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Wavecom GR64 Technical data
GR64 GSM/GPRS Modem
Integrators Manual
The information contained in this document is the proprietary information of Sony Ericsson
Mobile Communications International. The contents are confidential and any disclosure to
persons other than the officers, employees, agents or subcontractors of the owner or
licensee of this document, without the prior written consent of Sony Ericsson Mobile
Communications International, is strictly prohibited.
Further, no portion of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or
transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying
and recording, without the prior written consent of Sony Ericsson Mobile Communications
International, the copyright holder.
First Edition (March 2006)
Sony Ericsson Mobile Communications International publishes this manual without making
any warranty as to the content contained herein. Further Sony Ericsson Mobile
Communications International reserves the right to make modifications, additions and
deletions to this manual due to typographical errors, inaccurate information, or
improvements to programs and/or equipment at any time and without notice. Such changes
will, nevertheless be incorporated into new editions of this manual.
All rights reserved.
© Sony Ericsson Mobile Communications International, 2006
Publication number: LZT 123 1834
Printed in US
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Contents
Overview....................................................................................................... 8
1
Introduction............................................................................................ 9
1.1
TARGET USERS........................................................................................................... 9
1.2
PREREQUISITES........................................................................................................... 9
1.3
MANUAL STRUCTURE ................................................................................................. 9
1.4
NOTATION............................................................................................................... 10
1.5
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ............................................................................................. 10
2
GR64 Wireless Modem .......................................................................... 11
2.1
ABOUT THE GR64 .................................................................................................... 11
2.2
WIRELESS MODEMS IN A COMMUNICATION SYSTEM .................................................. 12
2.3
FEATURES ................................................................................................................ 14
2.3.1
TYPES OF MOBILE STATION ............................................................................... 14
2.3.3
VOICE CALLS..................................................................................................... 15
2.3.5
GPRS MULTI-SLOT SUPPORT.............................................................................. 16
2.3.2
2.3.4
2.3.6
2.3.7
2.3.8
2.4
SHORT MESSAGE SERVICE.................................................................................. 14
DATA................................................................................................................ 15
SIM CARD ......................................................................................................... 16
POWER CONSUMPTION...................................................................................... 16
OTHER FEATURES.............................................................................................. 17
SERVICE AND SUPPORT ............................................................................................ 18
2.4.1
WEB PAGES ....................................................................................................... 18
2.4.3
M2MPOWER APPLICATION GUIDE....................................................................... 18
2.4.2
2.4.4
AT COMMANDS MANUAL .................................................................................. 18
DEVELOPER’S KIT .............................................................................................. 18
2.5
PRECAUTIONS .......................................................................................................... 19
2.6
GUIDELINES FOR SAFE AND EFFICIENT USE................................................................ 19
2.6.1
2.6.2
GENERAL USAGE ............................................................................................... 19
RADIO FREQUENCY (RF) EXPOSURE AND SAR ..................................................... 20
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2.6.3
2.6.4
3
PERSONAL MEDICAL DEVICES ............................................................................ 21
DISPOSAL OF OLD ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT ...................................................... 21
Abbreviations ....................................................................................... 22
Integrating the Wireless Modem.................................................................. 24
4
Mechanical Description ......................................................................... 25
4.1
INTERFACE DESCRIPTION ......................................................................................... 25
4.2
PHYSICAL DIMENSIONS ............................................................................................ 27
5
System Connector Interface .................................................................. 29
5.1
OVERVIEW................................................................................................................ 29
5.2
DEALING WITH UNUSED PINS.................................................................................... 32
5.3
GENERAL ELECTRICAL AND LOGICAL CHARACTERISTICS ........................................... 34
5.3.1
5.3.1.1
5.3.1.2
5.4
LEVEL SHIFTER INTERFACES............................................................................... 34
COMMON LEVEL SHIFTER INTERFACE ............................................................. 34
I2C LEVEL SHIFTER INTERFACE ....................................................................... 36
GROUNDS ................................................................................................................ 37
5.4.1
5.4.2
ANALOGUE GROUND (AREF) .............................................................................. 37
COMMON GROUND (GND) ................................................................................. 37
5.5
REGULATED POWER SUPPLY INPUT (VCC) .................................................................. 38
5.6
VOLTAGE REFERENCE (VREF) .................................................................................... 39
5.6.1
5.6.2
5.7
VREF AS AN OUTPUT ......................................................................................... 39
VREF AS AN INPUT ............................................................................................ 40
BATTERY CHARGING INPUT (CHG_IN) ....................................................................... 41
5.7.1
CHARGING PROCESS ......................................................................................... 42
5.7.3
BATTERY SELECTION ......................................................................................... 43
5.7.2
5.8
POWERING THE MODULE ON AND OFF (ON/OFF) ...................................................... 47
5.8.1
5.8.2
5.9
SERIES DIODE.................................................................................................... 43
TURNING THE MODULE ON ............................................................................... 47
TURNING THE MODULE OFF .............................................................................. 48
ANALOGUE AUDIO ................................................................................................... 50
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5.9.1
AUXILIARY AUDIO TO MOBILE STATION (AUXI)................................................... 51
5.9.3
MICROPHONE SIGNALS (MICIP, MICIN) ............................................................... 52
5.9.2
AUXILIARY AUDIO FROM MOBILE STATION (AUXO) ............................................. 52
5.9.4
SPEAKER SIGNALS (EARP, EARN)......................................................................... 53
5.10
PCM DIGITAL AUDIO (SSP)..................................................................................... 53
5.11
SERIAL DATA INTERFACES..................................................................................... 55
5.10.1
5.11.1
PCM DATA FORMAT .......................................................................................... 53
UART1 .............................................................................................................. 56
5.11.2
5.11.2.1
5.11.2.2
5.11.3
5.11.3.1
SERIAL DATA SIGNALS (DTM1, DFM1) ................................................................ 56
SERIAL DATA FROM WIRELESS MODEM (DFM1) ............................................... 57
SERIAL DATA TO WIRELESS MODEM (DTM1).................................................... 57
CONTROL SIGNALS (RTS1, CTS1, DTR1, DSR1, DCD1, RI) ................................... 57
HARDWARE FLOW CONTROL RTS1 AND CTS1................................................. 57
5.11.3.2
REQUEST TO SEND (RTS1) .............................................................................. 57
5.11.3.4
DATA TERMINAL READY (DTR1) ..................................................................... 58
5.11.3.3
5.11.3.5
5.11.3.6
5.11.3.7
5.11.4
5.11.4.1
5.11.4.2
CLEAR TO SEND (CTS1).................................................................................. 58
DATA SET READY (DSR1) ............................................................................... 58
DATA CARRIER DETECT (DCD1) ..................................................................... 58
RING INDICATOR (RI) ..................................................................................... 58
UART3 (DTM3, DFM3) ....................................................................................... 59
TRANSMITTED DATA (DTM3) ......................................................................... 59
RECEIVED DATA (DFM3)................................................................................. 59
5.11.5
USB................................................................................................................... 60
5.11.6
SIM CARD INTERFACE........................................................................................ 61
5.11.7
SIM DETECTION (SIMDET) .................................................................................. 62
5.12
SERVICE/PROGRAMMING ...................................................................................... 62
5.13
BUZZER ................................................................................................................ 63
5.14
LED ...................................................................................................................... 63
5.15
GENERAL PURPOSE IO ........................................................................................... 65
5.15.1
5.15.2
5.15.3
EMBEDDED APPLICATIONS................................................................................. 66
LED/IO6 CAPABILITIES....................................................................................... 66
ADC4................................................................................................................ 66
5.16
DIGITAL TO ANALOGUE CONVERTER – DAC .......................................................... 67
5.17
ANALOGUE TO DIGITAL CONVERTERS (ADIN1, ADIN2, ADIN3, ADIN4) ................... 67
5.18
I2C SERIAL CONTROL BUS ..................................................................................... 69
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5.19
BURST TRANSMISSION (TX_ON) ............................................................................. 70
5.20
REAL TIME CLOCK ................................................................................................ 70
5.20.1
5.20.2
5.20.2.1
5.20.3
REAL TIME CLOCK BACKUP SUPPLY (VRTC)......................................................... 71
RTC ALARM (ALARM)......................................................................................... 72
ALARM OUTPUT FROM THE MODULE.............................................................. 72
ALARM UTILIZATION AS A WAKE-UP.................................................................. 73
6
Antenna Connector ............................................................................... 74
7
Hints for Integrating the Wireless Modem ............................................. 75
7.1
SAFETY ADVICE AND PRECAUTIONS ......................................................................... 75
7.1.1
GENERAL .......................................................................................................... 75
7.2
SIM CARD ................................................................................................................ 76
7.3
ANTENNA ................................................................................................................ 76
7.4
INSTALLATION OF THE WIRELESS MODEM................................................................. 77
7.4.1
7.4.1.1
7.4.1.2
7.4.1.3
7.4.1.4
7.4.2
WHERE TO INSTALL THE WIRELESS MODEM ........................................................ 77
ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS ...................................................................... 77
SIGNAL STRENGTH ........................................................................................ 78
CONNECTION OF COMPONENTS TO WIRELESS MODEM ................................... 78
NETWORK AND SUBSCRIPTION ....................................................................... 78
HOW TO INSTALL THE WIRELESS MODEM ........................................................... 79
7.4.2.1
POWER SUPPLY .............................................................................................. 79
7.4.2.3
AUDIO........................................................................................................... 79
7.4.2.2
7.4.2.4
7.5
GROUNDS...................................................................................................... 79
SOFTWARE UPGRADE ..................................................................................... 79
ANTENNA ................................................................................................................ 80
7.5.1
GENERAL .......................................................................................................... 80
7.5.3
ANTENNA PLACEMENT ...................................................................................... 81
7.5.2
7.5.4
7.5.5
8
ANTENNA TYPE ................................................................................................. 80
THE ANTENNA CABLE........................................................................................ 81
POSSIBLE COMMUNICATION DISTURBANCES ...................................................... 81
Embedded Applications ........................................................................ 83
8.1
FEATURES ................................................................................................................ 83
8.2
IMPLEMENTATION .................................................................................................... 83
8.2.1
LIMITATIONS..................................................................................................... 83
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8.2.2
9
M2MPOWER IDE (INTEGRATED DEVELOPMENT ENVIRONMENT) ........................... 84
TCP/IP Stack ......................................................................................... 85
9.1
IMPLEMENTATION .................................................................................................... 85
10
Technical Data ................................................................................... 86
10.1
MECHANICAL SPECIFICATIONS .............................................................................. 86
10.2
POWER SUPPLY VOLTAGE, NORMAL OPERATION .................................................... 87
10.3
RADIO SPECIFICATIONS ........................................................................................ 87
10.4
SIM CARD............................................................................................................. 87
10.5
ENVIRONMENTAL SPECIFICATION.......................................................................... 88
11
Regulatory Notices ............................................................................. 90
Developers Kit ............................................................................................ 91
12
Introduction to the Universal Developer’s Kit ..................................... 92
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Overview
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1
Introduction
1.1 Target Users
The GR64 wireless modems are designed to be integrated into machine-to-machine
or man-to-machine communications applications.
They are intended to be used by manufacturers, system integrators, applications
developers and developers of wireless communications equipment.
1.2 Prerequisites
It is assumed that the person integrating the wireless modem into an application has
a basic understanding of the following:
• GSM networking;
• Wireless communication and antennas (aerials)
• AT commands
• ITU-T standard V.24/V.28
• Micro controllers and programming
• Electronic hardware design
1.3 Manual Structure
This manual is composed of three parts.
Part 1- Overview
This section provides a broad overview of the Gx64 family and includes a list of
abbreviations used in the manual.
Part 2 - Integrating the Wireless modem
This section describes each of the signals available on the GR64 wireless modem,
along with mechanical information. The section also provides you with design
guidelines and what is needed to commercialize an application from a regulatory
point of view.
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Part 3 – Developer’s Kit
This section lists the contents of the Developer’s Kit and provides the information to
setup and use the equipment.
1.4 Notation
The following symbols and admonition notation are used to draw the readers
attention to notable, or crucially-important information.
Note
Draws the readers attention to pertinent, useful or interesting
information
NOTE
Tip
Provides advice, suggestions, guidance or recommendations which
augment the formal text
TIP
Caution
Cautionary information must be heeded, it draws the readers attention
to the need for understanding, care or watchfulness in relation to the
CAUTION
!
WARNING
information provided
Warning
Notes marked warning must be heeded, they alert readers to
precautionary measures,
risks, hazards or safety information which
directly effects equipment function, warranty or personnel safety
Danger
This information must be heeded, it identifies information and
cautionary behavior that otherwise ignored could result in catastrophic
DANGER
equipment failure, bodily injury or death
1.5 Acknowledgements
Parts of this document, including text passages, tables, and illustrations, are
reproduced from copyright information by kind permission of Agere Systems Inc.
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2
GR64 Wireless Modem
2.1 About the GR64
The Sony Ericsson Gx64 family of devices are Quad Band GSM/GPRS wireless modems
operating in the GSM 850/900/1800/1900 bands.
These products belong to a new generation of Sony Ericsson wireless modems, and
are intended to be used in machine-to-machine applications and man-to-machine
applications. They are used when there is a need to send and receive data (by SMS,
CSD, or GPRS), and make voice calls over the GSM network.
The GR64 conforms to the European Union (EU) Restriction of Hazardous Substances
(RoHS) directive 2002/95/EC.
The GR64 is available in four variants. Table 1: GR64 Variants lists the hardware and
software features for each variant. The device is available in two hardware variants.
Each hardware variant is available in two software variants. The first hardware variant
(/10 and /30) is equipped with PCM compatible pins but does not have a USB
interface or an integrated SIM card holder. The second hardware variant (/20 and
/40) is equipped with a USB interface and an integrated SIM card holder, but does not
have PCM compatible pins.
Table 1: GR64 Variants
PCM
SIM Card
Embedded
Variant
Compatible
VREF Input
USB
DPY 102 1494/10
Yes
No
No
No
No
DPY 102 1494/20
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
DPY 102 1494/30
Yes
No
No
No
Yes
DPY 102 1494/40
No
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
PINS
Holder
Applicatio
ns
One software variant is designed to be controlled from a micro-controller situated on
the host application. The other software variant offers the option to run applications
embedded onto the module itself. When using the embedded application version the
controlling script can be run internal to the module, with or without the use of an
external control.
A typical application, involves a micro-controller and a wireless modem, in which the
micro-controller sends AT commands to the wireless modem via an RS232
communications link.
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2.2 Wireless modems in a Communication System
Figure 2.2-1 and Figure 2.2-2 illustrate the main blocks of a wireless communication
system using the wireless modem. Figure 2.2-1 shows the communication system
when the script is embedded on the wireless modem and Figure 2.2-2 shows the
communication system when a micro-controller is used. They also show the
communication principles of the system and the interface between the wireless
modem and the application. The definitions in the figures, as used elsewhere in this
manual, are in accordance with the recommendations of 3GPP TS 27.007.
The MS (mobile station) represents the wireless modem and SIM card. The wireless
modem excluding SIM card, is known as the ME (mobile equipment).
The DTE (data terminal equipment) is the controlling application. This can be either
an external host or an internal embedded application.
The DCE (data circuit terminating equipment) is the serial communication interface of
the MS.
MS
GSM
NETWORK
SIM
SIM
SYSTEM INTERFACE
DC
POWER
GSM
GSM
ENGINE
ENGINE
STATUS &
RESPONSE
DCE
DCE
EMBEDDED
APPLICATION
DTE
DTE
COMMAND
& CONTROL
Figure 2.2-1 Main Blocks in a Wireless System (embedded application)
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MS
GR64
SIM
GSM
NETWORK
SIM
STATUS &
RESPONSE
SYSTEM INTERFACE
DC
POWER
DTE
DTE
GSM
GSM
ENGINE
ENGINE
DCE
DCE
COMMAND
& CONTROL
Figure 2.2-2 Main Blocks in a Wireless System (external micro-controller)
In accordance with the recommendations of ITU-T (International Telecommunication
Union - Telecommunications Standardization Sector) V.24, the TE communicates with
the MS over a serial interface.
The functions of the wireless modem follow the recommendations provided by 3GPP
(3rd Generation Partnership Project) and ITU-T. 3GPP is a collaboration agreement
that was established in December 1998.
The collaboration agreement brings
together a number of telecommunications standards bodies which are known as
Organizational Partners. The current Organizational Partners are ARIB, CCSA, ETSI,
ATIS, TTA, and TTC.
3GPP specifies a set of AT commands for controlling the GSM element of the wireless
modem; these commands are supplemented by Sony Ericsson specific commands.
To find out how to work with AT commands, see the AT Commands Manual.
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2.3 Features
The wireless modem performs a set of telecom services (TS) according to 3GPP
release 99 and ITU-T.
The functions of the wireless modem are implemented by
issuing AT commands over a serial interface.
2.3.1 Types of Mobile Station
The GR64 is a fully Quad Band capable GSM/GPRS mobile station with the
characteristics shown in the table below.
Feature
GSM850
E-GSM900
GSM1800
GSM1900
Tx
824-849
880-915
1710-1785
1850-1910
Rx
869-894
925-960
1805-1880
1930-1990
200kHz
200kHz
200kHz
200kHz
Number of channels
124
174
374
299
Number of TD slots
8
8
8
8
Duplex spacing
45MHz
45MHz
95MHz
80MHz
GSM power class
4 (2W)
4 (2W)
1 (1W)
1 (1W)
Frequency range (MHz)
Channel spacing
Modulation
Receive sensitivity
GMSK
<-102dBm at antenna connector
GPRS multi-slot class
Class 10
2.3.2 Short Message Service
The wireless modem supports the following SMS services:
• Sending; MO (mobile-originated) with both PDU (protocol data unit) and text mode
supported
• Receiving; MT (mobile-terminated) with both PDU and text mode supported
• CBM (cell broadcast message); a service in which a message is sent to all
subscribers located in one or more specific cells in the GSM network (for example,
traffic reports)
• SMS status report according to 3GPP TS 23.40
The maximum length of a text mode SMS message is 160 characters using 7-bit
encoding. The wireless modem supports up to six concatenated messages to extend
this function. Concatenation is performed by the host application.
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2.3.3 Voice Calls
The wireless modem offers the capability of MO (mobile originated) and MT (mobile
terminated) voice calls, as well as supporting emergency calls.
Multi-party, call
waiting and call divert features are available. Some of these features are networkoperator specific.
For the inter-connection of audio, the wireless modem offers both single ended and
balanced analogue input and output lines. Direct interface to the digital PCM (pulse
code modulation) bus used within the wireless modem is available, thus by-passing
the internal analogue circuitry. The wireless modems support HR, FR, EFR and AMR
vocoders.
2.3.4 Data
The wireless modem supports the following data protocols:
• GPRS (General Packet Radio Service)
The wireless modem is a Class B terminal. The wireless modem is GPRS multi-slot
class10 (4+2) enabled, capable of receiving at a maximum of four timeslots per
frame (down link), and transmitting in two timeslots per frame (up link). See
section 2.3.5 for multi-slot allocation by class.
• CSD (Circuit Switched Data)
The GR64 wireless modem is capable of establishing a CSD communication at 9.6
kbps over the air.
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2.3.5 GPRS Multi-Slot Support
GSM Multi-slot classes supported by Gx64 devices
Multislot
Maximum slot allocation
Allowable
Class
Downlink
Uplink
Active
Configuration
8
4
1
5
1 up; 4 down
1 up; 4 down
10
4
2
5
2 up; 3 down
Max data rate
8-12Kbps Send
32-48Kbps Receive
8-12Kbps Send
32-48Kbps Receive
16-24Kbps Send
24-36Kbps Receive
2.3.6 SIM Card
The GR64 supports an external SIM card through its system connector. A variant of
the GR64 also supports an on-card SIM.
For dual SIM support, automated SIM-
switching is available. Both 3V and 1.8V SIM technology is supported. Older, 5V SIM
technology is not supported.
A mechanical variant of the GS64 also supports an on-card SIM.
support, automated SIM-switching is available.
For dual SIM
Only one SIM is active at any one
time, it is not possible to concurrently register on more than one network.
2.3.7 Power Consumption
Sleep Mode
Feature
GSM850 & E-GSM900
GSM1800 & GSM1900
DRX 8
Voice/CSD
Data (GPRS)
Voice/CSD
Data (GPRS)
Idle Mode
Transmit
Operation
1.6 mA
17 mA
2000 mA
1.6 mA
16 mA
1450 mA
The power consumption figures shown represent typical average current for
maximum transmitted power, single uplink (transmit) slot, and single downlink
(receive) slot. The module will consume more average power in different multi-slot
configurations, the worst case being that of two uplink and three downlink slots.
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2.3.8 Other Features
The GR64 supports many other features, including:
• 3GPP TS 27.010 multiplexing
• GPS interoperability
• SIM application tool kit, class 2 release 99 compliant
• On board TCP/IP stack
In addition, customers have the option of a GS64 software variant which adds
embedded application functionality.
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2.4 Service and Support
2.4.1 Web Pages
Visit the Sony Ericsson M2M extranet web site for the following information:
• Where to buy wireless modems or for recommendations concerning accessories
and components
• Local contact details for customer support in your region
• FAQs (frequently asked questions)
Access to the Sony Ericsson extranet site requires a user account and password.
Accounts can be arranged through your local account manager.
The extranet web site address is:
https://extranet.sonyericsson.com/collaborationarea/m2m/default.aspx
2.4.2 AT Commands Manual
The AT Commands Manual provides users with all the AT commands that can be used
with the wireless modem. AT commands appear in logical groups and contain the
command, a description of its functionality and an example of use.
2.4.3 M2mpower Application Guide
The M2mpower Application Guide provides users with all the information they need
to build an application using the M2mpower support environment. This manual is
supplied as part of the M2mpower package.
2.4.4 Developer’s Kit
Sony Ericsson provides the developer’s kit to get you started quickly. The kit includes
the following hardware which is required to begin the development of an application:
• This Integrator’s Manual
• RS232 cable
• Developer’s kit hardware
• Headset
• Developer’s kit accessories
• Antenna
• Power supply
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Make sure to order the M2M module(s) that are applicable to the needs of your
organization.
Also, ensure that you have computer or micro-controller.
The AT
command manual provides the necessary command and control reference to drive the
module.
2.5 Precautions
The wireless modems are ESD protected up to ±15kV on all 2.8V IO pins. All other
pins are protected up to ±2kV. Integrators must follow electronic device handling
precautions when working with any electronic device system to ensure no damage
occurs to the host or the wireless modem. In the section ‘Integrating the Wireless
modem’, users will find more information about safety and product care.
Do not
exceed the environmental and electrical limits as specified in ‘Technical Data’ section.
2.6 Guidelines for Safe and Efficient Use
Users must follow the general usage outlined in this chapter before using the GR64
for any purpose.
2.6.1 General Usage
•
Always treat the product with care and keep it in a clean and dust-free place.
•
Do not expose the product to liquid.
•
Avoid exposing the product to moisture or high humidity environments.
•
Do not expose the product to extreme high or low temperatures beyond those
specified for operation and storage.
•
Do not expose the product to open flames or lit tobacco products.
•
Do not drop, throw or try to bend the product.
•
Do not paint the product.
•
Do not use the product near medical equipment without requesting
permission.
•
Do not use the product when in, or around aircraft, or areas posted “turn off
two-way radio”.
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•
Do not use the product in an area where a potentially explosive atmosphere
exists.
•
Do not place the product or install wireless equipment in the area above a
vehicle’s air bag.
•
Do not attempt to disassemble the product; only Sony Ericsson authorized
personnel should perform servicing.
2.6.2 Radio Frequency (RF) exposure and SAR
Your wireless modem device is a low-power radio transmitter and receiver
(transceiver). When it is turned on, it emits low levels of radio frequency energy (also
known as radio waves or radio frequency fields).
Governments around the world have adopted comprehensive international safety
guidelines,
developed
by
scientific
organizations,
e.g.
ICNIRP
(International
Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection) and IEEE (The Institute of Electrical
and Electronics Engineers Inc.), through periodic and thorough evaluation of scientific
studies. These guidelines establish permitted levels of radio wave exposure for the
general population. The levels include a safety margin designed to assure the safety
of all persons, regardless of age and health, and to account for any variations in
measurements.
Specific Absorption Rate (SAR) is the unit of measurement for the amount of radio
frequency energy absorbed by the body when using a transceiver. The SAR value is
determined at the highest certified power level in laboratory conditions, but the
actual SAR level of the transceiver while operating can be well below this value. This is
because the transceiver is designed to use the minimum power required to reach the
network.
The GR64 wireless modem device has been approved for applications where the
antenna is located >20cm from the body. In all other configurations the integrator is
responsible for meeting the local SAR regulations.
Integrators of the GR64 wireless modem device are responsible for ensuring that they
meet the SAR regulatory requirements of the countries in which they intend to
operate the device, and that their documentation contains the relevant SAR
declaration, certification information, and user guidance as appropriate.
More information on radio frequency exposure and SAR can be found at
www.sonyericsson.com.
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2.6.3 Personal Medical Devices
Wireless modem devices may affect the operation of cardiac pacemakers, hearing aids
and certain other implanted equipment. If a minimum distance of 15 cm (6 inches) is
maintained between the GR64 module’s radiating antenna and a pacemaker, the risk
of interference is limited. If the integrator’s application is likely to be situated in the
vicinity of personnel, a suitable warning should be contained in the equipment
manual to this effect.
2.6.4 Disposal of Old Electronic Equipment
This symbol on the product or on its packaging indicates that this product shall not
be treated as household waste. Instead it shall be handed over to an appropriate
collection point for the recycling of electrical and electronic equipment. By ensuring
this product is disposed of correctly, you will help prevent potential negative
consequences for the environment and human health, which could otherwise be
caused by inappropriate waste handling of this product. The recycling of materials
will help to conserve natural resources. For more detailed information about recycling
of this product, please contact your local city office, your household waste disposal
service or the Sony Ericsson regional sales office.
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3
Abbreviations
Abbreviation
Explanation
AMR
Adaptive Multi Rate
ATMS
Audio to Mobile Station
AFMS
Audio from Mobile Station
CBM
Cell Broadcast Message
CBS
Cell Broadcast Service
CSD
Circuit Switched Data
DCE
Data Circuit Terminating Equipment
DK
Developer’s Kit
DTE
Data Terminal Equipment
DTMF
Dual Tone Multi Frequency
EA
Embedded Application
EFR
Enhanced Full Rate
EMC
Electro-Magnetic Compatibility
ETSI
European Telecommunication Standards Institute
FR
Full Rate
GPRS
General Packet Radio Service
GPS
Global Positioning System
GSM
Global System for Mobile Communication
HR
Half Rate
IDE
Integrated Development Environment
IP
Internet Protocol
ITU-T
International Telecommunication Union – Telecommunications
(Standardization Sector)
LDO
Low-Dropout
M2mpower
Sony Ericsson’s powerful support environment
ME
Mobile Equipment
MMCX
Micro Miniature Coax
MO
Mobile Originated
MS
Mobile Station
MT
Mobile Terminated
PCM
Pulse Code Modulation
PDU
Protocol Data Unit
RF
Radio Frequency
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Abbreviation
Explanation
RFU
Reserved for Future Use
RLP
Radio Link Protocol
RTC
Real Time Clock
SDP
Service Discovery Protocol
SIM
Subscriber Identity Module
SMS
Short Message Service
TCP
Transport Control Protocol
UDP
User Datagram Protocol
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Integrating the Wireless
Modem
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4
Mechanical Description
4.1 Interface Description
The pictures below show the mechanical design of the wireless modem along with the
positions of the different connectors and mounting holes. The wireless modem is
protected with tin coated steel ASI 1008/1010 covers that meet the environmental
and EMC requirements.
system connector
wireless modem
shielded circuits
Figure 4.1-1 Wireless modem viewed from below
mounting hole &
ground connection
antenna connector
integrated SIM holder
Figure 4.1-2 Wireless modem, viewed from above (Integrated SIM holder variant)
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Please note the following:
• Mounting holes positioned at the corners make it possible to securely bolt the
wireless modem into your application.
• Keypad, display, microphone, speaker and battery are not part of the wireless
modem.
• For the GR64 variant without an integrated SIM holder, the SIM card is mounted in
the user application, external to the wireless modem (this is also an option for the
integrated SIM holder variant).
• The GS64 variant without an integrated SIM holder has no components mounted
on the top-side.
• The System Connector is a 60-pin, standard 0.05 in (1.27 mm) pitch type. The
pins and their electrical characteristics are described in Section 5, together with
the System Connector Interface.
• Information about the Antenna Connector is found in Section 6.
• Antenna Connector details are found in Section 6.
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4.2 Physical Dimensions
Figure 4.2-1 Dimensions of the Wireless modem (Integrated SIM variant)
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Figure 4.2-2 Dimensions of the Wireless modem (Legacy variant)
Measurements are given in millimeters. See also Technical Data, in Section 10.
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5
System Connector Interface
5.1 Overview
Electrical connections to the wireless modem (except the antenna), are made through
the System Connector Interface. The system connector is a 60-pin, standard 0.05 in
(1.27 mm) pitch device.
The system connector allows both board-to-board and board-to-cable connections
to be made. Use a board-board connector to connect the wireless modem directly to
a PCB, and a board-cable connector to connect the radio device via a cable. Surface
mount mating connectors for the 60-pin system connector are available from Harwin
(part number M50-3113022).
Figure 5.1-1 below shows the numbering of the connector pins.
A ground connection is provided at the mounting hole next to the RF connector on
the wireless modem as shown below. Connect this ground point to the DGND pins of
the wireless modem by the shortest, low-impedance path possible. The purpose of
this connection is to allow any antenna ESD strikes to bypass the wireless modem’s
internal ground path.
ground connection
pin 59
pin 60
pin 1
pin 2
Figure 5.1-1 Wireless modem, viewed from underneath
The following table gives the pin assignments for the system connector interface and
a short description for each signal.
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Table 5.1-1 Pin Assignments
Pin
Name
Function
DC power
Yes
Ground
Yes
DC power
Yes
Ground
Yes
DC power
Yes
Ground
Yes
DC power
Yes
Ground
Yes
DC power
Yes
Ground
Yes
1
VCC
Input
2
GND
-
3
VCC
Input
4
GND
-
5
VCC
Input
6
GND
-
7
VCC
Input
8
GND
-
9
VCC
Input
10
GND
-
11
CHG_IN
12
GND
13
PIN
Direction
Input
-
ADIN4
Input
GPIO5
In/Out
14
ON/OFF
Input
15
SIMVCC
Output
16
SIMDET
Input
17
SIMRST
18
Connection
Required
Battery charger power
Ground
Yes
ADC Input 4
General purpose IO
Device on/off control
Yes
1.8V or 3.0V SIM card supply
Yes1
SIM presence detection
Yes1
Output
SIM card reset signal
Yes1
SIMDAT
In/Out
SIM card data
Yes1
19
SIMCLK
Output
SIM card clock signal
Yes1
20
DAC
Output
Pulse width modulated signal
21
GPIO1
In/Out
General purpose IO
22
GPIO2
In/Out
General purpose IO
23
GPIO3
In/Out
General purpose IO
24
GPIO4
In/Out
General purpose IO
25
VRTC
Input
DC supply for real time clock
26
ADIN1
Input
ADC Input 1
27
ADIN2
Input
ADC Input 2
28
ADIN3
Input
ADC Input 3
29
SDA
In/Out
I2C data
30
SCL
Output
I2C clock signal
31
BUZZER
Output
Buzzer Output
DSR1
Output
Data Set Ready (UART1)
GPIO7
In/Out
General purpose IO
32
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Yes2
30
Pin
Name
Direction
Function
LED
Output
LED control signal
GPIO6
In/Out
General purpose IO
34
VREF
In (Out)
Core voltage reference
35
TX_ON
Output
Transmit indication
RI
Output
Ring Indicator
GPIO8
In/Out
General purpose IO
DTR1
Input
33
36
37
38
39
40
Data Terminal Ready (UART1)
GPIO10
In/Out
General purpose IO
DCD1
Output
Data Carrier Detect (UART1)
GPIO11
In/Out
General purpose IO
RTS1
Input
Ready To Send (UART1)
GPIO9
In/Out
General purpose IO
CTS1
Output
Clear To Send (UART1)
GPIO12
In/Out
General purpose IO
PIN
Connection
Required
Yes
Yes2
Yes2
Yes2
41
DTM1
Input
Data To Module from host (UART1)
Yes3
42
DFM1
Output
Data From Module to host (UART1)
Yes3
43
DTM3
Input
Data To Module from host (UART3)
44
DFM3
Output
Data From Module to host (UART3)
45
USBDP
In/Out
USB data positive
Yes4
46
USBDN
In/Out
USB data negative
Yes4
47
SSPDTM
Input
Serial PCM data to module from host
48
SSPDFM
Output
Serial PCM data from module to host
49
VUSB
50
ALARM
Output
RTC alarm
51
SSPFS
In/Out
Serial PCM frame synchronization
52
SSPCLK
In/Out
Serial PCM clock
53
MICIP
Input
Microphone input positive
54
MICIN
Input
Microphone input negative
55
EARP
Output
Earpiece output positive
56
EARN
Output
Earpiece output negative
57
AUXO
Output
Auxiliary audio from module to host
58
SERVICE
Input
Flash programming enable signal
59
AUXI
Input
Auxiliary audio to module from host
60
AREF
-
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Input
USB DC power
Yes4
Analogue reference
31
1
2
- These signals are required if the external SIM interface is used
- These pin connections are required for sleep mode operation
3, 4
- At least one of these interfaces is required to be connected
NOTE
5.2 Dealing with Unused pins
Integrators applications may connect all of the GR64 signals pins, or just those
necessary for minimal operation, or most commonly some other permutation.
If
GR64 signal pins are not connected to the host application you should terminate
them in the following manner.
Table 5.2-1 Unused Pin Termination
Pin
Name
Unused pin termination
1, 3, 5, 7, 9
VCC
Must be connected
2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12
GND
Must be connected
11
CHG_IN
Leave Open
13
ADIN4/GPIO5
Ground
14
ON/OFF
Must be connected
15
SIMVCC
Leave Open
16
SIMDET
Leave Open
17
SIMRST
Leave Open
18
SIMDAT
Leave Open
19
SIMCLK
Leave Open
20
DAC
Leave Open
21
GPIO1
Connect to VREF
22
GPIO2
Connect to VREF
23
GPIO3
Connect to VREF
24
GPIO4
Connect to VREF
25
VRTC
Leave Open
26
ADIN1
Ground
27
ADIN2
Ground
28
ADIN3
Ground
29
SDA
Leave Open
30
SCL
Leave Open
31
BUZZER
Leave Open
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Pin
Name
Unused pin termination
32
DSR1/GPIO7
Connect to VREF
33
LED/GPIO6
Connect to VREF
34
VREF
Must be connected
35
TX_ON
Leave Open
36
RI/GPIO8
Connect to VREF
37
DTR1/GPIO10
Connect to VREF
38
DCD1/GPIO11
Connect to VREF
39
RTS1/GPIO9
Connect to VREF
40
CTS1/GPIO12
Connect to VREF
41
DTM1
Connect to VREF
42
DFM1
Leave Open
43
DTM3
Connect to VREF
44
DFM3
Leave Open
45
USBDP
Leave Open
46
USBDN
Leave Open
47
SSPDTM
Connect to VREF
48
SSPDFM
Leave Open
49
VUSB
Leave Open
50
ALARM
Leave Open
51
SSPFS
Leave Open
52
SSPCLK
Leave Open
53
MICIP
Connect to AREF
54
MICIN
Connect to AREF
55
EARP
Leave Open
56
EARN
Leave Open
57
AUXO
Leave Open
58
SERVICE
Ground
59
AUXI
Connect to AREF
60
AREF
Leave Open
33
5.3 General Electrical and Logical Characteristics
The core digital IO is based upon 1.8V technology in the baseband chipset. All
external IO signals undergo bi-directional level shifting on the physical module to
provide flexibility to users of different voltage technology.
An internal core IO
regulator is used as a reference for the module-side logic, whilst the application
(host-side) reference is fed by VREF in one of two implementations.
In order to provide legacy users a migration path to GR64, the module IO is made
compatible with 2.8V (or level-adapted 3.0V) controllers, popular in older technology
applications. This arrangement is implemented in variant products DPY 102 1494/10
& DPY 102 1494/30. In these products the 2.8V VREF is derived from an internal
voltage regulator, distributed to the host-side level shifters and also output on the
VREF signal pin.
The arrangement differs in non-legacy variant GR64 products DPY 102 1494/20 &
DPY 102 1494/40. In these products the internal voltage regulator is disconnected
and the user application provides the VREF as a reference to the host-side level
shifters.
The range of VREF voltages is specified in sections 5.6.1 & 5.6.2.
Many of the signals indicated in Table 5.1-1 are high-speed CMOS
logic inputs or outputs powered by the 1.8V internal core regulators,
and then subsequently level shifted at the system interface. All serial
NOTE
interfaces and general purpose IO fall in to this category.
5.3.1 Level Shifter Interfaces
Two different level shifter circuits are implemented in GR64. The ‘common’ interface
is used on all level-shifted IO with the exception of the I2C signals, SDA & SCL.
5.3.1.1 Common Level Shifter Interface
The common level shifter used within the GR64 is a Maxim MAX3001EEBP-T, which
has a specified maximum data rate of 4Mbps. The level shifter has ESD protection to
±15kV (HBM).
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Figure 5.3-1 Common Level Shifter Circuit (VREF as an Output)
The output impedance of the Maxim chip is 6kohm, so you must ensure that your
application impedance to ground or supply is high enough to allow for full voltage
swing. A minimum application impedance of 56kohm should be assumed. Similarly,
where a GPIO is used as an input, your application driver output impedance must not
exceed 680 ohm.
The GR64 VREF can be configured as an output (to the host application) or an input
(from the host application), as defined in section 5.6.
Any GPIO that is used truly bi-directional cannot be open drain type on
both sides. At least one side needs to be able to drive the signal both
high and low.
NOTE
Table 5.3-1 Level shifter IO logic levels
Parameter
Min
IO input voltage high threshold (VIHC)
IO input voltage low threshold (VILC)
Max
Unit
VREF-0.4
V
0.4
IO output voltage high threshold (VOHC)
IO output voltage low threshold (VOLC)
Nom
V
VREF-0.4
0.4
V
V
The level shifter IO interfaces have typical input and output rise/fall times of 25ns.
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5.3.1.2 I2C Level Shifter Interface
Because of the nature of the I2C interface signals, SDA (data) & SCL (clock), they utilize
a different type of level-shifting technology to that of the ‘common’ IO. The I2C level
shifter IC uses an open drain construction with no direction pin, ideally suited to bi-
directional low voltage (such as the GR64 1.8 V processor) I2C port translation to the
normal 3.3 V or 5.0 V I2C-bus signal levels. Unlike the common level shifters, the I2C
level shifters have a very low (6.5ohm RDSON) resistance between input and output
pins.
The I2C level shifters use VREF as the host-side voltage reference and the internal
1.8V digital IO core as the module-side reference.
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5.4 Grounds
Pin
Name
Direction
Function
2
GND
-
Ground
4
GND
-
Ground
6
GND
-
Ground
8
GND
-
Ground
10
GND
-
Ground
12
GND
-
Ground
60
AREF
-
Analogue reference
There are two ground connections in the wireless modem, AREF (analogue ground)
and GND (digital ground). Pin assignments are shown in the table above.
AREF and GND are connected at a single point inside the wireless
modem, however they must not be joined together in the user
application.
NOTE
5.4.1 Analogue Ground (AREF)
AREF is the return signal, or analogue audio reference, for AUXI and AUXO. These
two signals provide a single-ended auxiliary audio input (host to module) and output
(module to host). AREF is connected to the common GND inside the wireless modem
only. The application must not connect GND and AREF.
Parameter
Limit
Unit
Maximum current (IMAX)
12.5
mA
5.4.2 Common Ground (GND)
GND is the reference, or return signal, for all system interface digital signals, radio
section power, and is also the DC return for the power supply, VCC.
To carry the high current drawn by the wireless modem, the user application circuitry
should connect all GND pins together.
Parameter
Per Pin
Total
Unit
Maximum current (IMAX)
600
3600
mA
Maximum average current (IAVG)
100
600
mA
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5.5 Regulated Power Supply Input (VCC)
Pin
Name
Direction
Function
1
VCC
Input
DC power
3
VCC
Input
DC power
5
VCC
Input
DC power
7
VCC
Input
DC power
9
VCC
Input
DC power
Power is supplied to the wireless modem VCC pins, from an external source.
User application circuitry should connect all VCC pins together in to carry the current
drawn by the wireless modem.
The electrical characteristics for VCC are shown in the following table.
Parameter
Mode
Limit
VCC Supply voltage
Nominal
3.6 V
Min
3.2 V
Max
4.5 V
Absolute maximum
voltage range
Maximum supply ripple
Maximum allowable voltage drop
Maximum current consumed
!
WARNING
Transmission burst
Full power (2W) transmit
(single uplink slot)
-0.3V to 6.5V
<100mV @<200kHz
<20mV @>200kHz
200mV
2050 mA peak
330mA average
Stresses in excess of the absolute maximum limits can cause permanent
damage to the device. These are absolute stress ratings only. Functional
operation of the device is not implied at these or any other conditions in
excess of those given in the operational sections of the data sheet.
Exposure to absolute maximum ratings for extended periods can
adversely affect device reliability.
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The wireless modem has insufficient internal capacitance to supply the
large current peaks during GSM burst transmission - use the following
TIP
general guidelines in designing the application power supply.
• Fit a low ESR electrolytic capacitor close to the wireless modem
(>1,000 µF, with an ESR < 100 mΩ)
• Ensure power supply to wireless modem line resistance is < 200 mΩ
The module has approximately 40µF of internal capacitance across the
VCC pins. During initial power-up the host power supply will have to
CAUTION
charge this capacitance to the operating voltage. This initial in-rush
current may exceed the module’s normal peak current, sometimes
greater than an order of magnitude higher (depending upon the power
supply design) for a short duration (generally a few microseconds).
5.6 Voltage Reference (VREF)
Pin
Name
Direction
Function
34
VREF
Input (Output)
Core voltage reference
GR64 provides a voltage reference interface for user applications.
Level shifters are integrated in the GR64 product. The integrated level shifters are
referenced to an internal IO regulator on the module side and to an application
voltage on the user side of the interface.
There are two implementation of VREF,
dependent upon the users’ GR64 variant;
• VREF as an output (DPY 102 1494/10 & DPY 102 1494/30 variants)
• VREF as an input (DPY 102 1494/20 & DPY 102 1494/40 variants)
5.6.1 VREF as an Output
The version of GR64 without an integrated SIM holder provides a 2.8V reference to
the host side level shifter devices.
This enables legacy users, and users of older
interface technology to connect directly to the GR64’s IO. The same reference voltage
is provided as an output on VREF. In this arrangement VREF can be used as a further
level shifter reference in the users application circuits, or to power external circuits,
since it has a 75mA current sourcing capability.
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VREF output
Parameter
Min
Nom
Max
Unit
VREF output voltage
2.74
2.8
2.86
V
75
mA
VREF load current
5.6.2 VREF as an Input
The version of GR64 with an integrated SIM holder provides a reference input to the
host side level shifter devices. This enables users of varying technologies to connect
directly to the GR64’s IO by providing a reference from their own application IO.
VREF Input
Parameter
Min
VREF input voltage
1.8
VREF load current
Typ
0.1
Max
Unit
5.2
V
50
µA
Figure 5.6-1 Level shifter arrangement
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5.7 Battery Charging Input (CHG_IN)
Pin
Name
11
CHG_IN
Direction
Input
Function
Battery charger power
For battery powered applications, the GR64 provides a charge input (CHG_IN) pin to
aid and support battery charging.
A typical application would power the wireless
modem directly from a battery source connected to VCC (pins 1, 3, 5, 7, 9) then
provide a dc power source to the CHG_IN connection (pin 11). The GR64 can control
an internal switching FET which creates a charging pathway to the battery. While
power is provided at CHG_IN, the battery charge can be maintained. If the power
should fail or be removed at CHG_IN, the application will be supported by the battery
alone. When CHG_IN voltage returns, the battery charging and maintenance will
commence once more.
The GR64 module supports only one mode of charging, microprocessor supervised
pulsed-charging. Also, the module only supports one battery cell type as standard.
Users may, if they wish, develop charging algorithms and control through the Sony
Ericsson M2mpower Embedded Applications. Users wishing to attempt charging of
battery types not supported by the standard type, indicated in this document, do so
at their own risk.
Battery charging algorithms are unique to different battery types. Sony
Ericsson Mobile Communications will not accept any responsibility or
DANGER
liability for damage, product failures, even death or injury occurring as
a result of incompatible battery and charging algorithms being applied.
Safety considerations must be taken into account when using the battery charge
function of the GR64; for example, monitoring the temperature of the battery. If the
temperature of the battery exceeds its specification limits, battery charging must be
stopped immediately.
If the battery temperature continues to rise the application
should be suspended or the battery disconnected.
Battery temperature can be
monitored with a suitable detection circuit, using the GR64 ADC inputs.
When charging Lithium batteries, the battery pack must have an
internal protection circuit in accordance with the manufacturer's
instructions.
CAUTION
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41
During microprocessor supervised mode, the GR64 takes a current-limited voltage
source at the CHG_IN pin to implement constant-current charging of a single Li-Ion
cell connected to the VCC pins.
CHG_IN
3.6V
3.6V
50mA
50mA
CHARGE FET
C1
D1
+
VCC
MAX CURRENT
DETECTION
-
V REF1
SINGLE
CELL Li-ION
+
VOLTAGE
SOURCE
BATTERY
BATTERY
CHARGER
CHARGER
CONTROL
CONTROL
TIMER
TIMER
TO
uPC
SUI
SUI
-
V REF2
ADC
ADIN1
Figure 5.7-1 Typical application for pulse charging a battery
5.7.1 Charging Process
Figure 5.7-1 shows a typical battery charging implementation. The voltage source
must be current limited (500 mA max). A reverse current protection diode prevents
external fault conditions from draining the battery.
A small (typ 10µF) capacitor
should be placed close to the CHG_IN pin.
In the application shown, a conditioning phase slowly raises the voltage of a deeply
discharged battery cell to a level suitable for fast-charging. After cell conditioning is
complete, the microprocessor uses the GR64’S ADC converter to monitor the cell’s
status and uses the power management block to control the charge-FET.
A charge request is initiated when an external voltage source is applied to the CHG_IN
pin. However, before this request is passed to the microprocessor, CHG_IN is verified
to be greater than VCC by 150 mV, and at least 3.7 V. If the latter criteria is not met,
the module limits charging to the conditioning phase. If the former criteria is not met,
the charge request is ignored and all charging is disabled. If the CHG_IN voltage
exceeds the upper limit of 6.3 V it will be detected by the module, but charging is not
inhibited. In this case, however, CHG_IN is outside the normal operating range of the
device, so the software will not initiate charging if CHG_IN > 6.3 V is detected.
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The delta between CHG_IN and VCC is continuously monitored; however, the valid to
invalid detection has a delay of 46 ms. When CHG_IN exceeds VCC by 150 mV, it is
considered to be at a valid relative level. It is considered to have an invalid relative
level if it subsequently falls below VCC by 50 mV. If the relative voltage of CHG_IN
goes invalid and remains invalid for the duration of the detection delay, charging is
terminated.
As a safety precaution, the battery cell voltage must be at least 2.5 V before fastcharge is allowed to take place. If the battery cell voltage is less than 2.5 V, it is
considered either deeply discharged or shorted. To protect a Li-ion cell from the
damage that may occur if it is fast-charged from this state, a 3.6 V trickle-charge
source is used to safely condition the battery cell. The conditioning charge current is
limited to 50 mA, which for most Li-ion cells is 10% or less of the recommended CC
fast-charge current. In most instances, the battery cell voltage will be greater than
2.5 V at the time the charge request is initiated, resulting in the conditioning phase
being skipped.
There is always a small chance that the charge management block in
the GR64 power management ASIC will malfunction or fail, which
could
CAUTION
lead
to
over-charging
of
the
battery.
It
is
strongly
recommended that any battery chosen for use with your application
has its own additional
protection.
integrated over-current and over-voltage
5.7.2 Series Diode
When charging is disabled, the potential for rapid cell discharge through the body
diode inherent in the Enhancement-mode charging FET, a Schottky diode must be
placed in between the external source and the CHG_IN pin. The diode should have a
forward current and power dissipation rating consistent with its intended use, and a
maximum forward voltage drop of 0.6V.
5.7.3 Battery Selection
Whilst there are several rechargeable battery technologies commercially available,
including Nickel Cadmium (NiCd), Nickel Metal Hydride (Ni-MH), Lithium-Polymer (LiPolymer) and Lithium-Ion (Li-Ion), the only technology recommended and supported
for use with the GS64 is Li-Ion. Li-Ion provides a good combination of high energy
(3.7v) and long cycle life, which lead to low overall energy cost.
LZT 123 1834
43
The weight of lithium ion batteries is approximately one half compared with a nickel
cadmium or nickel metal hydride battery of similar capacity. The volume of lithium
ion batteries is 40 to 50% smaller than that of nickel cadmium, and 20 to 30% smaller
than that of a nickel metal hydride.
The lithium ion battery is free from the so-called memory effect, a phenomenon
associated with nickel cadmium in which the apparent battery capacity decreases
when shallow charge and discharge cycles are repeated.
A single lithium ion cell has a voltage of 3.7V (mean value), which is equal to either
three nickel cadmium or nickel-metal hydride cells connected in series. This voltage
is close to the nominal VCC of the GR64 device.
Li-Ion batteries generally provide long storage life with few limiting condition, and
offer problem-free charge after long storage. Under normal conditions, the lithium
ion battery has a life of more than 500 charge/discharge cycles.
Also, Li-Ion
batteries have a slow self-discharge rate (typically 1.3% per month, compared with
Ni-MH batteries which can exceed 50% per month).
Lithium ion batteries are environmentally friendly, inasmuch as they do not contain
any heavy metal pollution substances such as cadmium, lead, or mercury.
There are many manufacturers of Li-Ion batteries worldwide. Sony Ericsson make no
recommendations with regard to specific vendors, but here are some considerations
for GR64 users which may prove to be useful in the selection process and
implementation:
•
Li-Ion batteries marketed for cellular (mobile) phone use may make a good
choice
•
battery manufacturers with heritage in supplying the cellular (mobile) phone
industry could make a good choice, especially for high-volume requirements
•
look carefully for batteries which are rated at temperatures that the GR64 is
likely to operate at (many batteries are only specified for -20°C to +65°C
operation which may not be sufficient)
•
small form-factor (typically handset-sized) Li-Ion battery capacity varies
considerably, some batteries are rated as high as 3200mAh (600mAh to
1800mAH are more commonly available)
•
weight is generally not a problem with typical GR64 user application, even so
small form-factor Li-Ion batteries (up to 1800mAh) can vary between 10 to 40
grams
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44
•
size is generally a factor of capacity, since larger capacity batteries naturally
have more material/cells, and will range between 2750mm3 to 18000mm3 for
small form-factor Li-Ion batteries
•
the speed by which lithium-ion ages is governed by temperature and stateof-charge; high temperatures and deep discharge will effect useful life
•
if possible avoid frequent full discharges because this puts additional strain
on the battery, partial discharges with frequent recharges are better
•
never short circuit the terminals of a Li-Ion battery
•
do not expose Li-Ion batteries to moisture or rain
•
monitor battery temperature during charging using a thermistor placed on or
near the battery wired to an ADC input on the module
•
Li-Ion batteries have a higher ESR (compared to Ni-Cd or Ni-MH), although
this should not be a limiting factor for peak current delivery, any battery
should be capable of at least 50% greater than the GR64 demands (~3A pk)
To determine battery life, on a full charge, the following rule of thumb can be
applied:
Standby time = Battery Capacity (mAh) / Idle current (mA)
Call time (voice or data) = Battery Capacity (mAh) / Call current (mA)
Example 1 – Standby time:
A 600mAh rated Li-Ion battery, from fully charged (around 4.2V) to the module cutoff point (3.2V) will provide around 95% of its total charge capacity. For a standby
(idle) current of 18mA, the module will typically provide
600*0.95/18 = 32 hours standby time
Example 2 – Call time:
An 1800mAh rated Li-Ion battery fully charged, transmitting maximum power on a
low-band (850/900MHz) channel may consume an average 320mA, therefore the
module would typically provide
1800*0.95/320 = 5 hours 20 mins call time
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45
Example 3 – Typical Operation:
A module performing periodic network data transfers and communicating intervallic
status information to its host would spend its non-active periods in sleep mode. If
the module spends 30 mins each day on call (320mA), 30 second each hour
performing housekeeping, monitoring and status tasks (110mA), and sleeps (2.1mA)
during the intervening periods, an 1800mAh rated Li-Ion battery fully charged would
typically provide
1800*0.95/([0.5hr*320]+[0.2hr*110]+[23.3hr*2.1]) = 7 days 6 hrs operation
The above examples are given for guidance, the actual battery life will
depend upon variables such as battery condition, number of previous
charge/discharge cycles, operating temperature, series resistance
CAUTION
LZT 123 1834
between battery and the module, and manufacturing tolerances
46
5.8 Powering the Module ON and OFF (ON/OFF)
Pin
Name
14
ON/OFF
Direction
Input
Function
Device on/off control
5.8.1 Turning the Module On
Figure 5.8-1 Power On timing
The GR64 power ON sequence is shown above.
ON/OFF and VREF, shown by solid lines.
The significant signals are VCC,
The other signals (in dashed lines) are
internal to the module and are shown for reference purposes only.
Initially, power is supplied to the VCC pins. The presence of power raises the ON/OFF
through a pull-up resistor to VCC potential. In order to power the module, ON/OFF is
pulled to ground. Once ON/OFF has been held low for 125ms (denoted by t1) the
primary LDOs power up; the VREF signal comes from one of the primary LDOs. For
module variants where VREF supplies a reference voltage to the host, it acts as a
useful indicator that the baseband is powered.
When the VREF is configured as an input, it cannot be used as a power
indicator.
NOTE
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47
VREF exceeds it’s reset threshold approx 500µs later, then 250ms afterwards
(denoted by t2) the RESET line goes high. The microprocessor can latch the power on
state by setting the power keep (PWR_KEEP) high after the RESET
goes high and
before the power on (ON/OFF) signal is released.
It is recommended that ON/OFF is held low for at least 450ms to guarantee
completion of the power up sequence.
5.8.2 Turning the Module Off
VCC
ON/OFF
VREF
reset threshold
t3
(RESET)
(PWR_KEEP)
P_ON
pulled low
Power down
sequence complete
power
removed
Figure 5.8-2 Power Down timing
Powering the GR64 power down sequence is shown above. The significant signals are
VCC, ON/OFF and VREF, shown by solid lines. The other signals (in dashed lines) are
internal to the module and are shown for reference purposes only.
With the module powered normally, ON/OFF is pulled-up to VCC potential. In order
to power down the module, ON/OFF is pulled to ground. Once ON/OFF has been held
low for at least 125ms the shut-down procedure begins. Although ON/OFF can be
held low for longer, it will delay completion of the shut-down event. If the module is
registered on a GSM network, the de-registration process will complete; this may last
between 3 to 30 seconds. The power latch (PWR_KEEP) is released and approximately
70ms later the LDO outputs fall.
For module variants where VREF is an output, the absence of VREF is a useful
indicator that the network de-registration and shut-down is complete. Once VREF is
no longer present, the application can safely remove VCC.
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the RTC can continue to operate even though VCC is removed, provided
that a sufficiently charged backup device is connected to the VRTC.
Refer to section 5.18.1 for details.
NOTE
The relevant characteristics of the ON/OFF Power control interface are shown in the
table below.
Parameter
Input current
LZT 123 1834
Conditions
Min
Typ
Max
Unit
Input low (0V), VCC = 3.6V
-60
-25
-12
µA
1
µA
Input high (VCC), VCC = 3.6V
0
49
High-level
Low-level
5.9 Analogue Audio
Pin
Name
Direction
Function
53
MICIP
Input
Microphone input positive
54
MICIN
Input
Microphone input negative
55
EARP
Output
Earpiece output positive
56
EARN
Output
Earpiece output negative
57
AUXO
Output
Auxiliary audio from module to host
59
AUXI
Input
Auxiliary audio to module from host
60
AREF
-
Analogue reference
The analogue audio signals comprise of two audio inputs to the module, and two
audio output from the module.
The Auxiliary interface signals are single-ended,
whilst the MIC and EAR interface signals are differential. Analogue audio can be used
for various configurations, including a car kit mode, portable hands free and
speakerphone (with an additional output gain stage).
Five audio profiles are available for GR64 users to configure various modes of
operation. Each profile is factory set to represent different modes, typical of general
usage. The customer can modify profiles to optimize acoustic performance to their
specific application.
The analogue inputs and outputs share common uplink and downlink chains which
are multiplexed, and selectively switched by the user through AT-commands.
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50
There five factory-set audio profiles as follows:
• Portable hands free
Low-level is recommended.
• Handset
Low-level is recommended.
• Car kit
Low-level is recommended.
• Speakerphone
High-level is recommended.
• Headset
Low-level or High-level can be used with headset, depending on requirements.
Portable hands free is the factory-set default profile. The modification, configuration,
manipulation and storage of audio profiles is achieved with the AT*E2EAMS (Audio
Profile Modification) and AT*E2APR (Audio Profile).
5.9.1 Auxiliary Audio to Mobile Station (AUXI)
AUXI is a single-ended auxiliary analogue audio input to the wireless modem.
Internally, the signal is routed to the CODEC (COder/DECoder), where it is converted
to digital audio and mapped to an internal bus.
AUXI provides a DC bias when it is used as the microphone input in Portable Handsfree applications. All other sources must be AC-coupled to avoid attenuation of low
frequencies, and to prevent incorrect biasing or damage to the AUXI input. Use a
capacitor greater than the value shown in the table below.
The AUXI input is a passive network followed by the transmit part of the CODEC.
Parameter
Input voltage full scale
Frequency response
Output dc bias level
AC coupling capacitance
LZT 123 1834
Conditions
Min
Typ
Max
Unit
max input gain
142
158
178
mVrms
min input gain
447
501
564
mVrms
-3dB cut-off
300
3400
Hz
2.64
V
2.16
1
2.4
µF
51
5.9.2 Auxiliary Audio from Mobile Station (AUXO)
AUXO is a single-ended auxiliary analogue audio output from the wireless modem
and may be used to drive a speaker or an earpiece. The interface has an internal
100nF coupling capacitor; a load of 10kohm will provide a near full-scale output
capability between 300 to 4300 Hz.
The table below shows the audio signal levels for AUXO.
Parameter
Conditions
Min
Typ
Max
Unit
Output voltage full scale RL =10kΩ
670
750
840
mVrms
Frequency response
225
-3dB cut-off (RL =10kΩ)
Hz
5.9.3 Microphone Signals (MICIP, MICIN)
MICP and MICN are balanced differential microphone input pins. These inputs are
compatible with an electret microphone. The microphone contains a FET buffer with
an open drain output, which is supplied with at 2.4V ±10% relative to ground by the
wireless modem as shown below.
Figure 5.9-1 Microphone connections to the wireless modem
The input low-noise amplifier stage is constructed out of standard low-noise op
amps. External resistors set the gain of this stage.
The input gain is scaled by the input resistors to be around 18, which provides
optimal performance for many standard types of electret microphones. The module
provides a microphone bias at 2.4V, and can supply at least 1mA of current.
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52
Parameter
Input voltage full scale
Frequency response
Conditions
Min
Typ
Max
Unit
max input gain
14
16
18
mVrms
min input gain
45
50
56
mVrms
3400
Hz
2.64
V
-3dB cut-off
Output dc bias level
300
2.16
2.4
5.9.4 Speaker Signals (EARP, EARN)
EARP and EARN are the speaker output signals. These are differential-mode outputs.
With a full-scale PCM input to the CODEC, 0 dB audio output gain setting, and a
differential load RL = 30Ω, the output voltage between EARP and EARN is 1.5 V rms.
For load resistances less than 30Ω, the full-scale output needs is limited using the
modules internal programmable gain attenuator.
The electrical characteristics are given in the table below.
Parameter
Conditions
Min
Typ
Max
Unit
RL = 30Ω
1.34
1.5
1.68
Vrms
RL = 16 Ω
1.41
Vrms
RL = 8Ω
1.24
Vrms
-3dB cut-off
300
Input voltage full scale
Frequency response
3400
Hz
5.10 PCM Digital Audio (SSP)
Pin
Name
Direction
Function
48
SSPDFM
Output
Serial PCM data from module to host
47
SSPDTM
Input
Serial PCM data to module from host
51
SSPFS
In/Out
Serial PCM frame synchronization
52
SSPCLK
In/Out
Serial PCM clock
The SSP (Synchronous Serial Port) digital interface is configured to provide a PCM
(digital) audio interface.
This interface can be used to process PCM digital audio
signals as an alternative to routing signals to the CODECs through the analogue
uplink and downlink chains.
5.10.1 PCM Data Format
The PCM digital audio interface for GR64 is based upon the Texas Instruments SSI
standard.
The SSP is a versatile interface which can be programmed for different
clock rates and data frame sizes between 4 to 16 bits.
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PCMCLK (bit clock) and PCMSYNC (frame synchronization) are both generated by the
DSP within the wireless modem. The DSP within the wireless modem in this instance
is the master for all external PCM, so clocks and data from external devices must be
synchronized to it.
For standard GSM voice a 13-Bit PCM data word is embedded in a 16-bit word frame,
as shown in Figure 5.10-1 below.
sample LSB justified
MSB
LSB
D15
D0
13-bit sample occupies these frame bits
Figure 5.10-1 Typical 16-bit PCM Voice Sample Word Format
Typical PCM data transfer is shown in the following figures.
SSPCLK
SSPFS
SSPDTM
SSPDFM
Q
MSB
LSB
MSB
LSB
Q
Figure 5.10-2 PCM Frame format for a single transfer
SSPCLK
SSPFS
SSPDTM
LSB
MSB
LSB
MSB
SSPDFM
LSB
MSB
LSB
MSB
Frame n-1
Frame n
Frame n+1
Figure 5.10-3 PCM Frame format for a continuous transfer
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54
The PCM interface has a Slave mode, however the allocated DSP buffer size limits the
maximum data rate available.
A separate Application Note describing slave mode
implementation can be obtained from Sony Ericsson through Customer Support.
5.11 Serial Data Interfaces
The serial channels consist of two UARTs and a USB port.
communication links to the application or accessory units.
These provide
The serial channels can be used in differing configurations, depending upon the users
requirements and application.
described:
However, the common configuration options are
• UART1 has full RS-232 functionality and is used for all on- and off –line
communication (modem sleep & wake functional control is an integral component
of this interface). Its intended use is that of the primary command (AT) interface.
• UART3 behaves as a general-purpose serial data link.
It can be used for data
logging and de-bugging purposes. A GPS device can be used with UART3 as part
of an embedded application.
• The USB port provides a convenient general purpose peripheral (slave) port for use
with host devices which have USB controllers.
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5.11.1 UART1
Pin
Name
Direction
Function
32
DSR1
Output
Data Set Ready (UART1)
36
RI
Output
Ring Indicator
37
DTR1
Input
38
DCD1
Output
39
RTS1
Input
Ready To Send (UART1)
40
CTS1
Output
Clear To Send (UART1)
41
DTM1
Input
Data To Module from host (UART1)
42
DFM1
Output
Data From Module to host (UART1)
Data Terminal Ready (UART1)
Data Carrier Detect (UART1)
UART1 is a full featured Universal Asynchronous Receiver Transmitter providing fullduplex asynchronous communication.
UART1 has the following features:
• 32 bytes of FIFO for both receive and transmit
• FIFO threshold interrupts
• 1 start bit, 7 or 8 data bits, 1 optional parity bit, 1 or 2 stop bits
• Programmable baud rate
• Auto-configuration mode with auto-baud and auto-format operation
• Hardware flow control
• Software flow control.
UART1 signals replicate a 9-pin RS232 (V.24) serial port. However, UART1 signal
levels are not compliant with the RS232 (V.28) standard. Conversion between the
wireless modem CMOS levels and RS232 levels can be achieved using a standard
interface IC, such as the Maxim Integrated Products MAX3237. The relationship
between the levels is shown in the following table:
DTM, DFM
RI,RTS,CTS,DSR,DTM,DCD
RS232 level
GR64 level
1
OFF
<-3V
VREF-0.4V
0
ON
>+3V
0.4V
5.11.2 Serial Data Signals (DTM1, DFM1)
The default baud rate of the UARTs is auto-baud. Baud rates of between 600 bauds
to 460 kbauds are possible.
The wireless modem also supports 3GPP TS 27.010
multiplexing protocol, which starts when the appropriate command is sent.
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5.11.2.1
Serial Data From Wireless modem (DFM1)
DFM1 is an output signal that the wireless modem uses to send data via UART1 to the
host application.
The electrical characteristics of this level-shifted signal are described in section 5.3.1.
5.11.2.2
Serial Data To Wireless modem (DTM1)
DTM1 is an input signal, used by the application to send data via UART1 to the
wireless modem.
The electrical characteristics of this level-shifted signal are described in section 5.3.1.
5.11.3 Control Signals (RTS1, CTS1, DTR1, DSR1, DCD1, RI)
Depending upon the user application, some, all, or none of the control signals may be
needed.
Each of the control signals can alternatively be configured as a general
purpose IO. When hardware flow control is not used in communications between the
application and the wireless modem, some applications may require RTS and CTS to
be connected to each other at the wireless modem.
themselves with the specific implementation of their UART.
Users should familiarize
UART1 converted signals, together with GND, DTM1 and DFM1 form a 9-pin RS232
data port.
The electrical characteristics of these level-shifted signals are described in section
5.3.1.
5.11.3.1
Hardware flow control RTS1 and CTS1
RTS and CTS provide a hardware flow control mechanism.
5.11.3.2
Request to Send (RTS1)
RTS is used to condition the DCE for data transmission. The default level is high by
internal pull up. The application must pull RTS low to enable data transmission from
the wireless modem. Similarly, the wireless modem asserts CTS low, indicating it is
ready to receive data transmission from the host.
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57
5.11.3.3
Clear To Send (CTS1)
CTS is asserted by the DCE to indicate that the host (DTE) may transmit data. When
CTS is high, the host (DTE) is not permitted to transmit data. The table below shows
the load characteristics for this signal.
5.11.3.4
Data Terminal Ready (DTR1)
DTR indicates that the DTE is ready to receive data. It also acts as a hardware ‘hang-
up’, terminating calls when switched high. The signal is active low. To define the
exact behavior of DTR, use an AT&D command.
5.11.3.5
Data Set Ready (DSR1)
DSR indicates that the DCE is ready to receive data. The signal is active low. To define
the behavior, use an AT&S command.
5.11.3.6
Data Carrier Detect (DCD1)
DCD indicates that the DCE is receiving a valid carrier (data signal) when low. To
define the exact behavior of DCD use an AT&C command
5.11.3.7
Ring Indicator (RI)
RI indicates that a ringing signal is being received by the DCE when low. To define
the exact behavior of RI, use using the AT*E2SMSRI command, which includes the
option of asserting the RI signal to flag an incoming SMS.
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58
5.11.4 UART3 (DTM3, DFM3)
Pin
Name
Direction
Function
43
DTM3
Input
Data To Module from host (UART3)
44
DFM3
Output
Data From Module to host (UART3)
UART 3 consists of a full duplex serial communication port with transmission and
reception lines.
Timing and electrical signals characteristics are the same as for UART1, DTM1 and
DFM1, including the baud rate range and the capability to auto-baud.
5.11.4.1
Transmitted Data (DTM3)
DTM3 is used by the application to send data to the wireless modem via UART3. It
has the same electrical characteristics the equivalent signal in UART1.
5.11.4.2
Received Data (DFM3)
DFM3 is used to send data to the application via UART3. It has the same electrical
characteristics as the equivalent signal in UART1.
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59
5.11.5 USB
Pin
Name
Direction
45
USBDP
In/Out
USB data positive
46
USBDN
In/Out
USB data negative
49
VUSB
Input
Function
USB DC power
The USB interface is compliant with the USB2.0 standard for a full speed (12Mbps)
endpoint device.
Together with VUSB and GND it creates a standard USB 4-pin
interface. VUSB (VBUS in the USB standard) is nominally 5.0V.
USB is not available on legacy variant GR64 devices (DPY 102 1494/10
& DPY 102 1494/30 products).
On these products, the signal
connections can be left un-terminated.
NOTE
The USB interface has the following features:
• Full-speed (12 Mbits/s) device operation
• 16 unidirectional endpoints
• Each endpoint capable of supporting control, interrupt, isochronous and bulk
transfer
• Programmable endpoint types and FIFO sizes and internal 1120-byte logical
(2240-byte physical for dual-packet mode) shared FIFO storage allow a wide
variety of configurations.
• Dual-packet mode of FIFOs reduces latency
• USB reset can be programmed to clear device address.
• Firmware ability to wake up and reset a suspended device
• 8, 16, 32, and 64-byte FIFO sizes for non-isochronous transfers
• 64, 256, 512, and 1024-byte FIFO sizes for isochronous transfers
• Firmware downloading
• Trace debug port for module diagnostics
The USB interface supports 3GPP TS 27.010 multiplexing, and may be used as the
primary AT-command interface.
Internally, the USBDP line is pulled up by a 1.5K resistor, in accordance with the USB
standard, to indicate that it’s a full-speed capable device to the USB controller.
To implement successful applications using the GR64 USB interface, users should
familiarize themselves with the USB specification.
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60
5.11.6 SIM Card Interface
Pin
Name
Direction
Function
15
SIMVCC
Output
16
SIMDET
Input
17
SIMRST
Output
SIM card reset signal
18
SIMDAT
In/Out
SIM card data
19
SIMCLK
Output
SIM card clock signal
1.8V or 3.0V SIM card supply
SIM presence detection
This interface allows the user to communicate with the smart (SIM) card in the user
application.
The GR64 offers alternative arrangements for accessing the SIM
depending on which variant of the GR64 is used. Both variants provide this interface
through the system connector, referred to as the external or remote SIM interface to
distinguish it from the integrated SIM interface.
The maximum distance between the SIM card holder and the wireless modem is
70cm. SIM holders placed further than this distance may not meet the SIM interface
performance specification.
This SIM interface allows the use of 3 V and 1.8 V SIM cards (5V is unsupported). The
wireless modem automatically detects the SIM type, switching the signal voltages
accordingly.
Signal
Parameter
SIM supply voltage
SIMVCC
Quiescent Supply Current
Max
Unit
1.8V
1.71
1.8
1.89
V
3.0V
2.75
2.9
3.05
V
50
mA
10
3.0V
20
µA
0.3
2
µF
Output Capacitor ESR
0.01
1.0
Ω
1.8V
0.7xSIMVCC
V
3.0V
0.7xSIMVCC
V
SIMDAT
High level output voltage (VOH)
Low level output voltage (VOL)
LZT 123 1834
Typ
Output Capacitance
Low level input voltage (VIL)
SIMRST
Min
Short circuit current
High level input voltage (VIH)
SIMCLK
Mode
High level output voltage (VOH)
Low level output voltage (VOL)
1.8V
0.2xSIMVCC
V
3.0V
0.4
V
1.8V
0.8xSIMVCC
V
3.0V
0.8xSIMVCC
V
1.8V
0.4
V
3.0V
0.4
V
1.8V
0.9xSIMVCC
V
3.0V 0.9xSIMVCC
V
1.8V
0.4
V
3.0V
0.4
V
61
5.11.7 SIM Detection (SIMDET)
SIMDET is used to determine whether a SIM card has been inserted into or removed
from the SIM card holder. You should normally wire it to the ‘card inserted switch’ of
the SIM card holder, but different implementations are possible.
When left open, an internal pull-up resistor maintains the signal high and means ‘SIM
card missing’ to the wireless modem. When pulled low the radio device assumes a SIM
card is inserted. SIMDET is a Digital IO signal input with characteristics defined in
paragraph 5.3.1.
In order to meet regulatory approval requirements, the SIMDET function
must be implemented in the host application.
NOTE
5.12 Service/Programming
Pin
Name
Direction
Function
58
SERVICE
Input
Flash programming enable signal
The SERVICE interface is flash programming enable input. The SERVICE pin is driven
active high by the host application using either a logic control input or applying a dc
voltage (common in legacy applications) to begin a flash download. This pin should
be pulled low or grounded during normal use.
The SERVICE signal drives an N-channel FET switch which has a resistive divider on
the input.
Figure 5.12-1 SERVICE Pin Interface
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62
Signal
Mode
Value
Active High
SERVICE
Inactive Low
Minimum input voltage
2.5
V
Maximum input voltage
12.0
V
Maximum input voltage
0.8
V
There are two methods for updating the firmware in the GR64:
Sony Ericsson Emma III and Updater. The Emma III system is a web
based tool that accesses a Sony Ericsson server from which signed
software can be downloaded. The Updater is a local application
NOTE
that downloads a signed image provided by SEMC.
5.13 Buzzer
Pin
Name
31
BUZZER
Direction
Output
Function
Buzzer Output
Connecting the BUZZER signal to an inverting transistor-buffer followed by a
piezoelectric transducer enables the wireless modem to play pre-programmed
melodies or sounds.
5.14 LED
Pin
Name
33
LED
Direction
Output
Function
LED control signal
The LED interface is intended to operate a status LED, which can be programmed on
and off, or for a particular blink sequence. The LED signal is derived from a standard
GPIO and does not have sufficient drive capability to operate an LED directly, so it
requires the user to implement some form of transistor circuit.
implementation is shown below.
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A recommended
63
Figure 5.14-1 Recommended circuit for an LED
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64
5.15 General Purpose IO
Pin
Name
Default
Alternate function
21
GPIO1
GPIO1
22
GPIO2
GPIO2
23
GPIO3
GPIO3
24
GPIO4
GPIO4
13
GPIO5
ADIN4
ADC Input 4
33
GPIO6
LED
LED control signal
32
GPIO7
DSR1
Data Set Ready (UART1)
36
GPIO8
RI
Ring Indicator
39
GPIO9
RTS1
Ready To Send (UART1)
37
GPIO10
DTR1
Data Terminal Ready (UART1)
38
GPIO11
DCD1
Data Carrier Detect (UART1)
40
GPIO12
CTS1
Clear To Send (UART1)
All general purpose IO (GPIO) is programmable by the user. Some GPIO has alternate
functionality already associated with it; this is indicated in the default column. GPIO
which has alternate function is effectively multiplexed, so that the user chooses
through AT commands the appropriate configuration for their application.
GPIO is programmable for the following features:
• An input or output
• Level-sensitive or transition-sensitive
• Open drain or direct drive
• Polarity (inversion)
• Internal pull-up resistors
If pins labeled in the table above are not being used for the indicated alternative
function they may be used as general purpose inputs or outputs; they are not
constrained to work in only one direction. All GPIO is level shifted on the GR64, and
has the characteristics defined in paragraph 5.3.1.
GPIO has a number of sharing (configuration) options. Sharing means that it is not
feasible to operate all the alternative features concurrently, however, with care,
dynamic switching from one feature to another is possible.
Users should note that if flow control is required for UART1 then GPIOs 7 to 12
inclusive cannot be configured for general purpose use.
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Some GPIO is configured to provide a keyboard interface (details are covered in the
next section).
In the GR64, all IO undergoes level shifting to maintain backward compatibility with
older interface technology.
Users should not that GPIO that is used truly bi-
directional cannot be open drain type on both sides. At least one side needs to be
able to drive the signal both high and low.
5.15.1 Embedded Applications
When a particular IO feature is required, the user sets the state of the relevant IO
blocks by disabling one set before enabling others.
The wireless modem checks the state of the IO when the user requests a new
function. The new function is rejected if the current function is not released first.
The states of GPIOn to GPIOm are retained for the next power up.
For example,
inputs remain as inputs and outputs remain as outputs. The voltage of a defined
output pin will still drop to 0 Volts in the wireless modem power down state.
5.15.2 LED/IO6 Capabilities
The LED function pin can be used as a general purpose digital I/O when the flashing
LED function is not required. However, this pin does not have an on-board pull-up
resistor. It is required that an external pull-up or pull-down resistor be provided by
the host circuitry when either not used or when used as a digital input.
5.15.3 ADC4
A further ADC input (in addition to the three dedicated pins) is created by
multiplexing one of the GPIO signals (GPIO5).
In order to use ADC4 as a GPIO interface you must insert a 1kohm series resistor
between the host circuit and the module on this pin.
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5.16 Digital to Analogue Converter – DAC
Pin
Name
Direction
20
DAC
Output
Function
Pulse width modulated signal
The GPIOx has dual functionality. In addition of being a fully programmable GPIO it
also has the capability of becoming a PWM output. This PWM can be used as a DAC
by implementing an RC-filter followed by an optional buffer.
Figure 5.16-1 Typical arrangement for adapting PWM for a DAC function
5.17 Analogue to Digital Converters (ADIN1, ADIN2, ADIN3, ADIN4)
Pin
Name
Direction
Function
26
ADIN1
Input
ADC Input 1
27
ADIN2
Input
ADC Input 2
28
ADIN3
Input
ADC Input 3
13
ADIN4
Input
ADC Input 4/GPIO5
ADC pins is converted and stored in a register inside the wireless modem. When the
appropriate AT command is received by the wireless modem, the digital value stored
in the register is read.
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The module has a single precision 10-bit ADC, shared by a number of functions
within the module and also through the external interface connections (three
dedicated, one shared). The ADC sharing arrangement is shown below.
Figure 5.17-1 ADC sharing arrangement
ADC sampling frequency and sampling source selection can be set up and controlled
with AT-commands by the user. ADC samples requires up to 5 clock (ADCLK) cycles
to process. The ADC also performs some system-level sampling. These two factors
limit the maximum practical sampling rate to around 20ksps.
Parameter
Condition
Min
Resolution
Differential Nonlinearity
Integral Nonlinearity
Full-scale Error
Offset Error
ADC output=000h
High-level Input Voltage
ADC output=3FFh
ADC Sample Delay
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bit
3FF
Hex
–1
1
lsb
–10
10
lsb
–3
3
%
–14
14
lsb
Conversion Intercept*
Low-level Input Voltage
Unit
000
Conversion Gain*
ADC Conversion Time
Max
10
Coding: Unsigned Magnitude
ADC Clock (ADCLK)
Typ
421
lsb/V
–9
lsb
2.45
260
325
2.59
V
390
kHz
12
ADCLK
5
ADCLK
68
5.18 I2C Serial Control Bus
Pin
Name
Direction
Function
29
SDA
In/Out
I2C data
30
SCL
Output
I2C clock
The I2C interface comprises two signals; data (SDA) and clock (SCL). Both SDA and
SCL have pull-up resistors. Therefore, when the bus is free, both SDA and SCL are in
a HIGH state.
The GR64 implementation of I2C supports only a single master mode, with the
module being the master. The output stages of SDA and SCL must have an open-
drain or open-collector to perform a wired-AND function. The wired-AND function
provides the I2C bus ability to perform clock synchronization on the SCL line. Due to
the wired-AND function, the SCL line will be held LOW by the device with the longest
LOW period. Therefore, the device with the shorter LOW period will be in a HIGH
wait-state during this time.
Clock synchronization can be used as a handshaking mechanism, to enable receivers
to cope with fast data transfers. On a byte level, a slave (host application-side) I2C
device may be able receive a data transfer, but need time to store the byte received
before it is ready to receive another byte. The slave/receiver will therefore hold the
SCL line low, after sending the acknowledge bit following the byte received, thereby
forcing the master into a wait state. Once the SCL is released by the slave/receiver,
the wait state of the master will end. This feature of the I2C standard is known as
clock-stretching and is supported by the GR64.
The I2C interface supports Standard-mode (100kbps) and Fast-mode (400kbps). It
also supports Normal (7-bit) addressing and Extended (10-bit) addressing.
Fast-mode signal characteristics
Parameter
SCL clock frequency
Min
0
Typ
Max
Unit
400
kHz
LOW period of the SCL clock
1.3
µs
HIGH period of the SCL clock
0.6
µs
Data hold time
Capacitive load for each bus line
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0.9
µs
400
pF
69
5.19 Burst Transmission (TX_ON)
Pin
Name
Direction
35
TX_ON
Output
Function
Transmit indication
Burst transmission is the period during which the GSM transceiver is transmitting RF
signals. TX_ON is an indicator that the module is transmitting.
A typical application may use TX_ON to blank adjacent receiver circuitry as a means of
protecting sensitive input stages. TX_ON is active HIGH.
5.20 Real Time Clock
The real-time clock (RTC) is driven by a 32.768 kHz clock from an internal crystal
oscillator. The clock is divided by 32,768 to generate a clock with a 1 second period
that increments a 29-bit seconds counter. In addition, it can generate interrupts at a
programmed time. The following are the features of RTC:
• 17-year time interval with 1 second resolution.
• Programmed time alarm interrupt
• Alarm output pin
An RTC alarm can be set by loading an appropriate value into the seconds alarm
register and enabling an interrupt via an AT-command.
The RTC relies on an uninterrupted 1.5 V (nominal) power supply (VRTC), whether the
module is powered off or on. The RTC alarm operates from the VRTC supply, and
therefore utilize 1.5 V logic. Users have the responsibility to provide a backup battery
to provide uninterrupted VRTC function when the module is powered down.
RTC Accuracy
Parameter
Condition
Max
Unit
RTC accuracy
Ambient (+25±2°C) operation
52.6
Secs/month
RTC accuracy
Extreme temperatures
65.2
Secs/month
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5.20.1 Real Time Clock Backup Supply (VRTC)
Pin
Name
Direction
25
VRTC
Input
Function
DC supply for real time clock
VRTC provides an input connection to the module which allows the user to power the
real time clock (RTC) within the GR64 by way of a coin cell or charged capacitor.
When the module is powered, an internal LDO regulator provides a 200µA source
designed to supply the microprocessor’s RTC block. It is also intended to recondition
a rechargeable coin cell that supplies the RTC module when the main battery is
removed, or has insufficient energy. Because this LDO is always on, even when the
module is powered down, it features very low quiescent current. It also offers reverse
current protection, with low leakage, when the coin cell is powering the RTC block.
The RTC LDO is primarily designed to charge manganese-silicon lithium batteries.
Rechargeable coin cells with different chemical composition may also be charged,
provided their charging requirements are consistent with the RTC LDO’s electrical
characteristics. The VRTC output is nominally 1.5 V.
VRTC LDO characteristics
Parameter
Condition
Min
Typ
Max
Output Voltage Tolerance
IOUT = 10 µA
1.45
1.5
1.55
Maximum Output Current
200
Unit
V
µA
Short-circuit Current Limit
VRTC to GND
0.7
1.6
2.9
mA
Output Resistance
IOUT = 10 µA
75
100
150
Ω
Line Regulation
IOUT = 10 µA
5
mV
1
µA
Off Reverse Leakage Current
0.1
In the backup condition the RTC block will function to as low as 1.1V on the VRTC
pin. The RTC draws 10µA typically during powered backup (15µA max).
Figure 5.20-1 shows the VRTC connectivity arrangement.
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Figure 5.20-1 VRTC connection
5.20.2 RTC Alarm (ALARM)
Pin
Name
50
ALARM
Direction
Output
Function
RTC Alarm
The Alarm output is logic output from the module which is supplied from the RTC
circuitry block.
This block is in turn supplied either from the main supply of the
module or from a backup battery if the main supply is not available.
5.20.2.1
ALARM Output from the Module
The ALARM time is set by the use of an AT-command. The output is normally at
VRTC level and will go low for one second when the ALARM becomes active.
Since the VRTC interface is operable down to 1.1V, transistor circuitry must be used
on the host side. It is recommended that integrators use an FET to minimize current
consumption. If a suitable FET, operating at the low voltage necessary, cannot be
found then bi-polar must be used. The resistors shall be kept as high impedance as
possible to minimize current consumption.
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Figure 5.20-2 Typical host-side circuit for ALARM output
VRTC is specified to work down to 1.1V across the environmental operating
conditions of the GR64. Integrators may discover in controlled environments that the
VRTC interface will function reliably as low as 0.8V, so best practice would be to
design the circuitry to operate down to 0.7V.
5.20.3 ALARM Utilization as a Wake-up
The ALARM output can be used by the host application to wake up from standby or
hibernation mode, but it can also be used to completely power up the host
application. The example below shows how the ALARM output (marked Out on Figure
5.20-2, and In on Figure 5.20-3) triggers the enabling of the main power to the
application. The application has a parallel hold transistor (V4), and a Start Button.
Figure 5.20-3 Example of host wake-up circuit
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6
Antenna Connector
The wireless modem’s antenna connector allows transmission of the radio frequency
(RF) signals from the wireless modem to an external customer supplied antenna. The
connector is a micro-miniature coaxial MMCX through hole mounted socket.
A number of suitable MMCX type, mating plugs are available from the following
manufacturers:
• Amphenol
• Suhner
• IMS Connector Systems
The nominal impedance of the antenna interface is 50 ohms.
Feature
GSM850
E-GSM900
GSM1800
GSM1900
Frequency range (MHz)
824-894
880-960
1710-1880
1850-1990
Maximum power
33dBm (2W) 33dBm (2W) 30dBm (1W) 30dBm (1W)
Antenna Connector impedance
Antenna VSWR
50 ohms
2.5:1 max
To bypass the MMCX connector, a pair of PCB landing pads are
available on the underside of the module. You can probe these pads or
solder a coaxial cable directly to them. Sony Ericsson; however, cannot
NOTE
guarantee absolute performance when connecting to the antenna in
this way due to the attenuation such a connection could potentially
cause. When connecting in this way, proceed with care.
5.20-4 RF Antenna Pad Dimensions
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7
Hints for Integrating the Wireless Modem
This chapter gives you advice and helpful hints on how to integrate the wireless
modem into your application from a hardware perspective.
Make sure you read and consider the information under the following headings
before starting your integration work:
• Safety advice and precautions
• Installation of the wireless modem
• Antenna
7.1 Safety Advice and Precautions
7.1.1 General
Always ensure that use of the wireless modem is permitted. The radio device may
present a hazard if used in proximity to personal medical electronic devices. As a
rule, the wireless modem must not be used in hospitals or onboard aircraft.
You are responsible for observing your country’s safety standards, and where
applicable the relevant wiring rules.
Never use the wireless modem at a gas station, refueling point, blasting area or in any
other environment where combustible vapors or explosives may be present.
Operating the wireless modem close to other electronic devices, such as antennas,
television sets, and radios may cause electromagnetic interference.
Never try to dismantle the wireless modem yourself. There are no components inside
the wireless modem that can be serviced by the user. If you attempt to dismantle the
wireless modem, you may invalidate the warranty.
To protect the power supply cables and meet the fire safety requirements, it is
recommended that the electrical circuits are supplied with a power regulator. The
power regulator should be placed as close to the terminals of the power supply as
possible.
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Do not connect any incompatible component or product to the module.
!
Sony Ericsson does not warrant against defects, malfunction, non-
conformities or deviation caused by the connection of incompatible
components or products to the GR64.
WARNING
The connection/disconnection method for the development board is by means of the
DC power jack. For this reason, the mains supply should be situated close to the
development board and be easily accessible.
7.2 SIM Card
Before handling any SIM card, users should ensure that they are not charged with
static electricity.
Use proper precautions to avoid electrostatic discharges. The
wireless modem must be switched off before the SIM card is installed or uninstalled.
When the SIM card holder is opened, the SIM card connections lie exposed under the
SIM card holder.
CAUTION: Do not touch these connections! Failure to heed this advice may release an
electrical discharge that could damage the wireless modem or the SIM card.
When designing applications, the SIM card’s accessibility should be taken into
account.
Sony Ericsson recommends that users protect SIM card access by a PIN
code. This will ensure that the SIM card cannot be used by an unauthorized person.
7.3 Antenna
If the antenna is to be mounted outside, consider the risk of lightning.
Always follow the instructions provided by the antenna manufacturer.
Never connect more than one wireless modem to a single antenna.
The wireless modem can be damaged by radio frequency energy from the transmitter
of another adjacent wireless transmitter.
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Like any mobile station, the antenna of the wireless modem emits radio frequency
energy. To avoid EMI (electromagnetic interference), users must determine whether
the application itself, or equipment in the application’s proximity, requires further
protection against radio emission and the disturbances it might cause. Protection is
secured either by shielding the surrounding electronics or by moving the antenna
away from the electronics and the external signals cable.
The wireless modem and antenna may be damaged if either come into contact with
ground potentials other than the one in the users application.
potential are not always what they appear to be.
Beware, ground
In the final application, the antenna must be positioned more than 20 cm away from
human bodies.
When this rule cannot be applied, the application designer is
responsible for providing the SAR measurement test report and declaration.
Even if SAR measurements are not required, it is considered good practice to insert a
warning in any manual produced, indicating it is a radio product and that care should
be taken.
7.4 Installation of the Wireless modem
7.4.1 Where to Install the Wireless modem
The following conditions need to be taken into consideration when designing your
application as they might affect the wireless modem and its function:
• Environmental conditions
• Signal strength
• Connection of components to wireless modem
• Network and subscription
7.4.1.1 Environmental Conditions
The wireless modem must be installed so that the environmental conditions stated in
the Technical Data chapter, such as temperature, humidity and vibration are satisfied.
Additionally, the electrical specifications in the Technical Data section must not be
exceeded.
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7.4.1.2 Signal Strength
The wireless modem has to be placed in a way that ensures sufficient signal strength.
To improve signal strength, the antenna can be moved to another position. Signal
strength may depend on how close the wireless modem is to a radio base station. You
must ensure that the location at which you intend to use the wireless modem, is
within the network coverage area.
Degradation in signal strength can be the result of a disturbance from another
source, for example an electronic device in the immediate vicinity. More information
about possible communication disturbances can be found in section 8.3.5, page 59.
When an application is completed, you can verify signal strength by issuing the AT
command AT+CSQ or AT*E2EMM. See the AT Commands Manual for further details.
Before installing the wireless modem, use an ordinary mobile telephone
to check a possible location for it. In determining the location for the
radio device and antenna, you should consider signal strength as well
TIP
as cable length.
7.4.1.3 Connection of Components to Wireless modem
The integrator is responsible for the final integrated system. Incorrectly designed or
installed, external components may cause radiation limits to be exceeded. For
instance, improperly made connections or improperly installed antennas can disturb
the network and lead to malfunctions in the wireless modem or equipment.
7.4.1.4 Network and Subscription
Before the integrator’s application is used, the user must ensure that their chosen
network provides the necessary telecommunication services.
contact their service provider to obtain the necessary information.
Integrators should
Integrators intending to use SMS in the application should ensure this is included in
their (voice) subscription.
Similarly, integrators intending to use GPRS for data services should also ensure that
this service is available on their network and in their account plan.
Users should consider the choice of the supplementary services described in section
2.3.2 Short Message Service, on page 14.
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7.4.2 How to Install the Wireless modem
7.4.2.1 Power Supply
Use a high-quality power supply cable with low resistance.
This ensures that the
voltages at the connector pins are within the allowed range, even during the
maximum peak current. An electrolytic capacitor should be placed close to the power
supply pins of the wireless modem to supply the peak currents during burst
transmission. See 5.5 Regulated Power Supply Input (VCC), page 38.
7.4.2.2 Grounds
A ground connection is provided at the mounting hole next to the RF connector on
the wireless modem (see Figure 5.1, page 19). Connect this ground point to the GND
pins of the wireless modem by the shortest, low impedance path possible. The
purpose of this connection is to allow any ESD picked up by the antenna to bypass the
wireless modem’s internal ground path.
It is recommended that you use a cable with a maximum resistance of 5
milliohm for the ground connection.
AREFand GND are connected at a single point inside the wireless
NOTE
modem. They must not be joined together in your application.
7.4.2.3 Audio
Use a coupling capacitor in AUXI line if the application does not use the wireless
modem’s bias voltage. See also Figure 5.9-1 Microphone connections to the wireless
modem, page 52.
7.4.2.4 Software Upgrade
There are two ways of updating the firmware in the GR64. There is a web-based tool
that can access a Sony Ericsson server from where SW can be downloaded. There also
is an Updater, which is a local application that downloads an image provided by
SEMC.
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7.5 Antenna
7.5.1 General
The antenna is the component in the users system that maintains the radio link
between the network and the wireless modem. Since the antenna transmits and
receives electromagnetic energy, its efficient function will depend on:
• Type of antenna (for example, circular or directional)
• Placement of the antenna
• Communication disturbances in the vicinity in which the antenna operates
In the sections below, issues concerning antenna type, antenna placement, antenna
cable, and possible communication disturbances are addressed.
In any event, users should contact their local antenna manufacturer for additional
information concerning antenna type, cables, connectors, antenna placement, and the
surrounding area. Users should also determine whether the antenna needs to be
grounded or not. Usually, a local antenna manufacturer should be able to design a
special antenna suitable for the integrators application and environment.
7.5.2 Antenna Type
Users should ensure that they choose the right type of antenna for the wireless
modem.
The antenna must be designed for the frequency bands deployed in the regions that
the wireless modem is being used. For fixed locations this may be dual bands (for
example E-GSM900/GSM1800 in Europe; GSM850/GSM1900 in North America). For
applications which are mobile, users should consider whether three or all four GSM
bands could be encountered.
Other factors in choosing antenna are equally important:
• Impedance of the antenna and antenna cable must be 50 ohms at all frequencies
being used
• Antenna output-power handling capability must be a minimum of 2 W
• Antenna VSWR value should be less than 3:1 to avoid damage to the radio device
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7.5.3 Antenna Placement
The antenna should be placed away from electronic devices or other antennas. The
recommended minimum distance between adjacent antennas, operating in a similar
radio frequency band, is at least 50 cm.
If signal strength is weak, it is useful to face a directional antenna at the closest radio
base station. This can increase the strength of the signal received by the wireless
modem.
The wireless modem’s peak output power can reach 2 W. RF field strength varies with
antenna type and distance. At 10 cm from the antenna the field strength may be up
to 70 V/m and at 1m it will have reduced to 7 V/m.
In general, CE-marked products for residential and commercial areas, and light
industry can withstand a minimum of 3 V/m.
7.5.4 The Antenna Cable
Use 50 ohm impedance low-loss cable and high-quality 50 ohm impedance
connectors (frequency range up to at least 2 GHz) to avoid RF losses. Ensure that the
antenna cable is as short as possible.
The effectiveness of the antenna, cable and connectors is determined by their quality.
All connectors, adaptors and cables should be of the highest quality, lowest loss,
lowest VSWR rating that is affordable to the user.
Minimize the use of extension cables, connectors and adapters.
Each additional
cable, connector or adapter will result in additional loss of signal power.
7.5.5 Possible Communication Disturbances
Communication disturbances can adversely effect the quality of wireless links,
including the following causes:
• Noise can be caused by electronic devices and radio transmitters.
• Path-loss occurs as the strength of the received signal steadily decreases in
proportion to the distance from the transmitter.
• Shadowing is a form of environmental attenuation of radio signals caused by hills,
buildings, trees or even vehicles.
This can be a particular problem inside
buildings, especially if the walls are thick and reinforced.
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• Multi-path fading is a sudden decrease or increase in the signal strength. This is
the result of interference caused when direct and reflected signals reach the
antenna simultaneously.
reflect signals.
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82
8
Embedded Applications
The wireless modem has the capability to store and run customer written code in the
form of a script during the processor’s idle time, through the use of an on board
interpreter.
8.1 Features
Main features of embedded applications are as follows:
• C-based scripting language (Sony Ericsson specific)
• Over the air upgrade of scripts (NOT GSM software)
• Library of intrinsic functions
• 2 scripts can be stored in the memory at any time (but only 1 can be active)
8.2 Implementation
The wireless modem has up to 128k of space available for storage of two scripts in
the scripting language and 100k of operating RAM. Structures included in this
language are:
• If - then - else statements
• While loops
• For loops
All hardware interfaces that are normally available to the wireless modem through the
AT commands are available to the embedded application.
Further drivers have been written such as M bus, keypad, SPI and I2C for use by the
embedded application (EA) through the use of the I/O pins.
8.2.1 Limitations
Since the wireless modem is processing the script using its own memory, limitations
are placed onto the scripts that are run.
A direct comparison cannot be made to a fully compiled C program in terms of size,
but a gauge of script size is that if each line were 128 characters long in the script
then the script could be about 1600 lines long.
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Processing power is something that needs to be considered as the script is run as a
low priority process within the software. However, controller mode stops GSM
operation and provides all the processing power for the script to be run. See the
M2mpower Application Guide for more details.
Code cannot be ported directly from an existing application and loaded directly onto
the wireless modem. It must be re-written in the Sony Ericsson Mobile script
language so that the wireless modem interpreter can function correctly.
8.2.2 M2mpower IDE (Integrated Development Environment)
The IDE is a Windows based package which allows the user to write, simulate, debug
and download the application into a wireless modem with the embedded application
(EA) software. The standard version is designed to run on Windows XP and 2000.
The M2mpower Application Guide is available for implementing applications using the
developer’s kit and the embedded application (EA) functionality.
This is a required package to be able to implement an embedded application (EA).
For further information please contact Sony Ericsson Mobile Communications
customer support.
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9
TCP/IP Stack
An on board IP/TCP/UDP stack has been integrated into the software negating the
need for the customer to implement one in their own code base.
This is accessible by using an embedded application (see section 9) using intrinsic
functions.
9.1 Implementation
The following types of commands allow various functions:
• Open/closing IP connections - Negotiates/closes an IP address with the web
server.
• Send/Receive TCP packets - Performs all TCP operations to send and receive
packets.
• Send/Receive UDP packets - Performs all UDP operations to send and receive
packets.
• Resolve URL to an IP address - Similar to nslookup command in DOS When the unit
is set up and controlled using the embedded applications.
The embedded applications or an external application can generate data to be sent
and pass it to the wireless modem for transmission.
This effectively provides a transparent communication link from the application to an
internet server over GPRS.
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10 Technical Data
10.1 Mechanical Specifications
Refer to Figure 4.2-1 & Figure 4.2-2 for reference to mechanical features.
Mechanical Feature
Variant
Value
Length
50 mm
Width
33 mm
Thickness (see illustration below)
without SIM holder
3.3 mm
with SIM holder
5.9 mm
Weight
3.3
Figure 10.1-1 Thickness of module variant without SIM holder
5.9
Figure 10.1-2 Thickness of module variant with SIM holder
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10.2 Power supply voltage, normal operation
Parameter
Mode
Limit
VCC Supply voltage
Nominal
3.6 V
Min
3.2 V
Max
4.5 V
Absolute maximum
-0.3V to 6.5V
voltage range
<100mV @<200kHz
Maximum supply ripple
Maximum allowable voltage drop
Transmission burst
Maximum current consumed
Full power (2W) transmit
<20mV @>200kHz
200mV
2250 mA (peak)
2100 mA (avg)
Stresses in excess of the absolute maximum limits can cause permanent
!
damage to the device. These are absolute stress ratings only. Functional
operation of the device is not implied at these or any other conditions in
WARNING
excess of those given in the normal Min & Max values stated. Exposure
to absolute maximum ratings for extended periods can adversely affect
device reliability.
10.3 Radio specifications
Feature
Frequency range (MHz)
Maximum power
GSM850
E-GSM900
GSM1800
GSM1900
824-894
880-960
1710-1880
1850-1990
33dBm (2W)
33dBm (2W)
30dBm (1W)
30dBm (1W)
Antenna impedance
50 ohms
10.4 SIM card
Parameter
1.8V
3.0V
5.0V
External SIM support
Yes
Yes
No
Integrated SIM support (optional)
Yes
Yes
No
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10.5 Environmental Specification
Test Case
Test Summary
Ref Standard
Temp: max storage
Heat Test
Cold Test
Humidity: nominal
Duration: 16 hours
Temp: min storage
Duration: 16 hours
IEC 60068-2-2
IEC 60068-2-1
Temp (low) : min storage
Temp (high) : max storage
Temperature Cycling
2 hrs dwell at each extreme
6 hrs transition between temps
IEC 60068-2-14
Duration: 5 cycles x 16 hours
(80 hrs total)
Temp (low) : min storage
Temp (high) : max storage
Thermal Shock Test
6 min dwell at each extreme
0.5 to 3 min transition
IEC 60068-2-14
Duration: 30 cycles (Group 2,3)
Temp (low) : nominal ambient
Temp (high) : max operating
Humidity (high) : 95% ±5% RH
Moist Heat Cyclic Test
Humidity (low) : 93% ±5% RH
9 hr dwell at each temperature
IEC 60068-2-30
3 hr transition between temps
Duration: 6 cycles x 24 hours
(144 hrs total)
SIM insertion : 500 cycles
Operational Durability
System connector : 10,000 cycles
Flips/Hinges : 1,000 cycles
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RF connector : 5,000
1m drop height on to concrete
- all sides
Free Fall Test
- all faces
- all corners
IEC 60068-2-32 Test Ed
- any extended features
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Test Case
Test Summary
Ref Standard
Freq: 10-60 Hz, constant
displacement ≡±0.35mm
Freq : 60-500 Hz, constant
Sinusoidal Vibration
acceleration ≡ 5 g
Sweep velocity: 1 oct/min
IEC 60068-2-6
Sweeps: 5 per axis
Axis: 3 axis (x, y, z) per device
Power Spectral Density:
5 Hz
0.10 m2/s3
12 Hz
Random Vibration
2.20 m2/s3
20 Hz
2.20 m2/s3
200 Hz 0.04 m2/s3
IEC 60068-2-34
500 Hz 0.04 m2/s3
Duration : 2 hrs each axis
Axis : 3 axis (x, y, z) per device
Pulse shape: Half-sine
Amplitude: 30 g±15%
Mechanical Shock Test
Duration:
Axis:
6 ms
±x, ±y, ±z
No. shocks: 3 each direction
IEC 60068-2-27
Test Ea
(18 total)
Mixed Plug-in
Connector
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Mechanical force :
50 N in ±x, -y, ±z directions
100 N in +y (mating axis)
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11 Regulatory Notices
The GR64 described in this manual conforms to the Radio and Telecommunications Terminal
Equipment (R&TTE) directive 99/5/EC with requirements covering EMC directive 89/336/EEC
and Low Voltage directive 73/23/EEC. The product fulfils the requirements according to
3GPP TS 51.010-1, EN 301 489-7 and EN60950.
This device complies with Part 15 of the FCC rules. Operation is subject to the following two
conditions:
(1) This device may not cause harmful interference, and
(2) The device must accept any interference received, including interference that may
cause undesired operation.
FCC ID PYB7BC051021
This product has not yet received GCF or FCC approval
IC: 4170B-BC051021
Append Declaration
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Developers Kit
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12 Introduction to the Universal Developer’s Kit
The Sony Ericsson M2M universal developer’s kit (UDK) is designed to get you started
quickly. It contains all the hardware you will need to begin the development of an
application.
The only items you need to provide are; a wireless modem, a computer, a SIM card
with a network subscription, and a knowledge of programming with AT commands.
The main hardware of the UDK is an open board onto which you plug the wireless
modem, using an adaptor board where necessary.
Connectors, switches, jumpers
and SIM card holder are provided to allow you to configure and access all the
functions of the radio device.
Two version of the UDK exists; the first-generation UDK is designed for legacy M2M
products available during 2003 to 2005; a second-generation Universal Developers
Kit Mk 2 is available for M2M products from 2006 onwards. Components, adaptor
boards and peripheral interfaces are not inter-changeable between the two UDK
products.
A separate user manual describes the set-up and use of the UDK.
This can be
downloaded from the Sony Ericsson M2M Extranet web pages or obtained from your
local sales support representative upon request.
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