VAXft Systems Owner’s Manual EK–VXFT1–OM.004 Digital Equipment Corporation

VAXft Systems Owner’s Manual EK–VXFT1–OM.004 Digital Equipment Corporation
VAXft Systems Owner’s Manual
EK–VXFT1–OM.004
Digital Equipment Corporation
December, 1991
The information in this document is subject to change without notice and should not
be construed as a commitment by Digital Equipment Corporation. Digital Equipment
Corporation assumes no responsibility for any errors that may appear in this document.
Possession, use, duplication, or dissemination of the software described in this
documentation is authorized only pursuant to a valid written license from Digital or
the third-party owner of the software copyright.
No responsibility is assumed for the use or reliability of software on equipment that is not
supplied by Digital Equipment Corporation.
Copyright © Digital Equipment Corporation 1991
All Rights Reserved.
Printed in U.S.A.
The following are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation: CompacTape, DEC, DSSI,
MicroVAX, RT, ThinWire, TK, VAX, VAXcluster, VAXft, VMS, and the DIGITAL logo.
FCC NOTICE: This equipment generates, uses, and may emit radio frequency energy.
It has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class A computing device
pursuant to Subpart J of Part 15 of FCC rules for operation in a commercial environment.
This equipment, when operated in a residential area, may cause interference to radio/TV
communications. In such event the user (owner), at his own expense, may be required to
take corrective measures.
VAXft Systems Documentation Road Map
Overview
Information
(VAXft Systems)
Hardware
Information
(VAXft Systems)
Operating System
(VMS)
Software
Information
(VAXft System Services)
Customer Letter
Site Prep and
Installation Guide
VMS Upgrade and
Installation Manual
Using Factory−Installed Software
with VAXft Systems
Owner’s Manual
VMS Upgrade and
Installation Supplement:
VAXft Systems
Software Product
Description
VAXft Systems
Configuration Guide
Mini−Reference
Guide
Release Notes
VAX Wide Area Network
Device Drivers
Installation
Guide
Manager’s
Guide
Release Notes
VMS Volume
Shadowing Manual
Reference
Manual
= Book
= Online
Online Help
= Tape
Error Message
Manual
= Bookreader
Master Index
MR−5490−RA
Contents
xi
About This Manual
1
VAXft System
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.3.1
1.4
1.4.1
1.4.2
1.5
1.5.1
1.5.2
1.5.3
1.5.4
1.5.5
1.6
2
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4
2.5
2.6
2.7
2.8
2.9
Fault-Tolerant Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Offerings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 110 System Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 110 Base System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 310 and 410 System Descriptions . . . . . . . .
Model 310 and 410 Base System . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 310 and 410 System with Expansion . . . .
Model 610 and 612 System Descriptions . . . . . . . .
Model 610 Base System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 610 System with One Expander Cabinet .
Model 610 System with Two Expander Cabinets
Model 612 Base System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 612 System with Expansion . . . . . . . . . .
System Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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1–2
1–4
1–5
1–5
1–11
1–11
1–17
1–20
1–20
1–22
1–25
1–28
1–31
1–34
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2–2
2–4
2–6
2–8
2–10
2–12
2–13
2–18
2–21
System Components
TK70 Fixed Tape Drive . . . . . . .
TF70 Cannister Tape Drive . . . .
TF857 Tape Subsystem . . . . . . .
RF-Series Fixed Disk Drive . . . .
RF-Series Cannister Disk Drive
RF-Series Carrier Disk Drive . .
Power Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Logic Modules and Connectors .
Cabinet Cooling System . . . . . . .
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iii
iv Contents
3
Controls and Indicators
3.1
3.1.1
3.1.2
3.1.3
3.2
3.3
3.4
4
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
4.6
4.7
5
Cabinet Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 110 System . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 310 and 410 Systems . . . .
Model 610 and 612 Systems . . . .
RF-Series Disk Drives . . . . . . . . . .
System Cabinet Summary Panel . .
Expander Cabinet Summary Panel
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. 3–1
. 3–1
. 3–3
. 3–5
. 3–6
. 3–9
. 3–11
....
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...
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. 4–2
. 4–4
. 4–6
. 4–8
. 4–10
. 4–12
. 4–13
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Console Operations
Console Description . . . . . . . . . . . .
Console Operating Modes . . . . . . . .
Console Control Characters . . . . . .
Console Command Language Syntax
Bootstrap Procedures . . . . . . . . . . .
BOOT Command Syntax . . . . . . . . .
Boot Devices and Module Expansion
CIO Mode Console Commands
5.1
Entering CIO Mode . . . . . . . . . .
5.2
BOOT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.3
CONTINUE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.4
DEPOSIT and EXAMINE . . . . .
5.5
HALT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.6
INITIALIZE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.7
MIO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.8
NEW CPU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.9
PIO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.10 REPEAT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.11 SET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.11.1 SET BOOT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.11.2 SET PORT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.11.3 SET TERMINAL PROGRAM .
5.11.4 SET ZONE . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5.12 SHOW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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5–2
5–4
5–7
5–8
5–11
5–11
5–12
5–12
5–13
5–13
5–14
5–15
5–16
5–18
5–19
5–20
Contents v
5.13
5.14
5.15
6
START . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–21
TEST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–22
Z . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5–24
MIO Mode Console Commands
6.1
Entering MIO Mode . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.2
CIO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.3
DIALOUT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.4
DISABLE REMOTE . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.5
ENABLE REMOTE . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.6
HANGUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.7
PIO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.8
RBD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.8.1
Setting System Drive Parameters
6.8.1.1
Base System . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.8.1.2
System with Expansion . . . . . .
6.8.2
The SHOW_DSSI Command . . . .
6.8.3
DUP PARAMS Commands . . . . .
6.9
SET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.9.1
SET LANGUAGE . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.9.2
SET LOCAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.9.3
SET MODEM_TYPE . . . . . . . . . .
6.9.4
SET NOTIFICATION . . . . . . . . .
6.9.5
SET PORT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.9.6
SET REMOTE . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.9.7
SET RESTART_ACTION . . . . . .
6.9.8
SET TERMINAL PROGRAM . . . .
6.10 SHOW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6.11 TEST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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6–2
6–4
6–5
6–6
6–7
6–8
6–9
6–10
6–10
6–11
6–12
6–13
6–14
6–18
6–19
6–20
6–22
6–23
6–26
6–28
6–31
6–32
6–33
6–34
vi Contents
A
A.1
A.2
A.3
A.4
A.5
A.6
A.7
A.8
B
B.1
B.2
B.2.1
B.2.2
B.3
B.4
B.4.1
B.4.2
B.4.3
B.4.4
B.5
B.5.1
B.5.2
B.5.3
B.5.4
C
TF70 Tape Drive Operation
Controls and Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . .
TK Tape Cartridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Loading a Tape Cartridge . . . . . . . . . .
Unloading a Tape Cartridge . . . . . . . .
Handling and Storing Tape Cartridges
Inspecting the Tape Leader . . . . . . . . .
Inspecting the Drive Takeup Leader . .
If There is a Problem . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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. A–2
. A–6
. A–7
. A–8
. A–8
. A–9
. A–10
. A–12
Power-On Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mode Select Key . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Operating Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Service Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Operator Control Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Slot Select, Load/Unload, and Eject Button Functions . .
Selecting a Cartridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Loading the Cartridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Unloading the Cartridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Opening the Receiver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Magazine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Inserting a Cartridge into the Front of the Magazine
Removing a Cartridge from the Magazine . . . . . . . . .
Removing the Magazine from the Receiver . . . . . . . .
Installing the Magazine into the Receiver . . . . . . . . .
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. B–1
. B–2
. B–2
. B–4
. B–5
. B–7
. B–7
. B–7
. B–8
. B–8
. B–9
. B–9
. B–11
. B–11
. B–11
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TF857 Subsystem Operation
System Drive Removal and Replacement
C.1 Removing/Replacing a Cannister Drive . .
C.1.1
Removing a Cannister Drive . . . . . . . .
C.1.2
Replacing a Cannister Drive . . . . . . . .
C.2 Removing and Replacing a Carrier Drive
C.2.1
Removing a Carrier Drive . . . . . . . . . .
C.2.2
Replacing a Carrier Drive . . . . . . . . . .
C.3 Using the Server Setup Switch . . . . . . . .
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C–1
C–2
C–5
C–6
C–7
C–8
C–9
Contents vii
D
D.1
D.2
D.3
Module Handling, Removal, and
Installation/Replacement Procedures
Module Handling and ESD Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing a Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing/Replacing a Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
D–2
D–4
D–5
Index
Figures
1–1
1–2
1–3
1–4
1–5
1–6
1–7
1–8
1–9
1–10
1–11
1–12
1–13
1–14
1–15
1–16
1–17
1–18
1–19
1–20
1–21
2–1
2–2
2–3
2–4
2–5
Model 110 Zones/Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 110 Base System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 110 Pedestal System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 110 Rackmount System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 110 Logic Module Placement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 310 and 410 Base System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Layout of Model 310 and 410 Base System . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 310, 410, 610, and 612 Logic Module Placement . . .
Model 310 and 410 System with Expansion . . . . . . . . . . . .
Layout of Model 310 and 410 System with Expansion . . . .
Model 610 Base System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Layout of Model 610 Base System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 610 System with One Expander Cabinet . . . . . . . . .
Layout of Model 610 System with One Expander Cabinet .
Model 610 System with Two Expander Cabinets . . . . . . . .
Layout of Model 610 System with Two Expander Cabinets
Model 612 Base System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Layout of Model 612 Base System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 612 System with Expansion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Layout of Model 612 System with Expansion . . . . . . . . . . .
VAXft System Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TK70 Tape Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TF70 Cannister Tape Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TF857 Tape Subsystem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RF-Series Fixed Disk Drive Controls and Indicators . . . . .
RF-Series Cannister Disk Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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1–3
1–6
1–7
1–8
1–10
1–12
1–13
1–15
1–17
1–18
1–20
1–21
1–23
1–24
1–26
1–27
1–29
1–30
1–32
1–33
1–34
2–3
2–4
2–7
2–9
2–10
viii Contents
2–6
2–7
2–8
2–9
2–10
2–11
2–12
2–13
2–14
3–1
3–2
3–3
3–4
3–5
3–6
4–1
4–2
4–3
4–4
4–5
4–6
A–1
A–2
A–3
A–4
A–5
A–6
A–7
B–1
B–2
B–3
B–4
B–5
C–1
RF-Series Carrier Disk Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 110 Power Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 310 and 410 Power Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 610 and 612 Power Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Logic Modules and Connectors in a Five-Slot Backplane . . .
Logic Modules and Connectors in a Seven-Slot Backplane . .
Model 110 Cabinet Airflow Pattern . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 310 and 410 Cabinet Airflow Pattern . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 610 and 612 Cabinet Airflow Pattern . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 110 System Cabinet, Front View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 310 or 410 System Cabinet, Front View . . . . . . . . . .
Model 610 or 612 System Cabinet, Front View . . . . . . . . . .
RF-Series Disk Drive Summary Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
System Cabinet Summary Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Expander Cabinet Summary Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
VAXft Console Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Console Operating Modes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Boot Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
BOOT Command Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Primary System I/O Controller Module Zone/Slot Specifiers
for Model 110 System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Primary System I/O Controller Module Zone/Slot Specifiers
and Module Expansion Sequence for Model 310, 410, 610,
and 612 Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TF70 Cannister Tape Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TK70 Fixed Tape Drive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
CompacTape II Tape Cartridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Inserting a Tape Cartridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Inspecting the Tape Leader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Inspecting the Drive Takeup Leader . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Drive Takeup Leader Components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TF857 Operator Control Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Write-Protect Switch on a Cartridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Inserting a Cartridge into the Magazine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Removing a Cartridge from the Front of the Magazine . . . .
Receiver Opened . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 310/410 Cannister Drive Controls and Latch . . . . . .
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2–12
2–14
2–15
2–16
2–19
2–20
2–22
2–23
2–24
3–2
3–3
3–5
3–7
3–9
3–12
4–2
4–4
4–10
4–12
. 4–14
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4–15
A–2
A–3
A–6
A–7
A–9
A–10
A–11
B–3
B–9
B–10
B–12
B–13
C–3
Contents ix
C–2
C–3
Model 610/612 Cannister Drive Controls and Latch . . . . . . .
Carrier Drive Controls and Captive Thumb Screw . . . . . . . .
C–4
C–6
Tables
1–1
1–2
2–1
3–1
3–2
3–3
4–1
4–2
4–3
4–4
5–1
5–2
5–3
5–4
Model 110 Logic Modules and Adapters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Model 310, 410, 610, and 612 Logic Modules and Adapters
VAXft System DC Power Characteristics . . . . . . . . . . . . .
RF-Series Disk Drive Summary Panel Elements . . . . . . . .
System Cabinet Summary Panel Elements . . . . . . . . . . . .
Expander Cabinet Summary Panel Elements . . . . . . . . . .
VAXft Console Parts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Console Control Characters and Function Keys . . . . . . . . .
Console Command Language Syntax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Boot Procedure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
BOOT Command Qualifier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
VMB Program Control Flags for /R5:n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DEPOSIT and EXAMINE Command Data Size Qualifiers
DEPOSIT and EXAMINE Command Address Space
Qualifiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5–5 SET PORT Command Qualifiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5–6 Terminal Mode Change Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
5–7 SHOW Command Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6–1 SET LANGUAGE Command Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6–2 SET LOCAL Command Qualifiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6–3 SET MODEM_TYPE Command Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6–4 SET NOTIFICATION Command Options . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6–5 Dialout Countries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6–6 SET PORT Command Qualifiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6–7 SET REMOTE Command Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6–8 SET REMOTE Command Qualifiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6–9 SET RESTART_ACTION Command Options . . . . . . . . . .
6–10 Terminal Mode Change Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A–1 TK70 Tape Drive Controls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
A–2 TK70 Tape Drive Indicators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
B–1 TF857 Operator Control Panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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1–11
1–16
2–18
3–8
3–10
3–13
4–3
4–6
4–8
4–11
5–6
5–6
5–9
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5–9
5–17
5–18
5–20
6–19
6–21
6–22
6–23
6–25
6–27
6–29
6–30
6–31
6–32
A–4
A–5
B–5
About This Manual
Intended Audience
This manual is intended for system managers, users, and operators who
have system management experience and fault-tolerant VAXft system
training.
Document Structure
This manual provides system and console reference information. It is
made up of the following chapters and appendixes:
•
Chapter 1, VAXft System — Introduces the base system and system
with expansion, and the system architecture.
•
Chapter 2, System Components — Describes the modular
components inside the VAXft cabinets.
•
Chapter 3, Controls and Indicators — Explains the use of the
cabinet operating controls.
•
Chapter 4, Console Operations — Describes the system console
and the I/O operating modes. Provides several variations of the boot
command syntax.
•
Chapter 5, CIO Mode Console Commands — Describes the console
commands available in the console I/O mode (CIO mode).
•
Chapter 6, MIO Mode Console Commands — Describes the
console commands available in the module I/O mode (MIO mode).
•
Appendix A, TF70 Tape Drive Operation — Describes how to
operate the TF70 cannister tape drive, TK70 fixed tape drvie, and TK
tape cartridges.
•
Appendix B, TF857 Subsystem Operation — Describes how to
operate the TF857 tape subsystem and TK tape cartridges.
•
Appendix C, System Drive Removal and Replacement —
Describes how to remove and replace cannister and carrier drives.
Explains the use of the server setup switch.
•
Appendix D, Module Handling, Removal, and Installation
/Replacement Procedures — Describes how to remove, replace, or
install a logic module in the system backplane.
xi
xii About This Manual
Related Documentation
The VAXft documentation set includes the following manuals:
•
VAXft Systems Site Preparation and Installation Guide (EKVXFT1-IN) — Provides site preparation guidelines and the system
specifications. Describes how to install, boot, and verify the system.
Provides procedures for removing, handling, and replacing the logic
modules, and for removing and replacing the system drives.
•
VAXft Systems Owner’s Manual (EK-VXFT1-OM) — Provides a
functional description of the VAXft system. Describes the system
controls and indicators, console commands, bootstrap functions, and
tape drive operation. Provides procedures for removing and replacing
the system drives and for removing, handling, and replacing the logic
modules.
•
VAXft Systems Mini-Reference Guide (EK-VXFT1-HR) — Provides
summaries of the system controls and indicators, console operation,
console commands, bootstrap functions, and system registers.
Additional Documentation
Other documents related to the VAXft system include:
•
VAXft Systems Configuration Guide — Describes the VAXft system
and describes fault-tolerant computing.
•
VAX Wide Area Network Device Drivers — Describes the software
utilities used in wide area network communications.
•
VAXft System Services Installation Guide — Provides step-by-step
procedures for installing the VAXft system services software on your
VAXft system.
•
TF857 Magazine Tape Subsystem Owner’s Manual — Provides a
functional description of the TF857 magazine tape subsystem.
Describes operation, local programs and utilities, error conditions
and problem resolutions, head cleaning procedures, and operating
commands.
•
VAXft System Services Manager’s Guide — Describes the VAXft
system and the VAXft system services software. Provides information
on managing a fault tolerant system that is running VAXft system
services software.
•
VAXft System Services Release Notes — Provides information related
to the current version of VAXft system services. Provides additional
information for installing and maintaining your VAXft system.
About This Manual xiii
•
VAXft System Services Reference Manual — Provides reference
information on VAXft system services operation. Describes the DCL
commands used on a VAXft system.
•
VAXft System Services Online Help — Provides information about
using the VAXft system services specific information and the DCL
commands used on a VAXft system.
•
VAXft System Services Error Message Manual — Provides descriptions
of error messages that may be encountered in using VAXft system
services. Provides a reference for fault tolerant and system error
messages.
•
VAXft System Services Master Index — Provides a complete index for
the software documentation set.
•
VMS Upgrade and Installation Manual — Describes the installation
and upgrade procedures for the current release of the VMS operating
system. Provides information on the user environmental test package
(UETP).
•
VMS Upgrade and Installation Supplement: VAXft Systems —
Supplements the VMS Upgrade and Installation Manual with
information specific to the VAXft computer including startup,
shutdown, and backup procedures.
•
VMS Release Notes — Provides notes on various aspects of the VMS
operating system.
•
VMS Volume Shadowing Manual — Provides an in-depth discussion
of volume shadowing (phase II), shadow sets, the mount utility, and
DCL commands used to mount, monitor, and dismount volume shadow
sets.
1
VAXft System
The VAXft system is a fault-tolerant VAX computer that provides high
levels of availability and reliability for a variety of applications. Hardware
redundancy and failover techniques ensure uninterrupted operation in
the event of a single point of failure anywhere in the system. Modular
components simplify repair and maintenance procedures, reducing the
time required to bring components back into service.
The VAXft system:
•
Operates as a stand-alone system or as the boot or satellite node for a
local area VAXcluster configuration.
•
Has expansion capabilities in the areas of main memory, input/output
(I/O) devices, synchronous communications adapters, and disk storage.
This chapter introduces the VAXft system and includes:
•
Fault-tolerant operation
•
System offerings
•
Model 110 system descriptions
•
Model 310 and 410 system descriptions
•
Model 610 and 612 system descriptions
•
System architecture
1–1
1–2 VAXft System
1.1 Fault-Tolerant Operation
The VAXft system achieves fault tolerance through a combination of
redundancy and failover techniques. All critical functions of the VAXft
hardware are duplicated.
The VAXft system has two zones. Each of the zones contains the
hardware required to execute an application. The two zones are identical
in configuration, except in cases where the customer chooses not to have
hardware redundancy. The zones are physically and logically connected,
and simultaneously process the same instructions. When both zones
operate in this synchronous manner, they perform as a single, faulttolerant system. If a single hardware fault occurs in a component in
either zone, the problem is communicated to the other zone.
Once the fault is ‘‘known’’ within the system, the system takes action to
isolate the faulty component. This action can be:
•
Disabling an I/O path
•
Removing an element from service (for example, a memory module)
•
Removing an entire zone from service
Despite the nature of the failure and recovery action, the system is able
to remain in full operation.
A simplified representation of the two zones is shown in Figure 1–1.
VAXft System
Figure 1–1 Model 110 Zones/Modules
1–3
1–4 VAXft System
1.2 System Offerings
The VAXft systems vary in processing power and storage capability. The
configurations include:
•
Model 110 system
•
Model 310 and 410 base systems
•
Model 310 and 410 systems with expansion
•
Model 610 and 612 base systems
•
Model 610 and 612 systems with expansion
The VAXft model 110, 310 and 410 systems are configured as pedestal or
rackmount systems.
NOTE
The system cabinet is the pedestal package.
Each pedestal is 68.6 cm (27.0 in) high by 53.3 cm (21.0 in) wide. The
VAXft 110 system has two zones enclosed in one cabinet, which is similar
to a BA213 cabinet.
A model 310 or 410 base system has two system cabinets. Each system
cabinet includes power supplies, cooling, logic modules, and two storage
slots. Thus, a model 310 or 410 base system has four storage slots. One
of the four storage slots may house a TF70 tape drive.
The tape drive can be used for loading software. It can also be used as a
backup device. The other three storage slots can be used for disks, or if
desired, each zone can house one disk and one tape. RF-series disks are
used.
A model 310 and 410 system with expansion has two system cabinets
and two expander cabinets. Each system cabinet is connected to both
expander cabinets.
An expander cabinet has seven storage slots, six of which can be used.
One expander cabinet may house a TF70 tape drive in one of the storage
slots. Each expander cabinet can house up to six fixed disk drives or five
fixed disk drives and a removable tape drive or a removable disk drive.
VAXft System
1–5
The VAXft model 610 and 612 systems are 152.4 cm (60.0 in) cabinets.
Each cabinet contains two zones (upper and lower). A model 610 base
system has one cabinet. Each zone enclosure houses power supplies,
cooling, logic modules, and four storage slots. A base cabinet has two
additional storage slots. One of the six storage slots may house a TFseries tape drive.
Customers needing more storage space can order a model 610 system
with one or two expander cabinets. Each expander cabinet contains power
supplies, cooling, and more storage slots.
Also available to customers are the model 612 base system and systems
with expansion. A model 612 base system has two system cabinets and
one expander cabinet. A model 612 system with expansion has two
system cabinets and two expander cabinets. These configurations allow
more processing power and storage space than the model 610 system
configurations.
1.3 Model 110 System Description
This section describes the model 110 base system.
1.3.1 Model 110 Base System
Figure 1–2 shows the front view of a base system with VT-series video
terminals as the local console terminals. Terminals used in console
applications may be hard copy, video, or video with printer. A variety of
video terminals and printer stands are available.
The model 110 is similar to the model 310 system, but is housed in one
cabinet. It has less expandability in terms of memory, disk capacity, and
available module options.
The VAXft model 110 system is available as a pedestal (Figure 1–3) or
rackmount (Figure 1–4) system. The rackmount system is the pedestal
system without the plastic cover and casters. It can be installed in a
standard 19-inch RETMA1 rack cabinet.
1
RETMA rack cabinets are used by Digital and other major manufacturers of
electronic equipment. The cabinet rails, mounting hole patterns, and spacing
conform to international standards that allow compatibility with products
manufactured by Digital and other major manufacturers.
1–6 VAXft System
Figure 1–2 Model 110 Base System
VAXft System
Figure 1–3 Model 110 Pedestal System
1–7
1–8 VAXft System
Figure 1–4 Model 110 Rackmount System
VAXft System
1–9
The media storage used in the model 110 can include the following storage
devices:
•
TK70 tape drive
•
RF-series disk drives
The media storage in zone A can have up to two RF72 or three RF31 disk
drives. The media storage in zone B can have one TK70 tape drive and
either one RF72 or two RF31 disk drives. If a tape drive is not necessary
in zone B, then zone B can have two RF72 or three RF31 disk drives.
For memory shadowing, each zone must have the same number of storage
devices. The maximum is three storage devices in each zone.
The TK70 tape drive can serve as a system software load device as well as
a backup device. The RF-series disk drives can be used as data backup,
software load, or bootstrap devices.
Each zone contains a logic backplane with five slots. The following
three modules are the minimum required in each backplane for system
operation:
•
One MS520 memory module
•
One KA510 processor module
•
One KFE52 system I/O controller module
Each module has a dedicated slot in the backplane.
The MS520 memory module provides 32 MB of main memory with error
correction code (ECC).
The KA510 processor module executes the VAX native instruction set.
Each processor module operates with a pair of synchronized processors.
The processor modules in each zone are connected through a pair of
cross-link cables that provide interprocessor communications.
The KFE52 system I/O controller module supports:
•
An expandable DSSI bus for the system storage devices
•
Two serial ports for the local and remote console terminals
•
An Ethernet interface for either a ThinWire or traditional (thickwire)
network interconnect (NI) link
1–10 VAXft System
Each backplane has two additional slots that may contain up to two
additional MS520 memory modules, up to two wide area network (WAN)
communications adapters, or an additional KFE52 system I/O controller
module.
The WAN communications adapter provides two synchronous
communications lines. These lines can be connected redundantly between
two zones using external cabling and circuitry.
Figure 1–5 shows the correct placement of the logic modules in the
backplane of a zone. Table 1–1 describes the logic modules. The number
of memory modules must be the same in both zones.
Figure 1–5 Model 110 Logic Module Placement
PRIMARY SYSTEM I/O
CONTROLLER MODULE
PROCESSOR
MODULE
1/4−TURN
FASTENER
MEMORY MODULE 1
ASSIST
LEVER
MEMORY MODULE 2
WAN OR I/O MODULES
MEMORY MODULE 3
WAN OR I/O MODULES
MR−0739−91RAGS
VAXft System
1–11
Table 1–1 Model 110 Logic Modules and Adapters
Slot
1
2
Module
T3001
Description
1
T3005-BA
Primary KFE52 system I/O controller module
1
1
KA510 processor module
3
T3003
4
T3003 or T3004
Second MS520 memory module, or WAN module
(optional), or KFE52 system I/O controller module
5
T3003 or T3004
Third MS520 memory module, or WAN module
(optional), or KFE52 system I/O controller module
First MS520 memory module
1 Slots 1, 2, and 3 contain the primary system I/O controller module, a processor module,
and a memory module. This is the minimum required for operation.
1.4 Model 310 and 410 System Descriptions
This section describes the model 310 and 410 base systems and systems
with expansion.
1.4.1 Model 310 and 410 Base System
Figure 1–6 shows the front view of a base system with VT-series video
terminals as the local console terminals. Terminals used in console
applications may be hard copy, video, or video with printer. A variety of
video terminal and printer stands are available.
The model 310 and 410 are identical except for the processor module. The
model 310 system’s KA520 processor module has 3.8 VUPs of processing
power. The model 410 system’s KA550 processor module offers 6.0 VUPs
of processing power.
1–12 VAXft System
Figure 1–6 Model 310 and 410 Base System
LOCAL
CONSOLE
TERMINAL
SYSTEM
CABINETS
LOCAL
CONSOLE
TERMINAL
MR-0185-90.DG
VAXft System
1–13
Figure 1–7 shows the layout of the modular components in the base
system cabinets. It also shows the DSSI node ID numbers for the drives.
In a base system, both system cabinets contain a cannister disk drive in
the right slot as the system operating media. The drive is housed in a
removable cannister. All cannister drives are removable and are shock
mounted for portability. Cannister disk drives may be removed and stored
for backup purposes.
Appendix C describes how to remove and replace a cannister drive.
Figure 1–7 Layout of Model 310 and 410 Base System
SUMMARY PANEL
SUMMARY PANEL
BATTERY PACK
H7233-AA
DC POWER
SUPPLY
WITH FAN
DISK
DRIVE
1
2
3
4
5
6
LOGIC
MODULES
H407-A
AC POWER
INPUT BOX
7
5
TAPE, DISK,
OR BLANK
CANNISTER
MODULE
7
7
H7233-AA
DC POWER
SUPPLY
WITH FAN
DISK
DRIVE
BATTERY PACK
5
DISK
OR
TAPE
DRIVE
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
LOGIC
MODULES
H407-A
AC POWER
INPUT BOX
FAN
FAN
MR-0189-90.DG
1–14 VAXft System
The power system for each cabinet consists of two packages: ac power
input box and dc power supply. The ac power input box converts its input
to unregulated dc.
The dc power supply supplies regulated dc power to the logic modules and
storage elements in the system cabinet. A battery backup unit, which is
comprised of batteries, can supply the system cabinet with dc power for
at least 30 minutes on a full charge. Further information on the power
modules can be found in Chapter 2.
Each system cabinet contains a logic backplane with seven slots. The
following three modules are the minimum required in each backplane for
system operation:
•
One MS520 memory module
•
One KA520 (model 310) or KA550 (model 410) processor module
•
One KFE52 system I/O controller module
Each of the above modules has a dedicated slot in the backplane.
The MS520 memory module provides 32 MB or 64 MB of main memory
with error correction code (ECC).
The KA520 or KA550 processor module executes the VAX native
instruction set and incorporates an integral cache memory and floatingpoint accelerator. Each processor module operates with a pair of
synchronized processors. The processor modules in each zone are
connected through a pair of cross-link cables that provide interprocessor
communications.
The KFE52 system I/O controller module supports:
•
An expandable Digital small storage interconnect (DSSI) bus for the
system storage devices
•
Two serial ports for the local and remote console terminals
•
An Ethernet interface for a ThinWire or traditional (thickwire)
network interconnect (NI) link
Each backplane has four additional slots that in a base system may
contain up to three additional MS520 memory modules, up to four wide
area network (WAN) communications adapters, or an additional KFE52
system I/O controller module for connection to a second Ethernet or to
support storage expansion.
VAXft System
1–15
The WAN communications adapter provides two synchronous
communications lines. These lines can be connected redundantly between
two zones using external cabling and circuitry.
Figure 1–8 shows correct placement of the logic modules in the system
backplane. Table 1–2 describes the logic modules. The number of memory
modules must be the same in both system cabinets.
Figure 1–8 Model 310, 410, 610, and 612 Logic Module Placement
PROCESSOR
MODULE
1/4 − TURN
FASTENERS
PRIMARY SYSTEM I/O
CONTROLLER MODULE
ASSIST
LEVERS
MEMORY MODULE 1
MEMORY MODULE 2
OR WAN MODULE
SECONDARY SYSTEM I/O
CONTROLLER MODULE OR
WAN MODULE
MEMORY MODULE 3
OR WAN MODULE
MEMORY MODULE 4
OR WAN MODULE
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
MR−0159−90.RAGS
1–16 VAXft System
Table 1–2 Model 310, 410, 610, and 612 Logic Modules and Adapters
Slot
Module
Description
1
T3001 or T3004
Secondary KFE52 system I/O controller module or
WAN module
21
T30012
Primary KFE52 system I/O controller module
3
T3005 or T3007
2
2
KA520 or KA550 processor module, respectively
4
T3003
5
T3003 or T3004
Second MS520 memory module or (optional) WAN
module
6
T3003 or T3004
Third MS520 memory module or (optional) WAN
module
7
T3003 or T3004
Fourth MS520 memory module or (optional) WAN
module
First MS520 memory module
1 Slot 2 contains the primary system I/O controller module, which supports console
functions.
2 Slots 1, 2, and 3 contain the primary system I/O controller module, a processor module,
and a memory module. This is the minimum required for operation.
NOTE
Unused module slots require a T3999 filler module to maintain
cooling airflow. The module handles also maintain ground
continuity to meet FCC and FTZ regulations and provide
electrostatic discharge (ESD) protection.
VAXft System
1–17
1.4.2 Model 310 and 410 System with Expansion
Figure 1–9 shows the front view of a system with expansion. The system
cabinets are placed in the center with the expander cabinets on each end.
Figure 1–10 shows the layout of the modular components in the expander
cabinets. It also shows the DSSI node ID numbers for the drives.
Figure 1–9 Model 310 and 410 System with Expansion
LOCAL
CONSOLE
TERMINAL
EXPANDER
CABINET
EXPANDER
CABINET
SYSTEM
CABINETS
LOCAL
CONSOLE
TERMINAL
TM
TM
TM
MR_X1405_89.DG
1–18 VAXft System
Figure 1–10 Layout of Model 310 and 410 System with Expansion
SUMMARY PANEL
SUMMARY PANEL
5
5
DISK
3
2
H7233-AB
DC POWER
SUPPLY
WITH FAN
DISK
DISK
4
DISK
3
2
DISK
DISK
0
1
DISK
DISK
BLANK
CARRIER
MODULE
OR
DISK
0
1
H407-A
AC POWER
INPUT BOX
5
TAPE, DISK,
OR BLANK
CANNISTER
MODULE
BATTERY PACK
BLANK
CARRIER
BATTERY PACK
H7233-AB
DC POWER
SUPPLY
WITH FAN
4
5
DISK
OR
TAPE
DRIVE
DISK
DISK
H407-A
AC POWER
INPUT BOX
FAN
FAN
MR-0190-90.DG
CAUTION
To prevent a system fault, you must set the expander cabinet
circuit breaker to OFF (down) whenever all the expander cabinet
disks are powered off.
VAXft System
1–19
A system with expansion offers increased storage over a base system.
The system cabinets are interconnected just as in a base system. The
connections between the system cabinets and expander cabinets are made
using cables between the system I/O controller modules in the system
cabinets and the DSSI bus in the expander cabinets.
In a system with expansion, all drives must be mounted in the expander
cabinets. The system cabinet in a system with expansion contains no
disks or tapes. One to six storage devices can be housed in the expander
cabinet.
One expander cabinet may contain a cannister tape drive in the cannister
slot as a software installation and backup device. The other expander
cabinet may contain a:
•
Removable cannister tape drive in the cannister slot
•
Removable cannister disk drive in the cannister slot
•
Nonremovable carrier disk drive in the top left carrier slot
All cannister drives are removable and shock mounted for portability.
Cannister disk drives may be removed and stored for backup purposes.
An unused cannister slot requires a TM002 blank cannister module (PN
70-27929-01) to maintain cooling airflow inside the cabinet. Unused
carrier slots require a TM003 blank carrier module (PN 70-27928-01).
Appendix C describes how to remove and replace a cannister or carrier
drive.
The ac power input box and dc power supply in an expander cabinet
perform the same functions as in the system cabinets. The system
cabinets of a system with expansion must have four modules:
•
One MS520 memory module
•
One KA520 or KA550 processor module
•
Two KFE52 system I/O controller modules
The placement of these modules in the system cabinets is shown in
Figure 1–8 and described in Table 1–2.
1–20 VAXft System
1.5 Model 610 and 612 System Descriptions
This section describes the model 610 and 612 base systems and systems
with expansion.
1.5.1 Model 610 Base System
Figure 1–11 shows the front view of a model 610 base system with video
terminals. Figure 1–12 shows the layout of the modular components in a
model 610 base system cabinet.
Figure 1–11 Model 610 Base System
syst
VA
em
s
X ft
LOCAL
CONSOLE
TERMINAL
SYSTEM
CABINET
LOCAL
CONSOLE
TERMINAL
MR-0424-91DG
VAXft System
Figure 1–12 Layout of Model 610 Base System
Zone A
RFxx−JA
Option
B
B
U
RFxx−JA
Required
1 234 56 7
K K C MO O O
F F PS P P P
E EU5 T T T
55 2 I I I
2 2 0 OO O
NN N
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
Summary
Panel
TF70C−AA
OR
TF857−Cx
Option
Zone
A
AC Box
Zone B
RFxx−JA
Option
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
B
B
U
RFxx−JA
Required
1 234 56 7
K K C MO O O
F F PS P P P
E EU5 T T T
55 2 I I I
2 2 0 OO O
NN N
Summary
Panel
TF70C−AA
OR
TF857−Cx
Option
Zone
B
AC Box
MR−0472−91RAGS
1–21
1–22 VAXft System
The base system includes two zones in a single cabinet. Each zone has a
seven-slot backplane and mass storage devices. The base system supports
a maximum of six DSSI devices (three per zone). The mass storage
devices can be configured as follows:
•
Four RF-series disks
•
Four RF-series disks and 1 TF70 or TF857 tape loader
•
Four RF-series disks and 2 TF70 or TF857 tape loaders
The placement of the logic modules is shown in Figure 1–8 and described
in Table 1–2.
1.5.2 Model 610 System with One Expander Cabinet
Figure 1–13 shows the front view of a model 610 system with one
expander cabinet and video terminals. Figure 1–14 shows the layout
of the modular components in a model 610 system with one expander
cabinet.
CAUTION
To prevent a system fault, you must set the expander cabinet
circuit breaker to OFF (down) whenever all the expander cabinet
disks are powered off.
In this configuration, the system cabinet is the same as in a base cabinet,
but contains no disks. The system cabinet can house one or two TF70 or
TF857 tape loaders. The system cabinet may have four modules in each
seven-slot backplane:
•
One MS520 memory module
•
One KA550 processor module
•
Two KFE52 system I/O controller modules
The placement of the logic modules is shown in Figure 1–8 and described
in Table 1–2.
VAXft System
1–23
In this configuration, a maximum of 12 DSSI devices (6 per zone) are
housed in the expander cabinet:
•
Up to 12 RF-series disks
•
10 or 11 RF-series disks and 1 or 2 TF70 or TF857 tape loaders
•
11 RF-series disks and 1 or 2 RF-series removable disks
Figure 1–13 Model 610 System with One Expander Cabinet
syst
VA
em
s
X ft
LOCAL
CONSOLE
TERMINAL
SYSTEM
CABINETS
LOCAL
CONSOLE
TERMINAL
MR-0425-91DG
1–24 VAXft System
Figure 1–14 Layout of Model 610 System with One Expander Cabinet
Expander
Summary Panel
Zone A
NOT
USED
B
B
U
NOT
USED
1 234 56 7
K K CM
F F PS
E EU5
55 2
22 0
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
Summary
Panel
TF70C−AA
OR
TF857−Cx
Option
Zone
A
AC Box
B
RFxx
B
Removable U
Option
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
B
B
U
NOT
USED
1 234 56 7
K KCM
FF PS
E EU 5
55 2
22 0
RFxx RFxx
Fixed Fixed
Option Option
RFxx RFxx
Fixed Fixed
Option Option
Expander
Summary Panel
Zone B
NOT
USED
RFxx RFxx
Fixed Fixed
Option Option
Summary
Panel
TF70C−AA
OR
TF857−Cx
Option
Zone
B
AC Box
B
RFxx
B
Removable U
Option
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
RFxx RFxx
Fixed Fixed
Option Option
RFxx RFxx
Fixed Fixed
Option Option
RFxx RFxx
Fixed Fixed
Option Option
MR−0473−91RAGS
VAXft System
1–25
1.5.3 Model 610 System with Two Expander Cabinets
Figure 1–15 shows the front view of a model 610 system with two
expander cabinets and video terminals. Figure 1–16 shows the layout
of the modular components in a model 610 system with two expander
cabinets.
CAUTION
To prevent a system fault, you must set the expander cabinet
circuit breaker to OFF (down) whenever all the expander cabinet
disks are powered off.
In this configuration, the system cabinet is the same as in a base cabinet,
but contains no disks. The system cabinet can house one or two TF70 or
TF857 tape loaders. The system cabinet may have seven modules in each
seven-slot backplane:
•
One MS520 memory module
•
One KA550 processor module
•
Four KFE52 system I/O controller modules
The placement of the logic modules is shown in Figure 1–8 and described
in Table 1–2.
In this configuration, a maximum of 24 DSSI devices (12 per zone) are
housed in the expander cabinets in the following combinations:
•
Up to 24 RF-series disks
•
22 or 23 RF-series disks and 1 or 2 TF70 or TF857 tape loaders
•
22 or 23 RF-series disks and 1 or 2 RF-series removable disks
Four RF-series carrier disks are the minimum requirement for mass
storage in this configuration.
1–26 VAXft System
Figure 1–15 Model 610 System with Two Expander Cabinets
syst
VA
em
s
X ft
LOCAL
CONSOLE
TERMINAL
SYSTEM
CABINETS
LOCAL
CONSOLE
TERMINAL
MR-0467-91DG
VAXft System
1–27
Figure 1–16 Layout of Model 610 System with Two Expander Cabinets
Expander
Summary Panel
B
RFxx
B
Removable U
Option
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
RFxx RFxx
Fixed Fixed
Option Option
RFxx RFxx
Fixed Fixed
Option Option
RFxx RFxx
Fixed Fixed
Option Option
NOT
USED
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
RFxx RFxx
Fixed Fixed
Option Option
RFxx RFxx
Fixed Fixed
Option Option
RFxx RFxx
Fixed Fixed
Option Option
B
B
U
NOT
USED
1 234 56 7
K K CM K K
F F PS F F
E EU5 E E
55 2 55
22 0 22
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
Expander
Summary Panel
B
RFxx
B
Removable U
Option
Expander
Summary Panel
Zone A
Summary
Panel
TF70C−AA
OR
TF857−Cx
Option
Zone
A
AC Box
B
RFxx
B
Removable U
Option
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
B
B
U
RFxx RFxx
Fixed Fixed
Option Option
RFxx RFxx
Fixed Fixed
Option Option
Expander
Summary Panel
Zone B
NOT
USED
RFxx RFxx
Fixed Fixed
Option Option
NOT
USED
1 234 56 7
K K CM K K
F F PS F F
E EU5 E E
55 2 55
22 0 22
Summary
Panel
TF70C−AA
OR
TF857−Cx
Option
Zone
B
AC Box
B
RFxx
B
Removable U
Option
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
RFxx RFxx
Fixed Fixed
Option Option
RFxx RFxx
Fixed Fixed
Option Option
RFxx RFxx
Fixed Fixed
Option Option
MR−0474−91RAGS
1–28 VAXft System
1.5.4 Model 612 Base System
Figure 1–17 shows the front view of a model 612 base system with video
terminals. Figure 1–18 shows the layout of the modular components in a
model 612 base system.
CAUTION
To prevent a system fault, you must set the expander cabinet
circuit breaker to OFF (down) whenever all the expander cabinet
disks are powered off.
This configuration includes two model 610 system cabinets and one
expander cabinet. Each system cabinet can house one or two TF70 or
TF857 tape loaders. Each system cabinet may have four modules in each
seven-slot backplane:
•
One MS520 memory module
•
One KA550 processor module
•
Two KFE52 system I/O controller modules
The placement of the logic modules is shown in Figure 1–8 and described
in Table 1–2.
In this configuration, a maximum of 12 DSSI devices (6 per zone) are
housed in the expander cabinet in the following combinations:
•
12 RF-series disks
•
10 RF-series disks and 1 or 2 TF70 or TF857 tape loaders, or 11
RF-series disks and 1 TF70 or TF857 tape loader
•
10 RF-series disks and 1 or 2 RF-series removable disks, or 11 RFseries disks and 1 RF-series removable disk
•
8 or 9 RF-series carrier disks, 1 or 2 RF-series removable disks, and 1
or 2 TF70 or TF857 tape loaders
A minimum of two RF-series carrier disks are required for this
configuration.
VAXft System
1–29
Figure 1–17 Model 612 Base System
syst
VA
syst
VA
em
em
s
X ft
s
LOCAL
CONSOLE
TERMINAL
X ft
SYSTEM
CABINETS
LOCAL
CONSOLE
TERMINAL
MR-0426-91DG
B
B
U
NOT
USED
1 234 56 7
K K C MO O O
F F PS P P P
E EU5 T T T
55 2 I I I
2 2 0 OO O
NN N
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
Summary
Panel
TF70C−AA
OR
TF857−Cx
Option
Zone
A
AC Box
B
RFxx
B
Removable U
Option
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
B
B
U
NOT
USED
1 234 56 7
K K C MO O O
F F PS P P P
E EU5 T T T
55 2 I I I
2 2 0 OO O
NN N
RFxx RFxx
Fixed Fixed
Option Option
RFxx RFxx
Fixed Fixed
Option Option
NOT
USED
Summary
Panel
TF70C−AA
OR
TF857−Cx
Option
Zone
B
AC Box
B
RFxx
B
Removable U
Option
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
RFxx RFxx
Fixed Fixed
Option Option
RFxx RFxx
Fixed Fixed
Option Option
RFxx RFxx
Fixed Fixed
Option Option
B
B
U
NOT
USED
1 234 56 7
K K C MO O O
F F PS P P P
E EU5 T T T
55 2 I I I
2 2 0 OO O
NN N
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
Expander
Summary Panel
Zone B
NOT
USED
RFxx RFxx
Fixed Fixed
Option Option
Summary
Panel
NOT
USED
Zone
A
AC Box
Zone B
NOT
USED
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
B
B
U
NOT
USED
1 234 56 7
K K C MO O O
F F PS P P P
E EU5 T T T
55 2 I I I
2 2 0 OO O
NN N
Summary
Panel
NOT
USED
Zone
B
AC Box
MR−0476−91RAGS
1–30 VAXft System
NOT
USED
Zone A
Figure 1–18 Layout of Model 612 Base System
Expander
Summary Panel
Zone A
VAXft System
1–31
1.5.5 Model 612 System with Expansion
Figure 1–19 shows the front view of a model 612 system with expansion
with video terminals. Figure 1–20 shows the layout of the modular
components in a model 612 system with expansion.
CAUTION
To prevent a system fault, you must set the expander cabinet
circuit breaker to OFF (down) whenever all the expander cabinet
disks are powered off.
This configuration includes two model 610 system cabinets and two
expander cabinets. Each system cabinet can house one or two TF70
or TF857 tape loaders. Each system cabinet has four modules in each
seven-slot backplane:
•
One MS520 memory module
•
One KA550 processor module
•
Four KFE52 system I/O controller modules
The placement of the logic modules is shown in Figure 1–8 and described
in Table 1–2.
In this configuration, a maximum of 24 DSSI devices (12 per zone) are
housed in each expander cabinet in the following combinations:
•
Up to 24 RF-series disks
•
22 or 23 RF-series disks and 1 or 2 TF70 or TF857 tape loaders
•
22 or 23 RF-series disks and 1 or 2 RF-series removable disks
A minimum of four RF-series carrier disks are required for this
configuration.
1–32 VAXft System
Figure 1–19 Model 612 System with Expansion
syst
VA
em
s
X ft
LOCAL
CONSOLE
TERMINAL
syst
VA
em
s
X ft
SYSTEM
CABINETS
LOCAL
CONSOLE
TERMINAL
MR-0427-91DG
NOT
USED
1 234 56 7
K K C MO O O
F F PS P P P
E EU5 T T T
55 2 I I I
2 2 0 OO O
NN N
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
Summary
Panel
TF70C−AA
OR
TF857−Cx
Option
Zone
A
AC Box
B
RFxx
B
Removable U
Option
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
NOT
USED
1 234 56 7
K K C MO O O
F F PS P P P
E EU5 T T T
55 2 I I I
2 2 0 OO O
NN N
RFxx RFxx
Fixed Fixed
Option Option
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
Summary
Panel
TF70C−AA
OR
TF857−Cx
Option
Zone
B
AC Box
B
RFxx
B
Removable U
Option
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
RFxx RFxx
Fixed Fixed
Option Option
RFxx RFxx
Fixed Fixed
Option Option
RFxx RFxx
Fixed Fixed
Option Option
RFxx RFxx
Fixed Fixed
Option Option
RFxx RFxx
Fixed Fixed
Option Option
RFxx RFxx
Fixed Fixed
Option Option
Zone A
NOT
USED
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
RFxx RFxx
Fixed Fixed
Option Option
RFxx RFxx
Fixed Fixed
Option Option
RFxx RFxx
Fixed Fixed
Option Option
NOT
USED
1 234 56 7
K K C MO O O
F F PS P P P
E EU5 T T T
55 2 I I I
2 2 0 OO O
NN N
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
Expander
Summary Panel
B
RFxx
B
Removable U
Option
B
B
U
Summary
Panel
NOT
USED
Zone
A
AC Box
Zone B
NOT
USED
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
B
B
U
NOT
USED
1 234 56 7
K K C MO O O
F F PS P P P
E EU5 T T T
55 2 I I I
2 2 0 OO O
NN N
Summary
Panel
NOT
USED
Zone
B
AC Box
MR−0475−91RAGS
VAXft System
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
B
B
U
RFxx RFxx
Fixed Fixed
Option Option
Expander
Summary Panel
Zone B
NOT
USED
RFxx RFxx
Fixed Fixed
Option Option
B
RFxx
B
Removable U
Option
Figure 1–20 Layout of Model 612 System with Expansion
NOT
USED
B
B
U
Expander
Summary Panel
Expander
Summary Panel
Zone A
1–33
1–34 VAXft System
1.6 System Architecture
All the memory, processing, and I/O facilities shown in Figure 1–21 are
provided in two interconnected system cabinets in a base system.
During normal operation, both zones operate in lockstep. While operating
in lockstep, there is no single point of hardware failure. An error in one
zone will not disable the VAXft system.
When a solid hardware failure occurs, the zone with the failing component
is brought off-line for repair. When the repair is completed, the zone is
powered on and the VAXft system automatically resynchronizes with
the operating zone, restoring redundancy. This process is transparent to
applications running on the VAXft system.
Figure 1–21 VAXft System Architecture
SYSTEM CABINET
SYSTEM CABINET
UP TO FOUR
UP TO FOUR
ZONE A
ZONE B
MEMORY
MEMORY
CROSS−LINK
PROCESSOR
PROCESSOR
MI BUS
MI BUS
MI BUS
UP TO
FOUR
SECONDARY
I/O AND
COMM
MI BUS
LOCAL
CONSOLE
TERMINALS
PRIMARY
I/O
PRIMARY
I/O
REMOTE
PORT
Ethernet
TF70
TF70
RF31
RF31
DSSI
BUS
DSSI
BUS
SECONDARY
I/O AND
COMM
UP TO
FOUR
REMOTE
PORT
Ethernet
MR−0206−90.RAGS
2
System Components
This chapter describes the system components and storage devices housed
in the VAXft cabinets. This chapter includes:
•
TK70 fixed tape drive
•
TF70 cannister tape drive
•
TF857 tape subsystem
•
RF-series fixed disk drive
•
RF-series cannister disk drive
•
RF-series carrier disk drive
•
Power modules
•
Logic modules and connectors
•
Cabinet cooling system
CAUTION
Installation and maintenance procedures may be performed
only by qualified personnel. They must be familiar with the
electrostatic discharge (ESD) procedures and power procedures
for the VAXft system. Excessive shock or incorrect handling can
damage the logic modules.
2–1
2–2 System Components
2.1 TK70 Fixed Tape Drive
Figure 2–1 shows a front view of the TK70 tape drive.
The tape drive is fixed with its associated controller behind the I/O
bulkhead.
The TK70 tape drive may be used for:
•
Installing or updating the operating software
•
Installing or updating the user software
•
Storage and retrieval of archived information
For more information on the TK70 fixed tape drive, see Appendix A.
System Components
Figure 2–1 TK70 Tape Drive
2–3
2–4 System Components
2.2 TF70 Cannister Tape Drive
Figure 2–2 shows a front view of the TF70 cannister tape drive.
Figure 2–2 TF70 Cannister Tape Drive
TAPE IN USE
(YELLOW)
WRITE
PROTECTED
(ORANGE)
OPERATE
HANDLE
(GREEN)
Pr
ote
cte
d
UNLOAD
BUTTON
TAPE
CARTRIDGE
RELEASE
HANDLE
SU
SERVER
SETUP
SWITCH
POWER
SWITCH
MAGNETIC
FAULT
INDICATOR
MR-0186-90.DG
System Components
2–5
The tape drive unit is mounted with its associated controller inside a
removable cannister module.
The TF70 cannister tape drive may be used for:
•
Installing or updating the operating system
•
Installing or updating user software
•
Storage and retrieval of archived information
Two switches are located on the TF70 cannister, the power switch and the
server setup (SU) switch.
•
The power switch controls power to the drive. The switch must be set
to off (0) before you remove the cannister from the system. It must
also be set to off (0) when you insert the cannister in the system.
•
The server setup (SU) switch allows you to set the DSSI parameters
for a drive you are installing in a running VAXft system. It has no
effect when the system is halted.
The server setup switch must be pressed in and held while you power
on: a new drive or a drive you are returning to the system after
repair. The switch has no other function; use of the switch at any
other time has no effect. After setting DSSI parameters under the
DUP facility, power off the drive; then power on the drive without
using the server setup switch. For further information on drive DSSI
parameters and the DUP facility, refer to the BOOT command syntax
(Section 4.4), BOOT command description (Section 5.2), and the RBD
command description (Section 6.8).
A magnetic fault indicator (MFI) is located on the cannister. This
indicator shows yellow when a failure is detected in the tape drive. A
fault may be detected at power-on or during operation. Upon successful
completion of the power-on diagnostics, the indicator is blank (not yellow).
For more information on the TF70 cannister tape drive, see Appendix A.
Removal and replacement procedures and the use of the server setup
switch are covered in Appendix C.
2–6 System Components
2.3 TF857 Tape Subsystem
Figure 2–3 shows a front view of the TF857 tape subsystem.
The tape unit is mounted with its associated controller inside a removable
module.
The TF857 tape subsystem can be used for:
•
Installing or updating the operating software
•
Installing or updating the user software
•
Storage and retrieval of archived information
The Mode Select key (Figure 2–3) can lock the loader transfer assembly
into the enclosure, as well as lock the receiver closed. It has four modes:
•
OCP Disabled
•
Automatic
•
Manual
•
Service
The OCP Disabled, Automatic, and Manual modes are for operational
use; the Service mode is for head cleaning and servicing procedures. See
Appendix B for more information on the Mode Select key and its function.
The TF857 operator control panel (OCP) has 3 OCP pushbuttons and 16
indicators that are used with the Mode Select key. See Appendix B for
more details on button and indicator operations.
System Components
2–7
Figure 2–3 TF857 Tape Subsystem
OPERATOR CONTROL PANEL
Eject
Load/Unload
M OD E S E LE C T K E Y
BUTTON
AND
INDICATOR
AREA
Slot Select
OCP
DISABLED
0
AUTOMATIC
MODE
Power On
OCP LABEL
CURRENT
SLOT
INDICATORS
0-6
Write
Protected
Tape In Use
1
MANUAL
MODE
Use
Cleaning Tape
SERVICE
MODE
Magazine
Fault
Loader Fault
2
Eject
3
DSSI NODE
ID LABEL
Load/Unload
Slot Select
0
Power On
Write
Protected
Write Protect
Load Fault
1
Tape In Use
Use
Cleaning Tape
4
Magazine
Fault
Loader Fault
2
3
5
4
5
6
6
40% REDUCTION
SHR_X1025B_89
2–8 System Components
2.4 RF-Series Fixed Disk Drive
Figure 2–4 shows a front view of the RF-series fixed disk drive.
The RF-series disk drive and its associated controller is fixed inside the
I/O bulkhead.
The RF-series disk drive may be used as:
•
Data backup, software load, or bootstrap device
•
Operating media
For more information on the RF-series disk drive, see Appendix A.
System Components
Figure 2–4 RF-Series Fixed Disk Drive Controls and Indicators
2–9
2–10 System Components
2.5 RF-Series Cannister Disk Drive
Figure 2–5 shows a front view of the RF-series cannister disk drive.
Figure 2–5 RF-Series Cannister Disk Drive
SCALE: SC,F,.58
SU
SERVER
SETUP
SWITCH
POWER
SWITCH
MAGNETIC
FAULT
INDICATOR
MR-0187-90.DG
System Components
2–11
The Winchester disk drive unit is shock mounted with its associated
controller inside a removable cannister module.
The RF-series cannister disk drive may be used as the:
•
Data backup, software load, or bootstrap device
•
Operating media in an entry-level system
Two switches are located on the RF-series cannister, the power switch and
the server setup (SU) switch.
•
The power switch controls power to the drive. The switch must be set
to off (0) before you remove the cannister from the system. It must
also be set to off (0) when you insert the cannister in the system.
•
The server setup (SU) switch allows you to set the DSSI parameters
for a drive you are installing in a running VAXft system. It has no
effect when the system is halted.
The server setup switch must be pressed in and held while you power
on: a new drive or a drive you are returning to the system after
repair. The switch has no other function; use of the switch at any
other time has no effect. After setting DSSI parameters under the
DUP facility, power off the drive; then power on the drive without
using the server setup switch. For further information on drive DSSI
parameters and the DUP facility, refer to the BOOT command syntax
(Section 4.4), BOOT command description (Section 5.2), and to the
RBD command description (Section 6.8).
A magnetic fault indicator (MFI) is located on the cannister. This
indicator shows yellow when a failure is detected in the tape drive. A
fault may be detected at power-on or during operation. Upon successful
completion of the power-on diagnostics, the indicator is blank (not yellow).
2–12 System Components
2.6 RF-Series Carrier Disk Drive
Figure 2–6 shows a front view of the RF-series carrier disk drive.
The Winchester disk drive unit is mounted with its associated controller
inside a fixed carrier module.
The two switches and magnetic fault indicator on the RF-series carrier
disk drive have the same functions as on the RF-series cannister disk
drive.
Removal and replacement procedures for the carrier drives are covered
in Appendix C. RF-series carrier disk drives are used as the system
operating media in the expander cabinets. The drives should not be
removed, except by qualified maintenance personnel.
Figure 2–6 RF-Series Carrier Disk Drive
MAGNETIC
FAULT
INDICATOR
SERVER
SETUP
SWITCH
SU
CAPTIVE
THUMB
SCREW
POWER
SWITCH
MR-0184-90.DG
System Components
2–13
2.7 Power Modules
Figure 2–7 shows a front view of the power modules located in the model
110 cabinet. Figure 2–8 shows a front view of the power modules located
in each model 310 and 410 cabinet. Figure 2–9 shows a front view of the
power modules located in each model 610 and 612 cabinet.
The VAXft power system consists of the following modules:
•
AC power supply (model 110 only)
•
AC power input box
•
DC power supply
•
Battery pack
•
AC distribution box (model 610 and 612 only)
The H7868 ac power supply provides unregulated direct voltage to the
internal power bus. The ac power input box accepts 115 Vac (nominal) or
230 Vac (nominal) at 47 to 63 Hz from the cabinet line cord.
The H407-A ac power input box provides an unregulated direct voltage of
48 Vdc to the internal power bus. The ac power input box accepts 115 Vac
(nominal) or 230 Vac (nominal) at 47 to 63 Hz from the cabinet line cord.
An input voltage selector switch located on the ac power transformer
selects one of the voltage ranges. The VAXft Systems Site Preparation
and Installation Guide (EK-VXFT1-IN) provides the procedures needed
to check or change the switch position. The power breaker switch for the
cabinet is located on the front of the ac power input box. The magnetic
fault indicator (MFI) on the front of the box shows yellow when a fault is
detected. One of the following faults is most likely:
•
Main bulk regulator
•
Battery switch circuit
•
Charger circuit
2–14 System Components
Figure 2–7 Model 110 Power Modules
ZONE A
ZONE B
DC OK
LED
POWER
RESET
SWITCH
AC POWER
CORD
RECEPTACLE
DC OK
LED
POWER
RESET
SWITCH
POWER
ON/OFF
SWITCH
H7868
AC POWER
SUPPLY
CIRCUIT
BREAKER
POWER
ON/OFF
SWITCH
AC POWER
CORD
RECEPTACLE
CIRCUIT
BREAKER
MR−0642091−RAGS_IMG
System Components
2–15
Figure 2–8 Model 310 and 410 Power Modules
2
BATTERY
PACK
DC POWER
SUPPLY
WITH FAN
AC POWER
INPUT BOX
FAN
AC CIRCUIT
BREAKER
AC POWER
TRANSFORMER
MR−0208−90.RAGS
2–16 System Components
Figure 2–9 Model 610 and 612 Power Modules
Zone A
B
B
U
1 234 56 7
K K C MO O O
F F PS P P P
E EU5 T T T
55 2 I I I
2 2 0 OO O
NN N
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
Zone
A
AC Box
Zone B
B
B
U
DC
POWER
SUPPLY
AC
POWER
SUPPLY
1 234 56 7
K K C MO O O
F F PS P P P
E EU5 T T T
55 2 I I I
2 2 0 OO O
NN N
Zone
B
AC Box
MR−0477−91RAGS
System Components
2–17
The H7233 dc power supply converts the 48 Vdc unregulated power to
regulated voltages used within the VAXft cabinets. Table 2–1 lists the
dc voltages required by the VAXft components. The H7233-AA dc power
supply is used in the system cabinet. The H7233-AB dc power supply is
used in the expander cabinet. The system dc power supply regulates the
voltages required for the system logic, storage, and cooling elements. The
dc power supply has a magnetic fault indicator (MFI) on the front of the
box. The magnetic fault indicator shows yellow when a fault is detected.
One of the following faults is most likely:
•
PCIM logic
•
Logic regulator
•
Disk regulator
•
Cooling fan
Within the dc power supply is a power and cooling intelligence module
(PCIM). It monitors the power system and cooling system inside the
cabinet and communicates with the operating system. When a power or
cooling problem occurs, the operating system is informed, so it can take
appropriate action.
Each of the VAXft cabinets has a battery pack that typically provides
about ½ hour of power to the cabinet during ac power outages. Thus,
during a power outage, the VAXft system can be shut down after
completion of all outstanding transactions and processes. The PCIM
also tracks the operation of the battery and notifies the operating system
when the battery is:
•
Active due to ac power outage
•
Charging
The dc power supplies used in the VAXft system contain a right and a left
regulator that supply two separate sections of the cabinet. Table 2–1 lists
the dc power available to the internal system cabinet components from
the H7233-AA dc power supply. One regulator supplies the logic power.
The other regulator supplies power to the disk drives and fans. In the
expander cabinets, each of the two regulators in the H7233-AB dc power
supply provides power to the disk drives and fans.
2–18 System Components
Table 2–1 VAXft System DC Power Characteristics
Regulation
Maximum
Current
+5 V
+4.95 to +5.25 Vdc
40.0 A
+12 V
+11.64 to +12.36 Vdc
2.0 A
-10 V
-9.5 to -10.5 Vdc
1.5 A
+12 V
+11.6 to +12.6 Vdc
15.0 A
+5 V
+4.95 to +5.25 Vdc
10.0 A
+24.0 to +28.0 Vdc
3.0 A
DC Voltage
Logic power:
Disk power:
Fan power:
+26 V
2.8 Logic Modules and Connectors
Figure 2–10 shows a typical module complement in a five-slot backplane
(model 110). Figure 2–11 shows a typical module complement in a sevenslot backplane.
Figure 2–10 and Figure 2–11 also identify:
•
Cable connectors on the module handles
•
Console terminal connectors on the chassis under the backplane
•
Magnetic fault indicators (MFIs)
•
LED indicators
CAUTION
Excessive shock or incorrect handling can damage the logic
modules.
System Components
2–19
Figure 2–10 Logic Modules and Connectors in a Five-Slot Backplane
PROCESSOR
MODULE
I/O
MEMORY
MODULE
MODULES
MAGNETIC
FAULT
INDICATORS
DSSI CABLE
CONNECTOR
LED
INDICATOR
ETHERNET
CONNECTORS:
THICKWIRE
ThinWire
WAN
MODULE
MAGNETIC
FAULT
INDICATOR
100−PIN
Y−BOX CABLE
CONNECTOR
MAGNETIC
FAULT
INDICATORS
20−PIN
MONITOR CABLE
CONNECTOR
CROSS−LINK
CABLE
CONNECTORS
MR−0641−91RAGS
2–20 System Components
Figure 2–11 Logic Modules and Connectors in a Seven-Slot Backplane
PROCESSOR
MODULE
I/O
MEMORY
MODULES
MODULES
MAGNETIC
FAULT
INDICATORS
DSSI CABLE
CONNECTORS
LED
INDICATORS
ETHERNET
CONNECTORS:
THICKWIRE
ThinWire
WAN
MODULES
MAGNETIC
FAULT
INDICATORS
100−PIN
Y−BOX CABLE
CONNECTORS
MAGNETIC
FAULT
INDICATORS
20−PIN
MONITOR CABLE
CONNECTORS
CROSS−LINK
CABLE
CONNECTORS
LOCAL CONSOLE
TERMINAL CONNECTOR
REMOTE CONSOLE
TERMINAL CONNECTOR
MR−0209−90.RAGS
System Components
2–21
2.9 Cabinet Cooling System
Figure 2–12 shows the airflow pattern for the model 110 cabinet.
Figure 2–13 shows the airflow pattern for each of the cabinets in the
model 310 and 410 system. Figure 2–14 shows the airflow pattern for
each of the cabinets in the model 610 and 612 system.
The cabinets are continuously cooled by two variable-speed dc fans, one in
the left side and one in the right side of each cabinet (Figure 2–8). The
speed of the fans is based on the ambient temperature of the cabinet as
determined by thermal sensors. The thermal sensor output is issued to
the PCIMs, which control the speed of the fans.
When the magnetic fault indicator on the cooling fan panel shows yellow,
one of the following conditions is likely:
•
Cooling fan is stopped.
•
Cooling fan is running at less than 20% of the speed of the fan located
in the dc power supply.
The fans direct the airflow in the cabinet. The system must rest on a firm
surface to maintain cooling airflow.
2–22 System Components
Figure 2–12 Model 110 Cabinet Airflow Pattern
INTAKE AIRFLOW
TM
EXHAUST AIRFLOW
53%
MR-0640-91DG
System Components
Figure 2–13 Model 310 and 410 Cabinet Airflow Pattern
INTAKE AIRFLOW
TM
EXHAUST AIRFLOW
53%
MR_X1407_89.DG
2–23
2–24 System Components
Figure 2–14 Model 610 and 612 Cabinet Airflow Pattern
sys
VA
tem
s
X ft
INTAKE AIRFLOW
ZKO-050-000079-18-DG
3
Controls and Indicators
This chapter explains the use of the controls and indicators on the cabinet
summary panels. This chapter includes:
•
Cabinet access
•
System cabinet summary panel
•
Expander cabinet summary panel
3.1 Cabinet Access
All operating access takes place from the front of the system.
3.1.1 Model 110 System
Figure 3–1 identifies the front door on a model 110 cabinet.
Figure 3–1 also shows the release latch and its function. An antistatic
key (supplied with each cabinet) must be used to turn the latch.
3–1
3–2 Controls and Indicators
Figure 3–1 Model 110 System Cabinet, Front View
Controls and Indicators
3.1.2 Model 310 and 410 Systems
Figure 3–2 identifies the front doors and base cap on the computer
cabinets.
Figure 3–2 Model 310 or 410 System Cabinet, Front View
UPPER
DOOR
OPEN UPPER DOOR
TM
VAXft systems
DOORS LOCKED
OPEN BOTH DOORS
LOWER
DOOR
BASE
CAP
MR_X1414_89.DG
3–3
3–4 Controls and Indicators
Figure 3–2 also shows the front panel latch and its functions. (The upper
door may be opened by itself or both doors may be opened together.) A
key (supplied with each cabinet) must be used to turn the latch.
•
The upper door provides access to the summary panel and cannister
drives.
•
The lower door is opened only for maintenance purposes. The lower
door provides access to the cables and main circuit breaker in each
cabinet, logic modules in the system cabinets, and carrier disk drives
in the expander cabinets.
CAUTION
Installation and maintenance procedures may be performed
only by qualified personnel. They must be familiar with
the electrostatic discharge (ESD) procedures and power
procedures for the VAXft system.
•
The base cap provides additional access for routing and installing
cables.
WARNING
A cabinet may weigh as much as 118 kg (260 lb) and is too
heavy to be handled by one person. At least two people are
required to move a cabinet.
Controls and Indicators
3.1.3 Model 610 and 612 Systems
Figure 3–3 identifies the front doors on the computer cabinets.
Figure 3–3 Model 610 or 612 System Cabinet, Front View
sys
VA
tem
s
X ft
MR-0423-91DG
3–5
3–6 Controls and Indicators
Figure 3–3 also shows the key (supplied with the system) used to turn the
latch.
•
The upper door provides access to zone A of the system or expander
cabinet.
•
The lower door provides access to zone B of the system or expander
cabinet.
CAUTION
Installation and maintenance procedures may be performed
only by qualified personnel. They must be familiar with
the electrostatic discharge (ESD) procedures and power
procedures for the VAXft system.
WARNING
A cabinet may weigh as much as 433 kg (956 lb) and is too
heavy to be handled by one person. At least two people are
required to move a cabinet.
3.2 RF-Series Disk Drives
Figure 3–4 shows the layout of the RF-series disk drive summary panel
on a model 110 cabinet. Table 3–1 describes the functions of the summary
panel elements.
Controls and Indicators
Figure 3–4 RF-Series Disk Drive Summary Panel
3–7
3–8 Controls and Indicators
Table 3–1 RF-Series Disk Drive Summary Panel Elements
Element
Setting
Function
Unit ID
Fixed
Each unit ID sets the DSSI address to the number
specified (0, 1, 2).
Removed
DSSI address undefined. If drive is present, drive
fault LED is on (lit).
On
Indicates a faulty drive or an undefined DSSI
address.
Off
Drive functioning correctly and DSSI address
defined (normal operating position).
Out,
LED off
System can read from and write to the disk
(normal operating position).
In,
LED on
System cannot write to the disk, but can read from
the disk.
Out,
LED on
Disk is on-line (normal operating position). System
can read from and write to the disk.
In,
LED off
Disk is off-line. System cannot read from or write
to the disk.
On
Indicates a system fault.
Off
Normal state. CPU can run system software.
On
DC voltage within tolerance.
Off
DC voltage not present or not within tolerance.
Drive fault
(Red) LED
Write
protect
LEDs
Drive
ready
LEDs
Fault
(Red) LED
DC OK
(Green)
LED
Controls and Indicators
3–9
3.3 System Cabinet Summary Panel
Figure 3–5 shows the layout of the summary panel in the system cabinets.
Each switch is labeled as left or right to indicate the disk drive it controls.
(The switches have no effect on a TF-series tape drive.)
Figure 3–5 System Cabinet Summary Panel
VAX System Indicators
Local Console Disable
OS Running/Battery
Fault
MODEL 310 OR 410
Write Protect
Drive on Left
Drive on Right
Ready/Online
Drive on Left
Drive on Right
SU Server Setup Switch
Fault
Console Communication
Modem
MODEL 610 OR 612
MR−0469−91RAGS
3–10 Controls and Indicators
Table 3–2 describes the functions of the system cabinet summary panel
elements.
Table 3–2 System Cabinet Summary Panel Elements
Element
Function
Local Console Disable
Two-position switch with amber indicator. Enables or
disables the Break key function for the local console
terminal. (The switch has no effect on the remote
console terminal. Full access privileges for the remote
operator are set by the local operator.)
When the switch is released (OFF, button out), the
Break key function is enabled and the indicator is dark
(unlit). The local operator may leave program I/O (PIO)
mode and enter console I/O (CIO) mode by pressing the
Break key. The console returns the >>> prompt.
When the switch is pressed in (ON), the Break key
function is disabled and the indicator is amber (lit). If
the Break key is pressed, the Break character is passed
to the operating software.
OS Running/Battery
Green indicator. When the indicator is green (lit), the
operating software is running. When the indicator is
dark (unlit), the operating software is not running (the
processor may be running the console firmware). When
the indicator is blinking, the system cabinet is running
on battery power.
Fault
Red indicator. The normal state of the indicator is dark
(unlit). When the indicator is blinking quickly, a logic
problem is present. When the indicator is blinking
slowly, a power system problem is present.
The MFI of the faulty device may also indicate the
fault. The normal state of an MFI is dark (reset).
Controls and Indicators
3–11
Table 3–2 (Continued) System Cabinet Summary Panel Elements
Element
Function
Write Protect1
Two-position switches with amber indicators. The
switches enable or disable the associated drives for
writes by the software. When pressed in, a switch
disables writes to the drive and the indicator is amber
(lit). When released (button out), a switch enables
writes to the drive and the indicator is dark (unlit).
Ready/On Line1
Two-position switches with green indicators. The
switches enable or disable the associated drives for
acceptance of commands from software. When the
switch is released (button out), the drive is enabled.
When it is pressed in, the drive is disabled. When the
indicator is green (lit), the associated drive is up to
speed. When it is dark (unlit), the drive is not up to
speed or does not have power applied.
1 The
Write Protect and On Line switches control the RF-series disk drives and have no
effect on a TF-series tape drive. TF-series protection is set by a write-protect switch on the
TK tape cartridge.
3.4 Expander Cabinet Summary Panel
Figure 3–6 shows the layout of the summary panel in the expander
cabinets. The upper and lower switches are labeled from left to right as X
through 5 to indicate the disk drives they control. (The switches have no
effect on a TF-series tape drive.)
3–12 Controls and Indicators
Figure 3–6 Expander Cabinet Summary Panel
OS Running
/Battery
Write Protect
Fault
Ready/Online
X
0
1
2
3
4
5
NOTE: THE SWITCHES AND INDICATORS
CONTROL THE FOLLOWING DRIVES.
X
X
X
5
4
3
2
1
0
MODEL 310 OR 410
5
4
3
2
1
0
5
4
3
2
1
0
MODEL 610 OR 612
MR−0470−91RAGS
Controls and Indicators
3–13
Table 3–3 describes the functions of the expander cabinet summary panel
elements.
Table 3–3 Expander Cabinet Summary Panel Elements
Element
Function
OS Running/Battery
Green indicator. When the indicator is green (lit), the
cabinet is running on ac power. When the indicator
is blinking, the system cabinet is running on battery
power.
Fault
Red indicator. The normal state of the indicator is
dark (unlit). When the indicator is blinking, a fault is
present.
The MFI of the faulty device may also indicate the fault.
The normal state of an MFI is dark (reset).
Write Protect1
Two-position switches with amber indicators. The
switches enable or disable the associated drives for
writes by the software. When pressed in, a switch
disables writes to the drive and the indicator is amber
(lit). When released (button out), a switch enables writes
to the drive and the indicator is dark (unlit).
Ready/On Line1
Two-position switches with green indicators. The
switches enable or disable the associated drives for
acceptance of commands from software. When the
switch is released (button out), the drive is enabled.
When it is pressed in, the drive is disabled. When the
indicator is green (lit), the associated drive is up to
speed. When it is dark (unlit), the drive is not up to
speed or does not have power applied.
1 The
Write Protect and On Line switches control the RF-series disk drives and have no
effect on a TF-series tape drive. TF-series protection is set by a write-protect switch on the
TK tape cartridge.
4
Console Operations
This chapter describes the VAXft console and the console operating modes.
It also provides information on booting the system. This chapter includes:
•
Console description
•
Console operating modes
•
Console control characters
•
Console command language syntax
•
Bootstrap procedures
•
BOOT command syntax
•
Boot devices and module expansion
NOTE
The focus of this chapter is model 310, 410, 610, and 612 systems.
If you own a model 110 system, keep in mind the following:
•
An expanded system is always a model 310, 410, 610, or 612
system.
•
A dual cabinet system is always a model 310, 410, 610, or 612
system. In a model 110 system, the two zones are housed in a
single cabinet.
•
The Local Console Disable switch is present on model 310, 410,
610, and 612 systems. In a model 110 system, the consoles are
always enabled.
4–1
4–2 Console Operations
4.1 Console Description
The VAXft system supports a local console terminal in each zone as shown
in Figure 4–1. Console firmware (console programs located in ROM)
resides on the primary system I/O controller module and on the processor
module in each system cabinet.
Figure 4–1 VAXft Console Architecture
SYSTEM
CABINET
SYSTEM
CABINET
TO MEMORY
TO MEMORY
ZONE A
ZONE B
CROSS − LINK
PROCESSOR
PROCESSOR
PRIMARY
I/O
PRIMARY
I/O
LOCAL
CONSOLE
TERMINAL
LOCAL
CONSOLE
TERMINAL
REMOTE
CONSOLE
TERMINAL
(OPTIONAL)
REMOTE
CONSOLE
TERMINAL
(OPTIONAL)
MR−0212−90.RAGS
Console Operations 4–3
An optional remote console terminal may be connected to each zone. The
remote console terminal and the local console terminal are connected to
the zone through the primary system I/O controller module. The primary
system I/O controller module is located in slot 2 of the module card cage in
model 310, 410, 610, and 612 systems. The primary system I/O controller
module is located in slot 1 in each zone of the model 110 system.
Table 4–1 describes the function of each component of the VAXft console.
Table 4–1 VAXft Console Parts
Part
Function
Local console terminal
Terminal located with the system that is used for
console input and display output.
Remote console port
One remote port is available in each zone. The
port may be connected to a remote console terminal
through a modem. The remote console port provides
the same functions as the local console port.
If connected through a modem, the remote port may
serve as a dial-in port for the user or as a dial-out
port for the autonotification process.
Console firmware
The VAXft console firmware resides on the primary
system I/O controller module and on the processor
module.
It is best to use only one of the four possible console terminals for input
commands at any given time. All of the console terminals echo the
response of the system to a console command.
When the VAXft system is operating with only a single zone, the local or
remote console terminals connected to the operational zone are used as
the input devices.
4–4 Console Operations
4.2 Console Operating Modes
Console operators communicate with the system in one of the three
input/output (I/O) operating modes shown in Figure 4–2.
Figure 4–2 Console Operating Modes
PIO MODE
BREAK
KEY
−PROGRAM I/O (PIO) MODE
PIO
COMMAND
−CONSOLE I/O (CIO) MODE
CIO MODE
PIO
COMMAND
MIO
COMMAND
CIO
COMMAND
MIO MODE
−MODULE I/O (MIO) MODE
MR−0214−90.PSART
Console Operations 4–5
The three console operating modes are:
•
Program I/O mode (PIO mode)
•
Console I/O mode (CIO mode)
•
Module I/O mode (MIO mode)
Normal operation takes place in the PIO mode. The CIO and MIO
modes are used by system managers to control the system and to set the
operating parameters.
PIO mode allows the operator to use the console terminal. Specifically, in
PIO mode the operator can use the VAXft console terminal to log in, use
the mail facility, create and edit files, and do other types of work typically
done from a user terminal.
PIO mode can be entered from either of the two other console operating
modes. To transition the console into PIO mode, use one of these console
commands: SET TERMINAL PROGRAM or PIO.
CIO mode allows the operator to execute the VAXft console commands.
These commands are a subset of the VAX–11 console command language
and include the VAXft specific commands. The CIO commands are
described in Chapter 5 of this manual.
To transition from PIO mode to CIO mode, be sure the Local Console
Disable switch on the summary panel is released (button out). Then
press the Break key on the console terminal once. Be sure you press the
Break key once only. By pressing the key more than once, you will enable
baud-rate cycling (Section 5.11.2, SET PORT).
MIO mode is used to set or change console parameters involving the
primary system I/O controller module. The only way to enter MIO mode
is by using the MIO command from CIO mode. While in MIO mode, the
VAXft operating system may be running or halted. A complete listing of
the MIO commands is provided in Chapter 6 of this manual. The CIO
or PIO mode can then be entered from MIO mode using the CIO or PIO
command.
4–6 Console Operations
4.3 Console Control Characters
The ASCII control characters and function keys listed in Table 4–2 have
special meanings when typed on a console terminal running in CIO or
MIO mode.
Table 4–2 Console Control Characters and Function Keys
Character/Key
Function
Break
Causes the console to exit PIO mode and enter CIO mode.
First, be sure the Local Console Disable switch on the
summary panel is released (button out). Then press the
Break key on the console terminal.
Ctrl/C
Echoes ^C and causes the console to abort processing of a
command.
Ctrl/O
Alternately enables and disables console output to the
terminal.
Ctrl/R
Echoes ^R and retypes the command line.
Ctrl/S
Stops console transmission to the terminal until Ctrl/Q is
typed.
Ctrl/Q
Resumes console output previously suspended by Ctrl/S .
Ctrl/U
Echoes ^U and erases the command line.
Esc or Ctrl/[
Disables the meaning of the next character you type. This
function is keyboard dependent. Refer to your terminal
owner’s manual.
Ctrl/P
Exits the z mode and returns to the CIO mode.
Return
Terminates a command line and executes the command.
<x (delete)
Deletes the character to the left of the cursor. On a hardcopy terminal, use the rubout key. Refer to your terminal
owner’s manual.
Break Break
Enables autobaud.
Console Operations 4–7
In PIO mode, the Break key causes the console to exit PIO mode and enter
CIO mode (if the Local Console Disable switch is not enabled). In CIO
or MIO mode, Break is the equivalent of Ctrl/C and is echoed as ^C. If
issued from a remote console terminal without full privileges, the break
character is passed to the operating software like any other character.
(For a remote operator to use CIO mode, full privileges must be set by the
local operator.)
Ctrl/C echoes ^C and aborts the processing of a command in progress. To
ensure the abort, you may need to press Ctrl/C twice.
Ctrl/O alternately enables and disables console output to the terminal.
When the output is disabled, the console echoes ^O and ignores further
software transmissions. Console output may also be reenabled using the
Break key or Ctrl/C .
Ctrl/R echoes ^R and retypes the command line. This feature is useful
when editing a command line on a hard-copy terminal.
Ctrl/S stops console transmission to the terminal.
transmission previously stopped by Ctrl/S .
Ctrl/Q
resumes a console
Ctrl/U echoes ^U and erases all characters previously typed on the
command line.
The Esc (Escape) key or a Ctrl/[ (control/left bracket) disables the meaning
of the next character typed, allowing a control character or special
character to be included in the command line. Refer to your terminal
owner’s manual.
Ctrl/P
changes the console from the z mode to the CIO mode.
The Return key terminates a command line. Pressing Return enters the
command line and invokes the command function. By typing Ctrl/U or
Ctrl/C before you press Return , you cancel the command and erase the
command line.
The <x (delete) key deletes the last character typed. On a hard-copy
terminal, the rubout key functions the same way. Refer to your terminal
owner’s manual.
4–8 Console Operations
4.4 Console Command Language Syntax
The console commands accept qualifiers. A qualifier is used to specify a
numerical value or to select an option from a list of options. Command
elements may be abbreviated and any extra tabs or spaces are ignored.
Unless otherwise noted, numerical values must be given in hexadecimal
(hex) notation. The command length may not exceed 80 characters.
Table 4–3 lists the console command language syntax rules. The console
commands available for the VAXft system are listed in Chapter 5 and
Chapter 6. The console command language syntax rules are valid for the
commands listed in those chapters.
Table 4–3 Console Command Language Syntax
Command Element
Rule
Abbreviations
A command verb or argument may be abbreviated
to the extent that it remains unique.
Multiple adjacent spaces
and tabs
Are treated as a single space.
Qualifiers
May appear after a command verb, option, or
symbol. They must be preceded by a slash (/).
Numbers
Must be hexadecimal (hex).
No characters
Are treated as a null command. No action is taken.
Console Operations 4–9
Commands, qualifiers, and options may be shortened. However a
minimum number of characters (enough to uniquely identify the command
keyword) must be entered. At the beginning of Chapters 5 and 6 of this
manual, console abbreviations are shown in bold capital letters.
Qualifiers may be used after the command keyword or after any symbol
or number in the command. Each qualifier must be preceded by a slash
(/). Spaces are allowed before a slash, but no spaces are allowed between
a slash and the qualifier.
Comments are allowed on a command line. Comments, or characters
following an exclamation point (!), are ignored by the console when the
Return key is pressed. This feature is useful when you document a console
session on a hard-copy terminal.
Uppercase or lowercase characters may be used for the command input.
A command line with no characters is a null command. If you press the
Return key, the console takes no action.
4–10 Console Operations
4.5 Bootstrap Procedures
The BOOT command initializes the system and then loads and starts the
virtual memory bootstrap (VMB) program from read-only memory (ROM).
The VMB program, in turn, loads and starts the operating system from
the specified boot device. Figure 4–3 and Table 4–4 show the steps in the
boot procedure.
Figure 4–3 Boot Procedure
ENTER BOOT COMMAND
AT THE >>>
CONSOLE PROMPT
BOOT PROCEDURE
INITIALIZES
THE SYSTEM
BOOT PROCEDURE
LOADS VMB INTO
MAIN MEMORY
VMB LOADS THE
OPERATING SYSTEM
MR−0213−90 .RAGS
Console Operations 4–11
Table 4–4 Boot Procedure
Step
Procedure
1
The operator enters the BOOT command at the console terminal,
which is in CIO mode. The operator may use device specifiers with
the BOOT command to select one or more boot devices of the same
type.
2
The system enters a reset procedure that initializes all system
components.
3
The BOOT command loads and starts the VMB program from the
specified boot source.
4
VMB loads and starts the operating system.
Boot Devices
The VAXft system may be booted from the following types of boot devices:
•
TF-series tape drives
•
RF-series disk drives
•
Boot sources available over an Ethernet
CAUTION
You cannot boot the system from the remote console. The
KFE52 I/O module is reset when the system boots, and this reset
disconnects the modem.
VMB
The VMB program is the primary bootstrap program. It is stored in ROM
in the VAXft system.
4–12 Console Operations
4.6 BOOT Command Syntax
The operating system may be booted using the syntax shown in
Figure 4–4.
Figure 4–4 BOOT Command Syntax
>>> BOOT /R5:n ddan or name
CONSOLE COMMAND THAT
INVOKES BOOT PROCEDURE
REGISTER 5 = HEX NUMBER OF
OPTIONAL VMB PARAMETERS
SELECTS BOOT DEVICE TYPE
SELECTS BOOT I/O MODULE
SELECTS DECIMAL UNIT
NUMBER OF BOOT DEVICE
SELECTS NAME OF
STORED BOOT COMMAND
MR−0390−90.PSART
Additionally, the operating system may be booted using one of the
following syntax variations.
Variations
1. >>> BOOT ddan
! Boots directly from one device.
2. >>> BOOT ddan, ddan, ddan, ddan
! Boots from up to four paths to
! the same type of device.
3. >>> BOOT name
! Boots from one of ten stored boot
! commands with symbolic names. (See
! Section 5.11.1, SET BOOT.)
4. >>> BOOT
! Boots from the default boot specifier.
! (See Section 5.11.1, SET BOOT.)
NOTE
The BOOT name command can be used only after the operator
has established a boot name using the SET BOOT name command.
Console Operations 4–13
4.7 Boot Devices and Module Expansion
For a complete description of the commands to determine the
configuration of the disks in the system, see Section 6.8, RBD.
The device specifier shown in Figure 4–4 takes the form ddan where:
•
dd specifies the device type
MI is a TF-series tape drive
DI is an RF-series disk drive
EP is an Ethernet port
•
a specifies the zone and slot of the primary or secondary system I/O
controller module. Figure 4–5 shows this for the model 110 system.
Figure 4–6 shows this for the model 310, 410, 610, and 612 systems.
Figure 4–6 also lists the correct module expansion sequence.
•
n specifies the decimal unit number of the boot device. If FORCEUNI
is set to 1 on a particular system drive, n specifies the DSSI node ID
number selected by the backplane.
If the FORCEUNI parameter is set to 0 in all system drives, the device
specifier ddan must specify the device unit number stored in the drive.
The RBD command description in Chapter 6 provides information on
setting the drive parameters.
You may specify as many as four paths to one or more of the same type
of device (see variation 2). The boot procedure then tries one or more of
the specified boot paths. Remember, the specifiers must be separated by
commas.
Chapter 5 provides more information on the BOOT command. Section 5.2
provides the BOOT command parameters and VMB program flags.
Section 5.11.1 explains how to store up to ten boot commands with
symbolic names.
4–14 Console Operations
Figure 4–5 Primary System I/O Controller Module Zone/Slot Specifiers
for Model 110 System
Console Operations 4–15
Figure 4–6 Primary System I/O Controller Module Zone/Slot Specifiers
and Module Expansion Sequence for Model 310, 410, 610,
and 612 Systems
MODULE SLOTS IN SYSTEM BACKPLANE
1
2
3
4
I/O
CPU
MEM
5
6
7
I/O RBD PROMPT
2
1
−
−
5
4
3
BOTH ZONES
ZONE A
B
A
−
−
E
D
C
ZONE B
G
F
−
−
J
I
H
ZONE SLOT
IDENTIFIERS FOR
BOOT PROCEDURE
ZONE A SLOT ID
2
−
−
−
5
4
3
ZONE B SLOT ID
7
−
−
−
A
9
8
MEMORY
−
−
−
1
2
3
4
I/O
2
1
−
−
−
−
−
WAN
1
−
−
−
4
2
2
USED WITH
Z COMMAND
MODULE
EXPANSION
SEQUENCE
MR−0468−91RAGS
5
CIO Mode Console Commands
This chapter describes the console commands available when the console
is in the console I/O (CIO) mode.
To recognize and process most CIO commands, the operating software
must be halted and the processor must be running the console firmware.
Certain CIO commands may be executed when the operating software
is not halted. These commands are: MIO, PIO, SET PORT, SET
TERMINAL, and SHOW PORT. This chapter includes:
•
Entering CIO mode
•
CIO mode console commands:
Boot
Continue
Deposit
Examine
Halt
Initialize
Mio
NEW CPU
Pio
Repeat
SEt Boot
SEt Port
SEt Terminal Program
SEt Zone
SHow Boot
SHow
SHow
SHow
SHow
Start
Test
Z
COnfiguration
CPu
Ethernet
Port
NOTE
The shortest possible command abbreviations are shown in bold
capital letters.
5–1
5–2 CIO Mode Console Commands
NOTE
The focus of this chapter is model 310, 410, 610, and 612 systems.
If you own a model 110 system, keep in mind the following:
•
An expanded system is always a model 310, 410, 610, or 612
system.
•
A dual cabinet system is always a model 310, 410, 610, or 612
system. In a model 110 system, the two zones are housed in a
single cabinet.
•
The Local Console Disable switch is present on model 310, 410,
610, and 612 systems. In a model 110 system, the consoles are
always enabled.
5.1 Entering CIO Mode
Using the example as a guide, follow the numbered steps to enter CIO
mode. A remote operator can use CIO mode only when full access
privileges for the remote console have been set at the local console.
Example
$
Break
$
>>> HALT
?002 External halt
PC = 01E01473
>>>
!
!
!
!
!
!
>>> CONTINUE
>>> PIO
$
!
!
!
!
!
From PIO mode, release the Local Console
Disable switch (button out). Press the
Break key. Halt the processor. Be sure
you press the Break key once only.
Begin your console session in CIO mode.
.
.
.
After completing your console session,
you may continue, start, or boot the
system. If you continue, entering the
PIO command returns you to PIO mode and
issues the DCL $ prompt.
Comments are allowed on a command line. Comments, or characters
following an exclamation point (!), are ignored by the console when the
Return key is pressed. This feature is useful when you document a console
session on a hard-copy terminal. The terminal mode change commands
are listed in Table 5–6.
CIO Mode Console Commands 5–3
To enter and use CIO mode:
1. Your console terminal is connected to a system cabinet. While still
in PIO mode, check the summary panel on that system cabinet.
Make sure the Local Console Disable switch on the summary panel is
released (button out, LED not lit).
2. Press the Break key to leave PIO mode. When the console enters CIO
mode it returns the >>> prompt.
3. Enter the HALT command before using the CIO mode commands. If
you do not halt the processor, the console returns an error message.
4. To return to PIO mode, enter one of these commands: SET
TERMINAL PROGRAM or PIO.
Chapter 4 provides more information on use of the various console
operating modes.
Some commands controlling the terminal ports on the primary system
I/O controller module (SET PORT and SET TERMINAL PROGRAM) are
recognized in CIO and MIO modes. MIO commands may be used with the
processor running or halted and are described in Chapter 6.
5–4 CIO Mode Console Commands
5.2 BOOT
The BOOT command initializes the system and then loads and starts the
virtual memory bootstrap (VMB) program from ROM. The VMB program,
in turn, loads and starts the VMS operating system.
CAUTION
You cannot boot the system from the remote console. The
KFE52 I/O module is reset when the system boots, and this reset
disconnects the modem.
Examples
1.
>>> BOOT MIA5
! Zone A boots from TF70 tape drive
! unit 5 through the primary system
! I/O controller module.
2.
>>> BOOT DIA0
! Zone B boots from RF-series disk drive
! unit 0 through the primary system
! I/O controller module.
3.
>>> BOOT TAPE
! Boots from the stored boot command
! called TAPE that was created by the
! SET BOOT command.
4.
>>> BOOT
! Boots from the stored boot command
! called DEFAULT that was created by
! the SET BOOT command.
5.
>>> BOOT DIA0, DIG0, DIB6, DIF6
! Boots from the first RF-series disk
! drive found in zone A or B.
6.
>>> BOOT EPA0, EPF0
! Boots from the first responding
! Ethernet device requested by
! zone A or zone B.
The BOOT command syntax is:
B[OOT] [/qualifier] [device list] [/qualifier]
or
B[OOT] [name]
CIO Mode Console Commands 5–5
Specification of the boot device is optional. The boot device is used to
identify the path(s) to the boot device(s). Specify as many as four paths
to one or more of the same type of device. Commas are used to separate
these device specifiers.
The boot device takes the form ddan where:
dd specifies the device type, which could be one of the following:
MI is a TF-series tape drive
DI is an RF-series disk drive
EP is an Ethernet port
The usage of a and n depends on the system DSSI configuration and
storage device settings. Sections 4.6 and 4.7 explain the boot device
specifier usage when the FORCEUNI value is 1 in all storage devices.
Section 6.8 explains the boot device specifier usage when the FORCEUNI
value is 0 in all storage devices.
The qualifier field is optional and may be used before or after the boot
device(s). Table 5–1 describes the /R5:n qualifier and Table 5–2 lists the
VMB program control flag values for n.
The switch R5 is used to pass boot parameters to the VMB program. If
the BOOT command is used without arguments, the stored boot command
is used. Section 5.11.1 explains how to name and store boot commands
with preset values.
The name specifier is used by itself to invoke a stored boot command. It
must be a 1- to 4-character symbolic name.
5–6 CIO Mode Console Commands
Table 5–1 BOOT Command Qualifier
Qualifier
Function
/R5:n
Register 5 parameter, where n is the hex value of a
binary bit mask that selects one of the VMB program
bootstrap options listed in Table 5–2. If /R5:n is omitted,
the default value is 0.
Table 5–2 VMB Program Control Flags for /R5:n
Bit
Position
Hex Value (n)
Flag Name/Function When Bit is Set
<0>
1
Conversational Boot — Returns the SYSBOOT>
prompt. From this prompt, the console operator
may enter SYSGEN parameters.
<1>
2
Debug — The operating system maps the
XDELTA debugger into its system page tables.
<2>
4
Initial Breakpoint — The operating system
executes a breakpoint (BPT) instruction after
turning on memory management.
<5>
20
Bootstrap Breakpoint — The VMB and
secondary bootstrap programs execute BPT
instructions to transfer control to the XDELTA
program.
<8>
100
Solicit File Name — The VMB bootstrap
program prompts the console terminal for
the secondary bootstrap procedure.
<31:28>
(0-F)000000
Specify the top-level directory number for a
system disk with multiple system roots.
CIO Mode Console Commands 5–7
5.3 CONTINUE
The CONTINUE command resumes execution from the point where the
system halted.
Example
>>> CONTINUE
! Resumes execution of the system.
The CONTINUE command syntax is:
C[ONTINUE]
When the CONTINUE command is issued, the console reloads the context
saved by the HALT process (PC, PSL, GPRs, and memory management).
The processor resumes program execution at the address held by the PC.
The console terminal remains in CIO mode.
5–8 CIO Mode Console Commands
5.4 DEPOSIT and EXAMINE
The DEPOSIT command stores the specified data in the specified address.
The EXAMINE command displays the data stored in the specified
address.
Examples
1.
>>> D /L /P 27 0
CTB0: D /L /P 27 0
! Deposits a longword value of 0 in
! physical address 27.
2.
>>> E /L /P 27
! Displays the longword value stored
CTB0: E /L /P 27
! in physical address 27.
P 00000027 00000000
The DEPOSIT command syntax is:
D[EPOSIT] [/qualifier] address data [/qualifier]
The EXAMINE command syntax is:
E[XAMINE] [/qualifier] address [/qualifier]
A qualifier may be placed before or after the address and data specifier.
Tables 5–3 and 5–4 describe qualifiers used with the DEPOSIT and
EXAMINE commands.
The address specifier identifies either the physical or virtual hex memory
address for a DEPOSIT or EXAMINE.
The data specifier identifies the hex data to be stored by a DEPOSIT.
When the system is initialized, or when any transition from a running to
a halted state occurs, the default physical address space (0) and data size
(longword) are used.
CIO Mode Console Commands 5–9
Table 5–3 DEPOSIT and EXAMINE Command Data Size Qualifiers
Qualifier
Function
/B
Sets the data size to byte.
/W
Sets the data size to word.
/L
Sets the data size to longword.
Table 5–4 DEPOSIT and EXAMINE Command Address Space Qualifiers
Qualifier
Function
/P
Sets physical address space.
/V
Sets virtual address space. An EXAMINE to virtual
memory returns the translated physical address. A
DEPOSIT to virtual memory sets the PTE <M> bit.
/I
Sets internal processor register (IPR) address space
accessed by the MTPR and MFPR instructions.
/G
Sets general register address space R0 through PC.
/N:count
Sets the range of addresses to be accessed. The console
begins at the specified address and then accesses the
number of ascending addresses specified by count, even
if the symbolic address - (minus) is used. The console
continually accesses the range of addresses until Ctrl/C
is typed. (See the REPEAT command description.)
5–10 CIO Mode Console Commands
The address specifier may be a 1- to 8-character hex address or may
specify one of the following symbolic addresses:
•
PSL — processor status longword. The address space qualifier is not
allowed when PSL is used as the symbolic address.
•
PC — program counter.
•
SP — stack pointer.
•
FP — frame pointer.
•
AP — argument pointer.
•
Rn — general register number n in decimal notation. Valid only for
R0 through R11 with the KA510 abd KA520 processor modules. Valid
for R0 through R15 with the KA550 processor module.
•
+ (plus) — location following the last location accessed by an
EXAMINE or DEPOSIT. For references to physical or virtual memory
address space, the accessed location is the last address plus the size of
the last reference. For all the other addresses, the location is the last
address plus 1.
•
- (minus) — location preceding the last location accessed by an
EXAMINE or DEPOSIT. For references to physical or virtual memory
address space, the accessed location is the last address minus the size
of the last reference. For all the other addresses, the location is the
last address minus 1.
•
* (asterisk) — last location referenced by an EXAMINE or DEPOSIT.
CIO Mode Console Commands 5–11
5.5 HALT
The HALT command suspends execution and causes the processor module
to invoke the processor console firmware.
Example
>>> HALT
! Halts the system.
The HALT command syntax is:
H[ALT]
The HALT command sends a request to the processor to halt program
execution. The HALT process stops execution, invokes the console
firmware, and saves the current processor context (PC, PSL, GPRs,
and memory management).
CAUTION
System operation may be jeopardized when you use this
command.
5.6 INITIALIZE
The INITIALIZE command initializes the system to its power-on state.
Example
>>> INIT
! Initializes the system.
The INITIALIZE command syntax is:
I[NITIALIZE]
The INITIALIZE command sets selected system registers to poweron states by performing a hard reset to the processor module and the
primary system I/O controller module.
The zone executing the INITIALIZE command is forced into a simplex
console mode. Rhe console must be in a simplex mode before executing
most diagnostic commands.
5–12 CIO Mode Console Commands
5.7 MIO
The MIO command changes the console mode from CIO to MIO.
Example
>>> MIO
MIO>
! Changes the console to MIO mode
! and issues the MIO> prompt.
The MIO command syntax is:
M[IO]
The MIO command changes the console mode from CIO to MIO to allow
use of MIO mode console commands (Chapter 6). You do not need to
halt the operating software to use the MIO mode commands, but some
commands are used for maintenance only. Maintenance commands
should be executed only from a halted system. For a remote operator
to use MIO mode, full access privileges must be set by the local operator.
For more information on terminal mode change commands, see Table 5–6.
5.8 NEW CPU
The NEW CPU command updates a new processor module with system
information from the processor module located in the partner zone.
Example
>>> NEW CPU
! The new processor module copies
! EEPROM data from the other zone.
>>> I[NITIALIZE]
! Initializes the system.
The NEW CPU command syntax is:
NEW CPU
CAUTION
The NEW CPU command is executed only by qualified
maintenance personnel.
CIO Mode Console Commands 5–13
5.9 PIO
The PIO command changes the console mode from CIO to PIO.
Example
>>> PIO
! Changes the console to PIO mode.
The PIO command syntax is:
P[IO]
The PIO command has the same function as the SET TERMINAL
PROGRAM command. In PIO mode, all keyboard characters are passed
to the operating software.
For more information on terminal mode change commands, see Table 5–6.
5.10 REPEAT
The REPEAT command continuously executes the specified console
command.
Examples
>>> REPEAT E 27
! Continuously examines location
! 27 (hex) until Ctrl/C is typed.
The REPEAT command syntax is:
R[EPEAT] command
The command may be any CIO mode command except TEST Z (KA550
only), REPEAT, CIO, PIO, MIO, HALT, SHOW, or SET. Execution
continues until the operator types Ctrl/C from the keyboard. A command
must be supplied.
CAUTION
The REPEAT command is used only during maintenance
procedures.
5–14 CIO Mode Console Commands
5.11 SET
Follow these rules whenever you issue the SET commands from
CIO mode:
1. Issue the INITIALIZE command from CIO mode to make sure the
zones are in SIMPLEX mode.
2. Be sure to issue identical SET commands to both zones. Failure to do
so may result in an EEPROM CHECKSUM message each time the
zones attempt to synchronize.
3. A SET BOOT command issued to provide single-fault protection
during boot should include the bootpath designation for both zones
and both members of the system disk shadowset. This ensures that
both zones boot using the same boot command string.
A typical boot command for a model 610 with expansion might be:
>>> SET BOOT DEFAULT /R5:70000000 DIA0, DIG1, DIB10, DIF10
When both zones have booted, the software boots to root 7 on system
disk DIA0 (zone A) or DIG0 (zone B). If the disk is inaccessible, the
shadowset partner provides backup access to the system disk through
the other zone.
CIO Mode Console Commands 5–15
5.11.1 SET BOOT
The SET BOOT command names and stores a boot command.
Examples
1.
>>> SET BOOT DISK /R5:5 DIA0
! Creates an RF-series boot command called
! DISK and stores it in EEPROM.
2.
>>> SET BOOT ENET EPF0
! Creates an Ethernet boot command
! called ENET and stores it in EEPROM.
3.
>>> SET BOOT DEFAULT DIA0
! Creates the default boot specifier
! and stores it in EEPROM.
The SET BOOT command syntax is:
SE[T] B[OOT] name [/qualifier] [device list] [/qualifier]
The name specifier must be a 1- to 4-character symbolic name for
the stored boot command. Use of symbolic names that are the same
as the device specifiers is not recommended. A qualifier may be included
before or after the device specifier. The syntax is the same as for the
BOOT command.
Example 1 creates a command to boot from an RF-series disk and stores
it in EEPROM. When the command BOOT DISK is given, general register
R5 passes a hex value of 5 to the VMB bootstrap program, and the boot
uses disk unit 0 on the primary system I/O controller module in zone A.
Example 2 creates a command to boot from Ethernet and stores it in
EEPROM. When the command BOOT ENET is given, the boot uses the
Ethernet port on the primary system I/O controller module in zone B.
5–16 CIO Mode Console Commands
Example 3 creates a default boot specifier and stores it in EEPROM. The
default boot specifier is used during autoboot or when no device list is
used with the BOOT command. The word DEFAULT must be spelled out.
It is not a symbolic name.
Use the following console command sequence to define a default boot
specifier:
>>> INIT
>>> SET BOOT DEFAULT name
>>> SHOW BOOT
!
!
!
!
!
!
!
Initializes the system.
Creates the default boot specifier.
(You must use this command for
both zones.)
Displays all stored boot commands.
(You must verify that the default
is the same for both zones.)
If the BOOT command is issued without arguments, the process uses the
saved boot specification called the default.
If you issue the SET BOOT name command without a device specifier and
press Return , the stored boot location is cleared:
>>> SE[T] B[OOT] [name]
>>>
5.11.2 SET PORT
The SET PORT command sets the operating parameters for the terminal
port issuing the command.
Example
>>> SET PORT /SPEED=9600
! Sets terminal port input and output
! rate to 9600 baud.
The SET PORT command syntax is:
SE[T] [/P[ermanent]] P[ORT] /qualifier(s)
The qualifiers are listed in Table 5–5. At least one qualifier must be
supplied.
The SET PORT command affects only the terminal port connected to the
terminal issuing the command. It may be issued from the local console
terminal or the remote console terminal (with full access privileges). It
uses the same qualifiers that are used with the SET LOCAL and SET
REMOTE commands.
CIO Mode Console Commands 5–17
Table 5–5 SET PORT Command Qualifiers
Qualifier
Function
/B[reak], /NOB[reak]
/BREAK enables baud-rate cycling for the port after the
port receives two consecutive Break characters from the
terminal. /NOBREAK disables the baud-rate cycling for
the port.
/U[pper], /L[ower]
/UPPER changes the received character to uppercase
before it is interpreted by the console. (Has no effect in
PIO mode.) /LOWER inhibits changes to uppercase; all
characters are accepted and interpreted as received.
/H[ardcopy],
/NOH[ardcopy]
/HARDCOPY sets the console for hard-copy terminal
operation. /NOHARDCOPY sets the console for video
terminal operation. (These qualifiers have the same
effect as /NOSCOPE and /SCOPE.)
/SC[ope], /NOS[cope]
/SCOPE sets the console for video terminal operation.
/NOSCOPE sets the console for hard-copy terminal
operation. (These qualifiers have the same effect as
/NOHARDCOPY and /HARDCOPY.)
/SYNC_I[n],
/NOSYNC_I[n]
/SYNC_IN causes the console to recognize the Ctrl/S and
Ctrl/Q flow-control characters. /NOSYNC_IN causes the
console to ignore Ctrl/S and Ctrl/Q and pass them as
normal characters.
/SYNC_O[ut],
/NOSYNC_O[ut]
/SYNC_OUT causes the console to generate Ctrl/S and
Ctrl/Q for flow control from the processor module.
/NOSYNC_OUT causes the console to disable flow
control.
/SP[eed]=rate or
/SP[eed]:rate
Sets the baud rate for the port issuing the command.
Valid baud rates are: 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600,
and 19200. The default baud rate is 9600.
5–18 CIO Mode Console Commands
5.11.3 SET TERMINAL PROGRAM
The SET TERMINAL PROGRAM command sets the I/O mode for the
terminal issuing the command.
Example
>>> SET TERMINAL PROGRAM
! Sets the terminal to the program
! I/O mode.
The SET TERMINAL PROGRAM command syntax is:
SE[T] T[ERMINAL] P[ROGRAM]
The SET TERMINAL PROGRAM command is synonymous with the PIO
command. The mode change commands are listed in Table 5–6.
Table 5–6 Terminal Mode Change Commands
Command
Function
P[io] or SE[t]
T[erminal] P[rogram]
Changes the console mode from CIO or MIO to PIO
mode. To recognize and process PIO commands, the
operating software must be running. In PIO mode,
all keyboard characters are passed to the operating
software.
CI[o]
Changes the console mode from MIO to CIO. The Break
key is used to enter CIO mode from PIO mode. To
recognize and process CIO commands, the operating
software must be halted and the processor must be
running the console firmware.
M[io]
Changes the console mode from CIO to MIO. You cannot
enter MIO mode from PIO mode; first enter CIO mode.
You do not need to halt the operating software to use
the MIO mode commands. For a remote operator to use
MIO mode, full access privileges must be set by the local
operator.
CIO Mode Console Commands 5–19
5.11.4 SET ZONE
The SET ZONE command establishes the zone configuration.
Examples
1.
>>> SET ZONE A
! Configures the zone for zone A operation.
2.
>>> SET ZONE B
! Configures the zone for zone B operation.
The SET ZONE_ID command syntax is:
SE[T] Z[ONE] option
The option specifier may be the letter A or B. The zone configuration is
always stored in the EEPROM of the zone issuing the command.
CAUTION
The SET ZONE command is used only during installation and
maintenance procedures. After a SET ZONE, initialize the system
(Section 5.6, INITIALIZE).
5–20 CIO Mode Console Commands
5.12 SHOW
The SHOW command displays the system operating parameters.
Example
>>> SHOW BOOT
CTzn SHOW BOOT
! Displays all stored boot
! commands in volatile memory.
TAPE /R5:0000004 MIA0
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
!
!
!
!
!
!
Sends to all terminals,
where z identifies the
zone issuing the command
as A or B, and n identifies
the local terminal as 0 and
the remote terminal as 1.
The SHOW command syntax is:
SH[OW] option
The options are listed in Table 5–7. An option specifier must be supplied.
Table 5–7 SHOW Command Options
Option
Function
B[OOT]
Identifies the zone and issuing terminal and displays the
settings for all stored boot commands.
CO[NFIGURATION]
Displays a table of the modules in the backplane.
CP[U]
Displays the ROM version of the CPU and the primary
I/O controller module.
E[THERNET]
Displays the physical Ethernet addresses.
P[ORT]
Displays the port address.
ALL
Displays boot, configuration, CPU, and Ethernet
parameters.
CIO Mode Console Commands 5–21
5.13 START
The START command begins execution of the operating software from the
specified address.
Example
>>> S 100
! Starts the program beginning
! at address 100 (hex).
The START command syntax is:
S[TART] [address]
The address specifier is optional and used to identify the hex value of the
starting address. Program execution starts at the specified address or, if
the address is omitted, at the PC contents saved on the previous HALT.
If memory management is enabled, the address is virtual. If memory
management is not enabled, the address is physical.
5–22 CIO Mode Console Commands
5.14 TEST
The TEST command invokes the ROM-based diagnostic (RBD) monitor on
the processor module.
Examples
1.
>>> T
! Invokes the RBD monitor.
VAXft 3000 RBD Monitor VX.X
RBD>
2.
>>> T /RBD
RBD>
RBD> QUIT
>>>
! Invokes the RBD monitor
! and returns the RBD> prompt.
! You are able to run RBD tests.
.
.
.
! Leaves the RBD monitor and returns
! you to CIO mode.
or
1.
>>> T
! Invokes the RBD monitor.
VAXft RBD Monitor VX.X
RBD>
2.
>>> T /RBD
RBD>
RBD> QUIT
>>>
! Invokes the RBD monitor
! and returns the RBD> prompt.
! You are able to run RBD tests.
.
.
.
! Leaves the RBD monitor and returns
! you to CIO mode.
CIO Mode Console Commands 5–23
The TEST command syntax is:
T[EST] [/R[bd]]
The TEST and TEST /RBD commands invoke the RBD interactive mode,
return the RBD> prompt, and terminate all other processor functions.
The operator may then run the complete set or selected parts of the
processor module diagnostics from the RBD monitor. RBD tests may be
run from the local console terminal or remote console terminal.
When the operator exits RBD mode, the processor returns to CIO mode
(the console firmware).
CAUTION
The TEST command is used only by qualified maintenance
personnel.
5–24 CIO Mode Console Commands
5.15 Z
The Z command invokes the RBD monitor on any system logic module
except for the primary system I/O controller module, processor module, or
a memory module.
Example
>>> Z 2
CTA0: Z 2
MIO> T/R
MIO> T/R
!
!
!
!
!
Invokes the RBD monitor on the
secondary system I/O controller module
in slot 1 of the backplane. When the
module responds, press Return again and
issue the TEST/RBD command.
VAXft 3000 RBD Monitor Vx.x
RBD2>
!
!
!
!
RBD2> QUIT
!
!
!
!
Places you in the RBD monitor on the
secondary system I/O controller module
in slot 1. (Slot 1 has slot ID 2. See
Chapter 4.) You are able to run RBD tests.
.
.
.
Exits the RBD monitor and
enters the MIO mode.
Type Ctrl/P to return to
CIO mode.
!
!
!
!
!
Invokes the RBD monitor on the
secondary system I/O controller module
in slot 1 of the backplane. When the
module responds, press Return again and
issue the TEST/RBD command.
RBD2>
!
!
!
!
RBD2> QUIT
!
!
!
!
Places you in the RBD monitor on the
secondary system I/O controller module
in slot 1. (Slot 1 has slot ID 2. See
Chapter 4.) You are able to run RBD tests.
.
.
.
Exits the RBD monitor and
enters the MIO mode.
Type Ctrl/P to return to
CIO mode.
Return
MIO> ^P
>>>
or
>>> Z 2
CTA0: Z 2
Return
MIO> T/R
VAXft RBD Monitor Vx.x
Return
MIO> ^P
>>>
CIO Mode Console Commands 5–25
The Z command syntax is:
Z n
The n specifies the slot ID number of an approved I/O or adapter module
in the backplane of the local zone (Chapter 4, Console Operations). If
you specify a slot that does not contain a module, the console returns an
error message.
The Z command invokes a system console communication mode that
allows the console operator to run interactive RBD tests on the designated
module. The console returns the RBDn> prompt. The n is the slot ID
number of the module under test. See Figure 4–6.
CAUTION
The Z command is used only by qualified maintenance personnel
and cannot be used to go to another zone.
6
MIO Mode Console Commands
This chapter describes the console commands available when the console
is in the module I/O (MIO) mode. MIO commands affect output to the
console terminal or port; the processor may be running or halted. This
chapter includes:
•
Entering MIO mode
•
MIO mode console commands:
CIo
DIAlout
DISable Remote
Enable Remote
Hangup
Pio
Rbd
SEt
SEt
SEt
SEt
SEt
SEt
SEt
SEt
SEt
LAnguage
Local
Modem_type
Notification
Port
REMote
REStart_action
Terminal Program
SHow
SHow
SHow
SHow
SHow
SHow
SHow
Test
LAnguage
Local
Notification
Port
REMote
REStart_action
NOTE
The shortest possible command abbreviations are shown in bold
capital letters.
6–1
6–2 MIO Mode Console Commands
NOTE
The focus of this chapter is model 310, 410, 610, and 612 systems.
If you own a model 110 system, keep in mind the following:
•
An expanded system is always a model 310, 410, 610, or 612
system.
•
A dual cabinet system is always a model 310, 410, 610, or 612
system. In a model 110 system, the two zones are housed in a
single cabinet.
•
The Local Console Disable switch is present on model 310, 410,
610, and 612 systems. In a model 110 system, the consoles are
always enabled.
6.1 Entering MIO Mode
Using the example as a guide, follow the numbered steps to enter MIO
mode. For a remote operator to use MIO mode, full access privileges must
be set by the local operator.
Example
$
$
Break
>>>
>>> MIO
MIO>
MIO> CIO or
PIO
! From PIO mode, release the Local Console
! Disable switch (OFF, button out). The
! indicator is dark (unlit). Then press the
! Break key.
.
.
.
! Entering the CIO or PIO command returns
! you to CIO or PIO mode, respectively.
Comments are allowed on a command line. Comments, or characters
following an exclamation point (!), are ignored by the console when the
Return key is pressed. This feature is useful when documenting a console
session on a hard-copy terminal.
MIO Mode Console Commands 6–3
To enter and use MIO mode:
1. Your console terminal is connected to a system cabinet. While still
in PIO mode, check the summary panel on that system cabinet.
Make sure the Local Console Disable switch on the summary panel is
released (OFF, button out) and the indicator is dark (unlit).
2. Press the Break key to leave PIO mode. When the console enters CIO
mode it returns the >>> prompt.
3. Enter the MIO command and press Return . (The processor may be
running or halted.) When the console returns the MIO> prompt, enter
MIO commands.
4. To return to one of the other modes, enter one of these commands:
SET TERMINAL PROGRAM, PIO, or CIO.
Chapter 4 provides more information on use of the various console
operating modes.
Some commands controlling the terminal ports on the primary system
I/O controller module (SET PORT and SET TERMINAL PROGRAM)
are recognized in CIO and MIO modes. To recognize and process
CIO commands, the operating software must be halted and the
processor must be running the console firmware. CIO commands
are described in Chapter 5.
6–4 MIO Mode Console Commands
6.2 CIO
The CIO command changes the console mode from MIO to CIO.
Example
MIO> CIO
>>>
! Changes the console to CIO mode
! and issues the >>> console prompt.
The CIO command syntax is:
CI[O]
The CIO command changes the console mode from MIO to CIO to allow
use of CIO mode console commands (Chapter 5). Halt the operating
software to use the CIO mode commands.
For more information on terminal mode change commands, see
Table 6–10.
MIO Mode Console Commands 6–5
6.3 DIALOUT
The DIALOUT command invokes the console autonotification process.
Example
MIO> DIALOUT
! Invokes the console dialout procedure.
The DIALOUT command syntax is:
DIA[LOUT]
When the DIALOUT command is issued, the autonotification process dials
out using the stored notification phone number, retry count, and retry
delay time. (These parameters are set using the SET NOTIFICATION
command.) If the connection is successful, the notification message is
transmitted and the MIO> prompt is returned to the issuing console
terminal. If the connection is not successful, an error message is returned
to the issuing console terminal.
CAUTION
The DIALOUT command is used only during maintenance
procedures.
6–6 MIO Mode Console Commands
6.4 DISABLE REMOTE
The DISABLE REMOTE command disables all remote terminal console
privileges.
Example
MIO> DISABLE REMOTE
! Disables all remote console privileges.
The DISABLE REMOTE command syntax is:
DIS[ABLE] R[EMOTE]
The DISABLE REMOTE command has the same function as the SET
REMOTE OFF command. If a remote session is in progress, the command
does not take effect until the remote terminal ‘‘hangs up’’ and breaks the
connection. Future dial-in attempts are ignored.
MIO Mode Console Commands 6–7
6.5 ENABLE REMOTE
The ENABLE REMOTE command enables remote terminal console
privileges.
Examples
1.
MIO> ENABLE REMOTE
! Enables all remote console privileges.
2.
MIO> ENABLE REMOTE USER
! Enables PIO mode access for the remote
! console.
The ENABLE REMOTE command syntax is:
E[NABLE] R[EMOTE] [U[SER]]
Without the USER option, the command has the same function as the
SET REMOTE FULL command, enabling all privileges including dial-in
access when the remote connection is made through a modem.
With the USER option, the command has the same function as the SET
REMOTE SECURE command, enabling access for the remote operator,
but only in PIO mode. If the remote terminal is in any other mode,
the command does not take effect until the remote operator enters PIO
mode. Then the remote operator cannot leave PIO mode until full access
privileges are set by the local operator.
6–8 MIO Mode Console Commands
6.6 HANGUP
The HANGUP command breaks the remote terminal telephone
connection.
Example
MIO> HANGUP
! Disconnects the telephone connection.
The HANGUP command syntax is:
H[ANGUP]
When the HANGUP command is issued from a remote terminal connected
through a modem, the modem breaks the connection by deasserting
the data terminal ready (DTR) signal. If a DISABLE REMOTE or SET
REMOTE OFF command has also been issued, the remote terminal
becomes inactive.
MIO Mode Console Commands 6–9
6.7 PIO
The PIO command changes the console mode from MIO to PIO.
Example
MIO> PIO
! Changes the console to PIO mode.
The PIO command syntax is:
P[IO]
The PIO command has the same function as the SET TERMINAL
PROGRAM command. In PIO mode, all keyboard characters are passed
to the operating software.
For more information on terminal mode change commands, see
Table 6–10.
6–10 MIO Mode Console Commands
6.8 RBD
The RBD command invokes the ROM-based diagnostic (RBD) monitor
on the primary system I/O controller module. In the RBD monitor, the
system drives can be configured using the diagnostic/utility protocol
(DUP) facility.
Example
>>> MIO
MIO> RBD
RBD1>
! Enters MIO mode from CIO mode.
! Invokes the RBD monitor and
! returns the RBD1> prompt.
The RBD command syntax is:
R[BD]
The RBD command is identical to the TEST/RBD command. It invokes
the RBD interactive mode, returns the RBD> prompt, and terminates all
other console functions. When the operator exits RBD mode, the primary
system I/O controller module initializes itself and returns to PIO mode
(the default).
CAUTION
The RBD command is used only by qualified maintenance
personnel. The RBD command must not be used while the
operating system is running.
6.8.1 Setting System Drive Parameters
Placing two drives with the same DSSI parameters in the same system
can prevent the use of one of the devices or can cause irretrievable loss of
data. Therefore, no two drives at a computer site should have the same
unit number or DSSI node name.
Drives may be written with the parameters shown in the following
sections or as required by the application. The parameters shown
in Sections 6.8.1.1 or 6.8.1.2 should be written during the system
installation. Sections 6.8.2 and 6.8.3 provide examples of how to read
and write parameters on a halted system.
If, at a later date, you need to install a new drive, or a drive that has
had the DSSI controller/interface module replaced, write the drive
parameters to configure the drive into the system. The VAXft System
Services Manager’s Guide provides further information on replacing or
configuring drives in a running system.
MIO Mode Console Commands 6–11
6.8.1.1 Base System
Drive numbering sequences greater than 7 (decimal) should be used as
shown in the following chart. This method ensures each drive has a
unique unit number1 and DSSI node name1 , even if drives are improperly
installed later.
First system on site: Allocation Class = 1
Zone A Cabinet Drives
Zone B Cabinet Drives
DSSI
Node Name
TAPE15
DISK17
DSSI
Node ID
Unit
Number
VMS
Device Name
DSSI
Node Name
15
17
TAPE15$MIA15
$1$DIA17
DISK25
DISK27
51
7
DSSI
Node ID
Unit
Number
51
7
25
27
VMS
Device Name
$1$DIA25
$1$DIA27
Second system on site: Allocation Class = 2
Zone A Cabinet Drives
DSSI
Node Name
TAPE35
DISK37
DSSI
Node ID
51
7
Zone B Cabinet Drives
Unit
Number
VMS
Device Name
DSSI
Node Name
35
37
TAPE35$MIA35
$2$DIA47
DISK45
DISK47
DSSI
Node ID
Unit
Number
51
7
45
47
Third system on site: Allocation Class = 3
Zone A Cabinet Drives
Zone B Cabinet Drives
DSSI
Node Name
TAPE55
DISK57
1
DSSI
Node ID
51
7
Unit
Number
VMS
Device Name
DSSI
Node Name
55
57
TAPE55$MIA55
$3$DIA57
DISK65
DISK67
DSSI
Node ID
51
7
Unit
Number
65
67
VMS
Device Name
$2$DIA45
$2$DIA47
VMS
Device Name
$3$DIA65
$3$DIA67
Node 5 may be a disk or tape device. The DIA or MIA portion of the unit
number cannot be changed. In the VMS device name, the number parsed by
dollar signs identifies the allocation class. Tapes do not have allocation classes.
6–12 MIO Mode Console Commands
6.8.1.2 System with Expansion
Drive numbering sequences greater than 7 (decimal) should be used as
shown in the following chart. This method ensures each drive has a
unique unit number1 and DSSI node name1 , even if drives are improperly
installed later.
First system on site: Allocation class = 1
Zone A Expander Cabinet Drives
Zone B Expander Cabinet Drives
DSSI
Node Name
DISK10
DISK11
DISK12
DISK13
DISK14
DISK15
DSSI
Node ID
0
1
2
3
4
51
Unit
Number
10
11
12
13
14
15
VMS
Device Name
DSSI
Node Name
$1$DIA10
$1$DIA11
$1$DIA12
$1$DIA13
$1$DIA14
$1$MIA15
DISK20
DISK21
DISK22
DISK23
DISK24
DISK25
DSSI
Node ID
0
1
2
3
4
51
Unit
Number
20
21
22
23
24
25
VMS
Device Name
$1$DIA20
$1$DIA21
$1$DIA22
$1$DIA23
$1$DIA24
$1$DIA25
Second system on site: Allocation Class = 2
Zone A Expander Cabinet Drives
Zone B Expander Cabinet Drives
DSSI
Node Name
DISK30
DISK31
DISK32
DISK33
DISK34
DISK35
DSSI
Node ID
0
1
2
3
4
51
Unit
Number
30
31
32
33
34
35
VMS
Device Name
DSSI
Node Name
$2$DIA30
$2$DIA31
$2$DIA32
$2$DIA33
$2$DIA34
$2$MIA35
DISK40
DISK41
DISK42
DISK43
DISK44
DISK45
DSSI
Node ID
0
1
2
3
4
51
Unit
Number
40
41
42
43
44
45
VMS
Device Name
$2$DIA40
$2$DIA41
$2$DIA42
$2$DIA43
$2$DIA44
$2$DIA45
Third system on site: Allocation Class = 3
Zone A Expander Cabinet Drives
Zone B Expander Cabinet Drives
DSSI
Node Name
DISK50
DISK51
DISK52
DISK53
DISK54
DISK55
1
DSSI
Node ID
0
1
2
3
4
51
Unit
Number
50
51
52
53
54
55
VMS
Device Name
DSSI
Node Name
$3$DIA50
$3$DIA51
$3$DIA52
$3$DIA53
$3$DIA54
$3$MIA55
DISK60
DISK61
DISK62
DISK63
DISK64
DISK65
DSSI
Node ID
0
1
2
3
4
51
Unit
Number
60
61
62
63
64
65
VMS
Device Name
$3$DIA60
$3$DIA61
$3$DIA62
$3$DIA63
$3$DIA64
$3$DIA65
Node 5 may be a boot or backup device. The DIA or MIA portion of the unit
number cannot be changed. In the VMS device name, the number parsed by
dollar signs identifies the allocation class. Tapes do not have allocation classes.
MIO Mode Console Commands 6–13
6.8.2 The SHOW_DSSI Command
NOTE
The SHOW_DSSI command does not apply to model 110 systems
because the node IDs are fixed at 0, 1, and 2.
The SHOW_DSSI command shows the parameters for all available drives
connected to the primary system I/O controller module in the zone issuing
the command.
Zone A of a base system might show the following combination of drives
in the left system cabinet:
RBD1> SHOW_DSSI
DSSI Node 5 (T7GAT0)
-MIA5
(TF70)
DSSI Node 6
(*)
DSSI Node 7 (R3DK3G)
-DIA7
(RF-series)
RBD1>
In the previous example, the zone A cabinet contains a TF70 cannister
tape drive in the DSSI ID 5 slot and an RF-series cannister disk drive in
the DSSI ID 7 slot. DSSI node 6 is occupied by the primary system I/O
controller module.
The drives return the following information:
•
DSSI node ID value (node 5 and 7) from the backplane
•
Factory-set DSSI node name (T7GAT0 and R3DK3G)
•
Unit number (MIA5 and DIA7) from the backplane
•
Device type (TF70 and RF-series)
6–14 MIO Mode Console Commands
Zone B of a base system might show the following combination of drives
in the right system cabinet:
RBD1> SHOW_DSSI
DSSI Node 5 (R3DK3D)
-DIA5
(RF-series)
DSSI Node 6
(*)
DSSI Node 7 (R3DK3E)
-DIA7
(RF-series)
RBD1>
In the above example, the zone B cabinet contains RF-series carrier disk
drives in the DSSI ID 5 and DSSI ID 7 slots. DSSI node 6 is occupied by
the primary system I/O controller module.
The drives return the following information:
•
DSSI node ID value (node 5 and 7) from the backplane
•
Factory-set DSSI node name (R3DK3D and R3DK3E)
•
Unit number (DIA5 and DIA7) from the backplane
•
Device type (RF-series)
6.8.3 DUP PARAMS Commands
Setting the force unit (FORCEUNI) bit to a 0 causes the drives to use the
stored unit numbers written by the DUP PARAMS procedure.
Setting the FORCEUNI bit to a 1 (the factory default) causes the drives
to use the hardwired unit numbers selected by the backplane.
CAUTION
The FORCEUNI bit must be the same in all drives in the system.
Digital recommends setting the FORCEUNI bit to 0. Doing so
causes the unit number to remain the same if the device is moved
to another DSSI device slot.
MIO Mode Console Commands 6–15
The following examples show how to write DSSI parameters to the drives
in both system cabinets of a base system. The same procedures can be
used with a system with expansion. Use the numbering sequences shown
in Section 6.8.1.1 for a base system or Section 6.8.1.2 for a system with
expansion.
Zone A Parameters
The following example shows how to write the drive parameters in the
zone A cabinet of a base system.
RBD1> DUP 5 PARAMS
Starting DUP server...
! Selects backplane DSSI
! ID 5 slot.
DSSI Node 5 (T7GAT0)
Copyright (C) 1988 Digital Equipment Corporation
PARAMS>
PARAMS>
PARAMS>
PARAMS>
SET FORCEUNI 0
SET UNITNUM 15
SET NODENAME TAPE15
WRITE
!
!
!
!
!
!
!
Sets FORCEUNI equal to 0.
Sets 15 as the unit number.
The unit number and node
name values must be the same.
The unit number may be up to
three decimal digits (maximum
of 999).
Changes require controller initialization, ok? [Y/(N)] Y
PARAMS> EXIT
Stopping DUP server...
! Leaves PARAMS to select the
! next drive in the zone.
RBD1> DUP 7 PARAMS
Starting DUP server...
! Selects backplane DSSI
! ID 7 slot.
DSSI Node 7 (R3DK3D)
Copyright (C) 1988 Digital Equipment Corporation
PARAMS> SET FORCEUNI 0
PARAMS> SET UNITNUM 17
PARAMS> SET NODENAME DISK17
PARAMS> SET ALLCLASS 1
PARAMS> WRITE
!
!
!
!
!
Sets FORCEUNI equal to 0.
Sets 17 as the unit number.
The unit number and node
name values must be the same.
Sets allocation class to 1.
Changes require controller initialization, ok? [Y/(N)] Y
PARAMS> EXIT
Stopping DUP server...
RBD1>
6–16 MIO Mode Console Commands
To display the new parameters for the drives, enter the SHOW_DSSI
command:
RBD1> SHOW_DSSI
DSSI Node 5 (TAPE15)
-MIA15
(TF70)
DSSI Node 6
(*)
DSSI Node 7 (DISK17)
-DIA17
(RF-series)
RBD1> QUIT
$ CIO
>>>
!
!
!
!
The console leaves the RBD
monitor and enters PIO mode.
The CIO command then places
you in CIO mode.
Zone B Parameters
The following example shows how to write the drive parameters in the
zone B cabinet of a base system.
NOTE
ALLCLASS should be set to match the SYSGEN parameter
ALLOCLASS for the node.
RBD1> DUP 5 PARAMS
Starting DUP server...
! Selects backplane DSSI
! ID 5 slot.
DSSI Node 5 (R3DK3F)
Copyright (C) 1988 Digital Equipment Corporation
PARAMS> SET FORCEUNI 0
PARAMS> SET UNITNUM 25
PARAMS> SET NODENAME DISK25
PARAMS> SET ALLCLASS 1
PARAMS> WRITE
!
!
!
!
!
Sets FORCEUNI equal to 0.
Sets 25 as the unit number.
The unit number and node
name values must be the same.
Sets allocation class to 1.
MIO Mode Console Commands 6–17
Changes require controller initialization, ok? [Y/(N)] Y
PARAMS> EXIT
Stopping DUP server...
! Leaves PARAMS to select the
! next drive in the zone.
RBD1> DUP 7 PARAMS
Starting DUP server...
! Selects backplane DSSI
! ID 7 slot.
DSSI Node 7 (R3DK3G)
Copyright (C) 1988 Digital Equipment Corporation
PARAMS> SET FORCEUNI 0
PARAMS> SET UNITNUM 27
PARAMS> SET NODENAME DISK27
PARAMS> SET ALLCLASS 1
PARAMS> WRITE
!
!
!
!
!
Sets FORCEUNI equal to 0.
Sets 27 as the unit number.
The unit number and node
name values must be the same.
Sets allocation class to 1.
Changes require controller initialization, ok? [Y/(N)] Y
PARAMS> EXIT
Stopping DUP server...
RBD1>
To display the new parameters for the drives, enter the SHOW_DSSI
command:
RBD1> SHOW_DSSI
DSSI Node 5 (DISK25)
-DIA25
(RF-series)
DSSI Node 6
(*)
DSSI Node 7 (DISK27)
-DIA27
(RF-series)
RBD1> QUIT
$ CIO
>>>
!
!
!
!
The console leaves the RBD
monitor and enters PIO mode.
The CIO command then places
you in CIO mode.
6–18 MIO Mode Console Commands
6.9 SET
The SET command establishes the console settings.
Examples
1.
MIO> SET LANGUAGE ENGLISH
! Sets language to the ENGLISH option
! in volatile memory.
2.
MIO> SET /PERMANENT LANGUAGE ENGLISH
! Sets language to the ENGLISH option
! both in volatile memory and in EEPROM.
The SET command syntax is:
SE[T] [/P[ermanent]] option parameter
The /P[ermanent] qualifier is optional, but the option and the parameter
for the option must be supplied.
Without the /P[ermanent] qualifier, the command stores the setting in
volatile memory. The volatile memory value is lost if power is removed
from the processor.
With the /P[ermanent] qualifier, the command stores the setting in volatile
memory and in EEPROM. The EEPROM value is saved if power is
removed from the processor and is written to volatile memory when power
is restored.
The SET command establishes the console settings for the following
options:
LA[nguage]
N[otification]
RES[tart_action]
L[ocal]
P[ort]
T[erminal] P[rogram]
M[odem_type]
REM[ote]
MIO Mode Console Commands 6–19
6.9.1 SET LANGUAGE
The SET LANGUAGE command sets the MIO console error message
output.
Examples
1.
MIO> SET /PERMANENT LANGUAGE ENGLISH
! Sets the terminal display to English
! for the MIO error message code and
! the error description.
2.
MIO> SET /PERMANENT LANGUAGE INTERNATIONAL
! Sets the display to International.
! Displays the MIO error message code
! without the error description.
SET /P LANGUAGE I and SET LANGUAGE I both set the display
temporarily to international. Once the zone or system is powered off and
then powered on, the language defaults to English.
The SET LANGUAGE command syntax is:
SE[T] [/P[ermanent]] LA[NGUAGE] option
The options are listed in Table 6–1. An option specifier must be supplied.
Table 6–1 SET LANGUAGE Command Options
Option
Function
E[nglish]
Displays the error code with the definition in English
text.
I[nternational]
Displays the error code without the text.
6–20 MIO Mode Console Commands
6.9.2 SET LOCAL
The SET LOCAL command sets the operating parameters for the local
terminal port.
Examples
1.
MIO> SET LOCAL /SCOPE
! Sets the local console terminal port
! for a video terminal.
2.
MIO> SET LOCAL /NOSCOPE
! Sets the local console terminal port
! for a hard-copy terminal.
The SET LOCAL command syntax is:
SE[T] [/P[ermanent] L[OCAL] /qualifier(s)
The qualifiers are listed in Table 6–2. At least one qualifier must be
supplied.
The SET LOCAL command may be issued from the local console terminal
or the remote console terminal (with full access privileges). It uses the
same qualifiers used with the SET PORT and SET REMOTE commands.
MIO Mode Console Commands 6–21
Table 6–2 SET LOCAL Command Qualifiers
Qualifier
Function
/B[reak], /NOB[reak]
/BREAK enables baud-rate cycling for the port after the
port receives two consecutive Break characters from the
terminal. /NOBREAK disables the baud-rate cycling for
the port.
/U[pper] /L[ower]
/UPPER changes the received character to uppercase
before it is interpreted by the console. (Has no effect in
PIO mode.) /LOWER inhibits changes to uppercase; all
characters are accepted and interpreted as received.
/H[ardcopy],
/NOH[ardcopy]
/HARDCOPY sets the console for hard-copy terminal
operation. /NOHARDCOPY sets the console for video
terminal operation. (These qualifiers have the same
effect as /NOSCOPE and /SCOPE.)
/S[cope], /NOS[cope]
/SCOPE sets the console for video terminal operation.
/NOSCOPE sets the console for hard-copy terminal
operation. (These qualifiers have the same effect as
/NOHARDCOPY and /HARDCOPY.)
/SYNC_I[n],
/NOSYNC_I[n]
/SYNC_IN causes the console to recognize the Ctrl/S and
Ctrl/Q flow-control characters. /NOSYNC_IN causes the
console to ignore Ctrl/S and Ctrl/Q and pass them as
normal characters.
/SYNC_O[ut],
/NOSYNC_O[ut]
/SYNC_OUT causes the console to generate Ctrl/S and
Ctrl/Q for flow control from the processor module.
/NOSYNC_OUT causes the console to disable flow
control.
/SP[eed]=rate or
/SP[eed]:rate
Sets the baud rate for the port issuing the command.
Valid baud rates are: 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600,
and 19200. The default baud rate is 9600.
6–22 MIO Mode Console Commands
6.9.3 SET MODEM_TYPE
The SET MODEM_TYPE command defines the type of connection between
the remote terminal and the system I/O module.
Example
MIO> SET /PERMANENT MODEM_TYPE V22
! Sets the console interface for the
! modem both in volatile memory and
! in EEPROM.
The SET MODEM_TYPE command syntax is:
SE[T] [/P[ermanent]] M[ODEM_TYPE] option
The options are listed in Table 6–3. An option specifier must be supplied.
Table 6–3 SET MODEM_TYPE Command Options
Option
Function
N[one]
The remote terminal is connected directly to the system
I/O module or through a Digital remote services console
(RSC) interface.
V2[2]
The remote terminal is connected through an
asynchronous modem that conforms to V22, such as
a Digital DF03 or DF224 modem.
NOTE
To ensure data integrity, error correcting modems using
conditioned lines are suggested.
MIO Mode Console Commands 6–23
6.9.4 SET NOTIFICATION
The SET NOTIFICATION command sets the operating parameters for the
autonotification process.
Example
MIO> SET NOTIFICATION TRANSMIT_DELAY 5
! Sets the notification transmit
! delay to 5 seconds.
The SET NOTIFICATION command syntax is:
SE[T] /P[ermanent] N[OTIFICATION] option
The options are listed in Table 6–4. An option specifier must be supplied.
Quoted parameters must be entered within quotation marks (‘‘ ’’) as
shown.
The autonotification process is invoked when the system I/O module loses
contact with the host operating system or when the DIALOUT command
is issued.
Table 6–4 SET NOTIFICATION Command Options
Option
Function
P[hone_number] ‘‘number’’1
The ‘‘number’’ is the phone number for the dial-out
process. The quoted string is sent to the modem when
autonotification is invoked.
Normal dial-outs use the phone number stored in
volatile memory. Emergency dial-outs use the phone
number stored in EEPROM.
M[essage] ‘‘message’’1
The ‘‘message’’ is the message to be transmitted when
the DIALOUT command is successful.
1 The
quoted string may consist of up to 255 ASCII characters if preceded by the escape
(<ESC>) character (ASCII 27).
6–24 MIO Mode Console Commands
Table 6–4 (Continued) SET NOTIFICATION Command Options
Option
Function
C[ountry] name
The name is the country from which a dialout message
will occur. Each country has an associated retry count,
retry delay, and disconnect timeout. Table 6–5 lists the
countries you can select. The defaults are as follows:
•
Retry count = 1
•
Retry delay = 0
•
Disconnect timeout = 60
E[mergency_message] ‘‘message’’1
The ‘‘message’’ is the message to be transmitted by
the autonotification process if the I/O module loses
communication with the processor module.
PARAM1 ‘‘parameter’’1
The ‘‘parameter’’ is the first of three parameters passed
to the script interpreter for the dial-out procedure.
PARAM2 ‘‘parameter’’1
The ‘‘parameter’’ is the second of three parameters
passed to the script interpreter for the dial-out
procedure.
PARAM3 ‘‘parameter’’1
The ‘‘parameter’’ is the third of three parameters passed
to the script interpreter for the dial-out procedure.
T[ransmit_delay] value
The value is a positive 0 to 255 (decimal) value
representing the number of seconds the autonotification
process waits before transmitting a message after data
set ready (DSR) is asserted by the modem (indicating
that the remote connection has been established). The
value is also used as the delay after the message is sent
before data terminal ready (DTR) is released.
1 The
quoted string may consist of up to 255 ASCII characters if preceded by the escape
(<ESC>) character (ASCII 27).
MIO Mode Console Commands 6–25
Table 6–5 Dialout Countries
Country
Retry Count
Retry Delay
Disconnect
Timeout
AL[geria]
1
0
60
AUSTRA[lia]
10
120
61
AUSTRI[a]
10
120
90
B[elgium]
10
120
80
C[anada]
10
120
90
D[enmark]
10
120
61
E[gypt]
1
0
60
FI[nland]
4
120
90
FR[ance]
5
120
120
G[ermany]
8
120
90
IR[eland]
4
120
61
IS[rael]
4
300
61
I[taly]
4
300
61
J[apan]
10
300
61
NET[herlands]
10
120
61
NEW[_zealand]
4
300
61
NO[rway]
10
120
61
P[ortugal]
4
300
61
SA[udi_Arabia]
1
0
60
SP[ain]
4
300
61
SWE[den]
10
120
61
SWI[tzerland]
5
120
90
UK
7
120
61
US[a]
10
120
90
6–26 MIO Mode Console Commands
6.9.5 SET PORT
The SET PORT command sets the operating parameters for the terminal
port issuing the command.
Example
MIO> SET PORT /SPEED=9600
! Sets terminal port input and output
! rate to 9600 baud.
The SET PORT command syntax is:
SE[T] [/P[ermanent]] P[ORT] /qualifier(s)
The qualifiers are listed in Table 6–6. At least one qualifier must be
supplied.
The SET PORT command affects only the terminal port connected to the
terminal issuing the command. It may be issued from the local console
terminal or the remote console terminal (with full access privileges). It
uses the same qualifiers that are used with the SET LOCAL and SET
REMOTE commands.
MIO Mode Console Commands 6–27
Table 6–6 SET PORT Command Qualifiers
Qualifier
Function
/B[reak], /NOB[reak]
/BREAK enables baud-rate cycling for the port after the
port receives two consecutive Break characters from the
terminal. /NOBREAK disables the baud-rate cycling for
the port.
/U[pper], /L[ower]
/UPPER changes the received character to uppercase
before it is interpreted by the console. (Has no effect in
PIO mode.) /LOWER inhibits changes to uppercase; all
characters are accepted and interpreted as received.
/H[ardcopy],
/NOH[ardcopy]
/HARDCOPY sets the console for hard-copy terminal
operation. /NOHARDCOPY sets the console for video
terminal operation. (These qualifiers have the same
effect as /NOSCOPE and /SCOPE.)
/SC[ope], /NOS[cope]
/SCOPE sets the console for video terminal operation.
/NOSCOPE sets the console for hard-copy terminal
operation. (These qualifiers have the same effect as
/NOHARDCOPY and /HARDCOPY.)
/SYNC_I[n],
/NOSYNC_I[n]
/SYNC_IN causes the console to recognize the Ctrl/S and
Ctrl/Q flow-control characters. /NOSYNC_IN causes the
console to ignore Ctrl/S and Ctrl/Q and pass them as
normal characters.
/SYNC_O[ut],
/NOSYNC_O[ut]
/SYNC_OUT causes the console to generate Ctrl/S and
Ctrl/Q for flow control from the processor module.
/NOSYNC_OUT causes the console to disable flow
control.
/SP[eed]=rate or
/SP[eed]:rate
Sets the baud rate for the port issuing the command.
Valid baud rates are: 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600,
and 19200. The default baud rate is 9600.
6–28 MIO Mode Console Commands
6.9.6 SET REMOTE
The SET REMOTE command sets the operating parameters and
privileges for the remote terminal port.
Example
MIO> SET REMOTE FULL
! Enables the remote terminal for
! full console access privileges.
MIO> SET REMOTE /SCOPE
! Enables the remote port for
! video terminal option.
The SET REMOTE command syntax is:
SE[T] [/P[ermanent]] REM[OTE] option
or:
SE[T] [/P[ermanent]] REM[OTE] /qualifier(s)
The options are listed in Table 6–7. The qualifiers are listed in Table 6–8.
At least one option or qualifier must be supplied, but multiple qualifiers
may be issued. However, options and qualifiers cannot be issued in the
same command.
The SET REMOTE option command sets access privileges for the remote
terminal port without affecting a remote session currently in progress.
The command may be issued from the local console terminal or the
remote console terminal (with full access privileges).
The SET REMOTE /qualifier(s) command may affect a remote session
currently in progress. SET REMOTE uses the same qualifiers used with
the SET LOCAL and SET PORT commands.
MIO Mode Console Commands 6–29
Table 6–7 SET REMOTE Command Options
Option
Function
F[ull]
Enables the remote terminal for full access privileges
as a console terminal. Synonymous with the ENABLE
REMOTE command.
S[ecure]
Enables the remote terminal for use only as an operating
terminal in PIO mode. If a remote session is in progress,
the command does not take effect until the remote
operator enters PIO mode. Synonymous with the
ENABLE REMOTE command.
O[ff]
Disables all remote user terminal console functions.
If a remote session is in progress, the command does
not take effect until the remote terminal ‘‘hangs up’’
and breaks the connection. Future dial-in attempts are
ignored. Synonymous with the DISABLE REMOTE
command.
6–30 MIO Mode Console Commands
Table 6–8 SET REMOTE Command Qualifiers
Qualifier
Function
/B[reak], /NOB[reak]
/BREAK enables baud-rate cycling for the port after the
port receives two consecutive Break characters from the
terminal. /NOBREAK disables the baud-rate cycling for
the port.
/U[pper], /L[ower]
/UPPER changes the received character to uppercase
before it is interpreted by the console. (Has no effect in
PIO mode.) /LOWER inhibits changes to uppercase; all
characters are accepted and interpreted as received.
/H[ardcopy],
/NOH[ardcopy]
/HARDCOPY sets the console for hard-copy terminal
operation. /NOHARDCOPY sets the console for video
terminal operation. (These qualifiers have the same
effect as /NOSCOPE and /SCOPE.)
/SC[ope], /NOS[cope]
/SCOPE sets the console for video terminal operation.
/NOSCOPE sets the console for hard-copy terminal
operation. (These qualifiers have the same effect as
/NOHARDCOPY and /HARDCOPY.)
/SYNC_I[n],
/NOSYNC_I[n]
/SYNC_IN causes the console to recognize the Ctrl/S and
Ctrl/Q flow-control characters. /NOSYNC_IN causes the
console to ignore Ctrl/S and Ctrl/Q and pass them as
normal characters.
/SYNC_O[ut],
/NOSYNC_O[ut]
/SYNC_OUT causes the console to generate Ctrl/S and
Ctrl/Q for flow control from the processor module.
/NOSYNC_OUT causes the console to disable flow
control.
/SP[eed]=rate or
/SP[eed]:rate
Sets the baud rate for the port issuing the command.
Valid baud rates are: 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600,
and 19200. The default baud rate is 9600.
MIO Mode Console Commands 6–31
6.9.7 SET RESTART_ACTION
The SET RESTART_ACTION command defines the action the zone takes
after an initialization or power-on sequence.
Example
MIO> SET /PERMANENT RESTART_ACTION HALT
! Sets the zone to halt and invokes
! the console firmware after an
! initialization or power-on sequence.
The SET RESTART_ACTION command syntax is:
SE[T] [/P[ermanent]] RES[TART_ACTION] option
The options are listed in Table 6–9. An option specifier must be supplied.
The SET RESTART_ACTION command determines what action the
system reset process takes after the system self-test diagnostics run
successfully. The action is invoked after a system initialization, power-on
sequence, or power-on following a power failure.
Table 6–9 SET RESTART_ACTION Command Options
Option
Function
R[estart]
First, an operating system dump to disk is performed.
Then the system boots from a device specifier or boot
specification stored in volatile memory or EEPROM.
(Only EEPROM is valid for a power-on sequence.)
B[oot]
Similar to RESTART, but without the operating system
dump to disk. The system boots from a device specifier
or boot specification stored in volatile memory or
EEPROM. (Only EEPROM is valid for a power-on
sequence.)
H[alt]
The processor halts execution of the operating software
and enters the console firmware. The local console
terminal and remote console terminal (if enabled) both
enter CIO mode.
6–32 MIO Mode Console Commands
6.9.8 SET TERMINAL PROGRAM
The SET TERMINAL PROGRAM command sets the I/O mode for the
terminal issuing the command.
Example
MIO> SET TERMINAL PROGRAM
! Sets the terminal to the program
! I/O mode.
The SET TERMINAL PROGRAM command syntax is:
SE[T] T[ERMINAL] P[ROGRAM]
The SET TERMINAL PROGRAM command is synonymous with the PIO
command. The mode change commands are listed in Table 6–10.
Table 6–10 Terminal Mode Change Commands
Command
Function
P[io] or SE[t]
T[erminal] P[rogram]
Changes the console mode from CIO or MIO to PIO
mode. To recognize and process PIO commands, the
operating software must be running. In PIO mode,
all keyboard characters are passed to the operating
software.
CI[o]
Changes the console mode from MIO to CIO. The Break
key is used to enter CIO mode from PIO mode. To
recognize and process CIO commands, the operating
software must be halted and the processor must be
running the console firmware.
M[io]
Changes the console mode from CIO to MIO. You cannot
enter MIO mode from PIO mode; first enter CIO mode.
You do not need to halt the operating software to use
the MIO mode commands. For a remote operator to use
MIO mode, full access privileges must be set by the local
operator.
MIO Mode Console Commands 6–33
6.10 SHOW
The SHOW command displays the current settings for the specified
option.
Examples
MIO> SHOW REMOTE
! Shows the remote port parameters
! stored in volatile memory.
MIO> SHOW /PERMANENT RESTART_ACTION
! Shows the restart-action switch
! setting stored in EEPROM.
The SHOW command syntax is:
SH[OW] [/P] option
Without the /P[ermanent] qualifier, the command displays the current
settings stored in volatile memory. The volatile memory value is lost if
power is removed from the processor.
With the /P[ermanent] qualifier, the command displays the current
settings stored in EEPROM. The EEPROM value is saved if power is
removed from the processor and is written to volatile memory when power
is restored.
The SHOW command displays the current settings for the following
options:
LA[nguage]
P[ort]
RES[tart_action]
L[ocal]
REM[ote]
N[otification]1
1 Display
includes the MODEM_TYPE setting.
6–34 MIO Mode Console Commands
6.11 TEST
The TEST command invokes the ROM-based diagnostic (RBD) monitor on
the primary system I/O controller module.
Examples
1.
MIO> TEST
! Invokes the power-on self-tests.
2.
MIO> TEST /RBD
RBD1>
! Invokes the RBD monitor
! and returns the RBD1> prompt.
The TEST command syntax is:
T[EST] [/R[bd]]
With the /R[bd] qualifier, the command has the same function as the
RBD command. It invokes the RBD interactive mode, returns the RBD>
prompt, and terminates all other processor functions. The operator may
then run the complete set or selected parts of the system I/O module
diagnostics from the RBD monitor. RBD tests may be run from the local
console terminal or the remote console terminal.
The QUIT command must be used to exit the RBD tests.
CAUTION
The TEST command is used only by qualified maintenance
personnel.
A
TF70 Tape Drive Operation
The TF70 cannister tape drive or the TK70 fixed tape drive serves as a
system software load device. The cannister tape drive consists of a TK70
streaming tape drive shock-mounted inside a removable cannister with a
DSSI controller module and an interface module. The fixed tape drive (in
model 110 systems) is fixed behind the I/O bulkhead.
The TF70 drive accepts a TK tape cartridge that contains the magnetic
tape on a single-feed reel. When a tape cartridge is inserted, the drive
hooks the end of the tape and threads it onto a takeup reel inside the
drive. The tape must be completely rewound and unloaded before the
cartridge can be removed from the drive. Rewinding and unloading may
take up to 90 seconds. This appendix includes:
•
Controls and indicators
•
TK tape cartridge
•
Loading a tape cartridge
•
Unloading a tape cartridge
•
Handling and storing tape cartridges
•
Inspecting the tape leader
•
Inspecting the drive takeup leader
•
If there is a problem
A–1
A–2 TF70 Tape Drive Operation
A.1 Controls and Indicators
Figure A–1 shows a front view of the TF70 cannister tape drive.
Figure A–2 shows a front view of a TK70 fixed tape drive.
Figure A–1 TF70 Cannister Tape Drive
TAPE IN USE
(YELLOW)
WRITE
PROTECTED
(ORANGE)
OPERATE
HANDLE
(GREEN)
Pr
ote
cte
d
UNLOAD
BUTTON
TAPE
CARTRIDGE
RELEASE
HANDLE
SU
SERVER
SETUP
SWITCH
POWER
SWITCH
MAGNETIC
FAULT
INDICATOR
MR-0186-90.DG
TF70 Tape Drive Operation
Figure A–2 TK70 Fixed Tape Drive
A–3
A–4 TF70 Tape Drive Operation
Table A–1 summarizes the TK70 tape drive controls. Table A–2 describes
the TK70 tape drive indicators.
The TF70 drive can read data from a tape written by a TK70 or TK50
drive, but it cannot overwrite a tape originally written by a TK50. (Also,
a TK50 drive cannot read a tape written by a TK70 or TF70.)
Before executing a tape command, the TF70 drive determines whether the
cartridge was written by a TK50 drive. If so, the TF70 drive sets its own
write protection so the tape cannot be written.
Table A–1 TK70 Tape Drive Controls
Control
Position
Function
Handle
Open
Lets you insert or remove a tape after
rewind and unload operations are
completed.
Closed
Locks tape in operating position and
begins load sequence.
Momentary
contact switch
Rewinds and unloads the tape.
Unload button
TF70 Tape Drive Operation
A–5
Table A–2 TK70 Tape Drive Indicators
Orange
Yellow
Green
Condition
Off
Off
Off
No power to the tape drive.
Off
Off
On steadily
Safe to move cartridge release
handle. Power is present.
Off
Off
Blinking
Load fault. The cartridge leader
may be defective. Pull out the
handle and remove the cartridge.
Do not use the cartridge.
On/Off
On steadily
Off
Tape is loaded but not in motion.
On/Off
Blinking
Off
Tape is in motion.
On
On steadily/
blinking
On
Cartridge is write-protected.
Blinking
Blinking
Blinking
A fault is occurring. Press the
Unload button to unload the tape
cartridge. If the fault is cleared,
the yellow light blinks while the
tape rewinds. When the green
light comes on, you can move the
handle to remove the cartridge.
If the fault is not cleared, all
three lights continue to blink. Do
not attempt to remove the tape
cartridge. Call Digital Customer
Services.
A–6 TF70 Tape Drive Operation
A.2 TK Tape Cartridge
Figure A–3 shows the CompacTape II tape cartridge recommended for use
in TF70 drives.
Figure A–3 CompacTape II Tape Cartridge
LABEL
ORANGE INDICATOR
LABEL SLOT
WRITE PROTECT
SWITCH
MR-0178-90.DG
Only CompacTape II high-density cartridges should be used. They provide
about 296 MB of formatted data storage.
The cartridge write protect switch slides to the left or right. When the
orange indicator is visible, the tape is write protected. When the indicator
is not visible, the tape is write enabled.
TF70 Tape Drive Operation
A–7
A.3 Loading a Tape Cartridge
Figure A–4 shows how to insert a TK tape cartridge in the TF70 drive.
Figure A–4 Inserting a Tape Cartridge
WRITE PROTECT
SWITCH
LABEL SLOT
MR-0179-90.DG
Insert a TK tape cartridge into the TF70 drive as follows:
1. Make sure the cartridge write protect switch is in the desired position
(write protected or write enabled).
2. If the green indicator is on, pull the cartridge release handle out and
to the left (open).
3. Insert the cartridge with the label facing out and the write protect
switch towards the top of the drive as shown in Figure A–4.
4. Push the cartridge in until it is completely seated in the drive.
5. Return the cartridge release handle to the closed position.
A–8 TF70 Tape Drive Operation
The yellow indicator blinks while the tape is loading. When it stays on
steadily, the drive is ready for use.
A.4 Unloading a Tape Cartridge
Unload a TK tape cartridge from the TF70 drive as follows:
1. Push the unload button shown in Figure A–1.
2. When the beeper sounds and the green indicator turns on, the tape is
fully rewound and unloaded.
3. Pull the cartridge release handle out and to the left to eject the
cartridge.
4. Remove and store the cartridge. Return the cartridge release handle
to the closed position.
A.5 Handling and Storing Tape Cartridges
Observe the following precautions when handling and storing tape
cartridges:
•
Do not drop or bang the cartridge. If the tape leader is displaced, the
cartridge is unusable and may cause damage to the drive.
•
Keep cartridges out of direct sunlight and away from heaters and
other sources of heat.
•
Store cartridges in a dust-free environment where the temperature is
between 10°C and 38°C (50°F and 100°F) and the relative humidity is
between 20% and 80%.
•
If a tape cartridge has been exposed to extreme heat or cold, allow it
to stabilize at room temperature for the same amount of time it was
exposed (up to 24 hours).
•
Do not place cartridges near sources of electromagnetic interference
(terminals, motors, video or X-ray equipment). Data on the tape may
be erased.
•
Place a label on a cartridge only in the label slot shown in Figure A–3.
TF70 Tape Drive Operation
A–9
A.6 Inspecting the Tape Leader
If you have trouble loading a cartridge, inspect both the tape leader and
the drive takeup leader.
Figure A–5 shows the correct position of the tape leader inside the
cartridge. To release the door lock, lift the catch with your thumb.
Open the access door to expose the leader. Make sure the leader is in
the correct position as shown.
CAUTION
Do not touch exposed portions of the magnetic tape. If the tape
leader is not in the correct position, do not attempt to use it. Use
a new cartridge instead.
Figure A–5 Inspecting the Tape Leader
DOOR LOCK
(RELEASE BY LIFTING
CATACHE WITH THUMB)
MR-0180-90.DG
A–10 TF70 Tape Drive Operation
A.7 Inspecting the Drive Takeup Leader
If you have trouble loading a cartridge, inspect the tape leader and the
drive takeup leader.
Compare the leader in your drive with the ones shown in Figures A–6
and A–7. If the leader is unhooked, displaced, or damaged, call a qualified
service person. Do not attempt to fix the leader yourself.
Pr
ote
cte
d
Figure A–6 Inspecting the Drive Takeup Leader
BUCKLING
LINK
TAKEUP
LEADER
NOTCH
TAKEUP
LEADER
MR-0181-90.DG
TF70 Tape Drive Operation
Figure A–7 Drive Takeup Leader Components
CORRECT LOCATION OF LEADER
TAKEUP
LEADER
BUCKLING
LINK
ACCEPTABLE
LEADER UNHOOKED
TAKEUP
LEADER
NOTCH
NOT ACCEPTABLE
LEADER DISPLACED ABOVE LINK
MR-0182-90.DG
A–11
A–12 TF70 Tape Drive Operation
A.8 If There is a Problem
If you experience a problem with your drive, the following checks may
help you define the problem.
Correctable Failure During Operation
If the TF70 fails during operation, you may be able to reset the fault, then
rewind, unload, and remove the tape cartridge.
If all three drive indicators are blinking, press the unload button. If the
error is correctable, the tape begins to rewind and the yellow indicator
blinks. When the tape is unloaded, the green indicator turns on and the
beeper sounds. Then pull the cartridge release handle open and remove
the cartridge.
Noncorrectable Failure During Tape Motion
If the tape does not rewind when you push the unload button and all
three indicators continue to blink, the error is not correctable. The drive
must be replaced or serviced.
Failure During Cartridge Insertion
A cartridge fault occurs if a tape cartridge is damaged or if internal
portions of the drive that handle the cartridge are not working. Suspect
a cartridge fault if the green indicator blinks, but the tape does not
move (the yellow indicator does not blink). Remove the cartridge and try
another or inspect the tape leader and drive takeup leader.
B
TF857 Subsystem Operation
This appendix explains TF857 subsystem operation:
•
Power-on process
•
Mode Select key modes
•
Operator control panel (OCP) indicator functions
•
Slot Select, Load/Unload, and Eject button functions
•
Magazine cartridge insertion and removal
B.1 Power-On Process
When the TF857 subsystem powers on, all of the indicators on the
operator control panel (OCP) light, within 15 seconds. The power-on
self-test, or POST, is initializing the subsystem. When POST completes
successfully, all OCP indicators, including the Magazine Fault and Loader
Fault indicators, turn off — except for Power On.
NOTE
If the Magazine Fault or Loader Fault indicator remains on, POST
has detected an error. See the TF857 Magazine Tape Subsystem
Owner’s Manual for information on error conditions.
B–1
B–2 TF857 Subsystem Operation
The elevator scans the magazine to determine which slots contain
cartridges. If the subsystem has a magazine with a cartridge in
slot 0, and no cartridge is in the drive, these indicators should be on:
Power On
Eject
Load/Unload
Slot Select
Slot 0
B.2 Mode Select Key
The Mode Select key (Figure B–1) can lock the loader transfer assembly
into the enclosure, as well as lock the receiver closed. It has four modes:
OCP Disabled, Automatic, Manual, and Service. The OCP Disabled,
Automatic, and Manual modes are for operational use; the Service mode
is for head cleaning and servicing procedures.
B.2.1 Operating Modes
The following modes are for operational use:
•
OCP Disabled mode — When the magazine is inserted into the
receiver and the receiver is closed, the loader transfer assembly scans
the magazine. The first cartridge in the magazine automatically loads
into the drive.
Operations stop if you are copying data to tape and the storage
capacity of the last tape cartridge is exceeded or no tape cartridge is
in the next sequential slot in the magazine.
To lock the TF857 subsystem into the enclosure and lock the
receiver, set the Mode Select key to OCP Disabled mode. The OCP
pushbuttons are disabled.
•
Automatic mode — This mode is the default, or normal, mode of
the TF857 subsystem. It automatically loads and unloads cartridges
as necessary during backup procedures. Operations stop if you are
copying data to tape and the storage capacity of the last tape cartridge
is exceeded or no tape cartridge is in the next sequential slot in the
magazine.
To lock the TF857 subsystem into its normal operating position in the
enclosure, but leave the receiver unlocked, set the Mode Select key to
Automatic mode. The receiver can be opened; all OCP pushbuttons
are enabled.
TF857 Subsystem Operation B–3
Figure B–1 TF857 Operator Control Panel
OPERATOR CONTROL PANEL
Eject
Load/Unload
M OD E S E LE C T K E Y
BUTTON
AND
INDICATOR
AREA
Slot Select
OCP
DISABLED
0
AUTOMATIC
MODE
Power On
OCP LABEL
CURRENT
SLOT
INDICATORS
0-6
Write
Protected
Tape In Use
1
MANUAL
MODE
Use
Cleaning Tape
SERVICE
MODE
Magazine
Fault
Loader Fault
2
Eject
3
DSSI NODE
ID LABEL
Load/Unload
Slot Select
0
Power On
Write
Protected
Write Protect
Load Fault
1
Tape In Use
Use
Cleaning Tape
4
Magazine
Fault
Loader Fault
2
3
5
4
5
6
6
40% REDUCTION
SHR_X1025B_89
B–4 TF857 Subsystem Operation
•
Manual mode — Automatic loading and unloading of cartridges does
not occur in this mode; rather, press the Load/Unload button to move
each cartridge. This mode is most useful for, but not restricted to,
copying specific files to or from tape.
To lock the TF857 subsystem into the enclosure, set the Mode Select
key to Manual mode. The receiver is unlocked and can be opened; all
OCP pushbuttons are on.
NOTE
During Manual mode, the cartridge returns to the magazine, but
the current Slot Select indicator does not advance forward to the
next available cartridge.
B.2.2 Service Mode
Service mode is for performing head cleaning by manually loading the
CleaningTape III and for performing servicing procedures. See the TF857
Magazine Tape Subsystem Owner’s Manual for information on head
cleaning.
To unlock the TF857 subsystem from its enclosure and remove it from its
normal operating position, set the Mode Select key to Service mode. The
receiver is unlocked and can be opened.
TF857 Subsystem Operation B–5
B.3 Operator Control Panel
The TF857 operator control panel (OCP) has 3 OCP pushbuttons and 16
indicators used with the Mode Select key (Table B–1). See Section B.2 for
information on the Mode Select key and its functions. See Section B.4 for
more details on button and indicator operations.
Table B–1 TF857 Operator Control Panel
Button/Indicator
Color
Function
Eject button
–
Opens the receiver, allowing access to
the magazine for removal and insertion
of cartridges. Also can be used to unload
the tape from the drive to the magazine.
Eject indicator
Green
Indicates that pressing the Eject button
opens the receiver. If a cartridge is in
the drive, the cartridge unloads to the
magazine and the receiver opens. If no
cartridge is in the drive, the receiver
opens.
Load/Unload button
–
Loads the currently selected cartridge
into the TK857 tape drive, or unloads the
cartridge in the drive to the magazine.
If the Loader Fault or Magazine Fault
indicators are on, can also be used to
reset the subsystem.
Load/Unload indicator
Green
Indicates you can press the Load/Unload
button.
Slot Select button
–
When pressed, increments the current
slot indicator to the next slot.
Slot Select indicator
Green
Indicates the Slot Select button can be
used. Pressing the button increments
the current slot indicator to the next
slot.
Power On indicator
Green
When on, indicates the TF857 subsystem
is in a known good power state (ac and
dc voltages are within tolerance). When
off, indicates the power is missing from
loader.
B–6 TF857 Subsystem Operation
Table B–1 (Continued) TF857 Operator Control Panel
Button/Indicator
Color
Function
Write Protected indicator
Orange
When on, indicates the cartridge
currently in the drive is write-protected.
When off, indicates the current cartridge
is write-enabled.
NOTE
You can write-protect cartridges by:
Tape In Use indicator
Yellow
•
Setting the write-protect switch
to write-protect.
•
Using software write-protect
qualifiers. (See your operating
system documentation.)
•
Using a CompacTape or
CompacTape II cartridge
previously written by another
drive.
Indicates tape drive activity as follows:
•
Slow blinking indicates tape is
rewinding; rapid blinking indicates
tape is reading or writing.
•
When on steadily, indicates a
cartridge is in the drive and the
tape is not moving.
•
When off, indicates no cartridge is in
the drive.
Magazine Fault indicator
Red
Indicates a magazine failure.
Use Cleaning Tape
indicator
Orange
Indicates the read/write head needs
cleaning.
Loader Fault indicator
Red
Indicates a TF857 loader transfer
assembly error or drive error.
TF857 Subsystem Operation B–7
Table B–1 (Continued) TF857 Operator Control Panel
Button/Indicator
Color
Function
Current slot indicators
0–6
Green
Identifies the current slot (see Slot Select
button). Each current slot indicator
blinks when its corresponding cartridge
moves to or from the drive. Also used
with the Magazine Fault or Loader Fault
indicator to indicate the type of fault.
B.4 Slot Select, Load/Unload, and Eject Button
Functions
The Slot Select, Load/Unload and Eject buttons are OCP pushbuttons.
They contain a green indicator and are operable only when their
corresponding indicators are on.
NOTE
The Load/Unload button has three functions: load, unload, and
reset. If there is a loader fault and the Loader Fault indicator is
on, press the Load/Unload button to reset the TF857 subsystem.
B.4.1 Selecting a Cartridge
Use the Slot Select button to select a cartridge; press this button
to advance the slot indicator light to the next available slot. After a
successful initialization, the TF857 subsystem automatically selects slot
0 and the Slot Select button becomes active. The Load/Unload and Eject
indicators remain on during the slot selection.
B.4.2 Loading the Cartridge
Press the Load/Unload button to load the cartridge into the drive.
This action causes the Select Slot, Load/Unload, and Eject indicators to
turn off, and the elevator to move to the selected slot, indicated by the
light. The cartridge is then removed from the magazine and placed in
the elevator. The elevator moves to the drive position and inserts the
cartridge into the drive. The indicators remain off until the tape has
loaded to the beginning of the tape (BOT). After the cartridge is loaded
into the drive, the Eject and Load/Unload indicators turn on, and the
corresponding buttons are enabled. The Slot Select indicator remains off.
B–8 TF857 Subsystem Operation
B.4.3 Unloading the Cartridge
CAUTION
Do not press the Load/Unload button until backup or other tape
operations are stopped at the terminal. Doing so can result in
operation failure and drive unavailability.
When you press the Load/Unload button, the Select Slot, Load/Unload,
and Eject indicators turn off, and the cartridge unloads from the drive
into the magazine. However, automatic operation now stops and the
Select Slot operation does not increment. The indicators turn on once the
cartridge is returned to the magazine.
The Load/Unload indicator must be on before you press the button to
load or unload a cartridge. If the Loader Fault indicator is on, showing a
malfunction, press the Load/Unload button to reset the subsystem and try
to clear the error.
B.4.4 Opening the Receiver
The Eject button opens the receiver for insertion or removal of the
magazine. It is disabled when the Mode Select key is in the OCP Disabled
position. The Eject button can also be used to unload a tape from the
drive.
NOTE
When a cartridge is not in the drive, the Slot Select, Load/Unload,
and Eject indicators are on before any operation begins. Pressing
the Eject button causes all indicators to turn off. The elevator
then returns to its home position and the receiver opens.
When a cartridge is in the drive, the Eject and Load/Unload
indicators are on before the operation begins. When you press the
Eject button, both indicators turn off and the cartridge unloads
from the drive and moves back into the magazine. The receiver
then opens to allow access to the magazine.
In both situations, once the receiver is closed again, a magazine
scan begins, and the indicators turn back on when the scan is
complete.
TF857 Subsystem Operation B–9
B.5 Magazine
The front of the magazine has numbers, 0 through 6, that indicate the
number of the slot.
NOTE
Insert and remove all cartridges at the front of the magazine.
B.5.1 Inserting a Cartridge into the Front of the Magazine
To simplify cartridge insertion, place the magazine on its back and facing
you. Each slot is numbered — to ensure you are inserting the cartridge
correctly in the front of the magazine. Usually, cartridges are inserted
into consecutive slots.
To insert a cartridge into the magazine:
1. Grasp the cartridge with the CompacTape III label facing up and the
write-protect switch facing you (Figure B–2).
2. Set the cartridge’s write-protect switch to the desired position. If
you want to write on the tape, slide the switch to the right (orange
indicator is not visible). If you want to write-protect the tape, slide
the switch to the left (orange indicator is visible).
Figure B–2 Write-Protect Switch on a Cartridge
ORANGE
INDICATOR
TM
Co
a
mp
cT
ap
II
eI
WRITEPROTECT
SWITCH
WRITEENABLED
WRITEPROTECTED
SHR_X1020C_89
B–10 TF857 Subsystem Operation
3. Insert the cartridge (Figure B–3) by pushing it into the slot until you
hear a click. A small metal tab holds the cartridge in place.
Figure B–3 Inserting a Cartridge into the Magazine
BACK OF
MAGAZINE
TM
Co
mp
ac
Ta
pe
II I
0
1
2
3
4
5
5
6
1
2
3
0
0
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
6
6
NOTE: Push tape in
until a click is heard
SLOT
NUMBERS
0-6
FRONT OF
MAGAZINE
SHR_X1021_89
TF857 Subsystem Operation B–11
B.5.2 Removing a Cartridge from the Magazine
To remove a cartridge from the magazine, press the cartridge (Figure B–4)
at the front of the magazine until you hear a click; then, release. The slot
uses a spring-release action. When you press the cartridge in all the way,
it pops out.
NOTE
Never apply labels to the top or bottom of tape cartridges. Doing
so can cause cartridge jams in the TF857 subsystem. Use the
space on the front of the cartridge for labels. If a jam occurs, call
your Digital Customer Services representative.
B.5.3 Removing the Magazine from the Receiver
To remove the magazine from the receiver, be sure the:
1. Power On indicator is on (Figure B–1).
2. Tape drive is unloaded.
3. Eject indicator is on. (It must be on before you can press the Eject
button.)
Then:
1. Press the Eject button (Figure B–1) to open the receiver.
2. Grasp the receiver after it opens (Figure B–5) and gently pull it
forward to access the magazine.
3. Grasp the magazine’s handle only to lift the magazine out of the
receiver.
B.5.4 Installing the Magazine into the Receiver
To install the magazine into the receiver:
1. Slide the magazine down into the receiver (Figure B–5) while holding
the magazine by the handle. Since the magazine is slotted, restore it
in the correct orientation only.
2. Push the receiver closed.
3. Observe that the receiver is fully closed in the TF857 subsystem
before proceeding.
B–12 TF857 Subsystem Operation
Figure B–4 Removing a Cartridge from the Front of the Magazine
BACK OF
MAGAZINE
0
1
2
NOTE: Push tape in
until a click is heard
3
4
5
6
1
TM
Co
mp
ac
Ta
pe
II
2
3
TM
0
Co
mp
ac
Ta
pe
II
0
1
2
1
3
2
4
4
3
5
5
4
6
5
6
SLOT
NUMBERS
0-6
FRONT OF
MAGAZINE
SHR_X1022_89
TF857 Subsystem Operation B–13
Figure B–5 Receiver Opened
FRONT
BEZEL
Ejec
Loa
Slot
Pow
Wri
t
d/U
nloa
Sele
er O
n
te P
ro
Tap
tect
e In
Use
Use
Cle
anin
Driv
Loa
d
ct
g Ta
p
e Fa
u
d Fa
u
e
lt
lt
SHR-X0046-90
C
System Drive Removal and Replacement
Cannister drives used as boot or backup devices may be removed or
replaced during normal operation. The tape drive is also a removable
unit.
CAUTION
Carrier drives must not be removed, except by qualified
maintenance personnel.
Always wear a grounded wrist strap when you remove or replace
a tape or disk drive.
Shadowed drives must first be removed from the configuration before you
remove them from the system. They must be added to the configuration
when you return them to the system. When nonshadowed drives are
removed, shut down the application (or part of the application) using the
drive. The VAXft System Services Manager’s Guide provides information
on reconfiguring the system. This appendix includes:
•
Removing and replacing a cannister drive
•
Removing and replacing a carrier drive
•
Using the server setup switch
C.1 Removing/Replacing a Cannister Drive
Figure C–1 shows the location of the latch that secures the cannister
drives in the model 310 and 410 systems.
Figure C–2 shows the location of the latch that secures the cannister
drives in the model 610 and 612 systems.
C–1
C–2 System Drive Removal and Replacement
C.1.1 Removing a Cannister Drive
Do not power off the cabinet to remove a system drive. To remove a
cannister drive from the system backplane:
1. Write protect a disk drive by pressing the summary panel Write
Protect switch in. The Write Protect indicator should be on.
Then take the disk drive off-line by pressing the summary panel On
Line switch in.
The summary panel switches have no effect on the cannister tape
drives. Tape may be write protected by setting the write protect
switch on the TK cartridge.
2. Set the drive power switch to off (0). Wait 15 to 20 seconds (for disk
drive to stop spinning and interlock solenoid to release).
3. Attach the grounded wrist strap to your wrist.
CAUTION
Use great care when removing, replacing, or transporting a
drive. Do not drop the drive or allow it to come into contact
with any object while you carry it.
Always wear a grounded wrist strap when you remove or
replace a tape or disk drive.
4. See Figure C–1. Push the drive latch down and pull the drive straight
out of the slot.
5. If you are not replacing the drive with another, a blank cannister
module (PN 70-27929-01) must be inserted in the slot to maintain
cooling airflow.
System Drive Removal and Replacement C–3
Figure C–1 Model 310/410 Cannister Drive Controls and Latch
10%
CANNISTER DRIVE
POWER
SWITCH
MAGNETIC
FAULT
INDICATOR
SU
SERVER
SETUP
SWITCH
DRIVE
LATCH
MR-0183-90.DG
C–4 System Drive Removal and Replacement
Figure C–2 Model 610/612 Cannister Drive Controls and Latch
ZONE A
CANNISTER DRIVE
J5
1 234 56 7
J6
ZONE B
MAGNETIC
FAULT
INDICATOR
SERVER
SETUP
SWITCH
POWER
SWITCH
SU
J5
1 234 56 7
DRIVE LATCH
J6
MR−0471−91RAGS
System Drive Removal and Replacement C–5
C.1.2 Replacing a Cannister Drive
When you remove a cannister disk or tape drive and then return it to the
same slot, the drive keeps the same DSSI node address.
When you install a new drive, or replace a drive after replacing its DSSI
interface module, use the server setup switch. Section C.3 covers use of
the server setup (SU) switch.
To replace a cannister drive in the system backplane:
1. Attach the grounded wrist strap to your wrist.
CAUTION
Use great care when removing, replacing or transporting a
drive. Do not drop the drive or allow it to come into contact
with any object while you carry it.
Always wear a grounded wrist strap when you remove or
replace a tape or disk drive.
2. Insert the drive in the slot. Push the drive straight in and seat it
firmly.
3. Secure the drive with the drive latch as shown in Figure C–1.
4. Set the drive power switch to on (1). Wait 15 to 20 seconds (for disk
drive to come up to speed and Ready indicator to turn on).
5. Write protect the drive, if necessary. Then bring the drive on-line by
releasing the On Line switch (button out).
The summary panel switches have no effect on the cannister tape
drives. Tape is write protected by setting the write protect switch on
the TK cartridge.
C–6 System Drive Removal and Replacement
C.2 Removing and Replacing a Carrier Drive
Figure C–3 shows the location of the captive screw that secures the
carrier drives in the expander cabinets.
CAUTION
Carrier drives must not be removed, except by qualified
maintenance personnel.
Always wear a grounded wrist strap when you remove or replace
a tape or disk drive.
Figure C–3 Carrier Drive Controls and Captive Thumb Screw
MAGNETIC
FAULT
INDICATOR
SERVER
SETUP
SWITCH
SU
CAPTIVE
THUMB
SCREW
POWER
SWITCH
MR-0184-90.DG
System Drive Removal and Replacement C–7
C.2.1 Removing a Carrier Drive
You do not need to power off the cabinet to remove a system drive. To
remove a carrier drive:
1. Write protect the drive by pressing the summary panel Write Protect
switch in. The Write Protect indicator should be on.
Then take the drive off-line by pressing the summary panel On Line
switch in.
2. Set the drive power switch to off (0). Wait 15 to 20 seconds (for disk
drive to stop spinning and interlock solenoid to release).
3. Attach the grounded wrist strap to your wrist.
CAUTION
Use great care when removing, replacing, or transporting a
drive. Do not drop the drive or allow it to come into contact
with any object while you carry it.
Always wear a grounded wrist strap when you remove or
replace a tape or disk drive.
4. See Figure C–3. Release the captive thumb screw. Then pull the drive
straight out of the slot.
5. If you are not replacing the drive with another, a blank carrier module
(PN 70-27928-01) must be inserted in the slot to maintain cooling
airflow.
C–8 System Drive Removal and Replacement
C.2.2 Replacing a Carrier Drive
When you remove a carrier drive and then return it to the same slot, the
drive keeps the same DSSI node address.
When you install a new drive, or replace a drive after replacing its DSSI
interface module, use the server setup switch. Section C.3 covers use of
the server setup (SU) switch.
To replace a carrier drive in the expander cabinet backplane:
1. Attach the grounded wrist strap to your wrist.
CAUTION
Use great care when removing, replacing, or transporting a
drive. Do not drop the drive or allow it to come into contact
with any object while you carry it.
Always wear a grounded wrist strap when you remove or
replace a tape or disk drive.
2. Insert the drive in the slot. Push the drive straight in and seat it
firmly.
3. Secure the drive with the captive thumb screw as shown in
Figure C–3.
4. Set the drive power switch to on (1). Wait 15 to 20 seconds (for disk
drive to come up to speed and Ready indicator to turn on).
5. Write protect the drive, if necessary. Then bring the drive on-line by
releasing the On Line switch (button out).
System Drive Removal and Replacement C–9
C.3 Using the Server Setup Switch
The server setup (SU) switch is provided for use on a running system and
has no effect when the system is halted.
CAUTION
The server setup switch must only be used during maintenance
procedures.
Using the server setup switch when you power on a drive inhibits the
drive from joining the DSSI cluster. This allows the console operator to
set host from DCL and write DSSI parameters to the drive under the
diagnostic/utility protocol (DUP) facility without halting the system.
DSSI parameters must be set whenever you install a tape or disk drive
with unknown parameters. Placing a drive in service without first
writing the parameters could cause irretrievable loss of data. Write
DSSI parameters if the drive you are installing or replacing is:
•
A new drive with factory-set parameters
•
An existing drive with a new DSSI controller/interface module
The diagnostics chapter of the VAXft Systems Maintenance Guide (EKVXFT1-MG) provides information on setting host from DCL. The RBD
command description in Chapter 6 of this manual provides information
and guidelines for writing DSSI parameters to the storage devices under
the DUP facility.
To set drive parameters on a running system, power on the drive as
follows:
1. Press and hold the server setup switch
2. Set the power switch to on (1)
3. Release the server setup switch
It takes 15 to 20 seconds for a disk drive to come up to speed and the
Ready light to turn on (light). Then set the drive switches as follows:
1. Place a disk drive on-line by releasing the summary panel On-Line
button to the out position
2. Write-enable a disk drive by releasing the summary panel Write
Protect button to the out position
3. The summary panel switches and indicators have no effect on a tape
drive
C–10 System Drive Removal and Replacement
When you have set host and written the DSSI parameters, place the drive
in service as follows:
1. Set the drive power switch to off (0).
2. Wait a few seconds for the drive power to bleed off. Wait 15 to 20
seconds for a disk drive to stop spinning.
3. Set the drive power switch to on (1). Wait 15 to 20 seconds for a disk
drive to come up to speed and the Ready indicator to turn on (light).
4. Set the Write Protect switch to the desired state and add the drive
into the system configuration.
D
Module Handling, Removal, and
Installation/Replacement Procedures
This appendix describes how to remove or install a logic module in a
system cabinet.
NOTE
The following procedures are intended for use during system
installation. Before using any of these procedures on a
system that is running, first contact the responsible customer
representative, system manager, or application manager to shut
down the zone and power off the system cabinet.
This appendix includes:
•
Module handling and ESD procedures
•
Removing a module
•
Installing/replacing a module
D–1
D–2 Module Handling, Removal, and Installation/Replacement Procedures
Observe the module handling and ESD procedures (Section D.1) whenever
you need to remove, install, or replace a logic module in a system cabinet.
CAUTION
An ESD wrist strap, ground clip, and grounded ESD workmat
must be used as described in Section D.1 whenever you handle
the logic modules.
If you must use any of these procedures on a running system, first contact
the responsible customer representative, system manager, or application
manager to shut down the zone and power off the system cabinet. The
VAXft System Services Manager’s Guide (AA-NL35A-TE) describes how to
shut down the zone and power off the system cabinet from the console.
D.1 Module Handling and ESD Procedures
Three grounding cords are stored in the lower front door of the system
cabinet. One cord is connected to a wrist strap. The other cord is
connected to a grounding clip for attaching to an antistatic ESD box.
When the wrist strap is in place, there must be no more than 10 M
through the grounding cord, wrist strap, and your wrist.
T3000-series modules are very fragile and static sensitive. Use the
grounding cords and observe the following precautions when handling
logic modules.
•
Always put on a grounded wrist strap before handling a logic module.
•
Be sure nothing touches the module or the components on the module
because leads can be damaged. Avoid contact with the wrist strap,
grounding cord, clothing, jewelry, cables, or other modules.
•
Minimize any potential for physical or ESD damage as follows:
— Remove all unnecessary materials in the service area (tools,
documents, paper, plastics, polystyrene).
— Avoid clothing that contains more than 80% nonconductive
materials (silk or synthetic fiber).
— Do not wear a jacket. Wear a short-sleeve shirt or roll up the
sleeves on a long-sleeve shirt.
— Do not wear jewelry.
— Loose clothing, such as a necktie, must be fastened in place.
Module Handling, Removal, and Installation/Replacement Procedures D–3
•
Before removing a module from an ESD box, place the box on a clean
surface. Do not allow the box to fall.
NOTE
Never place an ESD box on the floor.
•
Keep the module in the antistatic ESD box until you are ready to
install it.
•
Before removing a module from an ESD box, attach the grounding clip
to the ESD box.
•
If you are replacing a module, put the module you just removed on a
grounded ESD workmat on a clean surface in the service area. Put
the module side 2 down on the ESD workmat.
•
Save the ESD box for future use. Store a module in the ESD box until
you are ready to install it.
•
When removing or installing a module, be sure the module does not
come into contact with a cable or another module. Also, be sure
nothing else touches the module or any module components.
•
Hold a module only by the handle or by the edges with your hands
flat and perpendicular to the circuit board. Do not touch the etch
circuit or any components, leads, or connector pins. Do not bend the
module.
•
Do not slide the module across any surface because the leads are
fragile and can be damaged.
•
An ESD sensitive module may come into contact with the following
items only:
— Approved ESD workmat
— Antistatic packaging on the ESD workmat
— Tools and test equipment on the ESD workmat
— Chassis being serviced
— Hands of someone wearing an ESD wrist strap
D–4 Module Handling, Removal, and Installation/Replacement Procedures
D.2 Removing a Module
To remove a module (or a T3999 blank module) from a system backplane:
CAUTION
An ESD wrist strap, ground clip, and grounded ESD workmat
must be used as described in Section D.1 whenever you handle
the logic modules.
1. Locate the module to be removed. Attach the grounded wrist strap to
your wrist.
2. If the module has cables attached, remove the cables.
3. Release the fasteners at the top and bottom of the module handle.
Push in each fastener and turn it one quarter turn to the left.
4. Use both hands to remove the module. Pull the module levers to
disengage the backplane connector. You may hear a ‘‘snap’’ when the
connector disengages.
5. Grasp the module handle. Slide the module out of the card cage slot.
6. Put the module in an ESD box or on a grounded ESD workmat.
Module Handling, Removal, and Installation/Replacement Procedures D–5
D.3 Installing/Replacing a Module
To install/replace a module in the system backplane:
CAUTION
An ESD wrist strap, ground clip, and grounded ESD workmat
must be used as described in Section D.1 whenever you handle
the logic modules.
1. Before removing the module from the ESD box, attach a grounding
clip to the ESD box.
2. Holding the module only by the handle, remove it from the ESD box.
Hold the module vertically with the backplane connector on the right.
3. Guide the edges of the module into the upper and lower tracks of the
card cage slot. Gently push the module and slide it into position.
4. Use both hands to seat the module. Press the module levers at the top
and bottom with equal force. You may hear a ‘‘snap’’ when the module
is fully seated.
5. Secure the fasteners at the top and bottom of the module handle.
Push in each fastener and turn it one quarter turn to the right.
6. Attach any cables that must be connected.
7. Make sure the cables are connected correctly and verify installation
procedures.
8. Contact the responsible customer representative, system manager, or
application manager before you power on the system cabinet.
9. When you are ready, power on the system cabinet by turning the ac
circuit breaker to the ON (up) position.
Index
A
Airflow pattern, 2–21 to 2–24
Architecture, 1–34
Automatic mode, B–2
B
BACKUP command
Automatic mode, B–2
BOOT command syntax, 4–12 to
4–15
Boot devices, 4–11
Bootstrap procedures, 4–10, 4–11
C
Cabinet access, 3–1
Cabinet airflow pattern, 2–21 to
2–24
Cable connectors, 2–18
Cannister disk drive, 2–10 to 2–11
Cannister tape drive, 2–4 to 2–5
Carrier disk drive, 2–12
Cartridge
inserting into magazine, B–9
loading, B–7
unloading, B–8
write-protect switch, B–9
CIO mode console commands, 5–1
BOOT, 4–10 to 4–15, 5–4
CONTINUE, 5–7
DEPOSIT, 5–8
EXAMINE, 5–8
HALT, 5–11
INITIALIZE, 5–11
MIO, 5–12
NEW CPU, 5–12
PIO, 5–13
CIO mode console commands (cont’d)
REPEAT, 5–13
SET BOOT, 5–15
SET PORT, 5–16
SET TERMINAL PROGRAM,
5–18
SET ZONE, 5–19
SHOW, 5–20
START, 5–21
TEST, 5–22
Z, 5–24
CIO mode, entering, 5–2
Console
command language syntax, 4–8,
4–9
control characters, 4–6, 4–7
description, 4–2 to 4–3
functions, 3–1 to 3–13
I/O operating modes, 4–4
operations, 4–1 to 4–15
Controls and indicators, 3–1 to 3–13
D
Documentation road map, iii
Drive removal and insertion, C–1 to
C–8
E
Eject button, B–7
cartridge in drive, B–8
no cartridge in drive, B–8
unload function, B–5
ESD procedures, 3–4
Expander cabinet summary panel,
3–11 to 3–13
Index 1
2 Index
F
Fault-tolerant operation, 1–2 to 1–3
G
Grounding procedures (ESD), 3–4
L
Load/Unload button, B–7
reset function, B–5
Logic module connectors, 2–18
Logic module removal and
replacement, D–1 to D–5
Logic modules and adapters, 1–15 to
1–16
M
Magazine, B–9
removing from receiver, B–11
restoration into receiver, B–11
Manual mode, B–2, B–4
MIO mode console commands, 6–1
CIO, 6–4
DIALOUT, 6–5
DISABLE REMOTE, 6–6
ENABLE REMOTE, 6–7
HANGUP, 6–8
PIO, 6–9
RBD, 6–10
SET, 6–18
SET LANGUAGE, 6–19
SET LOCAL, 6–20
SET MODEM_TYPE, 6–22
SET NOTIFICATION, 6–23
SET PORT, 6–26
SET REMOTE, 6–28
SET RESTART_ACTION, 6–31
SET TERMINAL PROGRAM,
6–32
SHOW, 6–33
MIO mode console commands
(cont’d)
TEST, 6–34
MIO mode, entering, 6–2
Mode Select key, 2–6
Automatic mode, B–2
description, B–2
Manual mode, B–2
mode definitions, 2–6, B–2
OCP Disabled mode, B–2
Service mode, B–4
Model 110 system, 1–5 to 1–11
logic modules, 1–9
media storage, 1–9
Model 310 and 410 base system,
1–11 to 1–16
Model 310 and 410 expander
cabinet, 1–17 to 1–19
Model 310 and 410 system, 1–11 to
1–19
Model 310 and 410 system with
expansion, 1–17 to 1–19
Model 610 and 612 system, 1–20 to
1–31
Model 610 base system, 1–20 to
1–22
Model 610 system with one expander
cabinet, 1–22 to 1–24
Model 610 system with two expander
cabinets, 1–25
Model 612 base system, 1–28
Model 612 system with expansion,
1–31
Module handling and ESD
procedures, D–2
Module placement, 1–15 to 1–16
Module removal and replacement,
D–1 to D–5
O
OCP Disabled mode, B–2
Operating modes, B–2
Operating procedures, B–1
Index 3
P
POST, B–1
Power modules, 2–13 to 2–18
Power-on, B–1
Power-on self-test
status of OCP indicators, B–1
R
Receiver, B–11
Remote console disable, 6–6, 6–28
Remote console enable, 6–7, 6–28
Reset
Load/Unload button, B–5
RF-series cannister disk drive, 2–10
to 2–11
RF-series carrier disk drive, 2–12
RF-series fixed disk drive, 2–8 to
2–9
S
Service mode
unlocking the TF857 subystem,
B–4
Slot Select button, B–7
operation, B–7
Summary panels, 3–1 to 3–13
System
architecture, 1–34
controls, 3–1 to 3–13
description, 1–1 to 1–19
System cabinet, 1–4
System cabinet summary panel, 3–9
to 3–11
System components, 2–1 to 2–21
System drive removal and insertion,
C–1 to C–8
T
TF70 cannister tape drive, 2–4 to
2–5, A–1 to A–12
TF857 tape subsystem, 2–6
TK tape cartridge, A–1 to A–12
TK70 fixed tape drive, 2–2, A–1 to
A–12
TK70 tape drive indicators, A–5
V
VAXft system description, 1–1 to
1–19
VMB program, 4–11
W
Write-protect switch, B–9
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