2011 annUal report Edith Cowan UnivErsity

2011 annUal report Edith Cowan UnivErsity
Edith Cowan University
2011 annual report
JOONDALUP CAMPUS
Edith Cowan University
270 Joondalup Drive
JOONDALUP WA 6027
This report is available in PDF format from the ECU
website: www.ecu.edu.au/news/annual-reports
To minimise download times and reduce printing,
the report is provided in chapters, as well as a
single document.
Phone: 13 43 28
Fax: (08) 9300 1257
MOUNT LAWLEY CAMPUS
2 Bradford Street
MOUNT LAWLEY WA 6050
Phone: 13 43 28
Fax: (08) 9370 2910
SOUTH WEST CAMPUS
Robertson Drive
BUNBURY WA 6230
Phone: 13 43 28
Fax: (08) 9780 7800
ECU EMAIL and WEB ADDRESS
[email protected]
www.ecu.edu.au
2
ECU encourages you to use recycled paper and
to print the report and/or its sections in doublesided formats.
The Annual Report references other documents
obtainable from the ECU website. If you have
difficulties accessing any of these documents, or you
require the Annual Report in an alternative format,
then please contact [email protected]
Official correspondence relating to the Annual Report
should be addressed to:
Council Secretary
Edith Cowan University
270 Joondalup Drive
JOONDALUP WA 6027
Contents
SECTION 1 – OVERVIEW
5
SECTION 3 – SIGNIFICANT ISSUES AND TRENDS
43
Statement of Compliance 6
Economic Conditions
44
Chancellor’s Foreword
7
Australian Government Legislation and Policy
44
Vice-Chancellor’s Commentary
8
State Government Legislation and Policy
47
SECTION 4 – DISCLOSURES AND
LEGAL COMPLIANCE
48
Auditor General’s Statement
49
Certification of Financial Statements
51
About ECU
10
ECU Organisational Structure
11
ECU Governance Structure
12
University Committees
14
Work of the University Council
15
Financial Statements
52
SECTION 2 – AGENCY PERFORMANCE
17
Key Performance Indicator Report Certification
122
Report on Operations
19
Key Performance Indicators
123
Summary Statistics
34
Other Financial Disclosures
130
Summary of Performance Against Financial
Targets and Key Performance Indicators
Governance Disclosures
133
41
Other Legal Requirements
135
3
List of Tables
Table 1: Enrolments by Type of Attendance,
2007-201134
127
Table 25: Research Income ($m)
128
Table 26: Higher Degree Research Completions by
level, total number and per 10 Academic FTE129
Table 2: Enrolments by Course Level, 2007-2011
34
Table 3: Enrolments by Campus, 2007-2011
34
Table 4: Enrolments by Gender, 2007-2011
34
Table 5: Enrolments by Citizenship and Broad
Course Level, 2007-2011
Table 27: Research and Development Weighted
Publications per 10 Academic FTE
129
35
Table 28: Major Capital Projects Completed, 2011
130
Table 6: Enrolments by Citizenship, 2007-2011
35
Table 7: Enrolments by Equity Group, 2007-2011
35
Table 8: Student Load (EFTSL) by Funding
Category, 2007-2011
Table 30: Academic Staff by Contract Type,
2007-2011130
36
Table 9: Student Load (EFTSL) by Broad Field of
Education, 2007-2011
Table 31: General Staff by Contract Type,
2007-2011131
36
Table 32: Performance against 2010/11 Injury
Management Targets
132
Table 33: Advertising Expenditure, 2011
135
Table 10: Student Load (EFTSL) by Faculty,
2007-201136
Table 11: Completions by Course Level, 2007-2010 39
Table 12: Library Holdings, 2007-2011
39
Table 13: Revenue ($’000), 2007-2011
39
Table 14: Research Block Funding by Category,
2007-2011 ($m)
40
Table 15: Research Funding by Category,
2007-2011 ($m)
40
Table 16: Higher Degree by Research Student Load,
2007-201140
Table 17: Financial Ratios, 2011
41
Table 18: Summary of Performance against
KPI Targets
42
Table 19: Retention Commencing Bachelor
Pass Students
124
Table 20: Undergraduate CEQ Course Satisfaction 125
Table 21: Undergraduate CEQ Good Teaching Scale 125
Table 22: Domestic Bachelor Course Level
Graduates in Full-time Employment
126
Table 23: Undergraduate Share of First Preferences 127
4
Table 24: Teaching-related Expenditure per
Student Load
Table 29: Major Capital Projects in Progress, 2011 130
List of Figures
Figure 1: ECU Organisational Structure as at
31 December 2011
11
Figure 2: ECU Committees as at 31 December 2011 14
Figure 3: Unit and Teaching Satisfaction, 2006-2011 37
Figure 4: Graduate Satisfaction, 2006-2010
37
Figure 5: Mid CEQ Mean Scores, 2007-2011
38
Figure 6: Higher Degree by Research Graduate
Satisfaction, 2006-2010
38
Edith Cowan University
2011 Annual Report
SECTION 1 -
OVERVIEW
5
Statement of
Compliance
The Hon Dr Elizabeth Constable MLA
Minister for Education
19th Floor, Governor Stirling Tower
197 St George’s Terrace
PERTH WA 6000
12 March 2012
Dear Minister
In accordance with section 61 of the Financial Management
Act 2006 (WA), we hereby submit for your information
and presentation to Parliament the Annual Report of Edith
Cowan University for the year ending 31 December 2011.
The Annual Report has been prepared in accordance with
the provisions of the Financial Management Act 2006
(WA) and is made in accordance with a resolution of the
University’s Council.
Yours sincerely
The Hon Dr Hendy Cowan
Chancellor
On behalf of the University Council
Edith Cowan University
270 Joondalup Drive
JOONDALUP WA 6027
6
CHANCELLOR’S
foreword
During 2011 the University Council and the senior
management of the University continued to work together
to support the University achieving its objectives.
A number of key initiatives were progressed during the year,
including ECU’s leadership role in the development of the
proposed Wanneroo GP Super Clinic, the completion of
the construction of the new Engineering and Technology
building on the Joondalup Campus, and the move to
become a smoke-free University from 2012. In addition,
ECU continued its evaluation of its international programs.
Rigorous quality reviews were undertaken on all aspects of
the offshore operations and program delivery to help ensure
that the University can maintain its place in the international
higher education market in the future.
Council was pleased to be involved in the University’s
preparation for the Tertiary Education Quality and Standards
Agency audit in October 2011. A Council Workshop held in
September provided an excellent opportunity for Council
to engage with the work of the University and to join with
the senior leadership team to review significant activity and
progress made by ECU over the last few years.
Council welcomed the passage of the Higher Education
Legislation Amendment (Student Services and Amenities)
Bill 2010 (Cwlth) and the opportunities it now provides to the
University to continue to enhance student services working
jointly with the Guild and other student groups.
In April Council endorsed the ECU Reconciliation Action
Plan, supporting a range of activities to improve access and
success in higher education for Indigenous Australians.
The University remains committed to finding strategies that
will increase the representation of disadvantaged members
of our community in higher education, and the Reconciliation
Action Plan is one small part of the work which continues to be
done in this vital area.
The work of the University’s researchers continues to
receive recognition at the highest levels. It was a pleasure
for Council to be able to acknowledge the success of
Professor Donna Cross, named Western Australia’s
Australian of the Year 2012. Professor Ralph Martins, was
named Western Australian Citizen of the Year 2011 in the
category of Professions, while Dr Cat Hope was a finalist in
the Arts, Culture and Entertainment category.
Council noted the continued high performance of ECU on
measures of student satisfaction. Whilst surveys are only
part of the information gathered by the University, regular
oversight of these indicators by Council has confirmed a
steady improvement across a range of measures, with
targets being achieved or substantial progress being made
towards achievement.
Importantly, the University achieved its 2011 financial
targets. The Budget for 2012 was approved at the December
2011 meeting of Council, and will provide a sound financial
basis to support the strategic goals of the University
for 2012. Governance remains a central focus of Council
with benchmarking and other indicators suggesting that it is
a strength.
Committees of Council are actively involved in oversight of
the University, particularly on matters relating to resources,
quality, audit, risk and governance. Council is fortunate to
have outstanding community and business leaders amongst
its members. At the end of 2011 Council recognised the
contributions of two highly regarded members who had
concluded their third terms on Council; Mr Steve Abbott and
Justice Rene Le Miere. Council was delighted to welcome
to Council two new members; Mr John Cahill and Dr Saliba
Sassine, who bring a wealth of experience to the governing
body. The University is fortunate to have secured the
services of such outstanding members of the community.
It is an honour to continue to serve as Chancellor of
ECU and to work with outstanding students, staff and
Council members. As will be seen from the Annual Report,
our students, staff and graduates continue to achieve
great results.
The Hon Dr Hendy Cowan
Chancellor, March 2012
7
VICE-CHANCELLOR’S
COMMENTARY
During 2011, the fine achievements of the
year at ECU were enhanced by celebrations
of three significant anniversaries. One was
the 150th anniversary of the birth of Edith
Cowan, the second was the 90th anniversary
of her election to Parliament as the first
woman to achieve this in Australia, and
the third was the 20th anniversary of the
establishment of Edith Cowan University.
It was fitting therefore, that the Western
Australian Minister for Education, the
Hon Dr Elizabeth Constable MLA, in her 20th
year in Parliament and the first woman as an
Independent to become a Minister, delivered
this year’s Vice-Chancellor’s Distinguished
Oration, entitled “Edith Cowan: a Woman for
our Time”.
Our celebrations were not only focussed on the past.
Our students and staff have again excelled this year and
highlights are included in this Annual Report. It is my
pleasure, however, to give special mention to our world
champion advertising students, the ECU team Boomerang
One, who were announced winners of the International
Advertising Association (IAA) global student competition.
Headquartered in New York the IAA is represented in 76
countries. The dedication of our staff in their support of our
students in this global success is also to be commended.
In November 2011, our colleague Professor Donna Cross
was named Western Australia’s Australian of the Year 2012
in recognition of her tireless work as a children’s advocate
and for improving the health and wellbeing of young people.
Another colleague and Western Australia’s Australian of the
Year 2010, Professor Ralph Martins, was named Western
Australian Citizen of the Year 2011 in the Professions
category. We congratulate Donna and Ralph on their
outstanding personal achievements.
In research we are pleased with the award of $5.6 million in
Australian Government funding over the next three years to
build research collaborations in four broad areas of research
(Health, Education, Environment and Engineering) with nine
research intensive Australian universities. In addition, we
have a major role in the new Cooperative Research Centre
for Mental Health and the Australian Imaging, Biomarker and
8
Lifestyle Study of Ageing. Other new major research activities
include partnerships with the Rio Tinto Group, the WA
Department of Fisheries, Centrecare (on suicide prevention)
and the National Centre of Excellence in Desalination, as well
as internationally-funded security research.
Although many celebrations have taken place throughout
the year, we have not averted our focus on delivering quality
outcomes. In so doing, we were well prepared for our
University’s quality audit which was undertaken this year
by the Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency.
We were delighted with the preliminary analysis of the panel
of experts, communicated to us during their exit meeting
late in 2011 and the audit report itself is due to be provided in
early 2012.
Our strong commitment to teaching and learning excellence
has resulted in a five-star rating for Teaching Quality and
Graduate Satisfaction for the third consecutive year.
With quality high on our agenda, we have not only reviewed
our international partnerships, but have also reviewed the
courses and units which we deliver and how we deliver
them. As part of our Curriculum 2012 project, we were the
first and, at the time, the only University to be awarded
funding under the Gillard Government’s $400 million
Structural Adjustment Fund. Federal Minister for Tertiary
Education, Skills, Jobs and Workplace Relations, Senator
Chris Evans, visited ECU to announce our successful bid for
$6.9 million. This funding has greatly assisted in our ability
to implement Curriculum 2012 from the start of Semester
1 2012, which will provide increased emphasis in the
discipline/professional contexts for students to increase their
critical appraisal skills, abilities to communicate, awareness
of cultural differences, understanding of teamwork, and,
through these attributes, their employability.
To all of our recent graduates and current students here
in Australia and overseas, I congratulate you on your
achievements to date and wish you continued success.
Like the many thousands of students who graduated
from ECU over the past 20 years (and earlier from our
predecessor institutions), I strongly encourage you to
maintain your links with the ECU community through our
Alumni Association.
I acknowledge and thank all of our staff for the many and
varied helpful contributions and commend them for their
efforts on behalf of the University and the community at
large. In particular, I congratulate again, all the recipients
(students and staff), of the Edith Cowan Anniversary
Celebration Awards.
At the most senior level, we have had to come to terms with
the departure of our Vice-President (Corporate). Warren
Snell has been the constant member of the senior leadership
team, having been with ECU since before we became a
University. His personal drive, sound and outcome-focused
decision-making, and his overall commitment to ECU have
led to many of our University-wide achievements. The
University Council, at its August 2011 meeting, resolved to
confer on Mr Snell, the degree of Doctor of the University
(honoris causa). It is my pleasure to thank Warren, on behalf
of all ECU stakeholders (past and present) for his immense
efforts and contributions. We wish him a well-earned change
of pace and much happiness for his future endeavours.
We also farewelled our Executive Dean of the Faculty of
Education and Arts and Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Engagement,
Equity and Indigenous) Professor Brenda Cherednichenko,
who has since commenced her new position of Pro-ViceChancellor of Arts and Education at Deakin University.
Brenda has achieved much at ECU over the four years here
in the West and we wish her continued success.
Another great leader at ECU has been, and continues
to be, our Chancellor, the Hon Dr Hendy Cowan, who
leads our effective Council. We are grateful to him and all
members of the University Council for their contributions
to our rapid development. This year we farewelled two
long-serving members of Council: Mr Steve Abbott, who
has served the University Council since 2002, most recently
as Pro-Chancellor; and, Justice Rene Le Miere, who has
served Council in addition to chairing the WAAPA Board,
since January 2005.
In concluding my commentary for 2011, I acknowledge
Mr Arthur Hartley, who passed away earlier this year at
the age of 105. Arthur was our oldest Alumnus and was an
inspiration to all who knew him. He will be remembered for
his lifelong perseverance and determination to succeed.
May we all learn from him.
Professor Kerry O. Cox
Vice-Chancellor and President, March 2012
9
About Ecu
Mission, Vision, Values and
Strategic Priorities
Edith Cowan University is a large multi-campus
institution serving communities in Western Australia
and internationally.
ECU’s strategic direction, as approved by Council, is
outlined in: Edith Cowan University: Engaging Minds;
Engaging Communities. Towards 2020.
Awarded university status in 1991, ECU has since
developed innovative and practical courses across a wide
range of disciplines and a vibrant research culture with high
quality researchers and research partners, working at the
cutting edge of their fields.
ECU works hard to develop productive and mutually
beneficial partnerships with its varied stakeholders.
ECU has almost 24,000 students at undergraduate and
postgraduate levels. Approximately 4,800 of these are
international students originating from over 90 countries.
More than 300 courses are offered through four faculties:
„„ Business
and Law;
„„ Computing,
Health and Science;
„„ Education
and Arts, which includes the Western
Australian Academy of Performing Arts (WAAPA); and
„„ Regional
Professional Studies.
The University has two metropolitan campuses at Mount
Lawley and Joondalup, and also serves Western Australia’s
South West Region from a campus at Bunbury, 200 km
south of Perth.
ECU is committed to breaking down barriers to
higher education through its school and community
outreach activities, multiple entry pathways and flexible
learning options.
10
Mission
To further develop valued citizens for the benefit of Western
Australia and beyond, through teaching and research
inspired by engagement and partnerships.
Vision
For our staff, students and graduates to be highly regarded
as ethical and self-reliant contributors to more prosperous,
inclusive and sustainable communities.
Values
� Integrity
– behaving ethically and pursuing rigorous
intellectual positions
� Respect
– valuing individual differences and diversity
� Rational
inquiry – motivated by evidence and reasoning
� Personal
Excellence – striving to realise potential
Strategic Priorities
� Engaging
and serving our communities;
� Providing
programs to meet the needs of our
communities, in a supportive and stimulating learning
environment;
� Developing
� Building
research focus, depth and impact; and
organisational sustainability.
Office of Governance
Services (OGS)
Mrs J Tracey
Director
Marketing and
Communicatons
Services Centre
(MCSC)
Mrs J Turner
Director
Information
Technology Services
Centre (ITSC)
Mr G Trinder
Chief Information
Officer
Facilities and
Services Centre
(FSC)
Mr B Yearwood
Director
Finance and Business
Services Centre
(FBSC)
Mr B Francis
Chief Financial Officer
Vice-President
(Corporate)
Mr W Snell
Office of
Advancement (OA)
Dr A Medhurst
Director
Graduate Research
School (GRS)
Professor J Luca
Dean
Office of Research
and Innovation (ORI)
(Vacant)
Director
Deputy ViceChancellor (Research
and Advancement)
Professor J Finlay-Jones
Pro-Vice-Chancellor
(Health Advancement)
Professor C Rudd
Figure 1: ECU Organisational Structure as at 31 December 2011
Planning, Quality
and Equity Services
Centre (PQESC)
Mr A Lazzara
Director
Office of Legal
Service (OLS)
Ms J Quinn
General Counsel
Student Services
Centre (SSC)
Dr G Jackson
Director
Human Resources
Service Centre
(HRSC)
Mr R Bernstein
Director
Risk and Assurance
Services Centre
(RASC)
Mr P Draber
Director
Faculty of Regional
Professional Studies
(FRPS)
Mr R Irvine
Dean
Deputy ViceChancellor
(Academic)
Professor A Omari
Office of Academic
Governance (OAG)
Mrs G McQuillan
Manager
Library Services
Centre (LSC)
Mr D Archibald
University Librarian
Centre for Learning
and Development
(CLD)
Professor S Stoney
Head
Pro-Vice-Chancellor
(Teaching and
Learning)
Professor R Oliver
Professor Kerry O. Cox
Vice-Chancellor
University Council
ECU International
(ECUI)
Professor G Shen
Dean
Medical Sciences
Psychology and Social
Science
Nursing and Midwifery
Natural Sciences
Engineering
Computer and Security
Science
Exercise and Health
Sciences
Faculty of Computing
Health and Science
(FCHS)
Professor A Watson
Executive Dean
Deputy Vice-Chancellor
(International)
Professor A Watson
Marketing, Tourism
and Leisure
Management
Law and Justice
Accounting Finance
and Economics
Faculty of Business
and Law (FBL)
Professor A Islam
Executive Dean
Pro-Vice-Chancellor
Professor A Islam
WA Academy of
Performing Arts
(WAAPA)
Kurongkurl Katitjin
Education
Communications
and Arts
Faculty of Education
and Arts (FEA)
Professor R Oliver
Executive Dean
(Acting)
Pro-Vice-Chancellor
(Engagement,
Equity and
Indigenous)
Professor C Hayward
(Acting)
ECU ORGANISATIONAL STRUCTURE
11
ECU Governance STRUCTURE
Council Membership for 2011
Member
Term
Date term
commenced/
ended
Council
Meetings
Attended
Other
Committee
Meetings
Attended
Current
6
18
Chancellor (ECU Act, section 12(1))
Hon Dr Hendy Cowan
01.01.2011 – 31.12.2013
01.01.2008 – 31.12.2010
01.01.2005 – 31.12.2007
Members appointed by the Governor (ECU Act, section 9(1)(a))
Mr Steve Abbott
(Pro-Chancellor 20.05.06 to 28.08.11)
30.08.2008 – 29.08.2011
30.08.2005 – 29.08.2008
14.05.2002 – 13.05.2005
Term ended
29.08.2011
4(4)*
16
Mr John Cahill
09.08.2011 – 08.08.2014
Term
commenced
09.08.2011
Current
2(2)
8
Ms Leslie Chalmers
27.04.2011 – 26.04.2014
27.04.2008 – 26.04.2011
12.04.2005 – 26.04.2008
Current
5(5)
14
Hon Dr Hendy Cowan
31.01.2010 – 30.01.2013
01.03.2007 – 30.01.2010
01.03.2004 – 28.02.2007
Current
6
18
Mr Kempton Cowan
19.12.2009 – 19.12.2012
19.12.2006 – 19.12.2009
Current
4(4)
1
Dr Pamela Garnett
21.09.2009 – 21.09.2012
Current
5
6
Member nominated by Minister charged with administration of the School Education Act 1999 (WA)
(ECU Act, section 9(1)(aa))
Dr Norman Ashton
12
30.08.2011 – 29.08.2014
30.08.2008 – 29.08 2011
30.08.2005 – 29.08.2008
Current
6
10
Member
Term
Date term
commenced/
ended
Council
Meetings
Attended
Other
Committee
Meetings
Attended
Current
5
12
Chief Executive Officer – ex-officio (ECU Act, section 9(1)(b))
Professor Kerry O. Cox
Ex-officio
Academic Staff – elected (ECU Act, section 9(1)(c))
Professor Ron Oliver
01.10.2009 – 30.09.2012
01.10.2006 – 30.09.2009
01.10.2002 – 30.09.2006
Current
6
5
Associate Professor Ute Mueller
16.05.2011 – 31.09.2012
Current
4(4)
N/A**
Current
5
1
Salaried Staff, Other than Academic Staff – elected (ECU Act, section 9(1)(d))
Ms Valentina Bailey
01.10.2009 – 30.09.2012
01.04.2009 – 30.09.2009
Enrolled Students – elected (ECU Act, section 9(1)(e))
Ms Christine Hamilton-Prime
11.10.2010 – 10.10.2011
Term ended
10.11.2011
3(4)
N/A
Ms Katharine Hawkins
11.10.2010 – 10.10.2011
Term ended
10.11.2011
3(4)
N/A
Mr Luke Butler
11.10.2011 – 10.10.2012
Term
commenced
11.10.2011
0(2)
N/A
Mr David Trescuri
11.10.2011 – 10.10.2012
Term
commenced
11.10.2011
2(2)
N/A
Ms Julie Proud
20.09.2010 – 19.09.2013
01.04.2009 – 19.09.2010
Current
5
1
Mr Henry Heng
20.12.2008 – 19.12.2011
Term ended
19.12.2011
4
4
Mr Brad McManus
20.12.2011 – 19.12.2014
Term
commenced
20.12.2011
0(0)
0
Alumni – elected (ECU Act, section 9(1)(f))
Members co-opted by Council (ECU Act, section 9(1)(i))
Ms Janet Curran
20.09.2009 – 21.09.2012
Current
6
8
Mr Neil Douglas
18.03.2009 – 17.03.2012
18.03.2006 – 17.03.2009
Current
3
12
(NB: previously held one term as a Member appointed by the Governor, 28.11.2003 – 01.03.2006)
Mr Simon Holthouse
12.09.2010 – 11.09.2013
12.09.2007 – 11.09.2010
Current
5
5
Dr Saliba Sassine
25.08.2011 – 16.11.2012
Term
commenced
25.08.2011
Current
2(2)
6
Justice Rene Le Miere
18.08.2008 – 17.08.2011
18.08.2005 – 17.08.2008
01.01.2005 – 17.08.2005
Term ended
17.08.2011
2(3)
4
Ms Denise McComish
(Pro-Chancellor since 25.08.2011)
22.03.2010 – 21.03.2013
22.03.2007 – 21.03.2010
Current
4(4)
11
*Council held six regular meeting during the year. The bracketed figures indicate the potential number of attendances for members whose term of office
did not cover the full year, or who had leave of absence during the year.
**N/A indicates that the member was not a member of a Council Committee or Board during the year.
Additional Council membership information can be viewed at Members of Council.
13
university committees
Figure 2: ECU Committees as at 31 December 2011
University Council
Council
Executive
Resources
Committee
Quality Audit and
Risk Committee
Nominations
Committee
Legislative
Committee
Remuneration
Committee
Governance
Committee
Academic Board
Vice Chancellor
Academic Services
Committee
Vice-Chancellor’s Planning
and Management Group
Equity Committee
Legislative
Sub-Committee
Disability Access
Working Party
Curriculum Teaching and
Learning Committee
Research and Higher
Degrees Committee
Indigenous Consultative
Committee
Indigenous Employment
Sub-committee
Student Appeals
Committee
ICT Advisory Group
Honorary Awards
Committee
South West Campus
(Bunbury) Advisory
Board
WA Academy of
Performing Arts
Board
Human Research
Ethics Committee
Animal Ethics
Committee
Vice-Chancellor’s Student
Advisory Forum
Occupational Safety and
Health Policy Committee
Institutional Bio-safety
Committee
ECU Foundation
Board
Fees Allocation
Committee
14
Provides advice and
reports for noting
WORK OF THE
UNIVERSITY COUNCIL
ECU’s enabling Act provides that the Council is the
governing authority of the University. The fundamental
responsibilities of the Council are to determine the
strategic direction and governance framework of the
University. The Council is chaired by the Chancellor
and consists of the Vice-Chancellor (ex-officio)
and members drawn from the community and the
University’s alumni, students and staff. Council
members fulfil an important duty for the University and
the community and do so on an honorary basis.
Under the chairmanship of its Chancellor, the Hon Dr Hendy
Cowan, the Council met on seven occasions during 2011,
holding six regular meetings, and one residential workshop.
The major activities of Council in 2011 fell into
four categories:
„„ strategic
direction of the University;
„„ self-governance
„„ governance
of the Council;
of the University; and
„„ compliance.
Strategic Direction of the University
„„
the impact of changes within the higher education
sector, particularly in relation to enrolment projections,
opportunities for growth, the social inclusion agenda,
increasing participation, the uncapping of places, the
impact of the half cohort in 2015 and the role of the
Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency.
To inform and enhance Council’s role in shaping the strategic
direction of the University, presentations on key issues and
themes were included in the Council’s meeting program for
2011. Matters discussed during the year included:
„„ ECU’s
Mission-based Compact negotiated with the
Australian Government;
„„
ECU’s Reconciliation Action Plan;
„„ strategic
staffing issues – demographic challenges and
future planning around fit-for-purpose staffing;
„„ process
for the review of Council and members’
performance;
„„ the
Report on the National Governance Protocols and the
adoption of the Voluntary Code of Best Practice for the
Governance of Australian Universities;
„„ ECU’s
Cycle Two Audit, undertaken in October 2011 by
the Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency
(TEQSA), formerly known as the Australian University
Quality Agency (AUQA);
„„ strategic
opportunities provided by the growth of Perth’s
northern metropolitan area; and
Major strategic issues considered by Council in
2011 included:
„„ the
„„ the
A residential workshop was held in September 2011,
focusing on preparations for the TEQSA audit of the
University in October 2011.
University’s lead role in the establishment of the
Wanneroo GP Super Clinic;
„„ international
activities and the effect of changes in the
international student market; and
updated functional plans for Teaching and Learning;
Research and Research Training; and Engagement.
At its December 2011 meeting, Council considered and
approved the Budget for 2012.
15
Self-governance of the Council
Council’s statement on corporate governance was put
in place in December 2002. The Corporate Governance
Statement assists current and commencing members of
Council, executive management and senior staff of the
University in carrying out their roles. It also helps students
and staff of the broader University community to be kept
informed about governance processes at the University,
and serves a similar purpose for the external community,
including stakeholders such as governments.
During 2008 amendments to the Higher Education
Support Amendment Act 2003 (Cwlth) were passed,
removing provisions that had imposed adherence to the
National Governance Protocols as a specific condition
of Commonwealth Grant Scheme funding. The protocols
have been replaced by a Voluntary Code of Best Practice
for the Governance of Australian Universities. ECU’s
governing Council has affirmed a commitment to monitor
its performance against the Voluntary Code of Best Practice.
Council Evaluation
Following an external review in 2010, in 2011 Council
undertook a self-evaluation process – an online
questionnaire asking members to assess their own
performance and that of Council. An independent reviewer
received the responses and prepared a report for the
Chancellor. The report confirmed that governance remains
robust at ECU, with the skills and expertise of Council
members, the leadership of the Chancellor and the working
relationship with the Vice-Chancellor highlighted as
particular strengths. The work of Council committees was
also considered to be highly effective.
Governance of the University
Key Council activities in 2011 relating to the governance of
the University included:
„„ Regular
meetings of Council committees. Reports from
these committees were subsequently provided to Council
to keep it informed of activities across the academic and
operational areas of the University.
16
„„ The
Vice-Chancellor provided mid-year and end-of-year
reports on the performance of the University against its
key performance indicators.
„„ In
June and December 2011, the Vice-Chancellor
reported on progress against the Key Actions for 2011,
as previously approved by Council.
„„ A number
of amendments to the University Admission,
Enrolment and Academic Progress Rules and the
Misconduct Rules and the ECU Foundation Rules
were approved.
„„ The
introduction of a Register of Interests was approved
at its October meeting, a key governance improvement.
„„ All
members of Council were offered professional
development opportunities throughout the year.
Compliance
The 2010 Annual Report was approved by Council and
submitted to the State Minister for Education in accordance
with the required timelines.
The Council’s monitoring of the University, particularly
through the Resources Committee and the Quality, Audit
and Risk Committee, provided assurance to Council that
the University has in place appropriate risk management,
financial and quality controls.
The Voluntary Code of Best Practice for the Governance of
Australian Universities (Item 14) requires that a university
should disclose in its annual report its compliance with the
Voluntary Code of Best Practice and provide reasons for
any areas of non-compliance. At its August 2011 meeting
Council confirmed that it continued to comply with the (then)
National Governance Protocols. The Voluntary Code of
Best Practice was adopted in October 2011, and Council is
satisfied that the University is compliant with the new Code
of Best Practice.
Item 4 of the Voluntary Code of Best Practice (which deals
with procedures for the removal of the Chancellor or ProChancellor) does not apply as the University’s legislation does
not contain the relevant provisions. That notwithstanding, in
2012 the Governance Committee will review the Corporate
Governance Statement and the Council Standing Orders to
provide greater guidance to Council on this issue.
Edith Cowan University
2011 Annual Report
SECTION 2 -
agency performance
17
Highlights
WA Australian of
the Year
Professor Donna Cross, the
Foundation Professor at
ECU’s Child Health Promotion
Research Centre (CHPRC),
was named the 2012 WA
Australian of the Year.
The award recognised her
work to improve the health and
wellbeing of young people, particularly in the areas of
bullying, smoking, nutrition and mental health.
Mobile Chronic Disease Management Service
Edith Cowan Anniversary Celebrations
2011 marked the 150th anniversary of Edith Dircksey
Cowan’s birth, the 90th anniversary of her election to
Parliament and the 20th anniversary of the establishment of
the University named in her honour. A series of celebratory
events and presentations was held to pay tribute to the
University’s namesake, including the Vice-Chancellor’s
student and staff engagement awards at the Edith Cowan
Anniversary Celebration Awards.
Wanneroo GP Super Clinic
The Funding Agreement for the Wanneroo GP Super Clinic
was signed in September 2011. This partnership between
ECU, and the Australian and State governments will
result in the provision of an integrated, multi-disciplinary,
patient-centered, primary health care service in Wanneroo.
ECU is currently negotiating land acquisition with the
City of Wanneroo, completing the detailed design of
the clinic and developing the clinical governance and
operational arrangements.
Rock Solid Foundations
ECU celebrated the 60th anniversary of its first Aboriginal
graduate, Len Hayward, who graduated in 1951 from the
University’s predecessor institution, Claremont Teachers’
College. The event recognised the achievements of ECU’s
501 Indigenous alumni and included the unveiling of seven
granite pillars at the Mount Lawley campus in their honor.
18
In September 2011 ECU was funded by Health
Workforce Australia to establish a mobile chronic
disease management service. The initiative will service
the north metropolitan and outer metropolitan areas,
providing clinical placement opportunities for ECU
health students in community settings. The service will
work with primary care and not-for-profit organisations to
improve access to chronic disease health management
in the north metropolitan area, as well as increasing
health workforce capacity and quality clinical training
capacity in the health professions.
State Minister for
Education delivers
Vice-Chancellor’s
Distinguished
Oration 2011
The State Minister for
Education, the Hon Dr Liz
Constable MLA presented the
2011 oration: “Edith Cowan:
A Woman for Our Time”. The oration was attended by
distinguished guests, ECU students, staff and members
of the community.
Office of Advancement Established
The University established the Office of Advancement
and appointed its first Director of Advancement in July
2011. The Office is responsible for building relationships
to achieve philanthropic and other support from the
communities that ECU serves. Strategies to support
fundraising and alumni relationships are in development
for implementation from 2012.
Report on Operations
Engaging and Serving Our Communities
Engagement at ECU
Engaged Practice at ECU
ECU seeks to embed its engagement activities into its core
functions, providing a point of differentiation for ECU and
realising mutual benefits and productive relationships with
the University’s various communities.
Key achievements and outputs in this area included:
In 2011 ECU’s goals for this Strategic Priority were to:
„„ substantially
progress the Wanneroo GP Super Clinic
Project Plan; and
„„ establish
a Council-approved ECU Fundraising Plan,
with strategies to support fundraising and alumni
relationships, agreed and supported by a fully-staffed and
operational Office of Advancement.
Planning and Communicating Engagement
Child Health Promotion Research Centre – the Centre
commenced an innovative three year project in 2011 to
develop a community-based social marketing campaign
to reduce harm from bullying among Aboriginal children
and young people living in the Yamatji region of Western
Australia. Professor of Child and Adolescent Health, Donna
Cross, undertook the world’s first study into strategies being
used by schools, families and students to combat the effects
of cyber-bullying. In recognition of her leadership and work
in improving the health and well being of young people,
Professor Cross has been named Western Australia’s
Australian of the Year 2012.
The University continued its work to meet the goals and
objectives of the ECU Engagement Functional Plan 2011 2013. Key activities included developing closer relationships
with ECU’s communities and measuring and improving the
University’s engagement performance.
The South West Community Engagement Key Actions and
Initiatives 2011 - 2013 plan was approved in 2011. The
actions and initiatives relate specifically to the Bunbury
Education Precinct and are aligned with, and supplement,
ECU’s Engagement Functional Plan. These additional
actions and initiatives recognise the special role of the
Bunbury Education Precinct as an education hub for the
communities of the South West Region of Western Australia.
The University’s engagement practice was audited by
TEQSA in 2011. ECU was required to prepare and submit
a Performance Portfolio, including an extensive analysis
of ECU’s engagement performance, evidencing the
University’s progress and achievements, and identifying
opportunities for improvement in the future. The audit
included a four day visit by the Audit Panel to ECU’s
campuses to meet with the Senior Leadership Team,
staff, students, research partners, and industry and
community stakeholders. The Audit concentrated on the
four sub-themes of: Engagement Strategy and Planning;
Measuring Engagement in Teaching and Research;
Engaged Teaching; and Engaged Research.
The Auditors’ report is expected in early 2012 and ECU will
prepare an Action Plan in response. This will be incorporated
into ECU’s existing Engagement Functional Plan.
An Engagement Communication Strategy was developed
in order to improve student, staff and community
understanding of community-university engagement and to
promote ECU as an “Engaged University” with internal and
external stakeholders.
Stronger Smarter Learning Communities – is one of
many projects to improve outcomes within Indigenous
communities, run by the Kurongkurl Katitjin Centre for
Indigenous Australian Education and Research.
ECU’s Health Simulation Centre – is increasingly
recognised, nationally and internationally as a leader in the
field of simulation. In April 2011 the Centre was awarded
the State Government contract for the provision of high
fidelity simulation for the State of Western Australia. ECU
is a member of a consortium of five Australian universities
awarded the Health Workforce Australia contract in June
2011 to design and implement a training program for
simulation education and technical training across Australia.
19
ECU Health and Wellness Institute – ECU students and staff
work with external partners in this multi-disciplinary, cuttingedge health and wellness facility, providing services for up
to 1200 people each week. The Institute was awarded third
place in the Strengthening Families & Communities category
of the 2011 Premier’s Awards for Excellence in Public Sector
Management.
Centre of Excellence for Alzheimer’s Disease Research
and Care – the Centre brings together researchers from
different disciplines, including physiologists and brain imaging
specialists, to lower the impact of Alzheimer’s disease on the
community and to enhance the quality of life of people affected
by the disease. In November 2011 the Cooperative Research
Centre (CRC) for Mental Health was established with over 20
partners, including the Centre of Excellence for Alzheimer’s
Disease Research and Care, CSIRO, Hall and Prior, the
Mental Health Research Institute, McCusker Foundation,
Mercy Health and Pfizer. The CRC has been awarded $23
million from the Australian Government to develop diagnostics
and early treatments for Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s
disease, Schizophrenia and other related disorders.
The Interprofessional Ambulatory Care Unit (IpAC) –
a University-based clinic developed in 2010 and funded
by an Australian Government Increased Clinical Training
Capacity (ICTC) grant of $4.6 million. The IpAC enables
students to participate in client consultations that offer real
life experience as a member of an inter-professional team
in a clinical setting. The project target of 49,464 clinical
placement hours for 2011 was exceeded, providing over
7,000 clinical placement days for students from nine health
disciplines. Over 233 community members have received
chronic disease self-management education and support
from ECU health students.
The Parkinson’s Centre (ParkC) group at ECU works on
research into the debilitating Parkinson’s disease and has
community connections with: Parkinson’s Association
of WA, local support groups, geriatricians, neurologists,
allied health professionals, local businesses, and graduate
students from ECU, UWA and Curtin University.
20
ECU Backing Soccer in WA – ECU continued its
sponsorship of the School Sports Western Australia Football
Cup competition. From 2012 ECU will offer Australia’s first
football (soccer) degree – the Bachelor of Sports Science
and Football – offering students the opportunity to combine
general exercise science units with football specific units.
ECU’s Melanoma Research Group – in 2011 ECU joined
forces with the international manufacturers, Cristal
Global, and Newcrest Mining to examine the incidence of
melanoma, the cause of 80 percent of skin cancer related
deaths, and other skin cancers amongst their workforce,
and to raise awareness about the danger of prolonged
sun exposure.
yourtutor – in 2011 ECU partnered with the cities of
Joondalup, Wanneroo, Stirling and Bunbury, and six high
schools to make the yourtutor online tutoring service
available to local school students. Over 3000 tutoring
sessions were provided through the various library services
and around 2000 tutoring sessions were provided through
the school partnerships. In participant feedback, 88% of high
school student respondents indicated that yourtutor was
helping them understand and complete their homework, and
86% would recommend yourtutor to a friend.
A state-of-the-art pilot malting facility at ECU is benefitting
Australian grain growers and the malting and brewing
industries through improved research and development.
The new facility is a joint initiative between the ECU and
the WA Department of Agriculture and Food, and will
be managed within the University’s brewing science
teaching program.
ECU and the Student Experience
ECU’s commitment to an engaged student experience and
developing job-ready graduates was demonstrated in the
following teaching programs in 2011:
Through the Joondalup Community Legal Centre and
ECU Psychological Services Centre, ECU students and staff
continued to provide valuable services to the community
while at the same time, providing students with valuable
real-life learning experiences.
The Western Australian Academy of Performing Arts
(WAAPA) continued its program of performances, recitals
and exhibitions including WAAPA in the Park held in
conjunction with the City of Stirling. In association with the
Albany Entertainment Centre, WAAPA brought together
over 60 students from Albany Senior High School and
Great Southern Grammar School in late August to make
music, culminating in WAAPA In Residence: RADIO ACTIVE,
a rock concert at the new Albany Entertainment Centre.
ECU’s Teacher Residency Program offered rural
placements for the first time in 2011, providing rural students
with the full benefit of residency learning and the opportunity
to complete the residency program with placements in
schools in their home town. The program is offered in early
childhood studies, primary education and high school
education and is also open to metropolitan-based students.
Social Work Online and Law Online – ECU continued to
offer the Bachelor of Social Work and Bachelor of Laws in
off-campus mode. Social Work Online provides the necessary
specialist skills and knowledge for working in regional, rural
and remote communities.
ECU’s WA Screen Academy
received top honours in the
2011 Australian Teachers
of Media (ATOM) awards,
winning Best Tertiary Short
Fiction for the second
consecutive year. The film,
Stripped, was a collaboration
between the WA Screen
Academy and the Aboriginal
Theatre program, with
direction from graduate Geoff
Kelso and starring Aboriginal
actor Kelton Pell.
[email protected] 2011
100 Partnerships
A Compendium of 100 partnerships was published
in 2011, as an update to the first edition (2009) which
highlighted 50 examples of ECU’s engaged practice.
The updated Compendium presents 100 examples
of engaged practices and partnerships with ECU’s
communities around the themes of Health, Arts,
Science, Justice and Security, Business, Education,
Sustainability, and Partners and Precincts.
The Compendium demonstrates the University’s strong
and sustained collaboration and engagement at all
levels of the University with a range of stakeholders
including industry, professions, government, and
the community.
21
Highlights
Broadcasting for charity – twenty ECU students in
Broadcasting gained valuable live television experience
when they helped host the Telethon fundraising event in
October. This provided opportunities to make industry
contacts and gain new skills in Broadcasting.
Testing WA’s top young footballers – ECU Sports Science
students and staff collaborated with the Western Australian
Football Commission’s State Academy to test almost 400
Colts players. They were tested for muscular power, speed
and aerobic capacity, providing valuable information to the
clubs and hands-on, practical experience for ECU students.
Funding for structural changes – ECU was the
first university to receive funding under the Australian
Government’s $400 million Structural Adjustment Fund,
which assists universities making significant structural
change in preparation for the uncapping of place in 2012.
ECU received $6.9 million for the implementation of
Curriculum 2012.
Five-star student experience – the 2012 edition of the
Good Universities Guide rates ECU’s student experience
as one of the best in Australia. ECU’s graduates again gave
ECU courses a five-star rating for teaching quality, generic
skills and overall satisfaction.
World Champion Advertising Students – ECU Bachelor
of Communication students won the top prize at the annual
International Advertising Association (IAA) InterAd XIII
global student advertising competition. World champions
Annabel Slade, Jakob Reimerson, Colby Lathwell, Jon
Ismailovski, Jack Geerssen and Sebastian Forsström made
up the winning team, known as Boomerang One. They
received the award and certificates in September 2011, at an
event in London hosted by the IAA UK Chapter.
Teaching police leadership – a new course co-delivered
by ECU and the WA Police Academy was run in 2011.
The Graduate Certificate in Executive Leadership and
Management is a mix of theoretical management units
and practical, contextual learning designed to develop
leadership skills for WA Police personnel.
22
Providing Programs to Meet the Needs of Our
Communities, in a Supportive and Stimulating
Learning Environment
Teaching at ECU
ECU seeks to be recognised for providing high-quality and
fulfilling educational experiences. In 2011 ECU’s goals as
described in the Teaching and Learning Functional Plan,
2010-2012 were:
„„ to
be responsive to students and employers through a
relevant and engaged curriculum;
„„ to
articulate a distinctive ECU model for the curriculum
that responds to reforms in Higher Education;
„„ to
enhance the quality of teaching; and
„„ to
enhance student support and learning experiences.
Teaching and Learning
In 2011 much of the teaching and learning focus at ECU was
on the planning and implementation of Curriculum 2012.
The project seeks to create consistency in the quality of,
and outcomes from, all undergraduate courses at ECU,
developing distinctive features for all ECU courses aligned
with the University’s Mission and Vision.
During 2011 teams of academics from across the University
developed resources and programs for implementation in
2012. The initial focus of Curriculum 2012 will be the support
of students in their transition to university with particular
emphasis on:
„„ the
provision of appropriate academic support for first
year students;
„„ a
focus on English literacy awareness and development
for all students through the implementation of a Post
Enrolment Literacy Assessment (PELA) across all
courses at ECU;
„„ providing
opportunities for more flexibility in
course delivery;
„„ assessment
activities that promote and support
learning; and
„„ early
identification of individual student support needs
and provision through the Connect for Success project.
Funding from the Structural Adjustment Fund will be used to
support the development of the curriculum, new world-class
teaching and learning spaces on all campuses and
innovative technology solutions to support student learning.
In 2011 ECU implemented a number of projects to enhance
the use of technologies for flexible delivery and support for
student learning. Activities undertaken included:
„„ upgrade
of the learning management system to
Blackboard 9.1;
„„ development
of functional specifications to support the
implementation of an e-portfolio system;
„„ enhancements
to the capability and functionality of the
lecture capture system;
„„ early
work on the installation of a virtual desktop system
for all ECU computer laboratories to increase student
accessibility to ECU software systems;
„„ staff
training and development to increase the level of
flexibility in course offerings; and
„„ forward
planning for a large scale project to develop
greater numbers of online courses.
The outcome from these activities will see increases
in technology use in teaching and learning across the
University in 2012.
23
ECU Teaching and Graduate Outcomes
ECU academic develops first of its kind
iPad application
Dr Alistair Campbell, Post Doctoral Research
Fellow, School of Education, has developed an iPad
application (app) for marking student assessments
to replace the more time-consuming paper-based
approaches used currently. The app combines the
best features of a word processor, spreadsheet and
database, to improve the ease of assessment of
students’ work.
Winner of the ECU Innovator of the Year for 2011,
Dr Campbell was awarded $20,000 which will
contribute to the commercialisation of the app,
which has already attracted interest from other
Australian universities.
ECU academics awarded Australian
Learning and Teaching Council
(ALTC) grants
Pro-Vice-Chancellor (Health Advancement), Professor
Cobie Rudd was one of five recipients of an ALTC/
DEEWR 2011 National Teaching Fellowship. She was
awarded $350,000 to enhance the uptake of learning
through simulation in health.
Head of Journalism, Professor Trevor Cullen, received
an ALTC grant to investigate the status of journalism
education in Australian universities. He will collaborate
with two colleagues at the University of Wollongong
and the University of South Australia.
24
ECU again performed well on national measures of teaching
excellence. Performance data derived from the Course
Experience Questionnaire (CEQ) and ECU’s own online Unit
and Teaching Evaluation Instrument (UTEI) and mid-course
CEQ survey is shown in the Summary Statistics beginning
on page 34.
In the latest national CEQ survey results, ECU was ranked
5th nationally for Overall Course satisfaction. On Good
Teaching satisfaction ECU was ranked 3rd nationally and for
the fourth consecutive year ECU had the highest rating for WA
universities. On Generic Skills satisfaction ECU ranked 4th
out of the Australian universities. ECU has been consistently
above the State and national averages for these indicators
and the latest survey results are the best yet for ECU.
ECU’s graduate full-time employment rate in the 2011
Graduate Destination Survey showed a decline – as did
all WA universities – reflecting the prevailing economic
conditions at the time the survey was taken (see Key
Performance Indicators beginning on page 127).
ECU is continuing to develop new approaches to
improve its graduate employment outcomes and ECU’s
ranking amongst the WA universities has improved as a
consequence. Approaches being used to create stronger
opportunities for graduates include:
„„ a
focus on employability in the Curriculum 2012 project;
„„ engagement
with course consultative committees to
support the relevance and currency of all courses;
„„ increasing
practicum components and opportunities for
workplace-integrated learning across courses; and
„„ support
from ECU careers staff for students in their
search for employment, including bringing industry
representatives to the campuses, organising employment
workshops and Career Expos.
ECU’s graduate further study rate improved in the 2011
Graduate Destination Survey. ECU ranked 2nd of the WA
universities in the latest survey, and this score is again
above the State average.
Student Recruitment
ECU’s The Road is Open marketing campaign was
introduced in 2011, with two new television advertisements
promoting the Joondalup and Mount Lawley campuses and
a range of advertising to promote the ECU brand, its large
range of disciplines and the South West Campus.
Social media remained a major focus in 2011 with marketing
efforts in Facebook, YouTube, Twitter and LinkedIn.
Growth in social media during 2011 was significant: total
ECU Facebook fans grew to over 14,661 (120%), Twitter
followers grew to 3340 (126%), YouTube video views grew
to 71,106 (127%) and LinkedIn members grew from 287
members to 811 (182%).
A new digital engagement initiative, The Me Project, was
also launched in 2011. The website allows high school
students to upload photos and information relating to their
interests, enabling ECU to provide suggestions for courses
that may match those interests.
In student recruitment, ECU has increased the range and
number of events to attract future students. New events
included industry-focused information evenings, weekly
campus tours and Year 10 information evenings. As a
result of these and many other metropolitan and regional
recruitment events, in 2011 over 10,000 more prospective
students engaged in ECU events than 2010.
ECU continuously improves its course offerings to meet
identified needs within the community. Eighteen new
courses were introduced in 2011, including:
„„ undergraduate
degrees in Writing, Arts Management,
Web Technology, Counter Terrorism Security and
Intelligence, Engineering and Business, Engineering and
Science, Health Science Honours, Biological Sciences,
Environmental Science, Environmental Management,
Nursing and Midwifery, Social Science; and
„„ postgraduate
programs in Education, Engineering
Science, Teaching and Coaching, Professional
Accounting (Extended), Business Administration
(International) and Criminology and Justice.
Retention
ECU experienced a slight decline in total enrolments in 2011,
after growth in the period from 2007 to 2010 (see Summary
Statistics beginning on page 34). Domestic student enrolments
remained strong and grew in 2011. The small overall decline
is attributable to ECU’s international partnership consolidation
strategy, with reviews of programs and financial viability leading
to the closure of a number of several offshore programs.
The retention rate for ECU students who commenced in 2010
and were retained into 2011 improved compared with the
previous year’s results, although remaining below the national
average (see Key Performance Indicators beginning on
page 127).
Strategies utilised in 2011 to improve retention, included:
„„ providing
ECU-funded scholarships, grants and loans to
assist students in financial difficulty, particularly where
there was a risk of ceasing studies;
„„ the
introduction of Student Connect Officers to administer
case-managed specialist support to students;
„„ the
introduction of a three tier strategy by the Careers
Service to enable students to prepare for their
chosen careers;
„„ implementation
of a comprehensive orientation and
transition program; and
„„ an
increase in the number of Learning Access Plans
provided by the Equity and Disability Service.
New courses for 2012
ECU announced several new undergraduate courses for 2012,
designed to give students the skills to take advantage of new
opportunities in growing employment sectors in Australia and
internationally. New courses for 2012 will include:
� Bachelor of Technology (Aeronautical) - the only aeronautical
course in WA, focusing on the engineering aspects of
aviation, including design, manufacturing and operation.
� Bachelor
of Engineering (Marine and Offshore Systems),
Bachelor of Engineering (Naval Architecture) and Bachelor
of Engineering (Ocean Engineering) - in collaboration with
the Australian Maritime College in Launceston, ECU will
offer three new maritime engineering courses in the areas
of marine and offshore systems, naval architecture and
ocean engineering.
� Bachelor of Science (Sports Science and Football) - combining
general sports science and soccer-specific units, graduates will
have the skills to coach a team, assess performance, manage
players and run soccer clubs.
25
Highlights
Closer ties with Australian universities
ECU was awarded $5.6 million over three years under
the Australian Government’s Collaborative Research
Networks program. ECU will collaborate with nine
universities on six projects to increase research capacity
and widen access to supervisors for more than 30 ECU
research students.
Excellence in research
The 2010 Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA)
National Report results, released in January 2011,
placed ECU “at world standard” in four discipline areas:
Environmental Sciences, Engineering, Medical and
Health Sciences and Studies in Creative Arts and Writing.
Within the Medical and Health Sciences discipline, Clinical
Sciences and Nursing were both rated at, or above,
world standard.
Research Week
The Joondalup and Mount Lawley Campuses again
hosted the annual Research Week event, with more
than 50 seminars, presentations, colloquia and
exhibitions to inspire the next generation of researchers.
Over 800 people, including more than 60 international
guests attended.
The ECU Three Minute Thesis Competition showcased
research undertaken by higher degree by research
candidates. Management PhD candidate Matt Bambach
won and went on to represent ECU at the national final,
where he was a runner-up.
The Visualising Research Exhibition held during Research
Week showcased research photography, visual arts,
performance projects, posters, illustration and artwork
from ECU’s candidates and staff.
National anti-cyber-bullying campaign
The Child Health Promotion Research Centre (CHPRC)
played a key role in a national campaign to address
cyber-bullying. CHPRC provided the research to drive
an innovative anti-cyber-bullying initiative with Human
Rights Australia (formerly the Australian Human Rights
Commission) and communications specialists Primary
Communications.
National fishing survey
ECU partnered with the WA Department of Fisheries,
Recfishwest and Murdoch University in the Statewide
Recreational Boat Fishing Survey. Over 23,000 fishermen
from across WA were interviewed for the survey, which
aimed to provide detailed estimates of the quantity of
fish caught and released from each WA fishing region, to
inform Government decision-making.
26
Professor Ralph Martins wins
Vice-Chancellor’s Award for Excellence
in Research in 2011
Professor Ralph Martins continues to be at the forefront of
research into Alzheimer’s disease since his contribution
to two seminal discoveries 25 years ago. The significance
of his work and leadership was recognised with the
award of Western Australia’s Australian of the Year 2010,
and Western Australian Citizen of the Year 2011 in the
Professions category.
Boost to prostate cancer research
The ECU Health and Wellness Institute was awarded
more than $775,000 of category 1 funding from Cancer
Australia and the Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia
to conduct research into the effects of exercise on prostate
cancer patients, including funding for two new project grants
and equipment.
Developing Research Focus, Depth and Impact
Research at ECU
ECU seeks to be recognised for high impact research
providing social, economic, environmental and
cultural benefits.
In 2011 ECU’s goals for this Strategic Priority were to:
„„ build
areas of research concentration, depth and
sustainability;
„„ increase
research collaboration within and external
to ECU;
„„ stimulate
knowledge transfer and commercialisation;
„„ strengthen
research culture, training and support; and
„„ increase
Research Higher Degree student enrolments
and completions.
Research Profile
Also at world standard are ECU’s research in Engineering,
Environmental Science, Studies in Creative Arts and Writing
(particularly Performing Arts and Creative Writing and
Journalism and Professional Writing).
ECU continued to strengthen its research culture to
support growth in capacity and capability through targeted
appointments of research staff and through the appointment
of faculty-based research development officers to assist with
project development and grant and publication writing.
In 2011 a project to review the Research Activity Index (RAI)
and the Creative and Performing Arts Index (CPAI) was
undertaken. A revised model for measuring and quantifying
research performance – Acknowledging Successful
Performance in Research Excellence (ASPIRE) – was
developed to better reward researchers for research activity
and research quality. Consultation on the new scheme was
conducted in December 2011, for implementation in 2012.
ECU has identified eight areas of research focus:
„„ Health
and Wellness;
„„ Education;
„„ Environment
„„ Engineering
„„ Social
and Sustainability;
and ICT;
and Community;
„„ Business
and Society;
„„ Communications
„„ Security,
and Creative Arts; and
Law and Justice.
ECU’s Health and Wellness research area performed
strongly in the Australian Government’s 2010 Excellence
in Research for Australia review, with Nursing rated above
world standard, while overall, Medical and Health Sciences
and Clinical Sciences were rated at world standard.
Innovations in communications
technology
Two ECU projects were nominated in the 2011 WA
Innovator of the Year Awards.
� Researchers
from the Centre for Communications
Engineering Research were nominated for their work
on the Wireless Token Network, which could improve
the way WIFI networks carry voice over internet
protocol (VOIP) services such as Skype.
� A team
from the Electron Science Research Institute
was recognised for advances in multi-band, tunable
laser sources, which could dramatically increase the
capacity of optic fibre networks, including Australia’s
National Broadband Network.
27
Collaborative research
ECU secured three grants under the Australian Research
Council’s Linkage Projects scheme in 2011:
� Faculty
of Education and Arts researchers, together
with Landgate and Charles Darwin University, received
$179,982 to promote FireWatch satellite monitoring.
� Faculty
of Business and Law researchers, with the
City of Joondalup and West Coast Institute of Training,
received $90,000 to provide sustainable environmental
management to Australian businesses.
� Faculty
of Education and Arts researchers received
$179,000 to work with the WA Curriculum Council to
improve school assessments.
Research Funding
Total Research income for 2011 was $15 million (unaudited).
The final figure for 2010 was $15.3 million, an increase of
20% compared with 2009. ECU maintained its high level of
research collaboration and increased its income in the Other
Public Sector Funding and Industry and Other Funding
categories in 2010 compared with 2009 (see Summary
Statistics page 41).
In 2011 ECU increased its strategic research investment
by 12% to $9.1 million. These funds are applied to key
State, national and international initiatives, fellowships,
scholarships and infrastructure, in order to foster industry
linkages and commercialisation in areas of research priority.
ECU was involved in key collaborations to further the
diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease. ECU received $9.5 million
over seven years from the Australian Government for its
Alzheimer’s Research program through the Cooperative
Research Centre for Mental Health. ECU also received
$1.5 million as part of its Australian Imaging, Biomarker
and Lifestyle (AIBL) Study of Ageing, placing Australia
and ECU as a globally recognised leader for Alzheimer’s
disease research.
ECU has established a new research collaboration with
Dampier Salt Ltd, part of the Rio Tinto group, which will pave
the way for a unique series of research opportunities in
Australia’s North West.
A project to investigate treatments for spinal cord injuries
began in 2011, with a $581,000 grant from Spinal
Cord Australia.
Research Training
ECU’s research higher degree students and graduates
continue to rate the support provided to them by their
supervisors and the ECU Graduate Research School highly.
In particular:
„„ a Needs Analysis survey
for research training completed
in May 2011, gave high ratings for the Graduate Research
School from the 285 students responding;
28
„„ the
International Student Barometer Entry Wave 2011
ranked ECU first in Australia out of 28 universities
surveyed and reported 98% satisfaction with Graduate
Research School support; and
„„ the
Postgraduate Research Experience Questionnaire
(see Summary Statistics page 34) has shown improved
student satisfaction over the last three years.
In 2011 a Supervisor Register was implemented as a portal
to ECU’s information databases, allowing the University
to monitor supervisor compliance with policy and enhance
the research student experience. A publicly available view
of the Supervisor Register was also developed to help
promote areas of research strength and opportunities for
research candidates.
Professor Ron Adams from Victoria University was invited to
run ‘demystifying the thesis’ seminars in Semester 1 and 2,
2011. There was excellent feedback from the seminars in
which 23 candidates and 27 staff participated.
In 2011 ECU was awarded an Australian Learning and
Teaching Council grant to develop a Best Practice
Framework to inform and guide research-training excellence
in Australia. The framework will be developed by sharing
best practice principles, processes and performance
indicators, to promote quality and standards. The framework
will be informed by research training best practice in other
countries such as the United Kingdom and United States.
Once complete, ECU will implement the framework as a
model for other Australian institutions to adopt.
Research higher degree candidates are required to
complete progress reports every six months to maintain their
candidature and online progress reports were implemented
for the first time in Semester 1, 2011. This allows for a
breadth of information to be collected to improve research
training and to better meet the needs of research higher
degree candidates.
A new unit ‘Research Training and Supervision’ was offered
for the first time in Semester 2, 2011, providing professional
development for ECU academic staff on good practice in
supervision.
Highlights
ASPEO Framework
The Academic Staff Performance Expectations and
Outcomes (ASPEO) Framework was implemented
to provide Academic staff with clarity on performance
expectations and required outcomes in the core areas of:
Learning and Teaching; Research and Creativity; and
Academic Leadership and Service.
Walk around the world
ECU staff again participated in the annual Global Corporate
Challenge to improve their fitness. ECU ranked most active
university in WA and second most active university globally.
Over 16 weeks the 385 ECU participants covered a total
of 311,000 km – equivalent to walking around the world
eight times.
Audit by TEQSA
CHOGM visit showcases ECU’s facilities
In October, Commonwealth Heads of Government
Meeting delegates from the Republic of Gambia, including
the Gambian Minister for Foreign Affairs, toured ECU’s
Health Simulation Centre, the Health and Wellness Clinic
and the new Engineering and Technology building at the
Joondalup Campus.
The Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency
(TEQSA, formerly AUQA) conducted its Cycle Two Audit
of ECU in October 2011. The Audit Panel visited the
South West Campus and offshore partners in Singapore,
Malaysia and Sri Lanka, before making a four-day visit to
the Joondalup and Mount Lawley campuses. The Panel
commended ECU on the openness and honesty of the
Performance Portfolio submission and the commitment of
staff to the University. ECU’s clear sense of direction and
commitment to quality also impressed the Panel.
Smoke-Free University
The University announced that its three campuses would be
smoke-free from 1 January 2012. The move complements
ECU’s leading research in the health and wellness field and
will help to provide healthier places for ECU students, staff
and visitors to work and study.
29
Building
Organisational
Sustainability
Organisational Sustainability at ECU
This Strategic Priority comprises three elements:
„„ Staffing;
„„ Financial
Positioning; and
„„ Infrastructure
and Services.
Staffing
In 2011 ECU’s goal in relation to staffing was:
ECUlture
The ECU Learning and Teaching University
Research Event (ECUlture) is now in its fourth
year, and has grown from an initial 60 participants
in a one-day event, to more than 160 participants
over two days. The 2011 ECUlture focused on the
themes of Internationalisation of the Curriculum
and Diversity.
„„ to
attract, develop and retain staff required for ECU to
achieve its strategic priorities.
During 2011 the University made significant progress in its
support for the development of staff. ECU’s new Role-Based
Development Framework (RBDF) was integrated with the
Management for Performance System supported by an
online tool to assist staff and supervisors to make informed
choices for performance improvement and medium and
long-term career development.
Other initiatives included:
„„ a
concerted effort to reinforce ECU values and their
relevance during all professional development events;
„„ the
mapping of organisational and people development
processes; and
„„ a
review and update to professional development
programs.
ECU’s leadership capacity was strengthened by a number of
appointments across key areas. These included:
„„ Professor
Mark Stoney, appointed Associate Dean
(Teaching and Learning), Faculty of Business and Law.
„„ Associate
Professor Wendy Giles, appointed Associate
Dean (Academic Programs), Faculty of Regional and
Professional Studies.
30
„„ Associate
Professor Moira Sim, appointed Head of the
School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Computing,
Health and Science.
„„ Professor
Hugh Wilkins, appointed Head of the School
of Marketing, Tourism and Leisure, Faculty of Business
and Law.
„„ Professor
Ken Greenwood was named the new Head of
School of Psychology and Social Sciences, Faculty of
Computing, Health and Science.
„„ Professor
Sian Maslin-Prothero, appointed Professor of
Nursing (Clinical) in the School of Nursing and Midwifery,
Faculty of Computing, Health and Science.
„„ Dr
Kate Andre, appointed Associate Professor in the
School of Nursing and Midwifery, Faculty of Computing,
Health and Science.
„„ Associate
Professor Sue Reed, appointed Associate
Professor in the School of Exercise and Health Sciences,
Faculty of Computing, Health and Science.
„„ Professor
Pierre Horwitz was promoted to the position of
Professor within the School of Natural Sciences.
„„ Dr Anthony
Medhurst, appointed Director, Office
of Advancement.
Significant appointments made in 2011 that will commence
early in 2012 include:
„„ improve
„„ Mr
„„ support
Scott Henderson, appointed Vice-President
(Corporate Services).
„„ Professor
Lynne Cohen, appointed Executive Dean,
Faculty of Education and Arts, and Pro-Vice-Chancellor.
„„ Mrs Elizabeth Wilson, appointed Chief Information Officer.
„„ Mr
David Howard, appointed University Librarian.
Financial Positioning
In 2011 ECU’s goals in relation to financial positioning were:
„„ to
maintain a strong position and continue to manage
financial resources efficiently and effectively; and
„„ to
build alternative sources of revenue such as fee-paying
courses, commercial activities, fundraising and its
investment portfolio over time.
The University’s four strategic priorities are reflected in
University-wide strategic budget allocations and in the
expenditure plans of individual business units. ECU has
implemented a number of strategies at both the Universitywide and business unit level to position ECU to be able to
respond quickly to change while progressing its Mission and
Strategic Priorities.
These budget initiatives work in parallel with complementary
initiatives designed to:
„„ continue
to focus ECU’s academic activities and staff
profile in areas of strength;
the quality of activities, services and outcomes in
teaching and research; and
the financial viability of ECU through a combination
of cost-saving strategies and improved efficiencies, and
through the achievement of revenue targets.
Throughout 2011 ECU operated within the key budget
parameters approved by Council.
Council approved the ECU Budget for 2012 at its December
2011 meeting.
ECU adopts a prudent approach to financial management.
Its overall financial position remains sound and the University
received a “clean bill of health” from the Department
of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations
(DEEWR) in its annual review of the financial position of
Australian universities.
Performance against the 2011 financial targets set by Council
was once again strong (see Summary of Performance against
Financial Targets and Key Performance Indicators, page 41).
The University posted a 2011 operating result of $33 million for
the year, which was an increase of $7 million from the original
budget ($26 million).
Total revenue for the University in 2011 was $353 million,
which was an increase of $15 million from the original budget
($338 million).
The University once again received an unqualified external
audit opinion for 2011.
31
In 2011 all major building projects were
within budget and met milestone targets.
Significant building projects included:
� Completion
of construction of the Engineering
and Technology building at the Joondalup
Campus. The facility will be fully operational in
Semester 1, 2012.
� Completion
of a number of projects under
the Campus Renewal Program associated
with the implementation of the University’s
One University: Students First initiative.
Student Load Targets
Student demand remained steady in 2011 despite Western
Australia‘s continued strong economic growth and low
unemployment rates. ECU’s full-year total student load for
2011 was 18,478 EFTSL, 1.5 percent below total student
load for 2010 (18,759 EFTSL)
The Commonwealth Grant Scheme (CGS) load estimate
for 2011 was 12,996 EFTSL. This is around 15 percent or
1722 EFTSL above the target agreed with DEEWR (11,274
EFTSL) (see Summary Statistics page 34).
ECU’s international students come from more than 90
countries and an integrated model for University-wide
recruitment of international students drives this diversified
international student profile.
International student load totalled 3701 EFTSL in 2011, a
decline of 18% on the 4522 EFTSL in 2010. Most of this
decline was in ECU’s offshore activities where the University
continues to consolidate its international partnerships to
facilitate high academic quality and financial viability. ECU’s
international offshore student load was 1102 EFTSL, a
significant downturn of 38% on 2010. International onshore
student load was 2599 EFTSL, a small decline of 5% on
2010 student load.
32
� Contribution
of $2 million for the development
by Ramsay Health Care of a Community Clinical
School at the Joondalup Health Campus
to support student clinical placements, in
conjunction with the University of Western
Australia and Curtin University of Technology.
� Completion
of the 357 bed student
accommodation facility – part of the 523 room
ECU Village Mount Lawley – and officially
opened by the Minister for Defence, the Hon
Stephen Smith MP. The project was the result
of a $37.5 million Private Public Partnership
between the University and Campus Living
Villages. The Australian Government committed
over $4 million from the Better Universities
Renewal Funding for the project. The ECU
Village Mount Lawley commenced operations in
Semester 1, 2011.
� Completion
of construction of additional
infrastructure for the Western Australian
Academy of Performing Arts (WAAPA) at the
Mount Lawley Campus. The new Scenery and
Props Construction Workshop commenced
operation in Semester 2, 2011.
Infrastructure and Services
In 2011 ECU’s goal in relation to quality infrastructure and
services was:
„„ to
provide quality infrastructure and services which reflect
sustainability principles.
Building Infrastructure
ECU’s Strategic Asset Management Framework and
Buildings Asset Management Plan deliver a structured and
consistent approach to the management of the University’s
high value assets. The framework and plan supports the
University’s Mission and Vision by delivering building
infrastructure which supports ECU’s core functions of
teaching, learning and research.
In 2011 the planning, design and documentation
commenced for the ECU Wanneroo Centre, following
advice from the Australian Government of ECU’s successful
funding submission. The facility will incorporate a GP
Super Clinic, Pharmacy, Medical Imaging, Pathology, ECU
Psychology Clinic, Student Clinical Placements and a floor
of commercial leasing. Negotiations are proceeding with the
City of Wanneroo for the purchase of land.
Also in 2011:
„„ Negotiations
commenced with Campus Living Villages to
develop expanded student accommodation facilities at
the Joondalup Campus. The project will be part funded by
the National Rental Affordability Scheme.
„„ Planning
and design work commenced for world-class
teaching and learning spaces supporting the
implementation of Curriculum 2012.
„„ Planning
commenced for an Engineering Pavilion on the
Joondalup Campus, to support growth in Engineering
and reduce the need for the University to lease additional
accommodation.
IT Infrastructure
Several major information technology projects were
completed in 2011, including:
„„ a
major upgrade to the student management
system Callista;
„„ a
web printing solution – Student Printing System –
allowing students to print documents directly from their
personal laptops through the ECU wireless network, was
made available via the student portal in August 2011;
„„ upgraded
video conferencing infrastructure and training
material to help staff to better utilise the new facilities in
teaching environments; and
„„ concept
design and Proof of Concept testing has been
completed for the Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI)
solution in the Flexible Learning Space (FLS). Work on
the FLS, the first phase of this project will commence
in 2012.
Major improvements were made in ECU’s underlying
technical infrastructure and support in 2011 including:
„„ firewall
modernisation, to increase bandwidth and
improve security;
„„ a
new network infrastructure for WAAPA;
„„ improved
server virtualisation – now at 90% - leading to
a significant drop in electrical usage (measured as a % of
capacity of the data centres); and
„„ a
restructuring of the Small Applications Team and a new
project governance model, resulting in an increase in the
number of computer applications being deployed across
the University network.
Environmental sustainability
ECU operates under an environmental management system
that is accredited to ISO 14001, Environmental Management
Systems. This system includes programs around energy,
water, waste and travel that educate, inform and change
behaviour on environmental issues.
Improvements undertaken during 2011 included:
„„ The
procurement of a major cleaning and waste contract
– to improve cleaning and waste initiatives, increase
recycling and reduce environmental impacts and waste
to landfill.
„„ Completion
of a feasibility study and commencement
of procurement for the private sector to build, own and
operate (via a Private Public Partnership) a gas-fired
cogeneration plant on the Joondalup Campus. The plant
has the potential to significantly reduce the University’s
carbon footprint and costs for the University.
„„ Development
of the Campus Access Strategy to reduce
reliance on motor vehicles and increase the use of public
transport and other environmental sustainable solutions.
Following a number of workshops, a draft Campus
Access Strategy was developed and will be presented to
the ECU Council in 2012.
„„ upgrade
of the learning management system to
Blackboard 9.1;
„„ expansion
of the Customer Relationship Management
tool RightNow to better facilitate management of the
University’s incoming enquiries by email, web form (from
‘Ask Us’) and walk in;
33
SUMMARY STATISTICS
STUDENT ENROLMENTS (PERSONS)
Table 1: Enrolments by Type of Attendance, 2007-2011
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
Full-time
14,408
15,116
16,152
17,604
17,813
Part-time
5,657
5,912
6,122
6,548
6,145
20,605
21,028
22,274
24,152
23,958
Total
Notes: 2011 data is as at 01/02/2012. 2010 data is finalised and may differ from the provisional figures reported in the Annual Report for 2010.
Table 2: Enrolments by Course Level, 2007-2011
Doctorate by Research
Doctorate by Coursework
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
357
341
385
436
443
65
57
43
39
28
124
130
127
154
164
2,242
2,547
3,029
3,178
2,542
Graduate Diploma
889
844
862
964
939
Postgraduate Diploma
218
311
335
311
336
Postgraduate/Graduate Certificate
832
728
782
719
692
Bachelor Honours
206
182
168
189
143
14,595
14,359
14,973
16,412
17,173
48
85
103
113
115
Master by Research
Master by Coursework
Bachelor Pass
Associate Degree
Advanced Diploma/Diploma
75
72
78
46
16
VET
397
417
465
523
489
Other
557
955
924
1,068
878
Total
20,605
21,028
22,274
24,152
23,958
Notes: 2011 data is as at 01/02/2012. 2010 data is finalised and may differ from the provisional figures reported in the Annual Report for 2010.
Table 3: Enrolments by Campus, 2007-2011
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
Joondalup
6,978
8,772
9,504
11,025
11,787
Mount Lawley
6,426
6,575
7,584
7,910
7,451
974
975
943
997
1,012
2,611
870
0
0
0
Bunbury
Churchlands
Study Centres (Domestic and Overseas)
Total
3,616
3,836
4,243
4,220
3,708
20,605
21,028
22,274
24,152
23,958
Notes: 2011 data is as at 01/02/2012. 2010 data is finalised and may differ from the provisional figures reported in the Annual Report for 2010.
Table 4: Enrolments by Gender, 2007-2011
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
12,347
12,642
13,471
14,642
14,738
Male
8,258
8,386
8,803
9,510
9,220
Total
20,605
21,028
22,274
24,152
23,958
Female
Notes: 2011 data is as at 01/02/2012. 2010 data is finalised and may differ from the provisional figures reported in the Annual Report for 2010.
34
Table 5: Enrolments by Citizenship and Broad Course Level, 2007-2011
Domestic Postgraduate
Domestic Undergraduate
International on-shore Postgraduate
International on-shore Undergraduate
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2,954
2,896
3,283
3,497
3,551
13,253
13,273
13,119
15,103
15,634
843
959
1,120
1,204
985
1,736
1,730
2,066
1,922
2,032
International off-shore Postgraduate
930
1,103
1,160
1,119
628
International off-shore Undergraduate
889
1,067
1,526
1,307
1,128
20,605
21,028
22,274
24,152
23,958
Total
Notes: 2011 data is as at 01/02/2012. 2010 data is finalised and may differ from the provisional figures reported in the Annual Report for 2010.
Table 6: Enrolments by Citizenship, 2007-2011
Domestic
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
16,207
16,169
16,402
18,600
19,185
China
423
469
583
756
800
India
270
344
506
497
305
Other Asian countries
880
831
881
924
957
African countries
553
582
603
564
542
European countries
225
295
257
251
275
Other
228
168
356
134
138
China
266
154
129
65
64
India
31
154
228
301
56
Other Asian countries
1,029
1,456
1,655
1,616
1,302
African countries
107
311
368
398
243
European countries
35
32
53
28
19
Other
351
63
253
18
72
20,605
21,028
22,274
24,152
23,958
International on-shore
International off-shore
Total
Notes: 2011 data is as at 01/02/2012. 2010 data is finalised and may differ from the provisional figures reported in the Annual Report for 2010.
Table 7: Enrolments by Equity Group, 2007-2011
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
Low SES
1,765
1,779
1,842
1,810
2,191
Regional
2,452
2,531
2,554
2,474
3,015
Indigenous Australian
196
170
163
188
179
Disability
355
336
397
704
913
Notes: 2011 data is as at 01/02/2012. Changes in methodology for collection and reporting mean that 2011 figures are not comparable with prior
year figures.
35
STUDENT LOAD (FULL-TIME EQUIVALENCE)
Table 8: Student Load (EFTSL) by Funding Category, 2007-2011
Commonwealth Grant Scheme
Research Training Scheme and ECU-funded
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
10,279
10,622
11,409
12,654
12,996
247
249
287
325
337
Fee-paying Overseas On-shore
2,220
2,390
2,665
2,734
2,599
Fee-paying Overseas Off-shore
1,202
1,659
2,069
1,788
1,102
Domestic Tuition Fee
919
640
731
768
966
Vocational Education and Training
388
418
449
490
478
15,254
15,978
17,610
18,759
18,478
Total
Notes: 2011 data is as at 01/02/2012. 2010 data is finalised and may differ from the provisional figures reported in the Annual Report for 2010.
Table 9: Student Load (EFTSL) by Broad Field of Education, 2007-2011
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
90
88
92
101
87
2
11
29
29
34
Creative Arts
2,163
2,207
2,330
2,459
2,487
Education
3,002
3,246
3,357
3,635
3,419
234
290
393
520
702
1
1
1
1
1
Health
2,016
2,012
2,100
2,452
2,856
Information Technology
1,173
1,092
1,196
1,211
1,040
Management and Commerce
2,704
3,103
3,746
3,691
3,116
5
4
5
3
3
879
947
1,091
1,230
1,310
Agriculture, Environmental and Related
Architecture and Building
Engineering and Related Technologies
Food, Hospitality and Personal Services
Mixed Field Programmes
Natural and Physical Sciences
Society and Culture
Total
2,986
2,977
3,270
3,427
3,423
15,254
15,978
17,610
18,759
18,478
Notes: 2011 data is as at 01/02/2012. 2010 data is finalised and may differ from the provisional figures reported in the Annual Report for 2010.
Table 10: Student Load (EFTSL) by Faculty, 2007-2011
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
Business and Law
3,450
3,991
4,758
4,694
4,085
Computing, Health and Science
5,447
5,509
6,081
6,788
7,296
Education and Arts
5,359
5,376
5,645
6,122
6,002
Regional Professional Studies
731
710
661
667
686
Other
268
390
465
488
409
Total
15,254
15,978
17,610
18,759
18,478
Notes: 2011 data is as at 01/02/2012. 2010 data is finalised and may differ from the provisional figures reported in the Annual Report for 2010. “Other”
refers to student load for courses (mainly preparation courses) which are unassigned to a faculty.
36
TEACHING PERFORMANCE
Mean OS (-100 to +100)
70
60
50
40
30
20
Modified UTEI introduced for
Semester 2, 2007
Figure 3: Unit and Teaching Satisfaction, 2006-2011
Teaching Quality
Unit Content
10
0
S1
2007
S2
2007
S1
2008
S2
2008
S1
2009
S2
2009
S1
2010
S2
2010
S1
2011
S1
2011
Semester / Year
Notes: Mean overall satisfaction is measured on a scale of -100 to +100. The measure includes all ECU student cohorts and all coursework units.
Percentage Broad Agreement (%)
Figure 4: Graduate Satisfaction, 2006-2010
96
94
92
90
88
Good Teaching
86
Generic Skills
Overall Satisfaction
84
82
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
Year of Survey
Notes: The three measures record the percentage of ECU Bachelor level graduates who, in responding to the relevant Course Experience
Questionnaire survey items ‘broadly agree’ with those statements. The percentage broad agreement is the percentage of responses that are 3 (neither
agree nor disagree), 4 (agree) and 5 (strongly agree) on the five-point Likert scale.
37
Figure 5: Mid CEQ Mean Scores, 2007-2011
56
54
52
50
48
46
44
Good Teaching
Generic Skills
Mean score
42
Overall Satisfaction
Graduate Qualities
40
38
36
34
32
30
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
Year of Survey
Broad Agreement (%)
Figure 6: Higher Degree by Research Graduate Satisfaction, 2006-2010
96.0
94.0
92.0
90.0
88.0
ECU
National Average
86.0
84.0
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
Year of Survey
Notes: This measures the percentage of ECU Higher Degree by Research graduates who, in responding to the overall satisfaction item from the
national Postgraduate Research Experience Questionnaire ‘broadly agree’ with the statement “Overall, I was satisfied with the quality of my higher
degree research experience”. The percentage broad agreement is the percentage of responses that are 3 (neither agree nor disagree), 4 (agree) and 5
(strongly agree) on the five-point Likert scale.
38
STUDENT OUTCOMES
Table 11: Completions by Course Level, 2007-2010
2007
Higher Degree by Research
2008
2009
2010
84
93
80
70
894
1,245
1,597
1,423
Other Postgraduate
1,136
1,004
1,095
1,178
Bachelor (Pass and Honours)
3,499
3,393
3,651
3,459
Master by Coursework
Other Undergraduate
77
44
48
55
VET
79
68
125
182
5,769
5,847
6,596
6,367
Total
Notes: 2009 data is finalised and may differ from the provisional figures reported in the Annual Report for 2010.
Other Inputs
Table 12: Library Holdings, 2007-2011
Library Volumes
Serial Subscriptions
eBooks
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
643,561
637,931
653,575
638,912
650,236
33,982
36,044
52,078
58,465
67,863
-
2,263
3,399
33,600
81,760
Table 13: Revenue ($’000), 2007-2011
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
107,068
125,904
133,337
137,325
144,882
State Government
10,697
11,499
13,317
12,996
12,774
Student Tuition Fees (HECS-HELP, FEES-HELP)
58,512
59,195
65,461
76,789
85,491
Other Fees and Charges
Australian Government
51,535
56,369
66,240
69,688
67,193
Investment Income
3,870
4,032
5,322
6,407
9,852
Royalties
6,338
7,370
9,536
9,497
8,599
Consultancy and Contract Research
5,207
5,914
3,352
3,286
4,130
Other
Total Revenue
23,886
25,069
18,715
20,645
25,327
267,113
295,352
315,280
336,633
358,248
Notes: Total revenue for Edith Cowan University and its subsidiary (consolidated entity). Revenue for 2007 and 2009 varies from that reported in the
financial statements of those years, due to retrospective changes in accounting treatments.
39
RESEARCH INPUTS
Table 14: Research Block Funding by Category, 2007-2011 ($m)
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
Change
2010-2011
Joint Research Engagement Program
1.94
1.92
1.87
2.03
2.19
7.9%
Research Training Scheme
4.22
4.33
4.38
4.41
4.41
0.0%
Research Infrastructure Block Grant
0.54
0.46
0.39
0.37
0.47
27.0%
-
-
-
0.45
0.52
15.6%
6.70
6.71
6.63
7.27
7.59
4.4%
2008
2009
2010
2011
Change
2010-2011
Sustainable Research Excellence
Total
Notes: the 2011 income figures are unaudited and are as at 01/02/2012.
Table 15: Research Funding by Category, 2007-2011 ($m)
2007
National Competitive Research Grants
1.62
2.15
2.91
2.75
2.26
-17.8%
Other Public Sector Research Funding
5.51
7.24
7.71
8.30
8.58
3.4%
Industry and Other Funding
2.34
2.93
2.01
4.21
4.13
-1.9%
Co-operative Research Centre Funding
0.11
0.075
0.18
0.05
0.00
-
Total
9.58
12.39
12.81
15.31
14.97
-2.2%
Notes: the 2011 income figures are unaudited and are as at 01/02/2012. The 2010 income figures are final (audited) and may differ from the provisional
figures reported in the Annual Report for 2010.
Table 16: Higher Degree by Research Student Load, 2007-2011
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
186
185
205
255
286
ECU Funded
61
64
81
70
52
International
84
82
88
108
117
4
6
5
4
3
335
337
380
437
458
Commonwealth-supported
Domestic Tuition Fee
Total
Notes: 2011 data is as at 01/02/2012. 2010 data is finalised and may differ from the provisional figures reported in the Annual Report for 2010.
40
Summary of Performance Against Financial
Targets and Key Performance Indicators
Performance against Financial Targets
2011 Operating Result
The University posted a 2011 operating result of $33 million for the year, which was an increase of $7 million from the original
budget ($26 million).
2011 Revenue
Total revenue for the University in 2011 was $353 million, which represents an increase of $15 million compared to original
budget ($338 million) due to growth in student enrolments, commonwealth grants, land sales and investment income.
2011 Financial Ratios
Table 17: Financial Ratios, 2011
Actual
Target
Operating Margin
9.3%
At least 4%
The operating margin is above the Target set for 2011.
Interest cover on borrowings
10.3x
At least 3x
The interest cover on borrowings is above the Target set for
2011.
2.3
At least 0.8
The current ratio is above the target set for 2011.
5.1%
Not more
than 30%
The debt to equity ratio is within the Target set for 2011.
18
At least 4
The number of week’s revenue in cash assets is above the
Target set for 2011.
Liquidity – Current Ratio
Debt to equity ratio
Cash Reserves (no. of weeks)
Variance/Comment
The Financial Statements begin on page 50 of this Annual Report.
41
Performance against Key Performance Indicator Targets
The Key Performance Indicator Report begins on page 127 of this Annual Report and gives detailed information on the
University’s performance against nine Key Performance Indicators (KPIs). These are a sub-set of ECU’s KPI Framework,
which is used by the University for performance monitoring.
A summary of performance against targets for the most recent audited data is provided in Table 18 below.
Table 18: Summary of Performance against KPI Targets
Performance Indicator
Actual
Target
Retention (%) – 2010
commencements
80.4
80.0
Variance/Comment
The retention rate improved by 2.2 percentage points and was
0.4 of a percentage point above Target.
Course Satisfaction (%) –
2010 survey
95.0
93.0
Performance improved by 2.4 percentage points and was
2.0 percentage points above Target. ECU’s graduate Course
Satisfaction is above both the National Average and the
State Average.
Quality of Teaching (%) – 2010
survey
92.4
91.0
Performance improved by 3.3 percentage points and was
1.4 percentage points above Target. ECU’s Good Teaching
satisfaction is above both the National Average and the
State Average.
Graduate Employment (%) –
2010 survey
75.6
83.0
Performance declined by 2.4 percentage points and was
7.4 percentage points below Target. This is consistent with the
decline in the State Average (4.7 percentage points).
Share of First Preference (%) –
2011 Admissions
16.6
18.0
ECU’s share of first preference applications for Bachelor and
Associate Degree courses processed through TISC declined
by 3.5 percentage points and was 1.4 percentage points
below Target.
Teaching-related Expenditure
per Student Load ($/ EFTSL)
– 2011
15,305
14,719
Teaching-related expenditure per student load increased and
was above the Target.
Research Income ($m) – 2010
15.312
13.629
ECU’s total research income increased by $2.503m and was
$1.683m above Target.
Higher Degree Research
Completions (per 10
Academic Staff FTE) – 2010
1.3
2.2
Higher degree research completions per 10 academic staff
FTE remained steady for 2010 and the result was below
Target. Longer completion times and lower enrolments in
early years have contributed to the decline for 2009 and 2010.
Research Publications (per 10
Academic Staff FTE) – 2010
11.3
12.8
Weighted Research Publications per 10 Academic Staff FTE
increased slightly, but the result was below Target. Staff FTE
increased between 2009 and 2010, while productivity for
these new staff is yet to be realised.
Notes: Actual results are for the most recent data available. Full definitions are provided in the Key Performance Indicator Report.
42
Edith Cowan University
2011 Annual Report
SECTION 3 -
Significant issues & trends
43
Economic Conditions
Significant natural disasters in Australia, New Zealand and
Japan, as well as continuing economic uncertainty in Europe
and the potential for a “double-dip recession” in the US,
impacted many economies in 2010 and 2011. The Australian
economy is better placed than most other countries to
withstand the current difficult global economic conditions.
Continued investment in the resources sector and a strong
Australian Dollar led to modest economic growth of 1.8% in
the 12 months to June 2011, and moderate economic growth
is forecast for 2012 and 2013.
The Australian labour market remained largely unchanged
in 2011, with a reduction in full-time employment being
offset by an increase in part-time employment. The
unemployment rate for July 2011 was 5.1%, slightly lower
than for July 2010 (5.3%). Domestic student demand for
higher education remained strong despite the prevailing
employment opportunities.
The relative strength of the Australian Dollar, recessions in a
number of developed economies, together with a reduction
of student fees in the UK, and changes to visa requirements
have all contributed to reduced demand for international
education at universities in Australia.
Australian Government Legislation
and Policy
The previous Rudd/Gillard Labor Government embarked
on an ambitious education reform agenda, which included
significant additional funding to the higher education
sector to improve participation and attainment rates.
While the policy environment under the current Gillard
Labor Government has been less certain, the Australian
Government has shown continued commitment for improved
quality and growth in higher education.
Australian Government legislation and policy reforms of
relevance in 2011 are described below.
The Higher Education Support Amendment
(Demand Driven Funding System and Other Measures)
Bill (Cwlth)
This legislation was passed by the Australian Government
on 14 September 2011. The legislation progressed changes
to the Commonwealth Grant Scheme (CGS) funding
arrangements, to remove the ‘cap’ on over-enrolments and
the ‘safety net’ guaranteeing funding for under-enrolments.
An allocation of $1.2 billion over the next four years will
support 500,000 student places in 2012, an increase of
20,000 from 2011. The “uncapping” effectively provides
funding for all Bachelor degree places in approved courses.
Sub-Bachelor award courses, enabling courses and
postgraduate coursework courses will remain capped.
ECU is expected to benefit from these changes as overenrolments have been experienced in recent years.
44
The Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency
(TEQSA) Act 2011 (Cwlth) and Tertiary Education Quality
and Standards Agency (Consequential Amendments
and Transitional Provision) Act 2011 (Cwlth)
The Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency
Act 2011 (Cwlth) established TEQSA as an agency
replacing the Australian Universities Quality Agency
(AUQA). The Tertiary Education Quality and Standards
Agency (Consequential Amendments and Transitional
Provision) Act 2011 (Cwlth) provides for the transition to
new higher education regulatory and quality arrangements.
During 2011, the Department of Education, Employment
and Workplace Relations developed, through public
consultation, “Threshold Standards” which TEQSA will use
to assess higher education institutions. From January 2012,
TEQSA will register and evaluate the performance of higher
education providers against this new Higher Education
Standards Framework.
The Higher Education Legislative Amendment (Student
Services and Amenities) Act 2010 (Cwlth)
Passed on 11 October 2011, these amendments to the
Higher Education Support Act 2003 (Cwlth) will allow higher
education providers to charge a student services and
amenities fee of up to $263 per student per annum, from
January 2012. The ability to charge the Student Services
and Amenities Fee will assist the University in providing a
wider range of support services to students, while funds
previously used to support the Guild will again be available
to support core activities.
2011/12 Commonwealth Budget
Additional funding was announced in the 2011/12
Commonwealth Budget, including improved funding for
regional higher education through the Regional Loading
Scheme and a new “Regional Priorities” round of the
Education Investment Fund.
Commonwealth Grant Scheme (CGS) indexation will rise
from 2.3% in 2011 to 3.8% in 2012. Universities will receive
a further $550 million over the next four years, increasing the
total additional funding to $3.15 billion from 2011-2015.
The Higher Education Participation and Partnerships
Program will provide $177.6 million to assist universities
in initiatives to attract and support students from low
socio-economic status backgrounds in higher education.
A review of subsidies for student contributions resulted in the
discount to upfront student contributions being reduced from
20% to 10%, and the voluntary repayment bonuses being
reduced from 10% to 5%.
A record $9.3 billion “science and research budget” was
announced in 2011, with the Australian Government
affirming its commitment to increase funding for the indirect
costs of university research from 20 to 50 cents in the dollar.
As part of the Mid-year Economic and Fiscal Outlook the
Australian Government abandoned performance funding of
$240 million over four years, intended to reward universities
for achieving performance targets on student outcomes
and student satisfaction. The reduced student contribution
amounts for Maths and Science courses were also removed,
representing an average annual cost to students of $300
million nationally.
45
Student Income Support (Youth Allowance and
ABSTUDY) amendments
The parental income test threshold was raised and the
age of independence will be lowered incrementally from
24 in 2010, to 23 in 2011 and 22 from 2012 onwards.
A tightening of the workforce participation criterion for
financial independence was planned for January 2010, but
was delayed by six months following concerns that those
currently working in their gap year were disadvantaged. The
intended increase in personal income threshold from 2010
was delayed until July 2011, to maintain the cost-neutrality
of the changes.
Competition and Consumer law – Trade Practices
Amendment (Australian Consumer Law) Act (No. 1)
2010 (Cwlth)
From 1 January 2011 a single, national consumer law:
the Australian Consumer Law (ACL), applied federally to
corporations under the Trade Practices Act 1974 (Cwlth),
which is to be amended and renamed the Competition and
Consumer Act 2010 (Cwlth). Equivalent legislation was
enacted in state jurisdictions to apply the ACL to individuals.
In Western Australia, the Fair Trading Act 1987 (WA) was
amended and renamed the Fair Trading Act 2010 (WA).
Under the ACL, the University will continue to observe its
general trade practices and consumer protection obligations
to act fairly, reasonably and not unconscionably when
dealing with students, customers and suppliers.
Education Services for Overseas Students Legislation
Amendment Act 2011 (Cwlth)
Enacted on 8 April 2011, the Act amended the Education
Services for Overseas Students Act 2000 (Cwlth) by
strengthening registration requirements for providers
delivering education services to overseas students and
increasing the range of non-compliant behaviour that
would attract financial sanctions. The Ombudsman Act
1976 (Cwlth) was also amended to expand the role of
the Commonwealth Ombudsman to include dealing with
complaints relating to private education providers. The
legislation is intended to target “rogue operators” within
the sector.
Student Visa Legislation (The Knight Report)
In December 2010, the Australian Government appointed
the Hon Michael Knight AO to conduct an independent
review of the student visa program. Mr Knight made 41
recommendations to enhance the quality, integrity and
competitiveness of Australia’s international education
sector and improve the integrity of the student visa program.
In September 2011 the Australian Government issued
a statement that it supports in principle all of the Knight
recommendations, subject to some modifications with the
majority of recommendations expected to be implemented in
2012/2013.
46
Education Services for Overseas Students (Registration
Charges) Amendment Act 2011 (Cwlth) and Education
Services for Overseas Students Amendment
(Registration Charges Consequentials) Act 2011 (Cwlth)
The acts passed on 26 September 2011 represent
the second stage in the Australian Government’s
implementation of the recommendations from the Baird
Review, designed to strengthen the risk management of
education services to overseas students. The acts amend
the compulsory annual registration charge payable by all
CRICOS registered providers (with high-risk providers
paying a higher charge) and replace the initial registration
charge with an annual entry to market charge. New
providers are considered to be of higher risk and will
pay more.
Education Services for Overseas Students Legislation
Amendment (Tuition Protection Service and Other
Measures) Bill 2011 (Cwlth), Education Services for
Overseas Students (TPS Levies) Bill 2011 (Cwlth) and
Education Services for Overseas Students (Registration
Charges) Amendment (Tuition Protection Service) Bill
2011 (Cwlth)
This package of bills would establish a tuition protection
service. The three bills provide for amendments to the
Education Services for Overseas Students Act 2000 (Cwlth)
and place obligations on registered providers where they fail
to start or finish providing a course; to provide for national
registration of providers; to limit the amount of initial prepaid
tuition fees that may be collected by a provider; to provide
that students are only eligible for the unused portion of
prepaid tuition fees; and to specify what details providers
must keep on student records. The bills also provide for the
imposition of a tuition protection services levy on registered
providers. The Senate Education, Employment and
Workplace Relations Legislation Committee issued a report
on 27 February 2012 recommending that the bills be passed
by the Senate subject to certain amendments.
State Government
Legislation and Policy
The State Government’s role in funding and regulating
primary and secondary school education and Vocational
Education and Training impacts on higher education
provision, particularly in terms of levels of school attainment,
school-leaver transition to higher education and articulation
to higher education from Vocational Education and
Training courses.
As an employer, the State Government’s role in providing
health and education services has a direct impact on
demand in Nursing and Teaching courses and employment
outcomes for graduates from these programs.
State Government legislation and policy reforms of
relevance in 2011 are described below.
2011/12 Western Australian State Budget
The State Government’s 2011/12 Budget, handed down on
19 May 2011 focused heavily on investment in infrastructure,
and maintained the level of investment in education and
training. Investment in training places to address critical
skills shortages increased to $33.4 million, equating to
12,000 additional training places.
Increased electricity, gas and water tariffs, approved by the
State Government in the 2011/12 budget will have a direct
impact on operating costs of the University, as they will for
all businesses.
National Review into Model Occupational Health
and Safety (OHS) legislation
Harmonisation of the health and safety legislation across
Australia will result in new work health and safety legislation
in each state jurisdiction. The Western Australian legislation
was expected to be implemented from 1 January 2012.
However the new laws are now expected to be enacted on
1 June 2013. ECU has reviewed the impacts of the proposed
laws and is well prepared to meet the likely requirements of
the new legislation.
47
Edith Cowan University
2011 Annual Report
SECTION 4 -
Disclosures and
Legal compliance
48
AUDITOR GENERAL’S STATEMENT
Auditor General
INDEPENDENT AUDITOR’S REPORT
To the Parliament of Western Australia
EDITH COWAN UNIVERSITY
Report on the Financial Statements
I have audited the accounts and financial statements of the Edith Cowan University and the
consolidated entity.
The financial statements comprise the Statement of Financial Position as at
31 December 2011, the Income Statement, Statement of Comprehensive Income, Statement
of Changes in Equity and Statement of Cash Flows of the University and the consolidated
entity for the year then ended, and Notes comprising a summary of significant accounting
policies and other explanatory information.
University Council’s Responsibility for the Financial Statements
The University Council is responsible for keeping proper accounts, and the preparation and fair
presentation of the financial statements in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards
and the Treasurer’s Instructions, and for such internal control as the University Council
determines is necessary to enable the preparation of financial statements that are free from
material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error.
Auditor’s Responsibility
As required by the Auditor General Act 2006, my responsibility is to express an opinion on the
financial statements based on my audit. The audit was conducted in accordance with
Australian Auditing Standards. Those Standards require compliance with relevant ethical
requirements relating to audit engagements and that the audit be planned and performed to
obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free from material
misstatement.
An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and
disclosures in the financial statements. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s
judgement, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial
statements, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor
considers internal control relevant to the University’s preparation and fair presentation of the
financial statements in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the
circumstances. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of the accounting
policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates made by the University Council,
as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements.
I believe that the audit evidence obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for my
audit opinion.
Opinion
In my opinion, the financial statements are based on proper accounts and present fairly, in all
material respects, the financial position of the Edith Cowan University and the consolidated
entity at 31 December 2011 and their financial performance and cash flows for the year then
ended. They are in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards and the Treasurer’s
Instructions.
Page 1 of 2
th
7 Floor Albert Facey House 469 Wellington Street Perth 6000 Western Australia Tel: 08 6557 7500 Fax: 08 6557 7600
49
AUDITOR GENERAL’S STATEMENT
Edith Cowan University
Report on Controls
I have audited the controls exercised by the Edith Cowan University. The University Council is
responsible for ensuring that adequate control is maintained over the receipt, expenditure and
investment of money, the acquisition and disposal of public and other property, and the
incurring of liabilities in accordance with the Financial Management Act 2006 and the
Treasurer’s Instructions, and other relevant written law.
As required by the Auditor General Act 2006, my responsibility is to express an opinion on the
controls exercised by the University Council based on my audit conducted in accordance with
Australian Auditing Standards.
Opinion
In my opinion, the controls exercised by the Edith Cowan University are sufficiently adequate to
provide reasonable assurance that the receipt, expenditure and investment of money, the
acquisition and disposal of property, and the incurring of liabilities have been in accordance
with legislative provisions.
Report on the Key Performance Indicators
I have audited the key performance indicators of the Edith Cowan University. The University
Council is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of the key performance
indicators in accordance with the Financial Management Act 2006 and the Treasurer’s
Instructions.
As required by the Auditor General Act 2006, my responsibility is to express an opinion on the
key performance indicators based on my audit conducted in accordance with Australian
Auditing Standards.
Opinion
In my opinion, the key performance indicators of the Edith Cowan University are relevant and
appropriate to assist users to assess the University’s performance and fairly represent
indicated performance for the year ended 31 December 2011.
Independence
In conducting this audit, I have complied with the independence requirements of the Auditor
General Act 2006 and the Australian Auditing Standards, and other relevant ethical
requirements.
GLEN CLARKE
ACTING AUDITOR GENERAL
12 March 2012
Page 2 of 2
50
Certification of Financial Statements
The accompanying financial statements of ECU and the
accompanying consolidated financial statements have been
prepared in compliance with the provisions of the Financial
Management Act 2006 (WA) from proper accounts and
records to present fairly the financial transactions for the
financial year ended 31 December 2011 and the financial
position as at 31 December 2011.
Certification of financial statements
required by DIISRTE
I declare that:
„„ at
the time of this certification there are reasonable
grounds to believe that ECU will be able to pay its debts as
and when they fall due; and
At the date of signing we are not aware of any circumstances
which would render the particulars included in the financial
statements misleading or inaccurate.
„„ the
The Hon Dr Hendy Cowan
Chancellor
The Hon Dr Hendy Cowan Chancellor
1 March 2012
1 March 2012
Professor Kerry O. Cox
Vice-Chancellor
Professor Kerry O. Cox
Vice-Chancellor
1 March 2012
1 March 2012
amount of Commonwealth financial assistance
expended during the financial year ended 31 December
2011 was for the purpose(s) for which it was provided.
Mr Brad Francis
Chief Financial Officer
1 March 2012
51
Financial Statements
Income statements
53
Statements of comprehensive income
54
Statements of financial position
55
Statements of changes in equity
56
Statements of cash flows
57
Notes to the financial statements
58
This financial report covers both Edith Cowan University as an individual entity and the consolidated entity consisting of Edith Cowan University and its
subsidiary. The financial report is presented in the Australian currency.
The financial report was authorised for issue by the Council on 1st day of March 2012. The consolidated entity has the power to amend and reissue the
financial statements.
52
income statements
For the year ended 31 December 2011
Consolidated
Notes
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Income from continuing operations
Australian Government financial assistance
Australian Government grants
4
144,882
137,325
144,882
137,325
HECS-HELP Australian Government
payments
4
64,145
57,521
64,145
57,521
FEE-HELP
4
10,134
7,455
10,134
7,455
5
12,774
12,996
12,774
12,996
11,212
11,813
11,212
11,813
State and local Government financial
assistance
HECS-HELP – Student payments
Fees and charges
6
67,193
69,688
67,193
69,688
Investment revenue
7
8,293
4,986
8,227
4,908
Royalties
8
8,599
9,497
5,273
5,902
Consultancy and contracts
9
4,130
3,286
4,129
3,273
7,283
7,758
7,283
7,758
Sale of goods
Other revenue
10
Total revenue from continuing operations
7,491
7,324
6,063
4,851
346,136
329,649
341,315
323,490
Gains on disposal of assets
11
8,685
3,231
8,685
3,233
Other investment income
7
1,559
1,421
1,559
1,421
Other income
10
1,868
2,332
1,868
2,332
358,248
336,633
353,427
330,476
Total revenue and income from continuing
operations
Expenses from continuing operations
Employee related expenses
12
188,935
183,061
186,351
180,453
Repairs and maintenance
13
7,349
6,339
7,345
6,335
Depreciation and amortisation
14
19,316
19,732
19,300
19,713
Borrowing costs
15
3,560
3,981
3,560
3,981
Impairment of assets
16
1,041
1,382
1,041
1,382
Investment losses
7
1,995
626
1,995
626
3,766
4,143
3,766
4,143
99,552
95,870
97,131
92,867
325,514
315,134
320,489
309,500
32,734
21,499
32,938
20,976
118
10
-
-
32,852
21,509
32,938
20,976
Cost of goods sold
Other expenses
17
Total expenses from continuing operations
Operating result before income tax
Income tax expense
18
Operating result attributable to
members of Edith Cowan University
34(b)
The above income statements should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.
53
Statements of comprehensive income
For the year ended 31 December 2011
Consolidated
Notes
Operating result after income tax for the
period
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
32,852
21,509
32,938
20,976
(25,129)
2,372
(25,129)
Gain/(loss) on revaluation of property, plant
and equipment, net of tax
34
2,372
Gain/(loss) on value of available for sale
financial assets, net of tax
34
(2,164)
Cash flow hedges, net of tax
34
Exchange differences on translation
of foreign operations
34
(16)
Impairment adjustments
34
471
Total comprehensive income
Total comprehensive income
attributable to members of Edith
Cowan University
34
Parent entity
23
778
(23)
(93)
1,245
23
778
(23)
-
-
471
1,245
686
(23,222)
702
(23,129)
33,538
(1,713)
33,640
(2,153)
The above statements of comprehensive income should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.
54
(2,164)
Statements of financial position
As at 31 December 2011
Consolidated
Notes
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
ASSETS
Current assets
Cash and cash equivalents
19
33,963
57,177
32,491
55,017
Receivables
20
15,846
12,977
15,193
12,319
Inventories
21
2,041
2,505
1,626
2,065
Derivative financial instruments
22
-
218
-
218
Other financial assets
23
70,351
50,781
70,342
50,772
Non-current assets classified as held
for sale
24
31,516
262
31,516
262
Other non-financial assets
25
Total current assets
15,128
12,675
14,991
12,371
168,845
136,595
166,159
133,024
25,577
24,548
25,577
24,548
Non-current assets
Receivables
20
Other financial assets
23
17,884
20,600
17,884
20,600
Property, plant and equipment
26
792,857
822,193
792,765
822,090
Investment properties
27
10,913
12,908
10,913
12,908
Deferred tax assets
28
193
59
-
-
Intangible assets
29
Total non-current assets
Total assets
5,638
-
5,421
-
853,062
880,308
852,560
880,146
1,021,907
1,016,903
1,018,719
1,013,170
LIABILITIES
Current liabilities
Trade and other payables
30
12,301
13,917
11,711
13,158
Borrowings
31
2,170
29,754
2,170
29,754
Derivative financial instruments
22
1
242
1
242
Provisions
32
33,389
28,091
33,157
27,956
Other liabilities
33
25,776
29,920
25,622
29,473
73,637
101,924
72,661
100,583
Total current liabilities
Non-current liabilities
Borrowings
31
42,387
44,558
42,387
44,558
Provisions
32
66,405
64,459
66,340
64,338
Deferred tax liabilities
28
87
74
-
-
Total non-current liabilities
108,879
109,091
108,727
108,896
Total liabilities
182,516
211,015
181,388
209,479
Net assets
839,391
805,888
837,331
803,691
EQUITY
Reserves
34(a)
387,245
385,921
387,449
386,109
Retained earnings
34(b)
452,146
419,967
449,882
417,582
839,391
805,888
837,331
803,691
Total equity
The above statements of financial position should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.
55
Statements of changes in equity
For the year ended 31 December 2011
Consolidated
Reserves
Balance at 1 January 2010
Total
Reserves
Total
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
377,384
807,601
430,312
375,532
805,844
-
21,509
21,509
-
20,976
20,976
(25,129)
-
(25,129)
(25,129)
-
(25,129)
Gain on available for sale
financial assets
778
-
778
778
-
778
Cash flow hedges
(23)
-
(23)
(23)
-
(23)
Exchange differences on
translation of foreign operations
(93)
-
(93)
Impairment adjustments
1,245
-
1,245
-
Transfers between Reserves
(21,074)
21,074
Total comprehensive income
(44,296)
42,583
Balance at 31 December 2010
385,921
419,967
(1,713)
805,888
-
-
-
1,245
-
1,245
(21,074)
21,074
-
(44,203)
42,050
386,109
417,582
Consolidated
Balance at 1 January 2011
Retrospective changes
Balance as restated
Profit or loss
Gain on revaluation of property,
plant and equipment
Loss on available for sale
financial assets
Cash flow hedges
(2,153)
803,691
Parent entity
Reserves
Retained
earnings
Total
Reserves
Retained
earnings
Total
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
385,921
419,967
805,888
386,109
417,582
803,691
-
-
-
-
(35)
(35)
385,921
419,932
805,853
386,109
417,582
803,691
-
32,852
32,852
-
32,938
32,938
2,372
-
2,372
2,372
-
2,372
(2,164)
-
(2,164)
(2,164)
-
(2,164)
23
-
Exchange differences on
translation of foreign operations
(16)
-
(16)
-
-
-
Impairment adjustments
471
-
471
471
-
471
Transfers between Reserves
638
-
638
(638)
23
23
-
(638)
23
-
Total comprehensive income
1,324
32,214
33,538
1,340
32,300
33,640
Balance at 31 December 2011
387,245
452,146
839,391
387,449
449,882
837,331
The above statements of changes in equity should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.
56
Retained
earnings
430,217
Profit or loss
Loss on revaluation of property,
plant and equipment
Retained
earnings
Parent entity
Statements of cash flows
For the year ended 31 December 2011
Consolidated
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
Notes
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Australian Government Grants received
4(g)
217,538
201,616
217,538
201,616
OS-HELP (net)
4(g)
38
2
38
2
Superannuation Supplementation
4(g)
3,185
2,796
3,185
2,796
State and Local Government Grants received
5
Cash flows from operating activities
12,774
12,996
12,774
12,996
HECS-HELP – Student payments received
11,212
11,813
11,212
11,813
Receipts from student fees and other customers
91,621
105,061
86,695
98,998
Dividends and distributions received
1,439
800
1,439
800
Interest received
7,376
4,212
7,310
4,134
Payments to suppliers and employees
(inclusive of goods and services tax)
(299,404)
(283,691)
(293,992)
(277,826)
Interest and other cost of finance paid
(3,607)
(4,031)
(3,607)
(4,031)
(25)
59
-
-
42,147
51,633
42,592
51,298
36,443
40,308
36,443
40,305
Payments for property, plant and equipment,
non-current assets held for sale
(53,016)
(42,464)
(52,789)
(42,451)
Payments for financial assets
(21,632)
(37,543)
(21,632)
(37,543)
Income taxes paid
Net cash provided by/(used in) operating
activities
43
Cash flows from investing activities
Proceeds from sale of property, plant and
equipment and non-current assets held for sale
2,613
Proceeds from sale of financial assets
Net cash provided by/(used in)
investing activities
1,150
2,613
1,150
(35,592)
(38,549)
(35,365)
(38,539)
Proceeds from borrowings
19,088
16,723
19,088
16,723
Cash flows from financing activities
Repayment of borrowings
(48,841)
(5,898)
(48,841)
(5,898)
Net cash provided by/(used in)
financing activities
(29,753)
10,825
(29,753)
10,825
Net increase in cash and cash equivalents
(23,198)
23,909
(22,526)
23,584
Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of
the financial year
57,177
33,361
55,017
31,433
-
-
32,491
55,017
Effects of exchange rate changes on cash
and cash equivalents
(16)
Cash and cash equivalents at the end
of the financial year
19
Financing arrangements
31
Non-cash financing and investing activities
44
33,963
(93)
57,177
The above statements of cash flows should be read in conjunction with the accompanying notes.
57
Notes to the financial statements – 31 December 2011
Contents of the notes to the financial statements
Note
1
University Organisation
2
Summary of significant accounting policies
3
Critical accounting estimates and judgements
4
Australian Government financial assistance including HECS-HELP and other Australian
Government loan programs
5
State and local Government financial assistance
6
Fees and charges
7
Investment revenue and income
8Royalties
9
Consultancy and contracts
10
Other revenue and income
11
Gains on disposal of assets
12
Employee related expenses
13
Repairs and maintenance
14
Depreciation and amortisation
15
Borrowing costs
16
Impairment of assets
17
Other expenses
18
Income tax
19
Cash and cash equivalents
20Receivables
21Inventories
22
Derivative financial instruments
23
Other financial assets
24
Non-current assets classified as held for sale
25
Other non-financial assets
26
Property, plant and equipment
27
Investment property
28
Deferred tax assets and liabilities
29
Intangible assets
30
Trade and other payables
31Borrowings
32Provisions
33
Other liabilities
34
Reserves and retained earnings
35
Restricted funds
36
Key management personnel disclosures
37
Remuneration of auditors
38Contingencies
39Commitments
40
Related parties
41Subsidiaries
42
Events occurring after the reporting date
43
Reconciliation of operating result after income tax to net cash flows from operating activities
44
Non-cash financing and investing activities
45
Financial risk management
46Write-offs
47Superannuation
48 Acquittal of Australian Government financial assistance
58
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85
86
87
87
88
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93
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96
96
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101
103
103
104
105
105
106
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107
107
108
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112
113
116
Notes to the financial statements
31 December 2011
1 University Organisation
Edith Cowan University (the University) is a Statutory Authority of the Government of Western Australia and is domiciled
in Australia. The address of its registered office is 270 Joondalup Drive, Joondalup, Western Australia.
The University is a public not-for-profit institution of higher education, funded primarily through Commonwealth grant funding.
Established in 1902, when it began as a teaching college, the University gained university status in 1991. Its principal
activities cover teaching, learning and research.
The University Council is the governing body which controls the operations, affairs, concerns and property of the University.
The Vice-Chancellor has been delegated the responsibility of managing the operations, affairs, concerns and property of
the University.
2 Summary of significant accounting policies
The principal accounting policies adopted in the preparation of the annual financial statements are set out below.
These policies have been consistently applied to all the years presented, unless otherwise stated. The annual financial
statements include separate financial statements for Edith Cowan University as an individual entity and the consolidated
entity consisting of Edith Cowan University and its subsidiaries.
General Statement
The financial statements constitute a general purpose financial report which has been prepared in accordance with Australian
Accounting Standards, the Framework, Statements of Accounting Concepts and other authoritative pronouncements of
the Australian Accounting Standards Board as applied by the Treasurer’s instructions. Several of these are modified by
the Treasurer’s instructions to vary application, disclosure, format and wording.
The Financial Management Act and the Treasurer’s instructions are legislative provisions governing the preparation of
financial statements and take precedence over Australian Accounting Standards, the Framework, Statements of A
ccounting Concepts and other authoritative pronouncements of the Australian Accounting Standards Board.
Where modification is required and has a material or significant financial effect upon the reported results, details
of that modification and the resulting financial effect are disclosed in the notes to the financial statements.
Reporting Entity
The reporting entity comprises the University and its controlled entity, E.C.U. Resources for Learning Ltd (ECURL).
Specific details of controlled entities appear in note 41.
(a) Basis of preparation
The financial statements have been prepared on the accrual basis of accounting using the historical cost convention,
as modified by the revaluation of available-for-sale financial assets, financial assets and liabilities (including derivative
instruments) at fair value through profit and loss, certain classes of property, plant and equipment and investment properties.
The consolidated financial report is presented in Australian dollars and all values are rounded to the nearest thousand dollars
($’000).
Critical accounting estimates
The preparation of financial statements in conformity with Australian Accounting Standards requires the use of certain critical
accounting estimates. It also requires management to exercise its judgements in the process of applying the consolidated
entity’s accounting policies. The areas involving a higher degree of judgement or complexity, or areas where assumptions
and estimates are significant to the financial statements are disclosed in note 3.
59
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2011
2 Summary of significant accounting policies (Continued)
(b) Basis of consolidation
Subsidiary
The consolidated financial statements have been prepared by combining the financial statements of all entities that comprise
the consolidated entity, being the University (the parent entity) and its controlled entities, in accordance with AASB 127
Consolidated and Separate Financial Statements and modified by Treasurer’s instruction 1105. A list of controlled entities
appears in note 41 – Subsidiaries. Consistent accounting policies have been applied and all inter-entity balances and
transactions, and unrealised profits arising within the consolidated entity are eliminated in full.
Edith Cowan University and its controlled entities together are referred to in this financial report as the consolidated entity.
(c)Income
Revenue recognition
The consolidated entity recognises revenue when the amount of revenue can be reliably measured, it is probable that future
economic benefits will flow to the consolidated entity and specific criteria have been met for each of the consolidated entity’s
activities as described below. The amount of revenue is not considered to be reliably measurable until all contingencies
relating to the sale have been resolved. The consolidated entity bases its estimates on historical results, taking into
consideration the type of customer, the type of transaction and the specifics of each arrangement.
Revenue is measured at the fair value of the consideration received or receivable. Revenue is recognised for the major
business activities as follows:
(i) Grants, donations, gifts and other non-reciprocal contributions
The consolidated entity treats operating grants received from Australian Government entities as income in the year of receipt.
Grants received from Government are recognised as revenue when the consolidated entity obtains control over the asset
comprising the contribution, it is probable that economic benefits will flow to the consolidated entity and it can be measured
reliably. When the University does not have control over the contribution, does not have the right to receive the contribution
or, in case of reciprocal grants, has not fulfilled grant conditions, the grant contribution is treated as a liability in the statement
of financial position as deferred income.
Donations, gifts and other contributions are recognised as revenue when the University obtains control over the assets
comprising the contributions, it is probable that economic benefits will flow to the consolidated entity and it can be measured
reliably.
(ii) Student fees and charges
Fees and charges are recognised as income in the year of receipt, except to the extent that fees and charges relate to courses
to be held in future periods. Such income is treated as income in advance. Conversely, fees and charges relating to debtors
are recognised as revenue in the year to which the prescribed course relates.
(iii) Rendering of services
Revenue is recognised on delivery of the service to the client or by reference to the stage of completion of the transaction.
(iv) Interest revenue
Revenue is accrued on a time-proportion basis, by reference to the principal outstanding and at the effective interest rate
applicable.
(v) Sale of goods
Revenue is recognised from the sale of goods and disposal of other assets when the significant risks and rewards
of ownership control transfer to the purchaser and the revenue can be measured reliably.
60
2 Summary of significant accounting policies (Continued)
(vi)Royalties
Royalty income is recognised on an accrual basis in accordance with the substance of the relevant agreements.
Income recognition
(vii)Land development and resale
Land is not sold until the development work is completed, and income is recognised when the significant risks and rewards
of ownership control transfer to the purchaser and can be measured reliably.
(viii)Gains
Gains may be realised or unrealised. Realised gains are determined on a net basis as the difference between the sale
proceeds received or receivable and the carrying amount of the non-current asset. Unrealised gains are determined
on a net basis as the difference between the fair value and the carrying amount of an asset.
The policies adopted for the recognition of significant categories of gains are as follows:
Realised gains on disposal of non-current assets
Gains arising on the disposal or retirement of a non-current asset are recognised when control of the asset and the significant
risks and rewards of ownership transfer to the purchaser. Net gains are included in income for the period in which they arise.
Unrealised gains associated with investment property at fair value
Gains arising from changes in the fair value of an investment property are included in income for the period in which they
arise.
Gains or losses associated with financial assets
Gains arising on the retirement of financial assets are recognised when control of the asset and the significant risks and
rewards of ownership transfer from the consolidated entity. Net gains are included in income for the period in which they arise.
(ix) Parking and library fines
Income from parking and library fines are recognised on a cash basis, as the purpose of the fine is to act as a deterrent and
not for raising revenue. Non-payment of these fines is not actively pursued.
(x) Lease income
Lease income from operating leases is recognised in income on a straight-line basis over the lease term.
(xi) Service concession income
Service concession income generated from the consumption of access rights by the operator is recognised on a straight line
basis over the life of the service concession arrangement being 36.5 years. This represents the amortisation of the service
concession provision. Refer to Note t(iii) for further details regarding this provision.
(d) Income tax
The consolidated entity is exempt from income tax in Australia under the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997.
The consolidated entity is subject to foreign income tax for overseas operations. Deferred tax assets are only recognised
where it is probable that future amounts will be available to utilise those temporary differences and unused tax losses.
The taxation expense represents the sum of tax currently payable and is measured at 31 December each year.
Taxable profit differs from net profit as reported in the income statements because it excludes items of income or expense
that are taxable or deductible in other years and it further excludes items that are never taxable or deductible. The liability
for current tax is calculated using tax rates that have been enacted by the reporting date.
61
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2011
2 Summary of significant accounting policies (Continued)
The income tax expense or revenue for the period is the tax payable on the current period’s taxable income based on
the national income tax rate for each jurisdiction adjusted by changes in deferred tax assets and liabilities attributable to
temporary differences between the tax bases of assets and liabilities and their carrying amounts in the financial statements,
and to unused tax losses.
Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognised using the liability method, for temporary differences at the tax rates expected
to apply when the assets are recovered or liabilities are settled, based on those tax rates which are enacted or substantively
enacted for the jurisdiction where the entity is situated. The relevant tax rates are applied to the cumulative amounts of
deductible and taxable temporary differences to measure the deferred tax asset or liability. An exception is made for certain
temporary differences arising from the initial recognition of an asset or a liability. No deferred tax asset or liability is recognised
in relation to these temporary differences if they arose in a transaction, other than a business combination, that at the time
of the transaction did not affect either accounting profit or taxable profit or loss.
Deferred tax liabilities and assets are not recognised for temporary differences between the carrying amount and tax bases
of investments in controlled entities where the parent entity is able to control the timing of the reversal of the temporary
differences and it is probable that the differences will not reverse in the foreseeable future.
Current and deferred tax balances attributable to amounts recognised directly in equity are also recognised directly in equity.
(e) Borrowing costs
Borrowing costs that have been incurred for the construction of any qualifying asset are capitalised during the period of time
that is required to complete and prepare the asset for its intended use or sale. Other borrowing costs are expensed when
incurred.
(f) Impairment of assets
Property, plant and equipment, investment properties, intangible assets, non-current assets held for sale and financial assets
are tested for any indication of impairment at each reporting date. Where there is an indication of impairment, the recoverable
amount is estimated. Where the recoverable amount is less than the carrying amount, and the decline in the carrying value is
considered significant and prolonged, the asset is considered impaired. The asset is written down to the recoverable amount
and an impairment loss is recognised. As the consolidated entity is a not-for-profit entity, unless an asset has been identified
as a surplus asset, the recoverable amount is the higher of an asset’s fair value less costs to sell and depreciated
replacement cost.
The risk of impairment is generally limited to circumstances where an asset’s depreciation is materially understated, where
the replacement cost is falling or where there is a significant change in useful life. Each relevant class of asset is reviewed
annually to verify that the accumulated depreciation/amortisation reflects the level of consumption or expiration of the
asset’s future economic benefits and to evaluate any impairment risk from falling replacement costs.
The recoverable amount of assets identified as surplus assets is the higher of fair value less costs to sell and the present
value of future cash flows expected to be derived from the asset. Surplus assets carried at fair value have no risk of material
impairment where fair value is determined by reference to market based evidence. Where fair value is determined by
reference to depreciated replacement cost, surplus assets are at risk of impairment and the recoverable amount is
measured. Surplus assets at cost are tested for indications of impairment at each reporting date.
(g) Cash and cash equivalents
For cash flow statement presentation purposes, cash and cash equivalents includes cash on hand and short-term deposits
with financial institutions with original maturities of three months or less that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash
and which are subject to an insignificant risk of changes in value.
62
2 Summary of significant accounting policies (Continued)
(h) Restricted funds
Endowment and bequest funds are classified as restricted funds. Endowment and bequest funds have been received from
benefactors who, by the terms of their conveying instruments, have stipulated that the use of funds is limited in future years
to the purposes designated by the benefactors.
(i)Receivables
Receivables are recognised and carried at the original invoice amount less an allowance for any uncollectible amounts.
The collectability of receivables is reviewed on an ongoing basis and any receivables identified as uncollectible are written-off
against the allowance for impairment. The allowance for impairment (doubtful debts) is raised for all amounts overdue more
than 90 days. The carrying amount is equivalent to the fair value as it is due for settlement within 30 days.
(j)Inventories
Inventories are measured at the lower of cost and net realisable value. Cost comprises direct materials and where applicable,
import duties, transport and handling costs that have been incurred to bring the inventories to their present location and
condition. Cost is calculated using the weighted average method. Net realisable value represents the estimated selling price
less all estimated costs of completion and costs to be incurred in marketing, selling and distribution.
(k) Investments and other financial assets
Classification
The consolidated entity classifies its investments in the following categories: loans and receivables, held-to-maturity
investments and available-for-sale financial assets. The classification depends on the purpose for which the investments
were acquired. Management determines the classification of its investments at initial recognition and, in the case of assets
classified as held-to-maturity, re-evaluates this designation at each reporting date.
(i) Loans and receivables
Receivables are non-derivative financial assets with fixed or determinable payments that are not quoted in an active market.
They are included in current assets, except for those with maturities greater than 12 months after the statements of financial
position date which are classified as non-current assets. Loans and receivables are included in receivables in the statements
of financial position (note 20).
(ii) Held-to-maturity investments
Held-to-maturity investments are non-derivative financial assets with fixed or determinable payments and fixed maturities that
the consolidated entity’s management has the positive intention and ability to hold to maturity.
(iii) Available-for-sale financial assets
Available-for-sale financial assets, comprising principally marketable equity securities, are non-derivatives that are either
designated in this category or not classified in any of the other categories. They are included in non-current assets unless
management intends to dispose of the investment within 12 months of the statements of financial position date.
Regular purchases and sales of financial assets are recognised on trade-date – the date on which the consolidated entity
commits to purchase or sell the asset. Available-for-sale financial assets are initially recognised at fair value plus transaction
costs. Available-for-sale financial assets are derecognised when the rights to receive cash flows from the financial assets
have expired or have been transferred and the consolidated entity has transferred substantially all the risks and rewards of
ownership. In circumstances, where an investment is liquidated and capital distributions are received, the capital distributions
are accounted for as a reduction in the carrying value of the investment.
When securities classified as available-for-sale are sold, the accumulated fair value adjustments recognised in equity are
included in the Income statements as gains and losses from investment securities.
63
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2011
2 Summary of significant accounting policies (Continued)
Subsequent measurement
Available-for-sale financial assets are subsequently carried at fair value. Held-to-maturity investments are carried at cost and
interest is accrued on a monthly basis until that interest is recorded at maturity. Loans and receivables are recorded at the
transaction cost or face value because there is no interest rate applicable and subsequent measurement is not required
as the effect of discounting is not material.
Changes in the fair value of securities classified as available for sale are recognised in equity.
Fair value
The fair values of quoted investments are based on current bid prices. If the market for a financial asset is not active (and for
unlisted securities), the consolidated entity establishes fair value by using valuation techniques. These include reference to
the fair values of recent arm’s length transactions, involving the same instruments or other instruments that are substantially
the same, discounted cash flow analysis, and option pricing models refined to reflect the issuer’s specific circumstances.
Impairment
The consolidated entity assesses at each balance date whether there is objective evidence that a financial asset or group
of financial assets is impaired. In the case of equity securities classified as available-for-sale, a significant or prolonged
decline in the fair value of a security below its cost is considered as in determining whether the security is impaired. If any
such evidence exists for available-for-sale financial assets, the cumulative loss – measured as the difference between the
acquisition cost and the current fair value, less any impairment loss on that financial asset previously recognised in profit
and loss – is removed from equity and recognised in the income statements. Impairment losses recognised in the income
statements on equity instruments are not reversed through the income statements.
(l) Property, plant and equipment
All items of property, plant and equipment are initially recognised at cost. For items of property, plant and equipment acquired
at no cost or for nominal cost, cost is their fair value at the date of acquisition.
Each class of property, plant and equipment are subsequently measured at cost or fair value as indicated, less, where
applicable, any accumulated depreciation and impairment losses. For asset classes carried at fair value, increases in the
carrying amount arising on revaluation of the asset class are recognised in other comprehensive income and accumulated
in the revaluation surplus in equity. Revaluation decreases that offset previous revaluation increments of the same class
of assets are also recognised in other comprehensive income as a reduction in the revaluation surplus reserve. All other
revaluation decrements are charged to the income statement as an expense of the period.
Items of property, plant and equipment (excluding Works of Art) costing $5,000 or more are recognised as assets and the cost
of utilising assets is expensed (depreciated) over their useful lives. Items of property, plant and equipment costing less than
$5,000 are expensed direct to the income statement (other than where they form part of a group of similar items which are
significant in total).
The assets residual values and useful lives are reviewed each year and adjusted where appropriate at the end of each
reporting period.
Land and Buildings
Land and buildings are measured at fair value based on periodic valuations by an external independent valuer, less
subsequent depreciation for buildings. Fair value of land is determined on the basis of current market values with reference
to recent transactions whereas the fair value of buildings is determined on the basis of depreciated replacement cost which
is equivalent to the current replacement cost of an asset less, where applicable, accumulated depreciation calculated on the
basis of such cost to reflect the already consumed or expired future economic benefits of the asset.
Buildings are depreciated on a straight line basis over their useful life to the consolidated entity commencing from the time that
the building is held ready for use. Leasehold improvements are depreciated over the shorter of either the unexpired period
of the lease or the estimated useful lives of the improvements.
64
2 Summary of significant accounting policies (Continued)
Leasehold improvements
Leasehold improvements are capitalised at amounts directly attributable to bringing the asset to the location and condition
necessary for it to be capable of operating in the manner intended for the consolidated entity. Such assets are depreciated
over the shorter of the lease term and the assets useful life. Where lease arrangements contain options for renewal and
extension of the lease term, such extensions are only taken into account for the purposes of determining an appropriate
depreciation period when, at inception of the lease, it is reasonably certain that the consolidated entity will exercise the option.
Service concession assets
The University has entered into arrangements with respect to the development and refurbishment of student accommodation.
Such arrangements provide for the appointment of an operator responsible for construction, asset upgrades and subsequent
operation and management of the assets for an extended period. It is deemed that the University continues to control such
assets primarily due to the University, as grantor:
(i)
ultimately controlling or regulating the services that may be provided by the operator with respect to the student
accommodation assets, the pricing of such services, and to whom such services may be provided; and
(ii) controlling the significant residual interest in the infrastructure at the end of the term of the arrangement.
Existing University buildings that form part of the arrangement with the external operator have been transferred from Land
and Buildings into the Service Concession Assets class of assets. Capital improvements to such assets are capitalised at cost
which is equivalent to their fair value.
Service concession assets under construction at reporting date are recognised at cost, which will be an amount equivalent to
fair value based on depreciated replacement cost. Subsequent to initial recognition, service concession assets are measured
at cost and depreciated of their useful life.
Works of art
All Works of art are initially recognised at fair value and continue to be measured at fair value, such value being based on
current market values determined by a qualified independent valuer. Works of Art are not subject to depreciation having
regard to their indefinite life and the expectation of increasing value over time. Such assets controlled by the University are
classified as heritage assets and are protected and preserved for public exhibition, education, research and the furtherance
of public service. They are neither disposed for financial gain nor encumbered in any manner.
Library collection assets
Library collection assets (excluding intangible assets) are carried at cost less accumulated depreciation and any accumulated
impairment losses. Where library assets are acquired at no cost, or for a nominal cost, cost will represent the asset’s fair value
as determined by qualified library staff, and will generally represent that asset’s cost to replace.
Library collection assets carried at cost are depreciated on a straight line basis over 10 years.
Depreciation
The depreciable amount of all fixed assets including buildings and capitalised lease assets, but excluding freehold land and
Works of Art, are depreciated on a straight-line basis over the asset’s useful life to the consolidated entity commencing from
the time the asset is held ready for use. Leasehold improvements are depreciated over the shorter of either the unexpired
period of the lease or the estimated useful lives of the improvements.
65
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2011
2 Summary of significant accounting policies (Continued)
The depreciation rates used for each class of depreciable assets are:
Asset category
Life
Buildings
50 years
Service concession assets – buildings
50 years
Computing equipment
4 years
Other equipment and furniture
6-10 years
Motor vehicles
4-6 years
Works of art
Not depreciated
Leasehold improvements
Refer to policy above
Library collections
10 years
(m) Investment properties
Investment properties exclude properties held to meet service delivery objectives of the University and comprises of land
and/or buildings which are held to earn rentals and/or capital appreciation.
Investment properties are initially recognised at cost. Costs incurred subsequent to initial acquisition are capitalised when it is
probable that future economic benefits in excess of the originally assessed performance of the asset will flow to the University.
Where an investment property is acquired at no cost or for nominal consideration, its cost shall be deemed to be its fair value,
as at the date of acquisition.
Subsequent to initial recognition at cost, investment property is carried at fair value. The fair value of all land has been
determined by reference to recent market transactions and the fair value of buildings have been determined by reference
to the cost of replacing the remaining future economic benefits. Changes in fair values are recorded in the income statement
as part of other investment income. The properties are not depreciated.
Rental revenue from the leasing of investment properties is recognised in the income statement in the periods in which it is
receivable and is accounted for on a straight line basis over the lease term.
(n)Leases
Leases in which a significant portion of the risks and rewards of ownership are retained by the lessor are classified as
operating leases (note 39).The consolidated entity leases certain property and equipment by way of operating leases.
Payments made under operating leases (net of any incentives received from the lessor) are charged to the income
statements on a straight-line basis, over the period of the lease.
(o) Intangible assets
All acquired and internally developed intangible assets are initially measured at cost. For assets acquired at no cost or for
nominal cost, cost is their fair value at the date of acquisition.
Subsequent costs are included in the asset’s carrying amount or recognised as a separate asset, where appropriate, only
when it is probable that future economic benefits associated with the item will flow to the consolidated entity and the cost of
the item can be measured reliably. All other repairs and maintenance are charged to the income statement during the financial
period in which they are incurred.
Amortisation is calculated on a straight line basis over the estimated useful life of the asset. The estimated useful lives for
each class of intangible assets are:
66
Intangible asset class
Life
Computer software
2-5 years
Publishing titles
10 years
Library collection
10 years
2 Summary of significant accounting policies (Continued)
(p) Unfunded superannuation
In accordance with the 1998 instructions issued by the Department of Education, Training and Youth Affairs (DETYA) now
known as the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR), the effects of the unfunded
superannuation liabilities of the Edith Cowan University and its controlled entities were recorded in the Income statements
and the Statements of financial position for the first time in 1998. The prior years’ practice had been to disclose liabilities
by way of a note to the financial statements.
An arrangement exists between the Australian Government and the State Government to meet the unfunded liability for the
Edith Cowan University’s beneficiaries of the State Superannuation Scheme on an emerging cost basis. This arrangement
is evidenced by the State Grants (General Revenue) Amendment Act 1987, Higher Education Funding Act 1988 and
subsequent amending legislation. Accordingly, the unfunded liabilities have been recognised in the statements of financial
position under Provisions with a corresponding asset recognised under Receivables. The recognition of both the asset and
the liability consequently does not affect the year-end net asset position of the Edith Cowan University and its controlled
entities.
(q) Non-current assets held for sale
Non-current assets classified as held for sale are stated at the lower of carrying amount and fair value less costs to sell where
the carrying amount will be recovered principally through a sale transaction rather than through continuing use.
An impairment loss is recognised for any initial or subsequent write down of the asset to fair value less costs to sell. A gain
is recognised for any subsequent increases in fair value less costs to sell of an asset, but not in excess of any cumulative
impairment loss previously recognised. A gain or loss not previously recognised by the date of the sale of the non-current
asset is recognised at the date of derecognition.
Non-current assets classified as held for sale are not depreciated or amortised and are presented separately from other
assets in the statement of financial position.
(r)Payables
Payables are recognised when the consolidated entity becomes obliged to make future payments as a result of a purchase
of assets or services. Accounts payable are not interest bearing and are stated at their nominal value.
The carrying amount is equivalent to its fair value, as they are generally settled within 30 days.
(s)Borrowings
Interest-bearing loans are recorded at cost when the proceeds are received, net of direct issued costs. Finance charges are
accounted for on an accrual basis.
Borrowings are classified as current liabilities unless the consolidated entity has an unconditional right to defer settlement
of the liability for at least 12 months after the statements of financial position date.
(t)Provisions
Provisions are liabilities of uncertain timing and amount and are recognised where there is a present legal or constructive
obligation as a result of a past event and when the outflow of resources embodying economic benefits is probable and a
reliable estimate can be made of the amount of the obligation. Provisions are reviewed at each reporting date.
67
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2011
2 Summary of significant accounting policies (Continued)
(i) Employee benefits
Provision is made for the consolidated entity’s liability for employee benefits arising from services rendered by employees
to the end of the reporting period. Provisions for employee benefits such as salaries and wages and annual leave that are
expected to be settled within 12 months are measured at the amounts expected to be paid when the liability is settled.
Employee benefits payable later than 12 months such as post-employment benefits and long service leave have been
measured at the present value of the estimated future cash outflows to be made for those benefits. Liabilities of long term and
post employment benefits for which settlement cannot be deferred beyond 12 months is recognised in the current provisions
for employee benefits and is measured in accordance with the policy for short term benefits described above. In determining
the liability, consideration is given to increases in salary costs including non-salary components such as superannuation and
the probability that the employee may satisfy vesting requirements which can exist in specific types of employment contract.
Such vesting conditions generally comprise length of service and renewal of contract. Those cash flows are discounted using
market yields on national government bonds with terms to maturity that match, as closely as possible, the expected timing
of cash flows.
Liability for sick leave is recognised as the related service is provided by the employees and which increases their sick leave
entitlement. The accumulated sick leave entitlement is measured at the additional undiscounted amount expected to be
paid as a result of the unused entitlement that has accumulated at the end of the reporting period. The past history of leave
utilisation is taken into account in the estimation process.
Employment on-costs, including workers’ compensation insurance and payroll tax, are not employee benefits and are
recognised as liabilities and expenses when the employment to which they relate have occurred. Employment on-costs
are not included as part of the consolidated entity’s employee related expenses and the related liability is included in the
employment oncosts provision.
Termination benefits are payable when employment is terminated before the normal retirement date, or when an employee
accepts voluntary redundancy in exchange for these benefits. The consolidated entity recognises termination benefits when
it is demonstrably committed to either terminating the employment of current employees according to a detailed formal
plan without possibility of withdrawal or providing termination benefits as a result of an offer made to encourage voluntary
redundancy. Benefits falling due more than 12 months after balance date are discounted to present value.
(ii) Superannuation
The consolidated entity contributes to a number of superannuation schemes, including both defined contribution and defined
benefit schemes. Payments to defined contribution schemes are charged as an expense as they fall due. The University’s
obligation is limited to these contributions.
Defined benefit schemes provide a defined lump-sum benefit to scheme members based on years of service and final
average salary. A defined benefit liability is included in the statement of financial position equal to the present value of the
defined benefit obligation at the reporting date (less any past service costs not yet recognised) less the fair value of scheme
assets at the reporting date.
Actuarial gains and losses are recognised immediately as income or expense in the income statement in the year in which
they occur.
For details relating to the individual schemes, refer to note 47.
(iii) Service concession provision
The University has recognised a service concession provision in the statement of financial position. The liability reflects
the performance obligation the University has incurred to allow the operator access to, and the right to generate revenue
from, service concession assets. The liability incurred is initially recognised at an amount equivalent to the value of service
concession assets delivered to the University and is amortised to the statement of comprehensive income over the duration
of the service concession arrangement. As a provision, it is subsequently measured at the best estimate of the amount that
the University would rationally pay to settle the obligation at the reporting date or to transfer it to a third party.
This will generally equate to the unamortised balance at each reporting date.
68
2 Summary of significant accounting policies (Continued)
(u) Foreign currency translation and hedge accounting
Transactions denominated in currencies other than Australian dollars are recorded at the rates of exchange prevailing on the
dates of the transactions. At each reporting date, monetary assets and liabilities that are denominated in foreign currencies
are retranslated at the rate of exchange prevailing at the reporting date. Non-monetary assets and liabilities carried at fair
value that are denominated in foreign currencies are translated at the rates prevailing at the reporting date when the fair value
was determined. Exchange gains and losses arising on retranslation are included in the income statement for the period.
Forward foreign exchange contracts are entered into as hedges to avoid or minimise possible adverse financial effects of
movements in exchange rates. Such derivative financial instruments are stated at fair value. Changes in the fair value of
derivative financial instruments that are designated and effective as hedges of future cash flows are recognised directly
in equity and the ineffective portion is recognised immediately in the income statement.
When the hedged firm commitment results in the recognition of an asset or a liability, then, at the time the asset or liability
is recognised, the associated gains or losses that had previously been recognised in equity are included in the initial
measurement of the acquisition cost or other carrying amount of the asset or liability. For all other cash flow hedges, the gains
or losses that are recognised in equity are transferred to the income statement in the same year in which the hedged firm
commitment affects the net profit and loss, for example when the future sale actually occurs.
(v) Goods and Services Tax (GST)
Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of the amount of associated GST, unless the GST incurred is not
recoverable from the taxation authority. In this case it is recognised as part of the cost of acquisition of the asset or as
part of the expense.
Receivables and payables are stated inclusive of the amount of GST receivable or payable. The net amount of GST
recoverable from, or payable to, the taxation authority is included with other receivables or payables in the statements
of financial position.
Cash flows are presented on a gross basis. The GST components of cash flows arising from investing or financing activities
which are recoverable from, or payable to the taxation authority, are presented as operating cash flow.
(w) New accounting standards and Interpretations
Certain new Accounting Standards and Interpretations have been published that are not mandatory for 31 December 2011
reporting periods. The Edith Cowan University’s assessment of the impact of these new Standards and Interpretations is set
out below:
(i)
AASB 1053 Application of Tiers of Australian Accounting Standards and AASB 2010-2 Amendments to Australian
Accounting Standards arising from reduced disclosure requirements (effective from 1 January 2014)
This Standard establishes a differential financial reporting framework consisting of two Tiers of reporting requirements
for preparing general purpose financial statements:
(a) Tier 1: Australian Accounting Standards
(b) Tier 2: Australian Accounting Standards Reduced Disclosure Requirements
Tier 2 comprises the recognition, measurement and presentation requirements of Tier 1 and substantially reduced
disclosures corresponding to those requirements. The following entities apply Tier 1 requirements in preparing general
purpose financial statements:
(a) For-profit entities in the private sector that have public accountability (as defined in this Standard)
(b) The Australian Government and State, Territory and Local Governments.
The following entities apply either Tier 2 or Tier 1 requirements in preparing general purpose financial statements:
(a) For-profit private sector entities that do not have public accountability
(b) All not-for-profit private sector entities
(c) Public sector entities other than the Australian Government and State, Territory and Local Governments.
The consolidated entity will consider the provisions of this standard when applicable.
69
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2011
2 Summary of significant accounting policies (Continued)
(ii) AASB 9 Financial Instruments and AASB 2010-7 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from AASB 9
(December 2010) (effective from 1 January 2013)
AASB 9 and AASB 2010-7 are effective to annual reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2013 with the aim
of replacing AASB 139 Financial instruments: Recognition and Measurement. AASB 9 simplifies the classification
of financial assets into those to be carried at amortised cost, and those to be carried at fair value. It also simplifies
requirements for embedded derivatives and removes the tainting rules associated with held-to-maturity assets. Entities
will be required to reclassify their financial assets when there is a change in the entity’s business. The consolidated entity
will consider adopting these provisions when it is applicable.
(iii) AASB 2010-6 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards – Disclosures on Transfers of Financial Assets
[AASB 1 & AASB 7] (effective from 1 January 2012)
This Standard adds and amends disclosure requirements about transfer of financial assets, including in respect of
the nature of the financial assets involved and the risks associated with them. The amendments are designed to allow
users of financial statements to improve their understanding of transfer transactions of financial assets (for example
securitisations, factoring of receivables), including understanding the possible effects of any risks that may remain with
the entity that transferred the assets. The amendments also require additional disclosures if a disproportionate amount
of transfer transaction are undertaken around the end of a reporting period. The consolidated entity does not hold
financial assets that require additional disclosure. The changes introduced in the Standard do not have any impacts
to the consolidated entity.
(iv) AASB 2010-8 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards – Deferred Tax: Recovery of Underlying Assets
(effective from 1 January 2012)
These amendments provide a practical approach for measuring deferred tax liabilities and deferred tax assets when
investment property is measured using the fair value model in AASB 140 Investment Property. The consolidated entity
does not have income tax liabilities for its operations within Australia. The Standard does not have any impact to the
consolidated entity.
(v) AASB 1054 Australian Additional Disclosures and AASB 2010-9 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards –
Severe Hyperinflation and Removal of Fixed Dates for First-time Adopters (effective from 1 January 2012)
The main changes introduced in this Standard is the removal of fixed dates. The amendments provide relief for first-time
adopter of Australian Accounting Standards from having to reconstruct transactions that occurred before their date of
transition to Australian Accountant Standards.It also provide guidance for entities emerging from severe hyperinflation
either to resume presenting Australian-Accounting-Standards financial statements or to present Australian-AccountingStandards financial statements for the first time. The consolidated entity does not expect that any adjustments will be
necessary as the result of applying the revised rules.
(vi) AASB 2011-1 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from the Trans-Tasman Convergence Project
and (effective from 1 January 2012)
70
The amendments made in the Standard are a consequence of Phase 1 of the joint Trans-Tasman Convergence project
of the AASB and the FRSB. It addressed the harmonisation of financial reporting requirements across the Tasman in
relation to for-profit entities that asset compliance with International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRSs).
AASB 2011-1 changed 9 existing Australian Standards and 3 interpretations to either delete Australian
specific-guidance or relocate it if it is still considered necessary in the Australian context.
In some instances, the AASB has removed guidance and definitions from Australian Accounting Standards for
conformity of drafting with IFRSs but without any intention to change requirements. The consolidated entity will consider
the provisions of this standard when applicable. The consolidated entity does not expect that any adjustments will be
necessary as the result of applying the revised rules.
2 Summary of significant accounting policies (Continued)
(vii) AASB 2011-5 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards – Extending Relief from Consolidation, the Equity
Method and Proportionate Consolidation (effective 1 January 2012)
The changes introduce the relief from consolidation for not-for-profit parent entities. Under the Amending Standards,
a not-for-profit parent would be relieved from preparing consolidated financial statements if it had an ultimate not-forprofit parent that produces consolidated financial statements complying with Australian Accounting Standards.
The consolidated entity does not expect that any adjustments will be necessary as the result of applying the revised
standard.
(viii) AASB 10 Consolidated Financial Statements (effective from 1 January 2013)
AASB 10 replaces AASB 127 and three key elements of control. According to AASB 10 an investor controls an investee
if, and only if, the investor has all the following: a) power over the investee; b) exposure, or rights, to variable returns from
its involvement with the investee; and c) the ability to use its power over the investee to affect the amount of the investor’s
returns. Additional guidance is provided about how to evaluate each of the three limbs above. The limbs above are more
principle based rather than hard and fast rules. The consolidated entity will consider the provisions of this standard when
applicable. The consolidated entity does not expect that any adjustments will be necessary as the result of applying the
revised rules.
(ix) AASB 11 Joint Arrangements (effective from 1 January 2013)
AASB 11 replaces the AASB 131 Interests in Joint Ventures. The previous Standard had three types of joint ventures
whereas AASB 11 only has two. These are: joint operations; and joint ventures. The consolidated entity will consider
the provisions of this standard when applicable. The consolidated entity does not expect that any adjustments will be
necessary as the result of applying the revised rules.
(x) AASB 12 Disclosure of Interests in Other Entities (effective from 1 January 2013)
AASB 12 provides the disclosure requirements for entities that have an interest in a subsidiary, a joint arrangement,
an associate or an unconsolidated structured entity. It requires an entity to disclose information that enables users of
financial statements to evaluate: a) the nature of, and risks associated with, its interests in other entities; and b) the
effects of those interests on its financial position, financial performance and cash flows. The Standard is not available
for early adoption for not-for-profit entities. The consolidated entity will consider the provisions of this standard when
applicable.
(xi) AASB 13 Fair Value Measurement and AASB 2011-8 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from
AASB 13 (effective from 1 January 2013)
The new standard aligns IFRS and US GAAP specifying how an entity should apply the fair value measurement
requirements that apply in existing IFRS standard. It seeks to ensure that these varied requirements are applied
consistently, have clear measurement objectives, and use a robust measurement framework. It does not introduce
any requirements for the use of fair value but does clarify the definition and enhance the disclosures where it is used.
The consolidated entity will consider the provisions of this standard when applicable.
(xii) AASB 2011-9 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards – Presentation of items of Other Comprehensive Income
(effective from 1 January 2013)
The new standard amends AASB 101 Presentation of Financial Statements to require entities to group items presented
in other comprehensive income (OCI) on the basis of whether they are potentially reclassifiable to profit or loss
subsequently (reclassification adjustments).These changes are to clarify the nature of items included in the other
comprehensive income. It does not remove the option to present profit or loss and other comprehensive income in
two statements. The consolidated entity will consider the provisions of this standard when applicable.
71
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2011
(xiii) AASB 119 Employee Benefits and AASB 2011 10 Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from
AASB 119 (effective from 1 January 2012)
AASB 119 is amended focusing on but not limited to the accounting for defined benefit plans. The major changes
introduced in the revised Standard are: all actuarial gains and losses recognised immediately in other comprehensive
income; expected return on plan assets recognised in profit or loss calculated based on rate used to discount the defined
benefit obligation; definition of short-term and other long-term employee benefits; termination benefits are recognised
at the earlier of when the entity recognises costs for a restructuring that includes the payment of termination benefits
and when the entity can no longer withdraw the offer of the termination benefits. The consolidated entity will consider
the provisions of this standard when applicable.
(x) Change in accounting estimates and prior period reclassification
The consolidated entity changed its estimates with respect to the useful life of its library collection. The consolidated entity
has extended the useful life of such physical library assets, classified within property, plant & equipment, to 10 years.
This change in estimates has been recognised prospectively in the financial statements as from 1 January 2011. Given
the reclassifications and adjustments discussed below, it is not practicable to ascertain the financial effect of this change
in estimates in future periods.
In addition, intangible library assets have been reclassified as a separate class of asset whereas previously they were
included within property, plant & equipment. Refer to note 29 for details of intangible library assets. Amortisation of such
intangible assets is based on a 10 year useful life. As the effects of such reclassification on prior year financial statements
are immaterial, comparatives have not been adjusted.
The aggregate effect of the above mentioned changes on the annual financial statements for the year ended 31 December
2011 is as follows:
31 December
2011
$’000
Increase/
(Decrease)
$’000
31 December
2011 (Restated)
$’000
Statement of comprehensive income (extract)
Depreciation and amortisation
20,768
(1,452)
19,316
Other expenses
97,770
1,782
99,552
Operating result
33,182
(330)
32,852
798,608
(5,751)
792,857
Statement of financial position (extract)
Property, plant and equipment
Intangible
72
217
5,421
5,638
Net assets
839,721
(330)
839,391
Retained earnings
452,476
(330)
452,146
Total equity
839,721
(330)
839,391
3 Critical accounting estimates and judgements
Estimates and judgements are continually evaluated and are based on historical experience and other factors, including
expectations of future events that may have a financial impact on the consolidated entity and that are believed to be
reasonable under the circumstances.
(a) Critical accounting estimates and assumptions
The key assumptions made concerning the future, and other key sources of estimating uncertainty at the reporting date
that have a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities within the next
financial year include:
„„ Allowances
„„ Estimating
for impairment of financial assets;
useful life of key assets – the useful life reflects the consumption of the key assets’ future economic benefits.
Defined benefit superannuation plans
In determining the consolidated entity’s ultimate cost of its defined benefit superannuation plans, actuarial assumptions
are required to be made. The principal actuarial assumptions used are disclosed in note 47.
(b) Critical judgements in applying the entity’s accounting policies
The judgements that have been made in the process of applying accounting policies which have the most significant effect
on the amounts recognised in the financial report include:
„„ Estimating
the useful life of key assets;
„„ Impairment
of property, plant and equipment, investment properties, receivables and other financial assets;
„„ Classification
„„ Discount
„„ Long
of financial assets;
rates used in estimating provisions;
service retention rates and discount rates.
73
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2011
4Australian Government financial assistance including HECS-HELP
and other Australian Government loan programs
Consolidated
Notes
(a)Commonwealth Grant Scheme and other
grants
Commonwealth Grant Scheme#1
Indigenous Support Program
Partnership and Participation Program#2
Disability Support Program
Capital Development Pool
Diversity and Structural Adjustment Fund
Transitional Cost Program
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
116,392
116,947
116,392
116,947
48.1
646
624
646
624
2,359
1,362
2,359
1,362
64
72
64
72
-
1,042
-
1,042
275
-
275
-
118
118
118
118
2,148
-
2,148
-
122,002
120,165
122,002
120,165
HECS-HELP
64,145
57,521
64,145
57,521
FEE-HELP
10,134
7,455
10,134
7,455
74,279
64,976
74,279
64,976
1,652
1,392
1,652
1,392
International Postgraduate Research
Scholarships
185
168
185
168
Commonwealth Education Cost
Scholarships#4
393
161
393
161
Commonwealth Accommodation
Scholarships#4
435
52
435
52
Indigenous Access Scholarships
46
106
46
106
2,711
1,879
2,711
1,879
2,190
2,034
2,190
2,034
4,415
4,412
4,415
4,412
469
371
469
371
-
41
-
41
526
451
526
451
55
47
55
47
Other
Total Commonwealth Grants Scheme and
other grants
(b) Higher Education Loan Programs
48.2
#3
Total Higher Education Loan Programs
(c)Scholarships
48.3
Australian Postgraduate Awards
Total Scholarships
(d) DIISR Research
Joint Research Engagement Program
Research Training Scheme
Research Infrastructure Block Grants
Implementation Assistance Program
Sustainable Research Excellence
in Universities
74
Parent entity
Commercialisation Training Scheme
48.4
#5
Other
1,989
-
1,989
-
Total DIISR Research Grants
9,644
7,356
9,644
7,356
4Australian Government financial assistance including HECS-HELP
and other Australian Government loan programs (CONTINUED)
Consolidated
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
161
82
161
82
Projects
378
784
378
784
Total Australian Research Council
539
866
539
866
Notes
(e)Australian Research Council
48.6
48.6(a)
(i) Discovery
Project
(ii) Linkages
48.6(b)
(f)Other Australian Government
financial assistance
National competitive
1,718
1,726
1,718
1,726
Other research grants
3,820
3,084
3,820
3,084
Other non-research grants
4,448
2,249
4,448
2,249
9,986
7,059
9,986
7,059
219,161
202,301
219,161
202,301
Total Other Australian Government
financial assistance
Total Australian Government
financial assistance
#1 Includes the basic CGS grant amount, CGS – Regional Loading and CGS – Enabling Loading and Science and Maths Transitional Loading.
#2 Includes Equity Support Program.
#3 Program in respect of FEE-HELP for Higher Education only.
#4 Includes Grandfathered Scholarships, National Priority and National Accommodation Priority Scholarships respectively.
#5 Includes Institutional Grants Scheme.
Reconciliation
Australian Government grants
[(a) + (c) + (d) + (e) + (f)]
144,882
137,325
144,882
137,325
HECS-HELP payments
64,145
57,521
64,145
57,521
FEE-HELP payments
10,134
7,455
10,134
7,455
219,161
202,301
219,161
202,301
Total Australian Government
financial assistance
75
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2011
4Australian Government financial assistance including HECS-HELP
and other Australian Government loan programs (CONTINUED)
Consolidated
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
122,002
120,165
122,002
120,165
71,313
64,323
71,313
64,323
Scholarships
3,739
1,857
3,739
1,857
DIISR Research
9,644
7,356
9,644
7,356
ARC grants – Discovery
161
72
161
72
ARC grants – Linkages
518
784
518
784
Other Australian Government Grants
10,161
7,059
10,161
7,059
217,538
201,616
217,538
201,616
38
2
38
2
3,185
2,796
3,185
2,796
220,761
204,414
220,761
204,414
Notes
(g) Australian Government Grants received
– cash basis (Ref note 48)
CGS and Other DEEWR Grants
Higher Education Loan Programs
Total Australian Government Grants
received – cash basis
OS-Help (Net)
Superannuation Supplementation
Total Australian Government funding
received – cash basis
5 State and local Government financial assistance
Consolidated
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
WA State Department of Education and Training*
7,982
7,725
7,982
7,725
WA State and local Government research grants
4,792
5,271
4,792
5,271
12,774
12,996
12,774
12,996
State financial assistance
Total State and local Government
financial assistance
* The funding relates to West Australian Academy of Performing Arts ([email protected]).
76
6 Fees and charges
Consolidated
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
577
595
577
595
57,749
60,020
57,749
60,020
3,300
3,542
3,300
3,542
23
5
23
5
-
2
-
2
61,649
64,164
61,649
64,164
172
191
172
191
46
36
46
36
522
470
522
470
70
280
70
280
Course fees and charges
Continuing education
Fee-paying overseas students
Fee-paying domestic postgraduate students
Fee-paying domestic undergraduate students
Fee-paying domestic non-award students
Total course fees and charges
Other non-course fees and charges
Amenities and service fees
Course consumable fees
Examination, registration and photocopying fees
Late fees
Library fines
123
51
123
51
Other fees and charges
1,050
925
1,050
925
Parking fees
1,559
1,523
1,559
1,523
Rental charges
1,628
1,430
1,628
1,430
Seminar and workshop fees
Total other non-course fees and charges
Total fees and charges
374
618
374
618
5,544
5,524
5,544
5,524
67,193
69,688
67,193
69,688
7 Investment revenue and income
Consolidated
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
553
415
487
337
Interest from bank bills
7,740
4,571
7,740
4,571
Total investment revenue
8,293
4,986
8,227
4,908
389
79
389
79
1,170
721
1,170
721
-
621
-
621
1,559
1,421
1,559
1,421
Investment revenue
Interest revenue from operating account
Other investment income
Dividends received
Distributions from managed funds
Rental income from investment properties
Total other investment income
Other investment losses
Net Change in fair value of investment properties
1,995
626
1,995
626
Net investment income
7,857
5,781
7,791
5,703
77
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2011
8Royalties
Consolidated
2011
Royalties
Parent entity
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
8,599
9,497
5,273
5,902
9 Consultancy and contracts
Consolidated
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Research
304
277
303
264
Contract research
3,826
3,009
3,826
3,009
Total consultancy and contracts
4,130
3,286
4,129
3,273
Consultancy
10 Other revenue and income
Consolidated
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Other revenue
Donations and bequests
891
463
891
463
Prizes, contributions and scholarships
813
414
813
414
Proceed from sale of non-capitalised equipment
208
120
208
120
Professional development courses
1,428
2,317
-
-
Commissions, recoveries and rebates received
1,873
1,931
1,875
1,931
78
116
78
116
Expense recoups
571
564
571
564
1,047
857
1,045
701
Medical practitioners fees
153
98
153
98
Other revenue
429
444
429
444
7,491
7,324
6,063
4,851
183
643
183
643
Box office – WAAPA
Sundry Income
Total other revenue
Other income
Bad debts recovered
3
132
3
132
Service concession income
948
948
948
948
Other income
734
609
734
609
1,868
2,332
1,868
2,332
Insurance claims
Total other income
78
11 Gains on disposal of assets
Consolidated
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
37,165
40,659
37,165
40,659
(28,480)
(37,428)
(28,480)
(37,426)
8,685
3,231
8,685
3,233
(a) Disposal of property, plant and equipment and
non-current assets held for sale
Proceeds from sale of property, plant and equipment
and non-current assets held for sale
Carrying amount of property, plant and equipment and
non-current assets held for sale sold
Net gain on disposal of property, plant and
equipment and non-current assets held for sale
12 Employee related expenses
Consolidated
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Salaries
73,613
71,750
73,613
71,750
Superannuation and other post employment benefits
10,975
10,331
10,975
10,331
2,599
2,061
2,599
2,061
Academic
Long service leave
Annual leave
262
330
262
330
Redundancy costs
247
2,609
247
2,609
2,391
2,805
2,379
2,764
90,087
89,886
90,075
89,845
Salaries
83,530
75,538
81,256
73,134
Superannuation and other post employment benefits
11,996
10,712
11,738
10,470
2,140
4,630
2,138
4,655
Annual leave
327
1,417
289
1,471
Redundancy costs
364
538
364
538
Other
491
340
491
340
98,848
93,175
96,276
90,608
188,935
183,061
186,351
180,453
Other
Total academic
Non-academic
Long service leave
Total non-academic
Total employee related expenses
The employment on-costs expense is included at note 17.
79
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2011
13 Repairs and maintenance
Consolidated
2011
Parent entity
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Buildings maintenance
5,188
4,893
5,188
4,893
Grounds maintenance
1,054
545
1,054
545
Other equipment maintenance
1,107
901
1,103
897
Total repairs and maintenance
7,349
6,339
7,345
6,335
14 Depreciation and amortisation
Consolidated
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
10,793
11,175
10,793
11,175
1,070
377
1,070
377
842
934
840
931
Other equipment and furniture
2,883
2,795
2,880
2,791
Computing equipment
1,498
1,407
1,487
1,395
Depreciation
Buildings
Service concession assets
Leasehold improvements
65
61
65
61
Library collections
1,297
2,983
1,297
2,983
Total depreciation
18,448
19,732
18,432
19,713
868
-
868
-
19,316
19,732
19,300
19,713
Motor vehicles
Amortisation
Intangible assets
Total depreciation and amortisation
15 Borrowing costs
Consolidated
Interest paid
Less: Amount capitalised
Total borrowing costs expensed
80
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
4,811
4,253
4,811
4,253
(1,251)
3,560
(272)
3,981
(1,251)
3,560
(272)
3,981
16 Impairment of assets
Consolidated
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Bad and Doubtful Debts
570
-
570
-
Impairment of investments
471
1,245
471
1,245
-
137
-
137
1,041
1,382
1,041
1,382
Impairment of property, plant and equipment
Total impairments of assets
*Additional details on impairments of receivables are included at note 20.
17 Other expenses
Consolidated
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Scholarships, grants and prizes
8,690
8,888
8,690
8,888
Advertising and marketing expenses
8,422
9,504
8,125
9,262
Audit fees, bank charges, legal costs and insurance
2,035
1,577
1,868
1,396
Computer software and maintenance
8,259
9,080
8,232
9,059
Employment on-costs*
10,350
10,626
10,106
10,397
General consumables
4,137
3,995
3,601
3,216
Hire and lease Costs
2,140
1,513
2,140
1,513
Non-capitalised equipment
4,036
3,773
4,036
3,773
485
459
446
414
Printing, postage and stationery
3,643
3,403
3,530
3,283
Professional and consulting fees
11,813
13,652
11,727
13,502
Student related expenditure
10,203
6,177
10,203
6,177
Telecommunications
2,524
1,517
2,495
1,487
Travel, staff development & entertainment
7,169
7,015
6,825
6,648
Utilities and rates
6,556
6,278
6,324
6,022
55
32
55
30
9,035
8,381
8,728
7,800
99,552
95,870
97,131
92,867
Operating lease rental expenses
Write-offs during the year**
Other
Total other expenses
*Includes workers’ compensation insurance, payroll tax and other employment on-costs. The on-costs liability associated with the recognition
of annual leave and long service leave liability is included at note 32. Superannuation contributions accrued as part of the provision for leave are
employee benefits and are not included in employment on-costs.
**Additional details on write-offs during the year are included at note 46.
81
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2011
18 Income tax
Consolidated
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
(a) Income tax expense/(benefit)
Current tax
3
25
(121)
(35)
(118)
(10)
Operating result from continuing operations
(118)
(10)
Aggregate income tax (benefit)/expense
(118)
(10)
(134)
(45)
Deferred tax
Income tax expense is attributable to:
Deferred income tax (revenue)/expense included in income tax expense comprises:
Decrease/(increase) in deferred tax assets (note 28)
Increase in deferred tax liabilities (note 28)
13
(121)
10
(35)
Income tax is only in relation to the controlled entity ECURL which includes overseas branches.
(b) Numerical reconciliation of income tax expense to prima facie tax payable
Operating result from continuing operations before income tax expense
Less: Non taxable operating result from Australian operations
32,734
21,499
(32,979)
(21,443)
(245)
56
Tax at the Australian tax rate of 30% (2010 – 30%)
(73)
17
Difference in overseas tax rates
(38)
(26)
Deferred tax under-provision
Previously unrecognised tax losses used to reduce current tax expense
19
10
(26)
(17)
(118)
(16)
Tax effect of amounts which are not deductible (assessable) in calculating taxable income:
-
(10)
Income tax expense adjusted for permanent differences
-
(10)
Tax losses carried forward not recognised
-
16
Sundry items
Total income tax expense
(118)
(10)
(c) Amounts recognised directly in equity
Aggregate current and deferred tax arising in the reporting period and not recognised in
net profit or loss but directly debited or credited to equity
82
Net deferred tax – credited directly to equity
-
(7)
-
(7)
18 Income tax (CONTINUED)
Consolidated
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
225
228
68
68
(d) Tax losses
Unused tax losses for which no deferred tax asset has been recognised
Potential tax benefit @ 30%
All unused tax losses were incurred by the New Zealand branch.
19 Cash and cash equivalents
Consolidated
Cash at bank
Bank Bills
Cash held in imprests
Total cash and cash equivalents
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
9,503
8,950
8,580
7,816
24,435
48,202
23,887
47,176
25
25
24
25
33,963
57,177
32,491
55,017
Reconciliation to cash at the end of the year
The above figures are reconciled to cash at the end of the financial year as shown in the statements of cash flows as
follows:
Consolidated
Unrestricted cash
Restricted funds (note 35)
Balances per statements of cash flows
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
27,589
51,638
26,117
49,478
6,374
5,539
6,374
5,539
33,963
57,177
32,491
55,017
83
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2011
20 Receivables
Consolidated
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
12,282
8,761
11,629
8,103
Current
Trade receivables and student fees
Less: Provision for impaired receivables
Deferred Government contribution for superannuation
(843)
(511)
(843)
(511)
11,439
8,250
10,786
7,592
2,952
3,144
2,952
3,144
1,455
1,583
1,455
1,583
15,846
12,977
15,193
12,319
Deferred Government contribution for superannuation
25,577
24,548
25,577
24,548
Total trade and other receivables
41,423
37,525
40,770
36,867
GST and withholding tax receivable
Total current receivables
Non-current
Impaired receivables
As at 31 December 2011 current receivables of the consolidated entity with a nominal value of $0.8m (2010: $0.5m) were
impaired. It was assessed that a portion of the receivables is expected to be recovered.
The ageing analysis of these receivables is as follows:
Consolidated
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
3 to 6 months
309
314
Over 6 months
534
197
843
511
As of 31 December 2011, trade receivables of $3.3m (2010: $2.9m) were past due but not impaired. These relate to a
number of independent customers for whom there is no recent history of default.
The ageing analysis of these receivables is as follows:
Consolidated
2011
3 months or less
3 to 6 months
84
2010
$’000
$’000
2,748
2,746
519
203
3,267
2,949
20 Receivables (CONTINUED)
Movements in the provision for impaired receivables are as follows:
Consolidated
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
At 1 January
511
1,268
Provision for impairment recognised during the year
570
-
Receivables written off during the year as uncollectible
Amounts recovered during the year
At 31 December
(54)
(114)
(184)
(643)
843
511
The creation and release of the provision for impaired receivables has been included in ‘Impairment of assets’ in the
income statements. Amounts charged to the provision account are generally written off when there is no expectation of
recovering additional cash.
The other amounts within receivables do not contain impaired assets and are not past due. Based on credit history, it is
expected that these amounts will be received when due.
21 Inventories
Consolidated
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
2,041
2,505
1,626
2,065
Current
Trading stock
at cost
22Derivative financial instruments
Consolidated
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Forward foreign exchange contracts – cash flow hedges
-
218
-
218
Total derivative financial instruments (asset)
-
218
-
218
Forward foreign exchange contracts – cash flow hedges
1
242
1
242
Total derivative financial instruments (liability)
1
242
1
242
(1)
(24)
(1)
(24)
Current assets
Current liabilities
Net derivative financial instruments
85
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2011
22 Derivative financial instruments
(a) Instruments used by the consolidated entity
The consolidated entity is party to derivative financial instruments in the normal course of business in order to hedge
exposure to fluctuations in foreign exchange rates in accordance with the University’s financial risk management policies
(refer to note 45).
Forward exchange contracts – cash flow hedges
In order to protect against exchange rate movements, the University has entered into a forward exchange contract to
purchase United Stated Dollars and Great British Pounds.
These contracts are hedging obligations for payments for the ensuing financial year. The contracts are timed to mature
when payments for major shipments of component parts are scheduled to be made.
The portion of the gain or loss on the hedging instrument that is determined to be an effective hedge is recognised directly
in equity. When the cash flows occur, the University adjusts the initial measurement of the component recognised in the
balance sheets by the related amount deferred in equity.
(b) Interest rate and foreign exchange risk
For an analysis of the sensitivity of derivatives to interest rate and foreign exchange risk refer to note 45.
23 Other financial assets
Consolidated
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Term deposits
70,351
50,781
70,342
50,772
Total current other financial assets
70,351
50,781
70,342
50,772
Current
Held to maturity
Non-current
Available for sale investments
1,400
1,544
1,400
1,544
Investment in managed funds*
16,484
19,056
16,484
19,056
Total non-current other financial assets
17,884
20,600
17,884
20,600
Total other financial assets
88,235
71,381
88,226
71,372
Investment in shares
*During 2011, the University received $2.6m (2010: $1.1m) capital distributions from a fund that is in the process of being gradually wound-up.
These capital distributions have been accounted for as a reduction in the carrying value of the investments. Fair value changes of these fund
continue to be recognised in equity (refer note 34). The cumulative gains and losses of this fund will be included in the income statement once the
winding-up of the fund is completed and the investment in the fund is derecognised.
86
24 Non-current assets classified as held for sale
Consolidated
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
-
262
-
262
Land
31,516
-
31,516
-
Total non-current assets classified as held for sale
31,516
262
31,516
262
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
12,224
9,488
12,152
9,444
2,904
3,187
2,839
2,927
15,128
12,675
14,991
12,371
Plant and equipment
25 Other non-financial assets
Consolidated
Parent entity
Current
Accrued income
Advances and prepayments
Total current other non-financial assets
87
88
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Disposals
Accumulated depreciation
on disposals
Write-offs during the year
Accumulated depreciation
on write-offs
Revaluation increment/
(decrement)
Impairment charge recognised
in profit and loss
Classified as non-current
assets held for sale
Depreciation charge
-
25,539
Accumulated depreciation
Net book amount
-
25,539
25,539
– Valuation
– Cost
At 31 December 2010
Closing net book amount
(65,974)
63,931
Additions
Transfers/rounding
27,582
Opening net book amount
Year ended 31 December 2010
27,582
Accumulated depreciation
Net book amount
-
27,582
$’000
– Valuation
– Cost
At 1 January 2010
Consolidated
Work in
progress
-
-
-
160,109
-
160,109
526,555
-
526,555
-
526,555
10,307
160,109
(11,175)
-
-
-
(21,010)
-
-
-
-
-
548,433
548,433
-
548,433
$’000
Buildings
15,015
-
-
(1,267)
-
-
-
(22,781)
-
169,142
169,142
-
169,142
$’000
Land
26 Property, plant and equipment
11,149
-
-
11,149
11,149
471
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
10,678
10,678
-
-
10,678
$’000
Service
concession
assets –
land
52,922
(566)
-
53,488
52,922
34,606
(377)
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
18,693
18,693
(189)
-
18,882
$’000
Service
concession
assets –
buildings
-
10,496
(27)
10,523
-
10,496
1,537
(934)
-
-
(2,852)
-
-
-
-
-
12,745
12,745
(24)
12,769
$’000
Leasehold
improvements
-
12,498
-
12,498
-
12,498
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
113
12,385
12,385
-
12,385
$’000
Works
of Art
11,332
(2,983)
-
14,315
11,332
4,038
(2,983)
-
-
-
2,652
(2,652)
-
-
-
10,277
10,277
(2,652)
-
12,929
$’000
Library
Collections
187
(204)
-
391
187
(1)
(61)
-
-
-
-
-
94
(111)
101
165
165
(237)
-
402
$’000
Motor
Vehicles
8,797
(22,730)
-
31,527
8,797
(1)
(2,795)
(262)
(137)
-
69
(76)
682
(949)
2,250
10,016
10,016
(20,864)
-
30,880
$’000
Other
equipment
and
furniture
2,609
(7,488)
-
10,097
2,609
2
(1,407)
-
-
-
-
-
1,498
(1,500)
1,363
2,653
2,653
(7,583)
-
10,236
$’000
Computing
equipment
822,193
(33,998)
709,685
146,506
822,193
-
(19,732)
(262)
(137)
(25,129)
2,721
(2,728)
2,274
(25,341)
67,758
822,769
822,769
(31,549)
742,729
111,589
$’000
Total
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2011
Consolidated
(26,857)
-
7,497
-
(31,516)
-
14,156
123,389
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
(62,310)
11,307
Disposals
Accumulated depreciation on
disposals
Write-offs during the year
Accumulated depreciation
on write-offs
Revaluation increments/
(decrements)
Reclassifications in/(out)
Classified as non-current
assets held for sale
Depreciation charge
Transfers/rounding
Closing net book amount
-
123,389
-
123,389
-
-
11,307
– Valuation
Accumulated depreciation
Net book amount
– Cost
11,307
At 31 December 2011
-
48,078
-
160,109
25,539
Additions
$’000
$’000
Opening net book amount
Year ended 31 December 2011
Land
Work in
progress
555,650
-
555,650
-
555,650
46,713
(10,793)
-
-
(5,575)
-
-
-
(1,250)
-
526,555
$’000
Buildings
11,149
-
-
11,149
11,149
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
11,149
$’000
Service
concession
assets –
land
26 Property, plant and equipment (CONTINUED)
89
51,852
(1,636)
-
53,488
51,852
-
(1,070)
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
52,922
$’000
Service
concession
assets –
buildings
10,101
(30)
10,131
-
10,101
(1)
(842)
-
-
448
-
-
-
-
-
10,496
$’000
Leasehold
improvements
12,537
-
12,537
-
12,537
-
-
-
-
-
-
(26)
-
-
65
12,498
$’000
Works
of Art
6,116
(4,415)
-
10,531
6,116
1,440
(1,297)
-
(5,359)
-
-
-
-
-
-
11,332
$’000
Library
Collections
193
(247)
-
440
193
(1)
(65)
-
-
-
-
-
14
(17)
75
187
$’000
Motor
Vehicles
8,130
(25,019)
-
33,149
8,130
1
(2,883)
(37)
-
-
17
(20)
373
(426)
2,308
8,797
$’000
Other
equipment
and
furniture
2,433
(7,157)
-
9,590
2,433
-
(1,498)
(15)
-
-
-
-
139
(141)
1,339
2,609
$’000
Computing
equipment
792,857
(38,504)
701,707
129,654
792,857
(2)
(18,448)
(31,568)
(5,359)
2,370
17
(46)
526
(28,691)
51,865
822,193
$’000
Total
90
Parent entity
-
Asset reclassification
-
Classified as non-current assets
held for sale
Depreciation charge
-
-
25,539
-
Accumulated depreciation
Net book amount
-
25,539
– Valuation
– Cost
At 31 December 2010
160,109
-
160,109
-
160,109
-
Impairment charge recognised
in profit and loss
(1,267)
-
25,539
-
Revaluation increment/
(decrement)
Closing net book amount
-
Accumulated depreciation
on write-offs
-
-
-
Write-off during the year
-
(22,781)
15,015
-
Accumulated depreciation
on disposals
-
-
Disposals
-
169,142
169,142
-
-
(65,974)
63,931
Additions
-
169,142
Transfers/rounding
27,582
Opening net book amount
Year ended 31 December 2010
27,582
-
Accumulated depreciation
Net book amount
-
27,582
$’000
$’000
– Valuation
– Cost
At 1 January 2010
Land
Work in
progress
-
526,555
-
526,555
-
526,555
10,307
(11,175)
-
-
(21,010)
-
-
-
-
-
548,433
548,433
-
-
548,433
$’000
Buildings
11,149
-
-
11,149
11,149
471
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
10,678
10,678
-
-
-
10,678
$’000
Service
concession
assets –
land
26 Property, plant and equipment (CONTINUED)
52,922
(566)
-
53,488
52,922
34,606
(377)
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
18,693
18,693
-
(189)
-
18,882
$’000
Service
concession
assets –
buildings
-
10,460
-
10,460
-
10,460
1,537
(931)
-
-
(2,852)
-
-
-
-
-
12,706
12,706
-
-
12,706
$’000
Leasehold
improvements
-
12,498
-
12,498
-
12,498
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
113
12,385
12,385
-
-
12,385
$’000
Works
of Art
11,332
(2,983)
-
14,315
11,332
4,038
(2,983)
-
-
-
2,652
(2,652)
-
-
-
10,277
10,277
-
(2,652)
-
12,929
$’000
Library
Collections
(22,658)
8,776
(196)
186
31,434
8,776
-
(2,791)
(262)
(137)
-
69
(76)
682
(949)
2,246
9,994
9,994
-
(20,794)
-
30,788
$’000
-
382
186
-
(61)
-
-
-
-
-
77
(93)
101
162
162
-
(212)
-
374
$’000
Motor
Vehicles
Other
equipment
and
furniture
2,564
(7,389)
-
9,953
2,564
-
(1,395)
-
-
-
-
-
1,490
(1,491)
1,351
2,609
2,609
-
(7,484)
-
10,093
$’000
Computing
equipment
822,090
(33,792)
709,622
146,260
822,090
-
(19,713)
(262)
(137)
(25,129)
2,721
(2,728)
2,249
(25,314)
67,742
822,661
822,661
-
(31,331)
742,666
111,326
$’000
Total
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2011
Parent entity
-
-
-
-
-
-
Write-offs during the year
Accumulated depreciation
on write-offs
Revaluation increments/
(decrements)
Reclassifications in/(out)
Classified as non-current
assets held for sale
Depreciation charge
-
11,307
Accumulated depreciation
Net book amount
-
11,307
– Fair value
– Cost
At 31 December 2011
11,307
-
Accumulated depreciation
on disposals
Closing net book amount
-
Disposals
(62,310)
48,078
Transfers/rounding
25,539
Additions
555,650
123,389
123,389
-
123,389
555,650
-
555,650
-
46,713
-
(10,793)
-
-
-
(5,575)
-
-
-
(1,250)
-
526,555
$’000
Buildings
14,156
(31,516)
-
7,497
-
-
-
(26,857)
-
160,109
$’000
$’000
Opening net book amount
Year ended 31 December 2011
Land
Work in
progress
1,149
-
-
11,149
11,149
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
11,149
$’000
Service
concession
assets –
land
26 Property, plant and equipment (CONTINUED)
91
51,852
(1,636)
-
53,488
51,852
-
(1,070)
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
52,922
$’000
Service
concession
assets –
buildings
10,068
-
10,068
-
10,068
-
(840)
-
-
448
-
-
-
-
-
10,460
$’000
Leasehold
improvements
12,537
-
12,537
-
12,537
-
-
-
-
-
-
(26)
-
-
65
12,498
$’000
Works
of Art
6,116
(4,415)
-
10,531
6,116
1,440
(1,297)
-
(5,359)
-
-
-
-
-
-
11,332
$’000
Library
Collections
193
(247)
-
440
193
-
(65)
-
-
-
-
-
14
(17)
75
186
$’000
Motor
Vehicles
8,108
(24,944)
-
33,052
8,108
-
(2,880)
(37)
-
-
17
(20)
373
(426)
2,305
8,776
$’000
Other
equipment
and
furniture
2,396
(7,047)
-
9,443
2,396
-
(1,487)
(15)
-
-
-
-
139
(141)
1,336
2,564
$’000
Computing
equipment
792,765
(38,289)
701,644
129,410
792,765
(1)
(18,432)
(31,568)
(5,359)
2,370
17
(46)
526
(28,691)
51,859
822,090
$’000
Total
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2011
26 Property, plant and equipment (CONTINUED)
(a) Valuations of land, buildings and works of art
Land, buildings and leasehold improvements were revalued as at 31 December 2011 by independent professional valuers.
The fair value of all land has been determined by reference to recent market transactions and the fair value of buildings and
leasehold improvements have been determined by reference to the cost of replacing the remaining future economic benefits,
refer to note 2(l).
Works of art are heritage assets and have been valued as at 31 December 2009 by independent professional valuers,
the fair value of works of art has been determined by reference to recent market transactions.
(b) Service concession assets
The University has entered into a Service Concession Arrangement with Campus Living Villages (‘CLV’), an entity that
specialises in the construction, operation and maintenance of long-term student accommodation services. As part of this
arrangement, CLV will construct a 355 bed student village at the Mt Lawley Campus and will undertake refurbishment
of existing accommodation at Mt Lawley, Joondalup and Bunbury campuses. CLV will assume management of all such
accommodation. CLV is compensated for the provision of capital works to the University through the granting of rights by the
University to CLV allowing CLV to operate and enjoy full access to such assets, including the retention of all rental income.
The term of the arrangement is for 36.5 years in total, at which time CLV management and operational rights will cease, and
the full operation and management will return to the University. The financial statements reflect the control of all such assets
by the University pursuant to the principles of service concession accounting.
A breakdown of service concession assets at reporting date is:
Consolidated
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Land
11,149
11,149
11,149
11,149
Buildings
51,852
52,922
51,852
52,922
Net book amount
63,001
64,071
63,001
64,071
27 Investment property
Consolidated
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
13,534
12,908
13,534
At fair value
92
Opening balance at 1 January
12,908
Gain/(loss) on revaluation
(1,995)
Closing balance as at 31 December
10,913
(626)
12,908
(1,995)
10,913
(626)
12,908
27 Investment property (CONTINUED)
(a) Amounts recognised in profit and loss for investment properties
Consolidated
Fair value of investment property
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
(1,995)
(626)
-
Net rental income
Parent entity
621
(1,995)
(5)
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
(1,995)
(626)
-
621
(1,995)
(5)
(b) Valuation basis
The fair value of all land has been determined by reference to recent market transactions and the fair value of buildings have
been determined by reference to the cost of replacing the remaining future economic benefits. The investment properties
have been valued as at 31 December 2011 by independent professional valuers.
28 Deferred tax assets and liabilities
Consolidated
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Deferred tax assets
193
59
-
-
Total deferred tax assets
193
59
-
-
Accrued expenses
5
6
-
-
Accounts payable
3
4
-
-
Customer deposits
2
15
-
-
Sundry other
5
6
-
-
178
30
-
-
193
61
-
-
(2)
-
-
193
59
-
-
15
29
-
-
178
30
-
-
193
59
-
-
The balance comprises temporary differences
attributable to:
Amounts recognised in profit or loss
Tax losses
Amounts recognised directly in equity
Revaluation of deferred tax opening balance
Net deferred tax assets
Deferred tax assets to be recovered within 12 months
Deferred tax assets to be recovered after more
than 12 months
-
93
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2011
28 Deferred tax assets and liabilities (CONTINUED)
Movements
Consolidated
$’000
Movements
At 1 January 2010
147
Charged to the income statements
45
Charged directly to equity
(2)
Retrospective adjustments
(131)
At 31 December 2010
59
At 1 January 2011
59
Credited to the income statements
134
Charged directly to equity
-
Retrospective adjustments
-
At 31 December 2011
193
Consolidated
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Deferred tax liability
87
74
-
-
Total deferred tax liabilities
87
74
-
-
32
38
-
-
The balance comprises temporary differences
attributable to:
Amounts recognised in operating result
Accounts receivable
Accrued income
31
23
-
-
Sundry other
17
13
-
-
Accelerated capital allowance
2
3
-
-
Depreciation
5
6
-
-
87
83
-
-
(9)
-
-
Amounts recognised directly in equity
Revaluation of deferred tax opening balance
94
-
Net deferred tax liabilities
87
74
-
-
Deferred tax liabilities to be settled after more
than 12 months
87
74
-
-
87
74
-
-
28 Deferred tax assets and liabilities (CONTINUED)
Movements
Consolidated
$’000
Movements
At 1 January 2010
77
Charged to the income statements
10
Charged directly to equity
(9)
Retrospective adjustments
(4)
At 31 December 2010
74
At 1 January 2011
74
Charged to the income statements
13
Charged directly to equity
-
Retrospective adjustments
-
At 31 December 2011
87
29 Intangible assets
Consolidated
Computer
software
Publishing
titles
Library
collections
Total
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
7,225
-
-
7,225
(7,225)
-
-
(7,225)
-
-
At 31 December 2010
– Cost
– Accumulated amortisation
Net book amount
Consolidated
Computer
software
Publishing
titles
Library
collections
Total
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Opening net book amount
-
-
-
-
Reclassification in/(out)
-
-
5,359
5,359
Additions
-
217
930
1,147
Amortisation charge
-
-
Closing net book amount
-
217
7,150
217
Year ended 31 December 2011
(868)
5,421
(868)
5,638
At 31 December 2011
Cost
Accumulated amortisation and impairment
Net book amount
(7,150)
-
217
9,613
16,980
(4,192)
(11,342)
5,421
5,638
95
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2011
30 Trade and other payables
Consolidated
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
11,418
12,834
11,184
12,542
-
111
-
111
41
25
41
25
280
418
-
-
Current
Trade and other payables
CGS liability to Australian Government
OS HELP and Superannuation Supplementation
Liability to Australian Government
Department of Education and Training
GST Payable
Total trade and other payables
562
529
486
480
12,301
13,917
11,711
13,158
The fair value of trade and other payables is equal to their carrying value.
Foreign currency risk
The carrying amounts of the consolidated entity’s trade and other payables are denominated in the following currencies:
Consolidated
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
12,165
13,830
11,606
13,120
21
36
-
-
SG Dollar
1
-
1
-
US Dollar
114
51
104
38
12,301
13,917
11,711
13,158
Australian Dollars
GB Pounds
For an analysis of the sensitivity of trade and other payables to foreign currency risk refer to note 45.
31 Borrowings
Consolidated
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Current – unsecured
WA Treasury Corporation
2,170
29,754
2,170
29,754
Total current borrowings
2,170
29,754
2,170
29,754
Non-current – unsecured
96
WA Treasury Corporation
42,387
44,558
42,387
44,558
Total non-current borrowings
42,387
44,558
42,387
44,558
Total borrowings
44,557
74,312
44,557
74,312
31 Borrowings (CONTINUED)
(a) Financing arrangements
Unrestricted access was available at balance date to the following lines of credit:
Consolidated
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
100,852
101,059
100,852
101,059
37,658
17,608
37,658
17,608
138,510
118,667
138,510
118,667
44,557
74,312
44,557
74,312
1,239
1,126
1,239
1,126
45,796
75,438
45,796
75,438
Credit standby arrangements
Total facilities
WA Treasury Corporation
Bank facilities
Total facilities
Used at balance date
WA Treasury Corporation
Bank facilities
Total used at balance date
Unused at balance date
WA Treasury Corporation
56,295
26,747
56,295
26,747
Bank facilities
36,419
16,482
36,419
16,482
92,714
43,229
92,714
43,229
Total unused at balance date
Consolidated
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
138,510
118,667
138,510
118,667
Used at balance date
45,797
75,438
45,797
75,438
Unused at balance date
92,713
43,229
92,713
43,229
Bank loan facilities
Total facilities
The current interest rates on loans from WATC range between 5.61% and 7.10%, depending on the type of borrowing
(2010: 4.84% and 7.10%).
A majority of the used bank facilities of $1.239m (2010 – $1.126m) represent credit card balances outstanding as at year
end which are included in trade payables.
97
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2011
31 Borrowings (CONTINUED)
(b) Fair value
The carrying amounts and fair values of borrowings at balance date are:
Consolidated
2011
2010
Carrying
amount
Fair value
Carrying
amount
Fair value
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
44,557
44,557
74,312
74,312
44,557
44,557
74,312
74,312
Carrying
amount
Fair value
Carrying
amount
Fair value
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
On-statement of financial position*
Non-traded financial liabilities
WA Treasury Corporation
Parent Entity
2011
2010
On-statement of financial position*
Non-traded financial liabilities
WA Treasury Corporation
44,557
44,557
74,312
74,312
44,557
44,557
74,312
74,312
*The fair value of borrowings equals their carrying amount, as the impact of discounting is not significant.
(c) Risk exposures
The exposure of the consolidated entity’s borrowings to interest rate changes and the contractual repricing dates at the
balance dates are as follows:
Consolidated
6 months or less
6 to 12 months
1 to 5 years
Over 5 years
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
582
22,722
582
22,722
1,588
7,032
1,588
7,032
42,348
44,438
42,348
44,438
39
120
39
120
44,557
74,312
44,557
74,312
These borrowings are classified as follows:
Current borrowings
Non-current borrowings
2,170
29,754
2,170
29,754
42,387
44,558
42,387
44,558
44,557
74,312
44,557
74,312
The carrying amounts of the consolidated entity’s borrowings are denominated in Australian Dollars.
For an analysis of the sensitivity of borrowings to interest rate risk refer to note 45.
98
32 Provisions
Consolidated
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Current provisions expected to be settled
within 12 months
Employee benefits
Annual leave and other compensated absences
5,780
5,357
5,606
5,247
Long service leave
8,067
7,013
8,012
7,013
Deferred government benefits for superannuation
2,952
3,144
2,952
3,144
Staff bonuses
1,043
850
1,043
850
Superannuation and other post employment benefits
1,797
1,621
1,797
1,621
3
25
-
-
Employee on-costs
960
862
960
862
Provision for service concession liabilities
948
948
948
948
Provision for Income Tax
Other
Subtotal
3,196
-
3,196
-
24,746
19,820
24,514
19,685
426
468
426
468
6,889
6,521
6,889
6,521
821
794
821
794
Current provisions expected to be settled after more
than 12 months
Employee benefits
Annual leave and other compensated absences
Long service leave
Superannuation and other post employment benefits
Employee on-costs
Subtotal
Total current provisions
507
488
507
488
8,643
8,271
8,643
8,271
33,389
28,091
33,157
27,956
6,638
6,213
6,573
6,092
25,577
24,548
25,577
24,548
343
376
343
376
1,147
664
1,147
664
455
422
455
422
31,288
32,236
31,288
32,236
957
-
957
-
Non-current
Employee benefits
Long service leave
Deferred government benefits for superannuation
Provision for deferred salary
Superannuation and other post employment benefits
Employee on-costs
Provision for service concession liabilities
Other
Total non-current provisions
66,405
64,459
66,340
64,338
Total provisions
99,794
92,550
99,497
92,294
99
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2011
32 Provisions (CONTINUED)
Current provisions expected to be settled after more than 12 months represents a current obligation of the consolidated entity,
however it is the view of the management that they are expected to be settled after more than 12 months.
Annual leave liabilities have been classified as current as there is no unconditional right to defer settlement for at least
12 months after reporting date.
Long service leave liabilities have been classified as current where there is no unconditional right to defer settlement for
at least 12 months after the reporting date.
The settlement of annual and long service leave liabilities gives rise to the payment of employment on-costs including
workers’ compensation premiums and payroll tax. The provision is measured at the present value of expected future
payments. The associated expense, apart from the unwinding of the discount (finance cost), is included at note 17.
(a) Movements in provisions
Movements in provision during the financial year, other than employee benefits, are set out below:
Provision
for Income
Tax
Employment
on-costs
Service
concession
liabilities
$’000
Other
$’000
$’000
25
1,350
948
-
-
117
948
3,196
$’000
Consolidated – 2011
Current
Carrying amount at start of year
Additional provisions recognised
Amounts incurred and charged
(22)
-
(948)
-
Unused amounts reversed
-
-
-
-
Carrying amount at end of year
3
1,467
948
3,196
-
422
32,236
-
-
957
Consolidated – 2011
Non-current
Carrying amount at start of year
Additional provisions recognised
-
33
Amounts incurred and charged
-
-
Carrying amount at end of year
-
455
31,288
957
233
1,061
948
-
-
289
948
-
(948)
-
Consolidated – 2010
Current
Carrying amount at start of year
Additional provisions recognised
(948)
-
25
1,350
948
-
Carrying amount at start of year
-
345
8,178
-
Additional provisions recognised
-
77
24,058
-
Carrying amount at end of year
-
422
32,236
-
Amounts incurred and charged
Carrying amount at end of year
(208)
-
Consolidated – 2010
Non-current
100
33 Other liabilities
Consolidated
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
13,830
13,661
13,766
13,363
1,202
3,087
1,202
3,087
Current
Fees and grants received in advance
Financial assistance received in advance
Accrued expenses
10,744
13,172
10,654
13,023
Total other liabilities
25,776
29,920
25,622
29,473
34 Reserves and retained earnings
Consolidated
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
384,488
381,478
384,488
381,478
2,962
4,655
2,962
4,655
(a) Reserves
Property plant and equipment revaluation reserve
Investments revaluation reserve
Hedging reserve – cash flow hedges
(1)
(24)
(1)
Foreign currency translation reserve
(204)
(188)
-
-
387,449
386,109
387,245
385,921
Consolidated
(24)
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
381,478
427,681
381,478
427,681
Movements:
Property plant and equipment revaluation reserves
Balance 1 January
Revaluation – gross
Transfers to retained earnings
Balance 31 December
2,372
638
(25,129)
(21,074)
384,488
381,478
4,655
2,632
2,372
638
(25,129)
(21,074)
384,488
381,478
4,655
2,632
Investment revaluation reserve
Balance 1 January
Gain/(loss) on revaluation
Impairments
Balance 31 December
(2,164)
778
(2,164)
778
471
1,245
471
1,245
2,962
4,655
2,962
4,655
101
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2011
34 Reserves and retained earnings (CONTINUED)
Consolidated
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Hedging reserve – cash flow hedges
Balance 1 January
(24)
(1)
(24)
(1)
Revaluation – gross
(1)
(24)
(1)
(24)
Transfer to inventory and other assets – gross
24
Balance 31 December
(1)
(24)
(1)
(188)
(95)
-
1
24
1
(24)
Foreign currency translation reserve
Balance 1 January
Currency translation differences arising during the year
Balance 31 December
-
(16)
(93)
-
-
(204)
(188)
-
-
(b) Retained earnings
Movements in retained earnings were as follows:
Consolidated
Retained earnings at the beginning of the year
Operating result for the period
Transfer from property, plant and equipment reserve*
Retained earnings at 31 December
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
419,932
377,384
417,582
375,532
32,852
21,509
32,938
20,976
(638)
452,146
21,074
419,967
(638)
449,882
21,074
417,582
*Transfer from revaluation reserve of $638,000 (2010: $21,074,000) represents realisation of revaluation surplus on assets retired.
(c) Nature and purpose of reserves
(i) Property, plant and equipment reserve
The property, plant and equipment revaluation reserve is used to record increments and decrements on the revaluation of
non-current assets, as described in note 2(l).
(ii) Investments revaluation reserve
Changes in the fair value and exchange differences arising on revaluation of investments, such as equities, classified as
available-for-sale financial assets, are taken to the investments revaluation reserve, as described in note 2(k). Amounts are
recognised in profit and loss when the associated assets were sold or impaired.
(iii) Hedging reserve – cash flow hedges
The hedging reserve is used to record gains or losses on a hedging instrument in a cash flow hedge that are recognised
directly in equity, as described in note 2(u). Amounts are recognised in profit and loss when the associated hedged transaction
affects profit and loss.
(iv) Foreign currency translation reserve
Exchange differences arising on translation of the foreign controlled branches of the University’s subsidiary are taken to the
foreign currency translation reserve, as described in note 2(u).
102
35 Restricted funds
Consolidated
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
6,374
5,539
6,374
5,539
Restricted funds
ECU Foundation
The purpose of the ECU Foundation is to hold funds received from external sources. These funds are appropriated for a
variety of educational and research purposes ranging from scholarships, research, prizes and special lecture programs.
The Foundation was established to aid and promote excellence in educational and research activities by seeking, receiving
and administering private gifts for the benefit of the University and its community.
36 Key management personnel disclosures
Remuneration of members of the accountable authority
For the purposes of the Financial Management Act the University Council is the accountable authority of the University.
The number of members of the accountable authority, whose total of fees, salaries, superannuation, non-monetary benefits
and other benefits for the financial year, fall within the following bands are:
2011
2010
19
18
$100,001 to $110,000
-
1
$110,001 to $120,000
1
-
$140,001 to $150,000
1
1
$270,001 to $280,000
-
1
$290,001 to $300,000
1
-
$620,001 to $630,000
-
1
$660,001 to $670,000
1
-
$ 1,224
$ 1,139
Nil to $10,000
The total aggregate remuneration of members of the accountable authority (‘000)
Council members include University employees who may be ex-officio members or elected staff members. No council
member has received any remuneration in his/her capacity as a council member. 17 members (2010:18 members) of the
accountable authority received no remuneration, fees, superannuation or benefits.
The total remuneration includes the superannuation expense incurred by the University in respect of members of the
accountable authority.
No members of the accountable authority are members of the pension scheme.
103
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2011
36 Key management personnel disclosures (CONTINUED)
Remuneration of senior officers
The number of senior officers, other than senior officers reported as members of the accountable authority, whose total fees,
salaries, superannuation, non-monetary benefits and other benefits for the financial year, fall within the following bands are:
2011
2010
$190,001 to $200,000
-
1
$240,001 to $250,000
1
1
$250,001 to $260,000
-
1
$300,001 to $310,000
1
1
$320,001 to $330,000
1
1
$340,001 to $350,000
1
2
$350,001 to $360,000
-
1
$370,001 to $380,000
2
-
$380,001 to $390,000
1
-
$ 2,358
$ 2,377
The total aggregate remuneration of senior officers (‘000)
The superannuation included here represents the superannuation expense incurred by the University in respect of senior
officers other than senior officers reported as members of the accountable authority.
One senior officer is a member of the pension scheme.
37 Remuneration of auditors
Remuneration to the Auditor General and non related audit firms for the financial year is as follows:
Consolidated
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
291
278
235
219
20
23
3
-
311
301
238
219
Assurance services
Audit services
Office of the Auditor General (OAG)
Auditing the accounts, financial statements and
performance indicators
Non-OAG audit firms for the audit or review of financial
reports of any entity in the consolidated entity
Total remuneration for audit services
104
38 Contingencies
Contingent liabilities
In addition to the liabilities incorporated in the financial statements, the consolidated entity has the following contingent
liabilities:
Native title claims
Native title claims have been made on the University land for which judgement was handed down on 19 September 2006.
It was held that Native Title exists in the area which was the subject of the claim. The existence of these Native Title rights
is currently being appealed.
Contaminated sites
During 2011, the Bunbury campus was classified as a possible contaminated site by DEC, further investigation is required
to determine the contaminate status of this site. ECU is currently unable to assess the likely outcome of the classification
process and accordingly, it is not practical to estimate the financial effect or to identify the uncertainties relating to the amount
or timing of outflows.
Outstanding litigation
ECU is a defendant in an action with an external party. It is too early at this stage to determine the likely outcome of the action
or determine the quantum of the claim. The claim is currently being defended.
Workers compensation claims
The consolidated entity may have some potential liability towards workers compensation claims. The process of defending
the claims are still at an early stage, however the claims are not material and sufficient insurance is in place to cover the
potential liability.
Other contingencies
ECU has received advice of non-accreditation of a new course which is currently in the process of being appealed. It is too
early at this stage to determine the likely outcome of the appeal process.
39 Commitments
(a) Capital expenditure commitments
Capital expenditure commitments, being contracted capital expenditure additional to the amounts reported in the financial
statements, including amounts for infrastructure, are payable as follows:
Consolidated
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
16,411
21,815
16,411
21,815
16,411
21,815
16,411
21,815
Property, plant and equipment
Within one year
105
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2011
39 Commitments (CONTINUED)
(b) Lease commitments: The consolidated entity as lessee
(i) Operating leases
Commitments in relation to leases contracted for at the reporting date but not recognised in the financial statements as
liabilities, are payable as follows:
Consolidated
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Within one year
432
459
247
297
Later than one year but not later than five years
458
560
247
342
3
32
-
-
893
1,051
494
639
893
1,051
494
639
Later than five years
Representing:
Cancellable operating lease
(c) Other expenditure commitments
Commitments in relation to purchase orders in existence at the reporting date, but not recognised as liabilities, are payable
as follows:
Consolidated
Within one year
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
6,504
8,076
6,504
8,076
40 Related parties
Subsidiaries
The University had one related party during the financial year. Interests in subsidiaries are set out in note 41.
(a) Transactions with related parties
The following transactions occurred with related parties:
Consolidated
106
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Sales of goods and services
-
-
13
7
Purchases of goods
-
-
37
22
41 Subsidiaries
The consolidated financial statements incorporate the assets, liabilities and results of the following subsidiary in accordance
with the accounting policy described in note 2(b):
Equity holding
Name of entity
Country of
incorporation
Class of shares
Australia
Australian public
company limited
by guarantee
E.C.U. Resources for Learning Ltd
(ECURL)*
2011
2010
100%
100%
* The address of ECURL is 234 Great Eastern Highway, Ascot. WA 6104.
42 Events occurring after the reporting date
No events have occurred since the reporting date that are likely to have a material impact on the financial statements or notes
of the consolidated entity.
43Reconciliation of operating result after income tax to net cash
flows from operating activities
Consolidated
Operating result for the period
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
32,852
21,509
32,938
20,976
19,316
19,732
19,300
19,713
1,995
626
1,995
626
570
-
570
-
Non-cash items:
Depreciation and amortisation expense
Revaluation of investment property
Provision for impairment of receivables
Service concession income
Net gain on disposal of assets
(948)
(948)
(948)
(948)
(8,685)
(3,235)
(8,685)
(3,233)
Net loss on asset write-offs
55
30
55
30
Impairment of investments
471
1,245
471
1,245
-
137
-
137
45,626
39,096
45,696
38,546
Impairment of property, plant and equipment
Subtotal
Change in assets and liabilities
(Increase)/decrease in receivables
(Increase)/decrease in tax assets
(Increase)/decrease in inventories
Increase/(decrease) in trade and other payables
Increase/(decrease) in tax liabilities
Increase/(decrease) in provisions
(6,199)
(134)
438
(5,789)
13
(647)
88
(137)
8,361
(3)
(6,370)
413
(5,298)
(608)
(60)
8,437
-
-
8,192
4,875
8,151
4,983
Subtotal of change in operating assets and liabilities
(3,479)
12,537
(3,104)
12,752
Net cash provided by/(used in) operating activities
42,147
51,633
42,592
51,298
107
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2011
44 Non-cash financing and investing activities
Consolidated
Proceeds accrued from sale of property,
plant and equipment
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
9,087
8,365
9,087
8,365
During the financial year, there were sales of Churchlands property that has been sold but not yet settled and therefore not
reflected in the cash flow statement.
45 Financial risk management
The consolidated entity is exposed to the following financial risks as a result of its activities:
Consolidated
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Cash and cash equivalents
33,963
57,177
32,491
55,017
Trade and other receivables
11,439
8,250
10,785
7,592
-
218
-
218
17,884
20,600
17,884
20,600
Financial assets
Derivative financial instruments
Available-for-sale financial assets
70,351
50,781
70,342
50,772
133,637
137,026
131,502
134,199
Trade and other payable
11,739
13,388
11,225
12,678
Borrowings
44,557
74,312
44,557
74,312
Held-to-maturity investments
Financial liabilities
Derivative financial instruments
1
242
1
242
56,297
87,942
55,783
87,232
(a) Market risk
(i) Foreign exchange and interest risk
The consolidated entity does not trade in foreign currency and is not materially exposed to other price risks (for example,
equity securities or commodity price changes). The University’s exposure to market risk for changes in interest rates relates
primarily to the long-term debt obligations. The University’s borrowings are all obtained through the Western Australian
Treasury Corporation (WATC) and are at fixed rates with varying maturities. The risk is managed by WATC through portfolio
diversification and variation in maturity dates. Other than as detailed in the interest rate sensitivity analysis table below,
the University has limited exposure to interest rate risk because it has no borrowings other than the WATC borrowings.
(ii) Price risk
The consolidated entity investment portfolios’ are exposed to fluctuations in the prices of equity securities. The University’s
investment policy provides strategies for minimisation of price risk with the diversification of that risk through a number of
investment managers and regular independent expert monitoring to ensure that there is no concentration of risk in any
one area.
108
45 Financial risk management (CONTINUED)
(iii) Summarised sensitivity analysis
The following table summarises the sensitivity of the consolidated entity’s financial assets and financial liabilities to interest
rate risk, foreign exchange risk and other price risk.
Consolidated
31 December 2011
-1%
Interest rate risk
+1%
Foreign exchange risk
-10%
+10%
-10%
Other price risk
+10%
Carrying
amount
$’000
Profit
$’000
Equity
$’000
Profit
$’000
Equity
$’000
Profit
$’000
Equity
$’000
Profit
$’000
Equity
$’000
Profit
$’000
Equity
$’000
Profit
$’000
Equity
$’000
33,963
(340)
(340)
340
340
(35)
(35)
35
35
-
-
-
-
Financial assets
Cash and cash
equivalents
Accounts receivable
11,439
-
-
-
-
(19)
(19)
19
19
-
-
-
-
AFS investments
17,884
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
(1,788)
(1,788)
1,788
1,788
Held to maturity
investments
70,351
(704)
(704)
704
704
(1)
(1)
1
1
-
-
-
-
Derivatives – cash
flow hedges
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
(1,044)
(1,044)
1,044
1,044
(55)
(55)
55
55
(1,788)
(1,788)
1,788
1,788
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Trade payables
11,739
-
-
-
-
(14)
(14)
14
14
-
-
-
-
Borrowings
44,557
Sub Total
Financial liabilities
Derivatives – cash
flow hedges
Sub Total
Total increase/
(decrease)
(9)
(9)
9
9
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
(9)
(9)
9
9
(14)
(14)
14
14
-
-
-
-
(1,053)
(1,053)
1,053
1,053
(69)
(69)
69
69
(1,788)
(1,788)
1,788
1,788
109
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2011
45 Financial risk management (CONTINUED)
Consolidated
Interest rate risk
-1%
31 December 2011
Foreign exchange risk
-10%
+10%
+1%
Other price risk
-10%
+10%
Carrying
amount
$’000
Profit
$’000
Equity
$’000
Profit
$’000
Equity
$’000
Profit
$’000
Equity
$’000
Profit
$’000
Equity
$’000
Profit
$’000
Equity
$’000
Profit
$’000
Equity
$’000
57,177
(572)
(572)
572
572
(41)
(41)
41
41
-
-
-
-
Financial assets
Cash and cash
equivalents
Accounts
receivable
8,250
-
-
-
-
(26)
(26)
26
26
-
-
-
-
AFS investments
20,600
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
(2,060)
(2,060)
2,060
2,060
Held to maturity
investments
50,781
(508)
(508)
508
508
(1)
(1)
1
1
-
-
-
-
Derivatives – cash
flow hedges
218
Sub Total
-
-
-
-
(22)
(22)
22
22
-
-
-
-
(1,080)
(1,080)
1,080
1,080
(90)
(90)
90
90
(2,060)
(2,060)
2,060
2,060
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Financial liabilities
Derivatives – cash
flow hedges
242
Trade payables
13,388
-
-
-
-
(9)
(9)
9
9
-
-
-
-
Borrowings
74,312
(178)
(178)
178
178
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
(178)
(178)
178
178
(9)
(9)
9
9
-
-
-
-
(1,258)
(1,258)
1,258
1,258
(99)
(99)
99
99
(2,060)
(2,060)
2,060
2,060
Sub Total
Total increase/
(decrease)
(b)Credit risk
Credit risk arises when there is the possibility of the consolidated entity’s receivables defaulting on their contractual
obligations resulting in financial loss to the University. The consolidated entity measures credit risk on a fair value basis and
monitors risk on a regular basis.
The maximum exposure to credit risk at the reporting date in relation to each class of recognised financial assets is the gross
carrying amount of those assets inclusive of any provisions for impairment.
The consolidated entity trades only with recognised, credit worthy third parties. In addition, receivable balances are monitored
on an ongoing basis with the result that the consolidated entity’s exposure to bad debts is minimal. There are no significant
concentrations of credit risk.
Provision for impairment of financial assets is calculated based on past experience, and current and expected changes
in client credit ratings. For financial assets that are either past due or impaired, refer to note 20.
110
45 Financial risk management (CONTINUED)
(c) Liquidity risk
The consolidated entity is exposed to liquidity risk through its trading in the normal course of business. Liquidity risk arises
when the University is unable to meet its financial obligations as they fall due.
The consolidated entity’s objective is to maintain a balance between continuity of funding and flexibility through the use of
bank loans and finance leases. The consolidated entity has appropriate procedures to manage cash flows by monitoring
forecast cash flows to ensure that sufficient funds are available to meet its commitments.
The tables below analyse the consolidated entity’s financial assets and liabilities based on the remaining period at the
reporting date to the contractual maturity date. The amounts disclosed in the table are the contractual undiscounted cash
flows. Balances due within 12 months equal their carrying balances, as the impact of discounting is not significant.
Consolidated – At 31 December 2011
Less than 1
year
Between 1 and
2 years
Between 2 and
5 years
Over 5 years
Total
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Cash and cash equivalents
33,963
-
-
-
33,963
Trade and other receivables
Financial assets
11,439
-
-
-
11,439
Derivative financial instruments
-
-
-
-
-
Financial assets measured at fair value
-
-
-
17,884
17,884
70,351
-
-
-
70,351
11,739
-
-
-
11,739
2,170
41,970
378
39
44,557
1
-
-
-
1
Financial assets measured at amortised cost
Financial liabilities
Trade and other payables
Borrowings
Derivative financial liabilities
Consolidated – At 31 December 201o
Less than 1
year
Between 1 and
2 years
Between 2 and
5 years
Over 5 years
Total
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Cash and cash equivalents
57,177
-
-
-
57,177
Trade and other receivables
8,250
-
-
-
8,250
218
-
-
-
218
-
-
-
20,600
20,600
50,781
-
-
-
50,781
Financial assets
Derivative financial instruments
Financial assets measured at fair value
Financial assets measured at amortised cost
Financial liabilities
Trade and other payables
13,388
-
-
-
13,388
Borrowings
29,754
2,170
42,268
120
74,312
242
-
-
-
242
Derivative financial liabilities
111
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2011
45 Financial risk management (CONTINUED)
The following are the average interest rates for the above financial assets and liabilities as at 31 December 2011:
Financial assets
1. Cash and cash equivalents – 5.14% p.a (2010: 5.48%)
2. Trade and other receivables – Non-interest bearing financial asset
3. Available-for-sale financial assets – Non-interest bearing financial asset
4. Held to maturity investments – 5.99% p.a (2010: 6.31%)
Financial liability
1. Trade and other payable – Non-interest bearing financial liability
2. Borrowings – 6.68% p.a (2010: 6.28%)
The consolidated entity’s derivative financial instruments will be settled on a gross basis within the next 12 months.
(d) Fair value estimation
The fair value of financial assets and financial liabilities must be estimated for recognition and measurement or for disclosure
purposes.
The fair value of financial instruments traded in active markets (such as publicly traded derivatives, and traded securities)
is based on quoted market prices at the reporting date. The quoted market price used for financial assets held by the
consolidated entity is the current bid price.
The fair value of forward exchange contracts is determined using forward exchange market rates at the reporting date.
The carrying value less impairment provision of trade receivables and payables is a reasonable approximation of their fair
values due to the short-term nature of trade receivables.
46 Write offs
Consolidated
Parent entity
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Receivables written off against provision*
54
114
54
114
Property plant and equipment
29
7
29
7
Inventory
26
24
26
24
109
145
109
145
Total write-offs as approved by the accountable
authority during the financial year
Total write-offs
* The vast majority of the receivables write-offs are relating to international student debts incurred in 2010 and before which have been identified as
irrecoverable.
112
47 Superannuation
Government Employees Superannuation Board
Unfunded Pension and Unfunded Gold State (Lump sum) Schemes
The University has in its staffing profile a number of employees who are members of the Government Employees
Superannuation Board (GESB) Scheme. As the Employer, the University is required to contribute to the scheme
as employees are paid a pension or lump sum pay out. Consequently, an unfunded liability has been created.
The Commonwealth Government is committed to reimbursing the University for payments actually made to
the scheme for these emerging costs.
Pension Scheme
Pension Scheme members receive pension benefits on retirement, death or invalidity. The Fund Share of the pension
benefit, which is based on the member’s contributions plus investment earnings, may be commuted to a lump sum benefit.
The employers do not bear the cost associated with indexation of any pension arising from the Fund Share. The State Share
of the pension benefit, which is fully employer-financed, cannot be commuted to a lump sum benefit.
Gold State Super (transferred benefits)
Some former Pension Scheme members have transferred to Gold State Super. In respect of their transferred benefit the
members receive a lump sum benefit at retirement, death or invalidity which is related to their salary during their employment
and indexed during any deferral period after leaving public sector employment.
Reconciliation of the assets and liabilities recognised in the statement of financial position
Pension Scheme
Defined benefit obligation
(+) Fair value of assets
Gold State Super
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
27,656
26,611
873
1,081
-
-
-
-
27,656
26,611
873
1,081
(-) Unrecognised past service cost
-
-
-
-
(-) Unrecognised net (gain)/loss
-
-
-
-
27,656
26,611
873
1,081
Deficit/(surplus)
Liability/(asset)
Reconciliation of the present value of the defined benefit obligation
Balance at the beginning of the year
Current service cost
Interest cost
Contributions by plan participants
Actuarial (gains) and losses
Benefits paid
Past service cost
Balance at the end of the year
Pension Scheme
Gold State Super
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
26,611
27,931
1,081
1,147
-
-
-
-
1,377
1,402
55
56
-
-
-
-
2,574
106
140
46
(2,906)
(2,828)
(403)
(168)
-
-
-
-
27,656
26,611
873
1,081
113
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2011
47 Superannuation (CONTINUED)
These defined benefit obligations are wholly unfunded, such that there are no Assets. The employer contributes, as required,
to meet the benefits paid.
Pension Scheme
Gold State Super
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Balance at the beginning of the year
-
-
-
-
Expected return on plan assets
-
-
-
-
Reconciliation of the fair value of plan assets:
Actuarial gains and (losses)
-
-
-
-
Contributions by employers
2,906
2,828
403
168
-
-
-
-
Contributions by plan participants
Benefits paid
Balance at the end of the year
(2,906)
(2,828)
-
-
Pension Scheme
Current service cost
Interest cost
Expected return on plan assets
(403)
(168)
-
-
Gold State Super
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
-
-
-
-
1,377
1,402
55
56
-
-
-
-
Net actuarial losses (gains) recognised in year
2,574
106
140
46
Total included in employee benefits expense
3,950
1,508
195
102
Scheme Assets
There are no assets in the pension scheme or Gold State Super for current employees to support the transferred benefits.
Hence, there is
114
„„ No
fair value of Scheme assets;
„„ No
asset allocation of Scheme assets;
„„ No
assets used by the employer;
„„ No
expected return of Scheme assets;
„„ No
actual return on Scheme assets.
47 Superannuation (CONTINUED)
The principal actuarial assumptions used were as follows:
Pension Scheme
Gold State Super
2011
2011
2010
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Discount rate (active members)
3.97%
5.48%
3.97%
5.48%
Discount rate (pensioners)
3.97%
5.48%
3.97%
5.48%
Expected salary increase rates
5.50%
4.50%
5.50%
4.50%
Expected pension increase rates
2.50%
2.50%
2.50%
2.50%
The discount rate is based on the 10 year Government bond rate at the relevant date. The decrement rates used
(e.g. mortality and retirement rates) are based on those used at the last actuarial valuation for the Schemes.
(a) Historic summary
Present value of defined benefit plan
obligation – pension scheme
Fair value of scheme assets
– pension scheme
Present value of defined benefit plan
obligation – gold state super
Fair value of scheme assets
– gold state super
(Surplus)/deficit in scheme
2011
2010
2009
2008
2007
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
27,656
26,611
27,931
31,777
28,509
-
-
-
-
-
873
1,081
1,147
1,098
1,308
-
-
-
-
-
28,529
27,692
29,078
32,875
29,817
(1,536)
2,541
790
63
53
Experience adjustments loss
– scheme liabilities – pension scheme
(314)
452
Experience adjustments loss
–scheme liabilities – gold state super
24
56
45
The experience adjustment for Scheme liabilities represents the actuarial loss due to a change in the liabilities arising
from the Scheme’s experience (e.g. membership movements, unit entitlements) and excludes the effect of the changes
in assumptions (e.g. movements in the bond rate and changes in pensioner mortality assumptions).
Expected employer contributions
Expected employer contributions
Pension Scheme
Gold State Super
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
2875
77
115
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2011
48 Acquittal of Australian Government financial assistance
48.1 DEEWR – CGS and Other DEEWR Grants
Parent entity
Financial assistance
received in CASH during
the reporting period (total
cash received from the
Australian Government
for the Programmes)
Commonw’lth Grant
Scheme1
2011
2010
2011
2010
2011
2010
2011
2010
2011
2010
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
116,392
116,947
646
624
2,359
1,362
64
72
-
-
-
1,042
118
118
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
116,392
116,947
646
624
2,359
1,362
64
72
-
-
-
1,042
118
118
-
-
-
-
-
50
(37)
(53)
135
190
-
-
-
-
116,392
116,947
646
624
2,359
1,412
27
19
135
190
-
1,042
118
118
(116,392) (116,947)
(650)
(624) (2,274) (1,412)
(27)
(56)
(135)
(55)
-
(1,042)
(118)
(118)
-
(37)
-
135
-
-
-
-
Net accrual adjustments
Revenue for the period
Surplus/(deficit) from the
previous year
Total revenue including
accrued revenue
Less expenses including
accrued expenses
Surplus/(deficit) for
reporting period
-
-
(4)
-
Parent entity
85
-
Diversity and
Structural Adjustment
Fund
Other
Total
2011
2010
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
275
-
2,148
-
122,002
120,165
-
-
-
-
-
-
275
-
2,148
-
122,002
120,165
-
-
-
-
98
187
Total revenue including accrued revenue
275
-
2,148
-
122,100
120,352
Less expenses including accrued expenses
(56)
-
-
-
(119,652)
(120,254)
Surplus/(deficit) for reporting period
219
-
2,148
-
2,448
98
Financial assistance received in CASH during the reporting period
(total cash received from the Australian Government for the Programmes)
Net accrual adjustments
Revenue for the period
Surplus/(deficit) from the previous year
1
116
Transitional
Cost
Programme
Capital
Development
Pool
Workplace
Productivity
Program
Disability
Support
Program
Partnership &
Participation
Program
Indigenous
Support
Program
Includes the basic CGS grant amount, CGS Regional Loading, CGS-Enabled Loading and Science and Maths Transition Loading.
48.2 Higher Education Loan Programs (excl OS HELP)
HECS-HELP
(Australian
Government
payments only)
Parent entity
FEE-HELP1
Total
2011
2010
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
62,033
57,816
9,280
6,507
71,313
64,323
Net accrual adjustments
2,112
(295)
854
948
2,966
653
Revenue for the period
64,145
57,521
10,134
7,455
74,279
64,976
-
-
-
-
-
-
Financial assistance received in CASH during the reporting period
(total cash received from the Australian Government for the Programmes)
Surplus/(deficit) from the previous year
64,145
57,521
10,134
7,455
74,279
64,976
(64,145)
(57,521)
(10,134)
(7,455)
(74,279)
(64,976)
-
-
-
-
-
-
Total revenue including accrued revenue
Less expenses including accrued expenses
Surplus/(deficit) for reporting period
1
Program is in respect of FEE-HELP for Higher Education only.
48.3 Scholarships
Parent entity
International
Postgraduate
Research
Scholarship
Australian
Postgraduate
Awards
Commonwealth
Accommodation
Scholarships*
Commonwealth
Education Cost
Scholarships*
Indigenous Access
Scholarships
Total
2011
2010
2011
2010
2011
2010
2011
2010
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
1,652
1,392
185
168
853
155
1,003
36
46
106
3,739
1,857
-
-
-
-
(460)
6
(568)
16
-
-
(1,028)
22
1,652
1,392
185
168
393
161
435
52
46
106
2,711
1,879
333
368
2
30
26
130
23
132
9
-
393
660
Total revenue including
accrued revenue
1,985
1,760
187
198
419
291
458
184
55
106
3,104
2,539
Less expenses including
accrued expenses
(1,655)
(1,427)
(187)
(196)
(419)
(265)
(458)
(161)
(55)
(97)
(2,774)
(2,146)
330
333
-
2
-
26
-
23
-
9
330
393
Financial assistance
received in CASH during
the reporting period (total
cash received from the
Australian Government
for the Programmes)
Net accrual adjustments
Revenue for the period
Surplus/(deficit) from the
previous year
Surplus/(deficit) for
reporting period
*Includes Grandfathered Scholarships, National Priority and National Accommodation Priority Scholarships respectively.
117
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2011
48.4 DIISR Research
Parent entity
Financial assistance
received in CASH
during the reporting
period (total cash
received from the
Australian Government
for the Programmes)
Net accrual
adjustments
Revenue for the period
Surplus/(deficit) from
the previous year
Total revenue including
accrued revenue
Less expenses
including accrued
expenses
Surplus/(deficit) for
reporting period
Joint Research
Engagement
Implementation
Assistance
Program
Research
Infrastructure
Block Grants
Research
Training
Scheme
Commercialisation
Training Scheme
Sustainable
Research
Excellence in
Universities
2011
2010
2011
2010
2011
2010
2011
2010
2011
2010
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
2,190
2,034
4,415
4,412
469
371
-
41
-
-
55
47
526
451
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2,190
2,034
4,415
4,412
469
371
-
41
-
-
55
47
526
451
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
27
-
125
44
10
-
-
2,190
2,034
4,415
4,412
469
371
-
68
-
125
99
57
526
451
(2,190) (2,034) (4,415) (4,412)
(469)
(371)
-
(68)
-
(125)
(64)
(13)
(526)
(451)
-
-
-
-
-
-
35
44
-
-
-
-
-
-
Parent entity
Financial assistance received in CASH during the reporting period
(total cash received from the Australian Government for the Programmes)
Net accrual adjustments
Revenue for the period
Surplus/(deficit) from the previous year
Total revenue including accrued revenue
Less expenses including accrued expenses
Surplus/(deficit) for reporting period
118
Australian
Scheme
for Higher
Education
Repositories
Other
Total
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
1,989
-
9,644
7,356
-
-
-
-
1,989
-
9,644
7,356
-
-
44
162
1,989
-
9,688
7,518
-
(7,689)
(7,474)
-
1,999
(25)
1,964
44
48.5 Other Capital Funding
Parent entity
Better Universities Renewal
Funding
Teaching and Learning Capital
Fund
Total
2011
2010
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Financial assistance received in
CASH during the reporting period
(total cash received from the
Australian Government for the
Programmes)
-
-
-
-
-
-
Net accrual adjustments
-
-
-
-
-
-
Revenue for the period
-
-
-
-
-
-
Surplus/(deficit) from the
previous year
-
894
7,902
10,902
7,902
11,796
Less expenses including
accrued expenses
-
(894)
(7,902)
(3,000)
(7,902)
(3,894)
Surplus/(deficit) for
reporting period
-
-
-
7,902
-
7,902
119
Notes to the financial statements (continued)
31 December 2011
48.6 Australian Research Council Grants
(a) Discovery
Parent entity
Project
Total
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
161
72
161
72
-
10
-
10
161
82
161
82
47
77
47
77
208
159
208
159
Less expenses including accrued expenses
(44)
(112)
(44)
(112)
Surplus/(deficit) for reporting period
164
47
164
47
2011
2010
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
$’000
$’000
Financial assistance received in CASH during the reporting period (total
cash received from the Australian Government for the Programmes)
518
784
518
784
Net accrual adjustments
(140)
Revenue for the period
378
784
378
784
Surplus/(deficit) from the previous year
343
475
343
475
Total revenue including accrued revenue
721
1,259
721
1,259
Less expenses including accrued expenses
(664)
(916)
57
343
Financial assistance received in CASH during the reporting period (total
cash received from the Australian Government for the Programmes)
Net accrual adjustments
Revenue for the period
Surplus/(deficit) from the previous year
Total revenue including accrued revenue
(b) Linkages
Parent entity
Surplus/(deficit) for reporting period
120
Project
Total
-
(140)
(664)
57
-
(916)
343
48.7 OS-HELP
Parent entity
Cash Received during the reporting period
Cash Spent during the reporting period
Net Cash received
2011
$’000
$’000
278
232
(240)
(230)
38
2
3
1
41
3
Cash Surplus/(deficit) from the previous period
Cash Surplus/(deficit) for reporting period
2010
48.8 Superannuation Supplementation
Parent entity
Cash Received during the reporting period
University contribution in respect of current employees
Cash available
Cash Surplus/(deficit) from the previous period
Cash available for current period
Contributions to specified defined benefit funds
Cash Surplus/(deficit) this period
2011
2010
$’000
$’000
3,185
2,796
195
357
3,380
3,153
22
270
3,402
3,423
(3,584)
(3,401)
(182)
22
121
Key Performance Indicator Report Certification
We hereby certify that the key performance indicators are based on proper records, are relevant
and appropriate for assisting users to assess ECU’s performance, and fairly represent the
performance of ECU for the financial year ended 31 December 2011.
The Hon Dr Hendy Cowan
Chancellor
1 March 2012
Professor Kerry O. Cox
Vice-Chancellor
1 March 2012
122
Key Performance Indicators
Introduction
ECU’s Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) focus on the University’s core business (teaching, learning and research) and key
stakeholders (students). The KPIs are informed by the functions of the University as set out in Section 7 of the Edith Cowan
University Act 1984 (WA) (ECU Act), particularly:
„„ S7(a)
“to provide…courses of study appropriate to a university to meet the needs of the community in this State.”
„„ S7(c)
“to support and pursue research and scholarship and aid the advancement, development, and practical applications
to education, industry, commerce and the community, of knowledge or any techniques.”
The University’s strategic directions document: Edith Cowan University: Engaging Minds; Engaging Communities. Towards
2020 specifies ECU’s mission and four strategic priorities which articulate the University’s commitment to the communities
it serves.
ECU’s Mission is:
To further develop valued citizens for the benefit of Western Australia and beyond, through teaching and research inspired by
engagement and partnerships.
ECU’s four Strategic Priorities are:
„„ Engaging
and Serving Our Communities;
„„ Providing
Programs to Meet the Needs of Our Communities, in a Supportive and Stimulating Learning Environment;
„„ Developing
„„ Building
Research Focus, Depth and Impact; and
Organisation Sustainability.
The Annual Report section entitled Report on Operations has been structured around these strategic priorities, reflecting their
importance in setting direction for the University’s operations.
In this Key Performance Indicator Report, the functions specified in the ECU Act and reflected in ECU’s current strategic
priorities; provide the basis for the following outcomes, against which the University’s performance is measured:
Outcome 1: ECU’s courses of study meet the needs of the Western Australian community and are provided in a supportive
and stimulating learning environment.
Outcome 2: ECU’s research and scholarship advance and develop education, industry, commerce and the community,
through the practical application of knowledge.
For each KPI, the Key Performance Indicator Report provides:
„„ ECU’s
„„ a
performance over the last four or five years;
comparison to Target for the most recent year; and
„„ wherever
possible, comparisons to the overall performance of universities in Australia (“National Average”) and to public
universities in Western Australia (“State Average”).
Outcome 1: ECU’s courses of study meet the needs of the Western Australian community
and are provided in a supportive and stimulating learning environment.
This outcome has the following measures:
Key Effectiveness Indicators
Retention
Course Satisfaction
Quality of Teaching
Graduate Employment
Share of First Preferences
Key Efficiency Indicator
Teaching-Related Expenditure per Student Load
123
Key Performance Indicators (continued)
1. Retention
Many factors influence whether students decide to remain in their studies (Retention), including the relevance of those studies
to their needs, and the learning environment in which that study takes place. Student retention is therefore an indicator of the
extent to which ECU’s courses meet the needs of the Western Australian community and are provided in a supportive and
stimulating learning environment.
Retention is here defined as the percentage of all domestic and international students who commence a Bachelor Pass
course in a given year (Year of Commencement) and either complete, defer or are still enrolled in the same course or another
ECU course one year later.
Table 19: Retention Commencing Bachelor Pass Students
Year of Commencement
2007
2008
2009
2010
ECU
76.2%
78.9%
78.2%
80.4%
Target
80.0%
80.0%
80.0%
80.0%
National Average2
82.7%
84.0%
84.0%
n/a
20111
Notes: 1. Retention data for students commencing in 2011 will not be available until March 2012.
2. The National Average figures are from Table 4.9 of Appendix 4 on the DEEWR website at: http://www.deewr.gov.au/HigherEducation/
Publications/HEStatistics/Publications/Pages/Students.aspx The National Average figure for 2010 will not be available until mid-2012.
The retention rate for ECU students commencing in 2010 increased (by 2.2 percentage points) compared with the retention
rate for those who commenced in 2009. The 2010 result is a continuation of an upward trend for retention rate since
2007. The retention rate for ECU students commencing in 2010 is 0.4 percentage points above Target, and is below the
National Average.
2. Course Satisfaction
Graduates are more likely to rate their course highly, in terms of overall satisfaction, if the course was relevant to their needs,
provided in a supportive learning environment and has proven useful and relevant in an employment context following
graduation. Graduate satisfaction with the quality of their course is therefore an indicator of the extent to which ECU’s
courses of study meet the needs of the Western Australian community and are provided in a supportive and stimulating
learning environment.
Comparative data on how ECU’s graduates rate the quality of their courses is available from responses to the Course
Experience Questionnaire (CEQ), a national survey of graduates conducted four to six months after course completion.
Course Satisfaction is here defined as the percentage of all domestic and international Bachelor level (Bachelor Pass,
Bachelor Honours and Bachelor Graduate Entry) graduates who ‘broadly agree’ with the statement: “Overall, I was satisfied
with the quality of this course” from the Course Experience Questionnaire. The percentage broad agreement is the percentage
of responses which are 3 (neither agree nor disagree), 4 (agree) or 5 (strongly agree) on the five-point Likert scale.
124
Table 20: Undergraduate CEQ Course Satisfaction
Year of Survey
2007
2008
2009
2010
ECU
92.2%
92.1%
92.6% 95.0%
Target
90.0%
93.0%
93.0%
93.0%
National Average
89.8%
88.5%
88.1%
93.1%
State Average
91.2%
90.0%
89.9%
93.5%
20111
Notes: 1. CEQ data for the 2011 survey was not made available by Graduate Careers Australia in sufficient time to allow inclusion in this Report.
2. The performance results are shown here by “Year of Survey”, as is common practice across the sector.
3. For the 2010 survey 2966 ECU Bachelor graduates were surveyed, of whom 1546 responded to the CEQ, equating to a response rate of 52.1%.
ECU graduates’ Course Satisfaction level in the 2010 survey increased (by 2.4 percentage points), compared with the 2009
survey. The latest result is the highest of the last eight years (2003-2010). The 2009 survey result is 2.0 percentage points
above Target.
ECU’s Course Satisfaction results are consistently above both the National Average and the State Average.
3. Quality of Teaching
Graduates are more likely to rate highly the quality of the teaching in their course, if the content and teaching style was
relevant to their needs and the course was provided in a supportive learning environment. Graduate satisfaction with the
teaching they experienced during their course is therefore an indicator of the extent to which ECU’s courses of study meet the
needs of the Western Australian community and are provided in a supportive and stimulating learning environment.
Comparative data on how ECU’s graduates rate the quality of the teaching they experienced is available from responses
to the Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ), a national survey of graduates conducted four to six months after course
completion. Six items in the CEQ make up the Good Teaching Scale which is used to indicate how satisfied graduates were
with the teaching experience during their course.
The Good Teaching Scale is here defined as the average of survey respondents’ percentage Broad Agreement. Percentage
Broad Agreement is the proportion of a respondent’s scores on the six items which are 3 (neither agree nor disagree), 4
(agree) or 5 (strongly agree) on the five-point Likert scale and expressed as a percentage. Respondents are domestic and
international Bachelor level (Bachelor Pass, Bachelor Honours and Bachelor Graduate Entry) graduates.
Table 21: Undergraduate CEQ Good Teaching Scale
Year of Survey
2007
2008
2009
2010
ECU
88.3%
89.6%
89.1% 92.4%
Target
86.6%
90.0%
91.0%
91.0%
National Average
83.4%
82.8%
82.8%
87.7%
State Average
85.4%
85.0%
85.5%
88.7%
20111
Notes: 1. CEQ data for the 2011 survey were not made available by Graduate Careers Australia in sufficient time to allow inclusion in this Report.
2. The performance results are shown here by “Year of Survey”, as is common practice across the sector.
3. For the 2010 survey 2966 ECU Bachelor graduates were surveyed, of whom 1546 responded to the CEQ, equating to a response rate of 52.1%.
ECU graduates’ level of satisfaction with the quality of teaching for the 2010 survey increased (by 3.3 percentage points),
compared with the 2009 survey. The latest result is well above those in the survey years 2007-2009. The level of satisfaction
in the 2010 survey year is above Target by 1.4 percentage points.
ECU’s Good Teaching Scale results are consistently above both the National Average and the State Average.
125
Key Performance Indicators (continued)
4. Graduate Employment
There is strong evidence that many students undertake higher education for employment-related reasons (i.e. to gain
employment, or to advance their career). The employers, on whom the job prospects of graduates largely depend, seek
employees who have the skills and attributes needed in their professions and occupations. Graduate employment is therefore
an indicator of the extent to which ECU’s courses of study meet the needs of the Western Australian community and are
provided in a supportive and stimulating learning environment.
Comparative data on employment outcomes for ECU graduates is available from the Graduate Destination Survey (GDS), a
national survey of graduates, conducted four to six months after course completion.
Graduate Employment is here defined as the percentage of domestic Bachelor level (Bachelor Pass, Bachelor Honours and
Bachelor Graduate Entry) graduates in full-time employment as a proportion of all domestic Bachelor level graduates in, or
seeking, full-time work (including those who were working part-time or on a casual basis while seeking full-time employment).
Table 22:  Domestic Bachelor Course Level Graduates in Full-time Employment
Year of Survey
2007
2008
2009
2010
ECU
85.7%
84.7%
78.0%
75.6%
Target
85.0%
87.0%
87.0%
83.0%
National Average
85.2%
86.1%
81.1%
78.5%
State Average
88.0%
87.9%
82.2%
77.5%
20111
Notes: 1. GDS data for the 2011 survey were not made available by Graduate Careers Australia in sufficient time to allow inclusion in this Report.
2. The performance results are shown here by “Year of Survey”, as is common practice across the sector.
3. For the 2011 survey 2366 ECU Bachelor graduates were surveyed, of whom 1309 responded to the GDS, equating to a response rate of 55.3%.
The proportion of ECU graduates in full-time employment at the time of the 2010 survey declined by 2.4 percentage points,
compared with those surveyed in 2009. The 2010 survey result is 7.4 percentage points below Target and is below both the
National Average and the State Average.
The decline in ECU’s Full-time Employment results for the 2010 survey are consistent with the State Average decline between
the surveys conducted in 2009 and 2010 (4.7 percentage points) and reflects the prevailing economic and employment
conditions in Western Australian for the year in which the graduates were surveyed.
5. Share of First Preferences
The relevance of courses and quality of the learning environment in which they are taught, as perceived by prospective
students and the wider community, will influence demand for places at a university. ECU’s Share of First Preferences,
processed through the Western Australian Tertiary Institutions Service Centre (TISC), is an indicator of the level of demand
for the University’s undergraduate courses within the broader competitive market in the State. It is therefore an indicator of the
extent to which ECU’s courses of study meet the needs of the Western Australian community.
Share of First Preferences is here defined as the number of first preference applications for ECU’s undergraduate courses,
expressed as a percentage of all first preference applications to Western Australia’s public universities as processed by TISC.
Data is taken at the end of the applications process for that year’s entry to university. A definitional change was applied from
2010 to limit the data to applications for Bachelor and Associate Degree courses only.
126
Table 23: Undergraduate Share of First Preferences
Entry Year
ECU
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
17.7%
18.9%
19.5%
20.1%
16.6%
20.0%
21.0%
21.0%
18.0%
Target
Curtin
33.6%
31.6%
31.6%
34.0%
34.0%
Murdoch
15.6%
15.2%
14.5%
13.6%
14.2%
UWA
33.1%
34.2%
34.4%
32.3%
35.1%
Notes: From 2010 a revised definition, approved by ECU’s Council at its meeting of December 2009, has been applied. The change in definition
provides better comparisons between the universities by limiting the data to applications for Bachelor and Associate Degree courses only.
Therefore figures for 2006-2009 inclusive vary from those reported in earlier Annual Reports.
ECU’s share of first preference applications for undergraduate courses processed through TISC decreased by 3.5 percentage
points between the 2010 and the 2011 entry years. This was not unexpected as ECU seeks to diversify entry pathways.
Murdoch and UWA increased their respective share of first preference applications, while the share of first preferences at
Curtin University remained unchanged.
ECU’s first preference share in 2011 was below Target by 1.4 percentage points.
6. Teaching-related Expenditure per Student Load
Teaching-related expenditure per Student Load shows the cost associated with providing teaching and learning support to a
full-time equivalent student in a given year. Over time, the measure shows whether such costs are decreasing or increasing,
which could be interpreted as indicating either increased efficiency or reduced efficiency respectively.
This measure must, however, be interpreted in the context of other KPIs associated with Outcome 1. A decrease in cost does
not necessarily indicate improved efficiency if it leads to, for example, lower retention, graduate satisfaction or graduate
employment outcomes. For example, a substantial increase in class size (student: staff ratio) may reduce costs, but might
adversely impact on performance against other indicators.
Trends on this measure can also be affected by factors such as changes in the overall ECU student load, the proportion of
costs which are fixed, and the proportion of student load in higher cost disciplines.
Teaching-related Expenditure per Student Load is here defined as the total expenditure less research-only expenditure,
divided by total full-time equivalent students (EFTSL) in the year.
Table 24: Teaching-related Expenditure per Student Load
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
228,321
246,399
252,064
277,172
282,800
Total Student Load (EFTSL)
15,254
15,978
17,583
18,711
18,4781
Teaching-Related Expenditure/Total
Student Load ($)
14,968
15,417
14,336
14,813
15,305
15,619
14,756
14,572
14,7192
16,618
15,130
15,239
15,305
16,831
15,573
14,990
14,719
Teaching-Related Expenditure ($’000)
Target ($)
Teaching-Related Expenditure/Total
Student Load (2011 $ equiv)3
Target (2011 $ equiv)
16,734
Notes: 1. 2011 student load figure is as at 01/02/2012 (the sum of the March, August and preliminary post-August census date load) and includes VET
course load.
2. Target for 2011 is derived from Teaching-Related Expenditure based on the Original 2011 Full year Budget ($279,612,000) divided by the total
Student Load (18,997 EFTSL) from the 2011 Budget. 3. Prior year expenditure is indexed for current costs, based on CPI for December Qtr 2011.
Teaching-related expenditure per Student Load (2011 $ equivalent) increased slightly between 2010 and 2011. The 2011
figure is slightly higher than targeted.
127
Key Performance Indicators (continued)
Outcome 2: ECU’s research and scholarship advance and develop education, industry,
commerce and the community, through the practical application of knowledge.
This outcome has the following measures:
Key Effectiveness Indicator
Research Income
Key Efficiency Indicators
Higher Degree Research Completions
Research Publications
7. Research Income
Universities attract research income as a result of their: historical competitiveness in winning grants; previous research outcomes;
and perceived ability to deliver quality research and scholarship. Research income, across the four categories listed below,
reflects the relevance and potential impact of ECU’s research as perceived by various funders. It is therefore an indicator of the
extent to which ECU’s research and scholarship, advance and develop education, industry, commerce and the community.
Research Income is here defined as the level of external research funding obtained during a year, in total and in each of the
four categories defined by the Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research (DIISR).
Table 25: Research Income ($m)
Category
2007
2008
2009
2010
1 – National Competitive Research Grants
1.619
2.154
2.907
2.750
2 – Other Public Sector Research Funding
5.512
7.235
7.709
8.301
3 – Industry and Other Funding for Research
2.341
2.926
2.012
4.211
4 – Co-operative Research Centre Funding
0.112
0.075
0.182
0.050
Total
9.584
12.390
12.809
15.312
Target
10.015
10.015
13.629
13.629
20111
Note: 1. Research income for 2011 is unavailable until verified by audit in June 2012.
Between 2007 and 2010, total research income has increased by $5.728 million. Between 2008 and 2009 research income
increased in two of the four categories defined by DIISR. Total research income in 2010 was above Target by $1.683 million.
8. Higher Degree Research Completions
Doctorate and Master by Research completions is a measure of ECU’s success in training new researchers who will
undertake research activity and scholarship, to advance and develop education, industry, commerce and the community.
Higher Degree Research Completions per 10 Academic FTE is a measure of the efficiency of ECU’s higher degree research
programs in providing new researchers to education, industry, commerce and the community.
Higher Degree by Research Completions is defined here as the number of Research Doctorates and Masters by Research
theses passed in a year. Completions are also expressed per 10 full-time equivalent (FTE) academic staff, where academic
staff are those at Level B and above, classified as ‘teaching and research’ or ‘research only’.
128
Table 26: Higher Degree Research Completions by level, total number and per 10 Academic FTE
2007
2008
2009
2010
Doctorate by Research
53
58
41
51
Master by Research
28
35
23
19
Total Completions
81
93
64
70
746
639
659
647
7,141
7,178
7,092
7,403
Total State Completions
Total National Completions
Academic Staff FTE
444
448
494
531
Completions per 10 FTE
1.8
2.1
1.3
1.3
Target
1.8
1.9
2.2
2.2
20111
Notes: 1. Research completions for 2011 are unavailable until verified by audit in June 2012.
2. State and National Higher Degree by Research completions for 2010 are from Table 8 of the 2010 Award Course Completions listings on the
DEEWR website at: http://www.deewr.gov.au/HigherEducation/Publications/HEStatistics/Publications/Pages/Students.aspx
Total completions for Research Higher Degree Students increased between 2009 and 2010. However, due to an increase in
the Academic Staff FTE between 2009 and 2010, completions per 10 Academic Staff FTE remained steady (at 1.3) and below
Target by 0.9 completions per 10 Academic Staff FTE.
9. Research Publications
The number of recognised research and development publications produced in a year, as reported to the Department of
Innovation, Industry, Science and Research (DIISR), is a direct measure of research output.
The number of weighted research and development publications per 10 Academic Staff FTE is a measure of the efficiency of
research output and an indicator of how efficiently ECU’s research and scholarship advance and develop education, industry,
commerce and the community.
Research and Development “Weighted Publications” is defined as the number of publications in the DIISR-defined categories
A1, B, C1, E1 and J1 in a year. The number of publications is assessed annually in a rigorous, externally audited system
prior to submission to DIISR. Weighted publications are expressed per 10 full-time equivalent (FTE) academic staff, where
academic staff are those at Level B and above, classified as ‘teaching and research’ or ‘research only’.
Table 27: Research and Development Weighted Publications per 10 Academic FTE
2007
2008
2009
2010
20111
Unweighted Publications per 10 FTE
A1 – Authored Research Books
0.21
0.37
0.36
0.38
B – Book Chapter
1.16
0.59
1.03
0.88
C1 – Articles in Scholarly Refereed Journal
5.00
5.48
5.02
5.06
E1 – Full Written Paper – Refereed
Proceedings
3.91
4.25
3.32
3.53
0.0
0.0
0.0
0.0
Total Unweighted Publications
J1 – Major Original Creative Works
456.2
479.0
480.9
522.1
Total Weighted Publications
493.2
545.8
552.9
602.1
Academic Staff FTE
444
448
494
531
Weighted Publications per 10 FTE
11.1
12.2
11.2
11.3
Target
10.6
11.5
12.8
12.8
Note: 1. Research publications figures for 2011 are unavailable until verified by audit in June 2012.
Both Total Unweighted Publications and Total Weighted Publications increased in number between 2009 and 2010, by 41.2
and 49.2 publications respectively. Weighted Publications per 10 Academic Staff FTE increased slightly between 2009 and
2010 (from 11.2 to 11.3), but was below Target by 1.5 publications per 10 Academic Staff FTE in 2010.
129
Other Financial Disclosures
Pricing Policies
ECU sets the level of the student contribution for Commonwealth-supported places at the maximum allowed under the
Higher Education Support Act 2003 (Cwlth), as is the case for most Australian universities. Fees for fee-paying courses are
determined on the basis of cost and market conditions and take into account Australian Government requirements regarding
fees set for non-Commonwealth-supported places.
Major Capital Projects
Table 28: Major Capital Projects Completed, 2011
Project
Campus Renewal Program
Community Clinical School
Engineering and Technology Building, Joondalup
WAAPA Workshop, Mount Lawley
Estimated total
cost ($m)
Actual total
cost ($m)
1.950
5.049
2.000
2.000
40.000
40.000
4.950
4.950
Note: The actual total cost of the Campus Renewal Program exceeded the estimated total costs by $4.243 million, due to the
increase scope of work resulting from the University’s implementation of its One University: Students First initiatives.
Table 29: Major Capital Projects in Progress, 2011
Estimated total
cost ($m)
Actual
total cost to
complete ($m)
Expected year
of completion
Sports and Fitness Centre Expansion, Joondalup
7.500
7.500
2012
Building 2 Leak Rectification, Joondalup
5.000
5.000
2012
Research Support Facility (Engineering Pavilion), Joondalup
4.000
4.000
2013
Project
Employees and Employee Relations
Table 30: Academic Staff by Contract Type, 2007-2011
Staff
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
Permanent Full-time
387
370
367
372
369
Permanent Part-time
19
18
29
27
33
Temporary Full-time
88
112
146
142
141
Temporary Part-time
23
27
36
41
45
Casual
155
175
178
180
105
Total
672
702
756
761
693
Notes: Figures are based on full-time equivalency, rather than headcount and therefore prior year figures are not as reported in earlier annual reports.
Figures are average full-time equivalents for the 12 calendar months. Figures include staff in VET provision.
130
Table 31: General Staff by Contract Type, 2007-2011
Staff
Permanent Full-time
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
601
592
610
636
641
Permanent Part-time
89
96
102
107
117
Temporary Full-time
131
167
170
145
183
Temporary Part-time
73
77
80
74
79
Casual
67
65
65
67
112
961
998
1026
1029
1052
Total
Notes: Figures are based on full-time equivalency, rather than headcount and therefore prior year figures are not as reported in earlier annual reports.
Figures are average full-time equivalents for the 12 calendar months. Figures include staff in VET provision.
Occupational Safety, Health and Injury Management
Commitment to Occupational Safety, Health and Injury Management
ECU places a high priority on maintaining a safe and healthy environment for all students, staff and visitors; one that is
conducive to study, job satisfaction and productivity. ECU is proactive in preventing and minimising the potential for injury
and harm and aims to exceed the requirements for compliance with the State Government’s Code of Practice: Occupational
Safety and Health in the Western Australian Public Sector.
Formal Mechanism for Consultation with Employees on Occupational Safety, Health and Injury
Management Matters
ECU’s committee structure for occupational safety and health matters comprises four levels:
„„ Occupational
Safety and Health Policy Committee (reporting to the Vice-Chancellor);
„„ Institutional
Bio-safety Committee/Radiation Committee (reporting to the Occupational Safety and Health Policy
Committee);
„„ Occupational
Safety and Health Campus Working Groups (reporting to the Director, Facilities and Services); and
„„ Faculty-level
and Service Centre-level Occupational Safety and Health Committees and special working parties (reporting
to senior business managers and the University Occupational Safety and Health Policy Committee).
Each of these committees engages with elected safety and health representatives and employee representatives to facilitate
consultation at all levels. Information on these University committees is available from the ECU website.
In addition to statutory responsibilities, the University expects all managers and supervisors to provide information,
instruction, training and supervision on safety and health procedures and work practices to support a safe and healthy
working environment. This responsibility is achieved via the consultative committee process where hazards, risks and all
matters relating to occupational safety and health are discussed and aligned to the business unit’s operational safety plan.
A Statement of Compliance with the Workers’ Compensation and Injury Management Act (WA)
ECU has a formal Occupational Safety and Health and Injury Management Policy developed in consultation with employees
and elected safety and health representatives. ECU’s safety and injury management programs are communicated via its safety
committees and incorporated into the operational plans of all business units. The University’s target is to achieve a zero lost time
injury rate. The University’s Workers’ Compensation and Injury Management policy is available from the ECU website.
131
Table 32: Performance against 2010/11 Injury Management Targets
Indicator
Target 2010/11
Result 2010/11
Result 2009/10
Number of fatalities
Zero (0)
0
0
Lost time injury/diseases incident rate1
Zero or 10% reduction on
previous year
0.11
0.09
Lost time injury severity rate
Zero or 10% improvement on
previous year
0
0
Percentage of injured workers returned to
work within 28 weeks
100%
100%
100%
Percentage of managers trained in
occupational safety and health and injury
management2
See Note 2
n/a
n/a
Notes: 1. Lost time injury/diseases incident rate and lost time injury severity rate are defined as the incidents per 100 employees.
2. ECU does not provide training specifically in Occupational Safety and Health (OSH) and Injury Management. Obligations relating to these
activities are incorporated into broader OSH training and information sessions provided to managers.
Occupational Safety and Health Management Systems
ECU has implemented an occupational safety and health management system for mandatory self-assessment based on the
primary functions and supporting principles of the Australian and New Zealand Standard AS/NZS 4801:2001. All business
units of the University have developed strategic and operational plans to achieve best practice. A number of business units
have elected to be formally accredited against the Standard. ECU’s occupational safety and health performance statistics are
reported to two committees of Council: the Resources Committee and the Quality, Audit and Risk Committee.
Additionally, staff attitudes to, and perceptions of, safety in their work environment are monitored through a bi-annual staff
survey. The results of the latest survey were reported in the ECU Annual Report for 2009 and the survey will be repeated in
2012 and reported in the Annual Report for that year.
132
Governance Disclosures
Corporate Standards and Risk Management
Equity
ECU is committed to encouraging and supporting potential and current students as well as the broader community to reach
their potential. To achieve this, a whole-of-University approach has been taken to integrate equity principles and practices into
planning processes and strategic and operational activities. The University maintains a number of specific action plans which
describe initiatives, performance measures and responsibilities for progressing equity and social inclusion. These plans are
monitored through the Equity Committee and its sub-committees and through standing review processes.
ECU also supports two volunteer equity networks. University Contact Officers help to resolve equal opportunity issues by
providing referral advice on equity policies and practices for students and staff, while “Allies” provide a network of trained
contacts for Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex students and staff.
Equity Initiatives and Activities in 2011
The University completed the development of its first Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) in 2011 and launched the document on
National Sorry Day on 26 May 2011. The RAP outlines the University’s vision for reconciliation and its objective is to translate
its commitments to Indigenous Australians into actions. Broad consultation was carried out during the development of the
RAP and ECU became only the 6th university in Australia to have its RAP endorsed by Reconciliation Australia. The RAP
Working Group met quarterly during 2011 to monitor progress on the initiatives outlined in the RAP. A report on progress will
be provided to Council in 2012.
A new five-year Disability Access and Inclusion Plan (DAIP) for 2011-2016 was finalised in July 2011. The DAIP was informed
through consultation with students, staff and community members and articulates a number of high level objectives to guide
the University’s access and inclusion plans over the next five years. The Disability Access and Inclusion Sub-Committee will
develop DAIP Annual Implementation Plans, and monitoring is undertaken through the Equity Committee.
In 2011 the University celebrated the 150th anniversary of the birth of Edith Dirksey Cowan, the 90th anniversary of her
election to the Parliament of Western Australia, and the 20th anniversary of the university established in her name. These
celebrations guided a number of activities relating to supporting and encouraging female staff in the workplace. The late Edith
Cowan, together with: Honorary Doctorate recipient, former staff member, renowned Australian athlete and conservationist
the late Shirley Strickland de la Hunty; senior lecturers Dr Anne Aly and Dr Lekkie Hopkins; research fellow Dr Abigail Bray;
and former staff member, Ms Estelle Blackburn, were all inducted into the WA Women’s Hall of Fame to coincide with the
centenary of International Women’s Day in March 2011.
The University was not required to report to the Australian Government’s Equal Opportunity for Women in the Workplace
Agency (EOWA) in 2011, having demonstrated that the University is not only compliant with all aspects of the Equal
Opportunity for Women in the Workplace Act 1999 (Cwlth), but has gone further by taking all practicable steps to advance
women and remove barriers to their employment and promotion.
ECU hosted a range of events for students, staff and the community in 2011. These included celebrating Harmony Week,
International Women’s Day, NAIDOC Week, International Day of People with a Disability, Pride Month and Mental Health Week.
Other compliance and legislative reporting completed during the year included the submission of the Indigenous Education
Statement and Equity Statement for the Australian Government’s Institutional Performance Portfolio, and the annual report to
the Western Australian Aboriginal Education and Training Council.
133
Quality
ECU’s Quality Unit provides leadership and strategic advice in the planning, and management of quality matters within the
University, while ECU’s [email protected] model, incorporating the Plan, Do, Review, Improve cycle, provides a consistent
approach to continuous quality improvement across different levels of planning and review.
The ECU Quality Review Policy supports the various quality review processes and defines the purpose, function and
frequency of all Annual, School, Research Centre and Offshore program reviews. The guidelines for these processes provide
a consistent and robust approach to the review process at ECU.
As part of the five-yearly cycle of external school reviews, one school was reviewed in 2011. Four offshore partners and two
research centres were also reviewed in 2011. Refinements made in previous years were incorporated into the Annual Review
process for 2011. This process continues to be underpinned by an evidence-based approach and 2011 saw the introduction of
performance-based metrics for service centres.
The Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency (TEQSA, formerly AUQA) conducted its Cycle Two Audit of ECU in
October 2011. Prior to the visit, ECU submitted its Performance Portfolio, which focused on progress since the 2004 Cycle
One Audit and provided a reflective analysis of the two themes of ‘Internationalisation’ and ‘Engagement’. The Audit Panel
visited the South West Campus and offshore partners in Singapore, Malaysia and Sri Lanka before making a four-day visit to
the Joondalup and Mount Lawley campuses. ECU is awaiting the draft report from the audit panel which should be available in
early 2012.
More information on the Cycle Two Audit visit can be found on the ECU website.
Risk Management
A major component of corporate governance at ECU is effective risk management. To this end, ECU revised its Strategic
Risk Register during 2011 and completed the first round of operational risk registers based on the Strategic Risk Register.
In addition, ECU developed a high level assurance map that matches the University’s standing review mechanisms with its
strategic risks.
Fraud and misconduct prevention training for senior staff was delivered across all three campuses during 2011. In addition,
the University revised its Public Interest Disclosure procedures and has appointed additional Public Interest Disclosure
Officers. Also in 2011, ECU assessed its operations for legislative compliance with the Copyright Act 1968 (Cwlth) and the
Gene Technology Act 2000 (Cwlth). In both cases, the University was assessed as being materially compliant.
Business Continuity Plans are in place for all ECU campuses. The plans for ECU’s Mount Lawley Campus were tested in
2011, while the documentation and testing of IT disaster recovery plans and key IT systems continued during 2011. All critical
IT systems were tested during the year.
More information on Risk Management can be found on the ECU website.
Risk Management Statement
This statement is consistent with and complies with the Voluntary Code of Best Practice for the Governance of Australian
Universities (Item 11):
ECU has an Integrated Risk Management Framework and Policy. It is compliant with ISO Standard 31000: Risk Management.
Strategic oversight of risk management is included in the terms of reference for the Quality, Audit and Risk Committee, as well
as in the Quality, Audit and Risk Committee Charter and the Risk and Assurance Service Centre Charter approved by Council
in August 2011. A Risk Reference Forum, chaired by the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic), assists with the exchange of
experiences of best practice and dissemination of risk management-related material within the University.
Functionally, the Risk Assurance Service Centre is responsible for the development and implementation of risk management
strategies, methods and tools (including insurances), legislative compliance, business continuity and fraud and misconduct
prevention and management. The Human Resources Services Centre is responsible for the day-to-day operation of
occupational safety and health strategies and workers’ compensation. The Office of Legal Services is responsible for the
oversight of legal risk within ECU.
134
Other Legal Requirements
Advertising
In accordance with the requirements of section 175ZE of the Electoral Act 1907 (WA) the University is required to report
all expenditure incurred by, or on behalf of, the University on advertising, market research, polling, direct mail and media
advertising during the financial year.
Advertising expenditure in 2011 totalled $4,280,470. The amount in each expenditure class and the organisations paid, are
listing in Table 33 below.
Table 33: Advertising Expenditure, 2011
Advertising agencies
1,633,685
303 Group Pty Ltd
Hobsons Australia Pty Ltd
Market research organisations
0
Polling organisations
0
Direct mail organisations
0
Media advertising organisations
2,646,785
Mitchell and Partners Australia Pty Ltd
Google
Other organisations
Total Expenditure
4,280,470
Recordkeeping
The Electronic Document and Records Management System (EDRMS) is the University’s approved record keeping system,
allowing emails and documents from the Microsoft Office Suite to be saved electronically. A project is in train to roll out the
EDRMS across the University.
State Records Commission Standard 2 Record Keeping Plans: Principle 6 – Compliance
ECU is subject to the requirements of the State Records Act 2000 (WA) and is committed to compliance in its record
keeping activities.
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ECU’s activities under each of the requirements include:
The efficiency and effectiveness of the organisation’s record keeping system is evaluated not less than once
every 5 years.
ECU’s Record Keeping Plan was submitted to the State Records Office for review in March 2011 and was approved for
a further five year period. It is due for review again in 2016.
Under the Universities Retention and Disposal Schedule collaborative work is underway to develop a common Disposal
Schedule for Western Australia’s public universities. Nine completed functions were submitted to the State Records
office in March 2011 for approval, with the remainder to be submitted by the end of 2011.
The ECU-wide Disaster Recovery Plan was completed and can be accessed by ECU staff through the ECU website
intranet. Staff completed disaster recovery training in September 2011 which included participation in a scenariobased exercise.
An independent review of the University’s Record Keeping Framework and the EDRMS project was conducted in
July 2011. The review acknowledged best practice in both areas and made a number of recommendations relating to
resources and further management championship.
Record keeping surveys have been conducted as part of the EDRMS project roll-out.
The organisation conducts a record keeping training program.
ECU conducts regular record keeping training programs including:
record keeping induction training package is available and is integrated into the University’s overall
professional development and training program.
„„ A basic
„„ The
Records Awareness Training System was implemented in 2008 to raise record management awareness for staff
and continues to be offered to staff. Since implementation, over 80 percent of staff have completed, or are working
through the course.
„„ Monthly training courses on the University’s record keeping software (TRIM) are provided at Basic and Intermediate levels.
„„ One-on-one
training occurs, on request.
The efficiency and effectiveness of the record keeping training program is reviewed from time to time
The outcomes of the Records Awareness Training are monitored and staff feedback is collected through a
questionnaire. The feedback is reviewed to assess whether the training has been effective. An intermediate user course
was introduced as a result of the feedback.
The organisation’s induction program addresses employees’ roles and responsibilities with regards to their
compliance with the organisation’s record keeping plan.
All new ECU employees undergo an induction course which addresses employee roles and responsibilities in regard
to the compliance aspects of the Record Keeping Plan. Additionally, this material is included in a handbook issued to
employees when they commence work at ECU.
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Disability Access and Inclusion Plan Outcomes
In May 2011, as required under schedule 3 of the Disability Service Regulations 2004 (WA), ECU reported on achievements
against its Disability Access and Inclusion Plan (DAIP) for the 2010/11 reporting year. It is important to note that as the DAIP
spans a five year period (2011-2016) many of the strategies will continue to be implemented throughout that period. Some
examples of achievements against ECU’s DAIP Outcomes in 2010/11 are listed below.
Outcome One: People with disabilities have the same opportunities as other people to access the services of, and
any events organised by, the University.
„„ The
Course Management System was updated to enable staff to enter details on inherent course requirements, which
will now appear on ECU’s course information website.
„„ Principles
for inclusive curriculum development and design were embedded in the Teaching at ECU Principles and
Practices and Teaching Online @ ECU units of recommended staff professional development.
Outcome Two: People with disabilities have the same opportunities as other people to access the buildings and
other facilities of the University.
„„ Access and Mobility Maps for the ECU Bunbury, Joondalup and Mount Lawley campuses have been developed and finalised.
„„ Feasibility assessments for the provision of accessible bus stop points and shelters for each campus have been undertaken.
Outcome Three: People with disabilities receive information from the University in a format that will enable them
to access the information as readily as other people are able to access it.
„„ All
digitised reserve readings provided in OCR format to assist vision impaired students.
„„ All
Blackboard sites updated to conform to accessibility guidelines.
Outcome Four: People with disabilities receive the same level and quality of service from the staff of the
University as other people receive from the staff of the University.
„„ Disability Awareness Training
was delivered with attendance from key customer service areas, including the Library,
Student Services Centre and IT Service Centre.
„„ Mental
Health Workshops were delivered with 157 staff in attendance.
Outcome Five: People with disabilities have the same opportunities as other people to make complaints to the
University.
„„ A review
of outcomes of complaints received in 2010 was undertaken and a report provided to Council.
„„ The
Complaints Process has been updated to require referral of the complaint to a senior member of staff within the
relevant area.
Outcome Six: People with disabilities have the same opportunities as other people to participate in any public
consultation by the University.
„„ ECU’s
five year DAIP was published on ECU’s Planning, Quality & Equity website along with the DAIP Annual
Implementation Plan.
„„ The
2010-2011 DAIP Annual Implementation Plan was finalised following extensive consultation via the University’s
Equity Committee structures, which includes student and staff representation.
Outcome Seven: People with disabilities have the same opportunities as other people to seek employment and
work experience placements with the University.
„„ The
new online recruitment system eRecruit has been launched and features accommodations depending on the type
of disability that is disclosed.
„„ ECU’s
Staff Kiosk now includes functionality for staff to update EEO details, including the option of disclosing a disability.
Outcome Eight: The University promotes an inclusive culture that values diversity, does not tolerate harassment
or discrimination and encourages a secure and safe environment for all students and staff.
„„ Annual
ECU events were held to commemorate International Day of People with a Disability and Mental Health Week.
„„ A Timeline
Fact Sheet was produced during Mental Health Week highlighting the impact of metal health issues and
legislation on Indigenous Australians.
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Contact ECU by
phone on 134 ECU (134 328)
For calls outside Australia
phone (61 8) 6304 0000
For calls regarding South West region
phone (61 8) 9780 7709
Email us at [email protected] or
visit ecu.edu.au
Every effort has been made to ensure that the information contained in this publication is correct
at the time of printing. The information is subject to change from time to time and the University
reserves the right to add, vary or discontinue courses and impose limitations on enrolment in any
course. The publication constitutes an expression of intent and is not to be taken as a firm offer or
understanding.
CRICOS IPC 00279B key2creative_33389_04/12
Greening ECU: Edith Cowan University is committed to reducing the environmental impact
associated with its operations by conducting its activities in a socially and environmentally responsible
manner. This includes implementing strategies and technologies that minimise waste of resources
and demonstrate environmentally sensitive development, innovation and continuous improvement.
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