Illinois Learning and Development Standards (3-5)

Illinois Learning and Development Standards (3-5)
For Preschool
3 YEARS OLD TO KINDERGARTEN ENROLLMENT AGE
Illinois Early Learning
and Development
Standards
REVISED SEPTEMBER 2013
Contents
Contents
2 | Preface
21 | Language Arts
4 | Introduction
41 | Mathematics
6 | Development of the Illinois
Early Learning and
Development Standards
55 | Science
7 | Purposes of the Illinois
Early Learning and
Development Standards
73 | Physical Development
and Health
8 | Uses of the Illinois
Early Learning and
Development Standards
9 | Terminology in the Illinois
Early Learning and
Development Standards
16 | Guiding Principles
18 | How to Navigate
63 | Social Studies
83 | The Arts
89 | English Language
Learner Home
Language Development
93 | Social/Emotional Development
103 | References/Resources
111 | Acknowledgments
121 | Preschool Benchmark Index
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Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
Preface
The Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards (IELDS) provide reasonable expectations
for children’s growth, development, and learning in the preschool years. When used as part of
the curriculum, the IELDS provide guidance to teachers in early childhood programs to create
and sustain developmentally appropriate experiences for young children that will strengthen
their intellectual dispositions and support their continuing success as learners and students.
The age-appropriate benchmarks in the IELDS enable educators to reflect upon and evaluate
the experiences they provide for all preschool children.
There are cautions to consider when implementing the IELDS. They are meant to be used to
enhance planning for preschool children, to enrich play-based curricular practices, and to
support the growth of each child to his or her fullest potential. They are not meant to push down
curriculum and expectations from higher grades. The IELDS are research-based, so they identify
expectations that are just right for preschool children.
As teachers in early childhood programs implement the IELDS, they can be guided by Dr. Lilian
Katz, internationally known early childhood leader, expert, and professor emeritus at the
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Her reminder to expand our thinking beyond just the
IELDS themselves and also consider “standards of experiences” is an important message for all.
Dr. Katz writes:
As we think about standards, I suggest we ask ourselves: “What are the standards of
experience that we want all of our children to have?” Below is a very preliminary list
of some important “standards of experiences” that should be provided for all young
children in all programs.
Young children should frequently have the following experiences:
• Being intellectually engaged, absorbed, challenged.
• Having confidence in their own intellectual powers and their own questions.
• Being engaged in extended interactions (e.g., conversations, discussions, exchanges of
views, arguments, planning).
• Being involved in sustained investigations of aspects of their own environment worthy of
their interest, knowledge, understanding.
• Taking initiative in a range of activities and accepting responsibility for what
is accomplished.
• Knowing the satisfaction that can come from overcoming obstacles and setbacks and
solving problems.
• Helping others to find out things and to understand them better.
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Preface
• Making suggestions to others and expressing appreciation of others’ efforts
and accomplishments.
• Applying their developing basic literacy and numeracy skills in purposeful ways.
• Feelings of belonging to a group of their peers.
The list is derived from general consideration of the kinds of experiences that all
children should have much of the time in our educational settings. It is based on
philosophical commitments as well as the best available empirical evidence about
young children’s learning and development.
If the focus of program evaluation and assessment is on “outcomes” such as those
indicated by test scores, then evaluators and assessors would very likely emphasize
the “drill and practice” of phonemics, or rhyming, or various kinds of counting, or
introductory arithmetic. While in and of themselves such experiences are not
necessarily harmful to young children, they overlook the kinds of experiences that are
most likely to strengthen and support young children’s intellectual dispositions and
their innate thirst for better, fuller, and deeper understanding of their own experiences.
A curriculum or teaching method focused on academic goals emphasizes the
acquisition of bits of knowledge and overlooks the centrality of understanding as an
educational goal. After all, literacy and numeracy skills are not ends in themselves
but basic tools that can and should be applied in the quest for understanding.
In other words, children should be helped to acquire academic skills in the service of
their intellectual dispositions and not at their expense.
Dr. Lilian Katz, professor emeritus
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
November 2012
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Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
Introduction
Dear Colleagues,
I am pleased to introduce to you the revised Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards
2013 (IELDS), formerly known as the Illinois Early Learning Standards. The purpose of the updated
IELDS is to assist the Illinois early childhood community in providing high-quality programs and
services for children age 3 years to kindergarten enrollment (as defined in Section 10-20-2012 of
the School Code).
The standards are organized to parallel content in the Illinois State Goals for Learning
(see 23 Illinois Administrative Code 1. Appendix D found on the Illinois State Board of
Education Web site, www.isbe.net). The revised standards also demonstrate alignment
to the Illinois Kindergarten Standards and the Common Core State Standards for
Kindergarten. The Kindergarten Common Core Language Standards are found at
www.corestandards.org/assets/CCSSI_ELA%20Standards.pdf and the Kindergarten Common
Core Mathematics are found at www.corestandards.org/Math/Content/K/introduction.
The original Illinois Early Learning Standards document, published in 2002, was developed by the
Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) with assistance from the Chicago Public Schools, DeKalb
Community Unit School District, Indian Prairie School District, and Rockford Public School District.
The development of the revised IELDS includes additional assistance from the Erikson Institute
in Chicago as well as eight content-area experts who are nationally and internationally known
leaders in the field of early childhood education.
The Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards are broad statements that provide
teachers with reasonable expectations for children’s development in the preschool years. Based
on the broad Illinois State Goals and Standards (see Illinois Administrative Code, Section 235,
Appendix A), this resource includes Preschool Benchmarks and Performance Descriptors for most
Learning Standards. It is critical to remember that while these standards represent an alignment
with the K-12 standards, the IELDS are not a “push-down” of the curriculum; rather, they are a
developmentally appropriate set of goals and objectives for young children. Early learners must
develop basic skills, understandings, and attitudes toward learning before they can be successful
in the K-12 curriculum.
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Introduction
The challenge when describing children’s development in various domains is to accurately
convey the degree to which development and learning are interconnected across and within
domains. An integrated approach to curriculum recognizes that content areas of instruction are
naturally interrelated, as they are in real life experiences. Curriculum should reflect a conceptual
organization that helps all children make good sense of their experiences.
The revised IELDS were reviewed and critiqued by early childhood professionals from public and
private schools, Head Start, colleges, and community-based early care and learning programs.
Recommendations from these stakeholders and users were considered and incorporated into the
revisions. The Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) acknowledges and is grateful for the very
thoughtful and knowledgeable comments that have helped shape these standards.
Sincerely,
Cindy Zumwalt
Division Administrator
Early Childhood Education
Illinois State Board of Education
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Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
Development
of the Illinois Early Learning
and Development Standards
The Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards (2013) are a revised version of the original
Illinois Early Learning Standards published in 2002. They have been updated to align with
the Illinois Early Learning Guidelines for Children Birth to Age 3, with the Illinois Kindergarten
Standards, and with the Common Core State Standards for Kindergarten.
The Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards (IELDS) were developed in collaboration
with key Illinois stakeholders in the preschool education field. Early childhood leaders, educators,
practitioners, and policy experts came together to ensure the creation of an accessible, userfriendly document, presenting evidence-based and up-to-date information on preschool
development for parents and family members, teachers, early childhood professionals, and policy
makers. The goal is to ensure a document that aligns with and integrates into the complex system
of services for children in multiple preschool settings in the state and fulfills the ultimate goals of
improving program quality and strengthening the current systems. The IELDS are designed to be
used with children from ages 3 to 5 or those in the two years before their kindergarten year. The
term preschool is used rather than prekindergarten to recognize the inclusion of these two years
instead of only addressing the one year before kindergarten. In addition, the term teacher is used
to refer to any adult who works with preschool children in any early childhood setting.
From January to May 2013, a statewide field test of the IELDS was conducted. More than 300
participants reviewed and implemented the standards in their preschool environments and
provided feedback through focus group webinars. The field test participants included teachers
and administrators from state funded Preschool for All programs, Head Start, center-based child
care, family child care, special education, faith-based preschools, and park district programs. The
comments and recommendations from the field test were reviewed by a work group and, when
appropriate, incorporated into this final document. This collaborative approach in finalizing the
IELDS allowed for important decisions to be made by a diverse range of professionals representing
different areas of the field.
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Purposes
Purposes
of the Illinois Early Learning
and Development Standards
As with the Illinois Early Learning Guidelines for Children Birth to Age 3, there are multiple
purposes for the Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards. The IELDS:
1. Create a foundational understanding for families and teachers of what
children from 3 through 5 years of age are expected to know and do across multiple
developmental domains.
2. Improve the quality of care and learning through more intentional and
appropriate practices to support development from 3 through 5 years of age.
3. Provide support for a qualified workforce.
4. Enhance the state’s early childhood services by aligning preschool
standards with existing guidelines or standards for younger and older children.
5. Serve as a resource for those involved in developing and implementing policies for
children from 3 through 5 years of age.
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Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
Uses
of the Illinois Early Learning
and Development Standards
The Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards are designed to provide a cohesive
analysis of children’s development with common expectations and common language. They
are broad statements that provide teachers with useful information and direction that are needed
as part of the daily early childhood environment. Preschool educators can refer to the IELDS when
determining appropriate expectations for preschoolers, when planning for individual children’s
needs, when implementing a play-based curriculum, and when using authentic observational
assessment procedures.
There are appropriate and inappropriate uses of the Illinois Early Learning and Development
Standards. The IELDS are not intended to be a curriculum or assessment tool and are not an
exhaustive resource or checklist for children’s development.
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Terminology
Terminology
in the Illinois Early Learning
and Development Standards
The primary goal of the Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards (IELDS) is to provide
a comprehensive resource of reasonable expectations for the development of children in the
preschool years (ages 3 to 5) for all teachers across the state of Illinois. All domains or areas of
development are included so the focus is on the whole child.
Throughout the IELDS, terms are used to name the various components of the standards and to
describe the ways that preschool children show what they know and can do related to specific
benchmarks in each domain. It is important that teachers using the IELDS become familiar with this
terminology so they can understand the standards and use them in ways that are best for children.
In this way, no matter in what community or part of the state a teacher is working with young
children, s/he will be looking at the standards with the same understanding and application as
teachers elsewhere. This consistency of understanding makes application of the standards much
more reliable from teacher to teacher.
The following terms describe the major components or are used in the Introduction, Development,
Purposes, and Guiding Principles sections of the IELDS. In addition, action words that are used
throughout the preschool benchmarks (across all domains) are defined.
Major Components of the IELDS
Common Core State Standards Alignment
In the learning areas/domains of Language Arts and Mathematics, the IELDS Preschool
Benchmarks have been aligned with the kindergarten standards in the Common Core State
Standards (CCSS) Initiative for Kindergarten through Twelfth Grade. These standards were
developed in a state-led effort coordinated by the National Governors Association Center for Best
Practices (NGA Center) and the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) in partnership with
Achieve (NAEYC, 2012, p. 2). They are referred to as “the Common Core” and have been adopted by
45 states, including Illinois.
Developmentally Appropriate Practice (DAP)
These are recommended practices adopted by the National Association for the Education of
Young Children for the care and education of young children from birth through age 8 (Copple &
Bredekamp, 2009). Such practices address three key concerns:
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Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
1. What is known about child development and learning specific to different age groups from birth
through age 8?
2. What is known about each child as an individual?
3. What is known about the social and cultural contexts in which children live?
When a Learning Standard in the IELDS is determined to be “not applicable,” it is because it does
not match what is known about what’s appropriate for preschool-age children.
Goal
Provides an overview of or general statement about learning in the learning area/domain. Many of
the goals in the IELDS are consistent and aligned for all grade levels from preschool through high
school in the state of Illinois, but some goals in the IELDS are only appropriate for the preschool level.
Learning Areas/Domains
Reflect universal aspects of child development or subject areas for education from preschool
through high school. There are eight learning areas/domains in the IELDS. Most are consistent
and aligned for all grade levels from preschool through high school. In the state of Illinois, these
subject areas are Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, Physical Development
and Health, The Arts, English Language Learner Home Language Development, and
Social/Emotional Development.
Learning Standard
Defines what students/children should know and be able to do. Like the state goals, many learning
standards in the IELDS are aligned for all grade levels, preschool through high school. However,
not all learning standards are considered developmentally appropriate for the preschool years
and are identified as “Not applicable.” In some instances, the learning standards have been revised
so they are appropriate only for the preschool level.
Performance Descriptors
Give examples that describe small steps of progress that children may demonstrate as they
work toward preschool benchmarks. They are not intended to replace the IELDS nor are they
all-inclusive. They are a resource for voluntary use at the local level to enable teachers to better
recognize age-appropriate guidelines and expectations for preschool children. There are three
levels of performance descriptors in the IELDS: Exploring (the first level where a child is just
beginning to show some of the aspects of the benchmark), Developing (the second level where
the child is beginning to show more understanding or related skills), and Building (the description
of how a child demonstrates the benchmark as it is written). A child does not have to master
or perform every descriptor to show mastery of the preschool benchmark. And, a child may
demonstrate his or her capabilities related to a specific preschool benchmark in a different way
than described in the performance descriptors.
Preschool Benchmarks
Provide teachers with specific ways that preschool children demonstrate learning standards. The
benchmarks are unique to preschool children. Learning standards deemed “not applicable” do
not have identified preschool benchmarks.
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Terminology
Terms Used in the Introduction, Development,
Purposes, and Guiding Principles Sections of the IELDS
Adaptation or Accommodation
A change in the implementation of a curricular strategy that best meets the needs of a child.
Appropriate Curriculum
Curricular practices that match the age group of the children as well as adapt to meet individual
needs and respect cultural differences.
Assessment Tool
The IELDS is not an assessment tool. There are many commercially developed research-based
checklists and locally designed materials that teachers can use in observational assessment
practices to determine how each child is learning and growing across multiple domains. It is
important for teachers to make sure that the assessment tool they are using is aligned with
the IELDS.
Authentic Observational Assessment Procedures
Assessments based on teachers observing children in everyday activities including play, daily
routines, and large- and small-group times. Teachers determine best ways to document their
observations and relate them back to the developmental expectations or the IELDS.
Challenging Areas
The capabilities or skills that are more difficult for a child or that s/he has to work hard on in order
to accomplish them.
Challenging Experiences
Experiences that are at the edge of a child’s capabilities but not overly frustrating or overwhelming.
Checklist for Children’s Development
The IELDS is not a checklist for children’s development. It is a resource for preschool
teachers in the state of Illinois to define reasonable, agreed-upon expectations for preschool
children. Teachers may use research-based checklists that have been aligned to the IELDS for
assessment purposes.
Child-Initiated Activities
Activities that a child independently chooses to do and determines how to proceed.
Child’s Individuality
The unique characteristics about a child, such as personality, learning style, health issues, family
and cultural background, interests, strengths, and challenges.
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Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
Construct Understanding
As children play and explore, they figure out how things work and come to conclusions for
themselves that they continue to test and refine.
Curriculum
“Curriculum is everything that goes on in a program from the moment a child arrives until she
leaves. Teachers plan, implement, observe, reflect, and make adjustments based on individual
children’s needs and the needs of the group. Curriculum is an ongoing process that requires
teachers to think about child development, to observe how the children in their classroom are
learning and growing, and to make hundreds of decisions about the best ways to help them reach
their full potential.” (Gronlund, 2013, p. 31)
Developmental Delay or Disability
A significant lag in a child’s development identified by specialists through formal
assessment procedures.
Dynamic Interaction of Areas of Development
Development in one domain influences development in other domains. As children demonstrate
what they know and can do, they show their skills and capabilities in integrated ways rather than
in isolation.
Evidence-based
Educational practices based on research that supports their effectiveness.
Exhaustive Resource
The IELDS is not an exhaustive resource. The document does not capture every single aspect
of child development in the preschool years. Rather, it identifies the significant benchmarks in
multiple domains that the state of Illinois has deemed appropriate for preschool teachers to
incorporate into the curriculum for young children.
Growth Patterns
Identified trends in children’s development of skills and capabilities in various domains and in
accomplishment of benchmarks.
High Expectations
Expectations that are appropriate for leading the development of young children and help
teachers determine goals for planning.
Individualized Education Program (IEP)
A legal document that identifies the delay or disability that qualifies a child for special education
services, the type of services to be provided, the goals for such services, and any accommodations
needed to assist a child.
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Terminology
Intentional Practices
Teaching with purpose, with goals in mind for the group of children as well as for each individual
child, and being planful in implementing those goals in a variety of ways in a preschool program.
Parents or Family Members
The primary caregivers of the child in his or her home setting.
Play
Opportunities for children to explore, investigate, and discover things about their world and
themselves. Play requires an interesting, well-organized environment and ample time for children
to get deeply engaged. Teachers act as facilitators and coaches as children play.
Play-based Curriculum
Curricular practices that incorporate a significant portion of the day for children to play with
materials and with other children while teachers facilitate and guide the play so it is beneficial
and full of learning opportunities for the children. A planned and organized environment is an
important part of play-based curriculum with interesting and engaging materials and clear
purposes for their use (e.g., dress-up clothes for dramatic play, blocks for building, art materials
for creating).
Prekindergarten
A program that serves children in the year before their kindergarten year.
Preschool
A program that serves children from ages 3 to 5 or in the two years before their kindergarten year.
Proficiency or Mastery
Being very good at or accomplishing the skills or application of skills identified in a benchmark.
Programmatic Goals
The overall goals a preschool has for the children who attend (e.g., to love learning, to get along
with others, to gain preschool skills in all domains).
Range of Skills and Competencies
The levels or strengths and weaknesses of children’s performance in various domains.
Reasonable Expectations
Expectations that are appropriate for the age of the children. The IELDS standards and
benchmarks were designed and reviewed by nationally recognized content experts.
Scaffolding or Assistance
The help or support a teacher (or a peer) gives to a child as s/he engages in a challenging
experience that is not quite in his or her range of competency.
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Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
Strengths
The capabilities or skills that are easy for a child or that s/he does very well.
Teacher-initiated Activities
Activities that the teacher has chosen, designed, or invited children’s participation in and/or leads.
Teachers, Early Childhood Professionals
Any adult who works with preschool children in any type of early childhood program or setting.
Work Collaboratively with Families
To join in partnership with families determining mutual goals that are in the child’s best interests.
Action Words Used Throughout
the Preschool Benchmarks
Begin to
To take initial steps or actions or demonstrate something inconsistently.
Compare
To examine or consider something (an object, a person, an idea, etc.) for similarities
and differences.
Demonstrate
To show through actions and/or words understanding of a concept or ability to perform a skill.
Describe
To tell about something in words (an object, a person, an experience, etc.).
Develop
To become more capable at a skill, to add more detail to a verbally expressed idea, to create
something with a beginning point and add to it.
Differentiate
To determine what is not the same through actions and/or words.
Discuss
To talk with others.
Engage
To become involved in or take part in an activity of some sort.
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Terminology
Exhibit
To demonstrate understanding or capability to others through words and/or actions.
Explore or Experiment With
To interact with a set of materials or items to discover their characteristics and possibilities, to try
things out through trial and error, or to test a particular hypothesis.
Express
To communicate with others through facial expressions, gestures, words, and/or actions.
Identify
To verbally name, label, or, in some cases, to point to or act upon showing understanding of an
expressed question to distinguish certain items.
Name
To verbally identify or label.
Participate
To join others in an activity, conversation, or discussion.
Recite
To say something that has a set pattern, such as the alphabet or the counting order of numbers.
Recognize
To show understanding of distinctive items, such as numerals, letters, or shapes by naming,
identifying, grouping, touching, and/or pointing to them.
Show
To demonstrate understanding of a concept or ability to perform a skill through actions and/
or words.
Understand
To comprehend the meaning of a concept or term and use words or actions accordingly to
demonstrate such comprehension.
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Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
Guiding Principles
Early learning and development are multidimensional. Developmental
domains are highly interrelated.
Development in one domain influences development in other domains. For example, a child’s
language skills affect his or her ability to engage in social interactions. Therefore, developmental
domains cannot be considered in isolation from each other. The dynamic interaction of all areas
of development must be considered. Standards and preschool benchmarks listed for each domain
could also be cited in different domains.
Young children are capable and competent.
All children are potentially capable of positive developmental outcomes. Regardless of children’s
backgrounds and experiences, teachers are intentional in matching goals and experiences to
children’s learning and development and in providing challenging experiences to promote each
child’s progress and interest. There should be high expectations for all young children so that
teachers help them to reach their fullest potential.
Children are individuals who develop at different rates.
Each child is unique. Each grows and develops skills and competencies at his or her own pace.
Teachers get to know each child well and differentiate their curricular planning to recognize
the rate of development for each child in each domain. Some children may have an identified
developmental delay or disability that may require teachers to adapt the expectations set out
in the Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards and to make accommodations in
experiences. Goals set for children who have an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) reflect these
adaptations and accommodations so that individual children can be supported as they work
toward particular preschool benchmarks.
Children will exhibit a range of skills and competencies in any
domain of development.
All children within an age group should not be expected to arrive at each preschool benchmark
at the same time or to show mastery to the same degree. Children may show strengths in some
domains and be more challenged in others. Teachers recognize each child‘s individuality and
plan curricular strategies that support the child as a learner by building on his or her strengths
and providing scaffolding and support in more challenging areas. There is no expectation that
every child will master every preschool benchmark. Teachers work with children to meet them
where they are and help them continue to make small steps of progress toward each preschool
benchmark. There also is recognition that some children may go beyond mastery of the preschool
expectations. Teachers plan for challenging experiences for these children to help them continue
to grow, develop, and learn.
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Guiding Principles
Knowledge of how children grow and develop—together with
expectations that are consistent with growth patterns—are essential
to develop, implement, and maximize the benefits of educational
experiences for children.
The Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards provide reasonable expectations for
preschool children (ages 3 to 5). They give teachers a common language—defining what they
can expect preschool children to know and be able to do within the context of child growth
and development. With this knowledge, teachers can make sound decisions about appropriate
curriculum for the group and for individual children.
Young children learn through active exploration of their environment in
child-initiated and teacher-initiated activities.
Early childhood teachers recognize that children’s play is a highly supportive context for
development and learning. The early childhood environment should provide opportunities for
children to explore materials, engage in activities, and interact with peers and adults to construct
understanding of the world around them. There should, therefore, be a balance of child-initiated
and teacher-initiated activities to maximize learning. Teachers act as guides and facilitators
most of the time, carefully planning the environment and helping children explore and play in
productive, meaningful ways. They incorporate the preschool benchmarks into all play areas, daily
routines, and teacher-led activities.
Families are the primary caregivers and educators of young children.
Teachers communicate in a variety of ongoing ways with families to inform them of programmatic
goals, experiences that are best provided for preschool children, and expectations for their
performance by the end of the preschool years. Teachers and families work collaboratively to
ensure that children are provided optimal learning experiences.
Adapted from Preschool Curriculum Framework and Benchmarks for Children in Preschool Programs (1999).
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Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
How to Navigate
1. Learning Area/Domain is listed at the top of each page. There are eight learning areas
comprising eight sections of the document. The “English Language Learner Home Language
Development” learning area has replaced the “Foreign Language” learning area. Each learning
area has a brief introduction.
2. Goal provides an overview of the subject or learning area. Goals are the most general
statements about learning. Some of the goals are consistent and aligned for all grade levels,
prekindergarten through high school. Others are more specific to the preschool years.
3. Learning Standards are aligned under each goal and define what students/children should
know, understand, and be able to do. Like the goals, the learning standard remains the same for
most of the document for all grade levels, prekindergarten through high school, while some are
more specific to the preschool years.
4. Preschool Benchmarks provide
teachers with specific ways that
preschool children demonstrate
learning standards. Learning standards
deemed “not applicable” do not have
preschool benchmarks.
1
2
3
4
5
5. Example Performance Descriptors
give examples that describe small
steps of progress that children may
demonstrate as they work toward
preschool benchmarks. There are three
levels of performance descriptors:
Exploring, Developing, and Building. A
child does not have to master or perform
every descriptor to show mastery of the
preschool benchmark.
6. Common Core State Standards (CCSS)
Alignment in the Language Arts and
Mathematics domains shows the CCSS
kindergarten standards that the IELDS
goals, standards, and benchmarks
build toward.
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6
For Preschool
3 YEARS OLD TO KINDERGARTEN ENROLLMENT AGE
Illinois Early Learning
and Development
Standards
Language Arts
Language Arts
In her family child care home, Rosalie cares for children of multiple ages with different
language capabilities. She knows that conversations with all of the children are important
to develop their listening skills, their vocabulary, and their ability to express themselves. So,
she talks with them often and listens carefully to how they communicate. For her preschool
children, she listens as they tell her about things that happened at home the night before or
plans their family has for a trip to Grandma’s house or a visit to the park. She asks questions
to encourage them to expand on their descriptions and tell her more, and she invites them
to ask questions of each other. She finds books related to their interests and reads them to
the children, then encourages them to look at the books on their own, noticing the pictures
and describing what they see or retelling the stories in their own words. She provides writing
materials for her 3- to 4-year-olds in a variety of play areas (yet safely away from the fingers
and mouths of her mobile infants and young toddlers). She loves it when a child brings her a
grocery list full of scribbles or a letter telling her, “It says ‘I love you.’” She reads the scribbles
and marks with the child, validating his or her efforts to communicate through writing.
And, she communicates with her families to let them know just what to expect of their
preschoolers as they learn more about how language works.
The domain of Language Arts includes Preschool
Benchmarks in: Listening, Speaking, Reading, and Writing
Preschool children’s language skills are some of the best predictors of reading success in first and
second grade. Their use of language to listen and speak, as well as their understanding of reading
and writing, will be critical to their academic success in the early elementary grades. Effective
language and literacy instruction for young children go hand in hand. Young children are learning
how to communicate what they want their listeners to know, how to play with language, how to
interact with books, how to understand and tell stories, and how to begin to write as a form of
communication. Language arts instruction for preschool children involves helping children gain
the skills they need to function socially and in their daily lives. While teachers plan for engaging
language and literacy experiences, they are also flexible, with room for spontaneity as children
joyfully express themselves, explore books and stories, experiment with writing, and listen and
learn together.
Preschool teachers pay attention to each child’s capabilities in language arts, recognizing that
while there are developmental sequences, each child will demonstrate her capabilities in her own
ways and at her own pace. Therefore, teachers are ever ready to provide individualized assistance
and support to the child when needed. In fact, many of the preschool benchmarks in the
Language Arts domain are written with the expectation that children will receive such assistance
from their teacher. Preschool teachers recognize that mastery of listening, speaking, reading, or
writing is not something to expect of preschoolers; rather, skills and understandings are emerging
and need teacher support to develop.
Effective preschool teachers help young children develop both their expressive and receptive
language. Teachers model the correct use of grammar and the pragmatics of communicating with
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LANGUAGE ARTS
|
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
others. They help children learn to speak clearly and correctly, to carry on conversations, and to
ask questions. They are attentive to the child’s home language (if it is not English) and turn to the
English Language Learner Home Language Development domain of the IELDS to best address the
child’s overall language needs.
|
LANGUAGE ARTS
Meaningful and interesting experiences are provided in preschool classrooms that introduce
new vocabulary words to children and help expand their abilities to express themselves. “There
is a direct correlation between vocabulary development and academic success, so students’
acquisition of new words should be emphasized from the start” (Resnick & Sow, 2009, p. 73).
Preschool children need
• many opportunities to hear and use a variety of new and interesting words,
• encouragement to express themselves in more than a single sentence, and
• time to tell stories and give explanations that involve the use of several sentences.
Preschool teachers also help children learn to listen. Adult language modeling is important!
Teachers model how to use language to request information, how to appropriately acknowledge
the communication and conversation attempts of others, and how to provide appropriate answers
and responses to others’ requests for information. To develop language, preschool children
need to be immersed in an environment rich in language. They need opportunities to engage in
frequent conversations—to talk and listen with responsive adults and with their peers.
Helping children attend to the sounds of language is another important part of language
development. Preschool teachers plan engaging ways to develop phonological and phonemic
awareness, important precursors to phonics. Phonological awareness is the general ability
to attend to the sounds of language as distinct from its meaning. Phonemic awareness is the
understanding that every spoken word can be conceived as a sequence of individual sounds.
Preschool teachers plan activities that develop skills such as noticing words that sound alike,
rhyming, and counting syllables in words. Many activities used to develop phonemic awareness
can also be used to introduce letters of the alphabet, help children recognize the relationship
between spoken and written words, and build the understanding that sounds are represented by
letters that are combined to form words. Singing songs, chanting rhymes and poems, and playing
with the sounds of words, syllables, and letters are beginning steps toward phonemic awareness.
One of the best ways to help children naturally develop phonemic awareness and other emergent
reading skills is through the use of children’s books. Many books lend themselves to playing with
the sounds of language. They are rich with rhymes, alliteration, and predictable patterns such as
Chicka Chicka Boom Boom (Martin, 1989). Children love playing with language through listening to
and repeating rhymes, inventing nonsense words, and saying silly sentences.
In order for children to view reading as a skill they desire, they need to hear the language of print
in all its forms and be exposed to a variety of texts. They need to laugh at books such as Clifford the
Big Red Dog (Bridwell, 1995), learn interesting facts about animals in informational picture books
such as What Do You Do With a Tail Like This? (Jenkins & Page, 2003), and enjoy reciting rhymes in
stories such as “Little Miss Muffet” and other examples of alliterative and rhyming verse. Preschool
teachers offer book-sharing experiences with individual children and in small and large groups.
They discuss books with children, helping them to learn more about authors and illustrators and
building their reading comprehension by identifying key events and talking about characters
and settings. In such discussions, they help children make personal connections with books,
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Language Arts
comparing and contrasting stories or informational texts to their own lives. They set up a library
area and provide books in other play areas so children can look at books alone and with others
and can use them to enhance their play (e.g., looking at a book about buildings when building
with blocks).
Understanding concepts of books and print is critical to the development of subsequent reading
abilities. For example, young children need to know the orientation of the book (that books
are read from front to back and from left to right) and how to turn the pages with care. With
more exposure, they begin to see that pictures and words convey meaning and that letters are
combined to form words that are separated by spaces. High-quality preschool environments offer
children plenty of good books and time for reading and discussing them with adults and peers. In
addition, preschool teachers recognize that each child experiments with different aspects of the
reading process. Very few preschool children are able to identify unfamiliar words. Instead, they
imitate what they have seen their family members and teachers do. For example, they hold a book
and retell a story from the pictures. The story they tell may be closely related to the content of the
book or it may not. Some preschool children figure out that the print on the page is important
and consistent and may follow along by tracing over words with their fingers. It is important
that preschool teachers accept and celebrate these legitimate stages in emergent reading and
recognize that “picture reading” is an appropriate form of “real reading” for preschool children.
Encouraging children’s emergent writing efforts is one way to provide young children with
opportunities to apply their growing knowledge of print concepts, alphabet letters, and sounds.
Preschool teachers surround children with print and call attention to letters and words in the
environment. They also make a special effort to help children learn to recognize their names and
to develop the prerequisite understandings and fine-motor skills necessary for writing them. They
provide plenty of meaningful writing opportunities so that children experiment with their writing
skills. And again, they celebrate whatever efforts each child makes to express him or herself
through writing. They let preschool children know that their scribbles, their pretend letters, and
their invented spellings are okay. In fact, these beginning attempts are important milestones in the
literacy journey.
All children need to feel confident about their growing understandings and abilities in using and
understanding language and in emergent reading and writing. In other words, they need to be in a
preschool program where the climate is conducive to exploring language, print, and books; where
they feel accepted and encouraged to express themselves and to take risks in their initial attempts
at reading, writing, and spelling; and where they feel both challenged and supported as they strive
to increase their skills and abilities.
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LANGUAGE ARTS
|
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
GOAL 1
Demonstrate increasing competence in oral communication (listening and speaking).
1.A
|
LANGUAGE ARTS
LEARNING STANDARD 1.A
Demonstrate understanding through age-appropriate responses.
1
Preschool Benchmarks
1.A.ECa
Follow simple one-, two- and three-step directions.
1.A.ECb
Respond appropriately to questions from others.
1.A.ECc
Provide comments relevant to the context.
1.A.ECd
Identify emotions from facial expressions and body language.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Perform one-step directions stated
orally (e.g., “Throw your paper towel
in the trash can.”).
Perform two-step directions stated
orally (e.g., “Get your coats on and
line up to go outside.”).
Perform three-step directions stated
orally (e.g., “Put your paper in your
cubby, wash your hands, and come
sit on the rug.”).
Answer simple questions
stated orally with a simple reply
(e.g., “yes,” “no”).
Respond to simple questions stated
orally with appropriate actions
(e.g., “Did you remember to wash
your hands?” and the child goes to
the sink and washes hands).
Respond to simple questions stated
orally with appropriate actions and
comments (e.g., “Did you remember
to wash your hands?” and the child
says “Oh, I forgot!” and goes to the
sink and washes hands).
Make one comment that is related
to the topic of the conversation or
discussion (e.g., “I have a dog, too.”).
Make more than one comment
related to the topic of the
conversation or discussion
(e.g., “I have a dog, too. His name
is Champ.”).
Make comments and ask questions
that are related to the topic of the
conversation or discussion (e.g., “I
have a dog, too. His name is Champ.
What’s your dog’s name?”).
Look at a person’s face or body
language and ask how s/he feels
(e.g., “What’s wrong with her,
teacher? Did she get hurt?”).
Look at a person’s face to
determine how they feel (e.g., “She
looks mad.”).
Look at a person’s body language
to determine how they are feeling
(e.g., “He’s sitting there all by himself.
I think he’s sad, teacher.”).
1 Aligns with the Kindergarten Common Core, Speaking and Listening 2-3.
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Language Arts
LEARNING STANDARD 1.B
Communicate effectively using language appropriate to the situation and audience.
2
Preschool Benchmarks
LANGUAGE ARTS
1.B.ECa
Use language for a variety of purposes.
1.B.ECb
With teacher assistance, participate in collaborative conversations with diverse
partners (e.g., peers and adults in both small and large groups) about age-appropriate
topics and texts.
1.B.ECc
Continue a conversation through two or more exchanges.
1.B.ECd
Engage in agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening, making eye contact,
taking turns speaking).
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Ask for help when needed.
Use language to interact socially
with others during various times
of the day (e.g., group time, center
time, outdoor play, meal time).
Use language to influence the
behavior of others (e.g., “That hurt
when you pushed into me.”).
With teacher assistance, tell
something to peers and adults in
small- and whole-group situations
about age-appropriate topics
(e.g., Teacher: “Can you tell us what
your idea is?” Child to group in block
area: “I want to build a big boat.”)
With teacher assistance, converse
with peers and adults (with one
back-and-forth exchange) in smalland whole-group situations about
age-appropriate topics (e.g., Child to
another child: “My Grandma lives in
Florida. Where does your Grandma
live?” Other child: “In Chicago.” First
child: “Do you go see her there?”).
With teacher assistance, converse with
peers and adults (with more than one
back-and-forth exchange) in smalland whole-group situations about
age-appropriate topics (e.g., Teacher:
“How many of you played in the
snow yesterday?” Child: “I did. I went
sledding.” Another child: “Me too! I saw
you there.” First child: “I was with my
Dad and sister. Who were you with?”
Second child: “My Mom. My Dad was
at work. I got really cold.” First child:
“Me too!”).
Use one appropriate conversational
skill, such as listening to others,
making appropriate eye contact,
or taking turns speaking about the
topics and texts under discussion
(e.g., in the library, yells to friend,
“Hey, wanna read this book together?
It’s my favorite.” When friend joins
him, he looks at his friend but does
all of the talking.).
Use two appropriate conversational
skills, such as listening to others,
making appropriate eye contact, or
taking turns speaking about the topics
and texts under discussion (e.g., while
pretending to cook in the dramatic
play area, child says, “Pretend we’re
the sisters.” Other child says, “I don’t
want to be a sister. I want to be the
Mom.” Other child replies without
looking at her, “But you have to be
the sister. We don’t have a Mom.” The
other child leaves the area.).
Use more than two appropriate
conversational skills, such as listening
to others, making appropriate eye
contact, and taking turns speaking
about the topics and texts under
discussion (e.g., at snack time, talking
about seeing the latest “Cars” movie
and looking at each other, listening,
and taking turns speaking).
2 Aligns with Kindergarten Common Core, Speaking and Listening 1-1a, 1-1b.
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1.B
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
LEARNING STANDARD 1.C
Use language to convey information and ideas.
3
1.C
|
LANGUAGE ARTS
Preschool Benchmarks
1.C.ECa
Describe familiar people, places, things, and events and, with teacher assistance,
provide additional detail.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
With teacher assistance, tell about
a favorite toy or other object during
a show-and-tell experience or when
talking to a teacher at arrival time
(e.g., “It’s my new stuffed turtle. See,
his head goes in and out.”).
With teacher assistance, tell about
a family experience at home or a
special family event (e.g., “It was
my baby sister’s birthday. We had a
cake, and she smooshed it all over
her face.”).
Share information about a personal
experience and, with teacher
assistance, provide additional detail
(Child: “I’m going to my aunt’s house
for a barbecue. I hope we have hot
dogs.” Teacher: “What else do you
think you’ll have?” Child: “Maybe
chips. And popsicles.” Teacher: “Do
you like popsicles? What flavor?”
Child: “I like the orange ones.”).
3 Aligns with Kindergarten Common Core, Speaking and Listening 4 and 6.
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Language Arts
LEARNING STANDARD 1.D
Speak using conventions of Standard English.
4
Preschool Benchmarks
LANGUAGE ARTS
1.D.ECa
With teacher assistance, use complete sentences in speaking with peers and adults in
individual and group situations.
1.D.ECb
Speak using age-appropriate conventions of Standard English grammar and usage.
1.D.ECc
Understand and use question words in speaking.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
With teacher assistance, speak
in simple sentences that are
usually, though not always,
grammatically correct.
With teacher assistance, speak in
sentences that use regular plural
nouns by adding /s/ or /es/ (e.g., dog,
dogs; wish, wishes) in speaking.
With teacher assistance, speak in
sentences that use an increasing
number of pronouns (e.g., she,
he, her, him, their, his, our, myself,
yourself, herself, mine, me, you),
though not always appropriately.
Use negatives (no, not) appropriately.
Add /ed/ to words to indicate
past tense (e.g., walk, walked;
rain, rained), though not always
appropriately, and begin to use past
tense negatives (wasn’t, weren’t),
though not always appropriately.
Use irregular verbs (e.g., ate, sang,
swam) and nouns (mice, geese),
though not always appropriately.
Use one or two of the most
frequently occurring prepositions
(e.g., to, from, in, out, on, off, for, of,
by, with) in speaking.
Use three or four of the most
frequently occurring prepositions
(e.g., to, from, in, out, on, off, for, of, by,
with) in speaking.
Use more than four of the most
frequently occurring prepositions
(e.g., to, from, in, out, on, off, for, of,
by, with) in speaking.
Answer and ask questions that begin
with “who” or “what”.
Answer and ask questions that begin
with “where” or “when”.
Answer and ask questions that begin
with “who”, “what”, “where”, “when”,
“why”, and “how”.
4 Aligns with Kindergarten Common Core, Speaking and Listening 6, Language 1a -2d.
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1.D
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
LEARNING STANDARD 1.E
Use increasingly complex phrases, sentences, and vocabulary.
5
1.E
|
LANGUAGE ARTS
Preschool Benchmarks
1.E.ECa
With teacher assistance, begin to use increasingly complex sentences.
1.E.ECb
Exhibit curiosity and interest in learning new words heard in conversations and books.
1.E.ECc
With teacher assistance, use new words acquired through conversations and
book-sharing experiences.
1.E.ECd
With teacher assistance, explore word relationships to understand the concepts
represented by common categories of words (e.g., food, clothing, vehicles).
1.E.ECe
With teacher assistance, use adjectives to describe people, places, and things.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
With teacher assistance, make
sentences more complex by
adding modifiers or auxiliary verbs
(e.g., “I want the sparkly one.”
“He was running.”).
With teacher assistance, combine
two short sentences (e.g., “I have
a dog. He can jump.”) into one
longer sentence (“I have a dog,
and he can jump.”).
With teacher assistance, use
complex sentences to express
more complicated relationships
(e.g., “When my Mom comes,
I’m going to Target.”).
With teacher assistance, repeat
new words that have been heard
aloud (e.g., Child: “What kind of
dinosaur is it again?” Teacher:
“Tyrannosaurus rex.” Child: “Oh yeah,
Tyrannosaurus rex.”).
Ask questions about unfamiliar
words (e.g., “What does ___ mean?”).
With teacher assistance, attempt to
use new words that have been heard
aloud in one’s own speaking (e.g., “I
saw a gigantic bug outside.”).
With teacher assistance, sort objects
into categories (e.g., clothing, toys,
food) to gain an understanding of
the underlying concepts.
With teacher assistance, begin
to label sorted categories of
objects (e.g., “I put all of the blue
blocks together.”).
With teacher assistance, label and
describe categories of objects
(e.g., “These are all the fruits. You
can eat them.”).
With teacher assistance, use
descriptive words to explain how
a familiar person, place, or thing
looks (e.g., describing a pet or a
favorite food).
With teacher assistance, use
descriptive words to explain how a
familiar person, place, or thing looks
and feels (e.g., describing a pet or a
favorite food).
With teacher assistance, use
descriptive words to explain how
a familiar person, place, or thing
looks and feels, as well as describing
how it sounds, smells, and/or
tastes (e.g., describing a pet or a
favorite food).
5 Aligns with Kindergarten Common Core, Listening 4, 4a, and 5, Language 4b, 5a-5d, 6.
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Language Arts
GOAL 2
Demonstrate understanding and enjoyment of literature.
LEARNING STANDARD 2.A
LANGUAGE ARTS
Demonstrate interest in stories and books.
6
Preschool Benchmarks
2.A.ECa
Engage in book-sharing experiences with purpose and understanding.
2.A.ECb
Look at books independently, pretending to read.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Show interest in reading or in
written text by enjoying listening to
books read aloud.
Show interest in reading or in
written text by asking to be read to.
Show interest in reading or in
written text by asking the meaning
of something that’s written.
Make a comment while looking at
the pictures in a book.
Describe what they see while
looking at the pictures in a book.
Tell a story while looking at the
pictures in a book.
Incorporate books into dramatic
play, such as reading to a baby doll
or stuffed animal.
Incorporate books and other written
materials into dramatic play, such as
reading from a real or pretend menu.
Incorporate books and other written
materials into dramatic play on a
regular basis.
6 Aligns with Kindergarten Common Core, Reading Literature 10, Reading Foundational Skills 4.
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2.A
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
LEARNING STANDARD 2.B
Recognize key ideas and details in stories.
7
2.B
|
LANGUAGE ARTS
Preschool Benchmarks
2.B.ECa
With teacher assistance, ask and answer questions about books read aloud.
2.B.ECb
With teacher assistance, retell familiar stories with three or more key events.
2.B.ECc
With teacher assistance, identify main character(s) of the story.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
With teacher assistance, ask and
answer simple questions about
a story related to a particular
character, action, or picture in
the storybook.
With teacher assistance, ask and
answer simple questions about a
story by describing what happened.
With teacher assistance, ask and
answer simple questions about a
story by telling how a particular
character might feel or predicting
what might happen next.
With teacher assistance, use props
(e.g., pictures, puppets, flannel
pieces) to retell a well-known story
with one or two correct details.
With teacher assistance, use props
(e.g., pictures, puppets, flannel
pieces) to retell a well-known story
with more than two correct details.
With teacher assistance, use props
(e.g., pictures, puppets, flannel
pieces) to retell a well-known story
with most of the correct details in
the flow of the story.
With teacher assistance, recall
something about one main
character in the story (e.g., it’s a dog;
he’s red).
With teacher assistance, recall
something about more than one
main character in the story.
With teacher assistance, recall most
of the main character(s) in the story
and tell something about them.
7 Aligns with Kindergarten Common Core, Reading Literature 1-4, Reading Informational Text 1-2, 4.
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Language Arts
LEARNING STANDARD 2.C
Recognize concepts of books.
8
Preschool Benchmarks
LANGUAGE ARTS
2.C.ECa
Interact with a variety of types of texts (e.g., storybooks, poems, rhymes, songs).
2.C.ECb
Identify the front and back covers of books and display the correct orientation of books
and page-turning skills.
2.C.ECc
With teacher assistance, describe the role of an author and illustrator.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Enjoy listening to and pretending
to read different types of texts
(e.g., picture books and predictable
books with repetitive patterns).
Enjoy listening to and pretending
to read different types of texts
(e.g., simple storybooks).
Enjoy listening to and pretending
to read different types of texts
(e.g., more complex and lengthy
storybooks or books with poems,
rhymes, and/or songs).
Hold books with front cover
facing up.
Turn pages correctly, moving from
front of book to the back.
Look at page on the left then page
on the right.
With teacher assistance, begin to
show interest when told about
the role of an author or illustrator
(e.g., sees similarities in Eric
Carle books).
With teacher assistance, respond
appropriately to questions such
as “What do we call the name of the
person who writes the book?”
With teacher assistance, respond
appropriately to questions such
as “What do we call the name of the
person who writes the book and the
person who draws the pictures?”
8 Aligns with Kindergarten Common Core, Reading Literature 5-6, Reading Informational Text 5-6.
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2.C
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
LEARNING STANDARD 2.D
Establish personal connections with books.
9
2.D
|
LANGUAGE ARTS
Preschool Benchmarks
2.D.ECa
With teacher assistance, discuss illustrations in books and make personal connections
to the pictures and story.
2.D.ECb
With teacher assistance, compare and contrast two stories relating to the same topic.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
With teacher assistance, talk about
the pictures in a book (e.g., describe
what they see on each page, tell
how the characters look).
With teacher assistance, make
personal comments about how
the pictures are like something in
their lives.
With teacher assistance, make
personal comments about how the
story is like something in their lives.
With teacher assistance, discuss
how the pictures in two books are
alike and/or different (e.g., noticing
that photographs of real animals are
used in one book and drawings are
used in another).
With teacher assistance, discuss
how the characters in two books are
alike and/or different.
With teacher assistance, discuss
how the plot, storyline, or actions in
two books are alike and/or different.
9 Aligns with Kindergarten Common Core, Reading Informational Text 7, 9-10, Reading Literature 7, 9.
| 32 |
Language Arts
GOAL 3
Demonstrate interest in and understanding of informational text.
LEARNING STANDARD 3.A
LANGUAGE ARTS
Recognize key ideas and details in nonfiction text.
10
Preschool Benchmarks
3.A.ECa
With teacher assistance, ask and answer questions about details in a nonfiction book.
3.A.ECb
With teacher assistance, retell detail(s) about main topic in a nonfiction book.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
With teacher assistance, look at the
pictures or text in a nonfiction book.
With teacher assistance, ask and
answer simple questions about the
pictures or text in a nonfiction book.
With teacher assistance, look at
pictures in an informational book
to find an answer to a question
(e.g., looking to see what a tadpole
looks like and how it is different from
a frog).
With teacher assistance, identify one
important fact in a nonfiction book
heard read aloud.
With teacher assistance, identify
more than one important fact from a
nonfiction book heard read aloud.
With teacher assistance, recall
important facts from a nonfiction
book heard read aloud.
LEARNING STANDARD 3.B
Recognize features of nonfiction books.
11
Preschool Benchmarks
3.B.ECa
With teacher assistance, identify basic similarities and differences in pictures and
information found in two texts on the same topic.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
With teacher assistance, talk about
how the pictures in two books
about the same topic are alike
and different (e.g., noticing that
photographs are used in one book
and drawings in another book on
the same topic).
With teacher assistance, talk about
how the facts in two books about
the same topic are alike and
different (e.g., in two books about
construction vehicles, notice that one
includes two kinds of dump trucks).
With teacher assistance, talk about
how the pictures and facts in two
books about the same topic are
alike and different (e.g., in two books
about birds, notice that they both
have many birds with red beaks and
show different kinds of nests).
10 Aligns with Kindergarten Common Core, Reading Informational Text 1-3.
11 Aligns with Kindergarten Common Core, Reading Informational Text 7-9.
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3.B
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
GOAL 4
Demonstrate increasing awareness of and competence in emergent reading skills and abilities.
4.A
|
LANGUAGE ARTS
LEARNING STANDARD 4.A
Demonstrate understanding of the organization and basic features of print.
12
Preschool Benchmarks
4.A.ECa
Recognize the differences between print and pictures.
4.A.ECb
Begin to follow words from left to right, top to bottom, and page by page.
4.A.ECc
Recognize the one-to-one relationship between spoken and written words.
4.A.ECd
Understand that words are separated by spaces in print.
4.A.ECe
Recognize that letters are grouped to form words.
4.A.ECf
Differentiate letters from numerals.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Identify that labels and signs in the
classroom are words.
Ask to have words read (e.g., “What
does this say?”).
Seek out print to gather information
(e.g., check the attendance chart to
see who is at school today; check
the job chart to see whose turn it is
to feed the fish).
During shared reading experiences,
practice tracking from page to page
with the group.
During shared reading experiences,
practice tracking print from top to
bottom of the page.
During shared reading experiences,
practice tracking print from left to
right and top to bottom of the page.
Point to one word (e.g., “Can you
show me just one word?).
Correctly identify that two words
are presented.
Count number of words on a
page or in a line of print in a book
containing just a few words on the
page (e.g., “How many words are on
this page? Can you count them?”).
Point to a single letter (e.g., “Can
you show me just one letter?”).
Count number of letters in own
name (e.g., “How many letters are in
your name? Can you count them?”).
Count number of letters in one or
more friends’ or family members’
names (e.g., “How many letters are
in this name? Can you count them?”).
Distinguish one letter from
one numeral.
Distinguish two or three letters from
two or three numerals.
Sort more than three letters and
numerals into separate groups.
12 Aligns with Kindergarten Common Core, Reading Foundational Skills 1-1c.
| 34 |
Language Arts
LEARNING STANDARD 4.B
Demonstrate an emerging knowledge and understanding of the alphabet.
13
Preschool Benchmarks
LANGUAGE ARTS
4.B.ECa
With teacher assistance, recite the alphabet.
4.B.ECb
Recognize and name some upper/lowercase letters of the alphabet, especially those
in own name.
4.B.ECc
With teacher assistance, match some upper/lowercase letters of the alphabet.
4.B.ECd
With teacher assistance, begin to form some letters of the alphabet, especially those
in own name.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
With teacher assistance, sing
or chant part of the alphabet
with others.
With teacher assistance, sing or
chant part of the alphabet alone or
with others.
With teacher assistance, sing, chant,
or recite the alphabet alone or
with others.
Point to and name some letters
in own name.
Point to and name most letters in
own name.
Point to and name letters in own
name and some other upper/
lowercase letters.
With teacher assistance, engage in
letter sorting and matching activities
(e.g., find two magnetic letters that
look exactly the same).
With teacher assistance, engage in
letter sorting and matching activities
(e.g., from a small container of
letters, locate all the m’s).
With teacher assistance, engage
in letter sorting and matching
activities (e.g., locate letters that are
and are not in own name).
With teacher assistance, use
a small group of letters that
represent both upper and lower
case (e.g., Ss, Mm, Oo, Pp) to match
one upper- and lowercase letter
(may be from own name).
With teacher assistance, use a small
group of letters that represent both
upper and lower case (e.g., Ss, Mm,
Oo, Pp) to match two to three upperand lowercase letters.
With teacher assistance, use a small
group of letters that represent both
upper and lower case (e.g., Ss, Mm,
Oo, Pp) to match more than three
upper- and lowercase letters.
13 Aligns with Kindergarten Common Core, Reading Foundational Skills 1d.
| 35 |
|
4.B
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
LEARNING STANDARD 4.C
Demonstrate an emerging understanding of spoken words, syllables, and sounds (phonemes).
14
4.C
|
LANGUAGE ARTS
Preschool Benchmarks
4.C.ECa
Recognize that sentences are made up of separate words.
4.C.ECb
With teacher assistance, recognize and match words that rhyme.
4.C.ECc
Demonstrate ability to segment and blend syllables in words (e.g., “trac/tor, tractor”).
4.C.ECd
With teacher assistance, isolate and pronounce the initial sounds in words.
4.C.ECe
With teacher assistance, blend sounds (phonemes) in one-syllable words
(e.g., /c/ /a/ /t/ = cat).
4.C.ECf
With teacher assistance, begin to segment sounds (phonemes) in one-syllable words
(e.g., cat = /c/ /a/ /t/).
4.C.ECg
With teacher assistance, begin to manipulate sounds (phonemes) in words
(e.g., changing cat to hat to mat).
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Recognize words forming sentences
as s/he dictates to the teacher.
Show awareness of words in a
sentence (e.g., clap each word in
a sentence).
Indicate the number of words in a
sentence (e.g., count each word in
a sentence).
With teacher assistance, recite finger
plays, chants, rhymes, and poems
containing rhyming words.
With teacher assistance, provide
rhyming words in songs, poems,
or books with a rhyming pattern
(e.g., “Jack and Jill went up
the ____.”).
With teacher assistance, identify
rhymes in songs, poems, or books
(e.g., “Hey, that sounds like ‘whale’ –
‘pail’, ‘whale’.”).
Provide second syllable for common
words when teacher provides the
first syllable (e.g., “I am holding a
pen___.” Child says “cil” to make the
word “pencil”.).
Show awareness of syllables in a
word (e.g., clap each syllable in
a word).
Indicate the number of syllables
in a word (e.g., count or clap each
syllable in a word).
With teacher assistance, respond
when called by first sound of his/
her name (e.g., “Whose name begins
with ‘BBBB’?”).
With teacher assistance, substitute
beginning sound of a word to say
a new word or nonsense word
(e.g., cat, hat, mat, sat; Heather,
weather, meather, seather).
With teacher assistance, identify
the first letter in a word or name
that s/he is attempting to write
(e.g., “What sound does cat begin
with?” “KKKK” “Yes, a K does make
that sound. So, does a C.”)
With teacher assistance, respond
when teacher stretches the sounds
of his/her name.
With teacher assistance, state word
when teacher stretches the sounds
(e.g., “Whose turn is it to line up after
you? Ssssss-aaaaaammmm.” Child
says “Sam.”)
With teacher assistance, stretch
out sounds in words with teacher
(e.g., “Let’s stretch the sounds to
help us write the word ‘can’.”).
14 Aligns with Kindergarten Common Core, Reading Foundational Skills 1d.
| 36 |
Language Arts
LEARNING STANDARD 4.D
Demonstrate emergent phonics and word-analysis skills.
15
Preschool Benchmarks
LANGUAGE ARTS
4.D.ECa
Recognize own name and common signs and labels in the environment.
4.D.ECb
With teacher assistance, demonstrate understanding of the one-to-one
correspondence of letters and sounds.
4.D.ECc
With teacher assistance, begin to use knowledge of letters and sounds to spell
words phonetically.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Identify own first name (e.g., point to
own name on cubby and say, “That
says Jason!” or find name card at
sign-in time).
Recognize environmental print
and one or two classmates’ names
(e.g., road signs from a restaurant or
a local store).
Identify labels (e.g., the words posted
to identify various centers, objects,
and materials) and more than two
classmates’ names in the classroom.
With teacher assistance, respond
to prompts about the sound
associated with a specific letter,
especially the first letter of his/her
name (e.g., “Your name starts with
the letter ‘m’. Can you remember the
sound that this letter makes?”).
With teacher assistance, identify the
sound of the beginning letter of a
word (e.g., “What letter makes the
sound you hear at the beginning of
the word ‘snake’?”).
With teacher assistance, identify
examples of alliteration (e.g., saying
that the words “big blue bouncing
ball” all begin with the /b/ sound).
With teacher assistance, identify
individual sounds by saying
names of classmates that begin
with the sound that is made by a
specific letter.
With teacher assistance, identify
individual sounds through activities
such as naming words that begin
with the sound that is made by a
specific letter.
With teacher assistance, spell
words phonetically, using known
letter sounds (e.g., “s” for snake,
“kt” for cat).
15 Aligns with Kindergarten Common Core, Reading Foundational Skills 3a-3c.
| 37 |
|
4.D
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
GOAL 5
Demonstrate increasing awareness of and competence in emergent writing skills and abilities.
5.A
|
LANGUAGE ARTS
LEARNING STANDARD 5.A
Demonstrate growing interest and abilities in writing.
16
Preschool Benchmarks
5.A.ECa
Experiment with writing tools and materials.
5.A.ECb
Use scribbles, letterlike forms, or letters/words to represent written language.
5.A.ECc
With teacher assistance, write own first name using appropriate upper/
lowercase letters.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Choose one type of writing material
to engage in making marks or
scribbles identified as a name.
Choose one or two types of writing
materials (e.g., markers, pencils) to
engage in making letterlike forms
identified as a name.
Use a variety of writing materials
(e.g., markers, pencils, crayons,
chalk) to attempt to write own name
and/or the names of friends and
family members.
Make marks or scribbles and identify
as writing in play activities, such
as developing a grocery list during
dramatic play or a sign for a
block construction.
Make letterlike forms and identify
as writing in play activities, such
as developing a grocery list during
dramatic play or a sign for a
block construction.
Make letters or words in play
activities, such as developing a
grocery list during dramatic play
or a sign for a block construction.
With teacher assistance, make
marks or scribbles to represent own
name on sign-up charts, drawings,
and other pieces of work.
With teacher assistance, make
letterlike forms to represent own
name on sign-up charts, drawings,
and other pieces of work.
With teacher assistance, write
increasingly recognizable letters
of own name on sign-up charts,
drawings, and other pieces of work.
If available, show interest in
letters on an electronic keyboard
(e.g., computer, iPad).
If available, show interest in letters
in own name on an electronic
keyboard (e.g., computer, iPad).
If available, and with teacher
assistance, locate and type letters
in own name on an electronic
keyboard (e.g., computer, iPad).
16 Aligns with Kindergarten Common Core, Language 1a.
| 38 |
Language Arts
LEARNING STANDARD 5.B
Use writing to represent ideas and information.
17
Preschool Benchmarks
LANGUAGE ARTS
5.B.ECa
With teacher assistance, use a combination of drawing, dictating, or writing to express
an opinion about a book or topic.
5.B.ECb
With teacher assistance, use a combination of drawing, dictating, or writing to
compose informative/explanatory texts in which they name what they are writing
about and supply some information about the topic.
5.B.ECc
With teacher assistance, use a combination of drawing, dictating, or writing to narrate a
single event and provide a reaction to what happened.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Contribute personal opinions to
be included in group-dictated
pieces of writing (e.g., “My favorite
food is ______,” “I like ________
because ________.”).
Contribute factual information
to be included in group-dictated
pieces of writing (e.g., brainstorm
characteristics of a familiar type
of animal, food, or vehicle; recall
and share true information about
a familiar topic).
Contribute to group-dictated stories
about a shared experience (e.g., tell
about something that happened
on a field trip; describe how the
dramatic play area was changed
into a pet store and new ways the
child was able to use that area of
the room).
With teacher assistance, draw a
picture about a personal event that
took place and dictate to the teacher
to share information and feelings
about it.
With teacher assistance, draw a
picture about a personal event that
took place and use scribbles and/or
letterlike forms to share information
and feelings about it.
With teacher assistance, draw a
picture about a personal event
that took place and use scribbles,
letterlike forms, letters, and/or
words to share information and
feelings about it.
With teacher assistance, participate
in making decisions for a groupdictated piece of writing created
electronically (e.g., on a computer,
iPad, or Smart Board).
With teacher assistance, participate
in making decisions for a groupdictated piece of writing in which
photographs will be taken to use
for illustrations.
With support from the teacher, use
electronic means (e.g., a computer,
iPad, or Smart Board) to create a
piece of writing.
17 Aligns with Kindergarten Common Core, Writing 1-3, 5-6, Speaking and Listening 5.
| 39 |
|
5.B
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
LEARNING STANDARD 5.C
Use writing to research and share knowledge.
18
5.C
|
LANGUAGE ARTS
Preschool Benchmarks
5.C.ECa
Participate in group projects or units of study designed to learn about a topic
of interest.
5.C.ECb
With teacher assistance, recall factual information and share that information through
drawing, dictation, or writing.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Join in an activity to learn about a
topic of interest to the group.
Join in multiple activities to learn
about a topic of interest to the group.
Join in multiple activities to learn
about a topic of interest to the group
and contribute documentation to
the study (whether it be drawings,
photos, or writing).
With teacher assistance, share
through dictation factual
information gained from hands-on
experiences or written sources.
With teacher assistance, share
through drawing factual information
gained from hands-on experiences
or written sources.
With teacher assistance, share
through writing (whether scribbles,
letterlike shapes, letters, or words)
factual information gained from
hands-on experiences or
written sources.
18 Aligns with Kindergarten Common Core, Writing 7-8.
| 40 |
Mathematics
Mathematics
Math is a big part of every day in Ms. O’Brien’s Preschool for All classroom. She knows that
understanding quantity for preschoolers goes far beyond reciting counting words, and she
provides many opportunities for children to count in meaningful situations. Each day, the
group counts how many children are present and how many are absent, how many steps
from the door of their classroom to the playground, and how many plates and napkins
are needed to set a table for snacks. They say the counting words in both English and
Spanish. She provides many manipulatives that encourage children to use one-to-one
correspondence as they sort, categorize, order, and build to create groups of objects and to
connect numbers to quantities of objects. Shapes are everywhere in her preschool classroom,
and Ms. O’Brien takes advantage of every opportunity she can to name the shapes for the
children in both English and Spanish and to encourage them to explore, manipulate, and
build with them. The children have also learned to love taking surveys. Ms. O’Brien has
created clipboards with Yes/No graphs on them for children to interview each other about
favorites. She loves to hear a child ask another, “¿Te gusta helado de chocolate?” (“Do you like
chocolate ice cream?”) and see him note the answer under the Yes or No column. She makes
sure to follow up on the results of his survey and have him present it to the class at large
group time. Ms. O’Brien finds it easy to include math goals from the IELDS on her lesson plan
for her play areas, daily routines, and group experiences because math is everywhere!
The domain of Mathematics includes Preschool
Benchmarks in: Sense of Numbers, Identification of
Relationships in Objects, Concepts of Geometry, and
Analysis of Data Information
Young children are natural mathematicians, fascinated by what is “bigger,” wanting “more” of their
favorite things, and very concerned with whether the distribution of those things is “fair.” These
kinds of observations of the world are mathematical at their core because they are about quantity
and size. Preschool children’s experiences of the world are equally affected by ideas about spatial
relationships and shape. They explore the concepts of geometry whether they are maneuvering
through the living room, building a block tower, or choosing a puzzle piece. Such daily experiences
are packed with mathematical concepts that fascinate and challenge young thinkers and can
eventually prompt analytical thought, growing precision, and abstraction.
The major mathematical task of early childhood is to coordinate these natural interests and
understandings with the beginnings of a useful knowledge of conventional math concepts and
skills. Unfortunately, for many children, meaningful mathematical thinking is displaced too early
by an emphasis on math “facts” (such as 2 + 2 = 4) and math “procedures” about what to do when.
Too many young children learn how to say the counting words up to 20 without being able to
successfully count out a set of five objects. While the procedures—such as the order of the count
words—must be learned, it is crucial that they be meaningfully connected to things children
| 41 |
MATHEMATICS
|
5.C
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
understand and care about, such as “how many” children can fit at the play dough table or “how
many” slices of apple they can have at lunch.
6.A
|
MATHEMATICS
To effectively build on young children’s innate interests in quantity and space and move their
thinking in conventional mathematical directions, the most important thing teachers can do is
talk with them, helping them “see” the math in the world. When adults provide rich language
to mathematical experiences, such as “thicker” or “longer” rather than simply “bigger,” children
understand that there are many different types of attributes that can be compared and measured.
When teachers ask, “How do you know the door looks like a rectangle?” they support children’s
budding conception of geometric rules, such as a rectangle having four sides. When teachers
count with one-to-one correspondence to find out “how many children are in the group today,”
they demonstrate the use of whole numbers in a way that is very real to children and matters
to them. These sorts of interactions, based on experiences that are a natural part of children’s
everyday lives, are the best way to ensure the development of beginning mathematical
understandings that inspire children to keep learning.
The mathematics standards in the IELDS are more detailed and developmentally informed
than those in the previous version, reflecting our growing understanding of how children’s
mathematical thinking develops during early childhood. We hope they will provide a useful
guide to the kinds of mathematics experiences preschool children ought to have prior to their
kindergarten year.
GOAL 6
Demonstrate and apply a knowledge and sense of numbers, including numeration and operations.
19
LEARNING STANDARD 6.A
Demonstrate beginning understanding of numbers, number names, and numerals.
20
Preschool Benchmarks
6.A.ECa
Count with understanding and recognize “how many” in small sets up to 5.
6.A.ECb
Use subitizing (the rapid and accurate judgment of how many items there are without
counting) to identify the number of objects in sets of 4 or less.
21
22
6.A.ECc
Understand and appropriately use informal or everyday terms that mean zero, such as
“none” or “nothing”.
23
6.A.ECd
Connect numbers to quantities they represent using physical models and
informal representations.
24
19 Aligns with Kindergarten Mathematics Common Core, Counting and Cardinality, 1-7, Operations and Algebraic Thinking, 1-6.
20 Aligns with Kindergarten Mathematics Common Core, Counting and Cardinality, 1-7.
21 Aligns with Kindergarten Mathematics Common Core, Counting and Cardinality, 4-5.
22 Aligns with Kindergarten Mathematics Common Core, Counting and Cardinality, 4-5.
23 Aligns with Kindergarten Mathematics Common Core, Counting and Cardinality, 3.
24 Aligns with Kindergarten Mathematics Common Core, Counting and Cardinality, 3-4.
| 42 |
Mathematics
6.A.ECe
Differentiate numerals from letters and recognize some single-digit written numerals.
6.A.ECf
Verbally recite numbers from 1 to 10.
6.A.ECg
Be able to say the number after another in the series up to 9 when given a “running
start,” as in “What comes after one, two, three, four…?”.
25
26
Example Performance Descriptors
MATHEMATICS
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Recognize how many there are in a
set of 1 or 2 without counting them
(e.g., one car or two blue crayons).
Recognize how many there are in
a set of 3 without counting them
(e.g., three yellow beads).
Recognize how many there are in
sets of 4 and 5 when presented in
a nonlinear, organized fashion (like
a die face).
Point to or move objects around
as though to organize without
necessarily counting out loud.
Point to or move objects when
counting out loud without
effectively tracking items counted
(may skip items or count items
more than once).
Point to or move each object to
make sure sure each is counted
once and only once when counting
in sets up to 5.
Demonstrate an understanding of zero
by making a comment such as “Now
I don’t have any more” when finished
with a snack of four crackers.
Demonstrate understanding of none
by looking into an empty container
and commenting that there is
“nothing in there.”
Respond to a question about
quantity, such as “How many red
bears are left?” when none are left
by saying: “None.”
Confuse numerals and letters, saying
number names occasionally when
pointing to letters.
Say number names when pointing
to numerals (but not letters), even if
they don’t match.
Correctly identify the numerals 1, 2,
and 3.
Say some counting words
when “counting.”
Recite counting words from 1-10,
with 2-4 errors (e.g., skip numbers,
mix up order) but also some number
names in words in consecutive order
(e.g., “one, two, five, four, six, seven,
nine, ten”).
Recite counting words in order from
1-10 (with an occasional error).
Fill in the next number when the
teacher says, “one, two…”
Fill in the next number when the
teacher says, “one, two, three…”
Fill in the next number when the
teacher says, “three, four, five…”
(not starting at “one”).
25 Aligns with Kindergarten Mathematics Common Core, Counting and Cardinality, 3 & 7.
26 Aligns with Kindergarten Mathematics Common Core, Counting and Cardinality, 1.
| 43 |
|
6.A
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
LEARNING STANDARD 6.B
Add and subtract to create new numbers and begin to construct sets.
Preschool Benchmarks
6.B.ECa
Recognize that numbers (or sets of objects) can be combined or separated to make
another number.
27
6.B
|
MATHEMATICS
6.B.ECb
Show understanding of how to count out and construct sets of objects of a given
number up to 5.
28
6.B.ECc
Identify the new number created when small sets (up to 5) are combined or separated.
6.B.ECd
Informally solve simple mathematical problems presented in a meaningful context.
6.B.ECe
Fairly share a set of up to 10 items between two children.
29
30
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Combine items to create a new
number (e.g., combine two blocks
with a friend’s two blocks and say,
“Now we have four.”)
Separate items from a set (e.g., with
a set of three cups, takes one away
and says, “Now we have two.”)
Recognize that combining sets
always results in “more” and
separating sets always results
in “less.”
Count out two objects correctly
(e.g., count two crackers on plate
at snack time).
Count out three and four objects
correctly (e.g., count four blocks in a
block tower).
Count out five objects correctly
(e.g., count five children in a
small group).
Solve simple math problems
(e.g., know that if one child is added
to the group that makes one more).
Solve simple math problems
(e.g., know that if one chair is taken
away from the table that makes less).
Solve simple math problems
(e.g., know that if one orange is
taken away from a group of five,
there are four oranges left).
Divide a set of two to four objects
between self and a friend evenly.
Divide a set of six to nine objects
between self and a friend evenly.
Divide a set of 10 crackers between
self and a friend evenly.
27 Aligns with Kindergarten Mathematics Common Core, Operations and Algebraic Thinking, 1-5.
28 Aligns with Kindergarten Mathematics Common Core, Operations and Algebraic Thinking, 1-2.
29 Aligns with Kindergarten Mathematics Common Core, Operations and Algebraic Thinking, 1-4.
30 Aligns with Kindergarten Mathematics Common Core, Operations and Algebraic Thinking, 4-5.
| 44 |
Mathematics
LEARNING STANDARD 6.C
Begin to make reasonable estimates of numbers.
Preschool Benchmarks
6.C.ECa
Estimate number of objects in a small set.
MATHEMATICS
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
Make reasonable estimates of small
quantities of objects (e.g., guess
“four” when asked how many peach
slices are in the bowl).
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Tell whether a set is more or less
than 5.
Presented with a set of 7 or 8,
estimate a number in the range
of 5 to 12.
LEARNING STANDARD 6.D
Compare quantities using appropriate vocabulary terms.
31
Preschool Benchmarks
6.D.ECa
Compare two collections to see if they are equal or determine which is more, using a
procedure of the child’s choice.
6.D.ECb
Describe comparisons with appropriate vocabulary, such as “more”, “less”, “greater
than”, “fewer”, “equal to”, or “same as”.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Match sets of things that go together,
item to item (e.g., match one napkin
to each of the place settings at
the table).
Through words or gestures, identify
which set has more.
Through words or gestures, identify
whether sets have more, less, or an
equal amount.
Use the terms “more” or “same as”
(e.g., acknowledge that one child
has more pegs and another has the
same number).
Use the terms “less”, “not as many”,
or “fewer” (e.g., acknowledge that
one child has less play dough than
others do).
Use a variety of appropriate
vocabulary to make comparisons
of quantity (e.g., “more”, “less”,
“greater than”, “fewer”, “equal to”, or
“same as”).
31 Aligns with Kindergarten Mathematics Common Core, Counting and Cardinality, 6.
| 45 |
|
6.D
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
GOAL 7
Explore measurement of objects and quantities.
32
LEARNING STANDARD 7.A
Measure objects and quantities using direct comparison methods and nonstandard units.
7.A
|
MATHEMATICS
Preschool Benchmarks
7.A.ECa
Compare, order, and describe objects according to a single attribute.
7.A.ECb
Use nonstandard units to measure attributes such as length and capacity.
7.A.ECc
Use vocabulary that describes and compares length, height, weight, capacity, and size.
7.A.ECd
Begin to construct a sense of time through participation in daily activities.
33
34
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Compare magnitudes of one object
to another (e.g., line up two strings
of beads to determine which is
longer; stand next to peer to see
who is taller).
Order multiple objects to compare
magnitudes (i.e., arrange blocks
from tallest to shortest).
Order multiple objects to
compare magnitudes and
describe comparisons
(i.e., arrange blocks from tallest
to shortest and describe).
Use nonstandard means to measure
items (e.g., using a piece of string or
a long block as a measurement tool).
Use nonstandard units to
measure items (e.g., use hands
or small blocks to measure the
length of a table).
Use nonstandard units to measure
items and identify the quantity of
units (e.g., may not be correct but
attempt to count the number of
hands or small blocks in the length
of the table).
Use appropriate vocabulary when
making measurements, such as
“small”, “big”.
Ask about the sequence of the
daily schedule (e.g., “When will
we have snack?” “When are my
Mom and Dad coming?”).
Use appropriate vocabulary when
making measurements, such as
“small”, “big”, “short”, “tall”.
Know the sequence of the daily
schedule and guess the progression
of the schedule throughout the day
but not with accuracy (e.g., guess
incorrectly that snack is after circle
time yet knows that Mom or Dad will
come after outside time).
32 Aligns with Kindergarten Mathematics Common Core, Measurement and Data, 1-3.
33 Aligns with Kindergarten Mathematics Common Core, Measurement and Data, 2.
34 Aligns with Kindergarten Mathematics Common Core, Measurement and Data, 1.
| 46 |
Use a wider appropriate vocabulary
when making measurements,
such as “small”, “big”, “short”, “tall”,
“empty”, “full”, “heavy”, and “light”.
Know the sequence of the daily
schedule and begin to accurately
gauge time by progression of the
schedule throughout the day
(e.g., know that naptime comes after
lunch or that outside time comes
after snack).
Mathematics
LEARNING STANDARD 7.B
Begin to make estimates of measurements.
Preschool Benchmarks
7.B.ECa
Practice estimating in everyday play and everyday measurement problems.
MATHEMATICS
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Make predictions and estimations
during play without much accuracy
(e.g., estimate how many scoops of
sand it will take to fill a small bucket
at the sand table — “I think 100!”).
Make more accurate predictions
and estimations during play without
checking by counting (e.g., estimate
how many pebbles will fill the
balance scale cup, “I think 10” but
without counting to check).
Make more accurate predictions
and estimations during play and
check them by counting (e.g.,
“I think it will take five scoops of sand
to fill this cup – 1,2,3,4,5,6 –
oh, I was almost right!”).
Estimate to solve a task without
much accuracy (e.g., when setting
table for snack, estimate how many
napkins are needed. “I think 50.”).
Estimate to solve a task with more
accuracy but without checking by
counting (e.g., during block play,
estimate how many blocks are
needed to make the road being
constructed reach the wall, “I think
six” – but without counting to check).
Estimate to solve a task with more
accuracy and check by counting
(e.g., during block play, estimate
how many blocks are needed to
make the road being constructed
reach the wall, then count to see
how many it took).
| 47 |
|
7.B
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
LEARNING STANDARD 7.C
Explore tools used for measurement.
Preschool Benchmarks
7.C
|
MATHEMATICS
7.C.ECa
With teacher assistance, explore use of measuring tools that use standard units to
measure objects and quantities that are meaningful to the child.
7.C.ECb
Know that different attributes, such as length, weight, and time, are measured using
different kinds of units, such as feet, pounds, and seconds.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Incorporate teacher-introduced
standard measuring tools into play
without attention to quantity.
With teacher assistance, use
standard measuring tools without
expressing interest in quantity
(e.g., teacher suggests they see how
many rulers high the shelf is; child
helps with measuring).
Ask teacher to help with using
standard measuring tools and
figuring out quantities (e.g., use a
measuring tape and ask how long
the two blocks are).
With teacher assistance,
explore measuring hot and
cold with thermometers.
With teacher assistance, learn that
clocks measure time.
With teacher assistance, use a scale
that provides numerical weight
to compare weights of objects in
the classroom.
With teacher assistance, use
a variety of similar tools for
measurement
of weight (e.g., use both balance
scales and scales that provide a
numerical weight to explore objects
in the classroom).
Learn the vocabulary words
“thermometer” and “clock”.
With teacher assistance, use a
balance scale to compare weights
of objects in the classroom.
| 48 |
Mathematics
GOAL 8
Identify and describe common attributes, patterns, and relationships in objects.
35
LEARNING STANDARD 8.A
Explore objects and patterns.
MATHEMATICS
Preschool Benchmarks
8.A.ECa
Sort, order, compare, and describe objects according to characteristics or attribute(s).
8.A.ECb
Recognize, duplicate, extend, and create simple patterns in various formats.
36
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Match similar objects when an
attribute is named (e.g., “Which rocks
are smooth like this one?” “Can you
find another ball that’s this big?”).
Compare and describe various
objects, identifying one of their
attributes (e.g., describe different
rocks by referring to their size,
shape, or weight).
Compare and describe various
objects, identifying at least two
of their attributes (e.g., describe
different rocks by referring to their
size and shape or texture and weight).
Match similar objects (e.g., putting
all the toy cars together or lining up
plates on a table).
Sort objects by a single attribute
(e.g., ordering fire trucks from
shortest to longest or ordering rocks
from smooth to rough).
Sort objects according to two
different characteristics and
describe a sorting strategy (e.g., sort
crayons by color and size, “Here
are the big red ones and there are
the little blue ones”, or sort blocks
by shape and color, “These are all
yellow triangles and these are the
green rectangles”).
Attempt to create a simple A-B
repeating pattern using early
childhood materials but without
maintaining the repeating pattern
(e.g., makes colored marks on the
white board beginning with black,
green, black, then adds red, green,
black, blue, black).
Successfully create a simple A-B
repeating pattern using classroom
objects (e.g., build a tower of
alternating blue and red cubes).
Create a simple A-B-C or A-B-B
repeating pattern using classroom
objects (e.g., lines up people figures
with small, medium, large as the
repeating pattern; strings beads
on a necklace with one yellow, two
orange in a repeating pattern).
Replicate a simple pattern in music
following the beat by clapping or
tapping foot lightly.
Replicate patterns in music by
playing finger games such as
“Open, Shut Them.”
Replicate patterns in music by
singing repetitive songs such
as “B-I-N-G-O.”
35 Aligns with Kindergarten Mathematics Common Core, Measurement and Data, 1-3.
36 Aligns with Kindergarten Mathematics Common Core, Measurement and Data, 1.
| 49 |
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8.A
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
LEARNING STANDARD 8.B
Describe and document patterns using symbols.
Preschool Benchmarks
8.B.ECa
8.B
|
With adult assistance, represent a simple repeating pattern by verbally describing it or
by modeling it with objects or actions.
MATHEMATICS
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
With adult assistance, describe a
pattern in words (e.g., “tall, short,
tall, short, tall, short” or “red, blue,
yellow, red, blue, yellow, red,
blue, yellow”).
When presented with a visual “redblue, red-blue, red-blue” repeating
pattern and told “do a clap for
red and a tap for blue,” produce
clap-tap, clap-tap, clap-tap with
adult assistance.
When presented with a visual “circlesquare, circle-square, circle-square”
repeating pattern and told “do a
green bear for circles and a yellow
bear for squares,” produce green
bear-yellow bear, green bear-yellow
bear, green bear-yellow bear pattern
with adult assistance.
GOAL 9
Explore concepts of geometry and spatial relations.
37
LEARNING STANDARD 9.A
Recognize, name, and match common shapes.
Preschool Benchmarks
9.A.ECa
Recognize and name common two- and three-dimensional shapes and describe some
of their attributes (e.g., number of sides, straight or curved lines).
38
9.A.ECb
Sort collections of two- and three-dimensional shapes by type (e.g., triangles,
rectangles, circles, cubes, spheres, pyramids).
39
9.A.ECc
Identify and name some of the faces (flat sides) of common three-dimensional shapes
using two-dimensional shape names.
40
9.A.ECd
Combine two-dimensional shapes to create new shapes.
9.A.ECe
Think about/imagine how altering the spatial orientation of a shape will change how it
looks (e.g., turning it upside down).
41
42
37 Aligns with Kindergarten Mathematics Common Core, Geometry, 1-6.
38 Aligns with Kindergarten Mathematics Common Core, Geometry, 1-2.
39 Aligns with Kindergarten Mathematics Common Core, Geometry, 3-6.
40 Aligns with Kindergarten Mathematics Common Core, Geometry, 2-5.
41 Aligns with Kindergarten Mathematics Common Core, Geometry, 5-6.
42 Aligns with Kindergarten Mathematics Common Core, Geometry, 4-6.
| 50 |
Mathematics
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Identify the shape of various twodimensional items in the early
childhood environment (e.g., state
that the clock is shaped like a circle
or that the table top is a rectangle).
Identify the shape of various twodimensional items in the classroom
and describe their attributes
(e.g., state that a square block has
four sides and a triangle block has
three sides).
Identify the shape of various twoand three-dimensional items in the
early childhood environment and
describe their attributes (e.g., “I used
all these ‘rolling blocks’ (cylinders)
to hold up my bridge.”).
Match triangles to triangles, squares
to squares, circles to circles, and
rectangles to rectangles.
Match triangles to triangles,
squares to squares, circles
to circles, and rectangles
to rectangles even when
size (or proportion) differs
among examples.
Match cubes, spheres, and
pyramids, even when size differs
among examples.
Match the face (flat side) of one
common three-dimensional shape
to another (e.g., match the face of
one cube to another or one cylinder
to another).
Describe the face (flat side) of
one common three-dimensional
shape (cube or cylinder) using
two-dimensional shape names
(square or circle).
Describe the faces (flat sides) of
more than one common threedimensional shape, such as
cubes and cylinders, using twodimensional shape names, such as
squares and circles.
Use one common two-dimensional
shape to create simple
representations of things in the real
world (e.g., line up several rectangle
blocks to make a “road”).
Use more than one common
two-dimensional shape to create
representations of things in the
real world (e.g., place small square
blocks on the “road” to be the “cars”).
Use common two-dimensional
shapes to create more complex
representations of things in the
real world (e.g., place triangles
around a circle to make a “flower”).
Rotate and flip shapes, such as
blocks and puzzle pieces, to make
them “fit.”
Rotate and flip a shape to create
something different (e.g., place the
rectangle on its short or long side).
Discuss with teacher how rotating
and flipping a shape will create
something different (e.g., Teacher:
“What do you think will happen if you
turn the triangle upside down? Let’s
try it.” Child: “It stands up by itself!”).
| 51 |
MATHEMATICS
|
9.A
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
LEARNING STANDARD 9.B
Demonstrate an understanding of location and ordinal position, using appropriate vocabulary.
43
Preschool Benchmarks
9.B
|
MATHEMATICS
9.B.ECa
Show understanding of location and ordinal position.
9.B.ECb
Use appropriate vocabulary for identifying location and ordinal position.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
Respond appropriately to request to
place an object somewhere in space
in relation to other objects (e.g., put
doll in front of pillow; place shoes
under table).
Respond to questions about
location of an object (e.g., respond
correctly to questions such as
“Which colored block is on top?”).
Attempt to use vocabulary for
location during play activities, not
always correctly (e.g., when asked,
say the doll is under the pillow when
she is in front).
Use appropriate vocabulary for
location during play activities
(e.g., in conversations, use
terms such as “near” and “far”,
“over”and “under”).
43 Aligns with Kindergarten Mathematics Common Core, Geometry, 1.
| 52 |
BUILDING
Respond to questions about ordinal
position of an object (e.g., respond
correctly to questions such as “Who
is first in line?” or “Which car came
in third?”).
Use appropriate vocabulary
for ordinal position during play
activities (e.g., in conversations,
use terms such as “first” and “last”,
“second” and “third”).
Mathematics
GOAL 10
Begin to make predictions and collect data information.
44
LEARNING STANDARD 10.A
Generate questions and processes for answering them.
MATHEMATICS
Preschool Benchmarks
10.A.ECa With teacher assistance, come up with meaningful questions that can be answered
through gathering information.
10.A.ECb Gather data about themselves and their surroundings to answer meaningful questions.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
With teacher assistance, identify a
“yes” or “no” question to ask a peer
and report verbally to teacher.
Notice a change in the environment
and comment (e.g., “We need more
paintbrushes at the easel.”).
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
With teacher assistance, identify a
“yes” or “no” question to ask multiple
peers, recording on a “yes” or “no”
chart or clipboard.
With teacher assistance, formulate
questions of personal interest (make
a list of things to find out about, such
as favorite cookies or how children
get to school each day) and conduct
surveys on charts or clipboards.
Discuss one aspect of their
environment and then collect
relevant information with teacher
assistance as needed (e.g., discuss
whether trees have buds yet and go
outside to check).
Discuss more than one aspect of
their environment and then collect
relevant information with teacher
assistance as needed (e.g., discuss
what kinds of insects live on the
school playground and then go
outside to investigate).
44 Aligns with Kindergarten Mathematics Common Core, Measurement and Data, 3.
| 53 |
|
10.A
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
LEARNING STANDARD 10.B
Organize and describe data and information.
Preschool Benchmarks
10.B
|
10.B.ECa Organize, represent, and analyze information using concrete objects, pictures, and
graphs, with teacher support.
MATHEMATICS
10.B.ECb Make predictions about the outcome prior to collecting information, with teacher
support and multiple experiences over time.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Organize materials with teacher
support to prepare for graphing
(e.g., sort leaves by color, sort fruit
by type).
Participate in creating a data display
using concrete objects or pictures
with teacher support (e.g., organize
children’s favorite fruit in rows to
demonstrate whether more children
prefer apples or oranges).
Compare numerical information
derived from graphs to find answers
to questions with teacher support
as needed (e.g., use information
depicted on a chart or graph to
describe which classroom games
are most popular).
With teacher support, begin to
predict the outcome of an activity
(e.g., predict there are more boys
than girls at the snack table).
With teacher support, provide a
reasonable prediction or guess
for the outcome of an activity
(e.g., predict that the class collected
more yellow than red leaves on
the nature walk before sorting and
counting them).
With teacher support, predict with
more accuracy the outcome of a
counting or comparison activity
(e.g., predict how many more chairs,
when three are already there, are
needed for the small group table so
that six children can all have a seat).
LEARNING STANDARD 10.C
Determine, describe, and apply the probabilities of events.
Preschool Benchmarks
10.C.ECa Describe likelihood of events with appropriate vocabulary, such as “possible”,
“impossible”, “always”, and “never”.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
Attempt to use vocabulary to
describe likelihood, but not always
with accuracy (e.g., “My birthday is
always on Saturday.”).
Use vocabulary terms “always”
and “never” in reasonable ways to
describe the likelihood of an event
(e.g., “Spring always comes after
winter” or “We will never have an
elephant as a class pet”).
| 54 |
BUILDING
Use vocabulary terms “possible”
and “impossible” to describe the
likelihood of an event (e.g., “It’s
impossible to walk on the ceiling” or
“It’s possible to sit on the chair”).
Science
Science
In Drew’s integrated preschool special education classroom, he makes sure that all of the
children are challenged at just the right level for their capabilities. He has found that science
explorations are a wonderful way for him to individualize experiences so that each child gains
from the investigation. He can incorporate the IEP goals for his students with special needs
and, at the same time, meet the needs of the peer models in his class. Recently, the children
in Drew’s class noticed changes in the mulch on the playground after heavy rains for several
days. They saw shallow trenches that had been created by the flow of water. Drew talked with
them about the rain and the power of water and suggested they do some water explorations
themselves. They were all interested! In the classroom, he set up his sensory table with
mulch and dirt and encouraged children to explore what happened when they poured
water from different containers onto the mulch. Over several days, they experimented with
small and large cups, watering cans, and large pitchers—with every child pouring water and
watching the reaction. Children with more language capabilities described what they saw
while others used a word here or there or pointed and gestured. Jason, a child with special
needs, repeatedly said “Water” as he poured from the different containers. Susannah, his
constant friend, said, “You’re pouring the water, huh, Jason? See, it’s making a puddle in the
dirt.” Jason reached into the puddle and splashed with his fingertips. Drew said, “It’s wet, isn’t
it, Jason? And, look. Now your fingertips are brown.” Jason studied his fingers and grinned,
then went to the sink and washed his hands. Throughout the investigation, Drew took photos
of the children at the sensory table and charted the results of the experiments with them.
They noted that the large pitcher had created the most changes in the mulch and dirt and
drew pictures of the results, some with scribbles and some with more representation. Drew
created a display with the photos and drawings to show families about the investigation.
The domain of Science includes Preschool Benchmarks
in: Demonstrating Curiosity about the World and
Beginning to Use the Practices of Science and
Engineering, Exploring Life, Physical and Earth
Sciences, and Connecting and Understanding
Science and Engineering
Preschool children have an innate drive to explore and make sense of the world around them.
Teachers can set the stage for children to become curious and confident young scientists by
sharing in their interest and excitement and providing opportunities for them to engage in the
practices of science.
Teachers help children develop the dispositions of a scientist through active engagement in
the practices of science. These dispositions include curiosity, persistence, motivation to answer
questions and solve problems, and interest in real discovery. As preschool teachers work with
children to help them answer questions such as what makes a shadow, they are involving them
| 55 |
SCIENCE
|
10.C
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
in the use of science practices. When they support them in the work of solving a problem such as
how to connect a wagon to a tricycle so one friend can pull another, they are helping them learn
about practices of engineering design. The science standards integrate science and engineering
practices, along with technology and mathematics, to help children learn more about their world.
11.A
|
SCIENCE
Children who participate in active investigations to learn about their environment and experiences
are engaging in the real work of scientists. They are asking questions, investigating, and trying
out their ideas to find answers. They begin to construct new ways of thinking by talking about
their experiences with other children and interested adults. Just as adult scientists do, preschool
children can make careful observations, collect and record data, and share their findings with
others. For example, they may create a simple chart to keep track of which objects roll down a
ramp and which objects slide.
Preschoolers engage in engineering design when they solve the problem of a ramp that keeps
falling down by building it differently. They may use the science practice of modeling as they work
with a friend to create drawings of their ideas for making a big ramp outside. With an interested
adult, they may reflect on their experiences and think of new possibilities to try. This process
of actively exploring and investigating, communicating and thinking about what they have
discovered, and trying additional ideas lays the foundation for a solid, experiential understanding
of important core ideas of science and the practices of science and engineering. In addition,
children use skills such as observation and problem solving—integrated with ideas from art,
mathematics, and language development—to deepen their understanding of science.
When teachers provide opportunities for children to sit quietly and watch the movements of a
snail or to assess the weather and decide if a jacket is needed, they are helping children develop
curiosity, the skills of observation, and other practices of science. When teachers encourage a
group of children to keep trying as they attempt to move a big log to a shadier spot, they are
helping children develop persistence as well as skills in problem solving and cooperation—the
practices of engineering. When caring adults respond thoughtfully to children’s questions and
encourage them to investigate possible answers or solve problems, they are helping them
develop initiative and creativity—the dispositions of scientists and engineers. When teachers
challenge children with open-ended science investigations, they allow children across the range
of developmental levels typically present in preschool classrooms to share in the excitement of
learning. Most importantly, when adults support children in active scientific inquiry, everyone
shares in the wonder and delight of discovery.
45
GOAL 11
Demonstrate curiosity about the world and begin to use the practices of science and engineering
to answer questions and solve problems.
LEARNING STANDARD 11.A
Develop beginning skills in the use of science and engineering practices, such as observing, asking
questions, solving problems, and drawing conclusions.
45 The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and the Illinois Learning Standards for Science (K-12) were consulted in revising the IELDS
Science standards.
| 56 |
Science
Preschool Benchmarks
11.A.ECa Express wonder and curiosity about their world by asking questions, solving problems,
and designing things.
11.A.ECb Develop and use models to represent their ideas, observations, and explanations
through approaches such as drawing, building, or modeling with clay.
11.A.ECc Plan and carry out simple investigations.
11.A.ECd Collect, describe, compare, and record information from observations
and investigations.
11.A.ECe Use mathematical and computational thinking.
11.A.ECf
Make meaning from experience and information by describing, talking, and thinking
about what happened during an investigation.
11.A.ECg Generate explanations and communicate ideas and/or conclusions about
their investigations.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Show curiosity and interest in the
world around them and ask why
questions (e.g., “Why is the sidewalk
shiny from the rain?” “How come
it smells so good in here?” when
muffins are baking).
Participate in a discussion about
why things happen (e.g., describe
why some objects roll and others
do not).
Pose what, why, and how questions
about the world around them
(e.g., ask why some objects move
when placed near a magnet, what
made the hole in the acorn, or where
do ants live).
Represent through actions
or materials the physical
characteristics of a natural object
(e.g., crawl like a worm, mix colors
of paint to show the colors of leaves
changing on a tree, make an acorn
out of clay).
Draw the physical characteristics
of something observed (e.g., record
the growth of a sprouting seed
through drawings).
Draw the physical characteristics
of something observed and
describe the characteristics with
words (e.g., record the growth of a
sprouting seed through drawings
and describe the changes observed).
Use the senses to investigate and
make comparisons (e.g., compare
textures of objects using the sense
of touch).
Investigate simple cause and effect
or other scientific principles such as
magnetism and gravity through play
activities (e.g., observe that a toy car
rolls slower when a ramp is lowered
or that block towers consistently
fall downward).
With teacher assistance, conduct
an investigation, predicting and
testing results (e.g., mixing colors
into cup of water, predicting
changes with each new color added,
then testing results).
Use materials to design solutions to
problems (e.g., after trial and error,
realize which blocks work best to
create a stable bridge for toy cars to
roll across).
Use simple charts to collect data
(e.g., test a collection of objects
to see which bounce and record
the results).
Use simple graphs to collect data
(e.g., organize all of the autumn
leaves collected outdoors into a
color graph).
| 57 |
SCIENCE
|
11.A
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
GOAL 12
Explore concepts and information about the physical, earth, and life sciences.
LEARNING STANDARD 12.A
Understand that living things grow and change.
Preschool Benchmarks
12.A
|
SCIENCE
12.A.ECa Observe, investigate, describe, and categorize living things.
12.A.ECb Show an awareness of changes that occur in oneself and the environment.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Identify and describe the different
structures of familiar mammals
(e.g., explain that dogs and cats
have eyes and ears).
Identify and describe the different
structures of familiar plants
and a greater range of animals
(e.g., explain that plants have leaves,
stems, and roots and that fish have
fins and gills).
Identify things as living or nonliving
based on characteristics such as
breathing, movement, and growth.
Observe similarities and differences
when viewing pictures of self,
beginning in infancy.
Observe living things to see
how they change over time
(e.g., compare a variety of plants to
observe how quickly they grow and
change over time).
Understand that living things grow
and change. Can use drawings or
other forms of representation to
describe changes familiar to them
(e.g., record changes in a nearby tree
through the seasons).
| 58 |
Science
LEARNING STANDARD 12.B
Understand that living things rely on the environment and/or others to live and grow.
Preschool Benchmarks
12.B.ECa Describe and compare basic needs of living things.
12.B.ECb Show respect for living things.
Example Performance Descriptors
SCIENCE
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Compare human basic needs to
those of other living things.
Compare what different animals
need to live and grow.
Observe, describe, and compare
the habitats of various plants
and animals.
Show awareness of the need to care
for living things (e.g., water plants,
feed pets, put food out for birds).
Take responsibility for caring for
living things (e.g., water plants, feed
pets, put food out for birds).
Describe and compare how changes
in the seasons and weather affect
plants and animals.
LEARNING STANDARD 12.C
Explore the physical properties of objects.
Preschool Benchmarks
12.C.ECa Identify, describe, and compare the physical properties of objects.
12.C.ECb Experiment with changes in matter when combined with other substances.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Match objects according to physical
properties, such as color, texture,
or shape.
Sort objects according to physical
properties, such as color, texture,
or shape.
Explore and describe the properties
of different objects using the
senses of touch, smell, taste, sight,
and hearing.
Explore and discuss simple chemical
reactions with teacher assistance
(e.g., mix substances such as baking
soda and water and describe
what happens).
Explore changes in matter with
teacher assistance (e.g., make
gelatin to show that matter changes
from a liquid to a solid or melt ice to
show how solids change to a liquid).
Recognize that some changes in
matter are reversible and some are
not (e.g., water can be changed to
ice and become water again; flour
used to make play dough cannot be
returned to its original state).
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|
12.C
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
LEARNING STANDARD 12.D
Explore concepts of force and motion.
Preschool Benchmarks
12.D.ECa Describe the effects of forces in nature.
12.D.ECb Explore the effect of force on objects in and outside the early childhood environment.
12.D
|
Example Performance Descriptors
SCIENCE
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Describe and compare the effects
of common forces, such as pushing
and pulling.
Explore the effects of simple forces
in nature, such as wind, gravity,
and magnetism.
Describe the effects of simple forces
in nature, such as wind, gravity,
and magnetism.
Explore and describe the motion of
toys and objects (e.g., compare how
cars roll on ramps when placed at
different angles).
Recognize and describe the effect of
actions on objects (e.g., explain what
happens if one blows on a pinwheel
or kicks a ball).
Explore the impact of their own
use of force and motion on objects
(e.g., can control the distance a ball
travels by using a gentle or hard kick).
LEARNING STANDARD 12.E
Explore concepts and information related to the Earth, including ways to take care of our planet.
Preschool Benchmarks
12.E.ECa Observe and describe characteristics of earth, water, and air.
12.E.ECb Participate in discussions about simple ways to take care of the environment.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Investigate and identify physical
properties and characteristics of
water as a solid and liquid.
Explore and compare the size, shape,
weight, and texture of minerals
and rocks (e.g., sort rocks by rough/
smooth or small/large).
Investigate and discuss similarities
and differences in samples of
soil, such as a clay, sand, potting
soil, and dirt from the playground
(e.g., sift or add water to sand
and compare).
Show some awareness of reusing
and recycling materials.
Participate in reusing and
recycling materials.
Identify ways to protect the
environment (e.g., participate in
discussions about conservation
strategies such as turning off lights,
turning off water faucets, and
not littering).
| 60 |
Science
LEARNING STANDARD 12.F
Explore changes related to the weather and seasons.
Preschool Benchmarks
12.F.ECa
Observe and discuss changes in weather and seasons using common vocabulary.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Describe changes in weather.
Participate in discussions about the
differences in the seasons.
Discuss which seasons are more
appropriate for certain activities
(e.g., explain that leaves are raked
in the fall, that sledding takes place
in winter).
Describe and create representations
of clouds.
Explore the effects of the sun on
objects (e.g., feel the difference in
temperature in objects placed in
sunlight and shade).
Participate in activities that require
one to understand differences
between the seasons
(e.g., match appropriate clothes
to the right season).
SCIENCE
GOAL 13
Understand important connections and understandings in science and engineering.
LEARNING STANDARD 13.A
Understand rules to follow when investigating and exploring.
Preschool Benchmarks
13.A.ECa Begin to understand basic safety practices one must follow when exploring and
engaging in science and engineering investigations.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Participate in discussion about
safety when using the senses to
explore things (e.g., talk with peers
about not building blocks over their
shoulders because they could fall
and hit their heads).
Participate in discussions about
safety before acting when using
the senses to explore things
(e.g., understand the need be
cautious when touching things
that may be hot, such as light
bulbs, and not to lick or taste
unknown substances).
Ask teacher about safety before
acting when using the senses to
explore things (e.g., “Is it okay if
I touch this, teacher?” “I need
safety goggles for the workbench,
huh, teacher?”).
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13.A
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
LEARNING STANDARD 13.B
Use tools and technology to assist with science and engineering investigations.
Preschool Benchmarks
13.B.ECa Use nonstandard and standard scientific tools for investigation.
13.B.ECb Become familiar with technological tools that can aid in scientific inquiry.
13.B
|
Example Performance Descriptors
SCIENCE
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Try out one or two tools to explore
the world (e.g., look at classroom
through a prism, study natural items
under a magnifying glass).
Use a variety of tools, such as
magnifiers, balance scales, and
thermometers, to explore the world
and learn how things work.
Use standard and nonstandard tools
and technology in pretend play
(e.g., ruler, scale, or yarn to measure,
rocks to compare weight, cardboard
tube to amplify a voice).
Observe teacher using technology to
aid in investigation, exploration, and
scientific inquiry.
Make suggestion to use technology
to aid in investigation, exploration,
and scientific inquiry.
Use technology, such as a computer
or camera, to aid in investigation,
exploration, and scientific inquiry.
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Social Studies
Social Studies
Miss Trina and Mrs. Yolanda work as a teaching team at a large, urban child care program.
Their 3- and 4-year-olds come and go throughout the day depending on their family
members’ work schedules. Trina and Yolanda provide many opportunities for the children
to get engaged in productive, interesting play with the teachers facilitating—sometimes
playing right alongside the children, engaging them in conversations, asking questions,
or sometimes sitting quietly and observing. During a team meeting, Trina and Yolanda
discussed how much the children enjoy dramatic play and get involved in the roles they act
out. They realized that this is really a form of social studies for preschoolers. The children are
attempting to understand adult roles, whether they be mommies and daddies or workers of
some sort. Recently, a group of children were enacting what happens at the grocery store.
Trina and Yolanda posted a sign on their Family Bulletin Board asking for empty food boxes,
clean cans, and paper shopping bags to enhance the children’s play. They pulled out a toy
cash register from their storage area and worked with the children to set up the grocery
store. The group decided on a name for the store, “The Food Place,” and some children
volunteered to make a sign. Others made play money for the cash register. The teachers led
the children in discussions about different roles to play in the store: cashier, bagger, shelf
stocker, and customer. As children joined in the play, they determined who would play what
role and how they would do their job. Of course, cashier was the most popular! One day,
Trina commented to Yolanda, “Look at the Food Place, today. We have 10 ‘customers’ waiting
patiently in line to check out.” It was true. The children were acting out the role of “waiting
customer” with no problems whatsoever. Yolanda and Trina were truly amazed that in
dramatic play, the children could practice what it means to be a good citizen and member of
the classroom community!
The domain of Social Studies includes Preschool
Benchmarks in: Concepts Related to Citizenship,
Economic Systems and Human Interdependence, and
Awareness of Self, Geography, People, and Families
Social studies is defined as the “part of a school curriculum concerned with the study of social
relationships and the functioning of society” (Merriam-Webster). The knowledge and skills learned
through social studies prepare children to become informed and engaged citizens of their country
and the world. Including social studies in the educational curriculum of the early childhood years
provides an opportunity for adults to support children as they are developing a sense of self and
an awareness of their family and community. While preschool programs may not have a formal
social studies curriculum, many everyday preschool experiences provide a foundation for social
studies skills.
Initially, young children’s focus is on themselves and their family. As they enter preschool, their
world widens to include the school or caregiving environment. And as children grow and develop
during the preschool years, they begin to understand that though they are individuals, they
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SOCIAL STUDIES
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13.B
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
exist not only within a family and school but also within other larger contexts, such as their
neighborhood and community. They begin to see that they have a role to play within each of
these contexts: They are a son or daughter, a sister or brother, a student or friend, a neighbor or
community member. Young children learn how to act as a member of these wider communities,
being loving, helpful, respectful, and contributing to the greater good.
14.A
|
SOCIAL STUDIES
At the same time, they are becoming aware that there are other members of these communities
who make contributions to their own well-being and that of the other community members. They
are fascinated by police officers and firefighters. They imitate doctors, nurses, grocery clerks, and
teachers. Preschool teachers can lead them in studies of topics within their community, including
businesses, community services, and the jobs and responsibilities of adults. These studies
enable children to develop the intellectual habits of investigation and inquiry as they learn how
to transform their curiosity into questions and then represent what they have learned using
developing skills in language, fine arts, and play.
As children learn about broader communities and their members, their sense of geography
expands. They become aware that there are other neighborhoods, other cities, and a larger
country. They begin to see how these spaces and locations can be described and studied using
maps, pictures, and diagrams. As they enter the primary years, their world will widen even more,
and they will begin to understand that other communities exist in other environments. Their
investigations in these early years enable children to have confidence and enthusiasm for finding
answers to the compelling questions of the social sciences as they continue in their schooling.
By incorporating social studies in the early years, teachers are establishing the foundation for a
democracy. They help preschool children to develop group participation skills, such as social
negotiation and problem solving, communicating about one’s needs, and making decisions as a
group. Experiences in social studies provide a foundation for the skills needed to become an active
and productive citizen.
GOAL 14
Understand some concepts related to citizenship.
46
LEARNING STANDARD 14.A
Understand what it means to be a member of a group and community.
47
Preschool Benchmarks
14.A.ECa Recognize the reasons for rules in the home and early childhood environment and for
laws in the community.
14.A.ECb Contribute to the well-being of one’s early childhood environment, school,
and community.
46 In the K-12 IL Learning Standards, Goal 14 reads, “Understand political systems, with an emphasis on the United States.”
47 In the K-12 IL Learning Standards, Standard 14.A reads, “Understand and explain basic principles of the United States government.”
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Social Studies
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Engage in conversation with teacher
about fairness and sharing when a
conflict needs to be resolved.
Participate in discussions
about fairness and sharing
in general conversations.
Demonstrate an understanding of
fairness and sharing (e.g., accepts
the need to wait for a turn with a toy).
Participate in activities that benefit
the group as a whole, such as
cleaning up after play or watering an
early childhood environment plant.
Participate in making group
rules and/or rules for routines
and transitions.
Display awareness of role as a
member of a group and that rules
are made to benefit the members
of a group (e.g., explain that hitting
isn’t allowed because someone
might get hurt).
SOCIAL STUDIES
LEARNING STANDARD 14.B
Understand the structures and functions of the political systems of Illinois, the United States, and
other nations.
Preschool Benchmarks
Not Applicable
LEARNING STANDARD 14.C
Understand ways groups make choices and decisions.
48
Preschool Benchmarks
14.C.ECa Participate in voting as a way of making choices.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Demonstrate preferences and
choices when the group votes to
make simple decisions.
Participate in discussions about how
voting works (e.g., that the majority
vote wins).
Demonstrate an understanding
of the outcome of a vote
(e.g., recognize and accept
that the majority vote wins).
48 In the K-12 IL Learning Standards, Standard 14.C reads, “Understand election processes and responsibilities of citizens.”
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14.C
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
LEARNING STANDARD 14.D
Understand the role that individuals can play in a group or community.
49
Preschool Benchmarks
14.D.ECa Develop an awareness of what it means to be a leader.
14.D.ECb Participate in a variety of roles in the early childhood environment.
Example Performance Descriptors
14.D
|
SOCIAL STUDIES
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Assume simple leadership roles
(e.g., take on role of line leader).
Take responsibility in simple
leadership roles (e.g., as snack
helper, ask about and perform the
necessary tasks).
Assume the role of teacher’s helper
(e.g., table helper; person who
waters the plant; pass out plates,
cups, and spoons for snack).
Identify roles that children play in
the group (e.g., line leader, person
who selects the afternoon story).
Act out various roles that a
person might play within a group
(e.g., pretend to be a teacher,
student, parent, or child during
dramatic play).
Identify and describe roles that
children play in the group (e.g., line
leader, person who selects the
afternoon story).
LEARNING STANDARD 14.E
Understand United States foreign policy as it relates to other nations and international issues.
Preschool Benchmarks
Not Applicable
LEARNING STANDARD 14.F
Understand the development of United States’ political ideas and traditions.
Preschool Benchmarks
Not Applicable
49 In the K-12 IL Learning Standards, Standard 14.D reads, “Understand the roles and influences of individuals and interest groups in the
political systems of Illinois, the United States and other nations.”
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Social Studies
GOAL 15
Explore economic systems and human interdependence.
50
LEARNING STANDARD 15.A
Explore roles in the economic system and workforce.
51
Preschool Benchmarks
15.A.ECa Describe some common jobs and what is needed to perform those jobs.
15.A.ECb Discuss why people work.
SOCIAL STUDIES
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Identify commonly known
community workers and the services
they provide (e.g., describe the work
of firefighters, nurses, mail carriers,
doctors, and police officers).
Act out roles of commonly known
community workers in dramatic play
(e.g., pretend to be a cashier in a
grocery store).
Identify tools and equipment
that correspond to various roles
and jobs of commonly known
community workers.
Participate in a discussion about
jobs their family members may have.
Participate in a discussion that
relates work to earning money.
Participate in a discussion that
relates work to services provided
(e.g., to teach, to take care of people,
to take care of cars, to manage
a business).
LEARNING STANDARD 15.B
Explore issues of limited resources in the early childhood environment and world.
52
Preschool Benchmarks
15.B.ECa Understand that some resources and money are limited.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Participate in a conversation about
taking turns with materials when
there is not enough for everyone to
have their own.
Recognize equal distribution when
sharing a snack, materials, or toys
among a group.
Contribute to a community service
activity of the class (e.g., collecting
food for the needy, recycling early
childhood materials).
50 In the K-12 IL Learning Standards, Goal 15 reads, “Understand economic systems, with an emphasis on the United States.”
51 In the K-12 IL Learning Standards, Standard 15.A reads, “Understand how different economic systems operate in the exchange, production,
distribution and consumption of goods and services.”
52 In the K-12 IL Learning Standards, Standard 15.B reads, “Understand that scarcity necessitates choices by consumers.”
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15.B
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
LEARNING STANDARD 15.C
Understand that scarcity necessitates choices by producers.
53
Preschool Benchmarks
Not Applicable
LEARNING STANDARD 15.D
Explore concepts about trade as an exchange of goods or services.
54
15.C
|
SOCIAL STUDIES
Preschool Benchmarks
15.D.ECa Begin to understand the use of trade or money to obtain goods and services.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Engage in trading with peers
(e.g., trade two pretzels for two
crackers at snack or two small cars
for one big truck during play).
Understand that money is needed
to obtain goods and services
(e.g., while playing store, ask other
children to pay for goods; explain
that you must pay for things that
you get at the store).
Demonstrate understanding
that payment or money comes
in different forms, such as coins,
money, credit cards, and bartering
goods (e.g., while playing store, offer
to pay for goods with credit card,
check, or cash).
LEARNING STANDARD 15.E
Understand the impact of government policies and decisions on production and consumption in
the economy.
Preschool Benchmarks
Not Applicable
53 In the K-12 IL Learning Standards, Standard 15.C reads, “Understand that scarcity necessitates choices by producers.”
54 In the K-12 IL Learning Standards, Standard 15.D reads, “Understand trade as an exchange of goods or services.”
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Social Studies
GOAL 16
Develop an awareness of the self and his or her uniqueness and individuality.
55
LEARNING STANDARD 16.A
Explore his or her self and personal history.
56
Preschool Benchmarks
16.A.ECa Recall information about the immediate past.
16.A.ECb Develop a basic awareness of self as an individual.
SOCIAL STUDIES
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Answer questions such as “How did
you get to school today?” or “In what
centers did you play today?”
Draw or write about something that
happened at school.
Use phrases that differentiate
between events that happened
in the past and are happening in
the present (e.g., describe events
that took place yesterday or are
happening today).
Discuss things that s/he likes
and dislikes.
Demonstrate awareness of self at
a younger age (e.g., bring in picture
of self as an infant).
Participate in discussions about his
or her past (e.g., explain that “When
I was little, I could not ride a tricycle,
but now I can”).
LEARNING STANDARD 16.B
Understand the development of significant political events.
Preschool Benchmarks
Not Applicable
LEARNING STANDARD 16.C
Understand the development of economic systems.
Preschool Benchmarks
Not Applicable
55 In the K-12 IL Learning Standards, Goal 16 reads, “Understand events, trends, individuals and movements shaping the history of Illinois, the
United States and other nations.”
56 In the K-12 IL Learning Standards, Standard 16.A reads, “Apply the skills of historical analysis and interpretation.”
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16.C
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
LEARNING STANDARD 16.D
Understand Illinois, United States, and world social history.
Preschool Benchmarks
Not Applicable
LEARNING STANDARD 16.E
Understand Illinois, United States, and world environmental history.
16.D
|
SOCIAL STUDIES
Preschool Benchmarks
Not Applicable
GOAL 17
Explore geography, the child’s environment, and where people live, work, and play.
57
LEARNING STANDARD 17.A
Explore environments and where people live.
58
Preschool Benchmarks
17.A.ECa Locate objects and places in familiar environments.
17.A.ECb Express beginning geographic thinking.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Follow directions to find objects
or materials in the early childhood
environment (e.g., can find crayons if
told that they are next to the glue).
Engage in basic mapping activities
(e.g., place pictures of common
household items in a map showing
the correct room, such as placing
the toaster in the kitchen and the
bed in the bedroom).
Discuss a diagram of the early
childhood environment showing
where various features of the
room are located.
Participate in a discussion about
maps and diagrams.
Comment on a diagram showing
how mats are arranged at naptime.
Describe basic topographical
features, such as hills, rivers,
and roads.
57 In the K-12 IL Learning Standards, Goal 17 reads, “Understand world geography and the effects of geography on society, with an emphasis
on the United States.”
58 In the K-12 IL Learning Standards, Standard 17.A reads, “Locate, describe and explain places, regions and features on the Earth.”
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Social Studies
LEARNING STANDARD 17.B
Analyze and explain characteristics and interactions of the Earth’s physical systems.
Preschool Benchmarks
Not Applicable
LEARNING STANDARD 17.C
Understand relationships between geographic factors and society.
Preschool Benchmarks
SOCIAL STUDIES
Not Applicable
LEARNING STANDARD 17.D
Understand the historical significance of geography.
Preschool Benchmarks
Not Applicable
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17.D
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
GOAL 18
Explore people and families.
59
LEARNING STANDARD 18.A
Explore people, their similarities, and their differences.
60
Preschool Benchmarks
18.A.ECa Recognize similarities and differences in people.
18.A
|
SOCIAL STUDIES
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Distinguish boys from girls.
Notice differences in physical
characteristics between self
and others.
Describe similarities and differences
in physical characteristics between
self and others (e.g., comment on
characteristics such as hair length,
skin color, age, and height).
LEARNING STANDARD 18.B
Develop an awareness of self within the context of family.
61
Preschool Benchmarks
18.B.ECa Understand that each of us belongs to a family and recognize that families vary.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Compare photos of families and
identify members of own family.
Compare photos of families and
discuss the variety of family structures.
Role-play a variety of family
members in dramatic play.
LEARNING STANDARD 18.C
Understand how social systems form and develop over time.
Preschool Benchmarks
Not Applicable
59 In the K-12 IL Learning Standards, Goal 18 reads, “Understand social systems, with an emphasis on the United States.”
60 In the K-12 IL Learning Standards, Standard 18.A reads, “Compare characteristics of culture as reflected in language, literature, the arts,
traditions and institutions.”
61 In the K-12 IL Learning Standards, Standard 18.B reads, “Understand the roles and interactions of individuals and groups in society.”
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Physical Development and Health
Physical Development
and Health
Juanita teaches preschool at a Head Start program in rural Illinois. Her children have long
bus rides to and from the program. When they arrive, they have lots of energy and need to
run, jump, and play. Juanita recognizes that trying to settle them down immediately is a lost
cause. It’s far more important for them to have opportunities to move after having been so
sedentary on the bus. So, she begins the day with outdoor time if the weather allows and,
if not, movement activities indoors. She not only expects the children to use the standard
playground equipment at her Head Start site, she also plans for other engaging activities
for them outdoors. She sets up obstacle courses—not so much with special equipment but
rather with special directions for the children. They love to hear what she’s got in store for
them this time: “Run to the slide. Climb up carefully. Slide down. Take two big jumps. Walk
backward to the red pole, then tiptoe over to me and give me a hug!” Remembering all of
those directions is a challenge to the children, and she coaches them as they go. But they
keep asking her for another obstacle course every day! When outdoor time is over, they have
expended lots of energy and are ready to go inside, eat a nutritious morning snack, and settle
into the indoor routines.
The domain of Physical Development and Health
includes Preschool Benchmarks in: Movement
Skills, Rules and Safety During Physical Activity,
Team-Building Skills, Principles of Health Promotion
and Prevention, and Human Body Systems
The general health and well-being of young children is central to the core of child development.
The first five years of life mark significant changes in a child’s body and establish a critical
foundation for the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor behaviors needed to progress
through childhood.
In addition to significant health benefits, physical activity, creative movement, and play provide
many advantages for the growing child. Young children who are physically active show greater
brain functioning and an enhanced ability to develop gross-motor movements. Studies have
shown that physical activity plays an essential role in creating nerve cell networks that are
the essence of learning (Ratey, 2008). This research reinforces the need to move in a variety of
ways, such as left to right, up then down, through and around, tracking a moving ball, and so
on. Research also indicates that regular physical activity can help to increase concentration and
reduce disruptive behaviors, suggesting a direct correlation to academic achievement (Trudeau,
F., & Shephard, R. J., 2008). Physical activity and movement also improve children’s self-concept
and social skills. Children exhibit joy and confidence as they accomplish basic motor skills while
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P H Y S I C A L / H E A LT H
|
18.C
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
playing simple games of low organization or when they move to the rhythm of a beat. Creative
movement experiences help children express themselves and learn what they can do with their
bodies. And in many physical activities, children learn to relate to other children as they share
equipment or take turns.
Learning about health and safety practices is important, too. Preschool teachers can help
children become more aware of their bodies and develop general health habits early in life.
It is also important for children to develop decision-making skills and be able to differentiate
between a safe and an unsafe situation.
The teaching of physical development and health at the preschool level plays a significant role
across the major developmental domains. A strong foundation of physical activity, healthy eating
habits, and general health practices will provide each child with the necessary skills and behaviors
to be able to benefit from the learning environment and to lead an active, healthy life.
18.C
|
P H Y S I C A L / H E A LT H
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Physical Development and Health
GOAL 19
Acquire movement skills and understand concepts needed to explore the environment, support
learning, and engage in health-enhancing physical activity.
62
LEARNING STANDARD 19.A
Demonstrate physical competency and control of large and small muscles.
63
Preschool Benchmarks
19.A.ECa Engage in active play using gross- and fine-motor skills.
19.A.ECb Move with balance and control in a range of physical activities.
19.A.ECc Use strength and control to accomplish tasks.
19.A.ECd Use eye-hand coordination to perform tasks.
19.A.ECe Use writing and drawing tools with some control.
P H Y S I C A L / H E A LT H
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Exhibit body control while running
(e.g., run in and out of cones in a
figure eight or change directions
while moving and step down from
higher surface instead of jumping).
Move in general space throughout
the play area exhibiting adequate
body control and safety.
Demonstrate the skills of climbing
(ladders, playground equipment),
hopping (on one foot), and jumping
(can jump over objects 4-6 inches
high and land on both feet).
Exhibit balance while using grossmotor equipment.
Exhibit balance, control, and
coordination during movement
activities (e.g., climb stairs using
alternating feet; run, jump, and walk
in a straight line; stand and hop on
one foot).
Demonstrate strength and balance
by performing body support
movements (e.g., bear crawl and
crab walk).
Put on clothing items, such as shirts,
jackets, pants, and shoes.
Demonstrate ability to use writing
and drawing tools (e.g., hold pencils,
crayons, and markers in a functional
grasp; use paintbrushes to make
strokes at an easel).
Demonstrate eye-hand coordination
and fine-motor control through
various activities (e.g., string beads,
manipulate pegs, build with small
blocks, pour using different tools,
assemble puzzles, button/zip, snap,
use scissors to cut paper).
62 In the K-12 IL Learning Standards, Goal 19 reads, “Acquire movement skills and understand concepts needed to engage in health-enhancing
physical activity.”
63 In the K-12 IL Learning Standards, Standard 19.A reads, “Demonstrate physical competency in individual and team sports, creative
movement and leisure and work-related activities.”
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19.A
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
LEARNING STANDARD 19.B
Demonstrate awareness and coordination of body movements.
64
Preschool Benchmarks
19.B.ECa Coordinate movements to perform complex tasks.
19.B.ECb Demonstrate body awareness when moving in different spaces.
19.B.ECc Combine large motor movements with and without the use of equipment.
Example Performance Descriptors
19.B
|
P H Y S I C A L / H E A LT H
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Demonstrate awareness of spatial
boundaries and the ability to
maneuver within the area.
Move effectively in different
pathways (e.g., zigzag, curved),
able to stop quickly and
change directions.
Coordinate large movements to use
equipment (e.g., peddle a tricycle,
pull a wagon).
Demonstrate the ability to throw
(overhand and underhand).
Throw, catch, or kick a
lightweight ball.
Demonstrate the ability to kick or
strike (using an implement) in a
specific direction with some control
and accuracy.
Participate in activities involving a
series of large motor movements
(e.g., dance, play “Follow the Leader,”
play “Simon Says”).
Demonstrate understanding of
spatial relationships, such as under,
over, behind, and next to, by using
the body and an object.
Demonstrate ability to coordinate
fine- and gross-motor movement
(e.g., build structures, such as some
houses and roads, with hollow and
unit blocks).
LEARNING STANDARD 19.C
Demonstrate knowledge of rules and safety during activity.
Preschool Benchmarks
19.C.ECa Follow simple safety rules while participating in activities.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Demonstrate safe, controlled
movement during activities, with
occasional adult reminders.
Adhere to basic safety rules during
gross- and fine-motor activities, with
occasional adult reminders.
Apply body control during grossmotor activities to prevent accident
or injury to self or others.
Participate in discussions about the
importance of helmets for safety on
tricycles, scooters, and wagons.
Understand the concept of safety
relative to helmets while riding
tricycles, skating on a scooter, or
riding in a wagon.
Ask for a helmet before riding
tricycles, skating on a scooter, or
riding in a wagon.
64 In the K-12 IL Learning Standards, Standard 19.B reads, “Analyze various movement concepts and applications.”
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Physical Development and Health
GOAL 20
Develop habits for lifelong fitness.
65
LEARNING STANDARD 20.A
Achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of physical fitness.
66
Preschool Benchmarks
20.A.ECa Participate in activities to enhance physical fitness.
20.A.ECb Exhibit increased levels of physical activity.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Participate in activities that
increase heart rate, flexibility,
muscle strength, endurance, and
cardiovascular endurance, such as
running and jumping.
Participate in activities that require
stretching muscles, such as climbing,
reaching, and pulling.
Engage in repetitive behavior to
practice and promote skill and
ability, recognizing that physical
activity keeps the body healthy.
P H Y S I C A L / H E A LT H
LEARNING STANDARD 20.B
Assess individual fitness levels.
Preschool Benchmarks
Not Applicable
LEARNING STANDARD 20.C
Set goals based on fitness data and develop, implement, and monitor an individual fitness
improvement plan.
Preschool Benchmarks
Not Applicable
65 In the K-12 IL Learning Standards, Goal 20 reads, “Achieve and maintain a health-enhancing level of physical fitness based upon continual
self-assessment.”
66 In the K-12 IL Learning Standards, Standard 20.A reads, “Know and apply the principles and components of health-related fitness.”
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20.C
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
GOAL 21
Develop team-building skills by working with others through physical activity.
LEARNING STANDARD 21.A
Demonstrate individual responsibility during group physical activities.
Preschool Benchmarks
21.A.ECa Follow rules and procedures when participating in group physical activities.
21.A.ECb Follow directions, with occasional adult reminders, during group activities.
Example Performance Descriptors
21.A
|
P H Y S I C A L / H E A LT H
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Ask questions such as “Is it my turn
now?” during a game.
Show basic awareness of others
and participate in an activity while
remaining in their personal space.
Follow rules for simple games.
Participate in discussion of safety
during physical activity.
Participate safely in the day’s
physical activity, with assistance
from adults.
Participate safely in the day’s
physical activity, with few reminders
from adults.
LEARNING STANDARD 21.B
Demonstrate cooperative skills during structured group physical activity.
Preschool Benchmarks
21.B.ECa Demonstrate ability to cooperate with others during group physical activities.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Share equipment with others during
a group physical activity.
Take turns during group
physical activities.
Cooperate with others during a
physical activity to complete a task.
Encourage peers to be successful.
Respect others’ abilities.
Respect others’ abilities and
cooperate to help the activity be fun
and enjoyable for all.
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Physical Development and Health
GOAL 22
Understand principles of health promotion and the prevention and treatment of illness and injury.
LEARNING STANDARD 22.A
Explain the basic principles of health promotion, illness prevention, treatment, and safety.
Preschool Benchmarks
22.A.ECa Identify simple practices that promote healthy living and prevent illness.
22.A.ECb Demonstrate personal care and hygiene skills, with adult reminders.
22.A.ECc Identify and follow basic safety rules.
Example Performance Descriptors
P H Y S I C A L / H E A LT H
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Participate in discussions about
healthy living (e.g., eating healthy
foods, hand washing, sneezing and
coughing into sleeve).
Distinguish food on a continuum
from more healthy to less healthy.
Recognize the importance of doctor
and dentist visits for staying healthy.
Participate in hand washing
throughout the day, with
adult reminders.
Practice personal hygiene, such
as using a tissue to wipe nose
and throwing used tissues in a
wastebasket or covering the mouth
when sneezing and coughing, with
adult reminders.
Complete personal care tasks, such
as toileting and washing hands, with
only occasional reminders.
Identify ways to reduce injuries on
the playground, such as standing
far enough from swings to avoid
injury and using play equipment in
safe ways.
Discuss safety rules such as
pedestrian safety (e.g., look both
ways before crossing the street and
walking on the sidewalk).
Demonstrate basic safety
knowledge (e.g., looking both ways
before crossing the street, wearing a
seatbelt, practicing bus safety, using
a helmet).
LEARNING STANDARD 22.B
Describe and explain the factors that influence health among individuals, groups,
and communities.
Preschool Benchmarks
Not Applicable
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22.B
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
LEARNING STANDARD 22.C
Explain how the environment can affect health.
Preschool Benchmarks
Not Applicable
GOAL 23
Understand human body systems and factors that influence growth and development.
LEARNING STANDARD 23.A
22.C
|
P H Y S I C A L / H E A LT H
Describe and explain the structure and functions of the human body systems and how
they interrelate.
Preschool Benchmarks
23.A.ECa Identify body parts and their functions.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Point to external body parts, such as
arms, legs, knees, ears, and toes.
Identify external body parts, such as
arms, legs, knees, ears, and toes, by
naming them.
Identify or demonstrate ways to use
body parts (e.g., ears to hear, eyes to
see, legs to walk and run).
| 80 |
Physical Development and Health
LEARNING STANDARD 23.B
Identify ways to keep the body healthy.
67
Preschool Benchmarks
23.B.ECa Identify examples of healthy habits.
23.B.ECb Identify healthy and nonhealthy foods and explain the effect of these foods on
the body.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Distinguish between being healthy
and not healthy.
Participate in discussions of good
health habits, such as getting
enough sleep, eating healthy foods,
and getting enough exercise
every day.
Identify good health habits, such as
getting enough sleep, eating healthy
foods, and getting enough exercise
every day.
Identify healthy foods and snacks.
Explain that bodies need healthy
food to grow, feel well, and have
energy to play.
Participate in discussions about the
importance of eating breakfast.
LEARNING STANDARD 23.C
Describe factors that affect growth and development.
Preschool Benchmarks
Not Applicable
67 In the K-12 IL Standards, Standard 23.B reads, “Explain the effects of health-related actions on the body systems.”
| 81 |
P H Y S I C A L / H E A LT H
|
23.C
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
GOAL 24
Promote and enhance health and well-being through the use of effective communication and
decision-making skills.
LEARNING STANDARD 24.A
Demonstrate procedures for communicating in positive ways, resolving differences, and
preventing conflict.
Preschool Benchmarks
Refer to Social/Emotional Development
24.A
|
P H Y S I C A L / H E A LT H
LEARNING STANDARD 24.B
Apply decision-making skills related to the protection and promotion of individual health.
Preschool Benchmarks
Not Applicable
LEARNING STANDARD 24.C
Demonstrate skills essential to enhancing health and avoiding dangerous situations.
Preschool Benchmarks
24.C.ECa Participate in activities to learn to avoid dangerous situations.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Understand some practices can be
unsafe (e.g., horsing around on the
playground equipment).
Communicate to adults if there
is an unsafe condition in the play
area, such as “Bobby is tripping
other children.” or “The playground
equipment is wet”.
Demonstrate understanding of how
to respond in unsafe situations,
such as what to do if playing near
the street, not wearing a helmet, or
someone gets hurt (e.g., tell an adult,
call 911).
Participate in a discussion about
familiar adults.
Participate in a discussion about
who is and who is not a stranger.
Know when you feel “uncomfortable”
with an adult to express that to
another adult.
| 82 |
The Arts
The Arts
Jenna teaches at her community church preschool program and emphasizes creativity and
the arts with the children throughout the day. She loves to see how they express themselves,
whether it is through music, movement and dance, visual arts, or drama. Each child is so
unique and interesting! José sings as he builds with blocks, sometimes under his breath and
sometimes loudly, almost in triumph, as his block creation is finished. “Ta-daa!!!” Like many
of the children, he sings the favorite class songs as well as songs he hears on the Spanish
radio station that his family listens to. Marianna always moves with grace and requests
scarves and favorite recordings for dancing. She takes dance lessons and shows other
children how to hold their arms and point their toes. Lila and Anthony are the drama queen
and king. They can act out any scene, whether using puppets to act out a story the group
has read or playing at being Mom and Dad in the dramatic play area. While they may argue
some over their roles, they successfully negotiate and keep scripts going, sometimes into the
next day or week. Jenna has written down some of their scenes and read them back to the
group, much to the delight of Lila and Anthony. Painting is Teena’s specialty, both at the easel
and at a table with finger paints. The messier the better for Teena. She uses many colors and
comments as she mixes them. Her paintings are full of energy and motion. Jenna makes sure
to communicate with all of the children’s families about the ways they express their creativity
and the importance of the arts in their young lives.
The domain of the Arts includes Preschool
Benchmarks in: Exploring the Arts and Using the
Arts to Communicate Ideas and Emotions
The creative arts allow young children to explore and express their individuality, imaginations,
and ideas through music, movement and dance, drama, and the visual arts. Through artistic
experiences, children are motivated to engage in problem solving as they experiment with
combinations of media and creative expression. Opportunities to regularly recognize and discuss
beauty in their environment, their work, and in the work of others support young children as they
begin to develop their appreciation of the arts.
Preschool teachers can learn as much about children by observing them in the act of creating as
they can by examining the products of these acts. The topic of children’s work may reflect their
individual interests, while the way they depict the topic may reflect their feelings about that topic,
their fine- or gross-motor skills, and their developing perceptual abilities. Teachers can support
their creative efforts by observing and talking with them about their work and providing them with
strategies that will help them accomplish their artistic goals.
When first introduced to a new element of the arts (a musical instrument, an art medium, or a
movement), young children are typically focused on the process of manipulating that element
rather than on producing an end product. However, as they are given opportunities to become
more familiar with the element, they begin to use it with increasing intent and skill.
| 83 |
THE ARTS
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24.C
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
It is important to give young children extensive opportunities and encouragement to explore
new media so they can begin to use them for expression. Preschool teachers need to provide a
rich variety of visual art materials, musical instruments, recordings and experiences, props and
materials for dramatizing, and opportunities for movement and dance so the arts are integrated
into learning experiences across the curriculum. Accepting the way each child expresses his or her
creativity and encouraging experimentation, exploration, and risk-taking as he or she engages in
creative work will support a child’s development in the arts.
GOAL 25
Gain exposure to and explore the arts.
68
LEARNING STANDARD 25.A
Investigate, begin to appreciate, and participate in the arts.
69
25.A
|
THE ARTS
Preschool Benchmarks
25.A.ECa Movement and Dance: Build awareness of, explore, and participate in dance and
creative movement activities.
25.A.ECb Drama: Begin to appreciate and participate in dramatic activities.
25.A.ECc Music: Begin to appreciate and participate in music activities.
25.A.ECd Visual Arts: Investigate and participate in activities using visual arts materials.
Example Performance Descriptors: Movement and Dance
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Participate in movement games
and activities (e.g., imitate animal
movements in a group activity,
dance with classmates, play “Simon
Says”, freeze when music stops).
Combine music and movement
(e.g., move to the beat of a drum).
Change movement in response to
tempo (e.g., moving more slowly
when music slows down and more
quickly when music speeds up).
Begin to purposely use simple
movement patterns as they move
to music (e.g., intentionally using
dance movements they have
learned or made up, dancing to a
familiar tune).
Portray emotions through
movement (e.g., hanging head
and drooping shoulders to portray
feeling sad; swinging arms, smiling,
and taking big steps to portray
feeling happy).
Move in coordination with a partner
(e.g., mirroring the movements of a
partner, holding hands and moving
to rhythmic dance music, swinging
partner by linking elbows).
Perform imaginative and
unstructured movement activities,
such as galloping, twirling in
response to music, or dancing
with scarves.
Begin to coordinate rhythm and
timing in movement activities
(e.g., swinging on swings or sharing
a teeter-totter).
Move to the beat of music.
68 In the K-12 IL Learning Standards, Goal 25 reads, “Know the language of the arts.”
69 In the K-12 IL Learning Standards, Standard 25.A reads, “Understand the sensory elements, organizational principles and expressive
qualities of the arts.”
| 84 |
The Arts
Example Performance Descriptors: Drama
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Participate in or dramatize familiar
songs (e.g., imitate teacher in moving
like various animals during a song
about farm animals).
Act out roles in the dramatic play area
(e.g., pretend to be a doctor, mother,
cashier, or police officer).
Use a pretend play to represent
known or anticipated situations
(e.g., reenact a visit to the dentist).
Begin to dramatize character by
changing speech, facial expression,
gestures, and body movement
(e.g., “washing animals” like Mrs.
Wishy Washy with a teacher during
a read-aloud).
Begin to coordinate roles in dramatic
play with others who take on roles
(e.g., enters dramatic play about the
grocery store and agrees with other
children regarding who will play
which role).
Proactively organize dramatic play
with others (e.g., assigning roles,
props, and laying out rules for
the play).
View the dramatic performances of
the teacher retelling a story or acting
out a puppet play.
View the dramatic performances
of other children attentively
(e.g., watches other children reenact
a familiar story).
Appreciate the dramatic
performances of others (e.g., may
clap, laugh at, or verbally praise the
comedic performance of others).
Example Performance Descriptors: Music
THE ARTS
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Listen to music representing a variety
of rhythms, styles, and cultures.
Play various musical instruments
to explore the type of sound
each makes.
Identify differences in styles of music
or sounds of musical instruments
(e.g., “That music is slower.” “The flute
sounds high.”)
Show appreciation for music
through body language and facial
expressions (e.g., clap when a favorite
song is played).
Request favorite songs to sing, dance
with, or listen to.
Request favorite songs to sing, dance
with, or listen to and describe favorite
features of the song.
Example Performance Descriptors: Visual Arts
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Explore various ways to use visual
arts such as painting materials
(e.g., combine paint colors, paint
with large brushes as well as with
cotton swabs).
Manipulate play dough or clay
in different ways, such as rolling,
pinching, or squeezing.
Create two- and three-dimensional
works of art while experimenting with
color, line, shape, form, texture, and
space (e.g., use paint, markers, crayon,
clay, pipe cleaners, found
art materials).
Use a variety of visual art materials
independently (e.g., get out paper,
glue, and scissors to create a collage;
get clay, water bowl, and clay tools
from shelves and bring to table
to work; use digital camera to
capture images).
Use a wide variety of tools and
techniques to create art (e.g., use
fine-bristled brush to paint fine lines
and dots).
Begin to revise and expand on ideas
by revisiting art projects (e.g., add
more detail to a drawing, use another
media to elaborate on the original
over several days in the art area).
Use the visual arts to represent
(not necessarily with appropriate
details) a person, place, thing, or
event (e.g., draw a picture of Mommy
or form a three-dimensional figure
using clay).
Begin to coordinate the features of
objects and their spatial relationship
to one another (e.g., eyes are enclosed
in circle that represents head, arms
are connected to the body).
Use details to accurately represent
some details of objects, people,
places, or things (e.g., pictures of
person include clothing, hair, and the
correct number of fingers).
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25.A
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
LEARNING STANDARD 25.B
Display an awareness of some distinct characteristics of the arts.
70
Preschool Benchmarks
25.B.ECa Describe or respond to their creative work or the creative work of others.
Example Performance Descriptors
25.B
|
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Describe something in their own
creative work (e.g., “I made two
pancakes with play dough.”)
Describe feelings in response
to music or art of self or others
(e.g., comment that an upbeat song
makes him/her feel happy or that he
likes the blue paint his friend used).
Show appreciation for the
creative work of others (e.g., watch
attentively as classmates put
on a puppet show or perform
with instruments).
Paint a picture and discuss it with
a classmate.
Comment on another child’s
art and ask questions about it,
independently or in response to
teacher prompts.
Comment on the art
of professional artists.
THE ARTS
70 In the K-12 IL Learning Standards, Standard 25.B reads, “Understand the similarities, distinctions and connections in and among the arts.”
| 86 |
The Arts
GOAL 26
Understand that the arts can be used to communicate ideas and emotions.
71
LEARNING STANDARD 26.A
Understand processes, traditional tools, and modern technologies used in the arts.
72
Preschool Benchmarks
Not Applicable
LEARNING STANDARD 26.B
Understand ways to express meaning through the arts.
73
Preschool Benchmarks
26.B.ECa Use creative arts as an avenue for self-expression.
THE ARTS
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Create movement to intentionally
represent something or portray
phenomena (e.g., move like a falling
leaf, a bird flying, or a ball bouncing).
Create music to accompany
activities (e.g., sing and dance during
play activities).
Create a puppet or mask to portray a
character in a story.
Establish a play space for
dramatization (e.g., set up chairs for
a pretend bus ride).
Dramatize an event (e.g., act out
going on a field trip to the zoo).
Use the visual arts to depict an
event (e.g., draw a picture about
something that happened on
the playground).
71 In the K-12 IL Learning Standards, Goal 26 reads, “Through creating and performing, understand how works of art are produced.”
72 In the K-12 IL Learning Standards, Standard 26.A reads, “Understand processes, traditional tools and modern technologies used in the arts.”
73 In the K-12 IL Learning Standards, Standard 26.B reads, “Apply skills and knowledge necessary to create and perform in one or more of the arts.”
| 87 |
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26.B
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
GOAL 27
Understand the role of the arts in civilizations, past and present.
LEARNING STANDARD 27.A
Analyze how the arts function in history, society, and everyday life.
Preschool Benchmarks
Not Applicable
LEARNING STANDARD 27.B
Understand how the arts shape and reflect history, society, and everyday life.
Preschool Benchmarks
27.A
|
THE ARTS
Not Applicable
| 88 |
English Language Learner Home Language Development
English Language Learner
Home Language Development
Geraldo and his co-teacher, Mingyu, have children from families who speak many different
languages in their homes. Both teachers recognize the importance of a child’s first language
and work hard to use words and phrases they hear at home. They invite families to teach
them so they can expand their own capabilities to communicate with the children. They
also know that as children participate in an English-speaking environment, their brains are
busy processing and interpreting what is being said. They are patient and understanding,
letting each child know that he can communicate in whatever way works best for him. They
are amazed as they watch children with various languages at play together. The amount of
accommodation they make for each other is so heartwarming.
The domain of English Language Learner Home
Language Development includes Preschool
Benchmarks in: Using Home Language to
Communicate and to Make Connections and
Reinforce Knowledge and Skills Across Academic
and Social Areas
ELL/HLD
For young children who are English Language Learners (ELLs), the home language is the vehicle
by which they are socialized into their families and communities. It is the medium that fosters
their earliest and most enduring relationships, their initial ideas about how the world works, and
their emerging sense of self and identity. When preschool ELLs enter English-only preschool
classrooms, they may lose their desire and eventually their ability to speak their home language.
The development of linguistic, cognitive, and literacy skills in the child’s first language provides the
foundation for learning these skills in English. The knowledge and skills children demonstrate in
their home language can be applied to the learning of English for social and academic purposes.
Therefore, a child’s understanding and ability to use her home language is the first step in
acquiring English proficiency and English literacy skills.
Recent research from cognitive neuroscientists has found that
•  the preschool years are an ideal time for children to learn two languages;
•  there are multiple cognitive, social, and cultural benefits when young children have
the opportunity to learn more than one language;
•  knowing more than one language does not delay the acquisition of English or impede
academic achievement in English when both are supported; and
•  children who learn English after their home language has been established (usually
around 3 years of age) are capable of adding a second language and this dual| 89 |
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27.B
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
language ability confers long-term cognitive, cultural, and economic advantages.
Some children learn two languages simultaneously, starting before the age of 3,
and follow similar developmental trajectories as their monolingual peers when the
development of both languages is supported.
The early childhood years are the critical time for developing mastery of the sounds, structures,
and functions of language and thus an ideal time to expose children to the benefits of two
languages. Therefore, the Illinois ELL Home Language Development Standards begin with home
language goals and benchmarks. These indicators of progress in mastering the elements of the
home language are critical to the process of acquiring English proficiency and developing the
underlying linguistic knowledge necessary for academic success in English.
27.B
|
ELL/HLD
| 90 |
English Language Learner Home Language Development
GOAL 28
Use the home language to communicate within and beyond the classroom.
LEARNING STANDARD 28.A
Use the home language at age-appropriate levels for a variety of social and academic purposes.
Preschool Benchmarks
28.A.ECa May demonstrate progress and mastery of benchmarks through home language.
28.A.ECb Use home language in family, community, and early childhood settings.
28.A.ECc Develop an awareness of the different contextual and cultural features in the early
childhood and community settings the child participates in.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Use the home language in greetings
and other social situations.
Answer questions about self in
home language.
Use the home language to respond
to stories, conversations, or share
personally meaningful information,
such as what the family did over
the weekend.
Label elements in family photo
(e.g., self, family members, event,
location) in the home language.
Describe actions in play scenarios
and act out familiar role in dramatic
play using home language
(e.g., mother, grandfather, doctor).
Resolve conflicts with another child
who speaks the same language
using home language (e.g., taking
turns on a bike, sharing a doll).
Use one- to two-word utterances
to convey an idea in the
home language.
Use three- to five-word utterances
to convey an idea in the
home language.
Use utterances of five or more
words to convey an idea in the
home language.
Begin to show some awareness of
different languages, communication
styles, and/or formats to use in
community settings (e.g., home,
grocery store, church).
Begin to show some awareness of
different languages, communication
styles, and/or formats to use in early
childhood settings (e.g., gym, art,
playtime, group times).
Use different languages,
communication styles, and/or
formats to use in early childhood
settings and in community settings
(e.g., chooses language(s) for play
depending upon the peer(s), turns
and talks to a peer using appropriate
language, talks to adults using
appropriate language).
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ELL/HLD
|
28.A
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
GOAL 29
Use the home language to make connections and reinforce knowledge and skills across academic
and social areas.
LEARNING STANDARD 29.A
Use the home language to attain benchmarks across all the learning areas and to build upon and
develop transferable language and literacy skills.
Preschool Benchmarks
29.A.ECa Use home cultural and linguistic knowledge to express current understandings and
construct new concepts.
29.A.ECb With adult support, begin to bridge home language and English to demonstrate
progress in meeting IELDS.
29.A.ECc Exhibit foundational literacy skills in home language to foster transfer to English.
Example Performance Descriptors
29.A
|
ELL/HLD
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
In home language, retell home
routine to understand concept of
sequencing (e.g., tell the things done
at home before school).
In home language, describe
what s/he is doing in a play or
group experience.
In home language, explain a new
discovery or understanding acquired
through a play or group experience.
With adult support, use one or two
English words to communicate
about familiar routines.
With adult support, attempt to
use general and specific English
words connected to a specific
topic (e.g., butterfly, wing, eye,
pretty, fly) with home language
in conversations, responses, and/
or questions.
With adult support, connect
vocabulary in home language with
English vocabulary (e.g., círculo/
circle, más/more, carro/car).
Pretend to read text in home
language (e.g., tell the things seen in
pictures to read a picture book to a
friend in home language).
Use knowledge of stories read in
home language to answer simple
questions in English or the home
language (e.g., after completing
a picture walk of a book in home
language, the child answers
questions about characters in
the book).
Dictate information that includes
some details or sequence of
events to be written on a piece
of work in the home language
(e.g., could dictate to a family
member, classroom volunteer, or
another person who speaks the
child’s home language).
| 92 |
Social/Emotional Development
Social/Emotional
Development
Tamika knows that preschool children’s social/emotional development is the foundation
for all of their learning. In her park district preschool program, she focuses on building
strong relationships with and among the children. She respects the ways each child shows
and receives affection, giving big hugs to some and shaking hands with others. And she
recognizes the budding friendships children are developing and tries to support each child
in those relationships. She encourages children’s expression of feelings and empathy for
others. She is proactive rather than reactive, helping children learn ways to talk about and
label their feelings to prevent physical expressions of anger or frustration. She guides them
as they try to work out disagreements and come to mutual understanding, recognizing how
their actions affect others. She has even set up a “Peace Table” where children can go and
negotiate with each other. Most of them have become so successful at it that she’s not even
needed in the discussion much of the time, except to recognize them when a solution is
reached. Tamika uses many strategies to help children develop self-regulation. She gives
them plenty of notice when transitions are about to occur. She encourages them to make
plans for their play activities and helps them to follow through. She invites them to pretend in
ways that help them control their behaviors, such as being as quiet as butterflies when they
have to walk past the park offices on their way to the playground. She also plans for ways to
develop children’s focus, attention, engagement, curiosity, and initiative. She knows these
approaches to learning will build toward academic success in kindergarten and beyond.
The domain of Social/Emotional Development includes
Preschool Benchmarks in: Self-Management Skills,
Social Awareness and Interpersonal Skills, and
Decision-making Skills and Responsible Behaviors
Social/emotional competence of young children is an important predictor of success in school.
There is solid evidence that children need to achieve minimal social/emotional competence by
about the age of 6 (Katz & McClellan, 1997) to have a positive experience in the early elementary
grades. The basic competencies of social/emotional development help not only in the preschool
and kindergarten years but also in the long-term—affecting lifelong trajectories related to
schooling and employment. The inclusion of social/emotional development in the IELDS is
essential to promote children’s growth in all domains. And there is much that preschool teachers
can do to take advantage of natural as well as planned opportunities to support this important
aspect of early development.
Social/emotional development includes learning to
•  identify and understand one’s feelings,
• accurately read and comprehend emotional states in others,
| 93 |
SOCIAL/EMOTIONAL
|
29.A
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
•  manage strong emotions and their expression in a constructive manner,
•  regulate one’s behavior,
•  develop empathy for others, and
•  establish and sustain relationships. (Boyd, Barnett, Bodrova, Leong, & Gomby, 2005, p. 3)
Young children are gradually developing an understanding of the consequences of their actions.
Part of this development is learning to understand rules and their purposes. In addition, the early
years are an important time to develop self-regulation—the ability to postpone acting on one’s
first impulse, which might be anger or aggression or not following the teacher’s directions—and
gradually learn how to develop constructive strategies that lead to conflict resolution. For children to
become successful learners in a classroom, they must begin to self-regulate. Preschool teachers can
work with children to help them focus on the task at hand and “begin to think ahead, to plan their
activities, and to think about and use strategies to solve social problems” (Boyd et al., 2005, p. 4).
Approaches to learning are another important area addressed in the social/emotional domain
(under Goal 30, Learning Standard C). Preschool children are learning how to be a learner at their
early childhood program. They are developing executive functions, “the brain functions we use
to manage our attention, our emotions, and our behavior in pursuit of our goals. ... Executive
functions predict children’s success as well as—if not better than—IQ tests” (Galinsky, 2012). When
preschool teachers help children develop their approaches to learning and executive functions,
they are building the foundation for academic success in kindergarten and beyond. In the IELDS,
approaches to learning include
•  eagerness and curiosity as a learner;
29.A
|
SOCIAL/EMOTIONAL
•  persistence and creativity in seeking solutions to problems;
•  initiative, self-direction, and independence in actions; and
•  engagement and sustained attention in activities.
Preschool experiences can be ripe with opportunities to develop children’s approaches to learning
and build toward their future school success. As children play, they explore and investigate new
items, materials, and ways of using them. They stay with tasks that are interesting and rewarding to
them, solving problems as they arise with creativity and critical thinking. Play fosters independence
and self-direction. As preschool children become more competent players, their ability to engage
and sustain attention spills over into other activities that are interesting to them, including teacherled small and large groups that include active participation, hands-on exploration, movement, and
challenging exploration of a topic, an experience, or a long-term study.
Teachers have a large role to play in the development of social/emotional competence. A positive
foundation in these skills will serve children well throughout their lifespan, helping each child to
accept and benefit from education and experience in every domain.
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Social/Emotional Development
GOAL 30
Develop self-management skills to achieve school and life success and develop positive
relationships with others.
LEARNING STANDARD 30.A
Identify and manage one’s emotions and behavior.
Preschool Benchmarks
30.A.ECa Recognize and label basic emotions.
30.A.ECb Use appropriate communication skills when expressing needs, wants, and feelings.
30.A.ECc Express feelings that are appropriate to the situation.
30.A.ECd Begin to understand and follow rules.
30.A.ECe Use materials with purpose, safety, and respect.
30.A.ECf
Begin to understand the consequences of his or her behavior.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Begin to label own basic
emotions with teacher assistance
(e.g., Teacher: “How does that make
you feel when they don’t let you play
here?” Child: “That makes me mad.”).
Identify the emotions of characters
in a storybook (e.g., “How do you
think that made her feel when...”?).
Use language to express feelings
when playing with or negotiating
with another child (e.g., “Don’t yell
so loud. That scares me.”).
Begin to increase ability to follow
early childhood environment
rules and procedures (e.g., accept
need to wait when interested in
playing at the sand table when it is
already “full”).
Increase ability to control impulses
and follow rules (e.g., wait for
teacher approval before opening the
early childhood environment door
to the outdoor play area).
State rules as reasons for own
behavior and for what other children
should do (e.g., “You shouldn’t run in
the classroom. You can run outside.”).
Begin to respond appropriately
to teacher intervention when
not following early childhood
environment rules (e.g., stops
throwing sand when asked most of
the time).
Can discuss with teacher reason
for teacher intervention when
not following classroom rules
(e.g., Teacher: “You need to come off
the slide now. Do you know why?”
Child: “Because I’m climbing up the
slide instead of the stairs.”).
Accept, with minimal frustration,
consequences for not following
the rules (e.g., being removed from
the water table after repeatedly
and intentionally splashing
another child).
Begin to use materials safely and
with purpose.
Use materials safely and with
purpose (e.g., put away things
in designated locations at
cleanup time).
Recognize unsafe use of materials
and tell an adult.
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SOCIAL/EMOTIONAL
|
30.A
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
LEARNING STANDARD 30.B
Recognize own uniqueness and personal qualities.
74
Preschool Benchmarks
30.B.ECa Describe self using several basic characteristics.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
Express likes and dislikes, including
favorite foods, colors, or activities.
30.B
|
DEVELOPING
Show confidence in abilities,
(e.g., “Look what I can do.” or
“Look how far I jumped.)
BUILDING
Describe him or her self (e.g., talk
about self in terms of looks, gender,
family, and interests; complete a
self-portrait and describe the picture
to the teacher).
SOCIAL/EMOTIONAL
74 In the K-12 IL Learning Standards, Standard 1.B reads, “Recognize personal qualities and external supports.”
| 96 |
Social/Emotional Development
LEARNING STANDARD 30.C
Demonstrate skills related to successful personal and school outcomes.
75
Preschool Benchmarks
30.C.ECa Exhibit eagerness and curiosity as a learner.
30.C.ECb Demonstrate persistence and creativity in seeking solutions to problems.
30.C.ECc Show some initiative, self-direction, and independence in actions.
30.C.ECd Demonstrate engagement and sustained attention in activities.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Show excitement about new items
in the early childhood environment
(e.g., express delight over new
blocks or science materials or
the addition of bubbles in the
water table).
Ask questions about new items
in the early childhood
environment (e.g., “How does
this work, teacher?”).
Use materials or props in novel ways
(e.g., use a block as a cell phone or a
banana as a microphone).
Persistently work toward completing
challenging activities and ask for
assistance from peers or an adult
if needed (e.g., when trying to
complete a difficult puzzle or build a
complex block structure).
Independently seek out solutions to
problems (e.g., use tape to combine
materials to create new objects for
dramatic play or to make a block
structure more stable).
Begin to make choices for play
activities and follow through with
self-direction and independence.
Make choices for play activities
regularly and follow through with
self-direction and independence.
Suggest new ideas for play activities
and follow through with selfdirection and independence.
Stay with one or two tasks that
interest him or her for at least 10
minutes each.
Stay with more than two tasks that
interest him or her for at least 10
minutes each.
Sustain engagement with a task that
interests him or her for long periods
of time (at least 30 minutes) and
begin to sustain attention in tasks
that are not based on his or her
interests (e.g., in a teacher-led small
or large group).
Ask questions using “who”, “what”,
“how”, “why”, “when”, and “what if” to
learn about the indoor and outdoor
classroom environment.
75 In the K-12 IL Learning Standards, Standard 1.C reads, “Demonstrate skills related to achieving personal and academic goals.”
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SOCIAL/EMOTIONAL
|
30.C
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
GOAL 31
Use social-awareness and interpersonal skills to establish and maintain positive relationships.
LEARNING STANDARD 31.A
Develop positive relationships with peers and adults.
76
Preschool Benchmarks
31.A.ECa Show empathy, sympathy, and caring for others.
31.A.ECb Recognize the feelings and perspectives of others.
31.A.ECc Interact easily with familiar adults.
31.A.ECd Demonstrate attachment to familiar adults.
31.A.ECe Develop positive relationships with peers.
Example Performance Descriptors
31.A
|
SOCIAL/EMOTIONAL
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Ask about another child’s feelings
(e.g., “Is she sad that her Mom left?”).
Demonstrate sympathy and caring
(e.g., comfort a friend who has fallen
on the playground).
Describe how others are feeling
based on their facial expressions,
gestures, and what they say.
Greet teachers upon arrival and
say goodbye to family members
upon departure.
Demonstrate affection for familiar
adults through hugs, kisses, or
making gifts.
Engage in reciprocal conversations
with familiar adults.
Choose to play with another child
more frequently than with others.
Develop friendships with peers.
Accept that others may have
different preferences, such as foods
they like, favorite colors, or activities
they like to do.
76 In the K-12 IL Learning Standards, Standard 2.A reads, reads, “Recognize the feelings and perspectives of others.”
| 98 |
Social/Emotional Development
LEARNING STANDARD 31.B
Use communication and social skills to interact effectively with others.
Preschool Benchmarks
31.B.ECa Interact verbally and nonverbally with other children.
31.B.ECb Engage in cooperative group play.
31.B.ECc Use socially appropriate behavior with peers and adults, such as helping, sharing,
and taking turns.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Acknowledge another child through
a smile or wave when she enters the
early childhood environment.
Talk with another child in play or
other daily activities.
Engage in reciprocal conversations
with other children throughout
the day.
With teacher assistance,
communicate with another child to
determine roles and activities during
play (e.g., Teacher: “Can you tell your
friend that you want to help him
build his road?” Child: “Can I build
with you?”).
Communicate with another child to
determine roles and activities during
cooperative play (e.g., talk with
classmate to decide who will be the
nurse during dramatic play, talk with
classmate to come up with a plan for
setting the table together).
Follow through with cooperative
actions after communicating with
another child to determine roles and
activities during cooperative play
(e.g., act out roles in doctor/nurse
play, set the table together).
Respond to teacher request to help
or share (e.g., responding to request
to help teacher and children clean
up the block area).
Interact in socially appropriate ways
with peers, such as helping and
sharing (e.g., assist another child
with a puzzle, share blocks with
a classmate).
Interact in socially appropriate
ways with peers and adults, such
as helping and sharing (e.g., offer
help to adult in getting the paints
cleaned up).
SOCIAL/EMOTIONAL
| 99 |
|
31.B
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
LEARNING STANDARD 31.C
Demonstrate an ability to prevent, manage, and resolve interpersonal conflicts in constructive ways.
Preschool Benchmarks
31.C.ECa Begin to share materials and experiences and take turns.
31.C.ECb Solve simple conflicts with peers with independence, using gestures or words.
31.C.ECc Seek adult help when needed to resolve conflict.
Example Performance Descriptors
31.C
|
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Respond positively to teacher
reminders to share materials and
take turns most of the time.
Keep play going with another
child by sharing materials most of
the time.
Take turns with another child when
materials are limited (e.g., share
microscope with classmate, each
taking turns to look at objects).
Respond positively to teacher
assistance in solving a conflict with
another child.
Attempt to resolve conflicts to keep
play going with another child.
Suggest solutions to conflicts
(e.g., propose to classmate: “You
play with these cars, and I can use
these trucks.”).
Begin to accept adult help when
needed to resolve conflict.
Accept adult help when needed to
resolve conflict.
Ask an adult for help when
needed (e.g., seek out a teacher
when another child is being
physically aggressive).
SOCIAL/EMOTIONAL
| 100 |
Social/Emotional Development
GOAL 32
Demonstrate decision-making skills and behaviors in personal, school, and community contexts.
LEARNING STANDARD 32.A
Begin to consider ethical, safety, and societal factors in making decisions.
77
Preschool Benchmarks
32.A.ECa Participate in discussions about why rules exist.
32.A.ECb Follow rules and make good choices about behavior.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Accept reminders from teacher
about why rules exist.
Participate in a discussion about
how throwing objects in the
early childhood environment
is dangerous.
Discuss how hitting others is not
allowed because it can hurt others.
Follow an early childhood
environment rule with
teacher reminder.
Follow more than one early
childhood environment rule with
teacher reminder.
Follow simple early childhood
environment rules independently
much of the time.
SOCIAL/EMOTIONAL
77 In the K-12 IL Learning Standards, Standard 3.A reads, “Consider ethical, safety and societal factors in making decisions.”
| 101 |
|
32.A
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
LEARNING STANDARD 32.B
Apply decision-making skills to deal responsibly with daily academic and social situations.
Preschool Benchmarks
32.B.ECa Participate in discussions about finding alternative solutions to problems.
Example Performance Descriptors
EXPLORING
DEVELOPING
BUILDING
Stop actions and listen to teacher
discuss alternative solutions to
hitting someone.
Participate in a discussion with a
teacher about alternative solutions
to hitting someone who has taken
a toy.
Offer solutions to problems
(e.g., “I am using these; you can
use those.”).
LEARNING STANDARD 32.C
Contribute to the well-being of one’s school and community.
Preschool Benchmarks
Refer to Social Studies, Standard 14.A
32.B
|
SOCIAL/EMOTIONAL
| 102 |
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Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
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| 108 |
National Council of Teachers of Mathematics.
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| 110 |
Acknowledgments
Acknowledgments—
Content-area Experts
Thank you to the content-area experts who reviewed, and edited, their respective learning areas—
focusing on what is best and developmentally appropriate for preschool children:
Dr. Kathy Barclay, Western Illinois University, Macomb
Dr. Sallee Beneke, St. Ambrose University, IA
Dr. Linda Espinosa, University of Missouri
Dr. Judy Harris Helm, Best Practices, Inc., Brimfield, IL
Dr. Lilian Katz, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Dr. Jennifer McCray, Erikson Institute, Chicago
Dr. Elizabeth Sherwood, Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville
Dr. Stephen Virgilio, Adelphi University, NY
Acknowledgments—
Participants
Thank you to the Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards workgroup members, to
those who were part of the infancy stages of the revision process—through and/or including
the development planning for the workshops to train practioners. Their contribution of time,
thoughtful feedback, and commitment, in whatever way, is sincerely appreciated.
Samantha Aigner-Treworgy, Chicago Public Schools, Chicago
Shannon Alamia, Children’s Learning Center, DeKalb
Julie Allen, Skip-A-Long Child Development, Moline
Arthur Baroody, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
Karen Berman, Ounce of Prevention Fund , Chicago
Jill Calkins, Tri-County Opportunities Council (TCOC), Rock Falls
Madeline Cancel-Hanieh, Department of Family & Support Services, Chicago
Jeanna Capito, Positive Parenting DuPage, Warrenville
| 111 |
Acknowledgments
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
Pat Chamberlain, Chamberlain Educational Consulting, Inc, Elgin
Rhonda Clark, Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield
Kim Collins, Governor’s Office of Early Childhood Development, Chicago
Denise Conkright, PACT for Central Illinois, Mount Sterling
Julia Cotter, Livingston County Special Services Unit, Pontiac
Carol Crum, Cook County SD 130, Blue Island
Isolda Davila, City of Chicago Children & Youth Services
Kathy Davis, District 186 – Early Start Pre-K, Springfield
Debbie Ditchen, Heartland Head Start, Bloomington
Natalie Doyle, Rock Island County ROE, Moline
Claire Dunham, Ounce of Prevention Fund, Chicago
Donna Emmons, Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield
Lisa Fisher, Early Childhood Consultant, Naperville
Theresa Hawley, Governor’s Office of Early Childhood Development, Chicago
Denise Henry, STARNET Region IV, Belleville
Reyna Hernandez, Illinois State Board of Education, Chicago
Linda Housewright, Preschool for All Coach and Consultant, Dallas City
Denise Jordan, Department of Family & Support Services, Chicago
Beth Knight, Illinois Network of Child Care Resource & Referral, Bloomington
Terri Lawrence, Tri-County Opportunities Council (TCOC), Rock Falls
Tom Layman, Illinois Action for Children, Chicago
Kathleen Liffick, Champaign County Head Start, Champaign
Lori Longueville, Child Care Resource & Referral, Carterville
Heather Madden, Chicago Public Schools, Chicago
Cathy Main, University of Illinois at Chicago
Stephen Marlette, Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville
Jan Maruna, Illinois Network of Child Care Resource & Referral, Bloomington
Elizabeth Mascitti-Miller, Chicago Public Schools, Chicago
Rebecca McBroom, Kankakee SD 111/Head Start, Kankakee
Louisiana Melendez, Erikson Institute , Chicago
Paulette Mercurius, Department of Family & Support Services, Chicago
Brian Michalski, Illinois Resource Center: Early Childhood, Arlington Heights
Libby Mitchell, Illinois Network of Child Care Resource & Referral, Bloomington
| 112 |
Acknowledgments
Lauri Morrison-Frichtl, Illinois Head Start Association, Springfield
Marta Moya-Leang, Belmont-Cragin Early Childhood Center, City of Chicago School District 299
Kimberly Nelson, Rockford Public Schools District 205, Rockford
Kristie Norwood, Ounce of Prevention Fund, Chicago
Tamara Notter, Child Care Resource & Referral, Joliet
Donna Nylander, Valley View Early Childhood Center, Romeoville
Jeanine O’Nan Brownell, Erikson Institute, Chicago
Charles Parr, Riverbend Head Start & Family Services, Alton
Jenine Patty, Tri-County Opportunities Council (TCOC), Rock Falls
Pam Reising Rechner, Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield
Vanessa Rich, Department of Family & Support Services, Chicago
Diane Richey, SIU – Southern Region Early Childhood Programs, Carbondale
Allen Rosales, Christopher House, Chicago
Elizabeth Sherwood, Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville
Connie Shugart, STARNET Regions I & III, Macomb
Katherine Slattery, STARNET Region II, Arlington Heights
Loukisha Smart-Pennix, Department of Family & Support Services, Chicago
Penelope Smith, Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield
Erin Stout, Peoria County Bright Futures, Peoria Heights
Kathy Villano, Early Childhood Developmental Enrichment Center, The Center, Arlington Heights
Laurie Walker, Skip-A-Long Child Development, Moline
Amy Weseloh, Fox Valley Home Day Care, Batavia
Maureen Whalen, Woodford County Special Education Association/Bright Beginnings, Metamora
Karen Yarbrough, Ounce of Prevention Fund, Chicago
Cindy Zumwalt, Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield
| 113 |
Acknowledgments
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
Acknowledgments—
Field Test Participants
Thank you to the programs and practitioners that field tested the revised IELDS in their program
settings. Their enthusiasm and eagerness to provide feedback was contagious and exemplified
their commitment and dedication to the work they do for children and families throughout Illinois.
Illinois Early Learning Standards Participant List
This list also includes those who participated in the development of the original standards.
*Indicates participation in the 2013 revisions and field testing.
*ABC Preschool, Decatur
*Alton Day Care & Learning Center, Alton
*Anna’s Daycare, St. Charles
*Anne M. Jeans Pre-K, CCSD 180, Willowbrook
*Archdiocese of Chicago, Office of Catholic Schools, Chicago
Argenta-Oreana CUSD 1, Argenta
*As We Grow Preschool, Oswego
*Atwood Hammond CUSD 39, Atwood
Aurora West CUSD 129, Aurora
Avon CUSD 176, Avon
Ball-Chatham CUSD 5, Chatham
*Barrington Early Learning Center/Barrington SD 220, Barrington
BCMW Head Start, Centralia
*Bellwood SD 88, Bellwood
*Belmont-Cragin Early Childhood Center/CPS District 299, Chicago
Belvidere CUSD 100, Belvidere
Bethalto CUSD 8, Bethalto
| 114 |
Acknowledgments
*Bizzy Bee’s Family Child Care, Carpentersville
*Children’s Learning Center, DeKalb
*Blessed Beginnings Preschool, Aurora
*Christopher House, Chicago
*City of Chicago Department of Family &
Support Services, Chicago
Bloomington SD 87, Bloomington
Blue Ridge CUSD 18, Farmer City
City of Chicago SD 299, Chicago
Bond County CUSD 2, Greenville
*Connecting Kids Preschool, Wilmette Public
SD 39, Wilmette
Bourbonnais SD 53, Bourbonnais
*Bright Beginnings, Minonk
Cook County SD 130, Blue Island
*Bright Beginnings Preschool and Childcare,
Highland
*Crawford’s Daycare, Carol Stream
Cuba SD 3, Cuba
Canton CUSD 66, Canton
Carbondale Elementary SD 95, Carbondale
*Cuddle Care, Inc., Riverdale
*CUSD 300, deLacey Family Education Center,
Carpentersville
*Carlinville CUSD 1, Carlinville
Carlyle CUSD 1, Carlyle
Dallas City CUSD 336, Dallas City
*Carmi Pre-K/Carmi-White County CUSD 5,
Carmi
*Carole Robertson Center, Chicago
*Danville Area Community College Child
Development Center, Danville
Danville CCSD 118, Danville
Carroll, JoDaviess, Stephenson ROE, Freeport
Carterville CUSD 5, Carterville
*Darling Day Care, Lombard
Decatur SD 61, Decatur
*Catholic Charities, Chicago
DeKalb CUSD 428, DeKalb
*CCSD 181, Burr Ridge
*Discovery School, O’Fallon
*Center for New Horizons, Chicago
*District 146 Early Learning, Tinley Park
*Champaign County Head Start, Urbana
*District 186 Early Start Pre-K, Springfield
*Champaign Unit 4 Schools Pre-K Program,
Champaign
Dolton SD 149, Calumet City
*Dwight Common SD 232, Dwight
*Chicago Commons, Chicago
Chicago Heights SD 170, Chicago Heights
*Chicago Youth Centers, Chicago
*Early Childhood Developmental
Enrichment Center/Arlington Heights SD 25,
Arlington Heights
*Child Care Resource & Referral, Joliet
| 115 |
Acknowledgments
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
*Early Childhood Developmental
Enrichment Center/Mount Prospect SD 57,
Mount Prospect
*Early Childhood Developmental Enrichment
Center/Palatine CCSD 15, Palatine
*Early Childhood Developmental Enrichment
Center/Prospect Heights CCSD 23,
Prospect Heights
*Early Childhood Developmental Enrichment
Center /River Trails CCSD 26, Mount Prospect
*Early Childhood Developmental Enrichment
Center /Wheeling CCSD 21, Wheeling
*Early Learning Center – Springfield Public
Schools 186, Springfield
East Alton SD 13, East Alton
East Dubuque CUSD 119, East Dubuque
East Richland CUSD 1, Olney
Edwardsville CUSD 7, Edwardsville
*Effingham CUSD 40, Effingham
Egyptian CUSD 5, Tamms
Eldorado CUSD 4, Eldorado
*Elgin Child and Family Resource Center, Elgin
Elgin School District U-46, Elgin
*First Step Child Care Center, Inc.,
Richton Park
*First United Methodist Child Care Center,
Champaign
*Ford-Iroquois Preschool Cooperative/I-KAN
ROE, Milford
Four Rivers Special Ed. District, Jacksonville
*Fox Valley Home Day Care, Batavia
*Fox Valley Montessori School, Aurora
*Frank Family Daycare, Carol Stream
Freeburg CCSD 70, Freeburg
*Freeport SD 145/Taylor Park Elementary,
Freeport
*Gads Hill Center, Chicago
Galesburg CUSD 5, Galesburg
Genoa Kingston CUSD 424, Genoa
*Got Tots, Lombard
Hamilton County CUSD 10, McLeansboro
Hamilton-Jefferson County ROE 25,
Mount Vernon
Harlem CUSD 122, Loves Park
Harrison SD 36, Wonder Lake
*Elite Childcare and Center, Saint Joseph
Harvard CUSD 50, Harvard
*Elmhurst Academy, Elmhurst
Harvey SD 152, Harvey
Erie CUSD 1, Erie
*Erie Neighborhood House, Chicago
*Faith Lutheran Preschool, Godfrey
*Family Daycare, Aurora
*First Start, Westmont
| 116 |
*Havanna CUSD 126, Havana
Hawthorn SD 73, Vernon Hills
*Henderson-Mercer-Warren ROE 27 Early
Learning Project, Monmouth
High Mount SD 116, Swansea
Acknowledgments
Hillsboro CUSD 3, Hillsboro
Lombard Elementary SD 44, Lombard
Hoover-Schrum SD 157, Calumet City
Lovington CUSD 303, Lovington
*Howard Area Community Center, Chicago
*Lutheran Social Services of Illinois, Chicago
*Lutheran Social Services of Illinois,
Des Plaines
Huntley SD 158, Huntley
*Illinois Action for Children, Chicago
Macomb CUSD 185, Macomb
Indian Creek CUSD 425, Shabbona
*Mary Crane Center, Chicago
*Indian Prairie SD 204, Naperville
*MDO/ABC Preschool, Sycamore
Indian Springs SD 109, Justice
*Innovative Technology Education Fund,
St. Louis, MO
*Metropolitan Family Services, Chicago
Midstate Special Education, Taylorville
*Milestones Early Learning Center &
Preschool, Bloomington
Iroquois County CUSD 9, Watseka
*Iroquois West CUSD 10, Gilman
*Jack and Jill Child Development Center,
Belleville
Milford CCSD 280, Milford
Momence CUSD 1, Momence
Jonesboro CCSD 43, Jonesboro
Morton SD 709, Morton
*Kankakee SD 111, Kankakee/Head Start
Program, Kankakee
Mundelein Elementary SD 75, Mundelein
*Katie’s Kids Learning Center, Normal
Murphysboro CUSD 186, Carbondale
Nashville CCSD 49, Nashville
*Kiddie Kollege of Fairfield, Fairfield
*New Athens Pre-K, New Athens SD 60,
New Athens
*Kid’s Kingdom, Oblong
*Kool Kids Day Care, Troy
New Berlin CUSD 16, New Berlin
*Korean American Community Services,
Chicago
Northwest Special Education District,
Freeport
*La Petite Academy, Champaign
Oblong CUSD 4, Oblong
*O’Fallon CCSD 90, O’Fallon
LeRoy CUSD 2, LeRoy
Oglesby Elementary SD 125, Oglesby
Litchfield CUSD 12, Litchfield
*Little Prince Day Care, Villa Park
Olympia CUSD 16, Stanford
*Livingston County Special Services Unit,
Pontiac
Orland SD 135, Orland Park
| 117 |
Acknowledgments
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
*Over the Rainbow, Washington
Palos Heights SD 128, Palos Heights
*PASS Preschool, Freeport
Paxton-Buckley-Loda CUSD 10, Paxton
Pekin SD 108, Pekin
*Peoria County Bright Futures, Dunlap
District 323, Dunlap
*Peoria County Bright Futures, Illini Bluffs
District 327, Glasford
*Peoria County Bright Futures, Norwood
District 63, Peoria
*Peoria County Bright Futures, Peoria Heights
District 325, Peoria Heights
*Peoria County Bright Futures, Pleasant Valley
District 62, Peoria
*Peoria SD 150, Valeska Hinton Early
Childhood Education Center, Peoria
*Player Early Childhood Center, Indian
Springs School District 109, Justice
*Rockford Early Childhood Program, Rockford
District 205, Rockford
Rockton SD 140, Rockton
*SAL Child Care Connection, Peoria
*Salvation Army Child Care, Chicago
*Salvation Army Red Shield Head Start,
Chicago
Savanna CUSD 300, Savanna
Schaumburg CCSD 54, Schaumburg
*Schaumburg Park District, Schaumburg
*School Readiness Center Preschool,
Naperville
Schuyler SD 1, Rushville
*See Saw Day Care Center, Burlington
*Shiloh Elementary Pre-K Program, Shiloh
Village SD 85, Shiloh
*Shining Stars Christian Preschool,
Montgomery
Silvis SD 34, Silvis
*Prairie Children Preschool/Indian Prairie
School District 204, Aurora
*Somerset Family Childcare
*Pre-K At Risk Program/Marquardt School
District 15, Glendale Heights
*Southern Region Early Childhood Programs/
Southern Illinois University, Carbondale
Princeville CUSD 326, Princeville
Queen Bee SD 16, Glendale Heights
Quincy SD 172, Quincy
Southern Seven Head Start, Ullin
*Southwestern Illinois College (SWIC),
Kids Club, Belleville
St. Anne CCSD 256, St. Anne
*Rend Lake College Foundations Children’s
Center, Ina
STARNET Region I & III, Macomb
*Richland Community College, Decatur
STARNET Region IV, Belleville
Robinson CUSD 2, Robinson
| 118 |
*St. Barnabas Christian Preschool, Cary
Acknowledgments
*Winfield District 34 Tiger Cub Preschool,
Winfield
*Step By Step Inc., Alton
Sterling CUSD 5, Sterling
Winnebago CUSD 323, Winnebago
*Summit Early Learning Center, Elgin
*Teresa’s Daycare, West Chicago
*Woodford County Special Education
Association, Metamora
*The Learning Tree Child Care Center, Elgin
*YMCA Garfield Center, Chicago
*The Learning Tree Child Care Center, Huntley
*Zion Lutheran School, Bethalto
*The Learning Tree Early Childhood School,
Lake Zurich
*Thunderbird Preschool, Crystal Lake
*Township High School District 211, Palatine
*Triad CUSD #2, Troy
Thank you to our editor
and designers:
Editor: Kevin Dolan, Illinois Early
Learning Project, University of Illinois
at Urbana-Champaign
Trico CUSD 176, Campbell Hill
*Tri-Point CUSD #6J, Kempton
Design: Propeller, Inc., Arlington Heights, IL,
and Design To4C, Inc., Deerfield, IL
*Troy Early Childhood Center, Troy
*Two Rivers Head Start Agency, Aurora
*Uni-Press Kindercottage, East St. Louis
*Unity Point School #140, Carbondale
*Urbana SD 116, Urbana
*Valley View Early Childhood Center, Valley
View CUSD 365U, Romeoville
Vienna Elementary SD 55, Vienna
Virginia CUSD 64, Virginia
VIT CUSD 2, Table Grove
*West Chicago School District 33, Early
Learning Center, West Chicago
Finally, but by no means last, a special thank
you to Gaye Gronlund, nationally known
early childhood expert and author, for
helping us make the revised standards come
alive in Illinois as she worked tirelessly and
enthusiastically in guiding the workgroup and
field testing programs and participants.
We wish to thank everyone who participated
in the revision of the IELDS. We have striven
to make this list as complete as possible. If
your program was not included on this list, we
apologize for the oversight. Please let us know
so we can update this list in future printings of
the Standards.
West Richland SD 2, Noble
*Willow Family Child Care, Wheaton
| 119 |
Acknowledgments
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
| 120 |
Benchmark Index
Benchmark Index
Language Arts
Follow simple one-, two- and three-step directions.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24
Respond appropriately to questions from others. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24
Provide comments relevant to the context. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24
Identify emotions from facial expressions and body language. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24
Use language for a variety of purposes.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
With teacher assistance, participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners
(e.g., peers and adults in both small and large groups) about age-appropriate topics and texts. . . . . . 25
Continue a conversation through two or more exchanges. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Engage in agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening, making eye contact,
taking turns speaking). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Describe familiar people, places, things, and events and, with teacher assistance, provide
additional detail. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26
With teacher assistance, use complete sentences in speaking with peers and adults in
individual and group situations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Speak using age-appropriate conventions of Standard English grammar and usage. . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Understand and use question words in speaking. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
With teacher assistance, begin to use increasingly complex sentences.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28
Exhibit curiosity and interest in learning new words heard in conversations and books. . . . . . . . . . .28
With teacher assistance, use new words acquired through conversations and
book-sharing experiences.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28
With teacher assistance, explore word relationships to understand the concepts represented
by common categories of words (e.g., food, clothing, vehicles). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28
With teacher assistance, use adjectives to describe people, places, and things. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28
Engage in book-sharing experiences with purpose and understanding. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29
Look at books independently, pretending to read.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29
With teacher assistance, ask and answer questions about books read aloud.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30
| 121 |
BENCHMARK INDEX
|
Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
With teacher assistance, retell familiar stories with three or more key events.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30
With teacher assistance, identify main character(s) of the story. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30
Interact with a variety of types of texts (e.g., storybooks, poems, rhymes, songs). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Identify the front and back covers of books and display the correct orientation of books and
page-turning skills. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
With teacher assistance, describe the role of an author and illustrator. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
With teacher assistance, discuss illustrations in books and make personal connections to the
pictures and story. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
With teacher assistance, compare and contrast two stories relating to the same topic.. . . . . . . . . . . 32
With teacher assistance, ask and answer questions about details in a nonfiction book. . . . . . . . . . .33
With teacher assistance, retell detail(s) about main topic in a nonfiction book.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33
With teacher assistance, identify basic similarities and differences in pictures and information
found in two texts on the same topic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .33
Recognize the differences between print and pictures. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34
Begin to follow words from left to right, top to bottom, and page by page. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34
Recognize the one-to-one relationship between spoken and written words. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34
Understand that words are separated by spaces in print. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34
Recognize that letters are grouped to form words.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34
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Differentiate letters from numerals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34
With teacher assistance, recite the alphabet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Recognize and name some upper/lowercase letters of the alphabet, especially those
in own name. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
With teacher assistance, match some upper/lowercase letters of the alphabet. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
With teacher assistance, begin to form some letters of the alphabet, especially those
in own name. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Recognize that sentences are made up of separate words. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36
With teacher assistance, recognize and match words that rhyme. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36
Demonstrate ability to segment and blend syllables in words (e.g., “trac/tor, tractor”).. . . . . . . . . . .36
With teacher assistance, isolate and pronounce the initial sounds in words. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36
With teacher assistance, blend sounds (phonemes) in one-syllable words (e.g., /c/ /a/ /t/ = cat). . . . .36
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With teacher assistance, begin to segment sounds (phonemes) in one-syllable words
(e.g. cat = /c/ /a/ /t/). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36
With teacher assistance, begin to manipulate sounds (phonemes) in words (e.g., changing cat
to hat to mat). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36
Recognize own name and common signs and labels in the environment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
With teacher assistance, demonstrate understanding of the one-to-one correspondence of
letters and sounds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
With teacher assistance, begin to use knowledge of letters and sounds to spell
words phonetically. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Experiment with writing tools and materials. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38
Use scribbles, letterlike forms, or letters/words to represent written language. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38
With teacher assistance, write own first name using appropriate upper/lowercase letters. . . . . . . . .38
With teacher assistance, use a combination of drawing, dictating, or writing to express an
opinion about a book or topic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39
With teacher assistance, use a combination of drawing, dictating, or writing to compose
informative/explanatory texts in which they name what they are writing about and supply
some information about the topic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39
With teacher assistance, use a combination of drawing, dictating, or writing to narrate a
single event and provide a reaction to what happened. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39
Participate in group projects or units of study designed to learn about a topic of interest.. . . . . . . . .40
With teacher assistance, recall factual information and share that information through
drawing, dictation, or writing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40
Mathematics
Count with understanding and recognize “how many” in small sets up to 5. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Use subitizing (the rapid and accurate judgment of how many items there are without
counting) to identify the number of objects in sets of 4 or less. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Understand and appropriately use informal or everyday terms that mean zero, such as “none”
or “nothing”.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Connect numbers to quantities they represent using physical models and
informal representations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42
Differentiate numerals from letters and recognize some single-digit written numerals.. . . . . . . . . . .43
Verbally recite numbers from 1 to 10. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
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Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
Be able to say the number after another in the series up to 9 when given a “running start,” as
in “What comes after one, two, three, four…?”. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .43
Recognize that numbers (or sets of objects) can be combined or separated to make
another number. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44
Show understanding of how to count out and construct sets of objects of a given number up to 5. . . .44
Identify the new number created when small sets (up to 5) are combined or separated. . . . . . . . . . .44
Informally solve simple mathematical problems presented in a meaningful context. . . . . . . . . . . . .44
Fairly share a set of up to 10 items between two children. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44
Estimate number of objects in a small set.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Compare two collections to see if they are equal or determine which is more, using a
procedure of the child’s choice.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Describe comparisons with appropriate vocabulary, such as “more”, “less”, “greater than”,
“fewer”, “equal to”, or “same as”. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
Compare, order, and describe objects according to a single attribute. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
Use nonstandard units to measure attributes such as length and capacity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
Use vocabulary that describes and compares length, height, weight, capacity, and size. . . . . . . . . .46
Begin to construct a sense of time through participation in daily activities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
Practice estimating in everyday play and everyday measurement problems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
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With teacher assistance, explore use of measuring tools that use standard units to measure
objects and quantities that are meaningful to the child. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
Know that different attributes, such as length, weight, and time, are measured using different
kinds of units, such as feet, pounds, and seconds. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48
Sort, order, compare, and describe objects according to characteristics or attribute(s). . . . . . . . . . .49
Recognize, duplicate, extend, and create simple patterns in various formats.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49
With adult assistance, represent a simple repeating pattern by verbally describing it or by
modeling it with objects or actions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50
Recognize and name common two- and three-dimensional shapes and describe some of
their attributes (e.g., number of sides, straight or curved lines). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50
Sort collections of two- and three-dimensional shapes by type (e.g., triangles, rectangles,
circles, cubes, spheres, pyramids). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50
Identify and name some of the faces (flat sides) of common three-dimensional shapes using
two-dimensional shape names. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50
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Combine two-dimensional shapes to create new shapes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50
Think about/imagine how altering the spatial orientation of a shape will change how it looks
(e.g., turning it upside down). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50
Show understanding of location and ordinal position. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Use appropriate vocabulary for identifying location and ordinal position.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
With teacher assistance, come up with meaningful questions that can be answered through
gathering information. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .53
Gather data about themselves and their surroundings to answer meaningful questions. . . . . . . . . .53
Organize, represent, and analyze information using concrete objects, pictures, and graphs,
with teacher support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54
Make predictions about the outcome prior to collecting information, with teacher support
and multiple experiences over time.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54
Describe likelihood of events with appropriate vocabulary, such as “possible”, “impossible”,
“always”, and “never”. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .54
Science
Express wonder and curiosity about their world by asking questions, solving problems,
and designing things. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Develop and use models to represent their ideas, observations, and explanations through
approaches such as drawing, building, or modeling with clay. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Plan and carry out simple investigations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Collect, describe, compare, and record information from observations and investigations. . . . . . . . . 57
Use mathematical and computational thinking. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Make meaning from experience and information by describing, talking, and thinking about
what happened during an investigation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Generate explanations and communicate ideas and/or conclusions about their investigations. . . . . . 57
Observe, investigate, describe, and categorize living things.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58
Show an awareness of changes that occur in oneself and the environment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .58
Describe and compare basic needs of living things. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
Show respect for living things. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
Identify, describe, and compare the physical properties of objects. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
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Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
Experiment with changes in matter when combined with other substances. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59
Describe the effects of forces in nature.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60
Explore the effect of force on objects in and outside the early childhood environment. . . . . . . . . . .60
Observe and describe characteristics of earth, water, and air.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60
Participate in discussions about simple ways to take care of the environment.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .60
Observe and discuss changes in weather and seasons using common vocabulary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Begin to understand basic safety practices one must follow when exploring and engaging in
science and engineering investigations. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Use nonstandard and standard scientific tools for investigation.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Become familiar with technological tools that can aid in scientific inquiry. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Social Studies
Recognize the reasons for rules in the home and early childhood environment and for laws
in the community. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .64
Contribute to the well-being of one’s early childhood environment, school, and community. . . . . . .64
Participate in voting as a way of making choices. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65
Develop an awareness of what it means to be a leader. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66
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BENCHMARK INDEX
Participate in a variety of roles in the early childhood environment.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66
Describe some common jobs and what is needed to perform those jobs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Discuss why people work. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Understand that some resources and money are limited. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Begin to understand the use of trade or money to obtain goods and services. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .68
Recall information about the immediate past. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69
Develop a basic awareness of self as an individual. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .69
Locate objects and places in familiar environments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70
Express beginning geographic thinking. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70
Recognize similarities and differences in people.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Understand that each of us belongs to a family and recognize that families vary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
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Physical Development and Health
Engage in active play using gross- and fine-motor skills. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Move with balance and control in a range of physical activities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Use strength and control to accomplish tasks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Use eye-hand coordination to perform tasks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Use writing and drawing tools with some control. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75
Coordinate movements to perform complex tasks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76
Demonstrate body awareness when moving in different spaces.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76
Combine large motor movements with and without the use of equipment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76
Follow simple safety rules while participating in activities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .76
Participate in activities to enhance physical fitness. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Exhibit increased levels of physical activity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Follow rules and procedures when participating in group physical activities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78
Follow directions, with occasional adult reminders, during group activities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78
Demonstrate ability to cooperate with others during group physical activities.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .78
Identify simple practices that promote healthy living and prevent illness. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79
Demonstrate personal care and hygiene skills, with adult reminders.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79
Identify and follow basic safety rules. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .79
Identify body parts and their functions.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .80
Identify examples of healthy habits. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Identify healthy and nonhealthy foods and explain the effect of these foods on the body.. . . . . . . . . 81
Participate in activities to learn to avoid dangerous situations.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
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Illinois Early Learning and Development Standards, Preschool—Revised September 2013
The Arts
Movement and Dance: Build awareness of, explore, and participate in dance and creative
movement activities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84
Drama: Begin to appreciate and participate in dramatic activities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84
Music: Begin to appreciate and participate in music activities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84
Visual Arts: Investigate and participate in activities using visual arts materials. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .84
Describe or respond to their creative work or the creative work of others. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .86
Use creative arts as an avenue for self-expression.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
English Language Learner Home Language Development
May demonstrate progress and mastery of benchmarks through home language. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Use home language in family, community, and early childhood settings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Develop an awareness of the different contextual and cultural features in the early childhood
and community settings the child participates in. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Use home cultural and linguistic knowledge to express current understandings and construct
new concepts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
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BENCHMARK INDEX
With adult support, begin to bridge home language and English to demonstrate progress in
meeting IELDS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Exhibit foundational literacy skills in home language to foster transfer to English.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Social/Emotional Development
Recognize and label basic emotions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Use appropriate communication skills when expressing needs, wants, and feelings. . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Express feelings that are appropriate to the situation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Begin to understand and follow rules. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Use materials with purpose, safety, and respect. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Begin to understand the consequences of his or her behavior. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Describe self using several basic characteristics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .96
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Exhibit eagerness and curiosity as a learner. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Demonstrate persistence and creativity in seeking solutions to problems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Show some initiative, self-direction, and independence in actions. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Demonstrate engagement and sustained attention in activities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
Show empathy, sympathy, and caring for others. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98
Recognize the feelings and perspectives of others. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98
Interact easily with familiar adults.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98
Demonstrate attachment to familiar adults.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98
Develop positive relationships with peers.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .98
Interact verbally and nonverbally with other children. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99
Engage in cooperative group play. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99
Use socially appropriate behavior with peers and adults, such as helping, sharing,
and taking turns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .99
Begin to share materials and experiences and take turns. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Solve simple conflicts with peers with independence, using gestures or words. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Seek adult help when needed to resolve conflict. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Participate in discussions about why rules exist. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Follow rules and make good choices about behavior. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Participate in discussions about finding alternative solutions to problems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
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ILLINOIS STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION
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Springfield, Illinois 62777-0001
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