Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
Environment
Water
Information Technology
ECP
Nanotechnology
Math and Physics
Petrochemicals
Advanced Materials
Biotechnology
Energy
Space and Aeronautics
Oil and Gas
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
Ministry of Economy and Planning
http://www.mep.gov.sa
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology
Ministry of Economy and Planning
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
Contents
Executive Summary
4
Introduction
6
Background
6
Scope
6
Process
8
Strategic Context
10
Capabilities in the Kingdom
11
Space and Aeronautic R&D Indicators
12
Summary of Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats (SWOT)
23
Program Strategy
24
Vision
24
Mission
24
Values
25
Strategic Objectives
25
Program Management
34
Program Organization
34
Strategic Management Office (SMO)
36
Project Management
37
Work Breakdown Structure
38
Schedule Control
40
Change Control
40
Configuration and Data Management
41
Product Assurance
42
Key Performance Indicators
43
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
Contents
Risk Management
45
Progress Reporting
48
Reviews
48
Property Control
49
Appendix A - Acronyms
50
Appendix B: Plan Development Process
52
Planning Project Core Team
53
Workshop Participants
54
Acknowledgements
55
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
Executive summary
The National Policy for Science
and Technology, approved by the
Council of Ministers in 1423 H
(2002 G), defined 11 programs
for localization and development
of strategic technologies that are
essential for the Kingdom’s future
development.
This document is
the strategic priorities for one of
these programs, the Space and
Aeronautics Program.
This document presents the strategic plan for the development of space and
aeronautical capabilities for the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, over the 5 year
period from 2008-2012 led by the King Abdulaziz City for Science and
Technology (KACST). This plan encompasses all R&D and industrialization
aspects of these sectors, including civil but excluding military aviation. The
strategic program is to be managed by a Space Program Management Office
(SPMO) to be formed within KACST, along with a group of stakeholders
consisting of critical engineering departments in the Kingdom’s universities,
government units related to aviation and aeronautics, and members of the
Kingdom’s industrial base.
The vision for the program is:
“Over the next five years, with the strategic support of other key stakeholders,
is to become a regional leader in space and aeronautical activities not limited
to research and development and will support the needs of national security
and sustainable development within the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) in
these disciplines”.
Seven high priority strategic objectives have been established:
To develop into the leading provider of commercial and Earth Observation
(EO) products within the region.
To enhance significantly the Geographical Information System (GIS)
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
Executive summary
capabilities for both national and regional development.
and aeronautical sectors.
To implement an optimized, responsive, and advanced
To promote the wider national use of space and
civilian Earth Observation satellite system to provide key
aeronautical projects and services within government,
data for the region.
industry and the general public.
To design and develop advanced aeronautical
platforms for research and commercialization.
The projects necessary to achieve these medium priority
To become the leading provider of numerical
objectives will be authorized during the second half of
simulation services for aerospace objectives within the
2009 after the feasibility study and baseline definition
region.
are conducted during 2009. The majority of associated
To create a thriving commercial space and
aeronautical sector within the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
development and testing programs will be completed by
the end of 2012.
(KSA) capable of executing advanced technology
programs.
The process has been constructed on the basis of
To research and develop specific advanced enabling
maximizing the synergies brought by each of the
technology in order to develop intellectual property (IP)
stakeholders to create a unified Strategic Plan. The
for longer term international collaboration, commercial
intent is to build a consensus of stakeholder acceptance
exploitation
of the plan so that the implementation will attract the
or
to
support
stakeholder
strategic
programs.
full co-operation and support of the stakeholders. It is
recommended that a Memorandum of Understanding
The projects necessary to achieve these high priority
(MOU) be drawn up to reflect the agreement between
objectives will be authorized during the second half of
the stakeholders and to establish the future working
2008 after a feasibility study and baseline definition are
relations for the implementation phase. The MOU will
conducted during 2008. All associated development and
also outline the estimated balance of public and private
test programs are planned to be completed by the end
financing that form the basis of funding for space and
of 2011.
aeronautical initiatives in the Kingdom.
Four medium priority strategic objectives have been
established:
To become a participant in international or regional
aerospace science missions.
To exploit the downstream opportunities opened up
by the introduction of space systems provided by other
aerospace organisations.
To raise the level of aerospace higher education and
training programs within the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
(KSA) and to expand interest and resources in the space
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
Introduction
Background
King Abdulaziz City for Science and
on science and technology. In July
Technology (KACST) was directed
2002, the Council of Ministers
by its charter of 1986 to “propose a
approved the national policy for
national policy for the development
science and technology, entitled
of science and technology and
“The Comprehensive, Long-Term,
to devise the strategy and plans
National Science and Technology
necessary to implement them.” In
Policy:”
accordance with this charter, KACST
launched a comprehensive effort in
collaboration with the Ministry of
Economy and Planning (MoEP), to
develop a long-term national policy
Then KACST and MoEP embarked on a national effort in collaboration
with stakeholders to develop the national plan for science, technology and
innovation (STI), which drew up the broad lines and future directions of
science, technology, and innovation in the Kingdom, considering the role
of KACST as well as that of universities, government, industry and society at
large.
Scope
This document presents the strategic plan for the development of space and
aeronautical capabilities for the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia led by the King
Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST), over the 5 year period
from 2008-2012. This plan encompasses all R&D and industrialization
aspects of these sectors, including civil but excluding military aviation. It
defines the strategic objectives to be achieved and the role of KACST and
other stakeholders and partners in organizing and establishing projects,
initiatives, and partnerships both within Saudi Arabia and with international
collaborators. It is derived from the objectives of the National Plan for Science
and Technology as defined by the National Policy for Science and Technology,
which stated an objective to be:
“.......to direct scientific research and technical development to secure the
strategic needs of defence and national security with attention to scientific
research and technological development.”
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
Introduction
In addition to the Space Program Management Office (SPMO), which is a
new office to be formed to manage the program, the stakeholders will be
representatives from key institutional sectors of the Kingdom. Among the
stakeholders will be representatives from critical engineering departments in
the Kingdom’s universities as well as from industry. The Kingdom’s agencies
for governance of civilian aviation and aeronautics are also stakeholders. The
range of key stakeholders is necessary to fulfill the breadth of the scope of the
space and aeronautics program.
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
Introduction
Process
The process used for generating this space and aeronautics strategic development plan is shown in diagrammatic form
in figure 1:
Figure 1: Process Flow Chart
Background Documents
&
Stakeholder Questionnaire
Research
Study Requirements
&
National Objectives
Stakeholder Capability
Mapping
SWOT
Space & Aeronautics
Sector Review
Initial Review
with Stakeholders
Headline Objectives
Buy-in Review
with Stakeholders
Strategic Plan
Initial
Review of Current
Resources in Saudi Arabia
Strategic Plan
Final
Management Plan
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
Implementation Plan
Introduction
The process has been constructed on the basis of maximizing the synergies
brought by each of the stakeholders to create a unified strategic plan. The
intent is to build a consensus of stakeholder acceptance of the plan so that
the implementation will attract the full co-operation and support of the
stakeholders. It is recommended that a Memorandum of Understanding
(MOU) be drawn up to reflect this agreement between the stakeholders and
to establish the future working relations for the implementation phase.
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
Strategic Context
The international space and
aeronautics sector is characterized
by accelerating technological
advancement and increasing
competition. The Kingdom of Saudi
Arabia seeks to become a regional
leader in critical areas of this sector.
The major thrusts in this sector are
the following:
Space:
- Earth Observation.
- Navigation.
- Telecommunications.
- Science.
- Launch Services.
Aeronautical and Aviation:
- Very light aircraft.
- Unmanned Aerial Vehicles.
Earth Observation (EO) is a well established scientific and technical field.
In many ways, it is a common link between the major areas of the space
sector as it relies on the fundamental technical platforms that support these
areas. There are generations of imaging satellites dating back to the 1960’s
that provide detailed data on the earth’s topography and atmospheric and
weather system dynamics. Due to the increasing sophistication of current
and planned generations of imagining satellites, there is a growing set of
applications derived from earth observation platforms.
The applications
include, for example, monitoring biosphere changes, solid earth topography,
interior characteristics, and natural resources, and improving geographical
information systems. In addition to the increase in specific applications, there
is a broader trend in the characteristics of satellites themselves. Major space
10
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
Strategic Context
agencies are planning for smaller satellites with more
the importance of having a balance between state and
specific functionalities to be launched more frequently.
private investment in space-based initiatives.
State
funded initiatives will be required to specifically
Satellites as well as their complementary technologies
address key needs of individual nations. Private funding,
are becoming increasingly decentralized.
however, will foster broad commercialization of specific
Until the
late 1980’s only the United States, the former Soviet
technologies and the development of niche specialties.
Union and the European Space Agency operated EO
satellites. Currently more than 20 nations, including
There are significant trends underway in aeronautics and
the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia operate EO satellites. In
aviation as well. For example, there is an increasing
the early stages of this transformation, many nations
need to manage the ever growing demand for global air
simply purchased satellites. Today, not only are satellites
travel. Some of the challenges associated with that are
distributed among more nations, the technical capability
devising more efficient air traffic management systems
to develop and maintain satellite systems and the data
and developing new business models to accommodate
processing platforms to support them are also more
the changing landscape of air travel generally. Another
broadly distributed.
The distribution of capability
component of the aeronautics and aviation sector is in
and the growing specification of satellite functions
the development of new kinds of aircraft that serve a
has resulted in increasing international collaboration
variety of functions. Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV),
on space-based initiatives.
There are a number of
for example, are used in a host of applications relevant
international organizations coordinating space-based
to security surveillance and monitoring the atmosphere,
earth observation projects among several participating
weather, and natural resources. Another example is very
nations. This trend presents yet another mechanism for
light jets, which are currently generating considerable
strategic partnerships among nations and for accelerated
interest among major aircraft manufacturers.
development of individual nations’ technical capacity
reduction in weight is directly correlated with the
through collective learning and interdependence.
reduction in fuel consumption, which is of international
The
concern. As a result, there are significant opportunities to
Another consequence of the decreasing size of
develop specific skills and contribute to this increasingly
individual satellite projects and the diffusion of satellite
large and complex global supply chain.
technology is the increasing role of the private sector.
There is growing private sector involvement in space-
Capabilities in the Kingdom
based projects coinciding with a slackening of state
The vision of KACST, along with its strategic stakeholders,
control and decreasing capital investment requirements.
is to have the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia be a regional
The emergence of privately financed earth observation
leader in space and aeronautical activities. In the current
and space-based initiatives is another fundamental shift
global context of the space and aeronautical sector,
in the space and aeronautics sector that represents an
the Kingdom is well poised to realize this vision. The
enormous potential for increased participation and
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia currently has well established
technical specialization in niche markets among many
critical capacities in the space and aeronautics sector.
nations such as the Kingdom. This trend demonstrates
The stakeholders of the Strategic Development Plan each
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
11
Strategic Context
offer unique specialties that contribute to the Kingdom’s
capabilities
in
manufacturing
and
flight
systems
capacity. The combination of university and government
modification as well as specific components relevant
based research and technical capacities combined
to satellite systems and advanced aircraft. In addition
with an industrial focus on technical applications and
to general industrial expertise in electronic systems
commercialization provide a substantial foundation for
and components, the Advanced Electronic Company
further development of the space and aeronautical sector
specializes in the manufacture, testing, and inspection
in the Kingdom.
of electronic components for military vehicles including
advanced fighter aircraft. The Al Salam Aircraft Company
KACST Space Research Institute (SRI) is composed of
has considerable experience and expertise in heavy
an array of centers dedicated to satellite technologies,
maintenance and modification on both civilian and
including
data
military aircraft. In addition, Al Salam offers competency
processing. In addition, there are centers dedicated
in avionics and aircraft communication systems. The
to material testing for aeronautical applications,
other industrial partners, Saudi Aramco and SABIC
and numerical modeling and simulation, including
offer large scale industrial experience and significant
computational fluid dynamics and finite element
resources to support relevant components of the space
modeling. Importantly, KACST SRI currently supports a
development plan. The oil and natural gas industry
generation of Saudi satellites, having already crossed the
as well as the petrochemical industry are also natural
barriers to entry to successful space systems programs.
customers of advanced earth observation technologies,
These core competencies are complemented by the
which are a key component of the strategic plan.
monitoring,
communications,
and
research and development taking place in the Kingdom’s
major universities: King Abdulaziz University (KAAU),
Space and Aeronautic R&D Indicators
King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM)
Overview
and King Saud University (KSU). KAAU and KFUPM
Publication and patent activity are widely used as
have departments specifically dedicated to aeronautical
indicators of research output and invention.1 The
and aerospace engineering. There is significant existing
frequency with which publications and patents are
research and established competence in theoretical and
cited by others (forward citations) is used as a measure
computational fluid dynamics and thermodynamics.
of impact. Co-authoring relationships are used as an
The mechanical engineering department at King Saud
indicator of scientific collaboration. Although there is
University offers relevant competencies in material
general agreement that these are useful indicators, it is
characterization, solid mechanics and heat transfer.
important to recognize that they are not by themselves
complete indicators of R&D output or quality.2 Several
The Kingdom’s industrial stakeholders offer considerable
indicators are used here to provide measures of science
1 Seminal research in the use of publications as a measure of scientific productivity includes A.J. Lotka, “The frequency distribution of scientific productivity,” Journal
of the Washington Academy of Sciences, vol 16 (1926); D. Price, Little Science, Big Science, (New York: Columbia university Press, 1963); J.R. Cole and S Cole, Social
Stratification in Science, (Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 1973); J. Gaston, The reward system in British and American science, (New York: John Wiley (1978);
and M.F. Fox, “Publication productivity among scientists: a critical review,” Social Studies of Science, vol 13, 1983.
2 For example, they do not cover research results that are presented on conferences, technical reports, or new technology that is protected by copyrights rather than
patents.
12
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
Strategic Context
and technology output, impact, and collaboration in fields related to the KSA
space and aeronautics program.
The overall field, “space and aeronautic technology”, as well as sub-topics
of interest to the Kingdom, were defined in close consultation with KACST
researchers and other KSA stakeholders. The KSA space and aeronautic
technologies program identifies five sub-topics -– remote sensing and
geographic information systems, space platforms, aeronautical platforms,
numerical simulation, and enabling technologies -– as relevant to KSA strategic
priorities. Lists of keywords were used to develop search queries to develop
databases of publications and patents in these areas.3 Space and aeronautic
technology is a fast moving field, so the scope of this study was restricted to
only recent publication (2005-2007) and patent (2002-2006) activity in the
identified sub-topics. These databases of KSA-relevant space and aeronautic
fields were then used to analyze the position of the Kingdom in these fields.
Space and Aeronautic Publication Activity
Between 2005 and 2007, there were 17840 articles published worldwide
related to KSA space and aeronautic R&D priorities. As illustrated in figure 2,
the United States was the world’s largest producer of related articles, generating
6791 articles over this time period. The United Kingdom was a distant second,
producing 1617 articles, followed by Germany and the Peoples Republic of
China with 1579 and 1437 articles respectively. Saudi Arabia was the 48th
largest producer of publications, producing 24 articles.4
3 ISI Web of Science and Delphion were queried for scientific publication and U.S. patent application data, respectively. The ISI Web of Science is a database of peerreviewed articles in major scientific journals from around the world. Delphion is a searchable database of global patent activity, including the U.S. Patent and Trademark
Office (USPTO). The USPTO is one of the world’s major granters of patents and it has been argued that the U.S. market is so large that most important inventions from
around the world are patented there.
4 A publication is assigned to a country if any of the publication’s author’s affiliations are located in that country. Because publications often have multiple authors, a
single publication may be assigned to multiple countries. Aggregate figures, such as total global publication output, count each publication only once, but adding up
sub-totals may yield a result larger than the reported total due to multiple counting.
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
13
Strategic Context
Figure 2: Space and Aeronautics Activity
Belgium
Israel
Russia
Australia
Spain
Japan
Sweden
Netherlands
France
Brazil
USA
Canada
Saudi
Arabia
People R. China
India
Germany
UK
Italy
As shown in table 1 remote sensing and geographic
followed by space platforms (4788), enabling
information systems accounts for the largest share
technologies (3446), aeronautical platforms (2847) and
of space and aeronautic related publications (8421)
numerical simulations (981).
Table 1: Space and Aeronautic Sub Topics (2005-2007)
Sub-Topic
14
Publications
Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems
8400
Space Platforms
4051
Enabling Technologies
3442
Aeronautical Platforms
2872
Numerical Simulation
937
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
Strategic Context
Benchmark Countries
all countries at 2.55 followed by France (2.42), Germany
Average publication impact is calculated as the number
(2.29), and the UK (2.22). The average publication
of citations of articles from a particular country divided
impact for Saudi Arabia was 0.33 with only 8 citations
by the total number of articles published by authors from
of 24 articles. Saudi Arabia’s most highly cited article,
that country. For instance, a country that published 50
“Statistical processing of large image sequences”5, was
articles that were cited 100 times would have an average
produced in collaboration with researchers in the UK
publication impact of two. Between 2005 and 2007, the
and Canada. Table 2 presents publication and citation
Netherlands had the highest average publication impact of
counts for benchmark countries.6
Table 2: Benchmark Countries Publication Impact (2005-2007)
Country
Publications
Total Citations
Average Publication Impact
Netherlands
627
1601
2.55
France
1446
3496
2.42
Germany
1697
3878
2.29
UK
1739
3866
2.22
USA
7195
15888
2.21
Canada
995
2135
2.15
Italy
1202
2299
1.91
South Africa
133
240
1.80
Japan
995
1352
1.36
Peoples R. China
1454
1364
0.94
India
681
622
0.91
Iran
90
77
0.86
Jordan
18
14
0.78
Kuwait
14
7
0.50
Saudi Arabia
24
8
0.33
United Arab Emirates
14
1.50
0.21
Egypt
31
1.42
0.16
5 Khellah, F, Fieguth, P, Murray, ML, Allen, M. 2005. Statistical processing of large image sequences. IEEE Trans. Image Process., 14 (1): 80-93.
6 Benchmark countries include global leaders in terms of total space and aeronautics output in addition to a list of specific countries provided by KACST.
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
15
Strategic Context
Space and Aeronautics Research Organizations
As shown in table 3, the three institutions producing the largest number
of publications related to space and aeronautic technology R&D are the
National Aeronautics and Space Administration (811), the Chinese Academy
of Sciences (494), and the California Institute of Technology (345). NASA is
the number one producer of publications in all sub-topic fields except remote
sensing, in which the Chinese Academy of Sciences is the leader. For the
institutions on this list, authors from NASA have generated the papers with
the largest number of citations (2521 citations) followed by the California
Institute of Technology (1235 citations), and NOAA (862 citations).
16
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
12
16
6
33
7
20
29
52
12
5
32
75
56
19
28
41
62
49
67
63
17
33
45
35
106
98
55
98
49
51
67
2.53
2.23
2.95
1.45
2.61
1.07
4.03
215
197
192
161
153
153
152
CNR
CNRS
Univ Florida
USN
Russian Acad Sci
Univ Paris
Univ Maryland
5
9
40
17
178
2.23
229
USDA
10
62
51
56
87
3.70
233
NOAA
18
41
64
59
92
3.41
239
Univ Colorado
22
55
45
56
133
1.82
284
Univ Texas
44
25
67
166
101
3.58
345
CALTECH
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
13
8
16
9
8
12
69
80
359
1.15
494
Chinese Acad Sci
89
135
186
262
280
3.11
811
NASA
Numerical
Simulation
Aeronautical
Platforms
Space
Platforms
Enabling
Technologies
Remote Sensing
and Geographic
Information
Systems
Average
Impact
Total
Publications
Institution
Table 3: Space and Aeronautic Technology R&D Organizations (2005-2007)
Strategic Context
17
Strategic Context
International Collaboration and Publication Impact
country’s level of international collaboration (horizontal
For countries with a similar level of publication activity,
axis) against the average impact of its publications
those countries with a high level of international
(vertical axis). Countries, such as the Netherlands and
collaboration also tend to produce publications with a high
France, that show significant international collaborative
level of impact. International collaboration is calculated
activity also tend to produce papers with a higher average
as the average number of countries represented per
impact.
publication, based on authors’ addresses. Figure 3 plots a
Figure 3: Space and Aeronautics International Collaboration and Publication Impact (2005-2007)
3.00
Netherlands
2.50
France
USA
UK
Canada
Germany
2.00
Average Impact
Italy
South Africa
1.50
Japan
1.00
India
Peoples R. China
Iran
Jordan
Kuwait
0.50
Saudi Arabia
Egypt
United Arab Emirates
0
0.00
0.50
1.00
1.50
2.00
Average Level of International Collaboration
18
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
2.50
3.00
Strategic Context
KSA Collaboration Activity
Kingdom.
As shown in table 4, authors affiliated with KSA
publications with authors from Canada, Egypt, Iran, Italy,
institutions collaborated on more than one article with
Jordan, and Turkey.
KSA authors collaborated on individual
authors from the United States, Pakistan, and the United
Table 4: KSA Publication Collaborators (2005-2007)
Country
Number of Publications
United States
3
Pakistan
2
UK
2
Canada
1
Egypt
1
Iran
1
Italy
1
Jordan
1
Turkey
1
Space and Aeronautic Technology Journals
number of articles in the KSA space and aeronautics sub-
Table 5 presents journals that have published the greatest
fields from 2005-2007.
Table 5: Space and Aeronautics Journals (2005-2007)
Numerical Simulation
Journal
Publications
JOURNAL OF AIRCRAFT
68
JOURNAL OF GUIDANCE CONTROL AND DYNAMICS
40
ACTA ASTRONAUTICA
35
JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-SPACE PHYSICS
34
JOURNAL OF SPACECRAFT AND ROCKETS
34
AIAA JOURNAL
24
ASTRONOMY & ASTROPHYSICS
23
PLANETARY AND SPACE SCIENCE
20
AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING AND AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY
18
ICARUS
16
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
19
Strategic Context
Enabling Technologies
Remote Sensing and GIS
Space Platforms
Journal
20
Publications
ACTA ASTRONAUTICA
232
IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING
109
JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-ATMOSPHERES
105
GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS
95
ANNALES GEOPHYSICAE
88
JOURNAL OF SPACECRAFT AND ROCKETS
84
INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF REMOTE SENSING
79
JOURNAL OF GUIDANCE CONTROL AND DYNAMICS
73
INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS AND
NETWORKING
63
REMOTE SENSING OF ENVIRONMENT
52
IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING
379
INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF REMOTE SENSING
357
REMOTE SENSING OF ENVIRONMENT
321
ISPRS JOURNAL OF PHOTOGRAMMETRY AND REMOTE SENSING
111
ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT
100
JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-ATMOSPHERES
98
GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS
97
ENVIRONMENTAL GEOLOGY
85
PHOTOGRAMMETRIC ENGINEERING AND REMOTE SENSING
84
INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF GEOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION SCIENCE
84
JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-ATMOSPHERES
151
APPLIED OPTICS
122
IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING
100
GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS
94
REMOTE SENSING OF ENVIRONMENT
63
IEEE GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING LETTERS
62
PHYSICA B-CONDENSED MATTER
54
INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF REMOTE SENSING
51
ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS
46
OPTICS EXPRESS
44
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
Strategic Context
Aeronautical Platforms
Journal
Publications
JOURNAL OF AIRCRAFT
240
JOURNAL OF GUIDANCE CONTROL AND DYNAMICS
96
AERONAUTICAL JOURNAL
70
AIAA JOURNAL
70
JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH-ATMOSPHERES
49
PROCEEDINGS OF THE INSTITUTION OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERS PART
G-JOURNAL OF AEROSPACE ENGINEERING
44
AEROSPACE SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY
43
AIRCRAFT ENGINEERING AND AEROSPACE TECHNOLOGY
42
JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN HELICOPTER SOCIETY
39
AVIATION SPACE AND ENVIRONMENTAL MEDICINE
39
Space and Aeronautic Patent Activity
applications), Japan (317 applications), and Germany
Between 2002 and 2006, there were 5,584 space and
(247 applications). The most cited space and aeronautic
aeronautic related patent applications filed with the
related patent application (54 citations): “Structural
United States Patent Office (USPTO).
As shown in
reinforcing member with ribbed thermally expansible
table 6, the majority of these (3,914) listed at least one
foaming material,”7 listed only inventors from the
inventor from the United States. Other countries with
United States. No space and aeronautic related patent
a significant number of inventors include: France (377
applications listed an inventor from Saudi Arabia.
Table 6: Space and Aeronautics Patents Applications (2002-2006)
Remote
Sensing and
GIS
Space
Platforms
Aeronautical
Platforms
Numerical
Simulation
Enabling
Technologies
Total
140
1818
1886
26
168
3914
France
5
81
285
1
8
377
Japan
2
237
77
0
2
317
Germany
5
60
176
0
10
247
United Kingdom
3
70
114
2
7
189
Country
United States
7
Fitzgerald, Gerald E., Stratman, Randy, Chang, Chin-Jui, U.S. Patent Application # 20020074827, 2002.
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
21
Strategic Context
Remote
Sensing and
GIS
Space
Platforms
Aeronautical
Platforms
Numerical
Simulation
Enabling
Technologies
Total
Canada
9
63
88
0
12
172
Italy
2
6
29
0
2
39
India
3
13
3
0
0
19
Netherlands
0
9
6
0
1
15
China
1
2
8
0
2
13
Saudi Arabia
0
0
0
0
0
0
Country
While the majority of the space and aeronautics related
be future targets for collaboration. As shown in table 7,
patent applications are defined as individually owned
Boeing Company is listed as the patent assignee on 100
patent applications by the United States Patent Office,
space and aeronautic related patent applications followed
institutions are designated as the patent assignee on a
by Honeywell International Inc. (50 applications),
significant number of applications. These institutions,
Hughes Electronics Corporation (46 applications), and
which have records as inventors in technology fields
Airbus France (44 applications).
related to KSA space and aeronautics priorities, could
Table 7: Leading Space and Aeronautics Patent Assignees (2002-2006)
USTPO Assignee
22
No. of Patents Apps.
Individually Owned Patents
3977
Boeing Company
100
Honeywell International Inc.
50
Hughes Electronics Corporation
46
Airbus France
44
Alcatel
41
International Business Machines Co.
40
Snecma Moteurs
31
Lockheed Martin Corporation
21
General Electric Company
20
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
Strategic Context
Summary of Strengths, Weaknesses,
Opportunities and Threats (SWOT)
satellites and Global Navigation Satellite Systems
KACST SRI and its strategic stakeholders are well poised to
collection and processing of atmospheric data is an
pursue the Kingdom’s aim of becoming a regional leader
opportunity for the Kingdom to become one of the
in space and aeronautical technologies. The experience
leading providers of such services.
applications. The region’s relative weakness in the
of the Space Research Institute in successfully supporting
a fleet of Saudi satellites is a particular strength of the
The lack of internal collaboration and limited workforce
Kingdom. The strong and continuing financial support
development is the principal threat to Saudi space
of the Saudi government is also a considerable strength
science. As is the case in all technologies, the Kingdom
of the space and aeronautical development plan. The
faces considerable competition from other developing
financial strength of Saudi oil and gas and petrochemical
nations, most notably India and China. In addition, the
industries combined with their desire to utilize the
Kingdom’s limited international profile in complex space
proposed technical products is a unique advantage of
science projects could lead to it being left out of maturing
the space and aeronautics plan.
markets and international collaborative partnerships.
The limited size of the technical workforce in the
On balance, the Kingdom possesses considerable
Kingdom is a weakness that affects all of the strategic
strengths and there are ample opportunities to develop
technology plans. This shortage of technical workers is
regional prominence in space and aeronautical
compounded by a relative weak ability of the Kingdom’s
sciences. It will require efficient collaboration between
universities to attract and train students in relevant fields
the KACST Space Research Institute and its stakeholders
such as advanced mathematics, physics and material
to overcome the structural weaknesses of the Kingdom
science. Notwithstanding the shared technical interests
and reduce the external threats it faces. This effort will
between the universities and industry in the Kingdom,
require a concerted alignment behind the singular vision
there is little substantive collaboration or linkages
and mission of the space and aeronautical strategic
between the two. That internal discord contributes to a
development plan.
lack of international scientific collaboration which limits
the speed with which KACST SRI and the Kingdom can
become truly viable members of the international space
community.
The current global environment of the space and
aeronautics sector provides significant opportunities for
Saudi space as well. The Kingdom is well-positioned
to contribute to regional development of space
technological systems. There are also significant
opportunities to commercialize Saudi technologies
particularly related to the constellation of Saudi Comsat
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
23
Program Strategy
Vision
Mission
“Over the next five years the Saudi
The mission of the Space and
Space and Aeronautics Program,
Aeronautics Program is to enhance
with the strategic support of key
the position of the Kingdom in
stakeholders, will become a regional
space and aeronautics technologies
leader in space and aeronautical
and systems, through a nationally
activities not limited to research
and internationally collaborative
and development, and will support
program of research, development,
the needs of national security and
and technology transfer.
sustainable development within the
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in these
disciplines”.
The vision shall be achieved by:
Developing capabilities in sectors in which the stakeholders have existing
expertise.
Broadening capabilities by moving into sectors where the stakeholders
have little or no current involvement and which support the vision.
Implementing a number of challenging projects and initiatives specifically
chosen to achieve the vision. These will:
- Raise stakeholder profiles nationally, regionally and internationally.
- Allow stakeholders to join and become active in regional and global
forums.
- Promote international collaboration with companies and universities
- Focus R & D and develop products and IP.
- Stimulate sustainable industrial expansion.
Promoting and encouraging an expansion of space and aeronautical
related education and training.
Expanding the range of existing and stimulate new private and joint venture
companies.
Promoting wider use of space and aeronautical applications within
government, industry and the general public.
Establishing aeronautical or aerospace research groups at the three
stakeholder universities to support the plan and to encourage an increase in
the numbers and quality of graduates in relevant disciplines.
24
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
Program Strategy
The program will be led by the PMO with support of the other stakeholders
and will cover major projects and capital investments in the space and
aeronautical development sector. However individual stakeholders would
still be able to perform their own smaller programs, make independent capital
investments in space and aeronautics, and diversify into non-space and nonaeronautical sectors. As a guideline, major strategic projects and capital
investments are considered to be those greater than US $100K and smaller
projects and capital investments are those less than US $100K.
Among the stakeholders are the relevant engineering departments of major
KSA universities. To ensure that the activities in these departments are directed
towards the achievement of the strategic plan and are given the right priority
and resources, it is proposed to establish aeronautical or aerospace research
groups in these departments, funded by KACST and initially providing 100
percent support from the plan. The scope, resources, and specializations of
each of these centers will be defined by the SMO in conjunction with each
university in early 2008.
Values
The Program’s core values are:
Excellence of work.
Professional integrity and ethical behaviour.
Openness with all stakeholders.
Commitment to achieving objectives.
Quality of products.
Sustainability of activities.
Core values have been generated to capture the key characteristics of the
participants necessary to achieve successfully the vision statement.
Strategic Objectives
Eleven strategic objectives have been derived by the stakeholders and are
defined in this section:
Seven high priority objectives. These are each of equal priority and are
considered essential to achieving the vision statement.
Four medium priority objectives. These are each of equal priority and are
considered important to achieving the vision statement.
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
25
Program Strategy
For each objective a rationale is provided together with
policies, projects, and initiatives to be considered as part
of the implementation.
STC to continue to control the Saudisat 3 satellite
throughout the period of the strategic plan.
SCRS to upgrade the Ground Segment to collect data
from future planned Saudisat 4, 5, 6.
High Priority Strategic Objectives
SCRS to build a fast accessed national database for
Strategic Objective 1
EO satellite images including collecting and archiving
To develop into the leading provider of commercial Earth
data from:
Observation products within the region.
- Externally sourced data (under license).
- Data from Saudisat 3.
Rationale
- Vdata from the next generation Saudisat 4, 5, 6 as
This objective is a logical development of current Earth
they become operational during the 5 year period (see
Observation capabilities within KACST. It supports
also objective 3).
a national objective of providing for sustainable
SCRS to collaborate with another EO operator to
development within KSA and will provide enhanced
maximise the synergistic return of data from an enlarged
support to national objectives of securing the strategic
family of satellites and to develop advanced EO products
needs in defense, national security and domestic civilian
in conjunction with objectives 2 and 3.
topographic data needs. There is considerable potential
SCRS to establish and operate an Atmospheric
for exploiting products commercially beyond KSA and
Monitoring and/or Hazard Warning Unit in conjunction
for developing international collaboration.
with other countries to provide emergency response
information to civil defence authorities and international
Policies, Projects and Initiatives
organizations with timely products and services.
KACST Space Research Institute will collaborate with the
Examples of products and services are:
Satellite Technology Centre (STC) and the Saudi Centre
- Identifying offshore hydrocarbon seepage and oil
for Remote Sensing (SCRS) to maintain and develop
slicks.
a fleet of satellites to provide critical data in support
- Pipeline zone integrity monitoring.
of KSA national security and domestic needs.
- Identifying
The
flood
responsibilities of STC and SCRS will focus on satellite
assessment.
development and data processing respectively.
- Food security status.
hazard
areas
and
damage
- Monitoring forest and scrubland fires.
26
STC will continue to control the Saudisat 3 satellite and
- Earthquake prediction and damage assessment.
will orchestrate the research, development and support
- Prediction and monitoring of desert locust outbreaks.
of the next generation of satellites - Saudisat 4, 5 and 6.
SCRS to provide a leading role in environmental and
SCRS, in conjunction with the Numerical Studies Center
biodiversity monitoring in KSA and the region, including
(NSC), will play a lead role in the development of data
the provision of data and products for:
gathering and processing systems to support the key
- Identifying habitats and land cover changes (including
needs of the Kingdom. The key policies, projects and
desertification).
initiatives are:
- Plant diversity mapping.
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
Program Strategy
- Land and soil degradation.
specifications for all Saudi GIS users and consolidating
- Coastal zone degradation.
base maps, digital elevation models (DEMs) and ground
- Coral reef monitoring.
control points (GCP)s already available for national and
- Coastal lagoon monitoring.
regional use.
GISC, with NSC support and international cooperation
- Effluent mapping.
SCRS to support national and regional mapping and
with advanced research centers elsewhere in the world, to
management of resources, with data and products (with
conduct research and develop specialized GIS software
support from KACST’s Geographical Information Systems
for:
Center (GISC)) for:
- Auto generation of ortho-rectified satellite images.
- Crop inventory and production forecasting.
- Generation of specialized 3D visualization products.
- Water management and irrigation scheduling.
- Land cover change detection applications.
GISC in conjunction with SCRS, to develop and
- Precision farming.
- Pastureland management.
provide the web-based GIS framework for the delivery of
- Mineral exploration.
EO data, products and services (see strategic objective
Monitoring urban development.
1), including:
Strategic Objective 2
- ‘Google earth’ or similarly based applications for
To develop into the leading provider of commercial Earth
displaying data coverages and on-line ordering.
Observation products within the region.
- User-specific monitoring systems linked to
environmental and resource management applications
Rationale
(e.g. coastal zone degradation, irrigation efficiency, crop
GISC already has systems and infrastructure in place
stress).
for national institutional applications together with
GISC in conjunction with SCRS, to develop an end-to-
an existing and active stakeholder network. This
end web-based GIS software system for the operational
objective supports a national objective of providing for
services to be provided by the Monitoring and/ or Hazard
sustainable development within KSA and should provide
Warning Unit (see strategic objective 1).
enhanced support to a national objective of securing the
strategic needs of defense and national security. There
SCRS and GISC to provide a commercial outlet for
EO based GIS products regionally.
is significant potential for regional development and
commercialization. There is also potential for exploiting
Strategic Objective 3
products commercially beyond KSA and for developing
To implement an optimized, responsive and advanced
international collaboration.
civilian Earth Observation satellite system to provide key
data for the region.
Policies, projects and initiatives
Rationale
The particular policies, projects and initiatives planned
This objective involves introducing new and advanced
are for:
systems which contribute new information regionally or
GISC to build a fast access national database for
globally and raise the stakeholders profile internationally.
GIS products, including unifying the standards and
It supports a national objective for providing for
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
27
Program Strategy
sustainable development within KSA and enhances prospects for international
collaboration and has the potential for training and technology transfer.
Advanced systems are now becoming available for civil and commercial use
from satellite suppliers.
Policies, Projects and Initiatives
The particular policies, projects and initiatives planned are for:
STC to continue to develop, launch, and operate Saudisat 4 with an
advanced multi-spectral imaging capability.
Stakeholders to study, develop, launch, and operate with international
collaborators a regionally optimized hyper-spectral mission (Saudisat 5),
justified on the basis of:
- Strong applications potential within KSA and regionally, including
coastal and offshore monitoring (oil slicks with thermal channels), mineral
exploration, vegetation characterization and monitoring.
- High number of cloud free days favorable to the operation and use of
narrow band optical imaging.
- Very few hyperspectral instruments currently operate in space, so there is
the prospect of developing a world-leading position (note:. the Surrey Satellite
Technology Ltd/European Space Agency (SSTL/ ESA) experimental Compact
High Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (CHRIS) instrument is currently the
only high resolution, 18m, imaging spectrometer in space).
- Excellent prospects for collaborating with international partners in
instrument development, operations and applications.
Stakeholders to study alternative candidate missions for an additional
advanced EO satellite (Saudisat 6), including the following:
- A latitude optimized synthetic aperature radar (SAR) mission, which would
provide an all-weather mapping and surveillance capability, together with
special capabilities for ship tracking, oil slick detection, subsidence mapping
and earthquake prediction.
- A regionally optimized atmospheric chemistry mission, primarily aimed at
monitoring ozone and levels of atmospheric pollution.
Strategic Objective 4
To design and develop advanced aeronautical platforms for research and
commercialization.
28
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
Program Strategy
Rationale
of desert locust spraying).
This objective expands and extends current capability
- Design, implement, and test modifications to a light
within KACST’s Aeronautics Technology Center (ATC),
aircraft for emergency response in desert operations.
and universities. The development of a research
- Design, implement, and test modifications to a light
and development agenda in advanced aeronautical
aircraft for SAR operations.
technologies
will
complement
the
civilian
and
commercial efforts in Earth Observation systems.
Strategic Objective 5
Expertise in advanced aeronautical systems supports
To become the leading provider of numerical simulation
the national objective of providing for sustainable
services for aerospace objectives within the region.
development within KSA and has the potential for Saudi
industrial involvement and international collaboration.
Rationale
The KACST Numerical Studies Center (NSC) has
Policies, Projects and Initiatives
existing capabilities and facilities for Computational
The advanced aeronautical systems initiative will be
Fluid Dynamics and Finite Element modeling and
anchored in the development of unmanned aerial
analyses. Further development of numerical simulation
vehicles (UAV) and light aircraft that will enable a range
and computational capacity within the Kingdom
of technological capabilities relevant to the key needs of
will enhance the potential for commercialization in
the Kingdom:
the aerospace industry and related technical areas.
Surveillance and atmospheric measurements with
Capacity development in these critical fields serve as a
electro optic payloads and both remotely and fully
compliment to several major projects proposed in the
autonomous flight control systems.
Kingdom’s strategic plan. This is particularly true of
Development of solar and electric power sources for
UAVs.
strategic objectives in Earth Observation platforms and
Geographical Information Systems.
Development of control systems capable of dynamic
data processing and communication systems with UAVs.
In collaboration with the General Authority for Civil
Aviation, develop regulatory policy to integrate UAVs
into Saudi military and civilian airspace.
KSA universities and companies to design, implement
and test modifications to a light aircraft or helicopter for
specialist applications. Potential missions to be studied
Policies, Projects and Initiatives
The particular policies, projects, and initiatives planned
are for:
NSC to develop research and develop specialised
software in collaboration with external software companies
in support of GIS objective 2 and objective 6.
NSC to provide numerical analyses expertise to space
will include:
and aeronautical projects as defined under objectives 1,
- Design, implement, and test modifications to
3. Required numerical support includes :
an aircraft for atmospheric pollution measurement
- Structural analyses (static and dynamic).
applications.
- Thermal analyses (steady state and diurnal).
- Design, implement, and test advanced modifications
- Mission and orbit analyses.
to a light aircraft for pest control operations (e.g. spraying
- Aerodynamics and thermodynamics.
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
29
Program Strategy
- Radiation analyses.
- EMC/ ESD analyses.
- Fault free control analyses and algorithms (for on
board software).
KACST to form an joint venture company to
commercialize the Saudicomsat constellation.
STC and ATC under the auspices of KACST to
establish joint-ventures with KSA companies that utilize
NSC to market and provide training and consultancy
on numerical analysis techniques to universities, external
organisations, and companies and to become a regional
producer and supplier of numerical software.
the acquired technologies, .e.g., space and airborne
platforms.
KACST to
form an joint venture company to
commercialize EO/ GIS products throughout the region
(see objectives 1 and 2).
Strategic Objective 6
To create a thriving commercial space and aeronautical
Strategic Objective 7
sector within the KSA capable of executing advanced
To research and develop specific advanced enabling
technology programs.
technologies in order to develop IP for longer term
international collaboration, commercial exploitation or
Rationale
to support stakeholder strategic programs.
This objective builds on the capabilities of the existing
industrial stakeholders and promotes the involvement of
Rationale
new and existing companies other than the stakeholders. In
Research and development in aerospace needs to be
particular it encourages and motivates interplay between
focused in accordance with the strategic vision and other
academic and local industries. It supports a national
strategic objectives. In particular it is essential that it is
objective for providing for sustainable development
used to provide assets such as IP that can be exploited
within KSA. An active and mature aerospace industry
in the future. Also it will be necessary to provide R&D in
will help focus academic activities and will be of mutual
support of other strategic objectives.
benefit.
Policies, Projects and Initiatives
Policies, Projects and Initiatives
The particular policies, projects and initiatives planned
The particular policies, projects, and initiatives planned
are for:
are for:
STC, NSC, and KSA universities to perform detailed
KACST to perform surveys to determine and evaluate
the local industrial infrastructure and hence provide
satellites, e.g.
necessary support to it according to the needs of
- Interferometry.
aerospace development.
- Reflectometry.
KACST to become a strategic shareholder in a new
30
R&D studies and develop key IP and products related to
- Close formation flying between satellites.
service company formed to provide services for geo
- LIDARs (including Doppler).
comsats. This company could also become a supplier of
- Experimental on board wireless data systems for
space equipment and subsystems into the project as part
satellites.
of a strategic shareholding.
- Space ISLs.
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
Program Strategy
- Electric propulsion.
- Laser ranging between satellites.
- Experimental space robotics including tele-operation.
- Deep drilling operations (lunar and asteroids).
ATC, NSC, and KSA universities will perform detailed studies in order to
identify key technologies related to aeronautical vehicles.
Medium Priority Strategic Objectives
Strategic Objective 8
To become a participant in international or regional aerospace science
missions.
Rationale
This objective would extend aerospace involvement into a new sector that
offers wide potential for international collaboration with major agencies or
universities. It could be developed into a flagship project in particular in
support of Strategic Objective 10. It requires an interested user to emerge
from the KSA science community.
Policies, Projects and Initiatives
The particular policies, projects and initiatives planned are for:
STC to collaborate in a Phase A/B of a space science mission. Potential
examples are:
- An early warning satellite for severe solar activity -- Solar & Heliospheric
Observatory (SOHO) replacement.
- A tracking satellite for potential Earth collision asteroid Apophis.
- A satellite to characterise interstellar dust.
- Equipment for impactor/ deep drilling (lunar orbiter or lander).
ATC to collaborate on an aeronautical science mission. Potential example is:
- high altitude contrails.
Strategic Objective 9
To exploit the downstream opportunities created by more mature Global
Navigation Satellite Systems in Europe and the United States.
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
31
Program Strategy
Rationale
Rationale
Other aerospace organizations are planning large capital
This objective is necessary to ensure the flow of
investment in space systems. Examples include the new
suitably trained qualified personnel into the space and
Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) satellites
aeronautical organizations that will be expanding under
such as the European Union’s Galileo, the United States’
this strategic plan. This will require close cooperation
NAVSTAR GPS lll as well as space tourism ventures
with the Ministry of Higher Education and initiatives
such as Britain’s Virgin Galactic. Although these will
should make use of the new and challenging programs
offer limited or minimal upstream opportunities for the
contained within this plan to raise aerospace awareness
stakeholders, there will be extensive opportunities for
among the student population. The objective also
commercial downstream development with much easier
supports a national objective for providing for sustainable
market entry and lower capital investment requirements.
development within KSA.
In addition, involvement would be extended to new
aerospace sectors and the strategic objective also
Policies, projects and initiatives
supports a national objective for providing for sustainable
The particular policies, projects and initiatives planned
development within KSA.
are for:
KACST to enhance its education coordination
Policies, Projects and Initiatives
programs to include :
The particular policies, projects and initiatives planned
- Collaborating with the Ministry of Higher Education
are for:
in developing and executing technical programmes in the
STC and KSA companies to develop terrestrial
curriculum that relate and promote interest in space and
equipment, software, systems, and services for these
aeronautics and in increasing the number of qualified
space systems. Examples include:
graduates and technicians for the space and aeronautical
- Tracking of high value containers and packets via
sectors. Another goal is to increase the retention and
GNSS and Saudicomsat.
attract postgraduates from abroad.
- Tracking and control of aircraft, trains and vehicles
- Organising a programme of visits by students to all
using GNSS and GEO comsats.
stakeholders to promote interest and participation in
- Testing and maintenance of commercial space
space and aeronautical activities.
tourism vehicles.
- Providing short or dedicated education and training
GACA to provide a regulatory and operational
environment for testing and operations of the above
airborne services.
courses in aerospace related disciplines.
KACST to establish aeronautical or aerospace research
groups at KSA universities in support of this plan and to
use these centers to encourage interest and expansion
Strategic Objective 10
in undergraduate and post graduate courses at these
To raise the level of aerospace higher education and
universities in relevant disciplines.
training programs within the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
(KSA) and to expand interest and resources in the space
and aeronautical sectors.
32
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
Program Strategy
Strategic Objective 11
To promote the wider national use of space and aeronautical projects and
services within government, industry, and the general public.
Rationale
This objective is necessary to ensure widespread support for the space and
aeronautical sectors throughout KSA. Initiatives should make use of the new
and challenging programs contained within this plan. The objective also
supports a national objective for providing for sustainable development
within KSA.
Policies, Projects and Initiatives
The particular policies, projects, and initiatives planned are for:
KACST to extend its public relations department to:
- Increase awareness among Saudi government agencies of space and
aeronautical products, such as by circulating newsletters and organising
seminars.
- Increase awareness among the Saudi industry of space and aeronautical
products such as by arranging visits and organising seminars.
- Raise awareness within the general public of space and aeronautics by
encouraging broadcasters to make space and aeronautical programs and by
arranging exhibitions.
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
33
Program Management
KACST will form a Space Program
the projects and initiatives under
or joint venture companies. The
Management Office (SPMO) to
the strategic plan and will also
SPMO will manage and control
oversee the activities and progress
serve to coordinate the efforts and
three aeronautical or aerospace
of the Kingdom’s strategic plan for
communications of the stakeholders
groups to be established in the early
space and aeronautics. The SPMO
and relevant organizations.
phases in direct support of the plan
will consist of a combination of
SPMO (or its parent body) shall
personnel
and
have sufficient legal powers to
managerial expertise. Members of
enter into collaborative agreements
the SPMO will be given specialized
with international partners and
training courses to help with the
agencies although private financing,
successful implementation of the
shareholding,
strategic plan. The SPMO will
contractual
have overall responsibility for all
be the responsibility of the private
with
technical
and
The
at stakeholder universities.
associated
commitments
shall
The Space Program Manager will lead the SPMO and will formally report to
the KACST Strategic Program Director and the KACST Advisory Board every
six months on the progress of the Program. An Executive Steering committee
shall be formed consisting of senior managers from each of the stakeholders.
The purpose of this committee shall be to keep abreast of relevant emerging
technologies and to monitor the progress of the major activities outlined by
the strategic plan. This committee shall meet quarterly under the chairmanship
of the SPMO Program Manager.
Program Organization
The overall management and reporting structure is shown in Figure 4. The
SPMO Program Manager reports formally to the KASCT Strategic Program
Director and to the Advisory Board. The Executive Steering Committee
assists the SPMO Program Manager. The various project teams are grouped
according to the strategic objectives with the High Priority objectives 1-7
being established at the start of the program and the Medium Priority objective
teams being phased in during the program as soon as resources allow.
34
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
Objective 2
Project
Team 2A
Project
Team 2N
Objective 1
Project
Team 1A
Project
Team 1N
Objective 4
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
Project
Team 3N
Project
Team 3A
Project
Team 4N
Project
Team 4A
Project
Team 5N
Project
Team 5A
Project
Team 6N
Project
Team 6A
Objective 6
Project
Team 7N
Project
Team 7A
Objective 7
SMO
Program Manager
Objective 5
High Priority Projects
Objective 3
Executive
Steering Committee
KACST Strategic
Program Director
Objective 9
Project
Team 8N
Project
Team 8A
Project
Team 9N
Project
Team 9A
Project
Team 10N
Project
Team 10A
Project
Team 11N
Project
Team 11A
Objective 10 Objective 11
Medium Priority Projects
Objective 8
Advisory Board
Program Management
Figure 4: Overall Management and Reporting Structure
35
Program Management
Strategic Management Office (SPMO)
teams formed within the stakeholders. When the number
The SPMO organization is as shown in Figure 5. It is
of projects and their scope becomes excessive, an
a matrix organization with line functions of Contracts,
Assistant Program Managers will be added to support
Engineering, Project Control, Quality and International
and act for the Program Manager for individual projects
relations being coordinated by the Program Manager to
or a range of projects.
oversee and act as customers for the individual project
Figure 5: The SMO Organization
Executive
Steering Committee
SMO
Program Manager
Secretariat
Contracts
Officer
Assistant
Program
Manager
36
Chief
Technical
Officer
Project
Controller
Quality
Manager
International
Operation
Manager
(KACST)
Space Project
Engineer
Scheduler
Product
Assurance
International
Bodies
Aeronautical
Project
Engineer
Accountant
Quality
Assurance
Collaboration
with
Agencies
Ground Segment
Project
Engineer
CADM
Manager
QA and KPI
Auditor
Subcontracts
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
Program Management
The roles and responsibilities of the key members of the
of projects underway within the stakeholder’s project
SPMO team are defined below.
teams and in particular the numbers in later phases of
development (i.e., Phase B onwards).
The SPMO Program Manager has full delegated
The SPMO Chief Technical Officer is responsible
responsibility for the execution of the overall program
for the technical performance of the program and is
and is the formal point of contact together with the
the overall Design Authority. The CTO is supported by
Contracts Officer. Formal communications signed by
specialist senior engineers:
the Program Manager and the Contracts Officer will be
– A Senior Space Systems Engineer is responsible for
binding. The Program Manager reports on the status of the
all systems requirements and technical performance of
program to the Strategic Program Director representing
the space-related projects.
KACST Management and the Advisory Committee. The
– A
Strategic Program Director can implement actions which
responsible for all systems requirements and the technical
fall outside the authority of the Program Manager if
performance of the aeronautical related projects.
necessary. This reporting loop can be fast-tracked if an
– A Senior Terrestrial Systems Engineer is responsible for
emergency situation arises.
all systems requirements and the technical performance
Senior
Aeronautical
Systems
Engineer
is
of terrestrial projects (e.g. Ground segments, GIS).
Reporting to the SPMO Program Manager are:
The SPMO Contracts Officer is responsible for all
The SPMO Quality Manager is responsible for the
quality and product assurance aspects of the program
commercial, legal and contractual aspects of the program
and is supported by personnel as follows:
and assists and advises the Program Manager in all such
– A Senior PA Engineer is responsible for overseeing all
matters during negotiation and execution. His approval
PA matters on the projects.
is required together with the Program Manager on all
– A Senior QA Engineer is responsible for overseeing
binding commitments.
all QA matters on the projects.
The SPMO International Operations Manager is
responsible for managing all agreements with external
– A Senior QC Engineer is responsible for auditing and
KPI monitoring.
aerospace agencies and bodies and companies and is
also responsible for overseeing all contracts involving
Project Management
companies outside KSA. This Manager is seconded from
Projects
the KACST International Cooperation Department.
Each Project will be negotiated and authorized prior
The SPMO Project Controller is responsible for
to formal start and a definitive charter will be executed
schedule, cost and configuration control for the program.
between the SMO and individual stakeholder Project
The Project Controller will be supported by a scheduler,
Teams. The emphasis will be on actively monitoring
CADM Manager and project accountant.
project performance without duplicating functions. Each
The SPMO Assistant Program Managers (APMs)
charter will contain:
support the Program Manager in managing the
Contract Terms and Conditions.
performance of individual projects or a range of projects.
Statement of Work.
The number of APMs will be dependent on the number
Specifications (where applicable).
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
37
Program Management
Project Management requirements for subcontractors shall be contained with
the respective Statement of Work. The subcontractor’s management of the
program shall be in accordance with a Project Management Plan (PMP) to be
developed by each Project in compliance with the SPMO requirements and
to be approved by the SPMO Program Manager.
Each project team is required to establish and apply a program control system
that provides the milestone payment status, as well as the planning and
technical data necessary to adequately manage the program. Each project
team will hold a monthly meeting or teleconference with the SPMO to discuss
the progress in the project.
The project team is required to establish and apply a Business Management
System that provides the following functions:
Contract Monitoring and Finance Control.
Schedule Status Control.
Action Item Control.
Configuration and Data Management.
Meeting Coordination.
Project Reporting.
External contracts and collaborations
These shall be negotiated and controlled by the SPMO International Operations
Manager with the involvement of individual project teams.
Work Breakdown Structure
Work and activities are broken down into a logical Work Breakdown Structure
as shown in Figure 6. Activities are grouped into twelve work areas covering
the activities of the SMO and of the eleven strategic objectives.
The next level contains work packages covering disciplines within the SMO
and individual projects. Each project will be required to define a Work
Breakdown Structure in accordance with this overall structure and an SMO
defined numbering system.
38
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
Program Management
Figure 6: Overall Work Breakdown Structure
Strategic Plan
SMO
Objective 1
Objective 6
Management
Objective 2
Objective 7
Objective 3
Objective 8
Objective 4
Objective 9
Objective 5
Objective 10
Project A
Project A
Project N
Project N
Objective 11
Contracts
Technical
Project Control
Quality
International
Operations
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
39
Program Management
Schedule Control
Preparation and maintenance of a list of project
Ensuring on-time delivery of the strategic objectives is
milestones (major events).
a major function of the SMO and the individual project
Each project will identify a schedule contingency
teams. The project teams shall establish project networks
to increase the likelihood of on time delivery. This
showing activities, links, and dependencies identified.
contingency will then be managed carefully to ensure
The SMO shall establish a Master Network showing
that project evolution has limited impact on these key
major and milestones activities and links between
stages in the project. The contingency taken in the
projects. Updates to the program master network and
schedule will take into account any factors highlighted
lower levels schedules will be performed monthly and
in the risk management process.
they will be regularly subjected to Critical Path Analysis
(CPA). The SMO shall establish Microsoft Project as the
The SMO will regularly assess the overall project schedule
standard scheduling software throughout the program.
status, taking into account the actual accomplishment of
all project work as well as problems encountered, and
The progress of completing activities shall then be
shall report quarterly to the Strategic Program Director.
carefully reviewed, deviations from the planned
The analyses will be performed to produce:
completion date will be identified, and the appropriate
Schedule Report including CPA.
management action will be taken either at SMO or
Detailed and summary bar charts.
project level depending upon the gravity of the situation.
Trend analyses of major programme milestones and
The derivation of the schedule will take in to account
dependencies.
the major program milestones. These milestones will
include major business and design reviews, deliveries
The SMO will provide a Schedule Report as part of a
and funding authorization.
Quarterly Report. The SMO will advise the Strategic
Program Director immediately if a seriously situation
The schedule control will, in particular, ensure the
arises likely to adversely affect the program and
following:
will investigate and implement corrective action as
Effective communication of current plans and
appropriate.
schedules to the staff ultimately responsible for the
execution of the work.
Adherence to the requirements of these plans and
schedules.
The SMO will establish and maintain a system for
managing the following types of changes to the SMO
Use of these plans to control actively the execution of
the work not merely for recording progress.
Real time reporting of any actual or foreseeable
deviation from the plan.
Effective processing of such reported deviations
40
Change Control
and subcontracts. Requirements will be flowed down
to Project Teams via the appropriate Statement of Work.
This system will be administered by the SMO Project
Controller:
Change to Technical Requirements.
including the definition and implementation of any
Change to the Scope of Work (additions or deletions).
required corrective action.
Change to the Delivery Requirements (schedule).
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
Program Management
The system shall provide the interface link between the
and maintained.
SMO’s internal change control procedures. The main
Ensure that all affected participants are aware of the
features of the contract change control system are as
impact of proposed changes, and participate in their
follows.
evaluation.
Project Change Notice (PCN)
Configuration Items
Any change raised by the projects, either on its own
In order to implement an effective configuration
initiative or at the SMO request, shall be submitted to the
management system, a tree of Configuration Items will
SMO for Approval. The SMO will notify the Project of its
be created, to separate the elements of each project
acceptance or rejection of a PCN within 15 working days
into smaller subsets for the purpose of controlling their
of receipt. Signature of a PCN by the SMO authorized
physical and functional characteristics. Each Configured
representatives constitutes approval of the change and
Item will be identified with a unique reference number
renders it enforceable. If the Project implements a change
to denote its hierarchical position within the program.
prior to any SMO approval, this shall be at its own risk.
Part Marking
Waivers and Deviations
All hardware and software data carriers will be identified
If, during the execution of the Subcontracts, the
by a non-ambiguous reference number.
Contractor desires to depart from the requirements in the
technical requirements for a specific item or a limited
Baselines
number of items, a Request for Deviation/ Waiver (RDW)
Design baselines, a set of control documents defining the
is required be submitted to the SMO.
physical and functional characteristics of a configured
item, shall be established by the Project corresponding
Recording and Tracking
with critical milestones of the project (e.g. Baseline Design
The Change Control System will include provisions for
Review, Preliminary Design Review, Critical Design
recording, tracking and reporting on status of PCN’s and
Review, etc.). A baseline shall be a point of departure
RDW’s.
for the control of subsequent performance, design, and
build changes. The design standard of a configured item
Configuration and Data Management
shall be the design baseline plus approved changes.
Configuration Management
The objectives of the configuration control system are
Configuration Accounting
to:
The following records and listings shall represent the
Ensure that all documents which define the functional
major elements of the configuration accounting task:
and physical characteristics of project equipment are
Maintaining a record for each configured item.
uniquely identified.
Maintaining a register for all changes.
Ensure that the design and build standard of the
equipment can be defined at any point in the program.
Ensure that effective change control is established
Providing an historical record of the alterations made
to each document.
Providing an As Built Configuration List as part of the
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
41
Program Management
Acceptance Data Package for each CI to be delivered.
This is the build standard and will be verified against the
design standard and any differences reconciled.
Each project achieves the required functional and
operational reliability.
The design and developments are traceable (as built
versus as designed).
Documentation Management
The SMO shall establish and maintain a documentation
The formal verification processes (qualification) are
traceable.
and test data control system for the program. A document
Requirements are verified.
list shall be prepared by each project showing deliverable
Key Performance Indicators are achieved.
documentation to the SMO. An example list is contained
The Product Assurance Plan will document:
in Appendix A
The PA organisation.
Deliverable documentation shall be submitted under
The authority and independence of PA management.
one of the following criteria:
Status reporting.
For Information: Routine documentation which will
Personnel and training.
be evaluated by SMO to determine current program
Program audits.
status, progress, and future planning requirements.
Rights of access.
For Review: Documentation to be evaluated by SMO
for acceptance or rejection prior to its intended use.
For Approval: Documentation that requires written
approval from SMO before its acceptance or intended use.
Design assurance.
Components,
materials,
mechanical
parts
and
processes.
PA implementation.
Risk management.
Revision to any formally deliverable document shall be
Design control.
subject to the same submission criteria as applied to the
Control of vritical items.
initial release of that document.
Documentation and data control.
Configuration management.
Product Assurance
Subcontractor and supplier control.
Product Assurance activities
PA interfaces.
The SMO will establish an organization under the
Product Assurance Manager to plan, organize, and
Quality Assurance
control all activities in such a manner that objectives
Quality Assurance activities shall be performed according
are systematically achieved and any deficiencies are
to EN ISO 9001:2000 and KACST internal procedures.
detected, corrected, and prevented from occurrence.
They shall encompass monitoring and auditing as
appropriate of:
A Product Assurance Plan will be designed as success
Feasibility studies.
oriented and the quality requirements shall be
Development.
implemented to assure that:
Procurement.
Strategic objectives are met within the period of the
plan.
42
Manufacturing.
Production.
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
Program Management
Test.
Key Performance Indicators
Launch and flight.
Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) are defined overall
Handling, storage, transport and maintenance
and for each objective (see Table 8). Each KPI will be
Quality control functions shall include:
monitored on a monthly basis by the SMO and formally
Metrology and calibration.
reviewed and reported every three months. The SMO
Non conformance control.
shall be responsible for taking action if achievement of a
Traceability and changes.
particular KPI is at risk of not being achieved.
Table 8: Key Performance Indicators
Subject
Overall Vision
Strategic
Objective
1
Strategic
Objective
2
Strategic
Objective
3
Key Performance Indicator
Success Criteria
Comparison with regional aeronautical institutes
and agencies based on a formula using the following
metrics:
No of aircraft flight tested over 5 year period
No of instruments flight tested over 5 year period
Contribution of knowledge to international or regional
aeronautical bodies
Number of aeronautical qualified persons employed
within country
Annual commercial sales of aeronautical products
Overall first within region after five
years
Overall first within region after five
years
Support to KSA on national defence
Major contribution considered
made to national defence as judged
by the responsible ministries
Support to sustainable development
Order book for commercial aerospace products
Numbers of aerospace related staff employed within
country
Number of aerospace qualified persons employed
within country
Major contribution made to
sustainable development as judged
by the responsible ministries
Percentage of EO data provided regionally
Increase of 40% per annum
Number of customers regionally for EO images
Increase of 60% per annum
Number of EO products offered
Increase of 40% per annum
Number of GIS customers
Increase of 40% per annum
Number of GIS products
Increase of 60% per annum
Number sales of GIS products
Increase of 40% per annum
Design Reviews for satellites (BDR, PDR, CDR, AR)
Satisfactory completion
Launch and in-orbit commissioning of satellites
Satisfactory completion
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
43
Program Management
Subject
Strategic
Objective
4
Strategic
Objective
5
Strategic
Objective
6
Strategic
Objective
7
Strategic
Objective
8
44
Key Performance Indicator
Success Criteria
Design Reviews for platforms (BDR, PDR,CDR, AR)
Satisfactory completion
Launch and in-orbit commissioning of satellites
Satisfactory completion
Design Reviews for UAVs and manned aircraft (BDR,
PDR,CDR, AR)
Satisfactory completion
Completion of flight test programme (UAVs and manned
aircraft)
Satisfactory completion
Number of NSC customers
Increase of 40% per annum
Number of NSC products
Increase of 60% per annum
Annual sales of NSC products
Increase of 40% per annum
Number of aerospace companies
Increase of 200% per five year
period
Number of annual aerospace sales
Increase of 40% per annum
Number of staff in aerospace companies
Increase of 40% per annum
Number of patents
Increase of 200% per five year
period
Number of papers published in international recognised
publications
Increase of 200% per five year
period
Agreement with international collaborator
Signed
Design Reviews
Satisfactory completion
Launch and in-orbit commissioning of satellite or
Completion of flight test programme (UAVs and manned
aircraft)
Satisfactory completion
Strategic
Objective
9
No of new products developed
10
Annual income from sales of new products
$10M
Strategic
Objective
10
Number of students per annum studying to a curriculum
which relates and promote interest in space and
aeronautics
Greater than 1000 per annum
Number of aerospace qualified graduates per annum
Increase of 100% per five year
period
Number of aerospace qualified technicians per annum
Increase of 100% per five year
period
Number of training courses x persons attending per
annum
Increase of 40% per annum
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
Program Management
Subject
Strategic
Objective
11
Key Performance Indicator
Success Criteria
Number of newsletters circulated per month to
interested parties in government and industry
4 after second year
thereafter increasing to 10 at fifth
year
Number of interested parties in government and industry
on circulation list
100 after second year
thereafter increasing to 400 at fifth
year
Number of seminars x attendance per annum
500 after second year
thereafter increasing to 2000 at
fifth year
Number of hours of aeronautical and space related TV
broadcast within KSA
10 hours after second year
thereafter increasing to 25 at fifth
year
Risk Management
and their Probability/ Gravity periodically and to take
Risk Management will be implemented by the SMO
decisions on implementing mitigation action when
throughout the program and requirements will be flowed
necessary.
down to individual projects. The Risk Management
process is designed to improve the probability of
The authority for managing the process is the SMO
successful project execution (i.e. satisfactory technical
Program Manager who can decide to implement
performance, timely delivery, costs within budgets) by
mitigating actions or changes within the boundaries of
identifying problems before they occur and by proactively
the program cost budget. The authorities for managing
taking mitigating actions, if considered appropriate, to
the process at individual project level are the Project
reduce their impact.
Managers who are required to report regularly to the
SMO on the status of their most significant risks. The
Approach
process is shown in Figure 7.
The approach adopted is to:
Levels of Probability for Risk Occurrence
identify potential events which could effect the
planned progress of activities, to identify a likelihood of
Probability that an unexpected event (a risk) occurs is
measured according to three levels:
each event occurring (i.e. Probability) and to quantify the
potential impact on schedule, cost and performance (i.e.
Gravity) if it does.
Level 1 (low): probability of occurrence in the range
0-10%.
evaluate potential actions to mitigate the impact of
such events and to quantify improvements on Probability
and Gravity parameters.
Level 2 (low/ medium): probability of occurrence in
the range 10-30%.
Level 3 (medium): probability of occurrence in the
review and update the register of significant risks
range 30-50%.
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
45
Program Management
Level 4 (medium/ high): probability of occurrence in
the range 50-70%
Level 5 (high): probability of occurrence in the range
70-100%
Figure 7: Risk Management Process
Inputs / Updates
from within
SMO
Inputs / Updates
from Projects
Program Baseline:
Cost
Schedule
Performance
Resources
Modify / Quantity
Program Risks
Update Risk Register
Review Risk Register
Decide to Implement
Mitigating Action
Up-to-date
Risk Register
Levels of Gravity for Risk Impact
performance impacts. Table 9 shows the scale applicable
Gravity is also defined by five levels (1 = low, 3 =
to the program.
medium, 5 = high), according to the cost, planning and
46
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
Program Management
Table 9: Gravity Table for Strategic Development Program
Impact
Level 1
Level 2
Level 3
Level 4
Level 5
Technical
Performance
degraded
but project
requirements still
achieved
Project
requirements
not achieved but
does not affect
the strategic plan
Requirement not
achieved but
the impact may
be accepted by
SMO
SMO
Requirement
not achieved
with serious
significant on
the strategic plan
and unlikely to
be acceptable
by SMO
Requirement
not achieved
with impact on
strategic plan not
acceptable by
SMO
Schedule
Delay ≤ 2 weeks
on delivery
2 weeks < Delay
< 1 month on
delivery
1 month < Delay
< 3 months on
delivery
3 months <
Delay < 6
months on
delivery
Delay ≥ 6
months on
delivery
Note: A risk may have at the same time technical and/ or
Development Program and managed by the SMO. The
schedule and/ or cost impacts. The level of gravity of the
most critical risks shall be reported monthly.
risk is given by the higher impact.
Acceptability/Non-acceptability of Risks
Risk Register
Risks shall be evaluated as shown in Figure 8.
A specific risk register shall be produced for the Strategic
Figure 8: Domain of Acceptability/Non-acceptability
Probabilty
5
4
3
2
1
1
2
3
4
5
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
Gravity
47
Program Management
Project Progress Report and Meetings
Action Required:
Red Zone: Unacceptable--Major risk to program,
immediate project management action required.
Orange Zone: Unacceptable--Significant risk to
program, urgent project management action required.
Yellow
Zone:
Unacceptable--Risk
to
program,
mitigation action required by work package manager.
Green Zone: Acceptable--Acceptable risk to program,
work package manager to monitor.
Project Managers are required to submit a concise
Progress Report to the SMO five working days prior
to Progress Meetings which will be held at monthly
intervals. The content of the report shall include:
SOFTQ Report (Successes, Opportunities, Failures,
Threats, Quality).
Project Schedule summary.
Key Technical summary.
Update to Risk Register.
Progress Reporting
Cost status.
Program Progress Report and Reviews
Action Item status.
The SMO Program Manager shall submit a concise
Change status.
report covering key program and strategic issues to the
Non Conformance status.
Strategic Program Director and the Advisory Board prior
Ad Hoc meetings may be convened by the SMO or the
to reviews. The content of the report shall include:
Project Teams to resolve particular issues or external
Project status:
interfaces.
- Technical.
- Schedule.
Emergency reporting
- External interface.
The SMO Program Manager shall immediately notify
Program Schedule summary including CPA and
milestone achievement.
the Strategic Program Director of any event that puts the
achievement of the strategic plan at risk. This requirement
Main outstanding risk issues.
is flown down to individual project managers concerning
Status of Key Performance Indicators.
their delivery schedule.
Funding/cost status.
by project managers of any major emergency events
A Quarterly Progress Review shall be held between the
The SMO shall be notified
immediately they becoming apparent.
SMO and the Steering Committee chaired by the SMO
Program Manager. A six monthly review shall be held
Reviews
between the SMO and the KACST Management and the
Project Design Reviews
Advisory Boards chaired by the KACST Strategic Program
SMO appointed chairmen (typically the SMO Program
Director to address key program and strategic issues. The
Manager or Assistant Program Managers) together with
former will occur one day before the latter when they
review boards of appointed specialists will perform design
are scheduled at similar times. Typically these reviews
reviews on the projects. These reviews will consist of:
will rotate between the sites of the stakeholders so that
Baseline Design Review (BDR).
Management can also see progress on a site-by-site
Preliminary Design Review (PDR).
basis.
Critical Design Review (CDR).
Acceptance Review (AR).
48
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
Program Management
Lower level Reviews
Individual projects will conduct a series of lower level design reviews. The
reviews will be planned, organized, and managed by the project teams and
will be occasions where the responsible parties for each item under review
formally concur about the equipment status, having previously had the
opportunity to evaluate the applicable documentation. The SMO shall be
invited to attend and may serve as a member of the review board for some
reviews.
Property Control
The SMO will implement a Property Control System to account for all owned
property funded by the Strategic Program. The system will operate in such a
way that:
The existence, location and working condition of all property, both fixed
and movable, can be verified.
Changes in financial values, resulting from acquisitions, disposals and
items written off are recorded.
Financial reconciliation can be made and status reports prepared for
incorporation into the SMO annual accounts.
All property shall be physically labeled with a unique inventory number and
statement of ownership. The numbering system shall operate throughout the
program with a centralized overall record held by the SMO in the form of a
computerized database.
All projects shall be required to operate a Property Control system compatible
with the requirements. Any disposal programme hardware will be agreed with
SMO prior to the event.
The inventory control system shall be capable of providing reports containing
the following information:
Item description.
Unique Item Registration/ Inventory Number.
Physical location.
The SMO has the right to audit the project inventory and to have physical
checks at project premises.
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
49
Appendix A - Acronyms
50
ACWP
Actual Cost of Work Performed
AEC
Advanced Electronic Company
AR
Acceptance Review
ACWP
Actual Cost of Work Performed.
ATC
Aeronautics Technology Center (KACST SRI)
BCP
Baseline Cost Plan
BDR
Baseline Design Review
CAD
Computer Aided Design
CADM
Configuration and Data Management
CCB
Change Control Board
CDR
Critical Design Review
CI
Configured Item
CPA
Critical Path Analysis
CTO
Chief Technical Officer
DRL
Document Requirements List
EAC
Estimate at Completion
EIDP
End Item Data Pack
EMC
Electromagnetic Compatibility
ETC
Estimate to Complete
ESD
Electrostatic Discharge
FMECA
Failure Modes, Effects and Criticality Analysis
GACA
General Authority for Civil Aviation
GEO Comsats
define
GIS
Geographical Information System
GISC
Geographical Information Systems Center (KACST SRI)
IP
Intellectual property
KACST
King Abdulaziz City of Science and Technology
KAAU
King Abdulaziz University
KFUPM
King Fahd University for Petroleum and Minerals
KPI
Key Performance Indicator
KSA
The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
Appendix A - Acronyms
KSU
King Saud University
NSC
Numerical Studies Center (KACST SRI)
OSO
Outer Space Office
PA
Product Assurance
PCN
Project Change Note
PDR
Preliminary Design Review
PMI
Project Management Institute
PMP
Project Management Plan
QA
Quality Assurance
QC
Quality Control
R&D
Research and Development
RDW
Request for Waiver or Deviation
SCRS
Saudi Center for Remote Sensing (KACST SRI)
SMO
Strategic Management Office
SOFTQ
Successes, Opportunities, Failures, Threats, Quality
SOW
Statement of Work
SRI
Space Research Institute (KACST)
STC
Satellite Technology Centre (KACST SRI)
TRB
Test Review Board
TRR
Test Readiness Review
WBS
Work Breakdown Structure
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
51
Appendix B: Plan Development Process
The process used for generating this space and aeronautics
form in flow chart figure B1:
strategic development plan is shown in diagrammatic
Figure B1: Process Flow Chart Figure
Background Documents
&
Stakeholder Questionnaire
Research
Study Requirements
&
National Obgectives
Stakeholder Capability
Mapping
SWOT
Space & Aeronautics
Sector Review
Initial Review
with Stakeholder
Headline Objectives
Buy-in Review
with Stakeholder
Strategic Plan
Initial
Review of Current
Resources in Saudi Arabia
Strategic Plan
Final
Management Plan
52
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
Implementation Plan
Appendix B: Plan Development Process
The process has been constructed on the basis of maximizing the synergies
brought by each of the stakeholders to create a unified strategic plan. The
intent is to build stakeholder consensus on the acceptability of the plan so
that the implementation will attract the full cooperation and support of the
stakeholders. It is recommended that a Memorandum of Understanding
(MOU) be drawn up to reflect this agreement between the stakeholders and
to establish the future working relations for the implementation phase.
Planning Project Core Team
The KACST members of the planning project management team are :
Name
Dr. Khaled Alhussan
Dr. Abdulaziz Alsugair
Eng. Waleed Mulla
Mr. Fahad Algernass
Eng. Adil Alomair
Eng. Fawzan Alharby
Eng. Rames Alshehry
Mr. Mohammad Alwhaiby
Eng. Salah Redwan
Eng Saud Algahtany
Eng. Abdulaziz Aljewair
Mr. Mohammad Bin Mahfoodh
Dr. Abdullah Almudaimeegh
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
53
Appendix B: Plan Development Process
Workshop Participants
Name
54
Affiliation
Dr. Ibraheem Alqadhy
King Abdulaziz University
Dr.K haled Aljuhanee
King Abdulaziz University
Dr. Mohammad Omar Budair
King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals
Dr. Bakeer Yalbas
King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals
Dr. Ayman Qassem
King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals
Dr. Ahmmad Alqarnee
King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals
Dr.Abdulla Alqarnee
King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals
Eng.Adil Aloofee
General Authority for Civil Aviation
Eng. Tareq Fayraq
General Authority for Civil Aviation
Dr. Abdulhakeem Almajed
King Saud University
Dr. Yahya Shakwa
Advanced Electronic Company
Eng.Akram Ahmad
Advanced Electronic Company
ENG. Khaled Aljaaweeny
Advanced Electronic Company
ENG. Ibraheem Alnassar
Alsalam Aircraft Company
Mr. Abdulaziz Alomran
Alsalam Aircraft Company
Dr. Mohammad Alhameedah
Aramco Company
Dr. Abdullah Alqarny
Ministry Of Municipalities & Rural Affairs
Dr. Mohammad Qary
King Abdulaziz University
Dr. Naser Salma
King Saud University
Eng. Talat Albar
Madinah City Municipality
Dr. Abdulqader Alsery
Alhasebah Technology Company
Dr. Naser Alhumaid
King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals
Eng. Abdulsalam Abdulaal
Saudi Telecom Company
Dr. Samy Zaydan
Makah & Almadinah development Commission
Saeed Alhaznawi
King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
Appendix B: Plan Development Process
Acknowledgements
We would like to thank our stakeholders for their assistance with this
project.
King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals
King Saud University
King Abdulaziz University
General Authority for Civil Aviation
Ministry Of Municipalities & Rural Affairs
Madinah City Municipality
Makah & Almadinah Improvement Commission
Aramco Company
Saudi Telecom Company
Alhasebah Technology Company
Advanced Electronic Company
Alsalam Aircraft Company
Strategic Priorities for Space and Aeronautics Technology Program
55
www.kacst.edu.sa
King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology
Doc. No. 19P0001-PLN-0001-ER01
DAKKIN 01 478 8584
Tel 488 3555 - 488 3444
Fax 488 3756
P.O. Box 6086 Riyadh 11442
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
www.kacst.edu.sa
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