Guide to Popping Corn (1989)

Guide to Popping Corn (1989)

ORVILLE REDENBACHER'S AUTHORIZED

AND

COMPLETE POPCORN LOVER'S

GUIDE

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Orville Redenbacher r

The Popcorn King

O

1985

Beatrice

Companies, lnc.

r p.g.

Box 508

Valparaiso, lndiana

46383

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The first thing you have to understand is that popping corn is a special breed of corn.

ln

fact, botanists divide corn into five different types.

1.

POD CORN is something you only see in dried flower arrangements, and is prettier than

it

is useful. Each kernel on the ear is covered by a separate husk, instead of one husk sheathing the whole ear.

2.

FLINT CORN

for food these

days,

either.

handsome,

or

lndian Corn is not used multi-colored corn

lt is

the

you

see

as

decoration

on

doors

and

tables at

Thanksgiving.

3.

DENT CORN is generally raised for livestock feed.

Today

it

is usually a hybrid, grows larger than other corn, and is the commonest kind. lts combination of hard and soft starches makes it dry unevenly, and that results in the dent on the crown of the kernel.

4.

SWEET CORN

is

special because the kernels are soft, milky and sweet-tasting.

Very little

of its

sugars turn

to

tougher starch,. unless you pick them rnuch too late or wait too long between picking and cooking.

5.

POPCORN, properly known as "popping

corn"

is the only corn that explodes to many times its original volume when you heat

it.

Popping corn has practically all hard starch, but, inside each kernel there can be kept a tiny measure of moisture.

ln your popper when the temperature is just right, this droplet

of

moisture turns to steam, builds up pressure, and finally explodes.

Popping corn is small, compared to the other types, in stalk, ear and kernel.

THE

EANUEST

AITIERICAII

TtIIlB

Unknown to the rest of the world, American lndians cultivated some species of native American grass, from which corn was developed

.

.

. over

80,000 years ago.

Archeologists have unearthed corn pollen that old in Mexico. And university botanists have been breeding corn backward

to

discover

just

how have already

it all

worked back began. They

to

corn with ancestral grass-like characteristics with just two rows of kernels on top.

Ears

of

popcorn

5,600 years

old

have turned up in caves

in

New Mexico, and there's good reason

to

believe popcorn was the first type

of

corn raised for human consumption.

Peru

lt

was popular from

to

Massachusetts

and from

the

Southwest to the West lndies. Wherever the early

European explorers found lndians who farmed, they noticed popcorn was an important food. Cortez and

Columbus also found lndians making ceremonial decorations with popcorn, which is fun to remember when you string some for your

Christmas tree.

Popped

corn was

served

at the

first

American Thanksgiving. Quadequina, the

brother of the

Wampanoag chieftain,

Massasoit,

of

brought

a big

deerskin bag

it

as his

"hostess present." Through

Colonial times, lndians

often

brought along popped corn to peace negotiations with the settlers as a token

of

goodwill.

Like you, they probably noticed it is hard to be grouchy while eating popped corn.

While popcorn most grew folks raised

in

popularity, and

a

patch

of it in

their gardens, it became a cash crop only with the great development of the Midwestern corn belt in the nineteenth century.

ln

the

1920's two things happened that really turned popcorn

Research began

into a

business.

to

improve

the

breed through hybridization. And somebody discovered that popcorn and movies are a great combination

of

pleasures. Today popcorn is sold in 99 per cent of all movie theaters.

(l

understand some

big

city theaters that show only foreign movies figure their audiences are too snooty to munch popcorn in public.)

Popcorn became popular in Europe only recently. The American credit.

Gl deserves the

I

have often watched the sound

and scent of a

popcorn-wagon draw crowds of young and old enthusiasts in

Europe's parks and boulevards.

But Americans eat 620 million pounds of popped corn a year, and the rest of the world will have to munch fast to catch up.

POPGOmIi$

EITGTS

Americans

42 quarts now eat of popped woman and child!

a

yearly average of corn for every man,

Popcorn is a family snack food. About

70 per cent of the

U.S. popcorn crop is eaten at home, and about

90 per cent of that is popped at home. The sound and sight and smell of corn popping appeals to young and old, it seems. And while a few individuals are cantankerous enough to dislike popcorn, I have never met a family that doesn't enjoy it.

Popcorn eaten out zoos, the circus and all sorts of sporting events accounts at movies, ball-parks, lor

25 per cent of the total crop. The other

5

per cent

is

labelled miscellaneous- export, cushioning fragite products during shipment, (a terrible waste, if you ask me), decoration and so on.

popccpN'S

NO.f CNLY TUN

The U.S.

Department of

Agriculture says popcorn is 77 percent carbohydrate, 12 percent protein, 5 percent fat, and 2 percent minerals, plus some water and roughage.

ln

1984 the American Dental Association recommended popcorn as a snack food because it does not contain sugar like many snack foods and chewing it actually helps cleanse the teeth and gums!

Here is a tip for people watching their weight.

Don't use butter; it's the butter that makes popcorn fattening. And when you use a top quality, flavorful corn like mine, it is delicious without butter.

I always take my popcorn plain, with a touch of popcorn salt.

Compared to many another snack food, popcorn is economical. lt takes just a half cup of my Gourmet

Popping

Corn to fill a fourquart popper. That means, including the oil and salt, satisfy you can make enough popcorn to the whole family for about 30 cents.

WHITE CORN

oRyELLow

coRNe

Ten per cent of the popping corn grown in this country is the white variety. These sharp, pointy kernels generally pop up white and fluffy, but the majority prefer the of us popcorn lovers yellow corn because of its llavor.

Yellow corn comes in large, medium or small kernel varieties. My Gourmet Popping

Corn is a small variety because I find it gives the best taste, and the best popping volume.

A

little naturally colored popping corn is grown (red, brown, blue, the husk is colored.

and black), and you'll sometimes see corn that has been dyed with food coloring. lt all pops out white.

Only

xmrxffHHH

n0Hg

FOFrySHN

EHET\T?

Practically

all of

grown in the great corn belt that stretches

West from Ohio this

to

nation's popcorn

Nebraska and is

Kansas.

lowa,

Nebraska and lndiana grow the most.

I may be prejudiced, but I prefer lndiana.

Popcorn

is

also grown

in

South Africa,

Hungary, Greece, Yugoslavia,

France, Spain,

Italy, lsrael, Argentina and

Australia.

But they get most all their hybrid popcorn seed from the

U.S.

At one time I sold popcorn seed to a lot of these countries, so

I got to travel and see how they were doing with it.

For example, the

Government

Agricultural

Co-operative of lsrael complained

to

me in

1972 that their corn wouldn't pop. We quickly found that in their climate the popcorn got too dry before harvesting.

So we upped the harvest date by

10 days, and they have popped happily ever since.

My

Gourmet trotrpin$ eor.n

Well over

35 years ago,

I set out

to

develop a popcorn seed that would produce

the

most outstanding bowl

of

popcorn you ever munched.

It

took decades

of

experiments, crosspollinating and plain, hard work to get the hybrid

just

right. Now, we have

a

team including Carl Hartman from lowa State, our plant breeder, who joined us in

1959, and we

still try

about

9,00O cross pollinizations and inbreeds

a

year

in

our

Valparaiso,

Homestead, lndiana nursery,

Florida nursery. better popcorn possible, and

in

our

lf

there's we'll find it.

a

ln the

nursery,

the

"mother" plant/ear shoots are covered with a sack to prevent the silk from being fertilized by any roving corn pollen which happens

to

be in the air. The "father" plants' tassels are secured

in

paper bags so we can collect their precious pollen and pour it carefully over the female silks. Each strand of silk when fertilized with one grain

of

pollen will produce one kernel of popcorn seed.

All this is done carefully by hand.

Each seed days ear remains covered for another

30

while it

matures, and then loses moisture for another three weeks before harvesting and testing. With similar care, we raise my special seed corn in nearby fields.

Students from

the

local high schools give us a hand with detasseling, and learn some botany at the same time.

The following spring, this special seed is planted by farmers

I

have chosen because their fields are high in fertility, just right for my popping corn, and because they are willing to take the special pains in growing and harvesting that

I demand.

Even so, like all farmers, we have to depend on Nature to cooperate for the next

six

months

if we

are

to

have

a

good, healthy crop. We need rain, but not too much.

Warm sun, just enough of it. Mild breezes, not gales that could flatten the stalks. And slow cooling as Autumn sets in, because an early frost can make the corn unpoppable and quite husky.

HAANTE$TANA

SO!88

About mid-October, the moisture content

of the popcorn

kernels concentrates down to about nineteen per cent. That's the point when the harvest begins, because the proper moisture content is vital to corn that will pop to your satisfaction.

Modern corn-harvesting combine machinery would bruise some of my kernels.

Bruised kernels

so

will not pop with quality,

I

use only special harvesting equipment

This that harvests the corn on

is

more expensive,

but

the ear.

it

ensures top quality.

Next the shucked ears are held

in

bins where

I

can keep an eye on them while the moisture level is slowly reduced to about

15 per cent. Then we shell the kernels

off

the cob the

old

fashioned way with a corn sheller that rubs the ears together. (Ordinary shelling equipment has rough metal burrs that could bruise the kernels and

I

have

told

you how

I

feel about that.

So we make sure our shellers have the rough edges removed before we start shelling.)

Now we slowly conhition the corn, drying

it

just enough

so the

moisture level in each kernel is at the exact point where

it will

pop its maximum.

All of this may seem

very

exacting,

but as

someone once said,

"Trifles make perfection, but perfection is no trifle."

We're also particularly fussy about sorting and cleaning our corn. First we sift out all the kernels that are a little too big or a little too small. Then a gravity separator rejects any kernels that are too dry and light, and any bits of cob that sneaked past. The acceptable kernels go into the polisher which rubs away any dust, along with the little "bees wings" that attached the kernel to the cob.

A stream of clean

air

leaves the shining polished kernels ready to package.

It would be no use

my

taking

these troubles corn,

to

make

you

perfect popping

if the

package was not going to keep it in perfect popping condition until you use it. So I rejected the idea of bags

or

boxes. They let the moisture escape.

And once you open a tin can, the rest of the corn could dry out and be less poppable than the first batch. This is why my

Gourmet Popping Corn is sold only in jars which are vacuum packed for freshness.

We put it up in three sizes,15 ounces, 30 ounces, and

45 ounces. lf you put the lid on tight after each use, the last batch in the jar will pop up as well as the first.

To make absolutely certain nothing has gone awry, we check random samples of the corn, many times each day, as

it

is packed,

I want to be positive that virtually every kernel you get will be in prime popping condition. That

it will

pop up big, crisp and tasty.

That is what you get when you buy a jar of Gourmet Popping Corn with my name on it.

g{owrTrS6uPTorou l've explained all that we do

Gourmet

Popping Corn a truly superior corn.

I would hate popping getting it badly.

the

to

So here are my rules biggest see

bowl

to make my you ruin

of the it

besttasting popped corn every single time.

by for

1.

The popper.

Many folks today use elec-

tric

poppers which

do

save work and worry. But skillet, dutch is heavy, if you'd rather use a pot, pan, the oven or lid vents automatic go right ahead.

Just be sure off the fry pan, bottom the steam, and the heat is set at medium. lf you pop corn in a wire basket over an open fire, hold it far enough above the coals or flame so the corn won't scorch!

2. Measure, or man your brooms! ure out one part of vegetable oil

Measto three parts

of

popp.!ng corn.

_l

Redenbacher'[email protected] [email protected] prefer

Orville

Buttery

[email protected]

Popping Oil. (Never use butter. lt will burn.)

It is truly important to measure my

Gourmet

Popping Corn, because

it

pops up to

40 times or more its unpopped volume. (The usual popcorns so you can see how mY care

PaYs oodoinq time.) This means iny

cori

and pop up about 30 that

3'tablespoons of oil

1/z cup of will tim-es, ott at make a iull four-quart popperful. lf you put in too much, it may lift the lid and start popping all over the room. For

3 quarts use of corn and 2 tablesPoons of oil.

l/s cup

3.

Let pan to off eteam. pop in, be lf you're sure using a skillet or the lid allows steam to escape during popping.

As

the

moisture explodes releases steam and

if

the

the

corn, it steam can't escape, it will make the popped corn tough and soggy.

4. Shake.

lf

you aren't popper, shake the pan using an electric to make sure every keiriel is heated equally so that none burn or scoot off to the side.

When popping slows, remove from heat or unplug popper.

5. Salt after popping. Never put the salt in the popper with the corn, because that tends

to

strongly recommend using fine-grained popcorn salt rather than regular table salt.

It clings better and won't bottom make of the the popped corn all tough. land in either on the salt or the popcorn shelf.

the bowl. Many stores have it,

I

7. Be kind and

I to

have shouldn't be

"shy fellowsl' done our

a jobs

scatter

of lf

both right, you there unpoppable

"old maids" in the bottom of a batch of my

Gourmet Popping Corn. But sometimes a kernel or two gets crowded away from the heat and lf doesn't have a chance

to

pop.

you find one, put it back in the jar to pop with your next batch.

8. Put the

Iid back on. I have mentioned that my corn comes in screw-top jars to keep it fresh between poppings. Do your part by putting the lid back on nice and

tight. And don't

refrigerate.

Gourmet

Popping Corn pops larger and fluffier if it is stored at room temperature.

9.

For those of you that like to use hot air poppers, try my

[email protected]

Hot Air Popping

Corn developed specially

It for hot air poppers.

pops up lighter and fluffier and best of all, you get very few unpops.

10. For extra convenience try my

[email protected]

Microwave Popping Corns, available in natural, butter, and salt-free varieties.

6. Butter?

I is salt.

[email protected] butter

lf

to think

Popping the my Gourmet

Corn is so good that all you need you'd like the flavor without its high calorie_s, try popping with

Orville Redenbacher'[email protected] [email protected]

Buttery

Oil

instead popped corn. lf

Popping

of of

to add butter adding you simply love butter and your conscience allows...

melt, pour and toss with the popped corn in a big bowl.

G[[,]D[[email protected]

6]tffi ts

["[ il"T

To my mind a bowl of lreshly-popped corn, warm and fragrant, is hard to improve upon. But over the years we have experimented with some recipes. Here are some plain and lancy favorites.

We hope you'll lind them tasty.

Each one starfs with you popping a batch of my Gourmet

Popping

Corn, needless to say.'

OIII]DDATI

|USS'N

ilDli']

This is great as a snack. My wife,

Nina, and I enjoy it with cocktails, sweet cider or a glass of cold milk. When the grandchildren come to visit, we often serve it for lunch with the family's favorite cream of tomato soup.

lt

"fixes" while the soup heats.

4 qts. popped Orville

-_

Gourmet Popping

Redenbacher's

Empty popped corn into an oven-proof

Corn

1/3 cup butter or margarine, melted r/z leazp. each, garlic and onion

Zcupi shredileld sharp Cheddar

salt

mixing bowl. cheese

Add margarine, satts and

(a small amount at

a

time) and

cheese

toss. Place in 325'oven

5 to

10 minutes to melt cheese; stir gently once or twice.

Makes

4 quarts.

-

POPC{DffiN

PAffiTYSdEX

Here's a popcorn mix to serve on almost any occasion.

We always keep

a

batch

on

hand

(it

stores well

in

a tightly-covered container) to serve guests who drop by our Valparaiso home.

lt

adds a party touch

to

any gathering.

l/e cup

1/z buller or leasg. margarine garlic salt

% teasp. onion salt

% leasp. celery sall

172 Tablesp.

Worcestershire

% teasp. Tabasco

2 qts. popped Orville

Redenbacher's

1

Gourmet Popping Corn cup pretzel sticks

1% cups salted mixed nuts

Melt butter in small saucepan. Add seasonings; mix thoroughly. Spread popped

Gourmet Popping Corn, pretzelsticks and nuts

in

large shallow baking pan. Pour seasoned butter over

all;

toss

to

mix.

Bake

at 275' t

hour. Stir

4 or

5 times.

Store in tightly covered container, Makes

2 quarts.

ffi"milIBEL'S0,mflffitcml{

Everyone loves crispy caramel corn and the homemade variety is especially tasty.

My sister, Mabel, developed her own family recipe for caramel corn. lt's the best

I've ever tast6d. She often gives hostess

gift,

packed

lt

as a

in

canisters she makes from empty food containers with their tight-fitting lids. lt's one reason we just love to have Mabel come visit us!

2 cupr llghl brown rtrglr,llrmly packed

!A cup llght corn tA lb. ryrup mergnrlnc or butlcr y. tearp. crcam ol

trrtrr

I

!arp..rlt

I

tcarp. baklng rode

0 qtr. poppd

Olvllle Redenbecher'r

Gourmcl Popplng Corn

(lwo balclur)

ln

21/z quart saucepan, combine brown sugar, corn syrup, butter, cream of tartar and salt. Bring to boil, stirring, over medium high heat. Stirring constantly, boil rapidly to hard ball stage,

260'

(about

5 mirtutes). Remove from heat. Stir in baking soda quickly but thoroughly; pour at once over popcorn

in

large roasting or baking pan.

Stir gently until are coated. Bake at 200o

2

all

kernels

t

hour, stirring

or

3 times during baking.

Turn out at once allow

on

wax paper; spread apart and

to cool

completely. Break apart; store in tightly covered container. Makes

6 quarts.

PEANUT BUTTER

NOUGAT

BARS

When any of our

16 grandchildren come

to

visit, there are always special treats.

This one is a special family favorite, especially with the youngsters. My daughters tell me it's a great after-school snack.

I

(6-oz.) pkg. butterscotch pieces

1/3 cup peanut butter

2 Tablesp. butter or margarine

3 cupt miniature qrarshmallows

% teasp. salt

21h qts. popped Orville Redenbacher's

Gourmet Popping Gorn

1 cup granola

1

(6-oz.) pkg. semi-sweet chocotale pieces

Melt butterscotch pieces, peanut butter, butter, marshmallows and salt in top part of double boiler over hot water. Stir constantly until melted and smooth. Combine with popped corn and granola in buttered

9 x

13 x 2-inch pan. Toss until well mixed; press smooth in pan. Melt chocolate over hot, not boiling water; spread over nou-

gat

mixture

to

form

lacy

pattern.

Cool until firm; cut in

1

x

2-inch bars. Makes

4Vz dozen.

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entertaining tamily and triends.

Here are some ol our popcom recipes that can add a lestive touch to you r holiday gatherings.

/([ii!\

rDorD(onr

parrru

This versatile recipe can be made with

Yz

Vt

3

1

1Yz

h

2

4

*ff*W quartr popped orvllle dourmlt iibpping

cupsgranuliieaiugar cupllghtcornsyrup

Tablesp.

lSlS:f:t",

or to

Corn----"-- butter

Redenbacher's

rarrar

+iaUfif.

any ltavor gehrin

dessert

tearp. bakiirg

soaa -

I

I

I

I lI

I

saucepan butter, combine

sugar' corn

syrup' salt and cream of tartar. Bring to

boil, stirring

constantly.

Cook

to

250'

I

I

I

ll

(hard ball stage) without stirring.

stir

in

I

. flavored gelatin, continue cooking about

I

'

1 minure to

260o. Remove from heat.

Add soda and

stir in

quickly but thoroughly.

I

t

Pour at once while foamy over warm pop-

I

t

corn; mix gently to coat corn.

Return to

I

I

oven; bake

at

200o

t

hour.

Stir

2 or

3

I

I

I

I

times.

Cool

comptetely. Separate into

I small

pieces. containers.

Store

Makes

4 in tightly

quarts.

covered

&

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PINK

BIRTHD4Y FZRTY

PIE

Popcorn

Pie Crust is so delicious that l have developed lots of ways to serve it.

I've tasted them

Popcorn King's

all

and given them the seal

of

royal approval.

You can make it ahead of time, and that's handy for parties.

Vt cup granulaled suEar

1/a cup light corn syrup

1

Tablesp. butter

% teasp. salt

% teasp. cream ol tartar

1

1/z to

2

Tablesp. strawberry flavored gelatin leasp. baking soda

1 qt. popped Orville Redenbacher's

Gourmet Popping Corn

1 qt. French vanilla ice cream, slightly soltened

Fresh strawberries, halved

Combine sugar, corn syrup, butter, salt and cream of tartar in

1 quart saucepan.

Bring

to

boil, stirring constantly. Cook, without stirring, to 250'

(hard ball stage).

Stir in

strawberry flavored gelatin; continue cooking about

1

minute

to

260'.

Remove

from

heat.

Add

soda and stir quickly but thoroughly.

Pour at once while foamy over popped

corn in

bowl; mix gently

to coat

thoroughly. Press, with lightly buttered fingers, onto bottom and sides

of

buttered

9

or

10 inch pie pan.

Bake at

200o

45 minutes. Cool.

Fill with ice cream, spreading smooth with back of spoon. Arrange strawberry halves cut side down

once in

pattern over top. Serve at

or

freeze

until

ready

to

serve.*

Makes

6 servings.

*When freezing berries until pie,

do

not add just before serving.

straw-

Valentine's Party

Use raspberry flavored gelatin; press onto bottom and sides of buitered heart shaped mold before baking.

Cool and

fill

with sherbet. Decorate raspberry with poufs of whipped cream.

FOR OTHER

SPECTAL OCCASIONS

Halloween

Party Use flavored gelatin; cooled pib fill shellwith orange baked

and

chocolate

Chrislmas vored crust

Parly

Use cherry gelatin; prepare in

Christmas popcorn mold if flade-

ice cream. Garnish with

sired. Cool and fill with pistawhipped cream and sprinkle chio ice cream. Garnish with with confetti cake decorations. whipped cream and a sprinkle of red or green fine cake decorating candy crystals.

,'

{t

f/t l/

,f f

j

ITANYEST

PTNilPKIN

BALL

Harvest pumpkin ball is my personal favorite popcorn party decoration because it's so good

looking-and

you can eat it.

Vl cup waler

1 leaep. pumpkln ple tplce

lt

tearp. ralt

I

lb. vanllla caramelc

(about

6rl) t0 qtr. popped Orvllle Redenbacher's

Gourmet Popping Gorn

Shoertrlng

Green llcorice gumdropr

Combine water, pumpkin pie spice and salt in top of double boiler; mix well. Add caramels;.melt over

hot

water, stirring often,

until

smooth.

Pour mixture over popped corn in large bowl;toss until kernels are well coated. With lightly buttered hands, form into pumpkin shape measuring about 8 inches in diameter at the bot-

tom and

aboul 4Vz inches high

at

the center. Make

7 or 8

slight indentations from center

to

bottom

to

form pumpkin

"sections." Cut strips of shoestring licorice and press down center

of

each indentation. Use green gumdrops to make pumpkin copia

"stem."

Arrange

with

cornu-

of fresh red and

green apples, grapes and nuts and use as centerpiece for table.

ORVILLE'S

POPCORN PLEASERS

.

Serve a in place of crackers wiih soup

. . . especially good with clam chowder.

big bowl ol fresh, hot buttered popcorn on the table r Toss some Popcorn Party

Mix into green salad instead of lhe usual croutons.

.

Sprinkle

a

bowl

of

freshly popped corn generously with grated

Parmesan cheese and serve with chili suppers.

# ff i{ t:-Q{'

}*&'!

ds.,':

Aldttle

AboutJVIe.

I was born and reared in lndiana, and my

taste for

popcorn developed

right

at home. Dad grew it in our garden, so naturally popcorn was one

of

our favorite family treats. During grade school and high school, I made my spending money raising popcorn.

My alma mater, Purdue University pioneered research

in

popcorn hybridization, back

in

the twenties, while

I

was working for my B.S. in agriculture. lt took my fancy,

so

I

went on

to

do graduate work in agronomy and plant breeding at

Colorado State.

During the years when I taught agriculture and worked as a

County Farm

Agent here in lndiana,

I was still especially fascinated

with the

production

of

hybrid corn and popcorn seed. ln fact,

I organized and for

10 years managed Princeton

Farms where

we

grew hybrid popcorn seed and commercial popcorn.

ln

1952,

Charles Bowman, my friend since

Purdue, and

I went into business for ourselves, and after a bit Carl Hartman, who is a truly fine professional plant breeder, joined our team. Working together we developed the genuinely superior popping corn I had been searching hood.

for since boy-

Well, the popcorn industry didn't want it, because

it

had

to

cost a bit more!

I am stubborn and I am not shy, special corn in jars to keep so I put it fresh my and put my own name on the label and got some local stores to carry it. lwas right.

You people do appreciate a better prod-

uct

when you

find

one. Hunt-Wesson

Foods recognized the product quality too, and is now distributing my Gourmet Popping

Corn all across the country and

I have to write a book like this because my corn gets so many fan letters!

I still oversee the growing and production

of

Orville Redenbacher's Gourmet

Popping

Corn, and

I

am

still just

as fussy about it. ln the off-seasons, I have travelled to

85 other countries with the government's People-to-People program, to help their agricultural experts improve their popping corn quality and yield.

My lovely

wife

Nina and

I

now live in

Coronado, California. We still enjoy our frequent visits to

Valparaiso, lndiana and love to see our children, grandchildren, friends and neighbors. ite corner of the world.

lt is still our favor-

Orvills Redenbachsr'so [email protected] Popping Corn, Beatrice Companies, lnc. P.O. Box 4800, Fullerton, CA 92634. print€d in

U.S.A.-All righls reserved.

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