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Back to Basics SCL5 User manual
SLC 500™ BASIC and
BASIC-T Modules
(Catalog Numbers 1746-BAS and
1746-BAS-T)
User Manual
Important User
Information
Because of the variety of uses for the products described in this publication, those
responsible for the application and use of this control equipment must satisfy
themselves that all necessary steps have been taken to assure that each application
and use meets all performance and safety requirements, including any applicable
laws, regulations, codes and standards.
The illustrations, charts, sample programs and layout examples shown in this
guide are intended solely for purposes of example. Since there are many variables
and requirements associated with any particular installation, Rockwell
International Corporation does not assume responsibility or liability (to include
intellectual property liability) for actual use based upon the examples shown in
this publication.
Rockwell Automation publication SGI-1.1, Safety Guidelines for the Application,
Installation and Maintenance of Solid-State Control (available from your local
Rockwell Automation office), describes some important differences between
solid-state equipment and electromechanical devices that should be taken into
consideration when applying products such as those described in this publication.
Reproduction of the contents of this copyrighted publication, in whole or part,
without written permission of Rockwell Automation, is prohibited.
Throughout this manual we use notes to make you aware of safety considerations:
ATTENTION
Identifies information about practices or circumstances that
can lead to personal injury or death, property damage or
economic loss
Attention statements help you to:
• identify a hazard
• avoid a hazard
• recognize the consequences
IMPORTANT Identifies information that is critical for successful
application and understanding of the product.
PLC-5 is a registered trademark; and MicroLogix, SLC 500, RSLogix, and RSLinx are trademarks of Rockwell Automation.
Modbus is a trademark of Schneider Automation Incorporated.
DeviceNet is a trademark of Open DeviceNet Vendor Association (ODVA).
Summary of Changes
The information below summarizes the changes to this manual since the last
printing.
To help you find new information and updated information in this release of the
manual, we have included change bars as shown to the right of this paragraph.
New Information
i
References to the 1746-BAS-T module were added throughout the manual.
Specific information regarding 1746-BAS-T optional memory modules and
module installation is shown in the table below.
For this new information
See page(s)
1746-BAS-T Overview
1-1
Optional Memory Modules
2-2
Jumper Settings for Optional Memory Modules
3-3 and 3-4
1746-BAS-T Module ID Code
4-3
Publication 1746-UM004A-US-P
Summary of Changes
ii
Publication 1746-UM004A-US-P
Table of Contents
Preface
Who Should Use This Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Purpose of this Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
How to Use this Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Terms and Abbreviations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Conventions Used in this Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rockwell Automation Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Local Product Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Technical Product Assistance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Your Questions or Comments on this Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
P-1
P-1
P-2
P-3
P-3
P-4
P-4
P-4
P-4
Chapter 1
Module and Development
Software Overview
Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
BASIC and BASIC-T Modules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hardware Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Software Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Module Communication Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Module LEDs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
BASIC Development Software (1747-PBASE) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Typical Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Module Integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Module Programming Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Module Network Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1-1
1-1
1-2
1-3
1-3
1-4
1-5
1-6
1-6
1-7
1-9
Chapter 2
Component Selection
Memory Requirements for BASIC Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Optional Memory Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Components Required for DH485 Communication. . . . . . . . . . . . .
Alternate Connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1747-AIC Isolated Link Coupler. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1747-PIC Interface/Converter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1784-KR DH485 Interface Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DH485 Cable Requirements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Components Required for DF1 Communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2-1
2-2
2-3
2-4
2-5
2-5
2-6
2-6
2-6
Chapter 3
Installing and Wiring Your
Module
i
Setting Module Jumpers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Jumper JW1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Jumper JW2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Jumper JW3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Setting Jumper JW4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Installing Your module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wiring Your Communication Ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
3-1
3-2
3-2
3-3
3-4
3-6
3-7
Publication 1746-UM004A-US-P
Table of Contents
ii
Wiring to Ports PRT1 and PRT2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7
Hardware Handshaking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8
DTE and DCE Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-9
DTE - Data Terminal Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-9
DCE - Data Communication Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-10
Wiring to Port DH485 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-12
Chapter 4
Programming Overview
Understanding Module Memory Organization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1
Allocating SLC memory for the Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2
Module ID Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
BASIC Programming Instructions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3
BASIC Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4
BASIC Statements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-5
BASIC Operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6
Creating and Editing a BASIC Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-7
Entering a BASIC Program Using an ASCII Terminal . . . . . . . . 4-7
Running a BASIC Program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-9
Stopping a BASIC Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-9
Editing a BASIC Program Line Through an ASCII Terminal . . 4-10
Deleting a BASIC Program Line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-11
Renumbering a BASIC Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-12
Transferring Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-13
Transferring Data Between the SLC Processor and Port PRT2 . 4-13
Transferring Data Between the SLC Processor and Port PRT1 . 4-15
Transferring Data Between the SLC Processor and Port DH485 4-16
Transferring Data Between the SLC Processor and the Module 4-17
Status Information for the SLC Processor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-17
SLC Fault Codes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-19
Appendix A
Specifications
Module Hardware Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1
1747-PBASE BASIC Development Software Specifications . . . . . . . A-2
Related Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-3
Appendix B
Module Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Port PRT1 Configuration (Jumper JW1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Port PRT2 Configuration (Jumper JW2) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Optional Memory Module Selection (Jumper JW3) . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Program Port and Protocol Selection (Jumper JW4) . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Publication 1746-UM004A-US-P
B-1
B-1
B-2
B-3
B-4
Table of Contents
iii
Appendix C
Lithium Battery Replacement,
Handling, and Disposal
Battery Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Battery Handling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Storage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Battery Disposal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
C-1
C-3
C-3
C-3
C-4
Publication 1746-UM004A-US-P
Table of Contents
iv
Publication 1746-UM004A-US-P
Preface
Read this preface to familiarize yourself with the rest of the manual. This preface
covers the following topics:
• who should use this manual
• the purpose of this manual
• how to use this manual
• terms and abbreviations
• conventions used in this manual
• Rockwell Automation support
Who Should Use This
Manual
Use this manual if you are responsible for designing, installing, programming, or
troubleshooting control systems that use Allen-Bradley small logic controllers.
You should have a basic understanding of SLC 500™ products. You should
understand programmable controllers and be able to interpret the ladder logic
instructions required to control your application. If you do not, contact your local
Rockwell Automation representative for information on available training courses
before using this product.
Purpose of this Manual
This manual is a reference guide for the design and installation of the SLC 500
BASIC and BASIC-T modules. It describes the procedures for installing and using
the modules.
Chapter
P-1
Title
Contents
Preface
Describes the purpose, background, and scope of this
manual. Also lists related publications.
1
Module and
Development
Software Overview
Explains the hardware and software features.
2
Component Selection
Explains and illustrates how to select memory modules,
network configurations, and modems for your
application.
3
Installing and Wiring
your Module
Provides installation procedures and wiring guidelines.
4
Programming
Overview
Provides information needed to program your module.
Appendix A
Specifications
Presents the modules’ specifications.
Appendix B
Worksheets
Describes how to set the module for proper functioning.
Appendix C
Lithium Battery
Replacement,
Handling, and
Disposal
Provides important information for the replacement,
handling, and disposal of lithium batteries.
Publication 1746-UM004A-US-P
P-2
Related Documentation
The following documents contain additional information regarding Rockwell
Automation products. To obtain a copy, contact your local Rockwell Automation
office or distributor.
For
Read this document
Publication Number
A BASIC Language reference
BASIC Language Reference
manual that describes BASIC
Manual
commands, CALLS, and functions
1746-RM001A-US-P
A programming manual with
BASIC Development
detailed instructions on installing Software Programming
and using BASIC Development
Manual
Software to program the BASIC
and BASIC-T modules.
1746-PM001A-US-P
An overview of the SLC 500
family of products
SLC 500 System Overview
1747-SO001A-US-P
A description of how to install
and use a Modular SLC 500
Processor
Modular Hardware Style
Installation and Operation
Manual
1747-6.2
A reference manual that contains SLC 500™ and MicroLogix™ 1747-6.15
1000 Instruction Set
status file data and instruction
Reference Manual
set information for SLC 500
processors
A description of how to install
and use a module that acts as a
bridge between DH485 networks
and devices requiring DF1
protocol.
DH485/RS-232C Interface
Module User’s Manual
1747-6.12
In-depth information on
grounding and wiring
Allen-Bradley programmable
controllers
Allen-Bradley
Programmable Controller
Grounding and Wiring
Guidelines
1770-4.1
A glossary of industrial
automation terms and
abbreviations
Allen-Bradley Industrial
Automation Glossary
AG-7.1
An article on wire sizes and types National Electric Code
for grounding electrical
equipment
How to Use this Manual
Publication 1746-UM004A-US-P
Published by the National
Fire Protection Association
of Boston, MA
To use this manual effectively, use the worksheets provided in appendix B. The
worksheets can help you document your application and settings and also facilitate
the flow of information to other individuals in your organization for
implementation.
P-3
Terms and Abbreviations
The following terms and abbreviations are specific to this product. For a complete
listing of Allen-Bradley terminology, refer to the Allen-Bradley Industrial
Automation Glossary, publication number ICCG-7.1.
• Module  SLC 500 BASIC and BASIC-T Modules (catalog numbers
1746-BAS and 1746-BAS-T)
• BASIC development software  BASIC Development Software (catalog
number 1747-PBASE)
• DH485  network communication protocol
• EPROM  Erasable Programmable Read Only Memory
• MTOP  system control value that holds the last valid memory address
• RS-232/423  serial communication interface
• RS-422  differential communication interface
• RS-485  network communication interface
• SLC 500  SLC 500 fixed and modular controller
Conventions Used in this
Manual
The following conventions are used throughout this manual:
• Bulleted lists such as this one provide information, not procedural steps.
• Numbered lists provide sequential steps or hierarchical information.
• Italic type is used for emphasis.
• Text in this font indicates words or phrases you should type.
• Key names match the names shown and appear in bold, capital letters within
brackets (for example, [ENTER]).
Publication 1746-UM004A-US-P
P-4
Rockwell Automation
Support
Rockwell Automation offers support services worldwide, with over 75 Sales/
Support Offices, 512 authorized Distributors and 260 authorized Systems
Integrators located throughout the United States alone, plus Rockwell Automation
representatives in every major country in the world.
Local Product Support
Contact your local Rockwell Automation representative for:
• sales and order support
• product technical training
• warranty support
• support service agreements
Technical Product Assistance
If you need to contact Rockwell Automation for technical assistance, please review
the information in the appropriate chapter first. Then call your local Rockwell
Automation representative.
Your Questions or Comments on this Manual
If you find a problem with this manual or if you have any suggestions for how this
manual could be made more useful to you, please contact us at the address below:
Rockwell Automation
Control and Information Group
Technical Communication, Dept. A602V
P.O. Box 2086
Milwaukee, WI 53201-2086
Publication 1746-UM004A-US-P
Chapter
1
Module and Development Software Overview
This chapter introduces you to the SLC 500™ BASIC and BASIC-T modules and
the BASIC Development Software. After reading this chapter you should be
familiar with the:
• module components and features
• BASIC Development Software features
• typical configurations of the module
• module hardware specifications
• module-related products
Overview
The module and the development software provide the following benefits:
• easy data collection from user devices
• integrated program debugging environment
• operator interface capabilities
• flexible program and data storage options
• high-level math
• clock/calendar
• high-level programming environment
• extensive online help system
• easy access to editor functions through user interface
• advanced text editor windows
NOTE
BASIC and BASIC-T
Modules
The 1746-BAS-T is a higher-speed version of the 1746-BAS
module with identical hardware features. The modules can be
interchanged, except that the 1746-BAS-T uses different
(optional) memory modules. Due to the high speed of the
1746-BAS-T, existing programs written for the 1746-BAS may
require adjustment for identical operation using the faster
1746-BAS-T module.
The modules are single-slot modules that reside in a SLC 500 fixed or modular
controller chassis. Use the module as:
• a foreign device interface
• an operator interface
1
Publication 1746-UM004A-US-P
1-2
Module and Development Software Overview
Figure 1.1 Module with Door Open
BASIC
BASIC-T
5
4
3
2
1
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
PR T1
5
4
3
2
1
9
8
7
6
PR T1
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
9
8
7
6
PR T2
PR T2
DH485
DH485
Hardware Features
The module provides the following hardware features:
• 24K bytes of battery backed RAM for storage of user programs and data
• capacitive backup of RAM during battery change
• socket for a standard 1747-M1, M2, M3, or M4 memory module (1746-BAS)
for non-volatile storage of user programs
• socket for a 1771-DBMEM1 or -DBMEM2 memory module (1746-BAS-T)
for non-volatile storage of user programs
• battery-backed, 24-hour clock/calendar
• free-running clock with 5 ms resolution
• two isolated 9-pin D-shell serial ports (PRT1 and PRT2) that provide RS-232/
423, RS-422, and RS-485 communication with I/O devices
• Port PRT2 provides DF1 full-duplex or half-duplex slave protocol for SCADA
applications
• one RJ-45 port (DH485) that provides communication over the DH485
network
• multiple LEDs for operator interface
• SLC 500 backplane interface
Publication 1746-UM004A-US-P
Module and Development Software Overview
1-3
Software Features
The module provides the following software features:
• BASIC programming with the Intel BASIC-52 Language and enhancements
• SLC 500 backplane data read and write support including image table
transfers and M0 and M1 file transfers
• execution of programs from memory modules
• string manipulation support
• DH485 network support
• DF1 protocol support
• full set of trigonometric function instructions
• floating point calculations and conversion
• extensive call libraries
Module Communication Ports
There are three communication ports on the front of the module. The location,
name, and pin numbers of these ports are listed on the inside of the module door.
They are:
• PRT1 – Used to interface the module with user devices. This port is a serial
port that accommodates RS-232/423, RS-422, and RS-485 communication
modes. Port PRT1 is capable of operating full-duplex at 300, 600, 1200, 2400,
4800, 9600, and 19200 baud. The default settings are 1200 baud,
RS-232/423 communications.
• PRT2 – Used to interface the module with user devices or a modem using
DF1 protocol. This port is a serial port that accommodates RS-232/423,
RS-422, and RS-485 communication modes. Port PRT2 is capable of
operating full-duplex at 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, and 19200 baud.
• DH485 – Used to interface the module with the DH485 network. This port
is not isolated and cannot directly drive the DH485 network. You must use a
1747-AIC link coupler to link port DH485 with the DH485 network.
IMPORTANT
When DF1 protocol is selected on port PRT2, DH485
communications are disabled.
Publication 1746-UM004A-US-P
1-4
Module and Development Software Overview
Module LEDs
There are eight LEDs on the front of the module. These LEDs are used for module
diagnostics and operator interface. The LEDs and their indications are shown on
page 1-4.
Figure 1.2 Module LEDs
BASIC
ACT
485
FAULT
BA LOW
PR T1
LED1
PR T2
LED2
Table 1.1 Module LEDs
LED
ACT
Status
ON
Indication
The module is receiving power from the backplane and is
executing BASIC code.
Blinking
The module is in Command mode.
OFF
The module is not receiving power from the backplane. A fault
condition exists.
Port DH485 on the module is active for communication.
485
Green
ON
OFF
Port DH485 on the module is not active for communication.
PRT1
Green
Blinking
Port PRT1 on the module is transmitting or receiving signals.
OFF
Port PRT1 on the module is not transmitting or receiving
signals.
Blinking
Port PRT2 on the module is transmitting or receiving signals.
OFF
Port PRT2 on the module is not transmitting or receiving
signals.
ON
A system problem was detected during background
diagnostics. Contact your local Allen-Bradley representative.
OFF
No system problems are detected during background
diagnostics.
ON
The voltage of the battery that backs up RAM is low. A new
battery is needed.
OFF
The voltage of the battery that backs up RAM is at an
acceptable level.
ON
User definable. LED activated through the user program.
OFF
User definable. LED de-activated through the user program.
ON
User definable. LED activated through the user program.
OFF
User definable. LED de-activated through the user program.
PRT2
FAULT
BA LOW
Publication 1746-UM004A-US-P
Color
Green
Green
Red
Red
LED1
Amber
LED2
Amber
Module and Development Software Overview
BASIC Development
Software (1747-PBASE)
1-5
The BASIC Development Software provides the user with a structured and
efficient means to create BASIC programs for the module. This software is loaded
into a an MS-DOS compatible personal computer. It uses the personal computer
to facilitate editing, compiling (translating), uploading, and downloading of
BASIC programs.
The BASIC Development Software has a menu-driven, window-type environment
that offers:
• pull-down menus to access all editor functions
• function key access to frequently used functions
• multiple window editing
• cut and paste support between windows
• search and replace support
• search between files support
• built-in calculator that can paste results into your program
• ASCII look-up table
• line draw editor to create operator interface images without having to enter
ASCII characters
• keystroke macros
• undo and redo functions
• extensive help messages for each menu, menu option, and for keywords
embedded in the menu text
• capability to create user-defined macro libraries
• sophisticated debug tools including watch windows, single-step operation, and
go to cursor breakpoint operation
• syntax checked translations to native BASIC to reduce debug time
• BASIC translator that steps through the BASIC program and identifies errors
• ASCII terminal mode
• hex file transfer support
The development software enables you to program the module from a personal
computer connected to either the module’s DH485 or PRT1 ports. The software
allows direct access to the module through terminal emulation over an RS-232/423
or DH485 network.
Refer to the BASIC Development Software Programming Manual (publication
number 1746-PM001A-US-P) for additional information on the software.
Publication 1746-UM004A-US-P
1-6
Module and Development Software Overview
Typical Configurations
The typical configuration of the SLC system that incorporates your BASIC or
BASIC-T module depends on whether the module is:
• integrated with a SLC 500 fixed or modular controller
• programmed directly with an ASCII terminal or programmed using a personal
computer with the BASIC Development Software 1747-PBASE
• communicating with a DH485 network or with an external source through a
modem using DF1 protocol
Module Integration
The module is a single-slot module that is inserted into a slot in the expansion
chassis of your SLC 500 fixed controller or an open slot in the 1746 I/O chassis of
your SLC 500 modular controller. The module may be inserted in any slot of the
1746 I/O chassis except the first slot of the first chassis, which is reserved for the
SLC modular processor. Typical SLC fixed and modular configurations are shown
in the following figures.
Figure 1.3 Typical Configurations
SLC 500 Fixed Controller
Power Supply
Publication 1746-UM004A-US-P
Slot
Filler
BASIC
or
BASIC-T
SLC 500 Input BASIC Output
Modular Module
or
Module
Processor
BASIC-T
Module and Development Software Overview
1-7
Module Programming Interface
Your module can be programmed using an ASCII terminal with ASCII terminal
emulation software. You can also use a personal computer with the BASIC
Development Software (catalog number 1747-PBASE). Use an ASCII terminal to
enter a BASIC program one line at a time to the module. Use a personal computer
with the BASIC Development Software to create a BASIC program that is then
downloaded to your module. Typical programming interface configurations
include:
• ASCII terminal interface – Figure 1.4
• BASIC Development Software interface (RS-232) – Figure 1.5
• BASIC Development Software interface (DH485) – Figure 1.6
ASCII Terminal Interface
Use an ASCII terminal to enter a BASIC program one line at a time to your
module through port PRT1. The ASCII terminal connected to the module must
be an industrial terminal, workstation, or personal computer (without the BASIC
Development Software) that communicates in alphanumeric mode. An ASCII
terminal can also be used to display charts or graphs generated by the BASIC
program. Figure 1.4 shows a typical ASCII terminal interface.
Figure 1.4 Module ASCII Terminal Interface
Null Modem
Cable
ASCII Terminal or Personal
Computer Running ASCII
Terminal Emulation Software
SLC 500 Controller with BASIC or BASIC-T
In this configuration, the RS232 port on the back of your industrial terminal or
personal computer is connected to port PRT1 on your module. Port PRT1 must be
configured as the program port. See chapter 3 for additional information on port
configuration.
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1-8
Module and Development Software Overview
BASIC Development Software Interface (RS232)
Use a personal computer with the BASIC Development Software (PBASE) to
create a BASIC program that is then downloaded to your module. PBASE provides
an efficient means to edit, compile (translate), upload, and download BASIC
programs. Refer to the BASIC Development Software Programming Manual
(publication number 1746-PM001A-US-P) for additional information on this
software.
Figure 1.5 BASIC Development Software Interface (RS-232)
Null Modem
Cable
Personal Computer with BASIC
Development Software
SLC 500 Controller with BASIC or BASIC-T
In this configuration, the serial port on the personal computer is connected to port
PRT1 on the module. The personal computer communicates with the module
through terminal emulation over an RS-232 interface. Port PRT1 must be
configured as the program port. See chapter 3 for additional information on port
configuration.
IMPORTANT
Publication 1746-UM004A-US-P
When using the BASIC Development Software to interface with
the RS-232 port of the module, PBASE must be configured for
RS-232 communication through the configuration and terminal
selection menus. Refer to the BASIC Development Software
Programming Manual (publication number
1746-PM001A-US-P) for additional information.
Module and Development Software Overview
1-9
BASIC Development Software Interface (DH485)
In this configuration, the serial port on the personal computer interfaced with port
DH485 on the module through a 1747-PIC Interface/Converter. Port DH485
must be configured as the program port with DH485 protocol. See chapter 3 for
additional information on port configuration.
Figure 1.6 BASIC Development software Interface (DH485)
Interface/Converter
RS-232 to RS-485
Catalog Number 1747-PIC
SLC 500 Controller
with BASIC or
BASIC-T
ASCII Terminal or Personal
Computer Running ASCII
Terminal Emulation Software
The 1747-PIC Interface/Converter converts the RS-232 signals from the personal
computer RS-232 serial port to RS-485 format.
IMPORTANT
When using the BASIC Development Software to interface with
port DH485 of the module, PBASE must be configured for
DH485 communication through the configuration and terminal
selection menus. Refer to the BASIC Development Software
Programming Manual (publication number
1746-PM001A-US-P) for additional information.
Module Network Configurations
Your module may communicate with a DH485 network or it can communicate
with a remote device through a modem using the DF1 protocol. When DF1
protocol is used on PRT2, port DH485 is disabled. Typical communication
configurations are shown in the following figures:
• DH485 network configurations – Figure 1.7, Figure 1.8, and Figure 1.10
• DF1 protocol configuration – Figure 1.10
ATTENTION Do not place the module on an active DH485 network until the
node address and baud rate of the module are configured. Refer
to the BASIC Language Reference Manual (publication number
1746-RM001A-US-P) for additional information on setting the
module node address and baud rate.
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Module and Development Software Overview
Figure 1.7 shows the module interfaced with a DH485 network through a
1747-AIC Isolated Link Coupler. The link coupler also provides an interface to the
DH485 network for a personal computer with the BASIC Development Software.
Figure 1.7 DH485 Network Configuration
SLC 500
Controller
1747-C11 Cable
DH485
Communication
Cable
(Belden #9842)
SLC 500 Controller
with BASIC or
BASIC-T
1747-C11 Cable
Personal Computer with BASIC
Development Software
1747-C10 Cable
Interface/Converter
RS-232 to RS-485
Catalog Number 1747-PIC
The 1747-PIC Interface/Converter converts the RS-232 signals from the personal
computer RS-232 serial port to RS-485 format. The 1747-AIC link coupler links
the converted signals with the DH485 network and port DH485 on the module.
Port DH485 must be configured as the program port in order to communicate
with PBASE software via the DH485 network. See chapter 3 for additional
information on port configuration.
IMPORTANT
• Each module requires a link coupler port to interface it with
the DH485 network.
• When using the BASIC Development Software to interface
with the module, the BASIC Development Software must be
configured for DH485 communication through the
configuration and terminal selection menus. Refer to the
BASIC Development Software Programming Manual
(publication number 1746-PM001A-US-P) for additional
information.
Publication 1746-UM004A-US-P
Module and Development Software Overview
1-11
Figure 1.8 also shows the module interfaced with a DH485 network through a
1747-AIC link coupler. The link coupler also provides an interface to the DH485
network for a personal computer with the BASIC Development Software. In this
configuration, a 1784-KR DH485 Interface Card must be installed in the personal
computer.
IMPORTANT
Type PBASE/KR to select the driver software. This allows you to
interface directly to the DH485 network when using a 1784-KR
DH485 Interface Card in your personal computer.
Figure 1.8 DH485 Network Configuration Using a 1747-C10 Cable
Link Coupler
1747-AIC
SLC 500
Controller
1747-C11 Cable
DH485 Communication
Cable
(Belden #9842)
Link Coupler
1747-AIC
SLC 500
Controller with
BASIC or
BASIC-T
1784-KR DH485
Interface Card
1747-C11 Cable
Link Coupler
1747-AIC
Personal Computer with BASIC
Development Software
1747-C10 Cable
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Module and Development Software Overview
Figure 1.9 DH485 Network Configuration Using a 1747-C13 Cable
Link Coupler
1747-AIC
SLC 500
Controller
1747-C11 Cable
DH485 Communication
Cable
(Belden #9842)
Link Coupler
1747-AIC
SLC 500
Controller with
BASIC or
BASIC-T
1784-KR DH485
Interface Card
1747-C11 Cable
1747-C13 Cable
Personal Computer with BASIC
Development Software
IMPORTANT
When the 1747-C13 cable is used, you can connect the center
port on any link coupler on the network directly to the module.
This may reduce the number of link couplers that you need.
(Compare the amount of equipment shown in figures 1.8 and
1.9.)
The 1747-C13 cable acts only as a communication link and does not carry 24V dc
power. The 1747-C10 or 1747-C11 cable carries 24V dc power from the processor
to the link coupler as shown above. (The 1747-C10 cable and 1747-C11 cable are
interchangeable.)
You can also supply power to the link coupler by connecting the 1747-C10 or
1747-C11 cable from the link coupler to the module and not to the processor.
The 1784-KR DH485 Interface Card enables the personal computer to
communicate with the DH485 network. The DH485 data link connector on the
1784-KR card and port DH485 on your module are interfaced with the DH485
network through a 1747-AIC link coupler.
Port DH485 must be configured as the program port in this configuration. See
chapter 3 for additional information on port configuration.
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Module and Development Software Overview
1-13
Figure 1.10 shows the module using DF1 to control communications with a
modem. In this configuration, the module is interfaced with a DH485 network
through a peer-to-peer communication interface with full-duplex, DF1 protocol.
Figure 1.10 Full-Duplex, DF1 Protocol Configuration
SLC 500
Controller with
BASIC or
BASIC-T
Modem
Modem
DH485 Communication
Cable
(Belden #9842)
SLC 500
Controller
with 1747-KE
Module(1)
Link Coupler
1747-AIC
1747-C13 Cable
1747-C11 Cable
Link Coupler
1747-AIC
Personal Computer with BASIC
Development Software
Interface/Converter
RS-232 to RS-485
Catalog Number
1747-PIC
SLC 500
Controller
1747-C11 Cable
(1) The 1747-KE module can be replaced by the 1770-KF3 DH485 Communication Interface Module. The KF3 is a stand-alone version of the KE module.
The modems in this configuration may be dial-up. If the modems are dial-up, the
BASIC program may initiate dial-up and then switch port PRT2 to DF1 protocol
when connection is made to the 1747-KE or 1770-KF3 DH485 Communication
Interface Module. Port PRT2 on your module must be configured as having DF1
protocol. See chapter 3 for additional information on port configuration.
The 1747-C13 Cable acts only as a communication link and does not carry 24V dc
power. The 1747-C10 or 1747-C11 Cable carries 24V dc power from the
processor to the link coupler. (The 1747-C10 Cable and 1747-C11 Cable are
interchangeable.)
IMPORTANT
By configuring JW4 for DF1 communication on PRT2, DH485
communications are disabled.
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Module and Development Software Overview
Publication 1746-UM004A-US-P
Chapter
2
Component Selection
After reading this chapter, you should understand the:
• module memory requirements for BASIC programming and be able to select
the memory modules necessary for your application
• concepts of connecting your module to the DH485 network and be able to
select the components necessary for your application
• concepts of connecting a modem to the module and be able to select the
necessary components for your application
Memory Requirements
for BASIC Programming
The module uses the following types of memory modules during BASIC
programming:
• a 32K byte battery backed RAM of which 24K byte is reserved to store BASIC
programs and protected variables
• an optional 8K or 32K byte memory module to store BASIC programs
IMPORTANT Maximum user program storage space is 56K byte. Battery
backed RAM provides 24K byte and the optional memory
module provides up to 32K byte.
1
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Component Selection
Optional Memory
Module
The optional memory module provides non-volatile storage of user BASIC
programs and port configuration. The socket that holds the optional memory
module is located on the module’s mother board as shown in Figure 2.1.
Figure 2.1 Optional Memory Module Socket Location
Memory Module Socket
Mother Board
Daughter Board
ATTENTION
Do not expose the module to surfaces or other areas that may
typically hold an electrostatic charge. Electrostatic charges can
alter or destroy memory.
You may use any of the following memory module options with your module:
• 1747-M1, 8K byte EEPROM (1746-BAS only)
• 1747-M2, 32K byte EEPROM (1746-BAS only)
• 1747-M3, 8K byte UVPROM (1746-BAS only)
• 1747-M4, 32K byte UVPROM (1746-BAS only)
• 1771-DBMEM1, 8K byte EEPROM (1746-BAS-T only)
• 1771-DBMEM2, 32K byte EEPROM (1746-BAS-T only)
Your module can program the 1747-M1, 1747-M2, 1771-DBMEM1, and
DBMEM2 EEPROM optional memory modules. The 1747-M3 and 1747-M4
UVPROM optional memory modules must be programmed by an external PROM
programmer. Jumper JW3 is used to redirect the module circuitry for the different
memory module options. Refer to chapter 3 of this manual for additional
information on jumper JW3.
IMPORTANT
Publication 1764-UM001A-US-P
The module can program and erase EEPROM memory modules.
However, it cannot program or erase UVPROM memory
modules. Refer to the SLC 500 Fixed and Modular Style
Programmable Controller’s Installation and Operation Manuals
(catalog numbers 1747-6.1 and 1747-6.2) for additional
information on programming and erasing UVPROMs.
Component Selection
2-3
The data format of the module EEPROM and UVPROM optional memory
modules is hexadecimal. The BASIC development software provides a hex file
transfer option that can be used to upload and download hex files to the module
EEPROM or UVPROM. The primary use of hex file transfers is to transfer the
data from an EEPROM in one module to an EEPROM in another module. Hex
file transfers can also be used to copy the data of an EEPROM to a UVPROM via
a PROM programmer. Refer to the BASIC Development Software Programming
Manual (publication number 1747-PM001A-US-P) for additional information on
hex file transfers.
Components Required
for DH485
Communication
Your module and the BASIC development software can interface with a DH485
network using a combination of the following:
• 1747-AIC Isolated Link Coupler
• 1747-PIC Interface/Converter
• 1784-KR DH485 Interface Card
• 1770-KF3 DH485 Communication Interface Module, or
• 1747-KE DH485/RS-232C Communication Interface Module
Figure 2.2 and Figure 2.3 show some of these components in typical DH485
network interfaces.
Figure 2.2 DH485 Network Interface
Link Coupler
1747-AIC
SLC 500
Controller
1747-C11 Cable
DH485
Communication Cable
(Belden™ 9842)
Link Coupler
1747-AIC
SLC 500
Controller with
BASIC or BASIC-T
Module
1747-C11 Cable
Link Coupler
1747-AIC
Personal Computer with BASIC
Development Software
Interface/Converter
(1747-PBASE)
RS-232 to RS-485 Catalog
Number 1747-PIC
1747-C10 Cable
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2-4
Component Selection
Figure 2.3 DH485 Network Interface
Link Coupler
1747-AIC
DH485
Communication Cable
(Belden™ 9842)
SLC 500
Controller
1747-C11 Cable
Link Coupler
1747-AIC
1784-KR DH485
Interface Card
SLC 500
Controller with
BASIC or BASIC-T
Module
1747-C11 Cable
Link Coupler
1747-AIC
Personal Computer with BASIC
Development Software
(1747-PBASE)
1747-C10 Cable
Alternate Connection
The 1747-C13 Cable is designed to connect the following SLC 500 products to
each other:
• 1747-AIC Isolated Link Coupler
• a 1746-BAS or 1746-BAS-T BASIC Module
• fixed controllers
• modular controllers
The following figure shows one application for the 1747-C13 Cable.
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Component Selection
2-5
Figure 2.4 1747-C13 Cable Connection
DH485 Communication
Cable (Belden™ 9842)
Link Coupler
1747-AIC
SLC 500
Controller with
BASIC or BASIC-T
Module
1747-C10 Cable
1747-C13 Cable
The 1747-C10 Cable supplies
power to the 1747-AIC.
The 1747-C13 cable acts only as a communication link and does not carry 24V dc
power. The 24V dc can come from either the processor or an outside power
source. The 1747-C10 or 1747-C11 cable carries 24V dc power from the
processor to the link coupler. (The 1747-C10 and 1747-C11 are interchangeable.)
A cable connected to the outside power source carries 24V dc from the outside
power source to the link coupler.
The module and SLC 500 CPU act as two separate nodes on the DH485 network.
Refer to the following sections for additional information on some of the
components shown in the previous figures.
1747-AIC Isolated Link Coupler
The 1747-AIC Isolated Link Coupler allows you to link modules to the DH485
network. Figure 2.2 and Figure 2.3 show a DH485 network with the module and
a personal computer linked to the network through a 1747-AIC link coupler.
1747-PIC Interface/Converter
Use the 1747-PIC Interface/Converter to convert the RS-232 signals from the
personal computer’s serial port to RS-485 signal format. Figure 2.2 shows the
interface/converter integrating a personal computer with the BASIC development
software to the module across a DH485 network.
IMPORTANT
When using the BASIC development software to interface with
the module through the 1747-PIC, the BASIC development
software must be configured for DH485 communication through
the configuration and terminal selection menus. Refer to the
BASIC Development Software Programming Manual (publication
number 1746-PM001A-US-P) for additional information.
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2-6
Component Selection
1784-KR DH485 Interface Card
The 1784-KR DH485 Interface Card enables your personal computer to
communicate across the DH485 network to the module without the interface/
converter. Figure 2.3 shows a DH485 network configuration with the 1784-KR
DH485 Interface Card and its host computer linked with the module through a
link coupler.
In this configuration, your personal computer must have the 1784-KR DH485
Interface Card installed in one of its expansion slots. The DH485 data link
connector on the 1784-KR card and port DH485 on your module are interfaced
with the DH485 network through a 1747-AIC link coupler. Port DH485 must be
configured as the program port in this configuration.
DH485 Cable
Requirements
Use the 1747-C10 cable, 1747-C11 cable, or 1747-C13 cable to interface port
DH485 of the module with a 1747-AIC link coupler. Use the DH485
communication cable, Belden #9842, to interface between the link couplers on the
DH485 network.
Refer to the SLC 500 Fixed and Modular Style Programmable Controller’s Installation
and Operation Manuals (publication numbers 1747-6.1 and 1747-6.2) for
additional information on DH485 cables.
Components Required
for DF1 Communication
Your module may use DF1 to communicate with external devices. The DF1
driver is accessed through port PRT2. The module communicates with the
external devices using one of the following:
• a leased phone line
• a radio link
• a dial-up modem
Refer to the following sections for additional information on these components.
Publication 1764-UM001A-US-P
Component Selection
2-7
Figure 2.5 DF1 Communication Interface
SLC 500 Controller
with BASIC or
BASIC-T Module
Modem
Modem
DH485 Communication
Cable (Belden™ 9842)
Link Coupler
1747-AIC
1747-C11 Cable
Link Coupler
1747-AIC
Personal Computer with BASIC
Development Software
Interface/Converter
(1747-PBASE)
RS-232 to RS-485 Catalog
Number 1747-PIC
SLC 500 Controller
with 1747-KE
Module (1)
1747-C13 Cable
SLC 500
Controller
1747-C11 Cable
(1) The 1747-KE module can be replaced by the 1770-KF3 DH485 Communication Interface Module, a stand-alone version of the KE module.
Leased Phone Line
A leased phone line is a private, dedicated phone line. Leased phone lines provide a
phone link between modems that is available for communication at all times.
Typically, leased phone lines are used when you have a high or constant transfer of
communication between the module and external devices.
Radio Link
A radio link provides a communication link when phone lines are inaccessible or
expensive to use. A radio link provides a communications link between radio
modems.
Dial-Up Modem
Dial-up or phone modems are modems capable of communicating across standard
phone lines. One dial-up modem initiates the communication, while another
modem receives the communication.
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Component Selection
Publication 1764-UM001A-US-P
Chapter
3
Installing and Wiring Your Module
After reading this chapter, you should be able to:
• set the module’s jumpers
• install your module into your SLC 500 fixed or modular controller system
• wire the mating connectors of the cables used to interface user devices to the
module ports
Setting Module Jumpers
The module has four sets of jumpers that you need to set. Jumpers JW1 and JW2
configure ports PRT1 and PRT2. Jumper JW3 configures the type of optional
memory module. Jumper JW4 configures the program port. Figure 3.1 shows the
location of these jumpers.
Figure 3.1 Jumper Locations
JW1
CAT
SER
FRN
SLC 500
BASIC MODULE
SERIAL NO.
JW1
9 87 6
54 3 2 1
PRT1
JW3
UL
9 87 6
54 3 2 1
PRT2
SA
JW4
DH485
JW2
JW2
ATTENTION
1
Do not expose the module to surfaces or other areas that may
typically hold an electrostatic charge. Electrostatic charges can
alter or destroy memory.
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3-2
Installing and Wiring Your Module
Setting Jumper JW1
Use jumper JW1 to select one of the following configurations for port PRT1:
• RS-232/423
• RS-422
• RS-485
Figure 3.2 JW1 Pin Assignments and Settings
Pin Assignments
RS-422
2 4 6 8 10
1 3 5 7 9
Daughter Board
Daughter Board
RS-232/-423 (shipped configuration)
RS-485
Daughter Board
Daughter Board
ATTENTION
All other jumper settings for JW1 are illegal and may cause
damage to the module.
Use the worksheet in appendix B to document the selected jumper setting of
jumper JW1. Documenting your selection provides others with information
necessary to integrate the module with their SLC 500 fixed or modular controllers.
Setting Jumper JW2
Use jumper JW2 to select one of the following configurations for port PRT2:
• RS-232/423
• RS-422
• RS-485
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Installing and Wiring Your Module
3-3
Figure 3.3 JW2 Pin Assignments and Settings
Pin Assignments
RS-422
Daughter Board
Daughter Board
9 7 5 3 1
10 8 6 4 2
RS-232/-423 (shipped configuration)
RS-485
Daughter Board
Daughter Board
ATTENTION
All other jumper settings for JW2 are illegal and may cause
damage to the module
Use the worksheet in appendix B to document the selected jumper setting of
jumper JW2. Documenting your selection provides others with information
necessary to integrate the module with their SLC 500 fixed or modular controllers.
Setting Jumper JW3
Use jumper JW3 to configure the memory module socket for one of the following
optional memory modules:
• 1747-M1, 8K bytes EEPROM (1746-BAS only)
• 1747-M2, 32K bytes EEPROM (1746-BAS only)
• 1747-M3, 8K bytes UVPROM (1746-BAS only)
• 1747-M4, 32K bytes UVPROM (1746-BAS only)
• 1771-DBMEM1, 8K bytes EEPROM (1746-BAS-T only)
• 1771-DBMEM2, 32K bytes EEPROM (1746-BAS-T only)
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3-4
Installing and Wiring Your Module
Figure 3.4 JW3 Pin Assignments and Settings
SER
SLC 500
BASIC MODULE
FRN
Pin Assignments
CAT
6
SERIAL NO.
2 4
1 3 5
JW1
9 87 6
54 3 2 1
PRT1
UL
9 87 6
54 3 2 1
PRT2
1747-M1 EEPROM (1746-BAS only)
1747-M2 EEPROM (1746-BAS only)
1747-M3 UVPROM (1746-BAS only)
1771-DBMEM1 EEPROM (1746-BAS-T only)
1771-DBMEM2 EEPROM (1746-BAS-T only)
(shipped configuration)
SA
DH485
JW2
1747-M4 UVPROM (1746-BAS only)
ATTENTION
All other jumper settings for JW3 are illegal and may cause
damage to the module.
Use the worksheet in appendix B to document the selected jumper setting of
jumper JW3. Documenting your selection provides others with information
necessary to integrate the module with their SLC 500 fixed or modular controllers.
Setting Jumper JW4
Use jumper JW4 to select one of the following configurations for the module ports:
• PRT1 Port – Program port with default communication settings
PRT2 Port – ASCII interface port
DH485 Port – Run time DH485 operation only
• PRT1 Port – ASCII interface port
PRT2 Port – ASCII interface port
DH485 Port – Program port with DH485 protocol
• PRT1 Port – Program port with programmed communication settings
PRT2 Port – ASCII interface port
DH485 Port – Run time DH485 operation only
• PRT1 Port – Program port with programmed communication settings
PRT2 Port – DF1 protocol
DH485 Port – Disabled
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Installing and Wiring Your Module
3-5
Figure 3.5 JW4 Pin Assignments and Settings
SER
SLC 500
BASIC MODULE
CAT
FRN
Pin Assignments
SERIAL NO.
2 4 6
1 3 5
JW1
9 87 6
UL
9 87 6
54 3 2 1
PRT2
SA
DH485
JW2
PRT1 Port = ASCII interface port
PRT2 Port = ASCII interface port
DH485 Port = Program port with DH485 protocol
(shipped configuration)
54 3 2 1
PRT1
PRT1 Port = Program port with default
communication settings
PRT2 Port = ASCII interface port
DH485 Port = Run-time DH485 only
PRT1 Port = Program port with programmed communication settings
PRT2 Port = ASCII interface port
DH485 Port = Run-time DH485 only
PRT1 Port = Program port with programmed communication settings
PRT2 Port = DF1 protocol
DH485 Port = Disabled
IMPORTANT
The first setting shown above is the default configuration. When
the jumper is set in this position, the module always powers up in
Command mode at 1200 baud, no parity, 8 data bits, and 1 stop
bit.
ATTENTION
IMPORTANT
All other jumper settings for JW4 are illegal and may cause
damage to the module.
• When DF1 protocol is selected for port PRT2, port DH485 is
not available for DH485 programming or run-time operation.
• DF1 communication must be enabled through the BASIC
program.
Use the worksheet in appendix B to document the selected jumper setting of
jumper JW4. Documenting your selection provides others with information
necessary to integrate the module with their SLC 500 fixed or modular controllers.
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Installing and Wiring Your Module
Installing Your module
Once you have unpacked and set the jumpers on your module, you are ready to
install it in your:
• SLC 500 fixed controller expansion chassis
• SLC 500 modular controller 1746 I/O chassis
Your module may be installed in any open slot of your SLC 500 I/O chassis except
the first slot of the first chassis, which is reserved for the processor module.
Figure 3.6 Installation in a SLC 500 I/O Chassis
SLC 500 Processor
ATTENTION
Publication 1764-UM001A-US-P
Never install, remove, or wire any module with power applied to
the chassis.
Installing and Wiring Your Module
Wiring Your
Communication Ports
3-7
The locations of the module’s communication ports, PRT1, PRT2, and DH485,
are shown in Figure 3.7.
Figure 3.7 Communication Ports
BASIC
BASIC-T
5
4
3
2
1
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
PR T1
5
4
3
2
1
Wiring to Ports PRT1
and PRT2
9
8
7
6
PR T1
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
9
8
7
6
PR T2
PR T2
DH485
DH485
Ports PRT1 and PRT2 can communicate to user devices through RS-232/423,
RS-422, and RS-485 communication modes. Set jumpers JW1 and JW2 to reflect
the communication mode you desire. The table below lists the pin assignments for
ports PRT1 and PRT2.
Refer to the MODE command in the BASIC Language Reference Manual,
publication number 1746-RM001A-US-P, for the default programming port
configuration information
.
IMPORTANT
When default communications are selected via JW4, the module
defaults to the Command mode on powerup. Refer to page 3-4 of
this manual for the default communication settings.
Use these pin assignments to wire the mating connector of the cable used to
interface a user device to port PRT1. The sockets of this connector must be wired
to correspond to the selected communication mode.
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Installing and Wiring Your Module
Table 3.1 Ports PRT1 and PRT2 Pin Assignments
Pin
RS-232/423
RS-422
RS-485
IBM AT Standard
RS-232 Signals
1
Note 1
422 TXD -
TRXD -
DCD or CD
2
RXD
422 RXD -
(3)
RXD
3
TXD
(2)
(2)
TXD
4
DTR
(2)
(2)
DTR
5
COMMON
COMMON
COMMON
COMMON
6
DSR
422 RXD +
(3)
DSR
7
RTS
(2)
(2)
RTS
8
CTS
(2)
(2)
CTS
9
(1)
422 TXD +
TRXD +
RI
(1) In RS-423 mode, these pins are still connected to their RS-422 loads. Do not use these pins in RS-423
mode.
(2) In RS-422 and RS-485 modes these pins are connected to their RS-423 drivers and receivers. Do not use
these pins in either RS-422 or RS-485 mode.
(3) In RS-485 mode, these pins are still connected to their RS-422 receivers. Do not use these pins in RS-485
mode.
Wiring diagrams for the RS-232/423 communication mode are shown starting on
page 3-10.
Hardware Handshaking
The module uses the following rules when hardware handshaking is enabled. The
module:
• does not transmit until CTS becomes active
• examines DSR following the receipt of a character. If the DSR is active, the
character is placed in the input queue. If DSR is inactive, the character is
assumed to be noise and is discarded.
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Installing and Wiring Your Module
3-9
DTE and DCE Overview
IMPORTANT
You need to know whether the device connecting to the module
has a DTE or DCE interface. Figure 3.8 through Figure 3.12 are
provided to help you make the appropriate connection.
DTE - Data Terminal Equipment
The module’s serial ports are configured as 9-pin Data Terminal Equipment
(DTE), as are most terminals or computer ports.
Table 3.2 DTE Configurations
DTE 9 Pinout
Pin #
Signal Description
Signal from
DTE
Perspective
DTE 25 Pinout
Pin #
1
NC-No Connection
(for BASIC module only)
Input
8
2
RXD-Received Data
Input
3
3
TXD-Transmitted Data
Output
2
4
DTR-Data Terminal Ready
Output
20
5
Com-Signal Common
Shared
7
6
DSR-Data Set Ready
Input
6
7
RTS-Request to Send
Output
4
8
CTS-Clear to Send
Input
5
9
NC-No Connection
(for BASIC module only)
Input
22
Signal Description
CD-Carrier Detect
RI-Ring Indicator
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Installing and Wiring Your Module
DCE - Data Communication Equipment
Devices such as modems are Data Communication Equipment (DCE). The
pinouts on these terminals are defined for ease of interfacing with DTE equipment.
Table 3.3 DCE Configurations
DCE 9 pinout
Pin #
Signal from DCE
Perspective
Signal Description
DCE 25
pinout
Pin #
1
CD-Carrier Detect
Output
8
2
RXD-Received Data
Output
3
3
TXD-Transmitted Data
Input
2
4
DTR-Data Terminal Ready
Input
20
5
Com-Signal Common
Shared
7
6
DSR-Data Set Ready
Output
6
7
RTS-Request to Send
Input
4
8
CTS-Clear to Send
Output
5
9
RI-Ring Indicator
Output
22
IMPORTANT
All signal directions are listed in the previous two tables are valid.
For example, TXD, Transmitted Data, is a DTE output but is
also a DCE input. The signal description is the same for both the
DTE and DCE but the direction of the signal (perspective) has
changed based on whether you have a DTE or DCE device.
Figure 3.8 RS-232/423 Wiring Diagram - Module to a Modem (Hardware Handshaking
Enabled)
Basic DTE
1
N.C.
CD
2
3
RXD
TXD
RXD
TXD
4
5
DTR
COM
DTR
COM
6
7
8
DSR
RTS
CTS
DSR
RTS
CTS
9
N.C.
RI
IMPORTANT
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DCE
9-pin 25-pin
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
8
3
2
20
7
6
4
5
22
For DCE devices other than modems, connect the DSR of the
module with the DSR of the device. The CD signal of the device
(other than a modem) is not used
Installing and Wiring Your Module
3-11
Figure 3.9 RS-232/423 Wiring Diagram - Module to DTE Device (Hardware Handshaking
Disabled)
Basic DTE
(2)
(2)
DTE
1
N.C.
DCD (3)
2
3
RXD
TXD
TXD
RSD
4
5
DTR
COM
DSR
COM
6
DSR
DTR
7
8
9
RTS
CTS
N.C.
CTS
RTS
GND(1)
9-pin 25-pin
1
3
2
6
5
4
8
7
8
2
3
6
7
20
5
4
1
(2)
(2)
(1) Connect to the shield of the cable.
(2) Jumpers are only needed if you cannot disable the hardware handshaking on the port.
(3) This is a N.C. for the 1747-KE, 1746-BAS or 1746-BAS-T.
Figure 3.10 RS-232/423 Wiring Diagram - Module to Printer (Hardware Handshaking
Enabled, Standard Printer Adapter Cable)(1)
Basic DTE
1 N.C.
DTE
CD
2
RXD
TXD
3
4
TXD
DTR
RXD
DSR
5
6
COM
DSR
COM
DTR
7
8
RTS
CTS
CTS
RTS
9
N.C.
RI
GND(2)
9-pin 25-pin
1
8
3
2
2
3
6
6
5
7
4
20
8
5
7
4
9
22
1
(1) The 1747-CP3 Cable works in this application.
(2) Connect to the shield of the cable.
Figure 3.11 RS-422 Wiring Diagram
Basic
1
2
TXD
RXD
RXD
TXD
COM
RXD+
COM
TXD+
TXD+
RXD+
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
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Installing and Wiring Your Module
Figure 3.12 RS-485 Wiring Diagram
Basic
1 TRXD-
TRXD-
2
3
4
5
COM
COM
6
7
8
9 TRXD+
TRXD+
Wiring to Port DH485
Port DH485 can communicate to user devices through the DH485
communication mode. Use a 1747-C10 Cable or 1747-C13 Cable to connect the
module to a link coupler interfaced with the DH485 network.
Publication 1764-UM001A-US-P
Chapter
4
Programming Overview
This chapter provides an overview of the information needed to program your
module. After reading this chapter, you should be familiar with:
• Module memory organization
• SLC memory allocation for your module
• BASIC programming instructions
• entering, running, and editing a BASIC program from an ASCII terminal
• interfacing the module with other devices
Understanding Module
Memory Organization
All data transferred to the module from the SLC 500 CPU must be routed through
the module input buffer. Table 4.1 lists the addresses of the module input buffer.
Table 4.1 Input Buffer Addresses
Address
Definition
0 through 39
Data transferred from the DH485 common interface file.
40 through 99
Reserved
100 through 163
Data transferred from the CPU M0 file.
164 through 199
Reserved
200 through 207
Data transferred from the CPU output image table.
All data transferred from the module to the SLC 500 CPU must be routed through
the module output buffer. Table 4.2 lists the addresses of the module output buffer.
Table 4.2 Output Buffer Addresses
1
Address
Definition
0 through 39
Data transferred to the DH485 common interface file.
40 through 99
Reserved
100 through 163
Data transferred to the CPU M1 file.
164 through 199
Reserved
200 through 207
Data transferred to the CPU input image table.
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4-2
Programming Overview
Allocating SLC memory
for the Module
Your SLC 500 fixed or modular controller communicates to the module through
the SLC backplane interface. The backplane interface transfers data from the CPU
input and output image tables to the module input and output buffers as shown in
Figure 4.1.
For more information regarding the transfer of data between the SLC and the
module, refer to page 4-15 of this manual and to the BASIC Language Reference
Manual (publication number 1747-RM001A-US-P).
Figure 4.1 SLC 500 to Module Data Transfer
CPU Output
Image Table
CPU Input
Image Table
Word 0
Word 200
Word 1
Word 2
Word 201
Word 202
Word 3
Word 203
Word 4
Word 204
Word 5
Word 205
Word 6
Word 206
Word 7
Word 207
Word 0
Word 1
Word 2
Word 200(1)
Word 201
Word 202
Word 3
Word 203
Word 4
Word 204
Word 5
Word 205
Word 6
Word 206
Word 7
Word 207
BASIC or
BASIC-T
Module Input
Buffer
BASIC or
BASIC-T
Module Output
Buffer
(1) Word 200 is predefined. You cannot write to word 200 of the BASIC output buffer.
In addition to transferring image table data, the SLC 5/02 and above modular
controller may transfer an additional 64 words of input or output data to the
module. Figure 4.2 shows the transfer of M0 and M1 files between the SLC 5/02
and higher processors and the module.
For more information on M0 and M1 files, refer to the SLC 500™ and
MicroLogix™ 1000 Instruction Set Reference Manual, publication number
1747-6.15.
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Programming Overview
4-3
Figure 4.2 SLC 5/02 to Module M0 and M1 File Transfer
Word 0
Word 100
Word 1
.
Word 101
.
.
.
.
.
Word 62
Word 162
Word 63
Word 163
Word 0
Word 100
Word 1
.
Word 101
.
.
.
.
.
Word 62
Word 162
Word 63
Word 163
CPU M0 File
CPU M1 File
BASIC or
BASIC-T
Module Input
Buffer
BASIC or
BASIC-T
Module Output
Buffer
Module ID Codes
Table 4.3 lists the ID codes needed to configure the memory of your SLC 500 fixed
or modular controller.
Table 4.3 Module ID Codes
Module ID Code
Controller
SLC 500, 5/01
SLC 5/02 and higher
BASIC Programming
Instructions
1746-BAS
3506
1746-BAS-T
3523 (Class 1)
13106
13123 (Class 4)
BASIC programs are composed of BASIC programming instructions grouped
together. These instructions are a combination of BASIC commands, statements,
operators, and system subroutines (CALLs).
IMPORTANT
The module operates in two modes: the Command mode (Direct
mode) and the Run mode (Interpreter mode). You can only enter
commands when the processor is in the Command mode.
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4-4
Programming Overview
BASIC Commands
BASIC commands are programming instructions that are executed during the
Command mode except for CONTROL-C. CONTROL-C takes you from Run
mode to Command mode. Typically these commands are used to perform some
type of program maintenance. Table 4.4 lists the BASIC programming commands.
Table 4.4 BASIC Commands
Command
CONT
Function
CONTinue program execution after a STOP
statement or CONTROL-C command.
Examples
CONT
CONTROL-C
Stop current program execution in Run mode and
return module to Command mode.
[CTRL-C]
CONTROL S
Interrupt a LIST command.
[CTRL-S]
CONTROL Q
Restart a LIST command after a CONTROL S
command.
[CTRL-Q]
DISABLING
CONTROL-C
Disable the CONTROL-C break function. CALL 18
disables the CONTROL-C break function. CALL 19
re-enables the CONTROL-C break function.
CALL 18 (disable)
CALL 19 (re-enable)
ERASE
Erase the program stored in ROM.
ERASE
LIST
LIST current program or indicated lines of program to LIST, LIST 10-50
the console device.
LIST#
LIST current program or indicated lines of program to LIST#, LIST#50
the device connected to port PRT1.
LIST@
LIST current program or indicated lines of program to LIST@, LIST@50
the device connected to port PRT2.
MODE
Set up port parameters.
MODE(DH485,19200)
NEW
Erase the program stored in RAM.
NEW
NULL
Count the number of null characters the module
outputs after a carriage return.
NULL, NULL4
PROG
Program the EEPROM module with the current
program.
PROG
PROG1
Program the EEPROM module with port information PROG1
for all three ports and store MTOP information.
PROG2
Execute the first program stored in EEPROM when
the module is turned on.
PROG2
RAM
Select the current program from RAM.
RAM
ROM
Select the current program from EEPROM.
ROM, ROM3
RUN
Execute the currently selected program.
RUN
XFER
Transfer a program from EEPROM to RAM, then
select RAM mode.
XFER
Refer to the BASIC Language Reference Manual (publication number
1747-RM001A-US-P) for additional information on these commands.
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Programming Overview
4-5
BASIC Statements
BASIC statements are programming instructions that are executed during Run
mode. Typically these statements are used to control program execution. Table 4.5
lists the BASIC programming statements.
Table 4.5 BASIC Statements
Statement
CLEAR
CLEAR (S&I)
CLOCK (1&0)
DATA
DIM
DO-WHILE
DO-UNTIL
END
FOR-TO-STEP
GOSUB
GOTO
IF-THEN-ELSE
INPUT
LD@
LET
NEXT
ONERR
ON-GOTO
ON-GOSUB
ONTIME
PH0.
PH1.
POP
PRINT
PUSH
READ
REM
RESTORE
RETI
RETURN
ST@
STOP
STRING
Function
CLEAR variables, interrupts, and strings.
CLEAR stacks and interrupts.
Enable and disable free running clock.
Read information with the DATA statement.
Allocate memory for arrayed variables.
Set up loop for WHILE.
Set up loop for UNTIL.
Terminate program execution.
Set up FOR-NEXT loop.
Execute subroutine.
GOTO program line number.
Test for a condition.
INPUT a string or variable.
Load top of stack from user specified location.
Assign a variable or string a value. (LET is optional.)
Test FOR-NEXT loop condition.
Perform conditional arithmetic ERROR handling.
Perform conditional GOTO.
Perform conditional GOSUB.
Generate an interrupt when TIME is equal to or
greater than the expression following ONTIME
statement.
PRINT HEX mode with zero suppression.
PRINT HEX mode without zero suppression.
POP argument stack to variables.
PRINT variables, strings or literals.
PUSH expressions on argument stack.
READ data in a DATA statement.
Insert a remark statement in a program.
RESTORE READ pointer.
RETURN from interrupt.
RETURN from subroutine.
Store top of stack at user specified location.
Break program execution.
Allocate memory for STRINGs.
Examples
CLEAR
CLEARS, CLEARI
CLOCK1, CLOCK0
DATA 100
DIM A(20)
DO - WHILE
DO - UNTIL
END
FOR A = 1 TO 5
GOSUB 1000
GOTO 500
IF A>B THEN A=0
INPUT A
LD@ 1000H, LD@ A
LET A=1
NEXT A
ONERROR 10
ON A GOTO 5, 20
ON A GOSUB 6, 2
ONTIME10, 1000
PH0. A
PH1. A
POP A, B, C
PRINT A
PUSH 10, A
READ A
REM DONE
RESTORE
RETI
RETURN
ST@ 1000H, ST@ A
STOP
STRING 50, 10
Refer to the BASIC Language Reference Manual (publication
number1747-RM001A-US-P) for additional information on these statements.
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Programming Overview
BASIC Operators
BASIC operators are programming instructions that are executed during Run
mode. Typically these operators perform a predefined operation on either variables
or constants. Operators require either one or two operands. Table 4.6 lists the
BASIC programming operators.
Table 4.6 BASIC Operators
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Operator
ABS ( )
Function
Return the absolute value of expression.
Examples
ABS (-3)
()+()
Add expressions together.
1+1
ASC ( )
Return integer value of ASCII character.
ASC (3)
ATN ( )
Return arraignment of argument.
ATN (1)
CHR ( )
Convert numeric expression to ASCII value.
CHR (65)
COS ( )
Return the cosine of argument.
COS (0)
()/()
Divide first expression by second expression.
10/2
EOF
Test for empty input buffer.
IF (NOT(EOF))
EXP ( )
Raise number to power of argument.
EXP (10)
( ) ** ( )
Raise first expression by the power of the second
expression.
2**4
FREE
List available bytes in RAM.
FREE=
GET
Read console.
P. GET
INT ( )
Return integer portion of expression.
INT (3.2)
IP
Read/assign IP register.
IP=0
LEN
List amount of bytes in current program.
LEN
LOG ( )
Return the natural log of the argument.
LOG (10)
( ) .AND. ( )
Combine the first expression with the second expression
using .AND..
10.AND.5
( ) .OR. ( )
Combine the first expression with the second expression
using .OR..
2.OR.1
( ) .XOR. ( )
Combine the first expression with the second expression
using .XOR..
3.XOR.2
MTOP
Return last valid memory address.
PRINT MTOP
()*()
Multiply expressions together.
4*4
p
Store constant.
3.1415926
RND
Return a random number.
RND
SGN ( )
Return the sign of argument.
SGN (-5)
SIN ( )
Return the sine of argument.
SIN (3.14)
SQR ( )
Return the square root of the argument.
SQR (100)
()-()
Subtract one expression from another.
8-4
TAN ( )
Return the tangent of argument.
TAN (.707)
TCON
Read/assign TCON register.
TCON=10H
TIME
Read/assign the free running clock.
P. TIME
XBY ( )
Read/assign external data memory.
P. XBY (10)
()=()
Allow the first expression to equal the second expression. 10=10
Programming Overview
4-7
Table 4.6 BASIC Operators
Operator
()<()
Function
Allow the first expression to be less than the second
expression.
Examples
9<10
( ) <= ( )
Allow the first expression to be less than or equal to the
second expression.
X<=10
()>()
Allow the first expression to be greater than the second
expression.
10>9
( ) >= ( )
Allow the first expression to be greater than or equal to the X>=10
second expression.
( ) <> ( )
Allows the first expression to be unequal to the second
expression.
10<>9
Refer to the BASIC Language Reference Manual (publication number
1747-RM001A-US-P) for additional information on these statements.
Creating and Editing a
BASIC Program
Module execution is controlled through a BASIC program residing in RAM or
ROM. You have the option of creating and editing this program:
• either on a personal computer using the BASIC development software and
then downloading it to the module. BASIC development software uses an
MS-DOS compatible personal computer to facilitate editing, compiling
(translating), uploading, and downloading BASIC programs. Refer to the
BASIC Development Software Programming Manual (publication number
1747-PM001A-US-P) for additional information on the BASIC development
software.
• or entering the program one line at a time directly to the module using an
ASCII terminal. ASCII terminal programming must be done one line at a
time.
Entering a BASIC Program Using an ASCII Terminal
BASIC line numbers indicate the order in which the program lines are stored in
memory. They are also used as references when branching and editing. Typically
you start numbering BASIC programs with line number 10 and increment by 10.
This allows you to add additional lines later as you work on your program.
Since the computer runs the statements in numerical order, additional lines need
not appear in consecutive order on the screen. For example, if you enter line 35
after line 40, the computer still runs line 35 after line 30 and before line 40. This
technique saves you from re-entering an entire program if you forget to include a
line.
IMPORTANT
Reuse of an existing line number causes all of the information
referenced by the original line number to be lost. Be careful when
entering numbers in the Command mode; you may accidentally
erase some program lines.
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Programming Overview
After the line number, there may be a combination of BASIC commands,
statements, operators, or CALLs. See Table 4.4, Table 4.5, and Table 4.6 for a list
of BASIC commands, statements, and operators. Depending on the logic of your
program, there may be more than one statement on a line. If so, each statement
must be separated by a colon (:).
To enter a BASIC program using an ASCII terminal follow these steps:
1. Select the program port using JW4.
2. Connect the ASCII terminal to the selected program port on the module.
3. Verify that the console device is configured to communicate with the module
(protocol and communication settings).
4. Apply power to your system.
If there is no program in RAM, this appears on the ASCII terminal.
!
"# $"#% $#& ''
& (
)
If there is a program in RAM and the module has been programmed to execute
from RAM, this program starts running. If you type this screen appears:
!
!
!
*+, - ...
/-01
)
IMPORTANT
Publication 1746-UM004A-US-P
The system prompt indicates that the module is in Command
mode, and the module “ACT” indicator light should be blinking.
Programming Overview
4-9
5. Enter a line of the BASIC program at the system prompt [>].
/-01
) /-
/* ,/+2/
)3 ,/* 45-+ 6+/07
A BASIC program line always begins with a line number and must contain at least
one character, but no more than 68 characters.
6. Press to end the program line.
Running a BASIC Program
After entering your BASIC program, you are ready to run it. To run a BASIC
program, type at the system prompt [>].
/-01
)/8
5-+ 6+/0
/-01
)
Stopping a BASIC Program
To stop a program that is running, press .
IMPORTANT
If is disabled, you cannot stop program execution
through a BASIC command. You must have jumper JW4 set in
the default position and cycle power to stop program execution.
(See page 3-4.)
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4-10
Programming Overview
Editing a BASIC Program Line Through an ASCII Terminal
When the module is in Command mode, you can edit the BASIC program that
resides in RAM. Editing a BASIC program is done on a line-by-line basis. To edit
an existing line in the BASIC program, type and the line number of the line to
edit as shown on the following screen:
/-01
)-0* The BASIC program line specified by the Edit command is displayed on the ASCII
terminal. You can perform any of the following edit operations:
• cursor right and left
• replace a character
• insert a character
• delete a character
• retype a line
Table 4.7 lists the BASIC edit operations, their functions, and keystrokes required
to perform the edit operation.
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Programming Overview
4-11
Table 4.7 BASIC Edit Operations
Operation
Move
Use To
Provide right/left cursor control.
Key Strokes
– moves the cursor one
space to the right.
– moves the cursor one
space to the left.
Replace
Replace the character at the current
cursor position.
Insert
Insert text at the current cursor
position.
Important: When you use the Insert
command, all text to the right of the
cursor disappears until you type the
second . Total line length is
79 characters.
Press the key that corresponds to the
character that will replace the
character at the current cursor
position.
Important: You must type a second
to terminate the Insert
operation.
Delete
Delete the character at the cursor
position.
Exit
– exits the editor and
replaces the old line with the edited
line.
– exits the editor without
saving any changes made to the line.
Copy the current line of text and insert it at the line following the current line.
The cursor is moved to the first
character on the new line.
Retype
Exit the editor with or without saving
the changes.
Deleting a BASIC Program Line
When the module is in Command mode, you can delete an existing line of the
BASIC program. To delete an existing line of the BASIC program, type the line
number of the line to delete; then press as shown on the following screen:
/-01
)
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Programming Overview
Renumbering a BASIC Program
When the module is in Command mode, you can renumber the BASIC program
that resides in RAM. To renumber a BASIC program, you must enter a REN
command at the system prompt [>]. Table 4.8 lists the commands, functions, and
keystrokes needed to renumber your BASIC program.
IMPORTANT
• The REN command updates the destination of GOSUB,
GOTO, ON ERR, ONTIME and ON GOTO statements.
• If the target line number does not exist, or if there is
insufficient memory to complete the task, no lines are changed
and the message appears on the console
screen.
• Because the REN command uses the same RAM for
renumbering as it does for variable and program storage,
available RAM may be insufficient in large programs. You
should renumber your program periodically during
development instead of waiting until it is completed.
Command
Renumber
Publication 1746-UM004A-US-P
Renumbers the Program Starting at
Key Strokes
the beginning of the program. The new line numbers begin at 10 and increment by 10.
the beginning of the program. The new line numbers begin at 10 and increment by
NUM.
the beginning of the program. The new line !
numbers begin with NUM1 and increment
by NUM2.
NUM2. The new line numbers begin with ! "
NUM1 and increment by NUM3.
Programming Overview
Transferring Data
4-13
You can transfer data, through the use of various commands, between the SLC
processor and:
• port PRT2
• port PRT1
• port DH485
• the 1746-BAS or 1746-BAS-T module
Transferring Data Between the SLC Processor and Port PRT2
Use port PRT2 to interface the module with external devices sending ASCII code
(bar code decoders and printers) or DF1 packets (PLCs). The commands in the
following table are used to transfer data either to or from port PRT2.
Table 4.8 Data Transfer Commands
Command
PRINT#
Purpose
Prints a string or variable to PRT2.
INPUT#
Inputs a string or variable from PRT2.
INPL#
Inputs a string or variable from PRT2.
INPS#
Inputs a string or variable from PRT2.
GET#
Reads a console input device connected to PRT2.
CALL 22
Transfers data from PRT1 or PRT2 to the SLC I/O or M files.
CALL 23
Transfers data from the SLC I/O or M files to PRT1 or PRT2.
CALL 118
Allows unsolicited writes from a remote SLC or PLC node.
CALL 122
Reads a PLC data file and transfers it to the SLC I/O or M files.
CALL 123
Transfers data from the SLC I/O or M files to a remote PLC.
Figure 4.3 Data Flow Between the SLC Processor and Port PRT2 of the Module
PRINT#
CALL 123
PRT2 OUTPUT QUEUE
CALL 23
Port PRT2
CALL 22
CALL 122
256 bytes
CALL 118
SLC Processor
256 bytes
INPUT#
INPL#
INPS#
GET#
PRT2 INPUT QUEUE
1746-BAS or 1746-BAS-T Module
Publication 1746-UM004A-US-P
4-14
Programming Overview
In addition, the commands in the following table provide status of and control over
the data transfer between the SLC processor and port PRT2 of the module.
Table 4.9 Status and Control Commands
Command
MODE
Purpose
Sets the port parameters of PRT1, PRT2, and DH485.
CALL 16
Enables interrupt capability when a DF1 packet is received.
CALL 17
Disables the DF1 packet interrupt capability.
CALL 30
Sets the port parameters for PRT2.
CALL 31
Displays the current PRT2 port configuration on the program port terminal
screen.
CALL 35
Retrieves the current character in the 256 character input buffer of port PRT2.
CALL 36
Retrieves the number of characters in the input or output buffer of port PRT2.
CALL 37
Clears the peripheral port input and/or output buffers.
CALL 97
Enables the DTR signal for port PRT2.
CALL 98
Disables the DTR signal for port PRT2.
CALL 108
Enables DF1 driver communications. You must use this CALL in conjunction with
CALLs 16, 17, 118, 122, and 123.
CALL 110
Prints the complete output buffer with addresses, front pointer, and number of
characters in the buffer to the console device.
CALL 111
Prints the complete input buffer with addresses, front pointer, and number of
characters in the buffer to the console device.
CALL 113
Disables DF1 driver communications.
CALL 114
Initiates DF1 packet transmission.
CALL 115
Checks DF1 packet transmission status.
CALL 117
Gets DF1 packet length.
CALL 119
Resets port parameters back to their default settings.
For more information regarding the use of these commands, refer to the BASIC
Language Reference Manual (publication number 1747-RM001A-US-P).
Publication 1746-UM004A-US-P
Programming Overview
4-15
Transferring Data Between the SLC Processor and Port PRT1
Use port PRT1 to interface the module with external devices sending ASCII code.
The commands in the following table are used to transfer data either to or from
port PRT1.
Table 4.10 Data Transfer Commands
Command
PRINT@
Purpose
Prints a string or variable to PRT1.
INPUT@
Inputs a string or variable from PRT1.
INPL@
Inputs a string or variable from PRT1.
INPS@
Inputs a string or variable from PRT1.
GET@
Reads a console input device connected to PRT1.
CALL 22
Transfers data from PRT1 or PRT2 to the SLC I/O or M files.
CALL 23
Transfers data from the SLC I/O or M files to PRT1 or PRT2.
Figure 4.4 Data Flow Between the SLC Processor and Port PRT1 of the Module
PRINT@
CALL 23
PRT1 OUTPUT QUEUE
CALL 22
PORT PRT1
256 bytes
INPUT@
INPL@
INPS@
GET@
SLC Processor
256 bytes
PRT1 INPUT QUEUE
1746-BAS or 1746-BAS-T Module
In addition, the commands in the following table provide status of and control over
the data transfer between the SLC processor and port PRT1 of the module.
Table 4.11 Status and Control Commands
Command
MODE
Purpose
Sets the port parameters of PRT1, PRT2, and DH485.
CALL 94
Displays the current port PRT1 configuration on the program port terminal
screen.
CALL 95
Retrieves the number of characters in the input or output buffer of port PRT1.
CALL 96
Clears port PRT1 input and output buffers.
CALL 103
Prints the complete output buffer with addresses, front pointer, and number of
characters in the buffer to the program port screen.
CALL 104
Prints the complete input buffer with addresses, front pointer, and number of
characters in the buffer to the program port screen.
CALL 105
Resets the port parameters of port PRT1 to their default setting.
For more information regarding the use of these commands, refer to the BASIC
Language Reference Manual (publication number 1747-RM001A-US-P).
Publication 1746-UM004A-US-P
4-16
Programming Overview
Transferring Data Between the SLC Processor and Port DH485
Use port DH485 to interface the module with the DH485 network (other SLC
processors). The commands in the following table are used to transfer data either to
or from port DH485.
Table 4.12 Data Transfer Commands
Command
CALL 14
Purpose
Converts 16-bit signed integer located in the BASIC input buffer to BASIC
floating-point.
CALL 15
Converts 16-bit unsigned integer located in the BASIC input buffer to BASIC
floating-point.
CALL 24
Converts BASIC floating point to a 16-bit signed integer and places the result in
the BASIC output buffer.
CALL 25
Converts BASIC floating point to a 16-bit binary number and places the result in
BASIC output buffer.
CALL 27
Transfers the data from a remote DH485 data file to the SLC processor.
CALL 28
Transfers the data from the SLC processor to a remote DH485 data file.
CALL 84
Transfers the data from the DH485 common interface file to words 0 through 39
of the module input buffer.
CALL 85
Transfers words 0 through 39 of the module output buffer to the DH485
common interface file.
CALL 90
Transfers the data from a remote DH485 data file to words 0 through 39 of the
module input buffer.
CALL 91
Transfers words 0 through 39 of the module output buffer to a remote DH485
data file.
CALL 92
Transfers the data from a remote DH485 interface file to words 0 through 39 of
the module input buffer.
CALL 93
Transfers words 0 through 39 of the module output buffer to a remote DH485
interface file.
CALL 118
Allows unsolicited writes from a remote SLC or PLC node.
Figure 4.5 Data Flow Between the SLC processor and Port DH485 of the Module
PRINT
CALL 28
CALL 27
CALL 118
SLC Processor
INPUT
CALL 14/15
CALL 24/25
ASCII OUTPUT
QUEUE
256 bytes
256 bytes
PORT DH485
ASCII INPUT
QUEUE
BASIC INPUT
BUFFER
BASIC
OUTPUT
BUFFER
CALL 90/92
CALL 84
CALL 91/93
COMMON
INTERFACE INPUT
FILE
COMMON
INTERFACE
OUTPUT FILE
CALL 85
1746-BAS or 1746-BAS-T Module
Publication 1746-UM004A-US-P
256 bytes
256 bytes
Programming Overview
4-17
In addition, the commands in the following table provide status of the data transfer
between the SLC processor and port DH485 of the module.
Table 4.13 Status and Control Commands
Command Purpose
MODE
Sets the port parameters of PRT1, PRT2, and DH485.
CALL 86
Checks the remote write status of the DH485 common interface file.
CALL 87
Checks the remote read status of the DH485 common interface file.
For more information regarding the use of these commands, refer to the BASIC
Language Reference Manual (publication number 1747-RM001A-US-P).
Transferring Data Between the SLC Processor and the Module
Use the module to interface with the SLC processor. For example, the module
performs large mathematical calculations for the processor which the SLC
processor uses to execute an operation. The commands in the following table are
used to transfer data either to or from the SLC processor.
Table 4.14 Data Transfer Commands
Command Purpose
CALL 14
Converts 16-bit signed integer located in the BASIC input buffer to BASIC
floating-point.
CALL 15
Converts 16-bit unsigned integer located in the BASIC input buffer to BASIC
floating-point.
CALL 24
Converts BASIC floating point to a 16-bit signed integer and places the result in
the BASIC output buffer.
CALL 25
Converts BASIC floating point to its 16-bit binary representation.
CALL 53
Transfers the eight words in the CPU output image table to words 200 through 207
of the module input buffer.
CALL 54
Transfers words 200 through 207 of the module output buffer to the CPU input
image table.
CALL 56
Transfers the words in the CPU M0 file to words 100 through 163 of the module
input buffer.
CALL 57
Transfers words 100 through 163 of the module output buffer to the CPU M1 file.
Status Information for the SLC Processor
Input image word 0 for the module slot contains two status bits. One status bit
informs the SLC processor of the mode the module is presently in. The other status
bit informs the SLC processor of the battery status. These status bits are as follows:
• I:e. 0/13 = 0battery OK
= 1 battery low
• I:e. 0/15 = 0module in Run mode
= 1 module in Command mode
Publication 1746-UM004A-US-P
4-18
Programming Overview
Figure 4.6 Data Flow Between the Module and SLC Processor
BASIC INPUT
BUFFER
CALL 14/15
CALL 53
CALL 56
BASIC
OUTPUT
BUFFER
CALL 14/15
16 bytes
16 bytes
CALL 54
SLC M0
CALL 57
SLC M1
SLC OUTPUT
IMAGE
SLC INPUT IMAGE
128 bytes
128 bytes
SLC Processor
1746-BAS or 1746-BAS-T Module
In addition, the commands in the following table provide status of and control over
the data transfer between the SLC processor and module.
Table 4.15 Status and Control Commands
Command Purpose
CALL 51
Checks if the CPU output image buffer was updated.
CALL 55
Checks if the CPU input image buffer was read by the processor.
CALL 58
Checks if the CPU M0 file was updated.
CALL 59
Checks if the CPU M1 file was read by the processor.
CALL 86
Checks if the DH485 interface file was updated.
CALL 87
Checks if the DH485 interface file was read by an external device.
CALL 120
Clears the module input and output buffers.
For more information regarding the use of these commands, refer to the BASIC
Language Reference Manual (publication number 1747-RM001A-US-P).
The following table lists module buffer addresses. Refer to page 4-1 for more
information regarding module buffer addresses.
Table 4.16 BASIC Input/Output Buffer Address Map
Publication 1746-UM004A-US-P
Address
M1:e.s
BASIC Input/Output Buffer Address
100 through 163
M0:e.s
100 through 163
I:e.s
200 through 207
O:e.s
200 through 207
CIF in
0 through 39
CIF out
0 through 39
Programming Overview
4-19
The SLC processor and module operate independently of each other. The
following CALLs allow the SLC processor and module to interrupt each other.
Table 4.17 Interrupt CALLs
SLC Fault Codes
CALL
CALL 16
Purpose
Enables interrupt capability when a DF1 packet is received.
CALL 17
Disables the DF1 packet interrupt capability.
CALL 20
Enables SLC processor interrupt capability.
CALL 21
Disables SLC processor interrupt capability.
CALL 26
Generates an interrupt to the SLC processor.
Fault codes are reported in word 6 of the SLC processor status file. The format of
the status word and applicable error codes are shown below:
Figure 4.7 SLC Fault Code Placement
4-digit Hex Number
Slot Number
Fault Code
Table 4.18 SLC Fault Codes
SLC
Fault
Code
57H
Description
Possible Cause
Recommended Action
Module has not
responded to a lock
shared memory command
within the required time
limit.
Cycle power to the
module to re-initialize
parameters and re-run
the program.
58H
Module generated a
generic fault.
Module hardware problem.
Module internal stacks,
pointers, etc. (if XBY
instructions are used) are
corrupted by the user
program.
Module hardware problem.
Module internal stacks,
pointers, etc. (if XBY
instructions are used) are
corrupted by the user
program.
59H
Module did not complete
a command within the
required time limit.
Module hardware problem.
Module internal stacks,
pointers, etc. (if XBY
instructions are used) are
corrupted by the user
program.
Verify that module is
configured correctly
(correct I/O and M files).
Cycle power to the
module to re-initialize
parameters and re-run
the program.
Cycle power to the
module to re-initialize
parameters and re-run
the program.
Publication 1746-UM004A-US-P
4-20
Programming Overview
Table 4.18 SLC Fault Codes
SLC
Fault
Code
5AH
Description
Possible Cause
Recommended Action
Hardware interrupt
problem.
Module hardware problem.
Module internal stacks,
pointers, etc. (if XBY
instructions are used) are
corrupted by the user
program.
Module is trying to be
configured using G files.
Wrong M0/M1 file size is
chosen.
Verify that the module
slot is enabled. Cycle
power to the module to
re-initialize parameters
and re-run the program.
5BH
G file configuration error.
5CH
M0/M1 file configuration
error.
5DH
Interrupt requested but
the processor will not
support the interrupt.
75H
Module watchdog
timeout.
90H
Module issued an
interrupt while the slot
was disabled.
Description
SLC
Fault
Code
91H
Module has faulted while
slot was disabled.
92H
Module I/O or ISR
configuration is incorrect.
93H
Processor did not
recognize the error code
from the Module.
SLC 500 fixed controller or 5/
01 modular processor does
not support module
interrupts.
Module hardware problem.
Module internal stacks,
pointers, etc. (if XBY
instructions are used) are
corrupted by the user
program.
Module is issuing an I/O
interrupt. CALL 26 causes this
interrupt.
Possible Cause
Module hardware problem.
Module internal stacks,
pointers, etc. (if XBY
instructions are used) are
corrupted by the user
program.
Module slot was configured
incorrectly in the SLC ladder
logic program.
Module hardware problem.
Module internal stacks,
pointers, etc. (if XBY
instructions are used) are
corrupted by the user
program.
Verify the module is not
configured with G files.
Verify the module is
configured with M0 or
M1 files no larger than
64 words.
A 5/02 or higher
processor must be used
for interrupt capability.
Cycle power to the
module to re-initialize
parameters and re-run
the program.
Enable the slot before
using interrupts.
Recommended Action
Cycle power to the
module to re-initialize
parameters and re-run
the program.
Verify the slot
configuration for the
module.
Cycle power to the
module to re-initialize
parameters and re-run
the program.
Application errors such as divide by zero error, syntax error, receipt of a
CONTROL-C, and execution of STOP or END statements cause the module to
return to the Command mode from Run mode. Use CALL 38 (EXPANDED
ONERR) to jump to an interrupt routine instead of returning to the Command
mode.
Publication 1746-UM004A-US-P
Appendix
A
Specifications
Module Hardware
Specifications
The module hardware specifications are listed in the following tables.
Table A.1 Power Consumption
Operating
Voltage
5V dc
Current Requirement
Module Only
.150 A
Current Requirement
Module With Link Coupler
.150 A
24V dc
.040 A
.125 A
IMPORTANT If a Hand-Held Terminal, Data Table Access Module, or interface
converter is connected to the link coupler, the additional
backplane power draw of these components (shown in Table A.1)
must be added to the .125 Amperes listed in the table above.
This only applies when the module is connected to the network
via the link coupler and 1747-C10 Cable or 1747-C11 Cable.
This does not apply when the 1747-C13 Cable is used.
Table A.2 Power Consumption of Hand-Held Terminal, Data Table Access Module, and
Interface Converter
Component
Hand-Held Terminal
Operating Voltage
24V dc
Current Requirement
.105A
Data Table Access
Module
24V dc
.104A
Interface Converter
24V dc
.060A
IMPORTANT The BASIC module receives its power from the SLC backplane.
The power consumption of the module must be taken into
consideration when planning your SLC 500 system. Refer to the
documentation supplied with your SLC 500 fixed or modular
controller for additional information on power supplies and
current requirements.
Table A.3 Environmental Conditions
1
Condition
Operating temperature
Range
0° C to 60° C (32° F to 140° F)
Storage temperature
-40° C to 85° C (-40° F to 185° F)
Relative humidity
5% to 95% (non-condensing)
Publication 176-UM04A-US-P
A-2
Specifications
Table A.4 Port Isolation
Port
PRT1
Isolation
Backplane to Port
Isolation Voltage
710V dc for 1 minute
PRT2
Backplane to Port
710V dc for 1 minute
PRT1 and PRT2
PRT1 to PRT2
710V dc for 1 minute
IMPORTANT
Port DH485 is not isolated.
Table A.5 Clock/Calendar Accuracy
Specification
Accuracy
Range
± 1 minute/month @ 25°C
+ 0, - 6 minute/month @ 60°C
Table A.6 Maximum Communication Distances
Communication
Maximum Distance Allowed m (ft)
Rate (bps)
300
RS-232
15 (50)
RS-423
1230 (4000)
RS-422
1230 (4000)
RS-485
1230 (4000)
600
15 (50)
920 (3000)
1230 (4000)
1230 (4000)
1200
15 (50)
770 (2500)
1230 (4000)
1230 (4000)
4800
15 (50)
245 (800)
1230 (4000)
1230 (4000)
9600
15 (50)
120 (400)
1230 (4000)
1230 (4000)
19200
15 (50)
60 (200)
1230 (4000)
1230 (4000)
IMPORTANT
1747-PBASE BASIC
Development Software
Specifications
Use the RS-423 jumper settings when communicating in RS-232
mode.
The BASIC Development Software must be loaded into a personal computer to
operate. This personal computer must conform to the following specifications:
• IBM PC/AT compatible computer with display and keyboard
• DOS version 3.1 to 6.22
• 640K bytes of RAM memory
• 1 floppy disk drive (3 1/2 in. or 5 1/4 in.)
• hard disk with 2M bytes free disk space
• 1 RS-232 compatible serial port
Refer to the BASIC Development Software Programming Manual (publication
number 1747-PM001A-US-P) for additional information.
Publication 176-UM04A-US-P
Specifications
Related Products
A-3
Table 1.H lists the products related to the module.
Table A.7 BASIC Module Related Products
Product
8K byte EEPROM Memory Module for 1746-BAS
Catalog Number
1747-M1
32K byte EEPROM Memory Module for 1746-BAS
1747-M2
8K byte UVPROM Memory Module for 1746-BAS
1747-M3
32K byte UVPROM Memory Module for 1746-BAS
1747-M4
8K byte EEPROM Memory Module for 1746-BAS-T
1771-DBMEM1
32K byte EEPROM Memory Module for 1746-BAS-T
1771-DBMEM2
BASIC Development Software
1747-PBASE
Communication Cable (72” length, interchangeable with C-11 cable)
1747-C10
Communication Cable (12” length, interchangeable with C-10 cable)
1747-C11
Communication Cable (36” length, different from C-10 and C-11 cables)
1747-C13
DH485 Interface Card
1784-KR
Interface/Converter (RS-232 to RS-485)
1747-PIC
Link Coupler
1747-AIC
SLC 500
1747-L20, -L30, -L40
SLC 5/01
1747-L511, -L514
SLC 5/02
1747-L524
SLC 5/03
1747-L531, -L532
SLC 5/04
1747-L541, -L542,
-L543
SLC 5/05
1747-L551, -L552,
-L553
Publication 176-UM04A-US-P
A-4
Specifications
Publication 176-UM04A-US-P
B
Appendix
This appendix contains important information you should be concerned with
when configuring the module. The information is general in nature and
supplements specific information contained in earlier chapters of this manual.
Topics include worksheets for configuring:
• the BASIC or BASIC-T module
• jumpers JW1-JW4
Module Configuration
Specify the connection information by filling in the boxes in the figure below.
Figure 2.1 Module Configuration
BASIC
5
4
3
2
1
Connected Device: YES______ NO ______
Device Type: _______________________
Protocol: __________________________
Program Port: YES______ NO ______
9
8
7
6
PR T1
5
4
3
2
1
Connected Device: YES______ NO ______
Device Type: _______________________
Protocol: _________________________
9
8
7
6
PR T2
Connected Device: YES______ NO ______
Device Type: _______________________
Protocol: __________________________
Program Port: YES______ NO ______
DH485
IMPORTANT When DF1 protocol is selected for port PRT2, the DH485 port
is not available for programming or run time operation.
What to Do Next: Give a copy of this worksheet to the hardware installer. Store
this worksheet with your application program for future reference.
Port PRT1 Configuration
(Jumper JW1)
See Figure 3.1 on page 3-1 for the locations of the four jumpers.
See Figure 3.2 on page 3-2 for jumper JW1 pin assignments and settings.
Specify the configuration of port PRT1 on your module by filling in the table
below.
1
Publication 1746-UM004A-US-P
B-2
Table B.1 Port PRT1 Configuration
Port
Configuration
Selection
Corresponding Jumper Position on JW1
PRT1
RS-232/423
Across pins 1 and 2, 3 and 4
RS-422
Across pins 5 and 6, 7 and 8
RS-485
Across pins 7 and 8, 9 and 10
What to Do Next: Give a copy of this worksheet to the hardware installer. Store
this worksheet with your application program for future reference.
Port PRT2 Configuration
(Jumper JW2)
See Figure 3.1 on page 3-1 for the locations of the four jumpers.
See Figure 3.3 on page 3-3 for jumper JW2 pin assignments and settings.
Specify the configuration of port PRT2 on your module by filling in the table
below.
Table B.2 Port PRT2 Configuration
Port
Configuration
Selection
Corresponding Jumper Position on
JW2
PRT2
RS-232/423
Across pins 1 and 2, 3 and 4
RS-422
Across pins 5 and 6, 7 and 8
RS-485
Across pins 7 and 8, 9 and 10
What to Do Next: Give a copy of this worksheet to the hardware installer. Store
this worksheet with your application program for future reference.
Publication 1746-UM004A-US-P
B-3
Optional Memory
Module Selection
(Jumper JW3)
See Figure 3.1 on page 3-1 for the locations of the four jumpers.
See Figure 3.4 on page 3-4 for jumper JW3 pin assignments and settings.
Specify the optional memory module selection for the system by filling in the table
below.
Table B.3 Optional Memory Module Selection
Memory Module Option
Optional
Memory
Module
Selection
Corresponding Jumper
Position on JW3
1747-M1 8K byte EEPROM (1746-BAS only)
Across pins 1 and 3, 2 and 4
1747-M2 32K byte EEPROM (1746-BAS only)
Across pins 1 and 3, 2 and 4
1747-M3 8K byte UVPROM (1746-BAS only)
Across pins 1 and 3, 2 and 4
1747-M4 32K byte UVPROM (1746-BAS only)
Across pins 3 and 5, 4 and 6
1771-DBMEM1 8K byte EEPROM
(1746-BAS-T only)
Across pins 1 and 3, 2 and 4
1771-DBMEM 32K byte EEPROM
(1746-BAS-T only)
Across pins 1 and 3, 2 and 4
What to Do Next: Give a copy of this worksheet to the hardware installer. Store
this worksheet with your application program for future reference.
Publication 1746-UM004A-US-P
B-4
Program Port and
Protocol Selection
(Jumper JW4)
See Figure 3.1 on page 3-1 for the locations of the four jumpers.
See Figure 3.5 on page 3-5 for jumper JW4 pin assignments and settings.
Specify the Program Port and its protocol by filling in the table below.
Table B.4 Program Port and Protocol Selection
Selection Port
Program
Port?
Protocol
PRT1
YES
Default Communication
Settings
PRT2
NO
ASCII Interface
DH485
NO
Run Time DH485
PRT1
NO
ASCII Interface
PRT2
NO
ASCII Interface
DH485
YES
DH485 Program Port
(non-isolated)
PRT1
YES
Programmed
Communication Settings
PRT2
NO
ASCII Interface
DH485
NO
Run Time DH485
PRT1
YES
Programmed
Communication Settings
PRT2
NO
DF1
DH485
NO
Disabled
Corresponding Jumper
Position on JW4
Across pins 3 and 4, 5 and 6
Across pins 1 and 3, 2 and 4
Across pins 3 and 5, 4 and 6
Across pins 1 and 2, 3 and 4
What to Do Next: Give a copy of this worksheet to the hardware installer. Store
this worksheet with your application program for future reference.
Publication 1746-UM004A-US-P
Appendix
C
Lithium Battery Replacement, Handling, and
Disposal
This appendix contains important information you should know when using
lithium batteries.
Topics include:
• battery replacement
• battery handling
• battery disposal
Battery Replacement
Your module provides back-up power for RAM through a replaceable lithium
battery (catalog number 1747-BA). This battery provides back-up for
approximately five years. A BAT LOW indicator on the front of the module alerts
you when the battery voltage has fallen below the the replace battery threshold
level.
To replace the lithium battery follow these steps:
1. Remove power from the SLC 500 power supply module.
ATTENTION
Do not remove the module from the SLC 500 chassis until all
power is removed from the SLC 500 power supply.
2. Remove the module from the chassis by depressing the retainer clips at both
the top and bottom of the module and slide it out.
IMPORTANT If the top or bottom retainer clips are broken when removing the
module they can be easily replaced. Pry the broken clip(s) off
from the bottom with a screwdriver, if necessary. Do not twist
off. Snap in the replacement clip. Order Catalog Number
1746-R15 (2 per package).
ATTENTION
1
Do not expose the module to surfaces or other areas that may
typically hold an electrostatic charge. Electrostatic charges can
alter or destroy memory.
Publication 1746-UM004A-US-P
C-2
Lithium Battery Replacement, Handling, and Disposal
3. Unplug the battery connector. See Figure 3.1 on page C-2 for battery
connector location.
The module has a capacitor that provides 30 minutes of battery
IMPORTANT
back-up while the battery is disconnected. Data in RAM is not
lost if the battery is replaced within 30 minutes.
4. Remove the battery from the retaining clips.
5. Insert a new battery into the battery retaining clips.
6. Plug the battery connector into the socket with the red lead wire on top and
the white lead wire on the bottom. See Figure 3.1 on page C-2 for battery
connector orientation.
7. Re-insert the BASIC module into the SLC 500 chassis.
8. Restore power to the SLC 500 power supply module.
Figure 3.1 Lithium Battery
CAT
SER
FRN
SLC 500
BASIC MODULE
SERIAL NO.
JW1
UL
SA
DH485
JW2
Lithium Battery
Publication 1746-UM004A-US-P
9 87 6
54 3 2 1
PRT2
White Wire
9 87 6
54 3 2 1
PRT1
Red Wire
Lithium Battery Replacement, Handling, and Disposal
Battery Handling
C-3
The procedures listed below must be followed to ensure proper battery operation
and reduce personnel hazards:
• Use battery only for intended operation.
• Do not ship or dispose of cells except according to recommended procedures.
• Do not ship on passenger aircraft.
ATTENTION
Do not charge the batteries. An explosion could result or the cells
could overheat causing burns.
Do not open, puncture, crush, or otherwise mutilate the
batteries. A possibility of an explosion exists and toxic, corrosive,
and flammable liquids would be exposed.
Do not incinerate or expose the batteries to high temperatures.
Do not attempt to solder batteries. An explosion could result.
Do not short positive and negative terminals together. Excessive
heat can build up and cause severe burns.
Storage
Store lithium batteries in a cool, dry environment, typically +20°C to +25°C
(+68°F to +77°F) with 40% to 60% humidity. Store the batteries and a copy of the
battery instruction sheet in the original container, away from flammable materials.
Transportation
One or Two Batteries - Each battery contains 0.23 grams of lithium. Therefore, up
to two batteries can be shipped together within the United States without
restriction. Regulations governing shipment to or within other countries may
differ.
Three or More Batteries - Procedures for the transportation of three or more
batteries shipped together within the United States are specified by the Department
of Transportation (DOT) in the Code of Federal Regulations, CRF49,
“Transportation”. An exemption to these regulations, DOT – E7052, covers the
transport of certain hazardous materials classified as flammable solids. This
exemption authorizes transport of lithium batteries by motor vehicle, rail freight,
cargo vessel, and cargo-only aircraft, providing certain conditions are met.
Transport by passenger aircraft is not permitted.
Publication 1746-UM004A-US-P
C-4
Lithium Battery Replacement, Handling, and Disposal
A special provision of the DOT – E7052 (11th Rev., October 21, 1982, par. 8-a)
provides that:
Persons that receive cell and batteries covered by this exemption may reship
them pursuant to the provisions of 49 CFR 173.22a in any of these packages
authorized in this exemption including those in which they were received.
The Code of Federal Regulations, 49 CRF 173.22a, relates to the use of packaging
authorized under exemptions. In part, it requires that you must maintain a copy of
the exemption at each facility where the packaging is being used in connection with
shipment under the exemption.
Shipment of depleted batteries for disposal may be subject to specific regulation of
the countries involved or to regulations endorsed by those countries, such as the
IATA Restricted Articles Regulations of the International Air Transport
Association, Geneva, Switzerland.
Regulations for transportation of lithium batteries are periodically revised.
Battery Disposal
The following procedures must be followed when disposing of lithium batteries.
ATTENTION Do not incinerate or dispose of lithium batteries in general trash
collection. Explosion or violent rupture is possible. Batteries
should be collected for disposal in a manner to rpevent against
short circuiting, compacting, or destruction of case integrity and
hermetic seal.
For disposal, batteries must be packaged and shipped in accordance with the
transportation regulations, to a proper disposal site. The U.S. Department of
Transportation authorizes shipment of “Lithium batteries for disposal” by motor
vehicle only in regulation 173.1015 of CRF49 (effective January 5, 1983). For
additional information contact:
U.S. Department of Transportation
Research and Special Programs Administration
400 Seventh Street, S.W.
Washington, D.C. 20590
Although the Environmental Protection Agency at this time has no regulations
specific to lithium batteries, the material contained may be considered toxic,
reactive, or corrosive. The person disposing of the material is responsible for any
hazards created in doing so. State and local regulations may exist regarding the
disposal of these materials.
Publication 1746-UM004A-US-P
Index
Numerics
1746-BAS BASIC Module 1-1, 2-4
1746-BAS-T BASIC-T Module 1-1, 2-4
1747-AIC Isolated Link Coupler 1-10, 1-11, 2-3, 2-4, 2-5
1747-C10 Cable 1-12, 1-13, 2-5, 2-6
1747-C11 Cable 1-10, 1-12, 1-13, 2-5
1747-C13 Cable 1-12, 1-13, 2-4
1747-KE DH-485/RS-232C Communication Interface Module
optional memory module 2-2
overview 1-1
programming 4-1
programming interface 1-7
related products A-3
software features 1-3
typical configurations 1-6
battery back-up C-1
2-3
1747-M1 8K byte EEPROM 2-2, 3-3
1747-M2 32K byte EEPROM 2-2, 3-3
1747-M3 8K byte UVPROM 2-2, 3-3
1747-M4 32K byte UVPROM 2-2, 3-3
1747-PBASE BASIC Development Software 1-5
1747-PIC Interface/Converter 1-9, 1-10, 2-3, 2-5
1770-KF3 DH-485 Communication Interface Module 2-3
1771-DBMEM1 8K byte EEPROM 2-2, 3-3
1771-DBMEM2 32K byte EEPROM 2-2, 3-3
1784-KR DH-485 Interface Card 1-10, 1-12, 2-3, 2-6
A
abbreviations and terms P-3
Allen-Bradley
contacting for assistance P-4
ASCII terminal interface 1-7
B
BASIC commands 4-4
BASIC development software
overview 1-5
RS-232 interface 1-8
RS-485 interface 1-9
specifications A-2
BASIC or BASIC-T module
ASCII terminal interface 1-7
BASIC development software interface 1-8, 1-9
communication ports 1-3
data transfer with SLC 4-2, 4-17
DF1 communication interface 2-6
DH-485 communication interface 2-3
hardware features 1-2
hardware specifications A-1
installation and wiring 3-1
integration 1-6
LEDs 1-4
memory organization 4-1
network configurations 1-9
C
cables 2-4, 2-6
CALLs 4-13
clock/calendar accuracy A-2
communication cable DH485 2-6
communication ports
DH485 1-2, 1-3, 3-4, 3-12, 4-16
PRT1 1-2, 1-3, 3-2, 3-4, 3-7, 4-15
PRT2 1-2, 1-3, 3-2, 3-4, 3-7, 4-13, B-2
component selection overview 2-1
components needed for DF1 communication
dial-up modem 2-6
leased phone line 2-6
radio link 2-6
components needed for DH485 communication
1747-AIC Isolated Link Coupler 2-3
1747-KE DH-485/RS-232C Communication Interface
Module 2-3
1747-PIC Interface/Converter 2-3
1770-KF3 DH485 Communication Interface Module 2-3
1784-KR DH485 Interface Card 2-3
configurations
typical 1-6
worksheets B-1
contacting Allen-Bradley for assistance P-4
contents of manual P-1
creating and editing a BASIC program 4-7
D
data transfer between the SLC and the module 4-2, 4-17
DCE 3-10
definitions P-3
deleting a program line 4-11
DF1
communication interface 2-7
components required for 2-6
dial-up modem 2-7
leased phone lines 2-7
radio links 2-7
Publication 1746-UM004A-US-P
2
Index
DH485 communication cable 2-6
DH485 communication port 1-2, 1-3, 3-4, 3-12, 4-16
DH485 network
cable requirements 2-6
interface card 1784-KR 1-12, 2-6
interfacing with the module and development software
1-3, 2-3
dial-up modem for DF1 communication 2-6
DTE 3-9
E
editing a program line 4-10
EEPROM 2-2, 3-3
entering a program 4-7
environmental conditions A-1
H
hardware features 1-2
hardware handshaking 3-8
hardware specifications
clock/calendar accuracy A-2
environmental conditions A-1
maximum communication distances A-2
port isolation A-2
power consumption A-1
I
input/output buffer address map 4-18
installation and wiring
communication ports 3-7
DH485 communication port 3-4, 3-12, 4-16
fixed controller expansion rack 3-6
modular controller rack 3-6
overview 3-1
PRT1 communication port 3-2, 3-4, 3-7, 4-15
PRT2 communication port 3-2, 3-4, 3-7, 4-13, B-2
setting jumper JW1 3-2
setting jumper JW2 3-2, B-2
setting jumper JW3 3-3, B-3
setting jumper JW4 3-4
interrupt CALLs 4-19
Publication 1746-UM004A-US-P
J
jumper JW1 3-2
jumper JW2 3-2
jumper JW2 worksheet B-2
jumper JW3 3-3
jumper JW3 worksheet B-3
jumper JW4 3-4
L
leased phone lines for DF1 communication 2-6
LEDs 1-2, 1-4
link coupler 2-4
lithium battery
disposal C-4
handling C-3
replacement C-1
storage C-3
transportation C-3
M
M0/M1 file transfers 1-3, 4-2
manuals
related P-2
maximum communication distances A-2
memory organization 4-1
memory requirements 1-2, 2-1
modem 2-7
module ID codes 4-3
module input buffer addresses 4-1
module integration
overview 1-6
with SLC 500 modular controller 3-6
with SLC fixed controller 1-6, 3-6
module output buffer addresses 4-1
module programming interface 1-7
N
network configurations 1-9
Index
O
3
R
optional memory modules
1747-M1 8K byte EEPROM 2-2
1747-M2 32K byte EEPROM 2-2
1747-M3 8K byte UVPROM 2-2
1747-M4 32K byte UVPROM 2-2
1771-DBMEM1 8K byte EEPROM 2-2
1771-DBMEM2 32K byte EEPROM 2-2
overview 2-2
worksheet B-3
overview 1-1
P
PBASE 1-5
port isolation A-2
ports
see communication ports 1-3
power consumption A-1
programming
commands 4-4
creating and editing 4-7
data transfer between the SLC and BASIC module 4-2,
4-17
deleting a program line 4-11
editing a program line 4-10
entering a program 4-7
instructions 4-3
memory requirements 2-1
module ID codes 4-3
module input buffer addresses 4-1
module output buffer addresses 4-1
operators 4-6
overview 4-1
renumbering a program 4-12
running a program 4-9
statements 4-5
stopping a program 4-9
programming instructions 4-3
programming operators 4-6
programming statements 4-5
PRT1 communication port 1-2, 1-3, 3-2, 3-4, 3-7, 4-15
PRT2 communication port 1-2, 1-3, 3-2, 3-4, 3-7, 4-13, B-2
publications
related P-2
radio link for DF1 communication 2-6
related products A-3
renumbering a program 4-12
RS-232 interface 1-8
RS-485 interface 1-9
running a program 4-9
S
setting jumper JW1 3-2
setting jumper JW2 3-2, B-2
setting jumper JW3 3-3, B-3
setting jumper JW4 3-4
SLC 500
backplane interface 1-3
fault codes 4-19
fixed controller 1-6, 3-6
SLC 500 modular controller 3-6
SLC fault codes 4-19
SLC processor
status information 4-17
software features 1-3
status bits
status information for the SLC processor 4-17
status information for the SLC processor 4-17
SLC processor 4-17
stopping a program 4-9
T
terms and abbreviations P-3
transferring data between SLC processor and the module
overview 4-13
port DH485 4-16
port PRT1 4-15
port PRT2 4-13
SLC processor 4-17
transferring data overview 4-13
troubleshooting
contacting Allen-Bradley P-4
typical configurations 1-6
U
UVPROM 2-2, 3-3
Publication 1746-UM004A-US-P
4
Index
W
wiring to DH485 communication port 3-4, 3-12
wiring to PRT1 communication port 3-2, 3-4, 3-7
wiring to PRT2 communication port 3-2, 3-4, 3-7, B-2
worksheets
BASIC module configuration B-1
optional memory module selection B-3
port PRT2 configuration B-2
Publication 1746-UM004A-US-P
Back Cover
Publication 1746-UM004A-US-P - April 2000 2
Supersedes Publication 1746-6.1 - November 1994
© 2000 Rockwell International Corporation. Printed in the U.S.A.
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