VAX 4000 Model 100 Customer Technical Information

VAX 4000 Model 100 Customer Technical Information

VAX 4000

Model 100

Customer Technical Information

Order Number: EK–467AA–TI. A01

September 1992

This manual provides technical information for the VAX 4000 Model 100 system. It also gives a list of the console commands, and specifications for the system unit, the CPU, the internal SCSI and DSSI devices.

Revision Information:

This is a new manual.

Digital Equipment Corporation

Maynard, Massachusetts

September 1992

The information in this document is subject to change without notice and should not be construed as a commitment by Digital Equipment Corporation. Digital Equipment Corporation assumes no responsibility for any errors that may appear in this document.

The software described in this document is furnished under a license and may be used or copied only in accordance with the terms of such license.

No responsibility is assumed for the use or reliability of software on equipment that is not supplied by Digital Equipment Corporation or its affiliated companies.

Restricted Rights: Use, duplication, or disclosure by the U.S. Government is subject to restrictions as set forth in subparagraph (c)(1)(ii) of the Rights in Technical Data and Computer

Software clause at DFARS 252.227-7013.

© Digital Equipment Corporation 1992.

All Rights Reserved.

The postpaid Reader’s Comments forms at the end of this document request your critical evaluation to assist in preparing future documentation.

The following are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation: RX, ThinWire, VAX,

VAXcluster, VAX DOCUMENT, VMS, VT, and the DIGITAL logo.

S2011

This document was prepared using VAX DOCUMENT, Version 2.1.

Contents

Preface

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1 System Description

1.1

1.1.1

1.2

1.3

1.3.1

1.3.2

Model 100 System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Model 100 VAX Architecture Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Internal Mass Storage Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Communications Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Asynchronous Communications Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Synchronous Communications Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2 Console Security Feature and System Defaults

2.1

2.2

2.3

2.3.1

2.3.2

2.3.3

2.3.4

2.3.5

2.3.6

2.4

2.5

Returning to Console Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Using the Console Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Console Security Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Setting the Security Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Enabling the Console Security Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Logging in to Privileged Console Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Changing the Security Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Disabling the Console Security Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Exiting from Privileged Console Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Setting the Default Boot Device . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Setting the Default Recovery Action . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3 Console Commands

3.1

3.2

3.3

3.4

3.5

3.6

BOOT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

CONTINUE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

DEPOSIT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

EXAMINE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

FIND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

HALT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

vii

2–2

2–4

2–5

2–6

2–7

2–7

2–8

2–8

2–9

2–10

2–11

1–1

1–3

1–5

1–6

1–6

1–6

3–1

3–3

3–3

3–4

3–6

3–6 iii

Figures

1–1

2–1

2–2

Tables

1–1

1–2

1–3

1–4

2–1

2–2

4–1

4–2

3.7

3.8

HELP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

INITIALIZE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3.9

LOGIN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3.10

MOVE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3.11

NEXT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3.12

REPEAT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3.13

SEARCH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3.14

SET . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3.15

SHOW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3.16

START . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3.17

TEST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3.18

UNJAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3.19

X—Binary Load and Unload . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3.20

! (Comment) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4 Hardware Specifications

4.1

4.2

4.3

System Unit Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Internal DSSI Device Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

KA52–AA CPU Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Index

Block Diagram of the VAX 4000 Model 100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Returning to Console Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Console Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Supported Internal Mass Storage Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Supported Asynchronous Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Supported Synchronous Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Synchronous Communications Option Cable Part

Numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Alternative Default Boot Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Default Recovery Actions and Associated Values . . . . . . . . . .

System Specifications: VAX 400 Model 100 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

System Unit Metrics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

iv

3–7

3–9

3–10

3–11

3–12

3–14

3–15

3–17

3–18

3–21

3–21

3–25

3–25

3–27

4–1

4–5

4–8

1–2

2–3

2–4

1–5

1–6

1–6

1–6

2–10

2–11

4–2

4–3

4–3

4–4

4–5

4–6

4–7

4–8

4–9

System Storage Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

System Operating Conditions and Nonoperating

Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

RF31T and RF35 Hard Disk Drive Specifications . . . . . . . . .

TZ30 Tape Drive Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

TZK10 QIC Tape Drive Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

TLZ06 Cassette Tape Drive Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

RRD42 Compact Disc Drive Specifications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

4–3

4–3

4–5

4–6

4–6

4–7

4–7 v

Preface

This manual provides technical information for the VAX 4000 Model 100 system. It also gives a list of the console commands, and specifications for the system unit, the CPU, and the internal SCSI devices.

Audience

This manual is intended for experienced users, for example, system programmers or system managers.

Structure of This Manual

This manual is divided into four chapters and an index:

• Chapter 1 describes technical information about the Model 100 system.

• Chapter 2 describes the console security feature and how to set system defaults.

• Chapter 3 describes the console commands.

• Chapter 4 gives specifications for the system unit and for internal DSSI devices.

Additional Information

See the VAX 4000 Model 100 Operator Information manual for the list of associated and related documents.

vii

Conventions

The following conventions are used in this manual:

Convention Description

MONOSPACE

boldface type

Note

Ctrl/x

x n

{ }

[ ]

Text displayed on the screen is shown in monospace type.

Boldface type in examples indicates user input. Boldface type in text indicates the first instance of terms defined either in the text, in the glossary, or both.

italic type

Italic type emphasizes important information, indicates variables, and indicates complete titles of manuals.

nn nnn.nnn nn

A space character separates digits in numerals with 5 or more digits.

For example, 10 000 equals ten thousand.

n.nn

A period in numerals signals the decimal point indicator. For example, 1.75 equals one and three-fourths.

UPPERCASE lowercase

Words in uppercase indicate a command.

In format descriptions, words in lowercase indicate parameters or arguments to be specified by the user.

| In command syntax descriptions, a vertical bar | separates similar options, one of which you can choose.

A note contains information of special importance to the reader.

Ctrl/x indicates that you hold down the Ctrl key while you press another key or mouse button (indicated here by x).

A lowercase italic x indicates the generic use of a letter. For example, xxx indicates any combination of three alphabetic characters.

A lowercase italic n indicates the generic use of a number. For example, 19nn indicates a 4-digit number in which the last 2 digits are unknown.

In format descriptions, braces indicate required elements. You must choose one of the elements.

In format descriptions, brackets indicate optional elements. You can choose none, one, or all of the options.

viii

1

System Description

This chapter gives a technical description of the VAX 4000 Model 100. This chapter includes information on the following subjects:

• Model 100 system

• Internal mass storage devices

• Communications devices

• Digital Storage Systems Interconnect (DSSI)

• KA52-AA CPU Specifications

1.1 Model 100 System

The Model 100 system uses the KA52 CPU module which is the primary component in the Model 100 system. The module contains the following components:

• NVAX processor chip with a 286 MHz clock

• NVAX memory controller (NMC) memory management chip

• NVAX CP bus adapter (NCA)

• DSSI support via the (SHAC) chip

• Q–bus support via the (CQBIC) chip

• SCSI controller and SQWF buffer chip

• Time-of-year (TOY) clock SSC chip

• DC541 (SGEC) chip Ethernet controller for standard or ThinWire Ethernet

• DC7085 (QUART) serial line controller (four serial lines, one with modem control)

• Support for up to 128 M bytes of memory modules

System Description 1–1

• Support for optional asynchronous communications devices, which provide either 8 or 16 additional DEC423 ports, or 8 additional asynchronous modem control ports

• Support for optional synchronous communications devices, using DSW42 and DHW42 options which provide two synchronous ports

Figure 1–1 is a block diagram of the VAX 4000 Model 100 system.

Figure 1–1 Block Diagram of the VAX 4000 Model 100

B-Cache

128 Kb

NCA

NVAX CPU

NDAL

NMC

XCVR XCVR

Flash ROM

SSC

Q-bus

CQBIC

Terminal

Lines

DHW42*

External Connection

*

Optional

DSSI SHAC

EDAL-C

SGEC

DSSI

DSW42*

SCSI (C94)

QUART

4

x

serial

Ethernet

SCSI

Internal

Serial Lines

Memory

SIMMs

16, 32, 64, 80,

128 Mbyte

MLO-009354

1–2 System Description

1.1.1 Model 100 VAX Architecture Support

The KA52 CPU module supports the following VAX data types:

• byte, word, longword, quadword

• character string

• variable-length bit field

• absolute queues

• self-relative queues

• f_floating point, d_floating point, and g_floating point

The operating system uses software emulation to support other VAX data types.

The KA52 CPU module supports the following VAX instructions:

• integer, arithmetic and logical

• address

• variable-length bit field

• control

• procedure call

• miscellaneous

• queue

• character string instructions:

MOVC3/MOVC5

CMPC3/CMPC5

LOCC

SCANC

SKPC

SPANC

• Operating system support

• f_floating point, d_floating point, and g_floating point

System Description 1–3

The NVAX processor chip provides special microcode assistance to aid the macrocode emulation of the following instruction groups:

• Character string (other than those mentioned previously)

• Decimal string

• CRC

• EDITPC

The operating system uses software emulation to support other VAX instructions.

1–4 System Description

1.2 Internal Mass Storage Devices

Table 1–1 shows the internal mass storage devices that are supported by the

Model 100 system.

Table 1–1 Supported Internal Mass Storage Devices

Device

RF31T

RF35

TZ30

TZK10

TLZ06

RRD42

Size (inches)

3.5"

3.5"

5.25

5.25

3.5

5.25

Capacity (bytes)

381M

852M

95M

320M or 525M

Up to 4.0G

600M

Description

Hard disk drive

Hard disk drive

Tape drive

Tape drive

Tape drive

CDROM drive

The Model 100 system supports a maximum of three internal DSSI devices, two

SCSI devices which are removable media devices. One of the RF-series disks contains factory installed software (FIS). Chapter 4 gives the specifications for each internal DSSI device.

System Description 1–5

1.3 Communications Devices

The Model 100 system supports asynchronous and synchronous communications devices.

1.3.1 Asynchronous Communications Devices

Table 1–2 lists the asynchronous devices supported by Model 100 system.

Table 1–2 Supported Asynchronous Devices

Device

DHW42-AA

DHW42-BA

DHW42-CA

DHW42-UP

Description

Eight-line DEC423 asynchronous option

Sixteen-line DEC423 asynchronous option

Eight-line EIA-232 modem asynchronous option

Eight-line to 16-line upgrade of the DEC423 asynchronous option

1.3.2 Synchronous Communications Devices

Table 1–3 lists the synchronous devices supported by the Model 100 system.

Table 1–3 Supported Synchronous Devices

Device Description

DSW42-AA Two-line EIA-232/V.24 synchronous module

If you order a different synchronous option cable, you can use different interface standards with the synchronous communications module. Table 1–4 lists each standard and the part number of the corresponding option cable.

Table 1–4 Synchronous Communications Option Cable Part Numbers

Standard

EIA-232/V.24

EIA-423/V.10

EIA-422/V.11

Option Cable Part Number

BC19D-02

BC19E-02

BC19B-02

1–6 System Description

2

Console Security Feature and System

Defaults

This chapter describes how to set system defaults and how to use the console security feature. It includes information on the following subjects:

• Returning to console mode

• Using the console port

• Console security feature

• Setting the default boot device

• Setting the default recovery action

Console Security Feature and System Defaults 2–1

2.1 Returning to Console Mode

To use the procedures described in this chapter, the system must be in console mode. Before returning to console mode, you must shut down the operating system software if it is running. See the operating system documentation for information on the shutdown procedures. To return to console mode, follow these steps:

1. Shut down the operating system software if it is running.

2. Press the halt button on the back of the system unit see Figure 2–1. The system responds with the console prompt (>>>) on port 3 when it is in console mode.

2–2 Console Security Feature and System Defaults

Figure 2–1 Returning to Console Mode

1

Halt Button

MLO-009355

Console Security Feature and System Defaults 2–3

2.2 Using the Console Port

The VAX 4000 Model 100 system provides a console port through MMJ port 3.

Follow these steps:

1. Set the on/off switch on the system unit to the off (O) position.

2. Connect the console terminal to MMJ port 3.

3. Set the break enable switch see Figure 2–2 to the up position (break enable).

The break enable LED lights when you set the switch to the up position.

4. Set the on/off switch on the system unit to the on ( | ) position.

The system recognizes the position of the switch only when you set the power switch to the on ( | ) position.

5. The system will stop at the console prompt (>>>).

Figure 2–2 Console Port

1

2

MMJ Port 3, Console Port

Break/Enable Switch

2–4 Console Security Feature and System Defaults

MLO-009356

2.3 Console Security Feature

The console security feature allows you to disable most of the system console commands. When the security password is set, there are two types of users: privileged users and unprivileged users. Privileged users know the security password and can use the full range of console commands; unprivileged users can use only the following commands:

• LOGIN—Use this command with the security password to become a privileged user.

• BOOT—Use this command without parameters to boot the operating system when the boot device has been set.

Chapter 3 describes the console commands.

The following subsections describe how to do the following tasks:

• Set the security password

• Enable the console security feature

• Log in to privileged console mode

• Change the security password

• Disable the security password

• Exit from privileged console mode

Console Security Feature and System Defaults 2–5

2.3.1 Setting the Security Password

The console security feature is disabled when you receive the system. To set the security password on the system, follow these steps:

1. Enter the following command at the console prompt (>>>):

>>> SET PSWD

The system responds with the following prompt:

>>> PSWD1 :

Note

• The security password must be a string of

EXACTLY 16 hexadecimal characters (0 to 9 and A to F).

• Write down the security password and store it in a safe place.

If you forget the security password, you must call your Digital

Services representative to disable the console security feature.

2. Enter a security password and press Return.

The system does not display the security password as you type it. The system responds with the following prompt:

>>>

PSWD2 :

3. Verify the security password by entering it a second time.

The system does not display the security password as you type it. If you enter the same security password at each prompt, the system saves the security password in nonvolatile memory. The system does not lose the security password when you turn off the system.

If the second security password does not match the first, the system responds with the following error message:

?80 ILLEGAL PASSWORD

>>>

4. Repeat steps 1 to 3 if you see an error message.

2–6 Console Security Feature and System Defaults

2.3.2 Enabling the Console Security Feature

When you have set the security password, you must enable the console security feature. To enable the console security feature, enter the following command at the console prompt:

>>> SET PSE 1

2.3.3 Logging in to Privileged Console Mode

When the console security feature is enabled, you must enter the security password to log in to privileged console mode. In privileged console mode you can use the full range of console commands. To log in to privileged console mode, follow these steps:

Note

You must set the security password before following these steps (see

Section 2.3.1).

1. Enter the following command:

>>> LOGIN

The system responds with the following prompt:

>>> Password:

2. Enter the security password and press Return.

The system does not display the security password as you type it. If you enter the correct security password, the system returns you to the console prompt and you become a privileged user. You can now use the full range of console commands.

If you enter an incorrect security password, the system responds with the following error message:

?81 INCORRECT PASSWORD

>>>

3. Repeat steps 1 and 2 if an error message is displayed.

Console Security Feature and System Defaults 2–7

2.3.4 Changing the Security Password

You must be a privileged user to change the security password. To change the security password, follow these steps:

1. Follow the procedure in Section 2.3.3 using the current security password to log in to the system.

2. Enter the following command:

>>> SET PSWD

The system responds with the following prompt:

PSWD1 :

3. Enter a new security password and press Return.

The system does not display the security password as you type it. The system then responds with the following prompt:

PSWD2 :

4. Verify the new security password by entering it a second time.

The system does not display the security password as you type it. If you enter the correct, current security password at the >>> prompt, and correctly enter the new security password a second time, the system saves the new security password in nonvolatile memory. The system does not lose the new security password when you turn off the system.

If you incorrectly enter the new security password a second time, the system responds with the following error message:

?80 ILLEGAL PASSWORD

>>>

5. Repeat steps 1 to 4 if an error message is displayed.

2.3.5 Disabling the Console Security Feature

When you disable the console security feature, all users can use the full range of console commands. To disable the console security feature, follow these steps:

1. Follow the procedure in Section 2.3.3 using the current security password to log in to the system.

2–8 Console Security Feature and System Defaults

2. Enter the following command:

>>> SET PSE 0

2.3.6 Exiting from Privileged Console Mode

When you exit from privileged console mode, privileged users must enter the

LOGIN command with the correct password before they can use the full range of console commands. To exit from privileged console mode, enter one of the following commands:

• BOOT (with any supplied parameters)

• CONTINUE

• HALT

• START

Chapter 3 describes each of these commands.

Console Security Feature and System Defaults 2–9

2.4 Setting the Default Boot Device

When the system is shipped, it is set to boot from the system disk, DIAO. This

RF-series disk holds the factory installed software (FIS).

If the toy battery has discharged, the default boot device may have to be set.

Use

SHOW BOOT to verify.

You can set the system to boot from a different default boot device that holds the operating system software. Table 2–1 shows the alternative default boot devices and their associated VMS™ device names.

Table 2–1 Alternative Default Boot Devices

Device

Hard disk (DSSI ID 0 to 6)

Network (the system boots from a remote system)

Tape drive (SCSI ID 0 to 7)

3

Compact disc (SCSI ID 0 to 7)

3

1

u represents the device unit number.

2

x represents the SCSI ID of that device.

3

This excludes ID number 6 which is the default controller ID.

VMS Device Name

DIAu

1

EZA0

MKAx00

2

DKAx00

2

To set an alternative default boot device, enter the SET BOOT command using the VMS device name of the alternative default boot device. For example, to set the system to boot over the network, enter the following command:

>>> SET BOOT EZA0

2–10 Console Security Feature and System Defaults

2.5 Setting the Default Recovery Action

There are five default recovery actions. You can change the default recovery action by entering the SET HALT command and the value or keyword associated with the action you want to set. Table 2–2 shows the five default recovery actions and their associated values. When the system is shipped, the default recovery action is set to halt.

Table 2–2 Default Recovery Actions and Associated Values

Recovery Action

Keyword

DEFAULT

RESTART

REBOOT

HALT restart_reboot

Associated

Value

0

1

2

3

4

Result

The system halts and displays the console prompt.

The system tries to restart the operating system.

If it fails to restart the operating system, it halts.

The system tries to boot. If it fails to boot, it halts.

The system halts and displays the console prompt.

The system tries to restart the operating system.

If it fails to restart the operating system, it tries to boot. If it fails to boot, it halts.

To set an alternative default recovery action, enter the SET HALT command using the value or keyword associated with the recovery action you want to set.

For example, to set the system to halt, enter one of the following commands:

>>> SET HALT 3

>>> SET HALT HALT

Console Security Feature and System Defaults 2–11

3

Console Commands

This chapter describes the console commands that you can enter when the system is in console mode. The system displays the console prompt (>>>) when it is in console mode. If the system is running the operating system software, see Chapter 2 for information on returning the system to console mode.

If the console security feature is enabled and a security password is set, you must log in to privileged console mode before using most of these commands.

See Chapter 2 for information on the console security feature.

The following sections describe all the console commands, give the command format, and describe the significance of each parameter.

3.1 BOOT

The BOOT command initializes the processor and transfers execution to VMB.

VMB attempts to boot the operating system from the specified device or list of devices, or from the default boot device if none is specified. The console qualifies the bootstrap operation by passing a boot flags bitmap to VMB in R5.

Format:

BOOT [qualifier-list] [{boot_device},{boot_device},...]

If you do not enter either the qualifier or the device name, the default value is used. Explicitly stating the boot flags or the boot device overrides, but does not permanently change, the corresponding default value.

When specifying a list of boot devices (up to 32 characters, with devices separated by commas and no spaces), the system checks the devices in the order specified and boots from the first one that contains bootable software.

Console Commands 3–1

Note

If included in a string of boot devices, the Ethernet device, EZA0, should be placed only as the last device of the string. The system will continuously attempt to boot from EZA0.

Set the default boot device and boot flags with the SET BOOT and SET

BFLAG commands. If you do not set a default boot device, the processor times out after 30 seconds and attempts to boot from the Ethernet device, EZA0.

Qualifiers:

Command specific:

/R5:{boot_flags}

/{boot_flags}

[device_name]

A 32-bit hex value passed to VMB in R5. The console does not interpret this value. Use the SET BFLAG command to specify a default boot flags longword. Use the SHOW BFLAG command to display the longword.

Same as /R5:{boot_flags}

A character string of up to 32 characters. When specifying a list of boot devices, the device names should be separated by commas and no spaces. Apart from checking the length, the console does not interpret or validate the device name. The console converts the string to uppercase, then passes VMB a string descriptor to this device name in R0. Use the SET BOOT command to specify a default boot device or list of devices. Use the SHOW BOOT command to display the default boot device. The factory default device is the Ethernet device, EZA0. Table 2–1 lists the boot devices supported by the Model 100 system.

Examples:

>>>SHOW BOOT

DKA300

>>>SHOW BFLAG

00000000

>>>B !Boot using default boot flags and device.

(BOOT/R5:0 DKA300)

2..

-DKA300

3–2 Console Commands

3.2 CONTINUE

The CONTINUE command causes the processor to begin instruction execution at the address currently contained in the program counter (PC). This address is the address stored in the PC when the system entered console mode or an address that the user specifies using the DEPOSIT command. The

CONTINUE command does not perform a processor initialization. The console enters program I/O mode.

Format:

CONTINUE

Example:

>>>CONTINUE

$ !VMS DCL prompt

3.3 DEPOSIT

The DEPOSIT command deposits data into the address specified. If you do not specify an address space or data size qualifier, the console uses the last address space and data size used in a DEPOSIT, EXAMINE, MOVE, or SEARCH command. After processor initialization, the default address space is physical memory and the default data size is longword. If you specify conflicting address space or data sizes, the console ignores the command and issues an error message.

Format:

DEPOSIT [qualifier-list] {address} {data} [data...]

Qualifiers:

Data control: /B, /W, /L, /Q, /N:{count}, /STEP:{size}, /WRONG

Address space control: /G, /I, /M, /P, /V, /U

Arguments:

{address} A longword address that specifies the first location into which data is deposited. The address can be an actual address or a symbolic address.

{data} The data to be deposited. If the specified data is larger than the deposit data size, the firmware ignores the command and issues an error response.

If the specified data is smaller than the deposit data size, it is extended on the left with zeros.

Console Commands 3–3

[{data}]

Examples:

Additional data to be deposited (as many as can fit on the command line).

>>>D/P/B/N:1FF 0 0

>>>D/V/L/N:3 1234 5

>>>D/N:8 R0 FFFFFFFF

>>>D/L/P/N:10/ST:200 0 8

>>>D/N:200 - 0

! Clear first 512 bytes of

! physical memory.

! Deposit 5 into four longwords

! starting at virtual memory address

! 1234.

! Loads GPRs R0 through R8 with -1.

! Deposit 8 in the first longword of

! the first 17 pages in physical

! memory.

! Starting at previous address, clear

! 513 longwords or 2052 bytes.

3.4 EXAMINE

The EXAMINE command examines the contents of the memory location or register specified by the address. If no address is specified, + is assumed.

The display line consists of a single character address specifier, the physical address to be examined, and the examined data.

EXAMINE uses the same qualifiers as DEPOSIT. However, the /WRONG qualifier causes EXAMINE to ignore ECC errors on reads from physical memory. The EXAMINE command also supports an /INSTRUCTION qualifier, which will disassemble the instructions at the current address.

Format:

EXAMINE [qualifier-list] [address]

Qualifiers:

Data control: /B, /W, /L, /Q, /N:{count}, /STEP:{size}, /WRONG

Address space control: /G, /I, /M, /P, /V, /U

Command specific:

/INSTRUCTION Disassembles and displays the VAX MACRO–32 instruction at the specified address.

Arguments:

[{address}] A longword address that specifies the first location to be examined.

The address can be an actual or a symbolic address. If no address is specified, + is assumed.

3–4 Console Commands

Examples:

>>>EX PC

G 0000000F FFFFFFFC

>>>EX SP

G 0000000E 00000200

>>>EX PSL

M 00000000 041F0000

>>>E/M

M 00000000 041F0000

>>>E R4/N:5

G 00000004 00000000

G 00000005 00000000

G 00000006 00000000

G 00000007 00000000

G 00000008 00000000

G 00000009 801D9000

! Examine the PC.

! Examine the SP.

! Examine the PSL.

! Examine PSL another way.

! Examine R4 through R9.

>>>EX PR$_SCBB

I 00000011 2004A000

>>>E/P 0

P 00000000 00000000

!Examine the SCBB, IPR 17

! (decimal).

! Examine local memory 0.

>>>EX /INS 20040000

P 20040000 11 BRB

! Examine 1st byte of ROM.

20040019

>>>EX /INS/N:5 20040019 ! Disassemble from branch.

P 20040019 D0 MOVL I^#20140000,@#20140000

P 20040024 D2 MCOML @#20140030,@#20140502

P 2004002F D2 MCOML S^#0E,@#20140030

P 20040036 7D MOVQ R0,@#201404B2

P 2004003D D0 MOVL I^#201404B2,R1

P 20040044 DB MFPR S^#2A,B^44(R1)

>>>E/INS ! Look at next instruction.

P 20040048 DB MFPR S^#2B,B^48(R1)

>>>

Console Commands 3–5

3.5 FIND

The FIND command searches main memory, starting at address zero for a page-aligned 128-KByte segment of good memory, or a restart parameter block

(RPB). If the command finds the segment or RPB, its address plus 512 is left in SP (R14). If it does not find the segment or RPB, the console issues an error message and preserves the contents of SP. If you do not specify a qualifier,

/RPB is assumed.

Format:

FIND [qualifier-list]

Qualifiers:

Command specific:

/MEMORY

/RPB

Searches memory for a page-aligned block of good memory, 128 KBytes in length. The search looks only at memory that is deemed usable by the bitmap. This command leaves the contents of memory unchanged.

Searches all physical memory for an RPB. The search does not use the bitmap to qualify which pages are looked at. The command leaves the contents of memory unchanged.

Examples:

>>>EX SP

G 0000000E 00000000

>>>FIND /MEM

>>>EX SP

G 0000000E 00000200

>>>FIND /RPB

?2C FND ERR 00C00004

>>>

! Check the SP.

! Look for a valid 128 KBytes.

! Note where it was found.

! Check for valid RPB.

! None to be found here.

3.6 HALT

The HALT command has no effect. It is included for compatibility with other

VAX consoles.

Format:

HALT

Example:

>>>HALT ! Pretend to halt.

>>>

3–6 Console Commands

3.7 HELP

The HELP command provides information about command syntax and usage.

Format:

HELP

Example:

>>>HELP

Following is a brief summary of all the commands supported by the console:

UPPERCASE denotes a keyword that you must type in

| denotes an OR condition

[]

<> denotes optional parameters denotes a field specifying a syntactically correct value

..

...

denotes one of an inclusive range of integers denotes that the previous item may be repeated

Valid qualifiers:

/B /W /L /Q /INSTRUCTION

/G /I /V /P /M

/STEP: /N: /NOT

/WRONG /U

Valid commands:

BOOT [[/R5:]<boot_flags>] [<boot_device>]

CONFIGURE

CONTINUE

DEPOSIT [<qualifiers>] <address> <datum> [<datum>...]

EXAMINE [<qualifiers>] [<address>]

FIND [/MEMORY | /RPB]

HALT

HELP

INITIALIZE

LOGIN

MOVE [<qualifiers>] <address> <address>

NEXT [<count>]

REPEAT <command>

SEARCH [<qualifiers>] <address> <pattern> [<mask>]

SET BFLG <boot_flags>

SET BOOT <boot_device>

SET HALT <0..4 |DEFAULT|RESTART|REBOOT|HALT|RESTART_REBOOT>

SET HOST/DUP/DSSI/BUS:<0..1> <node_number> [<task>]

SET HOST/DUP/UQSSP </DISK|/TAPE> <controller_number>[<task>]

SET HOST/DUP/UQSSP <physical_CSR_address> [<task>]

SET HOST/MAINTENANCE/UQSSP/SERVICE <controller_number>

SET HOST/MAINTENANCE/UQSSP <physical_CSR_address>

SET LANGUAGE <1..15>

Console Commands 3–7

>>>

SET PSE <0..1 |DISABLED | ENABLED>

SET PSWD <password>

SET RECALL <0..1 | DISABLED | ENABLED>

SET SCSI <0..7>

SET SCSI_ID

SHOW BFLG

SHOW BOOT

SHOW CONFIG

SHOW DEVICE

SHOW DSSI

SHOW ETHERNET

SHOW HALT

SHOW LANGUAGE

SHOW MEMORY [/FULL]

SHOW PSE

SHOW QBUS

SHOW RECALL

SHOW RLV12

SHOW SCSI

SHOW SCSI_ID

SHOW TRANSLATION <physical_address>

SHOW UQSSP

SHOW VERSION

START <address>

TEST [<test_code> [<parameters>]]

UNJAM

X <address> <count>

3–8 Console Commands

3.8 INITIALIZE

The INITIALIZE command performs a processor initialization.

Format:

INITIALIZE

The following registers are initialized:

Register

PSL

IPL

ASTLVL

SISR

ICCS

RXCS

TXCS

MAPEN

Caches

Instruction buffer

Console previous reference

TODR

Main memory

General registers

Halt code

Bootstrap-in-progress flag

Internal restart-in-progress flag

State at Initialization

041F0000

1F

4

0

Bits <6> and <0> clear; the rest are unpredictable

0

80

0

Flushed

Unaffected

Longword, physical, address 0

Unaffected

Unaffected

Unaffected

Unaffected

Unaffected

Unaffected

Console Commands 3–9

The firmware clears all error status bits and initializes the following:

• CDAL bus timer

• Address decode and match registers

• Programmable timer interrupt vectors

• The QUART LPR register is set to 9600 baud

• All error status bits are cleared

Example:

>>>INIT

>>>

3.9 LOGIN

Allows you to put the system in privileged console mode. When the console security feature is enabled and when you put the system in console mode, the system operates in unprivileged console mode. You can access only a subset of the console commands. To access the full range of console commands, you must use this command. This command may only be executed in secure console mode. The format of this command is as follows:

LO[GIN]

When you enter the command, the system prompts you for a password as follows:

Password:

You must enter the current console security password. If you do not enter the correct password, the system displays the error message, INCORRECT

PASSWORD. When you enter the console security password, the system operates in privileged console mode. In this mode, you can use all the console commands. The system exits from privileged console mode when you enter one of the following console commands:

• BOOT

• CONTINUE

• HALT

• START

3–10 Console Commands

3.10 MOVE

The MOVE command copies the block of memory starting at the source address to a block beginning at the destination address. Typically, this command has an /N qualifier so that more than one datum is transferred. The destination correctly reflects the contents of the source, regardless of the overlap between the source and the data.

The MOVE command actually performs byte, word, longword, and quadword reads and writes as needed in the process of moving the data. Moves are supported only for the physical and virtual address spaces.

Format:

MOVE [qualifier-list] {src_address} {dest_address}

Qualifiers:

Data control: /B, /W, /L, /Q, /N:{count}, /STEP:{size}, /WRONG

Address space control: /V, /U, /P

Arguments:

{src_address} A longword address that specifies the first location of the source data to be copied.

{dest_address} A longword address that specifies the destination of the first byte of data. These addresses may be an actual address or a symbolic address. If no address is specified, + is assumed.

Examples:

! Observe destination.

>>>EX/N:4 0

P 00000000 00000000

P 00000004 00000000

P 00000008 00000000

P 0000000C 00000000

P 00000010 00000000

>>>EX/N:4 200

P 00000200 58DD0520

P 00000204 585E04C1

P 00000208 00FF8FBB

P 0000020C 5208A8D0

P 00000210 540CA8DE

>>>MOV/N:4 200 0

! Observe source data.

! Move the data.

Console Commands 3–11

>>>EX/N:4 0

P 00000000 58DD0520

P 00000004 585E04C1

P 00000008 00FF8FBB

P 0000000C 5208A8D0

P 00000010 540CA8DE

>>>

! Observe moved data.

3.11 NEXT

The NEXT command executes the specified number of macro instructions. If no count is specified, 1 is assumed.

After the last macro instruction is executed, the console reenters console I/O mode.

Format:

NEXT {count}

The console implements the NEXT command, using the trace trap enable and trace pending bits in the PSL and the trace pending vector in the SCB.

The console enters the "Spacebar Step Mode". In this mode, subsequent spacebar strokes initiate single steps and a carriage return forces a return to the console prompt.

The following restrictions apply:

• If memory management is enabled, the NEXT command works only if the first page in SSC RAM is mapped in S0 (system) space.

• Overhead associated with the NEXT command affects execution time of an instruction.

• The NEXT command elevates the IPL to 31 for long periods of time

(milliseconds) while single-stepping over several commands.

• Unpredictable results occur if the macro instruction being stepped over modifies either the SCBB or the trace trap entry. This means that you cannot use the NEXT command in conjunction with other debuggers.

3–12 Console Commands

Arguments:

{count}

Examples:

A value representing the number of macro instructions to execute.

>>>DEP 1000 50D650D4

>>>DEP 1004 125005D1

>>>DEP 1008 00FE11F9

>>>EX /INSTRUCTION /N:5 1000

P 00001000 D4 CLRL R0

P 00001002 D6 INCL R0

P 00001004 D1 CMPL S^#05,R0

P 00001007 12 BNEQ 00001002

P 00001009 11 BRB

P 0000100B 00 HALT

00001009

! Create a simple program.

! List it.

>>>DEP PR$_SCBB 200

>>>DEP PC 1000

! Set up a user SCBB...

! ...and the PC.

>>>

>>>N ! Single step...

P 00001002 D6 INCL R0 ! SPACEBAR

P 00001004 D1 CMPL S^#05,R0 ! SPACEBAR

P 00001007 12 BNEQ 00001002 ! SPACEBAR

P 00001002 D6 INCL R0 ! CR

>>>N 5 ! ...or multiple step the program.

P 00001004 D1 CMPL S^#05,R0

P 00001007 12 BNEQ 00001002

P 00001002 D6 INCL R0

P 00001004 D1 CMPL S^#05,R0

P 00001007 12 BNEQ 00001002

>>>N 7

P 00001002 D6 INCL R0

P 00001004 D1 CMPL S^#05,R0

P 00001007 12 BNEQ 00001002

P 00001002 D6 INCL R0

P 00001004 D1 CMPL S^#05,R0

P 00001007 12 BNEQ 00001002

P 00001009 11 BRB 00001009

>>>N

P 00001009 11 BRB

>>>

00001009

Console Commands 3–13

3.12 REPEAT

The REPEAT command repeatedly displays and executes the specified command. Press

CTRL/C to stop the command. You can specify any valid console command except the REPEAT command.

Format:

REPEAT {command}

Arguments:

{command} A valid console command other than REPEAT.

Examples:

>>>REPEAT EX PR$_TODR !Watch the clock.

I 0000001B 5AFE78CE

I 0000001B 5AFE78D1

I 0000001B 5AFE78FD

I 0000001B 5AFE7900

I 0000001B 5AFE7903

I 0000001B 5AFE7907

I 0000001B 5AFE790A

I 0000001B 5AFE790D

I 0000001B 5AFE7910

I 0000001B 5AFE793C

I 0000001B 5AFE793F

I 0000001B 5AFE7942

I 0000001B 5AFE7946

I 0000001B 5AFE7949

I 0000001B 5AFE794C

I 0000001B 5AFE794F

I 0000001B 5^C

>>>

3–14 Console Commands

3.13 SEARCH

The SEARCH command finds all occurrences of a pattern and reports the addresses where the pattern was found. If the /NOT qualifier is present, the command reports all addresses in which the pattern did not match.

Format:

SEARCH [qualifier-list] {address} {pattern} [{mask}]

SEARCH accepts an optional mask that indicates bits to be ignored (don’t care bits). For example, to ignore bit 0 in the comparison, specify a mask of 1. The mask, if not present, defaults to 0.

A match occurs if (pattern and not mask) = (data and not mask), where:

Pattern is the target data

Mask is the optional don’t care bitmask (which defaults to 0)

Data is the data at the current address

SEARCH reports the address under the following conditions:

/NOT Qualifier

Absent

Absent

Present

Present

Match Condition

True

False

True

False

Action

Report address

No report

No report

Report address

The address is advanced by the size of the pattern (byte, word, longword, or quadword), unless overridden by the /STEP qualifier.

Qualifiers:

Data control: /B, /W, /L, /Q, /N:{count}, /STEP:{size}, /WRONG

Address space control: /P, /V, /U

Command specific:

/NOT Inverts the sense of the match.

Console Commands 3–15

Arguments:

{start_ address}

{pattern}

[{mask}]

Examples:

A longword address that specifies the first location subject to the search. This address can be an actual address or a symbolic address. If no address is specified, + is assumed.

The target data.

A mask of the bits desired in the comparison.

>>>DEP /P/L/N:1000 0 0

>>>

>>>DEP 300 12345678

>>>DEP 401 12345678

>>>DEP 502 87654321

>>>

>>>SEARCH /N:1000 /ST:1 0 12345678

P 00000300 12345678

P 00000401 12345678

>>>SEARCH /N:1000 0 12345678

P 00000300 12345678

>>>SEARCH /N:1000 /NOT 0 0

P 00000300 12345678

P 00000400 34567800

! Clear some memory.

! Deposit some search data.

! Search for all occurrences

! of 12345678 on any byte

! boundary.

Then try on

! longword boundaries.

! Search for all non-zero

! longwords.

P 00000404 00000012

P 00000500 43210000

P 00000504 00008765

>>>SEARCH /N:1000 /ST:1 0 1 FFFFFFFE ! Search for odd-numbered

! longwords on any boundary.

P 00000502 87654321

P 00000503 00876543

P 00000504 00008765

P 00000505 00000087

>>>SEARCH /N:1000 /B 0 12

P 00000303 12

P 00000404 12

>>>SEARCH /N:1000 /ST:1 /w 0 FE11

>>>

>>>

>>>

! Search for all occurrences

! of the byte 12.

! Search for all words that

! could be interpreted as

! a spin (10$: brb 10$).

! Note that none were found.

3–16 Console Commands

3.14 SET

The SET command sets the parameter to the value you specify.

Format:

SET {parameter} {value}

Parameters:

BFLAG

BOOT

HALT

HOST

LANGUAGE

PSWD

PSWD

RECALL

SCSI_ID

Sets the default R5 boot flags. The value must be a hex number of up to eight digits.

Sets the default boot device. The value must be a valid device name or list of device names as specified in the BOOT command description in Section 3.1.

Sets the user-defined halt action. Acceptable values are the keywords "default", "restart", "reboot", "halt", "restart_reboot", or a number in the range 0 to 4 inclusive.

Makes a DUP connection to a DSSI device.

Sets console language and keyboard type. If the current console terminal does not support the multinational character set (MCS), then this command has no effect and the console message appears in English. Values are 1 through 15.

Allows you to enable or disable the console security feature of the system. The SET PSE command accepts the following values:

1.

0—Console security disabled

2.

1—Console security enabled

When the console security feature is enabled, only a subset of the console commands are available to the user. These commands are listed in Section 2.3. To enable the complete set of console commands once the console security feature is enabled, you must use the LOGIN command (see Section 3.9).

Allows you to set or change the console security password.

Sets command recall state to either ENABLED (1) or DISABLED

(0).

Sets the SCSI ID of the SCSI controller, to a number in the range

0 to 7. The SCSI ID of the SCSI controller is set to 6 by default.

Console Commands 3–17

Qualifiers: Listed in the parameter descriptions above.

Examples:

>>>

>>>SET BFLAG 220

>>>

>>>SET BOOT DUA0

>>>

>>>SET LANGUAGE 5

>>>

>>>SET HALT RESTART

>>>

3.15 SHOW

The SHOW command displays the console parameter you specify.

Format:

SHOW {parameter}

Parameters:

BFLAG

BOOT

CONFIG

DEVICE

HALT

DSSI

ETHERNET

Displays the default R5 boot flags.

Displays the default boot device.

Displays the system configuration. The command displays information about the devices that the firmware has tested. It also displays the device errors that the most recent device test detected.

Displays all devices in the system.

Shows the user-defined halt action.

Shows the status of all nodes that are on the DSSI bus. For each node on the DSSI bus, the console displays the node number, the node name, and the boot name and type of the device, if available. The command does not indicate the "bootability" of the device.

The node that issues the command reports a node name of "*".

The device information is obtained from the media type field of the MSCP command GET UNIT STATUS. In the case where the node is not running or is not capable of running an MSCP server, then no device information is displayed.

Displays hardware Ethernet address for all Ethernet adapters that can be found. Displays as blank if no Ethernet adapter is present.

3–18 Console Commands

LANGUAGE

MEMORY

MEMORY/FULL

PSE

QBUS

RECALL

RLV12

UQSSP

SCSI

TRANSLATION

VERSION

Displays console language and keyboard type. Refer to the corresponding SET LANGUAGE command for the meaning.

Displays main memory configuration.

Additionally, displays the normally inaccessible areas of memory, such as the PFN bitmap pages, the console scratch memory pages, the Q22–bus scatter-gather map pages. Also reports the addresses of bad pages, as defined by the bitmap.

Displays the condition of the console security feature of the system.

Displays all Q22–bus I/O addresses that respond to an aligned word read, and speculative device name information. For each address, the console displays the address in the VAX I/O space in hex, the address as it would appear in the Q22–bus I/O space in octal, and the word data that was read in hex.

This command may take several minutes to complete. Press

CTRL/C to terminate the command. During execution, the command disables the scatter-gather map.

Shows the current state of command recall, either ENABLED or

DISABLED.

Displays all RL01 and RL02 disks that appear on the Q22–bus.

Displays the status of all disks and tapes that can be found on the Q22–bus that support the UQSSP protocol. For each such disk or tape on the Q22–bus, the firmware displays the controller number, the controller CSR address, and the boot name and type of each device connected to the controller. The command does not indicate whether the device contains a bootable image.

This information is obtained from the media type field of the

MSCP command GET UNIT STATUS. The console does not display device information if a node is not running (or cannot run) an MSCP server.

Shows any SCSI devices in the system.

Shows any virtual addresses that map to the specified physical address. The firmware uses the current values of page table base and length registers to perform its search; it is assumed that page tables have been properly built.

Displays the current firmware version.

Qualifiers: Listed in the parameter descriptions above.

Console Commands 3–19

Examples:

>>>

>>>SHOW BFLAG

00000220

>>>

>>>SHOW BOOT

DUA0

>>>SHOW CONTROLP

>>>

>>>SHOW ETHERNET

Ethernet Adapter

-EZA0 (08-00-2B-0B-29-14)

>>>

>>>SHOW HALT restart

>>>

>>>SHOW LANGUAGE

English (United States/Canada)

>>>

>>>SHOW MEMORY

16 MB RAM, SIMM Set (0A,0B,0C,0D) present

Memory Set 0: 04000000 to 04FFFFFF, 16MB, 32768 good pages, 0 bad pages

64 MB RAM, SIMM Set (1E,1F,1G,1H) present

Memory Set 1: 00000000 to 03FFFFFF, 64MB, 131072 good pages, 0 bad pages

Total of 80MB, 163840 good pages, 0 bad pages, 136 reserved pages

>>>

>>>SHOW MEM/FULL

16 MB RAM, SIMM Set (0A,0B,0C,0D) present

Memory Set 0: 00000000 to 00FFFFFF, 16MB, 32768 good pages, 0 bad pages

Total of 16MB, 32768 good pages, 0 bad pages, 104 reserved pages

Memory Bitmap

-00FF3000 to 00FF3FFF, 8 pages

Console Scratch Area

-00FF4000 to 00FF7FFF, 32 pages

Scan of Bad Pages

>>>

3–20 Console Commands

>>>SHOW SCSI

SCSI Adapter 0 (761300), SCSI ID 7

-DKA100 (DEC TLZ04)

>>>

>>>SHOW TRANSLATION 1000

V 80001000

>>>

>>>SHOW VERSION

KA52 Vn.n VMBn.n

>>>

>>>SHOW DSSI

DSSI Bus 0 Node 1 (R5WBAA)

-DIA1 (RF35)

DSSI Bus 0 Node 7 (*)

3.16 START

The START command starts instruction execution at the address you specify.

If no address is given, the current PC is used. If memory mapping is enabled, macro instructions are executed from virtual memory, and the address is treated as a virtual address. The START command is equivalent to a

DEPOSIT to PC, followed by a CONTINUE. It does not perform a processor initialization.

Format:

START [{address}]

Arguments:

[address] The address at which to begin execution. This address is loaded into the user’s PC.

Example:

>>>START 1000

3.17 TEST

The TEST command invokes a diagnostic test program specified by the test number. If you enter a test number of 0 (zero), the powerup diagnostics are executed. The console accepts an optional list of up to five additional hexadecimal arguments.

Format:

TEST [{test_number} [{test_arguments}]]

Console Commands 3–21

Arguments:

{test_number}

{test_arguments}

A two-digit hex number specifying the test to be executed.

Up to five additional test arguments. These arguments are accepted, but they have no meaning to the console.

Example:

>>>TEST 0

72..71..70..69..68..67..66..65..64..63..62..61..60..59..58..57..

56..55..54..53..52..51..50..49..48..47..46..45..44..43..42..41..

40..39..38..37..36..35..34..33..32..31..30..29..28..27..26..25..

24..23..22..21..20..19..18..17..16..15..14..13..12..11..10..09..

08..07..06..05..04..03..

Tests completed.

>>>

Example:

>>>

>>>

>>>

>>>t 9c

! Display the CPU registers.

savpc=20048C68 savpsl=20048C68 sbr=03FA0000 slr=00003040 p0br=80000000 p0lr=00182000 p1br=00000000 p1lr=00000000 sid=13001401 sie=03020801 mapen=00000000 tcr0=00000000 tir0=00000000 tnir0=00000000 tivr0=00000078 tcr1=00000001 tir1=02AF768E tnir1=0000000F tivr1=0000007C bdr=3FFB08FF ssccr=00D05070 scbb=20053400

DZ csr=0020 tcr=0008 msr=0F75 scr=0000D000 dser=00000000 qbear=0000000F dear=00000000 qbmbr=03FF8000 ipcr=0000 nicsr0=1FFF0003 3=00004030 4=00004050 5=8039FF00 6=83E0F000 7=00000000 nicsr9=04E204E2 10=00040000 11=00000000 12=00000000 13=00000000 15=0000FFFF

NISA=08-00-2B-29-1C-7A intmsk=00 intreq=00 scdadr=00000000 scddir=0

SCSI_CSRs 0=00 1=00 2=00 3=00 4=00 6=05 5=05 7=00 8=16 9=5B A=5B B=00 C=04

VIC......icsr=00000001 vmar=000007E0 ecr=000000CA

PC......pcctl=FFFFFC13 pcsts=FFFFF800 pcadr=FFFFFFF8

BC_128K..cctl=00000007 bcetsts=000003E0 bcetidx=FFFFFFE0 bcetag=FFFFFE00

......bcedsts=00000F00 bcedidx=001FFFF8 bcedecc=00000000

........nests=00000000 neoadr=E0055F70 neocmd=8000FF04 neicmd=000003FF

......nedathi=FFFFFFFF nedatlo=FF7F9FFF cefsts=00019200 cefadr=E00002C0

MEMORY...mesr=00006000 mear=08406010_____Add=21018040 mmcdsr=01111000

......memcon0=80000005 memcon1=00000007 moamr=00000000

NCA......cesr=00000000 cmcdsr=0000C108 cnear=00000000 ssr=C0CE

.......csear1=00000000 csear2=00000000 cioear1=00000000 cioear2=000002C0

.........iccs=00000000 nicr=FFFFD8F0 icr=FFFFD8F0 todr=00000000

>>>

3–22 Console Commands

Example:

>>>

>>> ; list diagnostics and scripts

>>>t 9e

Test

# Address Name Parameters

___________________________________________________________________________

20053800 SCB

20054590 De_executive

30 200637BC Memory_Init_Bitmap *** mark_Hard_SBEs ******

31 20064094 Memory_Setup_CSRs **********

32 20064464 NMC_registers

33 20064600 NMC_powerup

**********

**

34 2005D0A4 SSC_ROM ***

35 20067394 B_Cache_diag_mode bypass_test_mask *********

37 200681C4 Cache_w_Memory bypass_test_mask *********

40 2006242C Memory_count_pages SIMM_set0 SIMM_set1 Soft_errs_allowed *****

41 200579C0 Board_Reset *

42 2005B56C Chk_for_Interrupts **********

46 200670D4 P_Cache_diag_mode bypass_test_mask *********

47 20063D7C Memory_Refresh start_a end incr cont_on_err time_seconds *****

48 20061558 Memory_Addr_shorts start_add end_add * cont_on_err pat2 pat3 ****

4A 200634E0 Memory_ECC_SBEs start_add end_add add_incr cont_on_err ******

4B 20061D78 Memory_Byte_Errors start_add end_add add_incr cont_on_err ******

4C 20062E90 Memory_ECC_Logic start_add end_add add_incr cont_on_err ******

4D 200613BC Memory_Address start_add end_add add_incr cont_on_err ******

4E 20061AF8 Memory_Byte

4F 20062628 Memory_Data start_add end_add add_incr cont_on_err ****** start_add end_add add_incr cont_on_err ******

51 2005BA5C FPA **********

52 2005BED8 SSC_Prog_timers which_timer wait_time_us ***

53 2005C1A8 SSC_TOY_Clock

54 2005B670 Virtual_Mode

55 2005C360 Interval_Timer

58 200602F0 SHAC_RESET repeat_test_250ms_ea Tolerance ***

********

***** port_number time_secs not_pres

59 2005F584 SGEC_LPBCK_ASSIST time_secs **

5C 2005FAEC SHAC bypass_test_mask *******

5F 2005E870 SGEC

63 2005CF48 QDSS_any

80 200649FC CQBIC_memory

81 2005CBA8 Qbus_MSCP

82 2005CD70 Qbus_DELQA

83 20058C70 QZA_Intlpbck1

84 2005A328 QZA_Intlpbck2

85 20057EE4 QZA_memory loopback_type no_ram_tests ****** input_csr selftest_r0 selftest_r1 ****** bypass_test_mask *********

IP_csr ****** device_num_addr **** controller_number ******** controller_number ********* incr test_pattern controller_number *******

86 200583A0 QZA_DMA Controller_number main_mem_buf ********

90 2005BE54 CQBIC_registers *

91 2005BDE8 CQBIC_powerup **

99 200647D0 Flush_Ena_Caches dis_flush_VIC dis_flush_BC dis_flush_PC

Console Commands 3–23

9A 2005D1DC INTERACTION

9B 20064680 Init_memory pass_count disable_device ****

***

9C 2005D1A8 List_CPU_registers *

9D 2005DEC4 Utility Modify_CPU_type *********

9E 2005C518 List_diagnostics script_number *

9F 20060888 Create_A0_Script **********

C1 20057B90 SSC_RAM_Data *

C2 20057D68 SSC_RAM_Data_Addr *

C5 2005E770 SSC_registers

C6 20057AD4 SSC_powerup

*

*********

D0 20066C98 V_Cache_diag_mode bypass_test_mask *********

D2 20065220 O_Bit_diag_mode bypass_test_mask *********

DA 20067FE8 PB_Flush_Cache

DB 20065A18 Speed

********** print_speed *********

DC 200642BC NO_Memory_present *

DD 200661FC B_Cache_Data_debug start_add end_add add_incr *******

DE 20065DB4 B_Cache_Tag_Debug start_add end_add add_incr *******

DF 20065614 O_BIT_DEBUG start_add end_add add_incr seg_incr ******

E0 20068498 SCSI

E1 20068578 SCSI_Utility environment reset_bus time_s ******* environment util_nbr target_ID lun ******

E2 20068630 SCSI_MAP

E4 200689D4 DZ

E8 20068B4C SYNC

E9 20068BF4 SYNC_Utility

EC 20068CAC ASYNC bypass_test addr_incr_data_tst ******** environment ********* environment ********* environment ********* environment *********

Scripts

# Description

A0 User defined scripts

A1 Powerup tests, Functional Verify, continue on error, numeric countdown

A3 Functional Verify, stop on error, test # announcements

A4 Loop on A3 Functional Verify

A6 Memory tests, mark only multiple bit errors

A7 Memory tests

A8 Memory acceptance tests, mark single and multi-bit errors, call A7

A9 Memory tests, stop on error

B2 Extended tests plus BF

B5 Extended tests, then loop

BF DZ, SYNC, ASYNC with loopbacks

>>>

>>>

3–24 Console Commands

3.18 UNJAM

The UNJAM command performs an I/O bus reset, by writing a 1 (one) to IPR

55 (decimal). SHAC and SGEC are explicitly reset, EDAL_INTREQ register error bits are cleared and SCST_DMA map registers are cleared.

Format:

UNJAM

Example:

>>>UNJAM

>>>

3.19 X—Binary Load and Unload

The X command is for use by automatic systems communicating with the console.

The X command loads or unloads (that is, writes to memory, or reads from memory) the specified number of data bytes through the console serial line

(regardless of console type) starting at the specified address.

Format:

X {address} {count} CR {line_checksum} {data} {data_checksum}

If bit 31 of the count is clear, data is received by the console and deposited into memory. If bit 31 is set, data is read from memory and sent by the console.

The remaining bits in the count are a positive number indicating the number of bytes to load or unload.

The console accepts the command upon receiving the carriage return. The next byte the console receives is the command checksum, which is not echoed. The command checksum is verified by adding all command characters, including the checksum and separating space (but not including the terminating carriage return, rubouts, or characters deleted by rubout), into an 8-bit register initially set to zero. If no errors occur, the result is zero. If the command checksum is correct, the console responds with the input prompt and either sends data to the requester or prepares to receive data. If the command checksum is in error, the console responds with an error message. The intent is to prevent inadvertent operator entry into a mode where the console is accepting characters from the keyboard as data, with no escape mechanism possible.

Console Commands 3–25

If the command is a load (bit 31 of the count is clear), the console responds with the input prompt (>>>), then accepts the specified number of bytes of data for depositing to memory, and an additional byte of received data checksum.

The data is verified by adding all data characters and the checksum character into an 8-bit register initially set to zero. If the final content of the register is nonzero, the data or checksum are in error, and the console responds with an error message.

If the command is a binary unload (bit 31 of the count is set), the console responds with the input prompt (>>>), followed by the specified number of bytes of binary data. As each byte is sent, it is added to a checksum register initially set to zero. At the end of the transmission, the two’s complement of the low byte of the register is sent.

If the data checksum is incorrect on a load, or if memory or line errors occur during the transmission of data, the entire transmission is completed, then the console issues an error message. If an error occurs during loading, the contents of the memory being loaded are unpredictable.

The console represses echo while it is receiving the data string and checksums.

The console terminates all flow control when it receives the carriage return at the end of the command line in order to avoid treating flow control characters from the terminal as valid command line checksums.

You can control the console serial line during a binary unload using control characters (

CTRL/C

,

CTRL/S

,

CTRL/O

, and so on). You cannot control the console serial line during a binary load, since all received characters are valid binary data.

The console has the following timing requirements:

• It must receive data being loaded with a binary load command at a rate of at least one byte every 60 seconds.

• It must receive the command checksum that precedes the data within 60 seconds of the carriage return that terminates the command line.

• It must receive the data checksum within 60 seconds of the last data byte.

If any of these timing requirements are not met, then the console aborts the transmission by issuing an error message and returning to the console prompt.

The entire command, including the checksum, can be sent to the console as a single burst of characters at the specified character rate of the console serial line. The console is able to receive at least 4 KBytes of data in a single X command.

3–26 Console Commands

3.20 ! (Comment)

The comment character (an exclamation point) is used to document command sequences. It can appear anywhere on the command line. All characters following the comment character are ignored.

Format:

!

Example:

>>>! The console ignores this line.

>>>

Console Commands 3–27

4

Hardware Specifications

This chapter lists the hardware specifications of the following devices:

• System unit

• Internal SCSI device

• KA52-AA CPU

• Internal DSSI device

4.1 System Unit Specifications

The following tables list the specifications for the VAX 4000 Model 100 system.

Hardware Specifications 4–1

Table 4–1 System Specifications: VAX 400 Model 100

Subject Description

Processor

Boot and diagnostic firmware ROM

DRAM memory

KA52 (NVAX).

512KB.

Hard disk

Maximum running current

Steady state current

Expandable from 16MB using one set of four 4MB SIMMs to a maximum of 128MB using two sets of four 16MB SIMMs. These are MS44 memory options.

RF35 and RF31T (the system supports a maximum of three disk devices in the enclosure).

Tape drive TZ30, TZK10, TLZ06.

Compact disc drive RRD42.

Terminals

Interfaces

Supports the VT series.

One DSSI bus, one synchronous SCSI bus, one ThinWire Ethernet port

1

, one standard Ethernet port

1

(thickwire), three MMJ ports, one modem port. Optional: 8 or 16 additional asynchronous DEC423 MMJ ports or 8 additional asynchronous modem ports, 2 synchronous ports.

Input voltage

Maximum inrush current

Automatically adjusting ac input. Range: 100 V ac to 120 V ac or 220 V ac to 240 V ac.

2.0 amperes (A) at 220 V ac.

2.2 A at 110 V ac, 1.1 A at 220 V ac.

2.2 A at 110 V ac, 1.1 A at 220 V ac.

Maximum power consumption

Frequency

200 watts (W).

49 Hz to 61 Hz.

1

Both Ethernet types cannot be used simultaneously.

4–2 Hardware Specifications

Table 4–2 System Unit Metrics

System Unit

Weight

1 kg (lb)

Model 100 18.18 (40)

Height cm (in)

14.99 (5.90)

1

Depends on configuration

Width cm (in)

46.38 (18.26)

Depth cm (in)

40.00 (15.75)

Table 4–3 System Storage Conditions

Storage Condition

Temperature range

Relative humidity

Altitude

Maximum wet bulb temperature

Minimum dew point

Range or Value

5°C to 50°C (41°F to 122°F )

10% to 95% at 66°C (noncondensing)

0 m to 2400 m (0 ft to 8000 ft)

32°C (90°F)

2°C (36°F)

Table 4–4 System Operating Conditions and Nonoperating Conditions

Operating Conditions

Temperature range

Temperature change rate

Relative humidity

Maximum wet bulb temperature

Minimum dew point

Altitude

Range or Value

10°C (50°F) to 32°C (90°F) with TZ30 tape drive; otherwise 10°C (50°F) to 40°C (104°F)

11°C (20°F) per hour maximum

10% to 90% noncondensing (20% to 80% if tape device installed)

28°C (82°F)

2°C (36°F)

2400 m (8000 ft) at 36°C (96°F)

(continued on next page)

Hardware Specifications 4–3

Table 4–4 (Cont.) System Operating Conditions and Nonoperating Conditions

Nonoperating Conditions

Temperature range

Relative humidity

Altitude

Maximum wet bulb temperature

Minimum dew point

–40°C (–40°F) to 66°C (151°F)

10% to 95% at 66°C (151°F)

4900 m (16 000 ft)

28°C (82°F)

2°C (36°F)

4–4 Hardware Specifications

4.2 Internal DSSI Device Specifications

The following tables list the specifications for the internal DSSI devices.

Table 4–5 RF31T and RF35 Hard Disk Drive Specifications

Formatted Storage Capacity

Per drive (MB )

Blocks per track

Blocks per drive

Buffer size (KB)

RF31T

381

57

744,534

512

RF35

852

57

1,664,628

512

Performance RF31T

Transfer rate to or from media (MB/second)

Data transfer rate

(MB/second)

Transfer rate to or from buffer, asynchronous

(MB/second)

Transfer rate to or from buffer, synchronous

(M bytes/second)

Average seek time

(milliseconds)

3.3

4.0

N/A (SCSI only)

N/A (SCSI only)

5.5

Maximum seek time, full stroke (milliseconds)

Average latency

(milliseconds)

5.6

Average access (milliseconds) 11.1

9.5

19

5.6

15.1

RF35

3.3

4.0

N/A (SCSI only)

N/A (SCSI only)

Hardware Specifications 4–5

Table 4–6 TZ30 Tape Drive Specifications

Subject

Mode of operation

Media

Bit density

Number of tracks

Transfer rate (at host)

Tape speed

Track format

Cartridge capacity

Description

Streaming

12.77 mm (0.5 in) unformatted magnetic tape

2624 bits/cm (6667 bits/in)

22

62.5Kb/s

190 cm/s (75 in/s)

Multiple track serpentine recording

95MB, formatted (approx)

Table 4–7 TZK10 QIC Tape Drive Specifications

Subject

Mode of operation

Media

Track width: write

Track width: read

Bit density

Number of tracks

Transfer rate

Tape speed

Track format

Cartridge capacity

Description

Streaming.

DC6320, DC6525, or Digital approved equivalent.

See the VAX 4000 Model 100 Operator Information manual.

0.1778 mm +0.0000, -0.0127 mm (0.0070 in +0.0000,

-0.0005 in).

0.1270 mm +0.0127, -0.0000 mm (0.0050 in +0.0005,

-0.0000 in).

16Kb/in.

26.

200K bytes/s at average streaming mode, 1.5MB/s at

SCSI maximum.

305 cm/s (120 in/s).

Multiple track serpentine recording.

320MB or 525MB, formatted (approx), depending on the QIC tape used.

4–6 Hardware Specifications

Table 4–8 TLZ06 Cassette Tape Drive Specifications

Subject

Mode of operation

Media

Bit density

Transfer rate (sustained)

Recording format

Description

Streaming and start/stop.

TLZ04-CA, TLZ06-CA, or Digital approved equivalent. See the VAX 4000 Model 100 Operator

Information manual.

114Mb/in.

183KB/s noncompression

Digital Data Storage (DDS, DC)

Table 4–9 RRD42 Compact Disc Drive Specifications

Subject

Acceptable discs

Disc capacity

Rotation speed: innermost track

Rotation speed: outermost track

Sustained data transfer rate

Burst data transfer rate

Access time: full stroke

Access time: average

Description

CD-ROM mode-1 data discs

CD-ROM mode-2 data discs

600MB

530 r/min at CLV = 1.4 m/s

200 r/min at CLV = 1.2 m/s

150KB/s

1.5MB/s

650 ms

380 ms

Hardware Specifications 4–7

4.3 KA52–AA CPU Specifications

The Model 100 system uses the timesharing KA52–AA CPU (54-21797-01).

Central Processing Unit

Addressing modes

Clock rate

Data path width

Number of data types

Number of instructions

General purpose registers

I/O bus interface

Q–bus backplane termination

Memory Management and Control

Page size

Virtual address space

Physical memory space

Number of memory sets

Architecture

Instruction prefetch buffer size

Primary Cache

Data stored

Write algorithm

Size

General register: 8

Program counter: 4

Index: 9

286 MHz (14 ns cycle)

64 bits

Hardware: 9

Software emulated: 7

Hardware: 242

Microcode assisted: 21

Software emulated: 41

16 (32-bit wide)

Interval timer: 1 (programmable)

Programmable timers: 2

One Q22–bus interface with 8192 entry scatter/gather map

123

512 bytes

4GB

128MB

2 sets

16 bytes

Instruction and data

Write-through

8KB

4–8 Hardware Specifications

Architecture

Speed

Associativity

Back-up Cache

Data stored

Write algorithm

Size

Speed

Associativity

Translation buffer

Size

Associativity

Q22–bus address translation

Q22–bus map cache

Size

Associativity

Q22–bus I/O bus buffer size

Input

Output

Q22–bus Maximum I/O bandwidth

Block mode DMA read

Block mode DMA write

Ethernet Port

Supported protocols

Supported media types

Data path width

Data rate

Buffer size

Transmit buffer

Receiver buffer

14 nanoseconds (READ)

Two-way

Instruction stream and data

Write-back

128 Kbytes

42 nanoseconds

Direct mapped

96 entry

Fully associative

16 entry

Fully associative

32 bytes

4 bytes

2.4MB/second

3.3MB/second

Ethernet V2.0 (IEEE 802.3)

Standard or ThinWire

1 bit

10Mb/second

128 bytes

128 bytes

Hardware Specifications 4–9

Digital Storage System Interconnect (DSSI)

Number of DSSI interfaces

Maximum number of supported devices

Data path width

Maximum bandwidth

Maximum queue I/O rate

Buffer size

Transmit buffer

Receiver buffer

Console Serial Lines

Interface standards

Data format

Baud rates

Ordering Information

Included as part of base system

1

7

8 bits

4MB/second

1200/second

256 bytes

256 bytes

EIA RS–423–A/CCITT V.10 X.26

EIA RS–232–C/CCITT V.28

DEC–423

1 start bit, 8 data bits, 0 parity bits,

1 stop bit

300; 600; 1200; 2400; 4800; 9600;

19,200; 38,400

4–10 Hardware Specifications

Operating System Support

VMS

Diagnostic Support

MicroVAX Diagnostic Monitor

Self-tests

Related Documentation

EK–473AA–MG

Version 5.5-1HN

Release 137A and later

Yes

KA52 CPU System Maintenance

Hardware Specifications 4–11

Index

A

Alternative boot devices, 2–10

Asynchronous communications devices

DHW42-AA, 1–6

DHW42-BA, 1–6

DHW42-CA, 1–6

DHW42-UP, 1–6

B

Binary load and unload (X command), 3–25

Boot device, 2–10 recovery action, 2–11

BOOT command, 2–5, 3–1 use of, 2–9

Boot device alternatives, 2–10 default, 2–10 device names, 2–10 resetting default, 2–10

Break enable switch use of, 2–4

Break enable switch LED meaning, 2–4

Break key halting the system, 2–4

C

Cables synchronous option, 1–6

Commands for unprivileged users, 2–5

Comment command (!), 3–27

! (comment command), 3–27

Communications devices asynchronous, 1–6 synchronous, 1–6

Compact disc drives

RRD42, 1–5

Console command

LOGIN, 3–10

Console commands binary load and unload (X), 3–25

BOOT, 3–1

! (comment), 3–27

CONTINUE, 3–3

DEPOSIT, 3–3

EXAMINE, 3–4

FIND, 3–6

HALT, 3–6

HELP, 3–7

INITIALIZE, 3–9

MOVE, 3–11

NEXT, 3–12

REPEAT, 3–14

SEARCH, 3–15

SET, 3–17

SHOW, 3–18

START, 3–21

TEST, 3–21

Index–1

Console commands (cont’d)

UNJAM, 3–25

X (binary load and unload), 3–25

Console mode privileged, 2–7 returning to, 2–2 console port

MMJ port 3, 2–4 use of, 2–4

Console port, 2–4

Console prompt, 2–2

Console security feature description, 2–5 disabling, 2–8 enabling, 2–7 values, 3–17

CONTINUE command, 3–3 use of, 2–9

CPU

KA52, 1–1

D

Defaults boot device, 2–10 recovery action, 2–11

DEPOSIT command, 3–3

Device names boot device, 2–10

Dimensions system unit, 4–3

Disk drives

RF31T, 1–5

RF35, 1–5

E

EXAMINE command, 3–4

F

Factory installed software, 1–5, 2–10

Features

Model 100, 1–1

Index–2

FIND command, 3–6

FIS, 1–5, 2–10

H

Halt recovery action, 2–11

Halt button use of, 2–2, 2–4

HALT command, 3–6 use of, 2–9

Halting system, 2–4

Hardware specifications

RF31T hard disk drive, 4–5

RF35 hard disk drive, 4–5

RRD42 compact disc drive, 4–7 system unit, 4–1

TLZK06 cassette tape drive, 4–6

TZ30 tape drive, 4–5

TZK10 QIC tape drive, 4–6

HELP command, 3–7

I

INITIALIZE command, 3–9

K

KA52–AA modules system names, 4–8

L

LOGIN command, 2–5, 3–10 use of, 2–7, 2–9

M

Mass storage devices internal, 1–5

MMJ port 0 as console port, 2–4

MMJ port 3 alternative console port, 2–4

Model 100 features, 1–1

KA52 CPU, 1–1 system description, 1–1

VAX architecture support, 1–3

MOVE command, 3–11

N

NEXT command, 3–12

Nonoperating conditions system specifications, 4–4

NVAX processor, 1–1

O

Operating conditions system specifications, 4–3

Operating system shutting down, 2–2

P

Password security password, 2–6

Privileged console mode exiting, 2–9 logging in to, 2–7 use of, 2–7

Privileged user definition, 2–5

R

Recovery action actions, 2–11 default, 2–11 resetting default, 2–11

REPEAT command, 3–14

Restart recovery action, 2–11

RF31T hardware specifications, 4–5

RF35 hardware specifications, 4–5

RRD42 compact disc drive hardware specifications, 4–7

S

SEARCH command, 3–15

Security password changing, 2–8 entering, 2–6, 2–7 setting, 2–6 verifying, 2–6

SET BOOT command use of, 2–10

SET command, 3–17

SET HALT command boot, 2–11 halt, 2–11 restart, 2–11 use of, 2–11

SET HOST/DUP command, 3–17

SET PASSWORD command use of, 2–6

SET PSE command use of, 2–7, 2–8

SET PSWD command use of, 2–8

SHOW command, 3–18

START command, 3–21 use of, 2–9

Storage conditions system unit, 4–3

Storage devices compact disc drives, 1–5 disk drives, 1–5 diskette drives, 1–5 tape drives, 1–5

Support

VAX architecture, 1–3

Synchronous communications devices

DSW42-AA, 1–6

Synchronous option cables, 1–6

System description

Model 100, 1–1

Index–3

System disk, 1–5, 2–10

System specifications nonoperating conditions, 4–4 operating conditions, 4–3

System unit dimensions, 4–3 hardware specifications, 4–1 storage conditions, 4–3

T

Tape drives

TLZ06, 1–5

TZ30, 1–5

TZK10, 1–5

TEST command, 3–21

TLZ06 cassette tape drive hardware specifications, 4–6

TZ30 tape drive hardware specifications, 4–5

TZK10 QIC tape drive hardware specifications, 4–6

U

UNJAM command, 3–25

Unprivileged user definition, 2–5

V

VAX architecture support, 1–3

VAX architecture support

Model 100, 1–3

VAX instructions support of, 1–3

X

X command (binary load and unload), 3–25

Index–4

Reader’s Comments

VAX 4000 Model 100 Customer Technical Information

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