2005–2006 Estimates Health Canada Part III — Report on

2005–2006 Estimates Health Canada Part III — Report on
Health Canada
2005–2006
Estimates
Part III — Report on
Plans and Priorities
Report on Plans and Priorities 2005–2006
1974—
Radiation Emitting Devices Act 1970—
Hazardous Products Act 1969—
Canada Medical Care Act 1966—
Hospital Insurance and Diagnostic Services Act
1957—
Food and Drugs Act
1953—
1944—
1908—
Propriety of Patent Medicines Act
1902—
1990’s
1980’s
—1987
—1986
Federal Centre for AIDS established
Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion (WHO)
—1981
Symptoms that now are considered diagnostic of AIDS
are first reported in Los Angeles and New York
—1974
—1972
Lalonde Report: A New Perspective on the Health of Canadians
National Health Insurance Plan for hospitals and medical care
in Canada instituted, life expectancy in Canada reaches
76 years for women and 69 years for men
Christiaan Barnard, a South African surgeon, performs the first
whole heart transplant from one person to another
—1967
—1960
—1955
—1947
—1944
—1933
—1929
—1925
—1922
1874—
Canada’s first public health insurance plan instituted
in Saskatchewan
Halifax physician Oswald Theodore first to show that DNA
is agent responsible for transfering genetic information
Montreal’s Dr. Armand Frappier responsible for BCG vaccine
production in Canada
British researcher Sir Alexander Fleming discovers penicillin
Montreal tuberculosis clinic prepares BCG vaccine for pilot project
—1908
National Association of Nurses founded
—1897
Victorian Order of Nurses established
—1896
Canadian Red Cross Society established
—1892
“Principles and Practices of Medicine” published by
Canadian physician Sir William Osler
—1874
First nursing training school established by
Dr. Theophilus Monk in St. Catharines, Ontario
—1867
Emily Jennings Stowe becomes Canada’s first female physician
1870’s
Quarantine Act, Adulteration Act (precedes Food and
Drugs Act)
Development of the oral contraceptive
by the American biologist Gregory Pincus
Polio vaccine made available by injection
—1918
—1921
1880’s
Tobacco Restraint Act, Propriety or Patent Medicines Act
Life expectancy in Canada reaches 81.4 years for women
and 75.7 years for men
First life expectancy data in Canada recorded
61 years for women and 59 years for men
Canadian researchers Banting and Best treat diabetes using
their newly discovered insulin
Spanish influenza kills more than 20 million people worldwide
1910’s
1919—
—1996
1900’s
Department of Health established
—2004 Ten-Year Plan to Strengthen Health Care signed at
First Ministers’ Meeting
—2003 Appointment of Dr. Carolyn Bennett as Minister of State
for Public Health
“Learning from SARS — Renewal of the Public Health in Canada”
Report released
—2002 Romanow Report released
1890’s
1920’s
1930’s
Department of National Health and Welfare established
1970’s
The Established Program Financing Act
1960’s
2002—
2000—
1999—
1997—
1996—
Health Canada established 1993—
Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse Act 1988—
Financial Administration Act,
Hazardous Materials Information Review Act 1985—
Canada Health Act 1984—
1950’s
Pest Control Products Act
Canadian Institutes of Health Research Act
Canadian Environmental Protection Act
Tobacco Act & Canadian Food Inspection Agency Act
Controlled Drugs and Substances Act, Department of Health Act
1940’s
Creation of the Public Health Agency of Canada 2004—
Act Respecting Assisted Human Reproduction 2004—
and Related Research
2000’s
Canada’s Health History at a Glance
Federal Health Ministers
The Department of Health was established in 1919. Canada’s First Minister of National Health was Newton Roswell.
Previously, public health matters were handled mainly by the Department of Agriculture. In 1944, the Department of
National Health and Welfare was established and in 1993, Health Canada was created.
Minister of Health
Period
Prime Minister
Ujjal Dosanjh
July 20, 2004 – present
Paul Martin Jr.
Pierre Pettigrew
December 12, 2003 – July 19, 2004
Paul Martin Jr.
Anne McLellan
January 15, 2002 – December 11, 2003
Jean Chrétien
Allan Rock
June 11, 1997 – January 14, 2002
Jean Chrétien
David Dingwall
January 25, 1996 – June 10, 1997
Jean Chrétien
Diane Marleau
November 4, 1993 – January 24, 1996
Jean Chrétien
Mary Collins
June 25, 1993 – November 3, 1993
Kim Campbell
Benoît Bouchard
April 21, 1991 – June 24, 1993
Brian Mulroney
Perrin Beatty
January 30, 1989 – April 20, 1991
Brian Mulroney
Jake Epp
September 17, 1984 – January 29, 1989
Brian Mulroney
Monique Bégin
March 3, 1980 – September 16, 1984
Pierre Trudeau/John Turner
David Crombie
June 4, 1979 – March 2, 1980
Joe Clark
Monique Bégin
September 18, 1977 – June 3, 1979
Pierre Trudeau
Marc Lalonde
November 27, 1972 – September 17, 1977
Pierre Trudeau
John C. Munro
July 6, 1968 – November 26, 1972
Pierre Trudeau
Allan MacEachen
December 18, 1965 – July 5, 1968
Lester Pearson/Pierre Trudeau
Judy LaMarsh
April 22, 1963 – December 17, 1965
Lester Pearson
Jay Waldo Monteith
August 22, 1957 – April 21, 1963
John Diefenbaker
Alfred Johnson Brooks*
June 21, 1957 – August 21, 1957
John Diefenbaker
Paul Martin Sr.
December 12, 1946 – June 20, 1957
William Lyon Mackenzie King/
Louis St-Laurent
Brooke Claxton
October 18, 1944 – December 11, 1946
William Lyon Mackenzie King
* Acting Minister of Health
Table of Contents
Health Canada’s Report on Plans and Priorities 2005–2006 follows the revised reporting guidelines set out by the Treasury Board of
Canada, Secretariat. Therefore, the reporting format differs from the Report on Plans and Priorities 2004–2005. For more details see
http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/est-pre/20052006/p3_e.asp
Section 1: Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
Minister’s Message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
Departmental Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Summary Information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
About Health Canada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Our Vision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Mission Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Roles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Health Canada’s Regions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4
Acting in Concert with Others . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Departmental Plans and Priorities — the Health Canada Planning Context . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
Departmental Medium-Term Priorities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6
To Maintain Confidence in a Publicly-funded Health Care System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
To Improve the Quality of Life of Canadians . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
To Reduce the Risks to the Health of the People of Canada . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
To Improve Accountability to Canadians . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Endnotes and Web Site Links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Section 2: Analysis of Program Activities by Strategic Outcome . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Strategic Outcome # 1: Strengthened Knowledge Base to Address Health and Health Care Priorities . . . . 12
Program Activity Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Implementing the Ten-Year Plan to Strengthen Health Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Maintaining Confidence in the Publicly-funded Health Care System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Accelerating the Use of Information and Communications Technologies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15
Expanding and Improving the Indicators of Health System Performance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Health Sciences Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
New Health Protection Legislation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Assisted Human Reproduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Improving Access to Health Services by Official Language Minority Communities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
International Collaboration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Endnotes and Web Site Links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
Strategic Outcome # 2: Access to Safe and Effective Health Products and Food and Information
for Healthy Choices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Program Activity Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Transform Our Efficiency, Effectiveness and Responsiveness as a Regulator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Increasing Responsiveness to Public Health Issues and Greater Vigilance of Safety
and Therapeutic Effectiveness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Improving Transparency, Openness and Accountability to Strengthen Public Trust
and Stakeholder Relationships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Providing Authoritative Information for Healthy Choices and Informed Decision Making . . . . . . . . 23
Endnotes and Web Site Links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Strategic Outcome # 3: Reduced Health and Environmental Risks From Products and Substances,
and Safer Living and Working Environments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Program Activity Description — Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Workplace and Environmental Hazards, Consumer Products (Including Cosmetics),
Radiation-Emitting Devices, New Chemical Substances and Products of Biotechnology . . . . . . . 25
Tobacco Consumption and the Abuse of Drugs, Alcohol and Other Controlled Substances . . . . . . . 26
Endnotes and Web Site Links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Program Activity Description — Pest Control Product Regulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Implementing the New Pest Control Products Act . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Improving Efficiencies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Informing, Consulting and Involving Canadians . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Endnotes and Web Site Links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
Strategic Outcome # 4: Better Health Outcomes and Reduction of Health Inequalities Between
First Nations and Inuit and Other Canadians . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Program Activity Description . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Implementing the First Ministers’ Commitments on Aboriginal Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Addressing Early Childhood Health Priorities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Acting on Major Threats to Aboriginal Health. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Supporting Effective Health Services in First Nations and Inuit Communities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Endnotes and Web Site Links . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Section 3: Supplementary Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Management Representation Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
Health Portfolio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Table 1: Departmental Planned Spending and FTEs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
Table 2: Program Activities for 2005–2006 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40
Table 3: Voted and Statutory Items Listed in Main Estimates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41
Table 4: Net Cost of Department for 2005–2006 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Table 5: Sources of Respendable and Non-Respendable Revenues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Table 6: Resource Requirements by Branch and by Program Activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Table 7: Major Regulatory Initiatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Table 8: Details on Transfer Payments Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49
Table 9: Foundations (Conditional Grants) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Table 10 : Horizontal Initiatives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Section 4: Other Items of Interest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Advancing the Science Agenda. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Health Canada Highlights from the 2005 Federal Budget . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Health Care and Health Protection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Health and the Environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Aboriginal Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Expenditure Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Departmental Contacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Overview
1
Report on Plans and Priorities 2005–2006
Minister’s Message
Helping Canadians
Overall, the Plan demonstrates our continued
to maintain and
commitment to providing leadership and working
improve their health
together with the provinces, territories and
is a top priority of the
stakeholders to ensure Canadians have the best
Government of Canada.
possible health care system. The Ten-Year Plan reflects
Health Canada has
a shared commitment of federal, provincial and
committed itself to
territorial governments to public accountability and
improving the lives of
commits to providing performance measurement
all of Canada’s people
indicators, which will help ensure that we reach
and to making this
our goals.
country’s population
As this report shows, Health Canada will continue
among the healthiest in the world. The Department’s
to seek ways to minimize health risks and to protect
2005–2006 Report on Plans and Priorities builds on the
the health of Canadians. We are making strides on
progress we made in 2004 and provides an overview
a number of important issues — mandatory adverse
of our planned responses to the opportunities and
reaction reporting, disclosure of clinical trials, mental
challenges facing us.
health issues, environmental health, reduction of
Strengthening and renewing Canada’s publicly
tobacco use and continued work on the Therapeutics
funded system is at the forefront of Health
Access Strategy, a proactive strategy that requires
Canada’s agenda. At the First Ministers’ Meeting
the dedication of all stakeholders. We are constantly
of September 2004, the Prime Minister and the
examining ways to be more innovative and results-
Premiers signed the Ten-Year Plan to Strengthen
oriented. Health Canada will work with other health
Health Care that will lead to better health care for all
portfolio partners, including the new Public Health
Canadians. The Plan provides new federal investments
Agency of Canada, which works in health promotion,
of $41 billion over the next 10 years and responds
illness prevention and emergency preparedness and
directly to the key concern of Canadians — reducing
response.
wait times and improving access to care. Important
Health Canada remains committed to delivering
progress has been made on Aboriginal health as
tangible results to Canadians. This Report on Plans and
well. First Ministers and Aboriginal Leaders agreed to
Priorities sets out Health Canada’s strategies to help
develop a collaborative blueprint for concrete action
maintain and improve the health of citizens. It signals
to improve Aboriginal health and access to services.
a broad, ambitious and balanced agenda — an agenda
The federal government also announced $700 million
that reflects the priorities of Canadians.
to enhance prevention and promotion programming,
develop Aboriginal health human resources and
create an Aboriginal Health Transition Fund to enable
governments and communities to devise new ways to
integrate and adapt existing health services to better
Ujjal Dosanjh
meet the needs of Aboriginal people.
Minister of Health
Health Canada
page 2
Departmental Overview
Summary Information
Departmental Spending
Financial Resources (in millions of dollars):
2005–2006
2006–2007
2007–2008
2,879.0
2,632.5
2,641.7
2005–2006
2006–2007
2007–2008
8,123
8,082
8,037
Human Resources:
Departmental Priorities (in millions of dollars)
Type
To Maintain Confidence in a Publicly-funded Health
Care System
To Improve the Quality of Life of Canadians
To Reduce the Risks to the Health of Canadians
To Improve Accountability to Canadians
About Health Canada
Health matters deeply to Canadians — to individuals,
families and communities — as does Canada’s health
system, which has become a defining feature of this
country. The importance of health to Canadians is
grounded in our knowledge of, and experience with,
the tremendous benefits of good health to individual
well-being and to the well-being of our society
and economy. The importance of reducing health
inequalities reflects a shared sense of commitment
to the health of all Canadians.
Parliament and the Government of Canada
recognize the high priority that Canadians place
on health, and both have given Health Canada the
mandate to address Canada’s health agenda. The
Department of Health Act formally establishes the
Planned Spending
2005–2006
2006–2007
2007–2008
Ongoing
437.9
171.4
163.5
Ongoing
Ongoing
Ongoing
1,849.3
356.2
235.6
1,881.8
343.5
235.8
1,909.0
336.7
232.5
another 18 laws, which include the Canada Health
Act, the Food and Drugs Act, the Pest Control Products
Act, and the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act.1
In addition to these legislated responsibilities, the
Department has significant science and research,
policy development, and program and service delivery
roles that benefit Canadians.
Our Vision
Health Canada is committed to improving the lives
of all of Canada’s people and to making this country’s
population among the healthiest in the world as
measured by longevity, lifestyle and effective use of
the public health care system.
Mission Statement
Department’s mandate, while the Minister of Health
To help the people of Canada maintain and improve
is also responsible for the direct administration of
their health.
Report on Plans and Priorities 2005–2006
page 3
Objectives
By working with others in a manner that fosters the
trust of Canadians, Health Canada strives to:
• prevent and reduce risks to individual health
and the overall environment;
• promote healthier lifestyles;
• ensure high quality health services that are
efficient and accessible;
• integrate renewal of the health care system with
longer term plans in the areas of prevention,
health promotion and protection;
• reduce health inequalities in Canadian society;
and
• provide health information to help Canadians
make informed decisions.
Roles
biologics, medical devices, natural health products,
consumer goods and foods. We deliver a range of
programs and services in environmental health and
protection, and have responsibilities in the areas of
substance abuse, tobacco policy, workplace health and
the safe use of consumer products. As well, Health
Canada monitors and tracks diseases and takes action
where required.
Service Provider through the provision of
supplementary health benefits to approximately
749,725 eligible First Nations and Inuit to cover
pharmaceuticals, dental services, vision services,
medical transportation, medical supplies and
equipment, and crisis intervention mental health
counselling. We support the delivery of public health
and health promotion services on-reserve and in Inuit
Health Canada plays five core roles in order to
communities. We also provide primary care services
realize our vision. In playing these roles identified
on-reserve in remote and isolated areas, where there
below, our Department draws on our strengths as a
are no provincial services readily available.
science-based department. We generate knowledge
Information Provider through performing high-
through the research, analysis and evaluations that we
quality science and research, we support policy
conduct, partner in and support. We also draw on the
development, regulate increasingly-sophisticated
knowledge that is being generated around the world to
products and provide the services, information and
help us and others make informed, effective choices
management essential to affordable and world-class
across all five roles.
health care for Canadians. Through research and
Leader/Partner through the administration of the
surveillance, we provide information that Canadians
Canada Health Act, which embodies the key values
can use to maintain and improve their health.
and principles of Medicare.
Health Canada’s Regions
Funder through policy support for the federal
government’s Canada Health and Social Transfer,
replaced on April 1, 2004 by the new Canada Health
Transfer. Health Canada also transfers funds to First
Nations and Inuit organizations and communities
to deliver community health services and provides
grants and contributions to various organizations
that reinforce the Department’s health objectives.
Roughly 35% of Health Canada’s staff are at work in
communities outside of the National Capital Region,
as indicated on the accompanying map. We deliver
health services and programs in First Nations and
Inuit communities, manage links with provincial
and territorial governments, conduct laboratory
investigations, work with local health organizations,
serve as a frontline service and information provider
Guardian/Regulator through a stewardship role that
for Canadians and much more. This strong regional
involves both protecting Canadians and facilitating
presence enables us to maximize the reach and
the provision of products vital to the health and well-
effectiveness of departmental programs and
being of our citizens. Our Department regulates and
resources, by matching national directions to local
approves the use of thousands of products, including
conditions and opportunities.
pesticides, toxic substances, pharmaceuticals,
Health Canada
page 4
Report on Plans and Priorities 2005–2006
page 5
Acting in Concert with Others
Health Canada works with the people of Canada
through consultation and public involvement. This
includes working with our partners: provincial and
territorial governments, First Nations, Inuit and
other Aboriginal organizations and communities,
professional associations, consumer groups,
universities and research institutes, international
Health Canada activities are a significant part
of the work taking place across the Government of
Canada Health Portfolio. We work with the other
partners in this portfolio, each of which has its own
Report on Plans and Priorities, namely:
• the Canadian Institutes of Health Research;
• the Hazardous Materials Information
Review Commission;
organizations, volunteers and other federal
• the Patented Medicine Prices Review
Board; and
departments and agencies.
• the new Public Health Agency of Canada.
Departmental Plans and
Priorities — the Health Canada
Planning Context
Health Canada’s plans and priorities are based on
the latest research and analysis of health issues
In 2004, the Government of Canada created the
Public Health Agency of Canada to address Canada’s
public health challenges.
Departmental Medium-Term
Priorities
facing Canadians. They synthesize our Departmental
For 2004–2005 and beyond, Health Canada
commitments to focus on the most effective means
established four medium-term corporate priorities
to achieve health results for Canadians, given our
that reflect our Department’s vision, mission,
Department’s mandate and jurisdiction. This work
mandate and jurisdiction, as well as Government
includes:
of Canada directions and commitments, and First
• analyzing broad global and domestic social
and economic trends that influence the health
of Canadians;
Ministers’ Agreements. These priorities will continue
• assessing the key health challenges facing
Canadians and Canada’s health system; and
First Ministers’ September 2004 Ten-Year Plan
• identifying how the Department can contribute
to the achievement of the Government of
Canada’s broader policy directions and
commitments, including those set out in
Speeches from the Throne.
Most Health Canada resources are allocated to
to translate the key issues, health challenges and
federal government-wide agenda, including the
to Strengthen Health Care, into focal points for
Departmental action in 2005–2006 and beyond.
These priorities, described in detail below, are:
• to maintain confidence in a publicly-funded
health care system;
• to improve the quality of life of Canadians;
under the Department of Health Act and other laws
• to reduce the risks to the health of
Canadians; and
that include the Canada Health Act, the Food and Drugs
• to improve accountability to Canadians.
Act, the Pest Control Products Act, and the Controlled
These priorities guided the Departmental decision
ongoing responsibilities, particularly those established
Drugs and Substances Act. Our planning process
to focus on four areas of strategic policy and program
recognizes the need to manage risks and relies
development, which are: sustaining health care
on the effective use of scientific evidence and
renewal; towards a 21st century public health system;
expertise.
an Aboriginal health agenda; and health and the
environment.
Health Canada
page 6
To Maintain Confidence in a
Publicly-funded Health Care
System
Health Canada will act as an information and
knowledge provider through research, surveillance and
health promotion activities. We will build on existing
collaborative work with provinces and territories in
Canada’s health care system accounts for a large share
specific areas such as pan-Canadian health human
of public sector budgets and its effectiveness and
resources planning, improved access to health
accessibility is important to Canadians. Since 2000,
services by Official Language Minority Communities,
the Government of Canada and the governments
and expanding and improving the indicators of health
of the provinces and territories have agreed to a
system performance. As well, we will continue to act
series of actions designed to maintain confidence in
as a funder of health services through transfers to the
Canada’s publicly-funded health care system. These
provinces and territories and as the provider of non-
agreements include support for structural reforms to
insured health benefits to First Nations and Inuit. As
primary health care, home care and catastrophic drug
the department responsible for the Canada Health
coverage; improved health human resources planning;
Act, we remain the guardian of the universal publicly-
and collaborative efforts to better manage drug costs.
funded health care system.
These agreements also provide long-term funding
through increases in the Canada Health Transfer and
investments in information and communications
technology. Enhanced accountability for health care
system performance is provided through support for
the arm’s-length Health Council of Canada and regular
jurisdictional reporting to Canadians.
The Ten-Year Plan to Strengthen Health Care
builds on this base with a focus on achieving tangible
results for patients through reduced wait times in
priority areas and improved access to home and
primary health care services. The Plan will ensure
an adequate supply and appropriate mix of health
care professionals, including the acceleration and
expansion of the assessment and integration of
internationally trained health care graduates. It
recognizes the unique health care delivery challenges
in the North and encourages innovative delivery of
health care services in rural and remote communities.
While the provinces and territories have primary
responsibility for delivering on the commitments
set out in the Ten-Year Plan, Canadians expect their
governments to work in partnership to preserve
and strengthen their health care system, and to
work collaboratively on initiatives to modernize
health programs and improve health care services
delivery. Health Canada will act on this expectation,
demonstrate leadership and work collaboratively
with provinces and territories to ensure that the
First Ministers’ commitments are implemented.
To Improve the Quality of Life
of Canadians
Health is a key factor in improving the quality of life
of Canadians. Although Canadians are among the
healthiest people in the world by most indicators,
rising obesity rates, the increasing prevalence of
diabetes and other issues point to areas for action.
Also, in comparison to the general Canadian
population, Aboriginal peoples face a higher risk
for poor health and demonstrate a greater prevalence
of injuries, suicide and chronic conditions.
All levels of government have roles to play in
protecting and promoting the health of Canadians.
Health Canada plays an important leadership role
working in collaboration with provincial and territorial
governments and the health community.
Our Department recognizes the importance of
balanced investments across illness prevention, health
promotion, protection and care. The Department
constantly examines the determinants of health in
order to develop interventions that can improve the
health outcomes of individuals, particular groups
and the entire population. We develop policies and
programs and work through partnerships to promote
healthy choices and environments for individuals
and communities. In addition, Health Canada’s
science and evaluation expertise represent important
contributions to improving the impact of programs
Report on Plans and Priorities 2005–2006
page 7
and services that can have real and lasting benefits
for Canadians.
Many of these activities represent ongoing work
To Reduce the Risks to the Health
of the People of Canada
with specific priorities for attention that we note in
Reducing health risks takes many forms for Health
Section II of this Report, such as our commitment to
Canada. A strong capability to perform and access
improve product regulation as part of the Government
the science necessary to do so underpins all of these
of Canada’s larger commitment to “smart regulation.”
activities. Our ongoing legislated responsibility to
In addition to those ongoing commitments,
regulate various products is one example of this.
Health Canada is addressing the pressures facing
Under the Therapeutic Access Strategy, we will
the First Nations and Inuit health system and
continue to expand efforts to achieve timely reviews
supporting sustainable health programming in their
of pharmaceutical products, with full attention to
communities. Our goal is to provide efficient, effective
safety and efficacy. As noted earlier in this section,
and sustainable health services and programs that
our Department will work closely with the new Public
contribute to better health outcomes for First Nations
Health Agency of Canada in order to strengthen the
and Inuit. Some significant investments and reforms
country’s public health system.
have already been put in place through funding
Health and environment linkages represent a
announced in recent budgets. The September 2004
growing focus of Departmental attention under this
First Ministers’ Meeting with Aboriginal Leaders
corporate priority. Scientific evidence shows that
resulted in an agreement to build on this work. Under
hazards arising from environmental degradation,
that agreement, the Government of Canada and the
climate change and the introduction of new
governments of the provinces and territories will work
substances and technologies can affect the health
with Aboriginal organizations to develop a blueprint
of Canadians. Health Canada is already taking action
to improve the health status of Aboriginal peoples
across many health and environment topics, such
and health services in Canada. The goals of the
as preparation to implement the new Pest Control
blueprint are:
Products Act, which strengthens the current emphasis
• improved delivery of and access to health
services to meet the needs of all Aboriginal
peoples through better integration and
adaptation of all health systems;
on minimizing environment and health risks from
• measures that will ensure that Aboriginal
peoples benefit fully from improvements to
Canadian health systems; and
the health effects of pollutants and assessments of
• a forward looking agenda of prevention, health
promotion and other upstream investments
for Aboriginal peoples.
To reinforce that commitment, Health Canada will
pesticides, as well as research into health issues
related to the Canadian Environmental Protection Act.
The Department conducts and supports research on
health-related environmental issues in specific regions,
such as in border regions between Canada and the
United States.
This work is expected to expand in response
to greater awareness of environmental and health
work to implement the Government’s commitment
linkages. Collaboration with current or possible
to create an Aboriginal Health Transition Fund, which
partners in other federal government departments,
should lead to better health services to more effectively
other governments and in the scientific and
meet the needs of all Aboriginal peoples, including
health communities should also grow as a more
First Nations, Inuit and Métis. The Department will
comprehensive health and environment agenda
lead the new Aboriginal Health Human Resources
takes shape.
Initiative and health promotion and disease prevention
programs focussed on major Aboriginal health
concerns.
Health Canada
page 8
To Improve Accountability
to Canadians
• Contributing to healthier environments and
safer products for Canadians through improved
departmental activities and sustainable
management of land and facilities; and
The previous three priorities are grounded in a
• The collaborative delivery of health promotion,
disease prevention and health care services
for First Nations and Inuit.
Department-wide commitment to be accountable
in delivering the results that Canadians expect and
deserve. This priority incorporates Departmental
activities to integrate the principles of sustainable
development and modern comptrollership, introduce
improved systems and processes for Departmental
operations, and address human resource priorities.
The same commitment that has led First
Ministers to agree to clear benchmarks for health
system improvement is reflected in efforts to improve
performance management within Health Canada that
are focussed largely on health outcomes. For example,
this Report is organized along the new Program
Activity Architecture that aligns our desired strategic
outcomes, Departmental priorities and high-level
performance indicators with our Department’s day-today activities and responsibilities.
In support of the achievement of all Strategic
Outcomes, simultaneous activities — large and
small — on many fronts will strengthen stewardship
and accountability, further enhancing the
Department’s ability to meet its objectives.
Health Canada will continue its operationalization
of the Management Accountability Framework (MAF)
at all levels by building capacity through learning
programs in areas such as risk management, financial
management and procurement and contracting
for example. Comprehensive actions on a range of
human resources and workplace health initiatives will
ensure that the Department maintains its leadership
role in the area of human resources management
modernization.2
Health Canada will also enhance its financial
management practices and effective use of
resources through the implementation of a Financial
Management Control Framework which includes the
development of management tools and improved
reporting capacity for managers.
Endnotes and Web Site Links
1
are at: http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/english/about/
Health Canada’s Sustainable Development
Strategy 2004–2007, entitled Becoming the Change
We Wish to See, commits the Department and its
employees to consider the principles of sustainable
development when developing and delivering health
programs and services to Canadians. By integrating
the principles of sustainable development into its
work, Health Canada will ensure its policies and
More details on the legislation and regulations
acts_regulations.html
2
For more information about the MAF, visit Health
Canada’s web page at: http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/
english/care/estimates/modern_comptrollership.
htm or the Treasory Board of Canada Secretariat
website at: http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/cmo_mfc/
index_e.asp
programs are ecologically sound. In the coming year,
the Department commits to:
• Strengthening partnerships on health,
environment and sustainable development to
contribute to healthier environments and safer
foods and products for Canadians;
• Integrating sustainable development
into departmental decision-making and
management processes to contribute to the
effective delivery of Health Canada’s programs;
Report on Plans and Priorities 2005–2006
page 9
Analysis of Program
Activities by Strategic
Outcome
2
Report on Plans and Priorities 2005–2006
Strategic Outcome # 1: Strengthened Knowledge Base
to Address Health and Health Care Priorities
Program Activity — Health Policy, Planning and Information
PLANNED SPENDING AND FULL-TIME EQUIVALENTS (FTEs)
Forecast
Planned
Spending
Spending
($ millions)
2004–2005
2005–2006
456.3
Net expenditures* **
422.0
682
FTEs
637
Planned
Spending
2006–2007
189.4
666
Planned
Spending
2007–2008
181.3
639
* The increase in net expenditures from 2004–2005 to 2005–2006 is mainly due to an increase in funding levels for the Primary
Health Care Transition Fund, for the Set-up of the Assisted Human Reproduction Agency and for the Access to Key Services for
Official Language Minority Communities Initiative. The decrease in net expenditures from 2005–2006 to 2006–2007 is mainly
due to a reduction in funding levels for the Primary Health Care Transition Fund Initiative and the sunset of funds related to
the Northern Health Supplement to the 2003 First Ministers’ Accord on Health Care Renewal. Budget 2005 has announced
new funding that addresses certain sunsetting items. Please see Section 4 for further details on the Budget. The decrease in
net expenditures from 2006–2007 to 2007–2008 is mainly due to the sunsetting of the Primary Health Care Transition Fund
Initiative and a decrease in the level of funding for the Assisted Human Reproduction Agency.
** Figures include an amount for other departmental and regional infrastructure costs supporting program delivery. These costs
are $20.2 million in 2004–2005, $18.4 million in 2005–2006, $18.1 million in 2006–2007 and $17.8 million in 2007–2008.
Program Activity Description
The Health Policy Branch (HPB) provides advice
and support to the Minister, the Departmental
executives and to program branches in the areas
of policy development, intergovernmental and
international affairs, strategic planning, program
delivery and review, and the administration of the
Canada Health Act.
The Information, Analysis and Connectivity Branch
(IACB) contributes to improved health outcomes
for Canadians by promoting the increased and more
effective use of information and communications
technologies; by improving access to reliable health
information; by providing policy research and analysis
to support evidence-based decision-making; by
working with official language minority communities
and others to improve access to health services in the
official language of choice; and by taking into account
Canadians’ privacy expectations with respect to health
information.
Most of the work under this Program Activity
represents a range of ongoing activities such as
health policy analysis and development; monitoring
Health Canada
page 12
and analyzing provincial and territorial health issues,
including compliance with the principles, conditions,
and extra-billing and user-charge provisions of the
Canada Health Act. We manage relations with other
governments and health organizations in Canada
and internationally on health issues and deal with
specific priority topics including women’s health,
nursing and the health-related issues affecting official
language communities. Our efforts related to data
and information gathering for many issues that touch
on all Strategic Outcomes are included here, as is our
work to promote and address the most effective use
of advanced information, communications and health
technologies across Canada’s health system.
As such, international human security issues,
Canadian societal trends, pressures on the health care
system, scientific advances and new technology, along
with the federal-provincial environment all challenge
and shape our operating environment.
The Government of Canada has made renewal
of the health care system a central priority, which
is reflected in the Health Canada corporate priority,
“to maintain confidence in a publicly funded health
care system.” We will continue to support the use
of information and communication technologies
to improve health care delivery and management;
In British Columbia, Health Canada will continue
continue to contribute to the development of
to partner with other levels of government, health
indicators that all jurisdictions can use to track
researchers, academia and stakeholder groups
and report health system performance; continue
to identify and undertake research and other
the expansion of the evidence base for policy and
complementary activities (e.g., policy forums;
operational decisions; and continue to ensure that
workshops) to support knowledge transfer on
official language minority communities have access
health priorities. This will include follow-up to
to health services in their own language.
a successful Vancouver-based Regional Forum on
We will take action to meet these priorities in many
ways, described below.
Primary Health Care and the first ever Canadian
Conference on Arts and Health, which looked at
how arts and culture can contribute to the health
Implementing the Ten-Year Plan
to Strengthen Health Care
On September 16, 2004, the Prime Minister and all
Premiers and Territorial Leaders signed the Ten-Year
Plan to Strengthen Health Care.1 The agreement
addresses Canadians’ priorities for sustaining and
renewing the health care system, and also provides
long-term funding of $41 billion over ten years to
make those reforms a reality.
The Ten-Year Plan builds on work that began
under the 2003 First Ministers’ Accord on Health Care
Renewal on home care, catastrophic drug coverage,
primary health care, health technology assessment
and health human resources. The Ten-Year Plan
goes beyond these Accord commitments by adding
the Wait Times Reduction Strategy and the National
Pharmaceuticals Strategy to encourage optimal drug
use and improve cost management.
Foremost on the agenda for renewal of health care
in Canada is the need to make timely access to quality
care a reality for all Canadians. The $4.5 billion Wait
Times Reduction Fund will build upon provincial and
territorial initiatives to reduce waiting times for health
services. Our roles under the Wait Times Reduction
Strategy will centre on collaboration with partners to:
• establish evidence-based benchmarks for
medically acceptable wait times starting with
the following priority areas — cancer, heart
disease, diagnostic imaging procedures, joint
replacements and sight restoration;
of Canadians.
• develop comparable indicators of access to
health care professionals, and diagnostic
and treatment procedures; and
• support collective efforts to promote and
facilitate wait times management, such as
public education, information sharing and
promotion of best practices.
Health Canada will work with our provincial/
territorial counterparts to further the development
and implementation of the National Pharmaceuticals
Strategy as mandated by First Ministers in the
Ten-Year Plan. Building on shared efforts to date, we
will be actively engaged in intergovernmental work to:
• develop, assess and cost options for
catastrophic pharmaceutical coverage;
• establish a common National Drug Formulary
for participating jurisdictions based on safety
and cost effectiveness;
• accelerate access to breakthrough drugs for
unmet health needs through improvements
to the drug approval process;
• strengthen evaluation of real-world drug safety
and effectiveness;
• pursue purchasing strategies to obtain best
prices for Canadians for drugs and vaccines;
• enhance action to influence the prescribing
behaviour of health care professionals so that
drugs are used only when needed and the right
drug is used for the right problem;
• broaden the practice of e-prescribing through
accelerated development and deployment of
the Electronic Health Record;
Report on Plans and Priorities 2005–2006
page 13
• accelerate access to non-patented drugs and
achieve international parity on prices of nonpatented drugs; and
• enhance analysis of cost drivers and costeffectiveness, including best practices in
drug plan policies.
To build on health human resource (HHR)
activities that support the 2003 Accord and the 2004
Ten-Year Plan, Health Canada will continue with the
implementation of the Health Human Resource
Strategy through three broad initiatives: Pan-Canadian
Health Human Resource Planning; Interprofessional
Education for Collaborative Patient-Centred Practice;
and Recruitment and Retention. Specific Strategy
activities include:
• collaborative partnerships involving
governments and key stakeholders to accelerate
and expand the assessment and integration of
internationally trained health care graduates
and to address issues of integration into the
Canadian workforce for internationally educated
health professionals;
• attention to the HHR needs of health providers
servicing Aboriginal populations;
• continuing collaboration with provincial/
territorial governments in the development
and implementation of a Pan-Canadian HHR
Planning Framework;
• work with the Canadian Institute for Health
Information on health care provider data
and forecasting;
• collaboration with provinces and territories to
assess gaps in HHR modelling and forecasting
capacities;
In partnership with Health Canada’s Alberta/
NWT Region, health researchers from academia,
non-government organizations and various
communities will develop a community-based
health agenda to enhance positive health outcomes
for women in Alberta.
later in this section, we expect to build on the work to
date in addressing commitments identified in the
Ten-Year Plan which include:
• reiteration of the target for primary health
care identified in the 2003 Accord. Health
Canada will identify its own targets vis à vis the
populations for which it provides health care
services. The Primary Health Care Transition
Fund ($800 million from 2000 to 2006)
continues to support the direction of the 2003
and 2004 agreements to develop and test
new ways of providing and managing primary
health care; and
• establishment of a Best Practices Network
for primary health care, which will help with
information-sharing and support collaborative
activity to address common barriers to
progress.
In September 2004, First Ministers also agreed
that their governments would provide first-dollar
coverage for certain home care services, based on
assessed need by 2006. Working with our federal
partners, Health Canada will ensure that the population
served by federal departments (specifically First
Nations, Inuit and veterans) will have access to
• projects to address interprofessional
collaborative patient-centred practice initiatives;
and
this coverage.
• financial support to the Society of Rural
Physicians of Canada for strategies to recruit
and retain rural physicians, educational
programs and new models of access to rural
surgical care.
Ministers’ Accord, including:
Primary health care refers to the first level of
service and contact that most Canadians have with the
health care system. Governments have been working
together on new approaches to primary health care for
the past decade. In addition to initiatives described
Health Canada
page 14
Health Canada will also continue to support the
implementation of commitments in the 2003 First
• working with provinces/territories and other key
stakeholders to implement the new Canadian
Health Technology Strategy;
• working closely with the Canadian Patient
Safety Institute (CPSI) as it moves forward to
implement its strategic business plan; and
• supporting the Health Council in its renewed
mandate from the Ten-Year Plan.
Maintaining Confidence in
the Publicly-funded Health
Care System
Health Canada’s Ontario and Nunavut Region,
in collaboration with the Information, Analysis
and Connectivity Branch, are working on the
Our Department will act on other issues that will help
Canada Health Portal. The goal of the Canada
to maintain confidence in Canada’s health care system
Health Portal is to provide authoritative, trusted
during 2005–2006.
health information across provincial/territorial
We will improve our reporting to Parliament and
jurisdictions, and act as a “one-stop shop” for
Canadians on insured health care services provided
information and previously inaccessible health-
by the provinces and territories, through the Canada
related government information and services for
Health Act Annual Report, which is required under
all Canadians. A pilot project with the Province
the Canada Health Act, and through which the
of Ontario and Toronto Public Health to test the
federal Minister of Health provides information on
feasibility of interjurisdictional partnerships has
the administration and operation of provincial and
been launched.
territorial health plans as they relate to the criteria
and conditions of the Act.2
We will continue to support initiatives to improve
In addition to the work on primary health care
the quality and availability of palliative and end-
innovation and reform noted earlier, we intend to work
of-life care across Canada through collaborative
with our provincial, territorial and stakeholder partners
opportunities with the palliative care community,
to draw attention to the progress being made under
provincial and territorial counterparts, and other
the Primary Health Care Transition Fund (PHCTF)
federal departments.
during 2005–2006, such as:
• increasing the visibility of service delivery
initiatives, using extensive stakeholder and
public consultations and engagement;
• holding workshops on topics such as physician
remuneration, chronic disease management,
information technology and primary health
care renewal in the north;
Accelerating the Use of Information
and Communications Technologies
The increased adoption of information and
communications technologies in the health sector
is essential to creating a sustainable health system
that provides better access to services for Canadians,
• launching a national awareness strategy; and
now and in the future. Since 2001, Canada Health
• sharing the results of all PHCTF initiatives
nationally, including audits and evaluations.
Infoway (Infoway) has been allocated $1.2 billion in
Family and informal caregivers provide an
estimated 80–90% of care that seniors receive in
their homes. The October 2004 Speech from the
Throne recognized “the vital role of Canadians who
care for aged or infirm relatives or those with severe
disabilities” and undertook to “improve its existing
tax-based support and will ask Parliament to consult
across the country on additional initiatives.” We will
work with Social Development Canada, which has
the federal policy lead for family caregiving, in pursuit
of a national strategy to support family caregivers of
seniors and people with disabilities.
federal funding to work with provinces and territories
in developing Pan-Canadian eHealth solutions for
electronic health records, telehealth and health
surveillance.
Health Canada’s role is to ensure Infoway fulfils its
obligations under its Funding Agreement (including
an evaluation in 2006 by Infoway of its overall
performance in achieving expected outcomes), to
provide national leadership, particularly on policy
issues, and to collaborate with the provinces and
territories to avoid duplication of efforts and
reduce costs.
In 2005–2006, we will continue to focus on
addressing the privacy concerns of Canadians
Report on Plans and Priorities 2005–2006
page 15
in the health system, including for eHealth. The
cure thousands of disorders and the rising impact
Pan-Canadian Health Information Privacy and
of technological change on health care spending
Confidentiality Framework proposes a harmonized
growth. Accordingly, we will be contributing to federal,
set of core provisions for the collection, use and
provincial, territorial, and international efforts in areas
disclosure of personal health information in both the
such as gene patenting, ensuring the quality and
publicly- and privately-funded sectors. Consistent
accuracy of genetic tests and assessing the impact of
privacy regimes among jurisdictions will facilitate
genetic medicine and technologies on health systems
health care renewal, including the development of
serving a diverse population.
electronic health record systems and primary health
care reform.
Expanding and Improving the
Indicators of Health System
Performance
Health Canada supports the development and better
use of evidence for decision-making, improved
performance measurement and accountability, all
important elements contributing to a sustainable
health system. The Ten-Year Plan to Strengthen
Health Care, signed by all Canada’s First Ministers
in September 2004, emphasizes accountability by all
governments and builds on their previous actions to
report on health system performance to Canadians.
During 2005–2006, Health Canada will continue to
work with the provinces and territories, Statistics
Canada and the Canadian Institute for Health
Information to improve health statistics. This will
strengthen the foundation required to better manage
the health system.
We will also invest in other research to support
Health Canada decision making with respect to the
priority themes of innovation, regulation, healthy
communities and First Nations and Inuit health.
Working with our partners, we are committed
to participating and leading in the early issue
identification and monitoring of emerging technologies
that impact on the health of individuals, vulnerable
populations and the health system. Through active
information sharing, targeted policy research, and
consultations, we will support the development of
evidence-based recommendations, strategies, and new
and amended policies and guidelines in priority areas,
such as the ethical conduct of research involving
humans, nanotechnology, biobanks, and sharing the
benefits of research with study participants.
New Health Protection Legislation
In the October 2004 Speech from the Throne, the
Government committed to introducing new health
protection legislation. We will actively support the
Government in the development and legislative
progress of this effort to replace several outdated
pieces of legislation within Health Canada’s mandate
with new legislation. The goal will be a clear, coherent,
comprehensive and flexible legislative approach that
will be more responsive to social and technological
realities and that will provide the necessary tools to
better protect the health of Canadians now and in
the future.
Health Sciences Policy
Rapid advances in scientific and health knowledge
make an active policy research and development role
critical to the achievement of all Strategic Outcomes
Health Canada is partnering with the Manitoba
for the health of Canadians. In addition to work in
Institute for Patient Safety and the Canadian
many other areas, we will pay particular attention to
Patient Safety Institute to identify priorities and
two fields in 2005–2006.
issues associated with patient safety in the health
Human genetics has clear implications for the
sustainability of Canada’s health care system in terms
of potential new ways to prevent, diagnose, treat and
Health Canada
page 16
care system in a variety of urban, rural and
on reserve settings throughout Manitoba.
Assisted Human Reproduction
The Assisted Human Reproduction Act received Royal
Assent in March 2004, and we have begun work
towards its implementation. The Act provides for the
establishment of the Assisted Human Reproduction
Agency of Canada to license, monitor and enforce
activities controlled under the Act. Health Canada
will proceed with a public recruitment process
for Governor in Council appointments to the
Agency’s board of directors, including the President.
Departmental efforts will also continue towards
the development of the Agency’s governance and
infrastructure frameworks including the drafting of its
first strategic business plan and budget to coincide
with it achieving full operational status by 2006–2007.
In 2005–2006 the Department will proceed with
public consultations to develop the components of
the regulatory framework for the implementation of
the Act. The Department will also begin to address
priority areas where regulations are required to bring
the legislation into effect, for example, regulations
ensuring that written consent is obtained from
donors for the use of their reproductive material and
regulations regarding the reimbursement of receipted
expenditures by donors. Work is also underway by
Health Canada to lay the foundations for creating the
personal health information registry mandated by the
Assisted Human Reproduction Act.
In 2005–2006, the focus will be to build on
the momentum already achieved as a result of the
Action Plan and to identify further opportunities for
improvement.
International Collaboration
Public health risks and threats originating beyond
Canada’s borders increasingly influence the health
of Canadians. International collaboration on
global health events, developments and policies
is of growing importance to the sustainability and
responsiveness of Canada’s health system. Health
Canada positions itself internationally to: anticipate
and respond to international health developments
and their impact on Canadians and the health system;
influence international health events and fora; provide
leadership on selected health issues; and work with
the multiplicity of players on the global health scene.
During 2005–2006, a strategic framework for
Health Canada’s international health activities will
be completed, and implementation will begin. This
framework will guide the Department’s decisions on
international involvement, advance domestic health
priorities, and contribute to Canada’s foreign policy.
We will participate in World Health Organization
(WHO) negotiations to revise the International Health
Regulations as this is a priority for the protection of
Canadians against the spread of infectious disease.
In order to shape and strengthen the international
Improving Access to Health Services
by Official Language Minority
Communities
agenda on health and health care issues, consistent
Improved access to health-related services by English-
Organization (PAHO); continue to develop and
and French-speaking language minority communities
advance Canada’s health interests in other multilateral
in their official language is a Government of Canada
(e.g., European Union) and bilateral (e.g., Mexico)
and Health Canada priority, and an important
relations; seek mechanisms to engage countries in
component of a sustainable health care system.
collaboration on health policy and programmatic
Health Canada will continue to work closely with the
issues through, for example, Letters of Agreement, and
official language minority communities through the
Memoranda of Understanding. We will continue to
five-year federal Action Plan for Official Languages
serve as the Secretariat for the Global Health Security
($119 million between 2003–2008, which included
Initiative to coordinate the planning, organization and
$30 million in the Official Language Envelope of the
implementation of work, including annual Ministerial
Primary Health Care Transition Fund).
Meetings, by this international partnership to improve
with Canada’s priorities and values, we will represent
Canada at annual high level meetings and other major
meetings of the WHO and Pan-American Health
Report on Plans and Priorities 2005–2006
page 17
public health preparedness and response to man-
through projects administered by the Canadian
made (e.g., bioterrorism) and naturally occurring
International Development Agency, the World Bank,
(e.g., pandemic influenza) public health threats.
and health organizations such as PAHO, with special
International work will continue to advance
attention on relations with key countries such as the
such key issues as the Government of Canada’s
USA and Mexico. Expertise and assistance will be
strategies on HIV/AIDS by taking a leadership role
provided to visiting foreign delegations here to learn
in planning and preparations for the 2006 XVI
about Canada’s health system.
International AIDS Conference in Toronto; tobacco
control by participating in the WHO Conference of
Endnotes and Web Site Links
Parties to implement the Framework Convention
1
Further information on the Ten-Year Plan can
on Tobacco Control; and international trade and
be found at http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/english/
health through policy analysis and collaboration with
hca2003/index.html
other departments and domestic and international
stakeholders. Opportunities will be sought to utilize
Health Canada’s technical expertise to assist countries
Health Canada
page 18
2
Further information on the Canada Health Act is
available at http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/medicare
Strategic Outcome # 2: Access to Safe and Effective Health
Products and Food and Information for Healthy Choices
Program Activity — Health Products and Food
PLANNED SPENDING AND FULL-TIME EQUIVALENTS (FTEs)
Forecast
Planned
Spending
Spending
($ millions)
2004–2005
2005–2006
275.2
Gross expenditures
300.0
41.2
Less: Expected respendable revenues
41.2
234.0
Net expenditures* **
258.8
2,379
FTEs
2,371
Planned
Spending
2006–2007
262.4
41.2
221.2
2,336
Planned
Spending
2007–2008
260.5
41.2
219.3
2,339
* The decrease in net expenditures between 2004–2005 and 2005–2006 is mainly due to a decrease in the level of funding for
the Therapeutic Access Strategy, Medical Devices Litigation Management, and for resources related to collective agreements.
The decrease in net expenditures between 2005–2006 and 2006–2007 is mainly due to a decrease in the level of funding for
the Implementation of Health Canada’s Therapeutic Access Strategy, the Department’s contribution to the $1 billion federal
government reallocation exercise and the sunsetting of the funding for Further Measures on Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy.
Budget 2005 has announced new funding that addresses certain sunsetting items. Please see Section 4 for further details on the
Budget. The decrease in net expenditures between 2006–2007 and 2007–2008 is mainly due to the Department’s contribution
to the $1 billion federal government reallocation exercise and a decrease in the level of funding for the Implementation of the
Doha Declaration on the Trade-Related Intellectual Property Rights Agreement and Public Health.
** Figures include an amount for other departmental and regional infrastructure costs supporting program delivery. These costs
are $54.4 million in 2004–2005, $49.8 million in 2005–2006, $49.0 million in 2006–2007 and $48.3 million in 2007–2008.
Program Activity Description
Health Canada is responsible for a broad range
of health protection and promotion activities that
affect the everyday lives of Canadians. As the federal
authority responsible for the regulation of health
products and food, Health Products and Food Branch
(HPFB) evaluates and monitors the safety, quality
and effectiveness of thousands of drugs (human
and veterinary), vaccines, blood and blood products,
biologics and genetic therapies, medical devices and
natural health products, as well as the safety of the
foods we eat. We also provide useful information
about risks and benefits related to health products and
food so that Canadians can make informed decisions
also faces challenges associated with rapid advances
in technology and scientific breakthroughs that have
resulted in the growth of an unprecedented number
of biologics, genetic therapies and vaccines and
genetically modified and other novel foods. We are
meeting these challenges by drawing on sound science
and effective risk management in evidence-based
decision making. These disciplines are integrated into
our daily operations, and together with our health
promotion activities, they enable timely access to safe
and effective health products and food for Canadians.
In support of our operations, we have identified
four priorities for action under this Program Activity.
life cycle of health products and food, from clinical
Transform Our Efficiency,
Effectiveness and Responsiveness
as a Regulator
trials to surveillance, compliance, and enforcement.
Health Canada and our partners continue to
The scope of our work is significant with more than
implement strategies to improve access for
22,000 human drug products and 40,000 medical
Canadians to safe and effective health products
devices on the Canadian market today. Health Canada
and food. The Therapeutics Access Strategy (TAS),
about their health and well-being.
Our ongoing regulatory responsibilities span the
Report on Plans and Priorities 2005–2006
page 19
launched in 2003–2004, arose from the First
the provinces and territories. Together, we will
Ministers’ commitments to strengthen Canada’s
enhance national decision-making on food safety
regulatory performance for human drugs as part of
and nutritional issues, ensure an equivalent level of
the government-wide strategy for Smart Regulation
protection for all consumers regardless of where they
outlined in the 2002 Speech from the Throne which
purchase food in Canada and increase consumer
committed an investment of $190 million over
confidence in the food supply. During 2005–2008,
five years from the 2003 Federal Budget.1
the Department will renew existing health protection
The overall objective of TAS is to improve
legislation. The renewal will, among other things,
Canadians’ access to human drugs and other
position a new Canada Health Protection Act to
therapeutic products that are safe, of high quality,
provide the basis for the standards and policies
therapeutically effective, appropriately used, and
required to protect the food supply in Canada.
accessible in a timely and cost-effective manner.
Over the next year, we will work with a multi-
In addition to improving regulatory efficiency and
stakeholder task force to develop recommendations
transparency, TAS aims to optimize the benefits
and strategies for reducing trans-fatty acids (trans-
of human drugs in the health care system through
fats) in Canadian foods to the lowest levels possible,
appropriate use, including better prescribing practices,
while ensuring that alternatives are safe.3 In addition,
cost controls, and drug plan management. TAS
we will implement new regulations requiring food
initiatives will contribute to a more cost-effective
labels to identify certain allergens in prepackaged
health care system and improved health outcomes
foods so that consumers have the information they
for Canadians.
need to make informed choices.4 We will further
Investments and progress made toward
prohibit the personal importation of drugs intended
modernizing the regulatory review process through
to be used in food-producing animals and revise
TAS are expected to enable Health Canada to eliminate
our limits of acceptable veterinary drug residues in
the backlog of new pharmaceuticals submissions
food products. As well, we will update our policies
in 2006 while maintaining Health Canada’s high
and regulations to ensure that the existing regulatory
standards for safety. As well, the Department will
framework is keeping pace with scientific advances
review ninety percent of biologics submissions on
and changes in technology by addressing the issues of
target by March 2007. These performance targets
antimicrobial resistance and the addition of vitamins
are consistent with international standards. We will
and minerals to foods.
2
improve the transparency of our regulatory decision-
A number of novel foods (such as genetically-
making by publishing the basis for Health Canada’s
modified animals and plants) will be submitted to
regulatory authorizations of therapeutic drug products
Health Canada for review, authorization and release to
and medical devices that have not been previously
the Canadian market. Given the challenges they pose
approved for marketing. In addition, we will pursue
to our traditional processes for safety evaluations,
policy development and planning for the longer term
Health Canada will continue to update the ways in
implementation of TAS and the development of a
which we conduct safety assessments to prevent and
new external charging regime for therapeutic product
mitigate risks to Canadians.
submissions as part of a long term funding strategy.
We worked with the Canadian Standards
All of these initiatives will help sustain improved
Association to establish national safety standards for
regulatory performance for health products in general.
cells, tissues and organs in 2003; however, compliance
As part of a nationally integrated and coordinated
with these standards remains voluntary. Because some
approach to food safety, Health Canada is working
human tissues are regulated as biological drugs, and
collaboratively with the Canadian Food Inspection
others are regulated as medical devices (e.g., heart
Agency, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, and
valves), there is no consistent regulatory approach for
Health Canada
page 20
cells, tissues and organs. As a result, in 2005–2006,
and education on best practices in drug prescribing
Health Canada will introduce new standards-based
and utilization. This work will lead to improved health
safety regulations (i.e., incorporate the standards into
outcomes and the cost-effective use of medications
proposed regulations by reference). This approach
by changing knowledge, attitudes, and behaviour.
will help address compliance challenges, infectious
The Ten-Year Plan that the First Ministers
disease threats, technology advances and responds to
adopted in 2004 includes a commitment to work
recommendations by the Auditor General in 2000.5
together on the development and implementation of
Increasing Responsiveness to
Public Health Issues and Greater
Vigilance of Safety and Therapeutic
Effectiveness
a comprehensive National Pharmaceuticals Strategy
(NPS)7, which will complement TAS and the ongoing
mandate of HPFB. In addition to influencing better
prescribing and drug use, the NPS will support the
development and costing of options for catastrophic
pharmaceutical coverage, establishment of a common
Strengthening the safety of drugs, medical devices
National Drug Formulary, and enhanced access
and other therapeutic products is a key Health
to drugs and other therapies to address unmet
Products and Food Branch (HPFB) objective which
therapeutic or public health needs. It will deliver
responds to public concerns about the therapeutic
heightened monitoring and analysis of safety and
product safety, including the need for appropriate
effectiveness information on drugs; analysis of cost-
disclosure of information emerging from clinical trials.
drivers and cost-effectiveness, including Drug Plan
To help achieve this objective, we will strengthen
Management Best Practices; accelerated access to,
our capacity to generate, collect, detect, monitor,
and international parity on prices of non-patented
evaluate, and disseminate timely evidence about
drugs; and purchasing strategies to obtain best prices
safety and therapeutic effectiveness of drugs and
for Canadians for drugs and vaccines. By June 2006,
other therapeutic products.
a Ministerial Task Force will report on the progress
Reporting by health professionals of adverse
effects of drugs that are in use by the public is an
made by NPS.
Single-use devices (SUDs) are medical devices
important aspect of improving safety. In 2005–2006,
such as certain kinds of syringes, catheters and biopsy
we will launch a new Internet portal called
forceps designed and designated by manufacturers
“MedEffectCanadaMedEffet” to encourage more
for one-time use. Because these devices can be
adverse reaction reporting. We will work closely with
expensive, evidence suggests some health care
officials in other countries, in particular the United
institutions have reused them. While this approach
States, to share data. As part of a new inspection
may reduce environmental and waste disposal costs,
strategy, Health Canada will also monitor industry
evidence suggests that improper cleaning may result
compliance with respect to reporting on adverse drug
in a transfer of pathogens from one patient to another
reactions, and unexpected failures in the efficacy
or reduced functionality.8 In addition, manufacturers
of new drugs. This information will be helpful in
of these SUDs are not required to provide any
understanding why events happen and acting on
information to Health Canada to demonstrate that
how they can be prevented.
their devices can be successfully cleaned for reuse, or
Support for improved real world access is another
how re-use should be carried out to avoid potential
TAS priority. In 2005–2006, drug prescribing and
health impacts. Based on consultations with provincial
utilization will be improved through evidence-based
and territorial health ministries, and analysis by
best practices information, strategies, and tools,
experts and stakeholders, we will identify and
by working with the Canadian Optimal Medication
implement options to minimize risks to Canadians.
Prescribing and Utilization Service (COMPUS),6 the
In addition, we are finalizing an action plan to address
Canadian centre for nationally coordinated information
Report on Plans and Priorities 2005–2006
page 21
to be a significant issue.10 We will use new funding
Improving Transparency, Openness
and Accountability to Strengthen
Public Trust and Stakeholder
Relationships
to conduct risk assessments and scientific research
Consultation and partnerships support our evidence-
to support public health policy development and
based decision making and contribute to our
decision-making for specific priority areas related
ongoing broader efforts to develop and implement
to BSE.
modern approaches to regulation in support of the
recommendations made by the Auditor General in the
2004 Report on the Regulation of Medical Devices.9
BSE (bovine spongiform encephalopathy,
commonly known as mad-cow disease) continues
In addition to continuing ongoing food monitoring
Government’s commitment to smart regulation.
programs such as the Total Diet Study, Health Canada
Accordingly, Health Canada will implement a public
will work with Statistics Canada on developing the
involvement framework to further strengthen the
Canadian Health Measures Survey by 2006 with
means by which we take the views of Canadians into
11
results released in 2008. This tool will measure
account. Health Canada will continue to develop
the nutritional status of Canadians and the effects
partnerships in federal, provincial and territorial
of exposure to environmental chemicals and
jurisdictions, industry, consumer and advocacy
disease-causing organisms. This data will help us and
groups and academia. To improve our ability to
others to develop food safety and nutrition policies,
resolve disputes, and support accountability,
standards, and regulations, and to measure the health
transparency and openness, we will establish a
impact of existing food safety and nutrition programs.
Health Products and Foods Ombudsman Office in
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Health Canada
page 22
2005. In the international arena, Health Canada will
As well, Health Canada is revising Canada’s Food Guide
realize a more coordinated and strategic approach to
to Healthy Eating for release by 2006 to ensure that
enable better information sharing and collaboration
it reflects current scientific evidence concerning the
with international authorities. As an example of
relationships between diet and health, and continues
international cooperation, Health Canada and the
to promote a pattern of eating that meets nutrient
European Medicines Agency will publish draft joint
needs and minimizes the risk of nutrient-related
guidance documents in 2005 concerning inhalation
chronic diseases such as Type II diabetes. The main
and nasal products. We have begun negotiations
cause of this disease in Canada is obesity, which has
on a Memorandum of Understanding as a precursor
impacted an increasingly greater proportion of the
to a Mutual Recognition Agreement (MRA) with
population since 1995.
12
the Australian Therapeutic Goods Administration.
The aim is to facilitate access to health products in
Endnotes and Web Site Links
the respective partners’ markets while maintaining
1
high regulatory standards for medical devices. The
MRA is intended to recognize the Canadian and
bkheae.htm
2
Australian systems and certificates relating to quality
management systems of manufacturers of medical
3
4
5
6
7
essential medicines.13
Providing Authoritative
Information for Healthy Choices
and Informed Decision Making
Health Canada continues to be active in providing
authoritative information for healthy choices and
informed decision making. For example, December
2005 is the deadline for implementation of the new
nutrition labelling requirements. Health Canada is
supporting the work of the Canadian Food Inspection
http://www.pm.gc.ca/eng/news.asp?category=
1&id=260
8
Canada’s international efforts to fight HIV/AIDS and
the shared goal of providing humanitarian access to
http://www.ccohta.ca/compus/compus_
intro_e.cfm
used to treat HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis and
other epidemic diseases. This program complements
http://www.oag-bvg.gc.ca/domino/reports.nsf/
html/0026ce.html
passed in 2004. The Access to Medicines Program
will facilitate access to pharmaceutical products
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hpfb-dgpsa/onpp-bppn/
labelling-etiquetage/regulations_faqs_e.html
least-developed and developing countries with the
establishment of regulations to support legislation
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/english/media/
releases/2004/trans_fats-gras_e.html
July 2005.
Access to medicines will be facilitated for
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hpfb-dgpsa/tpd-dpt/
tpd_news_winter_2004_e.html
devices. Both organizations expect to enter an
operational phase of the MOU at the beginning of
http://www.fin.gc.ca/budget03/booklets/
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hpfb-dgpsa/tpd-dpt/
letter_reprocess_e.html
9
http://www.oag-bvg.gc.ca/domino/reports.nsf/
html/20040302ce.html
10 http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/food-aliment/fpi-ipa/
e_policy_srm.html
11 http://www.statcan.ca/english/survey/household/
measures/measures.htm
12 http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hpfb-dgpsa/tpd-dpt/
inhalation_nasal_products_e.html
13 http://www.ic.gc.ca/cmb/welcomeic.nsf/
558d636590992942852564880052155b/
85256a5d006b972085256f2b0052d071!
OpenDocument&Highlight=2,c-9
Agency and the food industry to meet this milestone.
Report on Plans and Priorities 2005–2006
page 23
Strategic Outcome # 3: Reduced Health and Environmental
Risks From Products and Substances, and Safer Living and
Working Environments
Program Activity — Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety
PLANNED SPENDING AND FULL-TIME EQUIVALENTS (FTEs)
Forecast
Planned
Spending
Spending
($ millions)
2004–2005
2005–2006
288.9
Gross expenditures
286.2
15.2
Less: Expected respendable revenues
13.8
273.7
Net expenditures* **
272.4
1,832
FTEs
1,796
Planned
Spending
2006–2007
284.7
15.4
269.3
1,833
Planned
Spending
2007–2008
277.5
15.6
261.9
1,821
* The increase in net expenditures from 2004–2005 to 2005–2006 is mainly due to an increase in funding for the Cannabis
Reform — drug analysis services and for the Implementation of the Border Air Quality Strategy and Related Air Quality Measures.
The increase in respendable revenues is related to a change in the National Dosimetry Product and Services Fee Structure.
The decrease in net expenditures from 2005–2006 to 2006–2007 is mainly due to the Department’s contribution to the
$1 billion federal government reallocation. The decrease in net expenditures from 2006–2007 to 2007–2008 is mainly due to
the Department’s contribution to the $1 billion federal government reallocation and a decrease in the level of funding due to
the sunsetting of the Implementation of the Border Air Quality Strategy and Related Air Quality Measures. Budget 2005 has
announced new funding that addresses certain sunsetting items. Please see Section 4 for further details on the Budget.
** Figures include an amount for other departmental and regional infrastructure costs supporting program delivery. These costs
are $54.4 million in 2004–2005, $50.1 million in 2005–2006, $49.3 million in 2006–2007 and $48.6 million in 2007–2008.
Program Activity Description
Under this Strategic Outcome, Health Canada
has a mandate to address many elements of dayto-day living that have an impact on the health of
Canadians. These include drinking water safety, air
quality, radiation exposure, substance use and abuse
(including alcohol), consumer product safety, tobacco
and secondhand smoke, workplace health, and
chemicals in the workplace and in the environment.
We are also engaged in other health and safety related
activities, including the Government of Canada’s
public safety and anti-terrorism initiatives, inspection
of food and potable water for the travelling public,
and health contingency planning for visiting foreign
dignitaries. Our broad national mandate flows from
legislation including the Food and Drugs Act, the
Health Canada
page 24
Controlled Drugs and Substances Act, the Hazardous
Products Act, the Radiation Emitting Devices Act, the
Canadian Environmental Protection Act, the Tobacco
Act and others. Our results are delivered through
partnerships and by an active presence throughout
every region of the country. In addition to our ongoing
activities, for 2005–2006 we have identified two broad
priorities that encompass a range of activities, as
described below:
• reducing risks to health and safety, and
improve protection against harm associated
with workplace and environmental hazards,
consumer products (including cosmetics),
radiation-emitting devices, new chemical
substances and products of biotechnology; and
• reducing health and safety risks associated with
tobacco consumption and the abuse of drugs,
alcohol and other controlled substances.
Workplace and Environmental
Hazards, Consumer Products
(Including Cosmetics), RadiationEmitting Devices, New Chemical
Substances and Products of
Biotechnology
Consistent with the Departmental priority of health
and the environment, we will address the health risks
associated with air pollutants in indoor and outdoor
environments — with an emphasis on vulnerable
populations, such as children, the elderly and people
with lung and heart conditions. Our major focus will
remain on ozone and particulate matter but will also
include other common air pollutants such as carbon
monoxide and sulphur dioxide. Our work will include
evaluating the health benefits of different pollution
reduction approaches, and assessing the risks and
benefits of alternative fuels and additives.
We will also build on research pilot studies
underway in the Great Lakes Basin and the Georgia
Basin/Puget Sound airsheds to assess the health
impacts of air pollution. We will also facilitate work on
the development of a health-based Air Quality Index
and an Air Health Indicator. Under the Canada/US
Border Air Quality Strategy (BAQS), research studies
will provide information to help protect Canadians and
inform authorities about trends in the health impacts
of air pollution.
An important ongoing responsibility under this
priority will be our responsibilities under the Canadian
Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA).1 As part
of this, we will finalize a prioritized list of substances
(based on potential risks to human health) that will
require subsequent screening assessment. We also
expect to carry out ten health assessments on existing
substances that could lead to activities to manage
their impacts, should we determine them to be toxic as
defined under CEPA. Our Department is committed to
the implementation of a Results-Based Management
and Accountability Framework to measure program
performance in our CEPA activities, supported by an
integrated management framework that will focus
our program delivery.
The Globally Harmonized System of Classification
and Labelling of Chemicals is an international
initiative to enhance protection of human health and
the environment.2 We will continue to work toward
the legislative and regulatory changes necessary to
implement a fully operational system by our target
date of 2008.
As part of the government-wide commitment
to action on climate change, Health Canada will
complete the Climate Change and Health Vulnerability
Assessment in 2006. This will form the health
component of Canada’s National Climate Change
Impact Assessment and contribute to the Government
of Canada’s international obligations to report on
impacts and adaptation efforts related to climate
change.
We will continue our work with other federal
departments to help manage the human health risks
associated with contaminated sites. Our Department
will provide expert advice on conducting human health
risk assessments at over 20 of the highest risk federal
contaminated sites and will train between 300 and
400 federal managers on health risk assessments and
the engagement of potentially affected communities.
Our actions related to health and the environment
during 2005–2006 will take many other forms. For
example, revised notification regulations will come
into force during 2005 that will lead to health risk
assessments of 800 new chemicals and biotechnology
products. Both environmental and health risk
assessments will be conducted on about 100 new
pharmaceuticals, veterinary drugs and personal care
products. We also expect to impose control measures
on approximately ten new substances, resulting in
fewer toxic substances in the environment that could
have adverse affects on the health of Canadians.
As part of protecting human health, we expect new
regulatory amendments to improve safety standards
for dental x-ray equipment and will support the
Government of Canada in proposing amendments to
regulations for diagnostic x-ray equipment. We will
also expand our Lead Risk Reduction Strategy through
final regulations that would restrict the lead content
of children’s jewellery, surface coating materials
Report on Plans and Priorities 2005–2006
page 25
and candles with lead wicks.3 We will also propose
amendments to the Glazed Ceramics and Glassware
Health Canada will continue to work with the
Regulations to further limit the lead content of
Federal Prairie Water Committee to develop a
those products.
common federal approach to water issues in the
We will also revise indoor air quality guidelines,
Prairies by providing input on future program and
continue to work with provincial and territorial
policy initiatives to the National Interdepartmental
partners to develop Guidelines for Canadian Drinking
Working Group on Drinking Water.
Water Quality and enhance our state of readiness to
provide scientific support for chemical emergencies.
As well, Health Canada will participate in planning
for the next generation of the International Nuclear
Emergency Exercises.4 Integration of Canadian and
Tobacco Consumption and the
Abuse of Drugs, Alcohol and Other
Controlled Substances
US radiological monitoring networks will commence
This Strategic Outcome incorporates our high-priority
in order to develop protocols and provide early
responsibilities to address the threats to health
warning of nuclear incidents.
posed by tobacco, alcohol and drug use. In addition
In order to protect the millions of people who
to ongoing tobacco control initiatives supporting
travel in Canada every year, and Canadians who
the four pillars of prevention, cessation, protection
come into contact with travellers, Health Canada will
and harm reduction, in 2005–2006 we will focus our
continue to provide public health inspections on air,
attention on smoking among youth and young adults.6
rail and marine conveyances related to food, water and
We will work with the provinces and territories to
general sanitation. We will expand the frameworks that
develop a Framework for Action for Youth and Young
guide physical and psycho-social emergency response,
Adults to identify appropriate interventions and future
initially developed under the Government of Canada’s
directions for this group. We will continue to support
Public Security and Anti-Terrorism Initiative, to include
targeted prevention and cessation activities and
health emergencies such as SARS and we will continue
dissemination of the no-smoking message through
our efforts to build capacity to support the emergency
youth engagement initiatives.
responders and federal workers who provide services
The Department will work with partners to pilot
during and immediately following critical incidents or
and evaluate a range of stop smoking approaches.
public health emergencies.
We will support national and regional mass media
Health Canada will continue its efforts to support
campaigns that educate Canadians regarding
research related to the impacts of the workplace
the health impacts of smoking and that provide
on human health in order to develop a better
information and referrals to help more Canadians
understanding of indirectly and directly associated
quit smoking.
human health risks such as substance abuse, anxiety,
depression, infections, conflicts and injuries.
5
The Department will also continue to deliver
Health Canada will pursue regulations that would
mandate changes to tobacco products other than
cigarettes to help decrease the number of fires they
the Public Service Health Program to approximately
cause with their associated injuries and deaths.7 We will
250,000 federal employees in more than 20 federal
also pursue the regulatory process leading to a ban on
departments and agencies in Canada and overseas.
the descriptors “light” and “mild” and will work on the
The Department will continue to provide Employee
renewal of health warnings for tobacco products.
Assistance Program and Organizational Services to
140 public sector organizations.
Health Canada
page 26
Our Department will continue to lead Canada’s
Drug Strategy, working in partnership with the
provinces and territories, municipalities, non-
Our Alcohol and Drug Treatment and
government organizations and stakeholder groups.
Rehabilitation Program is a cost-shared program
We will direct new funding towards priorities
with the provinces and territories that supports
including: increasing the federal leadership role in
treatment for women and youth suffering from
the development and implementation of the Strategy;
substance abuse problems. We will work with the
developing a national framework for action on
provinces and territories on a plan to review the
substance abuse (including the possible development
focus of the Program, including developing an
of a policy on alcohol abuse) in partnership with the
accountability framework so that performance can
Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse and relevant
be assessed through changes in levels of access to
stakeholders; and reporting on the progress and
treatment services and a reduction in risk behaviours
impacts of the Strategy to Parliament and Canadians.
among the population being served.
8
In related work, we will analyze and report on
the results of the Canadian Addiction Survey, and
Endnotes and Web Site Links
enhance Canadian research in the area of alcohol and
1
drug abuse through the development of a National
Research Agenda on Substance Abuse.
cepa_overview.html
2
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hecs-sesc/whmis/
3
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hecs-sesc/cps/pdf/
We will continue to administer the Controlled
Drugs and Substances Act and its regulations, provide
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/english/iyh/environment/
harmonization.htm#top
expert scientific advice and drug analysis services to
lrrs_complete.pdf
law enforcement agencies and manage the medical
4
http://www.nea.fr/html/rp/inex/index.html
marijuana program. As well, we will continue to fund
5
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hecs-sesc/workplace/
community-based projects through the Drug Strategy
Community Initiatives Fund and fund the treatment
other.htm and http://www.enwhp.org
6
component of drug treatment courts.
index.html and http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hecs-sesc/
Overall, we will assess our performance through
measures such as changes in awareness levels,
tobacco/youth/index.html
7
attitudes and behaviours and through an evaluation
framework.
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hecs-sesc/tobacco/ftcs/
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hecs-sesc/tobacco/pdf/
pdf/RIP-ENG.pdf
8
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hecs-sesc/cds/index.htm
Report on Plans and Priorities 2005–2006
page 27
Program Activity — Pest Control Product Regulation
PLANNED SPENDING AND FULL-TIME EQUIVALENTS (FTEs)
Forecast
Planned
Spending
Spending
($ millions)
2004–2005
2005–2006
58.4
Gross expenditures
60.9
7.0
Less: Expected respendable revenues
7.0
51.4
Net expenditures* **
53.9
642
FTEs
639
Planned
Spending
2006–2007
58.3
7.0
51.3
645
Planned
Spending
2007–2008
58.2
7.0
51.2
648
* The decrease in net expenditures from 2004–2005 to 2005–2006 is mainly due to the Department’s contribution to the
$1 billion federal government reallocation, an adjustment in the rate of the Employees Benefit Plan and a one-time funding
in 2004–2005 for New Pest Control Product Registration and Decision Making. The decrease in net expenditures from
2005–2006 to 2007–2008 is mainly due to the Department’s contribution to the $1 billion federal government reallocation.
** Figures include an amount for other departmental and regional infrastructure costs supporting program delivery. These costs
are $12.3 million in 2004–2005, $11.2 million in 2005–2006, $11.0 million in 2006–2007 and $10.8 million in 2007–2008.
Program Activity Description
To help prevent unacceptable risks to people and
the environment, Health Canada regulates the
importation, sale and use of pesticides under
the federal authority of the Pest Control Products
Act (PCPA) and Regulations. The scope of our
work is extensive with more than 5,000 registered
pesticides — including herbicides, insecticides,
fungicides, antimicrobial agents, pool chemicals,
microbials, material and wood preservatives, animal
and insect repellents, and insect- and rodentcontrolling devices.
Ongoing regulatory responsibilities constitute the
majority of the work under this Program Activity, all
of which contribute to our strategic outcome. Using
internationally accepted approaches and protocols,
we conduct science-based health, environmental
and value assessments. Pesticides are registered
only if the health and environmental risks are
considered acceptable, and if the product is effective.
We set maximum pesticide residue limits for food
commodities under the Food and Drugs Act. Older
pesticides are re-evaluated to determine if their use
continues to be acceptable under current scientific
approaches. We facilitate, encourage and maximize
Health Canada
page 28
compliance with the PCPA and the conditions of
registration. We also develop and promote the use of
sustainable pest management practices and products
in cooperation with stakeholders.
We collaborate with other organizations to help
deliver our programs and achieve our expected
results while responding to specific needs. With
Mexico, the United States and other Organisation for
Economic Co-operation and Development countries,
we will continue activities to harmonize regulatory
approaches for evaluating pesticides. Our Department
will continue to work with Agriculture and Agri-Food
Canada to develop risk reduction strategies for the
agricultural sector, and improve access to specialized
pest control products that are priorities for Canadian
growers.1 Finally, we will seek to improve the federal
government’s coordination of pesticide research and
regulatory activities in collaboration with other federal
government departments.1
Beyond these ongoing regulatory activities, we
have identified some specific priorities under this
Program Activity. Expected results under this Program
Activity are: protected health and environment;
increased use of reduced risk pest management
practices and products; and increased public and
stakeholder confidence in pesticide regulation.
Implementing the New Pest Control
Products Act 2
international joint reviews and work share agreements.
The new PCPA received Royal Assent in 2002 and
to improved regulatory efficiencies and access to
is expected to be proclaimed by Parliament in
new pesticide technologies while maintaining health
2005–2006. The most significant initiative under
and environmental protection. Over the next several
this Program Activity will be the development of the
years, we will continue to facilitate the availability
supporting regulations, policies and procedures
of specialized agricultural pesticides through joint
needed to bring the Act into force.
reviews and workshare agreements with the United
The new legislation will strengthen health and
The ability to share the workload and accept the
scientific reviews of other countries will contribute
States and other countries. Since it is the pesticide
environmental protection currently provided by
industry’s responsibility to develop and submit
the existing PCPA. To this end, Health Canada will
applications for registration, Health Canada will
continue to incorporate modern risk assessment
continue to encourage them to participate in joint
concepts into the regulatory process. For example, the
reviews, electronic submissions and other global
new PCPA will codify the current practice of providing
worksharing initiatives.
special consideration for children and other vulnerable
Health Canada recently launched the world’s first
groups, considering pesticide exposure from all
web-based service for conducting pesticide regulatory
sources, and considering the cumulative effects
transactions. This on-line service will allow industry
of pesticides that act in the same way.
to submit applications, provide data, and apply for
The new PCPA will also help to make the
registration in a secure manner. Improvements to
regulatory system more transparent, and strengthen
existing electronic systems over the next several
post-registration controls. When the new legislation
years will help increase the efficiency of electronic
is brought into force, Health Canada will establish
data management and help deliver on transparency
a register of pest control products that will contain
initiatives envisioned in the new PCPA.
information about pesticide applications, registrations,
re-evaluations and special reviews. We will make this
information available to the public, allow the public to
inspect confidential test data, and establish a process
for the reconsideration of regulatory decisions. In
2005–2006, we will finalize the regulations that will
require pesticide companies to report adverse effects
related to their pesticides. This information will
contribute to the re-evaluation of registered pesticides
and may trigger special reviews. Regulations requiring
registrants to submit pesticide sales data will also
be finalized during this timeframe. As an indicator
of pesticide use, the sales data will be incorporated
into evidence-based health and environmental risk
assessments.
Improving Efficiencies
Continued efforts to harmonize pesticide regulatory
approaches with international pesticide regulatory
bodies will enable Health Canada to further pursue
Informing, Consulting and
Involving Canadians
The new Act enshrines, in law, the current consultation
process for major registration and re-evaluation
decisions. Under the new legislation, Health Canada
is mandated to “encourage public awareness in
relation to pest control products by informing
the public, facilitating public access to relevant
information and (encourage) public participation in
the decision-making process”.2 The Department will
inform Canadians about pest management practices
and advise them about the safe use of pest control
products. We will publish proposed regulatory
decisions, provide detailed health, environmental
and value evaluations, and allow the inspection of
non-confidential data. Not only will the public have
the opportunity to provide input on major regulatory
decisions as they do now, but they will also be able
to request the reconsideration of these decisions and
Report on Plans and Priorities 2005–2006
page 29
request the initiation of special reviews of existing
registrations. These initiatives are expected to
help increase transparency of regulatory decisions,
which will lead to increased public confidence in the
regulation of pesticides in Canada.
PMRA home page:
http://www.pmra-arla.gc.ca/
PMRA Strategic Plan 2003–2008:
http://www.pmra-arla.gc.ca/english/pdf/
plansandreports/pmra_strategicplan2003-2008-e.pdf
Health Canada
page 30
Endnotes and Web Site Links
1
Horizontal Initiative Table (http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/
rma/eppi-ibdrp/hrdb-rhbd/profil_e.asp)
2
Pest Control Products Act
(http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/P-9.01/92455.html)
Strategic Outcome # 4: Better Health Outcomes and
Reduction of Health Inequalities Between First Nations
and Inuit and Other Canadians
Program Activity — First Nations and Inuit Health
PLANNED SPENDING AND FULL-TIME EQUIVALENTS (FTEs)
Forecast
Planned
Spending
Spending
($ millions)
2004–2005
2005–2006
1,869.1
Gross expenditures
1,849.3
Less: Expected respendable revenues
5.5
5.5
1,863.6
Net expenditures* **
1,843.8
FTEs
2,550
2,588
Planned
Spending
2006–2007
1,906.8
5.5
1,901.3
2,602
Planned
Spending
2007–2008
1,933.5
5.5
1,928.0
2,590
* The increase in net expenditures from 2004–2005 to 2005–2006 is mainly due to increases related to the growth of the
Indian Envelope, the Sustainability of First Nations and Inuit Health System and the Implementation of the First Nations
Water Management Strategy. These increases are partially offsetted by decreases related to the sunsetting of the Canadian
Diabetes Strategy and the Labrador Innu Healing Strategy, a one-time contribution in 2004–2005 to the Province of Ontario
for the construction of the Meno-Ya-Win Health Centre, a one-time funding in 2004–2005 for Non-Insured Health Benefits,
and a contribution to the $1 billion federal government reallocation exercise. Budget 2005 has announced new funding that
addresses certain sunsetting items. Please see Section 4 for further details on the Budget. The increase in net expenditures from
2005–2006 to 2006–2007 is mainly due to increases related to the growth of the Indian Envelope, the Implementation of the
First Nations Water Management Strategy and the Sustainability of First Nations and Inuit Health System. These increases are
partially offsetted by a contribution to the $1 billion federal government reallocation exercise. The net increase from 2006–2007
to 2007–2008 is mainly due to the Indian Envelope growth. This increase is partially offsetted by the sunset of the Resolution
Framework for Indian Residential Schools Initiative.
** Figures include an amount for other departmental and regional infrastructure costs supporting program delivery. These costs are
$113.8 million in 2004–2005, $106.3 million in 2005–2006, $108.4 million in 2006–2007 and $107.0 million in 2007–2008.
Program Activity Description
The objectives of Health Canada’s First Nations and
Inuit Health program activity include improving health
outcomes; ensuring availability of, and access to,
quality health services; and supporting greater control
of the health system by First Nations and Inuit.
Health Canada has an extensive range of ongoing
programs under this Program Activity that will
continue in 2005–2006. We will provide primary health
care services through nursing stations and community
health centres in remote and/or isolated communities
to supplement and support the services that
provincial, territorial and regional health authorities
provide. Due to the isolation of First Nations and
Inuit communities north of 60°, community health
nurses will also meet non-urgent health care needs.
These services will be complemented by home
and community care programs and programs
and activities to address oral diseases. Our NonInsured Health Benefits coverage of drug, dental
care, vision care, medical supplies and equipment,
short-term crisis intervention mental health services,
and medical transportation will be available to all
749,000 registered Indians and recognized Inuit in
Canada, regardless of residence.
We will continue to support targeted health
promotion programs for Aboriginal people, regardless
of residency (e.g., Aboriginal Diabetes Initiative),
as well as counselling, child and maternal health
supports, addictions and mental wellness services.1
Other programs will support the development and
implementation of activities to promote healthy
lifestyle choices, thereby contributing to the
prevention of chronic disease and injuries. Ongoing
communicable disease programs will address
preventable diseases and implement measures to
manage, contain and control risks of outbreaks of
Report on Plans and Priorities 2005–2006
page 31
diseases such as tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS. The
the disparity in the health status of this population.
environmental health and research program aims to
First Ministers and Aboriginal leaders agreed to
reduce the risk of exposure to environmental hazards
work together to develop a blueprint to improve the
in First Nations and Inuit communities and to improve
health status of and health services to Aboriginal
capacity in the community to implement measures
peoples in Canada. In addition, the Government of
to manage, contain and control those hazards.
Canada announced $700 million for a series of new
We will continue to integrate the principles
federal commitments that will address urgent and
of environmental management and sustainable
critical aspects of a longer term plan. These included
development into the Health Facilities and Capital
an Aboriginal Health Transition Fund to enable the
Program, the Environmental Health and Research
federal, provincial and territorial governments and
Program and other program areas.
communities to devise new ways to integrate and
The Department faces many of the same
adapt existing health services to better meet the
challenges as other Canadian health systems such
needs of all Aboriginal peoples. Also included was
as increasing costs and health human resource
the Aboriginal Health Human Resources Initiative
shortages. In addition, the First Nations and Inuit
(AHHRI) to increase the number of Aboriginal people
health system has additional challenges such as
choosing health care professions; to adapt current
growing populations with a higher rate of disease
health professional curricula to provide a more
burden and populations living largely in remote and
culturally sensitive focus; and to improve the retention
rural areas of the country.
of health workers serving all Aboriginal peoples. The
Given these challenges we will draw on the
funding will also enhance health promotion and
evaluations that are scheduled for many of our
disease prevention programs focussing on suicide
programs to identify areas for improvements. In line
prevention, diabetes, maternal and child health, and
with our First Nations and Inuit evaluation plan, we
early childhood development.
plan to review or evaluate the National Native Alcohol
During 2005–2006, we will move forward on these
and Drug Addictions Program, the First Nations and
commitments and funding. On AHHRI, for example,
Inuit Tobacco Control strategy, Health Integration
we will consult with partners and stakeholders,
Initiative and the First Nations Water Management
establish a comprehensive program framework and
Strategy. At a regional level, the Aboriginal Diabetes
begin to implement activities. These efforts will be
Initiative will pilot a community-based evaluation
linked to broader federal-provincial-territorial health
process in Manitoba and Quebec. Finally, as a
human resources processes.
relatively new initiative, the Indian Residential
Schools — Mental Health Support Program will
begin a formative evaluation.
Based on our assessment of needs and to
implement Government of Canada commitments,
we have identified a number of priority issues for
action in 2005–2006 related to improving Aboriginal
health outcomes.
Addressing Early Childhood
Health Priorities
The new funding announced in September 2004 will
also help to enhance our already growing continuum
of services that support Aboriginal mothers, children
and families from before pregnancy to the time a child
enters school. These increased services will contribute
Implementing the First Ministers’
Commitments on Aboriginal Health
to the positive growth and development of Aboriginal
In September 2004, First Ministers and Aboriginal
attained by non-Aboriginal Canadians.2
Leaders met to discuss joint actions to improve
Aboriginal health, and adopt measures to address
Health Canada
page 32
infants, children and their mothers so that the health
outcomes of these groups reach levels that have been
A separate issue of importance to our child health
goals will be our work to increase immunization
Nova Scotia’s First Nation Chiefs, Health Canada is
Supporting Effective Health
Services in First Nations and
Inuit Communities
supporting the Mi’kmaq Youth, Recreation and Active
As noted in the introduction, our nursing services are
Circle of Living initiative. One component of this
essential in many remote or isolated First Nations
initiative is developing tools to support community-
and Inuit communities. To improve the quality,
based health staff in the promotion of healthy
accessibility, effectiveness and integration of these
behaviours such as active living and healthy eating.
health services, we will continue to implement our
In partnership with the province of Nova Scotia,
Indian and Northern Affairs Canada and
comprehensive nursing transformation strategy. We
coverage rate for on-reserve children and reduce their
will invest $55.4 million over the next three years to
higher incidence of vaccine preventable diseases and
add more than 120 new positions, with 74 targeted to
related complications. To do this, we will provide
nursing stations. We will also introduce more skilled
access to targeted vaccines to on-reserve populations.
roles for nurses in these front-line posts.
Acting on Major Threats to
Aboriginal Health
In addition to our ongoing attention to chronic
and communicable diseases, in 2005–2006,
Health Canada will enhance Aboriginal Diabetes
programming to increase awareness of healthy
behaviours such as healthy eating, active living and
increased access to appropriate diabetes services.
Over time, these enhancements will help to reduce
health disparities related to diabetes that exist
between Aboriginal people and other Canadians. In
combination with these efforts, we will also provide
funding to the First Nations and Inuit Tobacco Control
Strategy to increase awareness of how tobacco
contributes to the development of several chronic
diseases, including diabetes.
There is a growing burden of disease in First
Nations and Inuit communities despite continuing
efforts to fight HIV/AIDS. In 2005–2006, our
To improve our ability to recruit and retain nurses
with the skills that we need, we will support their
professional development and continuing education.
In partnership with the nursing profession, Health
Canada will contribute to the establishment of a
web-based National Nursing Portal that will provide
access to the information for nurses in rural and
remote settings that they need to support professional
nursing and evidence-based practice and to eliminate
professional isolation.
Our Health Facilities and Capital Program
supports the construction, operation, and
maintenance of on-reserve health facilities and
staff residences. For 2005–2006, we plan to invest
$7 million to build or expand nine health facilities. We
also plan to spend $7.6 million for sixteen residential
units, which will improve the living and working
conditions of nursing staff. This is a key element
in our recruitment and retention of qualified health
professionals.
Department will complete the First Nations and Inuit
component of the Canadian Strategy for HIV/AIDS.
To assist with capacity building, Health Canada
This will include conducting consultations with
is promoting the career choice of environmental
First Nations and Inuit on program planning and
health officer among members of francophone
implementation, developing national guidelines and
First Nations communities in Quebec. For these
timely mechanisms for funding, developing regional
communities, Health Canada co-developed a
infrastructure and supporting the communities on
four-year training program in environmental
national Aboriginal intervention. An action plan will be
health, which will be offered starting in 2005 in
developed to ensure the continuation of programming
partnership with the Bathurst Campus of the
to reduce the incidence of HIV/AIDS in First Nations
New Brunswick Community College.
and Inuit communities.
Report on Plans and Priorities 2005–2006
page 33
in First Nations communities that showed significant
Health Canada, provincial governments and
potential health risks when assessed against federal-
licensing bodies in the Atlantic region will
provincial-territorial guidelines. We will continue to
undertake a project that will result in the
use the $116 million in resources allocated to our
establishment of an integrated and comprehensive
Department to increase the frequency of drinking
package of standards, policies, and guidelines
water quality monitoring in First Nations communities
for community health nursing in First Nations
to meet nationally recommended standards, increase
communities.
the number of First Nations communities that have
on-site sampling and testing kits, and provide training
The First Nations and Inuit Home and Community
to increase First Nations communities’ capacity to
Care (HCC) program has enabled the establishment
sample and test drinking water quality. By 2006,
of home care services in approximately 90% of
the department will be able to meet the nationally
First Nations and Inuit communities. In addition
recommended standards for water quality monitoring,
to an evaluation of HCC that will be completed by
which will result in increased First Nations confidence
March 2006 and will assist us in improving home
in the quality of their drinking water.
and continuing care, we will work with the Assisted
Living program of Indian and Northern Affairs Canada
Endnotes and Web Site Links
(INAC) and First Nations and Inuit partners to identify
1
gaps in community-based continuing care services
Futures; Building Health Communities; National
and to explore potential options to address these
Native Alcohol and Drug Abuse Program,
gaps. This will help us complete a continuing care
Youth Solvent Abuse; First Nations Inuit Tobacco
policy framework in 2005.
Control Strategy; Innu Healing Strategy; and
The 2003 Federal Budget announced
the Indian Residential School Mental Health
$600 million over five years, starting in 2003–2004,
for the implementation of the First Nations Water
Management Strategy by INAC and Health Canada to
upgrade, maintain and monitor water and wastewater
systems on First Nations reserves. This responded to
comprehensive assessments of water quality issues
Health Canada
page 34
Includes the following programs: Brighter
Support Program.
2
Includes the following programs: Aboriginal
Head Start On-Reserve, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum
Disorder; and the Canada Prenatal Nutrition
Program.
Supplementary
Information
3
Report on Plans and Priorities 2005–2006
Management Representation Statement
I submit, for tabling in Parliament, the 2005–2006
Report on Plans and Priorities for Health Canada.
This document has been prepared based on the
The reporting structure on which this document is
based has been approved by Treasury Board
Ministers and is the basis for accountability for the
reporting principles and disclosure requirements
results achieved with the resources and authorities
contained in the Guide to the Preparation of the
provided.
2004–2005 Report on Plans and Priorities:
• It accurately portrays the organization’s plans
and priorities.
• The planned spending information in this
document is consistent with the directions
provided in the Minister of Finance’s Budget
and by the Treasury Board Secretariat.
• It is comprehensive and accurate.
• It is based on sound underlying departmental
information and management systems.
Health Canada
page 36
Morris Rosenberg
Deputy Minister
Health Canada
March 2005
Health Portfolio
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Report on Plans and Priorities 2005–2006
page 37
Table 1: Departmental Planned Spending and FTEs
Forecast
Spending
2004–2005(1)
Planned
Spending
2005–2006
Planned
Spending
2006–2007
Planned
Spending
2007–2008
Budgetary Main Estimates
Less: Respendable Revenues
3,232.9
2,924.6
2,684.9
2,696.2
66.6
68.9
69.1
69.3
Total Main Estimates
3,166.3
2,855.7
2,615.8
2,626.9
($ millions)
Adjustments:(2)
Transfer to the Public Health Agency of Canada
Supplementary Estimates:
Operating budget carry forward (horizontal item)
Funding to support the construction of the
Meno-Ya-Win Health Centre in Sioux Lookout,
Ontario
Funding for initiatives related to the 2003 First
Ministers’ Accord (Health Council, Health Human
Resources and territorial health supplements)
One year extension to existing health promotion
programs (Canadian Diabetes Strategy and
Hepatitis C Prevention, Support and Research
Program)
Funding related to government advertising
programs (horizontal item)
Realignment of resources in recognition of the
continued devolution of non-insured health
services to First Nations’ control
Activities to mitigate the impact of the Bovine
Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE) crisis
(horizontal item)
Realignment of resources in order to purchase
anti-viral drugs and to fund operational activities,
such as assessments and evaluations in support
of the department’s grant and contribution
programs
Assessment, management and remediation of
federal contaminated sites (horizontal item)
Incremental funding to address gaps in public
health and to lay the foundation for the creation
of the Public Health Agency of Canada
Funding to deliver federal programs and
services in two Labrador Innu communities,
including health and community policing
(Labrador Innu Comprehensive Healing
Strategy) (horizontal item)
Additional funding for the Access to Medicines
Program which helps make available drugs that
are sold to least developed countries for the
treatment of HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis
and other epidemics
Funding to strengthen initiatives in support of
the Canadian Strategy on HIV/AIDS in Canada
(horizontal initiative)
Health Canada
page 38
-410.3
39.5
37.4
25.0
18.4
15.8
9.5
8.0
6.2
7.6
5.7
5.5
5.3
1.4
3.3
3.7
3.3
0.5
2.0
2.7
3.0
Table 1: (cont’d)
($ millions)
Funding for initiatives on sustainable development
issues of global importance (horizontal item)
Initiatives to support the implementation of a
common electronic infrastructure and multichannel service delivery strategy (Government
On-Line) (horizontal item)
Funding related to the development of
Official Language Minority Communities
(Interdepartmental Partnership with the Official
Language Communities) (horizontal item)
Funding to modernize human resources
management in the Federal Public Service (Public
Service Modernization Act) (horizontal initiative)
Less: Spending authorities available
Less: Spending authorities related to the
government-wide reallocation initiative
Other Adjustments:
Collective Agreements
Repeal of the Radiation Dosimetry Services Fees
Regulations and Revision of the National Dosimetry
Services Product, Service and Fee Structure
Canadian Biotechnology Strategy —
Genomics-based research
Set-up of the Assisted Human Reproduction Agency
Cannabis Reform — drug analysis services
Less: Spending authorities available
Total Adjustments
Net Planned Spending
(3)
Forecast
Spending
2004–2005(1)
Planned
Spending
2005–2006
Planned
Spending
2006–2007
Planned
Spending
2007–2008
0.1
0.1
0.1
0.1
-63.7
-3.7
17.1
0.2
4.0
4.0
4.0
7.1
0.7
5.6
0.7
3.8
0.7
-315.4
23.3
16.7
14.8
2,850.9
2,879.0
2,632.5
2,641.7
148.5
240.0
330.0
-28.1
-50.5
2,844.4
8.9
78.3
2,921.2
8.9
78.0
-35.0
Budget Announcements:
Budget 2005 initiatives(4)
Expenditure Review Committee reductions(5)
Departmental initiatives
Government-wide efficiencies — procurement
Total Net Planned Spending
Less: Non-respendable Revenues
Plus: Cost of services received without charge(6)
2,850.9
8.8
75.1
-16.5
-3.6
3,007.4
8.9
76.5
Net Cost of Program
2,917.2
3,075.0
2,913.8
2,990.3
7,993
8,123
8,082
8,037
Full-Time Equivalents
(7)
(1) Reflects the best forecast of total net planned spending to the end of the fiscal year.
(2) Adjustments reflect Supplementary Estimates for 2004–2005 and future year approvals not reflected in the 2005–06 Main Estimates.
(3) Refer to Section 2 for explanation by program activity of year-over-year fluctuations.
(4) This reflects changes in planned program spending for the upcoming planning period as a result of 2005 Budget
announcements. Budget 2005 Information can be found under Section 4.
(5) This reflects the reductions to the department’s planned spending as a result of the Expenditure Review Committee exercise and
which were announced in the 2005 Budget — more information will be provided in the next Supplementary Estimates.
(6) Includes the following services received without charge: accommodation charges (Public Works and Government Services
Canada); Contributions covering employers’ share of employees’ insurance premiums and expenditures (Treasury Board
Secretariat); Workers’ Compensation (Social Development Canada); and Legal Services (Department of Justice Canada).
(7) Full-time equivalents reflect the human resources that the Department uses to deliver its programs and services. This number is
based on a calculation that considers full-time, term, casual employment, and other factors such as job sharing.
Report on Plans and Priorities 2005–2006
page 39
Table 2: Program Activities for 2005–2006 (in millions of dollars)
Program Activity
Health Policy,
Planning and
Information
Health Products
and Food
Healthy
Environments and
Consumer Safety
Pest Control
Product Regulation
First Nations and
Inuit Health
Total
Health Canada
page 40
Grants and
Operating Capital Contributions Gross
Adjustments
(planned
Total
Total
spending
Respendable
Main
not in Main Planned
Revenues Estimates Estimates) Spending
95.3
—
353.1
448.4
—
448.4
7.9
456.3
251.0
1.4
9.9
262.3
(41.2)
221.1
12.9
234.0
236.8
1.0
50.0
287.8
(15.2)
272.6
1.1
273.7
58.3
—
—
58.3
(7.0)
51.3
0.1
51.4
1,077.5
1.5
788.8
1,867.8
(5.5)
1,862.3
1.3
1,863.6
1,718.9
3.9
1,201.8
2,924.6
(68.9)
2,855.7
23.3
2,879.0
Table 3: Voted and Statutory Items Listed in Main Estimates (in millions of dollars)
2005–2006
Vote or
Statutory
Item
1
5
(S)
(S)
Current
Previous
Truncated Vote or Statutory Wording
Main Estimates
Main Estimates
1,552.6
Operating expenditures
1,702.4
1,201.8
Grants and contributions
1,343.8
0.1
Minister of Health — Salary and motor car allowance
0.1
101.2
Contributions to employee benefit plans
120.0
Total Department
2,855.7
3,166.3
The major differences between the current and previous year are: a decrease of $359 million related to the transfer of
resources from Health Canada to the new Public Health Agency of Canada following its creation; and an increase
of $47 million related to the Sustainability of First Nations and Inuit Health System.
Report on Plans and Priorities 2005–2006
page 41
Table 4: Net Cost of Department for 2005–2006 (millions of dollars)
Gross Planned Spending
(Gross Budgetary Main Estimates plus Adjustments)
Budget 2005 initiatives*
Expenditure Review Committee reductions**
Departmental initiatives
Government-wide efficiencies — Procurement
Total Gross Planned Spending
Plus: Services Received without Charge
Accommodation provided by Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC)
Contributions covering employers’ share of employees’ insurance premiums and expenditures
paid by Treasury Board Secretariat
Worker’s compensation coverage provided by the Department of Human Resources and Skills
Development
Salary and associated expenditures of legal services provided by Justice Canada
Less : Respendable Revenues
Less: Non-respendable Revenues
2005–2006 Net cost of the Department
2,947.9
148.5
-16.5
-3.6
3,076.3
31.1
41.1
0.8
3.5
68.9
8.9
3,075.0
* This reflects changes in planned program spending for the upcoming planning period as a result of 2005 Budget
announcements. Budget 2005 Information can be found under Section 4.
** This reflects the reductions to the department’s planned spending as a result of the Expenditure Review Committee exercise and
which were announced in the 2005 Budget — more information will be provided in the next Supplementary Estimates.
Health Canada
page 42
Table 5: Sources of Respendable and Non-Respendable Revenues
Respendable Revenues
(millions of dollars)
Forecast
Revenue
2004–2005
Planned
Revenue
2005–2006
Planned
Revenue
2006–2007
Planned
Revenue
2007–2008
Health Products and Food
41.2
41.2
41.2
41.2
Program Activity
Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety
13.8
15.2
15.4
15.6
Pest Control Product Regulation
7.0
7.0
7.0
7.0
First Nations and Inuit Health
5.5
5.5
5.5
5.5
67.5
68.9
69.1
69.3
Forecast
Revenue
2004–2005
Planned
Revenue
2005–2006
Planned
Revenue
2006–2007
Planned
Revenue
2007–2008
Health Products and Food
3.9
3.9
3.9
3.9
Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety
1.6
1.7
1.7
1.7
Pest Control Product Regulation
1.0
1.0
1.0
1.0
First Nations and Inuit Health
2.3
2.3
2.3
2.3
Total Non-Respendable Revenues
8.8
8.9
8.9
8.9
76.3
77.8
78.0
78.2
Total Respendable Revenues
Non-Respendable Revenues
(millions of dollars)
Program Activity
Total Respendable and Non-Respendable Revenues
Report on Plans and Priorities 2005–2006
page 43
Table 6: Resource Requirements by Branch and by Program Activity (in millions of dollars)
2005–2006
Branch
Health Policy Branch
Health Products and Food
Branch
Healthy Environments and
Consumer Safety Branch
Pest Management
Regulatory Agency
First Nations and Inuit
Health Branch
Information, Analysis and
Connectivity Branch
Corporate Services Branch
Departmental Executive
Branch*
Total
Program Activity
Healthy
Pest Control First Nations
Health Policy, Health
Planning and Products Environments and
Product
and Inuit
Total Planned
Information and Food Consumer Safety Regulation
Health
Spending
399.4
399.4
184.2
184.2
223.6
223.6
40.2
40.2
1,757.3
1,757.3
42.6
10.9
11.0
2.5
19.0
86.0
7.6
20.3
20.5
4.6
38.1
91.1
6.7
18.6
18.6
4.1
49.2
97.2
456.3
234.0
273.7
51.4
1,863.6
2,879.0
* Includes such areas as Communications, Legal Services, Office of Chief Scientist, Audit and Accountability Bureau, Executive
Offices and Offices of Regional Directors General.
Health Canada
page 44
Table 7: Major Regulatory Initiatives
PROGRAM ACTIVITY: HEALTH POLICY, PLANNING AND INFORMATION
Regulations
Regulations concerning section 8 of the Assisted Human
Reproduction Act (consent) and the definition of an in vitro
embryo donor.
Expected Results
Human reproductive material and in vitro embryos are
used only with the donor’s written consent. The principle
of free and informed consent is promoted and applied
as a fundamental condition of the use of assisted human
reproductive technologies.
PROGRAM ACTIVITY: HEALTH PRODUCTS AND FOOD
Regulations
Food and Drugs Act — Implement Phase I and II of
the regulatory framework for cells, tissues and organs
intended for transplantation.
Expected Results
The new regulations will aim to balance the need for safe
cells, tissues, and organs of high quality with the need
to ensure the availability of cells, tissues and organs for
transplantation. The Phase I regulations will focus on the
basic safety requirements for human cells, tissues and
organs.
The Phase II regulations will include adverse event
reporting requirements and a compliance and
enforcement strategy.
Amendment to Processing and Distribution of Semen for The amended regulations will reflect current safety
Assisted Conception Regulations (Semen Regulation).
standards for semen used in assisted conception.
Food and Drug Regulations — Amendment to provisions The amended regulations will reflect current methods
respecting plasmapheresis in Division 4 of Part C.
and practices used to collect human plasma as well as
the list of transmissible diseases for which tests must be
performed in order to maximize the safety of plasma and
plasma donors.
Food and Drugs Act — New Regulations Respecting Blood The new regulations will aim to balance the need for safe
blood and blood components with the need to ensure
and Blood Components.
the availability of blood and blood components for
transfusion. The new regulations will include basic safety
requirements, adverse event reporting requirements and
a compliance and enforcement strategy.
Food and Drug Regulations — Amendment to Division 3 The amended regulations will eliminate regulatory burden
of Part C to provide for an exemption for the requirement
for the performance of certain limited basic research
studies, while helping to ensure that patient safety is not
to file Clinical Trial Applications for certain
radiopharmaceutical studies.
compromised.
Revision of regulations on the addition of vitamins and
Food and Drug Regulations (Addition of Vitamins and
minerals to foods taking into account the role of nutrient
Minerals to Foods)
addition to foods, consumer needs and expectations, and
industry requests.
Food and Drug Regulations (Enhanced Labelling)
Mandatory labelling of specific food allergens, gluten
sources and sulphites when present at 10 parts per
million or more, on the labels of prepackaged food
products, whether they have been added directly or
indirectly.
Food and Drug Regulations (Mandatory Labelling of Raw Reduction of food borne illness as a result of providing
Ground Meat and Ground Poultry)
safe handling information on the labels of these products.
Food and Drug Regulations (Saccharin)
Availability of an additional intense sweetener to allow
a wider range of dietetic food products for the benefit of
consumers who wish to consume these products.
Report on Plans and Priorities 2005–2006
page 45
Table 7: (cont’d)
Food and Drug Regulations (Caffeine)
Additional beverages containing added caffeine and more
information on levels of caffeine in these products to
allow consumers to make an informed choice about their
caffeine intake.
Optional use of the food irradiation process for ground
Food and Drug Regulations (Food Irradiation)
beef, poultry, shrimp and prawns and mangoes to control
pathogens, reduce microbial load and insect infestation
and extend shelf life.
Modernization and expansion of the safety and labelling
Food and Drug Regulations (Revisions to
requirements for prepackaged water and ice products
Division 12 — Prepackaged Water and Ice)
under the Food and Drug Regulations.
Environmental Assessment Regulations
Health Canada has begun developmental work for
new Environmental Assessment Regulations for
approximately 9,000 substances in products regulated
under the Food and Drugs Act. Extensive stakeholder
consultations with industry, environmental groups and
scientists have already been held to raise awareness on
this issue and engage stakeholders. The next round of
consultations will centre on several regulatory options
laid out in an Options Analysis paper. Support of related
scientific research will also continue to provide evidence
to both support the regulatory approach and identify
related best practices. The new regulatory framework
will bring substances in products regulated under the
Food and Drugs Act into compliance with the Canadian
Environmental Protection Act (1999).
Appropriate revisions of Schedule F to accommodate the
Food and Drug Regulations — Routine amendments to
marketing of drugs for which a Notice of Compliance has
update Schedule F to the Food and Drug Regulations
been issued.
Medical Device Regulations — Exclusion of certain tissues The Medical Devices Regulations are being amended to
from the Medical Device Regulations
exclude certain tissues that will be regulated under the
proposed Cells, Tissues and Organs (CTO) Regulatory
Framework. This amendment has to be coordinated with
the coming into force of the CTO Regulations.
The data protection provisions of the Food and Drug
Food and Drug Regulations — Amendment of the Data
Protection provisions of Division 8
Regulations are being amended to provide effective
data protection for a period of eight years, for innovator
drugs that contain medicinal ingredients not previously
approved for sale in Canada. An additional six months
will be provided for submissions that include pediatric
studies that were designed and conducted with the
purpose of increasing knowledge about the drug in
pediatric age groups in which the drug may be used.
Food and Drug Regulations — Amendment to Division 8 Will provide legislative means for Health Canada to
accelerate access to new life-saving drug therapies on
to allow for the issuance of a Notice of Compliance with
the basis of promising evidence of clinical effectiveness.
Conditions (NOC/c)
Will also provide the means to monitor and regulate
the products effectively in the post-market domain and
mitigate legal liability.
Food and Drug Regulations — Regulations amending the The current special access program allows for the
Special Access Program
authorization of a drug for use by an individual patient.
This amendment will allow for the release of drug to a
block of patients under certain limited circumstances.
Health Canada
page 46
Table 7: (cont’d)
Food and Drug Regulations
Food and Drug Regulations
Food and Drug Regulations
New or revised maximum residue limits for veterinary
drugs in foods to ensure the safety of food products from
animals treated with the veterinary drugs.
Increase the scope of the prohibition on importation of
veterinary drugs to include the personal importation of
drugs intended to be used in food producing animals to
avoid potentially harmful residues in food products from
animals treated with these drugs.
Prohibition of sale of products containing carbadox for
sale in Canada to avoid potentially harmful residues in
food products from animals treated with this drug.
PROGRAM ACTIVITY: HEALTHY ENVIRONMENTS AND CONSUMER SAFETY
Regulations
Regulations under the Controlled Drugs and Substances
Act (CDSA) to expand the authority for regulated health
professionals to prescribe controlled substances where
appropriate.
Tobacco Advertising Regulations
Tobacco Labelling Regulations (Revised)
Tobacco Regulations on “Light” and “Mild” Descriptors
Tobacco Retail Promotion Regulations
Expected Results
Federal legislation will not unnecessarily restrict the
professional practice of any health profession regulated
by provincial or territorial (P/T) authorities, including
practitioners of medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine,
podiatric medicine, midwifery, and nurse practitioners,
with respect to the use of controlled substances in the
treatment of their patients. This result will be achieved
over the next 2 to 3 years as federal and P/T regulations
are amended to allow health professionals to prescribe
controlled substances in accordance with standards
of professional practice defined by their regulatory
authorities. Objectives will be achieved when the federal
legislation permits specific health professionals, other
than practitioners of medicine, dentistry and veterinary
medicine, to use/prescribe controlled substances as
permitted by P/T regulation.
Increased awareness of tobacco-related health hazards
through mandating of new health warnings in advertising.
Awareness will be measured through surveys.
Increased awareness of tobacco-related hazards through
mandating of new health warnings on packaging.
Awareness will be measured through surveys.
Reduced confusion among smokers regarding these
descriptors. Greater awareness that no class of cigarettes
is a “safer” alternative. Achievements will be measured
through surveys.
Reduced visibility of tobacco promotion at retail.
Achievements will be measured through surveys at retail.
Report on Plans and Priorities 2005–2006
page 47
Table 7: (cont’d)
PROGRAM ACTIVITY: PEST CONTROL PRODUCT REGULATION
Regulations
Revision of current Pest Control Product Regulations in
light of new Pest Control Products Act (new PCPA)
Adverse Effects Reporting Regulations
Review Panel Regulations
Expected Results
Revised regulations will ensure that terminology is
consistent with the new Act and that any provisions
that have been moved to the Act are deleted from the
Regulations and, through use of authority in new PCPA,
will codify current policy.
New regulations will specify types of information that
must be reported by registrants/applicants under
new PCPA and time frames for reporting. Will provide
information for re-evaluation and possible trigger for
special review, resulting in removal of pesticides and uses
of unacceptable risk. Will contribute to strengthen health
and environmental protection.
The new PCPA includes a process for the reconsideration
of major registration decisions by a review panel. New
regulations will specify administrative details necessary
to govern the reconsideration process. Will contribute
to better public participation in the regulatory process,
increased transparency and increased public and
stakeholder confi dence in pesticide regulation.
Revised regulations will reflect additional violations under
the new Act and regulations.
Revision of Agriculture and Agri-Food Administrative
Monetary Penalties Regulations Respecting the Pest
Control Products Act and Regulations
Food and Drug Regulations (Amendments to Division 15) New or revised maximum residue limits for pesticides.
Will ensure the safety of food following use of these
products on crops or food-producing animals.
Revised regulations will ensure that terminology is
Revision of current regulations in light of new Pest
consistent with the new Act and that any provisions
Control Products Act (new PCPA)
that have been moved to the Act are deleted from the
Regulations and, through use of authority in new PCPA,
will codify current policy.
Revised regulations will reflect additional violations under
Revision of Agriculture and Agri-Food Administrative
Monetary Penalties Regulations Respecting the Pest
the new Act and regulations.
Control Products Act and Regulations
Food and Drug Regulations (Amendments to Division 15) New or revised maximum residue limits for pesticides.
Will ensure the safety of food following use of these
products on crops or food-producing animals.
Health Canada
page 48
Table 8: Details on Transfer Payments Programs
Over the next three years, Health Canada will manage the following transfer payments programs in excess of
$5 million:
2005–2006
• Health Information Contribution Program
• Contribution Program to Improve Access to Health Services for Official Language Minority Communities
• Contributions to Indian bands, Indian and Inuit associations for groups or local governments and the territorial
governments for Non-Insured Health Services
• Payments to the Aboriginal Health Institute/Centre for the Advancement of Aboriginal Peoples’ Health
• Contributions for First Nations and Inuit health promotion and prevention projects and for developmental projects
to support First Nations and Inuit control of health services
• Contributions on behalf of, or to, Indians or Inuit towards the cost of construction, extension or renovation of
hospitals and other health care delivery facilities and institutions as well as hospital and health care equipment
• Contribution towards the Aboriginal Head Start On-reserve Program
• Capital contributions for Non-Departmental Health Facilities for First Nations and Inuit
• Payments to Indian bands, associations or groups for the control and provision of health services
• Contributions to support pilot projects to assess options for transferring the Non-Insured Health Benefits Program
to First Nations and Inuit Control
• Contributions for integrated Indian and Inuit community-based Health Care Services
• Health Care Strategies and Policy Contribution Program
• Health Care Strategies and Policy, Federal/Provincial/Territorial Partnership Grant Program
• Named Grant to the Health Council of Canada
• Named Grant to the Canadian Coordinating Office for Health Technology Assessment
• Grant to the Canadian Patient Safety Institute
• Health Policy Research Program
• Northern Health Supplement to the 2003 First Ministers’ Accord on Health Care Renewal
• Women’s Health Contribution Program
• Alcohol and Drug Treatment and Rehabilitation (ADTR) Contribution Program
• Contributions in Support of the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse (CSCCSA)
• Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund (Vote 5)
• Tobacco Control Programme
• Contribution to Canadian Council on Donation & Transplantation
• Grant to the Canadian Blood Services
For further information on the above-mentioned transfer payment programs see http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/est-pre/estime.asp
Report on Plans and Priorities 2005–2006
page 49
Table 8: (cont’d)
2006–2007
• Health Information Contribution Program
• Contribution Program to Improve Access to Health Services for Official Language Minority Communities
• Contributions to Indian bands, Indian and Inuit associations for groups or local governments and the territorial
governments for Non-Insured Health Services
• Payments to the Aboriginal Health Institute/Centre for the Advancement of Aboriginal Peoples’ Health
• Contributions for First Nations and Inuit health promotion and prevention projects and for developmental projects
to support First Nations and Inuit control of health services
• Contributions on behalf of, or to, Indians or Inuit towards the cost of construction, extension or renovation of
hospitals and other health care delivery facilities and institutions as well as hospital and health care equipment
• Contribution towards the Aboriginal Head Start On-reserve Program
• Capital contributions for Non-Departmental Health Facilities for First Nations and Inuit
• Payments to Indian bands, associations or groups for the control and provision of health services
• Contributions to support pilot projects to assess options for transferring the Non-Insured Health Benefits Program
to First Nations and Inuit Control
• Contributions for integrated Indian and Inuit community-based Health Care Services
• Health Care Strategies and Policy Contribution Program
• Health Care Strategies and Policy, Federal/Provincial/Territorial Partnership Grant Program
• Named Grant to the Health Council of Canada
• Named Grant to the Canadian Coordinating Office for Health Technology Assessment
• Grant to the Canadian Patient Safety Institute
• Health Policy Research Program
• Women’s Health Contribution Program
• Alcohol and Drug Treatment and Rehabilitation (ADTR) Contribution Program
• Contributions in Support of the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse (CSCCSA)
• Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund (Vote 5)
• Tobacco Control Programme
• Contribution to Canadian Council on Donation & Transplantation
For further information on the above-mentioned transfer payment programs see http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/est-pre/estime.asp
Health Canada
page 50
Table 8: (cont’d)
2007–2008
• Contribution Program to Improve Access to Health Services for Official Language Minority Communities
• Contributions to Indian bands, Indian and Inuit associations for groups or local governments and the territorial
governments for Non-Insured Health Services
• Payments to the Aboriginal Health Institute/Centre for the Advancement of Aboriginal Peoples’ Health
• Contributions for First Nations and Inuit health promotion and prevention projects and for developmental projects
to support First Nations and Inuit control of health services
• Contributions on behalf of, or to, Indians or Inuit towards the cost of construction, extension or renovation of
hospitals and other health care delivery facilities and institutions as well as hospital and health care equipment
• Contribution towards the Aboriginal Head Start On-reserve Program
• Capital contributions for Non-Departmental Health Facilities for First Nations and Inuit
• Payments to Indian bands, associations or groups for the control and provision of health services
• Contributions to support pilot projects to assess options for transferring the Non-Insured Health Benefits Program
to First Nations and Inuit Control
• Contributions for integrated Indian and Inuit community-based Health Care Services
• Health Care Strategies and Policy Contribution Program
• Health Care Strategies and Policy, Federal/Provincial/Territorial Partnership Grant Program
• Named Grant to the Health Council of Canada
• Named Grant to the Canadian Coordinating Office for Health Technology Assessment
• Grant to the Canadian Patient Safety Institute
• Health Policy Research Program
• Women’s Health Contribution Program
• Alcohol and Drug Treatment and Rehabilitation (ADTR) Contribution Program
• Contributions in Support of the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse (CSCCSA)
• Drug Strategy Community Initiatives Fund (Vote 5)
• Tobacco Control Programme
• Contribution to Canadian Council on Donation & Transplantation
For further information on the above-mentioned transfer payment programs see http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/est-pre/estime.asp
Report on Plans and Priorities 2005–2006
page 51
Table 9: Foundations (Conditional Grants)
Over the next three years, Health Canada will manage the following foundations using conditional grants:
2005–2006
• Canada Health Infoway Inc. (Infoway)
• Canadian Institute for Health Information
• Canadian Health Services Research Foundation
2006–2007
• Canada Health Infoway Inc. (Infoway)
• Canadian Institute for Health Information
• Canadian Health Services Research Foundation
2007–2008
• Canada Health Infoway Inc. (Infoway)
• Canadian Institute for Health Information
• Canadian Health Services Research Foundation
For further information on the above-mentioned foundations see http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/est-pre/estime.asp
Health Canada
page 52
Table 10 : Horizontal Initiatives
Over the next three years, Health Canada will participate in the following horizontal initiatives:
2005–2006
• Building Public Confidence in Pesticide Regulation and Improving Access to Pest Management Products
• Canada’s Drug Strategy
• Federal Early Childhood Development (ECD) Strategy for First Nations and Other Aboriginal Children
• Therapeutic Access Strategy
2006–2007
• Building Public Confidence in Pesticide Regulation and Improving Access to Pest Management Products
• Canada’s Drug Strategy
• Federal Early Childhood Development (ECD) Strategy for First Nations and Other Aboriginal Children
• Therapeutic Access Strategy
2007–2008
• Building Public Confidence in Pesticide Regulation and Improving Access to Pest Management Products
• Canada’s Drug Strategy
• Federal Early Childhood Development (ECD) Strategy for First Nations and Other Aboriginal Children
• Therapeutic Access Strategy
For further information on the above-mentioned horizontal initiatives see http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/est-pre/estime.asp
Report on Plans and Priorities 2005–2006
page 53
Other Items
of Interest
4
Report on Plans and Priorities 2005–2006
Advancing the Science Agenda
To bring leadership, coherence and expertise to the
To enhance access to the evidence the Department
overall strategic direction of Health Canada’s scientific
requires to support decision-making, policy
responsibilities and activities, the Department has
development and regulation, and to ensure that
undertaken priority initiatives in the areas of science
its science and research activities are aligned with
advice, partnerships, science activity valorization and
Departmental and federal science and technology
development.
policy priorities, Health Canada will develop a policy
Health Canada’s Framework for Science outlines
for managing its current and future science and
five principles for science (alignment, linkages,
research partnerships. Understanding and taking
excellence, innovation, and stewardship) and is
effective action on science policy issues that are
intended to enable the Department to fulfill our
increasingly complex and multidisciplinary in nature
mandate and contribute to the Government of
many times requires the participation of governments,
Canada’s overarching priorities. In 2003–2004, the
universities and the private sector, both nationally,
Department developed an inventory of its science.
and often, internationally. The policy on science
In 2005–2006, the Department will develop a policy
and research partnerships will guide and support
to integrate science planning into Departmental
Departmental efforts to: link activities and collaborate
planning.
with science and research partners; access external
In response to members of Health Canada’s
sources of expertise while focusing its internal
social science community, the Office of the Chief
science and research on those tasks that it is uniquely
Scientist (OCS) is also leading a new Social
equipped to deliver; and measure the outcomes of its
Sciences Initiative, which will provide a framework
science and research collaborations.
to enhance the recognition of social sciences in the
In addition to these new initiatives, the OCS
Department, improve the integration of the social
will continue its ongoing activities, which includes
science community, and provide opportunities for
coordinating involvement with the federal science
ongoing training to ensure that the policies developed
and technology community, fostering and facilitating
in the Department are based on the most current
research partnerships, promoting and communicating
methodologies.
Health Canada science and research, and providing
Under the leadership of OCS, a Departmental
intellectual property support through the Business
working group has been established to assist and
Development Office. To develop Health Canada’s
inform Health Canada’s scientists participating in
research capacity, OCS administers a Postdoctoral
collaborative arrangements. The working group will
Fellowship (PDF) program and an Innovative Science
develop a comprehensive interpretation of Treasury
Competition. OCS also organises the Health Canada
Board policies and a Departmental roadmap for
Science Forum and provides secretariats for the
scientists who participate in these arrangements.
Research Ethics Board and the Science Advisory
Board.
Health Canada
page 56
Health Canada Highlights from the 2005 Federal Budget
On February 23, 2005, the Minister of Finance tabled
the federal Budget. The following is a brief summary
of some of the major items that will directly affect the
work of Health Canada.
Health Care and Health Protection
• As part of the 10-Year Plan to Strengthen Health
Care, the Government of Canada announced an
additional $41.3 billion in federal investments
in September 2004. The Budget provides an
additional $150 million over five years to the
territories to assist with the costs associated
with medical travel, to facilitate long-term
reforms to territorial health care systems, and
to create a federal-territorial working group and
secretariat to improve health care delivery.
• The Budget also commits a total of
$200 million over five years to support
implementation of the 10-Year Plan, to be
allocated as follows:
• $75 million over five years to accelerate and
expand the assessment and integration
of internationally educated health care
professionals;
• $15 million over four years for wait times
initiatives that will build on and complement
provincial and territorial initiatives; and,
• $110 million over five years to improve
the data collection and reporting of health
performance information.
• The Budget provides an additional $170 million
over five years to strengthen the safety of
drugs, medical devices, and other therapeutic
products. Funding will strengthen Health
Canada’s ability to review clinical trial
applications, and monitor and respond to
adverse events reports; ensure that the process
for developing and manufacturing products is
monitored for safety; increase compliance and
enforcement; and, assist in the establishment
of strong regulations for the safe handling of
cells, tissues and organs.
Health and the Environment
• The Budget provides $90 million over
five years to assist the Department in fulfilling
its outstanding health risk assessment and
health protection obligations under the
Canadian Environmental Protection Act in order
to reduce the exposure of Canadians to toxic
substances.
Aboriginal Health
• The Budget confirmed $700 million in
funding over five years announced at the
Special Meeting of First Ministers and
Aboriginal Leaders in September 2004. This
funding will go towards the Aboriginal Health
Transition Fund ($200 million over five years),
the Aboriginal Health Human Resources
Initiative ($100 million over five years) and
health promotion and disease prevention
($400 million over five years).
• In addition, Health Canada will receive
funding for early childhood development
programming (Aboriginal Head Start) for
First Nations children on reserve. In support
of early learning and child care, the Budget
commits an additional $100 million over the
next five years to ensure a healthy start for First
Nations children. The Department will receive
approximately half of this funding. Specific
areas of funding will be determined following
community consultations, assessments of
programs, and the Aboriginal roundtable
discussions.
Expenditure Review
• The Budget incorporates the Expenditure
Review Committee’s first review of federal
spending. The Budget identifies $10.9 billion
of expenditure reductions over five years
from both Government-wide efficiencies and
departmental initiatives. Reductions from
Government-wide efficiency measures total
$6.7 billion and include initiatives in such
Report on Plans and Priorities 2005–2006
page 57
areas as procurement, property management
and service delivery. The total impact of these
broad initiatives on Health Canada is yet to be
determined.
• The Department’s contribution to departmental
initiatives from internal program and
administrative efficiencies is $196 million over
five years through improvements to corporate
efficiency, the use of information products and
program streamlining.
Health Canada
page 58
Departmental Contacts
ATLANTIC REGION
MANITOBA AND SASKATCHEWAN REGION
Maritime Centre, Suite 1918
1505 Barrington Street
Halifax, Nova Scotia B3J 3Y6
Telephone: (902) 426-9564
Facsimile: (902) 426-6659
391 York Avenue, Suite 300
Winnipeg, Manitoba R3C 4W1
Telephone: (204) 983-4764
Facsimile: (204) 983-5325
QUEBEC REGION
ALBERTA AND NORTHWEST TERRITORIES REGION
Complexe Guy-Favreau, East Tower
Suite 208
200 René-Lévesque Blvd. West
Montreal, Quebec H2Z 1X4
Telephone: (514) 283-5186
Facsimile: (514) 283-1364
Canada Place, Room 710
9700 Jasper Avenue
Edmonton, Alberta T5J 4C3
Telephone: (780) 495-5172
Facsimile: (780) 495-5551
ONTARIO AND NUNAVUT REGION
BRITISH COLUMBIA AND YUKON REGION
4th Floor, 25 St. Clair Avenue East
Toronto, Ontario M4T 1M2
Telephone: (416) 954-3593
Facsimile: (416) 954-3599
757 West Hastings Street, Room 235
Vancouver, British Columbia V6C 1A1
Telephone: (604) 666-2083
Facsimile: (604) 666-2258
NATIONAL CAPITAL REGION
FOR PUBLICATIONS, WRITE TO:
Telephone: (613) 957-2991
Facsimile: (613) 941-5366
Internet: http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca
Health Canada
0900C2, Brooke-Claxton Building
Ottawa, Ontario, CANADA
K1A 0K9
or
Telephone: (613) 954-5995
Facsimile: (613) 941-5366
Report on Plans and Priorities 2005–2006
page 59
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