We are a leading New Zealand , with an internationally recognised excellence.

We are a leading New Zealand , with an internationally recognised excellence.
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ANNUAL REPORT
ANNUAL REPORT 2004
2004
We are a leading New Zealand
research university, with an
ethos of problem solving and
internationally recognised excellence.
Composite
Contents
1
MISSION STATEMENT
3
REPORT FROM THE CHANCELLOR
5
REPORT FROM THE VICE-CHANCELLOR
8
YEAR IN REVIEW
17
2004 COUNCIL
18
2004 OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY
19
DIRECTORY
20
FINANCIAL REVIEW 2004
22
SUMMARY FACTS AND FIGURES
23
STATEMENT OF RESPONSIBILITY
24
AUDIT REPORT
26
STATEMENT OF ACCOUNTING POLICIES
31
STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE
32
STATEMENT OF MOVEMENTS IN EQUITY
33
STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION
34
STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS
36
NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
50
MASSEY UNIVERSITY MISSION
50
STATEMENT OF SERVICE PERFORMANCE
135
APPENDICES:
136
STUDENTS
140
STAFF
145
RESEARCH AND OTHER CONTRACT FUNDING
Massey University is driven by a spirit of
community relevance and engagement,
while maintaining intellectual independence.
MASSEY UNIVERSITY
Mission Statement
Massey University is committed to meeting the needs of New Zealand and New Zealanders,
enhancing access to university study for diverse populations, preparing students for life-long
learning, and meeting international standards of excellence in research and teaching. Massey
University is an integrated multi-campus institution of higher learning that creates new
knowledge and understanding; synthesises, applies and disseminates knowledge; develops
advanced learning and scholarly abilities for a national and international student body; and
promotes free and rational inquiry. We offer high-quality learning experiences that empower
people and their communities to prosper in an increasingly knowledge-dependent and
technologically advanced world.
Massey University is driven by a spirit of community relevance and engagement, while maintaining
intellectual independence. We will use our multi-campus structure to meet the needs of our
constituent regional communities, while our flexible delivery and distance (extramural) education
capabilities give a national and international reach to our educational programmes.
Massey University recognises and respects the significance of mana whenua within its regions
and the range of Mäori organisations contributing to Mäori development and advancement.
We have demonstrated our commitment to Mäori development by providing Mäori academic
leadership, research opportunities and educational qualifications that assist in the achievement
of Mäori aspirations.
Our integrated academic structures and organisational arrangements enable and support
interdisciplinary and cross-disciplinary research and academic programmes. We pride ourselves
on the relevance of our programmes; on our openness to students of diverse backgrounds
spanning age, geographic location, educational background, ethnicity and culture; on the support
we provide for our students; and on the relationship we have built with our alumni.
1
REPORT FROM THE
Chancellor
Reflecting on the 2004 year a wide range of outcomes spring to mind.
As detailed elsewhere in this report the level of domestic student enrolments was
slightly reduced, both against budget and when compared with the previous year.
While this was partially the result of earlier decisions to reduce the number of
programmes offered (particularly sub degree), it also reflected the general stability in domestic
enrolments being experienced throughout the New Zealand university sector. This reflects the
general University commitment to the retention of focus on academic and research quality, but
meant that universities collectively received only a small (approximate 16%) portion of the growth
in tertiary funding provided by the Government during the year.
We have welcomed the gradual shift in funding from predominantly a volume driven formula to
a more value focused approach. While this produced a slight increase in funding from Massey
we were disappointed at the overly simplistic comparisons which were highlighted when the
performance base research funding (PBRF) outcomes were reported. Clearly there was a lack of
consistency in the approach taken amongst universities which regrettably disguised the high level
of achievement within Massey.
While domestic comparisons between universities are important, it was perhaps more satisfying
to record the high ranking that Massey University received amongst several international surveys
released during the year which constantly recognized Massey’s high level of positioning both
internationally and within New Zealand.
This focus on excellence will continue to be a major theme for 2005 with increased undergraduate
enrolment standards, proportionately higher postgraduate enrolments, and further focus on
research led teaching being prime examples of this strategy.
International student participation remains strong and above budget despite the policy of
enrolment limits being introduced at the commencement of the year. It is interesting to note that
during the year Massey joined the ranks of three other New Zealand universities at which the level
of international fee contribution exceeded that received from domestic students.
Another satisfactory financial surplus of $14.8m was achieved for the year. Even allowing for
the abnormal contribution from the sale of surplus property, the actual result was in line with
3
that budgeted and again confirms the effective level of fiscal management maintained within
the University. A high level of short term financial investments was maintained throughout
the year, which will largely be utilized to fund a broad range of capital investments being
undertaken during 2005. Further teaching and research capability is being invested in the
Albany campus, but the major focus during 2005 will be experienced within the Palmerston
North campus where new student facilities, halls of residence, and revamped science facilities
will be completed. Planning is expected to be completed for similar focused investment within
the Wellington campus during 2005.
Massey, with its three major campuses and extensive extramural programme, retains a unique
position within the New Zealand university scene. Each campus is developing a specialist
positioning which over time will result in a largely complementary role being defined. Massey is
well aware of its unique contribution to distance learning and during 2005 will be reviewing areas
where its role can be further developed and improved.
In conclusion I acknowledge the considerable contribution made to Massey’s success by its staff
and extensive range of friends and partner organizations, but perhaps above all I acknowledge
the contribution that students make to the University and wish all who graduated in 2004 best
wishes for their ongoing career or personal self development.
Nigel Gould
Chancellor
Massey University
4
REPORT FROM THE
Vice-Chancellor
A distinctive quality of Massey University is its future-focused approach and
commitment to teaching and research training in a research-led environment,
particularly in domains essential to economic, cultural and social progress.
The University’s track record in exploration and discovery is a by-word: We are committed to
maintaining a strong research-oriented culture and to nurturing domains of excellence and future
relevance in which our research stars and the emerging stars amongst our postgraduate students,
can succeed, shine and flourish. We are committed to strengthening our extramural programmes
that are an important means of access to both initial and further tertiary study for a diversity of
New Zealanders – many of whom are mature and in employment, both here and abroad.
Such success does not come without careful planning and investment. For example, we must
ensure that our academic staff members have the time, support and equipment they need to
achieve success – for themselves and for their research students. As part of this commitment, the
University is home to New Zealand’s fastest research computer, the Double Helix, and to New
Zealand’s most powerful nuclear magnetic spectrometer. We are also the host of the Allan Wilson
Centre for Molecular Ecology and Evolution, a government-funded Centre of Excellence that is,
among many other achievements, extending our knowledge of the role of DNA in evolution.
As a forward-thinking and ambitious university, we are pleased when our investments in research
and postgraduate study are fruitful. In particular we note that we now hold the number one
position amongst New Zealand tertiary institutions for the highest reported number of research
postgraduate degree completions. This confirms that Massey postgraduate degrees are highly
sought after. It also means that each person graduating from Massey University with a completed
research degree represents a further contribution to New Zealand’s stock of knowledge - an
important human resource for this country.
Two independent reviews of the world’s best universities were commissioned in 2004 by The Times
Higher Education Supplement and by Shanghai Jiao Tong University. Both reviews ranked only three
New Zealand universities in their lists of the world’s best and it was pleasing to note that Massey
was one of those three.
During 2004 the University began a process of re-focusing to consolidate and grow our distinctive
domains of excellence and future focus. This process includes the further strengthening of core
areas of academic focus including recruitment of high quality staff in key areas of our flexible
modes of delivery, research training and engagement with our local, national and international
communities. It involves a health check on the quality of programmes and research activities
and reviews of administrative processes and structure across the University to ensure they are
consistent with best practice and, where possible, are benchmarked against relevant standards.
5
On the basis of outcomes of these reviews, the University is increasing its investment in teaching
and research in areas of high quality and national strategic importance, including investment in
infrastructure and equipment, with a corresponding reduction in less strategic investments that do
not serve our core mission as a university of national significance and international standing.
A key factor is to balance the University’s commitment to developing and growing domains of
excellence with our commitment to access. A further unique factor is the ability to maximise gains
from our geographic and disciplinary breadth of expertise.
Examples of initiatives achieved or further developed during 2004:
•
Installation of New Zealand’s most powerful imaging microscope, the 700 mHz
NMR spectrometer on the Palmerston North campus and the commissioning of a
supercomputer, the Double Helix, based at the Albany campus.
•
Further growth of the Riddet Centre that focuses on fundamental food research from
two staff members to 30 within a year, further boosting the University’s participation in
research training.
•
Expansion of the CoRE Alan Wilson Centre (molecular biology), a Centre of Excellence
hosted at Massey University in partnership with other leading research institutions.
•
Further growth in the community-driven outputs of both the Auckland-based SHORE
Centre (alcohol and drug research) and the Wellington-based Centre for Public Health
Research.
•
A more than 13.3 percent growth in external research and consultancy income from $44.8
in 2004 to $50.7 in 2004, fuelled in part by an increased number of successful Marsden
grants.
•
Establishment of a new cross-campus, cross-Institute School of Engineering and
Technology.
•
Development of an academic plan for the Wellington campus which will result in a
divestment of sub degree programmes which do not staircase into degree programmes and
the enhancement of existing and new programmes and research activities appropriate to a
university.
•
Further investment to ensure continued growth in key strategic areas within the College
of Sciences in response to changing student needs and emerging research imperatives,
coupled with a review of those areas where staffing may be in excess of current and future
demands.
•
Introduction of enhanced reward systems for excellence in teaching and research,
including the first awards of the Massey Research Medals (for Outstanding Individual
Researcher, Supervisor, Early Career Research and Team Research Medal) and the
expansion of the Teaching Excellence awards.
•
Implementation of the Mä[email protected] strategy which focuses on achievement and quality
outcomes.
•
Establishment of the Massey University Foundation and development of incentives for
commercialisation and for tapping external funding sources.
•
Greater private sector involvement in research centres and projects – for example
Fonterra’s sponsorship of the Centre for Business and Sustainable Development.
6
•
Planning for the introduction of new services to enhance learning outcomes for extramural
students.
The University’s refocus on excellence, academic leadership and critical mass is driven in part
by the Government’s desire, expressed through the Tertiary Education Commission (TEC),
for greater differentiation in the tertiary education sector. The debate on differentiation was
heightened during 2004 by a consultation paper from the TEC: The Distinctive Contributions
of Tertiary Education Organisations. In Massey’s response to this paper, we supported a more
differentiated tertiary education system in which the role of the universities is characterized by
research-led training at postgraduate level and research-informed teaching at both undergraduate
and postgraduate levels. In such a system, one hopes that greater recognition will be accorded
the role of universities in knowledge generation and national wealth creation. In supporting
arguments for a more differentiated and specialised tertiary education sector, Massey must look to
its own evolution as a university within that sector.
A key priority is to focus our academic profile more sharply and to build our major academic
operations around agreed areas of excellence and emerging areas of excellence, each of which
is generated and sustained by the intellectual and creative activities of a critical mass of staff and
students. Excellence in these areas will be demonstrated through high quality teaching and
research training, international (or national) reputation and intellectual outputs that will include
inter alia publications and creative works, consultancies, research contracts and commercialisation,
with all of these outputs contributing to national wealth and well being. This commitment to
focused excellence complements Massey’s commitment to access and relevance.
A priority of focused excellence, academic leadership and critical mass will translate in various
ways. As a university operating in a national and a global setting, we will continue to build
strategic partnerships, particularly with institutions with complementary strengths, to achieve
national and institutional benefits. Examples include Massey’s partnership with Victoria University
to create a joint School of Music, and Massey’s membership of a New Zealand consortium to
participate in the Australian Synchrotron project. Processes that are consequent to focused
excellence include quality assurance measures, international accreditation, benchmarking,
strategic partnerships, external membership on course advisory groups, and scholarship strategies.
While Massey is influenced by many external factors and must comply with requirements imposed
by groups such as the Tertiary Advisory Monitoring Unit, the Tertiary Education Commission, the
Committee on University Academic Programmes and the Auditor-General, the definition of our
future strategic directions lies principally in our own hands - a challenging but exciting prospect.
Judith Kinnear
Vice-Chancellor
7
Year In Review
JANUARY
•
The University announces a range of new scholarships called ‘Scholarships for Building
New Zealand’ that will provide support for selected first-year undergraduate students and
first-year postgraduate students, in most cases for the duration of their study.
•
The University is granted $333,100 per year for the next three-and-a-half years (a total
of $1.165 million) from the Government’s new Pre-Seed Accelerator Fund to help take
research proposals with commercial potential to market. It was one of only four universities
to receive funds.
•
A new Research Centre for Mäori Health and Development is formed. The centre
consolidates research programmes in Te Putahi-a-Toi, the School of Mäori Studies, under
the directorship of Professor Chris Cunningham, appointed Professor in Mäori Health in
January.
•
An academic audit of the University returns a favourable result, with the New Zealand
University Academic Unit recognising Massey as “a learning institution which undertakes
its own investigations of aspects of its operations when and as issues arise”. The Audit Unit
made 15 commendations in its report, alongside recommendations for consideration by
the University.
•
A new Bachelor of Communication (BC) degree is created, combining disciplines from
the College of Business and the College of Humanities and Social Sciences, and bringing
together diverse perspectives on communication and media.
•
Dr Max Scott from the Centre of Functional Genomics is one of 15 scientists from around
the world to come together in Vienna to discuss recent progress on the genetic control of
insects.
FEBRUARY
•
Dr Jeroen Douwes receives a $500,000 fellowship from the Health Research Council to
continue research that could lead to relief for half of New Zealand’s asthma sufferers.
•
Massey’s new marine transport design course becomes the first in the world to get formal
accreditation from the Royal Institution of Naval Architects.
•
A new book by Professor Mason Durie is launched. Nga Kahui Pou – Launching Mäori
•
The Centre for Eighteenth-Century Music, which is based at the Wellington campus, is
Futures is a collection of Professor Durie’s keynote addresses from 1999-2002.
launched at the National Library in Wellington with a recital of extracts from some of the
works the centre will publish this year.
•
Cambridge University awards the honour of Doctor of Science to natural scientist John
Flenley, a Professor of Geography at Massey and a graduate of Cambridge University.
MARCH
•
Incoming Deputy Vice-Chancellor – Auckland, Professor John Raine, makes his first formal
8
appearance at the University when he joins Acting Principal Professor Ian Watson for
Professor Watson’s annual address.
•
Associate Professor in Industrial Design Tony Parker is chief designer in a consortium
which unveils plans to create a quality, hand-built performance car.
•
The University makes a $10,000 cash contribution to the lower North Island regional
flood recovery fund, along with consultancy services to the value of $20,000 to support the
regional rural response effort. The region was devastated by rain, floods, slip and wind
damage after storms that left 400 homes uninhabitable and much of the lower farmland
under water.
•
The University joins 100 of New Zealand’s top science, technology and business leaders at
an Innovation Showcase in Christchurch. The New Zealand Trade and Enterprise event is
run alongside the 4th APEC Ministers’ Meeting on Regional Science and Technology Cooperation.
•
The Institute of Technology and Engineering and Carter Holt Harvey Packaging sign
an agreement that sees CHH Packaging make available the skills and expertise of its
packaging professionals to Bachelor of Technology (Product Development) students, as
well as making a financial contribution for each participating student.
•
A new School of Engineering and Technology is formed. The cross-institute, cross-campus
school is an important outcome of a review of programmes and research across the
University by the Technology and Engineering Taskforce
•
A tiny refrigerator for storing insulin takes second prize for Product Development lecturer
Olaf Diegel in the Emhart ‘Create the Future’ international design contest.
•
A new research and service unit is established within the College of Education at Albany to
boost the development of specialist education programmes.
•
A study into gifted education in New Zealand, carried out by a team from the College of
Education led by Dr Tracy Riley, is released by Education Minister Trevor Mallard.
APRIL
•
The Anzode Research Centre is opened at the Palmerston North campus. It is one
outcome of a deal struck between the University and a group of United States-based
investors to commercialise a new zinc battery technology developed by chemists Drs Simon
Hall and Michael Liu.
•
•
Four Vice-Chancellor’s Awards for Excellence in Teaching are announced.
Dr Richard Shaw and Dr Douglas Stirling receive awards for Excellence in Teaching.
Professor Richard Buchanan receives an award for Excellence in First-Year Teaching and
Dr Mary Simpson, Dr Bill Anderson and Marion Orme receive an award for Excellence in
the Creative Use of IT and the Web in Teaching. Each award is valued at $10,000.
•
A new $1 million state-of-the-art rotary dairy shed is opened at the Palmerston North
campus.
•
An interdisciplinary research team led by Dr Shane Cronin is awarded $4.2 million
in funding from the Foundation for Research, Science and Technology for a six-year
programme to develop a way to forecast when Mt Ruapehu and Mt Taranaki might erupt.
•
New Zealand Veterinary Pathology opens. It is the first commercial veterinary diagnostic
9
laboratory to be situated within a teaching and research environment, enhancing the
learning experience for students and increasing research opportunities in the critical fields
of disease control and biosecurity.
•
The Fonterra Co-operative Group Limited becomes the new major sponsor of the Centre
for Business and Sustainable Development. As a sponsor, Fonterra will adopt a total
sustainability management programme, a joint venture between the Centre and the Total
Sustainability Management team at Herriot Watt University in Britain.
•
Professor Ian Watson, retiring Principal of the Albany campus is awarded an Honorary
Doctorate, Doctor of Science (honoris causa).
•
The graduation season is under way, beginning with the Albany campus where just over
900 graduate.
MAY
•
The Vice-Chancellor Professor Judith Kinnear is one of a select few to attend the inaugural
meeting of the Australia New Zealand Leadership Forum in Wellington. The forum is to
become an annual event, bringing together key leaders from both countries to identify
areas in which the relationship between New Zealand and Australia might be enhanced
and collaboration improved.
•
The New Zealand Centre for Ecological Economics (NZCEE), a joint research centre
uniting economists and ecologists from the University and Landcare Research, is launched.
Based in Palmerston North, the NZCEE is led by Professor Murray Patterson .
•
A team of academics from across various disciplines including business, social work and
nursing begins the most comprehensive survey yet of New Zealand’s gay and lesbian
communities.
•
The University and the New Zealand School of Dance come together to offer a
postgraduate Diploma in Dance Studies aimed at mid-career dancers, dance teachers, arts
administrators, and event managers looking to take the step in professional development.
•
The PBRF audit finds Massey has the third-highest concentration of PBRF quality-rated
staff (A, B or C), behind Auckland and Otago, ranks third in external research funding
behind Auckland and Otago, and is third in the area of research degree completion,
behind the medical schools, which received a weighting of 2.5 for each postgraduate
degree completion compared with 1 awarded for each business or similar qualification.
Consequently, the PBRF funding allocation table for 2004 shows Massey University in third
place, behind the universities of Auckland and Otago. It will receive 14 percent of the
funds available; a net gain of $372,000 over the funding it would have received under the
previous EFTS-based system.
•
About 1600 students graduate in ceremonies in Palmerston North and another 1000
graduate in absentia.
•
Professor Neil Pearce, Director of the University’s Centre for Public Health Research in
Wellington, is awarded a Doctor of Science at the Palmerston North ceremonies.
•
Industrial design student Garry Sammons wins the Ducati.com Special Prize for his Velocità
coffee maker.
•
Professional artist, teacher and academic Professor Sally Morgan is appointed to head the
10
University’s College of Design, Fine Arts and Music.
•
Vice-Chancellor Professor Judith Kinnear is one of three new members of the board of the
Foundation for Research, Science and Technology. The appointment is for a three-year
term from to 30 April 2007.
•
Dr Scott Eastham’s book Biotech Time-Bomb – How genetic engineering could irreversibly change
our world is the first book written outside the United States to win the Lewis Mumford
Award for Outstanding Scholarship in the Ecology of Technics.
JUNE
•
A study of more than 6600 meat industry workers around New Zealand by Dr Dave
McLean, Centre for Public Health Research, finds a significantly high rate of cancers,
particularly lung cancer, which may be caused by exposure to cancer causing agents
carried by animals.
•
An adult female great spotted kiwi is sent to the NZ Wildlife Health Centre at the
Palmerston North campus for care after breaking the tip of her beak.
•
Associate Professor Peter Beatson is chosen as the New Zealand Society of Authors’
honorary president for 2004.
•
Massey University Rugby Football Club holds its 75th Jubilee Celebrations.
•
The Riddet Centre, a partnership between Massey University, the University of Auckland
and the University of Otago, appoints three new principals – Professor David Mellor from
Massey, a leading mammalian physiologist; Professor Dong Chen from the University of
Auckland, an international leader in food engineering, and Professor Jim Mann from the
University of Otago, a pre-eminent human nutritionist.
•
Playwright, actor, director and multimedia artist Stephen Bain becomes the College of
Humanities and Social Sciences’ new artist-in-residence.
•
Celebrating Research Day brings together for the first time the research community at
Massey’s Wellington campus and offers staff, students, and the Wellington public the
chance to see a cross section of the breadth and vitality of research at Massey.
•
The Albany-based Coastal Marine Research Group, lead by Dr Mark Orams, gets a new
5.6metre Stabi-Craft boat ‘Aronui-Moana’ with funding from a University equipment grant
and Hibiscus Coast-based Gulf Land Marine.
•
The Riddet Centre, co-directed by Professors Paul Moughan and Harjinder Singh, receives
$13 million from Fonterra and the Foundation for Research, Science and Technology along
with German-based multinational BASF for research into POSIFoods – individualised
foods, manufactured at point of sale.
•
Dr Dave Clarke from the School of Psychology at Albany is subcontracted as a named
investigator to a multidisciplinary research team looking at gambling in New Zealand.
•
An article examining the use of survey evidence in a recent trademark legal battle wins
Professors Janet Hoek and Phil Gendall a prestigious Emerald Award.
•
The Conservatorium of Music and the Wellington Branch of Autism New Zealand trial a
programme of music experiences for children who have Autistic Spectrum Disorder.
•
Five research programmes on health issues are granted funding from the Health Research
Council. The Centre for Public Health Research (CPHR) gets $409,715 for a four-year
11
study of whether endotoxin exposure can reverse atopy and atopic disease. CPHR is also
funded $120,000 over three years to study cancer in Pacific populations, and researchers in
the Institute for Food, Nutrition and Human Health get $113,945 for research into insulin
resistance, muscle triglyceride and Maori. Professor Neil Pearce gets funding of $790,756
to work on ISAAC phase three analysis, publication and dissemination. Professor Chris
Cunningham is collaborating on a housing and health research programme which has
been funded for $3.65 million three years.
•
The Engineering and Technology building on the Oteha Rohe precinct of the Albany
campus is officially opened.
•
David Mellor, Professor of Animal Welfare Science and of Applied Physiology and
Bioethics, is awarded the New Zealand Veterinary Association President’s Award for 2004
for his significant contribution to the veterinary profession in New Zealand.
JULY
•
A two-day conference offering practical information for people who are passionate about
Mäori success in farming, forestry, horticulture and business is hosted by the University.
•
The Albany campus hosts New Zealand’s biggest ever conference on boys’ education issues.
•
Professor Chris Cunningham is a director and Dr Robyn Phipps an investigator on an
Otago University Medical School-led research project which has received $3.65 million
funding from the Health Research Council to look at the health and environmental effects
of gas versus electric heaters.
•
Dr Richard Shaw, School of Sociology, Social Policy, Social Work, receives a national
Tertiary Teaching Excellence Award for Sustained Excellence.
•
Dr Stephen Stannard of the Institute for Food, Nutrition and Human Health, receives
Health Research Council funding of $113,945 to collaborate on a study of insulin
resistance, muscle triglyceride and Mäori.
•
Twenty-three projects, amounting to a total of $243,000, receive funding from The Fund for
Innovation and Excellence in Teaching.
•
Te Mata ö te Tau, the Academy for Mäori Research and Scholarship, is officially launched
at the Albany campus.
•
Robert Lord Winston, 2004 Royal Society of New Zealand Distinguished Speaker, gives a
one-off public lecture at the Regent Theatre, Palmerston North.
•
Darryn Joseph publishes a children’s sci-fi book, RT3 Ki Tua ö Rangi Ätea, written in Te Reo
Mäori.
•
The College of Sciences retrofit project, a $25 million upgrade of the College buildings on
the Palmerston North campus, begins.
•
The University has a leading role in this year’s National Fieldays at Mystery Creek, where
the theme is celebrating sustainability in agriculture.
•
Major General (Ret.) Piers Reid, senior lecturer in Defence Studies is asked by Civil
Defence Minister George Hawkins to chair an independent review of the overall
effectiveness of the emergency management of the February 2004 storms and floods.
•
Plans are unveiled for a $60 million facelift for the Palmerston North campus, including an
upgrade of the Student Centre building.
12
•
AgResearch’s animal health research team is to relocate to a site alongside the Institute of
Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical Sciences on the Palmerston North campus, creating a
leading international centre for animal health research.
•
Professor Colin Holmes is awarded the prestigious McMeekan Memorial Award by the New
Zealand Society of Animal Production.
AUGUST
•
A $400,000 pilot programme to develop industry training within the biotechnology sector
is announced by Research, Science and Technology Minister Pete Hodgson. The pilot will
be steered by a team of Massey biotechnology experts, led by Professor Yusuf Chisti.
•
New Zealand’s biggest microscope, the $3 million 700MHz NMR machine arrives at the
Palmerston North campus.
•
Design graduate Leon Oliver’s Sentinel ‘man-overboard’ boating device wins the 2004
Dyson Product Design Award.
•
Prime Minister Helen Clark opens the $9.4 million Albany campus Recreation Centre.
•
The School of Fine Arts announces that the 2004 Massey University Rita Angus Visual Artist
in Residence is leading German artist Thomas Bayrle.
•
Four individual researchers and one research team are selected as the inaugural University
Research Medal recipients. The medals are the highest awards for research to be bestowed
by the University and will be awarded annually.
•
The inaugural University Research Medal for an outstanding individual researcher is
awarded to Professor David Parry, head of the Institute of Fundamental Sciences.
•
The 2004 medal for the top research team is awarded to the Allan Wilson Centre for
Molecular Ecology and Evolution.
•
Dr Jeroen Douwes and Dr Ulrich Zuelicke are awarded Early Career Research Medals.
•
Associate Professor Kerry Chamberlain, from the School of Psychology on the Albany
campus, is awarded the Supervisor Research Medal.
•
Associate Professor Frank Sligo, Dr Cory Matthew, Dr Bernd Rehm, Dr Emily Parker, Dr
David Harding, Associate Professor John Overton, Dr Craig Johnson, Professors David
Lambert and Mike Hendy, Dr Robyn Phipps and Professor David Penny are awarded
funding from the Massey University Postdoctoral Fellowships fund.
•
Massey University Technical Assistance Awards of up to $10,000 are granted to seven
lecturers and senior lecturers to assist them in the advancement of research projects.
•
Associate Professor Simon Tipping and Professor Margaret Trawick are this year’s
recipients of Massey University Research Fellowships.
•
Nine women academics – Dr Inga Hunter, Dr Mary Salisbury, Dr Barbara Crump, Ms
Jeanie Douche, Dr Jean Gilmour, Dr Celia Briar, Dr Sita Venkateswar, Dr Jill BevanBrown and Dr Janet Sayers – are awarded research funding through the annual University
Women’s Awards.
•
Jhanitra Murray, from the School of Psychology, is the recipient of the annual University
Mäori Award.
•
Five doctoral students are awarded the Government-funded Top Achiever Doctoral
Scholarships.
13
•
A Grant Development Fund of up to $25,000 per year is established to provide funding
to help develop teams, normally of three or more, that will be competitive in applying for
external funding.
•
The new International Visitor Research Fund covering travel costs and up to $500 towards
expenses is established to promote high quality research outputs through international
collaboration.
•
Double Helix, a super computer using the latest 64-bit technology, is commissioned by the
University.
SEPTEMBER
•
The University commits $450,000 over the next three years as part of New Zealand’s $5
million contribution to the Australasian Synchrotron beamlines project.
•
A team from the Centre for Public Health Research, led by Professor Neil Pearce, begins
a Ministry of Health-funded project to investigate health problems among timber workers
exposed to industry chemical PCP.
•
Massey is ranked between 67 and 89th in the Asia Pacific region and between 404 and 502
in the world in the annual Shanghai Jiao Tong rating of the top 500 universities in the
world.
•
Professor David Lambert and his research feature in top science stories showcased by
Australian Science magazine.
•
The University’s founding Vice-Chancellor, Sir Alan Stewart, dies. He was awarded the
CBE in 1972 and knighted in 1981. In May 1984 he was capped Doctor of Science (honoris
causa) by the University.
•
The University is hosting an $8 million project with the Aotearoa New Zealand Social
Sciences research network, made up of New Zealand’s leading social scientists and led by
Professor Paul Spoonley.
•
Professor David Penny is awarded New Zealand’s top science honour, the Rutherford
Medal, by the Royal Society of New Zealand.
•
New Zealand’s first Bod Pod, a space capsule-like pod that measures and tracks body fat
and lean muscle mass using air displacement technology, arrives at Institute of Food,
Nutrition and Human Health.
•
The University receives more than $5.1million from the 2004 Marsden Fund, nearly $2
million more than last year and the largest grant the University has ever received from the
Marsden Fund. Eleven Massey projects secure funding – six full Marsden projects and five
Fast Start projects.
OCTOBER
•
In a study commissioned by the New Zealand Police, Massey’s SHORE researchers uncover
important new information on the social and economic impact of Amphetamine Type
Stimulants in New Zealand.
•
The University Council votes not to increase domestic fees for 2005.
•
The Council approves a package to allow extramural students to receive a raft of new
services to support their learning from February 2005.
14
•
A gala dinner is held at the Palmerston North Convention Centre to present the ViceChancellor’s Excellence in Teaching Awards and the Massey University Research Medals.
•
The New Zealand School of Music, combining the strengths of Massey University and
Victoria University, is launched at a celebration concert at Te Papa.
•
Professor Marilyn Waring is appointed to undertake review of NZAID, the Government’s
aid agency and its aid operations and programmes.
•
Professor Barrie Macdonald, Pro Vice-Chancellor of the College of Humanities and Social
Sciences, is appointed interim head of the College of Business.
•
A free bus service supported by the University, Horizons Regional Council and Transfund
is to begin in February 2005.
•
New research headed by Professor Neil Pearce from the Centre for Public Health Research
suggests a higher rate of deaths from cancer for workers exposed to dioxin during the
manufacture of herbicides at the Ivon Watkins-Dow (IWD) plant in New Plymouth.
NOVEMBER
•
Exposure 2004, an exhibition of work by graduating students from the College of Design,
Fine Arts and Music, is held in Wellington.
•
Professor Roger Morris donates $100,000 of commercialisation income to establish the
Roger Morris Trust for Animal Health, which is intended to protect the future viability of
the EpiCentre he directs.
•
At the launch of the Massey University Foundation it is announced that teaching
fellowships, and visits by overseas-based star alumni are among its first projects.
•
Professor Gaven Martin, widely regarded as the top pure mathematician in New Zealand,
joins the Institute of Information and Mathematical Sciences at the Albany campus.
•
Best practices in the assessment of learning outcomes are topics in this year’s series of ViceChancellor’s Symposia on all three campuses.
•
An exhibition by photographer Anne Noble, of the College of Design, Fine Arts and
Music, opens in Wellington. It investigates the presentation of the Antarctic landscape
around the world.
•
Dr Paul Perry, a senior sociology researcher, is one of three principal investigators on
The New Zealand Study of Values funded by the Foundation for Research, Science and
Technology.
•
The longstanding partnership between the Institute of Food, Nutrition and Human Health
and the New Zealand Pork Industry Board is strengthened with a renewal of a three-year
contract.
•
The Michael Hirschfeld Gallery marks its fifth anniversary with an exhibition by artist and
lecturer Richard Reddaway.
•
Dr Sue Cassells, lecturer in the Department of Finance, Banking and Property, has
undertaken the first New Zealand study into the situation for end-of-life vehicles with
support and funding from Toyota New Zealand.
•
New Zealand’s Unknown Warrior is interred at the National War Memorial in a tomb
created by a team led by College of Design, Fine Arts and Music senior lecturer Kingsley
Baird.
15
•
Dr Max Scott and the Centre for Functional Genomics and scientists at the University
of Melbourne join forces to investigate the genome of the Australian sheep blowfly in a
project funded by Australian Wool Innovation.
•
Professor Richard Buchanan, who received a Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Teaching
this year, wins the Distinguished Teacher prize awarded by the International Society for
Marketing Advances.
•
The newly formed Sir Peter Blake Trust is to be based at the Albany campus. Dr Mark
Orams is named Executive Director of the Trust.
•
Massey University is ranked 108th in The Times Higher Education Supplement’s world top 200,
behind The University of Auckland in 67th place and ahead of Otago at 114th.
•
Tim Harvey, of Agricultural Services, receives a Friendship Award from the Chinese
Government.
•
A North Island brown kiwi with unique white feathering around his head is nursed back to
health by the University’s wildlife experts.
DECEMBER
•
The Government appoints three new members to Council: Business academic Professor
Ngatata Love, accountant and company director Alison Paterson and Wellington lawyer
Stephen Kos.
•
The Council re-elects Nigel Gould as Chancellor and Dr Liz Gordon as Pro Chancellor.
•
Professor Ruth Kane, and Christine Harwood, from the College of Education, receive
Teaching and Learning Research Initiative grants from the Government.
•
A new ecology laboratory is established at the Albany campus. It brings a talented team of
scientists to the University, all widely regarded for research on New Zealand birds.
•
A Restorative Justice conference at Albany attracts a top line-up of international speakers
and more than 200 delegates from local and international universities and social agencies.
•
It is announced that the University will convert from a 100 point standard equivalent fulltime year for academic programmes to one of 120 credits.
•
Professor Graeme Wake, Director of the Centre for Mathematics in Industry at Albany, is
elected as a Fellow to the Royal Society of New Zealand.
•
Five senior academics are promoted to professor: Kerry Chamberlain, Anne Noble, Ralph
Sims, Velmurugu Ravindran and Keith Thompson.
•
PhD graduate Paul Gardner is awarded the Hatherton Medal from the Royal Society
of New Zealand for the best paper by a PhD University student, in the physical, earth,
mathematical and information sciences.
•
Associate Professor Andrew Trlin, from the School of Sociology, Social Policy and Social
Work, is appointed to the Human Rights Review Tribunal panel.
•
Work of undergraduate and postgraduate students in the Mäori Visual Arts programme
goes on show in Palmerston North.
•
Graphic design senior lecturer Claire Robinson is the co-winner of the 2004 Wallace Award
for the book New Zealand Votes: The General Election of 2002
16
Appointed by the Academic
2004
Board
J. Dowds, BSc (Hons) Belf.,
Council
MBA Ulster, PhD, FCIS,
FCCM
Chancellor
Mr Nigel J Gould JP, BCA Vict
FCA.
Elected by Permanent
Vice-Chancellor
Professor J.F. Kinnear,
BEd LaTrobe, MSc, PhD
Melb., GradDipComputerSc
Swinburne UT., FLS
Student Federation
Appointed by the Minister of
Education
M.C. Campbell, BA
Macquarie, DipTchg
Joint EXMSS/MUSA
Appointed by the Minister of
Education
P.W. Rieger QSO JP.
Retired Dec 2004
President Extramural
Elected by Permanent
Members of the Academic
Staff
A. Vitalis, BA (Hons) Open
DMS MSc, PhD Lond CEng,
MIMech, MErgS
Elected by Court of
Appointed by the Academic
Board
J.A. Codd, MA, PhD, DipEd,
DipTchg
Elected by Court of
Members of the General Staff
A. Davies, BBS
Representative on Council
A. Maynard, BTech
Representative
B. Tipene-Hook, BHthSc
Students’ Society
E. Barker, BA, DipBusAdmin,
Dip Arts (Media Studies)
Convocation
E. Gordon, MA (Hons), PhD
Massey
Convocation
R. Hubbard, ONZM,BSc,
DSc (Honoris causa) Massey,
FNZIFST, FNZIM
Appointed by the Massey
Appointed by the Minister of
University Council on the
Education 3 December 2004
Nomination of the Vice-
N. Love, BCom, BCA (Hons), PhD
Chancellor
Well, ACIS, ANZIM
J.G. Todd, CBE, BCom Vic, FCA
S. Kos, LLB (Hons) Vict LLM Cam
A. Paterson, FAC F.IoD
17
2004
Officers of the University
Vice-Chancellor
Professor Judith Kinnear, BEd LaTrobe, MSc, PhD Melb., GradDipComputerSc Swinburne UT.,
FLS.
Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Academic)
Professor Luanna Meyer, BA Uni W Madison, MS, PhD Indiana
Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Maori)
Professor Mason H Durie, CNZM, MBChB, DPsych (McGill), D.Litt, FRANZCP, FRSNZ
Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Research)
Professor Nigel Long, MSc Auck., PhD Q’ld, FNZPS
University Registrar
Mrs Adrienne Cleland, MBA, FAIBF
Director - Human Resources
Ms Annemarie de Castro, BA, MHRINZ (Resigned 4 June 2004)
Mrs Sheryl Bryant, BEd, PGDip BusAdmin (appointed 8 November 2004)
Deputy Vice-Chancellors
Deputy Vice-Chancellors (Auckland and International)
Professor John Raine, BE (Hons) NZ,, PhD, CEng, FIMechE., FIPENZ, MSAE
Deputy Vice-Chancellors (Palmerston North)
Professor I. J. Warrington, MHortSc, DSc, DLitt, FRSNZ, FNZSHS
Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Wellington and Strategic External Relations)
Professor K.J. Heskin, BA (Hons) Belf., MA Dublin, PhD Durh.
Pro Vice-Chancellors
College of Business: Professor Keith White-Hunt, BA (Hons), MSc, DSc (Econ)
College of Design, Fine Arts & Music: Professor Sally J. Morgan, MA Warw, KASKA Antwerp, BA Hons, Sheff
Hallam
College of Education: Professor James Chapman, MA Well, PhD Alta.,DipTchg, FIARLD
College of Humanities and Social Sciences: Professor Barrie Macdonald, BA(Hons) Well, PhD ANU
College of Sciences: Professor Robert Anderson, MAgrSc, PhD C’nell, DDA, FNZIAS
18
Directory
Bankers
Bank of New Zealand
Auditor
Audit New Zealand on behalf of the Auditor-General
Valuer
Quotable Value New Zealand
Legal Advisors
Buddle Findlay, Wellington
Cooper Rapley, Palmerston North
Russell McVeagh, Wellington
Andrea Craven, Palmerston North
Insurers
Vero Liability Ls, 6
Axiom Risk Insurance Management Limited
QBE Insurance International Ltd
Internal Auditor
PricewaterhouseCoopers
19
FINANCIAL REVIEW 2004
Introduction
Massey University has had a less buoyant year financially than the prior three years. While the final bottom
line result appears sound, in reality the operating results are below budget but in line with the revised forecast
promulgated during the year. There continues to be significant commitments made to revitalise the capital stock
of the University especially in Palmerston North and Wellington while modest investment is being made to cater
for Albany campus growth.
The University maintained its Equivalent Full Time Students (EFTS) numbers during 2004 (23,326) as
compared to the previous year (23,342) but fell short by some 444 of the target of 23,770. Continuing gains in
international EFTS were almost exactly offset by shortfalls in domestic EFTS while unfunded EFTS remained
static. Pressure of increased student numbers continued to be an issue during 2004 in the College of Business
but is expected to ease in the 2005 Year.
The managed enrolment scheme started in 2003 worked well in 2004 on all campuses and restricted
international student numbers appropriately. Some revenue was forgone in the interests of maintaining a good
mix of students.
The University’s surplus for the year was $14.8 million or 4.3% of revenue, marginally higher than the
comparable figure of $14.6 million (4.4%) for 2003 and $4.2 million above budget of $10.6 million. The
result as stated includes a profit on sale of the St George complex of buildings of $3.9 million and a gain of
$0.8 million reflecting the downward adjustment in Employee Entitlements. This leaves an operating result of
$10.1 million that is $0.5 million below the 2004 budget and $6.6 million less than the 2003 figure. The 2004
operating surplus is a 2.9% return on Revenue and is below the 3% guideline suggested by the Tertiary Advisory
Monitoring Unit of the Ministry of Education.
Statement of Financial Performance
Major variances against both the budget and last year’s performance for the University are explained below:
1
Total Revenue
Revenue has increased 6.5% over 2003 and by 1.6% as compared to budget. This has been mainly due to
increases in international fees offset partly by decreases in domestic fees and government grants. Interest
income was much higher than budgeted due to higher holdings of cash while charges for services and
research were 8% up on 2003.
2
Total Cost of Operations
The University budgeted for a significant increase in costs for 2004 of 8.9% over 2003 actual but in the
event costs slightly exceeded budget, increasing by 9.2% i.e. over budget by 0.3%. Staff costs were slightly
under budget by 1.8% although more than the 2003 actual by 6.8%. This included a further increase in
the holiday pay provision. Other increases in costs included Asset Related costs where increased use of
electronic subscriptions caused this area to be over budget.
3
Depreciation
This was higher than budget due largely to a miscalculation in the budget that did not allow sufficiently
for library depreciation.
4
Employee Entitlements
This decreased for the first time in several years due to an increase in the number of staff retiring or
otherwise leaving the University and a slight increase in interest rates.
20
Statement of Financial Position
The relatively healthy state of the University’s financial position reflects the surpluses that have been
accumulated over several good years. The capital plan before the University far exceeds cash on hand and
the cash deficit needs to be met from future surpluses or less desirably, from borrowing. A university normally
operates on very slim margins and any reduction in surplus because of interest paid on money borrowed is hard
to justify. The loan capital also has to be repaid from the same slim surpluses. Asset sales are unlikely to meet
much of the shortfall.
1
Working Capital
This has improved due to the generation of additional cash from the surplus and a less than expected
spend on capital assets. The working capital ratio is 1.13:1 for 2004 as compared to a budget of 0.69:1
and the 2003 figure of 1.05:1. This figure is budgeted to deteriorate for 2005 as the catch-up of capital
expenditure occurs.
2
Non Current Assets
These are above last years due mainly to a shift in classification of investments back to long term from
current assets.
3
Non Current Liabilities
The increase as compared to last year is due to the draw down of the loan funding the Sports Leisure and
Cultural centre at the Albany Campus. The total is less than budgeted for due to a reclassification of a
loan funding the E-Centre at Albany to current liabilities.
Statement of Cashflows
Cashflows for the year have been satisfactory. This resulted from a higher than expected inflow from
international students and a lower than expected capital spend.
Net operating cash flows were significantly lower than 2003 by $20.3 million but higher than budget by $2.8
million. Investing activities were well below budget (-$30.4 million) but less than the previous years figure (-$4.2
million).
Conclusion
The University has a sound financial base from which to launch into a significant capital expenditure phase.
There are clouds on the horizon however as the budgeted surplus for 2005 is set at $7.0 million – less than is
ideal - and the resultant cash flow for the year will be far less than the projected capital spending. There will
need to be continued emphasis on increasing revenue sources, cost reduction and efficiencies if progress is to
be made on the reinvestment plan in the years beyond 2005. All of these are essential elements in maintaining
Massey University’s place in the top 200 universities in the world.
Trevor Sew Hoy
Director - Finance Operations
21
SUMMARY FACTS AND FIGURES
2004
2003
2002
2001
2000
22,649
22,690.1
21,079
19,846.4
19,668.3
Students
Equivalent Full-Time Students (EFTS)
Change Over Previous Year (%)
Total Student Enrolments
Change Over Previous Year (%)
(0.18%)
7.86%
5.84%
0.9%
(3.2%)
41,436
41,662
39,745
37,060
36,391
(0.54%)
4.82%
7.25%
1.8%
(3.50%)
89.1%
87.1%
87.7%
88.8%
86.9
90.1%
89.8%
88.5%
87.7%
89.6
College Academic Staff (Full-Time Equivalent)
1,307
1,283
1,166
1,138
1,204
Student: Staff ratio
17.3:1
17.5:1
18:1
17.4:1
16.3:1
Total General Staff (Full-Time Equivalent)
1,583
1,601
1,444
1,174
1,154
1.21
1.25
1.23
1.26
0.95
$11,316
$10,731
$10,218
$9,914
$9,990
Net Operating Surplus/(Deficit) ($000)
14,762
14,282
16,459
15,229
5,599
Return on Total Assets
2.48%
2.44%
3.01%
2.6%
0.97%
Return on Total Income
4.20%
4.40%
5.43%
5.65%
2.21%
Capital Expenditure per EFTS
$1,605
$1,899
$1,363
$1,498
$3,127
Short Term Liquidity
1.13:1
0.99:1
0.84:1
0.48:1
0.43:1
Working Capital Ratio
1.19:1
1.05:1
0.92:1
0.58:1
0.51:1
Examination pass rate -internal student (passed/sat)
-extramural study (passed/sat)
Staff
Total General: College Academic Staff
Financial Performance
Net Cost of Services per EFTS
Financial Position
Debt to Equity
1.37%
0.37%
0.49%
1.72%
16.75%
Change in Equity
2.61%
8.22%
4.31%
3.20%
1.93%
*General staff includes technical and casual, excluded Contract and Trading
EFTS funded included MOE Funded plus Full-Fee/International
22
STATEMENT OF RESPONSIBILITY
In the financial year ended 31 December 2004, the council and management of Massey University were
responsible for:
•
the preparation of the financial statement and the judgements used therein
•
establishing and maintaining a systems of internal control designed to provide reasonable assurance as to
the integrity and reliability of financial reporting.
In the opinion of the Council and management of Massey University the financial statements for the financial
year fairly reflect the financial position and operations of Massey University.
N Gould
Chancellor
J Kinnear
Vice-Chancellor
T. Sew Hoy
Director, Finance Operations
23
REPORT OF THE AUDITOR-GENERAL
TO THE READERS OF MASSEY UNIVERSITY AND GROUP’S
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2004
The Auditor-General is the auditor of Massey University (the University) and group. The Auditor-General has
appointed me, L H Desborough, using the staff and resources of Audit New Zealand, to carry out the audit of
the financial statements of the University and group, on his behalf, for the year ended 31 December 2004.
Unqualified opinion
In our opinion the financial statements of the University and group on pages 26 to 135:
•
comply with generally accepted accounting practice in New Zealand; and
•
fairly reflect:
-
the University and group’s financial position as at 31 December 2004;
-
the results of operations and cash flows for the year ended on that date; and
-
the service performance achievements measured against the performance targets adopted for the
year ended on that date.
The audit was completed on 29 April 2005, and is the date at which our opinion is expressed.
The basis of our opinion is explained below. In addition, we outline the responsibilities of the Council and the
Auditor, and explain our independence.
Basis of opinion
We carried out the audit in accordance with the Auditor-General’s Auditing Standards, which incorporate the
New Zealand Auditing Standards.
We planned and performed the audit to obtain all the information and explanations we considered necessary in
order to obtain reasonable assurance that the financial statements did not have material misstatements whether
caused by fraud or error.
Material misstatements are differences or omissions of amounts and disclosures that would affect a reader’s
overall understanding of the financial statements. If we had found material misstatements that were not
corrected, we would have referred to them in our opinion.
The audit involved performing procedures to test the information presented in the financial statements. We
assessed the results of those procedures in forming our opinion.
Audit procedures generally include:
•
determining whether significant financial and management controls are working and can be relied on to
produce complete and accurate data;
•
verifying samples of transactions and account balances;
•
performing analyses to identify anomalies in the reported data;
•
reviewing significant estimates and judgements made by the Council;
•
confirming year-end balances;
•
determining whether accounting policies are appropriate and consistently applied; and
24
•
determining whether all financial statement disclosures are adequate.
We did not examine every transaction, nor do we guarantee complete accuracy of the financial statements.
We evaluated the overall adequacy of the presentation of information in the financial statements. We obtained
all the information and explanations we required to support our opinion above.
Responsibilities of the Council and the auditor
The Council is responsible for preparing financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting
practice in New Zealand. Those financial statements must fairly reflect the financial position of the University
and group as at 31 December 2004. They must also fairly reflect the results of operations and cash flows and
service performance achievements for the year ended on that date. The Council’s responsibilities arise from the
Public Finance Act 1989.
We are responsible for expressing an independent opinion on the financial statements and reporting that
opinion to you. This responsibility arises from section 15 of the Public Audit Act 2001 and section 43(1) of the
Public Finance Act 1989.
Independence
When carrying out the audit we followed the independence requirements of the Auditor-General, which
incorporate the independence requirements of the Institute of Chartered Accountants of New Zealand.
In addition to the audit we have carried out assignments in the following assurance areas:
•
auditing the Chief Executive Officer’s declaration on the Performance-Based Research Fund External
Research Income;
•
quality assurance services over the University Student Management System Renewal Project.
These are compatible with those independence requirements. Other than the audit and these assignments, we
have no relationship with or interests in the University or any of its subsidiaries.
L H Desborough
Audit New Zealand
On behalf of the Auditor-General
Palmerston North, New Zealand
Matters relating to the electronic presentation of the audited financial statements
This audit report relates to the financial statements of the University and group for the year ended 31 December 2004
included on the University’s website. The Council is responsible for the maintenance and integrity of the University’s
website. We have not been engaged to report on the integrity of the University’s website. We accept no responsibility for any
changes that may have occurred to the financial statements since they were initially presented on the website.
We have not been engaged to report on any other electronic versions of the University’s financial statements, and accept no
responsibility for any changes that may have occurred to electronic versions of the financial statements published on other
websites and/or published by other electronic means.
The audit report refers only to the financial statements named above. It does not provide an opinion on any other
information which may have been hyperlinked to/from these financial statements. If readers of this report are concerned
with the inherent risks arising from electronic data communication they should refer to the published hard copy of the
audited financial statements and related audit report dated 29 April 2005 to confirm the information included in the
audited financial statements presented on this website.
Legislation in New Zealand governing the preparation and dissemination of financial statements may differ from legislation
in other jurisdictions.
25
STATEMENT OF ACCOUNTING POLICIES
for the year ended 31 December 2004
The Reporting Entity
Massey University was established as a university under the Massey University Act 1963 (founding legislation).
These financial statements have been prepared in accordance with Section 41 of the Public Finance Act 1989
and Section 203 of the Education Act 1989, which refers to the provisions of Section 41(2) of the Public Finance
Act 1989.
Massey University comprises the following areas of significant activity for teaching, research and community
service:
Colleges of
•
Business
•
Design, Fine Arts and Music
•
Education
•
Humanities and Social Sciences
•
Sciences
The group consists of Massey University and its subsidiaries, Creative Campus Enterprises Limited (formerly
known as Wellington Polytechnic Enterprises Limited) 100% owned, Massey University Holdings Limited 100%
owned, and Estendart Limited 100% owned by Massey University Holdings Limited.
All the above-mentioned companies have a balance date of 31 December.
Measurement Base
The financial statements have been prepared on a historical cost basis, modified by the revaluation of certain
fixed assets.
Accounting Policies
The following accounting policies which materially affect the measurement of financial performance and
financial position have been applied:
1.
Basis of Consolidation
The Consolidated Financial Statements are prepared from the financial statements of the University and
all subsidiaries as at 31 December 2004 using the purchase method. Corresponding assets, liabilities,
revenues, expenses and cashflows are added together on a line by line basis.
2.
Budget Figures
The budget figures are those approved by the Council at the beginning of the financial year.
The budget figures have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting practice and
are consistent with the accounting policies adopted by the Council for the preparation of the financial
statements.
26
3.
Allocation of Overheads
Administrative and indirect teaching and research costs are allocated to significant activities on the basis
of total equivalent full-time students (EFTS) in each college. Exceptions to this rule are allocated on the
following basis:
(i)
Regional Facilities Management - by floor space
(ii)
Recreation Centre - by internal full-time students
(iii)
Student Services - by internal equivalent full-time students
(iv)
Annual leave - by general staff numbers for general staff and from academic department leave
records for academic staff
4.
Revenues
Government Grants, which include a capital component, are recognised as income on entitlement.
Trust Funds, including donations of a capital nature, are recognised as income when money is received,
or entitlement to receive money is established.
Income for research which is externally funded is recognised in the Cost of Services Summary (see
note 3) as “Charges for Services” when research expenditure is incurred. Research funds which are not
expended at year end are included in the Statement of Financial Position as “Receipts in Advance”.
5.
Foreign Currencies
Foreign Currency transactions are converted at the New Zealand dollar rate of exchange ruling at the
dates of the transactions. Foreign currency balances have been converted into New Zealand dollars using
the exchange rate at the close of business on 31 December 2004. Foreign exchange gains and losses have
been recognised in the Statement of Financial Performance.
6.
Investments
Government Stock investments are stated at cost plus/less the proportion of any premium/discount on
purchase allocated over the time to maturity. Other investments, including those in subsidiaries, are
stated at the lower of cost or net realisable value.
7.
Receivables
Accounts Receivable are stated at their estimated realisable value after providing for amounts not
considered recoverable.
8.
Inventories
Inventories, excluding livestock, are valued at the lower of cost (using the first-in first-out basis) or net
realisable value. Livestock are valued at herd values (average market values), as supplied by the Inland
Revenue Department. All consumables are charged direct to expenditure.
27
9.
Fixed Assets
(i)
Valuation
Asset Category
Valuation By
Frequency Last Valuation
• Land and Buildings
Quotable Value New Zealand
Triennially 1 January 2003
Valued at historical cost
-
-
- Implements
Valued at historical cost
-
-
- Furniture
University staff
Triennially 31 December 2003
• Furniture and Fittings
- Equipment
(The valuation methodology used
is checked and approved by
Quotable Value New Zealand)
- Art Collection
Christopher Moore Gallery
(Palmerston North Campus) Wellington
- Art Collection
(Albany Campus)
- Art Collection - Silver
Triennially 31 December 2004
Portfolio Gallery
Auckland
Triennially 31 December 2004
Philip Rhodes Antiques
Palmerston North
Triennially 31 December 2004
Premi-Air Aviation Limited
Annually
• Other Assets
Aircraft
31 December 2004
H. Maidment MIPMV
(Registered Valuer)
Motor Vehicles
Valued at historical cost
-
-
Capital Works in Progress
Valued at historical cost
-
-
Leasehold Improvements
Valued at historical cost
-
-
Library Collection
Valued at historical cost
-
-
Land is valued on the basis of highest and best use.
Buildings (which include land improvements, reticulated services and forestry) are valued at depreciated
replacement cost on the basis of highest and best use.
Additions between valuations are recorded at cost.
Aircraft are valued on the basis of highest and best use.
Capital Work in Progress is valued on the basis of expenditure incurred and Certified Gross Progress
Claim Certificates up to balance date.
Furniture is valued at depreciated replacement cost.
Art collections are valued on the basis of their estimated market value as a permanently retained
collection.
28
The level at which individual assets are capitalised as fixed assets is $2,000.
(ii)
Depreciation
The depreciation rates used in the preparation of these statements are as follows:
Asset Class
Depreciation Rate
Method
Buildings
15 to 100 years
Straight Line
Reticulation
20 to 50 years
Straight Line
Leasehold Improvements
10%
Straight Line
Equipment, Furniture and Implements
5%-33%
Straight Line
Computers and Research Equipment
25%
Straight Line
Computer Software
33.33%
Straight Line
Motor Vehicles
20%-25%
Straight Line
Aircraft
6%
Straight Line
Library Collection (current use)
10%
Straight Line
Land, forestry, permanently retained library collections, art collections and archives are not
depreciated.
Leasehold improvements are depreciated based upon their estimated useful life and the term of
lease.
Work in Progress is not depreciated. The total cost of a project is transferred to the relevant asset
class upon completion and then depreciated.
(iii)
Crown Owned Assets
Crown owned land and buildings that are used by Massey University are included as part of Massey
University’s fixed assets. These were first recognised on 31 December 1989. Although legal title
has not been transferred, Massey University has assumed all the normal risks and rewards of
ownership.
10.
Employee Entitlements
Annual leave for Academic and General Staff has been accrued. In addition an accrual has been made
for retirement gratuities for both Academic and General Staff and long service leave for General Staff.
Both retirement gratuities and long services leave have been accrued on the following basis:
•
leave and gratuities which have vested in the employee (an entitlement has been established)
have been measured at nominal value using remuneration rates current at reporting date. This is
included as a Current Liability.
•
leave and gratuities which have not yet vested in the employee (no entitlement has been
established) have been measured using the present value measurement basis which discounts
expected future cash outflows. This is treated as a Non-Current Liability. It is included to comply
with “generally accepted accounting practice” as defined in the Financial Reporting Act 1993
and results from the adoption of Australian Accounting Standard AASB 1028: “Accounting for
Employee Entitlements”.
29
Duty leave overseas for Academic Staff has not been accrued as this leave is a commitment subject to
eligibility and is not an entitlement.
11.
Goods and Services Tax (GST)
The financial statements are prepared on a GST exclusive basis, with the exception of accounts receivable
and accounts payable.
12.
Taxation
Tertiary institutions are exempt from the payment of income tax as they are treated by the Inland
Revenue Department as charitable organisations. Accordingly, no charge for income tax has been
provided for.
Massey University’s subsidiaries are also exempt from paying income tax, except for Estendart Limited,
which has allowed for income tax.
13.
Leases
Finance leases effectively transfer to Massey University substantially all the risks and benefits incidental to
ownership of the leased item. These are capitalised at the lower of fair value of the asset or the present
value of the minimum lease payments. The leased assets and corresponding lease liabilities are disclosed
and the leased assets are depreciated over the period Massey University is expected to benefit from their
use.
Operating lease payments, where the lessor effectively retains substantially all the risks and benefits
of ownership of the leased items, are included in the determination of the operating profit in equal
instalments over the lease term.
14.
Financial Instruments
Massey University and its subsidiaries are party to financial instruments as part of their normal operations.
These financial instruments include bank accounts, investments, debtors, creditors and loans. All
financial instruments are recognised in the Statement of Financial Position and all revenues and expenses
in relation to the financial instruments are recognised in the Statement of Financial Performance.
15.
Joint Venture
The University has a 50% interest in a joint venture with Capital Hill Limited. The University’s interest in
the joint venture is accounted for using the proportionate method of consolidation.
Changes in Accounting Policies
There have been no changes in accounting policies and the policies have been applied on a basis consistent with
prior years.
30
STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE
for the year ended 31 December 2004
University
Budget
2004
(000)
Notes
Government Grants
1
Student Fees
Interest
Charges for Services
Trust Funds
9
Total Operating Revenue
Consolidated
Actual
2004
(000)
Actual
2003
(000)
Actual
2004
(000)
Actual
2003
(000)
143,340
138,935
136,794
138,935
136,794
128,541
126,577
118,366
126,577
118,366
1,729
4,191
3,638
4,231
3,639
72,632
76,690
66,051
80,199
68,619
720
1,141
1,429
1,141
1,429
346,962
347,534
326,278
351,083
328,847
Staff Related Costs
2
202,592
198,998
186,347
199,991
187,033
Depreciation
2
22,900
26,185
24,879
26,276
24,929
Other Direct Costs
2
110,150
111,252
98,242
113,778
100,202
Trust Funds
9
720
952
78
952
78
336,362
337,387
309,546
340,997
312,242
Total Cost of Operations
Operating Surplus before adjustment
for Employee Entitlements
Employee Entitlements
10,600
10,147
16,732
10,086
16,605
8
-
795
(2,123)
795
(2,123)
-
3,881
-
3,881
-
13
10,600
14,823
14,609
14,762
14,482
Profit on Sale of St George Complex
Net Surplus
The Statement of Accounting Policies and Notes to the Financial Statements form part of and are to be read in
conjunction with these statements.
31
STATEMENT OF MOVEMENTS IN EQUITY
for the year ended 31 December 2004
University
Budget
2004
(000)
Notes
Consolidated
Actual
2004
(000)
Actual
2003
(000)
Actual
2004
(000)
Actual
2003
(000)
Public Equity as at 1 January
578,372
576,442
532,546
576,347
532,578
Equity at 1 January
578,372
576,442
532,546
576,347
532,578
10,600
14,823
14,609
14,762
14,482
-
270
29,287
270
29,287
10,600
15,093
43,896
15,032
43,769
588,972
591,535
576,442
591,379
576,347
Net Surplus
Increases/(Decreases) in revaluation
10
Total recognised revenues and
expenses for the period
Public Equity as at 31 December
11
The Statement of Annual Accounting Policies and Notes to the Financial Statements form part of and are to be
read in conjunction with these statements.
32
STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION
as at 31 December 2004
University
Notes
Consolidated
Budget
2004
(000)
Actual
2004
(000)
Actual
2003
(000)
Actual
2004
(000)
Actual
2003
(000)
1,300
2,032
-
2,433
-
ASSETS
Current Assets
Cash and Bank
Prepayments
Accounts Receivable and Accruals
14
3,500
6,052
5,067
6,058
5,072
19,627
31,599
17,988
32,205
18,386
Inventories
4
5,633
4,348
4,241
4,491
4,357
Short Term Investments
5
15,754
44,500
46,000
48,912
46,000
Long Term Investment Maturing 2005
5
-
4,775
10,416
4,775
10,416
45,814
93,306
83,712
98,874
84,231
Total Current Assets
Non Current Assets
Term Investments
5
14,199
15,091
4,331
9,996
3,971
Fixed Assets
6
627,345
594,487
592,262
594,920
592,617
Total Non Current Assets
641,544
609,578
596,593
604,916
596,588
Total Assets
687,358
702,884
680,305
703,790
680,819
LIABILITIES AND EQUITY
Current Liabilities
Cash and Bank
-
-
946
-
403
26,684
27,429
28,412
27,944
29,020
Accounts Payable and Accruals
15
Loans
7
-
2,250
19
2,290
19
Provision for Employee Entitlements
8
9,480
14,144
11,054
14,253
11,119
Receipts in Advance
30,000
38,469
39,574
38,776
40,053
Total Current Liability
66,164
82,292
80,005
83,263
80,614
12,427
8,114
2,117
8,205
2,117
21,741
Non-Current Liabilities
Loans
7
Provision for Employee Entitlements
8
19,795
20,943
21,741
20,943
Total Non-Current Liabilities
32,222
29,057
23,858
29,148
23,858
Total Liabilities
98,386
111,349
103,863
112,411
104,472
588,972
591,535
576,442
591,379
576,347
687,358
702,884
680,305
703,790
680,819
Public Equity
11
Total Liabilities and Public Equity
The Statement of Annual Accounting Policies and Notes to the Financial Statements form part of and are to be
read in conjunction with these statements.
33
STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS
for the year ended 31 December 2004
University
Consolidated
Budget
2004
($000)
Actual
2004
($000)
Actual
2003
($000)
Actual
2004
($000)
Actual
2003
($000)
Government Grants
143,300
138,420
138,793
138,420
138,793
Student Fees
128,541
143,885
128,582
143,885
128,582
Other Income
70,198
59,076
62,234
62,916
65,104
3,500
4,628
3,364
4,665
3,365
720
416
1,204
416
1,204
346,259
346,425
334,177
350,302
337,048
313,475
312,400
278,961
316,414
281,619
600
418
74
432
77
314,075
312,818
279,035
316,846
281,696
32,184
33,607
55,142
33,456
55,352
9,259
10,381
-
10,381
-
-
728
2,287
742
2,287
9,259
11,109
2,287
11,123
2,287
Purchase of Investments
10,000
10,340
539
10,631
279
Purchase of Fixed Assets
66,676
36,346
43,014
36,358
43,087
76,676
46,686
43,553
46,989
43,366
(67,417)
(35,577)
(41,266)
(35,866)
(41,079)
Notes
CASHFLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES
Cash was provided from
Interest on Operating Income
Trust Funds
Cash was applied to
Payments to Employees and Suppliers
Interest Paid
Net Cashflow from Operating Activities
CASHFLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES
Cash was provided from
Withdrawal of Investments
Sale of Fixed Assets
Cash was applied to
Net Cashflow from Investing Activities
The Statement of Annual Accounting Policies and Notes to the Financial Statements form part of and are to be
read in conjunction with these statements.
34
University
Notes
Consolidated
Budget
2004
($000)
Actual
2004
($000)
Actual
2003
($000)
Actual
2004
($000)
Actual
2003
($000)
10,300
8,500
-
8,501
-
Cashflows from Financing Activities
Cash was provided from
Loans Raised
Cash was applied to
Loans Repaid
-
272
480
343
480
Loan to Subsidiary
-
4,780
-
-
-
Net Cashflow from Financing Activities
10,300
3,448
(480)
8,158
(480)
Net Increase /(Decrease) in Cash Held
(24,933)
1,478
13,396
5,748
13,793
Cash Brought Forward
41,987
45,054
31,658
45,597
31,804
Ending Cash Carried Forward
17,054
46,532
45,054
51,345
45,597
Cash in Hand is made up of
Bank of New Zealand Accounts
Short Term Investments
1,300
2,032
(946)
2,433
(403)
15,754
44,500
46,000
48,912
46,000
17,054
46,532
45,054
51,345
45,597
The Statement of Annual Accounting Policies and Notes to the Financial Statements form part of and are to be
read in conjunction with these statements.
35
NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
for the year ending 31 December 2004
1.
Government Grants
The Ministry of Education provides income to the University by way of a grant which is based on equivalent fulltime students (EFTS). Funding is provided by means of a tuition subsidy according to different cost categories
for the courses being offered.
2.
•
Cost of Operations
Staff Related Costs
Includes direct staff related costs allocated to colleges, support services and regions. Employee
Entitlements relating to actuarial calculations are shown separately.
•
Depreciation
Includes all depreciation on all assets held by the University.
•
Other Direct Costs
Includes all direct costs of operating and maintaining the University. It also includes the cost of research
including salaries and wages.
3.
Cost of Services Summary 2004 (Refer Page 48)
Cost of Services includes the net costs of services for the significant activities of the University, and is represented
by Charges for Services less Costs of Services. Significant activities comprise the Colleges of the University, as
shown in the entity statement, that provide teaching, research and community services.
The costs of inputs necessary in providing teaching, research and community services are analysed in the Cost of
Services Summary to follow. These inputs are as follows:
•
Staff Related Costs
Includes only salaries and wages of those staff directly allocated to the college. Other salaries and wages
are included in the appropriate overhead area in which they are incurred. Also includes expenses of
training and development, employers contribution to superannuation funds, retirement related costs and
accident insurance premiums.
•
Other Direct Costs
Includes all other direct costs of operating and maintaining colleges. It also includes the cost of
operating research and service centres directly attached to them.
•
Divisional and Regional Costs
Includes all costs associated with the support service divisions and regions. The activities include all
support functions managed under the following groupings:
Academic Services, Research Services, Resources, Support Services, Vice-Chancellor’s Office and Regional
Administration and Infrastructure.
36
•
Depreciation
Includes only depreciation on those assets directly held by the college. All other depreciation is included
in Divisional and Regional Costs.
COST OF SERVICES SUMMARY 2004
2004
Staff Related Costs
Other Direct Costs
Divisional Costs
Depreciation
Total Costs
2003
Humanities &
Social Sciences
($000)
Business
($000)
Design, Fine
Arts & Music
($000)
31,508
10,369
21,774
27,784
53,650
145,085
29,460
9,059
20,638
25,636
51,338
136,131
Education
($000)
Sciences
($000)
Total
($000)
14,052
2,614
7,351
8,635
21,978
54,630
13,501
2,352
7,592
6,732
20,549
50,726
34,387
13,215
14,174
20,585
45,422
127,783
32,581
11,901
14,009
18,774
40,125
117,390
5,490
810
665
346
510
3,159
800
658
346
450
3,042
5,296
80,757
26,863
43,645
57,514
124,209
332,988
76,342
23,970
42,585
51,592
115,054
309,543
Charges of Services
9,645
1,862
15,773
14,795
34,615
76,690
5,999
738
15,918
11,460
31,936
66,051
Net cost of Services
71,112
25,001
27,872
42,719
89,594
256,298
70,343
23,232
26,667
40,132
83,118
243,492
4.
Inventories
University
Consolidated
2004
2003
2004
2003
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
Material and Stores
1,362
1,337
1,505
1,453
Livestock
2,986
2,904
2,986
2,904
Total
4,348
4,241
4,491
4,357
37
5.
Investments
University
Short Term
Long Term Investment Maturing 2005
Consolidated
2004
2003
2004
2003
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
44,500
46,000
48,912
46,000
4,775
10,416
4,775
10,416
Total Short Term
49,275
56,416
53,687
56,416
Long Term
15,091
4,331
9,996
3,971
Total
64,366
60,747
63,683
60,387
3,100
9,250
3,100
9,250
ASB Bank
12,000
20,500
16,412
20,500
National Bank
21,630
24,130
21,630
24,130
Westpac
2,500
2,500
2,500
2,500
Kiwi Bank
10,000
-
10,000
-
Current Portion
Bank of New Zealand
Loans
45
36
45
36
49,275
56,416
53,687
56,416
Bank of New Zealand
7,750
2,100
7,750
2,100
Loans
5,103
113
109
113
Total
Term Portion
Shares
Total
12,853
2,213
7,859
2,213
2,238
2,118
2,137
1,758
15,091
4,331
9,996
3,971
Refer to Note 12 for weighted average interest rate.
Shares in Subsidiaries.
Name of Entity:
Creative Campus Enterprises Limited (previously known as Wellington Polytechnic
Enterprises Ltd)
Principal Activity:
Accommodation Management
Ownership:
100%
Owner:
Massey University
Contribution:
$82,638 Loss (2003: $128,000 Loss)
The fair value of Massey University’s investment in Creative Campus Enterprises Limited as approximated by the
net assets of the company as at 31 December 2004 is $(79,193). ($3,444 as at 31 December 2003)
Name of Entity:
Massey University Holdings Limited
Principal Activity:
Holding Company
Ownership:
100%
Owner:
Massey University
Contribution:
Nil
The fair value of Massey University’s investment in Massey University Holdings as approximated by the net assets
of the company as at 31 December 2004 is $0. ($0 as at 31 December 2003)
38
Name of Entity:
Estendart Limited
Principal Activity:
Animal health services
Ownership:
100%
Owner:
Massey University
Contribution:
$9,545 Loss (2003: $1)
The fair value of Massey University’s investment in Estendart Limited as approximated by the net assets of the
company, and included in Massey University Holdings Limited, as at 31 December 2004 is $246,803. ($602 as at
31 December 2003)
Name of Entity:
Massey University Foundation
Principal Activity:
Investment
Ownership:
100%
Owner:
Massey University
Contribution:
$36,000
The fair value of Massey University’s investment in Massey University Foundation as approximated by the net
assets of the company as at 31 December 2004 is $36,000.
6.
Fixed Assets
University 2004
University 2003
Cost /
Valuation
Accumulated
Depreciation
Net
Cost /
Valuation
Accumulated
Depreciation
Net
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
74,045
-
74,045
78,605
-
78,605
Buildings
446,657
26,738
419,919
424,955
13,961
410,994
Total Land and Buildings
520,702
26,738
493,964
503,560
13,961
489,599
Equipment (incl Computer)
103,525
75,856
27,669
95,124
68,686
26,438
175
159
16
175
156
19
1,775
1,060
715
1,800
913
887
Land
Implements
Furniture and Fittings
Art Collections
Total Furniture and Equipment
Aircraft
Vehicles
1,512
-
1,512
935
-
935
106,987
77,075
29,912
98,034
69,755
28,279
2,881
-
2,881
1,338
94
1,244
3,088
2,451
637
3,441
2,777
664
Capital Works in Progress
32,180
-
32,180
39,125
-
39,125
Leasehold Improvements
2,187
333
1,854
329
319
10
Total Other Assets
40,336
2,784
37,552
44,233
3,190
41,043
Library Collection
47,800
14,741
33,059
43,327
9,986
33,341
Total Fixed Assets
715,825
121,338
594,487
689,154
96,892
592,262
39
Consolidated 2004
Consolidated 2003
Cost /
Valuation
Accumulated
Net
Cost /
Valuation
Accumulated
Depreciation
Depreciation
Net
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
Land and Buildings
520,702
26,738
493,964
503,560
13,961
489,599
Equipment (incl Computer)
104,174
76,183
27,991
95,601
68,942
26,659
Implements
175
159
16
175
156
19
Furniture and Fittings
1,894
1,101
793
1,914
942
972
Art Collections
1,512
-
1,512
935
-
935
107,755
77,443
30,312
98,625
70,040
28,585
Total Furniture and Equipment
Aircraft
2,881
-
2,881
1,338
94
1,244
Vehicles
3,134
2,464
670
3,494
2,781
713
Capital Works in Progress
32,180
-
32,180
39,125
-
39,125
Leasehold Improvements
2,187
333
1,854
329
319
10
Total Other Assets
40,382
2,797
37,585
44,286
3,194
41,092
Library Collection
47,800
14,741
33,059
43,327
9,986
33,341
Total Fixed Assets
716,639
121,719
594,920
689,798
97,181
592,617
Asset values included in the Statement of Financial Position as at 31 December 2004 include all land and
buildings as occupied and utilised by Massey University. The exception to this is the land on Riverside farm
(leased from the Sydney Campbell Foundation).
Legal ownership of land and buildings is detailed as follows (at Statement of Financial Position values):
2004
2003
2004
2003
Land
Land
Buildings
($000)
($000)
($000)
Buildings
($000)
i) Massey University owned
46,062
50,622
250,157
237,843
ii) Crown Owned (includes buildings on Crown owned land)
27,983
27,983
169,762
173,151
74,045
78,605
419,919
410,994
40
7.
Loans (Parent and Consolidated)
University
Consolidated
2004
2003
2004
2003
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
Opening Balance
2,136
2,616
2,136
2,616
Repayments
(272)
(480)
(272)
(480)
Loans Raised
8,500
-
8,631
-
Closing Balance
10,364
2,136
10,495
2,136
Current Portion
2,250
19
2,290
19
Term Portion
8,114
2,117
8,205
2,117
Details of loans are as follows:
Loan
Interest Rate
2004
2003
2004
2003
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
BNZ - Fixed Interest Rate Facility
6.60%
8,247
-
8,247
-
Tindall Foundation
2.77% - 3.38%
2,000
2,000
2,000
2,000
Staff Club
6.0%
117
136
117
136
-
-
131
-
10,364
2,136
10,495
2,136
Other
Total Loans
The average interest rate for 2004 was 5.86% (2003: 3.20%)
Borrowings are unsecured.
8.
Employee Entitlements (University and Consolidated)
University
Consolidated
2004
2003
2004
2003
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
12,908
10,877
13,017
10,942
892
1,311
892
1,311
Retirement Gratuities
21,287
20,607
21,287
20,607
Total
35,087
32,795
35,196
32,860
Current
14,144
11,054
14,253
11,119
Non-Current
20,943
21,741
20,943
21,741
Total
35,087
32,795
35,196
32,860
Annual Leave
Long Service Leave
41
9.
Trust Funds (University and Consolidated)
Opening
Balance
01.01.04
($000)
Movement
($000)
Closing
Balance
31.12.04
($000)
Helen Akers Bequest
777
12
789
Massey University Agricultural Research Foundation (MUARF)
380
15
395
MU Common Fund
7,256
123
7,379
Sasakawa Foundation
5,598
22
5,620
Delahunty Trust
413
9
422
Norwood Trust
50
3
53
A G East Memorial Trust
20
2
22
Tony Drakeford Memorial Trust
55
3
58
14,549
189
14,738
Total Trust Funds
Although these items are trusts, Massey University has control over them and obtains benefits associated with
ownership of them. They have therefore been treated as equity in the Parent and Consolidated Statement of
Financial Position. Details of Trust Funds are as follows:
Helen Akers Bequest
Funds bequeathed from the Estate of Helen Akers to provide scholarships for students.
Massey University Agricultural Research Foundation
Trust fund established for agricultural research by students and staff.
Massey University Property Foundation
Foundation established to support the Department of Finance, Banking and Property Studies and the real estate
industry.
Massey University Common Fund
Pool of funds used for holding and paying out scholarships and prize monies to students.
Sasakawa Foundation
Scholarships provided from the Sasakawa Foundation, Japan, for students.
Delahunty Trust
Trust fund established to provide research grants to foster primary industry accounting research to students
living in New Zealand.
Norwood Trust
Prizes for students for achievements in trade courses.
A G East Memorial Trust
Educational scholarships for technical and trade courses
Tony Drakeford Memorial Trust
Educational scholarships for commerce courses.
42
10.
Asset Revaluation Reserves (University)
2004
2003
($000)
($000)
Balance 1 January
2,709
2,787
Movement
(589)
(78)
Balance 31 December
2,120
2,709
3,568
3,410
Aircraft
Furniture & Fittings
Balance 1 January
Movement
10
158
3,578
3,568
Balance 1 January
99,721
70,514
Movement
(3,925)
29,207
Balance 31 December
95,796
99,721
Balance 1 January
176
176
Movement
533
-
Balance 31 December
709
176
741
741
Balance 31 December
Land & Buildings
Art Collections
Library Books
Balance 1 January
Movement
-
-
741
741
106,915
77,628
Balance 31 December
Total
Balance 1 January
Movement
Balance 31 December
11.
(3,971)
29,287
102,944
106,915
Public Equity
The University Public Equity is made up as follows:
Opening
Balance
01.01.04
($000)
Trust Funds
Asset Revaluation Reserves
Movements
($000)
Operating
Surplus/
Deficit
($000)
Closing
Balance
31.12.04
($000)
14,549
-
189
14,738
102,944
106,915
(3,971)
-
Special Reserves
17,581
(100)
-
17,481
General Reserves
437,397
4,341
14,634
456,372
Total
576,442
270
14,823
591,535
43
The Consolidated Public Equity is made up as follows:
Opening
Balance
01.01.04
($000)
Trust Funds
Movements
($000)
Operating
Surplus/
Deficit
($000)
Closing
Balance
31.12.04
($000)
14,549
-
189
14,738
106,922
(3,971)
-
102,951
Special Reserves
17,579
(100)
-
17,479
General Reserves
437,297
4,341
14,573
456,211
Total
576,347
270
14,762
591,379
Asset Revaluation Reserves
•
Special Reserves includes funds set aside for uninsured risks, residential capital development, building
replacement (farms and research/service units), farms development and replacement of implements and
plant (farms and research/service units). In terms of Massey University Treasury Management Policy,
special reserves, along with trust funds, should have 50% coverage by cash reserves. As at 31 December
2004 this coverage is as follows:
2004
2003
($000)
($000)
Total Cash & Investments
64,106
59,801
Trust Funds (50% cover)
(7,369)
(7,275)
Special Reserves (50% cover)
(8,740)
(8,790)
Available to cover General Reserves
47,997
43,736
•
General Reserves include funds set aside for departmental reserves and University capital.
12.
Financial Instruments
Massey University is party to financial instrument arrangements as part of its everyday operations. These
financial instruments include Bank Accounts, Bank Deposits, Accounts Receivable, Accounts Payable and Term
Borrowings, and are recognised in the Statement of Financial Position. The weighted average interest rate for
2004 was 6.31% (2003: 5.86%).
A facility to borrow up to $30 million (2003: $30 million) has been arranged with the Bank of New Zealand.
Credit Risk
Financial instruments which potentially subject Massey University to credit risk principally consist of bank
balances and accounts receivable.
Maximum exposures to credit risk at balance date are:
University
Consolidated
2004
2003
2004
2003
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
Bank Deposits
64,160
58,629
63,979
58,629
Receivables and prepayments
37,651
23,055
38,263
23,458
2,236
2,118
2,137
1,758
Investments
- Shares
The above maximum exposures are net of any recognised provision for losses on these financial instruments.
No collateral is held on the above amounts.
44
Massey University invests funds in deposits with registered banks, and limits the amount of credit exposure to any
one institution. There are no major concentrations of credit risk with respect to accounts receivable.
Fair Value
The fair value of Massey University’s investment in Massey University Holdings Limited, Estendart and Creative
Campus Enterprises is disclosed in Note 5 of these financial statements.
The fair value of other financial instruments is approximately equivalent to the carrying amount disclosed in the
Statement of Financial Position.
Interest Rate Risk
The effective interest rates on the loans is at a margin above the 90 day bank bill rate. Trust Funds are credited
with the actual return received from investments made purchased with these funds.
Currency Risk
Massey University holds a bank current account in United States dollars which is subject to exchange rate
fluctuations. The University has taken out forward cover to cover known commitments.
13.
Statement of Financial Performance Disclosures
University
The net surplus is after charging:
Consolidated
2004
2003
2004
2003
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
Audit Fees
83
79
122
89
Other Services Provided by principal auditor
25
19
25
19
Internal Audit Fees
Bad debts written off
Increase/ (Reduction) in provision for bad debts
Council members’ fees
Depreciation Buildings
Reticulation
Leasehold Investments
Aircraft
78
48
78
48
510
885
526
895
(286)
192
(280)
192
55
56
55
56
12,088
12,019
12,088
12,019
1,012
997
1,012
997
14
32
14
32
80
115
80
115
178
151
192
156
Equipment
7,846
7,836
7,913
7,877
Implements
3
4
3
4
209
247
218
251
Furniture and Fittings
Vehicles
Library
Total
Interest expense
4,755
3,478
4,755
3,478
26,185
24,879
26,275
24,929
434
75
442
75
Rental expense on operating leases
3,316
2,796
3,356
2,800
Net Profit/(Loss) on disposal of fixed assets
3,791
170
3,790
170
-
70
-
70
Asset write offs
45
14.
Accounts Receivable and Accruals
University
Consolidated
2004
2003
2004
2003
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
Trade Debtors
27,046
12,570
26,906
12,935
Less Provision for doubtful debts
(1,219)
(1,505)
(1,238)
(1,527)
Net Receivables
25,827
11,065
25,668
11,408
5,772
6,923
6,537
6,978
31,599
17,988
32,205
18,386
Other amounts receivable
Total
15.
Accounts Payable and Accruals
University
Consolidated
2004
2003
2004
2003
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
23,000
25,211
22,589
25,444
4,429
3,201
5,355
3,576
27,429
28,412
27,944
29,020
2004
2003
N Gould
19,500
19,500
C Campbell
10,980
10,980
J Todd
4,335
4,590
P Reiger
4,590
4,845
E Barker
3,060
3,060
R Hubbard
2,295
3,570
B Tipene-Hook
3,060
2,550
M Evetts
-
3,060
W Vercoe
-
1,275
L Gordon
3,060
3,060
A Maynard
3,060
-
A Paterson
255
-
N Love
255
-
S Kos
255
-
54,705
56,490
Trade Creditors
Amounts Payable
Total
16.
Council members’ fees paid during 2004 year
Total 2004
46
17.
Related Party Information
The Crown
The Government influences the roles of the University as well as being its major source of revenue.
Creative Campus Enterprises Limited
Massey University charges interest at wholesale deposit rate + 1% to Creative Campus Enterprises Limited
on short term funding. During the year Massey University entered into transactions with Creative Campus
Enterprises Limited. All transactions between the entities were conducted on an arm’s length basis using
commercial terms.
Massey University charged Creative Campus Enterprises Limited $332,907 (2003: $288,755) including GST
for rental, power, gas, postage and salary of the General Manager. The amount owed to Massey University by
Creative Campus Enterprises Limited at the year end was $63,297 (2003: $75,486), payable under normal trading
terms.
Creative Campus Enterprises Limited charged Massey University $56,250 (2003: $56,250) including GST for
pastoral care services. A loan was raised by Creative Campus Enterprise Limited from Massey University for
$100,000.
The amount owed to Creative Campus Enterprises Limited by Massey University at the end of the year was
$523,299 (2003: $325,508) being:
-
$7,722 (2003: $20,723) which is payable on normal trading terms
-
$515,577 (2003: $304,529) - funds held by Massey University (largely investments) which Creative Campus
Enterprises Limited administer on behalf of the owners of Te Awhina and Drummond Street apartments.
Estendart Limited
During the year Massey University entered into transactions with Estendart Limited. All transactions were
conducted on an arm’s length basis using commercial terms.
Massey University charged Estendart Limited $95,959 (2003: $332,976) including GST for rental, postage,
insurance and fixed asset. The amount owed to Massey University by Estendart Limited at the year end was
$2,192 (2003: $366,726), payable under normal trading terms.
Estendart Limited charged Massey University $128,876 (2003: $15,765) including GST for professional services.
The amount owed to Estendart Limited by Massey University at the end of the year was Nil (2003: $11,171),
payable under normal trading terms.
Massey University Holding Limited
During the year Massey University entered into no transactions with Massey University Holdings Limited.
Massey University Foundation
During the year Massey University entered into no transactions with Massey University Holdings Limited.
Members of Council
During the year Massey University purchased goods and services from or sold goods and services to:
47
•
Hubbards Foods Limited, of which Mr R Hubbard, a Councillor of Massey University, is a shareholder
and director. These goods were supplied on normal commercial terms at a cost of $840, with a Nil
balance owing to Massey University at the end of the year.
•
Reigers Copy Centre Limited, of which Mr P Reiger, a Councillor of Massey University, is a shareholder
and director. These goods were supplied on normal commercial terms at a cost of $1,345, with a Nil
balance owing to Reigers Copy Centre Limited at the end of the year.
•
There were no transactions between Massey University and other Councillors.
18.
Segmental Information
Massey University operates predominantly in the tertiary education sector in New Zealand with major campuses
at Albany, Palmerston North and Wellington. Regional locations include Napier and New Plymouth.
19.
Reconciliation of the Net Surplus on Operations with the Net Cash Flows from Operating Activities
University
Consolidated
2004
2003
2004
2003
($000)
($000)
($000)
($000)
14,823
14,609
14,762
14,482
Depreciation
26,185
24,879
26,276
24,929
Asset Disposals
(3,712)
640
(3,718)
640
(286)
192
(286)
192
106
90
106
90
Surplus /(Deficit) on Operations
Add Non Cash Items
Provision for Bad Debts
Foreign Exchange Loss /(Gain)
Shares Movement
(120)
241
(120)
241
Increase/Decrease In Employee Entitlements
(798)
3,520
(798)
3,520
21,375
29,562
21,460
29,612
Movements In Working Capital
Decrease/(Increase) in Prepayments
(985)
(1,547)
(985)
(1,552)
(2,024)
3,674
(2,155)
3,082
Decrease /(Increase) in Stocks
(107)
1,327
(85)
1,275
Increase /(Decrease) in Accounts Payable
1,630
1,960
1,678
2,506
Decrease/(Increase) in Account Reveivable
Increase /(Decrease) in Receipts in Advance
Net Cashflow from Operating Activities
48
(1,105)
5,557
(1,219)
5,947
(2,591)
10,971
(2,766)
11,258
33,607
55,142
33,456
55,352
20.
Statement of Commitments
As at 31 December 2004.
The following Commitments for capital projects have been made (University and Consolidated).
Projected Total
Expenditure
Unspent
cost of Project
to 31.12.04
Commitment
($000)
($000)
($000)
Total Project Commitments 2004
38,673
8,590
30,083
Total Project Commitments 2003
43,445
27,196
16,249
In addition, the University had operating commitments in respect of leases of land, buildings and equipment:
University
Actual
Consolidated
Actual
Actual
Actual
2004
2003
2004
2003
(000)
(000)
(000)
(000)
Due not later than one year
3,272
3,583
3,327
3,587
Due later than one year and not later than two years
4,238
2,300
4,290
2,304
Due later than two years and not later than five years
3,651
3,457
3,708
3,459
Due later than five years
4,206
5,013
4,206
5,013
15,367
14,353
15,531
14,363
21.
Statement of Contingent Liabilities
As at 31 December 2004.
Massey University had the following contingent liability (University and Consolidated):
There were five employees contractual claims against the University proceeding as at 31 December 2004.
Contingent liability assessed at $160,000 (2003: $80,000).
22. Post Balance Date Events
There are no significant post balance date events (2003: Nil)
49
MASSEY UNIVERSITY MISSION
(Excerpt from the Massey University Charter)
1.1
Massey University is committed to meeting the needs of New Zealand and New Zealanders, enhancing
access to university study for diverse populations, preparing students for life-long learning, and meeting
international standards of excellence in research and teaching. Massey University is an integrated
multi-campus institution of higher learning that creates new knowledge and understanding; synthesises,
applies and disseminates knowledge; develops advanced learning and scholarly abilities for a national
and international student body; and promotes free and rational inquiry. We offer high-quality learning
experiences that empower people and their communities to prosper in an increasingly knowledgedependent and technologically advanced world.
1.2
Massey University is driven by a spirit of community relevance and engagement, while maintaining
intellectual independence. We will use our multi-campus structure to meet the needs of our constituent
regional communities, while our flexible delivery and distance (extramural) education capabilities give a
national and international reach to our educational programmes.
1.3
Massey University recognises and respects the significance of mana whenua within its regions and
the range of Mäori organisations contributing to Mäori development and advancement. We have
demonstrated our commitment to Mäori development by providing Mäori academic leadership, research
opportunities and educational qualifications that assist in the achievement of Mäori aspirations.
1.4
Our integrated academic structures and organisational arrangements enable and support
interdisciplinary and cross-disciplinary research and academic programmes. We pride ourselves on
the relevance of our programmes; on our openness to students of diverse backgrounds spanning age,
geographic location, educational background, ethnicity and culture; on the support we provide for our
students; and on the relationship we have built with our alumni.
STATEMENT OF SERVICE PERFORMANCE
PERFORMANCE REVIEW
The Massey University Interim Profile 2004-2006 states specific performance indicators and measures under each
of the University’s eight primary aim headings. These are reported on in the Statement of Service Performance.
The Appendices provide additional information and detail on the University’s profile.
PRIMARY AIM HEADINGS
The eight primary aims of Massey University are:
Research and Creative Work
Teaching and Learning
Treaty of Waitangi
Students
Staff
The University and The Wider Community
Internationalisation
Organisation and Management
Goals and objectives stated at the beginning of each primary aim section are excerpts from the Massey University
10 Year Plan (Strategic Plan).
50
RESEARCH AND CREATIVE WORKS
GOALS
1.
To advance the reputation and performance of Massey University as a research university of international
standing.
2.
To strengthen our contribution to New Zealand’s economic, social and cultural advancement, through
excellent, accessible and relevant research, scholarship and creative work.
OBJECTIVES
•
To encourage research, scholarship and creative work in the University’s chosen disciplines in the pursuit
of academic excellence and to recognise and reward outstanding achievement.
•
To build the overall research capability of the University by :
-
ensuring all campuses and colleges attain and maintain a high proportion of staff who are
research active and qualified doctorally or with the appropriate terminal degree for the discipline,
-
providing researchers with infrastructure and support of international standard,
-
identifying and nurturing new or emerging areas of research, relevant to our overall strategy,
-
promoting collaborative arrangements, innovative research, and technology transfer aimed at
improving the economic performance, social well-being and sustainable development of our
regions and New Zealand,
-
measuring research excellence, relevance and accessibility through regular, systematic
benchmarking against national priorities and international standards,
-
placing a high priority on the commercialisation of intellectual property and the growth of
external research funding from government, industry and international sources,
-
increasing the numbers of students undertaking postgraduate research programmes and the level
of scholarship and other support available to them,
-
placing a greater emphasis on the professional development of staff who are able to lead
and direct research programmes and research teams and on staff who are willing to work in
collaborative research teams,
-
establishing at an international standard, 4 - 5 Centres of Research Excellence, and to establish at
a national standard, 6 - 10 Centres of Research Excellence,
-
ensuring that all research is conducted to the University’s protocols and ethical standards,
-
augmenting and enhancing research into all aspects of the environment, across a range of
disciplines.
PERFORMANCE 2004
2004 was a very successful year for research at Massey University and our international research reputation was
confirmed in The Times Higher Education Supplement which ranked only two New Zealand universities in the
world’s top 200. Massey University’s world ranking of 108th clearly places us among the world’s best and this
performance has been confirmed by other international comparisons.
Closer to home, these comparisons would place us about 15th among Australasian universities. Considering the
financial support most of these universities receive, this is a most creditable level of performance.
51
While rankings are a very public indicator of our relative standing, they do not capture the true essence of the
research culture within Massey University. This is very much more difficult to measure and we must always be
aware of the other important indicators of research. In this regard Massey University has world class researchers
in nearly all of the major disciplinary areas in which we claim special expertise. Our continued success in all
research endeavours will ensure our research culture will be sustained into the future.
In 2004 Massey University’s research and contracts income grew by 13.3% to $50.7 million. This increased
revenue was achieved by a combination of a record number of external grants and a significant increase in the
revenue of our rapidly growing research centres. As an example, the University received over $5.1 million from
the Marsden Fund in 2004. This is the largest grant we have received from the Marsden Fund, nearly $2 million
more than last year. Eleven Massey projects secured funding.
Research training, as measured by research degree completions, grew in 2004 by 16% from 861 to 999 EFTS.
Research postgraduate enrolments at 1,372 EFTS were also well ahead of target (1,108 EFTS) for 2004. The
University’s postgraduate EFTS as a proportion of total EFTS continues to increase and at the end of 2004 was
21.49%. This level of performance makes Massey University New Zealand’s largest provider of post-graduate
education. Continuing to maintain this level of graduate supervision and research training is a major endeavour
and can be expected to contribute positively to New Zealand’s economic and social well being.
To help support staff with their research, the University has continued to invest in new research equipment
(including the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance 700MHz spectrometer) and through the award of Massey University
Research Funds and strategic grants.
The University’s focus on rewarding outstanding research endeavour has been boosted with four major new
medals. The honours, to be known as Massey University Research Medals, will be awarded annually to the
University’s highest achieving researchers. The individual Research Medal will be given to a researcher who
has made an outstanding research contribution in a particular discipline. This award will be the highest award
for research bestowed by the University. Details of the 2004 award recipients are provided at the end of the
Performance Indicators section below.
This year also highlights new research initiatives from Colleges which will focus more on identifying and
supporting areas of research strength and enhancing networking with partners with a similar research focus.
These partnerships will enable teams to come together to form the critical research infrastructure which is
necessary to achieve success in the competitive research pools. A number of Chairs have been established and
filled in targeted discipline areas.
Performance Indicators
Target 2004:
Outcome/Progress 2004:
1 Continue the Advanced Degree Award fund to
Achieved - Ongoing
assist staff to complete research qualifications, with
Majority of award recipients have completed degree
a view to increasing the proportion of staff who
on schedule with others expected to complete within
are doctorally qualified or hold an appropriate
a year.
terminal degree for the discipline.
52
Achieved - Ongoing
2 Establish five Chairs in targeted discipline areas
including chairs in Sport, Software Engineering,
Highlights included:
Mäori Health, and Speech and Language Therapy.
Established and filled:
•
Chair in Mäori Health (Wellington)
•
Chair in Software Engineering
•
Chair in Nursing (Wellington)
•
Chair in Languages (Palmerston North)
•
Chair in Public Policy (Personal Chair)
•
Chair in Telecommunications and Network
•
Chair in Theoretical Chemistry (Albany)
•
Chair in Pure Mathematics (Albany)
Engineering
•
Chair in Information Sciences and Technology
•
MAF Professor in Food Safety and Veterinary Public
Health Chair in Cell Biology (Palmerston North)
Established and in process of being filled:
•
Chair in Sport and Exercise Sciences
•
Chair in Natural Hazards Planning
•
Chair in Computer Science
•
Chair in Statistics (Palmerston North)
A Chair in Speech and Language Therapy was
established, however, an Associate Professor of Speech
Language Therapy was appointed in place of a
professorial level appointment.
Achieved - Ongoing
3 Continue to encourage comprehensive research
endeavour of a high standard through access to
Highlights included:
internal research funds, and increased support for
•
Appointment of a Marsden mentor.
researchers applying to external research funds
•
Contractors engaged to support Foundation
of Research, Science and Technology, Health
through mentoring schemes.
Research Council, and Tertiary Education
Commission funding opportunities.
Achieved - Ongoing
4 Initiate at least three new centres of research
excellence by 2006 which could include:
Highlights included:
- literacy
New Centres established:
- middle level education
•
Research Centre for Mäori Health and
- environment
•
New Zealand Centre for Ecological Economics.
- creative industries
•
Centre for Design Values and Practice.
- 18th Century music
•
Centre for 18th Century Music.
- food
•
Centre for Studies in Sport & Exercise.
- agriculture and life sciences
•
Centre for Particle Formulation & Processing.
- sport
•
Massey Anzode Research Centre.
- governance
•
Centre for Organisational Excellence in Research.
Development.
- Mäori community development
53
- Mäori governance
Research excellence network:
•
Massey University was chosen to host and lead
the new BRCSS (Building Research Capability in
the Social Sciences) Network. A groundbreaking
$8million was awarded to the Aotearoa New
Zealand Social Sciences Research Network is the
largest single investment ever in a social science
project in this country. The University will be
working with eminent researchers from the
University of Auckland, University of Canterbury,
Lincoln University, Victoria University, Waikato
University and the Family Centre in Lower Hutt.
The funding will be used to develop research
capability and to encourage and mentor new
research.
Achieved - Ongoing
5 Continue to explore a strategic alliance with
Lincoln University to build on mutual strengths
Discussions on the possibility of a strategic alliance
in Agriculture and the Life Sciences (Palmerston
continue.
North campus) and to support the aspirations
Highlights included:
and development of the biological economy
•
Collaboration on projects and research based in
the National Centre for Advanced Bio-Protection
nationwide.
Centre of Excellence at Lincoln.
•
Partnership for Excellence application involved
staff from both universities and is focussed on
building technological and human capability at
Massey, Lincoln and in industry to ensure that the
on-farm and near-farm sectors of New Zealand
agriculture and biological industries are led and
managed by outstanding individuals, sustain a
steady influx of New Zealand’s best and brightest
young minds, supported and informed by leading
edge research and technology development.
6 Renew and strengthen research technology transfer
partnerships with Crown Research Institutes and
economic agencies and in particular:
-
support AgResearch in the establishment of an
Achieved – Ongoing
optimal expanded presence in Palmerston North,
Highlights included:
•
Expanded presence of AgResearch on the
Palmerston North campus is on track. Detailed
planning is currently taking place around the
type of physical facilities required and Massey
staff will meet early in 2005 with AgResearch
Senior Management in order to underline the
54
already strong relationship and identify further
collaborative opportunities between the two
enterprises as a result of this relocation.
-
establish the Manawatu Bio-Commerce Centre
Achieved - Ongoing
in collaboration with Vision Manawatu and
Highlights included:
Palmerston North based Crown Research
•
Bio-Commerce Centre established.
Institutes in 2004,
•
Massey University representation on Board and on
Trust.
•
-
Activities with Vision Manawatu strengthened.
evaluate an expansion of the e-Centre initiative
Achieved - Ongoing
on the Albany campus in 2004 in collaboration
Highlights included:
with the North Shore City Council and industry
•
partners,
Three-year business plan developed for the ecentre with the aim of enhancing its business focus
and providing strong regionally-based, businesslinked governance.
-
expand collaborative Creative Capital
Achieved - Ongoing
initiatives with Wellington City Council and
Highlights included:
Victoria University of Wellington, and
•
New Zealand School of Music (NZSM) officially
launched in partnership with Victoria University of
Wellington.
•
Secured Civic Square site for new building to
house the NZSM from Wellington City Council.
-
explore opportunities under the Partnerships
Achieved - Ongoing
for Excellence scheme over the planning
period.
Other initiatives focused on technology transfer partnerships
included:
•
Completed Memo of Understanding with the
BioCommerce Centre Ltd and commenced work
with the BioCommerce Centre, Crown Research
Institutes and Vision Manawatu to identify and
progress a variety of technology transfer projects.
•
Massey University was chosen to host the new
BRCSS (Building Research Capability in the Social
Sciences) Network. This is a partnership of five
universities and a private research centre. It
will bring research opportunities for other staff
and strong networks of support for postgraduate
students in a wide range of fields.
7 Establish the University Graduate Research Office
Achieved
in 2004 and appoint a Director of Postgraduate
Graduate Research School established in Palmerston
Studies.
North and Dean appointed.
55
Partially Achieved – Ongoing
8 Initiate at least two new Mäori research initiatives
Highlights included:
in each college by 2005.
•
Te Au Rangahau completed research in the area of
Mäori business; an annotated bibliography of the
other available research reports related to Mäori
business and establishment of a database of Mäori
business.
•
Two major projects have been initiated by
University historians: a history of the Mäori war
effort in World War Two, and a history of the
relationship between Ngati Porou, the Crown and
the Church in the 19th Century.
•
Health Research Council funded study initiated
into insulin resistance and muscle triglyceride in
Mäori.
•
Health Research Council funded study completed
on Mediation and the public negotiation of health
inequalities: Comparing Mäori and mainstream media.
•
Two-year Foundation of Research, Science &
Technology funded project initiated to develop
technologies for making unique produce from
Taewa Mäori.
•
Joint study entitled The Papawai Marae and Stream
Project initiatied through the Wellington Regional
Council to research the health of the stream
catchment and its links to the Papawai Marae.
•
Research study in partnership with Ngati
Whitikaupeka and Te Rünanga o Otaihape
initiated focusing on a threatened lizard found
exclusively on private land.
•
Te Mata o Te Tau was awarded Innovation and
Development Funding from the Tertiary Education
Commission for $644,000.
Partially Achieved - Ongoing
9 Establish a project to update and integrate the
University’s various systems for the management
Highlights included:
of research and consultancy activity across the
•
Research management database Research Master 4
University and provide appropriate reporting
purchased and installed, implementation planned
mechanisms to support PBRF (Performance-Based
for 2005.
Research Fund) implementation.
10 Implement the University’s commercialisation
model over the planning period and in particular:
-
complete risk framework for
Partially Achieved - Ongoing
commercialisation,
Risk framework and implementation of commercial
model progressed.
56
Highlights included:
•
Progressed strategy and business plan for
commercialisation of intellectual property at
Massey University.
•
Initiated development of a Governance Charter
for Massey University Holdings Limited which
should be complete in 2005.
•
New or revised policies approved during 2004
included; Policy on Conflict of Commitment
and Interest, Policy in Formation of Start-up
Companies.
•
Developed templates for subsidiaries for
•
Established inaugural two-day training programme
•
Established appointment letter template for
Constitution/Shareholders Agreement.
for Directors of University Subsidiaries.
University appointed Directors together with an
induction programme.
-
identify and progress two commercialisable
Achieved - Ongoing
intellectual property opportunities.
Highlights included:
•
Nine intellectual property opportunities selected
for commercialisation in 2004 and progressed as
follows:
New patent applications:
-
Five new inventions have progressed through
market due diligence to be filed as patent
applications :
-
A super-emulsifier composed of dairy proteins
for potential use in a wide variety of food
products, replacing the need for natural gums
which are a limited resource.
-
A novel method of encapsulating omega-3 oils
so that they can be ingested without the taste
of fish.
-
Light-gathering chemical compounds which can
convert light to electricity within a solar cell.
-
A novel design of handcuff.
-
A novel method for screening for
pharmaceutical drug leads.
Spin-out companies:
•
Two spin-out companies have been formed and
a third business is already planned for 2005.
Licence agreements:
•
57
A patented flow meter has been licensed to an
Australian mining company for applications in
mineral processing.
Other highlights focused on Research & Creative Work:
Highlights included:
•
Installation of the 700MHz spectrometer took
place this year and the expansion of the NMR
(Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) suite has been
necessary to also house the 500 and 400MHz
spectrometers and the widebore magnet. The
700MHz NMR Unit was officially opened in
December by the Right Honourable Helen Clark.
•
Helix Supercomputer based at the Albany campus
has been upgraded (effectively doubled in size)
in preparation for the arrival of theoretical and
computational chemistry and physics.
•
National open access peer reviewed educational
journal The New Zealand Journal of Teachers’ Work
was launched from the College of Education,
the editorial board for which contains members
from the New Zealand Educational Institute,
Post-Primary Teachers Association and traditional
teacher education providers.
•
Extensive research programme for the Waitangi
Tribunal continued.
•
Labour Market Research Programme funded by
•
Student in the School of Design has been
North Shore City Council for a further five years.
nominated as a finalist in the 2005 International
Michelin Design Awards.
•
Tertiary Education Commission Growth and
Innovation Pilot Initiative project Emerging
Biotechnology Capability Enhancement Modules was
initiated in 2004.
•
Professor David Penny, Allan Wilson Centre for
Molecular Ecology & Evolution, was awarded New
Zealand’s top science and technology honour by
the Royal Society of New Zealand, the Rutherford
Medal.
•
Professor Colin Holmes received the prestigious
McMeekan Memorial Award from the New
Zealand Society of Animal Production.
•
Associate Professor John Ayers, was awarded
the prestigious Thomson Medal “in recognition
of his outstanding contribution to the application of
science and technology” by the Royal Society of New
Zealand.
•
58
Dr Tammy Smith was awarded the Hamilton
Memorial Prize “for her pioneering contributions to
the mathematics of structure and function of proteins
and the geophysics of two-phase flows in fractured porous
media” by the Royal Society of New Zealand.
•
Dr Paul Gardner, formerly with the Institute
of Fundamental Sciences and the Allan Wilson
Centre, was awarded the Hatherton Award “for
his contribution as lead author of the paper Optimal
Alphabets for an RNA World.” by the Royal Society
of New Zealand. This is awarded for the best
paper by a PhD student, published or accepted for
publication either during their studies or within
a year of receipt of the PhD in physical sciences,
earth sciences, or mathematical or information
sciences.
•
Te Mata o Te Tau was awarded Innovation and
Development Funding from the Tertiary Education
Commission for $644,000.
•
Recipients of the inaugural Massey University 2004
Research Medal Awards are as follows:
-
Outstanding Individual Research
Professor David Parry, Head of the Institute
of Fundamental Sciences, received a research
grant of $20,000. Professor Parry’s Medal
recognised his outstanding contribution as one
of the world’s leading authorities on fibrous
proteins, including connective tissue, muscle
and intermediate filaments from diverse
sources, especially those present in hair.
-
Top Research Team
Allan Wilson Centre for Molecular Ecology
and Evolution. The Massey members of the
centre of research excellence, hosted by the
Institute of Fundamental Sciences and Institute
of Molecular Biosciences, are Professors
Mike Hendy and David Penny, Professor
David Lambert and Associate Professor Peter
Lockhart. The Massey staff shared a research
grant of $25,000. The team’s nomination was
based on their success in securing $17 million
in Government Centre of Research Excellence
funding.
-
Early Career Research Medals
Dr Jeroen Douwes and Dr Ulrich Zuelicke
who each receive a $10,000 grant. Dr Douwes,
Centre for Public Health Research leads the
asthma research programme, investigating
59
non-allergic mechanisms for asthma, the role
of microbial exposures, asthma in farming
families and the potential protective effects of
exposure to endotoxins. Dr Ulrich Zuelicke,
Institute of Fundamental Sciences, already
has international validation for his work on
the theory of functional nanostructures. He is
currently researching the interplay between
quantum effects, such as tunnelling and wavelike behaviour and their affect on ultra small
transistors and wires in determining electronic
and transport properties in nanostructures.
-
Supervisor Research Medal
Professor Kerry Chamberlain School of
Psychology, received a $10,000 grant. Dr
Chamberlain has supervised 14 PhD and more
than 60 Masters and Honours students and
is committed to good supervision, quality
research practice and collegial activity to
improve postgraduate performance. Dr
Chamberlain is himself a leading researcher in
the field of health psychology, including social
and cultural influences on health and illness.
60
Performance Measures
Note:
It is recognised that with the introduction of the Performance Based Research Fund (PBRF) the University will
need to review its key performance indicators to ensure consistency.
Publications (Number of)
Total
Target
2004
College Actual 2004
Business
Design, Fine
Arts & Music
Education
Other
Humanities &
Social Sciences
Total
Actual
2004
Sciences
Actual
2003
2,780
666
156
167
455
876
51
2,371
2,003
Refereed Journal
Paper/Article
803
123
2
43
177
379
12
736
626
Book Authored by
Staff Member
35
4
3
4
13
7
0
31
34
Book, Journal or
Conference
Proceedings Edited
by Staff Member
71
26
3
6
14
18
4
71
89
Chapter in Book
225
38
6
24
60
35
3
166
174
Refereed Paper in
Conference/Meeting
Symposium
359
198
6
14
20
151
1
390
392
Non-refereed
Journal Paper/
Article
225
42
10
30
37
59
5
183
178
Non-refereed Paper
in Conference/
Meeting
355
74
1
12
9
131
4
231
151
Book Review
117
17
7
3
39
16
6
88
65
Other Publications
432
144
19
25
86
80
16
370
244
Creative Works
100
0
94
4
0
0
0
98
39
58
0
5
2
0
0
0
7
11
Performance
Publications per Academic Staff Member (Ratio)
Target
2004
Total
1.78
Note:
Academic Staff FTE include all permanent as at 31 December.
61
Actual
2004
1.93
Actual
2003
1.72
Target
2004
Contract Income Earned
from External Sources ($m)
47.90
College Actual 2004
Other
Business
Design, Fine
Arts & Music
Education
Humanities &
Social Sciences
Sciences
1.24
0.03
8.69
13.77
25.39
Total
Actual
2004
Actual
2003
1.63
50.75
44.78
Target
2004
Actual
2004
Actual
2003
Postgraduate EFTS - Taught (Number of, by paper level)
3,212
2,908
2,960
Postgraduate EFTS - Research (Number of, by paper level)
1,108
1,372
1,230
101
106
69
Total
Actual
2004
Revised
Actual
2003
951
804
PhD completions (Number of)
College Actual 2004
PhD (Doctoral Students) Headcount (Number of)
Business
Design, Fine
Arts & Music
Education
Humanities &
Social Sciences
Sciences
149
1
102
281
418
Please also refer to Extension and Technology Transfer Outputs provided in The University and the Wider
Community section below.
62
TEACHING & LEARNING
GOAL
1.
To provide tertiary education of a quality and kind that will enhance the capabilities, potential, and
intellectual independence of its students, on a life-long basis, through education both on and off campus.
OBJECTIVES
•
To promote and develop the distinctive nature of Massey University reflected in its extramural
programme, and broaden this to a flexible learning and teaching focus that integrates new technologies
into course delivery for both internal and extramural students.
•
To ensure that all courses, regardless of the campus or mode of delivery, provide students with access to
excellent education of high international standard, supported by effective quality systems and, where
appropriate, with specific international accreditation.
•
•
To reinforce strong commitment to research-led teaching and scholarship.
To provide access for all students to high quality and appropriate on-line educational services, Library
services, support tools and pedagogy.
•
To place high priority on the first year experience for our students.
•
To ensure staff continue to have access to high quality staff development programmes relevant to learning
and teaching.
•
To conduct regular surveys of students, graduates and major employers of graduates and use the resulting
information to improve the relevance and quality of academic programmes, learning support, and
services.
•
To foster discussion of environmental issues in the University Community.
PERFORMANCE 2004
As one of New Zealand’s leading research universities, Massey University makes a major contribution to researchbased university education in New Zealand both in its own right and in partnership with other institutions
within New Zealand and internationally. This contribution reflects both our mission and special character.
The breadth of academic programmes offered, the uniqueness of our contribution in some areas, and flexible
arrangements for delivery, mean we offer an integrated portfolio of qualifications relevant to the New Zealand
environment and available to our students through arrangements that suit their location and circumstances and
that can be accommodated alongside their family and employment commitments.
During 2004 the University has continued to establish and ensure monitoring mechanisms for an optimal
academic profile for each campus and extramural, as illustrated in the Performance Indicators section below.
All but one of the University’s targeted new programmes and offerings were introduced as planned.
Massey University has rigorous and constantly evolving processes in place for the purpose of assessing teaching
quality and enhancing student learning outcomes. Our processes are routinely audited, most recently for
Massey, through the Cycle 3 Academic Audit (Academic Audit Unit, New Zealand Vice-Chancellors’ Committee)
undertaken in 2003.
During 2004 32 qualifications were reviewed under our Qualification Review Policy which provides the operational
framework for reviews of entire academic programmes and composite majors through the peer evaluation of
63
objectives, structure and management, teaching, learning and assessment processes. A Discussion Document
on Sub-Degree and Non-Degree Programmes at Massey University was completed in August 2004 in support of
future individual qualification reviews and strategic planning. The report considered aspects such as student
achievement, staircasing to higher qualifications, and programmes available from alternative providers.
The Working Party on Tertiary Assessment Practices was established in 2004 and initiated a review of current practice,
due for completion in 2005. The Final Report to Academic Board on Recommendations from the Reviews of the First Year
Experience (FYE) and Support Strategies for Flexible Learning & Teaching (FLT) was presented in December 2004.
This report included a summary of major accomplishments to date with respect to approved recommendations,
with evidence of implementation on each of the three campuses in particular and key policy developments
representing significant progress.
The Vice-Chancellor’s Symposium is always one of the years highlights. This year was no exception, with the
VC’s Symposium on Best Practice in Tertiary Assessment being attended by more than 300 participants across all three
campuses. The contribution by the 50 or so Massey staff who were involved in the “best practice” presentations
revealed many exciting and innovative initiatives and the excellent practice taking place within Massey.
Massey University has a commitment to collaboration and the formation of constructive partnerships with
institutions within and beyond New Zealand with which we have interests in common, and where the partnership
will enhance the contribution, standing and performance of Massey University. In addition to the numerous
examples provided below and throughout the 2004 performance report the New Zealand E-Learning Quality
Standards, Framework and Guidelines Project, led by the Director, Training and Development Unit, Massey University
provides another example of ongoing collaboration. This project involved Massey University, Victoria, Waikato,
Lincoln, Auckland and AUT Universities plus the Open Polytechnic which successfully bid for funding from
the E-Learning Collaborative Development Fund (bid made in 2003 and funding received in 2004) to develop
a set of quality standards and guidelines suitable for the delivery of e-learning across the New Zealand tertiary
education sector, focusing on process and institutional self-monitoring and self-improvement.
In 2004 Massey University teaching excellence was identified and celebrated throughout the University.
Highlights of the tributes given at the highest University and national level are included at the end of the
Performance Indicators section to follow.
Performance Indicators
Target 2004:
1
Outcome/Progress 2004:
Established the following new specific
qualifications and offerings 2004-2006:
1.1 Albany
Bachelor of Aviation Management with Honours (new
Achieved
qualification)
All qualifications and qualification/major
combinations established at the Albany campus as
Bachelor of Aviation with Honours (new qualification)
targeted.
Bachelor of Business Information Systems (new
qualification)
64
Bachelor of Science (Molecular Biosciences) (new
major)
Bachelor of Information Sciences (Data Mining) (new
major)
Certificate in Advanced ESOL (new offering)
Certificate in Intermediate ESOL (new offering)
Certificate in Introductory ESOL (new offering)
Master of Design (new offering)
Master of Music (new offering)
Master of Public Health (new qualification)
Certificate in University Preparation (new offering)
1.2 Palmerston North
Bachelor of Business Information Systems (new
Achieved
qualification)
Bachelor of Communication (new qualification)
Achieved
Bachelor of Aviation Management with Honours (new
Achieved
qualification)
Bachelor of Aviation with Honours (new qualification)
Achieved
Bachelor of Information Sciences (Data Mining) (new
Achieved
major)
Bachelor of Science (Bioinformatics) (new major)
Achieved
Certificate in Advanced ESOL (new offering)
Achieved
Certificate in Intermediate ESOL (new offering)
Achieved
Certificate in Introductory ESOL (new offering)
Not Achieved - Deferred
It is intended to offer this certificate in 2005.
Graduate Diploma in Arts (new endorsement in
Achieved
Spanish)
65
Master of Nursing, Postgraduate Diploma Nursing,
Achieved
Postgraduate Certificate Nursing (new endorsements
– perioperative nursing, primary health care)
Master of Public Health (new qualification)
Achieved
1.3 Wellington
Bachelor of Business Information Systems (new
Achieved
qualification)
Bachelor of Communication (new qualification)
Achieved
Bachelor of Information Sciences (new offering)
Achieved
Bachelor of Performance Design (Jointly awarded with
Achieved
NZ School of Drama) (new qualification)
Graduate Diploma in Dance Studies (new
Achieved
qualification)
Graduate Diploma in Design (new endorsement in
Achieved
performance design)
Master of Nursing, Postgraduate Diploma Nursing,
Achieved
Postgraduate Certificate Nursing (new endorsements
– perioperative nursing, primary health care)
Master of Public Health (new qualification)
Achieved
Certificate in University Preparation (new offering)
Achieved
1.4 Extramural
Bachelor of Aviation Management with Honours (new
Achieved
qualification)
All qualifications established in extramural mode as
targeted.
Bachelor of Aviation with Honours (new qualification)
Bachelor of Communication (new qualification)
Graduate Diploma in Dance Studies (new
qualification)
Postgraduate Diploma in Discursive Therapies (new
qualification)
2
Appoint Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Palmerston
Achieved
North and Extramural) with specific accountability
66
to provide specialist strategic leadership for the
Extramural portfolios.
3
Progress portfolio development at the Wellington
Partially Achieved – Ongoing
campus in line with recently adopted vision
Highlights included:
including exploration of a film school, and a
•
fashion incubator. (2004-2006).
4
Campus Academic Development Plan sponsored
and draft plan produced.
•
Film School development under consideration.
•
Fashion incubator established in Wellington City.
Progress establishment of National School of
Achieved - Ongoing
Music in collaboration with Victoria University of
Highlights included:
Wellington. (2004-2006).
•
New Zealand School of Music (NZSM) officially
launched on October 1 (at Te Papa) by the
Minister of Education.
•
Secured Civic Square site for new building
to house New Zealand School of Music from
Wellington City Council.
•
Partnerships for Excellence bid submitted to
Tertiary Education Commission and fund-raising
plans progressed significantly by year end.
5
Establish and ensure monitoring mechanisms for
an optimal academic profile for each campus and
extramural. Specific initiatives within this planning
period will include strategies for:
-
developing cross-college synergies in the
Partly Achieved - Ongoing
sports area and opportunities of staircasing
Highlights included:
with Universal College of Learning, on the
•
Palmerston North campus,
Cross College synergies in sports area explored
and encouraged; co-location of staff achieved.
•
Some synergies with Universal College of Learning
(and other tertiary providers such as the Eastern
Institute of Technology) achieved.
-
-
the effective implementation of the
Partially Achieved – Ongoing
Engineering and Technology Strategy across all
Implementation of the Technology and Engineering
campuses,
taskforce recommendations commenced.
the optimal delivery of information systems,
Partially Achieved – Ongoing
An analysis of subject and research interests in the
information systems area has been undertaken and
optimal delivery structures under consideration by
academic leaders.
-
the strengthening of the University’s
Achieved – Ongoing
agriculture and life sciences programmes and
Highlights included:
67
research activities, in partnership with industry
•
and other providers,
Partnership for Excellence proposal submitted
relating the agricultural and life sciences
developed in partnership with Lincoln University.
•
Partnership for Excellence proposal developed in
partnership with the Equine industry.
•
Initiative underway for AgResearch co-location on
the Palmerston North campus.
•
Established joint venture with Lincoln and Otago
Universities and AGMARDT (The Agricultural
Marketing and Research Development Trust) to
deliver the “FAME” (Food and Agribusiness Market
Experience) programme for emerging business
leaders in the food and agricultural manufacturing
and export sector.
•
New Professional development programmes
continue to be delivered to industry including
Post-Harvest horticulture and Te Ohu Whenua
Hui A Tau a conference for Mäori farmers and
industry.
•
First ICEHOUSE Agribusiness course modules run
in conjunction with the University of Auckland
Business School and the University of Melbourne
were completed. ICEHOUSE is a programme
for the agribusiness sector and is aimed at owner
managers of agribusiness organisations across the
spectrum of farming, horticulture, viti-culture,
fishing, food processing, seafood and beverages
including wine where growth is the underlying
premise of the programme.
•
On-going participation in Agricultural and
Horticultural pan-industry group looking
to strengthen human capability throughout
agricultural, horticulture and related areas.
-
evaluating programme development
Achieved
opportunities in environmentally–related
Highlights included:
education at Palmerston North,
•
Further delivery of Sustainable Nutrient
Management in Agriculture programme in
conjunction with the fertiliser industry.
•
Development of long-term programme for
integrated catchment management in the
Wairarapa region in consultation with a number of
local stakeholders.
•
Hosted the International Expert meeting on
behalf of the OECD on Farm Management
Indicators and the Environment.
68
- development of psychology clinics on each campus to
Partially Achieved
enhance research-based clinical teaching.
Highlights include:
•
Auckland - Business case for the establishment
of a unified centre for the School of Psychology,
including a psychology clinic, in the Albany village,
completed September 2004.
•
Palmerston North –Clinic established and
operational for some years.
•
Wellington - Clinic completed and ready for
occupation.
Other initiatives focused on optimal academic profiles for
each campus included:
•
Key performance indicators relating to the
Academic Profile established by campus.
6
Implement the adopted recommendations of
Partially Achieved - Ongoing
the strategic review of the School of Aviation and
Implementation of the recommendations of the
ensure consistency with the conclusions of the
strategic review almost complete.
Tertiary Education Commissions study and industry
Highlights included:
proposals.
•
Consolidation of flight training to Palmerston
North with the closure of Ardmore Flight Systems
Centre.
•
Industry alliances being developed specifically
with Air New Zealand and Nelson-Marlborough
Institute of Technology.
•
School statement of strategic intent (with mission
•
Three-year business plan presented to Audit &
and vision statements) developed
Risk Council Committee, December 2004.
7
Review provider contracting arrangements
Achieved - Ongoing
and strengthen as necessary to ensure quality
Highlights included:
assurance.
•
Subcontracting teaching agreement template
developed for use in those instances where
the University subcontracts teaching to other
providers. It is the intention that this template be
used for all future subcontracts and re-negotiation
of subcontracts with existing providers.
•
Policy for the subcontracting of teaching activity
approved and available on the University’s Policy
website.
•
University approval process for the subcontracting
of teaching activity is also under development to
support the policy development.
69
8
Continue strategic dialogue with other Tertiary
Education Organisations in our regions or
common academic domains to optimise portfolio
provision in the sector including:
-
Lincoln University,
Achieved – Ongoing
-
Eastern Institute of Technology,
Achieved – Ongoing
Highlights included:
•
Liaison person appointed and several meetings
held to advance initiatives.
-
Achieved – Ongoing
Universal College of Learning (UCOL),
Highlights included:
•
Liaison person appointed to advance initiatives
between UCOL and Massey University.
-
Victoria University of Wellington,
Achieved – Ongoing
-
Wellington Institute of Technology,
Achieved – Ongoing
-
Auckland University of Technology,
Not Achieved - Refocused
Efforts were refocused on sharing best practice on
new information technology solutions with Auckland
University of Technology, Auckland University and
Unitec.
-
Open Polytechnic of New Zealand,
Not Achieved
-
Te Wänanga o Raukawa,
Achieved – Ongoing
Highlights included:
•
Massey representative, appointed by the ViceChancellor, on Mana Whakahaere, the council for
Te Wänanga o Raukawa.
•
Lecturers from Massey provide assistance to the
teaching programmes at Te Wänanga o Raukawa.
-
Achieved – Ongoing
Nelson Marlborough Institute of Technology.
Other activities focused on collaboration with other tertiary
organisations included:
•
Participated in a Forum held by Manukau City
Council, including all key tertiary providers in
the Auckland region, to discuss the possibility of
contributing to the establishment of a tertiary
institution in the heart of Manukau City.
70
9
Continue the systematic programme of
Achieved – Ongoing
qualification reviews to include academic and
32 qualification reviews completed in 2004.
industry evaluations, student feedback, and peer
reviews. (2004-2006).
Achieved – Ongoing
10 Continue to progress international accreditation
of programmes in the College of Business. (20042006).
Achieved – Ongoing
11 Refine and develop further procedures for the
Evaluation of Teaching Quality including feedback
to staff and students on student satisfaction,
student progression, graduate experience and the
requirements of major employing bodies.
Partially Achieved – Ongoing
12 Implement the University’s Flexible Learning and
Teaching Strategy and adopted projects (including
Report presented to Academic Board in December
those funded under the E-learning Collaborative
2004 encompassing progress on implementation to
Development Fund) and continue to integrate new
date and advice on further actions for consideration.
technologies across the curriculum in a systematic
The University will advance the development of an
manner (2004-2006).
approved e-Learning strategy in 2005.
Partially Achieved – Ongoing
13 Implement recommendations from the First Year
Experience Review including the establishment
Implementation of approved recommendations is
of best practice initiatives to enhance academic
ongoing with Colleges establishing new initiatives
performance in papers and programmes and
within the limits of existing resources.
across all modes, internal and extramural. (20042006).
Achieved - Ongoing
14 Continue to promote and recognise teaching
excellence through award programmes and
Highlights included:
sharing of best practice.
•
Four Vice-Chancellor’s Teaching Excellence Awards
presented.
•
Towards Best Practices in Tertiary Assessment ViceChancellor’s Symposium attracted more than 300
participants across all three campuses with some
50 staff involved in best practice presentations.
•
Training and Development Unit sponsors sharing
of best practice through ongoing personal
development programmes.
•
Teaching awards and/or opportunities for best
practice sharing provided at University, College
and in some cases department levels.
Other highlights of initiatives focused on Teaching &
Highlights included:
Learning:
•
Participated in the Deakin University summer
school virtual exchange programme.
71
•
Introduced two new papers in the Postgraduate
Diploma in Arts (Social Work) in response to
social work practitioners’ requirements.
•
The first Higher Education Exchange Programme
(HEEP) academic visitor was hosted. Under this
programme the Asia 2000 Foundation provides
grants for New Zealand tertiary institutions
to undertake new or established exchange,
placement or collaborative research programmes
with partner institutions in Asia.
•
WebCT component introduced into all Massey
University English Language programmes.
•
2004 Tertiary Teaching Excellence Award for Sustained
Excellence
Dr Richard Shaw, of Sociology, Social Policy
and Social Work has developed and taught
undergraduate papers in public policy since
their inception as part of the University’s
Bachelor of Arts programme. The Government
announcement of the award winners describes
his teaching as characterised by his passion for his
subject, his belief in his students and the pleasure
he derives from the act of teaching. “His philosophy
is that good teaching contributes significantly to learning
and future life opportunities of students. Testimonials
from students show that his teaching has had a profound
and continuing effect on many, inspiring some to alter
majors and in some cases even career plans. In 1999
he received a College Teaching Award in recognition
of teaching excellence. He continues to research and
publish on his subject, and maintains strong links with
policy stakeholders and developers ensuring that his
teaching is up-to-the-minute and relevant to the current
political environment.”
This was the third successive year in which a
Massey University staff member has received
one of the nine national awards from the many
nominations across the tertiary sector and affirms
the commitment and quality of teaching at Massey.
•
Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching for
2004
Dr Douglas Stirling, Institute of Information
Sciences and Technology, has succeeded in
making statistics accessible for many hundreds of
students, some of whom have little natural affinity
for the subject. His outstanding achievement has
been the development of a suite of computer-
72
based learning software and programmes that
allow students to model the techniques they are
learning and to receive feedback on their growing
mastery of the subject. Dr. Stirling’s software
has been widely used both internationally as well
as nationally, and is recognised as being at the
leading edge of such computer-based learning
systems. But, the true test of his efforts has been
their impact on his students. Throughout an
extended period of research and development
of these learning systems, Dr. Stirling’s first year
students have remained the primary focus and
beneficiaries of his efforts.
•
Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching for
2004
Dr Richard Shaw, School of Sociology, Social
Policy, Social Work, is an outstanding teacher
of undergraduate courses in politics and public
policy in New Zealand. He exhibits all the
essential elements of good teaching including
thorough preparation, dynamic and varied
presentation, constant revision, and careful
assessment. What truly distinguishes him is his
ongoing reflection on the teaching and learning
process, and his passionate commitment to
providing an outstanding learning experience
for all his students. Year after year, Dr. Shaw
achieves the central goal of the humanities and
social sciences: to challenge students to adopt an
inquiring, critical, and well-informed approach to
the world around them.
•
Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in First Year
Teaching
Professor Richard Buchanan, Department
of Marketing, has been recognised for his
contribution to first year teaching, and in
particular for his teaching of ‘mega classes’
within the College of Business where enrolments
frequently number in the hundreds rather than
the dozens. His teaching over many years has
displayed a creative approach to organising,
assessing and supporting these large, compulsory
classes. During a decade when teaching resources
have not always kept pace with growth in student
numbers, Professor Buchanan has maintained
a personal vision to provide a high quality
learning experience for students in large first year
73
marketing classes. He has achieved this through
preparation and organisation, clear expectations
of students, dynamic presentation and an
innovative approach to student assessment. At the
same time, he is well aware of the stresses facing
first year students and takes an active and caring
approach in identifying and assisting students at
risk.
•
Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in the Creative
Use of IT and the Web in Teaching
Dr Mary Simpson, Department of Social and
Policy Studies in Education, Dr Bill Anderson,
Department of Learning and Teaching, and
Marion Orme, Department of Arts and Language
Education, have led the team that developed and
continues to deliver the External Delivery Option
(EDO) of the Bachelor of Education (Teaching).
This programme uses WebCT as the primary
teaching and learning medium for the whole
degree. This is the first programme at Massey
that is taught principally online, and it serves
as an exemplar of best practice for this mode.
The team has been successful in transferring its
principles of learning and teaching into the online
environment, to establishing genuine learning
communities among students and staff. The
team has also demonstrated that online teaching
is a realistic and fulfilling teaching environment
for teachers of all levels of technical skill. More
importantly, the team has shown that students can
complete demanding yet satisfying professional
qualifications in an online learning environment,
and go on to achieve at equivalent levels to those
educated in a campus setting.
•
Distinguished Teacher Prize
Professor Richard Buchanan, Department of
Marketing, received international recognition by
a jury of his peers. The Distinguished Teacher prize
was awarded by the international Society for Marketing
Advances. The society brings together marketing
educators from throughout the United States and
16 other countries. The award was judged and
presented at the society’s annual conference in St
Petersburg, Florida.
74
Performance Measures
Undergraduate qualifications to be offered (Number of)
Target
2004
Discrete qualifications offered
Actual
2004
Actual
2003
120
126
116
Palmerston North Region
83
85
76
Auckland Region
44
48
40
Wellington Region
53
56
48
Extramural Region
64
66
61
116
113
109
Palmerston North Region
79
78
74
Auckland Region
58
59
54
Wellington Region
39
39
38
Extramural Region
62
62
60
University Mean
4.00
3.93
3.94
College of Business
4.15
3.85
3.92
College of Humanities & Social Sciences
4.10
4.15
4.11
College of Education
4.20
3.98
4.07
College of Sciences
3.90
3.92
3.88
College of Design, Fine Arts & Music
3.50
3.94
3.92
University Mean
4.00
4.12
4.12
College of Business
4.15
3.99
4.08
College of Humanities & Social Sciences
4.20
4.36
4.35
College of Education
4.30
4.36
4.45
College of Sciences
4.00
4.11
4.06
College of Design, Fine Arts & Music
3.50
4.21
4.20
University Mean
4.05
4.54
4.54
College of Business
4.30
4.45
4.44
College of Humanities & Social Sciences
4.30
4.59
4.61
College of Education
4.30
4.61
4.61
College of Sciences
4.10
4.58
4.56
College of Design, Fine Arts & Music
4.42
4.73
4.77
Qualifications offered by region
Postgraduate qualifications to be offered (Number of)
Discrete qualifications offered
Qualifications offered by region
Academic Evaluation and Assessment
(SECAT scores [Student Evaluation of Course, Administration and Teaching])
(i) Internal SECAT-Paper
Academic Evaluation and Assessment
(SECAT scores)
(ii) Internal SECAT-Teacher
Academic Evaluation and Assessment
(SECAT scores)
(iii) Extramural SECAT-Paper
75
Actual
2004
Eligible papers for which SECAT surveys are completed by Mode (%)
Internal
Extramural
Target
2004
Qualifications available on the web
(Number of complete qualifications)
5
31%
31%
100%
100%
Actual
2004
Actual
2003
5
Please also refer to EFTS information provided in the Students and Internationalisation sections below.
76
Actual
2003
3
TREATY OF WAITANGI
GOALS
1. Demonstrate Massey University’s commitment to being recognised as:
(i)
a Mäori-relevant university;
(ii)
a place where Mäori language and culture can flourish;
(iii)
a place where Mäori students are likely to graduate;
(iv)
a university where Mäori will obtain relevant higher degrees;
(v)
a university which has the teaching and research capacity to make a substantial contribution to
positive Mäori development;
(vi)
a university that provides academic leadership for Mäori development.
OBJECTIVES
•
To achieve full Mäori participation across the University, including governance and management.
•
To increase enrolment of Mäori undergraduate and postgraduate students.
•
To achieve greater academic success by, and retention of, Mäori undergraduate and postgraduate
students.
•
To increase the proportion of Mäori staff.
•
To use the Mäori language appropriately across the University.
•
To foster mutual regard for, and understanding of, academic knowledge and customary Mäori
knowledge.
•
To establish effective consultation mechanisms with Mäori both internally and external to the University.
•
To ensure that the University has teaching programmes relevant to the aspirations of Mäori in both
content and delivery.
•
To encourage research into broad issues of Mäori development including policy, resource and
community development;
•
To enable Mäori students to develop dual competencies, thereby adding value to academic programmes
and facilitating greater Mäori participation in te reo Mäori and society generally.
PERFORMANCE 2004
The University has continued implementation of its Mä[email protected] strategy during 2004. Mä[email protected] aims to
distinguish Massey as a university that will make a substantial difference to Mäori people and the Mäori resource
base. Four platforms have been selected as sites for building the strategy; two are directed inwards towards
Massey processes (Academic Excellence and Campus Innovation), and two are focussed outwards towards Mäori
communities and government agencies (Engagement with Mäori and Effective Policies).
Academic Excellence
In 2004, Mäori student numbers remained steady but Mäori equivalent full-time student (EFTS) enrolments
declined marginally (3%). However, it was particularly pleasing to see a 17% increase in Mäori postgraduate
research EFTS. This increase was 5% higher than the overall University increase in postgraduate research.
Mäori graduate numbers were in line with target and marginally up on the previous year. The work completed
during 2004 to establish baseline data, including an analysis of trends and opportunities, on the academic
achievement of Mäori students, will provide important information to improve course retention and completion
rates for Mäori students.
77
Te Mata o Te Tau, The Academy for Mäori Research and Scholarship, was successful in obtaining funds from
the Tertiary Education Commission Innovation Development Fund. This enabled the Academy to extend its
lecture, research and scholarship programme (doctoral and post-doctorate) and host a National Mäori Research
Symposium. Our academic, research and community partnerships have also been strengthened with the
signing of Memoranda of Understandings with Te Rau Matatini, a Mäori Mental Health Workforce development
organisation, and Te Runanga o Raukawa.
The Centre for Indigenous Governance and Development established in 2004, led by a recent graduate of The
Australian National University, has an ambitious research programme and will form part of a wider network of
Massey University Mäori Research Centres.
Massey University received a Highly Commended in the State Sector category of the BearingPoint Innovation Awards
2004. The Awards aim to promote examples of world-class government management, improved managerial
competence and organizational excellence through innovative and successful initiatives in the public sector.
The Massey University entry outlined the Mäori mental health program, Te Rau Puawai: Workforce 100, which was
a finalist in two categories of the awards: State Sector and Innovation in Services to Mäori.
The Highbury Community Scholarship has been successful in its first year with two second year and three first
year students being supported in their studies in Education, Humanities and Social Sciences and Business.
Campus Innovation
The development of a Mäori hostel on the Turitea campus has been advanced and the first intake of students will
occur in 2005.
To ensure that the University can become ‘a place where Mäori language and culture can flourish’ (as stated in the
Massey University Charter) the Matua Reo Kaupapa Report (Massey University Mäori Language Policy Working
Party Report) was completed at the end of 2004 and a final policy will be submitted for approval in 2005. 2004
also saw continued growth in the number of courses delivered in Te Reo and the renewal of Whakapiki i te Reo,
Mäori Language courses funded by the Ministry of Education for teachers in schools. We were also pleased to
host, at the Wellington campus, the Taura Whiri i te Reo/Mäori Language Commission’s Translators Annual Hui
in September 2004 which was attended by approximately 80 Mäori Language experts from around the country.
Engagement with Mäori
A discussion paper, Relationship Building Between Mäori and Massey University, was completed and presented to the
Vice-Chancellors’ Executive Committee. It outlined several opportunities for engagement and highlighted three
levels of relationship: governance relationships, operational relationships and strategic relationships, where
Mäori may work together with Massey University. Detailed research on effective ways of communicating with
Mäori, undertaken by Huia Communications during 2004, will advance the Mäori Communications Strategy and
create a strong platform for implementation in 2005.
Effective Policies
Where appropriate, the Office of the Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Mäori) has actively participated in and provided
advice on the policies of the Tertiary Education Commission and the Ministry of Education. Participation during
2004 in Te Kähui Amokura, the New Zealand Vice-Chancellors’ Committee Senior Mäori Advisory Group, will
also assist in our ability to contribute to the national educational policies.
78
Mä[email protected] Strategy
Following on from the Academic Audit the Mä[email protected] Strategy was selected for submission to the Australian
University Quality Agency Good Practice Database, an international database of good practices in higher
education. This entry was one of three accepted from Massey University and the first good practice entries to be
accepted from a New Zealand university.
Performance Indicators
Target 2004:
Outcome/Progress 2004:
1
Establish baseline data, including an analysis
Partially Achieved – Ongoing
of trends and opportunities, on the academic
Interim reports outlining the trends in enrolment and
achievement of Mäori students by 2004.
pass rates have been completed. Work commenced
on establishment of a comprehensive data set.
2
Extend senior Mäori appointments to each college
Partially Achieved – Ongoing
and on each campus by 2006.
Highlights included:
•
A Professor of Mäori Health appointed at
Wellington.
3
Develop Te Mata o Te Tau, the inter-disciplinary
Achieved - Ongoing
Academy for Mäori Research and Scholarship over
Highlights included:
2004-2005.
•
Achieved a further two-years funding for the
Academy from the Tertiary Education Commission
Innovation & Development Fund.
•
Presentation of four Academy lectures on Oteha,
Turitea, Hokowhitu and Wellington sites.
•
Hosted a visit of indigenous scholars from the
University of Hawaii.
•
Appointed a Resident Post-Doctoral Scholar.
•
Offered three doctoral scholarships.
•
Held three research seminars for Mäori academic
staff.
•
Hosted a national forum for Mäori academics and
research funders on Mäori research strategies in
December 2004.
4
Initiate at least two new Mäori research initiatives
Partially Achieved – Ongoing
by 2005 in each college.
Highlights included:
•
Te Au Rangahau completed research in the area of
Mäori business; an annotated bibliography of the
other available research reports related to Mäori
business and establishment of a database of Mäori
business.
•
Two major projects have been initiated by
University historians: a history of the Mäori war
79
effort in World War Two, and a history of the
relationship between Ngati Porou, the Crown and
the Church in the 19th Century.
•
Health Research Council funded study initiated
into insulin resistance and muscle triglyceride in
Mäori.
•
Health Research Council funded study completed
on Mediation and the public negotiation of health
inequalities: Comparing Mäori and mainstream media.
•
Two-year Foundation of Research, Science &
Technology funded project initiated to develop
technologies for making unique produce from
Taewa Mäori.
•
Joint study entitled The Papawai Marae and Stream
Project initiated through the Wellington Regional
Council to research the health of the stream
catchment and its links to the Papawai Marae.
•
Research study in partnership with Ngati
Whitikaupeka and Te Ränanga o Otaihape
initiated focusing on a threatened lizard found
exclusively on private land.
•
Te Mata o Te Tau was awarded Innovation and
Development Funding from the Tertiary Education
Commission for $644,000.
5
Increase Mäori enrolments in and opportunities
Achieved – Ongoing
for postgraduate study over the planning period.
Mäori postgraduate student enrolments increased
by 2.45% and EFTS (equivalent full-time students)
numbers were maintained in 2004.
Highlights included:
•
Offered Te Ara Rangahau: Pathway to Research – a
programme developed for postgraduate Mäori
students enrolled in the College of Business, which
focused on developing research skills and ideas.
This programme was organised by the Kaitautoko
Mäori with the support of Te Au Rangahau, the
Mäori Business Research Centre.
6
Increase the number of Te Reo Mäori courses.
Achieved – Ongoing
Highlights included:
•
New courses offered extramurally:
182.334 Ngä Whakatauanga
182.235 He Körero Paki
7
Increase Mäori participation in the immersion
Not Achieved
teacher training degree programme, Te Aho Tatai-
Highlights included:
Rangi.
•
80
Programme reviewed with a focus on providing a
platform to develop a flexi mode delivery.
•
Introduction of Fees scholarships for Te Aho TataiRangi students for 2005.
8
Continue to support the significant Te Rau Puawai
Achieved
Bursary scheme to support workplace development
Highlights included:
in Mäori Mental Health over the planning period.
•
The University submitted this programme in
the BearingPoint Innovation Awards 2004 and
achieved Highly Commended in the State Sector
category.
•
119 bursars supported through this scheme in 2004
representing a 16% increase on 2003.
9
Develop a Mäori language policy for the University
Partially Achieved
in 2004.
Te Reo policy drafted and now in the consultation
phase of development. A full Te Reo Policy will be
drafted from this feedback in early 2005.
10 Evaluate and where necessary plan for improved
Achieved - Ongoing
cultural, recreational and study facilities on each
Highlights included:
campus over the planning period.
•
Where appropriate the Office of the Assistant
Vice-Chancellor (Mäori) has given advice on the
cultural, recreational and study facilities for each
campus.
•
Two whanau rooms have been set up adjacent to the
Marae complex for Mäori student support on the
Wellington campus. These facilities support a quiet
study area, a computer lab and a relaxation area.
•
Weekly kapa haka practices established on the
Wellington campus to support powhiri and the
annual Graduation ceremonies.
11 Establish a comprehensive Mäori activity database
Not Achieved - Refocused
by 2005.
Project incorporated into the Mäori Communications
Strategy as part of a broader plan on facilitating
internal communication with Mäori.
12 Progressively implement the Communication
Not Achieved – Deferred
Strategy by:
Video and web-site now scheduled for 2005. Other
-
producing a video to inform potential students
aspects of the Communications Strategy will be
by 2004,
progressively delivered following necessary staffing
developing a website for Mäori viewers 2004-
appointments.
2006, and
Highlights included:
ensuring consistent approach to written and
•
-
electronic communication, by 2006.
Initial research on the effectiveness of current
communications with Mäori completed.
13 Review existing agreements and options for new
Achieved - Ongoing
81
Highlights included:
relationships in 2004.
•
Agreement with Te Wänanga Whare Tapere o
•
Te Kähui Amokura, the New Zealand Vice-
Takitimu reviewed and renewed.
Chancellor’s Committee (NZVCC) Senior Mäori
Advisory Group, established. Terms of reference
was drafted for consideration with NZVCC.
•
The University initiated discussions with the Mäori
Manager at the Universal College of Learning
(UCOL).
Achieved - Ongoing
14 Develop at least three memoranda of
understanding and agreements with Mäori by
Highlights included:
2005.
•
Three Memoranda of Understanding signed with:
-
Te Wänanga Whare Tapere o Takitimu;
-
Te Rau Matatini; and
-
Te Rünanga o Raukawa.
Partially Achieved - Ongoing
15 Revise our current agreement with Te Whare
•
Wänanga Tapere o Takitimu and develop a three
Agreement with Te Wänanga Whare Tapere o
Takitimu reviewed and renewed to 31 December
year plan for collaboration by 2004.
2005.
Achieved - Ongoing
16 Contribute to Tertiary Education Commission
(TEC), Performance-Based Research Funding
Where appropriate the Office of the Assistant Vice-
(PBRF) and educational policies for Mäori over
Chancellor (Mäori) contributed and gave advice on
the planning period.
educational policies.
Highlights included:
•
Participating in the consultation on the “Strategy for
•
Participation in the Hui Taumata Mätauranga.
•
Participation in Secondary Futures.
•
Participation in the Performance-Based Research
the TEC: Working with Mäori”.
Fund moderation panel and chairs panel.
Other highlights of initiatives focused on Treaty of Waitangi/
Highlights included:
Mä[email protected] Strategy:
•
Recommendation approved from the Doctoral
Research Committee to Academic Board to
include a nominee from the Te Mata o te Tau
(Academy for Mäori Research and Scholarships).
•
Memorandum of Understanding was signed with
Te Runanga O Raukawa Inc to engage in joint
research initiatives with a focus on the hauora
(health) needs of, and development opportunities
for, rangatahi (youth).
•
Hosted the Mäori Language Commission’s
Translators Annual Hui in September 2004 at
82
the Wellington campus which was attended by
approximately 80 Mäori Language experts from
around the country.
•
Renewal of Whakapiki i te Reo, Mäori Language
courses funded by the Ministry of Education for
teachers in schools, for 2004–5.
•
A rangatahi Wänanga for emerging artists held by
•
Hosted the Te Ohu Whenua Hui A Tau – Mäori
the School of Mäori Studies in November 2004.
succeeding in Agribusiness hui. This hui attracted
over 180 participants and included three Cabinet
Ministers as keynote speakers. The Conference is
planned as an annual event in future.
•
Te Kaiwawao, Wellington campus is a member
of the District Mäori Advisory Group Wellington
Police Headquarters.
•
Te Rangiwhenua are actively involved in the
promotion of Te Au Rangahau by participating
in Mäori organised regional and national hui,
for instance, Ngämanu Korero, Mäori Business
Expo, FOMA, Te Mata O Te Tau, Hui Taumata,
and Te Awe Mäori Business Network (Wellington),
Mäori Academic Awards, Kaupapa Mäori Research
Workshop, Qualitative Research in Business
Symposium.
•
Established external relationships with Manaaki
Whenua, Crop & Food Research, Te Puni Kökiri,
Te Awe, Mäori Business Network.
Performance Measures
Target
2004
Mäori-centred courses(papers) (Number of Discrete)
Actual
2004
Actual
2003
164
164
156
Mäori-centred qualifications (Number of Discrete)
19
20
19
Courses (papers) delivered in Te Reo (Number of)
56
58
54
Mäori students enrolled
3,899
3,942
3,937
First year Mäori students (new to Massey)
Mäori Student Enrolments (Number of)
1,272
1,230
1,249
Mäori postgraduate students
545
710
693
Mäori graduates
374
369
365
83
Mäori course completion
Target
2004
Actual
2004
Actual
2003
College of Business
71%
67%
68%
College of Design, Fine Arts & Music
75%
83%
84%
College of Education
85%
82%
88%
College of Humanties & Social Sciences
66%
65%
64%
College of Sciences
77%
76%
76%
Mäori students
53%
53%
52%
Student Services Satisfaction - Mäori Students (% students rating services good/very good)
72%
71%
71%
16
43
14
240
666
266
159.39
175.04
163.84
Retention from first year of study to second year of study - all undergraduate programmes (%)
Training opportunities for staff relating to Treaty of Waitangi, Te Reo, cultural awareness
(Number of)
Staff participating in training opportunities-see above (Number of)
Mäori representation amongst full-time equivalent staff (Number of)
Treaty of Waitangi - Policy Statement
Massey University is committed to giving effect to the principles of the Treaty of Waitangi within the policies and
practices of the University and to recognise the mutual benefits that follow. It will promote Mäori development
and full Mäori participation across the University, maintain the Mäori language as an official language of the
University, foster mutual regard and understanding for academic knowledge and customary Mäori knowledge,
recognise and acknowledge the special status of tangata whenua in the mana whenua of each campus, seek
opportunities for mutually beneficial partnerships with Mäori, and facilitate teaching and research programmes
consistent with Mäori aspirations and processes.
Please also refer to figures presented in this section, above, and to information provided under “Regional Equity
Committees” in the Organisation and Management section below.
84
STUDENTS
GOAL
1.
Distinguish Massey University by the vibrancy of its campuses and student learning experience, its
inclusiveness and its outstanding service to students.
OBJECTIVES
•
To provide a range of academic programmes of excellence that are accessible to different groups
throughout New Zealand, relevant to students, develop students as independent learners, and
significantly enhance the employment opportunities available to graduates.
•
•
To seek enrolment of high calibre students and support them in reaching their potential.
To provide student support services and a physical environment that will attract students and support
greater academic success and retention.
•
•
To continue to encourage enrolment from under-represented groups and to support their progress.
To be recognised as providing a superb first year experience for our students and to pursue initiatives that
will enhance the overall student learning experience at Massey University.
•
To ensure through surveys and other research tools, that the quality of services matches student
expectations and needs.
PERFORMANCE 2004
Massey University has student-centred strategies that maximise accessibility to staff, flexibility and focus of
programmes, and support in the learning process. Our ambition is to help students reach their intellectual
potential though the provision of relevant, quality programmes. We seek to provide students with stimulating
teaching, to ensure that they are stretched to achieve their best, and are supported in meeting their social and
academic needs. In accordance with our commitment to access, we will continue to encourage the enrolment
and support of students with impairment, and to remove barriers that prevent an inclusive environment being
created at Massey University.
In 2004 graduands across the University celebrated completion of 5,516 programmes of study (1 April 2003 – 31
March 2004) including a record number of students capped with PhDs (82 completions).
Other graduation highlights from the year included:
•
The first 16 graduands of the Bachelor of Fine Arts from the Wellington ceremonies in May, three years after
the School of Fine Arts was established.
•
A record number of more than 910 graduands at the Albany campus in May, including 500 extramural
students.
•
The graduation of nine students from the Te Rau Puawai programme in Palmerston North in May. The
programme is a joint venture between the University and the Health Funding Authority to increase the
professional mental health workforce by 100, a goal completed with the nine new graduates.
•
A record number of Tertiary Students with Disability (TSD) graduands (177). This was an increase of 11% on
last year. The largest increase in graduation rates was for postgraduate TSD students which rose by 15%.
2004 enrolments levels were in line with the previous year but below that targeted. Domestic numbers
continue to decline, which is of concern, but indicative of a number of factors affecting the domestic market
85
– full employment conditions in the labour market impacting on recruitment of mature students and strong
competition for young adults in the school leaver market e.g. growth in sub-degree level student numbers in the
non-university sector.
During 2004 the University has continued to progress a number of specific initiatives in support of its studentcentred strategies, with particular emphasis on extramural and postgraduate students. The workshop conducted
in 2004 to provide a basis for establishment of an [email protected] strategy is an example of this progress, as was
the establishment of the University’s Graduate Research School. A number of systems improvement projects,
which will provide direct benefits to all students, were also progressed during 2004 (see Performance Indicators
section below).
The Vice-Chancellor’s Bursary Award Scheme achieved a record number of 563 students participating in
the programme in 2004. The purpose of the Vice-Chancellor’s Bursary Award is to enhance, encourage and
support entry to university study for students from low decile schools and under-resourced families with limited
previous history of participation in university degree study. 11 low decile secondary schools participated in this
programme in 2004.
Massey University awarded 135 Secondary School Scholarships at the end of 2004 for tenure in 2005. 45 were
awarded in each of the regions, Auckland, Central and Wellington. The Graduate Research School and the
Student Liaison Office has received positive feedback from both recipients and schools. Scholarship funding
overall increased $584,540 in 2004 to $3.6 million.
As stated previously, Massey University has rigorous and evolving processes in place for the purpose of assessing
teaching quality and enhancing student learning outcomes. As an example of this the Teaching Quality
Evaluation Working Party was convened in 2004 and charged with two primary tasks: to design a comprehensive
strategy for evaluation of teaching quality at Massey University; and to review and revise the SECAT (Student
Evaluation of Course, Administration and Teaching) instrument so that it is more responsive to the needs of
staff and students. During 2004 the Working Party developed a framework for identifying issues and gathering
feedback from staff and students. A report from the Working Party is due in 2005. In this regard, it is pleasing
to note that overall course retention rates for undergraduate programmes have improved on last year and
exceeded target for 2004. Course completion rates were also higher than last year for both internal and
extramural papers.
During 2004 a working party was established to develop a strategy for Pasifi[email protected] Proposals have been
drafted to be progressed in 2005.
In 2004 the quality of Massey students and alumni has been further demonstrated by their success in a number
of areas including, for example, the following:
Hatherton Medal
Massey Graduate Dr Paul Gardner was awarded the Hatherton Medal by the Royal Society of New Zealand. The
Hatherton award recognises the best paper by a PhD student at a New Zealand university in the physical, earth,
mathematical and information sciences. This is the highest honour that can be given to a student by the Society.
Dr Gardner’s winning research on the genetic alphabet was part of his PhD thesis, published in the Proceedings
of the Royal Society of London to considerable media attention from the BBC, Japanese television and the
prestigious scientific journal Nature.
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Special Prize, Ducati.com
Industrial design student Garry Sammons won a prestigious international Ducati.com special prize for his Velocità
coffee maker. Sammons was once of five students from Massey’s industrial design programme to make the finals.
2004 Dyson Production Design Award
Massey graduate Leon Oliver won the 2004 Dyson Production Design Award with a design for a life-saving, manoverboard boating device. Oliver’s ‘Sentinel’ is designed to protect a crew member who has fallen overboard at
sea. Using an electronic watch the crew member can remotely deploy a life raft from the vessel. The watch also
activates an onboard alarm to alert the crew to the accident. Massey graduates have won the award every year
since it was set up in 2001.
First Prize, Davines Fashion Designers’ Competition
Rebecca Ward’s devore wool and viscose coat won her a trip to Italy as First Prize in the Dávines Fashion Designers’
Competition. The 20-year-old is in the second year of a Bachelor of Design, studying fashion and textiles.
Geddes Champion Print Award, New Zealand Professional Photography Awards
Best Still Life Photo, New Zealand Professional Photography Awards
Massey graduate Ian Robertson from Wellington won The Geddes Champion Print Award, taking home a cash prize
of $5000 and a bronze sculpture. Mr Robertson also won the award for Best Still Life Photo.
Architecture Award, New Zealand Professional Photography Awards
The Architecture Award was won by Massey graduate Michael Hall (Australia).
Editorial/Corporate Award, New Zealand Professional Photography Awards
Massey graduate Murray Lloyd (Wellington) won The Editorial/Corporate Award.
Series Category Award, New Zealand Professional Photography Awards
The Series Category Award went to Massey graduate Paul Fisher (Wellington).
Best Single Arts Picture by a Junior, Qantas Media Awards
Massey graduate Claire de Barr won the award for the Best Single Arts Picture by a Junior, for her portrait of ballet
dancers. The judges said it contained good composition and contrast. Ms de Barr works at The Dominion Post as
an illustrations assistant.
Best Single Arts Picture, Qantas Media Awards
The award for Best Single Arts Picture was presented to Massey graduate Ross Giblin, who works at The Dominion
Post, for ‘Aerialist’, which the judges said “took a lot of planning and effort”.
Runner-Up in Agriculture, Forestry and Fishing, MacDiarmid Young Scientists of the Year Awards
A Massey University student recipient Ms Anna Williams was awarded the Runner-up Prize in the Agriculture, Forestry
and Fishing category for her project Instant Milk Powder: Onions or Grapes? Anna is now enrolled for a PhD at Massey
University in the Institute of Technology and Engineering.
Supreme Winner, Zonta Design Awards
Industrial Design Award, Zonta Design Awards
The Supreme Winner, Massey graduate Helena Webster, sponsored by Weta Workshop, received $5000 cash. Ms
Webster, 23, is employed as a product designer for the Christchurch firm InFact Ltd. InFact is an electronic
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product and automation machinery design company. “At InFact, we are making a machine that measures wood quality
using acoustic science.”
Interior Design Award, Zonta Design Awards
Massey graduate Nuala Collins, received $1000 cash sponsored by Limited Editions.
Photographic Design Award, Zonta Design Awards
Massey graduate Jessica Dewsnap, received $1000 cash sponsored by Imagelab.
Graphic Design Award, Zonta Design Awards
Massey graduate Katherine Gee, received $1000 cash sponsored by Clemenger Design.
Fashion & Textile Design Award, Zonta Design Awards
Massey graduate Holly McQuillan, received $1000 cash sponsored by Rembrandt Suits.
2004 Graphics and New Media Design Ambassador Award
Massey graduate Kat Gee is the winner of the 2004 Graphics and New Media Design Ambassador Award.
Avante Garde, Lycra Student Design Awards
1st: Alicia Bewick, final year textile design;
2nd: Mingwei Li, third year fashion.
Active Wear, Lycra Student Design Awards
1st: Alicia Bewick, final year textile design;
2nd: Jo Torr, Grad Dip Design;
Highly commended: Lucy Taylor, third year fashion.
Intimate Apparel, Lycra Student Design Awards
1st: Ella Sarjant, second (final) year Diploma in Fashion Design and Technology.
Highly Commended in the Magazine Cover of the Year, New Zealand Magazine Awards
Massey School of Design graduate Rebecca ter Borg of Wellington has gained two honours after entering a
competition run by youth magazine, Tearaway. The brief of the competition was to design the cover of Tearaway.
Ms ter Borg’s entry not only won the competition, but was also Highly Commended in the Magazine Cover of the Year
category at the New Zealand Magazine Awards in April. Ms ter Borg, who works as a freelance illustrator, has been
invited to design the Wellington Film Festival poster and programme cover for 2004.
Olympic Games Competitors
A number of Massey students and alumni competed in the Olympic Games in Athens this year. They included:
2004 Students
Timothy Gudsell, Cycling – Track; Peter Latham, Cycling – Track; Donna Loffhagen, Basketball; Emily Naylor,
Hockey; Helen Norfolk, Swimming and Kayla Sharland; Hockey.
Alumni
Jessica Beer, Fencing; Ed Book, Basketball; Bevan Hari, Hockey; Just Kidd, Equestrian – Management; Meredith
Orr, Hockey; Rebecca Cotton, Basketball; Caroline Evers-Swindell; Rowing; Georgina Evers-Swindell; Rowing;
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Alison Fitch, Swimming; Dean Kent, Swimming; Karen Li, Table Tennis; Caryn Paewai, Hockey; Heelan
Tompkins, Equestrian – Eventing and Robyn Wong, Cycling – MTB.
Performance Indicators
Target 2004:
Outcome/Progress 2004:
1
Establish Extramural portfolio and research
Partly Achieved - Ongoing
capability under the Office of Deputy Vice-
Highlights included:
Chancellor (Palmerston North and Extramural) in
•
The focus to date has been on extending provision
of services to extramural students with new staff
2004.
appointed to support delivery.
2
Establish an [email protected] strategy to be
Partly Achieved - Ongoing
systematically implemented over the planning
Workshop held to review past practices and
understand current needs. The [email protected]
period.
strategy will be developed from this base.
Other initiatives focused on Extramural (distance learning at
Massey) included:
•
Initiated planning towards the provision of career
counselling and development programmes for
extramural students.
3
Establish the Certificate of University Preparation
Partially Achieved - Ongoing
(CertUniPrep) on all campuses and extramurally
Certificate of University Preparation offered on all
to provide access to degree study for school leavers
three campuses in Semester One 2004.
as well as mature learners who require additional
preparation for entrance and for successful
academic performance at the University (20042006).
4
Continue to invest in communication and support
Achieved – Ongoing
for extramural students via 0800 MASSEY, OWLL
Highlights included:
and the distance library service.
•
Distance Library service continues to receive high
praise (student satisfaction survey).
5
Introduce a system to contact all extramural
Achieved - Ongoing
students with a disability at the start of each
All first year internal and extramural students who
semester.
disclose a disability at enrolment are personally
contacted by Massey University Disability Services staff.
All students who disclose a disability are sent Disability
Services newsletters twice yearly.
89
6
Incorporate provision of student facilities in the
Comprehensive Development Plans for each
region and in particular, over the planning period,
provide for:
-
appropriate library and computer laboratories,
Achieved - Ongoing
Highlights included:
•
Planning for new library expansion/improvement
at Palmerston North campus underway. Student
Learning Centre will form part of the new Library
and Information Commons.
•
Detailed planning underway for library facilities at
Wellington and Albany campuses.
-
the Student Centre redevelopment at
Achieved - Ongoing
Palmerston North, and
Highlights included:
•
Student Centre building construction
commenced.
•
Operating protocol for Student Centre agreed to
with Massey University Students’ Association.
7
the Te Whare a Iwi at Albany.
Achieved - Ongoing
Establish the University Graduate Research
Achieved - Ongoing
Office to provide more effective support and
Highlights included:
administration for postgraduate students in 2004.
•
Graduate Research School established in
Palmerston North and Dean appointed.
•
Induction and orientation programme run in May
and November 2004 for Doctoral Students.
•
Workshops for doctoral students held in Auckland
(x2) and Palmerston North (x1) during the year.
•
Beyond Graduation event held in the College
of Sciences for undergraduates to promote
postgraduate study opportunities.
8
Progress key systems improvement projects over
the planning period, including:
-
-
renewal of the Student Management System
Achieved - Ongoing
(SMS),
SMS Renewal Project well underway.
enhancement of web access to student services,
Achieved - Ongoing
Highlights included:
•
Enhanced student access to the web and web
enrolment.
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•
Upgrade of the web server infrastructure.
•
Upgrade of the web portal environment to support
the 2004/5 expected increased usage levels by
students.
•
Student data storage upgrade on all three
campuses.
-
upgrade on-line learning platform and support
Achieved - Ongoing
for students and academics.
Highlights included:
•
Introduced leased computer facilities in general
teaching laboratories.
•
Improved technical support services for
laboratories using appropriate remote
management software.
•
Developed and delivered software request
process for computer laboratories ensuring full
consultation processes for teaching staff.
•
Audio visual support structures enhanced with
the use of leased demonstration platforms of a
standard configuration in each of the centrally
booked teaching spaces.
•
Established a web services group capable of
updating information in support of student
administration, teaching and learning.
•
Upgrade of the student learning management
system.
•
Increased the bandwidth and access paths for
student Internet services.
•
Introduction of Internet access services to
University student residences allowing access from
residences.
•
Introduction of flexible, postgraduate, computer
laboratory facilities on all three campuses.
9
Implement approved recommendations of the
Partially Achieved – Ongoing
University’s First Year Experience Report to
Highlights included:
enhance the first year experience for students
•
(2004-2006).
Interim report produced (Final report to go to
Academic Board in February 2005).
•
Selected initiatives underway in each College.
•
Centralised services will enhance the provisions to
first year students including the “let’s get going” first
year student programme.
•
Retention pilot focusing on early intervention for
at-risk students in first year papers will be carried
out in 2005.
10 Continue the activities of the Student Academic
Achieved – Ongoing
Advisory Committee (SAAC) to enhance the
SAAC sponsored successful Class Representation
quality and effectiveness of student input into
proposal approved by Academic Board in November
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academic policy formation across the university
2004.
(2004-2006).
11 Continue annual administration of the Student
Achieved – Ongoing
Satisfaction Survey and provide relevant senior
Survey undertaken in April 2004 and results presented
managers with advice and recommendations for
to key service delivery staff and managers on all
improvement targets as needed (2004-2006).
campuses in July 2004 to drive self-improvement
activities.
12 Strengthen learning support for Mäori students
Achieved - Ongoing
by evaluation and enhancement of appropriate
Highlights included:
mechanisms on all campuses and for extramural in
•
2004.
The Te Rangahau Tauira intensive learning,
writing and study skills programme has been
expanded.
•
Redevelopment of Kainga Rua facilities that assist
Mäori student learning, in close proximity to the
Mäori hostel facilities on the Turitea campus.
•
Appointment of a permanent position for
Learning Centre Advisor, Mäori, in Wellington.
•
Appointment of Kaihautu Mäori, in the Library,
Palmerston North.
•
Appointment of Kaiwhakarato Parongo Mäori in
the Library, Palmerston North.
•
Four scholars successfully completed the inaugural
year of the Highbury Community Scholarships
offered in Palmerston North (the Tertiary
Education Commission fund the first year of study
and Massey University funds years two and three).
•
13 scholars completed the Rangatahi Mäia firstyear scholarship offered in Palmerston North
(funded by the Tertiary Education Commission).
13 Review and implement, as appropriate,
Achieved - Ongoing
recommendations from the Cycle 3 Academic
Audit towards the enhancement of Student
Learning.
14 Establish a mechanism of early notice mid-year to
Achieved - Ongoing
students who are experiencing academic difficulty
Students are monitored and those who appear to be
including referral to learning support and
experiencing academic difficulties are contacted and
academic advice.
supported through provision of academic guidance
and learning support.
15 Explore and develop appropriate structures for
Partially Achieved - Ongoing
the support of Pacific Island students and establish
Highlights included:
a [email protected] strategy.
•
The Special Supplementary Grant: Pacific Students
was utilised to assist in achieving consistent levels
92
of learning support services for Pasifika students
across the three campuses and extramurally.
•
Pasifika Strategy Working Party completed
research to support the establishment of a
Pasifi[email protected] Strategy.
16 Review the requirements for English Language
Achieved – Ongoing
competence and literacy at university entrance
towards enhancing pathways to and academic
success in degree programmes (2005).
17 Continue to support the Vice-Chancellor’s Bursary
Achieved – Ongoing
Awards Scheme to enhance access to University
Highlights included:
study for students from low-decile secondary
•
schools (2004-2006).
30 new awards made at end of 2004 school year
to secondary graduates planning degree study in
2005 at Massey. This initiative has been generously
supported by external donors.
18 Expand the number of prestigious scholarships
Achieved - Ongoing
that support high calibre students over the
Scholarship fund increased $584,540 in 2004 to
planning period, including support for access to
$3,625,634.
the Fulbright programme.
Other highlights of initiatives focused on Students:
Highlights included:
•
Wellington campus hosted presentation ceremony
for the Pacific Islands Polynesian Scholarships.
•
New Recreation Centre was officially opened at
•
Outstanding student achievement recognised at
Albany campus in July.
Massey Blues Awards.
Performance Measures
Student Profile by Level of Student (Enrolled, by programme level)
Actual
Students
2004
Non-degree
Undergraduate
Postgraduate (except PhD)
PhD (Doctoral)
Total
Actual
EFTS
2004
Actual
Students
2003
4,673
2,053
4,538
2,106
27,478
16,260
28,180
16,363
8,334
4,158
8,140
4,129
951
855
804
744
41,436
23,326
41,662
23,342
Actual
2004
Postgraduate EFTS as % of Total EFTS (by programme level)
21.49%
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Actual
EFTS
2003
Actual
2003
20.88%
EFTS - Taught by Region (Number of, by paper campus)
Target
2004
Actual
2004
Actual
2003
Total
23,770
23,326
23,342
Palmerston North Region
14,375
14,083
14,325
Auckland Region
4,909
4,582
4,546
Wellington Region
4,486
4,661
4,471
16,486
16,159
16,090
7,284
7,167
7,252
Total
18,853
17,840
18,349
Palmerston North Region
EFTS - Taught by Mode (Number of, by paper mode)
Internal
Extramural
Note:
Figures in all tables above include all students enrolled regardless of funding sources.
EFTS - Funded by Ministry of Education (Number of)
12,276
11,832
12,248
Auckland Region
3,378
2,974
3,060
Wellington Region
3,199
3,035
3,041
Pasifika students enrolled
1,115
1,026
1,061
Students with disability
1,318
1,529
1,512
360
563
530
All students
60%
65%
63%
Pasifika students
56%
56%
57%
All students
66%
62%
65%
Pasificka students
70%
67%
66%
Note:
Figures above are Ministry of Education funded students under funding classification 01.
Equal Educational Opportunities (Number of)
Participants in the Vice-Chancellor’s Bursary Award Scheme
Retention from first year of study to second year of study - all undergraduate programmes (%)
Note:
Figures in both tables above include all students enrolled regardless of funding sources.
Overall Student Service Satisfaction-Non Academic Services (% students rating services good/very good)
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Student Achievement
Actual
2004
Actual
2003
Successful course (paper) completion: internal
89.1%
87.1%
Successful course (paper) completion: extramural
90.1%
89.8%
Note:
Successful course completion is the percentage of students passing assessment by examination or internal assessment.
Actuals do not include Semester Three results as they are not available at the time of the Annual Report compilation.
Programme Completions by Type of Qualification (Headcount)
Actual
2003
Actual
2002
Doctoral Degree
82
70
Masters Degree
687
684
Bachelors Honours
186
193
Postgraduate Diploma
852
810
Postgraduate Certificate
44
45
2,484
2,672
Advanced Diploma/Graduate Diploma
472
285
Diploma
347
306
Bachelor Degree
Advanced Trade Certificate
0
5
Advanced Certificate/Undergraduate Certificate
242
299
Certificate
120
79
5,516
5,448
Total
Note:
Figures above are for all qualifications under which students have successfully applied to graduate between 1
April 2003 and 31 March 2004 - “2003 Academic Year”.
Figures above are Ministry of Education funded and Full-Fee/International students only.
Actual
2003
Actual
2002
Masters, Honours and Doctoral Completion/Total Programme Completions (%)
17.3%
17.4%
All Postgraduate Completion/Total Programme Completions
33.6%
33.1%
Actual
2004
Graduating students who enroll for graduate programmes at Massey University (%)
16.7%
Target
2004
Actual
2004
Actual
2003
17.8%
Actual
2003
Overall Graduate Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ Mean Score)*
3.92
3.91
-
Overall Research and Experience Questionnaire (CEQ Mean Score)*
3.85
3.87
-
Note:
Survey not undertaken in 2003.
Please also refer to the Headcount and EFTS information provided in the Treaty of Waitangi and the
Internationalisation sections above and below (respectively).
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Equity of Educational Opportunity - Policy Statement
Massey University is committed to providing equity of access to educational opportunities for all current and
prospective students irrespective of their sex, marital status, religious belief, colour, race, ethnic or national
origin, disability, age political opinion, employment status, family status or sexual orientation. To achieve this
policy objective Massey University will:
(a) encourage enrolment from under-represented groups: specifically Maori, People with Disability, Pacific
Peoples and Women;
(b) provide a learning environment that facilitates successful participation by all students, including those with
specific needs;
(c) be pro-active in providing access and equitable opportunities for success for groups that are underrepresented;
(d) ensure that each student has the opportunity to achieve according to his or her own individual potential;
(e) ensure that its processes or procedures are non-discriminatory and pay due consideration to the needs of all
groups of students; and
(f) monitor its performance against this policy objective.
2004 REPORT ON SPECIAL SUPPLEMENTARY GRANTS
Tertiary Students with Disabilities
1,529 Students with Disabilities enrolled at Massey in 2004. This was a small increase on the 1,512 students in
2003. The Special Supplementary Grant for Tertiary Students with Disabilities increased in 2004 from $29.25
per domestic EFTS to $32.18. This increase was to provide material in accessible formats for students with print
disabilities. A total of 43 students accessed this service in 2004. The bulk of the Grant continued to be spent
on support for individual students, which included salaries for five support persons across the campuses. The
pool of assistive technology and equipment for internal and extramural students was maintained. Recruitment
publications were distributed to Secondary Schools Careers Advisers and community groups nationally.
Mäori and Pacific Peoples
The objective of the Special Supplementary Grant: Mäori and Pacific Peoples have been to create and support
programmes that provide environments in which Mäori and Pacific students are likely to achieve academic
excellence. The Campuses and Colleges have used the Grant to supplement the salaries of a number of Mäori
and Pacific student support positions, and to supplement the academic support services and programmes for
Mäori and Pacific students. Note that the objective contributes to the attainment of two of the four platforms of
Massey University’s Mä[email protected] Strategy, namely Academic Excellence and Campus Innovation.
96
STAFF
GOAL
1.
To strengthen Massey University as an employer of choice for outstanding academic and general staff.
OBJECTIVES
•
To ensure the University has a culture that attracts and encourages staff, and appropriately values,
recognises and rewards quality performance by staff.
•
To provide development and support that enhances the effectiveness of staff, with students from diverse
cultural backgrounds and needs.
•
To ensure that the responsibilities of the University as an Equal Opportunities Employer are upheld.
•
To encourage staff to develop and maintain links within the University, and also regionally, nationally and
internationally, to enhance teaching, research, and student support services.
•
To value a collegial, devolved approach to decision-making thereby empowering members of the
University community to exercise initiative and responsibility for the development of plans and priorities.
•
To place a high priority on effective and efficient communication with staff in all colleges, campuses,
administrative and service divisions of the University.
PERFORMANCE 2004
Staff are Massey University’s most valuable resource; the destiny of the University will be determined by the
leadership and achievements of our academic and support staff. The quality and commitment of staff members
are the basis of the quality of the University’s qualifications and research outputs and the excellence of its
teaching delivery. We are committed to implementing future-focused, professional development programmes
for staff.
The University’s Advanced Degree Awards are aimed at building the University’s research and academic capacity.
The awards provide funding to release academic staff members from teaching and other duties in order to
complete advanced research degrees. 49 staff from all campuses and colleges received Advanced Degree Awards in
2004: 12 to complete Masters; 16 to submit doctoral proposals; and 21 to complete doctoral theses. In this regard
it is also very pleasing to report that, at the end of 2004, over 50% (over 600) of our academic staff now hold a
doctorate qualification.
From a staff development perspective, a record number of training and development courses were facilitated
in 2004 by the Training & Development Unit, Information Technology Services and Human Resources Section
(Health & Safety Unit) with a 57% increase in the number of training courses available and a 40% increase in
participation. The University’s Leadership and Management Training hours increased by 152%. This trend is
indicative of the University’s continued commitment to the provision of staff development programmes and the
commitment of its staff in undertaking ongoing personal development.
In addition, the MAP @ Massey Mentoring Project was launched with an introductory workshop in February
2004, involving approximately 50 staff in mentor or mentee roles, and the Being a [email protected] induction
programme for Heads of Departments was developed during 2004 and run as a pilot in December 2004.
The Workloads Monitoring Group submitted a report to the Vice-Chancellor and representatives of the Combined
97
Unions in March 2004. The report was subsequently released to all staff. The report comprises an analysis and
case study research to investigate the effectiveness, benefits and challenges of implementing workloads allocation
models in all units across the University. The case studies were carried out to identify remaining challenges and
issues for improving workloads management. The report recommended a number of initiatives considered most
likely to have a positive impact on workloads management across the University.
Recognition of outstanding staff achievement through awards was maintained during 2004 as indicated in the
Performance Indicators section below.
A number of Human Resources systems improvements were progressed during 2004 including systems to ensure
compliance with new health and safety legislation.
In 2004 the quality of Massey staff has been further demonstrated by their external recognition in a number of
areas including, for example, the following:
Rutherford Medal
Professor David Penny, Allan Wilson Centre/Institute of Molecular BioSciences, has been awarded the Rutherford
Medal by the Royal Society of New Zealand, recognising outstanding contributions to science and technology.
This is New Zealand’s top science honour. Professor Penny’s contribution to research and scholarship has been
consistent and outstanding throughout his career and he is a most deserving recipient of this prestigious award.
Doctor of Science in Epidemiology of Communicable Disease
Professor Neil Pearce, Centre for Public Health Research, has been awarded Massey University’s highest award
for science a Doctor of Science in Epidemiology of Communicable Disease to recognise his work on epidemiology
methods and their application in research into non-communicable diseases. His wide-ranging research has
included studies of asthma, occupational health, socio-economic factors in health, Mäori health, cancer and
environmental health.
Doctor of Science, Cambridge University
Professor John Flenley, School of People, Environment and Planning, has been awarded the honour of Doctor of
Science from Cambridge University. This award recognises the international status of Professor Flenley’s research
across a range of disciplines in Social Sciences, Earth Sciences and Biological Sciences.
Hunter Award
Professor Ian Evans, School of Psychology, received the prestigious Hunter Award in recognition of his career as a
clinical psychologist and academic. This is the first time a Massey psychologist has received the award.
Fellow to the Royal Society of New Zealand
Professor Graeme Wake, Centre for Mathematics in Industry, was elected as a Fellow to the Royal Society of New
Zealand. The Royal Society citation for Professor Wake acknowledges him as a talented and versatile applied
mathematician who has been instrumental in focusing applied mathematics on issues of specific relevance to
New Zealand, particularly in modelling biological systems in the agricultural, health and industrial sectors.
2004 SGS Prize for Excellence in the Chemical Sciences
Professor Geoff Jameson, Institute of Fundamental Sciences, has been honoured by the New Zealand Institute of
Chemistry. He was awarded the 2004 SGS Prize for Excellence in the Chemical Sciences. The SGS Excellence prize is
awarded to a chemical researcher based on their original contribution of the chemical sciences over the past five
years.
98
Sir Charles Hercus Health Research Fellowship
Dr Jeroen Douwes, Centre for Public Health Research, has been awarded the prestigious Sir Charles Hercus Health
Research Fellowship for funding of $500,000 over four years by the Health Research Council of New Zealand to
continue research into asthma.
Lifetime Achievement Award
James Acheson, Department of Three-Dimensional Design, received a Lifetime Achievement Award by the American
Film Guild.
Life Member of the ANZ Association of Social Workers
Dr Mary Nash, School of Sociology, Social Policy and Social Work, has been honoured as a Life Member of the
ANZ Association of Social Workers in recognition of her outstanding service to social work.
New Zealand Veterinary Association President’s Award
Professor David Mellor received the New Zealand Veterinary Association President’s Award for 2004, for his
significant contribution to the veterinary profession.
Thomson Medal, Royal Society of New Zealand
Associate Professor John Ayres, Institute of Fundamental Sciences, won the Royal Society of NZ Thomson Medal for
2004 in recognition of his outstanding contribution to the application of science and technology.
Hamilton Memorial Prize
Dr Tammy Smith, Institute of Fundamental Sciences, received the Hamilton Memorial prize for her pioneering
contributions to the mathematics of structure and function of proteins.
Charles E Wedemeyer Award
In 2004 Dr Bill Anderson, Department of Learning and Teaching, received the Charles E Wedemeyer Award of the
(United States) University Continuing Education Association for the outstanding book of 2003. Dr Anderson coedited the book which brought together contributions from prestigious practitioners in distance education.
Lewis Mumford Award for Outstanding Scholarship in the Ecology of Technics
Dr Scott Easthman, School of English and Media Studies, won a prestigious American literary award for his most
recent book Biotech Time-Bomb - How genetic engineering could irreversibly change our world. This is the first book
written outside of the United States to win this award.
Emerald Award
Professor Janet Hoek and Professor Phil Gendall, both of the Department of Marketing, received a prestigious
Emerald Award. Their article David Takes on Goliath: An Analysis of Survey Evidence in a Trademark Dispute, which
was published in the International Journal of Market Research, was selected as one of the top fifty articles in Emerald
Management Reviews for 2004.
Tracy Goodall Early Career Award
Dr Nikolaos Kazantzis, School of Psychology, is the 2004 winner of the Australian Association for Cognitive
Behaviour Therapy’s Tracy Goodall Early Career Award.
McMeekan Memorial Award
Professor Colin Holmes, Institute of Veterinary, Animal and Biomedical Sciences, received the prestigious
99
McMeekan Memorial Award by the New Zealand Society of Animal Production in recognition of his career-long
contribution to the New Zealand dairy industry and to agricultural education.
National Tertiary Teaching Award for Sustained Teaching Excellence
Dr Richard Shaw, School of Sociology, Social Policy and Social Work, received a National Tertiary Teaching Award
for Sustained Teaching Excellence.
Second Prize, Emhart ‘Create the Future’ Contest
Mr Olaf Diegel, Institute of Technology and Engineering, received runner up in the prestigious Emhart ‘Create the
Future’ inter-national design contest for developing a mini refrigerator for storing insulin. The contest attracts
more than 1,000 entries from engineering professionals, students and the general public across the world.
Co-Winner, 2004 Wallace Award
Ms Claire Robinson, Department of Two Dimensional Design, was the co-winner of the 2004 Wallace Award for the
book New Zealand Votes: The General Election of 2002.
Ministry of Culture and Heritage Fellowship
Dr Monty Soutar, School of Maori Studies, received a two-year Fellowship with the Ministry of Culture and
Heritage to work with the Ministry’s History Group on two major projects.
New Zealand Fulbright Senior Scholar
Dr Paul Duignan, SHORE Centre (Social and Health Outcomes Research & Evaluation), was selected as the sole
2005 New Zealand Fulbright Senior Scholar.
Fulbright New Zealand as the 2005 Visiting Lecturer in New Zealand Studies
Dr Adam Claasen, School of Social and Cultural Studies, received the Fulbright New Zealand 2005 Visiting
Lecturer in New Zealand Studies at the Centre for Australian and New Zealand Studies at Georgetown University.
Silver Medal: US Library of Congress International Poet of the Year Awards
Mana Cracknell, Department of Social and Policy Studies in Education, received a silver medal in the US Library
of Congress International Poet of the Year Awards. His poem will be stored in the US Library of Congress.
International Virginia French Allen Award
Associate Professor Cynthia White, School of Language Studies, received the International Virginia French Allen
Award for scholarship and service to the teaching of English to speakers of other languages (TESOL).
Friendship Award, State Administration for Foreign Experts Affairs in China
Mr Tim Harvey, Agricultural Services, received a Friendship Award from the State Administration for Foreign
Experts Affairs in China. The award recognises Mr Harvey’s contribution over many years to pastoral
agricultural development and training in China.
Best Jazz Album, New Zealand Music Awards
Mr Rodger Fox, the Conservatorium of Music, won Best Jazz Album in the New Zealand Music awards for his CD A
Rare Connection.
Bright Futures Scholarship
Ms Judith Engelbrecht, Department of Information Systems, received the Tertiary Education Commission: Bright
Futures Scholarship.
100
Highly Commended Emerging Researcher 2004
Mr Sebastian Link, Department of Information Systems, received the Tertiary Education Commission: Highly
Commended Emerging Researcher 2004 award.
2004 Dialogica Awards
Dr Bryan Walpert, School of English and Media Studies, has written one of three winning essays in the 2004
Dialogica Awards for his work entitled ‘The Art of Paying Attention: Nature, Poetry, and the Nature of Poetry’.
2004 Playwrights’ Association of New Zealand Awards
Dr Angie Farrow, School of English and Media Studies, came first at the 2004 Playwrights’ Association of New
Zealand Awards with her play entitled ‘Amnesia’.
Konica Minolta Dame Jean Herbison Scholarship
Professor Wayne Edwards, Department of Social and Policy Studies in Education, received the New Zealand
Educational Administration and Leadership Society Konica Minolta Dame Jean Herbison Scholarship 1994 for
research and study in the UK and US during 2004.
New Zealand Educational Administration and Leadership Society President’s Research Award
Dr Marian Court, Department of Social and Policy Studies in Education, won a New Zealand Educational
Administration and Leadership Society President’s Research Award for her PhD research into how co-principalships
emerged in New Zealand during the 1990s.
Asia 2000 Award
Dr Sita Venkateswar, School of People, Environment and Planning, has received a $20,000 Asia 2000 Award to
develop joint research and related collaborative activities with the Centre for Social Studies, Calcutta.
Performance Indicators
Target 2004:
Outcome/Progress 2004:
1
Achieved – Ongoing
Continue and evaluate the Advance Degree
Award fund to assist staff to complete research
qualifications in 2004 with a view to increasing the
proportion of staff who are doctorally qualified
or hold an appropriate terminal degree for the
discipline (2004-2006).
2
Achieved – Ongoing
Continue to develop and run staff development
programmes in key areas including at least the
following: ethics, research supervision, leadership
and management, budgeting, strategic and
business planning, best practices in tertiary
assessment, flexible teaching and learning, online
and web-enhanced delivery of teaching and
learning, and the Treaty of Waitangi (2004-2006).
101
3
Achieved – Ongoing
Support staff in the development of researchled university teaching and assessment practices
resulting in international refereed research
outputs (2005).
4
Conduct research to better understand the key
Achieved – Ongoing
factors affecting our recruitment and retention
Highlights included:
strategies (by 2004) and use this research to
•
The concept of a Talent Pool as part of a staff
Attraction Strategy was explored. In August 2004
inform the development of a human resource plan
the Massey University Talent Pool was launched.
by 2005.
•
An Employee Information Database was
established in 2003 to provide current and
ultimately trend employee information and to
inform attraction and retention strategies.
5
Establish five Chairs in targeted discipline areas
Achieved - Ongoing
including chairs in Sport, Software Engineering,
Highlights included:
Mäori Health, and Speech and Language Therapy.
Established and filled:
•
Chair in Mäori Health (Wellington)
•
Chair in Software Engineering
•
Chair in Nursing (Wellington)
•
Chair in Languages (Palmerston North)
•
Chair in Public Policy (Personal Chair)
•
Chair in Telecommunications and Network
Engineering
•
Chair in Theoretical Chemistry (Albany)
•
Chair in Pure Mathematics (Albany)
•
Chair in Information Sciences and Technology
•
MAF Professor in Food Safety and Veterinary
Public Health Chair in Cell Biology (Palmerston
North)
Established and in process of being filled:
6
•
Chair in Sport and Exercise Sciences
•
Chair in Natural Hazards Planning
•
Chair in Computer Science
•
Chair in Statistics (Palmerston North)
Increase the proportion of Mäori staff over the
Achieved - Ongoing
planning period.
Mäori staff full-time equivalent representation
increased to 6.22% in 2004 (5.94% in 2003).
Highlights included:
•
Project on Mäori staff capacity was completed at
the end of 2004 recognising the current market
constraints with respect to qualified Mäori staff.
This provided initial data and recommendations
on Mäori staff and will be followed by a project to
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examine Mäori staff workforce development over
the planning period.
•
Professor of Mäori Health appointed at
Wellington.
7
Utilise the results of annual staff satisfaction
Partially Achieved – Ongoing
surveys to identify needed changes to enhance the
Highlights included:
workplace environment in various units and across
•
the University (2004-2006).
Results of annual staff satisfaction surveys provided
to all departments.
•
Report to Vice-Chancellor and Vice-Chancellor’s
Executive Committee submitted by Workloads
Monitoring Group with recommendations based
on achievements to date.
•
Human Resource Advisors continue to work with
Managers to ensure appropriate human resource
practices followed.
8
Implement Council and Academic Board decisions
Achieved - Ongoing
around academic policy-making processes and
Highlights included:
structures (2004 and 2005).
•
Academic Board re-constituted under its revised
•
Academic Board established a Task Force to
Terms of Reference.
complete a review of its sub-committee structures,
terms of reference and delegations.
•
College Boards terms of reference and
composition reviewed.
9
Continue a limited number of Assistant Lecturer
Not Achieved
position allocations (up to 5 annually) based upon
2002 and 2003 Assistant Lecturer awards continued up
evidence of workloads needs in selected units
to the end of the two year appointment period. Needs
according to the units’ Workloads Allocations
assessment resulted in no new awards in 2004 or 2005.
Models (2004 and 2005).
10 Review and implement appropriate
Achieved – Ongoing
recommendations identified in the November
2002 Report of the Workloads Monitoring Group
(WMG) based upon evaluation of the first year
of full implementation of workloads allocations
models across all units, including necessary
revisions of policy and practice.
11 Over the planning period continue to introduce
Achieved – Ongoing
employee benefits for employees to enhance staff
Highlights included:
well-being.
•
Quit Smoking Programme offered to all staff free
of charge for a period of time as part of the new
Smoke-Free Policy.
•
103
Palmerston North staff will have access to “free”
public transport from 2005.
•
Albany campus progressing public transport
initiative.
12 Continue to promote the University’s web-site
Achieved - Ongoing
as a tool for effective communication to, and
Highlights included:
information resource for, staff.
•
Publications Policy drafted and circulated and new
•
Massey Website Awards competition successfully
position of web content manager created.
planned and executed.
•
Deployed web content management system and
updated templates, standards and guidelines.
13 Continue development and implementation of
Achieved - Ongoing
Performance Scorecard programme to provide
Performance Scorecard principles incorporated into
regular relevant feedback to staff and managers
the University’s planning and reporting template.
(2004-2006).
14 Continue to recognise outstanding University
Achieved - Ongoing
teachers through nominations to the Tertiary
Highlights included:
Teaching Excellence Awards, the Vice-Chancellor’s
•
Awards for Excellence in University Teaching
Four Vice-Chancellor’s Teaching Excellence
Awards presented.
and in recognition for outstanding research-led
•
Training and Development Unit sponsors sharing
teaching in the annual promotions round (2004-
of best practice through ongoing personal
2006).
development programmes.
•
Staff member awarded a national Tertiary Teaching
Excellence Award for Sustained Excellence.
Administered by the New Zealand Qualifications
Authority this award category is for teachers
who demonstrate continuing excellence in their
teaching over a period of at least six years.
15 Continue to recognise outstanding staff
Achieved - Ongoing
performance through awards, such as conferencerelated travel (at least 2 per College and 20
annually), and further development opportunities.
16 Revise the University’s policy on intellectual
Partially Achieved - Ongoing
property in conjunction with the development of a
•
policy on Commercialisation.
Broad guidelines for new policy developed for
Commercialisation (relating particularly to spinout companies) approved by Massey University
Holdings Limited.
17 Consider Academic and General Salary Taskforce
Achieved - Ongoing
conclusions in developing University budgets and
Highlights included:
proposing salary levels for staff.
•
Combined Universities and Unions agreed to
jointly prepare a ‘white paper’ for Government to
104
increase academic salary levels.
•
General Staff Remuneration Group in the process
of being established. This group will oversee
the implementation of recommendations in the
General Staff Salaries Task Force Report, which
will commence early 2005.
18 Strengthen the University’s Human Resources
Partially Achieved – Ongoing
performance reporting capability by;
Highlights included:
-
•
The implementation of the new Human Resources
•
Initial research on user requirements for
concluding the implementation of a new
Human Resources Information Systems,
-
Information System ‘PSe‘ continued.
developing a Human Resources reporting
framework that integrates relevant staffing
development of human resource report capability
information from a variety of data sources
completed.
(2005).
19 Implement new procedures to ensure compliance
Achieved – Ongoing
with new health and safety legislation (2004) and
Highlights included:
improve staff access to relevant health and safety
•
information (2005).
Health & Safety essentials list communicated to
Heads of Department. This is also available on the
Health & Safety website.
•
Staff Contracts reviewed and aligned to the new
•
Health & Safety website improvement project
legislation.
underway.
Performance Measures
Target
2004
Staff PRP (Performance Review & Planning) completion (% of FTE - Fulltime Equivalent)
Leadership and Management training (Hours)
Target
2004
Training and development courses (Number of)
Training and development participants (Number of)
Actual
2004
Actual
2003
92%
80%
69%
160
270
107
Actual
2004
Revised
Actual
2003
Actual
2003
550
741
473
464
4,960
7,350
5,263
4,701
Note:
The above are courses and participants in training offered by the Training & Development Unit, Information
Technology section, and Human Resources section (Health and Safety courses).
105
Target
2004
Actual
2004
Actual
2003
Gender balance amongst staff (%)
(a) Female Academic staff
College of Business
35%
37%
36%
College of Humanities & Social Sciences
52%
57%
58%
College of Education
60%
62%
63%
College of Sciences
25%
23%
22%
College of Design, Fine Arts & Music
33%
41%
38%
College of Business
31%
36%
32%
College of Humanities & Social Sciences
50%
44%
43%
College of Education
48%
50%
51%
College of Sciences
38%
40%
38%
College of Design, Fine Arts & Music
20%
26%
31%
FTE Academic Staff with a PhD (% Fulltime Equivalent)
46%
50%
47%
(b) Female Academic staff at Senior Lecturer level and above (%)
Please also refer to Headcount information provided in the Treaty of Waitangi section above.
Equity of Employment Opportunities - Policy Statement
Massey University is committed to upholding its responsibilities as an Equal Opportunities Employer and
creating a workplace that attracts, retains and values diverse employees. To achieve this policy objective Massey
University will:
(a) provide equal opportunities for recruitment, appointment, development and promotion for all current
and prospective employees, regardless of sex, marital status, religious belief, colour, race, ethnic or national
origin, disability, age, political opinion, employment status, family status or sexual orientation;
(b) develop and maintain a workplace culture that values and supports diversity;
(c) ensure that it provides a safe, supportive and healthy environment for all employees that is conducive to
quality teaching, research and community service;
(d) identify and eliminate all aspects of policies and procedures and other institutional barriers that cause or
perpetuate inequality in respect of the employment of any person or group of persons;
(e) not tolerate any form of unfair discrimination in the workplace on any ground, including sex, marital status,
religious belief, colour, race, ethnic or national origin, disability, age, political opinion, employment status,
family status or sexual orientation;
(f) promote equal employment opportunities as an integral part of University policies and practices;
(g) monitor, review and evaluate progress towards achieving equal employment opportunities.
106
THE UNIVERSITY AND THE WIDER COMMUNITY
GOAL
1.
To be an integral, respected and favoured part of our core communities through our role as a creator
and repository of knowledge, a critic and conscience of society, a guardian of culture and a source of
expertise and advice.
OBJECTIVES
•
To contribute to informed/intellectual debate in the wider community.
•
To serve and inform our core communities and be an integral part of those communities.
•
To strengthen links with the University’s graduates, particularly through the Alumni and Friends
networks, recognising them, together with our current students and their families, as our primary
ambassadors within the wider community.
•
To elevate public awareness of the pivotal role Massey University can and does play toward New Zealand’s
economic, social and cultural advancement.
•
To develop and strengthen links with industry and the arts, professional and other sector groups, schools
and other educational institutions, in a systematic manner and to mutual advantage.
•
To develop effective systems to support our interaction with the wider community, particularly in the
areas of government relations, relationship management and public affairs.
•
To play a constructive part in the development and promotion of environmental awareness and best
management practices in the wider community.
PERFORMANCE 2004
Massey University seeks to add significant intellectual, social, cultural and economic value to New Zealand and
New Zealanders. In accordance with our traditions, we bring an emphasis on community relevance together
with research and scholarly excellence to issues facing New Zealand in the 21st century. We encourage our
graduates to be outward looking and globally oriented, with a strong ‘knowledge to the people’ commitment. In
2004 the University’s approach to community relevance has been reaffirmed by continued growth in extension
and technology transfer outputs (see Performance Measures section below). In addition, strong growth in
the indicators relating to Research Output Communications (up 71%) and Community Communication on
Environmental Issues (up 81%) has been achieved. The University has continued its significant contribution to
the community via its public lecture series programme, its public seminars and industry relevant conferences.
As has been stated earlier, we have a commitment to collaboration and the formation of constructive
partnerships with institutions and organisations within and beyond New Zealand with which we have interest
in common, and where the partnership will enhance the contribution, standing and performance of Massey
University. 2004 has seen continued progress of the community business incubator initiatives, particularly with
the establishment of the Bio-Commerce Centre at Palmerston North. A number of collaborative relationships
with other tertiary providers have been developed and enhanced with further relationships being explored.
Linkages with our alumni are also important to the University and our significant 2004 achievements are
highlighted below.
The quality and contribution of Massey staff, students and alumni has been recognised in a number of areas
including, for example, the following:
107
2004 New Year’s Honours
Current and past staff
Officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit
Professor Sally Casswell, head of the Centre for Social and Health Outcomes Research and Evaluation (SHORE).
This award recognises Professor Casswell’s contribution to health research, and social policy more widely.
Companion of the New Zealand Order of Merit
Dr Judy McGregor, Former head of the Department of Communications and Journalism. Dr McGregor left the
University last year to become the country’s first Equal Employment Opportunities Commissioner.
Alumni
Officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit
Alumnus and Honorary Teaching Fellow with the School of Design, Richard Taylor. Richard Taylor is head of
Weta Workshop which played a key role in the making of The Lord of the Rings trilogy.
Companion of the New Zealand Order of Merit
Alumnus and member of the Massey University Foundation, Warren Larsen.
Members of the New Zealand Order of Merit
Gavin Ross Jones.
Anthony Weymouth McLeod.
2004 Queen’s Birthday Honours
Current and past staff
Officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit (ONZM)
Professor Ian Watson, former Principal, Auckland. This is a fine acknowledgement for someone who has had a
distinguished career not only in academia but in service to the community through his leadership in the tertiary
sector.
Alumni
Companion of the New Zealand Order of Merit (CNZM)
Dr Russell Ballard, for public services.
Ms Sharon Crosbie, OBE, for services to broadcasting and the community.
Member of the new Zealand Order of Merit (MNZM)
Ms Deirdre Dale, J.P, for services to education and the community.
Mr Neil Shroff, for services to the community.
Companion of the Queen’s Service Order (QSO)
The Hon. Roger Maxwell, for public services.
Service Medal for Public Services (QSM)
Mr Malcolm Guy, for public services.
Mr Warwick Pudney, for public services.
Ms Melda Townsley, JP, for public services.
108
Massey University will continue to play a significant and distinctive role in the economic and social development
of New Zealand through our research portfolio, academic programmes, and service to both rural and urban
communities.
Performance Indicators
Target 2004:
Outcome/Progress 2004:
1
Expand the public lecture series programme
Achieved - Ongoing
over the planning period, and continue to host
Highlights included:
exhibitions and cultural performances.
•
Public Lecture by Chief Judge Mäori Land Court
& Waitangi Tribunal Chair, Judge J Williams held
at Wellington campus.
•
Inaugural lecture of Professor Chris Cunningham
as Chair in Mäori Health on 3 June. This event
was also the annual Whanganui-a-Tara Lecture of
Te Mata o TeTau, the Academy for Mäori Research
& Scholarship.
•
The successful Viggo Mortensen Photographic
Exhibition closed at the end of January.
•
The Ice Rink and Lilac Ship Art Installation
attracted large numbers of the public during the
mid year semester break.
•
Hosted the Festival of New Arts September/
October 2004.
•
Held the successful Summer Shakespeare
programme in February/March.
•
Held the Lunchtime Theatre/Arts on Wednesday’s
programmes.
2
Continue to deliver public seminars and hold
Achieved - Ongoing
industry-relevant conferences in all Colleges (at
Over 132 events were held. These were attended
least one per College annually and a total of 10
by students, staff and the general public and
annually).
representatives from the educational sector,
community organisations, Crown Research
Institutions, Industry, government bodies and
international attendees.
Highlights included:
•
National conference on assessment for the
National Certificate of Educational Achievement
was organised and delivered at Hokowhitu
through the Centre for Educational Development,
in collaboration with the Ministry of Education.
•
109
Held the Expanding Documentary Conference on
documentary film making attracting 50 attendees
including approximately 30 international
attendees.
•
Held the seminar and film series Global Health and
Social Justice.
•
Hosted the annual symposia in Health Research and
Policy – with international keynote speakers.
•
Presented papers at the Paediatric Society of New
Zealand Annual Conference and the XIV Annual
meeting of the Australasian Epidemiological
Association.
•
Hosted the New Zealand Language & Society
Conference and the Applied Linguistics Association of
New Zealand Symposium.
•
Hosted the Mäori Language Commission’s
Translators Annual Hui in September 2004 at
the Wellington campus which was attended by
approximately 80 Mäori Language experts from
around the country.
•
Provided information on culture and language to
•
Hosted a conference on restorative justice
the New Zealand Police Asian Community Course.
– December 2004.
•
Hosted an annual public seminar series through
the School of History, Philosophy and Politics.
•
Massey Agricultural Centre for Professional
Development administered the Dairy 3 conference
held in Rotorua. The Conference was attended by
approximately 500 delegates.
•
Fertilizer and Lime Research Centre held two
short courses which hosted participants from
industry and Crown Research Institutes. A total of
223 participants have attended these short courses
since their inception.
•
The Digital Signal Processing short course covering
fundamentals of digital signal and processing
followed with practical applications of signal
processing e.g. home entertainment and
telecommunication systems was held on the
Wellington campus and well attended by both
perspective students and industry representatives.
3
Host the annual campus/community debate in
Not Achieved
Auckland.
4
Further develop the University’s government
relations programme and ensure effective links
110
with our academic staff in areas of relevant policy
and curriculum development and in particular;
-
respond to the review of professional
Achieved – Ongoing
education in the New Zealand defence
Current stage of Defence Force education review is
force and make adjustments to structural
complete. Massey University will proceed to advertise
arrangements and academic programmes as
Director of Centre for Defence Studies.
appropriate,
-
extend relationships with the Ministry of
Achieved – Ongoing
Health and the Health Sector regarding health
Highlights included:
workforce development.
•
Te Rau Puawai funding extended by the Ministry
of Health for three further years at increased levels
of funding.
5
Progress community business incubator initiatives
as follows:
-
evaluate, with North Shore City Council and
Achieved - Ongoing
business partners, the establishment of e-
Highlights included:
Centre #2 on the Albany campus (with a theme
•
of robotics/tectonics),
Discussions commenced with North Shore City
Council and prospective industry partners for
e-centre #2. However, short term focus will be on
the further development of the current e-centre.
-
establish the incubator concept of the Bio-
Achieved - Ongoing
Commerce Centre at Palmerston North (in
association with local CRIs , city agencies and
local businesses) by mid 2004,
-
expand Creative HQ at Wellington to double
Not Achieved
its current size (in association with Positively
Wellington Business/Victoria University of
Wellington) by end of 2004.
6
Establish Massey University as a premier centre of
Partially Achieved - Ongoing
expertise in commercialisation over the planning
Highlights included:
period and in particular form 1-3 spin out
•
companies per annum.
Commercialisation Office (formed in 2003) has
developed robust systems for screening and triage
of commercial opportunities.
•
A strategy for further development of
commercialisation will be considered by the
University Council in 2005.
•
Commercialisation Office continued to execute
licence agreements and assist the formation
of spin-out companies. In 2004 two spin-out
companies were formed.
111
7
Further develop the student/industry/community
Achieved
placement in targeted programmes and expanding
Student placements are integral to numerous areas of
the scheme for assisting graduate employment
study including, for example: social work, journalism,
over the planning period.
nursing, veterinary, veterinary nursing, clinical
psychology, education, to name but a few. Types of
student placements include: client-based, researchbased, community based, multi-site field, work
experience, school, clinical, laboratory, overseas and
whanau, hapu, and iwi placements. Opportunities
and requirements are programme dependent.
Highlights included:
•
Developed the web-based Social Work Field
Education: Resources for Agencies providing
information on the student placement process to
assist students and agencies.
8
Introduce an ‘industry’/community placement
Not Achieved
(sabbatical) scheme for staff members where this is
The proposed industry placement scheme is under
relevant to curriculum development and research
review.
knowledge transfer.
9
Progress our strategy to be the national partnering
Achieved - Ongoing
provider of extension services for key industry
Highlights included:
sectors, such as: dairying, meat and wool, equine,
•
Involved in a Technology for Business Growth
project on wool with Keratec Ltd. Keratec Ltd
companion animal, pigs, poultry and horticulture.
is a subsidiary of Canesis Network Ltd, charged
with adding value to businesses via technical
and scientific expertise and capabilities. Core
competencies are in the areas of textiles, carpets,
protein science, diary and meat processing and
engineering.
•
Collaboration between Massey and Lincoln
Universities, with co-operation and support from
key industry sectors, in the Agriculture and Life
Sciences Partnership for Excellence bid.
•
Involved in delivering the Meat Diploma with the
Southland Institute of Technology.
•
Supervised a number of Masterate students for
Fonterra.
•
Continued to provide continuing professional
development courses on Sustainable Nutrient
Management for the fertiliser and related
industries.
Achieved - Ongoing
10 Establish a College visitors programme for
distinguished members of ‘industry’ (for instance,
Highlights included:
the Academy of Distinguished Fellows for Massey
•
112
The Sir Neil Waters Distinguished Lecture Series
Agriculture, the Massey Food Foundation Board).
was inaugurated in 2004. This series will be
held annually and it is intend to bring a leading
foremost international scientist in the fields of
mathematics, chemistry or maths (on a rotating
basis) to give a series of three lectures to students
and researchers here at Massey University.
11 Continue to support regionally-based advisory
Achieved - Ongoing
boards and reference groups (2004-2006).
12 Continue to develop collaborative relationships
with other tertiary providers including, but not
limited to, the following specific examples:
-
further development of Universal College of
Achieved - Ongoing
Learning/Massey University/Palmerston North
Initiatives undertaken by the Education Guardian
City Council joint initiatives over promotion of
Group (sponsored by Vision Manawatu) have
Palmerston North as a Tertiary destination,
addressed many of the associated issues. The Group
comprises senior executive from local tertiary
institutions (Massey University, Universal College of
Education, Te Wänanga O Aotearoa, International
Pacific College), Palmerston North City Council,
Vision Manawatu (the regional development
agency), school principals and other senior sector
representatives.
Highlights included:
•
Specific initiatives identified by Group include:
Subsidised Bus Services for Students, Student City
Centre, Student Connectivity, Student-Business
Linkages Project, One Student Card, Marketing of
the City to Students, “More Things to Do”.
-
exploration of collaborative relationships with:
•
Eastern Institute of Technology with respect to
Achieved - Ongoing
mutual programme strengths,
Highlights included:
•
Staircasing of some undergraduate degrees.
•
Options for hosting Massey University
postgraduate students in Hawke’s Bay.
•
•
Options for relocating Ruawharo activities.
Universal College of Learning with respect to
Partially Achieved - Ongoing
mutual programme strengths,
Exploration of opportunities for collaboration
continued.
Highlights included:
•
•
Victoria University of Wellington,
Agreement to co-sharing of library resources.
Achieved - Ongoing
Developing relationship with Victoria University of
113
Wellington in progressing the New Zealand School of
Music project.
•
•
Open Polytechnic of New Zealand with respect
Not Achieved
to mutual programme strengths,
Not progressed in 2004.
Lincoln University with respect to mutual
Achieved – Ongoing
programme strengths.
Highlights included:
•
Collaboration with Lincoln University continued
in the form of a Partnership for Excellence bid.
-
progressing the joint initiative with Victoria
Achieved - Ongoing
University of Wellington for the delivery of music
Joint venture with Victoria University to establish the
programmes.
New Zealand School of Music and lessons learned can
facilitate other developments in the future.
Other initiatives focused on collaborative relationships with
other tertiary providers included:
•
Disability Services continued to utilise collaborative
relationships with other tertiary institutions in
order to provide support to extramural students.
In 2004 Eastern Institute of Technology, Waikato
University and Otago University assisted in the
provision of support to Massey University students.
•
Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Wellington) chaired
the Wellington Tertiary Education Cluster, which
involves Chief Executive Officers of local publicly
funded tertiary providers. Via Cluster membership
a relationship with Otago University Medical
School was established and assistance provided
by Wellington campus with Otago student
accommodation.
•
Staff collaborated in the Centres of Excellence
established in both Victoria and Auckland
Universities.
•
Promotional CD for international education
in Wellington produced by Wellington Tertiary
Education Cluster in Collaboration with Positively
Wellington Business.
13 Strengthen links with schools in the University’s
regions over the planning period through the
following initiatives:
-
establishing in 2004, a network with schools and
Achieved - Ongoing
educational organisations to promote middle level
Highlights included:
education research and development,
•
114
Work of the Middle-years Educational Research
and Innovation Centre (MERIC) is now closely
integrated with NZAIMS, the NZ Association of
Intermediate and Middle Schools. Specifically,
for 2005, NZAIMS has allocated $20,000-25,000 to
fund collaboration with Massey to:
-
Produce and distribute the NZAIMS
Newsletter and assemble and disseminate
information resources that support schools
and communities to adopt middle years
educational provisions and practices;
-
Develop a national media strategy to promote
the value and importance of Middle Years
Education; and
-
Formalise links with the Post-Primary Teachers
Association, New Zealand Principals’
Federation, New Zealand Educational
Institute, Secondary Principals Association
of New Zealand and the Integrated Schools
Association and develop a formal association
with key professional middle years associations
internationally with National Middle School
Association (USA) and Middle Years of
Schooling Association (Australia).
-
continuation of the North Shore Schools Net and
Achieved – Ongoing
South Schools Net projects,
-
developing new software resources, through
Not Achieved - Ongoing
MUSAC (Massey University School Administration
Development of new resources for schools has been
by Computer), the preferred provider for
delayed by Ministry of Education requirements for
computerised school information systems to the
accreditation. However, MUSAC’s staffing resource
New Zealand school community, and
has increased in 2004 to broaden capability and
programming and quality assurance systems to allow
networking opportunities with schools.
-
increasing, from 2004, the collaborative research
Achieved - Ongoing
activities between classroom teachers in schools
Highlights included:
and staff of the University.
•
Staff submitted several bids for funding to the
Teaching and Learning Research Initiative in
collaboration with teaching staff in local schools
and other teacher education providers nationally.
14 Extend linkages with our alumni by way of
Achieved - Ongoing
activities, functions and communications over the
Highlights included:
planning period.
Functions:
•
Eight functions were held in 2004 (three in
2003). They took place in Wellington, Auckland,
115
Palmerston North, Christchurch, Napier, Brisbane,
Australia (two events) and Kuching, Malaysia.
•
Data in relation to alumni interest in involvement
with Massey were gathered at these functions to
inform the establishment of a network of Alumni
and Friends’ Chapters.
•
Contact was made with alumni in Melbourne,
Australia and London, UK. This communication
will be further developed in 2005, with a view to
extending the Chapter network.
•
Many alumni were invited to, and attended, the
launch of the Massey University Foundation.
Activities:
•
Alumni were involved in providing benefits for
the alumni and friends of Massey. Agreements
with TeAwa Winery and Duty Free Stores New
Zealand were finalised. Agreements with Stone
and Associates and Karleri Photography are under
discussion.
•
Establishment of a Career Mentoring programme
was planned and data gathered from interested
alumni. This programme will be further developed
in 2005.
•
Alumni Relations Advisory Group established to
draw on the expertise and experience of university
staff to inform the activities of the Office of
Development and Alumni Relations.
Communications:
•
New signage developed for all campuses
to heighten awareness of the presence and
involvement of alumni and friends.
•
Website revised and made ready for migration to
the new format early in 2005.
•
E-newsletter software was reviewed and newsletters
for both internal and external distribution drafted,
ready for distribution in 2005.
International Alumni:
•
Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Wellington & External
Relations) and Director of Alumni attended
inaugural New Zealand Alumni Convention in
Kuching, Malaysia and met alumni in Malaysia and
Singapore.
116
Other highlights of initiatives focused on ongoing
Highlights included:
collaboration, knowledge development and application which
•
Massey staff continued to give expert opinion to
media on topical issues.
contributes to society, community, industry, environment and
•
economy:
Economic Impact Report produced by Wellington
Tertiary Education Cluster showed publicly funded
tertiary institutions contributing $1.3Billion to
local economy.
•
National open access peer reviewed educational
journal The New Zealand Journal of Teachers’ Work
was launched from the College of Education, the
editorial board which contains members from the
New Zealand Educational Institute, Post-Primary
Teachers Association and traditional teacher
education providers.
•
Staff contributed to the Quality Public Education
Coalition’s successful acquisition of funding from
teacher associations and the subsequent tendering
process for a research project on educational
outcomes.
•
Partnership formed with Te Aroha Noa
Community Services involving research, student
placements and seminars.
•
Renewal of Health Promoting Schools contract for
2004–5 in the College of Education, with the focus
on implementing health programmes in schools;
funding is from the Ministry of Health.
•
Undertook supervision workshops for Capital
Coast Health and Group Special Education.
•
Memorandum of Understanding signed with
Capital Coast Health to facilitate collaborating
research and joint appointments.
•
Hosted the Sir Peter Blake Trust (through Dr
Mark Orams). The Trust is established to support
the education aspects the work of the late Sir
Peter Blake commenced through development
of programmes and resources to enable young
New Zealanders learn about research and develop
leadership skills.
•
Established contracts with marae communities,
Creative NZ, Te Waka Toi and Toi Mäori Aotearoa.
•
Staff associated with the Mäori visual arts
programme were active in either group or solo
exhibitions.
•
Supporting a display at Te Manawa for five years.
The exhibit will be in the children’s area and
involve identifying animal teeth with x-rays.
•
117
Palmerston North campus collaborated with
local District Health Board to develop a network
of service providers for patients with Eating
Disorders.
•
Fonterra became the new major sponsor of the
University’s Centre for Business and Sustainable
Development. Fonterra will adopt a total
sustainability management programme, a joint
venture between the centre and a team at Herriot
Watt University in Britain.
•
The New Zealand Centre of Ecological Economics was
launched This is a joint research centre uniting
economists and ecologists from the University and
Landcare Research.
•
The Riddet Centre, received $13 million from
Fonterra, Foundation of Research, Science and
Technology and German-based multi-national
BASF for research into individualised foods,
manufactured at point of sale.
•
The Albany-based Coastal Marine Research Group,
received a new 5.6 metre Stabi-Craft boat with
funding from a University grant and Hibiscus
Coast-based Gulf Land Marine.
•
The Anzode Research Centre opened at Palmerston
North. It is one outcome of an agreement
between the University and a group of United
States-based investors to commercialise a new zinc
battery technology developed by Massey chemists
Dr Simon Hall and Michael Liu.
•
A $400,000 Government pilot programme to
develop industry training within the biotechnology
sector will be steered by a team of Massey
biotechnology experts.
•
The University will host an $8 million project with
the Aotearoa New Zealand Social Sciences research
network, made up of New Zealand leading social
scientists.
•
New Zealand’s Unknown Warrior was interred
at the National War Memorial, in front of the
Museum Building, in a Tomb designed by a team
led by Design Lecturer, Kingsley Baird, College of
Design, Fine Arts and Music.
•
Dr Max Scott, Centre of Functional Genomics,
was one of 15 scientists from around the world to
meet in Vienna to discuss progress on the genetic
control of insects.
•
Dr Paul Perry, a senior sociology researcher,
School of Sociology, Social Policy and Social Work,
118
was one of three principal investigators on The New
Zealand Study of Values funded by the Foundation of
Research, Science and Technology.
•
Associate Professor Andrew Trlin, School of
Sociology, Social Policy and Social Work, was
appointed to the Human Rights Review Tribunal
panel.
•
Professor Ian Warrington, Deputy Vice-Chancellor
(Palmerston North and Extramural) was awarded
the Manawatu Evening Standard 2004 Person of the
Year.
Performance Measures
Target
2004
Courses Offered in Summer Session/Semester Three (Number of)
Extension & Technology
Transfer Outputs
(Number of)
Patents
Software
Target
2004
202
College Actual 2004
Business
4
0
Design, Fine
Arts & Music
Education
0
0
Other
Humanities &
Social Sciences
3
249
Total
Actual
2004
Sciences
0
Actual
2004
0
Actual
2003
217
Actual
2003
3
7
10
0
0
0
0
1
0
1
3
Addresses to
Professional Bodies
1,260
355
64
114
345
853
35
1,766
1,444
Extension Activities
571
63
27
31
34
73
3
231
185
Addresses to
Community
Organisations
434
40
5
28
37
53
8
171
148
Professional
Consultancies
190
21
4
10
18
60
0
113
115
Radio, Television &
Newsprint Interviews
574
125
44
24
83
297
3
576
517
Professional Practice
in Arts & Design
57
0
23
0
0
0
0
23
208
Target
2004
Research Output Communications (Number of)
Actual
2004
Actual
2003
Total
2,650
3,169
1,856
Palmerston North Region
1,800
2,044
1,228
Auckland Region
450
577
325
Wellington Region
400
548
303
1,850
2,117
1,169
Palmerston North Region
950
1,275
704
Auckland Region
450
488
265
Wellington Region
450
354
200
27
25
25
Community communications on environmental issues (Number of)
Total
Academic qualifications offered in partnership with other organisations (Number of)
119
INTERNATIONALISATION
GOALS
1.
To pursue increased internationalisation and advance Massey University’s standing in the international
community.
2.
To emphasis and enhance Massey University’s presence in the Asia - Pacific region and to strengthen
relationships with Pacific nations and peoples.
OBJECTIVES
•
To value the different contributions that international staff and students make with reference to building
international awareness and goodwill, contribution to scholarship, and involvement in the life of the
wider community.
•
To foster well chosen international alliances, partnerships and joint ventures.
•
To ensure that all subjects and programmes, regardless of the campus or mode of delivery, provide
students with access to an education of international standard, (and, where appropriate, with specific
international accreditation), that will prepare students for life and work within the global community.
•
To increase the opportunities for the University’s students to study overseas and to interact with students
from other countries.
•
To continue to internationalise research activities by forging international linkages and by achieving
further international recognition for research quality.
•
To ensure that international students at Massey University are well supported and that campus life is
reflective of international cultures and values.
•
To develop effective and appropriate international enrolment and programme delivery opportunities in
order to enhance the reputation and strengthen the resources and capacity of the University.
•
To increase the relevance of the University’s teaching and research for the peoples of the Pacific region.
PERFORMANCE 2004
At Massey University we conduct our research in an international context, recruit staff from around the world,
and derive institutional benefits from participation in student exchange programmes.
To measure our excellence in research and scholarship Massey University seeks to be recognised at the highest
international level. It was therefore pleasing in 2004 to be ranked 108th in the world’s top 200 in The Times
Higher Education Supplement world university rankings. This performance has been confirmed by other
international comparisons. These comparisons would place Massey University about 15th among Australasian
universities.
A further example of Massey University’s international status comes with the acknowledgement of the
University’s new marine transport design course in 2004 by the Royal Institution of Naval Architects (RINA).
The Massey course is the first in the world to gain formal accreditation from the prestigious London based
institution. RINA is an internationally renowned professional institution whose members are involved at all
levels in academia, industry and maritime organisations in more than 90 countries, including New Zealand.
Historically it has represented the group of specialised engineers known as naval architects, who design large
ships and pleasure craft, but more recently it has acknowledged the role of the new breed of marine designers.
120
During 2004 the College of Business continued to work towards international accreditation of its programmes
with the Association to Advance Collegiate Studies in Business (AACSB) International. The AACSB is the
premier accrediting agency and service organisation for business schools and the College seeks accreditation for
its degree programmes in the business disciplines at all levels.
Massey University’s strategy for the internationalisation of curriculum, research, campus life and staff and
student experience will be further supported by the International Policy and Strategy Advisory Committee
which was established in 2004. This will serve to strengthen the Universities commitment to building strong
relationships with overseas universities based on mutual goals of excellence in teaching and research, and will
assist in the development of strategies to enhance the delivery of international student services, along with
achieving a stable target enrolment of international students well distributed across colleges and across countries
of origin.
As part of the commitment to provide an international learning experience priority has continued to be given
to the development of the Study Abroad programme resulting in a 41% increase in Study Abroad students in
2004 and four new study abroad organisation agreements in place for 2005. The Student Exchange programme
has seen a 44% increase in inbound students and, while the outbound numbers remain static, the provision
of Student Exchange (Outbound) travel grants and increased promotion has seen growth in applications for
outbound exchange in 2005.
Following the July 2004 external audit of the University’s compliance with the national Code of Practice for Pastoral
Care of International Students, the University was commended, by the Academic Audit Unit (New Zealand ViceChancellors’ Committee), on the quality of the services provided. However, the growth in international student
numbers and addressing issues raised by international students in the Student Satisfaction Survey continues to
challenge for the University and addressing these issues will continue to be a focus of our efforts.
Performance Indicators
Target 2004:
Outcome/Progress 2004:
1
Achieved – Ongoing
Ensure our qualification review process
appropriately recognises that contextual content
(rather than nationally specific), assessment and
assignments are relevant to the needs and interests
of international students.
2
A targeted staff development programme on
Achieved – Ongoing
internationalisation will be maintained during the
Highlights included:
planning period.
•
11 courses were run by the Training and
Development Unit with 208 participants.
3
Partially Achieved - Ongoing
Complete the Association to Advance Collegiate
Studies in Business (AACSB) accreditation process
for the University’s business school by 2005.
121
4
Organise at least one international conference per
Achieved - Ongoing
annum.
Highlights included:
International conference subjects included:
•
Early childhood.
•
Documentary film making - Expanding Documentary.
•
OECD Farm Management Indicators and the
Environment (in conjunction with the Ministry of
Agriculture and Forestry).
•
2004 International Conference on the Science and
Technology of Synthetic Materials (satellite symposium
organised by the Nonmaterial Research Centre).
5
6
Develop a strategy for international partnerships/
Partially Achieved - Ongoing
strategic alliances for selected teaching and
Preliminary planning has commenced and an
research areas and review existing arrangements
International Policy and Strategy Advisory Committee
for consistency with this strategy (2005).
established late 2004.
Build on the opportunities afforded by
Achieved – Ongoing
accreditation of the University’s Veterinary
Highlights included:
programme by the American Veterinary Medical
•
20 full-fee paying students were among the 100
students admitted to the professional phase of the
Association (2004-2006).
Bachelor of Veterinary Science programme this year.
7
8
Develop a set of guidelines to screen international
Not Achieved - Ongoing
opportunities, particularly those relating to
Initiative delayed awaiting appointment of
collaborative agreements with offshore parties
International Director. This position has now been
(2004).
appointed and the initiative will be a target for 2005.
Achieve three key strategic research alliances with
Partially Achieved – Ongoing
international universities by 2006.
Highlights included:
•
University level relationship established with the
prestigious University of Tokyo, Japan for highlevel research exchange primarily in molecular
biosciences and veterinary sciences.
•
Discussions in progress with Peking University,
China. A delegation to New Zealand has been
hosted by Massey University and a Massey
delegation visited Peking University to discuss a
mutually rewarding strategic research alliance.
9
Set up a system for exchange of both operational
Not Achieved - Ongoing
and executive research staff in key areas by 2004.
Initiative delayed awaiting appointment of
International Director. This position has now been
appointed and the initiative will be a target for 2005.
Not Achieved - Ongoing
10 Establish at least two postgraduate degrees which
are jointly branded with offshore institutions by
2006.
122
11 Implement the revised Code of Practice for
Achieved - Ongoing
Pastoral Care of International Students.
Highlights included:
•
Massey University fully compliant with Code of
Practice requirements.
•
Further development of University policies in some
compliance areas is being undertaken.
•
The New Zealand Vice-Chancellors Committee
Academic Audit Unit commended the University
on the quality of the services provided.
Achieved - Ongoing
12 Implement the new automated offer, admission
and enrolment system to support the University’s
Highlights included:
managed enrolment policy for international
•
Stage I (offer of place process) of the international
student offer management system (OMS) for the
students.
admission of international students (pre-degree &
degree) fully implemented.
•
Stage II (further enhancement features to Stage I)
is under action.
•
Regular statistical reports provided to key
stakeholders in Colleges.
Achieved – Ongoing
13 Continue to monitor international student
satisfaction through the use of surveys and work to
Highlights included:
enhance services as appropriate (2004-2006).
•
Survey undertaken to assess admission and prearrival services and processes.
•
Measurement of on-campus service delivery to
International Students included in the National
student satisfaction survey.
•
Massey University English Language Centre
(MUELC) conducts student surveys of MUELC
programmes and services as well as entrance and
exit interviews/surveys.
Achieved - Ongoing
14 Develop further exchange opportunities
for students and continue to give priority to
Highlights included:
development of the Study Abroad programme
•
Three new exchange programmes established
in 2004 and four new study abroad organisation
(2004-2006).
agreements in place for 2005.
•
•
41% increase in Study Abroad students in 2004.
44% increase in Student Exchange (inbound)
students; Student Exchange (outbound) remains
static, however, there is strong growth in applications
for Exchange (outbound) in 2005, as a result of
increased internal promotion at all campuses.
Partially Achieved - Ongoing
15 Progress the English Language Centre expansion
Massey University English Language Centre
in line with the University strategy and report
123
against business case milestone targets over the
completed its move to new facilities on both Turitea
planning period.
and Wellington campuses and incorporated general
English programmes at Wellington. The contraction
in the Chinese student market has constrained overall
student numbers however the centre has increased
hosting of block course study groups from overseas.
16 Investigate and establish, where appropriate, the
Partially Achieved - Ongoing
delivery of selected qualifications offshore via
offshore extramural delivery mode by 2005.
17 Target recruitment of able postgraduate students
Achieved - Ongoing
in niche areas to support building of research
Highlights included:
groups (2004-2006).
•
Departments and Centres continued to target
international postgraduate and post-doctoral
students resulting in a 28% increase in research
postgraduates. Contestable research funds have
assisted these efforts.
Other highlights of initiatives focused on Internationalisation:
Highlights included:
•
Memorandum of Understanding developed
with the University of South Pacific, Suva, Fiji
to facilitate the development of a social work
programme.
•
Delivered professional social work programmes for
•
Registration of Massey University for United
the Department of Social Welfare, Suva, Fiji.
States Federal Aid status has seen growth in
American students seeking admission for full
degrees programmes, particularly the Bachelor of
Veterinary Science.
•
Developed a proposal to offer English language
and teacher training for secondary and tertiary
teachers of ESOL (English for Speakers of Other
Languages) through Mahasarakham University in
Thailand.
•
Secured first time study tours from Thai and
Taiwanese Universities for 2005.
•
Funding secured by the Massey University English
Language Centre for space/places for refugees in
Wellington and Palmerston North for 2005.
•
Established English Language Education Awards
for post-graduate research students from India,
Vietnam and Thailand.
•
Goodwill Ambassador” programme developed with
Palmerston North City Council and in conjunction
with “Going Home” programme.
124
•
Deputy Vice-Chancellor Wellington & External
Relations participated in the production of a
promotional CD promoting Wellington as a
study destination for international students
in collaboration with the Wellington Tertiary
Education Cluster and Positively Wellington
Business.
•
Deputy Vice-Chancellor Palmerston North
continued to act as link person for Thailand.
Growth in undergraduate and postgraduate
numbers at all Massey campuses achieved.
Performance Measures
Target
2004
Actual
2004
Actual
2003
Exchange Students - ‘To’ (Number of)
33
26
18
Exchange Students - ‘From’ (Number of)
18
11
12
Study Abroad Students to Massey University (Number of)
56
45
32
Formal Academic Arrangements with Offshore Institutions (Number of)
69
69
63
Total
4,293
4,809
4,341
Palmerston North Region
1,669
1,755
1,605
Auckland Region
1,393
1,496
1,364
Wellington Region
1,231
1,588
1,372
EFTS - Full-Fee International
Note:
These are full-fee international students as per Ministry of Education funding classification 02 and 20.
Student Services Satisfaction - International Students (% students rating services good/very good)
125
51%
42%
48%
ORGANISATION AND MANAGEMENT
GOALS
1.
To ensure the University has a sustainable resource base sufficient to pursue its primary aims.
2.
To have management at all levels which is competent, effective and accountable.
3.
To support teaching, learning and research activities, through provision of quality infrastructure, national
shared services and regional support activities.
OBJECTIVES
•
To act as a responsible user of resources, employing management processes and structures appropriate to
the size, purpose and multi-campus nature of the University.
•
To strengthen the University’s financial position through pursuit of higher net revenues and greater
utilisation of assets, and by ensuring the effectiveness of all expenditures.
•
•
To ensure that the University is managed in such a manner as to safeguard its long-term viability.
To ensure that comprehensive planning processes and development strategies are formulated and
implemented for the future continuing benefit of the University.
•
To continue to enhance effective information systems that can support sound and timely decision-making.
•
To continue to develop health and safety management systems that meet statutory (and ACC) standards
and provide for the welfare of staff and students.
•
To monitor the University’s organisational structure to ensure that its activities are carried out in an
efficient and effective manner.
•
To further develop or adopt organisational structures that enhance and promote those areas that have
created the distinctive features of Massey University.
•
To manage the University’s natural environment in a sustainable manner, and to protect, and where
possible, to enhance the environmental quality of its natural resources.
•
To continue to enhance the aesthetic values of the campuses and maintain a stimulating environment for
the work, recreation and cultural activities of staff and students.
PERFORMANCE 2004
Massey University is an integrated university operating across three major campuses as well as supporting sites,
and extramurally by distance education. Its multi-campus organisation is supported by national shared systems
and services. This ‘one university’ culture is a key feature of Massey University and provides an extraordinary
breadth of access to teaching and research activities and cooperative exchange across disciplines and geographic
locations.
An academic audit on Massey University by the New Zealand University Academic Unit (NZAAU) recognized
Massey as “a learning institution which undertakes its own investigations of aspects of its operations when and as issues
arise”. The University was commended for the number of initiatives it has undertaken independent of the
specific requirements of the audit. The Audit made particular mention of the good practice model presented in
the Review of Academic Policy Formation and Massey University’s commitment to its responsibilities under the Treaty
of Waitangi, reflected in the development of the Mä[email protected] strategy.
2004 has seen significant progress in planning and implementing campus development plans that support the
University’s core academic activities and align with the Long Term Financial Strategy. This progress is detailed in
126
the Performance Indicators section below, and will support the goal to optimize the use of physical infrastructure
in the University.
Significant progress has also been made in the implementation of the University’s performance and risk
management framework.
As part of the University’s commitment to continuous improvement of our support systems and processes,
systems and process improvement initiatives undertaken during 2004 are detailed in the Performance Indicator
section below and include improvements to: the Timetabling and Room Booking system; Human Resources
and Payroll systems; International student offer management, admission and enrolment processes; Network
Administration system; Research Management Information systems; and the Student Management system.
Organisationally the University continues to review its structures to ensure its activities are carried out in an
effective and efficient manner. The School of Aviation was reviewed in 2003 and recommendations of that review
were implemented including consolidation of operations at Palmerston North during 2004. A review of the
College of Design, Fine Arts and Music was initiated in 2004 and a report has been presented to senior management
in 2005. In the College of Education, recommendations of the review of the Graduate School of Education are in the
process of being implemented.
The Graduate Research School formally commenced operation in February 2004 under the leadership of Professor
Ken Milne. The formation of the Graduate Research School, and provision of dedicated leadership, represents
a significant milestone in Massey’s commitment to providing quality graduate research experiences for research
masters and doctoral students.
The Massey Foundation was launched in November 2004 with the consolidation of the University’s general trust
funds. The driver and theme for the Foundation’s activities is ‘Enhancing Excellence’ and the Foundation Board
will oversee fundraising and administer these funds on behalf of the University. Among the first projects
supported by the Foundation is the Massey Masters program that will bring outstanding academics to New
Zealand for short-term visits to contribute to specific teaching and research activities.
Performance Indicators
Target 2004:
Outcome/Progress 2004:
1
Continue planning and implementing campus
Partially Achieved - Ongoing
development plans that support core academic
Campus Development Plans require further
activities and align with the Long Term Financial
development to include spatial analysis and
Strategy.
reconciliation data with the Long Term Financial
Strategy.
Specific deliverables targeted over the planning period:
-
refine and adopt a ten year development plan for
Partially Achieved - Ongoing
the Albany campus,
Long-term strategic development review completed
for the Albany campus. A Campus Development Plan
update is scheduled for 2005.
127
-
Achieved - Ongoing
develop strategies for the Palmerston North
campus that include future long-term use of the
Hokowhitu and Ruawharo sites and campus Heart
development by 2004,
-
Achieved - Ongoing
implement a ten-year refurbishment and
space plan for College of Sciences, Palmerston
North which incorporates the Technology and
Engineering strategy,
-
develop a long-term space requirement and capital
Partially Achieved - Ongoing
development plan for Wellington campus by 2004,
Highlights included:
including Library development, and
•
Campus Development Plan – Stage One
completed. Stage Two is due for completion in Q2
2005.
•
Long term space planning partially completed
with space utilisation reports.
•
Development of a campus academic plan
substantially complete and will feed into space
requirement planning.
•
Information Services Centre (including Library
development) funding approved by Council,
December 2004.
-
develop a strategy for library provision on each
Partially Achieved - Ongoing
campus for the next ten years.
Library provision strategies form part of the
Campus Development Plans (CDP). CDP require
further development to include spatial analysis and
reconciliation data with LTFS.
Highlights included:
•
Albany CDP to be updated based on recent
strategic development review report presented in
outline to Council in September 2004.
•
Palmerston North draft Stage 1 CDP released for
consultation in November 2004.
•
Wellington Stage 2 CDP in draft awaiting outcome
of academic business plan in early 2005.
2
Meet energy efficiency targets as agreed with
Partially Achieved – Ongoing
Energy Efficiency Conservation Authority (2004-
Highlights included:
2006).
•
Period of agreement covers 2002 to end 2005.
Reduction in energy use is currently under target.
A number of initiatives have been proposed to
further manage energy consumption.
•
Vehicle fuel consumption reduced by 26% (against
target of 15%) mainly as a result of the Fleet
Vehicle Management System.
128
3
Establish a medium term investment plan for IT
Partially Achieved - Ongoing
infrastructure and large items of equipment.
Highlights included:
•
Audit initiated of the University’s large items
of research equipment as a precursor to the
establishment of a long-term replacement/
investment plan.
•
Information Services Strategic Planning
commenced which will include a medium term
investment plan for IT infrastructure.
4
Implement the approved recommendations of the
Achieved
Review of Academic Policy-Formation in 2004.
Highlights included:
•
Academic Board re-constituted under its revised
Terms of Reference.
•
Academic Board established a Task Force to
complete a review of its sub-committee structures,
terms of reference and delegations.
•
College Boards terms of references and
membership reviewed.
5
Achieved
Continue to meet the requirements of the tertiary
education reforms, for example refinement of
Charters and Profiles.
6
Continue development and implementation of the
Achieved - Ongoing
University’s performance scorecard for student
Highlights included:
and internal service units with a view to optimising
•
Performance Scorecard principles incorporated
into the University’s planning template.
student/stakeholder satisfaction whilst achieving
institutional level economies of scale (2004-2006).
7
Continue to enhance the University’s financial
Achieved - Ongoing
model and refine the long-term financial strategy
Highlights included:
(2004-2005)
•
Further refinements made to the financial model.
•
New Equivalent Full-Time Students (EFTS)
forecasting model under development and
nearing completion (this to be fully integrated
with the financial model).
8
Continue implementation of the University’s
performance and risk management framework
which includes:
-
extending the implementation of performance
Partially Achieved - Ongoing
and risk reporting across the University,
Highlights included:
Performance and Risk Reporting roll out almost
complete and following software enhancements the
system will be operationalised in 2005.
129
-
progressively implementing the legal compliance
Achieved
programme in line with the University’s adopted
During 2004 the Legal Compliance system was
policy (2004-2006), and
implemented throughout Massey University. This
involves high-level confirmation of legislative
compliance across all Colleges/Regions/Divisions.
Highlights included:
•
A review of contracting policies and procedures.
•
A Contract Law for Non-lawyers seminar was
delivered.
-
completion of the review of University policies,
Achieved
procedures and delegations.
Highlights included:
•
All existing policies reviewed and new policies
drafted.
•
Policy Guide placed on intranet.
•
Delegations Policy and associated Delegations
Procedure were approved for implementation.
9
Consider and, as appropriate, implement
Achieved - Ongoing
improvement initiatives to the University’s
Highlights included:
governance practices including any regulatory
•
Relationship Building Between Mäori and Massey
change arising out of Professor Edwards review
University paper presented to Vice-Chancellor’s
of TEI governance, and specifically consider the
Executive Committee for discussion. It
aspect of meaningful accountability to its Mäori
outlined several opportunities for engagement
communities. (2004-2006).
and highlighted three levels of relationship:
governance relationships, operational
relationships and strategic relationships, where
Mäori may work together with Massey University.
Partially Achieved – Ongoing
10 Implement revised policies and practices for
health and safety to ensure compliance with
Highlights included:
legislation (2004) and good practice (2005-2006).
•
All the Health and Safety procedures are being
reviewed as part of transfer to a new web server.
25% complete.
•
ACC (Accident Compensation Commission) audit
in progress.
•
Working in a Situation likely to cause Serious
Harm Policy completed.
Achieved
11 Complete implementation of the new timetabling
system and the upgrade of the University’s space
Highlights included:
management systems in 2004.
•
New Timetable and Room Booking system
•
Space management system, SpaceMan, upgraded
implemented and will be fully operationalised in 2005.
to a windows based interface and added to the new
Massey National Administration System (NAS).
130
12 Continue with administrative systems and process
improvement initiatives over the planning period,
to include, but not limited to:
-
Achieved - Ongoing
Student Management System renewal (SMS),
SMS Renewal Project well underway.
-
Achieved - Ongoing
Human Resources and Payroll system,
Phase I completed with full completion intended by
end of June 2005.
-
Achieved - Ongoing
empowerment of Finance System users via webbased reporting and budgeting tools,
-
Achieved - Ongoing
implementation of supply chain management
systems,
-
review of fees administration invoicing and debtor
Achieved - Ongoing
management processes, and
Fees administration invoicing and debtor
management review proceeding.
-
review financial reporting requirements in line
Achieved - Ongoing
with internationalisation of financial reporting
Financial Reporting Standards project in train for
standards.
adoption by 2006/7.
Other initiatives focused on continuous system and process
improvements included:
•
Enhanced student access to the web and web
enrolment.
•
Upgrade of the web server infrastructure.
•
Upgrade of the web portal environment to support
the 2004/5 expected increased usage levels by
students.
•
Student data storage upgrade on all three campuses.
•
Mass e-Mall Project: Mass-e-Mall environment
continues to grow in scope and significance. The
number of purchase card users and the number
of preferred suppliers has grown significantly.
Purchase patterns and related supply chain
intelligence is beginning to accumulate through
this mechanism.
Partially Achieved - Ongoing
13 Implement the recommendations of the review of
Implementation of the recommendations of the
the School of Aviation, as adopted (2004-2005).
strategic review almost complete.
Highlights included:
•
131
Consolidation of flight training to Palmerston
North with the closure of Ardmore Flight Systems
Centre.
•
Industry alliances being developed specifically
with Air New Zealand and Nelson-Marlborough
Institute of Technology.
•
School statement of strategic intent (with mission
and vision statements) developed
•
Three-year business plan presented to Audit &
Risk Council Committee, December 2004.
14 Actively develop projects to strengthen capability
Achieved - Ongoing
development and where appropriate apply to the
Highlights included:
Innovation and Development Fund. (2004-2006).
•
Submitted five project proposals for funding
consideration under the Innovation and
Development Fund in 2004:
-
Centre for Genetic Damage.
-
Innovative Biotech Research & Education Centre.
-
Sequencing the Kiwi Genome.
-
Centre for Corporate and Institutional Governance
(in partnership with Victoria University).
-
Te Mata O Te Tau 2004.
Other highlights of initiatives focused on organisation and
Examples of key strategic investments in infrastructure and
management:
equipment made in 2004 to strengthen and support Massey
University’s special character, academic specialisations,
research excellence and contribution to New Zealand
included:
700MHz NMR Spectrometer
The Prime Minister officially opened the Bio-NMR
Laboratory in December 2004. This facility houses
New Zealand’s first high-field BioNMR spectrometer,
a 700-MHz BioSpin instrument, and represents a
$3million investment by Massey University to advance
science and technology in New Zealand. This is the
largest single investment in research infrastructure
made by any New Zealand university. High-field
Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) is a core
technique in the biological and bio-medical sciences,
and in biotechnology. The absence of such advanced
technology has seriously disadvantaged New Zealand
scientists in the past, and among with recently
acquired protein X-ray diffraction equipment for
the Allan Wilson Centre for Molecular Ecology and
Evolution, Massey University now has equipment and
expertise along with the best in the world. This will
present valuable research opportunities, both within
132
the University and for other research entities, which
have not been available within New Zealand until
now. “There is no other unit in New Zealand with a cluster
of machines like this or the expertise surrounding them.”
says head of the Institute of Fundamental Sciences
Professor David Parry. “A whole variety of people have
expressed interest in using the facility. It is great for Massey
researchers and students but is also a resource for all New
Zealand.” he says. “It will mean researchers can conduct this
part of their research in New Zealand instead of having to go
offshore to places like Scotland.”
Double Helix Linux Cluster
In November 2004 the new Double Helix cluster
computer was installed at Albany campus. It has
between five to ten times the computational power of
the university’s existing supercomputer, the 64-node
Helix 1, which just two years ago was ranked the most
powerful in the country and in the world top 500
supercomputers. Insite Technology in Christchurch
assembled the cluster, worth about $300,000, which is
believed to be the first cluster of AMD Opteron 250
processors in New Zealand. There is a Master node
with 16Gb RAM and 19 slave nodes each with 4Gb
RAM. Each node has dual processors and two 120Gb
hard drives. This move to greater power and capacity
was prompted by the arrival at the campus of leading
theoretical chemist Professor Peter Schwerdtfeger
and the seven other scientists who came to join him
in the university’s new group of theoretical and
computational chemists. Although Double Helix is
vital to progressing the research of this group, it is an
important advance to the University’s entire science
community. The extra computational power will be
welcome for students and researchers in the areas of
bioinformatics and computational chemistry and will
reduce the waiting times for students’ computational
tasks. Double Helix will also facilitate interaction
between Massey researcher and their overseas
counterparts who have access to comparable highpower super computers.
Rotary Dairy Shed
A 50-year history of trailblazing research in the dairy
industry continued with the opening of $1million
state-of-the-art rotary dairy shed at Massey University
in March 2004. Since 1928 Massey has been
133
undertaking research fundamental to the success of
the dairy industry, which is now worth $5.6 billion
to the country and making up 20 percent of our
exports. The new 50 bale dairy shed, based on a
DeLaval milking system, is again leading the way
with its computer controlled systems, electronic cow
identification capability, automated cup removal
and automatic washdown on the backing gate. Milk
collection at each station is recorded and samples can
be taken for research purposes. At the commissioning
of the shed, Vice-Chancellor Professor Kinnear said
the $1million dollar project had her full support
because it filled not only a functional role but also the
University’s teaching and research aims. “A key driver
at the Palmerston North campus will continue to be the land
based industries and the science and teaching that supports
and adds value to that. That is what makes this campus
distinctive. It is what our history is based on and our
commitment to land based research and teaching will remain
a key focus at Massey University.”
Performance Measures
Financial Performance Indicators
Target
2004
Operating Surplus to Total Revenue
Actual
2004
Actual
2003
3.1%
4.20%
4.40%
Working Capital Ratio
72.9%
118.75%
104.49%
Cash Cover - Liquidity
(Liquid Funds to annual cash operating)
10.0%
29.13%
30.52%
Cash Cover - EBITD/Int Exp
118.8X
95.56X
526.48X
Operating Surplus to Total Assets
1.6%
2.10%
2.13%
52.9%
59.37%
57.06%
Revenue per Funded EFTS
$14,880
$15,501
$14,493
Operating Costs per Funded EFTS
$14,424
$15,056
$13,761
$2,163
$1,605
$1,899
$25,534
$26,267
$26,118
1.7%
1.37%
0.37%
Total Revenue to Net Assets
Capital Expenditure per Funded EFTS
Fixed Assets per Funded EFTS
Debt to Debt plus Equity
Change in Financial Value
2.1%
2.61%
8.22%
202,592
199,991
187,033
Revenue from Domestic Tuition Fees ($m)
67,441
64,644
65,023
Revenue from International Tuition Fees ($m) (Full-Fee Foreign)
61,100
61,933
53,340
17.57%
17.64%
16.22%
Salary Related Expenses (000’s)
International Tuition Fees/Total Revenue
134
Space Utilisation Usable Floor Area m2/EFTS (Equivalent full-time student)
(Excluding residential and farm related space)
Target
2004
Actual
2004
Actual
2003
- Wellington
7.09
5.67
10.16
- Albany
4.34
9.33
5.05
- Palmerston North
15.61
10.90
11.58
University Average
9.94
9.55
10.04
- Wellington
73.15
53.94
99.29
- Albany
49.94
94.14
52.10
- Palmerston North
56.12
68.21
73.06
University Average
57.80
69.71
73.93
Space Utilisation Usable Floor Area m2/FTE (Full-time equivalent staff member)
Note: Student EFTS is all students as at 31 December regardless of funding source.
Staff FTE includes all staff (permanent plus casual) as at 31 December.
135
APPENDICES
All the information provided in these appendices prior to 1997 excludes the former Palmerston North College
of Education.
All information provided in these appendices prior to 1999 excludes the former Wellington Polytechnic.
SUMMARY OF STUDENT NUMBERS
NOTE: Figures below are Student head count and include all students enrolled regardless of funding source.
University Totals
1
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
13,512
14,371
14,349
18,611
17,458
18,283
19,506
21,461
21,893
Extramural 1
16,334
17,967
18,044
18,959
18,933
19,336
20,239
20,201
19,543
Total
29,846
32,338
32,393
37,570
36,391
37,619
39,745
41,662
41,436
% change over previous year
0.9%
8.3%
0.2%
16.0%
(3.1%)
3.26%
5.65%
4.82%
(0.54%)
Students included in Totals above:
International 2
1,206
995
1,026
1,132
1,222
1,820
3,445
5,754
6,216
Internal
NOTE:
1 By Student Mode
2 1996 -2000 International figures above do not directly compare to 2001 figures onwards.
3 1996 - 2000 figures are international full-fee students only. 2001 figures onwards are all international
students regardless of New Zealand residency or funding status.
136
EQUIVALENT FULL-TIME STUDENTS (EFTS)
Internal 1
2002
2003
2004
14,221.0
15,954.0
16,921.8
Extramural 1
6,528.8
6,559.3
6,404.0
Total all students enrolled regardless of funding sources
21,539.1
23,342.4
23,325.8
% change over previous year
6.62%
8.37%
(0.07%)
Students included in Totals above:
2,493.4
4,340.9
4,808.8
EFTS funded by Ministry of Education 3
18,542.7
18,349.2
17,840.4
% change over previous year
(0.30%)
(1.04%)
(2.77%)
Full-Fee/International 2
Note:
1 By Student Mode.
2 Full-Fee International students as per Ministry of Education Funding Classification 02 and 20.
3 As per Ministry of Education Funding Classification 01.
137
STUDENT AGE DISTRIBUTION (ENROLLED HEADCOUNT)
2003
%Total
40+
Total
% Total
2004
Ethnicity
Gender
<17
17-19
20-24
25-29
30-34
35-39
<17
17-19
20-24
25-29
30-34
35-39
New Zealand
Female
4
187
558
433
415
337
706
2,640
6%
3
221
569
440
407
335
733
2,708
7%
Mäori
Male
1
99
283
233
193
185
303
1,297
3%
1
100
282
201
195
171
284
1,234
3%
All
40+
Total
All
Total
5
286
841
666
608
522
1,009
3,937
9%
4
321
851
641
602
506
1,017
3,942
10%
Pakeha/
Female
2
1,388
3,343
2,161
2,130
1,796
4,801
15,621
37%
6
1,442
3,341
2,096
2,119
1,759
4,683
15,446
37%
European
Male
7
1,079
2,396
1,371
1,299
1,109
2,612
9,873
24%
3
1,021
2,363
1,273
1,138
1,066
2,489
9,353
23%
Total
9
2,467
5,739
3,532
3,429
2,905
7,413
25,494
61%
9
2,463
5,704
3,369
3,257
2,825
7,172
24,799
60%
Pasifika
Asian
Other
Unspecified
Total
Female
1
42
163
135
106
80
102
629
2%
-
35
167
112
105
74
99
592
1%
Male
0
34
125
82
71
52
68
432
1%
-
34
113
73
68
67
79
434
1%
Total
1
76
288
217
177
132
170
1,061
3%
-
69
280
185
173
141
178
1,026
2%
Female
0
355
2,152
743
443
241
229
4,163
10%
2
271
2,255
886
458
245
230
4,347
10%
Male
2
334
2,173
742
398
245
228
4,122
10%
-
277
2,271
965
377
233
239
4,362
11%
Total
2
689
4,325
1,485
841
486
457
8,285
20%
2
548
4,526
1,851
835
478
469
8,709
21%
Female
0
57
269
170
130
122
229
977
2%
-
81
247
180
166
124
227
1,025
3%
Male
1
81
272
146
120
97
179
896
2%
1
90
263
149
134
112
193
942
2%
Total
1
138
541
316
250
219
408
1,873
4%
1
171
510
329
300
236
420
1,967
5%
Female
0
9
99
53
44
70
300
575
1%
-
15
86
56
52
59
322
590
1%
Male
1
11
118
50
27
35
195
437
1%
1
20
82
38
31
36
195
403
1%
Total
1
20
217
103
71
195
495
1,012
2%
1
35
168
94
83
95
517
993
2%
Female
7
2,038
6,584
3,695
3,268
2,646
6,367
24,605
59%
11
2,065
6,665
3,770
3,307
2,596
6,294
24,708
60%
12
1,638
5,367
2,624
2,108
1,723
3,585
17,057
41%
6
1,542
5,374
2,699
1,943
1,685
3,479
16,728
40%
19
3,676
11,951
6,319
5,376
4,369
9,952
41,662
17
3,607
12,039
6,469
5,250
4,281
9,773
41,436
0%
9%
29%
15%
13%
10%
24%
0%
9%
29%
16%
13%
10%
24%
100%
Male
Total
%Total
All
Note:
% Total All column and row is the percent of the total year figure: 2003 = 41,662; 2004 = 41,436
Figures above include all students regardless of funding source.
Student data as at 31 December.
138
STUDENT ETHNICITY, MODE AND GENDER
(ENROLLED HEADCOUNT)
2003
Internal
943
590
1,533
4%
935
571
1,506
4%
Mäori
Extramural
1,697
707
2,404
6%
1,773
663
2,436
6%
Total
2,640
1,297
3,937
10%
2,708
1,234
3,942
10%
Internal
5,855
4,511
10,366
25%
6,071
4,395
10,466
25%
Extramural
9,766
5,362
15,128
36%
9,375
4,958
14,333
35%
25,494
61%
15,446
9,353
24,799
60%
241
554
1%
279
232
511
1%
Extramural
316
191
507
1%
313
202
515
1%
Total
629
432
1,061
2%
592
434
1,026
2%
3,591
3,758
7,349
18%
3,752
3,957
7,709
19%
572
364
936
2%
595
405
1,000
2%
4,163
4,122
8,285
20%
4,347
4,362
8,709
21%
Internal
534
639
1,173
3%
554
661
1,215
3%
Extramural
443
257
700
2%
471
281
752
2%
Total
977
896
1,873
5%
1,025
942
1,967
5%
Internal
256
230
486
1%
269
217
486
1%
Extramural
319
207
526
1%
321
186
507
1%
Total
575
437
1,012
2%
590
403
993
2%
Internal
11,492
9,969
21,461
52%
11,860
10,033
21,893
53%
Extramural
13,113
7,088
20,201
48%
Total
24,605
17,057
41,662
59%
41%
% Total All
Note:
All
9,873
Total
Total
Total
313
Internal
Unspecified
Male
15,621
Extramural
Other
Female
All
Internal
Total
Asian
Total
% Total
New Zealand
Pasifika
Male
2004
Mode
Pakeha/European
Female
% Total
Ethnicity
12,848
6,695
19,543
47%
24,708
16,728
41,436
100%
60%
40%
100%
% Total All column and row is the percent of the total year figure: 2003 = 41,662; 2004 = 41,436
Figures above include all students regardless of funding source.
Student data as at 31 December.
139
STAFFING LEVELS
FULL-TIME EQUIVALENT (FTE) STAFF
STAFF FTE
2002
2003
2004
1,159
1,283
1,307
607
623
595
Colleges
Academic 1
General 2
Contract & Trading
Total Colleges
251
284
304
2,016
2,190
2,206
293
323
351
Support Services & Administration
Regional Services
Other National Shared Services
13
14
12
Vice-Chancellor’s Office
17
17
17
18
25
30
University Registrar
Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Research)
213
228
244
Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Academic)
262
261
242
Deputy Vice-Chancellor (International)
15
21
13
0
8
8
Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Mäori)
English Language Centre
Total Support Services & Administration
Total Staff 3
48
81
71
879
978
988
2,895
3,168
3,194
1
Academic: casual academic assistance converted to FTE at the rate paid to a lecturer on Step 4
2
General: casual general and technical assistance converted to FTE at the rate paid to general staff on
Grade D Step 1
3
Figures are as at 31 December. Data published in the Annual Report 2002, was for permanent FTE as at
31 July. 2002 figures have been re-stated based on 31 December to allow for comparison.
140
STAFF FTE BY COLLEGE
College of Business
2002
2003
2004
Academic
286
323
326
General
146
155
133
Contract & Trading
College of Design, Fine Arts & Music
Academic
1
3
3
107
125
141
41
33
36
General
Contract & Trading
College of Education
Academic
0
0
0
145
154
146
General
College of Humanities & Social Sciences
College of Sciences
64
71
63
Contract & Trading
101
111
104
Academic
265
236
266
General
77
65
61
Contract & Trading
40
60
72
Academic
385
415
429
General
280
299
302
Contract & Trading
Total Colleges
Total Academic
Total General
Total Contract & Trading
Total FTE
110
110
125
1,159
1,283
1,307
607
623
595
251
284
304
2,016
2,190
2,206
STAFFING RATIOS :
2003
2004
Funded Equivalent Full-time Students (EFTS)
22,690
22,649
Total Academic Staff incl Casual Academic
1,283
1,307
Total General Staff incl Casual General
1,601
1,583
College of Business
2003
Ratio of EFTS to
Academic Staff
2003
Ratio of General to
Academic Staff
2004
Ratio of EFTS to
Academic Staff
2004
Ratio of General to
Academic Staff
27.0:1
0.48:1
27.0:1
0.41:1
College of Design Fine Arts & Music
13.1:1
0.26:1
12.7:1
0.26:1
College of Education
16.5:1
0.46:1
16.6:1
0.43:1
College of Humanities & Social Sciences
18.3:1
0.24:1
17.7:1
0.23:1
College of Sciences
11.2:1
0.72:1
11.1:1
0.70:1
University Total
17.5:1
1.25:1
17.3:1
1.21:1
141
2004 STAFF ETHNICITY, GENDER, AGE (HEADCOUNT)
Ethnicity
Gender
<=19
20-24
25-29
30-34
35-39
40-44
New Zealand
Maori
Female
0
7
15
21
22
Male
0
2
8
4
8
Total
0
9
23
25
30
36
34
14
9
5
4
2
191
6%
European
Female
2
43
96
129
119
160
163
165
136
58
16
6
1,093
36%
Male
1
18
55
104
101
140
122
129
141
109
28
7
955
32%
Total
3
61
151
233
220
300
285
294
277
167
44
13
2,048
68%
Female
0
1
2
5
2
2
0
3
3
0
0
0
18
1%
Male
0
0
1
2
3
3
0
2
0
0
0
0
11
0%
Total
0
1
3
7
5
5
0
5
3
0
0
0
29
1%
Pasifika
Asian
Other
Unspecified
Total
50-54
55-59
60-64
65+
28
20
11
5
2
1
8
14
3
4
3
3
Unspecified
Grand
Total
% Total
All
2
134
4%
57
2%
Female
0
11
16
14
20
20
19
7
6
3
0
0
116
4%
Male
0
4
18
17
20
24
13
12
6
9
1
0
124
4%
Total
0
15
34
31
40
44
32
19
12
12
1
0
240
8%
Female
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0
0
0
3
0%
Male
0
0
0
1
5
0
3
3
0
1
0
0
13
0%
Total
0
1
0
1
6
0
3
3
1
1
0
0
16
0%
Female
0
4
11
18
25
41
53
40
36
24
4
3
259
9%
Male
0
1
11
19
17
37
41
25
44
31
13
3
242
8%
Total
0
5
22
37
42
78
94
65
80
55
17
6
501
17%
Female
2
67
140
187
189
251
255
226
187
87
21
11
1,623
54%
Male
1
25
93
147
154
212
193
174
195
153
45
10
1,402
46%
Total
3
92
233
334
343
463
448
400
382
240
66
21
3,025
0%
3%
8%
11%
11%
15%
15%
13%
13%
8%
2%
1%
% Total All
Note:
45-49
% Total All column and row is the percent of the total figure 3,025
Permanent staff data as at 31 December 2004
142
2004 STAFF ETHNICITY, GENDER, CLASSIFICATION, REGION
(HEADCOUNT)
Ethnicity
Gender
%
Academic Staff
Albany
Palmerston
Wellington
North
Other
Pasifika
New Zealand
Maori
Total
Total
Wellington
North
%
General
General
Grand
Total
Total
Total
Total
All
0
0
0
0%
0
2
1
3
0%
3
0%
2
7
2
11
1%
1
1
0
2
0%
13
0%
2
7
2
11
1%
1
3
1
5
0%
16
0%
70
219
83
372
28%
85
577
59
721
43%
1,093
36%
Male
92
358
93
543
40%
35
341
36
412
24%
955
32%
Total
162
577
176
915
68%
120
918
95
1,133
67%
2,048
68%
Female
17
20
8
45
3%
16
40
15
71
4%
116
4%
Male
13
48
6
67
5%
12
41
4
57
3%
124
4%
Total
30
68
14
112
8%
28
81
19
128
8%
240
8%
Female
1
3
1
5
0%
3
7
3
13
1%
18
1%
Male
1
1
0
2
0%
5
2
2
9
1%
11
0%
Total
2
4
1
7
1%
8
9
5
22
1%
29
1%
Female
6
30
5
41
3%
20
60
13
93
6%
134
4%
Male
2
24
6
32
2%
2
21
2
25
1%
57
2%
8
54
11
73
5%
22
81
15
118
7%
191
6%
Female
11
60
25
96
7%
19
133
11
163
10%
259
9%
Male
21
78
29
128
10%
11
82
21
114
7%
242
8%
Total
32
138
54
224
17%
30
215
32
277
16%
501
17%
Female
105
332
122
559
42%
143
819
102
1,064
63%
1,623
54%
Male
131
516
136
783
58%
37%
1,402
46%
Total
236
848
258
1,342
18%
63%
19%
% Total
Aca
% Total
Gen
% Total
All
Note:
Palmerston
0
Total
Unspecified
Total
Albany
Male
Female
Asian
Academic
Female
Total
European
%
General Staff
Academic
8%
28%
8%
44%
66
488
65
619
209
1,307
167
1,683
12%
78%
10%
7%
43%
6%
% Academic Total column is the percent of the Academic total figure 1,342
% General Total column is the percent of the General total figure 1,683
% Total All column and row is the percent of the total figure 3,025
Permanent staff data as at 31 December 2004
General staff include staff categorised as Technical and Contract & Trading
143
56%
3,025
2004 STAFF ETHNICITY, GENDER, COLLEGES,
REGIONS & DIVISIONS (HEADCOUNT)
College of
Ethnicity
Gender
Regions &
Divisions
Business
New Zealand
Maori
Female
30
11
8
Male
12
6
5
42
17
13
38
58
23
191
6%
European
Female
353
141
41
137
166
255
1,093
36%
Male
224
150
51
60
99
371
955
32%
Total
577
291
92
197
265
626
2,048
68%
Female
5
2
0
2
7
2
18
1%
Male
5
1
1
1
3
0
11
0%
Total
10
3
1
3
10
2
29
1%
Female
36
31
2
4
13
30
116
4%
Male
24
26
1
2
4
67
124
4%
Total
Total
Pasifika
Asian
Other
Unspecified
Total
Education
Humanities &
Social Sciences
Sciences
Grand
Total
% Total
All
26
43
16
134
4%
12
15
7
57
2%
60
57
3
6
17
97
240
8%
Female
1
1
0
0
0
1
3
0%
Male
1
6
0
0
1
5
13
0%
Total
2
7
0
0
1
6
16
0%
93
30
12
52
28
44
259
9%
Male
60
41
16
26
14
85
242
8%
Total
153
71
28
78
42
129
501
17%
Female
518
216
63
221
257
348
1,623
54%
Male
326
230
74
101
136
535
1,402
46%
844
446
137
322
393
883
3,025
28%
15%
5%
11%
13%
29%
Female
Total
% Total All
Note:
Design, Fine
Arts & Music
% Total All column and row is the percent of the total figure 3,025
Permanent staff data as at 31 December 2004
144
RESEARCH AND OTHER CONTRACT FUNDING
Research and Contract Funding
Total
($000)
1,356
College of Business
College of Design, Fine Arts and Music
College of Education
Research
Grants /
Projects
($000)
921
Research
Centres
($000)
-
Consultancies
($000)
Commercial
-isation Projects
($000)
323
Teaching
Contracts
($000)
-
Internal
Research
Allocation
($000)
-
112
124
-
-
26
-
-
98
8,732
78
507
1,202
-
6,919
26
College of Humanities and Social Sciences
14,926
4,536
6,642
1,869
-
1,586
293
College of Sciences
28,080
17,867
6,879
2,122
-
131
1,081
507
-
-
-
507
-
-
2004
53,725
23,402
14,028
5,542
507
8,636
1,610
2003
46,305
20,529
12,428
5,525
426
5,874
1,523
Other
Total Funding Received
Note: This statement reflects contract funding attracted by Massey University during the financial period. The external
research funding reported as received in this statement differs from external research income that qualifies under the
Performance Based Research Fund (PBRF), which is based on research work undertaken during the financial period (refer
Section E).
Total External and Internal Funding
External Funding
Internal Funding
Total Funding Received
145
2000
($000)
2001
($000)
2002
($000)
2003
($000)
2004
($000)
38,519
39,455
44,588
44,782
52,115
1,377
1,394
1,277
1,523
1,610
39,896
40,849
45,865
46,305
53,725
External Contract Funding - Source of Funds
2004
($000)
2003
($000)
New Zealand Government Agencies
36,175
32,728
Private and Public Sector Businesses
11,870
8,458
2,886
2,493
Societies and Private Trusts
985
954
Local Bodies
162
147
Overseas Institutions and Agencies
Other
37
2
52,115
44,782
2004
($)
2003
($)
Massey University Postdoctoral Fellowship
609,647
624,994
Massey University Research Fund
Total External Funding Received
Internal Contract Funding - Source of Funds
816,382
766,643
Massey University Maori Award
23,830
24,000
Massey University Womens Award
37,497
42,776
Massey University Research Fellowship
30,000
-
Massey University Technical Award
28,000
-
URC Research Award
65,000
65,000
1,610,356
1,523,413
Total Internal Research Allocation
146
External Research Income Qualifying for Performance Based Research Funding (PBRF)
External Research Income Qualifying for PBRF
147
2002
($000)
2003
($000)
2004
($000)
24,148
31,255
33,598
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