2015 Expression of University Strengths

2015 Expression of University Strengths
Kansas State University
Expression of University Strengths
April 2015
TABLE OF CONTENTS
MEMORANDUM FROM PRESIDENT KIRK SCHULZ
AGRICULTURE
1.1 Building the Future of Global Food Systems through the new “Food Systems Research and
Education Facility”
1.2 Wheat Genetics Resources Center
1.3 Food Animal Residue Avoidance and Depletion (FARAD) Program
1.4 Great Plains Sorghum Improvement and Utilization Center
1.5 Institute for the Health and Security of Military Families
1.6 Pre-Harvest Food Safety and Security
1.7 Center of Excellence for Food Safety Research in Child Nutrition Programs
1.8 Groundwater and Society: Developing Technologies to Conserve the Ogallala Aquifer
1.9 Child Health and Physical Activity
1.10 Healthy Cattle, Healthy People, Healthy Planet: Beef Initiative
1.11 Healthy Relationships
1.12 Pathways Analysis of Transboundary Animal Diseases to Assess Risks in United States
Agricultural Industries and Worldwide Food Security
1.13 EPICENTER: Laboratory for a network science approach to predict and control the spread of
infectious diseases
1.14 Increasing the capacity of College of Architecture, Planning and Design to advance development of
rural towns through university-community-professional partnerships
COMMERCE, JUSTICE, STATE
2.1 Big Data Analytics Institute: A Center of Excellence for Large-Scale Informatics in Business,
Engineering, Science and Education
2.2 Center for Big Data Analytics: Development of a Center of Excellence for Large-Scale Inference in
Business, Science and Education
2.3 Great Plains Center for Urban Watersheds
2.4 Global Institute and National Center for Aerospace Diversity, Innovation and Education (I-CADIE)
2.5 Preparing Future STEM Faculty from Underrepresented Groups
2.6 Innovation through Design and Cross-generation, Cross-sector, Cross-disciplinary Learning and
Discovery
2.7 EPICENTER: Laboratory for a network science approach to predict and control the spread of
infectious diseases
2.8 Integration of Research, Training and Education in Biosafety and Biocontainment
2.9 Center for Technology Development: Product and Technology Development for the Advanced
Manufacturing Industry
2.10 Networking, Security, and Resiliency for Critical Infrastructures
2.11 Virtual Interactive Design Education
2.12 Bringing the Critical Zone Observatory Paradigm to Konza
2.13 Operations Research: Applied and Theoretical Advances across Multiple Sectors
2.14 Developing a Better Understanding of Controls on the Quality of Water Resources
DEFENSE
3.1 National Center for Information Assurance and Security
3.2 Development of Researchable Databases that can be utilized by DOD, Academia and others for
Research Projects
3.3 Real-Time Monitoring of Biosafety Level 3 and 4 Exhaust Flow Purity
ENERGY AND WATER
4.1 Aluminum Nitride for High-Power Electronics and Ultraviolet Light-Emitting Diodes
4.2 Performance and Innovation in Building Envelopes
4.3 Center for Attosecond Nanophotonics
4.4 Networking, Security, and Resiliency for Critical Infrastructures
4.5 Large-Scale Integration of Clean Technologies in the Power Grid
HOMELAND SECURITY
5.1 Bio / Agro Security Innovation Systems - BASIS
5.2 EPICENTER: Laboratory for a network science approach to predict and control the spread of
infectious diseases
5.3 Fusion Centers and their Roles in Global Food and Water Security
5.4 Development, Management, and Maintenance of Data, Programs, and Response Plans Critical for
National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility (NBAF) Reporting, Assessments and Documentation
5.5 Real-Time Monitoring of Biosafety Level 3 and 4 Exhaust Flow Purity
5.6 Identifying Corrective Actions from Agricultural Response (ICAAR) and Planning and Curriculum
for Food and Agriculture Emergency Response
INTERIOR, ENVIRONMENT
6.1 Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Resource Management Operations
6.2 Prairie Studies Initiative
6.3 Investigating Place Using Digital Toolset
LABOR, HHS, EDUCATION
7.1 Preparing STEM Teachers: Responding to New Challenges
7.2 Troops to Teachers: Recruiting and Supporting Preparing post-9/11 Veterans to Become K-12
Educators
7.3 Promoting Health through the Built Environment
7.4 Breaking the Barriers: Aging in Place
7.5 Developing Educational Leadership in K-12 Schools, Districts and 2-Year Postsecondary Schools
and Colleges
7.6 Prairie Studies Initiative
7.7 Research on Culturally Responsive Teaching and Learning
MILITARY CONSTRUCTION, VETERANS
8.1 Operations Research: Applied and Theoretical Advances across Multiple Sectors
TRANSPORTATION, HUD
9.1 Center for Rural Transportation Research and Education
9.2 Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems Standards Validation
9.3 Rail Infrastructure Durability and Sustainability
AGENCY INITIATIVES
1. Title XII-USAID International Ag Development: The Importance of Feed the Future Food Security
Innovation Labs
2. National Plant Diagnostic Network
3. USDA-ARS Ogallala Aquifer Program
4. NSF Long-Term Ecological Research Program at Konza Prairie
5. National Animal Health Laboratory Network
6. National Canola Research Program-Great Plains Region
7. Center for Grain and Animal Health Research (CGAHR)
 Protecting Swine From Foreign Diseases
 Wheat Quality and Competitiveness
 Development of Heat and Drought Resilient Wheat
 Hessian Fly Research
8. NSF National Ecological Observatory Network
NATIONAL INITIATIVES
1.
Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities (APLU)
2.
College of Veterinary Medicine/Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges
MEMORANDUM
DATE:
April 22, 2015
TO:
Members and Staff of the Kansas Congressional Delegation
FROM:
Kirk H. Schulz, President Kansas State University
RE:
Kansas State University Expression of Strengths Document
______________________________________________________________________________
On behalf of Kansas State University, I would like to thank each of you for your work in
Washington on behalf of the citizens of Kansas. Your guidance and help has helped the
University to launch and enhance programs and research efforts over the years. We
particularly appreciate the support you have shown Kansas State University in the past.
This document is presented to you as expressions of university strengths. The university VicePresidents, Provost, Deans, and Directors believe these initiatives represent the strengths of the
university and match current federal initiatives and programs. In addition these initiatives are
in step with K-State 2025. This is the University’s strategic plan with the goal to be recognized
nationally as a Top 50 Research University by 2025.
If you have questions about any of these requests, please contact Sue Peterson, Director
of Governmental Relations, at 785-532-6221 or [email protected] She will provide you
with whatever information you may require. You may also access this document
electronically on the K-State Governmental Relations website at www.kstate.edu/govrelations/federal/.
Building the Future of Global Food Systems
Through the new “Food Systems Research and Education Facility”
research, which was approximately half the total
research expenditures at Kansas State University.
The College of Agriculture and K-State Research and
Extension are starting to plan a new Food Systems
Research and Education Facility. This state-of-the-art
building would house diverse programs related to
agricultural and food systems. It would include
cutting-edge
research
laboratories,
modern
greenhouses, specialized teaching laboratories,
extension and distance education space, and
classrooms.
Relevance
College of Agriculture Teaching Excellence
Faculty in K-State’s College of Agriculture have
earned 13 national or regional Excellence in College
and University Teaching Awards from USDA and the
Association for Public and Land-Grant Universities,
more than any other university in the nation. Not
surprisingly, this teaching excellence has attracted
more students.
Background
Kansas agriculture has been successful because of
solid partnerships between producers, government,
industry and Kansas State University. “Farm to Fork”
agriculture employs more Kansans than any other
sector of the state’s economy. As the biggest business
in the state, agriculture is critical to Kansas’ future,
and K-State is essential for continuing to grow this
industry.
During the past 10 years, the number of students in the
college has increased by more than 1,000, reaching a
total of 3,370 in fall 2014. In addition, almost 100% of
College of Agriculture graduates find excellent jobs,
most of them in Kansas (~65%). USDA expects the
demand for these graduates will continue to grow.
With an increasing world population and a growing
middle class, Kansas is well positioned to benefit from
the resulting increased food demand. However, we
need to develop higher yielding crops, more intensive
cropping systems, enhanced beef/dairy genetics and
production, and improved processing and distribution
systems that minimize food loss while maintaining the
natural resource base for future production.
For K-State to reach its 2025 goal of becoming one of
the nation’s Top 50 public research universities, the
College of Agriculture/K-State Research and
Extension must continue to increase its research,
teaching and outreach activities.
Current Agricultural Facilities Situation
The College of Agriculture has very few modern
laboratories, greenhouses and other research or
teaching intensive facilities. The last building
constructed
for
plant-related
research
was
Throckmorton Hall, completed in two phases (1981
and 1994). Other buildings housing animal, meat,
food, grain and entomology studies range from 58 to
102 years old. While renovations have been made,
these facilities cannot be retrofitted to meet modern
research and teaching needs.
Description
Researchers and educators at Kansas State are
internationally recognized in food and agriculture.
Last year, the U.S. Agency for International
Development selected K-State for three international
centers to focus on postharvest loss, sorghum and
millet, and wheat. The National Science Foundation
also funded its first ever center for wheat genetics
resources at K- State.
The College of Agriculture does have a few new stateof-the-art facilities, such as the flour mill and feed
technology innovation center, and these were critical
to securing the large USAID and USDA grants
recently received. Funders notice new, cutting-edge
research facilities and their capabilities. To increase
our competitive edge, we need to invest in modern
facilities.
Recently, the National Academies of Science’s
National Research Council published the rankings of
doctoral programs in the United States. Most of KState’s College of Agriculture programs were in the
Top 10: Plant Pathology – No. 1; Agricultural
Economics – No. 4; Entomology – No. 8; Food
Science – No. 9; and Plant Sciences – No. 10. The
Department of Animal Sciences and Industry was No.
5 in terms of research productivity.
To capitalize upon our existing strengths in food and
agricultural research, we propose a new Food Systems
Research and Education Facility (FSREF). The new
building will also address the need for growth
In 2013-2014, the College of Agriculture/K-State
Research and Extension expended $85 million in
1.1
required by the College of Agriculture/K-State
Research and Extension and Kansas State University
to meet the goals in their respective 2025 strategic
plans.
A recent Space Needs Analysis for the college,
conducted as part of the K-State campus master
planning process, identified a serious need for an
additional 231,572 square feet of usable research
laboratory space. The new FSREF will only partially
meet this need.
The FSREF would add about 110,000 square feet of
usable state-of-the-art research laboratory space; an
additional 50,000 square feet of modern greenhouse
space to supplement the existing and aging
greenhouse facilities; and nearly 40,000 square feet of
usable space for teaching, extension and distance
education.
Laboratory space would be configured in an open
model. A relatively small amount of space will be
fixed, while the remainder will be flexible, easily
reconfigured space with moveable lab benches,
cabinetry and other lab furniture accessories.
The new building will include an appropriate number
of offices and conference rooms, as well as adequate
space for our partners from the USDA Agricultural
Research Service. This will continue our great
research collaboration and synergy.
Research space would be allocated to work on the big
issues facing Kansas agriculture and the food system
(i.e. wheat, sorghum, beef, food safety, water, etc.).
With enhanced facilities at K-State, Kansas will
continue to produce more crops and livestock for
consumers here and abroad, and Kansas agriculture
will continue to lead the state’s economy.
1.1
Wheat Genetics Resource Center (WGRC):
A Global Leader in Wheat Genetics Research
Partners in Job Creation, Economic Development,
Cutting-edge Technology and Innovation
Background
 Temperature increases are projected to decrease
wheat yields by 20-30%
 Demand for wheat is expected to increase by 60%
over the coming decades
The WGRC at Kansas State University and
public/private partners will leverage wild wheat genetic
diversity to ensure the stability and profitability of
future wheat crops.
Genetic diversity is the raw
material for developing new and improved crop
varieties. Research at the WGRC will address the
challenges of hot and dry climate conditions through
adaptive breeding, leading to job creation and billions
of dollars in economic impact.
Description
Over the last 100 years, scientists have collected wild
wheat species from the harshest environments on earth.
Over the last 36 years, the WGRC has assembled a
wild wheat species working collection now housed at
Kansas State University and the Kansas Wheat
Innovation Center in Manhattan, KS. Contained in these
wild wheats are naturally developed traits ranging from
pest resistance, heat and drought tolerance, and other
climate-related adaptation traits to end-user health and
nutritional characteristics. Although the WGRC has
made pioneering contributions in collecting this treasure
trove for wheat improvement programs, limited
technology, resources, and expertise impede the ability
to efficiently and fully mine these genetic resources.
Addressing this need, Kansas and Colorado farmers,
private corporations, Federal and State agencies, Kansas
State University and Colorado State University
have leveraged expertise and resources to form the
WGRC Industry/University Cooperative Research
Center (WGRC I/UCRC), a National Science
Foundation (NSF) Research Center. The first of its kind
in the plant sciences, this Research Center’s mission
is to access and apply wild wheat traits to wheat
breeding programs across the US and the world.
WGRC NSF I/UCRC research will lead directly to
the development of world-changing wheat varieties,
reaching
every
corner
of
the
globe.
Center Resources and Objectives
1. Collect, conserve, and distribute wheat genetic
resources: The WGRC gene bank currently
maintains 20,000 lines, including 4,000 wild wheat
species strains, native to the Middle East, that may
be extinct, and 16,000 unique genetic stocks. These
collections are continuously expanding as the
WGRC acquires, develops, and distributes new
genetic and genomic resources to facilitate wheat
genetics, genomics, and breeding research.
2. Develop improved germplasm with emphasis on
drought and heat tolerance: Novel traits are
continuously identified and incorporated into
improved germplasm.
Fifty-seven improved
germplasm lines containing novel pest resistance
genes have been released and made available to the
wheat breeders across the globe.
3. Training and outreach: Over the past 36 years, the
WGRC has trained 15 MS, 23 PhD, and 22 PostDoctoral students. WGRC has sponsored 72 visiting
scientists with formal appointments and publishes
the Annual Wheat Newsletter for dissemination of
research results.
In addition, the WGRC will focus on the identification
and application of drought and heat tolerant wheat traits
for the Southern Great Plains and other drought prone
regions in the US.
Relevance
With operational and infrastructure investment, the
Center will greatly accelerate the genetic resources
conservation program, bridging fundamental research to
commercial applications in a shorter period of time.
Agency Contact Information
Larry Hornak, Program Director, NSF
Industry/University Cooperative Research Centers
Program (ENG/IIP), [email protected], 703.292.2678
1.2
Food Animal Residue Avoidance and Depletion (FARAD) Program
Background/Description
rabbits, fish shrimp, and honeybees). Veterinarians
often must use drugs approved for both animals
and humans to address animal health and welfare
and to enhance public safety. PL 103-396, Animal
Medicinal Drug Use Clarification Act (AMDUCA),
authorized in 1994, permits veterinarians to
prescribe drugs in an extra-label manner to treat
conditions for which there are no effective approved
drugs. AMDUCA requires a scientifically-derived
withdrawal period for drugs used in an extra-label
manner. FARAD is the only approved source for
such information and in fact enables much needed
drug usage in food animal practice. FARAD serves
as the veterinarian’s clearing house for residue data.
The Food Animal Residue Avoidance and
Depletion (FARAD) program is an integrated
extension and applied research program that
maintains
the
Food
Animal
Residue
Avoidance Databank, which is designed to
eliminate adverse drug and chemical residues
from appearing in the edible tissues of food
producing animals. FARAD helps keep food
animals healthy and safe for human consumption
through outreach activities that include a telephone
hot-line (1-888-USFARAD), website for request by
veterinarians for direct residue avoidance assistance
(www.FARAD.ORG), and mobile applications for
field use. FARAD is a veterinary tool designed to
keep adverse levels of drugs and chemicals from
contaminating milk, meat and eggs destined for
human consumption. No other federal or private
entity duplicates work carried out by FARAD.
FARAD straddles the missions of USDA
(agriculture research and extension) and FDA (food
safety). FARAD is an integrated extension and
applied research program that provides required,
scientifically valid information on how to avoid
drug, environmental and pesticide contaminant
residues in milk, meat and eggs, thus helping to
avert food safety crises. FARAD provides the
scientific basis for determining the appropriate
withdrawal period when drugs are used in an extralabel manner, a scenario often employed when
veterinarians are trying to reduce antimicrobial
resistance in animals they treat. The research
component of this program involves development of
mathematical models that predict withdrawal times
and then can be used real time by veterinarians in
field situations. FARAD publishes handbooks and
journal digests of these data to increase availability to
practitioners, as well as contributing technical
manuscripts to the peer reviewed scientific literature
of this field. FARAD is also used when foodproducing animals are mistakenly exposed to
environmental contaminants (pesticides or biotoxins,
melamine, etc), or for example to nuclear fall-out two
years ago from the Fukushima reactor disaster in
Japan. FARAD provides veterinarians with a legal
mechanism for determining withdrawal intervals for
extra-label drug use or contaminant exposures.
Because it is often not economically viable for
pharmaceutical companies to pursue a drug label
claim for minor species, FARAD is the only source
for food safety and drug withdrawal information for
veterinarians treating these particular species
(sheep, goats, reindeer, elk, ducks, pheasant, quail,
Relevance National/Regional
The FARAD program was developed in 1981by
pharmacologists and toxicologists at four land-grant
universities. Dr. Jim Riviere of the College of
Veterinary Medicine at KSU is the national
coordinator for this program with collaborators at the
University of California-Davis, University of Florida
and North Carolina State University. FARAD
continues to serve as the primary resource for
veterinarians to maintain a drug and chemical residue
free food supply. In 2014, FARAD experienced a 20%
increase in residue avoidance cases. FARAD
personnel developed a protocol requested by a number
of states to help divert some residue contaminated
milk, not appropriate for direct human consumption,
by defining limits for safe use in veal calf operations.
The global veterinary drug residue avoidance database
effort continues to be pursued, a development which
would greatly impact the food safety community, and
provide direct support for Kansas beef exporters.
Agency Contact Information
U.S. Department of Agriculture
National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA)
1400 SW Independence Ave., SW
Washington, DC 20250-2240
The Food Animal Residue Avoidance Databank is
authorized in the Agriculture Action of 2014 (PL
113-79), Section 7307 [H7308] at $2.5 million. The
program is scheduled to be funded for Fiscal Year
2014 at $1.25 million. 1.3
Great Plains Sorghum Improvement and Utilization Center
Background
Relevance
This project is an effort to enhance the overall
productivity and value of U.S. grain sorghum and
improve its value as a food, feed, and bioenergy crop.
Past surveys of sorghum growers identified their primary
sorghum needs. Based on grower’s responses, the following
objectives were identified:
 Improve yield potential, production efficiency, and
food, feed and bioenergy value of sorghum, through
plant breeding and genetics.
 Develop new uses for sorghum in food and non-food
applications, emphasizing the sorghum grain’s
desirable characteristics, such as absence of gluten.
 Identify more efficient production strategies that will
enhance water and nutrient use, particularly nitrogen,
and provide new options for the control of weeds and
pests, to increase sorghum yield and profits.
 Expand research on sorghum as a bioenergy crop
uniquely adapted to drier regions of the U.S.
 Provide market and policy analyses, and develop
educational programs for sorghum-based products
and production systems to increase profitability of all
segments of the U.S. sorghum industry.
Description
The U.S. is a major producer of grain sorghum.
Kansas and Texas are the largest producers,
contributing to >80% of U.S. sorghum acreage and
production. Despite the importance of this crop for
farmers in drought prone environments and the many
new opportunities for sorghum utilization in the
bioenergy, bioproducts, and food industries,
particularly gluten-free foods, relatively little public
or private resources are being invested in research on
genetic improvement, production, or innovative uses
of the various types of sorghum. The trend towards
less research and technology transfer efforts on
sorghum threatens the economic stability of sorghum
producers and fails to capitalize on the unique
opportunities afforded by this crop. This is reflected
in the continual decline in sorghum acreage in the
U.S. and, particularly, in key sorghum producing
regions of Kansas and Texas. In 2014, sorghum was
planted on about 7.2 million acres across the U.S.,
down 940,000 acres from the 8.1 million planted in
2013. The decrease was caused by producers
choosing to switch acreage to higher valued
soybeans, particularly in areas with improved
growing conditions from previous years of drought,
like Kansas and Texas, the two largest sorghum
producing States in the Nation. Sorghum is more
resilient to drought and high temperature stress
compared to corn. More strategic research is needed
to increase the yield potential of sorghum under both
irrigated and dryland conditions.
Kansas State University initiated the Center for
Sorghum Improvement in 2001. In 2006, these efforts
were expanded to a regional scale with the
development of the Great Plains Sorghum
Improvement and Utilization Center (GPSIUC). The
GPSIUC extended the interdisciplinary concept to
include K-State, Texas Tech University, and Texas
A&M University, integrating the combined expertise
and resources of these three universities. The focus of
research was on genetic improvement, production
systems to enhance water and nutrient use, innovative
strategies to provide improved weed control,
utilization of sorghum in human food products,
animal feed, and as a bioenergy and industrial
feedstock, plus marketing, and policy analysis in
support of the US sorghum industry.
The GPSIUC is continuing existing research and education
programs, particularly in genetic improvement, production
efficiency, and sorghum utilization. Sorghum is one of the
most drought and heat tolerant crops in the world, offering
potential advantages as a food, feed, and bioenergy crop to
the rural economies of the Great Plains. The wide diversity
of sorghum types (sweet, forage, silage, biomass, grain)
offer tremendous opportunity, but these resources need to
be evaluated to identify the best suited varieties to meet the
specific needs of food, feed, biofuel, and industrial uses.
The absence of gluten in sorghum grain offers opportunities
for the development of new food products for people
suffering from gluten intolerance.
Systems for production, harvesting, transportation, and
storage of sorghum products, feedstocks, and co-products
have to be developed to meet the needs of the bioenergy
industry, while optimizing the use of our natural resources,
especially water and nitrogen in our dry climate, and
protecting the environment.
To meet the growing demand from private industry and
academia, it is important to train graduate students as sorghum
scientists. Expanding training and research on genetic
improvement, production and utilization will result in
technologies and information leading to an increase in
sorghum productivity and profitability, and improving the
U.S. sorghum’s industry global competitiveness.
Agency Contact Information
USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture
Ann Marie Thro, 202-401-6702
1.4
Institute for the Health and Security of Military Families
Background
military installations, the Kansas National Guard,
Army Reserve, US Department of Veteran’s Affairs,
the Department of Defense, and other state and
national organizations.
For American military personnel who have served in
war, federal programs have long been in place to
address physical injuries from bullets and bombs and
psychological injuries of wartime trauma. In
relatively recent times, however, veterans returning
from war have faced difficulties neither anticipated
nor addressed by federal programs. These include
chronic health problems resulting from exposure to
environmental hazards (e.g., chemical defoliants in
Vietnam and a complex mix of neurotoxins in the
Persian Gulf War) and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)
encountered during deployment, as well as long-term
health impacts (e.g., PTSD) on SMVF populations.
Increasingly for today’s professional military (both
active and reserve components), the aftermath of
wartime service has consequences not only for
veterans’ well-being, but for their families and
communities.
Relevance National/Regional
Our current partnerships with the U.S. Departments
of Agriculture and Defense have been primarily
focused on outreach rather than on research funding
for the study of military families. These outreach
initiatives
support
significant
programming
underway at K-State and across Kansas. Proposals to
other federal agencies, such as the Department of
Health and Human Services, will expand the reach of
the College of Human Ecology and its units.
Expanding partnerships to support additional
investment in relevant research would enable Kansas
State University, the College of Human Ecology and
the Institute for the Health and Security of Military
Families to capitalize on the expertise available here.
Description
Kansas State University (KSU) is home to a unique
cadre of scientists from diverse disciplines with an
impressive track record in research, outreach,
academic and clinical service programs addressing
the health, well-being, and sustainment of service
members, veterans and their families (SMVF),
including:
 Programs and community support networks for
military-connected children and youth, through
local 4-H Clubs, schools and OMK youth/family
camps
 Research and training programs on violence
prevention in military families, quality childcare
and childhood social emotional health
 Clinical programs for military personnel, veterans
and families
 Research on the long-term effects of deployment
and war-trauma on marriages, child and youth
development, employment, and financial planning
 Cooperative Extension services to families of
military personnel
 Online graduate programs for professionals who
serve military families
 Research on the effects of high-intensity functional
exercise training on the body composition, fitness
and health of active duty military personnel as well
as on barriers to physical activity participation for
disabled veterans.
Agency Contact Information
Brent Elrod, National Program Leader
Military and Veterans Programs
Division of Family and Consumer Sciences
National Institute of Food and Agriculture
United States Department of Agriculture
1400 Independence Avenue SW
Washington, D.C. 20250-2225
202.690.3468 (V) 202.720.9366 (F)
[email protected]
Dr. Carol Benesh, National Program Leader
Military, Child and Youth
Division of Youth and 4-H
National Institute of Food and Agriculture
United States Department of Agriculture
1400 Independence Avenue SW
Washington, D.C. 20250-2225
202.401.6861 (V) 202.720.9366 (F)
[email protected]
Dr. Christine M. Hunter
Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolic
Disease
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and
Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
301.594.4728
[email protected]
In addition to contributions made by researchers
from colleges across the university, the Institute is
the “tip of the spear” for K-State’s alliances with area
1.5
Pre-Harvest Food Safety and Security
Background/Description
have not been developed. Data on prevalence and
factors affecting fecal shedding of these serogroups in
the cattle population are needed before strategies for
their control can be developed.
Salmonella: The presence of Salmonella in beef
cattle production systems can cause serious adverse
effects in cattle as well as humans.
In cattle,
Salmonella can affect morbidity, mortality, production
efficiency, and the economic well-being of cattle
producers.
Salmonella is a common cause of
gastroenteritis in humans with outbreaks and infections
often linked to consumption of contaminated beef,
water or other foods.
The emergence and
dissemination of multi-drug resistant Salmonella are
also major concerns for public health. The research
goals are to understand the ecology and epidemiology
of Salmonella in cattle.
Campylobacter: The species of Campylobacter
cause enteritis and in some instances abortion in
cattle. However, the importance of Campylobacter is as
a food-borne pathogen that can cause sporadic
cases and outbreaks of human Campylobacter
infections. In the past, human infections have chiefly
been attributed to poultry sources. Recently, cattle
have been recognized as an important source of food
contamination. The research goals are to understand the
ecology and epidemiology of Campylobacter in cattle.
Antimicrobial Resistance: The use of antimicrobials
in animal agriculture is considered a major contributor
to the emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistance
in the environment. The concern over antimicrobial
resistance has important consequences for public health
and food-animal industries, including restricted access
to global markets. The goal is to monitor prevalence,
amplification, and dissemination of antimicrobial
resistance genes and bacteria that carry resistance genes
in beef cattle.
The goal of this program is to develop strategies to
identify and mitigate food-borne pathogens and
antimicrobial resistance in beef production systems.
Specifically, studies will focus on the ecology of Shiga
toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC), both O157
and non-O157 serotypes, Salmonella, Campylobacter,
and antimicrobial resistance elements in beef cattle and
on the development and testing of on-farm mitigation
strategies, with the ultimate goal of enhancing food
safety and public health. Because of the economic
importance of beef production and beef processing in
Kansas, as well as Kansas State University's leadership
in beef cattle research, it is logical for researchers to
focus on food-borne pathogens and pre-harvest beef
safety. The research outcomes will have major positive
impacts on public health, animal well-being, and the
economic prosperity of the state of Kansas and U.S.
Relevance National/Regional
The food supply in the United States is one of the safest
in the world; however, food-borne illnesses do occur
and frequently are associated with foods of animal
origin. The College of Veterinary Medicine at K-State
has an interdisciplinary research team to address
scientific issues related to the four vital areas in preharvest food safety in beef cattle: STEC (O157:H7
and non-O157), Salmonella, Campylobacter, and
antimicrobial resistance of food borne and normal gut
bacteria. The team with microbiology, molecular
biology, epidemiology and production systems
expertise, with collaborations with researchers from
other departments at K-State, and input from key
industry stakeholders is generating valid and industryrelevant outcomes. The long-term research goals are to
understand the ecology of food-borne pathogens in
cattle and their environment and develop effective and
practical strategies for comprehensive reduction or
elimination of food-borne pathogens at the farm level. Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC): Healthy
cattle are the major reservoir of STEC, with the
organisms residing primarily in the hindgut. These
bacteria are shed in the feces, which then serve as a
source of contamination of beef, produce, and
recreational and drinking water. Research efforts in the
past have focused primarily on STEC O157:H7.
Recently, there is increased recognition that six other
STEC serogroups, O26, O45, O1O3, O111, O121, and
O145, are also major public health concerns. According
to the CDC, the non-O157 STEC serogroups account
for twice as many illnesses as STEC O157. However,
not much is known about the ecology of the non-O157
STEC in cattle and their environment, partly because
methodologies to isolate and detect non-O157 STEC
The four issues outlined strengthen the need to
understand the ecology and epidemiology of food-borne
pathogens for effective pre-harvest intervention
strategies so that cattle with fewer pathogens and lower
antimicrobial resistance elements are presented for
slaughter. Control strategies aimed at reducing the
prevalence and concentration of these bacteria and their
resistance elements in cattle feces, thus reducing the
overall number of bacteria entering both food and
environmental pathways, may be the most effective
approach for reducing the overall risk of human
infection and maximizing public health outcomes.
Agency Contact Information
USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture
Jan Singleton, 202-401-1954 1.6
The Center of Excellence for Food Safety Research in Child Nutrition Programs
Background
safety education group in USDA Food Safety
and Inspection Service in planning and
implementing a research project to evaluate the
effectiveness of one of their educational
campaigns. Funding of $500,000 was provided
to the Center through an interagency agreement.
The United States Department of Agriculture’s
Food and Nutrition Services (FNS) provides
support for feeding more than 31 million
children school lunch each day in 100,000
schools and about 12.1 million breakfasts in
89,000 schools. The safety of these meals is of
great importance and there is strong Federal
legislation to support food safety.
Relevance National/Regional
K-State offers food safety expertise along the
entire continuum of the food chain that is
unparalleled in any university across the nation.
Research results generated by the Center of
Excellence have national relevance. Research
focuses on current food safety practice. This
applied research is used by FNS and the
National Food Service Management Institute
(funded by FNS) as the basis for developing
educational programs. This strong relationship
ensures that the research is translated in
meaningful resources to have a positive impact
on practice.
As part of an initiative of the Secretary of
Agriculture, FNS established The Center of
Excellence for Food Safety Research in Child
Nutrition Programs at Kansas State University in
2011 to provide science-based support to
improve the safety of foods provided through the
FNS nutrition assistance programs, particularly
those served in schools and child care settings.
Description
Faculty at Kansas State University has
established the Center of Excellence and is
conducting research to support food safety
issues and concerns of FNS. The Center of
Excellence provides researchers the opportunity
to conduct food safety research that will have an
immediate impact on child nutrition programs
and the safety of food served. The goals of the
Center of Excellence are to provide a
multidisciplinary approach to basic and applied
food safety research needs related to child
nutrition programs and conduct applied studies
to resolve food safety issues in schools and other
child nutrition programs and convey those
findings in a way that facilities the transfer of
knowledge to school foodservice directors and
program operators, scientists, policy makers,
educators, and practitioners.
The Center developed an intensive immersion
course on the food safety principles that
undergird food safety. The course was pilot
tested twice in 2013, offered three times in 2014,
and is planned for three sessions in 2015. The
course continues to be delivered to school
foodservice practitioners to develop their
understanding of food science as it applies in
their school districts and to develop preventive
programs and respond to any crises that might
occur. Staff from USDA regional offices and
state agencies also participate.
Agency Contact Information
Brenda H. Halbrook, MS, RD
Director, Office of Food Safety
USDA Food and Nutrition Service
3101 Park Center Drive
Alexandria, VA 22302
703-305-2608
[email protected]
The Department of Hospitality Management and
Dietetics, in the College of Human Ecology,
serves as the administrative home of the Center
of Excellence. The Center has received funding
for a four year period at $3.2 million.
Continuation of the Center will depend on FNS
priorities and funding availability. Further, FNS
could decide to require us to compete for the
grant after the fourth year of funding.
This cooperative agreement with FNS provides a
funding mechanism for other projects. For
example, in 2012-2013 we worked with the food
1.7
Groundwater and Society: Developing Technologies to Conserve the Ogallala Aquifer
Background
resource management and the economic, social and
natural system impacts of policy strategies.
2) Develops more efficient irrigation technologies,
improved scheduling procedures, and combined water
and nutrient management. Research and extension
efforts guide producers in efficient irrigation strategies
for various types of irrigation systems, as well as
transition towards limited irrigation and dryland
practices.
3) Evaluates alternative food and feed grains, oil
seeds, and energy crops for drought and heat
tolerance, adaptation to no-till or strip-till production
systems, and utility as feed for livestock or feedstock
for liquid fuel production.
4) Develops and evaluates technology to utilize for
wastewater-use from concentrated animal feeding
operations. Technologies can decrease potential
environmental impacts from wastewater re-use, such
as runoff into streams and odor, while conserving
fresh water.
5) Utilizes the latest technologies and computational
forecasting tools to quantify and understand
interactions and feedbacks between available water
resources and societal needs and values. Collectively,
this computational infrastructure can provide the
scientific basis to support sound planning, state,
county, and local analysis and decision-making to
development of equitable and fair water policies.
A grand challenge for the 21st century is providing
high quality water for Kansas, the USA, and the
globe. Fresh water from surface and underground
sources is increasingly in short supply in the Ogallala
region of western Kansas. Aquifer and surface water
depletion, limited precipitation, and population shifts
to mid-sized communities in western Kansas have
stretched community and regional water supplies.
However, this region leads Kansas in crop production
and comprises the core of the U.S. beef cattle feeding
industry. The top eight Kansas agricultural counties
are located over the Ogallala Aquifer and represent
$4.7 billion in crops and livestock, or one-third of
Kansas' total agricultural revenue.
Developing more comprehensive understanding of the
nexus of water, food, and society is crucial. As
demand for water resources continues to increase,
improved water management practices for crop and
livestock production and water supply assurance for
communities will be critical for sustaining economic
viability and population base of the region. The latest
tools and technologies are available to analyze the
impacts of water-use policy decisions on economies
and society and to engineer politically acceptable
solutions.
Description
An interdisciplinary team of faculty members at
Kansas State University studies risks and
consequences of groundwater use and scarcity and
develops new technologies to help citizens effectively
manage water resources. As a Land Grant University,
K-State has water-related expertise in agricultural
sciences, social demography, resource economics,
agricultural systems analysis, water resources
engineering, policy analysis, and computer science
and technology.
Research: Agricultural sciences, engineering and
public policy dimensions of water and society provide
information critical to decision-quality actions.
Education: Curriculum in water management, plant
genetics, and computational models trains the next
generation of water scientists and managers.
Extension and Outreach: Engagement with agencies
and stakeholder organizations identify alternative
methods to minimize groundwater scarcity challenges
and assist water managers implement new practices.
While groundwater stores are vulnerable, water
resources systems can be made more resilient in order
to cope with the foreseeable future. Communities,
businesses and agricultural interests worldwide are
struggling to address problems in efficient water-use
for efficient agricultural and industrial. This program
provides science-based research to guide management
and policy. Well planned conservation of water
resources is critical to the economic viability and
stability of western Kansas.
Western Kansas seeks long-term solutions to manage
a depleting Ogallala and develop agricultural systems,
engineering and policy solutions to sustain the aquifer
for current and future generations. Water is a primary
requirement for quality of life in drinking water,
power generation, crop production, and industrial and
municipal use). Without the water of the Ogallala
Aquifer, Kansas communities will suffer.
Relevance
Agency Contact Information
US Dept. of Agriculture (NIFA, 202-401-5016) and
US Dept. of Interior (USGS, 443-498-5505)
This team:
1) Informs citizens, planning agencies and policy
makers understand of technical aspects of water
1.8
Child Health and Physical Activity
5) The Youth Physical Activity and Nutrition
Motivation Laboratory studies community--‐
based
childhood
obesity
prevention
interventions.
Background
Childhood obesity is a major public health issue
facing the United States and the world. Prevention of
childhood obesity is not likely to be solved by a
simple solution.
Rather, scientific consensus
documents suggest that the causes are multifaceted
and best understood by applying a human ecological
model across the lifespan in research and practice. The
College of Human Ecology at Kansas State University
is uniquely positioned to address this important public
health problem because it is one of a handful of
institutions that houses programs specializing in the
study and practice of physical activity, human
nutrition and dietetics, food sensory analysis, family
systems and therapy, and child development.
The collaborations of College of Human Ecology
Faculty have led to competitive grants totaling
$12 million in funding to support childhood obesity,
physical activity, nutrition, and community
interventions to improve the health behavior of
children.
Relevance National/Regional
The issue of child nutrition and health has national
relevance due to its relationship with quality of life
and cost of health care. Kansas State University is
well positioned to conduct basic and applied research
to support improvement of child nutrition and health.
Description
Scholarly work currently underway includes:
1) Investigation of ways to make health behavior
change easier for parents and families to
incorporate into their lifestyles;
2) Experiments
that
incorporate
community
stakeholders in the process of creating health
promoting communities,
3) Analysis of how food and physical activity
choices specifically affect health outcomes in
children of all ages.
4) Multi--‐state extension education projects focused
on reducing childhood obesity.
We have the facilities needed to support clinical
research of childhood nutrition, health, and obesity
and we provide educational programs for school
foodservice professionals and other community
practitioners whose work impacts the health of
children.
Agency Contact Information
Audrey Rowe, Administrator USDA Food and
Nutrition Service
3101 Park Center Drive
Alexandria, VA 22302
[email protected]
Kansas State University has research facilities
structured (physically and organizationally) to study
child health issues.
1) The Hoeflin Stone House Early Childhood
Education Center where children are
observed at play and at mealtime.
2) The internationally recognized Sensory Analysis
Center investigates how different aspects of food
(taste, texture, smell, etc.) affects children’s food
choices to better understand how to make healthy
options the preferred choice of children.
3) The Center of Excellence for Food Safety
Research in Child Nutrition Programs,
provides scientific solutions to child food
safety problems --‐ especially food safety
problems that are evident in school lunch
rooms across the United States.
4) The newly established Physical Activity and
Nutrition Clinical Research Facility supports
cause--‐effect studies of how lifestyle choices
impact the health of children, their parents, and
adults.
Cindy Long, Director, Division of Child Nutrition
3101 Park Center Drive
Alexandria, VA 22302
[email protected]
1.9
Healthy Cattle, Healthy People, Healthy Planet: Beef Initiative
Background/Description
Relevance National/Regional
Kansas State University is recognized as a leader in
beef cattle production and health management
research, outreach and education. The Kansas State
University Beef Cattle Institute (BCI) is an
international leader in beef cattle production education
and outreach.
The BCI has established the
international online bilingual training center for beef
producers, veterinarians, food processors and others
involved in producing beef. The focus of this training
is food safety, antimicrobial antibiotic avoidance, beef
cattle health and well-being, employee training,
employee retention, and beef cattle production
practices. It is vital to understand the impact of
management practices on subsequent safety from
food-borne pathogens in the beef industry. This
program could also enhance food security in the U.S.
as an emergency notification system for all people
involved in food animal production on foreign animal
diseases. The BCI aims to develop an international
training center to educate producers world-wide on the
best management practices to raise affordable beef
while promoting food safety, environmental
stewardship and animal well-being.
Programs offered through the Beef Cattle Institute
translate and communicate critical animal health and
well-being information to the livestock industry. A
safe beef supply for the nation begins in the grasslands
and extends through the supermarket.
Kansas is home of the second greatest concentration
of beef cattle per square mile of any state in the U.S.
The beef sector generates over $7 billion annually in
cash receipts. The beef industry is absolutely central
to the state and the regional rural economies.
Unparalleled challenges and opportunities face the
beef industry in the coming decade. Food security,
food safety, antimicrobial avoidance and beef cattle
health and well-being are dependent on the
development of such a center in the United States.
Support of this request will provide international
leadership for the world’s One Health Initiative… the
confluence of animal health, human health and
environmental health.
Agency Contact Information
U.S. Department of Agriculture
National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA)
Adele Turzillo, Division Director
Division of Animal Systems
3418 Waterfront Centre
Washington, DC 20250
(202) 401-6158
We are seeking federal support to address emerging
issues in the beef industry. The support will: 1) fund
further development of an international bilingual
training center to enhance beef food safety, minimize
antimicrobial residues, improve the health and wellbeing of beef cattle and promote environmental
stewardship through training of the rural workforce
world-wide, 2) fund research to manage health and
well-being of beef cattle through a living classroom,
3) provide support for effective communications with
producers and consumers about best practices for beef
production and prevention of the spread of food-borne
pathogens, and 4) invest in the development of a
program that could be adopted by other food animal
industries in the U.S. and other countries world-wide.
EXPECTED OUTCOMES: Support will provide a far
reaching, cost effective program that will: 1) enhance
food safety from farm to fork, 2) decrease
antimicrobial residues in beef, 3) improve cattle health
and well-being, 4) increase job opportunity for
English and Spanish speakers in the beef industry, and
5) benefit consumers by providing cost effective
training that improves food safety, antibiotic residue
avoidance and cattle health without increasing the cost
of production or the cost at the counter.
1.10
Healthy Relationships
Background
better physical health, fewer physical and emotional
problems and are more financially successful.
In 2011, 24,159 domestic violence incidents were
reported to law enforcement agencies across Kansas,
the most seen in the state in 20 years. In that same
year, nearly one in four homicides in Kansas was
partner violence-related. However, these statistics are
unable to provide a complete picture as these numbers
represent only the cases that are reported. It is
estimated that almost half of the cases of domestic
violence go unreported and therefore many more men,
women and children suffer as a result of partner
violence. Both the Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention and organizations such as the Kansas
Coalition against Sexual and Domestic Violence are
calling for research on which to base the development
and enhancement of prevention and intervention
programs. Every person deserves the opportunity to
have healthy relationships and to live lives free from
the experience of intimate partner violence.
K-State researchers in the School of Family Studies
and Human Services in the College of Human
Ecology are conducting basic and applied research to
support healthy relationship development and to
prevent intimate partner violence. They are receiving
private, state and federal funding for their research
and have received national and international
recognition for their efforts.
Agency Contact Information
Brent Elrod, National Program Leader
Military and Veterans Programs
Division of Family and Consumer Sciences National
Institute of Food and Agriculture United States
Department of Agriculture
1400 Independence Ave SW
Washington, DC 20250
202-690-3468 (V), 202-720-9366 (F)
[email protected]
Description
Scholarly work underway includes research on:
1) ways to support healthy relationships across lifecycle transitions, across cultures, in emerging
adulthood and in long-term relationships;
2) the impact of witnessing interparental violence on
healthy relationship development in subsequent
generations;
3) the impact of treating depression on intimate
relationships;
4) romantic relationship factors linked with the
management and course of diabetes;
5) the impact of relationship and/or fatherhood
mobile applications in supporting healthy partner
and/or or parenting relationships;
6) developing and testing a partner violence risk
assessment tool to guide prevention and treatment
of partner violence efforts in military families;
7) developing and testing of various partner violence
prevention programs in the USAF;
8) The impact of romantic relationships and
parenting behaviors on child outcomes.
Katherine Robertson, LCSW, Family Advocacy
Program Manager
The Office of the Secretary of Defense
Military Community and Family Policy
Office of Family Policy, Children and Youth Family
Advocacy Program
4800 Mark Center Drive, Suite 03G15
Alexandria, VA, 22350-1400
571-372-5350
[email protected]
The collaborations of College of Human Ecology
faculty have led to grants and contracts totaling over
$9 million in funding to support research on building
healthy relationships and preventing partner violence.
Relevance National/Regional
Healthy relationships enhance all aspects of life.
Children who grow up in home with parents in healthy
relationships do better in all aspects of life. Adults
who are in healthy committed relationships have
1.11
Pathways Analysis of Transboundary Animal Diseases to Assess Risks in United States
Agricultural Industries and Worldwide Food Security
Description
Through pathways analysis, NABC provides
information and analysis used by policy officials,
animal health officials, and NBAF scientists to make
more informed decisions concerning strategies to
prevent or control the spread of high-consequence
TADs. Initial pathways analyses focus on NBAFtargeted agents and can be effectively expanded to
include World Organization of Animal Health (OIE)
reportable diseases, other government agencies’
needs, and industry prioritized agents.
In support of the National Bio and Agro-Defense
Facility (NBAF), the National Agricultural
Biosecurity Center (NABC) developed a defined,
consistent, and reliable method for assessing pathways
through which transboundary animal disease (TAD)
agents might enter the US.
 In order to address threats arising from TADs, the
pathways of potential introduction should be
identified, understood and documented. An up-todate template for investigating pathways along with
an established process for information acquisition
provides the framework for analysis.
 The 10-year old pathways analysis for Classical
Swine Fever Virus (CSFV) using current science
and data served as the initial study and model for
this project.
 Pathways analysis for African Swine Fever Virus
(ASFV), currently on the DHS/USDA priority agent
list for research in NBAF, will serve as the second
high-consequence disease approved for pathways
analysis.
 Pathways analysis for Rift Valley Fever Virus
(RVFV), also currently on the DHS/USDA priority
agent list for research in NBAF, will be the third
high-consequence disease approved for pathways
analysis.
Relevance
Pathways analysis will assist policy officials making
informed recommendations for strategic preparedness
planning to optimize surveillance and response
strategies. Pathways analyses for agents of concern
will enable proactive strategies to manage and respond
to TAD introductions/outbreaks. Knowledge gaps
identified through pathways analysis will prove useful
in determining future NBAF research needs.
Knowledge products created are relevant to agencies
concerned with protecting US animal health and food
safety, security, and defense. Potential users of
pathways analysis include the USDA, DHS Science
and Technology (DHS S&T), and livestock
commodity groups such as the National Pork Board
(NPB) and National Cattleman’s Beef Association
(NCBA). NABC’s ability to work in the classified
arena will provide a more robust analysis to U.S.
Government agencies on potential threats.
Background
The United States’ food and animal agriculture
industry is highly integrated, open, global, and
complex. Introduction of a high-consequence
transboundary animal disease (TAD) into US
livestock would have a crippling effect on the overall
economy, international trade, and the public’s
perception of food safety. To address potential threats
arising from TAD introduction into the US, whether
accidental or intentional, pathways of introduction
must be investigated, understood, and documented.
Research on NBAF-targeted agents is relevant to US
interests due to the critical importance of protecting
the nation from devastating economic effects resulting
from introduction and spread of TAD’s. Creation of a
defined, consistent, and reliable methodology of
pathways analysis provide infrastructure and
capabilities for an agricultural knowledge center
capable of serving NBAF, government, industry, and
partnering agencies information needs.
The Department of Homeland Security (DHS), which
will own NBAF, has developed a list of priority
agents to be studied. Included in the list are CSFV,
ASFV, and RVFV.
Agency Contact
United States Department of Agriculture /
Agricultural Research Service – Arthropod-Bourne
Animal Disease Research/Center for Grain and
Animal Health Research, Dr. William C. Wilson,
(785) 537-5570
NABC recognizes a need for a defined, consistent,
and reliable methodology for pathways analysis
describing the potential routes of entry, impacts, and
information gaps associated with introduction into the
US of any high-consequence disease organisms.
Department of Homeland Security – Office of Health
Affairs, Dr. Marvin Meinders, (202) 254-2218,
[email protected]
1.12 EPICENTER: Laboratory for a network science approach to predict and
control the spread of infectious diseases
Background
those same individuals. In zoonotic diseases,
interconnected networks include the network of
animals and the network of humans in which a virus
can transfer from one population (network) to another.
Integrated models of disease spread, supply chain
logistics, and communication networks:The objective
of this project is to develop integrated models that
capture interdependencies between disease dynamics,
supply chain logistics, and communication networks.
For example, the spread of disease is influenced by
the movement of animals, plants, and food products
through the supply chain. Effective management of
this movement and deployment of countermeasures
such as vaccines, require effective risk and crisis
communication plans that engage multiple
stakeholders. Stakeholders also constitute a network
through which information is transmitted. The
integrated modeling approach is expected to yield new
insight in order to prevent, mitigate, and respond to
infectious disease outbreaks.
Few events disrupt society and cause economic loss as
severely as an out-of-control infectious disease.
Terrorist activities or natural causes can produce an
epidemic that may result in human deaths, the disposal
of herds, and the destruction of crops. Fundamental to
EPICENTER’s mission is the conviction that
epidemic dynamics and intervention strategies must
be derived while accounting for underlying complex
networks that describe multiple and dynamic
interconnections among involved systems.
Description
EPICENTER, a laboratory within Kansas State
University’s College of Engineering, provides
resources to build, analyze, and simulate data-driven
computational models for biomedical and biological
systems represented as complex networks.
Research at EPICENTER challenges scientific
boundaries by addressing
the impact of (1)
heterogeneity, (2) interdependence, and (3)
stratification of networks in spreading processes.
These three characteristics abound in natural and manmade infrastructures and networks, but fundamental
questions
remain
unanswered
regarding
interconnected and stratified/multilayer networks
Relevance
The National Agricultural Biosecurity Center
(NABC), the Institute for Computational Comparative
Medicine (ICCM), the Center of Excellence for
Emerging and Zoonotic Animal Diseases (DHS
CEEZAD), the planned National Bio and AgroDefense Facility (DHS NBAF), and EPICENTER are
all located in Manhattan, Kansas, thus making Kansas
the national leader in developing countermeasures to
naturally-occurring and intentionally-introduced plant,
animal, human, and zoonotic diseases.
Projects within EPICENTER
EPICENTER has succesfully conducted several
research projects since its inception in 2007. Current
projects include:
Predictive models of infectious diseases: This project
aims to develop innovative multiscale computational
models and tools to describe potential transmission
cycles of zoonotic pathogens that could be introduced
into the United States. Data generated by these models
will be used to produce an operationally relevant
predictive model that estimates the timing and spatial
extent of emerging disease and the transmission risk
to humans. Studied diseases include Ebola, Rift
Valley fever, and Japanese Encephalitis.
Spreading
processes
over
multilayer
and
interconnected networks: The research goal is to
establish mathematical tools and techniques in order
to understand the role of multilayer and
interconnected topologies in spreading processes. For
example, a multilayer network is a physical contact
network in which a disease can propagate among
individuals and an online information dissemination
network in which information can propagate among
Agency Contact Information
USDA Janey Thornton, Deputy Under Secretary
(202) 720-7711
USDA Jeanette Thurston, National Program Leader
(202) 720-7166, [email protected]
DHS Matthew Coats, National Program Leader
(202) 254-5695, [email protected]
USDA Cyril Gay, National Program Leader
(301) 504-4786, [email protected]
NSF Wendy Nilsen, National Program Leader
(703) 292-2568, [email protected]
1.13
Increasing the capacity of College of Architecture, Planning and Design to advance
development of rural towns through university-community-professional partnerships
Background
Relevance
Small rural towns have challenges that are unique to
their locations and situations. The vitality of these
towns is challenged, among other things, by decaying
public and private building stock and related
infrastructure. This is compounded by diminishing
resources, aging and/or dwindling population bases,
and a lack of opportunities for growth, education,
recreation, and community development. Universityled teams have a unique set of skills to address these
endemic problems.
Funds are sought to promulgate the Small Town
Studio’s approach into a standing center to link the
needs of Kansas communities with the resources of
KSU’s CAP+D and other units across the university.
Precedents for such a rural design and development
center can be found in other Midwestern states,
including Nebraska and Iowa; more broadly
community and urban design centers have been
established across the US. Most of these are universityled centers, due in no small part to the resourcestrategic advantages of such a model.
For the past three years, the Small Town Studio at
Kansas State University has been proffering design,
development, and community-building services to
small, rural towns across Kansas. The paradigm of the
Small Town Studio’s work involves three
constituencies, playing to the strengths of each group.
University student and faculty teams have the time,
basis of work, and knowledge base to devote to early
pre-development exercises, including informationgathering and dissemination, community engagement,
project definition, initial design proposals, and
logistical work including consensus-building and the
development of project funding, steps often difficult for
town residents. Citizens of these towns, however, offer
a great deal to the process of project development. They
offer a wealth of historical and current information;
they critique and guide student designs; they provide
enthusiasm and communication; and they often pitch in
to help complete projects. The third constituency is
affiliated design and construction practitioners, who
provide expertise, official documentation and other
professional services.
Agency Contact Information
USDA Rural Development
Lisa Mensah, Undersecretary
202-720-4581
The work has strong benefits for all concerned.
Architecture students are able to study and design
in a real context, sharpening their skills at interfacing
with clients and the public, pre-design activities
such as project formulation, and logistical concerns
such as project implementation and management.
These are all highly valuable traits in emerging
professionals.
Small
rural
towns
receive
close, high quality design and research services
as well as real outcomes including economic
development and realized designs. Practicing
professionals receive fees associated with projects
moving forward into production, and ensure
high-quality
built
design
for
the
town.
1.14
Big Data Analytics Institute: A Center of Excellence for
Large-Scale Informatics in Business, Engineering, Science, and Education
Background
designing big data studies; collection, storage, and
retrieval of big data; modeling and analysis of such
data; and interpretation of results. New tools for data
modeling, integration, and mining, statistical machine
learning, and information visualization will be
developed and disseminated to the broader community.
A fundamental goal of the Center will be development
of innovative curricula for undergraduate and graduate
students to engage in large-scale data science and
computational applications such as data mining and
visualization, recommendation, or pattern recognition.
The Center will contribute collective expertise to
applications of STEM such as precision agriculture,
bioinformatics, health and medical informatics,
security, and enhancement of secondary education. It
will also provide significant advancements for federal
and state initiatives on STEM workforce development.
Vast amounts of data currently inundate researchers in
all fields of study, but the data deluge especially
impacts and challenges university researchers. A
consistent, university-wide, large-scale resource able
to provide high performance and efficient, flexible data
access is therefore vital to those working to analyze
and use this data. Attaining this type of resource and
resulting data access will equip Kansas State
University (KSU) for future research opportunities and
satisfy compliance and data governance requirements
for federal funding agencies. Although large datastores
are essential for education and economic development,
near-term shortfalls of nearly 200,000 trained data
scientists able to utilize big data, and convert it to
$300B in economic growth, are projected.
Information is currently generated as massive, highdimensional, often heterogeneous data sets with
complex correlation structures and/or nontraditional
formats, typified by high volume, velocity, and variety.
Big data refers to data sets characterized above and
big data analytics are techniques for discovering
patterns, unknown correlations, and large-scale
inference methods for reliable variable selection and
prediction. Cutting-edge research in social sciences,
life sciences, physical sciences, and education
generates petabytes of data that are transformatively
collected, transmitted, stored, processed, and analyzed,
thereby revolutionizing how scientists, engineers,
businesspeople, and educators approach complex
problems. High-dimensional data are generated in
diverse fields, including agriculture, astronomy,
climate science, ecology, energy, genetic analysis,
geospatial sciences, and plant and animal health. These
data are often generated in real time and require rapid
analysis. Web-based sources also provide new realms
of massive data to explore: linked data, spatial data,
and natural language text, with applications to search,
business intelligence, social media, digital humanities,
and digital arts. This offers potential for improved
decision support and informed policy making.
Relevance
Establishing a Kansas Center for Data Analytics is
well-aligned with KSU 2025 goals related to graduate
and undergraduate education and research, including
research experiences for undergraduates. The Center
will focus on university strengths and critical needs,
particularly biosciences, animal health, data mining,
and informatics at KSU. In addition, utilizing cluster
hires and/or joint appointments will strengthen and
expand research funding opportunities universitywide. The Center will also facilitate corporate
partnerships with industry in the Kansas-Missouri
Animal Health Corridor. The KSU Olathe campus
offers a convenient venue for business engagement
and/or professional development related to big data.
KSU’s ICRES has consistently developed and
influenced cyber-infrastructure for research and
education. With existing collaborations between
leading national and international research
organizations and the anticipated arrival of NBAF,
ICRES can form alliances with and attract many cyberenabled bioscience and biotech companies. This
project will stimulate these endeavors, provide a vital
research test bed, and establish a regional center in
which to train a future cyber-enabled workforce.
Description
This initiative proposes development of an
interdisciplinary Center for Data Analytics at KSU,
Manhattan, staffed primarily by data scientists from
the Departments of Mathematics and Statistics in the
College of Arts and Sciences and faculty associated
with KSU’s Institute for Computational Resarch in
Engineering and Sciences (ICRES) in the College of
Engineering. These faculty, in collaboration with
campus researchers, will provide the requisite skills for
Agency Contact Information
Michael Vogelius, [email protected]
Director, Math. Sciences, NSF
Farnam Jahanian, [email protected]
Asst. Director, CISE, NSF
2.1
Center for Big Data Analytics
Development of a Center of Excellence for Large-Scale Inference in Business, Science and Education
Background
initiative, including solicitations supported by the
National Science Foundation and National Institutes of
Health
Information nowadays is generated as massive, highdimensional data sets with complex correlation
structures and/or nontraditional formats, and arriving
with unprecedented velocity. For example, cutting
edge data from the social sciences, life sciences,
physical sciences, and education generate massive
amounts of data (the so called Data Deluge). These
data are being collected, transmitted, stored, processed
and analyzed in a transformative way revolutionizing
how scientists, engineers, business people, and
educators approach complex problems. Applications
of high dimensional data problems are pervasive in
ecology, plant and animal health, agriculture, energy,
and climate predictions. Astronomical transmissions
and the geospatial sciences generate streaming data
with demands for real time analysis. Yet another
source for today’s massive data sets is Web based,
providing new realms of data to explore including online searches, social networking activities and financial
transactions, all with potential for advantageous
business decisions and informed policy making. Big
Data is the term given to such data sets as characterized
above, and Big Data Analytics refers to techniques for
the discovery of patterns, unknown correlations and the
large-scale inference methods for reliable variable
selection and prediction.
(www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp?pims_id=504767&or
g=DMS&from=home).
Description
Based on the preceding interest and needs, it
is proposed to develop a Center for Big Data Analytics
on the Manhattan campus of Kansas State University.
It is envisioned to be an interdisciplinary center staffed
primarily by data scientists from the Departments
of Mathematics and Statistics in the College
of Arts & Sciences, working with subject matter
scientists from across campus for the research
and development of new tools for Big Data Analytics,
as well as providing consulting support for specific
Big Data analysis projects. Center partcipants would
be expected to publish in top tier venues, secure
private and public research funding and play a vigorous
role in securing workforce grants.
Therefore,
a fundamental goal of the center would be
the development of innovative curricula for
undergraduate and graduate programs for students
to engage in large-scale data-driven science.
More specifically, the center would provide a
step forward for NSF and NIH’s mission on
STEM workforce development. In fact, a 2011
report projected a necessary increase of nearly
200,000 professionals with expertise in data
science
(a
50%
increase)
by
2018.
Data scientists, a term applied to people equipped to
draw insights from large quantities of information,
naturally
includes
statisticians
and
applied
mathematicians. Using the technology associated with
Big Data, statisticians and applied mathematicians
search for features in massive data sets while working
to avoid false discovery, bias and confounding, build
mathematical/statistical models that explain and
predict phenomena complete with measures of
uncertainty, and design experiments to elicit data with
useful information content. The interdisciplinary
nature of much of today’s research motivates and
supports advances in Big Data science.
(www.mckinsey.com/insights/mgi/research/technology_and
_innovation/big_data_the_next_frontier_for_innovation).
The Departments of Mathematics and Statistics will
have a combined faculty of 50 in 2013. Our faculty are
graduates from top Mathematics and Statistics
programs with some faculty having expertise in high
dimensional data analysis, data mining, compressive
sensing, random matrices, machine learning, and
computational mathematics. Indeed, our faculty has a
diverse range of specialties appropriate to a Land Grant
Institution. Such expertise is completely consistent
with the proposed center but does not constitute a
necessary critical mass of faculty specialists needed to
support the creation of new algorithms, software, and
networking capabilities, as well as new approaches for
security and privacy protocols. In order to develop and
run a prominent Center for Big Data Analytics, it is thus
requested that we expand our faculty numbers in the
research specialties that lie in the intersection of
mathematics, statistics, engineering, and computer
However, and notably, classical methods of inference
are not well-suited for Big Data applications. Further,
although there has been much creative development of
methodology to accommodate the analysis of Big Data
in recent years, there exist significant limitations of
current large-scale inference techniques (cf LargeScale Inference by Efron, Cambridge University Press,
2010). Indeed, the importance of Big Data Analytics
has been exemplified by the administration’s recently
announced Big Data research and development
2.2
science. For example, wavelet packet transforms as
tools for dimensional reduction in the context of
hyperspectral imagery in medicine is now a
breakthrough tool in applied mathematics, requiring
both specialists in applied Fourier analysis and
modelers who can connect real-world situations with
mathematical abstractions, along with a forum where
collaboration can develop. We also propose to hire
staff scientists and expand our graduate
and
undergraduate assistants base so as to focus some of our
most talented students on research projects in Big Data
Analytics. Timelines for these hires would occur in the
short (1 to 5 years) and intermediate (6 to 10 years)
terms.
Considering the interdisciplinary and
multidisciplinary nature of the envisioned center, such
growth could well utilize joint appointments and/or
cluster hires. It is estimated that $1.5-3M, including
start-up needs, would be required for such faculty
growth, while the university supercomputer (Beocat)
would constitute the major computing platform in
conjunction with emerging technologies for Big Data
Analytics. Also, during the time span mentioned
above, the center would require renovation/expansion
within current facilities or migration to other buildings
consistent with the University Master Plan.
established as collaborators with scientists involved
with high dimensional genomics research on campus in
the Division of Biology and the College of Veterinary
Medicine. The creation of the center with cluster hires
and/or joint appointments would strengthen and expand
research funding opportunities for all in the
biosciences. In addition, the center would facilitate
corporate partnerships with industry in the KansasMissouri Animal Health Corridor. The K-State Olathe
campus offers an appropriate venue for such
engagement involving professional development
and/or business related Big Data issues. A Big Data
initiative at K-State would also be in consonance with
the Mathematics Department’s Center for the
Integration of Undergraduate, Graduate, and
Postdoctoral Research, which involves workforce
training for a diverse group of undergraduates, and data
mining research projects for graduate students at the
Center for Quantitative Education. To reach the KState 2025 goals on retention and graduation will
require developing models of student success using Big
Data Analytics.
Agency Contact Information
Sastry Patula, PhD
Director of Mathematical Sciences
National Science Foundation
703-292-8870
[email protected]
National/Regional Relevance
The establishment of a Center for Big Data Analytics is
in perfect alignment with K-State 2025: A Visionary
Plan for Kansas State University with the goal of being
recognized as one of the nation’s Top 50 Public
Research Universities. In particular, the center is in
concordance with the stated theme of research,
scholarly and creative activities, and discovery. In
addition,
the opportunity to offer instructional
programs at the undergraduate and graduate level in
Big Data science would greatly enhance recruitment of
students interested in the tools for today’s data-driven
sciences and business. For example, such a center
would aid in the recruitment and subsequent cross
training of graduate students enrolled in either of the
Mathematics or Statistics Department’s Graduate
Certificate programs in Applied Mathematics and
Applied Statistics. Such themes also are consistent with
College of A&S and department strategic plans.
The interdisciplinary nature of the center allows a
focused approach to university strengths and critical
needs. In particular, the activities of the proposed
center would mesh well with the renowned bioscience
and animal health environment at K-State, including
initiatives at the College of Veterinary Medicine,
ongoing work at the Biosecurity Research Institute, and
future efforts at the planned National Bio and Agrodefense Facility. Several Statistics faculty are well
2.2
Great Plains Center for Urban Watersheds
Joining sustainable water science, planning, and management
Description
employed to design measures and practices for the
dramatically different climatic, geologic, and biotic
conditions and regimes of Kansas. Few of these
measures are being monitored to gauge efficacy or
applicability. Currently there is little to no extension or
outreach to assist communities, agencies, or private
entities regarding green infrastructure and water
conservation. The requisite interdisciplinary expertise
and experience are here at Kansas State; the
coordination, synergy and conveyance of GPCUW
allows for the application of this expertise.
The Great Plains Center for Urban Watersheds
(GPCUW) is a nexus of research, application, and
outreach focused on sustainable green infrastructure
and urban stream restoration in the communities of
Kansas, the Midwest and Great Plains. GPCUW
research focuses upon sustainable stormwater
management, natural stream channel design and
restoration, and innovative water conservation
techniques in the cities and towns of Kansas. GPCUW
communication joins teaching, service learning, and
outreach with entrepreneurial opportunities between
Kansas State University, Kansas State, Olathe, and
those involved with sustainable water infrastructure in
Kansas communities.
GPCUW facilitates the
development of new technologies and refinement of
current practices for sustainable water planning and
management.
GPCUW practices rigorous and
sustained monitoring of stormwater management,
stream restoration, and water conservation measures
for this is how we learn, improve, invent, and move
closer to sustainability.
Relevance
In 2009 the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act
allowed the Kansas Department of Health and
Environment to fund 15 “Green Infrastructure” projects
for a total of $35M. Of these, 13 were in cities across
Kansas and provided for the installation of one or more
green infrastructure technologies or measures such as
“constructed wetlands, rain gardens, bioswales,
infiltration basins, bioretention cells, water harvesting,
and green roofs”. These innovative, green technologies
are being implemented throughout Kansas and the
Midwest yet there is no research hub focused upon
gauging efficacy or developing the most placeappropriate and sustainable measures. The need for the
Great Plains Center for Urban Watersheds – its work of
developing new technologies and practices for
sustaining the water resources of Kansas is as real and
urgent as the issues it will address. The sharing of new
knowledge through education, extension, servicelearning and innovative public-private partnerships is
the mission of a land grant university. GPCUW at
Kansas State University and Kansas State-Olathe will
focus and facilitate a more resilient and sustainable
water future for the communities and people of Kansas,
the Midwest and Great Plains.
Background
Kansas communities are facing water supply shortages,
the necessity of replacing aging water infrastructure,
and the need for cost-effective, sustainable water
conservation measures. Seventy three percent of
Kansas population (most of which is in eastern KS)
relies on surface water for all or part of their water
needs. Three of the five major river basins that supply
water to the cities and towns of eastern Kansas show
potential for shortages within the next fifteen years
(perhaps sooner given current climate change and
drought predictions). The remaining basins rely
heavily upon reservoir storage which continues to
decrease due to accelerated erosion and sedimentation.
Thus the need for water conservation is real and
pressing. Most Kansas communities are addressing the
replacement of aging, water related infrastructure as a
result of design life expiration or due to CSO’s
(Combined Sewer Outflows), as well as searching for
less expensive, longer lasting ways of handling
stormwater in newly developing areas. Cities, towns,
environmental planners and engineers, architects and
landscape architects are in great need of green,
sustainable water solutions. Yet, little research has
been conducted regarding green infrastructure, natural
channel design restoration, or innovative water
conservation strategies in the Midwest. Information
from the eastern US and the Pacific Northwest is often
Agency Contact Information
National Science Foundation:
Bruce K. Hamilton, Program Director,
[email protected]
US Environmental Protection Agency:
Nancy Stoner, [email protected]
Andrew Sawyers, [email protected]
2.3
Global Institute and National Center for Aerospace Diversity, Innovation and
Education (I-CADIE)
Background/Description:
The Global Institute and National Center for
Aerospace Diversity, Innovation and Education
(I-CADIE) is a collaborative effort between
government, industry and academia. It addresses
emerging global challenges, long term
educational sustainment, and the development of
a technically skilled and diverse workforce in the
aviation industry.
The aerospace industry encompasses both
manned and unmanned aviation and touches
every aspect of Science, Technology,
Engineering and Math (STEM) related need.
Why important? By 2030 the aviation industry in
particular will require:
 460,000 new commercial airline pilots
 650,000 new commercial airline maintenance
technicians
 The largest demand for pilots and technicians
will be in the Asia Pacific region with an
expected need for 182,300 pilots and 247,400
technicians.
 China alone will need 72,700 pilots and
108,300 technicians1
I-CADIE addresses current and future industry
STEM opportunities for disadvantaged and
underrepresented minorities. It will sustain
opportunity by developing and maintaining a
highly skilled and technical work force.
Engaging untapped or underutilized resources, ICADIE will address unfolding demographic
changes that will influence the US over the
coming decades. Emerging solutions include
aviation industry workforce development, STEM
related education and talent creation, workforce
dynamics and demographics, and opportunity for
collaborative partnering.
strength and competitive advantage in the global
aviation industry.
Relevance
I-CADIE will build on and expand core strengths
by providing viable solutions for critical
immediate, emerging, and long-term needs. Our
responsive educational approach will lay the
foundation for our future, both from an academic
and industry perspective.
The National Aeronautics Research and
Development Plan of February 2010 states that
“the Federal government must continue to
advance U.S. technological leadership in
aeronautics by fostering a vibrant and dynamic
aeronautics
community
that
includes
government, industry, and academia.”2 Also, the
Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC)
issued 23 consensus recommendations, one of
which stated that “…Aviation-related research
and development investments are vital for a high
technology economy…”3
Our approach to
education, engagement and outreach will be a
catalyst and key enabler.
Agency Contact Information:
National Science Foundation
Directorate for Engineering (ENG)
Engineering Education Centers (EEC)
White House Office of Science and Technology
Policy
Kansas Commission on Aerospace Education
(KCAE)
Dr. Tara L. Harl, President, Aviation Workforce
Development
www.aviationworkforce.org
1
Pilot & Technician Study Boeing 2011
http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/micro
sites/ostp/aero-rdplan-2010.pdf 3
http://www.dot.gov/faac
2
Our interactive approach spans an educational
environment from K-12, higher education and
opportunity for lifelong education in relevant
environments. Working across traditional and
non-traditional approaches, I-CADIE will
address and meet the interrelated needs of
government, industry, and academia. Enabling
relevant educational opportunities it will remain
responsive to emerging needs, now and in the
future. It supports and sustains U.S. technology
2.4
Preparing Future STEM Faculty from Underrepresented Groups
Background
research projects. Specialized workshops will also be
provided to facilitate current faculty members in more
effectively mentoring both undergraduate and graduate
students in the STEM disciplines. The outcome of this
initiative is to begin addressing the major gap in supply
and demand for faculty from minority populations in
all STEM disciplines.
Kansas State University is commited to recruiting
students from under-represented groups for
undergraduate and graduate degrees. Progress has been
made in recent years at the undergraduate level and to
a more limited extent in doctoral programs in the
STEM disciplines. Despite the progress K-State has
made to create a more inclusive educational
environment, disparities remain and will continue to
grow with changing demographics unless major
initiatives are implemented. K-State has the
demonstrated infrastructure to support this initiative.
Currently K-State coordinates twelve undergraduate
research experiences during the summer that recruit a
substantial number of students from the target
populations; supports a developing scholars program to
provide first generation and minority students research
experience; a McNair scholars program that provides
research and academic support services for the same
target group of students; and successful multi-year
mentoring programs for female faculty members and
students in the STEM disciplines. Thus, we have a core
group of faculty members who would support this
initiative by serving as mentors to selected doctoral
students.
Relevance National/Regional
The United States is becoming increasingly diverse;
however, this diversity is not reflected in the STEM
workforce and higher education. The Commission of
Professions in Science and Technology (December
2008) reported that approximately one third of the U.S.
population between the ages of 18-24 are
underrepresented minorities. The U.S. Bureau of Labor
predicts that 50% of the college-aged population will
be students from underrepresented groups by 2050. For
both women and underrepresented minorities,
participation declines as the degree level increases. For
example, only 26% of the STEM doctorates are
awarded to women and 6% to individuals from
underrepresented groups. This results in a void in
faculty mentors for under-represented minorities.
Previous research has found that these students identify
most with faculty who look like them and share
common backgrounds. Diversity in higher education is
essential in ensuring balance, providing new
perspectives, and reaching students at all levels.
Description
Nationally a significant gap exists between the numbers
of doctoral graduates from underrepresented groups
and the demand for these graduates to fill positions in
higher education, industry, and government. This gap
is especially great in the STEM disciplines. With an
increasingly diverse population, it is imperative that
universities
educate
more
students
from
underrepresented groups to fill this gap and serve as
role models and leaders in the future. New and dynamic
models for career development programs are needed to
train the next generation of faculty members who can
serve as role models for both undergraduate and
graduate students in institutions of higher education
and as researchers and leaders in industry and
government.
Agency Contact Information
Jermelina Tupas, Acting Division Director
Directorate for Education and Human Resources
Division of Human Resource Development
National Science Foundation
(703) 292-8768; [email protected]
A comprehensive program, “Preparing Mentors in the
STEM Disciplines to Educate the Future Workforce in
Science and Technology,” will prepare participants for
the
multifaceted
roles
(teaching,
research,
mentoring/advising, service and outreach) of junior
faculty in the STEM disciplines that they will be
expected to perform while serving as role models for
the next generation of minority students. An emphasis
will be placed on involvement in interdisciplinary
2.5
Innovation through Design and Cross-generation, Cross-sector, Cross-disciplinary
Learning and Discovery
Background
approach and have hired a Design Thinker in
Residence.
K-State’s campus in Olathe which opened in 2011 is
largely funded through a local sales tax administered by
the Johnson County Education Research Triangle
Authority. With a mandate for research and graduate
education in food, animal health and related sectors, the
vision of the campus is to be a ‘solution finder for
businesses’.
Programming is being developed to be
nimble and responsive to the needs of regional
businesses through innovative educational and R&D
opportunities.
Relevance (Regional and National)
In its 2014 report “Prosperity at a Crossroads:
Targeting Drivers of Economic Growth for Greater
Kansas City”, the Brookings Institute concluded that
the greater Kansas City region continues to have an
economic
dependence
on
manufacturing,
transportation and financial services. However, it is
becoming less competitive and not fueling high
performance. Not unlike many other urban regions
across the U.S., greater Kansas City is not creating
sufficient new industries or commercial applications or
enough innovation and talent in science and
technology. The report further recommended that by
connecting sectors, engaging in broad, data-driven
discussion and decision-making as well as defining a
‘unified economic agenda’, there are very real
opportunities for driving growth.
In working with
communities across the state of Kansas and the nation,
higher education has an opportunity to engage with
community, private sector and government to define
new paradigms for workforce development and
sustainable, knowledge driven economic growth.
Description
The campus received approval for a new School for
Applied and Interdisciplinary Studies in January 2015
and is developing university wide partnerships and
integrating education and research through new, interand cross-disciplinary approaches. With increasing
need for (1) innovation and entrepreneurship; (2)
graduates who are workforce ready; and (3) businesses
that have to be globally competitive; K-State Olathe is
filling a niche by connecting different stakeholders
from community, government, industry and education.
Pilot programs are linking the creativity of K-12 with
the target student population for K-State Olathe which
is working professionals in the 25-50 year old range.
Eventually, the goal is to connect these two age groups
with the experiences and expertise of older
professionals (working and retired) to stimulate colearning and discovery that foster entrepreneurial
partnerships. Early phase retirees have a lot of
expertise that we hope to connect to younger
learners. Early phase retirees also have ideas and
discretionary dollars that can stimulate collaborative
pools of seed funding for start-up operations. Diverse
groups will connect to develop and share ideas, and
work on real life business problems at the K-State
Olathe campus.
Agency Contact Information
NSF Partnership for Innovation
Barbara Kenny, PFI:AIR Program Director
703- 292-4667, [email protected]
www.nsf.gov/eng/iip/pfi/air-tt.jsp
One of our educational innovations is through Design
Thinking. DT is an approach for creative solution
finding by ‘building up’ ideas and directed
brainstorming.
In the 1990s, DT launched the dSchool at Stanford University and sprouted companies
like IDEO and Frog Design that are now global
innovation consultancies.
DT is an interactive and
experiential approach, and provides a basis from which
the K-State Olathe campus will promote educational
innovation and help big and small companies with new
ideas for process, product and/or technologies. We
have already started various programs using this
2.6
EPICENTER: Laboratory for a network science approach to predict and
control the spread of infectious diseases
Background
individuals.
In
zoonotic
diseases,
interconnected networks include the network of
animals and the network of humans in which a virus
can transfer from one population (network) to another.
Integrated models of disease spread, supply chain
logistics, and communication networks:The objective
of this project is to develop integrated models that
capture interdependencies between disease dynamics,
supply chain logistics, and communication networks.
For example, the spread of disease is influenced by the
movement of animals, plants, and food products
through the supply chain. Effective management of this
movement and deployment of countermeasures such as
vaccines, require effective risk and crisis
communication plans that engage multiple
stakeholders. Stakeholders also constitute a network
through which information is transmitted. The
integrated modeling approach is expected to yield new
insight in order to prevent, mitigate, and respond to
infectious disease outbreaks.
Few events disrupt society and cause economic loss as
severely as an out-of-control infectious disease.
Terrorist activities or natural causes can produce an
epidemic that may result in human deaths, the disposal
of herds, and the destruction of crops. Fundamental to
EPICENTER’s mission is the conviction that epidemic
dynamics and intervention strategies must be derived
while accounting for underlying complex networks that
describe multiple and dynamic interconnections among
involved systems.
Description
EPICENTER, a laboratory within Kansas State
University’s College of Engineering, provides
resources to build, analyze, and simulate data-driven
computational models for biomedical and biological
systems represented as complex networks.
Research at EPICENTER challenges scientific
boundaries by addressing
the impact of (1)
heterogeneity, (2) interdependence, and (3)
stratification of networks in spreading processes. These
three characteristics abound in natural and man-made
infrastructures and networks, but fundamental
questions remain unanswered regarding interconnected
and stratified/multilayer networks
Relevance
The National Agricultural Biosecurity Center (NABC),
the Institute for Computational Comparative Medicine
(ICCM), the Center of Excellence for Emerging and
Zoonotic Animal Diseases (DHS CEEZAD), the
planned National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility (DHS
NBAF), and EPICENTER are all located in Manhattan,
Kansas, thus making Kansas the national leader in
developing countermeasures to naturally-occurring and
intentionally-introduced plant, animal, human, and
zoonotic diseases.
Projects within EPICENTER
EPICENTER has succesfully conducted several
research projects since its inception in 2007. Current
projects include:
Predictive models of infectious diseases: This project
aims to develop innovative multiscale computational
models and tools to describe potential transmission
cycles of zoonotic pathogens that could be introduced
into the United States. Data generated by these models
will be used to produce an operationally relevant
predictive model that estimates the timing and spatial
extent of emerging disease and the transmission risk to
humans. Studied diseases include Ebola, Rift Valley
fever, and Japanese Encephalitis.
Spreading
processes
over
multilayer
and
interconnected networks: The research goal is to
establish mathematical tools and techniques in order to
understand the role of multilayer and interconnected
topologies in spreading processes. For example, a
multilayer network is a physical contact network in
which a disease can propagate among individuals and
an online information dissemination network in which
information can propagate among those same
Agency Contact Information
USDA Janey Thornton, Deputy Under Secretary
(202) 720-7711
USDA Jeanette Thurston, National Program Leader
(202) 720-7166, [email protected]
DHS Matthew Coats, National Program Leader
(202) 254-5695, [email protected]
USDA Cyril Gay, National Program Leader
(301) 504-4786, [email protected]
NSF Wendy Nilsen, National Program Leader
(703) 292-2568, [email protected]
2.7
Integration of Research, Training, and Education in Biosafety and Biocontainment
procedures. Similarly, a postdoctoral fellowship
program will provide both short- and long- term
training in containment research beyond the doctorate.
These two activities will be integrated with a broader
program to provide technical support staff, who will fill
biocontainment workforce needs nation-wide, with
skills to work in the BSL-2, 3, and 3Ag environment
safely and securely. The technical support overlay also
includes training building maintenance and
management professionals on the unique aspects of
working in a biocontainment facility.
Background
In the late 1990’s, Kansas State University made a
programmatic commitment to the area of food safety
and security. As a land grant institution with a major
focus on food animal husbandry, KSU made food
animal health and welfare a priority. The State of
Kansas made a strong investment in KSU’s research
priorities by funding the construction of the Biosecurity
Research Institute (BRI). Further, the Department of
Homeland Security has acknowledged KSU’s
leadership within this area and named Manhattan as the
home of the National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility
(NBAF).
This initiative also provides the framework to
synergistically link and integrate the biosafety and
biocontainment research/educational investments,
infrastructure, resources, expertise, and missions of the
K-State main campus, K-State Olathe campus, and the
NBAF. This extension additionally lays the foundation
for the development of collaborative graduate
education programs with federal institutes such as
NIH’s National Biosafety and Biocontainment
Training Program (NBBTP).
Description
The Kansas State Graduate School seeks to develop,
deploy and manage an education and training program,
focused on meeting an area of national need, by
establishing a path of graduate study focused on
cultivating the next generation of biosafety and
biocontainment professional.
This program will
address critical workforce development needs in a
profession that has recently been scrutinized during
congressional oversight. An investment in biosafety
and biocontainment education and research will
support a program with national, regional and global
implications.
Relevance Regional/National/International
Utilizing KSU’s world-class resources to educate
tomorrow’s biosafety and biocontainment professions
will provide our students with a competitive edge as
they apply for technical or faculty positions.
Additionally, the program would provide necessary
training and experience for the future workforce at
NBAF and biotech companies in the expanding animal
health corridor.
This program will be based at the Biosecurity Research
Institute (BRI) which is a state-of-the-art enhanced
BSL-3 and BSL-3Ag research facility. In addition to
actual research areas, the program will utilize the
10,000 square foot educational wing to provide handson training activities in a pathogen free integrated
laboratory training suite. This allows students to gain
foundational skills in a realistic work environment
without the risk of biosafety concerns or
biocontainment breaches. The BRI also includes
world-class high-definition video capture and
streaming technology allowing the training suite and
research areas to broadcast live video or serve as
filming studios.
Students can view laboratory
techniques and monitor disease progression in
challenged animals without the need to enter high-risk
research spaces..
With thousands of BSL-2 and BSL-3 laboratories in the
United States, a graduate level research and educational
program
for
biosafety
and
biocontainment
professionals would provide valuable hands-on skills to
ensure safe and secure operations.
Research and training agreements with the U.S.
Department of Agriculture, the Department of
Homeland Security, Australia’s Commonwealth
Scientific and Industrial Research Organization, and
Kenya’s International Livestock Research Institute
provide unique opportunities for students, staff, and
faculty to gain experience for NBAF and related
projects that complement existing programs.
Opportunities will be created for individuals seeking a
career in biosafety and biocontainment as well as
providing essential understanding for professionals
seeking a career in high-consequence infectious disease
research. The program will benefit doctoral students
seeking research careers in the biosciences by coupling
research with training in biocontainment practices and
Agency Contact Information
Valerie Wilson, Acting Division Director
Directorate of Education and Human Resources
Division of Graduate Education, NSF
(703) 292-260; [email protected]
2.8
Center for Technology Development: Product and Technology Development for the
Advanced Manufacturing Industry
Background
manufacturing and technology development capabilities
and engage industrial companies in mutually beneficial
projects that generate new technologies and products and
help technology-based companies to grow.
"America’s ability to make things underpins America’s
ability to innovate, compete, and create good jobs. U.S.
manufacturers perform 70 percent of all private-sector
R&D and account for 60 percent of U.S. exports and the
majority of U.S industry patents. Over the last six
decades, innovation - in new products or new processes was central to three-quarters of the nation’s economic
growth."*
The CTD will be a unique university, industry, and
government partnership that will facilitate open
collaboration
between
advanced
manufacturing
researchers, industrial scientists, and engineers. It will
leverage faculty expertise and encourage collaboration
between colleges, between K-State and industry, and
between design and manufacturing.
Universities need a systematic process to partner with
manufacturing companies to develop technologies and
bring new products to market. This translational research
capability is critical to leveraging research investments to
grow innovation-based manufacturing companies.
Efforts will be concentrated in areas that support
university and government priorities. The CTD will use
AMI’s industrial partnering experience and project
management expertise to establish and manage
collaborative technology development partnerships.
Kansas State University seeks to expand its capability to
collaborate with industrial partners in product and
technology development by building on the following
unique technology development assets:
 The Advanced Manufacturing Institute (AMI) has
completed more than 2,500 technology development
projects with 500 businesses across the nation. AMI
employs
an
integrated
business/technology
development approach that facilitates collaborative
industrial projects and partnerships.
 Nationally recognized tools to facilitate open
innovation
through
opportunity
recognition,
innovation analytics, and network weaving.
 Distinguished faculty researchers and productive
laboratories conducting advanced manufacturing
related research across the university, including one
faculty member currently serving as an NSF Program
Director for an Advanced Manufacturing program.
 An EDA-funded innovation accelerator focused on
animal health and food processing industries located
on the K-State Olathe campus.
The CTD will produce proof-of-concept artifacts,
prototype device and processes and harden technologies
for targeted uses. Ideas will be transformed into reality,
students will be engaged in creating and developing
products, applications for new technologies will be
defined and developed, and university technologies and
inventions will be developed and hardened for specific
market uses.
To realize the full potential of the CTD requires an
investment to expand faculty and doctoral student
involvement, enhance advanced manufacturing and
realization laboratories, and expand CTD’s geographic
and industrial reach.
The CTD will help K-State realize its goal to become a
Top 50 Public Research University by supporting and
developing an advanced manufacturing industry sector
that is critical to economic vitality. The CTD will:
 increase the value of industrially sponsored research
and intellectual property generated;
 develop an innovation workforce by expanding
student involvement in the CTD;
 catalyze industrial partnerships to jointly develop new
technologies and products.
Relevance
In order to improve the competitiveness of U.S.
manufacturers, federal agencies have been directed to: 1)
strengthen advanced manufacturing research and
development; 2) support the education of a highly skilled
manufacturing workforce; and 3) spur innovation in new
products and processes.
Agency Contact Information
US Department of Commerce, Penny Pritzker, Secretary
of Commerce, 202- 482-2000, [email protected]
Description
K-State will achieve these objectives by building the
Center for Technology Development (CTD). The CTD
will forge strategic university/industry partnerships that
will accelerate industry-focused research and innovation,
commercialize technology, and bring new products to
market. The CTD will integrate K-State’s advanced
Division of Civil, Mechanical & Manufacturing
Innovation (ENG/CMMI), NSF, George Hazelrigg,
Deputy Division Director, 703-292-7068,
[email protected]
*http://manufacturing.gov/welcome.html
2.9
Networking, Security and Resiliency for Critical Infrastructures
Background
Grid example, large-scale experiments that incorporate
resources from the Smart Grid Lab at Kansas State
University (KSU), KSU networking resources, and the
Global Environment for Network Innovations (GENI)
test bed can be performed. A hybrid simulator has been
created that integrates continuous-time behaviors of the
power system with discrete event behaviors of the
communication network. This platform has
demonstrated
performance
impacts
of
the
communication network and the power system when
the physical infrastructure is designed to maximize
robustness. Furthermore, this platform was utilized to
demonstrate that an OpenFlow communication
network could perform equal to or better than its
traditional counterpart. The goals of this research
initiative are to successfully compete in programs such
as DOE’s Academic Collaboration for Cybersecurity of
Energy Delivery Systems (CEDS) Research and
Development for the Energy Sector, or NSF’s NeTS.
Daily societal activities increasingly depend on
interdependent critical infrastructures such as power
grids, telecommunication networks, transportation
networks, food networks, and water distribution
networks. In contrast to isolated systems,
interdependent networked systems demonstrate
emergent behaviors caused by unpredictable, rare, nonlinear interactions between numerous social, physical,
and cyber components. Because infrastructure systems
are large, they are often decentrally controlled through
cyber systems. However, even if decentralization and
self-organization theoretically reduce failure risk,
interdependencies can lead to disruptive and massive
cascading failures.
Interdependent
and
multilayer
networks
characterize
critical
social
and
engineered
infrastructures, but a thorough understanding of their
behaviors through fundamental results is still lacking.
For example, the Smart Grid concept includes
application of advanced computer, communications,
and power technologies to obtain a highly automated,
responsive, and resilient, transmission and distribution
infrastructure. At the distribution level, the Smart Grid
integrates distributed renewable generation sources
with energy storage and provides demand response
management to customers through dynamic pricing. At
the transmission level, communication architecture
creates an intelligent infrastructure that can detect and
mitigate faults faster than they can propagate, thus
providing utility operators with improved efficiency
and reliability. Although ongoing efforts to design a
next-generation communication network within the
Smart Grid framework are in progress, lack of
flexibility and programmability of network equipment
has impeded experimentation with new schemes.
Consequently, power operators are reluctant to adopt
untested solutions.
Relevance National/Regional
Numerous critical infrastructures in Kansas and the
United States rely on secure networking and
communications. In Kansas, power and networking
companies have demonstrated endorsement by
sponsoring KSU’s Electrical Power Affiliate’s
Program (EPAP). This research has also received
national contributions from Raytheon BBN
Technologies, KanREN, Internet2, National Science
Foundation, and National LambdaRail.
Agency Contact Information
Bradley Ring, Department of Energy (DOE)
303-275-4930 [email protected]
Angelos D. Keromytis, NSF CISE/CNS
703-292-8061, [email protected]
Description
This project has two primary goals. The first goal is to
study interdependencies between critical infrastructure
networks and provide fundamental insights on the
impact of these interdependencies related to reliability
of the coupled system with the ultimate intent to
increase reliability by developing analytical tools to
measure and adapt system interdependencies. The
second goal is to address key issues in order to allow
rigorous experimentation and analysis of networking
solutions in the real-world environment. For a Smart
2.10
Virtual Interactive Design Education
Background
Project-based learning is student-centric model where
students acquire knowledge through activity and
experiential learning. This approach has proven to
be an effective pedagogical model in higher education
to develop thinking and creativity. Research is needed
to determine if the synthesis of problem-based learning
through
a
serious-game
virtual
interactive
environment, coupled with the Unified Learning
Model, can be more effective as a teaching and learning
approach to the support areas of professional education
in areas such as engineering, architecture, and design.
In addition to the successful synthesis model of
learning with problem-oriented studios in design-based
education, traditional subject-oriented approaches are
common in many of the specific knowledge areas. In
traditional lecture-based approaches, students are
treated as passive recipients with linear and fragmented
teaching presentations that provide little opportunity
for learning the holistic nature of their discipline. The
Unified Learning Model (ULM) is based on three core
principles: learning requires working memory
allocation (attention); working memory’s capacity for
allocation is affected by prior knowledge; and, working
memory allocation is directed by motivation. These
three principles guide a complete model of learning that
synthesizes what is known from research in brain
function, cognition, and motivation. Integration of
serious gaming into these subjects and utilizing the
ULM will provide the basic evidence to support
institutionalization of an approach to education that is
potentially transformative for student learning.
Sound pedagogical ideas must be merged with the
astounding capabilities of new and emerging
technologies in a new model of learning that provides
opportunities for learning in project-based disciplines.
Game-based learning may assist in building a diverse
work force and increasing opportunities for innovation
while encouraging critical decision-making strategies.
Simulations incorporated in the serious games can
provide project-based experiential learning leading to
better prepared graduates entering the workforce.
Description
Active project-based learning is proven more likely to
meet educational objectives when compared to
traditional lectures. Serious games (those in which
education is the primary goal) may provide an effective
virtual interactive environment employing contextually
rich interactive simulations and promoting a holistic
approach to design education. The cutting-edge
synthesis of ideas and concepts from the cognitive,
motivation, and neurobiological sciences within the
ULM, combined with virtual serious games will
provide an integrated project-based pedagogy
throughout the curriculum, increasing critical thinking
and practice of students.
Simulations have been shown to improve skills and
safety in medical techniques; and studies regarding
generational attributes suggest incoming students learn
more efficiently using simulation games. A recent
report by a Blue Ribbon Panel of the National Science
Foundation calls for an “overhaul our educational
system to foster the interdisciplinary study that SBES
requires.”
Agency Contact Information
NSF TUES grants
Interdisciplinary: Corby Hovis, Program Director,
703-292-4625, [email protected]
Relevance
Social Sciences: Myles Boylan, Program Director,
703-292-4617, [email protected]
Contextually rich interactive simulations have proven
effective at improving the educational experience in
fields like health care and military operations. In a 2009
workshop, the National Academy Committee on
Engineering Education recognized the need to enhance
engineering curriculum through creative uses of
instructional technologies. Tashiro (2009) found that
further research was necessary to determine if serious
games will become a valuable tool for education and
professional development. While architectural and
design education are known for their studio/
problem-based approach to integrative professional
education,
the
subjects
supporting
the
studios are, in many instances, taught through passive
and traditional means.
Engineering: Don Millard, Program Director,
703-292-4620, [email protected] 2.11
Bringing the Critical Zone Observatory Paradigm to Konza
Background
The Earth’s Critical Zone (CZ) is the thin outer
veneer of our planet from the top of the tree
canopy to the bottom of our drinking water
aquifer—the region of Earth that supports almost
all human activity. But population growth—and
the associated demands for food, fuel and clean
water—combined
with
climate
and
environmental change are placing ever increasing
pressures on this “critical zone”. Understanding,
predicting and managing intensification of land
use while mitigating and adapting to rapid
climate change, biodiversity decline and
sustained provision of key ecosystem services is
now one of the most pressing societal challenges
of the 21st Century.
The Critical Zone
Observatory Network aims to make this step
change in observation and is the US contribution
to a global initiative that includes over 60
research sites on six continents.
K-State aims to join this network by building on
the Konza Prairie Long-Term Ecological
Research (LTER) program1, a comprehensive
ecological research, education and outreach
initiative centered on one of the most productive
grasslands in North America–the tallgrass prairie.
Description
The research builds on significant previous
investment in ecological and hydrological
research, not only within the LTER but also more
broadly (e.g. the Ogallala aquifer)2. The K-State
initiative is an ideal complement to the existing
CZO network, because it can address a number of
issues that cannot be addressed by other CZOs.
A region with areas largely unmodified by human
activities. Grasslands, rangelands, steppe, tundra,
savanna and shrub-grasslands cover 40% of the
Earth’s land surface. North American tall grass
prairie covered ~67 million ha in the US prior to
1800s. Today, less than 5% of these grasslands
remain and these are concentrated in the Flint
Hills of Kansas and Oklahoma.
A region of ecological transition. From east to
west, tall grass gives way to mixed grass to short
grass, and these ecological transitions are
sensitive to small changes in climate and soil
type, all of which impact on CZO processes
(weathering, hydrology, geomorphology, etc.).
A region of high climate gradients. The region
lies at the confluence of areas predicted to
undergo contrasting change in climate (drier to
the southwest, wetter to the northeast). Rising
temperatures will lead to increased demand for
water and energy, which constrains development,
stresses natural resources, increases competition
for water and requires new management practices
A region with significant water challenges.
Groundwater serves as the main source of water
to irrigate the Critical Zone in western Kansas.
Water balance across the region is delicate and
aquifer depletion is predicted at current extraction
rates. 30% of the groundwater has been pumped
and another 39% will be depleted over the next
50 years given existing trends. Recharge supplies
only 15% of the current pumping and would take
an average of 500 to 1,300 years to completely
refill the aquifer.
A CZO in the Konza region would (i) add to the
range of lithologic gradients being investigated
by the CZO network; (ii) introduce significant
Permo-Carboniferous sequences of alternating
limestones and shales; (iii) bring an unglaciated
peri-karst weathering history into consideration
and (iv) provide the opportunity to examine the
consequences of global climate change in an area
that could be one of the most dynamic and
sensitive to climate variability and change in the
United States.
Relevance
This initiative will bring several K-State
departments and colleges together (Biology,
Agronomy, Geography, Geology, Engineering)
to work collaboratively on this cutting-edge
research problem that is not only timely but of
great importance to society.
Agency Contact Information
National Science Foundation, Division of Earth
Sciences, Geobiology and Low Temperature
Geochemistry; Enriqueta Barrera, Program
Director, 703-2927780; [email protected]
1
http://www.konza.ksu.edu/knz/pages/home/home.aspx
2
Steward et al (2013) www.pnas.org/cgi/content/short/
1220351110
2.12
Operations Research: Applied and Theoretical Advances across Multiple Sectors
challenges in the aftermath of a disaster. Disasters
highlight complications inherent in decentralized
supply chains, or those in which multiple stakeholders
take actions that impact the overall system. Proactive
supply chain engineering can prevent inefficiency,
redundancy, and missed opportunities. KSU
researchers are using advanced analytics to improve
efficiency and effectiveness in decentralized decision
environments.
Modeling stakeholder decisions regarding water
resource management: Water resource management is
a critical throughout the United States and particularly
in Kansas. Farmers, landowners, community members,
and policymakers each have a role in responsibly
utilizing water. Current work at KSU will lead to a
novel integrated human and natural systems model to
simulate the impact of water use policies, agricultural
and community decision-making, and ecosystems
dynamics on the overall water system.
Optimizing the design of high-speed railroad ties:
High-speed rail is a multi-billion dollar industry used
by numerous countries for passenger and freight
transport. As demand for this technology increases, the
need for improved railroad design also increases.
Current efforts at KSU involve use of operations
research models to inform design of rail ties that can
withstand the pressure of high-speed transport and be
manufactured in bulk for a reasonable cost.
Improving healthcare systems: Seventeen percent
of U.S. gross domestic product is spent on healthcare,
and opportunities abound to improve efficiency,
effectiveness, and equity. KSU researchers are
applying techniques such as data envelopment analysis
modeling, information systems modeling, and
mathematical optimization to design improvements for
complex health systems. To date, this work has
improved work flow in a local intensive care unit and
improved nurse and surgery scheduling processes.
Background
Grand challenges related to water, energy, security,
health, and food systems involve optimal allocation of
scarce resources, balance of multiple decision
objectives, and understanding of complex systems.
Operations research provides a quantitative framework
to confront these issues.
Description
Kansas State University (KSU) faculty are uniquely
qualified to address theoretical and applied research
questions that advance the discipline of operations
research and create solutions to urgent societal
challenges. This work is generating new scientific
knowledge in response to critical opportunities in one
or more of these three areas: (1) How can optimization
methods be more effectively integrated with methods
from social and natural sciences to make it possible to
understand complex systems holistically?; (2) How can
algorithms be designed to more effectively process data
or solve optimization problems that support decisionmaking?; and (3) How can these advances in modeling
and solution techniques be translated into decisionsupport frameworks that can be implemented in
practice?
Several current operations research projects
illustrate these overarching opportunities and the
potential for fundamental and practical impact:
Harnessing the decision-making power of big data:
The evolution of computers and communication
technology has produced an abundance of powerful
devices capable of unprecedented data capture.
Resulting data sets are massive but messy. KSU
researchers are developing methods to turn raw data
into relevant information for decision makers in
manufacturing, service, and health care industries.
Improving solution times for integer programs:
Integer programs are used to identify optimal decisions
and policies in sectors such as transportation, financial
services, healthcare, and government. However,
current methods are limited in their ability to solve
integer programs, even when using the most advanced
technology, which leaves decision makers with
suboptimal strategies. KSU researchers are discovering
novel techniques to solve integer programs by utilizing
graphs and hypergraphs. They are creating new cutting
planes, developing new branching procedures, and
generating polynomial time algorithms to lift variables,
all of which allow large integer programming problems
that arise in practice to be solved.
Measuring and mitigating the impact of
decentralized decision making in humanitarian
response systems: Government, military, private, and
nongovernmental organizations face immense
Relevance
Tools for optimal quantitative decision-making touch
every sector. In particular, new models, algorithms, and
decision-support frameworks contribute to state and
national key initiatives regarding water, health,
transportation, and food systems.
Agency Contact Information
NSF, Service Enterprise Systems, Diwakar Gupta,
Program Director, [email protected],
703.292.7902
NSF, Operations Research, Edwin Romeijn, Program
Director, [email protected], 703.292.2211
Dept. of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Engineering
Resource Center, Angela G. Beck, Contract Specialist,
[email protected], 605.347.2511
2.13
Developing a Better Understanding of Controls on the Quality of Water Resources
Background
Education: Geoscience courses that train future water
scientists include introduction to geochemistry, water
resources geochemistry, hydrogeology, geochemical
and biogeochemical modeling, geomicrobiology,
environmental geology.
The availability of water is a key variable that
influences our ability to sustain growth of human
populations, industry, and agriculture in the USA and
worldwide. Population growth, human activities, the
natural variability of the hydrologic cycle, and climate
change all pose challenges to ensuring that water
supplies of sufficient quality are available.
Extension and Outreach: Geoscience faculty and
students promote water science to middle school
students and underrepresented groups through
participation in the Kansas Louis Stokes Alliance for
Minority Participation (KS LSAMP), the K-State
Developing Scholars Program (DSP), and the K-State
program Girls Researching Our World (GROW).
Additionally, our researchers participate in the K-State
Urban Water Institute and Natural Resources
Educational Sources as a Secondary Major.
Understanding the fundamental chemical, biological,
and hydrological controls on water resources is
essential to our ability to meet future water resources
challenges.
Description
A team of students and faculty in the Department of
Geology are working to expand our knowledge of
water quality and ensure that a diverse workforce is
available to meet future demands for water scientists
and managers.
Relevance
Groundwater resources in western Kansas and much of
the USA are dwindling and yet expected to be relied on
more heavily in the future. These resources are
hydrologically linked to surface water bodies. To
ensure sufficient supply of quality resources in the
future, we need to consider both settings.
Research: studies faculty members and students are
actively engaged in include:
1) Management strategies for protecting our drinking
water resources – ongoing studies in Kansas, but also
international sites
2) Investigation of environmental controls on aquifer
microbiology. Aquifer microbes strongly influence the
quality of water resources. In turn, aquifer
environments represent a fundamental control on the
activity of the microbial populations they host.
3) Controls on the mobility of toxic trace elements,
including arsenic, manganese, tungsten, selenium.
These solutes are hazardous to human health even at
very low concentrations. Factors that control their
mobility directly influence their ability to accumulate
in water and disperse throughout a water resource.
4) Controls on water quality in urban and rural reaches
of a freshwater stream over time. Human activities and
natural processes affect the quality of water in our
streams. The nature and magnitude of these effects vary
seasonally and with the type of setting.
5) Investigating the consequences of CO2 injection into
the subsurface and its impact on water resources.
Involves injection of 50,000 metric tons of CO2 into the
deep saline aquifer at Wellington Oil Field, KS,
including pre- and post-injection monitoring and
analysis of water and head gas from the shallow
unconfined freshwater aquifers. Variations in dissolved
gases, organic constituents, isotopic fractionations,
trace and major elements are being combined to
develop a model to predict the consequence of CO2
injection in the years to come.
Our efforts will better enable us to:
1) predict and manage consequences of future
environmental change, including those caused by
human activities, climate change and land-use
pattern changes;
2) limit human impacts to surface water resources in
urban and rural areas;
3) develop strategies to remediate contaminated water
supplies; and
4) preserve ecosystem services that help cleanse water
supplies naturally.
Agency Contact Information
National Science Foundation, Division of Earth
Sciences, Hydrologic Sciences and Geobiology and
LT Geochemistry; Thomas Torgersen, Enriqueta
Barrera, Program Directors, 703-292-8549 and
703-2927780; [email protected], [email protected]
U.S. Department of Energy
National Energy Technology Laboratory
Brian Dressel, Program Manager (Storage Division),
412-386-7313, [email protected]
2.14
National Center for Information Assurance and Security
Background
vulnerability assessment capabilities are inadequate
and often result in security vulnerabilities and cost
over-runs. CIAS researchers have developed tools
to efficiently design and assemble large software
systems at low cost.
 CIAS researchers have received several prestigious
awards, including four CAREER awards from the
National Science Foundation.
The proposed project will enhance CIAS capabilities in
order to address challenges that confront the next
generation of complex cyber-physical systems. The
project will (1) tackle challenges for designing “zerofailure” mission-critical systems at lower cost and
decreased completion time, (2) develop cyber-defense
solutions to protect the U.S. critical infrastructures, and
(3) partner with local, state, and national agencies and
industry to educate people concerning cyber-security
challenges. CIAS is uniquely poised to address these
challenges because of the following specific efforts:
 Utilizing partnership with various federal agencies,
CIAS will develop threat assessment tools that
holistically encompass system security management.
Enabling techniques based on automated correlation
and threat analysis will be researched in order to
generate high-confidence alerts.
 CIAS will develop collaborations with companies
specializing in cyber-security and bio-security in order
to build a vibrant regional center and provide an
attractive environment in which those companies
would desire to expand to Manhattan, Kansas.
 A shortage of cyber-security engineers has been
consistently cited as a potential threat to U.S. national
security. CIAS has led development of and will
continue to develop educational material for security.
Technology is rapidly creating a highly networked
world in which software pervades every aspect of
society. Consequently, cyber-attacks represent a major
threat to our nation that endanger mission-critical
systems and the lives and assets those systems protect.
Trillions of dollars and the well-being of millions of
people currently depend on the correct operation of
software. Recent reports to the National Academy of
Sciences have urged development of software with
evidence of correctness ("correctness certificates") that
can be automatically verified by a third party. In
response to these challenges, the U.S. Department of
Defense (DOD) has developed a “System Assurance
Strategy” that emphasizes security throughout the life
cycle of a project and requires DOD programs to
account for system vulnerabilities. Researchers at
Kansas State University (KSU) have a world-renowned
reputation for developing software design tools and
technologies that result in the construction of safe,
secure systems.
Description
The Center for Information Assurance and Security
CIAS has a long history of research, teaching, and
outreach in the cybersecurity area:
- In 2010, CIAS was designated as a National Center
of Academic Excellence for Research in Cyber
Security (CAE-R) by the National Security Agency
(NSA) and Department of Homeland Security (DHS).
- Since 1999, CIAS researchers have collaborated
with partners such as Rockwell Collins, Lockheed
Martin, Boeing, HP, Honeywell, Microsoft, and Idaho
National Lab to develop techniques for designing largescale, secure, mission-control systems. Many new
collaborations for cyber-security research and
education are currently being explored.
- CIAS has contributed substantially to the building
of tools to secure the U.S. national infrastructure:
 The Argus group in CIAS has developed tools to
address the defense aspects of cyber warfare.
Researchers at National Institute of Standards and
Technology (NIST) which maintains the National
Vulnerability Database (NVD) are using some of
those tools to develop security metrics.
 A team of CIAS researchers received a 2003 NASA
Turning Goals into Reality (TGIR) award for their
work on techniques to verify software system
functioning.
 The DOD and its major contractors build complex,
software-controlled, highly networked systems by
integrating hundreds of suppliers and commercial
off-the-shelf components. However, current design
techniques,
acquisition
procedures,
and
Relevance
KSU’s CIAS has a world-renowned reputation of
developing technologies that lead to the creation of
secure software systems. Because of existing
collaborations with leading cyber-security companies
and the anticipated arrival of National Bio and
Agricultural Defense Facility (NBAF), CIAS has the
potential to form alliances with and attract a multitude
of cyber- and bio-security companies to Manhattan.
This project will stimulate these endeavors and
establish a regional center in which the future cybersecurity workforce can be trained.
Agency Contact Information
Dr. Kathleen Kaplan, MIT Fellow, AFOSR
875 Randolph Street
Arlington, VA 22203
703-696-7312, [email protected]
3.1
Development of Researchable Databases that can be utilized by DOD, Academia and
others for Research Projects
Description
Background
The objective of this initiative is to define and establish
a process for creating, populating, and maintaining
researchable databases that can be used by DOD,
academia, industry and other interested parties for
research purposes. This would include unclassified and
classified data. The initial effort would be to gather and
process to all data materials related to the National
Guard Agribusiness Development Teams (ADT) that
were formed and deployed to Afghanistan. The
processes and database infrastructure developed would
be one that could be used in the gathering and
establishment of a wide variety of datasets that would
be of value to multiple research interests such as DOD,
academia and others. The initiative will leverage the
Kansas State University (KSU) Biosecurity Research
Institute (BRI), Libraries and the National Agricultural
Biosecurity Center (NABC) infrastructure and
capabilities. The objective is accomplished through the
following activities:
The United States has a global footprint of data
generation that includes military, academia, industry
and others. Large amounts of data are accumulated in
various forms and historically have not been able to be
widely utilized because of a variety of reasons such as
curation, common formatting, lack of cataloging, of
system compatibility, and general lack of access issues,
etc. Because much of the data, even though gathered,
is generally not available for research, redundant
collection efforts of the same data occurs which adds
cost and impacts the timeliness of research products.
The ongoing availability of appropriate datasets would
also increase the opportunities for the conducting and
utilization of the resulting research in a timely manner.
An enhancement of this initiative would be identifying
data gaps and working with interested partners in filling
those data gaps.
Relevance
This would support United States efforts world-wide
and would significantly support military, academia and
other interests by providing datasets that could be used
in support of research and information needs. The
datasets could also include data that would be of value
to industry when researching and gathering information
for future business decisions.
 Develop and maintain information technology
infrastructure, unclassified and classified, to support
multiple databases that could be made available to
support research.
 Process development for acquiring the data to
establishing the researchable databases.
Agency Contact:
 Process development for including information
stakeholders and potential users for determining
how data is stored and made available to support
research and discovery.
Dr. Lynn Copeland
Chief, Civil Information
CIMDPS Requirements Manager/Technical Lead
USAJFKSWCS (Special Warfare Center and School)
910-432-7596
[email protected]
 Process development for efficiently and properly
cataloging data for maximum research benefit with
a goal of having as much structured data as possible.
The process would take into account the wide
variety of data sources that could be included. The
data would be in multiple formats including paper,
photographs, electronic, etc.
 Identify and obtain other datasets (government,
academia, industry, etc.) that could be added to the
researchable databases to facilitate research and
information products.
Tagged, labeled and
supervised datasets would be of significant interest
to Global Food System focused research.
3.2
Real-Time Monitoring of Biosafety Level 3 and 4 Exhaust Flow Purity
In conjunction with on-call research from other
disciplines including physics, computer science,
agriculture, mechanical, and chemical engineering, the
IER and BRI will focus on known principles of optical
detection using laser light combined with current and
emerging particle-counting technologies while
maintaining airflow system integrity. Novel, highly
tunable ionic liquid-coated HEPA filters will be
developed for the specific capture and remediation of
target compounds. The objective is to obtain a low cost,
low maintenance system that is easily retrofitted on the
downstream side of current air handling equipment in
NBC (particularly BSL-3 and 4) containment facilities.
Background
Hazards due to industrial accidents, nuclear plant
accidents, or accidental releases of biological or
chemical agents from a laboratory can be prevented or
minimized if precautionary measures are established
and necessary equipment and trained personnel are
available to respond. A majority of spaces that require
strict airflow filtering use High-Efficiency Particulate
Absorption (HEPA) filters. Filters used in Nuclear,
Biological, and Chemical (NBC) applications currently
require manual periodic inspection; unfortunately,
however, this method detects the potential release of
dangerous substances only after the release occurs.
Additional funding in the amount of $1,000,000 is
needed to advance these efforts.
The proposed effort will utilize current collaboration
between the Institute for Environmental Research
(IER) and the Biosecurity Research Institute (BRI)
which are both located at Kansas State University
(KSU).
Relevance
Hazards are real or potential conditions that can cause
injury, illness, or death; damage to or loss of equipment
or property; or damage to the environment. Hazards can
be intentionally or inadvertently caused by hostile
forces or the accidental release of chemical or
biological agents (e.g., natural disaster, accidental
release by governmental or commercial sectors).
The IER is an interdisciplinary research center focused
on interactions between humans and their environment.
It is comprised of 6,500 square feet of laboratory space,
encompassing
eight
computer-controlled
environmental chambers and an environmentally
controlled, 11-row mock-up of a wide-body aircraft
cabin for use in studying air distribution, air quality,
contaminant transport, and decontamination. IER
faculty and staff have particular expertise in airflow,
filtration, particulate detection, and novel experimental
design.
Due to their explosive, chemical, or biological natures,
hazardous materials cause safety, public health, or
environmental concerns that require concentrated effort
to detect, manage, mitigate, and remediate. The new
National Bio Agro-Defense Facility (NBAF) is
currently being constructed in Manhattan, Kansas. Its
collocation with KSU provides unparalleled
opportunity to advance the science and safe operation
of facilities used for experimentation with and storage
of hazardous substances, particularly biological
pathogens. The capability this effort will provide does
not currently exist; therefore, this research will provide
increased safety and surety in biosecurity laboratory
operations.
The BRI at Pat Roberts Hall at KSU is a unique
biocontainment research and education facility.
Comprised of 113,000 square feet of lab, education,
and administrative space, this BSL-3, ABSL-3, and
BSL3-Ag facility offers abundant research and
education opportunities in bioscience. The BRI
supports collaborations between KSU researchers and
other academic, federal, and private researchers. BRI
faculty and staff have particular expertise in livestock,
insect, and plant pathogens that threaten food supplies
and health.
Agency Contact Information
Dept. of Homeland Security
245 Murray Drive SW #14
Washington, DC 20528
(202) 282-8000
Description
The proposed research and development effort aims to
design and prototype a system to monitor, capture, and
remediate biological hazards caused by accidents or
equipment failure and link this system to air handling
controls for rapid shutdown of air flow through the
laboratory.
U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development
Center (USAERDC) Headquarters
3909 Halls Ferry Road
Vicksburg, MS 39180-6199
601-634-3188
3.3
Aluminum Nitride for High-Power Electronics and Ultraviolet Light-Emitting Diodes
Background
they can be made more then 6 times smaller than
compariable silicon devices. In addition, aluminum
nitride devices can operate 200 degrees hotter while
providing all advantages at increased energy
efficiencies.
Aluminum nitride is an undeveloped semiconductor
that offers promising new solid-state device
capabilities and high energy-saving efficiencies
compared to silicon, the most common, well-known
semiconductor. Aluminum nitride’s physical, optical,
and electrical properties are superior to silicon for highpower electronic devices and ultraviolet (UV) lightemitting diodes (LEDs), two technologies poised to
develop into multi-billion dollar per year industries
within five to seven years. Kansas State University
(KSU) and the start-up company Nitride Solutions Inc.,
leaders in producing high quality aluminum nitride
single crystals and thin films, propose to team together
to mover beyond materials synthesis to device
fabrication and the development of systems
incorporating these devices.
Aluminum nitride is the only semiconductor which is
suitable material for making deep UV LEDs. UV LED
light sources are essential for biological contamination
detection, and for killing pathogens in air and water.
Aluminum nitride-based UV light sources also directly
impact a broad array of defense technologies.
Biological detection, identification, diagnosis, therapy
and elimination, hostile fire identification (HFI)
systems, superior light detection and ranging (LIDAR),
three-dimensional (3D) imaging through smoke, shortrange free-space communication, and target
recognition are critical military applications enabled by
aluminum nitride-based UV light sources. As in all
defense-related material platforms, this technology will
filter down to commercial and private use for
anticollision systems in cars, faster wireless
communication, and a multitude of future products.
Description
Funds are sought to support research to solve lingering
technical challenges related to material synthesis,
device fabrication, device characterization, and
electronic system design that incorporates aluminum
nitride devices. Funds are also sought to provide
education and training necessary to produce qualified
researchers to accelerate the growth of this new
industry. Funds will support KSU faculty and students,
in partnership with Nitride Solutions, to develop
advanced manufacturing technologies for aluminum
nitride-based solid-state devices. Funding is request to
help establish a Kansas-based advanced solid-state
device industry that will create jobs and bring Kansas
technological recognition.
Since 1997, KSU has been a research leader of the
synthesis of nitride semiconductors. In fact, former
KSU students founded Nitride Solutions in order to
capitalize on this technology. Proposed funding would
support the next step in the manufacturing chain by
developing technology to create electronic devices and
UV LEDs from aluminum nitride. Ultimately,
aluminum nitride electronic devices will be deployed in
electric vehicles, wind turbines, elevators, computer
power supplies, solid-state UV light sources for nonchemical disinfection of water and food, and
environmental monitoring.
These funds will support research to create high purity,
low defect density materials, develop practical device
fabrication processes, and design electrical circuits to
support new devices. Funds will also support education
to produce engineering students with specialized talent,
technical skills, and entrepreneurial spirit needed for
this burgeoning industry to thrive.
Agency Contact Information
U.S. Department of Energy
Advanced Manufacturing Office
Dr. Mark Johnson, Director
(202) 586-9488
[email protected]
Relevance
Although silicon has the properties needed for lowpower electronic devices for computers, mobile phone,
and photovoltaics, its properties are not well-suited for
high-power switches and transistors, as are used in
electrical conditioning in power supplies, motor
controllers, and power distribution systems. Because
aluminum nitride can withstand higher voltages,
currents, and temperatures than silicon or silicon
carbide (the current choice for power eletronics), its
devices can switch more than 10 times the power while
4.1
Performance and Innovation in Building Envelopes
Background
integrated nature of performance in the building
envelope and the need for interdisciplinary, out-of-thebox innovation linked with emerging technologies for
manufacturing and testing to solve this pressing issue
in the sustainability of buildings.
Innovation in building envelopes is essential to
reducing building energy use and embodied energy.
While the HVAC-R research field has been a subject of
focus for engineers and scientists, direct collaboration
between architects, engineers, and manufacturers is
necessary to confront the multimodal performance
challenges of the building envelope. The proposed
project represents a model of innovation built upon the
broad applied knowledge of the architectural discipline
and that is expanded by way of collaborative inquiry
among engineers, scientists, and manufacturers using
the most advanced technologies for fabrication and
testing.
Agency Contact Information
Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy
Forrestal Building, 1000 Independence Ave, SW
Washington, DC 20585
Department of Energy
1000 Independence Ave, SW
Washington, DC 20585
Description
The project involves graduate architecture students
engaging practicing architects and consultants to
explore a particular environmental issue (i.e. thermal
transfer or daylight control) impacting performance in
the building envelope. In parallel, the research team
collaborates with a manufacturer of building
components to understand how these environmental
performance issues can be addressed in manufacturing
and building product development.
The project is currently in its pilot year (AY 2013-14),
working specifically on the use of ventilated building
cladding to reduce summer heat gain in buildings.
Graduate architecture students from Kansas State
University are conducting the research in collaboration
with BNIM, a nationally recognized practice, and
Zahner, a leading manufacturer of innovative envelope
systems. Students have used computer analysis and
instrumented mockups, built with the support of
Zahner, to develop, test, and integrate innovative
building skins that can reduce cooling season energy
use. Leading architects from BNIM are participating
directly as research guides and experts in the
integration of envelope systems.
Relevance
The project aims to advance innovation in sustainable
technology by addressing the complex and
interconnected issues that define the performance of
buildings: integrating issues of physics and energy
transfer, resistance to weather and climate, structural
performance, embodied energy of materials, and the
comprehensive impact of architecture for building
users and owners. Architectural decisions are driven
frequently by aesthetics and economics on the other
hand. This research project recognizes the deeply
4.2
Center for Attosecond Nanophotonics
Background/Description
The proposed Center for Attosecond Nanophotonics
(CAN) will develop from a synergistic overlap between two
strong subfields in the Physics department, namely AtomicMolecular-Optical (AMO) physics and Nanomaterials. This
highly innovative center offers promise for new discoveries
by combining advanced photonics, nanoscience and soft
matter systems. It is a collaboration unlike any other in the
world.
The J. R. MacDonald laboratory (JRML) in the K-State
physics department is a large AMO physics laboratory,
supported by the US DOE and its predecessors since 1969.
JRML was the first US laboratory to produce single
attosecond (billionth of a billionth sec; comparable to the
extremely short time taken by electrons in an atom to change
energies) light pulses. Currently, the JRML group is known
for its leadership in ultrafast laser science and is well
positioned to be the nucleus for a leading attosecond
nanophotonics center in the US.
The Nanomaterials group at K-State has excellent
synthetic and materials characterization capabilities.
Scientists in this group have extensive experience in the
synthesis of nanoparticles and their assembly, nanowires,
and graphene. The major theme of this research is to create a
new class of nanoparticle solids in which the nanoparticles
act as the “atoms” of the material and thereby mimic atomic
and molecular materials found in nature.
It is thus timely to extend the application of ultrafast and
intense optical pulses to the new arena of nanoscale matter in
the Center for Attosecond Nanophotonics. The proposed
Center will use light sources with unprecedented properties,
applying them to nanoscale matter that research has shown
to be a treasure box of new phenomena. This novel
combination is certain to yield exceptional new physics
given the extremes of intensity, time and length scales.
electronics. The light sources that will be developed in
the center can be applied for biomedical imaging and
opto-genetics as well. Two leading companies in high
power ultrashort lasers such as KMLabs (Boulder, CO)
and Thales (Paris, France) have already shown interest
in collaboration with the scientists in the center. We
envision establishment of spinoffs companies of new
laser and imaging technology as a result of these
collaborations.
At present, the physics department is limited by
space and cannot accommodate the necessary physical
environment for attosecond studies of nanoscale
particles and structures (which require temperature
stability, a vibration-free environment, etc.). While we
are successful in acquiring multi-million dollar laser
equipment through resources available from Federal
funding agencies, infrastructure for the new center CAN
requires other Federal funding resources.
In summary, the proposed development of a
federally funded world-class research center CAN will
cultivate a research and teaching environment that
accommodates the synergy of our niche research areas.
CAN’s fundamental research output can be translated
into a powerful engine of innovation and
entrepreneurship. Students involved with CAN will be
encouraged to have an entrepreneurship focus and in
collaborations with K-State Business School and
Institute for Commercialization will be introduced to
various aspects of intellectual property, technology
transfer, and the process of innovation. Trained this
way, these student innovators, who are by definition the
foremost authorities on their discoveries, will facilitate
and shorten the time needed for research outcomes to be
transferred into a marketable product.
K-State Physics department has a strong culture of
solving practical problems and “producing products”.
The department has recently received a major private
gift for the purposes of creating innovation and
entrepreneurship and promoting opportunities for
interdisciplinary research. Some recent intellectual
property disclosures from our department include
Detonation Graphene Nanosheets, Fiber Lasers, and
Electrochemical Nanowires. Explorations are currently
underway for applications in sub-cellular force sensors,
laser-based chemical detection and remote sensing, and
optical telecommunications.
Agency Contact Information
U.S. Department of Energy
Two Contacts: Basic Energy Sciences and Materials
Sciences Divisions
Jeffrey L. Krause, Team Leader
Office of Basic Energy Sciences
301-903-5827, [email protected]
Linda Horton, Ph.D., Director
Materials Sciences and Engineering Division
[email protected]
We are confident that CAN’s novel science will lead to
next-generation opto-electronic technologies that could
enable high speed computing using light interfaced with
4.3
Networking, Security and Resiliency for Critical Infrastructures
Background
Grid example, large-scale experiments that incorporate
resources from the Smart Grid Lab at Kansas State
University (KSU), KSU networking resources, and the
Global Environment for Network Innovations (GENI)
test bed can be performed. A hybrid simulator has been
created that integrates continuous-time behaviors of the
power system with discrete event behaviors of the
communication network. This platform has
demonstrated
performance
impacts
of
the
communication network and the power system when
the physical infrastructure is designed to maximize
robustness. Furthermore, this platform was utilized to
demonstrate that an OpenFlow communication
network could perform equal to or better than its
traditional counterpart. The goals of this research
initiative are to successfully compete in programs such
as DOE’s Academic Collaboration for Cybersecurity of
Energy Delivery Systems (CEDS) Research and
Development for the Energy Sector, or NSF’s NeTS.
Daily societal activities increasingly depend on
interdependent critical infrastructures such as power
grids, telecommunication networks, transportation
networks, food networks, and water distribution
networks. In contrast to isolated systems,
interdependent networked systems demonstrate
emergent behaviors caused by unpredictable, rare, nonlinear interactions between numerous social, physical,
and cyber components. Because infrastructure systems
are large, they are often decentrally controlled through
cyber systems. However, even if decentralization and
self-organization theoretically reduce failure risk,
interdependencies can lead to disruptive and massive
cascading failures.
Interdependent
and
multilayer
networks
characterize
critical
social
and
engineered
infrastructures, but a thorough understanding of their
behaviors through fundamental results is still lacking.
For example, the Smart Grid concept includes
application of advanced computer, communications,
and power technologies to obtain a highly automated,
responsive, and resilient, transmission and distribution
infrastructure. At the distribution level, the Smart Grid
integrates distributed renewable generation sources
with energy storage and provides demand response
management to customers through dynamic pricing. At
the transmission level, communication architecture
creates an intelligent infrastructure that can detect and
mitigate faults faster than they can propagate, thus
providing utility operators with improved efficiency
and reliability. Although ongoing efforts to design a
next-generation communication network within the
Smart Grid framework are in progress, lack of
flexibility and programmability of network equipment
has impeded experimentation with new schemes.
Consequently, power operators are reluctant to adopt
untested solutions.
Relevance National/Regional
Numerous critical infrastructures in Kansas and the
United States rely on secure networking and
communications. In Kansas, power and networking
companies have demonstrated endorsement by
sponsoring KSU’s Electrical Power Affiliate’s
Program (EPAP). This research has also received
national contributions from Raytheon BBN
Technologies, KanREN, Internet2, National Science
Foundation, and National LambdaRail.
Agency Contact Information
Bradley Ring, Department of Energy (DOE)
303-275-4930 [email protected]
Angelos D. Keromytis, NSF CISE/CNS
703-292-8061, [email protected]
Description
This project has two primary goals. The first goal is to
study interdependencies between critical infrastructure
networks and provide fundamental insights on the
impact of these interdependencies related to reliability
of the coupled system with the ultimate intent to
increase reliability by developing analytical tools to
measure and adapt system interdependencies. The
second goal is to address key issues in order to allow
rigorous experimentation and analysis of networking
solutions in the real-world environment. For a Smart
4.4
Large-Scale Integration of Clean Technologies in the Power Grid
Background
stochastic nature of renewable resources, thereby
leading to more efficient planning and operation. The
investigation will allow opportunity to build models
and tools that will facilitate more effective utilization
of existing renewable resources and integration of a
significantly larger amount of additional renewable
generation into the power grid.
Increased global demand for energy and dwindling
fossil fuel reserves are beginning to cause concerns
regarding global warming, climate change, and
sustainability, resulting in strong worldwide interest in
clean energy technologies, such as wind and solar
energy, and electric vehicles. Total worldwide wind
power capacity has increased from 24 Gigawatt (GW)
in 2001 to 318 GW in 2013; the United States share
surpassed 65 GW in 2013. Similarly, solar energy
capacity in the U. S. increased from less than 1 MW in
2000 to about 18 GW in 2014. On the consumption
side, over 100,000 electric vehicles have been sold in
the U. S. since 2013. Despite many benefits of the clean
energy, integration of these systems into the power grid
can lead to a new set of technical challenges such as
power plant scheduling to accommodate fluctuating
wind and solar power, mitigating power quality issues
due to higher usage of power electronics converters,
reducing maintenance cost while providing high
reliability and availability of wind turbines, and
integrating high levels of rooftop solar photovoltaic
(PV) generation and electric vehicles.
The research will include solid-state converters, which
have become enabling technology to realize a wide
range of critical technologies such as grid-tied wind
and solar energy systems, electric hybrid vehicles, etc.
They can significantly enhance flexibility and
controllability of the power grid; consequently,
transferring the existing energy infrastructure to the
next generation with extraordinary features.
Research related to power distribution networks will
focus on large-scale integration of solar rooftop
genetration and electric vehicles with on-site storage.
Life cycle analysis will be used to consider air quality
and climate change impacts using triple bottom line of
social, environmental, and economic concerns.
Government and industry have funded several research
projects at Kansas State University (KSU), making
KSU a leader in power engineering research and
education in the State of Kansas. The proposed research
aims to leverage prior research and strength in power
systems and cyber-physical systems to seek innovative
solutions for increasing penetration of clean
technologies into the power grid.
Public education will be included in order to increase
understanding of the benefits of electric cars, wind and
solar energy. The requested amount for the project is
$4,000,000 to be used by KSU for research, education,
and outreach. A significant portion of the funding will
be used to involve undergraduate and graduate students
in research projects.
Description
Relevance
Objectives of the proposed multidisciplinary research
include removing barriers and developing human
capital through education in order to advance
sustainable energy pathways associated with electricity
generation and its use in transportation while utilizing
synergy between clean electricity generation and
consumption. Faculty, students, industrial companies,
and government agencies will collaborate for
successful commercialization.
In an effort to reduce dependence on foreign oil and
reduce carbon emmissions, the U.S. government has
made promotion of clean technologies a top priority for
the past 10 years. In his inaugration address in 2012,
President Obama renewed his commitment to
renewable energy and emission reductions. The
proposed research will leverage collaboration with Fort
Riley, Kansas, which is under a federal mandate to
utilize renewable energy to reduce carbon emissions.
World leadership in research and education related to
clean energy generation and utilization advances the KState 2025 plan to be a top 50 research university.
The research will investigate enhancement of wind
turbine efficiency and durability, energy forecasting,
integrated planning, reconfigurable grid-interactive
converters, and integration of advanced cyber and
communication technologies for optimized operation
of the system as a cyber-physical system with high
penetration of renewable resources. Higher efficiency
and long-term reliability are crucial in order for wind
turbines to compete directly with natural gas. Accurate
forecasting will allow better characterization of the
Agency Contact Information
U.S. Dept. of Energy:
Gary Nowakowski, [email protected],
303-275-4808
Fort Felker, Director, National Wind Technology
Center, [email protected], 303-384-6905
4.5
Bio /Agro Security Innovation System – BASIS
BASIS Strategy: To catalyze and enhance bio/agro
security innovation for America’s livestock industry.
 Engage stakeholders: First of all, undertake the
systematic engagement of private sector, producer/
industry, university and government stakeholders
for the purpose of understanding their innovation,
talent and training needs, plus their capabilities and
major challenges.
 Align stakeholder’s capabilities and needs:
Second, identify and catalog natural alignments
that exist within the stakeholder network and
determine which of those alignments can provide a
foundation for more significant, committed BASIS
partnerships.
 Enable connectivity: Third, enable stakeholder
interests and needs to be connected with other
stakeholder capabilities for the purpose providing a
new framework by which to protect animal health,
public health and the food supply while at the same
time enhancing economic growth.
 Advance foundational partnerships: Fourth,
secure key partnerships, identify specific shared
goals within each of these, ascertain progressive
benchmarks for success, and help operationalize
each partnership.
 Enrich, enhance and evolve strategic stakeholder
alliances: Fifth, mature ecosystem alliances that
support regional economic growth and further
develop the partnerships nationally/internationally
if/when appropriate. And, finally, evolve the
strategy to reflect dynamic market conditions and
global events for the enrichment of all BASIS
public/private partners.
Background
The Bio /Agro Security Innovation System – BASIS –
is designed to be a highly networked technology
development ecosystem. It is expected to catalyze
bio/agro security innovation in and around the
Department of Homeland Security’s (DHS’s) National
Bio and Agro-defense Facility (NBAF) currently under
construction in Manhattan, Kansas via enhanced
engagement, the creation of new partnerships and
increased public and private-sector investments.
The already evolving ecosystem consists of a network
of capabilities, services and know-how that work
together to provide a variety of benefits and outcomes
upon which all BASIS stakeholders depend ― access
to innovation, talent and training. Active participants
are anticipated to interact with each other in a
synergistic manner which should enhance the missions
of all the constituents, particularly, long-term.
Relevance
Description
Accelerating the delivery new technologies into the
marketplace to meet the needs of America’s livestock
industry will help ensure the safety and security of
animal health, public health and the global food supply.
It will also serve as an engine of economic growth
locally, regionally and beyond.
BASIS Vision: To protect the nation’s health and food
supply through an integrated, advanced bio/agro
security innovation system.
BASIS Mission: To create a highly networked bio/agro
security innovation system for the diagnosis, treatment
and prevention of high-hazard infectious diseases that
threaten the U.S. BASIS is designed to: (1) materially
enhance public-sector/private-sector cooperation and
collaboration; (2) leverage stakeholder knowledge and
capabilities; (3) accelerate the advancement/transition
of technologies and products into the marketplace; and
(4) enable skilled worker training, talent development
and regional economic growth.
Agency Contact Information
Department of Homeland Security
Julie S. Brewer, Deputy Director
NBAF Program Executive Office
DHS Science & Technology Directorate
[email protected]
202.254.6454
5.1
EPICENTER: Laboratory for a network science approach to predict and
control the spread of infectious diseases
Background
those same individuals. In zoonotic diseases,
interconnected networks include the network of
animals and the network of humans in which a virus
can transfer from one population (network) to another.
Integrated models of disease spread, supply chain
logistics, and communication networks:The objective
of this project is to develop integrated models that
capture interdependencies between disease dynamics,
supply chain logistics, and communication networks.
For example, the spread of disease is influenced by the
movement of animals, plants, and food products
through the supply chain. Effective management of this
movement and deployment of countermeasures such as
vaccines, require effective risk and crisis
communication plans that engage multiple
stakeholders. Stakeholders also constitute a network
through which information is transmitted. The
integrated modeling approach is expected to yield new
insight in order to prevent, mitigate, and respond to
infectious disease outbreaks.
Few events disrupt society and cause economic loss as
severely as an out-of-control infectious disease.
Terrorist activities or natural causes can produce an
epidemic that may result in human deaths, the disposal
of herds, and the destruction of crops. Fundamental to
EPICENTER’s mission is the conviction that epidemic
dynamics and intervention strategies must be derived
while accounting for underlying complex networks that
describe multiple and dynamic interconnections among
involved systems.
Description
EPICENTER, a laboratory within Kansas State
University’s College of Engineering, provides
resources to build, analyze, and simulate data-driven
computational models for biomedical and biological
systems represented as complex networks.
Research at EPICENTER challenges scientific
boundaries by addressing
the impact of (1)
heterogeneity, (2) interdependence, and (3)
stratification of networks in spreading processes. These
three characteristics abound in natural and man-made
infrastructures and networks, but fundamental
questions remain unanswered regarding interconnected
and stratified/multilayer networks
Relevance
The National Agricultural Biosecurity Center (NABC),
the Institute for Computational Comparative Medicine
(ICCM), the Center of Excellence for Emerging and
Zoonotic Animal Diseases (DHS CEEZAD), the
planned National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility (DHS
NBAF), and EPICENTER are all located in Manhattan,
Kansas, thus making Kansas the national leader in
developing countermeasures to naturally-occurring and
intentionally-introduced plant, animal, human, and
zoonotic diseases.
Projects within EPICENTER
EPICENTER has succesfully conducted several
research projects since its inception in 2007. Current
projects include:
Predictive models of infectious diseases: This project
aims to develop innovative multiscale computational
models and tools to describe potential transmission
cycles of zoonotic pathogens that could be introduced
into the United States. Data generated by these models
will be used to produce an operationally relevant
predictive model that estimates the timing and spatial
extent of emerging disease and the transmission risk to
humans. Studied diseases include Ebola, Rift Valley
fever, and Japanese Encephalitis.
Spreading
processes
over
multilayer
and
interconnected networks: The research goal is to
establish mathematical tools and techniques in order to
understand the role of multilayer and interconnected
topologies in spreading processes. For example, a
multilayer network is a physical contact network in
which a disease can propagate among individuals and
an online information dissemination network in which
information
can
propagate
among
Agency Contact Information
USDA Janey Thornton, Deputy Under Secretary
(202) 720-7711
USDA Jeanette Thurston, National Program Leader
(202) 720-7166, [email protected]nifa.usda.gov
DHS Matthew Coats, National Program Leader
(202) 254-5695, [email protected]
USDA Cyril Gay, National Program Leader
(301) 504-4786, [email protected]
NSF Wendy Nilsen, National Program Leader
(703) 292-2568, [email protected]
5.2
Fusion Centers and their roles in global food and water security
Description
Since the tragedy of 9/11 local, state, tribal, and federal
officials across the country have been working hard to
restore public order and confidence, and to identify those
responsible for the vicious terrorist attacks on the United
States of America. These officials have also been
working to find ways to prevent or mitigate future terrorist
acts, which has led to the development of a number of
strategies and programs designed to strengthen domestic
security. Many of these strategies focus on improving
ways to combine relevant information from disparate
databases, in order to maximize the usefulness and quality
of available information.
A global paradigm for the peaceful coexistence of
nations is the security of the food and water supplies
by which nations sustain their citizens. The National
Agricultural Biosecurity Center (NABC), through its
interactions with both the intelligence community at
large and the Department of Homeland Security
(DHS) funded state-wide Fusion Centers has been
working to make this paradigm a reality.
This paradigm is underpinned by both classified and
unclassified work, and involves a close
cooperation/collaboration between the NABC and
the Kansas Intelligence Fusion Center (KIFC).
Subject matter experts, largely based within the
University science environment, are linked
synergistically with intelligence community
analysts. The objective of this initiative is to continue
to enhance the capabilities of NABC to provide food
and agricultural subject matter expertise (SME) to
DHS and (KIFC) in both an unclassified and
classified role.
Improvements in communication, information sharing,
and analysis must continue for those gains that have been
made to be realized going forward. Specific assets have
been deployed in Kansas, which serve as a national
model. The State Legislature authorized The Adjutant
General for Kansas (TAG) to establish the Kansas
Information Fusion Center (KIFC) and directed the KIFC
be housed in a Sensitive Compartmented Information
Facility (SCIF). Placement of the KIFC in a SCIF enables
the KIFC to access classified threat information
pertaining to the Nation. This ensures the KIFC has the
best information available to predict, prevent, and
respond to threats facing its citizens. NABC provides the
agriculture/food component of the federal, state and local
mission of the KIFC to protect the nation by providing a
multi-discipline, information sharing network designed to
gather, analyze, and disseminate information in a timely
manner.
NABC brings several assets to this conversation. It
has established a SCIF and has identified the SME’s
to support the university’s role in safeguarding food
and water security. Beginning in 2005, NABC
entered into a strategic relationship with DHS and
the KIFC to leverage expertise in support of efforts
toward global food and water security.
Background
Many of the Homeland Security Presidential
Directives (HSPD) identify improved information
sharing as a key component of Homeland Protection.
These HSPD’s also identify that much of critical
areas that must be protected are under the control
and/or oversight of state and local governments, and
the private sector. These critical infrastructure and
key resources provide the essential services that
underpin American society and national security and
thus it must be protected from disruption from
natural, accidental, or deliberate events. Improving
information sharing constitutes a cornerstone of our
national strategy to protect the American people and
our institutions and to defeat terrorists and their
support networks at home and abroad. The National
Commission on Terrorist Attacks upon the United
States (the 9/11 Commission) identified the
breakdown in information sharing as a key factor
contributing to the failure to prevent the September
11, 2001 attacks.
Relevance
At the Federal level, the Intelligence Community, led by
the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the
Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), participate in
several joint fusion centers. This carries down to 76
regional, state and local fusion centers that bring together
not only the governmental and law enforcement
representatives but also private sector and academia. As
with disasters, the point of the spear for Homeland
Security is the maintaining of fully functional fusion
centers staffed with fully trained and cleared experts.
Agency Contact
Department of Homeland Security
James Johnson, Executive Director
NBAF Program Office
202-254-6098, [email protected]
KIFC, 785-274-1805, [email protected]
5.3
Development, management, and maintenance of data, programs, and response plans
critical for National Bio and Agro-Defense Facility (NBAF) reporting, assessments
and documentation
Description
stability, food security, and the Nation’s public health.
DHS has the responsibility and the national
stewardship mandate to detect, prevent, protect against,
and respond to terrorist attacks within the U.S.
(Homeland Security Act of 2002, 6 U.S.C 182). DHS
shares these responsibilities, as they apply to the
defense of animal agriculture, with the U.S.
Department of Agriculture (USDA); hence, a
coordinated agricultural research strategy (as called for
in the Homeland Security Act of 2002 and Homeland
Security Presidential Directive 9 (HSPD-9), “Defense
of U.S. Agriculture and Food,” January 30, 2004) has
been developed. HSPD-9 also specifically identified
the need for “safe, secure, and state-of-the-art
agriculture biocontainment laboratories that support
research and develop diagnostic capabilities for foreign
animal and zoonotic diseases.” The NBAF will provide
the infrastructure needed to satisfy the need for these
modern biocontainment laboratories.
The objective of this initiative is to establish and
maintain data, programs and response plans required
for responsive DHS NBAF reporting, assessments and
documentation purposes. The initiative will leverage
Kansas State University’s (KSU’s) Biosecurity
Research Institute (BRI) and National Agricultural
Biosecurity Center (NABC) infrastructure and
capabilities, and integrate activities of KSU with DHS.
The objective is accomplished through the following
activities:
Development and maintaining of pertinent data in a
responsive manner that is to be used in support of
NBAF programs, response plans and risk based
decision tools. This would also include the necessary
data for reporting, assessments and ongoing
documentation purposes to meet DHS requirements.
Development and maintaining of emergency response
plans at the state and local level to ensure support of
DHS NBAF specific emergency response planning and
documentation.
Safety and security are of paramount importance in the
planning, design, construction, and operations of the
NBAF. From selection of the site to the design of the
facility and, finally, the operation of the NBAF, DHS
is committed to understanding the associated safety and
security risks and mitigating those risks through the
necessary design, engineering, operational protocols,
and response planning efforts.
Development and maintenance of activities to support
the four phases (Mitigation, Preparedness, Response
and Recovery) of emergency management. Mitigation
and Preparedness are critical for minimizing the effects
of a negative event and promoting rapid Response and
Recovery phases. This would require but not be limited
to activities such as training and exercising in support
of emergency planning and response.
Relevance
In support of DHS and NBAF, this initiative
significantly enhances the development and
maintenance of the necessary data to support DHS’s
needs for assessments, reports and other decisions. In
addition, this will support DHS in the development of
training, plans and exercises in the broad scope of the
four phases of emergency management.
Support and maintain information technology
infrastructure
and
architecture
and
secure
communications infrastructure needed to support the
areas of interest outlined in this initiative.
Promote capabilities to conduct threat and vulnerability
analysis of foreign disease agents in a biocontainment
laboratory environment using foreign animal, plant,
foodborne and zoonotic disease to support threat
characterization analysis.
Agency Contact:
Department of Homeland Security – Office of
Health Affairs, Dr. Marvin Meinders,
(202) 254-2218, [email protected]
Background
The research infrastructure provided by the NBAF is
necessary for continuing protection of the U.S. food
and agriculture industries. These highly integrated,
global, and complex industries are inherently
vulnerable to foreign animal, emerging, and zoonotic
disease outbreaks that could threaten economic
5.4
Real-Time Monitoring of Biosafety Level 3 and 4 Exhaust Flow Purity
In conjunction with on-call research from other
disciplines including physics, computer science,
agriculture, mechanical, and chemical engineering, the
IER and BRI will focus on known principles of optical
detection using laser light combined with current and
emerging particle-counting technologies while
maintaining airflow system integrity. Novel, highly
tunable ionic liquid-coated HEPA filters will be
developed for the specific capture and remediation of
target compounds. The objective is to obtain a low cost,
low maintenance system that is easily retrofitted on the
downstream side of current air handling equipment in
NBC (particularly BSL-3 and 4) containment facilities.
Background
Hazards due to industrial accidents, nuclear plant
accidents, or accidental releases of biological or
chemical agents from a laboratory can be prevented or
minimized if precautionary measures are established
and necessary equipment and trained personnel are
available to respond. A majority of spaces that require
strict airflow filtering use High-Efficiency Particulate
Absorption (HEPA) filters. Filters used in Nuclear,
Biological, and Chemical (NBC) applications currently
require manual periodic inspection; unfortunately,
however, this method detects the potential release of
dangerous substances only after the release occurs.
Additional funding in the amount of $1,000,000 is
needed to advance these efforts.
The proposed effort will utilize current collaboration
between the Institute for Environmental Research
(IER) and the Biosecurity Research Institute (BRI)
which are both located at Kansas State University
(KSU).
Relevance
Hazards are real or potential conditions that can cause
injury, illness, or death; damage to or loss of equipment
or property; or damage to the environment. Hazards can
be intentionally or inadvertently caused by hostile
forces or the accidental release of chemical or
biological agents (e.g., natural disaster, accidental
release by governmental or commercial sectors).
The IER is an interdisciplinary research center focused
on interactions between humans and their environment.
It is comprised of 6,500 square feet of laboratory space,
encompassing
eight
computer-controlled
environmental chambers and an environmentally
controlled, 11-row mock-up of a wide-body aircraft
cabin for use in studying air distribution, air quality,
contaminant transport, and decontamination. IER
faculty and staff have particular expertise in airflow,
filtration, particulate detection, and novel experimental
design.
Due to their explosive, chemical, or biological natures,
hazardous materials cause safety, public health, or
environmental concerns that require concentrated effort
to detect, manage, mitigate, and remediate. The new
National Bio Agro-Defense Facility (NBAF) is
currently being constructed in Manhattan, Kansas. Its
collocation with KSU provides unparalleled
opportunity to advance the science and safe operation
of facilities used for experimentation with and storage
of hazardous substances, particularly biological
pathogens. The capability this effort will provide does
not currently exist; therefore, this research will provide
increased safety and surety in biosecurity laboratory
operations.
The BRI at Pat Roberts Hall at KSU is a unique
biocontainment research and education facility.
Comprised of 113,000 square feet of lab, education,
and administrative space, this BSL-3, ABSL-3, and
BSL3-Ag facility offers abundant research and
education opportunities in bioscience. The BRI
supports collaborations between KSU researchers and
other academic, federal, and private researchers. BRI
faculty and staff have particular expertise in livestock,
insect, and plant pathogens that threaten food supplies
and health.
Agency Contact Information
Dept. of Homeland Security
245 Murray Drive SW #14
Washington, DC 20528
(202) 282-8000
Description
The proposed research and development effort aims to
design and prototype a system to monitor, capture, and
remediate biological hazards caused by accidents or
equipment failure and link this system to air handling
controls for rapid shutdown of air flow through the
laboratory.
U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development
Center (USAERDC) Headquarters
3909 Halls Ferry Road
Vicksburg, MS 39180-6199
601-634-3188
5.5
Identifying Corrective Actions from Agricultural Response (ICAAR) and Planning
and Curriculum for Food and Agriculture Emergency Response
Description
Once lessons learned have been identified and
corrective actions made available to agriculture
emergency response planners, identified needs may be
addressed by matching them to training available
within existing educational programs of DHS.
Planning and Curriculum for Food and Agriculture
Emergency Response:
Currently, no uniform planning process for the
development of emergency operation plans for the
defense of food and agriculture exist. FAVD branch
within DHS/OHA seeks to promote a common
understanding of the fundamentals of risk-informed
planning and decision making. Such an understanding
will allow for the development of integrated,
coordinated, and synchronized emergency operation
plans through the integration of a uniform planning
process, across the Food and Agriculture Sector by
National, State, local, tribal and territorial government
entities.
Identifying Corrective Actions from Agricultural
Response (ICAAR) / Food, Agriculture, and Veterinary
Defense (FAVD)



Review of agriculture related After Action
Reports/Improvement Plans (AAR/IP) from
emergency response exercises or incidents and
addition of identified corrective actions to a
searchable ICAAR database.
Provide corrective action database for access
and use by agriculture emergency response
planners nationwide to share lessons learned.
Lessons learned from the AAR/IP’s highlight
gaps identified in emergency response training
exercises or actual events and are crossmatched with existing training programs
offered by DHS. Deficits in training
availability are identified and reported to DHS.
Planning and Curriculum for Food and Agriculture
Emergency Response


Relevance
Lessons Learned Information Sharing (LLIS) / Food,
Agriculture and Veterinary Defense (FAVD):
The needs of the agricultural community in response to
an emergency situation often mirror the urban
response. However, there are also many needs and
solutions that are unique to an agricultural setting.
Information available from NABC lessons learned
analysis combined with a searchable corrective action
database will allow agriculture emergency response
managers to review lessons and corrective actions from
tabletop and field exercise AAR/IP’s and then
incorporate them into their own emergency response
plans.
Development of the Livestock Emergency
Response Plan (LERP) toolkit to ensure a riskinformed planning process by stakeholders
involved in agriculture emergency response.
Integrate format and curriculum of the existing
Food Emergency Response Plan (FERP)
toolkit and USDA/APHIS FADPReP
documents with the recently developed
Livestock Emergency Response Plan (LERP)
toolkit.
Background
Department of Homeland Security (DHS) – Office of
Health Affairs (OHA) has identified two key Food,
Agriculture, and Veterinary Defense (FAVD) needs,
each of which is being addressed through projects
performed by the National Agricultural Biosecurity
Center (NABC) at Kansas State University (K-State). Planning and Curriculum for Food and Agriculture
Emergency Response:
A common format and instructional curriculum for
risk-informed planning and decision making will allow
for the development of integrated, coordinated, and
synchronized emergency operation plans across the
Food and Agriculture Sector by National, State, local,
tribal and territorial government entities.
Lessons Learned Information Sharing (LLIS):
Review and analysis of AAR/IP’s from training
exercises or agriculture-based incidents are integral to
the continuous evolution of agricultural emergency
response. Lessons learned and their associated
corrective actions serve no purpose if their value is left
buried within the text of an exercise or incident report.
Agency Contact:
Department of Homeland Security – Office of Health
Affairs, Dr. Marvin Meinders, (202) 254-2218,
[email protected]
5.6
Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Resource Management Operations
Background
Although the collection and analysis of remotely
sensed data has been the focus of much research over
the last decade, significant limitations in the
methodology remain. Three main components to UAS
data collection are: 1) the hardware to carry, locate,
and actuate the sensor(s), 2) the sensor itself and its
calibration, and 3) the collected data and its associated
processing,
ortho-rectification,
analysis,
and
dissemination. All of these components have their
inherent challenges and limitations; this project
addresses these challenges.
With the proliferation of UAS technology comes the
enablement of a myriad of applications which
potentially benefit from the availability of an aerial
sensor. Many of these applications share common
technical challenges associated with data collection.
One common challenge is identifying a reliable, costeffective means of collecting aerial imagery that is
both ortho-rectified and scalable in order to provide
end-users with actionable-intelligence in support of
making reliable resource management decisions which
often require the need for exact volume and linear
measurements. If successful in solving this challenge
this may be a significant commercialization prospect
for Kansas State University Salina.
Initial trials are underway; upon selection of the
necessary test sUAS platforms, KSU will obtain the
necessary approvals from the FAA to conduct flight
operations, The next step will be to conduct
airworthiness reviews of the systems using KSU’s
internal airworthiness review processes and file
applications for Certificates of Authorization (COAs)
for locations at the Crisis City Training Center outside
of Salina, Kansas.
One government agency that has a need to solve this
problem is the Bureau of Land Management (BLM)
located within the Department of the Interior (DOI).
In the fall of 2014, Kansas State University Salina
responded to a BLM solicitation and was subsequently
chosen to partner with the BLM to solve this problem
under a Cooperative Ecosystems Studies Unit (CESU)
agreement.
Relevance
As mentioned, many applications across the spectrum
of existing industries will benefit from this work. The
ability to make cost-effective, precise measurements
independent of ground survey control points from a
UAS will increase the efficiencies of a host of
applications such as infrastructure inspection and
monitoring, surveying, energy exploration, and many
more. Positive results here will yield significant time
and financial resource savings that will help drive the
success of the UAS industry.
Description
The ultimate goal of this project is to identify lowcost, commercially available systems that can collect
data that will result in finished ortho-products, which
are precisely scalable through a new scaling technique
independent of ground surveys called “camera station
scaling”. The tasks associated with this effort include:
1) Hardware Selection – Identification and testing of
low-cost, commercially available, electric VTOL
small UAS that are suitable for stereo image
capture and/or precise measurement of relative
camera station location.
2) Payload Development – Modification of
commercially available cameras for stereo image
capture and their associated mounting and
interfacing with the autopilot, including camera
triggering techniques.
3) Operational Testing and Procedures –
Refinement of stereo and single image capture
flight profiles to achieve optimal results.
4) Data Analysis – Initial research and development
of camera station scaling techniques and
processing tools.
Agency Contact Information:
Bureau of Land Management
Matthew Bobo
National Operations Center
PO Box 25047
Denver, CO 80225
(303) 236-0721
[email protected]
6.1
Prairie Studies Initiative
Background
plants in this small park and connects it with research
at Konza Prairie Biological Station and the work of
artists in the museum’s collection who have explored
the prairie. The museum hosts an annual PSI artscience residency titled Open AIR. Additional
programs have included film screenings, panel
discussions, workshops, and conference presentations.
Kansas State University is situated in the Flint Hills, an
eco-region that includes a majority of the remaining tall
grass prairie in the United States. The importance of
grassland as intact ecosystems is poorly understood,
except by experts; consequently grasslands are not
always properly stewarded. Grasslands provide many
crucial ecosystem services, including biodiversity and
provisions of drinking water. Grasslands support food
production livelihoods that have global importance:
ranching and farming. Unfortunately, less than four
percent of grasslands worldwide are protected; nearly
fifty percent of grassland ecosystems worldwide have
already been destroyed.
PSI will seek funding to provide fellowships for
faculty; organize symposia to share outcomes of
PSI; and fund a coordinator position. Currently
under development is a website that aims to serve as
a portal for prairie-related expertise and programs
in our region and at peer institutions.
K-State 2025 goals reaffirm the university’s land grant
commitment to be a center for teaching, research, and
service that benefit Kansans, the nation and world.
Because of the important role Kansas plays in global
food systems, fully understanding this place – the
tallgrass prairie and high plains of Kansas – is critical.
Meaningful dialogue between science and technical
fields on the one hand, and the arts and humanities on
the other is necessary if K-State is to incentivize
creative research and equip students to participate in
21st century democracy.
Relevance
PSI supports 2025 aims to make K-State the site of
world-class research and to provide scientific and
technical education enriched by critical thinking and
cultural awareness that distinguishes K-State from
other schools with technical and agricultural strengths.
Art and science each bring distinctive tools and
practices to research. Understanding how to employ the
full range of these tools can enhance the work of both
scientists and artists. Improved communication can
make research questions and discoveries meaningful to
wide audiences.
Description
The Prairie Studies Initiative (PSI) is a collaborative
venture of K-State faculty, staff, and students from a
range of disciplines. PSI creates incentives and support
structures for the study of the cultural and ecological
dimensions of the prairie, challenges to sustaining
grassland ecosystems, and visions for new futures for
these important landscapes and the people who live and
work in them. PSI does not fund research; it is still
incumbent on faculty and students to seek external
funding for their projects. But PSI offers support for
networking, workshops, fellowships and collaborations
to bring in presenters.
PSI highlights opportunities for international and
multicultural work. The grasslands of Central Asia,
Africa, South America, and Australia offer rich
possibilities for comparative studies and shared
discoveries. The changing demographics and cultural
profiles of regions in Kansas also call for the
perspective of place-focused studies. Place-based
teaching and research can reveal a 360 degree view of
the past, present, and potential future of a defined
region.
Agency Contact Information
National Science Foundation
Alphonse deSena
Advancing Informal STEM Learning Program Officer
(703) 292-5106, [email protected]
PSI meaningfully engages the arts/humanities with
explorations in science, technology, and engineering in
programs and projects that pair experts from diverse
fields of study. PSI programs enrich the intellectual life
of the campus by focusing on the meaning, identity, and
value of the Flint Hills eco-region. The Beach Museum
of Art serves as a locus for many of PSI’s public
offerings, with McCain Performing Arts as a frequent
collaborator. These university venues are designed to
welcome public audiences. PSI has developed a parklike native plant garden, The Meadow. A touch screen
table inside the museum provides information about the
National Endowment for the Humanities
Collaborative Research Area
(202) 606-8200, [email protected]
Institute of Museums and Library Services
Museums for America – Community Anchors
Steve Shwartzman, Sr. Program Officer
(202) 653-4641, [email protected]
6.2
Investigating Place Using Digital Toolset
Background
Relevance
Historically, the process of design, construction, and
post-occupancy observation and evaluation has formed
the basis of informing future decisions in design for the
built environment. Efficiencies in time and resources
are projected through the use of parametric and
information modeling of projects, performance and
simulation-based design, digital fabrication, and
algorithic design and interface development.
Parametric design systems provide a means for
developing design thinking while also engaging the
ability to explore, discover, optimize and achieve useroriented parametrically-defined design solutions as
well as engaging in materialization and fabrication
processes; speculating on how these activities will fold
into a design process that explores the role of “user”
with new eyes. As the age of information passes in to
the age of choice, designers are developing models that
enable users to participate in the design process. While
the models vary in complexity, from those that simply
engage aesthetic to those that drive sustainable
agendas, the user can now set the parameters that the
models act against.
Emerging technologies and computational tools
continue to alter the process of design, methods of
project delivery, and manufacturing techniques that
profoundly impact design and architectural
innovations. Building information modeling (BIM),
environmental information modeling (EIM), alongside
performance-oriented simulations and increased
automations in decision-based prototyping increase the
capacity for optimizing designs toward specific
economic, social, and environmental goals; offering a
unique opportunity to respond to and influence
particular areas that are critical to ongoing research and
developments across disciplines.
Products can be explored that become part of a holistic
system but are adapted to different sites and functions,
creating a sense of identity per space while achieving
unity and connection throughout a community. Not
only in design education, but as a model for complex
systems-oriented decision matrices, this approach has
far-reaching implications for multiple fields.
Development of this stage of the project will lead to
evaluation metrics that can be employed throughout an
investigation to render immediate feedback and
implications. Initially, the project is seen as a model to
inform education; subsequently, as a decision paradigm
for complex environments.
Description
This project builds upon the existing experiences and
research of multiple trans-disciplinary faculty to
develop a digital toolset as a process-oriented approach
to the investigation of place design. The toolset builds
upon the understanding of how place, history, climate,
and ideals of occupants may be combined with
simultaneous investigations of materiality, object and
space to propose cohesive environments that can be
subsequently envisioned and modeled for effective
evaluation and iteration.
Parametric modeling as a means to develop space and
product that can respond to given criteria can
additionally simulate systems for design thinking.
Simulations of variabilities within interior and exterior
spaces are structured with variable decision points that
allow a particular product to be “custom fit” to a space
and project on a large scale the idea of “masspersonalization.” This advocates for a revolution
similar to that of the industrial revolution; where the
entire way of life at every scale was reconstructed and
reorganized, from product design and production to
consumption and recycling.
Agency Contact Information
National Endowment for the Arts
Jen Hughes, [email protected]
202-682-5547
This project develops a formative and evaluative
toolset to address attributes and how proposed designs
can help support these attributes.
6.3
Preparing STEM Teachers: Responding to New Challenges
Background
• A dual degree program was approved in 2013 that
enables undergraduate students to complete a STEM
major and become a licensed middle/high school
STEM teacher in four years.
The National Science Board issued a report in 2010
strongly stating the need for quality education of the
future STEM workforce. Key recommendations that
relate directly to the preparation of teachers in STEM
fields include: providing professional development
opportunities for teachers, principals, counselors, and
other key school staff; supporting research-based
STEM preparation for teachers; and fostering peer-topeer connections and collaborations with the scientific
research community. Besides this call to action, here
are three new challenges in preparing STEM teachers
in the nation’s teacher preparation programs.
1. Unmet needs for endorsed and highly qualified
math and science teachers. Over the next decade,
schools will need 200,000 or more new math and
science teachers nationally. In Kansas, the shortage of
math and science teacher is expected to reach critical
levels with the potential retirement of 36% of Kansas
teachers eligible to retire in five years.
2. The reform of science and math standards in K-12
education (the Next Generation Science Standards,
NGSS). NGSS updates content and represents a shift in
the way STEM education has been conceptualized and
implemented, necessitating a change in the approach to
preparing science and mathematics teachers.
3. The adoption of Common Core State Standards,
(CCSS). The new CCSS provide a clear understanding
of expected student outcomes, which provide new
guidelines and expectations for preparing teachers.
• The college is implementing a Teacher Education
Initiative, funded by the Kansas Board of Regents,
focused on designing an enhanced Graduate Certificate
in Teaching and Learning to recruit and prepare STEM
graduates to become STEM teachers. In addition, this
project is designing courses and providing professional
development to support currently licensed teachers
wishing to gain an additional license in science or
mathematics.
• The Center for Intercultural and Multilingual
Advocacy (CIMA) is providing professional
development to ESL teachers to improve their capacity
to teach math and science to ESL students.
• The math education faculty, the Department of
Mathematics, and CIMA have developed several
proposals to NSF for the development of culturallyresponsive math instruction strategies, which include
extensive professional development for Kansas’s math
teachers.
• Math education and mathematics faculty have been
conducting
successful
summer
mathematics
professional development institutes for Kansas
teachers for the past 11 years.
Description
Efforts planned for the near future are: recruiting
veterans into STEM teacher certification programs; an
endowed chair in science education; expansion of the
STEM faculty in the college; focused efforts on
recruiting STEM preservice teachers; workshops and
webinars on NGSS; and collaboration with the College
of Engineering related to engineering education.
The College of Education (COE) at K-State is
responding to these challenges by implementing
activities to increase the number and quality of STEM
teachers for Kansas schools:
• An NSF-funded scholarship program, K-State
TEACH, focuses on K-State science majors who want
to be come certified teachers is a collaboration between
the COE and the College of Arts and Sciences (physics
geology, chemistry and biology).
Relevance
STEM teacher education relates to the College’s 2025
plan, Theme II, with a goal of increasing the number of
STEM graduates by 50% in the next 10-15 years. These
activities also relate to K-State 2025, Themes II and III.
• Collaboration with the local school district to conduct
summer STEM camps for middle school students,
funded by DoDEA.
Agency Contact Information
• The Center for Science Education has the mission of
improving the quality of science, math, and technology
teaching and learning throughout Kansas, the region,
and the nation. In consideration of NGSS and CCSS,
the Center is preparing to expand its mission and reach.
Dr. Joan Ferrini-Mundy, Assistant Director, Education
and
Human
Resources
Directorate,
NSF,
[email protected]; Deborah S. Delisle, Assist. Secretary,
Office of Elementary and Secondary Education, U.S.
Department of Education, [email protected]
7.1
Troops to Teachers:
Recruiting and Supporting Preparing post-9/11 Veterans to Become K-12 Educators
• Our adult education graduate program is active at Ft.
Leavenworth and has awarded over 600 graduate
degrees to officers at the Command and General Staff
College in the past twenty-five years.
• Faculty and graduate students conduct research
related to timely topics in education; several recent
dissertations have addressed military and veterans’
issues, such as the impact of deployment on school
behavior, creativity and cognitive development in
military courses, effects of stress in the military
classroom, military faculty self-efficacy, and faculty
development at military colleges.
We have focused experience in working with
military- and former military-connected adult learners
and we have an award-winning teacher preparation
program. Therefore, K-State’s College of Education has
the potential to make a significant contribution to
remediating the shortage of teachers in Kansas and
across the country.
Background
The College of Education at Kansas State University is
committed to a military/veteran focus as part of our work.
The needs and strengths of military personnel, veterans
and their families have been systematically addressed by
the faculty of the College of Education, who educate
teachers, principals, superintendents, adult educators,
school counselors, special educators, postsecondary
advising and college student personnel services staff.
Our military initiative, ED-OPS, is a college-wide
program that has been in place for several years. The
focus of the initiative is military-connected learners at all
education levels, recognizing especially that veterans in
college face challenges in adjusting to a college culture
that differs greatly from the highly structured military
culture. Therefore, we are designing programs and
conducting research related to military-connected
learners.
• The college became one of the first 100 universities
to join Operation Educate the Educators, a nationwide
Joining Forces initiative that was given guiding
principles set forth by the American Association of
Colleges for Teacher Education and the Military Child
Education Coalition.
• The school counseling program has developed a
Certificate of Competence in Counseling Militaryconnected Students for school counselors and candidates
in counselor education graduate programs based on the
theoretical and research framework and best practices in
parent /family counseling and education strategies and
interventions.
• The Military Child Education Coalition awarded the
College of Education the 2014 LTG (Ret.) H.G. “Pete”
Taylor Higher Education Partnership of Excellence
award in recognition of our work with school partners in
educating military-connected students.
• A faculty-developed leadership-training program,
the Command Team Spouse Development Program—
Brigade, awarded the Malcolm Knowles Award for
Outstanding Program in Adult Education in 2010.
• The college produced a widely-disseminated
documentary, A Walk in My Shoes: Military Life
(http://coe.ksu.edu/about/military/militarylife.html) in
which seven people currently connected to the College
of Education – retired soldiers, spouses, a child and
educators – share their perspectives on the rewards and
challenges of being connected to the military. Topics
include the realities of deployments for the family and
the soldier, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and
the social/emotional needs of military-connected
children.
Description
The College of Education at Kansas State University has
the capacity and commitment to recruit, support and
prepare former military personnel to become K-12
teachers via our outstanding teacher preparation program.
A special emphasis is on science and math teachers, and
our current National Science Foundation funded
program provides fellowships for individuals with math
or science degrees to become teachers. We also have in
place a cooperative dual-degree for those interested in
concurrent math or science and education degrees.
Although these programs do not focus primarily on
former military personnel, they are actively recruited to
the programs. The college is seeking funds to develop a
full veteran-focused recruitment and teacher preparation
program that is designed specifically for former military
personnel who seek to become teachers.
Relevance
This initiative is aligned with the K-State and College of
Education commitment to serve military and their
families. In addition, these endeavors align with
K-State’s 2025 themes I - IV, and three of the College’s
2025 goals, one of which relates specifically to
engagement in issues, activities, and research related to
the military.
Agency Contact Information
U.S. Department of Education: Fund for the
Improvement of Postsecondary Education, Ralph
Hines, Director, [email protected]; Office of
Elementary and Secondary Education, Deborah Delisle,
Assist. Secretary and Department of Defense Education
Activity, [email protected]
7.2
Promoting Health through the Built Environment
Background
known as the "Baghdad boil"), malaria, memory loss,
migraines, sleep disorders and tuberculosis as potential
deployment health conditions the Iraq and Afghanistan
veterans may endure.
At no time in history has our world been faced with the
complexity and vast array of environmental and health
care problems, and yet been so connected to each other.
The intricate web of connection forges an imperative
responsibility to find solutions to many of the issues
propagated by industrialized nations. Conservation of
the environment and the stewardship of these resources
in the design of our communities and buildings is a
fundamental contribution to society and economic
development.
Relevance
The Pentagon's Defense and Veterans Brain Injury
Center reports having diagnosed 229,106 cases of mild
to severe traumatic brain injury from 2000 to the third
quarter of 2011, including both Iraq and Afghan vets.
These wounded veterans have special medical needs
that the civilian health care system is insufficiently
trained to handle. The growing number of returning
wounded, often with catastrophic injuries, tests the
health response of the Department of Defense (DoD)
facilities infrastructure. These wounded warriors not
only need assistance in healing physically, but also
need help in integrating back into the society they left
behind when they went to fight the war.
New knowledge is presented every day regarding the
fragile and delicate relationship between the natural
and designed environment with humans. Areas include
the sensory impact on early childhood development;
childhood obesity and obesity in general (at epidemic
proportions in this country); the influence of the
interior environment on musculoskeletal issues, indoor
air quality, productivity, and reduced absenteeism, each
are areas ripe with potential to impact individuals
through design.
Current work collaborates with wounded warriors,
medical staff from Fort Riley, and rehabilitation
specialists to investigate, propose, and initially evaluate
innovative solutions to the design of rehabilitation
facilities and their impact on the healing of wounded
warriors and their integration back into society.
Evidence-based design is raising the awareness of the
impact of design in all areas, and the opportunity to
contribute to the body of knowledge – in interior
architecture, product design, and furniture design – is
profound. With the pursuit of new knowledge come
new opportunities for fresh collaborative ventures and
exploration. As an example of evidence-based design
on designers’ access to quality information to affect
design, in a ten-year period (1998 – 2008), the number
of credible peer-reviewed articles regarding healthcare
design grew from 84 to over 1,200.
Agency Contact Information
Health Resources and Services Administration
Rebecca E. Desrocher, [email protected]
301-443-5934
Description
The war in the Middle East has caused much suffering
and pain for all parties involved, although the tragic
loss of life is not the only direct aftermath of these wars.
Bond (2012), notes that over the past decade of conflict,
tens of thousands of America’s wounded have been
injured in combat. The success stories of battlefield
medicine advances is the increased rate of survival
from injuries that in previous conflicts, resulted in
death. The survival rate for U.S. service members
wounded in Iraq has reached 90%, higher than in any
previous war. (p. 30). Given this large number of
survival rate, it is not surprising that these veterans
come back with severe injuries. Unfortunately, not
all injuries are visible or physical. The Department
of Veterans Affairs lists chronic fatigue syndrome,
depression, fibromyalgia, hearing difficulties,
hepatitis A, B and C, Leishmaniasis (also
7.3
Breaking the Barriers: Aging in Place
Background
situations) to remain in their home is the impetus of the
approach presented here and exemplified through the
research, design, prototyping, and testing of products
seamless to the home environment.
As the demographics of the United States and indeed
the world increasingly shift toward the elderly
population, a need to understand implications of the
built environment upon the quality of life of older
individuals and provide accessible and affordable
solutions exist. While strides toward increased
attention to the conditions designed in existing and new
congregate care, assisted living, and other specific
facilities aimed at housing those with decreased
functioning due to age or disease is on the rise;
affordable alterations to the inventory of current
housing for those same individuals with lower
economic means is relatively stagnant.
Relevance
Most people age 75+ have at least one joint affected by
arthritis. In 2003-2005, 50% of adults 65 years or older
reported an arthritis diagnosis and that percentage has
continued to rise. Women are impacted 2-3 times more
than men by Rheumatoid Arthritis. Most hearing loss
begins between 40-50 years. Over twenty-eight
percent of those individuals age 65 and older have a
measurable hearing impairment and by age 85, 50% of
individuals have a hearing impairment. One-in-two
women and one-in-eight men 50-plus years of age will
have an osteoporosis-related fracture.
Depth
perception begins to decline during the 50’s, and a 60year-old person may require 2 to 3 times as much light
as a 20 year old; with the amount of light required
doubling for each 13 years after the age of 20.
Description
Rather than expecting humans to adapt to their
environment, changing their behavior or actions due to
the fixed nature of the building housing them; this
project aims to redesign existing living environments
toward the needs of its aging inhabitants and allowing
effective aging-in-place measured through quality of
life and economic models.
While available alternatives of retirement housing,
independent living, congregate care, assisted living,
skilled nursing, specialized nursing facilities, and
nursing homes, are plentiful in many urban areas of the
country, many individuals and families prefer to agein-place within their existing community. Arthritis,
cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, hearing impairment,
mental disorders, muscular loss, neurological diseases,
osteoporosis and vision impairment are nine ailments
determined to impact the built environment for those
wishing to age-in-place, and which this project
mitigates through products and interventions.
Medical terminology can be confusing and
overwhelming to the general public. Initial steps of
comprehending the characteristics associated with each
aging ailment and translating medical literature
regarding ailments to design features implemented with
low cost has been accomplished. Building upon that
understanding and utilizing a trans-disciplinary model
of process, and including rapid prototyping, multiple
models of interventions can be envisioned, tested and
brought to fruition, creating an aesthetically-pleasing,
ailment-specific, safe living space. In the end, a few
well-designed changes can mean the difference
between residents staying put or forced to move to
special care facilities (and incurring the significant
impact to their personal financial condition and
subsequent need to employ Medicare financial
support).
Agency Contact Information
Health & Human Services: Administration for
Community Living; Administration on Aging
Greg Link, [email protected], 202-357-3545
Many adults wish to maintain their independence, often
in the homes in which they’ve lived for many years.
Social services and senior home care services are
available in most communities to support mature adults
aging in place. However, these familiar environments
themselves often create physical barriers for those
suffering from specific age-related ailments. To
overcome these barriers, design of the environment
to support and enable people as they age (whether
their choice stems from financial or personal
7.4
Developing Educational Leadership in K-12 Schools, Districts and 2-Year
Postsecondary Schools and Colleges
academic work. The KELI mission and model are
unique in the country.
Background
In an era dominated by higher standards and greater
accountability for America’s schools, the K-State
response is to prepare great leaders at all levels who
know how to implement change. The College of
Education (COE) at K-State is utilizing partnerships for
educational leadership development that will have wide
and lasting impact in Kansas and across the nation. The
programs and the activities in the College are lead by
the Department of Educational Leadership, which
includes preparation of K-12 school leaders as well as
faculty who specialize in adult education. This group
uses a partnership model for collaborating with schools
and other educational organizations to provide
leadership training that touches the lives of thousands
of learners and hundreds of schools. We believe that
partnering for a new generation of leaders produces
better results by focusing on the different leadership
needs associated with different community and school
contexts. This foundational premise accounts for the
success of current programs and informs the design of
future programs.
• COE has a long history of collaboration to provide
educational leadership opportunities at Fort
Leavenworth with the Command and General Staff
College (CGSC). The Adult Education Program has
awarded 787 graduate degrees in a cohort Master’s
program to officers at the CGTSC during their 25year history. The program has also awarded 10
doctorates to faculty and faculty developers at
CGSC.
• K-State faculty, graduate students and school
partners are collaborating on research that
demonstrates the efficacy of our school leadership
models and programs. More funding is being sought
to provide support for the extensive and rigorous
research and evaluation that is needed to promote
this K-State model into a nationally recognized and
adopted exemplary practice.
• Among the new avenues being considered for
educational leadership development in Kansas
include professional development and mentoring for
a new generation of 2-year and technical college
leaders based on the successful Academies and
KELI models.
• The education leadership graduate program is
actively seeking funds to enhance professional
development of school leaders in such topical areas
as computer science.
Description
The COE at K-State is creating models and
implementing
educational
and
professional
development activities to increase the number and
quality of educational leaders in Kansas schools at all
levels. These include:
• Educational Leadership Academies in Junction City
and other large school districts working with
economically and socially diverse populations have
provided graduate education and leadership
development opportunities for school principals
across the state. K-State’s academies have operated
since 1987 and have drawn national praise, having
prepared over 500 school leaders at principal and
superintendent levels.
• The Kansas Educational Leadership Institute
(KELI) emerged from collaborative planning by six
major Kansas professional entities interested in
developing and supporting leadership for Kansas
schools and districts in the 21st century. Partners in
this effort are: Kansas Association of School
Boards, Kansas State Department of Education,
Kansas School Superintendents Association,
Kansas Leadership Center, Kansas State University,
and United School Administrators. KELI supports
26 first year Kansas superintendents a year. These
superintendents participate in seminars, a mentoring
program,
and
leadership
coaching
and
Relevance
Preparing successful educational leadership is the
primary mission of the College’s Educational
Leadership Program and relates to the College’s 2025
plan, Themes III (provide quality graduate education
that prepares students for leadership), and IV, (increase
service to communities through systematic
engagement). These activities also relate to K-State
2025, Themes III and IV.
Contacts
U.S. Department of Education: Fund for the
Improvement of Postsecondary Education in the Office
of Postsecondary Education (Brenda Dann-Messier),
the Office of Career, Technical and Adult Education
(Brenda Dann-Messier) and the Office of Elementary
and
Secondary
Education
(Deb
Delisle,
[email protected]). The National Science Foundation,
Directorate of Education and Human Services (Joan
Ferrini-Mundi, [email protected]).
7.5
Prairie Studies Initiative
Background
plants in this small park and connects it with research
at Konza Prairie Biological Station and the work of
artists in the museum’s collection who have explored
the prairie. The museum hosts an annual PSI artscience residency titled Open AIR. Additional
programs have included film screenings, panel
discussions, workshops, and conference presentations.
Kansas State University is situated in the Flint Hills, an
eco-region that includes a majority of the remaining tall
grass prairie in the United States. The importance of
grassland as intact ecosystems is poorly understood,
except by experts; consequently grasslands are not
always properly stewarded. Grasslands provide many
crucial ecosystem services, including biodiversity and
provisions of drinking water. Grasslands support food
production livelihoods that have global importance:
ranching and farming. Unfortunately, less than four
percent of grasslands worldwide are protected; nearly
fifty percent of grassland ecosystems worldwide have
already been destroyed.
PSI will seek funding to provide fellowships for
faculty; organize symposia to share outcomes of
PSI; and fund a coordinator position. Currently
under development is a website that aims to serve as
a portal for prairie-related expertise and programs
in our region and at peer institutions.
K-State 2025 goals reaffirm the university’s land grant
commitment to be a center for teaching, research, and
service that benefit Kansans, the nation and world.
Because of the important role Kansas plays in global
food systems, fully understanding this place – the
tallgrass prairie and high plains of Kansas – is critical.
Meaningful dialogue between science and technical
fields on the one hand, and the arts and humanities on
the other is necessary if K-State is to incentivize
creative research and equip students to participate in
21st century democracy.
Relevance
PSI supports 2025 aims to make K-State the site of
world-class research and to provide scientific and
technical education enriched by critical thinking and
cultural awareness that distinguishes K-State from
other schools with technical and agricultural strengths.
Art and science each bring distinctive tools and
practices to research. Understanding how to employ the
full range of these tools can enhance the work of both
scientists and artists. Improved communication can
make research questions and discoveries meaningful to
wide audiences.
Description
The Prairie Studies Initiative (PSI) is a collaborative
venture of K-State faculty, staff, and students from a
range of disciplines. PSI creates incentives and support
structures for the study of the cultural and ecological
dimensions of the prairie, challenges to sustaining
grassland ecosystems, and visions for new futures for
these important landscapes and the people who live and
work in them. PSI does not fund research; it is still
incumbent on faculty and students to seek external
funding for their projects. But PSI offers support for
networking, workshops, fellowships and collaborations
to bring in presenters.
PSI highlights opportunities for international and
multicultural work. The grasslands of Central Asia,
Africa, South America, and Australia offer rich
possibilities for comparative studies and shared
discoveries. The changing demographics and cultural
profiles of regions in Kansas also call for the
perspective of place-focused studies. Place-based
teaching and research can reveal a 360 degree view of
the past, present, and potential future of a defined
region.
Agency Contact Information
National Science Foundation
Alphonse deSena
Advancing Informal STEM Learning Program Officer
(703) 292-5106, [email protected]
PSI meaningfully engages the arts/humanities with
explorations in science, technology, and engineering in
programs and projects that pair experts from diverse
fields of study. PSI programs enrich the intellectual life
of the campus by focusing on the meaning, identity, and
value of the Flint Hills eco-region. The Beach Museum
of Art serves as a locus for many of PSI’s public
offerings, with McCain Performing Arts as a frequent
collaborator. These university venues are designed to
welcome public audiences. PSI has developed a parklike native plant garden, The Meadow. A touch screen
table inside the museum provides information about the
National Endowment for the Humanities
Collaborative Research Area
(202) 606-8200, [email protected]
Institute of Museums and Library Services
Museums for America – Community Anchors
Steve Shwartzman, Sr. Program Officer
(202) 653-4641, [email protected]
7.6
Research on Culturally Responsive Teaching and Learning
Background
Kansas designated as Hispanic Serving Institutions
(HSI). This pipeline project promotes the recruitment,
retention and graduation of underrepresented
minorities in STEM. College faculty provide expertise
and professional development for their partners related
to culturally responsive practices in recruitment,
retention, and teaching. We are also engaged in
research related to these best practices.
• Commitment to and inclusion of culturally responsive
teaching and learning is demonstrated by research
conducted by faculty in all departments in the college.
Examples are:
• Bhattacharya, K. (2013). Performing gender as
“Third-World-Other’’
in
higher
education:
De/colonizing transnational feminist possibilities.
Creative Approaches to Research, 6(3), 30-47.
• Losinski, M., Cuenca-Carlion, Y., Zablocki, M.,
& Teagarden, J. (2014). Examining the efficacy of selfregulated strategy development for students with
emotional or behavioral disorders: A meta-analysis.
Behavioral Disorders, 40(1), 52-67.
• Craft, C. M., & Seley, J. (2014). Review of
“Intersections of Religious Privilege: Difficult
Dialogues and Student Affairs Practice.” Journal of
Student Affairs Research and Practice, 51(1), 98-100
• Herrera, S.G. (2010). Biography-driven culturally
responsive teaching. New York: Teachers College
Press.
• Herrera, S.G., Perez, D.R., & Escamilla, K. (2010).
Teaching reading to English language learners:
Differentiated literacies. Boston: Allyn & Bacon.
• Herrera, S.G., Kavimandan, S.K., & Holmes, M.A.
(2011). Crossing the vocabulary bridge: Differentiated
strategies for diverse secondary classrooms. New
York: Teachers College Press.
• Herrera, S.G., Cabral, R.M., & Murry, K.M.
(2013). Assessment accommodations for classroom
teachers of culturally and linguistically diverse
students (2nd ed.). Boston, MA: Allyn & Bacon.
The College of Education (COE) recognizes our
important and continuing work of preparing our
students for the increasingly “diverse and changing
world”. Significant work is being done in the college
that positions us as a national and international leader
in addressing culturally responsive teaching and
learning through our programs and our research. The
COE’s longstanding commitment to diversity can be
seen throughout the collective work of its departments,
centers, and programs since the early 1990s. Guiding
these initiatives is the College mission of "Preparing
educators to be knowledgeable, ethical, caring
decision makers in a diverse and changing world."
Description
The COE is creating educational programming and
conducting social science research related to
pedagogical practices that are culturally relevant and
are informed by the context of the learner and the
educator through a number of programs, projects and
research endeavors:
• The Midwest Equity Assistance Center (MEAC)
provides
technical
assistance,
professional
development and information about race, gender and
national origin equity to educational agencies in the
region and is the predominant regional source of best
practices for culturally responsive education. This
includes the new C4 Database that houses exemplary
lesson plans that integrate both the National Diversity
Standards and the Common Core Standards.
In collaboration with the Kansas Department of
Education, MEAC is working to review the
Accreditation System for bias and sensitivity related to
diversity.
• The Center for Intercultural and Multilingual
Advocacy (CIMA) implements programs and conducts
research that has national and international significance.
CIMA originated the BESITOS program model that
has supported 95 bilingual/bicultural students to
graduation and placement in ESL education. Of these,
35 have gone on to graduate school with 21 to date
completing and serving in Kansas. CIMA has
supported over 500 migrant students in obtaining
GED’s, and has served over 98 migrant students in
post-secondary education. Several CIMA programs
have won national and international awards. In addition,
CIMA researchers have produced highly ranked books
and peer-reviewed publications.
• The College is a partner in the Kansas Louis Stokes
Alliances for Minority Participation (LS-AMP)
funded by NSF. This award funds four colleges at
K-State who partner with community colleges in
Relevance
Our current and planned work in this area aligns with
tall Themes of the College’s 2025 plan as well as to the
mission of the College. These activities also relate to
K-State 2025, Themes I, II and III.
Agency Contact Information
U.S. Department of Education: Office of Elementary
and
Secondary
Education
(Deb
Delisle,
[email protected], 202-401-0113); Office of English
Language Acquisition (Libia S. Gil, [email protected],
202-453-6562).
7.7
Operations Research: Applied and Theoretical Advances across Multiple Sectors
challenges in the aftermath of a disaster. Disasters
highlight complications inherent in decentralized
supply chains, or those in which multiple stakeholders
take actions that impact the overall system. Proactive
supply chain engineering can prevent inefficiency,
redundancy, and missed opportunities. KSU
researchers are using advanced analytics to improve
efficiency and effectiveness in decentralized decision
environments.
Modeling stakeholder decisions regarding water
resource management: Water resource management is
a critical throughout the United States and particularly
in Kansas. Farmers, landowners, community members,
and policymakers each have a role in responsibly
utilizing water. Current work at KSU will lead to a
novel integrated human and natural systems model to
simulate the impact of water use policies, agricultural
and community decision-making, and ecosystems
dynamics on the overall water system.
Optimizing the design of high-speed railroad ties:
High-speed rail is a multi-billion dollar industry used
by numerous countries for passenger and freight
transport. As demand for this technology increases, the
need for improved railroad design also increases.
Current efforts at KSU involve use of operations
research models to inform design of rail ties that can
withstand the pressure of high-speed transport and be
manufactured in bulk for a reasonable cost.
Improving healthcare systems: Seventeen percent
of U.S. gross domestic product is spent on healthcare,
and opportunities abound to improve efficiency,
effectiveness, and equity. KSU researchers are
applying techniques such as data envelopment analysis
modeling, information systems modeling, and
mathematical optimization to design improvements for
complex health systems. To date, this work has
improved work flow in a local intensive care unit and
improved nurse and surgery scheduling processes.
Background
Grand challenges related to water, energy, security,
health, and food systems involve optimal allocation of
scarce resources, balance of multiple decision
objectives, and understanding of complex systems.
Operations research provides a quantitative framework
to confront these issues.
Description
Kansas State University (KSU) faculty are uniquely
qualified to address theoretical and applied research
questions that advance the discipline of operations
research and create solutions to urgent societal
challenges. This work is generating new scientific
knowledge in response to critical opportunities in one
or more of these three areas: (1) How can optimization
methods be more effectively integrated with methods
from social and natural sciences to make it possible to
understand complex systems holistically?; (2) How can
algorithms be designed to more effectively process data
or solve optimization problems that support decisionmaking?; and (3) How can these advances in modeling
and solution techniques be translated into decisionsupport frameworks that can be implemented in
practice?
Several current operations research projects
illustrate these overarching opportunities and the
potential for fundamental and practical impact:
Harnessing the decision-making power of big data:
The evolution of computers and communication
technology has produced an abundance of powerful
devices capable of unprecedented data capture.
Resulting data sets are massive but messy. KSU
researchers are developing methods to turn raw data
into relevant information for decision makers in
manufacturing, service, and health care industries.
Improving solution times for integer programs:
Integer programs are used to identify optimal decisions
and policies in sectors such as transportation, financial
services, healthcare, and government. However,
current methods are limited in their ability to solve
integer programs, even when using the most advanced
technology, which leaves decision makers with
suboptimal strategies. KSU researchers are discovering
novel techniques to solve integer programs by utilizing
graphs and hypergraphs. They are creating new cutting
planes, developing new branching procedures, and
generating polynomial time algorithms to lift variables,
all of which allow large integer programming problems
that arise in practice to be solved.
Measuring and mitigating the impact of
decentralized decision making in humanitarian
response systems: Government, military, private, and
nongovernmental organizations face immense
Relevance
Tools for optimal quantitative decision-making touch
every sector. In particular, new models, algorithms, and
decision-support frameworks contribute to state and
national key initiatives regarding water, health,
transportation, and food systems.
Agency Contact Information
NSF, Service Enterprise Systems, Diwakar Gupta,
Program Director, [email protected],
703.292.7902
NSF, Operations Research, Edwin Romeijn, Program
Director, [email protected], 703.292.2211
Dept. of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Engineering
Resource Center, Angela G. Beck, Contract Specialist,
[email protected], 605.347.2511
8.1
Center for Rural Transportation Research and Education
Background
environment. The Center has the following unique
facilities, services and programs to achieve its mission:
Civil Infrastructure Systems Lab, Annual Kansas
Transportation Engineering Conference, Traffic
Assistance Services for Kansas (highway safety
training programs), pavement laboratory technician
certification program (Superpave), Kansas Annual
Bridge Workshop, Center for Roundabout Research
and Education and a mobile Transportation Lab.
Since 1989, the College of Engineering has actively
participated in the Kansas Department of
Transportation (KDOT) Kansas Transportation
Research and New Developments Program (K-TRAN).
The K-TRAN program provides approximately
$400,000/year in state funds to support applied
transportation research projects involving faculty and
students from civil, mechanical, industrial, and
electrical engineering, as well as from economics,
sociology, and geology. KSU also has been the
contractor in many pooled funds programs in which
several state agencies combine their resources to fund
multi-year research projects of mutual interest. In
addition, the College of Engineering and the
Department of Civil Engineering have a long history of
excellence in creating and delivering technology
transfer programs for transportation and workforce
development, including specialty conferences, distance
education programs, workshops, and training courses.
In 2006, KSU was designated a Tier II University
Transportation Center (UTC) under the USDOT
Research and Innovation Technology Administration’s
(RITA) University Transportation Centers Program,
with funding of approximately $450,000 per year
through FY 2011. During the period 2005-2011, the
KSU UTC generated over $2.3M in new research
funding, awarded 42 scholarships, and provided
financial support for 42 GRA positions. Establishment
of the KSU UTC allowed consolidation of KSU’s
transportation-related research and technology transfer
programs to a single administrative unit. In addition,
establishment of the UTC allowed expansion of the
college’s transportation research program to include a
substantial
education
component,
including
scholarships, assistantships, and travel grants to attract
and retain highly qualified students. KSU will compete
for UTC funding in future grant solicitations from the
USDOT Office of the Assistant Secretary for Research
and Technology (OST-R). In the meantime, the Center
seeks additional/alternate funding to maintain KSU’s
current transportation research programs and to elevate
the transportation research program to national
prominence.
Relevance
The theme of the proposed Center for Rural
Transportation Research and Education is “Safety and
Sustainability of Rural Transportation Systems and
Infrastructure.” This theme and corresponding Center
expertise encapsulate three areas of concern widely
recognized as critical challenges facing the United
States: safety, sustainability, and infrastructure.
Funding is requested to allow KSU to expand its
influence and contributions in order to discover and
implement solutions to problems related to the safety
and sustainability of U.S. rural transportation systems
and infrastructure. In addition, the Center can provide
expertise to support other federally supported programs
and centers currently in place at KSU. For example,
transportation center expertise in transportation
network modeling and simulation, emergency
evacuation planning, and traffic control could be a
valuable asset for advancing KSU’s agricultural biosecurity programs. Other research focus areas will
include rural economic development, alternative
transportation project funding sources, use of
agricultural by-products in roadway paving materials,
and rural highway dust abatement programs.
Agency Contact Information
Office of Infrastructure Finance and Innovation
Office of the Secretary of Transportation
1200 New Jersey Ave, SE
Washington, DC 20590
202-366-0301
USDA Rural Development, Room 4801-S
Mail Stop 0705
1400 Independence Avenue SW
Washington, DC 20250-0705
202-720-4323
Description
Research, education, and technology transfer activities
of the Center will focus on identifying and deploying
rural transportation systems and infrastructure
innovations aimed at decreasing transportation project
delivery, enhancing transportation system safety,
promoting economic development, and protecting the
9.1
Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems Standards Validation
Background
currently restricted to only recreational, research, and
governmental functions. If the ASTM standards can
In February 2012, the FAA Modernization and
Reauthorization Act (FMRA) was passed by Congress
requiring the FAA to integrate Unmanned Aircraft
Systems (UAS) into the National Airspace System
(NAS) by September 2015. Successful integration of
UAS requires many technological and regulatory
hurdles to be addressed. One of these hurdles is
demonstrated airworthiness of unmanned systems to
operate in a congested airspace environment.
serve as a certification basis, then commercial UAS
operations ranging from precision agriculture to
pipeline inspection would be authorized by having an
aircraft with a FAA airworthiness certificate.
Additionally, the FAA is anticipating the release of a
Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) for a new
regulation covering sUAS soon with anticipated rules
for larger UAS airspace integration in the pipeline.
Future proposed rules may reference the industry
consensus standards developed by the ASTM F38
Committee as the approved aircraft design criteria.
However, the FAA will be unwilling to issue a Notice
of Availability (NOA) that cites the ASTM standards
unless those standards have first been validated by an
independent organization. The current research at KState Salina will provide this independent standards
verification.
On August 29, 2013, Kansas State University – Salina
signed a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) with the
FAA to validate the industry consensus standards for
small UAS (sUAS) – defined as aircraft weighing less
than 55 lbs. The validation of the industry consensus
standards developed by the ASTM F38 Committee on
Unmanned Aircarft Systems will demonstrate the
capability of these standards to address airworthiness
concerns for sUAS. This effort is titled as the sUAS
Standards Validation Project. This project is now in
phase 2, application and sequencing having
successfully completed phase 1- planning. We have
partnered with Wichita State University’s NIAR and
are working closely in pertnership. The FAA is pleased
with progress thus far thus our hope for further followon projects is high, the next being building a safety
plan.
Furthermore, it is expected that the sUAS Standards
Validation Project will identify portions of the ASTM
standards that are too robust, and therefore difficult to
comply with; or too weak and thus unlikely to ensure
an appropriate level of safety. The work at K-State
Salina will likely result in significant revision of the
internationally developed ASTM standards that will
effect a large existing and potential market.
Description
K-State Salina and the FAA are working together to
validate the industry consensus standards for sUAS by
applying for a restricted category airworthiness
certificate for an example sUAS using the ASTM
standards as the certification basis. This process
requires a detailed review of all documentation relating
to the aircraft design and equipment along with
justification for why the aircraft is safe to operate in the
NAS.
The FAA has expressed a desire, pending adequate
funding, for turning the sUAS Standards Validation
Project into a much larger scope effort that would begin
with a “clean sheet” aircraft design that is taken through
flight testing and ultimately certified as the first
commercially operable, non-military sUAS. However,
prevailing federal fiscal policy will dictate the future
growth in scope in this regard.
K-State Salina is working closely with the FAA’s UAS
Integration Office (D.C.) and the Small Airplane
Directorate (Kansas City) in reviewing and
determining the acceptability of the ASTM standards
for sUAS as a certification basis.
Agency Contact Information
Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)
James H. Williams
Manager, UAS Integration Office
490 L’Enfant Plaza, Suite 3200
Washington, DC 20024
(202) 385-4835
[email protected]
Relevance
The integration of UAS into the NAS is expected to
bring a multi-billion dollar market to life with new
opportunities for a myriad of commercial applications
of unmanned systems. Currently, the use of UAS is
9.2
Rail Infrastructure Durability and Sustainability
Background
including hot and cold temperatures, wet and dry
conditions, and varying sub-grade materials and
temperatures. Existing test infrastructure that has been
developed under current concrete railroad tie research
funding will be enhanced to create the the nations first
climate-controlled full-scale test chamber for railroad
track systems.
Railways are the backbone of our nation’s economic
system, allowing for swift, economical and fuel
efficient movement of agricultural products, coal, and
finished goods. Keeping freight moving requires
efficient train networking and reliable track systems.
Kansas State University has multi-disciplinary
expertise in railway track systems, and is investigating
methods of improving the safety and durability of
concrete railroad ties under current contracts with the
Federal Railroad Administration totaling over $3.2
Million. The KSU dapartments involved in this
research include Civil Engineering (CE), Mechanical
and Nuclear Engineering (MNE), and Industrial and
Manufacturing Systems Engineering (IMSE).
Durability of Railroad Ties Under Different Loadings.
Concrete railroad ties made with different reinforcing
materials have the potential to provide longer life,
increasing the sustainability of the railroad
infrastructure. Concrete ties with material-related
durability problems stemming from chemical reactions
between the aggregate and cement may also decrease
the service life of ties. Testing to determine the
reduction in service life in these ties will help determine
the interplay between material problems and loading.
Description
The overarching theme of this work has been
enhancing our understanding of how different materials
and fabrication processes interact to affect the railway
durability. Kansas State University has pioneered the
development of a laser-speckle imaging (LSI) device
that can be used in rugged environments. This patented
device has led to the development of a system for
imaging concrete railroad ties to determine if they are
properly stressed at the manufacturing plant to prevent
cracking and failure in track.
Deployment of Existing Laser-Speckle Technology.
KSU researchers will demonstrate the application of
the newly-developed LSI technology at concrete
railroad tie plants in the United States and assist with
the implementation of the technology in concrete tie
manufacturing plants for improved quality assurance.
This technology will allow for the optimal components
(concrete mixtures and prestressing reinforcement) to
be selected for maximum durability.
Researchers are also currently working on methods to
determine how the raw materials and manufacturing
processes affects durability in cold, wet climates found
in Kansas and northern climates. As such, KSU has
recently installed a large environmental chamber
dedicated to the investigation of full-sized concrete
railroad ties under freezing and thawing thermal cycles,
and is the only existing facility of its kind in the United
States.
Relevance National/Regional
Railways play an increasing role in our nation’s
economy, with sharp increases in rail traffic in recent
years. Heavy-haul and high-speed rail lines use
concrete railroad ties because in spite of their higher
initial cost, their increased durability. Improved
materials and test methods for railroad tie systems, and
development of reliable test procedures for new ties
and components, will help prevent derailments and
increase the lifespan of current railways.
The use of LSI techniques and full-scale freeze-thaw
testing of concrete railroad ties has positioned Kansas
State University at the forefront of railroad track
systems durability research. Under the proposed center,
these existing technologies will be leveraged and
deployed to improve the durability and sustainability of
the US rail infrastructure.
Agency Contact Information
Cameron Stuart
Federal Railroad Administration
[email protected]
(202) 493-6384
Funding for the Rail Infrastructure Durability and
Sustainability Center will have the following
objectives:
New Railway Infrastructure Environmental Test
chamber. Long-term durability of railroad ties under
repeated loads from heavy coal and other freight loads
should be tested under extreme weather conditions,
9.3
TITLE XII – USAID International Ag Development:
The Importance of Feed the Future Food Security Innovation Labs
• The Innovation Labs are tackling the world’s most
challenging agricultural development problems
and sharing scientific knowledge throughout the
developing world on issues such as productivity,
yield, climate resiliency, and human nutrition. To
remove dependency on development assistance it
is essential to train a workforce of well-educated
citizens to enable the transition to independent
economic growth.
Background
As of fall 2012, the USAID Collaborative Research
Support Programs (CRSPs) are now called Feed the
Future Food Security Innovation Labs (FTF SILs), as
part of the Feed the Future Food Security Innovation
Center (FSIC), under the amendment “Title XII Famine Prevention and Freedom From Hunger” to the
Foreign Assistance Act of 1961.
Description
Through Feed the Future, the U.S. Government
contributes to this global effort, working hand in hand
with partner countries to develop their agriculture
sectors and improve global food security. Putting
“whole-of-government” into practice, Feed the Future
draws on the agricultural, trade, investment, science,
development, and policy resources and expertise of
departments and agencies across the U.S. Government.
In just a few years, this U.S. Government initiative is
already delivering results that are helping reduce
poverty and hunger while also improving nutrition for
millions of children and families around the world.
The establishment of the Innovation Labs is creating
new partnerships between U.S. and developing-nation
universities across the globe with a focus on building
human and institutional capacity.
It is evident:
• No country can grow without educated leaders,
scientists, entrepreneurs, doctors, teachers, nurses,
engineers, and other high-skilled drivers of
economic growth. Lack of well-educated citizenry
is a major impediment to international
development; it undermines U.S. development
assistance efforts and makes private sector
engagement costly and difficult.
• Unfortunately, USAID investment in higher
education is significantly imbalanced with
similarly important investment in basic education.
APLU supports robust funding of education, both
basic and higher.
• A World Bank study shows the returns to higher
education investments are substantial.
Contrary to prevailing thought, the poorer the
country the greater the return on investment to
higher education. In fact, the poorest world region,
Sub-Saharan Africa, shows the highest rates of
return from investments in higher education at
21.9%, which is nearly double that for primary and
secondary education in the region.
• The Innovation Labs are a two-for-one investment.
They solve critical agricultural problems that
impact food security and poverty through research
conducted collaboratively between U.S. and
developing country students and scientists while
also building the developing country capacity to
solve their own problems in the future.
• More than 60 U.S. universities throughout the
nation are engaged in the Labs. This global
engagement increases the reach of U.S. research
institutions, creates linkages that facilitate U.S.
economic ties with developing countries and
fosters economic growth in developing countries
that benefits their economy and ours.
SUSTAINING PROGRESS
On September 18, 2014, members of both the U.S.
Senate and House of Representatives introduced
authorizing legislation to codify and strengthen US
AID’s Feed the Future’s comprehensive approach to
cultivating the transformative potential of agriculturesector growth.
The legislation codifies the U.S. Government’s
commitment to the productivity, incomes and
livelihoods of small-scale producers, particularly
women, by working across agricultural value chains
and expanding farmers’ access to local and
international markets. It strengthens the initiative’s
existing accountability mechanisms and establishes
parameters for robust Congressional oversight,
monitoring and evaluation of impact toward this
commitment.
Both bills call for a strategic approach emphasizing:
 Coordination through USAID, of a whole-of-U.S.Government approach that currently includes the
participation of 10 additional federal agencies
 A foundation in country strategies, ownership and
engagement
 The harnessing of science, technology and
innovation
 Leveraging of unique partnerships in development,
including private sector and research institutions
1

A focus on women’s economic empowerment and
nutrition
 An expansion in the capacity of local organizations
and institutions
 Resilience approaches to ensure that chronically
vulnerable populations are linked to market
systems so they can truly escape poverty
 Engagement in consultative processes with critical
external stakeholders, including civil society and
the private sector.
Relevance
Kansas State University is currently leading four
USAID Feed the Future Security Innovation Labs.
They are the:
1) Applied Wheat Genomics Innovation Lab
2) Reduction of Post-Harvest Loss Innovation Lab
3) Sorghum and Millet Innovation Lab, and the
4) Sustainable Intensification Innovation Lab.
Kansas State University is the only university in the
U.S. to have successfully competed for four of the new
innovation labs.
Kansas State University also will continue its work
with other existing and new USAID Feed the Future
Food Security Innovation Labs, as it continues its
leadership in global food systems.
Agency Contact Information
Robert B. Bertram
Director, Office of Agricultural Research and Policy
USAID Bureau for Food Security
[email protected]
1
National Plant Diagnostic Network
Background
There are over 40 million people on food assistance in
the U.S. Increased food costs resulting from
import/export disruptions will increase the number of
people requiring food assistance in the U.S. This will
lower the standard of living in the U.S. and impair our
ability to address the global food security challenge.
The National Plant Diagnostic Network (NPDN) is a
critical component of our national plant health
infrastructure and has become a model for universitygovernment-industry partnerships. Funded through the
Food and Agricultural Defense Initiative (FADI),
NPDN addresses national agricultural biosecurity
imperatives through enhanced detection and diagnostic
capability for new diseases and pests. The agricultural
and natural plant systems that we rely upon for food,
feed, fuel, timber and fiber are under increasing
pressures from a long list of biological invasions
associated with the massive imports of plants and plant
products into the U.S. These biological invasions
threaten both domestic production systems and our
agricultural export industries. NPDN operates in all 50
states and US territories through five regional centers,
and reports detections to the NPDN National Data
Repository. The U.S. is dependent upon exports to
stimulate an economic recovery. Plants and plant
products contribute one half to two thirds of U.S.
agricultural exports worth over $60 billion annually.
The European Union, Australia, and Canada are all
creating plant diagnostic networks based on the NPDN
model.
Relevance
NPDN is listed as critical infrastructure by USDA and
by the Department of Homeland Security. To protect
U.S. agriculture from the threats of bioterrorism and
from unintentional introductions, this infrastructure
must be strengthened. International phytosanitary
protocols, and ultimately policies, are transitioning to
advanced molecular-based detection and diagnostic
technologies. Protocols based on these more accurate
and sensitive technologies will require that plant
diagnostic labs that support trade are equipped with
these technologies and staffed by trained
diagnosticians. NPDN is an important partner with
APHIS Plant Protection and Quarantine in
safeguarding U.S. agriculture. Underfunding NPDN
jeopardizes the effectiveness of that partnership.
The Plant Diagnostic Information System (PDIS), a lab
management software system developed at KSU, is in
use in 30 states. K-State provides leadership for the
national exercise scenario program to facilitate
preparedness of local, state, and federal personnel in
outbreak management. Due to funding cuts, the
national exercise preparedness program is at risk. All
GPDN states have participated in K-State organized
training workshops on advanced diagnostic techniques,
first detector training, and secure communications.
Those essential programs have been dramatically
reduced.
Description
The reduced funding (40% cut) from USDA continues
to weaken NPDN. NPDN is one of three programs
funded through FADI. Administrative decisions at
USDA will see the animal diagnostic network
transition from a NIFA program to APHIS. We are
hopeful that the funding for FADI remain the same and
that support for NPDN and EDEN can then be restored
to pre-cut levels and increase in future.
Drastically reduced training and education programs
impair early detection of new and emerging pathogens
and pests. Aging diagnostic technologies compromise
the ability to employ the most sensitive and reliable
detection and diagnostic protocols in NPDN
laboratories. The USDA is investing tens of millions/
year to enhance plant biosecurity infrastructure in other
nations (our competitors), while funding for NPDN
remains at less than $3 million annually. The volume
of plants and plant product imports is so large that we
only inspect 1-2%; border inspection and interception
alone will not protect US agriculture. Without effective
plant biosecurity infrastructure for early detection and
accurate diagnostics to inform rapid and appropriate
response, both agricultural production and exports are
at risk.
K-State and GPDN continue to provide leadership in
setting a vision for the network. That leadership is
recognized as evidenced by many invitations to speak
at national and international meetings, including
Keynote presentations and Plenary Lectures at
International Meetings. Although significant advances
were made in enhanced diagnostic capability, we
remain deficient in our national detection capability.
Agency Contact Information
USDA NIFA
Marty Draper, 202-401-1990
2
USDA-ARS Ogallala Aquifer Program
Background/ Description
will result in balancing utilization and protection of
the Ogallala Aquifer.
Funding in the USDA-ARS budget for FY2016 is
requested for the Ogallala Aquifer Program. This
program is conducting research and outreach activities
to protect the Ogallala Aquifer and retain the economic
integrity of the Southern Great Plains region, including
the Texas High Plains, and portions of Oklahoma, New
Mexico, Kansas, and Colorado, all states that are
dependent on the survival of the Ogallala Aquifer.
Objectives
 Investigate and improve water management within
existing cropping systems.
 Develop and evaluate integrated crop and livestock
systems that reduce dependence on underground
water resources.
 Investigate designs, performance, and management
strategies for water conservation.
 Assess groundwater resources in the Ogallala
Aquifer and their relationships with climate.
 Enhance the knowledge base of producers, water
professionals, and policy makers.
 Develop and evaluate water-saving technologies
for concentrated animal feeding operations and
industries.
 Evaluate the implications of alternate water policy
options.
The Ogallala Aquifer in Western Kansas and the Texas
High Plains is declining at an unacceptable rate with
average depletion rates of 1 to 3 feet per year.
Agricultural irrigation use accounts for nearly 90
percent of the groundwater withdrawals in the region.
Water availability, cost, and policy, together with
technology development and adoption rates, will shape
the rural landscape in the coming decades. To ensure
the sustainability of rural communities in this region,
continued investments are needed in irrigation
management and agronomic research concerning water
use efficiency, improved hydrologic assessments of
water availability and sustainability, socioeconomic
considerations and wise public policy regarding water
rights, and public outreach engaging all stakeholders.
Funding for FY2016 will allow the partners to continue
developing innovative conservation measures for the
Ogallala Aquifer resource through a multi-state
university and federal program. The group will
develop, evaluate, and transfer technologies that will
allow efficient water utilization while conserving and
protecting the Ogallala Water Aquifer. The consortium
also will develop and establish the program as the
resource for data and knowledge in the development of
fair and effective water policy.
The Ogallala Aquifer has provided water for the
regional development of a highly significant
agricultural economy. Ninety percent of groundwater
withdrawals are used for irrigation. This region
produces about 4 percent of the nation’s corn, 25
percent of the hard red winter wheat, 23 percent of the
grain sorghum, 28 percent of the cotton and 42 percent
of the fed beef. Local grain production is used primarily
as feed grains for intensive beef, dairy, and swine
production. The Ogallala Aquifer is a finite resource
with aquifer recharge being much less than
withdrawals. Research into the complex nature of water
availability, uses, technological improvements, and
pricing will drive the discussions and decisions relative
to water policy.
Partners
USDA-Agricultural Research Service (lead agency)
Texas AgriLife Research
Texas AgriLife Extension Service
Kansas State University Research and Extension
West Texas A&M University
Texas Tech University
Agency Contact Information
Relevance National/Regional
USDA NIFA
CPRL USDA Ag Research Service
David Brauer, 806-356-5769
This initiative will:
 Develop, evaluate, and disseminate information and
technologies for water users that will result in
balancing economic, environmental, and social
concerns;
 Provide scientifically sound data and knowledge to
planners and policymakers to enable them to
develop effective water management policies that
3
NSF Long-Term Ecological Research Program at Konza Prairie
Contributing to the conservation and management of grasslands worldwide
Background and Description
NSF funding for the Konza Prairie LTER site
supports an interdisciplinary research program
with a long-term goal of building a
comprehensive understanding of ecological
processes in tallgrass prairie and other grasslands,
while contributing to broad synthetic and
conceptual advances in ecology. The Konza
LTER program also provides education and
training (K-12 to postgraduate), public outreach,
and knowledge to inform grassland management
and conservation. Our site-based research focuses
on the tallgrass prairies of Kansas, but cross-site
and comparative studies with other grasslands
extend the relevance of this research globally.
The Long Term Ecological Research (LTER)
program was created by the National Science
Foundation (NSF) in 1980 to support a network
of research sites to address critical ecological
questions that cannot be answered with more
typical short-term observations or experiments.
Funding is provided by NSF in the form of
renewable six-year grants, which are peerreviewed and renewed based on the quality of
science, research productivity and contributions
to network and synthesis activities. NSF conducts
rigorous reviews of LTER sites at the midpoint of
each grant cycle, as well as a comprehensive
review of the entire LTER Network every 10
years.
Konza Prairie LTER research is organized around
four major themes — land-use change, climatic
variability, altered biogeochemical cycles and
restoration ecology — and builds on a 30-year
foundation of long-term experiments and
measurements in terrestrial and aquatic grassland
ecosystems.
Konza
Prairie
Biological
Station
has
approximately 120 active registered research
projects by Kansas State University scientists in
five colleges and 14 departments as well as more
than 60 visiting scientists and students from other
research institutions across the U.S. and world.
Research conducted at Konza Prairie has resulted
in more than 1,450 publications and more than
220 student theses and dissertations.
Konza Prairie LTER funding also supports onsite K-12 activities, undergraduate and graduate
education and training, community outreach and
engagement with grassland managers and
conservationists. Collectively, LTER research
and associated cross-site and comparative studies
are contributing to improved management,
conservation and restoration of grasslands
globally.
Relevance
K-State’s Konza Prairie Biological Station is the
core research site for the Konza Prairie LTER
(KNZ) program. Konza Prairie, an 8,600 acre
native tallgrass prairie research station, is jointly
owned by Kansas State University and The
Nature Conservancy and managed by K-State’s
Division of Biology. Konza Prairie was one of the
initial LTER sites funded in 1980, and LTER
funding for the site was renewed in 2014 for the
next six years at a level of $6.76 million, bringing
total LTER funding for the program to more than
$29 million.
Agency Contact
National Science Foundation
Division of Environmental Biology (BIO/DEB)
Saran Twombly, Program Director
[email protected]
703-292-8133
4
National Animal Health Laboratory Network
Description
vanguard to protect America’s pre-harvest resources.
The NAHLN represents a cooperative effort between
two USDA agencies: APHIS and the National Institute
of Food and Agriculture (NIFA), and the American
Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians
(AAVLD). The NAHLN is a multifaceted network
comprised of sets of laboratories that focus on different
high-consequence diseases (primarily foreign animal
diseases), using common testing methods and software
platforms to process diagnostic requests and share
information.
The NABC at KSU was established to help protect the
U.S. agricultural infrastructure and economy from
endemic and emerging biological threats. Beginning in
2006, NABC entered into a strategic relationship with
the NAHLN for the development of training exercises
and operations software that provided a common and
secure frame of reference for NAHLN Laboratories in
disease outbreak response.
The National Animal Health Laboratory Network
[NAHLN] provides an automated high throughput
diagnostic protocol to facilitate rapid and accurate
examination of samples from diseases of importance
to food animal security. A major paradigm for the
success of a great nation is its ability to provide food
and water resources to its citizens. An essential
element in this process is the health and wellbeing of
our food animals, with NAHLN at the forefront of
diagnosing and preventing the spread of important
limitations to our food supply and our ability to
export food supplies to our global partners.
Kansas State University (KSU) has participated with
NAHLN in significant ways, including both the
Kansas State Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory
[KSVDL] and the National Agricultural Biosecurity
Center [NABC]. These include the development,
enhancement and delivery of targeted technical
training support programs, with: (1) exercises and
reviews of best practices from NAHLN labs; (2)
expanded animal health diagnostic screening
capabilities regionally; (3) increased testing
capacity of the KSVDL by conducting research on
new methodologies; and (4) development of training
strategy framework for NAHLN laboratories by
assessing lessons-learned.
Relevance
At the Federal level, USDA’s National Veterinary
Services Laboratories (NVSL) serves as the national
veterinary diagnostic reference and confirmatory
laboratory.
The State/University laboratories, such as KSVDL in
the NAHLN perform routine diagnostic testing for
endemic animal diseases as well as targeted
surveillance and response testing for foreign animal
diseases and other high-consequence diseases.
State/University laboratories also participate in the
development of new assay methodologies and are on
the frontline of detecting emerging diseases important
in animal and/or human health (zoonoses).
Networking these resources provides an extensive
infrastructure of facilities, equipment, and personnel
that are geographically accessible no matter where
disease strikes. The laboratories have the capability to
conduct nationwide surveillance testing for the early
detection of an animal disease outbreak. The ability to
test large numbers of samples rapidly during an
outbreak and then to demonstrate freedom from disease
after eradication is critical and requires enhanced
capacity nation wide.
Background
Homeland Security Presidential Directive – 9
(HSPD-9), Defense of United States Agriculture and
Food, states that America’s agricultural and food
sector is vital to our economy and is one of the key
underpinnings of national security and thus it must
be protected from disruption by natural, accidental,
or deliberate events. HSPD-9 also directed a number
of federal agencies to work together to provide a
unified strategy to protect our agriculture sector and
to improve coordination with and among the states.
More specifically, the directive states that these
agencies should “…develop nationwide laboratory
networks for food, veterinary, plant health, and water
quality that integrate existing Federal and State
laboratory resources, are interconnected, and utilize
standardized diagnostic protocols and procedures.”
Historically, the United States Department of
Agriculture (USDA) Animal and Plant Health
Inspection Service (APHIS) has served as the
Agency Contact
USDA-APHIS-VS-NVSL-NAHLN
Christina M. Loiacono, DVM, PhD, DACVP
[email protected]
5
National Canola Research Program - Great Plains Region
Background/Description
Relevance
Early demonstrations and production management
The National Canola Research Program is a competitive
research program, funded through the USDA-NIFA
Supplemental and Alternative Crops Grants Program.
studies with canola in the 1980s often failed because the
winter cultivars used were not well adapted. As a result,
Kansas State University began a canola breeding and
research program focused on developing cultivars
adapted specifically to the southern Great Plains. It is the
only public canola breeding program in the region.
Producers in the Great Plains need profitable and reliable
winter broadleaf crops that can be grown in rotation.
Canola is an alternative crop that can be used to enhance
winter wheat quality and yield. Kansas State University
research has shown increases between 18% and 51% in
wheat yield the first year following winter canola.
Additionally, growing canola in rotation reduces or
eliminates the need for tillage, decreases soil erosion,
improves water infiltration, and enhances sustainability.
Many wheat producers view rotation with winter canola
as a sustainable and effective method for managing hardto-control, grassy annual weed species. Thus, breeding
cultivars resistant to glyphosate herbicide will expand
rotation and non-selective weed control options.
Harvested wheat fields are one of the few areas open for
planting winter canola in the fall. However, 50% of
winter wheat acres in the region are treated with
sulfonylurea herbicides. Many of these herbicides have a
residual life of nearly two years and canola is extremely
sensitive to the carryover. Thus, Kansas State is breeding
cultivars tolerant to carryover from sulfonylurea
herbicides. Growing these cultivars will increase the
number of fields where canola can be produced.
A high-value market exists for the heart-healthy oil and
high-protein meal derived from canola seed. The USA
imports over 80% of the canola oil consumed
domestically. Production in the major spring canola
growing areas has nearly peaked because of competition
with other crops. Therefore, more winter canola must be
grown to meet U.S. demand. As a result, winter canola
planted acres have increased substantially in the Great
Plains. Total planted acres in the region have exceeded
250,000 in the past three cropping seasons. Federal crop
insurance is available and regional seed crushing
facilities provide end markets. More adapted cultivars
are needed to increase production to meet demand.
Seven adapted cultivars have been released by the
breeding program since 2010. ‘Riley’ possesses a total
oil content that is 40%. It is estimated that increasing oil
content of U.S. cultivars by just 1% would be worth an
additional $5 million per year. ‘Griffin’ is the first
cultivar that will be marketed as dual-purpose for forage
and grain production. The program released four
glyphosate tolerant cultivars in 2013 and 2014.
The long-term goal of this multi-state, multidisciplinary
project is to facilitate the adoption of winter canola as a
viable rotation crop in the southern Great Plains. To
promote acreage and production increases in the region,
the project will focus on the high priority areas of
development and testing of superior cultivars, improved
methods of production, and transfer of new knowledge
to producers. The objectives of the project are: 1)
Develop and evaluate high-yielding, regionally adapted
winter canola cultivars. Priority traits include: winter
survival, tolerance to sulfonylurea herbicide carryover,
tolerance to post-emergence applications of glyphosate
herbicide, yield potential, quality of the grain and
extracted oil, blackleg disease and pest resistance, and
forage quality. 2) Improve canola cropping systems by
addressing agronomic management issues. Production
studies will address: crop establishment, simulated
grazing of forage, crop rotation, nutrient balance and
management, harvest management, on-farm testing, and
crop modeling. 3) Extend production and marketing
technologies through extension and outreach programs.
Methods of delivery may include field days, field tours,
risk management schools, extension and journal
publications, professional society meetings, radio and
television, and social media.
Most states do not have statewide canola cultivar testing
programs and few researchers focus on winter canola.
Thus, regional variety testing and agronomic trials are an
important component of this project. The National
Winter Canola Variety Trial (NWCVT) is also
coordinated by Kansas State and this trial is planted at 51
locations in 19 states. NWCVT data facilitates the release
of new cultivars in areas where they can be profitably
marketed. Coordination of the NWCVT demonstrates a
strong ability to manage a collaborative program with
national impact.
Partners - Through the National Canola Research
Program, Kansas State cooperates with four universities
in the Great Plains region and 20 others nationally. Many
commercial and experimental cultivars are evaluated for
domestic and international enterprises.
Agency Contact Information
USDA NIFA – Ann Marie Thro, 202-401-6702
6
USDA-ARS Center for Grain and Animal Health Research
(CGAHR)
Protecting swine from foreign diseases
Relevance:
Description:
o The US produces 31 million tons of pork annually,
valued at more than $14 billion. Exotic diseases of
swine threaten domestic production as well as an
important export market. These funds are needed to
increase research efforts on African Swine Fever
and other exotic swine diseases.
The Arthropod-Borne Animal Disease Research Unit
(ABADRU), in the Center for Grain and Animal Health
Research, is conducting research on animal diseases
including Rift Valley Fever, Vesicular Stomatitis, and
Blue Tongue that threaten US livestock. Collaborative
research including Kansas State University (KSU)
scientists in the Colleges of Agriculture and Veterinary
Medicine has recently been initiated on several swine
diseases including African Swine Fever, Japanese
encephalitis and Classical Swine Fever that pose a
serious risk to producers and the entire industry
because of the trade impacts that outbreaks could cause
if these diseases are introduced into the US. This
initiative will strengthen on-going research to develop
diagnostic and control measures for these diseases. In
addition, several critical research gaps will be
addressed including determining the potential North
American arthropod vectors and the host-vectorparasite relationships involved in arbovirus
transmission to swine, and the understanding the
epidemiology and progression of both diseases. There
is critical need to strengthen the vector biology
component of this research.
o With these funds ABADRU and its KSU partners
will:
 Evaluate the competence of potential native
arthropod vectors to transmit disease to
domestic and feral swine, and determine their
possible role should the disease be introduced
to the US.
 Determine the important geographic,
climatological, and ecological factors that
could influence the establishment and spread
of this disease.
 Develop and evaluate disease diagnostic,
surveillance and control measures to protect
US swine from this disease.
Agency Contact: USDA-ARS Center for Grain and
Animal Health Research (CGAHR)
Arthropod-Borne Animal Disease Research Unit,
Manhattan, KS
The requested funds ($2 mill. permanent increase to
base funds) will be used to hire two scientists in
ABADRU along with support staff to conduct this
research.
Agency Director:
Dr. Tom Herald
[email protected]
7
Wheat Quality and Competitiveness
Description:
o The HWWQL and Engineering need program
funds to support the development of:
 Rapid assessment of wheat quality to more
accurately predicts protein, starch, processing
and end-product quality.
 Rapid, accurate and non-destructive evaluation
on a single kernel basis, of color, hardness,
protein and starch quality.
 Novel end-use qualities and trait combinations
using molecular and conventional biochemical
approaches.
The Hard Winter Wheat Quality Laboratory
(HWWQL), part of the Grain Quality and Structure
Research Unit, serves the largest growing region of the
four USDA-ARS Wheat Quality Laboratories and
provides leadership, expertise and service to the U.S.
industry for improving quality and marketability of
hard winter wheat (HWW).
The Engineering component within the Stored Product
Insect and Engineering Research Unit (SPIERU) has
responsibility to develop new technology for
measuring, selecting and predicting wheat quality.
These programs have suffered from long-term decline
in funding, staffing, and antiquated equipment.
The National Wheat Improvement Committee,
National Association of Wheat Growers, North
American Millers’ Association, and US Wheat
Associates strongly recommend additional funding for
a multidisciplinary initiative to improve wheat quality
and competitiveness, and security in our domestic and
export markets. To successfully compete in the world
wheat market, U.S. wheat must have superior end-use
qualities and offer exceptional value to millers and
bakers. This initiative would support the HWWQL and
its national mandate to conduct research and provide
support for the entire wheat industry, including
breeders, growers, millers, bakers, and exporters.
Immediate action must be taken to provide adequate
funding and resources, or research critical to the
economic health of the US wheat industry will be
curtailed.
The requested funds will be used to increase
program funds to both HWWQL and Engineering
component of SPIERU ($650,000 permanent
increase to base funds for each program).
Relevance:
Agency contact: USDA-ARS Center for Grain and
o The Hard Winter Wheat Quality Laboratory was
established by Congress in 1937 to determine the
end-use quality of experimental wheat lines. The
HWWQL evaluates 100% of the hard winter wheat
commercially released in the US that is used in a $70
billion bakery and snack food industries. A similar
volume of HWW is exported.
Animal Health Research (CGAHR)
Grain Quality and Structure Research Unit and Stored
Product Insect and Engineering Research Unit,
Manhattan, KS
Agency Director:
Dr. Tom Herald
[email protected]
7
Development of Heat and Drought Resilient Wheat
Description:
To achieve these objectives, the following new USDAARS positions are needed:
1) Category
1
Research
Plant
Physiologist/Biochemist
2) Category 1 Research Plant Molecular Biologist
3) Category 3 Support Scientist
In Kansas and neighboring states, heat stress cuts
average wheat yields in half and significantly reduces
grain quality. Heat stress also dramatically reduces
water use efficiency, especially in irrigated wheat. In
rainfed systems, drought stress is typically the most
important yield constraint. If predictions of climate
change and aquifer depletion are realized, the
challenges from heat and drought will become even
greater in the future. Unfortunately, breeding for
tolerance to heat and drought stress is difficult. New
research investment is urgently needed to accelerate
efforts to improve wheat resilience to heat and drought
stress.
The requested addition to permanent base funds for
salaries, materials, supplies, and equipment, as well as
overhead, is $1,100,000.
Justification:
 Tolerance to heat stress is the single most
important genetic improvement that is needed for
wheat worldwide.
 Tolerance to drought stress is the second most
potentially useful trait in the Great Plains.
 Expected outputs include: 1) high throughput
stress tolerance screening methods; 2) biomarkers
or reporter genes for measuring stress responses;
3) new elite germplasm lines with enhanced
conventional stress tolerance; 4) locations, effects,
and DNA markers for genes that are involved in
conventional stress tolerance; 5) identification of
physiological or biochemical constraints and
yield-limiting factors under heat or drought stress;
6 ) understanding of the composition and
dynamics of stress-responsive gene regulatory
networks; 7) new models, strategies, and testable
hypotheses for abiotic stress tolerance; and 8)
invention of novel stress-resilient transgenic
wheat lines.
An aggressive, comprehensive program is required that
uses both conventional and biotechnological
approaches for germplasm enhancement and
fundamental studies on stress tolerance. The program
will leverage existing USDA-ARS and KSU personnel
who have expertise in wheat genetics, high throughput
genotyping, whole plant stress physiology, and field
plot-level physiology. This expertise must be
complemented by additional personnel with expertise
in the cellular-level physiology, biochemistry, and
molecular biology of stress tolerance.
Research objectives include: 1) develop improved
laboratory and field screening techniques for heat and
drought tolerance; 2) identify wheat lines or wheat wild
relatives with stress tolerance and introgress into elite
germplasm lines; 3) map and characterize genes
involved in conventional tolerance to heat and drought;
4) characterize biochemical mechanisms and
regulatory pathways that control heat and drought
stress susceptibility or tolerance; 5) identify novel
molecular targets and innovative strategies for
enhancing stress tolerance, and 6) develop transgenic
wheat plants to test new hypotheses and strategies for
increasing abiotic stress tolerance.
KSU contacts: Dr. Gary Pierzynski, Head,
Department of Agronomy; Dr. J. Ernest (Ernie)
Minton, Associate Director of Research, College of
Agriculture
USDA contact: Dr. Robert Bowden, Research
Leader, Hard Winter Wheat Genetics Research Unit,
USDA-ARS Center for Grain and Animal Health
Research (CGAHR)
7
Hessian Fly Research
Description:
screening for resistance services to all public and
private wheat breeding programs in the hard
winter wheat region.
 Increased capacity to screen germplasm and
develop resistant wheat varieties are needed
to support regional breeding efforts.
 The search for more durable resistance
requires investment in basic research to
determine molecular mechanisms for insect
virulence and host plant resistance.
o The Hessian fly project is under-funded in relation
to the mission that it fulfills.
The Hard Winter Wheat Genetics Research Unit, in the
Center for Grain and Animal Health Research, in close
cooperation with Kansas State University (KSU),
conducts research to control the Hessian Fly. This pest
attacks wheat across the US and is especially prevalent
in the Southern Great Plains. It is typically found in
70% of wheat fields in Kansas, Oklahoma and north
Texas. Most older, resistant varieties have been
defeated by new biotypes of the Hessian fly.
New genetic sources of resistance and rapid, effective
screening methods are needed to achieve more durable
resistance. Also needed is a greater understanding of
the mechanistic basis of insect virulence and host
resistance. New sources of resistance and knowledge of
this pest are critical to protecting US wheat producers.
The National Wheat Improvement Committee,
National Association of Wheat Growers, and US
Wheat Associates strongly recommend additional
funding for this initiative to improve Hessian Fly
resistance in wheat.
The requested funds ($250,000 permanent increase to
base funds) will be used to expedite research on this
high priority constraint.
Agency contact: USDA-ARS Center for Grain and
Animal Health Research (CGAHR)
Hard Winter Wheat Genetics Research Unit,
Manhattan, KS
Justification:
o Hessian fly is becoming a more important
problem. The resurgence of the Hessian fly can be
attributed to increasing adoption of reduced tillage
management practices, increased insect virulence,
and warmer fall and winter weather. In the
Southern Great Plains only 2 of 22 resistance
genes are continuing to provide resistance to the
Hessian fly. New resistance genes are urgently
needed.
o The Hessian fly project at Manhattan currently
provides resistant germplasm sources and
KSU contacts: Dr. Gary Pierzynski, Head,
Department of Agronomy; Dr. J. Ernest (Ernie)
Minton, Associate Director of Research, College of
Agriculture
USDA contact: Dr. Robert Bowden, Research
Leader, Hard Winter Wheat Genetics Research Unit,
USDA-ARS Center for Grain and Animal Health
Research (CGAHR)
7
NSF National Ecological Observatory Network
Background and Description
The National Ecological Observatory Network
(NEON) is a continental-scale ecological
observation facility sponsored by the National
Science Foundation to gather and synthesize data
on the nation’s natural resources and biodiversity.
When completed, it will consist of state-of-the-art
environmental sensors and standardized research
equipment and sampling protocols at sites across
the U.S. (including Alaska, Hawaii and Puerto
Rico) strategically selected to represent different
ecosystem types, land-uses, and climates.
NEON moved through the concept, approval and
design stage from 2006 through 2012. NEON
funding has been approved by congress, and
NEON sites are currently being developed and
instrumented. At the Kansas sites, construction of
instrument towers and sensor arrays began in
2014. NSF expects that all NEON sites will be
fully operational by 2017, and that the core sites
will collect data for at least 30 years.
NEON will combine site-based measurements
with airborne remote sensing and other
continental-scale data sets (e.g., satellite data) to
document the health of the nation’s ecosystems
and to assess changes in those ecosystems
through time. Sensor networks, instrumentation,
experimental infrastructure, natural history
archives, and remote sensing will be coupled
linked with computational, analytical, and
modeling capabilities to create an integrated
NEON infrastructure. In this way, NEON will
transform biological research by enabling studies
on major environmental challenges at regional to
continental scales.
Continued funding for NEON will bring new
state-of-the art equipment to biological field
stations in Kansas and provide unique research
capabilities for researchers and students at KState and elsewhere. The co-location of NEON
infrastructure and the Konza LTER program also
will provide unique research and training
opportunities for students and scientists at
institutions throughout Kansas and beyond. We
expect that this will facilitate additional research
funding built around NEON and LTER
capabilities and data availability, and this will
help in attracting the nation’s top ecological
scientists and students to Kansas.
Relevance
Agency Contact
NEON sites are distributed across 20 large
regions (eco-climatic domains), with each region
having a “core” terrestrial and aquatic site and
two additional sites that represent contrasting
environmental conditions or different land-uses.
For the Prairie Peninsula region, the core
terrestrial and aquatic sites are located at KState’s Konza Prairie Biological Station, and an
additional relocatable site is located at the
University of Kansas field station. The two
Kansas sites are the only NEON sites in the
multistate Prairie Peninsula region.
National Science Foundation
Division of Environmental Biology (BIO/DEB)
Elizabeth “Liz” Blood, NEON Program Director
[email protected]
703-292-8400
8
A۰P۰L۰U / FY 2016 APPROPRIATIONS REQUEST / NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE
Overview of F Y 2016 Request
America’s land-grant universities and related institutions provide much of the research, education, and public outreach that
sustains U.S. food, fiber, and renewable fuel production while addressing many urgent and important local, regional, national, and
global problems.
Financial support for this world-renowned enterprise comes
from both public and private sources, but the most significant
funding source is the federal-state partnership managed by the
National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA)—USDA’s extramural science agency — and funded by NIFA and state and local governments.
As shown in Table 1, the Association of Public and Landgrant Universities supports AFRI funding at $450 million. We
also support funding for the six capacity priorities that support
research, education, and extension efforts at America’s landgrant universities and related institutions at the levels contained
in Table 1.
TABLE 1. CORE NIFA PRIORITIES
Agriculture and Food Research Initiative
F Y 2016
$450.000 M+
Smith-Lever 3(b)-(c)
304.000 M+
Hatch Act
256.201 M+
Evans-Allen
60.500 M+
competitive grant program within NIFA. We have - and con-
1890 Institutions Extension
49.350 M+
tinue to - aggressively endorse additional funding for this pro-
McIntire-Stennis Cooperative Forestry
35.500 M+
gram. As shown in table 1, we request fiscal year 2016 funding
1994 Institutions Research and Extension
The Agriculture and Food Research Initiative is the flagship
for this program at $450 million. Meanwhile, the Smith-Lever,
Hatch, McIntire-Stennis, Evans-Allen and 1890’s Extension
programs are the foundation on which America’s Land-grants
meet the critical challenges of today and tomorrow. This predictable source of funding is vital to deliver extension education
and sustain the basic and translational research at land-grant institutions. As such, we oppose the FY 2016 budget proposal to
change the law and make a portion of several of these funds
competitive.
We urge Congress to continue to make overall NIFA funding
a high priority and specifically request funding for the six capacity programs that support research, education, and extension
efforts at America’s land-grant universities and related institutions at the levels also outlined in Table 1.
For more information and updated documents, visit:
http://land-grant.org/appropriations_docs.html
For additional information, please email Hunt Shipman
( [email protected] ) or Jim Richards
( [email protected] ). Phone: 202.448.9500
ASSOCIATION OF PUBLIC AND LAND-GRANT UNIVERSITIES (2015)
A۰P۰L۰U represents 230 public research universities, land-grant institutions, state university systems, and related organizations.
9.247 M+
A۰P۰L۰U / FY 2016 APPROPRIATIONS REQUEST / NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURE
Feeding 9.6 Billion by 2050
The U.S. Census Bureau maintains digital clocks which display net
population growth both domestically and worldwide. Those clocks show
a net gain of one person in the United States every 15 seconds and another person worldwide about every half second.
To put this in perspective, if the world population clock were an
automobile odometer, the car would be hurtling along at a velocity of
≈7,200 miles per hour or roughly Mach 9.4!
At present rates, the global population will reach 9.6 billion by 2050
and experts believe that agricultural productivity must double from current
www.census.gov/popclock
Feb. 9, 2015 - 6:30 PM (UTC)
Sources of Growth in Agricultural Output: Low Income Countries
1961-2011
levels to feed a global population of that magnitude. One private-sector
group that has been out front on this issue is Global Harvest Initiative
(GHI).
Each year GHI publishes a Global Agricultural Productivity (GAP)
Report® “to mark the progress made toward sustainably doubling agricultural output to meet the 2050 demand for food, fiber, fuel, and other
industrial products derived from agriculture.” This annual report also
“highlights key policies required to encourage more investment and innovation, and to build efficient, sustainable agricultural value chains.”
We believe that GHI’s 2014 GAP Report® could help inform the
congressional debate over funding for the National Institute of Food and
Agriculture and is worth reading in its entirety. We would highlight the
following key policy recommendation:
Investment in agricultural research and development (R&D) is
a principal driver of agricultural productivity growth… The private
sector is a growing source of R&D funding, but greater public-sector investment is critical for innovation, basic research and making
research findings and technologies widely available. Integrative research brings together multi-disciplinary teams of scientists from the
government, academia, and the private sector to create synergies, accelerate progress, and improve cost effectiveness. New technologies
must then be adapted to meet local needs and conditions so the benefits of these innovations are extended to farmers and producers across
the value chain. The extension and commercialization of these new
technologies should be pursued through collaborative public-private
partnerships. Investments in agricultural R&D make significant contributions to sustained growth in agricultural productivity, alleviating
poverty and improving food security. [Emphasis added.]
QUICK LINKS:
■■ www.globalharvestinitiative.com
■■ GHI 2014 GAP Report: http://www.globalharvestinitiative.org/GAP/2014_
Sources of Growth in Agricultural Output: High Income Countries
1961-2011
Reprinted from GHI’s 2014 GAP Report, ® these two charts
demonstrate the profound difference that total factor productivity
(TFP) has made in the developed world over the past 50 years.
“Total factor productivity is the ratio of agricultural outputs
(gross crop and livestock output) to inputs (land, labor, fertilizer,
machinery and livestock). When TFP rises, more output can be
produced from a fixed amount of inputs. TFP growth can result
from increased effectiveness of inputs, more precise use of inputs,
or the adoption of improved production practices.”
GAP_Report.pdf
ASSOCIATION OF PUBLIC AND LAND-GRANT UNIVERSITIES (2015)
A۰P۰L۰U represents 230 public research universities, land-grant institutions, state university systems, and related organizations.
College of Veterinary Medicine/Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges
Background
more and faster global travel and displaced human and
animal populations, leading to rapid and wide dispersal
of infectious diseases; and changing human behavior,
such as consuming exotic foods and keeping exotic
pets, which increases the risk of exposure to newly
emerging infectious diseases.
Veterinary medicine is an integral and indispensable
component of our public health system as well as our
agriculture and agricultural biosecurity systems. In
addition to their obvious role in maintaining animal
health, veterinarians also protect human health by
preventing and controlling infectious diseases,
ensuring the safety and security of our food supply,
promoting healthy environments, and providing health
care for animals. Because of the threat that infectious
diseases pose to both human and animal health, there is
an immediate and urgent need to build national
capacity in training of veterinarians with expertise in
food animal medicine, public health and agricultural
biosecurity. Rural veterinarians, engaged in food
animal practice, are our nation’s first line of defense in
recognizing a foreign animal disease. It has become
increasingly important for schools and colleges of
veterinary medicine to provide high quality training
programs in agricultural biosecurity, within the
instructional program for veterinary medical students,
and at a higher level, for graduate veterinarians who
seek advanced training in agricultural biosecurity.
Such additional instructional programs are difficult to
implement within the severe constraints of veterinary
medical schools and colleges, placing a premium on
programs that can assist the educational institutions in
meeting a greatly expanded national need.
To be successful, programs that seek to recruit and
retain veterinarians in careers in food animal practice,
public health and agricultural biosecurity must compete
effectively with programs recruiting veterinarians to
many other career options. A new graduate from an
accredited U.S. veterinary medical school or college
typically enters the profession with over $160,000 of
educational debt load. Consequently, graduates very
logically examine the salary expectations, both at entry
and over the long term, of a potential career choice,
recognizing their need to repay their student loans even
as they seek to establish a family and maintain a
reasonable life style. With such financial pressures and
analyses, a career in food animal practice and
agricultural biosecurity often pales in comparison to the
salary potential of other, more lucrative career options.
Consequently, measures to relieve a significant portion
of debt load, contingent upon entering and remaining in
a career in food animal practice and agricultural
biosecurity, are very important for the recruitment and
retention of veterinarians to this area of national need.
There are only 30 veterinary medical colleges in the
country, and they do not have enough capacity to meet
all of these needs. All of these schools are at the
maximum number of students they can accept due to
space limitations for teaching, diagnostics, and
research. Laboratories, teaching hospitals, veterinary
research facilities, and animal diagnostic areas are built
specifically for use with animals including laboratory
animals, livestock species, and wildlife. This is space
built with unique safety, restraint, and handling
requirements that are not commonly found on
American campuses.
The support of effective strategies to recruit and retain
an adequate number of veterinarians in food animal
practice, and to facilitate their training in agricultural
biosecurity, are key elements in maintaining the
security of our food supply and of our agricultural
economy.
Measures to facilitate the recruitment and retention of
veterinarians in food animal practice, while
simultaneously expanding the training of veterinarians
in agricultural biosecurity are keys to maintaining the
security of animal agriculture, our agricultural
economy, and our food supply.
In addition to the projected need based on current
assumptions about veterinary medicine, even more
veterinarians will be needed due to other factors such
as greater encroachment on animal habitat, resulting in
increased human interaction with wild and exotic
animals; changing climates and ecosystems,
deforestation, dam building and irrigation, leading to
greater numbers of arthropod vectors of disease and
greater contact between these vectors and humans;
Description
The Agriculture Act of 2014 (PL 113-79) contained
provisions important to veterinary medicine. Section
7104 established a competitive veterinary services
grant program to develop, implement, and sustain
veterinary services. Authorized at $10 million
annually, this section would amend the National
2
Relevance
Agricultural Research, Extension and Teaching Policy
Act of 1977 to direct the Secretary of Agriculture
(USDA) to carry out a program with qualified entities
to develop, implement and sustain veterinary services
in the states. This grant would allow recipients to: a)
establish or expand veterinary practices or establish
mobile veterinary facilities, b) recruit veterinarians,
technicians, and students, c) attend training programs
in food safety or food animal medicine, d) establish or
expand accredited education, internship, residency and
fellowship programs, e) assess veterinarian shortage
situations, and f) support continuing education and
extension, including tele-veterinary medicine and other
distance-based education.
Agriculture, and specifically animal agriculture, is vital
to the Kansas economy. Training, recruiting, and
retaining enough veterinarians to meet the needs of
agriculture and of agricultural biosecurity are important
concerns of agriculture and related organizations. They
are also natural issues of concern to the College of
Veterinary Medicine at Kansas State University, one of
only 30 such schools in the United States. As one of
only 27 states with a College of Veterinary Medicine,
Kansas would clearly benefit by increased federal
investment in the training of veterinarians in
agricultural biosecurity and food animal practice, as
well as in their subsequent recruitment and retention.
The proposed federal investment would augment, not
replace or diminish the importance of funding from the
state of Kansas. It will, however, multiply the impact
of state funds and enhance the ability of Kansas State
University and the College of Veterinary Medicine to
meet the needs of the state and nation.
Leaders from the Kansas Congressional delegation
have lent their support to these important legislative
efforts.
The Veterinary Medicine Loan Repayment Program
(VMLRP) Enhancement Act would amend the Internal
Revenue Code to make VMLRP awards exempt from
gross income and employment taxes. Awards are
currently taxed at 39% although those taxes are paid by
USDA directly to the treasury on behalf of the award
recipient. Tax exemption for VMLRP awards would
result in one additional veterinarian for every three
based on current appropriations.
Agency Contact Information
Support is requested for: 1) Provisions of the
Agriculture Act of 2014 (PL 113-79) important to the
veterinary profession, namely the Animal Health and
Disease Research/1433 Formula Funds; Centers of
Excellence, Food Animal Residue Avoidance
Databank (FARAD), and the Competitive, Special and
Facilities Research Grant Act, as well as the new
authority for a the Veterinary Services Grant Program
(VSGP) to develop, implement, and sustain veterinary
services 2) tax exemption for awards made under the
Veterinary Medicine Loan Repayment Program
(VMLRP), and 3) passage of appropriations legislation
that maintains or increases funding for the VMLRP,
Animal Health and Disease Research/1433 Formula
Funds, Agriculture and Food Research Initiative,
FARAD, the VSGP, the National Animal Health
Laboratory Network (NAHLN) as well as for the
National Institutes of Health (NIH).
Veterinary Medicine Loan Repayment Program:
USDA, National Institute of Food and Agriculture
Stop 2220, 1400 Independence Avenue, SW
Washington, DC 20250-2220
202-401-4952
Aspirations for the appropriations for Fiscal Year 2016
should be to maintain current funding levels for such
critical programs as the Animal Health and Disease
Research/1433 Formula Funds, Veterinary Medicine
Loan Repayment Program, Agriculture and Food
Research Initiative, the Agriculture Research Service
(ARS), and the National Institutes of Health.
2
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