“Motorlab” Dynamics and Controls System “Motorlab” Apparatus

“Motorlab” Dynamics and Controls System  “Motorlab” Apparatus
“Motorlab” Dynamics and Controls System
Motor
Amplifier
“Motorlab”
Apparatus
Power
Supply
USB
Mechanical
System
Detail
Microcontroller
Board
Load
Encoder
Load
Inertia
Motor
Encoder
Load
Locking Screw
Spring
Coupling
Brushless
Motor
System Description
Below is a schematic representation of the Motorlab system in a closed-loop position or speed control
configuration. There are two position sensors on the apparatus, a motor encoder and a load encoder. The speeds of
the two inertias are measured by numerically differentiating the position signals in the computer controlling the
system (microcontroller). The motor amplifier has a control loop that measures and controls the electric current in
the motor windings. This results in what is commonly known as a “torque controlled” motor, since the magnetic
torque is proportional to the current in the windings. The microcontroller is interfaced to the motor amplifier
through a +/-10V analog signal. By varying the magnitude of this voltage the microcontroller can change the current
in the motor. This voltage, which is proportional to the controlled current, serves as a current command (desired
current) for the current control loop in the amplifier. An additional sensor, not shown below, is the current sensor in
the amplifier used to implement the current control. The signal from this sensor is also read by the microcontroller,
using an analog to digital converter. Although this signal is not used in the control loops on the microcontroller, it is
recorded for data analysis.
Motor (Electromechanical Dynamics)
R
ic
Microcontroller
24 V Supply,
and Motor
Amp with
Current Control
V
T  kt i
L
i
+
k b1
2
1
J1
J2
_
b1
1 , 2 , 1 ,  2
1
ks
b2
Several different configurations of the system can be utilized in experiments. Either sensor, the motor or load
encoder, can be used for the feedback of the control loop. The selection is made in the software interface. The
motor encoder is known as a “collocated” sensor since it is co-located with the input to the mechanical system, the
motor torque. The load sensor is separated from the input to the system by a spring and is therefore known as a
“non-collocated” sensor. In addition to varying which sensor is used, the mechanical system can be changed with
the lock down screw and the spring coupling. Also, a choice can be made between velocity control or position
control by selecting the appropriate control program. Any of the following mechanical models may be realized
using the Motorlab hardware and software.
T
2
1
J1
T
ks
b1
2
J1
J2
b1
ks
Third order system
1
T
Second order system
with a free integrator
T
1
J1
J1
b1
b2
b1
ks
Second order system
1
1
J1
b2
Fourth order system
with a free integrator
T
T
J1
J2
b1
1
ks
Second order system
with a free differentiator
b1
First order system
Software
The software for the system can be found in the “c:\Motorlab” directory on the laboratory machines. All the
needed Matlab functions can be found there. The software that is on the microcontroller is included in this directory
in the motorlabRepo.zip file. This program is burned into the flash memory of the microcontroller and runs on
power up. The software that runs on the PC is a GUI written in Matlab ("motorlabGUI.m"). There are additional
m-files in the "Motorlab" directory that can be used to plot data from the system.
User Interface
To run the Motorlab GUI you must open Matlab and add the “c:\Motorlab” directory to the Matlab path or set
this directory as the current directory. Normally you will add it to the path and set the current directory to the
location where you are storing your files. The microcontroller should be plugged into USB. In the Matlab command
window type "motorlabGUI." The opening dialog (below) asks you to select the communication port for the
microcontroller. If more than one port is listed you should be able to detect which is the Motorlab by unplugging
the USB or powering it down and then clicking the "Refresh List" button. The GUI should open after selecting the
com port.
Connection Dialog
2
Motorlab GUI
Data Acquisition
The microcontroller stores data in a circular buffer that is 2048 data samples in length with 9 variables in each
sample. After 2048 sample periods the buffer begins to be overwritten with the more recent data. At any time the
buffer contains the most recent 2048 samples. Pressing the "Save Data Buffer to Workspace" button will write this
data to a 2048x9 matrix in the Matlab workspace. Pressing the "Run Wave AutoSave" button starts the wave type
selected and then writes the data to the Matlab workspace once the buffer has filled with new data. The time length
of the data depends on the sample rate. If for example the sample rate is set to 500 Hz, then the last 4.096 seconds
(2048/500) of data will be saved in the buffer.
The data matrix saved in the Matlab workspace contains 9 variables (columns). The ninth column is reserved.
The other eight are listed below. Note that the variable in the second column changes. It depends on the "Controller
Mode" chosen at the time of the data storage.
Column
Description
Variable
1
Time
t (sec)
2
Command
 c (deg),
c (rpm),
3
Motor
Encoder
1 (deg)
4
Load
Encoder
 2 (deg)
5
Motor
Speed
1 (rpm)
6
Load
Speed
 2 (rpm)
7
Current
Command
ic (Amp)
8
Motor
Current
i (Amp)
ic (Amp)
M-files for plotting
There are m-files provided in the "c:\Motorlab" directory that can be used to plot the data from the Motorlab.
Although you will frequently want the access the data with your own m-files, these files are useful for quickly
viewing the data after acquiring it. There is one file for each of the "Controller Mode" settings.
File: mlolplots.m function: mlolplots(data,Iscale); Uses data generated by the Motorlab in open loop control. If
an "Iscale" argument is supplied then the commanded current values are scaled by the Iscale value in the plots.
example: mlolplots(data); Does not scale the current command.
example: mlolplots(data,Iscale); Multiplies commanded current values by Iscale.
3
File: mlposplots.m function: mlposplots(data);
example: mlposplots(data);
Uses data generated by the Motorlab position control mode.
File: mlspeedplots.m function: mlspeedplots(data); Uses data generated by the Motorlab velocity control mode.
example: mlvelplots(data);
File: trapprof.m function: [x,v,t] =trapprof(DX,Vmax,Amax,DT) Trapezoidal-velocity motion profile generation
Outputs: x=position vector, v=trapezoidal velocity vector, t=time vector
Inputs: DX=distance to move, Vmax=maximum velocity, Amax=maximum acceleration, DT=time step for outputs
example: [x,v,t] =trapprof(DX,Vmax,Amax,DT)
Hardware Specifications
Important Scaling Considerations
 Motor Amplifier Scaling = 1 Amp/Volt. Therefore, one Volt output from the microcontroller corresponds to a
one Amp command to the current control loop in the motor amplifier. The plotting routines provided take this
scaling into consideration.
 Position is measured in degrees and velocity is measured in RPM. The output of the control algorithm in the
microcontroller is measured in Volts. Therefore, for example, the units of the proportional and derivate gains in
the position controller would be Volts/deg and Volts*sec/deg, respectively. When multiplied by the amplifier
scaling (1 Amp/Volt) these gains become Amp/deg and Amp*sec/deg. The units of the proportional gain in the
velocity controller would be Volts/RPM (or Amp/RPM if amplifier scaling is included).
Inertias
A Few Other Details
 Max Data Acquisition Sample Rate = 10 kHz (the control update rate of the microcontroller software)
 Motor Encoder Resolution = 360 deg/1600 counts = 0.225 deg/count
 Load Encoder Resolution = 360 deg/2000 counts = 0.18 deg/count
 Max motor velocity with the 24 Volt power supply is about 4000 rpm
4
Speed Measurement
The two speeds measured by the Motorlab system are found using a discrete time approximation (i.e. computer
code) of a derivative with a low pass filter. The continuous time transfer function for this filter is given below. It
uses the encoder position measurement for input. Note the free s in the numerator performs the differentiation and
the filter with a cutoff frequency of 300 rad/s helps to filter spikes in the speed measurement caused by
differentiating the discrete steps inherent in an encoder position measurement.
Position
Measurement (deg)
 (s )
Speed
Filter
k rd  300 2 s
Speed
Measurement (rpm)
 (s )
s 2  212 s  300 2
k rd  1( rpm ) / 6 (deg/ s )
Specs from Motor Manufacturer’s Data Sheet
LA052-040E Motor Dynamic Specs From Shinano Kenshi
RATED POWER
RATED VOLTAGE
RATED SPEED
RATED TORQUE
RATED CURRENT
TORQUE CONSTANT
BACK EMF CONSTANT
PHASE RESISTANCE
PHASE INDUCTANCE
INSTANTANEOUS PEAK TORQUE
MAX SPEED
ROTOR INERTIA
POWER RATE
MECHANICAL TIME CONSTANT
ELECTRICAL TIME CONSTANT
MASS
UNITS
W
VDC
rpm
N-cm
kgf-cm
A
N-cm/A
kgf-cm/A
V/krpm
Ohm
mH
N-cm
rpm
g-cm2
kW/s
ms
ms
kg
Value
40
24
3,000
12.7
1.3
2.5
5.0
0.51
5.2
1.18
4.4
38.2
5,000
110
1.48
5.2
3.7
0.6
Current Control Loop Model
The motor amplifier has a current control loop. As configured in the Motorlab apparatus this loop has a
bandwidth of approximately 400 Hz. Using data acquired from step and sinusoidal responses the following two
closed loop transfer functions have been identified as approximate models for the closed-loop current control
dynamics.
where :

n 2 (s  z)
 td s
T
e


z  170  2 (rad/sec)
idelay
 n 2 (s  z)
z ( s 2  2 n s   n 2 )

 n  230  2 (rad/sec)
Ti 
or 
s 2  6s / t d  12 / t d 2
n 2 (s  z)
z ( s 2  2 n s   n 2 )
T
  0.8


 ipade z ( s 2  2 s   2 ) s 2  6s / t  12 / t 2
n
n
d
d

t  0.0002 (sec)
d
Two of the models above contain a time delay while the other does not. One model with the time delay uses the
exponential (exact) representation with the delay, while the other uses a second order Pade' approximation of the
5
delay. In the following two figures the responses of these two models are compared with actual data acquired from
one of the Motorlab systems. Both the step response and the frequency response models are shown.
Step Response of Current Control Loop
1.2
Current (Amp)
1
0.8
0.6
0.4
Command
Experimental Data
Model w/o Time Delay
Model with Time Delay
0.2
0
0
0.001
0.002
0.003
Time (sec)
0.004
0.005
Frequency Response of Current Control Loop
2
Magnitude (dB)
0
-2
-4
-6
-8
Phase (deg)
-10
0
-45
-90
Experimental Data
Model w/o Time Delay
Model with Time Delay
-135
-180 0
10
10
1
10
Frequency (Hz)
6
2
10
3
Motor Amplifier Manual
Model 503
DC Brushless Servo Amplifier
FEATURES
• CE Compliance to
89/336/EEC
•
Recognized Component
to UL 508C
• Complete torque ( current ) mode
functional block
• Drives motor with
60° or 120° Halls
• Single supply voltage
18-55VDC
• 5A continuous, 10A peak more
than double the power output of
servo chip sets
• Fault protected
PRODUCT DESCRIPTION
Short-circuits from output to
output, output to ground
Over/under voltage
Over temperature
Self-reset or latch-off
• 2.5kHz bandwidth
• Wide load inductance range
0.2 to 40 mH.
• +5, +15V Hall power
• Separate continuous, peak, and
peak-time current limits
• Surface mount technology
APPLICATIONS
•
•
•
•
X-Y stages
Robotics
Automated assembly machinery
Component insertion machines
THE OEM ADVANTAGE
• NO POTS: Internal component
•
•
header configures amplifier for
applications
Conservative design for high
MTBF
Low cost solution for small
brushless motors to 1/3 HP
Model 503 is a complete pwm servoamplifier for applications using DC
brushless motors in torque ( current ) mode. It provides six-step commutation of three-phase DC brushless motors using 60° or 120° Hall
sensors on the motor, and provides a full complement of features for
motor control. These include remote inhibit/enable, directional enable
inputs for connection to limit switches, and protection for both motor and
amplifier.
The /Enable input has selectable active level ( +5V or gnd ) to interface
with most control cards.
/Pos and /Neg enable inputs use fail-safe (ground to enable) logic.
Power delivery is four-quadrant for
bi-directional acceleration and deceleration of motors.
Model 503 features 500W peak power output in a compact package
using surface mount technology.
An internal header socket holds components which configure the various
gain and current limit settings to customize the 503 for different loads and
applications.
Separate peak and continuous current limits allow high acceleration
without sacrificing protection against continuous overloads. Peak current
time limit is settable to match amplifier to motor thermal limits.
Header components permit compensation over a wide range of load
inductances to maximize bandwidth with different motors.
Package design places all connectors along one edge for easy connection and adjustment while minimizing footprint inside enclosures.
High quality components and conservative ratings insure long service life
and high reliability in industrial installations.
A differential amplifier buffers the reference voltage input to reject
common-mode noise resulting from potential differences between
controller and amplifier grounds.
Output short circuits and heatplate overtemperature cause the amplifier
to latch into shutdown. Grounding the reset input will enable an autoreset from such conditions when this feature is desired.
Corporate Offices: 410 University Avenue
Westwood, MA 02090
Telephone: (781) 329-8200
Fax: (781) 329-4055
E-mail: sales@copleycontrols.com
http://www.copleycontrols.com
221
Model 503
DC Brushless Servo Amplifier
FUNCTIONAL DIAGRAM
MOMENTARY SWITCH RESETS FAULT
WIRE RESET TO GROUND FOR SELF-RESET
3
SHORT/O.T.
POWER FAULT
NORMAL
CH2
1.5 NF
RH1
499K
LED'S
R
R
G
8
STATUS
&
CONTROL
LOGIC
4
5
+5V
6
1nF
7
REF AMP
10K
10K
RH7
REF(-) 10
-
REF(+) 11
+
470 PF 2.2 MEG
CURRENT LIMIT
SECTION
100K
1
-
RH6
10K
PEAK
RH3
RH5
PEAK
TIME
1nF
RH4
+NORMAL
NEG ENABLE
POS ENABLE
ENABLE
ENABLE POL
GND
100 PF
J2 SIGNAL CONNECTOR
+
10K
J2 SIGNAL CONNECTOR
RESET
50K
CURRENT
ERROR
AMP
J1 MOTOR & POWER CONNECTOR
RH3
RH5
CONT
Gv = 1
CURRENT 9
MONITOR
OPEN = 120 DEG.
GND = 60 DEG.
HALLSELECT
1K
OUTPUT
CURRENT
SENSE
33NF
+/-5V AT
+/-10A
PWM
STAGE
MOSFET
"H"
BRIDGE
1
2
3
4
Gv = +HV
10
MOTOR
U
V
W
+HV
GND
5
2
U
17
V
HALLS
HALL
LOGIC
16
W
15
+5
+15
GND
+HV
GROUND CASE FOR SHIELDING
+5
14
+15
13
DC / DC
CONVERTER
CASE GROUND
NOT CONNECTED
TO CIRCUIT GROUND
-15
18
POWER GROUND AND SIGNAL GROUNDS ARE COMMON
TYPICAL CONNECTIONS
CONTROLLER
REF(-)
10
W
3
REF(+)
11
SIG GND
J2
12
J1
DC POWER SUPPLY
V
2
MOTOR
U
1
GND
AC
-
5
+
4
J1
AC
+HV
13
J2
14
+15 V
+5 V
15
16
222
SIG GND
1
/NEG ENAB
4
/POS ENAB
5
/ENABLE
6
17
18
J2
Corporate Offices: 410 University Avenue
Westwood, MA 02090
Vcc
W
V
U
GND
HALL
SENSORS
Telephone: (781) 329-8200
Fax: (781) 329-4055
E-mail: sales@copleycontrols.com
http://www.copleycontrols.com
Model 503
DC Brushless Servo Amplifier
APPLICATION INFORMATION
To use the model 503 set up the internal header with the
components that configure the transconductance, current
limits, and load inductance. Current-limits and load
inductance set up the amplifier for your particular motor,
and the transconductance defines the amplifiers overall
response in amps/volt that is required by your system.
COMPONENT HEADER SETTINGS
Use the tables provided to select values for your load and
system. We recommend that you use these values as
starting points, adjusting them later based on tests of the
amplifier in your application.
LOAD INDUCTANCE (RH1,CH2)
Maximizes the bandwidth with your motor and supply
voltage. First replace CH2 with a jumper (short). Adjust the
value of RH1 using a step of 1A or less so as not to
experience large signal slew-rate limiting. Select RH1 for
the best transient response ( lowest risetime with minimal
overshoot). Once RH1 has been set. choose the smallest
value of CH2 that does not cause additional overshoot or
degradation of the step response.
TRANSCONDUCTANCE (RH6,7)
The transconductance of the 503 is the ratio of output
current to input voltage. It is equal to 10kΩ/RH6 (Amps/
Volt). RH6,and RH7 should be the same value and should
be 1% tolerance metal film type for good common-mode
noise rejection.
CURRENT LIMITS (RH3, 4, & 5)
The amplifier operates at the 5A continuous, 10A peak
limits as delivered. To reduce the limit settings, choose
values from the tables as starting points, and test with your
motor to determine final values. Limit action can be seen
on current monitor when output current no longer changes
in response to input signals. Separate control over peak,
continuous, and peak time limits provides protection for
motors, while permitting higher currents for acceleration.
SETUP BASICS
1. Set RH1 and CH2 for motor load inductance (see
following section).
2. Set RH3, 4, & 5 if current limits below standard values is
required.
3. Ground the /Enable (/Enable Pol open), /Pos Enable,
and /Neg Enable inputs to signal ground.
4. Connect the motor Hall sensors to J2 based on the
manufacturers suggested signal names. Note that
different manufacturers may use
A-B-C, R-S-T, or U-V-W to name their Halls. Use the
required Hall supply voltage (+5 or +15V). Note that
there is a 30 mA limit at +5V. Encoders that put-out Hall
signals typically consume 200-300 mA, so if these are
used, then they must be powered from an external
power supply.
5. Connect J1-4,5 to a transformer-isolated source of DC
power,
+18-55V. Ground the amplifier and power supply with an
additional wire from J1-5 to a central ground point.
6. With the motor windings disconnected, apply power and
slowly rotate the motor shaft. Observe the Normal (green)
led. If the lamp blinks while turning then the 60/120°
setting is incorrect. If J2-2 is open, then ground it and
repeat the test. In order to insure proper operation, the
correct Hall phasing of 60° or 120° must be made.
6.Turn off the amplifier and connect the motor leads to
J1-1,2,3 in U-V-W order. Power up the unit. Apply a
sinusoidal reference signal of about 1 Hz. and 1Vrms
between
Ref(+) and Ref(-), J2-10,11.
7. Observe the operation of the motor as the current monitor
signal passes through zero. When phasing is correct the
speed will be smooth at zero crossing and at low speeds. If
it is not, then power-down and re-connect the motor.
There are six possible ways to connect the motor windings,
and only one of these will result in proper motor operation.
The six combinations are listed in the table below. Incorrect
phasing will result in erratic operation, and the motor may
not rotate. When the correct combination is found, record
your settings.
#1
#2
#3
#4
#5
#6
J1-1
U
V
W
U
W
V
J1-2
V
W
U
W
V
U
J1-3
W
U
V
V
U
W
GROUNDING & POWER SUPPLIES
Power ground and signal ground are common ( internally
connected ) in this amplifier. These grounds are isolated
from the amplifier case which can then be grounded for best
shielding while not affecting the power circuits.
Currents flowing in the power supply connections will create
noise that can appear on the amplifier grounds.
This noise will be rejected by the differential amplifier at the
reference input, but will appear at the digital inputs. While
these are filtered, the lowest noise system will result when
the power-supply capacitor is left floating, and each amplifier is grounded at its power ground terminal ( J1-5 ). In
multiple amplifier configurations, always use separate
cables to each amplifier, twisting these together for lowest
noise emission. Twisting motor leads will also reduce
radiated noise from pwm outputs. If amplifiers are more than
1m. from power supply capacitor, use a small (500-1000µF.)
capacitor across power inputs for local bypassing.
Corporate Offices: 410 University Avenue
Westwood, MA 02090
Telephone: (781) 329-8200
Fax: (781) 329-4055
E-mail: sales@copleycontrols.com
http://www.copleycontrols.com
223
Model 503
DC Brushless Servo Amplifier
APPLICATION INFORMATION (CONT’D)
COMPONENT HEADER
HEADER LOCATION
WARNING!
DISCONNECT POWER WHEN CHANGING HEADER
COMPONENTS. REPLACE COVER BEFORE APPLYING
POWER TO PREVENT CONTACT WITH LIVE PARTS.
( COVER
REMOVED )
RH1
J1
CH2
J2
LOAD INDUCTANCE SETTING
RH3
CONTINUOUS CURRENT LIMIT
RH4
PEAK CURRENT TIME LIMIT
RH5
PEAK CURRENT LIMIT
RH6
RH7
REFERENCE GAIN SETTING
LEDS
NOTE: Components in dotted lines are
not installed at factory
CONTINUOUS CURRENT LIMIT (RH3)
Icont (A)
5
4
3
2
1
RH3 (Ω)
open *
20k
8.2k
3.9k
1.5k
INPUT TO OUTPUT GAIN SETTING ( RH6, RH7 )
Note 1
Example: Standard value of RH6 is 10kΩ, thus G = 1 A/V
PEAK CURRENT LIMIT (RH5) Note 3
Ipeak (A)
10
8
6
4
2
RH5 (Ω)
open *
12k
4.7k
2k
750
LOAD INDUCTANCE SETTING (RH1 & CH2) Note 2
Load (mH)
0.2
1
3
10
33
40
RH1
49.9 k
150 k
499 k
499 k
499 k
499 k
PEAK CURRENT TIME-LIMIT (RH4) Note 4
CH2
1.5 nF
1.5 nF
1.5 nF *
3.3 nF
6.8 nF
10 nF
Tpeak (s)
0.5
0.4
0.2
0.1
RH4 (Ω)
open *
10 M
3.3 M
1M
Times shown are for 10A step from 0A
Notes:* Standard values installed at factory are shown in italics.
1. RH6 & RH7 should be 1% resistors of same value.
2. Bandwidth and values of RH1, CH2 are affected by supply voltage and load inductance. Final selection should be
based on customer tests using actual motor at nominal supply voltage.
3. Peak current setting should always be greater than continuous current setting.
4. Peak times will double when current changes polarity. Peak times decrease as continuous current increases.
224
Corporate Offices: 410 University Avenue
Westwood, MA 02090
Telephone: (781) 329-8200
Fax: (781) 329-4055
E-mail: sales@copleycontrols.com
http://www.copleycontrols.com
Model 503
DC Brushless Servo Amplifier
TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS
Typical specifications @ 25°C ambient, +HV = +55VDC. Load = 200µH. in series with 1 ohm unless otherwise specified.
OUTPUT POWER
Peak power
Unidirectional
After direction change
Continuous power
±10A @ 50V for 0.5 second, 500W
±10A @ 50V for 1 second, 500W
±5A @ 50V, 250W
OUTPUT VOLTAGE
Vout = 0.97HV -(0.4)(Iout)
MAXIMUM CONTINUOUS OUTPUT CURRENT
Convection cooled, no conductive cooling
Mounted on narrow edge, on steel plate, fan-cooled 400 ft/min
±2A @ 35°C ambient
±5A @ 55°C
LOAD INDUCTANCE
Selectable with components on header socket
200 µH to 40mH (Nominal, for higher inductances consult factory)
BANDWIDTH
Small signal
-3dB @ 2.5kHz with 200µH load
Note: actual bandwidth will depend on supply voltage, load inductance, and header component selection
PWM SWITCHING FREQUENCY
25kHz
ANALOG INPUT CHARACTERISTICS
Reference
Differential, 20K between inputs with standard header values
GAINS
Input differential amplifier
PWM transconductance stage
X1 as delivered. Adjustable via header components RH6, RH7
1 A/V ( output vs. input to current limit stage )
Output offset current ( 0 V at inputs )
Input offset voltage
20 mA max. ( 0.2% of full-scale )
20 mV max ( for 0 output current, RH6,7 = 10kΩ )
Logic threshold voltage
/Enable
/POS enable, /NEG enable
/Reset
/Enable Pol (Enable Polarity)
HI: ≥ 2.5V , LO: ≤1.0V, +5V Max on all logic inputs
LO enables amplifier (/Enable Pol open) , HI inhibits; 50 ms turn-on delay
LO enables positive and negative output currents, HI inhibits
LO resets latching fault condition, ground for self-reset every 50 ms.
LO reverses logic of /Enable input only (HI enables unit, LO inhibits)
OFFSET
LOGIC INPUTS
LOGIC OUTPUTS
+Normal
HI when unit operating normally, LO if overtemp, output short, disabled, or power supply (+HV) out of tolerance
HI output voltage = 2.4V min at -3.2 mA max., LO output voltage = 0.5V max at 2 mA max.
Note: Do not connect +Normal output to devices that operate > +5V
INDICATORS (LED’s)
Normal (green)
Power fault (red)
Short/Overtemp (red)
ON = Amplifier enabled, no shorts or overtemp, power within limits
ON = Power fault: +HV <18V OR +HV > 55V
ON = Output short-circuit or over-temperature condition
CURRENT MONITOR OUTPUT
±5V @ ±10A (2A/volt), 10kΩ, 3.3nF R-C filter
DC POWER OUTPUTS
+5VDC
+15VDC
30mA (Includes power for Hall sensors)
10mA
Total power from all outputs not to exceed 200mW.
Output short circuit (output to output, output to ground)
Overtemperature
Power supply voltage too low (Undervoltage)
Power supply voltage too high (Overvoltage)
Latches unit OFF (self-reset if /RESET input grounded)
Shutdown at 70°C on heatplate (Latches unit OFF)
Shutdown at +HV < 18VDC (operation resumes when power >18VDC)
Shutdown at +HV > 55VDC (operation resumes when power <55VDC)
PROTECTION
POWER REQUIREMENTS
DC power (+HV)
Minimum power consumption
Power dissipation at 5A output, 55VDC supply
Power dissipation at 10A output, 55VDC supply
+18-55 VDC @ 10A peak.
2.5 W
10W
40W
THERMAL REQUIREMENTS
Storage temperature range
Operating temperature range
-30 to +85°C
0 to 70°C baseplate temperature
MECHANICAL
Size
Weight
3.27 x 4.75 x 1.28 in. (83 x 121 x 33mm)
0.52 lb (0.24 kg.)
Power & motor
Signal & Halls
Weidmuller: BL-125946; Phoenix: MSTB 2.5/5-ST-5.08
Molex: 22-01-3167 housing with 08-50-0114 pins
CONNECTORS
Corporate Offices: 410 University Avenue
Westwood, MA 02090
Telephone: (781) 329-8200
Fax: (781) 329-4055
E-mail: sales@copleycontrols.com
http://www.copleycontrols.com
225
Model 503
DC Brushless Servo Amplifier
OUTLINE DIMENSIONS
Dimensions in inches (mm.)
4.75
(120.7)
(19.1)
(3.0)
0.75
0.17
3.27
(83.1)
2.00
(50.8)
4.50
(114.3)
(14)
0.55
1.28
(32.5)
ORDERING GUIDE
Model 503
5A Continuous, 10A Peak, +18-55VDC Brushless Servoamplifier
OTHER BRUSHLESS AMPLIFIERS
226
Model 505
Same power output as 503. Adds Hall / Encoder tachometer feature for velocity loop
operation.
5001 Series
Six models covering +24-225VDC operation, 5-15A continuous, 10-30A peak.
With optional Hall / Encoder tachometer, and brushless tachometer features.
Model 513R
Resolver interface for trapezoidal-drivemotors. Outputs A/B quadrature encoder signals
and analog tachometer signal for velocity loop operation. +24-180VDC operation, 13A
continuous, 26A peak.
Corporate Offices: 410 University Avenue
Westwood, MA 02090
Telephone: (781) 329-8200
Fax: (781) 329-4055
E-mail: sales@copleycontrols.com
http://www.copleycontrols.com
Excerpt of Data Sheet for the
STM32F4 Microcontroller
UM1472
User Manual
STM32F4DISCOVERY
STM32F4 high-performance discovery board
Introduction
The STM32F4DISCOVERY helps you to discover the STM32F4 high-performance features
and to develop your applications. It is based on an STM32F407VGT6 and includes an STLINK/V2 embedded debug tool interface, ST MEMS digital accelerometer, ST MEMS digital
microphone, audio DAC with integrated class D speaker driver, LEDs, pushbuttons and an
USB OTG micro-AB connector.
Figure 1.
September 2011
STM32F4DISCOVERY
Doc ID 022256 Rev 1
1/37
www.st.com
Hardware and layout
STM32F407VGT6 block diagram
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Wiring for the “Motorlab” Apparatus
Amp J2
Curr Mon
GND
Enable
Ref+
Ref‐
GND
15 Pin Microcontroller Connections
Hardware Wire Color 15pin Connector
Function
15pin Cable
Black
Red
Yellow
Blue
9 White
Black
Red
Orange
Yellow
Blue
12 Black
6 Green
11 Red
10 Orange
12 Black
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Black
Red
Yellow
Blue
White
Black
Red
Orange
White
Green
Orange
Green
Red
Black
Orange
Motor Encoder Ground
+5V Power
Motor Encoder Channel A
Motor Encoder Channel B
Current Monitor
Inertia Encoder Ground
+5V Power
Inertia Encoder Index
Inertia Encoder Channel A
Inertia Encoder Channel B
Amp Signal Ground
Amp Signal (Amp Enable)
Current Command +
Current Command ‐
GND
Wiring Diagram
1 Black
2 Brown
3 Red
4 Orange
5 Yellow
6 Green
7 Blue
8 Purple
9 Gray
10 White
11 Pink
12 Light Green
13 Black‐White
14 Brown‐White
15 Red‐White
STM32f4 Discovery
GND
Voltage Regulator
PE9 (TIM1‐Ch1)
PE11 (TIM1‐Ch2)
PB0 (ADC1‐Ch8) thru resistor network
GND
Voltage Regulator
‐‐
PA15 (TIM2‐Ch1)
PA1 (TIM2‐Ch2)
GND
PB11 (Digital Out)
PB4 (TIM3‐Ch1)
PB5 (TIM3‐Ch2)
‐‐
STM32F4Discovery Host Board
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