.
Figure 4: Graduate Satisfaction, 2007-2011
98.0
ECU’s graduate full-time employment rate in the 2011
Graduate Destination Survey showed a decline – as did all
Western Australian universities – reflecting the prevailing
economic conditions at the time the survey was taken (see
Report on Key Performance Indicators beginning on
page 36). ECU is continuing to develop new approaches
to improve its graduate employment outcomes and in
December 2012 an additional strategic priority specifically
addressing the improvement of graduate outcomes, was
approved by Council, highlighting the significance of this
issue. Approaches being used to increase employment
opportunities for graduates include:
zz a
focus on employability in the new Curriculum
Framework project;
zz engagement
with course consultative committees to
support the relevance and currency of all courses;
96.0
zz increasing
practicum components and opportunities for
workplace-integrated learning across courses; and
94.0
zz support
from ECU careers staff for students in their
search for employment, including bringing industry
representatives to the campuses, organising
employment workshops and Career Expos.
92.0
ECU’s graduate further study rate improved in the 2011
Graduate Destination Survey. ECU ranked 2nd of the
Western Australian universities in the latest survey,
with a score again above the State average.
90.0
Overall Satisfaction
Generic Skills
88.0
Award-winning smartphone app
Good Teaching
86.0
84.0
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
Year of Survey
An app developed by ECU students that turns a
smartphone into an emergency beacon won a
prestigious Western Australian Information Technology
Telecommunications Award (WAITTA) and national
iAward. The app was developed in collaboration with
the Western Australian Police and is available for
Android and iPhone.
Notes: The three measures record the percentage of ECU Bachelor level graduates who, in responding to the relevant Course Experience
Questionnaire survey items ‘broadly agree’ with those statements. The percentage broad agreement is the percentage of responses that are
3 (neither agree nor disagree), 4 (agree) and 5 (strongly agree) on the five-point Likert scale.
25
Strategic Priority
Three: Developing
Research Focus, Depth
and Impact
Highlights
Huntington’s disease study
ECU researchers undertook a world-first study
in 2012, that could change the way Huntington’s
disease is treated. Following a regular program of
brain-training exercises, gym training and social
stimulation, researchers found the participants
deteriorated 50 per cent slower than the control
group and increased their muscle mass.
Winning cell research
ParkC research Fellow Dr Rob White won the
Department of Health Western Australia New
Investigator Prize for Biomedical Research for
his presentation outlining his research into stem
cells. Dr White is currently collaborating with King’s
College, London, and the $2000 prize will enable
him to undertake further collaborative research in
the eastern states.
ECU’s HealthInfoNet turns 15
The nationally recognised Australian Indigenous
HealthInfonet celebrated its 15th anniversary
in 2012. Established in 1997 by former GP and
Director, Professor Neil Thomson, and based
at the Mount Lawley Campus, the online health
resource is a one-stop-shop, providing knowledge
and information on Indigenous health. The website
is freely accessible to policy makers, health
practitioners and researchers.
26
ECU’s Key Research and Research
Training Outcomes in 2012
CRN targets for increased research output were achieved
in 2012. Specifically:
The University’s governing Council approved one key
action for this Strategic Priority for 2012. This action was
fulfilled with the following outcome:
zz 25
Action: Attain the targets set for 2012 in the
Collaborative Research Networks (CRN) funding
for ECU, in order to build these areas of research
concentration, depth and impact.
ECU received $5.6 million in funding from the Australian
Governments’ Collaborative Research Network (CRN)
initiative, for collaborations between ECU researchers and
some of Australia’s leading scientists to develop worldclass research outcomes. The six CRN projects initiated in
2011 are:
zz Promotion
of mental health and wellbeing in young
people;
zz Exercise
medicine for the prevention and management
of chronic disease;
zz Integrated
health services to enhance community
based health care;
zz Nano-photonics
and nano-electronics to support
national frontier technologies;
zz Protection
of coastal ecosystems and marine resource
management; and
zz Advanced
technologies for leading teaching
and education practice.
CRN funding is already making a significant positive
impact at ECU by increasing research outputs.
Researchers have also used the opportunity that the CRN
provides to build and develop collaborative relationships
with a view to sustaining research networks beyond the
life of the CRN project.
grant applications were submitted to various
external granting bodies in conjunction with CRN
partners;
zz 12
collaborative journal articles and two book chapters
were submitted and/or published;
zz 10
Visiting Fellows have engaged in research-related
activities at ECU;
zz 11
PhD students are currently being co-supervised; and
zz four
training schools were held to provide practical
assistance to early-career researchers.
Research Profile
ECU seeks to be recognised for high impact research
providing social, economic, environmental and cultural
benefits, with eight identified areas of research focus:
zz Health
and Wellness;
zz Education;
zz Environment
zz Engineering
zz Social
and Sustainability;
and ICT;
and Community;
zz Business
and Society;
zz Communications
zz Security,
and Creative Arts; and
Law and Justice.
Engaged Research
ECU and Chevron collaboration
An acoustic sensor the size of a smartphone is helping
to protect Barrow Island’s unique native fauna from
the Asian House Gecko. This work is a research
collaboration between ECU’s Associate Professor
Adam Osseiran and Chevron Australia, which
operates the Gorgon Project on the island.
Migrant worker study
In an industry-first study, researchers from ECU’s
School of Management explored why resources
companies could not attract workers from other
states to Western Australia and had to recruit migrant
workers through the 457 visa scheme. The study,
in conjunction with the Australian Mines and Metals
Association, will inform the resources sector on how
best to attract skilled workers.
Teaching with technology
School of Education researcher Dr Jenny Lane hosted
a series of free seminars in 2012 for teachers from
schools across Western Australia. She shared the
results of her TRACK iPad Project in Schools (TIPS),
showing the teachers how to use iPads to enhance
their lessons.
27
0.87
An extensive review of ECU’s Research Grants
Administration Processes, including the Research
Management System, was undertaken by Deloitte in
2012. The recommendations to improve the service
delivery model and organisation design have for the most
part been implemented, providing a more streamlined
process for researchers to progress from concept
development, through grant submission and management
of successful applications.
The Office of Research and Innovation also underwent
an internal audit of its research administration functions
in 2012. All recommendations from that audit have
been implemented.
Research Funding
Total research income is expected to reach
$15.7 million, thereby exceeding budget target
($14 million), though slightly lower than the 2011 result
($15.75 million). Research income in 2010 was $15.3
million. The Australian Government’s total research block
grant allocation for 2012 was $8.1 million, a 7 per cent
increase from the 2011 allocation ($7.6 million).
28
2.3
5
4.97
In 2012 the Acknowledging Successful Performance in
Research Excellence (ASPIRE) project was implemented.
The project is a revised model for measuring and
quantifying research and was developed to broaden the
scope of the indices of research performance measured at
ECU, in particular engaged research.
50
ECU continued to strengthen its research culture to
support growth in capacity and capability with targeted
appointments of research staff and the appointment of a
new Director of the Office of Research and Innovation,
Dr Margaret Jones, in May 2012.
Research Funding by Category ($m)
4.
Research Administration
Table 4: Research Block Funding by Category, 2008-2012 ($m)
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
Joint Research Engagement Program
1.92
1.87
2.03
2.19
2.42
Research Training Scheme
4.33
4.38
4.41
4.41
4.48
Research Infrastructure Block Grant
0.46
0.39
0.37
0.47
0.51
-
-
0.45
0.52
0.71
6.71
6.63
7.27
7.59
8.12
Sustainable Research Excellence
Total
Table 5: Research Funding by Category, 2008-2012 ($m)
2008
2009
2010
2011
In 2012 ECU increased its strategic research investment
by 8 per cent to $9.8 million, with a focus on increasing
external research collaborations and building research
capacity. These funds were applied to key State, national
and international initiatives, fellowships, scholarships
and infrastructure, in order to foster industry linkages and
commercialisation in areas of research priority.
ECU maintained its position in the top Tier Two funding
group for Sustainable Research Excellence based on
Category 1 Australian Competitive Research Grant
income. New grants announced in 2012 included four
NHMRC projects totalling $2.5 million (see below) and
an ARC Discovery grant project valued at $330,000.
2012
National Health Grants
National Competitive Research Grants
2.15
2.91
2.75
2.80
3.17
Other Public Sector Research Funding
7.24
7.71
8.30
8.40
6.11
Industry and Other Funding
2.93
2.01
4.21
4.55
5.21
ECU researchers secured a total of $2.5 million over
three years from the National Health and Medical
Research Council (NHMRC):
Co-operative Research Centre Funding
0.075
0.18
0.05
0
1.22
zz Professor
Total
12.39
12.81
15.31
15.75
15.70
Notes: the 2012 income figures are unaudited and are as at 28/2/2012. The 2011 income figures are final (audited) and differ from the provisional
figures reported in the Annual Report for 2011.
zz ECU
Table 6: Higher Degree by Research Student Load, 2008-2012
2008
Research Training Scheme
2009
2010
2011
2012
185
205
255
285
299
ECU-funded
64
81
70
52
42
International
82
88
108
115
115
6
5
4
3
2
337
380
437
455
458
Domestic Tuition Fee
Total
Beth Armstrong, received grants
totalling $1.376 million for two different projects,
one focussing on the early treatment of aphasia in
stroke survivors and the second focussing on the
rehabilitation of indigenous stroke and traumatic
brain injury survivors;
cyber-bullying expert Professor Donna
Cross received $620,000 to focus on targeted
interventions to reduce mental health problems
resulting from bullying in schools; and
zz Associate
Professor Mel Ziman and her team
received $551,000 to look at the mutation
characteristics of melanomas and the creation of
personalised treatment programs for each case.
Notes: 2012 data is as at 23/01/2013. 2011 data is finalised and differs from the provisional figures reported in the Annual Report for 2011.
29
Research Training
Professor Ron Adams from Victoria University was invited
to run a “Writers’ Retreat” in October 2012. Twelve ECU
and five Victoria University students participated. There
was excellent feedback from the retreat, in particular the
opportunity to collaborate across institutions, and the
opportunity to get targeted writing development training.
ECU’s research and higher degree students and
graduates continue to rate highly the support provided to
them by their supervisors and ECU’s Graduate Research
School (GRS). In 2012 ECU scored a satisfaction rating of
98 per cent from international research students surveyed
by the International Student Barometer Entry Wave. This
placed GRS highest of the 18 Australian universities
surveyed, and the second highest of the more than 100
institutions surveyed globally.
A project to develop a “toolkit” for supervisors was
undertaken in collaboration with Swinburne University,
Victoria University, University of Southern Queensland
and Central Queensland University. The “toolkit” will be
available online and will be incorporated into existing
training for ECU supervisors.
The Postgraduate Research Experience Questionnaire
(for both domestic and international students) also
shows high levels of student satisfaction with ECU.
For the last two years ECU has been rated above the
national average.
Responding to student feedback on training requirements,
the research training program for Higher Degree by
Research candidates expanded in 2012. An additional
Figure 5: Higher Degree by Research Graduate Satisfaction, 2007-2011
100.0
98.0
96.0
94.0
92.0
90.0
ECU
National Average
88.0
86.0
84.0
2008
2009
2010
Year of Survey
2011
2012
Notes: This measures the percentage of ECU Higher Degree by Research graduates who, in responding to the overall satisfaction item from
the national Postgraduate Research Experience Questionnaire “broadly agree” with the statement “Overall, I was satisfied with the quality of my
higher degree research experience”. The percentage broad agreement is the percentage of responses that are 3 (neither agree nor disagree),
4 (agree) and 5 (strongly agree) on the five-point Likert scale.
30
research trainer role has been established,
responsible for the provision of more advanced
qualitative research training.
The final draft of the Good Practice Framework
(an ECU initiative funded by an Office of Learning
and Teaching grant received in 2011) was presented
in November to the Directors and Deans of Graduate
Schools. The Framework will be implemented at ECU
during 2013, and will help improve research training
quality and provide opportunities for benchmarking
with other institutions.
Research Week
The Bunbury, Joondalup and Mount Lawley
campuses again hosted the annual Research
Week event in September, with seminars,
presentations and exhibitions to inspire the
next generation of researchers. The ECU Three
Minute Thesis Competition showcased research
undertaken by higher degree by research
candidates. School of Exercise and Health Science
PhD candidate Kitty-Rose Foley won the ECU
competition for her presentation on her research,
which asks young people with Down Syndrome
“what do you want to be when you grow up?”.
Strategic Priority Four:
Building Organisational
Sustainability
Highlights
New building program
Work began in 2012 on a $72 million building
program for the Joondalup Campus. The Building 34
project includes a five-floor, state-of-the-art building,
as well as a new student hub with shops and a
marketplace to increase the vibrancy of the campus.
Engineering laboratory
A new engineering laboratory, housed within
ECU’s multi-million dollar Engineering building
on the Joondalup Campus, was established in
2012. The Schneider Electric Automation and
Control Laboratory is a partnership between ECU
and Schneider Electric and features the latest
engineering and processing technology and
equipment to help students learn the skills
needed to meet Australia’s mining boom.
Staff survey
The 2012 survey of University staff achieved an
excellent response rate of 78 per cent. For the first
time, results were benchmarked against 38 other
universities. The comparison showed that ECU staff
reported considerably higher levels of engagement
and commitment to the organisation in every one of
the four items measured, than their peers in other
Australian/New Zealand universities.
ECU’s Key Organisational Sustainability
Outcomes in 2012
The University’s governing Council approved two key
actions for this Strategic Priority for 2012. These actions
were fulfilled with the following outcomes:
Action 1: Develop strategies throughout ECU to
prepare for, and limit the financial impact of, the
2015 “half-cohort” of WA school leavers.
In April 2012 the Vice-Chancellor tasked the
Vice-President (Corporate Services) with the co-ordination
of planning to safeguard the financial sustainability of
the University during the period of potentially reduced
domestic student demand in 2015, resulting from the
“half-cohort” of Western Australian school-leavers in
2014. A range of financial management strategies were
initiated as part of the 2012 and 2013 budget process. In
addition a new Enterprise Resource Allocation Model was
developed as part of the 2013 budget setting process to
allow the University to make strategic allocation decisions
in resource-constrained circumstances.
In addition, the Vice-Chancellor together with vicechancellors from the other Western Australian universities
have been exploring the possibility of State and/ or
Australian government assistance to contribute to
offsetting the financial impact of the half-cohort between
2015 and 2018.
Action 2: Develop and commence implementation
of an integrated fundraising program and
strengthen links between advancement and
engagement through partnerships, fundraising
and Alumni relations.
New fundraising policies and procedures were approved
by the ECU Foundation Board in May 2012. The suite
of policies provides a strong framework upon which
the fundraising activities of the University will be built.
These policies will also enhance the integration of fund
raising, alumni relations and engagement across ECU,
while a new account management system will coordinate
approaches to companies and individuals.
Tools for fundraising success have been created,
including a wide range of Case Statements which
articulate the reasons for and benefits of supporting
ECU projects, and a manual of best practice.
Organisational Sustainability at ECU
This Strategic Priority comprises four elements:
zz Staffing;
zz Financial
Positioning;
zz Infrastructure;
and
zz Sustainability.
Staffing
In 2012 the Vice-Chancellor approved the new ECU
Staffing Plan, 2012-15 which covers the key workforce
planning issues and strategies to 2015. This plan also
incorporates the University’s major equity and diversity
commitments in relation to staffing, with the inclusion of
an Equal Employment Opportunity Management Plan
(EEOMP) addressing the legislative requirements of the
Equal Opportunity Act 1984 (WA).
For the first time, ECU’s 2012 staff survey was undertaken
by an external provider, VOICE Project. The use of
this survey instrument provided opportunities for
benchmarking with results from 37 other universities in
Australia and New Zealand.
The survey achieved a response rate of 78 per cent (1460
staff), the highest rate since the biennial ECU staff surveys
began in 2002. Significantly, ECU scored above average
on each of the 44 survey items that were benchmarked.
ECU staff reported high levels of engagement and
commitment to the University. Strong scores on items
relating to the purpose and direction of the organisation
31
suggest that ECU staff are aware of, and believe in,
the ECU Values, understand that high standards of
performance are expected of them and understand
how their jobs contribute to the overall success
of ECU.
Notwithstanding the commendable results for ECU
overall in comparison to the other 37 universities, staff
experiences varied in different parts of the University.
Opportunities for improvement were identified in
areas relating to management of change, innovation,
recruitment and selection, involvement in decisionmaking, workload and support for research activity.
These issues are being analysed further and will be
taken up with staff.
The full survey results are available from the Human
Resources Service Centre website.
Staff
Strengthening ECU’s Leadership Capacity
A number of significant appointments were made in 2012.
These included:
zz Professor Arshad
Omari, re-appointed as Deputy
Vice-Chancellor (Academic);
zz Professor
Ron Oliver, appointed to the new position
of Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Teaching, Learning and
International);
zz Mr
Scott Henderson commenced as Vice-President
(Corporate Services);
zz Professor
Colleen Hayward AM, appointed
Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Equity and Indigenous);
zz Professor
Lynne Cohen, appointed Pro-Vice-Chancellor
(Engagement: Communities) and Executive Dean, Faculty
of Education and Arts;
zz Professor
Ken Greenwood, appointed Pro-Vice-Chancellor
(Engagement: Science, Technology and Engineering)
and Executive Dean, Faculty of Computing, Health and
Science;
zz Professor
Daryoush Habibi, re-appointed Head of the
School in Engineering, Faculty of Computing, Health and
Science;
zz Associate
Professor Moira Sim, re-appointed Head of the
School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Computing, Health
and Science;
zz Associate
Professor Andrea Hinwood, appointed Head
of the School of Natural Sciences, Faculty of Computing,
Health and Science;
zz Professor Anne
Wallace, appointed Head of the School of
Law and Justice, Faculty of Business and Law;
zz Professor
Christopher Brook, appointed Head of the School
of Education, Faculty of Education and Arts;
zz Professor
Caroline Barratt-Pugh, promoted to the position
of Professor within the School of Education;
zz Professor
Daniel Galvão, promoted to the position of
Professor within the ECU Health and Wellness Institute;
zz Mrs
zz Mr
zz Dr
Elizabeth Wilson, appointed Chief Information Officer;
David Howard, appointed University Librarian; and
Margaret Jones, appointed Director of the Office of
Research and Innovation.
32
Financial Positioning
Student Load Targets
A decline in off-shore international students has occurred,
with student load expected to be 876 EFTSL, a decline of
16 per cent or 170 EFTSL from 2011 (1,046 EFTSL). This
results from a deliberate strategy by ECU to rationalise
off-shore operations, as the University repositions
offshore activities to focus on high academic quality
and cost effectiveness.
The University’s four strategic priorities are reflected in
University-wide strategic budget allocations and in the
expenditure plans of individual faculties, schools and
service centres. ECU has implemented budget strategies
to enable ECU to respond quickly to change, while
progressing its Purpose, Vision and Strategic Priorities.
ECU’s projections indicate that full-year total student load
for 2012 was 18,132 Equivalent Full Time Student Load
(EFTSL), a decline of 1.5 per cent from 2011 (18,410
EFTSL). The reduction in student load is attributed to
ECU’s strategic consolidation of off-shore activities and a
fall in on-shore international students.
These budget strategies work in parallel with
complementary initiatives designed to:
Table 7: Student Load (EFTSL) by Funding Category, 2008-2012
zz continue
to focus ECU’s academic activities
and staff profile in areas of strength;
zz improve
the quality of activities, services
and outcomes in teaching and research; and
zz support
the financial viability of ECU through a
combination of cost-savings and improved
efficiencies, and through the achievement of
revenue growth targets.
ECU overall financial position remained sound and
the University received a “clean bill of health” from the
Department of Industry, Innovation, Science, Research
and Tertiary Education in its annual review of the financial
position of Australian universities.
Throughout 2012 ECU operated within the key budget
parameters approved by Council.
Performance against the 2012 financial targets set
by Council was once again strong (see Summary of
Performance Against Financial and Key Performance
Indicator Targets, page 36). The University posted a
2012 operating result of $28 million for the year, which
was an increase of $1 million from the original budget
($27 million).
Total revenue for the University in 2012 was $375 million,
which was an increase of $16 million from the original
budget ($359 million).
The University once again received an unqualified
external audit opinion for 2012.
Council approved the ECU Budget for 2013 at its
December 2012 meeting.
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
10,622
11,409
12,654
12,996
12,998
249
287
325
337
340
Fee-paying International on-shore
2,390
2,665
2,734
2,595
2,384
Fee-paying International off-shore
1,659
2,069
1,788
1,046
876
Domestic Tuition Fee
640
731
768
963
1,050
Vocational Education and Training
418
449
490
474
483
15,978
17,610
18,759
18,410
18,132
Commonwealth Supported
Research Training Scheme and ECU-funded
Total
Notes: 2012 data is as at 23/01/2013. 2011 data is finalised and differs from the provisional figures reported in the Annual Report for 2010.
Across the sector, international student numbers have
declined and it is believed that Western Australia’s positive
economic position will continue to restrict growth in
domestic demand for higher education, as employment
opportunities remain highly favourable.
Nationally, university enrolments have surged following
the introduction of student demand driven funding for
Commonwealth-supported places in 2012. However, the
large growth in domestic student numbers in Queensland
and Victoria in particular, have not been seen in Western
Australia, predominantly because of historically lower
levels of unmet demand for higher education in Western
Australia. ECU experienced stable Commonwealthsupported student load in 2012. Projections indicate that
ECU’s Commonwealth-supported student load for 2012
will be 12,998 EFTSL, an increase of 2 EFTSL from 2011
(12,996 EFTSL).
ECU’s on-shore international student load for 2012 is
also expected to reduce to 2,384 EFTSL, a decline of
8 per cent or 211 EFTSL from 2011 (2,595 EFTSL). This
can be attributed to sector-wide issues related to policy
changes for student visas, the strong Australian dollar and
increasing competition from other international education
provider countries and from within former source countries
supplying international students.
33
Infrastructure and Services
Research Funding by Category
Building Infrastructure
15,000
ECU’s Strategic Asset Management Framework and
Buildings Asset Management Plan deliver a structured
and consistent approach to the management of the
University’s assets. The framework and plan supports
the University’s Purpose, Vision and Strategic Priorities
by delivering building infrastructure which enables ECU’s
core functions of teaching, learning and research.
12,998
12,000
9,000
In 2012 all major building projects were conducted within
budget and met milestone targets. Significant building
projects included:
6,000
2,384
3,000
zz A broad
range of smaller scale projects were completed
under the Campus Renewal Program which collectively
contribute to the improvement of amenity across the
University’s campuses.
340
876
1,050
483
0
zz The
Joondalup Sports and Recreation Building
(Building 22) underwent a substantial extension
with the addition of extra sports halls, biomechanics
laboratories, teaching spaces and offices. As part of
this project, the ECU Joondalup Soccer Club Rooms
(Building 25) was developed. This facility serves a
dual purpose as both a teaching venue for ECU and
club rooms for our engagement partner – the ECU
Joondalup Soccer Club.
zz A rain
shield was installed and additional structural
modifications were made to Building 2 at the Joondalup
Campus in order to rectify a major leak problem.
zz An
additional eight units were added to the Joondalup
ECU Business and Innovation Centre at Collier Pass,
bringing the total number of suites to thirty nine.
The following significant projects were at varying stages of
development at the end of 2012:
zz ECU
34
has completed a Heads of Agreement with
Campus Living Villages to develop an additional 125
bed Student Accommodation Facility on the Joondalup
Campus. The project will be funded principally through
the National Rental Affordability Scheme.
zz Planning
and design work associated with the
construction of the Engineering Pavilion on the
Joondalup Campus has commenced. This facility
will support growth in Engineering and negate the
need for the University to lease additional off-campus
accommodation. Construction will commence in early
2013, with a target completion date of mid-2014.
zz Construction
on the ECU Health Centre
(incorporating the Wanneroo GP Super Clinc)
will commence in early 2013.
zz Site
pre-works on Building 34 on the Joondalup
Campus is largely complete with construction
scheduled to commence in early 2013. It is anticipated
that the building will be operational in time for
Semester 1, 2015.
IT Infrastructure
Several major information technology projects were
completed, or partially completed in 2012, including:
zz development
of a conceptual architecture and
technology roadmap – assuring appropriate technology
capability across the University to support new ways of
delivering teaching and conducting research;
zz upgrade
to the wireless networks across all three
campuses – allowing better access to the University
network from Collaborative Learning Spaces and
student social spaces;
zz implementation
of the Virtual Desktop Infrastructure
(VDI) solution to support collaborative learning;
zz completion
of the first stage of the Identity and Access
Management system implementation – provides a
sustainable model for managing digital identities and
access to University systems – a robust information
security platform;
zz deployment
of Windows 7 into the standard operating
environment for Windows-based computers;
zz a
major upgrade of BlackBoard including the
implementation of BlackBoard Mobile – enabling
students to access BlackBoard Learning Management
System from their smartphones and tablets;
zz a
major upgrade of the Oracle Finance System; and
zz commencement
of a proof of concept for a content
management system with cloud storage for teaching
and learning content.
Major improvements were made in ECU’s underlying
technical infrastructure with the installation of new Voice
Over Internet Protocol (VOIP) phones. Support and
service processes were improved with the refinement of
Incident and Problem Management processes.
Environmental Sustainability
ECU operates under an environmental management
system accredited to ISO 14001, Environmental
Management Systems. This system includes programs
around energy, water, waste, travel and biodiversity
that educate, inform and change behaviour on
environmental issues. In 2012 ECU achieved
re-certification of this system.
Improvements and achievements during 2012 included:
zz The
negotiation of a major cleaning and waste contract
to improve cleaning and waste initiatives, increase
recycling and reduce environmental impacts and waste
to landfill.
zz Appointment
of Brookfield Co Gen Australia in
September 2012 to partner with ECU to progress
the gas-fired co-generation plant for the Joondalup
Campus. This `Private Public Partnership’ project may
significantly reduce the University’s carbon footprint
and energy costs.
zz The
investigation of an agreement with a private
company to design, construct and operate a solar farm
on the South West Campus at Bunbury. Similar to the
gas fired co-generation project, this opportunity is
designed to reduce the University’s carbon emissions
and reduce the cost of energy.
zz Development
of the Campus Access Strategy to
progressively reduce reliance on motor vehicles and
increase the use of public transport. Plans for improved
end-of-trip facilities and development of Travel Plans
for each campus will be implemented throughout 2013.
A Sustainable University
ECU has rolled-out a range of energy and water saving
devices in its buildings including motion sensor lights
in offices and reduced-flow taps in toilets and kitchens.
In 2012 ECU was recognised as the most energy and
water efficient university in Western Australia, by the
2012 Australian Campuses Toward Sustainability
(ACTS) Green Gown Awards, where ECU won the
Continuous Improvement – Institutional Change
category.
ECU is the second most water efficient university in
Australia. ECU has seen a reduction of 30 per cent
in potable water use since 2008 and the University
received a 2012 Water Wise award from the Western
Australian Water Corporation in recognition of this
achievement.
35
SECTION 2c
PERFORMANCE
REPORT ON KEY PERFORMANCE INDICATORS
36
Report Certification
Introduction
We hereby certify that the key performance indicators are
based on proper records, are relevant and appropriate for
assisting users to assess ECU’s performance, and fairly
represent the performance of ECU for the financial year
ended 31 December 2012.
ECU’s Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) focus on
the University’s core business (teaching, learning and
research) and key stakeholders (students). The KPIs are
informed by the functions of the University as set out in
Section 7 of the Edith Cowan University Act 1984 (WA)
(ECU Act), particularly:
Yours sincerely
zz S7(a)
“to provide…courses of study appropriate to
a university to meet the needs of the community in
this State.”
zz S7(c)
The Hon Dr Hendy Cowan
Chancellor
6 March 2013
Professor Kerry O. Cox
Vice-Chancellor
6 March 2013
“to support and pursue research and
scholarship and aid the advancement, development,
and practical applications to education, industry,
commerce and the community, of knowledge or
any techniques.”
The University’s strategic directions document:
Edith Cowan University: Engaging Minds; Engaging
Communities. Towards 2020 was reviewed in 2012
and a revised document was approved by Council at
its 13 December 2012 meeting. The revised document
specifies ECU’s purpose and five strategic priorities
which articulate the University’s commitment to the
communities it serves.
ECU’s Purpose is:
To further develop valued citizens for the benefit of
Western Australia and beyond, through teaching and
research inspired by engagement and partnerships.
ECU’s five Strategic Priorities are:
1. To create positive outcomes in our communities
through mutually beneficial engagement;
4. To strengthen research capability, capacity, translation
and impact; and
5. To enhance organisational resilience, sustainability
and reputation.
The Annual Report section entitled Report on Operations
has been structured around these strategic priorities,
reflecting their importance in setting direction for the
University’s operations.
In this Key Performance Indicator Report, the functions
specified in the ECU Act and reflected in ECU’s current
strategic priorities, provide the basis for the following
outcomes, against which the University’s performance
is measured:
Outcome 1: ECU’s courses of study meet the needs of the Western Australian community and are provided in a supportive and stimulating learning environment.
Outcome 2: ECU’s research and scholarship advance and develop education, industry, commerce and the community, through the practical application
of knowledge.
For each KPI, the Key Performance Indicator
Report provides:
zz ECU’s
zz a
performance over the last five years;
comparison to target for the most recent year; and
zz wherever
possible, comparisons to the overall
performance of universities in Australia (“National
Average”) and to public universities in Western
Australia (“State Average”).
2. To deliver accessible world-class education and an
enriching student experience;
3. To enhance the personal and professional outcomes
of graduates;
37
Outcome 1: ECU’s
courses of study
meet the needs of the
Western Australian
community and are
provided in a supportive
and stimulating
learning environment.
This outcome has the following measures:
Key Effectiveness
Indicators
Retention
Course Satisfaction
Quality of Teaching
Graduate Employment
Share of First Preferences
Key Efficiency
Indicator
Teaching-Related Expenditure
per Student Load
1. Retention
Many factors influence whether students decide to remain
in their studies (retention), including the relevance of
those studies to their needs, and the learning environment
in which that study takes place. Student retention is
therefore an indicator of the extent to which ECU’s
courses meet the needs of the Western Australian
community and are provided in a supportive and
stimulating learning environment.
Retention is here defined as the percentage of all
domestic and international students who commence
a Bachelor Pass course in a given year (Year of
Commencement) and either complete, defer or are still
enrolled in the same course or another ECU course one
38
year later. This measure is calculated on a point-to-point
basis, being 31 March of each year.
Table 8: Retention Commencing Bachelor Pass Students
Year of Commencement
2008
2009
2010
2011
ECU
78.9%
78.2%
80.4%
76.6%
Target
80.0%
80.0%
80.0%
81.0%
National
Average2
84.0%
84.0%
83.1%
n/a
20121
Notes: 1. Retention data for students commencing in 2012
will not be available until March 2013. 2. The National Average
figures are from Table 4.9 of Appendix 4 on the DIISRTE
website at: www.innovation.gov.au/HigherEducation/
HigherEducationStatistics/StatisticsPublications/Pages/
default.aspx .The National Average figure for 2011 will not be
available until mid-2013.
The retention rate for ECU students commencing in
2011 decreased (by 3.8 percentage points) compared
with the retention rate for those who commenced in 2010.
The 2011 result is ECU’s lowest result since 2009. The
retention rate for ECU students commencing in 2011 is
4.4 percentage points below target, and is below the
National Average.
ECU has committed significant effort and resources to
improving retention of commencing students, including
through additional student support and initiatives such
as Connect for Success and the revised undergraduate
Curriculum Framework.
2. Course Satisfaction
Graduates are more likely to rate their course highly, in
terms of overall satisfaction, if the course was relevant to
their needs, provided in a supportive learning environment
and has proven useful and relevant in an employment
context following graduation. Graduate satisfaction with
the quality of their course is therefore an indicator of the
extent to which ECU’s courses of study meet the needs of
the Western Australian community and are provided in a
supportive and stimulating learning environment.
Comparative data on how ECU’s graduates rate the
quality of their courses is available from responses to
the Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ), a national
survey of graduates conducted four to six months after
course completion.
Course Satisfaction is here defined as the percentage of
all domestic and international Bachelor level (Bachelor
Pass, Bachelor Honours and Bachelor Graduate Entry)
graduates who ‘broadly agree’ with the statement:
“Overall, I was satisfied with the quality of this course” from
the Course Experience Questionnaire. The percentage
broad agreement is the percentage of responses which
are 3 (neither agree nor disagree), 4 (agree) or 5 (strongly
agree) on the five-point Likert scale.
3. Quality of Teaching
Table 9: Undergraduate CEQ Course Satisfaction
Year of Survey
2008
2009
2010
2011
ECU
92.1%
92.6%
95.0%
96.1%
Target
93.0%
93.0%
93.0%
95.0%
National
Average
88.5%
88.1%
93.1%
93.6%
State
Average
90.0%
89.9%
93.5%
94.4%
20121
Notes: 1. CEQ data for the 2012 survey was not made available by
Graduate Careers Australia in sufficient time to allow inclusion in
this Report.
The performance results are shown here by “Year of Survey”, as is
common practice across the sector.
For the 2011 survey 2958 ECU Bachelor graduates were surveyed,
of whom 1563 responded to the CEQ, equating to a response rate
of 53 per cent.
ECU graduates’ Course Satisfaction level in the 2011
survey increased (by 1.1 percentage points), compared
with the 2010 survey. The latest result is the highest of the
last nine years (2003-2011). The 2011 survey result is 1.1
percentage points above target.
ECU’s Course Satisfaction results are consistently above
both the National Average and the State Average.
Graduates are more likely to rate highly the quality of the
teaching in their course, if the content and teaching style
was relevant to their needs and the course was provided in
a supportive learning environment. Graduate satisfaction
with the teaching they experienced during their course
is therefore an indicator of the extent to which ECU’s
courses of study meet the needs of the Western Australian
community and are provided in a supportive and stimulating
learning environment.
Comparative data on how ECU’s graduates rate the
quality of the teaching they experienced is available from
responses to the Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ),
a national survey of graduates conducted four to six months
after course completion. Six items in the CEQ make up the
Good Teaching Scale which is used to indicate how satisfied
graduates were with the teaching experience during their
course.
The Good Teaching Scale is here defined as the proportion
of domestic and international Bachelor level (Bachelor
Pass, Bachelor Honours and Bachelor Graduate Entry)
graduates who ‘broadly agree’ on average with the six items
comprising this scale. The percentage broad agreement
is the proportion of a respondent’s scores on the six items
which are 3 (neither agree nor disagree), 4 (agree) or 5
(strongly agree) on the five-point Likert scale.
Table 10: Undergraduate CEQ Good Teaching Scale
Year of Survey
2008
2009
2010
2011
ECU
89.6%
89.1%
92.4%
92.5%
Target
90.0%
91.0%
91.0%
92.0%
National
Average
82.8%
82.8%
87.7%
88.5%
State
Average
85.0%
85.5%
88.7%
88.8%
20121
Notes: 1. CEQ data for the 2012 survey were not made available
by Graduate Careers Australia in sufficient time to allow inclusion in
this Report.
The performance results are shown here by “Year of Survey”, as is
common practice across the sector.
For the 2011 survey 2958 ECU Bachelor graduates were surveyed,
of whom 1563 responded to the CEQ, equating to a response rate
of 53 per cent.
ECU graduates’ level of satisfaction with the quality of
teaching for the 2011 survey increased slightly (by 0.1
percentage points), compared with the 2010 survey. The
latest result is well above those in the survey years 2008
and 2009. The level of satisfaction in the 2011 survey year
is above target by 0.5 percentage points.
ECU’s Good Teaching Scale results are consistently
above both the National Average and the State Average.
39
4. Graduate Employment
There is strong evidence that many students undertake
higher education for employment-related reasons (i.e.
to gain employment, or to advance their career). The
employers, on whom the job prospects of graduates
largely depend, seek employees who have the skills and
attributes needed in their professions and occupations.
Graduate employment is therefore an indicator of the
extent to which ECU’s courses of study meet the needs of
the Western Australian community and are provided in a
supportive and stimulating learning environment.
Comparative data on employment outcomes for ECU
graduates is available from the Graduate Destination
Survey (GDS), a national survey of graduates, conducted
four to six months after course completion.
Graduate Employment is here defined as the percentage
of domestic Bachelor level (Bachelor Pass, Bachelor
Honours and Bachelor Graduate Entry) graduates in
full-time employment as a proportion of all domestic
Bachelor level graduates in, or seeking, full-time work
(including those who were working part-time or on a
casual basis while seeking full-time employment).
Table 11: Domestic Bachelor Course Level Graduates in
Full-time Employment
Year of Survey
40
2008
2009
2010
2011
ECU
84.7%
78.0%
75.6%
70.4%
Target
87.0%
87.0%
83.0%
79.0%
National
Average
86.1%
81.1%
78.5%
78.7%
State
Average
87.9%
82.2%
77.5%
78.2%
20121
Notes: 1. GDS data for the 2012 survey were not made available
by Graduate Careers Australia in sufficient time to allow inclusion in
this Report.
The performance results are shown here by “Year of Survey”, as is
common practice across the sector.
For the 2011 survey 2331 ECU Domestic Bachelor graduates were
surveyed, of whom 1277 responded to the GDS, equating to a
response rate of 55 per cent.
The proportion of ECU graduates in full-time employment
at the time of the 2011 survey declined by 5.2 percentage
points, compared with those surveyed in 2010. The 2011
survey result is 8.6 percentage points below target and is
below both the National Average and the State Average.
A definitional change was applied from 2010 to limit the
data to applications for Bachelor and Associate Degree
courses only.
Table 12: Undergraduate Share of First Preferences
ECU’s Full-time Employment results are consistently
below the WA Average and have been below the National
Average in four of the last five years.
ECU is addressing employment outcomes through a
range of strategies, including:
zz embedding
an employability focus through all courses
as a key part of the new Curriculum Framework;
zz implementing
an enhanced Careers Service from
2013, encompassing stronger links with teaching
programs, enhanced frontline services and support for
volunteering and student leadership activities; and
zz developing
a better understanding of graduate
employment experiences through a follow-up
telephone survey of 2010 and 2011 graduates.
5. Share of First Preferences
The relevance of courses and quality of the learning
environment in which they are taught, as perceived
by prospective students and the wider community, will
influence demand for places at a university. ECU’s Share
of First Preferences, processed through the Western
Australian Tertiary Institutions Service Centre (TISC), is
an indicator of the level of demand for the University’s
undergraduate courses within the broader competitive
market in the State. It is therefore an indicator of the extent
to which ECU’s courses of study meet the needs of the
Western Australian community.
Share of First Preferences is here defined as the number
of first preference applications for ECU’s undergraduate
courses, expressed as a percentage of all first preference
applications to Western Australia’s public universities
as processed by TISC. Data is taken at the end of the
applications process for that year’s entry to university.
Entry Year
2008
2009
2010
2011
20121
ECU
18.9%
19.5%
20.1%
16.6%
17.3%
Target
20.0%
21.0%
21.0%
18.0%
16.0%
Curtin
31.6%
31.6%
34.0%
34.0%
36.2%
Murdoch
15.2%
14.5%
13.6%
14.2%
16.1%
UWA
34.2%
34.4%
32.3%
35.1%
30.4%
Notes: From 2010 a revised definition, approved by ECU’s Council
at its meeting of December 2009, has been applied. The change in
definition provides better comparisons between the universities by
limiting the data to applications for Bachelor and Associate Degree
courses only. Therefore figures for 2008 and 2009 vary from those
reported in earlier Annual Reports.
ECU’s share of first preference applications for
undergraduate courses processed through TISC
increased by 0.7 percentage points between the 2011
and the 2012 entry years.
ECU’s first preference share in 2012 is above target by
1.3 percentage points.
This measure excludes direct applications and the
relevance of this KPI to ECU’s performance continues to
decline as the proportion of ECU students entering the
University using pathways other than TISC increases.
6. Teaching-related Expenditure per
Student Load
Teaching-related expenditure per Student Load shows
the cost associated with providing teaching and learning
support to a full-time equivalent student in a given year.
Over time, the measure shows whether such costs are
decreasing or increasing, which could be interpreted as
indicating either increased efficiency or reduced efficiency
respectively.
This measure must, however, be interpreted in the context
of other KPIs associated with Outcome 1. A decrease in
cost does not necessarily indicate improved efficiency
if it leads to, for example, lower retention, graduate
satisfaction or graduate employment outcomes. For
example, a substantial increase in class size (student:
staff ratio) may reduce costs, but might adversely impact
on performance against other indicators.
Trends on this measure can also be affected by factors
such as changes in the overall ECU student load, the
proportion of costs which are fixed, and the proportion of
student load in higher cost disciplines.
Teaching-related Expenditure per Student Load is here
defined as the total expenditure less research-only
expenditure, divided by total full-time equivalent students
(EFTSL) in the year.
Table 13: Teaching-related Expenditure per Student Load
Year of Survey
2008
Teaching-Related
Expenditure ($’000)
2009
2010
2011
20121
246,399 252,064 277,172 282,800 305,953
Total Student Load
(EFTSL)
15,978
17,583
18,711
18,478
18,132
Teaching-Related
Expenditure/Total
Student Load ($)
15,417
14,336
14,813
15,305
16,874
Target ($)
15,619
14,756
14,572
14,719
16,645
Teaching-Related
Expenditure/Total
Student Load
(2012 $ equiv)3
17,268
15,484
15,677
15,763
16,874
Target
(2012 $ equiv)
17,495
15,938
15,422
15,160
16,645
2
Notes:1. 2012 projected full year student load figure is as at 23/01/2013 and includes
VET course load. 2. Targets are derived from Teaching-Related Expenditure based on
the Original Full year Budget divided by the total Student Load from the Budget. For
2012, this was $299,799,000 divided by 18,011 EFTSL. 3. Prior year expenditure is
indexed for current costs, based on CPI for December Qtr 2012.
Teaching-related expenditure per Student Load (2012 $ equivalent)
increased between 2011 and 2012. The 2012 figure is higher than targeted.
41
Outcome 2: ECU’s
research and
scholarship advance
and develop education,
industry, commerce
and the community,
through the practical
application of
knowledge.
This outcome has the following measures:
Key Effectiveness
Indicator
Research Income
Key Efficiency
Indicators
Higher Degree Research
Completions
1 – National Competitive Research Grants
2.154
2.907
2.750
2.801
2 – Other Public Sector Research Funding
7.235
7.709
8.301
8.402
Research Publications
3 – Industry and Other Funding for Research
2.926
2.012
4.211
4.551
4 – Co-operative Research Centre Funding
0.075
0.182
0.050
0
Category
2008
2009
2010
2011
20121
7. Research Income
Total
12.390
12.809
15.312
15.754
Universities attract research income as a result of their:
historical competitiveness in winning grants; previous
research outcomes; and perceived ability to deliver
quality research and scholarship. Research income,
across the four categories listed below, reflects the
relevance and potential impact of ECU’s research as
perceived by various funders. It is therefore an indicator
of the extent to which ECU’s research and scholarship,
advance and develop education, industry, commerce and
the community.
Target
10.015
13.629
13.629
13.600
Research Income is here defined as the level of external
research funding obtained during a year, in total and in
each of the four categories defined by the Department
of Industry, Innovation, Science, Research and Tertiary
Education (DIISRTE).
42
Table 14: Research Income ($m)
Note: 1. Research income for 2012 is unavailable until verified by audit in June 2013.
Between 2008 and 2011, total research income has
increased by $3.364 million. Between 2010 and 2011
research income increased in three of the four categories
defined by DIISRTE. Total research income in 2011 was
above target by $2.154 million.
8. Higher Degree Research Completions
Doctorate and Master by Research completions is a
measure of ECU’s success in training new researchers
who will undertake research activity and scholarship, to
advance and develop education, industry, commerce and
the community.
Higher Degree Research Completions per 10 Academic FTE
is a measure of the efficiency of ECU’s higher degree research
programs in providing new researchers to education, industry,
commerce and the community.
Higher Degree by Research Completions is defined here as
the number of Research Doctorates and Masters by Research
theses passed in a year. Completions are also expressed per
10 full-time equivalent (FTE) academic staff, where academic
staff are those at Level B and above, classified as ‘teaching
and research’ or ‘research only’.
Table 15: Higher Degree Research Completions by level, total number and per 10 Academic FTE
2008
2009
2010
2011
Doctorate by Research
58
41
51
56
Master by Research
35
23
19
22
Total Completions
93
64
70
78
639
659
647
696
7,178
7,092
7,403
7,895
Academic Staff FTE
448
494
531
517
Completions per 10 FTE
2.1
1.3
1.3
1.5
Target
1.9
2.2
2.2
2.2
Total State Completions
Total National Completions
20121
Note: 1. Research completions for 2012 are unavailable until verified by audit in June 2013.
State and National Higher Degree by Research completions for 2011 are from Table 8 of the 2011 Award Course Completions listings on the
DIISRTE website at: www.innovation.gov.au/HigherEducation/HigherEducationStatistics/StatisticsPublications/Pages/default.aspx.
Total completions for both Research Doctorates and
Research Masters increased between 2010 and 2011.
Completions per 10 Academic Staff FTE increased
(from 1.3 to 1.5) but remain below target by 0.7
completions per 10 Academic Staff FTE.
9. Research Publications
The number of recognised research and development
publications produced in a year, as reported to the
Department of Industry, Innovation, Science, Research
and Tertiary Education (DIISRTE), is a direct measure of
research output.
The number of weighted research and development
publications per 10 Academic Staff FTE is a measure
of the efficiency of research output and an indicator
of how efficiently ECU’s research and scholarship
advance and develop education, industry, commerce
and the community.
Research and Development “Weighted Publications” is
defined as the number of publications in the DIISRTEdefined categories A1, B, C1, E1 and J1 in a year. The
number of publications is assessed annually in a rigorous,
externally audited system prior to submission to DIISRTE.
Weighted publications are expressed per 10 full-time
equivalent (FTE) academic staff, where academic staff are
those at Level B and above, classified as ‘teaching and
research’ or ‘research only’.
43
Table 16: Research and Development Weighted Publications per 10 Academic FTE
2008
2009
2010
2011
20121
Unweighted Publications per 10 FTE
A1 – Authored Research Books
0.37
0.36
0.38
0.22
B – Book Chapter
0.59
1.03
0.88
0.79
C1 – Articles in Scholarly Refereed Journal
5.48
5.02
5.06
5.73
E1 – Full Written Paper – Refereed Proceedings
4.25
3.32
3.53
3.90
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
Total Unweighted Publications
479.0
480.9
522.1
549.4
Total Weighted Publications
545.8
552.9
602.1
595.4
Academic Staff FTE
448
494
531
517
Weighted Publications per 10 FTE
12.2
11.2
11.3
11.6
Target
11.5
12.8
12.8
12.8
J1 – Major Original Creative Works
Note: 1. Research publications figures for 2012 are unavailable until verified by audit in June 2013.
Total Unweighted Publications increased in number between 2010 and 2011, by 27.3 publications; however Total
Weighted Publications decreased slightly over the same period by 6.7 publications. Weighted Publications per 10
Academic Staff FTE increased between 2010 and 2011 (from 11.3 to 11.6), but was below target by 1.2 publications
per 10 Academic Staff FTE in 2011.
44
45
SECTION 3
SIGNIFICANT ISSUES
46
The Tertiary Education Quality and
Standards Agency
The Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency
Act 2011 (Cwlth) established the Tertiary Education
Quality and Standards Agency (TEQSA) as an agency
replacing the Australian Universities Quality Agency.
Under the TEQSA Act, TEQSA registers and evaluates the
performance of higher education institutions against the
Higher Education Standards Framework. This framework
includes the Higher Education Threshold Standards.
Like all Australian universities, from January 2012, ECU
meets all the Threshold Standards required in order to be
registered and operate as a higher education provider
in Australia.
Master of Physiotherapy Course
Accreditation
ECU’s two-year graduate entry Master of Physiotherapy
program (offered since 2010) has failed to gain
accreditation status from the Australian Physiotherapy
Council. The University attempted to address
accreditation issues in the course when first notified in
December 2011 and achieved provisional accreditation
with conditions in August 2012. However, in December
2012 the University was informed that the provisional
accreditation had been revoked. This has implications
for the 2012 graduates of this course, as they will not be
eligible for general registration as physiotherapists.
An alternative registration pathway has been identified by
the Australian Physiotherapy Council for the 19 graduates
affected by this decision. The University is currently doing
everything in its power to support these students during
the alternative registration process.
approximately 40 per cent. By 2014, this “half-cohort” will
result in a Year 12 school-leaver cohort of approximately
13,000 students, compared to 21,000 students in the
previous year. School leavers represent approximately
37 per cent of commencing domestic undergraduate
enrolments to ECU, and cost management initiatives and
enrolment growth strategies have been developed to
offset the impact of the potential revenue reduction.
2012-13 Commonwealth Budget
The Commonwealth Budget continues to provide funding
for implementation of the Government’s education
reforms, despite tightening fiscal conditions. Notable
changes affecting higher education are described below:
2012 saw the introduction of changes to Commonwealth
Grant Scheme (CGS) funding arrangements, to remove
the “cap” on over-enrolments and the “safety net”
guaranteeing funding on under-enrolments. An increase
in funding from $4 billion in 2011-12 to $7.1 billion in
2012-13 for Fee-HELP was announced as part of this
reform. This increase will also allow Vocational Education
and Training (VET) students to access loans for their
contributions to fees.
Funding to the Higher Education Participation and
Partnerships Program (HEPPP) has been reduced.
The “participation” component of the program was
reduced by $68.2 million over four years from 1
January 2013. However, $50 million of these savings
were redirected to the “partnership” component of the
Program for outreach and collaboration activities to
encourage people from low socio-economic status (SES)
backgrounds to attend university. In 2013, ECU is forecast
to have an overall reduction in HEPPP funding in excess
of $400,000.2
The 2015 Half-year Cohort
In 2001, the Western Australian Government increased
the pre-school and school entry age by six months to align
with other Australian states and territories. This change
reduced the size of the kindergarten cohort in 2001 to
2. ECU’s proportion of national HEPPP allocations varies year
on year based on Australian Government low SES participation
measures.
47
As part of the Mid-year Economic and Fiscal Outlook
approximately $1 billion in forward estimates for higher
education were cut, including:
zz Slowing
the rate of funding increases for Sustainable
Research Excellence (SRE) by maintaining funding
at the 2012 level for the 2013 calendar year, then
increasing funding over the three years to a maximum
amount of $300 million in 2016. SRE payments will
decrease by $79 million in 2012 13 ($499 million over
four years). Funding will then be indexed annually
from 2017.
zz Abolishing
Facilitation Funding from 2014 (total $270.1
million), which was an interim measure ahead of
improved indexation arrangements.
zz Maintaining
Student Start-Up scholarships at the 2012
annual rate until 2017 (total $82.3 million).
until 2017 the extension of eligibility for
student payment for all masters by coursework
programs (total $167 million).
The Bill, passed in November 2012 introduces major
changes to Australian export control rules. Changes of
particular relevance to ECU include:
zz regulation
of intangible exports such as software and
electronic files (including those transferred by personto-person contacts or email)
zz regulation
of defence services, and
zz brokering
in such goods or services internationally,
where there is a connection with Australia, but not
necessarily involving an actual export from Australia.
In 2013 ECU’s Risk and Assurance Services will
implement risk management and compliance protocols to
mitigate risks created by this change in legislation.
zz Delaying
The Base Funding Review
(Lomax-Smith Review)
zz Applying
The purpose of the Review, conducted during 2011, was
to make recommendations on the principles for public
investment in Australian higher education and inquire into
the levels of funding that are appropriate for Australian
higher education to remain internationally competitive.
a general interest charge to student income
support debts (total $40 million).
Student Visa Processing
In December 2010, the Australian Government
appointed the Hon Michael Knight AO to conduct an
independent review of the student visa program. One of
the key recommendations of the Knight Review was to
streamline visa processing arrangements for prospective
international students. Amendments have now been made
to the Migration Regulations 1994 (Cwlth) (Migration
Legislation Amendment Regulation 2012 (No. 1)). From
24 March 2012, prospective international students for
ECU’s doctoral, masters and bachelor degrees courses
will be assessed as low migration risk once the University
has accepted the enrolment, regardless of the students’
country of origin.
48
The Defence Trade Controls Bill 2011
(the Export Controls Bill)
The Government is yet to respond to the final report
released by the Minister for Tertiary Education in
December 2011, which included recommendations for
changes to discipline cluster funding rates, loadings and
specific purpose funding schemes.
2012/13 Western Australian State Budget
The Western Australian Government committed $4.1
billion in 2012/13 to improve the State’s public education
system as part of the State Budget for 2012/13, which
includes an allocation of $341 million to transition Year 7
students to secondary schools from 2015.
An additional $99 million over two years has been
allocated from 2012/13 for the delivery of 33,000 VET
training places in Western Australia to help address the
State’s future labour needs. No additional funding support
for health and medical research was allocated by the
2012/13 State Government Budget.
National Review into Model Occupational
Health and Safety (OHS) legislation
Harmonisation of the health and safety legislation
across Australia will result in new work health and safety
legislation in each jurisdiction. The Western Australian
legislation was expected to be implemented from
1 January 2012, but the new laws are now expected to
be enacted in 2013. ECU has reviewed the impacts of
the proposed laws and is well prepared to meet the likely
requirements of the new legislation.
49
SECTION 4
DISCLOSURES AND LEGAL
COMPLIANCE
50
Auditor General’s Statement
51
Auditor General’s Statement
52
Certification of Financial Statements
The accompanying financial statements of ECU and the accompanying consolidated
financial statements have been prepared in compliance with the provisions of the
Financial Management Act 2006 (WA) from proper accounts and records to present fairly
the financial transactions for the financial year ended 31 December 2012 and the financial
position as at 31 December 2012.
At the date of signing we are not aware of any circumstances which would render the
particulars included in the financial statements misleading or inaccurate.
Certification of financial statements
required by DIISRTE
I declare that:
zz at
the time of this certification there are reasonable grounds to believe that ECU will be
able to pay its debts as and when they fall due; and
zz the
amount of Commonwealth financial assistance expended during the financial year
ended 31 December 2012 was for the purpose(s) for which it was provided.
The Hon Dr Hendy Cowan
Chancellor
6 March 2013
The Hon Dr Hendy Cowan
Chancellor
6 March 2013
Professor Kerry O. Cox
Vice-Chancellor
6 March 2013
Professor Kerry O. Cox
Vice-Chancellor
6 March 2013
Mr Brad Francis
Chief Financial Officer
6 March 2013
53
fINANCIAL StatementS
Contents
Page
Income statements55
Statements of comprehensive income
56
Statements of financial position
57
Statements of changes in equity
59
Statements of cash flows
60
Notes to the financial statements
61
This financial report covers both Edith Cowan
University as an individual entity and the consolidated
entity consisting of Edith Cowan University and its
subsidiary. The financial report is presented in the
Australian currency.
The financial report was authorised for issue by the
Council on 14th day of March 2013. The consolidated
entity has the power to amend and reissue the
financial statements.
54
income statement
For the year ended 31 December 2012
Consolidated
Notes
Parent entity
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Income from continuing operations
Australian Government financial assistance
Australian Government grants
4
167,994
144,882
167,994
144,882
HELP – Australian Government payment
4
76,575
74,279
76,575
74,279
State and Local Government financial assistance
5
HECS-HELP – Student payments
11,796
12,774
11,796
12,774
12,305
11,212
12,305
11,212
Fees and charges
6
70,308
67,193
70,308
67,193
Investment income
7
8,732
8,293
8,669
8,227
Royalties
8
7,018
8,599
4,022
5,273
Consultancy and contracts
9
6,251
4,130
6,251
4,129
7,137
7,283
7,062
7,283
6,254
8,107
5,980
6,679
Sale of goods
Other revenue
10
374,370
346,752
370,962
341,931
Gains on disposal of assets
11
2,531
8,685
2,568
8,685
Other investment income
7
771
1,559
771
1,559
Other income
10
Total revenue from continuing operations
Total revenue and income from continuing operations
1,002
1,252
1,002
1,252
378,674
358,248
375,303
353,427
Expenses from continuing operations
Employee related expenses
12
214,543
197,482
211,913
194,654
Depreciation and amortisation
13
22,267
19,316
22,239
19,300
Repairs and maintenance
14
8,634
7,349
8,616
7,345
Borrowing costs
15
3,594
3,560
3,594
3,560
Impairment of assets
16
1,421
1,041
1,160
1,041
Investment losses
7
1,093
1,995
1,093
1,995
3,708
3,766
3,708
3,766
17
97,755
91,004
95,112
88,827
353,015
325,513
347,435
320,488
Cost of goods sold
Other expenses
Total expenses from continuing operations
55
income statement (continued)
For the year ended 31 December 2012
Consolidated
2012
Notes
Operating result before income tax
Income tax benefits/(expense)
18
Parent entity
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
25,659
32,735
27,868
32,939
118
-
-
(55)
Operating result from continuing operations
25,604
32,853
27,868
32,939
Operating result after income tax for the period
25,604
32,853
27,868
32,939
The above income statement should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.
Statement of comprehensive income
For the year ended 31 December 2012
Consolidated
Notes
Operating result after income tax for the period
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
25,604
32,853
27,868
32,939
Gain/(loss) on revaluation of property, plant and equipment, net of tax
34
(3,032)
2,372
(3,032)
2,372
Gain/(loss) on value of available-for-sale financial assets, net of tax
34
1,852
(2,164)
1,852
(2,164)
Cash flow hedges, net of tax
34
1
23
1
23
Exchange differences on translation of foreign operations
34
204
(16)
-
-
Impairment adjustments
34
13
471
13
471
Total comprehensive income
34
(962)
686
Total comprehensive income attributable to members of Edith Cowan University
The above statement of comprehensive income should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.
56
Parent entity
2012
24,642
33,539
(1,166)
26,702
702
33,641
Statement of financial position
as at 31 December 2012
Consolidated
Parent entity
2012
2011
2012
2011
Notes
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Cash and cash equivalents
19
51,429
33,963
51,429
32,491
Receivables
20
9,130
15,847
9,130
15,194
Inventories
21
1,783
2,041
1,783
1,626
Other financial assets
23
92,476
70,351
92,476
70,342
Non-current assets classified as held for sale
24
16,853
31,516
16,853
31,516
Other non-financial assets
25
Assets
Current assets
Total current assets
14,544
15,128
14,544
14,991
186,215
168,846
186,215
166,160
Non-current assets
Receivables
20
26,816
25,577
26,816
25,577
Other financial assets
23
69,611
17,884
69,611
17,884
Property, plant and equipment
27
803,700
792,857
803,700
792,765
Investment properties
26
9,820
10,913
9,820
10,913
Deferred tax assets
28
-
193
-
-
Intangible assets
29
5,667
5,638
5,667
5,421
Total non-current assets
Total assets
915,614
853,062
915,614
852,560
1,101,829
1,021,908
1,101,829
1,018,720
Liabilities
Current liabilities
Trade and other payables
30
10,289
12,301
10,289
11,711
Borrowings
31
2,320
2,170
2,320
2,170
Derivative financial instruments
22
-
1
-
1
Provisions
32
39,652
33,389
39,652
33,157
Other liabilities
33
28,593
25,776
28,593
25,622
80,854
73,637
80,854
72,661
Total current liabilities
Non-current liabilities
Borrowings
31
90,067
42,387
90,067
42,387
Provisions
32
66,875
66,405
66,875
66,340
57
Statement of financial position (continued)
as at 31 December 2012
Consolidated
Parent entity
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
-
87
-
-
Total non-current liabilities
156,942
108,879
156,942
108,727
Total liabilities
237,796
182,516
237,796
181,388
Net assets
864,033
839,392
864,033
837,332
Notes
Deferred tax liabilities
28
Equity
Reserves
34(a)
380,519
387,245
380,519
387,449
Retained earnings
34(b)
483,514
452,147
483,514
449,883
864,033
839,392
864,033
837,332
Total equity
The above statement of financial position should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.
58
Statement of changes in equity
For the year ended 31 December 2012
Consolidated
Reserves
Balance at 1 January 2011
Profit or loss
Gain/ (loss) on revaluation of property, plant and equipment
Gain/ (loss) on available-for-sale financial assets
Cash flow hedges
Retained
earnings
Parent entity
Total
Reserves
Total
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
385,921
419,932
805,853
386,109
417,582
803,691
-
32,852
32,852
-
32,938
32,938
2,372
-
2,372
2,372
-
2,372
(2,164)
-
(2,164)
(2,164)
-
(2,164)
23
-
23
Exchange differences on translation of foreign operations
(16)
-
(16)
Impairment adjustments
471
-
471
Transfer between reserves
Retained
earnings
638
(638)
23
-
23
-
-
-
471
-
471
-
638
Total comprehensive income
1,324
32,214
33,538
1,340
32,300
33,640
Balance at 31 December 2011
387,245
452,146
839,391
387,449
449,882
837,331
Consolidated
Reserves
Balance at 1 January 2012
Profit or loss
Gain/ (loss) on revaluation of property, plant and equipment
Gain/ (loss) on available-for-sale financial assets
Cash flow hedges
Exchange differences on translation of foreign operations
Impairment adjustments
Retained
earnings
(638)
-
Parent entity
Total
Reserves
Retained
earnings
Total
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
387,245
452,146
839,391
387,449
449,882
837,331
-
25,604
25,604
-
27,868
27,868
(3,032)
-
(3,032)
(3,032)
-
(3,032)
1,852
-
1,852
1,852
-
1,852
1
-
1
1
-
1
204
-
204
-
-
-
-
13
-
13
Transfer between reserves
(5,764)
5,764
-
(5,764)
5,764
-
Total comprehensive income
(6,726)
31,368
24,642
(6,930)
33,632
26,702
483,514
864,033
483,514
864,033
Balance at 31 December 2012
13
380,519
13
380,519
The above statement of changes in equity should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.
59
Statement of cash flows
For the year ended 31 December 2012
Consolidated
Notes
Parent entity
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
249,048
217,538
249,048
217,538
Cash flows from operating activities
Australian Government Grants received
4(g)
OS-HELP (net)
4(g)
Superannuation Supplementation
4(g)
State and Local Government Grants received
5
(8)
38
3,209
3,185
(8)
38
3,209
3,185
11,795
12,774
11,795
12,774
HECS-HELP – Student payments received
12,305
11,212
12,305
11,212
Receipts from student fees and other customers
98,580
91,621
94,445
86,695
891
1,439
891
1,439
Dividends and distributions received
7,469
Interest received
Payments to suppliers and employees (inclusive of GST)
Interest and other cost of finance paid
Net cash provided by / (used in) operating activities
43
7,406
7,310
(299,404)
(315,580)
(293,992)
(3,580)
(3,607)
(3,580)
(3,607)
-
Income taxes recovered/paid
7,376
(321,490)
(25)
-
-
58,219
42,147
59,931
42,592
22,828
36,443
22,819
36,443
(39,616)
(53,016)
(39,634)
(52,789)
(72,205)
(21,632)
(72,205)
(21,632)
Cash flows from investing activities
Proceeds from sale of property, plant and equipment and non-current assets held for sale
Payments for property, plant and equipment and non-current assets held for sale
Payments for financial assets
-
206
Proceeds from sale of financial assets
Net cash provided by / (used in) investing activities
(88,787)
2,613
197
(35,592)
(88,823)
2,613
(35,365)
Cash flows from financing activities
60
Proceeds from borrowings
50,000
19,088
50,000
19,088
Repayment of borrowings
(2,170)
(48,841)
(2,170)
(48,841)
Net cash provided by / (used in) financing activities
47,830
(29,753)
47,830
(29,753)
Net increase / (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents
17,262
(23,198)
18,938
(22,526)
Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the financial year
33,963
57,177
32,491
55,017
Effects of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents
204
-
-
51,429
32,491
Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the financial year
19
Financing arrangements
31
Non-cash financing and investing activities
44
The above statement of cash flows should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.
51,429
(16)
33,963
Notes to the financial statements
31 December 2012
Contents of the notes to the financial statements
Note
1
University Organisation
2
Summary of significant accounting policies
3
Critical accounting estimates and judgements
4
Australian Government financial assistance including HECS-HELP and other Australian Government loan programs
5
State and Local Government financial assistance
6
Fees and charges
7
Investment revenue and income
8Royalties
9
Consultancy and contracts
10
Other revenue and income
11
Gains on disposal of assets
12
Employee related expenses
13
Depreciation and amortisation
14
Repairs and maintenance
15
Borrowing costs
16
Impairment of assets
17
Other expenses
18
Income tax
19
Cash and cash equivalents
20Receivables
21Inventories
22
Derivative financial instruments
23
Other financial assets
24Non-current assets classified as held for sale
25Other non-financial assets
26
Investment property
27
Property, plant and equipment
28
Deferred tax assets and liabilities
29
Intangible assets
30
Trade and other payables
31Borrowings
32Provisions
33
Other liabilities
34
Reserves and retained earnings
35
Restricted funds
Page
63
63
77
78
80
81
82
82
83
83
84
84
85
85
86
86
87
89
90
91
92
93
94
94
95
95
96
105
107
108
109
112
115
115
117
61
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2012
Contents of the notes to the financial statements
36
Key management personnel disclosures
118
37
Remuneration of auditors
119
38Contingencies
120
39Commitments
121
40
Related parties
122
41Subsidiaries
122
42
Events occurring after the reporting date
122
43
Reconciliation of operating result after income tax to net cash flows from operating activities
123
44Non-cash financing and investing activities
124
45
Financial risk management
124
46Write-offs128
47Superannuation
129
48 Acquittal of Australian Government financial assistance
133
62
Notes to the financial statements
31 December 2012
1 University Organisation
Edith Cowan University (the University) is a Statutory Authority of the Government of Western Australia and is domiciled in Australia. The address of its registered office is 270 Joondalup
Drive, Joondalup, Western Australia.
The University is a public not for profit institution of higher education, funded primarily through Commonwealth grant funding. Established in 1902, when it began as a teaching college,
the University gained university status in 1991. Its principal activities cover teaching, learning and research.
The University Council is the governing body which controls the operations, affairs, concerns and property of the University. The Vice Chancellor has been delegated the responsibility of
managing the operations, affairs, concerns and property of the University.
2 Summary of significant accounting policies
The principal accounting policies adopted in the preparation of the annual financial statements are set out below. These policies have been consistently applied to all the years presented,
unless otherwise stated. The annual financial statements include separate financial statements for Edith Cowan University as an individual entity and the consolidated entity consisting of
Edith Cowan University and its subsidiary.
General Statement
The financial statements constitute a general purpose financial report which has been prepared in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards, the Framework, Statements of
Accounting Concepts and other authoritative pronouncements of the Australian Accounting Standards Board as applied by the Treasurer’s instructions. Several of these are modified by
the Treasurer’s instructions to vary application, disclosure, format and wording.
The Financial Management Act and the Treasurer’s instructions are legislative provisions governing the preparation of financial statements and take precedence over Australian
Accounting Standards, the Framework, Statements of Accounting Concepts and other authoritative pronouncements of the Australian Accounting Standards Board.
Where modification is required and has a material or significant financial effect upon the reported results, details of that modification and the resulting financial effect are disclosed in the
notes to the financial statements.
Reporting Entity
The reporting entity comprises the University and its controlled entity, E.C.U. Resources for Learning Ltd (ECURL).
The directors intend that this will be the final year in which consolidated financial statements are prepared since the operations of the controlled entity have now been wound-up.
Specific details of controlled entities appear in note 41.
(a) Basis of preparation
The financial statements have been prepared on the accrual basis of accounting using the historical cost convention, as modified by the revaluation of available-for-sale financial assets,
financial assets and liabilities (including derivative instruments) at fair value through profit and loss, certain classes of property, plant and equipment and investment properties.
The consolidated financial report is presented in Australian dollars and all values are rounded to the nearest thousand dollars ($’000).
63
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2012
2 Summary of significant accounting policies (continued)
Critical accounting estimates
The preparation of financial statements in conformity with Australian Accounting Standards requires the use of certain critical accounting estimates. It also requires management
to exercise its judgements in the process of applying the consolidated entity’s accounting policies. The areas involving a higher degree of judgement or complexity, or areas where
assumptions and estimates are significant to the financial statements are disclosed in note 3.
(b) Basis of consolidation
Subsidiary
The consolidated financial statements have been prepared by combining the financial statements of all entities that comprise the consolidated entity, being the University (the parent
entity) and its controlled entities, in accordance with AASB 127 Consolidated and Separate Financial Statements and modified by Treasurer’s instruction 1105. A list of controlled entities
appears in note 41 – Subsidiaries. Consistent accounting policies have been applied and all inter-entity balances and transactions, and unrealised profits arising within the consolidated
entity are eliminated in full.
Edith Cowan University and its controlled entities together are referred to in this financial report as the consolidated entity.
(c)Income
Revenue recognition
The consolidated entity recognises revenue when the amount of revenue can be reliably measured, it is probable that future economic benefits will flow to the consolidated entity and
specific criteria have been met for each of the consolidated entity’s activities as described below. The amount of revenue is not considered to be reliably measurable until all contingencies
relating to the sale have been resolved. The consolidated entity bases its estimates on historical results, taking into consideration the type of customer, the type of transaction and the
specifics of each arrangement.
Revenue is measured at the fair value of the consideration received or receivable. Revenue is recognised for the major business activities as follows:
(i) Grants, donations, gifts and other non reciprocal contributions
The consolidated entity treats operating grants received from Australian Government entities as income in the year of receipt.
Grants received from Government are recognised as revenue when the consolidated entity obtains control over the asset comprising the contribution, it is probable that economic
benefits will flow to the consolidated entity and it can be measured reliably. When the University does not have control over the contribution, does not have the right to receive the
contribution or, in case of reciprocal grants, has not fulfilled grant conditions or provided services that specified in the agreement, the applicable grant contribution is treated as a liability in
the statement of financial position as deferred income.
Donations, gifts and other contributions are recognised as revenue when the University obtains control over the assets comprising the contributions, it is probable that economic benefits
will flow to the consolidated entity and it can be measured reliably.
(ii) Student fees and charges
Fees and charges are recognised as income in the year of receipt, except to the extent that fees and charges relate to courses to be held in future periods. Such income is treated as
income in advance. Conversely, fees and charges relating to debtors are recognised as revenue in the year to which the prescribed course relates.
64
(iii) Rendering of services
Revenue is recognised on delivery of the service to the client or by reference to the stage of completion of the transaction.
(iv) Interest revenue
Revenue is accrued on a time-proportion basis, by reference to the principal outstanding and at the effective interest rate applicable.
(v) Sale of goods
Revenue is recognised from the sale of goods and disposal of other assets when the significant risks and rewards of ownership control transfer to the purchaser and the revenue can be
measured reliably.
(vi)Royalties
Royalty income is recognised on an accrual basis in accordance with the substance of the relevant agreements.
Income recognition
(vii)Land development and resale
Land is not sold until the development work is completed, and income is recognised when the significant risks and rewards of ownership control transfer to the purchaser and can be
measured reliably.
(viii)Gains
Gains may be realised or unrealised. Realised gains are determined on a net basis as the difference between the sale proceeds received or receivable and the carrying amount of the
non-current asset. Unrealised gains are determined on a net basis as the difference between the fair value and the carrying amount of an asset.
The policies adopted for the recognition of significant categories of gains are as follows:
Realised gains on disposal of non-current assets
Gains arising on the disposal or retirement of a non-current asset are recognised when control of the asset and the significant risks and rewards of ownership transfer to the purchaser.
Net gains are included in income for the period in which they arise.
Unrealised gains associated with investment property at fair value
Gains arising from changes in the fair value of an investment property are included in income for the period in which they arise.
Gains or losses associated with financial assets
Gains arising on the retirement of financial assets are recognised when control of the asset and the significant risks and rewards of ownership transfer from the consolidated entity.
Net gains are included in income for the period in which they arise.
65
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2012
2 Summary of significant accounting policies (continued)
(ix) Parking and library fines
Income from parking and library fines are recognised on a cash basis, as the purpose of the fine is to act as a deterrent and not for raising revenue. Non-payment of these fines is not
actively pursued.
(x) Lease income
Lease income from operating leases is recognised in income on a straight-line basis over the lease term.
(xi) Service concession income
Service concession income generated from the consumption of access rights by the operator is recognised on a straight-line basis over the life of the service concession arrangement
being 36.5 years. This represents the amortisation of the service concession provision. Refer to Note t(iii) for further details regarding this provision.
(d) Income tax
The consolidated entity is exempt from income tax in Australia under the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997.
The consolidated entity is subject to foreign income tax for overseas operations. Deferred tax assets are only recognised where it is probable that future amounts will be available to utilise
those temporary differences and unused tax losses.
The taxation expense represents the sum of tax currently payable and is measured at 31 December each year.
Taxable profit differs from net profit as reported in the income statements because it excludes items of income or expense that are taxable or deductible in other years and it further
excludes items that are never taxable or deductible. The liability for current tax is calculated using tax rates that have been enacted by the reporting date.
The income tax expense or revenue for the period is the tax payable on the current period’s taxable income based on the national income tax rate for each jurisdiction adjusted by
changes in deferred tax assets and liabilities attributable to temporary differences between the tax bases of assets and liabilities and their carrying amounts in the financial statements,
and to unused tax losses.
Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognised using the liability method, for temporary differences at the tax rates expected to apply when the assets are recovered or liabilities are
settled, based on those tax rates which are enacted or substantively enacted for the jurisdiction where the entity is situated. The relevant tax rates are applied to the cumulative amounts
of deductible and taxable temporary differences to measure the deferred tax asset or liability. An exception is made for certain temporary differences arising from the initial recognition of
an asset or a liability. No deferred tax asset or liability is recognised in relation to these temporary differences if they arose in a transaction, other than a business combination, that at the
time of the transaction did not affect either accounting profit or taxable profit or loss.
Deferred tax liabilities and assets are not recognised for temporary differences between the carrying amount and tax bases of investments in controlled entities where the parent entity is
able to control the timing of the reversal of the temporary differences and it is probable that the differences will not reverse in the foreseeable future.
Current and deferred tax balances attributable to amounts recognised directly in equity are also recognised directly in equity.
(e) Borrowing costs
Borrowing costs that have been incurred for the construction of any qualifying asset are capitalised during the period of time that is required to complete and prepare the asset for its
intended use or sale. Other borrowing costs are expensed when incurred.
66
(f) Impairment of assets
Property, plant and equipment, investment properties, intangible assets, non-current assets held for sale and financial assets are tested for any indication of impairment at each reporting
date. Where there is an indication of impairment, the recoverable amount is estimated. Where the recoverable amount is less than the carrying amount, and the decline in the carrying
value is considered significant and prolonged, the asset is considered impaired. The asset is written down to the recoverable amount and an impairment loss is recognised. As the
consolidated entity is a not-for-profit entity, unless an asset has been identified as a surplus asset, the recoverable amount is the higher of an asset’s fair value less costs to sell and
depreciated replacement cost.
The risk of impairment is generally limited to circumstances where an asset’s depreciation is materially understated, where the replacement cost is falling or where there is a significant
change in useful life. Each relevant class of asset is reviewed annually to verify that the accumulated depreciation/amortisation reflects the level of consumption or expiration of the
asset’s future economic benefits and to evaluate any impairment risk from falling replacement costs.
The recoverable amount of assets identified as surplus assets is the higher of fair value less costs to sell and the present value of future cash flows expected to be derived from the asset.
Surplus assets carried at fair value have no risk of material impairment where fair value is determined by reference to market based evidence. Where fair value is determined by reference
to depreciated replacement cost, surplus assets are at risk of impairment and the recoverable amount is measured. Surplus assets at cost are tested for indications of impairment at each
reporting date.
(g) Cash and cash equivalents
For cash flow statement presentation purposes, cash and cash equivalents includes cash on hand and short-term deposits with financial institutions with original maturities of three
months or less that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and which are subject to an insignificant risk of changes in value.
(h) Restricted funds
Endowment and bequest funds are classified as restricted funds. Endowment and bequest funds have been received from benefactors who, by the terms of their conveying instruments,
have stipulated that the use of funds is limited in future years to the purposes designated by the benefactors.
(i)Receivables
Receivables are recognised and carried at the original invoice amount less an allowance for any uncollectible amounts. The collectability of receivables is reviewed on an ongoing basis
and any receivables identified as uncollectible are written-off against the allowance for impairment. The allowance for impairment (doubtful debts) is raised for all amounts overdue more
than 90 days. The carrying amount is equivalent to the fair value as it is due for settlement within 30 days.
(j)Inventories
Inventories are measured at the lower of cost and net realisable value. Cost comprises direct materials and where applicable, import duties, transport and handling costs that have been
incurred to bring the inventories to their present location and condition. Cost is calculated using the weighted average method. Net realisable value represents the estimated selling price
less all estimated costs of completion and costs to be incurred in marketing, selling and distribution.
(k) Investments and other financial assets
Classification
The consolidated entity classifies its investments in the following categories: loans and receivables, held-to-maturity investments and available-for-sale financial assets. The classification
depends on the purpose for which the investments were acquired. Management determines the classification of its investments at initial recognition and, in the case of assets classified
as held-to-maturity, re-evaluates this designation at each reporting date.
67
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2012
2 Summary of significant accounting policies (continued)
(i) Loans and receivables
Receivables are non-derivative financial assets with fixed or determinable payments that are not quoted in an active market. They are included in current assets, except for those with
maturities greater than 12 months after the statement of financial position date which are classified as non-current assets. Loans and receivables are included in receivables in the
statements of financial position (note 20).
(ii) Held-to-maturity investments
Held-to-maturity investments are non-derivative financial assets with fixed or determinable payments and fixed maturities that the consolidated entity’s management has the positive
intention and ability to hold to maturity.
(iii) Available-for-sale financial assets
Available-for-sale financial assets, comprising principally marketable equity securities, are non-derivatives that are either designated in this category or not classified in any of the other
categories. They are included in non-current assets unless management intends to dispose of the investment within 12 months of the end of the reporting period.
Regular purchases and sales of financial assets are recognised on trade-date – the date on which the consolidated entity commits to purchase or sell the asset. Available-for-sale
financial assets are initially recognised at fair value plus transaction-costs. Available-for-sale financial assets are derecognised when the rights to receive cash flows from the financial
assets have expired or have been transferred and the consolidated entity has transferred substantially all the risks and rewards of ownership. In circumstances, where an investment is
liquidated and capital distributions are received, the capital distributions are accounted for as a reduction in the carrying value of the investment.
When securities classified as available-for-sale are sold, the accumulated fair value adjustments recognised in equity are included in the Income statement as gains and losses from
investment securities.
Subsequent measurement
Available-for-sale financial assets are subsequently carried at fair value. Held-to-maturity investments are carried at cost and interest is accrued on a monthly basis until that interest is
recorded at maturity. Loans and receivables are recorded at the transaction cost or face value because there is no interest rate applicable and subsequent measurement is not required
as the effect of discounting is not material.
Changes in the fair value of securities classified as available-for-sale are recognised in equity.
Fair value
The fair values of quoted investments are based on current bid prices. If the market for a financial asset is not active (and for unlisted securities), the consolidated entity establishes
fair value by using valuation techniques. These include reference to the fair values of recent arm’s length transactions, involving the same instruments or other instruments that are
substantially the same, discounted cash flow analysis, and option pricing models refined to reflect the issuer’s specific circumstances.
Impairment
The consolidated entity assesses at each balance date whether there is objective evidence that a financial asset or group of financial assets is impaired. In the case of equity securities
classified as available-for-sale, a significant or prolonged decline in the fair value of a security below its cost is considered as in determining whether the security is impaired. If any such
evidence exists for available-for-sale financial assets, the cumulative loss – measured as the difference between the acquisition cost and the current fair value, less any impairment loss
on that financial asset previously recognised in profit and loss is – removed from equity and recognised in the income statement. Impairment losses recognised in the income statements
on equity instruments are not reversed through the income statement.
68
(l) Property, plant and equipment
All items of property, plant and equipment are initially recognised at cost. For items of property, plant and equipment acquired at no cost or for nominal cost, cost is their fair value at the
date of acquisition.
Each class of property, plant and equipment are subsequently measured at cost or fair value as indicated, less, where applicable, any accumulated depreciation and impairment losses.
For asset classes carried at fair value, increases in the carrying amount arising on revaluation of the asset class are recognised in other comprehensive income and accumulated in the
revaluation surplus in equity. Revaluation decreases that offset previous revaluation increments of the same class of assets are also recognised in other comprehensive income as a
reduction in the revaluation surplus reserve. All other revaluation decrements are charged to the income statement as an expense of the period.
Items of property, plant and equipment (excluding Works of Art) costing $5,000 or more are recognised as assets and the cost of utilising assets is expensed (depreciated) over their
useful lives. Items of property, plant and equipment costing less than $5,000 are expensed direct to the income statement (other than where they form part of a group of similar items
which are significant in total).
The assets residual values and useful lives are reviewed each year and adjusted where appropriate at the end of each reporting period.
Land and Buildings
Land and buildings are measured at fair value based on periodic valuations by an external independent valuer, less subsequent depreciation for buildings. Fair value of land is determined
on the basis of current market values with reference to recent transactions whereas the fair value of buildings is determined on the basis of depreciated replacement cost which is
equivalent to the current replacement cost of an asset less, where applicable, accumulated depreciation calculated on the basis of such cost to reflect the already consumed or expired
future economic benefits of the asset.
Buildings are depreciated on a straight-line basis over their useful life to the consolidated entity commencing from the time that the building is held ready for use. Leasehold improvements
are depreciated over the shorter of either the unexpired period of the lease or the estimated useful lives of the improvements.
Leasehold improvements
Leasehold improvements are capitalised at amounts directly attributable to bringing the asset to the location and condition necessary for it to be capable of operating in the manner
intended for the consolidated entity. Such assets are depreciated over the shorter of the lease term and the assets useful life. Where lease arrangements contain options for renewal
and extension of the lease term, such extensions are only taken into account for the purposes of determining an appropriate depreciation period when, at inception of the lease, it is
reasonably certain that the consolidated entity will exercise the option.
Service concession assets
The University has entered into arrangements with respect to the development and refurbishment of student accommodation. Such arrangements provide for the appointment of an
operator responsible for construction, asset upgrades and subsequent operation and management of the assets for an extended period. It is deemed that the University continues to
control such assets primarily due to the University, as grantor:
(i)
ultimately controlling or regulating the services that may be provided by the operator with respect to the student accommodation assets, the pricing of such services, and to whom
such services may be provided; and
(ii) controlling the significant residual interest in the infrastructure at the end of the term of the arrangement
Existing University buildings that form part of the arrangement with the external operator have been transferred from Land and Buildings into the Service Concession Assets class of
assets. Capital improvements to such assets are capitalised at cost which is equivalent to their fair value.
69
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2012
2 Summary of significant accounting policies (continued)
Service concession assets under construction at reporting date are recognised at cost, which will be an amount equivalent to fair value based on depreciated replacement cost.
Subsequent to initial recognition, service concession assets are measured at cost and depreciated of their useful life.
Works of art
All Works of art are initially recognised at fair value and continue to be measured at fair value, such value being based on current market values determined by a qualified independent
valuer. Works of Art are not subject to depreciation having regard to their indefinite life and the expectation of increasing value over time. Such assets controlled by the University are
classified as heritage assets and are protected and preserved for public exhibition, education, research and the furtherance of public service. They are neither disposed for financial gain
nor encumbered in any manner.
Library collection assets
Library collection assets (excluding intangible assets) are carried at cost less accumulated depreciation and any accumulated impairment losses. Where library assets are acquired at no
cost, or for a nominal cost, cost will represent the asset’s fair value as determined by qualified library staff, and will generally represent that asset’s cost to replace.
Library collection assets carried at cost are depreciated on a straight-line basis over 10 years.
Depreciation
The depreciable amount of all fixed assets including buildings and capitalised lease assets, but excluding freehold land and Works of Art, are depreciated on a straight-line basis over the
asset’s expected useful life to the consolidated entity commencing from the time the asset is held ready for use. Leasehold improvements are depreciated over the shorter of either the
unexpired period of the lease or the estimated useful lives of the improvements.
The estimated useful lives are as follows:
Asset category
Life
Buildings
20-50 years
Service concession assets – buildings
36-50 years
Computing equipment
4 years
Other equipment and furniture
6-10 years
Motor vehicles
4-6 years
Works of art
Not depreciated
Leasehold improvements
Refer to policy above
Library collections
10 years
(m) Investment properties
Investment properties exclude properties held to meet service delivery objectives of the University and comprises of land and/or buildings which are held to earn rentals and/or capital
appreciation.
70
Investment properties are initially recognised at cost. Costs incurred subsequent to initial acquisition are capitalised when it is probable that future economic benefits in excess of the
originally assessed performance of the asset will flow to the University. Where an investment property is acquired at no cost or for nominal consideration, its cost shall be deemed to be its
fair value, as at the date of acquisition.
Subsequent to initial recognition at cost, investment property is carried at fair value. The fair value of all land has been determined by reference to recent market transactions and the fair
value of buildings have been determined by reference to the cost of replacing the remaining future economic benefits. Changes in fair values are recorded in the income statement as part
of other investment income. The properties are not depreciated.
Rental revenue from the leasing of investment properties is recognised in the income statement in the periods in which it is receivable and is accounted for on a straight-line basis over the
lease term.
(n)Leases
Leases in which a significant portion of the risks and rewards of ownership are retained by the lessor are classified as operating leases (note 39).The consolidated entity leases certain
property and equipment by way of operating leases. Payments made under operating leases (net of any incentives received from the lessor) are charged to the income statement on a
straight-line basis, over the period of the lease.
(o) Intangible assets
All acquired and internally developed intangible assets are initially measured at cost. For assets acquired at no cost or for nominal cost, cost is their fair value at the date of acquisition.
Subsequent costs are included in the asset’s carrying amount or recognised as a separate asset, where appropriate, only when it is probable that future economic benefits associated
with the item will flow to the consolidated entity and the cost of the item can be measured reliably. All other repairs and maintenance are charged to the income statement during the
financial period in which they are incurred.
Amortisation is calculated on a straight-line basis over the estimated useful life of the asset. The estimated useful lives for each class of intangible assets are:
Intangible asset class
Life
Library collection
10 years
(p) Unfunded superannuation
In accordance with the 1998 instructions issued by the Department of Education, Training and Youth Affairs (DETYA) now known as the Department of Industry, Innovation, Science,
Research and Tertiary Education (DIISRTE), the effects of the unfunded superannuation liabilities of the Edith Cowan University were recorded in the Income statement and the
Statement of financial position for the first time in 1998. The prior years’ practice had been to disclose liabilities by way of a note to the financial statements.
An arrangement exists between the Australian Government and the State Government to meet the unfunded liability for the Edith Cowan University’s beneficiaries of the State
Superannuation Scheme on an emerging cost basis. This arrangement is evidenced by the State Grants (General Revenue) Amendment Act 1987, Higher Education Funding Act 1988
and subsequent amending legislation. Accordingly, the unfunded liabilities have been recognised in the statement of financial position under-provisions with a corresponding asset
recognised under Receivables. The recognition of both the asset and the liability consequently does not affect the year-end net asset position of the Edith Cowan University and its
controlled entities.
(q) Non-current assets held for sale
Non-current assets classified as held for sale are stated at the lower of carrying amount and fair value less costs to sell where the carrying amount will be recovered principally through
a sale transaction rather than through continuing use.
An impairment loss is recognised for any initial or subsequent write down of the asset to fair value less costs to sell. A gain is recognised for any subsequent increases in fair value less
costs to sell of an asset, but not in excess of any cumulative impairment loss previously recognised. A gain or loss not previously recognised by the date of the sale of the non-current
asset is recognised at the date of derecognition.
Non-current assets classified as held for sale are not depreciated or amortised and are presented separately from other assets in the statement of financial position.
71
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2012
2 Summary of significant accounting policies (continued)
(r)Payables
Payables are recognised when the consolidated entity becomes obliged to make future payments as a result of a purchase of assets or services. Accounts payable are not interest
bearing and are stated at their nominal value.
The carrying amount is equivalent to its fair value, as they are generally settled within 30 days.
(s)Borrowings
Interest bearing loans are recorded at cost when the proceeds are received, net of direct issued costs. Finance charges are accounted for on an accrual basis.
Borrowings are classified as current liabilities unless the consolidated entity has an unconditional right to defer settlement of the liability for at least 12 months after the end of the
reporting date.
(t)Provisions
Provisions are liabilities of uncertain timing and amount and are recognised where there is a present legal or constructive obligation as a result of a past event and when the outflow of
resources embodying economic benefits is probable and a reliable estimate can be made of the amount of the obligation. Provisions are reviewed at each reporting date.
(i) Employee benefits
Provision is made for the consolidated entity’s liability for employee benefits arising from services rendered by employees to the end of the reporting period. Provisions for employee
benefits such as salaries and wages and annual leave that are expected to be settled within 12 months are measured at the amounts expected to be paid when the liability is settled.
Employee benefits payable later than 12 months such as post-employment benefits and long service leave have been measured at the present value of the estimated future cash
outflows to be made for those benefits. Liabilities of long term and post-employment benefits for which settlement cannot be deferred beyond 12 months is recognised in the current
provisions for employee benefits and is measured in accordance with the policy for short-term benefits described above. In determining the liability, consideration is given to increases
in salary costs including non-salary components such as superannuation and the probability that the employee may satisfy vesting requirements which can exist in specific types of
employment contract. Such vesting conditions generally comprise length of service and renewal of contract. Those cash flows are discounted using market yields on national government
bonds with terms to maturity that match, as closely as possible, the expected timing of cash flows.
Liability for sick leave is recognised as the related service is provided by the employees and which increases their sick leave entitlement. The accumulated sick leave entitlement is
measured at the additional undiscounted amount expected to be paid as a result of the unused entitlement that has accumulated at the end of the reporting period. The past history of
leave utilisation is taken into account in the estimation process.
Employment on-costs, including workers’ compensation insurance and payroll tax, are not employee benefits and are recognised as liabilities and expenses when the employment
to which they relate have occurred. Employment on-costs are not included as part of the consolidated entity’s employee related expenses and the related liability is included in the
employment oncosts provision.
Termination benefits are payable when employment is terminated before the normal retirement date, or when an employee accepts voluntary redundancy in exchange for these benefits.
The consolidated entity recognises termination benefits when it is demonstrably committed to either terminating the employment of current employees according to a detailed formal plan
without possibility of withdrawal or providing termination benefits as a result of an offer made to encourage voluntary redundancy. Benefits falling due more than 12 months after balance
date are discounted to present value.
72
(ii)Superannuation
The consolidated entity contributes to a number of superannuation schemes, including both defined contribution and defined benefit schemes. Payments to defined contribution schemes
are charged as an expense as they fall due. The University’s obligation is limited to these contributions.
Defined benefit schemes provide a defined lump-sum benefit to scheme members based on years of service and final average salary. A defined benefit liability is included in the statement
of financial position equal to the present value of the defined benefit obligation at the reporting date (less any past service costs not yet recognised) less the fair value of scheme assets at
the reporting date.
Actuarial gains and losses are fully funded, refer note 2(p).
For details relating to the individual schemes, refer to note 47.
(iii) Service concession provision
The University has recognised a service concession provision in the statement of financial position. The liability reflects the performance obligation the University has incurred to allow
the operator access to, and the right to generate revenue from, service concession assets. The liability incurred is initially recognised at an amount equivalent to the value of service
concession assets delivered to the University and is amortised to the statement of comprehensive income over the duration of the service concession arrangement. As a provision, it
is subsequently measured at the best estimate of the amount that the University would rationally pay to settle the obligation at the reporting date or to transfer it to a third party. This will
generally equate to the unamortised balance at each reporting date.
(u) Foreign currency translation and hedge accounting
Transactions denominated in currencies other than Australian dollars are recorded at the rates of exchange prevailing on the dates of the transactions. At each reporting date, monetary
assets and liabilities that are denominated in foreign currencies are retranslated at the rate of exchange prevailing at the reporting date. Non-monetary assets and liabilities carried at fair
value that are denominated in foreign currencies are translated at the rates prevailing at the reporting date when the fair value was determined. Exchange gains and losses arising on
retranslation are included in the income statement for the period.
Forward foreign exchange contracts are entered into as hedges to avoid or minimise possible adverse financial effects of movements in exchange rates. Such derivative financial
instruments are stated at fair value. Changes in the fair value of derivative financial instruments that are designated and effective as hedges of future cash flows are recognised directly in
equity and the ineffective portion is recognised immediately in the income statement.
When the hedged firm commitment results in the recognition of an asset or a liability, then, at the time the asset or liability is recognised, the associated gains or losses that had previously
been recognised in equity are included in the initial measurement of the acquisition cost or other carrying amount of the asset or liability. For all other cash flow hedges, the gains or losses
that are recognised in equity are transferred to the income statement in the same year in which the hedged firm commitment affects the net profit and loss, for example when the future
sale actually occurs.
(v) Goods and Services Tax (GST)
Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of the amount of associated GST, unless the GST incurred is not recoverable from the taxation authority. In this case it is recognised
as part of the cost of acquisition of the asset or as part of the expense.
Receivables and payables are stated inclusive of the amount of GST receivable or payable. The net amount of GST recoverable from, or payable to, the taxation authority is included with
other receivables or payables in the statement of financial position.
Cash flows are presented on a gross basis. The GST components of cash flows arising from investing or financing activities which are recoverable from, or payable to the taxation
authority, are presented as operating cash flow.
73
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2012
2 Summary of significant accounting policies (continued)
(w) New accounting standards and Interpretations
Certain new Accounting Standards and Interpretations have been published that are not mandatory for 31 December 2012 reporting periods. The Edith Cowan University’s assessment
of the impact of these new Standards and Interpretations is set out below:
(i) AASB 10 Consolidated Financial Statements (effective from 1 January 2013)
AASB 10 establishes a new control model that applies to all entities. It replaces parts of AASB 127 Consolidated and Separate Financial Statements dealing with the accounting for
consolidated financial statements. According to AASB 10 an investor controls an investee if, and only if, the investor has all the following: a) power over the investee; b) exposure, or
rights, to variable returns from its involvement with the investee; and c) the ability to use its power over the investee to affect the amount of the investor’s returns. Additional guidance is
provided about how to evaluate each of the three limbs above. The limbs above are more principle based rather than hard and fast rules. Consequential amendments were also made to
other standards via AASB 2011-7. The consolidated entity will consider the provisions of this standard when applicable. The consolidated entity does not expect that any adjustments will
be necessary as the result of applying the revised rules.
(ii) AASB 11 Joint Arrangements (effective from 1 January 2013)
AASB 11 replaces the AASB 131 Interests in Joint Ventures. The previous Standard had three types of joint ventures whereas AASB 11 only has two. These are: joint operations; and joint
ventures. Consequential amendments were also made to other standards via AASB 2011-7. The consolidated entity will consider the provisions of this standard when applicable. The
consolidated entity does not expect that any adjustments will be necessary as the result of applying the revised rules.
(iii) AASB 12 Disclosure of Interests in Other Entities (effective from 1 January 2013)
AASB 12 provides the disclosure requirements for entities that have an interest in a subsidiary, a joint arrangement, an associate or an unconsolidated structured entity. It requires an
entity to disclose information that enables users of financial statements to evaluate: a) the nature of, and risks associated with, its interests in other entities; and b) the effects of those
interests on its financial position, financial performance and cash flows. The Standard is not available for early adoption for not-for-profit entities. The consolidated entity will consider the
provisions of this standard when applicable.
(iv) AASB 13 Fair Value Measurement and AASB 2011-8 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from AASB 13 (effective from 1 January 2013)
The new standard aligns IFRS and US GAAP specifying how an entity should apply the fair value measurement requirements that apply in existing IFRS standard. It seeks to ensure that
these varied requirements are applied consistently, have clear measurement objectives, and use a robust measurement framework. It does not introduce any requirements for the use of
fair value but does clarify the definition and enhance the disclosures where it is used. Consequential amendments were also made to other standards via AASB 2011-8. The consolidated
entity will consider the provisions of this standard when applicable.
(v) AASB 119 Employee Benefits (effective from 1 January 2013)
AASB 119 is amended focusing on but not limited to the accounting for defined benefit plans. The major changes introduced in the revised Standard are: all actuarial gains and losses
recognised immediately in other comprehensive income; expected return on plan assets recognised in profit or loss calculated based on rate used to discount the defined benefit
obligation; definition of short-term and other long term employee benefits; termination benefits are recognised at the earlier of when the entity recognises costs for a restructuring that
includes the payment of termination benefits and when the entity can no longer withdraw the offer of the termination benefits. Consequential amendments were also made to other
standards via AASB 2011-10. The consolidated entity will consider the provisions of this standard when applicable.
74
(vi) AASB 2011-3 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards – Orderly Adoption of Changes to the ABS GFS Manual and Related Amendments (effective
from 1 January 2013)
The Standard makes amendments to AASB 1049 Whole of Government and General Government Sector Financial Reporting to amend the definition of the ABS GFS Manual, provide
relief from adopting the latest version of the ABS GFS Manual, and require related disclosures where the latest version of the ABS GFS Manual has not been applied. The consolidated
entity does not expect that any adjustments will be necessary as the result of applying the revised rules.
(vii)AASB 2011-9 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards Presentation of items of Other Comprehensive Income (effective from 1 January 2013)
The new standard amends AASB 101 Presentation of Financial Statements to require entities to group items presented in other comprehensive income (OCI) on the basis of whether they
are potentially reclassifiable to profit or loss subsequently (reclassification adjustments).These changes are to clarify the nature of items included in the other comprehensive income.
It does not remove the option to present profit or loss and other comprehensive income in two statements. The consolidated entity will consider the provisions of this standard when
applicable.
(viii)AASB 2012-2 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards – Disclosures – Offsetting Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities (effective from 1 January
2013)
The new standard principally amends AASB 7 Financial Instruments: Disclosures to require disclosure of information that will enable users of an entity’s financial statements to evaluate
the effect or potential effect of netting arrangements, including rights of set-off associated with the entity’s recognised financial assets and recognised financial liabilities, on the entity’s
financial position. The consolidated entity does not expect that any adjustments will be necessary as the result of applying the revised rules.
(ix) AASB 2012 4 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards – Government Loans (effective from 1 January 2013)
The new standard adds an exception to the retrospective application of Australian Accounting Standards under AASB 1 First-time Adoption of Australian Accounting Standards to require
that first-time adopters apply the requirements in AASB 139 Financial Instruments: Recognition and Measurement (or AASB 9 Financial Instruments) and AASB 120 Accounting for
Government Grants and Disclosure of Government Assistance prospectively to government loans (including those at a below-market rate of interest) existing at the date of transition
to Australian Accounting Standards. The amendments ensure first-time adopters of IFRSs have access to the same relief from retrospective application that existing users of IFRSs
previously received.
(x) AASB 2012 5 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from Annual Improvements 2009–2011 Cycle (effective from 1 January 2013)
The new standard addresses a range of improvements, including the following:
zz repeat
application of AASB 1 is permitted (AASB 1)
zz clarification
of the comparative information requirements when an entity provides a third balance sheet (AASB 101 Presentation of Financial Statements).
The consolidated entity does not expect that any adjustments will be necessary as the result of applying the revised rules.
(xi) AASB 1053 Application of Tiers of Australian Accounting Standards (effective from 1 January 2014)
This Standard establishes a differential financial reporting framework consisting of two Tiers of reporting requirements for preparing general purpose financial statements:
(a) Tier 1: Australian Accounting Standards
(b) Tier 2: Australian Accounting Standards Reduced Disclosure Requirements
75
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2012
2 Summary of significant accounting policies (continued)
Tier 2 comprises the recognition, measurement and presentation requirements of Tier 1 and substantially reduced disclosures corresponding to those requirements. The following
entities apply Tier 1 requirements in preparing general purpose financial statements:
(a) For-profit entities in the private sector that have public accountability (as defined in this Standard)
(b) The Australian Government and State, Territory and Local Governments.
The following entities apply either Tier 2 or Tier 1 requirements in preparing general purpose financial statements:
(a) For-profit private sector entities that do not have public accountability
(b) All not-for-profit private sector entities
(c) Public sector entities other than the Australian Government and State, Territory and Local Governments.
Consequential amendments to other standards to implement the regime were introduced by AASB 2010-2, 2011-2, 2011-6, 2011-11, 2012-1 and 2012-7.
The consolidated entity will consider the provisions of this standard when applicable.
(xii)
AASB 2012-3 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards – Offsetting Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities (effective from 1 January 2014)
The new standard adds application guidance to AASB 132 Financial Instruments: Presentation to address inconsistencies in the application of the offsetting criteria by adding application
guidance to clarify the meaning of ‘currently has a legally enforceable right of set-off’, including clarifying that some gross settlement systems would be considered to be equivalent to net
settlement. The consolidated entity does not expect that any adjustments will be necessary as the result of applying the revised rules.
(xiii)
AASB-9 Financial Instruments (effective from 1 January 2015)
AASB 9 is effective to annual reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2015 with the aim of replacing AASB 139 Financial instruments: Recognition and Measurement.
AASB 9 simplifies the classification of financial assets into those to be carried at amortised cost, and those to be carried at fair value. It also simplifies requirements for embedded
derivatives and removes the tainting rules associated with held-to-maturity assets. Entities will be required to reclassify their financial assets when there is a change in the entity’s
business. Further amendments were made by AASB 2012-6 which amends the mandatory effective date and modifies the relief from restating prior periods by amending AASB 7 to
require additional disclosures on transition to AASB 9 in some circumstances. Consequential amendments were also made to other standards as a result of AASB 9, introduced by
AASB 2009-11 and superseded by AASB 2010-7 and 2010-10. The consolidated entity will consider adopting these provisions when it is applicable.
76
3 Critical accounting estimates and judgements
Estimates and judgements are continually evaluated and are based on historical experience and other factors, including expectations of future events that may have a financial impact on
the consolidated entity and that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances.
(a) Critical accounting estimates and assumptions
The key assumptions made concerning the future, and other key sources of estimating uncertainty at the reporting date that have a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to the
carrying amounts of assets and liabilities within the next financial year include:
zz Allowances
zz Estimating
for impairment of financial assets;
useful life of key assets – the useful life reflects the consumption of the key assets’ future economic benefits.
Defined benefit superannuation plans
In determining the consolidated entity’s ultimate cost of its defined benefit superannuation plans, actuarial assumptions are required to be made. The principal actuarial assumptions used
are disclosed in note 47.
(b) Critical judgements in applying the entity’s accounting policies
The judgements that have been made in the process of applying accounting policies which have the most significant effect on the amounts recognised in the financial report include:
zz Estimating
the useful life of key assets;
zz Impairment
of property, plant and equipment, investment properties, receivables and other financial assets;
zz Classification
zz Discount
zz Long
of financial assets;
rates used in estimating provisions;
service retention rates and discount rates.
77
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2012
4 Australian Government financial assistance including HECS-HELP and other
Australian Government loan programs
Consolidated
Notes
(a) Commonwealth Grant Scheme and other grants
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
131,197
116,392
131,197
116,392
48.1
Commonwealth Grant Scheme#1
Indigenous Support Program
Partnership and Participation Program#2
Disability Support Program
593
646
593
646
3,210
2,359
3,210
2,359
66
64
66
64
-
275
-
275
Transitional Cost Program
92
118
92
118
Promotion of Excellence in Learning and Teaching
50
-
50
-
Diversity and Structural Adjustment Fund
#3
333
-
333
-
7,067
3,758
7,067
3,758
142,608
123,612
142,608
123,612
66,642
64,145
66,642
64,145
9,711
10,134
9,711
10,134
222
-
222
-
76,575
74,279
76,575
74,279
1,840
1,652
1,840
1,652
International Postgraduate Research Scholarships
174
185
174
185
Commonwealth Education Cost Scholarships
172
393
172
393
162
435
162
435
83
46
83
46
2,431
2,711
2,431
2,711
Joint Research Engagement Program#6
2,417
2,190
2,417
2,190
Research Training Scheme
4,481
4,415
4,481
4,415
Research Infrastructure Block Grants
509
469
509
469
Sustainable Research Excellence in Universities
710
526
710
526
Reward Funding
Other
Total Commonwealth Grants Scheme and other grants
(b) Higher Education Loan Programs
48.2
HECS-HELP
FEE-HELP
#4
SA-HELP
Total Higher Education Loan Programs
(c) Scholarships
48.3
Australian Postgraduate Awards
#5
Commonwealth Accommodation Scholarships#5
Indigenous Access Scholarships
Total Scholarships
(d) DIISRTE Research
78
Parent
48.4
Consolidated
Parent
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
-
55
-
55
906
1,989
906
1,989
9,023
9,644
9,023
9,644
188
161
188
161
492
378
492
378
680
539
680
539
National competitive
2,487
1,718
2,487
1,718
Other research grants
2,528
3,820
2,528
3,820
Other non-research grants
3,636
2,838
3,636
2,838
8,651
8,376
8,651
8,376
4,601
-
4,601
-
13,252
8,376
13,252
8,376
244,569
219,161
244,569
219,161
144,882
167,994
144,882
66,642
64,145
66,642
64,145
9,711
10,134
9,711
10,134
222
-
222
-
244,569
219,161
244,569
219,161
Notes
Commercialisation training scheme
Other
Total DIISR Research Grants
(e) Australian Research Council
(i) Discovery
48.6
48.6(a)
Project
(ii) Linkages
Projects
Total Australian Research Council
48.6(b)
(f) Other Australian Government financial assistance
Non-capital
Total
Capital
Other non-research grants
Total Other Australian Government financial assistance
Total Australian Government financial assistance
#1 Includes the basic CGS grant amount, CGS – Regional Loading, CGS – Enabling Loading, Maths and Science Transition Loading and Full Fee Places Transition Loading.
#2 Includes Equity Support Program.
#3 Includes Collaboration & Structural Adjustment Program.
#4 Program in respect of FEE-HELP for Higher Education only and excludes funds received in respect of VET FEE-HELP.
#5 Includes Grandfathered Scholarships, National Priority and National Accommodation Priority Scholarships respectively.
#6 Includes Institutional Grants Scheme.
Reconciliation
Australian Government grants [(a) + (c) + (d) + (e) + (f)]
HECS-HELP payments
FEE-HELP payments
SA-HELP payments
Total Australian Government financial assistance
167,994
79
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2012
4 Australian Government financial assistance including HECS-HELP and other
Australian Government loan programs (continued)
Consolidated
Notes
Parent
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
143,159
123,612
143,159
123,612
(g) Australian Government grants received cash basis (Ref note 48)
CGS and Other DIISRTE grants
81,370
71,313
81,370
71,313
Scholarships
3,212
3,739
3,212
3,739
DIISRTE Research
9,033
9,644
9,033
9,644
188
161
188
161
Higher Education Loan Programs
ARC grants – Discovery
ARC grants – Linkages
Other Australian Government grants
Total Australian Government grants received cash basis
OS-Help (Net)
48.7
Superannuation Supplementation
48.8
Total Australian Government funding received cash basis
493
518
493
518
11,593
8,551
11,593
8,551
249,048
217,538
249,048
217,538
(8)
38
(8)
38
3,209
3,185
3,209
3,185
252,249
220,761
252,249
220,761
5 State and Local Government financial assistance
Consolidated
Parent
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
8,207
7,982
8,207
7,982
Non-Capital
WA State Department of Education and Training*
WA State and local Government research grants
Total State and Local Government financial assistance
* The funding relates to Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts (WAAPA).
80
3,589
4,792
3,589
4,792
11,796
12,774
11,796
12,774
6 Fees and charges
Consolidated
Parent
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
56,990
57,749
56,990
57,749
811
577
811
577
4,727
3,300
4,727
3,300
89
23
89
23
62,617
61,649
62,617
61,649
-
172
-
172
1,178
-
1,178
-
Course fees and charges
Fee-paying overseas students
Continuing education
Fee-paying domestic postgraduate students
Fee-paying domestic undergraduate students
Total course fees and charges
Other non-course fees and charges
Amenities and services fees
Student services and amenities fees
Course consumable fees
Examination, registration and photocopying fees
Late fees
51
46
51
46
514
522
514
522
22
70
22
70
55
123
55
123
Other fees and charges
1,424
1,050
1,424
1,050
Parking fees
1,494
1,559
1,494
1,559
Rental charges
2,446
1,628
2,446
1,628
507
374
507
374
Library fines
Seminar and workshop fees
Total other non-course fees and charges
Total fees and charges
7,691
5,544
7,691
5,544
70,308
67,193
70,308
67,193
81
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2012
7 Investment revenue and income
Consolidated
Parent
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Investment revenue
535
553
472
487
Interest from bank bills
8,197
7,740
8,197
7,740
Total investment revenue
8,732
8,293
8,669
8,227
Dividends received
115
389
115
389
Distributions from managed funds
656
1,170
656
1,170
Total other investment income
771
1,559
771
1,559
Interest revenue from operating account
Other investment income
Other investment losses
Net Change in fair value of investment properties
Net investment income
(1,093)
(1,995)
(1,093)
(1,995)
8,410
7,857
8,347
7,791
8Royalties
Consolidated
2012
Royalties
82
Parent
2011
2012
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
7,018
8,599
4,022
5,273
2011
9 Consultancy and contracts
Consolidated
Parent
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Research
374
304
374
303
Contract research
5,877
3,826
5,877
3,826
Total consultancy and contracts
6,251
4,130
6,251
4,129
Consultancy
10Other revenue and income
Consolidated
Parent
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
436
891
436
891
1,022
813
1,578
813
Other revenue
Donations and bequests
Prizes, contributions and scholarships
Proceed from sale of non-capitalised equipment
Professional development courses
Commissions, recoveries and rebates received
19
208
19
208
684
1,428
-
-
2,015
2,489
2,015
2,491
61
78
61
78
Box office sales
499
571
499
571
Sundry Income
892
1,047
746
1,045
Medical practitioners fees
177
153
177
153
Other revenue
449
429
449
429
6,254
8,107
5,980
6,679
11
183
11
183
Expense recoups
Total other revenue
Other income
Bad debts recovered
Insurance claims
Service concession income
Other income
Total other income
8
6
8
6
948
948
948
948
35
115
35
115
1,002
1,252
1,002
1,252
83
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2012
11Gains on disposal of assets
Consolidated
Parent
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Disposal of property, plant and equipment and non-current assets held for sale
Proceeds from sale of property, plant and equipment and non-current assets held for sale
Carrying amount of property, plant and equipment and non-current assets held for sale sold
Proceeds from sale of intangible assets
Net gain on disposal of property, plant and equipment and non-current assets held for sale
20,406
37,165
20,406
37,165
(17,884)
(28,480)
(17,838)
(28,480)
9
-
-
-
2,531
8,685
2,568
8,685
12Employee related expenses
Consolidated
Parent
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Salaries
77,469
72,902
77,469
72,902
Contributions to superannuation and pension schemes
11,713
10,975
11,713
10,975
Employment on-costs
4,969
4,830
4,969
4,830
Long service leave
2,166
2,649
2,166
2,649
240
336
240
336
4,589
958
4,589
958
Academic
Annual leave
Redundancy costs
721
528
721
520
101,867
93,178
101,867
93,170
Salaries
89,567
82,812
87,675
80,538
Contributions to superannuation and pension schemes
13,407
11,996
13,054
11,738
Employment on-costs
5,665
5,366
5,565
5,122
Long service leave
Other
Total academic
Non-academic
84
2,048
2,193
2,027
2,191
Annual leave
293
358
255
320
Redundancy costs
942
1,082
942
1,082
Other
754
497
528
493
Total non-academic
112,676
104,304
110,046
101,484
Total employee related expenses
214,543
197,482
211,913
194,654
13Depreciation and amortisation
Consolidated
Parent
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
13,806
10,793
13,806
10,793
1,559
1,070
1,559
1,070
534
842
516
840
Other equipment and furniture
3,037
2,883
3,034
2,880
Computing equipment
1,341
1,498
1,334
1,487
Depreciation
Buildings
Service concession assets
Leasehold improvements
Motor vehicles
Library collections
Total depreciation
82
65
82
65
999
1,297
999
1,297
21,358
18,448
21,330
18,432
909
868
909
868
22,267
19,316
22,239
19,300
Amortisation
Intangible assets
Total depreciation and amortisation
14Repairs and maintenance
Consolidated
Parent
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Buildings maintenance
6,925
5,188
6,907
5,188
Grounds maintenance
795
1,054
795
1,054
914
1,107
914
1,103
8,634
7,349
8,616
7,345
Other equipment maintenance
Total repairs and maintenance
85
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2012
15Borrowing costs
Consolidated
Interest paid
Less: Amount capitalised
Total borrowing costs expensed
Parent
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
4,811
3,763
3,763
(169)
3,594
(1,251)
3,560
4,811
(169)
3,594
(1,251)
3,560
16Impairment of assets
Consolidated
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
1,147
570
1,147
570
Impairment of investments
13
471
13
471
Impairment of inventory
44
-
-
-
Bad and doubtful debts
Impairment of intangibles
Total impairments of assets
*Additional details on impairments of receivables are included at note 20.
86
Parent
217
-
-
-
1,421
1,041
1,160
1,041
17Other expenses
Consolidated
Parent
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Scholarships, grants and prizes
9,487
8,690
9,486
8,690
Advertising and marketing
5,932
5,155
5,882
4,858
Promotions and sponsorships
3,076
2,576
3,076
2,576
Audit fees, bank charges, legal costs and insurance
1,712
2,035
1,584
1,868
11,750
8,259
11,750
8,232
General consumables
5,855
4,137
4,860
3,601
Hire and lease Costs
3,042
2,140
2,531
2,140
Non-capitalised equipment
4,030
4,036
4,030
4,036
365
485
365
446
Computer software and maintenance
Operating lease rental expenses
Printing, postage and stationery
3,533
3,643
3,481
3,530
Professional and consulting fees
13,852
13,672
13,803
13,586
Student related expenditure
10,568
10,203
10,568
10,203
Telecommunications
1,715
2,524
1,692
2,495
Travel, staff development & entertainment
6,704
7,169
6,608
6,825
Utilities and rates
6,779
6,556
6,779
6,324
Write-offs during the year
#1
Other
Total other expenses
48
55
48
55
9,307
9,669
8,569
9,362
97,755
91,004
95,112
88,827
#1 Additional details on write-offs during the year are included at note 46.
87
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2012
18Income tax
Consolidated
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
(a) Income tax expense / (benefit)
Current tax
(49)
Deferred tax
104
(121)
55
(118)
Operating result from continuing operations
55
(118)
Aggregate income tax (benefit) / expense
55
(118)
191
(134)
3
Income tax expense is attributable to:
Deferred income tax (revenue) / expense included in income tax expense comprises:
Decrease / (increase) in deferred tax assets (note 28)
Increase / (decrease) in deferred tax liabilities (note 28)
(87)
13
104
(121)
Income tax is only in relation to the controlled entity ECURL which includes overseas branches.
Consolidated
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
(b) Numerical reconciliation of income tax expense to prima facie tax payable
Operating result from continuing operations before income tax expense
Less: Non taxable operating result from Australian operations
Tax at the Australian tax rate of 30 per cent (2012-30 per cent)
Difference in overseas tax rates
Adjust for current tax of prior years
Deferred tax under-provision
Previously unrecognised tax losses used to reduce current tax expense
Tax losses carried forward not recognised
25,659
32,735
(25,987)
(32,979)
(328)
(244)
(98)
104
(49)
98
55
88
(73)
(38)
19
(26)
(118)
Consolidated
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
Tax effect of amounts which are not deductible (assessable) in calculating taxable income:
-
-
Income tax expense adjusted for permanent differences
-
-
Tax losses carried forward not recognised
-
-
Sundry items
Total income tax expense
55
(118)
(c)Amounts recognised directly in equity
Aggregate current and deferred tax arising in the reporting period and not recognised in net profit or loss but directly debited or credited to equity
-
-
-
-
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
Unused tax losses for which no deferred tax asset has been recognised
-
225
Potential tax benefit @ 30 per cent
-
68
Net deferred – tax credited directly to equity
(d) Tax losses
All unused tax losses were incurred by the New Zealand branch.
89
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2012
19Cash and cash equivalents
Consolidated
Parent
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Cash at bank
13,351
9,503
13,351
8,580
Bank Bills
38,068
24,435
38,068
23,887
10
25
10
24
51,429
33,963
51,429
32,491
Cash held in imprests
Total cash and cash equivalents
(a) Reconciliation to cash at the end of the year
The above figures are reconciled to cash at the end of the financial year as shown in the statement of cash flows as follows:
Consolidated
Unrestricted cash
Restricted funds (note 35)
Balances per cash flow statement
Parent entity
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
44,788
27,589
44,788
26,117
6,641
6,374
6,641
6,374
51,429
33,963
51,429
32,491
(b) Cash at bank and held in imprests
Cash at bank is placed in interest earning accounts. These are non-interest bearing for cash held in imprests.
(c) Bank Bills
The Bank Bills are bearing fixed interest rates between 4.36 per cent and 4.65 per cent (2011 – 4.50 per cent and 6.00 per cent). These deposits have an average maturity of 88 days.
90
20Receivables
Consolidated
Parent
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
6,629
12,283
6,629
11,630
Current
Trade receivables and student fees
Less: Provision for impaired receivables
(1,956)
(843)
(1,956)
(843)
4,673
11,440
4,673
10,787
Deferred Government contribution for superannuation
2,887
2,952
2,887
2,952
GST and withholding tax receivable
1,570
1,455
1,570
1,455
Total current receivables
9,130
15,847
9,130
15,194
Deferred Government contribution for superannuation
26,816
25,577
26,816
25,577
Total trade and other receivables
35,946
41,424
35,946
40,771
Non-current
Impaired receivables
As at 31 December 2012 current receivables of the consolidated entity with a nominal value of $2.0m (2011: $0.8m) were impaired. It was assessed that a portion of the receivables is
expected to be recovered.
The ageing analysis of these receivables is as follows:
Consolidated
3 to 6 months
Over 6 months
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
430
309
1,526
534
1,956
843
As of 31 December 2012, trade receivables of $1.1m (2011: $3.3m) were past due but not impaired. These relate to a number of independent customers for whom there is no recent
history of default.
The ageing analysis of these receivables is as follows:
Consolidated
3 months or less
3 to 6 months
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
1,030
2,748
31
519
1,061
3,267
91
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2012
20Receivables (continued)
Consolidated
Parent
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Movements in the provision for impaired receivables are as follows:
Consolidated
At 1 January
Provision for impairment recognised during the year
Receivables written-off during the year as uncollectible
Amounts recovered during the year
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
843
511
1,147
570
(26)
(54)
(8)
(184)
1,956
At 31 December
843
The creation and release of the provision for impaired receivables has been included in ‘Impairment of assets’ in the income statement. Amounts charged to the provision account are
generally written-off when there is no expectation of recovering additional cash.
The other amounts within receivables do not contain impaired assets and are not past due. Based on credit history, it is expected that these amounts will be received when due.
21Inventories
Consolidated
Parent
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
1,783
2,041
1,783
1,626
Current
Trading stock
at cost
92
22Derivative financial instruments
Consolidated
Parent
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
-
1
-
1
Current liabilities
Forward foreign exchange contracts-cash flow hedges
(a) Instruments used by the consolidated entity
The consolidated entity is party to derivative financial instruments in the normal course of business in order to hedge exposure to fluctuations in foreign exchange rates in accordance
with the University’s financial risk management policies (refer to note 45).
In order to protect against exchange rate movements, the University had entered into a forward exchange contract to purchase foreign currency.
These contracts are hedging obligations for payments for the ensuing financial year. The contracts are timed to mature when payments for major shipments of component parts are
scheduled to be made.
The portion of the gain or loss on the hedging instrument that is determined to be an effective hedge is recognised directly in equity. When the cash flows occur, the University adjusts
the initial measurement of the component recognised in the balance sheets by the related amount deferred in equity.
(b) Interest rate and foreign exchange risk
For an analysis of the sensitivity of derivatives to interest rate and foreign exchange risk refer to note 45.
93
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2012
23Other financial assets
Consolidated
Parent
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Term deposits
92,476
70,351
92,476
70,342
Total current other financial assets
92,476
70,351
92,476
70,342
1,880
1,400
1,880
1,400
Investment in managed funds*
17,731
16,484
17,731
16,484
Total available-for-sale investments
19,611
17,884
19,611
17,884
Term deposits
50,000
-
50,000
-
Total non-current other financial assets
69,611
17,884
69,611
17,884
162,087
88,235
162,087
88,226
Current
Held-to-maturity
Non-current
Available-for-sale investments
Investment in shares
Held-to-maturity
Total other financial assets
*During 2012, the University received $0.2m (2011: $2.6m) capital distributions from a fund that is in the process of being gradually wound-up. These capital distributions have been
accounted for as a reduction in the carrying value of the investments. Fair value changes of these fund continue to be recognised in equity (refer note 34). The cumulative gains and
losses of this fund will be included in the income statement once the winding up of the fund is completed and the investment in the fund is derecognised.
24Non-current assets classified as held for sale
Consolidated
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
37
-
37
-
Land
16,816
31,516
16,816
31,516
Total non-current assets classified as held for sale
16,853
31,516
16,853
31,516
Plant and equipment
94
Parent
25Other non-financial assets
Consolidated
Parent
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
12,131
12,224
12,131
12,152
2,413
2,904
2,413
2,839
14,544
15,128
14,544
14,991
Current
Accrued income
Advances and prepayments
Total current other non-financial assets
26Investment property
Consolidated
Parent
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Opening balance at 1 January
10,913
12,908
10,913
12,908
Gain/(loss) on revaluation
(1,093)
(1,995)
(1,093)
(1,995)
9,820
10,913
9,820
10,913
At fair value
Closing balance as at 31 December
(a)Amounts recognised in profit and loss for investment properties
Consolidated
Fair value of investment property
Parent entity
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
(1,093)
(1,995)
(1,093)
(1,995)
(1,093)
(1,995)
(1,093)
(1,995)
(b) Valuation basis
The fair value of all land has been determined by reference to recent market transactions and the fair value of buildings have been determined by reference to the cost of replacing the
remaining future economic benefits. The investment properties have been valued as at 31 December 2012 by independent professional valuers.
95
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2012
27Property, plant and equipment
Consolidated
Work in progress
Land
Service concession
assets-land
Buildings
Service concession
assets-buildings
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
25,539
-
-
11,149
53,488
At 1 January 2011
Cost
Valuation
Accumulated depreciation
Net book amount
-
160,109
526,555
-
-
-
-
-
-
25,539
160,109
526,555
11,149
52,922
(566)
Year ended 31 December 2011
Opening net book amount
25,539
160,109
526,555
11,149
52,922
Additions
48,078
-
-
-
-
Disposals
-
-
-
Accumulated depreciation on disposals
-
-
-
-
-
Write-offs during the year
-
-
-
-
-
Accumulated depreciation on write-offs
-
-
-
-
-
Reclassifications in/(out)
-
-
Revaluation increment/(decrement)
-
7,497
Classified as non-current assets held for sale
-
Depreciation charge
Transfers
Rounding
Closing net book amount
(62,309)
(1)
(26,857)
(31,516)
14,156
(1,250)
(5,575)
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
(10,793)
-
46,713
-
(1,070)
-
-
-
-
-
11,307
123,389
555,650
11,149
51,852
11,307
-
-
11,149
53,488
-
123,389
555,650
-
-
At 31 December 2011
Cost
Valuation
Accumulated depreciation
Net book amount
96
-
-
-
-
11,307
123,389
555,650
11,149
(1,636)
51,852
Leasehold
improvements
Works
of Art
Library
Collections
Other
equipment
and furniture
Motor
Vehicles
Computing equipment
Total
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
-
-
14,315
391
31,527
10,097
146,506
10,523
12,498
-
709,685
(27)
-
-
-
(2,983)
(204)
(22,730)
(33,998)
2,609
822,193
10,496
12,498
11,332
187
10,496
12,498
11,332
187
8,797
2,609
822,193
-
65
-
75
2,308
1,339
51,865
-
-
-
(17)
(426)
(141)
373
139
-
(26)
-
8,797
(7,488)
(28,691)
-
14
-
-
(20)
-
(46)
-
-
17
-
17
-
-
-
-
-
(5,359)
448
-
-
-
-
-
2,370
-
-
-
-
(842)
(1)
1,440
(5,359)
526
(1,297)
-
(65)
-
(15)
(31,568)
(2,883)
(1,498)
(18,448)
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
10,101
12,537
6,116
193
8,130
2,433
792,857
-
-
10,531
440
33,149
9,590
129,654
10,131
12,537
-
-
-
-
701,707
(30)
10,101
12,537
(1)
(37)
(4,415)
(247)
6,116
193
(25,019)
8,130
(2)
(7,157)
(38,504)
2,433
792,857
97
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2012
27Property, plant and equipment (continued)
Consolidated
Work in progress
Land
Service concession
assets-land
Buildings
Service concession
assets-buildings
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Opening net book amount
11,307
123,389
555,650
11,149
51,852
Additions
32,953
1,510
Disposals
-
Accumulated depreciation on disposals
-
Write-offs during the year
-
Accumulated depreciation on write-offs
-
Revaluation increments/(decrements)
-
Reclassifications in/(out)
-
-
-
Foreign currency valuation and translation
-
-
Classified as non-current assets held for sale
-
Depreciation charge
-
Year ended 31 December 2012
Transfers
Closing net book amount
(27,890)
16,370
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
(549)
(58)
(3,398)
-
(3,454)
-
(13,806)
-
(1,559)
2,083
23,408
-
-
122,977
561,798
11,149
50,293
At 31 December 2012
Cost
Valuation
Accumulated depreciation
Net book amount
98
16,370
-
-
11,149
53,488
-
122,977
561,798
-
-
-
-
-
-
16,370
122,977
561,798
11,149
(3,195)
50,293
Leasehold
improvements
Works
of Art
Library
Collections
Other
equipment
and furniture
Motor
Vehicles
Computing equipment
Total
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
10,101
12,537
6,116
193
8,130
2,433
792,857
-
148
-
240
3,699
-
-
-
(18)
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
297
(15)
(534)
786
39,336
(559)
(143)
(1,269)
9
508
117
634
-
(184)
(12)
(196)
-
-
177
12
189
183
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
(2)
(9)
-
-
-
(37)
-
(3,435)
-
-
939
-
970
490
-
9,849
12,868
6,056
342
9,665
2,333
803,700
-
-
11,470
663
36,731
10,672
140,543
9,849
12,868
-
-
-
-
707,492
12,868
(5,414)
(321)
6,056
342
(27,066)
9,665
(1,341)
(26)
(999)
-
(3,037)
-
-
9,849
(82)
(3,032)
(21,358)
(8,339)
(44,335)
2,333
803,700
99
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2012
27Property, plant and equipment (continued)
Parent entity
Work in progress
Land
Service concession
assets-land
Buildings
Service concession
assets-buildings
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
25,539
-
-
11,149
53,488
At 1 January 2011
Cost
Valuation
Accumulated depreciation
Net book amount
-
160,109
526,555
-
-
-
-
-
-
25,539
160,109
526,555
11,149
52,922
(566)
Year ended 31 December 2011
Opening net book amount
25,539
160,109
526,555
11,149
52,922
Additions
48,078
-
-
-
-
Disposals
-
-
-
Accumulated depreciation on disposals
-
-
-
-
-
Write-offs during the year
-
-
-
-
-
Accumulated depreciation on write-offs
-
-
-
-
-
Reclassifications in/(out)
-
-
Revaluation increment/(decrement)
-
7,497
Classified as non-current assets held for sale
-
Depreciation charge
Transfers
Rounding
Closing net book amount
(62,309)
(1)
(26,857)
(31,516)
14,156
(1,250)
(5,575)
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
(10,793)
-
46,713
-
(1,070)
-
-
-
-
-
11,307
123,389
555,650
11,149
51,852
11,307
-
-
11,149
53,488
-
123,389
555,650
-
-
At 31 December 2011
Cost
Valuation
Accumulated depreciation
Net book amount
100
-
-
-
-
11,307
123,389
555,650
11,149
(1,636)
51,852
Leasehold
improvements
Works
of Art
Library
Collections
Other
equipment
and furniture
Motor
Vehicles
Computing equipment
Total
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
-
-
14,315
391
31,527
10,097
146,506
10,523
12,498
-
709,685
(27)
-
-
-
(2,983)
(204)
(22,730)
(33,998)
2,609
822,193
10,496
12,498
11,332
187
10,496
12,498
11,332
187
8,797
2,609
822,193
-
65
-
75
2,308
1,339
51,865
-
-
-
(17)
(426)
(141)
373
139
-
(26)
-
8,797
(7,488)
(28,691)
-
14
-
-
(20)
-
(46)
-
-
17
-
17
-
-
-
-
-
(5,359)
448
-
-
-
-
-
2,370
-
-
-
-
(842)
(1)
1,440
(5,359)
526
(1,297)
-
(65)
-
(15)
(31,568)
(2,883)
(1,498)
(18,448)
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
(2)
10,101
12,537
6,116
193
8,130
2,433
792,857
-
-
10,531
440
33,149
9,590
129,654
10,131
12,537
-
-
-
-
701,707
(30)
10,101
12,537
(1)
(37)
(4,415)
(247)
6,116
193
(25,019)
8,130
(7,157)
(38,504)
2,433
792,857
101
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2012
27Property, plant and equipment (continued)
Parent entity
Work in progress
Land
Service concession
assets-and
Buildings
Service concession
assets-buildings
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Opening net book amount
11,307
123,389
555,650
11,149
51,852
Additions
32,953
1,510
Disposals
-
Accumulated depreciation on disposals
-
Write-offs during the year
-
Accumulated depreciation on write-offs
-
Revaluation increments/(decrements)
-
Reclassifications in/(out)
-
-
-
Foreign currency valuation and translation
-
-
Classified as non-current assets held for sale
-
Depreciation charge
-
Year ended 31 December 2012
Transfers
Closing net book amount
(27,890)
16,370
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
(549)
(58)
(3,398)
-
(3,454)
-
(13,806)
-
(1,559)
2,083
23,408
-
-
122,977
561,798
11,149
50,293
At 31 December 2012
Cost
Valuation
Accumulated depreciation
Net book amount
102
16,370
-
-
11,149
53,488
-
122,977
561,798
-
-
-
-
-
-
16,370
122,977
561,798
11,149
(3,195)
50,293
Leasehold
improvements
Works
of Art
Library
Collections
Other
equipment
and furniture
Motor
Vehicles
Computing equipment
Total
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
10,101
12,537
6,116
193
8,130
2,433
792,857
-
148
-
240
3,699
-
-
-
(18)
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
297
(15)
(534)
786
39,336
(559)
(143)
(1,269)
9
508
117
634
-
(184)
(12)
(196)
-
-
177
12
189
183
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
(2)
(9)
-
-
-
(37)
-
(3,435)
-
-
939
-
970
490
-
9,849
12,868
6,056
342
9,665
2,333
803,700
-
-
11,470
663
36,731
10,672
140,543
9,849
12,868
-
-
-
-
707,492
12,868
(5,414)
(321)
6,056
342
(27,066)
9,665
(1,341)
(26)
(999)
-
(3,037)
-
-
9,849
(82)
(3,032)
(21,358)
(8,339)
(44,335)
2,333
803,700
103
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2012
27Property, plant and equipment (continued)
(a) Valuations of land, buildings and works of art
Land, buildings and leasehold improvements were revalued as at 31 December 2012 by independent professional valuers. The fair value of all land has been determined by reference
to recent market transactions and the fair value of buildings and leasehold improvements have been determined by reference to the cost of replacing the remaining future economic
benefits, refer to note 2(l).
Works of art are heritage assets and have been valued as at 31 December 2012 by independent professional valuers, the fair value of works of art has been determined by reference to
recent market transactions.
(b) Service concession assets
The University entered into a Service Concession Arrangement with Campus Living Villages (‘CLV’), an entity that specialises in the construction, operation and maintenance of
long-term student accommodation services. As part of this arrangement, CLV has constructed a 355 bed student village at the Mt Lawley Campus and continue to undertake
refurbishment of existing accommodation at Mt Lawley, Joondalup and Bunbury campuses. CLV has assumed management of all such accommodation. CLV is compensated for the
provision of capital works to the University through the granting of rights by the University to CLV allowing CLV to operate and enjoy full access to such assets, including the retention
of all rental income.
The term of the arrangement is for 36.5 years in total, at which time CLV management and operational rights will cease, and the full operation and management will return to the
University. The financial statements reflect the control of all such assets by the University pursuant to the principles of service concession accounting.
A breakdown of service concession assets at reporting date is:
Consolidated
104
Parent entity
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Land
11,149
11,149
11,149
11,149
Buildings
50,293
51,852
50,293
51,852
Net book amount
61,442
63,001
61,442
63,001
28Deferred tax assets and liabilities
Consolidated
Parent entity
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Deferred tax assets
-
193
-
-
Total deferred tax assets
-
193
-
-
The balance comprises temporary differences attributable to:
Amounts recognised in profit or loss
Accrued expenses
-
5
-
-
Accounts payable
-
3
-
-
Customer deposits
-
2
-
-
Sundry other
-
5
-
-
Tax losses
-
178
-
-
-
193
-
-
Revaluation of deferred tax opening balance
-
-
-
-
Net deferred tax assets
-
193
-
-
Deferred tax assets to be recovered within 12 months
-
15
-
-
Amounts recognised directly in equity
Deferred tax assets to be recovered after more than 12 months
Movements
-
178
-
-
-
193
-
Consolidated
$’000
Movements
At 1 January 2011
Charged to the income statement
59
134
Charged directly to equity
-
Retrospective adjustments
-
At 31 December 2011
193
At 1 January 2012
193
Credited to the income statement
(193)
Charged directly to equity
-
Retrospective adjustments
-
At 31 December 2012
-
105
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2012
28Deferred tax assets and liabilities (continued)
Consolidated
Parent entity
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Deferred tax assets
-
87
-
-
Total deferred tax liabilities
-
87
-
-
The balance comprises temporary differences attributable to:
Amounts recognised in operating result
Accounts receivable
-
32
-
-
Accrued income
-
31
-
-
Sundry other
-
17
-
-
Accelerated capital allowance
-
2
-
-
Depreciation
-
5
-
-
-
87
-
-
Revaluation of deferred tax opening balance
-
-
-
-
Net deferred tax liabilities
-
87
-
-
Deferred tax liabilities to be settled after more than 12 months
-
87
-
-
-
87
-
-
Amounts recognised directly in equity
Movements
Consolidated
$’000
Movements
At 1 January 2011
74
Charged to the income statement
13
At 31 December 2011
87
At 1 January 2012
Charged to the income statement
106
87
(87)
Charged directly to equity
-
Retrospective adjustments
-
At 31 December 2012
-
29Intangible assets
Consolidated
Computer software
Publishing titles
Library collections
Total
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
7,150
-
-
7,150
(7,150)
(7,150)
At 1 January 2011
Cost
Accumulated amortisation
-
-
-
-
-
-
Opening net book amount
-
-
-
-
Reclassification in / (out)
-
-
5,359
5,359
Additions
-
217
930
1,147
Amortisation charge
-
-
Closing net book amount
-
217
5,421
5,638
7,150
17
9,613
16,980
(4,192)
(11,342)
5,421
5,638
Net book amount
Year ended 31 December 2011
(868)
(868)
At 31 December 2011
Cost
Accumulated amortisation
Net book amount
Consolidated
(7,150)
Computer software
217
Publishing titles
Library collections
Total
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Opening net book amount
-
217
5,421
5,638
Additions
-
-
1,155
1,155
Amortisation charge
-
-
Disposals
-
(217)
-
(217)
Accumulated amortisation on intangible assets retired
-
217
-
217
Impairment
-
(217)
-
(217)
Closing net book amount
-
-
5,667
5,667
7,150
-
10,768
17,918
-
(5,101)
(12,251)
-
5,667
Year ended 31 December 2012
(909)
(909)
At 31 December 2012
Cost
Accumulated amortisation and impairment
Net book amount
(7,150)
-
5,667
107
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2012
30Trade and other payables
Consolidated
Parent entity
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Current
8,709
11,418
8,709
11,184
CGS liability to Australian Government
716
-
716
-
OS HELP and Superannuation Supplementation Liability to Australian Government
313
41
313
41
Trade and other payables
Department of Education and Training
GST Payable
Total trade and other payables
-
280
-
-
551
562
551
486
10,289
12,301
10,289
11,711
The fair value of trade and other payables is equal to their carrying value.
Foreign currency risk
The carrying amounts of the consolidated entity’s trade and other payables are denominated in the following currencies:
Consolidated
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
10,289
12,165
10,289
11,606
Great British Pounds
-
21
-
-
Singapore Dollar
-
1
-
1
US Dollar
-
114
-
104
10,289
12,301
10,289
11,711
Australian Dollar
For an analysis of the sensitivity of trade and other payables to foreign currency risk refer to note 45.
108
Parent entity
31Borrowings
Consolidated
Parent entity
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Western Australian Treasury Corporation
2,320
2,170
2,320
2,170
Total current borrowings
2,320
2,170
2,320
2,170
Western Australian Treasury Corporation
90,067
42,387
90,067
42,387
Total non-current borrowings
90,067
42,387
90,067
42,387
Total borrowings
92,387
44,557
92,387
44,557
Current – unsecured
Non-current – unsecured
(a)Financing arrangements
Unrestricted access was available at balance date to the following lines of credit:
Consolidated
Parent entity
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
100,638
100,852
100,638
100,852
Credit standby arrangements
Total facilities
Western Australian Treasury Corporation
Bank facilities
Total facilities
6,050
37,658
6,050
37,658
106,688
138,510
106,688
138,510
92,387
44,557
92,387
44,557
272
1,239
272
1,239
92,659
45,796
92,659
45,796
8,251
56,295
8,251
56,295
Used at balance date
Western Australian Treasury Corporation
Bank facilities
Total used at balance date
Unused at balance date
Western Australian Treasury Corporation
Bank facilities
Total unused at balance date
5,778
36,419
5,778
36,419
14,029
92,714
14,029
92,714
109
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2012
31Borrowings (continued)
Consolidated
Parent entity
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Bank loan facilities
106,688
138,510
106,688
138,510
Used at balance date
92,659
45,797
92,659
45,797
Unused at balance date
14,029
92,713
14,029
92,713
Total facilities
The current interest rates on loans from Western Australian Treasury Corporation range between 4.13 per cent and 7.10 per cent, depending on the type of borrowing (2011: 5.61 per
cent and 7.10 per cent).
A majority of the used bank facilities of $0.272m (2011 – $1.239m) represent credit card balances outstanding as at year end which are included as part of Trade and other payables in
note 30.
(b)Fair value
The carrying amounts and fair values of borrowings at balance date are:
Consolidated
Carrying
amount
Fair value
Carrying
amount
Fair value
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
92,387
92,387
44,557
44,557
On statement of financial position*
Borrowings
Western Australian Treasury Corporation
Parent entity
Carrying
amount
Fair value
Carrying
amount
Fair value
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
92,387
92,387
44,557
44,557
On-statement of financial position*
Borrowings
Western Australian Treasury Corporation
*The fair value of borrowings equals their carrying amount, as the impact of discounting is not significant.
110
31Borrowings (continued)
Consolidated
Parent entity
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
621
582
621
582
41,349
1,588
41,349
1,588
(c)Risk exposures
The exposure of the consolidated entity’s borrowings to interest rate changes and the contractual repricing dates at the
balance dates are as follows:
6 months or less
6 to 12 months
1 to 5 years
Over 5 years
These borrowings are classified as follows:
Current borrowings
Non-current borrowings
417
42,348
417
42,348
50,000
39
50,000
39
92,387
44,557
92,387
44,557
2,320
2,170
2,320
2,170
90,067
42,387
90,067
42,387
92,387
44,557
92,387
44,557
The carrying amounts of the consolidated entity’s borrowings are denominated in Australian Dollar.
For an analysis of the sensitivity of borrowings to interest rate risk refer to note 45.
111
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2012
32Provisions
Consolidated
Parent entity
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Annual leave and other compensated absences
6,284
5,780
6,284
5,606
Long service leave
7,520
8,067
7,520
8,012
Deferred government benefits for superannuation
2,887
2,952
2,887
2,952
Staff bonuses
1,267
1,043
1,267
1,043
Superannuation and other post employment benefits
1,852
1,797
1,852
1,797
-
3
-
-
974
960
974
960
Current provisions expected to be settled within 12 months
Employee benefits
Provision for Income Tax
Employee on-costs
Provision for service concession liabilities
Other
Subtotal
948
948
948
948
8,874
3,196
8,874
3,196
30,606
24,746
30,606
24,514
496
426
496
426
7,158
6,889
7,158
6,889
861
821
861
821
Current provisions expected to be settled after more than 12 months
Employee benefits
Annual leave and other compensated absences
Long service leave
Superannuation and other post employment benefits
Employee on-costs
Subtotal
Total current provisions
531
507
531
507
9,046
8,643
9,046
8,643
39,652
33,389
39,652
33,157
7,407
6,638
7,407
6,573
26,816
25,577
26,816
25,577
239
343
239
343
1,560
1,147
1,560
1,147
513
455
513
455
Non-current
Employee benefits
Long service leave
Deferred government benefits for superannuation
Provision for deferred salary
Superannuation and other post employment benefits
Employee on-costs
112
32Provisions (continued)
Consolidated
Provision for service concession liabilities
Other
Total non-current provisions
Total provisions
Parent entity
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
30,340
31,288
30,340
31,288
-
957
-
957
66,875
66,405
66,875
6,340
106,527
99,794
106,527
99,497
Current provisions expected to be settled after more than 12 months represents a current obligation of the consolidated entity, however it is the view of the management that they are
expected to be settled after more than 12 months.
Annual leave liabilities have been classified as current as there is no unconditional right to defer settlement for at least 12 months after reporting date.
Long service leave liabilities have been classified as current where there is no unconditional right to defer settlement for at least 12 months after the reporting date.
The settlement of annual and long service leave liabilities gives rise to the payment of employment on-costs including workers’ compensation premiums and payroll tax. The provision is
measured at the present value of expected future payments. The associated expense, apart from the unwinding of the discount (finance cost), is included at note 12.
(a)Movements in provisions
Movements in provision during the financial year, other than employee benefits, are set out below:
Provision for Employment
Income Tax
on-costs
Service
concession
liabilities
Other
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
3
1,467
948
3,196
-
38
Consolidated – 2012
Current
Carrying amount at start of year
Additional provisions recognised
948
6,895
(948)
(1,217)
1,505
948
8,874
-
455
31,288
957
Amounts incurred and charged
(3)
Carrying amount at end of year
-
Carrying amount at start of year
-
Consolidated – 2012
Non-current
Additional provisions recognised
-
58
Amounts incurred and charged
-
-
Carrying amount at end of year
-
513
(948)
30,340
(957)
113
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2012
32Provisions (continued)
Provision for Employment
Income Tax
on-costs
Service
concession
liabilities
Other
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
25
1,350
948
-
-
117
948
3,196
Consolidated – 2011
Current
Carrying amount at start of year
Additional provisions recognised
Amounts incurred and charged
Carrying amount at end of year
(22)
-
(948)
-
3
1,467
948
3,196
Carrying amount at start of year
-
422
32,236
-
Additional provisions recognised
-
33
-
957
Payments/other sacrifices of economic benefits
-
-
Carrying amount at end of year
-
455
Consolidated – 2011
Non-current
114
(948)
31,288
957
33Other liabilities
Consolidated
Parent entity
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
12,459
13,830
12,459
13,766
3,236
1,202
3,236
1,202
Accrued expenses
12,898
10,744
12,898
10,654
Total other liabilities
28,593
25,776
28,593
25,622
Current
Fees and grants received in advance
Financial assistance received in advance
34Reserves and retained earnings
Consolidated
Parent entity
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
375,692
384,488
375,692
384,488
4,827
2,962
4,827
2,962
(a)Reserves
Property plant and equipment revaluation reserve
Investments revaluation reserve
Hedging reserve – cash flow hedges
-
(1)
-
(1)
Foreign currency translation reserve
-
(204)
-
-
380,519
387,449
380,519
387,245
Consolidated
Parent entity
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
384,488
381,478
384,488
381,478
Movements:
Property plant and equipment revaluation reserve
Balance 1 January
Revaluation – gross
Transfers to retained earnings
Balance 31 December
(3,032)
(5,764)
375,692
2,372
638
384,488
(3,032)
(5,764)
375,692
2,372
638
384,488
115
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2012
34Reserves and retained earnings (continued)
Consolidated
Parent entity
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Balance 1 January
2,962
4,655
2,962
4,655
Revaluation – gross
1,852
(2,164)
1,852
(2,164)
Investment revaluation reserve
Impairments
Balance 31 December
13
471
13
471
4,827
2,962
4,827
2,962
Hedging reserve – cash flow hedges
Balance 1 January
(1)
(24)
(1)
(24)
Revaluation – gross
-
(1)
-
(1)
Transfer to inventory and other assets gross
1
24
1
24
Balance 31 December
-
(1)
-
(1)
Consolidated
Parent entity
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Foreign currency translation reserve
Balance 1 January
Currency translation differences arising during the year
(204)
(188)
-
-
204
(16)
-
-
-
(204)
-
-
Balance 31 December
(b) Retained earnings
Movements in retained earnings were as follows:
Consolidated
2012
Retained earnings at the beginning of the year
Operating result for the period
Transfer from property, plant and equipment reserve*
116
Retained earnings at 31 December
Parent entity
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
452,146
419,932
449,882
417,582
25,604
32,853
27,868
32,939
5,764
483,514
*Transfer from revaluation reserve of $5,764,000 (2011: $638,000) represents realisation of revaluation surplus on assets disposed.
(638)
452,147
5,764
483,514
(638)
449,883
Consolidated
34Reserves and retained earnings (continued)
Parent entity
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
(c)Nature and purpose of reserves
(i) Property, plant and equipment reserve
The property, plant and equipment revaluation reserve is used to record increments and decrements on the revaluation of non-current assets, as described in note 2(l).
(ii)Investments revaluation reserve
Changes in the fair value and exchange differences arising on revaluation of investments, such as equities, classified as available-for-sale financial assets, are taken to the investments
revaluation reserve, as described in note 2(k). Amounts are recognised in profit and loss when the associated assets were sold or impaired.
(iii) Hedging reserve – cash flow hedges
The hedging reserve is used to record gains or losses on a hedging instrument in a cash flow hedge that are recognised directly in equity, as described in note 2(u). Amounts are
recognised in profit and loss when the associated hedged transaction affects profit and loss.
(iv) Foreign currency translation reserve
Exchange differences arising on translation of the foreign controlled branches of the University’s subsidiary are taken to the foreign currency translation reserve, as described in
note 2(u).
35Restricted funds
Consolidated
Parent entity
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
6,641
6,374
6,641
6,374
Restricted funds
ECU Foundation
The purpose of the ECU Foundation is to hold funds received from external sources. These funds are appropriated for a variety of educational and research purposes ranging from
scholarships, research, prizes and special lecture programs. The Foundation was established to aid and promote excellence in educational and research activities by seeking, receiving
and administering private gifts for the benefit of the University and its community.
117
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2012
36Key management personnel disclosures
Remuneration of members of the accountable authority
For the purposes of the Financial Management Act the University Council is the accountable authority of the University.
The number of members of the accountable authority, whose total of fees, salaries, superannuation, non monetary benefits and other benefits for the financial year, fall within the
following bands are:
Nil to $10,000
2012
2011
19
19
$50,001 to $60,000
1
-
$110,001 to $120,000
-
1
$120,001 to $130,000
1
-
$140,001 to $150,000
-
1
$150,001 to $160,000
1
-
$290,001 to $300,000
-
1
$310,001 to $320,000
1
-
$660,001 to $670,000
-
1
$720,001 to $730,000
The total aggregate remuneration of members of the accountable authority (‘000)
1
-
$1,386
$1,224
Council members include University employees who may be ex officio members or elected staff members. No council member has received any remuneration in his/her capacity as a
council member. 18 members (2011:17 members) of the accountable authority received no remuneration, fees, superannuation or benefits.
The total remuneration includes the superannuation expense incurred by the University in respect of members of the accountable authority.
No members of the accountable authority are members of the pension scheme.
Remuneration of senior officers
The number of senior officers, other than senior officers reported as members of the accountable authority, whose total fees, salaries, superannuation, non monetary benefits and other
benefits for the financial year, fall within the following bands are:
118
36Key management personnel disclosures (continued)
$90,001 to $100,000
1
$220,001 to $230,000
1
-
$240,001 to $250,000
-
1
$250,001 to $260,000
1
-
$270,001 to $280,000
1
-
$290,001 to $300,000
1
-
$300,001 to $310,000
-
1
$310,001 to $320,000
1
-
$320,001 to $330,000
-
1
$340,001 to $350,000
1
1
$370,001 to $380,000
-
2
$380,001 to $390,000
-
1
$410,001 to $420,000
1
-
$430,001 to $440,000
2
-
$3,081
$2,358
The total aggregate remuneration of senior officers (‘000)
-
The superannuation included here represents the superannuation expense incurred by the University in respect of senior officers other than senior officers reported as members of the
accountable authority.
One senior officer is a member of the pension scheme.
37Remuneration of auditors
Remuneration to the Auditor General and non related audit firms for the financial year is as follows:
Consolidated
Parent entity
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
302
297
242
237
22
20
5
3
324
317
247
240
Assurance services
Audit services
Office of the Auditor General (OAG)
Auditing the accounts, financial statements and performance indicators
Non-OAG audit firms for the audit or review of financial reports of any entity in the consolidated entity
Total remuneration for audit services
119
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2012
38Contingencies
Contingent liabilities
In addition to the liabilities incorporated in the financial statements, the consolidated entity has the following contingent liabilities:
Native title claims
University land is subject to Federal Court proceedings concerning native title rights and to settlement negotiations between the State Government and the South West Aboriginal Land
and Sea Council.
Contaminated sites
ECU has undertaken investigations of a contaminated site identified by the Western Australia Department of Environment and Conservation on the Bunbury Campus. The site is an old
rifle range and contains lead from spent ammunition. ECU has fenced off the site and erected warning signs. No further action will be undertaken until the future land use on this site is
determined.
Outstanding litigation
ECU is a defendant in an action with the Management Development Institute of Singapore. The claim is being defended and it is expected that the matter will go to trial during 2013.
The claim is indemnified under the University’s insurance arrangements.
Workers compensation claims
The consolidated entity may have some potential liability towards workers compensation claims. The process of defending the claims are still at an early stage, however the claims are
not material and sufficient insurance is in place to cover the potential liability.
Other contingencies
A course conducted by ECU has not received accreditation which may give rise to claims by third parties. At this stage the quantum of such claims is uncertain.
120
39Commitments
(a)Capital expenditure commitments
Capital expenditure commitments, being contracted capital expenditure additional to the amounts reported in the financial statements, including amounts for infrastructure, are payable
as follows:
Consolidated
Parent entity
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
19,409
16,411
19,409
16,411
19,409
16,411
19,409
16,411
Property, plant and equipment
1 year or less
(b) Lease commitments: The consolidated entity as lessee
(i) Operating leases
Commitments in relation to leases contracted for at the reporting date but not recognised in the financial statements as liabilities, are payable as follows:
Consolidated
Parent entity
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
1 year or less
229
432
229
247
1 to 5 years
199
458
199
247
Over 5 years
Cancellable operating lease
-
3
-
-
428
893
428
494
428
893
428
494
(c)Other expenditure commitments
Commitments in relation to purchase orders in existence at the reporting date, but not recognised as liabilities, are payable as follows:
Consolidated
1 year or less
Parent entity
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
7,837
6,504
7,837
6,504
121
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2012
40Related parties
Subsidiaries
The University had one related party during the financial year. Interests in subsidiaries are set out in note 41.
(a)Transactions with related parties
The following transactions occurred with related parties:
Consolidated
Parent entity
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Sales of goods and services
-
-
593
13
Purchases of goods
-
-
94
37
41Subsidiaries
The consolidated financial statements incorporate the assets, liabilities and results of the following subsidiary in accordance with the accounting policy described in note 2(b):
Name of entity
E.C.U. Resources for Learning Ltd (ECURL)*
Country of incorporation
Australia
Class of shares
Australian public
company limited by
guarantee
* The address of ECURL is 234 Great Eastern Highway, Ascot. WA 6104.
42Events occurring after the reporting date
No events have occurred since the reporting date that are likely to have a material impact on the financial statements or notes of the consolidated entity.
122
2012
100%
2011
100%
43Reconciliation of operating result after income tax to net cash flows from
operating activities
Consolidated
2012
Operating result for the period
Parent entity
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
25,604
32,853
27,868
32,939
Non-cash items:
22,267
19,316
22,239
19,300
Revaluation of investment property
1,093
1,995
1,093
1,995
Provision for impairment of receivables
1,147
570
1,147
570
Depreciation and amortisation expense
Service concession income
Net gain on disposal of assets
(948)
(948)
(948)
(948)
(2,531)
(8,685)
(2,568)
(8,685)
48
55
48
55
274
471
13
471
46,954
45,627
48,892
45,697
2,682
(6,199)
1,892
(6,370)
(Increase) / decrease in tax assets
193
(134)
(Increase) / decrease in inventories
173
438
Increase / (decrease) in trade and other payables
623
Net loss on asset write-offs
Impairment of assets
Subtotal
Change in assets and liabilities
(Increase) / decrease in receivables
Increase / (decrease) in tax liabilities
Increase / (decrease) in provisions
(87)
7,681
(5,789)
(198)
1,367
413
(5,298)
13
-
-
8,192
7,978
8,151
Subtotal of change in operating assets and liabilities
11,265
(3,479)
11,039
(3,104)
Net cash provided by / used in operating activities
58,219
42,148
59,931
42,593
123
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2012
44Non-cash financing and investing activities
Consolidated
Proceeds accrued from sale of property, plant and equipment and non-current assets held for sale
Parent entity
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
6,857
9,087
6,857
9,087
During the financial year, there were sales of Churchlands property that has been sold but not yet settled and therefore not reflected in the cash flow statement.
45Financial risk management
The consolidated entity is exposed to the following financial risks as a result of its activities:
Consolidated
Parent entity
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
51,429
33,963
51,429
32,491
Financial assets
Cash and cash equivalents
Trade and other receivables
Available-for-sale financial assets
Held-to-maturity financial assets
4,673
11,439
4,673
10,786
19,611
17,884
19,611
17,884
142,476
70,351
142,476
70,342
218,189
133,637
218,189
131,503
9,738
11,739
9,738
11,225
92,387
44,557
92,387
44,557
Financial liabilities
Trade and other payable
Borrowings
Derivative financial instruments
-
1
-
1
102,125
56,297
102,125
55,783
(a)Market risk
(i) Foreign exchange and interest risk
The consolidated entity does not trade in foreign currency and is not materially exposed to other price risks (for example, equity securities or commodity price changes). The University’s
exposure to market risk for changes in interest rates relates primarily to the long-term debt obligations. The University’s borrowings are all obtained through the Western Australian
Treasury Corporation (WATC) and are at fixed rates with varying maturities. The risk is managed by WATC through portfolio diversification and variation in maturity dates. Other than as
detailed in the interest rate sensitivity analysis table below, the University has limited exposure to interest rate risk because it has no borrowings other than the WATC borrowings.
124
The consolidated entity is exposed to the following financial risks as a result of its activities:
Consolidated
45Financial risk management (continued)
Parent entity
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
(ii)Price risk
The consolidated entity investment portfolios’ are exposed to fluctuations in the prices of equity securities. The University’s investment policy provides strategies for minimisation of
price risk with the diversification of that risk through a number of investment managers and regular independent expert monitoring to ensure that there is no concentration of risk in any
one area.
(iii) Summarised sensitivity analysis
The following table summarises the sensitivity of the consolidated entity’s financial assets and financial liabilities to interest rate risk, foreign exchange risk and other price risk.
Consolidated
Interest rate risk
-1%
31 December 2012
Foreign exchange risk
+1%
-10%
Other price risk
+10%
-10%
+10%
Carrying
amount
Profit
Equity
Profit
Equity
Profit
Equity
Profit
Equity
Profit
Equity
Profit
Equity
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Financial assets
Cash and cash equivalents
Accounts receivable
Available-for-sale financial
assets
Held-to-maturity financial assets
51,429
514
514
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4,673
-
-
-
-
(7)
(7)
7
7
-
-
-
-
19,611
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1,961
1,961
142,476
Sub Total
(514)
(514)
(1,425)
(1,425)
1,425
1,425
-
-
(1,939)
(1,939)
1,939
1,939
(7)
(7)
-
-
7
7
(1,961)
(1,961)
(1,961)
(1,961)
-
-
1,961
1,961
Financial liabilities
Trade payables
Borrowings
Sub Total
Total increase / (decrease)
9,738
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
92,387
(6)
(6)
6
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
(6)
(6)
6
6
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
(1,945)
(1,945)
1,945
1,945
(7)
(7)
7
7
1,961
1,961
(1,961)
(1,961)
125
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2012
45Financial risk management (continued)
Consolidated
Interest rate risk
-1%
31 December 2011
Foreign exchange risk
+1%
-10%
Other price risk
+10%
-10%
+10%
Carrying
amount
Profit
Equity
Profit
Equity
Profit
Equity
Profit
Equity
Profit
Equity
Profit
Equity
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
340
340
(35)
(35)
35
35
-
-
-
-
(19)
(19)
Financial assets
Cash and cash equivalents
33,963
Accounts receivable
10,786
-
-
-
-
Available-for-sale financial assets
17,884
-
-
-
-
Held-to-maturity financial assets
70,351
Sub Total
(340)
(340)
19
19
-
-
-
-
(1,788)
-
(1,788)
1,788
-
-
1,788
1,788
(704)
(704)
704
704
(1)
(1)
1
1
(1,044)
(1,044)
1,044
1,044
(55)
(55)
55
55
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
14
14
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
(1,788)
-
1,788
(1,788)
Financial liabilities
Derivatives – cash flow hedges
1
-
-
Trade payables
11,225
-
-
-
-
Borrowings
44,557
(9)
(9)
9
9
Sub Total
Total increase / (decrease)
(14)
-
(14)
-
(9)
(9)
9
9
(14)
(14)
14
14
(1,053)
(1,053)
1,053
1,053
(69)
(69)
69
69
(1,788)
(1,788)
-
-
1,788
1,788
(b) Credit risk
Credit risk arises when there is the possibility of the consolidated entity’s receivables defaulting on their contractual obligations resulting in financial loss to the University. The
consolidated entity measures credit risk on a fair value basis and monitors risk on a regular basis.
The maximum exposure to credit risk at the reporting date in relation to each class of recognised financial assets is the gross carrying amount of those assets inclusive of any provisions
for impairment.
The consolidated entity trades only with recognised, credit worthy third parties. In addition, receivable balances are monitored on an ongoing basis with the result that the consolidated
entity’s exposure to bad debts is minimal. There are no significant concentrations of credit risk.
Provision for impairment of financial assets is calculated based on past experience, and current and expected changes in client credit ratings. For financial assets that are either past
due or impaired, refer to note 20.
(c) Liquidity risk
The consolidated entity is exposed to liquidity risk through its trading in the normal course of business. Liquidity risk arises when the University is unable to meet its financial obligations
as they fall due.
126
The consolidated entity’s objective is to maintain a balance between continuity of funding and flexibility through the use of bank loans and finance leases. The consolidated entity has
appropriate procedures to manage cash flows by monitoring forecast cash flows to ensure that sufficient funds are available to meet its commitments.
45Financial
risk management
(continued)
Consolidated
Interest
rate risk
Foreign exchange risk
Other price risk
The tables below analyse the consolidated entity’s financial assets and liabilities based on the remaining period at the reporting date to the contractual maturity date. The amounts
disclosed in the table are the contractual undiscounted cash flows. Balances due within 12 months equal their carrying balances, as the impact of discounting is not significant.
Consolidated At
31 December 2012
Less than 1 year
Between 1 and 2 years
Between 2 and 5 years
Over 5 years
Total
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
51,429
-
-
-
51,429
4,673
-
-
-
4,673
92,476
-
-
69,611
162,087
1,044
1,044
Financial assets
Cash and cash equivalents
Trade and other receivables
Other financial assets
Financial liabilities
(1,044)
(1,044)
9,738
-
-
-
9,738
41,970
172
245
50,000
92,387
Less than 1 year
Between 1 and 2 years
Between 2 and 5 years
Over 5 years
Total
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Cash and cash equivalents
33,963
-
-
-
33,963
Trade and other receivables
10,786
-
-
-
10,786
Other financial assets
70,351
-
-
17,884
88,235
11,225
-
-
-
11,225
2,170
41,970
378
39
44,557
1
-
-
-
1
Trade and other payables
Borrowings
Consolidated At
31 December 2011
Financial assets
Financial liabilities
Trade and other payables
Borrowings
Derivative financial liabilities
The following are the average interest rates for the above financial assets and liabilities as at 31 December 2012:
Financial assets
1. Cash and cash equivalents – 4.10 per cent p.a (2011: 5.14 per cent)
2. Trade and other receivables – Non-interest bearing financial asset
3. Available-for-sale financial assets Non-interest bearing financial asset
4. Held-to-maturity investments – 5.25 per cent p.a (2011: 5.99 per cent)
127
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2012
45Financial risk management (continued)
Financial liability
1. Trade and other payable – Non-interest bearing financial liability
2. Borrowings – 5.33 per cent p.a (2011: 6.68 per cent)
The consolidated entity’s derivative financial instruments will be settled on a gross basis within the next 12 months.
(d) Fair value estimation
The fair value of financial assets and financial liabilities must be estimated for recognition and measurement or for disclosure purposes.
The fair value of financial instruments traded in active markets (such as publicly traded derivatives, and traded securities) is based on quoted market prices at the reporting date.
The quoted market price used for financial assets held by the consolidated entity is the current bid price.
The fair value of forward exchange contracts is determined using forward exchange market rates at the reporting date.
The carrying value less impairment provision of trade receivables and payables is a reasonable approximation of their fair values due to the short-term nature of trade receivables.
46Write-offs
Consolidated
Parent entity
2012
2011
2012
2011
$
$
$
$
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
26
54
26
54
7
29
7
29
Total write-offs as approved by the accountable authority during the financial year
Receivables written-off against provision*
Property plant and equipment
Inventory
41
26
41
26
Total write-offs
74
109
74
109
* The vast majority of the receivables write-offs are relating to international student debts incurred in 2011 and before which have been identified as irrecoverable.
128
47Superannuation
Government Employees Superannuation Board
Unfunded Pension and Unfunded Gold State (Lump sum) Schemes
The University has in its staffing profile a number of employees who are members of the Government Employees Superannuation Board (GESB) Scheme. As the Employer, the
University is required to contribute to the scheme as employees are paid a pension or lump sum pay out. Consequently, an unfunded liability has been created. The Commonwealth
Government is committed to reimbursing the University for payments actually made to the scheme for these emerging costs.
Pension Scheme
Pension Scheme members receive pension benefits on retirement, death or invalidity. The Fund Share of the pension benefit, which is based on the member’s contributions plus
investment earnings, may be commuted to a lump sum benefit. The employers do not bear the cost associated with indexation of any pension arising from the Fund Share. The State
Share of the pension benefit, which is fully employer financed, cannot be commuted to a lump sum benefit.
Gold State Super (transferred benefits)
Some former Pension Scheme members have transferred to Gold State Super. In respect of their transferred benefit the members receive a lump sum benefit at retirement, death or
invalidity which is related to their salary during their employment and indexed during any deferral period after leaving public sector employment.
Reconciliation of the assets and liabilities recognised in the statement of financial position
Pension Scheme
Defined benefit obligation
(+) Fair value of assets
Gold State Super
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
28,782
27,656
921
873
-
-
-
-
28,782
27,656
921
873
(-) Unrecognised past service cost
-
-
-
-
(-) Unrecognised net (gain)/loss
-
-
-
-
28,782
27,656
921
873
Deficit/(surplus)
Liability/(asset)
Reconciliation of the present value of the defined benefit obligation
129
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2012
47Superannuation (continued)
Balance at the beginning of the year
Current service cost
Interest cost
Contributions by plan participants
Actuarial (gains) and losses
Benefits paid
Past service cost
Balance at the end of the year
Pension Scheme
Gold State Super
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
27,656
26,611
873
1,081
-
-
-
-
1,041
1,377
33
55
-
-
-
-
2,869
2,574
15
140
(2,784)
(2,906)
-
(403)
-
-
-
-
28,782
27,656
921
873
These defined benefit obligations are wholly unfunded, such that there are no Assets. The employer contributes, as required, to meet the benefits paid.
Pension Scheme
Gold State Super
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Balance at the beginning of the year
-
-
-
-
Expected return on plan assets
-
-
-
-
Reconciliation of the fair value of plan assets:
Actuarial gains and (losses)
-
-
-
-
Contributions by employers
2,784
2,906
-
403
-
-
-
-
Contributions by plan participants
Benefits paid
Balance at the end of the year
130
(2,784)
-
(2,906)
-
-
(403)
-
47Superannuation (continued)
Pension Scheme
Gold State Super
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
-
-
-
-
1,041
1,377
33
55
-
-
-
-
Net actuarial losses (gains) recognised in year
2,869
2,574
15
140
Total included in employee benefits expense
3,910
3,950
48
195
Current service cost
Interest cost
Expected return on plan assets
Scheme Assets
There are no assets in the pension scheme or Gold State Super for current employees to support the transferred benefits. Hence, there is
fair value of Scheme assets;
zz No
zz No
asset allocation of Scheme assets;
zz No
assets used by the employer;
zz No
expected return of Scheme assets;
zz No
actual return on Scheme assets.
The principal actuarial assumptions used were as follows:
Pension Scheme
Gold State Super
2012
2011
2012
2011
Discount rate (active members)
3.11%
3.97%
3.11%
3.97%
Discount rate (pensioners)
3.11%
3.97%
3.11%
3.97%
Expected salary increase rates
5.00%
5.50%
5.00%
5.50%
Expected pension increase rates
2.50%
2.50%
2.50%
2.50%
The discount rate is based on the 10 year Government bond rate at the relevant date. The decrement rates used (eg. mortality and retirement rates) are based on those used at the last
actuarial valuation for the Schemes.
131
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2012
47Superannuation (continued)
(a)Historic summary
Present value of defined benefit plan obligation – pension scheme
Fair value of scheme assets – pension scheme
Present value of defined benefit plan obligation – gold state super
Fair value of scheme assets – gold state super
(Surplus) / deficit in scheme
2012
2011
2010
2009
2008
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
28,782
27,656
26,611
27,931
31,777
-
-
-
-
-
921
873
1,081
1,147
1,098
-
-
-
-
-
29,703
28,529
27,692
29,078
32,875
(1,536)
2,541
Experience adjustments loss – scheme liabilities – pension scheme
252
Experience adjustments loss – scheme liabilities – gold state super
8
(314)
24
452
56
45
63
The experience adjustment for scheme liabilities represents the actuarial loss due to a change in the liabilities arising from the scheme’s experience (eg. membership movements,
unit entitlements) and excludes the effect of the changes in assumptions (eg. movements in the bond rate and changes in pensioner mortality assumptions).
Expected contributions
Expected employer contributions
132
Pension scheme
Gold state super
2012
2012
$’000
$’000
2,798
89
48 Acquittal of Australian Government financial assistance
48.1 DIISRTE-CGS and Other DIISRTE Grants
Parent entity
Financial assistance
received in CASH during
the reporting period (total
cash received from the
Australian Government for
the Programs)
Net accrual adjustments
Revenue for the period
Surplus / (deficit) from the
previous year
Total revenue including
accrued revenue
Less expenses including
accrued expenses
Surplus / (deficit) for
reporting period
Commonw’lth
Grant Scheme#1
Indigenous
Support Program
Partnership &
Participation
Program#2
Disability
Support Program
Workplace
Productivity
Program
Diversity and
Structural
Adjustment
Fund#3
Transitional Cost
Program
2012
2011
2012
2011
2012
2011
2012
2011
2012
2011
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
131,550
116,392
646
646
3,355
2,359
66
64
-
-
-
275
92
118
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
(353)
-
(53)
131,197
116,392
593
646
3,210
2,359
66
64
-
-
-
275
92
118
-
-
(4)
-
85
-
-
(37)
-
135
219
-
-
-
131,197
116,392
589
646
3,295
2,359
66
27
-
135
219
275
92
118
(131,197)
(116,392)
(685)
(650)
(3,295)
(2,274)
(66)
(27)
(135)
(219)
(56)
(92)
(118)
(96)
(4)
-
-
-
85
-
-
-
-
-
219
-
-
133
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2012
48 Acquittal of Australian Government financial assistance (continued)
48.1 DIISRTE CGS and Other DIISRTE Grants (continued)
Parent entity
Financial assistance received in CASH during the reporting
period (total cash received from the Australian Government
for the Programs)
Net accrual adjustments
Revenue for the period
Surplus / (deficit) from the previous year
Promotion of Excellence
in Learning and
Teaching
Reward Funding
Other#4
2012
2011
2012
2011
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
50
-
333
-
7,067
3,758
143,159
123,612
-
-
-
-
-
-
50
-
333
-
7,067
3,758
142,608
123,612
-
-
-
-
652
-
952
98
-
333
-
Total revenue including accrued revenue
50
Less expenses including accrued expenses
(1)
Surplus / (deficit) for reporting period
49
-
(333)
-
-
#3 Includes Collaboration and Structural Adjustment Program.
#4 Includes Structural Adjustment Fund and Facilitation Funding.
134
(551)
-
7,719
3,758
143,560
123,710
(6,912)
(3,106)
(142,800)
(122,758)
807
#1 Includes the basic CGS-grant amount, CGS Regional Loading, CGS-Enabled Loading, Maths and Science Transition Loading and Full Fee Places Transition Loading.
#2 Includes Equity Support Program.
Total
652
760
952
48 Acquittal of Australian Government financial assistance (continued)
48.2 Higher Education Loan Programs (excl OS-HELP)
Parent entity
Financial assistance received in CASH during the reporting period
(total cash received from the Australian Government
for the Programs)
Net accrual adjustments
Revenue for the period
Surplus / (deficit) from the previous year
Total revenue including accrued revenue
Less expenses including accrued expenses
Surplus / (deficit) for reporting period
HECS-HELP (Australian
Government
payments only)
FEE-HELP#5
SA-HELP
Total
2012
2011
2012
2011
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
67,603
62,033
13,690
9,280
77
-
81,370
71,313
854
145
-
(4,795)
2,966
(961)
2,112
(3,979)
66,642
64,145
9,711
10,134
222
-
76,575
74,279
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
66,642
64,145
9,711
10,134
222
-
76,575
74,279
(66,642)
(64,145)
(9,711)
(10,134)
(222)
-
(76,575)
(74,279)
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
#5 Program is in respect of FEE-HELP for Higher Education only and excludes funds received in respect of VET FEE-HELP.
135
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2012
48 Acquittal of Australian Government financial assistance (continued)
48.3 Scholarships
Parent entity
Financial assistance received in CASH during
the reporting period (total cash received from the
Australian Government for the Programs)
Net accrual adjustments
Revenue for the period
Surplus / (deficit) from the previous year
Total revenue including accrued revenue
Less expenses including accrued expenses
Surplus / (deficit) for reporting period
Australian
Postgraduate
Awards
International
Postgraduate
Research
Scholarship
2012
2011
2012
2011
2012
2011
2012
2011
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
1,840
1,652
174
185
1,022
1,003
3,212
-
-
-
-
1,840
1,652
174
330
333
-
Commonwealth
Education Cost
Scholarships#6
Indigenous
Access
Scholarships
Total
853
95
81
46
(850)
(460)
67
(568)
2
-
185
172
393
162
435
83
46
2,431
2,711
2
-
26
-
23
-
9
330
393
(781)
3,739
(1,028)
2,170
1,985
174
187
172
419
162
458
83
55
2,761
3,104
(1,887)
(1,655)
(174)
(187)
(172)
(419)
(162)
(458)
(83)
(55)
(2,478)
(2,774)
283
330
-
-
#6 Includes Grandfathered Scholarships, National Priority and National Accommodation Priority Scholarships respectively.
136
Commonwealth
Accommodation
Scholarships#6
-
-
-
-
-
-
283
330
48 Acquittal of Australian Government financial assistance (continued)
48.4 DIISRTE Research#8
Parent entity
Financial assistance
received in CASH during
the reporting period (total
cash received from the
Australian Government for
the Programs)
Joint Research
Engagement#7
Less expenses including
accrued expenses
Commercialisation
Training Scheme
Sustainable
Research
Excellence in
Universities
Other
Total
2011
2012
2011
2012
2011
2012
2011
2012
2011
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
2,427
2,190
4,481
4,415
509
469
-
55
710
526
906
1,989
9,033
9,644
(10)
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2,417
2,190
4,481
4,415
509
469
-
55
710
526
906
1,989
9,023
9,644
-
-
-
-
-
-
35
44
-
-
1,964
-
1,999
44
2,417
2,190
4,481
4,415
509
469
35
99
710
526
2,870
1,989
11,022
9,688
(2,417)
(2,190)
(4,481)
(4,415)
(509)
(469)
(2)
(64)
(710)
(526)
(1,562)
(9,681)
(7,689)
33
35
1,341
1,999
Surplus / (deficit) from the
previous year
Total revenue including
accrued revenue
Research
Infrastructure
Block Grants
2012
Net accrual adjustments
Revenue for the period
Research
Training Scheme
Surplus / (deficit) for
reporting period
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1,308
(25)
1,964
(10)
-
#7 Includes Institutional Grants Scheme.
#8 The reported Surplus for Commercialisation Training Scheme ($0.033 million) and Collaborative Research Networks ($1.308 million) for 2012 is requested as a rollover.
137
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2012
48 Acquittal of Australian Government financial assistance (continued)
48.5 Other Capital Funding
Parent entity
Teaching and Learning
Capital Fund
Total
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Financial assistance received in CASH during the reporting period (total cash received from the Australian Government for
the Programs)
-
-
-
-
Net accrual adjustments
-
-
-
-
Revenue for the period
-
-
-
-
Surplus / (deficit) from the previous year
-
7,902
-
7,902
Less expenses including accrued expenses
-
(7,902)
-
(7,902)
Surplus / (deficit) for reporting period
-
-
-
-
48.6 Australian Research Council Grants
(a) Discovery
Parent entity
Total
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
188
161
188
161
-
-
-
-
Revenue for the period
188
161
188
161
Surplus / (deficit) from the previous year
164
47
164
47
Total revenue including accrued revenue
352
208
352
208
(188)
(44)
(188)
(44)
164
164
164
164
Financial assistance received in CASH during the reporting period (total cash received from the Australian Government for
the Programs)
Net accrual adjustments
Less expenses including accrued expenses
Surplus / (deficit) for reporting period
138
Project
48 Acquittal of Australian Government financial assistance (continued)
48.6 Australian Research Council Grants (continued)
(b) Linkages
Parent entity
Financial assistance received in CASH during the reporting period (total cash received from the Australian Government for
the Programs)
Net accrual adjustments
Revenue for the period
Project
Total
2012
2011
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
493
518
493
518
493
(140)
378
-
(140)
493
378
Surplus / (deficit) from the previous year
57
343
57
343
Total revenue including accrued revenue
550
721
550
721
(371)
(664)
(371)
(664)
179
57
179
57
Less expenses including accrued expenses
Surplus / (deficit) for reporting period
48.7 OS-HELP
Parent entity
Notes
Cash Received during the reporting period
Cash Spent during the reporting period
Net Cash received
4(g)
Cash Surplus / (deficit) from the previous period
Cash Surplus / (deficit) for reporting period
30
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
391
278
(399)
(240)
(8)
38
41
3
33
41
139
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2012
48 Acquittal of Australian Government financial assistance (continued)
48.8 Superannuation Supplementation
Parent entity
Notes
Cash Received during the reporting period
4(g)
$’000
3,209
(182)
Cash Surplus / (deficit) from the previous period
Cash available for current period
140
$’000
3,514
Cash available
Cash Surplus / (deficit) this period
2011
305
University contribution in respect of current employees
Contributions to specified defined benefit funds
2012
47/20
3,185
195
3,380
22
3,332
3,402
(3,052)
(3,584)
280
(182)
48 Acquittal of Australian Government financial assistance (continued)
48.9 Student Services and Amenities Fee
48.9 Student Services and Amenities Fee
Parent entity
Notes
SA-HELP revenue earned
4(b)
Student services fees direct from students
6
Total revenue expendable in period
Student Services expenses during period
Unspent/(overspent) Student Services Revenue
2012
2011
$’000
$’000
222
-
1,178
-
1,400
-
(1,400)
-
-
-
141
Additional Facts and Statistics
Student Enrolments (Persons)
Table 17: Enrolments by Type of Attendance, 2008-2012
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
Full-time
15,116
16,152
17,604
17,812
17,646
Part-time
5,912
6,122
6,548
6,052
5,869
21,028
22,274
24,152
23,864
23,515
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
Total
Notes: 2012 data is as at 23/01/2013. 2011 data is finalised and differs from the provisional figures reported in the Annual Report for 2011.
Table 18: Enrolments by Campus, 2008-2012
Joondalup
8,772
9,504
11,025
11,741
11,828
Mount Lawley
6,575
7,584
7,910
7,451
6,932
Bunbury
975
943
997
1,005
962
Churchlands
870
0
0
0
0
3,836
4,243
4,220
3,667
3,793
21,028
22,274
24,152
23,864
23,515
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
12,642
13,471
14,642
14,717
14,541
Male
8,386
8,803
9,510
9,147
8,974
Total
21,028
22,274
24,152
23,864
23,515
Study Centres (Domestic and Overseas)
Total
Notes: 2012 data is as at 23/01/2013. 2011 data is finalised and differs from the provisional figures reported in the Annual Report for 2011.
Table 19: Enrolments by Gender, 2008-2012
Female
Notes: 2012 data is as at 23/01/2013. 2011 data is finalised and may differ from the provisional figures reported in the Annual Report for 2011.
142
Table 20: Enrolments Domestic/International by Broad Course Level, 2008-2012
2008
Domestic Postgraduate
2009
2010
2011
2012
2,896
3,283
3,497
3,558
3,693
13,273
13,119
15,103
15,611
15,813
959
1,120
1,204
985
829
International on-shore Undergraduate
1,730
2,066
1,922
2,029
1,853
International off-shore Postgraduate
1,103
1,160
1,119
629
425
International off-shore Undergraduate
1,067
1,526
1,307
1,052
902
21,028
22,274
24,152
23,864
23,515
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
16,169
16,402
18,600
19,169
19,506
China
469
583
756
800
761
India
344
506
497
305
209
Other Asian countries
831
881
924
855
746
African countries
582
603
564
654
613
European countries
295
257
251
274
246
Other
168
356
134
126
107
China
154
129
65
63
66
India
154
228
301
53
133
1,456
1,655
1,616
1,242
902
311
368
398
287
178
European countries
32
53
28
18
13
Other
63
253
18
18
35
21,028
22,274
24,152
23,864
23,515
Domestic Undergraduate
International on-shore Postgraduate
Total
Notes: 2012 data is as at 23/01/2013. 2011 data is finalised and may differ from the provisional figures reported in the Annual Report for 2011.
Table 21: Enrolments by Country/Region, 2008-2012
Domestic
International on-shore
International off-shore
Other Asian countries
African countries
Total
Notes: 2012 data is as at 23/01/2013. 2011 data is finalised and differs from the provisional figures reported in the Annual Report for 2011.
143
Table 22: Enrolments by Equity Group, 2008-2012
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
Low SES Students
1,779
1,842
1,810
2,189
2,250
Regional Students
2,531
2,554
2,474
3,004
3,099
Indigenous Australian Students
170
163
188
178
200
Students with a Disability
336
397
704
945
979
Notes: 2012 data is as at 23/01/2013. Changes in methodology for collection and reporting mean that 2011 and 2012 figures are not comparable with prior year figures.
Student Load (Full-Time Equivalence)
Table 23: Student Load (EFTSL) by Broad Field of Education, 2008-2012
2008
2010
2011
2012
Agriculture, Environmental and Related
88
92
101
87
102
Architecture and Building
11
29
29
34
44
Creative Arts
2,207
2,330
2,459
2,484
2,306
Education
3,246
3,357
3,635
3,418
3,507
290
393
520
655
765
1
1
1
1
2
Health
2,012
2,100
2,452
2,855
3,148
Information Technology
1,092
1,196
1,211
1,040
967
Management and Commerce
3,103
3,746
3,691
3,117
2,753
4
5
3
3
4
947
1,091
1,230
1,311
1,301
2,977
3,270
3,427
3,406
3,232
15,978
17,610
18,759
18,410
18,132
Engineering and Related Technologies
Food, Hospitality and Personal Services
Mixed Field Programs
Natural and Physical Sciences
Society and Culture
Total
Notes: 2012 data is as at 23/01/2013. 2011 data is finalised and differs from the provisional figures reported in the Annual Report for 2011.
144
2009
Table 24: Student Load (EFTSL) by Faculty, 2008-2012
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
Business and Law
3,991
4,758
4,694
4,086
3,610
Computing, Health and Science
5,509
6,081
6,788
7,232
7,573
Education and Arts
5,766
6,110
6,600
6,381
6,266
710
661
667
712
682
15,978
17,610
18,759
18,410
18,132
Regional Professional Studies
Total
Notes: 2012 data is as at 23/01/2013. 2011 data is finalised and differs from the provisional figures reported in the Annual Report for 2011.
Figure 6: Mid CEQ Mean Scores, 2008-2012
56
54
52
50
48
46
44
Graduate Qualities
Overall Satisfaction
42
Generic Skills
Good Teaching
40
38
36
34
32
30
2008
2009
2010
Year of Survey
2011
2012
145
Student Outcomes
Table 25: Completions by Course Level, 2007-2011
2007
Higher Degree by Research
2008
2009
2010
2011
84
93
80
70
75
894
1,245
1,597
1,423
1,191
Other Postgraduate
1,136
1,004
1,095
1,178
1,041
Bachelor (Pass and Honours)
3,499
3,393
3,651
3,459
3,679
Other Undergraduate
77
44
48
55
32
Vocational Education and Training
79
68
125
182
188
5,769
5,847
6,596
6,367
6,206
Master by Coursework
Total
Notes: 2010 data is finalised and differs from the provisional figures reported in the Annual Report for 2011. 2012 completions will be available in mid-2013. Award courses only (enabling course completions not shown).
Other Inputs
Table 26: Library Holdings, 2008-2012
Library Volumes
Serial Subscriptions
eBooks
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
637,931
653,575
638,912
650,236
591,755
36,044
52,078
58,465
67,863
65,882
2,263
3,399
33,600
81,760
79,429
Table 27: Revenue ($’000), 2008-2012
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
125,904
133,337
137,325
144,882
167,994
State Government
11,499
13,317
12,996
12,774
11,796
Student Tuition Fees (HECS-HELP, FEES-HELP)
59,195
65,461
76,789
85,491
88,880
Fees and Charges
56,369
66,240
69,688
67,193
70,308
Investment Income
4,032
5,322
6,407
9,852
9,503
Royalties
7,370
9,536
9,497
8,599
7,018
Consultancy and Contract Research
5,914
3,352
3,286
4,130
6,251
25,069
18,715
20,645
25,327
16,924
295,352
315,280
336,633
358,248
378,674
Australian Government
Other
Total Revenue
146
Notes: Total revenue for Edith Cowan University and its subsidiary (consolidated entity). Revenue for 2009 varies from that reported in the financial statements of that year, due to retrospective application of adjusted
accounting treatments.
Other Financial Disclosures
Pricing Policies
ECU sets the level of the student contribution for Commonwealth-supported places at the maximum allowed under the Higher Education Support Act 2003 (Cwlth), as is the case for most
Australian universities. Fees for fee-paying courses are determined on the basis of cost and market conditions and take into account Australian Government requirements regarding fees
set for non-Commonwealth-supported places.
Major Capital Projects
Table 28: Major Capital Projects Completed, 2012
Estimated
total cost
($m)
Project
Actual total
cost ($m)
Campus Renewal Program
5.92
4.61
Joondalup Building 22 Extension and Building 25
8.13
7.84
Joondalup Building 2 Leak rectification
5.10
5.02
0.8
0.78
ECU Joondalup Innovation Centre
Table 29: Major Capital Projects in Progress, 2012
Project
Estimated
total cost ($m)
Actual total
cost to
complete ($m)
Expected year
of completion
Joondalup Student Housing Extension
15.00
0.04
2015
ECU Wanneroo GP Super Clinic
22.00
3.06
2014
5.00
0.07
2014
71.41
9.60
2015
Research Support Facility (Engineering Pavilion), Joondalup
Joondalup Building 34
Notes: The Joondalup Student Housing Extension is being funded off balance sheet through our partner Campus Living Villages via a combination of NRAS grants and debt.
147
Employees and Employee Relations
Table 30: Academic Staff by Contract Type, 2008-2012
Staff
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
Permanent Full-time
370
367
372
371
367
Permanent Part-time
18
29
27
33
32
Temporary Full-time
112
146
142
141
134
Temporary Part-time
27
36
41
45
45
Casual
175
178
180
181
174
Total
702
756
761
771
753
Notes: Figures are based on full-time equivalency, rather than headcount and therefore prior year figures are not as reported in earlier annual reports. Figures are average full-time equivalents for the 12 calendar months.
Figures include staff in VET provision.
Table 31: General Staff by Contract Type, 2008-2012
Staff
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
Permanent Full-time
592
610
636
642
620
Permanent Part-time
96
102
107
119
124
Temporary Full-time
167
170
145
186
226
Temporary Part-time
77
80
74
69
83
Casual
65
65
67
84
84
998
1,026
1,029
1,099
1,137
Total
Notes: Figures are based on full-time equivalency, rather than headcount and therefore prior year figures are not as reported in earlier annual reports. Figures are average full-time equivalents for the 12 calendar months.
Figures include staff in VET provision.
148
Occupational Safety,
Health and Injury
Management
Executive Commitment to Occupational
Safety, Health and Injury Management
ECU is committed to providing a safe and healthy
environment for all staff, students, visitors and contractors,
conducive to study, wellbeing and productivity. ECU
is proactive in preventing and minimising the potential
for injury and harm and the University has developed
and implemented a suite of safe work procedures and
protocols to meet and exceed legislative obligations.
Executive commitment is demonstrated via the
University’s due-diligence compliance framework which
requires the development of Occupational Safety and
Health (OSH) plans for business unit, completion of
Hazard Risk Registers and reporting against a suite of
lead and lag OSH performance indicators.
In addition to statutory responsibilities, the University
expects all managers and supervisors to provide
information, instruction, training and supervision on safety
and health procedures and work practices so that a safe
and healthy working environment is maintained. This
responsibility is achieved via a consultative committee
where hazards, risks and all matters relating to OSH are
discussed and aligned to a business unit’s operational
safety plan.
Mechanism for Consultation with
Employees on OSH and Injury
Management Matters
ECU’s committee structure for OSH matters comprises
the following four levels:
1. Occupational Safety and Health Policy Committee
(reporting to the Vice-Chancellor).
2. Institutional Bio-safety Committee / Radiation
Committee (reporting to the Occupational Safety and
Health Policy Committee).
3. Occupational Safety and Health Campus Working
Groups (reporting to the Director, Facilities and
Services and the Director Human Resources).
4. Faculty level and Service Centre-level Occupational
Safety and Health Committees and special working
parties (reporting to senior managers and the
University Occupational Safety and Health Policy
Committee).
Each of these committees engages with elected safety
and health representatives and employee representatives
from business units to facilitate consultation at all levels.
operational plans. Completion of a Hazard Risk Register
identifying business inherent and residual risk is
mandated. OSH performance statistics are reported to two
committees of Council: the Resources Committee and the
Quality, Audit and Risk Committee.
Additionally, staff attitudes to, and perceptions of, safety in
their work environment are monitored through bi-annual
staff surveys.
Table 32: Performance against 2011/12 Injury
Management Targets
Indicator
Target
2011/12
Number of fatalities
Zero (0)
Compliance with the Workers’
Compensation and Injury Management
Act 1981
Lost time injury/
diseases incident
rate1
ECU has a formal OSH and Injury Management Policy
developed in consultation with employees and elected
safety and health representatives. Safety and injury
management programs are communicated via safety
committees and incorporated into the operational plans
of all faculties, schools and service centres. Injury
management plans (return to work plans) are developed
in line with statutory obligations and consultation with the
relevant parties and medical practitioners. Performance
indicators are recorded and reported to the University’s
Senior Leadership Team.
Assessment of the occupational safety
and health management system
ECU has implemented an OSH management system
for mandatory self-assessment based on the primary
functions and supporting principles of the Australian and
New Zealand Standard AS/NZS 4801:2001. The audit
outcomes are utilised for the framework and development
of faculty, school and service centre strategic and
Result
2011/12
Result
2010/11
0
0
Zero or 10%
reduction on
previous year
0.14
0.11
Lost time injury
severity rate1
Zero or 10%
improvement
on previous
year
0
0
Percentage of
injured workers
returned to work
within (i) 13 weeks
and 26 weeks
Greater than
or equal to
80% return to
work within 26
weeks
100%
100%
Percentage of
managers trained
in occupational
safety and
health and injury
management2
Greater than or
equal to 80%
See Note 2
n/a
n/a
Note 1: Lost time injury/diseases incident rate and lost time injury
severity rate are defined as the incidents per 100 employees.
Note 2: ECU does not provide training specifically in Occupational
Safety and Health (OSH) and Injury Management. Obligations relating
to these activities are incorporated into broader OSH training and
information sessions provided to managers.
149
Governance
Disclosures
Corporate Standards and Risk
Management
Equity Commitments
ECU values diversity and aims to create an inclusive
environment free from discrimination for students,
staff and the broader community. ECU is committed to
increasing access by providing opportunities for students
who face barriers to higher education and thereby to
improve representation of disadvantaged groups within
the student profile. ECU’s staffing strategies seek to
achieve appropriate representation and distribution of
under-represented groups in its workplaces.
Equity groups as a proportion
of all enrolments
10% Low SES Students
13% Regional Students
1% Indigenous Australian Students
4% Students with a Disability
Governance and Reporting in 2012
The University has a number of specific equity plans
which describe initiatives, performance measures and
responsibilities for progressing equity and social inclusion.
ECU’s Equity Committee advises and reports to the
Vice-Chancellor on matters related to equity, including on
progress against these equity plans.
The University completed the development of its second
Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP), 2012-2015 in 2012. The
RAP outlines the University’s vision for reconciliation and
its objective is to translate its commitments to Indigenous
Australians into improved outcomes. ECU also reported
to Reconciliation Australia, through the ECU Council, on
achievements against the first (one year) RAP.
A new Indigenous Australian Employment Strategy and
Action Plan, 2012-2015 was also approved in 2012.
ECU’s five-year Disability Access and Inclusion Plan
(DAIP) for 2011-2016 continued to be supported in 2012
through an annual implementation plan co-ordinated by
the ECU Disability Access and Inclusion Sub-Committee
and reporting to the Equity Committee.
The University was not required to report to the
Australian Government’s Equal Opportunity for Women
in the Workplace Agency (EOWA) in 2012, having
demonstrated not only compliance with all aspects of the
Equal Opportunity for Women in the Workplace Act 1999
(Cwlth), but by taking all practicable steps to advance
women and remove barriers to their employment and
promotion.
In 2012 ECU also prepared and submitted a revised Equal
Employment Opportunities Management Plan, 20122015 as part of a revised ECU Staffing Plan, 2012-2015 to
comply with its legislative requirements under the Equal
Opportunities Act 1984 (WA).
Other compliance and legislative reporting completed
during the year included: the submission of the Indigenous
Education Statement and Equity Report for the Australian
Government’s Institutional Performance Portfolio; the
annual report to the Western Australian Aboriginal
Education and Training Council; the Annual Report on
150
progress against the Disability Access and Inclusion
(Annual Implementation) Plan, 2011/2012; and the Equal
Employment Opportunity demographics report.
Celebrating and Supporting Equity in 2012
ECU hosted a range of events for students, staff and
the community in 2012 to celebrate equity, including:
Harmony Week, International Women’s Day, NAIDOC
Week, International Day of People with a Disability, Pride
Month and Mental Health Week.
ECU also continued to support two volunteer equity
networks. University Contact Officers help to resolve
equal opportunity issues by providing referral advice on
equity policies and practices for students and staff, while
“Allies” provide a network of trained contacts for Gay,
Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex students
and staff.
Quality
ECU’s Quality Unit provides leadership and strategic
advice in the planning, and management of quality
matters within the University, while ECU’s [email protected]
model, incorporating the Plan, Do, Review, Improve
cycle, provides a consistent approach to continuous
quality improvement across different levels of planning
and review.
During 2012 the ECU Quality Review Policy, which
supports the various quality review processes within the
University, was reviewed as part of the development of the
ECU Excellence Framework. This framework will provide
an integrated quality improvement system describing
the elements and organisational characteristics needed
to sustain high levels of performance at ECU. Further
consultation on the framework and proposed additions to
the policy will take place in 2013, before seeking approval
for implementation from ECU’s Council.
The Annual Review process continued to be
underpinned by an evidence-based approach and 2012
saw further refinement of performance-based metrics for
service centres.
In July 2012 the Tertiary Education Quality and Standards
Agency (TEQSA, formerly AUQA) delivered its final report
on the Cycle Two Audit of ECU conducted in October
2011. The report provided a positive affirmation of the
significant progress made by the University in the area of
quality assurance and quality improvement.
More information on the Cycle Two Audit can be found on
the ECU website.
Risk Management Statement
This statement is consistent with, and complies with, the
Voluntary Code of Best Practice for the Governance of
Australian Universities (Item 11):
ECU has an Integrated Risk Management Framework
and Policy. It is compliant with ISO Standard 31000:
Risk Management.
Strategic oversight of risk management is included in
the terms of reference for the Quality, Audit and Risk
Committee, as well as in the Quality, Audit and Risk
Committee Charter and the Risk and Assurance Service
Centre Charter approved by Council in August 2011.
A Risk Reference Forum, chaired by the Deputy
Vice-Chancellor (Academic), assists with the exchange
of experiences of best practice and dissemination of risk
management-related material within the University.
Functionally, the Risk Assurance Service Centre is
responsible for the development and implementation
of risk management strategies, methods and tools
(including insurances), legislative compliance, business
continuity and fraud and misconduct prevention and
management. The Human Resources Services Centre is
responsible for the day-to-day operation of occupational
safety and health strategies and workers’ compensation.
The Office of Legal Services is responsible for the
oversight of legal risk within ECU.
Risk Management
A major component of corporate governance at ECU is
effective risk management. During 2012 ECU revised
its Strategic Risk Register to provide alignment between
ECU’s Integrated Risk Management Framework and
the Tertiary Education Quality Standards Agency’s Risk
Regulatory Framework. This resulted in:
zz changes
to the high level risk assurance map which
matches the University’s standing review mechanisms
with its strategic risks;
zz integration
of the risk management framework with
quality, internal audit and compliance assurance
processes; and
zz alignment
of strategic and operational risk
management with strategic and operational planning.
Fraud and misconduct prevention training for senior staff
was delivered at the South West Campus during 2012.
The fraud risk assessment has been updated and this will
form the basis of fraud and misconduct prevention training
for middle management and supervisors. ECU assessed
its operations for legislative compliance with the Education
Services for Overseas Students Act 2000 (Cwlth) and the
Vocational Education and Training Act 1996 (WA). In both
cases, the University was assessed as being materially
compliant. During 2012 a risk assessment of ECU’s
legislative compliance requirements was updated.
The University continues its preparation for the
introduction of the harmonised work, health and safety
legislation.
Business Continuity Plans are in place for all ECU
campuses. The plans for ECU’s Joondalup Campus were
tested in 2012, while the documentation and testing of
IT disaster recovery plans and key IT systems continued
during 2012. All critical IT systems were tested during
the year and as a result of an internal IT audit in 2012,
the Chief Information Officer initiated an IT Security Risk
Assessment.
More information on Risk Management can be found on
the ECU website.
Other Legal
Requirements
Advertising
In accordance with the requirements of section 175ZE
of the Electoral Act 1907 (WA) the University is required
to report all expenditure incurred by, or on behalf of, the
University on advertising, market research, polling, direct
mail and media advertising during the financial year.
Advertising expenditure in 2012 totalled $5,636,517.
The amount in each expenditure class and the
organisations paid, are listing in Table 33 below.
Table 33: Advertising Expenditure, 2012
Advertising agencies
303 Group Pty Ltd
Longtail Communications Company Pty Ltd
Hobsons Australia Pty Ltd
Market research organisations
2,564,576
64,377
Polling organisations
0
Direct mail organisations
0
Media advertising organisations
Mitchell and Partners Australia Pty Ltd
Google
Other organisations
3,007,563
Total Expenditure
5,636,517
Recordkeeping
The Electronic Document and Records Management
System (EDRMS) is the University’s approved record
keeping system, allowing emails and documents from any
application to be saved electronically. A project is in train to
roll out the EDRMS across the University.
151
State Records Commission Standard 2 Record Keeping Plans: Principle 6 – Compliance
ECU is subject to the requirements of the State Records Act 2000 (WA) and is committed to compliance in its record keeping activities.
ECU’s activities under each of the requirements include:
The efficiency and effectiveness of the organisation’s record keeping system is evaluated not less than once every 5 years.
ECU’s Record Keeping Plan was submitted to the State Records Office for review in March 2011 and was approved for a further five year period. It is due for review again in 2016.
The West Australian University Sector Disposal Authority for records has been approved by the State Record Commission and will be reviewed again in 2016. The work undertaken on
this collaborative project by the universities of Western Australia was recognised with the presentation of the Linton Award by the Records and Information Management Professional
Association for “excellence in recordkeeping by an outstanding group”.
Promotion of the ECU Vital Record program to ECU staff commenced in April 2012 and there was an increase of 100 per cent in University vital records registered in the record
management system between 2011 and 2012.
An independent review of the University’s Record Keeping Framework and the EDRMS project was conducted in July 2011 and recommendations from that review continued to be
addressed in 2012. Record keeping surveys have been conducted as part of the EDRMS project roll-out and show an increased understanding of recordkeeping requirements by
users, as well as increased satisfaction with the system and resources available to staff.
The organisation conducts a record keeping training program.
ECU conducts regular record keeping training programs that are integrated into the University’s overall professional development and training framework. These include:
zz A basic
record keeping induction training session, available to all new staff.
zz The
Records Awareness Training System, which was implemented in 2008 to raise record management awareness for staff, continues to be offered to staff. Since implementation,
over 80 per cent of staff have completed, or are working through the course.
zz Monthly
training courses on the University’s record keeping software (TRIM) are provided at Basic, Intermediate and Advanced levels. These sessions were reviewed and updated
in 2012.
zz Customised
group sessions on TRIM continued to be developed and delivered, on request.
zz One-on-one
training occurred, on request.
The efficiency and effectiveness of the record keeping training program is reviewed from time to time
The outcomes of all record keeping training are monitored and staff feedback is collected through questionnaires. This feedback is reviewed to assess whether the training has been
effective. Feedback is then used to review training sessions and the overall training program that is delivered. An Intermediate level course for users was introduced as a result of this
feedback.
The organisation’s induction program addresses employees’ roles and responsibilities with regards to their compliance with the organisation’s record keeping plan.
All new ECU employees undergo an induction course which addresses employee roles and responsibilities in regard to the compliance aspects of the Record Keeping Plan.
Additionally, this material is included in a handbook issued to employees when they commence work at ECU.
152
Disability Access and Inclusion Plan Outcomes
In July 2012, as required under schedule 3 of the Disability Service Regulations 2004 (WA), ECU reported on achievements against its Disability Access and Inclusion Plan (DAIP) for the
2011/12 reporting year. It is important to note that as the DAIP spans a five year period (2011-2016), many of the strategies will continue to be implemented throughout that period. Some
examples of achievements against ECU’s DAIP Outcomes in 2011/12 are listed below.
Outcome One: People with disabilities have the same opportunities as other people to access the services of, and any events organised by, the University.
zz An
inclusive curriculum checklist has been developed and distributed.
zz Accessibility
services are included in the student prospectus and advertising lift-outs.
Outcome Two: People with disabilities have the same opportunities as other people to access the buildings and other facilities of the University.
zz ECU’s
Planning and Design Guidelines were updated to incorporated Australian Human Rights Commission guidelines.
zz A report
was commissioned to provide innovative design ideas, which are above Australian standards, for ECU’s new Building 34 at the Joondalup Campus.
Outcome Three: People with disabilities receive information from the University in a format that will enable them to access the information as readily as other people are
able to access it.
zz The
[email protected]: The Little Red Book included information on accessibility and inclusivity.
zz The
ECU Library provided access to a range of equipment to help students with disabilities in Accessible Technologies Room, at both the Joondalup and Mount Lawley campuses.
Outcome Four: People with disabilities receive the same level and quality of service from the staff of the University as other people receive from the staff of the University.
zz A “Responding
zz A Mental
to Hidden Characteristics of the Class” Workshop was held in July 2012.
Health Workshop was provided on 3 November 2011.
Outcome Five: People with disabilities have the same opportunities as other people to make complaints to the University.
zz The
Risk Assurance Service Centre has commenced implementing an Integrated Complaints Mechanism for ECU.
zz During
2011/12 a report was produced highlighting opportunities to improve the visibility of the University Contact Officer network.
Outcome Six: People with disabilities have the same opportunities as other people to participate in any public consultation by the University.
zz ECU’s
standard survey software was deemed compliant with US section 508 accessibility requirements.
zz ECU’s
2012 staff survey results were analysed to examine differences in views expressed by those staff who identify themselves as having a disability.
Outcome Seven: People with disabilities have the same opportunities as other people to seek employment and work experience placements with the University.
zz ECU
has been in regular contact with employment agencies specialising in disability services.
zz Definitions
for disabilities were included in ECU’s Staff Kiosk human resources system.
Outcome Eight: The University promotes an inclusive culture that values diversity, does not tolerate harassment or discrimination and encourages a secure and safe
environment for all students and staff.
zz EO
Online (Equal Opportunity) training was included in the Role Based Capability Framework as a core activity.
zz Five
disability experts were identified and placed on the media experts database.
153
Contact ECU by
phone on 134 ECU (134 328)
Become a fan at
facebook.com/ecujourney
For calls outside Australia
phone (61 8) 6304 0000
Follow us at
twitter.com/edithcowanuni
Email us at [email protected]
or visit reachyourpotential.com.au
Watch us at
youtube.com/edithcowanuniversity
Every effort has been made to ensure that the information
contained in this publication is correct at the time of printing.
The information is subject to change from time to time and
the University reserves the right to add, vary or discontinue
courses and impose limitations on enrolment in any course.
The publication constitutes an expression of intent and is
not to be taken as a firm offer or understanding.
ECU IS SM KE-FREE
Greening ECU: Edith Cowan University is committed to reducing the environmental impact
associated with its operations by conducting its activities in a socially and environmentally responsible
manner. This includes implementing strategies and technologies that minimise waste of resources and
demonstrate environmentally sensitive development, innovation and continuous improvement.
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