Graduate Catalog 2011

Graduate Catalog 2011
California University of Pennsylvania
Graduate Catalog
2011–2012
October 2011
Edited by the School of Graduate Studies and Research
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California University of Pennsylvania
School of Graduate Studies and Research
250 University Ave.
California, PA 15419
724-938-4187
www.calu.edu
California University is a member of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education.
This catalog is neither a contract nor an offer of a contract. The information it contains
was accurate when it was placed on the Internet. Fees, deadlines, academic requirements,
courses, degree programs, academic policies and other matters described in this catalog
may change without notice. Not all courses are offered each academic year, and faculty
assignments may change. This catalog is updated annually on July 1. Any changes made
prior to the annual update may be found in the Addendum.
California University of Pennsylvania is an academic community dedicated to the ideals of
justice, fairness and equal opportunity for all. In compliance with federal and state laws,
the University is committed to providing equal educational and employment opportunities
for all persons without regard to race, color, sex, religion, national origin, age, disability,
ancestry, sexual orientation or status as a disabled or Vietnam-era veteran. The University
will not tolerate racial, ethnic or sexual discrimination. Sexual harassment is considered
by law to be a form of sexual discrimination and is, therefore, unacceptable. Direct equal
opportunity and affirmative action inquiries or complaints to the Special Assistant to
the President for EEEO/University Ombudsperson, Office of Social Equity, South Hall,
Room 112, 724-938-4014. Direct inquiries regarding services or facilities accessibility to the
ADA/504 Compliance Officer, Office of Student Development and Services, Azorsky Hall,
Room 105, 724-938-4076. Direct Title IX inquiries to the Senior Women’s Administrator/
Title IX Coordinator, Department of Athletics, Hamer Hall, Room 248, 724-938-4351.
The core values of California University are Integrity, Civility and Responsibility.
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Accreditations
MEMBER of the
American Association of State Colleges and Universities
1307 New York Ave. NW, Fifth Floor
Washington, DC 20005-4701
202-293-7070
Fax 202-296-5819
www.aascu.org
MEMBER of the
American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education (AACTE)
1307 New York Ave. NW, Suite 300
Washington, DC 20005-4701
202-293-2450
Fax 202-457-8095
www.aacte.org
ACCREDITED by the
Commission on Higher Education of the
Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools
3624 Market St.
Philadelphia, PA 19104
215-662-5606
Fax 215-662-5501
www.middlestates.org
ACCREDITED in Teacher Education by the
National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education
2010 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington, DC 20036-1023
202-466-7496
Fax 202-296-6620
www.ncate.org
[email protected]
ACCREDITED in Athletic Training by the
National Athletic Trainers’ Association
2952 Stemmons Freeway
Dallas, TX 75247
800-879-6282
www.nata.org
[email protected]
ACCREDITED in Communication Disorders by the
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
10801 Rockville Pike
Rockville, MD 20852
800-498-2071
301-897-5700
Fax 301-571-0457
www.asha.org
ACCREDITED in School Psychology by the
National Association of School Psychologists
4340 East West Highway, Suite 402
Bethesda, MD 20814
301-657-0270
www.nasponline.org
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ACCREDITED in Social Work by the
Council on Social Work Education
1725 Duke St., Suite 500
Alexandria, VA 22314-3457
703-683-8080
Fax 703-683-8099
www.cswe.org
ACCREDITED in Counselor Education by the
Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Education Programs
5999 Stevenson Ave.
Alexandria, VA 22304
703-823-9800 ext. 301
Fax 703-823-1581
www.cacrep.org
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Contents
Accreditations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii
Message from the President . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
About California University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
History . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Milestones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5
Financial Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Mission Statement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Location and Office Hours . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
About Financial Aid and How to Apply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Financial Aid Application Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8
Renewal Financial Aid Applicants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9
Award Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Financial Aid Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Loans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Employment / Scholarships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
Disbursement of Financial Aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12
Financial Aid Refunds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Maintaining Financial Aid Eligibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13
Refund/Repayment Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
Repayment of Unearned Financial Aid Assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Financial Aid Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17
Tuition and Fees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Admissions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Requesting an Application for Admission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Application Deadlines: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21
Application Process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Admission to Certification Programs Beyond the Master’s Degree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
Admission Decisions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
International Students . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Campus E-mail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Planning a Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Cohorts – Rights and Responsibilities: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Appealing a Grade or Other Academic Decision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Style Manuals for Preparation of Papers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Instructional II Certification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Act 48 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Course Load . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Candidacy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28
Transfer Credit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29
Withdrawals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Repeating a Course . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Cheating and Plagiarism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Academic Probation and Dismissal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Grades . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Course Numbering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
Final Examinations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Comprehensive Examinations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Period for Completion of Degree . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Graduation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
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Graduate Assistantships . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Academic Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Administrative Program For Principals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
Applied Criminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Athletic Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43
Business Administration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
Communication Disorders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
Counselor Education – Clinical Mental Health Counseling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Counselor Education – Community Agency Counseling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55
Counselor Education – School Counseling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
Elementary Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Early Childhood Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
English as a Second Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
National Board Teacher Certification Preparation (Elementary) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Elementary/Special Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Exercise Science and Health Promotion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Legal Studies: Criminal Justice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Legal Studies: Homeland Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Legal Studies: Law and Public Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Mentally/Physically Handicapped Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86
Mentally/Physically Handicapped Education: Autism Spectrum Disorders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Nursing Administration and Leadership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Reading Specialist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
School Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
Secondary Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Secondary Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
Social Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Spanish Certification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111
Sport Management Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113
Sports Counseling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116
Superintendent Letter of Eligibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119
Technology Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 122
Academic Integrity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Policy and Procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125
Course Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
ACC — Accounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
ADP — Administrative Program for Principals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129
ATE — Athletic Training . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
BUS — Business . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 130
CMD — Communication Disorders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131
CED — Counselor Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132
CRM — Applied Criminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
PCJ — Criminal Justice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
ECE — Early Childhood Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135
EAS — Earth Science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136
ECO — Economics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137
EDU — Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .138
EDE — Elementary Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138
FIN — Finance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140
GRA — Graduate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
AST — Homeland Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
LAW — Legal Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141
MGT — Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
MKT — Marketing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
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MSE — Master of Arts Teaching (initial certification track) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144
SEC — Master of Arts Teaching (advanced studies in secondary education) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
GMA — Mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
NUR — Nursing Administration and Leadership . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147
PRF — Performance Enhancement and Injury Prevention . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148
EDP — Professional Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150
PSY — Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
RES — Research . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
RSP — Reading Specialist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
SWK — Social Work . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153
SPN — Spanish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
ESP — Special Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155
SPT — Sport Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 157
SLE — Superintendent Letter of Eligibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 158
TED — Technology Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159
University Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
Louis L. Manderino Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 161
IT Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 162
Campus Learning Labs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163
Career Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164
Public Safety . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
Character Education Institute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 168
Student Affairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171
Alcohol and Other Drug Awareness Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
California Times (California Student Newspaper) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
CalCard — University Identification Card . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172
Cal U Student Bookstore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
Campus Ministry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
Clubs and Organizations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
Commuter Center/Commuting and Nontraditional Student Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174
Counseling and Psychological Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175
Activities Transcript . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175
California University Television (CUTV) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 175
Dining Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
Housing: [email protected] U . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176
Intercollegiate Athletics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 179
International Student Services Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
Student Exchange Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
Intramurals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180
Student Conduct . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
Multicultural Student Programs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
Web/Mobile Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
END V (Violence) Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
Recreational Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
Social Fraternities and Sororities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 181
Student Activities Board (SAB) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
Student Association Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
Student Congress . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
Student Health Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 182
Medical Absences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
Health Education Awareness Resource Team (HEART) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
Student Leadership Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 183
Office for Students with Disabilities (OSD) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
Veterans Affairs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184
WCAL (California Radio Station) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
Multimedia Access Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
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Women’s Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
Office of Social Equity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185
Faculty . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 193
Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 197
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Message from the President
The mission of California University of Pennsylvania
is to build the character and careers of our students.
While building careers may be expected of universities,
building character may seem less so. But the rationale
for building character, as well as careers, is best seen
in these words by Theodore Roosevelt: “To educate
a person in mind but not in morals is to educate a
menace to society.”
Since 1852, eager students have seized the opportunity
to develop their character and careers here and, in so
doing, have improved their lives and the lives of those
around them.
To advance its ultimate mission of building the
character and careers of students, the University
relies upon committed faculty, motivated students,
challenging programs and exceptional facilities. We
invite you to meet our faculty and students, to evaluate California University of Pennsylvania
our academic programs, and to tour our facilities.
President Angelo Armenti, Jr.
Because learning at California University is not
restricted to one’s academic major, the university experience here is a broad one, involving
many co-curricular and extracurricular opportunities. Students can select from a number of
academic minors and concentrations and from an array of student activities, ranging from
athletics to honor societies, from Greek organizations to service learning, and from scores
of student clubs and organizations.
Cal U is a student-centered university that is committed above all to academic excellence
and intellectual rigor in the context of personal and institutional integrity, civility and
responsibility. We provide a welcoming, family atmosphere. We are large enough to offer a
variety of programs, yet small enough to know many students by name.
Please excuse our dust as we continue to grow at Cal U. The expansion and renovation
of Herron Hall is complete, and students, faculty and staff are enjoying this state-ofthe-art fitness and recreation center. A multilevel parking facility has been completed
behind Manderino Library, providing sheltered parking for students, employees and
campus visitors. In the coming months, we look forward to opening our magnificent new
Convocation Center on the river’s shore.
In fall 2007 we opened a new residence hall on the main campus, bringing to six the total
number of suite-style, energy-efficient student housing facilities. The very successful offcampus residence complex, Vulcan Village, is located adjacent to Roadman Park on the
south campus and offers students the option of garden-style apartment living. These highquality residences reflect our commitment to students and their families. All residence halls
include amenities quite popular with students — air conditioning, private or semi-private
baths, Internet connections, and sprinkler and security systems.
We are a University on the move, and I invite you to visit us.
Angelo Armenti, Jr.
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California University of Pennsylvania
Identity
California University of Pennsylvania, a comprehensive regional institution of higher
education and a member of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education, is a
diverse, caring and scholarly learning community dedicated to excellence in the liberal arts,
science and technology, and professional studies and devoted to building character and
careers, broadly defined. The University is inspired by its core values of Integrity, Civility
and Responsibility and is guided by its bill of rights and responsibilities: We have the right
to safety and security, and we have the responsibility to ensure the safety and security of
others; We have the right to be treated with respect, and we have the responsibility to treat
others with respect; We have the right to expect the best, and we have the responsibility to
give our best; We have the right to be treated fairly, and we have the responsibility to treat
others fairly.
Mission: Building Character and Careers
To advance its ultimate mission of building the character and careers of students,
the University shall focus its efforts on three goals: student achievement and success,
institutional excellence, and community service. These interrelated ends will be facilitated
by the following means: high-quality faculty, students, programs and facilities. These
means, in turn, will be funded through an energetic program of resource acquisition and
stewardship.
Vision
To be recognized as the best comprehensive public university in America.
How is this accomplished?
• Offer an exceptional, one-of-a-kind character- and career-building experience;
• Focus character building on the University’s three core values and four rights and
responsibilities;
• Define career building broadly to include lifewide (multiple life roles) and lifelong
(legacy) aspects;
• Recruit and retain a distinguished faculty who challenge and mentor students to attain
their fullest potential;
• Recruit and retain a talented, diverse and highly motivated student body;
• Maintain an administrative staff dedicated to the highest professional standards and
service;
• Maintain a learning community known for its academic excellence, intellectual rigor and
civil discourse;
• Instill not just learning, but the love of learning;
• Be widely known as a center for thought, inquiry, dialogue and action in matters of
character and leadership;
• Maintain a campus of natural and architectural beauty featuring state-of-the-art facilities
and equipment;
• Reflect a special mission in science and technology through programs in science,
technology and applied engineering, as well as through emphasis on technology and
information literacy across the curriculum;
• Be widely known for high-quality undergraduate and selected master’s-level graduate
programs;
• Foster increasingly higher admissions criteria, academic quality and scholarly
expectations;
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• Incorporate continuous improvement into all programs and activities to ensure
competitive excellence;
• Prepare students for the world of work or further education, from multiple locations,
through multiple technologies, in order to meet the ever-changing needs of the
Commonwealth and the world;
• Sustain a reputation for the University’s academic excellence, its daring and
entrepreneurial spirit, and the integrity, success and loyalty of its graduates;
• Instill a culture of philanthropy among students, faculty, staff and alumni; and
• Create an ever-larger community of supporters and an endowment that will perpetuate
the work of the University and enable constant innovation and renewal.
Legacy
Founded in 1852, and now in its second 150 years of service, the University is committed
above all to academic excellence and intellectual rigor in the context of personal and
institutional integrity, civility and responsibility.
Adopted by the Council of Trustees of California University of Pennsylvania
on June 4, 2003.
3
About California University
The University lies within the borough of California, a community of approximately 6,000
residents located on the banks of the Monongahela River, less than an hour’s drive south
of Pittsburgh. It is accessible via Interstate 70, Exits 15 (PA 43), 16 (Speers) or 17 (PA 88,
Charleroi), or via U.S. 40 (PA 43 or 88). The Mon Valley Fayette Expressway (PA 43) links
California to the federal Interstate Highway System. The University is approximately
30 minutes from Exit 8 (New Stanton) on the Pennsylvania Turnpike, and an hour from
Pittsburgh International Airport.
The main campus consists of 40 buildings situated on 90 acres. An additional 98-acre
recreation complex, George H. Roadman University Park, is located one mile from campus.
This complex includes a football stadium, an all-weather track, tennis courts, a baseball
diamond, a softball diamond, soccer and rugby fields, a cross country course, areas for
intramural sports, and picnic facilities.
Roadman Park is also the site of an upper-campus student housing complex, Vulcan
Village, that is home to more than 760 students who live in attractive, furnished suites
— most with individual baths, a living room, dining area, completely furnished kitchen,
including dishwasher and microwave, and a full-size washer and dryer.
Between 2004 and 2007 the University opened six new residence halls on campus where
students live in suites of two or four students, usually sharing a bathroom with no more
than one other person. All residence halls are air-conditioned and have state-of-the-art
sprinkler systems.
The geographic location of the University gives the resident student opportunities to
explore and pursue a wide variety of activities. Located on the Appalachian Plateau, an
area of rolling hills, the University is a short drive from camping, hiking, fishing, hunting,
white-water rafting, canoeing and skiing. In addition to varied cultural activities on
campus, the student has easy access to the Pittsburgh metropolitan area, located only 35
miles north of the campus. This provides an opportunity to enjoy the Pittsburgh Symphony
Orchestra; the Pittsburgh Ballet; the Civic Light Opera; the David L. Lawrence Convention
Center; the Pittsburgh Steelers, Penguins and Pirates; various museums; and all of the
excitement and attractions of a major metropolitan area.
History
In June 2001, the University began a 17-month celebration of its sesquicentennial. The
institution that is now California University of Pennsylvania began as an academy 150
years ago. It has evolved over the years into a multipurpose university, one of the 14 stateowned institutions that comprise the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education.
Milestones
1852: A two-story academy, offering education from kindergarten through college, was
established in the recently founded community of California, Pa.
1865: The academy obtained a charter as a normal school for its district and became a
teacher-preparatory institution.
1874: The institution was renamed the South-Western Normal School.
1914: The Commonwealth acquired the institution and renamed it the California State
Normal School. The curriculum became exclusively a two-year preparatory course for
elementary school teachers.
1928: The institution became California State Teachers College, returning to its previous
status as a four-year-degree-granting institution, concentrating on industrial arts and
special education.
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1957: California began the process to gain the ability to grant a master’s degree.
1959: Liberal arts curricula were introduced and the college became California State
College.
1961: Final authorization was given by the State Council of Education to grant master’s
degrees in Elementary and Industrial Arts education.
1965-1968: California State College’s graduate program grows quickly, adding ten Master
of Education degree programs, three Master of Arts programs, and one Master of Science
program. The undergraduate program also grows, adding eighteen new areas of study.
1974: The college developed a special mission in science and technology.
1983: On July 1, 1983, the college became a part of the Pennsylvania State System of Higher
Education and changed its name to California University of Pennsylvania.
1983: The College of Science and Technology became fully operational.
1992: Angelo Armenti, Jr. was appointed President of California University.
1996: The College of Science and Technology was renamed Eberly College of Science and
Technology in honor of the Eberly Foundation for its philanthropic generosity.
1997: Cal U Southpointe Center in the Southpointe Technology Center in Canonsburg,
Pennsylvania, opened, offering a variety of courses and programs.
1998: The University formally adopted three core values: Integrity, Civility and
Responsibility.
2002: The University Council of Trustees formally adopted a list of rights and
responsibilities.
2004: The University responded to the needs of today’s students and completely redesigned
the concept of residence life with three new lower-campus residence halls and the uppercampus [email protected] complex.
2006: Two new residence halls opened on campus, completing a new quad around the
Natali Student Center.
2007: Carter Hall, the sixth and final residence hall, was opened in August 2007.
2010: Purchase of the 6-acre Philipsburg School property near the main campus and the 98acre Harris property adjoining Roadman Park enlarged the campus by 50 percent.
Additional information about the University and its history may be found in the book
California University of Pennsylvania: The People’s College in the Monongahela Valley, by Regis J.
Serinko, published in 1992.)
6
Financial Aid
Mission Statement
The primary mission of the Financial Aid Office at California University of Pennsylvania
is to provide financial planning and assistance to students and their families in meeting
the costs of education. In fulfilling this mission, each student will be given careful
consideration and the University will determine financial assistance based on federal,
state and institutional guidelines. Financial aid programs have been established to provide
access to higher education with guidelines to insure fairness in disbursing available funds
to qualifying students. The Financial Aid Office strives to ensure that courteous, timely
and accurate financial aid services are delivered to all students seeking assistance from our
office.
Location and Office Hours
The Financial Aid Office is located on the first floor of Dixon Hall. The office hours are 8
a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday. Appointments are encouraged, but a daily on-call
counselor is available to assist walk-ins.
Students can contact the Financial Aid Office by phone at 724-938-4415, by fax at 724-9384551 or by e-mail at [email protected] In addition, general financial aid information may
be obtained at www.calu.edu/financial-aid. Specific financial aid and student account
information is available 24 hours a day through the Vulcan Information Portal (VIP).
About Financial Aid and How to Apply
A college education is one of the most important investments a student and family can
make. You and your family will be expected to contribute as much as you can from
your own resources (income, savings and assets) to help meet your college expenses.
The purpose of financial aid is to help graduate (both on-campus and web-based
programs) students meet educational expenses that cannot be met through their own
resources. Financial aid can be either need-based or non-need-based. The results of the
Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), along with the cost of education, will
determine whether a student has financial need.
Students enrolled in any graduate program on-campus or through the Office of WebBased Programs are eligible to apply and receive financial aid assistance to assist them in
covering their educational costs. As a graduate student in an eligible program of study,
a student may qualify for assistance from the Federal Stafford Loan Program as well as a
wide variety of private loan programs. A student’s financial aid eligibility will be based on
the student’s enrollment status, the student’s expected family contribution, the student’s
cost of attendance and the student’s loan indebtedness (if applicable). In addition, federal
financial aid recipients must meet the following basic eligibility requirements:
• Must complete the FAFSA each year.
• Must comply with California University’s satisfactory academic progress standards.
• Must not be in default on an educational loan and must not owe a repayment on an
adjusted federal grant.
• Must be enrolled in an eligible degree program.
• Must be enrolled at least half-time (five credits) as a graduate student.
• If male and age 18-25, must be registered for Selective Service.
• Must be a citizen or eligible non-citizen with a valid Social Security number.
Note: According to federal regulations, students cannot receive federal financial aid at
more than one school at a time. Therefore, if you are applying for federal financial aid
at California University of Pennsylvania, you are ineligible for federal aid at another
institution while enrolled in one of our graduate programs. Failure to inform California
7
University of attendance and/or receipt of federal financial aid at another college or
university while enrolled at California University will result in an over award situation
with the federal government. If this occurs, you will automatically be suspended from
participation in the federal aid programs at California University until all ineligible funds
have been refunded to the appropriate federal program.
Financial Aid Application Process
Each year, a student must complete a paper or online version of the Free Application for
Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) in order to apply for financial aid assistance for the upcoming
year at California University. The University recommends that students and parents (if
applicable) use the online version of the FAFSA form called FAFSA on the Web.
Both the electronic versions (initial and renewal) of the 2011-2012 FAFSA are available
online now at: www.fafsa.gov.
After completing your 2011-2012 FAFSA, you may sign electronically with a federal
Personal Identification Number (see “Personal Identification Number (PIN)” on page
9 for additional information). Once you submit your application, you’ll be taken to a
confirmation page that shows your confirmation number and estimated expected family
contribution (EFC). If you provide a valid e-mail address, you will receive an e-mail with
a link to your Student Aid Report (SAR) information within five days after filing the
FAFSA. If you do not provide a valid e-mail address, you will receive a paper SAR or SAR
acknowledgment in the mail about two weeks after submitting your online FAFSA.
Whether completing the paper or online versions, take the time to read the instructions
before completing your FAFSA. Most questions can be answered through the instruction
information contained on the form or on the FAFSA website. In addition, our Financial
Aid Office homepage contains many helpful topics and links that may provide you with
additional assistance in completing the FAFSA. Our home page can be found at: www.calu.
edu/financial-aid. You can also contact our office by phone at 724-938-4415 or by e-mail at
[email protected]
Note: California University does not have an institutional financial aid application.
The benefits of FAFSA on the Web:
• Online FAFSA is free.
• The FAFSA on the Web site provides students/parents with numerous electronic options,
such as checking on the status of your FAFSA form, requesting a duplicate set of SARs,
tips and shortcuts, and requesting a PIN.
• Students can save their application information for up to 45 days so that it can be
completed and transmitted later.
• Online FAFSA does not require software to be installed, so it takes less time before
students can actually use the application.
• Students can access the online FAFSA website from anywhere, including school or home,
making it more convenient to complete the application.
• Online FAFSA automatically edits applicant answers before transmitting, resulting in
better information and fewer applications rejected by the central processing system.
• Online FAFSA uses skip logic, so it will only ask students those questions that they need
to answer.
• Online FAFSA can support an unlimited number of users, allowing thousands of
students to apply at once.
FAFSA on the Web Worksheet
If you complete the electronic version of the FAFSA, it is recommended that you complete
the FAFSA on the Web Worksheet prior to entering your information. This helpful
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worksheet is a “line for line” copy of the online FAFSA, thereby insuring accuracy in
completing the FAFSA via the Web. As with FAFSA on the Web, the worksheet also has
helpful instructions throughout the form. The FAFSA on the Web Worksheet can be
downloaded directly from the FAFSA on the Web site at www.fafsa.gov.
Personal Identification Number (PIN)
The PIN is similar to the Personal Identification Number you get from your bank that
enables you to access your bank account. Your PIN is confidential and should not be shared
with anyone, even if someone else completes your FAFSA for you. Students can request a
PIN by going to www.pin.ed.gov. Your PIN will be e-mailed to you within one to five days.
If you don’t provide an e-mail address, your PIN will be mailed to your permanent mailing
address within seven to 10 days. All prior year electronic FAFSA applicants will receive a
renewal reminder e-mail explaining the renewal process made possible through the student
PIN. A students who has forgotten a PIN can request a duplicate by selecting “Request a
Duplicate PIN” at the PIN website. Remember, your PIN is a valuable electronic tool that
allows you to electronically complete and sign your FAFSA or Renewal FAFSA, make
electronic corrections to the FAFSA form, and even electronically sign your Federal Stafford
Loan Master Promissory Note (MPN).
Renewal Financial Aid Applicants
Prior year aid recipients will receive a renewal reminder e-mail from the U.S. Department
of Education describing the online renewal process using their federal PINs. A renewal
student who did not provide an e-mail address on the FAFSA or whose e-mail is
returned “undeliverable” will receive a letter in the mail describing the renewal process.
As mentioned above, the PIN serves as your identifier to let you access your personal
information in various U.S. Department of Education systems, complete and make
corrections to your 2011-2012 Renewal FAFSA, and electronically complete and sign a
Federal Stafford Loan MPN. The Renewal FAFSA contains preprinted information that you
and your family (if applicable) reported last year, making it faster and easier for you to
complete. Carefully review and update any preprinted information.
FAFSA Results
The federal government will process your FAFSA and electronically send the results to the
Financial Aid Office provided you listed California University of Pennsylvania as one of
the schools to receive the results of your FAFSA. You should receive a paper Student Aid
Report (SAR) in the mail approximately two weeks after the federal processor receives your
FAFSA. You should review the SAR to see if any corrections are necessary. Otherwise, you
can keep the SAR for your records.
When you apply for federal student aid, the information reported on the FAFSA is used
in a formula approved by Congress. This federal formula determines a student’s expected
family contribution (EFC), the amount you are expected to contribute toward your
education. The basic elements included in determining the EFC are:
• Contribution from the student’s income and assets
• Number of members in the household
• Number of family members enrolled at least half-time in college.
EFC is used to determine Stafford Loan eligibility according to the following equation:
Cost of attendance less Expected Family Contribution less Other Aid Received (graduate
assistantships, scholarships, etc.) = Stafford Loan Eligibility
Verification
Some financial aid applicants are selected for a process called verification. During this
verification process, the Financial Aid Office must verify the accuracy of FAFSA data
reported by students. If your FAFSA is selected for verification by the federal government,
we will notify you and tell you exactly what documents we need from you. Typically,
9
students selected for verification will receive an award packet; however, these awards are
tentative (estimate only) pending the completion and outcome of verification. Students
selected for verification will receive an award packet after verification is complete. In
addition, Federal Loans are not certified until the verification process has been completed.
Award Letters
California University typically starts the awarding process for graduate students in early
June of each year.
Award information is available once we have received the results of your FAFSA and we
have determined that you are making satisfactory academic progress for financial aid
purposes. Award information may also be accessed on the Vulcan Information Portal (VIP).
Financial Aid Programs
Loans
Federal Stafford Loan Program (Subsidized/Unsubsidized)
The Federal Direct Stafford Loan may be either subsidized or unsubsidized or a
combination of both. In order to qualify for a subsidized loan, you must have financial
need. To determine if you have financial need, your expected family contribution, which
is determined by the results of your FAFSA, is subtracted from the cost of education. Also,
any other aid that you are receiving or expected to receive is subtracted from the cost of
education to determine if you have any remaining financial need in order to qualify for a
Federal Stafford Subsidized Loan.
If you do qualify for a subsidized loan, the federal government pays the interest on the
loan, i.e., subsidizes the loan, while you are in school, during your six-month grace period
prior to repayment and during any authorized period of deferment.
Students without financial need are eligible for the Federal Direct Stafford Unsubsidized
Loan. This means that you will be responsible for the interest on the loan from the time you
receive the funds until the loan is paid in full. You have the option of allowing the interest
to accumulate, or accrue, on the loan while you are in school and during your six-month
grace period before repayment.
You also have the option of paying the interest on the loan as it accumulates. If you decide
to delay interest repayment, the interest that accumulates will be “capitalized”; that is, it
will be added to your loan principal when you begin repayment. This means your total
loan principal will increase. It is better to pay the interest, if you can, because you will save
money in the end. However, not all students can afford to pay the interest while still in
school and that is why you have the option of letting the interest accumulate.
Under federal regulations, an eligible graduate student can borrow up to $8,500 from
the Federal Direct Stafford Subsidized Loan program and an additional $12,000 from the
Federal Direct Stafford Unsubsidized Loan program. However, our students’ maximum
loan eligibility cannot exceed the cost of attendance budget for a student. Because of our
relatively low costs, students enrolled in our online programs will not be eligible for the
$20,500 since our cost of attendance budgets are far below this maximum amount.
Stafford Loan Application Process (Master Promissory Note)
Step 1: File the 2011-12 Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).
Step 2: The Financial Aid Office will notify you of your maximum Federal Direct Stafford
Loan eligibility.
Step 3: If you have never completed a Federal Direct Stafford Loan Promissory Note
(MPN), go to studentloans.gov, sign in and select “Sign Master Promissory Note.” You will
need your Federal Student Aid PIN to sign the promissory note. This MPN is valid for 10
years.
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Step 4: You will also need to complete an Entrance Interview session at studentloans.gov if
you have never had a Stafford Loan. Step 5: Once these requirements are complete, your loan proceeds will disburse after the
semester begins.
Graduate PLUS
Federal Direct Graduate PLUS Loan
(for graduate students only)
The Federal Direct Graduate PLUS Loan is a credit-worthy loan for a graduate student
who has borrowed the maximum amount of Stafford Loan assistance. If you are a graduate
student, you can request up to your cost of education, less all other financial aid received.
A credit check is required to determine eligibility for this loan program.
The interest rate for Direct PLUS is fixed at 7.9%.
Repayment of the PLUS loan begins 60 days after the loan is fully disbursed for an
academic year. However, an optional in-school deferment will delay payments on the
PLUS loan until six months after the student ceases to be enrolled at least half-time. To
request an in-school deferment, contact Direct Loan Borrower Services at 1-800-848-0979.
Deferment must be requested on an annual basis, and may be requested 14 days after the
loan has been disbursed to the student’s account.
In order to apply for a Graduate PLUS Loan, borrowers will need to complete the steps
below.
1. Log on to studentloans.gov and complete a request for a Direct PLUS Loan. This
application will initiate a credit check on the borrower.
Note: All PLUS Loan requests will be processed for fall/spring (i.e., for the loan period
August through May), unless the borrower completes and immediately submits a Single
Term PLUS Loan Form to the Financial Aid Office.
Summer is a separate loan term and requires a separate PLUS Loan request and
completion of a Single Term PLUS Loan Form.
2. If the loan is approved, complete your electronic Master Promissory Note (eMPN). This
is also done at studentloans.gov. You will need your Federal Student Aid PIN to sign the
promissory note.
3. If your application is not approved, you will be given the option of appealing the
decision or resubmitting the application with a credit-worthy endorser.
If you elect to use an endorser, you can complete the Endorser Addendum online.
Graduate Loan Borrowing Chart
Stafford Loan Program
Annual Loan Limit:
Subsidized $8,500
Unsubsidized $20,000
Total $20,500 or cost of attendance (less EFC and other
aid), whichever is less
Lifetime Maximums:
$138,500 (subsidized and unsubsidized, with subsidized
limited to $65,500; includes any loans outstanding from
undergraduate study)
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Graduate PLUS Loan Program
Annual Loan Limit:
Students may borrow up to the cost of attendance minus
any financial aid they receive during the academic year.
Lifetime Maximums:
There are no lifetime maximums for the Graduate PLUS
Loan Program.
Private Education Funding (Alternative Loans)
In addition to the federal loan programs, there are also private sources of educational
loans. These are typically private, credit-based loans sponsored by banks and state agencies
or private guarantors. Typically, the results of the FAFSA are not used in determining
eligibility for these programs. Visit our website at www.calu.edu/financial-aid and select
“Loans,” then “Private Alternative Loans” for a list of lenders we recommend and their
application procedures.
Employment / Scholarships
Graduate Stipends/Assistantships
Graduate students may find employment opportunities within the University through the
Graduate Assistantship Program. This program provides full-time graduate students with
opportunities to work in various offices and departments on campus. Students interested
in graduate assistantships should contact the School of Graduate Studies and Research for
applications and additional information.
Scholarships/Fellowships
There are also many other agencies and organizations that provide financial assistance.
These include civic clubs, fraternal organizations, religious groups, employers,
organizations, unions, etc.
Electronic Scholarship Search Engines
The Financial Aid Office staff is frequently asked the following questions: “Which awards
made by California University might I qualify to receive?” “Are there other scholarships I
should pursue? If so, where can I get a listing of them and then obtain an application?”
We trust that the links provided below will assist you in your search.
FastWeb: FastWeb (www.fastweb.com) is the largest and most complete scholarship search
on the Internet. It provides access to a searchable database of more than 400,000 private
sector scholarships, fellowships, grants and loans available to students.
Collegenet: Collegenet.com (www.collegenet.com) is a simple and fast scholarship
resource locator. Students develop profiles of themselves to locate scholarships that best
match their qualifications.
Other Scholarship Searches: Other Scholarship Searches (www.finaid.org/scholarships/
other.phtml) will take you to other scholarship search engines.
Disbursement of Financial Aid
Crediting to a Student Account
For initial billing purposes, “estimated” Federal Stafford Loan awards do appear on the
billing statement in order to assist the student in determining the balance owed, if any, to
the University. However, a Federal Stafford Loan Master Promissory Note (MPN) is not
processed until all requested forms are received and verification is completed. Once the
loan has been processed, the lender will send the loan proceeds via check or Electronic
Funds Transfer (EFT) to the University. These funds will be applied to the student’s
account once the student has met all student eligibility criteria, e.g., enrolled at least halftime in an eligible program of study.
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How Registration Affects Your Financial Aid
Federal regulations and institutional guidelines require students to be registered before any
financial aid monies can be disbursed. In addition, federal and state financial aid programs
specify minimum enrollment requirements in order for a student to receive any (maximum
or partial) assistance from these programs. These minimum enrollment requirements are
broken into four enrollment classifications: full-time, three-quarter-time, half-time and
less-than-half-time. The chart below indicates the number of credits used to determine a
student’s enrollment status.
Credits that Determine Enrollment Status
Enrollment Status
Number of Credits Registered
Full-time
9 credits or more
Three-quarter-time
7-8 credits
Half-time
5-6 credits
Less-than-half-time
Less than 5 credits
In order to qualify for assistance from the Federal Stafford Loan program, students must be
enrolled at least half-time.
Financial Aid Refunds
Financial aid that exceeds the amount the student owes to the University, e.g., tuition and
fees, dorm and dining expenses, will be disbursed to the student in the form of a refund
check. The Bursar’s Office mails all refund checks to students. Refunds can be used to cover
non-institutional educational costs such as books and supplies, off-campus housing, and
transportation expenses. Typically, these refunds will be available starting with the second
week of the semester if the student has satisfied the eligibility requirements for each award.
Note: Students planning to attend California University of Pennsylvania should be aware
that financial aid refunds are not available until the second week of the semester for which
the funds are intended. Students should plan to come to the University with enough
personal money for early semester purchases (books, materials, art supplies, etc.) without
depending upon financial aid funds.
Maintaining Financial Aid Eligibility
NEW Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy for 2011-2012
The new Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy will go into effect starting with the Fall
2011 semester. At the end of the Fall 2011 semester the Financial Aid Office will review
Academic Progress for students using the criteria listed in this policy. Students will now be
reviewed for progress at the end of each semester of enrollment (including Summer).
Overview
Federal regulations require California University of Pennsylvania to establish Satisfactory
Academic Progress (SAP) standards for students applying for or receiving financial aid
assistance.
The school’s policies for SAP are designed to review a student’s academic performance in
terms of quantitative and qualitative measures to ensure the student is making progress
towards the completion of the academic program.
The SAP policies apply to all Title IV financial assistance programs including Federal
Work-Study, SEOG, Federal Perkins Loans, Federal Stafford Loans, and Federal Direct
PLUS loans.
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Students at California University of Pennsylvania must meet all of the requirements stated
in the Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy regardless of whether or not they previously
received financial aid.
Cal U is responsible for ensuring that all students who receive Title IV assistance are
meeting these standards.
Policies
The SAP policy for CAL U for Title IV students is the same as or stricter than the
university’s standards for students enrolled in the same educational program who are not
receiving Title IV aid.
Satisfactory Academic Progress standards include:
1. Qualitative (GPA)
2. Quantitative (credit hours earned)
3. Maximum Time Frame
For all degree-seeking students, SAP will be calculated at the end of each semester of
enrollment, typically in January, June, and August.
Qualitative
Undergraduate students must maintain at least a 2.00 cumulative grade point average to
remain in good academic standing.
Graduate students must maintain at least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average to remain in
good academic standing.
Quantitative
Students must earn 67% of credits attempted to maintain good standing and be considered
making Satisfactory Academic Progress.
The completed percentage is determined by dividing credits earned by the number of
credits attempted.
• Withdrawals, incompletes, and failures are considered attempted but not earned.
• Repeated courses are included in the calculation of both attempted and earned units.
• Audited courses are not considered units attempted or earned.
Maximum Time Frame
Maximum Time Frame is defined as the required length of time it will take a student to
complete his/her degree. A student will remain eligible for Federal Aid for up to 150% total
attempted credits. For example, if you are pursuing a degree which requires 120 semester
hours, you may not receive financial aid after you have attempted 180 hours. This includes
transfer credits. Most majors require 120 credits for graduation.
Some exceptions: B.S. in Education (certificate in Biology) requires 124 credits (193 credits
max). A dual Major in Education is 144 credits (216 credits max). A Bachelor of Science in
computer engineering technology, a B.S. in electrical engineering, and a B.S. in computer
science require 124 credits (186 credits max). Most graduate degrees require 45 credits (68
credits max). Please contact your Academic Advisor to see how many credits are required
to complete your degree. Then you will be able to determine your Maximum Time Frame.
Special Grades
I (Incomplete): An incomplete grade does not earn credit or influence the grade point
average in the semester in which the course work was taken. However, an incomplete
grade will count toward your total credits attempted. Once the incomplete has been
resolved and a passing grade has been earned, the credits and the grade will then be
14
counted toward satisfying the minimum credit hours and the grade point average
requirements.
W (Withdrawal): All withdrawal categories do not earn credit toward graduation or
toward satisfying the minimum credit hours requirement of the Satisfactory Academic
Progress policy. However, these credits will count toward your total attempted credits and
could possibly affect the Maximum Time Frame requirement.
P (Pass): If this grade is given, the credits will apply toward graduation and will also be
counted toward satisfying the minimum earned credit hours standard but it will not affect
the student’s grade point average.
Repeated Courses: For a course that has been repeated, the last grade earned will be used
in calculating the student’s grade point average with the credits being counted only for
the semester in which it was repeated. However, each time a student registers for a course,
those credits are counted toward the student’s Maximum Time Frame.
Military/Transfer Credits
In most cases, military training and/or service school experience credits can be counted
toward the total credit hours earned by a student for satisfying the minimum credit hours
requirement for academic progress. However, these credits will only be used during the
student’s first year of attendance at California University of Pennsylvania.
All credits transferred to the University will be counted toward the Maximum Time Frame
requirement for academic progress.
Review Period
Each student is reviewed at the end of each pay period (semester) to ensure that
Satisfactory Academic Progress has been achieved. A student who does not meet SAP
requirements will be placed on Financial Aid Warning status.
Financial Aid Warning
Financial Aid Warning is a status assigned to a student who fails to make Satisfactory
Academic Progress at a school that evaluates progress at the end of each payment period
(semester), and chooses to allow students who fail its progress standards to continue to
receive aid.
Financial Aid Suspension
If a student fails to achieve Satisfactory Academic Progress while on Financial Aid Warning
status, he/she will be placed on Financial Aid Suspension for the following semester.
These students will not be eligible for financial aid until all requirements for Satisfactory
Academic Progress have been achieved.
Financial Aid Probation
Financial Aid Probation is a status assigned to a student who fails to make Satisfactory
Academic Progress and who has appealed and has had eligibility for aid reinstated. During
the probationary period, students are given one semester to satisfactorily either raise
their GPA or percentage of earned units. If the GPA or percentage of units completed is
successful, the probation is removed. Financial Aid denial and suspension will result if the
student’s GPA or units completed is not successfully raised.
Eligibility for Reinstatement
In order to regain financial aid eligibility, a student must successfully meet all requirements
for Satisfactory Academic Progress. Students may use any semester(s) of the academic year
to eliminate his/her deficiency. However, he/she is financially responsible for all expenses
incurred during the time it takes to regain eligibility. Course work taken at another college
or university may be used to resolve the Minimum Credit Hours Earned requirement.
However, credits taken elsewhere will not resolve the Qualitative (GPA) component of the
Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy.
15
Progress Appeal Procedures
All Title IV aid recipients have the right to appeal a Financial Aid Suspension decision by
submitting a Satisfactory Academic Progress Appeal Form to the Financial Aid Office. The
student will be required to submit as part of the appeal, information regarding why he/she
failed to make SAP. The student must also explain what has changed in his/her situation
that would allow the student to demonstrate satisfactory academic progress at the next
evaluation.
A student may file an appeal if there is an unusual and/or mitigating circumstance that
affected their academic progress. Such circumstances may include a severe illness or injury
to the student or immediate family member; the death of a student’s relative; activation
into military service or other circumstances as deemed appropriate for consideration by the
SAP Appeals Committee.
Appeal forms with all supporting documentation must be submitted by the deadline.
Students will be notified in writing shortly after filing the appeal.
When reviewing an Appeal it will be determined if the student will be able to meet the SAP
standards after the subsequent pay period; or if the student can meet SAP standards by
following an Academic Plan established by the Financial Aid Office.
Students who have their Financial Aid reinstated through an Appeal will be placed on
Financial Aid Probation.
If the appeal is denied, a final appeal may be made to Financial Aid within 10 days of the
date on the denial letter.
PHEAA Academic Progress
Even though the PHEAA State Grant is a not a Title IV aid program, Satisfactory Academic
Progress requirements must also be met in order to remain eligible. A student must
successfully complete a minimum number of credits during each academic year that a State
Grant is awarded in order to maintain eligibility for the upcoming year.
Enrollment .
Status
Semesters .
Received
Credits Earned .
Per Year
Full-Time (12 or more credits)
2
24
Part-Time (6 – 11 credits)
2
12
For PHEAA Grant purposes, repeated courses can only be counted once in meeting the
credit hours standard requirement.
A student is only eligible to receive a maximum of 8 full-time semesters or 16 part-time
semesters of PHEAA Grant eligibility.
Refund/Repayment Policy
Refund Policy
Students who officially withdraw from the University or from specific classes during the
semester may be eligible for a refund of a portion of the tuition, fees, and room and board
paid to California University for that semester. Refunds are based on the official date of
withdrawal as recorded by the Academic Records Office (for additional information, see
“Withdrawal from the University” on page 29). Students who do not follow the official
withdrawal procedure but who stop attending classes for all of their courses will be
considered to have withdrawn at the 50 percent point of the semester unless attendance is
documented after that time.
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Return of Title IV Funds Formula
Two formulas exist for determining the amount of the refund: California University’s
Refund Policy (for additional information, see “Refund/Repayment Policy” on page 16) and
the federal Return of Title IV Aid formula. The federal formula is applicable to any student
receiving federal aid who withdraws from the University during the first 60 percent of a
semester. These students will have their federal financial aid (Federal Stafford and PLUS
loans) adjusted based on the percent of the semester completed before the withdrawal.
In essence, students will be entitled to retain the same percent of the federal financial aid
received as the percent of the semester completed. This percent is calculated by dividing
the number of days in the semester (excluding breaks of five days or longer) into the
number of days completed prior to the withdrawal (excluding breaks of five days or
longer). There will be no adjustment to federal financial aid after the completion of at least
60 percent of the semester. If any refund remains after the required return of Title IV aid,
the refund will be used to repay California University funds, state grant funds and other
private sources, and the student in proportion to the amount paid by each non-federal
source, as long as there was no unpaid balance due at the time of withdrawal. If there is an
unpaid balance, then all aid sources will be repaid before any refund is paid to the student.
Distribution Policy
Once the amount of the federal funds to be returned has been calculated, the funds will be
returned to the appropriate program(s) in the following priority order:
• Unsubsidized Stafford Loans
• Subsidized Stafford Loans
• Perkins Loans
• PLUS Loans
• Pell Grants
• Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants
Repayment of Unearned Financial Aid Assistance
Students who receive a refund of financial aid before withdrawing from the University
may owe a repayment of federal financial aid funds received. Students will be notified by
the Bursar’s Office and will be given 30 days to repay the funds to the University. Students
who fail to return the unearned portion of federal financial aid funds given to them will
have a “hold” placed on their University records, thereby preventing them from registering
for future semesters until repayment is made in full.
Financial Aid Glossary
1040 Form, 1040A Form, 1040EZ Form: The federal income tax return that is required to be
filed by each person who received income during the previous year.
Academic Year: The period of time school is in session, consisting of 30 weeks of
instruction.
Appeal: A formal request made by the student to have a financial aid administrator review
his/her aid eligibility and possibly use professional judgment to adjust the figures. In the
event of the death of a parent, unemployment or other unusual circumstances, he/she
should file an appeal.
Award Letter: An official letter issued by the Financial Aid Office that lists the financial aid
awarded to the student. You are required to either accept or decline the awards you wish to
receive, sign the award letter, and return it to the Financial Aid Office. Award information
is also available on our Vulcan Information Portal (VIP).
Bursar’s Office: The University office responsible for the billing and collection of University
charges.
17
Cost of Attendance (COA): Also known as the cost of education or “budget,” this is the
total amount used to calculate a student’s aid eligibility. This amount includes tuition
and fees, room and board, allowances for books and supplies, transportation costs, and
personal and incidental expenses.
Commuter Student: A student who resides at home with his/her parents and commutes to
school daily.
Dependent Student: A student who is 23 years old or younger and is supported by his/her
parents. A parent refusing to provide support for his/her child’s education is not sufficient
for the child to be declared independent.
Disbursement: The release of loan funds to the school for delivery to the borrower.
Disclosure Statement: A statement from the lending institution that provides the borrower
with information regarding the approval amount of the loan, interest rate, origination and
insurance fees, and any other finance charges incurred.
Electronic Funds Transfer: Used by some lenders to wire funds for Stafford Loan proceeds
directly to participating schools without requiring a check for the student to endorse.
Enrollment Status: Indication of total credits scheduled for an enrollment period. For
financial aid purposes, you must be enrolled at least half-time to receive aid.
Expected Family Contribution (EFC): The amount of money that the family is expected
to contribute to the student’s education. Congress bases this on the Federal Methodology
need analysis formula dictated.
Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA): Used to apply for all need-based aid.
Gift Aid: Financial aid that is not repaid, such as scholarships and grants.
Grant: Type of financial aid based on financial need that a student does not repay.
Independent Student: An independent student must meet at least one of the following
criteria:
• Age 24 or older
• Veteran of the U.S. Armed Forces
• Enrolled in a graduate or professional program beyond a bachelor’s degree
• Married
• Orphan or ward of the court or a ward of the court until age 18
• Legal dependents other than spouse for which you are responsible
Loan: A loan is a type of financial aid that must be repaid with interest to a lending
institution of your choice.
Need: The difference between the cost of attendance and the expected family contribution.
Scholarship: Gift aid that is not repaid.
Stafford Loan: A Stafford Loan comes in two forms, unsubsidized and subsidized. Students
are required to pay interest on an unsubsidized loan, whereas the government pays the
interest on a subsidized loan while the student is in school, during the six-month grace
period and during any deferment periods.
Subsidized Loan: A loan on which the government pays the interest while the student is
in school, during a six-month grace period and during any deferment periods. Subsidized
loans are based on need, and may not be used to finance the family contribution.
Unmet Need: The difference between the student’s award and the full cost of tuition.
18
Unsubsidized Loan: A loan that the government does not pay the interest on. The
borrower is responsible for the interest on an unsubsidized loan from the date the loan is
disbursed, even while the student is still in school.
Untaxed Income: Contribution to IRAs, Keoghs, tax-sheltered annuities and 401(k) plans,
as well as worker’s compensation and welfare benefits.
U.S. Department of Education: The U.S. Department of Education administers several
federal student financial aid programs, including the Federal Pell Grant, the Federal WorkStudy Program, the Federal Perkins Loan, the Federal Stafford Loan and the Federal PLUS
Loan.
Verification: A review process in which the Financial Aid Office determines the accuracy of
the information provided by the student and parents on their FAFSA. During this process,
the student will be required to submit requested documentation.
Tuition and Fees
For the most up-to-date information on graduate tuition, fees, and room and board charges,
visit: www.calu.edu/current-students/financial-aid/tuition-and-fees/index.htm and www.
calu.edu/current-students/housing/index.htm
Payment of Tuition and Fees for Semester Registration
All fees will be assessed four weeks prior to the beginning of each term. Payment may be
made by cash, check or money order payable to California University of Pennsylvania, or
by VISA, MasterCard, American Express or Discover Card. Online payments can be made
by ACH check payment and by credit card. If financial aid has been awarded, this amount
will be deducted from the bill. Payment plans (with initial payment) may be contracted
online at the first due date for each term.
Payment Information
California University of Pennsylvania is moving to e-billing. Students who take advantage
of early/rolling registration should receive a Cal U e-mail announcing that the billing
statement is available for viewing online through the Vulcan Informational Portal (VIP)
approximately four weeks prior to the start of the term. Students who enroll within four
weeks prior of the first day of a semester should be prepared to make payment at the time
of registration.
Payment Plans
Payment plans are available each fall and spring semester. Payment plans enable students
to pay costs on a monthly basis. Enrollment for the payment plan can be completed online.
Detailed information is also available online through Bursar’s Office website.
Third Party Billing
Some companies and government agencies pay tuition directly to the University. If tuition
is to be paid in this manner, authorizing forms or letters must be sent to the Bursar’s Office.
This payment must be received by the Bursar’s Office during the semester in which charges
originate and cannot be used in lieu of a personal payment for an authorized payment
plan. This payment option does not apply to corporate tuition reimbursement policies or
when the payment amount is based on grades and received after the term has ended.
Refund Policy
Tuition is adjusted for class withdrawals during the first week of the fall and spring
semesters. After the add/drop period ends, adjustments are made ONLY if a student
withdraws from all enrolled classes. Refunds are made to the amount of the charge, not the
amount that has been paid to date. The refund policy is available online and in the Bursar’s
Office. Financial aid recipients should refer to the Refund/Repayment Policy located in the
Financial Aid section of the catalog for the financial aid adjustment policy.
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Room Deposit
An application fee of $300 is required in order to reserve a room for the following academic
year. Request a housing contract packet from the Residence Life Office. The contract and
card must be signed and returned to the Bursar’s Office with a $300 payment. This fee is
non-refundable and is not deducted from room charges.
Late Registration Fee
Students who register after the add/drop date of the semester will be charged a $25 late
registration fee. (The structure of fees is subject to change without prior notice and such
changes shall take precedence over existing charges set forth in this catalog.)
Late Payment Fee
A late payment fee of $25 per month will be assessed when a student fails to pay the
required fees by the due date or when a student fails to pay according to an approved
payment plan. (The structure of fees is subject to change without prior notice and such
changes shall take precedence over existing charges set forth in this catalog.)
Return Check Charge
A $25 fee will be charged for any check that is made payable to California University of
Pennsylvania and returned by the bank because funds are unavailable. (The structure of
fees is subject to change without prior notice and such changes shall take precedence over
existing charges set forth in this catalog.)
20
Admissions
Requesting an Application for Admission
You may apply online at our website: www.calu.edu/academics. You may also e-mail our
office at [email protected] or call the office at 724-938-4187. If you do not have access to
a computer, then you may request a paper application and it will be mailed to you.
If you are anticipating applying for financial aid, the Free Application for Federal Student
Aid (FAFSA) form should be filled out simultaneously and California University should
be designated to receive your information. The best option is to complete the web-based
version of the FAFSA at www.fafsa.ed.gov, known as FAFSA on the Web. It includes stepby-step instructions for completing the online FAFSA as well as preapplication worksheets.
You can obtain a PIN to electronically sign the form by visiting www.pin.ed.gov. If you
have technical questions about using FAFSA on the Web, call 1-800-4-FED-AID.
You may pay the $25 application fee by credit card when you submit the application online.
Hard copy applications can be requested by e-mailing the Graduate School at [email protected]
calu.edu or by calling 724-938-4187. Applications should be forwarded, with the $25
application fee, to:
California University of Pennsylvania
School of Graduate Studies and Research
250 University Ave.
California, PA 15419
724-938-4187
At the same time, the granting institution of your degrees should send official sealed
transcripts of all graduate and undergraduate work to the School of Graduate Studies
and Research. It is not necessary to send a transcript of work completed at California
University.
Application Deadlines:
Application deadlines vary by program and students are advised to apply for admission
to the School of Graduate Studies and Research as early as possible. Consult www.calu.
edu/prospective and/or the Graduate School office (724-938-4187) for the deadline of the
semester and specific graduate program you wish to attend. Many programs have “rolling”
admissions (beyond those deadlines). To be sure your application gets full consideration, it
should be completed by the deadline date.
Some of the graduate programs described in this catalog lead directly to specialized
certification. Other programs may require licensing examinations. Individual program
coordinators should be consulted for in-depth information regarding certification and
licensure.
There are three sources* of additional information about graduate programs that you can
contact by telephone or e-mail to schedule an appointment:
• The graduate studies coordinator of the department offering that program
• The assistant director of graduate recruitment and admissions
• The chair of the department
*Visit www.calu.edu/prospective for contact information for these sources.
Application Process
For specific program requirements, visit our website, www.calu.edu/prospective, or contact
the Graduate School at [email protected] or call 724-938-4187.
Complete application and pay application fee following the guidelines listed above.
21
Applicants must present official sealed transcripts of all undergraduate and graduate work
to the School of Graduate Studies and Research. The bachelor’s degree must be awarded
from a college or university that is accredited by the National Commission on Accreditation
or the appropriate regional accrediting agency.
Some departments require additional documentation such as letters of recommendation,
references and/or other supporting material. Applicants for admission to certain graduate
programs may be required to take specified entrance exams (Praxis, GRE, MAT).
In some programs, applicants who have less than a 3.00 undergraduate GPA may seek
conditional admission based on the criteria established by each program. Visit the program
website or contact the program coordinator for more information.
Note: Admission to a program does not carry with it admission to candidacy for the
degree. See “Candidacy” on page 28.
Admission to Certification Programs Beyond the Master’s Degree
The University offers certification or certificate programs that require additional
experience and credits beyond the master’s degree. Those additional experiences develop
appropriate competencies in specific areas of specialization. They are in the fields of
the superintendent’s letter of eligibility and autism spectrum disorders certificates, and
certification in K-12 principal, elementary education, mentally and physically handicapped
education, school counseling, school psychology, and reading. For further information, see
the individual graduate program information in this catalog.
Although most graduate students at California University are enrolled in degree programs,
there are opportunities to take some graduate classes as a non-degree student, either for
personal or professional growth or for certification, without becoming an applicant for a
University graduate degree.
If you wish to take graduate courses at California University but do not wish to enroll in a
formal certification or degree program, you will nevertheless have to apply for admission
to the University (and pay the normal application fee as well as send copies of your official
transcripts). Your acceptance will be based on the amount and quality of your preparation
as determined by the academic department in which you will be taking courses.
Upon admission as a non-degree student, you will be permitted to take 6 credits.
Completion of these courses does not automatically and in itself lead to admission to a
degree or certification program. Applicants interested in further exploration must reapply
(fee waived).
Graduate students from other universities (sometimes known as “visiting students”) may
take courses at California University and must go through the normal application process.
They are responsible for knowing and adhering to the transfer policies of their home
institutions.
Admission Decisions
Once all application materials are received by the School of Graduate Studies and Research,
materials are sent to the program coordinator for a final admission decision. The applicant
is informed of the decision by letter to his/her home mailing address.
An admission decision is valid for one academic year (two semesters and one summer
term, i.e., the semester/term the student applied for and the following two semesters/
terms). If a student does not register for classes during that time, the acceptance is no
longer valid and the applicant must reapply for admission, repay the application fee and
resubmit all materials.
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International Students
California University welcomes applications from students from countries other than the
United States. Individuals who desire to study on campus must obtain F-1 non-immigrant
status prior to enrollment or possess other legal status that enables them to pursue studies
and maintain their status through the entirety of their studies. All international students
who apply for graduate studies must meet the same entrance requirements as all other
students. For admission, the following documents must be submitted:
1. A completed international application and non-refundable $25 application fee. All
international application requests must be sent to Jessica Spence, who can be reached by
e-mail at [email protected] or by telephone at 724-938-4187.
2. In addition to general admission requirements for degree programs, international
students for whom English is a second language must submit a certified English
translation of all official transcripts from post-secondary schools outside the United
States to California University of Pennsylvania’s School of Graduate Studies and
Research.
3. International students must also arrange to have photocopies of their post-secondary
diploma(s) submitted to one of the following organizations for a document-bydocument evaluation.
Josef Silny & Associates Inc.
International Education Consultants
7101 SW 102 Ave.
Miami, FL 33173
305-273-1616
FAX 305-273-1338
[email protected]
www.jsilny.com
or
World Education Services Inc.
P.O. Box 745
Old Chelsea Station
New York, NY 10113
212-966-6311
FAX 212-966-6395
www.wes.org
Students should contact the organization to request an application (or visit its website
to download an application), complete the application listing California University of
Pennsylvania School of Graduate Studies and Research as the recipient and return it
to the organization with the required fees and credentials. This transcript evaluation
can take up to four weeks to complete after all documents are received. Check with the
service(s) for their specific fee structure(s).
After review of official credentials, departments may subsequently request that the
student obtain a course-by-course evaluation.
4. An official copy of a teaching certificate (if application is being made to certain Master of
Education programs).
5. An official copy of your TOEFL score, sent from the testing center. Photocopies are not
acceptable. A minimum score of 550 on the paper-based test and 213 on the computerbased test, or 80 on the Internet-based test (iBT TOEFL) is required for most programs.
An official copy of an IELTS (International English Language Testing System) with a
minimum score of 6.0 may be substituted for the TOEFL score; IELTS is jointly owned
by the British Council, IDP: IELTS Australia, and the University of Cambridge ESOL
Examinations. For more information, visit www.ielts.org.
6. Any other necessary forms.
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Canadian Applicants
Students holding undergraduate degrees from a Canadian college or university need only
submit their official transcripts directly to the Graduate School. If they are similar to the
materials from the United States model, they will be evaluated locally. If not, students will
be required to comply with the above international student policy.
Financial Requirements
All international students must provide evidence of sufficient funding for one year of
graduate school as part of the admissions process before the international student advisor
will issue a Certificate of Eligibility for Nonimmigrant F-1 Student (also referred to as an
I-20).
Evidence of sufficient funding in the form of acceptable notarized affidavits, bank
statements, etc., must verify/demonstrate that the student requesting admission possesses
financial resources totaling a minimum baseline amount of $26,907.80 for one year of study
(graduate tuition, fees, housing/meal, books/supplies) to meet the financial admission
requirement. Other cost factors may either increase or decrease this total amount (see
below). This requirement is not repeated for a second or more year of study but it is the
student’s responsibility to meet university costs and all other expenses throughout the
entirety of their education to remain eligible for their I-20 for study.
Note: Federal regulations for F-1 students do not permit paid off-campus work. Note as
well that on-campus work opportunities are very limited. A limited amount of financial
aid is available to international students, chiefly in the form of graduate assistantships
requiring a certain amount of work at the University; but students must be certain of
adequate funds for their academic and living expenses before enrolling. International
students must be enrolled for at least one semester before a graduate assistantship may be
granted. International students should contact the dean of the Graduate School regarding
graduate assistantships.
Tuition
Non-Pennsylvanian resident tuition cost is $11,232 ($5,616 per semester) for a nine (9) credit
load. The additional cost per credit for 10 to 15 credits is $624 per credit.
Fees
Total fees cost is $3,465.80 ($1,723.90 per semester).
Housing/Meals
The cost for on-campus housing/meals is $10,442 ($5,221 per semester). This cost provides
you and a roommate with a 2 bedroom/2 bath, double occupancy suite in a campus
residence hall and a 14-meal per week dining plan. Any on campus living contract requires
that a meal plan be purchased. Costs may be adjusted accordingly for a student who
provides evidence of a reduced cost for off-campus housing/meals arrangements.
Books/Supplies
The cost for books and supplies is $1,768 ($884 per semester). This is an estimated cost that
can vary greatly from semester-to-semester.
Other Costs
• Each dependent accompanying the student must be declared and funding must be
sufficient and verified to support each dependent($6,000 per year for a spouse; $3,000 per
year for each child).
• Applicants must also provide proof of adequate health insurance coverage in the U.S.
Note that the University health insurance plan is not available to graduate students.
Federal regulations require that an F-1 visa student carry a minimum nine (9) credit fulltime course load (very limited circumstances permit a part-time load under approval of the
international student advisor)..
24
Final admission is contingent upon clearance from the education authorities of the home
country and from U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.
For more information, contact the Graduate School at 724-938-4187.
Registration
Your acceptance letter from California University will contain information enabling you
to access and use the VIP (Vulcan Information Portal), the University’s online student
registration system. Graduate students must consult with their academic advisers before
scheduling their courses. You may also schedule for the next semester by contacting the
School of Graduate Studies and Research at [email protected] or 724-938-4187.
If you have been accepted into a program of graduate studies but have not been recently
enrolled at California University, contact the School of Graduate Studies and Research to
inquire regarding your current status.
All questions concerning payment of tuition and fees should be directed to the Bursar’s
Office: 724-938-4431, [email protected] or www.calu.edu.
Responsibility for Regulations
Responsibility for knowing and complying with all academic rules and regulations,
including the requirements for graduation, rests with the individual graduate student.
Faculty advisers assist graduate students in planning their academic programs and
research requirements, but they are not expected to relieve graduate students of
responsibility in other areas.
Campus E-mail
All students are assigned a campus e-mail address. To retrieve your user name and
password, go to www.calu.edu and click on QUICKLINKS, then Get Campus Username
and Password. For assistance or questions setting up your e-mail account, contact the IT
helpdesk at [email protected] or 724-938-5911. Students are responsible for all official
University communications sent to that e-mail address.
ANY OTHER COMMUNICATION SENT TO OR FROM ANY OTHER E-MAIL ADDRESS
WILL NOT BE REGARDED AS VALID OR OFFICIAL.
Planning a Program
Students admitted to a graduate program will be referred to the appropriate department
for academic advising. Graduate students’ programs are planned in conference with their
advisers. Research advisers are assigned to graduate students by the program coordinator.
Each student should consult with his/her adviser throughout the graduate program on a
regularly scheduled basis. Programs of studies must be approved by a student’s adviser
before registration.
Cohorts – Rights and Responsibilities:
Several of California University of Pennsylvania’s graduate programs, both traditional and
online, are offered in a “cohort” format.
The purpose of creating a cohort model of enrollment is to maximize the size of the
enrollment and to better meet the needs of students by providing a clear scope and
sequence for the courses. This enrollment model has benefits for students, faculty and the
University – and also has responsibilities. Those rights and responsibilities will be spelled
out in this document.
The decision on the size of the cohort will be made by the administration at the time the
cohort is scheduled to begin. The administration also identifies the beginning time for a
cohort and, in consultation with the faculty, the scope and sequence of the courses.
Once a cohort has begun, the number of courses offered and the specific courses offered in
any given semester are at the discretion of the University. The administration promises to
25
provide instruction opportunities necessary to meet the needs of the cohort. This does not
necessarily mean the opportunities will be exclusively in the form of formal classes taught
by tenure track faculty. Individualized instruction may be used; adjunct faculty may also
be used.
Students must understand that when they become members of a cohort, they are
committing to the published scope and sequence of courses. As long as they attend the
course when offered, they will be able to proceed through the program. If, for whatever
reason, a cohort student fails to enroll in a scheduled cohort class (i.e., out of sequence), he/
she may have to wait a considerable period of time before it is offered again.
Appealing a Grade or Other Academic Decision
University decisions are based on applicable policies, rational procedures and sound
decision-making principles. Concerning a student’s grade, it must be understood that it is
not the policy of the administration to change a properly assigned grade (i.e., one based
upon recorded grades for quizzes, exams, assignments, projects and other grade criteria as
indicated on the course syllabus or outline).
When a student alleges violations of sound academic grading procedures, the University
administration and faculty mutually support a student appeal procedure, which gives
both the student and the faculty member a fair process to substantiate and/or refute those
allegations.
In appealing a grade, a student should first contact the faculty member who issued that
grade to discuss the reason for the grade. If the student is not satisfied with the faculty
member’s explanation, the student should then contact the faculty member’s department
chair or program coordinator. This contact must be in writing and must be filed with the
chair or program coordinator within 30 working days after the beginning of the fall or
spring semester following the term in which the grade in question was given. The chair
or program coordinator shall notify in writing the student and faculty member of his/
her receipt of the appeal from the student. The written appeal must include the following
information to the extent applicable:
• The final grade for the course.
• The grade on the assignment that is the subject of the appeal.
• Description of the relevant assignment that is the subject of the appeal. Please include a
copy of the assignment.
• A precise basis as to why the student is appealing this particular grade. Provide specific
rationales as to why the grade is improperly assigned.
If accord is not reached through the chair or program coordinator, the student may then
appeal to the dean of the School of Graduate Studies and Research. Such appeal must be in
writing and must be filed with the dean within 15 working days from the date of the final
written determination of the chair or program coordinator. The dean shall notify in writing
the student and faculty member of his/her findings and decision within 15 working days
of his/her receipt of the appeal from the student. The final source of appeal is the provost.
This final step should be taken only if there is no possibility for resolution at an earlier
stage, and only if the student is convinced that arbitrary and/or capricious standards were
applied. The appeal to the provost must be in writing and must be filed with the provost
within 15 working days from the date of the final written determination of the dean. The
provost shall review the matter and take action as necessary to provide equity in the
situation.
If you intend to appeal your grade(s), you may register and continue to take classes. If you
would like to remain in your scheduled courses pending appeal, you need to notify the
Graduate School of your intent to appeal by contacting Suzanne Powers
([email protected] or 724-938-4029) no later than Friday of the first week of class of
26
the following semester. Be aware that should your appeal fail, you may be financially
responsible for any additional classes you have scheduled.
In the case of other academic decisions, the student should follow the same appeal
procedure insofar as possible. In matters relating to student conduct and discipline, the
vice president for student development has authority to review student appeals. In matters
relating to financial aid, see “Financial Aid” on page 7; in matters relating to teacher
certification, see the relevant section of this catalog.
Style Manuals for Preparation of Papers
Research studies must conform to a format and style that is recognized by the principal
scholarly journals in the discipline. Students are expected to obtain and use the style
manuals suggested by their respective programs. Most programs in the School of Graduate
Studies and Research require the use of the most recent edition of the Publication Manual
of the American Psychological Association (APA) or the MLA Handbook for Writers of
Research Papers. The student has the responsibility to find out which style manual is
required by the program. Copies of these manuals and other manuals may be purchased in
the University bookstore or consulted in the Manderino Library. Guidelines for theses and
projects can be accessed through www.calu.edu/academics/files/ELECTRONICthesis.pdf.
Instructional II Certification
If you hold a Pennsylvania Instructional I teaching certificate, you can use the credits
you earn in a graduate program at California University toward the post-baccalaureate
requirements for the Instructional II certificate. Some graduate programs lead to specialized
initial teaching certification.
More information regarding Pennsylvania certification can be found on the Pennsylvania
Department of Education (PDE) website at www.education.state.pa.us.
A. Purpose and Scope
The purpose of this program is to provide the opportunity for individuals holding a
Pennsylvania Instructional I teaching certificate to fulfill the PDE requirements for the
Instructional II certificate. This program also provides the opportunity for individuals
holding an instructional certificate to meet the PDE requirement for continuing
professional education (Act 48).
B. Definition(s)
California University is a Pennsylvania Department of Education-approved provider for
Act 48 continuing professional education. All of California University’s graduate education
programs may be applied to Act 48 continuing education.
C. Policy
If you hold a Pennsylvania Instructional I teaching certificate, you can use the credits
you earn in a graduate program at California University toward the post-baccalaureate
requirements for the Instructional II certificate. Some graduate programs lead to
specialized initial teaching certification. Instructional Certificate holders may also meet the
Pennsylvania Department of Education-mandated continuing professional education (Act
48.)
D. Procedure(s)
Graduate courses may be taken as a non-degree candidate or as a degree candidate in any
of the approved graduate programs.
E. Effective Date
2005-2006 Graduate Catalog
27
Act 48
Persons holding Pennsylvania teacher certification may also satisfy the requirements of Act
48 by successfully completing graduate courses. Six graduate credits satisfy the 180-hour
professional development requirements of Act 48. If you are interested in these programs,
you may contact the School of Graduate Studies and Research at 724-938-4187 or the
College of Education and Human Services at 734-938-4125. For further information, see the
Pennsylvania Department of Education website at www.education.state.pa.us.
An Act 48 form is available for download on the School of Graduate Studies and Research
website at www.calu.edu/academics/colleges. Once you have completed a course for Act
48, fill out the form and send it to:
Act 48 Coordinator
Office of Academic Affairs
California University of Pennsylvania
Box 4
California, PA 15419
Course Load
A normal full-time graduate student load is 9-12 credits per semester. Students wishing
to take more than 12 credits in a semester must obtain the support of their adviser and
permission from the dean of the School of Graduate Studies and Research.
Candidacy
After admission to a graduate program, and in order to complete a program of study
leading to the master’s degree, several programs require the graduate student to apply for
and be admitted to the status of candidacy. It is the individual’s responsibility to apply
for candidacy in due time and manner. Application for candidacy should be made when a
graduate student has completed at least 6 but no more than 12 credits of graduate study at
this University. Students failing to meet this candidacy requirement may be blocked from
future registration. Credits completed in excess of 12 may not be accepted for inclusion in
a degree program. The candidacy application form is available to download on www.calu.
edu/academics/colleges/graduate-school/policies-forms/program-candidacy-applications/
index.htm or in the office of the School of Graduate Studies and Research. Candidacy
deadline dates are posted on the website each semester.
The applicant for candidacy must demonstrate a 3.00 GPA (B average) in graduate courses.
Approval for admission to candidacy is granted by individual departments or programs,
which may have special requirements such as interviews or tests, and by the dean of the
School of Graduate Studies and Research.
For more precise details, the applicant should consult with their assigned academic adviser
or graduate program coordinator. The University reserves the right to deny the applicant’s
request for admission to candidacy for the master’s degree.
Programs that do not require candidacy are the following:
• Applied Criminology
• Arabic Language and Culture Certificate
• Athletic Training
• Business Administration
• Exercise Science and Health Promotion
• Performance Enhancement and Injury Prevention
• Wellness and Fitness
• Rehabilitation Science
• Sport Psychology
28
• Legal Studies
• Criminal Justice
• Homeland Security
• Law and Public Policy
• Nursing Administration and Leadership
• School Administration – Administrative Program for Principals
• Spanish for Business Certificate
• Spanish for Law Enforcement Certificate
• Sport Management
• Technology Education
Transfer Credit
Most programs leading to the master’s degree programs at California University of
Pennsylvania vary in the number of credits required. For specific degree requirements,
consult with the program coordinator or view the graduate program information on our
website at www.calu.edu/prospective. Of the number of required credits, all but 6 must
be taken at California University. Up to 6 credits transferred from an accredited graduate
program may be transferred to California University. Faculty will review proposed transfer
credits and recommend acceptance to the dean of the School of Graduate Studies and
Research. Only courses with grades of A or B will be considered (a grade of P [passing] or S
[satisfactory] will not be accepted); transfer credits are not figured into grade point average.
Withdrawals
Withdrawal from a Course
If you are not planning to attend the class(es) in which you registered, you must officially
withdraw/drop your class registration. It is your responsibility to review and understand
California University of Pennsylvania’s refund policy. To review the refund policy and
processes, see www.calu.edu/current-students/financial-aid/withdrawal/index.htm.
You may view the California University of Pennsylvania Academic Calendar at
www.calu.edu/current-students/academic-resources/academic-calendar/index.htm.
Failure to withdraw/drop your class(es), and/or failure to attend class(es) including
eCollege, Blackboard and Desire2Learn, and/or failure to make payment, DOES NOT
dismiss your financial obligation per semester. You must officially withdraw/drop with the
appropriate department in order to determine your financial and academic obligation and
penalty per semester.
To drop courses, you must contact the Graduate School at 724-938-4187 or [email protected]
calu.edu. For 100 percent Global Online programs, contact the Office of Web-Based
Programs at 1-866-595-6348 or [email protected] The request to drop your course(s) must
be done via e-mail confirming the course(s) to drop. Students cannot withdraw from classes
via the California University of Pennsylvania website after the first class date.
Withdrawal from the University
A student who decides to withdraw from the University during any academic term,
regardless of the reason, must contact the School of Graduate Studies and Research
immediately. All withdrawals are governed by the following regulations:
A formal request to withdrawal from the University must be made in writing though:
29
• handwritten communication,
• e-mail through your campus e-mail to [email protected], or
• fax to 724-938-5712.
A dismissal is granted to a student who withdraws from the University in the official
manner, has met all financial obligations to the University and has been properly cleared
by the Graduate School. The Graduate School must clear a student’s dismissal through the
Financial Aid and Bursar’s offices. If the student withdraws officially during the first 10
weeks of a semester, a W grade is recorded for each course scheduled. A W grade carries no
academic penalty and is not counted in the student’s GPA. For an official withdrawal from
a five-week session, W grades will be recorded during the first two weeks only.
No student is permitted to withdraw officially from the University during the last five
weeks of a semester or summer term. For a five- or eight-week session, students must
withdraw prior to completion of 80 percent of the course.
Leaving the University without notifying the Graduate School or Academic Records
Office and making an official withdrawal may result in automatic failure for all courses
scheduled. It also makes the student ineligible for refund of tuition and fees, and may affect
academic status and financial aid.
Students planning to withdraw from the University should consult with the Financial Aid
Office prior to completing the withdrawal process.
Administrative Withdrawals
The University administration has the authority to withdraw a student from the University
and to revoke that student’s registration at any time for the following reasons:
• Registration in violation of University regulations (e.g., academic ineligibility to
register).
• Failure to comply with academic requirements (e.g., unsatisfactory class attendance,
violation of the learning contract for students on academic probation, etc.).
• Disciplinary suspension or dismissal for the remainder of an academic term or longer.
• Severe psychological or health problems such that the student cannot be permitted to
continue in attendance.
• Other reasons deemed appropriate by the proper administrative officer.
The grade of WX is recorded for administrative withdrawals. The grade of WX is not
computed in the student’s grade point average and therefore involves no academic penalty.
The registrar must authorize the recording of this grade. If a student registers in violation
of the academic eligibility rule, the registration is declared invalid, the tuition and fees paid
by the student are refunded in full, and no grades are recorded.
In other cases of administrative withdrawal, the date and reason for the withdrawal are
used to determine the grade to be recorded and the amount of tuition and fees to be
assessed or canceled. In most cases, the regular tuition and fee assessment and refund
policies of the University prevail.
For administrative withdrawals during the first six weeks of a semester or two weeks in
a five-week summer session, the grade of WX is recorded for all courses on a student’s
schedule. No other grades, such as incomplete, are assigned. After this period, the date and
reason of the administrative withdrawal are considered. The registrar has the authority to
antedate an administrative withdrawal if circumstances warrant such action.
Disciplinary suspensions or dismissals are initiated by the appropriate authority in the
Office of Student Development and Services and written notification is sent to the Graduate
School or Academic Records Office, which cancels the student’s registration and notifies
other administrative offices and faculty members as necessary.
30
If faculty members have reason to inquire about a specific case of administrative
withdrawal, they should consult the registrar or the provost. In certain cases, the student’s
right to confidentiality may not permit full disclosure of the circumstances.
Repeating a Course
Graduate students can repeat a single course for grade improvement only once. Graduate
students are limited to a maximum total of two repeats across the program. The most
recent grade (regardless of whether it is higher or lower) will be the grade used for GPA
calculation. This course repeat policy also applies to post-baccalaureate students; that is,
post-baccalaureate students can repeat a single course for grade improvement only once
with a limit of a maximum of two repeats during the post-baccalaureate career.
Cheating and Plagiarism
Truth and intellectual honesty are both the subject matter and the necessary prerequisites
for all education. Consequently, students who attempt to improve their grades or class
standing by cheating on examinations or plagiarism on papers may be penalized by
disciplinary action ranging from verbal reprimand to a failing grade in the course. If the
situation appears to merit a more severe penalty, the professor may refer the matter to
the dean of the School of Graduate Studies and Research or the provost, with a request
for more formal disciplinary action by the University’s Discipline Committee, which may
result in suspension or expulsion from the University. (See “Academic Integrity” on page 125.)
Academic Probation and Dismissal
Graduate students must maintain at least a 3.00 grade point average (GPA) in graduate
courses taken in the degree program. A student receiving a GPA below 3.00 will be placed
on academic probation. A student on probation is not eligible for graduate assistantships
or the positions of graduate residence hall director, assistant hall director or community
assistant. Students placed on academic probation will be given one semester to raise the
GPA. If the GPA is still below 3.00 after the probationary period, the dean of the School
of Graduate Studies and Research, after consultation with the department chair and/or
program coordinator, may dismiss the student from the Graduate School.
Students receiving a GPA below 2.50 after the probationary period will automatically be
dismissed from the Graduate School. Some departments may have additional requirements
regarding academic probation and dismissal. Students should consult with their program
advisers for specific requirements. Students who have failed to meet the provisions of
their admission or those who have fallen below the minimum requirements may be
academically dismissed from the University. Students who have been dismissed may
reapply to the program after sitting out one semester. Readmission into the program is not
guaranteed. Students who are readmitted must work closely with their advisers and the
Graduate School to develop a plan of study that focuses on repeating courses with failing
grades before moving on in the program. Graduate students who have been dismissed and
wish to be readmitted to another graduate program must reapply to the School of Graduate
Studies and Research.
STUDENTS WHO HAVE BEEN AWARDED A GRADUATE ASSISTANTSHIP WITH A
SEMESTER GPA BELOW 3.00 WILL LOSE THEIR ASSISTANTSHIPS.
Grades
Faculty are encouraged to utilize the plus/minus grading system; however, its use is not
required. Check your course syllabi for the professors’ grading systems. A GPA of at
least 3.00, equivalent to a B average, is required of all graduate students in all graduate
programs.
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Plus/Minus Grading System
Grade
Grade Points
A
4.00
A-
3.67
B+
3.33
B
3.00
B-
2.67
C+
2.33
C
2.00
F
0.00
N
No Grade Reported — Research Work In Progress
AU
Not Calculated — Audit
I
Not Calculated — Incomplete
P
Not Calculated — Passing
W
Not Calculated — Official Withdrawal
WX
Not Calculated — Administrative Withdrawal
UW
Not Calculated — Unofficial Withdrawal
The grade point average (GPA) is computed by multiplying the number of semester hours
specified for each course by the quality points attained in that course, adding the total of
these results and dividing this total by the total number of semester hours attempted.
The temporary grade of I (for incomplete) may be assigned by the professor if a student
has not completed the work of the course, either because of illness or for other reasons that
the professor considers acceptable. (The professor may, however, submit a course grade
on the basis of work that has been completed.) The student must arrange to complete the
work necessary to remove the grade of I within one calendar year of receiving it. If it is not
removed within that period, the grade of I automatically becomes a grade of I-F, which
cannot be removed from the graduate student’s transcript unless the course is repeated for
credit. The student must register and pay for the repeated course. If the grade of I is on a
student’s record in the semester or summer session when that student intends to graduate,
it becomes an I-F immediately before graduation – possibly adversely affecting graduation.
The department reserves the right not to permit a student to continue in a sequence of
courses if the student has an incomplete grade in a prerequisite.
If a graduate student has enrolled for the master’s thesis, research paper or research project,
the grade of N will remain on the transcript until the thesis, paper or project is completed.
A student cannot graduate with an N grade on the transcript.
The grade of P is awarded in certain courses to indicate the performance of satisfactory
work in situations, such as some kinds of internships, in which it would not be appropriate
to assign letter grades. The grade of P carries no quality points, and, although the course is
credited toward completion of a program or degree, the credits are not used to compute the
GPA. If satisfactory work is not performed in such a course, the grade of F is awarded, and
it is computed into the GPA. The University does not allow graduate students a “pass/fail
option” in courses in which letter grades are awarded.
Course Numbering
Courses numbered 499 and below are undergraduate courses. Courses numbered 500 and
above are graduate level courses.
32
Course Numbering System
Number
Course Level
0-99
Remedial Level
100-199
Freshman Level
200-299
Sophomore Level
300-399
Junior Level
400-499
Senior Level
500-899
Graduate Level
Final Examinations
Final examinations are given the last full week of each fall and spring semester. A final
examination schedule is prepared and distributed by the registrar and indicates the time
slots for specific exams. All final examinations will be administered throughout the week
according to this schedule. Exams will not be given at times other than those specified on
the final exam schedule. During the week prior to final exam week, no examinations will be
given in classes, with the exception of lab courses and to graduating seniors (if necessary).
All evening and Saturday class finals will be held at the time of their regularly scheduled
classes.
If a student is scheduled for more than three final exams in one day, he/she may reschedule
tests by consulting with the appropriate instructors, department chair or college dean. If a
mutually convenient time cannot be agreed upon, the Friday time slot should be used as an
alternate test date.
Comprehensive Examinations
Most programs require a comprehensive examination. (Consult the program website for
further information.) All graduate students who are candidates for the master’s degree
must pass a comprehensive examination. The nature of the examination may vary from
department to department, but it commonly has a written component and may have
an oral component as well. The purpose of the examination is to evaluate the graduate
student’s ability to demonstrate the achievement of the objectives and/or competencies
prescribed in the student’s program.
The comprehensive examinations are administered by the department and are scheduled
approximately halfway through the semester or the summer session. The date for this
comprehensive examination is always announced by the department. Such examinations
normally require three hours. Information about departmental examinations should be
obtained from the faculty adviser or program coordinator.
Applications to register for the comprehensive examination can be obtained in the office of
the School of Graduate Studies and Research in Dixon Hall.
Period for Completion of Degree
Graduate students must complete all requirements for the master’s degree within six years
after the date of initial registration for graduate studies at California University. After six
years, students may be expected to retake classes or take additional coursework.
Graduation
Application for Graduation
The application for graduation is available at www.calu.edu/prospective/graduate/index.
htm or in the office of the School of Graduate Studies and Research. This form must be
completed, signed and returned to the School of Graduate Studies and Research by the
graduation application date published on the website. This form will be reviewed by the
33
Graduate School office to assure that the student has completed all requirements and
fulfilled all obligations.
Students completing requirements for teaching certification must also complete a
certification endorsement form. This form must be signed by the program coordinator and
by the dean of the School of Graduate Studies and Research. Graduate students applying
for certification must also contact the office of the College of Education and Human
Services. Students may not graduate with a failing grade on their transcripts even if the
course is not required for their degrees or even if their grade point average is above 3.00.
Conferring Degrees
Degrees are conferred by the University three times each year: May, August and
December. Commencement ceremonies are held in May and December. Information about
commencement is available on the website.
Cap and Gown Fee
Candidates who have been approved for the master’s degree planning to participate in
commencement are required to purchase or rent a master’s cap, gown and hood to be
worn at the commencement exercises. They can be obtained from the University bookstore
located in the Natali Student Center or through the bookstore website.
Master’s Thesis/Master’s Project
The University uses an electronic submission process. Consult the website for current
requirements with regard to formatting of the documents.
34
Graduate Assistantships
A limited number of graduate assistantships are available to qualified students. To
apply for these positions, send a cover letter and resume highlighting work experience
(particularly at a college or university), research experience, etc., to the following areas:
California University of Pennsylvania
250 University Ave.
California, PA 15419
• School of Graduate Studies and Research — Box 91
• Office of the President — Box 95
• Accounting Office — Box 11
• Student Development and Services — Box 86
• University Advancement — Box 62
Facts Related to Graduate Assistantships
Assistantships/stipend positions are generally available for four semesters. Students
are only eligible for an assistantship/stipend for one degree. If a student is admitted for
a second graduate degree, he/she will not be eligible for an assistantship. International
students are not eligible for an assistantship/stipend during their first semester. In order
to maintain an assistantship/stipend, the student must be in good academic standing and
maintain a minimum GPA of 3.00. For a full stipend ($4,127/300 hours), the student must
be registered for 9 or more graduate credits. Partial stipends may be granted for less than
9 credits. Graduate assistants are required to have a payroll deduction unless otherwise
indicated by the Bursar’s Office. The graduate assistant salary is considered taxable income
and may affect future financial aid eligibility. To check the availability of assistantships,
check with the following offices at California University:
• Graduate Studies (724-938-4187)
• Administration and Finance (724-938-4432)
• Student Development and Services (724-938-4439)
• University Advancement (724-938-5938)
• Office of the President (724-938-4400)
35
Academic Programs
Administrative Program For Principals
Master of Education in School Administration and/or K-12 Principal
Certification
Credits: 24-30
Degree Programs
30 credits Master of Education and K-12 principal certification
Certifications
24 credits K-12 principal certification is offered to students who already hold an approved
master’s degree.
Accreditation
Approved by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, this online program meets
state educational requirements for certification as a principal. The program complies with
Interstate School Leaders Licensure Consortium (ISLLC) standards, and may be used to
meet certification and professional development requirements in other states.
Program Description
Cal U’s administrative program for principals (ADP) is the ideal program for working
professionals who want to make a difference in education. This part-time, online
program is a practice-centered, performance-based program that is designed to provide
a personalized approach in meeting the needs of all students, whether they are seeking
a principal’s certificate, or a master’s degree in education or simply wish to continue
to enhance their teaching and leadership skills. California University of Pennsylvania
offers one program with two tracks: K-12 principal certification only (24 credits) and the
Master’s in Education with K-12 principal certification (30 credits). At Cal U, K-12 principal
certification can be obtained as an integrated part of the master’s degree or as a separate
certification-only track for people who have previously obtained a master’s degree. The
K-12 principal certification and master’s degree require the same core courses, but an
additional two prescribed courses (6 credits) are required of those candidates pursuing the
master’s degree.
Delivery Mode
100 percent online
Admissions Criteria
• Graduate School Application plus $25 nonrefundable application fee
• A completed Applicant Data Sheet
• An official original transcript from every institution attended
• A copy of all current professional certificates held
• A letter of endorsement from applicant’s principal or immediate supervisor
• A current resume or curriculum vitae
• A statement of career goals and degree objectives
Additional Program Requirements
Evidence of an earned GPA of 3.00 on a 4.00 scale. The program is open to students with a
bachelor’s, master’s or doctorate degree. Previous teaching experience is not required, but
professional certified experience is a must.
37
Students with less than a 2.99 GPA may also be considered for admission provided that
such students, prior to admission, take and achieve the required qualifying scores on the
PPST (Praxis I: Pre-Professional Skills Assessments).
Curriculum
Course Requirements for all Students
Course Name
Credits
ADP 641: School Community Relations Seminar
3
ADP 647: Orientation and Assessment
3
ADP 621: Curriculum Leadership
3
ADP 661: Educational Leadership
3
ADP 631: School Law and Ethics
3
ADP 626: Instructional Strategies
3
ADP 670: Internship Part 1
3
ADP 670: Internship Part 2
3
Course Requirements for Master of Education Degree with K-12 Principal Certification
Course Name
Credits
ADP 664: Supervised Field Project/Leadership
3
ADP 673: Supervised Field Project/Research and Evaluation
3
Advisement
Candidates in the ADP program receive academic and professional counseling throughout
their enrollment in the program. Each candidate is assigned to an academic adviser from
the time they are accepted into the program of study. Advisers work with candidates
to discuss, monitor and provide counseling as it relates to their program of study.
Additionally, peer mentors provide basic guidance and assistance for new learners enrolled
in the Orientation and Assessment course that would complement existing advising and
support services.
Program Coordinator
Christine Patti, Ed.D.
724-597-7430
[email protected]
Department Website
www.calu.edu/go
Application Questions
School of Graduate Studies and Research
California University of Pennsylvania
250 University Ave.
California, PA 15419
724-938-4187
www.calu.edu/academics/colleges/graduate-school/index.htm
Graduate Faculty
Christine Patti, Ed.D., Program Coordinator, Full-time Faculty; Educational
Administration and Leadership
38
Brian Barnhart, Ed.D., Adjunct Faculty; Assistant Executive Director, Lancaster-Lebanon
Intermediate Unit 13
Silvia Braidic, Ed.D., Associate Professor, Full-time Faculty; Educational Administration
and Leadership
Patrick Dworakowski, Ed.D., Adjunct Faculty; Superintendent, Montour School District
Todd E. Keruskin, Ed.D., Adjunct Faculty; Principal, Baldwin-Whitehall School District
Thomas Knight, Ed.D., Adjunct Faculty; Superintendent, Bethel Park School District
Deborah Kolonay, Ed.D., Adjunct Faculty; Superintendent, Penn-Trafford School District
J. Kevin Lordon, Ed.D., Associate Professor, Full-time Faculty; Educational Administration
and Leadership
Helen McCracken, Ed.D., Adjunct Faculty; Superintendent, Canon-McMillan School
District
39
Applied Criminology
Master of Arts in Social Science
Credits: 36
Program Description
Cal U’s Master’s degree in applied criminology is on the forefront of solving crime. The
topics include areas such as the theory of behavioral analysis of violent crime; criminal
investigative analysis; equivocal death analysis; and geographical profiling. We combine
our expertise in multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches to the subject matter
from legal, sociological, psychological, and criminological perspectives. Together with
our partners in the relevant professions, California University of Pennsylvania professors
are uniquely positioned to offer graduate-level programs in applied criminology.
Students with bachelor’s degrees in criminology, sociology, criminal justice, psychology,
and forensic science are particularly suited for the M.A. in applied criminology, but the
completion of any undergraduate degree will be acceptable.
Delivery Mode
100 percent online
Admissions Criteria
• Graduate School Application plus $25 nonrefundable application fee
• Official transcripts verifying a 3.00 GPA
• Resume
• Essay
The essay should be a minimum of one full page and include: the purpose of applying
to this program; career interest after graduation; and other information to show strong
qualifications related to this program.
• If you are an international student studying from your country of origin, you must have
an official copy of your TOEFL score sent from your testing center. A minimum TOEFL
score of 500 is required on the paper-based test, a score of 61 on the Internet-based
test and a score of 173 on the computer-based test. An international applicant with a
degree from an English speaking college or university may, after consulting with the
graduate coordinator and the Graduate School, be waived from the document evaluation
requirement.
Official sealed transcripts must be submitted via mail to:
School of Graduate Studies and Research
California University of Pennsylvania
250 University Avenue
California, PA 15419
Additional documents can be submitted to:
School of Graduate Studies and Research
California University of Pennsylvania
250 University Avenue
California, PA 15419
Or via e-mail to [email protected]
40
Curriculum
Semester 1
Course Name
Credits
CRM 700: Advanced Criminological Theories
3
RES 800: Research Methods
3
Semester 2
Course Name
Credits
CRM 710: Advanced Behavioral Crime Analysis Theory
3
CRM 820: Ethical and Legal Aspects of Criminology
3
Semester 3
Course Name
Credits
CRM 830: Criminal Investigative Analysis
3
RES 810: Qualitative Research Methods in Social Science
3
Semester 4
Course Name
Credits
CRM 840: Equivocal Death Analysis
3
GRA 810: Special Topics in Graduate Studies
3
Semester 5
Course Name
Credits
CRM 850: Geographical Crime Analysis
3
CRM 860: Applied Research Methods in Criminology
3
Semester 6
Course Name
Credits
RES 849: Thesis OR
GRA 800: Graduate Internship OR
GRA 820: Graduate Studies Abroad
6
Program Coordinator
Dr. Aref Al-Khattar
724-938-1542
Fax 724-938-4265
[email protected]
Department Website
www.calu.edu/academics/online-programs/applied-criminology/index.htm
41
Application Questions
School of Graduate Studies and Research
California University of Pennsylvania
250 University Ave.
California, PA 15419
724-938-4187
www.calu.edu/academics/colleges/graduate-school/index.htm
42
Athletic Training
Master of Science in Athletic Training
Credits: 38
Accreditation
National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA)
Program Description
The post-professional graduate athletic training education program is nearing its 20th
anniversary and is accredited by the National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA) as an
advanced degree (post-certification) program in athletic training. The student entering this
program receives a Master of Science degree in athletic training. Students graduating from
the program will be eligible to receive national certification as a Performance Enhancement
Specialist through the National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM). Students will
learn how to use the same Optimum Performance Training Model used by the NASM for
training Olympic and professional athletes. In addition, students perform original research
through the creation of a thesis, complete a cadaver anatomy course and take courses that
enhance leadership skills. This program is a post-professional graduate athletic training
education program and the student must have passed the Board of Certification (BOC)
examination or have completed the requirements to take the certification examination. The
graduate athletic training student can expect to complete the academic coursework in one
calendar year, which starts in June of each year and ends in the following May. Graduate
students have an opportunity to apply for a graduate assistantship, which will defray the
cost of tuition and provide a stipend. This clinical experience is not required to enroll in the
program. Graduate assistantships occur from mid-August to approximately the end of May
the following year. Clinical experiences take place at area high schools, local colleges and
California University of Pennsylvania.
Delivery Mode
Traditional with online and distance education (web-based) offerings
Admissions Criteria
• Solid background in athletic training
• Graduate School Application plus nonrefundable $25 application fee
• Program application and essay
• Official transcripts/baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution
• Resume or curriculum vitae
• Two letters of recommendation
• BOC certified or have completed exam requirements (students must sit for the exam as
many times as possible before August camps)
• Minimum overall undergraduate 3.00 GPA
• Eligible for athletic training credential from Pennsylvania State Board of Medicine
• Emergency cardiac care certification prior to start of assistantship
• Liability insurance prior to start of assistantship
• Appropriate clearances prior to start of assistantship
43
Curriculum
Summer 1 – First Five Weeks
Course Name
Credits
ATE 705: Evidence-Based Practice in Athletic Training
3
ATE 800: Methods of Research in the Allied Health Sciences
3
Summer 2 – Second Five Weeks
Course Name
Credits
ATE 700: Gross Anatomy of the Extremities w/Lab
4
Summer – 10 Weeks
Course Name
Credits
EDP 600: Statistical Methods
3
Fall Semester
Course Name
Credits
ATE 725: Pedagogical Studies in Athletic Training
3
ATE 810: Thesis Seminar
3
PRF 710: Performance Enhancement in Physical Activity
3
ATE 770: Athletic Training Practicum
3
Spring Semester
Course Name
Credits
ATE 745: Contemporary Issues in Athletic Training
3
PRF 750: Performance Enhancement in Program Design
3
PRF 760: Leadership and Professional Development
3
RES 849: Master’s Thesis
4
Assistantships
Graduate assistantships are available and will be appointed based on qualifications and
experience.
Program Coordinator
Thomas F. West, PhD, ATC
724-938-5933
[email protected]
Department Website
www.calu.edu/academics/graduate-programs/athletic-training/index.htm
Application Questions
School of Graduate Studies and Research
California University of Pennsylvania
250 University Ave.
California, PA 15419
724-938-4187
www.calu.edu/academics/colleges/graduate-school/index.htm
44
Graduate Faculty
Thomas F. West, Ph.D., ATC, Penn State University; Professor, Program Coordinator
Bruce D. Barnhart, Ed.D., ATC, West Virginia University; Professor
Carol M. Biddington, Ed.D., West Virginia University; Assistant Professor
William B. Biddington, Ed.D., ATC, West Virginia University; Professor
Shelly Fetchen DiCesaro, Ph.D., ATC, University of Pittsburgh; Instructor
Marc S. Federico, DPT, MPT, Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania; Assistant Professor
Rebecca A. Hess, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; Professor
Robert H. Kane Jr., Ed.D., PT, ATC, West Virginia University; Professor
Barry E. McGlumphy, Ed.D., ATC, University of Pittsburgh; Associate Professor
Linda Platt Meyer, Ed.D., ATC, Duquesne University; Associate Professor
Joni L. Roh, Ed.D., ATC, West Virginia University; Professor
Jamie Weary, DPT, ATC, Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania; Assistant Professor
45
Business Administration
Master of Science in Business Administration
Credits: 36
Program Description
The demand for skilled managers in the business community today far outweighs the
availability of qualified candidates. The scope of business activities has assumed a level
of sophistication where the more significant opportunities require skills and abilities that
exceed the capabilities possessed by most baccalaureate degree holders.
The Master of Science degree offered in business administration directly addresses the
needs of today’s progressive business enterprise and non-profit institutions. This rigorous
program is designed for the student desirous of advanced managerial skill development
in the areas that significantly affect all aspects of operations. The use of analytical skills for
efficient decision-making and problem-solving is emphasized.
Successful completion of this curriculum will effectively equip the graduate for a more
challenging role in the business, industry and non-profit sectors of the economy.
The program is particularly appropriate for those currently employed, as well as those
recent graduates who desire to expand their current level of marketable skills. With many
of the courses being offered at appropriate hours and on the web for those currently
employed, this advanced degree is easily within the reach of most who are willing to
devote the time and effort required, on either a full- or part-time basis. The program
can be completed in 12 months at the main campus or at the California University of
Pennsylvania’s Southpointe Center.
Delivery Mode
Traditional with online and distance education (live video/audio conference) offerings
Admissions Criteria
• Minimum overall undergraduate 3.00 GPA
• Graduate School Application plus $25 nonrefundable application fee
• Official transcripts
Curriculum
Foundation Courses* (15 credits)
Course Name
Credits
ACC 200: Financial Accounting
3
ECO 201: Introductory Microeconomics
3
ECO 202: Introductory Macroeconomics
3
MAT 225/215: Business Statistics/Statistics
3
MKT 300: Principles of Marketing
3
*Foundation courses are waived for students who have successfully completed them.
Master’s Degree Curriculum (36 credits)
Core Curriculum
Course Name
Credits
ACC 711: Managerial Accounting
3
46
Course Name
Credits
BUS 771: Quantitative Methods
3
BUS 799: Strategic Management
3
ECO 716: Applied Economic Analysis
3
FIN 711: Corporate Finance
3
MGT 751: International Business Management
3
MKT 711: Marketing Management
3
Select one of the following (3 credits)
Course Name
Credits
MGT 712: Organizational Behavior
3
MGT 731: Industrial Relations
3
MGT 742: Human Resource Management
3
Electives (12 credits)
Any four of the 3-credit graduate courses from the following areas:
ACC/BUS/ECO/FIN/MGT/MKT (500+/700+ level)
Program Coordinator
Dr. Arshad Chawdhry
724-938-5990
[email protected]
Department Website
www.calu.edu/academics/colleges/eberly/business-economics/index.htm
Application Questions
School of Graduate Studies and Research
California University of Pennsylvania
250 University Ave.
California, PA 15419
724-938-4187
www.calu.edu/academics/colleges/graduate-school/index.htm
Graduate Faculty
M. Arshad Chawdhry, Ph.D., University of Illinois; Program Coordinator
Burrell A. Brown, J.D., University of Pittsburgh
Ismail Cole, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh
Mark DeHainaut, M.B.A., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; Ed.D., University of
Pittsburgh
Paul L. Hettler, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh
Richard J. LaRosa, M.B.A., Drexel University; A.B.D., Cleveland State University
Shirley A. Lazorchak, Ph.D., Ohio State University
Edward Mendola, C.P.A., M.S., Robert Morris College
John Michaels, Ph.D., George Washington University; M.B.A., American University
Young J. Park, Ph.D., Temple University
47
Clyde A. Roberts, D.B.A., University of Kentucky
Louise E. Serafin, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh
Joseph J. Schwerha IV, J.D., University of Pittsburgh
48
Communication Disorders
Master of Science in Communication Disorders
Credits: 46
Accreditation
The master’s program in speech-language pathology at California University of
Pennsylvania is accredited by the Council of Academic Accreditation in Audiology and
Speech-Language Pathology of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.
Program Description
This program provides specialized training in all areas of communication disorders.
Graduates are qualified to provide clinical services to individuals of all ages in a variety
of settings including schools, hospitals, government agencies, private practice, etc. The
University has excellent facilities, including a large clinic and a Language and Learning
Enrichment Center located within the department, along with a technologically advanced
Communication Science Laboratory. Applicants without a degree in communication
disorders will need to complete a small number of core undergraduate courses prior to
beginning graduate courses. A summer only cohort program is available for individuals
who are employed in the field of communication disorders during the school year. This
academic program can be completed in five summers. Contact the department (724-9384175) for further details on this program.
Delivery Mode
Traditional
Admissions Criteria
• Minimum overall undergraduate 3.00 GPA
• Graduate School Application plus $25 nonrefundable application fee
• Official transcripts
• Three letters of recommendation
• GRE scores
• 3-5 page personal essay
• Documented proof of 25 hours of observation in this profession (not necessary at time of
application; can be completed at a later date)
Criteria for Continuing in the Program
Students move through the program as a cohort. Each cohort completes an identical core of
required courses that are critical to successful functioning as a speech-language pathologist
(SLP). In addition to those courses, each cohort completes a unique combination of
additional courses, guaranteeing that there are SLPs throughout the nation to provide the
many areas of specialized service needed by very diverse patient populations. Students
must maintain a minimum 3.00 GPA while in the program. Students who fail to maintain
a 3.00 GPA will not be permitted to complete the candidacy interview or register for an
externship placement. Failure to reacquire a 3.00 during the single probationary semester
may result in dismissal from the program.
Curriculum
First Term: Fall
Course Name
Credits
CMD 701: Language Disorders in Adults
3
49
Course Name
Credits
CMD 702: Language Disorders in Children
3
CMD 708: Neurology
3
CMD 711, 713 or 714: Clinical Practicum in Various Settings
1-3
CMD 712: Clinical Practicum in University Clinic
1-2
Practicum/Internships
Students participate in extensive hands-on clinical experiences both at the in-house clinic
and the Language and Learning Enrichment Center and at more than 60 off-campus
facilities with which the department has contractual relationships.
Program Coordinator
Dr. Ralph Belsterling
724-938-4175
[email protected]
Department Website
www.calu.edu/academics/colleges/education/communication-disorders/index.htm
Application Questions
School of Graduate Studies and Research
California University of Pennsylvania
250 University Ave.
California, PA 15419
724-938-4187
www.calu.edu/academics/colleges/graduate-school/index.htm
Graduate Faculty
Ralph Belsterling, Program Coordinator; Au.D., University of Florida; specializes in
audiometric assessment, aural rehabilitation, amplification and hearing conservation
Barbara Bonfanti, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; specializes in adult and child neurogenic
communication disorders, fluency, dysphagia and research
Nancy Carlino, M.A., Duquesne University; specializes in neurogenics and articulation,
phonology and traumatic brain injury
Nancy Heard Hepting, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; specializes in early intervention
– birth to 3 years and 3 years to 5 years, behavior management and natural environmentbased treatments
Denise Joseph, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; specializes in pediatric language disorders,
pediatric feeding and swallowing disorders, and communication disorders in special
populations
Robert Skwarecki, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh; specializes in vocal pathologies, speech
science, assistive technology, anatomy and physiology, and neurogenesis
50
Counselor Education – Clinical Mental Health Counseling
Master of Science in Clinical Mental Health Counseling
Credits: 54
Accreditation
Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP).
Program Description
The Master of Science degree prepares students to work as professional counselors in a
variety of behavioral health and social service settings. Courses offered by the department
have been approved by both the National Board for Certified Counselors and the
Pennsylvania Department of Education for certification and continuing education credits
(Act 48).
The program fulfills the degree requirements necessary to become a National Certified
Counselor (NCC) and a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC), as well as being able to
take the National Counselor Examination (NCE). Students also have the option to take an
additional 6 credits before or after graduation to total 60 credits, also required to become
Licensed Professional Counselors in Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania Licensure Act 136 of
1998). Students will need two or more additional years of supervised work experience after
graduation to complete the requirements for LPC.
Prospective students are advised to read the CED Student Handbook, which describes the
philosophy, admissions and departmental procedures in detail. This may be downloaded
at www.calu.edu/academics/colleges/education/counselor-education/index.htm.
Delivery Mode
Traditional with occasional online coursework
Admissions Criteria
• Minimum overall undergraduate 3.00 GPA (see handbook for exceptions)
• Applications may be considered with an undergraduate GPA of at least 2.60, a score of
403+ on Miller Analogies Test (MAT) and admissions interview
• Graduate School Application plus $25 nonrefundable application fee
• Three letters of recommendation
• One-page resume of work and education
• Psychobiography
• Official transcripts from all graduate and undergraduate work
• An admissions interview may be required
Transition to Clinical Mental Health Counseling
Important Information to Consider
Community and Agency Counseling
The community and agency counseling program at California University of Pennsylvania
is accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational
Programs (CACREP). That accreditation runs through March 2014. Due to impending
changes in the accreditation process, Community and Agency Counseling students should
plan to graduate by this date. See your adviser for more information.
51
Clinical Mental Health Counseling
In order to better serve our students, our department is preparing to transition from
community and agency counseling to the new CACREP designation for counselors
working in community settings, clinical mental health counseling (CMHC).
The CMHC program is currently accredited by CACREP as a community counseling
program through March 2014. The CED department intends to seek full CACREP
accreditation for this program as a clinical mental health counseling program when it
comes up for reaccreditation per CACREP guidelines.
Summary
Students who graduate in either the community and agency counseling or the CMHC
program prior to our obtaining CACREP reaccreditation in 2014 will be considered to have
graduated from our CACREP-accredited community counseling program. See your adviser
for more information.
Certifications
State and National
• National Certified Counselor (NCC)
• Students can begin to fulfill exam and credit requirements toward becoming Licensed
Professional Counselors (LPC) in Pennsylvania
Practicum/Field Education
Practicum and field education are taken near the end of the student’s program. Practicum
requires two days per week on-site for a minimum of 150 hours. Students will be
supervised by professionals in their areas of interest. Internship experiences require
a minimum of 600 hours under the supervision of counselors in the students’ areas of
interest. This will be arranged in consultation with the internship coordinator.
Curriculum
Area I: Core Courses Required For Candidacy
Course Name
Credits
CED 702: Counseling Theory
3
CED 710: Counseling Skills and Techniques
3
CED 724: Experiential Group Process
3
CED 789: Introduction to Clinical Mental Health Counseling
3
Area II: Advanced Counseling Core
Course Name
Credits
CED 705: Developmental Group Counseling
3
CED 720: Cross-cultural Counseling
3
CED 786: Career Counseling
3
Area III: Field Education
Course Name
Credits
CED 711: Practicum in Counselor Education
3
CED 712: Clinical Field Experience in Counselor Education
6
CED 787: Integration, Collaboration and Consultation
3
52
Area IV: Psychological Foundations
Course Name
Credits
CED 717: Diagnosis and Treatment in Mental Health
3
PSY 713: Psychology of Growth and Development
3
PSY 721: Advanced Tests and Measurements
3
Area V: Research
Course Name
Credits
CED 785: Research Methods in Counseling
3
Area VI: Clinical Core
Course Name
Credits
CED 708: Substance Abuse and Addiction
3
CED 735: Introduction to Family Therapy
3
CED 791: Crisis Counseling and Disaster Preparedness
3
Corequisites
Either one course in psychology (graduate or undergraduate) or approved CED
substitution. Must have a minimum C (2.00) undergraduate grade, or 3.00 graduate grade,
and may be taken concurrently with other CED requirements.
Practicum/Clinical Field Experience
Practicum and clinical field experience are taken near the end of the student’s program.
Practicum requires a minimum of 150 hours on-site. The student will be supervised by a
professional in his/her area of interest. The clinical field experience requires a minimum of
600 hours under the supervision of a professional in the student’s area of interest. This will
be arranged in consultation with the field site coordinator.
Program Coordinator
John Patrick, D.Ed.
724-938-4123
[email protected]
Department Website
www.calu.edu/academics/colleges/education/counselor-education/index.htm
Application Questions
School of Graduate Studies and Research
California University of Pennsylvania
250 University Ave.
California, PA 15419
724-938-4187
www.calu.edu/academics/colleges/graduate-school/index.htm
Graduate Faculty
Jacqueline A. Walsh, Ph.D., NCC, LPC, Professor; Department Chair; 724-938-4123;
[email protected]
Grafton Eliason, Ed.D., NCC, LPC, Associate Professor; 724-938-4464; [email protected]
Gloria Cataldo Brusoski, Ph.D., NCC, Professor, Licensed Psychologist; 724-938-4123;
[email protected]
53
Elizabeth Gruber, Ph.D., NCC, LPC, Professor/Field Site Coordinator; 724-938-1567;
[email protected]
John Patrick, D.Ed., CRC, NCC, LPC, Professor; 724-938-4452; [email protected]
Jeff Samide, Ed.D., NCC, LPC, Associate Professor; 724-938-4123; [email protected]
Taunya Tinsley, Ph.D., NCC, LPC, Assistant Professor; 724-938-5698; [email protected]
54
Counselor Education – Community Agency Counseling
Master of Science in Community Agency Counseling
Credits: 48
Accreditation
Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Education Programs (CACREP)
Program Description
The Master of Science prepares students to work as professional counselors in a variety
of behavioral health and social service settings. Courses offered by the department have
been approved by both the National Board for Certified Counselors and the Pennsylvania
Department of Education for certification and continuing education credits (Act 48).
The program fulfills the degree requirements necessary to become a National Certified
Counselor (NCC) and a Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC), as well as being able to
take the National Counselor Examination (NCE). Students also have the option to take an
additional 12 credits before or after graduation to total 60 credits, also required to become
Licensed Professional Counselors in Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania Licensure Act 136 of
1998). Students will need two or more additional years of supervised work experience after
graduation to complete the requirements for LPC.
Prospective students are advised to read the CED Student Handbook, which describes the
philosophy, admissions and departmental procedures in detail. Download the handbook at
www.calu.edu/academics/graduate-programs/community-and-agency-counseling/index.
htm.
The Master of Science in community agency counseling will soon transition to our Master
of Science in clinical mental health counseling. Students beginning fall 2011 and after will
fall under the clinical mental health counseling program.
Delivery Mode
Traditional
Curriculum
Area I: Core Courses Required For Candidacy
Course Name
Credits
CED 702: Counseling Theory
3
CED 710: Counseling Skills and Techniques
3
CED 724: Experiential Group Process
3
CED 789: Introduction to Community Counseling
3
Area II: Advanced Counseling Core
Course Name
Credits
CED 705: Developmental Group Counseling
3
CED 720: Cross-cultural Counseling
3
CED 786: Career Counseling
3
Area III: Field Education
Course Name
Credits
CED 711: Practicum in Counselor Education
3
55
Course Name
Credits
CED 712: Clinical Field Experience in Counselor Education
6
CED 787: Integration, Collaboration and Consultation
3
Area IV: Psychological Foundations
Course Name
Credits
CED 708: Substance Abuse and Addiction
3
CED 717: Diagnosis and Treatment in Mental Health
3
PSY 713: Psychology of Growth and Development
3
PSY 721: Advanced Tests and Measurements
3
Area V: Research
Course Name
Credits
CED 785: Research Methods in Counseling
3
Corequisites
Either one course in psychology (graduate or undergraduate) or approved CED
substitution. Must have a minimum C (2.00) undergraduate grade, or 3.00 graduate grade,
and may be taken concurrently with other CED requirements.
Practicum/clinical field experience
Practicum and clinical field experience are taken near the end of the student’s program.
Practicum requires a minimum of 150 hours on-site. The student will be supervised by a
professional in his/her area of interest. The clinical field experience requires a minimum of
600 hours under the supervision of a professional in the student’s area of interest. This will
be arranged in consultation with the field site coordinator.
Admissions Criteria
• Minimum overall undergraduate 3.00 GPA (see handbook for exceptions)
• Applications may be considered with an undergraduate GPA of at least 2.60, a score of
403+ on Miller Analogies Test (MAT), and admissions interview
• Graduate School Application plus $25 nonrefundable application fee
• Three letters of recommendation
• One-page resume of work and education
• Psychobiography
• Official transcripts from all graduate and undergraduate work
• An admissions interview may be required
Transition to Clinical Mental Health Counseling
Effective fall 2011 the community agency counseling (MS) program will become the clinical
mental health counseling (MS) program. See “Counselor Education – Clinical Mental
Health Counseling” on page 51.
Community and Agency Counseling
The community and agency counseling program at California University of Pennsylvania
is accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational
Programs (CACREP). That accreditation runs through March 2014. Due to impending
56
changes in the accreditation process, community and agency counseling students should
plan to graduate by this date. See your adviser for more information.
Clinical Mental Health Counseling
In order to better serve our students, our department is preparing to transition from
community counseling to the new CACREP designation for counselors working in
community settings, clinical mental health counseling (CMHC).
The CMHC program is currently accredited by CACREP as a community counseling
program through March 2014. The CED department intends to seek full CACREP
accreditation for this program as a clinical mental health counseling program when it
comes up for reaccreditation per CACREP guidelines.
Summary
Students who graduate in either the community and agency counseling or the CMHC
program prior to our obtaining CACREP reaccreditation in 2014 will be considered to have
graduated from our CACREP-accredited community counseling program. See your adviser
for more information.
Program Coordinator
John Patrick, D.Ed.
724-938-4123
[email protected]
Department Website
www.calu.edu/academics/colleges/education/counselor-education/index.htm
Application Questions
School of Graduate Studies and Research
California University of Pennsylvania
250 University Ave.
California, PA 15419
724-938-4187
www.calu.edu/academics/colleges/graduate-school/index.htm
Graduate Faculty
Jacqueline A. Walsh, Ph.D., NCC, LPC, Professor; Department Chair; 724-938-4123;
[email protected]
Grafton Eliason, Ed.D., NCC, LPC, Associate Professor; 724-938-4464; [email protected]
Gloria Cataldo Brusoski, Ph.D., NCC, Professor, Licensed Psychologist; 724-938-4123;
[email protected]
Elizabeth Gruber, Ph.D., NCC, LPC, Professor/Field Site Coordinator; 724-938-1567;
[email protected]
John Patrick, D.Ed., CRC, NCC, LPC, Professor; 724-938-4452; [email protected]
Jeff Samide, Ed.D., NCC, LPC, Associate Professor; 724-938-4123; [email protected]
Taunya Tinsley, Ph.D., NCC, LPC, Assistant Professor; 724-938-5698; [email protected]
57
Counselor Education – School Counseling
Master of Education in School Counseling
Credits: 48
Accreditation
• Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP)
• Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE)
Program Description
School counseling programs at California University of Pennsylvania are accredited by the
Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP).
Through the University, the Middle States Association of Colleges and Post-Secondary
Schools accredits the Department of Counselor Education. The National Council for the
Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) accredits the school counseling programs
(elementary and secondary school guidance). Courses offered by the department have been
approved by both the National Board for Certified Counselors and by the Pennsylvania
Department of Education for certification and continuing education credits (Act 48). The
Counselor Education Department is authorized by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
Department of Education to offer certification programs in elementary and secondary
school guidance.
Our Master of Education program in school counseling fulfills the degree requirements
needed for the National Counselor Examination (NCE), required to become a National
Certified Counselor (NCC) and Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC). Students also have
the option of taking an additional 12 credits before or after graduation to total 60 credits,
also required to become an LPC in Pennsylvania (Pennsylvania Licensure Act 136 of 1998).
Students will need two or more additional years of supervised work experience after
graduation to complete the requirements for LPC.
Students who hold a master’s degree in another discipline may decide to seek certification.
The department will evaluate their transcripts to determine which courses are required.
For certification-only students, passing Praxis I scores must be submitted with application
materials.
Prospective students are advised to read the CED Student Handbook, which describes the
philosophy, admissions and departmental procedures in detail. This may be downloaded
at www.calu.edu/academics/colleges/education/counselor-education/index.htm.
Delivery Mode
Traditional with occasional online coursework
Admissions Criteria
• Minimum overall undergraduate 3.00 GPA (see handbook for exceptions)
• Applications may be considered with an undergraduate GPA of at least 2.60, a score of
403+ on Miller Analogies Test (MAT) and admissions interview
• Graduate School Application plus $25 nonrefundable application fee
• Three letters of recommendation
• One-page resume of work and education
• Psychobiography
• Official transcripts from all graduate and undergraduate work
• An admissions interview may be required
58
Curriculum
Area I: Core Courses Required for Candidacy
Course Name
Credit
CED 700: Foundations of School Counseling
3
CED 702: Counseling Theory
3
CED 710: Counseling Skills and Techniques
3
CED 724: Experiential Group Process
3
Area II: Advanced Counseling Core
Course Name
Credits
CED 705: Developmental Group Counseling
3
CED 720: Cross-cultural Counseling
3
CED 786: Career Counseling
3
Area III: Field Education
Course Name
Credits
CED 711: Practicum in Counselor Education
3
CED 712: Clinical Field Experience in Counselor Education
6
CED 787: Integration, Collaboration and Consultation
3
Area IV: Specialty Courses
Course Name
Credits
ESP 610: Special Education Foundations and Collaboration
3
Area V: Psychological Foundations
Course Name
Credits
CED 721: Diagnosis and Counseling Children and Adolescents
3
PSY 713: Psychology of Growth and Development
3
PSY 721: Advanced Tests and Measurements
3
Area VI: Research
Course Name
Credits
CED 785: Research Methods in Counseling
3
For initial certification, students must complete the following prior to candidacy:
• 6 credits of college math
• 3 credits of English composition
• 3 credits of English composition II or English/American literature
• Pass the Basic Skills Praxis I exam
School counseling certification also requires passing Praxis II, preferably before graduation.
59
Corequisites
Must have a minimum C (2.00) undergraduate grade or 3.00 graduate grade, and may be
taken concurrently with CED requirements.
Required courses
• One psychology course – recommendation: Introduction to Psychology,
Psychopathology, Psychology of Learning or CED-approved elective
• Two PDE-required courses or equivalent: graduate or undergraduate
• ESP 613 – Evidence-Based Practices for Secondary Inclusion
• EDU 650 – Supporting English Language Learners
Practicum/clinical field experience
Practicum and clinical field experience are taken near the end of the student’s program.
Practicum requires a minimum of 150 hours on-site. The student will be supervised by a
professional in his/her area of interest. The clinical field experience requires a minimum of
600 hours under the supervision of a school counselor in the student’s area of interest. This
will be arranged in consultation with the field site coordinator.
Program Coordinator
Grafton Eliason, Ed.D.
724-938-4123
[email protected]
Department Website
www.calu.edu/academics/colleges/education/counselor-education/index.htm
Application Questions
School of Graduate Studies and Research
California University of Pennsylvania
250 University Ave.
California, PA 15419
724-938-4187
www.calu.edu/academics/colleges/graduate-school/index.htm
Graduate Faculty
Jacqueline A. Walsh, Ph.D., NCC, LPC, Professor; Department Chair; 724-938-4123;
[email protected]
Grafton Eliason, Ed.D., NCC, LPC, Associate Professor; 724-938-4464; [email protected]
Gloria Cataldo Brusoski, Ph.D., NCC, Professor, Licensed Psychologist; 724-938-4123;
[email protected]
Elizabeth Gruber, Ph.D., NCC, LPC, Professor/Field Site Coordinator; 724-938-1567;
[email protected]
John Patrick, D.Ed., CRC, NCC, LPC, Professor; 724-938-4452; [email protected]
Jeff Samide, Ed.D., NCC, LPC, Associate Professor; 724-938-4123; [email protected]
Taunya Tinsley, Ph.D., NCC, LPC, Assistant Professor; 724-938-5698; [email protected]
60
Elementary Education
Master of Education in Elementary Education
Credits: 51+
Accreditation
National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE)
Program Description
The Master of Education in elementary education degree is available to students seeking
Pennsylvania elementary education (grades K-6) certification and/or a master’s degree.
Candidates for Pennsylvania certification must have completed undergraduate or graduate
studies that include 6 credits of college-level mathematics, 6 credits of special education,
3 credits each of biology, physical science, environmental sciences, U.S. history, English
composition, English or American literature, economics, health/wellness, instructional
technology, and English as a second language. Students entering the program without all,
or part, of the undergraduate requirements may meet them with additional coursework or
by competency tests while they are taking the graduate classes.
Delivery Mode
Traditional and distance education (live video/audio conference or online) offerings
Admissions Criteria
• Official transcripts
• Minimum overall undergraduate 2.80 GPA or 3.00 GPA in last 48 college credits taken
• Graduate School Application plus $25 nonrefundable application fee
• Passing scores on Praxis I tests by candidacy
• Current Act 34, 151 and 114 clearances
Curriculum
Professional Education (21 credits)
Course Name
Credits
PSY 712: Advanced Psychology of Learning
3
ESP 501: Introduction to Exceptionality
3
EDE 700: Foundation and History of American Education
3
EDE 701: Development and Organization of the Curriculum
3
EDE 795: Student Teaching Internship*
3
*Students who are Pennsylvania certified teachers in another specialty area are not required to take EDE 795.
Praxis II 0511 – Fundamental Subjects: Content Knowledge (required for candidacy) 0011 – Elementary Education:
Curriculum Instruction and Assessment (required before student teaching EDE 795)
Professional Specialization (27 credits)
Course Name
Credits
EDE 702: Instructional Strategies
3
EDE 703: Field Experience
3
EDE 708: Teaching Reading
3
EDE 715: Teaching Language Arts
3
EDE 716: Teaching Social Science
3
61
Course Name
Credits
EDE 718: Teaching Mathematics
3
EDE 731: Expressive Arts
3
EDE 737: Literature and Literacy K-12
3
EDE 740: Teaching Science
3
Research (5-7 credits)
Course Name
Credits
RES 800: Methods of Research**
3
RES 829: Project (optional) OR
RES 849: Thesis (optional)
2
4
**Students seeking certification only are not required to take RES courses.
Program Coordinator
Jane Bonari, M.Ed.
724-938-4569
[email protected]
Graduate Program Secretary
Cynthia Pascarell
724-938-4875
[email protected]
Department Website
www.calu.edu/academics/graduate-programs/elementary/index.htm
Application Questions
School of Graduate Studies and Research
California University of Pennsylvania
250 University Ave.
California, PA 15419
724-938-4187
www.calu.edu/academics/colleges/graduate-school/index.htm
Graduate Faculty
Jane Bonari, Program Coordinator; M.Ed., California University of Pennsylvania;
specializes in Mathematics Education
Holly Diehl, Ed.D., West Virginia University; specializes in Reading Education
William Hug, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University; specializes in science education and
research
Beverly Melenyzer, Ed.D., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; specializes in Curriculum
and Instruction
Christine Peterson, Ed.D., West Virginia University; specializes in Technology Education
Richard Wyman, Ed.D., University of Washington; specializes in Social Studies Education
62
Early Childhood Education
Master of Education in Early Childhood Education
Credits: 33
Accreditation
National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC)
Program Description
This program is a completely online 33-credit graduate program for certified teachers
interested in gaining additional certification in early childhood education. Graduate
students in the early childhood education degree program will apply knowledge of child
development, families and best teaching practices to a variety of educational settings,
including public schools pre-kindergarten to grade 4 primary programs, preschool
programs, Head Start, child care, parenting and family support programs.
Delivery Mode
100 percent online
Admissions Criteria
• Official transcripts with minimum overall undergraduate 3.00 GPA or 3.00 GPA in last 48
college credits taken
• Graduate School Application plus $25 nonrefundable application fee
• Copies of all professional certificates held (only early, elementary or special education
certifications acceptable)
• Resume or curriculum vitae
Applicants with a GPA of 2.99 or less must also:
• Have a 3.00 or higher in the last 48 credits or
• Submit two letters of recommendation from individuals who know the applicant well
and can comment on the applicant’s intellectual and leadership abilities.
• Submit evidence of successful teaching or professional educational experience.
Curriculum
Master’s Curriculum (33 credits)
Semester
Course Name
Credits
1
PSY 712: Advanced Psychology of Learning
3
1
EDE 701: Development and Organization of School Curriculum
3
2
ESP 501: Introduction to Exceptionality
3
2
RES 800: Methods of Research
3
3
ECE 702: Advanced Childhood Development
3
3
ECE 700: Early Childhood Curriculum and Assessment
3
3
ECE 703: Literacy Development
3
4
ECE 704: Special Topics in Early Childhood Education
3
4
ECE 705: Science and Math in Early Childhood Education
3
5
ECE 707: Leadership and Management in Early Childhood
Settings
3
63
Semester
Course Name
Credits
5
RES 849: Thesis OR
EDE 766: Action Research OR
EDE 768: Internship (current clearances needed)*
3
*The internship is to be completed during semester 3, 4 or 5 in the cohort cycle. All internships must be preapproved a semester in advance and all internship students must have appropriate clearances (ACT 34, 114 and 151
if Pennsylvania internship). If you are completing an out-of-state internship, clearances necessary for that state also
apply. Schools or sites may require additional documentation. Any additional documents/requirements must be met
in order for the internship to begin. Effective 2011.
Certification Only Option (24 credits)
Semester
Course Name
Credits
1
ECE 707: Leadership and Management in Early Childhood
Settings
3
1
RES 800: Methods of Research
3
2
ECE 702: Advanced Childhood Development
3
2
ECE 700: Early Childhood Curriculum and Assessment
3
2
ECE 703: Literacy Development
3
3
ECE 704: Special Topics in Early Childhood Education
3
3
ECE 705: Science and Math in Early Childhood Education
3
4
RES 849: Thesis OR
EDE 766: Action Research OR
EDE 768: Internship (current clearances needed)*
3
*Note: The internship is to be completed during semester 3, 4 or 5 in the cohort cycle. All internships must be preapproved a semester in advance and all internship students must have appropriate clearances (ACT 34, 114 and 151
if Pennsylvania internship). If you are completing an out-of-state internship, clearances necessary for that state also
apply. Schools or sites may require additional documentation. Any additional documents/requirements must be met
in order for the internship to begin. Effective 2011
Note: Those seeking Pennsylvania early childhood certification must also complete the
following courses in order to meet Pennsylvania Chapter 49 regulations effective for any
candidate applying for a Pennsylvania instructional and/or educational specialist certificate
after 2011.
Due to Pennsylvania regulations, California University of Pennsylvania mandates the
following: (a) at least 9 credits of special education/ accommodations and adaptations
for students with disabilities in an inclusive setting, and (b) at least 3 credits addressing
instructional needs of English language learners.
Course Name
Credits
ESP 612: Evidence-Based Practices (pre-K to grade 8) OR
ESP 607: Early Intervention (pre-K)
3
ESP 701: Introduction to Behavioral Analysis
3
ESP 501: Introduction to Exceptionality (already in core courses above) OR
ESP 610: Special Education Foundations and Collaboration
3
EDE 704: Introduction to Teaching English as a Second Language
3
64
3
3
Note: If equivalent coursework at the undergraduate level has been completed, the
candidate may request a course listed above to be waived that is equivalent to the
graduate level course. The program coordinator will review transcripts, course syllabi,
etc., to determine whether coursework is equivalent. The program coordinator has the
sole discretion to accept or deny any equivalency requests. If a course is determined to be
equivalent, additional coursework may need to be taken to fulfill the 24 credit certificationonly requirements for the program.
Note: Internship may be taken any semester during the cohort cycle.
Program Coordinator
Dr. Christine Peterson
724-938-4028
[email protected]
Department Website
www.calu.edu/academics/online-programs/cert-early-childhood/index.htm
Application Questions
School of Graduate Studies and Research
California University of Pennsylvania
250 University Ave.
California, PA 15419
724-938-4187
www.calu.edu/academics/colleges/graduate-school/index.htm
Graduate Faculty
Christine Peterson, Program Coordinator; Ed.D., West Virginia University; specializes in
Technology Education
Deborah Farrer, Ed.D., West Virginia University; specializes in Reading
Clover Wright, Ed.D., West Virginia University; specializes in Elementary/Early Childhood
Education
65
English as a Second Language
Master of Education: English as a Second Language (ESL)
Credits: 33
Program Description
This completely online program is for certified teachers interested in gaining a master’s
degree and seek additional certification in English as a second language (ESL). The
curriculum is aligned with the Pennsylvania Department of Education ESL program
specialist standards and Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL)
standards. Graduate students in the English as a second language degree program will
apply knowledge in the following domains: language, culture, instruction, assessment
and professionalism. In each of these domains, educators will be challenged to develop
professionalism in language education, promote individual language rights, provide
accessible and high-quality education, develop collaboration in a global community,
engage in research and reflective practice for educational improvement and cultivate a
respect for diversity and multiculturalism.
Delivery Mode
100 percent online
Admissions Criteria
Only fully complete applications will be considered for admissions.
• A completed Graduate School application.
• An official transcript from every institution attended.
• A copy of all current professional certificates held.
• A current resume or curriculum vitae.
Additional Program Requirements
• Evidence of an earned GPA of 3.00 on a 4.00 scale.
• The program is open to students with a bachelor’s, master’s or doctorate degree and
teaching certification.
• Previous teaching experience is not required, but teaching certification is required for
admission.
• The program coordinator and faculty will determine final recommendation for
admission to the program.
Curriculum
Semester 1
Course Name
Credits
EDE 704: Introduction to Teaching English as a Second Language
3
EDE 701: Development and Organization of School Curriculum
3
Semester 2
Course Name
Credits
EDE 709: Developing Cultural Awareness and Sensitivity
3
EDE 713: Language Acquisition and Development
3
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Semester 3
Course Name
Credits
RES 800: Methods in Research
3
EDE 714: Language Proficiency Assessment
3
PSY 712: Advanced Psychology of Learning
3
Semester 4
Course Name
Credits
EDE 712: Content Instruction and Assessment Pre-K through Grade 12
3
ESP 501: Introduction to Exceptionality
3
PSY 712: Advanced Psychology of Learning
3
Semester 5
Course Name
Credits
EDE 719: Supporting Second Language Learners, Families and Community
3
*RES 849 Master’s Thesis/EDE 766: Action Research OR
*†EDE 768 Teacher Education Internship
3
*The online program coordinator will review the student’s résumé upon admission to the program to determine if
the student will need to complete EDE 768 Teacher Education Internship or RES 849 Master’s Thesis/EDE 766: Action
Research. The student is responsible for providing the coordinator with an accurate résumé that reflects his/her
teaching experience. A student who does not have experience teaching English language learners will be required to
complete the internship. A student who does not need to complete the internship is required to complete the research
study.
†The internship (120 hours) is to be completed during semester 3, 4 or 5 in the cohort cycle. All internships must be
preapproved a semester in advance and all internship students must have appropriate clearances (ACT 34, 114 and
151 if it is an internship in Pennsylvania.) If you are completing an out-of-state internship, clearances necessary for
that state also apply. Schools or sites may require additional documentation. Any additional documents/requirements
must be met in order for the internship to begin.
Program Coordinator
Dr. Christine Peterson
724-938-4028
[email protected]
Department Website
www.calu.edu/academics/online-programs/me-esl/index.htm
Application Questions
School of Graduate Studies and Research
California University of Pennsylvania
250 University Avenue
California, PA 15419
724-938-4187
www.calu.edu/academics/colleges/graduate-school/index.htm
Graduate Faculty
Christine Peterson, Program Coordinator, Ed.D., West Virginia University; specializes in
Technology Education
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Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) Education
Master of Education in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math
(STEM) Education
Credits: 30
Accreditation
National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE)
Program Description
This completely online 30-credit master’s degree program is designed to provide the forum
through which energized, professional teachers grow in their ability to help children
become proficient in the STEM content and process skills that will position them as
productive citizens in a competitive world. The program strives to help educators advance
their careers through developing the leadership skills that result in high achieving schools
and communities.
Delivery Mode
100 percent online
Admissions Criteria
Applicants are required to submit the following:
• Graduate School Application plus $25 nonrefundable application fee
• Official transcripts from every institution attended
• A copy of all current professional certificates held
• A current resume or curriculum vitae
• A written statement (500 words or less) that describes how you envision this degree will
help you better serve your students and your community by striving to be an awardwinning teacher leader in the school setting
Additional program requirements:
• Evidence of an earned GPA of 2.80 on a 4.00 scale
• The program is open to students with a bachelor’s, master’s or doctorate degree
• A teacher’s certificate (or substantial teaching experience in formal or non-formal
settings)
To be considered for admission, applicants with a GPA of 2.79 or less must also:
• Have a 3.00 or higher in the last 48 credits.
• Submit Miller Analogies Test (MAT) score. The program coordinator will use your score
in combination with other evidence to make the admissions decision.
• Submit evidence of successful teaching or professional educational experience.
• Submit two additional letters of recommendation.
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Master’s Curriculum (30 credits)
Core Courses (9 credits)
Course Name
Credits
EDE 770: The Nature of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics
Inquiry Learning in Elementary/Middle Schools OR
3
PSY 712: Advanced Psychology of Learning
EDE 765: Teachers as Leaders
3
EDE 776: Integrative Project in STEM Education
3
Research Courses (6 credits)
Course Name
Credits
RES 800: Methods of Research
3
EDE 766: Action Research
3
Science, Technology, Engineering and Math Education Courses (15 credits)
Course Name
Credits
EDE 771: Teaching Elementary and Middle School Children Earth and Space
Science
3
EDE 772: Teaching Elementary and Middle School Children Life Science
3
EDE 773: Teaching Elementary and Middle School Children Physical Science
3
EDE 774: Teaching Elementary and Middle School Children Math
3
TED 775: Integrating Technology in Elementary/Middle School STEM
Curriculum
3
Program Coordinator
Dr. J. William Hug
724-938-4135
[email protected]
[email protected]
Department Website
www.calu.edu/academics/online-programs/stem-teacher-education/index.htm
Application Questions
School of Graduate Studies and Research
California University of Pennsylvania
250 University Avenue
California, PA 15419
724-938-4187
[email protected]
www.calu.edu/academics/colleges/graduate-school/index.htm
Graduate Faculty
J. William Hug, Ph.D., M.S. Pennsylvania State University; specializes in Science and
Environmental Education
Jane Bonari, M.Ed., California University of Pennsylvania; specializes in Mathematics
Education
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Deborah Farrer, Ed.D., West Virginia University; specializes in Reading
70
National Board Teacher Certification Preparation (Elementary)
Master of Education in National Board Teacher Certification
Preparation (Elementary)
Credits: 33
Accreditation
National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE)
Program Description
This program is a completely online 33-credit graduate program for certified teachers
seeking National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS) teacher certification.
The curriculum is aligned with NBPTS’s Five Core Propositions and the certification
standards that will prepare teachers for national board teacher certification. The program
provides the substance for meaningful learning experiences that require teachers to
demonstrate what they know and can do while developing knowledge and skills that
emphasize content, pedagogy, inquiry, reflection, leadership and collegiality.
Delivery Mode
100 percent online
Admissions Criteria
• Elementary certification
• Official transcripts with minimum overall undergraduate 3.00 GPA or 3.00 GPA in last 48
college credits taken
• Graduate School Application plus $25 nonrefundable application fee
• Copy of all professional certificates held (only early, elementary or special education
certifications acceptable)
• Resume or curriculum vitae
Applicants with a GPA of 2.99 or less must also:
• Have a 3.00 or higher in the last 48 credits or
• Submit two letters of recommendation from individuals who know the applicant well
and can comment on the applicant’s intellectual and leadership abilities.
• Submit evidence of successful teaching or professional educational experience.
Curriculum
Master’s Curriculum (33 credits)
Semester
Course Name
Credits
1
PSY 712: Advanced Psychology of Learning
3
1
EDE 701: Development and Organization of the Curriculum
3
2
ESP 501: Introduction to Exceptionality
3
2
RES 800: Methods of Research
3
3
EDE 760: Introduction to National Board Certification
3
3
EDE 761: Family and Community Relations
3
4
EDE 762: Interdisciplinary Inquiry-Based Learning
3
4
EDE 763: Constructivism in Practice
3
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Semester
Course Name
Credits
4
EDE 764: Teacher Reflection
3
5
EDE 765: Teachers as Leaders
3
5
RES 849: Thesis OR
EDE 766: Action Research OR
EDE 767: Portfolio Development
3
Program Coordinator
Dr. Christine Peterson
724-938-4028
[email protected]
Department Website
www.calu.edu/academics/online-programs/me-national-board-teacher-certification/index.
htm
Application Questions
School of Graduate Studies and Research
California University of Pennsylvania
250 University Ave.
California, PA 15419
724-938-4187
www.calu.edu/academics/colleges/graduate-school/index.htm
Graduate Faculty
Christine Peterson, Program Coordinator; Ed.D., West Virginia University; specializes in
Technology Education
Jane Bonari, M.Ed., California University of Pennsylvania; specializes in Mathematics
Education
Holly Diehl, Ed.D., West Virginia University; specializes in Reading Education
Deborah Farrer, Ed.D., West Virginia University; specializes in Reading
Richard Wyman, Ed.D., University of Washington; specializes in Social Studies Education
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Elementary/Special Education
Master of Education in Elementary and Special Education (Dual
Certification)
Credits: 57
Accreditation
National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education
Program Description
The Master of Education in elementary/special education degree is available to students
seeking Pennsylvania elementary education (grade K-6) certification, Pennsylvania special
education certification and a master’s degree. Candidates for Pennsylvania certification
must have completed undergraduate or graduate studies that include 6 credits each of
college-level mathematics and English and/or literature. They must also complete 3 credits
each of biology, physical science, environmental sciences, U.S. history, economics, health/
wellness and instructional technology. Students entering the program without all, or part,
of the undergraduate requirements may meet them with additional coursework or by
competency tests while they are taking the graduate classes.
Delivery Mode
Traditional
Admissions Criteria
• Graduate School Application plus $25 non-refundable application fee
• A minimum overall undergraduate GPA of 3.00
• Official transcripts
• Passing scores on the Pre-professional Skills Tests (Praxis I): PPST – Reading, Writing
and Mathematics
• Current Act 34, 114 and 151 clearances
Curriculum
I. Professional Education (30 credits)
Course Name
Credits
ESP 501: Introduction to Exceptionality
3
ESP 502: Life Skills Planning and Instruction
3
ESP 503: Assessment and Prescriptive Teaching
3
ESP 504: Curriculum Methods I (Reading and Language Arts)
3
ESP 505: Curriculum Methods II
3
ESP 506: Transition
3
ESP 701: Introduction to Behavior Analysis
3
ESP 720: Student Teaching Internship
(1/2 Elementary, 1/2 Special Education)
9
II. Professional Specialization (24 credits)
Course Name
Credits
EDE 702: Instructional Strategies
3
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Course Name
Credits
EDE 703 OR ESP 739: Field Experience (1/2 and 1/2)
3
EDE 708: Teaching Reading
3
EDE 715: Teaching Language Arts
3
EDE 716: Teaching Social Studies
3
EDE 718: Teaching Mathematics
3
EDE 731: Expressive Arts
3
EDE 740: Teaching Science
3
III. Research (3 credits)
Course Name
Credits
ESP 800: Seminar in Advanced Behavior Analysis and Research Design
3
Additional Requirements
Undergraduate/graduate classes needed for certification (see below for explanation)
All courses, except ESP 800, must be completed before student teaching.
• Mathematics (6 credits)
• English composition I (3 credits) or English/American literature (3 credits)
• Instructional technology
• U.S. history
• English composition II
• Physical science
• Biology
• Environmental/earth science
• Educational psychology
• Economics
Praxis Tests
Test
Scores
Reading
Writing
Math
Fundamental Subject: Content Knowledge
Education of Exceptional Students: Core Content (0353)
Elementary Education: Curriculum, Instruction, Assessment (0011)
Evidence of the following:
• Negative TB test
• $1 million liability insurance policy
74
Date
Passed
• Current Act 34, 151 and 114 (fingerprint) clearances
• Speech and hearing evaluation
Candidacy
CANDIDATES MUST APPLY FOR CANDIDACY UPON COMPLETING 6 GRADUATE
CREDITS. APPLICATIONS ARE AVAILABLE IN THE SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
AND RESEARCH.
Candidates who are Pennsylvania certified in another specialty are not required to take ESP
720; instead, they complete ESP 719. Candidates seeking certification (new or additional)
must take and pass all appropriate Praxis tests.
Candidates may be required to take undergraduate courses when graduate courses are
unavailable. These courses will not count toward a master’s degree.
Candidates for Pennsylvania teaching certification must have evidence of undergraduate or
graduate study in the following areas:
• 6 credits of college level mathematics
• 3 credits of general biology
• 3 credits of physical science (physics or chemistry)
• 3 credits of U.S. history
• 3 credits of economics
• 3 credits of environmental/earth or space science
• 6 credits of English
• 3 credits of instructional technology
• 3 credits of educational psychology
Directions for Completing Graduate Endorsement Forms for Elementary and Special
Education Certification
The candidate must initiate this process.
1. The endorsement form is available online at:
www.calu.edu/academics/colleges/education/files/endorsement_form.pdf.
Complete the endorsement form with name and date of program completion.
2. Obtain the application for certification online at:
www.portal.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt?open=514&objID=506869&mode=2
Complete the application for certification and return it to the college of education’s
office of the dean.
Program Coordinators
Dr. Kalie Kossar
724-938-4982
[email protected]
Application Questions
School of Graduate Studies and Research
California University of Pennsylvania
250 University Ave.
California, PA 15419
724-938-4187
www.calu.edu/academics/colleges/graduate-school/index.htm
75
Graduate Faculty
Kalie Kossar, Ed.D., West Virginia University, program coordinator; specializes in
Collaboration, Inclusion, Assessment and Strategy Instruction
Jane Bonari, M.Ed., California University of Pennsylvania; specializes in Mathematics
Education
James Burton, Ed.D., West Virginia University, specializes in Life Skills, Transition and
Assistive Technology
Holly Diehl, Ed.D., West Virginia University, specializes Reading Education
Deborah Farrer, Ed.D., West Virginia University, specializes in Reading
J. William Hug, Ph.D., specializes in Science Education and Research
Katherine Mitchem, Ph.D., Utah State University; specializes in Applied Behavior Analysis
and Autism
Christine Peterson, Ed.D., West Virginia University, specializes in Technology Education
Mary Seman, Ed.D., West Virginia University, specializes in Applied Behavior Analysis,
Direct Instruction, Learning Strategies and Content Enhancement Routines
Sherrill Szalajda, M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh, specializes in Special Education
Pedagogy and Trends
Richard Wyman, Ed.D., University of Washington, specializes in Social Studies Education
76
Exercise Science and Health Promotion
Master of Science in Exercise and Health Promotion
Post-graduate Certificate in Exercise Science
Credits: 30
Program Description
The Master of Science degree in exercise science and health promotion is designed for
working professionals and recent bachelor’s degree graduates in the health and fitness
industry, including certified athletic trainers, physical therapists, health and physical
education teachers, coaches, chiropractors, personal trainers, business owners, wellness
counselors, military personnel, and other health/fitness professionals. The University
has worked closely with the National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM) to develop
outstanding course content. NASM was founded in 1987 by physicians, physical therapists
and fitness professionals. Since its inception, the organization has expanded throughout the
United States, Asia and Europe and has always focused on the development, refinement
and implementation of superior educational programs for fitness, performance and sports
medicine professionals.
Four distinct tracks are available, with each also offered as a post-graduate certificate to
those who already have a master’s degree. They are:
• Wellness and fitness
• Performance enhancement and injury prevention
• Rehabilitation science
• Sport psychology
Detailed information about each track can be found on our website. Each track
involves specific coursework preparing the student for one of three NASM certification
examinations:
• Certified Personal Trainer (CPT)
• Performance Enhancement Specialist (PES)
• Corrective Exercise Specialist (CES)
Program length is 12 consecutive months with a July or January start. Thirty students
per class work, learn, communicate online and function as a group of interactive peers.
This virtual community, or cohort, creates a lively, dynamic educational experience that
enriches the collaborative skills essential in the contemporary health care and fitness
workplace.
Delivery Mode
100 percent online
Admissions Criteria
• Graduate School Application plus $25 nonrefundable application fee
• Official transcripts/baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution
• Applicants must be a fitness, health, exercise science or wellness professional, health
educator, coach, or military personnel or be certified, licensed or registered in one of the
following: athletic training, physical therapy, occupational therapy, nutrition, physician
assistant, nursing, chiropractic or other similar health care profession.
• Minimum overall undergraduate 2.75 GPA (candidates in the 2.50-2.75 range will be
considered if they submit two professional letters of recommendation)
77
• Resume or curriculum vitae listing three references
• Applicants may be contacted for a phone or e-mail interview with the program
coordinator to determine success in a web-based learning environment.
Curriculum
Core Courses (required for all tracks)
Course Name
Credits
PRF 720: Essentials of Human Movement Science
3
PRF 705: Industrial, Clinical and Corporate Wellness
3
PRF 715: Business and Entrepreneurship in the Fitness Industry
3
PRF 760: Leadership and Professional Development
3
PRF 765: Nutrition for Peak Performance
3
PRF 770: Exercise Physiology: Assessment and Exercise Prescription
3
Note: One of the following tracks must be selected. All tracks are also available as postgraduate certificates for applicants who possess a graduate degree.
Wellness and Fitness Track
Course Name
Credits
PRF 800: Research in Fitness and Wellness
3
PRF 711: An Integrated Approach to Fitness and Wellness
3
PRF 751: Program Design in Fitness and Wellness
3
PRF 781: Current Topics in Fitness and Wellness
3
Performance Enhancement and Injury Prevention Track
Course Name
Credits
PRF 810: Research in Performance Enhancement
3
PRF 710: Performance Enhancement in Physical Activity
3
PRF 750: Performance Enhancement Program Design
3
PRF 780: Current Topics in Performance Enhancement
3
Rehabilitation Science Track
Course Name
Credits
PRF 820: Research in Rehabilitation
3
PRF 712: Corrective Exercise in Rehabilitation
3
PRF 752: Corrective Exercise Program Design
3
PRF 782: Current Topics in Rehabilitation
3
Sport Psychology Track
Course Name
Credits
PRF 713: Special Topics in Sport Psychology
3
PRF 753: Psychological Aspects of Sport Injury and Rehabilitation
3
78
Course Name
Credits
PRF 783: Psychological Perspectives in Sport Performance Enhancement and
Intervention
3
PRF 830: Research in Sport Psychology
3
Program Contact Information
Wellness and Fitness: [email protected]
Sport Performance Enhancement: [email protected]
Rehabilitation Science: [email protected]
Sport Psychology: [email protected]
Or call 1-866-595-6348 or visit www.calu.edu/go
Global Online Department Website
www.calu.edu/go
Application Questions
School of Graduate Studies and Research
California University of Pennsylvania
250 University Ave.
California, PA 15419
724-938-4187
www.calu.edu/academics/colleges/graduate-school/index.htm
Graduate Faculty
Barry E. McGlumphy, Professor and Program Coordinator; Ed.D., ATC, University of
Pittsburgh
William B. Biddington, Professor; Ed.D., M.S., ATC, West Virginia University
Carol M. Biddington, Associate Professor, Ed.D., West Virginia University
Michael A. Clark, Adjunct Professor; DPT, M.S., PES, University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill
Julie Ramsey Emrhein, Assistant Professor; M.Ed., University of Virginia
Marc Federico, Associate Professor; DPT, Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania
Jeffrey Hatton, Assistant Professor; M.S., OTR, California University of Pennsylvania
Scott Lucett, Adjunct Professor; M.S., California University of Pennsylvania
Linda Meyer, Associate Professor; Ed.D., ATC, Duquesne University
Martin Miller, Adjunct Professor; B.S., Canisius College; M.S., California University of
Pennsylvania; ATC, PES, CES, CSCS
Benjamin Reuter, Associate Professor; Ph.D., ATC, Auburn University
Joni L. Roh, Professor; Ed.D., ATC, West Virginia University
Christine Romani-Ruby, Associate Professor; M.P.T., ATC, Slippery Rock University of
Pennsylvania
Alan Russell, Adjunct Professor; M.S., ATC, PES, California University of Pennsylvania
Jim Thornton, Adjunct Professor; M.S., ATC, University of the Pacific
Ronald W. Wagner, Associate Professor; Ph.D., ATC, University of Arkansas
Ellen West, Associate Professor; M.S., ATC, West Virginia University
79
Legal Studies: Criminal Justice
Master of Science in Legal Studies, Criminal Justice Track
Credits: 36-37
Program Description
The Master of Science in legal studies: criminal justice track is offered on the California
University Global Online Network in an accelerated format. The program is housed in the
Department of Professional Studies within the College of Science and Technology. Both
academics and practitioners whose pedagogy blends theory with practice instruct in this
program. The curricular mission is to prepare learned and erudite justice practitioners who
will assume leadership positions in the justice sector and make substantial contributions to
the betterment of the legal and justice systems and the community served.
Delivery Mode
100 percent online
Admissions Criteria
• Minimum overall undergraduate 3.00 GPA
• Graduate School Application plus $25 nonrefundable application fee
• Official transcripts
• For those with less than 3.00 undergraduate GPA performances:
——Conditional acceptance with written essay
——Phone/e-mail interview with program coordinator
Curriculum
Core Courses: 12 Semester Hours
Course Name
Credits
LAW 600: Law and Public Policy
3
LAW 601: Law and Ethics
3
LAW 602: Law, Civil Liberties and the Constitution
3
LAW 603: Law and Legal Method
3
Core Courses: 24-25 Semester Hours
Course Name
Credits
PCJ 747: Financial Investigations
3
PCJ 748: Criminal Justice Organization and Management
3
PCJ 749: Seminar in Justice Studies
3
PCJ 750: Sexual Assault Investigations
3
PCJ 751: Executive Protection and the Law
3
PCJ 752: Digital Imaging, Forensic Photography and the Law
3
PCJ 755: Polygraph and Lie Detection
3
AST 700: U.S. Homeland Security
3
AST 740: Terrorism, Threat and Vulnerability: Analysis and Protection
3
80
Course Name
Credits
AST 760: Biological, Chemical, Nuclear and WMD Threats in Homeland
Security
3
AST 780: Intelligence Practice in Homeland Security
3
LAW 605: Law and Police Process
3
LAW 606: Law, Punishment and Corrections
3
LAW 607: Law and Criminal Conduct
3
LAW 702: Law, Science and Forensic Applications
3
LAW 730: Independent Study in Law and Public Policy OR
RES 849: Thesis
3
4
Program Coordinator
Dr. Charles Nemeth
724-597-7400
Fax 724-597-7402
[email protected]
Department Website
www.calu.edu/go
Application Questions
School of Graduate Studies and Research
California University of Pennsylvania
250 University Ave.
California, PA 15419
724-938-4187
www.calu.edu/academics/colleges/graduate-school/index.htm
Graduate Faculty
Charles P. Nemeth, J.D., Ph.D., LL.M., Program Coordinator, specializes in legal system
ethics, appellate legal practice and private sector justice
Jeffrey S. Magers, Ed.D., various experience in patrol, violent crimes, narcotics and hostage
negotiations
Christina A. Toras, M.A., J.D., also serves as Court of Common Pleas arbitrator
81
Legal Studies: Homeland Security
Master of Science in Legal Studies, Homeland Security Track
Credits: 36-37
Program Description
California University of Pennsylvania’s acute understanding of this extraordinary need
in contemporary society has led to the creation of the homeland security track in legal
studies. It presents a neat and clean track that prepares supervisory personnel to tackle
the many challenges inherent in the protection of a nation. It allows justice professionals,
health specialists and legal specialists to concentrate on the methodology of security in this
narrow context. Aside from the recurring demands of professional justice duty, homeland
security delivers another slant and perspective to harried and often over-tasked public
servants.
Program Objectives
• Develop strategies, plans and programs to prevent terrorist attacks within the United
States and reduce America’s vulnerability to terrorism
• Build the organizational arrangements needed to strengthen homeland security (HS),
including local/state/federal, civil-military and interagency cooperation
• Help government leaders make immediate as well as longer-term improvements in
HS preparedness by having their students conduct policy development work on “real
world,” actionable opportunities for progress
Delivery Mode
100 percent online
Admissions Criteria
• Minimum overall undergraduate 3.00 GPA
• Graduate School Application plus $25 nonrefundable application fee
• Official transcripts
Curriculum
Core Curriculum (15 credits)
Course Name
Credits
LAW 600: Law and Public Policy
3
LAW 601: Law and Ethics
3
LAW 602: Law, Civil Liberties and the Constitution
3
LAW 603: Law and Legal Method
3
LAW 700: Law and the International Community
3
Homeland Security Track (12 credits)
Course Name
Credits
AST 700: U.S. Homeland Security
3
AST 740: Terrorism, Threat and Vulnerability: Analysis and Protection
3
AST 760: Biological, Chemical, Nuclear and WMD Threats in Homeland
Security
3
AST 780: Intelligence Practice in Homeland Security
3
82
Homeland Security Electives (9-10 credits)
Course Name
Credits
LAW 605: Law and Police Process
3
LAW 606: Law, Punishment and Corrections
3
LAW 607: Law and Criminal Conduct
3
LAW 608: Law and Civil Litigation
3
LAW 609: Law, Culture and Society
3
LAW 610: Law, Justice and the Family
3
LAW 701: Law and Administrations Agencies
3
LAW 702: Law and Forensic Applications
3
LAW 703: Law and the Environment
3
LAW 704: Law, Business and the Workplace
3
RES 849: Thesis
4
LAW 730: Independent Study in Law and Public Policy
3
Program Coordinator
Dr. Charles Nemeth
724-597-7400
Fax 724-597-7402
[email protected]
Department Website
www.calu.edu/go
Application Questions
School of Graduate Studies and Research
California University of Pennsylvania
250 University Ave.
California, PA 15419
724-938-4187
www.calu.edu/academics/colleges/graduate-school/index.htm
Graduate Faculty
Charles P. Nemeth, J.D., Ph.D., LL.M., Program Coordinator, specializes in legal system
ethics, appellate legal practice and private sector justice
Jeffrey S. Magers, Ed.D., various experience in patrol, violent crimes, narcotics and hostage
negotiations
Christina A. Toras, M.A., J.D., also serves as Court of Common Pleas arbitrator
83
Legal Studies: Law and Public Policy
Master of Science in Legal Studies, Law and Public Policy Track
Credits: 36-37
Program Description
The online Master of Science in legal studies: law and public policy track blends the fields
of humanities, business, political science and jurisprudence. This Internet-based program
creates a wide-ranging educational opportunity for both working professionals and serious
students seeking graduate education in the analysis and application of law in a myriad
of settings. Law and public policy allows seasoned practitioners and scholarly graduate
students the opportunity to address, analyze and critique the law and its implications from
a social, administrative, juridical, operational, philosophical and managerial perspective.
Special emphasis will be given to the ethical considerations inherent in all legal decisionmaking, the constitutional parameters of law and its practice, and practical assessments of
how law influences the culture, the community and the individual.
Delivery Mode
100 percent online
Admissions Criteria
• Minimum overall undergraduate 3.00 GPA
• Graduate School Application plus $25 nonrefundable application fee
• Official transcripts
Curriculum
Core Curriculum (12 credits)
Course Name
Credits
LAW 600: Law and Public Policy
3
LAW 601: Law and Ethics
3
LAW 602: Law, Civil Liberties and the Constitution
3
LAW 603: Law and Legal Method
3
Law and Public Policy Electives (24-25 credits)
Course Name
Credits
LAW 605: Law and Police Process
3
LAW 606: Law, Punishment and Corrections
3
LAW 607: Law and Criminal Conduct
3
LAW 608: Law and Civil Litigation
3
LAW 609: Law, Culture and Society
3
LAW 610: Law, Justice and the Family
3
LAW 700: Law and the International Community
3
LAW 701: Law and Administrations Agencies
3
LAW 702: Law and Forensic Applications
3
LAW 703: Law and the Environment
3
LAW 704: Law, Business and the Workplace
3
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Course Name
Credits
RES 849: Thesis
4
LAW 730: Independent Study in Law and Public Policy
3
Program Coordinator
Dr. Charles Nemeth
724-597-7400
Fax 724-597-7402
[email protected]
Department Website
www.calu.edu/go
Application Questions
School of Graduate Studies and Research
California University of Pennsylvania
250 University Ave.
California, PA 15419
724-938-4187
www.calu.edu/academics/colleges/graduate-school/index.htm
Graduate Faculty
Charles P. Nemeth, J.D., Ph.D., LL.M., Program Coordinator, specializes in legal system
ethics, appellate legal practice and private sector justice
Jeffrey S. Magers, Ed.D., various experience in patrol, violent crimes, narcotics and hostage
negotiations
Christina A. Toras, M.A., J.D., also serves as Court of Common Pleas arbitrator
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Mentally/Physically Handicapped Education
Master of Education in Mentally/Physically Handicapped Education
Credits: 33-51
Accreditation
National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE)
Program Description
The Master of Education mentally/physically handicapped consists of four tracks:
Track A (33 credits)
For those who already hold an instructional/teaching certificate in any area, but not
Pennsylvania certification in special education.
Track B, Autism Spectrum Disorders/ASD (33 credits)
For those who already hold certification in mentally and/or physically handicapped or any
single-category area of special education.
Track C (48 credits)
For those without a teaching certificate who are now working with, or have worked with,
handicapped children or adults in either a community or an institutional setting. Track C
leads to both Pennsylvania certification and a master’s degree. Graduate students who will
student teach will be required to meet all requirements as are currently in place.
Track D (51 credits)
For those without a teaching certificate who would like to earn dual certification in
elementary and special education. Track D leads to Pennsylvania certification in elementary
education and special education and a master’s degree. Graduate students who will
student teach will be required to meet all requirements as are currently in place.
Certification
A certification-only program is available for those holding another certification
Delivery Mode
Traditional and online
Admissions Criteria
• Minimum overall undergraduate 3.00 GPA (or 3.00 GPA by calculation of last 48 credits
earned)
• Graduate School Application plus $25 nonrefundable application fee
• Official transcripts
• Passing scores on Praxis I exam
• Current Act 34, 151 and 114 (fingerprint) clearances
Curriculum
Track A (* designates a requirement)
Major Area – 33 Credits
Course Name
Credits
*ESP 501: Introduction to Exceptionality
3
*ESP 701: Introduction to Behavior Analysis
3
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Course Name
Credits
*ESP 739: Field Experience in Special Education
3
*ESP 502: Life Skills Planning and Instruction
3
*ESP 503: Assessment and Prescriptive Teaching
3
*ESP 504: Curriculum and Methods I: Reading and Language Arts
3
*ESP 505: Curriculum and Methods II: Math and Other Content Areas
3
*ESP 506: Transition Planning and Instruction
3
*ESP 712: Seminar on Trends and Issues or Approved Elective
3
*ESP 719: Internship
3
Research – 3 Credits
Course Name
Credits
*ESP 800: Seminar in Advanced Behavior Analysis and Research Design
3
Track B (* designates a requirement)
Major Area – 12 Credits
Course Name
Credits
*ESP 740: Nature/Characteristics of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD)
3
*ESP 741: Communication, Behavior and Instruction: ASD
3
*ESP 742: Life Transitions and Partnerships: ASD
3
*ESP 743: Navigating the Social World: ASD
3
Electives – 18 Credits .
Required at the graduate level, unless foundational content or certification in mentally/
physically handicapped is completed at the undergraduate level.
Course Name
Credits
ESP 701: Introduction to Behavior Analysis
3
ESP 502: Life Skills Planning and Instruction
3
ESP 503: Assessment and Prescriptive Teaching
3
ESP 504: Curriculum and Methods I: Reading and Language Arts
3
ESP 505: Curriculum and Methods II: Mathematics and Other Content Areas
3
Remaining Electives (to Total 18 Credits)
Course Name
Credits
ESP 712: Seminar on Trends and Issues
3
ESP 732: Seminar in Administration and Supervision
3
ESP 735: Seminar in Education of the Gifted
3
ESP 737: Seminar on Legislation/Litigation
3
ESP 739: Field Seminar in Special Education
3
ESP 506: Transition Planning and Instruction (if not previously taken)
3
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Research – 3 Credits
Course Name
Credits
*ESP 800: Seminar in Advanced Behavior Analysis and Research Design
3
Total of 33 graduate credit hours (36 required if all foundational content is needed)
required for the master’s degree with specialization in ASD.
Track C (* designates a requirement)
Major Area – 36 Credits
Course Name
Credits
*ESP 501: Introduction to Exceptionality
3
*ESP 701: Introduction to Behavior Analysis
3
*ESP 739: Field Experience in Special Education
3
*ESP 502: Life Skills Planning and Instruction
3
*ESP 503: Assessment and Prescriptive Teaching
3
*ESP 504: Curriculum and Methods I: Reading and Language Arts
3
*ESP 505: Curriculum and Methods II: Math and Other Content Areas
3
*ESP 506: Transition Planning and Instruction
3
*ESP 712: Seminar on Trends and Issues or Approved Elective
3
*ESP 720: Internship/Student Teaching
9
Professional Education – 9 Credits
Course Name
Credits
9 credits of education psychology as approved by adviser
9
Research – 3 Credits
Course Name
Credits
*ESP 800: Seminar in Advanced Behavior Analysis and Research Design
3
Note: Track C students must take 9 credits of ESP 720 Student Teaching
Track D
Professional Education (21 credits)
Course Name
Credits
ESP 501: Introduction to Exceptionality
3
ESP 502: Life Skills Planning and Instruction
3
ESP 503: Assessment and Prescriptive Teaching
3
ESP 701: Introduction to Behavior Analysis
3
ESP 720: Internship/Student Teaching
9
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Professional Specialization – 27 Credits
Course Name
Credits
EDE 702: Instructional Strategies
3
ESP 739: Field Experience (1/2 and 1/2)
3
EDE 708: Teaching Reading
3
EDE 715: Teaching Language Arts
3
ESP 504: Curriculum and Methods I
3
EDE 716: Teaching Social Studies
3
EDE 718: Teaching Mathematics
3
EDE 731: Expressive Arts
3
EDE 740: Teaching Science
3
Research – 3 Credits
Course Name
Credits
ESP 800: Seminar in Advanced Behavior Analysis and Research Design
3
Program Coordinator
Dr. Kalie Kossar
724-938-4982
[email protected]
Department Website
www.calu.edu/academics/graduate-programs/mental-and-or-physical-handicapped/index.
htm
Application Questions
School of Graduate Studies and Research
California University of Pennsylvania
250 University Ave
California, PA 15419
724-938-4187
www.calu.edu/academics/colleges/graduate-school/index.htm
Graduate Faculty
Kalie Kossar, Ed.D., West Virginia University; program coordinator; specializes in
Collaboration, Inclusion, Assessment and Strategy Instruction
James Burton, Ed.D., West Virginia University; specializes in Life Skills, Transition and
Assistive Technology
Kevin Koury, Ed.D., West Virginia University; specializes in Assessment and Special
Education Technology
Katherine Mitchem, Ph.D., Utah State University; specializes in Applied Behavior Analysis
and Autism and Special Education Technology
Mary Seman, Ed.D., West Virginia University; specializes in Applied Behavior Analysis,
Direct Instruction, Learning Strategies and Content Enhancement Routines
Sherrill Szalajda, M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh; specializes in Special Education
Pedagogy and Trends
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Mentally/Physically Handicapped Education: Autism Spectrum
Disorders
Certificate of Advanced Study in Mentally/Physically Handicapped
Education: Autism Spectrum Disorders
Credits: 12
Program Description
The certificate of advanced study in autism spectrum disorders directly addresses the
needs of today’s educators and professionals who are working with individuals with
autism spectrum disorders (ASD) throughout the lifespan. The proposed certificate
provides specialized preparation of teachers in ASD through an innovative 12 credit
hour graduate program endorsement in ASD that has the provision of socialization
opportunities for individuals with ASD and educational outreach materials and resources
for parents and community members at its core.
Delivery Mode
100 percent online
Admissions Criteria
• Minimum overall undergraduate 3.00 GPA
• Graduate School Application plus $25 nonrefundable application fee
• Official transcripts
• Teaching certificate*
• Current Act 34, 151 and 114 (fingerprint) clearances
*Other credentials and/or qualifications for educators and professionals applying to this
program without a teaching certificate will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis.
Curriculum
Required Courses
Course Name
Credits
ESP 740: Nature/Characteristics of Autism Spectrum Disorders
3
ESP 741: Communication, Behavior and Instruction: ASD
3
ESP 742: Life Transitions and Partnerships: ASD
3
ESP 743: Navigating the Social World: ASD
3
Program Coordinator
Dr. Katherine Mitchem
724-938-6039
[email protected]
Department Website
www.calu.edu/academics/graduate-programs/autism-spectrum-disorders/index.htm
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Application Questions
School of Graduate Studies and Research
California University of Pennsylvania
250 University Ave.
California, PA 15419
724-938-4187
www.calu.edu/academics/colleges/graduate-school/index.htm
Graduate Faculty
Katherine Mitchem, Ph.D., Utah State University; Program Coordinator; specializes in
Applied Behavior Analysis and Autism and Special Education Technology
James Burton, Ed.D., West Virginia University; specializes in Life Skills, Transition and
Assistive Technology
Kalie Kossar, Ed.D., West Virginia University; specializes in Collaboration, Inclusion,
Assessment and Strategy Instruction
Mary Seman, Ed.D., West Virginia University; specializes in Applied Behavior Analysis,
Direct Instruction, Learning Strategies and Content Enhancement Routines
Sherrill Szalajda, M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh; specializes in Special Education
Pedagogy and Trends
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Nursing Administration and Leadership
Master of Science in Nursing
Credits: 30
Accreditation
The MSN program will seek accreditation by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing
Education (CCNE), an autonomous arm of the AACN and devoted exclusively to the
accreditation of baccalaureate and graduate degree nursing education programs. California
University of Pennsylvania’s RN-BSN program is already fully accredited by the CCNE.
Program Description
If you already hold a baccalaureate degree in nursing, California University of
Pennsylvania offers a Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) with a concentration in
nursing administration and leadership. This program is designed to prepare nurses
for administrative and leadership positions in a variety of health care settings. The
courses blend theory and practice in administration, leadership, organization, quality
of care, delivery systems of patient care, human resource management, legal and ethical
practice and health care finance, and incorporates health care informatics. The program
culminates with a practicum in nursing administration where students work with a nurse
administrator in their area of interest. The MSN program builds upon California University
of Pennsylvania’s undergraduate RN-BSN program. Upon completion of the program,
graduates will be eligible academically to take the national certification exam for nurse
administration offered by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC).
Delivery Mode
The MSN program is a part-time, web-based degree program offering courses completely
online. Students take two 3-credit courses consecutively each term and the first summer
session. During the second summer session, students take the 6-credit practicum capstone
course.
Admissions Criteria
• Graduate School Application plus $25 nonrefundable application fee
• Official transcripts from every institution attended. For programs attended outside of
the United States, with the exception of Canada, applicants must submit a credential
evaluation from the Commission on Graduates of Foreign Nursing Schools (CGFNS) for
nursing course work and World Education Services (WES) for non-nursing course work.
• BSN from National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC) or CCNE
accredited program. For international students, completion of a nursing bachelor’s
degree, if available in the country of origin.
• Minimum undergraduate 3.00 GPA on all previous coursework or the last 60 credits
completed. For international students, scholastic record comparable to a 3.00 GPA.
Prerequisites
• Undergraduate course in nursing leadership (3 credits)
• Undergraduate course in nursing research (3 credits)
• Undergraduate course in statistics (3 credits)
• Two professional references – one from a supervisor who can speak to the applicant’s
clinical, administrative and/or leadership ability and one from someone who can speak
to academic ability (exception: if the applicant is out of school for five or more years, the
second reference should be a professional reference, preferably from a registered nurse).
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• Current license as a registered nurse in the state in which the applicant is employed
in nursing. International students need to be licensed in the country in which they are
employed in nursing.
• Current complete resume or curriculum vitae.
• A personal statement describing interest in advanced nursing education and career goals
related to the nursing administration and leadership program.
• A telephone or e-mail interview with the MSN in nursing administration and leadership
program coordinator and completion of the “Is Online Learning for Me?” online test to
determine the applicant’s potential for success in the web-based learning environment.
Note: Prospective international master’s students staying in their countries of origin and
taking an online program should also review international applicants information for
admission consideration in the Graduate Catalog.
Curriculum
Required Courses
Course Name
Credits
NUR 601: Theory and Research in Nursing
3
NUR 602: Health Policy in Nursing
3
NUR 603: Information Systems for Nurses in Health Care Organizations
3
NUR 604: Health Promotion/Disease Prevention
3
NUR 714: Legal Aspects of Health Care Administration
3
NUR 715: Financial Management in Non-Profit Health Care Organizations
3
NUR 711: Nursing Organization and Leadership Theory
3
NUR 712: Nursing Administration and Leadership Role
3
NUR 813: Nursing Administration Role Practicum
6
Program Coordinator
Dr. Mary A. O’Connor
724-938-1652
Fax: 724-938-5673
[email protected]
www.calu.edu/go
Department Website
www.calu.edu/academics/online-programs/nursing-administration/index.htm
Application Questions
School of Graduate Studies and Research
California University of Pennsylvania
250 University Ave.
California, PA 15419
724-938-4187
www.calu.edu/academics/colleges/graduate-school/index.htm
Graduate Faculty
Joan Clites, Ed.D., West Virginia University
Cheryl Hettman, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh
Mary A. O’Connor, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh
93
Linda Pina, Ph.D., Kennedy-Western University
Debra Shelapinsky, M.S.N., CRNP, University of Pittsburgh
94
Reading Specialist
Master of Education: Reading Specialist
Credits vary according to program plan
Reading Specialist Certification Only
Without Master of Education degree
Accreditation
National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE)
Program Description
RSP candidates will study and apply theory and research in literacy acquisition, instruction
and assessment. Candidates apply knowledge and expertise in a culminating practicum
experience in which they work with struggling readers to assess literacy development
to plan and implement appropriate instructional intervention and support. The mission
of the graduate reading specialist program is to encourage the development of reading
specialists who serve schools and communities with Integrity, Civility and Responsibility,
and who demonstrate superior knowledge and skills reflected in the International Reading
Association Standards for Reading Specialists.
The reading specialist program offers three options:
• Plan A requires coursework and a research project. In Plan A, candidates choose between
a program of study that involves 40 credits, including a 4-credit master’s thesis, or a
program of study that involves 38 credits, including a 2-credit research project. Plan A is
recommended for students who are interested in research or administration, or who plan
to pursue a doctoral degree in the future.
• Plan B requires 36 credits of coursework. Plan B will prepare students for work in the
classroom by strengthening instructional skills and theoretical orientation. It will also
prepare them for the role of a reading specialist who may serve as a resource person to
schools in addition to assessing and planning instruction to assist children and adults in
the development of literacy skills.
• Plan C requires between 27-33 credits of coursework. Completion of Plan C offers
students advanced certification on the Pennsylvania teaching certificate only.
All plans require successful completion of a LiveText reading specialist portfolio interview
to be taken during the last semester of coursework.
Reading specialist candidates seeking to have RSP certification added to their Pennsylvania
teaching certificate must pass the Praxis II Reading Specialist test.
Delivery Mode
Online and traditional courses are offered as well as hybrid courses that include a
combination of traditional and online components.
Admissions Criteria
• Official transcripts
• Minimum overall undergraduate 3.00 GPA or 3.00 GPA in last 48 college credits taken
• Graduate School Application plus $25 nonrefundable application fee
• Copy of teaching certificate before completion of first semester (students who fail to
meet this requirement will not be approved for RSP candidacy)
• Current Act 34, 151 and 114 (fingerprint) clearances
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Curriculum
Core Reading Courses (21 Credits Required)
Course Name
Credits
RSP 700: Fundamentals of Literacy — Theory and Practice
3
RSP 702: Diagnosis and Instruction
3
RSP 703: Practicum — Assessment Case Study
3
RSP 704: Practicum — Instruction Case Study
3
RSP 705: Psychology of Reading
3
RSP 706: Adult Literacy
3
RSP 734: Content Area Reading
3
English Language Learner Courses (3 credits required)
Course Name
Credits
EDE 704: Teaching English as a Second Language
3
EDU 650: Supporting English Language Learners
3
Educational Research Courses (3 Credits Required)
Course Name
Credits
RES 800: Methods of Research
3
ESP 800: Seminar in Advanced Behavioral Analysis and Research Design
3
Related Electives (Plan A and B: 9 Credits Required; Plan C: 3 - 9 Credits Required)
Course Name
Credits
EDE 700: Historical Background of the Elementary School
3
EDE 701: Development and Organization of the Curriculum
3
EDE 706: Evaluation and Measurement in the Elementary School
3
EDE 715: Teaching Language Arts
3
ESP 501: Introduction to Exceptionality
3
ESP 610: Special Education Foundations and Collaboration
3
ESP 613: Evidence-Based Practices for Secondary Inclusion
3
ESP 701: Introduction to Behavior Analysis
3
PSY 712: Advanced Psychology of Learning
3
PSY 720: Neuropsychology of Learning
3
EDP 600: Statistical Methods
3
Research with Adviser’s Approval (Plan A Only)
Course Name
Credits
RES 829: Research Project
2
RES 849: Master’s Thesis
3
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Effective January 2011, students entering the program must have at least 9 credits in
special education and 3 credits in teaching ESL. If you do not have special education
courses in your undergraduate or other graduate transcript (approved by the graduate RSP
coordinator), be sure to choose ESP courses when registering for related electives.
Certification only students who have transcripts that include 9 special education credits
(approved by the graduate RSP coordinator) can obtain certification with 3 credits of
related electives. Certification only students with no special education courses must take 9
credits of ESP courses from the list of related electives. Thus, the range of 27-33 credits for
the certification only program.
*All plans require successful completion of LiveText exit portfolio interview.
*Endorsement for certification requires Praxis II RSP test.
Program Coordinator
Dr. Connie J. Armitage
724-938-4496
[email protected]
Department Website
www.calu.edu/academics/graduate-programs/reading-specialist/index.htm
Application Questions
School of Graduate Studies and Research
California University of Pennsylvania
250 University Ave.
California, PA 15419
724-938-4187
www.calu.edu/academics/colleges/graduate-school/index.htm
Graduate Faculty
Connie J. Armitage, Program Coordinator; Ed.D., University of Pittsburgh; specializes in
Reading
Holly Diehl, Ed.D., West Virginia University; specializes in Curriculum and Instruction
Diane Nettles, Ph.D., University of South Florida; specializes in Curriculum and
Instruction
Christine Peterson, Ed.D., West Virginia University; specializes in Technology Education
97
School Psychology
Master of Science in School Psychology
Post-master’s Certificate in School Psychology
Credits: 36+
(31 additional credits for post-master’s certificate in school psychology)
Accreditation
National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE)
National Association of School Psychologists (NASP) (SLFull, 2006)
Certification
Post-master’s certificate in school psychology
Program Description
The school psychology program offers graduate study leading to a Master of Science
degree and/or a post-master’s certificate in school psychology. The program is built on a
respect for human diversity and does not discriminate in its practices or polices based on
race, color, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, disability, age, religion or ethnic
background.
Delivery Mode
Traditional and distance education (live video/audio conference or online) offerings
Admissions Criteria
Two professional letters of recommendation, i.e., from professors or employers (use
recommendation form found at www.calu.edu/academics/graduate-programs/files/
LETTER_OF_RECOMMENDATION_form_grad_program.pdf
• Minimum overall undergraduate 3.00 GPA
• Graduate School Application plus $25 nonrefundable application fee
• Official transcripts
• Autobiographical essay focusing on student’s motivation to become a school
psychologist
• Miller Analogies Test (MAT) or GRE scores
Admission to the Certification Program
Individuals who have earned a master’s degree in school psychology or a related area may
apply for direct admission to the certification phase of the school psychology program.
Applicants to the certification phase are not required to submit a Miller Analogies Test
score; however, all other admission requirements listed for the master’s degree program
must be met.
Curriculum
Master of Science Courses (36 credits)
Area I – Psychological and Educational Foundations
Course Name
Credits
PSY 702: Psychopathology of Childhood
3
PSY 713: Psychology of Growth and Development
3
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Course Name
Credits
PSY 712: Advanced Psychology of Learning
3
PSY 741: Theories of Counseling and Psychotherapy
3
PSY 720: Neuropsychology
3
Area II – Psychological Methods and Techniques
Course Name
Credits
PSY 721: Advanced Tests and Measurements
3
PSY 795: Seminar in Behavior Modification
3
Area III – School Programs and Organization
Course Name
Credits
PSY 752: Fundamentals of School Psychology
3
PSY 710: Principles of Instructional Design
3
Area IV – Research
Course Name
Credits
PSY 767: Research Methods in Psychology
3
PSY 766: Psychological Statistics
3
PSY 796: Seminar in Analysis of Research in School Psychology OR
PSY 849: Thesis Option (see student manual)
3
Specialist Certificate Courses (31 Credits)
Area II – Psychological Methods and Techniques
Course Name
Credits
PSY 722: Individual Psychological Evaluation I
3
PSY 723: Individual Psychological Evaluation II
3
PSY 724: Practicum in School Psychology
3
PSY 734: Assessment of Personality and Behavior I
3
PSY 742: Techniques of Counseling and Psychotherapy with Practicum
3
PSY 756: Consultation and Group Processes
3
Area V – Professional School Psychology
Course Name
Credits
PSY 773: Internship in School Psychology
10
PSY 798: Seminar in Professional School Psychology
3
For initial certification, students must have:
• 6 credits of college math*
• 3 credits of English composition*
• 3 credits of English/American literature*
*These credits may be graduate or undergraduate credits
99
Program Coordinator
Dr. Angela Bloomquist
724-938-4488
[email protected]
Department Website
www.calu.edu/academics/graduate-programs/school-psychology/index.htm
Application Questions
School of Graduate Studies and Research
California University of Pennsylvania
250 University Ave.
California, PA 15419
724-938-4187
www.calu.edu/academics/colleges/graduate-school/index.htm
Graduate Faculty
Angela Bloomquist, Ed.D., Indiana University of Pennsylvania, program coordinator
Holiday Adair, Ph.D., University of Akron
Richard Cavasina, Ed.D., West Virginia University
Gail Ditkoff, Ph.D., State University of New York at Albany
Kirk John, Ed.D., Indiana University of Pennsylvania
Sam Lonich, M.S., California University of Pennsylvania
Nickolas Martin, Ed.D., Indiana University of Pennsylvania
Elizabeth Mason, Ph.D., Ball State University
Rebecca Regeth, Ph.D., University of New Hampshire
Carrie Rosengart, Ph.D., University of Georgia
Richard Scott, Ph.D., University of Tennessee
Linda Toth, Ed.D., West Virginia University
100
Secondary Education
Master of Arts Teaching: Advanced Studies in Secondary Education
Credits: 30
Program Description
The program offers highly motivated adults with full-time teaching jobs in either a middle
or high school an opportunity to earn an advanced degree in secondary education online.
This program is designed for all middle and high school teachers, regardless of area of
certification/licensure.
With a Master of Arts in teaching (MAT), students will broaden and deepen their
knowledge and instructional skills and refine their pedagogies. The program is also
prepares students for National Board for Professional Teaching Standards teaching
certification.
Advanced studies in secondary education is a fall start, 30-credit graduate program
for middle and high school teachers who are seeking a Master’s of Education degree.
The curriculum is aligned with the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards
(NBPTS) and the National Board Certification process. The courses and activities will use
data from teachers’ own practices to reflect on their work and the work of their students to
develop a deeper understanding of student learning.
MAT students are expected to complete degree requirements in five semesters – two
courses each semester, including summer sessions.
Courses will use participation in online activities, including small group projects, case
studies, papers, exams, discussion and debate, as the basis for earning credits. All courses
feature asynchronous discussion; i.e., messages are posted at any time and students can
read previously posted messages by others. Students may participate at any time of the
day.
Courses have been approved by the Pennsylvania Department of Education for certification
and continuing education credits (Act 48).
Delivery Mode
100 percent online
Admissions Criteria
• Official transcripts
• Minimum overall undergraduate 3.00 GPA
• Graduate School Application plus $25 nonrefundable application fee
• Current resume
• Copy of valid teaching certificate
Applicants with a GPA of 2.99 or less must also:
• Have a 3.00 or higher in the last 48 credits OR submit two letters of recommendation
from individuals who know the applicant well and can comment on the applicant’s
intellectual and leadership abilities
• Submit evidence of successful teaching or professional educational experience
101
Curriculum
Semester 1 (Fall)
Course Name
Credits
MSE 740: Advanced Instructional Technology
3
MSE 755: Constructivists Instructional Strategies
3
Semester 2 (Spring)
Course Name
Credits
MSE 775: Teacher Leadership
3
MSE 750: Online Technologies in Education
3
Semester 3 (Summer)
Course Name
Credits
MSE 745: Advanced Classroom Management
3
MSE 766: Instructional Design and Assessment
3
Semester 4 (Fall)
Course Name
Credits
MSE 771: Strategies for Inclusive Classrooms in 7-12
3
MSE 725: Action Research in Secondary Education
3
Semester 5 (Spring)
Course Name
Credits
MSE 720: Advanced Standards-Aligned Instruction 7-12
3
MSE 760: Reflective Practitioner
3
Program Coordinator
Joseph Zisk, Ed.D.
Secondary Education Department
724-938-4487
[email protected]
Alternate Website
www.teacheronline.us
Application Questions
School of Graduate Studies and Research
California University of Pennsylvania
250 University Ave.
California, PA 15419
724-938-4187
www.calu.edu/academics/colleges/graduate-school/index.htm
Graduate Faculty
Joseph Zisk, Ed.D., Temple University; Program Coordinator
Keith Hepner, Ed.D., University of Pittsburgh
Marcia Hoover, Ed.D., West Virginia University
102
Connie Monroe, Ph.D., University of Dayton
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Secondary Education
Master of Arts Teaching in Secondary Education: Initial Teacher
Certification
Credits: 48
Accreditation
National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE)
Program Description
The initial teacher certification track provides teachers initial certification in the following
areas: art K-12, biology 7-12, chemistry 7-12, earth science 7-12, English 7-12, Spanish
K-12, mathematics 7-12, physics 7-12 and social studies 7-12. It is designed for individuals
with a background in each area or those individuals wishing to make a career change into
secondary teaching. However, anyone can be admitted regardless of previous degree. This
program is designed for practicing professionals who wish to become certified teachers in
their chosen fields of study, such as a chemist becoming a chemistry teacher, or a history
major becoming a social studies teacher. However, many of the students enrolled in the
program are becoming certified in areas not related to their undergraduate work. In this
program, you may apply for your Pennsylvania teacher certification at the completion of
student teaching. During the program, you may apply for a Pennsylvania intern certificate
if you have a school district willing to hire you full time. Contact the program coordinator
for more information about the intern certificate.
Delivery Mode
Online with 3-day on-campus residency component
Admissions Criteria
• Official transcripts
• Minimum overall undergraduate 3.00 GPA or 3.00 GPA in last 48 college credits taken
• Graduate School Application plus $25 nonrefundable application fee
• Current Act 34, 151 and 114 clearances (must be obtained at the beginning of the first
semester)
• Resume
• Three professional references (name, address, phone and e-mail)
• Passing scores on Praxis I (Reading, Writing and Mathematics) exam
Students must apply for candidacy after completing between 6 and 12 credit hours of
graduate work at California University of Pennsylvania. Download the Admission to
Candidacy form from www.calu.edu/academics/colleges/graduate-school/policies-forms/
program-candidacy-applications/index.htm.
Applicants will receive evaluations of their transcripts to determine what, if any, content
courses still need to be completed. This is done on an individual basis. Each applicant
should contact the MAT coordinator and send in a complete set of transcripts for a content
requirement evaluation. Certification area of interest should be specified.
Initial teacher certification track content requirements may vary. For example: Biology
certification requires different undergraduate courses than English. Each applicant will
need to compare his/her transcripts with required undergraduate courses to determine
what, if any, undergraduate (or graduate) content courses still need to be completed. This
is done on an individual basis.
Most students will need to take one or more undergraduate courses.
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Curriculum Initial Teacher Certification Track
Semester 1 (Fall)
Course Name
Credits
MSE 641: Orientation to 7-12 Education
3
MSE 642: Standards-Based Instruction in Secondary Education
3
ESP 610: Special Education Foundations and Collaboration*
3
Semester 2 (Spring)
Course Name
Credits
MSE 643: Content Area Literacy in 7-12 Education
3
MSE 644: Instructional Strategies in 7-12 Education
3
ESP 613: Evidence-Based Practices for Secondary Inclusion*
3
Semester 3 (Summer)
Course Name
Credits
MSE 65X: Methods of (Content) Teaching
3
MSE 646: Assessments and Interventions in 7-12 Education
3
MSE 645: Technology Integration in 7-12 Education
3
Semester 4 (Fall)
Course Name
Credits
MSE 647: Classroom Management in 7-12 Education
3
ESP 701: Introduction to Behavior Analysis*
3
EDU 650: Supporting English Language Learners*
3
Semester 5 (Spring)
Must earn a recommendation for student teaching
Course Name
Credits
MSE 660: Professional Practices in 7-12 Education
3
MSE 661: Student Teaching and School Law
9
*[Chapter 49-2 requirements mandated by the Pennsylvania Department of Education] Courses are allowed to be
satisfied with previously taken undergraduate courses subject approval of the program coordinator. The can reduce
the amount of graduate credits to a minimum of 39 credits for the MAT degree.
Applicants will receive free evaluations of their transcripts to determine what, if any,
content courses still need to be completed. This is done on an individual basis. Each
applicant should send in a complete set of transcripts for a content requirement evaluation
to:
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Program Coordinator
Dr. Joseph Zisk
Department of Secondary Education
Keystone Hall, Fourth Floor
250 University Ave.
California, PA 15419
724-938-4487
[email protected]
Program Alternate Website
www.teacheronline.us
Application Questions
School of Graduate Studies and Research
California University of Pennsylvania
250 University Ave.
California, PA 15419
724-938-4187
www.calu.edu/academics/colleges/graduate-school/index.htm
Graduate Faculty
Joseph Zisk, Ed.D., Temple University; Program Coordinator
Keith Hepner, Ed.D., University of Pittsburgh
Marcia Hoover, Ed.D., West Virginia University
Connie Monroe, Ph.D., University of Dayton
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Social Work
Master of Social Work
Credits: 36-60*
Accreditation
Council on Social Work Education (CSWE)
Program Description
The MSW program is committed to developing students’ personal and professional
growth, appreciating diversity, using an advanced generalist perspective to make a
difference in rural environments, and preparing graduates to be highly competent, effective
and well regarded social work practitioners. Our MSW program prepares students to
respond professionally and creatively to the increasingly complex matrix of rural human
needs and strengths in a changing society. It also provides students with a theoretical and
professional practice focused curriculum in social work that promotes an understanding
and appreciation of cultural diversity and its importance to competent advanced generalist
practice. Built on a professional advanced generalist curriculum model, the program
prepares students to work in direct and indirect practice and develops their leadership
capacities to prevent and meet needs that affect people in southwestern Pennsylvania,
including urban environments, and is designed for students with bachelor’s degrees in
psychology, social sciences, sociology, liberal arts and other disciplines.
*The 60-credit regular MSW program begins in the fall. The full-time regular program
requires two years (four semesters). The part-time regular program takes three years;
students must register for at least 6 credits each semester, are required to follow the
plan for appropriate course sequencing, and must complete degree requirements within
six years. The advanced standing program has 36 credits, and is designed for students
with bachelor’s degrees in social work from CSWE-accredited programs. It takes three
semesters of full-time study (fall, spring, fall ). Part-time advanced standing students follow
requirements for part-time students and normally finish in two years (four semesters).
Delivery Mode
Traditional with some online offerings
Admissions Criteria
Regular Program
• Minimum overall undergraduate 3.00 GPA
• Graduate School Application plus $25 nonrefundable application fee
• Official transcripts from institutions attended
• MSW application
• Current resume
• Three letters of recommendation
• Personal professional statement
• Completion of 30 credits of upper level liberal arts work
Advanced Standing Program
• Minimum overall undergraduate 3.00 GPA
• Graduate School Application plus $25 nonrefundable application fee
• Official transcripts from institutions attended
• MSW application
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• Current resume
• Three letters of recommendation
• Personal professional statement
• A social work degree from an accredited BSW program within six years of application to
the MSW program
• Minimum 3.25 GPA in social work major
Transfer Credit
A maximum of 12 credits of prior MSW course work and three credits of related graduate
course work may be submitted for faculty review. Transfer credits must have been
completed within six years of entrance into the program, must have a grade of B or
better and must be the equivalent of any courses they replace. No credit is given for life
experiences, previous work experiences or non-course credit work.
Curriculum
Full-time Regular Program (60 credits)
Foundation Year, Fall Term
Course Name
Credits
*SWK 701: Generalist Practice I
3
SWK 707: Human Diversity and the Social Environment
3
*SWK 709: Social Welfare Policy, Services and Program Design
3
SWK 729: First Year Field Practicum I
6
Foundation Year, Spring Term
Course Name
Credits
*SWK 702: Generalist Practice II
3
*SWK 705: Human Behavior and the Social Environment
3
*SWK 716: Social Work Research Methodology and Data Analysis
3
SWK 730: First Year Field Practicum II
6
Concentration Year Two, Fall Term
Course Name
Credits
SWK 801: Advanced Generalist Practice
3
SWK 803: Differential Assessment
3
SWK 806: Rural Family and Community Policy
3
SWK 829: Advanced Field Practicum I
6
Concentration Year Two, Spring Term
Course Name
Credits
SWK 808: Advanced Practice Evaluation
3
SWK 812: Practice in Supervision and Administration
3
SWK: Advanced Practice/SWK 840 Special Topic
3
SWK 830: Advanced Field Practicum II
6
*May be waived through examination
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Full-time Advanced Standing Program (36 credits)
Fall Term
Course Name
Credits
SWK 707: Human Diversity and the Social Environment
3
SWK 715: Research, Policy and Rural Practice
3
SWK 801: Advanced Generalist Practice
3
SWK 829: Advanced Field Practicum I
6
Spring Term
Course Name
Credits
SWK 812: Practice in Supervision and Administration
3
SWK 808: Advanced Practice Evaluation
3
SWK 830: Advanced Field Practicum II
6
Fall Term
Course Name
Credits
SWK 803: Differential Assessment
3
SWK 806: Rural Family and Community Policy
3
SWK Advanced Practice/SWK 840 Special Topic
3
Advanced Practice Special Topics
Course Name
Credits
SWK 811: Practice with Aging
3
SWK 813: Health Care Practice
3
SWK 814: Practice in MH/MR
3
SWK 815: Criminal and Juvenile Justice Practice
3
SWK 816: Practice with Children and Youth
3
SWK 821: Drug and Alcohol Abuse
3
SWK 840: Special Topics (varied)
3
Field Practicum
The program makes extensive use of a wide variety of practicum sites.
Program Coordinator
Norma Thomas, DSW
724-938-1597
[email protected]
Department Website
www.calu.edu/academics/graduate-programs/social-work/index.htm
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Application Questions
School of Graduate Studies and Research
California University of Pennsylvania
250 University Ave.
California, PA 15419
724-938-4187
[email protected]
www.calu.edu/academics/colleges/graduate-school/index.htm
Graduate Faculty
Norma Thomas, Program Coordinator; B.A., Pennsylvania State University; M.S.W.,
Temple University; D.S.W., University of Pennsylvania
Sylvia J. Barksdale, B.A., M.S.W., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh
Sheri Boyle, Field Coordinator; B.A., University of California – Los Angeles; M.S.W.,
University of Pennsylvania
Margaret (Peg) Christopher, B.A., Mount St. Mary College; M.S.W., M.Ph., Ph.D.,
University of Pittsburgh
Gwendolyn D. Perry-Burney, B.S.W., M.S.W., Temple University; Ph.D., University of
Pittsburgh
Rosalie Smiley, M.S.W., L.M.S.M., M.P.H., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh
Pamela C. Twiss, B.A., Point Park College; M.S.W., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh
110
Spanish Certification
Certificate in Spanish for Business
Certificate in Spanish for Law Enforcement
Credits: 12
Program Description
Latino/Hispanic communities in the United States are growing, and the need for certified
business and law enforcement professionals who speak Spanish is also on the rise.
California University of Pennsylvania’s online Spanish for business and Spanish for law
enforcement certificate programs address the needs of individuals seeking communication
skills in Spanish, utilizing vocabulary and procedures related to law enforcement, business
and international trade.
Courses are offered in accelerated eight-week sessions that fall within a regular 16-week
semester. For example, Elementary Spanish I and Elementary Spanish II are offered in
one semester and Intermediate Spanish I and Spanish for Business or Spanish for Law
Enforcement are offered in the subsequent semester. This way, the student completes the
entire certificate program in one academic year.
Delivery Mode
100 percent online
Admissions Criteria
To enroll in either the certificate in Spanish for business program or the certificate in
Spanish for law enforcement program at California University of Pennsylvania, no previous
college credit or work at the undergraduate level is necessary.
Complete and submit the following:
• Graduate School Application plus $25 nonrefundable application fee (current Cal U
students to NOT pay this fee)
• Official sealed transcripts (high school or college)
The program coordinator and faculty will make the final recommendation for admission to
the program.
Financial Aid
Federal and private loans may be available to Global Online students. A financial aid
specialist from the Office of Web-Based Programs will help online students develop a
comprehensive financial assistance package.
Registration
The certificate in Spanish for law enforcement and business, as well as all Global Online
programs of study, are housed within California University of Pennsylvania’s Office of
Web-Based Programs. This office assists students with their online educational experience,
from application to graduation.
Spanish for Business
The certificate in Spanish for business is specifically designed to meet the needs of business
majors, business professionals and others seeking to pursue business opportunities or
international trade in Spanish-speaking countries or U.S. communities with Spanishspeaking customers and clients. To successfully complete the certificate program, students
must take all four courses regardless of their pre-existing level of Spanish.
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Curriculum
First Semester
Course Name
Credits
SPN 101: Elementary Spanish I
3
SPN 102: Elementary Spanish II
3
Second Semester
Course Name
Credits
SPN 203: Intermediate Spanish I
3
SPN 305: Spanish for Business
3
Website
www.calu.edu/academics/online-programs/cert-spanish/index.htm
Spanish for Law Enforcement
The certificate in Spanish for law enforcement program is specifically designed to meet
the needs of law-enforcement officers, correctional officers, public and private security
personnel, and those students seeking employment in a relevant field. To successfully
complete the certificate program, students must pass all four courses in the curriculum,
regardless of their pre-existing level of Spanish.
Curriculum
First Semester
Course Name
Credits
SPN 101: Elementary Spanish I
3
SPN 102: Elementary Spanish II
3
Second Semester
Course Name
Credits
SPN 203: Intermediate Spanish I
3
SPN 304: Spanish for Law Enforcement
3
Website
www.calu.edu/academics/online-programs/cert-spanish/spanish-law-enforcement/index.
htm
Application Questions
Office of Web-based Programs
California University of Pennsylvania
Southpointe Center
135 Technology Drive
Canonsburg, PA 15317
724-873-2760
www.calu.edu/prospective/global-online/undergraduate-graduate-degrees/index.htm
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Sport Management Studies
Master of Science in Sport Management Studies
Credits: 36
Post-Baccalaureate in Sport Management Studies
Credits: 12
Program Description
The sport management studies curriculum was created especially for presentation via the
Internet. Sport management theory and principles are presented with streaming video,
narrated PowerPoint presentations and online forums. Threaded discussion groups,
chat rooms and e-mail allow the cohorts to communicate and interact, adding unique
insight into the discussion. Students have the option of completing the sport management
generalist track, the intercollegiate athletic administration track, or the sports counseling
track. Program length is approximately 13 consecutive months, with new cohorts
beginning in January and July. Cohorts of approximately 30-35 students each learn and
communicate online and regularly function as a group of interactive peers. All students
must be enrolled as full-time cohort members. This virtual community creates a lively and
dynamic educational experience that enriches the collaborative skills essential for success
in the sport industry. A post-baccalaureate/post-master’s certificate is also available in
intercollegiate athletic administration or sports counseling. Students are eligible for a
graduate certificate upon completion of the 12 credits of either track. Sports counseling
is offered through the Counselor Education Department. The intercollegiate athletic
administration track has been developed in consultation with the NCAA.
Delivery Mode
100 percent online
Admissions Criteria
• Bachelor’s degree from an accredited institution in sport management/administration
• Official transcripts
• Minimum overall undergraduate 3.00 GPA or 3.00 GPA in last 48 college credits taken*
• Graduate School Application plus $25 nonrefundable application fee
• Applicants with sport industry-related experience and a non-sport-related degree
(marketing, finance, business, coaching/physical education, public relations, etc.) may be
considered for admission.
*Students with a GPA of less than 3.00 may be considered by submitting two letters of
recommendation highlighting sport industry experience.
Applications received by April 1 will receive preference for July admission. Subsequent
applications will be considered until all class openings are filled.
A minimum of two student cohorts per year are accepted with approximately 3035 students in each cohort. New cohorts begin in January and July. The MS in sport
management studies offers students an option of completing the sport management
mentorship track, intercollegiate athletic administration track, or the sports counseling
track. Each track requires that students complete 36 credits to meet degree requirements.
The sport management track requires students to complete a 12-credit mentorship, and
the intercollegiate athletic administration and sports counseling tracks require students to
complete four courses in addition to the core requirements. The course sequences for each
track are listed below:
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Curriculum
Core Curriculum
Course Name
Credits
SPT 700: Research Methods in Sport
3
SPT 710: Socio-Cultural Aspects in Sport
3
SPT 720: Sport Marketing
3
SPT 730: Public Relations in Sport
3
SPT 740: Legal Aspects in Sport
3
SPT 750: Sport Finance
3
SPT 760: Sport Ethics
3
SPT 770: Management and Leadership in Sport
3
Intercollegiate Athletic Administration Track (12 credits)
Course Name
Credits
SPT 790: Sport Governance
3
SPT 791: Sport Compliance
3
SPT 792: Legal Aspects of Equity in Intercollegiate Athletics
3
SPT 793: Human Resource Strategies in Intercollegiate Athletics
3
Sports Counseling Track (12 credits)
Course Name
Credits
CED 780: Issues and Techniques in Counseling Athletes
3
CED 781: Sports Counseling Programming
3
CED 782: Advanced Issues and Techniques in Counseling Athletes
3
CED 788: Contemporary Topics in Counselor Education
3
Sport Management Track (12 credits)
Course Name
Credits
SPT 799: Sport Mentorship
12
Program Coordinator
Dr. Robert Taylor
724-938-4356
[email protected]
Department Website
www.calu.edu/go
Application Questions
School of Graduate Studies and Research
California University of Pennsylvania
250 University Ave.
California, PA 15419
724-938-4187
www.calu.edu/academics/colleges/graduate-school/index.htm
114
Graduate Faculty
Robert G. Taylor, Associate Professor and Program Coordinator; B.S., San Diego State
University; M.Ed., Frostburg State University; Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi
Carol M. Biddington, Associate Professor, Ed.D., West Virginia University
Mary Kreis, Associate Professor; B.S., University of Virginia; M.S., University of Texas at
San Antonio; Ph.D., University of Miami
Linda Meyer, Associate Professor; B.S., Lock Haven University; ATC, M.S., West Virginia
University; Ed.D., Duquesne University
Laura Miller, Assistant Professor; B.S., Pennsylvania State University – Behrend College;
M.S., Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi
Matt Wilson, Adjunct Faculty; B.S., M.Ed., Ed.D., Georgia Southern University
Brian D. Wood, Assistant Professor; B.S., University of Wisconsin-LaCrosse; M.S.,
Minnesota State University, Mankato; Ph.D., University of New Mexico
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Sports Counseling
Graduate Certificate in Sports Counseling
Credits: 12
Program Description
The graduate certificate in sports counseling is fully delivered online and is designed for
practicing counselors, counselors in training (post-48 credits), educators and/or other
helping professionals’ needs for an advanced or specialty area of training and development
with the athlete population. This program will provide counselor training competencies in
three core areas of study:
• Foundations of sports counseling
• Contextual dimensions of sports counseling
• Knowledge and skills for the practice of sports counseling
Students will be prepared to work with youth, adolescent, young adult or adult athletes
across a variety of settings.
Delivery Mode
100 percent online
Admissions Criteria and Process
Applicants must complete both Steps 1 and 2.*
Step 1: This process requires the applicant to submit the following materials directly to the
School of Graduate Studies and Research:
• Minimum overall undergraduate 3.00 GPA
• Graduate School Application plus $25 nonrefundable application fee
• Official transcripts from all colleges and universities
• Either a master’s or a baccalaureate degree
Step 2: This process requires the applicant to submit the following materials directly to the
Counselor Education Department:
• Documentation of a minimum 3.00 undergraduate GPA
• A one-page typed resume of employment and education history
• A 1,000-word typed psychobiography. The applicant’s psychobiography serves a
different purpose than does a resume. Life is a process of maturing, learning and
becoming. It is sometimes joyful, sometimes painful. The psychobiography is the
applicant’s own story. It should describe the psychosocial development of the writer.
Applicants should examine their early influences, including family, significant others,
economic, cultural and ethnic influences, athletics/sports, health and wellness, and
important personal events. They should reflect on the course of their emotional,
intellectual and personal development during the school years and as it relates to
athletics/sports. It might deal with questions such as: How did I cope with problems and
stress? What values were instilled, accepted and rejected? How did I become the person I
am? What are my strengths and weaknesses? What do I hope for the future? In addition,
how one has made the decision to seek advanced training in sports counseling should be
discussed.
• Three current letters of recommendation on letterhead from professional, academic and/
or business sources who can attest to the applicant’s potential as a helping professional
with the athlete population.
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• An admissions interview may be required in person or via telephone.
• Official transcripts from all colleges and universities.
All materials must be received before the Admissions Committee reviews the application.
Students may call the Counselor Education Department at 724-938-4123 or the School of
Graduate Studies and Research at 724-938-4187 to verify that all admissions materials have
been received.
Program Philosophy
Sports counseling is a process that assists individuals in maximizing their personal,
academic and athletic potential. Sports counseling is accomplished through a proactive,
growth-oriented approach that incorporates the principles of counseling, career
development, movement science, psychology and lifespan human development.
Counselors, educators and other helping professionals should have specialized awareness,
knowledge and skills beyond the basic counselor preparation as well as the ability to
develop effective therapeutic relationships.
The sports counseling certificate program meets the particular interests and needs of a
significant sub-sector of counselors, educators and other helping professionals who work
with the athlete population in a variety of settings, including youth sports programs,
interscholastic programs, colleges and universities, community and social agencies, and
professional sporting agencies, as well as recreational settings.
Note: The graduate certificate in sports counseling will not certify you as a professional
counselor. You may want to check your state’s licensure laws for more information.
However, the courses may be utilized for additional credits toward licensure or for
continuing education credits/units (CEUs).
Curriculum
Course Name
Credits
CED 780: Issues and Techniques in Counseling Athletes
3
CED 781: Sports Counseling Programming
3
CED 782: Advanced Issues and Techniques in Counseling Athletes
3
CED 788: Contemporary Topics in Counselor Education
3
Program Coordinator
Taunya Tinsley, Ph.D., NCC, LPC
[email protected]
724-938-4123
Department Website
www.calu.edu/academics/online-programs/sports-counseling/index.htm
Application Questions
www.calu.edu/prospective/global-online/apply/index.htm
For more information about Global Online, contact the Office of Web-Based Programs at
724-938-5958 or toll-free at 1-866-595-6348 or e-mail us at [email protected]
Graduate Faculty
Jacqueline A. Walsh, Ph.D., NCC, ACS, Chair; Licensed Professional Counselor, Professor
Taunya Tinsley, Ph.D., NCC, LPC, Program Coordinator; Licensed Professional Counselor,
Assistant Professor
Gloria Cataldo Brusoski, Ph.D., Licensed Psychologist, Professor
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Grafton Eliason, Ed.D., LPC, Licensed Professional Counselor, Associate Professor
Elizabeth Gruber, Ph.D., LPC, NCC, Licensed Professional Counselor, Professor
John Patrick, D.Ed., CRC, NCC, LPC, Licensed Professional Counselor, Professor
Jeffrey L. Samide, Ed.D., LPC, Licensed Professional Counselor, Associate Professor
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Superintendent Letter of Eligibility
Superintendent Letter of Eligibility Certification
Credits: 18-27
Accreditation
Approved by the Pennsylvania Department of Education, this online program meets state
educational requirements for certification as a superintendent. The program complies with
ISLLC standards, and may be used to meet certification and professional development
requirements in other states.
Program Description
The superintendent letter of eligibility (SLE) program provides an opportunity for a
graduate student to obtain certification in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania as a
superintendent. Although not required for admission to the program, certification by the
state of Pennsylvania requires a minimum of six years of professional certified service in
the basic schools, three years of which shall have been in administration or supervision.
The three years of administrative or supervision experience must be completed before
certification endorsement will be granted by the University.
Cal U’s professional and knowledgeable faculty is drawn from the ranks of practicing
school superintendents that represent the best of school leadership in southwestern
Pennsylvania. All faculty members have extensive experience as teachers and
administrators in area public schools.
Delivery Mode
100 percent online
Admissions Criteria
Although not required for admission, certification by the state of Pennsylvania requires a
minimum of six years of professional certified service in the basic schools, three of which
shall have been in administration. These three years must be completed before certification
will be granted. These can be obtained before, after or during participation in the program.
• Minimum overall undergraduate 3.00 GPA
• Official transcripts from every institution attended
• Graduate School Application plus $25 nonrefundable application fee
• Completed applicant data sheet
• Copies of all professional certificates
• Letter of endorsement from the chief school administrator in the school district of current
employment
• Resume or curriculum vitae
• Statement of career goals and degree objectives
Curriculum
18-27 credits depending on previously completed coursework. Program may be completed
in 12 months of part-time study.
Sample Course Sequence
Spring Semester
Course Name
Credits
SLE 701: Administration Theory, Organization and Operation (PIL approved)
3
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Course Name
Credits
SLE 708: Internship (PIL approved)
3
Summer Semester
Course Name
Credits
SLE 704: Technology and Facilities Development (PIL approved)
3
SLE 705: Curriculum and Instruction, Leadership/Supervision (PIL approved)
3
Fall Semester
Course Name
Credits
SLE 707: Strategic Planning, Policy Analysis, Board Relations (PIL approved)
3
SLE 708: Internship (PIL approved)
3
Note: Completion of an approved certification program is a requirement for certification in
Pennsylvania. In the certification process, the University informs the state that a student has
completed the University’s state-approved program. The state then reviews the student’s
credentials and determines eligibility for certification. We encourage all students to contact
the Pennsylvania Department of Education before beginning Cal U’s program for further
information about certification requirements in Pennsylvania.
Program Coordinator
Christine Patti, Ed.D.
724-597-7431
[email protected]
Department Website
www.calu.edu/go
Application Questions
School of Graduate Studies and Research
California University of Pennsylvania
250 University Ave.
California, PA 15419
724-938-4187
www.calu.edu/academics/colleges/graduate-school/index.htm
Graduate Faculty
Christine Patti, Ed.D., Full-time Faculty, Program Coordinator; Educational
Administration and Leadership
Brian Barnhart, Ed.D., Adjunct Faculty; Assistant Executive Director, Lancaster-Lebanon
Intermediate Unit 13
Silvia Braidic, Ed.D., Full-time Faculty, Educational Administration and Leadership
Patrick Dworakowski, Ed.D., Adjunct Faculty; Superintendent, Montour School District
Todd Keruskin, Ed.D., Adjunct Faculty; Assistant Superintendent, Elizabeth Forward
School District
Thomas Knight, Ed.D., Adjunct Faculty; Superintendent, Bethel Park School District
Deborah Kolonay, Ed.D., Adjunct Faculty; Superintendent, Penn-Trafford School District
120
Kevin Lordon, Ed.D., Full-time Faculty, Program Coordinator; Educational Administration
and Leadership
Helen McCracken, Ed.D., Adjunct Faculty; Superintendent, Canon-McMillan School
District
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Technology Education
Master of Education in Technology Education
Credits: 31
Accreditation
National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE)
Program Description
The mission of this degree is to provide professional development to teachers and other
educators in the field of technology education, providing a broad-based understanding of
the field and its direction. Technology education is a vital aspect of education and promotes
the development of technologically literate citizens by studying the broad spectrum of
technology. In contrast, educational technology focuses on using computer technology to
enhance instruction. This degree is not intended for individuals interested in educational or
instructional technology.
This program does not lead to certification. Students interested in Pennsylvania certification
in technology education should contact Dr. John Kallis at [email protected] or visit www.
calu.edu/academics/online-programs/me-tech-ed/index.htm.
Program Objectives
• Develop standards-based curriculum, instruction and assessment materials
• Evaluate and synthesize literature related to the field of mathematics, science and
technology education
• Develop a strategic plan for an educational program
• Research, develop and defend a grant proposal
• Evaluate the impacts and consequences of technology nationally and internationally and
make informed choices
• Design, investigate, implement and evaluate a major culminating research experience
• Research and evaluate current trends in technology education (e.g., engineering
education, STEM)
Delivery Mode
100 percent online
Admissions Criteria
• Minimum overall undergraduate 3.00 GPA (candidates with less than a 3.00 GPA may be
considered on a provisional basis)
• Graduate School Application plus $25 nonrefundable application fee
• Official transcripts from an accredited institution
• Applicant must read, sign and forward the Verification of Understanding for the
Master’s of Education in Technology Education document to be eligible for admission.
The form can be found at www.calu.edu/academics/online-programs/files/Waiver_of_
Understanding_for_Tech_Ed__3.pdf.
For program information, call 866-595-6348 or e-mail [email protected]
Curriculum
This program is offered in a cohort model. In order to complete the program, two courses
per semester are required with program start and finish. This includes summer semesters.
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First Term
Course Name
Credits
TED 701: Curriculum and Instruction in Technology Education
3
TED 807: Technology Program Development and Improvement
3
Second Term
Course Name
Credits
TED 702: Assessment in a Constructivist Classroom
3
TED 704: Integrating Math, Science and Technology
3
Third Term
Course Name
Credits
TED 703: Strategic Management in Education
3
TED 705: Technology and Sustainable Development
3
Fourth Term
Course Name
Credits
TED 725: Applied Research in STEM Education
3
TED 715: Study in Human Creativity
3
Fifth Term
Course Name
Credits
TED 718: Special Populations in Lab-Based Programs
3
TED 850: TED Major Project
4
Program Coordinator
Dr. Laura Hummell
724-938-4381
[email protected]
Department Website
www.calu.edu/academics/online-programs/me-tech-ed/index.htm
Application Questions
School of Graduate Studies and Research
California University of Pennsylvania
250 University Ave.
California, PA 15419
724-938-4187
www.calu.edu/academics/colleges/graduate-school/index.htm
Graduate Faculty
Laura Hummell, Assistant Professor and Program Coordinator; B.S., Pennsylvania State
University; M.S., Old Dominion University; Ed.D., East Carolina University
Daniel Engstrom, Associate Professor; B.S., Millersville University; M.Ed., Bowling Green
State University; Ph.D., Duquesne University
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Glenn Hider, Professor; A.S., B.S., State University of New York; M.S., Eastern State
University; Ed.D., West Virginia University
Rene Kruse, Professor; B.S., Peru State College; M.S., Ph.D., Texas A&M University
Peter H. Wright, Professor; B.A., Yale University; M.A., Ed.D., West Virginia University
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Academic Integrity
July 11, 2007
Policy and Procedures
From its beginnings as an academy in 1852 to its present status as a multi-purpose
university, California University of Pennsylvania has endeavored to provide quality
education, a preparation for life, an intellectual and moral regimen that has always
emphasized Responsibility, Civility and Integrity. These core values must guide the
University into the 21st century, serving as the foundation for all learning. As long ago
as 1914, when the school became California State Normal School, it possessed a written
honor code incorporating these values. Such a precedent requires our endorsement and our
commitment to uphold the standards expressed in this hallowed document. Consequently,
these policies and procedures have been developed to preserve academic integrity. As Leo
J. O’Donovan, S.J., of Georgetown University asserts, “Academic integrity reminds us that
the pursuit of intellectual truth has always been basic to the pursuit of learning, and the
pursuit of learning is the raison d’être of the university.”
California University of Pennsylvania fully embraces academic integrity, and therefore
does not tolerate cheating, academic impersonation, plagiarism, improper research
practices or dishonesty in publication.
Violations of academic integrity will not be ignored and will become part of the student’s
permanent academic record at the University.
I. Types of Academic Integrity Violations
Academic integrity may be violated by any of the following:
A.Cheating: Cheating is the attempt to gain an improper advantage in an academic
evaluation. For example, obtaining a copy of an examination before it is officially
available or learning an examination question before it is officially available; copying
another person’s answer to an examination question; consulting an unauthorized source
during an examination; and obtaining assistance by means of documentary, electronic
or other aids not approved by the instructor.
B. Academic Impersonation: The impersonation by another of one’s self in class, during
a test or examination, or in connection with any other type of assignment in a course is
a breach of academic honesty. Both the impersonator and the individual impersonated
may be charged.
C. Plagiarism: Plagiarism is the representation of another’s ideas or writing as one’s own.
The most obvious form of this kind of dishonesty is the presentation of all or part of
another’s published work as one’s own. However, paraphrasing another’s writing
without proper acknowledgement may also be considered plagiarism. Further, to
represent another’s artistic or technical work or creation as one’s own violates academic
honesty.
D.Improper research practices: Improper research practices include the dishonest
reporting of investigative results either through fabrication or falsification; taking or
using the research results of others without permission or due acknowledgement;
misrepresentation of research results or the methods used; and the selective reporting or
omission of conflicting information or data to support a particular notion or hypothesis.
Furthermore, all researchers have a responsibility to refrain from practices that may
unfairly inhibit the research of others now or later.
E. Dishonesty in publication: Dishonesty in publication includes the publishing of
information that will knowingly mislead or deceive readers, including the false
fabrication of data or information, as well as failing to credit collaborators as joint
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authors or listing as others who have not contributed to the work. Plagiarism is also
considered a form of dishonesty in publication.
(The above definitions have been adapted with permission from the Senate Policy on
Academic Honesty, August 1995, of York University.)
II. Procedures for Dealing with Charges of Violating Academic Integrity
An instructor who believes a student has violated academic integrity has an obligation to
meet with the student to discuss the charge before assigning a penalty. If the instructor
decides the situation warrants no penalty, the matter is concluded. If after talking with the
student the instructor believes academic integrity has been violated and assigns a penalty
to the student, the instructor must prepare a written record. Charges of violating academic
integrity will be handled in this manner:
A.The instructor will meet with the student to discuss the charge and will prepare a
written record (on the Academic Integrity form) of the meeting to be read and signed
by the student and the instructor. The instructor keeps a copy, the student keeps a copy
and the instructor sends a copy to Academic Records (or to the graduate school) to be
placed in the student’s permanent file. (The student’s signature indicates merely that the
student has read the record and has received a copy.)
B. If the meeting with the instructor is unsatisfactory to the student, the student may
appeal to the department chair within 10 working days. The department chair will then
hold a meeting with both the student and the instructor present and will also prepare a
written record (on the Academic Integrity form) of the meeting to be read and signed by
the student, the instructor and the chair. Each keeps a copy and the chair sends a copy
to Academic Records (or to the graduate school) to be placed in the student’s permanent
file. (The student’s signature and the instructor’s signature indicate merely that each has
read the record and has received a copy.)
C. If the meeting with the department chair is unsatisfactory to the student, the student
may appeal within 10 working days to the dean of the college in which the course is
taught. The dean will then hold a meeting with both the student and instructor present.
The dean will also prepare a written record (on the Academic Integrity form) of the
meeting to be read and signed by the student, the instructor, the chair and the dean. (In
the case of a graduate course, the undergraduate dean and the graduate dean will be
involved, and the graduate dean will prepare the written record.) Each keeps a copy,
and the dean sends a copy to Academic Records (or the graduate school) to be placed in
the student’s permanent file. (The signatures of the student, of the instructor and of the
chair indicate merely that each has read the record and has received a copy.)
1. If the student decides to pursue the Academic Integrity appeals process to the dean,
he/she forfeits the right to drop the course.
D.If the appeal to the dean is unsatisfactory to the student, the student may appeal to the
Academic Integrity Committee. Forms for this appeal may be obtained from the Dean’s
Office and must be filed within 30 days of the meeting with the dean. The dean will
forward the form to the chair of the Academic Integrity Committee, who will arrange a
hearing within 21 working days.
E. When the chair of the committee receives the appeal form from the dean, he/she will
immediately 1) contact the student to arrange for a hearing; 2) contact Academic
Records (or the graduate school) for copies of the records of the preceding meetings; and
3) send copies of these records to all committee members.
III. Academic Integrity Committee
A.Purpose and function:
The purpose of the Academic Integrity Committee is to oversee and implement the
academic integrity policy. Specifically, the committee serves as the final level in the
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appeal process and will render a recommendation to the provost regarding such
academic integrity matters.
B. Membership and membership selection:
1. The membership will consist of one full-time tenured faculty member from each
undergraduate college and one full-time tenured faculty member from the graduate
school; one full-time student in good standing from each undergraduate college and
one student in good standing from the graduate school; and one representative from
the Provost’s Office, who will serve as chair.
a. One alternate for each of the above members will be selected according to the
same criteria. Alternates are expected to attend all hearings.
2. Faculty members (and alternates) will be selected by the dean through the
appropriate College Council. The provost will select his/her representative.
3. Appointment to the committee will be for a period of two years, and members may
be reappointed. In order to create staggered terms, half of the initial appointments
will be for one year.
4. Members are expected to attend all hearings and to do whatever work is necessary
for a hearing. A member may have two absences in any semester before being
dismissed from the committee and replaced by the appropriate alternate. No
member may participate in a final vote unless he/she has attended all hearings of the
case.
C. Procedures for Hearings:
1. At the beginning of the hearing, the chair will introduce those present and see that
arrangements have been made for keeping an accurate record of the proceedings.
a. If the student fails to appear and does not submit an acceptable excuse to the
chair within 48 hours of the hearing, the student forfeits the opportunity for a
hearing, and the professor’s initial recommendation will stand. If the professor
fails to appear and does not contact the chair within 48 hours of the hearing with
an acceptable excuse, the professor will forfeit the opportunity for a hearing, the
case will be dismissed and the professor’s penalty eliminated.
2. The faculty member will then present his/her case to the committee. Next, the
student presents his/her case. Either party may have witnesses available. These
witnesses will remain outside the hearing room until their testimony is called for.
3. Committee members may question either party or any witness.
4. When the chair determines that both faculty member and student have presented
their cases fully, and when the committee members have completed their
questioning, the chair will dismiss all those present except for the committee
members who will begin their deliberations.
5. The committee’s decision will be determined by a majority vote of those present. The
standard shall be that of a preponderance of the evidence.
6. Within 10 working days, the chair will submit the committee’s decision and
recommendation to the provost, to the student and to Academic Records (or to the
graduate school) to be filed in the student’s permanent record.
7. Within 20 working days, the provost will inform the student and the committee
of his/her decision whether or not to uphold the committee’s recommendation.
The provost is free to exercise his or her discretion. The provost will also send a
copy to Academic Records (or to the graduate school) to be placed in the student’s
permanent record.
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8. If the student is found innocent of the charge of violating academic integrity, the
Provost’s Office will see that all paperwork relating to the charge is removed from
the student’s permanent record.
D.If a student is found to have violated academic integrity, sanctions will be applied. If
the professor has clearly indicated penalties for violations on a syllabus distributed
at the beginning of the course, those penalties will apply, and may include penalties
(a) through (d) from the list below. If the professor has not specified any penalties in
the syllabus or in other appropriate circumstances where required, the provost, upon
recommendation of the Academic Integrity Committee, will determine which sanction
to apply from the list below.
E. List of Sanctions:
Any of the following may be applied:
1. written disciplinary reprimand
2. make-up assignment or examination
3. lower grade or failure on the assignment or exam
4. failure in the course
5. suspension from the University for a defined period
6. notation on transcript
7. withholding or rescinding a California University of Pennsylvania degree, diploma
or certificate
8. retroactive failure of the course with a transcript notation of the reason for the grade
change
(The above sanctions are adapted with permission from the “Senate Policy on Academic
Honesty,” August 1995, of York University.)
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Course Descriptions
ACC — Accounting
ACC 601. SURVEY IN ACCOUNTING. This course covers the following topics: accounting cycle, accounting for
assets, liabilities and owner’s equity, partnership accounting, and corporate accounting. (3 crs.)
ACC 711. MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING. This course focuses on the use of accounting data for corporate financial
planning and control. Topics include organization for control, profit planning, budgeting, relevant costing, return on
investment and administration of controllership functions in business organizations. (3 crs.)
ACC 721. FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING. Introduction to financial accounting theory, the formulation of accounting
principles and the structure of generally accepted accounting principles. (3 crs.)
ACC 518. TAX PLANNING AND CONCEPTS. This course deals with the broad recognition of the tax effects of
business decisions and a practical approach to tax planning for both individuals and corporations. (3 crs.)
ADP — Administrative Program for Principals
ADP 621. CURRICULUM LEADERSHIP. Among the many leadership roles and responsibilities in the principalship,
none is more important than educational program development, administration and evaluation. The purpose of this
course is to develop the student’s understanding of the curriculum development process and the leadership necessary
for the process and the structure needed to provide appropriate professional development. (3 crs.)
ADP 626. INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES. This course is designed to provide principal candidates with a framework
for effective, practical use of a variety of instructional strategies. These strategies are used with teachers to improve
curriculum and instruction. Through various learning experiences, you will develop your knowledge, skills and
professional dispositions that will help you to lead your school. The course is designed to help you develop a
foundation for leadership by understanding what differentiated instruction is, why it is appropriate for all learners
and how to serve as an instructional leader in this area. Principal candidates will explore and analyze Standards-Based
Instruction, Bloom’s Taxonomy of the Cognitive Development, Differentiated Instruction for ALL students, Writing
Across the Curriculum, Multiple Intelligences, Multiple Measure of Data to Inform Decision-Making and Leadership
for Differentiating Schools. (3 crs.)
ADP 631. SCHOOL LAW AND ETHICS. This course helps students acquire a practical working knowledge of
school law. Education operates within a complex legal framework of law. Local school board policy, administrative
regulations, state and federal statutes, and the Constitution all impact the daily operation of our schools. Hence, every
person involved in the educational process should be aware of the laws that govern his/her daily activities in order
to be fair, efficient and effective. Students completing this course should have the knowledge base necessary to make
informed decisions and the research skills necessary to find additional information concerning points of law if needed.
(3 crs.)
ADP 641. SCHOOL COMMUNITY RELATIONS SEMINAR. This course is for educators who hope to become
principals or teachers who wish to assume a greater leadership role in the school in which they teach. The purpose
of this seminar is twofold: (1) to help school administrators and leaders develop an understanding of the conditions,
diversity and changes that affect school-community interaction and its impact on student achievement, and (2) to
help administrators and school leaders have an understanding of the strategic planning process, board policy on
community relations and research on community partnerships, and then apply this information to develop a five-year
plan on the importance of school and community partnerships in relation to student achievement. (3 crs.)
ADP 647. ORIENTATION AND ASSESSMENT SEMINAR. The Orientation and Assessment Seminar is required
of all principal candidates at the beginning of their program in order to explain program philosophy and ongoing
assessment activities. It provides students with the opportunity to become familiar with the program mission,
philosophy, goals and competencies. ”Orientation” indicates an introduction to the parameters and style of the
course. “Assessment” indicates the self-assessment that transpires by the very nature of the course activities. By
completing the required assignments, students come to understand the specific areas in which they are most familiar,
as well as those in which they need to place the most individual emphasis. Through a review of their personal
values, dispositions toward leadership and actual leadership skills, as well as their knowledge and understanding
of educational leadership, students will develop deeper understandings with which to guide their personal and
professional development as school leaders. This process that promotes self-understanding and professional growth,
within the context of educational leadership, is a focus of the Orientation and Assessment Seminar. (3 crs.)
ADP 661. EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP. This course provides an introduction to the theory and practice of
educational administration. The course progresses from an overview of leadership and leadership style to a review
of the structures and management systems that can make good educational leadership possible and, finally, focuses
on leadership skills needed by administrators to be effective leaders in education today. Included are such topics as
organizational culture, power in and around schools and the resolution of conflict, motivation, and ethics and moral
leadership. (3 crs.)
ADP 664. SUPERVISED FIELD PROJECT/ADMINISTRATION LEADERSHIP. In this course, problem-solving
activities and field experiences planned cooperatively with University and school district personnel are designed
in the area of leadership and special education. This practice-centered approach requires students to apply their
knowledge and demonstrate proficiency in those skills that contribute to effective performance as an administrator. (3
crs.)
ADP 670. INTERNSHIP. The internship is a standards-based leadership experience designed to put theory into
practice. It is where formal coursework is applied in a field setting. It provides significant opportunities in the
workplace to synthesize and apply the knowledge and to practice and develop skills identified in the program
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competency areas. An internship with a trained mentor is an important and highly valued part of the program. Each
placement will be made in cooperation with the program faculty, the participating school district and the intern.
The internship involves a school-year field placement with a carefully chosen and trained principal/mentor (field
supervisor) in a K-12 school, who shares the program philosophy that the principal should function as a standardsdriven change agent and facilitator of the reform process as well as a strong instructional leader. The intern is both a
participant and observer under the direction of the principal, who should provide the intern with as many standardsbased supervisory and administrative experiences as possible. The intern gains valuable work-related experience and
is given the opportunity to learn how academic knowledge and skills can be applied at the worksite with real people,
problems and events (6 crs.)
ADP 673. SUPERVISED FIELD PROJECT/RESEARCH AND EVALUATION. Problem-solving activities and field
experiences planned cooperatively with University and school district personnel are designed in the area of research
and evaluation. This practice-centered approach requires students to apply their knowledge and demonstrate
proficiency in those skills that contribute to effective performance as an administrator. (3 crs.)
ATE — Athletic Training
ATE 700. GROSS ANATOMY OF THE EXTREMITIES. The study of anatomical structures in the extremities of the
human body, coupled with laboratory dissection of human cadavers. (4 crs.)
ATE 705. EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICE IN ATHLETIC TRAINING. This course provides students with an
understanding of evidence-based practice as it relates to the practice of athletic training. Students will examine how
practice guidelines are created from systematic reviews of the literature and outcomes studies. The course will also
provide students with an appreciation of the importance of evidence-based practice in maximizing quality of patient
care, seeking out and obtaining reimbursement, and enhancing clinical competence. (3 crs.)
ATE 725. PEDAGOGICAL STUDIES IN ATHLETIC TRAINING. This seminar course allows the graduate student the
opportunity to design and develop presentations based on previous knowledge and experiences in athletic training
for the purpose of information delivery in multiple settings. Professor-directed peer review and content critique will
follow delivery of presentations for guidance prior to integration into classroom and clinical presentations in athletic
training education. (3 crs.)
ATE 745. CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN ATHLETIC TRAINING. Administrative functions, professional relationships,
facility design, professional conduct, management problems, record keeping, medical policies and procedures,
physical examinations, budgetary considerations, certification, and licensing. This course will discuss current trends
within the profession of athletic training. In addition, the student will be involved in research in academic areas,
concepts and practical ideas in the area of athletic training and sports medicine. (3 crs.)
ATE 770. ATHLETIC TRAINING PRACTICUM. This course provides students with the opportunity to apply entrylevel athletic training knowledge and skills to the practice of athletic training. Students will be expected to apply
evidence-based techniques to their clinical decision-making and appraise the effectiveness of their treatments and
interventions. Professionalism and ethical behavior in the practice of athletic training will also be discussed. (3 crs.)
ATE 800. METHODS OF RESEARCH IN THE ALLIED HEALTH SCIENCES. This course studies the basic tenets of
scientific research as they apply to the allied health fields. Topical discussions include development and limitation of
a research problem, research methodology, basic principles of tests and measurements, the review of literature and
library utilization, and writing the research document. (3 crs.)
ATE 810. THESIS SEMINAR. This course is designed to assist graduate students in development of the first three
chapters of their theses. Students will defend their proposals in a mock prospectus meeting. (3 crs.)
BUS — Business
BUS 741. BUSINESS LAW. The legal aspects of contracts and the results of contractual obligations, negotiable
instruments, agency, partnerships, corporations, real and personal property, and sales. (3 crs.)
BUS 743. BUSINESS, SOCIETY AND GOVERNMENT. A survey of social control of industry and business; the course
covers government regulation, consumerism and the role of technological change in society. (3 crs.)
BUS 745. BUSINESS ETHICS. The graduate course provides a framework to identify, analyze and understand
how business people make ethical decisions and deal with ethical issues. Using a case method approach, students
will analyze real-life business situations and gain insight into the realities and complexity of making decisions in a
business environment. (3 crs.)
BUS 771. QUANTITATIVE METHODS. Introduces mathematical and statistical techniques that have applications in
management. (3 crs.)
BUS 795. SEMINAR. Seminar in selected theoretical and empirical literature in a functional area (to be designated) of
business. (3 crs.)
BUS 797. RESEARCH STUDIES IN BUSINESS. A special tutorial arrangement between a graduate student and a
faculty member that permits guided reading and research in management. The graduate student must submit a
proposal to the program coordinator containing an outline and a brief discussion of the planned work and the name
of the professor under whom the graduate student wishes to work. The proposal must be approved by the program
coordinator and the department chair before the graduate student may register for the course. At the end of the term,
the supervising professor will submit the graduate student’s grade and research paper to the program coordinator. (3
crs.)
BUS 799. STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT. An integrated course dealing with corporate-level strategic planning and
policy from the point of view of chief administrative officers and boards of directors. The case study approach is used.
(3 crs.)
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CMD — Communication Disorders
CMD 600. RESEARCH AND PROFESSIONAL PRACTICE IN SPEECH/LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY. This course is
designed to teach the graduate student to be both a consumer and producer of research. A research endeavor (research
paper, project or thesis) is a requirement of graduation and is initiated in this class. Practice patterns in the profession
(ethical, clinical and legal aspects) are also addressed. (3 crs.)
CMD 701. LANGUAGE DISORDERS IN ADULTS. The purpose of this course is to prepare the student to provide
assessment techniques and therapy to manage the language and speech problems of individuals who have suffered
stroke, head trauma, dementia or other neurological disorders or injuries. (3 crs.)
CMD 702. LANGUAGE DISORDERS IN CHILDREN. The study of language disorders in children is presented.
Students learn to analyze and treat disorders involving language content difficulties, language form deficits and/or
pragmatic disabilities. Students obtain and analyze language samples and plan appropriate remediation of language
disorders in children. (3 crs.)
CMD 703. FLUENCY DISORDERS. This course summarizes the various generations’ theory concerning why people
stutter and what treatment is effective. The student learns to assess the multiple overt and covert symptoms of
stuttering and to plan effective treatment. (3 crs.)
CMD 705. VOICE DISORDERS. This course provides comprehensive academic and clinical training in the etiological
factors, description and management of voice disorders. (3 crs.)
CMD 707. PHONOLOGY AND ARTICULATION. This course provides the graduate student with traditional views
about articulation and phonology disorders, their assessment and treatment. Current assessment and management
procedures will be practiced in and out of the classroom. (3 crs.)
CMD 708. NEUROLOGY. The graduate student becomes familiar with those structures and functions of the central
and peripheral nervous systems that appear relevant to the comprehension and production of speech and language.
Brain asymmetry in normal and brain-damaged persons, left- and right-hemisphere language abilities in split-brain
patients, handedness as it relates to speech and language functioning, gender differences, disruption of language
functions after brain injury or disease, the effects of aging and stress on neurological functioning, and neurologic
endowment are all discussed. The central theme of this course is brain “governance” over all other body systems. (3
crs.)
CMD 711. APPLIED THERAPEUTIC PROCEDURES IN PRESCHOOL SETTING. The student participates in work in
the department’s preschool, where 10 normally developing children and 10 children with speech-language problems
are included. Focus is on actual work with children, inclusion theory, and normal and disordered development. (1-3
crs.)
CMD 712. APPLIED THERAPEUTIC PROCEDURES IN OUT-PATIENT SETTING. The student participates in “handson” work with clients in the University Speech and Hearing Clinic. Under supervision, the student will provide
therapy for one or more clients presenting with one of the following disorders: speech or language, stuttering, voice,
delayed development, stroke, or others. (1-3 crs.)
CMD 713. APPLIED DIAGNOSTIC PROCEDURES IN SPEECH PATHOLOGY. The student participates in “handson” diagnostic (testing) work as a member of the diagnostic team. Under supervision, the student administers
communication-based tests to clients from the community presenting with one or more of a wide variety of
communication deficits. (1-3 crs.)
CMD 714. APPLIED AUDIOLOGIC DIAGNOSTIC AND REHABILITATIVE PROCEDURES. The student participates
in audiological assessment as a member of the audiological team. Under the supervision of a certified audiologist, the
student tests the hearing ability of clients from the community who seek audiological intervention in this clinic. (1-3
crs.)
CMD 715. APPLIED THERAPEUTIC PROCEDURES IN EDUCATIONAL SETTING. Externship in an educational
setting. (1-3 crs.)
CMD 716. APPLIED NEUROGENIC PROCEDURES IN HEALTH CARE FACILITIES. Externship in a health care
setting. (1-3 crs.)
CMD 718. ADVANCED AUDIOLOGY FOR THE SPEECH-LANGUAGE PATHOLOGIST. The purpose of this course
is to assist the speech-language pathologist in working with hearing-impaired and deaf patients of all ages. (3 crs.)
CMD 731. EARLY INTERVENTION IN SPEECH LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY. This course offers the opportunity
for comprehensive study of delayed and/or disordered speech-language ability, deficits of social interaction and
development, hearing loss and deafness, and feeding and swallowing difficulties in children from infancy through
preschool age. The student will comprehend processes from referral to assessment through treatment and transition.
(3 crs.)
CMD 732. COUNSELING THE COMMUNICATIVELY DISABLED. This course teaches students to use evidencedbased counseling techniques during their work with clients. They learn to choose and use techniques for specific
purposes: to change attitudes, help clients accept their disorders, motivate and change client behaviors, and increase
understanding. The graduate student learns to use general counseling techniques through role play and guided client
contact. He/she also investigates the special counseling issues related to the pathologies commonly treated by the
speech-language pathologist. (3 crs.)
CMD 764. INSTRUMENTATION IN SPEECH/LANGUAGE PATHOLOGY. This course is designed to provide the
graduate student with a background in the clinical use of instrumentation. Students will learn how instrumentation
has been and can be used to measure various parameters of the speech signal and how these measurements can be
employed in the assessment and management of individuals with speech-language disorders. Emphasis is on PCbased instrumentation. (3 crs.)
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CMD 765. DYSPHAGIA. This course addresses the evaluation and management of children and adults with
disordered swallowing secondary to neurologic, structural and psychogenic abnormalities. The relationship of
dysphagia to speech disorders is discussed. (3 crs.)
CMD 766. TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY. The purpose of this course is to organize and understand the explosions of
information related to the medical, communication and psychosocial aspects of traumatic brain injury (TBI). When
possible and practical, practitioners from rehabilitation agencies will supplement the instructor’s lectures. (3 crs.)
CMD 772. AUGMENTATIVE AND ALTERNATIVE COMMUNICATION. This course is an in-depth study of: 1) the
underlying theory of augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems, including state-of-the-art and
emerging technologies; and 2) methodology for assessing and training individuals with communication disorders to
use AAC systems. The various modes of nonvocal communication are presented. These include, but are not limited to,
sign and gestural languages, computer-assisted communication, etc. Students learn to assess client need and potential,
select the augmentative or alternative method, access resources as needed, and provide intervention. Emphasis is
placed on functional strategies for the practicing clinician in AAC. Hands-on experience with various AAC systems is
an integral part of this course. (3 crs.)
CMD 785. SEMINAR IN SPEECH PATHOLOGY. The role of the speech-language pathologist as a diagnostician and
intervention in disciplinary and interdisciplinary investigations, including counseling procedures, and organization of
programs for various pathologies of speech and language are considered. (3 crs.)
CED — Counselor Education
CED 700. FOUNDATIONS OF SCHOOL COUNSELING. The role of school counselors is explored in relation to
counseling history, philosophy, theory, technology and trends. Counseling within the elementary and secondary
school settings, consultation, and coordination are core components. Professional development, documentation, and
ethical and legal standards are addressed. This course also focuses on the development of instructional programs
as part of a comprehensive K-12 school counseling curriculum, including teaching methods, lesson planning
and participation in multidisciplinary teams. Computer technology is explored and used as a resource for school
counselors. (3 crs.)
CED 702. COUNSELING THEORY. This course reviews theories, objectives, principles and practices of counseling
individuals, including children and the family. These theories are applicable in schools and other human service
institutions. (3 crs.)
CED 705. DEVELOPMENTAL GROUP COUNSELING. This course includes the meaning, function, types and
principles of the group approach to counseling; the dynamics of group interaction; leadership; role playing; personal
development in groups; and the influence of the group processes on individual development. (3 crs.)
CED 708. SUBSTANCE ABUSE AND ADDICTION. The focus of this course is prevention and rehabilitation in
drug and alcohol abuse. Since substance abuse and addiction are present in all sectors of society, it is important for
human service professionals to understand the process of addiction and the special problems experienced by affected
individuals and their significant others. (3 crs.)
CED 709. INDEPENDENT STUDY. The graduate student will have an opportunity to do independent study
or research in counseling under the guidance of a member of the faculty in Counselor Education. Prerequisite:
permission of the adviser. (Variable crs.)
CED 710. COUNSELING SKILLS AND TECHNIQUES. Graduate students develop counseling skills by learning and
practicing therapeutic techniques that facilitate the counseling process. In a laboratory setting, students practice basic
counseling skills such as attending to nonverbal behavior, focusing, reflection of feeling, etc. Students will audiotape
and videotape practice sessions. (3 crs.)
CED 711. PRACTICUM IN COUNSELOR EDUCATION. The student implements effective helping skills and
techniques using one or more recognized counseling theories. Students must see individual clients, and group
experiences are required. Students spend 150 hours on-site under the supervision of an experienced counselor, receive
individual and/or triadic supervision from the site supervisor and faculty supervisor, and attend a regularly scheduled
group supervision seminar. Students must be able to audiotape or videotape counseling sessions. Prerequisites: CED
700 or 789, 702, 724, 710, candidacy and departmental approval. (3 crs.)
CED 712. CLINICAL FIELD EXPERIENCE IN COUNSELOR EDUCATION. The purpose of this course is threefold:
to help students practice the skills they have learned and apply them in a real-world setting; for students to learn to
present cases to peers and offer constructive criticism and ideas in a “treatment team” or “case conference” format;
and for students to actively participate in the supervision group experience in order to develop as counselors,
supervisees and members of a “team” dedicated to their own and their peers’ growth as professionals. Prerequisites:
CED 700 or 789, 702, 724, 710, candidacy, practicum and departmental approval. (3 crs.)
CED 715. ADVANCED COUNSELING THEORY. The initial phase of this course reviews the theories and the
roles they play in the counseling process. The second phase deals with building around the various theoretical
approaches to counseling. Counseling approaches that are considered include rationale, learning theory, analytic,
phenomenological and existential. The final aspect of the course involves graduate students attempting to incorporate
a counseling approach into their own personalities and making an attempt to use this approach through role playing.
Prerequisite: instructor approval. (3 crs.)
CED 717. DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT IN MENTAL HEALTH. Students will learn to make accurate child
and adult diagnosis according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM IV-TR). Basic
psychopathology and treatment strategies will be explored. Limitations inherent in the use of DSM and other
diagnostic classifications are discussed. (3 crs.)
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CED 720. CROSS-CULTURAL COUNSELING. Students will explore the cognitive, affective and behavioral
considerations of culturally diverse client groups. Accordingly, counseling theories and programmatic approaches
relevant to the mental health needs and concerns of these groups will be introduced. This will include an examination
of how cultural attributes, strategies and coping skills can be effectively synthesized into the counseling process. (3
crs.)
CED 721. DIAGNOSIS AND COUNSELING IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS. This is a master’s-level course
in the diagnosis and counseling of children and adolescents in the school setting. Students will be able to interpret
diagnostic criteria of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) specifically related to
children and adolescents in the school setting. Treatment and counseling considerations for psychopathologies
most likely encountered by school counselors will be introduced in depth and students will be able to apply this
knowledge. (3 crs.)
CED 724. EXPERIENTIAL GROUP PROCESS. This course requires that students participate in a personal growth
group with other graduate counseling students. The purpose of the group is to have students develop an increased
understanding of their thoughts, feelings and behaviors. The department feels that openness to understanding oneself
is very important for counselors. In order to maintain confidentiality, an adjunct faculty member teaches this course.
Grading is pass/fail. Prerequisite: admission to the counselor education program. (3 crs.)
CED 730. ADVANCED COUNSELING SKILLS AND TECHNIQUES. This course is designed for the advanced student
or post-master’s counseling practitioner. The skills learned in CED 710 are reinforced. Initial assessment interviews,
note-taking, treatment planning and techniques specific to various theoretical perspectives are introduced. Examples
of some of the techniques that may be included are: relaxation training, mediation, genogram, two-chair technique,
group psychodrama, dream-work, play therapy, sand tray and art therapy techniques. Students will research various
techniques, make classroom presentations and demonstrate these techniques. They will also provide information on
how one gets further training or expertise. Students conduct practice counseling sessions with other students in class.
Videotaping will be used for practice and critique. Students should expect to be active participants in class. (3 crs.)
CED 735. INTRODUCTION TO FAMILY THERAPY. This course provides an introduction to family counseling. A
systems perspective is emphasized. This course covers the history of the field and provides an introduction to the
theories, processes and techniques of family therapy. Professional issues, such as ethical, legal and multicultural
issues, will be addressed. (3 crs.)
CED 777. STUDENT AFFAIRS SERVICES IN HIGHER EDUCATION. This course is a survey of theoretical and
applied information for counselors working in a student affairs settings. Course content includes an introduction to
the philosophical, legal and ethical foundations of the field of student affairs work; an overview of the functional areas
within student affairs divisions; and current issues in the field. The basics of program planning and evaluation are also
introduced. (3 crs.)
CED 778. THE COLLEGE STUDENT AND HIGHER EDUCATION ENVIRONMENT. This course examines the
characteristics, learning and developmental needs of college students and the impact of the higher education
environment on both traditional and nontraditional students. Issues that might affect the development and
functioning of college students are explored in depth. (3 crs.)
CED 779. ADMINISTRATION OF STUDENT SERVICES IN HIGHER EDUCATION. This course is intended to
introduce students to the administration of student affairs programs in higher education. This course will focus
primarily on the purpose of student affairs, its functions and how they can be effectively managed, coordinated and
integrated as part of the broad educational purposes of the institution. It also examines institutional strategies for
organizing, staffing and funding student affairs programs and services. (3 crs.)
CED 780. ISSUES AND TECHNIQUES IN COUNSELING ATHLETES. This course examines current counseling
strategies used with members of sport teams at the youth, high school, college and professional levels. Participants
will explore current research in three main areas: motivation and life skill development, psychosocial development
and career maturity. (3 crs.)
CED 781. SPORTS COUNSELING PROGRAMMING. This course offers students an overview of various life skills,
including career development, study skills, goal setting, time management, health and wellness, values clarification,
problem-solving, and decision-making, to name a few. Students will develop a teaching philosophy that includes
methods for teaching life skills to the athlete population. They will be given opportunities to make presentations on
topics of their interest so that they may teach or offer workshops on life skills to the athlete population. (3 crs.)
CED 782. ADVANCED ISSUES AND TECHNIQUES IN COUNSELING ATHLETES. This course is twofold. One, the
course is designed to prepare students for roles as professionals in the field. Areas of study include professional ethics
and legal issues, record keeping, National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) guidelines, and working as part of
an interdisciplinary team or as a consultant with individual athletes, teams and athletic organizations. Additionally,
this course is designed for students to improve their career development, counseling and skill-building techniques
with youth, adolescent, young adult and adult athlete populations. Participants have an opportunity to develop and
practice strategies to enhance their effectiveness in counseling this unique cultural group. This course includes field
experiences with the athlete population of students’ choice. (3 crs.)
CED 785. RESEARCH METHODS IN COUNSELING. The purpose of this course is to give the graduate student a
comprehensive review of the research and current literature in counselor education. Critical study and evaluation of
research findings are emphasized. (3 crs.)
CED 786. CAREER COUNSELING. This course reviews the theory and process of giving career information and
of counseling in school and agency settings. Topics include sources of career information, appraisal, classification
of careers, career resources, career and vocational education, systems of career guidance, and theories of career
development. (3 crs.)
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CED 787. INTEGRATION, COLLABORATION AND CONSULTATION. This course is intended for students who are
near the end of their programs. The purpose is to integrate the materials learned and to discuss the professional topics
and practices of agency and school counselors. This is done by focusing on the counselor as an ethical practitioner.
Prerequisite: concurrently with practicum or Clinical Field Experience. (3 crs.)
CED: 788. CONTEMPORARY TOPICS IN COUNSELOR EDUCATION. This is an advanced-level course, the
purpose of which is to increase students’ understanding of contemporary topics, practices and problems relevant to
counselors who work in school and agency settings. Students can expect to be proactive in researching and sharing
information, as well as evaluating practices and policies for their efficacy in various settings. They will demonstrate
their integration of this new knowledge into their prior learning as it relates to the counseling field through writing,
discussion and presentations. (1-3 crs.)
CED 789. INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING. This course is a survey of theoretical
and applied information for counselors working in mental health settings. Course content includes an examination of
mental health counseling as a helping profession, an overview of the history of mental health counseling, the practice
of mental health counseling, and the roles and tasks expected of mental health counselors. Mental health counseling
settings, relationships with other human service professionals, and characteristics of individuals and communities are
discussed. The topics of policy, consultation and advocacy, as well as current issues in mental health counseling, are
covered. (3 crs.)
CED 790. COUNSELING INTERNSHIP. This course provides advanced graduate students in counseling with a
supervised, on-the-job experience in an agency or school setting as a counselor trainee. Students will be on the site for
a minimum of 300 hours (if registered for 3 credits) or 600 hours (if registered for 6 credits). Students who anticipate
obtaining the Licensed Professional Counselor credential from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania will be required to
complete 6 credits of internship in addition to the requirements of practicum (CED 711). Of the 600 hours, a minimum
of 240 hours must be direct service work with clients. Students will receive a minimum of one-hour supervision per
week by the on-site supervisor. In addition, students will be required to attend a group supervision class once a week
where students will present cases. Ethical and legal issues will be discussed, and information shared. Prerequisites:
CED 700 or 789, 702, 710, 724, candidacy, practicum and department permission. (3 or 6 crs.)
CED 791: CRISIS COUNSELING AND DISASTER PREPAREDNESS. This course is a survey of theoretical and applied
information for counselors working in crisis and disaster situations. Course content includes an examination of the
dynamics, types and characteristics of crises and disasters and the reactions and risk factors of those impacted, as well
as the nature and types of responses made in crises and disasters. Intervention techniques and strategies normally
employed by counselors handling crises and disasters and with specific vulnerable populations will be explored.
Multicultural, ethical, legal, moral and contemporary issues will also be discussed. (3 crs.)
CRM — Applied Criminology
CRM 700. ADVANCED CRIMINOLOGICAL THEORIES. This course will examine the major theories of crime
relevant to criminal behavior, crime analysis, research and criminal justice system policies. Original works of selected
theories will be introduced and explained with examples of how theory, research and policy are applied to crimerelated issues. Theoretical works such as classical, biological, psychological, social, political and feminist criminology
will be explored in this course. (3 crs.)
CRM 710. ADVANCED BEHAVIORAL CRIME ANALYSIS THEORY. This course provides the theoretical foundation
for the behavioral analysis of violent crime associated with applied criminology. Specific course content will examine
theoretical underpinnings of criminal behavior, rapist typology and victimology. A particular emphasis will be on
the psychopathology of crime, violent offenders, paraphilias, pedophiles and crime victims. Accordingly, the course
provides students with the behavioral and psychological theories that are needed in the practical courses in applied
criminology, such as Criminal Investigative Analysis; Equivocal Death Analysis; and Geographical Crime Analysis. (3
crs.)
CRM 820. ETHICS AND LEGAL ASPECTS IN APPLIED CRIMINOLOGY. This course is an in-depth examination of
the ethical considerations that confront investigators, forensic scientists, supervisors and others involved in applied
criminology. Both theoretical and applied applications will be presented with emphasis on the practical courses in the
applied criminology track in social science. A particular focus will be on ethical issues relating to analysis of various
data sets and evidence, preparation of expert reports, discovery and disclosure, exculpatory evidence, and testifying
as a lay witness and as an expert witness. Relevant case studies will be reviewed. (3 crs.)
CRM 830. CRIMINAL INVESTIGATIVE ANALYSIS. This course builds upon the theoretical framework provided
in Advanced Criminological Theories and Advanced Behavioral Crime Analysis Theory. It provides the applied
components of criminal investigative analysis from operational aspects such as the formation of the investigative team,
predicting criminal behavior, locating offenders, and methodically collecting, analyzing and synthesizing relevant
evidence. Moreover, the student will learn other practical applications such as interview techniques for suspects and
crime victims, and how to minimize occurrences of false confessions. Prerequisites: CRM 700 and 710. (3 crs.)
CRM 840. EQUIVOCAL DEATH ANALYSIS. This course is designed to provide the theoretical and practical
applications in determining whether a death was the result of an accident, suicide, homicide or natural occurrence.
The student will be introduced to specific techniques that are used to disambiguate the manner of death, including
behavioral and psychological histories of the decedent. Other techniques covered in the course include the analysis of
autoerotic fatalities and staged crime scenes. Prerequisite: CRM 820. (3 crs.)
CRM 850. GEOGRAPHICAL CRIME ANALYSIS. This course is designed to provide the student of applied
criminology with the basic understanding of the theoretical and practical applications of Geographic Crime Analysis.
Topics covered will include target and predator patterns; predicting crime; locating offenders; and investigative
strategies for solving crimes. Students will also be introduced to the scientific and technological aspects of this field
and will be expected to critically evaluate the various processes and procedures with the view toward continuous
improvement in the field. Prerequisite: CRM 840. (3 crs.)
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CRM 860. APPLIED RESEARCH IN CRIMINOLOGY. This course will focus on the application of selected principles
of criminological theory and research methods toward understanding and resolving specific problems in the field
of applied criminology. It is designed to help students build upon previous courses in crime theories and research
methods. Students will be required to develop and complete a research proposal related to a criminological topic of
their choice. Prerequisite: RES 810. (3 crs.)
PCJ — Criminal Justice
PCJ 747. FINANCIAL INVESTIGATIONS. This course introduces the student to current perspectives dominant in the
field of financial investigations. Concepts of law and evidence, sources of information, accounting, methods of tracing
funds, banking and financial record keeping, and interviewing tactics will all be covered. Primary emphasis will be
placed on legal principles and applications of financial investigation techniques, and the pertinent crimes. (3 crs.)
PCJ 748. CRIMINAL JUSTICE ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT. This course is the study of command-level
problems and trends in criminal justice organizations and management. These include the functional concepts of
the administrative process, as well as the principles of organizing, controlling, planning and leadership relating to
criminal justice agencies. (3 crs.)
PCJ 749. SEMINAR IN JUSTICE STUDIES. This course for advanced graduate students allows the opportunity
for scholarly research in a specific topic relevant to the justice system. The course is a seminar because it offers
students the chance to interact in small groups online and be closely monitored by the instructor. A focused, esoteric
examination of a specifically approved research topic is the course’s chief purpose. Authorship of a large research
paper shared with the class and instructor is required. (3 crs.)
PCJ 750. SEXUAL ASSAULT INVESTIGATIONS. The investigation of sexual offenses requires both the humanity of
the investigator and the technical expertise of those remaining at the crime scene. How the forensic sciences play out
in these forms of investigation is crucial to course purpose and content. How evidence is collected, identified and
processed, as well as its suitability for use in the field, and its subsequent admissibility into court, are central themes
throughout the course. Students are also exposed to case law and statutory materials dealing with sexual offenses and
actual case studies for application and critique. (3 crs.)
PCJ 751. EXECUTIVE PROTECTION AND THE LAW. This course develops an understanding of the principles,
planning, tactics and techniques used in executive protection (EP). This course will teach students fundamentals of
EP, such as advance site survey development, protective formations and protective threat assessments. This work
provides students with the tools they need to know and appreciate the profession. Students learn what to expect when
they are in positions of confidence and trust. Students also examine the full implications of being responsible for the
safety and lives of others. The course emphasizes the basic elements of EP and its practical application. (3 crs.)
PCJ 752. DIGITAL IMAGING, FORENSIC PHOTOGRAPHY AND THE LAW. This course concentrates on the
role of digital imaging and forensic photography as protocol for law enforcement professionals. Students learn the
basic theories behind digital imaging, its equipment and functionality requirements, its methods and processes of
development, and the challenges associated with the integrity of said evidence. More specifically, the course will
weigh and evaluate actual case law concerning digital imaging, provide advice and counsel on how digital imaging
may be legally challenged, and what the typical pitfalls of this evidentiary form may suffer from. Case law and case
exercises are part of the course’s aim. (3 crs.)
PCJ 755. POLYGRAPH AND LIE DETECTION. Polygraph testing is used for three main purposes: event-specific
investigations (e.g., after a crime), employee screening and pre-employment screening. This course explores the
different uses involved in the search for different kinds of information. This exploration includes how the polygraph
measures several physiological processes (e.g., heart rate) and changes in those processes. It also includes examination
of the charts of those measures in response to questions on a polygraph test. This course focuses mainly on validity
because a test that is reliable (i.e., produces consistent outcomes) has little use unless it is also valid (i.e., measures
what it is supposed to measure). It evaluates available scientific evidence on polygraph test validity coming from
studies of specific-event investigations. (3 crs.)
ECE — Early Childhood Education
ECE 700. EARLY CHILDHOOD CURRICULUM AND ASSESSMENT. Based on the premise that curriculum,
instruction and assessment are inextricably intertwined, this course is designed to help prospective teachers of young
children conduct informal and formal assessments and develop an assessment system that draws information from
various sources. Teachers will develop knowledge and understand the principles and components of preschool
curricula and strategies of learning for preschool children. Curriculum and assessment, content, strategies, and
examples appropriate for the development and learning of young children are emphasized. The course communicates
the mindset that comprehensive, reliable and valid assessment data pave the way for meaningful, relevant and
engaging learning opportunities for children. (3 crs.)
ECE 702. ADVANCED CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT. This online course provides teachers with the opportunity
to review recent research and theory concerning advanced child growth and development. The course examines
the nature and process of child development with a focus on infancy and early childhood years. The primary goal
of the course is the integration of information generated from empirical research, both classic and current, into
explanatory systems (theories) of child development. The emphasis in this course is less on learning the “facts” of
child development and more on learning why child development research is conducted (theories), how it is conducted
(methodology), what it means for the field (conclusions) and how research is evaluated (critical thinking). (3 crs.)
ECE 703. LITERACY DEVELOPMENT. This online course provides teachers with the opportunity to review
recent research and theory concerning literacy development. The study of different areas of literacy development,
specifically oral language, writing and reading, are encompassed in the course. The theory and research is translated
into practical strategies, assessment materials and preparation of rich literacy environments. The course provides
teachers with an effort to reflect upon current issues in early literacy, specifically early intervention programs to assist
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struggling readers, language and diversity, teaching skills in developmentally appropriate settings, organization and
management of literacy programs, and family literacy partnerships. (3 crs.)
ECE 704. SPECIAL TOPICS IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION. A focused examination of an emerging and
dynamic problem or issue in the study and practice of early childhood education. Special subject matter not ordinarily
covered in the existing curricula can be presented by faculty. Examples include but are not limited to: design and
accreditation of early care settings, adapting instruction for diverse learners, cultural diversity in the early care setting,
parent and community involvement, advocacy and ethics, inquiry-based learning, or content specific topics. (3 crs.)
ECE 705. SCIENCE AND MATH IN EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION. This course provides practicing
teachers with the opportunity to attain an advanced conceptual understanding of and skill in using numerous
teaching strategies for science and math content. As the result of this course, teachers will be able to increase their
understanding of science and math content; select, plan and teach integrated constructivist-based lessons for diverse
learners in their early childhood years. (3 crs.)
ECE 707. LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT IN EARLY CHILDHOOD SETTINGS. Early childcare settings should
provide a supportive and encouraging environment. This course addresses planning for child care and education
facilities including staffing, regulations and licensing, organizing space and equipment, nutrition and health policies,
and parent and community relations. Teachers will examine the importance and application of developmentally
appropriate practices and programs that are nationally recognized. Careful attention will be given to standards, ethical
practices, and advocacy in the development of future leaders of Pre-K programs. (3 crs.)
EAS — Earth Science
EAS 527. TECTONICS. The nature of the earth’s tectonic framework. The following topics are of major concern: the
location of tectonic elements; theories of orogenesis, especially plate tectonics, crustal types and provinces; magma
and plate boundaries; the nature of convergent, divergent and strike-slip margins; and the Appalachian orogen. (3 crs.)
EAS 538. COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN WATER RESOURCES. An upper-level course designed to provide students
with the opportunity to apply computer and mathematical procedures to the solution of hydrologic problems.
Applications from other areas within the earth sciences may be considered. (3 crs.)
EAS 541. ADVANCED ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY. This course deals with the natural environment, particularly
geologic factors that may impact upon life or way of life of human beings. Emphasis is placed on an in-depth study of
environmental problems and possible alternative solutions to such problems. Basic engineering principles as applied
to geological problems are considered. Laboratory exercises, problems and written reports are an integral part of the
course. (3 crs.)
EAS 542. APPLIED CLIMATOLOGY. This course examines the effect of climate on the physical, biological and
cultural environments and includes both present-day and future relationships. Part of the course will examine
current practices/methodological developments that represent the basic “tools” that underpin applied climatological
research. Significant time will be spent investigating the relationship between climate and a wide range of human
activities and responses. (3 crs.)
EAS 548. WATERSHED EVALUATION. The purpose of this course is to analyze in detail rocks that serve for the
storage and ultimately for the production of petroleum. The characteristics of these rocks will be studied in hand
specimen, in thin section, in cores and on well logs. Laboratory work and problem-solving are emphasized. (3 crs.)
EAS 551. INVERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY. This course involves a detailed study of fossil representatives of the
various invertebrate phyla as well as a consideration of the more important of these as index fossils. Emphasis is on
laboratory exercises and problem-solving. This course will prove to be of interest to students in biology, as well as
those in geology. (3 crs.)
EAS 563. COASTAL GEOMORPHOLOGY AND MARINE RESOURCES. A study of the physical processes that shape
coastal landforms and the pelagic and neritic resources of the oceans. Topics include longshore transport, wave action,
swash zone dynamics, estuarine and deltaic geomorphology, ferromanganese and petroleum resources, and beach
structure. Prerequisite: EAS 163 or permission of the instructor. (3 crs.)
EAS 713. APPLIED EARTH SCIENCE. Investigation of problems in the earth sciences that cross the disciplinary
boundaries of hydrology, meteorology, geology and climatology. Library research, field investigations and laboratory
work will lead to an extensive research paper. (3 crs.)
EAS 720. HYDROLOGY. A survey course relating to the existence of water on Earth. Topics include the occurrence
and movement of water, physical and chemical characteristics of water, and climatologic and geologic consideration
of water. (3 crs.)
EAS 725. WEATHER ANALYSIS. The course presumes that the student has a background in elementary principles
of meteorology. It is concerned with the measurements and predictions of weather. Students present findings to the
class. (3 crs.)
EAS 740. SEDIMENTOLOGY. An advanced course that deals with the detailed analysis of sediments and sedimentary
rocks. Both qualitative and quantitative techniques are utilized to derive the maximum information from rock
samples. This information relates to the erosional, transportational and depositional history of the rocks. To the
greatest extent possible, the student works independently through a complete set of problems. (3 crs.)
EAS 741. STRATIGRAPHY. A study of the basic principles governing the interpretation, correlation, classification and
naming of stratified rock units. The stratigraphy of North America is discussed, with special emphasis placed on rocks
of the Pennsylvanian System. Problem-solving and individual investigations are important elements of the course.
(3 crs.)
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EAS 742. STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY. This course deals with the origin and analysis of geologic structures including
folds, faults and joints. Brittle and ductile deformation processes are examined in relation to fractures, faults and folds.
Geologic maps and cross-sections are formulated and analyzed. (3 crs.)
EAS 751. OPTICAL MINERALOGY. An in-depth examination of the optical behavior of mineral crystals in polarized
light with emphasis on identification. The optical theories of Snell and Huygens will be detailed as they relate to the
transmission of light through mineral crystals. Microscopic examination of mineral grain mounts and thin sections is
emphasized. (3 crs.)
EAS 755. GEOCHEMISTRY. The basic chemical principles employed in the solution of some geologic problems are
considered. Geologic dating, sedimentary geochemistry, chemical weathering, colloids and structural aspects of clay
minerals and soils are covered. (3 crs.)
EAS 760. FIELD PROBLEMS IN EARTH SCIENCE. This course is devoted to field work and mapping techniques. It
also involves visits to field locations of interest to the earth scientist and to governmental and private agencies devoted
to several of the earth science disciplines. A major written report and oral presentation are required. (3 crs.)
EAS 762. FIELD PROBLEMS IN HYDROLOGY. Opportunities for the graduate student to do practical work
concerning water and water budgets. Graduate students work with problems concerning storage of water, stream
measurement, evaporation, infiltration and migration, aquifer testing, tracer studies, mine drainage, and domestic use.
(3 crs.)
EAS 764. FIELD COURSE IN EARTH SCIENCE. For the student who wants to learn about his/her environment in situ.
The course will include a number of trips to actual sites of meteorologic, geologic or oceanographic significance where
materials and processes can be studied. A journal of site descriptions and a report on a specific site or process will be
required. (Variable crs.)
EAS 765. FIELD COURSE IN GEOLOGY. For the earth science student who desires to apply his/her classroom and
laboratory experiences at field sites that typify geologic principles. Site selection will reflect different emphases in
geology: mineralogy, petrology, paleontology, geomorphology or hydrology. Field trips to a minimum of 10 sites of
geologic significance will be supplemented by laboratory exercises, detailed journal entries and a final report that will
enable the student to develop analytical skills. (Variable crs.)
EAS 771. FIELD MAPPING. This is a field course designed for the student to learn various mapping procedures and
the use of mapping instruments. Problems involve the determination of distance, direction and evaluation. Plane table
surveying and map making in the field are emphasized. (3 crs.)
EAS 780. READINGS IN EARTH SCIENCE. The course deals with selected readings in the student’s area of interest in
earth science. It is designed to exemplify a sense of earth science problems and to develop abilities of critical appraisal.
(3 crs.)
EAS 781. RESEARCH IN EARTH SCIENCE. The organization of research in an area selected by the student with the
approval of the instructor. This research is in depth and may be on a micro scale or on a macro scale. (3 crs.)
EAS 792. SEMINAR IN GEOLOGY. A scientific writing course in which the student pursues a geologic topic through
library or field research. Students learn to define a geologic problem, obtain relevant literature, gather raw data, and
write and present a research paper. (3 crs.)
EAS 795. SEMINAR IN ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE. The latest developments in the field of meteorology and
climatology. Students are required to complete a research project and present findings to the class. (3 crs.)
EAS 796. SEMINAR IN OCEANOGRAPHY. Selected topics in geological, biological, physical and chemical
oceanography. Students are required to present a series of 11 short papers and one long paper. Class periods will
involve the students in discussions of oceanographic topics presented. (3 crs.)
EAS 800. METHODS OF RESEARCH IN EARTH SCIENCE. Consideration of purpose, scope and procedures of
earth science research including problem statement, data collection and data analysis. The course culminates with the
development of a problem that demonstrates research ability. (3 crs.)
EAS 829. RESEARCH PROJECT. A written report on a specific topic of investigation, based on knowledge of the
subject, research techniques and accurate presentation of the material. (2 crs.)
EAS 849. MASTER’S THESIS. A written report of exhaustive research into a specific area of investigation,
demonstrating thorough knowledge of the background of a subject, the published literature on a subject, and high
standards of original research and presentation. (4 crs.)
ECO — Economics
ECO 601. SURVEY OF ECONOMICS. A one-semester introduction to the principles of economics and their
applications to the leading economic problems of society. (3 crs.)
ECO 711. MICROECONOMIC ANALYSIS. Analysis of the theories of consumer behavior, resource allocation,
externalities, production and pricing policies of firms. (3 crs.)
ECO 712. MACROECONOMIC ANALYSIS. An analysis of the determination of national income, employment and
price levels, with discussion of consumption, investment, inflation, government fiscal and monetary policies, and
international trade, and their relevance to business and industry. (3 crs.)
ECO 716. APPLIED ECONOMIC ANALYSIS. This course gives students practical skills in the application of economic
principles to a variety of problems confronting business and government. The first half of the course reviews certain
microeconomic principles that are then applied to real situations in which a private or public official must make a
specific decision. This includes a diagnosis of the problem, analysis of the economic choices and development of a
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plan of action to help the enterprise or government agency reach a reasonable strategy or decision. The second section
reviews macroeconomic principles that are used to gain understanding of the forces determining current business
conditions, make macroeconomic forecasts, and evaluate the effects on the economic and business environment of
various macroeconomic and regulatory policies. (3 crs.)
ECO 721. MANAGERIAL ECONOMICS. The tools and techniques of economic analysis are used to analyze and solve
business and industrial decision-making problems. (3 crs.)
ECO 731. ECONOMETRIC METHODS. An introduction to statistical estimation in mathematically formulated
economic relationships, including the discussion of auto correlation, heteroskedasticity, dummy variables, functional
forms and distribution lags. Computer use is emphasized. (3 crs.)
EDU — Education
EDU 650. SUPPORTING ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS. The purpose of this course is to help the prospective
teachers in all initial certification areas develop an understanding of how to modify mainstream course materials and
instructional strategies so that English language learning students can engage in course content while simultaneously
developing their new language. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. (3 crs.)
EDE — Elementary Education
EDE 700. FOUNDATION AND HISTORY OF AMERICAN EDUCATION. This course is designed to provide a
historical review of elementary education from the past to the present day. (3 crs.)
EDE 701. DEVELOPMENT AND ORGANIZATION OF THE CURRICULUM. This course is designed to provide a
complete understanding of the history, organizational patterns and resources available for the development of the
school curriculum. Emphasis is on recent developments in curricula for infant/toddler programs, pre-kindergarten,
kindergarten and grades 1-12. Students receive an introduction to the many facets of curriculum development. Varied
opportunities are provided for the students to apply, synthesize and evaluate information through cooperative and
interactive learning experiences. (3 crs.)
EDE 702. INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES. Topics covered in this course include research on effective teaching,
written behavioral objectives, Bloom’s taxonomy of cognition, questioning and discussing behaviors, utilization of
thinking skills, integration of subject areas, inductive and deductive teaching, observation and assessment of children,
cognitive, psychomotor and affective concerns of children, content presentation skills, conflict resolution, values and
problem-solving as classroom management strategies, portfolio development for children and professionals, use of
technology for students and teachers, and strategies for teaching special learners in the regular classroom. Through
class discussions, practice sessions, role-playing and microteaching, students will learn how to plan for and utilize
strategies and effectively teach elementary and early childhood children. (3 crs.)
EDE 703. FIELD EXPERIENCE. This course is designed to provide students with a field experience in an elementary
classroom for a minimum of 45 hours. Students will function as teacher’s aides and develop and teach five lesson
plans. (3 crs.)
EDE 704. INTRODUCTION TO TEACHING ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE. The five domains of teaching
English language learners are explored: culture, language, planning instruction, assessment and professionalism.
Emphasis is placed on the Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) teaching standards and (ESL)
K-12 standards. Teachers will examine research-based practices in relation to the five domains and identify their role
as an ESL teacher. (3 crs.)
EDE 706. EVALUATION AND MEASUREMENT IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. Emphasis is placed on practical
methods and techniques for planning, construction and use of oral, performance, essay and objective tests with an
assumption that evaluation’s role in the teaching learning process is both active and fundamental. (3 crs.)
EDE 708. TEACHING READING. Emphasis is placed on reading trends and various procedures for teaching reading.
Through research findings, current literature and discussions, the student will be able to organize, administer and
evaluate a developmental reading program. (2 crs.)
EDE 709. DEVELOPING CULTURAL AWARENESS AND SENSITIVITY. Teachers across the country are finding their
classrooms increasingly diverse; therefore, this course will provide an examination of theory, diversity and pedagogy
constructs for explicit applications to practice in classrooms with English language learners. A historical exploration
of immigration, cultural perspectives and teaching practices that demonstrate and explicate the interconnectedness
of culture and cognition is provided. By examining the background of English language learners and their cultures, a
framework for creating a culturally responsive classroom environment is developed. (3 crs.)
EDE 712. CONTENT INSTRUCTION AND ASSESSMENT PRE-K THROUGH GRADE 12. Teachers will examine
the theories, principles, and practices that assist English language learners in achieving academic proficiency in the
content areas. Planning standards-based instruction and adapting instruction in the content areas is emphasized.
To promote the academic success of English language learners, teachers will involve the family and community,
and analyze the learner to establish learning goals and assessment measures that are appropriate for the individual
student. (3 crs.)
EDE 713. LANGUAGE ACQUISITION AND DEVELOPMENT. Second language learners of any age undergo certain
processes to be able to learn a new language. In this course, students will be exposed to these processes. They will
learn and conduct research on the structure and nature of language with a view to assisting their students to adjust to
the challenges of learning a new language. They will also learn the theories of second language acquisition and styles
and strategies in language learning, as well as the socio-cultural and cross-linguistic influences of language learning.
(3 crs.)
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EDE 714. LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY ASSESSMENT. Assessing English language learners can be a challenge to not
only teachers, but also the students themselves. As English as a second language (ESL) students in K-12 are taught
English, there needs to be proper instruments in place for assessing their progress in language learning. These tools
should be appropriate and should take into account the proficiency level of the learner. In this course, student teachers
will gain exposure to the tools necessary to be able to assess English language learners appropriately and in a timely
way. The course will offer knowledge on benchmarks for different proficiency levels. (3 crs.)
EDE 715. TEACHING LANGUAGE ARTS. Teacher candidates will research findings and current classroom practices
in the teaching of language arts. Methods of updating past teaching practices are considered and evaluated. (3 crs.)
EDE 716. TEACHING SOCIAL STUDIES. The foundations of the social studies are examined. Instructional strategies
and resources for the constructivist social studies classroom are discussed and demonstrated. Attention is given to
current trends and the present status of elementary social studies.
(3 crs.)
EDE 718. TEACHING MATHEMATICS. This course focuses on understanding the child’s perceptions and cognitive
development as they relate to mathematics. Activities appropriate to the developmental and academic levels of
elementary school children are explored and practiced. (2 crs.)
EDE 719. SUPPORTING SECOND LANGUAGE LEARNERS, FAMILIES AND COMMUNITY. Most second language
learners are from another country. They come in with anxieties and go through phases of cultural adjustments.
Without the necessary support, it might be hard for them to transition smoothly and thus be able to learn English
well and fast. This course is geared toward equipping English as a second language (ESL) teachers with the necessary
tools to give ESL students the support they need while they undergo the challenges of transition. Issues that may arise
concerning the support of students in the classroom, school and community will be addressed. (3 crs.)
EDE 731. EXPRESSIVE ARTS. This course deals with expressive arts during the early childhood and elementary
school years. The course content focuses on developing creativity and the teaching and integration of art, music,
movement and creative dramatics within the curriculum. (3 crs.)
EDE 737. LITERATURE AND LITERACY K-12. This course is designed to present future teachers and in-service
teachers with approaches and strategies for using children’s and adolescents’ literature as a basis for the reading
program and as a framework throughout the curriculum. The course uses a hands-on approach to accomplish its
objectives. (3 crs.)
EDE 740. TEACHING SCIENCE. This course is designed to acquaint students with the history of science curricula,
the content of science, the processes of science and science teaching, and researching recent trends in elementary
school science. The instructor will generate enthusiasm for science, encourage scientific inquiry, demonstrate positive
attitudes, and model effective science teaching consistent with the department’s constructivist model and the
standards listed under the objectives of the course cited above. (3 crs.)
EDE 760. INTRODUCTION TO NATIONAL BOARD CERTIFICATION. This course will provide an overview of the
National Board for Professional Teaching Standards (NBPTS) certification process, the requirements and research
support. “Accomplished Teaching” will be thoroughly investigated in the context of the national board teaching
standards. Working in a cooperative online environment, students will evaluate their professional work and then
design and implement a personalized professional development plan to achieve the status of “Accomplished
Teaching.” (3 crs.)
EDE 761. FAMILY AND COMMUNITY RELATIONS. This course emphasizes the role of parents and community in
the framework of educational planning for young children. The student will demonstrate skill in planning education
workshops. Students will use interview and conferencing techniques to learn from parents and community people
actively involved in programs for children. National Board for Professional Teaching Standards for family and
community involvement will be examined and threaded into the teaching units. Students will observe, interview and/
or discuss best practices with national board certified teachers. (3 crs.)
EDE 762. INTERDISCIPLINARY INQUIRY-BASED LEARNING. This course examines how inquiry-based learning
assists learners in making meaning through personal and collaborative interactions with the environment. Candidates
will engage in teaching exercises that require implementation of reflective, systematic and thoughtful inquiry and will
experiment with action research strategies in collaborative learning groups. Candidates will use the National Board
for Professional Teaching Standards and the Five Core Propositions as a guide in the development of interdisciplinary
curriculum to support themes, projects and student-centered learning, and to connect learning to society. (3 crs.)
EDE 763. CONSTRUCTIVISM IN PRACTICE. This course will define and thoroughly investigate constructivist
teaching strategies in connection with the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards and portfolio
requirements. Topics covered will include “best teaching practices” embedded in the content areas (social studies,
science, math and reading), along with designing a safe, well-managed and dynamic learning environment.
Definitions, purposes, essential elements and implementation plans will be thoroughly addressed. Authentic
assignments and cooperative online work will provide a venue for students to scaffold their professional work toward
“Accomplished Teaching.” (3 crs.)
EDE 764. TEACHER REFLECTION. This course will explore the understanding and practice of reflection. Reflective
practice, as required by the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, enables teachers and counselors to
identify and understand how they use their knowledge and skills to effectively impact student learning and monitor
their professional growth. Through reflection, professionals identify and assess the knowledge and skills embedded in
their practice and engage in self-assessment to improve their practice. Students will be exposed to various theories of
learning and knowledge generation and engage in exercises in which they reflect on classroom experiences. (3 crs.)
EDE 765. TEACHERS AS LEADERS. This course prepares teachers to identify a leadership role in preparation for
National Board for Professional Teaching Standards certification. (3 crs.)
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EDE 766. ACTION RESEARCH. This course provides experienced teachers with the opportunity to attain a conceptual
understanding of action research methods in elementary and early childhood education and the skill to use action
research methods to transform classrooms and schools through data-driven decision-making. As the result of this
course, students will be able to critically analyze action research projects; design action research projects; collect
student, class and school data; interpret the results of student, class and school data analysis; and articulate action
research principles as teacher leaders in their teaching contexts. (3 crs.)
EDE 767. PORTFOLIO DEVELOPMENT. This course will assist the teacher practitioner in developing a National
Board for Professional Teaching Standards certification portfolio that will include student work, videotapes and
commentary. (3 crs.)
EDE 768. TEACHER EDUCATION INTERNSHIP. The internship experience requires learners to participate in a
supervised experience in an early childhood/preschool setting under the supervision of a sponsoring organization and
the University. The number of hours will be dependent upon the learner’s prior experiences and may include up to
60 hours in an early childhood setting. Valid and current teacher clearances or clearances for your state are required.
Individual internship locations will be arranged based on prior educational experiences and the educational program.
(3 crs.)
EDE 770. THE NATURE OF STEM INQUIRY LEARNING IN ELEMENTARY/MIDDLE SCHOOLS. This course
explores recent developments in the science of learning with an emphasis on inquiry as practiced by the science,
technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) professions. Candidates will examine the nature of inquiry through
historical biography, case studies of exemplary teaching practices, research on how elementary/middle school children
learn STEM content and practical experience conducting STEM inquiry projects. (3 crs.)
EDE: 771. TEACHING ELEMENTARY AND MIDDLE SCHOOL CHILDREN EARTH AND SPACE SCIENCE.
This course provides experienced teachers with the opportunity to develop skills associated with synthesizing
Pennsylvania earth science standard curricula into age-appropriate lessons and content learning that facilitates
students achieving proficiency. Through targeted modules teacher learners will identify common elementary-level
misconceptions regarding earth science topics, research and discuss causes and implications of those misconceptions,
and develop standard-specific lessons and content delivery items to address them. As the result of this course, teachers
will be able to recognize student learning gaps in the earth sciences, identify age-appropriate content matter and
activities, and design and implement learning plans targeting those gaps. (3 crs.)
EDE 772. TEACHING ELEMENTARY AND MIDDLE SCHOOL CHILDREN LIFE SCIENCE. This course develops
the candidates’ capacity to design and deliver curriculum, instruction and assessment to elementary/middle school
children in the life sciences. Rooted in educational standards, assessment anchors and the common explanations
children use to understand scientific phenomena, the course provides candidates with opportunities to engage in
advanced studies of exemplary teaching strategies and in-depth exploration of pedagogical content knowledge
through engaging activities aligned with the needs of practicing teachers. (3 crs.)
EDE 773. TEACHING ELEMENTARY AND MIDDLE SCHOOL CHILDREN PHYSICAL SCIENCE. This course
develops the candidates’ capacity to design and deliver curriculum, instruction and assessment to elementary/middle
school children in the physical sciences. Rooted in educational standards, assessment anchors and the common
explanations children use to understand scientific phenomena, the course provides candidates with opportunities
to engage in advanced studies of exemplary teaching strategies and in-depth exploration of pedagogical content
knowledge through engaging activities aligned with the needs of practicing teachers. (3 crs.)
EDE 774. TEACHING ELEMENTARY AND MIDDLE SCHOOL CHILDREN MATH. This course develops the
candidates’ capacity to design and deliver curriculum, instruction and assessment to elementary/middle school
children in mathematics. Rooted in educational standards, assessment anchors and the common explanations
children use to understand math, the course provides candidates with opportunities to engage in advanced studies of
exemplary teaching strategies and pedagogical content knowledge through engaging activities aligned with the needs
of practicing teachers. (3 crs.)
EDE 776. INTEGRATED PROJECT IN STEM EDUCATION. Candidates will learn advanced instructional strategies
using research-based case studies and apply these principles through the design of curriculum, instruction and
assessment. This course provides candidates opportunities to apply their understanding of STEM education through
direct interactions with children in schools, teacher leadership initiatives, community service, scientific laboratory
experiences, environmental interpretation in parks and science learning in museums. Candidates will design and
complete integrative academic assignments that demonstrate application of STEM education, experiential education
and service learning instructional strategies. (3 crs.)
EDE 795. STUDENT TEACHING INTERNSHIP. The student teaching experience provides the opportunity for the
teacher candidate to engage in pedagogy that embraces the constructivist model. During the course of this assignment,
students work in two public school classrooms and attend weekly practicum. Discussions focus on current research
and best practices, constructivist teaching strategies and techniques, technology in the classroom, and Pennsylvania
school laws relevant to the work of the classroom teacher. The teacher candidate will conduct an action research
project and share with colleagues during practicum sessions. In addition to these school-based experiences, the
teacher candidate is encouraged to engage in a series of community and cultural events with the surrounding school
community. (3 crs.)
FIN — Finance
FIN 531. BANK MANAGEMENT. Banking environment and an analysis of operational decisions faced by bank
managers in the areas of loans, investments, deposit management and capital management.
(3 crs.)
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FIN 711. CORPORATE FINANCE. An introduction to the role of the financial manager in executive decision-making.
Topics include valuation models, financial planning, analysis and control, capital budgeting, cost of capital, capital
structure, and dividend policy. (3 crs.)
FIN 712. ADVANCED CORPORATE FINANCE. Topics include capital markets, common stock, debt and preferred
stock financing, lease financing, warrants and convertibles, reorganization and bankruptcy, and international business
finance. (3 crs.)
FIN 721. INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT. Evaluation of debt and equity security alternatives for the use of
investment funds and the theory and techniques basic to control of investment risks and optimization of investment
returns. (3 crs.)
FIN 731. FINANCIAL MARKETS AND INSTITUTIONS. Survey of financial markets and institutions and their
relationship to the economic process; financial innovations and current topics in financial markets and institutions. (3
crs.)
FIN 751. INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT. This course provides the conceptual framework within
which the key financial decisions of the multinational firm can be analyzed. Topics include exchange rates, foreign
exchange market, currency futures and options markets, foreign exchange risk management, multinational working
capital management, international banking, and foreign investment analysis. (3 crs.)
GRA — Graduate
GRA 800. GRADUATE INTERNSHIP. Student interns are placed with an organization that most nearly approximates
employment goals. The intent of the internship is to provide students with practical work experience in an
environment in which they will be addressing real problems requiring real solutions in a relatively short time frame.
Adviser and department chair approval is required before course enrollment. (Variable 1-12 crs.)
GRA 810. SPECIAL TOPICS IN GRADUATE STUDIES. This course provides students with the opportunity to explore
and research graduate-level topics of interest that are not available as regular course offerings of the University.
(Variable 3-12 crs.)
GRA 820. GRADUATE STUDIES ABROAD. This course is intended to provide students with a number of
opportunities to study or work in academic or professional settings abroad. Examples include field-based studies
with other students and a supervising professor; studying relevant aspects of the discipline in foreign institutions of
higher education; or pursuing an approved cultural and educational program abroad. Accordingly, students will be
able to apply their respective discipline-based skills in real-world environments and at the same time broaden their
intellectual and personal understandings of cultures operating outside of the United States. Prerequisite: permission of
graduate program coordinator. (Variable 3-12 crs.)
AST — Homeland Security
AST 700. U.S. HOMELAND SECURITY. The goal of this course is to provide students with a thorough understanding
of the strategic, political, legal and organizational challenges associated with the defense of the U.S. homeland, the
efforts that are under way to meet these challenges, and possible policy options. The course starts by examining
the range of potential threats to the U.S. homeland, focusing on potential terrorist acts. The course then examines
strategies and means for addressing these threats, including both military and nonmilitary options. The course goes
on to analyze organizational issues and impediments to effective policy coordination. Finally, the course addresses the
implications of homeland security challenges and policies for constitutional rights, legal protections and civil liberties.
(3 crs.)
AST 740. TERRORISM, THREAT AND VULNERABILITY: ANALYSIS AND PROTECTION. The course will help
“bound the problem” of homeland security by examining how terrorism has spurred sharp changes in U.S. strategy,
policy and governmental design, and how those changes should continue over the near and longer term. Elements
of threat and vulnerability assessments will be thoroughly discussed, as well as various procedures for assessments
and the method of tailoring the assessment to the facility/area under study. Manners of protecting the facility/area in
question will then be addressed, as well as evacuation plans and emergency plans. (3 crs.)
AST 760. BIOLOGICAL, CHEMICAL, NUCLEAR AND WMD THREATS IN HOMELAND SECURITY. This course
gives a thorough overview of the different types of biological, chemical and nuclear weapons and weapons of mass
destruction in existence today. The intelligence preparation for vulnerability analyses from nuclear, biological and
chemical weapons employment, including low-level radiation, depleted uranium and toxic industrial chemical
concerns, are addressed. Vulnerability reduction measures that can be implemented for protection are also discussed.
Formats for conducting risk assessments and vulnerability analyses are covered. (3 crs.)
AST 780. INTELLIGENCE PRACTICE IN HOMELAND SECURITY. This course examines threats, vulnerabilities,
objectives, strategy, instruments of national power, resources and risks associated with ensuring homeland defense.
Students will have the opportunity to fully address and create policy and discuss organizational and substantive
issues regarding homeland security intelligence support. An overview of diverse intelligence disciplines and how the
intelligence community operates will be discussed. Course emphasis will be on issues affecting policy, oversight and
intelligence support to homeland security and national decision-making. (3 crs.)
LAW — Legal Studies
LAW 600. LAW AND PUBLIC POLICY. The cornerstone course of the graduate degree composes this program
of study. Exactly how law plays out in a multitude of settings, from political and legal institutions, to schools and
educational entities, to business and free enterprise forms, in social structures and cultural institutions, should be a
perpetual concern for the policymaker. How the law impacts individuals also receives some needed attention, and
course participants will weigh and gauge the effects of proposed and implemented legislation in a wide array of
contexts, including: police and the citizenry, correctional institutions and the incarcerated, government benefit plans
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and targeted recipients, entitlement programs and the public treasury, tax policy and the incentive-based model, and
charitable giving and the law’s role in fostering giving, to name a few. Measuring impacts and effect on individuals
and institutions stands in the forefront of course delivery. (3 crs.)
LAW 601. LAW AND ETHICS. An inquiry into the interplay of law, morality, ethical reasoning and Western legal
tradition. The course exposes the tradition and foundations of the American legal system with special emphasis on
its jurisprudential foundations. Questions of right, justice, equity, law as moral command and order, natural law
reasoning, and the dignity of the human person are central to the instruction. The course delivers a critical look at how
our legal and justice institutions have come about and provides a method for dealing and delving into perennial legal
and moral problems that plague cultures. The course also delivers an overview of the major legal theories about the
nature of law and its place in the political system. Among the issues considered are the origin of law, its relationship
with divine law, obligations of obedience and disobedience, and the relationship between political sovereignty and
law. (3 crs.)
LAW 602. LAW, CIVIL LIBERTIES AND THE CONSTITUTION. The place of the Constitution and Supreme Court
in American policy, using both empirical and case materials, is the primary content of this course. The focus also
includes the structure and powers of national government, with special emphasis on the Supreme Court as a policymaking institution. Civil liberties and corresponding constitutional protections will be examined in depth, including
a close-up of the Bill of Rights and Civil War Amendments. Issues of jurisdiction, search and seizure, police powers,
free speech, privacy and its penumbras, state action, eminent domain, states’ rights, and other constitutional issues
will be fully analyzed. Even more attention will be given to questions involving discrimination whether based on race,
disability or gender. (3 crs.)
LAW 603. LAW AND LEGAL METHOD. A review of the American legal system, including the courts and the
legislatures, roles and functions of its personnel, form and substance of law from a procedural and substantive
perspective, and primary and secondary sources of the law. Students will be exposed to federalism, the function
of law making and dispute resolution in the judicial system. The course also surveys the processes of the judicial,
legislative and executive branches and the role of administrative agencies. Another facet of the course is dedicated
to the mastery of legal method and the research tools essential to that success, including: judicial reports, including
federal and state court reports and citation forms; case finding aids, including federal, state and Supreme Court
digests and encyclopedias; citators such as Shepard’s Citations; digests; annotated law reports; legal periodicals,
including periodical indexes and research procedure; the nature, function and characteristics of treatises; research
procedures; state and federal administrative law; federal, state and local court rules; miscellaneous research aids; and
nonlegal research aids. The student will also be exposed to the various types of law, including criminal, civil, contract
and business actions, as well as other typologies of law. Course participants will have ample opportunity to hone and
develop critical legal skills by argument, advocacy, interpretation and preparation of legal documents. (3 crs.)
LAW 605. LAW AND POLICE PROCESS. A comprehensive examination of the role of police as gatekeepers in the
justice system, with particular attention given to their role, function and responsibilities inside the legal system,
commences the course analysis. How police and law enforcement carry out their duties in a free society will be the
subject of debate and advocacy, as will the perennial issues surrounding police behavior — police misconduct, police
abuse of discretion and police alienation from communities. An equally important aspect of the course will relate to
the legal issues that surround police practice on a day-to-day basis. Police search and seizure, confessions and witness
cooperation, identification and investigative field practices, and the law of arrest and detention will be assessed
from a professional, statutory and constitutional perspective. Attention will be given to the efficacy of judicially
ordered remedies in the conduct of police and whether other methods of intervention may generate better results. A
comprehensive view of litigation tactics and strategies in police misconduct cases, from initial investigation to appeals,
will receive significant coverage. (3 crs.)
LAW 606. LAW, PUNISHMENT AND CORRECTIONS. Concepts related to correctional law and its applications
are the central themes of the course. Aside from the usual review of correctional law issues relating to prison
modalities and regimen, discipline and due process, and constitutional protections during incarceration, with
special analysis of 8th and 14th Amendment claims, the course expends considerable time on the role and function
of institutional processes and operations in the correctional sphere. This allows an even-handed discussion of the
rights and responsibilities of both the correctional officers and supervisory personnel and the inmates within their
custody. Further treatment includes emerging questions in the prison environment, including AIDS in the facility,
free expression and political speech, the right to vote, family and conjugal visitation, and matters involving parole
and furlough, as well as the theory of rehabilitation, both medical and mental, in prison operations. Lastly, the course
evaluates the diverse schools of thought in the matter of punishment, including its legitimacy and its condemnation,
and addresses the more controversial questions in prison practice and therapeutic activity as punishment. (3 crs.)
LAW 607. LAW AND CRIMINAL CONDUCT. A comprehensive analysis of the law of crimes from a historical,
philosophical, moral and statutory perspective is the chief end of the course. Topics include criminal responsibility,
criminal liability and criminal defenses. Students will be adept at understanding the roots of criminal conduct and
just as capable in the analysis of criminal legislation. Aside from dissecting the fundamental elements of each crime,
the participant will become learned in more than simple definition and delineation of crimes, but able to pose and
advocate defense tactics as well. How constitutional and social issues interplay with criminal proscription will
be central to course delivery. The course will include a study of criminal litigation process and procedure, with a
particular emphasis on appeal strategy. (3 crs.)
LAW 608. LAW AND CIVIL LITIGATION. A comprehensive review of civil action and remedies that are part and
parcel of the American legal system is the central focus of this course. Civil actions, in the law of torts and contracts
and in the arena of administrative process, impact the justice system in varied ways. From litigation to court docketing
to enforcement and fines, as well as other legal responses, civil litigation consumes the resources of the justice model.
In the law of torts and damages, the civil system provides intentional causes of action, from assault to defamation,
from invasion of privacy to false imprisonment, to injured parties. Negligence delivers remedies to those injured
by a lack of due caution and expected behavior from the reasonable person. Covered, too, will be the principles of
strict product and vicarious liability in particular relationships, such as employer/employee, parent/child or product
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manufacturer/consumer. Methods and issues of damage awards will be fully critiqued, as well as the current debate
over reform in the law of torts, workers compensation and other no-fault claim processes. (3 crs.)
LAW 609. LAW, CULTURE AND SOCIETY. An interdisciplinary survey of the functions of law in society is the
prime end of this course. The course not only analyzes law and legal theory and legal and social institutions, but also
evaluates the interplay and interdependence between law and the social order it resides within. The study delivers
special emphasis on issues of justice, fairness and equality. The relationship between law and the legal system and
political/economic institutions and ideologies is continually emphasized. Law and the legal systems are viewed from
a critical perspective, including the relationship between the law and the individual as to matters of inequality, race,
class and gender. Issues relating to art, free expression, religion and its practice, media, censorships, concepts of
pornography and obscenity, sexual activity, association, and political action will also be analyzed. (3 crs.)
LAW 610. LAW, JUSTICE AND THE FAMILY. A survey of the law of domestic relations from a statutory and common
law perspective is the course’s chief aim. Special emphasis will be given to the diverse controversies inherent in
the law of the family, including annulment, divorce, separation, and other temporary and permanent dissolution
agreements. In addition, course coverage weighs and evaluates the controversies and practical difficulties inherent
in the division of property, custodial and equitable dissolution awards, and the judicial oversight of parent-child
relationship. Other topical concerns are visitation, adoption, proof of paternity, questions of incorrigibility and
delinquency, adoption, and the diverse forms of litigation tactics so often witnessed in the law of domestic relations.
Contemporary dilemmas related to the family will be thoroughly scrutinized and include gay and lesbian adoption,
same-sex marriage, the rights of grandparents, state’s right to intrude in family life in matters of medical care and
worship, and other controversial claims. (3 crs.)
LAW 700. LAW AND THE INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY. This course examines the major legal systems of the
modern world, commencing with the West and moving to the East and some emerging Third World republics. In
the era of globalization, knowledge of the legal traditions and legal systems of the world’s major powers is essential.
The course scrutinizes and critiques legal systems as systems with distinctive components, internal relations and
functionalities, and includes a review of their respective history, culture and structure. The purpose of the course is
to compare the rules of law in the different legal systems in an effort to discern the general principles of law and gain
insight and understanding into the emerging globalization of legal principles and ideas. Serious assessment will also
be provided relative to human rights questions, definitions of “political prisoner” and the principles defined by treaty
and agreement as to the protection of individuals in a global context. (3 crs.)
LAW 701. LAW AND ADMINISTRATIVE AGENCIES. This course exposes participants to administrative law theory
and the practical aspects of administrative law practice, both within and outside the administrative agency. Coverage
equips the student with the necessary skills to understand, apply and research relevant statutory and regulatory
provisions at the federal and state level; read, interpret and draft proposed rules and regulations; and become familiar
with the process known as the administrative law hearing, the concept of administrative discretion and corresponding
remedies. Preliminary drafts of documents, briefs and opinions relative to the appellate stage of an administrative law
proceeding will also be covered. (3 crs.)
LAW 702. LAW, SCIENCE AND FORENSIC APPLICATIONS. An interdisciplinary course covering law, criminal
justice and technology in the evidentiary arena. Coverage in the course provides a broad-based assessment of expert
witnesses, microanalysis, pathological evidence, admissibility and investigatory practice, ballistics, fingerprints,
VASCAR/radar, and photographic techniques. Contrasted with criminalistics, subject matter of this course is primarily
evidentiary. More particularly, the course will delve into the rules of evidence that guide the admissibility of forensic
evidence in a court of law. Examination includes threshold tests for reliability and admissibility; qualification of
witnesses competent to testify; scientific rigor required for admission; and case law determinations on the use and
abuse of scientific evidence. (3 crs.)
LAW 703. LAW AND THE ENVIRONMENT. This course surveys the major federal statutes and regulatory schemes
relating to environmental quality and analyzes and compares the contrasting approaches to regulation that have been
used in judicial settings. Coverage focuses on the interaction of law and policy and considers the role of Congress,
regulatory agencies and the courts in defining and implementing environmental mandates. Focused attention is given
to air quality and its regulation, water and pollutants, the control and dissemination of toxic substances, management
of hazardous materials, and the debate around the government’s role as protector of the environment. (3 crs.)
LAW 704. LAW, BUSINESS AND THE WORKPLACE. Course content includes the various business entities and
the steps necessary for creation and operation, including initial and amended articles of incorporation, state filing
requirements, stock certificates and securities, stock ledgers and books, resolutions, dividends and stock splits,
and employment agreements, as well as introducing other business forms from partnerships to limited liability
corporations. In the employment sector, coverage will examine constitutional and statutory protection related to
employee rights from benefits and pensions to discrimination remedies. Collective bargaining and other labor
questions will be keenly assessed, as will emerging workplace questions involving maternity and family leave, wages
and compensation, COBRA, free expression, religious rights, and novel forms of disability claims. (3 crs.)
LAW 730. INDEPENDENT STUDY IN LAW AND PUBLIC POLICY. An independent opportunity for mature and
scholarly graduate students to build on and further develop research, writing and analytical thinking skills by
authoring a serious work of scholarship. The student is required to use advanced research and writing skills in the
resolution of a current substantive or procedural legal problem. The student works directly under the guidance of a
graduate faculty member and prepares, executes and submits for departmental review the proposed course of study.
(3 crs.)
MGT — Management
MGT 711. MARKETING MANAGEMENT. An analysis of modern complex organizations, with emphasis on those
areas of individual and group behavior that are directly relevant to all levels of management.
(3 crs.)
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MGT 712. ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR. Focuses on behavioral science concepts and research findings directed
toward the understanding and explanation of human behavior within organizations. Topics covered include
individual processes, group processes, organizational processes, work setting and change processes. (3 crs.)
MGT 721. PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT. Problems, techniques and other topics associated with the management
of production in industry. Topics include forecasting, inventory control, scheduling, sequencing and design of
production facilities. (3 crs.)
MGT 731. INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS. A survey of the legislation regulating employer-employee relations in the
United States today and an examination of the relationships between workers and their managers. Special emphasis
is given to collective bargaining, wage and hour requirements, equal opportunity regulations, and conflict resolution.
(3 crs.)
MGT 742. HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT. Theory and practice of personnel management and analysis of
personnel problems for managers. Topics include human resource planning, selection, training and development,
performance appraisal, compensation administration, and equal employment opportunity. (3 crs.)
MGT 751. INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT. The problems and policies of international business
enterprise at the management level. Cases in comparative management are utilized. Includes strategies of the firm
in international business, structure of the firm in international business, the international environment, restraints on
international competition, multinational enterprises and national institutions. (3 crs.)
MKT — Marketing
MKT 501. INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MARKETING. Upon completion of the course, the student will be able
to evaluate and make recommendations and decisions concerning the strategy and tactics of real-life targeting and
marketing mix development for both global and country-specific markets. The course will also cover selected elements
of international marketing research. (3 crs.)
MKT 711. MARKETING MANAGEMENT. Description and analysis of the nature, strategies and techniques in
marketing management. (3 crs.)
MKT 721. RESEARCH METHODS IN MARKETING. Examines the process of acquiring, classifying and interpreting
primary and secondary marketing data required for intelligent marketing decisions. (3 crs.)
MKT 731. MARKETING FOR NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS. A marketing course designed for MBA students that
differentiates between for-profit and not-for-profit organizations, investigates the competitive environment facing
nonprofits (e.g., hospitals, churches, charities, colleges and performing arts groups), and applies research techniques
and marketing/management tools (product, policy, distribution and delivery systems, monetary pricing, and
communication strategies) to the nonbusiness entity. (3 crs.)
MKT 751. ADVERTISING MANAGEMENT. A detailed analysis of the components of the advertising mix, reviewing
the components in order to determine selection techniques for appropriate media vehicles for various business
advertising demands. The graduate student will analyze and develop a media presentation as a member of an
advertising team, which will be presented at the end of the term. This process includes basic research, campaign
development and media selection. (3 crs.)
MKT 761. BUSINESS MARKETING STRATEGY. This course focuses on the expanded contemporary marketing
strategies that are essential for businesses to survive in today’s competitive global marketplace. Emphasis will
be placed on case studies, group presentations and class interaction to equip the graduate student with a level of
understanding to effectively function with a greater comprehension of business marketing while serving in business
management. Prerequisite: MKT 301. (3 crs.)
MSE — Master of Arts Teaching (initial certification track)
MSE 641. ORIENTATION TO 7-12 EDUCATION. A course for prospective teachers designed to begin their
professional development. Different instructional activities will allow the student to become proficient in the theories
of modern secondary education instructional development, basic history and philosophy of secondary education, and
of pedagogy in general. (3 crs.)
MSE 642. STANDARDS-BASED INSTRUCTION IN 7-12 EDUCATION. The Pennsylvania Standards Aligned System
(SAS) is a collaborative product of research and good practice that identifies six distinct elements which, if utilized
together, will provide schools and districts a common framework for continuous school and district enhancement
and improvement. There are many intangible components; however, research supports the notion that great schools
and school systems tend to have six common elements that ensure Student Achievement: Clear Standards, Fair
Assessments, Curriculum Framework, Instruction, Materials and Resources, and Interventions. (3 crs.)
MSE 643. CONTENT AREA LITERACY IN 7-12 EDUCATION. The purpose of this course is to help prospective
teachers of the secondary education academic subject areas develop an understanding of reading skills needed by
their students. Methods of establishing awareness of general reading needs, as well as supporting the special skills
unique to their subject area, will be stressed. (3 crs.)
MSE 644. INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES IN 7-12 EDUCATION. This course will allow the Master of Arts teaching,
track I major to explore and develop the many types of instructional strategies/methodologies that are accepted as
valid in the teaching of 7-12 students in differing content areas. Students will explore the principles underlying the
construction of valid and reliable tests, along with simple statistical measurement with stress on the application to
classroom work. (3 crs.)
MSE 645. TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION IN 7-12 EDUCATION. This course in educational technology provides the
learner with fundamental concepts and skills that build a foundation for applying computers, hardware and software
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in educational settings. The course focuses on the computer as an object of instruction, a productivity tool and an
adjunct to instruction in the classroom. (3 crs.)
MSE 646. ASSESSMENTS AND INTERVENTIONS IN 7-12 EDUCATION. Part of this course is designed to provide
insight into the design, implementation, and analysis of assessment instruments used in 7-12 education. The second
part of this course is to allow the secondary education candidate to become aware of, and to gain experience in, the
contemporary interventions that teachers use to prevent, minimize, or eliminate negative behaviors in the classroom.
(3 crs.)
MSE 647. CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT IN 7-12 EDUCATION. This course will allow the Master of Arts teaching,
track I major to explore different methods of classroom management, from the physical set-up of the classroom,
classroom rules and procedures for secondary education to dealing with problem students in the classroom. (3 crs.)
MSE 651. METHODS OF ENGLISH TEACHING. This course is designed to provide insight into the teaching of
general English, writing, literature, public speaking, communication, media and theater in grades 7 through 12.
Students become aware of and use the resources and methods of instruction for teaching English and Communications
at the secondary level. Open to secondary English and Communications education majors only. (3 crs.)
MSE 652. METHODS OF MATHEMATICS TEACHING. This course is designed to provide insight into the teaching of
general mathematics, algebra, geometry, probability, and statistics in grades 7 through 12. Students become aware of
and use the resources and methods of instruction for teaching mathematics at the secondary level. Open to secondary
mathematics education majors only. (3 crs.)
MSE 653. METHODS OF SCIENCE TEACHING. This course is designed to provide insight into the teaching of
Biology, Chemistry, Earth and Space Science, and Physics in grades 7 through 12. Students become aware of and
use the resources and methods of instruction for teaching science at the secondary level. Open to secondary Biology,
Chemistry, Earth and Space Science, and Physics education majors only. (3 crs.)
MSE 654. METHODS OF SOCIAL STUDIES TEACHING. This course is designed to provide insight into the teaching
of general social studies, history, political science, geography, economics, anthropology, psychology, and world
cultures in grades 7 through 12. Students become aware of and use the resources and methods of instruction for
teaching social studies at the secondary level. (3 crs.)
MSE 655. METHODS OF ART TEACHING. Students examine and discuss major issues in art education at the local,
state, national, and international levels. Students analyze traditional approaches to these issues, including history of
art education, national standards in art education, national teaching standards in art education, discipline-based art
education movement, multiple intelligence in art education, special populations, cultural diversity, intradisciplinary
arts education, collaboration outside the classroom, new mediums, presentation strategies, and art education
advocacy. (3 crs.)
MSE 656. METHODS OF FOREIGN LANGUAGE TEACHING. This course is intended to familiarize prospective
modern foreign language teachers with the oral proficiency methodology, its rationale and instructional materials of
various types. Emphasis is placed on oral proficiency techniques as well as the techniques for teaching reading and
writing, the effective and efficient use of electronic devices and visuals, the objectives of modern foreign language
teaching, the selection of textbooks, the preparation of lesson plans, and the preparation of materials for laboratory
and classroom use. (3 crs.)
MSE 660. PROFESSIONAL PRACTICES IN 7-12 EDUCATION. The development and refinement of contemporary
pedagogical skills constitute the primary learning purpose for student teachers. Specific teacher-learning skills that
are developed are lesson planning, delivery methods, organizational procedures, class control, and educational
measurement and evaluation. An integral component of the student teaching experience is a bi-weekly class. The class
serves as a means of coordinating activities and exchanging ideas and experiences of the student teachers. (3 crs.)
MSE 661. STUDENT TEACHING AND SCHOOL LAW. This is the final and most extensive clinical experience.
Students are assigned to a supervising teacher or teaching team at one of our clinical sites. The students spend full
time in the classroom teaching for a semester of 15 weeks. A university supervisor observes periodically and a weekly
practicum brings student teachers together to discuss common problems and concerns and those aspects of school
law pertinent for classroom teachers. Student teaching is scheduled during either the fall or spring terms of the senior
year. Pass/fail grade. (9 crs.)
MSE 720. ADVANCED STANDARDS – ALIGNED INSTRUCTION. This course focuses on planning instructional
units and lessons that are aligned with state standards. Using the Standards Aligned System (SAS), teachers
will develop a thorough understanding of curriculum planning and the importance of diagnostic and formative
assessment. All aspects of the SAS: Clear Standards, Fair Assessments, Curriculum Framework, Instruction, Materials
and Resources, and Interventions will be utilized to provide a common framework for the design of instruction and
assessment. (3 crs.)
MSE 725. ACTION RESEARCH IN SECONDARY EDUCATION. This course is designed to give teachers an
opportunity to study real classroom situations and to design a plan of action to improve that situation. Teachers will
learn how to conduct a review of the literature and develop an understanding of various research methodologies.
Reflection and analysis is a key component of action research. (3 crs.)
MSE 740. ADVANCED INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY. This course is designed to introduce teachers to various
instructional technologies that will be utilized throughout the graduate program and to provide opportunities to use
technology to improve classroom instruction. Tools such as PowerPoint, digital images, videotaping, software, multimedia, web-based projects, etc., will be implemented. (3 crs.)
MSE 745. ADVANCED CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT. This course is designed to provide teachers with
opportunities to review the research on classroom management and to develop a management plan for their own
classroom and school. (3 crs.)
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MSE 750. ONLINE TECHNOLOGIES IN EDUCATION. This course provides the learner with concepts and skills
that build a foundation for applying computers, software and web-based activities in educational settings. The course
focuses on computers and the World Wide Web as an object of instruction, a productivity tool, and an adjunct to
instruction in the classroom..(3 crs.)
MSE 755. CONSTRUCTIVISTS INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES. This course is designed to introduce teachers to
advanced methods in teaching. Various student-centered instructional strategies such as problem based learning, peer
to peer, inquiry approach and interdisciplinary instruction, will be the focus of this course. (3 crs.)
MSE 760. REFLECTIVE PRACTITIONER. This course is designed to provide teachers with opportunities to reflect on
their students’ learning and their teaching strategies. There will be intensive writing of self-reflection and analysis of
their practices in the classroom. (3 crs.)
MSE 765. CURRICULUM DESIGN. This course in curriculum design provides the learner with the fundamental
concepts and skills that will help teachers develop a thorough understanding of curriculum development. This course
is designed for teachers to help bridge theory and practice in curriculum development. The focus will be on presenting
the concepts and skills of curriculum development and showing how to apply them to actual curriculum planning.
(3 crs.)
MSE 766. INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN AND ASSESSMENT. This course in instructional design and assessment
provides the learner with the fundamental concepts and skills that will help teachers develop a thorough
understanding of curriculum development. This course is designed for teachers to help bridge theory and practice
in instructional development. The focus will be to present the concepts and skills of curriculum development and
assessment and show how to apply them to actual curriculum planning. (3 crs.)
MSE 770. DIFFERENTIATING INSTRUCTION. This course in differentiating instruction provides the learner with
the fundamental concepts and skills that will help teachers develop a thorough understanding of differentiation,
understanding the diverse needs of students and various instructional techniques to maximize student learning. The
course focuses on understanding the meaning of differentiated instruction and planning instruction to meet various
learning needs of students. (3 crs.)
MSE 771. STRATEGIES FOR INCLUSIVE CLASSROOMS. This course focuses on instructional strategies for the
inclusive classroom. Teachers will develop a thorough understanding of differentiation and instructional techniques
used to maximize learning for all students. It will address research-proven strategies to help special learners and
to manage the inclusive classroom. Teachers will use assessment to identify students’ needs, plan differentiated
instruction, and assess student achievement. (3 crs.)
MSE 775. TEACHER LEADERSHIP. This course is designed to develop leadership and collaboration skills of our
teachers that will help them to lead educational reform. The course will prepare teachers to understand their role as
teacher leaders, develop knowledge of systems change, and learn how to conduct and evaluate staff development. The
course will strive to develop teacher leaders that may serve as coaches in their schools for their departments. (3 crs.)
MSE 780. ASSESSMENT OF LEARNING. This course in assessment of student learning provides the learner with
the fundamental concepts and skills that will help teachers develop a thorough understanding of various forms of
assessment, designing effective assessments to measure student learning, analyzing student work to improve learning
and instruction, and applying the results of assessment. (3 crs.)
MSE 790. RESEARCH THESIS IN SECONDARY EDUCATION. The thesis will usually be empirical in nature and
involve the manipulation of independent variables, use of statistical methods or experimental design. The Publication
Manual of the American Psychological Association will be required for this thesis. The thesis requires at least three
members. Prerequisite: MSE 725. (3 crs.)
SEC — Master of Arts Teaching (advanced studies in secondary education)
SEC 705. ORIENTATION TO SECONDARY EDUCATION. A course for prospective teachers designed to begin their
professional development. Different instructional activities will allow the student to become proficient in the theories
of modern secondary education instructional development, basic history and philosophy of secondary education, and
pedagogy in general. (3 crs.)
SEC 710. SECONDARY INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES. This course will allow the Master of Arts teaching, track
I major to explore and develop the many types of instructional strategies/methodologies that are accepted as valid
in the teaching of 7-12 students in differing content areas. Students will explore the principles underlying the
construction of valid and reliable tests, along with simple statistical measurement with stress on the application to
classroom work. (3 crs.)
SEC 720. CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT. This course will allow the Master of Arts teaching, track I major to
explore different methods of classroom management, from the physical set-up of the classroom, classroom rules and
procedures for secondary education to dealing with problem students in the classroom. (3 crs.)
SEC 650. DIVERSITY IN THE CLASSROOM. This course will explore the many facets confronting public schools.
Schools are part of a multicultural society and this course is designed to develop awareness, knowledge, skills and
competencies needed to create a positive learning environment. The emphasis is on developing a multicultural
awareness and developing differentiating instruction to meet the diverse needs of students. (3 crs.)
EDF 633. TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION. This course in educational technology provides the learner with
fundamental concepts and skills that build a foundation for applying computers, hardware and software in
educational settings. The course focuses on the computer as an object of instruction, a productivity tool and an adjunct
to instruction in the classroom. (3 crs.)
SEC 740. RESEARCH IN SECONDARY EDUCATION. This course provides a broad understanding of the
foundations, purposes and principles of action research in secondary education. Activities will include developing a
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research topic, along with literature research strategies, methodology, data collection and analysis, and reporting the
findings. Students will develop action research proposals that they will be able to implement in their classrooms or
schools. (3 crs.)
SEC 750. CONTENT AREA LITERACY IN SECONDARY EDUCATION. The purpose of this course is to help
prospective teachers of the secondary education academic subject areas develop an understanding of reading skills
needed by their students. Methods of establishing awareness of general reading needs, as well as supporting the
special skills unique to students’ subject area, will be stressed. (3 crs.)
SEC 761. STUDENT TEACHING AND SCHOOL LAW. This is the final and most extensive clinical experience.
Students are assigned to a supervising teacher or teaching team at one of the University’s clinical sites. The students
spend full time in the classroom teaching for a semester of 15 weeks. A University supervisor observes periodically,
and a weekly practicum brings student teachers together to discuss common problems and concerns and those aspects
of school law pertinent for classroom teachers. Student teaching is scheduled during either the fall or spring terms of
the senior year. Pass/fail grade.
(9 crs.)
GMA — Mathematics
GMA 786. COMPUTER SCIENCE FOR TEACHERS. This course is for the secondary school mathematics teacher
who is interested in an introduction to the elementary concepts of computer programming, the early history and
development of computers, and the uses of the computer in the school and society. Emphasis is placed on writing
computer programs related to topics in secondary school mathematics.
(2 crs.)
NUR — Nursing Administration and Leadership
NUR 601. THEORY AND RESEARCH IN NURSING. This course explores theoretical foundations in nursing along
with the process for critique and utilization of appropriate theories in health care. The relationships between nursing
theory, nursing research and nursing practice are examined. The use of theory and research in the construction
of a scientific knowledge base for nursing practice will also be examined. Emphasis will be on the importance of
research as a process for developing and examining practice-based questions and evidence-based practice. The
research process, with emphasis on the logic and processes of inquiry, design, data collection and analysis, and
the interpretation, dissemination, and application of findings appropriate to nursing practice, will be reviewed. A
critical analysis of nursing research and the methodological approaches utilized in the practice of nursing care will
be conducted. Students will develop a proposal for an individual or group research project relevant to their area of
interest. Prerequisites: This course builds on the content covered in the student’s undergraduate courses in statistics
and upper division nursing research; graduate status. (3 crs.)
NUR 602. HEALTH POLICY IN NURSING. This course is intended to familiarize graduate nursing students with
current health care policy and the roles and responsibilities, processes, and strategies that create and support policybased initiatives in health care today, and the impact of policy on health care. Topics include Medicare and Medicaid
and care of the uninsured and the underinsured. Students will apply the fundamentals gained in this course in
advocacy and leadership roles in search of creative solutions to pervasive issues in health care to an intercultural
population. Prerequisite: graduate status. (3 crs.)
NUR 603. INFORMATION SYSTEMS FOR NURSES IN HEALTH CARE ORGANIZATIONS. This course is designed
to introduce students to information systems in health care organizations. Students will examine, evaluate and utilize
a variety of information systems available to the nurse administrator and leader in health care organizations. Use
of information systems, standardized databases and statistics needed for population analysis are presented. During
the course, students will compare and interact with information management applications related to administration,
education, practice and research. Multimedia technology and software will be used for projects related to the student’s
area of interest. Prerequisite: graduate status. (3 crs.)
NUR 604. HEALTH PROMOTION/DISEASE PREVENTION. This course addresses the health of populations from a
systems perspective in today’s health care environment. Applying epidemiological concepts, students investigate the
leading causes of illness and injury. Using a multilevel-intervention model, students plan and evaluate programs that
address the leading health problems. Prerequisite: graduate status. (3 crs.)
NUR 711. NURSING ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT. This course is designed to assist graduate nursing
students understand the theories of organizational design and management and decision-making of managers
and leaders in health care organizations. Emerging trends in health care, including ethical and legal aspects of
management, evidence-based care, quality management, patient safety, and health care services, will serve as a
backdrop for this course. Strategic planning process, including the elements required to successfully develop and
implement short- and long-term plans and marketing health care services, will be incorporated. Prerequisites: This
course builds on the content covered in the student’s undergraduate course in leadership; graduate status. (3 crs.)
NUR 712. NURSING ADMINISTRATION AND LEADERSHIP ROLE. This course is designed to assist the student in
developing problem-solving skills, personal and interpersonal effectiveness, and appreciation for others’ leadership
styles to forge collaborations that are essential to accomplishing the mission and goals of health care organizations.
Theories of leadership, motivation, power, communication, conflict, and change management will also be examined
and applied. The course also focuses on the development of skills necessary for transformational leadership in which
to practice in a management role and produce effective results and in creating a culture of total quality management
and patient safety within health care organizations. Analysis and operations are provided via case study learning
methods. The student will be challenged to develop a profile of oneself as a leader and create an action plan for
leadership development. A personal inventory will set the foundation for planned personal and role change.
Prerequisites: This course builds on the content covered in the student’s undergraduate course in leadership and
graduate course NUR 711; graduate status. (3 crs.)
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NUR 714. LEGAL ASPECTS OF HEALTH CARE ADMINISTRATION. An introduction to the laws, regulations and
court decisions covering the employment relationship, including labor-management relations, OSHA, EEOC, ERISA,
ADA, etc. Health care law and an overview of practical ways to improve the quality and safe delivery of nursing care
in health care organizations will also be reviewed. This course explores the most pressing legal and ethical issues and
concerns related to the delivery of patient care and the administration of nursing services. This course is structured to
present theories of ethical practice, as well as issues of the law related to health care delivery. Students will study both
specialties of practice in a blended manner, as the text provides for both to be examined among board-based issues.
Prerequisite: graduate status. (3 crs.)
NUR 715. FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT IN NONPROFIT HEALTH CARE ORGANIZATIONS. This course is
intended to prepare the student to effectively interact with financial management staff and participate in various
aspects of financial control and planning. Included will be a historical perspective of financial management in health
care, identifying trends in the industry and the forces that influence the financing of health care organizations.
Financial statements, the interpretation and analysis of financial reports, and topics such as cost-benefit analysis,
budgeting and capital management will also be addressed. Consideration will be given to the cost-effectiveness and
financial future of health care organizations. Prerequisite: graduate status. (3 crs.)
NUR 813. NURSING ADMINISTRATION ROLE PRACTICUM. This course provides students with the opportunity
to synthesize and apply their understanding of nursing administration and leadership within and across complex
integrated organizational and institutional boundaries. In this culminating experience, students plan, execute and
evaluate nursing practice within the context of the practice setting(s) or among a specific population of interest within
the organization or in communities. Within the practice situation, students enact leadership roles to expand, enhance
and optimize positive outcomes. The practicum experience consists of an administrative practicum and an online
seminar. This culminating experience of the graduate program is designed to provide students with an opportunity
to apply the knowledge and competencies acquired throughout the program of study to actual and simulated clinical
situations. Prerequisites: NUR 603, 604, 711, 712, 714 and 715; graduate status. (6 crs.)
PRF — Performance Enhancement and Injury Prevention
PRF 705. INDUSTRIAL, CLINICAL AND CORPORATE WELLNESS. This course is designed to develop knowledge
and awareness of the major issues in the field of work site health promotion and clinical care. The focus of the course
is on planning, administering and evaluating wellness and fitness programs based in clinical, industrial and corporate
environments. The cost of unhealthy lifestyle choices for the individual and employer and their relationship to the
workplace will be explored. Topics include “The Wellness Revolution,” “The Industrial Athlete Model,” benchmark
programs and outcomes assessment strategies. (3 crs.)
PRF 710. PERFORMANCE ENHANCEMENT IN PHYSICAL ACTIVITY. This course offers a comprehensive
discussion of functional anatomy, functional biomechanics and motor learning as they relate to functional
rehabilitation and athletic reconditioning. The student will be introduced to integrated, functional rehabilitation
techniques, including core stabilization, neuromuscular stabilization, reactive neuromuscular stabilization, integrated
flexibility, integrated strength, speed training, foot training and vision training. The student will also be taught a
comprehensive kinetic chain assessment to determine myokinematic, arthrokinematic and neuromuscular deficits.
After completing this course and Performance Enhancement Program Design, students will be eligible to sit for the
National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM) examination for Performance Enhancement Specialist certification. (3
crs.)
PRF 711. AN INTEGRATED APPROACH TO FITNESS AND WELLNESS. This course will introduce the
revolutionary exercise programming strategies of the Optimum Performance Training model. The student will
receive detailed insight into designing exercise programs for any personal training client. Students will be shown
how this systematic approach to program design uniquely blends the science of acute variables with the concepts of
flexibility, core stabilization, balance, reactive training, speed, agility and quickness, and strength training to develop
safe and effective exercise programs for all individuals. After completing this course and Program Design in Fitness
and Wellness, students will be eligible to sit for the National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM) examination for
Certified Personal Trainer certification. (3 crs.)
PRF 712. CORRECTIVE EXERCISE IN REHABILITATION. This course will introduce the student to corrective
exercise theory based on the pathokinesiological model. The student will be introduced to a systematic evaluation
approach based on the pathokinesiological model. The pathokinesiological model will examine human movement
systems in regard to key regions of the human body. These regions will be recognized as potential sites for integrated
corrective exercise programs. (3 crs.)
PRF 713. SPECIAL TOPICS IN SPORT PSYCHOLOGY. This course is designed to cover a diverse range of professional
issues related to sport psychology. Various organizations (Division 47 of the American Psychological Association
and the Association for the Advancement of Applied Sport Psychology) affiliated with sport psychology and ethical
concerns will be addressed. (3 crs.)
PRF 715. BUSINESS AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP IN THE FITNESS INDUSTRY. This course offers a comprehensive
discussion of the practical aspects of starting and running a business in performance enhancement and fitness. The
course focuses on launching new ventures, as well as business and management practices for individuals who are
already in business but want to learn how to improve their operations. Specific topics include management theory,
financial management, personnel management, record keeping, risk management and technology issues. (3 crs.)
PRF 720. ESSENTIALS OF HUMAN MOVEMENT SCIENCE. This course will introduce a scientific approach to
the essentials of human movement science. The student will receive detailed insight into the independent and
interdependent function of the muscular, articular and nervous systems during human force production, stabilization
and force reduction. The course will also introduce the student to various types and styles of learning via web-based
technologies and will orient the student to web-based methods of learning. (3 crs.)
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PRF 750. PERFORMANCE ENHANCEMENT PROGRAM DESIGN. This course requires the student to integrate
knowledge learned from the course Performance Enhancement in Physical Activity with professional experience and
prior learning in fitness and rehabilitation. Students will work in teams to prepare performance enhancement program
proposals, including program elements, rationale, innovative design and supporting research. Each week, cohort
members will professionally analyze and critique new proposals, resulting in high-level discussion and exchange.
After completing this course and Performance Enhancement in Physical Activity, students will be eligible to sit for the
National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM) examination for Performance Enhancement Specialist certification. (3
crs.)
PRF 751. PROGRAM DESIGN IN FITNESS AND WELLNESS. This course will introduce the revolutionary exercise
programming strategies of the Optimum Performance Training model specifically for the fitness and wellness
professional. Students will receive detailed insight into designing exercise programs for any personal training client.
They will be shown how this systematic approach to program design uniquely blends the science of acute variables
with the concepts of flexibility, core stabilization, balance, reactive training, speed, agility and quickness, and strength
training to develop safe and effective exercise programs for all individuals. (3 crs.)
PRF 752. CORRECTIVE EXERCISE PROGRAM DESIGN. This course will introduce corrective exercise strategies
based on loss of function. The student will receive detailed insight into the design of corrective exercise programs. The
systematic approach of an integrated corrective exercise design uniquely blends the variables of available flexibility,
isolated and integrated corrective strengthening, and corrective exercise design to provide the student with the
necessary foundation in designing and developing safe corrective exercise programs. (3 crs.)
PRF 753. PSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF SPORT INJURY AND REHABILITATION. This course is designed to
introduce students to various topics related to the psychological aspects of sport injury. The course focuses on the
onset (precursors), experience and treatment of athletic injuries from a biopsychosocial perspective. Course material
is based on empirical data and psychophysiology foundation and the role of psychological factors and psychological
interventions, which influence rehabilitation and recovery. (3 crs.)
PRF 760. LEADERSHIP AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT. This course is intended to prepare students for the
leadership decisions and actions that are inherent in performance enhancement management and fitness practice.
Professional and personal growth will be discussed. Principles and applications of leadership will be explored,
including persuasiveness, leading and directing teams, leading within organizations, and leadership opportunities in
shaping fitness policy. Techniques for managing change and empowering others are included in this course. Topics
related to effective leadership are issues of power, motivation, delegation, team building, persuasion and negotiation,
and total quality improvement. (3 crs.)
PRF 765. NUTRITION FOR PEAK PERFORMANCE. An in-depth examination of contemporary issues such as
performance enhancement dietary supplements, dietary lipids and heart disease, dietary fiber and health, and
influence of lifestyle factors on nutrition. Controversies in nutrition, ergogenic aids and cultural aspects of food are
also discussed. In addition, the course covers energy and nutrient needs for activity with emphasis on particular
physical and athletic activities, common myths and fallacies concerning diet and athletic performance, and
appropriate dietary approaches for specific activities and active people. (3 crs.)
PRF 770. EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY: ASSESSMENT AND EXERCISE PRESCRIPTION. This course offers a
comprehensive discussion of the knowledge, skills and abilities needed for American College of Sports Medicine
certifications and current clinical practices in sports medicine. Emphasis will be placed on the value and application of
exercise testing and prescription in persons with and without chronic disease. Special topics to be addressed include
exercise prescription in children, the elderly, pulmonary patients, cardiac patients and pregnant women. (3 crs.)
PRF 780. CURRENT TOPICS IN PERFORMANCE ENHANCEMENT AND INJURY PREVENTION. The purpose of
this course is to increase student understanding of various performance enhancement and injury prevention issues
facing America and the world today. This course introduces students to the field of exercise science as a discipline and
profession with a specific focus on contemporary topics facing all performance enhancement and injury prevention
professionals. (3 crs.)
PRF 781. CURRENT TOPICS IN FITNESS AND WELLNESS. The purpose of this course is to increase student
understanding of various fitness and wellness issues facing America and the world today. This course introduces
students to the field of exercise science as a discipline and profession with a specific focus on contemporary topics
facing all fitness and wellness professionals. (3 crs.)
PRF 782. CURRENT TOPICS IN REHABILITATION. The purpose of this course is to increase student understanding
of various rehabilitation issues facing America and the world today. This course focuses students toward the everchanging contemporary issues that impact direct and indirect client care.
(3 crs.)
PRF 783. PSYCHOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVES IN SPORT PERFORMANCE ENHANCEMENT AND INTERVENTION.
This course is designed to introduce students to various performance enhancement techniques commonly used in
sports. Examples of such techniques will be presented. Students will be able to apply the basic features of performance
enhancement and intervention to a specific sport or rehabilitation situation. Students will have the opportunity to
create their own intervention manuals based on research and course content. (3 crs.)
PRF 800. RESEARCH IN FITNESS AND WELLNESS. This course is designed to immerse the student in fitness and
injury prevention research, focusing on current clinical outcomes research, psychology and physical activity research,
and performance enhancement research. Topics include research in resistance training, core stabilization and aquatic
therapy. Fitness and injury prevention research is discussed related to special populations, such as athletes at opposite
ends of the age spectrum. (3 crs.)
PRF 810. RESEARCH IN PERFORMANCE ENHANCEMENT. This course is designed to immerse the student in
injury prevention research, focusing on current clinical outcomes research, psychology and physical activity research,
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and performance enhancement research. Topics include research in resistance training, core stabilization, reactive
training, posture, supplementation and sport vision training. Injury prevention research is discussed related to special
populations, such as athletes at opposite ends of the performance spectrum. (3 crs.)
PRF 820. RESEARCH IN REHABILITATION. This is an introductory class on evidence-based practice. The intended
outcome is to familiarize students with the evidence-based guidelines and prepare them with a practical strategy to
incorporate into their daily practice. (3 crs.)
PRF 830. RESEARCH IN SPORT PSYCHOLOGY. This course is designed to provide the student with knowledge
of research in the sport psychology arena. Students will be introduced to psychometric properties of research and
interpretation of results published, enabling them to critically analyze published material specific to the area of sport
psychology. (3 crs.)
EDP — Professional Education
EDP 600. STATISTICAL METHODS. This course introduces the student to statistical concepts and techniques that
are essential for valid and reliable educational research. Emphasis is placed upon understanding the logic of various
statistical inference procedures, their correct use and proper interpretation. Numerous descriptive and inferential
statistical methods are covered, including box plots, stem and leaf displays, scatter diagrams, single sample t test,
independent samples t test, related samples t test, Wilcoxon signed rank test, Mann Whitney U test, confidence
intervals, correlations, multiple regression, one-way and two-way analysis of variance, analysis of variance for
repeated measures designs, analysis of covariance, and multivariate analysis of variance. At the conclusion of the
course, the student is expected to be able to describe and critique the statistical methods used in published research
studies and correctly apply the appropriate statistical methods in his/her own research. The SPSS software statistical
package is extensively referenced throughout the course. (3 crs.)
EDP 605. PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION. An introduction to the discipline of philosophy and the significant
contribution that this discipline makes to education. Major schools of traditional and contemporary philosophy are
examined, with particular emphasis on the influence these philosophies have had on educational theory and practice
over the years. (2 crs.)
EDP 606. GENERAL HISTORY OF EDUCATION. The course is designed to develop a historical awareness,
appreciation and understanding of the people and the major cultural and educational events that have shaped
education in Western culture. The significance and relevance of these people and events for contemporary American
culture are stressed. (2 crs.)
EDP 608. COMPARATIVE EDUCATION. This course centers on the province of Quebec. Students are introduced to
basic rules of educational comparison followed by readings aimed at investigating the traditions, social organization,
and political and economic conditions that have determined the development of Quebec. Source reading is brought
into special perspective by a one-week program of school visitations in Quebec, where students can observe classes
and interview education personnel.
(3 crs.)
EDP 610. EDUCATIONAL SOCIOLOGY. The role of the school in child socialization, intergroup education, the
integration of school and community, group processes and the teacher, teacher problems in human relations, and
educating for leadership. (2 crs.)
EDP 611. HISTORY OF AMERICAN EDUCATION. The course is designed to develop a historical awareness,
understanding and appreciation of major cultural and educational events and of individuals that have shaped
American education from 1620 to the present. The significance and relevance of these events and individuals for
contemporary American education are stressed. (2 crs.)
EDP 615. TEACHER AWARENESS. A practical approach to the solution of daily problems arising from action and
interaction with students, other faculty members, administrators, school board members, parents and the community.
The course is experience-oriented and focuses on student rights, duties and responsibilities and the legal rights of
teachers, evaluations, classroom procedures and lesson planning. (3 crs.)
EDP 619. STUDENT TEACHING SUPERVISION. For teachers who are acting as cooperating teachers and for those
interested in serving in this capacity in the future. A prerequisite for admission to this workshop is three years’
teaching experience. The course provides an opportunity to strengthen, clarify, re-think and revitalize one’s approach
to student-teaching supervision. (Variable crs.)
EDP 620. CURRICULUM AND METHODS OF TEACHING BIOLOGY IN THE HIGH SCHOOL. The Biological
Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS) courses of study and how and why they were developed, along with a critical
analysis of each of the three versions in light of various school backgrounds. Laboratory projects will be pursued that
can serve as source material in a teacher’s classroom. Two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory. Prerequisite:
certification to teach biology. (2 crs.)
EDP 624. CHARACTER EDUCATION. This course will examine how schools contribute to the moral development of
children. Specifically, students will be introduced to the approaches to character education that have been used in the
nation’s schools. Particular attention will be paid to developing a comprehensive approach to moral development that
integrates earlier strategies. This integrative approach holds that character education must be a way of life for a school,
not just a program — that is, all aspects of a school’s life contribute to moral development. (3 crs.)
EDP 656. COMPUTER-ORIENTED RESEARCH. This course teaches necessary computer skills to master: (1) the
techniques of research, methods of scholarly investigation and search tips/strategies using library facilities, online
library databases, commercial databases and the Internet; (2) writing the research report as a publishable paper;
(3) publishing the research report as a series of web pages on the Internet; and (4) developing and giving an oral
presentation of the research results to the University community. This primarily hands-on course will review
computer system concepts; introduce the student to all facets of computer-oriented research search strategies (online
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California University of Pennsylvania library searching, searching using online databases, searching using commercial
databases, searching the Internet, evaluating web resources and evaluating search engines); develop the student’s
proficiency in writing the publishable research paper; develop the student’s proficiency in web page design and
publishing; and develop the student’s proficiency in developing and giving an oral presentation. (3 crs.)
EDP 663. COMPUTER-ASSISTED INSTRUCTION. The development of computer applications in education provides a
significant new resource in teacher education. This course is designed to include both theory and practice. This course
serves to acquaint learners with computers and their uses as instructional tools. Laboratory assignments are designed
to provide generalizable and transferable competencies. No previous computer-related knowledge is assumed. (3 crs.)
EDP 685. SEMINAR IN AUDIO-VISUAL TECHNIQUES. This course is designed to bring together the recent research
on teacher behavior with the theories and research of social psychology and group dynamics. It aims to give the
student some understanding of group processes and some personal experience helpful in developing a repertoire of
ideas and behaviors that will be pertinent in supervision and in the classroom. (2 crs.)
EDP 760. SEMINAR IN THE TEACHING OF MATHEMATICS. A mathematics methods course in the M.Ed. program
designed for secondary school teachers who want to develop or broaden their teaching skills and knowledge of
a particular content area in the secondary mathematics curriculum. The content area will be one of the following:
algebra, geometry, (AP) calculus, trigonometry, probability and statistics, applied mathematics, or integrated
mathematics. Relative to the particular chosen content area of mathematics, students will study current innovative
teaching approaches; review current textbooks, software and curricula; develop lessons and activities; integrate the
National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) standards in instruction; discuss different methods of problem
solutions; and analyze and develop assessment measures. (3 crs.)
PSY — Psychology
PSY 702. PSYCHOPATHOLOGY OF CHILDHOOD. Intensive study of cognitive, emotional and behavioral disorders
in children and adolescents. Emphasis is on etiology, early recognition and approaches to treatment or intervention in
schools. (3 crs.)
PSY 710. PRINCIPLES OF INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN. This course is designed for nonteaching educational specialists
to assist them in gaining a fundamental understanding of Pennsylvania’s K-12 curriculum standards and the basic
principles of instructional design. Students will examine a variety of theoretical frameworks that focus on the specific
components of instructional design. Special attention is given to exploring response to intervention and curriculumbased assessment, as well as the development, instruction and assessment of reading within the regular education
context. A practicum component is included. (3 crs.)
PSY 712. ADVANCED PSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING. This course examines the diverse, intricate process of
learning. Behavioral and cognitive views of learning are emphasized, with special attention given to the educational
implications of learning theory. (3 crs.)
PSY 713. PSYCHOLOGY OF GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT. This course explores how people grow and develop
from infancy through old age. Physical growth patterns, along with emotional, intellectual and social development,
are emphasized. Maturation and learning and their interrelationships are also examined in terms of their implications
for the home, school and community. (3 crs.)
PSY 720. NEUROPSYCHOLOGY OF LEARNING DISORDERS. This course examines the biological basis of
behavior. The central nervous system, in particular the brain, is studied in-depth. This course also presents the
neuropsychological approach to the identification and education of children with learning disorders.
(3 crs.)
PSY 721. ADVANCED TESTS AND MEASUREMENTS. This course is designed to provide the graduate student with
an understanding of the use of tests for diagnostic studies of children, adolescents and adults in a diverse society. It
explores the ways in which tests are constructed, evaluated, administered and interpreted. In addition, the course
provides a survey of some representative tests of achievement, aptitude, personality, intelligence and occupational
interests. Students also receive practice in administering, scoring and interpreting such tests through a practicum
involving an evaluation of themselves and at least one other person. (3 crs.)
PSY 722. INDIVIDUAL PSYCHOLOGICAL EVALUATION I WITH PRACTICUM. Emphasizes theory and
competence in the administration, scoring and interpretation of the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale V and the Bender
Visual Motor Gestalt Test. Extensive supervised practice in the administration, scoring and interpretation of these
tests with subjects age 2 to adult. Theory and experience with other infant and child measures of intelligence such as
the Bayley III and the K-ABC II are included. Ethics and cultural diversity in assessment are included. Psychological
report writing, working with diverse populations, and generation of research-based and data-driven educational
interventions are stressed. (3 crs.)
PSY 723. INDIVIDUAL PSYCHOLOGICAL EVALUATION II WITH PRACTICUM. This course emphasizes the
theoretical underpinnings of intellectual assessment and the development of competence in the administration,
scoring and interpretation of the Wechsler Scales: WISC, WPPSI and WAIS. Attention is directed toward the use of
these scales in measuring intellectual levels and identifying cognitive strengths and weaknesses. Practical experiences
are required and the student must demonstrate competency in the administration, scoring and interpretation of each
scale. Psychological report writing is also addressed. (3 crs.)
PSY 724. PRACTICUM IN SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY. This course is a practicum in psychoeducational assessment
and intervention planning in which students develop competence in the administration, scoring and interpretation
of individually administered achievement tests, as well as response to intervention, progress monitoring and the
generation of research-based, data-driven interventions. Under faculty supervision, students conduct comprehensive
evaluations of children, including gathering background information, writing reports and consulting with clients in
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the process of problem-solving in the educational setting. Ethical considerations, as well as the particular problems
encountered when working with a diverse population, are included. (3 crs.)
PSY 734. ASSESSMENT OF PERSONALITY AND BEHAVIOR I. An introduction to the assessment of personality
and behavior. Experience is given to the student in the administration, scoring and interpretation of the more widely
used personality assessment measures. Particular attention is given to assessment techniques used in planning for
remediation and treatment. (3 crs.)
PSY 741. THEORIES OF COUNSELING AND PSYCHOTHERAPY. This course is designed to introduce students to
the most common therapeutic approaches in use today (e.g., person-centered, cognitive, behavioral, family systems
and reality therapy). The course also focuses on the types of issues that school psychologists are likely to be called
upon to provide therapeutic intervention. Lectures, classroom demonstrations and role-playing are utilized to
illustrate these various orientations. Attention is paid to implementation of counseling that is respectful of ethical
boundaries/issues, as well as cultural factors that may be involved in the therapeutic process. Student participation is
required. A position paper describing the student’s own orientation is required. (3 crs.)
PSY 742. TECHNIQUES OF COUNSELING AND PSYCHOTHERAPY WITH PRACTICUM. This course is intended
to provide both a didactic and an actual experience in counseling. Graduate students familiarize themselves with the
phases, procedures and goals of counseling and therapy through assigned readings, audiotapes and group discussion
of case presentations. A major focus involves issues and disorders that school psychologists are frequently called upon
to provide therapeutic intervention. This will include consideration of ethical boundaries/issues and cultural factors
that are germane to the therapeutic process. Supervision of all cases is provided both in group sessions and on an
individual basis. Graduate students are seen outside of regularly scheduled group sessions for individual supervision.
(3 crs.)
PSY 752. FUNDAMENTALS OF SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY. This course is an introduction to the profession of school
psychology. Topics examined revolve around the roles and functions of school psychologists. A partial list of the
topics examined includes: school systems, the law and school psychology, and professional ethics. Field experiences in
educational settings are required for students enrolled in the school psychology program. (3 crs.)
PSY 756. CONSULTATION AND GROUP PROCESSES WITH PRACTICUM. This course is intended to familiarize the
student with models of consultation used in schools and other relevant settings. The course is designed to provide the
student with various consultation and collaboration techniques with diverse populations. The course is also intended
to familiarize the student with a variety of group methods and techniques utilized by the school psychologist with a
focus on providing opportunities to observe, then act, as a group leader. (3 crs.)
PSY 766. PSYCHOLOGICAL STATISTICS. This course is designed to give students the information they need to
interpret the statistics that are used most frequently in research and application in psychology. It is designed as a
continuation of PSY 767. The focus is on understanding and interpreting inferential statistics, including univariate
and multivariate analyses. In addition, it will cover the strengths and limitations of applied statistical techniques
in application and research. SPSS software will be used to analyze data. The course is intended to prepare students
for graduate courses in testing, as well as to provide them with the statistical skills required to solve problems in an
educational setting. It is also designed to assist those desiring to conduct a master’s-level research thesis. (3 crs.)
PSY 767. RESEARCH METHODS IN PSYCHOLOGY. This course is designed to give students the necessary
background in psychological research design that they need to understand, interpret and evaluate proposed and
published research in the behavioral sciences. It will cover hypothesis testing and interpretation of basic descriptive
and inferential statistics. Nonparametric measures will also be covered. The focus is on acquiring the skills to critically
evaluate a research report, analyze and interpret data, and write a research paper. This course is designed to provide
the background for students in PSY 766 and those desiring to conduct a master’s-level research thesis. (3 crs.)
PSY 773. INTERNSHIP IN SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY. The internship requires a minimum of 1,200 hours of practical
work experience under direct supervision of a qualified psychologist. A minimum of 800 hours must be completed
in a realistic educational setting (i.e., public school system). The remaining 400 hours may be in a related setting
(e.g., clinic, hospital, etc.). The intern is expected to demonstrate all of the competencies of the practicing school
psychologist. (10 crs.)
PSY 795. SEMINAR IN BEHAVIOR MODIFICATION WITH PRACTICUM. This course provides the student with the
knowledge and skills needed to design, implement and evaluate behavioral interventions. Interventions applicable
to school settings are emphasized, and students are required to develop a functional behavioral assessment and a
positive behavior support plan. (3 crs.)
PSY 796. SEMINAR IN THE ANALYSIS OF RESEARCH IN SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY. This course consists of an
examination of current research in school psychology. Critical study and evaluation of empirical research findings
applicable to selected topics from current editions of Best Practices in School Psychology are undertaken. The
student develops skills in using current databases to access empirically based research reports, as well as the abilities
to critically analyze and synthesize the content of these reports as it relates to situations and issues faced by the
practitioner school psychologist. Students develop an understanding of the importance of using empirical data in
making sound educational decisions. (3 crs.)
PSY 798. SEMINAR IN PROFESSIONAL SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGY. Concepts fundamental to the practice of school
psychology are discussed and evaluated in this course. A range of topics are discussed, including the roles and
functions of school psychologists, legal and ethical issues, the organization and operation of school systems, student
diversity, and community resources. As this course is taken in conjunction with the Internship in School Psychology,
discussions tend to be dynamic and framed within the context of actual experiences encountered by interns. (3 crs.)
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RES — Research
RES 800. METHODS IN RESEARCH. This course explores the design and analysis of experimental and quasiexperimental research. It explores both quantitative and qualitative techniques. Students will learn how to design and
undertake basic research, as well as become effective consumers of the research literature. (3 crs.)
RES 810. QUALITATIVE RESEARCH IN SOCIAL SCIENCE. This course will introduce participants to the
characteristics and various approaches to designing and conducting qualitative research projects within various social
science disciplines. Students will gain hands-on experience in various qualitative methods and analysis techniques
while carrying out research projects related to their areas of interest. Prerequisite: RES 800. (3 crs.)
RES 819. RESEARCH PAPER. A written report on a specific topic of investigation, based on knowledge of the subject,
acquaintance with the published literature on the subject and accurate presentation of findings. (1 cr.)
RES 829. RESEARCH PROJECT. An advanced study or presentation on a topic related to the student’s academic
discipline. The research project is more in depth than a research paper but less thorough than a master’s thesis.
Approval of only the graduate student’s adviser is needed. The American Psychological Association Style Manual or
other generally accepted style for a particular academic discipline will be used. (3 crs.)
RES 849. MASTER’S THESIS. The thesis will usually be inferential in nature and may involve intervention and
manipulation of some independent variables, employing a statistical analysis or experimental design. The American
Psychological Association Style Manual or other generally accepted style for a particular academic discipline will be
used. The thesis requires a committee with at least one professor from outside the department. (Variable 3-6 crs.)
RSP — Reading Specialist
RSP 700. FOUNDATIONS OF LITERACY — THEORY AND INSTRUCTION. The acquisition of multiple literacy
strategies, discussion and presentation of these strategies, and research implications to match theory with practice
are the foci of this course. Additionally, because of the need for technological literacy, the use of technology is also
required. The goal of this course is to prepare students for the role of the reading specialist in the inclusion model. (3
crs.)
RSP 702. DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF READING PROBLEMS. The purpose of this course is to provide
graduate students with the skills needed for diagnosing and remediating reading difficulties of students in grades
K-12 within a transactional, constructivist framework. Factors related to reading disability and principles of diagnosis
will be explored. Informal, holistic, student-centered and process-oriented forms of assessment will be taught.
Prerequisite: RSP 700. (3 crs.)
RSP 703. PRACTICUM: DIAGNOSTIC CASE STUDIES. The purpose of this course is to provide practical experience
with determining, in a holistic manner, a child’s reading needs, and making recommendations for individualized
instruction for those needs in a case study format. This course must be taken in the same semester as RSP 704.
Prerequisites: RSP 700 and 702. (3 crs.)
RSP 704. PRACTICUM: REMEDIAL CASE STUDIES. This course must be taken in the same semester as RSP 703. The
student applies knowledge of materials and methods gained in prerequisite classes to plan and implement a program
of instructional intervention for a remedial reader. The course contains a seminar component in which the student
utilizes modeling and communication skills to discuss and demonstrate plans for reading instruction with other
students as well as with the practicing teacher. Prerequisites: RSP 700, 702 and 703. (3 crs.)
RSP 705. PSYCHOLOGY OF READING. This course is designed to provide students with an in-depth knowledge of
reading theory as it relates to the psychology of learning. (3 crs.)
RSP 706. ADULT LITERACY. This course will expose students to the point of view that the adult learner is a complex
individual and has diverse needs, most of which have some bearing on any reading difficulties. Theories of the causes
of adult illiteracy will be presented and diagnostic and remedial techniques will be given. (3 crs.)
RSP 734. CONTENT AREA READING IN MIDDLE AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS. This course is designed to
investigate the problems inherent to reading to learn in the content areas at the secondary level. Theory-based,
practical strategies for content area reading instruction are studied. To help students construct meaning, the strategies
examined range from developing frames of reference during prereading to constructing and using reading guides and
vocabulary activities. The process of writing to learn and studying, along with relevant, meaning-based strategies,
are also explored. Professional growth and improved reading instruction through planned and informal staff
development programs are discussed. (3 crs.)
SWK — Social Work
SWK 701. GENERALIST PRACTICE I. Foundation framework for generalist social work practice, including the
problem-solving process, social work values/ethics and social work roles as they apply to varying size client systems.
Develops specific intervention skills, such as interviewing, assessment, contracting, goal setting and evaluation for
diverse client systems with the emphasis on rural and small communities. Prerequisite: program admission. (3 crs.)
SWK 702. GENERALIST PRACTICE II. Continues foundation for generalist social work practice and builds on SWK
701, with a focus on the community/rural content of practice. Explores basic intervention/advocacy, management and
evaluation. Provides examples from a variety of practice areas, including practice with populations throughout the
lifespan. Prerequisite: SWK 701. (3 crs.)
SWK 705. HUMAN BEHAVIOR AND THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT. This course provides the foundation for
working with individuals, families, groups and communities. Basic concepts of human development throughout
the life cycle are presented within the person-in-environment perspective. The framework is multidimensional,
considering the impact of ability, age, aging, class, exploitation, ethnicity, gender, oppression, political belief system,
race, religion, sexual orientation and the social environment on human behavior and development. Examples
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from social work practice integrating individual, family, groups, community and organizational assessment and
intervention strategies are taken from local, national and international rural and small communities. Prerequisite:
program admission or program director approval. (3 crs.)
SWK 707. HUMAN DIVERSITY AND THE SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT. This course provides foundation knowledge
about human diversity and an understanding of the emphasis of the social work profession on culturally competent
social work practice. Students develop skills to identify strengths, bicultural adaptation, patterns of oppression and
both change and continuity during the aging process, with particular emphasis on rural and small town communities.
The course assists students in understanding the impact of oppression on human growth and development and
social functioning for the integration of individual, family, group, community and organization level interventions to
promote or enhance social justice. Prerequisite: program admission or program director approval. (3 crs.)
SWK 709. SOCIAL WELFARE POLICY, SERVICES AND PROGRAM DESIGN. Examination of the history and value
base of the social work profession and U.S. social policy with a framework for policy analysis with special emphasis
on the impact of these policies and related services on small towns, rural communities, the aging and diverse
populations. Prerequisite: program admission. (3 crs.)
SWK 715. RESEARCH, POLICY AND RURAL PRACTICE. Use of research designs to inform and evaluate practice
and policy in small town and rural contexts. Development of knowledge and skills for understanding and conducting
applied research, with emphasis on research related to social work practices and programs serving small towns, rural
communities and diverse populations. Prerequisite: advanced standing. (3 crs.)
SWK 716. SOCIAL WORK RESEARCH METHODOLOGY AND DATA ANALYSIS. This course examines: the logic
of scientific inquiry; the social work research process with an emphasis on problem conceptualization, measurement
options and research design; the use of descriptive and inferential data analyses; and the development of skills needed
for understanding and conducting ethical quantitative and qualitative research related to social work practices and
programs serving small towns, rural communities and diverse populations. Prerequisite: program admission. (3 crs.)
SWK 729. FIRST YEAR FIELD PRACTICUM I. MSW-supervised placement in a social agency that provides
opportunities for generalist social work practice with individuals, families and groups of all ages from rural and small
communities, including advocacy skills to enhance social justice. The minimum hours required in a field placement is
240 for SWK 729. (6 crs.)
SWK 730. FIRST YEAR FIELD PRACTICUM II. MSW-supervised placement in a social agency that provides
opportunities for generalist social work practice with individuals, families and groups of all ages from rural and small
communities, including advocacy skills to enhance social justice. The minimum hours required in a field agency are
240 for SWK 730, equaling a total of 480 hours for SWK 729 and SWK 730 combined. Prerequisites: SWK 701, 705 and
729. (6 crs.)
SWK 801. ADVANCED GENERALIST PRACTICE. Builds on the generalist practice skills, knowledge and values
taught in Generalist Practice I and II. Integrates the use of advanced individual, family, group and organizational
skills within the agency and community settings that serve diverse rural and small town client systems. Addresses
practice concerns such as acquiring sanction for work, assessing needed resources, supervision, certification and
evaluation of practice. Prerequisites: SWK 702 and 705 or advanced standing. (3 crs.)
SWK 803. DIFFERENTIAL ASSESSMENT. Students in this course learn how to work with clients and client systems
to help them identify needs and assess problems as well as strengths. A number of different assessment methods
are explored, with particular emphasis on those appropriate for diverse populations across the lifespan from local,
national and international rural and small communities. Prerequisites: program admission, SWK 705 and 707 or
advanced standing. (3 crs.)
SWK 806. RURAL FAMILY AND COMMUNITY POLICY. Explores the design, function and impact of community and
family policies. Historical development of specific policies and the effects of policy on rural family and community
institutions and organizations. Skills in analyzing and synthesizing policy are applied to rural situations and change
strategies. Prerequisites: SWK 705, 709, 710 and 713 or advanced standing. (3 crs.)
SWK 808. ADVANCED PRACTICE EVALUATION. Advanced use of research to evaluate social work practices and
programs, particularly those serving small towns, rural communities, aging and diverse populations. Includes single
system design and program evaluation and the development of skills for assessing and adding to the knowledge base
of social work practice. Prerequisite: SWK 716. (3 crs.)
SWK 811. PRACTICE WITH AGING. Integration of knowledge about aging, rural aging, services for the aging
and the principles of social work and practice with various diverse older adult populations in rural environments.
Prerequisite: second year standing or program director approval. (3 crs.)
SWK 812. PRACTICE IN SUPERVISION AND ADMINISTRATION. Supervision, management and control in
human service organizations. Theoretical and functional models to assist staff to grow and function competently
as professionals. Understanding the elements of programming, budgeting, staffing, communications and control
within the organization. Identifying formal and informal systems, the impact of human diversity, and how all of this
functions in the rural setting. Prerequisite: SWK 701, 702 and 801. (3 crs.)
SWK 813. PRACTICE IN HEALTH CARE AND HEALTH PLANNING. Examines roles of the social worker and the
place of social work values and practice in health care planning, modern medical ethics and professional practice.
Prerequisite: second-year standing or program director approval. (3 crs.)
SWK 814. PRACTICE IN MH/MR. Overview of MH/MR policies and services; issues of rehabilitation, advocacy and
case management; and how treatment approaches (crisis behavioral and chemical) are related to social work roles and
values in the context of community needs. Prerequisite: second-year standing or program director approval. (3 crs.)
SWK 815. JUVENILE AND ADULT JUSTICE SYSTEM PRACTICE. Overview of the juvenile and adult criminal
justice system in urban and rural communities. Places emphasis on the development of an understanding of the
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ever-changing philosophies that undergird the criminal justice system. In addition, the focus of the course will include
an examination of the relationship between human diversity and aging in the criminal justice system. Prerequisites:
SWK 701 and 702 or program director approval. (3 crs.)
SWK 816. PRACTICE WITH CHILDREN AND YOUTH. Examines the major problems and legal and clinical issues
encountered when working with children. Special concern for victimized and at-risk children in rural settings.
Prerequisites: SWK 701 and 702 or program director approval. (3 crs.)
SWK 821. SOCIAL WORK WITH SUBSTANCE ABUSE/ADDICTIONS. This course provides students with a
substantive knowledge base and critical skills for planning to work in the addictions fields as well as for those who
will encounter chemical dependency problems in their work with different age groups in the variety of arenas in
which they practice. Prerequisite: second-year standing or program director approval. (3 crs.)
SWK 829. ADVANCED FIELD PRACTICUM I. First semester advanced MSW-supervised placement in a social
agency setting for three days a week, requiring advanced generalist practice with varying sizes and types of client
systems, working in rural and small town communities. Students are required to complete a minimum of 330 hours.
Prerequisites: second-year standing, SWK 729 and 730. (6 crs.)
SWK 830. ADVANCED FIELD PRACTICUM II. Second of a two-semester advanced MSW-supervised placement in a
social agency setting for three days a week, providing an opportunity for advanced generalist practice with varying
sizes and types of systems for working in rural environments. Students are required to complete a minimum of 330
hours. Prerequisites: second-year standing and SWK 829.
(6 crs.)
SWK 840. SPECIAL TOPICS. Study of selected topics of significance or current importance and interest to the social
work profession. (3 crs.)
SPN — Spanish
SPN 101. ELEMENTARY SPANISH I. This course is designed for the student without previous knowledge of Spanish
who wishes to achieve a command of language fundamentals. Acquisition of speech skills in the classroom is
reinforced in the language laboratory. Progressively greater emphasis is placed on reading and writing. Three classhours and one language lab-hour per week. (3 crs.)
SPN 102. ELEMENTARY SPANISH II. This is a continuation of Spanish 101. Three class-hours and one language labhour per week. Prerequisite: SPN 101 or three to four years of high school Spanish. (3 crs.)
SPN 203. INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I. This course reviews the essentials of Spanish grammar through intensive
oral and written practice to facilitate the use of Spanish grammar and to develop the use of words and expressions
accepted throughout the Spanish-speaking world. Three class-hours and one language lab-hour per week.
Prerequisites: SPN 101 and SPN 102 or their equivalents. (3 crs.)
SPN 304. SPANISH FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT. This course focuses on the applied aspects of the Spanish language
in a law enforcement context. Significant emphasis will be on the practical exercises such as arrest situations, assisting
victims of crimes, conducting searches, undertaking criminal interviews and interrogations, and reading Miranda
rights. Students will also learn about the Hispanic community in terms of crimes, prison population, and how to
work with citizens and community leaders toward mutual goals and objectives. While some background is provided
in terms of the criminal justice system, such information is intended to assist in the language capabilities of justice
personnel as opposed to undertaking substantive studies in that regard. Prerequisites: SPN 203. (3 crs.)
SPN 305. SPANISH FOR BUSINESS. This course focuses on the applied aspects of the Spanish language in a business
and international trade context. Significant emphasis will be on practical communicative activities that involve
business scenarios, learning about business integrity and values that are recognized in the Hispanic community,
analysis and discussions of Spanish commercial readings, analysis and discussions of business-cultural reading that
impact the Hispanic market. While some background is provided in terms of the business and international trade
such information is intended to assist in the language capabilities of business personal as opposed to undertaking
substantive studies in this regard. Prerequisites: SPN 203. (3 crs.)
ESP — Special Education
ESP 501. INTRODUCTION TO EXCEPTIONALITY. This course introduces the student to the physical, social,
emotional and educational characteristics, incidence, prevalence, and educational intervention for the major
categories of exceptionality enrolled in public and private educational facilities in the K-12 grade range. In addition,
the course will identify ancillary services and agencies frequently impacting special populations, including the
major professional organizations and those concerned with residential programming and vocational training. The
course will also identify the major litigation and legislation that have significantly influenced the nature of service to
exceptional populations. (3 crs.)
ESP 502. LIFE SKILLS PLANNING AND INSTRUCTION. This course prepares students to work with children and/or
adults who require ongoing support in order to participate in one or more major life activities. Students are required
to design and implement an instructional program with a person who needs this type and level of support. (3 crs.)
ESP 503. ASSESSMENT AND PRESCRIPTIVE TEACHING. This course teaches students how to administer, score
and interpret both norm-referenced and criterion-referenced assessment devices and how to prescribe programs of
remediation based on the results of these devices. (3 crs.)
ESP 504. CURRICULUM AND METHODS I: READING AND LANGUAGE ARTS. This course is offered to postbaccalaureate students seeking certification in special education or to graduate students in the special education
program, taken the semester prior to their student teaching or internship experience. Curriculum and Methods I
is a materials and methodology course for preservice special education teachers. An emphasis is placed on results
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of reading research and proven methods of instruction for teaching beginning reading to children with learning
difficulties. The course stresses a behavioral, direct instruction approach to teaching, as well as the development
in implementation of intervention strategies for various populations of children with exceptionalities in inclusion
settings. Additional topics include modifications and adaptations of materials, effective teaching, learning strategies,
lesson planning, assessment, and individualized education programs. (3 crs.)
ESP 505. CURRICULUM AND METHODS II: MATH AND OTHER CONTENT AREAS. This course is offered to
special education majors the semester prior to their student teaching experience. Curriculum and Methods II is a
methods course for special education teachers in training that emphasizes the assessment, instructional skills and
materials necessary to teach arithmetic concepts to children with disabilities. The course stresses: (1) a behavioral
diagnosis of arithmetic strengths and weaknesses, (2) the development and implementation of intervention strategies
for various populations of exceptional children, (3) the selection and/or development of appropriate materials for
instruction, and (4) the procedures and techniques for continuous evaluation for the instructional process. (3 crs.)
ESP 506. TRANSITION PLANNING AND INSTRUCTION. This course deals with special education programs for
senior high school students as well as those persons who reside in the community. Emphasis is placed on vocational
preparation and training. Specific techniques for task analysis of jobs, daily living skills and social adaptation
constitute a major portion of this course. Emphasis is placed on the development of functional skills that contribute to
normalized development. (3 crs.)
ESP 610. SPECIAL EDUCATION FOUNDATIONS AND COLLABORATIONS. This course is designed to provide
information and skills necessary for accommodating exceptional learners in a variety of school arrangements.
The primary focus is foundations and characteristics of special education and students with exceptionalities and
collaboration/consultation for the successful inclusion of students with exceptionalities into the inclusionary
classroom. (3 crs.)
ESP 613. EVIDENCE-BASED PRACTICES FOR SECONDARY INCLUSION. Evidence-Based Practices for Secondary
Inclusion is offered to Secondary Education majors the semester prior to their student-teaching experience and is a
methodology course for pre-service education teachers. The purpose of the course is to prepare Secondary pre-service
teachers to provide math language arts instruction to students with disabilities in secondary inclusion settings.
An emphasis is placed on results of research and proven methods of instruction for teaching reading and math to
secondary students with learning difficulties. The course stresses a behavioral approach to teaching, as well as the
development and implementation of intervention strategies for various populations of children with exceptionalities
in inclusion settings. Additional topics include modifications and adaptations of materials, effective teaching, learning
strategies, lesson planning, assessment, and individualized education programs. (3 crs.)
ESP 701. INTRODUCTION TO BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS. The basic learning principles of operant and classical
conditioning, with the application of these principles to individuals with disabilities. (3 crs.)
ESP 712. SEMINAR ON CONTEMPORARY TRENDS AND ISSUES IN SPECIAL EDUCATION. Recent issues
concerning exceptional populations. A paper making use of current research is required of every graduate student,
who must present it to the class. Sample issues include such matters as normalization, nature and nurture, and
educational alternatives. (3 crs.)
ESP 719. SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHING INTERNSHIP. The internship is an abbreviated four-week (120 hours)
student teaching for individuals who already have an instructional certificate. Educational work is done with children
or adults with disabilities in a variety of settings, including special public school classes in residential treatment
centers, special schools and hospitals. Opportunities for case conferences, learning seminars and teaching critiques are
offered, as well as numerous field experiences to observe successful programs. All coursework must be completed and
approved prior to enrolling in ESP 719. (3 crs.)
ESP 720. SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHING PRACTICUM/INTERNSHIP. The Special Education Teaching
Practicum/Internship is designed to ensure that special education majors are exposed to the full range of children
covered under the comprehensive certification, i.e., mentally retarded, emotionally disturbed, learning disabled, brain
damaged and physically handicapped. The practicum/internship provides an intensive experience for the student
in two special education placements for a period of 16 weeks. The practicum seminar component meets weekly to
provide special education majors with an opportunity to discuss problems encountered by students in their teaching
experiences. Students are provided with opportunities to demonstrate the effectiveness and functionality of their
teacher-made devices, learning centers and curriculum materials used in their classrooms. Graduate students seeking
dual certification in both special education and elementary education are also supervised within the special education
department for their practicum experience. Teacher candidates are required to have one student teaching experience
within special education and another in a regular elementary classroom. All other components remain the same for
student teachers seeking dual certification. All coursework must be completed prior to enrolling in ESP 720. Graduate
students who will student teach will be required to meet all requirements as are currently in place. (9 crs.)
ESP 732. SEMINAR IN SPECIAL EDUCATION ADMINISTRATION AND SUPERVISION. For supervisors and
administrators, those seeking alternatives in education, and teachers who wish to communicate effectively with
supervisors and administrators. Sample topics may include such matters as the role and function of supervisors and
administrators, budgeting and financial issues, measures of teacher effectiveness, accountability, and legal standards.
(3 crs.)
ESP 734. SEMINAR IN COUNSELING PARENTS OF EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN. Designed to improve the skills
of professionals related to their interaction with parents of exceptional children, this course provides an opportunity
to learn the special needs of parents, techniques of communication, processes by which change can be implemented,
legal rights and implications, and resources. Participants are encouraged to assume the role of a parental consultant.
(3 crs.)
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ESP 735. SEMINAR IN EDUCATING THE GIFTED. Presentation by class members of selected topics related to the
gifted. State standards and guidelines for programs are discussed, as well as materials for use in classes for the gifted.
Students observe classes for the gifted and talented. (3 crs.)
ESP 737. SEMINAR ON LEGISLATION AND LITIGATION. Laws and court cases, both federal and local, that have
precipitated the initiation of programs for the exceptional child and with parents’ efforts to receive legal support for
opportunities for their children to receive an appropriate education. (3 crs.)
ESP 738. SEMINAR ON TEACHER BEHAVIOR AND GROUP DYNAMICS. An advanced course in methodology
and applications, in which the graduate student is given the opportunity to refine many of the skills and behaviors
acquired in previous courses in special education, especially as related to the skills and methods that contribute to
effective classroom instruction and management. (3 crs.)
ESP 739. FIELD EXPERIENCE SEMINAR IN SPECIAL EDUCATION. A means for graduate students to obtain needed
experiences with various groups of handicapped children, in such settings as an institution, a sheltered workshop,
an activity center, a summer camp or a community MH/MR facility, or by doing a specific piece of research with a
particular population of students. Specific requirements for individual graduate students are developed by those
students and the supervising professor. (3 crs.)
ESP 740. NATURE/CHARACTERISTICS OF AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS. This introductory course provides a
foundation in understanding and addressing the unique and complex challenges individuals on the autism spectrum
face in their learning, development and social experiences. (3 crs.)
ESP 741. COMMUNICATION, BEHAVIOR AND INSTRUCTION: ASD. This course offers preparation in the design
and delivery of communication, behavior and instructional supports for diverse learners with autism spectrum
disorders (ASD) and includes data-based assessment and intervention; Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA); functional
communication; Augmentative Alternative Communication (AAC); environmental supports; structured teaching;
differentiated instruction; and cognitive, developmental and sensory-based approaches. (3 crs.)
ESP 742. LIFE TRANSITIONS AND PARTNERSHIPS: ASD. This seminar is designed to offer rigorous exploration and
critical analysis of contemporary issues influencing the lifelong learning, development and socio-cultural experiences
of people on the autism spectrum. The course addresses core professional competencies in autism-related knowledge
and practice: (1) transition, vocational and independent living; (2) sexuality; (3) family support and partnerships; (4)
school and community partnerships; and (5) professional literacy and leadership. (3 crs.)
ESP 743. NAVIGATING THE SOCIAL WORLD: ASD. This seminar is designed to provide preparation in methods
to enhance socialization, communication and imagination in diverse learners with ASD. The course merges the
theoretical understanding of the “triad of impairments” as defining features of autism with practical modes of
assessment and intervention. (3 crs.)
ESP 800. SEMINAR IN ADVANCED BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS AND RESEARCH DESIGN. This is the required
research course in special education. The course covers the field of research design and methodology in intrasubject
experimentation. Required of all students in the master’s degree program. (3 crs.)
SPT — Sport Management
SPT 700. RESEARCH METHODS IN SPORT. This course is intended to introduce students to methods and design
problems specific to research in sport management. It is designed to promote an understanding of the theory,
tools and processes involved in designing sport management research studies. Course emphasis will be placed on
differentiating between qualitative and quantitative data, data collection, data analysis, data interpretation, and
sources of data specific to the sport industry. (3 crs.)
SPT 710. SOCIO-CULTURAL ASPECTS OF SPORT. This course will analyze the sport industry as a social
institution, using critical thinking skills to solve controversies and issues related to the sport culture. Discussion
will center around the social, political and economic significance of sport in society. Emphasis will also be placed on
understanding the positive and negative social effects of sport and physical activity on society. (3 crs.)
SPT 720. SPORT MARKETING. This course will compare and contrast the field of sport marketing with the practices
and applications of mainstream marketing. The course will examine the application of marketing principles within the
sport industry. Course emphasis will center on linking the marketing plan to an organization’s mission statement and
core values. Topics will include SWOT analysis, market segmentation, distribution, packaging, promotion, positioning
and pricing. (3 crs.)
SPT 730. PUBLIC RELATIONS IN SPORT. This course explores theories of communications and public relations
management necessary for successfully working with internal and external publics of a sport organization. The course
will demonstrate how community relations professionals serve their organizations by meeting social needs and
connecting with key publics. Topics will include employee relations, community relations, media relations, customer
relations and image enhancement. (3 crs.)
SPT 740. LEGAL ASPECTS OF SPORT. This course examines the law as it applies to sport organizations. An in-depth
analysis will be conducted on the topics of contract law, constitutional law, tort law, administrative law, antitrust law,
labor law and collective bargaining as they relate to the sport industry. (3 crs.)
SPT 750. SPORT FINANCE. This course is an in-depth study of financial analysis processes utilized in decisionmaking by sport managers. The focus of the course is on basic principles of micro economics, business structures in
sport organizations, basic tools of financial management, e-commerce, sources of revenue and stadium finance. (3 crs.)
SPT 760. SPORT ETHICS. This course will focus on the ethical issues impacting sport organization policy formation
and practice. Students will recognize and identify moral and ethical problems related to sport in its intrinsic and
extrinsic dimensions and develop a personal philosophy regarding social responsibility in the sport management
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setting. Topics include moral and ethical development theories, models of ethical analysis, code of professional ethics,
personal and management values, and situational analysis. (3 crs.)
SPT 770. MANAGEMENT AND LEADERSHIP IN SPORT. The course is an analysis of leadership and managerial
functions, concepts, and practices used to foster interpersonal and small-group relationships as found in sport
organizations. Topics include networking, power, communication, motivation, fostering creativity, group dynamics,
total quality management (TQM) and negotiation. (3 crs.)
SPT 790. SPORT GOVERNANCE. This course is designed to provide students with a knowledge and understanding
of the power and politics of sport organizations that govern intercollegiate athletics. Students will learn and analyze
how people involved in governance set the tone of an entire organization and how individual sport governance
bodies fit into the greater industry. Emphasis will be placed upon the student’s development of a working knowledge
of what these organizations do and what their true purpose is in the administration of an intercollegiate athletic
department. (3 crs.)
SPT 791. SPORT COMPLIANCE. This course is designed to provide students with a knowledge and understanding
of the necessary and mandatory compliance techniques of the major governing bodies of intercollegiate athletics to
ensure institutional control. Emphasis will be placed upon an in-depth review and discussion of the various National
Association of Intercollegiate Athletics bylaw manuals, as well as National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics rules
and regulations. (3 crs.)
SPT 792. LEGAL ASPECTS OF EQUITY IN INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS. This course is designed to provide
students with a knowledge and understanding of gender equity issues that are prevalent in an intercollegiate athletic
setting. This course also covers the many legal issues dealing with equity in intercollegiate athletic. Emphasis is placed
upon the development of an overall knowledge of Title IX and the various tests that have been implemented to ensure
compliance. (3 crs.)
SPT 793. DEVELOPMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCE STRATEGIES IN INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS. This course
is designed to provide students with the latest human resource strategies to successfully address everyday problems
that may arise with coaches, staff and personnel of an intercollegiate athletic department. The student will develop a
working knowledge of complex organizations and the problems that may affect the employees that he/she supervises.
(3 crs.)
SPT 799. SPORT MENTORSHIP. The sport mentorship allows the student to practice sport management theory in the
practical setting while under the direct supervision of a recognized leader in the student’s chosen area of specialty in
the sport industry. Course requirements dictate that students complete a minimum of 300 contact hours. Students may
not enroll in SPT 799 until all other coursework has been completed. (3 crs.)
SLE — Superintendent Letter of Eligibility
SLE 701. ADMINISTRATION THEORY, ORGANIZATION AND OPERATION (PIL approved). This course offers the
participant opportunities to gain competencies in and an understanding of the application of administrative theory
relating to the operations of a school district. Through inquiry into the subject of administrative theory, candidates
will gain critical and creative attitudes toward humanistic and scientific principles of public school organization and
administration. Along with required course activities, each participant will complete a minimum of 15 hours of field
experience assignments involving leadership or organization theory and practice. The field experiences will have
utility for the participant’s home school district or another school district and will be undertaken and completed in
concert with the instructor’s expectations. (3 crs.)
SLE 702. CONTRACT LAW: SCHOOL DISTRICT LEGAL ISSUES. American public education operates within a
complex framework of law. Federal and state constitutional provisions and statutes, along with administrative
regulations and local school board policies, control the daily operation of our schools. It is imperative that all who
are employed by school districts, particularly central office administrators, are conversant with this myriad of legal
mandates and constraints so that they can operate effectively and efficiently and avoid time-consuming litigation
and grievances. The purpose of this course is to familiarize aspiring superintendents with the legal basis for the
administration of public schools. By the conclusion of this course, it is hoped students will possess the knowledge base
and research skills necessary to make intelligent and informed educational decisions. In this course, emphasis will be
placed on Pennsylvania school law. (3 crs.)
SLE 703. SCHOOL FINANCE. This course provides students with the fundamentals of public school finance. It will
review issues that confront superintendents and school districts, and provide insights into resolving finance problems.
Students will read, research, problem-solve and explore financial issues.
(3 crs.)
SLE 704. TECHNOLOGY AND FACILITIES DEVELOPMENT (PIL approved). The course will offer the student an
opportunity to view, understand and execute the planning, acquisition and management of technology and school
facilities. The course emphasizes the use of technology for effective school management and instruction, promoting
an educational environment that encourages change but also focuses on linking technology with students, and
effectively analyzing and operating the management of the school organization as it relates to technology and facilities
development. Topics such as reform, empowering students with technology, productivity and technology windows
of the future and school facilities for the 21st century will be included. Participants will be required to demonstrate
competencies regarding an understanding of the superintendent’s role in the following areas: planning for immediate
and future facilities; efficiently managing technology and facilities; acquiring technology and facilities; and planning
for immediate and future technology needs. (3 crs.)
SLE 705. CURRICULUM/INSTRUCTION AND LEADERSHIP/SUPERVISION (PIL approved). This course offers
the participant the opportunity to gain an understanding of and skills related to the district level administration of
curriculum, instruction, leadership and supervision. The course emphasis is on current practice in the field, state level
requirements and national trends that are shifting theory and practice in their regard. (3 crs.)
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SLE 706. SCHOOL/COMMUNITY PUBLIC RELATIONS/MARKETING. The objective of the course is to provide
students the opportunity to view school public relations and marketing from the point of view of the school
superintendent, through practical, real-life experiences. To become an effective school superintendent or assistant
superintendent requires that an administrator be an effective communicator and develop positive community
relations. It requires networking, knowledge, the ability to market your “product” and the ability to establish
credibility within and outside the school community. One must be able to make decisions, sometimes quickly, and
then be accountable for those decisions. This 15-week course will enable students to learn the theory and practical
application of school and community relations. (3 crs.)
SLE 707. STRATEGIC PLANNING/POLICY ANALYSIS/BOARD RELATIONS (PIL approved). This course is
designed for aspiring school superintendents. Specifically, the course addresses strategic planning and thinking,
policy development and analysis, and the value of the relationship between the superintendent and the school board,
specifically the board president. The focus is reality-based and draws from experienced instructors. The goal is to
prepare aspiring superintendents for the duties and responsibilities they will encounter in the above-mentioned areas,
mindful of the fact that the key role of the school superintendent is to ensure a quality education for all students of the
district. (3 crs.)
SLE 708. INTERNSHIP (PIL approved). The internship is designed to be a theory-into-practice experience where
formal coursework is applied in a field setting. It provides significant opportunities in the workplace to synthesize
and apply the knowledge and to practice and develop skills identified in the program competency areas. Internships
with a trained mentor in diverse settings is an important and highly valued part of the program. Each placement will
be made in cooperation with the SLE faculty, the participating school district mentor and the intern. The internship
involves field placement with a carefully chosen and trained superintendent/mentor (field supervisor) in a K-12
school district, who shares the SLE program philosophy that the superintendent should function as a change agent
and facilitator of the reform process as well as a strong instructional leader. The intern is both a participant and
observer under the direction of the superintendent, who should provide the intern with as many supervisory and
administrative experiences as possible. The intern gains valuable work-related experience and is given the opportunity
to learn how academic knowledge and skills can be applied at the worksite with real people, problems and events.
(6 crs.)
TED — Technology Education
TED 565. SPECIAL PROBLEMS IN TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION. Original investigations in the field of technology
education. The nature of the problem will determine the credit-hour load. The student will provide evidence of the
ability to conduct independent study and gain credit by reporting the findings effectively. (1-6 crs.)
TED 701. CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION IN TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION. The focus of this course is twofold. First, students will use state and national standards to develop a technology education curriculum by using
various curriculum design processes. The second phase of the class is designed to improve the students’ ability to
use appropriate standards-based instructional methods. These include cooperative learning, problem-based learning,
discovery learning, constructivism, reflection, meta-cognition and others those students research and demonstrate to
the class. (3 crs.)
TED 702. ASSESSMENT IN A CONSTRUCTIVIST CLASSROOM. Assessment is the key to understanding student
learning. In this course, students analyze a variety of assessment techniques that are both authentic and traditional
in nature. Topics such as formative and summative assessment, portfolios, rubrics, test development and analysis,
interviews, simulations, and observations will be discussed. The second phase of the course examines how research
techniques can be incorporated into the assessment process to gain a more robust understanding of student
achievement. (3 crs.)
TED 703. STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT IN EDUCATION. This course will enable the student to systematically
analyze the enrollments, student performance and current status of a program in light of environmental resources,
constraints and pressures. From this systematic analysis, an overall strategic plan can be developed to guide the goals,
objectives and priorities for program development and future success. These skills can be used in many contexts, but
will most aid the technology education teacher in positioning, improving and growing programs. Finally, students
will research, develop and defend a grant proposal that will enhance their program. (3 crs.)
TED 704. INTEGRATING MATH, SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. This course is focused on integrating the
content of mathematics, science and technology education for the purposes of teaching in middle and high schools.
Curriculum issues and planning related to integrating mathematics, science and technology according to state and
national standards are discussed and practiced. Finally, students will have an opportunity to develop instructional
units and carry them out in an activity-based laboratory. (3 crs.)
TED 705. TECHNOLOGY AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT. Consideration of international systems and issues
in technology and of technology assessment methodologies will help students meet new state and national standards.
Technology content and activities can be developed with a broadened international focus and an emphasis on the
economic, ecological and social costs and benefits of technological systems. Activities based on ways in which different
people meet basic needs for water, food, structures, medical care and clothing will be stressed. (3 crs.)
TED 715. STUDY IN HUMAN CREATIVITY. The primary purpose of this course is to formally introduce the student
to the study of human creativity as an academic endeavor. It is specifically designed to establish each person’s
competence as a creative problem-solving facilitator (a teacher, one who is knowledgeable and skilled at applying
creative problem-solving methodologies). Individual, managerial and technical types of problem-solving activities
will be engaged. Each student will conduct (facilitate) several problem-solving excursions. Each student will study,
administer and evaluate several standardized tests that evaluate creative problem-solving skills. Students may
evaluate themselves, others or both. This is a learning laboratory, action-oriented course intended to simulate realworld creative problem-solving techniques. (3 crs.)
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TED 718. SPECIAL POPULATIONS IN LAB-BASED PROGRAMS. Understanding the specific needs, populations,
processes, adaptations, funding sources and other factors that affect the success of special populations who will be
educated in laboratory-based programs. (3 crs.)
TED 725. APPLIED RESEARCH IN STEM EDUCATION. This course is designed to give teachers an opportunity to
study real classroom situations and to design plans of action to improve the situations. Teachers will learn how to
conduct a review of the literature and develop an understanding of various research methodologies, especially as they
relate to Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) education. Reflection and analysis of current
trends in the STEM disciplines is a key component of action research. (3 crs.)
TED 775. INTEGRATING TECHNOLOGY IN ELEMENTARY/MIDDLE SCHOOL STEM CURRICULUM. This course
provides elementary and middle level teachers an in-depth, research-based examination of technological literacy
education within STEM disciplines. Candidates examine relevant technology education academic standards and
design curriculum, instruction and assessment to enhance student achievement of proficiency in technological literacy.
The course focuses on successful instructional strategies for integrating technology education throughout the existing
school curriculum and aligning technology activities to help students achieve academic standards. (3 crs.)
TED 795. TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION INTERNSHIP. Internship. (Variable crs.)
TED 807. TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT AND IMPROVEMENT. Students will engage in a process to
develop or access a district-wide technology standards-based program. They will develop strategies to facilitate and
enhance student learning in all areas of their program, including content, curricula, instruction, student assessment,
learning environment and professional development. They will examine the current status of a district’s program,
establish new goals, determine strategies to meet those goals, develop goals to enhance personnel knowledge and
skills, and examine strategies to evaluate their success. (3 crs.)
TED 850. TED MAJOR PROJECT. Students will produce a major culminating piece of academic work that synthesizes
contents from the technology education master’s program. This may take the form of a research activity of various
types: a major curriculum development project, other extensive individually produced pieces, or work that is
approved by the course instructor. All projects must follow a technological design process. (4 crs.)
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University Services
Louis L. Manderino Library
The Louis L. Manderino Library is committed to providing the resources needed to support
the research needs of Cal U students and faculty. This includes a substantial collection
of electronic and print journals, books (including e-books), online research databases,
audiovisual materials (videos, DVDs, CDs), and U.S. and Pennsylvania government
documents.
Electronic Resources
Computerized information retrieval has made library research faster, more thorough and
more efficient. Using the library’s online public access catalog, students can quickly locate
books, audiovisual materials or government documents in the library’s collection. Cal
U students have access to an impressive collection of more than 41,000 online, full-text
periodical titles. We also offer online books and reference resources (encyclopedias, literary
resources, etc.).
All of the library’s electronic resources are accessible from on- and off-campus locations.
This allows students to do research from anywhere they have Internet access: campus,
dorm, apartment, home, etc. Since the library seeks to provide the best resources for our
students, visit the library’s website at www.library.calu.edu to see the most current list and
descriptions of our electronic resources.
Reference Services and Library Instruction
With so many resources and so much content available to students, knowing how to find
appropriate information efficiently can be daunting. Our friendly reference librarians are
available — in the library, or by telephone, e-mail or instant messaging — to help guide
students in their research. Cal U librarians are faculty members and work with classroom
professors to provide instruction to students regarding the effective use of library resources
in their course work. Students are also welcome to seek additional help by scheduling
individual sessions with a librarian.
Shared Library Resources and Interlibrary Loan
In addition to our own collections, Cal U participates in several resource sharing programs
that offer our patrons a wealth of additional resources. The course reserves system allows
Cal U professors to make their textbooks available for student use in the library. Students
with access to the campus library may use E-Z Borrow to order books for free, fast delivery
from more than 50 partner university libraries. When items are not available using E-Z
Borrow, they can be ordered through our Interlibrary Loan Office. This service is normally
free, except for some very rare circumstances involving particularly unusual items.
Other Services
The library is regularly rated the No. 1 resource on campus in student satisfaction surveys
because of the services and technology solutions we offer. We have 30 desktop public
access computers, wireless Internet is available throughout the building, and wireless
laptop computers are available for students to borrow from the circulation desk. The
library has photocopying, black-and-white and color printing, and a KIC book scanner
to create image and audio files, as well as Flip video cameras. Our Media Services Center
provides audiovisual equipment and materials and offers lamination and binding services.
While the library is not always open, we have developed many research tools to help
students around the clock. Our online subject guides provide patrons with resources for
any major or class they are taking at Cal U. The library has collected every published Cal
U yearbook from 1913 to present, sheet music for silent movies, and a treasure trove of
local history on the library’s fourth floor in Archives and Special Collections. In addition,
Manderino Library is an official Federal Government Documents Depository.
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The library is not just about academic needs, it can also be fun! Students can relax in one
of our comfortable oversized chairs with coffee, a snack and one of our many sports, news,
culture and fashion magazines. Or browse our popular collections on the first floor to find
leisure reading and graphic novels. We also offer an assortment of Hollywood blockbuster
and classic DVDs. You can borrow them free for a week or reserve our audiovisual room,
equipped with a large LCD screen, for viewings and presentations within the library.
The library offers many programs every semester to suit student needs. The library
routinely presents a variety of 30-minute workshops to showcase the tools students can
use to cite their research, survive group projects, get the most out of online research and
more. Attendance at these workshops can be added to an activities transcript and LiveText
portfolio. The library also runs a video gaming event at the end of each semester.
IT Services
University IT Services is located in the basement of Manderino Library. IT Services consists
of two areas: computing systems and networking systems. Staff offices are open 8 a.m. to 4
p.m. Monday through Friday. Open computer labs located on the second floor of Noss Hall
are available for student use. The computer facilities at the University are separated into
two distinct functions. One function deals with providing computer resources to meet the
instructional and research needs of the University, such as student access for course work
and the Manderino Library online catalog. The other function provides resources to meet
the administrative needs of the University.
Computer Accounts
Students who register for classes automatically have a Windows computer account created
for their use during the semester. A VMS account will be created if the student registers for
specific classes. There is no charge for the service or for the use of the computer network.
Campus Network
The University campus buildings are connected via a high-speed, state-of-the-art GigE
local-area network. The network provides GigE connectivity to every floor on the campus,
and each floor has switched Ethernet to every office, classroom, lab and residence hall
room. Southpointe Center is connected via a high-speed wide-area network (WAN),
which extends all computer resources to the remote sites. The network also provides the
capability for distance-learning programs. The University is connected to the State COPA
(Commonwealth of PA) Network and is a SEGP (Sponsored Educational Group) under
Internet2. This statewide network includes the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and all of
the State System of Higher Education universities and the Office of the Chancellor.
Instructional Computing Facility
The Instructional Computing Facility (ICF), located on the second floor of Noss Hall, is the
main center for student campus network access and general use desktop computing. This
facility contains personal computer systems and printers in laboratories and classrooms
and provides access to adaptive technology systems. Generally, the labs are open seven
days a week during fall and spring semesters and five days a week during summer
sessions. However, schedules may change, and the hours are posted each semester in the
ICF and can be requested by calling 724-938-4335. The labs are closed during holidays and
session breaks.
Distance Education via Interactive TV (ITV)
As a leader in technology instruction, California University of Pennsylvania has numerous
courses that are currently delivered via distance learning. Classes can originate and
be received at the main campus and from off-campus sites, such as the Southpointe
Center. These courses are delivered instantly using state-of-the-art videoconferencing
systems across the University’s data network. Distance education equipment allows
the transmission of audio and video between two or more locations for the purpose of
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delivering instruction, enhancing educational experiences, conducting meetings and
participating in conferences.
(Distance education classrooms contain video cameras and sensitive microphones that can
be controlled from a remote site. Always assume what you are doing and saying is being
seen and heard ANYTIME you are in or near a classroom. Also, be aware that transmission
of audio and video can occur with the monitors off, and conversations in the hall outside of
classrooms may be heard. Private conversations should occur at some other location than
the distance education classroom.)
Other Campus Facilities
Many departments have computers for student use; only some of the facilities are listed
here. Additional campus computer laboratories are located in and operated by various
departments on campus, including Applied Engineering and Technology, Business
and Economics, Mathematics and Computer Science, Earth Science, and English (Word
Processing Laboratory). The College of Education and Human Services maintains a Teacher
Education Computer Lab in the Keystone Education Building. There is also a Student
Access Center computer lab located on the first level of the Natali Student Center. The
Southpointe Center provides laboratories for instructional use. Contact your department
for specific information about laboratory facilities available for educational purposes.
Campus Learning Labs
Math Lab
The following services and resources are offered free in the Math Lab in Noss Hall,
Room 115: tutorial support in math and math-related courses; Web-based math courses
homework, tutoring and testing; math anxiety help; and reference books.
Success in a math course is achieved by working on assignments as soon as possible after
class and by making accomplishments each day. Students who have difficulty with math
courses should call 724-938-5893 to schedule an appointment. They should bring attempted
homework with them.
Nationally renowned authors claim that half of all college students are math-anxious and
that many math-anxious students exhibit physiological symptoms, such as headaches or
stomachaches. Students with these symptoms only in math environments should discuss
the situation with the Math Lab director.
Reading Clinic
The Reading Clinic offers free one-hour tutoring sessions to all students. The clinic is
staffed by a faculty member and two work-study students who teach techniques to
improve reading comprehension and vocabulary. Help is also available in identifying
main ideas, making inferences, drawing conclusions, understanding concepts and facts,
and test-taking skills. Emphasis is placed on transferring these skills to college text
reading. In addition, the Reading Clinic assists students in Reading Praxis preparation and
obtaining reading rates. Students can make appointments to work privately or schedule
an independent lab session that is staff-directed. The Reading Clinic is housed in Noss
Hall, Room 107. The office of the Reading Clinic Director, Patricia Johnson, is located in
Noss Hall, Room 118. For more information, call 724-938-4364 or 724- 938-4469 or e-mail at
[email protected] The Reading Clinic is open Monday through Friday.
Writing Center
The Writing Center provides free writing assistance to Cal U students — undergraduate
and graduate — in all academic majors and programs. Trained writing consultants work
one-on-one with students who wish to improve their writing process, including getting
started, developing a first draft, and revising and editing. While writing consultants don’t
copy edit or proofread student papers, they will work closely with students as they learn
strategies (including editing and proofreading) for improving their own writing through
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revision. The Writing Center also offers computer access, a writing resource library and
informative handouts about writing.
Located in Noss Hall, Room 110, the Writing Center is open Monday through Friday.
Hours vary. Walk-ins are welcome, but appointments are encouraged. For more
information or to make an appointment, call 724-938-4336 or e-mail [email protected]
Career Services
Career Services can help you to gain a career advantage by guiding you through the
four steps of the Career Advantage Program: DISCOVER, EXPLORE, EXPERIENCE and
IMPLEMENT. Services are available to current and prospective students as well as alumni
via one-on-one appointments and the Career Services website. Every Cal U student and
graduate has a career adviser in Career Services.
Students are encouraged to visit Career Services beginning the freshman year to:
• Meet your career adviser;
• Obtain information and guidance in choosing a major and exploring career options using
the Strong Interest Inventory and eDISCOVER;
• Learn how to effectively use the Career Services website and other targeted resources to
explore careers and conduct a job or graduate school search;
• Find a job shadow experience;
• Find cooperative education opportunities (paid, career-related experience as early as the
summer after the freshman year);
• Learn how to write an effective resume and cover letter;
• Practice interviewing skills by doing a mock interview;
• Learn how to find full-time, part-time, co-op and internship positions on the College
Central Network at www.collegecentral.com/calu;
• Learn how to prepare for a job or career fair;
• Sign up for campus interviews and information sessions;
• Learn how to build your professional network using the Ca U Career Network on
LinkedIn at www.linkedin.com; and
• Meet with your career adviser to create your job search or graduate school plan at the
end of your junior year or beginning of your senior year.
Career Services also conducts workshops and presentations for classes and clubs. For more
information, call 724-938-4413 or visit the website at www.calu.edu/careers.
Find us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/CalUCareerServices.
Cooperative Education
Co-op is a program provided by Career Services that enables students in all majors
(undergraduate and graduate) to gain paid, career-related experience as early as their
sophomore year. The program gives students the opportunity to relate classroom theory
with a practical work experience in a field related to their academic or career goals.
Students may be employed part time or full time, and may choose to work during the
fall, spring and/or summer semester. Undergraduates, as well as graduate students, in
all academic majors are encouraged to participate, provided they meet the eligibility
requirements. It is expected that the student’s cooperative education experience will span
two semesters or summers while enrolled at California.
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Co-op Eligibility
• Completion of 32 credits (associate degree, 15; master’s degree, 6), and student must
have at least a 2.00 overall grade point average (3.00 for master’s); and
• Agreement to complete co-op experiences (experiences can be completed in the summer,
fall or spring, full time or part time).
Three Ways to Fit Co-op into an Academic Program:
• Work part time while still enrolled full time in classes;
• Work full time with no classes scheduled for the semester; and
• Work full time or part time in the summer.
Where Can I Work?
• Students can work either locally or nationwide;
• Co-op advertises positions throughout the United States and abroad; and
• The co-op coordinator can assist students in developing co-op sites in any location.
How Does Co-op Differ from Internships?
• All co-op positions are paid — internship positions can be either paid or unpaid;
• Co-op is administered through Career Services — internships are coordinated through
the Internship Center in partnership with academic departments; and
• Co-op is a noncredit experience — all internships are for credit. (Students receive a
notation on their transcript for their co-op experience.)
Cooperative education positions are advertised on the College Central Network website,
www.collegecentral.com/calu.
Students who enroll in cooperative education are eligible to apply for posted positions.
Additional information and appointments with the cooperative education coordinator are
available in the Career Services Department, Eberly Hall, Room 230.
Internship Center
An internship offers students a for-credit opportunity to acquire college-level knowledge
and skills outside of a traditional academic setting through an affiliation with community
organizations, governmental agencies or private businesses. More than 2,500 Cal U
students participate in internships and other types of experiential education each year.
Internship Center staff work with faculty, students and community organizations to create
quality internships. Cal U students have interned at hundreds of diverse local, regional and
national organizations. The following are just a few examples:
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• Late Show with David Letterman
• International Criminal Tribunal for the
Former Yugoslavia, The Hague, Netherlands
• Sands Resorts
• Dallas Cowboys
• KDKA-TV
• Pittsburgh Tissue Engineering Initiative
• U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency
• Pittsburgh Steelers
• America’s Most Wanted
• Walter Reed Army Medical Center
• U.S. Department of Defense
• Cox Broadcasting
• Department of Justice
• Drug Enforcement Agency
• Pittsburgh Children’s Museum
• Trump National Golf Club
• Urban League of Indianapolis
• Nickelodeon
• The Golf Channel
• NASA
Frequently Asked Questions
Where do I start if I want to participate in an internship?
Students should always start by meeting with their faculty adviser. A student’s academic
readiness, prerequisites, requirements, number of credits and possible internship sites will
be discussed. Students must also declare their intent to intern by enrolling in the internship
intent section during early registration for spring and fall semesters.
How do I find an internship?
The Internship Center maintains InternLink, a database of internship resources. Staff can
also assist students in researching related resources, such as industry-specific websites,
Labor and Industry information, technology councils, the Regional Internship Center,
and more. Students also locate internships through their academic department, family
and friends, Cal U alumni, job and internship fairs, and professional organizations. All
internships must have the approval of the academic department. Students can contact the
Internship Center to learn how to effectively search for an internship.
Are internships paid?
Internships can be paid or unpaid. Compensation is defined by the employer.
How many credits does a student receive for an internship?
Credits typically range from 3 to 12. The number of credits for the internship will be
recommended by department faculty and approved by the dean of the student’s college. In
most departments, students work 40 hours per credit for an internship.
What is the difference between an internship and co-op?
• Internship: The Internship Center coordinates internships in partnership with academic
departments. They can be either paid or unpaid. Internships are a for-credit program
and are supervised by faculty members.
• Co-op: A co-op is a service provided by the Career Services Department. They are
always paid positions. Students do not receive credit for their work experience.
What should I do to prepare for an internship?
• Contact Career Services to develop your Career Advantage Plan. There you will learn
about job shadowing, co-ops, informational interviewing, preparing a resume and cover
letter, mock interviews, and more.
• Go to www.calu.edu, search for and complete the following online orientations:
——“Introduction to Internships”
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——“Making the Most of your Internship”
——“Sexual Harassment”
——“Employment Discrimination”
——“Welcoming Diversity”
——“Safety and Security”
• Take related courses and hone your computer skills.
• Begin researching internships at least two semesters prior to the semester of the
internship.
• Keep those grades up!
Where do I get more information?
Students should contact the Internship Center for help in navigating the process, locating
internship sites or any issues related to internships:
• Visit the website at www.calu.edu and search “Internship Center.”
• Visit Eberly Science and Technology Center, Room 230. Phone: 724-938-1578.
• E-mail Karen Primm: [email protected]
Peer Mentoring
The peer mentoring program is designed to help new students with their transition into Cal
U. The peer mentoring program assigns first semester freshmen and transfer students to
upper-class peer mentors.
The peer mentor serves as a support and resource person who provides information,
encouragement and guidance during the student’s first year at Cal U. For more information
on peer mentoring, contact the Universitywide Mentoring Program at 724-938-1682 or
[email protected]
Visit www.calu.edu and search for “peer mentor” for additional information.
Visiting Student Program
Students at California University may choose to enroll for a period of time at any of
the other 13 institutions in the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education; and
similarly, students from those 13 institutions may enroll at California. These institutions
are Bloomsburg, Cheyney, Clarion, East Stroudsburg, Edinboro, Indiana, Kutztown, Lock
Haven, Mansfield, Millersville, Shippensburg, Slippery Rock and West Chester universities.
The purposes of this program are to allow students at one institution to participate, for
a limited period of time, in courses, programs or experiences not available at their home
institution, without loss of institutional residency, eligibility for honors or athletics or
credits toward graduation, and to expand options available to students in such matters as
student teaching, clinical experiences, internships and international exchange programs.
Further information may be obtained from the Office of the Provost. Links to online
undergraduate college catalogs of participating institutions may be found on the
Manderino Library’s website at www.library.calu.edu.
The procedures and standards for the Visiting Student Program apply equally to students
at any of the State System institutions and are as follows:
• The student must have satisfactorily completed at least 27 credits at California and be in
good academic standing.
• The student must obtain advance approval from California University to complete
specified studies at a sibling university under this program. Each university specifies the
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approval procedure for its own students’ participation and for students from other State
System universities.
• The student must present evidence of approval from California University and evidence
of visiting university acceptance at the time of registration at the sibling university.
• A student may complete up to 18 credits in a single semester and up to 16 credits of
summer work as a visiting student.
• All credits and grades accrued at the sibling university will be accepted in full by
California University and thereafter treated as California University credits and grades.
• The student registers at, and pays tuition and fees to, the State System university visited.
A student wishing to divide a course load between two institutions during the same
term registers and pays appropriate tuition and fees at both universities.
Public Safety
The Department of Public Safety and University Police at California University of
Pennsylvania is a fully recognized law enforcement agency as authorized by 71 P.S. 646,
the Administrative Code of 1929 as amended and Title 18 of the Pennsylvania Consolidated
Statutes (Crime and Offenses), and 24 P.S. 20-1006-A(14) 20-2010A (5) of the State System of
Higher Education Act.
The department consists of professionally trained individuals capable of responding to
requests for assistance in routine and emergency situations. The department is certified
with automatic external defibrillators (AED). The department, a diverse group of police
officers, communications officers and secretarial staff, provides continuous 24-hour
assistance to the University community.
The staff includes a director, assistant director, two shift supervisors and 11 additional
commissioned police officers that have received training at the Pennsylvania State Police
Academy. Two public safety communications officers and one departmental secretary
contribute to the operation of the department. Public Safety personnel are certified in CPR,
basic first-aid procedures, and the emergency medical airborne evacuation policy and
procedure for transportation of the seriously ill or critically injured.
Additional services offered to University students, faculty and staff consist of parking and
traffic management; criminal investigations; health, fire and safety surveys; special event
planning; accident investigation; and crime prevention information and presentations.
Pursuant to the Pennsylvania College and University Security Act and the Federal Crime
Awareness and Campus Security Act of 1990, postsecondary institutions, including
colleges and universities, must annually provide to all applicants, students and employees
information with respect to campus crime statistics and the security policies of the
institution.
The information is compiled by California University and made available through the
Office of Admissions, Office of Student Development and Services, Office of Public Safety,
and on the University website.
Character Education Institute
The California University of Pennsylvania Character Education Institute opened in January
1995 in response to Emphasis on Values, a report produced by the Pennsylvania State
System of Higher Education urging its universities to give increased attention to values
during the 1990s and beyond.
Goals of the Institute
The Character Education Institute has three broad goals based on the University’s core
values of Integrity, Civility and Responsibility:
• To provide character development training to regional organizations;
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• To serve as a resource to the University’s colleges, departments and student
organizations as they contribute to the moral development of California University
students; and
• To provide a resource center to help prepare education majors for their unavoidable
role as character educators, and to provide assistance to school districts and local
organizations that seek to contribute to the moral development of the citizens in their
communities.
Services
The Character Education Institute provides the following services and resources:
• The institute establishes relationships with regional businesses and organizations to
provide character education and principle-based consulting services and training. As a
result of this training, businesses and organizations establish endowed scholarships at
the University.
• The Character Education Institute provides resources to members of the University
community as they give increased attention to moral reflection and dialogue. These
resources include materials relevant to all education majors concerning their future role
as character educators.
• The institute maintains a resource center that contains character education curriculum
materials, books, journals, newsletters, audio and videotapes, and a clipping file on
special subjects, e.g., values in athletics. These materials are available to University
faculty, staff, administrators and students; to local civic groups; and to school directors
and staff from local school districts.
To obtain additional information about the California University Character Education
Institute, contact:
Ron Paul
Executive Director, Character Education Institute
California University of Pennsylvania
250 University Avenue
California, PA 15419
724-938-5491
[email protected]
www.calu.edu/education/charactered
Marketing and University Relations
The Office of Marketing and University Relations provides a full range of strategic
marketing, communications and public relations services to California University of
Pennsylvania. This office serves as an umbrella for the University’s Marketing and
Communications and Public Relations offices, as well as the Web Team. The office manages
the brand and image of the University and engages in strategic partnerships to promote
the University and its mission. It produces print, video and audio pieces for both internal
and external audiences, and it maintains the University’s official website and social media
sites. Its work is designed to raise awareness of the University, its offerings and its impact
on the region; to enhance relationships with the Cal U community, alumni and friends;
to communicate with prospective and current students, faculty, staff and the general
public; and to promote the progress and achievements of the University and its members.
Marketing and University Relations works with the President’s Office, University
Development and Alumni Relations, Admissions, Academic Affairs and other University
offices to assist in reaching institutional objectives. The director of communications and
public relations serves as the University spokesperson. The office of the vice president for
Marketing and University Relations is in Room 114 of Old Main. Phone: 724-938-5938; fax:
724-938-5880.
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Marketing
The Office of Marketing identifies opportunities to promote California University. In
conjunction with consultants and members of various University constituencies, Marketing
defines, plans and executes campaigns, producing supporting materials that satisfy
the stated goals of various University areas. The office also collects and analyzes data,
evaluates results and communicates its findings to the appropriate constituency. Phone:
724-938-4195; fax: 724-938-5932.
Communications and Public Relations
The Office of Public Affairs run by the director of communications and public relations
delivers the University’s message to a variety of audiences, gathering information from
the Cal U community and distributing it regularly to print and electronic media outlets. In
collaboration with Marketing, University administration and internal clients, this office sets
goals and develops strategies for the University’s relationship-building efforts. The office
publishes the Cal U Review, the University’s quarterly alumni magazine; the California
Journal, the University’s official weekly publication; and the President’s Perspective, a
quarterly publication circulated to a targeted on- and off-campus audience. Phone: 724-9384195; fax: 724-938-1500.
Web Team
The Web Team communicates the University’s message worldwide via the Internet. This
office produces and administers a variety of online applications, including the NuRelm
NuContent and Hannon Hill Cascade Server content management systems. The team
maintains California University’s official website, and it uses social media sites, such as
Facebook and YouTube, to build and maintain relationships among prospective, current
and former students, as well as University administration, faculty and staff. The office
also produces and posts podcasts (audio) and vidcasts (video) to raise awareness of the
University, highlight its offerings, showcase student and faculty projects, and promote
campus events.
University Development and Alumni Relations
The Office of University Development and Alumni Relations is responsible for the
University’s fundraising and alumni relations efforts. This office promotes alumni
engagement and works with individuals, corporations and foundations to provide critical
financial support for the University and its students. The office also leads and manages the
University’s capital campaign. The office of the vice president for University Development
and Alumni Relations is in Room 106 of Old Main.
University Development
The Development staff interacts with major gifts donors, corporations, foundations and
others to support the University’s strategic goals and to provide funding for student
scholarships. In addition to the capital campaign, planned giving, major gifts, corporate
and foundation relations, donor relations, prospect research, and advancement services are
part of this office’s mission. Phone: 724-938-5775; fax: 724-938-4547; e-mail:
[email protected]
Alumni Relations and Annual Giving
The Office of Alumni Relations and Annual Giving is the liaison between the University
and approximately 53,000 living alumni. Located on the first floor of the Michael and Julia
Kara Alumni House, this office organizes, coordinates and/or promotes a wide variety of
programs, services and events, including Homecoming, Alumni Weekend and numerous
class, geographic and special programs both on and off campus. In addition, this office
manages the Annual Fund, which provides operational support to enrich educational
experiences at Cal U, and it works with the Alumni Association to conduct various projects
to engage alumni. Phone: 724-938-4418; fax: 724-938-4327; e-mail: [email protected]
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Alumni Association
The California University of Pennsylvania Alumni Association serves the University
and its alumni by fostering a wide circle of beneficial relationships among alumni,
students, the University and the greater community. The University’s alumni have been
organized officially since 1939. Today, approximately 53,000 graduates are members of the
association. The association’s board consists of 24 directors, elected by the membership.
The board works closely with the President’s Office and the Office of University
Development and Alumni Relations. Phone: 724-938-4418; fax: 724-938-4327; e-mail:
[email protected]
Emeriti Faculty Association
The Emeriti Faculty Association of California University of Pennsylvania was founded in
1980 and has served and supported the University and its programs continuously as an
independent organization which exists to support the mission, goals and objectives of the
University. Today, 209 former faculty members are part of the Emeriti Faculty Association.
The executive director of Alumni Relations and Annual Giving serves as the liaison
between the Emeriti Faculty Association and the University. Phone: 724-938-4418; fax: 724938-4327; e-mail: [email protected]
Foundation for California University of Pennsylvania
The Foundation for California University of Pennsylvania, with offices on the second floor
of the Michael and Julia Kara Alumni House, was founded in 1986 to receive funds from
foundations, businesses, alumni, staff, faculty and friends to benefit the University and its
programs. The foundation manages endowment funds that provide support for student
scholarships and other University activities. The foundation board consists of 19 members
elected through a nominations process. The vice president for University Development and
Alumni Relations serves as the liaison between the University and the foundation. Phone:
724-938-4329; fax: 724-938-4480; e-mail: [email protected]
Student Affairs
Inherent in the University’s educational mission is a commitment to Building Character,
Building Careers as well as supporting the University’s core values of Integrity, Civility
and Responsibility. The central focus of the Student Development and Services division is
the personalization of the University experience, with concern for individual intellectual,
personal, social, leadership and physical development. The division is committed to
recognizing and assisting in the full realization of student potential. This includes
supporting the University’s Bill of Rights and Responsibilities, incorporating continuous
improvement into all programs and activities, promoting community service and diversity,
and instilling the culture of philanthropy throughout the student body.
In order to foster this holistic development of students, the division designed and
implemented student learning outcomes. The object of Student Development and Services
is to enable students to achieve the seven learning domains listed below through a variety
of programs and services:
• Values, Morals and Ethics;
• Self-Awareness/Intrapersonal Development;
• Interpersonal/Social Development;
• Leadership and Citizenship;
• Preparation for Lifelong Learning;
• Purpose/Vocational Competence; and
• Physical Development.
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For additional information and regulations governing student life and conduct besides
those presented here, students should refer to the current edition of The Student
Handbook.
Opportunities for work-study jobs, graduate assistantships, internships and volunteer
work assignments are available for qualified students. Check with the various offices or
departments to inquire about openings.
Registration at the University assumes the student’s acceptance of responsibility for
compliance with all regulations published in this catalog, as well as rules found in
official publications or officially announced to the University community. For additional
information and regulations governing student life and conduct, refer to “The Statement
of Student Rights and Responsibilities: Student Code of Conduct” in the current edition of
The Student Handbook.
Alcohol and Other Drug Awareness Programs
The University alcohol and other drug awareness and education programs are located in
Carter Hall. Education is provided by the CHOICES program, located in Suite G35.
The Wellness Center conducts outreach activities intended to make students aware of the
risks involved with alcohol and other drug use. The Wellness Center is staffed by a director
and is assisted by University students who are studying in the field of counseling and/or
have demonstrated interest in helping people better understand the potential consequences
of alcohol and other drug use. In this respect, Wellness Center activities and sponsorship of
programming is largely peer driven. The Wellness Center recognizes that there are periods
within students’ lives that risks run higher and makes added efforts to target these specific
periods with its awareness efforts. For more information, call 724-938-4056.
CHOICES provides assessment and intervention designed to assist those whose behavior
may be harmful to themselves and/or others because of alcohol and other drug use.
Participation in CHOICES is open to any University student, while those who have been
cited by the University judicial officer for violations of the Student Code of Conduct
involving the use of alcohol and other drugs are required to participate. CHOICES I, the
first level of this program, utilizes Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College
Students (BASICS). BASICS is a pragmatic and clinically proven approach to the prevention
and treatment of undergraduate alcohol abuse. For more information, call 724-938-5507.
CHOICES II involves participants in more in-depth assessment and intervention efforts
aimed at assisting them in making healthy decisions. This second level of the program may
include referral to a University counselor and/or an outside counseling agency. For more
information, call 724-938-5507.
California Times (California Student Newspaper)
The California Times is the University’s student newspaper, owned and operated by
the Student Association Inc. The Times supports the educational mission of California
University and the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education by providing students
with co-curricular journalism production experience. Students are given leadership
responsibilities in virtually all aspects of creating a weekly print and online newspaper
publication for the University community. Areas of specialization are available in news
writing, reporting, graphic design, photography, advertising and editing. For more
information, call 724-938-4321 or e-mail [email protected]
CalCard — University Identification Card
The CalCard is both a campus identification card and a convenient way to make purchases
and use services on campus. The CalCard is available to all California University of
Pennsylvania students, faculty, staff and eligible guests. The CalCard comes ready to use
and pre-programmed with basic services, and can be enhanced based on users’ needs.
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CalCard Services
AAA — Part of the basic service of each student CalCard is the AAA Roadside Assistance
program. Under this program, Cal U students can receive two free, limited roadside
assistance calls from AAA per academic year. To use this feature, simply call the toll-free
number on the back of the CalCard. For more information, visit the Information Desk in the
Natali Student Center for an AAA brochure.
Access — Students who reside on campus use their CalCard to access their residence halls.
Banking/Financial Services — On-campus financial services are offered to students,
faculty and staff through the Pennsylvania State Employees Credit Union (PSECU) in
conjunction with the CalCard. Students can elect to have their CalCard activated for use
as an ATM/debit card associated with their account. The PSECU E-Center is located on the
lower level of the Natali Student Center. ATMs are located at the Natali Student Center and
at the Vulcan Village apartments.
Entertainment — Students who have paid the student services fee receive free admission to
most entertainment events sponsored by the Student Association Inc.
Fitness Center — Students who have paid the student services fee receive unlimited access
to the Herron Recreation and Fitness Center. Faculty, staff and alumni who have purchased
a membership use their CalCard to gain admission to the fitness center.
Manderino Library — The CalCard is used to check out materials and access the library’s
PILOT system.
Tickets — Students who have paid the student services fee receive free admission to all
home, regular-season intercollegiate sporting events.
CalCard Accounts
CalCard accounts work like debit accounts; users deposit funds in advance and their
account is debited each time they make a purchase.
Meal — Everyone enrolled in a meal plan will use the CalCard to pay for their meals.
When purchasing a meal, just present the CalCard to the cashier. The user’s meal account
will be automatically reduced by one meal. Everyone enrolled in a meal plan will
automatically receive a Dine Account.
Dine — Opening a declining-balance Dine Account is as simple as making a deposit at the
Bursar’s Office. The Dine Account can be used to pay for food at all food service locations.
Deposits made to the Dine Account are available for use the next business day. Funds
deposited to a Dine Account are available throughout the academic year (fall through
spring), and do not carry over to the next academic year.
Shop — The CalCard Shop Account is the master debit account for on-campus use. Just
make an initial deposit by using cash at one of the Value Transfer Stations located in the
Natali Student Center or Manderino Library. Deposits can also be made via credit card
on the web at calcard.blackboard.com. Shop Dollars can be used to make purchases at
all food service locations, Cal U Student Bookstore, vending machines, laundry facilities,
Manderino Library for photocopies and overdue book fines, and at the Information Desk at
the Natali Student Center for CalCard services, tickets and stamps. Shop Dollars are carried
over on your account from semester to semester.
Lost Cards
Report lost CalCards to the CalCard Office. CalCards can also be suspended via the web
at calcard.blackboard.com. Those who have selected the option to have their CalCard
activated as an ATM/debit card also need to contact PSECU if their card is lost or stolen.
Additional Information
For more information, visit the Information Desk in the Natali Student Center, call the
CalCard Office at 724-938-4300 or e-mail [email protected]
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Cal U Student Bookstore
The Cal U Student Bookstore, located on the first level of the Natali Student Center, offers
varied services to all students, faculty and staff, including a textbook reservation service
that allows students to order books before the first week of class through its online service
at www.calupa.bkstr.com. The bookstore also offers a text rental program that allows
students to rent selected books at 50 percent off the new price. These books may be used
for the semester and then returned by the last day of finals. Some titles are also available
as e-books. Payments accepted are Visa, MasterCard, Discover, American Express, cash
and checks. If you would like to charge against your financial aid/account charge during
the first week of class (spring and fall semesters), visit our online site at www.calupa.
bkstr.com. Instructions as to how the process works and the authorization form that must
be completed will be located on the first page two weeks prior to the beginning of the
semester. The Cal U Student Bookstore offers a variety of other items, including Cal U
clothing and giftware, magazines, study guides, greeting cards and computer software.
Campus Ministry
Spiritual development is an integral part of the process of education and human growth.
A campus ministry, staffed by professional campus ministers, fosters the development
of spiritual and religious student life. The campus ministry of California University of
Pennsylvania, at 724-938-4573 or [email protected], is located in the Natali Student Center,
Room 143. Office hours are posted at the office while the University is in session.
Clubs and Organizations
Many active clubs and student organizations are offered through academic departments
and the Student Association Inc. These groups provide social, educational, civic
engagement, community service and leadership opportunities for students. A complete list
of SAI-funded organizations, current advisers and phone numbers may be found in The
Student Handbook or at calu.edu/current-students/get-involved/clubs-and-organizations.
Commuter Center/Commuting and Nontraditional Student Services
Commuter Center
This facility for commuting students, including nontraditional students, is located on the
first level of the Natali Student Center. It is a popular place to lounge between classes.
The center is the home of the Commuter Council. This bright, spacious and comfortable
room offers numerous amenities free of charge including computers and a laser printer,
microwave oven, refrigerator, television, lockers, and a wealth of information and referrals.
For more information, contact the Commuter Center at 724-938-4021. Also, visit the
Commuter Center website at www.calu.edu/current-students/student-services/commuters/
index.htm.
Commuter Council
Membership provides opportunities to enhance your leadership skills and broaden your
social life. The Commuter Council also welcomes the involvement of nontraditional
students (see “Nontraditional Student Services,” below). For more information, contact the
adviser at 724-938-4553.
Nontraditional Student Services
Student Affairs recognizes students seeking a degree after a hiatus from schooling,
seeking a second degree, seeking career skills enhancement, or taking non-degree or
continuing education courses. The Commuter Center provides services for commuters (see
“Commuter Center”) and opens avenues to the pleasures and benefits of university life for
those whose time on campus is subject to the constraints of off-campus responsibilities.
Nontraditional students frequent the Commuter Center (see “Commuter Center,” above)
and are also active members of the Commuter Council (see “Commuter Council,” above).
For more information, contact the adviser at 724-938-4553.
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Commuters and guests of the University who wish to avoid parking on the lower campus
are urged to use the park and ride lot across the street from Vulcan Village. Regular shuttle
service is available to the lower campus through the Mid Mon Valley Transit Authority.
The shuttle service is free of charge for California University of Pennsylvania students
with a valid CalCard. There is a nominal fee for nonstudents to ride the shuttle. For more
information, call 724-489-0880.
The Office of Student Affairs and the Student Association Inc. jointly support commuting
students at Cal U. For more information, visit the Commuter Center and the Commuter
Center Web page at www.calu.edu/current-students/student-services/commuters/index.
htm.
Counseling and Psychological Services
Counseling Center faculty members provide an array of short-term counseling and
psychological services to University students with problems that interfere with their
adjustment to campus life, personal development or effective educational performance. The
center provides the following services to students: evaluation, consultation, brief therapy
and emergency intervention. Students requiring intensive or specialized care will be
referred to community mental health providers. All therapists working in the Counseling
Center adhere to federal and state ethical and legal standards and laws concerning
confidentiality. Enrolled students can make an appointment by calling 724-938-4056, 8
a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, while school is in session. Evening hours may be
available by special appointment. After-hours and weekend crisis intervention is facilitated
through the Public Safety Department at 724-938-4299.
Activities Transcript
The activities transcript is an official record of the co-curricular activities, accomplishments
and learning experiences of students attending Cal U. Official copies of the activities
transcript may be used to complement a student’s resume and academic transcript when
applying to professional and graduate schools or prospective employers. The activities
transcript is the map for navigating through a student’s California University experience.
By reviewing the transcript each semester or academic year, students will begin to identify
strengths as well as identify areas they might improve. This information can guide a
student’s choice of activities in the following semester. Students can register and manage
their transcripts online at calyou.calu.edu/activitiestranscript.
California University Television (CUTV)
California University Television (CUTV) is the University’s cable television station, which
is owned and operated by the Student Association Inc. CUTV is seen in nearly 100,000
homes, 24 hours a day on the Atlantic Broadband and Armstrong cable systems, and is on
Video on Demand in the Comcast cable system.
The mission of CUTV is to produce and provide programming of regional community
interest while providing valuable hands-on educational experience for interested students.
This applied learning supports the mission and goals of California University, as well
as the priorities and imperatives of the State System of Higher Education. Students can
develop skills in television technology through experience in a variety of technical areas,
including camera work, editing, direction and other production roles, as well as on-air
talent positions.
California University television produces a variety of informational, educational and
entertainment programs, such as CUTV Newscenter (a live news show), a variety of local
government meetings, a student-produced comedy show (Over The Top), a local talk show,
Valley Views, and many more. CUTV is heavily involved with University and area high
school sports coverage. Over the past several years, CUTV has covered all of California
University’s football and basketball contests, as well as various volleyball, soccer, baseball
and softball events. CUTV also produces a weekly coach’s show for the sport in season.
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CUTV also produces a High School Football Game of the Week, with several of these
contests carried live to a statewide audience via the Pennsylvania Cable Network (PCN).
To its credit, CUTV has been recognized by many national organizations. The National
Association of Collegiate Broadcasters (NACB) awarded CUTV “Best in the Nation” for
its news and sports coverage, as well as station of the year. The station has also received
more than 30 Telly Awards for its sports, news and documentary coverage. In addition,
CUTV has received awards from the Society of Professional Journalists, Communicator,
Videography and Axiem organizations.
Offices and studios are located in the Natali Student Center. CUTV also maintains a fully
loaded production truck, capable of producing multicamera field events. The program
employs a staff of three professionals, and enjoys a student membership of more than 45.
For more information, contact J.R. Wheeler, assistant dean of student affairs/media, in the
Natali Student Center; phone: 724-938-5823; e-mail: [email protected]
Dining Services
The goal of the University dining services is to provide a quality, cost-effective, innovative
dining program for students living on and off campus. The University encourages student
involvement and awareness to help provide quality, nutritious meals at a reasonable
cost. Dining locations provide an important environment for student interaction and
socialization. Students living in the residence halls, as well as commuters, may choose from
a variety of meal plans. All students who live in lower-campus University residence halls
must participate in the meal program. A detailed dining services brochure may be obtained
at the Information Desk in the Natali Student Center.
Housing: [email protected] U
[email protected] U offers a variety of options for students, all designed to fit a variety of
lifestyles from the first year of college through graduate school. University housing was
designed with significant input from students, resulting in facilities and services tailored to
students’ changing needs. Suite-style residence halls on the lower campus house students
who are primarily freshmen. The suites also include a mix of upper-class students to
promote community development and sharing of campus traditions. Since the first year of
college typically involves numerous academic, personal and social transitions, the staff’s
emphasis is on support and building community so students feel connected to Cal U, adjust
to their new home and succeed academically. As students mature and want to branch out
on their own to more independent living, the garden-style apartment complex, Vulcan
Village, is available. Fully equipped apartments that house students just one mile from the
lower campus give students the increased freedom and independence they’re ready for.
Students must purchase a food service plan if they live in the suite-style halls on the
lower campus. Vulcan Village apartments have fully equipped kitchens, so a meal plan is
optional.
Lower-Campus Housing: The Suite Life
Housing on the lower campus is not guaranteed for everyone. A majority of lower-campus
spaces are reserved for incoming first-year students. These spaces are assigned on a
first-come, first-served basis, so it helps to apply as early as possible. A percentage of the
spaces available are set aside for upperclassmen, and a lottery is held to determine who
can contract for lower-campus housing. Students not selected in the lottery must fulfill the
remainder of their four-semester residency requirement at Vulcan Village. The University
policy states that all first-time freshmen who continue enrollment are required by the
University to reside in University housing (either lower-campus halls or upper-campus
housing at Vulcan Village) for the first four semesters of their college career, with the
following exceptions:
• Students commuting from the residence of their parents or legal guardians;
• Married students; and
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• Students who are 21 years of age or older by the date of registration.
The housing contract is binding and includes both the fall and spring semesters of an
academic year.
The University retains the right to assign all students to particular residence halls,
floors and roommates in the best interests of the University. You may request a room or
roommate(s), and we will attempt to honor the request, but will not be obligated to do
so. The University will not guarantee any student a given room, roommate or residence
hall based on class rank, previous occupancy or any other criteria. The assigned space
remains the property of the University and regulations apply for its use. Failure to abide
by set regulations may result in disciplinary action. If your behavior indicates that you are
not suitable for the residence hall environment, the University has the authority to take
possession of a given room at any time without refunding fees. Contracting for housing on
the lower campus in any academic year does not obligate the University to offer housing
in the same location in future semesters. For more information, contact the Housing and
Residence Life office at 724-938-4444.
The University has coed residence halls, all of which are completely smoke-free and consist
of suites in various configurations. All suites are single-gender. Fully air-conditioned
and carpeted, the suites provide the most popular amenities students requested during
construction planning. Each residence hall has a computer lab, community room, TV area
with large screen TV, a kitchen and vending area, recycling area, full CalCard use, and
digital video cameras. Each floor also has a lounge, study and laundry rooms, while each
suite provides free local telephone service, TV cable and high-speed Internet connection.
The lower-campus residence life program at California University serves the needs of
residential students and is designed to create a stable living and learning environment
based on the University’s core values of Integrity, Civility and Responsibility. Here, the
halls are more than a place to sleep; they are a learning experience. For many of you,
coming to college is your first opportunity to be away from parents, siblings and lifelong
friends. Residential living encourages you to develop a sense of independence and to build
new relationships with a variety of people, often resulting in long-lasting friendships.
Each semester, the staff works with students to plan activities and programs that promote
learning outside the classroom and help create a sense of community within the halls. In
addition, hall living can also be a cultural learning experience because you will be living
and interacting closely with a variety of students. This interaction helps to dispel myths
and stereotypes about people and their backgrounds. There are many opportunities for
student governance, including hall council, inter-residence hall council and residence life
conduct board.
Students who take advantage of the full experience offered by residence hall living will
learn about themselves as they gain hands-on experience in applying what they learn in
class, develop communication and leadership skills, and create lifelong friendships.
A detailed description of the residence life program, facilities and residence hall rules and
regulations is included in The Student Handbook.
Specialty Housing
Residence life offers students the opportunity to live in a community consisting of students
who share interests or concerns for similar issues. Current special interest housing, offered
when there is sufficient demand, includes wellness, quiet, limited visitation, single gender
and the University Honors Program.
Residence Life Staff
Each residence hall is supervised by a professional residence hall director, who assures
that students’ experience with the “suite life” is comfortable, safe and contributes to their
personal development and academic success. This director is supported by community
assistants, undergraduate or graduate student leaders who live on each floor of the halls.
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Safety and Security
While safety requires the cooperation of all members of the residence hall community, the
University uses several strategies to promote a secure living environment. In addition to
the live-in staff that is available through a 24-hour on-call schedule, residence hall desks
are staffed or monitored 24 hours a day. Hall access is controlled through main doors near
the desk, with other doors alarmed for emergency use only. The residence halls are locked
at all times. Only residents using their CalCards have unrestricted access. Guests must call
from the entrance and be signed in and escorted at all times. A state-of-the-art sprinkler,
fire and smoke detection system ensures prompt response to fire emergencies. Digital video
cameras are positioned at all entrances and exits, as well as inside the halls on each wing
door. All halls have emergency phones outside the entrances.
Inter-Residence Hall Council
This body represents the interests of students who live in the residence halls on the lower
campus. The council provides a forum for residence life issues and sponsors various
activities.
Tech Support
California University provides a computer lab with a printer in each residence hall for
residence hall student use. The labs are fully integrated into the University’s network.
Students have access to any of the network services on campus, including Manderino
Library, other State System libraries, students’ e-mail and web space, the Internet and
other services. All labs are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week, during the school
term. They are accessed by using your room key. The residence hall labs are for residents
and their guests with a valid ID (residents have priority). Rules posted by staff must be
followed. Each lab has a laser printer, but you must supply your own paper. If you bring
your own computer, all residence hall rooms have Cat-6 connections for hookup to the
network. This service is provided at no additional cost. There is no need to use a modem
or have a contract with an outside Internet provider. You need an Ethernet cable and
10BaseT Ethernet card installed and working. The University does not provide or install the
Ethernet card or cable. All students living in the residence halls must have their computer
scanned for the proper antivirus software for service and review the acceptable use
policies. For more information, contact the Help Desk at [email protected]
Upper-Campus Housing: Vulcan Village
Vulcan Village is located one mile from the lower campus and next to the University’s
sports complex. The property has 10 three-story buildings that primarily house 768 upperclass students in 199 separate apartment units. Vulcan Village offers a variety of apartment
configurations to meet your needs, including four-bedroom apartments with a private bath
for each resident (4x4), four private bedrooms and two shared baths (4x2), and two private
bedrooms with private baths (2x2). Each resident is responsible for his/her own individual
lease. Vulcan Village is staffed by five full-time office staff, including a live-in professional;
12 student community assistants; three full-time maintenance staff; and a part-time
groundskeeper. The staff is available to attend to the needs of the residents, which includes
responding to maintenance requests and developing social and educational opportunities
for residents to attend.
Each apartment has a full-size stove, microwave, refrigerator, dishwasher, garbage
disposal, and washer and dryer. High-speed wireless Internet (as well as hard-wired
Ethernet), local telephone service and cable TV service are all included in the rent and
are available in each bedroom and the common area/living room. All other utilities are
included with the rent as well (i.e., water, sewer, electric, garbage). Each unit is equipped
with interconnected smoke detectors and a sprinkler system. There is a fully equipped
fitness center on the property along with a computer lab. Additionally, the clubhouse
includes a recreation room with a large screen TV, pool table, table tennis, digital cable and
a video game system. Other amenities include outdoor volleyball and basketball courts
as well as an outdoor swimming pool. There is also a convenience store (The Mighty Bite)
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located in the clubhouse. Parking is available at each building and regular bus service is
provided by the Mid Mon Valley Transit Authority to the lower campus. The bus service
is available at no charge with a valid CalCard. For more information about Vulcan Village,
call 724-938-8990 or visit the website at www.vulcanvillage.com.
Off-Campus Housing
The Office of Off-Campus Housing works with students, landlords and borough officials to
educate and promote the safety and welfare of all students residing in off-campus facilities.
The office also assists students in their search for off-campus housing by providing an offcampus housing list and various resource and educational materials. For more information,
call 724-938-4444 or visit www.calu.edu/current-students/housing/housing/off-campushousing/ for an up-to-date listing of available off-campus housing and other information.
Disclaimer
The information contained in the off-campus list is provided as a service to students. The
data collected or transcribed may at times be inaccurate. The University, its employees or
students are not responsible for any claims or damages that may be incurred. The Office
of Off-Campus Housing makes no warranty on the conditions, terms, prices or other
information contained therein. This information is to be used as a guide to help students
locate off-campus housing and is not to be taken as approved or sanctioned off-campus
housing. This does not create an enforceable obligation to any party from California
University of Pennsylvania, the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education or the
students of California University.
Intercollegiate Athletics
The University sponsors a comprehensive athletic program for both men and women. The
athletic program is regulated by the policies of the NCAA, PSAC, University and athletic
forum and administered by the director of athletics. It is governed by the Office of Student
Affairs with the vice president as the senior administrative officer.
Eighteen varsity sports are available to students who desire to participate in intercollegiate
athletics and who meet the academic standards of the University, the PSAC and the NCAA.
For men, California offers baseball, basketball, cross country, football, golf, soccer, and
indoor and outdoor track and field; for women, California offers basketball, cross country,
golf, soccer, softball, swimming, tennis, indoor and outdoor track and field, and volleyball.
Freshman students must apply to the NCAA Eligibility Center to be eligible to compete in
intercollegiate athletics during their freshman year. Specific requirements may be obtained
from high school guidance counselors, the University athletic director or compliance
officer, and the admissions office.
Academic progress for athletes is monitored by the athletic compliance officer and the
director of academic support for student-athletes. A professional staff of athletic trainers is
always available to work with student-athletes on medical clearances, day-to-day practices
and rehabilitative services. The athletic strength and conditioning program provides sportspecific fitness training to student-athletes.
All students are encouraged to participate in the athletic CHAMPS/Life Skills leadership
program at some time during their athletic careers. The program develops skills in studentathletes in areas of communication, career services, resume writing, manners, etiquette
and diversity. All student-athletes are encouraged to sign up for Career Athletes, which is
designed to allow students to sharpen their career skills, network with alumni and explore
internships as they prepare for their careers after college.
The Student Athlete Advisory Committee (SAAC) is an advisory board made up of
representation of all sports teams that meets regularly to discuss issues pertaining to
student-athletes. This recommending body votes on policies and makes recommendations
to the conference and to the NCAA on proposed future changes in legislation.
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International Student Services Office
World culture is ever-present with students from 24 countries currently studying at
California University. The International Student Services Office, located in Carter Hall,
Room G35, strives to assist international students as they experience challenges as visitors
to the United States and as students at Cal U. Each day international students spend with
the California University community contributes to an experience that will benefit them
in their life pursuits. The International Student Services Office also provides a host of
social activities for international students and their friends from the University and local
communities. Such activities include the International Club and the Annual International
Dinner, held each spring. Additional information on the services provided to international
students or how to become involved with activities can be obtained by calling 724-938-5505.
Student Exchange Programs
California University is affiliated with both the National Student Exchange (NSE) and
Cultural Experiences Abroad (CEA) organizations. NSE (www.NSE.org) enables students
to exchange domestically to their choice from nearly 200 schools throughout the United
States. CEA (www.GoWithCEA.com) offers exchange to multiple locations throughout 15
countries worldwide.
The Student Exchange Program office provides guidance to students on how to
participate, determine available funding and obtain full-time credit while on exchange. A
successful candidate for exchange has a willingness to undertake exposure to unfamiliar
environments and is able to demonstrate academic integrity.
National Student Exchange (NSE)
Students can exchange to other NSE member campuses located throughout the United
States and its territories without having to pay the high cost for out-of-state tuition. Since
its establishment in 1968, NSE has grown to nearly 200 member campuses. Students
may study at the NSE member institution of their choice for up to a full academic year,
undertaking courses approved for application to their degree program at California
University through approval of their academic advisers. Students have the choice to pay
either California University tuition/fees or in-state tuition/fees at the institution to which
they exchange. For further information, contact the student exchange program director at
724-938-5505 and log on to the NSE website at www.nse.org.
Cultural Experiences Abroad (CEA)
CEA provides students with the opportunity to experience international education and
cultural exchange through offerings at institutions located in 24 cities within Argentina,
Australia, Chile, China, Costa Rica, Czech Republic, England, France, Germany, Ireland,
Italy, Mexico, South Africa and Spain. CEA has been chosen to collaborate with California
University in large part due to its practice of special attention to students in customer
service, cultural immersion, academic services and the well-being of participants. Students
undertake courses approved for application to their degree programs at California
University through approval of their academic advisers. CEA offers partial student
scholarships to qualified students. Log on to the CEA website at www.GoWithCEA.com.
Information on how you can become a participant and how to gain approval of course
work for credit toward your degree program can be obtained from the student exchange
program director by calling 724-938-5505.
Intramurals
The intramural program is designed to provide students with a flexible yet structured
environment in which to participate in sports. Activities are administered in league format
with various divisions serving men’s, women’s and open coed recreational teams. Teams
and individuals must formally register for activities. The program is open to all current
students, faculty and staff. For more information, contact Tom Hasbrouck at 724-938-5456.
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Student Conduct
Student Affairs is responsible for administering the conduct system and developing
behavioral standards. The Office of Student Conduct investigates allegations of violations
of behavioral standards for on- or off-campus behavior; explains options and rights to
students; takes disciplinary action on allegations through administrative or board conduct
hearings; maintains all University disciplinary records; and serves as a resource to faculty,
staff and students for behavioral problems. The Office of Student Conduct also offers
alternative conflict resolution options, such as mediation, restorative justice practices and
conflict coaching, that can be used to resolve certain issues outside the conduct system.
The Statement of Student Rights and Responsibilities: Student Code of Conduct outlines
the behavioral standards students are expected to abide by in order to create a positive
community, based on the University’s Rights and Responsibilities. The Office of Student
Conduct and designated hearing officers are responsible for resolving any alleged
violations of these behavioral standards through the process described in the statement,
which is available in the Student Planner and on the University’s website. The University
reserves the right to impose sanctions, such as declining readmission and removal from
University housing and/or the University, following appropriate University conduct
procedures. Immediate actions may be taken on an interim basis for actions deemed to
create a danger to the University community.
Multicultural Student Programs
The Office of Multicultural Student Programs provides programs and activities that
support the ideals of a culturally diverse learning community. It serves as an advocate
for students from diverse backgrounds and offers consultation to other members of the
University community when planning programs and events. For more information, contact
LaMont Coleman at 724-938-5697 or [email protected]
Web/Mobile Development
The SAI student web/mobile development team, located in the Multimedia Access Center,
consists of student employees and volunteers who develop and maintain websites, and
web and mobile applications for clubs and organizations and other areas within Student
Affairs and SAI.
END V (Violence) Center
The END V (Violence) Center works proactively to raise awareness and educate the
campus community on the issues of sexual violence, intimate partner violence and stalking.
In addition, the center offers survivors and their loved ones advocacy and support on
their journey to healing. The END V Center is located in Carter Hall, Room G45. For
information, contact the center at 724-938-5707 or [email protected]
Recreational Services
The mission of the Department of Recreational Services is to provide recreational facilities,
programs and developmental opportunities for the University community. Recreational
Services provides exposure to a variety of activities that contribute to individual physical
fitness. The department also creates opportunities for cooperative and competitive play in
game form. Seven service areas fall within the department: extramurals, fitness, informal
recreation, instructional programs, intramural sports, sports clubs and wellness. For more
information, contact Chuck Bohn, director of recreational services, at [email protected] or
724-938-5925.
Social Fraternities and Sororities
A sorority or a fraternity is an organization whose members have chosen to establish a
close affirmation and friendship with each other. Membership helps to provide leadership
opportunities and career preparation. Every chapter encourages and expects above
average scholarship and participation in various activities that offer valuable experience.
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Community service is also encouraged. For more information, contact the Fraternity and
Sorority Life Office at 724-938-4303.
Student Activities Board (SAB)
Many diverse forms of cultural and contemporary entertainment are offered to students
primarily through the Student Activities Board (SAB). This organization is composed
entirely of full-time undergraduate and graduate students who meet weekly to view and
discuss the possibilities of hosting different entertainment and cultural programs for the
entire University community. The types of programs that SAB sponsors include weekly
movies shown in the Vulcan Theater; spoken word and singer/songwriter performances;
novelty events, such as “Make Your Own Street Signs,” a “Funny Freakin’ Friday’s”
comedy event once a month; and off-campus trips such as Pittsburgh sporting events,
Cleveland Cavaliers games, snow tubing trips, performances at the Pittsburgh Public
Theater, and opportunities to see national and local recording artists in concert venues
in the Pittsburgh area. The organization is composed of various committees, including
concerts, day-time programming, evening and weekend programming, and publicity.
For more information about SAB, the types of entertainment and programs it provides, and
how to become a member, call 724-938-4303, e-mail [email protected] or visit the
office, located on the third level of the Natali Student Center near the SAI business office.
Student Association Inc.
The Student Association Inc. (SAI) serves Cal U’s diverse student body by providing
activities and programs and by supporting facilities on campus. The nonprofit corporation
– owned and operated by students – promotes the University core values, provides
leadership opportunities and serves as an advocate for Cal U students. It’s been at work
strengthening Cal U since 1937.
Every enrolled student is a shareholder in the corporation through their student
activities fee. The executive director serves as the liaison between SAI and the University.
Programs provided by SAI are determined by the Student Congress and by the SAI
Board of Directors. SAI supports the activities of student clubs and organizations. SAI
also provides partial funding for intercollegiate athletics. SAI owns Roadman Park, the
98-acre recreational area currently leased to the University. Facilities include tennis courts,
baseball, football, soccer, softball, rugby and intramural fields and a picnic area. A newly
acquired 94-plus acre farm was purchased by SAI in May 2010 adjacent to Roadman Park.
For more information, visit the website at calu.edu/current-students/get-involved/studentassociation-inc/index.htm.
Student Congress
Student Congress is the official student governing body. It is composed of the Student
Senate (60 senators); Student House of Representatives (representatives from each club);
and Student Cabinet. Congress represents and serves the entire student population. It
provides for a student forum, establishes channels for the communication of students’
concerns to the proper administrative and faculty personnel, implements programs and
activities that enrich campus life, and creates opportunities for students to exercise and
develop leadership skills.
Students are encourage to attend a Student Senate meeting, Mondays at 4:15 p.m. in Rooms
206/207 of the Natali Student Center, to find out how they can become active in Student
Congress. Students may also call 724-938-4303 or visit the Student Government office on
the third floor of the Natali Student Center.
Student Health Services
The Student Health Center is located in the Wellness Center in Carter Hall on the ground
floor. The goal of the Student Health Services department is to provide high quality health
care to our students; to direct students to other health care providers when appropriate;
to provide emergency care for all members of the University community; to address the
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specific health needs of those members of the student population with special problems;
and to conceive, develop and implement relevant health education programs for the
University community. All students must complete a pre-entrance health form that is kept
on file. All medical records are strictly confidential.
The Student Health Center is open 24 hours a day when the University is in session. A
staff of registered nurses are on duty during operating hours. A physician and certified
nurse practitioner are on duty Monday through Friday during specified hours. The RN/
Physician/CRNP may refer students to local hospitals in emergencies and for treatment
beyond the capabilities of the Student Health Center. The Student Health Center does
not assume responsibility for doctor bills, hospital bills or prescription costs accrued by
the students for treatment beyond the capabilities of the Student Health Center. The final
choice in hospital selection is the student’s decision.
Medical Absences
Students who are unable to attend classes because of illness should contact their professors,
explain their absences and arrange for completion of any work that may have been
missed. Student Health Services will provide a written notification to the professors in the
following circumstances (provided the student initiates the request):
• When a student consults a health care professional at Student Health Services and the
health care professional determines that the student has or had sufficient medical reason
not to attend class.
• When a student has consulted a private physician who has determined that the student
has or had sufficient medical reason not to attend class.
• When a student is confined for longer treatment or care at Student Health Services or
requires extended recovery with bed rest.
When there is an absence of three or more days, excuses are sent through interoffice mail
to a student’s professors (provided that Student Health Services is made aware of the
absence).
Upon notification from Student Health Services or any other health care professional, the
professor may decide whether to consider the notification as a valid excuse from class or
other academic obligations.
Health Education Awareness Resource Team (HEART)
HEART is a team of students promoting health and wellness and providing opportunities
for the campus community to learn about healthy lifestyles through programs and events,
and through information available to students in the wellness education room, located
in Carter Hall, Room G82. HEART students can provide information on many different
subjects, including but not limited to nutrition, weight management, physical fitness,
sexually transmitted diseases, stress management and the hazards of tobacco products.
The HEART peer educator group invites Cal U students interested in providing wellness
information to their peers to join the team.
Civic Engagement
The Center for Civic Engagement serves as a catalyst for students to connect with, build
and sustain meaningful service initiatives in partnership with communities surrounding
California University, as well as national organizations. The center enhances student
learning and leadership development by engaging students in educationally purposeful
and diverse co-curricular experiences. The Center for Civic Engagement is located in Carter
Hall, Room G35. For more information contact Diane Williams at 724-938-4794 or e-mail
[email protected]
Student Leadership Development
The Emerging Leaders Program fosters ethical leadership development and encourages
involvement in leadership opportunities to enhance a student’s capacity for dealing
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effectively with complex problems, real-life leadership situations and cross-cultural issues.
Programs are designed to promote an understanding of leadership theory and research,
skills, and competencies that support leadership effectiveness; a more fully developed code
of personal ethics; and an enhanced sense of lifelong commitment to social responsibility
and citizenship. The Emerging Leaders Program equips potential student leaders with
skills, including public speaking, team building, goal setting and event planning. This
program primarily focuses on first-year students and is offered during the fall semester.
Workshops are offered each week for 10 weeks throughout the semester and focus on a
particular area of leadership development. For more information, contact Nancy Skobel at
724-938-5857 or [email protected]
Office for Students with Disabilities (OSD)
California University of Pennsylvania welcomes otherwise qualified students with
disabilities. The University recognizes its responsibility to these students and is committed
to providing reasonable accommodations to insure equal access and full participation as
guided by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, and the Americans
with Disabilities Act (ADA/AA).
Students with disabilities follow the same admission procedures and standards as required
by California University of Pennsylvania’s admissions offices for all students. Questions
regarding admission procedures and/or acceptance status should be directed to the
Undergraduate Admissions Office at 724-938–4404 or to the School of Graduate Studies and
Research at 724-938-4187.
Accommodations for students with disabilities are approved through the Office for
Students with Disabilities (OSD). It is the responsibility of the student to adhere to OSD
procedures for self-identifying, providing documentation to substantiate requests and
requesting reasonable accommodations in a timely manner. Students must meet the
academic/technical standards of the classes/programs for which they are applying and/or
in which they are enrolled. In those instances where class/program requirements simulate
responsibilities of in-service personnel, students must meet the essential functions of the
job.
Parking spaces for persons with disabilities are marked as such on campus. These spaces
are solely for the use of persons who have the required state DOT-issued ADA parking
credentials displayed. Persons who wish to request a temporary disabled parking permit
(six weeks or less) must submit appropriate documentation to Department of Parking
and Transportation at 724-938-4677. Persons with disabilities needing to obtain required
DOT-issued credentials can make application to the respective state Department of
Transportation in which the vehicle is licensed. Additional information regarding parking
on campus can be found at www.calu.edu/parking.
Inquiries regarding disability access for students should be directed to the Office for
Students with Disabilities, Azorsky Hall, Room 105; phone 724-938–5781; e-mail
[email protected]; OSD website www.calu.edu/current-students/student-services/
disability/index.htm, or use the search word “disability” on the Cal U website
www.calu.edu.
Veterans Affairs
The Office of Veterans Affairs, located in Carter Hall, Room G35, is open from 8 a.m. to 4
p.m. Monday through Friday. Evening hours and appointments at the Southpointe campus
may also be requested. The phone number is 724-938-4076. All matters pertaining to
veterans, active duty service members and those entitled to veteran’s benefits are handled
in this office. The staff processes all VA forms and enrollment certifications for eligible
students. All veterans, active duty service members, Reservists and National Guard service
members, and other eligible dependents applying for entrance to the University, should
contact the Office of Veterans Affairs at an early date in order to ensure VA paperwork is
processed in a timely fashion. Undergraduate veterans are also advised to take advantage
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of the University’s program to award college credits for military service schools and
experience.
Reservists or members of the National Guard must contact the Office of Veterans Affairs in
the event of activation. The director of Veterans Affairs is the University’s designated point
of contact to coordinate withdrawal due to military activation.
The on-campus Veterans Club sponsors both the Col. Arthur L. Bakewell Veterans
Scholarship and the American Legion Post 790 National Guard Scholarship. These
scholarships are available to current students enrolled at California University of
Pennsylvania. For more information, contact the Office of Veterans Affairs at 724-938-4076
or [email protected]
WCAL (California Radio Station)
Owned and operated by the Student Association Inc. (SAI), WCAL is a 24-hour-a-day,
3300-watt FM station with a coverage radius of 40 miles. WCAL’s typical audience member
is in the 15-45 age bracket, residing in the five-county region (Washington, Fayette, Greene,
Westmoreland and Allegheny), with secondary listeners in parts of Maryland and West
Virginia. WCAL has a mission of providing students with hands-on radio experience while
broadcasting to a regional audience news, sports, public service information and the best
in popular musical entertainment from a variety of genres. Students who successfully
complete a training program are able to become on-air DJs. For more information, contact
J.R. Wheeler at 724-938-5823 or [email protected]
Multimedia Access Center
Located on the first level of the Natali Student Center, the Multimedia Access Center
houses an Apple computer lab that gives students access to the latest multimedia software
applications, audio/video equipment and color printing, including large-format printing.
There is also a large collaborative work area for group projects. The lab employs a variety
of student experts who are available to answer questions. The lab is open 8:00 a.m. to 4:00
p.m. Monday through Friday. Evening hours are 4:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. Monday through
Thursday. The Student Association Inc. supports and maintains the computer lab.
Women’s Center
The Women’s Center is working to create a community that promotes and nurtures the
contributions and experiences of women. The center offers services and programs for
women, advocates for greater equity, and provides an atmosphere to empower each
individual for the maximum development of personal, academic and professional success.
The center, open 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday, serves as a gathering place,
resource center and meeting space for independent campus organizations. The center is
located in Carter Hall, Room G45. For further information, contact us at 724-938-5857 or
e-mail us at [email protected]
Office of Social Equity
The Office of Social Equity supports the University’s goal of creating and maintaining a
learning environment in which the rights of all are respected. This office encourages the
entire University to become personally involved in enriching the campus through support
of enhanced diversity and pluralism. The Office of Social Equity reaffirms the University’s
commitment to equity and diversity through the promotion of understanding, tolerance
and respect for others, and ensures that the University community understands and
complies with federal and state laws and California University policies with respect to
equal opportunity and affirmative action.
Services
The Office of Social Equity helps students resolve concerns and complaints regarding
harassment, discrimination and disability. As ombudsperson, the director serves as an
advocate for students from diverse backgrounds, offering consultation and support in
equity and diversity issues. The Social Equity Office strives to help individuals explore
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their attitudes and behavior regarding equity issues and is available to any student
who needs information, assistance or has a concern about justice, fairness and equal
opportunity. Support services are provided in the following areas:
• Equal Opportunity, Diversity, Compliance and Equity
This area offers access to a resource library consisting of videos, books, pamphlets
and other information related to equity and diversity issues. In addition, the special
assistant strives to enhance diversity in the University community through work with
the Women’s Consortium, President’s Commission on the Status of Women, Frederick
Douglass Institute, END V Center, SAFE Zone, and the following standing committees
of the California University Forum: Safety and Social Equity Committee and Core Values
Committee.
• Social Equity Complaints
The responsibility for investigating complaints is vested in the Office of Social Equity
under the direction of the special assistant to the President. Complete information
regarding policies, procedures, and the informal and formal complaint processes can
be found in the policy statement and compliance procedures on equal employment
opportunity and social equity available from this office.
• Ombudsperson
As ombudsperson, the director offers consultation, assistance and support in equity and
diversity issues. All members of the University community have the right to seek advice
and information from the special assistant to the President, who will maintain such
consultation in confidence to the greatest extent possible.
• Sexual Harassment Education Sessions
As part of Cal U for Life new student orientation, the Office of Social Equity provides
an education session on sexual harassment awareness. The required student success
session is designed to review the California University policy on sexual harassment,
discuss issues regarding sexual harassment, notify students whom to contact if they
should experience sexual harassment, and inform students that they can seek help
and advice without fear of reprisal. In addition to the personal small group training
format, the Office of Social Equity offers online training in sexual harassment awareness.
All members of the University community have 24-hour access to the program at the
following Web address: www.newmedialearning.com/psh/cup/index.htm.
Location and Hours
The Office of Social Equity is located in South Hall, Room 112. Office hours are 8 a.m. to 4
p.m. Monday through Friday, and evenings and weekends by appointment. For services or
information, visit the office or call 724-938-4014.
The Web address is www.calu.edu/faculty-staff/administration/social-equity/index.htm.
Policies
I. Equal Opportunity
Our statement is on page ii of the catalog. A copy of the policy is available from the
Office of Social Equity and is also available on the website above.
II. Sexual Harassment
Sexual harassment is reprehensible conduct that will not be tolerated at California
University. The University is committed to providing a harassment-free atmosphere
for all members of the University community. The University is committed to the
human rights and dignity of all individuals; therefore, it is the policy of the University
to prevent and eliminate sexual harassment within the University community. In
addition, it is the policy of the University that any practice or behavior that constitutes
sexual harassment is unacceptable and will not be tolerated. The Office of Social
Equity has an established process to investigate and address any complaints of sexual
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harassment. A complete copy of the complaint procedure is available from this office
and on the website.
III.ADA/504
In accordance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans
with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), California University of Pennsylvania provides
reasonable accommodations for otherwise qualified students to ensure equal access to
University programs and activities.
Office for Students with Disabilities (OSD)
California University of Pennsylvania welcomes otherwise qualified students with
disabilities. The University recognizes its responsibility to these students and is
committed to providing reasonable accommodations to ensure equal access and full
participation as guided by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended,
and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA/AA).
Students with disabilities follow the same admission procedures and standards as
required by California University of Pennsylvania’s Admissions Offices for all students.
Questions regarding admission procedures and/or acceptance status should be directed
to the Undergraduate Admissions Office, 724-938-4404, or to the School of Graduate
Studies and Research, 724-938-4187.
Accommodations for students with disabilities are approved through the Office for
Students with Disabilities (OSD). It is the responsibility of the student to adhere to OSD
procedures for self-identifying, providing documentation to substantiate requests and
requesting reasonable accommodations in a timely manner. Students must meet the
academic/technical standards of the classes/programs for which they are applying and/
or in which they are enrolled. In those instances where class/program requirements
simulate responsibilities of in-service personnel, students must meet the essential
functions of the job.
Parking spaces for persons with disabilities are marked as such on campus. These
spaces are solely for the use of persons who have the required state department of
transportation-issued ADA parking credentials displayed. Persons who wish to request
a temporary disabled parking permit (six weeks or less) must submit appropriate
documentation to Department of Parking & Transportation, 724-938-4677. Persons with
disabilities needing to obtain required department of transportation-issued credentials
can make application to the respective state department of transportation in which the
vehicle is licensed. Additional information regarding parking on campus can be found
at www.calu.edu/parking.
Inquiries regarding disability access for students should be directed to the Office for
Students with Disabilities:
Office for Students with Disabilities
Azorsky Hall, Room 105
724-938-5781
[email protected]
www.calu.edu/current-students/student-services/disability/index.htm
ADA/504 Appeal Process
If a student considers that a requested accommodation has not been granted or is
inappropriate, he or she should immediately discuss the matter with the OSD director,
724-938-5781. If the student is not satisfied with the result of this conference, he or she
should contact the ADA Compliance Office, 724-938-4056. This office helps to ensure
compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with
Disabilities Act of 1990 and provides an avenue of resolution for student problems/
concerns regarding accommodations. If the student does not reach accord at this level,
he or she may appeal to the Office of Social Equity. The Office of Social Equity has an
established process to investigate and address any complaints of discrimination on the
basis of a disability.
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IV. Affirmative Action Statement
Integrity, Civility and Responsibility are the official core values of California University
of Pennsylvania, an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer. Women, minorities
and the physically challenged are encouraged to apply.
V. Nondiscrimination Statement
California University of Pennsylvania is an academic community dedicated to
the ideals of justice, fairness and equal opportunity for all. In compliance with
federal and state laws, the University is committed to providing equal educational
and employment opportunities for all persons without regard to race, color, sex,
religion, national origin, age, disability, ancestry, sexual orientation or status as
a disabled or Vietnam-era veteran. The University will not tolerate racial, ethnic
or sexual discrimination. Sexual harassment is considered by law to be a form of
sexual discrimination and is, therefore, unacceptable. Direct equal opportunity and
affirmative action inquiries or complaints to the Special Assistant to the President for
EEEO/University Ombudsperson, Office of Social Equity, South Hall, Room 112, 724938-4014. Direct inquiries regarding services or facilities accessibility to the ADA/504
Compliance Officer, Office of Student Development and Services, Carter Hall, Room
G52, 724-938-4056. Direct Title IX inquiries to the Senior Women’s Administrator/Title
IX Coordinator, Department of Athletics, Hamer Hall, Room 248, 724-938-4351.
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Governance and Administration
Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education
Chancellor
John C. Cavanaugh
Board of Governors
Guido M. Pichini, chair
Marie Conley Lammando, vice chair
Aaron A. Walton ‘68, vice chair
Leonard B. Altieri III
Rep. Matthew E. Baker
Jennifer Branstetter, designee for Governor Corbett
Gov. Tom Corbett, governor
Sarah C. Darling
Rep. Michael K. Hanna
Ronald G. Henry
Kenneth M. Jarin
Bonnie L. Keener
Jonathan B. Mack
Joseph F. McGinn
C.R. “Chuck” Pennoni
Sen. Jeffrey E. Piccola
Harold C. Shields
Robert S. Taylor
Ronald J. Tomalis
Sen. John T. Yudichak, Secretary of Education
California University of Pennsylvania President
Angelo Armenti, Jr.
Council of Trustees
Robert J. Irey, chair
Lawrence O. Maggi ‘79, vice chair
Peter J. Daley II ’72, ’75
James T. Davis ‘73
Annette Ganassi
Leo Krantz
Michael Napolitano ‘68
Gwendolyn Simmons
Jerry Spangler ’74
Aaron Walton ’68
The Hon. Dr. John C. Cavanaugh, chancellor, ex-officio
California University of Pennsylvania
California University of Pennsylvania Office of the President
Angelo Armenti, Jr., president
Lisa McBride, special assistant to the President for EEEO
Norman G. Hasbrouck, special assistant to the President/director of continuous
improvement
Dee Stalvey, executive associate to the President
Daphne Livingstone, development events coordinator
Ron Paul, executive director, Character Education Institute
Doug Philp, University architect
Juanita Timney, executive director, conference services
189
Academic Affairs
Geraldine M. Jones, provost and vice president, academic affairs
Bruce D. Barnhart, associate provost and vice president, academic affairs
Mark Aune, interim director, honors program
Leonard Colelli, dean, Eberly College of Science and Technology
William Edmonds, dean, admissions
Kathy Gavazzi, executive director, Summer College
Rhonda Gifford, director, career services
Terrie Greene, director, articulation and transfer evaluation
Douglas Hoover, dean, library services
Kevin Koury, dean, College of Education and Human Services
John Cencich, dean, School of Graduate Studies and Research
Richard L. Kline, director, institutional research
Harry M. Langley, associate provost, student retention
Karen Posa, director, Universitywide mentoring
Karen Primm, director, internship center
Jodie Rooney, academic events coordinator/Act 48/Governor’s Institute Coordinator
Heidi Williams, University registrar
Jenifer L. Sigado, director, welcome center, student orientation programs and University
ambassadors
Chad Smith, director, training services, Southpointe
Charles E. Talbert, associate director, academic records
Mohamed Yamba, interim dean, College of Liberal Arts
Mary Kay Dayner, executive staff assistant to provost
Ellen Nesser, executive director, Southpointe center
Daniel Engstrom, director, student teaching
Stanley Komacek, associate provost and vice president, academic affairs
Administration and Finance
Robert J. Thorn, interim vice president, administration and finance
Rosanne Pandrok, assistant vice president, administration/budget director
Fawn Petrosky, assistant vice president, finance/comptroller
Rose Granato, administrative assistant to the vice president, administration and finance
James Ahearn, director, payroll
Pamela Murphy, interim director of human resources
Jill Fernandes, director of financial aid
Sharon Elkettani, director of environmental health and safety
Robert Downey, Jr., director of public safety and University police
Betty Kroniser, bursar
Judith Laughlin, director of purchasing
Thomas Taylor, director of administrative services
Michael Peplinski, director of physical plant
Chris Johnston, director of parking and transportation
Student Affairs
Dr. Lenora Angelone, vice president for student affairs
Dr. Nancy Pinardi, associate vice president for student affairs/executive director, SAI
Dr. Timothy Susick, associate vice president for student affairs
Lawrence Sebek, dean for student services
Barry Niccolai, dean for residence and off-campus student life
Brenda DePaoli, executive staff assistant to the vice president
Debra Anderson, nurse supervisor
Terri Anderson, nurse
Nicole Arthur, administrative assistant, SAI
Shelly Bastin, secretary, Wellness Center
Cheryl Bilitski, director/assistant professor, Office for Students with Disabilities (OSD)
Charles Bohn, director, recreational services, SAI
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Megan Burd, resident services manager, Vulcan Village
Chelsey Burk, business manager, Athletics
Betsy Clark, residence hall director
LaMont Coleman, associate dean, student services/Multicultural Affairs
Kelly Collins, director, academic support for student athletes
Kimberly Cupplo, senior traditional accountant, SAI
Debra Custer, administrative assistant, Student Affairs
Pam DelVerne, director, new media services/activities transcript coordinator, SAI
Tomas Donovan, assistant director, activities/evening and weekend programming
Kay Dorrance, coordinator, END V Center/Women’s Center
Melissa Dunn, director, student activities
Todd Edwards, CalCard administrator
Frances Fayish, director, wellness education, nurse practitioner
Paul Fazio, associate dean, student services/commuter services
Brenda Fetsko, director, wellness and fitness, SAI
Donna George, alcohol and other drug education specialist
Patricia Godla, secretary, Office for Students with Disabilities (OSD)
Cheryl Golembiewski, student center coordinator, SAI
Christa Grillo, nurse
Lisa Hartley, accounts payable/payroll supervisor, SAI
Thomas Hasbrouck, assistant director, recreational services
Scott Helfrich, community manager, Vulcan Village
Jeff Helsel, director, news/video development and publications, SAI
Joy Helsel, director, fraternity and sorority life/special publications, SAI
Benjamin Hilborn, equipment manager, Athletics
Dr. Karen Hjerpe, associate athletic director/senior women’s athletic administrator
Donna Hoak, secretary, Women’s Center/END V Center
Jeremy Hodge, maintenance technician, Vulcan Village
Erica Hoover, housing accountant, SAI
Laura Jeannerette, assistant coordinator, student activities
Tonya Kirkland, accounting clerk, SAI
Gene Knight, facility manager, SAI
Leigh Ann Lincoln, chief financial officer, SAI
Leslie Loase, associate dean, residence education/learning initiatives/coordinator of
assessment
Dr. John Massella, professional counselor, Wellness Center
Christine Matty, nurse
Robert Mehalik, residence hall director
Dr. Dawn Moeller, clinical psychologist, Wellness Center
Robert Morris, maintenance technician, Vulcan Village
James Pflugh, associate dean, student conduct
Robert Prah, director, Veterans Affairs
Daniel Pretz, residence hall director
Dr. Tom Pucci, athletic director
Doug Robinson, maintenance technician, Vulcan Village
Jamison Roth, director, sports clubs
Dr. Mary Ann Salotti, clinical psychologist, Wellness Center
Ronald Sealy, athletic facilities foreman, SAI
Autumn Seybert, residence hall director
Jared Shiner, leasing and marketing manager, Vulcan Village
Keith Skirpan, senior housing accountant, SAI
Nancy Skobel, associate dean, student affairs and leadership
Gary Smith, director CUTV operations, SAI
Doris Sutch, nurse
Carolyn Tardd, administrative assistant, Athletics
Marissa Theakston, traditional accountant, SAI
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Jacqueline Thorn, Adirondack housing administrator
Diane Tomi, administrative assistant, housing and residence life
Shawn Urbine, associate dean, residential facilities/conferences
John Watkins, assistant dean, international students/NSE/CHOICES
Melissa Wazny, secretary, Football Office
Sheleta Webb, residence hall director
Steven Weiss, assistant community manager, Vulcan Village
J. R. Wheeler, assistant dean, student services/media
Edward Whited, director, athletic facilities and recreation services
Terry Wigle, associate dean, CalCard systems/auxiliary services
Diane Williams, director, Center for Civic Engagement
Thomas Zemany, maintenance manager, Vulcan Village
Launa Zucconi, leasing professional, Vulcan Village
Marketing and University Relations
Craig Butzine, vice president for marketing and University relations, director of marketing
Denise King, executive assistant to the vice president
Greg Sofranko, director, creative services
Christine Hudson, assistant director, marketing
Justin Harbaugh, graphic artist
Christine Kindl, director, communications and public relations
Wendy Mackall, assistant director, communications and public relations
Bruce Wald, information writer
Jeff Bender, PR and web writer
Christine Russell, director, web services
John Moore, assistant webmaster
Steve Zidek, assistant webmaster
Greg Buretz, social media coordinator
Doris Wadsworth, secretary
University Development and Alumni Relations
Ron Huiatt, vice president, University development and alumni relations
Kathleen Kuharik, executive staff assistant to the vice president
Lynn Baron, director, donor relations and stewardship
Lindsey Bennett, major gifts officer
Christian Caldwell, manager, development and alumni resources and support services
Cathy Connelly, manager, annual fund
Gordon Core, director, planned giving
Montean Dean, administrative support staff
John Fisler, senior associate vice president, development
Leslie Fleenor, assistant director, alumni relations
Howard Goldstein, associate vice president, corporate and foundation relations
Ryan Jerico, coordinator, student and young alumni programs
Mary Johnston, administrative support staff
Mitch Kozikowski, associate vice president, leadership giving
Amy Lombard, executive director, alumni relations and annual giving
Tony Mauro, major gifts officer
Randi Minerva, coordinator, parent and alumni relations
Sharon Navoney, associate vice president, development
Marie Spak, administrative support staff
Rebecca Stotka, administrative support staff
Staci Tedrow, administrative support staff
Jessica Urbanik, major gifts officer
Linda Volek, administrative support staff
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Faculty
(Date of permanent appointment to California University of Pennsylvania)
Holiday Eve Adair. (1998) Professor, Psychology. B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Akron
Amanda M. Allen. (2006) Assistant Professor, Health Science Sport Studies. B.S., Ashland University; ATC, M.S.,
California University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., Ohio University
Connie Armitage. (2005) Assistant Professor, Elementary, Middle and Special Education. B.S., M.Ed., California
University of Pennsylvania; Ed.D., University of Pittsburgh
Sylvia J. Barksdale. (1999) Professor, Social Work. B.A., M.S.W., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh
Bruce D. Barnhart. (1986) Professor, Health Science Sport Studies. B.S., ATC, M.Ed., California University of
Pennsylvania;; Ed.D., West Virginia University
Ralph J. Belsterling. (2001) Associate Professor, Communication Disorders. B.S., M.Ed., M.S., California University of
Pennsylvania; M.S., Clarion University of Pennsylvania; Au.D., University of Florida
Carol M. Biddington. (2005) Associate Professor, Health Science Sport Studies. B.S., M.S., Ed.D., West Virginia University
William B. Biddington. (1977) Professor and Chair, Health Science Sport Studies. B.S., M.S., ATC, Ed.D., West Virginia
University
Angela Bloomquist. (2008) Assistant Professor, Psychology. B.S., University of Pittsburgh; M.Ed., Ed.S., Pennsylvania
School Psychology Certification, Ed.D., Indiana University of Pennsylvania
Jane Bonari. (2000) Assistant Professor, Elementary, Middle and Special Education. B.S., M.Ed., California University of
Pennsylvania
Barbara H. Bonfanti. (1994) Professor and Chair, Communication Disorders. B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania;
M.S., St. Francis College of Illinois; M.Ed., California University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh
Sylvia Braidic. (2004) Associate Professor, Educational Administration and Leadership. B.S., M.S., Duquesne University;
Ed.D., University of Pittsburgh
Burrell A. Brown. (1989) Professor and Chair, Business and Economics. B.S., California University of Pennsylvania;
M.B.A., J.D., University of Pittsburgh
Edward Brown. (1967) Associate Professor, Social Work. B.S., University of Pittsburgh; M.L.S., Carnegie Mellon
University; M.S.W., University of Pittsburgh
Gloria Cataldo Brusoski. (1997) Professor and Chair, Counselor Education. B.A., Duquesne University; M.Ed., Gannon
University; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh
James O. Burton. (2007) Assistant Professor, Elementary, Middle and Special Education. B.A., Fairmont State University;
M.A., Ed.D., West Virginia University
Nancy Carlino. (2000) Assistant Professor, Communication Disorders. B.A., Duquesne University; M.A., University of
Pittsburgh
Richard Cavasina. (1992) Professor, Psychology. B.S., M.S., Duquesne University; Ph.D., West Virginia University
John R. Cencich. (2002) Professor and Interim Dean, Justice, Law and Society. B.S., St. Paul’s College; M.S., Virginia
Commonwealth University; LL.M., Kent Law School, University of Kent at Canterbury; Graduate Forensic Science and
Law Certificate, Duquesne University Law School; J.S.D., University of Notre Dame Law School
M. Arshad Chawdhry. (1976) Professor, Business and Economics. B.S., M.S., University of Agriculture (Pakistan); M.A.,
University of Maryland; M.S., Ph.D., University of Illinois
Margaret Christopher. (1995) Associate Professor and Chair, Social Work. B.A., Mount St. Mary College; M.S.W., M.Ph.,
Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh
Debra M. Clingerman. (1984) Associate Professor, Business and Economics. B.A., California University of Pennsylvania;
M.B.A., West Virginia University
Joan Clites. (2009) Associate Professor, Nursing. B.S., University of Pittsburgh; M.S.N., Ed.D., West Virginia University
Ismail Cole. (1988) Professor, Business and Economics. B.A., Harvard College; M.A., Tufts University; Ph.D., University
of Pittsburgh
Mark D. DeHainaut. (2002) Associate Professor, Business and Economics. B.S., M.B.A., Indiana University of
Pennsylvania; Ed.D., University of Pittsburgh
Holly Diehl. (2005) Assistant Professor, Elementary, Middle and Special Education. B.S., West Virginia University; M.Ed.,
Frostburg State University; Ed.D., West Virginia University
Gail S. Ditkoff . (1986) Professor, Psychology. B.A., State University of New York at Binghamton University — Harpur
College; M.S., Ph.D., State University of New York at Albany; Pennsylvania and New York Certified School Psychologist;
Licensed Psychologist
Grafton Eliason. (2004) Associate Professor, Counselor Education. B.A., Duquesne University; M.Div., Princeton
Theological Seminary; M.Ed., Shippensburg University; Ed.D., Duquesne University
193
Daniel E. Engstrom. (2001) Associate Professor, Applied Engineering and Technology. B.S., Millersville University; M.Ed.,
Bowling Green State University; Ed.D., Duquesne University
Deborah A. Farrer. (2001) Associate Professor, Elementary, Middle and Special Education. B.S., California University of
Pennsylvania; M.A., Ed.D., West Virginia University
Marc S. Federico. (1999) Associate Professor, Health Science Sport Studies. B.S., University of Pittsburgh; M.P.T., D.P.T.,
Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania
Jamie Foster. (2006) Assistant Professor, Health Science Sport Studies. B.S., ATC, DPT, Slippery Rock University of
Pennsylvania
Elizabeth Gruber. (1990) Professor, Counselor Education. B.S., Bowling Green State University; M.A., Youngstown State
University; Ph.D., Duquesne University
Chris T. Harman. (2005) Associate Professor, Health Science Sport Studies. B.S., University of Vermont; ATC, M.S.,
Indiana University; Ed.D., Oklahoma State University
Jeffrey R. Hatton. (2001) Assistant Professor, Health Science Sport Studies. B.S., Lock Haven University; B.S., College of
Misericordia; OTR/L, M.S., California University of Pennsylvania
Nancy Hepting. (2009) Associate Professor, Communication Disorders. B.S., Clarion University of Pennsylvania; M.S.,
California University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh
Rebecca A. Hess. (2001) Associate Professor, Health Science Sport Studies. B.S., West Virginia University; M.S., West
Virginia University; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh
Cheryl A. Hettman. (2007) Associate Professor, Nursing. B.S.N., West Liberty State College; M.S.N., West Virginia
University; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh
Glenn R. Hider. (1998) Professor, Applied Engineering and Technology. A.S., State University of New York; B.S., State
University College Oswego; M.S., Eastern Illinois University; Ed.D., West Virginia University
Marcia Hoover. (2007) Assistant Professor, Elementary, Middle and Special Education. B.S., M.Ed., California University
of Pennsylvania; Ed.D., West Virginia University
J. William Hug. (2007) Assistant Professor, Elementary, Middle and Special Education. B.S., Western Illinois University;
M.S., Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University
Laura Johnson Hummell. (2008) Assistant Professor, Applied Engineering and Technology. B.S.Ed., Pennsylvania State
University; M.Ed., Old Dominion University; Ed.D., East Carolina University
Kirk R. John. (1990) Professor, Psychology. B.A., California University of Pennsylvania; M.Ed., Ed.D., Indiana University
of Pennsylvania; NCSP; Pennsylvania Certified School Psychologist; Pennsylvania Licensed Psychologist
Denise M. Joseph. (2005) Assistant Professor, Communication Disorders. B.S.Ed., Duquesne University; M.S., Syracuse
University; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh
Stanley A. Komacek. (1987) Professor and Chair, Applied Engineering and Technology. B.S., California University of
Pennsylvania; M.Ed., Miami University; Ed.D., West Virginia University
Kalie R. Kossar. (2007) Assistant Professor, Elementary, Middle and Special Education. B.A., University of Pittsburgh;
M.Ed., California University of Pennsylvania; Ed.D., West Virginia University
René L. Kruse. (1989) Professor, Applied Engineering and Technology. B.S., Peru State College; M.S., Ph.D., Texas A&M
University
Mary Kreis. (2004) Associate Professor, Health Science Sport Studies. B.S., University of Virginia; M.S., University of
Texas at San Antonio; Ph.D., University of Miami
Regis Lazor. (1972) Associate Professor, Elementary, Middle and Special Education. B.S., California University of
Pennsylvania; M.Ed., University of Delaware
Nan Li. (2009) Associate Professor, Business and Economics. M.A., Ph.D., City University of New York; M.A., B.A.,
Zhongshan University
Sammy P. Lonich. (1989) Associate Professor and Chair, Psychology. B.S., M.S., California University of Pennsylvania;
Pennsylvania Certified School Psychologist; Licensed Psychologist
J. Kevin Lordon. (2003) Associate Professor, Educational Administration and Leadership. B.S., Edinboro University;
M.Ed., Duquesne University; Ed.D., University of Pittsburgh
Ayanna Lyles. (2006) Assistant Professor, Health Science Sport Studies. B.S., University of Connecticut; ATC, M.S.,
California University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., University of Carbondale
Jeffrey Magers. (2006) Assistant Professor, Professional Studies. B.S., M.S., Eastern Kentucky University; Ed.D., Spalding
University
Robert Mancuso. (2005) Assistant Professor, Communication Disorders. B.A., West Liberty State College; M.S., West
Virginia University
Margaret A. Marcinek. (1983) Professor, Health Science Sport Studies. B.S., Pennsylvania State University; M.S.N.,
University of Maryland; Ed.D., West Virginia University; R.N.
194
Nicholas Martin. (2000) Assistant Professor, Psychology. B.S., M.S.W., University of Pittsburgh; M.S., California
University of Pennsylvania; Ed.D., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; Certified School Psychologist; Licensed
Psychologist
Elizabeth Mason. (1987) Professor, Psychology. B.S., M.Ed., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., Ball State
University; NCSP; Pennsylvania and West Virginia Certified School Psychologist; Licensed Psychologist
Barry E. McGlumphy. (2003) Associate Professor, Health Science Sport Studies. B.S., Lock Haven University; M.S.,
University of Arizona; Ed.D., University of Arizona
Beverly J. Melenyzer. (1991) Professor, Elementary, Middle and Special Education. B.S., M.Ed., California University of
Pennsylvania; Ed.D., Indiana University of Pennsylvania
Linda Meyer. (2006) Associate Professor, Health Science Sport Studies. B.S., Lock Haven University; ATC, M.S., West
Virginia University; Ed.D., Duquesne University
John E. Michaels. (1999) Associate Professor, Professional Studies. B.S., M.B.A., American University; D.B.A., George
Washington University
Katherine J. Mitchem. (2005) Associate Professor and Chair, Elementary, Middle and Special Education. B.S., Manchester
University; M.Ed., Drury University; Ph.D., Utah State University
Connie Monroe. (2006) Assistant Professor, Elementary, Middle and Special Education. B.A., Case Western Reserve
University; Post-Baccalaureate Teaching Certification, University of Texas at San Antonio; M.A., Regis University; Ph.D.,
University of Dayton
Thomas R. Mueller. (1999) Associate Professor, Earth Sciences. B.S., Towson State University; M.A., University of
Connecticut; Ph.D., University of Illinois
Charles P. Nemeth. (2000) Professor and Chair, Professional Studies. B.A., University of Delaware; M.S., Niagara
University; M.A., Ph.D., Duquesne University; J.D., University of Baltimore; LL.M., George Washington University
Diane H. Nettles. (1989) Professor, Elementary, Middle and Special Education. B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of South
Florida
Mary O’Connor. (2001) Professor, Nursing. B.S.N., Carlow University; M.S.N., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh
Young J. Park. (1977) Professor, Business and Economics. B.P.A., Korea University; M.A., Ph.D., Temple University
Pratul C. Pathak. (1990) Professor, English. B.A., M.A., LL.B., University of Delhi, India; M.A., Ph.D., University of
Wisconsin-Milwaukee
John Patrick. (2001) Associate Professor, Counselor Education. B.A., Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania; M.S.,
University of Scranton; D.Ed., Pennsylvania State University
Christine A. Patti. (2005) Associate Professor, Educational Administration and Leadership. B.S., Duquesne University;
M.Ed., Ed.D., University of Pittsburgh
Gwendolyn D. Perry-Burney. (2001) Associate Professor, Social Work. B.S.W., M.S.W., Temple University; Ph.D.,
University of Pittsburgh
Christine A. Peterson. (2002) Associate Professor, Elementary, Middle and Special Education. B.S., Edinboro University of
Pennsylvania; M.S., Johns Hopkins University; Ed.D., West Virginia University
Linda Pina. (2007) Assistant Professor, Nursing. B.S.N., M.S.N., Indiana University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D. KennedyWestern University
Rebecca A. Regeth. (2001) Professor, Psychology. B.A., M.S., Western Washington University; Ph.D., University of New
Hampshire
Benjamin Reuter. (2004) Associate Professor, Health Science Sport Studies. B.S., Gettysburg College; M.S., Old Dominion
University; ATC, Ph.D., Auburn University
Joni L. Cramer Roh. (1991) Professor, Health Science Sport Studies. B.S., West Virginia University; ATC, M.A.T.,
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; Ed.D., West Virginia University
Christine Romani-Ruby. (2001) Associate Professor, Health Science Sport Studies. B.S., Indiana University of
Pennsylvania; ATC, M.P.T., Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania
Carrie R. Rosengart. (2005) Assistant Professor, Psychology. B.S., Tufts University of Medford; M.A., M.S., Ph.D.,
University of Georgia
Susan D. Ryan. (2002) Associate Professor, Earth Sciences. B.A., University of Western Ontario; M.A., Bournemouth
University, England; Ph.D., University of Calgary
Jeffrey L. Samide. (2005) Associate Professor, Counselor Education. B.A., Saint Vincent College; M.Ed., Ed.D., Indiana
University of Pennsylvania
Richard D. Scott . (1971) Professor, Psychology. B.A., Pennsylvania State University; M.S., University of Massachusetts;
Ph.D., University of Tennessee
Louise E. Serafin. (1991) Professor, Business and Economics. B.S., California University of Pennsylvania; E.M.B.A., Ph.D.,
University of Pittsburgh
195
Debra A. Shelapinsky. (1986) Associate Professor, Nursing. B.S.N., University of Akron; M.S.N., University of Pittsburgh;
C.R.N.P.
John W. Shimkanin. (1990) Professor, Elementary, Middle and Special Education. B.S., Moravian College; M.S., Clarion
University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University
Sylvia E. Sholar. (1995) Associate Professor, Communication Studies. B.A., Georgia Southern University; M.A., University
of Georgia; Ph.D., Temple University
Robert Skwarecki. (2000) Associate Professor, Communication Disorders. B.S., Duquesne University; M.S., Ph.D.,
University of Pittsburgh
Rosalie Smiley. (1999) Professor, Social Work. M.S.W., L.M.S.M., M.P.H., Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh
Robert G. Taylor. (2001) Associate Professor, Health Science Sport Studies. B.S., San Diego State University; M.Ed.,
Frostburg State University; Ph.D., The University of Southern Mississippi
Norma Thomas. (2007) Assistant Professor, Social Work. B.A., Pennsylvania State University; M.S.W., Temple University;
D.S.W., University of Pennsylvania
Taunya Tinsley. (2007) Assistant Professor, Counselor Education and Services. B.A., Augsburg College; M.A., University
of Iowa; Ph.D., Duquesne University
Linda Toth. (2000) Associate Professor, Psychology. B.S., California University of Pennsylvania; M.S., Duquesne
University; Ed.D., West Virginia University; Pennsylvania Licensed Psychologist
Pamela C. Twiss. (1999) Associate Professor, Social Work. B.A., Point Park College; M.S.W., Ph.D., University of
Pittsburgh
John R. Vargo. (1970) Associate Professor, Elementary, Middle and Special Education. B.S., California University of
Pennsylvania; M.A., West Virginia University; Reading Specialist
Jacqueline Walsh. (1998) Associate Professor, Counselor Education and Services. B.S., M.S., California University of
Pennsylvania; Ph.D., Kent State University
Ellen West. (2005) Associate Professor, Health Science Sport Studies. B.S., California University of Pennsylvania; ATC,
M.S., West Virginia University
Thomas F. West. (2004), Associate Professor, Health Science Sport Studies. M.S., West Virginia University; B.S., ATC,
Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University
Brian D. Wood. (2005) Assistant Professor, Health Science Sport Studies. B.S., University of Wisconsin-LaCrosse; M.S.,
Minnesota State University, Mankato; Ph.D., University of New Mexico
Clover Wright. (2011) Assistant Professor, Elementary/Early Childhood Education. B.A., Antioch College; M.A. and
Ed.D., West Virginia University
Peter H. Wright. (2000) Professor, Applied Engineering and Technology. B.A., Yale University; M.A., Ed.D., West Virginia
University
Richard M. Wyman. (1992) Professor, Elementary, Middle and Special Education. B.A., Franklin and Marshall College;
M.Ed., Tufts University; Ed.D., University of Washington
Joseph Zisk. (2000) Assistant Professor, Elementary, Middle and Special Education. B.S., M.Ed., California University of
Pennsylvania; M.S., Drexel University; Ed.D., Temple University
196
Index
Certification programs
Admission to 22
Early childhood education 63
Elementary/special education (dual) 73
Instructional II 27
Reading specialist 95
School counseling 58
Character education institute 168
Cheating and plagiarism 31
Civic engagement 183
Clinical mental health counseling 51
Cohorts 25
Communication disorders 49
Community agency counseling 55
Commuter center 174
Continuing education 27
Cooperative education 164
Counseling and psychological services 175
Counselor education 51, 55, 58
Course
Load 28
Numbering 32
Repeating a 31
Course descriptions
Accounting 129
Administrative program for principals 129
Applied criminology 134
Athletic training 130
Business 130
Communication disorders 131
Counselor education 132
Criminal justice 135
Early childhood education 135
Earth science 136
Education 138
Elementary education 138
Finance 140
Graduate 141
Homeland security 141
Legal studies 141
Management 143
Marketing 144
Master of arts teaching (advanced studies in
secondary education) 146
Master of arts teaching (initial certification
track) 144
Mathematics 147
Nursing administration and leadership 147
Performance enhancement and injury
prevention 148
Professional education 150
Psychology 151
Reading specialist 153
Research 153
Social work 153
Spanish 155
Special education 155
Sport management 157
Superintendent letter of eligibility 158
Technology education 159
Credits
Military 15
Transfer 15
Criminal justice 80
A
Academic
Dismissal 31
Integrity 125
Probation 31
Programs 37
Progress, PHEAA 16
Accreditations iii
Act 48 27, 28
Activities transcript 175
Administrative program for principals 37
Admissions 21
Decisions 22
Alcohol and other drug awareness programs 172
Application
Deadlines 21
Process 21
Requesting an 21
Applied criminology 40
Assistantships, graduate 35
Athletic training 43
B
Business administration 46
C
CalCard 172
California Times 172
California University of Pennsylvania
Governance and administration 189
History 5
Identity 2
Legacy 3
Milestones 5
Mission 2
Vision 2
California University television (CUTV) 175
Cal U student bookstore 174
Campus ministry 174
Canadian applicants 24
Candidacy 28
Cap and gown fee 34
Career services 164
Certificate programs
Exercise science (post-graduate) 77
K-12 principal 37
Mentally/physically handicapped education
86
Autism spectrum disorders, advanced
study 90
School psychology (post-master’s) 98
Spanish for
Business 111
Law enforcement 111
Sport management studies 113
Sports counseling, graduate 116
Superintendent letter of eligibility 119
197
D
H
Degree
Conferring of a 34
Period for completion of 33
Dining services 176
Dismissal, academic 31
Distance education via interactive TV 162
Health education awareness resource team
(HEART) 183
Homeland security 82
Housing 176
E
Instructional
Computing facility 162
II certification 27
Intercollegiate athletics 179
International students 23
Financial requirements 24
Services office 180
Internship center 165
Intramurals 180
IT services 162
I
Early childhood education 63
Elementary/special education 73
Elementary/special education dual certification 73
E-mail, campus 25
End V (violence) center 181
English as a second language 66
Examinations
Comprehensive 33
Final 33
Exercise science and health promotion 77
L
Law and public policy 84
Learning labs
Math lab 163
Reading clinic 163
Writing center 163
Library, Louis L. Manderino 161
Loans 10
Alternative 12
Federal Graduate PLUS 11
Federal Stafford 10
F
FAFSA 8
on the web worksheet 8
Results 9
Fellowships 12
Financial aid 7
Academic progress, PHEAA 16
Application process 8
Award letters 10
Disbursement 12
Distribution 17
Eligibility 13
Glossary 17
How to apply 7
Office 7
Probation 15
Programs 10
Refund 13, 16
Reinstatement 15
Renewal of 9
Repayment 16, 17
Satisfactory academic progress policy 13
Suspension 15
Verification 9
Warning 15
Fraternities and sororities 181
M
Master of arts
Social science 40
Master of arts teaching
Advanced studies in secondary education 101
Secondary education: initial teacher
certification 104
Master of education
Early childhood education 63
Elementary and special education 73
Elementary education 61
English as a second language (ESL) 66
Mentally/physically handicapped education
86
National board teacher certification
preparation (elementary) 71
Reading specialist 95
School administration 37
School counseling 58
Science in nursing 92
Science, technology, engineering and math
(STEM) education 68
Social work 107
Technology education 122
Master of science
Athletic training 43
Business administration 46
Clinical mental health counseling 51
Communication disorders 49
Community agency counseling 55
Exercise and health promotion 77
G
Grades 31
Appealing 26
Special 14
Graduate
Assistantships 12, 35
Stipends 12
Graduation, application for 33
198
Legal studies
Criminal justice 80
Homeland security 82
Law and public policy 84
School psychology 98
Sport management studies 113
Master’s project/thesis 34
Math lab 163
Maximum time frame 14
Medical absences 183
Mentally/physically handicapped education 86
Autism spectrum disorders 90
Military credit 15
Multicultural student programs 181
Multimedia access center 185
Style manuals 27
Superintendent letter of eligibility 119
T
Technology education 122
Thesis, master’s 34
Transfer credit 15, 29
V
Veteran’s affairs 184
Visiting student program 167
W
WCAL 185
Web/mobile development 181
Withdrawal 29
Administrative 30
from a course 29
from the University 29
Women’s center 185
Writing center 163
N
Nursing administration and leadership 92
O
Office for students with disabilities 184
Office of social equity 185
P
Peer mentoring 167
Plagiarism and cheating 31
President, message from the 1
Probation, academic 31
Program, planning a 25
Project, master’s 34
Public safety 168
R
Reading clinic 163
Reading specialist 95
Recreational services 181
Registration 25
S
Satisfactory academic progress, maintaining 13
Scholarships 12
School counseling 58
School psychology 98
Science, technology, engineering and math
(STEM) education 68
Secondary education 101, 104
Social work 107
Sororities and fraternities 181
Spanish certification 111
Sport management studies 113
Student
Activities board 182
Affairs 171
Association 182
Congress 182
Exchange programs 180
Health services 182
International 23
Leadership development 183
199
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