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Red Hat ENTERPRISE LINUX 4 - USING BINUTILS Installation guide
Oracle® Database
Release Notes
10g Release 2 (10.2) for Linux x86-64
B15666-11
February 2008
This document contains important information that was not included in the
platform-specific or product-specific documentation for this release. This
document supplements Oracle Database Readme and may be updated after it is
released.
To check for updates to this document and to view other Oracle documentation,
refer to the Documentation section on the Oracle Technology Network (OTN)
Web site:
http://www.oracle.com/technology/documentation/
For additional information about this release, refer to the readme files located in
the $ORACLE_HOME/relnotes directory.
This document contains the following topics:
■
Certification Information
■
Unsupported Products
■
Preinstallation Requirements
■
Documentation Corrections and Additions
■
Installation, Configuration, and Upgrade Issues
■
Other Known Issues
■
Documentation Accessibility
1 Certification Information
The latest certification information for Oracle Database 10g release 2 (10.2) is
available on OracleMetaLink at:
http://metalink.oracle.com
1.1 Supported Operating Systems
Oracle Database 10g release 2 is supported on the following operating systems:
■
Oracle Enterprise Linux 4
■
Oracle Enterprise Linux 5
■
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3
■
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4
■
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5
1
■
SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 9
■
SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 10
2 Unsupported Products
The following products are not supported with Oracle Database 10g release 2
(10.2):
■
Grid Control Support
Oracle Database 10g release 2 (10.2) can be managed as a target by Grid
Control 10.1.0.4. However, Oracle Database 10g release 2 is not supported by
Grid Control 10.1.0.4 as a repository.
■
Oracle Procedural Gateway for APPC
■
Oracle Procedural Gateway for WebSphere MQ
■
Oracle ODBC driver
■
Pro*COBOL
3 Preinstallation Requirements
You must review the following sections before installing Oracle Database 10g
release 2:
When installing SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 10, if you
choose Oracle Server Base and C/C++ Compiler and Tools options in
the Software Selection and System Tasks window, then the following
prerequisites are automatically available in the operating system.
Note:
■
Install libaio Before Installing or Upgrading
■
Install oracleasm-support to use ASMLib
■
Install binutils on Oracle Enterprise Linux 4.0 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux
4.0
■
Install libxm Before Installing Oracle Lite
■
Configuring Kernel Parameters
■
■
Oracle HTTP Server on Oracle Enterprise Linux 4.0 and Red Hat Enterprise
Linux 4.0
Oracle HTTP Server on Oracle Enterprise Linux 5.0 and Red Hat Enterprise
Linux 5.0
3.1 Install libaio Before Installing or Upgrading
Before upgrading to or installing Oracle Database 10g release 2, install the
libaio package on Oracle Enterprise Linux 4.0 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux
4.0.
2
3.2 Install oracleasm-support to use ASMLib
Install oracleasm-support package version 2.0.0.1 or higher to use ASMLib
on Oracle Enterprise Linux 4.0, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4.0 Advanced Server,
or SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 9. At the time of this publication, the ASMLib
user space tools and kernel module packages are not yet available for SUSE
Linux Enterprise Server 10.
3.3 Install binutils on Oracle Enterprise Linux 4.0 and Red Hat
Enterprise Linux 4.0
Before installing Oracle Database 10g release 2 on Oracle Enterprise Linux 4.0
and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4.0 Update 1, install the following package:
binutils-2.15.92.0.2-13.0.0.0.2.x86_64
This package can be downloaded from the following link:
http://oss.oracle.com/projects/compat-oracle/dist/files/RedH
at/binutils-2.15.92.0.2-13.0.0.0.2.x86_64.rpm
This issue is tracked with Oracle bug 4619031.
3.4 Install libxm Before Installing Oracle Lite
Before installing Oracle Lite, ensure that the following package is installed:
libxml2-2.5.10-7.i386.rpm
3.5 Configuring Kernel Parameters
After updating the values of kernel parameters in the /etc/sysctl.conf file,
ensure that you either reboot the computer or run the sysctl -p command to
make the changes of the /etc/sysctl.conf file available in the active kernel
memory.
On SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 9.0, ensure that you set the following kernel
parameter:
disable_cap_mlock = 1
On SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 10, ensure that you set the
hugetlb_shm_group kernel parameter to the gid of the group used as the dba
group. For example, on a system using a group named dba with the following
entry in the /etc/group file:
dba:!:104:oracle
On SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 10, ensure that you set the
hugetlb_shm_group kernel parameter to the GID of the group used as the dba
group. For example, on a system using a group named dba with the
dba:!:104:oracle entry in the /etc/group file, the hugetlb_shm_group kernel
parameter should be set to the following value:
hugetlb_shm_group = 104
3
3.6 Oracle HTTP Server on Oracle Enterprise Linux 4.0 and Red Hat
Enterprise Linux 4.0
If you intend to use Oracle HTTP server, which is included in Companion CD of
Oracle Database 10g Release 2 (10.2) Media pack, refer to the MetaLink note
317085.1 for more information on using Oracle HTTP server on Oracle Enterprise
Linux 4.0 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4.0.
3.7 Oracle HTTP Server on Oracle Enterprise Linux 5.0 and Red Hat
Enterprise Linux 5.0
If you intend to use Oracle HTTP server, which is included in Companion CD of
Oracle Database 10g Release 2 (10.2) Media pack, refer to the MetaLink note
317085.1 for more information on using Oracle HTTP server on Oracle Enterprise
Linux 5.0 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.0.
Legacy entry points required by this version of Apache (libdb.so.2) are
moved to gdbm-1.8.0-26.2.1.i386. You must create a symlink using the
following command:
$ ln -s /usr/lib/libgdbm.so.2.0.0 /usr/lib/libdb.so.2
4 Documentation Corrections and Additions
This section lists the following corrections to the installation guides for Linux
x86-64.
■
In the "Software Requirements" section of quick installation guides and
Chapter 2 of installation guides, the following (or later versions) should be
the list of packages for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 3.0:
make-3.79.1-17
compat-db 4.0.14-5.1
control-center-2.2.0.1-13
gcc-3.2.3-47
gcc-c++-3.2.3-47
gdb-6.1post-1.20040607.52
glibc-2.3.2-95.30
glibc-common-2.3.2-95.30
glibc-devel-2.3.2-95.30
glibc-devel-2.3.2-95.20 (32 bit)
compat-db-4.0.14-5
compat-gcc-7.3-2.96.128 (32 bit)
compat-gcc-c++-7.3-2.96.128 (32 bit)
compat-libstdc++-7.3-2.96.128 (32 bit)
compat-libstdc++-devel-7.3-2.96.128 (32 bit)
gnome-libs-1.4.1.2.90-34.2 (32 bit)
libstdc++-3.2.3-47
libstdc++-devel-3.2.3-47
openmotif-2.2.3-3.RHEL3
sysstat-5.0.5-5.rhel3
setarch-1.3-1
libaio-0.3.96-3
libaio-devel-0.3.96-3
■
The following (or later versions) should be the list of packages for Oracle
Enterprise Linux 4.0 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4.0:
4
binutils-2.15.92.0.2-10.EL4
compat-db-4.1.25-9
compat-libstdc++-33-3.2.3-47.3
compat-libstdc++-33-3.2.3-47.3(i386)
compat-libstdc++-296.i386
control-center-2.8.0-12
gcc-3.4.3-22.1
gcc-c++-3.4.3-22.1
glibc-2.3.4-2
glibc-2.3.4-2(i386)
glibc-common-2.3.4-2
glibc-devel-2.3.4-2
glibc-devel-2.3.4-2(i386)
gnome-libs-1.4.1.2.90-44.1
libaio-0.3.96-3
libgcc-3.4.3-9.EL4
libstdc++-3.4.3-9.EL4
libstdc++-devel-3.4.3-9.EL4
make-3.80-5
pdksh-5.2.14-30
sysstat-5.0.5-1
xorg-x11-deprecated-libs-6.8.1-23.EL
■
The following (or later version) should be the list of packages for Oracle
Enterprise Linux 5.0 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.0:
binutils-2.17.50.0.6-2.el5
compat-gcc-34-3.4.6-4
compat-gcc-34-c++-3.4.6-4
compat-libstdc++-33-3.2.3-61
compat-libstdc++-33-3.2.3-61(i386)
control-center-2.16.0-14.el5
gcc-4.1.1-52.el5
gcc-c++-4.1.1-52.el5
gdbm-1.8.0-26.2.1
glibc-2.5-12
glibc-common-2.5-12
glibc-devel-2.5-12
glibc-devel-2.5-12(i386)
libgcc-4.1.1-52.el5(i386)
libgcc-4.1.1-52.el5(x86_64)
libgnome-2.16.0-6.el5
libstdc++-devel-3.4.3-22.1
libXp-1.0.0-8.i386
make-3.81-1.1
sysstat-7.0.0-3.el5.x86_64.rpm
util-linux-2.13-0.44.e15.x86_64
■
In Oracle Database Oracle Clusterware and Oracle Real Application Clusters
Installation Guide, Chapter 2, "Preinstallation," in the section "Oracle
Clusterware Home Directory," it incorrectly lists the path
/u01/app/oracle/product/crs as a possible Oracle Clusterware home
(or CRS home) path. This is incorrect. A default Oracle base path is
/u01/app/oracle, and the Oracle Clusterware home must never be a
subdirectory of the Oracle base directory.
A possible CRS home directory is in a path outside of the Oracle base
directory. for example, if the Oracle base directory is u01/app/oracle, then
the CRS home can be an option similar to one of the following:
5
u01/crs/
/u01/crs/oracle/product/10/crs
/crs/home
This issue is tracked with Oracle bug 5843155.
■
The following text of the section 2.6.1, "IP Address Requirements," in Chapter
2, "Pre-Installation Tasks," of Oracle Database Oracle Clusterware and Oracle
Real Application Clusters Installation Guide states that the virtual IP address
(VIP) should respond to a ping command:
During installation, OUI uses the ping command to ensure that the VIP is
reachable.
The preceding statement is incorrect. Before installation, the VIP address
should be configured in DHCP or /etc/hosts, or both, but it must not be
assigned to a server that can respond to a ping command.
This issue is tracked with Oracle bug 6017001.
■
■
Appendix H, "Database Limits" of Oracle Database Administrator's Reference for
UNIX-Based Operating Systems states the incorrct maximum value (63) for the
MAXINSTANCES variable. The correct maximum limit for the variable is
1055.
In the "NFS Mount Options" section of Appendix C, "Using NAS Devices" in
Oracle Database Installation Guide 10g Release 2 (10.2) for Linux x86-64 the table
should also contain the following entry:
Option
Description
directio
Disable attribute caching.
Note: If the systems supports direcio, use this option
instead of noac to reliably disable caching.
5 Installation, Configuration, and Upgrade Issues
Review the following sections for information about issues that affect Oracle
Database installation, configuration, and upgrade:
■
Latest Upgrade Information
■
Upgrading Oracle Real Application Clusters Release 9.2
■
Oracle Universal Installer Operating System Prerequisite Checks
■
Installing Oracle Cluster Ready Services
■
Installing Enterprise Security Manager
■
Upgrading Oracle Clusterware 10.1.x to Oracle Clusterware 10.2
■
extjob Executable Required Directory Permissions
■
Modifying a Virtual IP Address Node Application
■
Raw Devices on Oracle Enterprise Linux and Red Hat Enterprise Linux
■
Database Migration
6
5.1 Latest Upgrade Information
For late-breaking updates and best practices about preupgrade, post-upgrade,
compatibility, and interoperability discussions, refer to Note 466181.1 on
OracleMetalink (https://metalink.oracle.com/) that links to "The
Upgrade Companion" Web site.
5.2 Upgrading Oracle Real Application Clusters Release 9.2
If you are upgrading a 9.2 RAC environment to Oracle Database 10g release 2 on
Red Hat Linux 3.0, then you must apply a patch to GLIBC before proceeding
with the Oracle Clusterware installation. Follow the instructions documented in
OracleMetaLink note 284535.1.
This issue is tracked with Oracle bug 3006854.
5.3 Oracle Universal Installer Operating System Prerequisite Checks
If you are installing Oracle Database 10g on Oracle Enterprise linux 5.0, Red Hat
Enterprise Linux 5.0, or SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 10, the current version of
Oracle Universal Installer does not recognized these operating systems as
supported operating systems and does not perform the installation.
Workaround #1 (recommended): Run the Oracle Universal Installer using the
ignoreSysPrereqs flag which causes the installer to skip the operating system
check and continue with the installation:
./runinstaller -ignoreSysPrereqs
As a side effect, the installer also skips other checks during the installation.
Workaround #2: On Oracle Enterprise Linux 5.0 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux
5.0, the installation passes the operating system prerequisite checks if you change
each 5 to 4 in the /etc/redhat-release file. Ensure that you replace the
original values in the /etc/redhat-release file after the Oracle installation is
complete.
Original Value
Changed Value
Enterprise Linux Enterprise
Linux server release 5
Enterprise Release Enterprise
Linux server release 4
(On Oracle Enterprise Linux 5.0)
Red Hat Enterprise Linux server
release 5
Red Hat Enterprise Linux server
release 4
(On Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.0)
On SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 10, the installation will pass the operating
system prerequisite checks if you change each 10 to 9 in the
/etc/SuSE-release file. Ensure that you replace the original values in the
/etc/SuSE-release file after the Oracle installation is complete.
Original Value
Changed Value
SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 10
(x86_64)
SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 9
(x86_64)
7
Original Value
Changed Value
VERSION = 10
VERSION = 9
This workaround causes the installer to consider the system to be running earlier
version of the operating system and the operating system check passes. The
changes to the release file should be reverted after the installation of all Oracle
software is complete. The changes to the release file could impact the ability of
other tools to be properly installed on the operating system.
5.4 Installing Oracle Cluster Ready Services
Near the end of the installation of Oracle Cluster Ready Services, Oracle
Universal Installer prompts for the $CRS_HOME/root.sh script to be run on all
of the nodes in the cluster. When the root.sh script is run on the last node in
the cluster, the script calls the VIPCA utility, which fails on Oracle Enterprise
Linux 5.0, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.0, and SUSE Linux Enterprise Linux 10.
Refer to the "SRVCTL and VIPCA Utilities Set the LD_ASSUME_KERNEL
Parameter" section for more details.
Workaround: Before running the root.sh script on the last node in the cluster,
alter the $CRS_HOME/bin/vipca script commenting out lines 119 through 123:
#
#
#
#
#
arch=’uname -m’
if [ "$arch" = "i686" -o "$arch" = "ia64" -o "$arch" = "x86_64" ]
then
LD_ASSUME_KERNEL=2.4.19
export LD_ASSUME_KERNEL
fi
With the lines commented out, root.sh should be able to call VIPCA
successfully. Ensure that you do not comment out line 118, which sets the arch
variable as that is needed by the root.sh script.
5.5 Installing Enterprise Security Manager
To install Oracle Security Manager, install Oracle Client and then select the
Administrator installation type.
5.6 Upgrading Oracle Clusterware 10.1.x to Oracle Clusterware 10.2
When upgrading from 10.1.x to 10.2, Oracle Clusterware will not start if the host
name directory under the /etc/oracle/scls_scr directory includes the
domain name. The following error message is displayed when you run the
rootupgrade.sh script.
A file or directory in the path name does not exist.
/etc/init.cssd[509]: /etc/oracle/scls_scr/host_name/root/cssrun: 0403-005
Cannot create the specified file.
Workaround: Move the /etc/oracle/scls_scr/hostname.domain_name
directory to /etc/oracle/scls_scr/hostname and rerun the
rootupgrade.sh script.
This issue is tracked with Oracle bug 4472284.
8
5.7 extjob Executable Required Directory Permissions
To enable the extjob executable to locate required libraries, the
$ORACLE_HOME/lib directory and all of its parent directories must have
execute permissions for group and other.
5.8 Modifying a Virtual IP Address Node Application
Use the srvctl modify nodeapps command to modify the name, IP address,
or netmask of an existing virtual IP address (VIP) resource. Use the -A argument
to include the existing interfaces for the VIP:
srvctl modify nodeapps -n mynode1 -A 100.200.300.40/255.255.255.0/eth0
This issue is tracked with Oracle bug 4500688.
5.9 Raw Devices on Oracle Enterprise Linux and Red Hat Enterprise
Linux
Verify that an appropriate raw devices utility (util-linux) rpm is installed for
the update of the operating systems. For example, on Oracle Enterprise Linux 4.0
and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4.0 (update 5),
util-linux-2.12a-16.EL4.23.x86_64 or later rpm should be installed. On
Oracle Enterprise Linux 5.0 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.0,
util-linux-2.13-0.44.EL5.x86_64 or later rpm should be installed.
When you restart an Oracle Enterprise Linux 4.0, Oracle Enterprise Linux 5.0,
Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4.0, or Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.0 system, raw
devices revert to their original owners and permissions by default. If you are
using raw devices with this operating system for your Oracle files, for example,
for ASM storage or Oracle Clusterware files, you need to override this default
behavior. To do this, add an entry to the /etc/rc.d/rc.local file for each
raw device containing the chmod and chown commands required to reset them
to the required values.
As an example, here are sample entries in a /etc/rc.d/rc.local file that
control the restart behavior of raw devices for two ASM disk files
(/dev/raw/raw6 and /dev/raw/raw7), two Oracle Cluster Registry files
(/dev/raw/raw1 and /dev/raw/raw2), and three Oracle Clusterware voting
disks (/dev/raw/raw3, /dev/raw/raw4, and /dev/raw/raw5):
# ASM
chown oracle:dba /dev/raw/raw6
chown oracle:dba /dev/raw/raw7
chmod 660 /dev/raw/raw6
chmod 660 /dev/raw/raw7
# OCR
chown root:oinstall /dev/raw/raw1
chown root:oinstall /dev/raw/raw2
chmod 660 /dev/raw/raw1
chmod 660 /dev/raw/raw2
# Voting Disks
chown oracle:oinstall /dev/raw/raw3
chown oracle:oinstall /dev/raw/raw4
chown oracle:oinstall /dev/raw/raw5
chmod 644 /dev/raw/raw3
chmod 644 /dev/raw/raw4
chmod 644 /dev/raw/raw5
9
5.10 Database Migration
Review the following sections if you want to migrate Oracle Database 10g release
2 database from Linux x86 to Linux x86-64:
■
Migrating Single Instance Database from Linux x86 to Linux x86-64
■
Migrating Oracle RAC Database from Linux x86 to Linux x86-64
5.10.1 Migrating Single Instance Database from Linux x86 to Linux x86-64
To migrate Oracle 10g release 2 single instance database from Linux x86 to Linux
x86-64, complete the following procedure:
1.
To protect the existing database 10g release 2 against any failures during the
migration, ensure that you take a complete backup of the database on Linux
x86-64 system.
2.
To create a control file that helps file after the migration, run the following
SQL command from the SQL prompt on the Linux x86 system:
SQL> ALTER DATABASE BACKUP CONTROLFILE TO TRACE;
This command saves the control file information to a trace file in the UDUMP
directory. The control file information is similar to the following where
ia32lnx_path is the location of the Linux x86 Oracle home:
CREATE CONTROLFILE REUSE DATABASE "SAMPLE" NORESETLOGS
NOARCHIVELOG
MAXLOGFILES 32
MAXLOGMEMBERS 2
MAXDATAFILES 32
MAXINSTANCES 1
MAXLOGHISTORY 112
LOGFILE GROUP 1 '/ia32lnx_path/oradata/eegp22/redo01.log' 25M,
GROUP 2 '/ia32lnx_path/oradata/eegp22/redo02.log' 25M
DATAFILE '/ia32lnx_path/oradata/eegp22/system01.dbf',
'/ia32lnx_path/oradata/eegp22/sysaux01.dbf',
'/ia32lnx_path/oradata/eegp22/users01.dbf',
'/ia32lnx_path/oradata/eegp22/undotbs01.dbf'
CHARACTER SET WE8DEC;
3.
Perform a clean Oracle database shutdown.
SQL> SHUTDOWN IMMEDIATE
4.
Copy the database files to the Linux x86-64 system.
5.
In a new Oracle home, install the Oracle 10g release 2 software for Linux
x86-64.
6.
Copy the Oracle initialization parameter file (initsid.ora) to the new
Oracle home. Change any Oracle home path references to use the new Oracle
home path on the Linux x86-64 system.
7.
Start up the database using SQL commands similar to the following example
where lnx_x86-64_path is the location of the Linux x86-64 Oracle home:
SQL> STARTUP NOMOUNT;
CREATE CONTROLFILE REUSE DATABASE "EEGP102" NORESETLOGS
MAXLOGFILES 32
MAXLOGMEMBERS 2
MAXDATAFILES 32
10
MAXINSTANCES 1
MAXLOGHISTORY 112
LOGFILE GROUP 1 '/lnx_x86-64_path/oradata/eegp22/redo01.log'size 25M,
GROUP 2 '/lnx_x86-64_path/oradata/eegp22/redo02.log'size 25M
DATAFILE '/lnx_x86-64_path/oradata/eegp22/system01.dbf',
'/lnx_x86-64_path/eegp22/sysaux01.dbf',
'/lnx_x86-64_path/eegp22/users01.dbf',
'/lnx_x86-64_path/eegp22/undotbs01.dbf'
CHARACTER SET WE8DEC
ALTER DATABASE OPEN ;
Note:
In the preceding example, the path value changes as per the
system.
8.
To change the word size of the release, run the following commands:
SQL> STARTUP UPGRADE;
SQL> @$ORACLE_HOME/rdbms/admin/utlirp.sql
9.
Run the utlrp.sql script to recompile all PL/SQL packages now instead of
when the packages are accessed for the first time. This step is optional but
recommended.
SQL> @$ORACLE_HOME/rdbms/admin/utlrp.sql
10. Perform a clean shutdown of the database.
SQL> SHUTDOWN IMMEDIATE
11. Take a complete backup of the database.
See Also:
■
Oracle Database Backup and Recovery Basics
■
Oracle Database Backup and Recovery Advanced User's Guide
■
Oracle Database Backup and Recovery Reference
■
Oracle Database Backup and Recovery Quick Start Guide
5.10.2 Migrating Oracle RAC Database from Linux x86 to Linux x86-64
To migrate Oracle RAC 10g release 2 from Linux x86 to Linux x86-64, complete
the following procedure:
1.
Complete steps 1 to 5 of the "Migrating Single Instance Database from Linux
x86 to Linux x86-64" section.
2.
Use the following command to ensure that gsd is running:
$ ps -elf | grep gsd
3.
Use the $ORACLE_HOME/bin/srvctl utility to add the database name and
the cluster node names in Linux x86-64. To create a database, use a command
similar to the following command:
$ srvctl add database -d 10gdb -o ORACLE_HOME -m us.oracle.com \-s
/dev/raw/raw2
11
To create an instance, use a command similar to the following command:
$ srvctl add instance -d 10gdb -i 10gdb1 -n pl-adc.amd15
4.
Set the ORACLE_SID environment variable for one of the database instances
in the environment.
For the Bash or Korn shell:
$ ORACLE_SID=10gdb1; export ORACLE_SID
For the C shell:
% setenv ORACLE_SID 10gdb1
5.
Export the server parameter file (SPFILE) to a text initialization parameter
file as follows:
SQL> CREATE PFILE = '$ORACLE_HOME/dbs/init10gdb1.ora' FROM SPFILE =
'/dev/raw/raw2';
6.
Edit the text initialization parameter file to update path names to point to the
Linux x86-64 Oracle home directory along with any other required changes.
Then re-create the SPFILE as follows:
SQL> CREATE SPFILE = '/dev/raw/raw2' FROM PFILE =
'$ORACLE_HOME/dbs/init10gdb1.ora';
Note: If the cluster database does not start in EXCLIUSIVE MODE,
mark all the entries with cluster-database as comments in the SPFILE.
7.
Directories listed in the SPFILE must exist before you start the database.
Create these directories, ensuring that they have write permissions for the
oracle user and dba groups.
8.
Add a listener name for the database that listens on all cluster nodes to the
$ORACLE_HOME/network/admin/tnsnames.ora file. Also add an entry
for each instance. The following is an example of the entries:
LISTENERS_10gdb.US.ORACLE.COM =
(ADDRESS_LIST =
(ADDRESS = (PROTOCOL = TCP) (HOST
(ADDRESS = (PROTOCOL = TCP) (HOST
LISTENERS_10gdb1.US.ORACLE.COM =
(ADDRESS = (PROTOCOL = TCP) (HOST
LISTENERS_10gdb2.US.ORACLE.COM =
(ADDRESS = (PROTOCOL = TCP) (HOST
9.
= server1-vip) (PORT = 1521)
= server2-vip) (PORT = 1521)
= server1-vip) (PORT = 1521)
= server2-vip) (PORT = 1521)
Create the password file using the orapwd utility. Use a command similar to
the following:
$ orapwd file=$ORACLE_HOME/dbs/orapwd10gdb1 entries=10 password=manager
10. Start the database without mounting it, using SQL commands similar to the
following where lnx_x86-64_path is the location of the Linux x86-64
Oracle home:
SQL> STARTUP NOMOUNT;
CREATE CONTROLFILE REUSE DATABASE "SAMPLE" NORESETLOGS
MAXLOGFILES 32
12
MAXLOGMEMBERS 2
MAXDATAFILES 32
MAXINSTANCES 1
MAXLOGHISTORY 112
LOGFILE
GROUP 1 '/lnx_x86-64_path/oracle/dbs/t_log1.dbf' size 25M
GROUP 2 '/lnx_x86-64_path/oracle/dbs/t_log2.dbf' size 25M
DATAFILE
'/lnx_x86-64_path/oracle/dbs/t_db1.dbf'
CHARACTER SET WE8DEC
ALTER DATABASE OPEN
11. Shut down the database.
SQL> SHUTDOWN IMMEDIATE
12. Before changing the word size of your release, you must edit the
initialization parameter file (pfile) by adding the following line:
_system_trig_enabled=false
13. Use the following command to start the database:
SQL> STARTUP PFILE = '$ORACLE_HOME/dbs/init-10gdb1.ora'
14. Check the amount of free space in the SYSTEM tablespace. Ensure there is
enough room for SYSTEM tablespace to increase its size by 50%.
SQL> SELECT SUM (df.bytes) AS total,
SUM (fs.bytes) AS free,
(SUM (fs,bytes)/SUM(df.bytes) * 100) AS percent_free
FROM dba_data_files df,
DBA_FREE_SPACE fs
WHERE df.tablespace_name = 'SYSTEM'
AND
df.tablespace_name = fs.tablespace_name
GROUP BY df.tablespace_name
If you get a percent_free value less than 33%, then you must add a new
raw device data file to SYSTEM tablespace, for example:
SQL> ALTER TABLESPACE SYSTEM ADD DATAFILE '/dev/raw/raw108' SIZE 200M;
15. Use the following commands to restart the database in upgrade mode:
SQL> SHUTDOWN IMMEDIATE;
SQL> STARTUP UPGRADE
16. To change the word size of your release, enter the following command:
SQL> @$ORACLE_HOME/rdbms/admin/utlirp.sql
17. Run the utlrp.sql script to recompile all PL/SQL packages now instead of
when the packages are accessed for the first time. This step is optional but
recommended.
SQL> @$ORACLE_HOME/rdbms/admin/utlrp.sql
13
Note:
You need to shutdown the database and start it in upgrade
mode.
18. Edit the text initialization parameter file to remove the following line:
_system_trig_enabled=false
19. To restart the database, use the following command:
./srvctl start database -d 10gdb -o pfile=$USR_ORA_PFILE
Ensure that the USR_ORA_PFILE variable is set to the location of pfile.
Alternately, you can specify the complete path of pfile in the command.
20. To create instances on the other cluster nodes, complete the following steps:
a.
Copy the $ORACLE_HOME/network/admin/tnsnames.ora file to the
same location on each node.
b.
Create the dump directories listed in the initialization parameter file
(pfile) in the Oracle home directory.
c.
Copy the initialization parameter file (pfile) from the original node to
the $ORACLE_HOME/dbs directory, changing its name to reflect the
instance name on the current node.
d.
Create a password file in the $ORACLE_HOME/dbs directory, ensuring its
name includes the instance name for the node.
e.
Start up the instance.
6 Other Known Issues
The following sections contain information about issues related to Oracle
Database 10g and associated products:
■
Building Pro*C Applications if PostgreSQL is Installed
■
Encoding Information Not Present in Translated Help Files
■
Oracle Clusterware Files Issues
■
Cluster Verification Utility
■
Removing Metrics for Wait Classes Removes Them Permanently
■
Support for 64-Bit JDBC
■
Patch for Oracle Clusterware Configuration with Voting Disk on Network
Attached Storage
■
SRVCTL and VIPCA Utilities Set the LD_ASSUME_KERNEL Parameter
■
Mapping of 127.0.0.2 to the Local Hostname
■
■
Error While Loading Shared Library When selinux is Enabled on Oracle
Enterprise Linux 5.0 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.0
MAX_IDLE_BLOCKER_TIME Does Not Work in Oracle RAC Environment
14
6.1 Building Pro*C Applications if PostgreSQL is Installed
If the postgresql-devel package is installed on the system, then you must
add the following directory to the beginning of the sys_include parameter in
the $ORACLE_HOME/precomp/admin/pcscfg.cfg file before building Pro*C
applications:
$ORACLE_HOME/precomp/public
If you do not make this change, then you may encounter errors similar to the
following when linking the applications:
/tmp/ccbXd7v6.o(.text+0xc0): In function ’drop_tables’:
: undefined reference to ’sqlca’
This issue is tracked with Oracle bug 3933309.
6.2 Encoding Information Not Present in Translated Help Files
If the system uses a European language, you might see corrupted characters in
Table of Contents of database tools, such as Database Configuration Assistant.
This issue is tracked with Oracle bug 3957096.
Workaround: If the system uses a European language, do not use the .UTF-8
locale. For example, if the system uses German, set the LANG and LC_ALL
environment variables to de_DE instead of de_DE.UTF-8.
6.3 Oracle Clusterware Files Issues
The following note applies if you are using Oracle Enterprise Linux 4.0, Oracle
Enterprise Linux 5.0, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4.0, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.0,
or SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 10 and using raw devices to store the Oracle
Cluster Registry (OCR) and the voting disk for Oracle Clusterware, or using raw
devices for Automatic Storage Management (ASM) database files. For each raw
device used for the purposes listed, you must add two entries in the
/etc/rc.d/rc.local file on Oracle Enterprise Linux 4.0, Oracle Enterprise
Linux 5.0, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4.0, and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.0, or the
/etc/init.d/after.local file on SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 10 after
running the root.sh script following the installation of Oracle Clusterware.
For each OCR file, the entries should look as follows, where oinstall is the
Oracle install group and /dev/raw/rawn is an individual device file:
chown root:oinstall /dev/raw/rawn
chmod 660 /dev/raw/rawnmar
For each voting disk file, the entries should look as follows, where oracle is the
Oracle user, oinstall is the Oracle install group, and /dev/raw/rawn is an
individual device file:
chown oracle:oinstall /dev/raw/rawn
chmod 644 /dev/raw/rawnmar
For each ASM file, the entries should look as follows, where oracle is the
Oracle user, oinstall is the Oracle install group, and /dev/raw/rawn is an
individual device file:
chown oracle:oinstall /dev/raw/rawn
chmod 660 /dev/raw/rawnmar
15
6.4 Cluster Verification Utility
This section lists the issues with Cluster Verification Utility on Oracle Enterprise
Linux 4.0, Oracle Enterprise Linux 5.0, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4.0, Red Hat
Enterprise Linux 5.0, and SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 9 and 10:
■
■
Cluster Verification Utility (CVU) does not support shared checks for raw
disks used for Oracle Cluster File System version 2 on Oracle Enterprise
Linux 4.0, Oracle Enterprise Linux 5.0, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4.0, Red Hat
Enterprise Linux 5.0, and SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 9 and 10.
Cluster Verification Utility (CVU) does not detect SMP-Kernel rpms for the
hosts and displays the "Kernel check failed" message. In verbose mode, the
status for kernel is displayed as "missing".
This issue is tracked with Oracle bug 4685951.
■
The preinstallation stage verification checks for Oracle Clusterware and
Oracle Real Applications Clusters and reports missing packages. Ignore the
following missing packages and continue with the installation:
compat-gcc-7.3-2.96.128
compat-gcc-c++-7.3-2.96.128
compat-libstdc++-7.3-2.96.128
compat-libstdc++-devel-7.3-2.96.128
6.5 Removing Metrics for Wait Classes Removes Them Permanently
Do not remove the key values for the wait class metrics. Doing so removes them
permanently and currently there is no easy way to recover them.
This issue is tracked with Oracle bug 4602952.
6.6 Support for 64-Bit JDBC
For Oracle Database 10g release 2 on Linux x86-64, 64-bit JDBC (using JDK 5) is
supported.
6.7 Patch for Oracle Clusterware Configuration with Voting Disk on
Network Attached Storage
To resolve Oracle Clusterware configuration issue when voting disk is on
Network Attached Storage, you need to apply the patch tracked through Oracle
bug 4697432.
6.8 SRVCTL and VIPCA Utilities Set the LD_ASSUME_KERNEL
Parameter
The SRVCTL and VIPCA utilities shipped with Oracle Database 10g release 2 and
Oracle Clusterware software set the environmental variable
LD_ASSUME_KERNEL. On SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 10, because the older
Linux threads API has been removed from GLIBC, setting this parameter causes
the SRVCTL and VIPCA utilities to exit with the following error:
/opt/oracle/crs/jdk/jre/bin/java:
error while loading shared libraries:
libpthread.so.0: cannot open shared object file:
No such file or directory
16
Workaround: Comment out the lines that set the LD_ASSUME_KERNEL variable
from the VIPCA and SRVCTL utilities. For the VIPCA utility alter the
$CRS_HOME/bin/vipca script commenting out lines 119 through 123 as
follows:
#
#
#
#
#
arch=’uname -m’
if [ "$arch" = "i686" -o "$arch" = "ia64" -o "$arch" = "x86_64" ]
then
LD_ASSUME_KERNEL=2.4.19
export LD_ASSUME_KERNEL
fi
With the lines commented out, root.sh should be able to call VIPCA
successfully. Ensure that you do not to comment out line 118 which sets the arch
variable as that is needed by the script.
For the SRVCTL utility alter the $CRS_HOME/bin/srvctl and the
$ORACLE_HOME/bin/srvctl scripts commenting out lines 173 and 174 as
follows:
#Remove this workaround when the bug 3937317 is fixed
#LD_ASSUME_KERNEL=2.4.19
#export LD_ASSUME_KERNEL
6.9 Mapping of 127.0.0.2 to the Local Hostname
By default, the hostname of a machine is mapped to the IP address 127.0.0.2
through an entry in the /etc/hosts similar to the following on SUSE Linux
Enterprise Server 10:
127.0.0.2
test test.example.com
YaST does this to provide compatibility with earlier versions of the applications
that had problems running on desktops with dynamically assigned hostnames
from DHCP. This mapping may cause certain Oracle networking libraries to
encounter errors when they attempt to resolve the hostname of the machine. To
avoid these problems, the entry should be removed from the /etc/hosts file.
Note that several network related YaST utilities may add this entry back to the
file.
6.10 Error While Loading Shared Library When selinux is Enabled on
Oracle Enterprise Linux 5.0 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.0
Oracle Call Interface (OCI) program calls fail with selinux enabled on Oracle
Enterprise Linux 5.0 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.0.
Workaround: Disable selinux on the system.
This issue is tracked with Oracle bug 6079461.
6.11 MAX_IDLE_BLOCKER_TIME Does Not Work in Oracle RAC
Environment
Setting a value for MAX_IDLE_BLOCKER_TIME feature of Resource manager
does not work as expected in Oracle RAC environment.
17
Workaround: Set a value for MAX_IDLE_TIME instead of setting a value for
MAX_IDLE_BLOCKER_TIME.
This issue is tracked with Oracle bug 6114355.
7 Documentation Accessibility
Our goal is to make Oracle products, services, and supporting documentation
accessible, with good usability, to the disabled community. To that end, our
documentation includes features that make information available to users of
assistive technology. This documentation is available in HTML format, and
contains markup to facilitate access by the disabled community. Accessibility
standards will continue to evolve over time, and Oracle is actively engaged with
other market-leading technology vendors to address technical obstacles so that
our documentation can be accessible to all of our customers. For more
information, visit the Oracle Accessibility Program Web site at
http://www.oracle.com/accessibility/.
Accessibility of Code Examples in Documentation
Screen readers may not always correctly read the code examples in this
document. The conventions for writing code require that closing braces should
appear on an otherwise empty line; however, some screen readers may not
always read a line of text that consists solely of a bracket or brace.
Accessibility of Links to External Web Sites in Documentation
This documentation may contain links to Web sites of other companies or
organizations that Oracle does not own or control. Oracle neither evaluates nor
makes any representations regarding the accessibility of these Web sites.
TTY Access to Oracle Support Services
Oracle provides dedicated Text Telephone (TTY) access to Oracle Support
Services within the United States of America 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
For TTY support, call 800.446.2398.
Oracle Database Release Notes, 10g Release 2 (10.2) for Linux x86-64
B15666-11
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