Taught Postgraduate Programmes Handbook 2015 2016

Taught Postgraduate Programmes Handbook 2015 2016
School of Management
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/management
Student Handbook
2015-2016
Taught Postgraduate Programmes
Taught Postgraduate Programmes
Level 2
School of Management
University of St Andrews
The Gateway
ST ANDREWS
Fife KY16 9RJ
Scotland, UK
T:+44 (0)1334 462200/462871
F:+44 (0)1334 462812
E:[email protected]
W: www.st-andrews.ac.uk/management
As a research intensive institution, the University ensures that its teaching references the research interests of
its staff, which may change from time to time. As a result, programmes are regularly reviewed with the aim of
enhancing students’ learning experience. Our approach to course revision is described at:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/media/teaching-and-learning/policies/course-revision-protocol.pdf
Produced by Print & Design, University of St Andrews September 2015
The University of St Andrews is a charity registered in Scotland, No: SC013532
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CONTENTS
Welcome Letter from the Co-Heads of the School of Management
Introduction
What does it mean to study at Masters Level?
PART A: PRACTICAL INFORMATION
Key Contact Points at the School of Management
Communication
Information Technology & Computer Services
Moodle & MMS (Module Management System)
The University Library
Disability Support
The Advice and Support Centre (ASC)
The Gateway Building
Health & Safety
Fire – Emergency Information
Timetable for the 2015/2016 Academic Year
Student Fees
Class Representatives and the Staff-Student Liaison Committee
School President
The Management Society (MNG Society)
PART B: RULES & REGULATIONS
Advising
Matriculation
University Marking System for Assessments & Progression to the MLitt/MSc Dissertation
Module Credits, Level and Academic Alerts
Withdrawal from Studies
Suspension of Studies
Termination of Studies
Assessment Procedures
Examinations
Dissertations
Research Ethics
Awards
Good Academic Practice Policy
Responsibilities: School & Student
Academic Appeals & Complaints
Absence Reporting
Student Support & Guidance
PART C: EFFECTIVE LEARNING
Group Work
Written Assignments
Referencing Guide
Guidelines on Academic Integrity
Preparing for Examinations
Further Help with Study Skills and Assessments
English Language Teaching
Further Information
PART D: TAUGHT POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES
Taught Postgraduate Programmes
Skills for Employment & the Co-Curricular MX Programme
MSc in Finance & Management
MSc in Banking & Finance
MLitt in International Business
MLitt in Marketing
MLitt in Management
MLitt in Human Resource Management
University map
Academic Calendar
Assessment Guidelines/Marking Structure
Example of Assessment Coursework Feedback Form
Coursework Cover Sheet
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The School of Management
University of St Andrews
The Gateway
ST ANDREWS
Fife
KY16 9RJ
September 2015
Dear Student,
Welcome to the School of Management in the lovely town of St Andrews. We hope you will
settle in well, join in interesting conversations and enjoy contributing to the life of the
School. We also hope you will make lasting connections during your time here.
The School of Management is a gathering of scholars who study, teach and engage with
policy and practice around the theme of “responsible enterprise”. What constitutes
responsible enterprise is not always clear and we will explore different nuances throughout
your study. We will help you develop an understanding of management processes and
practices as well as to take a broader view of the relationship between organisations, society
and the economy. In undertaking this exploration with you, we do not seek a lofty or
detached position. Instead, we will offer a critical and constructive engagement with the
subject matter, and one which is interested in the ethics of organising and managing.
We will be using case studies of “good practice”, and examples of less successful
management experiences, to ensure that you appreciate management in practice. We will
also encourage you to develop critical skills of inquiry, whether in essays, presentations or
group discussions. These skills are particularly important as you continue to engage with
and contribute to a range of organisations that play different parts in your life. We will help
equip you with the skills to question, analyse different sources of knowledge and develop
new ways of thinking about management.
Management is one of the most important activities in the modern world - not least in its
capacity to enable progressive, or dysfunctional, outcomes - and we are delighted that you
share our interest in, and passion about, its significance.
Welcome again to our learning community. We hope you will enjoy your time with us, and
with each other.
Yours faithfully,
Yours faithfully,
Kevin Orr & Lorna Stevenson
Co-Heads of School
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INTRODUCTION
This Student Handbook provides you with some important information relevant to
your studies with us. It includes key features of your postgraduate programme,
outlines the organisation of the academic and administrative support systems in the
School of Management and explains the procedures and regulations relevant to
postgraduate study at the University of St Andrews.
This Handbook is divided into four main parts:




the first one provides you with practical information about the School and
the University;
the second explains important rules and regulations common to all the
taught postgraduate programmes in the School;
the third part provides some advice to help make this year an effective
learning experience for you
the final part gives you more detail about your specific programme and its
relevant modules.
Further information on each module can be found in the “Management Student”
section of the School of Management website.
It is important that you understand your obligations and responsibilities as a
postgraduate student within the School of Management; if there is anything you do
not understand or if you need any help throughout the year, please do not hesitate
to contact a member of staff in the Taught Postgraduate Programme team. The
School is committed to providing the best possible learning environment and all staff
will endeavour to give you the support you require to achieve academic success.
What does it mean to study at Masters Level?
Programmes taught at postgraduate level study in the UK are subject to external
benchmarks set by the Quality Assurance Agency (QAA). One of the core
philosophies underpinning postgraduate level study is “Mastersness.” At the heart
of being a master is the ability to think critically and to critically evaluate concepts.
The following are some of the ways that “Mastersness” manifests itself:



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
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Level of excellence required for admission/entry to Postgraduate Programmes
Student knowledge acquisition on their chosen programme of study
Level and nature of assessment
Student achievement during assessment
Requirement for leading edge research to be integrated into teaching
Student skill attainment and employability
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As a basic rule of thumb, you will be expected to demonstrate mastery of the
following skills and knowledge by the time you have finished your postgraduate level
study:

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
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Critical thinking and creativity
Organisation of information and skills related to the acquisition of knowledge
including scanning and organising data and abstracting meaning from
information
Analysis, synthesis and appraisal skills
An ability to identify assumptions and to evaluate evidence, detect false logic or
reasoning, identify implicit values, define terms adequately and generalise
appropriately
Problem solving and decision making skills
Ethics and value judgement
Self-awareness, as a researcher (the application of critical evaluation to your own
underlying methodological assumptions, as well as the methods and techniques
used. This requires you to be aware of your own philosophical position with
regard to research)
The ability to reflect on your studies and work toward becoming a reflexive
professional
GOOD LUCK WITH YOUR STUDIES!
IMPORTANT NOTE
Please make sure that you familiarise yourself with the contents of this Student
Handbook.
Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided in this Student
Handbook is correct at the time of printing. However, errors can occur and both
the School and the University may make amendments and updates throughout the
year. Students are therefore urged to check on information published on the
School of Management and University of St Andrews websites on a regular basis:
http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/management/student/
http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/studenthandbook/
https://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/pgstudents/
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PART A
PRACTICAL INFORMATION
KEY CONTACT POINTS AT THE SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT
CO-HEAD OF SCHOOL:
Email:
Tel No:
PROFESSOR KEVIN ORR
[email protected]
(01334) (46)1998
CO-HEAD OF SCHOOL:
Email:
Tel No:
LORNA STEVENSON
[email protected]
(01334) (46)2820
Although Professor Orr and Ms Stevenson have overall responsibility for directing all
aspects of the activities of the School, in the first instance all queries and issues you
may have relating to your studies can be dealt with by contacting a member of the
Taught Postgraduate Programme Team indicated below.
The Taught Postgraduate Programme Team
The Taught Postgraduate Programme Team is located in the School of Management
Office on Level 2 of the Gateway building and is made up of:


Director of Postgraduate Programmes: Julie Brooks
Administrative Support Staff: Eleanor Brown, Jacqui Angus and
Fiona Harrison.
We are responsible for overseeing the operation of the Taught Postgraduate
Programmes in the School of Management on a day-to-day basis. We work together
with our other colleagues in the School and University to support you and ensure all
administrative and managerial aspects of your studies are handled smoothly and
that your overall experience as a postgraduate student is positive and enjoyable.
In addition to supporting current students, the team contributes to teaching on the
postgraduate programmes and are also responsible for: external relations, alumni
affairs, marketing, student recruitment and admissions to the MLitt/MSc
programmes and as well as liaison with University-wide services.
We have an email address specifically for current taught postgraduate students
([email protected]). We recommend you use this email address to contact
a member of staff for any queries. Alternatively, you are always welcome to stop by
the School Office on Level Two of the Gateway Building. The office is normally open
to students Monday to Friday from 9am – 1pm and 2pm - 5pm.
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JULIE BROOKS
Email:
[email protected]
Tel No:
(01334) (46)1962
Office:
Room 311, School of Management, The Gateway
ELEANOR BROWN
Email:
[email protected]
Tel No:
(01334) (46)2871
FIONA HARRISON
Email:
[email protected]
Tel No:
(01334) (46)2200
JACQUI ANGUS
Email:
[email protected]
Tel No:
(01334) (46)2878
Programme Directors
The Programme Directors/Co-ordinators are responsible for overseeing each
programme and are the people you would normally contact if you have an issue or
concern relating to your academic studies.

MSc in Finance and Management
Programme Directors: Dr Jimmy X Chen ([email protected]) &
Dr Dimitris Chronopoulos ([email protected])

MSc in Banking & Finance
Programme Director: Dr Pejman Abedifar ([email protected])

MLitt in International Business
Programme Director: Dr Ross Brown ([email protected])

MLitt in Marketing
Programme Director: Julie Brooks ([email protected])

MLitt in Management
Programme Director: Dr Sandra Romenska ([email protected])

MLitt in Human Resource Management
Programme Director: Dr Shiona Chillas ([email protected])
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Teaching Staff
Each module in your programme of study is led by a Module Co-ordinator – a
member of academic staff who is responsible for the co-ordination, teaching and
assessment of the particular module. In delivering the teaching of his/her module,
the Module Co-ordinator may be assisted by other members of the School’s
academic staff. Module Co-ordinators will issue specific details relating to module
objectives, administration, teaching arrangements and assessment procedures. If
you have a query relating to the teaching, learning and assessment of a particular
module you would normally contact the Module Co-ordinator in the first instance.
You will find that all members of staff in the School of Management will be helpful in
dealing with your queries. Please note that members of staff have many teaching,
administrative and research commitments, both within and out with the University.
Normally, meetings with members of staff should be arranged directly in advance by
email.
Many of your enquiries will be answered by careful reference to printed material you
have received or to information contained on the School and University websites.
Routine enquiries about the programme should be made at the School Office. More
substantive enquiries should be addressed to the relevant Programme Directors.
Other key roles in the School:
Director of Teaching:
Tel No:
Email:
Martin Dowling
(01334) (46)1970
[email protected] or
[email protected]
Examinations Officer:
Tel No:
Email:
Andrew Timming
(01334) (46)2798
[email protected]
Director of Research:
Tel No:
Email:
Professor John Wilson
(01334) (46)2803
[email protected]
School Administrator:
Tel No:
Email:
Shona Deigman
(01334) (46)2450
[email protected]
Disability Co-ordinator:
Tel No:
Email:
Jo McGinley
(01334) (46)2800
[email protected]
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Academic Misconduct Officer:
Tel No:
Email:
Julie Brooks
(01334) (46)1962
[email protected]
Safety Co-ordinator:
Tel No:
Email:
Shona Deigman
(01334) (46)2450
[email protected]
Contact for reporting absence
from classes:
Eleanor Brown
(01334) (46)2871
[email protected]
Contact for reporting Special
Circumstances:
Eleanor Brown
(01334) (46)2871
[email protected]
Student Support & Guidance Advice: Any member of Staff in the Taught
Postgraduate Programme team.
Address for Correspondence:
Taught Postgraduate Programme Team
School of Management
University of St Andrews
The Gateway
ST ANDREWS
Fife
KY16 9RJ
COMMUNICATION
There are two important University websites that provide you with information,
advice and guidance concerning your time with us as a student. These are:
http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/management/student/
https://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/pgstudents/
You should familiarise yourself with the contents of these websites and visit them on
a regular basis to find relevant information.
Your University email account is the official means of communication for the
University and you are therefore reminded that you should read your e-mails daily.
You can arrange to have your University e-mail account automatically forwarded to
your personal non-University account. However, you should be aware that there may
be problems with this and you should check regularly to make sure the forwarding is
working. Please check with the University IT Services Helpdesk ([email protected]).
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Wednesday Memo
The Wednesday Memo is a University wide email sent each Wednesday lunchtime to
undergraduate and postgraduate students alerting them to announcements and
messages which have been posted over the past week on the Undergraduate Memos
and Postgraduate Memos web pages. You will find the postgraduate memos at the
following link:
http://memos.wp.st-andrews.ac.uk/
You will also find a section in the Postgraduate Student webpage that provides
information about current news, events and announcements. These are of
relevance and interest to all students providing information from administrative and
academic staff, the Students' Association and student societies.
Friday Memo
The Friday memo is a School of Management-wide email sent each Friday afternoon
to Taught Postgraduate students. The memo will typically refer to events occurring
in the following week, bring to your attention any urgent issues arising and remind
you of critical dates and events that you may have been informed of earlier.
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND COMPUTER SERVICES
IT Services provides advice on many topics arising from the use of computers in the
University, from hardware faults on desktop and classroom computers, to problems
with word-processing and viruses.
There is also a PC clinic available, providing a wide range of computer services to
staff and students who require help with their personal computing equipment, for
more information email:
[email protected]
How to contact the Helpdesk:

email: please send your queries to helpdesk. If sending from outside St
Andrews please remember to add @st-andrews.ac.uk

telephone: (01334) (46)3333
The Helpdesk is closed every Friday between 09:30 and 10:30 for staff training.
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MOODLE and MMS (MODULE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM)
For each of your modules, online resources may be found on Moodle:
https://moody.st-andrews.ac.uk/moodle/
The Moodle link can also be accessed through the School of Management web page
and the Student web pages on the University of St Andrews website:
http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/management/student/
http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/students/
Details about how to use Moodle are on the first page, with links to more
information.
When you have accessed Moodle and opened a School of Management module, you
will find a link to the MMS (Module Management System) pages for the same
module. MMS is the University's online tool for coursework hand-ins and where
assessment marks are recorded. You can also access MMS directly (rather than
going via Moodle) on the Student web pages on the University of St Andrews
website:
https://mms.st-andrews.ac.uk/mms/
Sign up for tutorials is normally via MMS in Semester Two. Links to module readings
in the University of St Andrews Library and other resources can normally be found on
Moodle.
The Management Student page on the School of Management website has links to
additional resources:
http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/management/student/
THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY
The University Library offers a wide range of services and resources, you will find all
the relevant details at the following web pages:
http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/library/
If you need advice or assistance on any library matter, from finding a book on your
reading lists to locating the best sources of information on a particular topic, please
contact the Academic Liaison Librarian for business and management:
• Hilda McNae ([email protected])
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The Library’s online reading list service enables you to find and access the books,
journal articles, and other resources you are expected to use in relation to your
studies for the various modules that compromise your programme. By clicking links
in online reading lists you can see straight away the location and availability of books
in the Library and get direct access to online resources. By logging in you can use the
features which allow you to record what resources you have used, plan ahead, and
create personal study notes. You can also export citations to Endnote from reading
lists.
To find out if your modules have a reading list check the module in MMS or Moodle
(see page 9), or check the Online Reading List page on the Library website:
http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/library/information/subjectguides/readinglists/
DISABILITY SUPPORT
If you require support for disability reasons, for example teaching and exam
arrangements, please contact the Disability Team in Student Services who can
provide support for a wide range of disabilities such as learning difficulties, visual
and hearing impairments, mobility difficulties, Asperger’s, mental health, long
standing medical condition and much more.
http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/students/advice/disabilities/
THE ADVICE AND SUPPORT CENTRE (ASC)




Short of money?
Trouble with your flat mates?
Feeling upset or worried about something or someone?
Your visa is about to expire and you don't know what to do?
These are just some of the areas we can help with.
Come in to the ASC (Advice & Support Centre), 79 North Street, where staff will be
able to listen, give advice or refer you on to appropriate services. We always have
time for you and can help you deal with challenges you may be facing.
The Advice & Support team will provide advice on all welfare matters including
overseas student issues, flat mate problems, financial matters/problems or any
matter of concern to a student. If we cannot help then we will refer you to an
appropriate person either within the University or out with the University.
Contact the ASC on 01334 462020 or email: [email protected]
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Contact details:
TAUGHT POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES 2015-16
Student Services
University of St Andrews
The ASC (Advice & Support Centre)
79 North Street
St Andrews
Fife
KY16 9AL
THE GATEWAY BUILDING
The Gateway Building is the location of the School of Management. The facilities in
The Gateway are here to be used. You will normally enter the Gateway (Reception)
on Level 1, where the main public access area is situated, this includes meeting areas
and a brasserie where light snacks and refreshments are available. The lower ground
floor (Level -1) contains the teaching facilities, including lecture and seminar rooms
and also includes an area for self-study. Level -1 also contains a number of PCs and
printers for your use. Level 2 of The Gateway is where most of the administrative
and some of the academic staff of the School are situated. Levels -1, 1 and 2 of the
Gateway Building are accessible using your student swipe/ID card. Some members
of our academic staff are located on Level 3, students do not have access to this by
their swipe/ID cards and if you have a meeting with a member of staff on Level 3 you
should contact the staff member directly to arrange access.
IT Facilities at The Gateway: wireless access (Wi-Fi) is provided in the Gateway
building for St Andrews students with their own laptops. Many other locations in the
University also have wireless facilities. Further details, including configuration
information, are available at the following link:
http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/itsupport/network/networkservices/wirelessaccess/
The University of St Andrews also provides computer classrooms and labs for all
students to use. You will also have access to a number of computers in the Gateway
building on Levels -1 and 2.
Locations and opening times (many 24-hours) for computing facilities throughout the
university can be found on the IT Services web pages at:
http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/itsupport/help/classrooms/
Mobile phones: should only be used in the public areas of The Gateway on Level 1.
The Gateway Building is a no smoking zone.
Eating and drinking: is not permitted in Lecture Rooms, or study rooms/areas.
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HEALTH & SAFETY
First-aid boxes are located with the Administrative Support Staff on Level 2 of The
Gateway.
Notices are posted throughout the School indicating who the current First Aiders are
and how to contact them.
Notices are also displayed detailing your exit routes and assembly points in the event
of fire. All students should familiarise themselves with this information.
The School Safety Co-ordinator is Shona Deigman. Any hazards or safety-related
incidents should be reported to the School Safety Co-ordinator or the School of
Management Taught Postgraduate team immediately.
Students are reminded that the misuse of any Safety, Fire or First Aid equipment will
result in disciplinary action.
FIRE – EMERGENCY INFORMATION
Events can move rapidly when a fire occurs so you must know your fire routine
before a fire breaks out i.e. what to do if the fire alarm sounds and what to do if you
discover a fire.
If you discover a fire you should:
1.
Sound the alarm by breaking the nearest glass fire call point. This will set off
the building fire alarm. You or someone else must then phone 9-999 (or 999
from phones out-with the University) and request the attendance of the Fire
Service. The sounding of a building fire alarm does not mean the Fire Service
are automatically alerted. In fact this is not the case in most instances so you
must assume the alarm has not alerted the Fire Service and you should make
the emergency call EVERY TIME.
2.
Only fight the fire if you can do so without endangering yourself or others - a
water extinguisher can throw a jet of water up to 6 metres. If one
extinguisher does not put the fire out, GET OUT AND CLOSE THE DOOR
BEHIND YOU AND STAY OUT UNTIL TOLD BY A FIRE SERVICE OFFICER IT IS
SAFE TO RETURN.
3.
Do not fight a fire which is large and/or spreading or if you are unsure of the
type of extinguisher to use on the fire.
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If you hear the fire alarm you should:
1.
Leave your place of work, closing windows and doors behind you if this can
be done quickly.
2.
Follow your nearest exit route to the agreed place of safety/assembly point
and stay there until authorised to return by a Fire Officer.
The fire exit route in The Gateway Building is via either stair case down to
the basement level (-1) where you will exit via the fire doors in the stair well
and proceed to the safety/assembly point on the grass area away from the
building. Evacuation from Lecture Rooms 3 and 4 in the basement is via the
glass doors in the rooms which exit directly to the paved area outside of the
building.
3.
If your usual exit route is blocked by smoke, STOP - CHANGE DIRECTION FIND AN ALTERNATIVE EXIT ROUTE. You should still muster at the normal
assembly point for your workplace.
DO NOT
(a)
Stop to collect personal belongings
(b)
Use any lifts
(c)
Re-enter the building until authorised by a Fire Brigade Officer
Actions by Persons Requiring Assistance:
It is expected that, on entering the building for the first time, a person who for any
reason will require assistance:

Should familiarise themselves with the established procedures of the
building. (Fire action notices detailing this procedure are sited throughout the
building);

Contact a member of staff to arrange for the appropriate nominated person
to discuss an agreed fire evacuation plan;

Co-operate with the agreed managerial procedures for safe evacuation in the
event of fire.
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TIMETABLE FOR THE 2015/16 ACADEMIC YEAR
Key dates during the Academic Year
Please see page 75.
Programme Timetable
Your Programme/Module Timetable for Semester One of Academic Year 2015/16
will be issued to you during Orientation Week. Please ensure that you check both of
the following links regularly for updates:
iSaint Personal Timetable
https://isaint.st-andrews.ac.uk/ - students are able to view their Personal Timetable,
including all of their core and option module lectures, through iSaint only once they
have completed matriculation and are fully registered.
Web Timetable
http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/management/student/timetables/ - students are able
to view details of their specific tutorial group sessions using this web timetable.
You can also check MMS (see page 9) to see which tutorial group you are signed up
to and check the web timetable to see the times, dates and venues your group has
tutorial sessions scheduled. Please note that the web timetable is available by
programme (including all core modules). Option modules are available to view
separately. NOTE: in order to view your core and option modules, you will first need
to select your programme and the relevant semester to view the timetable for your
core modules and then view the option module timetable separately. The Semester
Two timetable will be issued as soon as possible during Semester One.
Examination Timetables
The University Examinations Office has responsibility for timetabling of all
examinations. You will be advised via the “Wednesday Memo” when the provisional
examination timetable is available for checking, please ensure you check the
timetable carefully. Whilst every effort is made by Schools and the Examinations
Office to prevent timetable clashes, these can occasionally occur. Where such a clash
is identified, students should contact the Examinations Office ([email protected]) as a matter of urgency while the exam timetable is still at a draft
stage.
All examination timetables are published via the web only and are available via your
E-vision account which can be accessed from the Current Students section of the
University home page: https://e-vision.st-andrews.ac.uk/urd/sits.urd/run/siw_lgn
Please make special note of the Examination Periods at the end of each semester.
You should remain in St Andrews until the end of each Examination Period even if
your Examination Timetable (when published) indicates that your examinations
finish before the end of the Examination Period – changes to the published
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Examination Timetable may have to be made at short notice for a variety of
operational reasons.
STUDENT FEES
Graduating in person or in absentia marks the end of your degree or diploma course
of studies at the University of St Andrews. If you have been accepted onto a new
degree or diploma programme at the University, the new programme is separate
and distinct from the course of studies from which you are about to graduate, and
you will be liable for all fees associated with that new programme.
CLASS REPRESENTATIVES AND THE STAFF-STUDENT LIAISON
COMMITTEE
At the start of the academic year, students from each postgraduate programme elect
two class representatives. The role of a class representative is to bring to the
attention of the School issues and matters of specific common concerns that affect
(or may affect) student progress with their studies. Such issues can be raised on a
“need-to” basis at any time and brought to the attention of any member of the
Taught Postgraduate Programme Team, the specific Programme Director or the
relevant Module Co-ordinator. Periodically, class representatives from all the
School’s postgraduate programmes meet with members of the Postgraduate
Management Team and other teaching staff to discuss issues that may apply to all
students. This is known as the School Staff-Student Liaison Committee (SSLC). More
details concerning the duties and election of class representatives, dates of the
meetings and the operation of the Staff-Student Liaison Committee will be made
known to you in due course.
SCHOOL PRESIDENT
The role of the School President is to make representations on behalf of the students
within their School to the University. The broad aim of the School President system
is to improve communications and co-operation between students and staff, for the
mutual benefit of both. The School Presidents will act as a fundamental link between
the student sabbatical officers of the Students’ Association and the class
representatives. The School President is normally either a 3rd or 4th year Honours
(Undergraduate) Student.
The School President for 2015/16 is Louis Fearn ([email protected]).
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THE MANAGEMENT SOCIETY (MNG SOCIETY)
This is a student society that is organised and operated by students from both the
undergraduate and postgraduate programmes in the School. A Committee elected
by all students in the School oversees the activities of the Society. Overleaf is a letter
of welcome written by the Management Society’s President. More information
about the Society will be available in due course.
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September 2015
Dear Management Student,
On behalf of The Management (MNG) Society, welcome to the School of Management! The
MNG Society is delighted to align its purpose with the School in helping students reach their
goals as future business professionals and leaders. The calibre of teaching, academic rigour
of the courses, and real world application of the subject matter are just a few of the
strengths the School of Management offers. It is this real world application that the MNG
Society aims to help bring students even further into the business world.
The Management Society’s chief goal is to provide a link from academic knowledge to the
business environment through our invited speakers, careers workshops, and meet-and-greet
events throughout the year. By providing professional insight through our prestigious
speakers, the MNG Society hopes that each “how they did it” tale brings students one step
closer to fulfilling their own success story.
One of St Andrews’ largest societies, MNG Society provides members with excellent
platforms for realising their career goals. Our previous talks by top executives come from
world famous companies across various industries such as Estée Lauder, BBC, Coca-Cola,
Topshop, British Airways and Land Rover. In addition, we host graduate recruiters to
showcase the wealth of talent found among our members, working closely with Bright
Futures UK. It is our sincerest hope that the glimpse we offer into industries such as finance,
consulting, fashion and entertainment will lead students to the career they truly love.
We aim to expand this glimpse by providing opportunities in the growing sectors of
technology and entrepreneurship. Fostering innovation and new ideas in a complex, everchanging business environment is at the heart of our mission this academic year. MNG
Society looks forward to exploring these areas not only through our events but also through
our subsidiary, the Entrepreneurship Society, where the main focus is on start-ups and small
businesses.
The MNG Society has enjoyed much success, but our real success story is YOU.
Guiding members as they make their way from business novices to business leaders is our
goal. Begin your success story with us by liking our Facebook page, following our website
www.mngsociety.com, or emailing us at [email protected] Become a member
and enjoy reduced entry to events such as our annual “Off the Clock” Wine and Cheese, St
Andrews Business Summit, and Women in Business Series, along with discounts at a range of
shops and restaurants in St Andrews.
The MNG Society looks forward to another exciting year and we hope you will join us!
Best Regards,
Lindsay Hamel
President 2015/2016
The Management Society
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PART B
RULES AND REGULATIONS
ADVISING
The Advising process in the University ensures that all students take the correct core
and optional modules and number of credits that they need in order to graduate in
their chosen degree. The School of Management is responsible for advising taught
postgraduate students into their modules.
Each MLitt/MSc programme consists of: (1) a set of modules which are core and (2) a
maximum of one option module per semester.
Postgraduate students in the School of Management will be advised into the core
modules for their programme during orientation week at the start of Semester One.
At the beginning of each semester taught postgraduate students will choose and be
advised into their option modules. Any queries regarding this process and module
selection should be addressed in the first instance to the Taught Postgraduate
Programmes team.
Students will be able to request their preferred option module (where applicable) by
completing a form and indicating their 1st, 2nd and 3rd option module choices for
Semesters One and Two. Details of option modules available to you can be found at
Part D of this handbook. The School will advise students into their option modules
once students have submitted their preferences. Please note: it may not always be
possible for students to be allocated to their first choice of option module.
Changing Modules/Re-advising
Students are allowed to change their option module only during the first week of
each semester. Students must put in a request by e-mail to Julie Brooks ([email protected]) before 4pm on the Friday of the 1st week of the semester (18
September 2015) to obtain the necessary approval for a change of option module.
Please note: places in option modules are limited and changes may not be
possible. After the first week of the semester the School will be required to place a
special request, on your behalf, to a senior University member of staff, the
Postgraduate Pro Dean (Arts), for approval to change an option module choice.
You must not, in any circumstances, simply start attending the classes for a new
module without being formally Re-Advised.
Once the advising process has been completed at the beginning of each semester
you will find information about your modules at the following website which is
within the postgraduate web page:
https://portal.st-andrews.ac.uk/personal-student-record/
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MATRICULATION
Matriculation is a compulsory University process by which students register on their
programme at the beginning of the academic session.
All Taught Postgraduate students are expected to matriculate during Orientation
Week at the start of Semester One. A separate Matriculation session has been
organised for all Taught Postgraduate Management Students in The Gateway, Level 1 on Monday, 7 September 2015. You should plan to matriculate between 9am and
5pm on Monday, 7 September 2015. Please note that online matriculation should
be completed by 12 noon on Friday, 11 September 2015 at the latest. Information
on matriculation is available on the ‘New Postgraduate Students’ page on the
University website:
http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/newpgtaught/
International students (those requiring a student visa) should have collected their
Biometric Residence Permit (BRP) card from the Lower Ground Floor of the Gateway
building on either on 5 or 6 September between 9am and 5pm.
UNIVERSITY MARKING SYSTEM FOR ASSESSMENTS
AND PROGRESSION TO THE MLITT/MSc DISSERTATION
Common Reporting Scale (20-point)
The University uses a 20-point Common Reporting Scale for grades (i.e. a 20-point
basic scale reported to one decimal point for final module grades). Details of the
Common Reporting Scale can be found at:
https://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/staff/teaching/examinations/scale/
Assessments in the School of Management are marked according to the University’s
20-point grading scale. In the case where assessments are marked otherwise, e.g. in
certain quantitative based assessments where percentage figures may be used,
these marks are then converted to the 20-point scale for reporting purposes (please
see page 76 for more information on assessment guidelines and mark conversions).
The following Marking Scale is adopted in all module assessments and examinations.
17 - 20
7 - 16
1 - 6
Pass/Distinction
Pass (*please see below for information on progression to the
MLitt/MSc dissertation)
Fail
This marking scale is used for all elements of module assessment (marks) as well as
for indicating the overall assessment achieved for modules (grades). The tables at
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page 76 give you an indication of what the marking system means in relation to
assessments. Details of the Common Reporting Scale can be found at:
https://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/staff/teaching/examinations/scale
Progression to the Dissertation
In order for students to progress to the dissertation element of their programme of
study, they must have passed all six taught modules in their programme.
Reporting of Results and Related Codes
At the end of each semester following School Examination Board meetings, your
academic record is updated to show the grades achieved in your modules. Your
academic record card may show module results reporting codes such as OD for
Deferred Assessment. Further information on the various reporting codes may be
found on the Registry web site:
http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/pgstudents/
Students can access their academic record through the following link:
https://portal.st-andrews.ac.uk/personal-student-record/
Deferred Assessment
Please note you can find further information on the University’s policy on Deferred
Assessment at the following link: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/media/teachingand-learning/policies/Assess Policies Procedures.pdf.
Special Circumstances - 'S' coding
‘S’ Coding is the method the University uses to recognise that special circumstances
have affected performance in the modules concerned. ‘S’ coding may only be applied
to Honours or taught postgraduate modules, except for taught postgraduate project
or dissertation modules which are excluded. ‘S’ coding may only be applied with the
explicit consent of the student and with the approval of the School. The final
decision to ‘S’ code a module grade rests with the School. You should be aware that
a maximum of 25% of the overall Honours credits required or 50% of the taught
element of a postgraduate award may be ‘S’ coded.
If you feel that most or all of the work of a module has been adversely affected by
personal circumstances during your final junior and senior Honours years or during
the taught modules of a taught postgraduate programme you should contact your
School in the first instance indicating the circumstances of the difficulty experienced.
This may relate to ongoing illness, close family bereavement or other significant
personal difficulties.
You must bring this information to the attention of the School as soon as possible as
there are a number of ways to deal with such situations, ‘S’ coding being the final
option. It may be possible (and it is viewed as preferable) to arrange deferred
assessments or extended submission dates rather than applying ‘S’ to the entire
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module. However, it should be noted that if such arrangements are made
(extensions or deferred assessments etc.) it is unlikely that you will be entitled to
have the module ‘S’ coded as well.
MODULE CREDITS, LEVEL AND ACADEMIC ALERTS
Module Credits
Credits measure the student workload required for the successful completion of a
programme of study – one credit represents about 10 hours of study. For a typical
20-credit module at master’s level, this means that approximately 200 hours of study
is required to pass the module. The 200 hours comprises class contact time (i.e.
lectures/tutorials); time to undertake the assessments associated with the module,
individual and in groups; and your own private study time. Typically, a 20
credit/200-hour module will comprise between 36 and 48 hours of class contact, 40
hours of assessment time with the remaining hours devoted to private study time.
Level
This indicates the educational standard at which the module is taught. Level 5
indicates teaching and learning at a postgraduate level (e.g. MN5001).
Academic Alert
Academic Alerts are a way of helping students who are having trouble coping with
their studies, such as missing deadlines for handing in work, or missing compulsory
tutorials. The aim of the Alert system is to help students by flagging up problems
before they seriously affect students’ grades. Academic Alerts will be issued by
email from the Director of Teaching, Director of Postgraduate Studies, Module
Coordinator or School administrator and will tell students what is wrong and what
they are required to do (e.g. attend classes in future). The Alerts will also tell
students what support the University can offer. If students do not take the action
required they will get another Alert, and eventually will automatically get a grade of
zero and will fail that module. The system is designed to help and support students
in order to remedy any problems or issues before these lead to failing a module.
Alerts will never appear on a student’s permanent transcript. For more information
on Academic Alerts and details on how the categories work, see http://www.standrews.ac.uk/media/teaching-and-learning/policies/Academic%20Alerts.pdf
WITHDRAWAL FROM STUDIES
If you are considering withdrawing from your studies at the University you should
discuss the matter with your Adviser of Studies in the first instance or your
Supervisor if you are a Research Postgraduate student. You should arrange to do this
as early as possible as there are often alternative options open to you that would not
require the final step of permanent withdrawal from the University. If you do decide
you wish to withdraw from your studies you must contact the appropriate Pro Dean
who will be able to offer guidance on your options and who will ensure that the
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process is completed correctly. You should be aware that there are fee implications,
as well as implications to your leave to remain in the UK if you are an overseas
student, when you withdraw from your studies part of the way through an academic
year. You should therefore ensure you contact the Money Adviser and the
International Adviser in Student Services to obtain early advice on the final
implications of your decision before you complete your withdrawal.
SUSPENSION OF STUDIES
Temporary suspension of studies or leave of absence may be requested if your
personal circumstances warrant this. For information about the procedure for
seeking leave of absence, please contact a member of staff in the School Office in
the first instance.
For further information on University procedures concerning Suspension of
Studies/Leave of Absence please refer to:
https://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/media/teaching-and-learning/policies/LOA.pdf.
TERMINATION OF STUDIES
If your academic performance is unsatisfactory you may be at risk of having your
studies at the University terminated. For more information on this matter please
see: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/students/advice/academic/Termination/
ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES
The School is committed to a continuing review of its assessment procedures and is
active in evaluating and implementing creative modes of assessment, where
appropriate. The philosophy and practical aspects of assessment for each module
will be fully explained by each Module Co-ordinator. A central aim of this approach
is that, for each module, the mode of assessment should constitute a strong
incentive for students to strive for excellence.
It is important that students understand the principles which guide the award of
particular grades for assessed work. In particular, it is essential that students
understand what is required to achieve the highest grades and that these grades are
achievable and available for high quality work.
The School is keenly aware of the importance of establishing the criteria for
excellence in an environment where teaching staff, departments and universities are
judged increasingly on student performance. There is, therefore, a common interest
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in developing a system and a culture which provides the incentive to aim for
excellence.
The University marking scale (see page 76) and its interpretation give a detailed
account of the type of work that will achieve the appropriate grade.
All assessments in the School are subject to a five-stage process.
1.
Assessed coursework and exam scripts are marked according to the marking
scales.
2.
A sample of scripts is second marked by a member of staff in the School with
a close knowledge of the subject area to ensure objectivity.
3.
The first and second markers discuss their marks and agree the final mark.
4.
A sample of scripts representing the different marking categories, any failures
and any problem scripts (for instance, where the first and second markers
cannot agree) are sent to the relevant External Examiner for the module in
question. The School’s external examiners are senior academics associated
with the relevant subject areas and employed at other UK universities.
External Examiners are responsible for “balancing and checking” to ensure
consistency. The role of the External Examiner is crucial and is taken very
seriously.
5.
A final stage follows which involves Examination Board meetings within the
School at the end of semester one and semester two attended by members
of staff and the External Examiners for all taught postgraduate programmes.
Every student’s record on coursework and examination is scrutinised and
approved by the examination board. Any special circumstances, including
requests for the S-coding of modules (see page 20), that students wish to
have noted as potentially adversely affecting their academic performance,
are discussed in confidence at meetings of the School’s Special Circumstances
Board (which meets prior to each Examination Board meeting).
6.
The School’s Examinations Officer then submits these final approved module
grades to the University Examinations Officer and student academic records
are updated accordingly.
Coursework submission
Written assignments should be submitted as follows:


All assignments must be word-processed.
All assignments should be accompanied by the coursework cover sheet, this
can be found at:
http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/management/student/
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One hard copy (stapled and not in a plastic wallet) should be placed in the
relevant submission box (this will be clearly indicated by the module number)
by 12 noon on the submission date, this will be advised by the Module Coordinator. The submission boxes are located within the open plan area on
Level 2 of the Gateway Building. In addition a soft copy uploaded to MMS
must be submitted by the same deadline. MMS, the University’s Module
Management System is a centralised system that is used to oversee student
academic results and module records. Further information on the operation
of MMS will be provided at the start of your studies with us.
Assignments should conform to the Harvard style of reference and be
accompanied by a full bibliography of items referenced in the text (see Part C
of the Handbook).
Late Submission of Coursework Assignments/Non Submission of Coursework
Normally, no extensions for coursework submissions are available. Extensions for
assessed coursework are given only where there is appropriate evidence of acute or
chronic ill health or serious personal issues. Please note, computer problems, extra
curricula activities and the pressure of work due to other modules are not valid
reasons for requesting an extension.
Students with exceptional circumstances who would like to request an extension
should approach the Module Co-ordinator after having completed the request for
extension form. Extensions must be requested in advance of the deadline. A copy of
any extension request will also be passed to the relevant Programme Director.
The request for extension form is found on the Management student section of the
School of Management website.
http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/management/student/
NOTE: Late assignments should be submitted directly to the School Office not via the
submission box system.
Penalties for late Submissions and/or Coursework of Incorrect Length
If work is submitted after the specified deadline, without valid cause (see above) the
following penalties will be applied.

LATE SUBMISSIONS: Work shall be penalized by one mark on the 20-point
scale for each day (or part thereof) that it is submitted late. In the context of
submission of assessed work, every day of the week will be considered as
counting towards a late penalty. This rule will apply to all holidays (public and
University) and includes weekends, with Saturday and Sunday each counting
as one day. Work submitted more than 10 days late will not be marked and
shall receive a mark of zero.

COURSEWORK OF INCORRECT LENGTH: All coursework assignments have a
word limit and this is clearly indicated as part of the assignment information.
Reference lists and any appended material are excluded from the word limit.
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To provide you with some flexibility, Module Co-ordinators will accept
assignments that are over or under the word limit by 10%. Assignments that
exceed this flexible limit will be penalised at the rate of one mark (on the 20point scale) for every 10% over the word limit. No penalties will be applied
for work that is under the word limit, however not making full use of the
word count is likely to mean that you have not fully addressed the
requirements of the coursework and the mark received may reflect this.
Anonymous Marking
All coursework and examination papers are marked anonymously. Therefore, it is
important that you do not include your name anywhere on your assessments prior
to submitting them. When submitting coursework (individual or group work) you
should use the coursework cover sheet, this can be found on the School of
Management web pages:
http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/management/student/
- an example is also included on page 77, please do not include your name on any
part of your assessment.
Feedback to Students on Assessed Coursework
Students must receive routine feedback on any work that they have submitted.
Feedback will give you advice that will guide you in improving your learning and
future performance. Feedback opportunities vary from school to school but can
include individual face-to-face discussion, written commentaries on work or
electronic feedback, for example through Moodle. Feedback on examination
performance can be given to a class as a whole or if you wish detailed feedback from
a member of academic staff on an examination script, you should contact your
School to arrange a suitable time. No fee is charged for this type of feedback.
Students are however also entitled to request a hard copy of any of their own
completed examination scripts. If a photocopy of the script is required for personal
reference, please contact your School and, on payment of a fee of £10 per
examination script, a photocopy will be provided for you within five working days.
Such requests should be made by the end of Week 3 of the semester that follows the
examination diet.
EXAMINATIONS
Any queries in relation to exam related matters should be addressed to the
University Examinations Officer: [email protected]
Registry has compiled a list of Frequently Asked Questions which may be of benefit
to you in your exam preparation:
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http://www.standrews.ac.uk/students/academic/Examinations/FrequentlyAskedQuestionsExams/#d.en.62577
You will also find all matters relating to examinations at the following link:
http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/students/academic/Examinations/
Illegible Exam Scripts
It is your responsibility to ensure that your handwritten answers provided in
examination scripts are legible and can be read by the markers. If a script cannot be
read by the marker then this could result in a delay in confirming your module grade.
You may be charged for a transcription service and could be required to return to the
School(s) concerned in order to transcribe the script. If you have already left St
Andrews then you will have to bear the costs of any return travel to the University.
More information is available at: https://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/media/teachingand-learning/policies/illegible-scripts.pdf
Recording Devices in Lectures
If you have a disability or some medical condition which means that you are unable
to take notes in lectures, you may seek permission from Student Services to use a
voice recorder or other computer-based device to record lectures and/or tutorials. If
you are not authorised by Student Services to record lectures then you must request
permission from the relevant academic member of staff prior to the lecture taking
place.
More
information
is
available
at:
https://www.standrews.ac.uk/media/teaching-and-learning/policies/recording-lectures.pdf
Academic Flexibility for Students with Recognised Sporting Talent
There is a policy which allows eligible students (with the permission of the School
and Sports Performance Manager) to have time off from their studies in order to
participate in key sporting tournaments and competitions. Further information is
available from Debby Sargent, Department of Sport and Exercise (email dls4) or see
http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/media/teaching-andlearning/policies/sports%20flexibility.pdf
Degree Regulations
A regulatory structure determined by Senate and Court governs the award of all
degrees. Undergraduate and Postgraduate Resolutions and Regulations are available
at:
https://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/students/rules/ugsenateregulations/
https://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/pgstudents/rules/pgsenateregulations/
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DISSERTATIONS
The University provides general guidance about dissertations in the University of St
Andrews Code of Practice for Supervisors and Students in Taught Postgraduate
Programmes (2015/16 Session). This document can be found at:
http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/staff/policy/tlac/postgraduate/taught/
The following section of your handbook deals with additional requirements specific
to taught Postgraduate Students in the School of Management. Further advice and
detailed instruction will be provided over the course of the year as part of the
Dissertation Module, which has two codes - MN5499 for students pursuing an
individual dissertation and MN5498 for students choosing to work on their
dissertation in a group. Any specific questions with regard to your dissertation
should be sent by e-mail to Julie Brooks, Director of Postgraduate Programmes
([email protected]).
1.
Choice of Dissertation Topic
We strongly advise you to be thinking about the topic of your dissertation as
early as possible during your year as a postgraduate student in the School of
Management. You will be asked to submit your dissertation proposal
including your choice of topic to the School for approval and you will be
allocated a supervisor. We make every reasonable effort to allocate
appropriate supervisors to students and although students may request a
particular member of staff as their supervisor, it is not always possible for
such requests to be met.
2.
Choice of Dissertation – Group or Individual
Taught Postgraduate students have the option to undertake either a Group
or an Individual Dissertation. Dissertations groups must designate a group
leader who will be the main point of contact with the School. For Group
Dissertations there is an additional requirement for each individual to submit
a separate essay (the “individual element” of the group dissertation) of no
more than 3,000 words, which is related/linked to the Group Dissertation
research topic. Students should choose their own topic for the individual
element of the group dissertation, which should be agreed with their
supervisor during the supervision process. Dissertation groups are also
required to keep an accurate record of group meetings (a log book is
provided to all groups for this purpose). The log of group meetings should be
submitted with the hard copy of the group dissertation. Group Dissertations
will be marked on a 70/30 basis: 70% Group Dissertation, 30% Individual
Element.
3.
Dissertation Submission
The dissertation should be submitted as follows:
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
Dissertations should be submitted to the School of Management Office no
later than 12 noon on Friday, 19 August 2016. Please note: the deadline for
submission is not flexible and neither your supervisor nor other staff in the
School of Management are in a position to grant extensions unless there are
extenuating circumstances (substantiated either by a Doctor or other official
means).

If for some reason you will be submitting your dissertation to us by post,
please ensure that you leave enough time for the dissertation to reach the
School of Management by the above deadline. It is your responsibility to
ensure that your dissertation arrives by the above deadline. Dissertations
arriving after 12 noon on 19 August 2016 may be penalised.

Two hard copies of the dissertation must be submitted together with an
electronic copy uploaded to MMS. The hard copies must be bound,
although students have a choice of either hard or soft binding. Please note
we will not accept stapled, ring or spiral bound dissertations. Following
assessment of the dissertation, one of the bound copies will be made
available for collection by students (normally at the time of graduation) from
the Taught Postgraduate Programme.

The University’s Print & Design Unit is ideally set up to print and/or bind your
dissertation or thesis. You can send your material in PDF format (with a note
of pages to be printed in colour) to: [email protected] and
then they will be in touch when your job is ready. Price lists and further
information: www.st-andrews.ac.uk/printanddesign/
Please allow adequate time for printing and binding your dissertation, as
this service becomes very busy around the submission date.

For Group Dissertations: The complete hard copy of the group dissertation
(including each of the individual submissions) must be handed in at one time
to the office. Hard copies of the individual elements do not need to be
included in the bound copy of the group dissertation, but can be stapled
separately and submitted at the same time. The designated group leader
must upload the group dissertation to MMS on behalf of all of the group
members. Each group member should upload their own individual element of
the group dissertation to MMS in the space provided. Dissertation Group Log
Books should also be submitted along with the copies of the dissertation.

Mandatory Declarations and Title Page:
The following sections should be included at the beginning of the
dissertation (for ALL dissertations):
(i)
A title page with the title of the dissertation, your name, your
matriculation number, the name of your supervisor, the name
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of the degree and the date of submission [specific format at
student’s own discretion]. Please note students are not
required to include the University crest on the title page of
their dissertation; however should you wish to do so please
follow the style guidelines for use of the University logo as
outlined on the University website:
https://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/staff/policy/styleguides/corporateidentity/
(ii)
The following declaration in the case of an individual
dissertation:
I hereby certify that this dissertation, which is approximately ….. words in
length, has been composed by me, that it is the record of work carried out by
me and that it has not been submitted in any previous application for a
higher degree. This project was conducted by me at [the University of St
Andrews / another location] from [month/year] to [month/year] towards
fulfilment of the requirements of the University of St Andrews for the degree
of ……..under the supervision of …………. date …… signature of candidate ………
(iii) The following declaration in the case of a group dissertation:
We hereby certify that this dissertation, which is approximately ….. words in
length, has been composed by us, that it is the record of work carried out by
us and that it has not been submitted in any previous application for a higher
degree. This project was conducted by us at [the University of St Andrews /
another location] from [month/year] to [month/year] towards fulfilment of
the requirements of the University of St Andrews for the degree of ……..under
the supervision of …………. date …… signature of candidates (in exceptional
circumstances one group member may sign on behalf of the dissertation
group) ………
The declaration for group dissertations must comply with the University’s
requirement for students working in groups to take responsibility for their
individual input to the group dissertation. In order to comply with this
requirement, all group dissertations must include a declaration of
responsibility. This declaration should take the form of a list of the
dissertation sections and the corresponding group member who is primarily
responsible for each section, for example
Introduction - E. Hemingway
Literature Review - J. Steinbeck
Methodology - C. Dickens
This declaration should be signed by each member of the group. A student
taking responsibility for a section will be held accountable should academic
misconduct be detected within their section. In the case of shared
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responsibility for one or more sections of the dissertation, students should
clearly state that the group members are jointly responsible for the section or
part of the dissertation.
(iv) The School of Management recognises that some postgraduates, such as
those whose first language is not English or who have dyslexia, may wish to
obtain additional assistance with their writing. As a general principle, such
assistance must be limited to matters of style, idiom, grammar, syntax and
spelling. If assistance of this kind is obtained by a student then this must be
explicitly acknowledged in a further signed declaration at the front of the
submitted dissertation as follows: “I, ……, received assistance in writing this
dissertation with style, idiom, grammar, syntax or spelling, which was
provided by [INSERT NAME].”
4.
Absence from St Andrews during the Dissertation Period
Students must be in St Andrews during the dissertation period (up until 19
August 2016). Students are expected to attend meetings with their
supervisors and also, in the case of group dissertations, with the other
members of their group. We recognise that it may be necessary for students
to travel in order to undertake certain aspects of their research related to
their dissertation; however any travel should be discussed and agreed with
your dissertation supervisor in advance. Please be advised that extensive
travel and/or absence from the University during the dissertation period
may hinder your ability to receive adequate supervision and to complete
your dissertation on time and to the required standard.
International Students (those who are non-European Economic Area
nationals) are affected by regulations introduced by the UK in relation to
immigration rules and visas. The University is now legally bound to report to
the United Kingdom Border Agency any student who is not in attendance for
28 days or more. In other words, if you are absent during the dissertation
period, this may affect your visa status.
5.
Dissertation Length and Format
Dissertations should be word-processed in 1.5 or double line spacing and the
font size should be no less than 12. Double-sided submission is acceptable.
The margins should be no narrower than 30mm. The dissertation or project
must not exceed 15,000 words (excluding ONLY the bibliography and any
appendices). This includes footnotes and edited original documents and
texts, as well as all other parts of the dissertation. This word limit is set by
the University and applies to all taught postgraduate dissertations. Students
must comply with the word limit and no excess will be allowed.
6.
Dissertation Log Books
The School of Management requires students and their supervisors to keep a
record of their meetings in a Supervisory Log Book. These log books will be
provided to supervisors at the beginning of the supervisory period and will be
kept by the supervisor and handed in to the School of Management office at
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the end of the dissertation period. A further log book is required to record
dissertation group meetings (please see above for more information).
7.
Dissertation Library
The School of Management maintains a small library of past dissertations.
The School makes every effort to ensure that dissertations in the library are
of a high quality and in particular those achieving a ‘distinction’ (a mark of
16.5 or better) may be included. Unless the School is notified otherwise,
dissertations receiving distinction-level marks may go into the School’s
dissertation library. Therefore students who submit a dissertation which is
of a confidential nature must include a note, requesting their dissertation
be withheld from the dissertation library.
The dissertation library is located on Level 2 in the Gateway Building behind
the reception area. Previous dissertations are only made available to staff
and students in the School of Management. Students may request to view
copies of previous dissertations via the School of Management office;
however, previous dissertations must not be photocopied, photographed or
taken away from Level 2 of the Gateway.
* MLitt in HRM students wishing to obtain the CIPD accredited qualification MUST
undertake an individual dissertation. Further information on additional dissertation
requirements in line with CIPD will be provided.
RESEARCH ETHICS (DISSERTATION)
As your dissertation research may include data obtained from living human subjects
(for example through conducting interviews, undertaking a survey, or focus groups)
it may therefore come within the scope of the University’s policies and procedures
concerning the ethical approval of such research activities. This is overseen by the
University’s Teaching and Research Ethics Committee (UTREC).
UTREC focuses on academic activity involving living human subjects, human tissues
and other human samples. All research and teaching activities of all staff and
students in all Schools and Units of the University that involve living human subjects,
tissues and/or other samples will require formal approval from UTREC.
Find out more please refer to:
http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/utrec/
Students will be informed of the requirements for obtaining ethical approval for any
data collection involving human subjects as part of the teaching on the dissertation
module.
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AWARDS
Programme Award
This refers to the academic qualification you are entitled to receive based upon the
results you have achieved in the modules that comprise your programme of study.
For the award of the Master’s in your chosen programme you are required to pass
the taught modules in your programme and the dissertation module with a
minimum credit weighted average of 13.5 and you are required to pass the
dissertation with a grade no lower than 13.5. If your performance is lower you may
be eligible for the award of Postgraduate Diploma.
Distinctions
Distinctions can be awarded in relation to: the dissertation element of your
programme; to the taught component of your programme; or, to the programme as
a whole. A grade of 16.5 or above constitutes the threshold for the award of
distinction in the dissertation. An average module grade of 16.5 or above in the six
taught modules of your programme constitutes the threshold for the award of
distinction in the taught component. A grade of 16.5 or above in the dissertation
and an average module grade of 16.5 or above in the taught component constitutes
the threshold for an overall distinction in your programme.
Prizes
The Head of School Prize is awarded at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels
and is offered to students in the School of Management who have contributed to the
School and in particular to its outreach activities.
The Macallan Marketing Prize is awarded at the discretion of the Examination Board
to the student from the MLitt Marketing programme who achieves the highest
overall average when the grades for the taught component of the programme and
the dissertation are combined.
Deans' List
This is an annual award for academic excellence, promoted by the Deans of the
University. Undergraduate and Postgraduate Taught students who achieve an
outstanding overall result in the course of an academic year have their names
inscribed on the Deans’ List, an honour which will also appear on your University
transcript. The criteria for the award are strict. Only students taking no fewer than
120 credits counting towards an approved degree programme over the course of an
academic year will be eligible and all credits have to be taken within the four
Faculties of the University of St Andrews. Any student who meets all the criteria and
who obtains a credit-weighted mean grade of 16.5 or above for the year will be
recorded on the Deans’ List. The rules will be adapted for part-time students, who
must achieve the minimum credit-weighted mean of 16.5 in 120 credits taken parttime over no more than three academic sessions. Full details of all the criteria and
conditions for the Deans’ List are available at:
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https://www.standrews.ac.uk/students/academic/awards/universityprizes/deanslist
and http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/media/teaching-and-learning/policies/PGT Credit
Grades Awards.pdf.
GOOD ACADEMIC PRACTICE POLICY
Academic integrity is fundamental to the values promoted by the University. It is
important that all students are judged on their ability, and no student will be allowed
to unfairly take an advantage over others, to affect the security and integrity of the
assessment process, or to diminish the reliability and quality of a University of St
Andrews degree.
Academic misconduct includes the presentation of material as one’s own when it is
not one’s own; the presentation of material whose provenance is academically
inappropriate; and academically inappropriate behaviour in an examination or class
test. Any work that is submitted for feedback and evaluation is liable for
consideration under the University’s Good Academic Policy irrespective of whether it
carries credit towards your degree. All work submitted by students is expected to
represent good academic practice.
You should be aware that the University takes academic misconduct offences
extremely seriously and any student found guilty of a repeat offence may be
expelled from the University either temporarily or on a permanent basis.
The University’s Good Academic Practice Policy (see link below) covers the behaviour
of both undergraduate and postgraduate students.
All students are required to undertaken the Training in Good Academic Practice
(TGAP) module. Further information on Academic and Study Skills can be found at
the following link:
http://www.standrews.ac.uk/students/academic/advice/studyskillsandadvice/academicskills/
http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/media/teaching-and-learning/policies/gap.pdf
http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/media/teaching-and-learning/documents/September 2014
Updated GAP Guide for Students.pdf
Students who are unsure about the correct presentation of academic material
should approach their tutors, and can also contact CAPOD, which is the University’s
Centre for Academic, Professional and Organisational Development, via email on
[email protected]
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RESPONSIBILITIES: SCHOOL AND STUDENT
In seeking to achieve our objectives, there are levels of input from the School and
students which should be regarded as minimum requirements.
School Responsibilities








To provide clear notification of module objectives and content, teaching
methods, assessment and the penalties for non-compliance with attendance
or submission requirements.
To ensure sensitivity in setting coursework submission dates and early notice
of such dates.
To provide a level of library provision which gives reasonable access to all
recommended material, where necessary through the short-loan system.
To provide high quality provision of study aids (hardcopy information,
electronic-based sources, etc).
To return coursework with appropriate feedback and normally within 3
weeks of submission. A copy of the Assessed Coursework Feedback Form
used by Module Co-ordinators can be found at page 77, (please note that this
Feedback Form may be amended by individual Module Co-ordinators as
necessary). In addition, assessment guidelines can be found at page 76.
Please note that all continuous assessment grades are technically provisional
until endorsed at the final Exam Board.
To provide advance notification of, and explanation for, any changes to
teaching times or rooms, communicated by email or by updating relevant
web pages.
To offer a reasonable level of access to staff outside formal class times.
To provide opportunities for discussion of performance in assessed
coursework and examinations; and in relation to your general progress with
your studies.
Please note that University policy concerning feedback on examination performance
and the return of examination scripts can be found at:
http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/media/teaching-and-learning/policies/student-feedback.pdf
Student Responsibilities




To be punctual and have full attendance at lectures and tutorials.
To check relevant University web pages for timetable changes and for
notices.
To read the reference materials provided by your Module Co-ordinator and
to consult additional sources as necessary.
To have adequately prepared for, and participate actively in, smaller group
classes such as tutorials, seminars etc.
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
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To organise and schedule work so that submission deadlines are met.
Requests for extensions to coursework submission dates must be agreed with
the relevant Module Co-ordinator.
When assessed presentations are included in the coursework of a particular
module, attendance on the date/time specified is mandatory and the
presentation should be regarded as if it were a formal examination for
purposes of absence and the like.
To provide written, and if possible, prior notification of unavoidable inability
to attend lectures/tutorials (e.g. on health grounds). In these cases, students
should email or write a letter to their Module Co-ordinator with a copy to the
Taught Postgraduate Programme team ([email protected]).
To follow strict compliance with University regulations relating to academic
offences (e.g. plagiarism) and acceptance of the penalties for non-compliance
(see the Good Academic Practice section of this handbook).
To undertake the Training in Good Academic Practice (TGAP) module.
To check your University email on a daily basis.
To inform us promptly of any change of address for either your St Andrews or
home details. This must be done through the Postgraduate Student Portal:
http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/studenthandbook/facilities/isaint/.
In meeting these responsibilities we recognise that you will need time, especially in
the first semester, to adjust to your own timetable and the facilities that you will
need to access in different parts of the University. We also recognise that it would
be rare for any student entering post-graduate study not to encounter aspects of life
that are difficult or uncertain. Experience suggests that addressing problems early
leads to an easier and quicker solution.
Personal Details
You are responsible for ensuring that your contact details are kept up to date. You
may do this at any time during the year via your E-vision account. This is the on-line
portal through which you can access a variety of information sources relevant to
your studies with us. E-vision can be accessed from the Current Students section of
the University home page.
Senate Regulations
You should make yourself aware of the Senate Regulations and the key Codes of
Practice and Rules that govern your studies and behaviour in St Andrews.
These are all available on the University web page under the Sections on Academic
Matters and Policy & Guidance, please see the following link:
http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/students/
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ACADEMIC APPEALS, COMPLAINTS AND DISCIPLINARY ISSUES
The University is committed to ensuring as high a quality student experience as
possible while studying at St Andrews. Occasionally things may go wrong and if you
are experiencing a difficulty, or are dissatisfied with your academic experience, you
should raise concerns as soon as possible. This allows effective resolutions to be
worked out quickly.
Such issues normally fall into one of three categories:



An appeal requesting a formal review of an academic decision - where, for
example, the University has made a judgement about your assessed work or
progression within a course of study which you have grounds to query (see
the relevant Policy on Student Academic Appeals);
Complaints - where you are dissatisfied with the quality or standard of
service that you have received from any part of the University, either
academic or non-academic (see the University’s Complaints Handling
Procedure);
Disciplinary cases - where the University has grounds to believe that you
have conducted yourself in an unacceptable manner in either an academic or
non-academic context. Academic Misconduct is dealt with under the Good
Academic Practice Policy; Non-Academic Misconduct is dealt with under
separate procedures.
If there are extenuating personal circumstances that may affect your academic
performance or impact on your progression you must bring these to the attention of
an appropriate member of staff (for example your Academic Adviser, module
coordinator or the appropriate Pro Dean) as soon as possible and normally prior to
completing any assessment. If you base a subsequent academic appeal on such
extenuating personal circumstances, you will be required to provide valid reasons to
explain why you failed to notify the examiners or other relevant persons of these
circumstances prior to completing the assessment.
Using the Right Procedure
If you are unsure whether to use the Appeals procedure or the Complaints
procedure, there is a key question to ask yourself. What kind of outcome are you
seeking? If you are seeking to have an academic decision changed (such as a mark or
grade, a decision about progression, or termination of studies), then you must use
the Appeals procedure. The permissible grounds for submitting an appeal are clearly
detailed therein. If you are dissatisfied with the level of service you have received
from the University, or if you believe that a service needs to be improved, or that the
University has failed (for example) to follow one of its administrative processes
properly, then the Complaints procedure is normally more appropriate. For matters
involving teaching in general, there are also feedback opportunities through StaffStudent Consultative Councils, module questionnaires and School presidents.
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You can make both a personal Complaint and an Appeal, by using both the Appeal
and Complaints procedures, but it must be emphasised that changing an academic
judgment or decision is not one of the outcomes from the Complaints procedure
used alone.
Further guidance and support
The Students' Association provides independent and confidential help and advice for
students who are contemplating submitting an academic appeal, complaint or are
having discipline proceedings taken against them. The Students' Association employs
Iain Cupples, the Student Advocate (Education), whose job it is to ensure that you
receive help with writing and submitting a submission. Iain can also accompany you
to any hearing. He should be your first point of contact as soon as you feel you need
help.
Contact:
Iain Cupples
Student Advocate (Education)
Telephone: 01334 462700
Email: [email protected]
ABSENCE REPORTING
Absence from Classes
Attendance is a basic assessment requirement for credit award, and failure to attend
classes or meetings with academic staff may result in your losing the right to be
assessed in that module. Please ensure that you are familiar with the 'Academic
Alert' policy as stated elsewhere in this handbook. If you have missed timetabled
classes/events or any other compulsory elements of the module due to illness or an
unavoidable pre-arranged event or appointment, you must complete a Self
Certificate of Absence form (through e-Vision) as soon as possible.
Under certain circumstances, Schools may request further documentation in
addition to the Self Certificate. In this case, students should contact Student Services
in order to organise the appropriate documentation. If you submit more than three
Self Certificates in a single semester, or if the period of absence extends to fifteen
working days, you may be contacted by Student Services, the relevant Pro Dean, or
by an appropriate member of staff in your School.
Completion of a Self Certificate is not an acceptable substitute for contacting your
tutors well in advance if you have to be absent. Advance notice of absence is
acceptable only for good reason (for example, a hospital appointment or job
interview). It is your responsibility to contact the appropriate member of staff to
complete any remedial work necessary.
If you are an international student (non-EEA nationals only), you will be affected by
recent changes introduced by the UK in relation to immigration rules and visas. The
University is now legally bound to report to the UKVI any student who fails to enrol
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on a module or programme of study, or who fails to attend, or who discontinues
their studies.
Absence from Examinations
Absence from Examinations due to illness or any other unavoidable reason should be
reported by submitting a Self Certificate of Absence form (through e-Vision) as soon
as you are able to do so, preferably before the examination is due to take place and
in any case no later than 3 days after the examination. You must contact the School
responsible for the module being examined in order to request alternative
arrangements, which are at the discretion of the School. You are only required to
notify the University Examinations Officer if there is a problem submitting the selfcertificate.
Contact:
Examinations Officer
The Old Burgh School
Abbey Walk
Telephone:
Email:
01334 464100
[email protected]
STUDENT SUPPORT & GUIDANCE
There are a number of support and guidance facilities available to you during your
time as a student with us. These include:


Staff in The School of Management;
The University’s Advice and Support Centre (ASC), see page 10;

The Student Association:
http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/studentservices/

Student Services:
http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/studentservices/
In seeking advice and guidance from colleagues in the University, please be assured
that personal matters will be dealt with confidentially and information will only be
passed on to other members of staff in accordance with the University Student
Confidentiality Code:http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/students/rules/dataprotection/
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PART C
EFFECTIVE LEARNING
GROUP WORK
During your postgraduate studies, working in multi-cultural teams or groups will
form an important part of your studies. Not only is this a key part of the learning
experience, but it will also help to prepare you for future employment. At the School
of Management, we strive to achieve diversity among our student cohorts to ensure
that the study environment reflects the globalised world in which we live and work.
We hope that you will form lasting relationships with the other students in your
cohort and that working together helps to facilitate this process.
During first semester, for group work undertaken in core modules, you will be
working in ‘Action-Learning Groups’ which have been allocated by the School to
ensure that all groups are as diverse as possible. For option modules in Semester
One groups will be assigned by the Module Co-ordinator on the same basis as the
Action-Learning Groups. During Semester two, students will be allowed to freely
choose with whom they wish to work and form their own groups.
In some cases, assessed group work will include an element of ‘peer evaluation’ in
order to inform the module co-ordinator about the process of group working. In
order to help you to work better in your Action Learning Groups, sessions on group
work have been organised in Orientation Week and early in Semester One, including
a Belbin self-assessment of group roles and a follow-up workshop to help individuals
understand how they normally work within teams or groups of people.
If you encounter any problems within your Action-Learning Groups that you are
unable to resolve yourselves, you should bring this to the attention of your module
co-ordinator as early as possible and before any assessed group work is submitted.
WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS
Many of the assessments you are required to complete as part of the coursework for
your modules are written assignments. These may be essays or more reflective
pieces of writing such as learning journals or blogs. The following notes might be of
help in preparing written assignments and also when revising for examinations as
most examination papers require you to write long answers in “essay-style” format.
The following paragraphs provide some general advice on writing essays; however
your Module Co-ordinators will provide additional advice for other types of written
assessments.
At the outset you should establish the amount of time needed to complete the essay
for the deadline date and work backwards to give an appropriate start date/time.
However, you should begin your essay as early as possible to ensure that you can
give enough time to the task of essay writing. Here are some tips on handling
written assignments:
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1.
Examine the task:
(a)
Make sure that you know how long the essay has to be.
(b)
Look for keywords in the question as these will help you to
understand what you are being asked to do.
(c)
Decide on the limits of the topic
2.
Collect the material you need:
(a)
Start early, thinking carefully about the topic and the approach you
are going to take to it.
(b)
Use a variety of sources, starting with the ones that have been
recommended, if any.
(c)
When reading material, always make sure that you have the essay
title in front of you and a list of questions you want to answer.
(d)
Carefully record the sources you use as you must reference them all,
and you may want to go back to the original material at a later date.
3.
Plan the outline and write a first draft:
(a)
Introduction – this first paragraph is often the most difficult to write,
but you can always rewrite it later if necessary. You should introduce
the topic, perhaps giving some explanation of what you understand by
the title, and establish the main point that you are going to develop.
(b)
Development – develop your ideas or argument as fully as you can,
usually one main point per paragraph. You will need to explain and
justify the points that you make, supporting them with evidence such
as examples and diagrams. Continually prove your point of view
throughout the essay; don’t drift or leave the primary focus of the
essay; don’t lapse into summary – that should come in the conclusion.
(c)
Conclusion – summarise your main points and, if asked, give your view
or position; draw more general conclusion if appropriate; refer back
to the essay title and, if it asks a specific question, make sure that you
have answered it. Read your first paragraph and the development.
(d)
Edit/rewrite the first paragraph if necessary.
(e)
References/Bibliography – do not plagiarise, you must give references
for both direct quotations and paraphrases of others’ ideas. All
referenced works must also appear in the bibliography.
4.
Take a day or two off!
5.
Re-read your essay with a fresh mind and a sharp pencil. You might like to
bear the following questions in mind:
(a)
Does the essay answer the question?
(b)
Is the content accurate and relevant?
(c)
Have you covered all the main aspects in sufficient depth?
(d)
Is each main point well supported by examples and argument?
(e)
Is the material arranged logically?
(f)
Is there a clear distinction between your ideas and other people’s
ideas?
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Have you acknowledged all sources and references?
Is it the right length?
Is it clearly written and well laid out?
Is the grammar, punctuation and spelling correct?
6.
Edit, correct, and re-write as necessary.
7.
Submit the essay.
8.
Congratulate yourself on a job well done!
Keywords in Essay Titles1
Analyse
Examine the detailed constituents of.
Compare
Examine qualities or characteristics to discover resemblances.
“Compare” is usually stated as “compare with”; you are to emphasize
similarities, although differences may be mentioned.
Contrast
Stress dissimilarities, differences, or unlikeness of things, qualities,
events or problems.
Criticise
Express your judgement of correctness or merit. Discuss the
limitations and good points or contributions of the plan or work in
question.
Define
Definitions call for concise, clear, authoritative meanings. Details are
not required but limitations of the definition should be briefly cited.
You must keep in mind the class to which a thing belongs and
whatever differentiates the particular object from all others.
Describe
In a descriptive answer, you should recount, characterize, sketch or
relate in narrative form.
Discuss
The term discuss, which appears often in essay questions, directs you
to examine, analyse carefully, and present considerations pro and con
regarding the problems or items involved. This type of question calls
for a complete and entailed answer.
Evaluate
In an evaluation question you are expected to present a careful
appraisal of the problem stressing both advantages and limitations.
Evaluation implies authoritative and, to a lesser degree, personal
appraisal of both contributions and limitations.
1
Modified and adapted from: University of St Thomas’ ISS-Learning Center (http://www.stthomas.edu/academicsupport)
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Explain
In explanatory answers it is imperative that you clarify, elucidate, and
interpret the material you present. In such an answer it is best to
state the ‘how’ or ‘why’, reconcile any differences in opinion or
experimental results, and, where possible, state causes. The aim is to
make plain the conditions that give rise to whatever you are
examining.
Illustrate
A question that asks you to illustrate usually requires you to explain or
clarify your answer to the problem by presenting a figure, picture,
diagram, or concrete example.
Interpret
An interpretation question is similar to one requiring explanation.
You are expected to translate, exemplify, solve, or comment upon the
subject and usually to give your judgement or reaction to the
problem.
Justify
When you are instructed to justify your answer you must prove or
show grounds for decisions. In such an answer, evidence should be
presented.
Outline
An outline answer is organised description. You should give main
points and essential supplementary materials, omitting minor details,
and present the information in a systematic arrangement or
classification.
Prove
A question that requires proof is one which demands confirmation or
verification. In such discussions you should establish something with
certainty by evaluating and citing experimental evidence or by logical
reasoning.
Relate
In a question that asks you to show the relationship or to relate, your
answer should emphasize connections and associations in descriptive
form.
Review
A review specifies a critical examination. You should analyse and
comment briefly in organised sequence upon the major points of the
problem.
State
In questions that direct you to specify, give, state, or present you are
called upon to express the high points in brief, clear narrative form.
Details and, usually, illustrations or examples, may be omitted.
Summarise
When you are asked to summarize, you should give in condensed
form the main points or facts. All details, illustrations and elaboration
are to be omitted.
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When a question asks you to trace a course of events, you are to give
a description of progress, historical sequence, or development from
the point of origin. Such narratives may call for probing or for
deduction.
Unless otherwise stated, essays and reports require a full answer in good English.
Although not essential, the use of headings and sub-headings is often helpful in
structuring an answer, and you should not be afraid to use these where appropriate. In
any event, separate paragraphs should be employed for the discussion of each new
point.
Essays are usually set in such a way that they cannot be satisfactorily answered by
paraphrasing standard textbooks or papers. Attempts to treat essays as
paraphrasing exercises will attract minimal marks and run the risk of penalties for
plagiarism. Essays invariably require a certain amount of reading, both of
recommended references and consideration of lectures and class discussions. While
references to the literature are expected, you should develop properly argued answers
in your own words rather than present a mere patchwork of other people's
thoughts/interpretations/words. This is the only way to understand a subject fully, and
demonstrate to tutors that you have a grasp of the subject.
All references/sources used in your work must be cited wherever appropriate. Failure
to comply with these directions means that you run the risk of penalties for plagiarism.
For example:
When you consciously refer to, or legitimately borrow an idea from an author's work,
you must always acknowledge this. The most convenient way of doing this is: “Ansoff
(1984; p73) suggests that” or “these four components together form the common
thread concept of strategy (Ansoff 1984).”
Direct quotations must be placed in quotation marks followed by a clear indication of
the source and relevant page number.
All references cited should be listed in full in alphabetical order at the end of your
work, see the information contained in the Referencing Guide of this Handbook.
REFERENCING GUIDE
This section of the Student Handbook sets out the Harvard system of referencing to
be used in tutor-marked assignments and research reports submitted to the School
of Management, University of St Andrews. It is important to reference published
material that you wish to use in your written work. While referencing is a standard
that is used to avoid plagiarism it also supports a strong scientific method. To build
arguments and provide evidence you must reference any published resources you
use. The spirit of referencing is embodied in Isaac Newton’s famous 1676 quote, “If I
have seen further it is by standing on the shoulders of giants”. It means that
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Newton’s great discoveries were made by building on the previous work of scientists.
This reference guide sets out how to reference other authors’ work properly.
For each type of material you are referencing (e.g. books, journal articles,
newspapers, internet sites), this guide presents two parts, and how to write the full
reference at the end of your work. The section at the end of the work should be
called a reference section and only include those references cited in the essay. For
the purposes of this guide these two sections will be called in-text referencing and
the reference list format.
A note on paraphrasing and quoting: quotations are direct transcriptions of text from
other sources while paraphrasing uses your own words to express others’ ideas. You
should attempt to paraphrase where possible and only use quotations sparingly and
strategically. Both paraphrasing and quoting require referencing, and quotations
must refer to the page number from which they were taken (see Books section
overleaf).
Generic Format
The Harvard system has a generic format for in-text referencing and the reference
list. While this guide provides a range of examples for books, articles, Internet
sources etc, the generic format below should be used where adaptation is necessary.
In-text
Author (year) or (Author, year)
e.g. Sillince (1996) or (Sillince, 1996)
In-text (direct quote)
Author (year: page number) or (Author, year: page number)
Reference list
Books
Author (Year) Title. Place Published: Publisher.
e.g. Sillince, J.A.A. (1996) Business Expert Systems. Hitchin: Technical Publications.
Articles
Author (Year) ‘Article title’. Journal Title, volume (number): pages.
e.g. Sillince, J.A.A. (1999) ‘The role of political language forms and language
coherence in the organizational change process’. Organization Studies, 20 (3):485518.
Books
The following exemplifies several in-text references for books with one author, two
authors, more than two authors, and authors cited by another author. When citing
more than two authors, list all authors’ surnames the first time, then use et al. (see
example; et al. is an abbreviated version of the Latin phrase et alii, which means
“and others”). Note the different formats for the in-text referencing of paraphrasing
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and quotations (with page number) and the complete references in the reference
list.
In-Text
One author
The development of bureaucratisation in the UK was fundamentally different from
that of the US. The Taylorist efficiency movement occurred in the US during an
expansionary period while the same movement occurred in the UK during one of the
worst ever recessions (Littler, 1982). Littler (1982) concludes that for these reasons
the labour movements in the UK are fundamentally different from those in the US.
These differences in capitalist development had important consequences, ‘This
affected the pattern of resistance, and British capitalism still carries the scars of this
historical conjuncture’ (Littler, 1982: 195).
Two authors
Managerial skills are a key focus for Whetton & Cameron’s (1991) introductory text.
Three or more authors
Smith, Child & Rowlinson’s (1990) case study of Cadbury’s Ltd revealed that the
corporate culture’s resistance to change was diminished by the use of new concepts
and symbols. The new vision embodied in the transformation was also facilitated by
key change agents located strategically throughout the organisational structure
(Smith, et al., 1990).
Author cited by other author: secondary sources
Haslam, Neale & Johal (2000) outline Porter’s (1980) industry structure analysis. It
features five important forces; barriers to entry buyers, suppliers, substitutes, and
intensity of rivalry (Porter, 1980, in Haslam, et al., (2000) cite Pharmaceutical giant
Glaxo-Wellcome as particularly at risk of low-cost substitutes as drug patents expire.
Reference List
Alphabetically ordered list of references.
Haslam, C., Neale, A., & Johal, S. (2000) Economics in a Business Context 3rd ed.
London: Thompson Learning.
Littler, C.R. (1982) The Development of the Labour Process in Capitalist Societies.
London: Heinemann.
Smith, C., Child, J., & Rowlinson, M. (1990) Reshaping Work: The Cadbury Experience.
Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Whetton, D.A., & Cameron, K.S. (1991) Developing Management Skills 2nd ed. New
York: Harper Collins.
Journal Articles
In-text referencing of journal articles uses the same format as books (see above).
Notice that the reference list includes the name of the journal article and the name
of the journal. Be wary of electronic journals or articles retrieved from the Internet,
as some formats may not include the original page numbers you might need for
direct quotations.
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In-text
Broadbent, Jacobs, & Laughlin’s (1999) comparison of the organisational
accountability of UK and New Zealand Schools reveals important distinctions.
Broadbent, et al. (1999) discuss how management accounting in UK schools results in
an individualistic focus in contrast to the socialising focus of an integrated financial
accounting in New Zealand schools. An individualising focus may result in
undermining ‘the capacity for communal action and alienate the organisational
members from the activities that they are required to undertake’ (Broadbent, et
al.,1999:358).
Reference list
Broadbent, J. Jacobs, K. & Laughlin, R. (1999) ‘Comparing schools in the UK and New
Zealand: Individualising and socialising accountabilities and some implications for
management control’. Management Accounting Research, 10:339-361.
Internet Sites
The variability of Internet site quality is problematic for referencing in academic
essays. However, access to annual company reports, press releases, and daily news
services provide ample reasons to utilise the Internet in essays. Journal articles
obtained over the Internet should use the standard journal format unless the journal
is solely in electronic format.
In-text
Wiegran & Koth’s (1999) article on successful online commerce focuses on customer
loyalty, increasing purchases, and higher margin products. They propose five
website features to achieve successful online commerce; value added information,
personalisation, intelligent communication, user generated content, and loyalty
incentives (Wiegran & Koth, 1999).
Since 1991, the price of oil has reached its highest in February 2000 and this rise is
due to OPEC restrictions on oil production (BBC, 2000).
Reference list
BBC, (2000, February 19) ‘Oil reaches $30 a barrel’. (BBC News), Available:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/business/newsid_644000/644028.stm (Accessed:
2000, February 20).
Wiegran, G., & Koth, H. (1999) ‘Customer retention in on-line retail’. (Journal of
Internet Banking and Commerce), Available:
http://www.arraydev.com/commerce/JIBC 4(1) (Accessed: 2000, February 20).
Other formats
Again, use the generic system when you encounter material to be referenced that
does not fit clearly into the previous or following examples.
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
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Newspapers In-text Use same as Books (i.e. Author, year). If no author is
found then use full name and date as follows. The oil crisis has caused
parents to ‘consider home education’ (The Times. 9 July 1973: 3).
Reference list
The Times (1973) ‘Oil Crisis Impacts on Learning’. 9th July: 3.

Chapter in edited collection
In Text
Note that the author’s cited chapter is taken from pages 138 to 157 from
Pollert’s Book, Farewell to Flexibility. Smith’s (1991) examination of flexible
specialisation focuses on production and consumption.
Reference list
Smith, C. (1991) ‘From 1960s’ Automation to Flexible Specialisation: A déjà vu
of technical panaceas’. In A. Pollert (ed.) Farewell to Flexibility: 138-157.
Oxford: Blackwell.

Company Publication
In-text
Flexible work technologies are a key focus for British Telecom. BT has set up
a consultancy unit that specializes in employing flexible working practices
with respect to technology (British Telecom, 1999).
Reference list
British Telecom (1999) Annual Review and Summary Financial Statement.
London: British Telecom.

Author with more than one publication in a year
In-text
Haslam, Williams, & Williams (1990a) is distinguished from Haslam, Williams,
& Williams (1990b).
Reference List
Haslam, C., Williams, J., & Williams, K. (1990a) ‘The hollowing of British
manufacturing’. Economy and Society, 19(4): 456-490.
Haslam, C., Williams, J., & Williams, K. (1990b) ‘Bad work practices and good
management practices’. Business History Review, 64(4): 657-688.

Interviews and personal communication
Students are advised not to reference personal communication (e.g. lectures
or meetings) unless as part of a submitted field research project with a
relevant section on methods. Lecture material should be traced back to
original sources.
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In-text
One respondent believed that post modern research methods were indicated
by the use of computers and quantitative algorithms with traditionally
qualitative textual analysis (Innes, 2000).
Reference list
Innes, P. (2000) Interview, no.01, 22 March.
GUIDELINES ON ACADEMIC INTEGRITY
It is critical to the reputation of the School of Management and of the University that
everyone associated with the programmes behaves with the highest academic
integrity. As the programmes help create individuals who will take up responsible
positions in business and government, we have a special responsibility to ensure that
our academic standards are beyond reproach.
All programmes encourage students to work together and discuss ideas, this is an
integral part of the learning process. However, we should caution you that
discussion and collaboration should be clearly separated from the written
preparation and submission of individually assessed work.
Please make sure you have read the section on “Good Academic Practice” in Part B
of this handbook.
PREPARING FOR EXAMINATIONS
Reciting/Memorising from lecture notes
The aim is not to memorise and recite what you think is the most relevant bit of the
lecture notes as accurately as possible. The aim is to answer the question that has
been asked. This may well require you to think hard in the examination room, using
all that you have been taught in this and other courses, as well as knowledge from
your own reading. There is nothing to be gained by memorising paragraphs of text
(and mathematics) for reciting in the examination. Indeed, such behaviour may
lead to charges of plagiarism.
Originality
High marks will be awarded for original thought that is sensible (and hopefully
correct) and for the use of information from additional reading. This is easily noticed
by the marker amongst a large amount of lecture note repetition.
Meaning
Deciding what the question means is a key aspect of answering some questions.
Good students are distinguished by their ability to correctly interpret the question. So
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part of your answer may sometimes involve some discussion of how the question can
be interpreted, and why you have chosen to interpret it in the way you have.
Argument
It is not enough to reproduce the relevant facts; you must use these facts in an
argument that answers the question. Most students do not need to know a lot
more to get higher marks. By just using what they already know in a better
argument they could get substantially higher marks. You may think the facts you have
written down "speak for themselves" and provide all that is needed for an intelligent
person to answer the question. But if you have not shown how they can be used to
answer the question, you will not get very good marks. For example, the observation
that apples fall to the ground is not the same thing as the theory of gravity.
Write It Down
You only get marks for what you have written down, not what you could have
written down, or what you meant to write down. For example, sometimes students
miss out the word "not", which has a dramatic effect on the meaning. More
generally, students fail to fully explain their argument.
Relevance
Strongly resist the temptation to stray off the point. You will get very few marks for
irrelevant material, even if it is all correct. It demonstrates a failure to properly
understand the question. Extra marks will be given for candidates who are able to
select only those parts of what they have been taught that are directly relevant to
answering the question.
Correct Answer
The examiner is often less interested in whether your answer to a question is Yes or
No, but in how you have arrived at your answer. Indeed, either yes or no may be
acceptable answers when properly justified by a well-structured argument.
References
You do not need to memorise (and quote in your answer) the names of the authors
of a large number of journal papers etc. What is important is that you understand the
contribution to knowledge a paper has made, and can make use of this knowledge,
where relevant.
Diagrams
They are easy and quick to draw, usually indicate an understanding of the problem,
and often assist candidates in analysing the problem, leading to a better answer.
Remember to label your axes and curves.
Handwriting and English
You will only get marks for what the examiner can read, and so you will not get marks
for illegible or incomprehensible material. Therefore, it is worthwhile writing a bit
more slowly so the meaning and handwriting are clear.
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Mathematics
In general, outside of statistics courses, unless you are asked for a proof, substantial
amounts of mathematics are not required or expected in answers. However, in a
question on say CAPM, a brief mathematical statement of the SML may be beneficial.
If you do use some mathematics, then briefly define your symbols.
Numerical Questions
Numerical questions versus essay questions. There is a risk return trade-off in
making this choice - numeric questions tend to have a higher average mark, but also
a much higher variance of marks.
Method
Most of the marks are usually allocated for showing a correct and clear
sequence of calculations. A lucky guess of the correct numerical answer will get few
marks. If your method is correct showing your workings also means that if you
make a slip in your calculations, you will still get good marks.
Omissions
You may think a piece of information is missing from the question. In this case, state
clearly any assumptions you make. Examiners may omit some assumptions which
are necessary to properly answer the question, but the deliberate omission of
numbers necessary to answer the question is rare.
Length of Answers
Very short answers, e.g. Yes or No, will score very few marks.
Fuller Answers
Given the constraints that your answer is (a) legible, (b) clearly expressed in good
English, (c) directly relevant to answering the question and (d) correct; then a fuller
answer will usually score higher marks. However, repetition will not lead to higher
marks.
Fundamental Mistakes
Lengthening your answer by making statements which demonstrate you do not
understand fundamental concepts may lead to lower marks than if you had not
written this material.
Conclusions
Try to have a final paragraph which concludes your answer and summarises your
main points.
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FURTHER HELP WITH STUDY SKILLS AND ASSESSMENTS
CAPOD, is the University’s Centre for Academic, Professional and Organisational
Development. CAPOD provides support for students in developing academic and
study skills (eg. essay writing, referencing, notetaking), support with any
maths/stats elements of your course, IT skills, and professional skills (e.g.
presentation skills, time-management, teamworking) to help you get set for the
workplace.
For academic/study skills support you can book an individual or small-group
appointment with one of our experienced postgraduate tutors or attend a drop-in
session every Thursday afternoon in the Main Library.
If you require support with maths/stats skills, you can book an individual or smallgroup appointment with one of our postgraduate mathematicians or statisticians.
More information and booking details can be found here: http://www.standrews.ac.uk/capod/students/pgtaught/
You can also take part in the Academic Skills Project, a series of subject-specific workshops
delivered by postgradutes. To find out more about the project see: https://www.standrews.ac.uk/students/academic/advice/studyskillsandadvice/asp/
Information about resources to help you develop your professional skills and IT skills
(including the ability to study for a Microsoft Office Specialist qualification) as well as
detail on the M-Skills programme for Masters students can be found on the MSkills
webpage: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/pgstudents/academic/advice/mskills/
Finally, you can contact CAPOD by: e-mail [email protected] or telephone
on 01334 (46)2141 or over visit in person at the Hebdomadar’s Block, St Salvator’s
Quad.
ENGLISH LANGUAGE TEACHING
The purpose of In-sessional English Language Service (iELS) is to help you acclimatise
to academic study in the UK. This includes:




understanding your lecturers’ expectations
developing and organising arguments
encouraging critical thinking
enhancing your language accuracy and fluency
iELS tuition comes in the form of:



one-to-one tutorials
workshops
a bank of 150+ online lessons
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In your induction session in orientation week, enrolment will be explained. You can
also visit our website and enrol on our Moodle site for the latest information about
iELS, and for access to a number of language competence diagnostic tools.
Contact details:
Email:
Moodle:
Website:
Address:
[email protected]
https://moody.st-andrews.ac.uk/moodle/course/view.php?id=241
https://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/elt/iels/
iELS
English Language Teaching Centre
Kinnessburn
Kennedy Gardens
ST ANDREWS
Fife
KY16 9DJ
Website: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/elt/support
Moodle: https://moody.st-andrews.ac.uk/moodle/course/view.php?id=241
FURTHER INFORMATION
The University is registered under the Data Protection Act and reserves the right to enter
personal student data on its computer systems.
Equal Opportunities: The School and University are committed to a comprehensive
policy of equal opportunities for students, in which individuals are selected and treated
on the basis of their relevant merits and abilities and are given equal opportunities
within the University. No student should receive less favourable treatment on any
grounds which are not relevant to academic ability and attainment. The University is
committed to a programme of action to make the policy fully effective.
Special Consideration: will be given to students who are subject to medical illness or
extenuating (social/personal) circumstances which are likely to affect academic
performance. Students should submit relevant documents and inform one of their
Programme Directors of all such circumstances as soon as possible. Please also note
the procedures in earlier sections of this document.
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PART D
TAUGHT POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES
Your chosen programme of study is one of a number of Taught Postgraduate
Programmes in the School:






MSc in Finance and Management
MSc in Banking & Finance
MLitt in International Business
MLitt in Marketing
MLitt in Management
MLitt in Human Resource Management
All programmes share a common philosophy in that they aim to provide students
with a critical understanding of the nature of strategic business and management
activity and the wider contexts within which such activity takes place. This is
achieved through the provision of programmes whose content is relevant to the
specialist area of study chosen and which:









is rooted in sound research into the nature of business and managerial work;
offers an integrated theoretical and empirical framework within which to
study the subject;
provides for a balance in the learning of useful concepts and techniques and
the development of analytical, critical, and evaluative skills that are
transferable and that will support the student’s needs for lifelong learning;
helps to prepare students who can be expected to operate in often diverse
cultural settings and within a global business environment;
examines the ethical dimensions of business and organisations;
gives you the opportunity to work in teams, make presentations and debate
and analyse with fellow students and staff contemporary issues in business
and management;
emphasises the process of learning as well as the content of learning;
through the provision of option modules, offers the opportunity for students
to tailor their studies to reflect their particular interests;
provides a variety of activities (for example, guest lectures and organisation
visits) to complement your studies and enable you to develop further your
knowledge of, and skills in, the subject of business and management.
The modules offered by the School of Management aim to develop both the
knowledge base and the skills of students. In each of these aims, there is an
important role for the concept of student-centred learning. In practical terms, this
involves a co-operative arrangement between staff and students, with staff
responsible for organising and guiding students towards a variety of learning
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resources and students making the fullest use of these resources on their individual
initiative.
It is a strong belief of the staff that, as well as encouraging academic excellence, the
School of Management should take a positive role in developing the types of skills
which are essential to effective leadership. Such skills include:







Analysis – learning to use methods of careful and logical reasoning.
Synthesis – recognising patterns of development in diverse material.
Oral presentations to small and large audiences of peers.
The ability to work in groups or teams, with the associated organisational,
leadership and delegation skills.
The capacity for constructive self-evaluation.
The ability to communicate with representatives of business and to
understand and use with confidence the vocabulary and conceptual
frameworks employed in business.
The capacity for research and investigation.
SKILLS FOR EMPLOYMENT, PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND THE
CO-CURRICULAR MASTERS EXTRA PROGRAMME
http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/management/programmes/pgtaught/mx2015-2016/
In addition to the academic studies associated with your programme, we have
designed an integrated programme of professional, personal and career
development activities to complement your academic studies, enhance your
experience at the University of St Andrews and contribute to your employment and
career development profile. Known as the co-curricular MX (Masters Extra)
Programme this comprises the following elements:
• MX-TALKS: A series of specialist lectures by guest speakers from industry,
commerce and the professions; presentations by leading employers and a number of
management-related interactive workshops all aimed at enhancing your knowledge
and understanding of business and management. Additional events will also be
organised by the School’s student-led Management or MNG Society.
• MX-JOBS: The opportunity to participate in the University Careers Centre
programme of activities and to take advantage of the Centre’s advice and guidance
on employability skills and issues. Throughout the year, activities organised by the
Careers Centre that are relevant to the School’s postgraduate students will take
place on Wednesday afternoons. Stay up to date with the Careers Centre follow on
Facebook https://www.facebook.com/universityofstandrewscareerscentre or please
drop in to 6 St Mary's Place (directly opposite the Student Association building)
which is open from 10am to 5pm Monday to Friday. Phone 01334 (46)2688 or email
[email protected]
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• MX-SKILLS: Personal development workshops provided by the University’s Centre
for Academic, Professional and Organisation Development (CAPOD). The workshops
will include topics such as Time Management, Project Planning and Cross-Cultural
working. Additionally, CAPOD offers a wider programme of workshops, ‘M-Skills’,
open to all Masters students at the University, including the opportunity to study for
a globally recognised IT qualification (Microsoft Office Specialist). For more
information on CAPOD please see page 51, and on M-SKILLS http://www.standrews.ac.uk/pgstudents/academic/advice/mskills/.
The various MX workshops, seminars and talks run on Wednesday afternoons
between 4.15 and 5.45 pm – though occasionally we present additional guest
speakers at other times. The MX Programme will develop your awareness of
employers, the skills they are looking for in potential employees, business practice
and employment opportunities in Scotland and beyond. Participation in this
programme of voluntary activities will also enable you to earn points towards a
Certificate in Career Development (CCD) awarded by the Careers Centre. More
details of the MX Programme and the CCD will be available during Orientation Week.
The MX programme is coordinated by Charles Lovatt ([email protected])
The Careers Centre is located at 6 St Mary's Place, directly opposite the Student
Association building and is open from 10am to 5pm Monday to Friday. (0)1334
(46)2688 [email protected]
Contact details:
Careers Centre
University of St Andrews
6 St Mary’s Place
ST ANDREWS
Fife
KY16 9UY
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THE MSc in FINANCE AND MANAGEMENT PROGRAMME
The programme will enable students to develop an integrated and critically aware
understanding of the financial context of managing business organisations and will
assist students to undertake effective roles within these organisations.
Programme Aims
The aims of this programme are to provide students with:
1.
an intellectual framework to study financial imperatives, tools and techniques
and the changing managerial context in which they operate.
2.
preparation for a career in business and management or for research or
further study in the area by developing skills at a professional or equivalent
level.
3.
the ability to apply knowledge and understanding of business and
management to complex issues, both systematically and creatively, so as to
help improve business and management practice.
4.
enhanced lifelong learning skills and personal development so as to be able
to work with self-direction and originality and to contribute to business and
society at large.
Learning Outcomes
At the end of this programme students should be able to:
1.
apply a systematic understanding of relevant knowledge about the nature of
management decisions within the financial environment of business.
2.
apply a range of financial analysis techniques applicable to complex
managerial situations.
3.
demonstrate a critical awareness of current issues in international business
which is informed by leading edge research and practice in the field.
4.
demonstrate various techniques to allow detailed investigation of social and
environmental issues affecting business.
5.
demonstrate creativity in the application of knowledge, together with a
practical understanding of how established techniques of research and
enquiry are used to develop and interpret knowledge in financial
management decision environments.
6.
acquire and analyse data and information, evaluate their relevance and
validity, and synthesise a range of information in the context of new
situations.
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apply conceptual understanding that enables the student to:

evaluate the rigour and validity of published research and assess its
relevance to new situations.

extrapolate from existing research and scholarship to identify new or
revised approaches to practice.
8.
conduct research into financial and management issues that requires
familiarity with a range of business data, research sources and appropriate
methodologies, and for such to inform the overall learning process.
9.
communicate effectively both orally and in writing, using a range of media.
Programme Structure
The core (compulsory) modules for your programme are indicated below.
Core Modules
Code
MN5442
MN5443
MN5444
MN5612
MN5498 or
MN5499
Title
Corporate Financial Management
Research Methods in Finance & Management
Strategic Financial Management
Portfolio Management & Investment
Dissertation (Group)
Dissertation (Individual)
Level/
Credit Value
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/60
Semester
One
One
Two
Two
All year
Option Modules
In addition to the core modules you must choose two option modules, one in each
semester. Option modules are indicated below. Please note, however, that changes
may be made to the list of available options and places may be limited.
Semester One Option Modules
Code
MN5401
MN5421
MN5501
MN5510
MN5513
MN5603
MN5607
MN5611
Title
International Marketing
Managing People in Global Markets
Scenario Thinking & Strategy
Entrepreneurship, Creativity & Innovation
Ethics, Organisations & Management
Responsibility Sustainability & Accountability in
Organisations
International Financial Management
Alternative Investments
57
Level/Credit Value
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT
TAUGHT POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES 2015-16
Semester Two Option Modules
Code
MN5311
MN5511
MN5554
MN5560
MN5604
MN5608
MN5821
Title
Responsible Investment
Leadership in Organisations
Marketing & Society
Creativity, Marketing & Communication
Financial Systems
Risk Management
Managing Non-governmental Organisations
Level/Credit Value
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
For information regarding arrangements concerning your choice of option modules please
refer to Part B: “Advising”.
Please note that, in exceptional circumstances, minor modifications to your
programme structure may be necessary during the course of the year.
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THE MSc IN BANKING & FINANCE
This programme has been designed to prepare students for advanced level
employment or doctoral research in the fields of Banking and Finance. The
quantitative orientation of the programme will provide students with the technical
skills needed to undertake independent empirical research and achieve a critical
understanding of current theories in banking and finance. The core and option
modules cover a very wide range of specialist areas from which students will gain a
thorough knowledge of the most current developments in the global financial
markets.
Programme Aims
The aims of this programme are to provide students with:
1. advanced training in elements of Banking and Finance, which are required to
undertake studies at PhD level.
2. an in-depth knowledge of the functioning of financial markets and institutions as
required by many financial firms and government agencies so that they may
undertake a career in the financial sector
3. enhanced lifelong learning skills and personal development so as to be able to
work with self-direction and originality and to contribute to business and society
at large.
Learning Outcomes
At the end of this programme students should be able to:
1. abstract from particular solutions to general ones.
2. use a range of theories for careful and logical analysis to anticipate the
consequences of alternative strategies.
3. take a critical view of the subject material in order to learn to recognise the
limitations of alternative theories and competing strategies.
4. Understand the theoretical foundations of banking & finance, specifically
concepts of financial intermediation and markets.
5. analyse the microeconomics of financial products and their underlying risk.
6. summarise and explain to different stakeholder groups alternative choices
relating to banking & finance decision-making.
7. conduct empirical research in the area of banking and finance.
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Programme Structure
The core (compulsory) modules for your programme are indicated below.
Core Modules
Code
MN5310
MN5443
MN5612
MN5320
MN5499
Title
Banking and Finance
Research Methods in Finance (Econometrics 1)
Portfolio Management and Investment
Research Methods in Banking and Finance
(Econometrics 2)
Dissertation
Level/
Credit Value
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
Semester
5/60
All year
One
One
Two
Two
Option Modules
In addition to the core modules you must choose two option modules, one in each
semester. Option modules are indicated below. Please note, however, that changes
may be made to the list of available options and places may be limited.
Semester One Option Modules
Code
MN5611
MN5607
Title
Alternative Investment
International Financial Management
Level/Credit Value
5/20
5/20
Semester Two Option Modules
Code
MN5311
MN5604
MN5608
Title
Level/Credit Value
5/20
5/20
5/20
Responsible Investment
Financial Systems
Risk Management
For information regarding arrangements concerning your choice of option modules
please refer to Part B: “Advising”.
Please note that, in exceptional circumstances, minor modifications to your
programme structure may be necessary during the course of the year.
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THE MLITT IN INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS PROGRAMME
The programme will provide students with a detailed knowledge of business systems
and institutions across the world in order to prepare them for positions as potential
international managers in the global marketplace.
Programme Aims
The aims of this programme are to provide students with:
1.
an advanced study of organisations, their management and the changing
external context in which they operate.
2.
preparation for a career in business and management or for research or
further study in the area by developing skills at a professional or equivalent
level.
3.
the ability to apply knowledge and understanding of business and
management to complex issues, both systematically and creatively, so as to
improve business and management practice.
4.
enhanced lifelong learning skills and personal development so as to be able
to work with self-direction and originality and to contribute to business and
society at large.
Learning Outcomes
At the end of this programme students should be able to:
1.
demonstrate a systematic understanding of relevant knowledge about
organisations, their international context and how they are managed.
2.
apply relevant knowledge to a range of complex cross-cultural situations
taking account of relationships and interactions with other areas of the
business or organisation.
3.
demonstrate a critical awareness of current issues in international business
which is informed by leading edge research and practice in the field.
4.
apply appropriate techniques sufficient to allow detailed investigation into
relevant international business issues.
5.
demonstrate creativity in the application of knowledge, together with a
practical understanding of how established techniques of research and
enquiry are used to develop and interpret knowledge in international
business.
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6.
acquire and analyse data and information, to evaluate their relevance and
validity, and to synthesise a range of information in the context of new
situations.
7.
apply conceptual understanding that enables the student to:

evaluate the rigour and validity of published research and assess its
relevance to new situations.

extrapolate from existing research and scholarship to identify new or
revised approaches to practice.
8.
conduct research into international business issues that requires familiarity
with a range of business data, research sources and appropriate
methodologies, and for such to inform the overall learning process.
9.
communicate effectively both orally and in writing, using a range of media.
Programme Structure
The core (compulsory) modules for your programme are indicated below.
Code
Title
MN5001
MN5423
MN5002
MN5425
Contemporary Global Issues in Management
Global Business Strategy
Contemporary Conceptual Issues in Management
Master Classes in International Business
MN5498 or
MN5499
Dissertation (Group)
Dissertation (Individual)
Level/
Credit Value
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
Semester
5/60
All year
One
One
Two
Two
Option Modules
In addition to the core modules you must choose two option modules, one in each
semester. Option modules are indicated below. Please note, however, that changes
may be made to the list of available options and places may be limited.
Semester One Option Modules
Code
MN5401
MN5421
MN5501
MN5510
MN5513
MN5603
MN5607
MN5611
Title
International Marketing
Managing People in Global Markets
Scenario Thinking & Strategy
Entrepreneurship, Creativity & Innovation
Ethics, Organisations & Management
Responsibility Sustainability & Accountability in
Organisations
International Financial Management
Alternative Investments
62
Level/Credit Value
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT
TAUGHT POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES 2015-16
Semester Two Option Modules
Code
MN5311
MN5511
MN5554
MN5560
MN5604
MN5608
MN5821
Title
Responsible Investment
Leadership in Organisations
Marketing & Society
Creativity, Marketing & Communication
Financial Systems
Risk Management
Managing Non-governmental Organisations
Level/Credit Value
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
For information regarding arrangements concerning your choice of option modules
please refer to Part B: “Advising”.
Please note that, in exceptional circumstances, minor modifications to your
programme structure may be necessary during the course of the year.
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THE MLITT IN MARKETING PROGRAMME
The programme will enable students to develop an integrated and critically aware
understanding of marketing and organisations and provide for their education as
marketing specialists in order that they may position themselves in the global
marketplace as a potent strategic marketer.
Programme Aims
The aims of this programme are to provide students with:
1.
An advanced study of marketing organisations, their management and the
changing external context in which they operate.
2.
Preparation for a career in marketing or for research or further study in the
area by developing skills at a professional or equivalent level.
3.
The ability to apply knowledge and understanding of marketing to complex
issues, both systematically and creatively, so as to improve business practice.
4.
Enhanced lifelong learning skills and personal development so as to be able
to work with self-direction and originality and to contribute to business and
society at large.
Learning Outcomes
At the end of this programme students should be able to:
1.
demonstrate a systematic understanding of relevant knowledge about
marketing and organisations.
2.
apply relevant knowledge to a range of complex marketing situations taking
account of its relationship and interaction with other areas of the business or
organisation.
3.
demonstrate a critical awareness of current issues in marketing which is
informed by leading edge research and practice in the field.
4.
apply appropriate marketing techniques sufficient to allow detailed
investigation into relevant business issues.
5.
demonstrate creativity in the application of knowledge, together with a
practical understanding of how established techniques of research and
enquiry are used to develop and interpret knowledge in business and
management.
6.
acquire and analyse data and information, to evaluate their relevance and
validity, and to synthesise a range of information in the context of new
situations.
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SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT
7.
TAUGHT POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES 2015-16
apply conceptual understanding that enables the student to:


evaluate the rigour and validity of published research and assess its
relevance to new situations.
extrapolate from existing research and scholarship to identify new or
revised approaches to practice.
8.
conduct research into marketing issues that requires familiarity with a range
of business data, research sources and appropriate methodologies, and for
such to inform the overall learning process.
9.
communicate effectively both orally and in writing, using a range of media
Programme Structure
The core (compulsory) modules for your programme are indicated below.
Code
Title
MN5001
MN5406
MN5002
MN5405
MN5498 or
MN5499
Contemporary Global Issues in Management
Consumer Behaviour & Market Research
Contemporary Conceptual Issues in Management
Dialogue & Debate (Master classes) in Marketing
Dissertation (Group)
Dissertation (Individual)
Level/
Credit Value
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/60
Semester
One
One
Two
Two
All year
Option Modules
In addition to the core modules you must choose two option modules, one in each
semester. Option modules are indicated below. Please note, however, that changes
may be made to the list of available options and places may be limited.
Semester One Option Modules
Code
MN5401
MN5421
MN5501
MN5510
MN5513
MN5603
MN5607
MN5611
Title
International Marketing
Managing People in Global Markets
Scenario Thinking & Strategy
Entrepreneurship, Creativity & Innovation
Ethics, Organisations & Management
Responsibility Sustainability & Accountability in
Organisations
International Financial Management
Alternative Investments
65
Level/Credit Value
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT
TAUGHT POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES 2015-16
Semester Two Option Modules
Code
MN5311
MN5511
MN5554
MN5560
MN5604
MN5608
MN5821
Title
Responsible Investment
Leadership in Organisations
Marketing & Society
Creativity, Marketing & Communication
Financial Systems
Risk Management
Managing Non-governmental Organisations
Level/Credit Value
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
For information regarding arrangements concerning your choice of option modules
please refer to Part B: “Advising”.
Please note that, in exceptional circumstances, minor modifications to your
programme structure may be necessary during the course of the year.
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THE MLITT in MANAGEMENT PROGRAMME
The programme will provide students with an integrated and critically aware
understanding of management and organisations and will help to prepare them for
employment in a variety of positions in both the public and private sectors.
Programme Aims
The aims of this programme are to provide students with:
1.
an introduction to contemporary management techniques, primarily based
around multi-functional project teams and networked organisations;
2.
an understanding of the concepts and techniques that inform contemporary
management practice;
3.
a range of analytical, critical, communication and leadership skills;
4.
analytical and practical skills to undertake a project with either a research or
management practice focus in the form of an MLitt dissertation.
Learning Outcomes
At the end of this programme students should be able to:
1.
understand the key disciplines of contemporary management;
2.
understand the key principles of management strategy – analysis, formation,
implementation and review;
3.
understand the main principles of the disciplines – marketing, finance, HR etc
– that constitute multi-functional project teams;
4.
demonstrate skills of working, influencing and leading in multi-functional
project teams;
5.
evaluate critically the strengths and weaknesses of particular strategies in
specific contexts;
6.
identify the likely effectiveness of proposed solutions to managerial and
organisational dilemmas;
7.
identify the implications for all stakeholders of a variety of policy alternatives
involving ethical, social and environmental issues;
8.
abstract from particular solutions to general ones;
9.
use a range of theories for careful and logical analysis to anticipate the
consequences of alternative strategies;
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10.
demonstrate a critical view of the subject material in order to learn to
recognise the limitations of alternative theories and competing managerial
strategies;
11.
apply critical analytical skills to complex practical problems;
12.
summarise and explain alternative choices to different stakeholder groups;
13.
demonstrate the capacity to evaluate alternative strategic choices, both in
writing and verbally;
14.
demonstrate the teamworking and leadership skills required to deliver
projects on time and on budget;
15.
communicate effectively both orally and in writing, using a range of media;
16.
review literature, produce research essays, and contribute to team-based
projects;
17.
demonstrate self-management skills: planning, organising, working
independently, showing initiative, managing time and other resources
effectively, showing responsibility for personal and career development;
18.
assess business potential and the viability and consequences, broadly
conceived, of alternative strategies.
Programme Structure
The core (compulsory) modules for your programme are indicated below.
Code
MN5461
MN5471
MN5424
MN5470
MN5498 or
MN5499
Title
Level/
Credit Value
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/60
Strategic Management
Marketing Principles & Practice
Corporate Finance & Accounting
Managing Human Resources
Dissertation (Group)
Dissertation (Individual)
Semester
One
One
Two
Two
All year
Option Modules
In addition to the core modules you must choose two option modules, one in each
semester. Option modules are indicated below. Please note, however, that changes
may be made to the list of available options and places may be limited.
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Semester One Option Modules
Code
MN5401
MN5421
MN5501
MN5510
MN5513
MN5603
MN5607
MN5611
Title
International Marketing
Managing People in Global Markets
Scenario Thinking & Strategy
Entrepreneurship, Creativity & Innovation
Ethics, Organisations & Management
Responsibility Sustainability & Accountability in
Organisations
International Financial Management
Alternative Investments
Level/Credit Value
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
Semester Two Option Modules
Code
MN5311
MN5511
MN5554
MN5560
MN5604
MN5608
MN5821
Title
Responsible Investment
Leadership in Organisations
Marketing & Society
Creativity, Marketing & Communication
Financial Systems
Risk Management
Managing Non-governmental Organisations
Level/Credit Value
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
For information regarding arrangements concerning your choice of option modules
please refer to Part B: “Advising”.
Please note that, in exceptional circumstances, minor modifications to your
programme structure may be necessary during the course of the year.
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THE MLITT in HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PROGRAMME
The programme will provide students with an integrated and critically aware
understanding of human resource management within the overall strategic
management of the organisation and will prepare them for employment in both the
specialist field of HRM and as line managers working in a team-based environment.
The Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development has accredited the
programme and students who follow the required curriculum will be eligible for
membership of the Institute. Please see page 72 for details.
Programme Aims
The aims of this programme are to provide students with:
1.
an integrated theoretical and practical framework that locates HRM within
the concepts and techniques that inform management practice as reflected in
contemporary approaches to strategic management and the effective
management and development of people.
2.
the skills to analyse and evaluate HRM and HRD as critical features of
contemporary management in organisations.
3.
a range of analytical, critical, communication, team-working and leadership
skills.
4.
the research skills necessary to undertake project work and to complete an
MLitt dissertation.
Learning Outcomes
At the end of this programme students should be able to:
1.
understand the key disciplines of contemporary management and the
strategic context within which HRM is practised.
2.
understand the key principles of management strategy – analysis, formation,
implementation and review and their links with HRM practice.
3.
understand the main principles and practices involved in an integrated
approach to HRM.
4.
design, implement and evaluate organisational strategies relating to the
management and development of people.
5.
demonstrate the skills necessary to work effectively as part of a multifunctional project team.
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6.
demonstrate that they can evaluate critically the strengths and weaknesses
of particular strategies in specific contexts.
7.
identify the likely effectiveness of proposed solutions to managerial and
organisational dilemmas.
8.
identify the implications for all stakeholders of a variety of policy alternatives
involving ethical, social and environmental issues.
9.
abstract from particular solutions to general ones.
10.
use a range of theories for careful and logical analysis to anticipate the
consequences of alternative strategies.
11.
take a critical view of the subject material in order to recognise the
limitations of alternative theories and competing managerial strategies.
12.
apply critical analytical skills to complex managerial and HR problems in
organisations.
13.
evaluate alternative strategic choices, both in writing and verbally.
14.
communicate effectively both orally and in writing, using a range of media.
15.
review literature, produce research essays, and contribute to team-based
projects.
16.
demonstrate self-management skills: planning, organising, working
independent, showing initiative, managing time and other resources
effectively, showing responsibility for personal and career development.
Programme Structure
The core (compulsory) modules for your programme are indicated below.
Code
MN5001
MN5480
MN5473
MN5481
MN5498 or
MN5499
Title
Contemporary Global Issues in Management
Managing and Developing People
Skills and Challenges for the HR Professional
Master Classes in Human Resource Management
Dissertation (Group)
Dissertation (Individual)*
Level/
Credit Value
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/60
Semester
One
One
Two
Two
All year
For information regarding arrangements concerning your choice of option modules
please refer to Part B: “Advising”.
Please note that, in exceptional circumstances, minor modifications to your
programme structure may be necessary during the course of the year.
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TAUGHT POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES 2015-16
Option Modules
In addition to the core modules you must choose two option modules, one in each
semester. Option modules are indicated below. Please note, however, that changes
may be made to the list of available options and places may be limited.
Semester One Option Modules
Code
MN5401
MN5421
MN5501
MN5510
MN5513
MN5603
MN5607
MN5611
Title
International Marketing
Managing People in Global Markets
Scenario Thinking & Strategy
Entrepreneurship, Creativity & Innovation
Ethics, Organisations & Management
Responsibility Sustainability & Accountability in
Organisations
International Financial Management
Alternative Investments
Level/Credit Value
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
Semester Two Option Modules
Code
MN5311
MN5511
MN5554
MN5560
MN5604
MN5608
MN5821
Title
Responsible Investment
Leadership in Organisations
Marketing & Society
Creativity, Marketing & Communication
Financial Systems
Risk Management
Managing Non-governmental Organisations
Level/Credit Value
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
5/20
The MLitt in Human Resource Management and the Chartered Institute of
Personnel and Development (CIPD)
The CIPD is the professional body for Human Resource professionals in the United
Kingdom (and Ireland). With close on 140,000 members, it is the most long-standing
and well-developed professional body of its kind, and is increasingly influential
worldwide. Students who wish to achieve CIPD membership as well as the MLitt
qualification are required to take MN5421 Managing People in Global Markets and
MN5511 Leadership in Organisations as their option modules in semesters 1 and 2
respectively and must also undertake an individual dissertation (MN5499). For these
students, success with the MLitt in HRM programme will enable you gain the
knowledge required at the advanced level for the CIPD’s Associate professional level
of membership (Assoc. CIPD). As your career develops after graduation and you
acquire the necessary professional experience, you can apply for a “membership
assessment” which, if successful, will enable you to be upgraded to the CIPD’s
Chartered level of membership.
Students opting to follow the curriculum for the MLitt in HRM that has been
approved by the CIPD will automatically be enrolled as student members of the CIPD.
This student membership will not only enable you to gain the appropriate
recognition from the CIPD at the end of your programme for your achievements but
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it will also provide you with access to a wide range of resources to support your
studies. For example, you will benefit from access to the CIPD’s vast library of HRM
and related texts, their surveys and reports, and receive their bi-monthly journal
“People Management”. You will also be able to attend sessions of interest/relevance
to your studies at your local branch meetings and develop networks with other
professionals to support your studies and your career.
At the start of your programme, we will guide you through the process of enrolling
as a CIPD student member. The Programme Director will provide you with your CIPD
number early in the induction process. It is then your responsibility to enrol online
with the CIPD and to keep your student detail and registration status up to date
whilst you are studying with us.
For further information about the CIPD and its resources visit: www.cipd.co.uk
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UNIVERSITY MAP
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ACADEMIC CALENDAR: School of Management 2015/16
Semester 1: Martinmas Semester
(Monday 14 September 2015 - Friday 18 December 2015)
Week
Week beginning
Events
Pre-sessional
Monday 7 September 2015
Orientation week
Week 1
Monday 14 September 2015
Teaching begins
Week 2
Monday 21 September 2015
Week 3
Monday 28 September 2015
Week 4
Monday 5 October 2015
Week 5
Monday 12 October 2015
Week 6
Monday 19 October 2015
Week 7
Monday 26 October 2015
Week 8
Monday 2 November 2015
Week 9
Monday 9 November 2015
Week 10
Monday 16 November 2015
Week 11
Monday 23 November 2015
Week 12
Monday 30 November 2015
Revision & St Andrew's Day Graduation (Mon 30 Nov)
Week 13
Monday 7 December 2015
Semester 1 examinations
Week 14
Monday 14 December 2015
Semester 1 examinations
Vacation
Monday 21 December 2015
Christmas vacation
Vacation
Monday 28 December 2015
Christmas vacation
Inter-semester
Monday 4 January 2016
Reporting
Inter-semester
Monday 11 January 2016
Reporting - deadline (to be confirmed)
Raisin Monday
Semester 2: Candlemas Semester
(Monday 25 January 2016 - Friday 27 May 2016)
Week
Week beginning
Events
Inter-semester
Monday 18 January 2016
Conclusion of semester 1 business - Semester 2 pre-sessional (from
Thursday 21)
Week 1
Monday 25 January 2016
Teaching begins
Week 2
Monday 1 February 2016
Week 3
Monday 8 February 2016
Week 4
Monday 15 February 2016
Week 5
Monday 22 February 2016
Week 6
Monday 29 February 2016
Week 7
Monday 7 March 2016
Vacation
Monday 14 March 2016
Spring vacation
Vacation
Monday 21 March 2016
Spring vacation
Week 8
Monday 28 March 2016
Week 9
Monday 4 April 2016
Week 10
Monday 11 April 2016
Week 11
Monday 18 April 2016
Week 12
Monday 25 April 2016
Revision week
Week 13
Monday 2 May 2016
May Day holiday - no teaching (Monday 2) Revision week
Week 14
Monday 9 May 2016
May examinations
Week 15
Monday 16 May 2016
May examinations
Week 16
Monday 23 May 2016
May examinations / Reporting
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ASSESSMENT GUIDELINES/MARKING STRUCTURE:
Essays, Reports and other Qualitative Assessments
Mark
Result
Criteria
1–6
Fail
Disjointed and with limited evidence of understanding, tending towards an
answer that is incoherent, irrelevant or non-existent.
7 - 11
Pass (Below
Level)
12 - 13
Pass
Adequate performance. Answer covers all relevant material but descriptive
rather than explanatory. Unreflective reproduction of lectures and basic
readings. Little analysis. Relatively coherent at top end; less coherent at bottom
end.
14 – 16
Pass
Performance is good to very good. A clear understanding of material. Augments
indicative answer. Well-structured and coherent argument. References exceed
basic readings. Upper end includes critical analysis. Lower end exhibits only
minor flaws in structure, or unclear linkage of concepts.
17 – 20
Pass / Distinction
Excellent performance. Includes critical analysis of course material, evidence of
wide reading, and thorough understanding of subject matter. Cogent, wellwritten and integrated answer, which illustrates main points with excellent
examples. Original insights at the top end.
Masters
Performance substantially below expected Masters level. Some knowledge and
understanding is evident, but answer is partial and inadequate; may be in
summary or list form only.
Assessment Guidelines/Marking Structure:
Technical Reports and Analysis and other Quantitative Assessments
Mark
%
Result
Criteria
1–6
1 -37%
Fail
Technically unacceptable or with very poor technical
work, very little effort and lacks understanding.
7 - 11
38 -49%
Pass
Weak technical coverage, little explanation, some
guesswork.
12 - 13
12 = 50 – 55%
13 = 56 – 59%
Pass
Partial answer, reasonable structure and explanation.
Reasonable understanding of the technical issues with
no serious errors in technical application.
14 – 16
14 = 60% - 63%
15 = 64% - 66%
16 = 67% - 69%
Pass
Good answer. A good understanding of the
theoretical and technical issues with clear structure
and presentation. Some omission and explanation at
lower end.
17 - 19
17 = 70% - 79%
18 = 80% - 89%
19 = 90% - 95%
Pass /Distinction
Complete answer, clearly structured and explained
with good presentation and references.
20
96% - 100%
Pass/Exceptional
performance
Perfect answer with full explanation.
76
SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT
TAUGHT POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES 2015-16
EXAMPLE
University of St Andrews
School of Management
Assessed Coursework Feedback Form
MODULE CODE & TITLE:
STUDENT ID:
Assignment number:
% of overall mark for module:
Penalties for late submission:
Days late =
Penalty Points =
Final Mark
Performance against assessment criteria
Very Good
Very Poor
Evidence of preparation
A
B
C
D
E
Ability to define and discuss key
concepts, and apply theory & ideas
A
B
C
D
E
Structure and clarity
A
B
C
D
E
Student Value Added:
A
B
C
D
E
Insights (analysis, arguments etc.)
Provided by a student beyond describing the current literature
Overall comments
Name of assessor:
Date:
Marking Scale
The following Marking Scale is adopted in all module assessments and examinations.
17 – 20 = Pass with Distinction
7 – 16 = Pass
1 – 6 = Fail
Please note that the mark awarded reflects overall performance on the assessment.
The assessment criteria and “A to E” scale provide additional feedback on the strengths and weaknesses of the assessment.
77
SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT
TAUGHT POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES 2015-16
STUDENT ID No:
(If group coursework, please list all ID Nos.)
MODULE CODE:
SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT
Taught Postgraduate Programmes
MODULE TITLE:
PROGRAMME:
(eg. MLitt Marketing, MLitt International Business, MSc Finance and Management, etc)
MODULE COORDINATOR:
WORD COUNT:
(List of references and appended materials are not to be included in the word count but tables, even
those input as images, will be counted as part of the word count)
DEADLINE DATE:
In submitting this assignment I hereby confirm that:




I have read and understood the University’s policy on Good Academic Practice.
I confirm that this assignment is all my own work.
I confirm that in preparing this piece of work I have not copied any other person’s work, or any other
pieces of my own work.
I confirm that this piece of work has not previously been submitted for assessment on another
programme.
78
School of Management
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/management
Student Handbook
2015-2016
Taught Postgraduate Programmes
Taught Postgraduate Programmes
Level 2
School of Management
University of St Andrews
The Gateway
ST ANDREWS
Fife KY16 9RJ
Scotland, UK
T:+44 (0)1334 462200/462871
F:+44 (0)1334 462812
E:[email protected]
W: www.st-andrews.ac.uk/management
As a research intensive institution, the University ensures that its teaching references the research interests of
its staff, which may change from time to time. As a result, programmes are regularly reviewed with the aim of
enhancing students’ learning experience. Our approach to course revision is described at:
www.st-andrews.ac.uk/media/teaching-and-learning/policies/course-revision-protocol.pdf
Produced by Print & Design, University of St Andrews September 2015
The University of St Andrews is a charity registered in Scotland, No: SC013532
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