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Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
TEACHER TOOLS
DVD Contents
This DVD offers ideas and content for direct instruction activities and scaffolding instruction adapted to English Language Learners, Special Education Students, and Struggling Readers. •
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Fast ForWord® to Reading 3 Characters
Canine Crew Word List
Teacher-directed Activity Suggestions
Sample Motivation Ideas and Activities
Sample Intervention Ideas and Activities
English Language Learners
Special Education Students
Struggling Readers
Sample Intervention Log
Sample Writing Activities
Scientific Learning Web Resources
Additional content and resources are available on the Scientific Learning website. 1. Resource: www.scilearn.com Scientific Learning Corporation provides a website, Customer Connect, for customer support. Reference materials, articles about the science behind the Fast ForWord products, training information, implementation guidance, and technical specifications are only a few of the helpful items available for teachers. WebEx training and information sessions can be accessed easily as well. Many useful forms and activities are also available for downloading, such as: ¾ Certificate of Achievement ¾ Fast ForWord to Reading 3 Points Chart ¾ Sample Schedules ¾ Motivation Activities ¾ Intervention Activities ¾ Word Lists 1
Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
2. Resource: www.brainconnection.com BrainConnection.com, an online resource from Scientific Learning Corporation, is dedicated to providing accessible, high‐quality information about how the brain works, how people learn, and how this affects the master of reading skills. Many discoveries are being made in areas that relate to the human brain, including language, memory, behavior, and aging, as well as illness and injury. Access to this information can provide practical tools for teaching and learning as well as valuable insights into almost every aspect of daily life. 2
Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Fast ForWord® to Reading 3 Characters
Teachers can use the Fast ForWord to Reading 3 exercise characters in many ways, such as bulletin board theme displays, story starter writing activities, covers for student‐produced booklets, and classroom wall décor. The characters can be printed out on a computer printer or copied and enlarged on a copy machine. Scrap Cat
Canine Crew
Chicken Dog
Twisted Pictures
Book Monkeys
Hog Hat Zone
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Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Fast ForWord® to Reading 3 Word List
The Canine Crew word list is available for teachers to use for pre‐teaching and supplemental practice, for integrated curriculum planning, and for creating extended activities. The word list also can be enlarged and cut into word strips to be used in various direct instruction activities. Canine Crew Word List
Canine Crew
Sample Grade 2
Vocabulary
Sample Grade 3
Vocabulary
Sample Grade 4
Vocabulary
Homophones
wood/would
hear/here
by/bye
due/dew
feet/feat
sun/son
new/knew
shown/shone
find/fined
flower/flour
guest/guessed
higher/hire
stare/stair
whose/who’s
beat/beet
pier/peer
waist/waste
loan/lone
massed/mast
muscle/mussel
first/last
one/several
in/out
little/big
most/least
new/old
same/different
bent/straight
command/obey
let/prevent
brief/long
panic/calm
silence/sound
melt/freeze
allow/forbid
constant/variable
discourage/encourage
greedy/generous
height/width
polite/rude
rare/common
but/although
did/accomplished
after/behind
find/discover
look/see
many/lots
more/greater
make/create
now/immediately
write/author
disappear/vanish
long/lengthy
right/correct
live/endure
immediately/promptly
call/summon
large/vast
only/sole
part/divide
chop/crop
pain/gain
meter/heater
clip/flip
quart/sort
toad/rode
knight/fright
ash/smash
aside/decide
attend/depend
mussel/rustle
cheese/keys
double/bubble
fault/salt
breakers/acres
fuse/news
thistle/whistle
yonder/wander
wilderness/watercress
knapsack/backpack
praise/blaze
thicket/picket
Antonyms
Synonyms
Rhymes
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Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Teacher-Directed Activities
The following teacher‐directed activities can be integrated into the classroom reading curriculum. They offer some ideas for direct instruction that can provide the students working on Fast ForWord exercises an opportunity to work with the rest of their classmates. These activities can function as scaffold to the exercises in the form of supplemental or extended learning experiences and can be adapted to English Language Learners, Special Education Students, and Struggling Readers. Chicken Dog Word Factory
Skill: Create new words by substituting initial consonants Estimated Time: 20 minutes Materials: Chicken Dog Worksheet #1 (attached below) Grade Level: Elementary Activity: Introduce the activity by demonstrating how to create new words by changing the initial consonant on a word such as “top”. Show students how to replace “t” with “m” and ask them what that word says and means. Give other examples and then ask students to volunteer words that can be changed. When the students appear to understand the task, give them the Chicken Dog Worksheet #1 and explain this is a fun, timed exercise. Students compete against the clock. After explaining the directions thoroughly, set a time clock for 10 minutes and tell the students to complete as much as they can. When they are finished, they can work together as a group or in teams of 2 to check their work. Discuss the results and if needed, re‐teach specific words that seem to be a problem. 5
Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Chicken Dog Word Factory
Worksheet #1
Time started: _________
Time ended: __________
Make words by combining the beginning letters from the box with the word
endings below. See how many words you can make in 10 minutes.
b f g h r l m n p w
Examples:
s ap
ap
ap
ap
s ip
ip
ip
ip
s at
at
at
at
s it
it
it
it
s et
et
et
et
s ick
ick
ick
ick
s ell
ell
ell
ell
s ill
ill
ill
ill
s um
um
um
um
s un
un
un
un
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Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Before and After – Hog Hat Zone
Skill: Complete sentences with words from a word list including prefixes and suffixes Estimated Time: 20 minutes Materials: Hog Hat Zone Worksheet #5 (See next page) Grade Level: Middle and High School Struggling Readers, ELL, Special Education Activity Introduce the activity by reviewing prefixes and suffixes –what they are, how they are used, what they mean. Create sample sentences where words are left out of the sentence and where prefixes and suffixes are used. When students appear to understand how to add words, prefixes and suffixes to complete sentence meaning, introduce the worksheet. Explain how to use the word list. Divide students into groups of 2 to share the activity. When completed, involve students in sharing their work and explaining why they chose the words they did.
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Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Hog Hat Zone Worksheet #5
BEFORE and AFTER
Complete the sentences by filling in one of these words, prefixes, or suffixes in each blank:
WORDS
PREFIXES
SUFFIXES
had his I it its me my
that was we were
re un
‘s ed er est ly y
Leaving the
conscious man in the charge of my housekeeper, ___________ all
three went down to the dead
lagoon. On the shingle there ___________ piled
a little heap of towels and clothes left by the stricken man. Slowly I walked round
the edge of the water, my comrades in Indian file behind ___________. Most of
the pool was quite shallow, but under the cliff where the beach was
hollow
out it was four or five feet deep. It was to this part that a swim
would natural
go, for ___________ formed a beautiful pellucid green pool as
clear as crystal. A line of rocks lay above it at the base of the cliff, and along this
___________ led the way, peering eager
I ___________ reached the deep
into the depths beneath me.
and stillest pool when ___________ eyes
caught ___________ for which they ___________ searching, and I burst into a
shout of triumph.
“Cyanea!” ___________ cried. “Cyanea! Behold the Lion
Mane!”
The strange object at which ___________ pointed did indeed look like a tangle
mass torn from the mane of a lion. ___________ lay upon a rock
three feet under the water, a curious waving, vibrating, hair
shelf some
creature with
streaks of silver among ___________ yellow tresses.
When you are done, read the passage out loud to be sure that it all makes sense.
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Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
What Does This Mean?
Skill: Responding to who, what, when, where, and how questions Estimated Time: 30 minutes + additional extended activity Materials: literature book for young readers. A helpful resource is the Reading Teachers’ Children’s Choices Lists. Two books elementary students may enjoy: Game Day Tiki and Ronde Barber with Robert Burleigh. Ill. Barry Root. Two American football superstars tell a story of brotherly love, perseverance and teamwork as each helps the other succeed. Readers get a good feel for the game of football and learn that it isnʹt only those who score touchdowns who win. Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers. 32 pp. Judy Moody Declares Independence Megan McDonald. Ill. Peter H. Reynolds. Judy Moody is caught by the founding fathersʹ spirit of revolution after her visit to Boston. Young readers greatly enjoy Judyʹs declaration: Freedom from brushing her hair and from little brothers. The book helps children make connections with this historical event. Candlewick Press. 144 pp. Grade Level: Elementary; Middle & High School Activity: 1. Introduce the book to the students with a brief overview of its contents. Stimulate their interest and curiosity without revealing too many details about the contents. 2. Read the book asking the students to just enjoy the story. 3. After the first reading, talk about what they heard in the first reading. 4. Then, talk about questions that guide our reading: who, what, etc. 5. Ask the students to share new information they learned from the reading. 5. On a large paper, write the question words. Ask students to help create a question sentence for each of the words. When finished, read the sentences together. Note: This activity can be extended into a writing activity, linking sentences together to create a paragraph. Students can also illustrate their writing.
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Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Motivation
Fast ForWord products require students to maintain consistent focus while working on the exercises. To encourage them, the motivation and reward ideas in this section can be very helpful. Additional motivation strategies and activities are available at www.scilearn.com/support. Encourage
Attendance
Daily & Weekly
Points
Weekly Door Prize Students enter the Fast ForWord lab and write their names down each day they attend to qualify for weekly door prizes. Wall of Fame Create a “Wall of Fame” for those high points achievers Attendance Chart Create a wall attendance chart. Have students mark their attendance with check marks, stickers, theme pictures, etc. Points Chart Track points on the daily points chart Highest Score
Completion
Highest Score Certificate When students reach their highest score in a Fast ForWord exercise, award them with a personalize “highest score” certificate that can be taken home. Lunch with the Principal For the student who achieves the highest score for the week, arrange lunch with the principal or coach Contract for Fast ForWord Achievement Create a contract for students to sign when they begin Fast ForWord instruction. Work with students to create the terms, benefits and rewards for keeping their promises and achieving their goals. Celebrate the conclusion o f the contract with a recognition event. Completion Ribbons Make an award ribbon for each student with names on the ribbon. Display the ribbons on a bulletin board. Using the Fast ForWord characters for each Fast ForWord exercise, make pugs. As each student reaches 80% completion in the exercise, the pug with that exercise character is put on their ribbon. 10
Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Motivation Bulletin Boards
Many Fast ForWord students respond positively to a creative learning environment. The following are just a few ideas teachers have tried in their Fast ForWord classrooms. Bulletin Board Ideas – Motivation Colorful, thematic bulletin board designs provide a focus for motivation and reward activities for students. Clicking Our Way to Success Computer mice with student’s names, pictures of students in the Fast ForWord lab. Welcome to Our Fast ForWord Community A community design where all roads lead to the Fast ForWord exercises. Go for the Gold Create an Olympic theme on the bulletin board. Students choose a sport to represent and picture on the board. When they complete their exercises, place a gold medal with their name on it on the picture of their sport. Wall of Fame Students’ names are placed on the Wall of Fame. Consider creating a wall of fame for those high point achievers. 11
Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Sample Motivation Activities
Teachers can create motivational activities to capture the learning excitement in students. The four suggestions below can be adapted to all the Fast ForWord to Reading 3 exercises. Additional activities can be located at www.scilearn.com/support. Scrap Cat
Cats Around the World To encourage students to attend Fast ForWord sessions every day, create a “Cats Around the World” display on a small table in the classroom. Library books about cats, videos, stuffed animals, National Geographic articles can be used. When students have perfect attendance for one week, allow them to choose a “cat” item from the display to take home for the weekend as a reward to perfect attendance. Adapt this exercise for older students by using a game or sports theme. Crazy Cats Find several large humorous‐looking cats to set on the teacher’s desk. When a student reaches 80% completion in the exercise, give a cat to that student and allow the student to put the cat on top of the computer or on his or her desk for the day. Adapt this exercise for older students by using a trophy or a highly‐
regarded sports memorabilia item. Hog Hat Zone
Construction Zone For those students intrigued by large machinery, use the construction theme in Hog Hat Zone to collect children’s books and videos about machinery, construction, building bridges, etc. and place them on a display table in the room. When students achieve an agreed‐upon goal in their work, allow them to choose an item to read or view and then return to the table for others to enjoy. Adapt this exercise for older students by using a display about cars, racing bikes, or other sports equipment that appeal to middle and high school students. Build a Wall – class activity Use a large box of building blocks for this activity. Decide as a class what goal to address, then as each student reaches this goal he or she chooses a block from the box, sets it on the table. The next student to achieve the goal places another block next to, or on top of the first block. At the end of the Fast ForWord lab experience, students view the completed wall and discuss the process, why walls are created and the results of a class effort. Adapt this exercise for older students by building a pyramid or other geometrically‐shaped item of interest to the students. 12
Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Intervention: Fast ForWord to Reading 3
Activities for English Language Learners
These intervention activities are designed specifically for English Language Learners. Some of the activities are designed for use with individual students. Other activities can be used with several students at one time. Often a small group of students can practice certain tasks together after the initial instruction, or they can bring the tasks home with them to share with their families. The Introductory Activities which should be conducted prior to students working on the exercises provide specific instruction for acquainting students with the meaning of words and directions for using the exercises. Ask for feedback from the students to ensure they understand. Other activities are appropriate as the students work on the exercise and encounter difficulties. Fast
ForWord
Product
Fast
ForWord
Exercise
Skill
Addressed
Intervention
Activity
Fast ForWord Scrap Cat to Reading 3 Categorical relationships Playing Category Cards Fast ForWord Canine Crew to Reading 3 Synonyms & Antonyms Similar and Opposite Fast ForWord Chicken Dog to Reading 3 Fast ForWord Twisted to Reading 3 Pictures Spelling Sound and Spell Sentence comprehension /grammatical comprehension;
pronouns Completing Sentences 13
ELL Levels
Speech emergence, Intermediate Fluency Speech emergence, Intermediate Fluency Early production to Intermediate fluency Speech emergence, Intermediate Fluency Grade
Levels
Elementary Middle & High School Elementary Middle & High School Elementary Middle & High School Elementary Middle & High School Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Fast
ForWord
Product
Fast
ForWord
Exercise
Fast ForWord Book to Reading 3 Monkeys Fast ForWord Hog Hat to Reading 3 Zone Skill
Addressed
Intervention
Activity
ELL Levels
Comprehension True or False? skills by Intermediate Fluency Choosing the Fill in the blanks correct pronoun to complete a sentence Speech emergence, Intermediate Fluency Grade
Levels
Elementary Middle School Elementary Middle NOTE: The 4 levels of English Language Learning are (progressively) as follows:
• Pre-production (nod, point, understand a little English
• Early Production (one to two word responses, follow some instructions, respond to intonation,
need modeling of instructions, of correct speech)
• Speech Emergence (simple sentences, follow spoken instructions, very early reading, some
grammatical/pronunciation errors, sight vocabulary, phrase patterns)
• Intermediate Fluency (complete sentences, fluency in social/playground English, Limited
academic text reading comprehension, structural errors in context-reduced writing tasks)
The activities below will focus on one, some or all of the last three levels. These are NOT activities
appropriate for students who speak no English or who are at the very beginning levels. Keep in mind the
English level of proficiency when working with students. Form questions that require responses at the level
from which the students are able to respond—sometimes just nods, sometimes one word answers,
sometimes phrases, etc. Generally, asking students who are at the lower stages to repeat words and
phrases, showing pictures for them to associate meaning and sound with words are good practices to use
on a regular basis when working with English Language Learners in the classroom. Avoid overcorrecting. Model correct speech in response to incorrect usage by saying what student answered in your
words. Provide visual aids whenever possible.
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Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Introductory Activity
Scrap Cat – Playing Category Cards
Providing vocabulary help for English Language Learners who have not used any of the programs before and may need reminders of words used in the introductions and commands of the programs is highly recommended. For Scrap Cats, some of the likely new terms they will encounter the first time they use it are: scrap, category, speaker, example, “help button”, definition. Students who are more fluent may not need this reminder, but newcomers to the program will definitely benefit from a quick review. For younger students, point to items in the initial screen or a print screen transparency and say the words. Ask students to repeat the words. Ask students to come up to point to the item as you say it. For both younger and older students, show real examples (or a picture) of the newer words. More abstract terms will require a little more imagination and modeling if no one in the room knows what the word means. Example: show categories by writing Boys/Girls on the board and putting a few student names under each. Skill Addressed: Understanding categorical relationships Grade Level: Elementary, Middle School, High School English Language Level: Speech emergence to Intermediate Fluency Type of Activity: Individual, Small Group Materials: • Large Manila Envelopes with category names (below) • Word cards (Word List below) Note: adapt categories and word cards to appeal to the interests of a high school student. Categories: Animals, Things to Wear, Things to Eat Word Cards: Animals: dog, cat, monkey, lion, tiger, tarantula, fox Things to Wear: shoes, socks, hat, gloves, and sweater Things to Eat: pizza, cookie, apple, carrots, Activity Mix cards together, choose a card and put it in the envelope that states the category to which it belongs. For high school students: Turn this into a card game for groups of 3 or 4. Each student gets 7 cards and the rest of the cards are stacked in the middle with 1 card facing up. If student doesn’t have a word card that matches the CATEGORY of the card facing up, he/she must put down one card facing up and SAY the new category. Next student takes turn. You may have up to 4 or more cards facing up at one time, with all the categories having been said. Proceed until the first student has NO cards left. Reshuffle and start again if there is time. 15
Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Introductory Activity
Providing vocabulary help for
English Language Learners
who have not used any of the
programs before and may need
reminders of words used in the
introductions and commands of
the programs is highly
recommended. For Canine
Crew, some of the likely new
terms they will encounter the
first time they use it are:
canine, crew, rhymes, match,
awarded, attempt, “you get the
most points”. Students who are
more fluent may not need this
refresher, but newcomers to the
program will definitely benefit
from a quick review. For
younger students, point to items
in the initial screen or a print
screen transparency and say the
words. Ask students to repeat
the words. Ask students to
come up to point to the item as
you say it. For both younger
and older students, show real
examples (or a picture) of the
newer words. Some tips:
canine = like a dog, of or about
dogs; crew: show a picture of a
ship’s crew; rhymes (say words
that rhyme); match: look for
colors that are the same in the
room; awarded: remind them
of the last time someone in
class won an award (or give an
“award” for the correct answer
to another question); attempt:
try, make an effort.
Canine Crew
Playing Cards: Similar and Opposite
Skill Addressed: Improving knowledge of synonyms and antonyms.
Using academic words that are synonyms and antonyms.
Grade Level: Elementary, Middle & High School
English Language Level: Speech emergence to Intermediate Fluency
Type of Activity: Individual, Small Group
Materials:
Word cards
• Synonym cards: big, large; tiny, small; yell, shout; coat, jacket;
glad, happy
• Antonym cards: happy, sad; large, small; whisper, shout; sit,
stand
NOTE: adapt categories and word cards to appeal to the interests of a
high school student and use some academic English words. Example:
• Synonyms: definition, meaning; attempt, effort, try,
experiment, test; progress, advance; solution, answer;
product, result, total; observe, watch or see.
• Antonyms: progress, revert or reverse; solution, answer;
create, destroy; similar, different; problem, solution;
missing, found; connect, disconnect; accept, decline.
Activity: Mix cards and turn face up. Explain the terms “same –
synonym” and “opposite – antonym.” If working with synonyms, direct
the student to take one word card, read it and then find another word
card that tEnglish Language Learners something very close to the same
meaning as the chosen word card. If working with antonyms, direct the
student to take a card that has the opposite meaning as the chosen word
card.
For high school students: Turn this into a card game for groups of 3 or
4. Each student gets 4 cards and the rest of the cards are stacked in the
middle with 1 card facing up. If student has a card in his/her hand that
matches (or is the opposite) of the one facing up, he/she make take the
card, declare a match (SAY: synonym or antonym), and put both cards
down face up for others to see in a stack. This student may play again
by putting one card down and the next student picks it up or takes one
from the stack. If no matches, next student tries. Next student takes
turn. Proceed until one student has NO cards left. Whoever has the most
matched pairs next to him/her, wins the game. Reshuffle and start again
if there is time.
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Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Chicken Dog
Sound and Spell
Introductory Activity
Providing vocabulary help for English Language Learners who have not used any of the programs before and may need reminders of words used in the introductions and commands of the programs is highly recommended. For Chicken Dog, there are fortunately few terms unknown to students working at this performance level, but, just in case, some may have never heard of: dog (referring to a hot dog, not to a real dog), missing, and click (if they have never used a computer before). Students who are more fluent may not need this refresher, but newcomers to the program will definitely benefit from a quick review. For younger students, point to items in the initial screen or a print screen transparency and say the words. Ask students to repeat the words. Ask students to come up to point to the item as you say it. For both younger and older students who need to learn these terms, show real examples (or a picture) of the newer words. Some tips: missing: show your hand and hide the thumb. Ask what is missing; click: make the sound; show a computer mouse and how to “click” it. Skill Addressed: Relating a word’s sound to its correct spelling. Spelling and sounding out academic words. Grade Level: Elementary, Middle & High School English Language Level: Early production to Intermediate fluency Type of Activity: Individual, Small Group Materials: Word Cards with partial spellings (attached) Activity: Choose a word card, direct the student to find the missing letter from the row of letters beneath the incompletely spelled word. Guide the student to verbally place the missing letter into the word and attempt to sound it out. See example on next page: Chicken dog: Sound and Spell. For beginners: Use shorter, simpler words. For high school students: Use words that are used in the content areas, (Examples: problem, factor, addition, multiply, divide; flask, weather, microscope, temperature.) Ask your content‐area colleagues to provide a list of commonly used words in their field of study. Even if students need simpler & shorter words to fit their proficiency level, use as many content‐area (academic) words as possible (Examples: sum, total, world, time, hot, cold, high, low, dew, stable, motion, station, spin, star, motor, etc.) 17
Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Chicken Dog – Sound and Spell Activity Sheet
li ____ e r
y, v, th, f, b
bu___p
t, p, m, n
ci____y
b p, m, t
birth___ay
y, s, b, d
trac___or
b, d, s, t
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Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Introductory Activity
Twisted Pictures
Completing Sentences
Providing vocabulary help for English Language Learners who have not used any of the programs before and may need reminders of words used in the introductions and commands of the programs is highly recommended. Fortunately, for Twisted Pictures, all the terms used in giving directions are fairly familiar terms. If you feel the students need an introduction to the program context: For younger students, point to items in the initial screen or a print screen transparency and say the words. Ask students to repeat the words. Ask students to come up to point to the item as you say it. For both younger and older students who need may be unfamiliar with museums of art, show pictures of an art gallery or museum with paintings. This provides a good opportunity to discuss a new topic and add a few more vocabulary words like: frame, hanging, art museum, art gallery, exhibit, etc. 19
Skills Addressed: Improving sentence comprehension by focusing on grammatical comprehension. Using pronouns in context. Grade Level: Elementary, Middle & High School English Language Level: Speech emergence, Intermediate Fluency Type of Activity: Individual Materials: Worksheets (attached) Nouns Verbs Adjectives Adverbs Activity: Choose the best word to complete the sentence in each worksheet. Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Twisted Pictures – Completing Sentences Worksheet
REMEMBER…..
Noun: the name of a person (Joe), a place (house), or a thing (pencil).
Proper Noun: a name that is yours and yours alone such as Mary, Joe, or even the
name of a state, California. Proper nouns always start with an upper case letter.
Common Noun: a name that is NOT a Proper Noun such as girl, boy, state, and
car. Common nouns always start with a lower case letter.
Fill in the blanks with a common noun:
1. I put the dog in the ____________ so he could ride with me.
car
milk
bottle
spoon
2. Susan found her cat in the ____________________.
weather
clouds
moon
tree
Fill in the blanks with a proper noun:
1. I put my dog, _____________ in the car so he could ride with me.
Spot
2.
pan
dish
roof
Susan found her cat, ______________ in the tree.
state
Calico
truck
fluffy
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Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Twisted Pictures – Completing Sentences Worksheet
REMEMBER…. A pronoun is a word that can ‘stand for’ a noun and take its
place in a sentence. He, she, I, it, me, you, him, her, that, and those can all
act as pronouns in sentences.
Circle the pronouns in the sentences below.
1. It looks like it is going to rain
2. They love to smell chocolate chip cookies baking in the oven.
3. Did the zebra see a bewildered duck that was searching for the exit?
4. He ordered a large strawberry ice cream cone.
5. She spilled the milkshake on the checkered floor.
6. Please give the mop to him.
7. Please call her today or she will be angry.
8. I don’t know why you like to swim so much.
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Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Page 2….
Write a pronoun in each blank in the sentences to complete the story.
(Hint: Try using she, he, her, you, I, me or him, they, it, we, or them)
Mary asked __________brother which one of _____ should wrap the present
for Aunt Sarah’s birthday.
He replied, “_________ can do all the work if ___________show
______where to find the gift wrappings.”
“The tape and the scissors are on the desk where ___________left ______,”
________ said.
He went to look, but said, “____ can’t find ______? Where did ____ say
you put them?”
I had to go help _____ find the scissors and tape. It ended up that
____ both worked on wrapping the present for _____.
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Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Page 3…
(For intermediate fluency middle/high school students)
Write a pronoun in each blank in the sentences to complete the
paragraph.
Yesterday, ___ did an experiment in science class. ___ was not a very
difficult one, but ___ was a lot of fun. The teacher asked us to find out
which makes better bubbles, skim milk or whole milk? Before trying to
answer the question, ____ had to know one thing: that
there is only one known difference between the two milks:
whole milk has 3.25% fat, and skim milk has almost none.
Otherwise, ______ are the same. _____ needed 2 cups and 2 straws for the
experiment. One cup was for skim milk and the other cup for whole milk.
_____ made a lot of noise trying it out. Mrs. Smith, our teacher, laughed.
______ said, “At least _____ did not make a mess!” When ___ finished,
____ wrote down what ____ found. _____ won’t tell you what _____ found
out. _____ will have to try _____ out for yourself.
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Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Book Monkeys - Comprehension
Introductory Activity True or False Providing vocabulary help for English Language Learners who have not used any of the programs before and may need reminders of words used in the introductions and commands of the programs is highly recommended. Fortunately, for Book Monkeys, all the terms used in giving directions are fairly familiar terms. If you feel the students need an introduction to the program context, reintroducing words like paragraph and icon may be helpful For younger students, point to items in the initial screen or a print screen transparency and say the words. Particularly point to the icons of pages and mention how they look like page, ask how many page icons they see. Students may need to repeat any words that are new to them. For both younger and older students who need may be unfamiliar with a library (unlikely, if they are reading at this level, but possible), arrange for a visit to the library, or show pictures of a library and discuss what you may find there. This provides a good opportunity to build additional vocabulary: librarian, check out or sign out a book, due date, return, preview, borrow, etc.) Skill Addressed: Building comprehension skills by determining true and false sentences Grade Level: Elementary and Middle School English Language Level: Intermediate Fluency Type of Activity: Individual Materials: •
•
•
Printed handout of Paragraph (attached) True and False Questions Pencils or pens 24
Activity 1 Activity 2 Discuss the meaning of “true” and “false” with the students. Read the following paragraph with them. Ask students to identify true statements below the paragraph. Identify false statements. (More advanced) Ask students to write a paragraph about an experiment, a field trip or any other activity they did in science, math, music or history class. Ask the students to write some True and False questions about what they wrote. Tell them to create a “key” of correct answers on a separate piece of paper with the same title as their paragraph. Put their names on both papers. Direct students to exchange their paragraphs with other students so they can “edit” each other’s work. Collect and review, make corrections and hand back to the original writer for a “clean version”. Collect the new versions and use them for a separate activity where a different student reads the paragraph and answers True/False and gives it back to the original writer for “grading.” Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Book Monkeys - True or False Worksheet
Because today is his birthday, Mike woke up early. He jumped out of bed and hurried downstairs for breakfast. Right after breakfast, his mother baked a lemon cake and covered it with vanilla frosting. Late that same afternoon, five of Mike’s friends came over to share some cake and open presents. True or False: Put a “T” in front of the sentences that are true. Put an “F” in front of sentences that are not true. ________Mike slept late on his birthday. ________Mike hurried downstairs to eat breakfast. ________Mike’s mother baked him a chocolate cake. ________Mike’s mother baked him a lemon cake. ________Seven of Mike’s friends came to his house for a party. ________Mike did not get any presents for his birthday. 25
Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Introductory Activity
Hog Hat Zone - Fill in the Blanks
Providing vocabulary help for English Language Learners who have not used any of the programs before and may need reminders of words used in the introductions and commands of the programs is highly recommended. Fortunately, in Hog Hat Zone, most of the terms used in giving directions are fairly familiar terms, except perhaps for zone, “fill in the blank” and “correct”. For younger students, you may familiarize them with the program by pointing to items in the initial screen or a print screen transparency and saying the words for them to repeat. Skill Addressed: Choosing the correct pronoun to complete a sentence. Grade Level: Elementary, Middle & High School English Language Level: Speech emergence, Intermediate Fluency Type of Activity: Individual, Small Group Materials: Worksheet (See next page.) Activity: Read through the list of pronouns. Use one pronoun from the list to complete the sentence. 26
Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Hog Hat Zone – Fill in the Blanks
Worksheet
REMEMBER….A pronoun is a word that can ‘stand for’ a noun and take its place in a sentence. He, she, I, it, me, you, him, her, his, hers, that, and those can all act as pronouns in sentences. Directions: Read each sentence. Circle the pronoun that best completes the meaning of each sentence. Aunt Emma dropped ______(her, his) work and walked to the window. ________(She, he, it) saw Tom fall off ______(his, her) bicycle. The handlebars flew from _____(his, her) bicycle and landed in the bushes. Tom sat on the ground, stunned, as _______(he, she) looked at _______(his, her) bicycle. -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The Blue Dolphin was a quick little sailboat, and ____(it, her) cost considerably more than Sandra wanted to spend. Sandra loved to go sailing in _______(her, it) old sailboat but now wanted a larger boat like the Blue Dolphin. (His, Her) father offered to help Sandra pay for the Blue Dolphin if Sandra was willing to work for __________(him, his, hers) on Saturdays at the Fish Market Restaurant. 27
Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Instructions for Swinging Water
You can make water whirl around in circles without spilling it all over ______ (you, it, us) and everyone else. I will tell you how to do ______ (he, she, it). All ___(she, he, you) need is a piece of cardboard, some string, and a plastic cup of water. If ______(me, they, you) are afraid to try ___ (her, it, him) with water, _____ (he, you, she), can use a few pennies in the cup instead. _______ (It, I, She) prefer a plastic cup because if you happen to drop ______(it, her, them), it won’t break. Oh, and if ____(he, you, she) want to use the water, go outside. Your parents will not be happy if this experiment fails, and _____ (she, he, you) don’t want to have to explain this all to (him, her, them). I tried this the first time in my room. My sister was there, and _____(they, we, I) spilled water all over _______(it, her, them). _____ (He, She, It) was very angry and told my Mom. _____ (She, He, We) scolded _____ (him, us, me) and told me to go outside next time. 28
Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Instructions for Swinging Water (continued) I did, but this time, ____ (he, I, they) splashed water on the cat, and ____ it, she, he) hates water! So, ____ (they, we, I) had to find a place in the park to try it. I told my friends about my experiment and _______(we, they, you) came to watch ____ (her, him, me) spin the water. It worked this time, and ____ (she, he, they) all laughed and clapped and wanted to try ____ (them, him, it), too. If ____ (he, you, she) want to try it, go to this website to find more fun experiments to do: http://www.tryscience.org . There, they even tell you how to do ____ (him, her, them) in Spanish and Chinese and Arabic! 29
Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Intervention: Fast ForWord to Reading 3
Activities for Special Education Students
To help students in special education environments meet learning standards, various learning strategies can be implemented. Students with learning challenges need special help in learning to develop phonological awareness, learning the alphabet, understanding the relationship or sound and letters, and developing an awareness of the printed language and writing system. Modeling, demonstrating, breaking skills into small segments and consistent repetition for the students as they work with these exercises make their learning tasks more successful. Fast
ForWord
Product
Fast ForWord to Reading 3 Fast
ForWord
Exercise
Scrap Cat
Skill
Addressed
Intervention
Activity
Categorical
relationships
Category
Puzzles
Similar and
Opposite
Fast ForWord to Reading 3 Canine Crew
Synonyms and
Antonyms
Fast ForWord to Reading 3 Chicken Dog
Spelling/Sounds Spelling Words
For Points
Fast ForWord to Reading 3 Twisted
Pictures
Sentence
Comprehension
Fast ForWord to Reading 3 Book Monkeys
Comprehension
Skills
Fast ForWord to Reading 3 Hog Hat Zone
Pronouns
30
What Does It
Mean
Organizer
Anticipatory
Strategy and
Memory
Strategies
Pronoun Chart
Grade Levels
Elementary
Middle &
High School
Elementary
Middle &
High School
Elementary
Middle & High
School
Elementary
Middle &
High School
Elementary
Middle School
Elementary
Middle School
& High School
Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Which Category?
Scrap Cat
How to create the puzzle
Skill Addressed: Understanding categorical relationships Grade Level: Elementary, Middle School, High School Type of Activity: Individual, Small Group Materials: Oak tag, Vocabulary Words from Scrap Cat, Categories from Scrap Cat Note: adapt categories and word cards to appeal to the interests of a high school student. Categories: Animals, Things to Wear, Things People Can Be,Tools Word Cards: Animals: fawn, turkey, goose, turtle, skunk, horse, salmander Things to Wear: shirt, crown, skirt, mitten, sweater , boot, pants Things people can be: daughter, queen, artist, scout, author, soldier, scientist Tools: shovel, saw, hammer, pliers, plow, file, screwdriver Activity: Vocabulary/Category puzzles are a good way to help students identify the vocabulary word and the category they fit into. The puzzles are sentence strips that include the vocabulary word, a visual cue (either drawn or cut out from book)to the word’s meaning, and the category it fits into. 31
(1) Cut oak tag into strips about 3 inches by 8 inches (2) Give students the list of vocabulary word from Group One of the program (3) Give students the list of categories from Group One of the program (4) Ask students to match the words with the categories (5) When a student matches the first word with the appropriate category they either draw a illustration of the word or a illustration of the meaning of the word. (6) The student creates the puzzle by gluing the picture or drawing the illustration in the fist third of the strip, writing the targeted word on the second third of the strip and the category on the last third of the strip (7) Puzzle lines divide the portions of the strip and the puzzle are cut irregularly apart Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
CANINE CREW - Similar and Opposite
Skill Addressed: Improving knowledge of synonyms and antonyms Grade Level: Elementary, Middle & High School Type of Activity: Individual, Small Group Materials: Colored Word cards (blue and yellow) Synonym words: make/ create; now/immediately; write/author; disappear/vanish; long/lengthy; right/correct Antonym words: bent/straight; command/obey; let/prevent; brief/long; panic/calm; silence/sound Activity: 1) Teacher makes up the following cards from the target words from the different categories of Canine Crew. 2) If the teacher is teaching synonyms , the blue cards are made as follows: a. First vocabulary word is written on one side of the card and the illustration that shows the meaning is on the back of the card. b. The second corresponding word is written on the front of the second card and the illustration that shows the meaning is on the back of the card. 3) If the teacher is teaching antonyms, the yellow cards are made as follows: a. First vocabulary word is written on one side of the card and the illustration that shows the meaning is on the back of the card. b. The second corresponding word is written on the front of the second card and the illustration that shows the meaning is on the back of the card. 4) The two different colors are used so that the student identifies synonyms and antonyms differently while they are working with the vocabulary words. 5) Each concept is studied independently from each other so that there is no confusion 6) Cards are placed in front of the student and the student has to match the words with the appropriate pictures. 7) When the match is correct for synonyms ,they write the two words in their notebook beside each other and draws one illustration that is appropriate for both words 8) When the match is correct for antonyms , they write the two words in their notebook beside each other and draws two illustration that is appropriate for both words that reflect the opposite meanings 9) After this is done, the teacher explains the terms “same‐synonym” and “opposite‐
antonym” 10) As a review, a worksheet is created. The synonym pairs of words and the antonym pairs of words are written in column form with a line next to each pair. The space is provided for the student to write whether the pair of words is a synonym (s) or an antonym(a). 32
Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
CHICKEN DOG - Sound and Spell
Skill Addressed: Relating a word’s sound to its correct spelling Grade Level: Elementary, Middle & High School Type of Activity: Individual, Small Group Materials: Spelling words for points. Activity: The category of words depends on the syllable rule that the teacher is emphasizing. If the teacher wanted to emphasize short vowels , the teacher would choose CVC words. If the teacher wanted to emphasize the Silent “e” words, the teacher would choose CVCE words. For this activity, the words that have been chosen are CVCE words. Spelling for Points is an activity that assigns point values to all the letter of the alphabet. The student chooses to spell words that give him/her the highest total value than anyone in his/her assigned group. A student can also compete against himself or herself .There are two worksheets one with a word bank and one without. A student first completes the word bank worksheet and then he is tested on what he/she remembers with the second worksheet. The second worksheet’s point value is worth double. This is to encourage the youngster to try to remember as many words as they can. 33
Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Chicken Dog – Sound and Spell Worksheet
Using the following point system, each letter of the alphabet is given its’ value: A=2
M=2
Y=4
B=4
N=2
C=3
O=1
D=4
P=4
E=1 F=6
Q=15 R=2
G=6
S=2
H=6
T=2
I=2
U=2
J=8
V=8
K=8 L=3
W=8 X=15
WORD BANK
Case state name place delete extreme theme these five like quite wife close home those whole excuse flute rule use WORD
1______________________
2______________________
3______________________
4______________________
5______________________
6______________________
7______________________
8______________________
9______________________
POINT
_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________
_____________
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Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
TWISTED PICTURES – Sentence Comprehension
Skill Addressed: Improving sentence comprehension by focusing on what a picture means. Grade Level: Elementary, Middle & High School Type of Activity: Individual Materials: Simple and complicated pictures and the “What Does It Mean?” Organizer. Activity: Students have many problems when they look at targeted pictures. They very rarely see the detail and every detail has a sentence attached to it. In order for a student to fully capitalize on the program “Twisted Pictures” they must be taught to look at pictures appropriately and notice all of the details. This activity is quite simple. The teacher chooses from different magazines or picture books simple and complicated illustrations of people or animals doing things. These illustrations are placed at the top of the “What Does It Mean” organizer. The student is to look at the picture and answer the questions in the organizer. After the questions are answered, the student then write a few sentences to explain what they actual see going on in the picture. This activity will only be successful if the teacher role models for the student on how this is done. He/She works with the group by analyzing the picture and looking at all of the details. The teacher than writes all of the sentences in the organizer. The teacher also writes the three different ways a sentence can be written while looking at each of the characters perspective.
35
Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Twisted Pictures Worksheet
“WHAT DOES IT MEAN”
Place the illustration inside this box
1. Who are the characters inside this illustration?
a.______________________________________
b________________________________________
c________________________________________
d________________________________________
2. What are the characters doing?
a________________________________________
b________________________________________
c________________________________________
d_________________________________________
3. Where is this illustration happening?
a_________________________________________
b_________________________________________
c_________________________________________
d_________________________________________
4. Why is this illustration happening?
a_________________________________________
b_________________________________________
c_________________________________________
d_________________________________________
5. Write three sentences using the characters in the illustration and explain how their
actions can be interpreted in three different ways.
a__________________________________________
b__________________________________________
c__________________________________________
36
Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
BOOK MONKEYS – Comprehension Skills
True or False
Memory Strategies
Skill Addressed: Building comprehension skills Memory Strategies that can be used to help by making predictions of the story you are comprehension of written text are as follow: going to read. 1. Use mnemonic and rhymes to cement Grade Level: Elementary and Middle School recall facts 2. Drill and practice helps but works Type of Activity: Individual or group better when applied immediately after Materials: Paragraph; Anticipation Organizer; studying. The use of computer‐
Memory Strategies assisted drills and practice methods help in the transfer of information Activity: Discuss the meaning of anticipating 3.
Note‐taking is helpful but if you what will happen before what is read or while underline key words and concepts it is being read. When a student listens to a with colored highlighters the retention story and can anticipate or predict what will is increased. happen next, he/she increases his/her ability to 4. Details are better recalled as a song. comprehend. Encourage students to make up raps Another factor in increasing the ability to or cheers to remember information comprehend is to increase memory. Many 5. Visual imagery helps to cement students appear to have comprehension comprehension. The use of movies and problems when in fact they have memory pictures that depict stories or concepts problems. The teacher reads a story or the help retention. student reads a story and as they read they Chunking information by turning text into forget what they have aleady read. small phrases of information helps especially while listening to oral reading. The following steps help in the skill of anticipating in order to increase the comprehension of text. (1) Write down what you already know before you read it, (2) List details from the selection. (3) Write your first prediction. (4)Verify which parts of your prediction happened.(5) Write another prediction down. (6) Check the appropriate box to indicate whether your prediction was correct. If not, write down what actually happened. 37
Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Book Monkeys Worksheet - Anticipation Strategy
1) What Do I Already Know Before I Read? a. b. c d. 2) Details from the Story read a. b. c. d. 3) My first anticipatory statement a. a. (corrected) 4) What actually happened a. b. c. d. 5) My next anticipatory statement a. a. (corrected) 6) Was I right? Was I wrong? Write the correct answer in the space provided under the first and second anticipatory statements. a. b. c. d.
38
Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
HOG HAT ZONE - Fill in the Blanks
Skill Addressed: Choosing the correct pronoun to complete a sentence. Grade Level: Elementary, Middle & High School Type of Activity: Individual, Small Group Materials: Worksheet (See next page.) Activity: Read through the list of pronouns. Use one pronoun from the list to complete the sentence
39
Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Hog Hat Zone – Fill in the Blanks
Worksheet
REMEMBER….A pronoun is a word that can ‘stand for’ a noun and take its place in a
sentence. He, she, I, it, me, you, him, her, his, hers, that, and those can all act as pronouns
in sentences. Different group of pronouns have different functions.
Part One: One group of pronouns takes the place of the subject in a sentence. These
pronouns are called subject pronouns. They are (1) I, you, he, she , it (means one) and (2)
We , you , they ( means more than one).
Example: What is Mary looking at? (one)
What are you looking at? (one)
The boys were walking around the game.(more than one)
They were walking about the game. (more then one)
Directions: Read each sentence. Underline the subject and replace it with a
pronoun. Rewrite the sentence using the correct pronoun than underline the
pronoun within the sentence that you rewrote.
I
you
it
he
she
we
they
(1)
Mary hopes to get in my way.________________________________
(2)
Sebastian leaped from his bike._______________________________
(3)
Ben and Alex live in New York.______________________________
(4)
Angela and I packed for vacation._____________________________
(5)
The dog ate all his food._____________________________________
(6)
“Fred can go to the store,” said his mother.______________________
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Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Hog Hat Zone – Fill in the Blanks
Worksheet
Part Two: Students learn that subject pronouns can be classified in two ways: a person
or a number.
(1) Person indicates the person who is speaking, the person spoken to, or the
person spoken about:
a. I and we are first person ( the person who is speaking)
b. You is the second person (person spoken to)
c. He, she ,it is the third person (person spoken about)
(2) Number may be singular (one) or plural (more than one)
a. I, you, she , it are singular subject pronoun
b. We, you , they are plural subject pronouns
Directions: Read each sentence. Underline the subject and replace it with a
pronoun. Rewrite the sentence using the correct pronoun than underline the
pronoun within the sentence that you rewrote. File in the chart below with the
correct pronouns.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
The men ran in the race.___________________________________
Michael was a fine artist.___________________________________
Connie is a fine teacher.______________________________________
The cat fell out of the window._________________________________
The boys and girls were on a bus going to school.__________________
Person
Singular
Plural
First Person
Second Person
Third Person
41
Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Interventions: Fast ForWord to Reading 3
Activities for Struggling Readers
Struggling readers benefit from the pre‐teaching of each Fast ForWord exercise to ensure they understand the exercise process, the key words, and the purpose of the exercise. Monitoring carefully the students’ performance reports and observing their daily behaviors while on the exercises can alert the teacher to situations where timely teacher‐
led instruction is crucial. Fast
ForWord
Product
Fast
ForWord
Exercise
Skill
Addressed
Intervention
Activity
Fast ForWord to Reading 3 Scrap Cat Categorization Sort Us Fast ForWord to Reading 3 Scrap Cat Categorization Where Do We Belong? Fast ForWord to Reading 3 Canine Crew Concentration Fast ForWord to Reading 3 Canine Crew Chicken Dog Chicken Dog Automatic word recognition; knowledge of phonological properties of words Improving knowledge of homophones Improving sensitivity to letter‐ sound correspondence Development of spelling skills Fast ForWord to Reading 3 Fast ForWord to Reading 3 42
Go Fish for Homophones Spell Out Spelling Match Type of
Activity
Grade
Levels
Individual Small Group Individual Small Group Individual Small Group Elementary Middle and High School Elementary Middle and High School Elementary Middle and High School Individual Small Group Individual Small Group Individual Small Group Elementary Middle and High School Elementary Middle and High School Elementary Middle and High School Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Fast
ForWord
Product
Fast ForWord to Reading 3 Fast ForWord to Reading 3 Fast ForWord to Reading 3 Fast ForWord to Reading 3 Fast
ForWord
Exercise
Twisted Pictures Book Monkeys Book Monkeys Hog Hat Zone Skill
Addressed
Intervention
Activity
Comprehension Can You Find It? Cause and effect Why? Making predictions What’s Next? Suffixes Select the Suffix Type of
Activity
Grade
Levels
Individual Small Group Individual Small Group Individual Small Group Individual Small Group Elementary Middle and High School Elementary Middle School Elementary Middle School Elementary Middle School Scrap Cat - Sort Us
Skill Addressed: Categorization Grade Level: Elementary; Middle and High School Type of Activity: Individual; Small Group Materials: Create an activity sheet (see sample below) Activity: Review the basic elements of each of the following categories: syllables, vowel sounds). Present the sheet and explain that the words that should be placed into each category. The students should read each word and place them into an appropriate category. (2 syllables) twinkle, myself, panther, steeper (same vowel sound as at) vein, strange, quail, elevation (same vowel sound as go) soap, road, clothes, flow, 2 SYLLABLES SAME VOWEL SOUND AS SAME VOWEL SOUND AS “Ate” “Go” 43
Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Scrap Cat - Categorization
Skill Addressed: Categorization Grade Level: Elementary; Middle and High School Type of Activity: Individual; Small Group Materials: activity sheet with columns for each category Activity: Review the basic elements of each of the following categories: syllables, vowel sounds). Present the sheet and explain that the words that should be placed into each category are included in the middle of the web. The categories that the words have to be placed into are found along the sides of the web. The students should read each word and place them into an appropriate category. 2 syllables‐ twinkle, myself, panther, steeper same vowel sound as ate‐ vein, strange, quail, elevation same vowel sound as go‐ soap, road, clothes, flow Scrap Cat- Where Do We Belong?
Skill Addressed: Categorization Grade Level: Elementary; Middle and High School Type of Activity: Individual; Small Group Materials: create activity sheet from sample below Activity: Organize the students into two teams. Each team member should get one activity sheet, but only person will record the team’s responses. The team will work together to sort the words accordingly. As soon as the team has completed the task and checked their answers, they should take their sheet to the teacher. The teacher will check the answers for accuracy. If correct, the team has won. If not, the team has to go back and recheck their answers. The first team to get all of the answers correct will win. Provide the winning team with two treats and everyone else with one Where Do We Belong?
Words
1
2
44
3
Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Canine Crew- Concentration
Skills Addressed: Improving automatic word recognition and knowledge of the phonological properties of words Grade Level: Elementary; Middle and High School Type of Activity: Individual; Small Group Materials: 4 x 6 index cards with rhyming word pairs on each (see below) renew‐review; praise‐blaze; sly‐rye; tumble‐rumble; bodyguard‐boulevard; thistle‐whistle; reveal‐conceal; shower‐flour; flipper‐skipper; knapsack‐backpack Activity: Use one index card per rhyming pair. Write each word on side of an index card. Draw zigzag lines on the cards and cut them out. Try to draw a variety of different types of lines as the pieces will fit back together and serve as a self checking mechanism. Students should take all of the cards out and lay them on the table or the floor. They should read over each word and then find the pair that rhymes. They can then put the pieces together and lay them to the side. After all of the pieces have been matched, reread the rhyming pairs and place them back into the envelope.
Canine Crew- Go Fish for Homophones
Skill Addressed: Improving knowledge of homophones Grade Level: Elementary; Middle and High School Type of Activity: Small Group Materials: index cards with one homophone written on each (see below) throne‐thrown; grown‐groan; hair‐hare; pair‐pear; bear‐bare; attendance‐attendants; sighed‐side; fined‐find; in‐inn; fowl‐foul; chilly‐chili; mail‐male; beet‐beat; reed‐read; not‐knot; ore‐or; mussel‐
muscle; sea‐see Activity: Shuffle the cards and deal 4 to each player. The rest of the cards are placed in the center of the table to draw from when needed. The first player asks other players if they have a match to a card in her hand (i.e., “I would like the homophone for mail‐m‐a‐i‐l.”). If a match is received the pair is placed down and this continues. The same player then asks for another card. If there is no match the player that was asked for a match says “go fish”. The player who was looking for matches must then draw one card from the pile or the “pond”. This player’s turn is complete if there are no further matches. The next player then takes a turn. Play continues until one person runs out of cards.
45
Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Chicken Dog- Spell Out
Skill Addressed: Increasing Sensitivity to Letter Sound Correspondences Grade Level: Elementary; Middle and High School Type of Activity: Individual; Small Group Materials: sentence strips with the word and its missing parts (see below); index cards containing the blends and digraphs (including 2 foils)‐ see below; tape __ovide (provide) sy__tm (system) ___y (why) __eleton (skeleton) pea__es (peaches) ba__ (back) __ay (play) any__ing (anything) blends and digraphs: pl; pr; sk; st; ch; ck; th; wh; sh; gr Activity: The teacher will state the word and give a student the sentence strip with the partial word written on it. The student will go to the board where the index cards containing the blends and digraphs are and tape the word to the board. He/she will then select the appropriate blend or digraph and tape it to the sentence strip to complete the word. The student will then state the word
Chicken Dog - Spelling Match
Skill Addressed: Development of spelling skills Grade Level: Elementary; Middle and High School Type of Activity: Individual Materials: activity sheet (see below) Activity: Review (if necessary) the sounds of the single consonants included in this activity. Explain to the students that they will match the partial word with the consonant needed to spell the word correctly. After completing, have the students read the words aloud.
46
Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Spelling Match
Match the incomplete word to the consonant to spell the word correctly. Write the consonant in the blank and draw a line through the consonant after it has been used once. 1. ___p
n
2. bla___ing
f
3. ___ound
s
4. na___
g
5. fi___ure
z
6. ___eave
u
7. upo___
b
8. variou___
l
47
Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Twisted Pictures- Can You Find It?
Skill Addressed: Improving Comprehension by Building Knowledge of Grammatical Features Grade Level: Elementary; Middle and High School Type of Activity: Individual; Small Group Materials: activity sheet (see below) Activity: Explain the basic meanings of nouns, verbs and adjectives noun‐ a word that names a person, place or thing (book) verb‐ a word used to express action (read the book) adjective‐ a word used to describe a noun or pronoun (read the big book) Explain to students that they will read a set of sentences and they will use the code to identify the nouns, verbs and adjectives in each sentence. Can You Find It? Read each sentence below and use the following code to identify the nouns, verbs and adjectives in each sentence‐ circle the nouns; underline the verbs; place an X over the adjectives. 1. The short, handsome dog and the tall slender cat are singing joyfully and loudly. 2.
The sleek stallion saw the spotted cow in the field. 3.
The guilty monkey is returning the worn guitar and the polished violin. 4.
The thin opera singer telephones the concert organizing gentleman that likes to eat. 5.
The tired kitten calms the singing mother cat that had been sleeping all day. 48
Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Book Monkeys - Why?
Skill Addressed: Identifying Cause and Effect Grade Level: Elementary; Middle School Type of Activity: Individual; Small Group Materials: sentence strips containing causes and effects (see below) Read the list of causes below. Select one cause and describe a possible effect. Discuss a variety of possible effects. • You ate the last piece of cake. • You do the household chores without anyone asking. • You break your ankle. • You perform very well on your report card. Read the list of effects below. Select one effect and describe a possible cause. Discuss a variety of possible causes. • You are tired. • You have to go to the police station. • You feel wonderful. • Your mother gives you a hug. Activity: Briefly explain cause and effect cause‐ the reason that something happened (to determine ask questions such as “What happened” or “What would happen if…”) effect‐ the result of something happening (to determine ask questions such as “What made this happen?”)
Book Monkeys- What’s Next?
Skills Addressed: Making Predictions Based on Text Information Grade Levels: Elementary; Middle School Type of Activity: Individual; Small Group Materials: narrative text from the classroom library Activity: Select and read a narrative text to the students. Stop periodically to check comprehension by asking pertinent questions. Just before the conclusion of the text, stop reading and ask the students to write a prediction for what they believe is going to happen at the end of the text. Allow the students to share their predictions and why they believe this to be true citing evidence from the text to support their answers. After everyone has shared, read the end of the text and have the students confirm or revise their predictions.
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Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Hog Hat Zone- Select the Suffix
Skill Addressed: Choosing the Appropriate Suffixes to Complete Sentences and Understand Paragraphs Grade Level: Elementary; Middle School Type of Activity: Individual; Small Group Materials: activity sheet (see below) Activity: Complete the paragraph by selecting the appropriate word and its suffix. Poisons are one of the best ways for ____________________ (plants, plant, planted) to defend themselves. Many plants are ____________________ (poisonous, poisons, poisoned) when they are eaten. Plants like mountain laurel make _________________ (grazing, grazed, grazes) animals sick. Certain mushrooms are extremely deadly if they are ________________________ (eaten, eats, eating). Other plants have fruits, such as the nightshade or pokeberry, that can cause illness and in some ____________________ (cases, casings, cased) death. Some plants poison livestock who may be grazing where they grow. The animals learn to leave these plants alone. Other plants are poisonous to the touch. Plants like poison oak and poison ivy cause skin _______________________(itching, itched, itches). 50
Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Fast ForWord® to Reading 3 Intervention Log
When the Success Viewer, Progress Tracker flags and reports and/or informal observation of the student reveal that the student is struggling with a specific exercise or skill within the exercise, some teachers use this form to track the intervention process. Student Name: ____________________________________ Check the Fast ForWord to Reading 3 exercises where intervention is needed. _____ Scrap Cat
_____ Canine Crew
_____ Chicken Dog
_____ Twisted Pictures
_____ Book Monkeys
_____ Hog Hat Zone
Date
Fast ForWord to
Reading 3
Exercise
Comments/Observations
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Progress
Tracker
Flag
Cleared?
Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Writing Activities
In this section, two samples of writing activities are provided for those teachers who wish to
supplement and extend the Fast ForWord to Reading 3 skill instruction. These activities can be
adapted to meet a variety of learning situations:
•
•
•
Integrate writing experiences into the lab environment
Integrate Fast ForWord skill instruction into the classroom curriculum
Provide extended activities for students to take home to parents
For those teachers whose students complete their Fast ForWord exercises quickly and wait for
others to complete, these writing activities can provide additional meaningful information. For
teachers who would like to include those students in their class who are not working on Fast
ForWord to Reading exercises, a short discussion about the Fast ForWord exercise and a display
of the exercise character provides background for participating in these writing exercises. For
those teachers who would like writing activities that can be shared with parent, these activities
can be adapted as extension activities for students to work on at home.
Book Monkeys – Trouble in the Library!
Goal: Build a story from starter sentences Type of Activity: Individual or Small Group Materials: Story starter sentences; pens or computers Activity: Create short stories about the Book Monkeys getting stranded on an elevator in the library. 1. Discuss with the students what starter sentences are and how to use them. Create a few starter sentences around the theme of the Book Monkeys working in the library after school one afternoon. The scenario unfolds as they decide to use the elevator to travel from the first floor to the second floor to find some DVDs to rent for their school project. Once on the elevator, the door closes and the elevator slowly moves upward and then jerks to a sudden stop… 2. Ask the students to write a short story telling how the Book Monkeys managed to get out of the elevator and on their way back home at the end of the day. 3. Students can illustrate their story, and then share the stories with the class. Ask the students to listen to how the stories started (most with the same starter sentences, but as the story unfolded, each student added his or her personal ideas and words to create an individual account) 52
Fast ForWord® to Reading 3
Resources for Teachers
Hog Hat Zone – Who Stole the Words?
Goal: Create new words to fill the blanks in the missing paragraphs Type of Activity: Small Groups of 2 students each Estimated Time: 2 class sessions Materials: Writing paper; pens (black and red) Activity: 1. Divide the class into groups of 2 students each. Review with the students the definition and examples of a paragraph. Use a sample paragraph from one of their recent reading selections. Ask the students to listen carefully as the paragraph is read. Read the paragraph a second time, leaving out several key words. Discuss with the students what they heard this time, reflecting on the fact that missing words confuse the meaning of the paragraph. 2. Explain to the students that they are going to create a mysterious paragraph. Each group is to write a paragraph about any topic they choose. Once they check the spelling and grammar in the paragraph, then they will write that same paragraph on a separate piece of paper, but leaving out a key word in each sentence. When they have finished the “missing word” page, they return the page to the teacher. 3. Ask a few volunteers to help collate the “missing word” pages into a packet that can be copied and distributed to each student. 4. In a second class session, distribute the packets. Ask students to choose a page that they did not create. Using the same grouping of students from the previous session, ask the students to discuss what words are missing, write the words in the blanks with a red pen, and then read the paragraph to each other. The remaining pages can be used as a “free time” activity for students, or additional assignments to be done at home with parents.
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