Citizens' Guide to the Budget

Citizens' Guide to the Budget
Fiscal Year 2014
Citizens’ Guide to the Budget

Chris Christie, Governor
Kim Guadagno, Lt. Governor
Andrew P. Sidamon-Eristoff
State Treasurer
Charlene M. Holzbaur
Director
Robert L. Peden
Deputy Director
Jacki L. Stevens
Associate Director
Mary E. Byrne
Assistant Director
Office of Management and Budget
December 2013
This document is available via the Internet at http://www.state.nj.us/treasury/omb
OFFICE OF THE STATE TREASURER
P.O. BOX 002
TRENTON, NJ 08625-002
CHRIS CHRISTIE
Governor
KIM GUADAGNO
Lt. Governor
ANDREW P. SIDAMON-ERISTOFF
State Treasurer
Message from Andrew Sidamon-Eristoff, Treasurer of the State of New Jersey:
The Citizens’ Guide is exactly what its name suggests – a guide designed to help concerned
citizens understand the impact of the State’s multi-billion dollar budget for Fiscal Year 2014.
While similar documents published earlier in the budget process were designed to explain the
Christie Administration’s budget proposals, the Citizens’ Guide details the final spending plan
approved by the Legislature and signed into law by Governor Christie. Much hard work went
into the Guide’s creation. Professionals at the Office of Management and Budget labored to
ensure that the Guide is both illuminating and useful. My thanks goes to all who contributed to
the creation of the Guide. On behalf of the Department of the Treasury and the administration,
I present this booklet to you in the interest of a more transparent and better government.
Sincerely,
Andrew Sidamon-Eristoff
New Jersey Is an Equal Opportunity Employer • Printed on Recycled and Recyclable Paper
Fiscal Year 2014
Citizens' Guide to the Budget
Table of Contents
Page
A Summary of the Appropriations Act
1
Chapter 1: Budget Highlights
2
Where Does The Money Go?
6
Chapter 2: Charts and Graphs
9
Chapter 3: Economic Overview & Revenue Forecast
39
Chapter 4: Budget Details
46
Revenue Certification
Summary of Appropriations
Major Increases/Decreases (Comparison to the Fiscal 2014 Governor’s Budget)
Summary of Changes (Comparison to the Fiscal 2013 Adjusted Appropriations)
Fiscal 2014 Appropriations Allocated by Core Mission
47
48
49
52
76
Appendix
102
Governor Christie’s Budget Message on February 26, 2013
New Jersey State Legislature Budget and Appropriations Committees
Fiscal 2014 Contributors
103
113
114
The Fiscal Year 2014 Citizens’ Guide to the Budget:
A Summary of the Appropriations Act
Governor Chris Christie is committed to reform, public accountability and transparency. To
that end, the State publishes the Citizens’ Guide to the Budget for the people of New Jersey.
The Citizens’ Guide provides details of the Appropriations Act, which implements the Budget
and directs State spending decisions. It is designed to be the State’s budgetary road map for
the current fiscal year and to help the public better understand what is included in the enacted
Budget.
Fiscal Year 2014 marks the fourth year in which Governor Christie has constitutionally
balanced the State Budget. This spending plan reflects the Governor’s continued commitment
to fiscal discipline, holding spending below Fiscal 2008 levels while still funding critical
initiatives that empower New Jerseyans. In the wake of Super Storm Sandy, Governor Christie
understands the importance of working together to recover, rebuild, and restore our state. By
building on past reforms and working closely with leaders in both parties, the Governor has set
an example for Washington, D.C. and the rest of the nation.
Members of the Governor’s staff, the Treasurer’s Office, the Office of Management and
Budget, and department managers collaborate throughout the year to ensure the State fulfills
key commitments while maintaining fiscal balance:
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In February 2013, Governor Chris Christie released his proposed Budget along with
the Budget Summary, a document outlining the State’s fiscal condition and
summarizing the Governor’s policy initiatives and Budget proposals.
During the legislative session, the Legislature crafted Senate Bill 3000, the
Appropriations Act, which modified the Governor’s Budget. After bipartisan
negotiations, the Legislature submitted the Appropriations Act for approval by the
Governor on June 24.
Due to successful cooperation with the Legislature, the Governor determined it was not
necessary to exercise his line-item veto authority, and he signed the Appropriations Act
as presented on June 28.
The Appropriations Handbook, released shortly afterward, provides detailed
information about the enacted Budget.
This publication, the Citizens’ Guide to the Budget, provides the citizens of New Jersey
with a summary of the changes in the enacted Budget and also details the State’s
certified revenue levels. In addition, the Citizens’ Guide includes charts and graphs that
help explain the State’s fiscal condition, along with specific budgetary information
about the Fiscal 2014 Budget. The Citizens’ Guide also contains detailed performance
targets for various State initiatives to provide accountability for taxpayer dollars.
All of the above documents are available electronically at:
http://www.state.nj.us/treasury/omb/
In keeping with his commitment to transparency, Governor Christie has ensured that the
Government Transparency Center, which is available 24 hours a day at
YourMoney.NJ.Gov, contains comprehensive and up-to-date information about State
government. The Center includes revenue and expenditure data, public payroll records, debt
information, and performance targets, along with other valuable information. To access the
Center, please visit: http://www.yourmoney.nj.gov/.
1
Chapter 1: Budget Highlights
2
CHAPTER 1: BUDGET HIGHLIGHTS
The Fiscal 2014 Budget: Recover. Rebuild. Restore.
For the fourth consecutive year, New Jersey will operate under a responsible spending
plan, funding key priorities while ensuring New Jersey has the resources available for
unforeseen circumstances. The fiscal year 2014 budget is a balanced $32.9 billion plan
which allows for a responsible surplus of $303 million. This bipartisan effort provides
$213.5 million to support job-creating tax cuts, brings state aid to schools to a historic
high, funds important drug treatment and mental health services and makes the largest
pension payment in state history.
Budget Highlights
The Budget:
•
•
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•
•
•
•
•
•
Holds spending below fiscal year 2008 levels.
Maintains historic reductions in the reliance on non-recurring revenue, down to
3.6 percent in fiscal year 2014.
Makes a $1.676 billion payment to the state’s pension funds, the largest in history.
Establishes a $40 million Super Storm Sandy contingency fund to ensure that
expenses not reimbursed by the federal government can be met without reducing
resources for other key priorities.
Continues the government reorganization begun in fiscal year 2013, acting on the
commitment to build a more common-sense state government that works smarter
and better.
Provides funding to hospitals to reward innovation with the goal of improving
healthcare outcomes. Preserves $128.3 million of fiscal year 2013 federal funding
to provide hospitals with a transition period to migrate to new funding pools, with
total fiscal year 2014 funding of $966 million.
Includes $750 per trainee in support for the training and development of the
emergency medical personnel of tomorrow.
Provides an additional $213.5 million in business tax relief for a total of $540
million in the third year of bipartisan, job-creating business tax cuts to help
businesses remain and grow in New Jersey.
Dedicates $3 million in funding to ensure that the budget sequestration does not
impair the ability to provide critical services.
3
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Increases state spending to support education. New funding of more than $100
million brings total state aid to schools to nearly $9 billion, marking the third year
in a row of setting a historic high. No school district will receive less K-12
formula aid than the amount provided in fiscal year 2013.
Ensures that New Jersey State Police remains one of the nation’s premier law
enforcement agencies by providing $3.4 million for the 154th and 155th Classes
of State Troopers.
Continues support of the Governor’s historic medical education reorganization by
providing an additional $35 million in state funds - $18 million for Rowan
University and $17 million for University Hospital.
Increases Tuition Aid Grants funding by $17 million to nearly $353 million in
total funding to assist the neediest college students.
Adds $3.5 million in funding for county colleges across the state.
Fully funds the nation’s toughest anti-bullying law by committing $1 million to
support school districts’ implementation of anti-bullying initiatives.
Expands health care access through Medicaid. More New Jerseyans at or near the
poverty line will have access to critical health services, while saving New Jersey
taxpayers approximately $227 million in fiscal year 2014 alone.
Continues the State’s bold and innovative reform of Medicaid with approval of
the Comprehensive Waiver, helping to preserve the program over the long term
while reducing costs to New Jersey taxpayers.
Provides $20 million in new funding for cancer research and treatment and to
support the state’s premier cancer facilities – the Cancer Institute of New Jersey
and the South Jersey Cancer Program; also provides $12 million in State and
federal funding for the Cancer Education and Early Detection Program.
Expands screening for all newborns by investing in implementation of Emma’s
Law, increasing funding for newborn screening by more than $1.6 million.
Responsibly allows State administering of medical marijuana for select New
Jerseyans, increasing funding by $823,000.
Builds on commitment to individuals with developmental disabilities or
behavioral health disorders by increasing funding by $95.8 million for community
placements and related services.
Expands the drug court program by increasing funding for addiction treatment
services by $4.5 million.
Supports homeless veterans by increasing the Department of Military and
Veterans Affairs (DMAVA) funding to $644,000 as the Veterans Haven North
continues to move toward full occupancy.
Demonstrates a commitment to providing subsidized health coverage for
uninsured children by supporting coverage for more than 164,000 children
through the NJ FamilyCare program.
Provides families the tools to success with $9.7 million in state funds along with
$2.5 million in federal funds for Family Success Centers.
4
•
•
•
Gives community providers necessary support by adding an additional $13.2
million in cross-departmental funding to community providers, including mental
health, developmental disabilities and child care.
Ensures the safety and dignity of seniors by providing an additional $1 million for
Adult Protective Services agencies located throughout the state.
Grows benefits for over 159,000 current beneficiaries of the Senior and Disabled
Citizens’ Property Tax Freeze and allows for 34,000 new beneficiaries by
including $214.2 million in funding.
Super Storm Sandy Recovery
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Millions in FEMA grants are being distributed to municipalities for Super Storm
Sandy recovery efforts. Community Disaster Loans and Essential Services Grants
have been issued to assist municipalities and to help prevent municipal layoffs.
The Sandy Recovery Division is up and running and issuing $10,000 Homeowner
Resettlement Checks to families impacted by the storm.
The Administration has launched the “reNew Jersey Stronger” housing initiative
and opened Housing Recovery Centers in impacted counties.
FEMA is supporting all categories of Public Assistance at 90 percent of total
eligible costs, except for things previously authorized at 100 percent. The balance
will either be funded with Community Development Block Grant funding or the
$40 million Super Storm Sandy contingency fund.
Funding is available through the Hazard Mitigation Grant Program (HMGP) to
provide grants for home elevation, and to buy certain properties damaged by
Super Storm Sandy.
Millions in federal dollars have been awarded to the Department of
Environmental Protection for Waterway Debris Removal.
The Department of Transportation is working aggressively to reconstruct
damaged roads.
Recognizing that Super Storm Sandy’s impacts extend beyond property owners,
the State is implementing federally-funded programs to help landlords and
renters.
The Administration obtained a federal grant to continue post-Sandy crisis
counseling for affected New Jerseyans.
The State is coordinating a federally-funded mediation program for unresolved
non-flood insurance claims as a result of the storm.
Federal Recovery Grant Awards for Super Storm Sandy-impacted school districts
have been issued to assist in rebuilding.
Further rounds of federal Community Development Block Grant – Disaster Relief
funding are expected to be awarded by the Department of Housing and Urban
Development over the course of fiscal year 2014, expanding the State’s efforts to
recover, rebuild, and restore.
5
The Programs and Services Behind the Fiscal 2014 Numbers
Helping Those in Need
People Served/Items Purchased
125,748,249 **
8,692,751 **
3,471,876 *
1,323,513
453,927
354,751
329,664
*
*
*
*
304,576 *
186,903
101,661
40,666
22,235
4,000 *
Subsidized School Lunches
Hunger Initiative -- Food Purchased (lbs)
Subsidized Drugs for Seniors and Dis abled: PAAD Annual
Prescriptions
Persons Receiving Health Care through Medicaid
Senior Gold Annual Prescriptions
Children and Adults Receiving Health Care via FamilyCare
Individuals Receiving Mental Health Services (Community
Programs)
Energy Assistance -- Tenants and Homeowners Served
Children Receiving Services from Division of Child Protection and
Permanency Services (DCP&P)
Temporary Assistance to Needy Families -- Recipients
Individuals with Disabilities Served (Community Programs )
Adoption Subsidies /Foster Care: Average Daily Populations
State Rental Assistance -- Families Served
Protecting the Public's Safety
779,300
228,816
98,000
21,118
*
*
*
*
15,932
1,500
1,286
700 *
State Police Investigations (Criminal, Accident, and General)
Fire, Housing, and Construction Code Inspections
State Police -- Instances of Aid to Motorists
Inmates Supervised (Annual Average -- Excludes Community
Programs )
Parolees Supervised
Forest Fire Responses
State-owned Bridge Safety Inspections
Criminal Indictments Obtained -- Criminal Jus tice
Preserving the Environment
18,000,000 **
14,000 *
6,000
8,000
7,184 *
Parks Visitors Served
Acres of Open Space Preserved:
Via Green Acres
Via Farmland Acres
Air and Water Pollution Inspections
6
Protecting the Public's Health
People Served/Items Purchased
305,000
220,000
103,000
86,350
42,500
23,400
3,500
890
**
**
*
**
*
Women, Infants , and Children -- Healthcare Recipients
Children Screened for Lead Poisoning
AIDS Clients Tested and Counseled
Number of Licensed Long Term Care Beds /Slots
Homes Tested for Radon
Breast Cancer and Cervical Cancer Screenings
Helicopter Res pons e Missions for Traumatic Injuries
Long-Term Care Facilities Licensed
Transportation Services
475,900
13,341
8,227
2,945 *
1,000
550
Average Daily Mas s Trans it Riders hip
Miles of Roads Maintained
Emergency and After-Hour Call Responses
Traffic Signals Maintained
Highway Lanes Under Construction
Lane Miles Resurfaced
Serving Businesses
532,075 *
93,000
83,500
6,700
5,200
200
State Professional Boards -- Total Regulated Licenses
Real Estate Brokers and Salespersons Licensed
Insurance Licenses Is sued
Currently Participating Businesses -- Urban Enterprise Zones
Banking Licenses Issued
Recipients -- Business Employment Incentive Grants
Educating Our Children
1,423,614
892,458 *
804,440
198,557
151,759
35,170
25,854
Total Enrollment (Public School System)
Standardized Tests Administered
Pupils Trans ported -- Public/Nonpublic
Special Ed Enrollment
Kindergarten/Preschool Enrollment
Charter School Enrollment
County Vocational Ed Enrollment
7
Higher Education Student Assistance
People Served/Items Purchased
181,509
76,466
3,744
New Jersey College Loans to State Students (NJCLASS)
Tuition Aid Grants (TAG, Full and Part-Time)
NJ Student Tuition Assistance Reward Scholarship
(NJSTARS I & II) Grants
Direct Property Tax Relief
837,100
232,100
193,200
57,900
Homestead Benefit Program (Recipients)
Veterans Claiming a Property Tax Deduction
Senior and Dis abled Property Tax Freeze (Recipients)
Seniors and Dis abled Claiming a Property Tax Deduction
Protecting our Residents
17,580 *
5,980
5,800
1,758
Mental Health Advocacy -- Representation of Individuals at
Civil Commitment Hearings -- New Cases
Elder Advocacy -- Nursing Home/Boarding Home/Other
Facility Visits
Elder Advocacy -- On-Site Investigations Regarding
Care/Abuse/Neglect or Patient Funds
Rate Counsel -- Representation of Ratepayers on Cases
Involving Utilities and Cable Television
*
Data reported is related to a Key Performance Indicator in
the Core Mission Summaries section of the Citizen’s Guide.
**
Data reported is also published as a Key Performance
Indicator in the Core Mission Summaries section of the
Citizen’s Guide.
8
Chapter 2: Charts and Graphs
9
History of Total Revenues*
FY 2014 Approximates FY 2008
(In Billions)
$34.0
$33.0
$32.8
$32.6
$32.0
$31.2
$31.0
$30.0
$28.9
$29.0
$28.7
$29.1
$27.9
$28.0
$27.0
$26.0
$25.0
FY 2008
CAFR
FY 2009
CAFR
FY 2010
CAFR
FY 2011
CAFR
FY 2012
CAFR
FY 2013
Certified**
* Not including federal stimulus aid
** FY 2013 Estimate includes $332.5 million of tax cuts enacted in FY 2012
*** FY 2014 Estimate includes $539.5 million of tax cuts enacted in FY 2012
CAFR – Comprehensive Annual Financial Report
10
FY 2014
Approp
Act***
Income Tax
(In Billions)
$14.0
$12.605
$12.0
$10.476
$10.323
$10.617
FY 2009
CAFR
FY 2010
CAFR
FY 2011
CAFR
$10.0
$11.128
$12.193
$13.039
$8.0
$6.0
$4.0
$2.0
$0.0
FY 2008
CAFR
FY 2012
CAFR
FY 2013
Certified
FY 2014
Approp Act
These revenues include changes in tax policy:
FY 2009 - Incremental Change in EITC Expansion ($60 million); Includes $88.9 million received from the Amnesty program
FY 2010 - Incremental Change in EITC ($9.9 million); EITC Federal Reimbursement ($150 million); Millionaire’s Tax enacted
FY 2011 - Millionaire’s Tax expired
FY 2012 - Includes $23.0 million in tax cuts
FY 2013 - Includes $67.0 million in tax cuts
FY 2014 - Includes $117.0 million in tax cuts
Sales Tax
Corporation Business Tax
(In Billions)
(In Billions)
$10.0
$9.0
$8.0
$8.395
$7.723
$7.523
$7.765
$7.936
$8.241
$8.680
$3.5
$3.0
$2.5
$7.0
$6.0
$2.0
$5.0
$4.0
$1.5
$3.0
$1.0
$2.0
$2.622
$2.416
$1.999
$2.227
$2.032
$2.257
$0.5
$1.0
$0.0
$2.993
FY 2008 FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 FY 2012 FY2013 FY2014
CAFR CAFR CAFR CAFR CAFR Certified Approp
Act
FY 2009 includes $142.5 million received under the Tax Amnesty program
Sales Tax excludes the tax on energy
$0.0
FY 2008 FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014
CAFR CAFR CAFR CAFR CAFR Certified Approp
Act
FY 2009 includes $392.6 million received under the Tax Amnesty program
FY 2011 4% Gross Income Tax Surcharge expired
FY 2012 includes $70.0 million in tax cuts
FY 2013 includes $127.5 million in tax cuts
FY 2014 includes $149.5 million in tax cuts
Corporation Business Tax excludes the tax on energy
11
FY 2014 Appropriations Act
(In Millions)
FY 2013
June Revised
Opening Surplus
Revenues
Income
Sales
Corporate
Other
Total Revenues
-------------------------FY 2014------------------------Budget
May Testimony
Approp. Act
$
447
$
375
$
410
$
467
$
12,193
8,241
2,257
8,504
$
12,969
8,606
2,388
8,883
$
13,039
8,676
2,413
8,685
$
13,039
8,680
2,416
8,678
$
31,195
$
32,846
$
32,813
$
32,813
Lapses
Homestead Benefits Aug 2013
121 *
394
Total Resources
$
32,157
$
33,221
$
33,223
$
33,280
Appropriations
Original
Supplemental
$
31,655
35 *
$
32,921
$
32,922
$
32,977
Total Appropriations
$
31,690
$
32,921
$
32,922
$
32,977
Fund Balance
$
467 ** $
300
$
301
$
303
* FY 2013 June Revised lapses and supplemental appropriations reflect line-item de-appropriations of $365 million.
** $1.5 million is in the Casino Control Fund.
12
Three Years of Pro-Growth Business Tax Relief
(In Millions)
Fiscal Impact*
FY 2012
Gross Income Tax
50% Phase-In Business Income/Loss
Netting and Loss Carry-Forward Relief
FY 2013
FY 2014
FY 2015
FY 2016
$
23.0
$
67.0
$
117.0
$
167.0
$
200.0
$
$
$
87.5
23.0
66.0
176.5
$
$
60.5
23.0
66.0
149.5
$
$
38.5
23.0
66.0
127.5
$
$
24.0
13.0
33.0
70.0
$
98.0
23.0
66.0
187.0
Economic Development
Full Funding of Technology Business Tax
Certificate Transfer Program
$
30.0
$
30.0
$
30.0
$
30.0
$
30.0
Transitional Energy Facility Assessment
(TEFA)
Phase-out over three years
$
55.4
$
108.0
$
243.0
$
243.0
$
243.0
Total Fiscal Year 2012 Initiatives
$ 178.4
$
332.5
$
539.5
$
616.5
$
660.0
Corporation Business Tax
Three-Year Phase-In Single Sales Factor
Reduce S Corporation Minimum Tax 25%
Increase R&D Credit to 100%
* Proposals became operational on January 1, 2012. FY12 and FY13 estimate for the Transitional Energy
Facility Assessment based on actual liabilities, FY13 estimate based on anticipated collections, and
estimates for FY14 through FY16 based on typical collections for recent years. For all other taxes,
estimates based on 2007 and 2008 data and do not reflect projections of growth in tax bases, inflation,
demographics, or dynamic scoring.
13
Christie Administration Continues
Commitment to Fiscal Stability While
Funding Critical Priorities
Pension Payments Account for Most Year-to-Year Growth
(In Billions)
$35.00
$33.61
$31.63*
$31.29*
$29.43*
$30.00
$30.95
$31.69**
$32.98
$25.00
$20.00
$15.00
$10.00
FY 2008 FY 2009 FY 2010 FY 2011 FY 2012 FY 2013 FY 2014
CAFR
CAFR
CAFR
CAFR
CAFR Adjusted Approp
Approp
Act
Pensions
Debt Service
All Other Appropriations
* Includes federal stimulus-supported expenditures that would have otherwise been State-supported expenditures.
** FY 2013 amounts reflect the de-appropriation of $365 million.
14
Reliance on Non-Recurring Resources
Reduced From 13.2% to 3.6%
FY 2010 to FY 2014
(In Millions)
$4,000
13.2%
$3,500
$3,000
$2,500
6.5%
$2,000
$1,500
4.1%
3.8%
3.6%
FY 2012
Approp Act
FY 2013
Approp Act
FY 2014
Approp Act
$1,000
$500
$0
FY 2010
Approp Act
FY 2011
Approp Act
Spend Down Opening Surplus
Tax Policy Changes
Revenue Initiatives
Appropriations Offsets
15
Building the Fiscal 2014 Budget
(In Billions)
Grants-In-Aid,
30%, $9.7
Executive
Operations,
11%, $3.5
Employee
Benefits, Rent
& Utilities, 8%,
$2.6
State Aid, 42%,
$13.9
Debt Service
excluding
School
Construction,
7%, $2.4
$33 Billion
Capital, < 1%,
$0.1
Legislature and
Judiciary, 2%,
$0.8
Executive Operations:
includes adult prison and juvenile facilities, state police and law enforcement, human services
institutions, veterans’ homes, children and families.
Grants-In-Aid: includes property tax relief programs, Medicaid, PAAD, nursing home and longterm care alternative programs, and support for higher education.
State Aid: includes education aid programs, school construction debt, municipal aid, general
assistance, and aid to county colleges.
16
FY 2014 Appropriations Act Details
(In Thousands)
FY 2013
Adjusted
Approp
Department
$
$
6,035
19,573
63,450
1,049,971
755,993
1,084,476
10,526,757
331,047
370,890
6,445,979
159,339
569,659
94,074
1,226,383
1,298,849
1,681,000
776
7
(31,625)
13,847
6,655
237,083
14,055
36,659
(7,537)
181
2,711
(180)
53,860
138,282
19,187
(200)
0.0
(2.9)
1.9
0.6
2.3
4.4
11.0
(0.1)
0.1
0.5
(0.2)
4.6
11.9
1.2
-
Change
%
Chief Executive
Agriculture
Banking and Insurance
Children and Families
Community Affairs
Corrections
Education
Environmental Protection
Health
Human Services
Labor and Workforce Development
Law and Public Safety
Military and Veterans' Affairs
State
Transportation
Treasury
Miscellaneous Commissions
$
Total Executive Branch
$ 25,201,266
$ 25,684,251
482,985
1.9
Interdepartmental
3,724,588
4,101,712
377,124
10.1
Local Pensions and Health Benefits Education and Treasury
1,603,853
2,117,654
513,801
32.0
General Obligation Debt Service Environmental Protection and Treasury
410,615
319,710
(90,905)
(22.1)
Legislature
Judiciary
76,656
672,981
76,154
677,481
(502)
4,500
(0.7)
0.7
Total Appropriations
6,035
19,566
63,450
1,081,596
742,146
1,077,821
10,289,674
316,992
334,231
6,453,516
159,158
566,948
94,254
1,172,523
1,160,567
1,661,813
976
FY 2014
Approp
Act
$ 31,689,959 *
$ 32,976,962
* FY 2013 amounts reflect the de-appropriation of $365 million.
17
1,287,003
4.1
Direct State Services By Department
(In Thousands)
FY 2013
Adjusted
Approp.
Department
FY 2014
Approp.
Act
$
Change
%
Chief Executive
Agriculture
Banking and Insurance
Children and Families
Community Affairs
Corrections
Education
Environmental Protection
Health
Human Services
Labor and Workforce Development
Law and Public Safety
Military and Veterans' Affairs
State
Transportation
Treasury
Miscellaneous Commissions
$
6,035
7,132
63,450
278,597
38,171
955,580
73,596
207,401
43,580
630,019
92,206
544,500
91,580
28,082
83,756
465,513
976
$
6,035
7,132
63,450
268,052
38,351
959,135
67,900
211,013
45,540
631,566
92,387
542,795
91,450
28,082
44,781
456,518
776
(10,545)
180
3,555
(5,696)
3,612
1,960
1,547
181
(1,705)
(130)
(38,975)
(8,995)
(200)
(3.8)
0.5
0.4
(7.7)
1.7
4.5
0.2
0.2
(0.3)
(0.1)
(46.5)
(1.9)
-
Total Executive Branch
$
3,610,174
$
3,554,963
(55,211)
(1.5)
76,656
672,981
76,154
677,481
(502)
4,500
(0.7)
0.7
Total Operating
4,359,811
4,308,598
(51,213)
(1.2)
Interdepartmental
2,477,933
2,855,699
377,766
15.2
6,837,744 * $
7,164,297
326,553
4.8
Legislature
Judiciary
Total Direct State Services
$
* FY 2013 amounts reflect the de-appropriation of $59.8 million.
18
$
FY 2014 State Operating Budget
(In Millions)
Other, $938.3, 22%
Judiciary and
Legislature, $753.6,
18%
Children and
Families, $268.1,
6%
Taxation, Revenue
and Budget, $144.1,
3%
Environmental
Programs, $211.0,
5%
Veterans’ Homes,
$76.5, 2%
Public Safety,
$1,330.5, 31%
JJC Institutions,
$103.0, 2%
DHS Institutions,
$438.2, 10%
Health, $45.5, 1%
Total State Operating Budget is $4.3 billion
The State Operating Budget excludes fringe benefits and other centrally budgeted costs.
19
Funding for Property Tax Relief
(In Millions)
FY 2013
Adjusted
Approp
Programs
State Aid to School Districts
Other Aid for Education
$
FY 2014
Approp
Act
8,871.6
2,817.4
$
8,977.0
3,433.5
Change
$
105.4
616.1
Municipal Aid
1,449.8
1,469.2
19.4
Property Taxpayer Relief Programs
1,191.9 *
1,205.3
13.4
817.9
135.9
Other Local Aid
Total Property Tax Relief
682.0
$
15,012.7 **
$
15,902.9
$
* May 2013 Homestead Benefits were deferred to August 2013, resulting in a lapse of $394.5
million in FY 2013.
** FY 2013 amounts reflect the de-appropriation of $58.6 million.
Property Tax Relief is Approximately Half the Total Budget
All Other
5%
Employee
Benefits
11%
Public Safety
7%
Property Tax
Relief
43%
Debt Service
7%
Higher Ed.
4%
Children's/Health/
Human Services
23%
20
890.2
School Aid
(In Millions)
FY 2013
Adjusted
Approp
FY 2014
Approp
Act
Change
State Aid to Schools
Formula Aid
$
7,791.7
$
7,855.9
$
64.2
Preschool Education Aid
633.7
648.1
14.4
Extraordinary Special Education Aid
162.7
162.7
-
-
16.8
16.8
33.1
49.1
16.0
4.1
4.1
-
(15.0)
(11.5)
3.5
8.7
16.0
7.3
Nonpublic School Aid
89.2
83.5
(5.7)
School Building Aid
73.7
67.4
(6.3)
Debt Service Aid
58.0
57.4
(0.6)
Assessment of EDA Debt Service
(21.0)
(26.5)
(5.5)
Other Aid
52.7
54.0
1.3
Under Adequacy Aid
School Choice Aid
Supplemental Enrollment Growth Aid
Payment Delay Savings
Charter School Aid
Total State Aid to Schools
$
8,871.6
$
8,977.0
$
105.4
$
645.5
$
1,019.2
$
373.7
Direct State Payments for Education
Teachers' Pension and Annuity Fund
Post Retirement Medical
863.1
969.0
105.9
Debt Service on Pension Obligation Bonds
155.6
167.9
12.3
Teachers' Social Security
738.5
754.8
16.3
Total Direct State Payments for Education
$
2,402.7
$
2,910.9
$
508.2
School Construction Debt Service
$
414.7
$
522.5
$
107.8
Total School Aid
$ 11,689.0 *
$ 12,410.4
$
721.4
* FY 2013 amounts reflect the de-appropriation of $35.0 million.
21
Municipal Aid
(In Millions)
FY 2013
Adjusted
Approp
Consolidated Municipal Property Tax Relief
Aid (CMPTRA) / Energy Tax Receipts
$
FY 2014
Approp
Act
1,342.1
Transitional Aid to Localities
$
Change
1,364.3
96.8
94.5
-
6.0
Open Space - Payments In Lieu of Taxes (PILOT)
6.5
-
Highlands Protection Fund Aid
4.4
4.4
Meadowlands Adjustment Payments Aid
Total Municipal Aid
1,449.8 ** $
$
1,469.2
$
(2.3) *
6.0
(6.5) ***
$
* FY 2014 includes the transfer of $22.2 million from Transitional Aid to Localities to CMPTRA.
** FY 2013 amounts reflect the de-appropriation of $11.9 million.
*** Municipalities operating under a calendar fiscal year will continue to anticipate the State’s fiscal year 2013
payments in their calendar year 2013 budgets and can anticipate an identical amount in their calendar year 2014
budgets.
22
22.2 *
19.4
Property Taxpayer Relief Programs
(In Millions)
FY 2013
Adjusted
Approp
Homestead Benefit Program
$
398.5
FY 2014
Approp
Act
*
$
400.5
Change
$
2.0
Property Tax Deduction Act
496.5
516.6
20.1
Senior/Disabled Citizens' Property Tax Freeze
221.5
214.2
(7.3)
***
Veterans' Property Tax Deductions
61.0
59.2
(1.8)
***
Senior/Disabled Citizens' Property Tax Deductions
14.4
14.8
0.4
***
Total Property Taxpayer Relief
$
1,191.9
**
$
1,205.3
$
13.4
* May 2013 Homestead Benefits were deferred to August 2013, resulting in a lapse of $394.5 million in FY 2013.
** FY 2013 amounts reflect the de-appropriation of $1.6 million.
*** FY 2014 continues these programs unaltered. The change amounts reflect the changes in forecasted costs.
23
Higher Education
(In Thousands)
FY 2013
Adjusted
Approp
FY 2014
Approp
Act
$
Change
%
(a)(b)
Senior Public Institutions
Rutgers University
University of Medicine and Dentistry of NJ
NJIT
Thomas Edison State College
Rowan University
New Jersey City University
Kean University
William Paterson University
Montclair State University
College of New Jersey
Ramapo College of New Jersey
Richard Stockton College of New Jersey
Subtotal Senior Colleges and Universities
University Hospital
Total Senior Public Institutions
(a) (c)
$
$
479,094
367,888
69,220
9,075
88,271
51,888
62,171
64,439
80,760
56,886
34,087
43,447
1,407,226
1,407,226
$
754,896
70,275
11,179
132,798
54,001
64,556
66,447
82,266
58,588
35,077
44,736
1,374,819
107,670
1,482,489
275,802
(367,888)
1,055
2,104
44,527
2,113
2,385
2,008
1,506
1,702
990
1,289
(32,407)
107,670
75,263
57.6
(100.0)
1.5
23.2
50.4
4.1
3.8
3.1
1.9
3.0
2.9
3.0
(2.3)
5.3
$
$
181,729
35,599
217,328
3,498
(1,760)
1,738
2.0
(4.7)
0.8
$
County Colleges
Chapter 12 Debt Service
Total County Colleges
$
$
178,231
37,359
215,590
Total Independent Colleges & Universities
$
-
$
1,000
$
325,043
10,360
9,673
38,974
1,630
1,000
2,298
388,978
$
341,161
11,236
10,629
38,822
1,000
2,260
405,108
16,118
876
956
(152)
(1,630)
(38)
16,130
$
$
24,467
4,793
29,260
$
50,372
4,793
55,165
25,905
25,905
105.9
0.0
88.5
$
2,041,054
$
2,161,090
120,036
5.9
1,000
-
Student Financial Assistance
Tuition Aid Grants
Part-Time Tuition Aid Grants for County Colleges
NJSTARS I & II
(d)
EOF Grants and Scholarships
(d)
Coordinated Garden State Scholarship Programs
Urban Scholarship Program
(d)
Other Student Aid Programs
Total Student Financial Assistance
Other Programs
Debt Service
All other programs
Total Other Programs
Grand Total Higher Education
$
$
$
(e)
5.0
8.5
9.9
(0.4)
(100.0)
(1.7)
4.1
(a) Includes appropriations for both direct operating support and net fringe benefits.
(b) Senior Public Institutions reflects M edical and Health Sciences Education Restructuring under P.L.2012, c.45.
(c) Includes funding from Supplemental Workforce Fund for Basic Skills of $21.3 million in FY 2013 and $18.8 million in FY 2014.
(d) FY 2013 is the last year of planned phase-outs for the following programs: Coordinated Garden State Scholarship Programs, Veterinary
M edicine Education Program, and M artin Luther King Physician-Dentist Scholarship Act of 1986.
(e) FY 2013 amounts reflect the de-appropriation of $41.1 million.
24
Medical and Health Sciences Education Restructuring
FY 2014 Direct Operating Support
GBM
Amounts
Rowan
$
School of Osteopathic Medicine
Subtotal, Rowan
Rutgers - New Brunswick
Approp Act
Reallocations
58,563 $
-
Approp Act
Additions
$
-
Approp Act
Totals
$
58,563
-
12,229
18,000
30,229
58,563
12,229
18,000
88,792
241,018
(50,516)
-
190,502
148,043
-
148,043
School of Biomedical & Health Services
Rutgers - Newark
-
31,816
-
31,816
Rutgers - Camden
-
17,140
-
17,140
241,018
146,483
-
387,501
160,553
(160,553)
-
Subtotal, Rutgers
UMDNJ
University Hospital
Totals
1,841
$ 460,134
25
$
-
18,841
17,000
$
35,000
$
495,134
Hospital Funding
State and Federal
(In Millions)
Charity Care
FY 2013
FY 2014
Adjusted
Approp
Approp
Act
$
675.0
Graduate Medical Education
Delivery System Reform Incentive Payments*
Hospital Relief Offset Payments*
$
Change
675.0
$
-
90.0
100.0
10.0
-
166.6
166.6
166.6
-
Hospital Mental Health Offset Payments
24.7
24.7
-
Health Care Stabilization Fund
30.0
-
(30.0)
Total Hospital Funding
$
986.3
$
966.3
(166.6)
$
(20.0)
*Reflects replacement of Hospital Relief Offset Payments with Delivery System Reform Incentive Payments per
Medicaid Comprehensive Waiver
26
Employee Benefit Costs
(In Millions)
$7,500
$7,000
$6,500
$6,000
$5,500
$5,000
$4,500
$4,000
$3,500
$3,000
$2,500
$2,000
$1,500
$1,000
$500
$0
$6,529
$5,574
$4,893
$4,762
$4,620
$3,340
$3,682
$3,953 $4,077
$4,312
$3,011
2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
Fiscal Year
Adjusted Approp
Approp* Act
Employer Taxes
Pensions/Debt Service on Pension Bonds
Health Benefits/Post Retirement Medical
FY 2012 includes $484 million to fund a one-seventh contribution for the defined benefit
pension plans. FY 2013 includes $1.03 billion to fund a two-sevenths contribution for the
defined benefit pension plans, and the FY 2014 Appropriations Act includes $1.68 billion to fund
a three-sevenths contribution as required by law.
*FY 2013 amount reflects the de-appropriation of $28 million for Health Benefits and Post
Retirement Medical.
27
Historical Pension Contributions
Defined Benefit Pension Contribution*
$1,800
$1,600
$1,400
$1,200
$1,000
$800
$600
$200
FY2014
FY2013
FY2012
FY2011
FY2010
FY2009
FY2008
FY2007
FY2006
FY2005
FY2004
FY2003
FY2002
FY2001
FY2000
FY1999
FY1998
FY1997
FY1996
$0
FY1995
Millions
$400
* Pension contribution amounts from FY1995 to FY2005 include funding for noncontributory life insurance; life insurance costs are not included thereafter.
FY2014 is the third year of a 7-year statutory commitment to reach full funding of the ARC.
28
The Fiscal Year 2014 Budget Continues Historic
Contributions to the State’s Pension Systems
(In Thousands)
Governor
Fiscal Year
Whitman
Whitman
Whitman
Whitman
Whitman
Whitman
Whitman
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
Defined Benefit
Pension
Contribution (a)
2002
Cumulative Totals
McGreevey
McGreevey
McGreevey
2003
2004
2005
2007
2008
2009
2010
Cumulative Totals
Christie
Christie
Christie
Christie
963,934
$
563
$
563
$
11,181
27,520
62,723
$
101,424
2006
Cumulative Totals
Corzine
Corzine
Corzine
Corzine
$
(c)
Cumulative Totals
Codey
193,342
227,916
104,616
90,194
286,203
61,663
-
(b)
Cumulative Totals
DiFrancesco
$
2011
2012
2013
2014
Cumulative Totals
165,026
$
165,026
$
1,023,192
1,046,136
106,268
-
$
2,175,596
$
484,484
1,029,296
1,675,695
$
3,189,475
(a) Pension contribution amounts from FY 1995 to FY 2005 include funding for non-contributory life insurance;
life insurance costs are not included thereafter.
(b) As of June 30, 1997, $2.75 billion in proceeds from the issuance of Pension Obligation Bonds was contributed to
the State funded pension systems. Additionally, corresponding legislation enacted authorized the use of excess
assets in the systems to fund any contribution requirements going forward.
(c) Beginning in FY 2004, excess assets were exhausted in most pension funds and the State was required to resume
making full pension contributions; however, due to budgetary constraints, the State began "phasing-in" required
contributions. In addition, in PERS and TPAF, funds accumulated in the Benefit Enhancement Fund were used to
cover the phased-in contributions for these two pension funds in FY 2004, FY 2005 and FY 2006.
29
State Workforce
ADMIN
START
01/30/10
PP 14
6/30/2013
Change
AGRICULTURE
215
205
(10)
BANKING AND INSURANCE
423
486
63
CHIEF EXECUTIVE O FFICE
118
109
(9)
CHILDREN & FAMILIES
6,929
6,647
(282)
CO MMUNITY AFFAIRS
1,055
888
(167)
CO RRECTIO NS (Balance)
8,881
8,021
(860)
679
597
(82)
806
795
(11)
2,710
2,489
(221)
244
222
(22)
1,770
1,155
(615)
(785)
- Parole Board
EDUCATIO N
ENVIRO NMENTAL PRO TECTIO N
- CBT Dedication
HEALTH
HUMAN SERVICES (Total)
15,169
14,384
- Management and Budget
369
365
(4)
- Medical Assistance
468
350
(118)
- Disability Services
33
249
216
- Family Development
377
1,353
976
- Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired
301
3,036
2,735
10
84
- Developmental Disabilities
8,730
4,064
(4,666)
- Mental Health and Add. Srvs.
4,881
121
(4,760)
0
327
3,133
2,922
- Deaf and Hard of Hearing
- Div of Aging
LABO R (Balance)
- Public Employee Relations Commission
74
327
(211)
32
32
0
235
239
4
3,864
2,496
3,001
3,659
658
- Homeland Security and Preparedness
95
105
10
- Election Law Enforcement Commission
70
67
(3)
- Violent Crimes Compensation Agency
35
27
(8)
- State Ethics Commission
12
11
(1)
1,563
1,201
(362)
(222)
- Civil Service Commission
LAW AND PUBLIC SAFETY (Balance)
- State Police
- Juvenile Justice
- Division of Gaming
MILITARY AND VETERANS' AFFAIRS
STATE (Balance)
- Secretary of Higher Education
- Student Assistance
TRANSPO RTATIO N
- Motor Vehicle Commission
TREASURY (Balance)
222
0
1,487
1,495
340
161
(1,368)
8
(179)
16
19
3
169
151
(18)
3,357
3,116
(241)
2,328
2,170
(158)
(219)
3,405
3,186
- O ffice of State Comptroller
90
141
51
- Casino Control Commission
279
50
(229)
- O ffice of Administrative Law
101
90
(11)
- O ffice of Information Technology
807
721
(86)
1,048
1,157
266
231
2
1
(1)
64,956
59,446
(5,510)
461
438
(23)
- Public Defender
- Board of Public Utilities
MISCELLANEO US CO MMISSIO NS
SUBTO TAL EXECUTIVE BRANCH
109
(35)
0
LEGISLATURE
- SCI
JUDICIARY
GRAND TOTAL
30
53
45
(8)
9,128
8,931
(197)
74,598
68,860
(5,738)
Comparison of Appropriations Acts to Prior Year Adjusted Appropriations
(In Millions)
Fiscal
Year
2014
2013
2012
2011
2010
2009
2008
2007
2006
2005
2004
2003
2002
2001
2000
1999
1998
1997
1996
1995
1994
1993
1992
1991
1990
1989
1988
1987
1986
1985
1984
1983
1982
1981
1980
1979
1978
1977
1976
1975
1974
1973
1972
1971
1970
1969
1968
1967
1966
1965
1964
1963
1962
1961
1960
1959
1958
1957
1956
1955
1954
1953
1952
1951
Approp
Act
$
Prior Year
Adjusted
Approp*
32,977.0
$
31,655.0
30,164.6 **
29,397.5 ***
31,245.8 ***
32,868.5
33,470.9
30,818.7
27,919.9
28,027.3
24,003.2
23,401.7
22,920.7
21,419.7
19,514.4
18,123.8
16,786.6
15,977.8
15,994.6
15,280.7
15,466.9
14,625.5
14,651.5
12,423.8
11,995.0
11,775.1
10,396.5
9,279.4
8,681.2
7,693.3
6,771.8
6,181.7
5,691.3
5,107.1
4,652.1
4,394.4
4,010.6
2,853.3
2,698.1
2,756.1
2,385.7
2,047.7
1,779.3
1,557.5
1,334.4
1,088.5
992.7
876.6
639.4
584.1
543.8
499.4
467.2
431.8
405.1
388.6
342.5
320.8
284.4
234.8
219.7
210.7
176.8
164.1
31,690.0
30,800.5
30,333.5
31,199.8
33,060.6
34,580.6
31,020.5
28,087.7
28,644.8
24,569.1
23,726.4
23,218.6
21,842.8
20,163.5
18,482.3
17,141.3
16,256.7
16,297.3
15,528.7
15,608.7
14,737.5
14,955.7
12,638.8
12,165.9
11,904.1
10,569.4
9,355.9
8,959.2
7,946.1
6,865.2
6,289.5
5,741.5
5,151.3
4,739.6
4,436.6
4,066.5
3,486.2
2,674.6
2,794.4
2,406.9
2,090.5
1,822.4
1,616.6
1,370.0
1,136.8
1,021.0
888.2
654.9
592.9
554.9
505.9
469.3
437.2
412.3
395.9
340.7
324.2
299.8
247.7
185.2
211.9
179.2
168.6
164.5
------------- Change ------------$
%
**
***
***
***
1,287.0
854.5
(168.9)
(1,802.3)
(1,814.8)
(1,712.1)
2,450.4
2,731.0
(724.9)
3,458.2
276.8
183.1
1,077.9
1,256.2
1,032.1
982.5
529.9
(319.5)
465.9
(328.0)
729.4
(330.2)
2,012.7
257.9
90.9
1,205.7
1,040.6
320.2
735.1
828.1
482.3
440.2
540.0
367.5
215.5
327.9
524.4
178.7
(96.3)
349.2
295.2
225.3
162.7
187.5
197.6
67.5
104.5
221.7
46.5
29.2
37.9
30.1
30.0
19.5
9.2
47.9
18.3
21.0
36.7
49.6
7.8
31.5
8.2
(0.4)
4.1
2.8
(0.6)
(5.8)
(5.5)
(5.0)
7.9
9.7
(2.5)
14.1
1.2
0.8
4.9
6.2
5.6
5.7
3.3
(2.0)
3.0
(2.1)
4.9
(2.2)
15.9
2.1
0.8
11.4
11.1
3.6
9.3
12.1
7.7
7.7
10.5
7.8
4.9
8.1
15.0
6.7
(3.4)
14.5
14.1
12.4
10.1
13.7
17.4
6.6
11.8
33.9
7.8
5.3
7.5
6.4
6.9
4.7
2.3
14.1
5.6
7.0
14.8
26.8
3.7
17.6
4.9
(0.2)
* Original Appropriations Act plus supplemental appropriations.
** Includes $468 million in FY 2012 debt service funded from FY 2011 resources.
*** Includes federal stimulus aid used for budget relief that otherwise would have needed a State appropriation.
31
Comparison of Appropriations Acts
(In Millions)
Fiscal Year
2014
2013
2012
2011
2010
2009
2008
2007
2006
2005
2004
2003
2002
2001
2000
1999
1998
1997
1996
1995
1994
1993
1992
1991
1990
1989
1988
1987
1986
1985
1984
1983
1982
1981
1980
1979
1978
1977
1976
1975
1974
1973
1972
1971
1970
1969
1968
1967
1966
1965
1964
1963
1962
1961
1960
1959
1958
1957
1956
1955
1954
1953
1952
1951
------------- Change ------------$
%
Approp Act
$
32,977.0
31,655.0
30,164.6 *
29,397.5 **
31,245.8 **
32,868.5
33,470.9
30,818.7
27,919.9
28,027.3
24,003.2
23,401.7
22,920.7
21,419.7
19,514.4
18,123.8
16,786.6
15,977.8
15,994.6
15,280.7
15,466.9
14,625.5
14,651.5
12,423.8
11,995.0
11,775.1
10,396.5
9,279.4
8,681.2
7,693.3
6,771.8
6,181.7
5,691.3
5,107.1
4,652.1
4,394.4
4,010.6
2,853.3
2,698.1
2,756.1
2,385.7
2,047.7
1,779.3
1,557.5
1,334.4
1,088.5
992.7
876.6
639.4
584.1
543.8
499.4
467.2
431.8
405.1
388.6
342.5
320.8
284.4
234.8
219.7
210.7
176.8
164.1
1,322.0
1,490.4
767.1
(1,848.3)
(1,622.7)
(602.4)
2,652.2
2,898.8
(107.4)
4,024.1
601.5
481.0
1,501.0
1,905.3
1,390.6
1,337.2
808.8
(16.8)
713.9
(186.2)
841.4
(26.0)
2,227.7
428.8
219.9
1,378.6
1,117.1
598.2
987.9
921.5
590.1
490.4
584.2
455.0
257.7
383.8
1,157.3
155.2
(58.0)
370.4
338.0
268.4
221.8
223.1
245.9
95.8
116.1
237.2
55.3
40.3
44.4
32.2
35.4
26.7
16.5
46.1
21.7
36.4
49.6
15.1
9.0
33.9
12.7
4.2
4.9
2.6
(5.9)
(4.9)
(1.8)
8.6
10.4
(0.4)
16.8
2.6
2.1
7.0
9.8
7.7
8.0
5.1
(0.1)
4.7
(1.2)
5.8
(0.2)
17.9
3.6
1.9
13.3
12.0
6.9
12.8
13.6
9.5
8.6
11.4
9.8
5.9
9.6
40.6
5.8
(2.1)
15.5
16.5
15.1
14.2
16.7
22.6
9.7
13.2
37.1
9.5
7.4
8.9
6.9
8.2
6.6
4.2
13.5
6.8
12.8
21.1
6.9
4.3
19.2
7.7
* Includes $468 million in FY 2012 debt service funded from FY 2011 resources.
** Includes federal stimulus aid used for budget relief that otherwise would have needed a State appropriation.
32
Fiscal Year 2013 Update
33
History of FY 2013 Revenues*
(In Billions)
$35.0
$34.0
$33.0
$31.7
$32.0
$31.3
$31.0
$30.0
$28.7
$29.0
$28.0
$31.2
$31.2
$29.1
$27.9
$27.0
$26.0
$25.0
FY 2010
CAFR
FY 2011
CAFR
FY 2012 FY 2013 Feb 2013 May 2013 June 2013
CAFR Approp Act Estimate Estimate Certified
* Excludes federal stimulus aid received in FY 2010 and FY 2011.
34
FY 2013 Revenues*
(In Millions)
FY 2012
CAFR
------------------FY 2013-----------------Approp
Feb 2013 June 2013
Act
Revised
Certified
$ 11,128
$ 11,767
$ 12,173
$ 12,193
20
0.2
Sales
7,936
8,423
8,216
8,241
25
0.3
Corporate
2,032
2,566
2,232
2,257
25
1.1
Other**
7,990
8,977
8,705
8,504
(201)
(2.3)
$ 29,086
$ 31,733
$ 31,326
$ 31,195
(131)
(0.4)
Income
Total
* Excludes federal stimulus aid
** All Sales Tax and Corporation Taxes on Energy are included in Other
35
Certified vs. Feb 2013
Change
$
%
FY 2013 Fund Balance
(In Millions)
July 2012
Approp. Act
Opening Surplus
Revenues
Income
Sales
Corporate
Other
Total Revenues
Feb 2013
Revised
May 2013
Testimony
June 2013
Revised
$
570
$
447
$
447
$
447
$
11,767
8,423
2,566
8,977
$
12,173
8,216
2,232
8,705
$
12,193
8,241
2,257
8,504
$
12,193
8,241
2,257
8,504
$
31,733
$
31,326
$
31,195
$
31,195
Lapses
Homestead Benefits Aug 2013
377
392
448
394
121 *
394
Total Resources
$
32,303
$
32,542
$
32,484
$
32,157
Appropriations
Original
Supplemental
$
31,655
$
31,655
512
$
31,655
419
$
31,655
35 *
Total Appropriations
$
31,655
$
32,167
$
32,074
$
31,690
Fund Balance
$
648
$
375
$
410
$
* June 2013 Revised lapses and supplemental appropriations reflect line-item de-appropriations of $365 million.
** $1.5 million is in the Casino Control Fund.
36
467 **
FY 2013 Additional Needs
(In Thousands)
Medicaid/NJ Family Care, Disability Services, and PAAD Trend Deficit
$
182,621
Department of Transportation - Winter Operations
39,267
Department of Children and Families - Grants/Salaries Trend and Federal Fund Shortfall
36,885
New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority - Operating Subsidy
27,400
Super Storm Sandy - State Share of Funding
20,000
Tort Claims Liability
17,350
Employee Benefits
12,628
Senior and Disabled Citizens’ Property Tax Freeze Trend
8,000
NJ SMART
7,901
Nonpublic School Aid
6,718
Consolidation Implementation
6,050
Division of Taxation - Fees for Collection Services
5,427
Property Rentals
4,198
Supplemental Enrollment Growth Aid
4,141
Department of Corrections
4,000
SEMI/MAC Administrative Reimbursement
3,533
Interest on Short Term Notes
3,450
Public Defender - Accrued Professional Services Liability
2,237
Miscellaneous - None Greater than $2 million
8,212
(365,013)
Less line-item de-appropriations
Total Additional Needs (net)
$
37
35,005
FY 2013 Surplus Balances
(In Thousands)
Homestead Benefit Program Deferral
$
New Jersey Transportation Capital Plan Debt Service
394,500
123,679 *
Employee Benefits and Salary Increases
45,610 *
Division of Family Development - Trend Surplus and Non-State Resources
42,303 *
Prior Year Lapse
36,110
CBT Dedication
22,851 *
Higher Education Capital Improvement Fund and Dormitory Safety Trust Fund
20,950 *
Department of Health Surplus
16,480 *
Division of Mental Health and Addiction Services Surplus
14,713 *
Workers' Compensation Self-Insurance Fund Surplus
14,600 *
School Construction Debt Service
14,143 *
Transitional Aid to Localities - Surplus Funds
11,881 *
Early Intervention Program Trend
11,600 *
Motor Vehicle Commission - Available Balance
11,500
Medicaid and Senior Gold - Trend and Administration Surplus
9,481 *
Health Care Subsidy Fund Surplus
9,374 *
AIDS Drug Distribution Program Trend
6,509 *
Repayment or Rescission of BEIP Grants
6,118 *
Department of Corrections and State Parole Board Surplus
5,510 *
Department of the Treasury Surplus
5,432
Higher Education Capital Improvement Fund - Use of Arbitrage Funds
5,204 *
NJ Transit - Operating Surplus
5,000 *
Charter School Aid Surplus
4,385 *
NJSTARS I and II Trend
4,176 *
Interdepartmental - Reduced Energy Costs
3,500
Consumer Fraud Revenue
3,000
Homelessness Prevention Program Surplus
2,500 *
NJ Build Surplus
2,500
State Rental Assistance Program Trend
2,500
Highway Safety Fund Balance
2,000
Statewide Assessment Program
2,000 *
Miscellaneous - None Greater than $2 million
19,928 *
(365,013)
Less line-item de-appropriations
Total Surplus Balances (net)
$
* Items impacted by line-item de-appropriations
38
515,024
Chapter 3: Economic Overview &
Revenue Forecast
39
CHAPTER 3: ECONOMIC OVERVIEW AND
REVENUE FORECAST
New Jersey Economic Overview
New Jersey’s expansion has gained momentum and the State’s economy is recovering from the losses seen
in the recession. Growth is likely to continue, aided by recovery from Super Storm Sandy, according to
projections made by the Office of the Chief Economist and other analysts in the Department of the Treasury.
• Payroll employment in New Jersey is projected to increase by 1.8 percent in calendar 2013,
surpassing 2012’s increase of 1.3 percent for the largest gain since 2000. State analysts forecast that
job generation will exceed 2 percent in calendar 2014, and by the end of the year the overall number
of jobs will be near the January 2008 peak.
• Personal income of New Jersey residents was the highest on record in 2012. Wages and salaries paid
by New Jersey employers also set a new record. Personal income is expected to increase another 2.0
percent in 2013.
• New Jersey’s unemployment rate was 8.6 percent in July 2013. Over the prior 12 months New
Jersey’s unemployment rate dropped by more than one percentage point, reflecting faster growth of
employment and a moderation in growth of the labor force after some unusually large gains in
2011 and the first half of 2012. The state’s unemployment rate is expected to continue to decline,
from an average of 8.7 percent in 2013 to 7.5 percent in 2014.
• New car sales have continued to strengthen in 2013, averaging more than 5 percent higher in the first
six months of the year than in the same period of 2012, and the level of sales in the first half of 2013
was the highest in such a period since 2007. Auto sales are expected to continue to move up over the
balance of 201 and into 201.
• The pace of homebuilding is picking up rapidly, adding on strong gains in 2012, with permits in the
state in the first six months of 2013 more than 30 percent higher than the number granted in the same
period of 2012. Activity is expected to continue to rise through the remainder of 2013 and into 201,
spurred by pent-up demand for housing and, despite some recent increases, low interest rates and
prices. Recent gains do not appear to have reflected marked rebuilding from Super Storm Sandy.
Sandy rebuilding should provide a marked further impetus to home construction in the state.
• The risk remains that the nation’s economy will continue to grow at a subpar pace. Deterioration in
the European economy and slower growth in China has affected manufacturing and commodity
markets around the globe, and ongoing disputes about U.S. economic policy continues to fuel
uncertainty. While financial market conditions are markedly better than in 2008-2009, a sudden
restriction in the flow of credit to households, businesses, and governments would imperil economic
growth. Thus, the direction of the economy nationally and in the state hinges on continued stabilization
of financial markets as well as improved confidence in the outlook, as well as sound national
economic policies.
40
Fiscal 2014 Revenue Projections
Total revenues for Fiscal Year 2014 are expected to be $32.8 billion, which is $1.6 billion, or 5.2 percent,
above the June certified Fiscal Year 2013 anticipated levels. New Jersey is projecting continued solid growth
of base revenues in Fiscal Year 2014 in the context of sustained economic recovery.
FY 2014 Revenues
(In Millions)
FY 2013
Approp. Act
Income
$
11,767
FY 2013
Certified
$
12,193
FY 2014
Approp Act
$
$
Change to
Certified
%
13,039
$
846
6.9 %
Sales
8,423
8,241
8,680
$
439
5.3
Corporate
2,566
2,257
2,416
$
159
7.0
Other*
8,977
8,504
8,678
$
174
2.0
Total
$
31,733
$
31,195
$
All Sales Tax and Corporation Business Tax on Energy are included in Other
41
32,813
$ 1,618
5.2 %
Sales Tax
The forecast of record-high $8.7 billion in Sales Tax revenue for Fiscal Year 2014 is an increase of $439
million over the Fiscal Year 2013 level certified in June. The 5.3 percent growth reflects continuing
recovery in consumer spending as employment gains fuel household income growth, as well as a step-up in
revenue stemming from the commencement of collections of sales tax from Amazon, and spending on
products used for rebuilding and replacing Sandy losses.
Sales Tax
(In Billions)
$10.0
$9.0
$8.0
$8.395
$7.723
$7.0
$7.523
$7.765
$7.936
FY 2011
CAFR
FY 2012
CAFR
$8.241
$8.680
$6.0
$5.0
$4.0
$3.0
$2.0
$1.0
$0.0
FY 2008
CAFR
FY 2009
CAFR
FY 2010
CAFR
FY 2013
Certified
FY 2009 includes $142.5 million received under the Tax Amnesty program
Sales Tax excludes the tax on energy
42
FY 2014
Approp
Act
Corporation Business Tax
The Corporation Business Tax forecast of $2.4 billion for Fiscal Year 2014 is $159 million, or 7.0 percent
above the June certified Fiscal Year 2013 level. Corporate taxes will grow as the economy and pre-tax
earnings expand, and taxpayers work off loss-carryforwards accumulated during the recession.
Corporation Business Tax
(In Billions)
$3.5
$3.0
$2.993
$2.622
$2.416
$2.5
$1.999
$2.0
$2.227
$2.032
$2.257
$1.5
$1.0
$0.5
$0.0
FY 2008
CAFR
FY 2009
CAFR
FY 2010
CAFR
FY 2011
CAFR
FY 2012
CAFR
FY 2009 includes $392.6 million received under the Tax Amnesty program
FY 2011 4 percent Gross Income Tax Surcharge expired
FY 2012 includes $70.0 million in tax cuts
FY 2013 includes $127.5 million in tax cuts
FY 2014 includes $149.5 million in tax cuts
Corporation Business Tax excludes the tax on energy
43
FY 2013
Certified
FY 2014
Approp Act
Gross Income Tax
For Fiscal Year 2014 the Gross Income Tax is projected to set a new record of $13.0 billion. The estimate is
$846 million or 6.9 percent above the June certified Fiscal Year 2013 figure. The anticipated increase in
income tax revenues reflects continuing growth of household income. Income tax growth in Fiscal Year
2013 was unusually high as upper-bracket taxpayers brought income forward to calendar year 2012 to avoid
Federal tax rate increases that commenced January 1, 2013. Thus, the growth rate of New Jersey’s income
tax is anticipated to be lower in Fiscal Year 2014 than in Fiscal Year 2013.
New Jersey’s income tax revenue is highly sensitive not only to the growth in aggregate income, but also to
its distribution. Households reporting more than $100,000 in taxable income (about 20 percent of New Jersey
taxpayers) have accounted for more than 85 percent of the State’s income tax revenue in most recent years.
This group has generally earned less than 70 percent of the State’s aggregate taxable income. By some
estimates in recent years New Jersey has had the most progressive income tax system of any state. It is
anticipated that with the firming of economic growth, a larger share of aggregate income will be subject to
tax at the rates in higher brackets, continuing to allow for growth in income tax receipts in excess aggregate
income growth.
Income Tax
(In Billions)
$14.0
$12.0
$12.605
$10.0
$10.476
$10.323
$10.617
FY 2009
CAFR
FY 2010
CAFR
FY 2011
CAFR
$13.039
$11.128
$12.193
FY 2012
CAFR
FY 2013 FY 2014
Certified Approp Act
$8.0
$6.0
$4.0
$2.0
$0.0
FY 2008
CAFR
Theserevenuesincludechangesintaxpolicy:
FY2009‐IncrementalChangeinEITCExpansion($60million);Includes$88.9millionreceivedfromtheAmnestyprogram
FY2010‐IncrementalChangeinEITC($9.9million);EITCFederalReimbursement($150million);Millionaire’sTaxenacted
FY2011‐Millionaire’sTaxexpired
FY2012‐Includes$23.0millionintaxcuts
FY2013‐Includes$67.0millionintaxcuts
FY2014‐Includes$117.0millionintaxcuts
44
Other Revenue
For Fiscal Year 2014, the forecast is a $174 million increase in other revenue collection from the June
certified Fiscal Year 2013 estimate. The majority of the increase is projected in the Casino Revenue Fund,
reflecting the fall 2013 inauguration of online gaming through Atlantic City casinos. In FY 2013, the State
Lottery Fund received $120 million in a one-time vendor payment, reflected in the reduction to FY 2014.
Other Revenue
(In Millions)
FY 2008
CAFR
Casino Revenue Fund
State Lottery Fund
Motor Fuels
Motor Vehicle Fees
Transfer Inheritance
Insurance Premium
Cigarette
Petroleum Products Gross Receipts
Public Utility Excise (Reform)
Corp. Banks and Financial Institutions
Alcoholic Beverage Excise
Realty Transfer
Tobacco Products Wholesale Sales
Total Other Major Taxes
$
FY 2009
CAFR
$
$
413
882
563
401
699
513
251
231
12
71
93
321
14
4,464
Total Miscellaneous Revenues
$
Total Other Revenues
$
FY 2010
CAFR
$
351
887
538
362
653
431
216
223
12
145
94
194
16
4,122
4,126
$
8,590
$
$
296
924
535
379
582
481
205
216
13
130
93
179
18
4,051
3,942
$
8,064
$
45
$
FY 2011
CAFR
$
FY 2012
CAFR
$
FY 2013
Cert
6/30/2013
$
218
1,095
540
455
650
560
263
220
14
177
109
228
20
$
4,549
FY 2014
Approp
Act
$
384
1,020
547
437
715
608
237
228
14
202
119
297
21
$ 4,829
$
266
930
524
408
642
458
227
216
15
118
98
175
19
4,096
$
239
950
540
464
642
528
288
223
14
106
102
188
21
4,305
3,984
$
3,955
$
3,685
$
3,955
$
3,849
8,035
$
8,051
$
7,990
$
8,504
$
8,678
Chapter 4: Budget Details
46
47
SUMMARY OF FISCAL YEAR 2013-14 APPROPRIATIONS
(thousands of dollars)
This table is a summary of appropriations of all State fund sources.
It highlights the total and percent change in appropriations between fiscal years.
FY 2013
Adjusted
Approp.
FY 2014
Approp.
Act
$ 22,939,915
$ 23,704,497
764,582
3.3
$
3,553,867
76,656
672,981
2,477,933
$
3,498,656
76,154
677,481
2,855,699
(55,211)
(502)
4,500
377,766
(1.6)
(0.7)
0.7
15.2
Total State Operations
$
6,781,437
$
7,107,990
326,553
4.8
Capital Construction
Debt Service
$
1,261,086
410,615
$
1,395,821
319,710
134,735
(90,905)
10.7
(22.1)
--------- Change --------$
%
GENERAL FUND AND
PROPERTY TAX RELIEF FUND
State Aid and Grants
State Operations
Executive Branch
Legislature
Judiciary
Interdepartmental
TOTAL GENERAL FUND AND
PROPERTY TAX RELIEF FUND
$ 31,393,053
$ 32,528,018
CASINO CONTROL FUND
CASINO REVENUE FUND
GUBERNATORIAL ELECTIONS FUND
$
$
GRAND TOTAL STATE APPROPRIATIONS
$ 31,689,959
55,344
235,362
6,200
48
1,134,965
3.6
55,344
383,600
10,000
148,238
3,800
0.0
63.0
61.3
$ 32,976,962
1,287,003
4.1
APPROPRIATIONS
MAJOR INCREASES AND DECREASES
Fiscal 2014 Budget to Appropriation
($ In Millions)
This table summarizes the major increases and decreases in the Fiscal 2014 Appropriations Act since the Governor’s
recommended Fiscal 2014 Budget and is organized by category.
Categories of recommended appropriations are defined as follows:
State Operations consists of programs and services operated directly by the State government. The largest single component is
for the salary and benefits of State employees. This portion of the Budget is subject to the spending limitations imposed by the
State Appropriations Limitation Act (P.L.1990, c.94), commonly known as the Cap Law.
Grants-in-Aid appropriations are for programs and services provided to the public on behalf of the State by a third party provider,
or grants made directly to individuals based on assorted program eligibility criteria. The Medicaid program, Tuition Aid Grant
Program, Homestead Benefit Program, and funding for New Jersey Transit and State colleges and universities fall into this
category.
State Aid consists of payments to or on behalf of counties, municipalities, and school districts to assist them in carrying out their
local responsibilities. This category of expenditure includes school aid and municipal aid. It also includes funding for county
colleges, local public assistance, and county psychiatric hospital costs.
Capital Construction represents pay-as-you-go allocations and debt service for construction and other infrastructure items.
Debt Service payments represent the interest and principal on capital projects funded through the sale of general obligation bonds.
All Changes were sponsored by the Executive except as noted in the "House/Sponsor" column.
House/Sponsor
Increases
Net
Change
Decreases
State Operations
Super Storm Sandy
$
20.000
Work First New Jersey (WFNJ) Technology
Investment
3.885
State Health Benefits Program
2.737
Subtotal - State Operations Increases
$
26.622
Unused Accumulated Sick Leave Payments
Trend
$
(1.500)
Subtotal - State Operations Decreases
$
(1.500)
Net Change (State Operations)
$
Grants-In-Aid
Rutgers (Restructuring)
Rowan (Restructuring)
University Hospital (Restructuring)
(S)
SANDRA B. CUNNINGHAM
(S)
STEPHEN M. SWEENEY
(A)
SHEILA Y. OLIVER
(S)
SANDRA B. CUNNINGHAM
(A)
SHEILA Y. OLIVER
(S)
STEPHEN M. SWEENEY
(A)
LOUIS D. GREENWALD
(S)
SANDRA B. CUNNINGHAM
49
$
146.483
30.229
18.841
25.122
House/Sponsor
Community Providers Contract Adjustments
(S)
RONALD L. RICE
(A)
SHEILA Y. OLIVER
(A)
JOHN J. BURZICHELLI
(S)
NELLIE POU
Increases
10.706
Payments for Medical Assistance Recipients
-Nursing Homes
(A)
ALBERT COUTINHO
(S)
PAUL A. SARLO
Cancer Institute of New Jersey
(A)
LOUIS D. GREENWALD
(S)
ROBERT M. GORDON
(A)
LOUIS D. GREENWALD
(S)
JAMES BEACH
(A)
VINCENT PRIETO
(S)
PAUL A. SARLO
(S)
M. TERESA RUIZ
(A)
SHEILA Y. OLIVER
Holocaust Survivor Assistance Program,
Samost Jewish Family and Children's
Service of Southern NJ
(S)
RICHARD J. CODEY
(A)
GARY S. SCHAER
Project S.A.R.A.H.
(A)
GARY S. SCHAER
(S)
LORETTA WEINBERG
Meadowlands Adjustment Payments Aid
Newark Museum
Subtotal - Grants-In-Aid Increases
UMDNJ (Restructuring)
Decreases
13.200
State Health Benefits Program - Higher
Education
South Jersey Cancer Program - Camden
Net
Change
10.325
10.000
10.000
6.000
1.000
0.200
0.045
$
(S)
SANDRA B. CUNNINGHAM
(A)
SHEILA Y. OLIVER
257.029
$
Medicaid Trend
(160.553)
(63.691)
Education Innovation Fund
(A)
VINCENT PRIETO
(5.000)
Opportunity Scholarship Demonstration
Program
(S)
NIA H. GILL, ESQ.
(2.000)
(A)
SHEILA Y. OLIVER
Subtotal - Grants-In-Aid Decreases
$
Net Change (Grants-In-Aid)
(231.244)
$
25.785
$
25.978
State Aid
Teachers' Post-Retirement Medical
School District Hold Harmless Funding
County College Operational Aid
Anti-Bullying Program
$
(S)
JIM WHELAN
(A)
GORDON M. JOHNSON
(A)
TROY SINGLETON
(S)
LINDA R. GREENSTEIN
(S)
LORETTA WEINBERG
(A)
VALERIE VAINIERI HUTTLE
Subtotal - State Aid Increases
7.421
3.000
1.000
$
Net Change (State Aid)
50
14.557
25.978
House/Sponsor
Increases
Net
Change
Decreases
Capital Construction
Hazardous Substance Discharge
Remediation Loans & Grants
- Constitutional Dedication
$
2.885
Subtotal - Capital Construction Increases
$
2.885
Net Change (Capital Construction)
$
2.885
$
(24.170)
$
55.600
Debt Service
General Obligation Bonds - Premium Savings
$
(24.170)
Subtotal - Debt Service Decreases
$
(24.170)
Net Change (Debt Service)
GRAND TOTAL
$
51
312.514
$
(256.914)
SUMMARY OF CHANGES
Major Agencies
(in thousands)
IPB Fund
**
Legislature
2013 Adjusted Appropriations (as reported in the Governor's Budget)
Amount
76,656
Department
DSS
Office of Legislative Services - Master Lease Payment - Supplemental Not Continued
(334)
DSS
(168)
New Jersey Apportionment Commission - Supplemental Not Continued
TOTAL FISCAL 2014 REDUCTIONS/INCREASES
(502)
FISCAL 2014 APPROPRIATION
76,154
**P** = Parent Record
52
SUMMARY OF CHANGES
Major Agencies
(in thousands)
IPB Fund
**
Chief Executive
2013 Adjusted Appropriations (as reported in the Governor's Budget)
FISCAL 2014 APPROPRIATION
Amount
6,035
6,035
**P** = Parent Record
53
SUMMARY OF CHANGES
Major Agencies
(in thousands)
IPB Fund
**
Agriculture
2013 Adjusted Appropriations (as reported in the Governor's Budget)
Department
DSS
Promotion/Market Development
Amount
19,623
(50)
TOTAL FISCAL 2014 REDUCTIONS/INCREASES
(50)
FISCAL 2014 APPROPRIATION
19,573
**P** = Parent Record
54
SUMMARY OF CHANGES
Major Agencies
(in thousands)
IPB Fund
**
Banking and Insurance
2013 Adjusted Appropriations (as reported in the Governor's Budget)
FISCAL 2014 APPROPRIATION
Amount
63,450
63,450
**P** = Parent Record
55
SUMMARY OF CHANGES
Major Agencies
(in thousands)
IPB Fund
**
Children and Families
2013 Adjusted Appropriations (as reported in the Governor's Budget)
Amount
1,063,706
Department
**P**
Children and Families Trend
1,677
GIA
Children's Placement Enhancement Project (C-PEP) - Developmentally Disabled Children
1,502
DSS
Annualization of Staff Transfer from Developmental Disabilities to Children and Families
163
GIA
Project S.A.R.A.H.
**P**
Comprehensive Waiver Savings - Children with Serious Emotional Disturbances and Dually
Diagnosed Developmental Disability/Mental Illness Programs
GIA
Human Services Advisory Council Contracts to Human Services Aging Services
(370)
DSS
Services Other Than Personal
(172)
DSS
Reduced Energy Costs
45
(16,544)
(36)
TOTAL FISCAL 2014 REDUCTIONS/INCREASES
(13,735)
FISCAL 2014 APPROPRIATION
1,049,971
**P** = Parent Record
56
SUMMARY OF CHANGES
Major Agencies
(in thousands)
IPB Fund
**
Community Affairs
2013 Adjusted Appropriations (as reported in the Governor's Budget)
Department
PTRF
Consolidated Municipal Property Tax Relief Aid
Amount
756,882
22,265
GIA
Meadowlands Adjustment Payments Aid
6,000
DSS
Ethics Re-Organization Returned from Law and Public Safety
**P**
Transitional Aid to Localities
PTRF
Open Space Payments in Lieu of Taxes (PILOT) - Align With Calendar Year Budgets
(6,438)
SA
Consolidation Implementation - Supplemental Not Continued
(6,250)
GIA
State Rental Assistance Program Trend
(2,500)
180
(14,146)
TOTAL FISCAL 2014 REDUCTIONS/INCREASES
(889)
FISCAL 2014 APPROPRIATION
755,993
**P** = Parent Record
57
SUMMARY OF CHANGES
Major Agencies
(in thousands)
IPB Fund
**
Corrections
2013 Adjusted Appropriations (as reported in the Governor's Budget)
Department
DSS
Inmate Healthcare
Amount
1,084,881
5,200
**P**
Refresh Fleet, Second Year of Line of Credit
230
DSS
Corrections Officers Lawsuit Settlement - Supplemental Not Continued
(1,980)
**P**
Salary Savings
(1,896)
GIA
Community Services Trend - Supplemental Not Continued
(1,729)
DSS
Telephone Savings
(230)
TOTAL FISCAL 2014 REDUCTIONS/INCREASES
(405)
FISCAL 2014 APPROPRIATION
1,084,476
**P** = Parent Record
58
SUMMARY OF CHANGES
Major Agencies
(in thousands)
IPB Fund
**
Education
2013 Adjusted Appropriations (as reported in the Governor's Budget)
Amount
11,788,095
Department
**P**
School Facilities Programs
81,136
**P**
Formula Aid to School Districts
63,537
PTRF
Under Adequacy Aid
16,763
PTRF
School Choice Aid
15,965
PTRF
Preschool Education Aid
14,400
PTRF
School Aid Payment Changes
3,495
PTRF
Charter School Aid
2,900
SA
Anti-Bullying Program
1,000
SA
Nonpublic Aid
1,000
DSS
Teacher Effectiveness and Accountability
500
DSS
Ethics Re-Organization Returned from Law and Public Safety
305
PTRF
Payments for Institutionalized Children - Unknown District of Residence
(938)
DSS
Statewide Assessment Program
(600)
Teachers Pensions/Social Sec.
**P**
Pensions and Insurance
374,206
**P**
Teachers' Post-Retirement Medical
91,345
PTRF
Local School Districts' Teacher Social Security Tax
16,300
PTRF
Debt Service - Pension Bonds
12,344
TOTAL FISCAL 2014 REDUCTIONS/INCREASES
693,658
FISCAL 2014 APPROPRIATION
12,481,753
**P** = Parent Record
59
SUMMARY OF CHANGES
Major Agencies
(in thousands)
IPB Fund
**
Environmental Protection
2013 Adjusted Appropriations (as reported in the Governor's Budget)
Department
**P**
CBT Dedication
Amount
360,945
(2,274)
DSS
Nuclear Emergency Response - Supplemental Not Continued
(881)
DSS
Hunting and Fishing Licenses for National Guard and Disabled Veterans - Supplemental Not
Continued
(578)
DSS
Reduced Energy Costs
(39)
Environmental Protection
**P**
CBT Dedication - Capital
(6,800)
Environmental Protection
DS
General Obligation Debt Service
2,180
TOTAL FISCAL 2014 REDUCTIONS/INCREASES
(8,392)
FISCAL 2014 APPROPRIATION
352,553
**P** = Parent Record
60
SUMMARY OF CHANGES
Major Agencies
(in thousands)
IPB Fund
**
Health
2013 Adjusted Appropriations (as reported in the Governor's Budget)
Department
GIA
Cancer Institute of New Jersey
Amount
364,801
10,000
GIA
Hospital Admission Fee - Lost Federal Match
8,180
**P**
South Jersey Cancer Program - Camden
7,239
GIA
Graduate Medical Education
5,000
DSS
Newborn Screening Expansion - Emma's Law
1,637
DSS
New Jersey Compassionate Use Medical Marijuana Act
GIA
Health Care Stabilization Fund
GIA
AIDS Drug Distribution Program (ADDP) Trend and Increased Rebates
(6,509)
GIA
Early Intervention Program (EIP) Trend
(3,292)
DSS
New Jersey State Commission on Cancer Research
(1,000)
GIA
Health Care Subsidy Fund Trend
823
(15,000)
(989)
TOTAL FISCAL 2014 REDUCTIONS/INCREASES
6,089
FISCAL 2014 APPROPRIATION
370,890
**P** = Parent Record
61
SUMMARY OF CHANGES
Major Agencies
(in thousands)
IPB Fund
**
Human Services
2013 Adjusted Appropriations (as reported in the Governor's Budget)
Division of Aging Services
GIA
Payments for Medical Assistance Recipients -Nursing Homes
Amount
6,542,701
10,325
GIA
Medicaid Long-Term Care Trend
1,335
GIA
Adult Protective Services
1,000
GIA
Reallocation from Dept of Children and Families and Division Developmental Disabilities
378
GIA
Holocaust Survivor Assistance Program, Samost Jewish Family and Children's Service of
Southern NJ
200
GIA
Pharmaceutical Assistance to the Aged and Disabled Trend
(9,551)
GIA
Aging Services Administrative Efficiencies
(1,000)
GIA
Senior Gold Prescription Discount Program Trend
(132)
Family Development
DSS
Work First New Jersey (WFNJ) Technology Investment
3,885
GIA
Reallocate Transportation Services from Disability Services to Family Development
**P**
Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) Trend
SA
General Assistance (GA) Trend
(7,049)
**P**
General Assistance Administrative Funding - Maximize Federal Resources
(4,835)
SA
Supplemental Security Income (SSI) Trend
(2,439)
GIA
Work First New Jersey Child Care Trend
(2,000)
Central Office
DSS
Line of Credit
DSS
233
(12,201)
(212)
Reallocate One Position from Management and Budget to Mental Health
(72)
Developmental Disabilities
GIA
FY14 Community Placements
20,679
GIA
Community Placements - Annualize FY13 Placements
13,654
GIA
Olmstead Community Placements
GIA
Reallocate Transportation Costs from Disability Services to Developmental Disabilities
**P**
Shift to Non-State Funds - FY14 and Annualization of FY13 Savings
GIA
Reallocate Dually Diagnosed Conditionally Extended Pending Placement (CEPP) Funding
from Developmental Disabilities to Mental Health
(2,247)
**P**
Developmental Centers' Operational Efficiencies Due to Lower Census
(1,278)
DSS
Eliminate One-Time Cost for Rate Study
8,683
56
(30,013)
(658)
**P** = Parent Record
62
SUMMARY OF CHANGES
Major Agencies
(in thousands)
IPB Fund
Human Services
Amount
DSS
Annualization of Staff Transfer from Developmental Disabilities to Children and Families
(163)
GIA
Human Services Composite Bond Debt Service
(128)
DSS
Reallocation from Developmental Disabilities to Disability Services
(103)
GIA
Reallocate Adult Activity Funding from Developmental Disabilities to Aging Services
(8)
Disability Services
GIA
Disability Services Trend
850
DSS
Reallocation from Developmental Disabilities to Disability Services
103
**P**
Reallocate Transportation Resources to Other Divisions
Mental Health and Addiction Services
**P**
FY13/FY14 Mental Health Community Services
(321)
12,784
GIA
Reallocate Dually Diagnosed Conditionally Extended Pending Placement (CEPP) Funding
from Developmental Disabilities to Mental Health
2,247
DSS
Reallocate Funding from Other Divisions
72
GIA
Reallocate Transportation Services from Disability Services to Mental Health
32
GIA
Community Care Trend
(2,400)
GIA
Comprehensive Waiver Savings - Medication Assisted Treatment Initiative (MATI)
(2,064)
GIA
Community Based Substance Abuse Treatment and Prevention - Shift to Non-State Funds
(1,600)
DSS
Psychiatric Hospitals' Operational Efficiencies Due to Lower Census
(1,002)
GIA
Human Services Composite Bond Debt Service
(98)
Medicaid
**P**
Medicaid Trend
93,460
**P**
Medicaid Cost Associated with the Federal Affordable Care Act
42,323
**P**
Medicaid - Shift to Non-State Funds - Affordable Care Act
TOTAL FISCAL 2014 REDUCTIONS/INCREASES
(227,447)
(96,722)
FISCAL 2014 APPROPRIATION
6,445,979
**P** = Parent Record
63
SUMMARY OF CHANGES
Major Agencies
(in thousands)
IPB Fund
**
Labor and Workforce Development
2013 Adjusted Appropriations (as reported in the Governor's Budget)
Department
DSS
Administration and Support Services - Shift to Non-State Funds
TOTAL FISCAL 2014 REDUCTIONS/INCREASES
Amount
159,789
(450)
(450)
FISCAL 2014 APPROPRIATION
159,339
**P** = Parent Record
64
SUMMARY OF CHANGES
Major Agencies
(in thousands)
IPB Fund
**
Law & Public Safety
2013 Adjusted Appropriations (as reported in the Governor's Budget)
Department
**P**
State Police 154th & 155th Recruit Classes
Amount
566,679
3,363
CCF
Transfer Staff from Casino Control Commission to Gaming Enforcement
**P**
State Police Salaries - Attrition and Shift to Non-State Funds
DSS
National Crime Information Center 2000
(425)
DSS
State Police Line of Credit
(400)
Election Law Enforcement
GEF
Gubernatorial Election Fund
385
(3,258)
3,800
State Ethics Commission
DSS
Ethics Re-Organization Returned to Community Affairs and Education
TOTAL FISCAL 2014 REDUCTIONS/INCREASES
(485)
2,980
FISCAL 2014 APPROPRIATION
569,659
**P** = Parent Record
65
SUMMARY OF CHANGES
Major Agencies
(in thousands)
IPB Fund
**
Military & Veterans Affairs
2013 Adjusted Appropriations (as reported in the Governor's Budget)
Department
DSS
Veterans' Haven North
Amount
94,271
244
DSS
Reduced Energy Costs
(291)
DSS
Burial Services - Shift to Non-State Funds
(100)
GIA
Support Services for Returning Veterans
(50)
TOTAL FISCAL 2014 REDUCTIONS/INCREASES
(197)
FISCAL 2014 APPROPRIATION
94,074
**P** = Parent Record
66
SUMMARY OF CHANGES
Major Agencies
(in thousands)
IPB Fund
**
State
Amount
2013 Adjusted Appropriations (as reported in the Governor's Budget)
Higher Ed Student Assistance Authority
**P**
Full-Time Tuition Aid Grants
1,176,750
16,118
GIA
Part-Time Tuition Aid Grants for County Colleges
876
**P**
NJSTARS I & II Trend
(3,220)
GIA
Coordinated Garden State Scholarship Programs - Phase-out Completed
(1,630)
GIA
Veterinary Medicine Education Program - VetMed - Phase-out Completed
(51)
GIA
Survivor Tuition Benefits
(38)
OSHE - Educational Opportunity Fund
GIA
Martin Luther King Physician-Dentist Scholarships - Phase-out Completed
Rowan University
GIA
School of Osteopathic Medicine (Medical Education Restructuring)
GIA
Shift from RWJ-Camden to Rowan-Cooper Medical School
(152)
30,229
3,750
Rutgers, Camden
GIA
Rutgers - Camden (Rutgers Restructuring)
17,140
Rutgers, Newark
GIA
Rutgers - Newark (Rutgers Restructuring)
31,816
Rutgers, The State University
GIA
School of Biomedical and Health Services (Medical Education Restructuring)
148,043
GIA
(50,516)
Rutgers - New Brunswick (Rutgers Restructuring/Medical Education Restructuring)
Thomas A. Edison State College
GIA
Thomas Edison State College Facilities Support
1,730
UMDNJ
GIA
University of Medicine and Dentistry (Medical Education Restructuring)
GIA
Shift from RWJ-Camden to Rowan-Cooper Medical School
University Hospital
GIA
University Hospital (Medical Education Restructuring)
Department
GIA
Newark Museum
(160,553)
(3,750)
18,841
1,000
**P** = Parent Record
67
SUMMARY OF CHANGES
Major Agencies
(in thousands)
IPB Fund
State
Amount
TOTAL FISCAL 2014 REDUCTIONS/INCREASES
49,633
FISCAL 2014 APPROPRIATION
1,226,383
**P** = Parent Record
68
SUMMARY OF CHANGES
Major Agencies
(in thousands)
IPB Fund
**
Transportation
2013 Adjusted Appropriations (as reported in the Governor's Budget)
NJ Transit
**P**
Transportation Assistance for Senior Citizens and Disabled Residents Casino Revenue
Statutory Dedication
Department
DSS
Winter Operations - Supplemental Not Continued
DSS
Amount
1,267,502
(4,289)
(30,000)
Reduced Energy Costs
(380)
Transportation - Proper
CC
New Jersey Transportation Capital Program - Debt Service
TOTAL FISCAL 2014 REDUCTIONS/INCREASES
66,016
31,347
FISCAL 2014 APPROPRIATION
1,298,849
**P** = Parent Record
69
SUMMARY OF CHANGES
Major Agencies
(in thousands)
IPB Fund
**
Treasury
2013 Adjusted Appropriations (as reported in the Governor's Budget)
Department
DSS
Risk Management Staffing
Amount
2,208,513
130
DSS
New Jersey Public Broadcasting Authority - Supplemental Not Continued
(1,975)
DSS
Lottery Manager Efficiencies
(1,898)
DSS
Arbitration and Litigation - Supplemental Not Continued
(750)
DSS
Maintenance of West Trenton Campus - Reallocation of Funding from Treasury DPMC to
Interdepartmental
(417)
Treasury - Casino Control Fund
CCF
Transfer Staff from Casino Control Commission to Gaming Enforcement
Treasury-Direct Property Relief
PTRG
Homestead Benefit Program Trend
(385)
2,000
**P**
Senior and Disabled Citizens' Property Tax Freeze Trend
(9,500)
PTRF
Senior/Disabled and Veterans' Property Tax Deduction Reimbursement Trend
(3,000)
Treasury-Municipal & County Aid
**P**
Pensions
24,484
PTRF
Municipal Retired Employees' Health Benefits (PRM)
5,528
PTRF
Debt Service - Pension Bonds
1,217
SA
South Jersey Port Corporation
(3,702)
SA
Public Library Project Fund - Debt Service
(1)
Office of Information Technology
**P**
Network and Storage Equipment Refresh Cycle and Electrical Upgrades Line of Credit
4,648
**P**
3,360
Information Technology Software/Hardware Maintenance
Economic Development Authority
Economic Redevelopment and Growth (ERG) Grant Program
Brownfield Site Reimbursement Fund
(3,250)
Fort Monmouth Economic Redevelopment Authority
Treasury
DS
General Obligation Debt Service
**P**
6,475
(14)
(85,013)
General Obligation Bonds Cash Defeasance
(9,404)
**P** = Parent Record
70
SUMMARY OF CHANGES
Major Agencies
(in thousands)
IPB Fund
Treasury
Amount
Higher Ed - County Colleges
SA
County College Retired Employees' Health Benefits (PRM)
3,748
**P**
Aid to County Colleges - Shift from Non-State Funds
2,500
**P**
Pensions and Insurance
SA
Debt Service - Pension Bonds
**P**
Debt Service for County College Chapter 12 Program
SA
County College Operational Aid
SA
Employer Taxes for Members of the Teachers' Pension and Annuity Fund
401
12
(663)
Higher Ed - Indepen. Colleges & Oth
GIA
Aid to Independent Colleges and Universities
(50)
1,000
Miscellaneous Higher Ed.
GIA
Higher Education Capital Improvement Program
GIA
(1,760)
4
Dormitory Safety Trust Fund
(253)
Public Defender
DSS
Line of Credit
(123)
TOTAL FISCAL 2014 REDUCTIONS/INCREASES
(66,651)
FISCAL 2014 APPROPRIATION
2,141,862
**P** = Parent Record
71
SUMMARY OF CHANGES
Major Agencies
(in thousands)
IPB Fund
**
Miscellaneous Commissions
2013 Adjusted Appropriations (as reported in the Governor's Budget)
Del. River Basin Comm
DSS
Delaware River Basin Commission
Amount
976
(200)
TOTAL FISCAL 2014 REDUCTIONS/INCREASES
(200)
FISCAL 2014 APPROPRIATION
776
**P** = Parent Record
72
SUMMARY OF CHANGES
Major Agencies
(in thousands)
IPB Fund
**
Interdepartmental
2013 Adjusted Appropriations (as reported in the Governor's Budget)
Amount
3,892,227
Employee Benefits
**P**
Pensions and Insurance - State and Higher Education Employees
255,875
**P**
Active Health Benefits - Including Prescription Drugs and Dental
103,003
**P**
Retired Employee Health Benefits (PRM)
**P**
Debt Service - Pension Bonds
9,710
**P**
Employer Taxes
6,863
**P**
Premium Based Employee Contribution for Health Benefits Savings
DSS
Non-Contributory Insurance - Supplemental Not Continued
17,310
(84,412)
(5,200)
Interdepartmental
CC
Garden State Preservation Trust Fund - Debt Service
19,716
CC
Life Safety and Emergency Projects - Statewide
10,000
CC
New Jersey Building Authority
(76,693)
Other Interdepartmental Accounts
GIA
Community Providers Contract Adjustments
13,200
DSS
Federal Sequester Contingency
3,000
DSS
Banking Services
GIA
New Jersey Performing Arts Center Debt Service
GIA
Sports and Exposition Authority Operations - Supplemental Not Continued
(27,400)
DSS
Disasters and Emergencies - Supplemental Not Continued
(20,000)
GIA
Sports and Exposition Authority Debt Service
(18,291)
DSS
Interest on Short Term Notes - Supplemental Not Continued
(6,600)
GIA
Business Employment Incentive Program (BEIP) Debt Service
(1,339)
GIA
New Jersey Performing Arts Center Debt Service - Supplemental Not Continued
GIA
Liberty Science Center Debt Service
GIA
Municipal Rehabilitation and Economic Recovery Debt Service
500
13
(952)
(41)
Rentals and Utilities
**P**
Household & Security
(2)
1,556
DSS
Maintenance of West Trenton Campus - Reallocation of Funding from Treasury DPMC to
Interdepartmental
DSS
Tort Claims Liability- Supplemental Not Continued
**P** = Parent Record
73
417
(20,000)
SUMMARY OF CHANGES
Major Agencies
(in thousands)
IPB Fund
Interdepartmental
Amount
DSS
Workers Compensation
(10,000)
DSS
Greystone Debt Service - Issue Refunding Bonds
(7,500)
DSS
Public Health, Environmental and Agricultural Laboratory Utilities
(2,500)
**P**
Property Rentals - Thomas Edison Lease Costs - Supplemental Not Continued
(1,730)
**P**
Reduced Energy Costs
(1,564)
DSS
Marlboro and Greystone Maintenance - Supplemental Not Continued
(500)
DSS
Insurance Property and Casualty
(195)
**P**
Property Rentals
(149)
Salary & Other Benefits (Adjustments)
DSS
Salary Increases - Executive Branch
44,093
DSS
Salary Increases - Judicial Branch
10,438
DSS
Salary Increases - Legislative Branch
DSS
Unused Accumulated Sick Leave Payments Trend
359
(1,500)
TOTAL FISCAL 2014 REDUCTIONS/INCREASES
209,485
FISCAL 2014 APPROPRIATION
4,101,712
**P** = Parent Record
74
SUMMARY OF CHANGES
Major Agencies
(in thousands)
IPB Fund
**
Judiciary
2013 Adjusted Appropriations (as reported in the Governor's Budget)
Department
DSS
Drug Court Treatment/Aftercare
Amount
672,981
4,500
TOTAL FISCAL 2014 REDUCTIONS/INCREASES
4,500
FISCAL 2014 APPROPRIATION
677,481
GRAND TOTAL -- FISCAL 2014 APPROPRIATION (Excludes Federal Funds)
**P** = Parent Record
75
32,976,962
Core Mission Summaries 76
Reading the Core Mission Area Tables
DEPARTMENT NAME
CORE MISSION SUMMARY
Each department has
identified one or more core
mission areas reflecting key
priorities.
Actual
FY 2012
Performance
Target
FY 2013
Performance
Target
FY 2014
Department Name
Core Mission Area #1
Total Resources allocated
to core mission area
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds
$000,000
$000,000
Non-State Funds
$000,000
$000,000
Key Performance Indicators
Indicator #1
X%
X%
X%
Indicator #2
X%
X%
X%
Key Performance
Indicators are
measures that track
progress within Core
Mission Areas.
Baseline
Performance
Data
77
Departments set
targets based on the
baseline (starting
point) performance,
resources available and
their potential to
achieve improvements.
FY14 Citizens’ Guide: Core Mission Summaries
Actual
FY 2012
Performance
Target
FY 2013
Performance
Target
FY 2014
$ 4,329
$ 4,552
$ 3,502
$ 5,453
$ 3,502
$ 4,886
2,085
109
551
1,258
436
63
7,998,477
132,056,008
33,849,360
740
991
145
12
10,394
308
117
80
27,576
1,832
1,032
195
520
147,780
1,637,064
461,722
253
1,523
400
122,113,083
2,400
60
500
1,200
300
60
8,400,000
132,000,000
33,600,000
840
1,200
148
12
10,750
300
120
80
24,000
1,820
828
144
100
100,000
1,000,000
200,000
350
2,000
400
100,000,000
2,400
60
500
1,200
300
75
8,400,000
132,000,000
33,600,000
840
1,200
148
12
10,750
300
120
80
25,000
1,820
828
144
100
100,000
1,000,000
200,000
350
2,000
400
100,000,000
$ 13,089
$ 369,674
$ 12,969
$ 420,487
$ 12,969
$ 431,889
35,958,385
122,061,977
40,843,703
2,762,536
38,115,888
123,282,597
41,252,140
2,790,161
38,878,206
125,748,249
42,077,183
2,845,964
33,891,449
8,437,926
34,230,363
8,522,305
34,914,970
8,692,751
$ 1,040
$ 3,449
$ 459
$ 5,622
$ 459
$ 5,184
122
256
6,987,272
691
122
312
7,000,000
550
122
312
7,000,000
550
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE
Protecting the Public
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Key Performance Indicators
Bee hive colonies inspected . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gypsy Moth aerial suppression (municipalities surveyed) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nursery plant dealer inspections (units) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Nursery locations inspected (units) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Phytosanitary inspections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Food safety audits performed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fruit and vegetable shipping points inspected (pounds) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fruit and vegetable terminal markets inspected (lbs of produce) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Shell eggs cases graded (pounds) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Feed, fertilizer and lime registrations issued . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Organic registrations issued . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wholesale seedsmen registered . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Aquaculture licenses issued . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dairy store licenses issued . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dairy dealer licenses issued . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Organic certifications processed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Certified NJ Organic operations meeting with federal standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Detection of animal diseases (tests performed) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Livestock, equine and poultry disease management (field investigations performed) . . . . .
Feed, fertilizer and lime samples taken . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Feed, fertilizer and lime deficiencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Animal waste management plans completed and filed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Beneficial Insect Lab: Weevils produced . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Beneficial Insect Lab: Adults produced . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Beneficial Insect Lab: Beetles produced . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dairy financial disputes settled . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dairy investigations conducted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dairy Change of Supplier Notices filed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Milk pooled (pounds) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Feeding NJ’s Schoolchildren and the State’s Food Insecure
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Key Performance Indicators
Total school breakfasts served . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Total school lunches served . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Total meals in child & adult care food programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Total meals in summer food program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Total food distributed under USDA School Commodities program, including fresh fruit
and vegetables (pounds) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Total purchases via the State Food Purchase Program (pounds) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Promoting and Supporting NJ Agricultural and Aquacultural Industries and Product
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Key Performance Indicators
Farm markets in urban areas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Farms whose products meet Jersey Fresh standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Consumer advertised Impressions for Jersey Fresh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Technical assistance to potential aquaculturalists (hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
78
FY14 Citizens’ Guide: Core Mission Summaries
Actual
FY 2012
Performance
Target
FY 2013
Performance
Target
FY 2014
$ 4,126
$ 1,693
$ 2,636
$ 6,048
$ 2,643
$ 6,314
5,681
72
1,004
383
1,281
888
8,000
100
1,100
376
1,200
800
8,000
100
1,100
376
1,200
800
55,968
50,000
50,000
$ 16,636
$ 134
$ 16,268
------
$ 16,346
------
294
250
240
123
89
66
16
40
100
75
40
40
100
75
40
100
46
60
55
60
50
57
90
90
Promoting Growth and Stability of Regulated Industries
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 10,241
$ 12
$ 11,061
------
$ 10,872
------
Key Performance Indicators
Abandoned calls to licensing (monthly percentage) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Average time to process Life and Health rate and form filings (in days) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Average time to process Property and Casualty rate and form filings (in days) . . . . . . . . . .
5.4%
49
20
6.0%
40
30
5.5%
40
30
Consumer Protection
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 31,096
$ 2,600
$ 36,121
$ 7,265
$ 36,232
$ 480
3,072
3,837
2,600
3,300
2,600
3,300
1,355
72
1,200
100
1,200
100
Preservation and Conservation of Natural Resources
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Key Performance Indicators
Acres of farmland preserved . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Easement purchase transactions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Number of easements monitored for compliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Number of SADC owned easements monitored for compliance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Technical and administrative assistance to Soil Conservation Districts (hours) . . . . . . . . . .
Farms assisted by conservation field staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
On--site inspections by Soil Conservation Districts to ensure adherence to chapter 251
regulations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
BANKING AND INSURANCE
Monitoring Financial Condition of Regulated Companies
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Key Performance Indicators
Complete Examinations
Average time to complete an insurance company examination (days) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Average time to complete a consumer lender (mortgage lender, check cashers, money
transmitters, etc.) examination (days) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Average time to complete a bank examination (days) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Average time to complete joint investigation with the FDIC or Federal Reserve (days) .
Average time to mail examination report to insurance companies (days) . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Average time to mail examination report to consumer lenders (includes mortgage
lenders, check cashers, money transmitters, etc.) (days) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Average time to mail examination report to bank (in days) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Average time to mail examination report of joint bank examinations with the FDIC or
Federal Reserve (days) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Key Performance Indicators
Fraud Deterrence
Consumer fraud referrals received . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Consumer fraud investigations completed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Consumer fraud investigations completed with cooperation of regulators and law
enforcement agencies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Meetings with consumer fraud deterrence investigative units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
79
FY14 Citizens’ Guide: Core Mission Summaries
Actual
FY 2012
Performance
Target
FY 2013
Performance
Target
FY 2014
Process Consumer Complaints
Abandoned consumer complaint calls (monthly percentage) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Average time to process a consumer insurance complaint (days) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Average time to process a consumer banking complaint (days) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Average time to process a consumer real estate complaint (days) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9%
84
86
185
6%
90
70
145
6%
90
60
145
Process Enforcement Actions
Average time to process a consumer protection insurance enforcement action (days) . . .
Average time to process a consumer protection banking enforcement action (days) . . . .
1,135
247
915
280
1,100
280
$ 681,389
$ 312,490
$ 687,224
$ 308,086
$ 675,443
$ 302,387
CHILDREN AND FAMILES
Ensure the safety, permanency and well--being of children experiencing child abuse or
neglect
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Key Performance Indicators
Average wait time before calls coming in to the State Central Registry hotline are
answered (seconds) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Abuse/Neglect Reports assigned for investigation within three hours of initial report . . . . .
Investigations of Abuse/Neglect Reports completed within 90 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
New Jersey children supervised by Child Protection and Permanency who receive monthly
caseworker visits (both in--home and out--of--home) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adoptions finalized within nine months of a child being placed in an adoptive home . . . . .
Children in out--of--home placement who have up--to--date immunization records . . . . . . . .
Children receiving initial physical exam within 24 hours of entering placement . . . . . . . . .
Intake workers: Caseload levels compliant with established standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Permanency workers: Caseload levels compliant with established standards . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adoption workers: Caseload levels compliant with established standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
28
98.5%
85.6%
25
98.0%
92.0%
25
98.0%
92.0%
91.4%
91.2%
95.5%
94.7%
77.0%
93.0%
89.0%
93.0%
88.0%
96.0%
96.0%
86.0%
94.0%
87.0%
93.0%
89.0%
96.0%
96.0%
89.0%
94.0%
90.0%
Serve children and adolescents with emotional and behavioral health care challenges and
intellectual and developmental disabilities through family--centered, community--based
programs
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 291,303
$ 125,844
$ 321,594
$ 139,294
$ 301,741
$ 175,366
99.8%
98.0%
98.0%
96.0%
95.0%
95.0%
$ 62,962
$ 27,086
$ 64,157
$ 25,742
$ 64,202
$ 28,004
95.0%
90.0%
90.0%
90.0%
82.8%
90.0%
85.0%
90.0%
85.0%
87.8%
90.0%
90.0%
Key Performance Indicators
Children requiring an out--of--home placement for a behavioral health issue that were
served in New Jersey (CY2012) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Crisis calls addressed by a Mobile Response Crisis Team where the child was able to stay
safely in their home/ current living arrangement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Support child abuse prevention and intervention programs and services to women through
a network of public/private partnerships and programs.
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Key Performance Indicators
Women’s Services clients that have more strategies for enhancing their safety (Federal
Standard is 65% for FFY2012) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Women’s Services clients that have more knowledge of available community resources
(Federal Standard is 65% for FFY2012) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Children served by the Home Visiting Program who are appropriately immunized . . . . . . .
Children served by the Home Visiting Program who are screened for developmental
delays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
80
FY14 Citizens’ Guide: Core Mission Summaries
Actual
FY 2012
Performance
Target
FY 2013
Performance
Target
FY 2014
$ 10,310
$ 47,512
$ 8,621
$ 47,187
$ 8,585
$ 47,161
1,161
98.0%
1,149
98.0%
1,149
98.0%
87.0%
93.0%
93.0%
81.0%
90.0%
90.0%
$ 52,311
$ 15,597
$ 37,799
$ 33,668
$ 37,799
$ 35,293
68%
80%
80%
91%
97%
85%
90%
85%
90%
Housing Assistance
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 6,811
$ 266,318
$ 25,641
$ 291,742
$ 25,641
$ 277,596
Key Performance Indicators
Affordable housing units financed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Spending rate on federal rental assistance vouchers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Spending rate on rental assistance in the State program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1,799
100%
85%
2,622
97%
85%
2,655
97%
85%
Community Development & Support Services
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 4,297
$ 234,113
$ 5,098
$ 198,660
$ 5,253
$ 191,557
Key Performance Indicators
Households receiving energy assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Units weatherized with energy assistance funding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Number of individuals with disabilities participating in athletic programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
300,574
15,778
22,000
300,000
6,000
22,000
300,000
4,000
22,000
Local Government Operations
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 431,567
$ 1,406
$ 673,608
$ 1,350
$ 687,300
$ 1,350
Key Performance Indicators
Municipal budgets with tax levy increases within 2% statutory cap (reported on CY basis)
564
565
565
Provide educational services to students with disabilities and special needs
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Key Performance Indicators
Total population served as of October 15th Educational Count (Ages 3 -- 21) (as of
October in FY) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Eligible students graduating high school while enrolled. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adherence to national average for at--risk academic students who showed improvement in
Reading from pre-- to post--test after being enrolled for 90 days. (FY12 shows Sep
2010--Aug 2011 ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adherence to national average for at--risk academic students who showed improvement in
Math from pre-- to post--test after being enrolled for 90 days. (FY12 shows Sep
2010--Aug 2011 ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
COMMUNITY AFFAIRS
Building Safety
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Key Performance Indicators
Construction specification reviews performed within 20 business days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Multiple dwelling unit inspections completed that are required to be performed by the
State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fire safety inspections completed that are required to be performed by the State . . . . . . . .
81
FY14 Citizens’ Guide: Core Mission Summaries
Actual
FY 2012
Performance
Target
FY 2013
Performance
Target
FY 2014
DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS
Protecting the Public
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 247,956
$ 10
$ 262,595
$ 1,000
$ 261,942
$ 1,000
Key Performance Indicators
Inmates who attempted escape from a secure correctional facility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Inmates who escaped from a secure correctional facility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
36 month reincarceration rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2
4
37.0%
0
0
35.0%
0
0
33.0%
Enhancing Safety within Institutions
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 245,702
$ 22,423
$ 237,222
$ 27,141
$ 238,038
$ 25,716
Key Performance Indicators
Assaults on staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rate of assaults on correction officers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Stabbings/slashing incidents by inmate on inmate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cell phone/paraphernalia discoveries within secure perimeters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cell phone/paraphernalia discoveries outside secure perimeters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Weapon discoveries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Drug/paraphernalia discoveries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rate within secure population . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Inmate disciplines in the secure facilities population . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Rate of inmate disciplines within the secure population . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Inmate drug tests that were positive for controlled dangerous substance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
23
0.4%
7
77
114
50
15
0.1%
1,078
5.2%
1.4%
22
0.4%
0
75
105
45
13
0.1%
1,000
5.0%
1.1%
21
0.4%
0
73
100
45
11
0.1%
975
4.8%
1.1%
Managing NJ’s Inmates
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 214,769
$ 205,584
$ 206,374
Key Performance Indicators
Total inmate population . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DOC secured facilities population . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Secure general population housing occupancy rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Residential Community Release Program population . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
State inmates housed in county jails . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
24,394
21,311
98.4%
2,795
314
23,640
20,709
97.0%
2,695
196
23,495
20,478
97.0%
2,657
320
Expanding Inmate Health, Rehabilitation and Re--entry Services
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 250,901
$ 1,370
$ 256,875
$ 1,969
$ 261,494
$ 1,996
77.2%
89.9%
76.4%
77.6%
74.0%
77.4%
78.0%
90.0%
76.3%
75.0%
75.0%
80.0%
80.0%
95.0%
76.3%
75.0%
75.0%
80.0%
77.7%
73.3%
75.0%
75.0%
75.0%
75.0%
97.8%
84
97.0%
90
97.0%
100
Key Performance Indicators
Medical specialty consults completed within 60 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dental specialty consults completed within 60 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Corrections Offender Re--entry Preparation program completion rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cage Your Rage program completion rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Helping Offenders Parent Effectively/EPIC program completion rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Successful Transition And Re--entry Series/STARS program completion rate . . . . . . . . . . .
Successful Employment & Lawful Living Through Conflict Management/SEALL
program completion rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Thinking for a Change program completion rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Released inmates that received Fair Release And ReEntry Act kits in compliance with the
Fair Release and Re--entry Act of 2009 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Substance abuse program completions awarded . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
82
FY14 Citizens’ Guide: Core Mission Summaries
Actual
FY 2012
Performance
Target
FY 2013
Performance
Target
FY 2014
Making Academic & Educational Gains
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 16,233
$ 8,483
$ 16,503
$ 8,382
$ 16,535
$ 9,310
Key Performance Indicators
Total number of high school diplomas awarded . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
G.E.D. tests administered in institutions with passing scores . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Total number of Career Technical Education certificates earned . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Inmates eligible for mandatory education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Average number of inmates enrolled each month in mandatory education . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mandatory education enrollment rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Hours served monthly by education volunteers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
56
68.2%
3,557
2,529
1,311
66.5%
756
60
58.0%
3,700
3,441
1,350
75.0%
770
60
58.0%
3,800
3,500
1,375
77.0%
770
$ 29,580
$ 17,672
$ 27,049
$ 15,526
$ 29,449
$ 15,526
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Student Learning and Achievement
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Key Performance Indicators
Math assessment -- students proficient or advanced proficient . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Language assessment -- students proficient or advanced proficient . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Number of Advanced Placement tests taken . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Number of Advanced Placement tests scored three or higher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
High school graduation rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Priority schools implementing a high--quality curriculum approved by the State . . . . . . . . .
Schools implementing the State model curriculum & unit assessments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Notes:
(a) Development year
Educator Effectiveness
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Key Performance Indicators
Local Education Agencies completing core implementation requirements -- teacher
evaluation initial pilot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Local Education Agencies completing core implementation requirements -- teacher
evaluation expanded pilot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Local Education Agencies completing core implementation requirements -- teacher
evaluation non--pilot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Local Education Agencies completing core implementation requirements -- principal
evaluation initial pilot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Average number of days to complete teacher certification reviews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Notes:
(a) Development year
76.4%
69.6%
86,477
63,559
86.5%
------ (a)
------ (a)
81.8%
76.4%
90,000
65,700
87.5%
100.0%
------ (a)
83.6%
78.8%
93,500
67,320
88.5%
100.0%
20.0%
$ 675
$ 3,981
$ 675
$ 205
$ 675
$ 205
70.0%
90.0%
95.0%
------ (a)
75.0%
95.0%
------ (a)
90.0%
90.0%
------ (a)
28
75.0%
25
95.0%
23
Choice, Innovation and Community Engagement
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 33,826
$ 2,818
$ 43,854
$ 2,264
$ 67,104
$ 2,264
Key Performance Indicators
Number of students participating in Interdistrict Choice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1,192
3,357
6,000
83
FY14 Citizens’ Guide: Core Mission Summaries
District and School Performance and Efficiency
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Actual
FY 2012
Performance
Target
FY 2013
Performance
Target
FY 2014
$ 15,532
$ 16,264
$ 5,787
$ 20,696
$ 5,787
$ 20,696
Key Performance Indicators
Students with Individualized Education Plans graduating from high school with a regular
diploma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Students with Individualized Education Plans aged 6 through 21 served inside the regular
class 80% or more of the day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Number of schools with low graduation rates receiving State intervention . . . . . . . . . . . . .
74.0%
74.7%
75.5%
48.0%
40
48.0%
42
49.0%
40
Responsiveness and Service
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 28,305
$ 26,301
$ 27,106
Key Performance Indicators
Districts receiving 80% or higher on all five Quality Single Accountability Continuum
District performance reviews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NJ SMART inquiries returned within 24 hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
80.0%
99.6%
81.0%
100.0%
82.0%
100.0%
School Finance
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 10,988,830
$ 826,676
$ 11,661,587
$ 791,670
$ 12,351,632
$ 793,148
Key Performance Indicators
School and other capital project long range facilities plans approved . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Discretionary grants contracts awarded annually . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Entitlement grants contracts awarded annually . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Total federal grant dollars administered (in millions) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Federal grant dollars returned to federal government . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
842
137
3,305
$ 861
0.29%
800
140
3,326
$ 800
0.01%
800
140
2,982
$ 800
0.01%
$ 243,992
$ 60,993
$ 199,157
$ 211,031
$ 210,617
$ 206,076
15,437
15,333
14,833
58
333
30
350
30
350
636
750
750
------ (a)
85.0%
85.0%
------ (a)
------ (a)
1,200
75.0%
1,200
75.0%
52
90
90
52
90
90
40
45
45
DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
Protecting the Land, Air and Waters of New Jersey
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Key Performance Indicators
Site Remediation Program
Active site remediation cases (fiscal year average) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Total average review time (in calendar days) for inspection/review of Licensed Site
Remediation Professionals documents (monthly average) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cases with final remediation documents issued (monthly average) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Compliance and Enforcement
Total number of sites participating in Environmental Stewardship Program . . . . . . . . . .
Compliance rate, the percentage of inspected facilities by C&E where no violations
were observed (monthly average) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Number of person--hours of compliance assistance training to help prevent violations
before they occur (quarterly average) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Percent of reported incidents responded to within two days (quarterly average) . . . . . . .
Land Use Management
Total average review time (in calendar days) to issue a Coastal Area Facility Review
Act General Permit decision (monthly average) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Total average review time (in calendar days) to issue a Waterfront Development
General Permit decision (monthly average) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Total average review time (in calendar days) to issue a Flood Hazard Area General
Permit decision (monthly average) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
84
FY14 Citizens’ Guide: Core Mission Summaries
Performance
Target
FY 2013
Actual
FY 2012
Total average review time (in calendar days) to issue a General Land Use Permit for
Coastal Area Facility Review, Waterfront, Development, or Flood Hazard Area
(monthly average) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Total average review time (in calendar days) to issue a Freshwater Wetlands General
Permit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Number of Tideland licenses processed (monthly average) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Total average review time (in calendar days) to process Tideland licenses (monthly
average) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Environmental Management
Days where air quality is deemed unhealthy for sensitive groups (monthly average) . . .
Air Quality permit activities completed (monthly average) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Air Quality permit activities completed on time (monthly average) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Homes tested for radon (monthly average) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Water Resources Management
Samples collected for shellfish sanitation compliance (monthly average) . . . . . . . . . . . .
Samples collected to determine coastal beach water quality (seasonal average) . . . . . . .
Number of freshwater network samples collected for water quality standards
compliance (by calendar year) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Percentage of freshwater monitoring networks completed (by calendar year) . . . . . . . .
Pounds of phosphorus prevented per year from entering waterbodies statewide due to
Americorps NJ Watershed Ambassadors Program cleanups (quarterly) . . . . . . . . . . . .
Total Department average review time (in days) to issue a Treatment Works Approval
(TWA) permit decision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Percent of New Jersey Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NJPDES) surface water
and groundwater discharge permits that are current (monthly) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Municipal Stormwater --Tons of sediment, solids and trash prevented per year from
entering waterbodies statewide due to stormwater infrastructure maintenance
(annual) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Environmental Infrastructure Financing Program monthly project outlays (in millions) .
Number of Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) outfall points for which draft
NJPDES--CSO permits containing updated requirements have been issued (annual) .
Percentage of all combined sewer overflow outfall points with improved signage and
improved public notification process of overflow events has been implemented
(annual) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Total Department average review time (in days) to process a Water Allocation Permit . .
Violations of the primary safe drinking water standards (monthly average) . . . . . . . . . . .
48
Performance
Target
FY 2014
55
55
146
------ (a)
180
50
180
50
------ (a)
60
60
3.0
------ (a)
------ (a)
3,519
1.4
240
220
3,386
1.4
240
220
3,386
1,316
867
1,250
850
1,250
850
------ (a)
------ (a)
1,552
100.0%
1,552
100.0%
------ (a)
40
40
------ (a)
90
90
------ (a)
100.0%
100.0%
------ (a)
------ (a)
300,000
$30
300,000
$30
------ (a)
37
37
------ (a)
------ (a)
52
20.0%
465
34
20.0%
465
34
$ 106,435
$ 36,049
$ 110,193
$ 83,154
$ 112,788
$ 73,275
18,200,000
17,176
4,943
18,000,000
14,657
5,822
18,000,000
14,657
5,822
------ (a)
200
200
------ (a)
167
167
(a)
500,000
10,416
500
3,000
500,000
10,416
500
3,000
Notes:
(a) Establishing baseline
Managing Our Natural and Historic Resources
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Key Performance Indicators
Natural and Historic Resources
State parks and forests -- total visitors (annual) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Freshwater fishing licenses sold (monthly average) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Overnight stays in State parks and campsites (monthly average) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
State Park Police: public service contacts (i.e. campsite checks, outreach programs, etc.)
which is indicative of a community policing approach (monthly average) . . . . . . . . .
NJ Forest Fire Service -- number of new wildfires on public or private lands suppressed
(monthly average) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Division of Fish and Wildlife -- number of individual anglers registered with the New
Jersey Saltwater Recreational Registry Program (annual) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Division of Fish and Wildlife -- number of hunting licenses sold (monthly average) . . . .
Division of Fish and Wildlife -- number of black bear calls received (annual) . . . . . . . . .
Division of Fish and Wildlife -- acres of forest habitat actively managed (annual) . . . . .
85
---------------------
(a)
(a)
(a)
FY14 Citizens’ Guide: Core Mission Summaries
Actual
FY 2012
Division of Fish and Wildlife -- acres of early successional habitat restored (i.e.
mowing, burning, tilling, hydroaxing, etc.) (annual) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Endangered and Nongame Species Program -- percentage of listed (endangered or
threatened) species for which populations are stable or increasing (annual) . . . . . . . .
NJ Historic Preservation Office -- number of cultural resources added to inventory
(annual) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Division of Fish and Wildlife Conservation Officers -- public contacts (general public,
sporting public & commercial fishermen) (monthly average) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Coastal Engineering/Beach Replenishment -- linear feet of shore protection, including
beach replenishment projects and other storm damage reduction construction
activities (annual) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dam Safety and Flood Control -- number of dam inspections determined by the hazard
rating of the dams (annual) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Preserved open space acres (monthly average) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Performance
Target
FY 2013
Performance
Target
FY 2014
------ (a)
5,000
5,000
------ (a)
100.0%
100.0%
------ (a)
1,100
1,100
------ (a)
5,000
5,000
------ (a)
57,600
57,600
------ (a)
427
400
509
400
509
$ 170
$1
$ 151
$ 25
$ 151
$ 23
38
34
34
15
10.0
15
10.5
15
10.5
5.0
3.2
3.2
56
17.9
------ (a)
------ (a)
61
30.0
100
110
61
30.0
100
110
------ (a)
------ (a)
------ (a)
28
800
80
28
800
80
------ (a)
20
20
3
------ (a)
3
2
3
2
13,198
11,000
11,000
99.1%
97.0%
97.0%
60
62.2%
84
65.0%
84
65.0%
Notes:
(a) Establishing baseline
Supporting Economic Growth
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Key Performance Indicators
Permit Coordination
Projects (resulting in less than 50 jobs) receiving consulting help from the new
permitting coordination unit (monthly average) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Projects (resulting in greater than 50 jobs) receiving consulting help from the new
permitting coordination unit (monthly average) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pre--application meetings held (monthly average) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
State and federal reviews facilitated and responded to, pursuant to Executive Order 215
and National Environmental Policy Act (monthly average) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sustainability and Green Energy
Outreach, referral and technical assistance activities held for small businesses (monthly
average) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Growing green industry -- solar development on brownfields in megawatts (annual) . . .
In--state generation of clean and renewable energy -- electricity in megawatts (quarterly)
Green and Clean Energy -- number of permits for geothermal energy (quarterly) . . . . . .
Green and Clean Energy -- number of filling stations for compressed natural gas
vehicles (annual) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Green and Clean Energy --number of electric vehicles sold in NJ (annual) . . . . . . . . . . .
Green and Clean Energy -- number of charging stations for electric vehicles (annual) . .
Number of individuals trained for green jobs through the Office of Sustainability and
Green Energy programs (quarterly) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Alternative Dispute Resolution
Disputes received for alternative dispute resolution (monthly average) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Number of cases closed using alternate dispute resolution (quarterly average) . . . . . . . .
Records Access (OPRA)
Open Public Records Act requests received by the Department (annual) . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Open Public Records Act requests received through the Department’s online submittal
process (annual) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Information Technology
Electronic submittal services for permits, registrations, and reports available (monthly
average) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Permits, registrations, and reports received electronically . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Notes:
(a) Establishing baseline
86
FY14 Citizens’ Guide: Core Mission Summaries
Actual
FY 2012
Performance
Target
FY 2013
Performance
Target
FY 2014
DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH
Delivery of Public Health Services
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 197,777
$ 526,692
$ 197,535
$ 615,797
$ 227,629
$ 622,974
Key Performance Indicators
Uninsured visits to Federally Qualified Health Centers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Women, Infant, and Children program participants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Children evaluated for eligibility under Early Intervention Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Eligible children receiving Early Intervention Program services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AIDS clients tested and counseled . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
AIDS Drug Distribution Program clients served . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Breast and cervical cancer visits under NJ Cancer Education and Early Detection Program
Lab tests performed by the Public Health and Environmental Health Programs . . . . . . . . .
Newborns screened for metabolic disorders and referred for follow--up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
605,581
294,385
16,366
22,395
102,560
7,806
20,210
5,209,119
5,376
621,838
303,000
15,688
22,753
103,000
7,500
23,400
5,608,000
5,600
628,054
305,000
16,000
22,753
103,000
7,800
23,400
5,300,000
6,000
Optimizing Health Quality, Licensing and Oversight
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 188,845
$ 851,223
$ 136,696
$ 902,929
$ 143,261
$ 893,604
Key Performance Indicators
Targeted Facilities Inspected
Nursing homes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Other long term care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Acute care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
371
189
67
372
203
84
372
203
84
Number of Targeted Complaints Investigated
All long term care (nursing homes and other LTC) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Acute care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1,832
565
2,329
1,050
2,329
1,050
Number of vital documents issued . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
215,663
243,355
274,603
$1,067,365
$ 530,820
$1,040,327
$ 545,363
$1,080,477
$ 586,497
585
568
551
84
125
140
$ 355,275
$ 384,370
$ 422,076
135
278
234
107
100
100
DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES
Olmstead and Services that Promote Community Integration
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Key Performance Indicators
Division of Developmental Disabilities
Consumers residing in 100% State--funded, out--of--state facilities. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Consumers moved from institutions to community residential placements in order to
comply with Olmstead requirement that services be provided in the least restrictive
setting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Federal Community Care Waiver revenues earned to offset State costs for community
placements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Division of Mental Health and Addiction Services
New community placements created to discharge consumers in the State hospitals
including those on conditional extension pending placement (CEPP) status. . . . . . . .
New community placements created for individuals diagnosed with mental illness who
are at risk of hospitalization or at risk of homelessness. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
87
FY14 Citizens’ Guide: Core Mission Summaries
Actual
FY 2012
Services that Promote Economic Independence
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Performance
Target
FY 2013
Performance
Target
FY 2014
$ 123,137
$ 265,724
$ 102,938
$ 317,367
$ 118,016
$ 319,935
39,851
40,000
40,000
98.5%
100%
100%
0.56
0.59
0.59
Division of Family Development
WorkFirst NJ/Temporary Assistance for Needy Families work participation rate
(includes school participation rate). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
18.8%
18.8%
18.8%
Services that Ensure the Safety Net
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 1,105,525
$ 890,045
$ 1,047,457
$ 981,025
$ 1,031,296
$ 1,012,213
Key Performance Indicators
Division of Developmental Disabilities
Developmental center census . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2,434
2,226
2,050
Division of Mental Health and Addiction Services
Psychiatric hospital census by end of fiscal year . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1,656
1,525
1,435
Division of Family Development
Performance level of child support collections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
General Assistance cases reviewed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cases closed or denied based on review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cash assistance savings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Emergency assistance savings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
65.1%
10,920
594
$ 531,321
$ 357,941
65.8%
20,000
1,000
$ 901,380
$ 571,356
66.5%
24,000
1,200
$ 1,084,968
$ 701,250
Services that Promote the Availability of Health Care
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 4,591,458
$ 4,520,073
$ 4,262,794
$ 5,637,132
$ 4,216,190
$ 6,647,363
Key Performance Indicators
Division of Aging Services
Global Options program participants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Medicaid--funded residents in nursing homes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Clients in home and community based options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
11,700
28,822
31.5%
13,000
27,000
33%
13,500
26,500
34%
Key Performance Indicators
Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired
Persons screened for visual problems by the Commission for the Blind and Visually
Impaired. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired clients who exit vocational
rehabilitation programs into employment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ratio of the average hourly wage earnings of all Commission for the Blind and Visually
Impaired clients in competitive employment to the average hourly earnings of all
employed individuals in the state. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Healthcare Effectiveness Data & Information Set performance measures for NJ Medicaid/FamilyCare managed care populations
Children receiving immunizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
66%
67%
Children receiving a blood lead screening test . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
80%
81%
Children receiving a well visit within the first 15 months of life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
67%
68%
Children receiving a well visit between ages 3 to 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
79%
80%
Women receiving timely prenatal care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
83%
84%
Women receiving timely postpartum care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
58%
59%
Clients served in NJ Personal Preference Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1,964
2,600
Medicaid/FamilyCare enrollment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1,298,183
1,318,151
Managed Care enrollment -- % of Managed Care eligible Medicaid/FamilyCare
participants enrolled in Managed Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
89.9%
90.0%
Children enrolled in FamilyCare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
180,726
181,815
88
68%
82%
69%
81%
85%
60%
3,200
1,328,499
90.0%
183,666
FY14 Citizens’ Guide: Core Mission Summaries
Actual
FY 2012
Performance
Target
FY 2013
Performance
Target
FY 2014
$ 9,578
------
$ 9,595
$ 477
$ 9,595
$ 477
99.2%
99.9%
99.9%
100.0%
100.0%
100.0%
100.0%
100.0%
100.0%
853
379
84.6%
100
300
100.0%
50
300
100.0%
$ 9,495
------
$ 6,066
$ 1,919
$ 6,066
$ 1,919
137
5.6%
120
10.0%
115
8.50%
2.0%
50.0%
70.0%
25.0%
55.0%
75.0%
1.3
1.2
1.0
Appeals & Regulatory Affairs
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 3,885
------
$ 3,219
$ 229
$ 3,219
$ 229
Key Performance Indicators
Complete more written records appeals, including those in a backlog status, than received
in the current month . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pending written record appeals aged greater than six months . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
117.0%
28.6%
115.0%
30.0%
115.0%
30.0%
Workforce Development
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 97,963
$ 209,816
$ 80,446
$ 287,593
$ 79,996
$ 287,593
Key Performance Indicators
Workforce Investment Act (WIA)
Adult participants who entered employment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adult participants’ six month average earnings of those who entered employment . . . . .
84.3%
$ 12,435
79.3%
$ 12,463
81.9%
$ 12,303
WIA Dislocated Workers
Participants who entered employment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Six month average earnings of those who entered employment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
83.6%
$ 17,508
79.8%
$ 15,869
82.3%
$ 18,390
WIA Youth (age 14 - 21)
Participants who have attained a high school degree or a GED certificate . . . . . . . . . . . .
Participants who entered employment or continued their education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
75.6%
66.6%
59.0%
59.0%
77.2%
65.2%
CIVIL SERVICE COMMISSION
Classification & Personnel Management
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Key Performance Indicators
Final layoff plans reviewed and approved within 30 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
State government certifications issued within 10 business days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Local government certifications issued within 5 business days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
State and local government titles consolidated or eliminated (largely completed during
FY2012) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pending classification appeals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Percentage of classification appeals completed within 180 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Selection Services
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Key Performance Indicators
Calendar days from job announcement to list issuance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Job announcements older than six months as a percentage of all active announcements . . .
Open Competitive job announcements accepting applications via the Online Application
System only . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Promotional job announcements accepting applications via the Online Application System
only . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Average number of minutes a caller remains in the queue until connected to a call center
employee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
DEPARTMENT OF LABOR
89
FY14 Citizens’ Guide: Core Mission Summaries
Actual
FY 2012
Performance
Target
FY 2013
Performance
Target
FY 2014
Employment Services
Participants who entered employment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Six month average earnings of those who entered employment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
45.0%
$ 16,435
43.0%
$ 14,810
45.0%
$ 16,435
WorkFirst New Jersey
Participants who entered employment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
39.0%
40.0%
41.0%
Vocational Rehabilitation Services
Average increase in the hourly rate of pay for those individuals who enter employment .
$ 10.48
$ 10.69
$ 10.69
Income Security
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 39,457
$ 200,034
$ 37,410
$ 285,036
$ 37,410
$ 285,036
Key Performance Indicators
Disability Determinations Services
Days to process a case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Processed cases deemed accurate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
95
96%
85
97%
85
97%
Unemployment Insurance
Cases receiving first payment within 21 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--monetary determinations decided within 21 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
82.8%
61.9%
87%
80%
87%
80%
6.7%
11.2%
45.6%
60%
80%
95%
60%
80%
95%
57
40
40
Unemployment Insurance Call Centers
Average wait time to speak to an agent (in minutes/seconds) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Initial claims filed online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Continued claims filed online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Percentage of initial claims filed without agent assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Time to process initial claims handled by agents (in days) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
21.53
53%
58%
51%
5
18.00
55%
70%
55%
5
17.30
60%
72%
60%
5
Temporary Disability Insurance
Cases in which eligibility was determined within 14 days of receipt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cases in which eligibility was determined within 28 days of receipt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
64%
87%
70%
90%
70%
90%
Family Leave Claims
Claims in which eligibility was determined within 14 days of receipt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Claims in which eligibility was determined within 28 days of receipt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
77%
92%
69%
88%
69%
88%
Workers’ Compensation
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 25,099
$ 185,335
$ 15,194
$ 183,625
$ 15,194
$ 184,491
Key Performance Indicators
Workers’ Compensation
Emergent medical treatment disputes resolved within 30 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--emergent issues resolved within 60 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
100%
68%
100%
75%
100%
75%
Benefits Appeals
Appellate Tribunal (Lower Level Appeals)
Decisions within 30 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Decisions within 45 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Decisions within 90 days . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Board of Review (Upper Level Appeals)
Average age (in days) of active cases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
90
FY14 Citizens’ Guide: Core Mission Summaries
Actual
FY 2012
Performance
Target
FY 2013
Performance
Target
FY 2014
Labor Standards and Safety Enforcement
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 14,441
$ 3,136
$ 3,723
$ 16,143
$ 4,285
$ 16,491
Key Performance Indicators
Asbestos Control and Licensing
Work sites inspected for asbestos abatement and contractors’, workers’, and
supervisors’ compliance with licensing requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2,595
2,760
2,760
Public Safety
Crane Inspections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mine Inspections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Explosive Inspections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Retail Gasoline Inspections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fireworks Inspections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
187
749
1,891
144
36
120
750
1,900
144
36
132
750
1,920
144
36
Public Employees Occupational Safety & Health (PEOSH)
Complaints investigated within five days as negotiated with OSHA as part of an
approved State Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
100%
100%
100%
On- Site Consultation & Training
Health and safety consultation visits to public sector employers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Health and safety consultation visits to private sector employers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Workforce Development Program Occupational Safety Training --number of training
sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
54
447
54
528
54
600
366
300
300
Boiler and Pressure Vessel Compliance
Boilers or pressure vessels inspected . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
25,893
26,160
27,600
Wage and Hour Compliance
Inspections triggered by a worker complaint that are completed within 90 days . . . . . . .
94%
93%
93%
Public Works Contractor Registration
Applications processed within 30 days of receipt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
98%
98%
98%
Public Safety
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 315,240
$ 57,503
$ 321,321
$ 38,966
$ 320,092
$ 25,156
Key Performance Indicators
State Police Uniformed Patrol
Motor vehicle accident responses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fatalities under State Police jurisdiction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fatalities suspected to be related to drugs/alcohol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Consent search/search warrant arrests resulting from traffic stops . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Controlled dangerous substance arrests resulting from traffic stops . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Driving while intoxicated arrests resulting from traffic stops . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Bench warrant arrests resulting from traffic stops . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
39,782
179
48
0.6%
0.7%
1.3%
2.0%
40,000
175
40
0.6%
0.7%
1.3%
2.0%
40,000
170
40
0.7%
0.8%
1.5%
2.2%
State Police Investigations Branch
Total arrests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fugitive arrests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gang member arrests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2,647
954
167
2,500
975
200
2,500
975
200
LAW AND PUBLIC SAFETY
91
FY14 Citizens’ Guide: Core Mission Summaries
Actual
FY 2012
Performance
Target
FY 2013
Performance
Target
FY 2014
Forensic/Drug Analysis/DNA Testing
Average time to complete a DNA analysis (days) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Average time to complete a trace case (days) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Average time to complete a toxicology case (days) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Average time to complete a drug case (days) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
62
138
35
43
30
60
30
15
30
60
30
15
Office of Law Enforcement Professional Standards
State Police public monitoring reports filed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
9
7
7
1,503
623
1,600
650
1,750
700
90.0%
95.0%
95.0%
6
13,520
7
15,700
8
17,000
--
100
200
Emergency Management
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 24,756
$ 91,014
$ 22,974
$ 29,700
$ 22,974
$ 31,500
Key Performance Indicators
Disasters
Hours spent on preparedness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Exercises/drills performed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Deployments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12,996
35
221
13,000
36
225
13,000
36
250
Services To The State
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 101,123
------
$ 96,746
------
$ 95,073
$ 500
Key Performance Indicators
Litigation resolved without need of trial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Litigation filed by the State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
97.2%
14,604
97.5%
14,600
97.5%
14,600
Services To The Public
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 148,086
$ 26,825
$ 47,742
$ 60,670
$ 47,742
$ 52,878
Key Performance Indicators
Bureau of Securities
Average response time to an investor from a complaint (days) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Total registrations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Broker/dealers registrations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Investment advisers registrations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Broker dealer agents registrations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Investment adviser representatives registrations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
7
41,650
0.4%
1.2%
90.8%
7.6%
6
41,600
0.4%
1.0%
91.0%
7.6%
5.5
41,600
0.4%
1.0%
91.0%
7.6%
Professional Boards
License renewals conducted on--line . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
98.3%
99.0%
100.0%
Criminal Justice
Criminal investigations -- newly opened . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Criminal prosecutions -- newly initiated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Conviction rate -- newly initiated criminal prosecutions (against criminal prosecutions
closed) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Medical Examiner Services
Counties using the State Toxicology Lab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Law enforcement drug tests performed at the State Toxicology Lab . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--law enforcement drug tests performed at the State Toxicology Lab (program
began January of FY 2012) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
92
FY14 Citizens’ Guide: Core Mission Summaries
Gaming
Number of revenue certification audits completed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gaming inspections -- slot machines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Field inspections -- slot machines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Actual
FY 2012
Performance
Target
FY 2013
Performance
Target
FY 2014
135
77,222
24.0%
144
75,000
20.0%
144
75,000
20.0%
$ 1,656
$ 1,589
$ 1,589
123
3,343
155
3,500
120
3,200
$ 5,027
$ 2,106
$ 2,106
$352,918,031
$ 72,555
$379,055,270
------
$191,333,517
------
$ 6,536
$ 26,393
$ 5,216
$ 31,369
$ 5,145
$ 28,850
99.1%
106%
32,866
112,612
214
188
100%
100%
30,000
102,000
200
180
100%
100%
23,800
86,250
200
180
$ 10,920
$ 1,087
$ 10,329
$ 1,431
$ 10,419
$ 3,438
4,014
19,020
18,263
new
88%
3,063
4,100
21,900
18,485
100%
100%
3,000
4,100
21,900
18,485
100%
100%
3,000
$ 76,473
$ 12,001
$ 78,429
$ 10,900
$ 78,230
$ 10,668
97%
50.3%
96%
31.8%
96%
102%
100%
50%
100%
30%
100%
100%
100%
50%
100%
30%
100%
100%
HOMELAND SECURITY AND PREPAREDNESS
Counter--Terrorism Operations
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Key Performance Indicators
Training programs to law enforcement, first responders and private sector . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Number of new user accounts into NJ Learn (Learning Management System) . . . . . . . . . .
State Preparedness
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Key Performance Indicators
Total federal grant dollars managed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Total grant dollars returned to the federal government . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MILITARY AND VETERANS’ AFFAIRS
National Guard Support Services
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Key Performance Indicators
Assigned strength, NJ Army National Guard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Assigned strength, NJ Air National Guard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Military use days, NJ Joint Training Center at Sea Girt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Other use days, NJ Joint Training Center at Sea Girt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
NJ Youth ChalleNGe Academy Cadet graduations per class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Academic credentials awarded per class . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Veterans’ Outreach and Assistance
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Key Performance Indicators
Total State Veteran services provided . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Total number of Veteran transportation rides . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PTSD counseling sessions conducted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Veterans Haven (North) occupancy rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Veterans Haven (South) occupancy rate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Burial services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Domiciliary and Treatment Services
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Key Performance Indicators
Occupancy rate, Menlo Veterans Military Home . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Approved waiting list, Menlo Veterans Military Home . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Occupancy rate, Paramus Veterans Military Home . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Approved waiting list, Paramus Veterans Military Home . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Occupancy rate, Vineland Veterans Military Home . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Approved waiting list, Vineland Veterans Military Home . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
93
FY14 Citizens’ Guide: Core Mission Summaries
Actual
FY 2012
Performance
Target
FY 2013
Performance
Target
FY 2014
State Approving Agency Services
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
-----$ 583
$ 15
$ 600
$ 15
$ 600
Key Performance Indicators
Program approvals granted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1,106
560
560
Economic Vitality -- The Partnership for Action
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 14,022
$4
$ 13,893
$ 650
$ 13,893
$ 300
Key Performance Indicators
Companies assisted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Business proposals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Business people assisted by the Business Call Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tourism destination marketing organization grants awarded . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tourism cooperative marketing applications received . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tourism cooperative marketing grants awarded . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Tourism economic impact ($ billions) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
20,324
178
35,365
16
90
37
40
27,735
137
39,334
16
90
36
40
15,000
130
32,000
16
90
36
43
Cultural and Historical Programs
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 25,457
$ 2,724
$ 24,101
$ 900
$ 25,101
$ 900
Key Performance Indicators
Council on Arts, Historical Commission, Cultural Trust
Grant applications received . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Grants awarded . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Technical assistance and outreach sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
231
355
635
296
235
140
350
290
200
State Museum
Visitors to State Museum & Planetarium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Educational programs conducted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
104,609
231
108,000
400
110,000
400
State Archives
Research and reference requests answered (Archives) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
87,070
84,000
84,000
Civic Engagement Responsibilities
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 11,705
$ 5,461
$ 11,893
$ 6,150
$ 11,893
$ 5,225
Key Performance Indicators
Elections
Voter registrations received . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Voter education training and outreach sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Accessible polling places . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
231,835
184
3,548
260,000
100
3,548
260,000
100
3,548
Division of Programs
Grant applications received . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Grants awarded . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Technical assistance and outreach sessions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
National service/volunteer participants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
289
79
339
548
234
92
200
400
260
101
200
506
DEPARTMENT OF STATE
94
FY14 Citizens’ Guide: Core Mission Summaries
Actual
FY 2012
Performance
Target
FY 2013
Performance
Target
FY 2014
DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION
State of Good Repair and Safety
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 429,741
$ 818,223
$ 528,907
$ 1,093,465
$ 569,982
$ 1,068,813
0.72
3.42
53%
89%
87%
38.3
2.5
18%
0.70
3.30
56%
89%
88%
48.0
2.0
15%
0.70
3.00
59%
90%
89%
48.0
2.0
15%
74%
76%
76%
Local Aid
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 235,479
$ 354,866
$ 200,737
$ 338,785
$ 236,752
$ 421,496
Key Performance Indicators
Competitive municipal aid grants awarded by municipalities within 18 months (calendar
year) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
County aid funds awarded by counties within 36 months (calendar year) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
94%
59%
90%
90%
90%
90%
Program Delivery
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 192,113
$ 336,211
$ 137,250
$ 220,005
$ 160,731
$ 208,942
Key Performance Indicators
Planned construction projects that have been awarded . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Average department bill processing time frame for capital payments (in days) . . . . . . . . . .
100%
35
95%
40
95%
40
Transportation Services
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 150,064
$ 132,386
$ 200,868
$ 341,260
$ 237,868
$ 316,075
Key Performance Indicators
Average State highway incident duration (in minutes) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Number of tons of trash picked up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
43
4,333
49
4,300
49
4,300
Improve Driver and Vehicle Safety
Appropriations ($000s)
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 109,792
$ 110,687
$ 128,741
Key Performance Indicators
Completion rate of those individuals scheduled to attend Probationary Driver
Improvement Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Completion rate of licensed motorcyclists who have passed a certified rider safety course.
Average number of bus safety inspections per person (daily rate) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Wait time for an emissions inspection at an MVC inspection lane (minutes) . . . . . . . . . . . .
68%
8%
4.3
9.3
70%
10%
5.0
5.0
100%
10%
7.0
5.0
Key Performance Indicators
Traffic fatalities per 100 million vehicle miles traveled (calendar year) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Traffic crashes per million vehicle miles traveled (calendar year) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
State highway pavement in acceptable condition (calendar year) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
State--owned bridges 20 feet or more in length in acceptable condition (calendar year) . . .
State--owned bridge deck area in acceptable condition (calendar year) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Average response time for non--emergency pothole repair (in hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Average response time for emergency pothole repair (in hours) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Traffic signals inspected needing repair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Crew responses within 90 minutes to electrical operations emergencies such as traffic
signal failures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MOTOR VEHICLE COMMISSION
95
FY14 Citizens’ Guide: Core Mission Summaries
Actual
FY 2012
Performance
Target
FY 2013
Performance
Target
FY 2014
Service Delivery Levels - Driver Testing
To receive a scheduled road test for a class D driver license (calendar days) . . . . . . . . . .
To receive a scheduled road test for a CDL driver license (calendar days) . . . . . . . . . . . .
To receive a scheduled road test for a motorcycle driver license (calendar days) . . . . . . .
17.0
41.0
9.0
10.0
30.0
10.0
10.0
5.0
10.0
Service Delivery Levels - Correspondence Response Times
To speak with a representative for general information (minutes) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To speak with a representative for surcharge processing (minutes) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To receive a response from an email (business days) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
To receive a response from a letter (business days) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Medical review cases backlogged over three weeks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.5
13.8
1.0
10.0
16%
1.0
5.0
1.0
10.0
10%
1.0
5.0
1.0
10.0
10%
Improve Customer Identification and Document Security
Appropriations ($000s)
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 160,576
$ 169,397
$ 200,794
Key Performance Indicators
Percent of major stakeholders trained in fraud/forgery prevention (goal is five classes per
month) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
175%
100%
100%
Service Delivery Levels
Registrations conducted online . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Registrations conducted at local agency offices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Registrations conducted through the mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Registrations conducted by third party vendors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
25%
30.9%
42.6%
1.5%
60%
10%
28%
2%
60%
10%
28%
2%
Improve Financial Sustainability
Appropriations ($000s)
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 26,682
$ 26,935
$ 11,952
Key Performance Indicators
Total federal grant dollars awarded (in millions) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Percent of processed data inquiries which are paid for by the State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$4.1
58.9%
$1.0
10%
$1.0
10%
Assure Safe Utility Service Delivery
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 4,975
$ 535
$ 5,279
$ 206
$ 5,279
$ 206
Key Performance Indicators
Utility damages per 1,000 markout requests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
2.90
2.80
2.80
Assure Reliable Utility Service Delivery
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 4,975
$ 535
$ 5,279
$ 206
$ 5,279
$ 206
$1,060
1,225
$1,070
1,250
$1,070
1,250
2.10
2.20
2.20
BOARD OF PUBLIC UTILITIES
Key Performance Indicators
Dollars spent per customer on pipeline infrastructure replacements and improvements . . . .
Average number of customers restored per hour per major outage event . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Number of pipeline inspections per 100 miles of main and transmission pipelines in
service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
96
FY14 Citizens’ Guide: Core Mission Summaries
Actual
FY 2012
Performance
Target
FY 2013
Performance
Target
FY 2014
Promote Affordable Utility Service
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 70,261
$ 535
$ 70,967
$ 207
$ 70,967
$ 207
Key Performance Indicators
Average monthly N.J. residential gas bill -- ($/therm) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Average monthly N.J. residential electric bill -- ($/kwh) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Average monthly N.J. residential water bill -- ($/month) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$1.41
$0.18
$48.00
$1.30
$0.17
$48.50
$1.30
$0.17
$48.50
Provide Effective Customer Service
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 4,975
$ 535
$ 5,263
$ 207
$ 5,263
$ 207
Key Performance Indicators
Number of complaints filed -- all utilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Number of complaints received -- cable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1,760
450
1,600
445
1,600
445
Promote Clean Energy Sources
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 3,484
$ 6,069
$ 3,877
$ 5,267
$ 3,877
$ 5,267
4
10
10
438
566
566
346,000
1,506,000
1,506,000
152,000
649,000
649,000
Advancing Job Creation and Retention Incentives to Grow Businesses in New Jersey
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 174,983
$ 172,482
$ 185,075
Key Performance Indicators
Amount of assistance provided through approved applications in millions . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Public/private investment leveraged in billions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$333.30
$1.20
$420.00
$1.25
$420.00
$1.25
Providing Financing to Small and Mid--Sized Businesses and Not--for--Profits
Appropriations ($000s)
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 32,000
$ 49,000
n/a
Key Performance Indicators
Amount of assistance provided through approved applications (in millions) . . . . . . . . . . . .
Public/private investment leveraged (in billions) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$237.80
$366.60
$60
$450
n/a
n/a
Supporting Redevelopment Projects that Revitalize Communities and Stimulate the
Economy
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 7,666
$ 21,713
$ 18,449
Key Performance Indicators
New jobs on Fort Monmouth property by end of calendar year 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
30
150
150
Key Performance Indicators
State facility energy audits updated or completed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Number of NJ municipalities utilizing BPU funds (Clean Energy and/or ARRA) to
implement energy efficiency programs or renewable energy projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Gas savings achieved through Office of Clean Energy Residential, Commercial and
Industrial Energy Efficiency programs (as of 9/2011) in decatherms (Dth) by calendar
year. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Electric savings achieved through Office of Clean Energy Residential, Commercial and
Industrial Energy Efficiency programs (as of 9/2011) in megawatt hours (Mwh) by
calendar year. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY
97
FY14 Citizens’ Guide: Core Mission Summaries
Actual
FY 2012
Performance
Target
FY 2013
Performance
Target
FY 2014
Providing Entrepreneurial Development through Training and Mentoring Programs
Appropriations ($000s)
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 350
$ 300
n/a
Key Performance Indicators
Number of clients counseled through partners . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
6,498
4,500
n/a
(a) The NJEDA operates on a calendar year, rather than on the State’s fiscal year. As a result, Actual fiscal year 2012 numbers shown are actuals for calendar year
2012. Performance Targets for fiscal year 2013 are Performance Targets for calendar 2013.
DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY
Revenue Generation (including Cost Management)
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 146,009
$ 8,212
$ 111,733
$ 12,508
$ 105,765
$ 12,508
Key Performance Indicators
Number of audit completions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Average deposit turnaround in business days (Revenue) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
142,838
2
134,461
2
128,531
2
Actual cash collections net of refunds expressed as percentages of forecast
Gross Income Tax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Sales Tax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Corporation Business Tax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Lottery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
+/-- 1%
+/-- 1%
+/-- 1%
+/-- 1%
+/-- 1%
+/-- 1%
+/-- 1%
+/-- 1%
+/-- 1%
+/-- 1%
+/-- 1%
+/-- 1%
Accuracy of New Jersey economic forecast variance between projection and actual for the calendar year
Personal income growth to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
+/-- 1%
Employment growth to date . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
+/-- 1%
Unemployment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
+/-- 1%
+/-- 1%
+/-- 1%
+/-- 1%
+/-- 1%
+/-- 1%
+/-- 1%
Asset Management
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 34,940
$ 22,258
$ 40,784
$ 21,791
$ 39,497
$ 21,791
Key Performance Indicators
Difference between pension fund return and benchmark (Investments) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Injury rate per employee (Risk Management) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Amount reunited with owner (Unclaimed Property) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
+1%
8.2%
$82,000,000
+1%
7.5%
$84,000,000
+1%
7.5%
$95,000,000
Services to the Public or Local Government Entities
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 29,121
$ 43,660
$ 33,859
$ 46,545
$ 32,476
$ 46,545
Key Performance Indicators
Call centers customer service levels (% answered vs. received)
Taxation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Pensions & Benefits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Revenue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
64%
66%
92%
67%
70%
92%
70%
75%
92%
Pension member payments disbursed through electronic funds transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Business formation/registrations and amended filings processed electronically . . . . . . . . . .
85%
75%
90%
80%
95%
80%
98
FY14 Citizens’ Guide: Core Mission Summaries
Actual
FY 2012
Performance
Target
FY 2013
Performance
Target
FY 2014
Statewide Support Service
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 39,559
$ 2,063
$ 37,666
$ 3,837
$ 33,784
$ 3,837
Key Performance Indicators
Procurement Awards affirmed after protest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cost per printed impression by the State Print Shop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Cost per printed copy by the State Print Shop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Monthly cost per State--owned vehicle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Revenue deposited through electronic funds transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
91%
$0.07
$0.06
$368
70%
90%
$0.08
$0.05
$368
75%
90%
$0.10
$0.05
$368
75%
$ 3,225
$ 3,380
$ 3,405
71.69%
70.00%
70.00%
n/a
(a)
65%
Program Management Office
Agency IT procurements jointly reviewed (OIT/OMB) and processed within 21 days or
less . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
70.99%
90.00%
90.00%
Maintaining a Secure Shared IT Infrastructure
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 57,766
$ 70,118
$ 78,698
Key Performance Indicators
Infrastructure Support Services
Agency Continuity of Operations Plan (COOP) IT reviews conducted by OIT . . . . . . . .
Average unplanned downtime of the State’s Internet presence (in minutes per day) . . . .
Average unplanned downtime of the State’s Core Network (in minutes per day) . . . . . . .
Help Desk calls resolved on the first call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
n/a
n/a
n/a
54.73%
(a)
(a)
(a)
70.00%
4
.73
.73
70.00%
Information Security
Electronic messages and Internet web requests with undesirable content that were
filtered and blocked (undesirable content includes spam, pornography,
viruses,security risks, etc.) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The percentage of employees completing security awareness training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
n/a
n/a
(a)
(a)
90%
95%
Supporting Agency and Enterprise Applications and IT Systems
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 40,559
$ 35,789
$ 36,010
Key Performance Indicators
Data Management Services and Geographic Information Services
Opportunities accomplished through Shared Enterprise data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
n/a
(a)
50%
Application Development and Maintenance
Service requests received compared to the number of service requests to be worked on
for application development and maintenance work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
n/a
(a)
80%
Sample Application Availability (End to End)
Average unplanned downtime of NJ.Gov (in minutes per day) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
n/a
(a)
7
OFFICE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY
IT Governance, Planning and Control
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Key Performance Indicators
Providing a Robust Enterprise Architecture
Projects in compliance with the Enterprise Architecture, at the conclusion of the logical
system architectural review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Agency projects that utilize an Enterprise Solution as a result of the system architecture
review process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
99
FY14 Citizens’ Guide: Core Mission Summaries
Supporting State and Local Emergency Telecommunications Services
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Key Performance Indicators
Office of Emergency Telecommunications
Public safety telecommunications and emergency medical dispatch training course
students who successfully pass the certification exam on the first attempt . . . . . . . . .
Training recertifications completed within 30 days from receipt of Office of Emergency
Telecommunications staff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Migration of users onto the Statewide P--25 shared radio system which includes State,
county, local Bi--State, and federal subscribers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Actual
FY 2012
Performance
Target
FY 2013
Performance
Target
FY 2014
$ 13,220
$ 13,272
$ 13,272
n/a
(a)
100%
n/a
(a)
95%
n/a
(a)
33%
(a) Establishing baseline
Notes:
In addition to the Office of Information Technology’s total State appropriation, the amounts above also include receipts collected from State
agencies supported by fees, federal funds, and other dedicated sources.
PUBLIC DEFENDER
Providing Appropriate Effective Legal Counsel
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 121,415
$ 223
$ 122,008
$ 223
$ 119,648
$ 223
Key Performance Indicators
Trial Services to Indigents
Adult criminal -- newly opened cases (annual) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adult criminal -- closed cases (annual) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Adult criminal -- average attorney caseload (includes per diem attorneys) . . . . . . . . . . . .
Juvenile criminal -- newly opened cases (annual) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Juvenile criminal -- closed cases (annual) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Juvenile criminal -- average attorney caseload (includes per diem attorneys) . . . . . . . . . .
Post--conviction relief -- opened cases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Post--conviction relief -- closed cases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
62,007
60,767
n/a
11,437
11,208
n/a
759
688
62,007
60,767
150
11,437
11,208
200
759
688
62,007
60,767
150
11,437
11,208
200
759
688
Appellate Services to Indigents
Notices of new direct appeals of criminal convictions or sentenced filed in Appellate
Division of NJ Superior Court . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Number of Excessive Sentence program dispositions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Number of briefs filed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Number of dismissals/administrative closings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Petitions for certification to NJ Supreme Court . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1,909
755
1,083
455
558
1,909
755
1,083
455
558
1,909
755
1,083
455
558
Office of Parental Representation (Title 9 proceedings)
Indigent parent charged with Civil Abuse/Neglect (Title 9) -- newly opened cases
(annual) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Indigent parent charged with Civil Abuse/Neglect (Title 9) -- closed cases (annual) . . . .
6,801
5,868
6,801
6,688
6,801
6,914
Office of Parental Representation (Title 30 proceedings)
Indigent parent in Termination of Parental Rights (Title 30) -- newly opened cases
(annual) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Indigent parent in Termination of Parental Rights (Title 30) -- closed cases (annual) . . .
995
1,159
1,266
1,151
1,266
1,297
Office of Parental Representation
Combined Parental Representation average attorney caseload (includes per diem
attorneys) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
57
75
75
Office of Law Guardian (Title 9 proceedings)
Children subject to Abuse/Neglect complaints (Title 9) -- newly opened cases (annual) .
Children subject to Abuse/Neglect complaints (Title 9) -- closed cases (annual) . . . . . . .
7,546
6,782
7,546
7,453
7,546
7,639
100
FY14 Citizens’ Guide: Core Mission Summaries
Actual
FY 2012
Performance
Target
FY 2013
Performance
Target
FY 2014
Office of Law Guardian (Title 30 proceedings)
Children in Termination of Parental Rights (Title 30) -- newly opened cases (annual) . . .
Children in Termination of Parental Rights (Title 30) -- closed cases (annual) . . . . . . . .
1,148
1,329
1,148
1,114
1,148
1,177
Office of Law Guardian
Combined Law Guardian average attorney caseload (includes per diem attorneys) . . . . .
113
88
88
16,884
1,055
10,862
n/a
1,963
17,577
1,172
11,397
120
2,040
17,580
1,034
11,500
120
2,040
3,612
86.0%
447
3,600
80.0%
420
3,500
80.0%
420
489
500
510
251
264
264
Providing Mediation Services
Appropriations ($000s)
State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Non--State Funds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
$ 449
$ 283
$ 533
$ 341
$ 533
$ 341
Key Performance Indicators
Office of Dispute Settlement
Mediation-- newly opened cases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Average mediator caseload . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Foreclosure mediation -- newly opened cases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Foreclosure mediation -- closed cases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Percentage of foreclosure mediation cases resolved . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
General civil court mediation -- newly opened cases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
General civil court mediation -- closed cases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
New home warranty program (State plan) arbitration hearings -- newly opened cases . . .
New home warranty program (State plan) arbitration hearing -- closed cases . . . . . . . . .
New home warranty program (private plan) arbitration hearings -- newly opened cases .
New home warranty program (private plan) arbitration hearing -- closed cases . . . . . . .
902
180
861
489
47.0%
41
29
98
103
73
79
924
184
864
840
47.0%
60
36
108
108
96
84
1,104
184
1,044
840
47.0%
60
36
108
108
96
84
Division of Mental Health Advocacy
Mental Health hearings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Scheduled hearings -- average number of attorney appearances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Number of scheduled initial and periodic review hearings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Number of outpatient commitment hearings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Number of scheduled voluntary review hearings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Number of scheduled placement review hearings for individuals who do not meet the
commitment standards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Percentage of completed hearings where client objective obtained . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Number of persons represented for other types of activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Number of represented individuals, who are committed involuntarily under the sexually
violent predators law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Number of Division of Developmental Disabilities’ clients represented at guardianship
of the person hearings -- newly opened cases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
101
Appendix
102
CHRIS CHRISTIE
GOVERNOR OF NEW JERSEY
TRANSMITTED TO THE SECOND ANNUAL SESSION
OF THE TWO HUNDRED AND FIFTEENTH LEGISLATURE
FEBRUARY 26, 2013
Lt. Governor Guadagno, Madam Speaker, Mr. President, members of the Legislature, fellow
New Jerseyans:
I am pleased to present to you my budget for fiscal year 2014.
The budget continues a journey you began with me three years ago – to get New Jersey’s house
in order; to turn Trenton upside down; to make hard but better choices so that we could put our
state back on a path to growth.
For the fourth year in a row, the budget maintains the fiscal discipline we need to restore New
Jersey. Fiscal sanity has indeed returned to Trenton.
For the fourth year in a row, this budget is balanced and imposes no tax increases on the people
of New Jersey. I want every New Jersey citizen to remember just how different things were
before we arrived. 115 tax and fee increases in eight years. Skyrocketing spending. $13 billion in
deficits left on our doorstep by the irresponsibility of the past.
We must never take for granted what we have already achieved. Reduced spending. New jobs.
Balanced budgets four years in a row. And lower taxes. It is truly a new day for New Jersey.
For the fourth year in a row, the budget funds the key initiatives necessary to rebuild our state
and restore our prospects for future growth and greatness.
It provides a record amount of funding for our schools.
It once again fully funds the pension contribution we agreed to in the landmark pension reform
we enacted together in 2011. In fact, no previous governor has contributed what we have
contributed to our pension fund.
This budget also triples our job-creating business tax cuts and incentives for growth that we put
in place two years ago.
It also provides for those most in need: our lowest-income families, those with chronic illnesses,
and people with developmental disabilities.
In total, the budget I am submitting to you today provides $32.9 billion in state spending. While
we are meeting the needs of our people in this budget, we are doing it by spending less than the
state spent in fiscal year 2008. Let me repeat that for you. Six years later, a budget that still
103
spends less. Where else is this happening in America? This is what happens when you have a
government that tells people the truth- that makes the hard choices and actually manages our
government.
When we looked around four years ago, we saw New Jersey in dire straits. Remember?
Jobs and families were leaving the state. Property taxes had increased 70% in the previous ten
years. The state had increased taxes and fees 115 times in the prior eight years. The budget was
in deficit even though the state had increased its debt nearly tenfold in the prior two decades.
We knew what we had to do. The results of the old path of higher taxes and higher spending
were all around us -- and they were disastrous. As the late, great General Norman Schwarzkopf
once said, “The truth of the matter is that you always know the right thing to do. The hard part is
doing it.”
Those who were supposed to be responsible for controlling taxes and spending before we came
to office fundamentally deceived the people of our state. They said yes to everything – yes to
higher taxes. Yes to more spending. We must not return to that era of recklessness and deceit.
Starting three years ago, the people of New Jersey rolled up their sleeves and we did it, we did it
together.
We knew we needed to get state government spending under control. Together, we recovered
from an era of taxes and deficits; restored balance to our finances; and rebuilt those things that
will contribute to economic health in the future.
First, we immediately impounded $2.1 billion in reckless spending by the previous
administration and its legislative budget leaders and balanced the fiscal year 2010 budget with no
new taxes.
We then quickly proposed a fiscal year 2011 budget that had real cuts in every single department
of state government and balanced an $11 billion budget deficit. Once again, we did it without
raising taxes on the people of New Jersey. We also laid the groundwork for better choices ahead.
We were able to put forward budgets in fiscal years 2012 and 2013 that held the line on spending
but provided needed amounts for priorities like our children’s schools and reformed pensions.
Now, the results are clear. New Jersey has turned around and is growing again.
What hasn’t grown is government. In fact, government has shrunk. Today, there are 5,200 fewer
state government employees than when we took office. In fact, there are over 20,000 fewer
government employees across all levels of government. We promised smaller government to our
people and we delivered.
The private sector and the private economy are a much different story. They have grown. Since
January 2010, New Jersey has added 103,000 new private sector jobs. The last two years – 2011
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and 2012 – have been the best two years of private sector job growth since 1999. We have
defeated New Jersey’s jobless decade through fiscal responsibility and pro-growth tax policies.
This budget will help continue that growth. The budget provides additional tax relief for the
engine of our economy – small business. This marks the third year of implementing the
bipartisan, job-creating tax reforms we enacted together and keeps us on the path to provide
more than $2 billion in tax relief to business in New Jersey.
And this budget is balanced without gimmicks. In the past, too often the deficit was declared
closed one year, only to reappear the next when the band-aids were peeled off. No more. The
state’s reliance on one-time revenues has been dramatically reduced – they made up 13% of the
budget under the budget leaders four years ago. Today, it is only 3% of the budget that I put
before you. We have done the hard work to put us on the path to responsible and priority-focused
budgets. No gimmicks this year means less trouble and better choices next year, and in our
future.
Mark Twain once joked, “Always do right. It will gratify some and astonish the rest.”
By doing right, by taking on the hard choices together, we have made our choices better today.
Just three years ago, our pension system was in ruins. Governors and the budget leaders in the
legislature had been making little or no contributions. The system was not sustainable. Our
police officers, our firefighters and our teachers were right to ask if their pensions would even be
there when they retired.
Together, on a bipartisan basis, we enacted needed and historic pension and health benefit
reforms. By making modest, but important and sensible changes to retirement age and incentives,
to COLAs, and to contributions from government employees, we saved the taxpayers $120
billion and put the pension system on much more sound footing. And we have continued to
invest wisely in a diversified fashion, outperforming most other states and large endowments.
Today, our pension system is on a path to restored health. So, I can say with confidence and
some pride to you today that this budget contains a record pension payment by the state: $1.676
billion for fiscal year 2014, the largest pension contribution ever made by New Jersey. This will
fund the third year of the landmark, bipartisan pension reform we enacted two years ago, and on
the terms we agreed to.
And one message to those naysayers and perpetual cynics who refused to fund the pension on
their own watches and opposed our reforms to protect the monied special interests: our citizens
are fortunate that your type of politics is dying in Trenton. Our pension system is alive as a
result.
It is a key step in showing what can be done if we come together to face up to our long-term
liabilities, and address them head on in a spirit of principled cooperation.
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We did this on property taxes too, enacting not only the 2% Property Tax Cap but the interest
arbitration reform to make the cap work.
And again, the results are evident. In 2011, after a decade of 7% annual increases, New Jersey
homeowners saw the lowest increase in two decades, down to 2.4%. And last year, we did even
better: statewide, property taxes increased by only 1.4%, the lowest in twenty-four years.
This didn’t just happen by accident. It happened because we took action. We enacted the cap.
We enacted pension reform. We capped excessive school superintendent salaries. And we
continued, even in challenging times, to fund the senior freeze – which we will again do in this
budget.
It seems to me our leaders in Washington, DC could learn from our example here. Their failure
to take on the nation’s budget challenges and address the unsustainability of the nation’s longterm liabilities is nothing short of inexcusable.
It’s past time for Washington to get its act together. That will take two things: Bipartisanship and
leadership. Unfortunately, both are missing today.
Here at home, there is still much to be done to improve our fiscal health even more. This year, I
ask you to take action on my proposal to prevent towns and counties from imposing user fees to
blow through the 2% Property Tax Cap. Why not close this loophole? What are you waiting for?
It is also time to finish the job with the property tax tool kit that will help municipal governments
keep property taxes down in the long run.
So far, you have taken action on only six of the 20 bills which embody the toolkit. And the
public is still waiting for action on legislation to remove barriers that prevent municipalities from
sharing services, and to once and for all, end the practice of six figure checks for government
employee sick days. The accumulated municipal government liability for sick and vacation leave
in New Jersey is almost one billion dollars. It is time to finish the job and enact these needed
reforms this year. These commonsense reforms can bring our property taxes down even further
and perhaps even reduce them. If you fail to act, everyone in New Jersey will know who
obstructed the solutions to our property tax problems.
One last word on the subject of taxes--Last year, I proposed cutting our income tax by 10%.
When some objected, in the spirit of compromise and conciliation, I agreed to the essence of the
Senate plan on tax cuts. Then, in a fit of political partisanship, some in this chamber decided to
deny New Jerseyans the tax cut they so desperately need and deserve.
It is clear to me that on this subject we simply disagree. I believe New Jerseyans are overtaxed.
Many of you in this chamber repeatedly vote for tax increases. So, let me be direct with you – I
have compromised and offered your plan for tax cuts. You have reneged on your promise to me
and the people of New Jersey. I will not shut down the budget process to continue this argument;
the people’s business and our least fortunate citizens’ needs are too vitally important in the
aftermath of Sandy. But, if you change your mind and concur with my conditional veto, my
Administration will figure out how to pay for this long overdue tax relief. If you do not, I am
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content to let the voters decide this in November.
We have learned from experience that taking on problems now will leave us better off in the
future. We have seen that it works. The first step is to change the mindset, to change the
conversation. And that means putting the people we serve first, and then getting down to work.
In the past year, of course, our economy has been challenged by Superstorm Sandy. In the face
of this unprecedented emergency, we have stood together: recovering, rebuilding, restoring.
I want to thank the members of this legislature and our congressional delegation, on both sides of
the aisle, for their support of the $60.4 billion emergency relief package which congress enacted
last month. We stood firm, and we stood together.
I want to make sure we can move ahead quickly, and without endangering resources for other
key priorities.
So today, I am proposing the establishment of a $40 million Sandy contingency fund for those
expenses not reimbursed by the federal government. This will ensure that we can move ahead
with maximum speed, and that those things that fall through the cracks do not bankrupt families,
businesses or local governments.
This will allow us to get small businesses back on their feet, without delay.
It will allow us to continue to make progress on restoring key roads and infrastructure, regardless
of federal timelines.
It will help us rebuild the shore. I grew up going to the shore every summer, and I still do. It is
the heart of New Jersey. It still beats strong, in every one of us.
The shore will come back – as I’ve said, it will come back stronger than ever. And I will tell you
this: I expect to go the Jersey Shore every summer for the rest of my life, including the summer
of 2013.
Sandy cast a bright light on the dedication, bravery and professionalism of our first responders.
To each and every one of you, we are grateful.
To honor your service, we need to make sure there are more of you – so in this budget I propose
an over 35% increase in funding to train the volunteer emergency medical personnel of
tomorrow.
While Sandy is a challenge that has confronted us today, the most important investment we can
make for our long term future is in education.
Therefore, for the third year in a row, I am increasing state aid to New Jersey’s schools. This
budget provides an increase of $97 million for school aid, bringing total state aid to education to
almost $9 billion – an all-time record, for the second year in a row. With this budget, 378 school
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districts will see funding increases and no district in New Jersey will experience a decline in K12 formula school aid for fiscal year 2014.
With this record commitment to funding must come an unyielding dedication to reform. Here
too, we have made great steps in these last three years, but our job is far from finished.
I have repeated to you my belief that a quality education in New Jersey should not be a function
of your zip code but a product of your hard work and enthusiasm.
To make good on this belief, I am including $2 million to fund a pilot program of opportunity
scholarship grants for needy students. Any child in a chronically failing school should have the
choice to find a better one, whether it be out-of-district or non-public. These grants will show
that choice can work, even – indeed especially -- in some of our most underperforming school
districts. I have been fighting for three years to end the abandonment of these children and their
families. Today, that fight continues.
I am providing today $5 million for an “Education Innovation Fund” in New Jersey, to
implement the best, new, innovative teaching models in all of our schools – including the use of
technology and the internet. Technology has transformed every other industry in America, to all
of our great benefit. Let’s make sure it transforms education as well, for the better.
These two initiatives, combined with record-setting support, are part of a reform agenda that
must be an urgent priority for this legislature.
We must continue to support, fund, and implement the historic tenure reform that we enacted on
a bipartisan basis last year.
We must also continue to authorize, fund, start, and support our charter schools in New Jersey.
Our student achievement ranks high among the states, but it does not rank high everywhere in
our state. And we should settle for nothing less than being the very best in education, in
innovation, and in achievement no matter where you live, this is the key to a brighter future for
New Jersey.
Now, in higher education, I am once again proposing to increase student assistance through the
Tuition Aid Grants (TAG) program. The budget calls for an increase of $17 million in TAG
funding; and, I am restoring aid to independent colleges with a $1 million increase in their
funding.
The voters also agreed with me that we needed to invest capital in our state colleges and
universities. For the first time in a quarter century, they voted overwhelmingly to invest in our
children’s future. We will put to work this spring over $1.6 billion in state and private funds to
build classrooms, laboratories and other facilities to grow and modernize our higher education
system.
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The correlation between the ability to get a job, a higher income, and educational attainment is
clear. So let’s make the path to college available to every New Jerseyan who’s willing to do the
work to get there.
Ensuring a quality education is one means of creating opportunity for the state’s most vulnerable
populations. Another is ensuring adequate quality health care.
New Jersey is a leader in the nation in reforming our Medicaid program. Last year the federal
government approved our innovative and strategic reform proposal, which does right by the
people the program is designed to serve. We have taken groundbreaking steps to ensure highquality, cost-effective and comprehensive health care for New Jerseyans by focusing on
controlling costs, promoting community-based care, preserving hospital funding and integrating
primary and behavioral health care.
For example, as a result of our reforms, instead of having the standard Medicaid program that
forces seniors into nursing homes as the only option when they need long-term care, our seniors
will now have a choice. They will be able to stay in their homes and communities while
receiving the services and support they need.
It’s simple. We are putting people first.
Which is why, after considerable discussion and research, we have decided to participate in
Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act. While we already have one of the most
expansive and generous Medicaid programs in the nation, including the second highest eligibility
rate for children, we have an opportunity to ensure that an even greater number of New Jerseyans
who are at or near the poverty line will have access to critical health services beginning in
January 2014.
For a single adult, 133% of the poverty level is under $16,000 a year. These people are
consistently among those who need help the most – men and women who have suffered trauma
in their lives, live with mental illness, rely on New Jersey’s emergency rooms for primary health
care needs, or those citizens who lack insurance or access to treatment.
Expanding Medicaid will ensure New Jersey taxpayers will see their dollars maximized. Federal
funding will cover 100% of the costs of this expansion for the first three years and then leveling
to 90% in 2020.
Let me be clear, refusing these federal dollars does not mean that they won’t be spent. It just
means that they will be used to expand health care access in New York, Connecticut, Ohio or
somewhere else. Accepting these federal resources will provide health insurance to tens of
thousands of low-income New Jerseyans, will help keep our hospitals financially healthy and
actually save New Jersey taxpayers money. In fact, taxpayers will save approximately $227
million in fiscal year 2014 alone.
Let me be clear, I am no fan of the Affordable Care Act. I think it is wrong for New Jersey and
for America. I fought against it and believe, in the long run, it will not achieve what it promises.
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However, it is now the law of the land. I will make all my judgments as governor based on what
is best for New Jerseyans. That is why I twice vetoed saddling our taxpayers with the untold
burden of establishing health exchanges.
But in this instance, expanding Medicaid by 104,000 citizens in a program that already serves 1.4
million is the smart thing to do for our fiscal and public health. If that ever changes because of
adverse actions by the Obama Administration, I will end it as quickly as it started.
Even without the Affordable Care Act, we have continued to work to provide health care to the
uninsured, including many thousands of low-income children through New Jersey family care.
This budget continues that effort by providing a $47 million increase for FamilyCare.
And our commitment to prevention in health care extends beyond Medicaid – it is across the
board.
Emma’s Law requires babies in New Jersey to be screened for 60 disorders that can cause
serious health problems. This budget increases funding for newborn screening by $1.6 million so
that it can be done at no additional cost to New Jersey’s parents.
This budget supports our health care clinics that serve over 1.4 million patient visits each year.
Total support for Federally Qualified Health Centers is now at $50 million – an all-time high.
We are also protecting last year’s significant increase for cancer screening under the New Jersey
Cancer Education and Early Detection Program. The budget provides $12 million for cancer
outreach, screening, and follow-up services.
And this budget provides substantial funding for our hospitals – some $966 million. To
maximize our share of federal matching funds, we have reformed the way we calculate
distributions so that hospitals are reimbursed based on the level and quality of care they provide
to patients.
We are also bringing those with disabilities into the economic mainstream. Since the beginning,
my Administration has paid particular attention to people with intellectual and developmental
disabilities and mental illness.
I have signed a bill to eliminate offensive and archaic references in our laws and regulations. We
have created a central registry of offenders who willfully abuse, neglect or exploit a person with
intellectual disabilities. We have expanded housing opportunities for people with disabilities.
And we have made New Jersey an “employment first” state – which is better for families,
employers and people with disabilities.
Today, I am proud to announce that we have settled an eight-year-old Olmstead lawsuit with
Disability Rights New Jersey. The suit claimed that New Jersey was not complying with U.S.
Supreme Court mandates to allow people with developmental disabilities to live in the least
restrictive and most appropriate setting. In response, we have increased funding for community-
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based services; we have reduced the waiting list for in-home supports and services, and we have
expanded group homes and supported living options.
We all know New Jersey’s sad history of over institutionalization. We have institutionalized
more citizens than any state other than Texas. It is shameful. It is ineffective. And, in this
Administration, it is ending. We are allowing people with disabilities to live where they and their
families want them to live: at home, in the community, among family and friends. So this suit is
settled.
But to continue this progress, my budget includes $83 million for community placements and
services for those with developmental disabilities.
Some of our worst health and mental health problems are related to another problem: drug
addiction.
Last year, I proposed to you that we require treatment for convicted drug offenders. It seems a lot
smarter to me to allow those battling drug addiction the chance to reclaim their lives through
treatment rather than wasting away in prison. I appreciate your passing this landmark legislation,
and was happy to sign it into law last summer.
This budget supports the expansion of the Drug Court Program to implement this law –
increasing funding by over $4.5 million for drug court.
However, you failed to adopt a bail reform package designed to keep the most violent,
sociopathic offenders behind bars while awaiting trial. Failure to put this measure on the ballot is
inexcusable and it makes every New Jerseyan less safe and our justice system less effective. As
New Jersey’s former U.S. Attorney, I know law enforcement. I know how to combat violent
crime. Along with Attorney General Chiesa, we have instituted programs which have crime
declining, corruption on the run and thousands of guns off the street with our gun buyback
program. Violent criminals on the streets make every citizen less safe and put witnesses at risk. If
there is room on the ballot for other issues, there is certainly room for a bail reform amendment,
which will give prosecutors and judges the tools to keep violent sociopaths behind bars. Please
do not fail our citizens again – how many more New Jerseyans need to be maimed or killed by
repeat offenders before we act? Put bail reform on the November ballot and let New Jersey
citizens vote for greater public safety for themselves and witnesses of violent crime.
At the end of the day, a budget is a blueprint for how to move forward. And this is our plan.
It holds the line on spending, while funding the most important priorities like education for our
kids and the reformed pension plan. It encourages growth with tax reductions, and helps us
rebuild from Sandy. It continues those things that will hold down property taxes. It makes a
record contribution to our pension system, accounting for 85% of all our increased spending. It
reforms those programs which help the most vulnerable – encouraging prevention, work, and
treatment -- even while providing the needed support so all New Jerseyans can participate in a
growing economy and building a better future. And it does all that while spending less of the
people’s hard earned money than we did six years ago.
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Fiscal discipline. Investments in growth. Inclusion of all. Bipartisan solutions today—not a
return to the reckless budgeting practices of the Corzine years. These are our principles. They are
working. They are building a better New Jersey for everyone.
I know for some it is tempting to go back to the old ways. “Let’s loosen the purse strings; we can
spend more if you let us tax more,” they say. But we have seen the result of this approach, and it
is ugly. It doesn’t work.
It is tempting for others to fight over every item on this agenda. To play the old partisan games.
To block progress in search of a better headline. To put their political future ahead of the future
of the state. But we know that doesn’t work either. Just look at the results in Washington. Is that
what we want in New Jersey? Do we really want to return to the tax and spend Trenton of the
four years before we arrived?
Our approach has been to stand up and say what we believe in. To plant our feet on the ground
and hold fast to our principles. To fight for what you believe in. But, when you see the other side
moving a little closer to you, to recognize that progress and reach out your hand in compromise.
To find the answer, instead of keeping the issue. Indeed, to be the answer.
That requires being willing to act, and willing to lead.
The reforms we put in place, the investments we make, the discipline we instill, may not all yield
results this year or in this term, but they are vital nevertheless. They are part of our obligation to
leave state government, to leave New Jersey, to leave this country, better than we found it.
For these past three years, we have been about results, and we are not going to change now. And
the people are better off for it.
We have turned Trenton upside down. We have gotten the budget under control, and we have
begun to address the long-term health of pensions. We have spurred a wave of over 100,000 new
jobs. And we have taken the steps to hold down property taxes. We have improved our schools at
the same time.
Let’s not stop now. Let’s not turn back. Let’s not fail to be bold with the challenges ahead. Let’s
finish the job.
The people of New Jersey have trusted us. They have put their faith in us to come together. It’s
truly remarkable what we have accomplished in these last three years. The state is growing
again. But we can make things even better.
So let’s continue to fight for our principles. Let’s work on a bipartisan basis. And let’s get to
work for the people who gave us these jobs in the first place. We have weathered the worst storm
in our state’s history with bold leadership, decisive action and bipartisan cooperation. The sky
ahead is limitless if we just have the courage to stay the course.
Thank you, God bless you, and God bless the great state of New Jersey.
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NEW JERSEY STATE LEGISLATURE
BUDGET AND APPROPRIATIONS COMMITTEES
SESSION OF 2013
SENATE BUDGET AND APPROPRIATIONS COMMITTEE
Paul A. Sarlo (D), 36th District (Parts of Bergen and Passaic), Chairman
Brian P. Stack (D), 33rd District (Part of Hudson), Vice-Chairman
Jennifer Beck (R), 11th District (Part of Monmouth)
Anthony R. Bucco (R), 25th District (Parts of Morris and Somerset)
Sandra B. Cunningham (D), 31st District (Part of Hudson)
Linda R. Greenstein (D), 14th District (Parts of Mercer and Middlesex)
Kevin J. O'Toole (R), 40th District (Parts of Bergen, Essex, Morris and Passaic)
Steven V. Oroho (R), 24th District (Sussex and parts of Morris and Warren)
Joseph Pennacchio (R), 26th District (Parts of Essex, Morris and Passaic)
Nellie Pou (D), 35th District (Parts of Bergen and Passaic)
M. Teresa Ruiz (D), 29th District (Part of Essex)
Jeff Van Drew (D), 1st District (Cape May and parts of Atlantic and Cumberland)
Loretta Weinberg (D), 37th District (Part of Bergen)
GENERAL ASSEMBLY BUDGET COMMITTEE
Vincent Prieto (D), 32nd District (Parts of Bergen and Hudson), Chairman
Gary S. Schaer (D), 36th District (Parts of Bergen and Passaic), Vice-Chairman
Christopher J. Brown (R), 8th District (Parts of Atlantic, Burlington and Camden)
Anthony M. Bucco (R), 25th District (Parts of Morris and Somerset)
John J. Burzichelli (D), 3rd District (Salem and parts of Cumberland and Gloucester)
Gordon M. Johnson (D), 37th District (Part of Bergen)
Declan J. O'Scanlon, Jr. (R), 13th District (Part of Monmouth)
Troy Singleton (D), 7th District (Part of Burlington)
Bonnie Watson Coleman (D), 15th District (Parts of Hunterdon and Mercer)
Jay Webber (R), 26th District (Parts of Essex, Morris and Passaic)
Benjie E. Wimberly (D), 35th District (Parts of Bergen and Passaic)
David J. Rosen, Legislative Budget and Finance Officer, Office of Legislative Services
Frank W. Haines III, Assistant Legislative Budget and Finance Officer, Office of Legislative Services
113
FISCAL YEAR 2013-2014 CONTRIBUTORS
Office of Management and Budget
Lynn Azarchi
Elizabeth Bakanic
Trish Barby
Eileen Billetdoux
Jennifer Carseberg
John Curtis
Gina DeMaio
Iris Duffield
David Eater
Patricia Fatatis
Brian Francz
Hannah Good
Michael Greco
James Kelly
Deborah Koneski
Adrienne Kreipke
Gleneta Lim
Elizabeth Mahn
Ryan McNeely
Carisa Marone
David Meek
Rebecca Miller
Janelle Monin
Ben Neville
Cathy Nichols
Perry Nikolica
Catherine Nonamaker
David Patella
Jacqueline Pruiti
Michele Ridge
Sonia Rivera-Perez
Roxann Robinson
Jenna Scheps
Tariq Shabazz
Alexander Sitts
Thomas Solecki
Beth Sottung
Matthew Spayth
Nancy Style
Michael Tantum
Tiffany Tribbitt
Candice Valente
Steven Watson
Felicia Wu
Stephen Xenakis
Other Contributors
Roger Cohen
Maria Comella
Jennifer D’Autrechy
Susan Fischer
Robert Garrenger
Lou Goetting
James Leonard
Ranjana Madhusudhan
Steven Petrecca
David Ridolfino
William Quinn
Robert Romano
Christopher Santarelli
Beth Schermerhorn
Charles Steindel
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