Colortran | Status 12/24 | User guide | Colortran Status 12/24 User guide

___________________________
LIGHTING CONTROL DIVISION
User Guide
Lighting Control Console
Innovator
LIT-31494-00
Software Release 1.30
Document Release 1.30.03.07.r1
Warranty
LEVITON LIGHTING CONTROL DIVISION of Leviton Manufacturing Co Inc.
warrants this control console to be free of material and workmanship
defects for a period of two years after system acceptance or 26 months
after shipment, whichever comes first. This Warranty is limited to repair of
replacement of defective equipment returned Freight Pre-Paid to Leviton
Lighting Control Division at 20497 Teton Ave., Tualatin, Oregon 97062, USA.
User shall call 1-800-959-6004 and request a return authorization number
to mark on the outside of the returning carton, to assure that the returned
material will be properly received at Leviton. All equipment shipped back to
Leviton must be carefully and properly packed to avoid shipping damage.
Replacements or repaired equipment will be returned to sender freight
prepaid, F.O.B. factory. Leviton is not responsible for removing or replacing
equipment on the job site, and will not honor charges for such work.
Leviton will not be responsible for any loss of use time or subsequent
damages should any of the equipment fail during the warranty period, but
agrees only to repair or replace defective equipment returned to its plant in
Tualatin, Oregon. This Warranty is void on any product that has been
improperly installed, overloaded, short circuited, abused, or altered in any
manner. Neither the seller nor Leviton shall be liable for any injury, loss or
damage, direct or consequential arising out of the use of or inability to use
the equipment. This Warranty does not cover lamps, ballasts, and other
equipment which is supplied or warranted directly to the user by their
manufacturer. Leviton makes no warranty as to the Fitness for Purpose or
other implied Warranties.
Notice
Although the information contained within this user guide is believed to be
accurate at the time of printing, it is not guaranteed to be without fault and
is subject to change without notice. Future software releases may change
the features or operation of this product. For current information contact:
Leviton Lighting Controls Division
Technical Services
PO Box 2210
Tualatin, Oregon 97062
Voice: (800)959-6004 Fax: (503)404-5601 Internet: www.colortran.com
Copyright © 2003
Leviton Manufacturing Company Incorporated.
All Rights Reserved.
User Guide
Table of Chapters
Table of Chapters
Chapter 1 Introduction.............................................. 1
Chapter 2 Displays................................................... 15
Chapter 3 Setting Channel Levels............................ 27
Chapter 4 Submasters ............................................. 41
Chapter 5 Cues ........................................................ 55
Chapter 6 Groups..................................................... 97
Chapter 7 Effects ................................................... 113
Chapter 8 Macros................................................... 123
Chapter 9 Patching ................................................ 135
Chapter 10 Automated Devices ............................. 147
Chapter 11 Memory Functions............................... 175
Chapter 12 System Settings .................................. 183
Chapter 13 Printing ............................................... 199
Chapter 14 Alternate Control Interfaces ............... 205
Appendix A Installation ......................................... 217
Appendix B Specifications ..................................... 229
Appendix C Maintenance ....................................... 233
Appendix D Resident Devices ................................ 237
Index ..................................................................... 239
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Table of Chapters
Page II
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User Guide
Table of Contents
Table of Contents
Chapter 1 Introduction .............................................. 1
About the Console ........................................................ 2
Setting up the Console.................................................. 3
Using this Guide ........................................................... 3
Text Conventions ............................................... 3
Terminology Definitions ................................................ 4
Console Controls ........................................................... 6
Hard-keys .......................................................... 7
Soft-keys ........................................................... 7
Macro Keys......................................................... 7
Display Keys ....................................................... 7
Data Keypad....................................................... 8
Trackball ........................................................... 10
Trackball Select / Change Keys ........................... 10
Grand-Master Fader ........................................... 10
Blackout Key ..................................................... 10
Playback Faders................................................. 11
Device Encoder Wheels ...................................... 11
Arrow Keys........................................................ 11
Leviton Logo Key / Shift Key (a.k.a. "Meatball") ... 11
Command Line ............................................................ 12
Command Line History ....................................... 13
Console Memory.......................................................... 13
Record Disk / Load Disk ..................................... 13
Contacting Technical Support ....................................... 14
Chapter 2 Displays................................................... 15
Common Display Features............................................
Selecting Displays ..............................................
Navigating Displays............................................
Live Displays ...............................................................
Stage Display ....................................................
Dimmer Output Sub-Display (Stage)....................
Effect Sub-Display (Stage) ..................................
Playback Display ................................................
Device Display ...................................................
Preview Displays .........................................................
Preview Displays: Cue, Submaster, Group............
Effect Sub-Display (Preview)...............................
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Page III
Table of Contents
Cuesheet Display ...............................................
Tracksheet Display.............................................
Configuration Displays........................................
Patch Display.....................................................
Setup Display ....................................................
Sub-Displays of Setup: Print, Disk,
Macro, Device Assignment, Profile,
Real Time Event, Network ..................................
The LCD Display..........................................................
Switching Active Monitors ............................................
21
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23
25
26
Chapter 3 Setting Channel Levels............................ 27
How to Set Levels with Channel Faders .........................
Channel Bump Buttons .......................................
How to Set Levels with the Keypad ...............................
How to set levels with the Trackball..............................
Proportional Control with the Trackball ................
Using Submasters to set Channel Levels .......................
Channel lists ...............................................................
Command Line Syntax........................................
Display of Channel Levels.............................................
Channel Level Colors ..........................................
Captured Channels.............................................
Active Channels .................................................
Console Operating Modes ............................................
Two Scene Mode (All models except 600) ............
Single Scene Mode.............................................
"Match and Take Control" difference
between Single Scene and Two Scene .................
Restoring channel levels (“Undo”).................................
Channel Check Mode ...................................................
+/- Mode ....................................................................
Parked Dimmers..........................................................
28
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40
40
Chapter 4 Submasters ............................................. 41
Recording Submasters ................................................. 42
Changing Submaster Pages ................................ 42
Submaster Playback .....................................................43
Submaster Fader Playback.................................. 43
Submaster Bump Button Playback ....................... 43
Timed Submasters ............................................. 44
Submaster Page Changes in Playback Display ...... 45
Submaster Types ........................................................ 46
Pile-On Submaster ............................................. 46
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Table of Contents
Inhibitive Submaster ..........................................
Assigning Effects to Submasters ...................................
Assigning Groups to Submasters...................................
Assigning Macros to Submasters...................................
Preview Mode and Submasters .....................................
Navigating the Submaster Preview Display...........
Recording Submasters in Preview........................
Editing Submasters in Preview ............................
Naming Submasters ...........................................
Copying Submasters ..........................................
Renumbering Submasters...................................
Clearing Submasters ..........................................
46
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52
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53
Chapter 5 Cues ........................................................ 55
Recording Cues ...........................................................
Cue Record Modes .............................................
Cue Numbering..................................................
Creating a Basic Cue ..........................................
Recording Cues in the Stage Display .............................
Recording Cue Fade Time(s)...............................
Recording a Cue Delay Time ...............................
Recording Cues with Follow ................................
Recording Cues with Link ...................................
Recording Cues in the Preview Display ..........................
Editing Cues................................................................
Editing Cues in the Stage Display ........................
Editing Cues in the Preview Display .....................
The Cuesheet Display.........................................
Editing Cue Attributes ........................................
Naming Cues ..............................................................
Copying Cues ..............................................................
Clearing Cues..............................................................
Inserting and Renumbering Cues..................................
Inserting Cues ...................................................
Renumbering Cues.............................................
Using Groups when Recording Cues..............................
Assigning Effects to Cues .............................................
Assigning Macros to Cues.............................................
Multipart Cues.............................................................
Playing Back Cues .......................................................
Playback Faders.................................................
Playback Keys....................................................
The Playback Display .........................................
Playing Back Manual Cues ............................................
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Playing Back Timed Cues .............................................
Taking Manual Control of Timed Cues .................
Rate Override ....................................................
Using the Real Time Event Clock to Playback Cues.........
Navigating the Real Time Event sub-display .........
Real Time Event Example Procedure ...................
Using Macros to Execute Cues ......................................
Cue Record Modes.......................................................
Selecting the Cue Record Mode...........................
Tracking Level Conventions ................................
The Tracksheet Display ......................................
Clean Up Mode ..................................................
Tracking Mode...................................................
Cue Only Mode ..................................................
Using the Clean Up hard-key ..............................
Converting Hard and Soft Levels ........................
84
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85
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87
88
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90
90
91
92
93
94
95
95
Chapter 6 Groups ..................................................... 97
Groups and Automated Devices .................................... 98
Recording Groups Live ................................................. 99
Recording a channel group live ........................... 99
Recording a device trait group live .................... 100
Editing Groups Live................................................... 101
Recalling Groups.............................................. 101
Editing a channel group live.............................. 101
Editing a device trait group live ......................... 102
Group Preview Sub-Display ........................................ 103
Navigating the Group Sub-Display ..................... 103
Recording Groups in the Group Preview Sub-Display .... 104
Recording a channel group blind ....................... 104
Recording a device trait group blind .................. 104
Editing Groups in the Group Preview Sub-Display......... 105
Editing a channel group blind............................ 105
Editing a device trait group blind....................... 105
Naming Groups ......................................................... 106
Copying Groups......................................................... 107
Renumbering Groups ................................................. 107
Clearing Groups ........................................................ 108
Using the Only Key with Groups ................................. 109
Using Groups in Cues................................................. 110
Using Groups in Submasters....................................... 111
Using Groups in Effects.............................................. 112
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Table of Contents
Chapter 7 Effects ................................................... 113
Effect Sub-Display .....................................................
Navigating the Effect Sub-Display .....................
Effect Sub-Display Soft-Keys .............................
Effect Attributes ........................................................
Setting Amount of Effect Steps .........................
Effect Fade and Dwell Times.............................
Effect Patterns.................................................
Creating and Editing Effects .......................................
Creating a Step................................................
Element Hierarchy ...........................................
Adding Steps.............................................................
Inserting Steps..........................................................
Deleting Steps...........................................................
Testing an Effect .......................................................
Clearing Effects .........................................................
Assigning Effects to Cues ...........................................
Assigning Effects to Submasters .................................
114
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116
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120
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120
120
121
122
122
Chapter 8 Macros................................................... 123
Macro Sub-Display.....................................................
Navigating the Macro Sub-Display .....................
Macro Paging ............................................................
Recording Macros ......................................................
Recording Real-Time Macros.............................
Nesting Macros ................................................
Playing Macros ..........................................................
Assigning Macros to Cues .................................
Assigning Macros to Submasters .......................
Editing Macros ..........................................................
Clearing Macros.........................................................
Example Macros ........................................................
Load and Execute a Cue ...................................
Record Show to Disk ........................................
Start Channel Check Automatically ....................
124
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133
Chapter 9 Patching ................................................ 135
Patch Display ............................................................
Patch Parameters.............................................
Navigating the Patch Display ............................
Patching 1 To 1.........................................................
Custom Patching Channels to Dimmers .......................
Proportional Levels ....................................................
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Page VII
Table of Contents
Patching Automated Devices ......................................
Dimmer Check ..........................................................
Profiles .....................................................................
Navigating the Profile Sub-Display.....................
Creating and Assigning Custom Profiles .............
141
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143
145
146
Chapter 10 Automated Devices ............................. 147
Understanding Your Automated Devices......................
Device Traits and DMX 512...............................
Assigning Devices......................................................
Initial Device Assignment .................................
Custom Device Address Assignment ..................
Clearing a Device Assignment ...........................
Assigning a Device Dimmer Trait to a
Channel Fader or Submaster.............................
Using Automated Devices...........................................
LCD and Encoder Wheels .................................
The Device Display ..........................................
Recording Cues................................................
Using Submasters ............................................
Using Groups...................................................
Using Effects ...................................................
Blind Recording and Editing of Devices ..............
Some Programming Hints .................................
Device Definition Language ........................................
Loading a new DDL into the console..................
Creating and Editing DDLs ................................
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Chapter 11 Memory Functions............................... 175
Console Memory (RAM) .............................................
Clear Functions .........................................................
Hard Clear (Console Reset)...............................
Soft Clear ........................................................
Diskette Functions .....................................................
Loading Show Files from a Floppy Disk ..............
Formatting a Floppy Disk ..................................
Upgrading Console System Software...........................
176
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182
Chapter 12 System Settings .................................. 183
Navigating the Setup Display......................................
Naming the Show ......................................................
Naming the File.........................................................
Setting number of Dimmers .......................................
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Table of Contents
Channel Bump/Toggle Buttons ...................................
Allocating Memory .....................................................
Setting number of Channels..............................
Setting number of Submasters ..........................
Setting number of Macro Pages ........................
Setting number of Effect Steps .........................
Setting number of Groups ................................
Setting Worklight level ...............................................
Selecting Dimmer Protocol .........................................
Selecting Printer type.................................................
Setting MIDI Configuration Information ......................
Setting MIDI device number .............................
Selecting MIDI transmit mode...........................
ColorNet Configuration (Innovator Only) .....................
Network Remote (Innovator Only) ..............................
Setting Two Scene / Single Scene Mode ......................
Selecting Secondary Video .........................................
Setting the Time and Day ..........................................
Soft-key Functions in Setup Display ............................
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Chapter 13 Printing ............................................... 199
Print Sub-Display.......................................................
Navigating the Print Menu ................................
Example Printing Procedure ..............................
Printouts Available.....................................................
Print Menu Page 1 ...........................................
Print Menu Page 2 ...........................................
Print Menu Page 3 ...........................................
Print Screen Option ...................................................
200
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Chapter 14 Alternate Control Interfaces ............... 205
Using the Hand Held Remote ..................................... 206
Protocol .......................................................... 206
Pin Out Information ......................................... 206
HHR Functions................................................. 207
Using MIDI ............................................................... 209
Standard MIDI................................................. 210
MIDI Show Control .......................................... 212
ColorNet (Innovator Only)...........................................213
IP Address Assignemnt..................................... 213
Hand Held Remote Activation ........................... 214
DMX IN .................................................................... 215
Remote Macro Activation ........................................... 215
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Table of Contents
Appendix A Installation ......................................... 217
Setting up your Console .............................................
Unpacking the console .....................................
Physical Setup .................................................
Power Connections ..........................................
Control Connections .........................................
Installing Console Worklights ............................
Power On ........................................................
Installing a Keyboard .................................................
Installing a Printer .....................................................
Secondary Video Option.............................................
Installation ......................................................
Configuration...................................................
218
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Appendix B Specifications ..................................... 229
Console Specifications ...................................... 229
Appendix C Maintenance ....................................... 233
How to Clean Console ......................................
Upgrading Software .........................................
Replacing AC Power Fuses................................
Replacing the RAM Backup Battery....................
233
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234
Appendix D Resident Devices ................................ 237
Resident Device Types ..................................... 237
Index ..................................................................... 239
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User Guide
Chapter 1 Introduction
Chapter 1 Introduction
This chapter is intended to orient you to the console and to the user guide.
Further in-depth explanations of the console are included later in the guide.
This chapter covers the following sections:
• About the Console
• Setting up the Console
• Using this Guide
• Text Conventions
• Terminology Definitions
• Console Controls
• Hard Keys
• Soft Keys
• Macro Keys
• Display Keys
• Data Keypad
• Trackball
• Trackball Select / Change Keys
• Grand-Master Fader
• Blackout Key
• Playback Faders
• Device Encoder Wheels
• Arrow Keys
• Leviton Logo Key / Shift Key (a.k.a. "Meatball")
• Command Line
• Command Line History
• Console Memory
• Contacting Technical Support
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Page 1
Chapter 1 Introduction
About the Console
The Leviton lighting control consoles have been designed to be both simple
and intuitive to operate, yet sophisticated and powerful in their
programming. With a wide variety of manual and programmed controls,
running lights can be as basic or as comprehensive as your needs require.
For example, some of the features are as follows:
• May be operated as either manual 2-Scene Preset consoles or as fully
programmed memory consoles (depending on model).
• Advanced cue parameters such as level tracking, cue macros, cue names
and multiple timing options.
• Advanced cue features such as links, follows and multi-part cues.
• 512 dedicated moving light channels patched across (3) DMX universes.
• Optional Hand Held Remote
• Primary, optional secondary and optional network remote video displays
provide additional information where you need it.
• User defined effects that may contain cues, channels, groups,
submasters or automated device traits.
• Memory loading and system software upgrades from floppy disk.
In addition, the monitor displays have been carefully laid out and colorcoded, providing concise, at-a-glance feedback for all control functions.
Model
24/48
48/96
72/144
600
(Innovator only)
Channel Faders:
48
96
144
N/A
Conventional
Channels:
384
384
384
600
Device Channels:
512
512
512
512
Submaster Faders:
24 Faders with 8 pages ofMemory(192 total).
Dimmers:
1,536 dimmers on 3 DMX Universes.
Maximum Cues:
600 cues per show.
Maximum Groups:
500 groups per show.
Maximum Macros:
500 macros per show.
Maximum Effects:
600 effects / 100 steps per effect / 9,999 steps total
The upper limit of cues, groups, macros and effects is user changeable to
maximize memory usage.
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User Guide
Chapter 1 Introduction
Setting up the Console
If this is the first time setting up the console or you need help getting up
and running, please see Appendix A Installation and Chapter 12 System
Settings for more information.
Using this Guide
This guide is designed for both the first time user and the advanced
professional user. Each chapter contains an overview describing the topics
of that chapter, explanations of the features and procedures which give
step-by-step examples.
Text Conventions
In this guide, actual key names and keystroke entries appear in bolded
letters.
Soft-keys appear inside parentheses ( ) and are labeled S1 - S8 on the
console.
Hard-keys appear inside brackets [ ].
For example:
The soft-key "Copy" appears as:
(Copy)
The hard-key "GROUP" appears as:
[GROUP]
A generic number entry appears as:
[#]
The number entry "253" appears as:
[253]
Single or multiple number lists appear as:
[# list]
Please see the Console Controls section further in this chapter for
definitions of hard and soft-keys.
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Chapter 1 Introduction
Terminology Definitions
Show: Shows are composed of cues, submasters, groups, effects, macros,
devices, the soft patch assignment and the system setup. A show is the
largest unit of memory. Only one show is active in the console at any given
time. Multiple shows can be stored on standard 3.5" computer floppy
diskette as show files. These files can be retrieved from floppy disks and
loaded back into the console's active memory.
Cue: Cues are recorded lighting changes or "looks" that can be reproduced
with specific timing. Cues are numbered and are usually played back in a
numbered sequential order. A Cue can be comprised of channels, device
traits, groups, macros and effects. Cues have attributes like fade, delay and
follow times and links to other cues.
Channels: Channels are the most basic unit of control and are used for
setting lights to various intensity levels. Usually a channel is represented by
a single fader on a control console, however, sometimes virtual channels in
excess of the number of physical faders on the console are used.
Captured Channels: Captured channels are channels with levels that are
currently being set and are shown in boxed amber in various displays.
Captured channels are a subset of active channels (see below).
Active Channels: Active channels include all captured channels plus any
channel level which may be originating from any other sources on the
console. In addition to captured channels, examples of the source for active
channel data could be cues, submasters, effects, macros or automated
devices.
Automated Device: This is the term used for a moving light or other DMX
512 controlled device.
Automated Device Channels: There are 512 dedicated channels that are
used for control of up to 256 automated devices such as moving lights.
They are separate from the conventional light channels.
Device Traits: "Device Traits" is the term used to refer to specific
parameters of a moving light. Examples of device traits could be pan, tilt,
color, gobo, etc.
Level: A level refers to the intensity of any lighting instrument that is
controlled by a given channel. A level is indicated by a percentage of the
maximum output of a given channel, from zero (00) to full (FL).
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Chapter 1 Introduction
Effect: Effects are continuous repeating patterns of lighting changes that
can be assigned to cues or played back independently. The rate and pattern
of an effect can be recorded and edited. A step of an effect contains up to
ten elements and these elements may include individual channels, device
traits, submasters, groups or cues.
Patch: Patching is the process of assigning console control channels to
dimmers or automated devices. Patching channels to dimmers or devices
can be done either on a 1 to 1 basis or a custom patch where one channel
can control any number of dimmers.
Profile: Establishes the actual relationship between the channel level and
the dimmer output. The "default" profile establishes a linear relationship.
Dimmer Protocols: There are different types of dimmer control signals,
also known as dimmer protocols. The current standard for dimmer
protocols is known as DMX 512. The console can transmit DMX 512 or CMX
(Colortran protocol), each of which contains up to 512 dimmer or device
control channels.
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Chapter 1 Introduction
Console Controls
1
2
3
4
5 6
7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14
Figure 1.0 Console
1. Channel Faders and Bump Buttons
8. Trackball Select / Change
Keys Page 10
2. Submaster Faders Chapter 4
9. Trackball Page 10
3. Submaster Bump Buttons
10. Device Encoder Wheels
4. Cue Playback Controls
11. Device Arrow / Shift Keys
5. Soft-keys / Macro Keys / Display Keys
12. Grand Master Fader
6. Data Keypad Pages 8 - 9
13. Blackout Key Page 10
7. Arrow Keys Page 11
14. Device LCD Chapter 10
Chapter 3
Chapter 4
Chapter 5
Page 7
Page 6
Chapter 10
Chapter 10
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Chapter 1 Introduction
Hard-keys
Hard-keys are the keys on the console that always have the same function.
Hard-keys are labeled with the name of the function that the key performs,
for example, [ENTER].
Soft keys
Macro keys
Display
keys
Figure 1.1 Soft Keys, Macro Keys, Display Keys
Soft-keys
Soft-keys are eight keys on the console that do not always have the same
function. They are labeled S1 - S8 as in Figure 1.1 above. The soft-key
functions depend upon the display you are currently working in. At the
bottom of the display, there is a row of eight teal colored boxes that
represent the eight soft-keys for the current display. Whenever you change
displays, you will notice that some or all of the soft-key labels change
function names.
Macro Keys
The Macro keys are labeled M1 - M8 on the console and are a time and
effort saving feature. See Figure 1.1 above. They are used to play back a
series of recorded keystrokes. Each macro key can record a sequence of up
to 64 keystrokes. The sequence can then be re-executed later by simply
pressing the assigned macro key or other macro event trigger. For more
information, see Chapter 8 Macros.
Display Keys
The Display keys are used to select the display on the video monitor screen.
See Figure 1.1 above. Each key is labeled with the name of the display that
appears when the key is pressed. There are more than eight displays
available, but some of these are actually sub-displays of the eight main
displays. Sub-displays are available through soft-keys in the main displays.
For a complete listing of all displays, see Chapter 2 Displays.
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Chapter 1 Introduction
Data Keypad
The Data keypad is used to enter various commands into the console. The
individual key functions are explained on the next two pages and in various
details throughout the user guide.
Figure 1.2 Data Keypad
The [ONLY] key was a Help key on early consoles, software release
1.30 changed this to the Only key.
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Chapter 1 Introduction
Enter Key
The [ENTER] key is used to execute console commands including those
entered into the command line. Pressing [ENTER] will also capture all
channels above zero and place them under trackball control.
Clear Key
The [CLEAR] key is used to clear keystrokes entered into the command
line, release all captured channels, or abort actions after receiving a
warning message.
And, Thru, Minus, Only Keys
The [AND], [THRU], [MINUS] and [ONLY] keys are used when entering
channel list data, see Chapter 3 Setting Channel Levels. The [ONLY] key is
also used when working with groups, see Chapter 6 Groups.
Part, Time, Delay, Follow, Link Keys
The [PART], [TIME], [DELAY], [FOLLOW], and [LINK] keys are used
to record different cue attributes, see Chapter 5 Cues.
Record Cue, Record Group, Record Sub Keys
The [RECORD CUE], [RECORD GROUP] and [RECORD SUB] keys are
used when recording cues, groups or submasters. For more information,
refer to Chapter 4 Submasters, Chapter 5 Cues and Chapter 6 Groups.
Cue, Group, Sub, Effect Keys
The [CUE], [GROUP], [SUB] AND [EFFECT] keys are used for recall of
the respective recorded memories. See Chapter 4 Submasters, Chapter 5
Cues, Chapter 6 Groups and Chapter 7 Effects.
Device Key
The [DEVICE] key is used to select an assigned device(s) for trait
adjustment with the encoder wheels or trackball. See Chapter 10
Automated Devices for more information.
Profile Key
The [PROFILE] key is used to assign a dimmer profile to a dimmer, see
Chapter 9 Patching.
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Chapter 1 Introduction
Dimmer Key
The [DIMMER] key is used when patching channels to dimmers or for
setting actual dimmer levels. See Chapter 9 Patching.
Clean Up Key
The [CLEAN UP] key is used to assign the Clean Up attribute to a cue. See
Chapter 5 Cues for more information
Trackball
The trackball is used to select channels, change channel levels and control
device traits such as pan and tilt. You can also control fade rates with the
trackball.
Trackball Select / Change Keys
These keys are used in conjunction with the trackball to select channels or
device traits and change their levels while in various console displays. They
can be used to toggle device trait levels to tracking or non-tracking modes
while in the Tracksheet display. The [CHANGE] key is also used to switch
primary displays.
Grand-Master Fader
The grand-master fader is used to proportionally control the output of all
the console channels. It masters all of the channel levels that are live on
stage. The behavior of moving light channels when the grand-master is
adjusted is determined by their device definition (DDL.) Generally, moving
light channels (device traits) will not be affected by the grand-master.
When the grand-master is set to a level less than full, the level of the
grand-master appears in the upper right corner of the Stage, Device and
Playback displays.
Blackout Key
The blackout key is used to control the output to all the channels with an
on/off toggle function. The [BLACKOUT] key function is the same as
instantly moving the grand-master fader between full and zero. There are
two visual indicators to let the operator know the "Blackout" function is on.
First, there is a red LED adjacent to the key itself. Second, the word
"Blackout" will appear in the upper right corner of the Stage, Device and
Playback displays. Due to the nature of automated lighting devices, it is
desirable that some device traits should ignore the blackout key.
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Chapter 1 Introduction
Playback Faders
There are two playback fader pairs on the console which are labeled A/B
and C/D. The playback faders allow you to playback recorded cues
automatically or manually.
Device Encoder Wheels
The device encoder wheels are used to control the individual traits of
automated devices, for example, color or gobo traits.
Arrow Keys
The left/right and up/down arrow keys located next to the data keypad are
multi-function keys. They are used to select display or menu items and
scroll or page through device traits.
Leviton Logo Key / Shift Key (a.k.a. "Meatball")
This multi-function key, located to the right of the LCD, has the following
functions;
1. Shift key for entering uppercase letters with the
submaster bump buttons.
2. Prints a display screen by holding it down then
pressing a display hard-key.
3. Changes the left and right arrow keys to page
device traits rather than scroll single traits.
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Chapter 1 Introduction
Command Line
Command Line
Figure 1.3 Command Line
The commands you enter into the console with the keypad appear on the
command line. The command line is visible near the bottom of the monitor
screen, just above the soft-keys (See Figure 1.3 above). A command is
entered by pressing a sequence of different soft-keys and hard-keys. Every
keystroke you make appears on the command line, creating a "sentence"
that becomes a command for the console. Normally your command is then
completed by pressing the [ENTER] key, at which time the console
executes the command. However, for simple entering of channel levels, it is
not necessary to use the [ENTER] key.
The [AND], [THRU] and [MINUS] keys, when pressed, will appear as
“+”, “>” and “-” respectively in the command line. The [ONLY] key
appears as "only".
When entering channel levels between 0 and 9, they must be entered
as two digit levels (00-09).
Before you execute a command, you can use the [CLEAR] key to erase
keystrokes in the command line. The keystroke immediately to the left of
the cursor is erased from the command line when the [CLEAR] key is
pressed.
Follow the example below to set channel 7 to a level of 75%:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [STAGE]
2. Press [7] [AT] [75]
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"Channel 7 at 75" appears in
Command Line
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Chapter 1 Introduction
Not all keys or commands are usable in every display. If a key is
inactive in the current display, it will not appear on the command line
when pressed.
Command Line History
After entering a command, you will notice that the command turns from
white and amber text to gray text. The entered command is now called the
command line history. You cannot manipulate the information in the
command line history, it just shows what command you last entered.
Console Memory
When you turn off your console, the console remembers the cues and all
other show information, so that when you turn the console back on, all the
show information from the previous session is still there. The show
information is stored in RAM (Random Access Memory) and remains there
because an internal battery keeps the RAM active. However, the battery
method is only as fail-safe as the battery itself. If the console does not
remember the previous show, the battery may need to be replaced. For this
reason it is important to backup shows to disk after every session where
significant programming changes occur.
To change the internal battery, see Appendix C Maintenance.
Record Disk / Load Disk
The current show data can be recorded from RAM onto a standard 3.5"
1.44MB High Density floppy disk for storage. You can then retrieve show
data from the floppy disk.
To record and retrieve show data, see Chapter 11 Memory Functions.
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Chapter 1 Introduction
Contacting Technical Support
If you cannot find answers in the user guide, please contact Technical
Support at www.nsicorp.com or www.colortran.com and we will be glad to
answer your questions. You may also call us during regular business hours
at
1-800-959-6004. Please have the following information available when you
call:
• Console model number and serial number as found on the labels on the
back panel of the console.
• Console software version number as shown at the top of the Setup
display.
• Any accessories or peripherals attached to your system.
• Dimmer or Device types that the console is operating.
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Chapter 2 Displays
Chapter 2 Displays
The control console has two means of display; video monitors and the
console LCD display. The console LCD display is used to show trait
information about the currently selected automated devices. It is also
sometimes used to show fade and follow times of cues. The video monitors
are used for all other display purposes.
With every console you have at least one video monitor and optionally two.
These monitors are used to display all information about what the console
is doing, configuration information, cue lists, setup menus, etc. The
information they display is divided up into either primary or sub-displays.
The primary displays are accessed via the primary display hard-keys on the
console. The secondary sub-displays are accessed via the context specific
console soft-keys. See Figure 2.0 below.
Primary
Display Keys
Figure 2.0
Both primary and sub-displays can show either Live, Preview (Blind) or
Configuration information. When you are in a Live display, all changes you
make with the console are reflected on the stage. When you are in a
Preview display, none of the console changes are reflected on the stage,
they are previewed only on the displays.
This chapter is intended to give a quick overview of the functions of the
displays and includes the following sections:
• Common Display Features
• Selecting Displays / Navigating Displays
• Live Displays / Preview Displays / Configuration Displays
• The LCD Display
• Switching Active Monitors
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Chapter 2 Displays
Common Display Features
Many of the displays share the same features, below are descriptions of
these features.
Title Bar
Cue Record Mode
Command Line
Soft-keys
Figure 2.1 Sample Stage Display
Title Bar
The title bar is located across the top of the display. The title bar contains
the name of the display you are currently viewing.
Command Line / Command Line History
The command line shows the command currently being entered. If the
information is in white letters, this is the current active command. If the
information is in gray, this is the command line history that shows the last
command that was executed. Please see Chapter 1 Introduction and
Chapter 3 Setting Channel Levels for more information.
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Chapter 2 Displays
Cue Record Mode
The current cue record mode appears in the field at the far left of the
command line. One of three cue record modes will appear: Tracking,
Cue Only and Clean Up. Further information about cue record modes can be
found in Chapter 5 Cues.
Soft-Keys
The soft-keys, numbered 1 – 8, appear at the bottom of the display and
change function according to the current display. The functions of these
soft-keys are executed by pressing the respective console hard-keys labeled
[S1] - [S8]. Some of the soft-keys reveal another level of soft-keys. To
return to the top level of soft-keys in any display, press the display key for
the current display. Individual soft-key functions are explained further in
operational chapters.
Selecting Displays
To change to a different primary display, press one of the eight display
hard-keys on the console as explained earlier in this chapter.
Primary displays may also be
changed by using the trackball
and moving the cursor into the
title bar and pressing the
[CHANGE] key. Select which
display is desired with the
Trackball then press [CHANGE]
again. Pressing the [CLEAR]
key will exit the menu.
Navigating Displays
The arrow keys are used to move within a
display or to change the contents of the display.
The arrow keys will usually have the effect of
scrolling up/down, or left/right, or moving
between different parts of the display.
Additionally, in some displays, holding the
Leviton Logo button while using the arrow keys
will reveal additional functionality. Specific indepth functions of the arrow keys are given in
further operational chapters.
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Chapter 2 Displays
Live Displays
Stage Display
To access this display press the
[STAGE] hard-key. The Stage
display is a live view showing
the current levels of all
channels, including active and
captured channels. The levels
on the screen accurately
represent in percent form those
levels actually output by the
console. The level of each
channel is located below its
respective channel number. The
lack of a level number indicates
a level of zero and that the channel is neither active nor captured. Any
record command takes a "snapshot" of all channel levels that appear in the
Stage display. The Stage display shows 144 channels, additional channels
can be scrolled by using the up/down arrow keys. The Stage display also
has areas which show the status of the A/B and C/D playback faders,
multipart cues, and a command line area. Please see Chapter 5 Cues for
information on how to record and playback cues.
Dimmer Output Sub-Display (Stage)
The Dimmer Output subdisplay is viewed by pressing
the (Levels) soft-key while in
Stage display. Pressing the
(Levels) soft-key again will
return you to the channel view.
The actual dimmer output
levels are shown in the display
with respect to the assigned
profile. Individual dimmers can
be given levels (parked) that
will hold until cleared. This
display is useful for setting minimum dimmer levels that are not recorded or
doing a fast dimmer check. See Chapter 3 Setting Channel Levels for more
information on this feature.
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Chapter 2 Displays
Effect Sub-Display (Stage)
From the Effect sub-display you
can create, edit and test effects.
It is accessed by pressing
(SelEff) followed by the effect
number then [ENTER]. Note
that the Effect sub-display can
also be accessed from the
Preview display for blind
operation. See Chapter 7
Effects.
Playback Display
To access this display press the
[PLAYBACK] hard-key. The
Playback display is used to view
the current status of any
running cues and active
submasters. The upper area of
the Playback display is the
Cuesheet Area, which lists each
cue and its attributes. See
Chapter 5 Cues for operational
information on cue playback.
Device Display
To access this display press the
[DEVICE] hard-key. The
Device display shows the list of
automated devices being used
and the current settings of the
device traits. Changes are made
to the trait settings by using
one of the seven encoder
wheels or the trackball. Up to 5
devices are displayed at one
time. See Chapter 10
Automated Devices.
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Chapter 2 Displays
Preview Displays
Preview Displays: Cue, Submaster, Group
To access these displays, press
the [PREVIEW] hard-key. The
Cue display is the default
preview display, the Group and
Submaster sub-displays are
accessed by pressing the
(SelGrp) and (SelSub) softkeys respectively.
The Preview display shows the
recorded channel or device trait
levels of a cue, group, or
submaster. Cues, groups and
submasters may also be created or edited in this display. The Preview
display is a blind display, meaning none of the levels shown in this display
can be seen as light output on the stage. The Cue, Group and Submaster
Preview displays are very similar in appearance with a few differences. For
more information and operational procedures please see Chapter 5 Cues,
Chapter 4 Submasters and Chapter 6 Groups.
Any edits to levels or fade parameters are automatically recorded in a
Preview display as they are made; it is not necessary to press a record
key. Using the record keys in this screen will record the stage levels not
changes made here.
Effect Sub-Display (Preview)
This blind display is very similar in appearance to the Effect sub-display of
Stage, which is described earlier in this chapter. The main difference is that
edits done here cannot be seen live on stage.
To access this display while in Preview, press the (SelEff) soft-key followed
by the effect number, then press [ENTER]. Please refer to Chapter 7
Effects for more information and operational procedures.
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Chapter 2 Displays
Cuesheet Display
To access this display press the
[CUESHEET] hard-key. The
Cuesheet display is used to
view the cue order and cue
attributes. Blank cues may be
created here. Cues can also be
deleted, copied, or renumbered
and attributes edited. See
Chapter 5 Cues for operational
information.
Tracksheet Display
To access this display, press the
[TRACKSHEET] hard-key. The
Tracksheet display is a
spreadsheet that shows all
channel levels of all cues so that
channel levels of cues may be
compared. Cues may be edited
or created in this display. Cue
attributes can also be added or
edited, although they are not
shown. Refer to Chapter 5 Cues
for more information on using
the Tracksheet.
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Chapter 2 Displays
Configuration Displays
Patch Display
To access this display press the
[PATCH] hard-key. In the
Patch display you can view the
individual dimmer outputs of
Ports A, B or C or all three ports
combined. The Patch display
shows the dimmer to channel
(or device trait) assignments
along with the proportional
level and profile. Please see
Chapter 9 Patching for more
information and operational
procedures.
Setup Display
To access this display press the
[SETUP] hard-key. The Setup
display is used to customize
show parameters to suit your
specific needs and shows all the
current setup parameters for a
show.
Printing, memory functions,
macro recording, device
assignment, profile editing,
real-time event programing and
network setup functions are
also performed from the Setup display via the soft-keys at the bottom of
the display (see next page).
The console software version number is shown at the top of the Setup
display. Below this are the Show Name and File Name of the currently
loaded show. The information fields in the Setup display are summarized in
Chapter 12 System Settings.
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Chapter 2 Displays
Sub-Displays of Setup: Print, Disk, Macro,
Device Assignment, Profile, Real Time Event,
Network
These sub-displays are accessed from the Setup display. References are
given below to relevant chapters for display examples and operational
information.
Print Sub-Display
This display is accessed by pressing (Print) while in the Setup display.
There are many different print options available including printing out
detailed lists of cues, submasters, groups, macros, effects, devices, realtime events and patching assignments. See Chapter 13 Printing for more
information.
Disk Sub-Display
Pressing (Disk) will bring up the Disk Menu from which you can save, load,
delete or rename show files. Floppy disk formatting and loading console
system software is performed here also. See Chapter 11 Memory Functions.
Macro Sub-Display
A Macro is a recorded sequence of keystrokes meant to serve as a time
saving technique for executing a repeated series of commands. Macros are
recorded, configured and edited in this sub-display, which is available under
the (Macro) soft-key. See Chapter 8 Macros for more information and
procedures.
Device Assignment Sub-Display
Automated devices are configured and assigned in this display. Device
address start positions as well as selection of one of the available three
DMX outputs is selected here also. The Device sub-display is available under
the (Device) soft-key of the Setup display. Refer to Chapter 10 Automated
Devices for details on the use of this display.
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Chapter 2 Displays
Profile Sub-Display
A profile is a method of customizing an output curve assignment, which
may be assigned any number of times to different dimmers. The Profile
Editor sub-display is available under the (Profil) soft-key of the Setup
display. See Chapter 9 Patching for details on the use of this display.
Clear Sub-Display
Pressing (Clear) while in the Setup display will bring up the Clear Menu
which allows you to clear different parts of the console memory. Options
include clearing cues, groups, submasters, effects, macros or all of the
above. Please see Chapter 11 Memory Functions for more information.
Real Time Event Sub-Display
The console allows cues to be executed based on a real time clock. Press
(RT Clk) from the Setup display to open this sub-display. From here you
can set the system clock and make assignments of cues for real time
execution. See Chapter 5 Cues for more information.
Network Sub-Display (Innovator Only)
Pressing (Netwrk) from the Setup display will bring up the Network subdisplay from which you can set up the console to be run over the ColorNet
Ethernet networking protocol. Refer to Chapter 14 Alternate Control
Interfaces for more information.
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Chapter 2 Displays
The LCD Display
Device Traits
Encoder Wheels
Leviton Logo Key
LCD Scroll Keys
LCD Brightness Control
In addition to the video displays, there is also one dedicated LCD display
which is used to view automated device traits. Below the LCD display are 7
encoder wheels that are used to change the settings of the device traits.
Access this display by pressing [DEVICE] [#] [ENTER]. The screen will
then display the traits of the selected device(s). To view additional traits,
the left and right arrow keys to the right of the encoder wheels are used.
Pressing and holding the Leviton Logo key while using the arrow keys will
page through the traits.
The LCD display operates as either live or blind. In other words, when it is
used while viewing a Live display, such as the Device display, the changes
made with the encoder wheels are seen live on stage. When it is used while
viewing a blind display, such as the Preview or Tracksheet displays, the
changes made with the encoder wheels are made "in the blind". The LCD
will close when switching between a live and blind type display.
For operational information on using the LCD display see Chapter 10
Automated Devices.
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Chapter 2 Displays
Switching Active Monitors
When a display is inactive, the soft-keys at the bottom of the display turn
gray. Also, the yellow command prompt turns gray. When a display is active,
the soft-keys at the bottom of the display are green and the yellow
command prompt is on.
Soft-keys: Green on active display, gray on inactive display
Command Prompt: Yellow on active display, gray on inactive display
There are 3 ways to switch between video displays on the console: A softkey, either [S8] or [S6] labeled (Monitr) will switch to the opposite
monitor. Second, the user may select one of the eight display keys (except
in manual switch mode, the displays with change). The third method is
using the trackball. Each of the methods is described below:
Switch Using The Soft-Keys: In all modes, the [S8] key is labeled either
(Monitr) or (More). If labeled "Monitr" this key may be used to switch
command activity to the other monitor. If labeled "More" there is another
level of soft-keys and the (Monitr) soft-key will be [S6] on the next level.
Switch Using The Display Keys: When in the autoswitch mode, the
display keys serve as a quick method of switching to either display and then
bringing up which ever mode is desired. When in fixed mode, seven of the
keys will switch from display to display on one monitor while the other
monitor is locked to its setting. Pressing its display key will make it active
but still not changeable.
A given display can be on only one monitor at a time. It is not possible
to have two Stage displays or two Patch displays for example.
Switch Using The Trackball: The trackball may be used to move
between video monitors. The user may move the cursor with the ball off the
side of the screen and it will appear on the other monitor. Pressing
[SELECT] will cause the other monitor to become active.
If you are setting up and using the secondary video for the first time, you
may wish to test this function. The cursor will only roll off the right side of
video 1 and on to the left side of video 2. If your monitors are reversed,
save time, switch the video cables, don't reposition the monitors.
See also Appendix A, Secondary Video Configuration.
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Chapter 3 Setting Channel Levels
Chapter 3
Setting Channel Levels
This chapter explains how to set channel levels for conventional channels,
setting device trait levels of automated devices is explained later in Chapter
10 Automated Devices.
Conventional channels, whether recalled from the keypad, channel
faders or submasters operate in a HTP (Highest takes precedence)
mode while device traits operate in a LTP (Latest takes precedence)
mode.
Setting channel levels is the first step in recording Submasters, Groups and
Cues. This chapter will show you how to set channel levels using all of the
console features and includes the following sections:
• How to set levels with Channel Faders (All models except Innovator 600)
• Channel Bump Buttons
• How to set levels with the Keypad
• How to set levels with the Trackball
• Proportional Control with the Trackball
• Using Submasters to set Channel Levels
• Channel Lists
• Display of Channel Levels
• Channel Level Colors
• Active vs. Captured Channels
• Console Operating Modes
• Two Scene Mode (All models except Innovator 600)
• Single Scene Mode
• "Match and Take Control" difference between Single Scene and
Two Scene modes
• Restoring Channel Levels (“Undo”)
• Channel Check Mode
• +/- Mode
• Parked Dimmers
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Chapter 3 Setting Channel Levels
How to Set Levels with Channel Faders
(All models except Innovator 600)
Channel levels can be set directly with the channel faders, however, you are
limited to the actual number of physical channel faders on the console. For
example, in the case of the 48/96, this would be 96.
See the following example to use channel faders to set levels:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [STAGE]
Opens Stage display
2. Raise channel faders 1 thru 5 to 80%
Stage display will show
channel levels.
3. Lower the grand-master to 50%
Channel levels are
proportionally lowered to
40%. (50% of 80 = 40)
Channel faders cannot be used to edit levels in a Preview display.
Channel Fader Section
Figure 3.0 Channel Faders
Channel Bump Buttons
Located below each channel fader is a channel bump button. The channel
bump buttons have two modes of operation; when pressed they will either
momentarily bring the channel level to full or toggle the level on/off. For
information on how to set the channel bump button mode, see Chapter 12
System Settings.
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Chapter 3 Setting Channel Levels
How to Set Levels with the Keypad
Channel levels can be entered through the command line by just using the
keypad. When a number is entered into the command line, the console
automatically assumes by default that channels are being addressed (there
is no “channel” key). It is not necessary to push the [ENTER] key after the
level is entered for a channel.
For example, to set channel 2 to a level of 80%: Press [2] [AT] [80]
(“Channel 2 at 80%” appears in the command line)
You need to enter a zero when you specify a level that is a multiple of
one. For example, to set channel 2 to a level of 05% you would enter
[2] [AT] [05]. If you wanted to set channel 2 to 50%, you would
enter [2] [AT] [50] or [2] [AT] [5] [ENTER] (by entering just [5],
the console assumes you mean 50%).
Follow the example below to set channel 1 to a level of 75%:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [STAGE]
Opens Stage display
2. Press [1]
3. Press [AT] [75]
Channel 1 level set
to 75%
Data Keypad
Figure 3.1 Data Keypad
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Chapter 3 Setting Channel Levels
How to set levels with the Trackball
The keypad and trackball can be used together to select and set channel
levels. In this method, the channels are selected with the keypad (as
described in the preceding section) and the levels are set with the trackball.
Follow these example steps to set levels using the keypad and the trackball:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [STAGE]
Opens Stage display
2. Press [1]
3. Press [ENTER]
4. Adjust trackball to set channel level
Channel levels can also be selected and set by only using the trackball. To
use just the trackball, first locate the cursor by moving the trackball. If you
have been selecting channels with the keypad or performing edits to levels,
you may find it necessary to push the [CLEAR] button a few times in order
to regain control of the cursor with the trackball.
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [STAGE]
Opens Stage display
2. Select a channel with trackball
Place the cursor directly
beneath the channel number
3. Press and hold the [CHANGE] key
while adjusting levels with trackball
Release [CHANGE] key when
done
Trackball
Figure 3.2 Trackball
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Chapter 3 Setting Channel Levels
It is also possible to select a range of channels with the trackball:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [STAGE]
Opens Stage display
2. Select first channel in range
with trackball
beneath the channel number
3. Press and hold the [SELECT] key
while moving trackball to select range
Place the cursor directly
Move the cursor in a straight
line to select channels on the
same line, or move up or
down to select channels in
lines above or below.
4. Release [SELECT] key after desired
range has been selected
5. Press and hold the [CHANGE] key
while adjusting levels with trackball
Release [CHANGE] key when
done
When channels are under command of the trackball they appear in
boxed amber, this means that the channels are "captured". See
Captured Channels section further in this chapter.
Proportional Control with the Trackball
All captured channels are affected proportionally when you use the
trackball. Proportional control operates such that a given rotation of the
trackball may cause a greater change to a higher level than to a lower level.
For example: Channels 1 and 2 are captured at 25% and 50% respectively.
If the trackball is used to move channel 1 to 50%, channel 2 will be brought
to 100% (FL). If the trackball is moved further, channel 1 will increase until
it reaches full also. This is known as "overranging". As the Trackball is used
to lower the levels, channel 1 will start to come down from full first. When it
reaches 50%, channel 2 will begin to come down. Eventually you can return
all channels under control of the trackball to their original levels, provided
that you maintain trackball control over them.
Using Submasters to set Channel Levels
Pre-recorded submasters can be used to quickly set channel levels. By
bringing up desired looks with submasters that already have channel levels
recorded, you can use these levels to record other submasters, cues and
groups.
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Chapter 3 Setting Channel Levels
Channel lists
The [AND], [THRU], [MINUS] and [ONLY] keys are used to make lists
of channels and other items. You are not required to enter the list in any
particular order. You can generally just enter channel lists in the order in
which you might be thinking of them. For example:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [STAGE]
Opens Stage display
2. Press [1] [AND] [6] [THRU] [12]
3. Press [AT] [75]
Command Line reads:
"1 + 6 > 12 at 75"
(Channels 1, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10,
11, 12 at 75%)
Remember, there is no “channel” key; when you enter a number in the
command line, the console automatically assumes that the number is a
channel number.
Command Line Syntax
[AND] appears in the Command Line as “+”
[THRU] appears in the Command Line as “>”
[MINUS] appears in the Command Line as “-”
[ONLY] appears in the Command Line as “only”
For example, if you enter key strokes as follows:
[12] [THRU] [24] [AND] [36] [MINUS] [23] [AT] [FULL]
"Channel 12 > 24 + 36 - 23 at Full" appears in the Command Line.
Listed below are common examples of channel / level command variations:
[#] [AT] [#] (Sets single channel to a level.)
[#] [AND] [#] [AT] [#] (Sets 2 different channels to a level.)
[#] [THRU] [#] [AT] [#] (Sets a list of consecutive channels to a level.)
Items using the [THRU] key may be listed from lowest to highest or
highest to lowest.
The [ONLY] key is particularly useful when working with Groups and
Devices. See Chapters 6 Groups and Chapter 10 Automated Devices.
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Chapter 3 Setting Channel Levels
Display of Channel Levels
Channel Level Colors
Channel Levels are displayed in various colors depending on their mode and
the display (see definitions below and color examples in Figure 3.3):
Boxed Amber: Captured channel.
Gray: Active channel; Channel fader controls the level directly.
- or- Channel control was released from keypad or trackball control.
- or- Tracking same level as last executed cue.
Red: Higher level in current cue than last executed cue.
Blue: Lower level in current cue than last executed cue.
White: Same level as last executed cue and not tracking (Preview and
Tracking displays only).
Green: Submaster controls the channel.
Yellow: Effect controls the channel.
Teal: Group channels (Preview and Tracking displays only).
Boxed Red: Channel check. See Channel Check section further in this
chapter.
Figure 3.3 Sample channel level colors
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Chapter 3 Setting Channel Levels
Captured Channels
Captured channels are channels with levels that are currently being set with
either the keypad or trackball and are shown in boxed amber in the display.
Captured channels are not the same as active channels, which can also be
visible in the display (see Active Channels section below).
You do not need to set channels to a level to capture them, they can be
captured by simply listing them and pressing [ENTER]. For example, to
capture channels 5 - 20, press [5] [THRU] [20] [ENTER].
Once levels are captured, any command that begins with [AT] will affect
the currently captured channels. For example, if channels 1 thru 5 have
already been captured, just pressing [AT] [50] will set the channels to
50%.
When the command line is empty, pressing the [ENTER] key captures all
active channels.
The exception to this is that pressing [ENTER] does not capture any
automated device traits. Automated devices must be dealt with
specifically. See Chapter 10 Automated Devices.
The [CLEAR] key releases captured channels, but the command line must
be inactive or else the [CLEAR] key acts like a backspace key to clear
keystrokes from the command line.
The following example shows how to capture channels, set levels, release
channels and clear all channels:
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Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [STAGE]
Opens Stage display
2. Press [1] [THRU] [20]
Chs 1 thru 20 are captured
3. Press [AT] [75]
Chs 1 thru 20 are captured
and set to 75%
4. Press [CLEAR]
Captured levels are released
5. Press [ENTER] [AT] [ENTER]
All levels are re-captured
6. Press [CLEAR]
All levels are cleared
from display
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Chapter 3 Setting Channel Levels
All captured channels are unaffected by executed cues; pressing the
[GO] button does not affect them, even if the channels have new level
assignments in the new cue. Captured channels remain under active
control of the trackball until control is released by pressing the
[CLEAR] key. A "CH" icon at the top right of the display shows when
channels are captured and disappears when channels are released.
Active Channels
Active channels include all captured channels plus any channel level which
may be originating from any other sources on the console. Note that any
record function will include these levels.
To completely clear the Stage display of both active and captured channels
follow the steps below:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [ENTER] [AT] [ENTER]
2. Press [CLEAR]
All channels completely
cleared
.
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Chapter 3 Setting Channel Levels
Console Operating Modes
Two Scene Mode
(All models except Innovator 600)
Scene A
Scene B
Figure 3.4 Two Scene Mode
A/B Crossfader
Two Scene mode is the simplest way to operate the console. It is also a
good way to become comfortable with some of the features if you are a
new user.
When in Two Scene mode, Scene A and Scene B control the same channel
numbers. For example, when using the 24/48 console, Scene A controls
channels 1 - 24 and Scene B also controls channels 1 - 24 (when the A/B
crossfader is at its top position, scene A is active; when it is at its bottom
position, scene B is active). Scenes A and B can then be crossfaded by
using the A/B crossfader. See example procedure on next page.
To set the operating mode to Two-Scene, follow below:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP] [21] [ENTER]
2. Use the up/down arrow keys
to select "Two Scene"
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Note that the system default is
"Single Scene".
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Chapter 3 Setting Channel Levels
Follow the example below to set channel levels in Scenes A and B and then
crossfade between them:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [STAGE]
System must be already set to
Two-Scene operation
2. Raise the A/B Crossfaders to their
top positions; A at 100, B at 0
Make sure grand-master is full
up and blackout key is off
3. Raise Faders 1 thru 12 to 75
in Scene A
Scene A channel levels are
visible in the Stage display
4. Raise Faders 13 thru 24 to 50
in Scene B
5. Lower the A/B Crossfaders to their
bottom positions; A at 0, B at 100
Scene B channel levels are
now visible in the Stage
display while Scene A channel
levels fade to 0.
While in Two Scene mode, you can also record memory cues and then
playback memory cues with the C/D crossfaders. See Chapter 5 Cues
for more information.
Single Scene Mode
When operating in Single Scene mode you cannot crossfade between
scenes A and B as described in Two Scene mode above. As all channel
faders are considered to be in one scene, the concept of fading between
scenes A and B does not exist. For example, on the 24/48 console, channel
faders 1 - 48 are all active at the same time.
Single Scene mode can be used when you need access to all channel faders
while recording submasters, cues and groups. Also with Single Scene mode,
both the A/B and the C/D crossfaders are available for memory cue
playback allowing you to have separate memory cue fades running at the
same time. See Chapter 5 Cues for information on recording and playing
back cues.
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Chapter 3 Setting Channel Levels
"Match and Take Control" difference between
Single Scene and Two Scene
The "Match and Take Control" functionality of a channel fader allows you to
use a channel fader to take control of an individual channel’s level that has
already been set by the keypad or a cue. This can be very useful if you
want to quickly adjust a channel’s level while a cue is running.
To match and take control of a channel you must first move the channel
fader to match the current level of the channel in the display. As soon as
the level is matched, the channel level changes color to indicate that the
channel fader now has control.
In single scene mode you will have full control of the channel’s level. For
example, if a cue has set channel 1’s level at 50%, you will be able to take
control of the channel’s level between 0 - FL once you have raised
(matched) the channel fader to 50%.
However in two scene mode, you will only have control of the channel’s
level above what it was initially set at by the keypad or cue. For example, if
a cue has set channel 1’s level at 50%, you will only be able to take control
of the channel’s level between 50 - FL once you have raised (matched) the
channel fader to 50%.
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Chapter 3 Setting Channel Levels
Restoring channel levels (“Undo”)
You can use the (Restor) soft-key to return channel levels to their level
prior to the last level setting command. The (Restor) soft-key is available
in the Stage, Preview, and Tracksheet displays. Although the previous level
command may not be present in the command line history, it remains
available to the restore command. For example:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [STAGE]
2. Press [1] [THRU] [20] [AT] [50]
Levels set to 50%
3. Press [1] [THRU] [20] [AT] [90]
Levels set to 90%
4. Press (Restor) [ENTER]
Levels restored to 50%
Channels may also be selectively restored by entering a list of channels
which are to return to their previous level.
Channel Check Mode
Channel Check mode can be used to see which channel controls which light.
It is a quick method to sequentially verify individual channels. You may
start a channel check with any channel. The channel check soft-key is
accessed from the Stage display.
Follow these example steps to run a channel check:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [STAGE]
2. Press the (More) soft-key
3. Press the (ChnChk) soft-key
4. Press [1] [AT] [FULL]
Captures the starting channel.
Specify any desired check
level.
5. Use the left/right arrow keys
to scroll through channels
Level will show in boxed red
video
6. Press [CLEAR] to stop check
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Chapter 3 Setting Channel Levels
+/- Mode
+/- mode can be used to modify individual channel levels within a scene so
that after modification, the changes are retained. It works similar to
channel check but when you move to the next channel, the change is
retained instead of reverting to the previous level. This allows you to
quickly customize the current lighting look.
When soft-key 4 displays "ChnChk", the console is in +/- mode. When
soft-key 4 displays "+/-", the console is in channel check mode.
Follow these steps to modify a lighting look that is currently live:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [STAGE]
2. Press [1] [AT] [25]
Captures the starting channel
4. Press right arrow key
Releases starting channel and
captures next channel
5. Set channel level with trackball
6. Repeat steps 3 and 4 to finish
editing or establishing desired look
7.
Press [CLEAR]
Releases captured channel
Parked Dimmers
A dimmer can be "parked" from the Dimmer sub-display of the Stage
display. The parked dimmers will not become part of any console recording
and will override any other output from any other process on the console.
Parked dimmer levels are displayed in amber and a "DM" icon is displayed
at the top of the Stage, Device and Playback displays.
To park a dimmer press [STAGE] (Levels) then select and set the dimmer
level with the keypad or trackball.
To release all parked dimmers, place the cursor over the "DM" icon and
press [CHANGE]. To release selective parked dimmers, press [DIMMER]
[#] [AT] [ENTER] where [#] is any individual dimmer or list of dimmers.
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Chapter 4 Submasters
Chapter 4 Submasters
Submasters are pre-recorded groups of channels at levels. Submasters can
traditionally be used as building blocks when creating cues, shortcuts to
groups of channels when running live, or somewhat non-traditionally be
used to recall effects and as a tool when programming moving lights. There
are 24 submaster faders on the control console and 8 virtual pages of
submaster memory for a total of 192 possible submasters. Below each
submaster fader is a submaster bump button which allows you to bump the
submaster to its full recorded level or to begin its programmed fade. This
chapter contains the following sections:
• Recording Submasters
• Changing Submaster Pages
• Submaster Playback
• Submaster Fader Playback
• Submaster Bump Button Playback
• Timed Submasters
• Submaster Types
• Pile-On Submasters
• Inhibitive Submasters
• Changing Submaster Types
• Assigning Effects to Submasters
• Assigning Groups to Submasters
• Assigning Macros to Submasters
• Preview Mode and Submasters
• Recording / Editing
• Naming / Copying / Renumbering / Clearing
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Chapter 4 Submasters
Recording Submasters
The [RECORD SUB] hard-key records the instantaneous "look" of the
current Stage display by recording all channels, groups, effects, macros and
devices at their current levels. This includes all levels that may be
originating from level setting commands, cues, running effects or other
subs. The Record Sub command can be executed from any display except
Setup.
Follow these example steps to record a simple pile-on submaster from the
Stage display:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [STAGE]
2. Select channels and set
channel levels
Creates look
3. Press [RECORD SUB] [10]
4. Press [ENTER]
If submaster 10 has already
been recorded, a warning
message will appear on the
screen. Press [ENTER] again
to overwrite.
Changing Submaster Pages
The default setting for the number of submaster pages is (1). See
Chapter 12 System Settings for procedures on how to add more
submaster pages.
To change submaster pages, follow below:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press (SubP #) while in the
Stage, Preview or Playback displays
Repetitively pressing this key
will advance through the
pages one by one
You can also enter a specific page directly: Press (SubP #), enter page
number, then press [ENTER].
See also Submaster Page Changes in Playback Display section further in
this chapter.
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Chapter 4 Submasters
Submaster Playback
Submasters can be played back by either raising the submaster fader or
pressing the submaster’s bump button. It is important to note that there
are certain conditions which apply to both methods and these are explained
below.
Submaster Fader Playback
As a submaster is a number of channels recorded at certain levels, playing
back the sub at 100% (FL) will bring these channel levels to their full
recorded state. The channels are recorded proportionally, so if the sub is
played back at 50% for example, then the channels will be at 50% of their
recorded levels.
Submaster Bump Button Playback
The bump button’s function depends on its mode and if the sub is recorded
as a Timed Submaster (please see following Timed Submasters section).
Bump Button Modes: There are two types of submaster bump button
modes; Normal and Toggle.
In Normal mode the bump buttons act as momentary switches; pressing a
bump button will bring its recorded level to full, releasing it will return to
the current level of the sub fader (zero or otherwise).
In Toggle mode the bump buttons act as on/off switches; each press will
turn the submaster on or off.
Changes to the bump button mode are done in the Submaster sub-display
of Preview. To change a bump button’s mode follow below:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [PREVIEW]
Opens the Preview display
2. Press (SelSub) [#]
3. Press (More) to change
soft-key levels
4. Press (Toggle) to activate or
deactivate Toggle mode
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Press 2 times until (Toggle)
appears.
"Tog" appears below "Dwl" in
attributes line
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Chapter 4 Submasters
Timed Submasters
You can assign fade times to bump buttons which control the fade up and
fade down time of the submaster. Then, when you press and hold the
submaster bump button, it will fade to 100% over the time period you
entered, and once the button is released, it will fade to 0% over the time
period you entered.
Additionally, you can enter a dwell time for a submaster. The dwell time
specifies the time from when you either release the bump button or the up
fade is complete until the time when the down fade starts. When a dwell
time is entered for a submaster, you can simply tap the bump button to
initiate a fade up, dwell, then fade down sequence. For example, if you had
submaster 8 programmed with a fade up time of 3 seconds, a dwell of 5
seconds, and a fade down time of 1 second, when you tapped the bump
button the submaster would fade to 100% over a time of 3 seconds, it
would pause for 5 seconds and then fade to 0% over 1 second.
Fade and Dwell times are assigned from the Submaster sub-display of
Preview and are shown in the "Time" and "Dwl information field.
Follow this example to assign a 4 second up time and a 5 second down time:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [PREVIEW]
2. Press (SelSub) [#]
3. Press [TIME] [4] [AND] [5] [ENTER] The [AND] key is used to
specify individual up and down
fade times.
You can also record a fade time as you record a submaster live:
Press [RECORD SUB] [#] [TIME] [#] [ENTER]
Follow below to assign a 3 second fade time and a 6 second dwell time:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [PREVIEW]
2. Press (SelSub) [#]
3. Press [TIME] [3]
4. Press [DELAY] [6] [ENTER]
The [DELAY] hard-key is used
to set the Dwell time for a sub
You can also record a dwell time as you record a submaster live:
Press [RECORD SUB] [#] [DELAY] [#] [ENTER]
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Chapter 4 Submasters
If you record a sub with no dwell time, the upfade starts when you press
and hold the bump button (Normal mode). It runs until channels reach full
recorded levels, then holds at full as long as you hold the bump button; the
downfade begins when you release it. If you don’t hold the bump button for
the duration of the upfade time, channels do not reach their full recorded
levels.
When a bump button is set to Toggle mode, you cannot enter a dwell
time. The upfade starts when you press the bump button. The channels
will hold at their full recorded levels until the bump button is pressed
again, which will cause the downfade to begin.
Raising the submaster fader of a timed sub while it is fading will allow you
to assume manual control over the fade. To override a timed sub, push the
sub fader to a higher level than the fade. Control of the fade transfers to
the sub fader once the sub fader passes the timed fade in progress.
Submaster Page Changes in Playback Display
To change submaster pages, please see Changing Submaster Pages section
earlier in this chapter.
When you change submaster pages while in the Playback display, any
submasters on stage will remain on stage until you move their sliders to
zero. The sub number will be displayed in Reverse Amber if it is from a
previous page. See figure 4.1 below.
Subs still active from other sub pages (reverse amber).
Figure 4.1 Submaster Playback
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Chapter 4 Submasters
Submaster Types
Pile-On Submaster
A pile-on submaster consists of channels recorded at proportional levels. If
a pile-on submaster’s channel levels are higher than established channel
levels, the submaster’s levels take precedence. If they are lower, the
established levels take precedence (Highest Takes Precedence, HTP).
Submaster numbers are displayed in gray in the Playback display if they are
programmed as pile-on, see Figure 4.2 on next page.
Inhibitive Submaster
With inhibitive submasters you can limit the output of a selection of
channels. An inhibitive submaster controls the levels of assigned channels
much like the way that the grandmaster controls the levels of all channels.
Submaster numbers are displayed in red in the Playback display if they are
programmed as inhibitive, see Figure 4.2 on next page.
Follow this example to create and add channels to an inhibitive submaster:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [PREVIEW]
2. Press (SelSub) [13]
Enter the number of the sub
to be inhibitive
3. Press (More) 2 times
Changes soft-key level
4. Press (Inhib)
"Inh" appears below "Type" in
fade attributes line
5. [1] [THRU] [24] [FULL]
Channels 1 > 24 set to 100%
(other ch levels may be set)
6. To check, Press [STAGE]
7.
Raise channel 10 with sub 13
at zero position
Channel is inhibited because
sub is at zero
8. Now raise sub 13 and try channel 10
The same channel can be included in more than one inhibitive
submaster.
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Chapter 4 Submasters
Changing Submaster Types
The preceding example showed you how to create an inhibitive submaster,
to change the submaster back to a pile-on type follow below:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [PREVIEW]
2. Press (SelSub) [13]
Enter the number of the sub
to be inhibitive
3. Press (More) 2 times
Changes soft-key level
4. Press (PileOn)
"Pile" appears below "Type" in
fade attributes line
Effect Subs (yellow) Inhibitive Subs (red) Pile-On Subs (gray)
Figure 4.2 Submaster Colors in Playback Display
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Chapter 4 Submasters
Assigning Effects to Submasters
An effect submaster has a specific effect assigned to it. Pressing an effect
submaster’s bump button or moving its slider will start the effect running.
If a submaster contains a recorded effect, the submaster number appears
in yellow in the submaster fader window of the Playback display, see Figure
4.2 on previous page.
Refer to Chapter 7 Effects for information on how to create and record
effect submasters.
Assigning Groups to Submasters
A group submaster is a submaster with a specific group assigned to it. In a
group submaster, the group is called up with its assigned levels
proportionately to the setting of the submaster fader. When a group is
edited, the submaster to which it was assigned to will also be updated. If a
submaster contains an group, the groups levels will appear in teal while in
the Submaster Preview display.
Please see Chapter 6 Groups for information on recording and assigning
groups to submasters.
Assigning Macros to Submasters
A macro is a series of keystrokes you record to perform a complex
command. A macro submaster is submaster with a macro number assigned
to it. In a submaster with a macro assigned, the macro begins to run when
you press the bump button or move the submaster fader. The fader handle
has no impact on any levels created within the macro, it simply executes
when the handle moves from zero.
See Chapter 8 Macros for information on how to create and record a macro
submaster.
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Chapter 4 Submasters
Preview Mode and Submasters
Sub Levels (green color)
Figure 4.3 Submaster Preview Display
Attributes Line
Navigating the Submaster Preview Display
To select a specific sub for viewing and editing press the (SelSub) soft-key
while in the Preview display. Follow these steps to select a submaster from
the Preview display:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [PREVIEW]
2. Press (SelSub) [#]
Selects sub
3. Press [ENTER]
You can also use the left/right arrow keys to view and page through all the
different subs.
Submaster Colors in Display: Submaster levels are displayed in green
while in the Preview and Stage displays.
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Chapter 4 Submasters
Recording Submasters in Preview
Submasters can be also be created "in the blind" from the Submaster subdisplay of Preview. Follow the steps below as an example:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [PREVIEW]
2. Press (SelSub) [#]
Creates new sub
3. Press [ENTER]
If Sub has already been
recorded, its levels will show.
4. Select channels and set
channel levels
Sub recorded
All levels are recorded automatically in the Preview display, it is not
necessary to press the [RECORD SUB] hard-key. If you do use the
[RECORD SUB] key, the active stage levels will be recorded, not the
blind levels.
Editing Submasters in Preview
Follow these steps to edit a previously recorded submaster:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [PREVIEW]
2. Press (SelSub) [#]
Selects sub
3. Press [ENTER]
4. Select channels and set
new channel levels
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Sub recorded
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Chapter 4 Submasters
Naming Submasters
You can assign names up to 16 characters in length to submasters. These
names can be exclusively numbers, exclusively letters or a combination of
letters and numbers. Names are entered using the submaster bump
buttons for letters and the keypad for numbers. You can also use a
standard PC keyboard to enter names. Please see Appendix A for
information on installing a keyboard.
Bump
Button
Alpha
Character
Bump
Button
Alpha
Character
Bump
Button
Alpha
Character
1
a
9
i
17
q
2
b
10
j
18
r
3
c
11
j
19
s
4
d
12
l
20
t
5
e
13
m
21
u
6
f
14
n
22
v (space)
7
g
15
o
23
wx
8
h
16
p
24
yz
Table 4.0 Character to Bump Button Assignments
In the above chart, the letters x and z are selected by pressing and holding
the w and y keys respectively. A space is added by pressing and holding the
v key. For uppercase letters, press and hold the Leviton Logo key while
selecting letters.
Follow the steps below to name a submaster:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [PREVIEW]
2. Press (SelSub) [#] [ENTER]
Enter the number of the sub
to be named
3. Press (Name)
4. Enter a name
Use Sub Bump Buttons or
PC keyboard
5. Press [ENTER]
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Chapter 4 Submasters
Copying Submasters
Follow the procedure below to copy the contents of one submaster to
another submaster within a sub page:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [PREVIEW]
2. Press (SelSub) [#]
Enter the number of the sub
to be copied
3. Press [ENTER]
4. Press (Copy)
5. Enter destination sub number
to copy to
6. Press [ENTER]
To copy between sub pages, follow the above example except change
pages with the (SubP #) soft-key before step 3.
Renumbering Submasters
Follow the procedure below to renumber a submaster:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [PREVIEW]
2. Press (SelSub) [#]
Enter the number of the sub
to be renumbered
3. Press [ENTER]
4. Press (Renum)
5. Enter new sub number
6. Press [ENTER]
If a destination sub number already exists, the contents will be overwritten.
A warning will appear asking for confirmation.
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Chapter 4 Submasters
Clearing Submasters
To delete an individual submaster press the (Delete) soft-key while in the
Submaster Preview display.
All submasters can be quickly cleared from the (Clear) menu of the Setup
display. Please follow the steps below:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP]
2. Press (More)
Changes soft-key level
3. Press (Clear)
Clear menu appears
4. Enter [3] “Clear Submasters”
Warning appears
5. Enter [1] to confirm
All submaster memory erased
6. Press any display key to exit
See Chapter 11 Memory Functions for more information on clearing console
memory.
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Chapter 4 Submasters
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Chapter 5 Cues
Chapter 5 Cues
Cues are recorded lighting changes or "looks" that can be reproduced with
specific timing. A cue is recorded as a set of channels or device traits with
specified levels along with certain other attributes. These attributes can
include Fade, Delay and Follow times, Cue Links, Cue Names and assigned
Groups, Effects and Macros. You can save up to 600 cues per show in the
control console. There are two playback fader pairs, A/B and C/D, which
allow you to playback recorded cues automatically or manually. Cues may
also be played back by pressing a Macro key or by using the Real Time
Event Clock. This chapter includes the following sections:
• Recording Cues
• Cue Record Modes
• Cue Numbering
• Creating a Basic Cue
• Cue Attributes
• Recording Cues in the Stage Display
• Recording Cues in the Preview Display
• Editing Cues
• The Cuesheet Display
• Naming / Copying / Clearing / Inserting / Re-numbering Cues
• Using Groups when Recording Cues
• Assigning Effects and Macros to Cues
• Multipart Cues
• Playing Back Cues
• Playback Faders
• Playback Keys
• The Playback Display
• Playing Back Manual Cues
• Playing Back Timed Cues
• Using the Real Time Event Clock to Playback Cues
• Using Macros to Playback Cues
• Cue Record Modes
• The Tracksheet Display
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Chapter 5 Cues
Recording Cues
Cues are created "Live" from the Stage or Device displays or "Blind" from
the Preview, Tracksheet or Cuesheet displays. When a cue is recorded live,
you see the immediate results on stage. When a cue is recorded blind, the
results will not be seen until the cue is played back. For more information
on Cue Playback, refer to the Playing Back Cues section further in this
chapter.
Cue Record Modes
There are three types of Cue Record Modes available when recording cues
in the console: Clean up Mode, Tracking Mode and Cue Only Mode. Clean
Up Mode is the simplest way of recording cues; channels are recorded
directly as you see on screen. The other two cue record modes have
complex channel tracking relationships which are created from cue to cue.
To get you started in learning how to record cues, we will use the simpler
Clean Up Mode for the procedural examples in this chapter. Once you
understand the basics how to record cues using the Clean Up Mode, you
can then apply the two other types of modes. Further explanations of these
modes are given later in this chapter, see Cue Record Modes.
To change the Cue Record Mode, press the (Q Mode) soft-key until the
desired mode name appears at the beginning of the command line.
Cue Numbering
The decision on how to number your cues requires a bit of thought. Many
individuals have different preferences on how cue numbering should work,
however, there are a few points you should consider. Most people create
cues following the formation 1, 2, 3, 4, etc. Then, if you need to insert a
cue between 3 & 4 for example, you could call the cues 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, etc. If
you are recording a show which will require the addition of a lot of cues in
between existing cues, you may find it helpful to number your cues in even
numbers only, or increase in increments of 5, or 10, or any other format
which you deem appropriate. See also Inserting and Renumbering Cues
section further in this chapter.
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Chapter 5 Cues
Creating a Basic Cue
To create a cue live from the Stage display, you first create the look by
setting channel levels. Then, using the record cue functionality of the
console, you enter the cue number and all required cue attributes. From
this point, pressing the [ENTER] key completes the recording of the cue.
The cue then can be recalled from the playback faders. In-depth examples
are given further in this chapter but here is the general procedure:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Set channel levels using channel faders,
keypad, submasters, groups, etc.
2. Press [RECORD CUE]
Initiates recording of a cue
3. Enter cue number
4. Enter cue attributes
5. Press [ENTER]
Cue recorded
The [RECORD CUE] hard-key records all levels that may be
originating from level setting commands, other cues, running effects,
active submasters, groups and selected automated device traits.
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Chapter 5 Cues
Cue Attributes
The attributes which can be recorded with a cue are as follows (procedural
examples of using these attributes are given further in this chapter):
For graphic examples of attribute keys see Figure 1.2, Page 8.
Fade Time
The fade time is the time that the cue takes to fade to
its final levels after the [GO] button has been pressed.
Delay Time
The delay time is the amount of time after you press
[GO] and when the fade actually begins.
Follow Time
A follow time assigned to a cue causes the next cue in
the cue list to start automatically without pressing the
[GO] button and specifies how long the console waits
after the current cue starts before the next cue runs.
Cue Link
Cues can be executed out of their normal numeric
sequence by assigning a Link to a cue. When you press
[GO], instead of executing the next higher numbered
cue, the cue execution sequence will "jump" to the
destination cue that you specify in the Link assignment.
Cue Name
Cues names of up to 16 characters in length can be
assigned to cues.
Assigned
Group
A group may be assigned to a cue so when the cue
executes, the group will execute also. See also Chapter
6 Groups for more information on working with groups.
Assigned
Effect
An effect may be assigned to a cue so when the cue
executes, the effect will execute also. Refer to Chapter 7
Effects for more information on working with effects.
Assigned
Macro
A macro may be assigned to a cue so when the cue
executes, the macro will execute also. See Chapter 8
Macros for more information on working with macros.
Table 5.0 Cue Attributes
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Chapter 5 Cues
Recording Cues in the Stage Display
When recording a cue from the Stage display, the levels being set are seen
live on stage. In this example you will be setting only channel levels for a
cue, recording a cue with attributes such as fade, delay and follow times
are shown further below.
Follow these steps to record a simple live cue:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [STAGE]
Opens Stage display
2. Press [ENTER] [AT] [ENTER] [CLEAR]
to clear screen (if necessary)
3. Press [1] [THRU] [24]
Selects channels to be
recorded
4. Press [AT] [75]
Sets channel levels
5. Press [RECORD CUE] [1]
6. Press [ENTER]
Records cue 1
A warning will appear if the cue already exists in memory. Press
[ENTER] to record over the existing cue or press [CLEAR] to cancel.
Recording Cue Fade Time(s)
The cue fade time is the time that the cue takes to fade to its final levels
after the [GO] button has been pressed. A cue may also be assigned split
fade times, which allows the cue fading out to happen at a different time
then the cue fading in.
You can record fade times in either seconds or minutes for a maximum of
99:59 minutes.
For example, to add a fade time of 6.5 seconds to a previously recorded
cue: Press [CUE] [1] [TIME] [6.5] [ENTER].
To enter a fade time in minutes, press the (Minute) soft-key after you
enter the value: Press [CUE] [1] [TIME] [8] (Minute) [ENTER].
The assigned fade time(s) can be viewed in the "Time" field of the
attributes line of the Preview display or from the Cuesheet display.
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Chapter 5 Cues
Recording a Cue with a Single Fade Time
Follow the example steps below to record a cue with a single fade time:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [STAGE]
2. Press [ENTER] [AT] [ENTER] [CLEAR]
to clear screen (if necessary)
3. Press [50] [AND] [61]
Selects channels to be
recorded
4. Press [FULL]
Not necessary to press the
[AT] key when recording Full
5. Press [RECORD CUE] [3]
6. Press [TIME] [5]
Adds single up/down fade
time of 5 seconds
7.
Records cue 3
Press [ENTER]
Recording a Cue with Split Fade Times
The [AND] hard-key is used to assign separate up and down times. In the
command line, the up time and down times are shown separated by a "+".
Follow the steps below to record a cue in Stage with split fade times:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [STAGE]
2. Press [ENTER] [AT] [ENTER] [CLEAR]
to clear screen (if necessary)
3. Press [50] [AND] [61]
Selects channels to be
recorded
4. Press [FULL]
Not necessary to press the
[AT] key when recording Full
5. Press [RECORD CUE] [5]
6. Press [TIME] [5] [AND] [7]
Adds split up/down fade times
of 5 and 7 seconds
7.
Records cue 5
Press [ENTER]
The up time specifies how long it takes for the next cue to fade in. The
down time specifies how long it takes for the previous cue to fade out.
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Chapter 5 Cues
Recording a Cue Delay Time
As explained earlier, a cue delay time is the amount of time after you press
[GO] and when the fade actually begins. You can record delay times in
either seconds or minutes for a maximum of 99:59 minutes.
For example, to add a delay time of 2.5 seconds to a previously recorded
cue: Press [CUE] [1] [DELAY] [2.5] [ENTER].
To enter a delay time in minutes, press the (Minute) soft-key after you
enter the value: Press [CUE] [1] [DELAY] [5] (Minute) [ENTER].
The assigned delay time(s) can be viewed in the "Dly" field of the attributes
line of the Preview display or from the Cuesheet display.
Follow these example steps to record a cue with a fade and a delay time:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [STAGE]
2. Press [10] [THRU] [21]
Selects channels to be
recorded
3. Press [AT] [95]
4. Press [RECORD CUE] [6]
5. Press [TIME] [2.5]
Fade time
6. Press [DELAY] [4] [ENTER]
Fade will start after a Delay
of 4 seconds
You can also enter separate delay times for a cue with split up/down fade
times. Follow the example below:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [STAGE]
2. Press [24] [THRU] [36]
Selects channels to be
recorded
3. Press [FULL]
4. Press [RECORD CUE] [7]
5. Press [TIME] [2.5] [AND] [5]
Split Fade times
6. Press [DELAY] [3] [AND] [4]
Separate Delay times
7.
Press [ENTER]
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Chapter 5 Cues
Recording Cues with Follow
As mentioned earlier in this chapter, a follow time specifies how long the
console waits after the current cue starts before the next cue automatically
executes.
Follow times can be recorded up to 99:59 minutes. For example, to add a
follow time of 2.5 seconds to a previously recorded cue:
Press [CUE] [10] [FOLLOW] [2.5] [ENTER].
To enter a follow time in minutes, press the (Minute) soft-key after you
enter the value: Press [CUE] [1] [FOLLOW] [5] (Minute) [ENTER].
The assigned follow time can be viewed in the "Flw" field of the attributes
line of the Preview display or from the Cuesheet display.
Follow these steps to record cue 2 with a fade and follow time in Stage:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [STAGE]
2. Press [1] [and] [21]
Selects channels to be
recorded
3. Press [AT] [95]
4. Press [RECORD CUE] [2]
5. Press [TIME] [5]
Adds Fade time
6. Press [FOLLOW] [10] [ENTER]
The cue following cue 2 will
start 10 seconds after cue 2
starts
You cannot run a follow cue if the fade time is manual; enter a time of
0 seconds if you want the next cue to immediately execute.
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Chapter 5 Cues
Recording Cues with Link
Cues can be played back out of their numeric sequence by assigning a Link
to a cue. When a cue is linked to another cue, the execution sequence
continues onward in the list from that destination cue until the end of the
cue list until another link is encountered in a later cue. The assigned link
can be viewed from the Cuesheet or Preview displays.
For example, to link cue 5 to cue 12:
Press [CUE] [5] [LINK] [12] [ENTER].
To assign a link to the current cue being viewed in a display:
Press [LINK] [#] [ENTER].
Creating Automatic Playback Loops
Follow and Link can be combined to create loops in which cues play back
automatically and repeat.
Follow the example steps below to record an automatic cue playback loop:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Create three cues
Cue #’s 1, 2, 3.
2. Press [CUESHEET]
3. Press [CUE] [1] [TIME] [2] [FOLLOW] [5] [ENTER]
4. Press down arrow key to highlight cue 2
5. Press [TIME] [2] [FOLLOW] [5] [ENTER]
6. Press down arrow key to highlight cue 3
7.
Press [TIME] [2] [FOLLOW] [5] [LINK] [1] [ENTER]
In the above example, cue 1 will start after you load a playback fader with
cue 1 and press [GO]. Cue 2 will follow cue 1, cue 3 will follow cue 2. Cue
1 will start over again because cue 3 is linked to cue 1. For more
information on cue playback see the Playing Back Cues section later in this
chapter.
You can also create loops using effects. These effect loops can then be
played back in a cue or submaster. See Chapter 7 Effects for more
information.
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Chapter 5 Cues
Recording Cues in the Preview Display
Recording a cue in the Preview display allows you to create a cue without
affecting the current look on stage. It is sometimes referred to as recording
"in the blind".
It is important to realize that the [RECORD CUE] key is not used for cues
that are recorded blind; blind cues are automatically recorded as they are
made. If you do use the [RECORD CUE] key, the active stage levels will
be recorded, not the blind levels.
Cues can be created using the same attributes as when recording live.
Follow the example steps below to record a simple blind cue in Preview:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [PREVIEW]
2. Press (SelCue) [2] [ENTER]
Or press [CUE] [2] [ENTER]
3. Press [25] [THRU] [48]
Selects channels to be
recorded
4. Press [AT] [50]
Cue is automatically recorded
as you enter levels
Follow the example below to record a blind cue with a single up/down fade
time in Preview:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [PREVIEW]
2. Press (SelCue) [4] [ENTER]
Or press [CUE] [4] [ENTER]
3. Press [68] [THRU] [72]
Selects channels to be
recorded
4. Press [AT] [66]
Cue is automatically recorded
as you enter levels
5. Press [TIME] [61] [ENTER]
Adds up/down fade time of 61
sec. (displayed as 1:01 min.)
Cues can also be created blind from the Tracksheet and Cuesheet
displays. (however, only cue attributes and not channel levels can be
recorded in the Cuesheet display.)
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Editing Cues
If you would like to edit channels in a cue that has already been recorded,
you can either play back the cue live from the Stage display or work blind in
the Preview or Tracksheet displays.
Editing, as in recording, while in different Cue Record Modes produces
different results. See the Cue Record Modes section further in this
chapter for more information.
Editing Cues in the Stage Display
To edit a cue live, either play back the cue with the playback faders or press
[CUE] [#] [FULL]. Then make the changes you want and re-record the
cue. For more information on Cue Playback, please see the Playing Back
Cues section later in this chapter.
For example: Assume Cue 1 is already recorded with channels 1 thru 24 at
75. To just adjust channels 10 thru 20 to 80 follow below:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [STAGE]
2. Press [ENTER] [AT] [ENTER] [CLEAR]
to clear screen (if necessary)
3. Press [CUE] [1] [FULL]
Or play back the cue with the
Playback faders
3. Press [10] [THRU] [20]
Selects channels to be
recorded
4. Press [AT] [80]
Sets channel levels
5. Press [RECORD CUE] [1]
6. Press [ENTER]
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Warning will appear, Press
[ENTER] to overwrite
previous cue
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Chapter 5 Cues
Editing Cues in the Preview Display
To edit cues in Preview, just make the changes you want, all changes are
recorded as you make them.
For example: Assume Cue 2 is already recorded with channels 1 thru 10 at
full. To just set channels 5 and 6 to a new level follow below:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [PREVIEW]
2. Press (SelCue) [2] [ENTER]
Or press [CUE] [2] [ENTER]
3. Press [5] [AND] [6]
Selects channels to be edited
4. Press [AT] [75]
Cue is automatically recorded
as you enter levels
Cues can also be edited blind from the Tracksheet display. For more
information on using the Tracksheet, please see the Cue Record Modes
section later in this chapter.
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Chapter 5 Cues
The Cuesheet Display
The Cuesheet display can be accessed by pressing the [CUESHEET] hardkey on the console. This display is used to view the order of cues and each
cue’s attributes. The features of this display include the ability to edit the
cue attributes, delete, copy or renumber cues and create blank cues.
Cue Number
Fade, Delay and Follow Times
Figure 5.0 Cuesheet
Assigned Effect
Cue Name
Assigned Group
Cues are listed by cue number, sorted from lowest numbered cue to highest
numbered cue. If a cue is playing in one of the playback faders, the
playback fader will be listed adjacent to the cue number. Each cue shows
columns of information showing each available attribute for every cue,
please see Table 5.1 on the next page.
Using the up/down arrow cues will scroll through the display. To quickly go
to a specific cue, press [CUE] [#] [ENTER].
When you press [CUE] [#] [ENTER], a new blank cue is created if the cue
does not already exist. If you are in tracking mode and there is a lower
numbered cue, the levels of that cue will be tracked into the new cue.
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Chapter 5 Cues
Up: assigned Up fade time
Eff: assigned Effect
Dwn: assigned Down fade time
Mac: assigned Macro
Dly: assigned Delay time
Grp: assigned Group
Flw: assigned Follow time
Lnk: assigned Link
Table 5.1 Cuesheet Attributes
To change the attributes of the currently selected cue, press the key on the
console corresponding to the specific attribute you want to change, then
enter the attribute information followed by the [ENTER] key. Multiple cue
attributes may be entered before the [ENTER] key is pressed. See
Editing Cue Attributes below for an example procedure.
Editing Cue Attributes
Follow the example below to modify a follow time attribute from the
Cuesheet display:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [CUESHEET]
2. Press [CUE] [5]
Or use the up/down arrow
keys
3. Press [FOLLOW] [7]
4. Press [ENTER]
New Follow time recorded
You can quickly edit cue attributes from the Stage, Preview, Cuesheet
or Tracksheet displays. For example, to edit a fade time, just press
[CUE] [#] [TIME] [#] [ENTER].
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Chapter 5 Cues
Naming Cues
You can assign names up to 16 characters in length to cues. These names
can be exclusively numbers, exclusively letters or a combination of letters
and numbers. Names are entered using the submaster bump buttons for
letters and the keypad for numbers. You can also use a standard PC
keyboard to enter names.
Bump
Button
Alpha
Character
Bump
Button
Alpha
Character
Bump
Button
Alpha
Character
1
a
9
i
17
q
2
b
10
j
18
r
3
c
11
j
19
s
4
d
12
l
20
t
5
e
13
m
21
u
6
f
14
n
22
v (space)
7
g
15
o
23
wx
8
h
16
p
24
yz
In the above chart, the letters x and z are selected by pressing and holding
the w and y keys respectively. A space is added by pressing and holding the
v key. For uppercase letters, press and hold the Leviton Logo hard-key
while selecting letters.
To enter a cue name while in the Preview display:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [PREVIEW] [CUE] [5] [ENTER]Or [Preview](SelCue)[5]
2. Press (More) (Name)
Enter a name
3. Press [ENTER]
To enter a cue name while in the Cuesheet display:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [CUESHEET]
2. Press [CUE] [5] [ENTER]
Or use the up/down arrow
keys to select cue number
3. Press (Name)
Enter a name.
4. Press [ENTER]
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Chapter 5 Cues
Copying Cues
Cues can be copied to another location in the cue list. Please follow the
example procedures below to learn how to copy cues.
To copy cues in the Cuesheet and Tracksheet displays:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Select the cue number
you wish to copy
2. Press (Copy)
3. Enter the destination cue
Command line reads:
Copy Cue # to Cue #
4. Press [ENTER]
To copy cues in the Preview display:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Select the cue number
you wish to copy
2. Press (More)
Changes soft-key level
3. Press (Copy)
4. Enter the destination cue
Command line reads:
Copy Cue # to Cue #
5. Press [ENTER]
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Chapter 5 Cues
Clearing Cues
Cues can be individually deleted from the cue list or all cues can be entirely
cleared from the console. Please see the following example procedures.
To delete cues while in the Cuesheet and Tracksheet displays:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press (Delete)
2. Enter cue you would
like to delete
Command line reads:
Delete Cue #
3. Press [ENTER]
To delete cues while in the Preview display:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press (More)
Changes soft-key level
2. Press (Delete)
3. Enter cue you would
like to delete
Command line reads:
Delete Cue #
4. Press [ENTER]
To clear all cues from the control console:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP]
2. Press (More)
Changes soft-key level
3. Press (Clear)
Clear menu appears
4. Enter [1] “Clear Cues”
Warning appears
5. Enter [1] to confirm
All cue memory erased
6. Press any display key to exit
See Chapter 11 Memory Functions for more information on clearing all
memory from the console.
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Chapter 5 Cues
Inserting and Renumbering Cues
Inserting Cues
A new cue can be inserted between two existing cues. For example, to
insert a new cue between cues 1 and 2, just record the new cue as cue 1.5.
Please see the Cue Numbering section earlier in this chapter for more
information on numbering cues.
Renumbering Cues
To renumber a cue use the (Renum) softkey. Please see the following
examples:
To renumber cue 1 to cue 5 while in the Cuesheet display:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Select Cue 1
2. Press (Renum) [5]
3. Press [ENTER]
To renumber a cue while in the Preview display:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. (More) (Renum) [#]
2. Press [ENTER]
If a cue already exists with the same number as the desired
renumbered cue, a warning will appear. Pressing [ENTER] will
overwrite the existing cue.
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Chapter 5 Cues
Using Groups when Recording Cues
Groups are frequently used combinations of channels or device traits which
can be used as building blocks when recording. There are two different
ways of working with groups:
1. The first way is to assign a single group to a cue. When you assign a
group to a cue, any changes that you make later in the group will be
updated in the cue also. This can be useful, for instance, when a group is
recorded with pan and tilt device trait levels (focus points) and the same
group is assigned to a number of cues. If the focus points need to be refocused later, you only have to update the group, all cues that have the
group assigned will be updated also. To assign a group to a cue:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [CUE] [#] [GROUP] [#]
2. Press [ENTER]
The assigned group number can be viewed in the "Grp" field of the
attributes line of the Preview display or from the Cuesheet display.
2. The second way groups may be used is to just use a group to set levels
while recording a cue. Be aware that if you use groups in this way any
future updates to the group will not be updated in the cue.
For example, to just use a group’s levels to record a cue from the Stage
display:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [GROUP] [#] [FULL]
2. Press [RECORD CUE] [#] [ENTER]
To just use a group’s levels to record a cue from the Preview or Tracksheet
displays:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Select the cue
2. Press [GROUP] [#] [FULL]
You may, of course, bring up
the group at a different level
than full.
For more information on groups, please see Chapter 6 Groups.
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Chapter 5 Cues
Assigning Effects to Cues
When an effect is assigned to a cue, the effect fades in during the up time
of the cue. The effect remains running until the next [GO] command is
executed, at which time the effect fades out during the down time of that
cue.
To assign an effect as a cue is being recorded:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [RECORD CUE] [#] [EFFECT] [#]
2. Press [ENTER]
To assign an effect to an existing cue:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [CUE] [#] [EFFECT] [#]
2. Press [ENTER]
When recording a cue while an effect is running, take out the effect on
stage with the playback fader or submaster before executing the
Record Cue command. The live Record Cue command records an
instantaneous stage picture and therefore will record channel levels
from the effect if the effect is left running.
You can also place cues into effects so when the effect is run it will start a
cue. Only the levels of the channels in the cue are used, not the cue
attributes. See Chapter 7 Effects for more information.
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Chapter 5 Cues
Assigning Macros to Cues
You can assign a recorded macro to a cue to automatically execute the
macro. The specified macro will execute when the cue fade begins.
This feature can be very useful for triggering timed submasters or for
capturing specific channels on the trackball for overriding cue control.
Another useful application is to assign rate control in a cue macro for a cue
or effect that requires it in every performance, this way the rate will always
be ready on the trackball when the cue is initiated.
To assign a macro to a cue using the Cuesheet display:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [CUE] [#] (More)
2. Press (Macro) [#]
3. Press [ENTER]
To assign a macro to a cue using the Preview display:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [CUE] [#] (More) (More)
2. Press (Macro) [#]
3. Press [ENTER]
To delete a macro from a cue:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [CUE] [#] (Macro)
Specify NO macro number
2. Press [ENTER]
Please refer to Chapter 8 Macros for information on programming and using
macros.
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Chapter 5 Cues
Multipart Cues
Multipart cues allow you to have up to eight simultaneously executing
separate cue parts in one main cue. Each part contain it’s own channel
levels along with fade times and delay times. By using individual delay
times for each part you can program fades that start at different times
within the main cue. Split fades and split delay times are also possible in
each cue part, see Figure 5.1 below.
You can also assign a group to a cue part, see the Using Groups when
Recording Cues section earlier in this chapter.
A channel can be included in only one part of a multipart cue. If a
channel has been recorded in one part and then you record the same
channel in a new part, the channel will be automatically removed from
the previous part.
Cue Parts
Split Fade and Delay Times
Figure 5.1 Cue Parts
Please follow the step by step example on the following page to re-create
the above multipart cue in Figure 5.1.
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Chapter 5 Cues
To record an example multipart cue as in Figure 5.1:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [CUESHEET]
2. Press [CUE] [1]
3. Press [PART] [1] [TIME] [5]
Adds part 1 with five second
fade time
4. Press [ENTER]
Records part 1
5. Press [PART] [2] [TIME] [5]
[DELAY] [3]
Adds part 2 with two
second fade time and three
second delay
6. Press [GROUP] [55]
Assigns group 55 to part 2
7.
Records part 2
Press [ENTER]
8. Press [PART] [3] [TIME] [5]
[DELAY] [6]
Adds part 3 with five
second fade time and six
second delay
9. Press [ENTER]
Records part 3
10. Press [PART] [4] [TIME]
[4] [AND] [6]
Adds part 4 with split up/
down fade
times of four and six seconds
11. Press [DELAY] [14] [AND] [25]
Adds delay times of 14 and
25 seconds to part 4
12. Press [ENTER]
Records part 4
Editing Multipart Cues
Multipart cues are edited using the same procedures as are used for normal
cues.
For example, to edit a multipart cue from Preview:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [PREVIEW]
2. Press [CUE] [1]
Or press (SELCUE) [1]
3. Press [PART] [3] [ENTER]
Or use right/left arrow keys
4. Press [15] [AND] [26]
Selects channels to be edited
5. Press [AT] [75]
Cue is automatically recorded
as you enter levels in the
Preview display
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Chapter 5 Cues
Playing Back Cues
Playback Faders
Playback Faders
Figure 5.2 Playback Faders section
The two playback fader pairs, A/B and C/D, allow you to play back recorded
cues. The left fader, A and C, of each fader pair controls upfades, the right
fader, B and D, of each fader pair controls downfades. A playback fader pair
is referred to simply as a playback fader in this user guide unless otherwise
noted.
A cue is loaded by pressing the [LOAD] key above the playback fader and
then selecting the cue number. If [GO] is pressed with no cue number
selected, the first cue in the cue list will execute.
Different cues may be played back on either playback fader simultaneously.
For example, you may play a 20 minute daylight window cue in one
playback fader and play a number of cues in the other playback fader. Or
playback conventional lighting cues in one fader and playback automated
device cues in the other.
A manual cue is played back by physically moving the faders, a timed cue is
played back from the timing attributes programmed into it. Please see the
sections titled Playing Back Manual Cues and Playing Back Timed Cues
further in this chapter for more information and procedural examples.
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Chapter 5 Cues
Playback Keys
See example procedure of using these keys on next page.
[LOAD]
A [LOAD] key is located above each pair of playback faders. The [LOAD]
key is used to load cues into each playback fader before pressing the [GO]
button. If you do not enter a cue number after pressing [LOAD], the first
cue in the cue list will automatically be loaded.
You can also load a cue with a fade time which will override any
programmed fade times. This is especially useful for quickly bringing up
cues on stage that you wish to edit or re-record. For example, pressing
[LOAD] [4] [TIME] [2] [GO] will bring up cue 4 in 2 seconds even if it
was already programmed with a fade time of 60 seconds.
[GO]
A [GO] button is located below each pair of playback faders and is used to
play back cues sequentially with their recorded fade times. If you press
[GO] before a cue finishes, the cue stops and the new cue begins from the
levels at which the previous cue was interrupted.
[CLEAR]
A [CLEAR] cue key is located above each pair of playback faders. When a
cue is currently loaded to a playback fader, you can clear the fade from the
fader and the Stage display by pressing [CLEAR] [ENTER]. A red LED
above the [CLEAR] cue key will light when this key is pressed.
[HOLD]
A [HOLD] key is located below each pair of playback faders. If any cues
are currently running in assigned fade times, pressing the [HOLD] key will
stop all the fades immediately. A red LED above the [HOLD] key will light
and the Up and Down % indicators in the Playback Fader Box will cease to
move. Pressing [HOLD] again will resume a fade that has been
interrupted.
[BACK]
A [BACK] key is located below each pair of playback faders. Pressing the
[BACK] key causes a reverse fade to the previous cue in two seconds. The
red LED on the [BACK] key will also light. By repetitively pressing the
[BACK] key you will move backward through the cue list.
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Chapter 5 Cues
[RATE]
A [RATE] key is located above each pair of playback faders. Pressing the
[RATE] key assigns control of the cue fade rate to the trackball and to the
wheels below the LCD display. Pressing the [RATE] key again releases rate
control and the adjusted fade times remain for the fade. See Rate Override
section further in this chapter.
Follow the steps below for examples of using the [LOAD], [GO], [HOLD]
and [BACK] keys:
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Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [LOAD] [4]
In this example Cue 4 is a
timed cue
2. Press [GO]
Cue executes
3. Press [HOLD] while cue 4 is running
Cue 4 stops
4. Press [HOLD]
Cue 4 resumes
5. After cue finishes, press [BACK]
Fades back to Cue 3 in
2 seconds
6. Press [BACK] while cue 3 is running
Fades to previous cue in
2 seconds
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Chapter 5 Cues
The Playback Display
The Playback display consist of three sections; the Cuesheet section, the
Submaster section and the Playback Faders section.
Cuesheet Section
The top area of the Playback display shows a section of the Cuesheet. If a
cue is playing in one of the playback faders, the playback fader will be listed
adjacent to the cue number.
Cuesheet Section
Submaster Section
Playback Faders section
Figure 5.3 Playback Display
Submaster Section
The Playback display also shows the levels of any submasters which are
active. When a submaster contains an assigned effect, the submaster
number is displayed in yellow. If a sub is inhibitive, its number is displayed
in red. If a sub is active from another submaster page, it’s number is
displayed in reverse amber. See Chapter 4 Submasters for more
information on working with submasters.
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Chapter 5 Cues
Playback Faders Section
The two Playback Fader boxes, labeled A/B and C/D, show you the current
status of the playback faders.
The Playback Fader Boxes contain the following information:
Cue
The number of the current cue.
Next
The number of the next cue to be executed.
Up
Indicates the up fade (in time or %) completion of the
cue or multipart cue.
Dn
Indicates the down fade (in time or %) completion of
the cue or multipart cue.
Delay
If a delay time is set, it will appear in the position that is
normally occupied by the up/down fade times (the delay
time will appear in yellow as the fade is in the process of
counting down its delay time). When the delay is
complete, the up/down fade times will appear and
progress.
Follow
Indicates the completion of time (in time or %) before
the next cue will automatically follow the current cue.
Table 5.2 Playback Fader Box attributes
To view the cue’s fade, delay and follow times in actual time remaining
or in percent completed, press the (Time/%) soft-key while in the
Playback display. From the Stage display, press (More) (Time/%).
Grand-Master Fader Indicator
In the upper right area of the Playback display is the grand-master fader
indicator which shows you the current level of the grand-master if the level
is less than full.
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Chapter 5 Cues
Playing Back Manual Cues
Cues that are assigned a manual fade time wait to be executed by the
movement of the A/B or C/D playback faders. The fade takes place as you
move the faders along to the completion of their travel. When the faders
reach the top, the fade is complete and is cleared from the fader
automatically. You may reverse the direction of the fade anytime before
you reach the top of the fader travel, but once you get to the top the fade
is complete and cleared from the playback fader. See the previous sections
in this chapter for information on how to record cues.
Follow these example steps to playback a manual cue:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [LOAD] [5]
Loads manual cue
2. Press [GO]
3. Lower and raise playback faders
Cue completes when faders
reach top
4. Repeat steps 2 and 3 for
next manual cue
5. Press [CLEAR] [ENTER]
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Use the [CLEAR] key above
the cue playback faders
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Chapter 5 Cues
Playing Back Timed Cues
Timed Cues are automatically executed after pressing the [GO] button
located at the bottom of each playback fader and the fade takes place
according to the timing information programmed with the cue.
It is necessary for the playback faders (A/B or C/D) to be in the
full UP position for timed fades to progress when the [GO] button
is pressed.
Follow this example to playback a timed cue:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [LOAD]
2. Press [2]
Loads cue 2
3. Press [GO]
Timed cue starts
If a cue has a follow time assigned, the next cue will start after the
follow time completes. Pressing [GO] again while a cue is running will
instantly advance to the next cue in the list.
Taking Manual Control of Timed Cues
As a timed cue is running, you can take manual control of the fade and
complete it by using the playback fader. To change the fade to a manual
fade, use the playback fader to “match and grab” the fade level. When the
playback fader has successfully grabbed a cue, a “Man” indication will
appear in the playback fader box. You can complete the remainder of the
fade as though it were a manual fade (the fade is complete when the fader
reaches the top position).
You can reverse the direction of a fade beyond the point where you took
manual control of it. For example, if you took control of a ten second fade
after five seconds, the entire fade is available to control with the playback
fader.
If you want to simply speed up or slow down the rate of a running timed
fade without stopping it to take manual control, you can use the [RATE]
key which will place control of the rate on the trackball or encoder wheels.
See the Rate Override section below.
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Chapter 5 Cues
Rate Override
When you are playing back cues on playback faders, you can use the
[RATE] key of a playback fader pair to assign control of the cue fade rate
to the trackball and to the wheels below the LCD display. Pressing the
[RATE] key again releases rate control and the adjusted fade times remain
for the fade.
Using the Trackball
The trackball adjusts both the up and the down fade times simultaneously.
Moving the trackball down increases the fade times while moving the
trackball up decreases the fade times. The remaining times of the fade in
progress is shown in the LCD display.
Using the Encoder Wheels
Using the encoder wheels will allow for individual adjustment of the up and
down fade times. Moving the up wheel increases or decreases the fade time
of the up fade. Moving the down wheel increases or decreases the fade
time of the down fade. The follow time can be adjusted in a similar manner.
Figure 5.4 LCD Display Of Rate Override
Follow the example below to change the fade rate of a cue being played
back:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [RATE]
2. Adjust rate with the trackball or wheels
3. Press [RATE]
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Releases rate control.
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Chapter 5 Cues
Using the Real Time Event Clock to
Playback Cues
A cue, or series of cues, can be run automatically by assigning them to be
played back by the console’s Real Time Event Clock. Up to 500 real time
events can be programmed in the control console. Some examples of using
this feature would be to automatically turn the work lights on for a regular
rehearsal, or bring up curtain warmers a half hour before show time. The
cues will run in real time according to the times and days of the week that
you assign in the Real Time Events sub-display. This display is accessed
from the Setup display; press [SETUP] (More) (RT Clk).
Real Time Events section
Real Time Menu section
Figure 5.5 Real Time Event sub-display
Before real time events can be used, memory first must be initialized.
Press [9] Activate Memory, from the Real Time Events sub display.
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Navigating the Real Time Event sub-display
Use the arrow keys to move the cursor within the desired area of the Real
Time Events section of the display then press [ENTER]. This will open up a
pop-up display allowing you to add or edit the relevant information. Press
[ENTER] again to complete the assignment.
To select a menu item from the Real Time Menu section of the display use
the keypad to enter the menu item number. The cursor must first be placed
over an Event number (E #) for the Real Time Menu to be active; use the
arrow keys to move the cursor.
Descriptions of the Real Time Menu items follow:
1. Clear Event
Press [1] to delete a real time event.
2. Sort Table
Press [2] to sort the real time events by time,
starting from lowest to highest. This is useful if
you have added or edited times and would like
to view the table chronologically.
3. Set System Day
Press [3] to select the current day. A pop-up
menu of the days of the week will appear with
the menu item numbers 1 - 7 representing the
days of the week. For example, to set the
current day to Monday: Press [3] [2].
4. Set System Time
Press [4] then enter the current time in 24 hour
clock format, (hhmmss: h = hour, m = minute,
s = sec.). For example, to set clock to 02:00pm
(14:00): Press [4][140000] [ENTER].
5. Scheduler
This option must be selected to "ON" for the
real time event to execute. Press [5] to toggle
between "ON" or "OFF".
Please see the following page for an example procedure where a cue is
assigned to be run automatically by using the Real Time Event Clock.
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Chapter 5 Cues
Real Time Event Example Procedure
Follow below to assign cue 101 to be automatically run at 7:00pm (19:00),
Monday through Friday evenings, as Event #1:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP] (More) (RT Clk)
Enters Setup display and
opens Real Time Event
Sub-display
2. Use the arrow keys to move the cursor
to the "E# 1" field.
3. Press [5] to set Scheduler to "ON"
4. Use the arrow keys to move the cursor
to the "Time" field of Event 1 (E# 1)
5. Press [ENTER]
6. Press [190000] [ENTER]
7.
Use 24 hour clock format
(hhmmss)
Use the arrow keys to move the cursor
to the "Day of Week" field of Event 1
8. Press [ENTER] then press [1] to
deselect Sunday and press [7]
to deselect Saturday. Press [ENTER]
All days of week are selected
by default
9. Use the arrow keys to move the cursor
to the "Cue" field of Event # 1 (E# 1)
10. Press [101]
Cue 101 assigned to Event # 1
Using Macros to Execute Cues
A cue can be automatically executed by pressing a macro key which has a
recorded cue load and go sequence programmed into it. This is a quick way
to playback recorded cues with a single key press. The cue macro can also
then be assigned to a submaster allowing cue playback from a sub.
See Chapter 8 Macros for more information on using macros.
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Chapter 5 Cues
Cue Record Modes
This section is more descriptive than procedural. It is meant to be used in
conjunction with the Recording Cues section earlier in this chapter which
shows actual cue recording and editing examples.
There are three different cue recording / editing modes, called Cue Record
Modes. Each of these modes affects the relationship of channel levels in a
cue to their levels in subsequent cues, in different ways. The different cue
record modes are: Tracking, Cue Only and Clean Up.
In Tracking mode, channel levels track from cue to cue. This is useful for
looks that remain constant throughout a scene from cue to cue. The
advantage to cue tracking is that it allows you to quickly edit a basic look
for all the cues in the scene by editing levels in the first cue, so that the
changes "track into" the following cues. For example, say that while in
tracking mode you have channel 1 at 100%. You then continue to record
cues 2, 3 and 4 with channel 1 still at 100% and have other channel
changes occurring. You then realize that channel 1 should have been at
75%. So, you recall cue 1, and change the level of channel 1 to 75%. Since
you were in tracking mode, the 75% level is automatically transferred to
cues 2, 3 and 4. See the Tracking Mode section further in this chapter for
more information.
Cue Only mode operates very similar to Tracking mode, The difference
between Tracking and Cue Only modes occurs when you create or edit cues
in a blind display (Preview or Tracksheet). Refer to the Cue Only Mode
section further in this chapter for more information.
Clean Up mode is the simplest way of recording and editing cues. Channels
do not track from cue to cue, each cue exists as a separate memory of
channel levels, with no relationship to each other. Please see the Clean Up
Mode section further in this chapter.
Explanations are given in this section as how different cue modes work
while using conventional lights. Tracking works in a very similar way
when working with Moving Lights and examples are given in Chapter 10
Automated Devices. You may want to read through this chapter first to
gain a good understanding of how tracking operates while using
conventional lights before moving on to Chapter 10.
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Chapter 5 Cues
Selecting the Cue Record Mode
To change the Cue Record Mode, press the (Q Mode) soft-key until the
desired mode name appears to the left of the command line.
You must select the type of Cue Record Mode you would like before
creating or recording the cue.
Tracking Level Conventions
Tracking Levels (Soft Levels)
A tracking level is referred to as a Soft Level. Soft levels are levels that
take their value from the level of the channel in the previous cue. Soft
levels are shown in gray in all displays that show cue levels (Stage, Preview,
and Tracksheet).
Non - Tracking Levels (Hard Levels)
A non-tracking level is referred to as a Hard Level. As opposed to soft
levels, hard levels do not take their value from the level of the channel in
the previous cue.
Hard levels occur in cues for channels that have different levels than they
had in the previous cue. For example, when you assign new levels and
record the cue from the Stage display, those channel levels that change are
hard levels.
In the Tracksheet display, hard levels are shown in white. In the Stage and
Preview displays, hard levels are shown in different colors: red represents a
channel that has a higher level than the previous cue, blue represents a
channel that has a lower level than the previous cue.
Hard and Soft Zeros
In some cues, you must bring the channel level to zero (like blackout cues,
for example). This is where you would use a Hard Zero. A hard zero is an
actual zero level and appears on screen as a zero.
In the Tracksheet display hard zeros are shown in white. In the Preview
display hard zeros are shown in blue. Hard zeros are never shown in the
Stage display.
A Soft Zero is basically a tracking zero and does not appear on screen in
any display.
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Chapter 5 Cues
The Tracksheet Display
Hard Levels
Soft Levels
Figure 5.5 Tracksheet Display
Hard Zeros
Soft Zeros (non-visible)
Assigned Group Levels (Teal)
Figure 5.5 above is an example of how Hard Levels, Soft Levels, Hard Zeros
Soft Zeros and Group Levels appear in the Tracksheet display.
Navigating the Tracksheet Display
To edit a cue while in the Tracksheet display, press [CUE] [#] [ENTER].
You can also use the up/down arrow keys to scroll through the list of cues.
If a cue does not exist, you can create one by pressing
[CUE] [#] [ENTER].
To make additional channels visible in the Tracksheet display, use the
left/right arrows keys to scroll. You can also enter a channel number
directly by using the keypad; press [#] [ENTER].
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Chapter 5 Cues
Clean Up Mode
When you operate in Clean Up mode the concept of tracking levels does not
exist. Note that you can make a cue that was recorded in Tracking or Cue
Only mode into a Clean Up cue by pressing the Clean Up hard-key. See
Using the Clean Up hard-key later in this chapter.
Recording and Editing Live in Clean Up Mode
When you record cues live in Clean Up mode, you only affect levels in the
cue you are creating. Every channel is assigned a hard level. If you don't
assign a specific level to a channel in Clean Up mode, a hard zero is
automatically assigned to the channel. Remember that zeros are not visible
in the Stage display. Press [RECORD CUE] [#] [ENTER] to record or edit
(re-record) live.
Recording Blind in Clean Up Mode
When you create a cue blind in Clean Up mode, every channel has a hard
zero assigned to it. You can then enter the channels and levels you would
like in the cue.
To create a cue blind in Clean Up mode, press [CUE] [#] [ENTER] then
enter your channels and levels.
Editing Blind in Clean Up Mode
Edits made in Clean Up mode only affect the cue in which the edits are
made, no other cues are affected.
Copying, Renumbering and Deleting in Clean Up Mode
Copying in Clean Up Mode: The copying of cues always results in the
exact same cue in two locations. The destination cue does not affect any
following cues.
Renumbering in Clean Up Mode: The Renumber command follows the
same rules as the Copy command above in the way levels are affected by
the cue’s new location in your show.
Deleting Cues in Clean Up Mode: The Delete Cue command completely
removes the designated cue from your show. The contents of the cues
following the deleted cue are preserved.
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Chapter 5 Cues
Tracking Mode
Recording and Editing Live in Tracking Mode
Channels that have new levels which are different from the previous cue
will have hard levels; all other channels will have soft levels.The new hard
levels will then track into subsequent cues as soft levels.
Press [RECORD CUE] [#] [ENTER] to record or edit (re-record) live.
Recording Blind in Tracking Mode
As with recording live, channels that have new levels which are different
from the previous cue will have hard levels and all other channels will have
soft levels.The new hard levels will then track into subsequent cues as soft
levels.
To create a cue in the Tracksheet display, press [CUE] [#] [ENTER] then
enter your channels and levels. Remember that changes are recorded
automatically when working in blind displays.
Editing Blind in Tracking Mode
Blind edits made to existing cues while in the Tracking mode will allow any
channel assigned a new level to continue to read at that level in subsequent
cues until it encounters another hard level. You must be sure you want the
new channel level to continue into later cues, because when you change it
in Tracking mode it can track through a large number of later cues. By
using the Tracksheet, you can see the subsequent cue levels that change as
a result of your edit.
Changes made to a soft level will always change it to a hard level while
in any Cue Record Mode. To restore a hard level back to a soft level or
change a soft level into a hard level, see the section on Converting Hard
and Soft Levels later in this chapter.
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Chapter 5 Cues
Cue Only Mode
Cue Only Mode operates in the same way as Tracking Mode when recording
live. The differences are when you record or edit blind (see explanations
below).
Recording and Editing Live in Cue Only Mode
Channels that have new levels which are different from the previous cue
will have hard levels; all other channels will have soft levels.The new hard
levels will then track into subsequent cues as soft levels.
Press [RECORD CUE] [#] [ENTER] to record or edit (re-record) live.
Recording Blind in Cue Only Mode
The difference between Tracking mode and Cue Only mode when you
record blind is that with Tracking mode, your newly created cue will have
the same channel levels of the previous cue in the list, while with Cue Only
mode, the channel levels in your newly created cue will instead be all zeros.
This creates a cue with all hard zero levels that you can use to build a new
cue from scratch. (This is also a quick way to create a blackout cue).
To create a cue in the Tracksheet display, press [CUE] [#] [ENTER] then
enter your channels and levels. Remember that changes are recorded
automatically when working in blind displays.
Editing Blind in Cue Only Mode
Blind editing of channel levels while in Cue Only mode affects levels “in that
cue only". Any newly assigned levels do not track into subsequent cues as is
the case when in Tracking Mode. This method is useful when you would like
to just adjust levels in a certain cue without affecting any following cues.
Changes made to a soft level will always change it to a hard level while
in any Cue Record Mode. To restore a hard level back to a soft level or
change a soft level into a hard level, see the section on Converting Hard
and Soft Levels later in this chapter.
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Using the Clean Up hard-key
When you are using tracking levels, you sometimes need to stop the
tracking levels from continuing into later cues. Typically, this happens at the
end of a scene when the basic stage look changes to the look of the next
scene. To prevent tracking levels from continuing into later cues, you can
assign the Clean Up attribute to a cue. When you assign the Clean Up
attribute to a cue, the cue levels all automatically become hard levels. In
this way it works like a “wall” that stops all previous tracking levels from
continuing into subsequent cues.
To assign the Clean Up attribute to any Tracking or Cue Only type cue:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Select the cue
2. Press [CLEAN UP] [ENTER]
Converting Hard and Soft Levels
In the Tracking display you can use the trackball cursor and the
[SELECT] key to toggle individual hard and soft levels.
Converting Hard Levels to Soft Levels
You can change a hard non-tracking level to a soft tracking level in any Cue
Record mode. This is called restoring tracking. You simply address the
channel number and use the [AT] and [ENTER] keys. This effectively
removes the hard level and allows that channel to track the level
assignment from the previous cue. For example, to restore tracking to a
channel list in the Preview or Tracksheet display:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [CUE] [50]
Selects the cue to be edited
2. Press [1] [THRU] [96] [AT] [ENTER] Specifies channels to become
soft levels
Converting Soft Levels to Hard Levels
You can change soft levels to hard levels in any Cue Record mode. In the
Preview or Tracksheet displays, when soft levels are captured and adjusted,
they immediately become hard levels.
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Chapter 6 Groups
Chapter 6 Groups
Lighting "Groups" can be thought of like virtual submasters or cues. Groups
are pre-recorded looks for use as building blocks in the creation of cues,
effects and live stage looks. This console gives you the ability to store and
recall up to 500 groups.
Chapter 6 describes working with Groups and includes the following
sections:
• Groups and Automated Devices
• Recording Groups Live
• Recording a Channel Group Live
• Recording a Device Trait Group Live
• Editing Groups Live
• Recalling Groups
• Editing a Channel Group Live
• Editing a Device Trait Group Live
• Group Preview Sub-Display
• Navigating the Group Preview Sub-Display
• Recording Groups in the Group Preview Sub-Display
• Recording a Channel Group Blind
• Recording a Device Trait Group Blind
• Editing Groups in the Group Preview Sub-Display
• Editing a Channel Group Blind
• Editing a Device Trait Group Blind
• Naming Groups
• Copying Groups
• Renumbering Groups
• Clearing Groups
• Using the Only Key with Groups
• Using Groups in Cues
• Using Groups in Submasters
• Using Groups in Effects
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Chapter 6 Groups
Groups and Automated Devices
As mentioned earlier, groups can be thought of as virtual submasters or
cues. In almost all aspects, groups are recorded and behave very similar to
a submaster or cue, however instead of being controlled or recalled by a
fader on the console, they are recalled by number and can be added to
cues, effects, and submaster faders. One of the most powerful features of
groups is that instead of the levels themselves being stored in cues or
effects, the group itself can be assigned to a cue or effect and if the group
changes the cue or effect is automatically updated also.
When programming automated devices you will find groups can be one of
your most important tools. Operating one moving light or automated device
is easy. Moving 10, 20 or more can be a major challenge. Groups can be
used as building blocks when programming moving lights. An example list
of possible groups would include:
• A separate group for each color trait planned
(i.e. red group, blue group etc.)
• A separate group for each major focus point (pan/tilt traits) on the
stage (i.e. center, left etc.)
• Separate groups for gobos and effects.
• Separate groups of different intensities.
A little pre-planning with groups will unleash the power of the console’s
Automated Device control to enhance any production.
See the following sections in this chapter and Chapter 10 Automated
Devices for more information on using groups with automated devices.
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Chapter 6 Groups
Recording Groups Live
The [RECORD GROUP] hard-key records the instantaneous look of the
current Stage or Device display by recording all channels or traits at their
current levels. This includes all levels that may be originating from level
setting commands, cues, running effects, or even other groups. The Record
Group command can be executed from any display except Setup.
If an effect is running, the Record Group command captures the effect
channels at the instant the [ENTER] key executes the command.
Recording a channel group live
Follow these example steps to record a simple group of conventional
channels live:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [STAGE]
2. Select channels and set
channel levels
Creates look
3. Press [RECORD GROUP] [20]
4. Press [ENTER]
Remember that the Record Group function works just like the Record
Cue or Record Submaster function in that it records all levels as they
are currently being output from the console, so be careful that you do
not get more than you bargained for when you record.
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Chapter 6 Groups
Recording a device trait group live
Follow these steps to record a group of device traits live:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [DEVICE] display key
Assume devices 1- 4 have
been assigned, see Chapter 10
2. Press [DEVICE] [1] [THRU] [4]
[ENTER]
Select the devices to be
recorded by using the device
key on keypad
4. Adjust traits using encoder wheels
or trackball
Captures traits for record,
notice "DV" icon at top
right of screen
5. Press [RECORD GROUP] [50] [ENTER]
To view additional devices while in the Device display, use the up/down
arrow keys. To page through additional traits use the right/left arrow
keys while pressing the Leviton logo key, to scroll through additional
traits use the device arrow keys next to the LCD.
To release the traits and control press (RelAll) [CLEAR]. See Chapter
10 Automated Devices for more information on working with automated
devices.
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Chapter 6 Groups
Editing Groups Live
Editing groups live, whether conventional channels or device traits, involves
the following steps:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Clear all console output
Recall the group
Edit the levels or device traits as required
Re-record the group.
Recalling Groups
To view a recorded group on stage, press [GROUP] [#] [FULL].
You can assign a level to a group in the command line. Just like
submasters, levels within the group read proportionally to the level
assignment of the group. For example: Group 20 contains channels 1
through 24 at 80%. To assign group 2 to a proportional level of 50% in the
Stage display press: [GROUP] [20] [AT] [50]. Channels 1 - 24 are set at
40% on stage (40% = 50% of 80%).
Device Traits stored in groups do not react to the level of the group.
They are always recalled at the level they were recorded at regardless
of the level of the group.
Editing a channel group live
To edit a group of conventional channels live you basically re-record the
group:
1. Press [STAGE]
Opens Stage display
2. Press [ENTER] [AT] [ENTER] [CLEAR]
to clear screen (if necessary)
3. Press [GROUP] [44] [FULL]
All levels from group 44
recalled and captured
4. Select channels and set new levels
5. Press [RECORD GROUP] [44]
Initiates re-record of group
6. Press [ENTER] [ENTER]
Pressing [ENTER] a second
time overwrites the old group.
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Chapter 6 Groups
Editing a device trait group live
To edit a group of device traits live you basically re-record the group:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [DEVICE] display key
2. Press [DEVICE] [1] [THRU]
[4] [ENTER]
Select the devices to be
edited by using the device
key on keypad.
3. Press [GROUP] [50] [ENTER]
4. Adjust traits using encoder wheels
or trackball
5. Press [RECORD GROUP] [50]
6. Press [ENTER] [ENTER]
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Captures traits for re-record,
notice "DV" icon at top
right of screen
Pressing [ENTER] a second
time overwrites the old group.
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Chapter 6 Groups
Group Preview Sub-Display
Group Number
Group Levels (note teal color)
Figure 6.0
Group Name
Device Display Box Device Trait in Group
Navigating the Group Sub-Display
To select a specific group, press the (SelGrp) soft-key while in the Preview
display. Only one group’s information is shown at a time. You can use the
left/right arrow keys to page through all the different groups.
Follow these steps to select a group from the Preview display:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [PREVIEW]
2. Press (SelGrp) [#]
Selects group, if group doesn’t
exist, creates new group
3. Press [ENTER]
Group Colors in Display: Group levels are displayed in Teal while in the
Preview display.
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Chapter 6 Groups
Recording Groups in the Group Preview
Sub-Display
Recording a channel group blind
Follow the steps below to record a group of conventional channels blind:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [PREVIEW]
2. Press (SelGrp) [#]
Creates new group
3. Press [ENTER]
If group has already been
recorded, its levels will
show.
4. Select channels and set
channel levels
Group recorded
All levels are recorded automatically when in a Preview display, it is not
necessary to press the [RECORD GROUP] hard-key.
Recording a device trait group blind
Follow the steps below to record a group of device traits blind:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [PREVIEW]
2. Press (SelGrp) [#]
Creates new group
3. Press [ENTER]
4. Press [DEVICE] [1] [THRU] [4] [ENTER]
5. Adjust traits using encoder wheels
Group recorded
To view additional devices, use the up/down arrow keys to scroll
through devices in device display box. Use the device arrow keys next
to LCD to view additional traits. To de-select a trait so that it will not be
recorded, position the trackball cursor over the trait and press the
[SELECT] key next to the trackball. See Chapter 10 Automated
Devices for more information on using automated devices.
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Chapter 6 Groups
Editing Groups in the Group Preview
Sub-Display
To select a specific group for viewing and editing press the (SelGrp) softkey while in the Preview display. Only one group’s channel or trait
information is shown at a time. Use the left/right arrow keys to view
additional groups.
Editing a channel group blind
Follow these steps to blind edit a previously recorded group:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [PREVIEW]
2. Press (SelGrp) [#] [ENTER]
Selects group
3. Select channels and set
new channel levels
Group recorded
Editing a device trait group blind
Follow the steps below to edit a group of device traits blind:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [PREVIEW]
2. Press (SelGrp) [#] [ENTER]
3. Press [DEVICE] [1] [THRU] [4]
4. Press [ENTER]
5. Adjust traits using encoder wheels
Select the devices to be
edited by using the device
key on keypad.
Changes are recorded
automatically in a blind display
To view additional devices use the up/down arrow keys to scroll
through devices in device display box. Use the device arrow keys next
to LCD to view additional traits.To de-select a trait so that it will not be
recorded, position the trackball cursor over the trait and press the
[SELECT] key next to the trackball.
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Chapter 6 Groups
Naming Groups
You can assign names up to 16 characters in length to groups. These
names can be exclusively numbers, exclusively letters or a combination of
letters and numbers. Names are entered using the submaster bump
buttons for letters and the keypad for numbers. You can also use a
standard PC keyboard to enter names. See Appendix A for information on
installing a keyboard.
Bump
Button
Alpha
Character
Bump
Button
Alpha
Character
Bump
Button
Alpha
Character
1
a
9
i
17
q
2
b
10
j
18
r
3
c
11
j
19
s
4
d
12
l
20
t
5
e
13
m
21
u
6
f
14
n
22
v (space)
7
g
15
o
23
wx
8
h
16
p
24
yz
Table 6.0 Character to Bump Button Assignments
In the above chart, the letters x and z are selected by pressing and holding
the w and y keys respectively. A space is added by pressing and holding the
v key. For uppercase letters, press and hold the Leviton Logo key while
selecting letters.
Follow the steps below to name a group:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [PREVIEW]
2. Press (SelGrp) [#] [ENTER]
Enter the number of the
group to be named
3. Press (Name)
4. Enter a name
Use Sub Bump Buttons /
Keypad or PC keyboard
5. Press [ENTER]
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Chapter 6 Groups
Copying Groups
Follow the procedure below to copy the contents of one group to another
group:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [PREVIEW]
2. Press (SelGrp) [#]
Enter the number of the
group to be copied
3. Press [ENTER]
4. Press (Copy)
5. Enter destination group number
to copy to
6. Press [ENTER]
If a group already exists in
the destination, a warning will
appear asking for confirmation
Renumbering Groups
Follow the procedure below to renumber a group:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [PREVIEW]
2. Press (SelGrp) [#]
Enter the number of the
group to be renumbered
3. Press [ENTER]
4. Press (Renum)
5. Enter new group number
6. Press [ENTER]
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If a destination group number
already exists, the contents
will be overwritten. A warning
will appear asking for
confirmation
Page
Chapter 6 Groups
Clearing Groups
From the Group sub-display of Preview: To delete an individual group press
the (Delete) soft-key.
From the Clear menu of the Setup display: To clear all groups follow the
steps below:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP]
2. Press (MORE)
Changes soft-key level
3. Press (Clear)
Clear menu appears
4. Enter [2] “Clear Groups”
Warning appears
5. Enter [1] to confirm
All group memory
erased
6. Press any display key to exit
See Chapter 11 Memory Functions for more information on clearing
memory.
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Chapter 6 Groups
Using the Only Key with Groups
The Only key is very useful when working with Groups. It can be used to
select "only" a channel or selection of channels from within a group. This
selection could be used to record other groups, subs, or cues. For example,
to select channels from a group live from the Stage display:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [STAGE]
2. Press [GROUP] [20]
Group 20 has channels 1 - 24
already recorded
3. Press [ONLY]
4. [5] [THRU] [10]
5. [FULL] or enter a level
using [AT] [#]
Only channels 5 - 10
appear on screen
By using Only you can also select certain devices from a group of devices.
For example, if group 5 contained pan and tilt trait levels for devices 1
through 8 you could select only the pan and tilt trait levels for device 3 and
record them into another group:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [DEVICE] display key
Opens Device display
2. Press [GROUP] [5]
3. Press [ONLY] [DEVICE] [3]
[ENTER]
Use Device key on
keypad
4. Use Trackball to place cursor
over device 3 trait name and
press [SELECT] to highlight
Trait captured for record
when white
5. Press [RECORD GROUP] [6]
6. Press [ENTER]
Only device 3 pan and
tilt positions are
recorded to group 6
Alternatively in step 4, you could press [DEVICE] [3] [ENTER] and adjust
the pan and tilt traits by using the trackball or encoder wheels.
To release traits so that they will not be recorded, press (RelAll). See
Chapter 10 Automated Devices for more information on working with
devices.
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Chapter 6 Groups
Using Groups in Cues
There are two ways groups can be used with cues with distinct differences
and potentially severe ramifications. The first method is to assign the group
to a cue. The second method is to recall the group and then record the
result into the cue. The first method of assigning the group to cue has the
benefit (or consequence) that when the group is changed, the use of the
group within the cue is changed as well. The second method of storing the
result of the group in the cue has the benefit (or consequence) that even if
the group is changed, the cue will never change.
To assign a group to a cue follow these steps:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [CUE] [#]
2. Press [GROUP] [#] [ENTER]
The assigned group number can be viewed in the "Grp" field of the
attributes line of the Preview display or from the Cuesheet display.
When a group is assigned to a cue, channels levels set within the cue or
from an active submaster or channel will take priority over that within
the group. This is true even if the level in the group is higher than any
other level.
To recall a group and record the result into a cue follow these steps:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [GROUP] [#] [FULL]
2. Press [RECORD CUE] [#] [ENTER]
You may, of course, bring up the group at a different level than full.
Groups can be added to, assigned, or stored in a cue the same way in
either preview or live displays.
See Chapter 5 Cues for more information on recording cues.
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Chapter 6 Groups
Using Groups in Submasters
There are two methods that groups can be used to set submaster levels.
The first method is to assign the group to a sub, the second method is to
just use the group’s levels to set sub levels.
With the first method, when a group is assigned to a submaster, the
group’s levels will be called up proportionately to the setting of the
submaster fader. When the group is edited, the submaster to which it was
assigned to will also be updated.
With the second method a group can also just be used to set levels for a
sub without actually assigning the group to the sub. Be aware that if you
use groups in this way any future updates to the group will not be reflected
in the sub.
To assign a group into a submaster follow this example:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [RECORD SUB] [#]
2. Press [GROUP] [#]
3. Press [ENTER]
To recall a group and record the result into a sub from a live display follow
these steps:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [GROUP] [#] [FULL]
2. Press [RECORD SUB] [#]
3. Press [ENTER]
To recall a group and record the result into a sub from the Group Preview
sub-display follow below:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press (SelSub) [#]
2. Press [GROUP] [#] [FULL]
Refer to Chapter 4 Submasters for more information on recording subs.
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Chapter 6 Groups
Using Groups in Effects
Groups can be used as building blocks when programming an effect. By
adding groups to effect steps you can create very complex and powerful
effects which can then be triggered by a submaster or cue. For example,
when using automated devices you could have a different group of
positions for each effect step. You could then add a different group of
colors to the same steps to create a moving pattern which changes color at
each step.
For more information on Effects and how to assign a group to an effect, see
Chapter 7 Effects.
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Chapter 7 Effects
Chapter 7 Effects
Think of an effect as a sequential series of lighting steps which contain time
attributes like cues but also can contain patterns. The content of an effect is
determined by the elements assigned to each of its steps and the attributes
defined for each step. Each effect step contains up to ten elements and
these elements may include individual channels, device traits, submasters,
groups or cues.
Effects are created from the Effect sub-display of the Stage or Preview
displays.
This chapter covers all areas of creating and using effects and contains the
following subjects:
• Effect Sub-Display
• Navigating the Effect Sub-Display
• Effect Sub-Display Soft-keys
• Effect Attributes
• Setting Amount of Effect Steps
• Effect Step Fade and Dwell Times
• Effect Patterns
• Creating and Editing Effects
• Creating a Step
• Element Hierarchy
• Adding Steps
• Inserting Steps
• Deleting Steps
• Testing an Effect
• Clearing Effects
• Assigning Effects to Cues
• Assigning Effects to Submasters
Some effects can also be created by using the "Real Time" recording
feature of Macros. See Chapter 8 Macros for more information.
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Chapter 7 Effects
Effect Sub-Display
The Effect sub-display is used to create new effects or edit existing effects.
The display lists the name and pattern type of the effect as well as the
elements and fade/dwell times for each effect step.
Effect Name
Step Number
Pattern Type
Dwell Time
Effect Elements
Fade Time
Figure 7.0 Effect Sub-Display
Navigating the Effect Sub-Display
Use the up/down and left/right arrow keys next to keypad to navigate the
the different areas of the display. Examples are given in procedures
throughout this chapter.
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Chapter 7 Effects
Effect Sub-Display Soft-Keys
Soft-key
Description
(ClrVal)
Clears the value of the current field.
(ClrStp)
Clears the values of the current step.
(InsStp)
Inserts a new step BEFORE your current
step position.
(DelStp)
Deletes the current step.
(AddStp)
Adds a new step at the END of the
current effect.
(DelAll)
Deletes all information for the current
effect and resets the effect to the default
blank two step effect.
Table 7.0 Effect Soft-keys
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Chapter 7 Effects
Effect Attributes
Setting Amount of Effect Steps
The number of steps consumed by all effects can be dynamically changed.
The console default is 100 and the maximum is 9,999. Be aware that effects
take a lot of memory and allowing too many steps can affect the remaining
number of cues, groups, submasters and channels. The number of effect
steps is set from the Setup display. To set the number of effect steps:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. [SETUP] [10] [ENTER]
2. Enter amount of steps
3. Press [ENTER]
See Chapter 12 System Settings for information on the Setup display.
Effect Fade and Dwell Times
Fade time: The fade time is the amount of time that it takes for the step to
fade in. Use the arrow keys to move the cursor to the fade time field for a
step. Use the keypad to enter the time. Valid times are 0 through 59
minutes, 59.9 seconds.
Dwell time: The dwell time is the amount of time that the step will hold
before moving to the next step. Use the arrow keys to move the cursor to
the dwell time field for a step. Use the keypad to enter the time. Valid times
are 0 through 59 minutes, 59.9 seconds.
If fade and dwell times are both set to 0.0 seconds for a particular step,
the effect will stop at that step and not continue. If this is not the
desired result, yet a minimum time is required, try setting the value to
0.1 seconds.
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Chapter 7 Effects
Effect Patterns
A pattern determines how the effect will play the steps. There are four
different patterns available:
Forward: The steps run from step 1 to the highest step number, then
begin again with step 1.
Reverse: The steps run from the highest step number down to step 1,
then begin again with the highest step.
Bounce: Each full cycle of the steps switches between the forward and
reverse patterns.
Random: The steps ignore their numerical sequence and execute in a
random order until all steps have become active once, then the random
sequence begins again.
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Chapter 7 Effects
Creating and Editing Effects
To create or edit an effect from either the Stage or Preview displays, press
(SelEff) [#] [ENTER].
If the number of the effect does not exist, a new effect will be created
at the given number.
Creating a Step
Follow the example below to create an effect with a channel assigned to
element one of step one:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [STAGE] or [PREVIEW]
2. Press (SelEff) [1] [ENTER]
3. Use the up arrow key to move
cursor to "Effect" field
4. Enter effect name using submaster
bump buttons.
5. Use the down arrow key to move
cursor to "Type" field
Hold down Leviton logo key
for uppercase letters
6. Use left/right arrow keys to select
type of pattern
7.
Use the down arrow key to move
cursor to "Fade" field
8. Press [3]
Enters 3.0 second fade
9. Use the down arrow key to move
cursor to "Dwell" field
10. Press [5]
Enters 5.0 second dwell
11. Use right arrow key to move
cursor to element 1 (purple box)
12. Press [20] [ENTER]
Selects channel 20 at FL
13. Press down arrow key to move
to level field
14. Press [75] [ENTER]
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Chapter 7 Effects
Assigning a group, sub, cue or device trait to an effect
To assign a group to an effect element, press [GROUP] [#] [ENTER] at
step 12 in the preceding example.
To assign a submaster to an effect element, press [SUB] [#] [ENTER] at
step 12 in the preceding example.
To assign a cue to an effect element, press [CUE] [#] [ENTER] at step 12
in the preceding example.
To assign a device trait to an element while in the Effect sub-display, follow
the example below:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [DEVICE]
Device list appears
2. Use the up/down arrow keys
to select device
3. Press [ENTER] [ENTER]
Trait list appears
4. Use the up/down arrow keys
to select trait
5. Press [ENTER]
6. Press the down arrow key
to move to setting field
7.
Press [ENTER]
8
Use the up/down arrow keys to select
the setting for the selected trait.
Trait setting list appears
9. Press [ENTER]
See Chapter 10 Automated Devices for additional information on automated
devices and their associated traits.
Element Hierarchy
There is a hierarchy associated for the elements within a step, with a higher
numbered element having precedence over a lower numbered element. For
example, if a group in element 1 contained a complete look with all traits of
a device recorded into it (pan, tilt, color, gobo, etc.) and element 2
contained just a gobo trait, the gobo in element 2 would have precedence
over the gobo in element 1 and would thus appear in the step when the
effect is run. By using the powerful functions of Element Hierarchy you can
create some very elaborate and dazzling effects.
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Chapter 7 Effects
Adding Steps
When an effect is first created there are only two steps in the effect. To add
more steps, press the (AddStp) soft-key. A new step will be added at the
END of the effect.
Inserting Steps
You can insert a step into an effect at any location by moving the cursor to
the desired location and then pressing the (InsStp) soft-key. The new step
will be inserted BEFORE the current step. All steps following the inserted
step will be renumbered.
Deleting Steps
To delete a selected step press the (DelStp) soft-key. All steps following
the deleted step are renumbered.
Testing an Effect
There are two ways to test an effect:
With the first method, when the effect is being created from the Stage
effect sub-display, press the (Live) soft-key. Pressing this soft-key will
cause the effect to be displayed on stage.
You must have the cursor in one of the effect elements for that step to
be displayed on stage.
The second method to test an effect is to assign it to a submaster. Please
see Assigning Effects to Submasters section further below.
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Chapter 7 Effects
Clearing Effects
From the Effect sub-display of Stage or Preview: To delete an individual
effect press the (DelAll) soft-key.
From the Clear menu of the Setup display: To clear all effects follow the
steps below:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP]
2. Press (MORE)
Changes soft-key level
3. Press (Clear)
Clear menu appears
4. Enter [4] “Clear Effects”
Warning appears
5. Enter [1] to confirm
All group memory
erased
6. Press any display key to exit
See Chapter 11 Memory Functions for more information on clearing
memory.
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Chapter 7 Effects
Assigning Effects to Cues
When an effect is assigned to a cue, the effect fades in during the up time
of the cue. The effect remains running until the next [GO] command is
executed, at which time the effect fades out during the down time of that
cue.
To assign an effect to a cue press [CUE] [#] [EFFECT] [#] [ENTER]
A [LOAD] fader [#] [GO] command fades out all running cue effects
immediately.
Please refer to Chapter 5 Cues for more information on working with cues.
Assigning Effects to Submasters
An effect assigned to a submaster may be activated anytime you move the
submaster fader up or press the sub bump button. An effect activated on a
submaster with the fader will run at the proportional level set by the sub
fader until the fader is taken to zero.
To assign an effect to a submaster press:
[RECORD SUB] [#] [EFFECT] [#] [ENTER]
Refer to Chapter 4 Submasters for more information on using submasters.
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Chapter 8 Macros
Chapter 8 Macros
A Macro is a series of keystrokes that you record to perform a complex
command with the press of a single macro key. Macros are especially useful
for executing command sequences that you repeat often. Some example
macros could include a macro that loads and plays a cue, a macro that
performs a channel check or a macro which records a show to floppy disk.
There are 64 pages of macros with eight macros per page for a total of 500
macros available on the console.
Macros can simply record a sequence of keystrokes or record the
keystrokes in real-time for playback of timed events.
This chapter includes the following sections:
• Macro Sub-Display
• Navigating the Macro Sub-Display
• Macro Paging
• Recording Macros
• Recording Real-Time Macros
• Nesting Macros
• Playing Macros
• Assigning Macros to Cues
• Assigning Macros to Submasters
• Editing Macros
• Clearing Macros
• Example Macros
• Load and Execute Cue
• Record Show to Disk
• Start Channel Check Automatically
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Chapter 8 Macros
Macro Sub-Display
Keystrokes
Active Macro Page # / Macro #
Macro Menu Options
Figure 8.0 Macro Sub-Display
To access the Macro sub-display, press [SETUP] (Macro).
Navigating the Macro Sub-Display
Menu selection in the General Options and Macro Specific sections is
performed by entering the menu item on the keypad then either entering
the appropriate value or selecting an option with the up/down arrow keys.
For example, to select a macro to record or edit press [4] followed by the
macro number. To set record mode to "Timed" press [2] then use the up/
down arrow keys to make the selection, then press [ENTER].
Edits to macro keystrokes are performed by first using the arrow keys to
move the cursor to the area to be edited then entering the type of edit
desired from the Macro Specific menu (Insert, Modify, or Delete). Please
see the Editing Macros section further in this chapter.
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Chapter 8 Macros
Macro Paging
A single macro page contains eight macros assigned to the eight macro
hard-keys labeled [M1] - [M8]. The number of macro pages available is
set from the Setup display. To change the number of pages, press
[SETUP] [9] [ENTER], enter the number of pages (up to 64) then press
[ENTER] again. For more information on the Setup display see Chapter 12
System Settings.
Increasing the number of macro pages will affect the remaining number
of cues, groups, effects and submaster pages. Only use what you need.
The current macro page number is shown on the macro soft-key (MP #)
while in the Stage, Playback, Preview or Cuesheet displays.
For example, to change the current macro page 1 to macro page 3 while in
the Stage or Playback displays:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [STAGE] or [PLAYBACK]
2. Press (MP 1)
Command Line reads:
"Macro Page"
3. Press [3] [ENTER]
Soft-key changes to (MP 3)
To change the current macro page 1 to macro page 3 while in the Cuesheet
or Preview displays:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [CUESHEET] or [PREVIEW]
2. Press (More) in Cuesheet or
press (More) twice in Preview
Changes soft-key level
3. Press (MP 1)
Command Line reads:
"Macro Page"
4. Press [3] [ENTER]
Soft-key changes to (MP 3)
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Chapter 8 Macros
Recording Macros
A macro may contain both hard-key and soft-key keystrokes, but cannot
record fader or trackball functions. A macro may contain up to 64
keystrokes. You may "nest" macros by using another macro inside a macro;
both will be executed with a single keystroke.
Macros are recorded literally as a series of keystrokes. When you record a
level setting command such as [1] [THRU] [10] [AT] [FULL], the macro
will work in any display that accepts that command syntax. If you want to
have the macro work only in a designated display, such as Stage, press the
display key as the first keystroke in the macro.
Be aware that different displays can interpret the same keystrokes
differently. For example, the command [12] [AT] [5] [ENTER] has
different results in the Stage and Patch displays. In the Stage display it sets
channel 12 at 50%, while in the Patch display it patches channel 12 to
dimmer 5. This is why you should usually start the macro with a display
key.
To end a macro recording, the macro hard-key which is the same number
as the macro selected for record must be pressed.
For example, to create a macro which automatically clears all levels from
the Stage display:
1. Press [SETUP] (Macro)
Opens Macro sub-display
2. Press [4]
Menu item 4: Macro Number
3. Enter macro number [1]
4. Press [1]
Menu item 1: Record Macro
Initiates macro 1 recording
5. Press [STAGE]
Note "Macro Recording"
at top of display
6. Press [ENTER] [AT] [00] [CLEAR]
7.
Press macro key [M1]
Ends recording
See Example Macros section further in this chapter for more examples
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Chapter 8 Macros
Recording Real-Time Macros
In addition to simply recording keystrokes, the console allows for “Real
Time” recording of macros. This feature can be very useful in building
special types of effects and playing them back as timed macros rather than
the sometimes tedious efforts required to build certain effects.
For example, bump buttons can be used to bump channels in a specific
order in a specific timed sequence to create an effect:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP] (Macro)
Opens macro sub-display
2. Press [4]
Menu item 4: Macro Number
3. Enter macro number to record
1-8
4. Press [2]
Menu item 2: Record Mode
5. Use the up/down arrow keys
to select "Timed"
6. Press [ENTER]
7.
Press [1]
8. Press [STAGE]
Menu item 1: Record Macro
Initiates macro recording
Note "Macro Recording"
at top of display
9. Press desired bump buttons
10. Press [M1]
Ends recording. Macro Key
number pressed must be
same as initial macro
selected from menu.
To view the actual timing sequence of the keystroke steps, press Menu item
5 from the Macro sub-display.
There are three options to choose from, use the arrow keys to make the
selection then press [ENTER]:
Reference Last: Displays the time between presses of buttons in the
macro.
Reference Begin: Displays a running total of the time accumulated for the
run of the entire macro.
Not Timed: Displays the keystrokes only.
Note that edits may be made to the individual times, see Editing Macros
section further in this chapter.
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Chapter 8 Macros
Nesting Macros
A macro may be nested within a macro. When the first macro runs, the
nested macro will automatically run when the nested macro key number is
sequenced.
For example to nest macro 2 within macro 1:
1. Press [SETUP] (Macro)
Opens Macro sub-display
2. Press [4]
Menu item 4: Macro Number
3. Enter macro number [1]
4. Press [1]
Menu item 1: Record Macro
Initiates macro 1 recording
5. Press desired keystrokes for macro 1
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6. Press [M2]
Nests macro 2 within
macro 1
7.
Ends macro 1 recording
Press [M1]
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Chapter 8 Macros
Playing Macros
To playback a macro, select the macro page from the Stage or Playback
displays then press the macro key you recorded to:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [STAGE] or [PLAYBACK]
2. Press (MP #)
Command Line reads:
"Macro Page"
3. Enter macro page
4. Press macro key 1 - 8
Macro executes
If the macro is a timed macro, you must first turn on the "Timed Execute"
option in the Macro sub-display:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP] (Macro)
Opens Macro sub-display
2. Press [6]
Menu item 6: Timed Execute
3. Use the up/down arrow keys
to select "ON"
4. Press [ENTER]
Assigning Macros to Cues
A macro may be assigned to a cue so that when the cue runs, the macro
will trigger. Macros are assigned to cues from the Preview and Cuesheet
displays: Press [CUE] [#] (More) (Macro) [#] [ENTER].
To delete a macro from a cue:
Press [CUE] [#] (Macro) [ENTER] (specify NO number).
Refer to Chapter 5 Cues for information on recording cues.
Assigning Macros to Submasters
A macro may be assigned to a submaster so that when the submaster runs,
the macro will trigger. Macros are assigned to submasters from the Preview
Submaster sub-display, for example:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [PREVIEW] (SelSub) [1] [ENTER]
2. Press (More)
Changes soft-key level
3. Press (Macro) [7] [ENTER]
Macro 7 assigned to sub 1
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Chapter 8 Macros
Editing Macros
Macros may be edited in one of three ways; Insert, Modify or Delete.
To insert a keystroke in a macro:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP] (Macro)
Opens Macro sub-display
2. Press [4]
Menu item 4: Macro Number
3. Enter macro number to edit
1-8
4. Use the arrow keys to select the
portion of macro to perform insert
5. Press [7]
Menu item 7: Insert
6. Press the keystroke to be inserted
Keystroke inserted, all
following keystrokes are
moved down list
To modify a keystroke in a macro:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP] (Macro)
Opens Macro sub-display
2. Press [4]
Menu item 4: Macro Number
3. Enter macro number to edit
1-8
4. Use the arrow keys to select the
portion of macro to modify
5. Press [8]
Menu item 8: Modify
6. Press the new keystroke
Keystroke modified.
To delete a keystroke in a macro:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP] (Macro)
Opens Macro sub-display
2. Press [4]
Menu item 4: Macro Number
3. Enter macro number to edit
1-8
4. Use the arrow keys to select the
portion of macro to delete
5. Press [9] to delete
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Keystroke deleted
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Chapter 8 Macros
Clearing Macros
To clear an individual macro:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP] (Macro)
Opens Macro sub-display
2. Press [4]
Menu item 4: Macro Number
3. Enter macro number
1-8
4. Press [9] repetitively to delete
all keystrokes
To clear all macros from memory:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP]
2. Press (More)
Changes soft-key level
3. Press (Clear)
Clear menu appears
4. Enter [5] “Clear Macros”
Warning appears
5. Enter [1] to confirm
All macro memory erased
6. Press any display key to exit
See Chapter 11 Memory Functions for more information on clearing
memory.
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Chapter 8 Macros
Example Macros
Load and Execute a Cue
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP] (Macro)
Opens Macro sub-display
2. Press [4]
Menu item 4: Macro Number
3. Enter macro number [2]
4. Press [1]
Menu item 1: Record Macro
Initiates macro 2 recording
5. Press [LOAD]
6. Enter cue number
7.
Press [GO]
8. Press macro key [M2]
Ends recording
Record Show to Disk
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP] (Macro)
Opens Macro sub-display
2. Press [4]
Menu item 4: Macro Number
3. Enter macro number [8]
4. Press [1]
Menu item 1: Record Macro
Initiates macro 8 recording
5. Press [SETUP]
6. Press (Disk)
7.
Press [1]
"Save Files"
8. Press [ENTER]
9. Press macro key [M8]
Ends macro recording
After this macro is run, you will have to select or enter the name of the
file to be saved.
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Chapter 8 Macros
Start Channel Check Automatically
This example is a timed macro:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP] (Macro)
Opens Macro sub-display
2. Press [4]
Menu item 4: Macro Number
3. Enter macro number [6]
4. Press [2]
Menu item 2: Record Mode
5. Use the up/down arrow keys
to select "Timed"
6. Press [ENTER]
7.
Press [1]
Menu item 1: Record Macro
Initiates macro 6 recording
8. Press [STAGE]
9. Press the (More) soft-key
10. Press the (ChnChk) soft-key
11. Press [1] [AT] [FULL]
Captures the starting
channel. Specify any desired
check level.
12. Use the right arrow key to
scroll through channels
Level will show in boxed red
video
13. Press [CLEAR] to stop channel check
14. Press macro key [M6]
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Chapter 8 Macros
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Chapter 9 Patching
Chapter 9 Patching
Before you begin patching, you should set the of number of channels and
dimmers that you will be using. Please see Chapter 12 System Settings for
more information. By using only the amount of channels and dimmers
needed, you will speed up processing and allow for the greatest number of
cues, macros, effects, etc.
The console is shipped with Ports A and B configured as a 1 to 1 patch for
conventional channels and dimmers. Port C is configured for Automated
Devices. Although you can reconfigure your console as needed, it is
recommended to start with the factory configuration until you become
further acquainted with the console.
This chapter will cover the following topics:
• Patch Display
• Patch Parameters
• Navigating the Patch Display
• Patching 1 To 1
• Custom patching Channels to Dimmers
• Proportional Levels
• Patching Automated Devices
• Dimmer Check
• Profiles
• Navigating the Profile Sub-Display
• Creating and Assigning Custom Profiles
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Chapter 9 Patching
Patch Display
To enter the Patch display press the [PATCH] hard-key.
Patching is the process by which console control channels are associated
with, or patched to, dimmer output addresses. As you will recall from earlier
sections of this guide, your console has 1,536 dimmer (DMX or CMX) output
addresses and has either 384 or 600 (depending on the model)
conventional lighting control channels.
Automated devices are not dealt with the same way as conventional
control channels. Automated device patches can be viewed from the
Patch display, however they are patched from the Device Assignments
sub-display of the Setup display. See Chapter 10 Automated Devices for
additional information.
Patch Parameters
On the control console there are six elements of a patch assignment and
they are as follows (see Figure 9.0 also):
Port: There are three ports; A, B, and C. Each port is capable of sending
512 DMX dimmer control signals.
Dimmer Number: This is the DMX or CMX Dimmer address.
Channel Number: This is the channel that the dimmer responds to.
Level: This is the proportional level that an individual dimmer will output.
The default is 100%. Proportional levels are shown in the third column of
the Patch display (%).
Profile: This is the output curve. The default curve (Profile 0) is linear and
not editable. There are 16 customizable profiles available. Dimmer profile
assignments are shown in the fourth column of the Patch display (Pr).
Device: This is the automated device trait that a given dimmer output
address responds to. Device numbers are shown in the fifth column of the
Patch display.
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Chapter 9 Patching
Channel
Dimmer
Proportional Level
Assigned Profile
Figure 9.0 Sample Patch Display
Navigating the Patch Display
To navigate the Patch display, use the arrow keys next to the keypad to
scroll or page through the patch list. The up/down arrow keys will scroll and
the left/right arrow keys will page.
You can also enter the dimmer or channel number directly to view an
assignment. For example, press [DIMMER] [05] [ENTER] to view
dimmer 05 or press [10] [ENTER] to view channel 10.
Before we get into further details about how to create patches, let’s look at
the different ways the information can be presented:
Viewing Specific Ports, [S1]
The console outputs three ports of dimmer data, referred to as Ports A, B,
and C. Each port outputs up to 512 dimmer channels of data for a total of
1,536 dimmer output channels. Viewing the patch by port allows you to
narrow your view to only those control channels which are patched to a
specific port. Pressing the [S1] soft-key toggles between viewing Port A,
Port B, Port C and viewing all ports.
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Chapter 9 Patching
Ordering of Dimmer Numbers, [S2]
You have the option of viewing and addressing dimmers either 1 - 512, per
port, or 1 - 1536 across all three ports. This soft-key toggles in between the
two views.
Sorted by Channel or Sorted by Dimmer, [S3]
This soft-key toggles between sorting either by console control channel or
by output dimmer.
Patching 1 To 1
Use the (1 to 1) soft-key in the Patch display to patch each channel to the
dimmer of the same number (ch 1 at dim 1, ch 2 at dim 2, etc.). This is the
default setting for the patch table. Parked dimmers, Non-Dim dimmers,
proportional dimmer levels, and profiles are retained when you execute this
command. (Refer to Chapter 3 Setting Channel Levels for more information
on Parked Dimmers.)
Follow these steps to create a 1 to 1 patch:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [PATCH]
Opens Patch display
2. Press (1 to 1)
Prompt reads: "Are you sure
you want to create a 1 to 1
patch? Enter 1 = Yes, 2 = No,
3 = Select Port"
3. Enter [1] on Keypad
1 to 1 patch created
Selecting option 1 in the example above automatically patches all three
ports (A, B and C) to a 1 to 1 patch. This may be unwanted in some
situations; for example, when you want automated devices on Port C.
Patches for automated devices are defined from the Device
Assignments sub-display of the Setup display. See Chapter 10
Automated Devices for additional information.
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Chapter 9 Patching
Custom Patching Channels to Dimmers
You can create a custom patch by pressing the number of the channel that
you want to assign, followed by the [DIMMER] key. At this point, you can
enter dimmer number assignment(s).
Follow these example steps to patch channel 2 to dimmer 5 at full:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [PATCH]
Opens Patch display
2. Enter [2] on keypad
Selects channel 2 for patching
3. Press [DIMMER]
4. Enter [5] on keypad
Selects dimmer 5
Use the [AND], [MINUS]
and [THRU] keys for multiple
dimmers.
5. Press [ENTER]
Command line reads:
"Channel 2 To Dimmer 5"
In all patching commands, it is not necessary to specify channel
numbers with a channel key. The console automatically assumes that
the channel is addressed in the first part of the command and the
dimmer in the second part, unless the [DIMMER] key is pressed first.
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Chapter 9 Patching
Proportional Levels
Proportional patching is an advanced feature which when applied correctly
can be very powerful. Proportional patching works very similar to a more
familiar concept of proportional submasters. With submasters, channels are
patched to the submaster at varying levels. The submaster controls those
channels from 0 up to the channel max all at the same proportional rate.
For example, imagine a situation where you have two fixtures both aimed
at the same area. Since both fixtures always work together, you've decided
to patch them into the same control channel. Suppose for a moment
though that one of the fixtures has a significantly shorter throw than the
other fixture. The result is that one fixture is brighter than the other.
Proportionally patching can fix this problem. You can patch the brighter
fixture at a lower level to the same control channel as the other fixture.
When done correctly, both fixtures will be the same brightness. This is only
one example of proportional patching, there are many other uses for this
feature.
When you assign a proportional level to a dimmer, it limits the maximum
output of the dimmer to the percentage specified. For example, a dimmer
assigned a proportional level of 50% never exceeds 50% output level, even
when the channel controlling that dimmer is at Full. In this case, a channel
level of Full provides 50% dimmer output. The same control channel at
50% would provide a dimmer output of 25%. Proportional level
assignments are shown in the third column of the patch display labeled
"%".
Follow these example steps to patch channel 2 to dimmer 5 at 50%:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [PATCH]
Opens Patch display
2. Enter [2] on keypad
Selects channel 2 for patching
3. Press [DIMMER]
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4. Enter [5] on keypad
Use the [AND], [MINUS]
and [THRU] keys for multiple
dimmers.
5. Press [AT] [50]
You can also press the
(DimLvl) soft-key instead of
[AT]
6. Press [ENTER]
Command line reads:
"Channel 2 To Dimmer 5 At
50%"
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Chapter 9 Patching
Patching Automated Devices
Automated Devices are patched from the Device Assignments sub-display
of the Setup display. See Chapter 10 Automated Devices for additional
information.
In the Patch display, the location of automated device patching is shown by
device numbers in the device column. For example, the screen shot in
Figure 9.1 below shows the 16 device traits of Device 1 (Dv 1) patched to
dimmer addresses 1-16 on Port C.
Dimmer Addresses
Device Traits
Figure 9.1 Patch Display showing Devices
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Chapter 9 Patching
Dimmer Check
Figure 9.2 Dimmer Check PopUp
The Dimmer Check utility lets you test the output of individual dimmers.
This is useful for verifying lamps, or investigating to see which fixtures are
connected to which dimmers. Follow these steps to check dimmers at full:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [PATCH]
2. Press [S1] to select the port
Port A is used in this example
3. Press (DimChk)
4. Enter [1] on Keypad
Command line reads:
"Check Dimmer 1"
5. Press [ENTER]
Dimmer Check popup appears
showing Dimmer 1a.
6. Use the up/down arrow keys
to consecutively check other dimmers
Press [CLEAR] to stop
Dimmer Check
Follow these steps to check dimmers at a given level:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [PATCH]
2. Press [S1] to select the port
Port A is used in this example
3. Press (DimChk) [1]
4. Press (DimLvl) [75]
Command line reads:
"Check Dimmer 1 at 75"
5. Press [ENTER]
Dimmer Check popup appears
showing Dimmer 1a.
6. Use the up/down arrow keys
to consecutively check other dimmers
Press [CLEAR] to stop
Dimmer Check
You can also check dimmers from the Dimmer Output Sub-Display,
please see Chapter 3 Setting Channel Levels.
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Chapter 9 Patching
Profiles
A Profile is a method of altering the output level of the console relative to
that of the level of the channel. For example, the default curve (profile 0)
dictates that when the console dictates a dimmer output of 25%, the
console output is at 25%. When the console dictates a dimmer level of
50%, the console outputs 50%, 75%/75%, etc. This is called a linear
profile, or dimmer curve. (See figure 9.3 below). This is the default
behavior and most of the time is exactly what you want. Let's say however
that you have connected a dimmer to a table lamp. When you dim the table
lamp, you will discover that it dims at a different rate than other fixtures.
You notice that it comes on slower, and then achieves full brightness faster.
To correct for this, you could create a profile which corrects these
problems. Look at the curve in figure 9.4 below, it represents a profile
which would correct this behavior.
Figure 9.3 Default Linear Curve
Figure 9.4 Early Rise Curve
A Dimmer Check always by passes any dimmer profiles (please see section
above titled Dimmer Check).
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Chapter 9 Patching
Non-Dim Dimmers (Virtual Non-Dims)
You can make any dimmer behave like a non-dim dimmer by creating a
custom profile that forces the dimmer to full at some point during the fade.
This means that the actual dimmer output on stage is zero until the dimmer
level in the fade reaches a “trigger level” at which point the dimmer output
immediately goes to Full. This is useful for practical lighting on your set,
such as table lamps, or other lights that actors may turn on “on cue.”
Remember however, that the dimmer will need to be recorded at FULL in
the cue. See figure 9.5 below for an example of a non-dim profile.
When you assign a virtual non-dim at the console, it has no effect on
the settings at your dimmer rack. The dimmer output continues to be
regulated voltage if your dimmer rack regulates the output voltage of
your dimmers. For this reason, the virtual non-dim setting is not
recommended for use with motors, ballasts, and other inductive loads.
A “true non-dim” setting at the dimmer rack should be used for these
types of loads. Consult the operation manual for your dimmer rack.
Figure 9.5 Non-Dim
Figure 9.6 Filament Pre-Heat
Another type of a custom profile you may wish to create is a profile which
pre-heats the lamp filament as this may increase lamp life. See figure 9.6
above.
The default curve (Profile 0) of the console is linear and not editable. There
are 16 customizable profiles available for editing in the console and
procedures are shown in the following section in this chapter.
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Chapter 9 Patching
Dimmer Output
Channel Level
Figure 9.7 Profile Sub-Display
Navigating the Profile Sub-Display
Edits to profiles are made from the Profile sub-display of the Setup display.
The current profile for editing is shown at the top of the sub-display. Each
profile is divided into 16 equal sections (Compressed Mode, see below) and
numbered in increments of roughly 6.25%. Each 6.25% increment is called
a fade point.
The default curve (profile 0) is a straight line from 0 to 255 (though 240 is
shown, the step beyond which is not displayed is 255 meaning that at the
16 point, 6.25% of the total assigned output of the dimmer has been
achieved, at the 32 point, 12.5%, etc).
When the profile is assigned to a dimmer, the left column of numbers
represents the dimmer output and the bottom row of numbers represents
the channel level. Use the left/right arrow keys to move to the desired
channel level then use the up/down arrow keys to move to the desired
dimmer output level. See further below for an example procedure.
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Chapter 9 Patching
Compressed Mode vs. Expanded Mode
The default mode when viewing or creating a profile is called Compressed
Mode and shows the profile divided into 16 equal sections. Expanded Mode
allows you to view or create a profile in more detail and is divided up into
255 equal sections.
To switch to Expanded mode press the [ENTER] key while in Compressed
mode. To switch back to Compressed mode, press the [ENTER] key again.
Creating and Assigning Custom Profiles
Follow the example steps below to create a custom profile:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP]
2. Press (Profil) soft-key
3. Press [PROFILE] on keypad
4. Enter [#] for new profile number
5. Press [ENTER]
6. Use the left/right arrow keys to move
channel level to desired column
7.
Use the up/down arrow keys to move
dimmer output to desired level
Follow the steps below to assign a custom profile to a dimmer:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [PATCH]
2. Press [DIMMER] [1]
Selects Dimmer for Profile
to be assigned to.
3. Press [PROFILE] [1]
Command line reads:
Dimmer 1 Profile 1
4. Press [ENTER]
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Chapter 10 Automated Devices
Chapter 10 Automated Devices
A special feature of the control console is that in addition to the control of
conventional stage lighting dimmers, the console provides a special set of
control features for the control of automated devices. Separated from the
conventional control channels are 512 dedicated channels reserved
exclusively for controlling automated devices. Mapping of device traits to
the control console is achieved through a rich Device Definition Language
(DDL), enabling virtually any DMX controlled automated device personality
to be defined.
This chapter explains how to assign (patch) automated devices in the
control console and how to use console controls such as the encoder
wheels and trackball to operate and program automated devices in order to
record cues, groups, submasters and effects. Creating and editing DDLs is
also covered.
• Understanding your Automated Devices
• Device Traits and DMX 512
• Assigning Automated Devices
• Initial Device Assignment
• Custom Device Address Assignment
• Clearing a Device Assignment
• Assigning a Device Dimmer Trait to a Channel Fader or Submaster
• Using Automated Devices
• The LCD and Encoder Wheels
• The Device Display
• Recording Cues
• Using Submasters
• Using Groups
• Using Effects
• Blind Recording and Editing of Devices
• Some Programming Hints
• Device Definition Language (DDL)
• Loading a new DDL into the console
• Creating and Editing DDLs
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Chapter 10 Automated Devices
Understanding Your Automated Devices
Moving lights, scrollers, fog machines etc., all fall into the family of
automated devices that may be controlled by the console. It is EXTREMELY
important that before you try to use an automated device that you become
familiar with its operation by reading the manual that came with your
device. Learning how each device works as well as how to make them
respond the way you want them to is the first step in working with
automated devices.
AC Power requirements: Some units need power other than 120V power
from a wall plug, or need a "non-dimming" power source.
Mounting Requirements: Simply put, since most of these fixtures move
or at least the beam of light moves, an eye for visual obstructions, space
and physical mounting requirements is a concern.
Device Traits and DMX 512
Device Traits are the specific parameters of a moving light or other
automated device. Examples of device traits could be pan, tilt, color, gobo,
zoom, etc. The traits of a device are controlled by individual DMX data
channels which are output from the console. Before the traits can be
controlled, they must be patched (addressed) to specific dimmer addresses
within the console. When DMX was first used to address only conventional
dimmers, then the "512” means up to 512 dimmers could be addressed
from a single data stream (port). With automated devices, this relationship
changes since a single device may need a number of data channels in order
to operate its traits. The example below is a 7 channel device that uses 2
channels for Pan, 2 channels for Tilt, 1 channel for Color, 1 channel for
Gobo and 1 channel for Dimmer. The DMX start address is 21.
DMX Data
1 ...
CH 1
Dev Traits:
21 - 27
CH 2
Pan
CH 3
Tilt
CH 4
... 512
CH 5
CH 6
CH 7
Color
Gobo
Dim
Figure 10.0 Device Traits to DMX Assignment
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Assigning Devices
Before you can control an automated device, the console must first know
what device it is going to control. This is done by "assigning" (patching) a
device to a DMX dimmer address and port. Assigning a device is done from
the Device Assignment sub-display of the Setup display (Fig 10.1 below).
To access this display press [SETUP] (Device).
Device Assignment
Start Address
Data Port
Figure 10.1 Device Assignment Sub Display
Device Menu
Navigating the Device Assignment Sub Display
Use the arrow keys to navigate within the Device Assignments area of the
display.
To select a menu item from the Device Menu, enter the menu item then
press [ENTER]. See Table 10.0 on the following page for descriptions of
the Device Menu items.
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Device Menu Item
Description
1. Edit Assignment
Use to assign the device, starting
address and DMX port.
2. Clear Assignment
Use to remove the device assignment
highlighted.
3. Edit Definition
Use to edit a device definition in
the device library.
4. Add Definition
Use to initiate the routine to add a new
device to the device library.
5. Delete Definition
Use to deletea device from the library.
Table 10.0 Device Menu Items
Initial Device Assignment
Figure 10.2 Device Library popup menu
Selecting "Edit Assignment" from the Device menu (Figure 10.1) will open
up the Device Library popup menu (Figure 10.2) so you can select your
device. Please see the procedure on the following page for an example.
For a list of the devices which are factory pre-loaded into the console, see
Appendix D Resident Devices.
When making the initial device assignments, the console will search for the
first available dimmer address not in use by a conventional channel. After
the initial assignment is done, you can then assign the device to a specific
dimmer address (see Custom Device Address Assignment further below).
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The console is shipped with Ports A and B configured as a 1 to 1 patch
for conventional channels and dimmers. Port C is clear and configured
for automated devices. This is also the default patch configuration after
performing a hard clear. See Chapter 9 Patching and Chapter 11
Memory Functions for more information.
Follow these example steps to initially assign a device:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP]
Opens Setup display
2. Press (Device)
Enters Device Assignment
sub-display
3. Use arrow keys to highlight the
desired device number
4. Press [1] or [ENTER]
Device menu item 1:
"Edit Assignment". Opens
device library menu.
5. Scroll device library menu using
up/down arrow keys to select device
6. Press [ENTER] to complete selection
If your device is not listed in the device library, you may need to add a
new Device Definition. Refer to the Device Definition Language section
later in this chapter.
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Custom Device Address Assignment
In the previous procedure, when the initial assignment was first made, the
console looked at its patch tables and assigned the device to the first
dimmer address that was not assigned to a conventional channel and has
enough unpatched consecutive channels following for the number of
channels required for the device. This may not be the address you wish the
fixture to respond to. If not, then the next step in making an assignment is
setting a new start address. In this step, two decisions must be made: First,
is what port from the console is to be used. Second, is what the starting
address of the selected device will be. Follow the steps below to assign a
new starting address and port while in the Device Assignment sub-display:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Use arrow keys to highlight the
device dimmer number
2. Use keypad to enter the desired
starting address
3. Press [ENTER]
Confirms assignment
4. Use arrow keys to highlight the port
5. Press [A] [B] or [C] to select
desired port (if necessary)
Use the submaster bump
button keys for letters
6. Press [ENTER]
Confirms assignment
Clearing a Device Assignment
Whereas from show to show, conventional lighting assignments may
change, the addressing of the automated devices tends to be more of a
constant. Therefore, when you clear the console memory or the console
patch, the assignment of devices is NOT cleared. These assignments are
cleared from the Device Assignment screen of the Setup display. For more
information on clearing conventional lighting assignments see Chapter 9
Patching and Chapter 11 Memory Functions.
The following steps show how to clear a device assignment:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP] (Device)
2. Use arrow keys to highlight the
desired device number to be cleared
3. Press [2]
Device menu item 2:
"Clear Assignment".
4. Press [ENTER] to confirm
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Assigning a Device Dimmer Trait to a Channel
Fader or Submaster
A dimmer address may be assigned to both a conventional channel and a
device trait at the same time. A device’s dimmer trait can be patched in this
way to directly control the device’s intensity via a conventional channel. The
channel could then be recorded into a submaster fader for quick access.
This would allow you to quickly adjust the device’s dimmer intensity from a
submaster while running the show.
Although possible, it is not recommended to patch other device
traits in this way.
Follow these steps to assign a device’s dimmer trait to a submaster:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [PATCH]
Opens Patch Display
2. Select Port using [S1] key
3. Enter [1] on keypad
Selects Channel 1
Hint: Use a free channel that
will not be controlling a
conventional light
4. Press [DEVICE] [1]
Use Device key on Keypad,
not Device Display key
5. Press [AT]
Device Trait popup menu
opens
6. Select “Dimmer” from Device
Trait popup menu using the
up/down arrow keys
Command line reads:
"Channel 1 To Device 1 Trait
Dimmer"
7.
Press [ENTER]
8. Exit Patch display by pressing
[DEVICE] or [STAGE]
9. Press [1] [FULL]
Channel 1 at full to be
recorded into Sub 1
10. Press [RECORD SUB] [1]
Device 1 Dimmer trait now
accessible from Sub 1
Hint: By patching the dimmer or shutter trait for multiple devices to a
single channel, you can create a master blackout or dimmer for all your
automated devices.
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Using Automated Devices
Submasters
Playback Faders
Encoder Wheels
Figure 10.3 Device Console Controls Trackball
LCD display
Device Default Key
After the automated devices have been properly assigned in the console
you can start controlling your devices by using the console’s encoder
wheels and trackball. The encoder wheels are used to control device traits
such as color or gobo while the trackball is usually used to control pan and
tilt traits (other traits can also be assigned to the trackball, this is done via
the Device Definition Language which is explained later in this chapter).
In order to control a device you first have to select the device that you wish
to use. It is possible to select either a single device or a group of similar
devices, see the following procedure:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press the [DEVICE] display key
Devices must already have
been assigned
2. Press [DEVICE] [#] [THRU] [#]
Select similar devices
3. Press [ENTER]
LCD opens showing selected
device’s traits
Once you have control of a device(s) you can then start recording cues,
submasters, groups and effects for your show. It is important to note the
power of using groups when programming automated devices. Example
recording procedures are given later in this chapter, see Recording Cues,
Using Submasters, Using Groups and Using Effects.
Assigned devices also appear in the Device display, which allows you to
view the devices and select or deselect the device’s traits for record. Refer
to the Device Display section in this chapter for more information.
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LCD and Encoder Wheels
As explained above, the encoder wheels are used to control the individual
traits of devices. To modify a trait, turn the encoder wheel to increase or
decrease the trait value. To view additional traits in the LCD use the left/
right arrow keys to scroll through the traits, to page through the traits,
press and hold the Leviton logo key while using the left/right arrow keys.
For example, to select and control devices 1 through 4, follow below:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [DEVICE] [1] [THRU] [4]
Use [DEVICE] key on keypad
2. Press [ENTER]
Device Traits and Levels
Encoder Wheels
Leviton Logo Key
LCD Scroll Keys
LCD Brightness Control
Figure 10.4 LCD and Encoder Wheels
The LCD display and encoder wheels function with "live" type displays
such as the Device display and "blind" type displays such as the
Preview or Tracksheet displays. The LCD display will close when
switching between these two types of displays.
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The Device Display
The primary display used when programming automated devices is the
Device display. The Device display is a "live" display, meaning that any
changes made to device traits here will be visible on stage.
The other displays in which you can view and adjust trait levels of devices
are the Preview displays, Effect display and Tracksheet display.
Traits selected for record (white)
Figure 10.5 Device Display
Active Device (Blue Arrows)
Figure 10.6
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Traits not selected (gray)
Traits under control of Trackball
or Encoder Wheels (boxed amber)
"DV" icon
Additional traits to view (Amber Arrows)
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Navigating the Device Display
You can view up to five consecutive devices at a time in the Device display.
Other assigned devices can be viewed in the display by using the up/down
arrow keys which will scroll the screen. Blue colored arrows indicate which
device is currently active in the view. See Figure 10.6 on previous page.
The left/right arrow keys are used to scroll through the traits of devices
which have more than seven traits. To page through the additional traits,
press and hold the Leviton logo key while pressing the left/right arrow keys.
An amber colored double arrow indicates if there are more traits to the left
or right of the current view. See Figure 10.6 on previous page.
Device Display Colors and Conventions
It is especially important to note the color of the device traits when
recording. See following table for details (see examples in Figure 10.5):
Trait Color
Description
Gray
Trait will not be recorded.
White
Trait is selected for record. Adjusting the trackball or
an encoder wheel will cause trait to be selected for
record.
Boxed Amber
Trait is under control of trackball or encoder wheels.
Table 10.1 Device Trait Colors
A "DV" icon at the top right of the display appears when a trait is under
control of the trackball or encoder wheels (see Figure 10.6). When
active, the trackball and encoder wheels have priority over device(s)
running in cues, subs or effects and allow you to take live control of the
device(s). Pressing [CLEAR] will release control.
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The following table gives descriptions of the Device display soft-keys:
Soft-key
Description
(Q Mode)
Switches Cue Record Modes, see Chapter 5 Cues for more
information.
(KillDv)
Quickly closes the shutter of devices which are active on
stage. For example, press (KillDv) [#] [ENTER].
(SelAll)
Selects all device traits of assigned devices for record.
Trait names will appear in white.
(RelAll)
De-selects all device traits of assigned devices so they will
not be recorded. Trait names will appear in gray.
(SelP&T)
Selects only pan and tilt traits of assigned devices for
record. The pan and tilt trait names will appear in white.
(RelP&T)
De-selects only pan and tilt traits of assigned devices so
they will not be recorded. The pan and tilt trait names will
appear in gray.
(NoTrkb) /
(Trkbal)
Disables trackball / Enables trackball. See note below.
(Monitr)
Switches active monitors if using secondary video option.
Table 10.2 Device Display Soft-keys
It may sometimes be desirable to disable the trackball while making
encoder wheel adjustments. This will prevent the trackball from
accidentally being moved very slightly which may affect the final
record. To disable the trackball, press (NoTrkb) in the Device display.
To re-enable the trackball, press (Trkbal).
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Recording Cues
As with conventional channels, the easiest way to program automated
device cues is live on stage. This allows you to create a particular look and
then save it. While recording an individual device or a group of devices,
always keep in mind the following:
Trait Selection: Only selected traits (white) will be recorded, unselected
traits (gray) are ignored. See the preceding Device Display section for more
information on trait colors.
Cue Record Mode: As with conventional lights, levels or positions of
devices can track cue to cue using Tracking. See the following Devices and
Cue Tracking section for additional information.
Timing: In addition to the normal fade times of cues, you also have the
ability to change the speed of some traits of automated devices. This
depends on the particular device and is sometimes known as motor speed
or "M Speed". Consult your device manual for further information.
Follow the example below to record a cue with all the traits of a device
recorded:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press the [DEVICE] display key
Devices must already have
been assigned
2. Select devices by pressing
LCD opens showing
[DEVICE] [#] [THRU] [#] [ENTER] selected devices
3. Press the [DEFAULT] key next to LCD Devices will go to their default
settings and all traits will be
selected (white) for record
4. Adjust encoder wheels or trackball
to desired look
5. Press [RECORD CUE] [#] [ENTER]
Cue recorded
6. Press (RelAll) (Optional)
This will release all traits to
prevent recording into further
cues.
Refer to Chapter 5 Cues for more information on working with cues.
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Devices and Cue Tracking
Cues using automated devices can be created easily by using Tracking as
the cue record mode. Tracking allows you to record a number of sequential
cues and adjust just the traits you want to change for each cue while not
affecting the other traits which track. Refer to Chapter 5 Cues for more
information on Tracking.
The example Tracksheet display below shows how Tracking can be used to
record cues 1 - 3. Only the pan and tilt positions changed in each cue while
the other traits remained the same (tracked). Follow the steps on the next
page as a tutorial to recreate this example.
Tracking levels (gray)
Figure 10.7 Tracking Device Cues
The trackball can be used while in the Tracksheet display to change
individual trait levels: Position the trackball cursor over a trait then press
and hold the [CHANGE] key while adjusting the level.
The trackball can also be used to change a level into a tracking or nontracking level: Position the trackball cursor over a trait then press the
[SELECT] key. Next, use the trackball to highlight "Toggle Tracking"
from the "Choose" popup menu which appears, then press [CHANGE].
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Follow the procedure below to recreate the example tracking cues as in
Figure 10.7 (note that a fade time of 2 sec. is also recorded for each cue):
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press (Q Mode) until "Tracking"
appears next to Command Line
2. Press the [DEVICE] display key
Device must already have
been assigned
3. Press [DEVICE] [1] [ENTER]
LCD opens showing
selected device
4. Press the [DEFAULT] key next to LCD Device will go to default
settings and all traits will be
selected (white) for record in
Device display
5. Use the trackball or encoder wheels
to set pan and tilt levels for cue 1
6. Press [RECORD CUE] [1] [TIME] [2]
7.
Press [ENTER]
All traits of device
recorded in Cue 1
8. Use trackball or encoder wheels to
set new pan and tilt levels for cue 2
9. Press [RECORD CUE] [2] [TIME] [2]
10. Press [ENTER]
Only pan/tilt traits changed,
all other traits are tracked
from cue 1
11. Use trackball or encoder wheels to
set new pan and tilt levels for cue 3
12. Press [RECORD CUE] [3] [TIME] [2]
13. Press [ENTER]
Only pan/tilt traits changed,
all other traits are tracked
from cue 1
14. Press [TRACKSHEET] (Device) to
view the tracked cues as in Figure 10.7
To view cues in the Tracksheet which have both devices and channels
recorded, press [S6]. This will toggle back and forth between viewing
devices or channels.
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Chapter 10 Automated Devices
Using Submasters
In addition to recording channel levels of conventional lights, submasters
can also record trait levels from automated devices. They are very dynamic
in nature, allowing the user to program even specific traits of a device. For
example, you could program a submaster to affect only the colors, positions
or gobos. The submasters could then be used to change traits of devices
which are running in a cue. An example of this scenario could be to have a
automatic cue loop of devices doing pan and tilt movements while in open
white. By bringing up a submaster which has only a red trait recorded into it
you can quickly change the color of the running devices on the fly. For more
information on using submasters please see Chapter 4 Submasters. See
Chapter 5 Cues for an example of recording an automatic cue loop
Follow the steps below to record a set of device color traits in submaster 2:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [DEVICE]
Opens Device display
2. Press (RelAll)
Releases all traits from
recording, note gray color
3. Press [DEVICE][#][AND][#][ENTER]
4. Use the encoder wheels beneath the
LCD to select color
Activates devices on LCD
Trait name becomes white,
meaning it is selected for
record
5. Press [RECORD SUB] [2] [ENTER]
6. Press (RelAll) (Optional)
This will release all traits to
prevent recording into further
cues.
It is important to remember that if you record device traits to a
submaster with a specific look, position or color, that submaster must
be played back at FULL in order to show that look. A level less than full
will modify the data going to the automated device and give different
results.
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Using Groups
Any specific traits of a device can be programmed as a group. The user can
build up focus positions, colors, gobos and effects such as strobing or
scrolling to be used as building blocks or palettes when recording cues,
subs or effects. Please see Chapter 6 Groups for more information on
working with groups.
If a group is assigned to a cue, sub or effect, whenever the group is
updated so will be the cue, sub or effect.
To assign a group to a cue press [CUE] [#] [GROUP] [#] [ENTER].
To assign a group to a sub press [SUB] [#] [GROUP] [#] [ENTER].
Refer to Chapter 7 Effects for more information on using effects.
Follow the steps below to record device color traits into a group then assign
the group to a cue:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [DEVICE]
Opens Device display
2. Press (RelAll)
Releases all traits from
recording, note gray color
3. Press [DEVICE][#][AND][#][ENTER]
4. Use the encoder wheels beneath the
LCD to select color
Activates devices on LCD
Trait name becomes white,
meaning it is selected for
record
5. Press [RECORD GROUP] [#] [ENTER]
6. Press (RelAll) (Optional)
7.
This will release all traits to
prevent recording into further
cues.
Press [CUE] [#] [GROUP] [#] [ENTER] Assigns group to cue
Groups can also be assigned to a cue as the cue is being recorded: press
[RECORD CUE] [#] [GROUP] [#] [ENTER].
It is important to remember that if you assign a group to a cue with a
specific look, position or color, that cue must be played back at FULL in
order to show that look. A level less than full will modify the data going
to the automated device and give different results.
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Chapter 10 Automated Devices
Using Groups as Focus Points
Sometimes the venue changes or there are other changes in the show
which demand re-focusing of certain pan and tilt positions. These new
positions can be quickly updated in your cues, subs and effects by first
recording your focus points into groups then assigning these groups to your
cues, subs or effects. This way, whenever the group is updated, any cue,
sub or effect which references that group will be automatically updated
also.
Follow below to program a group with a pan/tilt position using device one
and assign it to cue 1:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [DEVICE] [1] [ENTER]
Selects Device 1 and displays
it on the LCD display
2. Press [DEFAULT] key next to LCD
This will position the device in
the middle of its pan and tilt,
open the shutter, and bring
the dimmer to full
3. Press (RelAll)
Releases all traits so they
will not be recorded (gray)
4. Position the device as needed
using the trackball
Activates just the pan/tilt traits
for record (white)
5. Press [RECORD GROUP] [#] [ENTER] Group is recorded with
the pan/tilt traits of device 1
6. Press (RelAll) (Optional)
7.
Releases all traits to prevent
recording into further cues.
Press [CUE][1][GROUP][1][ENTER] Assigns group 1 to cue 1
Groups can also be assigned to a cue as the cue is being recorded: press
[RECORD CUE] [#] [GROUP] [#] [ENTER].
Using Effects
Effects can also be used to control automated devices. The Effects display
is set up to allow the user to input device traits, submasters, groups, cues
and channels into effect elements of which there are 10 per effect step.
Please see Chapter 7 Effects for more information on using effects.
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Blind Recording and Editing of Devices
Sometimes it is necessary to record or edit your devices while not affecting
the current look on stage. This can be accomplished by using the Cue,
Group and Submaster Preview displays or the Tracksheet display.
Figure 10.8
Group Preview Display showing Device Trait recorded
As the Cue, Group and Submaster Preview displays are similar in
appearance and operation, the following descriptions of the Group Preview
display also apply to the Cue and Submaster Preview displays.
In Figure 10.8 above, Group 1 has been recorded as a Cyan color group for
devices 1 - 4. To view the other devices in the group use the up/down
arrow keys. To blind edit this group press [DEVICE] [1] [THRU] [4]
[ENTER]. This will open up the LCD and enable the encoder wheels
allowing you to perform your edit. Although you cannot see more than one
device at a time in the Group Preview display, any edits you make while
adjusting the traits with the encoder wheels will affect the other devices in
the group as long as they have also been selected.
The trackball can also be used to select and adjust individual traits of a
single device by placing the cursor over the trait and pressing the
[CHANGE] key next to the trackball.
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Some Programming Hints
• There are many different ways in which lighting operators and designers
program automated devices in their consoles. Depending on the show
requirements and your personal preferences, you may choose to just create
individual looks which can be quickly recorded into cues for playback later.
Or you may choose to start recording groups or "palettes" of colors,
positions, gobos, etc. from which you can later choose from during the
design process of the show, much like how a painter lays out his palette of
colors before he starts to paint. Although this may seem more time
consuming in the beginning, in the end it will save you time if you have to
update cues later on, plus you will have palettes to choose from for the
next show you work on.
• As there are many details involved when working with automated devices
it is quite important to be as organized as possible. For instance, one
organizational method of recording a group of colors from a device’s color
wheel is to organize your color groups in the same sequence in which the
colors are installed on the color wheel. For example, if the first position on
the wheel is open white, create group 101 as open white also, if the next
color on the wheel is red, create group 102 as red, etc. Working this way
will allow you quick, logical access to your color palette as you build cues
and keep you more organized. This technique can also be applied to other
traits of an automated device; for instance, the numbering of your position
groups could represent the Stage Right to Stage Left or Upstage to
Downstage focus points on stage. For more information on programming
with groups, see the Using Groups section earlier in this chapter and
Chapter 6 Groups.
• Another programming technique is recording "Marked" cues. These are
cues where lights that are "Off" are moved to position and a color or gobo
is set as an un-seen cue prior to fading up the devices. One example of
using marked cues would be if you would like your devices to fade up in a
cue without visibly scrolling through the color or gobo wheels. For instance,
if you had Cue 1 in blue and wanted to later fade up Cue 2 in magenta
without seeing the colors in between, you could record Cue 1.5 as a
blackout cue which also moves the color wheel into it’s new position before
Cue 2 is triggered. Refer to the Recording Cues section earlier in this
chapter and Chapter 5 Cues for further information.
• The best way to learn the intricacies of programming automated devices
is to practice. When first learning, it is best sometimes to keep it simple and
use a small number of devices before expanding to a larger amount. As
mentioned earlier in this chapter, knowing how your automated devices are
supposed to operate is very important to your success.
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Device Definition Language
The Device Definition Language (DDL) is used to describe a device’s
personality (its traits). Devices can include moving lights, fog machines,
color scrollers or simply a series of dimmer channels. Through the use of
the DDL, the console can present the individual traits of the device with
descriptive labels rather than simple channel numbers as you would with a
standard lighting console.
For a list of the Automated Devices which are factory pre-loaded into the
console see Appendix D Resident Devices.
If the console does not contain the device you need, you can download the
device’s definition from the company website: www.nsicorp.com or
www.colortran.com.
If a DDL you need does not yet exist, even on the website, you can
program a new DDL directly into the console through the Device
Assignment sub-display of the Setup display. You can also create a DDL on
a PC by using an ASCII text editor (such as Notepad). Examples using both
techniques are given further in this chapter.
If your device is not loaded in the console or available from the
website, you may want to experiment with making new DDLs as soon
as possible before you begin programing. Defining a device’s DDL is a
very detailed orientated and meticulous process and may require extra
time to complete successfully.
Loading a new DDL into the console
A DDL is loaded into the console from a floppy disk which contains the new
DDL. Depending on the console model, the floppy disk drive is located on
the front edge or on the rear back panel. The console uses only 3.5"
double-sided HD (High Density) 1.44MB disks formatted for IBM compatible
PCs.
The procedure for loading a new DDL into the console is performed from
the Disk sub-display of the Setup display. Please see Chapter 11 Memory
Functions for more information on loading console memory.
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Creating and Editing DDLs
Before a DDL is created or edited (via the console or a text editor), it is
important to understand the following definitions of what comprises a DDL:
1. Types of Traits
There are three types of traits used when defining a device: Continuous,
Indexed and Union:
Continuous traits: These are traits that move continuously from a
minimum value to a maximum value such as pan/tilt or lamp intensity.
The attributes for Continuous traits include: Channel offset, Size of the
Data, Invert, X axis, Y axis, Blackout, Default, Maximum and Minimum.
(See Trait Attributes definitions below.)
Indexed traits: These are traits that do not move continuously. Instead,
discrete values are assigned to each index along with a unique label. These
are most often used to describe the indexed positions of individual colors or
gobos for example.
The attributes for Indexed traits include: Channel offset, X axis, Y axis,
Blackout, Default, Index Label and Index Value.
(See Trait Attributes definitions below.)
Union traits: These are made of combinations of both Continuous and
Indexed traits. An example of a Union would be a Color Wheel, which uses
a continuous range of DMX 512 values for spins and then discrete (indexed)
values for fixed color positions. The End Union trait is used to flag the end
of the Union structure. For example, if you were to define a Color Wheel as
described above, you would first insert a Union trait, then insert Continuous
and Indexed traits as needed followed by the End Union trait.
2. Trait Labels
Once the type of trait has been determined, a trait label (name) can be
assigned to the trait. The label can be up to eight characters long.
3. Trait Attributes
After the label has been selected, the attributes of the trait can be edited. A
discussion of each type of Trait Attribute follows:
Channel: This determines which channel of the DMX 512 data stream
should be used for the trait. This is a relative number which is added on to
the base address of the device once it is assigned. For example, if a device
is assigned to DMX channel 20 and a trait is assigned to channel 1 of the
device, the trait will end up being assigned to channel 20 not 21.
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Size of data: Determines whether the trait will use one or two bytes of the
DMX 512 stream. Choices are "8 Bit" or "16 Bit". 16 bit is mostly used for
Pan and Tilt of high resolution devices.
X/Y Axis Invert: This determines whether to invert a continuous trait
such as Pan so that it moves the direction that the trackball moves. Select
"Yes" if you would like to invert the trait. If a trait is to be assigned to the X
or Y axis, select "Yes" for these attributes. More than one trait of a device
may be assigned to either axis and a single trait can be assigned to both
axis.
Blackout: If the Blackout attribute is activated, the trait will be set to the
assigned Blackout Value whenever the Blackout button is pressed.
Default Values: When first selecting a device, it's trait can be any value.
Default values for each trait can be assigned so that tapping the Default key
next to the LCD will immediately cause the default value to be applied
whenever a device is active.
Maximums and Minimums: Continuous traits can be assigned a
maximum and minimum value. This is useful when a device does not use
the full range of DMX 512 values. It is also useful when a continuous trait is
part of a Union.
Index Values: Indexed traits are made of indexed values. Each indexed
value can be assigned a specific label just as each trait can be assigned a
specific label.
See the Table 10.3 further in this chapter for valid values of the
different trait attributes described above.
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Chapter 10 Automated Devices
Creating a new DDL with a Text Editor
When using a text editor for creating a new DDL, it is very important to be
precise with the syntax of the DDL so that the device will work properly.
Studying previously written DDLs is a good method to understanding the
intricacies involved. DDLs can be viewed in a text editor from the DDL
diskette which was included with your console. DDLs can also be printed
out directly from the console, provided a correct printer is attached. Please
see Chapter 13 Printing for more information.
Use a ".ddl " suffix when saving a DDL in a text editor; i.e. ABCLight.ddl
(a ".txt " suffix may also be used; i.e. ABCLight.txt).
A small sample DDL is shown below. See Table 10.3 on the following page
for descriptions and valid values for each keyword used in a DDL.
Device ABClight
Trait
Type
Channel
Size
Invert
XAxis
YAxis
Black
Master
Default
Maximum
Minimum
Pan
Continuous
1
8Bit
No
Yes
No
No
No
128
255
0
Trait
Type
Channel
XAxis
YAxis
Black
Default
Index
Index
Index
Index
Index
Color
Indexed
3
No
No
No
0
White,0
Blue,51
Yellow,102
Red,153
Green,204
Trait
Type
Channel
Size
Invert
XAxis
YAxis
Black
Master
Default
Maximum
Minimum
Tilt
Continuous
2
8Bit
No
No
Yes
No
No
128
255
0
Trait
Type
Channel
Size
Invert
XAxis
YAxis
Black
Master
Default
Maximum
Minimum
Dimmer
Continuous
4
8Bit
No
No
No
No
Yes
255
255
0
End
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Chapter 10 Automated Devices
Keyword
Valid Values
Description
Device
16 character text string
Defines the name of the device.
Trait
8 character text string
Defines the text label of the trait.
Type
Union, End Union,
Continuous, Indexed
Defines the type of the trait.
Channel
1 - 256
Defines the channel offset of the trait.
Size
8 Bit, l6 Bit
Defines the trait as 8 bit or 16 bit. Only used
in continuous types.
Invert
Yes, No
Causes the trackball to work opposite of
normal when controlling the trait.
X-axis
Yes, No
Assigns the trait to the horizontal movement
of the trackball.
Y-axis
Yes, No
Assigns the trait to the vertical movement of
the trackball.
Black
Yes, No
Assigns the trait to the Blackout key.
Index
8 character text string
followed by a comma
and a value ranging
from 0 - 255.
Defines the text label and its value of an
index entry of an indexed type trait.
End
None
Defines the end of the file.
BoValue
8 Bit : 0 - 255
16 Bit: 0 - 65,535
Defines the value that the Blackout button
assigns to the trait.
Master
Yes, No
Assigns the trait to the Grandmaster
Default
8 Bit : 0 - 255
16 Bit: 0 - 65,535
Defines the value that the Default key
assigns to the trait.
Maximum
8 Bit : 0 - 255
16 Bit: 0 - 65,535
Defines the maximum value of a continuous
trait.
Minimum
8 Bit : 0 - 255
16 Bit: 0 - 65,535
Defines the minimum value of a continuous
trait.
Table 10. 3 DDL Keyword Definitions and Valid Values
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Chapter 10 Automated Devices
Creating a new DDL in the Console
The procedure below gives the general steps for defining a new device
within the control console:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP]
Opens Setup display
2. Press (Device)
Enters Device Assignment
sub-display
3. Press [4]
Device menu item 4:
"Add Definition"
4. Enter new device name
Use the submaster bump
buttons for letters
5. Press [ENTER]
6. Use the Definition menu to modify or
insert traits accordingly.
7.
See Table 10.4 below
Use arrow keys to highlight the
trait attribute and select [ENTER] to edit.
8. Press [CLEAR] to return to previous screen.
Follow the example steps below to define a new device and add it to the
device library (a simple fog machine using one trait is used in this
example):
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP]
Opens Setup display
2. Press (Device)
Enters Device Assignment
sub-display
3. Press [4]
Device Menu item 4:
"Add Definition"
4. Enter [F] [O] [G]
Use the sub bump buttons for
letters for device name "FOG"
5. Press [ENTER]
6. Press [4]
(see Table 10.4 below)
7.
Use up/down arrow keys to select
"Special" from Trait name popup list
8. Press [ENTER]
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Definition Menu item 4:
"Insert Continuous"
Device Defined
Press [CLEAR] to exit
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Chapter 10 Automated Devices
Editing DDLs in the Console
The example steps below give the general steps for editing a device
definition:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP]
Opens Setup display
2. Press (Device)
Enters Device Assignment
sub-display
3. Press [3]
Device menu item 3:
"Edit Definition".
4. Use the arrow keys to highlight
the device to edit then press [ENTER]
5. Use the arrow keys to highlight the
trait to edit then press [ENTER]
6. Use the arrow keys highlight the
attribute of the trait to edit.
7.
Press [1]
(see Table 10.4 below)
Definition Menu item 1:
"Modify Trait"
8. Use the keypad for numbers or
the up/down arrow keys to
make the edit
9. Press [ENTER]
Definition Menu
Options
Description
[1] Modify Trait
Modifies a specific trait of a selected device.
[2] Insert Pan
Inserts a pan trait in the position highlighted.
[3] Insert Tilt
Inserts a tilt trait in the position highlighted.
[4] Insert Continuous
Inserts a continuous trait in the position
highlighted.
[5] Insert Indexed
Inserts an Indexed trait in the position
highlighted.
[6] Insert Union
Inserts a Union Trait in the position highlighted.
[7] Delete Trait
Deletes the trait highlighted.
Table 10.4 Device Definition Menu Options
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Chapter 10 Automated Devices
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Chapter 11 Memory Functions
Chapter 11 Memory Functions
This chapter includes information on how to clear console memory, record
and retrieve show information using a floppy disk and upgrade the
console’s system software. Refer to Chapter 12 System Settings for
information on how to allocate memory resources.
The topics covered here include:
• Console Memory (RAM)
• Clear Functions
• Hard Clear (Console Reset)
• Soft Clear
• Diskette Functions
• Recording Show Files to a Floppy Disk
• Loading Show Files from a Floppy Disk
• Formatting a Floppy Disk
• Upgrading Console System Software
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Chapter 11 Memory Functions
Console Memory (RAM)
When you record show information, the information is saved in the
console's RAM (Random Access Memory). All information remains in
memory when the console is turned off because the RAM has a battery to
keep the memory active. At some point however, the battery will fail. When
the battery fails, console memory can be lost! For this reason, it's important
to frequently back up all show and configuration data frequently.
Most people choose to backup their console at the completion of every
rehearsal or major set of changes. This usually is a sufficient frequency
of backups, however, you should backup as frequently as you need to
ensure that if the console lost your memory, your show would not be in
jeopardy.
To change the internal battery, see Appendix C Maintenance.
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Chapter 11 Memory Functions
Clear Functions
Hard Clear (Console Reset)
You can clear all memory in the console and reset the main processor in the
console by performing a "hard clear". This totally clears anything that has
been stored in RAM. No show information will remain in memory after you
perform a hard clear and the system settings will be reset to their default
settings. If the console has experienced a power surge or other anomaly
that you think may have caused your console to malfunction, it is
recommended that you perform a hard clear. For more information on
default settings, see Chapter 12 System Settings.
To perform a hard clear follow the steps below:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Hold down the [CLEAR] key
Keep key held down until
this procedure is complete
2. While continuing to hold down the
[CLEAR] key, turn the power switch to OFF
3. Wait approximately five seconds.
4. Turn the power switch to ON
5. Wait for the display to fully reappear on the monitor
6. Release the [CLEAR] key
Console is reset with
default settings
Remember, a Hard Clear will erase all console programming, be sure to
save your show files.
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Chapter 11 Memory Functions
Soft Clear
Figure 11.0 Clear sub-menu
A "soft clear" erases just the contents of some or all of the show memory, it
does not reset the board to it’s default settings as a hard clear does as
described in the preceding section. From the clear menu of the Setup
display you can individually clear cues, groups, submasters, effects and
macros or clear all of the above (see Figure 11.0 above).
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP]
2. Press (More)
Changes soft-key level
3. Press (Clear)
Clear sub-menu appears
4. Enter [#] to select area of
memory to be cleared
Menu items 1 - 6
5. Press [ENTER]
Memory cleared
6. You will be asked to confirm, press [1]
Assignments of automated devices are cleared from the Device
Assignment sub-display of the Setup display. See Chapter 10
Automated Devices for more information.
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Chapter 11 Memory Functions
Diskette Functions
Figure 11.1 Disk sub-menu
The Disk sub-menu allows you save, load, delete and rename files using a
floppy disk. It also allows you to format a floppy disk and load console
system software. The console uses only 3.5" double-sided HD (High
Density) 1.44MB disks formatted for IBM compatible PCs. The floppy disk
drive is located on the front edge or back panel of the console (depending
on the model).
It is always a good idea to keep your show stored on floppy disk as a
backup to what is stored in the console.
Figure 11.2 Save File sub-menu
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Chapter 11 Memory Functions
Recording Show Files to a Floppy Disk
File names have a .INN suffix (MYSHOW.INN for example). You can use the
submaster bump buttons or a standard PC keyboard to name the file to be
recorded. Up to 8 characters may be used to specify the file name.
To record show information to a floppy disk on the console, insert a disk
into the disk drive and follow these steps (see Figures 11.1 and 11.2 on
previous page):
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP] (Disk)
Opens Disk Menu
2. Press [1]
Opens Save File Menu
3. Enter the menu item number to
select type of file(s) file to save.
Menu items 1 - 9
4. Press [ENTER]
Opens Save File Name box
5. Use sub bump buttons to enter a
file name or select existing file by
using the up/down arrow keys
6. Press [ENTER]
Press [CLEAR] to abort
Devices, Subs, Cues and Groups will be automatically saved together
once devices have been assigned.
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Chapter 11 Memory Functions
Loading Show Files from a Floppy Disk
To retrieve a show file from a disk and load it into the console RAM, follow
the procedure below.
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP]
2. Press (Disk)
Opens Disk Menu
3. Press [2]
Opens Load File Menu
4. Use the up/down arrow keys to
select file to load
Opens Load File Name box
Select file with .INN suffix
5. Press [ENTER]
Press [CLEAR] to abort
When a show file is loaded to the console it will overwrite the existing
show file in console RAM. Save your existing show files before loading
new files.
Formatting a Floppy Disk
Formatting a floppy disk erases all information recorded on the disk.
Before a floppy disk can be used, it must be formatted on either the console
or an IBM compatible PC.
To format a floppy disk on the console, insert a disk into the disk drive and
follow these steps:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP]
2. Press (Disk)
Opens Disk Menu
3. Press [6]
Disk Menu Item 6:
Format Disk
4. Press [ENTER]
Press [CLEAR] to abort
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Chapter 11 Memory Functions
Upgrading Console System Software
The console has the ability to have new versions of operating software
loaded into it from floppy disk. The disk must be an Innovator or MC Series
system disk in order for the procedure to function correctly. The system
software file name has a. DWN suffix and is called INNOVATR.DWN. Your
console was shipped with a system disk that has a copy of the original
software version that was loaded in it when it was tested at the factory.
To load new system software follow these steps:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP]
2. Press (Disk)
Opens Disk Menu
3. Press [7]
Disk Menu item 7:
Load System
4. Press [ENTER]
Warning to save console
programming appears
5. Press [ENTER] to load system files
Press [CLEAR] to abort
Software upgrades can also be downloaded from the website. Check
periodically at www.colortran.com or www.nsicorp.com for software
updates for your product.
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Chapter 12 System Settings
Chapter 12 System Settings
The Setup display allows you to customize the console settings and execute
certain functions. For example, you can set the number of dimmers and
channels, select and patch automated devices, and perform printing and file
management tasks. Settings remain in memory after the console is turned
off. When console memory is hard cleared, the settings are reset to the
factory defaults. See Chapter 11 Memory Functions for more information on
clearing memory.
Some menu items, along with the soft-keys, are explained in greater detail
in relevant chapters.
Chapter 12 includes the following sections:
• Navigating the Setup Display
• Naming the Show
• Naming the File
• Setting number of Dimmers
• Channel Bump/Toggle Button
• Allocating Memory by setting maximum number of channels, submasters,
macros, effects, and groups
• Setting Worklight Level
• Selecting Dimmer Protocol
• Selecting Printer type
• Setting MIDI Configuration Information
• Setting MIDI Device number
• Selecting MIDI transmit mode
• ColorNet Configuration (Innovator Only)
• Network Remote (Innovator Only)
• Setting Two Scene / Single Scene Mode
• Selecting Secondary Video
• Setting the Time and Day
• Soft-key functions in Setup Display
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Chapter 12 System Settings
Navigating the Setup Display
Figure 12.0 Sample Setup Display
(Actual screen may vary depending on model)
To navigate within the Setup display, use the keypad to enter a menu item
number then press [ENTER]. The selected menu item parameter is
changed by either entering an applicable alphanumerical value or by using
the up/down arrow keys to toggle a selection. The sections throughout this
chapter demonstrate these techniques.
For descriptions of the Setup display’s soft-keys, please see the
Soft-Key Functions in the Setup Display section further in this chapter.
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Chapter 12 System Settings
Naming the Show
Setup menu item 1 provides a way to add an alphanumeric name to a
show. The Show Name only appears in the Setup display and can only be
viewed when the show is in active memory.
For example, to assign a Show Name:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP]
Opens the Setup display
2. Press [1] [ENTER]
Selects menu item 1:
“Show name”
3. Press the submaster bump buttons or
use a keyboard to enter a show name
4. Press [ENTER]
Use the [CLEAR] key to erase
Naming the File
Setup menu item 2 provides a way to specify a DOS style disk file name for
the show in current memory. This name is different from that of the "Show
Name" and must follow naming conventions of a maximum of 8 letters or
numbers. These will appear as "xxxxxxxx.INN" when the disk directory is
viewed on a PC.
For example, to assign a File Name:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP]
Opens the Setup display
2. Press [2] [ENTER]
Selects menu item 2,
“File name”
3. Press the submaster bump buttons or
use a keyboard to enter a file name
4. Press [ENTER]
Use the [CLEAR] key to erase
See Chapter 11 Memory Functions. See Appendix A Installation for
information on how to install a keyboard.
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Chapter 12 System Settings
Setting number of Dimmers
Rearranging memory by changing the number of channels, groups, etc.
may have an adverse effect (total loss) of items stored within that
memory. Backup your entire console BEFORE making configuration
changes.
The console provides 3 DMX output ports (A, B, or C) for addressing
dimmers or devices. Each port is capable of up to 512 DMX addresses for a
total of 1,536 addressable DMX channels. You are given the ability to
restrict the number of DMX address so that console performance can be
improved. The minimum number for each port is 48, the maximum is 512.
The factory default for each port is 144. Performing a “hard clear” will also
set the console to its default values. See Chapter 11 Memory Functions for
more information on clearing the console.
If you want to change the dimmer count, you need to take into
consideration how many physical dimmers are actually in your system and
whether you are patching automated devices.
If an automated device is to be patched to a port, make allowance for all
the channels in the device’s definition. For instance, a Studio Color 575
needs 16 channels to control all its traits, so 16 DMX 512 outputs are
required. See Chapter 10 Automated Devices for more information on
assigning automated devices.
Follow the example below to set the dimmer count to 512 on Port A:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP]
Opens the Setup display
2. Press [3] [ENTER]
Selects menu item
3: “Port A”
3. Press [512] [ENTER]
Valid numbers are
48 - 512
See Selecting Dimmer Protocol further in this chapter for dimmer data
protocol assignment.
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Chapter 12 System Settings
Channel Bump/Toggle Buttons
Console models with channel faders have a bump button associated with
the individual channel faders. Menu item 6 allows the user to change the
operation of the channel bump buttons from momentary on/off to
maintained on/off. When set to "off" the bump buttons are normal
momentary flash to full. When set to "on" the channel bump buttons toggle
on and off.
Follow these steps to select a Channel Flash or Toggle mode:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP]
Opens the Setup display
2. Press [6] [ENTER]
Selects menu item
6: “Ch Bump Tog”
3. Use the up/down arrow keys to select
either On or Off
On = Toggle
Off = Flash mode
(default)
4. Press [ENTER]
Confirms selection
See Chapter 3 Setting Channel Levels for more information on using the
channel bump buttons.
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Chapter 12 System Settings
Allocating Memory
Changing the number of channels, submasters, groups, macros and effects
available within the console’s memory resources will affect the remaining
resources. By increasing channels, for example, you will reduce the amount
of submasters, groups, etc. Be sure to back up your console before
performing memory allocation. See Chapter11 Memory Functions for
information on how to save your work.
Setting number of Channels
The maximum number of conventional control channels on models 24/48,
48/96 and 72/144 is 384 while the maximum on model 600 is 600. The
minimum number on all models is 48 while the system default is 144.These
numbers should not be confused with the number of manual channel
faders. Note that in addition to the amount of conventional control channels
there are 512 dedicated automated device channels, see Chapter 10
Automated Devices.
In some shows you may not need all of the conventional channels available
in your console. By reducing the channel count, you can reduce processing
time and free up console memory.
Follow this example to set up a show with 96 channels:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP]
Opens the Setup display
2. Press [7] [ENTER]
Selects menu item
7: “Number of channels”
3. Enter [96] [ENTER]
4. Select [1] from Memory re-order
confirmation box
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Press [CLEAR] to cancel
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Chapter 12 System Settings
Setting number of Submasters
The console is capable of holding up to 8 pages of submasters. Each page
contains 24 submasters which correspond to the submaster faders. The
total console capacity is 192 submasters.
Follow this example to set the number of submaster pages to four:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP]
Opens the Setup display
2. Press [8] [ENTER]
Selects menu item
8: “Number of
Submaster pages”
3. Press [4] [ENTER]
Valid numbers are 1 to 8
4. Select [1] from Memory re-order
confirmation box
Press [CLEAR] to cancel
See Chapter 4 Submasters for additional information on using submasters.
Setting number of Macro Pages
A macro is a recorded sequence of commands that may be played back
with the touch of one of the 8 macro hard-keys. The console is capable of
holding up to 64 pages of macros for a console capacity of 500 macros.
Each page contains 8 macros which correspond to the macro keys.
Follow this example to set the number of macro pages available to 20:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP]
Opens the Setup display
2. Press [9] [ENTER]
Selects menu item
9: “Number of macro pages”
3. Press [20] [ENTER]
Valid 1 to 64
4. Select [1] from Memory re-order
confirmation box
Press [CLEAR] to cancel
Remember, increasing the number of Channels, Groups, Macros,
Effects, Steps, and Submasters will affect the remaining amount of
available console memory.
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Chapter 12 System Settings
Setting number of Effect Steps
The console is capable of holding up to 600 recorded Effects. Each Effect
can have up to 100 steps. The total number of steps for all Effects
combined is 9,999. An Effect may be a simple sequential chase of channels
or a complex series of Submasters, Groups, Cues, or Device Traits.
Follow these example steps to set the number of effect steps to 1000:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [Setup]
Opens the Setup Display
2. Press [10] [ENTER]
Selects menu item 10:
"Number of efx steps”
3. Press [1000]
Valid 10 to 9999
4. Select [1] from Memory re-order
confirmation box
Press [CLEAR] to cancel
See Chapter 7 Effects for information on the programming and operation of
Effects.
Setting number of Groups
The console is capable of holding up to 500 Groups. A Group is a recorded
unit of channels or device traits similar to a cue but without timing
information. It can also be thought of as similar to a Submaster but without
a fader. Groups are very useful when programing moving lights.
Follow this example to set the number of Groups available to 120:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP]
Opens the Setup display
2. Press [11] [ENTER]
Selects menu item 11:
“Number of groups”
3. Press [120]
Valid numbers 1 to 500
4. Select [1] from Memory re-order
confirmation box
Press [CLEAR] to cancel
Remember, increasing the number of Channels, Groups, Macros,
Effects, Steps and Submasters will affect the remaining amount of
available console memory.
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Chapter 12 System Settings
Setting Worklight level
Depending on the model purchased, the control console has from 1 to 3
connectors on the back panel for the optional gooseneck worklights. This
menu item is used to set the intensity level of the console worklights.
Follow this example to set the worklight intensity to 100:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP]
Opens the Setup display
2. Press [12] [ENTER]
Selects menu item 12:
“Worklight level”
3. Enter [100] [ENTER]
Valid numbers are 0 to 100
4. Press [ENTER]
Selecting Dimmer Protocol
You can select between two different dimmer protocols for the output of
the console: DMX512 (USITT 1990 standard) and CMX (Colortran Multiplex
protocol). You can also select the ColorNet universe output number if the
console is to be connected to a LAN (Local Area Network). The protocols for
Ports A, B, and C are selected from Menu items 13, 14, and 15 respectively.
The console remembers the dimmer protocol setting when you turn the
console off, but not after you do a hard clear. Other conditions under which
protocol may need to be reset include when you update the console to new
software or when the RAM battery is dead.
Follow this example to assign DMX protocol to Port A:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP]
Opens the Setup display
2. Press [13] [ENTER]
Selects menu item 13, “Port A”
3. Use the up/down arrow keys
to select “DMX 512”
Valid options are DMX, CMX,
or Universe 1 - 9 (ColorNet)
4. Press [ENTER]
Confirms selection
See Chapter 14 Alternate Control Interfaces for information on ColorNet.
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Chapter 12 System Settings
Selecting Printer type
The console is capable of sending information for print to one of two printer
types: HP Laser Jet and Epson LX series. Most printers will emulate these
types, consult your printer manual for compatibility requirements.
Follow this example to select HP Laserjet type:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP]
Opens the Setup display
2. Press [16] [ENTER]
Selects menu item 16:
“Printer Type”
3. Use the up/down arrow keys
to select “HP Laserjet”
4. Press [ENTER]
Confirms selection
See Chapter 13 Printing for additional information on printing.
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Chapter 12 System Settings
Setting MIDI Configuration Information
Setting MIDI device number
Follow these example steps to set a MIDI device number:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP]
Opens the Setup display
2. Press [17] [ENTER]
Selects menu item 17:
“MIDI Device Number”
3. Enter [1]
Valid numbers are 0 to 127
4. Press [ENTER]
Confirms selection
Selecting MIDI transmit mode
Options: Off, Standard, MSC (MIDI Show Control)
Follow this example to select a MIDI transmit mode:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP]
Opens the Setup display
2. Press [18] [ENTER]
Selects menu item 18:
“MIDI Transmit Mode”
3. Use the up/down arrow keys
to select transmit mode
4. Press [ENTER]
Confirms selection
See Chapter 14 Alternate Control Interfaces for additional information on
MIDI.
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Chapter 12 System Settings
ColorNet Configuration (Innovator Only)
Follow this example to set the ColorNet option to “On”:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP]
Opens the Setup display
2. Press [19] [ENTER]
Selects menu item 19:
“ColorNet”
3. Use the up/down arrow keys
to select “On”
4. Press [ENTER]
Confirms selection
See Chapter 14 Alternate Control Interfaces for additional information on
ColorNet.
Network Remote (Innovator Only)
Follow this example to set the Network Remote option to “On”:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP]
Opens the Setup display
2. Press [20] [ENTER]
Selects menu item 20:
“Network Remote”
3. Use the up/down arrow keys
to select “On”
4. Press [ENTER]
Confirms selection
See Chapter 14 Alternate Control Interfaces for additional information on
using the hand held remote.
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Chapter 12 System Settings
Setting Two Scene / Single Scene Mode
All models of the control console except the Innovator 600 have manual
channel faders. These faders are arranged in two rows of either 24, 48, or
72 faders each. In single scene mode, each fader represents a control
channel. In two scene mode, the channel of the top row are duplicated on
the second row and the A/B playback fader serves as a split-fader to
operate the scenes.
To switch between single scene and two scene mode follow below:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP]
Opens the Setup display
2. Press [21] [ENTER]
Selects menu item 21:
“TwoScene/SingleScene”
3. Use the up/down arrow keys
to select your choice
4. Press [ENTER]
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Confirms selection
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Chapter 12 System Settings
Selecting Secondary Video
Secondary video is a product option, see Appendix A Installation for
additional information on adding a secondary video card.
To select type of secondary video display mode:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP]
Opens the Setup display
2. Press [22] [ENTER]
Selects menu item 22:
“Secondary Video”
3. Use the up/down arrow keys
to select your choice
4. Press [ENTER]
Confirms selection
Setting the Time and Day
To set the Time and Day:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP]
Opens the Setup display
2. Press the (More) soft-key
3. Press the (RT Clk) soft-key
4. Press [3] from menu
“Set System Day”
5. Select day of week
6. Press [4] from menu
“Set System Time”
7.
hh/mm/ss
Enter Time
8. Press [ENTER]
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Chapter 12 System Settings
Soft-key Functions in Setup Display
(System)
Returns you to the main Setup display while in a sub-display
(Print)
Executes printing commands. See Chapter 13 Printing.
(Disply)
Returns you to the main Setup display while in a sub-display
(Disk)
Allows you to save, load, delete, and rename show files
using a floppy disk. Formatting floppy disks and loading
system files are performed here also. See Chapter 11
Memory Functions.
(Macro)
Record macros, select the current Macro Page, and view
macro contents. See Chapter 8 Macros.
(Device)
Assign automated devices, create and edit device
definitions. See Chapter 10 Automated Devices.
(Profil)
Create and view profiles. See Chapter 9 Patching.
(More)
Changes soft-key level.
(Clear)
(Rt Clk)
(Netwrk)
Soft Clear different areas of memory. See Chapter 11
Memory Functions.
Set Real Time Events. Please see Chapter 5 Cues.
Configure console for ColorNet. See Chapter 14 Alternate
Control Interfaces
Table 12.0 Setup Display Soft-keys
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Chapter 13 Printing
Chapter 13 Printing
The console is designed to be used with parallel printers that support the
IBM ® character graphics set. The console is compatible with the LX line of
Epson ® dot-matrix printers or with any printer that supports emulation of
Epson ® LX printers. If you use a laser or inkjet printer, it must be a HP ®
Laser printer or a printer which supports emulation of a HP ® Laser printer.
See Chapter 12 System Settings for information on how to select a printer.
This chapter includes the following descriptions and procedures:
• Print Menu
• Navigating the Print Menu
• Example Procedure
• Printouts Available
• Print Menu Page 1
• Print Menu Page 2
• Print Menu Page 3
• Print Screen Option
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Chapter 13 Printing
Print Sub-Display
Print Menu Items
Print Menu Page Number
Figure 13.0 Print Menu, Page 1
Navigating the Print Menu
To access the print menu press [SETUP] (Print).
There are three pages of the print menu; to change pages press [9]. This
will bring you to the next page.
To select the type of printout desired, enter the menu item number then
press [ENTER].
When a menu item is selected for print, the letter "X" will appear in the
square brackets next to the menu item number. For example: [X] 2. Cues.
While a menu item is printing the letter "P" will appear in the square
brackets next to the menu item number. For example: [P] 2. Cues. A
"Printing Report" message will also show at the top of the display screen.
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Chapter 13 Printing
Example Printing Procedure
You can enter a range of specific items for printing. For example, to print
just cues 1 through 6 follow the steps below:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP] (Print)
Opens Print Menu
2. Press [2]
Selects menu item 2: Cues
3. Press [1] [ENTER]
[ENTER] in this case
functions as a Thru key
4. Press [6] [ENTER]
Cues 1 - 6 will begin
printing
Pressing [1] will cancel the print job.
To hold the print job, press [9] [8]. Press [8] to resume.
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Chapter 13 Printing
Printouts Available
The console allows for printouts of all of the different options used when
building a show. Following are descriptions of the print options available
along with their menu item number.
Print Menu Page 1
Page 202
Menu Item
Description
0. All
Prints all show data. Warning: This is a long
report, printing will take some time and use
a lot of paper.
1. Cancel
Cancels the print selection.
2. Cues
Prints selected cues with their channel levels
and cue attributes.
3. Cues by name
Prints all cues alphabetically by name along
with their cue attributes.
4. Cues by number
Prints selected cues numerically with their
cue attributes.
5. Device all
Prints selected device’s DDL (Device Definition
Language) from the console device library.
This includes all devices available in the
console.
6. Device list
Prints selected list of devices available in the
console library. Does not print the DDL as with
the "Device all" menu item above.
7. Device used
Prints selected device’s DDL (Device Definition
Language) of devices which are used in the
current loaded show.
8. Effects
Prints the selected effects along with their
effect attributeswhich are used in the current
loaded show.
9. (Next Page)
Go to Print Page 2.
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Chapter 13 Printing
Print Menu Page 2
Menu Item
Description
0. Groups
Prints the selected groups which are used in
the current loaded show.
1. Macros
Prints the selected macros which are used in
the current loaded show.
2. Misc
Prints a list of real time events and the power
up log.
3. Patch by channel
Prints selected channel to dimmer assignments
which are used in the current loaded show.
4. Patch by dimmer
Prints selected dimmer to channel assignments
which are used in the current loaded show.
5. Submasters
Prints selected submasters which are used in
the current loaded show.
6. Track Cues
Prints a list of conventional channels of
selected cues from the tracksheet which are
used in the current loaded show.
7. Track Devices
Prints a list of device traitsof selected
cues from tracksheet which are used in
the current loaded show.
8. Print Hold
Holds all print functions (Select again to
resume printing).
9. (Next Page)
Go to Print Page 3.
Print Menu Page 3
Menu Item
Description
0. Toggle Devices
Turns Print Automation ON or OFF.
1 - 8.
Not Used.
9. (First Page)
Go to Print Page 1.
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Chapter 13 Printing
Print Screen Option
Although the console is capable of printing out very detailed lists of cues,
devices, etc., you can also quickly print out just a display screen shot (a
shot of the Cuesheet display, for example). Any of the eight main displays
(Stage, Preview, Device, Cuesheet, Tracksheet, Playback, Patch, Setup)
may be printed in this manner. This function will print exactly what appears
on screen in the selected display at the time.
To print a display screen, press a display hard-key while pressing and
holding down the Leviton logo key next to the LCD display.
For example, to print out a screen shot of the Cuesheet display follow
below:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press and hold the Leviton Logo key
2. Press [CUESHEET]
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Chapter 14 Alternate Control Interfaces
Chapter 14 Alternate Control
Interfaces
The control console offers several means of optional control and
communication methods. This chapter will cover these more advanced
options and includes the following topics:
• Using the Hand Held Remote
• Using MIDI
• MIDI Standard
• MIDI Show Control (MSC)
• ColorNet (Innovator Only)
• DMX IN
• Remote Macro Activation
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Chapter 14 Alternate Control Interfaces
Using the Hand Held Remote
The optional Hand Held Remote (HHR) is a very useful device. It unchains
you from the console and allows you to stand on stage and call up and
check lights on the move, making for a quicker setup and focus. With the
HHR, you can access dimmers directly and move through dimmer or
channel checks quickly and effortlessly. The four-line backlit LCD display
allows you to verify your keystrokes, even in dark locations.
Protocol
The control console Hand Held Remote connector port conforms to the
following protocol:
• EIA RS-422 standard
• Baud Rate: 9600
• Parity: Even
• Data Bits: 7
• Stop Bits: 1
• Does not support Xon/Xoff
Pin Out Information
The following chart shows the functions of the pins on the 6-pin Neutrik
XLR-type connector on the console (female connector) and the HHR (male):
Belden 9830
Cable Pairs
Function at
Console
XLR Pin
Number
Function at HHR
1st Pair
Ground
1
Ground
+ 12 VDC out
2
+ 12 VDC in
- Receive Data
3
- Transmit Data
+ Receive Data
4
+ Transmit Data
- Transmit Data
5
- Receive Data
+ Transmit Data
6
+ Receive Data
2nd Pair
3rd Pair
Table 14.0 HHR Pin Out
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Chapter 14 Alternate Control Interfaces
The maximum cable length that the console can support for a HHR is
1000 feet, including all connecting cables and permanent wiring.
HHR Functions
When the control console receives a character signal through its Hand Held
Remote port, the console interprets the character signal as if the
corresponding key was pressed on the console in the Stage display.
The Hand Held Remote port receives keystroke codes in particular order to
make up commands to be executed by the console. Generally speaking,
commands at the HHR are made the same way that they are at the console
in the Stage display. All commands must be terminated by the [ENTER]
key, which sends the command to the processor for execution. The
exception to this is single-keystroke commands that do not require
[ENTER] are as follows: [GO], [STOP/REV], [CLEAR].
Hand Held Remote Keys/Functions
HHR
Key Description
. (decimal)
Decimal point
AND (+)
Used to create channel lists [#] [+] [#]
AT (@)
Assigns a level in a level
setting command.
@ means “at a level of”
CLEAR
Backspaces through a
partially complete command
CUE
Begins a cue editing
[CUE] [#] [@] [level]
command or uses a cue as [ENTER]
a group
DIM
Begins Dimmer Check
command
DOWN
Decrements level of
captured channels
ENTER
Executes a command or
captures all active channels
under wheel control
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Example
[1] [>] [10] [@] [50]
[DIM] [#] [@] [level]
[ENTER]
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Chapter 14 Alternate Control Interfaces
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HHR
Key Description
Example
FULL
Sets an item to its
maximum level
[#] [@] [FULL]
or [#] [FULL]
GO
Starts the next cue in the
cue list or resumes
stopped fades
GO TO CUE
Begins a Load Cue
command for the C/D
playback fader
GROUP
Sets a Group at a specified [GROUP] [#] [@] [level]
level.
[ENTER]
LAST
Used to decrement the channel
number for channel check
MINUS (-)
Used to create channel lists [#] [>] [#] [-] [#]
NEXT
Used to increment the channel
number for channel check
REC CUE
Begins a Record Cue
command
[REC CUE] [#] [TIME]
[#] [ENTER]
REC GRP
Begins a Record Group
command
[REC GROUP] [#] [TIME]
[#] [ENTER]
REC SUB
Begins a Record Submaster [REC SUB] [#] [TIME] [#]
command.
[ENTER]
STOP/REV
Stops active fade or goes
to the previous cue in a
2 second fade
SUB
Begins a Submaster editing [SUB] [#] [@] [level]
command or uses a sub
[ENTER]
as a group
THRU (>)
Used to create channel lists [#] [>] [#]
TIME
Used in cue and sub
editing or Go To Cue
commands
UP
Increments level of
captured channels
[GO TO CUE] [#]
[TIME] [#] [ENTER]
Same as BACK and HOLD
buttons on main console
[CUE] [#] [TIME] [#]
[ENTER]
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Chapter 14 Alternate Control Interfaces
Using MIDI
MIDI (Musical Instrument Digital Interface) is a control standard that was
first developed as a means to connect MIDI capable musical instruments
together so that one instrument may control another. It has since evolved
to allow a MIDI capable device, such as your lighting console, to control or
be controlled by another MIDI capable device such as another lighting
console or other piece of electronic equipment (synthesizers etc.).
There are two "options" of MIDI available on the control console to perform
distinct operations; Standard MIDI protocol and Midi Show Control
protocol (MSC).
One example of using Standard MIDI is to use a lighting console to act as a
back up console to another similar console. A further example of using
Standard MIDI would be to have a synthesizer actually controlling parts of
the lighting console’s operation or vice versa.
MSC is derived from the MIDI Standard but is used in different ways. MSC
contains a set of commands which is similar to the commands found in
memory lighting boards, sound and show control systems. MSC can be
used, for instance, as a means of control between lighting consoles where a
press of the Go button on one console will activate cues or submasters on
another console.
Further information on using Standard MIDI and MSC with your console are
explained below, however it is beyond the scope of this user guide to
provide a complete description of these protocols. A good source of further
research on MIDI specifications is the MIDI Manufactures Association
(MMA). The internet web address for the MMA is www.midi.org. There are
also many good publications available on MIDI in the market place.
MIDI In/Out/Thru Hardware Interface
At the rear of the console are three MIDI ports: IN/OUT/THRU. The IN port
receives data from another device’s MIDI OUT. The OUT port transmits
console MIDI data to another device. The THRU port allows multiple MIDI
capable devices to be daisy chained together. The MIDI ports on the
console use standard 5-pin Female, DIN-type connectors. Please see
Appendix A Installation for more information.
See Chapter 12 System Settings for information on how to configure your
console for MIDI.
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Chapter 14 Alternate Control Interfaces
Standard MIDI
The Standard MIDI Commands that the console can transmit/receive
include: Note On, Note Off, Control Change, Program Change and System
Exclusive (SysEx) messages. See table on next page. These commands all
use MIDI channels which allow a MIDI controller to send commands to
MIDI receivers. There are 16 MIDI channels (0-15) available when using
Standard MIDI. To select the channel that you would like your console to
transmit/receive on, you must first select Standard MIDI, then set the
channel desired. Follow the procedure below as an example:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP]
Opens the Setup display
2. Press [18] [ENTER]
Selects menu item 18:
“MIDI Transmit Mode”
3. Use the up/down arrow keys
to select "Standard"
4. Press [ENTER]
Confirms selection
5. Press [17] [ENTER]
Selects menu item 17:
“MIDI Device Number”
6. Enter [1]
Valid numbers are 0 to 15
when "Standard MIDI" is
selected from Menu Item 18
7.
Confirms selection
Press [ENTER]
Console Tracking
Using Standard MIDI can allow a second similar console to act as a backup
console during a show.
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Make sure both consoles have the
same versions of operating software loaded
2. Set both consoles to the same MIDI
channel as explained in the procedure above
3. Connect a standard MIDI cable from
the MIDI OUT port of the Master console
to the MIDI IN port of the Slave console
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Chapter 14 Alternate Control Interfaces
Command
MIDI
Number
Value
MIDI Note On
"
"
0
1
…
0 - 1271
0 - 127
…
"
127
0 - 127
Control Change
0
0 - 1271
"
"
1
…
0 - 127
…
"
17
0 - 127
Program Change
"
"
"
"
"
"
"
0
1
…
23
48
49
…
71
"
962
"
"
97
…
"
"
"
103
126
127
Console Function
Transmit on
Receive as
Ch Bump 1
Ch Bump 2
…
Ch Bump 127 if it
exists
Sub 1 Slider or Bump
change
Sub 2 Slider or Bump
change
…
Sub 24 Slider or Bump
change
Channel 1
Channel 2
…
Channel 127 if
allocated
Sub 1
Sub 2
…
Sub 24
Sub Bump 1 On
Sub Bump 2 On
…
Sub Bump 24 On
Sub Bump 1 Off
Sub Bump 2 Off
…
Sub Bump 24 Off
Sub Slider or Bump
change
Sub Slider or Bump
change
…
Sub Slider or Bump
change
Blackout on
Blackout off
Sub Page 1
Sub Page 2 if
allocated
…
Sub Page 8 if
allocated
Blackout on
Blackout off
Notes: 1: Value is multiplied by 2 and represents a level from 0 to 255
2: Submaster page number always needs to proceed Sub number
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Chapter 14 Alternate Control Interfaces
MIDI Show Control
MIDI Show control was developed to allow MIDI systems to communicate
with dedicated control equipment in environments such as live
performance, multi-media and theatre.
The MSC commands that the control console recognize are:
GO, STOP, RESUME, TIMED_GO, SET, FIRE, and ALL_OFF.
GO: Starts a fade to a cue. If no cue number is specified, the next cue in
numerical sequence will execute.
STOP: Halts currently running fades
RESUME: Causes stopped fades to continue running
TIMED_GO: Starts a timed fade to a cue
SET: Defines the value of a submaster, channel, or trait
FIRE: Triggers a Macro
ALL_OFF: Turns off all functions and outputs
Before the console can transmit or receive MSC protocol, you must first
select this option from the setup display and then set the Device Id number
(if receiving). The Device Id is used to indicate the intended receiver of a
message.
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP]
Opens the Setup display
2. Press [18] [ENTER]
Selects menu item 18:
“MIDI Transmit Mode”
3. Use the up/down arrow keys
to select "MSC"
Page 212
4. Press [ENTER]
Confirms selection
5. Press [17] [ENTER]
Selects menu item 17:
“MIDI Device Number”
6. Enter [1]
Valid numbers are 0 to 127
when "MSC" is selected from
Menu Item 18
7.
Confirms selection
Press [ENTER]
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Chapter 14 Alternate Control Interfaces
ColorNet (Innovator Only)
ColorNet is the Ethernet networking protocol used by Leviton’s lighting
control equipment. The ColorNet protocol use TCP/IP over Ethernet to
transmit/receive commands. With ColorNet, your lighting control console
has the following additional capabilities:
• Transmit any or all of the three DMX universes over ColorNet.
• Combined with the use of Network Protocol Converters you can:
• Merge, split, combine, patch, and manage multiple universes
of DMX Signals
• Remotely view video displays from your console
• Send / Receive Hand Held Remote data
To setup your console to use ColorNet, follow below:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP] [19] [ENTER]
2. Use the up/down arrow keys
to select “On” then press [ENTER]
3. Press (More) (Netwrk)
4. Press [1] then enter unique net name
5. Enter IP address. See IP Address Assignment section below
IP Address Assignment
Every device on the ColorNet TCP/IP Ethernet network must have a unique
IP address. Furthermore, all addresses must be on the same subnet. There
are two ways an IP address can be assigned to your console, DHCP, or the
auto assignment algorithm. If there is a DHCP server on your network, your
console will automatically retrieve a unique IP address from this server. If
there isn’t, then your console will automatically assign itself an IP address in
the form 100.x.x.x where the x.x.x is replaced with a unique address
derived from the MAC address of the control console.
When using ColorNet for live performance, all theatrical equipment
should be separated from other equipment to give the maximum
amount of potential bandwidth to your theatrical equipment.
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Chapter 14 Alternate Control Interfaces
Hand Held Remote Activation
If you plan to communicate to your console with a handheld remote across
the network follow these steps to set the Network Remote option to “ON”:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP]
Opens the Setup display
2. Press [20] [ENTER]
Selects menu item 20:
“Network Remote”
3. Use the up/down arrow keys
to select “ON”
4. Press [ENTER]
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Chapter 14 Alternate Control Interfaces
DMX IN
The DMX512 IN feature of the console merges incoming dimmer levels from
another console with those of the DMX512 Output B of the console in a
HTP fashion.
The DMX512 IN connector is a 5 pin male XLR and is located at the rear of
the console.
Remote Macro Activation
Macros recorded in macro keys M1 - M8 may be fired externally. If a
contact is made between pin 9 and any of pins 1 - 8 of the macro connector
on the back of the console, the macro corresponding to the diagram below
will fire. The macro will fire at the instant the contact is closed and will not
fire again until the contact is opened and closed again.
The connector at the rear of the console is 9 pin D type.
Pinout
Rev. 1.30.03.07.r1
Pin
Description
1
Macro Trigger 1
2
Macro Trigger 2
3
Macro Trigger 3
4
Macro Trigger 4
5
Macro Trigger 5
6
Macro Trigger 6
7
Macro Trigger 7
8
Macro Trigger 8
9
Common
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Chapter 14 Alternate Control Interfaces
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Appendix A Installation
Appendix A Installation
This Appendix covers the following topics:
• Setting up your Console
• Unpacking the console
• Physical Setup
• Power Connections
• Control Connections
• Installing Console Worklights
• Power On
• Installing a Keyboard
• Installing a Printer
• Secondary Video Option
• Installation
• Configuration
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Appendix A Installation
Setting up your Console
Unpacking the console
Carefully unpack your console from its carton. Underneath the console, you
will find:
• This guide
• Quick Reference Card
• Training Video
• System Disk
• A 7' AC power cable
• One 3.5", 1.44MB floppy show storage disk
• 1 or more gooseneck Worklight fixtures (if the option was ordered)
In a separate shipping container, (if ordered) you will find the console
monitor. Carefully inspect all items for evidence of shipping damage. If any
damage is noted, call the shipping company for an inspection. It is
recommended that you keep the shipping containers or purchase a touring
case in the event you need to transport your console.
Physical Setup
Place your console on a sturdy horizontal surface with at least 6” (152mm)
of clearance behind the console for cables and for proper ventilation. The
environment should be dust-free with an ambient temperature of 40 F (4 C)
to 90 F (32 C) and a relative humidity between 8% and 80% without
condensation.
WARNING! Do not expose console to rain or moisture, or
damage may occur.
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Appendix A Installation
Power Connections
Power Supply Specifications: The console has a dual-range power
supply designed to operate on AC power at any nominal voltage within the
two ranges, 100 to 120V, or 220 to 240V, 50/60 Hz. The power supply
requires a maximum of 4A. The console is shipped set for operation at
120V, and with a power supply cord containing a North American NEMA 515P plug (Edison, parallel-blade type). In other localities with different
connector systems and/or operating voltages, the user must obtain and use
a H05VV-F or better grade power supply cord with the plug rated for at
least 4A, and for at least the nominal operating voltage of that location. The
mating connector to the console is a female IEC 320, Sheet C13 connector
rated 10A, 250V.
Figure A.1 Console Power Connections
CAUTION: Double Pole/Neutral Fusing. This product is fused on
both the hot and neutral.
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Appendix A Installation
Power Supply Voltage Selection: The console contains a power supply
designed to operate on AC power at a nominal voltage range of 120V or
240V, 50/60Hz. The voltage selected is indicated in the window on the
console inlet connector on the back of the console. To change that selection
proceed as follows:
1. Remove the power supply cable.
2. Insert a screwdriver in the slot exposed by removing the cable and pry
out the fuse block.
3. Slide the printed-circuit board out of the fuse block and reverse it.
4. Re-insert the fuse block with its arrow up.
CAUTION! Verify that the nominal input voltage selection as
indicated in the window on the console inlet is compatible with
the nominal voltage of the available power, or damage may
occur. Localities with nominal voltages of 240V will have to
change the standard 120V selection made at the factory.
Console Power Connection: First, make sure the switch adjacent to the
power inlet connector on the back of the console is in the OFF (0) position;
and then plug the AC power cable into the console. Plug the other end into
an AC power source with a rating in compliance with the above
requirements, and with a computer-grade ground (earthing conductor). (A
computer-grade ground is an insulated, isolated ground, preferably
connected to the point where the AC power source is grounded in the
building.)
Back Panel Power Outlets: On the back panel of the console are two
switched female IEC 320-style power outlet connectors for connecting the
monitor(s), or other peripheral devices. The connectors are rated voltagewise and frequency-wise at the same voltage and frequency being supplied
to the console via the console power supply cord, and collectively at 3A
total for the two switched outlets.
CAUTION! Input voltage of peripherals connected must match
voltage applied to console line cord, or damage may occur.
Monitor Power Connection: The monitor(s) is typically an auto-ranging
unit, operating on AC power anywhere from 100V to 250V, 50/60 Hz at a
current of 1A maximum. The monitor is provided with a mating “reverse”
IEC 320-style plug. Refer to the instructions provided with the monitor to
find out whether the monitor is suitable for operation with the abovespecified connector. If so, plug the power cord of the monitor into one of
the console power connectors.
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Appendix A Installation
Control Connections
A label on the back panel of the console identifies all control connections.
They are all Class 2 low voltage circuits (extra-low voltage in some parts of
the world). Figure A.2 shows the back panel of a 24/48.
Figure A.2 Console Back Panel
Figure A.3 Console Dimmer Connections
Dimmer/Device Connection: The DMX control connections to the
dimmers or devices is via the DMX connector(s) on the back panel
(standard 5 pin XLR type female connectors). The DMX signals comply with
the USITT DMX 512-1990 standard except that pins #4 and #5 are not
used for a second RS485 data transmission channel. Instead pin 4 is
connected to common pin 1 and pin 5 is used for an analog over-temp
signal. The DMX A connector contains data for DMX 1 through 512, the
second connection DMX B, contains data for 513 through 1024. The third
connection DMX C contains 1025 through 1536. (Actual patch can vary DMX
output.) The three pin female connector will also output DMX. There are
two small switches near the video 1 connector. The left switch will reverse
the polarity of the data signal. The second switch (to the right of Video 1)
determines which data stream is output to the three pin female, either DMX
A, B or C.
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Appendix A Installation
Figure A.4 Monitor and Peripheral Device Connections
Monitor Connection: The monitor is supplied with a control cable
terminated in a high-density 15-pin "D" connector. Connect the monitor
control cable to the console connector marked VIDEO 1. The VIDEO 1
connector is a computer industry standard SVGA control connector. You can
secure the connector with a small, flat blade screwdriver, or in some cases,
with built-in hand-screws. If you purchased the second video option and
second monitor, attach it to the connector labeled VIDEO 2.
Peripheral Devices: If desired, peripheral devices may be connected to
the console back panel connectors as follows:
• Printer: Computer industry standard parallel printer connector. Not all
printers will work with the console, see Chapter 13 Printing.
• Keyboard: Computer industry standard 101 style keyboard.
• MIDI: Industry standard Musical Instrument Digital Interface
• Remote Macros: Accepts Contact closure inputs
• ColorNet: For Remote Video, Network DMX, and network HHR
(not available on all models)
• Hand Held Remote: Accepts model no.7-2021 Hand Held Remote.
(For information on the Hand Held Remote and ColorNet, please see
Chapter 14 Advanced Control Interfaces.)
Installing Console Worklights
Worklights are optional console accessories. The worklights plug into the 3pin XLR style or BNC connectors on the rear of the console. The intensity of
the worklights is set as option #12 on the Setup display. Refer to
Chapter 12 System Settings for more information.
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Appendix A Installation
Power On
WARNING! Do not consume food or beverages while
operating the console, because lethal voltages (120V or 220V)
exist inside the console. Spills may cause a hazardous
condition, or may cause damage to the console.
CAUTION! When the console has been stored in a cold
environment (below 40ºF), do not turn the power on until the
console warms up, or else damage to the console may occur.
You should avoid situations that could cause condensation to
occur inside the console.
Turning on the Monitor: Once the console and monitor have come to
room temperature (about 25ºC or 75ºF), the console is ready to be turned
on. Refer to the instructions provided with the monitor and turn on its
power switch. If the monitor is plugged into a convenience outlet on the
rear of the console, you can leave the monitor power switch turned on. The
convenience outlet on the console is a "switched" outlet (it turns off when
the console is turned off).
Turning on the Console: Turn on the console switch located on the right
rear corner of the back of the console. The “STATUS” LCD on the front
panel should illuminate. Within about ten seconds, the monitor should
warm up and show the Stage display. Refer to the instructions provided
with the monitor to adjust its display.
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Appendix A Installation
Installing a Keyboard
You can use an optional keyboard to assign names to different features of
your shows, such as to name the show and the cues, submasters, groups,
etc.
CAUTION! Do not connect or disconnect a keyboard while
your console is turned on.
To install an alphanumeric keyboard:
1. Insert the keyboard cable into the connector labeled Keyboard on the
rear of the console (connector is a DIN 5-pin).
Installing a Printer
CAUTION! Do not connect or disconnect a printer while your
console is turned on.
To install a printer:
1. Insert the printer cable into the parallel printer connector labeled Printer
on the rear of the console (connector is a 25 pin D type).
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Appendix A Installation
Secondary Video Option
The control console supports a second video display to enhance the
information provided to the console operator. By being able to view more
information, the operator can have not only additional information but with
the fast display change features more control of vital show functions.
Figure A.5 Video Card Installation
Installation
• Check package contents: (2) Zip style cable ties and (1) Video Card
• Disconnect AC power.
WARNING! The console contains high voltage (120 or 240 V)
which can cause injury or death. Be sure to unplug the console
from its AC power source before performing any maintenance
inside the console. Due to risk of electrical shock all
maintenance and repair inside console must be performed by
qualified service personnel.
1. Disconnect ALL control cable connections
2. On a padded surface invert the console, laying it face down
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Appendix A Installation
3. With a Phillips screwdriver, remove the rubber feet and screws from the
bottom panel. (see Figure A.6)
Figure A.6 Bottom of Console
Figure A.7 Location of CPU and Video cards
4. Locate the Main Processor Circuit card. (See Figure A.7)
5. Remove Video Connector Cover plate. Be sure to save the two screws.
6. Insert Secondary Video card, aligning the video connector with the back
panel and the white card connect facing the processor card. Press the
white connector together. (see Figure A.7 on next page)
7. Attach mounting screws for video connect to rear panel.
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Appendix A Installation
8. The video card and CPU card have two holes. Use the small cable ties
provided to secure the two card together. This is important for consoles
that are frequently moved or toured.
On some early versions of the main CPU card the cable tie holes are
filled with solder. This can easily be melted away with a small soldering
iron. If you have question or need assistance call Field Service at
1-800-959-6004 for further instructions.
9. Double check installation.
10. Reposition bottom panel and re-attach screws and rubber feet.
11. Turn console over and reconnect power, control and video cables
CAUTION! Modern electronics can sometimes be permanently
damaged by just a tiny amount of static electricity, an amount
much smaller than you can feel! To protect your console from
damage, it is recommended that you use a grounding wriststrap connected to the console chassis whenever you remove
the cover.
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Appendix A Installation
Configuration
If you are not familiar with the Setup Display of the control console, you
may wish to refer to Chapters 12 System Settings for an overview before
proceeding. Also refer to Chapter 2 Displays for information on how to
switch active monitors.
To configure the operation of the Secondary Video option:
Procedure:
Notes:
1. Press [SETUP]
Opens Setup display
2. Press [22]
Menu Item 22: Disabled
3. Press [ENTER]
4. Using the up/down arrow keys to
select mode (see Monitor Modes below)
5. Press [ENTER]
Monitor Modes
Disabled: Use this selection when you are using only one monitor.
Auto Switch: Use this selection to activate the secondary video display
and to allow "Automatic" switching between displays when a display key is
pressed.
Man Switch: Use this selection to activate the secondary video display and
to disallow "Automatic" switching between displays when a display key is
pressed. Moving between video displays must be set by the Trackball or the
(MONITR) soft-key.
Fixed mode: This mode has eight settings corresponding to the eight
primary displays for the console. The eight settings are:
Page 228
Fixed Stage
Fixed Preview
Fixed Device
Fixed Cuesht
Fixed Track
Fixed Playbk
Fixed Patch
Fixed Setup
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User Guide
Appendix B Specifications
Appendix B Specifications
Console Specifications
Model
24/48
48/96
72/144
600
(Innovator Only)
Channel Faders:
48
96
144
N/A
Conventional
Channels:
384
384
384
600
Device Channels:
512
512
512
512
Submaster Faders:
24 Faders with 8 pages ofMemory(192 total).
Dimmers:
1,536 dimmers on 3 DMX Universes.
Maximum Cues:
600 cues per show.
Maximum Groups:
500 groups per show.
Maximum Macros:
500 macros per show.
Maximum Effects:
600 effects / 100 steps per effect / 9,999 steps total
The upper limit of cues, groups, macros and effects is user changeable to
maximize memory usage.
Environmental
• Operating Temperature: +5 °C to +40°C (+40°F to +104°F)
• Non-operating Temperature: -25°C to +65°C (-13°F to +150°F)
• Operating Humidity: 20 - 80% non-condensing
• Non-operating Humidity: 10 - 85% non-condensing
Standards Compliance
• USITT DMX 512-1990 dimmer protocol (except pins 4 & 5)
• Underwriters Laboratories (UL and C-UL) listed
Power Requirements
• 100 - 130 VAC, 50 - 60 Hz or 220 - 240 VAC, 50 - 60 Hz
• 200 watts (max) (console only - no monitor or options plugged in)
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Appendix B Specifications
Memory
• 3.5" HD disk drive - 1.44 MB disk memory
• Operating system user-updated via floppy disk
• Alphanumeric naming of Cues, Effects, Groups, Subs and Shows
• Selective data retrieval from disk
• Pre-programmed library of user definable automated device attributes
Patch Capability
• 1,536 dimmers, 3 DMX Ports
• Proportional levels assignable to each dimmer
• Custom profiles assignable to each dimmer
Submasters / Effects
• Individually programmable as Pile-on, Inhibitive or Effect
• Fade times (separate Up, Down and Dwell times)
• Submaster Toggle Mode allows for sustained Submasters
• Effect steps can be assigned groups, subs, cues, channel levels or trait
values
• Up to 600 effects per show maximum and 100 steps per effect
• Effect patterns: Forward, Reverse, Bounce and Random
Cue Functions
• Split Up/Down Fade and Delay Times
• Links with other cues
• Follow parameter
• Cue Macros / Cue Effects
Playback Controls
• 2 pairs of playback faders (A/B, C/D) with individual Load keys
• Cue Hold and Back keys
• Trackball for rate, level and position
• 7 device encoder wheels
• 8 programmable macro keys
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Appendix B Specifications
Interfaces
Connector
Parallel printer port
25 pin D
DMX Out data universes
(3) 5 pin XLR and (1) 3 pin XLR
DMX In
(1) 5 pin XLR
MIDI In/Out/Thru
(3) 5-pin DIN
Single video monitor (standard)
High density 15-pin D
Second video monitor (optional)
High density 15-pin D
Hand Held Remote (optional)
6-pin XLR
8 external Macro Inputs
9 pin D
Worklights
3 pin XLR or BNC depending on model
Ethernet
RJ 45, AUI (Innovator Only)
Keyboard
5 pin DIN
Warranty
• Two year Warranty (see inside front cover)
• Free software upgrades during warranty period
Part Numbers
Description
Cat. No.
Innovator 24/48
7-0048
Innovator 48/96
7-0096
Innovator 72/144
7-0144
Innovator 600
7-0600
MC 24/48 (120 Volt)
N2448-000
MC 24/48 (240 Volt)
N2448-009
For Accessory information and part numbers, please consult
Console Data Sheet.
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Appendix B Specifications
Page 232
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Appendix C Maintenance
Appendix C Maintenance
Your console should require very little maintenance other than basic
cleaning.
How to Clean Console
The use of a dry non-abrasive cloth will remove most dust. For harder to
remove substances you may spray a little water into a soft cloth, then apply
carefully. Be sure to spray only into cloth and not directly on to console.
Using a cover to protect the console is highly recommended (see Console
data sheet for ordering information).
Upgrading Software
Please see Chapter 11 Memory Functions.
Replacing AC Power Fuses
CAUTION! You must replace fuses with new fuses of the
proper type and rating or else your console can be damaged
and any safety compliance certifications (UL, C- UL, CE, etc.)
voided.
Power Input Fuses: The power input fuses are located in the fuse holder
integral with the power input connector on the back of the console. They
protect the entire console including the convenience receptacles on the
back. They must be replaced with Bussman Part No. GDC-4A, Littelfuse Part
No. 218004, or Wickman Part No. 19195-4A fuses. These fuses are 5x20
mm fuses rated 4A, 250V with a Type T (IEC 127-2/III) (Slow Blow)
operating characteristic.
WARNING! The console contains high voltage (120 or 240
VAC) which can cause injury or death. Be sure to unplug the
console from its AC power source before performing any
maintenance inside the console. Due to risk of electrical shock
all maintenance and repair inside console must be performed
by qualified service personnel.
See following page for replacement steps.
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Appendix C Maintenance
1. Remove the power supply cable.
2. Insert a screwdriver in the slot exposed by removing the cable and pry
out the fuse block.
3. Replace the blown fuse(s) with a new one.
4. Re-insert the fuse block with its arrow up.
Power Supply Fuses: The power supply fuses are located in fuse holders
inside the console enclosure on brackets near the back of the power input
connector and the power supply transformer. They protect only the power
supply transformer and not the convenience receptacles. They must be
replaced with Bussman Part No. GDB-800mA, Littelfuse Part No. 217.800 or
Wickman Part No 19193-800mA fuses. These fuses are 5x20 mm fuses
rated 800mA, 250v with a Type F (IEC 127-2/II) (Fast Blow) operating
characteristic. Due to risk of electrical shock, all maintenance and
repair inside console must be performed by qualified service
personnel.
Replacing the RAM Backup Battery
CAUTION: Modern electronics can sometimes be permanently
damaged by just a tiny amount of static electricity, an amount
much smaller than you can feel! To protect your console from
damage, it is recommended that you use a grounding wriststrap connected to the console chassis whenever you remove
the computer cover.
CAUTION: Risk of explosion if battery is replaced by an
Incorrect type. Dispose of battery according to manufacture’s
instructions.
1. Obtain the correct replacement battery, which can be
purchased from your NSI-Colortran dealer as part # CAP90008-00 (3 VDC 560 mA/hr Lithium). You can also purchase a
battery from your local electronics retailer (Panasonic model
CR2354, or equivalent).
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Appendix C Maintenance
2. Unplug the console from the AC power source!
WARNING! The console contains high voltage (120 or 240 VA
C) which can cause injury or death. Be sure to unplug the
console from its AC power source before performing any
maintenance inside the console. Due to risk of electrical shock
all maintenance and repair inside console must be performed
by qualified service personnel.
3. Turn console upside down and place it on a flat sturdy surface on foam
bricks or other suitable support.
4. Using a Phillips screwdriver remove the screws around the bottom pan of
the console and then remove the bottom pan.
5. Locate the CPU Printed Circuit Board Assembly on the bracket off the
rear of the console. Locate the quarter-size battery BT-1 near the rear of
the board just right of center.
6. The easiest way to remove the battery from under its spring clip is to
first place a small flat-blade screwdriver in the notch in front of the battery,
and lift the front edge of the battery above the lip of the battery holder.
Next, place another small flat-blade screwdriver in the notch in the back of
the battery and push the battery forward out and over the front lip of the
battery holder.
7. Make sure that the "+" side of the new battery is facing up, and then
slide the new battery into place under the spring clip.
8. Replace the bottom pan and re-attach with the screws.
The clock will need to be reset after the above procedure, please see
Chapter 12 System Settings.
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Appendix C Maintenance
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User Guide
Appendix D Resident Devices
Appendix D Resident Devices
Resident Device Types
Software version 1.30 of the control console ships with the following
Automated Lighting Device Definitions resident in memory.
High End Systems Products
AF1000 - Personality DIP switches 3, 4 & 5 on.
CyberLight - Mode 2
CyberLight CX
Intellabeam - Personality switches 3 & 5 on, 8 channels
Intellabeam 16 - Personality switches 3, 5 & 6 on, 10 channels
Studio Color - Version 37a
Studio Spot 250
Studio Spot
Technobeam
Trackspot - Personality switches 3 & 5 on.
Martin Products
MAC 250 - Mode 4
MAC 300 - Mode 4
MAC 500 - Mode 4
MAC 600 - Mode 4
MAC 1200 - Mode 4
MX 1 - Full DMX mode, 6 channels, channel 2 is not used
Pal 1220 - Version 2 Mode 4 (SPEC\LoFF On)
Pal 1220 E - Version 1 Mode 4
Roboscan Pro 1220 XR - Mode 2
Roboscan Pro 1220 CMYR - Mode 2
Roboscan 518 - Mode 3, Jumper pins 4 & 5 of internal jumper PL432
Roboscan Pro 218- Mode 3
Roboscan Pro 218 - Martin DMX 512 Interface, Mode 11
Roboscan 812 - 7 channel mode, pins 4 & 5 of internal jumper PL11
Robocolor Pro 400 - Version 5
Robocolor - Martin DMX 512 Interface, Mode 2, Switch 2 down
Robocolor II - Martin DMX 512 Interface, Mode 3, Switches 1 & 2 down
Robocolor III
RoboZap - Mode 15, Switches 1, 2, 3 and 4 down
Rev. 1.30.03.07.r1
Page 237
Appendix D Resident Devices
Clay Paky Products
CombiColor
Golden Scan 2
Golden Scan 3 - Expanded Version (DIP switch 4 up)
Golden Scan HPE - (DIP switch 1, 2 & 4 up, 12 channels)
Mini Scan HPE - 7 channels
Super Scan- Expanded Mode (DIP switch 2 up)
Super Scan Zoom - Expanded Mode (DIP switch 4 up)
Silverado
VARI*LITE Products
VL5
VL6
KLS Products
SE204
SE600/601
American DJ Products
StarTec H150
Arcbeam 150
Colorchanger 250
X-treme
Abstract Fixtures
Color Change CED
Futurescan 2CE
Show*Pro (Ness) Products
Cyberscan
Techni-Lux Products
Techni-Scan DX
Techni-Scan 150
Techni-Scan S
Lyte Quest Products
Motorhead
JB Lighting Products
Varycolor 2000
Varyscan
Varyscan 4
Any trademarks referenced in this document are the property of their
respective owners. Consult your product manuals for complete
trademark information.
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Index
A
AC Power Fuses 233
Active Channels 4, 35
Allocating Memory 188
And key 9
Arrow keys 11
Automated Device
Clear Assignment 152
DDL 167
Focus Points 164
Patching (Assigning) 141, 149
Programming 154, 166
Recording Cues 159
Resident devices 237
Traits 4, 148
Using Effects with 164
Using Groups with 163
Using Submasters with 162
B
Back key 79
Blackout key 10
Bump button modes
Channel 28, 187
Submaster 43
C
Captured Channels 4, 34
Change key 10
Channel
+/- mode 40
Active 4, 35
Bump button mode 28, 187
Captured 4, 34
Check 39
Clearing levels 34
Level colors 33
Lists 32
Rev. 1.30.03.07.r1
Index
Restoring levels 39
Setting levels 27
Setting number of 188
Clean Up key 10
Clean Up mode 92
Cleaning Console 233
Clear key 9
Clear Playback Fader key 79
Clearing
Channel levels (example) 34
Console memory 177
Cues 71
Device Assignment 152
Effects 121
Groups 108
Macros 131
Submasters 53
Clock
Real Time Event 86
Setting 196
CMX 191
ColorNet
Configuration 194, 213
IP Address Assignment 213
Universe 191
Command Line 12
History 13
Syntax 32
Console
Cleaning 233
Control Connections 221
Controls 6
Maintenance
Replacing AC Power Fuses 233
Replacing RAM battery 234
Operating Modes
Single Scene 37
Two Scene 36
Power Connections 219
Power requirements 229
Reset 177
Set Up 3, 218
Specifications 229
Upgrading Software 182
Warranty 231
Page 239
Index
Control Connections 221
Converting Hard and Soft Levels 95
Copying
Cues 70
Groups 107
Submasters 52
Cue
Assigning Effects to Cues 74, 122
Assigning Macros to Cues 75, 129
Attributes 58
Back key 79
Clear Playback Fader key 79
Clearing 71
Converting Hard and Soft Levels 95
Copying 70
Edit blind in Preview display 66
Edit live in Stage display 65
Go key 79
Hold key 79
Inserting 72
Load key 79
Multipart Cues 76
Naming 69
Numbering 56
Playback 78
Rate Override 85
Record blind in Preview display 64
Record live in Stage display 59
Record Modes 56
Clean Up, Tracking, Cue Only 89
Record with delay time 61
Record with fade time 59
Record with follow time 62
Record with link 63
Recording 56
Renumbering 72
Tracking Level Conventions 90
Using Groups in Cues 73, 110
Using Macros to Execute Cues 88
Using the Real Time Event 86
Cue key 9
Cue Only mode 94
Cuesheet Display 67
Custom patching 139
Page 240
D
Data Keypad 8
Day
Setting 196
Default key 154, 169
Delay key 9
Device Definition Language (DDL) 167
Continuous traits 168
Creating / Editing 168
Indexed traits 168
Load to console 167
Trait Attributes 168
Trait Labels 168
Union traits 168
Device Display 156
Device key 9
Dimmer
Check 142
Non-Dim 144
Parked 40
Patching 138
Profiles 143
Selecting Protocol 191
Setting number of 186
Dimmer key 10
Display keys 7
Displays
Common Features 16
Cue Preview 20, 64
Cuesheet 21, 67
Device 19, 156
Device Assignment Sub-Display 23
Dimmer Output Sub-Display 18
Effect Sub-Display (Preview) 21, 114
Effect Sub-Display (Stage) 20, 114
Group Preview 20, 103
LCD 25, 155
Macro Sub-Display 23, 124
Monitor modes 228
Navigating 17
Patch 22, 136
Playback 19, 81
Print Sub-Display 200
Profile Sub-Display 24, 145
Real Time Event Sub-Display 24, 86
Rev. 1.30.03.07.r1
User Guide
Selecting 17
Setup 22, 184
Stage 18
Submaster Preview 20, 49
Switching Active Monitors 26
Tracksheet 21, 91
DMX-512
Device Traits 148
DMX IN 215
Port 136
Selecting Protocol 191
E
Effect
Assigning to Cues 74, 122
Assigning to Submasters 122
Clearing 121
Element Hierarchy 119
Recording, Editing 118
Setting number of Steps 190
Steps 118
Testing 120
Effect Sub-Display 20, 114
Encoder Wheels 155
Enter key 9
F
Faders
Channel 28
Grand Master 10, 82
Playback 11, 78, 82
Submaster 41
Focus Points 164
Follow key 9
Formatting a Floppy Disk 181
G
Go key 79
Grand Master fader 10, 82
Group
Clearing 108
Editing 101
Recording 99
Setting number of 190
Rev. 1.30.03.07.r1
Index
Using in Cues 110
Using in Effects 112
Using in Submasters 111
Using the Only key with 109
Using with Devices 98, 163
Group key 9
Group Preview Sub-Display 103
H
Hand Held Remote 206
Hard Clear 177
Hard-keys 7
Hold key 79
I
Inhibitive Submaster 46
Installation
Keyboard 224
Printer 224
Worklights 222
K
Keyboard Installation 224
Keys
And 9
Arrow 11
Back 79
Blackout 10
Change 10
Clean Up 10
Clear 9
Clear Playback Fader 79
Cue 9
Data Keypad 8
Default 154, 169
Delay 9
Device 9
Dimmer 10
Display 7
Effect 9
Enter 9
Follow 9
Go 79
Group 9
Page 241
Index
Hard 7
Hold 79
Leviton Logo 11
Link 9
Load 79
Macro 7
Meatball 11
Minus 9
Only 9, 109
Part 9, 76
Profile 9
Rate 80, 85
Record Cue 9
Record Group 9
Record Sub 9
Select 10
Soft 7
Sub 9
Thru 9
Time 9
L
LCD Display 25, 155
Leviton Logo Key 11
Link key 9
Load key 79
Loading Show Files 181
M
Macro
Assigning to Cues 129
Assigning to Subs 129
Clearing 131
Editing 130
Examples 132
Keys 7
Nesting 128
Pages 125
Playback 129
Real-Time 127
Recording 126
Remote activation 215
Setting number of 189
Macro Sub-Display 124
Page 242
Match and Take Control 38
Meatball (Leviton logo) Key 11
Memory
Hard Clear 177
Loading 181
Saving 179
Soft Clear 178
MIDI
Setting Device number 193
Setting Transmit mode 193
Show Control 209
Standard 209
Minus key 9
Multipart Cues 76
N
Naming
Cues 69
Disk file 185
Effects 114
Groups 106
Show 185
Submasters 51
Network Remote 194
Non-Dim Dimmers 144
O
One to One patching 138
Only key 9, 109
P
Parked Dimmers 40
Part key 9, 76
Patch
1 To 1 138
Automated Devices 141, 149
Custom 139
Parameters 136
Proportional 140
Patch Display 136
Peripheral Devices 222
Pile On Submaster 46
Playback
Cues 78
Rev. 1.30.03.07.r1
User Guide
Macros 129
Submasters 43
Playback Display 81
Playback Faders 11, 78, 82
Port
A, B, C 136
Power connections 219
Power Supply voltage selection 220
Print
Print Screen option 204
Printer installation 224
Printouts available 202
Selecting Printer type 192
Print Sub-Display 200
Profile Sub-Display 145
Profiles
Custom 146
Default 143
Programming Hints 166
Proportional patching 140
R
RAM Backup Battery 234
Rate key 80, 85
Rate Override 85
Real Time Event Sub-Display 86
Record Cue key 9
Record Group key 9
Record Sub key 9
Recording
Cues 56
Effects 118
Groups 99
Macros 126
Show Files 179
Submasters 42
Remote Macro Activation 215
Renumbering
Cues 72
Groups 107
Submasters 52
Reset Console 177
Resident Devices 237
Restoring channel levels 39
Rev. 1.30.03.07.r1
Index
S
Saving show files 179
Secondary Video
Installation 225
Monitor modes 225
Selecting 196
Switching Active Monitors 26
Select key 10
Setting Channel levels 27
Setting Worklight level 191
Setup Display 184
Shift (Leviton logo) key 11
Soft Clear 178
Soft-keys 7
Sub key 9
Submaster
Assigning Effects to Subs 48
Assigning Groups to Subs 48
Assigning Macros to Subs 48
Bump button modes 43
Changing pages 42
Clearing 53
Editing 50
Faders 41
Playback 43
Recording 42
Setting number of 189
Timed 44
Types
Pile On, Inhibitive 46
Submaster Preview Display 49
Switching Active Monitors 26
System Settings
ColorNet Configuration 194
Dimmer Protocol 191
MIDI Configuration 193
Name Disk File 185
Name Show 185
Network Remote 194
Number of Channels 188
Number of Dimmers 186
Number of Effect Steps 190
Number of Groups 190
Number of Macros 189
Number of Submasters 189
Page 243
Index
Printer type 192
Scene Mode 195
Secondary Video 196
Time / Day 196
Worklight level 191
T
Technical Support 14
Terminology Definitions
Active Channels 4, 35
Automated Device 4
Automated Device Channels 4
Captured Channels 4, 34
Channels 4
Cue 4, 55
Device Traits 4, 148
Dimmer Protocols 5
Effect 5, 113
Group 97
Level 4
Patch 5, 136
Page 244
Profile 5
Show 4
Thru key 9
Time key 9
Trackball 10
Proportional control 31
Setting levels with 30
Tracking Level Conventions 90
Tracking mode 93
Tracksheet Display 91
U
Upgrading Console Software 182
W
Warranty 231
Worklight
Installation 222
Setting level 191
Rev. 1.30.03.07.r1
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