Admin Rules
Ta b l e o f C o n t e n t s
35.01.02 - Idaho Sales and Use Tax Administrative Rules
000.
001.
002.
003.
004.
005.
Legal Authority (Rule 000). ............................................................................... 5
Title And Scope (Rule 001). .............................................................................. 5
Written Interpretations (Rule 002). .................................................................... 5
Administrative Appeals (Rule 003). ................................................................... 5
Incorporation By Reference (Rule 004). ........................................................... 5
Office -- Office Hours -- Street And Mailing Addresses -- Phone And Facsimile
Numbers -- E-Mail Address (Rule 005). ........................................................... 5
006. Public Records Act Compliance (Rule 006). ..................................................... 5
007. -- 009. (Reserved) .............................................................................................. 5
010. Definitions (Rule 010). ...................................................................................... 5
011. Retail Sales: Sale At Retail (Rule 011). ............................................................ 7
012. Contractors Improving Real Property (Rule 012). ............................................. 9
013. Road And Paving Contractors (Rule 013). ...................................................... 11
014. Contractors/Retailers (Rule 014). ................................................................... 12
015. Well Drillers/Pump Installers (Rule 015). ........................................................ 13
016. Retail Sale Of Asphalt, Concrete, And Concrete Products (Rule 016). .......... 14
017. Airlines, Buses, And Railway Dining Cars (Rule 017). .................................... 15
018. Retailer Defined (Rule 018). ........................................................................... 15
019. Sales By County Sheriffs (Rule 019). ............................................................. 16
020. Auctioneer, Agent, Broker, Distributor And Factors (Rule 020). ..................... 16
021. Multi-Level Marketing Firms (Rule 021). ......................................................... 16
022. Drop Shipments (Rule 022). ........................................................................... 16
023. (Reserved) ....................................................................................................... 17
024. Rentals Or Leases Of Tangible Personal Property (Rule 024). ...................... 17
025. Rentals Or Leases Of Real Property (Rule 025). ............................................ 19
026. (Reserved) ....................................................................................................... 19
027. Computer Equipment, Software, And Data Services (Rule 027). ................... 19
028. Hotels, Motels And Campgrounds (Rule 028). ............................................... 22
029. Producing, Fabricating, And Processing (Rule 029). ...................................... 23
030. Admissions Defined (Rule 030). ..................................................................... 24
031. Radio And Telecommunications Equipment And Land Mobile Radio Service
Of Systems (Rule 031). ................................................................................. 24
032. (Reserved) ....................................................................................................... 25
033. Sales Of Newspapers And Magazines (Rule 033). ......................................... 25
034. Trading Stamps (Rule 034). ............................................................................ 26
035. Layaway Sales (Rule 035). ............................................................................. 26
036. Signs And Billboards (Rule 036). .................................................................... 27
037. Aircraft And Flying Services (Rule 037). ......................................................... 28
038. Flying Clubs (Rule 038). ................................................................................. 29
039. Sale And Purchase Of Bullion, Coins, Or Other Currency (Rule 039). ........... 30
040. Professional Taxidermist (Rule 040). .............................................................. 30
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Table of Contents (cont’d)
041.
042.
043.
044.
045.
046.
047.
048.
049.
050.
051.
052.
Food, Meals, Or Drinks (Rule 041). ................................................................ 31
Price Labels (Rule 042). ................................................................................. 33
Sales Price Or Purchase Price Defined (Rule 043). ....................................... 33
Trade-Ins, Trade-downs And Barter (Rule 044). ............................................. 34
Rescinded Sale, Refunds Of Purchase Price (Rule 045). .............................. 35
Plating And Replating (Rule 046). ................................................................... 36
Outfitters, Guides, And Like Operations (Rule 047). ....................................... 36
Manufactured Homes (Mobile Homes) And Modular Buildings (Rule 048). ... 38
Warranties And Service Agreements (Rule 049). ........................................... 39
Veterinarians And Veterinary Supplies (Rule 050). ........................................ 40
Discounts, Coupons, Rebates, And Gift Certificates (Rule 051). .................... 40
Sale Of Tangible Personal Property Relating To Funeral Services
(Rule 052). ..................................................................................................... 42
053. Fees Charged For Fax Services (Rule 053). .................................................. 43
054. Persons Engaged In Printing (Rule 054). ....................................................... 43
055. Persons Engaged In Advertising (Rule 055). .................................................. 44
056. Photographers And Photofinishers (Rule 056). .............................................. 48
057. Dry Cleaners, Laundries, Laundromats, And Linen Suppliers (Rule 057). ..... 49
058. Sales Through Vending Machines (Rule 058). ............................................... 49
059. Sales By Florists (Rule 059). .......................................................................... 50
060. Federal Excise Taxes And Retailers Taxes (Rule 060). ................................. 51
061. Transportation, Freight, And Handling Charges. ............................................ 51
062. Repairs Sale Of Parts And Material (Rule 062). ............................................. 52
063. Bad Debts And Repossessions (Rule 063). .................................................... 52
064. Demurrage. ..................................................................................................... 55
065. Tires Balancing, Studding, And Siping (Rule 065). ......................................... 55
066. Contractor's Use Of Tangible Personal Property (Rule 066). ......................... 56
067. Real Property (Rule 067). ............................................................................... 56
068. Collection Of Tax (Rule 068). .......................................................................... 57
069. Interstate Commerce (Rule 069). .................................................................... 58
070. Permits (Rule 070). ......................................................................................... 59
071. (Reserved) ....................................................................................................... 60
072. Application And Payment Of Use Tax (Rule 072). .......................................... 60
073. Tangible Personal Property Brought Or Shipped To Idaho (Rule 073). .......... 61
074. Donations To Political Subdivisions And Certain Nonprofit Organizations
Of Tangible Personal Property Used For Improvements To Real Property
(Rule 074). ..................................................................................................... 62
075. -- 076. (Reserved) ............................................................................................ 63
077. Exemption For Research And Development At INL (Rule 077). ..................... 63
078. Motor Fuels (Rule 078). .................................................................................. 64
079. Production Exemption (Rule 079). .................................................................. 64
080. Lumber Manufacturing (Rule 080). ................................................................. 67
081. Underground Mining (Rule 081). ..................................................................... 68
082. Aboveground, Open Pit, Mining (Rule 082). ................................................... 70
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Table of Contents (cont’d)
083.
084.
085.
086.
087.
088.
089.
090.
091.
092.
093.
094.
095.
096.
097.
098.
099.
100.
101.
102.
103.
104.
105.
106.
107.
108.
109.
110.
111.
112.
113.
114.
115.
116.
117.
118.
Farming And Ranching (Rule 083). ................................................................ 71
Containers Returnable/Nonreturnable (Rule 084). ......................................... 72
Sales To And Purchases By Nonprofit Organizations (Rule 085). .................. 73
Sales And Purchases By Religious Organizations (Rule 086). ....................... 75
Lease Or Rental Of Motion Picture Television Film (Rule 087). ..................... 76
Sale Or Purchase Of Matter Used To Produce Heat By Burning (Rule 088). . 76
Boy Scout, Girl Scout And 4-H Group Sales And Purchases (Rule 089). ...... 77
Gas, Water, Electricity Delivered To Customers (Rule 090). .......................... 78
Sales To Indians (Rule 091). .......................................................................... 78
Out-Of-State Sales (Rule 092). ....................................................................... 78
Sales And Use Tax Liability Of Federal And State Credit Unions, National
And State Banks, And Federal And State Savings And Loan Associations
(Rule 093). ..................................................................................................... 78
Exemptions On Purchases By Political Subdivisions, Sales By The State
Of Idaho, Its Departments, Institutions, And All Other Political Subdivisions
(Rule 094). ..................................................................................................... 79
Money Operated Dispensing Equipment (Rule 095). ..................................... 80
Irrigation Equipment And Supplies (Rule 096). ............................................... 80
Yard Sales (Rule 097). .................................................................................... 80
Foreign Diplomats (Rule 098). ........................................................................ 81
Occasional Sales (Rule 099). ......................................................................... 81
Prescriptions (Rule 100). ................................................................................ 84
Motor Vehicles And Trailers Used In Interstate Commerce (Rule 101). ......... 86
Logging (Rule 102). ........................................................................................ 86
Hand Tool, Component, And Unit Price (Rule 103). ....................................... 88
Railroad Rolling Stock, Parts, Materials And Equipment (Rule 104). ............. 89
Time And Imposition Of Tax, Returns, Payments And Partial Payments
(Rule 105). ..................................................................................................... 90
Motor Vehicles Sales, Rentals, And Leases (Rule 106). ................................ 93
Vehicles And Vessels -- Gifts, Military Personnel, Nonresident, New Resident,
Tax Paid To Another State, Sales To Family Members, Sales To American
Indians, And Other Exemptions (Rule 107). .................................................. 95
Motor Vehicles Manufacturer’s, Rental Company's, And Dealer's Purchase
Or Use Of Motor Vehicles (Rule 108). ........................................................... 98
Amusement Devices (Rule 109). .................................................................... 99
Returns Filed By County Assessors And Financial Institutions (Rule 110). .. 100
Records Required And Auditing Of Records (Rule 111). .............................. 100
Direct Pay Authority (Rule 112). ................................................................... 102
Recreational Vehicle Registration (Rule 113). .............................................. 103
Records Required, Food Stamps, Electronic Benefits Transfers, And WIC
Checks (Rule 114). ...................................................................................... 104
Records Required, Nontaxed Sales By Retail Food Stores (Rule 115). ....... 105
Bonding (Rule 116). ...................................................................................... 105
Refund Claims (Rule 117). ............................................................................ 106
Responsibility For Payment Of Sales Taxes Due From Corporations, Limited
Liability Companies And Partnerships (Rule 118). ...................................... 107
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Table of Contents (cont’d)
119. Successor's Liability (Rule 119). ................................................................... 107
120. Jeopardy Determination (Rule 120). ............................................................. 108
121. Notice Of Deficiency Administrative Review And Appeals Judicial Review
(Rule 121). ................................................................................................... 108
122. Interest On Deficiencies, Refunds And Estimated Returns (Rule 122). ........ 109
123. Additions And Penalties (Rule 123). ............................................................. 110
124. Collection And Enforcement (Rule 124). ....................................................... 110
125. Distribution Of Sales Tax Revenues (Rule 125). .......................................... 110
126. Sales Tax Collected By The State Liquor Dispensary (Rule 126). ............... 110
127. Free Distribution Newspapers (Rule 127). .................................................... 111
128. Certificates For Resale And Other Exemption Claims (Rule 128). ............... 111
129. Use Of A Recreational Facility, Instructional Fees, And Pari-Mutuel Betting
(Rule 129). ................................................................................................... 116
130. Promoter Sponsored Events (Rule 130). ...................................................... 117
131. -- 132. (Reserved) ...........................................................................................118
133. Radio And Television Broadcast Equipment (Rule 133). .............................. 118
134. Sales Of Livestock (Rule 134). ..................................................................... 118
135. Snowgrooming And Snowmaking Equipment (Rule 135). ............................ 118
136. Rebates Paid To Certain Real Estate Developers (Rule 136). ..................... 119
137. -- 999. (Reserved) ...........................................................................................119
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IDAPA 35
TITLE 01
CHAPTER 02
35.01.02 - IDAHO SALES AND USE TAX ADMINISTRATIVE RULES
000.
LEGAL AUTHORITY (RULE 000).
In accordance with Sections 63-105, 63-3624, 63-3635, and 63-3039, Idaho Code, the State Tax Commission shall
promulgate rules implementing the provisions of the Idaho Sales Tax Act. They are the State Tax Commission’s
official statement of policy relating to interpretations and applications of the Idaho Sales Tax Act.
(7-1-98)
001.
TITLE AND SCOPE (RULE 001).
01.
Rules.”
Title. These rules shall be cited as IDAPA 35.01.02, “Idaho Sales and Use Tax Administrative
(3-30-07)
02.
Scope. These rules shall be construed to reach the full jurisdictional extent of the state of Idaho’s
authority to impose an excise tax upon each sale at retail of the sales price of all property subject to taxation under
this act and on the storage, use, or other consumption in this state of tangible personal property.
(3-30-07)
002.
WRITTEN INTERPRETATIONS (RULE 002).
This agency has written statements as defined in Section 67-5201(19)(b)(iv), Idaho Code, which pertain to the
interpretation of the rules of this chapter or to the documentation of compliance with the rules of this chapter. To the
extent that such documents are not confidential by statute or rule, the documents are available for public inspection
and copying at the main office of the State Tax Commission. See Rule 005 of these rules for the main office address.
(3-15-02)
003.
ADMINISTRATIVE APPEALS (RULE 003).
This chapter does allow administrative relief of the provisions outlined herein under Section 63-3049, Idaho Code.
(7-1-93)
004.
INCORPORATION BY REFERENCE (RULE 004).
These rules incorporate IDAPA 35.02.01, “Tax Commission Administration and Enforcement Rules.”
(3-30-07)
005.
OFFICE -- OFFICE HOURS -- STREET AND MAILING ADDRESSES -- PHONE AND
FACSIMILE NUMBERS -- E-MAIL ADDRESS (RULE 005).
01.
Main Office. The State Tax Commission main office is located at 800 Park Blvd., Plaza IV, Boise,
Idaho 83712-7742. The correspondence mailing address is P.O. Box 36, Boise, Idaho 83722-0410. The State Tax
Commission's Website is http://www.tax.idaho.gov. The telephone number for Taxpayer Services is (208) 334-7660,
or toll free 1-800-972-7660, and the facsimile number is (208) 334-7846. The State Tax Commission's e-mail is
[email protected] Main Office hours are from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday except for legal holidays.
(3-30-07)
02.
Regional Field Offices. The address and phone number for each regional field office is listed in
IDAPA 35.02.01.005 “Tax Commission Administration and Enforcement Rule 005.”
(3-15-02)
03.
Hearing Impaired. Hearing impaired individuals may contact any State Tax Commission office by
using the Idaho Relay Service Number 1-800-377-3529.
(3-15-02)
006.
PUBLIC RECORDS ACT COMPLIANCE (RULE 006).
The records associated with this chapter are subject to the provisions of the Idaho Public Records Act, Chapter 3,
Title 9, Idaho Code, to the extent that these documents are not confidential under Sections 63-3076, 63-3077 or 9-337
through 9-350, Idaho Code.
(3-30-07)
007. -- 009.
010.
(RESERVED)
DEFINITIONS (RULE 010).
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IDAHO ADMINISTRATIVE CODE
Idaho State Tax Commission
IDAPA 35.01.02
Idaho Sales & Use Tax Administrative Rules
01.
Admissions. The term admissions includes the right or privilege to enter into a place including
seats and tables reserved or otherwise and other similar accommodations and charges made therefor.
(7-1-93)
02.
Aircraft. The term aircraft means any contrivance now known or hereafter invented, used, or
designed, for navigation of or flight in the air.
(7-1-93)
03.
Cash Discount. The term cash discount means a discount offered by a retailer to a purchaser as an
inducement for prompt payment.
(7-1-93)
04.
Contractor Improving Real Property. A contractor is any person acting as a general contractor,
subcontractor, contractee, subcontractee, or speculation contractor, spec contractor, who uses material and equipment
to perform any written or verbal contract to improve, alter, or repair real property.
(7-1-93)
05.
Fleet. The term fleet shall mean one (1) or more vehicles registered under the International
Registration Plan or a similar proportional registration system.
(4-2-08)
06.
Hand Tool. A hand tool is an instrument used or worked by hand.
(7-1-93)
07.
Logging. The term logging includes the harvesting of forest trees for resale by cutting, skidding,
loading, thinning, or decking, regardless of whether the forest trees are owned by the person doing the harvesting.
The term logging does not include harvesting timber for firewood.
(7-1-93)
08.
Manufactured Home/Mobile Home. The term manufactured home, previously known as a mobile
home, means a structure, constructed according to HUD/FHA mobile home construction and safety standards,
transportable in one (1) or more sections, which, in the traveling mode, is eight (8) body feet or more in width or is
forty (40) body feet or more in length, or when erected on site, is three hundred twenty (320) or more square feet, and
which is built on a permanent chassis and designed to be used as a dwelling with or without a permanent foundation
when connected to the required utilities, and includes the plumbing, heating, air conditioning and electrical systems
contained therein, except that such term shall include any structure which meets all the requirements of this section
except the size requirements and with respect to which the manufacturer voluntarily files a certification required by
the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development and complies with the standards established under 42 U.S.C. 5401,
et seq.
(7-1-93)
09.
Manufacturer's Discount Coupon. The term manufacturer’s discount coupon means a price
reduction coupon presented by a consumer to a retailer upon purchase of a manufacturer’s product, the face value of
which may only be reimbursed by the manufacturer to the retailer.
(7-1-93)
10.
Manufacturer's Rebates. The term manufacturer’s rebate means a cash payment made by a
manufacturer to a consumer who has purchased or is purchasing the manufacturer’s product from the retailer.
(7-1-93)
11.
Mining. The term “mining” means the extraction from the earth of minerals including coal,
phosphate, sodium, molybdenum, asbestos, gold, silver, lead, zinc, copper, antimony, building stone, pumice, scoria,
clay, diatomaceous earth, sand, gravel, quartz, limestone, and marble, and includes the further processing of such
mineral. The term “mining” does not include the extraction from the earth of geothermal resources nor does it include
the extraction of soil.
(6-23-94)
12.
Modular Building. The term modular building, previously known as a prefabricated building,
means any building or building component, other than a manufactured home as defined, above, which is constructed
according to standards contained in the International Building Code, which is of closed construction and is either
entirely or substantially prefabricated or assembled at a place other than the building site, and is designed to be
affixed to real property.
(4-2-08)
13.
Office Trailer. An office trailer is a structure which is built on a permanent chassis, is transportable
in one (1) or more sections, and is designed for use as an office.
(7-1-93)
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Idaho State Tax Commission
IDAPA 35.01.02
Idaho Sales & Use Tax Administrative Rules
14.
Orthopedic Appliances. The term orthopedic appliance shall include those braces and other
external supports prescribed by a practitioner for the purpose of correction or relief of defects, diseases, or injuries to
bones or joints.
(7-1-93)
15.
Prescription or Work Order. The terms prescription or work order shall mean an order issued to,
or on behalf of, a specific individual by a practitioner licensed by the state under Title 54, Idaho Code, to prescribe
such items.
(7-1-93)
16.
Real Property. The term real property means land and improvements or fixtures to the land.
(7-1-93)
17.
Tax Rate. The terms “tax rate” or “rate” means the current tax rate as defined in Sections 63-3619
and 63-3621, Idaho Code. References to the tax rate in these rules may not reflect the current rate in effect. (4-2-08)
011.
RETAIL SALES: SALE AT RETAIL (RULE 011).
The Idaho Sales Tax is a tax on retail sales. Retail sales include all sales of tangible personal property except for
property that will be resold, leased, or rented in the regular course of the buyer’s business.
(7-1-93)
01.
Retail Sales. Retail sales also include:
(7-1-93)
a.
Sales to any person who constructs, alters, repairs or improves real property regardless of whether
the person improving the property intends to resell it. See Rule 012 of these rules.
(3-30-07)
b.
Producing or fabricating property to the special order of the customer. See Rule 029 of these rules.
(3-30-07)
c.
Furnishing, preparing or serving food, meals or drinks for compensation. See Rule 041 of these
(3-30-07)
d.
Admission charges. See Rule 030 of these rules.
rules.
(3-30-07)
e.
Charges for the use or privilege of using tangible personal property or facilities for recreation. See
Rules 030 and 047 of these rules.
(3-30-07)
f.
Providing hotel, motel, tourist home and trailer court accommodations. See Rule 028 of these rules.
(3-30-07)
g.
Leasing or renting tangible personal property. See Rule 024 of these rules.
(3-30-07)
h.
For sales of air transportation services see Rule 037 of these rules.
(3-30-07)
02.
Retail Sales of Tangible Personal Property Together with Services. The sales tax applies to
retail sales of tangible personal property. It does not apply to the sale of services except as stated above. However,
when a sale of tangible personal property includes incidental services, the tax applies to the total amount charged,
including fees for any incidental services except separately stated transportation and installation fees. The fact that
the charge for the tangible personal property results mainly from the labor or creativity of its maker does not turn a
sale of tangible personal property into a sale of services. The cost of any product includes labor and manufacturing
skill. To determine whether a transaction is a retail sale of tangible personal property or a sale of services, the
following tests must be applied.
(7-1-93)
a.
To determine whether a transfer of tangible personal property is a taxable retail sale or is merely
incidental to a service transaction, the proper test is to determine whether the transaction involves a consequential or
inconsequential professional or personal service. If the service rendered is inconsequential, then the entire transaction
is taxable. If a consequential service is rendered, then it must be determined whether the transfer of the tangible
personal property is an inconsequential part of the transaction. If so, then none of the consideration paid is taxable.
(7-1-93)
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Idaho State Tax Commission
IDAPA 35.01.02
Idaho Sales & Use Tax Administrative Rules
b.
To determine whether a mixed transaction qualifies as a sale of services, the object of the
transaction must be determined; that is, is the buyer seeking the service itself, or the property produced by the service.
(7-1-93)
c.
When a mixed transaction involves the transfer of tangible personal property and the performance
of a service, both of which are consequential elements whose costs may be separately stated, then two (2) separate
transactions exist. The one attributable to the sale of tangible personal property is subject to sales tax while the other
is not.
(7-1-93)
03.
Determining the Type of Sale. To determine whether a specific sale is a sale of tangible personal
property, a sale of services or a mixed transaction, all the facts surrounding the case must be studied and the tests
described above must be applied. Here are some examples.
(7-1-93)
a.
Example 1: An attorney is retained by a client to prepare his will. The attorney prepares the will,
sees that it is properly executed and bills the client. The physical document, the will, is then transferred from the
attorney to the client. This is a sale of services because the client’s object is not to obtain the will itself, but to ensure
that his estate is disposed of in a certain way when he dies. Since, the transaction between the attorney and the client
is not a retail sale of tangible personal property, no sales or use tax applies. However, the attorney must pay sales or
use tax when he buys stationery and other equipment to prepare the will. Compare Example 5.
(7-1-93)
b.
Example 2: The attorney in Example 1 prepares a form book of wills which he intends to sell to
other attorneys. The will he prepared in Example 1 is included in the form book. The sale of the form book to other
attorneys is a taxable retail sale of tangible personal property. From the buyer’s point of view, the object of the sale is
to obtain the book, which is tangible personal property. The fact that special skill or knowledge went into the
preparation of the book and is reflected in the purchase price does not make the sale of the form book a service
transaction.
(7-1-93)
c.
Example 3: An architect is hired to prepare construction plans for a house. He prepares the plans
and delivers them to his client. As in the example of the attorney preparing the will, this is a sale of services and the
transfer of the tangible personal property, the plans, is inconsequential the transaction. No sales or use tax is due on
the sale of the plans.
(7-1-93)
d.
Example 4: The architect in Example 3 is asked to provide additional copies of the same plans to
his original client or to a third party. The architect copies the plans on a duplicating machine and sells them to the
requesting party. This is a taxable retail sale of tangible personal property, since the buyer’s object is to obtain the
property, the plans.
(7-1-93)
e.
Example 5: An artist is commissioned to paint an oil portrait. When the portrait is completed,
ownership is transferred to the client who pays the artist a lump-sum amount for the portrait. This is a taxable retail
sale of tangible personal property because the buyer’s object is to obtain the portrait. If the artist otherwise qualifies
as a retailer, he is required to collect and remit sales tax on the sale of the portrait.
(7-1-93)
f.
Example 6: An automobile repair shop does repair work for a customer. To do the work, the shop
must replace certain parts on the automobile. The repair shop bills its customer an amount for the repair parts and a
separate amount for labor. This is a mixed transaction. As long as the sale of the tangible personal property, the parts,
and the sale of services, the labor, are separately stated, sales tax is due only on the sale of the parts and not on the
charge for labor. However, allocation of the total charge between parts and labor must be reasonable. If part of the
charge for parts is unreasonably attributed to the cost of labor, the allocation may be adjusted by the Tax Commission.
(7-1-93)
g.
Example 7: A retail clothing store provides needed alterations to items purchased by customers.
Even though the sale depends on the alterations being done, the service is incidental to the sale of the property. The
entire transaction is a retail sale subject to tax on the total price paid by the buyer, even if the charge for the alteration
labor is separately stated.
(7-1-93)
04.
Kinds of Services Incidental to the Sale. Two (2) kinds of services rendered incidental to a retail
sale are specifically exempt from tax if the charge for the service is separately stated. They are:
(7-1-93)
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IDAHO ADMINISTRATIVE CODE
Idaho State Tax Commission
a.
rules; and
b.
IDAPA 35.01.02
Idaho Sales & Use Tax Administrative Rules
Charges for transportation after the sale. See Section 63-3613, Idaho Code, and Rule 061 of these
(3-30-07)
Installation charges. See Section 63-3613, Idaho Code, and Rule 012 of these rules.
(3-30-07)
05.
Separately Stated Nontaxable Charges. Separately stated nontaxable charges for transportation
or installation may not be used to avoid tax on the actual sales price of tangible personal property. If the allocation of
the total price is unreasonable, the State Tax Commission may adjust it.
(7-1-93)
06.
Tangible Personal Property Used or Consumed by a Business. Tangible personal property used
or consumed by a business in performing a nontaxable service is subject to sales or use tax. See Rule 072 of these
rules.
(3-30-07)
012.
CONTRACTORS IMPROVING REAL PROPERTY (RULE 012).
01.
In General. This rule applies to contractors who construct, alter, repair, or improve real property.
Contractors are defined as consumers of materials they use, whether or not they resell the material. All sales of
tangible personal property to contractors are taxable.
(7-1-93)
a.
Contractors include bricklayers, plumbers, heating specialists, painters, sheet metal workers, carpet
layers, electricians, land levelers, well drillers, landscapers, and all others who do contract work on real property.
Unless these persons are employees of a contractor, they are acting as contractors and are consumers just as other
contractors.
(7-1-93)
b.
Persons doing residential repairs, such as plumbers and electricians, as well as those who both sell
and install carpet, also are contractors improving real property. Such contractors are defined as the consumers of the
materials they install and are required to pay sales or use tax on their cost for the materials. They do not charge sales
tax to their customers unless they make a sale of materials only, with no installation.
(7-1-93)
c.
The terms “contractor” and “subcontractor” are not applicable to persons who merely sell tangible
personal property in the form of building materials, supplies, or equipment to construction contractors for delivery at
the job site without any requirement that they install such tangible personal property.
(3-4-10)
02.
a.
lump sum.
Contract. A contract to improve real property may be in any of the following forms.
(7-1-93)
Lump Sum Contract. A lump sum contract is an agreement to furnish materials and services for a
(7-1-93)
b.
Cost-plus Contract. A cost-plus contract is an agreement to furnish materials and services at the
contractor’s cost plus a fixed sum or percentage of the cost.
(7-1-93)
c.
Guaranteed Price Contract. A guaranteed price contract is an agreement to furnish materials and
services with a guaranteed price which may not be exceeded.
(7-1-93)
d.
Time and Material Contract. A time and material contract is an agreement to sell a specific list of
materials and supplies at retail or an agreed price and to complete the work for an additional agreed price or hourly
rate for services rendered.
(7-1-93)
e.
The contractor or repairman who affixes or installs the personal property into real property is the
consumer of tangible personal property regardless of the type of contract entered into, whether it is a lump sum, time
and material, or a cost-plus contract.
(3-4-10)
03.
Use. As used in this rule, the term use includes exercising any right or power over tangible personal
property in performing a contract to improve real property, regardless of who owns the material or if the material is
leased.
(7-1-93)
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04.
IDAPA 35.01.02
Idaho Sales & Use Tax Administrative Rules
Real Property. See Rules 010 and 067 of these rules.
(3-15-02)
05.
Use Tax Reporting Number. Contractors need a use tax number if they make purchases on which
sales tax has not been charged. In this case, they are required to report and pay the Idaho use tax to the state. If a
contractor pays sales tax to his vendors on ALL purchases, he does not have to obtain a use tax number.
(7-1-93)
06.
Purchases by Contractors. Contractors are consumers of equipment they use in their business
such as trucks, tractors, road graders, scaffolding, pipe cutters, trowels, wrenches, tools in general, oxygen, acetylene,
oil, and similar items. They must pay the sales or use tax on their purchase of equipment, tools, and supplies. They
must also pay tax on their purchase of building materials and fixtures. Fixtures include items such as lighting fixtures,
plumbing fixtures, furnaces, boilers, heating units, air-conditioning units, refrigeration units, elevators, hoists,
conveying units, awnings, blinds, vaults, cabinets, counters, and lockers.
(7-1-93)
07.
Fuels. A contractor must pay tax on fuels used in off-road equipment unless on-road fuels excise
taxes have been paid.
(7-1-93)
08.
Custom-Made Goods. Sales tax applies to the entire price charged for custom-made goods sold by
the maker. If a contractor orders fabricated steel from a steel company, he must pay sales tax on the entire price of the
fabricated item, including the cost of the labor involved. On the other hand, if the contractor buys the steel and
fabricates it himself for the job, he pays a tax only on the materials he buys.
(7-1-93)
09.
Value. The contractor owes use tax on the value of the job materials at the time he exercises right or
power over them. Value, as used in Section 63-3621, Idaho Code, means:
(7-1-93)
a.
When a contractor fabricates and installs tangible personal property into Idaho real property, the
value is the cost of materials and parts he uses. If a contractor, with a contract to furnish and install goods, fabricates
the goods and hires a subcontractor to do the installation, the amount subject to tax is the cost of material to the
contractor who fabricated the goods.
(7-1-93)
b.
When a contractor who is also a retailer fabricates tangible personal property, puts it in his resale
inventory, and later withdraws it for a job, tax applies to the fully fabricated value. This is true regardless of whether
the fabricator installs the property himself or through an agent or subcontractor.
(7-1-93)
10.
Materials Provided by Project Owner.
(7-1-93)
a.
If a project owner who is not exempt from tax buys materials for a job and hires a contractor to
install them, he must pay sales or use tax when he buys the material. If the owner does not pay tax on the materials,
the contractor may be held liable for the tax.
(7-1-93)
b.
If material needed for a contract is purchased or supplied by an owner who is exempt from sales
and use taxes, then the use by the contractor is subject to use tax. This is true even if the property is owned by an
exempt entity such as the federal government or a state government agency. For example, if a contractor has a public
works contract to build a structure using materials owned and supplied by the government, whether federal, state, or
local, he is the consumer of the materials and is subject to a use tax on their value. This tax falls directly upon the
contractor and not the owner of the property.
(7-1-93)
c.
A contractor who buys tangible goods cannot avoid tax just because the goods will be built in to a
structure which will belong to, or be used by an exempt entity. Contractors and subcontractors may not avoid paying
sales or use tax due to a contract which allows invoices to be made out in the name of the exempt entity, such as the
U.S. Government, and designate the contractor or subcontractor as an agent of the exempt entity. In this case, the
contractor or subcontractor is the user or consumer of the material and its use, while it is in his possession and subject
to his labor, is taxable.
(7-1-93)
11.
Subcontractor. In general, a subcontractor is treated the same as a general contractor. Whether his
contract is with the owner or the general contractor, the subcontractor pays tax on materials he buys to improve real
property. Like any contractor, the subcontractor could be employed to work on or with material purchased by the
general contractor or the owner, with one or the other paying tax on the material purchased. These services rendered
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by the subcontractor are not taxable. His relationship with the owner or general contractor is no different than the
relationship between the contractor and owner. However, the provisions of Subsection 011.10 of this rule apply
equally to a subcontractor.
(6-23-94)
12.
Land Leveling.
(4-7-11)
a.
Persons who contract to level land are improving real property and are contractors under this rule.
Accordingly, they are subject to tax on equipment, material, and supplies purchased for land leveling.
(7-1-93)
b.
Notwithstanding the provisions of Rule 013 of these rules, contractors who crush rock are
performing a nontaxable service if the rock is obtained on a construction site, and the crushed rock is used on the
same site, for such purposes as backfill, land leveling, site preparation. or site cleanup. The use of such rock, backfill,
or other related materials is not subject to tax; however, such a contractor is not primarily devoted to mining and his
use of rock crushing equipment, or other equipment and supplies, does not qualify for exemption under Section 633622D, Idaho Code.
(4-7-11)
c.
The sale or use of crushed rock that is removed from a construction site and used elsewhere is
taxable. See Rule 013 of these rules.
(4-7-11)
13.
Exempt Purchases by Contractors. A contractor can buy materials tax exempt, provided that he
will install them into real property in a state that does not have a sales tax, such as Oregon, Montana, or Alaska. This
exemption also applies to a contractor improving real property in Washington if he will not owe a sales or use tax for
his activity there, even though a sales or use tax may be owed by a third party. Prior to July 1, 1993, this exemption
was extended only to Idaho resident contractors. In order to grant this exemption the retailer must have a properly
completed exemption certificate on file. See Rule 128 of these rules. Idaho tax applies to materials purchased or
withdrawn from inventory for use in a contract to improve real property in states with a sales tax, such as Nevada,
Utah, or Wyoming.
(3-15-02)
013.
14.
Cross-References.
(7-1-93)
a.
Road and paving contractors, see Rule 013 of these rules.
(3-15-02)
b.
Contractor/retailers, see Rule 014 of these rules.
(3-15-02)
c.
Well drillers/pump installers, see Rule 015 of these rules.
(3-15-02)
ROAD AND PAVING CONTRACTORS (RULE 013).
01.
In General. This rule illustrates the application of Idaho sales and use tax to specific activities of
road and paving contractors. The general principles stated in ISTC Idaho Sales Tax Administrative Rule 12 apply
equally to road and paving contractors.
(7-1-96)
02.
Road or Paving Contractor. A road or paving contractor is a contractor improving real property.
The use of materials over which he exercises right or power in the course of performing the contract is subject to tax.
This is true even if an exempt entity, such as a government agency, owns the material.
(7-1-96)
03.
Materials. The sale or use of materials which are extracted and crushed is taxable. Use tax does not
apply to the use of natural materials that are secured on site and used without significant change.
(7-1-96)
04.
Rock Crushing. The application of the sales or use tax to rock crushing operations depends upon
the circumstances of the case.
(7-1-96)
a.
A sale of crushing only is a sale of a taxable processing service. In this circumstance the crusher
obtains raw material owned by another, crushes the rock, and stockpiles it for subsequent use either by the owner or a
third party. Unless an exemption applies, the crusher must charge tax on all such sales.
(7-1-96)
b.
A contractor who applies crushed rock to the highway pursuant to a contract is a person engaged in
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improving real property. If the contractor applying the crushed rock purchases the rock, the purchase price will be
subject to a sales or use tax. If the contractor applies rock owned by another party, the contractor will be responsible
for a use tax on the value of the rock, unless the other party paid a sales tax upon its acquisition. This is true even if a
government agency supplied the rock. If a recent retail acquisition of the crushed rock exists, the retail price shall be
presumed to be the value of the material. If a recent retail sales price does not exist, then value shall be determined by
the current acquisition cost of like material from the same or a similar source. For purposes of this section, a retail
acquisition within one (1) year of the time of the performance of the contract shall be presumed to be a recent sales
price.
(7-1-96)
c.
A contractor whose contract calls for him to both crush and apply rock to a road is also subject to
sales or use tax on the value of the rock whether the contract is performed for a governmental or private contractee.
The value shall be determined by the royalty or similar charge for raw materials. If a royalty or similar charge does
not exist, then the value will be determined as the royalty fee or value of like material from a similar source. If the
contractor chooses to have the rock crushed by a subcontractor, the measure of the use tax is on the crushed value.
(7-1-96)
d.
A sale of rock crushing services to a retailer who will sell the rock is an exempt sale. The sale of
crushed rock to a consumer is a taxable sale unless an exemption applies.
(7-1-96)
05.
Production Exemption.
(7-1-96)
a.
Since a contractor improving real property is defined as the consumer of materials incorporated
into realty, he is not producing an article for resale. Therefore, the production exemption does not apply to the use of
equipment used by contractors to produce asphalt or concrete which are used to complete paving contracts. (7-1-96)
b.
A business which is primarily devoted to producing crushed rock, asphalt, or concrete which is
ultimately sold at retail will qualify for the production exemption. See Idaho Administrative Sales Tax Rules 079 and
082.
(7-1-96)
014.
CONTRACTORS/RETAILERS (RULE 014).
01.
In General. This rule shows how Idaho sales and use tax applies to contractors who are also
retailers. The general principles in Rule 012 of these rules also apply to contractor/retailers and should be reviewed
along with this rule.
(3-15-02)
02.
Contractor/Retailer. In many cases, a contractor is also a retailer. For instance, mechanical
contractors may operate retail plumbing shops. In this case, the contractor must have a sales tax permit and report
sales made directly to customers, just like any other retailer. Also, he is a consumer when performing contracts to
improve real property. Such a contractor might make separate purchases of material to be used on a specific job. He
probably would do so with major items such as boilers, furnaces, and similar items. He also may remove necessary
materials, probably small items such as joints, pipes, and tools, from his general inventory.
(7-1-93)
03.
Record Keeping Procedure. For convenience, the contractor-retailer may choose to follow any
consistent procedure that can apply to his particular operation.
(7-1-93)
a.
For instance, if the majority of a contractor-retailer’s business is performing contracts to improve
real property, he may wish to pay tax on all his purchases, keep a record of all his normal retail sales and then
regularly apply for credit against the sales and use tax due the state for tax paid on purchase.
(7-1-93)
b.
If the majority of the contractor/retailer’s business is retail sales, he may wish to make all his
purchases without paying tax by giving his suppliers a resale certificate, keeping a record of his withdrawals from
stock for use on contracts and paying a use tax to the state on these materials.
(7-1-93)
c.
If the contractor does major jobs, he may want to use separate accounting procedures, and make his
purchases for stock without paying tax by issuing a resale certificate, but pay tax on his major job material purchases.
See Rule 128 of these rules.
(3-15-02)
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04.
Inventory Withdrawals. When any withdrawal is made from nontaxed inventory, the use tax is
due to the state when the material is delivered to the job site, regardless of when it is actually used in performing a
contract.
(7-1-93)
05.
Tangible Personal Property vs. Improvements to Real Property. Built-in appliances and related
items become fixtures to realty when installed in residential buildings. Such built-in appliances include dishwashers,
microwave ovens, stove tops, refrigerators, stove hoods, central vacuum systems, waste disposal units, trash
compactors, water softeners, water purification systems, and garage door openers. Some appliances retain the
character of personal property such as microwave ovens that are not built-in, freestanding stoves, refrigerators,
washers, and dryers. Other rules may apply to commercial, industrial, and other non-residential buildings. See Rule
067 of these rules.
(5-8-09)
06.
Sales with Agreement to Install. A regular over-the-counter sale of a complete unit with an
agreement to install it is not a contract to improve real property if the item does not become affixed to realty. This
applies to sales of stoves, refrigerators, washing machines, dryers, and other electrical appliances. In this case, tax is
collected from the buyer by the seller on the retail sales price of the item. If the installation charges are properly
separated, tax is due only on the cost of the unit.
(5-8-09)
07.
Sales of Both Tangible Personal Property and Improvements to Real Property. If a contract
includes both retail sales of personal property and improvements to real property, the contractor-retailer must collect
sales tax on the retail portion of the contract. Also, if he does not pay sales tax to his vendor, he must pay use tax on
the materials used to perform the real property portion of the contract.
(7-1-93)
a.
Example: A cabinet builder contracts to build and install kitchen cabinets and build a portable,
freestanding china hutch. In the case of the cabinets, he is a contractor and must pay tax on his material costs. In the
case of the china hutch, he is a retailer and must charge his customer sales tax on the full price of the hutch, including
labor.
(7-1-93)
b.
Example: A cabinet builder is hired by Contractor X to fabricate and deliver cabinets to the job site.
Contractor X will do the installation. In this case, the cabinet builder is a retailer and must charge sales tax to
Contractor X on the full sales price, including labor.
(7-1-93)
015.
WELL DRILLERS/PUMP INSTALLERS (RULE 015).
01.
In General. This rule is meant to explain how Idaho sales and use tax applies to contractors who
drill wells and install pumps. The general principles in Rule 012 of these rules, Contractors Improving Real Property,
also apply to well drillers and pump installers and should be reviewed along with this rule.
(4-2-08)
02.
Types. The types of wells covered by this rule include, but are not limited to:
(7-1-93)
a.
Water wells, including those for municipal, domestic, commercial, and industrial purposes, and
wells used for agricultural irrigation.
(7-1-93)
b.
Monitor wells used to check for contamination or to find the water table.
(7-1-93)
c.
Anode wells used to ground power or gas lines.
(7-1-93)
d.
Construction wells used for pilings, shoring, and elevator hoists.
(7-1-93)
03.
Contractor Improving Real Property. A well driller is a contractor improving real property. In
general, he is subject to sales or use tax on materials and equipment he owns and uses or over which he exercises right
or power while performing a contract. He should not charge sales tax on materials, such as casing, pumps, screens,
piping, etc., used to complete a well. Section 63-3609(a), Idaho Code, states that these materials are consumed by the
well driller. He is subject to tax even if the owner of the material is exempt from the tax, such as a government
agency. Well drillers may be responsible for use tax on owner-supplied materials. See Rule 012 of this rule.
Exemptions are discussed in Subsection 015.05 of this rule. Pumps that are installed with a well, such as a pump that
supplies water to land or a building, are presumed to be real property improvements. Pumps that do not supply water
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Idaho Sales & Use Tax Administrative Rules
to land or buildings and are used in commercial or industrial applications will generally be considered personal
property unless they have been so integrated into the real estate that they would be considered a permanent fixture.
(4-2-08)
a.
Example: A well driller contracts to drill a water well and install a pump for a homeowner. He bills
the homeowner separately for materials and labor as well as the drill bits he used. He should pay sales or use tax on
his purchase of the materials and drill bits. He should not charge sales tax to the customer since this is a contract to
improve real property.
(4-2-08)
b.
Example: A well driller contracts to drill a well for an Idaho city. He must pay sales or use tax on
the materials and pumps used to complete the well, even though the eventual owner of these items is a governmental
entity. See Rule 094 of these rules.
(4-2-08)
04.
Well Drillers/Pump Installers as a Retailer. In some cases, a well driller or pump installer also
may be a retailer. For instance, he may sell casing, pumps or pump parts with no installation. In this case, he must
have a seller’s permit number, collect sales tax, and file sales tax returns, just like any other retailer. For more
information on contractors who are also retailers, see Rule 014 of these rules.
(4-2-08)
05.
Exemptions. In some cases, exemptions may apply to materials installed by well drillers and pump
installers. Note: These exemptions apply only to project materials and not to construction equipment and supplies,
such as drilling rigs and drill bits. If a well driller or pump installer makes exempt purchases, he must complete an
exemption certificate for the vendor’s records.
(4-2-08)
a.
Materials installed in a well which will be used primarily for agricultural irrigation are exempt
under Section 63-3622W, Idaho Code. The exemption applies even if the materials become part of the real property.
Agricultural irrigation includes supplying water to crops, livestock, and fish which are produced for resale. (7-1-93)
b.
Pumps and other equipment used directly in manufacturing or processing are exempt under Section
63-3622D, Idaho Code. Generally, such pumps retain the characteristics of personal property. This exemption applies
only to tangible personal property. It does not apply to materials which will become part of real property. Examples
include: pumps used directly in food processing; booster pumps and chlorine pumps used directly in manufacturing;
and dairy waste pumps.
(4-2-08)
06.
Motor Vehicles. In general, drilling rigs and licensed motor vehicles are subject to sales or use tax
when purchased by a well driller or pump installer. However, if a vehicle weighs more than twenty-six thousand
(26,000) pounds, is used more than ten percent (10%) of the time outside of Idaho, and is registered under the
International Registration Plan or similar pro rata plan, its purchase is exempt. See Rule 101 of these rules. This
exemption does not apply to repair parts for motor vehicles, or to drilling rigs purchased separately from a motor
vehicle.
(4-2-08)
07.
Fuel. Motor fuel taxes do not apply, or a refund may be obtained, if the fuel is used to run drilling
rigs or other off-road equipment. Fuel purchased for such off-highway use is subject to sales or use tax. See Sections
63-2410 and 63-2423, Idaho Code, and related IDAPA 35.01.05, “Idaho Motor Fuels Tax Rules.”
(7-1-93)
016.
RETAIL SALE OF ASPHALT, CONCRETE, AND CONCRETE PRODUCTS (RULE 016).
01.
In General. Asphalt, concrete and concrete products are building materials. The sale of such
products to construct, alter, repair, or improve real estate is subject to sales tax. Separately stated charges for delivery
by the vendor and vendor standby time are not subject to sales tax.
(7-1-93)
02.
Agricultural Irrigation. Materials purchased for agricultural irrigation are exempt from sales tax
whether purchased by the farmer, contractor, or subcontractor. This exemption applies even if the material is
permanently affixed to real estate, such as concrete used to line ditches or ponds. See Rule 096 of these rules. The
buyer must provide the seller with an exemption certificate. See Rule 128 of these rules.
(3-15-02)
03.
Production Exemption. The retailer who produces and sells asphalt or concrete may qualify to
claim the production exemption on equipment and supplies used directly to produce the concrete or asphalt for resale.
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See Rule 079 of these rules. However, trucks used by a ready-mix operator do not qualify for the production
exemption because they are used for transportation. Although they may incidentally contribute to the manufacture of
the final article, purchases of the truck, trailer, and the truck-mounted concrete mixer, which becomes a part of the
motor vehicle, are not exempt from the tax.
(3-15-02)
017.
AIRLINES, BUSES, AND RAILWAY DINING CARS (RULE 017).
01.
Sale of Meals. The sale of meals or drinks that are not included in the price of the ticket on
commercial aircraft, railway dining cars or buses operating in Idaho is a retail sale. An airline, bus company or
passenger train is operating in Idaho if a trip starts or ends in Idaho and part of the trip can be allocated to Idaho.
(7-1-93)
02.
Taxable Sales. The gross receipts of such a sale are taxable when the meals, beverages or other
tangible personal property are ordered or served within the boundaries of Idaho. It does not matter whether the meals
and other property are consumed in Idaho.
(7-1-93)
03.
Formula for Taxable Sales. A formula may be used to determine the taxable sales of meals and
beverages on the trip if accurate records of actual sales are not kept. The formula is: first, find the percentage of trip
miles in Idaho in relation to the total mileage of the trip; and then, multiply this percentage by the total sales of meals
or beverages served on the entire trip.
(7-1-93)
04.
Complimentary Meals, Snacks, Beverages or Other Tangible Personal Property. When the
price of an airline, bus, or railway ticket includes meals, snacks, beverages, or other tangible personal property, the
cost of these complimentary goods is subject to use tax. If the complimentary goods are purchased in Idaho by the
airline, bus company, or railway, sales tax must be paid to the vendor, whether or not the goods are distributed to
passengers in Idaho. If the goods are purchased in another state and no sales or use tax has been paid to that state, the
cost of goods distributed to passengers on trips that start or end in Idaho is subject to use tax. In the absence of
accurate records, the airline, bus company, or railway may determine taxable use based on trip miles determined by
the formula in ISTC Rule 017.03.
(7-1-93)
018.
RETAILER DEFINED (RULE 018).
01.
Retailer. The term retailer includes a person doing a regularly organized retail business in tangible
personal property and defined services and selling to the user or consumer, not for resale. Retailer includes
commission salesmen, sales at auctions, assignees for the benefit of creditors, receivers and any salesmen,
representatives, peddlers, or canvassers as agents of the dealers, distributors, irrespective of whether they are making
sales on their own behalf or on behalf of such dealers, distributors, supervisors or employers, the Tax Commission
may so regard them and may regard the dealers, distributors, supervisors or employers as retailers.
(7-1-93)
02.
Retailers Selling Incidental Tangible Personal Property. A person may be a retailer within the
meaning of the act although the sale of tangible personal property is incidental to his general business. For example, a
plumbing contractor may sell some plumbing supplies as a sideline and thereby become a retailer within the meaning
of this act.
(7-1-93)
03.
Farmers. Farmers who ordinarily sell their grain, livestock and other horticultural products for
resale or processing are not subject to tax. However, when they sell to ultimate consumers or users, they must obtain
a seller’s permit and report sales tax on their taxable sales.
(7-1-93)
04.
An Agent as a Retailer. Where there is a written agreement between a principal and his agent,
dealer or other third party, and such agreement stipulates that the agent, dealer or other third party will be responsible
for collection, reporting and payment of sales tax generated by sales, the Tax Commission will treat the position of
the agent, dealer or third party as that of a retailer and impose on him the burden of collecting, accounting for, and
paying the sales tax to the State Tax Commission.
(7-1-93)
a.
However, if for example, a milk route salesman, without such an agreement, makes regular
deliveries, collects for the products, and sales tax is included in the total proceeds collected and remitted to the
principal for proper crediting, accounting, discounts, etc., then it shall be the responsibility of the principal to relay
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the sales tax with proper reporting forms as prescribed by law.
(7-1-93)
b.
In some instances, such as the above, and the example of a newspaper delivery boy, the sales are
actually made on behalf of the dairy and the newspaper company respectively. In the absence of any such written
agreement, the Tax Commission will look to the principal as being responsible for the reporting and payment of the
sales tax.
(7-1-93)
019.
SALES BY COUNTY SHERIFFS (RULE 019).
01.
Sales. Where tangible personal property is sold by a county sheriff, either as a result of a court
order or pursuant to any summary notice and sale foreclosure procedure, a sales tax shall be assessed and collected by
the county sheriff at the time of the sale in the same manner as required of any other seller.
(7-1-93)
02.
Requirement to Register. There is no requirement for the various sheriff’s offices to register with
the Commission. Each sheriff’s office in the state of Idaho is assigned a seller’s permit number and must file returns
quarterly. Sheriffs’ offices must report all retail sales on Form ST-850.
(3-30-07)
020.
AUCTIONEER, AGENT, BROKER, DISTRIBUTOR AND FACTORS (RULE 020).
Every factor, auctioneer, broker and agent acting for a principal, or entrusted with any bill of lading, custom house
permit for delivery or any tangible personal property or entrusted with possession of any personal property for the
purpose of sale, shall be responsible for the proper collection and remittance of tax with respect to such sales,
regardless of the fact that the principal or owner of the property being sold would not have been liable for collection
of the tax if he had made the sale himself.
(7-1-93)
021.
MULTI-LEVEL MARKETING FIRMS (RULE 021).
01.
Multi-Level Marketing Firm. A multi-level marketing firm is an organization that can convey to
a person the right to sell a product and the right to convey those rights to another person.
(7-1-93)
02.
Agents. The Idaho Sales Tax Act provides the Commission with the authority to view salesmen,
representatives, peddlers, or canvassers as agents of the dealers or distributors under whom they operate or from
whom they obtain the tangible personal property sold by them, even if such persons are independent contractors. The
Commission may require the dealers or distributors to collect and remit the sales tax on behalf of such agents.
(7-1-93)
03.
Requirement of Multi-Level Marketing Firms to Collect Tax. The Commission may, upon the
request of the multi-level marketing firm or when it finds evidence of material failure to comply with the Idaho Sales
Tax Act or these rules and when the Commission determines that it is necessary for the efficient administration of
such act, require multi-level marketing firms to collect the sales and use tax on all taxable property sold by the multilevel marketing firm through such agents, whether or not the agents are independent contractors.
(7-1-93)
04.
Notification. The Commission, upon determination that a multi-level marketing firm shall be
required to collect the tax on taxable sales through its agents, shall provide to the multi-level marketing firm, by
certified mail, a notification of the sales and use tax remittance requirements imposed by the Commission. (7-1-93)
a.
Beginning with the first reporting period after receipt of the notice, the multi-level marketing firm
shall be responsible for collecting and remitting tax on all sales made by such agents.
(7-1-93)
b.
A taxpayer desiring to seek a redetermination of the notice must file a written protest with the
Commission within the time limit and under the procedures provided by ISTC 121.
(7-1-93)
022.
DROP SHIPMENTS (RULE 022).
01.
In General. Drop shipments refer to shipments made by a seller to someone other than its
purchaser. For example, a Manufacturer produces Product X. The Retailer is a distributor of Product X. The
Customer, which does business only in Idaho, is the ultimate purchaser and consumer of Product X. The Customer
places a purchase order with the Retailer. The Retailer, having no inventory in stock, places a purchase order with the
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Manufacturer. The Retailer directs the Manufacturer to ship the product directly to the Customer in Idaho. The
Manufacturer, however, bills the Retailer for the product and receives payment from the Retailer. The Retailer bills
and receives payment from the Customer. The nature and use of Product X is not within any of the specified
exemptions contained in the Idaho Sales Tax Act. The Manufacturer holds an Idaho seller’s permit.
(7-1-99)
02.
Privity of Contract. The Idaho sales tax is imposed upon sales transactions. Since there is not
privity of contract between the Manufacturer and the Customer, the Manufacturer will not be required to collect and
remit sales tax on the purchase by the Customer.
(7-1-99)
03.
Sales Tax Responsibilities of the Manufacturer. The Manufacturer can have sales tax
responsibilities as to the sales transaction between itself and the Retailer.
(7-1-99)
a.
If the Retailer holds an Idaho seller’s permit, it will be necessary for the Retailer to provide the
Manufacturer with a resale certificate evidencing its intentions to resell Product X. If the Retailer does not provide the
resale certificate, then the Manufacturer must charge Idaho sales tax on the sale of tangible personal property sold to
the Retailer and delivered in Idaho. If the Retailer provides a resale certificate, the Retailer must then charge the
Customer Idaho sales tax and remit the tax to the Idaho State Tax Commission together with a proper return. (7-1-99)
b.
If the Retailer does not hold an Idaho seller’s permit, a resale certificate from the Retailer to the
Manufacturer is unnecessary. If the Retailer has no nexus with the state of Idaho, it can accrue no sales tax liability
and the sale between the Manufacturer and the Retailer is not subject to the jurisdiction of the Idaho State Tax
Commission. The Manufacturer must obtain evidence of this fact in the form of a letter from the Retailer stating that
they have no nexus in Idaho or by any other clear and convincing evidence. The Customer’s use or consumption of
Product X within Idaho will cause it to accrue a use tax liability. It will be required to file a use tax return and report
and remit the use tax on the purchase of Product X.
(7-1-99)
04.
Resale Certificate. If either the Manufacturer or the Retailer is engaged in interstate commerce,
the resale certificate which the Retailer provides to the Manufacturer may be in the form prescribed for uniform
exemption certificates by the Multistate Tax Commission if the rules set forth in Rule 128 of these rules are met.
(3-15-02)
023.
(RESERVED)
024.
RENTALS OR LEASES OF TANGIBLE PERSONAL PROPERTY (RULE 024).
01.
a sale.
In General. The lease or rental of tangible personal property, including licensed motor vehicles, is
(7-1-93)
02.
Bare Equipment Rental. A bare equipment rental, that is, a rental of equipment without operator,
is a taxable sale. The owner of the equipment is a retailer and must get a seller’s permit and collect and remit sales
taxes. The equipment owner must collect sales tax on each rental payment and remit the tax to the State Tax
Commission just like any other retailer. The tax applies whether the equipment is rented by the hour, day, week,
month, or on a mileage, or any other basis. The equipment owner who mainly rents bare equipment may buy the
equipment without paying tax to the vendor by giving him a resale certificate. See Rule 128 of these rules. If the
owner uses the equipment for his own benefit or in his own business operations, he must pay use tax based on a
reasonable rental value for the period during which he used his own equipment.
(3-15-02)
03.
Fully Operated Equipment Rentals.
(7-1-93)
a.
A fully operated equipment rental, equipment with operator, is a service rather than a retail sale of
tangible personal property. No sales tax is due on a fully operated equipment rental.
(7-1-93)
b.
A fully operated equipment rental is an agreement in which the owner or supplier of the equipment
or property supplies it along with operators who are his own employees, and the property supplied is of no value to
the customer without the owner’s employees.
(7-1-93)
c.
The owner or supplier of the equipment or property used in a fully operated equipment rental is the
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consumer of the equipment or property, and is subject to sales or use tax when he buys or uses the equipment in
Idaho. Special rules apply to transient equipment used for short periods in Idaho. See Rule 073 of these rules.
(7-1-99)
d.
If the equipment or property has value to the customer without the owner’s or supplier’s
employees, then the lease or rental of the equipment or property is a distinct transaction. It is subject to sales or use
tax and its price must be stated separately from the price of the service provided by the employees of the owner or
supplier.
(7-1-93)
e.
Example: A crane rental company provides a mobile crane to a contractor, along with an operator.
The contractor may not use the crane without the rental company’s employee, so the leasing company is not required
to charge sales tax on the lease of the crane.
(7-1-93)
f.
Example: Pick-Up Industries provides a three (3) cubic yard trash container to a customer. Pick-Up
also provides trash hauling service to empty the container. Since the container is used to store trash between
collections, its transfer to a customer is a lease subject to sales tax.
(7-1-93)
04.
Mixed Use of Rental Equipment.
(7-1-93)
a.
If the equipment owner primarily rents bare equipment but sometimes supplies equipment with an
operator, he is the consumer of the equipment while it is used by his employees to perform his service contract.
Accordingly, he must pay use tax on the reasonable rental value of the equipment for that period of time unless he
paid tax when he bought the equipment.
(7-1-93)
b.
If the equipment owner primarily rents fully operated equipment but sometimes rents bare
equipment, he must charge and remit Idaho sales tax on the rental of the bare equipment. The tax applies even though
the equipment owner’s purchase of the property was also subject to sales or use tax. In this case, the owner purchased
the equipment for a purpose other than the resale or re-rental of that property in the regular course of business.
(7-1-93)
05.
Operator Required to Be Paid by Customer. In some cases, an equipment owner supplies
equipment along with an operator but a union contract or a state or federal law requires the customer to pay the
operator. If all other indications of an employee-employer relationship, such as the right to hire and fire, immediate
direction and control, etc., remain with the equipment owner, the owner is viewed as supplying a service and no sales
tax applies to the service fee. However, the fact that the transaction is a fully operated equipment rental must be
clearly stated on the face of the invoice or other billing document. The State Tax Commission may, whenever it
deems appropriate, examine the facts on a case-by-case basis to determine if a true employer-employee relationship
exists between the equipment owner and the operator.
(7-1-99)
06.
Maintenance of Rental Equipment. If the owner who rents bare equipment is responsible for the
maintenance of the equipment, he may buy the necessary repair parts and equipment tax exempt by providing his
vendor with a resale certificate. The owner who rents fully operated equipment may not buy the equipment or repair
parts tax exempt.
(7-1-93)
07.
Rentals to Exempt Entities. The rental or lease of equipment invoiced directly to an entity exempt
from sales tax, such as the state of Idaho or one (1) of its political subdivisions, is not subject to sales tax. However, if
the rental or lease is to an individual or organization performing a contract for, or working for an exempt entity, the
rental is taxable.
(7-1-93)
08.
Exempt Equipment Rentals. Equipment which would have been exempt from tax if purchased is
also tax exempt if leased or rented. To claim this exemption, the renter must furnish the owner with a properly
completed and signed exemption certificate. See Rule 128 of these rules.
(3-15-02)
09.
are taxable.
Rental Payments Applied to Future Sales. Rentals to be applied toward a future sale or purchase
(7-1-93)
10.
Personal Property Tax. A lessor may require reimbursement from the lessee for the personal
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property tax the lessor must pay on leased equipment. A charge for personal property tax will be exempt from sales
tax if the lease is for a term of one year or longer; if the property tax is billed as a separate line item; and if the charge
is no more than the property tax actually paid by the lessor.
(5-8-09)
11.
Out-of-State Rental/Lease. Rental or lease payments on equipment used outside Idaho are not
subject to Idaho sales tax. Rental or lease payments on equipment used in Idaho are taxable. If the equipment is
delivered in Idaho, even though it will be used outside the state, then the rental or lease payment for the first month,
or other period, is subject to Idaho tax.
(7-1-93)
12.
Lease-Purchase and Lease with Option to Purchase.
(7-1-93)
a.
Lease-purchase agreements include transfers which are called leases by the parties but are really
installment, conditional, or similar sales. Where ownership passes to the transferee at the end of the stated terms of
the lease contract with no additional consideration from the transferee, or where the additional consideration does not
represent the fair market value of the property, the transaction is a sale and tax on the entire sales price is collected on
the date the property is delivered.
(7-1-93)
b.
Lease with option to purchase agreements include transfers in which the personal property owner,
lessor, transfers possession, dominion, control or use of the property to another for consideration over a stated term
and the owner, lessor, keeps the property at the end of the term unless the lessee exercises an option to buy the
property. The owner/lessor must collect sales tax from the lessee at the time the rental is charged. If the lessee
exercises the option to buy, the lessor/owner must collect sales tax from the lessee/buyer on the full remaining
purchase price, the residual, when the option is exercised.
(7-1-93)
025.
13.
Cross-References.
(7-1-93)
a.
See Rule 025 of these rules on real property rental.
(7-1-99)
b.
See Rule 037 of these rules on aircraft and flying services.
(7-1-99)
c.
See Rule 038 of these rules on flying clubs.
(7-1-99)
d.
See Rule 044 of these rules on trade-in for rental or lease property.
(7-1-99)
e.
See Rule 049 of these rules on warranties and service agreements.
(7-1-99)
f.
See Rule 073 of these rules on transient equipment.
(7-1-99)
g.
See Rule 106 of these rules on motor vehicles.
(7-1-99)
RENTALS OR LEASES OF REAL PROPERTY (RULE 025).
01.
In General. The sale, lease, or rental of real property, including office space, living space, lockers,
boat docks, billboards, parking spaces, spaces for booths at fairs, and real property storage spaces is not subject to
sales tax.
(7-1-93)
02.
Hotel, Motel, and Campground Accommodations. The charge for providing hotel, motel, and
campground accommodations is subject to sales tax as provided by Section 63-3612, Idaho Code. See ISTC Rule
028.
(7-1-93)
026.
(RESERVED)
027.
COMPUTER EQUIPMENT, SOFTWARE, AND DATA SERVICES (RULE 027).
01.
Hardware and Computers Defined.
a.
Hardware is the physical computer assembly and all peripherals, whether attached physically or
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remotely by any type of network, and includes all equipment, parts and supplies.
(3-6-00)
b.
Computers are programmable machines or devices having information processing capabilities and
include word, data, and math processing equipment, testing equipment, programmable microprocessors, and any
other integrated circuit embedded in manufactured machinery or equipment.
(3-6-00)
02.
Computer Software, Storage Media and Transfer Media Defined.
(3-6-00)
a.
Computer Software. Computer software, interchangeable with the terms program or software
program, is a sequence of instructions or collections of data which, when incorporated into a machine readable data
processing storage or communication medium or device, is capable of causing a computer to indicate, perform, or
achieve a particular function, task, or result. Computer software includes upgrades, fixes and error corrections as well
as any documentation or related information held on storage media or transferred by whatever means from any
location.
(3-6-00)
b.
Storage and Transfer Media. Storage media includes, but are not limited to, hard disks, compact
disks, floppy disks, diskettes, diskpacks, magnetic tape, cards, and semiconductor memory chips used for nonvolatile
storage of information readable by a computer. Transfer media include, but are not limited to, the Internet, electronic
bulletin boards, local and remote networks, and file transfer protocols.
(3-6-00)
03.
Hardware. The sale or lease of computer hardware is a sale at retail. Sales tax is imposed based on
the total purchase price, lease, or rental charges. See Rule 024 of these rules.
(3-6-00)
04.
Canned Software. The transfer of title, possession, or use for a consideration of any computer
software which is not custom software is a transfer of tangible personal property and is taxable. Canned software is
prewritten computer software which is offered for sale, lease, or use to customers on an off-the-shelf basis or is
electronically transferred by whatever means, with little or no modification at the time of the transaction beyond
specifying the parameters needed to make the program run. Evidence of canned software includes the selling,
licensing, or leasing of the identical software more than once. Software may qualify as custom software for the
original purchaser, licensee, or lessee, but become canned software with respect to all others. Canned software
includes program modules which are prewritten and later used as needed for integral parts of a complete program.
(3-6-00)
a.
Canned software may be transferred to a customer electronically or in storage media. Tax applies to
the sale or lease of the canned software, including the charges for the storage media or the charge to effect an
electronic transfer.
(3-6-00)
b.
Tax applies when operational control of canned software is transferred to the buyer, whether title to
the storage media on which the software resides passes to the customer or the software resides on storage media
furnished by the customer. A fee for the permanent or temporary transfer of possession of software by any means is a
sale or lease of tangible personal property and is taxable.
(3-6-00)
c.
Tax applies to the entire amount charged to the customer for canned software. If the consideration
consists of license fees, royalty fees, right to use fees or program design fees, whether for a period of minimum use or
for extended periods, all fees are includable in the purchase price subject to tax.
(3-6-00)
05.
Maintenance Contracts. Maintenance contracts sold in connection with the sale or lease of canned
software generally provide that the purchaser will be entitled to receive periodic program enhancements and error
correction, often referred to as upgrades, either on storage media or through remote telecommunications. The
maintenance contract may also provide that the purchaser will be entitled to telephone or on-site support services.
(3-6-00)
a.
If the maintenance contract is required as a condition of the sale, lease, or rental of canned software,
the gross sales price is subject to tax whether or not the charge for the maintenance contract is separately stated from
the charge for software. In determining whether an agreement is optional or mandatory, the terms of the contract shall
be controlling.
(3-30-07)
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b.
IDAPA 35.01.02
Idaho Sales & Use Tax Administrative Rules
If the maintenance contract is optional to the purchaser of canned software:
(3-30-07)
i.
Then only the portion of the contract fee representing upgrades or enhancements is subject to sales
tax if the fee for any maintenance agreement support services is separately stated;
(3-30-07)
ii.
If the fee for any maintenance agreement support services is not separately stated from the fee for
upgrades or enhancements, then fifty percent (50%) of the entire charge for the maintenance contract is subject to
sales tax;
(3-30-07)
iii.
If the maintenance contract only provides canned computer software upgrades or enhancements,
and no maintenance agreement support services, then the entire sales price of the contract is taxable;
(3-30-07)
iv.
If the maintenance contract only provides support services, and the customer is not entitled to or
does not receive any canned computer software upgrades or enhancements, then the sale of the contract is not taxable.
(3-30-07)
06.
Reports Compiled by a Computer. The sale of statistical reports, graphs, diagrams, microfilm,
microfiche, photorecordings, or any other information produced or compiled by a computer and sold or reproduced
for sale in substantially the same form as it is produced is a sale of tangible personal property and is taxable
regardless of the means of transfer. If a report is compiled from information furnished by the same person to whom
the finished report is sold, the report will be subject to tax unless the person selling the report performs some sort of
service regarding the data or restates the data in substantially different form than that from which it was originally
presented.
(3-6-00)
a.
Example: An accountant uses a computer to prepare financial statements from a client’s automated
accounting records. No tax will apply since what is sought is the accountant’s expertise and knowledge of generally
accepted accounting principles.
(7-1-93)
b.
Example: A company sells mailing lists which are stored on a computer disk. The seller compiles
all the mailing lists from a single data base. Since the same data base is used for all such mailing lists it is not custom
software. Therefore, the sale is subject to tax.
(7-1-93)
c.
Example: An auto parts retailer hires a data processing firm to optically scan and record its parts
book on a computer disk. No analysis or other service is performed regarding the data. Essentially, this is the same as
making a copy of the parts books and the sale is, therefore, subject to tax.
(7-1-93)
d.
When additional copies of records, reports, manuals, tabulations, etc., are provided, tax applies to
the charges made for the additional copies. Additional copies are all copies in excess of those produced
simultaneously with the production of the original and on the same printer, where the copies are prepared by running
the same program, by using multiple printers, by looping the program, by using different programs to produce the
same output, or by other means.
(7-1-93)
e.
to tax.
Charges for copies produced by means of photocopying, multilithing, or by other means are subject
(7-1-93)
07.
Training Services. Separately stated charges for training services are not subject to the tax, unless
they are incidental services agreed to be rendered as a part of the sale of tangible personal property as provided by
Rule 011 of these rules.
(3-6-00)
a.
When separate charges are made for training materials, such as books, manuals, or canned
software, sales tax applies.
(7-1-93)
b.
When training materials are provided at no cost to the purchaser in conjunction with the sale of
tangible personal property, the training materials are considered to be included in the sales price of the tangible
personal property.
(7-1-93)
c.
When no tangible personal property, computer hardware or canned software, is sold and training
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materials are provided at no charge to the customer, the provider of the training is the consumer of the training
materials and must pay sales tax or accrue and remit use tax.
(3-6-00)
08.
Custom Software. The transfer of title, possession, or use for a consideration of custom software is
not subject to sales tax. Custom software is specified, designed, and created by a vendor at the specific request of a
client to meet a particular need. Custom software includes software which is created when a user purchases the
services of a person to create software which is specialized to meet the user’s particular needs. The term includes
those services that are represented by separately stated and identified charges for modification to existing canned
software which are made to the special order of the customer, even though the sales, lease, or license of the existing
program remains taxable. Examples of services that do not result in custom software include loading parameters to
initialize program settings and arranging preprogrammed modules to form a complete program.
(7-1-93)
a.
Tax does not apply to the sale, license, or lease of custom software regardless of the form or means
by which the program is transferred. The tax does not apply to the transfer of custom software or custom
programming services performed in connection with the sale or lease of computer equipment if such charges are
separately stated from the charges for the equipment.
(3-6-00)
b.
If the custom programming charges are not separately stated from the sale or lease of equipment,
they will be considered taxable as part of the sale.
(7-1-93)
c.
Custom software includes a program prepared to the special order of a customer who will use the
program to produce and sell or lease copies of the program. The sale of the program by the customer for whom the
custom software was prepared will be a sale of canned software.
(7-1-93)
09.
Purchases for Resale. Sales tax does not apply when computer hardware or software is purchased
for resale. A properly executed resale certificate must be on file. See Rule 128 of these rules.
(3-6-00)
028.
HOTELS, MOTELS AND CAMPGROUNDS (RULE 028).
01.
Fees. Fees charged for providing hotel, motel, and campground accommodations are subject to the
state sales tax, the Idaho Tourism and Convention taxes and may be subject to the Greater Boise Auditorium District
sales tax. These taxes are explained in the Commission’s rules entitled Hotel/Motel Room and Campground Sales
Tax Rules, IDAPA 35.01.06.
(7-1-93)
02.
Purchases by Hotels, Motels, and Campgrounds. Effective July 1, 1988, hotels, motels, and
campgrounds may purchase tangible personal property for consumption by their customers without paying tax if the
tangible personal property is included in the fee charged to the customer and is directly consumed by the customer in
such a way that it cannot be reused. Hotels, motels, and campgrounds must provide a resale certificate to their vendor
when purchasing such items for resale. Examples include:
(7-1-93)
a.
Facial tissue, toilet tissue, toilet sanitation tissues, disposable laundry pickup bags, and paper
(7-1-93)
b.
Soaps, hair shampoo, hair conditioners, and lotions.
napkins.
(7-1-93)
c.
Disposable plastic drinking glasses, disposable plastic utensils, disposable shoe shine cloths, and
disposable shower caps.
(7-1-93)
d.
Candies, beverages, meals, and newspapers furnished with the room.
(7-1-93)
e.
Room stationery, envelopes, notepads, and matches.
(7-1-93)
03.
Tangible Personal Property Subject to Tax. Tangible personal property which is not included in
the fee charged to the customer and not directly consumed by the customer is subject to the tax when purchased by
the hotel, motel, or campground. Tangible personal property subject to tax includes property which is NOT directly
consumed by the customer, property that is nondisposable in nature, or property that is depreciated in the books and
records of the hotel, motel, or campground. The hotel, motel, or campground is the user and consumer of such
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supplies and equipment and will pay sales tax on the purchase of such items. Examples include:
029.
(7-1-93)
a.
Bath towels, bath mats, linens, and bedding.
(7-1-93)
b.
Glassware, silverware, and china.
(7-1-93)
c.
Furniture and fixtures.
(7-1-93)
d.
Bibles, room service menus, and directories.
(7-1-93)
e.
Toilet sanitary rings and garbage can liners.
(7-1-93)
f.
Any tangible personal property available to the general public.
(7-1-93)
PRODUCING, FABRICATING, AND PROCESSING (RULE 029).
01.
In General. Tax applies to charges for producing, fabricating, processing, printing, imprinting, or
the engraving of tangible personal property for a consideration, whether or not consumers furnish either directly or
indirectly the materials used in the producing, fabricating, processing, printing, imprinting, or engraving.
(7-1-93)
a.
Example 1: An owner purchases cabinets from a cabinetmaker to be made according to
specifications furnished by the owner. The cabinetmaker delivers the cabinets to the owner who installs them himself.
A sales tax will be collected by the cabinetmaker from the owner measured by the entire sales price.
(7-1-93)
b.
Example 2: An owner purchases material, on which he pays a sales tax, which he delivers to a
cabinetmaker. The cabinetmaker uses this material to manufacture cabinets for the owner according to specification.
These cabinets are delivered to the owner and an agreed price is paid for the work done by the cabinetmaker. A sales
tax will be collected from the owner, measured by the entire price charged by the cabinetmaker.
(7-1-93)
c.
Example 3: An individual takes a plaque, on which sales tax has been paid, to an engraver and
requests the plaque be engraved with an inscription. The total price paid for the engraving shall be subject to tax.
(7-1-93)
d.
Example 4: A club purchases trophies from a retailer and requests that the trophies be engraved
with individual names. The trophies are engraved and delivered for an agreed price. The measure of the sales tax is
the price of the trophies plus the engraving charge.
(7-1-93)
e.
Example 5: An individual takes a beef to a packing plant and requests that the meat be processed by
cutting, wrapping, and freezing the meat to the purchaser’s specification. The total price paid for this processing shall
be subject to sales tax.
(7-1-93)
f.
Example 6: A hunter takes a deer to a business which processes smoked meats. Although the
material actually consumed in the smoking process may be minimal, the entire price paid for this processing is
subject to sales tax.
(7-1-93)
02.
Repairing and Reconditioning Distinguished. Producing, fabricating, and processing includes
any operation which results in the creation or production of tangible personal property or which is a step in a process
or series of operations resulting in the creation or production of tangible personal property. The terms do not include
operations which do not result in the creation or production of tangible personal property or which do not constitute a
step in a process or series of operations resulting in the creation or production of tangible personal property, but
which constitute merely the repair or reconditioning of tangible personal property to refit it for the use for which it
was originally produced.
(7-1-93)
03.
Cross-References.
(7-1-93)
a.
Repairs and Renovation of Tangible Personal Property. See ISTC Rules 011 and 062.
(7-1-93)
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b.
030.
IDAPA 35.01.02
Idaho Sales & Use Tax Administrative Rules
Fabrications by Contractors. See ISTC Rule 012.
(7-1-93)
ADMISSIONS DEFINED (RULE 030).
01.
Admissions. Charges for admission to a place or event in Idaho are taxable. The charge to gain
access to a place or event is subject to tax whether such charge is designated as a cover charge, minimum charge or
any such similar charge.
(3-6-00)
a.
When an original admission charge carries the right to remain in a place or use a seat or table or
other similar accommodation for a limited time only and an additional charge is made for an extension of such time,
the extra charge is paid for admission within the meaning of the code.
(7-1-93)
b.
When a person or organization acquires the sole right to use any place or the right to dispose of or
control the admissions to any place with the intent to charge people to attend the event, the amount paid for such right
is not subject to sales tax. Such a transaction constitutes a rental for resale. However, when the person or organization
sells admission, the tax will apply to the amounts paid for such admission. If the person or organization does not
charge people to attend the event, their rental of the recreational facility may be subject to sales tax. See Rule 129 of
these rules.
(3-6-00)
02.
Rental of Tangible Personal Property. When a charge is made only for the rental of tangible
personal property such as skates, golf clubs, etc., the rental will be taxable. If a lesser charge is made to a person not
desiring to use the property or services offered, this lesser amount shall be deemed to represent the amount charged
for admission.
(3-6-00)
031.
RADIO AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS EQUIPMENT AND LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICE
OF SYSTEMS (RULE 031).
01.
General Rule and Scope. Sales and purchases of communication equipment and land mobile radio
systems are subject to sales and use tax. This rule describes sales and use tax treatment of telephone terminal
equipment or services and land mobile radio systems or service.
(7-1-97)
02.
Telephone Terminal Equipment and Services.
(7-1-93)
a.
Telephone terminal equipment includes, but is not limited to, desk sets, PBX systems, automated
answering equipment, cellular telephones and mobile radio telephones. All lessors, or sellers, or both, of this type of
equipment are required to obtain seller’s permits, and must collect and remit sales tax on the retail sales price or lease
price.
(7-1-97)
b.
Fees for access charges, toll charges, call waiting, call forward, message recording, and similar
charges to customers are not subject to the sales tax.
(7-1-97)
03.
a.
Section 90.7.
Land Mobile Radio Systems or Services.
(7-1-93)
Generally, land mobile radio systems or services are defined by 47 Code of Federal Regulations,
(7-1-93)
b.
Sales of terminal equipment or customer premises equipment are taxable. Terminal and customer
premises equipment shall include handsets, mobile telephones, antennae, and like or similar property.
(7-1-97)
c.
Separately stated fees for labor rendered to install or apply terminal or customer premises
equipment on premises or in facilities under the dominion and control of the consumer are not subject to sales tax.
(7-1-93)
d.
Fees for access charges, toll charges, and similar charges are not subject to the sales tax.
(7-1-97)
04.
Provider Equipment. Equipment or tangible personal property used in receiving or transmitting,
other than terminal or customer premises equipment, shall be deemed purchased for use by the owner or provider of
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the telephone or land mobile radio system or service, and subject to sales or use tax on his purchase cost. The owner
or provider of telephone or land mobile radio systems or services will be deemed the consumer of other tangible
personal property which he purchases and which is used for other purposes including, but not limited to, office
supplies, repair equipment, accounting or customer billing equipment, and equipment or devices or other property
used to maintain or repair land mobile radio systems or services.
(7-1-93)
05.
Drop-In Equipment and Inside Wiring.
(7-1-93)
a.
Drop-in equipment and inside wiring shall include wires, plugs, sockets, receptacles, connectors
and similar items which are or become improvements or accessions to real estate, and which are useful or necessary
to bring telephonic or radio communication transmissions from a source outside the premises of the user, for
example, telephone pole or transmitter, to terminal equipment within the user’s premises.
(7-1-93)
b.
Sales and purchases of drop-in equipment and inside wiring shall be subject to sales or use tax as
tangible personal property consumed by a contractor improving real estate, and persons installing drop-in equipment
and inside wiring shall be considered contractors for the purposes of such installations. See Rule 012 of these rules
for tax treatment of contractors.
(3-20-04)
06.
Wireless Telecommunications Equipment. A retailer may give away wireless
telecommunications equipment as an inducement to commence or continue a contract for telecommunications
service. Such a use is exempt from tax pursuant to Section 63-3621(a), Idaho Code. For the purposes of this
exemption “telecommunications service” means the transmission of two-way interactive switched signs, signals,
writing, images, sounds, messages, data, or other information that is offered to the public for compensation.
“Telecommunication service” does not include the one-way transmission to subscribers of video programming, or
other programming service, and subscriber interaction, if any, which is required for the selection of such video
programming or other programming service, surveying, internet service, alarm monitoring service, or the provision of
radio paging, mobile radio telecommunication services, answering services (including computerized or otherwise
automated answering or voice message services).
(3-20-04)
032.
(RESERVED)
033.
SALES OF NEWSPAPERS AND MAGAZINES (RULE 033).
01.
Subscriptions. Subscriptions to newspapers and magazines are sales of tangible personal property.
The sale will be taxed if the single copy price of each newspaper or magazine purchased by the subscriber exceeds
eleven cents ($0.11). The single copy price shall be computed on an annual basis regardless of whether the
subscription is paid weekly, monthly or on some other periodic basis.
(7-1-93)
02.
Single Copy Price. The single copy price shall be computed according to the following formula.
(Published subscription price) x (Number of subscription periods in one (1) year) / (Number of issues a subscriber
receives in one (1) year) = Single Copy Price. If the single copy price as computed exceeds eleven ($0.11)cents, the
subscription is taxable. If the single copy price is eleven cents ($0.11) or less, the subscription price is not taxable.
(7-1-93)
03.
Computation of Tax. If the subscription price is taxable, the tax shall be computed on the
subscription price according to the schedule contained in Section 63-3619, Idaho Code.
(7-1-93)
04.
Subscription Price. As used in this rule, the terms published subscription price and subscription
price mean the total amount charged for purchase and delivery of the newspaper and magazine, except that separately
stated postage shall be excluded from the subscription price subject to tax. It is acceptable business practice for
publishers to establish a price for their newspapers as separate weekday-only and Sunday-only issues. The provisions
of this rule will be in effect in such cases. When the price is posted as a combined weekday-Sunday price, sales tax
will be charged on the combined subscription price.
(7-1-99)
05.
Individual Sales. Individual or separate sales of newspapers or magazines, except as provided in
Subsection 033.06 of this rule for a single price of eleven cents ($0.11) or less are not taxable. Individual or separate
sales of newspapers or magazines for a single price exceeding eleven cents ($0.11) are subject to tax according to the
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schedule provided in Section 63-3619, Idaho Code. Separate or individual sales of newspapers or magazines together
with retail sales or other tangible personal property subject to tax shall be taxable if the total sales price of all taxable
property included in the sale exceeds eleven cents ($0.11).
(3-15-02)
06.
Vending Machine Sales. Sales of newspapers or magazines through a vending machine are
governed by the provisions of Section 63-3613, Idaho Code, and Rule 058 of these rules, except when the cost of the
newspaper is greater than the sales price, tax will be computed on the retail sales price.
(7-1-99)
07.
Independent Retailer Sales. The sale of newspapers by a publisher to an independent retailer will
be tax exempt only if the retailer provides the publisher with a properly executed resale certificate. See Rule 128 of
these rules. The incidence of sales tax then falls upon the independent retailer who must have a registered seller’s
permit number and will be responsible for collecting, accounting for and remitting the sales tax on all newspapers
thus purchased and resold.
(3-15-02)
08.
Carriers Less Than Sixteen Years Old. If the carrier is less than sixteen (16) years old, the
publisher or other seller’s permit holder from whom he or she obtains the newspapers will be responsible for the
collection of sales tax and remitting such taxes to the State Tax Commission.
(7-1-93)
09.
Product Consumed by the Publisher. Eight-tenths of one percent (0.8%) of net press run of
newspapers or magazines, will be taxed as product consumed by the publisher. Any percentage figure below eighttenths of one percent (0.8%) must be supported by accepted accounting methods generally used in the publishing
industry. The value of the newspapers used shall be set at the retail price charged the consumer. Example: (Eight
tenths of one percent (0.8%) of Daily Net Press Run) x (Single Copy Retail Price) x (Tax Rate) / Daily Net Press Run
= Tax Per Copy.
(7-1-93)
10.
Single Unit Price and Net Press Run. For purposes of the computation in Subsection 033.09 of
this rule single copy price shall be the amount computed by the formula in Subsection 033.02 of this rule. Net press
run shall mean all readable, usable copies, including editorial copies, tearsheets, and archival copies, and not
including spoiled runs or printing waste.
(7-1-93)
034.
11.
Cross-Reference.
(7-1-93)
a.
See Rule 058 of these rules, Sales Through Vending Machines.
(7-1-99)
b.
See Rule 127 of these rules, Free Distribution Newspapers.
(4-6-05)
c.
See Rule 128 of these rules, Certificates for Resale and Other Exemption Claims.
(3-15-02)
TRADING STAMPS (RULE 034).
01.
Sales Price. Sales price includes the total consideration paid whether received in money or
otherwise. If property is purchased with trading stamps, a tax will be imposed at the time of sale measured by the
listed retail selling price for the goods. If no such price is listed, the actual retail selling price or the redemptive value
of the stamps, whichever is higher, will be used as the measure of the tax. Sales tax will be collected from the
purchaser.
(7-1-93)
02.
Purchase of Trading Stamps by Retailer. The purchase of trading stamps by a retailer for
distribution to his customers is a purchase of tangible personal property subject to the tax. As the stamps are
distributed by the retailer to his customers at no charge, the retailer is considered to be the customer of the trading
stamps.
(7-1-93)
035.
LAYAWAY SALES (RULE 035).
01.
In General. Layaway sales will be assessed sales tax. The tax shall be collected on the total sales
price of the items on layaway at the time of sale.
(7-1-93)
02.
The Time a Sale Occurs. A sale occurs when title to property passes through delivery to the
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customer or absolute and unconditional appropriation to a contract.
(7-1-93)
a.
The sales tax is accrued and remitted to the state based on the tax rate in effect at the time of sale.
(7-1-93)
b.
Separately stated nonrefundable service charges are not a measure of the applicable sales tax.
(7-1-93)
c.
Example 1: On March 1, 1986, a customer puts on layaway an item costing one hundred dollars
($100). A twenty dollar ($20) down payment is made, plus a nonrefundable two dollar ($2) service charge. A twenty
dollar ($20) biweekly payment is to be made. The customer meets the biweekly payment schedule, makes the final
payment, and accepts delivery of the item on April 26, 1986. On that date, title to the property passes through
delivery to the customer. If the two dollar ($2) service charge is separately stated, it is not a measure of the tax due.
The one hundred dollar ($100) retail sale is reported as occurring in April, 1986, and is subject to the rate of tax for
the month of April.
(7-1-93)
d.
Example 2: The same circumstances as in Subsection 035.02.c., Example 1, except that only two
(2) payments are made and the customer decides not to complete the layaway transaction. The retailer refunds all
amounts paid, except the two dollar ($2) nonrefundable service charge. A sale does not occur and no sales tax is due.
(7-1-93)
e.
Example 3: The same circumstances as in Subsection 035.02.c., Example 1, except after one (1)
payment the customer moves and cannot be located. No refund of amounts paid by the customer is made. The amount
no refunded is not subject to sales tax because there is no sale through delivery of tangible personal property to the
customer. See Section 63-3612, Idaho Code.
(7-1-93)
036.
SIGNS AND BILLBOARDS (RULE 036).
01.
Signs and Billboards as Custom Made Articles. The fabrication, manufacturing, lettering, etc., of
advertising or informational signs of whatever description, including, but not limited to, neon signs, display lettering
on trucks, display cards, show cards, etc., are considered made-to-order goods or custom made articles and as such
are subject to Idaho sales tax based upon the total sales price of the completed sign to the user. The sales price shall
include material and labor.
(7-1-93)
02.
Rental of Signs. The rental of signs is subject to sales tax and a sales tax will be collected and
remitted to the state upon the date on which rental payments are due and owing the lessor. The tax will be measured
by the gross rental receipts. A lease-purchase agreement which in fact a sale, will be treated as a sale and tax collected
on the entire sales price at the date upon which the contract is executed.
(7-1-93)
03.
Material That Becomes Part of a Sign. Persons who sell signs may buy materials which become
a part of the product without paying tax if they give the seller the documentation required by Rule 128 of these rules.
(3-15-02)
04.
Custom Painting Directly on Real Property. A sale of custom painting of displays, graphics or
signs directly on walls or windows of a building is not considered to be a retail sale of tangible personal property and
is not taxable. The sign painter must pay sales or use tax on purchases of materials used to paint these custom
displays, graphics or signs.
(7-1-99)
05.
Billboards.
(7-1-99)
a.
Billboards which are also referred to as twenty-four (24) sheet posters and painted billboards, are
not in the same category as signs covered in this rule. The rental of a billboard is not a rental of tangible personal
property under the Idaho Sales Tax Act.
(7-1-99)
b.
Billboard Material. Material used in the construction, erection, painting, and maintenance of a
billboard is subject to sales or use tax.
(7-1-99)
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037.
IDAPA 35.01.02
Idaho Sales & Use Tax Administrative Rules
AIRCRAFT AND FLYING SERVICES (RULE 037).
01.
Definitions. For the purposes of this rule, the following terms have the following meanings:
(7-1-94)
a.
Recreational Flight. The hiring on demand of an aircraft with a pilot to transport passengers for a
recreational purpose. Examples are a pleasure ride, sightseeing, wildlife viewing, hot air balloon rides, or other
similar activities.
(4-11-06)
b.
Freight. Goods transported by a carrier between two (2) points. Freight does not include goods
which are being transported for the purpose of aerial spraying or dumping. See Subsection 037.05 of this rule.
(4-11-06)
c.
Transportation of Passengers. The transportation of passengers means the service of transporting
passengers from one (1) point to another. It does not include survey flights, recreational or sightseeing flights, nor
does it include any flight that begins and ends at the same point.
(4-11-06)
d.
Nonresident Individual. An individual as defined by Section 63-3014, Idaho Code.
(7-1-94)
e.
Nonresident Businesses and Other Organizations. A corporation, partnership, limited liability
company, or other organization will be considered a nonresident if it is not formed under the laws of the state of
Idaho, is not required to be registered to do business with the Idaho Secretary of State, does not have significant
contacts with this state, and does not have consistent operations in this state. A limited liability company (LLC) or
other legal entity formed by an Idaho resident under the laws of another state primarily for the purpose of purchasing
and owning one (1) or more airplanes or other aircraft is not a nonresident. The use of an airplane owned by such an
entity will be subject to use tax upon its first use in Idaho.
(4-7-11)
f.
Day. For the purpose of this rule any part of a day is a day.
(7-1-94)
g.
Transportation of freight or passengers for hire. “Transportation of freight or passengers for hire”
means the business of transporting persons or property for compensation from one (1) location on the ground or water
to another. Such transportation must be offered indiscriminately to the general public. Entities such as LLCs or
closely held corporations, that only transport related parties, including but not limited to employees or family
members of the owner of the aircraft are not in the business of transporting freight or passengers for hire. (3-4-10)
02.
Sales of Aircraft. Sales of aircraft are taxable unless an exemption applies. Section 63-3622GG,
Idaho Code, provides an exemption for the sale, lease, purchase, or use of an aircraft:
(4-11-06)
a.
Primarily used to transport passengers or freight for hire;
(2-18-02)
b.
Primarily used for emergency transportation of sick or injured persons; or
(2-18-02)
c.
Purchased for use outside this state, when the aircraft is upon delivery taken outside this state, but
(3-20-04)
i.
The aircraft is sold to a nonresident as defined in Subsection 037.01.d. or 037.01.e. of this rule; and
(3-30-07)
only if:
ii.
The registration will be immediately changed to show the new owner and the aircraft will not be
used in this state more than ninety (90) days in any twelve (12) month period.
(3-20-04)
03.
Federal Law Prohibits States From Taxing Sales of Air Transportation. See 49 U.S.C. Section
40116. For this reason, sales of intrastate transportation as described by Section 63-3612(i), Idaho Code, are not
taxable in Idaho.
(4-11-06)
04.
Rentals and Leases of Aircraft. The rental or lease of an aircraft without operator is a sale subject
to sales tax, other than as provided in Subsection 037.02 of this rule. See Rule 024 of these rules.
(4-11-06)
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05.
Aerial Contracting Services. Businesses primarily engaged in the application of agricultural
chemicals as described in Federal Aviation Regulation Part 137, or in activities involving the carrying of external
loads as described in Federal Aviation Regulation Part 133, such as aerial logging, are performing aerial contracting
services. Such businesses are not primarily engaged in the transportation of freight.
(4-11-06)
a.
Aircraft purchased, rented, or leased for aerial contracting are subject to sales tax. It makes no
difference whether or not the service is provided to a government agency or a private individual or company. Sales or
use tax also applies to the purchase of repair parts, oil, and other tangible personal property.
(7-1-94)
b.
When aircraft held for resale are used by the owner, who is an aircraft dealer, for aerial contracting
services, a taxable use occurs. The use tax is due on a reasonable rental value for the time the aircraft is used to
provide the service.
(4-11-06)
06.
Air Ambulance Service. Charges for the emergency transportation of sick or injured persons,
including standby time, are not subject to sales tax.
(7-1-94)
07.
Flying Instructions. Flying instructions or lessons which may include solo flights are a service and
the fees are not subject to sales tax.
(7-1-94)
a.
or use tax.
Aircraft purchased, rented, or leased to be used primarily for flying instruction are subject to sales
(7-1-94)
b.
When aircraft held for resale are used by the aircraft dealer for flying instructions or lessons, a
taxable use occurs. The use tax is due on a reasonable rental value for the time the aircraft is used to provide the
service.
(7-1-94)
08.
Recreational Flights. Sales and purchase of aircraft used primarily for providing recreational
flights are subject to sales or use tax.
(4-11-06)
09.
Aircraft Held for Resale. Aircraft purchased and held for resale become taxable when used for
purposes other than demonstration or display in the regular course of business.
(7-1-94)
a.
Rentals of aircraft held for resale are taxable as provided by Subsection 037.04 of this rule.
(7-1-93)
b.
When an aircraft held for resale is used for a taxable purpose, the dealer owes tax on that use. The
use tax applies to a reasonable rental value for the time the aircraft is used.
(7-1-94)
c.
Parts and oil purchased to repair or maintain aircraft held for resale are not subject to sales tax. The
aircraft dealer must provide the supplier with a properly completed resale certificate. See Rule 128 of these rules.
(2-18-02)
10.
Fuel. The sale or purchase of fuels subject to motor fuels tax, or on which a motor fuels tax has
been paid, pursuant to Chapter 24, Title 63, Idaho Code, is exempt from sales and use tax.
(7-1-94)
038.
FLYING CLUBS (RULE 038).
01.
In General. A flying club is an association of persons who have purchased or leased aircraft for the
purpose of renting the aircraft to club members. The aircraft rentals to the club members are considered bare
equipment rentals and are subject to the tax at a reasonable rental value.
(7-1-93)
02.
Rental or Sale of Aircraft to Members. The flying club is a retailer who is required to obtain a
seller’s permit and collect and remit sales tax. The sales tax, at the prevailing tax rate, is to be collected by the flying
club and remitted to the Commission in the manner prescribed for other retailers. The tax is applicable whether the
aircraft is sold or is rented on an hourly, daily, weekly, monthly, or any other basis. The flying club, primarily engaged
in the business of making bare equipment rentals to club members, may purchase or lease the aircraft without paying
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sales tax by giving to its vendor a valid resale certificate as required by Rule 128 of these rules.
(3-15-02)
03.
Other Charges to Members. Charges for membership fees are generally subject to sales tax. If the
membership fee is in no way related to the rental of the aircraft, the fee is not subject to sales tax. Charges for flight
instruction, if such charges are separately stated, are not subject to sales tax. However, charges for logbooks and flight
instruction manuals are subject to tax.
(7-1-93)
04.
Aircraft Repair Parts. If the flying club is responsible for the maintenance of the aircraft, the club
may purchase the necessary repair and replacement parts without paying tax by providing a valid resale certificate.
See Rule 128 of these rules.
(3-15-02)
05.
039.
Cross-Reference. Aircraft and Flying Services see Rule 037 of these rules.
(3-15-02)
SALE AND PURCHASE OF BULLION, COINS, OR OTHER CURRENCY (RULE 039).
01.
Sales and Purchases of Bullion. Sales and purchases of precious metal bullion and monetized
bullion are exempt from sales tax.
(7-1-93)
a.
Precious metal bullion is an elementary precious metal, such as gold, silver, platinum, rhodium and
chromium which has been processed by smelting or refining and where the value of the metal depends upon the
content and not upon its form.
(7-1-93)
b.
Monetized bullion is a coin made of gold, silver or other metals which has been, is or will be used
as a medium of exchange under the laws of this state, the United States or any foreign nation.
(7-1-93)
02.
Jewelry or Other Works of Art. The exemption does not extend to coins or money sold to create
jewelry or other works of art. The exemption also does not extend to sales of coins whose values may be determined
by their form, and which are not minted or manufactured as currency.
(3-20-04)
a.
Sales of medallions, tokens or other coins created to commemorate a historical event are taxable.
However, sales of Idaho commemorative medallions through the Office of the Treasurer of the state of Idaho or its
agents are exempt pursuant to Section 63-3622PP, Idaho Code.
(3-20-04)
b.
Sales of precious metal ingots are exempt from sales tax. Sales of jewelry items, such as belt
buckles, bracelets or necklaces, containing silver dollars or other legal tender or ingots are taxable.
(3-20-04)
c.
Sales of coins, such as Krugerands the one (1) ounce gold coins of the Republic of South Africa,
are exempt, unless incorporated into a jewelry item or other decoration.
(3-20-04)
040.
PROFESSIONAL TAXIDERMIST (RULE 040).
01.
In General. The taxidermy profession is subject to Idaho sales and use tax under the category of
custom made items. The underlying reason for the custom made section of Idaho Code is to equalize the tax on
custom made items to those that could be purchased and sold in channels of trade. When buying an item fabricated
from either a hide or fur pelt, the purchase price is based on the full cost of material and labor. In the instance of the
taxidermy profession, the untanned pelt of hide would be the basic raw material from which the finished product was
fabricated.
(7-1-93)
02.
Fabrication. A deerskin brought to the taxidermist for tanning should be taxed on the price
charged by the taxidermist for tanning. If later that tanned skin is taken to a business that fabricates either gloves,
moccasins, or jackets, again the fabricator should charge tax on the cost of fabricating the tanned hide making the
total tax on the item fabricated comparable with the deerskin, gloves, etc., purchased from a retail store. This also
would apply to the mounting of antlers, etc., and even to the making of full mounts of animals. At the time the
taxidermist receives the head, the antlers, etc., of the animal from the customer, he has received only a basic piece of
material that would be useless until he performs certain functions to place it in a usable or finished condition.
(7-1-93)
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03.
Materials. All materials, such as mounting material, tanning material, and preservatives may be
purchased by the taxidermist tax exempt since he will charge tax on the finished product. He may provide his supplier
with a resale certificate. See Rule 128 of these rules.
(3-15-02)
041.
FOOD, MEALS, OR DRINKS (RULE 041).
01.
In General. This rule covers the imposition of tax on sales of food, meals, or drinks by commercial
establishments, college campuses, conventions, nonprofit organizations, private clubs, and similar organizations.
(7-1-93)
02.
Commercial Establishments. Sales tax is imposed on the amount paid for food, meals, or drinks
furnished by any restaurant, cafeteria, eating house, hotel, drugstore, diner, club, or any other place or organization
regardless of whether meals are regularly served to the public.
(7-1-93)
03.
Clubs and Organizations. Private clubs, country clubs, athletic clubs, fraternal, and other similar
organizations are retailers of tangible personal property sold by them, even if they make sales only to members. Such
organizations must obtain an Idaho seller’s permit and report and pay retail sales tax on all sales. Taxability of
membership dues depends upon the nature of the club. See Rule 030 of these rules. Special rules apply to religious
organizations. See Rule 086 of these rules.
(3-15-02)
a.
When an organization holds a function in its own quarters, maintains its own kitchen facilities, and
sells tickets which include items such as meals, dancing, drinks, entertainment, speakers, and registration fees
(convention), the charges may be separated and tax collected on meals, drinks, and admission fees when the ticket is
sold. For example, an organization holds a dinner dance in its own building. It charges twenty dollars ($20) for dinner
and dancing and twelve dollars ($12) for registration and speakers. Since the two (2) amounts are stated separately,
tax is only imposed on twenty dollars ($20). The amount of the tax must also be stated separately. Sales of meals and
the use of recreational facilities are taxable. Registration fees, speaker fees, and similar charges are not taxable.
(4-2-08)
b.
The organization holding the function or convention must obtain a seller’s permit and remit tax to
the state. When the charges are not separated, the total price of the ticket is taxable.
(7-1-93)
c.
When an organization holds a function in facilities operated by a restaurant or motel and sells
tickets for meals, drinks, and other services, no sales tax applies to these sales if the organization pays the restaurant
or hotel sales tax on the meals and drinks furnished and all other services performed. The hotel, restaurant, or caterer
will remit the tax to the state.
(7-1-93)
04.
Colleges, Universities, and Schools. A cafeteria operated by a state university, junior college
district, public school district, or any other public body is treated the same as a cafeteria operated by a private
enterprise. Purchases of food for resale are not taxable; meals sold are taxable.
(7-1-93)
a.
If a meal is paid for by cash or a meal ticket is sold to the student, tax is computed on the total sales
price of the meal. If meals are sold as part of a room and board fee, the amount paid for board must be separated from
the amount paid for the room. Tax is calculated and collected on that part of the total fee allocated to the purchase of
meals.
(7-1-93)
b.
Sales of meals by public or private schools under the Federal School Lunch Program are exempted
by Section 63-3622J, Idaho Code.
(7-1-93)
05.
Fraternities, Sororities, and Cooperative Living Group. Fraternities and sororities generally
purchase and prepare food for their own consumption. The food is prepared and served in a cooperative manner by
members of the fraternity or by employees hired by the group for this purpose. Purchases made by the fraternity or
sorority are for consumptive use and subject to sales tax. There is no sale of meals to fraternity or sorority members
and no sales tax imposed on any allocated charge for them whether stated separately or included as part of a lump
sum charge for board and room.
(7-1-93)
a.
If a concessionaire is retained by the fraternity or sorority to furnish meals, the concessionaire is a
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retailer engaged in the business of selling meals; food purchases are for resale and meals supplied by the
concessionaire to members of the fraternity or sorority are subject to sales tax.
(7-1-93)
b.
If the fraternity or sorority regularly furnishes meals for a consideration to nonmembers, these
meals become subject to tax and the fraternity or sorority must obtain an Idaho seller’s permit.
(7-1-93)
c.
Cooperative living groups are normally managed in much the same manner as fraternities and
sororities. Food is purchased and meals are prepared and served by members of the group or their employees. The
same conditions outlined above for fraternities and sororities apply to cooperative living groups.
(4-11-06)
06.
Boarding Houses. Sales of meals furnished by boarding houses are subject to tax, when they are
charged separately. This applies whether or not the meals are served exclusively to regular boarders. Where no
separate charge or specific amount is paid for meals furnished, but is included in the regular board and room charges,
the boarding house or other place is not considered to be selling meals, but is the consumer of the items used in
preparing such meals.
(7-1-93)
07.
Honor System Snack Sales. Honor system snack sales are those items of individually sized
prepackaged snack foods, such as candy, gum, chips, cookies or crackers, which customers may purchase by
depositing the purchase price into a collection receptacle. Displays containing these snacks are generally placed in
work or office areas and are unattended. Customers are on their honor to pay the posted price for the article removed
from the display. Purchases from these snack displays are subject to sales tax.
(7-1-93)
a.
included.
Sales tax applies to the total sales. The posted price must include a statement that sales tax is
(4-2-08)
b.
is the tax rate.
The formula for computing the taxable amount is: TS/ (100% + TR) where TS is total sales and TR
(4-2-08)
08.
Church Organizations. Special rules apply to religious organizations. See Rule 086 of these rules.
(4-11-06)
09.
Senior Citizens. Meals sold under programs that provide nutritional meals for the aging under Title
III-C of the Older Americans Act, Public Law 93-29, are exempted from the sales tax by Section 63-3622J, Idaho
Code. Organizations selling such meals must obtain an Idaho seller’s permit and collect sales tax when selling meals
to purchasers who are not senior citizens.
(7-1-93)
10.
Nontaxable Purchases by Establishments Selling Meals or Beverages. Persons who serve food,
meals, or drinks for a consideration may purchase tangible personal property without paying tax if the property is for
resale to their customers, is included in the fee charged to the customer, and is directly consumed by the customer in
such a way that it cannot be reused. A resale certificate must be provided to the vendor when the establishment
purchases such items for resale. See Rule 128 of these rules. Examples of items which are purchased for resale and
directly consumed by customers include:
(3-15-02)
a.
Disposable containers, such as milkshake containers, paper or styrofoam cups and plates, to-go
containers and sacks, pizza cartons, and chicken buckets.
(7-1-93)
b.
Disposable supplies included in the price of the meal or drink, such as drinking straws, stir sticks,
paper napkins, paper placemats, and toothpicks.
(7-1-93)
c.
drinks.
Candies, popcorn, drinks, or food, when included in the consideration paid for other food, meals, or
(7-1-93)
11.
Taxable Purchases by Establishments Selling Meals or Beverages. Tangible personal property
which is not included in the fee charged to the customer and not directly consumed by the customer is subject to the
tax when purchased by the restaurant, bar, food server, or similar establishment. Tangible personal property which is
not directly consumed by the customer includes property that is nondisposable in nature or property that is
depreciated in the books and records of the restaurant, bar, or similar establishment. Examples of taxable purchases
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include:
(7-1-93)
a.
Waxed paper, stretch wrap, foils, paper towels, garbage can liners, or other paper products
consumed by the retailer, as well as linens, silverware, glassware, tablecloths, towels, and nondisposable napkins,
furniture, fixtures, cookware, and menus.
(7-1-93)
b.
matches.
Any tangible personal property available to the general public, such as restroom supplies and
(7-1-93)
c.
Complimentary candies, popcorn, drinks, or food, when patrons are not required to purchase other
food, meals, or drinks in order to receive the complimentary goods.
(7-1-93)
042.
PRICE LABELS (RULE 042).
Sales of price labels, stickers, pricing ink, pricing guns and shelf labels are considered to be property used and
consumed by the store in the course of conducting its business activities and are subject to tax. Pricing labels which
contain commodity information such as ingredients, nutritional information, or caloric information are not subject to
tax, since the utility of the label does not end with the purchase of the product.
(7-1-93)
043.
SALES PRICE OR PURCHASE PRICE DEFINED (RULE 043).
01.
Sales Price and Purchase Price. The term sales price and purchase price may be used
interchangeably. Both mean the price paid by the customer or user to the seller including:
(7-1-93)
a.
The cost of transporting goods to the seller. See Rule 061 of these rules.
(3-20-04)
b.
Manufacturer’s or importer’s excise tax. See Rule 060 of these rules.
(3-20-04)
c.
Services agreed to be rendered as part of the sale.
d.
Separately stated labor charges to produce or fabricate made to order goods. See Rule 029 of these
(3-20-04)
rules.
(7-1-97)
02.
Services Agreed to Be Rendered as a Part of the Sale. The sales and use tax is computed on the
sales price of a transaction. The term “sales price” is defined by Section 63-3613, Idaho Code, to include “services to
be rendered as a part of the sale.” The following items are among those that are part of the sales price and, therefore,
may not be deducted before computation of the sales price. This in not intended to be an exclusive list of such items:
(3-20-04)
a.
Any charges for any services to bring the subject of a sale to its finished state ready for delivery and
in the condition specified by the buyer, including charges for assembly, fabrication, alteration, lubrication, engraving,
monogramming, cleaning, or any other servicing, customizing or dealer preparation.
(3-20-04)
b.
Any charge based on the amount or frequency of a purchase, such as a small order charge or the
nature of the item sold, such as a slow-moving charge for an item not frequently sold.
(3-20-04)
c.
similar person.
Any commission or other form of compensation for the services of an agent, consultant, broker, or
(3-20-04)
d.
Any charges for warranties, service agreements, insurance coverage, or other services required by
the vendor to be taken as a condition of the sale. If the sale could be consummated without the payment of these
charges, the charges are not part of the sales price if separately stated. Also see Rule 049 of these rules.
(3-20-04)
03.
Charges Not Included. Sales price does not include charges for interest, carrying charges,
amounts charged for optional insurance on the property sold, or any financing charge. These various charges may be
deducted from the total sales price if they are separately stated in the contract. In the absence of a separate statement,
it will be presumed that the amount charged is part of the total sales price.
(3-20-04)
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04.
Gratuities. A gratuity is defined as something given voluntarily or beyond obligation. Gratuities
may sometimes be referred to as tips.
(7-1-93)
a.
When a gratuity is given directly to employees by the purchaser in the form of cash or the purchaser
adds a nonsolicited gratuity to his bill, charge card voucher form, or house account form, no sales tax applies to the
gratuity.
(7-1-93)
b.
When an amount is added to a customer’s bill by the retailer and the customer is advised in writing
on the face of the bill that he may decline to pay all or part of the amount, that amount is a gratuity. Sales tax will not
apply to the gratuity.
(7-1-93)
c.
When an amount is added to a customer’s bill by the retailer, and the customer is not advised in
writing on the face of the bill that he may decline to pay all or part of the amount, it is not a gratuity and the fee so
added is subject to the sales tax.
(7-1-93)
d.
When a gratuity is negotiated before the sale, such as in the case of a banquet, tax must be charged
on the entire fee so negotiated. Because of the negotiation, the fee loses its identity as a gratuity and becomes a
service charge and part of the purchase price of the meal. See Subsection 043.04 of this rule.
(7-1-93)
05.
Service Charges. Amounts designated as service charges, added to the price of meals or drinks, are
a part of the selling price of the meals or drinks and accordingly, must be included in the purchase price subject to tax,
even though such service charges are made in lieu of tips and paid over by the retailer to his employees.
(7-1-93)
044.
TRADE-INS, TRADE-DOWNS AND BARTER (RULE 044).
01.
Trade-Ins. A trade-in is the amount allowed by a retailer on merchandise accepted as payment for
other merchandise. Merchandise is tangible personal property which is, or becomes, part of an inventory held for
resale.
(7-1-93)
02.
Trade-In Allowance. When a retailer sells merchandise from his resale inventory and lets the
customer trade in other goods which the retailer places in his resale inventory, the taxable sales price of the
merchandise may be reduced by the amount allowed as trade-in. Example: A customer buys a car from a dealer for
four thousand dollars ($4,000). A trade-in of one thousand five hundred dollars ($1,500) is allowed for the customer's
used car. Tax is charged on two thousand five hundred dollars ($2,500). To qualify for the trade-in allowance, the
property traded in must be consideration delivered by the buyer to the seller. The sales documents, executed not later
than the time of sale, must identify the tangible personal property being purchased and the trade-in property being
delivered to the seller. The delivery of the trade-in and the purchase must be components of a single transaction.
(5-8-09)
03.
Disallowed Trade-In Deductions. Trade-in deductions are not allowed on transactions between
individuals because the trade-in property does not become a part of an inventory held for resale.
(3-30-01)
a.
Example: Two (2) individuals exchange cars of equal value. No money, property, service, or
consideration other than the cars are exchanged. Both parties must pay tax on the fair market value of the vehicle
received in the barter.
(7-1-93)
b.
Example: Two (2) individuals, neither of whom are car dealers, exchange cars of different values.
Tom’s vehicle, which is worth ten thousand dollars ($10,000), is transferred to Bill. Bill’s car, which is worth eight
thousand dollars ($8,000), is transferred to Tom. Bill pays Tom two thousand dollars ($2,000). The trade-in allowance
is not applicable because neither car is merchandise. Tom pays use tax on eight thousand dollars ($8,000); Bill pays
use tax on ten thousand dollars ($10,000).
(7-1-93)
04.
Insurance Settlements. An insurance settlement does not qualify as a trade-in. Example: Tom is
involved in a car accident. His insurance company determines the damage exceeds the value of the car and settles
with Tom on that basis. If Tom buys another car, he must pay sales tax on the entire sales price of the replacement car.
(3-30-01)
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Idaho Sales & Use Tax Administrative Rules
05.
Core Charges. Parts for cars, trucks, and other types of equipment are often sold with an added
core charge. When the used core is returned, the core charge is refunded. This is essentially a trade-in of a used part
for a new part. Since the seller cannot be certain that the customer will return a reusable core, such core charges are
subject to sales tax. The tax on the core charge will be refunded by the seller at the time credit for the core charge is
allowed.
(7-1-93)
06.
Trade-In for Rental/Lease Property. When tangible personal property is traded in as part
payment for the rental or lease of other tangible personal property, sales tax applies to all payments made after the
value of the trade-in property has been depleted and the lessor actually begins charging for the lease or rental. The
methods of applying the trade-in value to the lease are:
(7-1-93)
a.
The trade-in value may be subtracted from the value of the leased or rented property, thereby
reducing the monthly payments and the sales tax due on those payments.
(7-1-93)
b.
The trade-in value may be subtracted from the initial lease payments, with no sales tax due on those
payments until it is used up.
(7-1-93)
c.
A combination of the two (2) methods, above.
(7-1-93)
d.
Example, a lessor leases a car for thirty-six (36) months at two hundred fifty dollars ($250) per
month. The value on which the lease payments are based is ten thousand dollars ($10,000). The customer trades in a
car worth two thousand dollars ($2,000).
(3-30-01)
i.
Alternative 1: The customer and lessor agree to reduce the value on which the lease is based by two
thousand dollars ($2,000) and reduce the payments to only two hundred dollars ($200) per month for thirty-six (36)
months. Sales tax is due on each two hundred dollar ($200) payment.
(3-30-01)
ii.
Alternative 2: The customer and lessor agree to apply the two thousand dollar ($2,000) trade-in
allowance against the two hundred fifty dollar ($250) per month payments for the first eight (8) months of the lease.
Sales tax is not due until the trade-in value is used up and the lessee is required to begin making monthly payments.
(3-30-01)
iii.
Alternative 3: The customer and lessor agree to combine the two methods and apply one thousand
dollars ($1,000) against the value on which the lease is based and use the remaining one thousand dollars ($1,000)
against the monthly payments, reducing the sales tax liability accordingly.
(3-30-01)
07.
Rental/Lease Property Traded-In. When a person disposes of tangible personal property that is
leased and assigns his right to purchase the leased property to the retailer, no trade-in allowance is given for the
amount of the residual buyout paid by the retailer. However, if the residual buyout amount which the lessee would
pay to purchase the property is less than the amount that would be allowed by the retailer as a trade-in if the lessee
had actually owned the vehicle, then the sales price subject to tax may be reduced by the difference between the total
trade-in amount and residual buyout.
(3-30-01)
a.
Example: A person is the lessee of an automobile. Near the end of the lease term, the lessee enters
into an agreement to purchase a new vehicle from an automobile dealer. The residual buyout amount for the leased
vehicle is ten thousand dollars ($10,000). The retailer would allow nine thousand dollars ($9,000) as a trade-in
amount if the lessee actually owned the vehicle. Since the amount the automobile dealer is willing to allow as a tradein is not greater than the residual buyout amount, there is no reduction in the sales price subject to sales tax.
(3-30-01)
b.
Example: A lessee trades in his leased automobile for a new vehicle. The residual amount is ten
thousand dollars ($10,000). The automobile dealer allows twelve thousand dollars ($12,000) as a trade. In this case,
the sales price of the new vehicle is reduced by the difference between the residual amount and the total trade-in, or
two thousand dollars ($2,000).
(3-30-01)
045.
RESCINDED SALE, REFUNDS OF PURCHASE PRICE (RULE 045).
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IDAPA 35.01.02
Idaho Sales & Use Tax Administrative Rules
01.
A Rescinded Sale. A transaction in which the seller and buyer place each other in the same
positions they were in prior to entering into any sales taxable transaction; and a transaction which meets the rules of
the Uniform Commercial Code for revoking acceptance in whole or in part. See Section 28-2-608, Idaho Code.
(7-1-93)
02.
Refund of Remitted Sales Tax. Where a seller has collected and remitted tax on the sale and has
refunded it to the buyer on rescission, the Commission will refund or credit the seller accordingly. The burden of
proving a recision is on the person claiming the refund or credit on a rescinded sale. See ISTC 117.
(7-1-93)
03.
Amount Refunded Reduced. If the seller reduces the amount refunded to the buyer on returned
merchandise to recover depreciation, buyer usage or other costs, the amount of the reduction is considered a charge
by the seller to the buyer for use of the tangible personal property and is subject to sales tax in the same manner as a
rental. The amount of sales tax refunded to the buyer must be reduced accordingly.
(7-1-93)
04.
Restocking Charge. If a seller places a restocking charge on returned merchandise, the charge is
not taxable. A restocking charge is a fee charged by a seller to cover his time and expense in returning goods to resale
inventory when the buyer has not used the goods in a way that decreases their value.
(7-1-93)
05.
Required to Buy Other Property. If the customer, in order to retain the refund, is required to buy
other property at a higher price, there is no refund and the amount credited on the subsequent purchase is treated as a
trade-in. The seller must charge the customer sales tax on the difference between the amount credited and the sales
price of the other property.
(7-1-93)
06.
Documentation. In order to obtain refund credit, the seller must keep adequate documents to
support his claim for refund or adjustment.
(7-1-93)
046.
PLATING AND REPLATING (RULE 046).
01.
Plating and Replating. Plating and replating operations are considered to be providing repair
services. If the materials such as chrome, gold, or silver can be separately stated on the billing to the customer, a tax
will apply on the sale of the material. If, as in the case of chrome plating of automobile bumpers and accessories, the
vat of material is used and reused, the material would be incidental to the overall charges. The replating company will
pay tax on the materials at time of purchase. See ISTC Rule 062.
(7-1-93)
02.
Exchange Basis. This, however, would not apply where a company operates on an exchange basis,
giving credit for the bumpers or accessories against the price of the reconditioned piece of equipment. This type of
transaction must be handled in the same manner as a trade-in with sales tax charged on the difference. See ISTC Rule
044.
(7-1-93)
03.
full sales price.
047.
Reconditioned Material. Sales of reconditioned or replaced material or parts will be taxable on the
(7-1-93)
OUTFITTERS, GUIDES, AND LIKE OPERATIONS (RULE 047).
01.
In General. Fees charged for services performed by outfitters, guides, dude ranches, hunting and
fishing lodges, or camps are charges for the use of, or privilege of using, tangible personal property or other facilities
for recreation. Fees charged by outfitters and like operations for providing outdoor recreational services are subject to
sales tax.
(7-1-93)
a.
An outfitter is any person who holds himself out to the public for hire to conduct outdoor
recreational activities, including: hunting animals or birds; float or power boating of rivers, lakes, and streams;
fishing; hiking; skiing; hazardous desert or mountain excursions; and other recreational activities.
(7-1-93)
b.
A guide is a person employed by an outfitter to furnish personal services for the conduct of outdoor
recreational activities.
(7-1-93)
02.
Services Performed in More Than One State. When an outfitter’s service to a client takes place
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Idaho Sales & Use Tax Administrative Rules
in more than one (1) state, and the customer receives an invoice from the outfitter that separately displays the Idaho
portion of the charges from those of the other states, only the Idaho portion is subject to Idaho sales tax.
(7-1-93)
a.
When an outfitter’s service to a client takes place in more than one (1) state and the outfitter fails to
separately state the Idaho portion of the charges from those of other states, sales tax must be charged on the total
amount.
(7-1-93)
03.
Government Use Fee. Land and water use fees imposed on outfitters, such as the three percent
(3%) fee paid to the U.S. Forest Service, are not subject to the sales tax when separately stated on the customer’s
invoice.
(6-23-94)
04.
Prepaid Travel Expense. When an outfitter’s invoice separately states prepaid travel expenses
such as lodging, and the outfitter has paid sales tax, when applicable, to vendors providing the travel services, the
outfitter will not be required to tax that portion of his bill to the customer. Example: An outfitter’s bill to a client for a
seven (7) day hunt and prepaid travel expenses should read:
SEVEN-DAY HUNT
FEE
IDAHO SALES TAX
Airline Ticket (New York/Boise)
$500
$0.00 (none)
1 Night Lodging, Motel X Boise
(Outfitter has paid tax to Motel X)
$50
$0.00 (none)
7 Day Hunt
$1,500
$75.00 (on 100%)
(4-11-06)
05.
Lodging. If an outfitter provides overnight lodging for a client at a facility operated by the outfitter,
charges for the lodging are subject to sales tax and hotel/motel taxes as provided by Idaho Hotel/Motel Room Sales
Tax Rule IDAPA 35.01.06.011.
(6-23-94)
06.
Equipment Rental. When an outfitter rents equipment such as ground sheets, sleeping bags, rain
gear, boots and dry bags, to his client for use during the recreational activity, sales tax must be charged on the
equipment rental.
(7-1-93)
07.
Game Processing, Packing, and Taxidermy. When an outfitter bills a client for game processing,
packing, or taxidermy services, sales tax must be charged on the entire fee to the client. The outfitter will provide the
vendor of the services with a properly completed resale certificate.
(7-1-93)
08.
Prepurchased Hunting and Fishing Licenses. When an outfitter purchases a hunting or fishing
license for a client and separately states the fee on the billing to the client, no sales tax applies to the license fee.
(7-1-93)
09.
Travel Agency Services.
(7-1-93)
a.
When outfitter services are purchased by a client through a travel agency and the outfitter bills the
travel agency for the fee, the amount billed to the travel agency is subject to tax. In this case, the agency is acting as
an agent for the client and the additional fee charged by the agency to the client is not subject to the sales tax.
(7-1-93)
b.
When outfitter services are arranged for a client by a travel agency but the outfitter bills the client,
the amount billed to the client is subject to tax. In this case, the agency is acting as the agent of the outfitter and the
fee paid to the travel agency by the outfitter cannot be deducted from the measure of the taxable sale. Even if the
outfitter separately states the travel agency fee on his billing to the client, he must charge tax on the total amount.
(7-1-93)
c.
When an outfitter, Outfitter X, books a client and hires a second outfitter, Outfitter Y, to provide the
services to the client, Outfitter X must charge the client tax on the full fee. Outfitter Y must obtain a resale certificate
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from Outfitter X. If this form is not obtained, Outfitter Y must charge sales tax on the services provided to Outfitter
X.
(7-1-93)
10.
Purchases by Outfitters and Like Operations.
(7-1-93)
a.
Outfitters must pay tax when purchasing equipment and supplies for use in their business.
Examples include boats, rafts, oars, motors, horses, tack, llamas, transportation equipment, camp gear, cooking gear,
animal feed, brochures, and promotional give-away items.
(7-1-93)
b.
When an outfitter maintains an inventory of gear, such as ground sheets, sleeping bags, boots, rain
gear, and dry bags, which is exclusively held for rental to clients, the outfitter may purchase the gear without tax in
the manner previously described. The outfitter may purchase gear without paying tax only if the gear is rented to
clients as a separate line item on the invoice to the client and sales tax is charged to the client. If gear is provided to
clients as a part of the outfitter package fee, the outfitter must pay tax when purchasing the gear.
(3-20-04)
c.
When an outfitter arranges travel accommodations for his client and pays the vendors of lodging,
and restaurant or catered meals, he must pay sales tax, as well as other applicable hotel/motel taxes, to the vendors.
When an outfitter purchases food that he will prepare and furnish to clients, no sales tax applies if the outfitter
provides a resale certificate. The outfitter must then collect a tax from his client on the sale of the furnished food.
Alternatively, an outfitter may buy food and pay tax on the purchase. Under this alternative, the outfitter will include
the cost of the food in his nontaxable charges to his client.
(4-11-06)
d.
When an outfitter purchases the services of a taxidermist or meat processor on behalf of his client,
he should not pay tax to the vendor by providing the vendor with a properly completed resale certificate. The outfitter
must charge tax to his client on this fee.
(7-1-93)
11.
Federal Preemption. The National Maritime Transportation Security Act of 2002, enacted
November 25, 2002, prohibits the states from imposing tax on any vessel or other water craft, or its passengers or
crew if the vessel or water craft is operating on any navigable waters. The Tax Commission interprets this statute to
mean that states are prohibited from taxing sales of rafting and jet boating trips if they occur on navigable waters. See
33 U.S.C. Section 5. If Congress repeals the preemption sales of rafting trips will become taxable on the effective
date of the repeal. This interpretation is subject to judicial review and could change, depending on rulings from state
or federal courts.
(4-11-06)
048.
MANUFACTURED HOMES (MOBILE HOMES) AND MODULAR BUILDINGS (RULE 048).
01.
New Manufactured Home. When a manufactured home is sold at retail for the first time, it is
subject to sales tax on fifty-five percent (55%) of the purchase price. The purchase price of a new manufactured home
shall include all component parts. Set up and transportation fees charged by the dealer shall be included in the
purchase price. No trade-in allowance is permitted.
(7-1-93)
02.
Modular Building. When a modular building is sold at retail, it is subject to sales tax on fifty-five
percent (55%) of the purchase price including all component parts. No trade-in allowance is permitted.
(5-3-03)
03.
Used Manufactured Home. Only the sale of a new manufactured home is subject to sales tax.
After the first sale at retail of a manufactured home, any subsequent retail sale of the unit shall be a sale of a used
manufactured home. The sale of a used manufactured home is exempt from tax, whether or not the original retail sale
was subject to sales taxes and without regard to whether the sale is made for use within or without Idaho or whether
sold by a dealer. A dealer who sells both new and used manufactured homes must maintain adequate records to
establish which sales are taxable and which are exempt for sales tax audit purposes.
(5-3-03)
04.
Sale of Office Trailer. An office trailer does not qualify as a manufactured home, because it is not
designed for use as a dwelling, nor does it qualify as a modular building, because it is not designed to be affixed to
real property. When an office trailer is sold at retail, it is subject to sales tax on one hundred percent (100%) of the
purchase price, including all furniture, fixtures, and appliances, whether the office trailer is new or used.
(7-1-93)
05.
Component Parts. Component parts include items incorporated by the manufacturer which remain
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unchanged at the time of the original retail sale, such as sinks, cabinetry, closet doors, central heating and cooling,
garbage disposals, water heaters, and carpeting. Refrigerators, ranges, draperies, and wood burning stoves placed in
the unit by the manufacturer are considered to be component parts.
(7-1-93)
06.
Noncomponent Parts. All fixtures, furniture, furnishings, appliances, and attachments not
incorporated as a component part of a new modular building or manufactured home shall be subject to tax separately
and distinctly from the sales price of such modular building or manufactured home. Such items shall be separately
stated on the sales invoice and tax shall be assessed on the separately stated items on their full retail value. (7-1-93)
07.
Repairs. Repairs to or renovations of used modular buildings or manufactured homes are repairs to
real property, whether or not the unit is affixed to real property and whether or not the unit is held for resale. Materials
used to repair or renovate a used modular building or manufactured home shall be subject to sales tax at the time of
purchase or use tax at the time of use.
(7-1-93)
049.
WARRANTIES AND SERVICE AGREEMENTS (RULE 049).
01.
Warranties and Service Agreements. Warranties or service agreements may be furnished by the
manufacturer or seller upon the sale, lease, or rental of tangible personal property by any of the following means:
(7-1-93)
a.
Including the price of the warranty or service agreement as part of the sales, lease, or rental price of
the tangible personal property.
(7-1-93)
b.
Separately stating the price of the warranty or service agreement, but requiring the purchase of the
warranty or service agreement as a condition of the sale, lease, or rental of tangible personal property.
(7-1-93)
c.
Allowing the purchaser the option of purchasing a separately stated warranty or service agreement.
(7-1-93)
02.
Separate Optional Contract. Service agreements may also be offered as a separate optional
contract on tangible personal property not owned or sold by the seller of the service agreement.
(7-1-93)
03.
Services Agreed to be Rendered. Services agreed to be rendered as a condition of a warranty or
service agreement may be performed by the seller of the warranty or service agreement or by any dealer or repair
facility that the seller may appoint to perform the repair or service.
(7-1-93)
04.
Non-Optional Warranty or Service Agreement. If the warranty or service agreement is required
as a condition of the sale, lease, or rental of tangible personal property, the gross sales price is subject to the sales tax
whether or not the charge for the warranty or service agreement is separately stated from the sales price of the
tangible personal property.
(7-1-93)
a.
When parts are replaced by the seller of the warranty or service agreement, no tax is imposed on the
purchase of the parts by the seller. The parts replaced are considered to have been taxed at the time the warranty or
service agreement was sold.
(7-1-93)
b.
When a third-party dealer or repair facility performs the repair, the seller of the warranty or service
agreement may provide the repairer with a resale certificate. See Rule 128 of these rules.
(3-15-02)
05.
Optional Warranty or Service Agreement. If the warranty or service agreement is optional to the
purchaser, no sales tax shall be charged on the sale of the warranty or service agreement. A taxable transaction does
occur with regard to the seller of the warranty or service agreement upon performance of the repair.
(7-1-93)
a.
If the seller of the warranty or service agreement performs the repair and purchases parts for the
repair or uses parts from his inventory, he will pay sales or use tax upon the parts when they are applied by him.
(7-1-93)
b.
When a third-party dealer or repair facility performs the repair and bills the seller of the warranty or
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service agreement, the third-party dealer or repair facility will separately state and charge sales tax on the parts to the
seller of the warranty or service agreement.
(7-1-93)
c.
The seller of the warranty or service agreement will pay sales or use tax on parts for the repairs,
whether or not the purchaser qualifies for any exemption under the Idaho Sales and Use Tax Act or rules. (7-1-93)
06.
Parts in Addition to Warranty Fee. Regardless of any of the above, if the seller of the warranty or
service agreement bills the purchaser for parts over and above the agreed upon warranty or service agreement fee,
sales tax shall be charged to the purchaser on the sales price of the parts.
(7-1-93)
07.
Replacement Parts and Maintenance Supplies. As used in this rule, a warranty or service
agreement applies to replacement parts and maintenance supplies that become a part of the tangible personal property
that is being serviced. The sale of other tangible personal property, such as paper for a copy machine, must be
separately stated from any warranty or service agreement fee and sales tax charged to the purchaser.
(7-1-93)
050.
VETERINARIANS AND VETERINARY SUPPLIES (RULE 050).
01.
In General. Fees charged by a veterinarian for professional services are not subject to sales or use
taxes. Tangible personal property used or consumed by a veterinarian or sold by a veterinarian are taxable in
accordance with the provisions of this rule.
(7-1-93)
02.
Drugs and Other Supplies. Drugs and other supplies used by a veterinarian while treating animal
patients are tangible personal property consumed by the veterinarian in the course of providing services. If the
veterinarian has not paid sales tax on his purchase of the drugs or supplies, a use tax is payable by the veterinarian.
(7-1-93)
03.
Services Provided to Exempt Customers. The veterinarian is taxable even though he may be
providing services to a cattle rancher, dairyman or other producer because the drugs are consumed by the veterinarian
and not by the producer. Since the production exemption is available only to persons engaged in a production
business, the veterinarian does not benefit from the exemption.
(7-1-93)
04.
Retail Sales of Drugs and Supplies. The sale of drugs and veterinary supplies by a veterinarian is
a retail sale. Veterinarians making such sales must obtain a seller’s permit and must charge and remit the sales tax on
such sales. However, the sale of drugs and veterinary supplies, except hand tools with a unit price of less than one
hundred dollars ($100), to a cattle rancher, dairyman or other person operating for gain or profit a stock, dairy,
poultry, fish, fur or other ranch is exempt if documented by an exemption certificate as provided in Rule 128.
(3-15-02)
05.
Equipment and Supplies. Tangible personal property purchased or acquired by the veterinarian
for the operation of his business including professional instruments and supplies, and office furnishings and
equipment are taxable.
(7-1-93)
051.
DISCOUNTS, COUPONS, REBATES, AND GIFT CERTIFICATES (RULE 051).
01.
following:
Adjustments That Apply After Tax Calculation. Tax must be charged before deducting the
(2-18-02)
a.
Cash discounts. Sales tax must be computed on the full amount of the purchase price before the
cash discount is subtracted. When an invoice or other billing document states that a discount will be allowed if
payment is made before a certain date, then the discount is presumed to be a cash discount. Discounts allowed on
payments received after the stated date are presumed to be cash discounts unless proven to the contrary by clear and
convincing evidence.
(7-1-93)
b.
Manufacturer’s rebates. Except as provided by Subsection 051.02 of this rule, sales tax must be
computed on the full amount of the purchase price without regard to the manufacturer’s rebate. Any rebate received
by the purchaser from the manufacturer, distributor, or any person other than the retailer will not reduce the retail
sales price subject to tax. Rebates paid by a retailer to the consumer will also be included in the price subject to sales
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tax if the retailer has been reimbursed by a third party, such as the manufacturer.
(2-18-02)
c.
Manufacturer’s discount coupons. Sales tax must be computed on the full amount of the purchase
price before subtracting the coupon amount. This includes coupons issued by a manufacturer allowing the purchaser
to buy one item and get a second item free if the retailer will be reimbursed by the manufacturer.
(7-1-98)
d.
Food Stamps and WIC. Purchases of food with coupons issued under the Federal Food Stamp
Program or food checks issued by the Federal Special Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants, and Children,
(WIC), are exempt from sales or use tax. When a purchaser uses manufacturer’s discount coupons along with food
stamps or WIC checks to purchase food items that qualify under these programs, the discount value of the coupon is
subject to sales tax. For example, a food stamp recipient purchases fifteen dollars ($15) worth of eligible food,
surrenders manufacturer’s discount coupons valued at two dollars ($2), and pays with thirteen dollars ($13) in food
stamps. Sales tax is due on the two dollar ($2) discounted amount. The purchaser may not use food stamps or WIC
checks to pay sales tax due.
(7-1-98)
02.
following:
Adjustments That Apply Before Tax Calculation. Tax is charged after the deduction of the
(2-18-02)
a.
Trade discounts. A trade discount is a reduction from the posted or listed price offered by a retailer
which is not an inducement for prompt payment and which, when applied to the posted or listed price, establishes the
true selling price to be paid by the purchaser.
(7-1-93)
b.
Retailer’s rebates. A retailer’s rebate is an amount of money or property paid by a retailer to a
purchaser which is conditioned upon the recipient making a purchase from the retailer. However, if a retailer is
reimbursed by a manufacturer or other third party, the transaction is not a retailer's rebate and the rebate amount is
included in the sales price subject to sales tax. This would be the case when a purchaser sends the rebate claim to the
retailer, the retailer sends the rebate amount to the purchaser and the manufacturer reimburses the retailer. (2-18-02)
c.
Retailer discount coupons. Retailer discount coupons are coupons issued by a retailer which entitle
the holder to purchase the issuing retailer’s products at less than the posted or listed retail price.
(7-1-93)
d.
Manufacturer’s motor vehicle rebates. Effective July 1, 1990, a manufacturer’s rebate offered to a
purchaser of a motor vehicle may be deducted from the purchase price of the vehicle before computing the tax IF the
rebate is used to reduce the retail sales price of the vehicle, or is used as a down payment on the purchase. The
dealer’s customer invoice must show the manufacturer rebate as a deduction to, or down payment on, the purchase
price of the vehicle. Only manufacturer rebates offered on motor vehicles qualify for the exclusion from tax.
Manufacturer rebates offered on trailers, off-highway equipment, and other property will be treated as discussed in
Subsection 051.01.b. of this rule.
(7-1-96)
03.
Coupon Books.
(3-30-07)
a.
The sale of a coupon book that contains coupons offering discounts is deemed to be the sale of an
intangible and is therefore not taxable.
(3-30-07)
b.
When the purchaser of a coupon book redeems one (1) of the coupons, the discount allowed by the
coupon is not included in the purchase price subject to tax if the retailer is not reimbursed by a manufacturer or other
third party.
(3-30-07)
04.
Donated Goods. The donor is the consumer of donated goods and must pay sales or use tax on the
purchase price of the goods.
(7-1-98)
05.
Gift Certificates. A gift certificate purchased from a vendor entitles a recipient to tangible personal
property or services when presented to the vendor. The purchase of a gift certificate is not a taxable transaction. When
the gift certificate is presented for redemption a sale is consummated. If the sale is a transfer of tangible personal
property, the vendor must collect sales tax at the time of sale. Tax applies to the purchase price of the tangible
personal property, irrespective of any cash refunded on any difference between the face value of the gift certificate
and the purchase price. If the sale is for services not subject to tax under the Sales Tax Act, the vendor will not collect
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sales tax.
(7-1-93)
06.
Buy One Get One Free Discounts. If a retailer offers a “buy one get one free” discount in which
the buyer purchases an item and receives another item of the same kind at no additional charge, the price subject to
tax is the actual price paid after the discount is taken. Use tax is not applicable to the item sold at no charge; however,
if a manufacturer’s discount allows the purchaser to receive a free item for which the retailer will be reimbursed by
the manufacturer the price subject to tax is the full amount before the discount is calculated.
(3-30-07)
07.
Complimentary Gift With Purchase of an Item.
(3-30-07)
a.
If a retailer offers a complimentary item to a customer at the time of, and in connection with, the
sale of tangible personal property, the gift is considered a part of the sale. The item given away is deemed to be
purchased for resale by the retailer; however, if the sale is of an item exempt from tax and the sale of the gift item
would have been taxable, the retailer is responsible for use tax on the gift. This subsection applies only to sales of
tangible personal property.
(3-30-07)
i.
Example: A retailer advertises that every purchaser of a refrigerator will receive a bike at no
additional charge. Since both the bike and the refrigerator were purchased for resale, the retailer would not owe tax
when it purchases either. When it sells the bike together with the refrigerator, the amount subject to sales tax is the
sales price of the refrigerator.
(3-30-07)
ii.
Example: A retailer offers to give a free coffee mug to anyone who purchases fifteen (15) gallons of
gas. Since the sale of the gasoline is exempt pursuant to Section 63-3622C, Idaho Code the retailer would not charge
any tax to the purchaser. The retailer must pay use tax on its purchase price of the coffee mug.
(3-30-07)
b.
If a retailer offers to give away a promotional item to anyone with no purchase required, then the
retailer did not purchase the promotional item for resale. The retailer must pay sales or use tax on its purchase price of
the promotional items given away.
(3-30-07)
c.
This rule applies only to items given away by sellers of tangible personal property. See Rule 028 of
these rules for items given away by hotels and motels. See Rule 041 of these rules for items given away by
restaurants.
(3-30-07)
052.
052).
SALE OF TANGIBLE PERSONAL PROPERTY RELATING TO FUNERAL SERVICES (RULE
01.
In General. The sale of tangible personal property relating to funeral services by a licensed funeral
establishment is exempt from tax.
(7-1-99)
02.
Sales by Licensed Funeral Directors. The exemption applies only when, at the time of sale, the
seller is a person holding a valid funeral director’s license issued pursuant to the authority of Title 54, Chapter 11,
Idaho Code. A sale made by any seller not so licensed is not exempt under this provision. For example, a casket sold
by a licensed funeral director as part of a funeral service is exempt. The funeral director’s purchase of the casket is a
purchase for resale and, therefore, excluded from the tax. The purchase of a memorial marker is not an integral part of
the funeral service. Accordingly, it is not included within the exemption for tangible personal property related to a
funeral service. The purchase of a memorial marker, therefore, is a taxable transaction regardless of whether it is sold
by a licensed funeral director or by another. Sales of tombstones and grave markers, which are embedded in the sod or
set on foundations, are subject to tax. The retail selling price includes the charge for cutting, shaping, polishing and
lettering.
(7-1-93)
03.
Purchases by Licensed Funeral Directors. The exemption does not include the sales to and
purchases by funeral directors of equipment and supplies used and consumed by funeral directors in the course of
providing funeral services. The funeral director’s purchase of equipment and supplies used for embalming and
preparing bodies for burial and all other tangible personal property used or consumed by the funeral director in the
course of his business operations to which title does not pass from the funeral director is taxable.
(7-1-99)
04.
Caskets, Vaults, and Burial Receptacles. Caskets, vaults and burial receptacles are exempt when
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sold by a licensed funeral director as a part of funeral services, even though they may be improvements to real
property. The funeral director is not a person engaged in improving real property within the meaning of Section 633609(a), Idaho Code; and, therefore, his purchase of these items is not subject to tax. However, the construction of a
building for use as a mausoleum is an improvement to real property and the sale or use of the materials for the
construction of the mausoleum creates a taxable incident and shall be generally taxed in the same manner as other
persons improving real property. See Rule 012 of these rules.
(7-1-99)
05.
Use Tax. When licensed funeral directors purchase equipment and supplies from suppliers who do
not collect and remit Idaho sales tax, the funeral directors will be required to report and remit use tax on their taxable
purchases.
(7-1-93)
06.
Documenting Purchases for Resale. Funeral directors purchasing tangible personal property for
resale will be required to document the purchase for resale by providing their seller with a resale certificate. See Rule
128 of these rules. The purchase by the funeral director of such items as caskets and special clothing is a purchase for
resale, even though the sale of the same property by the funeral director is exempt.
(3-15-02)
07.
Seller's Permit Required. A funeral director must apply for and maintain a valid seller’s permit.
The seller’s permit number and sales tax returns shall be used to report use tax on those items which are subject to use
tax. The funeral director should also report sales tax on the isolated retail sales of tangible personal property which
may be made but which are not related to the providing of any funeral service.
(7-1-93)
053.
FEES CHARGED FOR FAX SERVICES (RULE 053).
01.
sales tax.
Sending a Fax. A fee charged for sending a fax is a fee for a service and is, therefore, not subject to
(7-1-93)
02.
Receiving a Fax. A fee charged by a print shop, hotel, or other retailer to a person receiving a fax is
similar to a fee charged for a photocopy and is a taxable sale of tangible personal property.
(7-1-93)
054.
PERSONS ENGAGED IN PRINTING (RULE 054).
01.
Private Printing Plants. Persons operating private printing plants in conjunction with their
principal business must pay sales or use tax on the purchase of equipment and supplies used to produce display signs,
advertising brochures, and other materials for their own consumption.
(7-1-97)
02.
Printing upon Special Order. Persons primarily engaged in the printing of tangible personal
property upon special order for a consideration may purchase equipment and supplies directly used to produce such
property exempt from sales or use tax.
(7-1-93)
a.
The sale of typography, art work, photoengraving, electros, mats, stereotypes, hand or machine
composition, lithographic plates or negatives, electrotypes, etc., to a person primarily engaged in the printing of
tangible personal property for a consideration, and to be used directly by such person shall be deemed essentially
sales of service or exempt materials and not taxable.
(7-1-93)
b.
When purchasing goods exempt from tax, the printer must provide the seller with a properly
completed exemption certificate. See Rule 128 of these rules.
(3-15-02)
03.
Sales by Persons Engaged in Printing. Fees charged to ultimate consumers for printing of
tangible personal property upon special order are taxable.
(7-1-97)
a.
Printing of tangible personal property shall include imprinting and all processes or operations
connected with the preparation of paper or paperlike substances, the reproduction thereon of characters or designs
and the alteration or modification of such substances by finishing and binding.
(7-1-93)
b.
Upon such final sales, charges for materials, labor and production of fabrication or typography,
author’s alterations, art work, photoengravings, electros, mats, stereotypes, hand or machine composition,
lithographic plates or negatives, electrotypes, etc., and binding and finishing services shall be included in the selling
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price and the tax shall be computed upon such selling price whether the various charges are separately stated or not.
(7-1-93)
c.
The following charges, if separately stated, shall not be included in the selling price: charges for
furnishing government postage as part of the printed item, and charges for addressing, stamping, sealing, inserting or
wrapping in connection with the operation of a direct mail advertising in which items of tangible personal property
and service are supplied.
(7-1-93)
04.
Advertising Inserts. As used in this rule, advertising inserts means printed advertising distributed
concurrently with, but printed separately from, a newspaper, magazine, or other publication.
(7-1-93)
a.
The sale of advertising inserts by a printer or other supplier to an advertiser for use by the advertiser
in the promotion of its business or products, and not for resale by the advertiser, is a retail sale of tangible personal
property subject to sales tax. If, for any reason, the seller of the advertising inserts fails to collect sales tax on the sale
of the advertising inserts to the advertiser, the advertiser is subject to use tax on its use of advertising inserts in Idaho.
(7-1-93)
b.
When an advertiser contracts for the distribution of advertising inserts to locations within this state,
a taxable use by the advertiser occurs. The contracted distribution constitutes an exercise of right or power over the
advertising inserts by the advertiser. The person performing the distribution services may be a publisher, printer,
distributor of a newspaper, magazines, or other publication, or any other person performing distribution services.
(7-1-93)
c.
A contract between an advertiser and a publisher of a newspaper, magazine, or other publication,
whereby the publisher sells advertising space in its publication is not a sale subject to sales or use tax.
(7-1-93)
05.
Labels and Other Printed Matter Sold to Manufacturers. Sales of labels or name plates, and the
printing thereon, to manufacturers, producers, or wholesale merchants where the purpose of the purchaser is to affix
the label or name plate to his own product, or the container thereof will not be taxable.
(7-1-93)
a.
Sale of package inserts, individual folding boxes and setup boxes, and the printing thereon to
manufacturers, or producers, to accompany their own manufactured products, and to pass to the ultimate consumer
upon final sales of the manufactured product contained or described therein, shall be deemed made for the purpose of
resale.
(7-1-93)
b.
Sale of direction sheets, instruction books, or manuals to a manufacturer, producer, wholesale or
retail merchant, to be supplied with his product at no separate charge, are not taxable. If a separate charge is made for
such sheets, books, manuals, or pamphlets, the manufacturer, etc., shall collect the tax from the consumer. (7-1-93)
055.
PERSONS ENGAGED IN ADVERTISING (RULE 055).
01.
In General. Advertising agencies, television stations, radio stations, graphic artists, and other
persons engaged in advertising may be engaged in either the rendering of professional services or the sale of tangible
personal property or both. When such persons are engaged in the sale of tangible personal property, they are retailers
and must collect and remit sales tax on the property sold. When such persons are engaged in the rendering of
professional services, no sales tax applies to the service. Whether the sale is a sale of professional services or of
tangible personal property is determined by the object of the transaction, i.e., is the object sought by the buyer the
service per se or the tangible personal property produced by the service. Determining whether the sale is a sale of
professional services or of tangible personal property is a question of fact which must be determined in view of all the
facts and circumstances of each transaction.
(7-1-93)
02.
Advertising Agency as Agent of Client or as Non-Agent. An agent is one who represents
another, called the principal, in dealings with third persons. Advertising agencies may act as agents on behalf of their
clients in dealing with third persons or they may act on their own behalf. To the extent advertising agencies act as
agents of their clients in acquiring tangible personal property, they are neither purchasers of the property with respect
to the supplier nor sellers of the property with respect to their principals. To the extent advertising agencies act on
their own behalf in acquiring tangible personal property they are purchasers of the property with respect to the
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supplier. Generally, they are sellers of any of the property so acquired which they deliver to, or cause to be delivered
to, their clients or to third parties for the benefit of their client. They are also sellers of any of the property which they
retain but title to which they transfer to their client.
(7-1-93)
a.
Items acquired from outside sources. All acquisitions by advertising agencies of tangible personal
property are purchases by the agencies on their own behalf for resale or use unless the agency clearly establishes with
respect to any acquisition that is acting as agent for its client.
(7-1-93)
b.
To establish that a particular acquisition was made as agent for its client the agency must clearly
disclose to the supplier the name of the client for whom the agency is acting as agent; the agency must obtain, prior to
the acquisition, and retain written evidence of agent status with the clients; and the agency must clearly state on the
billing to its client that it is acting as agent for its client and that tax has been paid to the supplier or use tax has been
accrued by the agency on behalf of the client. The agency fee billed to the client, whether or not separately stated, is
not subject to the tax. The agency, in its records, must retain evidence of the payment of the tax. The agency may
make no use of the property for its own account, such as charging the item to the account of more than one client. An
advertising agency purchasing tangible personal property as an agent on behalf of its client may not issue a resale
certificate, as provided by Rule 128 of these rules, to the supplier. It will be presumed that an advertising agency who
issues a resale certificate to its supplier is purchasing the tangible personal property on its own behalf for resale and is
not acting as an agent for its client.
(3-15-02)
03.
Items Prepared by Agency. Advertising agencies are sellers of all items of tangible personal
property produced, printed, or fabricated by their own employees. Advertising agencies are not agents of their clients
with respect to the acquisition of materials incorporated into items of tangible personal property prepared by their
employees.
(7-1-93)
04.
Media Advertising and Advertisements. Media advertising is the use of mass media as a means
by which to reach a wide audience, viewers, listeners, or readers, with an advertisement to promote a product, service,
issue, or personality. Mass media is defined as radio, television, cable television, newspapers, periodicals, trade
journals, or other such media which is capable of reaching a mass audience with an identical message. The object
sought by the buyer purchasing media advertising is the intangible professional service of the seller. The sale of
media advertising is a sale of professional service and is a nontaxable transaction. The transfer of tangible personal
property is inconsequential to the services rendered.
(7-1-93)
a.
Radio and television advertisement. Sales tax does not apply to the amount charged to produce or
create advertisements which are to be broadcast by a radio or television station. It makes no difference whether the
producer or creator sends the advertisement directly to the broadcast facility or to the advertiser, who in turn
distributes the commercial to a broadcast facility.
(7-1-93)
b.
Radio and television dubs. Charges for dubs which are produced from a master copy of a radio or
television commercial or broadcast are not subject to sales tax so long as they are for distribution to other
broadcasting facilities. Sales tax will apply to the sale of radio or television commercial or broadcast dubs which are
not for distribution to a broadcast facility and are sold to a customer for another use. The measure of the tax will be
the total price charged for the copies.
(7-1-93)
c.
Magazine, newspaper, and periodical advertisements. Sales tax does not apply to the amount
charged to a customer to produce camera ready artwork, veloxs, and other forms of artwork which are to be
reproduced in and distributed as part of a mass media publication. Examples of such media publications are
magazines, newspapers, trade journals, and periodicals.
(7-1-93)
d.
Print media advertisement copies. Sales tax will apply to charges for reprints of a print media
advertisement sold to a customer. The measure of the tax will be the price charged for the reprints.
(7-1-93)
05.
Sales of Non-Media Advertising. Non-media advertising is any form of advertising which does
not use the mass media in reaching the targeted audience. Examples of such advertising are posters, brochures,
pamphlets, handbills, displays, business forms, stationery, business cards, key chains, cups and glasses, pens, pencils,
t-shirts, and other similar items. The object sought by the buyer is the tangible personal property. If the advertising
agency is the agent of its client, the sale is between the supplier of the tangible personal property and the client and is
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subject to tax based on the price charged by the supplier to the client. If the advertising agency is NOT the agent of its
client, then the purchase from the supplier is for resale. The sale from the agency to its client is a retail sale and is
subject to tax based upon the entire amount charged to the customer by the advertising agency, including separately
stated fees for:
(7-1-93)
a.
Artwork produced by the advertising agency, including all materials, design fees, and labor to
develop and produce the artwork, lettering, and designs used in the finished non-media advertising.
(7-1-93)
b.
Artwork, lettering, and designs purchased from a graphic artist.
(7-1-93)
c.
Photographs, negatives, and other similar items whether purchased from a commercial
photographer or produced in-house by the advertising agency.
(7-1-93)
d.
Professional modeling fees.
(7-1-93)
e.
Printing charges, whether printed by the advertising agency or a commercial printer, including any
markup or service charge.
(7-1-93)
f.
All other charges to the customer for services agreed to be rendered by the advertising agency as
part of the sale of non-media advertising.
(7-1-93)
06.
Sale of Custom Made Audio-Visual Films and Audio Recordings. A custom made audio-visual
film or audio recording is a film or recording whose intended purpose is not for media advertising. Examples of
custom audio recordings include those to be used with a slide show presentation, designed to be played alone for
information purposes or in-store advertising, or other similar purposes. Examples of custom films are safety films,
training films, filmed newsletters, in-store audio-visual advertising, and other audio-visual films not sold for media
advertising.
(7-1-93)
a.
The object of the purchaser is to obtain the tangible personal property. The fact that the charge for
the tangible personal property, the film or recording, is principally derived from labor or creativity of the maker of the
property does not transform the sale of the tangible personal property into a sale of services.
(7-1-93)
b.
If the advertising agency is the agent of its client, the sale is between the supplier of the tangible
personal property and the client and is subject to tax based on the price charged by the supplier to the client. If the
advertising agency is NOT the agent of its client, then the purchase from the supplier is for resale. The sale from the
agency to its client is a retail sale and is subject to tax based upon all charges for copy writing, directing, producing,
photographing, acting, vocal artists, recording, editing, mixing, and other similar charges to produce a finished film
or audio recording.
(7-1-93)
07.
Sales of Design Services. Determining whether design fees are subject to the sales tax will depend
on the object of the transaction. A fee charged to a customer for creation and design of a logo, product or business
trademark, letterhead, or similar item which does not involve the transfer of tangible personal property beyond that
which is required to convey the design to the customer, is a sale of services not subject to the sales tax. When design
fees are services agreed to be rendered as a part of the sale of tangible personal property, sales tax will apply to the
design fee. Tax does not apply to such fees when an agency acts as an agent. See Subsection 055.07.e. of this rule.
(3-15-02)
a.
Example 1: A graphic artist is commissioned to design a business logo for a client. The artist
completes the design and delivers it to the client. The transaction is a service transaction. The transfer of the tangible
personal property is inconsequential to the services rendered. No sales tax is due on the transaction.
(7-1-93)
b.
NOTE: Subsections 055.07.b. through 055.07.d. of this rule assume no agent relationship. Example
2: An advertising agency is commissioned by a client to design a trademark for its business and provide stationery
with the trademark printed on it. On the charges billed to the client, the design fee is separately stated from the
charges for printing the stationery and the paper stock. The advertising agency must charge sales tax on the entire
amount charged. The object of the transaction is to obtain tangible personal property, the stationery. The services
agreed to be rendered, the design, are inconsequential to the transaction.
(3-15-02)
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c.
Example 3: An advertising agency is commissioned by a client to design a logo for its business and
provide stationery printed with the logo. The advertising agency commissions a graphic artist to design the logo. The
sale of the design by the graphic artist to the advertising agency is a sale of services not subject to the sales tax. The
object sought by the advertising agency is the services of the graphic artist. The advertising agency then prints the
stationery and bills the client. As the object sought by the client is tangible personal property, the stationery, the
advertising agency must charge the client sales tax on the entire fee billed, including the design fee.
(7-1-93)
d.
Example 4: An agency is commissioned to design, produce, and provide one thousand (1,000)
copies of a corporation’s annual report. As the object sought by the client is the tangible personal property, annual
reports, the entire fee to the client will be subject to the sales tax.
(7-1-93)
e.
NOTE: This subsection assumes an agent relationship. Example 5: An advertising agency is
commissioned to design an annual report. As agent for its client, the agency orders one thousand (1,000) copies from
a printer. The charge for the design is a nontaxable service. The charge for the printed reports is taxable.
(7-1-93)
08.
Purchases by Radio and Television Broadcasters. Section 63-3622S, Idaho Code, provides an
exemption from tax for purchases of tangible personal property directly used and consumed in the production and
broadcasting of radio and television programs by businesses primarily devoted to such production and broadcasting.
(7-1-93)
a.
When broadcasters purchase tangible personal property to be directly used and consumed in the
production of television or radio advertising, no sales tax applies if they give their vendors a properly executed
exemption certificate. See Rule 128 of these rules.
(3-15-02)
b.
When a radio or television broadcaster produces custom films or audio recordings that will not be
broadcast, the exemption provided by Section 63-3622S, Idaho Code, does not apply. Purchases of tangible personal
property will be taxed as provided by Subsection 055.06.b. of this rule.
(3-15-02)
09.
Purchases by Advertising Agencies, Graphic Artists, and Similar Operations. Persons engaged
in advertising and graphic artists may provide both nontaxable services and taxable sales of tangible personal
property.
(7-1-93)
a.
When providing nontaxable services, including producing media advertising and providing design
services which do not involve the sale of tangible personal property, the agency/artist must pay tax on purchases of:
Art supplies, such as poster board, paper products, inks, letters, and paints; amount charged by others to produce
veloxs, negatives, lithographic plates, electrotype, and other such items; photographic work; prerecorded music and
sounds; and props, costumes, and backdrops.
(7-1-93)
b.
When engaged in the retail sale of tangible personal property, such as the sale of non-media
advertising items, custom films, custom audio recordings, or printed goods, the producer/agency/artist, when
purchasing tangible personal property to be incorporated into the product for resale, may provide vendors with a
properly executed resale certificate. See Rule 128 of these rules. Items considered to be directly incorporated into the
product for resale include purchases of: Art supplies such as poster board, paper products, inks, letters, and paints;
amounts charged by others to produce veloxs, negatives, lithographic plates, electrotype, and other such items;
photographic works; prerecorded sounds and music; and printing charges.
(3-15-02)
c.
Purchases from photographers. The sale of photographic prints, photostats, negatives, film, and
other articles of tangible personal property are retail sales subject to sales tax. See Rule 056 of these rules.
Photographs, film, negatives, photostats, and other tangible personal property purchased by an advertising agency
which are to be incorporated into media advertising are subject to sales tax. The total selling price on which sales tax
will be charged is the amount charged by the photographer for shooting, developing, processing, and printing the
photograph, film, negative, etc. Separately stated charges for travel expenses incurred by the photographer while
under contract to an advertising agency for such items as travel, food, and lodging which are reimbursed by the
advertising agency are not subject to sales tax. Photographs, film, negatives, photostats, and other tangible personal
property purchased for resale, see, Subsection 055.09.b. of this rule.
(3-15-02)
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d.
Rental of recording or production studios and equipment. Sales tax will apply to the rental of a
recording studio, audio-visual production studio, recording equipment, and audio-visual production equipment, when
the owner of the equipment does not furnish the personnel to operate the equipment and relinquishes total operational
control of the equipment. A taxable rental also occurs if the studio personnel merely render incidental services such
as maintenance and repair. No sales tax will apply to the rental of a recording studio, audio-visual production studio,
recording equipment, and audio-visual production equipment when the personnel to operate the equipment is
furnished with the rental of the equipment.
(7-1-93)
e.
Accounting. Persons engaged in the rendering of advertising or graphic artist services may elect to
follow any consistent procedure in purchasing art supplies and other tangible personal property from their vendors
which are to be incorporated into services or tangible personal property sold to their customers. The artist/agency
may wish to purchase all art and graphics supplies without tax from their vendors by issuing a resale certificate. In
this case the artist/agency will keep a record of all supplies withdrawn from inventory for use in nontaxable
advertising services and pay use tax on these supplies. If the bulk or majority of the artist/agency’s work is nontaxable
media advertising or design services, the artist/agency may wish to pay tax on all of their purchases, keep a record of
all retail sales, and regularly take a credit against the sales and use tax due for tax originally paid upon purchases. If
the artist/agency engages in major jobs, they may want to use separate accounting procedures and make purchases of
supplies for inventory without tax by issuing a resale certificate. Purchases for a specific job would be made with or
without tax dependent upon the taxable nature of the sale to the client. In all cases, art and graphic supplies are those
items which are directly incorporated into the artwork or advertisement, such as paint, ink, colored pencils and
markers, lettering, poster board, and other such consumable items. Items on which tax must be paid include rulers,
triangles, t-squares, paint brushes, razor or artist knife blades, any other artist tool, office supplies and equipment,
props, sets, wardrobes, costumes, and other equipment.
(7-1-93)
056.
10.
Cross-References.
(7-1-93)
a.
Newspapers and periodicals. See Rules 033 and 079 of these rules.
(3-15-02)
b.
Signs. See Rule 036 of these rules.
(3-15-02)
c.
Persons engaged in printing. See Rule 054 of these rules.
(3-15-02)
d.
Motion picture films. See Rule 087 of these rules.
(3-15-02)
e.
Resale certificates-purchases for resale. See Rule 128 of these rules.
(3-15-02)
PHOTOGRAPHERS AND PHOTOFINISHERS (RULE 056).
01.
Sales by Photographers and Photofinishers. Photographers and photofinishers are engaged in the
business of producing and selling tangible personal property.
(6-23-94)
a.
When such persons develop and/or print pictures, and sell films, frames, cameras, completed
photographs, photostats, blueprints, etc., they are making a sale of a completed article of tangible personal property in
every case and they must collect the tax on the total selling price unless an exemption applies.
(6-23-94)
b.
When such persons render service, such as retouching and tinting or coloring of photographs
belonging to others, they are performing taxable processing services and must collect the tax from their customers
unless an exemption applies.
(6-23-94)
c.
Photographers may charge a sitting fee to cover the cost of taking the picture, which may be
separately stated from any charges for developing and printing photographs. Such fees are charges for producing or
fabricating tangible personal property and are therefore subject to sales tax. See Idaho Sales Tax Administrative Rule
029.
(6-23-94)
02.
Sales to Photographers and Photofinishers.
a.
Photographers who are in the business of selling photographs may qualify for the production
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exemption. The production process begins when the film is exposed. Therefore, photographers must pay sales or use
tax on purchases of props, backdrops and other items used prior to the start of production of the photograph.
Equipment and supplies including cameras, lights, lenses, film, paper, fix, developer, and enlargers used to produce
photographs are used during the production process and are exempt.
(6-23-94)
b.
Photofinishers may purchase equipment and supplies exempt from sales or use tax as long as the
equipment and supplies are directly used to produce photographs which they will sell and they otherwise qualify for
the production exemption provided by Section 63-3622D, Idaho Code.
(6-23-94)
057.
DRY CLEANERS, LAUNDRIES, LAUNDROMATS, AND LINEN SUPPLIERS (RULE 057).
01.
Dry Cleaners and Laundries. Dry cleaners perform a service and are not required to collect tax
from their customers. Dry cleaners must pay sales or use tax on purchases of cleaning supplies, hangers, plastic bags
and other supplies used in the performance of this service. As of July 1, 1997, purchases of dry-to-dry transfer
systems by dry cleaners are exempt from sales and use tax. This exemption applies only to the purchase of entire
systems and does not apply to purchases of repair parts for such systems.
(7-1-98)
02.
Linen Suppliers.
(7-1-93)
a.
Linen supply firms or laundries which furnish such items as sheets, pillowslips, towels, uniforms,
diapers, etc., must collect and remit sales tax based on the rental charge. The sales tax will also apply to the rental of
shop towels, floor mats for building entrances, dust mops, room deodorizers and any other tangible personal property
rented or leased for building maintenance or service. The entire price charged for such rentals is taxable unless a
reasonable charge for cleaning is separately stated. If the allocation between rental and cleaning fees is unreasonable,
the State Tax Commission may deem the entire fee, or any portion thereof, to be taxable.
(7-1-98)
b.
Items acquired by these firms which are purchased for resale, rental or lease in the ordinary course
of business, may be purchased exempt from sales tax if a properly executed resale certificate is provided to the seller,
in accordance with Rule 128 of these rules.
(3-15-02)
03.
Laundromats.
(7-1-93)
a.
Receipts from coin-operated washers and dryers are not subject to the sales tax. Sales of cleaning
supplies such as soap or bleach through coin operated vending machines, are subject to the tax as provided by Rule
058 of these rules.
(3-15-02)
b.
Persons engaged in the laundromat business must pay sales or use tax when purchasing washers,
dryers, and other tangible personal property for the operation of their business.
(7-1-98)
058.
SALES THROUGH VENDING MACHINES (RULE 058).
01.
In General. The sale of tangible personal property through a vending machine is a taxable
transaction. The term vending machine shall mean any mechanical device which, without the assistance of a human
cashier, dispenses tangible personal property to a purchaser who deposits cash in the device. Video games and other
coin operated amusement devices are not vending machines. Fees paid for the use of coin operated amusement
devices are not subject to sales tax pursuant to Section 63-3623B, Idaho Code. See Rule 109 of these rules. (5-3-03)
02.
Amount Subject to Tax. Pursuant to Section 63-3613, Idaho Code, sales of items through a
vending machine for amounts from twelve cents ($0.12) through one dollar ($1) are taxable at one hundred seventeen
percent (117%) of the vendor’s acquisition cost of the items. Items sold for more than one dollar ($1) are taxable on
the retail sales price. Sales of items for a price of eleven cents ($0.11) or less are exempt from tax pursuant to Section
63-3622L, Idaho Code.
(5-3-03)
03.
Requirement to Obtain a Seller's Permit. Vendors who sell tangible personal property through a
vending machine must obtain a seller’s permit. Only one seller’s permit is required; however, each vending machine
operated by the vendor must conspicuously display the vendor’s name, address, and seller’s permit number. When a
number of vending machines are placed in a single location, the owner’s name, address, and seller’s permit number
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need be displayed only once.
(5-3-03)
04.
Calculation of Tax. The following examples show how vending machine operators shall calculate
the amount of sales tax due:
(5-3-03)
a.
Example 1: Corporation A’s business activity consists only of sales through vending machines in
various locations in the state of Idaho. All of the items sold in the vending machines are sold for a unit price of twelve
cents ($0.12) or more but none are sold for a price greater than one dollar ($1). During the month of July, Corporation
A’s total sales from the vending machine sales were ten thousand dollars ($10,000). Corporation A purchased the
items sold during that one (1) month period for eight thousand dollars ($8,000). The company made no nontaxable or
exempt sales. Corporation A should file a sales and use tax return for the month of July, computing and reporting its
taxable sales as follows. Numbers correspond to line numbers on the return.
Line 1.
Total sales
$9,360
Line 2.
Less nontaxable sales
$0
Line 3.
Net taxable sales
$9,360
Line 1 computed as follows:
8,000 x 117%
=
$9,360
(4-2-08)
b.
Example 2: During the month of July, Corporation B had total Idaho sales in the amount of ten
thousand dollars ($10,000). In addition to sales through vending machines, the corporation made over-the-counter
sales, all of which were taxable, in the amount of two thousand dollars ($2,000). The remaining eight thousand
dollars ($8,000) constituted sales through vending machines, of which one thousand dollars ($1,000) was for items
with a unit retail price of over one dollar ($1). The other seven thousand dollars ($7,000) were sales of items through
vending machines with a unit retail price of fifty cents ($0.50) each. The items sold during the month for fifty cents
($0.50) each were purchased by Corporation B for five thousand dollars ($5,000).
The amount to report as taxable sales is:
Taxable Sales = $2,000 (over the counter items) + $5,850 ($5,000 of purchases of items selling for $.50 x 117%) +
($1,000 ÷ (1 + tax rate expressed as a decimal) (items sold through vending machines for more that one dollar ($1)).
Assuming a 6% tax rate this amount would be $1,000 divided by 1.06 or $943.40.
Note that if a vendor sells some items for more than one dollar ($1) the sales tax is included in the total sales. This
amount must be divided by one (1) plus the current tax rate expressed as a decimal, to determine the sales before sales
tax.
(4-2-08)
059.
05.
Cross-References.
(7-1-93)
a.
Amusement devices, see Rule 109 of these rules.
(5-3-03)
b.
Money operated dispensing equipment, see Rule 095 of these rules.
(5-3-03)
c.
Sales of newspapers through vending machines, see Rule 033 of these rules.
(3-20-04)
SALES BY FLORISTS (RULE 059).
01.
Sales. Florists are engaged in the business of selling tangible personal property and must collect the
tax from the purchaser.
(7-1-93)
a.
Charges for creating, processing, fabricating, or setting up floral or plant arrangements are taxable,
even if separately stated.
(7-1-93)
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b.
Separately stated delivery charges, relating only to the transportation of the product after the sale,
are not subject to the tax.
(7-1-93)
02.
Rentals. Whenever florists rent or lease potted plants, palms, artificial wreaths and flowers, or
other tangible personal property, they are making a sale within the meaning of Section 63-3612, Idaho Code, and
must collect the tax on the amount charged.
(7-1-93)
03.
Telegraphed Sales. The tax shall be collected on orders taken by an Idaho florist or nurseryman to
be telegraphed to the second florist or nurseryman, whether the delivery is to be made within or without the state.
(7-1-93)
a.
Telephone, wire, and handling charges in connection with such sales must be included in the sales
price subject to the tax.
(7-1-93)
b.
A florist or nurseryman making deliveries pursuant to telegraph orders received from another
florist or nurseryman, shall not collect the tax regardless of whether the florist or nurseryman forwarding the order is
within or without the state of Idaho.
(7-1-93)
04.
Street Vendors. The above applies to individuals and street vendors as well as florists who
maintain a regular place of business.
(7-1-93)
060.
FEDERAL EXCISE TAXES AND RETAILERS TAXES (RULE 060).
01.
General Rule. The measure upon which Idaho sales or use tax is imposed shall include any amount
required to be paid by a retailer or his customer as a federal importer’s or manufacturer’s excise tax.
(7-1-93)
a.
Such federal taxes include those on: Tobacco products, distilled spirits, beer, cheese, mixed flour,
processed and renovated butter.
(7-1-93)
b.
Any federal tax payable to the wholesaler, importer, manufacturer or other producers, such as taxes
on gasoline, automobiles, tires, sporting goods, or other tangible personal property when sold by the wholesaler,
importer, manufacturer, or other producer.
(7-1-93)
02.
Excluded Federal Taxes. Federal taxes imposed directly on retail sales, such as those imposed by
Section 4051, Internal Revenue Code, are excluded from the measure of sales or use tax.
(7-1-93)
061.
TRANSPORTATION, FREIGHT, AND HANDLING CHARGES.
01.
In General. Whether or not transportation and handling charges are separately stated, the sales
price includes any charges made for delivery of goods to the seller. Charges for transportation and handling of goods
to the consumer are not included as a part of the sales price regardless of when title passes.
(7-1-97)
02.
Charges Not Separately Stated. Regardless of other provisions of this rule, transportation and
handling charges which are not separately stated are included in the sales price subject to tax.
(7-1-97)
03.
Example 1: Charges for Delivery to the Seller. A customer orders goods from a retailer. The
goods are shipped to a catalog store where the customer picks them up. A charge to the customer for delivery to the
store is a charge for delivery to the seller and is included in the sales price subject to sales tax.
(7-1-97)
04.
Example 2: Freight-In Taxable. A seller of construction equipment orders a part for a customer.
The seller separately states on the invoice charges for freight-in to the seller and freight-out to the consumer. The
charges for freight-in are part of the sales price subject to sales tax. The charges for freight-out are not subject to sales
tax.
(7-1-97)
05.
Example 3: Delivery by Retailer. A consumer orders building materials from a retailer. The
retailer delivers the goods to the purchaser by means of the retailer’s delivery van. The retailer separately states the
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charge for transportation and handling of the building materials. Since the charge is for delivery to the consumer, it is
not subject to sales tax.
(7-1-97)
06.
Example 4: Use of Transportation Charges as a Means of Avoiding Sales Tax. Seller offers to
give away merchandise worth approximately twenty dollars ($20) if the purchaser pays shipping of nineteen dollars
and ninety-five cents ($19.95). The entire price of nineteen dollars and ninety-five cents ($19. 95) is subject to sales
or use tax.
(7-1-97)
062.
REPAIRS SALE OF PARTS AND MATERIAL (RULE 062).
01.
In General. Repairs normally require both material and labor. Persons engaged in the business of
repairing, renovating or altering tangible personal property owned by others are required to collect sales tax upon the
parts or material required in the repair or renovation of the property.
(7-1-93)
02.
Separate Statement of Parts or Materials. The sales price of parts or materials must be separately
stated and sales tax must be charged on these parts or materials. Separately stated repair labor is not taxable. If parts
and materials are not separately stated from the repair labor, the total amount for parts and repair labor is subject to
sales tax.
(5-3-03)
03.
Repairs Covered by Insurance Benefits. Repairs, the costs of which are covered by insurance
benefits, are treated the same as otherwise described in this rule. Sales tax is to be collected on the parts and materials.
Separately stated repair labor is not taxable.
(5-3-03)
04.
Incidental Material. In some instances because of the small amount of materials used in a repair
job, the value of the material may be insignificant to the entire repair cost. For example, incidental amounts of
material are sometimes used in repairs made to tires, clothing, watches, and shoes. If materials such as buttons,
thread, watch parts, tire valve cores and stems are incidental to the repair they will be taxed when purchased by the
repairman. Other examples of materials which are incidental to repairs are touch-up paint and soldering materials
used in car repairs. Materials are incidental if they have a value which is insignificant and for which a reasonable
retail sales price cannot be readily determined.
(7-1-93)
05.
Shop Supplies. Dealer/repair shops should not charge sales tax on shop supplies that are consumed
during the repair, such as spray bottles, buffer pads, towels, masking tape, solvents, sandpaper, and other items that
have no specific identifiable value billed to the customer and which do not become a part of the item being repaired.
These supplies are subject to tax when purchased by the dealer/repair shop and should not be included as part of the
taxable amount billed to the customer.
(7-1-93)
06.
Repairs Versus Fabrications. Repairs and renovations to tangible personal property must not be
confused with fabrications of tangible personal property. Fabricated tangible personal property is subject to sales tax
on the entire price whether the parts and materials are separately stated or not. See Rules 011 and 029 of these rules.
(3-15-02)
07.
Parts for Resale. When a repair shop buys parts that will be resold to its customers or an auto
dealer buys parts to install in a car which is being reconditioned for sale, they should not pay tax to the supplier if they
provide the documents required by Rule 128 of these rules.
(3-15-02)
063.
BAD DEBTS AND REPOSSESSIONS (RULE 063).
01.
In General. Sales tax must be collected on an accrual basis. The tax is owed to the state at the time
of sale, regardless of when the payment is made by the customer.
(7-1-93)
02.
Rules for Unsecured Credit Sales. The following rules apply to unsecured credit sales: (7-1-93)
a.
When a seller cannot collect accounts receivable arising from an unsecured credit sale of tangible
personal property subject to sales tax, he may make an adjustment on his sales tax return or apply for a refund of taxes
according to this rule.
(7-1-93)
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b.
The adjustment or refund may be claimed on the sales tax return for the month in which the bad
debt adjustment is made on the books and records of the taxpayer. The tax for which the credit or refund is sought
must be included in the amount which is financed and which is charged off as a bad debt for income tax purposes.
(6-23-94)
c.
A written claim for the refund may also be filed with the State Tax Commission within three (3)
years from the time the tax was paid to the State Tax Commission. The State Tax Commission will review all such
refund claims. See Rule 117 of these rules, Refund Claims.
(3-20-04)
sale.
03.
Rules for Secured Credit Sales. The following rules apply to secured credit sales:
(7-1-93)
a.
If the collateral is not repossessed, the seller may treat a bad debt the same as an unsecured credit
(7-1-93)
b.
If the collateral is repossessed and not seasonably resold at a public or private sale, its retention is
considered to satisfy the debt and no bad debt adjustment is allowed.
(7-1-93)
c.
If the collateral is repossessed and seasonably resold at public or private sale, then the seller is
entitled to a bad debt adjustment. However, before calculating the amount of tax that may be credited or refunded, the
taxpayer must reduce the amount claimed as worthless by the amount realized from the sale of the collateral.
(3-30-01)
d.
If merchandise is repossessed and is subsequently resold at retail, sales tax is computed on the sales
price and collected and remitted the same as on other retail sales.
(7-1-93)
04.
Application to Taxpayers. The following rules apply to taxpayers who remit sales tax on an
accrual basis but report income tax on a cash basis or are not required to file income tax returns.
(7-1-93)
a.
Retailers are required to remit sales tax on an accrual basis, even though their accounting records
and income tax returns may be prepared on the cash basis of accounting.
(7-1-93)
b.
For taxpayers who keep their records and file income tax returns on a cash basis, a worthless
account cannot be written off as a bad debt because it has not been recognized as income in the taxpayer’s books.
These retailers may still claim a bad debt for sales tax purposes. The claim should be made at the same time and in the
same way discussed in Subsections 063.02 and 063.03 of this rule, even though the bad debt does not appear on the
retailer’s income tax return.
(7-1-93)
c.
For taxpayers who are not required to file income tax returns, the claim should be made the same
way discussed in Subsections 063.02 and 063.03 of this rule.
(6-23-94)
d.
As these claims cannot be verified against the income tax returns of these taxpayers, sufficient
evidence must be attached to the sales tax return to prove that the account has become worthless, that the tax was
remitted by the retailer, and that the retailer did not receive payment of the tax from the buyer.
(7-1-93)
05.
Amount of Credit Allowed. The amount of credit that can be claimed is the amount of sales tax
that is uncollectible. If both nontaxable and taxable items are financed, credit may be taken only for that portion of the
bad debt which represents unpaid sales tax.
(7-1-93)
a.
Example: Assume the tax rate is six percent (6%). A retailer sells a thirty thousand dollar ($30,000)
forklift for thirty-one thousand eight hundred dollars ($31,800) including sales tax. The purchaser pays a five
thousand dollar ($5,000) down payment and finances the balance. The purchaser later defaults and the retailer
repossesses the forklift and sells it at a public auction for six thousand dollars ($6,000). At the time of repossession
the purchaser owes seventeen thousand five hundred forty-five dollars ($17,545) including the financed sales tax.
After the sale the amount that the retailer writes off is eleven thousand five hundred forty-five dollars ($11,545). The
sales tax bad debt write off is six hundred fifty-three dollars ($653).
Total taxable sale
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6% sales tax
$1,800
Total sale
$31,800
Down payment
($5,000)
Total financed
$26,800
Payment to principal after sale
($9,255)
Amount realized at public sale
($6,000)
Total bad debt
$11,545
Sales tax portion of bad debt
$11,545 - (11,545 / 1.06) =
$653
(4-2-08)
b.
Example: A car dealer makes a taxable sale of an automobile for fourteen thousand nine hundred
dollars ($14,900) along with an extended warranty for five hundred dollars ($500), a documentation fee of one
hundred dollars ($100), a title fee of eight dollars ($8) and credit insurance for one hundred dollars ($100). The
customer pays one thousand dollars ($1,000) cash and trades in a car worth ten thousand dollars ($10,000) which is
pledged as security for an earlier outstanding loan of six thousand dollars ($6,000). The customer, therefore, has to
borrow enough to pay off the old loan on the trade-in. The customer defaults on the new ten thousand nine hundred
eight dollar ($10,908) loan after paying five hundred dollars ($500) towards the principal. The customer damages the
automobile in an accident leaving the collateral worthless. The car dealer may take an adjustment for only that
portion of the bad debt representing the taxable percentage of the total sales price of the car. Only five thousand
dollars ($5,000) of the total fifteen thousand nine hundred eight dollar ($15,908) cost was taxable.
Sales price of vehicle
$14,900
Documentation fee
$100
Extended warranty
$500
Credit insurance
$100
Title fee
$8
Trade-in
($10,000)
Sales tax
Subtotal
Down payment
Invoice total
Amount financed
Payment to principal after sale
Amount of bad debt
$300
$5,908
($1,000)
$4,908
$10,908
($500)
$10,408
Amount of down payment used to pay sales tax:
($300 / $5,908) = 5.08%
.0508 x $1,000 = $50.80
Amount of sales tax financed:
$300 - $50.80 = $249.20
Percentage of loan representing sales tax:
$249.20 / $10,908 = 2.28%
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Sales tax paid by payments to principal:
$500 x 0228 = $11.40
Amount of bad debt write-off:
$249.20 - $11.40 = $237.80
(4-2-08)
06.
Bad Debt Collected at a Later Date. If a bad debt account is collected later, the retailer must pay
tax on the amount collected.
(7-1-93)
07.
To Claim Credit for a Bad Debt. Credit for bad debts for sales tax purposes may be claimed by
the retailer that made the original sale and paid the sales tax to the state. Financial institutions or other third parties
who are the assignees of the retailer may claim a bad debt for sales tax on property for which they provided financing,
if the amount financed includes the sales tax remitted on the sale of the property. The person claiming the credit must
be the person who ultimately bears the loss if the purchaser of the property defaults on the obligation to repay.
(3-30-01)
08.
Cross-Reference. Rescinded Sale. See Rule 045 of these rules.
(3-20-04)
064.
DEMURRAGE.
Demurrage charges are not subject to sales or use tax if right, power, and control of the ship, freight car, or truck
remains with the transportation company. Demurrage is defined as a charge by a transportation company to its
customer for detaining a ship, freight car, or truck beyond the time allowed for loading or unloading.
(7-1-93)
065.
TIRES BALANCING, STUDDING, AND SIPING (RULE 065).
01.
Services Subject to Sales Tax. Sales tax applies to the amount charged for services agreed to be
performed in conjunction with the sale of a tire. Examples of such taxable services are balancing, studding, siping, or
similar charges. Sales tax will apply to the total amount charged for the tire, the services, and the materials used to
perform the services.
(7-1-93)
02.
a.
the customer.
Services Not Subject to Sales Tax.
(7-1-93)
Sales tax does not apply to the amount charged for balancing, studding, or siping a tire owned by
(7-1-93)
b.
Sales tax does not apply to a separately stated fee to mount or install a tire whether sold new or
owned by the customer.
(7-1-93)
c.
The person performing the nontaxable service must pay use tax on the value of the materials used
in performing the service.
(7-1-93)
03.
Materials Used in Performing a Service. Studs, wheel weights, valve stems, cores, patches, and
similar items are materials that may be used to perform both a taxable and nontaxable service. The seller may elect to
use any consistent method in determining the value and the amount of materials used in performing taxable and
nontaxable services.
(7-1-93)
a.
The allocation of materials may be determined using a percentage basis. Example: The seller
determined through some reasonable basis that sixty percent (60%) of the studs purchased for resale are used in tires
that are purchased from him. The remaining forty percent (40%) are used in tires owned by customers and brought in
for studding. Use tax will apply to the forty percent (40%) used in studding customer owned tires. As sales tax applies
to the entire fee charged for studding a tire sold to a customer, the remaining sixty percent (60%) of the studs will not
be subject to use tax, but are included in the amount subject to sales tax imposed on the purchaser.
(7-1-93)
b.
The allocation may be determined based on the value of the material used in performing both
taxable and nontaxable services.
(7-1-93)
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c.
The allocation may be determined using any other method that will allow a reasonable allocation of
materials used in both a taxable and nontaxable service.
(7-1-93)
04.
066.
Cross-Reference. Repairs. See ISTC Rule 062.
(7-1-93)
CONTRACTOR'S USE OF TANGIBLE PERSONAL PROPERTY (RULE 066).
01.
Use. The term use includes the exercise of any right or power over tangible personal property in the
performance of a contract, regardless of whether title to the tangible personal property is vested in the contractor or
the tangible personal property is leased.
(7-1-93)
02.
Contractors Use of Tangible Personal Property. If title to the tangible personal property is vested
in an entity not entitled to the production exemption, use tax will apply to the contractor. For contractors improving
real property, see ISTC Rule 012.
(7-1-93)
03.
Exception. The Sales Tax Act provides only one (1) exception. If title to the tangible personal
property is vested in a person entitled to the production exemption, see ISTC Rule 079, the contractor’s use of the
property will also be exempt.
(7-1-93)
067.
REAL PROPERTY (RULE 067).
01.
Improvements or Fixtures. Improvements or fixtures to real property include:
(7-1-93)
a.
Property which is physically attached to the land or other improvements affixed to the land in such
a manner that it may not be removed without materially damaging the real property or is of such a nature that it would
normally be expected to be sold together with the land.
(7-1-93)
b.
Property which increases the market value of the land or increases the ability of the possessor of the
land to use it more productively.
(7-1-93)
c.
Property which increases the market value or productivity on a relatively permanent basis. (7-1-93)
02.
Three Factor Test. A three (3) factor test may be applied to determine whether a particular article
has become a fixture to real property. The three (3) tests to be applied are:
(7-1-93)
a.
Annexation to the realty, either actual or constructive.
(7-1-93)
b.
Adoption or application to the use or purpose to which that part of the realty to which it is
connected is suitable.
(7-1-93)
c.
Intention to make the article a permanent addition to the realty.
(7-1-93)
03.
Example 1: The original builder or owner of an apartment building installs draperies. The draperies
meet the three (3) factor test of a fixture to realty. First, they are constructively annexed to the realty when attached to
the drapery rod. Although the draperies are not affixed to the realty, they comprise a necessary, integral, or working
part of the object to which they are attached. Second, they appropriately adapt to the purpose of the realty to which
they are connected. Window coverings are necessary in order to maintain occupancy of the apartment. The third and
controlling factor in this example is the intention with which the installation was made. The intention must be
determined from the surrounding circumstances at the time of installation. It is not the undisclosed purpose of the
annexor, but rather the intention implied and manifested by his act. The builders intended that the drapes would
remain as long as they served their purpose.
(7-1-93)
04.
Example 2: The three (3) factor test would not be met in Subsection 067.03 of this rule, if the
drapes were installed by a tenant of an apartment leased for a term with no agreement as to ownership. The tenant
would be expected to remove or sell the drapes to an incoming tenant, and his intention would be the controlling
factor. The draperies would not be considered as fixtures to the real property.
(5-8-09)
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05.
Personal Property Incidental to the Sale of Real Property. This rule does not affect the
provisions of Section 63-3609(c), Idaho Code.
(7-1-93)
06.
Store Fixtures. Store fixtures are items that are affixed to a building and used by retailers in the
conduct of their business. The term “store fixtures” includes display cases, trophy cases, clothing racks, shelving,
modular displays, kiosks, wall cases, register stands, and check-out counters. If store fixtures only benefit the
particular business occupying a building, they are not adapted to the use of the real estate and are therefore personal
property. A store fixture will only be deemed to be a real property improvement if:
(5-8-09)
a.
It is affixed to the real estate and its removal would cause significant structural damage to the
building itself; or
(5-8-09)
b.
It is affixed to the real estate and is of benefit to the land or building regardless of the particular
business conducted on the premises.
(5-8-09)
07.
Abandoned Cable. The National Electrical Code requires the removal of certain abandoned fiber
optic and communication cable. Such cable therefore is not intended to become a permanent part of a building. If a
contractor installs such cable, he is installing personal property. In this case he must separately state the charges for
the cable and collect sales tax on that amount. Raceways and other materials that are intended to permanently remain
in place are fixtures to realty. Contractors installing both personal property and improvements to realty must account
for each separately as required by Section 63-3610(e), Idaho Code.
(5-8-09)
068.
COLLECTION OF TAX (RULE 068).
01.
In General. Idaho Sales Tax is an excise tax which is imposed upon each sale at retail. The tax is
computed at the time of each sale and the tax on the total sales for the reporting period, usually monthly, will be
reported and paid on or before the due date as established by Rule 105 of these rules.
(4-11-06)
02.
Sales Tax To Be Collected by Retailer. Sales tax shall be collected by the retailer from the
customer. The tax will be computed on and collected for all credit, installment, conditional or similar sales when
made or, in the case of rentals, when the rental is charged.
(7-1-93)
03.
Computation of Tax. The retailer will compute the tax upon the total sale to a purchaser at a given
time and not upon each individual item purchased.
(7-1-93)
04.
Bracket System for Five Percent Tax Rate. The following schedule is to be used in determining
the amount of tax to be collected by a retailer at the time of sale if the sales tax rate is 5%. The 5% tax rate was in
effect from July 1, 2005, through September 30, 2006.
(4-2-08)
a.
Multiply five cents ($0.05) for every whole dollar included in the sale, and
b.
Add for each additional fractional dollar amount of sale the corresponding tax below:
Dollar Amount
of Sale
(7-1-93)
Tax
0.00 - 0.05
-
.00
0.06 - 0.25
-
.01
0.26 - 0.45
-
.02
0.46 - 0.65
-
.03
0.66 - 0.85
-
.04
0.86 - 0.99
-
.05
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However, sales to a total amount of eleven cents ($0.11) or less are exempt from tax.
(7-1-93)
05.
Bracket System for Six Percent Tax Rate. Beginning October 1, 2006, the sales tax rate is six
percent (6%). The following schedule is to be used in determining the amount of tax to be collected by a retailer at the
time of sale.
(4-2-08)
a.
Multiply six cents ($0.06) for every whole dollar included in the sale, and
b.
Add for each additional fractional dollar amount of sale the corresponding tax below:
Dollar Amount
of Sale
(3-20-04)
Tax
0.00 - 0.03
-
.00
0.04 - 0.20
-
.01
0.21 - 0.37
-
.02
0.38 - 0.53
-
.03
0.54 - 0.70
-
.04
0.71 - 0.87
-
.05
0.88 - 0.99
-
.06
However, sales to a total amount of eleven cents ($0.11) or less are exempt from tax.
(3-20-04)
06.
Tax to Be Separately Displayed. The amount of tax collected by the retailer must be displayed
separately from the list price, marked price, the price advertised in the premises or other price on the sales slip or
other proof of sale. The retailer may retain any amount collected under the bracket system which is in excess of the
amount of tax for which he is liable to the state during the period as compensation for the work of collecting that tax.
(7-1-93)
07.
Reimbursement of Tax From the Purchaser to the Seller. If the seller does not collect the sales
tax at the time of the sale and it is later determined that sales tax should have been collected, the seller can then collect
the sales tax from the purchaser if the delinquent tax has been paid by the seller. The legal incidence of the tax is
intended to fall upon the buyer, Section 63-3619, Idaho Code.
(7-1-93)
a.
Example: The Commission determines that certain nontaxed sales by a seller are subject to sales
tax and that the seller did not collect the tax and did not have documentation supporting exemption from the sales tax.
The Commission issued a Notice of Deficiency Determination to the seller imposing the tax and interest. The
assessment then paid by the seller entitles the seller to reimbursement from the buyer.
(7-1-93)
b.
assessed.
The seller is also entitled to collect reimbursement from the buyer of the interest paid on the taxes
(7-1-93)
c.
The seller is not entitled to reimbursement from the buyer for penalties imposed as part of the
assessment against the seller.
(7-1-93)
d.
The receivable established by the seller seeking reimbursement from the purchaser is not subject to
expiration of the statute of limitations provided in Section 63-3633, Idaho Code.
(7-1-93)
069.
INTERSTATE COMMERCE (RULE 069).
When tangible personal property is located within the state of Idaho at the time of sale and is delivered within the
state of Idaho, such sale is taxable irrespective of where the parties to the contract of sale are located and where the
contract was made or accepted or the funds paid. Example: A Washington-based interstate trucking firm hires an
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Idaho repair facility to install parts on a disabled truck. The trucking firm takes delivery of the repaired vehicle in
Idaho. The sale of the parts is subject to Idaho sales tax.
(7-1-93)
070.
PERMITS (RULE 070).
01.
Requirements for Obtaining Permits. All retailers, wholesalers and other persons required to
collect sales tax must obtain a permit from the Tax Commission before engaging in business. No fee is required for
the initial sales tax permit. Application forms may be obtained by contacting any Tax Commission office. (7-1-93)
a.
Every wholesaler, retailer or other person required to collect sales tax must apply for a permit on
the form prescribed by the Commission. The application for a permit must list each place of business operated by the
same person, firm or corporation. The permit must be posted in a conspicuous place at each location for which it is
issued. A separate permit number must be obtained for each business name.
(7-1-93)
b.
Example 1: Corporation A operates the businesses named B, C, and D. Three (3) permit numbers
are required, regardless of how many locations operate using the business names B, C, and D.
(7-1-93)
c.
Example 2: Corporation E operates three locations, using the business name F. Only one permit
number is required, since all locations have the same business name.
(7-1-93)
02.
Out-of-State Seller. An out-of-state seller desiring to conduct business as a seller within Idaho
must obtain a seller’s permit. This requirement also applies to any salesmen user’s agents who solicit orders for
nonresident sellers.
(7-1-93)
03.
Sales in Leased Premises. When any established business leases a portion of its shelves, counters
or floor space to other persons selling tangible personal property to consumers, the sales from such leased department
may be included in the tax return of the lessor. When the lessee conducts the leased department in the same manner as
a separate business and keeps separate business records, the lessee must apply for a sales tax permit.
(7-1-93)
04.
Cancellation of Sales Tax Permits. It is the responsibility of a permit holder to notify the Tax
Commission in writing immediately upon any change in ownership of the permitted business or upon complete or
partial termination of the permit holder’s business. Complete or partial termination of a permit holder’s business
includes the lease of part or all of the business or business location to another party who will be responsible for
remitting the sales tax. This notice must include the following information.
(7-1-93)
a.
This notice must include the date of closure, date of sale or date of lease. If the permit holder does
not continue to operate a business under that permit number, the notice must state that the permit should be canceled.
The permit holder must return the permit or send a written statement that the permit has been destroyed. If the permit
holder has sold or leased his business, the notice must state the last day of operation and the name of the new owner
or lessee.
(7-1-93)
b.
If this information is not furnished to the Tax Commission and the new owner or lessee continues
operation of the business on the previous owner’s or operator’s permit, without filing for and obtaining a new permit,
the original permit holder may be held responsible for all tax liability incurred during the period that the new owner
or lessee operated a business under the previous owner’s permit.
(7-1-93)
05.
Suspension of Sales Tax Permits. The permit holder must notify the Tax Commission in writing
of the anticipated discontinuation of a business due to seasonal operation or for any other reason. This notice must
contain the date of closure and anticipated date of reopening. Upon receipt of this information, returns will be
suspended during the period of closure.
(7-1-93)
06.
Requirements of Holding a Seller's Permit. A seller’s permit may be held only by persons
actively engaged in making retail sales subject to Idaho sales tax. Any person holding a permit who fails to meet this
requirement must surrender the permit to the Commission for cancellation. If a permit is held by a person who has
reported no sales for a period of twelve (12) consecutive months, the Commission may revoke the permit and require
the holder to return the permit to the Commission or provide a sworn statement that the permit has been destroyed by
the holder.
(7-1-93)
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07.
Seller's Permit and Sales Tax Permit. The terms seller’s permit and sales tax permit may be used
interchangeably. Both refer to the permit issued to a person desiring to engage in business in Idaho as a retailer.
(7-1-93)
08.
Temporary Seller’s Permits. The Commission may issue temporary seller’s permits that are valid
for a limited period of time. The time period for which the temporary permit is issued will be shown on the face of the
permit. No temporary seller’s permit shall be issued for a period of time greater than ninety (90) days.
(4-11-06)
071.
(RESERVED)
072.
APPLICATION AND PAYMENT OF USE TAX (RULE 072).
01.
Imposition of Use Tax. Use tax is imposed upon the privilege of using, storing, or otherwise
consuming tangible personal property within Idaho. The tax is imposed on the value of the tangible personal property.
A recent sales price is presumptive evidence of the value. In the absence of a recent sales price, the value of the
property subject to the use tax will be the fair market value at the time of first use in Idaho. Special rules apply to
transient equipment which is present in Idaho ninety (90) days or less in any consecutive twelve (12) months. See
Section 63-3621A, Idaho Code.
(7-1-93)
02.
Use. Use is the exercise of right or power over tangible personal property incident to either
ownership of the property or the performance of a contract. The term “use” does not include use of tangible personal
property incident to the performance of a contract if the owner of the tangible personal property is a business
primarily engaged in producing tangible personal property for resale and the property is exempt under Section 633622D, Idaho Code. See Rules 012, 077, and 079 of these rules.
(3-15-02)
03.
Storage. Storage is any keeping or retention of tangible personal property in this state, except as
inventory for the purpose of sale in the regular course of business or for subsequent use solely outside Idaho.
(7-1-93)
04.
Specifically Excluded from the Definition of Both Use and Storage Are:
(7-1-93)
a.
Retention or use of property for subsequent transportation outside the state; or
(7-1-93)
b.
Processing, fabricating, repairing, or manufacturing property for subsequent transportation and use
or resale solely outside the state.
(7-1-93)
05.
Receipt Showing Sales Tax Paid. If the property is purchased from an Idaho retailer and Idaho
sales tax is charged by and remitted to the retailer, then no use tax will apply to the property. A purchase order issued
by the purchaser advising the retailer to charge or include the Idaho sales tax is not sufficient evidence that the tax has
been paid. The retailer’s receipt provided to the purchaser must display separate statement of the tax to relieve the
purchaser of the use tax requirements.
(6-23-94)
06.
Out-of-State Purchases. If the property is purchased outside the state or from a retailer not subject
to the Commission’s jurisdiction and is subsequently used, stored, or otherwise consumed in this state, then a use tax
will apply. The purchaser must report and remit the use tax directly to the state by filing a use tax return on the forms
prescribed by the Commission.
(6-23-94)
07.
Taxes Paid to Another State. The taxpayer may offset from the use taxes payable to Idaho any
amount of general sales or use taxes paid to another state on the purchase or use of the same property if paid by the
same taxpayer. A credit may not be claimed for taxes erroneously paid to another state if no taxable sale or use under
the laws of that state occurred. In determining whether a tax is due in the state where paid, the Commission will be
bound by the laws, rules, and administrative rulings of the state to which tax is paid.
(7-1-93)
a.
If the amount of tax levied by the state to which it is paid is less than the amount of the Idaho tax
due, then the balance must be paid as Idaho tax.
(6-23-94)
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b.
If the amount of tax levied by the state to which it is paid is equal to or greater than the Idaho tax,
then there will be no taxes due to Idaho in regard to the same transaction or subsequent use of the property. (6-23-94)
c.
If the taxes paid to the other state are greater than the Idaho tax, the amount of offset available is
limited to the amount of Idaho tax due on the same transaction or use of the property.
(6-23-94)
08.
Use Undeterminable at Time of Purchase. In some cases a purchaser may be unable to determine
at the time of purchase whether or not property purchased by him will be used for a taxable or nontaxable purpose.
For example, a purchaser engaged in both a retailing and contracting business may not know whether an item will be
sold at retail or withdrawn from inventory and used in the course of performing a contract to improve real property. In
these circumstances the purchaser may purchase the goods without paying tax if he presents the documentation
required by Rule 128 of these rules. The purchaser must maintain adequate accounting control to insure that use tax is
properly accrued on all property subject to tax.
(3-15-02)
09.
Removal from This State. If property is held in this state solely for the purpose of subsequent
transport and use outside Idaho or is to be processed, fabricated, attached to, or incorporated into property that is to be
transported outside and used or sold outside the state, a use tax will not apply.
(7-1-93)
a.
Example 1. A sawmill withdraws lumber from its resale inventory and uses it to construct a
building. The lumber was not identified for this use until it was taken from inventory held for resale. Use tax is due on
the manufactured value of the lumber taken from inventory.
(7-1-93)
b.
Example 2. A sawmill cuts specific trees from its own land. The sawmill then cuts these trees to
specific dimensions and uses the beams and lumber to construct a building. The trees and lumber are identified for
use in constructing the building from the time the trees are cut. Use tax is due on the stumpage value of the trees.
(7-1-93)
c.
Example 3. A retailer purchases shirts without paying tax for his resale inventory. The shirts cost
the retailer ten dollars ($10) each. He withdraws ten (10) of the shirts from inventory and donates them to a sports
team he is sponsoring. The retailer owes use tax on one hundred dollars ($100).
(7-1-93)
073.
TANGIBLE PERSONAL PROPERTY BROUGHT OR SHIPPED TO IDAHO (RULE 073).
01.
Equipment Brought into Idaho. Equipment or other tangible personal property brought or
shipped to Idaho by residents or nonresidents is presumed to be for storage, use, or other consumption in this state.
Generally, tangible personal property is subject to use tax on its fair market value when it is first used in Idaho.
Special rules apply to transient equipment present in Idaho for ninety (90) days or less in any consecutive twelve (12)
month period. See Section 63-3621A, Idaho Code, and Subsection 073.03 of this rule. For property a contractor
fabricates to install into Idaho real property, see Rule 012 of these rules.
(4-11-06)
02.
Substantive Use. Any substantive use of the property in Idaho is sufficient to subject the property
to use tax. Use is defined in Section 63-3615, Idaho Code, and Rule 072 of these rules. The use tax does not apply to
the use of items purchased before July 1, 1965, or the use of items excluded from tax by Idaho Code.
(3-20-04)
03.
Transient Equipment. Transient equipment means equipment that is: owned by the user, which is
a business based in another state; a depreciable asset for income tax purposes and treated as such on the owner’s
income tax returns; brought to Idaho and kept here for ninety (90) days or less in any consecutive twelve (12) months;
and either was not taxed in another state or, if tax was paid to another state, the amount paid was less than the amount
of Idaho use tax due.
(7-1-93)
a.
A nonresident business that brings transient equipment to Idaho may elect to pay use tax on either
the fair market value of the equipment at the time it enters Idaho, or the fair market rental value of transient
equipment for the time it is kept in Idaho. Fair market rental value is the amount it would cost to rent or lease similar
equipment from an unrelated equipment rental company.
(3-20-04)
b.
Businesses that elect to pay use tax on the rental value of transient equipment may do so without
the approval of the Tax Commission as long as the use tax due on the first month’s rental is paid in a timely manner.
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If the owner fails to pay the tax timely, he must get written approval from the Tax Commission to use this option.
(7-1-93)
c.
Equipment which remains in Idaho for more than ninety (90) days in any consecutive twelve (12)
months is no longer transient. This equipment becomes subject to Idaho use tax on its fair market value at that time.
No credit may be taken for use tax paid on fair market rentals against the use tax due at the time equipment ceases to
qualify as transient.
(7-1-93)
d.
Example: A Wyoming contractor brings transient equipment, with a fair market value of one
hundred thousand dollars ($100,000), to Idaho for use on a ninety (90) day project. The fair market rental value of the
equipment for the ninety (90) days totals fifteen thousand dollars ($15,000). Idaho use tax on the fair market rental
value, assuming a rate of six percent (6%), totals nine hundred dollars ($900). The contractor paid three thousand five
hundred dollars ($3,500) of sales tax to the state of Wyoming when he bought the equipment new. The contractor is
not required to pay tax to Idaho since the tax paid to Wyoming exceeds the amount of Idaho use tax due.
(4-2-08)
e.
Example: The same contractor in the previous example returns to Idaho within the same twelve
(12) months with the same equipment, now with a fair market value of ninety-five thousand dollars ($95,000). As the
equipment has now exceeded the ninety (90) day rule for transient equipment, it is subject to Idaho’s six percent (6%)
use tax on its present value of ninety-five thousand dollars ($95,000) x six percent (6%) = five thousand seven
hundred dollars ($5,700). Credit of two thousand six hundred dollars ($2,600) is allowed for sales tax paid to
Wyoming, three thousand five hundred dollars ($3,500) less the nine hundred dollar ($900) credit already used on
rentals. The contractor owes three thousand one hundred dollars ($3,100) of use tax to Idaho.
(4-2-08)
04.
Licensed Motor Vehicles. A motor vehicle licensed in a nonresident’s home state and brought to
Idaho to use for ninety (90) days or less in any consecutive twelve (12) months is not subject to Idaho use tax. Once
the vehicle is used here more than ninety (90) days during any consecutive twelve (12) months, use tax applies to the
fair market value of the vehicle at that time unless tax was paid to another state in an amount equal to, or greater than,
the tax owed to Idaho. Special rules apply to new residents of Idaho. See Rule 107 of these rules.
(3-20-04)
074.
DONATIONS TO POLITICAL SUBDIVISIONS AND CERTAIN NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS
OF TANGIBLE PERSONAL PROPERTY USED FOR IMPROVEMENTS TO REAL PROPERTY (RULE
074).
01.
Donated Property. Effective July 1, 1991, there is an exemption from the use tax for the donation
of tangible personal property which is incorporated into real property, when donated to the state of Idaho, political
subdivisions of this state, or a nonprofit organization as defined in Section 63-3622O, Idaho Code. The exemption
applies whether the tangible personal property is incorporated into real property by the donee, a contractor or
subcontractor or any other person.
(7-1-93)
02.
Purchase of Donated Items. This exemption does not apply to sales tax which is applicable to the
purchase of tangible personal property which will be donated to the state of Idaho, its political subdivisions, or
qualified nonprofit organizations, for incorporation into real property.
(7-1-93)
03.
Property Not Incorporated into Real Property. This exemption does not apply to the sales or use
tax applicable to tangible personal property donated to the state of Idaho, its political subdivisions, or qualified
nonprofit organizations when the property donated will not be incorporated into real property.
(7-1-93)
a.
Example 1: A concrete company removes from inventory and donates twenty (20) yards of redimix concrete to a nonprofit Idaho college for the footings of a storage building. Another contractor who is donating
labor for erection of the building places the redi-mix concrete. Neither the redi-mix concrete company nor the
contractor are subject to use tax.
(7-1-93)
b.
Example 2: The same concrete company donates twenty (20) yards of redi-mix concrete to a
nonprofit organization which is not listed in Section 63-3622O, Idaho Code. The concrete company must declare and
pay use tax on the cost of the materials removed from inventory for the donation.
(7-1-93)
c.
Example 3: A contractor purchases materials from a local lumber yard which he donates to the
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nonprofit Idaho college to be used in building a storage building. This contractor must pay sales tax on the material
because the law provides exemption only from use tax.
(7-1-93)
d.
Example 4: A local automobile dealer takes three vehicles from inventory and donates them to the
athletic department of an Idaho university. The exemption does not apply. The automobile dealer is subject to use tax
on his cost of the vehicles because the vehicles will not become improvements to real property.
(7-1-93)
075. -- 076.
077.
(RESERVED)
EXEMPTION FOR RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT AT INL (RULE 077).
01.
In General. The purchase of certain tangible personal property used in connection with certain
activities at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is exempt from sales and use tax. To qualify for this exemption, the
property must be tangible personal property primarily or directly used or consumed in research, development,
experimental and testing activities, exclusively financed by the United States Government.
(7-1-99)
02.
Qualifying Activity. Research, development, experimental, and testing activity means any activity
of an original investigation, for the advancement of scientific knowledge in a field of laboratory science, engineering
or technology and does not have an actual commercial application.
(7-1-93)
03.
Real Property. The exemption does not apply to real property or to tangible personal property
which will become improvements or fixtures to real property. See Rules 012 and 067 of these rules.
(7-1-99)
04.
Incidental Use of Property. This exemption does not extend to the incidental use of any tangible
personal property which fails to meet the test of primary or direct use or consumption.
(7-1-97)
a.
Areas of support which are considered incidental include: communications equipment; office
equipment and supplies; janitorial equipment and supplies; training equipment and supplies; dosimetry or radiation
monitoring equipment which lacks the capability of giving an immediate indication and would not result in an
immediate evacuation of personnel or shutdown of equipment; subscriptions or technical manuals which provide
technology not primarily used or directly connected to the research activity; and hot and cold laundry operations.
(7-1-93)
b.
Materials of common support which are considered incidental include: clothing for weather
protection or of a reusable nature; hand tools which are not subject to contamination at the time of initial use;
protective coverings which are protection from other than radiation or are of a reusable nature; and all safety
equipment and supplies which do not protect from direct radiation exposure.
(7-1-93)
05.
Property Directly Used or Consumed. Tangible personal property primarily or directly used or
consumed in a research and development activity to perform quality assurance on research equipment is tax exempt.
Items of a general support nature, such as coveralls, are taxable.
(7-1-93)
06.
Parts for Equipment. The use of tangible personal property which becomes a component part of
research equipment being calibrated within a calibration lab is tax exempt; whereas, the use of parts and equipment in
calibrating or for the repair of other maintenance equipment is taxable.
(7-1-97)
07.
Radioactive Waste. The initial containment or storage of radioactive waste is an exempt use. Any
further processing or transporting of such waste not relating to a research and development activity is a taxable use.
(7-1-97)
08.
Motor Vehicles. The purchase of any motor vehicle licensed or required to be licensed by the laws
of this state is taxable.
(7-1-97)
09.
Agreements with Contractors. The State Tax Commission may enter into agreements with
contractors engaged in research at the INL prescribing methods by which the contractor or contractors may accrue
use tax based on the accounting procedures required by the U.S. Department of Energy.
(7-1-99)
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078.
IDAPA 35.01.02
Idaho Sales & Use Tax Administrative Rules
MOTOR FUELS (RULE 078).
01.
Exemptions.
(7-1-93)
a.
Motor fuels, including gasoline, diesel and gaseous fuels, upon which the taxes are imposed by
Title 63, Chapter 24, Idaho Code, are exempt from sales and use taxes. The Idaho Motor Fuels Tax Rules, IDAPA
35.01.05, explain in detail which petroleum and gaseous products are subject to taxation as motor fuel. Also exempt
are purchases upon which motor fuels taxes have actually been paid. If such purchases are later included in credits or
refunds for motor fuels taxes paid and not subject to taxes imposed by Title 63, Chapter 24, Idaho Code, and no other
exemption applies, sales and use taxes will be applicable.
(7-1-93)
b.
Fuel may be exempt under Section 63-3622(D), Idaho Code.
(7-1-93)
c.
Fuel used as heating fuel may be exempt if it qualifies under the exemption for space heating
materials. See ISTC 88.
(7-1-93)
d.
The sale or use of fuel for subsequent use outside this state and fuel brought into this state in the
fuel tanks of vehicles in interstate commerce may be exempt. Carriers engaging in interstate commerce are required
to maintain sufficient verifiable statistical data to substantiate any exemption claimed for fuel purchased in Idaho for
use outside this state. In the case of a substantial change in the mode of operation of the carrier or other circumstances
that would cause the statistical data to be invalid, the carrier is required to review and adjust the exemption claimed
accordingly.
(7-1-93)
02.
Exclusion from Exemption. Purchase or use of any fuels may be subject to sales and use taxes if
no other exemption applies. Examples include, without limitation:
(7-1-93)
a.
Fuel used by a road contractor in the operation of construction equipment or operation of stationary
engines to generate electricity, unless all of the electricity generated is used primarily and directly in the processing,
manufacturing or fabricating of tangible personal property to be sold at retail.
(7-1-93)
b.
Fuel used by private contractors in off-road vehicles in the performance of contracts with any
governmental instrumentality.
(7-1-93)
079.
PRODUCTION EXEMPTION (RULE 079).
01.
In General. Section 63-3622D, Idaho Code, known as the production exemption, provides an
exemption from sales and use taxes for certain tangible personal property used in production activities. The
production activities include:
(5-8-09)
a.
A manufacturing, processing, or fabrication operation primarily devoted to producing tangible
personal property that it will sell and is intended to be ultimately sold at retail.
(5-8-09)
b.
The following types of businesses may also qualify for the exemption, even though they perform
services and do not actually sell tangible personal property:
(5-8-09)
i.
The business of custom farming or operating a farm or ranch for profit.
ii.
The business of contract mining or operating a mine for profit.
iii.
Businesses devoted to processing tangible personal property for use as fuel for the production of
(5-8-09)
energy.
(7-1-93)
(6-23-94)
02.
Qualifying Businesses. The production exemption applies only to a business or a separately
operated segment of a business that primarily produces tangible personal property which is intended for ultimate sale
at retail.
(7-1-93)
a.
For the purposes of this rule, a separately operated segment of a business is a segment of a business
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for which separate records are maintained and which is operated by an employee or employees whose primary
employment responsibility is to operate the business segment.
(7-1-93)
b.
The production exemption does not include the performance of contracts to improve real property,
such as road or building construction, or to service-related businesses not devoted to the production of tangible
personal property for ultimate sale at retail.
(7-1-93)
c.
To qualify for the production exemption, a business must sell the products it produces or processes.
The only exceptions are businesses primarily devoted to processing fuel to be used for the production of energy;
custom farming; and contract mining.
(5-8-09)
03.
Exempt Purchases. As applied to manufacturing, processing, mining, or fabrication operations,
sales and purchases of the following tangible personal property are exempt, except as limited by other subsections of
this rule:
(4-11-06)
a.
Raw materials that become an ingredient or component part of the product which is produced.
(7-1-93)
b.
Equipment and supplies used or consumed primarily and directly in the production process and
which are necessary or essential to perform the operation. To qualify, the production use must be the primary use of
the equipment and supplies. Also, the equipment and supplies must be used directly in the production process.
(7-1-93)
c.
Chemicals and catalysts consumed in the production process which are used directly in the process
but which do not become an ingredient or component part of the property produced.
(7-1-93)
d.
equipment.
Repair parts, lubricants, hydraulic oil, and coolants, which become a component part of production
(7-1-93)
e.
activities.
Fuel, such as diesel, gasoline, and propane used in equipment while performing production exempt
(7-1-93)
f.
Chemicals and equipment used in clean-in-place systems in the food processing and food
manufacturing industries.
(7-1-93)
g.
Safety equipment and supplies required by a state or federal agency when used directly in a
production area.
(7-1-93)
h.
Equipment such as cranes, manlifts, and scissorlifts used primarily to install production equipment.
(7-1-93)
i.
Equipment used primarily to fabricate production equipment.
(7-1-93)
04.
Production Process Beginning and End. The production process begins when raw materials used
in the process are first handled by the operator at the processing plant or site. The production process ends when the
product is placed in storage, however temporary, ready for shipment or when it reaches the final form in which it will
be sold at retail, whichever occurs last.
(7-1-93)
05.
Taxable Purchases. The production exemption does not include any of the following:
(4-11-06)
a.
Motor vehicles required to be licensed by Idaho law. A motor vehicle required to be licensed, but
not actually licensed, is taxable. A motor vehicle not required to be licensed is exempt under the production
exemption only if it meets the tests in Subsection 079.03 of this rule.
(7-1-93)
b.
Repair parts for any equipment which does not qualify for the production exemption.
c.
A hand tool with a unit price of one hundred dollars ($100) or less, regardless of how necessary the
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tool may be to production, how directly it may be used in the process, or how specialized it may be.
d.
Office equipment and supplies.
(7-1-93)
(7-1-93)
e.
Safety equipment and supplies used somewhere other than a production area, such as an office, or
which are not required by a state or federal agency even if used in a production area.
(7-1-93)
f.
Equipment and supplies used in selling and distribution activities.
(7-1-93)
g.
Janitorial equipment and supplies, other than disinfectants used in the dairy industry to clean pipes,
vats, and udders, and clean-in-place equipment and chemicals used in food processing or food manufacturing.
(7-1-93)
h.
Maintenance and repair equipment and supplies which do not become component parts of
production equipment, such as welders, welding gases, shop equipment, etc.
(7-1-93)
i.
Transportation equipment and supplies.
(7-1-93)
j.
Aircraft of any type and supplies.
(7-1-93)
k.
Paint, plastic coatings, and similar products used to protect and maintain equipment, whether
applied to production equipment or other equipment.
(7-1-93)
l.
m.
exemption.
Other incidental items not directly used in production.
(7-1-93)
Fuel used in equipment while performing activities that do not qualify for the production
(7-1-93)
n.
Recreation-related vehicles regardless of use. Recreation-related vehicles are: snowmobiles; offhighway motorbikes and dual purpose motorcycles (a dual purpose motorcycle is designed for use off developed
roadways and highways, but is also equipped to be operated legally on public roads and highways); motorcycles,
motor scooters and motorized bikes; all-terrain vehicles (ATV’s), not including tractors (a tractor is a motorized
vehicle designed and used primarily as a farm implement for drawing plows, tillage equipment, and other farm
implements); portable truck campers designed for temporary living quarters; camping, park, travel, and fifth-wheel
travel-type trailers designed to provide temporary living quarters; motor homes; buses and van-type vehicles
converted to recreational use as temporary living quarters. Buses and vans are considered recreational vehicles if they
have at least four (4) of the following facilities: cooking, refrigeration or icebox, self-contained toilet, heating or air
conditioning, a portable water supply system including a faucet and sink, and separate one hundred ten to one
hundred twenty-five (110-125) volt electrical power supply or LP gas supply.
(7-1-93)
o.
Parts to repair recreation-related vehicles.
(7-1-93)
p.
Equipment used primarily to construct, improve, alter or repair real property.
(7-1-93)
06.
Real Property. The production exemption applies only to tangible personal property. It does not
apply to real property or to tangible personal property purchased with the intention of becoming improvements or
fixtures to real property.
(7-1-93)
07.
Change in Primary Use of Property. If tangible personal property is purchased for a use which
qualifies for the production exemption but later is used primarily for another purpose, it becomes taxable at its fair
market value when it ceases to qualify for the exemption. For instance, a loader may be used primarily in a mining
operation when purchased. If the primary use of the loader is later changed from mining to road building, it becomes
taxable at its fair market value when it ceases to be used for mining. If tax is paid on tangible personal property
because no exemption applies at the time of purchase, and the property later becomes eligible for the production
exemption, no refund is due the owner.
(7-1-93)
08.
Transportation Activities. Equipment and supplies used in transportation activities do not qualify
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for the production exemption.
(7-1-93)
a.
Transportation includes the movement of tangible personal property over private or public roads or
highways, canals, rivers, rail lines, through pipelines or slurry lines, or on private or public aircraft.
(7-1-93)
b.
Transportation includes movements of tangible personal property from one separate location which
is a continuous manufacturing, processing, mining, fabricating or farming activity to another separate location which
is a continuous exempt activity or process.
(7-1-93)
c.
Transportation includes movement of raw materials, except farm produce, from a point of initial
extraction or severance or importation to a point where processing, manufacturing, refining or fabrication begins. See
Rule 083 of these rules regarding farming.
(3-15-02)
09.
Exemption Certificate. To claim the production exemption the customer must complete an
exemption certificate for the seller’s records. See Rule 128 of these rules.
(3-15-02)
10.
Special Rules. Special rules apply to irrigation equipment, contractors, loggers, and farmers who
act as retailers. Refer to the specific rules relating to those subjects.
(7-1-93)
080.
LUMBER MANUFACTURING (RULE 080).
This rule is intended to illustrate the application of the production exemption to the lumber manufacturing industry.
The provisions of this rule are based upon the usual methods of doing business used in the industry generally. Factual
differences in the manner in which a specific taxpayer may conduct its business can result in determinations different
from those stated in this rule. In cases not covered by this rule, the general principles stated in Rule 079 of these rules
will control. Some equipment may be used for more than one purpose. Determinations of taxability will be based
upon the equipment’s primary use. This rule is limited in application to the manufacturing of rough and finished
lumber and does not encompass the manufacturing of plywood, particleboard, veneer, or paper products. (3-15-02)
01.
Nontaxable Activities. Generally considered as nontaxable activities are the following:
(7-1-93)
a.
Log receiving including log loaders, cranes, and front end loaders.
(7-1-93)
b.
Log deck/log pond including log loading equipment and boats moving logs from the storage area to
the debarker; sprinkler equipment when used for prevention of product deterioration; and devices used to detect metal
in logs.
(7-1-93)
c.
Debarking equipment used to strip bark from logs including conveyor equipment for moving
debarked logs further into the mill or for conveying bark when bark is used as boiler fuel or when conveying bark to
a further processing stage.
(7-1-93)
dry kiln.
d.
Chipper, used to produce chips including chip storage bins and pneumatic conveyors.
(7-1-93)
e.
Mill deck, as used for grading and cutting to length.
(7-1-93)
f.
Headrig/shotgun, as used for sawing logs.
(7-1-93)
g.
Edger, as used for edging rough lumber.
(7-1-93)
h.
Trimmer, as used for trimming to length.
(7-1-93)
i.
Resaw, as used for producing the proper thickness.
(7-1-93)
j.
Green chain, as used to determine according to size and species the amount of time required in the
(7-1-93)
k.
Dry kiln, as used to reduce moisture content. This exemption encompasses fire brick, steam pipe
and fans inside the kiln but does not include improvements to real property.
(7-1-93)
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l.
Unstackers.
(7-1-93)
m.
Planers, as used for finishing, grading and grade stamping of specialty products.
(7-1-93)
n.
Boiler when used for the generation of steam used to operate production equipment.
(7-1-93)
o.
Powerhouse when used to generate power used to operate production equipment.
(7-1-93)
p.
Waste collection, as used for the collection of waste products for use as fuel for the boiler, generally
referred to as hog fuel.
(7-1-93)
q.
Lumber wrap and steel strapping used for packaging material.
(7-1-93)
r.
Pollution control equipment when required by a state or federal agency.
(7-1-93)
s.
Equipment used primarily to install exempt equipment.
(7-1-93)
t.
Equipment used primarily to fabricate exempt equipment.
(7-1-93)
u.
Safety equipment and supplies required by a state or federal agency and used in a production area.
(7-1-93)
02.
Taxable Activities. Generally considered as taxable activities are the following:
(7-1-93)
a.
Saw filing activities using saw filing equipment and saw filing supplies.
(7-1-93)
b.
Shipping, including loading equipment and strapping, seals, and binders used in shipping activities
to secure lumber on railroad cars, trucks, etc.
(7-1-93)
c.
Cleanup.
(7-1-93)
d.
Equipment used to repair or maintain production equipment.
(7-1-93)
e.
Equipment used primarily to construct, improve, alter or repair real property.
(7-1-93)
f.
Safety equipment and supplies used in an area where no manufacturing occurs such as an office, or
which are not required by a state or federal agency even if used in a production area.
(7-1-93)
g.
Other items specifically identified as taxable in Rule 079 of these rules.
(3-15-02)
03.
Exemption Certificate. Persons engaged in lumber manufacturing who wish to purchase goods
that qualify for this exemption without paying sales tax must complete an exemption certificate. See Rule 128 of
these rules.
(3-15-02)
081.
UNDERGROUND MINING (RULE 081).
This rule is meant to show how the production exemption applies to the underground mining industry. This rule is
based on the usual methods of doing business. Differences in the way a specific taxpayer conducts his business can
result in determinations different from those in this rule. In cases not covered by this rule, the general principles in
Rule 079 of these rules apply. Determinations of taxability are based on the primary use of equipment.
(3-15-02)
01.
Nontaxable Purchases. The following are generally considered nontaxable:
(7-1-93)
a.
Development of known ore deposits, including diamond drilling and other activities to develop
levels, laterals, crosscuts, drifts, stopes, raises and shafts.
(7-1-93)
b.
Support materials, including, timber, concrete, rock bolts, shotcrete, matting, and equipment used
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to install them.
(7-1-93)
c.
Drilling of blast holes to facilitate the extraction of ore including pneumatic rock drills and
compressors used to supply compressed air to operate pneumatic rock drills.
(7-1-93)
d.
Blasting to facilitate the extraction of ore using explosives, caps, fuses, etc.
(7-1-93)
e.
Slushing/mucking to convey broken ore and waste to passes and chutes using scrapers, slushers,
muckers, hoists and loaders, and backhoes used to recover both ore and waste.
(7-1-93)
f.
Hauling, horizontal transportation, to transport ore, waste, men or materials from chutes into cars
and the movement of the cars to shaft stations using skips, hoists, hoist cable, shafts, shaft timbers, shaft stations,
shaft pockets, shaft guides, concrete, etc.
(7-1-93)
g.
Haulage, vertical transportation, to hoist ore, waste, men or materials in skips, using skips, hoists,
hoist cable, shafts, shaft timbers, shaft stations, shaft pockets, shaft guides, concrete, etc.
(7-1-93)
h.
Transportation to the surface to load the ore, waste, men or materials into main haulage cars for
transportation using locomotives, haulage cars, track and track spikes, fuel batteries used to power locomotives, and
conveyors and conveyor belts.
(7-1-93)
i.
Backfilling to pump tailings back underground as hydraulic sandfill to backfill mined-out areas
using, pumps, sumps, pipe, and concrete.
(7-1-93)
j.
Personal equipment including hard hats, miners’ lights, belts, and batteries, except any hand tool
costing one hundred dollars ($100) or less.
(7-1-93)
k.
Sampling/assaying for quality control purposes.
l.
Safety equipment and supplies required by a state or federal agency when used directly in a mining
(7-1-93)
m.
Equipment used primarily to install production equipment.
(7-1-93)
n.
Equipment used primarily to fabricate production equipment.
(7-1-93)
02.
Taxable Purchases. The following are generally considered taxable:
(7-1-93)
a.
Diamond drilling activities used for exploration.
(7-1-93)
area.
(7-1-93)
b.
Air ventilation and conditioning if an improvement to real property including fans, motors, vent
ducts; coolers; and air doors.
(7-1-93)
c.
Water lines and pumps used to remove water from the mine if improvements to real property.
(7-1-93)
d.
Safety equipment and supplies used somewhere other than a mining area, such as an office, or not
required by a state or federal agency even if used in a mining area.
(7-1-93)
e.
Maintenance and cleanup using backhoes, except when the primary use is to recover ore or waste;
equipment used to repair or maintain mining equipment; battery maintenance equipment including battery chargers,
and shop supplies and other materials or supplies which do not become a component part of production exempt
equipment.
(7-1-93)
f.
Sampling/assaying for purposes other than quality control.
g.
Other items specifically identified as taxable in Rule 079 of these rules.
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03.
Exemption Certificate. To claim this exemption underground miners must complete an exemption
certificate for the seller’s records. See Rule 128 of these rules.
(3-15-02)
082.
ABOVEGROUND, OPEN PIT, MINING (RULE 082).
This rule is meant to show how the production exemption applies to the aboveground, open pit, mining industry. This
rule is based on the usual methods of doing business in the industry. Differences in the way a specific taxpayer
conducts his business can result in determinations different than those stated in this rule. In cases not covered by this
rule, the general principles stated in Rule 079 of these rules apply. Determinations of taxability are made based on
primary use of the equipment. This rule applies only to aboveground mining activities commonly referred to as open
pit mining.
(3-15-02)
01.
Exempt Purchases. The following are generally considered nontaxable:
(7-1-93)
a.
Drilling and blasting, to loosen overburden for removal or, to define limits of existing ore bodies
using track drills, rotary drills, and compressors to operate them, drill rods, drill bits, explosives, caps, fuses, etc., for
this purpose.
(7-1-93)
b.
Ore and overburden extraction and removal using front end loaders, track loaders, power shovels,
backhoes, scoop loaders, and similar equipment used to extract and load ore or strip and load overburden. (7-1-93)
c.
Hauling of ore and overburden to stockpiles, loading sites, or disposal sites on the mine site using
scrapers, carryalls, and off-highway trucks and trailers.
(7-1-93)
d.
Ore sorting, grading, sizing, and crushing operations, including unloading from transport devices
using bulldozers, front end loaders, crushers, conveyors, and similar equipment.
(7-1-93)
e.
Pollution control equipment required by a state or federal agency. See Section 63-3622X, Idaho
(7-1-93)
f.
Safety equipment and supplies required by a state or federal agency when directly used in a mining
(7-1-93)
g.
Equipment used primarily to fabricate or install production equipment.
Code.
area.
h.
equipment.
02.
(7-1-93)
Equipment such as cranes, manlifts, and scissorlifts, used primarily to install production
(7-1-93)
Taxable Purchases. The following are generally considered taxable:
(7-1-93)
a.
Exploration, where the primary purpose is to discover new ore bodies using equipment, including
rotary drills, drill rigs, blasting equipment, seismic equipment, cats, bulldozers, and other materials and supplies,
primarily used for such activities.
(7-1-93)
b.
Real property improvements, construction, and maintenance activities, including materials and
equipment used primarily for constructing or maintaining buildings, fences, railroads, concrete pads and footings, and
roads. Equipment, including cranes, concrete equipment, and post hole diggers primarily used for such purposes.
Materials and supplies, including lumber, steel, roofing, trusses, fence posts, gates, and wire; and concrete, rebar, and
remesh.
(7-1-93)
c.
Maintenance and cleanup activities, including those where the primary purpose is to maintain
equipment and facilities or cleanup grounds and roads, except where cleanup activities are done primarily to recover
ore. Shop or other equipment used primarily to repair, clean, or maintain production equipment, including welders,
lathes, shop tools, hoists, cranes, mechanics’ trucks, oiling trucks and trailers, steam cleaners, and testing equipment.
Shop and other materials and supplies which will not become a component part of production equipment. (7-1-93)
d.
Land reclamation activities, including activities where mined ore pits or panels are filled in, shaped,
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and reseeded, including seed or seedlings, fertilizers, soil conditioners, soil, and bulldozers, scrapers, and seed drills
primarily used for this purpose; however, equipment primarily used for ore and overburden extraction and loading is
exempt, even though this equipment is also used in land reclamation.
(7-1-93)
e.
Transportation of personnel and materials, including transportation to and from worksites or about
the mine in general using buses, people movers, trailers, trucks, or similar equipment.
(7-1-93)
f.
Equipment and supplies used in transportation activities where ore or overburden is moved
between geographically separated mine sites, processing plants or disposal sites, if 1) a substantial break in the
production activities occurs, and 2) the activity does not sort, grade, size, crush, or in some other way further process
the ore. Transportation activities including loading, transporting, unloading, and stockpiling. A substantial break in
the production activities occurs when the product is transported between geographically separated production sites by
means of public roads, waterways, airways, railways, or any other public means. The production facility to which the
product is transported is a separate processing facility, and the equipment and supplies used to transport the product
are subject to tax. Examples of taxable equipment include: trucks and trailers, whether licensed or unlicensed;
railroad equipment; barges and other watercraft; pipelines; conveyors; front end loaders; and bulldozers. If the means
of transport to processing plants, smelters, etc., does not constitute a substantial break in the process, such as a slurry
line directly from the mine to the plant, then the loading and unloading activities are not taxable.
(7-1-93)
g.
Personnel support activities, including facilities, equipment, and supplies for eating, sleeping, and
recreation. Examples include eating trailers, utensils and food, clothing provided to employees at no charge, and pool
tables, beds, and linen.
(7-1-93)
h.
Other items specifically identified as taxable in Rule 079 of these rules.
(3-15-02)
03.
Exemption Certificate. To claim the production exemption, above ground miners must complete
an exemption certificate for the seller’s records. See Rule 128 of these rules.
(3-15-02)
083.
FARMING AND RANCHING (RULE 083).
This rule is intended to illustrate the application of the production exemption to the farming and ranching industry.
The provisions of this rule are based on the usual methods of doing business in the industry. Specific factual
differences in the manner in which a specific taxpayer may conduct his business can result in determinations different
from those stated in this rule. Cases not covered by this rule are controlled by the general principles stated in Rule 079
of these rules. Some equipment may be used for more than one purpose. Determinations of taxability will be based
upon the equipment’s primary use.
(3-15-02)
01.
In General. Farming includes custom farming and the operation of a farm or ranch, and includes
stock, dairy, poultry, fish, fur, fruit and truck farms, ranches, ranges, and orchards operated with the intention of
making a gain or profit. Farming does not include operation of ranches or stables where the sole purpose is showing
or racing horses, or the breeding of show or race horses.
(7-1-93)
02.
Property Primarily and Directly Used. As applied to the business of farming, the exemption
applies to all tangible personal property which is primarily and directly used to conduct the farming business, and
which is necessary or essential to the operation, except those categories of property listed in other sections of this
rule.
(7-1-93)
03.
Directly Used. The term directly used means the performance of a function reasonably necessary
to the operation of the total farming business, including, the planting, growing, harvesting, and initial storage of crops
and other agricultural products and movement of crops and produce from the place of harvest to the place of initial
storage.
(7-1-93)
04.
Transportation Activities. Equipment used to move farm produce to initial storage is exempt,
even though it may be mounted on a vehicle which is required to be licensed and is taxable. Equipment qualifies for
this exemption if:
(7-1-93)
a.
It is readily removable from the vehicle on which it is mounted;
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b.
It is separately stated on the vendor’s invoice; and
(7-1-93)
c.
It is sold to a qualified farming operation and is supported by a valid exemption claim form.
(7-1-93)
05.
Disinfectants Used in the Dairy Industry. Effective January 1, 1990, disinfectants used in the
dairy industry to clean cow udders or to clean pipes, vats, or other milking equipment are exempt.
(7-1-93)
06.
Safety Supplies. Safety supplies required by a state or federal agency and directly used in a
farming operation are exempt from sales or use tax.
(7-1-93)
07.
Plants. Plants, such as orchard trees and grape vines, are exempt.
(7-1-93)
08.
The Farming Exemption Does Not Include:
(9-1-93)
a.
Property purchased to meet the personal needs of a farmer, his family, or employees. Examples of
items that are excluded from the exemption include, but are not limited to, hand soap, toothpaste, shampoo, blankets,
sheets, pillowcases, towels, washcloths, irrigation boots, coveralls, gloves, other clothing, and grocery items.
(7-1-93)
b.
Food and supplies purchased for barnyard and household pets, such as cat and dog food, are subject
to the tax. Even though a dog may occasionally be used for herding livestock or a cat may control mice in the barn,
the supplies purchased for their care and maintenance do not qualify for the production exemption. Only when a
dog’s SOLE purpose is the herding or protection of a rancher’s livestock may the food and supplies for the dog be
purchased tax exempt under the production exemption.
(7-1-93)
c.
Livestock trailers which may be attached to motor vehicles used to transport horses, cattle, sheep,
or other farm animals on public roads are transportation equipment and are subject to sales or use tax.
(7-1-93)
d.
Motor vehicles required to be licensed are subject to sales or use tax even when used exclusively in
a farming operation. Motor vehicles purchased, but not licensed, by a farmer for use exclusively in an off-road
production activity, such as a feed truck, are not subject to sales or use tax.
(7-1-93)
e.
A hand tool, regardless of how necessary its use may be to production or how directly it may be
used, is specifically excluded from the production exemption if the unit price of the tool is one hundred dollars ($100)
or less. A hand tool is an instrument used or worked by hand. Examples of hand tools in the farming and ranching
industry include emasculators, branding irons, tattoo kits such as crimpers and rollers, eartag applicators, calf pullers,
syringes and needles, buckets, sponges, balling guns, shovels, wheelbarrows, ropes, cattle prods, whips, wrenches,
drills, and power tools. Hand tools do not include such things as feed bags, tack, halters and lead ropes, cow magnets,
and weaning rings. These items, depending on use, may qualify for the exemption. If a halter and lead rope are
purchased by a horse trainer, no exemption applies. If a halter and lead rope are purchased by a rancher to be used on
his stock horse, no tax applies.
(7-1-93)
f.
Other items specifically identified as taxable in Rule 079 of these rules.
(3-15-02)
09.
Exemption Certificate. Farmers or ranchers who wish to purchase goods that qualify for this
exemption without paying sales tax must complete an exemption certificate. See Rule 128 of these rules. (3-15-02)
084.
CONTAINERS RETURNABLE/NONRETURNABLE (RULE 084).
01.
Container. A container encloses or will enclose tangible personal property which is sold at
wholesale or retail. A container may be comprised of one (1) or more components. Items used as shipping supplies
which do not enclose the product are not considered to be containers. Example: Cartons of canned goods are placed
on a pallet. Shrink wrap is used to bind the cartons to the pallet. A shipping address label is affixed to the shrink wrap.
The container includes the cans in which the goods are enclosed; the cartons in which the canned goods are placed;
and the shrink wrap and pallet which enclose the cartons. The address label is not part of the container.
(4-6-05)
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02.
IDAPA 35.01.02
Idaho Sales & Use Tax Administrative Rules
Containers Exempt from Tax. The following containers are exempt from sales or use tax:
(7-1-93)
a.
Nonreturnable containers purchased by a retailer or wholesaler who places the contents in the
container and sells the contents with the container at retail or wholesale, including cans, barrels, boxes, cartons,
grocery sacks, disposable soft drink cups and lids, and other to-go fast food containers.
(4-6-05)
b.
Returnable containers when the container, along with the contents, is sold at retail if the fee for the
container is separately stated, including returnable beer kegs, returnable barrels, and returnable pallets.
(7-1-98)
c.
Returnable containers when sold back to retailers or manufacturers for refilling.
(7-1-93)
d.
Returnable or nonreturnable containers when sold with contents that are exempted from the tax,
regardless of whether or not the container is separately billed, including containers for prescription drugs, and oxygen
or acetylene cylinders, when the use of the gases qualifies for the production exemption.
(7-1-93)
03.
Taxable Containers. Containers subject to sales and use tax include containers used by persons
who are providing a service rather than selling a product, such as plastic clothing bags purchased by dry cleaners.
(7-1-98)
04.
Supplies. Shipping, selling, or distribution supplies are not considered to be containers and are
subject to the tax when purchased by the shipper, seller, or distributor, such as:
(7-1-93)
a.
Shipping pallets and lumber stickers when not banded or shrink wrapped to the product to be sold,
thereby not becoming a part of the container.
(7-1-93)
b.
Banding or binders used to secure goods to transportation equipment.
(7-1-93)
c.
Price stickers and address labels affixed to containers that do not provide any product information
such as weight, quantity, nutritional value, or other necessary product description. See Rule 042 of these rules.
(4-6-05)
d.
Example: Plywood is wrapped with lumber wrap. The bundles are rested on pallets for shipping. In
this example the lumber wrap is the only container. As the bundles are not enclosed onto the pallet, the pallet is not a
container and is instead a shipping supply subject to the tax.
(7-1-93)
085.
SALES TO AND PURCHASES BY NONPROFIT ORGANIZATIONS (RULE 085).
01.
In General. The Sales Tax Act does not provide any general exemption for, charitable or nonprofit
organizations, corporations, associations or other entities. Specific statutory provisions provide exemptions for some
charitable organizations. Unless an exemption is clearly granted to a specific organization or to specific sales or
purchases by a specific organization or a class of organization, no exemption applies. Special rules apply to religious
organizations. See Rule 086 of these rules.
(3-6-00)
02.
Educational Institutions. Sales to and purchases made by non-profit educational institutions, as
defined in Section 63-3622O, Idaho Code, are exempt from Idaho sales or use taxes.
(3-6-00)
03.
Health Related Entities. Sales to and purchases made by the specific health related entities listed
in Section 63-3622O, Idaho Code, are exempt from Idaho sales or use taxes. Health related organizations not named
are not entitled to any exemption from sales and use taxes as a health related entity.
(3-6-00)
04.
Hospitals. In addition to the health related entities listed in Section 63-3622O, Idaho Code,
hospitals which are nonprofit institutions licensed for the care of ill persons are exempt. To qualify for the exemption
the hospital must be a facility defined in Section 39-1301(a), Idaho Code, and licensed as provided in Chapter 13,
Title 39, Idaho Code, or an equivalent law in another state. Hospitals operated for profit do not qualify for this
exemption, nor do nursing homes, clinics, doctors’ offices, or similar facilities unless the organization qualifies for an
exemption under Section 63-3622O, Idaho Code.
(3-6-00)
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05.
Idaho Foodbank Warehouse, Inc. The Idaho Foodbank Warehouse, Inc. is a nonprofit
corporation which gathers food and food products at one (1) central location for distribution to food banks throughout
Idaho. All sales to, donations to, and purchases by the Idaho Foodbank Warehouse, Inc., are exempt from sales and
use taxes.
(3-6-00)
a.
Example 1: The XYC Corporation purchases food from a grocer to donate to the Idaho Foodbank
Warehouse, Inc. The XYC Corporation must pay sales tax on the purchase since they are not purchasing the food for
resale and no other exemption applies.
(3-6-00)
b.
purchase.
Example 2: The Idaho Food Bank Warehouse, Inc. purchases office supplies. No tax is due on the
(3-6-00)
06.
Food Banks and Soup Kitchens. Food banks or soup kitchens are nonprofit organizations, other
than the Idaho Foodbank Warehouse, Inc., which, as one of their regular activities, furnish food to others without
charge. Sales to, donations to, and purchases of food or tangible personal property used by food banks and soup
kitchens other than the Idaho Foodbank Warehouse, Inc. to grow, store, prepare, or serve food are exempt from sales
and use taxes. However, there is no exemption from the sales tax if goods are purchased with the intent and purpose
of donation to a qualified organization. This exemption does not extend to the sale, purchase, or use of licensed motor
vehicles by food banks or soup kitchens.
(3-6-00)
a.
Example 1: A grocer removes food from his inventory of goods held for resale to donate to a food
bank or soup kitchen. The grocer is exempt from the use tax on his cost of the inventory donated.
(3-6-00)
b.
Example 2: The XYZ Corporation purchases food from a grocer to donate to a food bank. The
XYZ Corporation is not purchasing the food items for resale, and no other exemption from sales tax applies. Sales tax
must be paid on the purchase.
(7-1-93)
c.
Example 3: A food bank purchases a licensed motor vehicle. The purchase is subject to sales tax
because the motor vehicle is not used to grow, prepare, or serve food.
(3-6-00)
07.
Red Cross. Sales to the American Red Cross are exempted from state sales tax by federal law.
(7-1-93)
08.
Nonsale Clothiers. Nonprofit organizations, one of whose primary functions is to provide clothing
to the needy without charge, may purchase the clothing without paying tax. Only clothing qualifies for the exemption.
Other purchases by the organization are taxable. Clothing may also be removed from a resale inventory and donated
to these organizations exempt from use tax. However, there is no exemption from the sales tax if goods are purchased
with the intent and purpose of donation to a qualified organization.
(3-6-00)
a.
Example 1: A department store removes clothing from resale merchandise to donate to a nonprofit,
nonsale clothier. The store is exempt from the use tax on the cost of the inventory donated.
(7-1-93)
b.
Example 2: A nonprofit, nonsale clothier purchases clothing and bed sheets from a department
store to give to the needy. No tax is due on the clothing, but the store must charge the organization sales tax on the bed
sheets.
(7-1-93)
09.
Exemption Certificate. The organizations listed in this rule may make purchases without paying
sales tax to the vendor by completing an exemption certificate. See Rule 128 of these rules.
(3-6-00)
10.
Literature. The sale, purchase, use, or other consumption of literature, pamphlets, periodicals,
tracts, books, tapes, audio CDs, and other literature which is produced in a machine readable format that are both
published and sold by an entity qualified under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code are exempt from the
tax if no part of the net earnings benefits any individual or shareholder.
(3-6-00)
11.
Sales by Nonprofit Organizations. An exemption from sales tax on sales to one of the foregoing
entities does not constitute an exemption from the requirements to collect and remit tax when the entity makes taxable
sales to purchasers not exempt from tax. When an exempt organization qualifies as a retailer the organization must
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register with the State Tax Commission, obtain a seller’s permit, and collect and remit sales taxes on sales as defined
in Section 63-3612, Idaho Code, in the same manner and in accordance with the same statutes and rules which govern
all other retailers in the state. There are two (2) exceptions to this rule.
(3-6-00)
a.
Sales of places to sleep by the Idaho Ronald McDonald house are exempt from sales taxes.
(3-6-00)
b.
Sales of admissions by an entity qualified under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code, or
by an organization conducting an exempt function defined in Section 527 of the Internal Revenue Code when:
(3-6-00)
i.
The event is not predominately recreational or commercial; and
(3-6-00)
ii.
Any entertainment value included in the admission charge is minimal when compared to the charge
for admission; and
(3-6-00)
iii.
Such entity has paid a sales or use tax on taxable purchases or tangible personal property or
services consumed during the event.
(3-6-00)
12.
Senior Citizen Centers. Sales to certain senior citizen centers are exempt from sales tax. The
definition of “senior citizen center” in Section 63-3622O, Idaho Code, is the same as the definition of a “multipurpose
senior center” as defined in the Older Americans Act, Title 42, Section 3002, United States Code. To qualify for the
exemption the center must have been granted exempt status pursuant to Section 501(c) (3) of the Internal Revenue
Code. Long-term care facilities do not qualify for this exemption.
(4-2-08)
13.
Free Dental Clinics. Sales to and purchases by organizations providing free dental care to children
are exempt from sales and use tax. For the purposes of this exemption “children” shall mean persons under the age of
eighteen (18). To qualify for the exemption property or services must be:
(4-2-08)
086.
a.
Purchased by an organization whose primary purpose is providing free dental care to children; and
(4-2-08)
b.
Primarily used by an organization whose primary purpose is providing free dental care to children.
(4-2-08)
SALES AND PURCHASES BY RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS (RULE 086).
01.
In General. The Sales Tax Act does not provide a GENERAL exemption from sales or use tax for
religious organizations. Other than the exemptions discussed in this rule, sales and purchases by religious
organizations are subject to tax.
(7-1-93)
02.
Meals Sold by a Church to Members Only. An exemption is provided by Section 63-3622J,
Idaho Code, for the sale of meals by a church to its members at a church function. For the exemption to apply, the
meals must be sold to members only.
(7-1-93)
a.
If the meal is open to members only, the church may purchase the food without paying tax by
providing the vendor of the food with a properly completed exemption certificate or, if the church holds an Idaho
seller’s permit number, it may provide the vendor with a properly completed resale certificate. See Rule 128 of these
rules.
(3-15-02)
b.
If the meal is open to persons other than members of the church, this exemption does not apply. See
Subsection 086.03 of this rule.
(3-15-02)
c.
Food purchased to prepare meals which are not sold by the church, such as meals for resident
pastors or for nuns living in a convent or associated with a hospital, is subject to tax.
(7-1-93)
03.
Incidental Sales by Religious Corporations or Societies. Incidental sales by religious
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organizations are exempt from sales taxes by Section 63-3622KK, Idaho Code, beginning July 1, 1990. The
exemption applies to sales of tangible personal property and other sales defined as subject to sales tax by the Idaho
Code, including taxes imposed on providing hotel/motel and campground accommodations. For the exemption to
apply, the following conditions must be met:
(7-1-93)
a.
If selling tangible personal property, the goods sold must either have been taxed when purchased by
the organization or received as a gift.
(7-1-93)
b.
The proceeds from the sales made by the organization must be used exclusively in the programs of
the organization which may include any combination of religious worship, education, and recreation.
(7-1-93)
c.
The sale may not be made to the general public in the open market in regular business competition.
(7-1-93)
d.
Example 1: A church has a used clothing store. The items sold are not exempt from the sales tax
because the store makes sales to the general public in regular competition with similar enterprises.
(7-1-93)
e.
Example 2: A church holds an annual pancake breakfast in its basement. The meal is advertised and
open to the public. If the church pays tax on the breakfast ingredients, it is not required to collect sales tax on the sale
of the meals. Although the meal is open to the general public, the church is not in REGULAR competition with other
food-serving enterprises.
(7-1-93)
f.
Example 3: A school owned by a religious corporation sells school supplies and meals only to its
students. If the school pays tax when it purchases these items, it is not required to collect sales tax on the sales to its
students. If, however, the school has a bookstore or cafeteria which is open to the general public, it must collect the
sales tax.
(7-1-93)
g.
Example 4: A school owned by a religious corporation sells admissions to its students to attend
athletic events through the sale of activity cards, and also sells admissions to the general public. The school must
collect sales tax. The sale is open to the general public and is in regular competition with other recreational events to
which admissions are charged.
(7-1-93)
04.
Sales of Literature by a Nonprofit Corporation. Literature which is both published and sold by
qualifying nonprofit corporations is exempt from sales tax. Refer to Rule 085 of these rules.
(3-15-02)
087.
LEASE OR RENTAL OF MOTION PICTURE TELEVISION FILM (RULE 087).
The sales tax or use tax is not applicable to rentals or leases of motion picture film to theaters or other exhibiting
enterprises where admission to the showing of films is subject to the sales tax. In the case of radio and television
stations, the purchase of films, tapes or records is exempt.
(7-1-93)
088.
SALE OR PURCHASE OF MATTER USED TO PRODUCE HEAT BY BURNING (RULE 088).
01.
Scope. Matter used to produce heat by burning shall include natural gas, liquefied propane, coal,
wood, oil, petroleum, and their by-products.
(7-1-93)
02.
Limitation. The phrase used to produce heat by burning shall mean the act of incineration of
materials defined in Subsection 088.01 of this rule in a furnace or similar device for the purpose of raising or
maintaining the temperature in an enclosed space, dwelling, or building including a building under construction, and
shall also include heating water and cooking. Heating fuel delivered in bulk to a dwelling or building for this purpose
and properly identified as such by the vendor in his books and records, on the delivery ticket, and invoice to the
customer relieves the vendor of the responsibility to obtain a sales tax exemption certificate, from the purchaser.
(7-1-93)
03.
Liquefied Propane. Sales of liquefied propane in units of fifteen (15) gallons or less, identified in
the vendor’s records as cylinder sales, will be considered to be used to produce heat by burning as defined in
Subsection 088.02 of this rule. These sales will not require that a sales tax exemption certificate be obtained from the
purchaser, and shall be exempt from the tax regardless of the use to which the purchaser places the liquefied propane.
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(3-15-02)
04.
Documentation of Other Exempt Sales. All other sales of natural gas, liquefied propane, coal,
wood, oil, petroleum, and its by-products are subject to the tax, unless specifically exempted or excluded elsewhere in
the Sales Tax Act. Such exempted or excluded sales must be documented in the following manner:
(7-1-93)
a.
of these rules.
If purchased for resale, the vendor must obtain a properly executed resale certificate. See Rule 128
(3-15-02)
b.
If purchased to produce heat by burning as defined in Subsection 088.02 of this rule and not bulk
delivered to the customer by the vendor, the vendor must either obtain a properly executed exemption certificate from
the purchaser, or require the purchaser to complete a stamped or imprinted statement on the face of the sales invoice
containing the following language:
I certify that the gas I have purchased will be used in a furnace or similar device for the purpose of water
heating, cooking, or raising or maintaining the temperature in an enclosed space, dwelling, or building.
This tax exemption statement qualifies if this statement is signed by the purchaser and the name and address
of the purchaser is shown on the invoice.
Any person who signs this certificate with the intention of evading payment of tax is guilty of a
misdemeanor.
___________________________________
BUYER’S SIGNATURE
The signature of the purchaser on this statement must be in addition to any other signature required on the invoice.
(7-1-93)
c.
If the purchaser claims an exemption from the tax for reasons other than heat by burning, a properly
executed exemption certificate must be obtained. See Rule 128 of these rules.
(3-15-02)
089.
BOY SCOUT, GIRL SCOUT AND 4-H GROUP SALES AND PURCHASES (RULE 089).
01.
Sales by Scout and 4-H Groups. In general, when a Scout or 4-H group makes retail sales to their
members or to the public, they are a retailer and must obtain an Idaho seller’s permit number.
(7-1-93)
a.
Sales to Members. Tangible personal property sold to members is subject to sales tax, including
badges, insignia, uniforms, and magazines. Camp fees are subject to sales tax. Dues charged to members are not
taxable.
(7-1-93)
b.
Sales by Members. Sales of tangible personal property by members, such as cookies, food, and
magazines are subject to the sales tax. The club is responsible for the collection and remittance of the tax. (7-1-93)
c.
Sales of Animals. Sales of animals in conjunction with a fair or at the Western Idaho Spring Lamb
Sale by 4-H or FFA club members are not taxable.
(7-1-93)
02.
Purchases by Scout and 4-H Groups.
(7-1-93)
a.
When a fee is charged to members to attend a camp, the food for the camp may be purchased by the
club without paying tax. The club must provide the retailers of the food a validly executed resale certificate. See Rule
128 of these rules.
(3-15-02)
b.
Other tangible personal property purchased for resale to members of the club or to the public may
be purchased without tax as in Subsection 089.02.a. of this rule.
(3-15-02)
c.
Materials and supplies purchased by the club for its own use and not for resale are subject to the
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tax. The club must pay tax to the vendor.
090.
(7-1-93)
GAS, WATER, ELECTRICITY DELIVERED TO CUSTOMERS (RULE 090).
01.
In General. Gas, water and electricity delivered to customers shall include those products of public
or private utility service or user’s cooperative or similar organizations when sold to customers for such customer’s
use.
(7-1-93)
02.
Telephone Service. Electricity shall also include the dial tone for telephone utility service.
(7-1-93)
091.
SALES TO INDIANS (RULE 091).
01.
Sales to Indians. Indians may make sales tax free purchases if these purchases are made within the
boundaries of an Indian Reservation. The retailer must insist upon proof of the fact that a purchaser is an enrolled
member of an Indian tribe. Presentation of an identification card issued by one (1) of the Indian tribes will be
acceptable for this purpose.
(7-1-93)
02.
Records. The retailer must maintain records in support of these exempt sales. Any of the following
methods may be accepted by the Tax Commission:
(7-1-93)
a.
the sales slip.
Recording of the purchaser’s name and number from the purchaser’s tribal identification card on
(7-1-93)
b.
Recording the name and number from the purchaser’s tribal identification card on the cash register
tape beside the record of the purchase.
(7-1-93)
c.
Completion of an exemption certificate recording the number from the purchaser’s tribal
identification card.
(7-1-93)
03.
092.
Sales of Motor Vehicles to Indians. See ISTC 107.
(7-1-93)
OUT-OF-STATE SALES (RULE 092).
01.
Out-of-State Sales. Section 63-3622Q, Idaho Code, does not distinguish between purchases made
by Idaho residents and nonresidents. The purchase of tangible personal property for delivery by the seller outside the
state through either a common carrier, U.S. mails or seller’s delivery service is not subject to sales tax.
(7-1-93)
02.
Records.The seller must maintain records to support the exemption claimed in this fashion.
Shipping data in the form of bills of lading, postal receipts or invoices setting forth the out-of-state destination with
adequate supporting documentation will be accepted as evidence of the exemption.
(7-1-93)
093.
SALES AND USE TAX LIABILITY OF FEDERAL AND STATE CREDIT UNIONS, NATIONAL
AND STATE BANKS, AND FEDERAL AND STATE SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATIONS (RULE 093).
01.
Purchases by Credit Unions. Purchases by Federal Credit Unions are exempt from sales and use
tax under the provisions of 12 U.S.C. 1768. Purchases by state-chartered credit unions are exempted from sales and
use tax by Section 26-2138, Idaho Code, and purchases by Idaho corporate credit unions are exempted from sales and
use tax by Section 26-2186, Idaho Code.
(7-1-93)
02.
Purchases by Banks and Savings and Loan Associations. Purchases by national and state banks,
as well as federal and state savings and loan associations, are subject to sales and use tax.
(7-1-93)
03.
Sales by Credit Unions, Banks, Savings and Loan Associations. When acting as a retailer, all
retail sales made by credit unions, banks, and savings and loan associations are subject to sales tax.
(7-1-93)
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094.
EXEMPTIONS ON PURCHASES BY POLITICAL SUBDIVISIONS, SALES BY THE STATE OF
IDAHO, ITS DEPARTMENTS, INSTITUTIONS, AND ALL OTHER POLITICAL SUBDIVISIONS (RULE
094).
01.
In General. This rule governs application of the sales and use tax to governmental
instrumentalities. As used herein, the term governmental instrumentalities means the state of Idaho, its agencies,
departments or institutions and all political subdivisions of the state of Idaho; but does not include other states, their
agencies, departments, or institutions and political subdivisions.
(7-1-93)
02.
Extent of Exemptions. The state and all its agencies, departments and institutions are exempt from
the sales and use tax. This exemption does not extend to corporations, the stock of which is owned in whole or in part
by the state, nor does it extend to private agencies to which the state contributes funds. The exemption only applies in
the case of purchases made directly by the state, its agencies, departments, and institutions.
(7-1-93)
03.
Political Subdivisions. Political subdivisions of this state are also exempt from payment of the
sales and use tax. A political subdivision is a governmental organization which embraces a certain territory organized
for public advantage and not in the interest of private individuals or classes to which has been delegated certain
functions of state government. In addition to this, a political subdivision has the power to levy taxes. Included within
the definition of political subdivisions would be all counties, municipalities, townships, towns and villages, public
school districts, cemetery maintenance districts, fire protection districts, local improvement districts and irrigation
districts. Canal companies and ditch companies do not come within the scope of this exemption.
(7-1-93)
04.
Purchases by Contractors. Contractors are consumers under Idaho tax law. Purchases made by
contractors are subject to tax even though they are to be applied to use on a state or political subdivision construction
project.
(7-1-93)
05.
Sales by Political Subdivisions. Sales by the state, its departments or institutions, counties, cities,
school districts or any political subdivision are subject to sales tax which is to be collected by the political
subdivision. If taxable sales are made, a permit is required. This permit is to be obtained by each sales outlet or by the
office at which regular and current sales records are maintained. Examples of taxable sales are all sales of tangible
personal property, admission charges, fees to use recreational facilities, recreational program fees, copies of
documents for which a fee is not set by Idaho Code and garbage service when receptacles or dumpsters are provided
by the service and part of the fee represents rental of the receptacle.
(7-1-93)
a.
Taxable sales. Taxable sales of tangible personal property will include sales of: code books; books
sold by library, book fairs, etc.; maps; crime prevention signs; calendars; cafeteria sales to employees or the public;
office supplies or any sale to employees; concession stands; trees, shrubs, or bedding plants; items sold to prisoners,
such as cigarettes, candy, pop, etc., through vending machines (tax is to be computed on one hundred seventeen
percent (117%) of acquisition cost if the machine is operated by the political subdivision); chemicals for noxious
weeds; unclaimed property; chemicals for pest control; surplus property-assets; gravel, culverts, or pipe; uniforms to
employees; equipment rentals with no operator; grave markers; rental of other property, golf carts, swimsuits; and
nonresident or resident library cards. See ISTC Rule 058.
(7-1-93)
b.
Admission charges. Taxable admission charges will include those fees for using golf courses and
swimming pools, for attending athletic events, concerts, fireworks displays, and fund raising events.
(3-4-10)
c.
Use of facilities for recreation. Taxable use of facilities for a recreational purpose will include
receipts from the use of park structures, picnic tables, fair grounds, rodeo grounds, gymnasiums, ball parks,
snowmobile areas and campground areas. Exception: If an individual or organization rents or leases one of these
facilities and charges admission to each person using the facility, tax will not be required on its rental or lease of the
facility. However, the individual or organization will be required to register and apply for a seller’s permit number,
under which the tax on the admission will be reported and paid. See ISTC Rule 030.
(7-1-93)
d.
Recreation program fees. Fees to participate in recreational programs are taxable. Some examples
of these programs are city recreational programs in softball, baseball, basketball and football. If instruction is
included in such activities as tennis, golf or swimming, the tax will not be due on the separately stated instructional
portion of the total fee. If not separately stated, the entire fee is taxable.
(7-1-93)
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e.
Garbage service. Garbage service is taxable on that portion of the total charge which is the rental of
the receptacle such as a dumpster. If the statement for service includes the rental of the dumpster or other receptacle
but the rental charge is not separately stated, the entire cost of the service is taxable.
(7-1-93)
f.
The examples cited above are not inclusive.
(7-1-93)
06.
Federal Government. Sales to and purchases by the federal government and its instrumentalities
are not subject to Idaho sales or use taxes except as provided by federal laws or regulations.
(7-1-93)
07.
Other States. Sales to and purchases by states OTHER than Idaho and their political subdivisions
are subject to the tax if delivery occurs in this state.
(7-1-93)
095.
MONEY OPERATED DISPENSING EQUIPMENT (RULE 095).
01.
Money Operated Dispensing Equipment. Effective July 1, 1990, the sale, purchase, lease, or
rental of money-operated dispensing equipment is exempt from tax if the equipment is only used to dispense a
tangible product, amusement, or service on which a retail sales tax is imposed by the state of Idaho.
(7-1-93)
02.
Parts, Kits, or Supplies. This exemption does not apply to parts, kits, or supplies used to repair,
refurbish, or upgrade the dispensing equipment. Refer to Section 63-3622II, Idaho Code.
(7-1-93)
096.
IRRIGATION EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES (RULE 096).
01.
Agricultural Irrigation. The Sales Tax Act exempts all irrigation equipment and supplies which
are used directly for agricultural irrigation, except hand tools with the unit price of less than one hundred dollars
($100). The hand tool exception includes such property as shovels and similar tools. To qualify for the exemption, the
irrigation equipment or supplies must be used directly and primarily for agricultural irrigation purposes. If the use of
the particular equipment or supplies is only incidental or only indirectly related to the agricultural irrigation process,
the exemption will not apply. Examples include:
(7-1-93)
a.
An off-highway motorbike or all-terrain vehicle, ATV, used to transport men or equipment is
indirectly related to the irrigation process.
(7-1-93)
b.
Irrigation boots worn to protect the irrigator are incidental to the process and subject to the tax.
(7-1-93)
02.
Nonagricultural Irrigation Equipment or Supplies. Irrigation equipment or supplies used for
any purpose other than agriculture are not exempt. For example, irrigation pipelines or sprinkler systems used on a
golf course are taxable.
(7-1-93)
03.
Real Property Improvements. The exemption applies regardless of whether the equipment
becomes a part of real estate. It is not necessary to distinguish between pipeline which retains its identity as tangible
personal property and pipeline which may become incorporated into real property such as buried mainline pipe.
(7-1-93)
04.
Title to Equipment. The exemption applies regardless of whether the equipment is installed by a
farmer, a contractor, or a subcontractor. The incidence of tax will not turn upon the determination of whether title to
the irrigation equipment passed at the time of sale or subsequent to installation.
(7-1-93)
05.
Exemption Certificate. A purchaser’s right to the exemption shall be documented by the use of an
exemption certificate in the manner prescribed by Rule 128 of these rules.
(3-15-02)
097.
YARD SALES (RULE 097).
01.
In General. Tangible personal property may be sold tax exempt at a home yard sale if the yard sale
meets the qualifications specified in this rule. A home yard sale is characterized by the following:
(7-1-93)
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a.
IDAPA 35.01.02
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The sale must be of short duration lasting no more than a few days.
(7-1-93)
b.
The seller may not be in the business of regularly selling the same or similar property as that which
is offered for sale at the yard sale.
(7-1-93)
c.
The items offered for sale at the yard sale may not be items which are specifically purchased for the
purpose of reselling them.
(7-1-93)
d.
The items offered for sale must be owned by the seller, no consignment sales may be made.
(7-1-93)
e.
The sale must be conducted on the residential premises of the seller.
(7-1-93)
02.
Exempt Yard Sales. An individual seller may only conduct two (2) exempt yard sales in the course
of one (1) calendar year. Two (2) or more sellers may join together to conduct a single yard sale which will be
considered to be a sale conducted by both such sellers. A home yard sale will include sales referred to as garage sales,
moving sales, and other similar such sales if the prerequisites of this rule are otherwise met.
(7-1-93)
098.
FOREIGN DIPLOMATS (RULE 098).
01.
In General. The United States Government grants immunity from state taxes to diplomats from
certain foreign countries. The diplomat is issued a federal tax exemption card by the U.S. Department of State. The
cards are nontransferable and bear a photograph of the holder, a federal tax exemption number, and specific
instructions as to the extent of the exemption granted to the diplomat.
(5-3-03)
02.
Federal Tax Exemption Cards. Federal tax exemption cards are coded with colored stripes. Cards
with a blue stripe exempt the bearer from all sales taxes, including taxes on hotel rooms. Cards with a yellow stripe
list all restrictions on tax exemptions on the face of the card. Cards with stripes colored red or green are no longer
issued but some may still be in use and have limitations that are printed on the face of the card.
(5-3-03)
03.
Mission Card. Some foreign diplomats are issued mission cards that may only be used by the
bearer for official foreign mission purchases, and may not, under any circumstances, be used for personal purchases.
“Mission cards” are so designated on the card’s face.
(5-3-03)
04.
a.
exempt sale; or
Documentation. Retailers must document an exempt sale to a foreign diplomat by:
(7-1-93)
Retaining a photocopy of the front and back of the federal tax exemption card to support the
(7-1-93)
b.
Recording for their permanent record the name of the bearer, the mission represented, the federal
tax exemption number displayed on the card, the date of expiration, and the nature of the exemption granted to the
diplomat.
(7-1-93)
099.
OCCASIONAL SALES (RULE 099).
01.
Occasional Seller. Sales of tangible personal property by an occasional seller are exempt from
sales and use tax. In order to qualify as an occasional sale, the seller must not make more than two (2) sales of
tangible personal property in a twelve (12) month period, nor hold himself out as engaged in the business of selling
tangible personal property.
(7-1-98)
a.
If the sale does not qualify as an occasional sale, the seller becomes a retailer, is required to register
for an Idaho seller’s permit, and must collect and remit sales tax. See Section 63-3610, Idaho Code.
(7-1-98)
b.
Proof of occasional sale. An occasional seller of tangible personal property must provide a written
statement to the purchaser if requested. An occasional seller of a transport trailer or office trailer may use Form ST108 to document his occasional sale claim. For occasional sales of other tangible personal property, the purchaser
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must obtain a written statement from the seller verifying that the seller is not a retailer and has made no more than one
(1) other sale of tangible personal property within the last twelve (12) months. The seller’s name and address, the
date, and the seller’s signature must appear on the statement. The purchaser must retain the occasional sale statement
provided by the seller as evidence that the purchase of the tangible personal property is not subject to use tax.
(3-15-02)
c.
Sales arranged by a third party are taxable. If any sales agent, licensed or unlicensed, participates in
the sale of tangible personal property, the sale is taxable. See Rule 020 of these rules.
(3-15-02)
02.
Change in the Form of Doing Business. A change in the form of doing business qualifies for an
occasional sale exemption when the ultimate ownership of the property is substantially unchanged. Example: The
incorporation of a partnership qualifies for an occasional sale exemption when substantially all of the property owned
by the partnership is transferred to the corporation, and the stockholders of the corporation own substantially the
same proportion of the corporation’s stock as they owned in the partnership interest as partners.
(7-1-93)
03.
Bulk Sale -- Sale of an On-Going Business. The sale of substantially all of the operating assets of
a business or of a separate division, branch, or identifiable segment of a business qualifies for the occasional sale
exemption if:
(7-1-98)
a.
The purchaser continues the same type of business operation; and
(7-1-93)
b.
Prior to the sale the income and expenses attributable to the separate division, branch, or
identifiable segment can be determined from the accounting records and books.
(7-1-93)
c.
Example: Corporation X sells its entire wood products division to Corporation Y, which continues
to operate it in substantially the same form. The transaction qualifies for an occasional sale exemption.
(7-1-93)
04.
Sale of a Motor Vehicle Between Family Members. Sales of motor vehicles between family
members related within the second degree of consanguinity, blood relationship, qualify for the occasional sale
exemption but only if the seller paid a sales or use tax when the motor vehicle was acquired.
(7-1-93)
a.
Example 1: A brother sells his automobile to his sister. The brother purchased the car from an Idaho
dealer and paid Idaho sales tax on the original purchase. No tax applies to the sale of the vehicle to the sister.
(7-1-93)
b.
Example 2: A mother sells her automobile to her son for five thousand dollars ($5,000). The mother
is an Oregon resident and did not pay a sales or use tax when she purchased the automobile. The son, who is a
resident of Idaho, must pay Idaho use tax on the five thousand dollar ($5,000) purchase price of the automobile.
(7-1-93)
05.
Transfers Between Related Parties. The transfer of capital assets between related parties qualifies
for an occasional sale exemption, but only if the person transferring the asset has paid a sales or use tax when the
asset was acquired. Exempt transfers between related parties include: capital assets transferred in and out of
businesses by owners, partners, shareholders stockholders, when the transfer is made only in exchange for equity in
the business, and capital assets transferred between a parent corporation and its subsidiary, if the parent owns at least
eighty percent (80%) of the subsidiary, and transfers between subsidiary corporations with a common parent, if the
parent owns at least eighty percent (80%) of both, and if the transfers are made only in exchange for stock or
securities.
(4-11-06)
a.
Example: Two (2) individuals form a partnership. Each contributes a car in exchange for a
percentage of ownership in the business. If each partner paid sales tax when he purchased his vehicle, no sales tax
applies to the transfer of the vehicle into the partnership.
(7-1-97)
b.
Example: Three (3) individuals are equal partners in a construction business. They dissolve the
partnership, and each person takes one-third (1/3) of the capital assets as his share of the equity in the business. If tax
was paid on the assets when they were purchased by the partnership, sales tax does not apply to the transfer of the
assets from the partnership to the co-owners.
(7-1-93)
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c.
Example: A corporation-owned car is given to a shareholder as a bonus for special
accomplishments. There is no change in the recipient’s shareholdings. The shareholder must pay tax on the bonus
based on the value of the car, regardless of whether the corporation paid tax when the car was purchased. The
exemption does not apply because the transfer of the car did not change the shareholder’s equity.
(7-1-93)
06.
Sales and Rentals to Related Parties. The sale of a capital asset to a related party qualifies for the
occasional sale exemption, but only if the seller has paid sales or use tax when the asset was acquired or if the seller
acquired the asset from a related party who paid sales tax on acquisition of the asset. Rentals and leases of capital
assets between related parties will also qualify for the occasional sale exemption, but only if the initial related party
paid sales tax upon acquisition of the asset. If the initial purchaser does not pay sales or use tax upon the purchase of
a capital asset and then leases the asset to a related party, the lessor must collect and remit sales tax on the lease
payments. The lease payments must also represent a reasonable rental value for the asset. Exempt transactions
between related parties include sales, rentals, and leases of capital assets other than aircraft, boats and vessels,
snowmobiles, off-highway motorbikes, and recreational vehicles, as defined by Section, 63-3622HH, Idaho Code,
such as the following:
(4-11-06)
a.
Sales to family members, but only if all parties to the sale are related within the second degree of
consanguinity, relationship by blood, or affinity, relationship by marriage, i.e., spouses, children, parents, brothers,
sisters, or grandparents. Example: A father and son are the stockholders of Corporation A. This corporation sells a
business asset to Proprietorship B, which is owned by the son’s grandfather. This sale is exempt as long as
Corporation A paid sales tax when the asset was acquired.
(7-1-98)
b.
Sales in which the new owners are identical to the prior owners. Example: Corporation B owns one
hundred percent (100%) of Corporation A. If the initial purchaser paid tax when it acquired an asset, it may sell the
asset to the other without tax. Example: John Doe owns one hundred percent (100%) of a corporation. He buys a
truck and pays sales tax. He later sells the truck to his corporation. No tax applies to the sale of the truck to the
corporation. Example: A and B each own fifty percent (50%) of a partnership. The partnership buys a capital asset
and pays sales tax to the vendor. The partnership immediately leases the asset to Corporation C. A owns ten percent
(10%) of Corporation C and B owns ninety percent (90%) of Corporation C. Since the percentages of ownership of
the partnership and the corporation are not identical, the lease transaction does not qualify for the occasional sale
exemption. The partnership must seek a refund of the sales tax paid on acquisition of the asset and collect and remit
sales tax on the lease payments.
(7-1-97)
07.
Motor Vehicles. Sales of licensed motor vehicles are not considered occasional sales and are
taxable, except under the provisions of Subsections 099.02 through 099.06 of this rule. If a motor vehicle transfer
qualifies for an exemption under Subsections 099.02 through 099.06 of this rule, the purchaser must complete an
appropriate exemption claim form prior to applying for an Idaho motor vehicle title. See Rule 107 of these rules
regarding sales of licensed motor vehicles that do not qualify as occasional sales and the appropriate exemption claim
form.
(4-11-06)
08.
Sales of Business Assets. Also excluded from the category of occasional sales, other than as
provided by Subsection 099.06 of this rule, are sales of assets or other items of tangible personal property used in an
activity requiring a seller’s permit. Even though the item sold is not of the type normally sold by the seller in his
regular course of business, the sale is subject to the tax. Example: A construction equipment dealership sells its office
computer. Even though the seller does not normally sell computers, it must collect sales tax on the sale of the
computer as the computer is used in a business requiring a seller’s permit.
(7-1-93)
09.
Taxable Sales of Aircraft, Boats, and Recreation Related Vehicles. The occasional sale
exemptions defined in Subsections 099.01 and 099.06 of this rule do not apply to the sale or purchase of the
following:
(7-1-97)
a.
Code.
Snowmobiles, including those required to be numbered as provided by Section 67-7102, Idaho
(7-1-97)
b.
Off-highway motorbikes and dual purpose motorcycles. A dual purpose motorcycle is designed for
use off developed roadways and highways, but is also equipped to be legally operated on public roadways and
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highways.
(7-1-93)
c.
All-terrain vehicles, ATV’s, but not including tractors. A tractor is a motorized vehicle designed
and used primarily as a farm implement for drawing plows, mowing machines, and other farm implements. (7-1-93)
d.
Portable truck campers designed for temporary living quarters, but not including pickup shells or
canopies that do not have a floor.
(7-1-93)
e.
living quarters.
f.
Camping, park, travel, and fifth-wheel travel-type trailers which are designed to provide temporary
(7-1-93)
Motor homes.
(7-1-93)
g.
Buses and van-type vehicles when converted to recreational use as temporary living quarters and
providing at least four (4) of the following facilities: cooking; refrigeration or icebox; self-contained toilet; heating or
air conditioning; a portable water supply system including a faucet and sink; and separate one hundred ten to one
hundred twenty-five (110-125) volt electrical power supply or LP gas supply.
(7-1-93)
h.
Aircraft, meaning any device which is designed or used for navigation of or flight in the air, except
a parachute or other device designed for such navigation but used primarily as safety equipment. See Rule 037 of
these rules regarding other exemption provided for aircraft.
(3-15-02)
i.
Boats or vessels, meaning every description of watercraft used or capable of being used as a means
of transportation on water. Example: A nonretailer sells a boat and boat trailer to an Idaho resident. The sale of the
boat does not qualify for the occasional sale exemption and is subject to the tax. The sale of the boat trailer may
qualify for the occasional sale exemption if the sales price of the boat trailer is separately stated on the bill of sale and
an occasional sale affidavit is provided by the seller.
(7-1-93)
10.
Exempt Sales of Aircraft, Boats, and Recreation-Related Vehicles. Sales of aircraft, boats, or
recreation-related vehicles under the provisions of Subsections 099.02 or 099.03 of this rule are exempted from the
tax. Transfers of aircraft, boats, or recreation-related vehicles under the provision of Subsection 099.05 of this rule
are exempted from the tax. The provisions of Subsection 099.04 of this rule apply to the sale of motorized, onhighway recreation-related vehicles.
(7-1-98)
11.
Exclusion from the Occasional Sale Exemption. Section 63-3622K, Idaho Code, excludes from
the occasional sale exemption the use of tangible personal property used to improve real property when such property
is obtained, directly or indirectly, from a person in the business of making like or similar improvements to real
property. This exclusion applies only to building materials and fixtures that will be incorporated into real property.
Sales of construction equipment such as loaders, backhoes, and excavators may still be included within the definition
of “occasional sale” if the seller meets all the other requirements of the exemption.
(4-11-06)
a.
Example. A contractor enters into a contract to fabricate and install a wrought iron gate. The
contractor fabricates the gate but prior to installation the building owner decides to install the gate himself and
purchases it from the contractor. The building owner’s purchase does not qualify for the occasional sale exemption.
(4-11-06)
b.
Example. A contractor has a backhoe that he uses in his contracting business. He sells the backhoe
to another contractor. If the seller is not a retailer, as defined by statute, the sale can still qualify as an exempt
occasional sale.
(4-11-06)
100.
PRESCRIPTIONS (RULE 100).
01.
In General. Sales tax does not apply to sales of drugs, oxygen, orthopedic appliances, orthodontic
appliances, dental prostheses including crowns, bridges, inlays, overlays, prosthetic devices, durable medical
equipment, and certain other medical equipment and supplies specifically named in Section 63-3622N, Idaho Code,
when:
(7-1-99)
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a.
Purchased by a practitioner to be administered or distributed to his patients if such practitioner is
licensed by the state under Title 54, Idaho Code, to administer or distribute such items, or when;
(7-1-93)
b.
Purchased by or on behalf of an individual under a prescription or work order issued by a
practitioner who is licensed by the state to practice one of the following professions: physician, physician assistant,
surgeon, podiatrist, chiropractor, dentist, optometrist, psychologist, ophthalmologist, nurse practitioner, denturist,
orthodontist, audiologist, or hearing aid dealer or fitter. Items purchased under the prescription or work order of a
person who is not a health care practitioner specifically named in Section 63-3622N(b), Idaho Code, will not qualify
for the exemption.
(5-8-09)
c.
Example: A physician issues a prescription for a wheelchair to a nursing home patient. The nursing
home delivers the prescription to a wheelchair retailer and purchases the wheelchair on behalf of the patient. No tax
applies.
(7-1-93)
d.
Example: A nursing home purchases wheelchairs for general use in its facility. Since the
wheelchairs are not purchased under prescription for a specific patient, sales tax applies.
(7-1-93)
02.
Seller Must Document Exempt Sale. The seller must keep the written prescription or work order
on file to document the exemption. Sales made without a prescription or work order are subject to tax. The seller must
be able to identify sales which are exempt under prescription from sales which are taxable.
(7-1-93)
a.
Refills of prescriptions on file with a seller are exempt from tax.
(7-1-93)
b.
Some drugs may be lawfully sold without a prescription. When sold over the counter without a
prescription, the drugs are subject to sales tax. When sold under a prescription, the drugs are exempt from tax.
(7-1-93)
03.
Purchases by Practitioners. A practitioner, who is licensed under Title 54, Idaho Code, to
administer or distribute a medical product listed in Section 63-3622N, Idaho Code, may purchase the item exempt
from tax by issuing his supplier an exemption certificate required by Rule 128 of these rules. Only the medical items
named in Section 63-3622N, Idaho Code, which the practitioner is licensed to administer or distribute qualify for this
exemption.
(3-15-02)
04.
Purchases by Nursing Homes and For Profit Hospitals. The Sales Tax Act does not provide a
general exemption from tax for purchases made by nursing homes and similar facilities or by hospitals operated for
profit. Tax must be paid on all purchases, with two (2) exceptions. The institution may purchase medical items
exempted by Section 63-3622N, Idaho Code, if:
(7-1-93)
a.
The purchase is made on behalf of a patient under a prescription or work order from a practitioner
licensed to prescribe such items; or
(7-1-93)
b.
The purchased items can only be administered by a practitioner licensed to administer such items.
(7-1-93)
c.
An exemption certificate must be completed and provided to the vendor of the exempted items. See
Rule 128 of these rules.
(3-15-02)
05.
Sale of Eyeglasses, Removable Contact Lenses, and Other Products by Optometrists,
Oculists, and Ophthalmologists. The sale of eyeglasses, removable contact lenses and other related products, such
as carrying cases, sunglasses, and cleaning solutions by optometrists, oculists, or ophthalmologists is subject to the
sales tax, regardless of whether any of these items are prescribed or fitted to the eyes of the purchaser.
(6-23-94)
a.
Amounts charged for professional services in examining the patient and prescribing and dispensing
the ophthalmic appliance are not subject to tax providing these services are not agreed to be performed as a part of the
sale and are separately stated on the billing to the patient.
(7-1-93)
b.
Separately stated charges for professional services may not be used to reduce the stated sales price
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of the property below its actual cost.
(7-1-93)
06.
Dental and Orthodontic Appliances. The sale or purchase of dentures, partial plates, dental
bridgework, orthodontic appliances, and related parts for such items by a dentist, denturist, orthodontist or other
practitioner is not a taxable sale.
(7-1-99)
101.
MOTOR VEHICLES AND TRAILERS USED IN INTERSTATE COMMERCE (RULE 101).
01.
In General. An exemption is provided from the sales and use tax for motor vehicles and trailers
sold or leased to commercial or private carriers to be substantially used in interstate commerce. Commercial or
private carriers shall include the business of transportation of persons or commodities owned by the carrier or
another, but shall not include farm vehicles or noncommercial vehicles as defined by Section 49-123, Idaho Code.
(3-30-07)
02.
Motor Vehicles. An exemption is provided from the sales and use tax for motor vehicles sold or
leased to a purchaser who will:
(7-1-93)
a.
Immediately register the vehicle with a maximum gross weight of over twenty-six thousand
(26,000) pounds;
(4-6-05)
b.
Register the vehicle under the International Registration Plan (IRP), or other similar proportional or
pro rata registration plan; and
(4-6-05)
c.
Operate the vehicle in a fleet of vehicles with a minimum of ten percent (10%) of the fleet miles
operated outside the state of Idaho in any registration period under the international registration plan.
(4-6-05)
03.
Trailers. An exemption is provided from the sales or use tax for trailers when the purchaser will:
(7-1-93)
a.
Immediately place the trailer in a fleet of vehicles registered under the International Registration
Plan (IRP), or other similar proportional or pro rata registration plan; and
(4-6-05)
b.
The trailer will be part of a fleet of vehicles with a minimum of ten percent (10%) of the fleet miles
operated outside the state of Idaho in any registration period under the International Registration Plan or other similar
plan.
(3-30-07)
04.
Title or Base Plate. The exemption applies whether the motor vehicles and trailers are titled or
base plated in Idaho or another state or nation.
(7-1-93)
05.
Documentation. Purchasers claiming this exemption must provide the seller or lessor with a
properly completed Form ST-104-MV, Sales Tax Exemption Certificate-Vehicle. When a vehicle qualifying for this
exemption is purchased from a retailer who is not registered to collect Idaho sales tax, the Form ST-104-MV must be
completed by the purchaser and provided to the county assessor or Department of Transportation when titling or
registering the vehicle in Idaho.
(7-1-93)
06.
Repair Parts and Supplies. The exemption does not apply to parts, supplies, or other tangible
personal property purchased by persons engaged in interstate commerce. Purchases of glider kits as defined by
Section 49-123, Idaho Code, will qualify if they are assembled into glider kit vehicles that will be immediately
registered under the International Registration Plan or other similar plan.
(3-30-07)
07.
Failure To Meet Interstate Mileage Requirement. The use of a fleet of trucks and trailers,
purchased exempt under the IRP exemption provided by Section 63-3622R, Idaho Code, will become taxable at the
end of any registration period for which the out of state mileage is less than ten percent (10%) of the total fleet
mileage.
(5-8-09)
102.
LOGGING (RULE 102).
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01.
In General. The Sales Tax Act provides an exemption from sales and use taxes for certain tangible
personal property used in logging activities. The provisions of this rule are based on the usual methods of doing
business in this industry. Specific factual differences in the way a specific taxpayer may conduct his business can
result in determinations different from those stated in this rule. Since some equipment may be used for more than one
(1) purpose, determinations of taxability will be made based upon the primary use of the equipment.
(7-1-93)
02.
Real Property. The logging exemption applies only to tangible personal property. It does not apply
to real property or to tangible personal property purchased for the purpose of becoming an improvement or fixture to
real property. See Rules 010 and 067 of these rules for a definition of real property.
(4-6-05)
03.
Property Used in Logging Operations. The logging exemption applies to tangible personal
property primarily used in a logging activity without regard to the primary business activity of the person performing
the logging. For example, a contractor building a road for the Forest Service may claim the logging exemption when
purchasing equipment and supplies primarily used to remove the timber from the right-of-way if the timber is resold,
even though logging is not the contractor’s primary activity.
(7-1-93)
04.
Logging Process Begins and Ends. The logging process begins when forest trees are first handled
by the logger at the site where such an operation occurs. The logging process ends when the product is placed on
transportation vehicles at the loading site, ready for shipment.
(7-1-93)
05.
Logging Exemption. Generally, the logging exemption includes equipment and supplies used or
consumed in the logging process and which are necessary or essential to the performance of the operation. To qualify,
the logging use must be the primary use of the equipment and supplies. Also, the equipment and supplies must be
directly used in the logging process. Examples include:
(7-1-93)
a.
Chain saws with a unit price of more than one hundred dollars ($100) and tree harvesters. (7-1-93)
b.
Skidders, tower-skidders, skidding cables, or chokers.
(7-1-93)
c.
Log loaders and log jammers which are not licensed motor equipment.
(7-1-93)
d.
equipment.
Repair parts, lubricants, hydraulic oil, and coolants which become a component part of logging
(7-1-93)
e.
Fuel, such as diesel, gasoline, and propane consumed by equipment while performing exempt
logging activities.
(7-1-93)
06.
Directly Used. Directly used, as applied to logging, means the performance of any of the following
functions when such functions occur between the point at which the logging operation begins and the point at which
the operation ends, as defined in Subsection 102.04 of this rule:
(7-1-93)
a.
The performance of a function in the logging process that effects a physical change in the property
being logged so as to render the property more marketable.
(7-1-93)
b.
The performance of a function which occurs simultaneously with and which is an integral part of
and necessary to a function which effects a physical change in the property being logged rendering it more
marketable.
(7-1-93)
c.
The performance of a function which is an integral and necessary step in a continuous series of
functions which effect a physical change in the property being logged rendering it more marketable.
(7-1-93)
d.
The performance of a quality control function which is an integral and necessary step in
maintaining specific product standards.
(4-11-06)
07.
Not Included in Logging Exemption. Generally, the logging exemption does not include the
following activities and equipment:
(7-1-93)
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a.
Road construction equipment and supplies such as tractors, road graders, rollers, water trucks,
whether licensed or unlicensed, explosives, gravel, fill material, dust suppression products, culverts, and bridge
material.
(7-1-93)
b.
Slash disposal or brush piling and clearing equipment and supplies, such as brush clearing
machines, brush rakes, and tractors, except when part of the operation of a tree farm.
(7-1-93)
c.
Reforestation equipment and supplies, except when part of the operation of a tree farm.
(7-1-93)
d.
Safety equipment and supplies, including hard hats and earplugs.
(7-1-93)
e.
Transportation equipment and supplies including vehicles to transport logs from the loading site to
the mill, whether the vehicles are licensed or unlicensed, and cable and tie-downs used to fasten logs to the vehicle.
(7-1-93)
f.
Machinery, equipment, materials, repair parts, and supplies used in a manner that is incidental to
logging such as: office equipment and supplies; selling and distribution equipment and supplies; janitorial equipment
and supplies; maintenance equipment and supplies which do not become component parts of logging equipment, such
as welders, welding gas, and shop equipment; and paint, plastic coatings, and all other similar products used to
protect and maintain equipment, whether applied to logging equipment or other equipment.
(7-1-93)
g.
Hand tools with a unit price of one hundred dollars ($100) or less, regardless of how necessary the
tools may be to the logging operation or how directly they may be used.
(7-1-93)
h.
Recreation-related vehicles, as defined in Section 63-3622HH, Idaho Code, regardless of use, such
as All Terrain Vehicles (ATV), snowmobiles, and off-highway motorbikes.
(4-6-05)
i.
Aircraft or motor vehicles licensed or required to be licensed by the laws of this state, regardless of
the use to which such motor vehicles or aircraft are put. A motor vehicle not required to be licensed is exempt under
the logging exemption only if it meets the tests established elsewhere in this rule.
(7-1-93)
08.
Election to Pay Sales Tax. The owner of a log loader, log jammer, or similar fixed load motor
equipment used in logging, not normally licensed for use on public roads, may elect to license and pay sales tax on
the motor equipment rather than placing it on the personal property tax rolls, if the motor equipment may be legally
operated on a public road as a commercial vehicle.
(4-6-05)
a.
Motor equipment licensed at the time of purchase. Sales tax applies to the total purchase price of
the motor equipment.
(7-1-93)
b.
Motor equipment licensed after the date of purchase. Use tax applies to the fair market value of
motor equipment on which no sales or use tax has been paid and which was not licensed at the time of purchase, if
acquired within the last seven (7) years. See Section 63-3633, Idaho Code. Fair market value may be determined from
the personal property tax records of the county assessor.
(7-1-93)
103.
HAND TOOL, COMPONENT, AND UNIT PRICE (RULE 103).
01.
Exempt Hand Tools. The Idaho sales tax law exempts hand tools with a unit price of over one
hundred dollars ($100) if the hand tools are used directly and primarily in any of the following operations: (7-1-93)
a.
Manufacturing, processing, mining, farming or fabricating, Section 63-3622D, Idaho Code;
(7-1-93)
b.
Broadcasting, Section 63-3622S, Idaho Code;
(7-1-93)
c.
Certain newspaper publishing, Section 63-3622T, Idaho Code;
(7-1-93)
d.
Agricultural irrigation, Section 63-3622W, Idaho Code;
(7-1-93)
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e.
IDAPA 35.01.02
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Logging, Section 63-3622JJ, Idaho Code.
(7-1-93)
02.
Unit. A unit, as applied to hand tools, means a single, distinct part or object which can be used by
itself to perform a specific function. For example, a screwdriver can be used by itself to tighten or loosen a screw.
When units, such as screwdrivers, are sold in sets to a manufacturer who will use the tools primarily and directly in
the production process, i.e., to assemble product, a per unit price must be computed to determine if the purchase
qualifies for the over one hundred dollars ($100) per unit exemption. When a manufacturer purchases a set of twenty
(20) wrenches for one hundred twenty-five dollars ($125) to be used in product assembly, the purchase is taxable
because the per unit price of the hand tools is less than one hundred dollars ($100).
(7-1-93)
03.
Component. A unit may be composed of two (2) or more components. A component is a distinct
part which must be physically attached to another part to perform a specific function. A component alone has no
utility. For example, a drill bit must be physically attached to a drill in order for the bit or the drill to have utility.
Together they become a unit which can perform a specific function. Single components or sets of components,
sockets, drill bits, etc., are taxable unless they will be physically joined to another component, ratchet, drill, etc., to
form a unit which exceeds one hundred dollars ($100) in cost. For example, drill bits which are physically attached to
a five hundred dollar ($500) drill press to perform a specific function in a production process are exempt from the tax.
(7-1-93)
04.
Unit Price. The total amount extended on a purchase invoice for multiple units is not the unit price.
The unit price must be computed to determine whether the hand tool exceeds one hundred dollars ($100) and
qualifies for a given exemption.
(7-1-93)
104.
RAILROAD ROLLING STOCK, PARTS, MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT (RULE 104).
01.
In General. Sections 63-3622CC and 63-3622DD, Idaho Code, provide exemptions from sales or
use tax for rebuilt or remanufactured railroad rolling stock which was previously used in interstate commerce more
than three (3) consecutive months, and for parts, materials, and equipment primarily used to rebuild or remanufacture
such railroad rolling stock.
(7-1-93)
02.
Definitions. As used in this rule, the following terms have the following meanings.
(7-1-93)
a.
Railroad rolling stock. Flanged-wheel locomotives, railroad cars, maintenance of way equipment
and other flanged-wheel vehicles designed and manufactured specifically for use on railroad tracks and railroad
systems, including component parts thereof.
(7-1-93)
b.
Remanufacture/rebuild. To reconstruct, remake, reassemble or reprocess railroad rolling stock to
materially extend the life of the equipment. This process requires extended removal of the railroad rolling stock from
the transportation stream.
(7-1-93)
c.
Equipment. All equipment, other than railroad rolling stock, which is used in the actual
remanufacturing/rebuilding process.
(7-1-93)
d.
Parts. Tangible personal property which becomes part of the remanufactured/rebuilt railroad rolling
stock or which becomes part of the equipment described in Subsection 104.02.c. above.
(7-1-93)
e.
Materials. Tangible personal property which is used or consumed in the actual process of
remanufacturing/rebuilding railroad rolling stock.
(7-1-93)
f.
Used in interstate commerce. Railroad rolling stock is used in interstate commerce when it actually
performs a function which is necessary to the operation of a business which transports goods or people between two
(2) or more states.
(7-1-93)
g.
Repair. To mend or restore to good usable condition railroad rolling stock which has not been
damaged to an extent requiring extended removal from the transportation stream.
(7-1-93)
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h.
Maintenance. Routine, periodic activities, such as lubrication and filter and oil changes, which are
necessary to the continued use and operation of railroad rolling stock.
(7-1-93)
i.
Primary or primarily. Used more than fifty percent (50%) of the time to remanufacture/rebuild
railroad rolling stock.
(7-1-93)
03.
a.
rolling stock.
Generally, Included Within the Exemption:
(7-1-93)
Equipment necessary to, and primarily used in the process of, remanufacturing/rebuilding railroad
(7-1-93)
b.
Tangible personal property which become part of the remanufacture/rebuilt railroad rolling stock or
which becomes part of the equipment identified in Subsection 104.03.a., above.
(7-1-93)
c.
process.
Tangible personal property which is consumed or primarily used in the remanufacturing/rebuilding
(7-1-93)
d.
Fuel used in testing remanufactured/rebuilt engines which are railroad rolling stock, and fuel used
in equipment which is necessary to, and primarily used in, the remanufacturing/rebuilding process.
(7-1-93)
04.
Generally, Excluded from This Exemption:
(7-1-93)
a.
Motor vehicles and trailers which are licensed or required to be licensed even though they may
have flanged-wheel attachments which enable travel on railroad tracks.
(7-1-93)
b.
Tangible personal property which is used in such a way that it becomes a fixture to, or an
improvement to, real property.
(7-1-93)
c.
Tangible personal property, equipment, parts, materials, used or consumed in an activity which is
primarily repair or maintenance of railroad rolling stock.
(7-1-93)
d.
Fuel used in activities other than those stated in Subsection 104.03.d. of this rule and which is not
exempt under other provisions of the Sales Tax Act.
(7-1-93)
e.
Tangible personal property used in related activities which are not primarily remanufacturing/
rebuilding activities, including: office equipment and supplies; safety equipment and supplies; equipment, other than
railroad rolling stock, which is primarily used to construct, improve, alter or repair real property; and chemicals,
solvents, and other cleaning agents used primarily for maintenance of the remanufacturing/rebuilding processing
area.
(7-1-93)
105.
105).
TIME AND IMPOSITION OF TAX, RETURNS, PAYMENTS AND PARTIAL PAYMENTS (RULE
01.
Time and Imposition of Tax.
(7-1-93)
a.
Sales Tax. Sales tax is imposed, computed and collected at the time of sale, without regard to the
provisions of any contract relating to the time or method of payment. In the case of installment sales, sales on
account, or other credit sales, the seller shall report as a taxable sale the entire sales price for the month in which the
sale is made. No part of the sales tax may be deferred until the time the retailer actually collects payment from the
buyer. A sale occurs when title to property passes through delivery to the customer or absolute and unconditional
appropriation to a contract. Lease or rental payments are taxable during the month or other period for which the
property is leased or rented.
(7-1-93)
b.
Use Tax. Use tax is determined at the time of the use, storage or other consumption of tangible
personal property in Idaho. The tax is reported and payable in accordance with the provisions of this rule. Persons
making purchases subject to use tax should apply for a use tax permit number from the Tax Commission. Application
forms may be obtained by contacting any Tax Commission office.
(7-1-93)
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c.
Taxable Sales Create State Revenue. The sales or use tax collected by a retailer from a customer at
the time of purchase becomes state money at that time. The collected amounts may not be put to any use other than
that allowed by Chapter 36, Title 63, Idaho Code, and these rules.
(7-1-93)
02.
Returns.
(7-1-93)
a.
Monthly Filing Generally Required. All retailers and persons subject to use tax are required to
remit the tax to the state on a monthly basis unless a different reporting period is prescribed by the Commission. The
remittance will include all sales and use tax due from the first through the last day of the preceding calendar month.
(7-1-93)
b.
Request to File Quarterly or Semiannually. Retailers or persons who owe seven hundred-fifty
dollars ($750) or less per quarter and have established a satisfactory record of timely filing and payment of the tax
may request permission to file quarterly or semiannually instead of monthly.
(5-8-09)
c.
Request to File Annually. Retailers or persons who have seasonal activities, such as Christmas tree
sales or repeating fair booths, may request permission to file annually. Approval of the request is at the discretion of
the Commission and is limited to taxpayers who have established a satisfactory record of timely filing and payment of
the tax.
(7-1-93)
d.
Variable Filing. If the Tax Commission finds it necessary or convenient for the administration of
the Sales Tax Act, it may assign an account to a taxpayer with a variable filing requirement. In such a case the
taxpayer would not be required to file returns at regular intervals. The Tax Commission may also create one-time
filing only accounts for taxpayers who are making a single payment of sales or use tax.
(4-6-05)
e.
Change in Filing Frequency. If the Tax Commission finds it necessary or convenient for the
efficient administration of the Sales Tax Act, it may require taxpayers reporting taxable sales of less than twelve
thousand dollars ($12,000) per year to file annually.
(5-8-09)
f.
Final Report. Whenever a taxpayer who is required to file returns under the Sales Tax Act or these
rules stops doing business, he must mark cancel on the last return he files. This return ends the taxable year for sales
or use tax purposes and constitutes the taxpayer’s final report of sales or use tax activities or liabilities. The taxpayer
must enclose his seller’s permit with his request for cancellation or send a written statement that the permit has been
destroyed. If the taxpayer continues business activity after filing a final report he may be subject to liabilities or
penalties for failing to comply with the Idaho Sales Tax Act and these rules.
(7-1-93)
03.
Valid Return. A tax return or other document required to be filed in accordance with Section 633623, Idaho Code, and these rules must meet the conditions prescribed below. Those which fail to meet these
requirements are invalid. They may be rejected and returned to the taxpayer to be redone in accordance with these
requirements and refiled. A taxpayer who does not file a valid return is considered to have filed no return. A
taxpayer’s failure to properly file in a timely manner may result in penalties imposed by Section 63-3634, Idaho
Code, and related rules.
(7-1-93)
a.
The sales and use tax return form must be completed and, if required, copies of all pertinent
supporting documentation must be attached. The results of required supporting documentation must be carried
forward to applicable lines on the sales or use tax return form.
(7-1-93)
b.
All sales and use tax returns or other documents filed by the taxpayer must include his sales or use
tax permit number and federal taxpayer identification number in the spaces provided.
(7-1-93)
c.
A sales or use tax return that does not provide sufficient information to compute a tax liability does
not constitute a valid return.
(7-1-93)
d.
Perfect accuracy is not required of a valid return, although each of the following conditions is
required: it must be on the proper form, as prescribed by the Commission; the tax liability must be calculated and
have sufficient supporting information, if required, to demonstrate how the result was reached; and it must show an
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honest and genuine effort to satisfy the requirements of the law.
(7-1-93)
04.
Perpetual Extensions of Time to File Revoked. Any previously granted permanent or perpetual
extension of time to file any sales or use tax returns is hereby revoked. Any person who has used such an extension in
the past may avoid a penalty for late filing by filing a timely extension of time return estimating the tax liability, as
provided by Subsection 105.05 of this rule.
(7-1-93)
05.
Use of Estimates Extension of Time Returns.
(7-1-93)
a.
The Commission may, for good cause, grant authority for a taxpayer to file for an extension of time
by filing an estimated return. When filing the Extension of Time estimated return, the taxpayer must attach a written
request which sets forth the reason for estimating. The Commission will review each request to determine if there is
good cause for filing an Extension of Time estimated return. If the Commission determines that the request should be
denied, the taxpayer will be notified in writing and a penalty, as provided by Section 63-3046, Idaho Code, will apply
to any delinquent tax due when the original return is filed.
(7-1-93)
b.
If the return for any period is filed on an estimated basis, the estimated return must be filed timely
and the estimate must be reconciled to actual figures by filing an original return within one (1) month of the due date.
Any additional tax due as a result of reconciliation must be remitted when the original return is filed and must include
interest on any unpaid balance due from the due date of the return.
(4-6-05)
c.
The estimated tax remitted must be at least ninety percent (90%) of the total sales and use tax due
for the period or one hundred percent (100%) of the total sales and use tax due for the same month of the prior year. If
the estimated tax paid is less than these requirements, a five percent (5%) penalty may be applied to the remaining tax
due, as provided by Section 63-3046(a), Idaho Code.
(7-1-93)
d.
Taxpayers wishing to file an Extension of Time estimated return must obtain the required forms
from the Commission.
(7-1-93)
06.
Forms Required.
(7-1-93)
a.
Separate Payments. The original return will be completed with the amount of total sales,
nontaxable sales, taxable sales, items subject to use tax, and tax due inserted in the blanks. Payment must accompany
the return. If the retailer owes payments for withholding or other taxes due to the state and payable to the
Commission, separate checks should be made out for each tax payment and the reports and checks should be sent
separately to the Commission. A complete sales and use tax return will be filed by each retailer or person subject to
use tax. This return will be on a form prepared and mailed to the taxpayer by the Commission. If the original is lost or
destroyed, a substitute form will be supplied upon request.
(7-1-93)
b.
Retailers Must Report Own Use and Nontaxed Transactions. All retailers must report any sales or
purchases on which no sales or use tax was collected or paid. Goods sold or produced and consumed by the retailer,
items withdrawn from stock for personal use or employee use, stock removed and used for gift or promotional
purposes, or any combination of such uses are subject to tax.
(7-1-93)
c.
Reporting Adjustments. Any adjustments for additional tax due or credits claimed should be made
on the next return due after the adjustments are discovered. These adjustments are to be shown on the line designated
for adjustments on the return form and must be accompanied by an explanation and any documents that support the
claimed adjustment.
(7-1-93)
07.
Payment of Tax.
(7-1-93)
a.
Payment to Accompany Return. The return filed in accordance with this rule must be accompanied
by a remittance of the total amount due as shown on the return. Checks or other negotiable instruments should be
made payable to the Idaho State Tax Commission.
(7-1-93)
b.
Payment of One Hundred Thousand Dollars ($100,000) or Greater. All taxes due to the state must
be paid by electronic funds transfer whenever the amount due is one hundred thousand dollars ($100,000) or greater,
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in accordance with rules promulgated by the Idaho State Board of Examiners, which is incorporated by reference to
these rules.
(7-1-93)
c.
Remittance of Collections Required--Bracket Exception. Retailers are required to remit all taxes
collected from purchasers, except any difference that may result from use of the bracket system described in Rule 068
of these rules. Any taxes erroneously collected in excess of those properly due should be refunded to the purchaser by
the retailer. If the retailer either cannot or does not make the refund during the period for which the return is due, then
the retailer must report the erroneously collected taxes on the return and pay them to the Commission. If the
erroneously collected taxes are subsequently refunded to the purchaser from whom they were collected, the retailer
may claim a credit or refund of sales taxes in accordance with Rule 117 of these rules. Under no circumstances may a
retailer retain any amount collected as sales or use tax which is greater than the retained amount authorized under the
bracket system by Rule 068 of these rules.
(3-20-04)
08.
Filing Dates--General Rule. The filing date for all sales or use tax returns is the twentieth day of
the calendar month immediately following the last day of the reporting period, unless otherwise allowed by these
rules. This is the filing due date for all regular monthly, quarterly, semiannual, and annual accounts. If the twentieth is
a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday, the return shall be due on the next following day which is not a Saturday, Sunday
or legal holiday.
(4-6-05)
106.
MOTOR VEHICLES SALES, RENTALS, AND LEASES (RULE 106).
01.
In General. The sale, lease, rental, or purchase of a motor vehicle is subject to sales and use tax.
Retailers, lessors, and dealers are required to collect the tax.
(7-1-93)
02.
Forms. The forms required for sales and use tax collection and reporting include the following,
with modifications that may be required from time to time:
(7-1-93)
a.
The title application form required by the Idaho Transportation Department.
(7-1-93)
b.
Form ST-133, Sales Tax Exemption Certificate-Transfer Affidavit, used for gifts of motor vehicles,
sales between family members, and sales to enrolled members of an Indian tribe within the boundaries of an Indian
reservation.
(7-1-93)
c.
Form ST-104-MV, Sales Tax Exemption Certificate-Vehicle, used by persons claiming exemption
under Section 63-3622, Idaho Code.
(7-1-93)
d.
Other forms that may be required by the Tax Commission or the Idaho Transportation Department.
(7-1-93)
03.
Vehicles Purchased from Idaho Dealers. When a dealer of new or used motor vehicles sells any
motor vehicle for delivery in Idaho, he must collect sales or use tax at the rate in effect on the date the motor vehicle
is delivered to the buyer, unless an exemption applies. He must also prepare a title application form and include the
dealer’s Idaho seller’s permit number, gross sales price, trade-in allowance, net sales price, and total tax collected. A
title application form which is completed by the dealer and displays Idaho sales tax collected is evidence that the
buyer paid sales tax to the dealer.
(7-1-93)
04.
Vehicles Purchased from Out-of-State Dealers. Title applications for vehicles purchased from
out-of-state dealers must be made according to Idaho Transportation Department instructions. Any trade-in allowance
must be shown on the original bill of sale, voucher, or other receipt from the out-of-state dealer. If sales tax was
correctly paid to a dealer in another state, a credit is allowed against sales or use tax payable to Idaho. See Rule 107 of
these rules.
(4-2-08)
05.
Vehicles Purchased from Nondealers.
(7-1-93)
a.
Title applications for vehicles purchased from nondealers, who are not required to have an Idaho
seller’s permit, must be made according to Idaho Transportation Department instructions. The buyer must present a
bill of sale or receipt as proof of the gross sales price. Canceled checks will not be accepted in lieu of a bill of sale. In
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the absence of a bill of sale, sales tax is collected on the value established as the “clean retail price” in the most recent
National Automobile Dealers Association (NADA). Official Used Car Guide, published by the National Automobile
Dealers Used Car Guide Company. Where there is a sale by a nondealer, a trade-in allowance is not allowed. See Rule
044 of these rules. The county assessor or Idaho Transportation Department must collect sales tax on the gross sales
price and remit the tax to the Tax Commission. Barters of motor vehicles are taxable on the full value of each vehicle
or other property which is the object of barter. Sales tax shall be collected on the value established as the “clean retail
price” stated for similar makes and models with comparable options in the most recent NADA Official Used Car
Guide.
(4-2-08)
b.
A retailer required to have an Idaho seller’s permit must collect the sales tax when selling a motor
vehicle, even though he is not licensed as a motor vehicle dealer. The retailer must give the buyer the title to the
motor vehicle, properly completing title transfer information on the title, including the retailer’s seller’s permit
number as proof that Idaho sales tax was collected. The retailer must also give the buyer a bill of sale stating: the date
of sale; the name and address of the seller; the complete vehicle description including the VIN, vehicle identification
number, which must agree with the VIN on the title; the person to whom the vehicle was sold; the amount for which
the vehicle was sold; and the amount of sales tax charged.
(7-1-93)
c.
A retailer is not relieved of the responsibility for collecting the tax unless he can provide
satisfactory evidence to the Tax Commission that the buyer paid tax to the county assessor or Idaho Transportation
Department. If a retailer fails to collect the tax from the buyer, the county assessor or Idaho Transportation
Department must collect the tax.
(7-1-93)
06.
Vehicles Rented or Leased.
(7-1-93)
a.
A lease-purchase and lease with option to purchase have separate definitions and tax applications.
See Rule 024 of these rules. A lease-purchase is subject to sales or use tax on the full purchase price at the time the
vehicle is delivered to the lessee. A true lease and a lease with an option to purchase are subject to sales tax on each
lease payment and on the buy-out or residual value when a lessee exercises his option to buy. The information in
Section 106 deals with rentals, true leases, and leases with an option to buy.
(4-2-08)
b.
The lessor of a motor vehicle is a retailer and must collect sales tax from the lessee on any rental or
lease payment on the date it is required to be made, at the tax rate in effect on that date. The lessor must also collect
tax on any lessee’s exercise of an option to buy based on the full purchase price or residual, at the tax rate in effect on
the date title is transferred to the lessee.
(7-1-93)
c.
The lessor may not rely on the county assessor or the Idaho Transportation Department to collect
sales or use tax if the purchase option is exercised.
(7-1-93)
d.
The lessor must collect sales tax on each lease payment received from the renter or lessee and remit
the tax to the state. The sales tax is applicable whether the vehicle is leased or rented on an hourly, daily, weekly,
monthly, mileage, or any other basis.
(7-1-93)
e.
If the lessor is responsible for maintaining the vehicle and this is stated in the lease or rental
agreement, tax does not apply to his purchase of necessary repair parts.
(7-1-93)
f.
Out-of-state lessors must obtain a seller’s permit and comply with this rule. If the county assessor
or Idaho Transportation Department cannot verify that the lessor is properly registered to collect the tax, title and
registration will be denied.
(7-1-93)
g.
When a vehicle is traded in as part payment for the rental or lease of another vehicle, a deduction is
allowed before computing the sales tax. The methods of applying the trade-in value to the lease are found in Rule 044
of these rules.
(4-2-08)
07.
Cross-References.
(7-1-93)
a.
See Rule 024 of these rules. Rentals or leases of tangible personal property.
(4-2-08)
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b.
See Rule 044 of these rules. Trade-ins, trade-downs, and barter.
(4-2-08)
c.
See Rule 099 of these rules. Occasional sales.
(4-2-08)
d.
See Rule 091 of these rules. Sales to indians.
(4-2-08)
e.
See Rule 101 of these rules. Motor vehicles and trailers used in interstate commerce.
(4-2-08)
f.
See Rule 107 of these rules. Motor vehicles gifts, military personnel, and exemptions.
(4-2-08)
g.
See Rule 108 of these rules. Motor vehicles manufacturer’s, rental company’s and dealer’s
purchase or use of motor vehicles.
(4-2-08)
107.
VEHICLES AND VESSELS -- GIFTS, MILITARY PERSONNEL, NONRESIDENT, NEW
RESIDENT, TAX PAID TO ANOTHER STATE, SALES TO FAMILY MEMBERS, SALES TO AMERICAN
INDIANS, AND OTHER EXEMPTIONS (RULE 107).
01.
In General. This rule discusses specific topics relating to motor vehicles including gifts, military
personnel, and exemptions. Refer to Rule 106 of these rules for general information on purchases, sales, rentals, and
leases of motor vehicles.
(3-6-00)
02.
Gifts of Motor Vehicles. When the following facts clearly establish that a motor vehicle is being
transferred as a gift from the titleholder to another, the vehicle can be transferred tax exempt if:
(7-1-93)
a.
No money, services, or other consideration is exchanged between the donor and recipient at any
(7-1-93)
b.
The recipient assumes no indebtedness.
(7-1-93)
c.
The relationship of the donor and recipient indicates a basis for a gift.
(7-1-93)
time.
d.
The donor and recipient complete and sign a Sales Tax Exemption Certificate-Transfer Affidavit,
Form ST-133, and submit it to the county assessor or the Idaho Transportation Department along with the title to the
vehicle being transferred. If the donor is unable to sign the affidavit:
(2-18-02)
i.
A letter stating the vehicle is a gift, and signed by the donor, may be accepted by the county
assessor or his representative and attached to the affidavit; or
(2-18-02)
ii.
The title may be marked as a gift and signed by the donor.
03.
Nonresidents.
(3-4-10)
(3-30-07)
a.
A nonresident does not owe use tax on the use of a motor vehicle which is purchased outside of
Idaho and titled or registered under the laws of another state or nation, is not used in Idaho more than ninety (90) days
in any consecutive twelve (12) months pursuant to Section 63-3621(k), Idaho Code, and is not required to be
registered or licensed under Idaho law. For purposes of this Subsection (107.03.a.), a motor vehicle is considered to
have been used in Idaho for a day when it is present in this state for more than sixteen (16) hours during any twentyfour (24) hour period. This exemption applies only to nonresidents. A limited liability company (LLC) or other legal
entity formed by an Idaho resident under the laws of another state primarily for the purpose of purchasing and owning
one (1) or more motor vehicles is not a nonresident. The use of a vehicle owned by such an entity will be subject to
use tax upon its first use in Idaho.
(4-2-08)
b.
For the purposes of this rule, a corporation, partnership, limited liability company, or other
organization will be considered a nonresident if it is not formed under the laws of the state of Idaho, is not registered
to do business with the Idaho Secretary of State, does not have significant contacts with this state and does not have
consistent operations in this state.
(3-30-07)
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04.
New Residents. A new resident of Idaho does not owe tax on the use of household goods, personal
effects, vehicles, vessels, and aircraft if they are personally owned and he acquired them while he resided in another
state and used them primarily outside Idaho. If a vehicle owner obtained a registration or title from another state or
nation of residence more than three (3) months before moving to Idaho, this is proof that the vehicle was primarily for
use outside Idaho. New residents entering Idaho with a vehicle titled in a state that does not impose a general sales
and use tax will be required to complete and sign a Three Month Exemption Claim Form ST-102 and submit it to the
Idaho Transportation Department or county assessor when applying for a title transfer.
(3-4-10)
a.
If the vehicle was acquired less than three (3) months before the buyer moved to Idaho, it is
presumed that it was acquired for use in this state.
(7-1-93)
b.
Exclusion from the tax applies only to vehicles and aircraft owned by an individual. A privately
owned vehicle or aircraft is one that is owned by, and titled to, a private individual or individuals.
(3-4-10)
05.
Military Personnel. Military personnel receive no special exemption from the Idaho sales and use
tax regarding motor vehicles or other tangible personal property. The exemptions discussed in this rule apply equally
to military and nonmilitary personnel. A military person with a home of record other than Idaho is considered to be a
nonresident. A military person whose home of record is Idaho is considered to be a resident of this state. Example: A
military officer with a home of record in Oregon brings a vehicle purchased in Germany to Idaho upon being
stationed at Mountain Home Air Force Base. During his first year at Mountain Home, the vehicle is present in Idaho
for more than ninety (90) days. The exemption provided to nonresidents, as discussed in Subsection 107.03 of this
rule, does not apply. Use tax applies to the fair market value of the vehicle.
(7-1-93)
06.
Tax Paid to Another State. When a general retail sales tax has been properly imposed by another
state or political subdivision of a state of the United States in an amount equal to or greater than the amount due
Idaho, no Idaho tax is due. The credit for state and local taxes paid in another state will be applied first to the state
sales tax due and the remainder, if any, will be applied to any local taxes due.
(3-30-07)
a.
If the amount paid to the other state is less, Idaho tax is due to the extent of the difference, unless
some other exemption applies. The owner must provide evidence that the tax was paid to the other state. A
registration certificate or title issued by another taxing state is sufficient evidence that tax was imposed at the other
state’s tax rate.
(7-1-93)
b.
Example: A resident of another state buys a vehicle in that state for ten thousand dollars ($10,000)
two (2) months before moving to Idaho. He presents his title from the other state to an Idaho county assessor. Since
he acquired the vehicle only two (2) months before entering Idaho, no exemption applies. The tax paid to the other
state was three hundred dollars ($300) when the vehicle was purchased. Credit for this amount is allowed against the
five hundred dollars ($500) tax due Idaho. The assessor will collect two hundred dollars ($200) tax.
(4-2-08)
c.
Example: A resident of another state purchased a vehicle two (2) months before moving to Idaho.
The applicant paid four percent (4%) state sales tax, one and six tenths percent (1.6%) city sales tax, and one and six
tenths percent (1.6%) county sales tax. The total general sales tax paid was seven and two tenths percent (7.2%).
Since the Idaho tax rate is lower, no tax is due Idaho because the amount of tax paid to the other state exceeds the
amount owed Idaho.
(4-2-08)
d.
Example: A resident of Alaska purchases a vehicle immediately prior to moving to Idaho. The
purchaser paid a three percent (3%) city sales tax in Alaska. When the purchaser moves to Idaho, credit will be given
for the local tax paid against the Idaho state use tax due.
(3-30-07)
e.
A registration certificate or title issued by another taxing state is proof that tax was paid to the other
taxing state. This does not apply to states that do not have a tax, such as Montana and Oregon, or when a state has
exempted the motor vehicle from tax.
(7-1-93)
f.
Example: A church buys and titles a vehicle in Utah. The Utah sales tax law exempts the purchase
of the vehicle from sales tax. The church later titles the vehicle in Idaho. Sales tax must be paid on the fair market
value of the vehicle when it is titled in Idaho.
(7-1-93)
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Taxes paid to another nation cannot be offset against the taxes owed to Idaho.
(7-1-93)
07.
Sales to Family Members. The tax does not apply to sales of motor vehicles between members of
a family related within the second degree of consanguinity. The second degree of consanguinity means only the
following blood or formally adopted relatives of the person making the sale: parents, children, grandparents,
grandchildren, brothers, and sisters. Relatives of the second degree of consanguinity do not include persons who are
related only by marriage. However, when the motor vehicle sold is community property, and it is sold to a person who
is related within the second degree of consanguinity to either spouse, the sale is exempt from tax.
(7-1-93)
a.
The Sales Tax Exemption Certificate-Transfer Affidavit, Form ST-133, is used to document this
exemption. The seller and buyer must complete and sign Form ST-133 and submit it to the Idaho Transportation
Department or county assessor along with the title to the vehicle being transferred. If the seller is unable to sign the
affidavit a letter from the seller stating the sale was made to a qualified family member may be accepted by the
county assessor or his representative and attached to the affidavit.
(2-18-02)
b.
This exemption does not apply if the seller did not pay tax when he acquired the vehicle. (7-1-93)
c.
Example: An Oregon resident buys a vehicle and titles it in Oregon without paying sales or use tax.
Later, he sells the vehicle for ten thousand dollars ($10,000) to his son who is an Idaho resident. No exemption
applies, since the father did not pay a sales or use tax when he acquired the vehicle. The son is required to pay Idaho
use tax on the ten thousand dollar ($10,000) purchase price of the vehicle.
(4-11-06)
08.
Sales to American Indians. An enrolled American Indian tribal member may buy a motor vehicle
exempt from tax if the sale and delivery of the vehicle is made within the boundaries of the Indian Reservation. The
Sales Tax Exemption Certificate-Transfer Affidavit, Form ST-133, is used to document this exemption. The seller and
the buyer must complete and sign Sales Tax Exemption Certificate - Transfer Affidavit Form ST-133 including the
name of the tribe, Tribal Identification Number and the name of the Reservation upon which the sale and delivery
occurred. The affidavit is then given to the Idaho Transportation Department or county assessor along with the title to
the vehicle being transferred.
(2-18-02)
09.
Bulk Sale Transfers. A transfer or sale of a motor vehicle as part of a bulk sale of assets or
property, as defined by Rule 099 of these rules, is exempt from tax. The buyer must complete and sign Sales Tax
Exemption Certificate -- Capital Asset Transfer Affidavit Form ST-133CATS to present to the Idaho Transportation
Department or county assessor when applying for transfer of title. The buyer must attach a copy of the sales
agreement showing the sale qualifies for the exemption on the Form ST-133CATS.
(2-18-02)
10.
Vehicles and Vessels Purchased in Idaho by Nonresidents for Use Outside Idaho.
(5-3-03)
a.
Sales to nonresidents of motor vehicles, trailers, vessels, all-terrain vehicles (ATVs), off-highway
motorcycles, and snowmobiles for use out of this state, even though delivery is made within this state are exempt
from tax when:
(5-3-03)
i.
The motor vehicles, vessels, ATVs, trailers, off-highway motorcycles, and snowmobiles will be
taken from the point of delivery in this state directly to a point outside this state; and
(5-3-03)
ii.
The motor vehicles, vessels, ATVs, trailers, off-highway motorcycles, and snowmobiles will be
registered immediately under the laws of another state or country and will be titled in that state or country, if required
to do so by that state or country and will not be used in Idaho more than sixty (60) days in any twelve-month period.
(5-3-03)
b.
To claim the exemption, the buyer must provide the seller a completed and signed Sales Tax
Exemption Certificate - Vehicle/Vessel Form ST104-MV.
(5-3-03)
c.
This exemption does not apply to sales of truck campers or to the sales of canoes, kayaks, or
inflatable boats regardless of length when sold without a motor.
(5-3-03)
d.
For purposes of Subsection 107.10 of this rule, an ATV means any recreational vehicle with three
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(3) or more tires, weighing under nine hundred (900) pounds, fifty (50) inches or less in width, having a wheel base of
sixty-one (61) inches or less, has handlebar steering, and a seat designed to be straddled by the operator.
(3-4-10)
e.
For purposes of Subsection 107.10 of this rule, a vessel means any boat intended to carry one (1) or
more persons upon the water which is either:
(3-20-04)
i.
Sold together with a motor; or
(5-3-03)
ii.
Eleven (11) feet in length or more, not including canoes, kayaks, or inflatable boats unless such
canoe, kayak, or inflatable boat is sold together with attached motor.
(5-3-03)
f.
For the purposes of Subsection 107.10 of this rule a trailer must meet the definition of either
“trailer” or “utility trailer” found in Sections 49-121 and 49-122 Idaho Code, which is a vehicle without motive
power designed for carrying persons or property and for being drawn by a motor vehicle. The term “trailer” includes
the specific types of trailers defined in Sections 49-121(6)(a) through 49-121(6)(h), Idaho Code.
(4-2-08)
g.
To qualify for this exemption the purchaser must be a nonresident of Idaho. An Idaho resident may
form an LLC or other legal entity under the laws of another state. If such an LLC or other entity is formed primarily
for the purpose of owning one (1) or more motor vehicles it is not a nonresident. The purchase or use of a motor
vehicle in Idaho by such an entity is taxable.
(3-30-07)
11.
Motor Vehicles and Trailers Used in Interstate Commerce. The sale of motor vehicles with a
maximum gross registered weight of over twenty-six thousand (26,000) pounds and trailers are exempt from sales or
use tax when they are purchased to become part of a fleet of vehicles registered under the International Registration
Plan, or similar proportional or pro rata registration system, and they will be used in interstate commerce with at least
ten percent (10%) of the fleet miles operated outside this state. The owner must complete and sign the Sales Tax
Exemption Certificate - Vehicle/Vessel Form ST-104MV, and provide it to the seller, the Idaho Transportation
Department or the county assessor when applying for title transfer. See Rule 101 of these rules.
(5-3-03)
12.
Related Party Transfers and Sales. Certain transfers and sales of motor vehicles between
businesses defined as related parties are exempt from tax. Refer to Rule 099 of these rules. The new owner must
complete and sign Sales Tax Exemption Certificate - Capital Asset Transfer Affidavit Form ST-133CATS to submit
to the Idaho Transportation Department or county assessor when applying for title transfer.
(2-18-02)
108.
MOTOR VEHICLES MANUFACTURER’S, RENTAL
PURCHASE OR USE OF MOTOR VEHICLES (RULE 108).
COMPANY'S,
AND
DEALER'S
01.
Purchases of Motor Vehicles for Resale. Licensed motor vehicle dealers, motor vehicle rental
companies, and manufacturers of motor vehicles may purchase motor vehicles tax exempt when the vehicles are held
for resale or rental and are used for no purpose other than retention, demonstration, or display while holding the
vehicles for sale or rental in the regular course of business. Purchases of parts that will be installed on vehicles held in
a resale inventory are exempt from sales tax.
(2-18-02)
02.
Titling a Motor Vehicle. Under the Sales Tax Act, no motor vehicle may be titled without
documentation establishing that any sales or use taxes which may be due have been paid. However, certain vehicles
may be titled by dealers and rental companies with no tax applying.
(7-1-93)
a.
Motor vehicle rental companies may title and register motor vehicles held in their rental inventory
in their company name with no tax applying.
(7-1-93)
b.
Idaho dealers may title motor vehicles held for resale in their dealer name to ensure clear title to the
vehicle. However, the vehicle cannot be registered in the dealer’s name. If the dealer applies for registration, tax
applies.
(2-18-02)
03.
Dealer Plates. Any vehicle upon which a dealer’s plate may be lawfully displayed, as provided by
Sections 49-1627 and 49-1628, Idaho Code, shall be considered, for purposes of the Sales Tax Act, to be inventory
held for sale and not subject to sales or use tax. If any use of a vehicle displaying a dealer plate requires that the dealer
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provide the user with a compensation form for federal income tax purposes, the amount so reported is subject to the
use tax. The use tax must be paid by the dealer in the month immediately following the issuance of the compensation
form. The unauthorized use or display of a dealer’s plate on the motor vehicle which is otherwise required to be titled
or licensed under the laws of the state of Idaho shall subject the dealer to a use tax liability.
(2-18-02)
04.
Service Vehicles. Vehicles, such as work or service vehicles, which are not held in stock for sale or
rental are subject to sales or use tax at the time of their purchase. The use tax shall be reported and paid on the sales
tax return relating to the period during which the vehicle was purchased. In titling the vehicle, the motor vehicle
dealer may report his seller’s permit number to the county assessor or Department of Transportation as evidence that
sales or use tax has been paid.
(7-1-93)
05.
Inventory Withdrawals by Dealers. Motor vehicle dealers may withdraw motor vehicles from
inventory and put them to a use for which a dealer’s plate is not authorized. Such vehicles must be titled and licensed.
Vehicles which are required to be titled and licensed are subject to tax. The taxpayer may choose one (1) of two (2)
methods for reporting the tax:
(7-1-93)
a.
At the time the vehicle is withdrawn from resale inventory, the taxpayer may report and pay use tax
on his acquisition cost.
(2-18-02)
b.
During each month or part of a month during which a motor vehicle is held for purposes other than
resale, the taxpayer may report and pay use tax on a reasonable monthly rental value. A reasonable monthly rental
value shall be an amount equal to rentals actually charged for vehicles of like or similar make and model when such
vehicles are leased or rented by the taxpayer or by other persons in the community in the business of leasing or
renting such vehicles.
(7-1-93)
06.
Inventory Withdrawals by Rental Companies. Motor vehicle rental companies that withdraw
motor vehicles from their rental inventory and put them to a use subject to use tax may elect either method of
reporting tax discussed in Subsection 108.05.
(7-1-93)
07.
Applicability of Rule 108. The provisions of this rule apply only to motor vehicle dealers or
manufacturers licensed as such by the Department of Transportation, and to companies engaged in the business of
renting motor vehicles without operators.
(2-18-02)
109.
AMUSEMENT DEVICES (RULE 109).
01.
Currency Operated Amusement Devices. “Amusement device” means all currency or token
operated machines and devices used for amusement or entertainment. This definition includes, but is not limited to,
game machines; pool tables; jukeboxes; electronic games; video or cinematic viewing devices; crane, rotary, and
pusher machines; and similar devices. It does not include vending machines that are used to sell tangible personal
property or noncurrency operated machines or games described in Subsection 109.03 of this rule.
(6-30-95)
02.
Requirement to Obtain Permit. The owner or operator of amusement devices is required to
obtain a seller’s permit if he is making retail sales other than the use of currency or token operated amusement
devices. If the owner or operator is not making such other retail sales, he need not obtain a seller’s permit, but must
obtain an amusement device permit for each device in service.
(6-30-95)
a.
Owners and operators of coin or currency operated amusement devices are required to pay a permit
fee for every such device in operation. At a tax rate of 5% this fee is thirty-five dollars ($35). Section 63-3623B(c),
Idaho Code, states that the fee may be increased proportionately to any increase in the tax rate. The formula to
calculate the permit fee is seven hundred dollars ($700) x tax rate. For example, at a tax rate of five percent (5%) the
amount of the permit fee is seven hundred dollars ($700) x five percent (5%) = thirty-five dollars ($35). If the tax rate
is six percent (6%), the permit fee will be forty-two dollars ($42). If any change in the tax rate becomes effective on
July 1 of a given year, the charge for the permit fee will change proportionately on that date also. If a change in the
tax rate occurs on a day other than July 1, the permit fee will be changed on the next July 1 following the change in
the tax rate.
(4-2-08)
b.
Upon receiving the appropriate payment, the Tax Commission will issue to the owner or operator of
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one or more amusement devices, a permit for each such device in service. A separate permit on each device in service
is required. The permit shall be affixed near the currency slot of the machine in such a manner that it is easily visible.
Permits are transferable from one person to another after written notice of the transfer is received and acknowledged
by the Tax Commission. Permits may be transferred from a machine that is no longer in service to another machine
owned or operated by the same person. An amusement device permit is not valid unless the name and business
address of the owner or operator is typed or printed in black ink on the face of the permit.
(3-16-04)
c.
Video amusement devices may have more than one (1) monitor and be designed to be operated
independently by more than one (1) person. In such cases a separate permit is required for each monitor. (6-30-95)
d.
Amusement device permits must be renewed annually. Annual permits are valid from July 1
through June 30. Permits must be renewed on or before July 1 by the owner or operator of the amusement devices.
Amusement devices acquired after July 1 or placed in service before the next July 1 will require the appropriate fee
for a full-year permit.
(3-16-04)
03.
Noncoin Operated Amusement Machines or Games. Charges for the use of amusement
machines or games which are not currency or token operated are subject to tax at the prevailing rate times one
hundred percent (100%) of the gross proceeds received for the use of the device. This applies regardless of the
method the owner or operator uses to determine the charge, such as by the hour or by the game. The owner or
operator of noncurrency or nontoken operated amusement machines or games is required to obtain a seller’s permit if
he is charging for the use of such machines.
(6-30-95)
04.
Equipment.
110.
Cross-Reference. See Rule 095 of these rules regarding purchases of Money-Operated Dispensing
(3-16-04)
RETURNS FILED BY COUNTY ASSESSORS AND FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS (RULE 110).
01.
Filing Returns. Upon collection of sales tax on applications for certificate of title to a motor
vehicle, trailer, or other titled property, or initial application for registration processed by the county assessor, the
assessor shall, no less than monthly, complete and submit to the Commission, Form ST-852, Idaho Sales Tax ReturnCounty Assessors. The assessor may, at his discretion, submit the form more frequently. But at no time shall the
amount of tax collected during any month be submitted later than the twentieth day of the month following the month
in which the tax was collected.
(4-6-05)
02.
Reimbursement. The assessor and the Idaho Transportation Department will be reimbursed at the
rate of one dollar ($1) for each application for certificate of title or initial registration of a motor vehicle, trailer, or
other titled property, and each Form ST-108, Truck Camper, Transport Trailer, Office Trailer and Untitled Boat
Certificate, processed by the assessor except those upon which any sales or use tax due has been previously collected
by a retailer or paid by the purchaser.
(4-6-05)
03.
Financial Institutions. Financial institutions collecting tax on sales of tangible personal property
that they are financing, whether sold by the financial institution or another, must remit the tax to the Commission no
later than the twentieth day of the month following the month in which the tax was collected from the purchaser of
the tangible personal property. Failure to remit the tax on a timely basis will result in the addition of penalties and
interest as provided by Sections 63-3632 and 63-3634, Idaho Code.
(4-6-05)
111.
RECORDS REQUIRED AND AUDITING OF RECORDS (RULE 111).
01.
In General. Every retailer doing business in this state and every purchaser storing, using, or
otherwise consuming in this state tangible personal property shall keep complete and adequate records as may be
necessary for the State Tax Commission to determine the amount of sales and use tax for which that person is liable
under Title 63, Chapter 36, Idaho Code.
(3-30-01)
a.
Unless the State Tax Commission authorizes an alternative method of record keeping in writing,
these records shall show gross receipts from sales or rental payments from leases of tangible personal property,
including any services that are a part of the sale or lease, made in this state, irrespective of whether the retailer or
purchaser regards the receipts to be taxable or nontaxable; all deductions allowed by law and claimed in filing the
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return; and the total purchase price of all tangible personal property purchased for sale or consumption or lease in this
state.
(3-30-01)
b.
These records must include the normal books of account ordinarily maintained by the average
prudent businessman engaged in such business, together with all bills, receipts, invoices, cash register tapes, or other
documents of original entry supporting the entries in the books of account, together with all schedules or working
papers used in connection with the preparation of tax returns.
(7-1-93)
c.
For taxpayers that maintain the required records in both a machine-sensible and a hard-copy
format, that taxpayer shall make the records available to the State Tax Commission in machine-sensible record format
upon the State Tax Commission's request. Machine-sensible records must be maintained in the original format for the
same time periods as required of hard-copy records outlines in Subsection 111.04. “Machine-sensible record” is a
collection of related information in an electronic format. This does not include hard-copy records that are created or
recorded on paper or stored in or by an imaging system such as microfilm, microfiche or storage-only imaging
systems.
(3-30-01)
02.
Alternative Storage Media. Records, including general books of account, such as cash books,
journals, voucher registers, ledgers, and like documents may be microfilmed, microfiched, or retained by a storageonly imaging system and the original hard-copy documents may be discarded when all other conditions of this rule
are met. A storage-only imaging system involves computer hardware, software, and other reproduction equipment
that provides for the storage, retention, and retrieval of records and documents which were originally created on
paper. It does not allow for any manipulation or processing of the documents. These records must be authentic,
accessible, readable, and meet the following requirements:
(3-30-01)
a.
Appropriate facilities are to be provided for preservation of the storage media for the periods
required and open to examination and the taxpayers must agree to provide transcriptions of any information on
microfilm, microfiche, or imaged data which may be required for verification of tax liability.
(3-30-01)
b.
All microfilmed, microfiched, and imaged data must be indexed, cross-referenced, and labeled to
show beginning and ending numbers and to show beginning and ending alphabetical listing of documents included,
and must be systematically filed to permit ready access.
(3-30-01)
c.
The taxpayer must make available upon request of the State Tax Commission facilities and
equipment in good working order at the examination site for reading, locating, and reproducing any record
concerning sales or use tax liability maintained on microfilm, microfiche, or other storage-only imaging system.
(3-30-01)
d.
The taxpayer must set forth in writing the procedures governing the establishment of its microfilm,
microfiche, or other storage-only imaging system and the individuals who are responsible for maintaining and
operating the system with appropriate authorization from the Board of Directors, general partners, or owner,
whichever is applicable.
(3-30-01)
e.
The microfilm, microfiche, or other storage-only imaging system must be complete and must be
used consistently in the regularly conducted activity of the business.
(3-30-01)
f.
The taxpayer must establish procedures with appropriate documentation so that the original
document can be followed through the conversion system.
(3-30-01)
g.
The taxpayer is responsible for the effective identification, processing, storage, and preservation of
microfilm, microfiche, or other storage-only imaging system making it readily available for as long as the contents
may become material in the administration of any state tax law.
(3-30-01)
h.
The taxpayer must keep a record identifying by whom the microfilm, microfiche, or other storageonly image system was produced.
(3-30-01)
i.
When displayed or reproduced on paper, the material must exhibit a high degree of legibility and
readability. For this purpose, legibility is defined as the quality of a letter or numeral that enables the observer to
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identify it positively and quickly to the exclusion of all other letters or numerals. Readability is defined as the quality
of a group of letters or numerals being recognizable as words or complete numbers.
(3-30-01)
j.
All production of microfilm or microfiche and processing duplication, quality control, storage,
identification, and inspection thereof must meet acceptable industry standards.
(3-30-01)
03.
Records Prepared by Automated Data Processing Systems, ADP. An ADP tax accounting
system may be used to provide the records required for the verification of tax liability. Although ADP systems will
vary from one taxpayer to another, all such systems must include a method of producing legible and readable records
which will provide the necessary information for verifying such tax liability. The following requirements apply to any
taxpayer who maintains any such records on an ADP system:
(7-1-93)
a.
Recorded or reconstructible data. ADP records shall provide an opportunity to trace any transaction
back to the original source or forward to a final total. If detailed printouts are not made of transactions at the time
when they are processed, the systems must have the ability to reconstruct these transactions.
(7-1-93)
b.
General and subsidiary books of account. A general ledger, with source references, shall be written
out to coincide with financial reports for tax reporting periods. In cases where subsidiary ledgers are used to support
the general ledger accounts, the subsidiary ledgers shall also be written out periodically.
(7-1-93)
c.
Supporting documents and audit trail. The audit trail shall be designed so that the details underlying
the summary accounting data may be identified and made available to the State Tax Commission upon request. The
system shall be so designed that supporting documents, such as sales invoices, purchase invoices, credit memoranda,
and like documents are readily available.
(3-30-01)
d.
Program documentation. A description of the ADP portion of the accounting system shall be made
available. The statements and illustrations as to the scope of operations shall be sufficiently detailed to indicate: The
application being performed; the procedures employed in each application, which, for example, might be supported
by flowcharts, block diagrams, or other satisfactory descriptions of the input or output procedures; the controls used
to insure accurate and reliable processing; and important changes, together with their effective dates, shall be noted in
order to preserve an accurate chronological record.
(7-1-93)
e.
Data storage media. Adequate record retention facilities shall be available for storing tapes and
printouts, as well as all supporting documents as may be required by law or this rule.
(7-1-93)
04.
Record Retention. All records pertaining to the transactions involving sales or use tax liability
shall be preserved for a period of not less than four (4) years. If an assessment has been made and an appeal to the
State Tax Commission or any court is pending, the books and records relating to the period under appeal by such
proposed assessment must be preserved until final disposition of the appeal.
(3-30-01)
05.
Examination of Records. All of the foregoing records shall be made available for examination on
request of the State Tax Commission or its authorized representatives.
(3-30-01)
06.
Failure of the Taxpayer to Maintain or Disclose Complete and Adequate Records. Upon
failure by the taxpayer, without reasonable cause, to substantially comply with the requirements of this rule, the State
Tax Commission shall:
(3-30-01)
a.
Impose any penalty as may be authorized by law.
(7-1-93)
b.
Subpoena attendance of the taxpayer and any other witness when the State Tax Commission deems
it necessary or expedient for examination and compel the taxpayer and witness to produce any documents within the
scope of its inquiry relating in any manner to the sales and use tax.
(3-30-01)
c.
Enter such other order as may be necessary to obtain compliance with this rule in the future by any
taxpayer found not to be in substantial compliance with the requirements of this rule.
(7-1-93)
112.
DIRECT PAY AUTHORITY (RULE 112).
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01.
In General. Direct Pay Authorization is issued to certain taxpayers where it is to the mutual
convenience of the Tax Commission, the taxpayer, and the taxpayer’s vendors to have the sales and use tax liability
upon the taxpayer’s purchases determined by the taxpayer and reported directly to the state in the form of a use tax.
This allows vendors to sell all items of tangible personal property to the particular taxpayer without charging any
sales tax. The only effect of this arrangement is to shift the reporting responsibility to the taxpayer holding the direct
pay authority.
(7-1-93)
02.
Purchases Subject to Tax. If the particular transaction would have been one subject to the sales
tax without the direct pay authorization, then the direct pay authorization holder must pay the sales tax to the state
even if the use of the item is not subject to use tax. For example, if a direct pay authority holder purchases goods in
Idaho from a retailer holding an Idaho seller’s permit, then the purchaser must pay sales tax on the transaction even if
the goods are intended for use solely outside the state.
(7-1-97)
03.
Documentation. To make a purchase without paying sales tax to the vendor, the taxpayer holding
the direct pay authorization must furnish to each of his vendors a copy of the letter from the Commission granting the
direct pay authority.
(7-1-93)
04.
Holder's Responsibilities. The direct pay authorization is granted only to those taxpayers who
have demonstrated, to the Commission’s satisfaction, the accounting and technical capability to comply with the
Sales Tax Act. Direct pay authority holders must make all purchases of tangible personal property tax exempt and all
taxes due as required by the Idaho Sales Tax Act will be remitted directly to the Commission by the direct pay
authority holder. Vendors will be allowed to sell all items of tangible personal property to the direct pay authority
holder without charging sales tax provided they obtain and keep on file a copy of the letter granting the direct pay
authority.
(7-1-93)
05.
Revocation. The Commission may revoke a direct pay authorization if it determines that the direct
pay authority holder is not complying with this rule or if the holder is allowing contractors or other third parties to
make exempt purchases under the holder’s authority. Notice of revocation shall be given in the manner provided for
deficiencies in taxes in Section 63-3629, Idaho Code, and shall be subject to review as provided in section 63-3631,
Idaho Code. Should the Commission revoke a taxpayer’s direct pay authority it shall be the taxpayer’s responsibility
to notify his vendors of the revocation.
(7-1-97)
06.
Tax Imposed by Hotel/Motel Room Sales Tax. Taxpayers granted direct pay authority may not
use this authority for taxes imposed on hotel/motel room or campground space accommodations. State sales tax,
Travel and Convention tax, and Greater Boise Auditorium District tax, when applicable, must be charged by and paid
to the retailer by the direct pay permittee.
(7-1-93)
07.
Valid Only on Purchases of Tangible Personal Property. The direct pay authority is valid only
on purchases of tangible personal property. The holder may not use their direct pay authority when engaging
contractors involved in improving real property. Special rules apply to contractors. Refer to Rules 012 through 015,
and 066 of these rules.
(3-20-04)
08.
Expiration. Direct pay authorizations are granted for a period of not more than five (5) years. If the
authorization is not renewed at the end of the expiration period, the authorization will expire automatically. (3-20-04)
113.
RECREATIONAL VEHICLE REGISTRATION (RULE 113).
01.
Snowmobile, Motorbike, or ATV. A new owner of a new or used snowmobile, motorbike, or ATV
must obtain a title for the recreational vehicle according to the Idaho Transportation Department instructions. The
buyer must present evidence that sales tax was paid to the seller of the recreational vehicle, or must pay any tax due to
the county assessor, Idaho Transportation Department, or Tax Commission before a title will be issued.
(7-1-93)
02.
Boat. A boat owner must register his boat each year with the Department of Parks and Recreation
through authorized agents appointed by that department.
(7-1-93)
a.
When registering the boat for the first time or transferring the registration to a new owner, the
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owner must complete Form ST-109, Recreational Vehicle Registration Sales Tax Affidavit, except as provided in
Subsection 113.02.c. of this rule.
(7-1-93)
b.
Each month the Department of Parks and Recreation will forward to the Tax Commission the
copies of Form ST-109 submitted by its agents.
(7-1-93)
c.
When registering a boat with a county assessor acting as an authorized agent of the Department of
Parks and Recreation, the requirements of this rule do not apply. The assessor will collect and remit to the Tax
Commission any sales or use tax due. See ISTC Rule 099.
(7-1-93)
114.
RECORDS REQUIRED, FOOD STAMPS, ELECTRONIC BENEFITS TRANSFERS, AND WIC
CHECKS (RULE 114).
01.
In General. Sales of food purchased under the Federal Food Stamp Program, the Federal Food,
Conservation and Energy Act of 2008, or the Federal Special Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants, and
Children, WIC, are exempt from the Idaho sales tax. Sales of food under these programs are exempt whether the
purchaser uses food stamps, vouchers, electronic benefits transfer cards, or any other exchange medium authorized
by federal law.
(4-7-11)
02.
Records Required. Retailers who accept food stamps, electronic benefits transfer cards, and WIC
checks must maintain accurate records of exempt sales.
(7-1-99)
a.
WIC Checks. WIC checks must be separately stated on daily bank deposit records or the retailer
must maintain verifiable records accounting for food purchased with WIC checks. Reporting of nontaxable WIC
check sales on sales tax returns must reconcile to the daily deposit record.
(7-1-99)
b.
Food Stamps. Retailers may deduct as nontaxable sales only the amount of the food actually
purchased with food stamps. Retailers must keep separate record on bank deposits of food stamp coupons deposited.
For reporting of nontaxable sales on sales tax returns, retailers may elect to either deduct the actual amount of food
purchased with food stamps, by programming cash registers to separately account for the total of the sales of food
purchased with food stamps, or by maintaining hand or machine posted records of actual sales, or deduct ninetyseven and five tenths percent (97.5%) of federal food stamps actually deposited by the retailer in lieu of actual sales
amounts.
(7-1-99)
c.
Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) Payments. Retailers may claim as nontaxable only the actual
amount of eligible food sales through EBT under the Federal Food Stamp Program. Accounting for the actual EBT
transfers shall be accomplished with and be verifiable through state supplied EBT sales and reporting devices or
through other electronic devices approved for use by the Federal Food Stamp Program and the state.
(7-1-99)
02.
Records Required. Retailers who accept food stamps, electronic benefits transfer cards, and WIC
checks must maintain accurate records of exempt sales.
(7-1-99)
a.
WIC Checks. WIC checks must be separately stated on daily bank deposit records or the retailer
must maintain verifiable records accounting for food purchased with WIC checks. Reporting of nontaxable WIC
check sales on sales tax returns must reconcile to the daily deposit record.
(7-1-99)
b.
Food Stamps. Retailers may deduct as nontaxable sales only the amount of the food actually
purchased with food stamps. Retailers must keep separate record on bank deposits of food stamp coupons deposited.
For reporting of nontaxable sales on sales tax returns, retailers may elect to either deduct the actual amount of food
purchased with food stamps, by programming cash registers to separately account for the total of the sales of food
purchased with food stamps, or by maintaining hand or machine posted records of actual sales, or deduct ninetyseven and five tenths percent (97.5%) of federal food stamps actually deposited by the retailer in lieu of actual sales
amounts.
(7-1-99)
c.
Electronic Benefits Transfer (EBT) Payments. Retailers may claim as nontaxable only the actual
amount of eligible food sales through EBT under the Federal Food Stamp Program. Accounting for the actual EBT
transfers shall be accomplished with and be verifiable through state supplied EBT sales and reporting devices or
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through other electronic devices approved for use by the Federal Food Stamp Program and the state.
115.
(7-1-99)
RECORDS REQUIRED, NONTAXED SALES BY RETAIL FOOD STORES (RULE 115).
01.
Petition for Reduced Record Keeping. Retail food stores may petition the Commission to be
relieved from the responsibility of retaining copies of detailed invoices for nontaxed sales.
(7-1-93)
02.
Form Required. A retail food store may apply for reduced record keeping requirements by
submitting a completed Form ST-110, Petition for Sales Tax Records Reduction by a Retail Food Store, to the
Commission.
(7-1-93)
03.
Authority. If authority for reduced record keeping is granted by the Commission, a retailer is not
required to keep detailed sales invoices if he obtains a properly completed resale or exemption certificate from the
customer and thereafter a properly completed Form ST-111, Sales Tax Exemption Claim Form-Grocer for each
exempt sale. The completed Form ST-111 must include the following information: The name of the customer; the
total purchase price of the exempt items; the date of the sale; whether the nontaxed merchandise sold consisted of
food, nonfood items or both; and the signature of the person making the exempt purchase.
(7-1-93)
04.
Standard Industry Code. For the purposes of this rule, retail food stores shall mean those retail
stores described in major group fifty-four (54) of the Standard Industrial Classification Manual, SIC, of 1987 and
whose sales of food for home preparation and consumption account for more than fifty percent (50%) of the store’s
total sales. Stores in major group fifty-four (54) consist of grocery stores; meat and fish markets; fruit and vegetable
markets; candy, nut, and confectionery stores; dairy product stores; retail bakeries; and egg and poultry dealers.
(7-1-93)
05.
Review of Petitions. The Commission will review all petitions for reduced record keeping
requirements. The Commission may examine the books and records of the petitioner to ensure that the petitioner is
primarily engaged in the business of selling food for home preparation and consumption. The Commission will give
written notice of its determination to the petitioner within sixty (60) days after receiving the petition.
(7-1-93)
116.
BONDING (RULE 116).
01.
Posting Security. The State Tax Commission may require a retailer to post security to insure
collection and remittance of sales and use taxes for cause including:
(7-1-93)
a.
A retailer failing to file sales tax returns.
(7-1-93)
b.
A retailer failing to remit in full taxes due upon any sales tax return.
(7-1-93)
c.
A retailer with a consistent history of delinquency either in the filing of returns or payment of tax.
(7-1-93)
d.
The submission of a check for the payment of taxes which is subsequently dishonored.
(7-1-93)
e.
The filing of a fraudulent return or any return which fails to report all taxable transactions for the
period for which the return relates.
(7-1-93)
f.
A retailer evidencing serious financial instability which, in the opinion of the Commission, creates
reasonable doubt as to the ability of the retailer to pay over sales and use taxes collected by it.
(7-1-93)
02.
Amount of Security. The amount of security will be fixed by the Commission but shall not exceed
an amount equal to three (3) times the anticipated monthly sales tax liability or ten thousand dollars ($10,000),
whichever is less, except in the case of retailers who are habitually delinquent in their submission of returns and/or
taxes in which case the amount of security shall not be greater than five (5) times the estimated average monthly
liability or ten thousand dollars ($10,000), whichever is less.
(7-1-93)
03.
Written Demand. Written demand for security will be sent to the retailer by the Commission by
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certified mail or by personal service upon the retailer. Failure of the retailer to post the demanded security can be
grounds for revocation of the retailer’s seller’s permit following proper notice and hearing.
(7-1-93)
04.
Forms of Security. The Commission will accept as security the following:
(7-1-93)
a.
Surety bond. A surety bond issued by a bonding company with the power of an attorney affixed
thereto which grants the issuing agent the power to obligate the company for this type of liability.
(7-1-93)
b.
Cash bond. Preferably in the form of cashier’s check.
(7-1-93)
c.
Pledged savings accounts. This type of security may be furnished, providing the savings account is
opened with a bank or savings and loan association and an assignment of the account is executed by the taxpayer or
authorized individual and accepted by the bank or savings and loan association. The savings account may be in the
business name or individual’s name, if a sole proprietorship; jointly in the names of the partners of a partnership; or in
the name of a corporation with the assignment properly executed by the officer or officers with the delegated
authority to sign documents for the corporation.
(7-1-93)
05.
Release of Security. Security which has been previously posted may be released by the
Commission upon receipt of written request from the retailer if, after careful review of the circumstances, the
Commission determines that security is not longer required. A request may be made one (1) year after posting the
security. Security will also be released upon the retailer’s termination of its retail activities. In either case, if the
Commission deems necessary, an audit may be conducted prior to the release of any security.
(7-1-93)
117.
REFUND CLAIMS (RULE 117).
01.
In General. Application for refund of sales or use taxes paid in excess of those properly imposed
by the Sales Tax Act, shall be in accordance with the provisions of this rule.
(7-1-93)
02.
Payment of Sales Tax by a Purchaser to a Vendor. When a purchaser has paid sales tax to a
vendor, and later determines that the sales tax was paid in error, the purchaser shall request the refund from the
vendor to whom the excess tax was paid. If the purchaser can provide evidence that the vendor has refused to refund
the tax, he may then file a claim for refund directly with the Tax Commission.
(7-1-93)
03.
Payment of Sales or Use Tax Directly to the State. When a person holding a seller’s permit or use
tax account number has paid tax to the state, and later determines that the sales or use tax was paid in error, he may
file a claim for refund directly with the Tax Commission.
(7-1-93)
04.
Bad Debts. Claims for refunds arising from bad debts must be filed with the Tax Commission in
the manner prescribed by Rule 063 of these rules.
(5-3-03)
05.
Mathematical Errors. When the filer of sales or use tax returns determines that a mathematical
error has been made on a previously filed return resulting in overpayment of the proper amount of sales or use taxes,
he may file a claim for refund directly with the Tax Commission.
(7-1-93)
06.
Claim Form. Form TCR, Sales Tax Refund Claim, may be used to file for a refund from the
Commission. Although this form is available for this purpose, it is not required. A refund claim, however, must be in
writing. The claim must include the full name and address of the claimant and his seller’s permit number or use tax
account number if the claimant has such a number. The claim must state the amount of the refund include a detailed
statement of the reason the claimant believes a refund is due, including a description of the tangible personal property,
if any, to which the tax relates and the date on which the claimed excess taxes were paid. If the claimant is the retailer,
the claim for refund must include a statement, under oath, that the amount of tax plus interest refunded to the retailer
have been or will be refunded by the retailer to the purchaser.
(4-2-08)
07.
Outstanding Liabilities. No claim for refund will be approved or issued if the claimant has
outstanding liabilities for other taxes administered by the Tax Commission.
(5-3-03)
08.
Payment Under Protest. It is not necessary for a taxpayer to pay taxes under protest in order to
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subsequently be able to claim a refund of such taxes.
(7-1-93)
09.
Statute of Limitations. A claim for refund will not be allowed if it is filed more than three (3)
years from the time the payment of the tax was made. The time the payment was made is the date upon which the
sales or use tax return relating to the payment was filed with the State Tax Commission.
(5-3-03)
10.
Taxes Paid in Response to a Notice of Deficiency Determination. A claim for refund may not be
filed relating to any sales or use taxes which have been asserted by a notice of deficiency determination. A taxpayer
contending that taxes have been erroneously or illegally collected by the State Tax Commission in conformance with
a notice of deficiency determination must seek a refund by using the appeal procedures outlined in Rule 121 of these
rules.
(5-3-03)
11.
Denial of a Refund Claim. All claims for refund or credit will be reviewed by the State Tax
Commission’s staff. If the staff concludes that all or part of the claim should not be allowed, notice of denial of the
claim shall be given to the claimant by return receipt requested delivery. The notice shall include a statement of the
reasons for the denial. The notice of denial shall be the equivalent of a notice of deficiency determination. If the
taxpayer wishes to seek a redetermination of the denial notice, he must file a petition for redetermination in the
manner prescribed in Rule 121 of these rules. A petition for redetermination must be filed no later than sixty-three
(63) days from the date upon which the notice of denial is mailed to or served on the claimant.
(5-3-03)
12.
Interest on Refunds. See Rule 122 of these rules.
(5-3-03)
118.
RESPONSIBILITY FOR PAYMENT OF SALES TAXES DUE FROM CORPORATIONS,
LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANIES AND PARTNERSHIPS (RULE 118).
01.
Corporate Officers Duty to Pay Sales Tax. Individuals including corporate officers and
employees with the duty to cause a corporation or a limited liability company to file a sales tax return or to pay sales
tax when due, or any partnership member or employee with such duty, shall become liable for payment of the tax,
penalty and interest due from the corporation or partnership if he shall fail to carry out his duty. Any such responsible
individual shall have the defenses, remedies and recourse provided in Sections 63-3045, 63-3049, 63-3065 and 633074, Idaho Code, and shall be afforded notice and opportunity to be heard on the question of such liability. (7-1-99)
02.
Penalty for Failure to Collect. Any individual required to collect, account for and pay over any
tax who willfully fails to carry out or execute his duty will be required to pay, in addition to the tax, penalty and
interest, an additional amount equal to the total amount of tax involved. This penalty is in addition to all other
penalties provided in Section 63-3634, Idaho Code.
(7-1-93)
119.
SUCCESSOR'S LIABILITY (RULE 119).
01.
Making Inquiries. Section 63-3628, Idaho Code, provides that when a vendor sells out his
business or stock of goods, the buyer shall make inquiry of the State Tax Commission and withhold from the purchase
price any amount of tax that may be due until such time as the vendor, seller, produces a receipt stating that no tax is
due. If the purchaser fails to withhold from the purchase price the tax due, he becomes personally liable for the tax.
(5-3-03)
02.
Written Inquiry Required. The purchaser must make written inquiry to the Boise Office of the
State Tax Commission setting forth the following:
(5-3-03)
a.
The name, location, and seller’s permit number of the business they are purchasing.
(7-1-93)
b.
A statement that they are purchasing the business or stock of goods.
(7-1-93)
c.
An inquiry as to any sales or use tax liability of the business they are purchasing.
(7-1-93)
03.
Copy of Earnest Money. The purchaser must attach to the written inquiry a copy of any earnest
money or similar agreement already entered into with the prospective seller. If no earnest money agreement has been
entered into, then the seller must provide written authorization to the State Tax Commission to release the information
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to the prospective buyer.
(5-3-03)
04.
Written Statement from State Tax Commission. The State Tax Commission, after receiving the
written inquiry from the purchaser as to the amount due, will issue a written statement to the purchaser setting forth
the amount of tax due by the seller, if any. The State Tax Commission shall advise the prospective buyer only of any
amount of sales or use tax that may be due to the State Tax Commission under the Sales Tax Act. The release of any
other information is not authorized. In the case that the prospective buyer requests to see the prospective seller’s sales
or use tax filing record in order to determine if the business is profitable, the prospective seller must provide a Power
of Attorney appointing the prospective buyer as attorney in fact to receive confidential information regarding sales or
use tax filings on behalf of the prospective seller.
(5-3-03)
05.
Application for Seller's Permit Number. Upon final sale, the purchaser must file an application
Form IBR-1 for a new seller’s permit number with the State Tax Commission. The seller must forward his seller’s
permit to the State Tax Commission for cancellation.
(3-30-07)
120.
JEOPARDY DETERMINATION (RULE 120).
If collection of any part of a tax required to be paid to the state of if any determination or redetermination will be
jeopardized by delay, the Tax Commission will make a determination of the tax or amount required to be collected
noting the need for expeditious procedure and the amount of required security upon the assessment. The amount
determined to be due the state is immediately payable and, if not paid immediately after service of notice of the
deficiency, may be entered as a final assessment and collected by judgment processes or through use of any collection
procedure available to the Tax Commission’s office. If, within thirty (30) days, the taxpayer files for redetermination
and deposits with his petition for redetermination such security as the Tax Commission may, in this specific case,
deem necessary to ensure compliance with this act, collection of the deficiency assessment will be delayed pending
redetermination. Hearings and other procedure will then proceed in accordance with the rules pertaining thereto.
(7-1-93)
121.
NOTICE OF DEFICIENCY ADMINISTRATIVE REVIEW AND APPEALS JUDICIAL REVIEW
(RULE 121).
01.
Notice of Deficiency. When the State Tax Commission determines that a deficiency exists with
respect to the tax liability of any taxpayer, notice shall be given to the taxpayer, return receipt requested delivery. This
notice shall be mailed as soon as practical after determination of the tax deficiency, addressed to the taxpayer’s last
known address.
(6-23-94)
02.
Administrative Review. A review of a deficiency determination made by the State Tax
Commission shall be made and conducted according to the procedures and practices described in this rule. (7-1-93)
a.
A taxpayer desiring to seek a redetermination must, within sixty-three (63) days of the date of
mailing of a notice of deficiency described in Subsection 121.01 of this rule, file a written protest with the State Tax
Commission requesting a redetermination of the deficiency. The terms petition for redetermination and petition, as
used in this rule, shall mean a written instrument which asks the State Tax Commission to review and redetermine the
tax assessed by notice of deficiency, as provided in Subsection 121.01. A petition need not be accompanied by
payment of the tax assessed in the notice of deficiency. Receipt of a petition meeting the requirements of Subsection
121.03, below, shall constitute the taxpayer’s protest of the deficiency determination.
(6-23-94)
b.
Any taxpayer who pays the tax under protest may file a petition for redetermination of the taxes so
paid. Under this circumstance, such a petition shall be considered a request or demand for refund, and the Tax
Commission will proceed under this rule and Idaho Sales Tax Administrative Rule 117.
(6-23-94)
c.
In the event a taxpayer fails to timely file a written petition seeking redetermination with the State
Tax Commission the deficiency shall be assessed and become due and payable upon notice and demand from the
State Tax Commission.
(6-23-94)
03.
Form of Petition. A petition seeking redetermination of a deficiency must be in writing, and shall
contain the taxpayer’s name, address and permit or identification number; the time period to which the petition for
redetermination relates; the specific item or items in the deficiency notice to which the taxpayer objects; and the
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factual or legal basis for the objections so made.
(6-23-94)
04.
Procedures. The taxpayer must file a written protest within the sixty-three (63) day period
described in Subsection 121.02.a. If the Tax Commission determines that the protest does not meet the requirements
of Subsection 121.03, above, the Tax Commission shall notify the taxpayer that his protest is inadequate. The written
notice must be mailed to the taxpayer’s last known address, return receipt requested, and must describe the reasons
why the protest is inadequate and the steps which the taxpayer must take to perfect his protest. The taxpayer shall
have twenty-eight (28) days from the date the notice is mailed to perfect his protest. If the taxpayer fails to perfect his
protest within the twenty-eight (28) day period, the taxpayer will be deemed to have waived any right to be heard,
even if the original sixty-three (63) day period, described in Subsection 121.02.a. above, has yet to expire. Upon
filing a protest with the Tax Commission, the taxpayer may request either an informal conference or a specified time
in which to submit additional documents. Any petitioner wishing to submit resale or exemption certificates in support
of his petition, must do so within ninety (90) days of the date of the notice of deficiency determination to which the
petition relates.
(6-23-94)
05.
Informal Conference. The State Tax Commission, any member, or any person designated by it
shall conduct informal conferences. The protestant should make available at the conference any information in
support of the issues under protest.
(6-23-94)
06.
Submission of Additional Documents. If the protestant does not wish to appear in person, he may
submit additional statements, documents, or other materials he desires the Commission to consider before issuing its
decision, and no personal appearance by the taxpayer before the Commission will be required. The protestant must
indicate the time within which he will submit such additional information.
(7-1-93)
07.
Failure to Appear, Produce or Submit Materials. If any protestant fails to comply with a
summons or subpoena issued by the Commission, or fails to appear for an informal conference or fails to timely
submit additional information, or fails to perfect an inadequate protest, the protestant will be deemed to have waived
rights to further opportunities to be heard, and the Tax Commission may issue a decision affirming the deficiency
without further notice or hearing.
(6-23-94)
08.
Representation. The taxpayer has a right to be represented at an informal hearing by any person he
chooses. If the representative is not an employee of the taxpayer, the taxpayer must execute a power of attorney
authorizing that person to represent the taxpayer. The power of attorney shall be in such form as the Tax Commission
finds acceptable. The Tax Commission may, in its discretion, limit the number of persons attending an informal
hearing.
(6-23-94)
09.
Appeals of Final Decisions. Appeals of final decisions of petitions for redetermination shall be
made within ninety-one (91) days from date of receipt of such decision. If receipt is refused, the date of first refusal
shall be deemed the date of receipt. Tax Commission decisions may be reviewed by the Board of Tax Appeals or by a
District Court in Idaho. A Tax Commission decision may not be appealed to the Board of Tax Appeals when the
amount of dispute exceeds twenty-five thousand dollars ($25,000) at the time the notice of deficiency determination
is issued. See Section 63-3049, Idaho Code, and Income Tax Rule 113, which explain the means for judicial review of
Tax Commission decisions.
(6-23-94)
10.
Administrative Review Procedures. The administrative review procedures set forth in
Subsections 121.02 through 121.09 of this rule shall also apply to a taxpayer desiring to seek a redetermination of
other decisions rendered by the Commission, including: Denial of a taxpayer’s refund request; denial of a taxpayer’s
request for a seller’s permit; and denial of a request for relief from the responsibility of retaining detailed invoices of
nontaxed sales by a taxpayer engaged in business as a retail food store.
(6-23-94)
122.
INTEREST ON DEFICIENCIES, REFUNDS AND ESTIMATED RETURNS (RULE 122).
01.
Interest Rate. From July 1, 1981, to December 31, 1993, the rate of interest on deficiencies or
refunds of tax was twelve percent per annum. As of January 1, 1994, the rate of interest on deficiencies or refunds of
tax is determined annually as provided in section 63-3045, Idaho Code and Idaho Tax Commission Administration
and Enforcement Rule 310. All interest on sales or use tax deficiencies is simple interest. Interest applies only to tax
and not to penalties.
(7-1-97)
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02.
Interest Accruing During a Period Subject to Audit. Interest on deficiencies accrues from the
due date of the return to which the deficiency relates. On refunds, the interest accrues from the due date of the return
or date of payment, whichever is later. However, when a refund is claimed or a deficiency is asserted for a period of
time which includes several reporting periods, in lieu of calculating interest for each reporting period, interest may be
averaged over the interest rate period if no substantial distortion results from the averaging technique. When
averaging interest, sales or purchases of extraordinary amounts outside the usual course of business which would
substantially distort the result should be excluded from the averaging calculation and interest calculated separately on
such transactions. Average interest, accruing during an interest rate period, may be calculated according to the
following formula:
Formula:
(-----------------------NxR ) – R2
N = Number of reporting periods in interest rate period.
R = Interest rate per reporting period, e.g., one percent (1%) for monthly filers, three percent (3%) for
quarterly filers, at a 12% annual interest rate, etc.
(6-23-94)
03.
Alternate Formulas. Alternatively, interest may be calculated according to such other formula as
the taxpayer and the Tax Commission’s sales tax audit staff may agree to apply.
(7-1-93)
04.
Estimated Returns. Interest on estimated returns accrues at an annual rate as provided in Section
63-3045, Idaho Code and Idaho Tax Commission Administration and Enforcement Administrative Rule 310.
(7-1-97)
05.
Failure to Register. Taxpayers who failed to have a tax number in a period where a deficiency
exists will be, for interest computation purposes, considered to be monthly filers.
(7-1-93)
06.
Judgments. Nothing in this rule is intended to effect interest rates on judgments pursuant to
Section 28-22-104(2), Idaho Code.
(7-1-93)
123.
ADDITIONS AND PENALTIES (RULE 123).
All additions and penalties provided by Sections 63-3046, 63-3075, 63-3076 and 63-3077, Idaho Code, are
incorporated in the Sales Tax Act.
(7-1-93)
01.
Substantial Underpayment. For purposes of enforcing the substantial underpayment penalty
provided by Section 63-3046(d), Idaho Code, the term taxable year shall, for purposes of the Sales Tax Act, mean the
twelve (12) month calendar period for which an annual reconciliation is required. The return, for purposes of such
taxable year, shall be the returns required to be filed under Idaho Sales Tax Administrative Rule 105. The taxpayer’s
entire calendar year or fiscal tax year shall be any fraction of a twelve (12) month period occurring prior to filing a
final report.
(7-1-97)
02.
Repeated or Intentional Invalid Exemption Claims. A purchaser who repeatedly or intentionally
claims exemption from tax on purchases that are not exempt and has not reported and paid use tax on the purchases,
shall owe the tax plus the interest prescribed in Idaho Sales Tax Administrative Rule 122 and may also be assessed a
penalty of five percent (5%) of the purchase price of the goods or services, or two hundred dollars ($200), whichever
is greater.
(7-1-97)
124.
COLLECTION AND ENFORCEMENT (RULE 124).
Incorporation of Rules. The rules promulgated by the State Tax Commission entitled “Idaho Tax Commission
Administration and Enforcement Rules” apply to the administration and enforcement of the Idaho Sales Tax Act.
(7-1-97)
125.
DISTRIBUTION OF SALES TAX REVENUES (RULE 125).
Refer to Idaho Property Tax Administrative Rule 995 for information on distribution of sales tax revenues to cities,
counties and other special purpose taxing districts.
(3-30-01)
126.
SALES TAX COLLECTED BY THE STATE LIQUOR DISPENSARY (RULE 126).
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01.
Liquor Subject to Sales Tax. All sales of liquor which includes alcohol, spirits, beer, and wine as
defined in Sections 23-105(g), 23-1303(a), and 23-1001(a), Idaho Code, unless specifically exempt, are subject to the
tax measured by the sales price.
(7-1-93)
02.
Sales for Resale. In the case of sales to persons licensed under the provisions of Title 23, Chapter
9, Idaho Code, only those purchases for resale by an establishment licensed to sell liquor will be exempt from the tax.
If the licensee purchases liquor for any purpose other than for resale, the licensee is subject to the use tax. (7-1-93)
03.
Reporting. The superintendent of the State Liquor Dispensary shall forward monthly to the Tax
Commission a report of all sales tax collected for the preceding month. All sales tax collected by the superintendent
of the State Liquor Dispensary and by contract private liquor stores, when the product is supplied by the State Liquor
Dispensary, shall be credited directly to the liquor account, and shall not become a part of the sales tax account.
(7-1-93)
127.
FREE DISTRIBUTION NEWSPAPERS (RULE 127).
01.
Newspaper Format. The term “newspaper format” shall mean a publication bearing a title, issued
regularly at stated intervals of at least twelve (12) times a year, and formed of printed paper sheets without binding.
Catalogs, advertising fliers, travel brochures, employee newsletters, theater programs, telephone directories,
restaurant guides, posters, and similar publications are not publications in newspaper format.
(7-1-96)
02.
Purchase or Use of Tangible Personal Property. The purchase or use of tangible personal
property used to produce newspapers distributed to the public free of charge is exempt from sales or use taxes if the
requirements of Section 63-3622T, Idaho Code are met.
(7-1-96)
03.
Qualifying for Exemption. To qualify for the exemption at least ten percent (10%) of the total
newspaper, computed on an average annual column inch basis, must be devoted to the publication of nonincome
producing informative material. Advertisements promoting the free distribution newspaper itself do not qualify as
nonincome producing informative material. Neither do logos, column headings, mastheads, borders, etc.
(7-1-96)
128.
CERTIFICATES FOR RESALE AND OTHER EXEMPTION CLAIMS (RULE 128).
01.
In General. This rule applies to proper documentation for exempt purchases of tangible personal
property for resale and all other exemption claims for taxable transactions enumerated in Section 63-3612, Idaho
Code. All forms approved by this rule may be reproduced.
(3-6-00)
02.
Burden of Proof. All sales made within Idaho are presumed to be subject to sales tax unless the
seller obtains from the purchaser a properly executed resale or exemption certificate. If the seller does not have an
exemption certificate on file it will have the burden of proving that a sale is not subject to tax. The seller may
overcome the presumption by establishing the facts giving rise to the exemption. If the seller obtains a valid
certificate from the purchaser, the seller need not collect sales or use taxes unless the sale of the tangible personal
property or the transaction in question is taxable to the purchaser as a matter of law in the particular instance claimed
on the certificate.
(3-4-10)
03.
Qualified Buyers for Purposes Other Than Resale. Producers, certain contractors and exempt
buyers may claim an exemption from paying sales tax on the purchase of goods and other taxable transactions by
qualifying under one (1) or more of the provisions of Sections 63-3622A through 63-3622UU, Idaho Code,
completing, and providing the required form to the seller.
(3-4-10)
04.
Qualified Buyers for Purposes of Resale. The resale exemption may be claimed by the following
purchasers when buying goods for resale:
(3-6-00)
a.
A retailer or wholesaler doing business in Idaho who holds an Idaho seller’s permit number. An
Idaho seller’s permit number has nine (9) digits followed by an “S.” Example: 000123456-S. If the number contains
any other letter or is an inappropriate number, such as a Federal Employer Identification Number, the certificate is not
valid.
(3-6-00)
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b.
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A wholesaler who makes no retail sales and who is not required to hold an Idaho seller’s permit
(3-6-00)
c.
An out-of-state retailer who makes not more than two (2) sales in Idaho in any twelve (12) month
period and is not required to hold an Idaho seller’s permit number.
(3-6-00)
05.
Description and Proper Execution of Approved Forms. In order to be valid, all forms must be
legible and include a date, the purchaser’s name, signature, title, and address. They must comply with any additional
requirements provided in these rules.
(3-4-10)
a.
To claim a resale exemption, Form ST-101, Sales Tax Resale and Exemption Certificate, must be
completed, except that multi-state taxpayers may use the Uniform Sales and Use Tax Certificate - Multi-jurisdiction.
The resale certificates approved by this rule may only be taken from a purchaser described in Subsection 128.04. The
reason for and the nature of the claimed exemption must be included on the form as well as the primary nature of
business and the type of products sold, leased or rented by the purchaser. An Idaho registered retailer must include a
seller’s permit number. A purchaser need not identify every type of product it sells but must indicate the general
character of the property it sells, rents or leases.
(3-4-10)
i.
Example. A grocery store that in addition to groceries sells miscellaneous items such as cosmetics,
magazines, and school supplies. The store would provide its resale number and describe the primary nature of its
business as selling groceries. It could buy cosmetics, magazines, and school supplies for resale and it does not need to
list those items on the resale certificate. It only needs to indicate the general character of the property it sells as
groceries.
(3-4-10)
ii.
Example. A lawn and garden store occasionally sells bar-b-que grills as promotional items. Even
though it describes lawn and garden items as the types of products it sells it can buy the grills for resale.
(3-4-10)
iii.
Example. A grocery store describes the primary nature of its business as selling groceries. It then
buys an automobile for resale. The grocery store should provide the automobile seller a resale certificate for this
transaction and identify its primary nature of its business as grocery and indicate it is specifically buying the
automobile for resale.
(3-4-10)
b.
Retailers of food products who have been granted records reduction authority by the State Tax
Commission may accept Sales Tax Exemption Claim Form-Grocer, Form ST-111, from a purchaser if the retailer has
a properly executed certificate (Form ST-101, ST-103, or ST-104) on file from the purchaser. Form ST-111 must
include the seller’s permit number (if applicable), the signature of the individual claiming the exemption, and, the
total purchase price and general nature of the nontaxable products sold.
(3-6-00)
c.
Sales Tax Exemption Claim for Cash Purchases by Governmental Agencies, Form ST-104G, may
be completed only by federal, Idaho State, and local government agencies making cash purchases and must be
furnished to the vendor at the time of sale. Each transaction requires a newly executed form signed by the agency’s
purchasing agent and the employee/purchaser. Blank forms will be furnished to government agencies by the State Tax
Commission upon request. The form cannot be used for lodging and meals bought by a travelling government
employee nor for any other reasons enumerated on the form.
(3-6-00)
d.
Sales Tax Exemption on Lodging Accommodations Claimed by Government Employees Using
Credit Card Payment, Form ST-104-HM, applies when a credit card company will directly bill to and be paid by a
federal, Idaho State, or local government agency employer. It does not apply to credit card payments that are paid by
the employee who is later reimbursed by the government agency employer. Each lodging transaction requires a newly
executed form signed by the employee/purchaser.
(3-6-00)
e.
The Diplomatic Tax Exemption Program of the United States Government grants immunity from
state taxes to diplomats from certain foreign countries. A federal tax exemption card issued by the U.S. Department
of State bears a photograph of the holder, a federal tax exemption number, and specific instructions as to the extent of
the exemption granted to the diplomat. Additional information is provided in Rule 098 of these rules.
(3-6-00)
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f.
Sales Tax Exemption Certificate - Vehicle, Form ST-104-MV, must be completed by a purchaser
claiming an exemption from tax under Section 63-3622R, Idaho Code, when purchasing a qualifying motor vehicle or
trailer.
(3-6-00)
g.
Motor Vehicle Transfer Affidavit, Form ST-133, must be completed when claiming an exemption
from tax when selling a motor vehicle to a relative under the exemption provided by Section 63-3622K, Idaho Code,
when selling a motor vehicle, boat or RV to a member of an Indian Tribe within the boundaries of an Indian
reservation, or when making a gift of a motor vehicle, boat or RV.
(3-6-00)
h.
Truck Camper, Transport Trailer, Office Trailer and Untitled Boat Certificate, Form ST-108, is
required by any person titling, registering, or licensing certain vehicles on which sales tax was not paid. Of those
vehicles mentioned on the form, only the sale of a transport trailer or an office trailer may qualify for an occasional
sale exemption, as described in Rule 099 of these rules, and the exemption requires the proper execution of ST-108 to
make the claim.
(3-15-02)
i.
Sales Tax Exemption Certificate - Capital Asset Transfer Affidavit, Form ST-133CATS, is required
under the provisions of Section 63-3622K, Idaho Code, when claiming an exemption from tax on the sale of certain
vehicles which are included in the bulk sale of a business’ assets when the new owner will continue to operate the
business in a like manner; for qualifying transfers of certain capital assets through sale, lease or rental; and, for the
transfer of vehicles to and from a business or between qualifying businesses when there is no change other than
owners’ equity.
(3-6-00)
j.
Information on the resale certificate. The resale certificate shall bear the name and address of the
purchaser, the name and address of the seller, shall be signed and dated by the purchaser or his agent, shall indicate
the number of the permit issued to the purchaser, or that the purchaser is an out-of-state retailer, and shall indicate the
general character of the tangible personal property sold by the purchaser in the regular course of business. By
executing the resale certificate, the buyer is certifying that the specific property being purchased is being purchased
for resale.
(3-4-10)
06.
Seller's Responsibility -- Purchases for Resale. A seller is not liable for the collection of sales tax
on items sold to a customer from whom the seller has obtained a properly executed Sales Tax Resale and Exemption
Certificate, Form ST-101 if the customer intends to resell the items in the regular course of business. The seller has no
duty or obligation to collect sales or use taxes in regard to any sales transaction so documented unless the sale fits into
the narrow classification of sales that can be considered to be taxable as a matter of law in the particular instance
claimed on the resale certificate. If the particular item being purchased for resale does not commonly match the
description of the general character of the tangible personal property as identified on the resale certificate, then it is
presumed that the sale is taxable as a matter of law; however, if the seller questions the purchaser and the purchaser
provides a new certificate specifically identifying the property in question as being purchased for resale, then the
seller can accept the certificate and is relieved of any further responsibility.
(3-4-10)
a.
Example: A restaurant operator completes an ST-101 for his supplier. He indicates the general
character of the products he sells as food and beverages. The restaurant operator purchases sugar and flour from the
supplier. The supplier is not liable for the collection of the sales tax as the character of the goods is that which the
restaurant operator will resell in the regular course of business. The resale claim made by the restaurant operator is
available as a matter of law.
(3-6-00)
b.
Example: The same restaurant operator later purchases dish towels and dish washing soap. The
supplier must collect the tax. The general character of the goods are not those sold by a restaurant in the normal
course of business. The exemption claimed by the restaurant is not available as a matter of law. However, if the
restaurant operator identifies cleaning supplies as one of the types of items it resells, either on the original certificate
or on a new certificate, then the supplier need not collect the tax.
(3-4-10)
c.
Example: An appliance store buys appliances and some furniture for resale from a supplier. The
appliance store has a resale certificate on file with the supplier. The supplier also sells warehouse equipment as part of
its business. The appliance store buys a forklift from the supplier. The supplier should charge tax. However, if the
furniture store provides a new certificate indicating it will sell the forklift, the supplier has no duty or obligation to
collect the tax. Without the new certificate, an objectively reasonable person would not assume a furniture store sells
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forklifts. Additionally, the furniture store is only buying one (1) forklift and this fact indicates to the supplier that it is
not buying the forklift for resale.
(3-4-10)
07.
Seller's Responsibility -- Purchases Claimed Exempt from Sales Tax for Reasons Other Than
Resale. A seller is not liable for the collection of sales tax on items sold to a customer from whom a properly
executed Sales Tax Resale and Exemption Certificate, Form ST-101, has been received if the nature of the exemption
claimed is available to the purchaser as a matter of law or the nature of the goods purchased qualify for the particular
exemption claimed on the certificate.
(3-4-10)
a.
A retailer must collect tax on the sale of any goods that are specifically excluded from an
exemption as a matter of law. For example, a purchaser claiming the production exemption provided by Section 633622D, Idaho Code, may not claim an exemption on the sale of items that are specifically excluded from the
exemption as a matter of law, such as:
(3-6-00)
i.
Hand tools with a unit price not in excess of one hundred dollars ($100);
(3-6-00)
ii.
Maintenance and janitorial equipment and supplies;
(3-6-00)
iii.
Office equipment and supplies;
(3-6-00)
iv.
Selling and distribution equipment and supplies;
(3-6-00)
v.
Property used in transportation activities;
(3-6-00)
vi.
Equipment or other property used to make repairs;
(3-6-00)
vii.
Tangible personal property which becomes a component of any real property or any improvement
or fixture thereto;
(3-6-00)
viii.
Licensed motor vehicles;
(3-6-00)
ix.
Aircraft; and
(3-6-00)
x.
Recreational vehicles.
(3-6-00)
b.
Example: A farmer completes an ST-101 claiming a production exemption on the purchase of a
fifteen dollar ($15) hammer and a case of motor oil. The retailer must collect the sales tax on the sale of the hammer,
but is not liable for the collection of the sales tax on the sale of the motor oil. The retailer cannot rely on the
exemption certificate when selling the hammer because, as a matter of law, the sale of hand tools with a unit price of
one hundred dollars ($100) or less is excluded from the production exemption. But the retailer can rely on the
exemption certificate when selling goods, such as the motor oil, which the farmer could put to either a nontaxable use
(e.g., oil for a tractor), or a taxable use (e.g., oil for a licensed pickup truck).
(4-11-06)
c.
Additionally, when a retailer sells merchandise which qualifies for the production exemption in
Section 63-3622D, Idaho Code, and which may be used for either a taxable or a nontaxable purpose, such as the sale
of a battery which is taxable when used in a car and not taxable when used in a farm tractor, the retailer is relieved of
the liability for and responsibility of collecting the sales tax if the purchaser provides a description on the exemption
certificate of the intended nontaxable use of the item.
(3-6-00)
d.
A retailer cannot rely on an exemption certificate obtained from a purchaser when the law does not
provide an exemption from the tax for the purchaser, such as a nonprofit organization not specifically exempted by
the sales tax law or a governmental agency of another state.
(3-6-00)
e.
Nor can a retailer rely on an exemption certificate when the limited language of the law pertaining
to the exemption claimed excludes all but certain goods from the exemption. For example, certain contractors can
execute an ST-101 to purchase construction materials for specific jobs in non-taxing states claiming an exemption
from tax under Section 63-3622B, Idaho Code, and Rule 012 of these rules. The retailer must collect tax on any goods
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that are not to be incorporated into the real property, such as parts for construction equipment and tools.
(3-6-00)
f.
In lieu of Form ST-101, retailers, when selling property that the purchaser claims is entitled to the
production exemption, may stamp or imprint on the face of their sales invoices, or purchasers may stamp or imprint
on the face of their purchase orders, a certificate containing the following language:
(3-4-10)
I certify that the property which I have here purchased will be used by me directly and primarily in the
process of producing tangible personal property by mining, manufacturing, processing, fabricating, or farming, or as
a repair part for equipment used primarily as described above.
This tax exemption statement qualifies if this statement is signed by the purchaser and the name, address,
and nature of business of the purchaser is shown on the invoice.
Any person who signs this certification with the intention of evading payment of tax is guilty of a
misdemeanor.
NATURE OF BUSINESS
BUYER’S SIGNATURE
The signature on this certificate must be in addition to any other signature required on the invoice. If no
Form ST-101 is on file with the vendor, then each exempt sale must be documented as described in this Subsection.
(3-4-10)
g.
Information on the exemption certificate. An exemption certificate shall show the purchaser’s name
and address, business name and address, and be signed and dated by the purchaser. The purchaser shall also provide
on the certificate the specific exemption being claimed and, if the production exemption is being claimed, a list of the
products the purchaser produces. If the purchaser is claiming the contractor exemption, the purchaser must identify
the invoice, purchase order, or job number to which the claim applies, the city and state where the job is located, and
the name of the project owner. If the purchaser is claiming an exemption as an American Indian, then the purchaser
must provide a valid Tribal I.D. number. By signing the exemption certificate, the buyer is certifying that the
purchase qualifies for an exemption from tax.
(3-4-10)
08.
Purchaser’s Responsibility. A purchaser has the responsibility to properly complete a certificate
and ensure that tax is charged on all taxable purchases. If the purchaser properly provides a certificate and normally
makes exempt purchases, he nevertheless must ensure that tax is paid when a taxable purchase is made. If the seller
does not charge the tax on a taxable purchase the purchaser must either notify the seller to correct the billing and then
pay the sales tax to the seller, or accrue and remit use tax on the transaction. If the purchaser intentionally or
repeatedly makes purchases, claiming they are exempt, when in fact they are not exempt, and the purchaser fails to
remit use tax, a penalty can be imposed in addition to the use tax. The penalty amount that may be asserted against the
purchaser is five percent (5%) of the sales price or two hundred dollars ($200), whichever is greater. The penalty will
be asserted by the Commission as a Notice of Deficiency but the purchaser may have the penalty abated when he can
establish that there were reasonable grounds for believing that the purchase was properly exempt from tax. In
addition, if the purchaser gives a resale or exemption certificate with the intention of evading payment of the tax, the
purchaser may be charged with a criminal misdemeanor and could be punished by a fine not exceeding one thousand
dollars ($1,000) or imprisonment for not more than one (1) year, or by both a fine and imprisonment.
(3-4-10)
a.
Example: A garden supply store sells, among other things, soil and wood chips in large quantities.
It buys a loader to use in its business to load items into customers trucks. When buying the loader, the garden supply
store gives a resale certificate to the seller indicating it intends to resell the loader. However, upon purchase the loader
is capitalized on the books of the garden supply store. The Commission could impose a penalty equal to five percent
(5%) of the purchase price of the loader against the garden supply store. This penalty is in addition to the use tax that
is due. The individual who executed the certificate, or authorized the execution, on behalf of the garden supply store,
if done with intent to evade payment of the use tax, could be criminally charged with a misdemeanor.
(3-4-10)
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Idaho State Tax Commission
IDAPA 35.01.02
Idaho Sales & Use Tax Administrative Rules
b.
Example: A restaurant buys food for resale from a supplier. It can properly give a resale certificate
to the supplier. Since it buys food on a continuing basis the supplier keeps a certificate on file. If the restaurant buys
cleaning supplies for its own consumption, the supplier should charge sales tax. If it fails to charge tax, the restaurant
should notify the supplier to correct the billing and collect the sales tax. If the restaurant fails to pay sales or use tax
on more than one purchase, then, under Section 63-3624 Idaho Code, the Commission can assert a use tax and a
penalty equal to five percent (5%) of the purchase price or two hundred dollars ($200), whichever is greater, against
the restaurant.
(3-4-10)
09.
Timely Acceptance of Certificates. A seller may accept a certificate from a purchaser prior to the
time of sale, at the time of sale, or at any reasonable time after the sale to establish the exemption claim, with the
exception of Forms ST-104-HM and ST-104G which must be provided at the time of sale. However, if no approved
certificate is obtained from the purchaser in the manner provided or permitted by this rule, the sale is presumed to be
taxable.
(3-6-00)
a.
Certificates obtained by a seller at a time subsequent to but not within a reasonable time after the
time of sale will be considered by the State Tax Commission in conjunction with all other evidence available to
determine whether or not the seller has established that a sales tax transaction is exempt from tax.
(3-4-10)
b.
Example: A retailer sells goods to a customer without charging the sales tax but does not obtain an
ST-101 from the customer. Instead, the customer writes his seller’s permit number on the invoice when he signs for
the goods. The retailer is later audited by the State Tax Commission and fails in an attempt to obtain a certificate from
his customer. The retailer argues that the seller’s permit number written on the invoice is evidence that the customer
purchased the goods for resale. However the number by itself does not establish that the customer bought the goods
for resale. The retailer is liable for the tax on the sale.
(3-4-10)
c.
Example: A retailer sells a truck load of hay to a customer, does not charge sales tax on the
transaction, and fails to obtain an ST-101. The retailer is later audited by the State Tax Commission and is unable to
obtain an ST-101 from the customer. The retailer argues that hay is a farm supply and this alone should establish that
the sale is exempt. However, the customer may be in a business which does not qualify for the farming production
exemption, such as racing or showing horses. Or, the customer may be using the hay for a nonbusiness purpose, such
as raising animals for his own consumption. The retailer is liable for the tax on the sale.
(3-4-10)
d.
When a Notice of Deficiency Determination has been issued to a seller by the State Tax
Commission and the seller petitions for redetermination as provided by Rule 121 of these rules, he may submit
certificates obtained from his customers as evidence of exemption claims, but only if the certificates are presented to
the State Tax Commission within ninety (90) days of the date of the Notice of Deficiency Determination.
(3-6-00)
129.
USE OF A RECREATIONAL FACILITY, INSTRUCTIONAL FEES, AND PARI-MUTUEL
BETTING (RULE 129).
01.
Use of a Recreational Facility. Charges or fees to procure the use of a particular facility, facilities,
or building for the purpose of recreation or physical conditioning are subject to sales tax.
(3-6-00)
02.
Dues. Dues paid to fraternal organizations such as the Elks, Eagles, Masonic Order, or similar
organizations are not normally paid primarily for the use of facilities for recreation; in such cases, recreational use of
facilities will be incidental. However, any separate, identifiable fees charged by such fraternal organizations, in
excess of ordinary membership dues and fees, specifically for the use of recreational or physical conditioning
facilities will be subject to sales tax including, but not limited to, bowling fees, green fees, swimming fees, court fees,
or equipment usage fees.
(3-6-00)
03.
Instructional Fees. Separately stated instruction fees, such as for jazzercise, aerobics, dance, and
swimming are not subject to sales tax.
(3-6-00)
04.
Pari-Mutuel Betting. Pari-mutuel betting is not subject to sales tax.
(3-6-00)
05.
Use of Tangible Personal Property. Charges imposed on persons using swimming pools, skating
rinks, golf courses and bowling alleys, etc., often combine the privilege of entering the place with the right to use
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Idaho State Tax Commission
IDAPA 35.01.02
Idaho Sales & Use Tax Administrative Rules
tangible personal property. When a uniform price is imposed upon all persons without regard to the intention of the
individual to use tangible personal property or the other facilities included, the total charge will be presumed a charge
for the use of a recreational facility and subject to sales tax.
(3-6-00)
130.
PROMOTER SPONSORED EVENTS (RULE 130).
01.
Promoter's Responsibility. Promoters at promoter sponsored events, as defined in Section 633620C, Idaho Code, shall obtain a completed copy of a Form ST-124 from each participant at the event. The promoter
shall forward a copy of the completed Form ST-124 to the State Tax Commission within ten (10) days following the
beginning of the event. The promoter shall also maintain a copy in its file.
(3-30-01)
02.
Period of Time for Which a Form ST-124 Is Valid. If the Form ST-124 is not used to issue a
temporary seller's permit, a Form ST-124 completed by a participant shall be valid until the following June 30, unless
the participant information changes. The promoter need only obtain a Form ST-124 from each participant at the first
show in which the participant participates after July 1 of any given year. The promoter shall forward to the State Tax
Commission the names, address, tax identification number and phone number, if known, of participants who do not
complete a new Form ST-124 as described in Subsection 130.03.
(3-30-01)
03.
Participant's Failure to Provide a Form ST-124 to the Promoter. If a participant does not
provide the completed Form ST124 to the promoter, the promoter will provide to the State Tax Commission within
ten (10) days following the beginning of the event, a list of participants who have failed to provide a completed Form
ST-124.
(3-30-01)
04.
Examples.
(3-30-01)
a.
The promoter sponsors events on July 16, September 22, and December 18, of year one (1), and
March 4, and July 30 of year two (2). Participant A attends and makes sales at all events. The promoter will need to
obtain a copy of the Form ST-124 from Participant A for the July 16, year one (1) event and the July 30, year two (2)
event. For the other events, the promoter will only need to include Participant A in the list of participants who did not
complete a Form ST-124 and forward this list to the State Tax Commission.
(3-30-01)
b.
Participant B attends the July 16, event and completes a Form ST-124 stating it will not be selling
any items of tangible personal property. Participant B also attends the September 22, event but in this event it will be
selling tangible personal property. The promoter will need to obtain a new Form ST-124 and forward it to the State
Tax Commission.
(3-30-01)
05.
Use of the Form ST-124. The Form ST-124 must be used every time a promoter issues a temporary
seller's permit. A promoter must use the Form ST-124 to issue temporary permits even to those participants who have
attended events during the preceding year. The promoter will provide the participant with the Form ST-124 who will
upon completing the form, return it to the promoter. The promoter will retain a copy of the Form ST-124 and provide
a copy to the State Tax Commission. The Form ST-124 shall include the following:
(3-30-01)
a.
The name of the promoter sponsoring the event, the name of the event, the event location, and the
dates of the event.
(3-30-01)
b.
The name, address, and phone number of participant in the event.
c.
The participant's federal employer identification number.
d.
Either:
(3-30-01)
i.
The participant's seller's permit number; or
(3-30-01)
ii.
A statement that an Idaho sales tax permit will be obtained before the date of the event; or
(3-30-01)
iii.
A statement from the participant that no taxable retail sales will be made at this event.
Page 117
(3-30-01)
(5-8-09)
(3-30-01)
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IDAHO ADMINISTRATIVE CODE
Idaho State Tax Commission
g.
IDAPA 35.01.02
Idaho Sales & Use Tax Administrative Rules
Other information the State Tax Commission may deem necessary.
(3-30-01)
06.
Temporary Seller's Permit Issued by Promoter. Before a promoter may claim the income tax
credit provided for by Section 63-3620C, Idaho Code, the promoter must forward a completed Form ST-124 to the
State Tax Commission for each temporary seller's permit the promoter assigns, along with the documentation for the
permit.
(3-30-01)
07.
Promoter's Sales Tax Liability. The promoter shall not be held responsible for collecting sales tax
on sales made by participants other than sales made by the promoter himself.
(3-30-01)
131. -- 132.
(RESERVED)
133.
RADIO AND TELEVISION BROADCAST EQUIPMENT (RULE 133).
Sales and purchases of equipment primarily and directly used in the production and broadcasting of radio and
television programs are exempt pursuant to Section 63-3622S, Idaho Code. To qualify for the exemption, a business
must be primarily devoted to both producing and broadcasting either radio or television programs. Businesses that
provide television or radio programs only to paid subscribers are not broadcasters and cannot claim this exemption.
(5-3-03)
134.
SALES OF LIVESTOCK (RULE 134).
01.
Exempt Sales of Livestock. Beginning February 27, 2002, certain sales and purchases of livestock
are exempt from sales and use tax. To qualify for the exemption, the livestock must be sold at a livestock market
chartered by the Idaho Department of Agriculture, or an organization expressly exempted from chartering
requirements by Section 25-1722, Idaho Code. Those groups expressly exempted from chartering requirements are:
(5-3-03)
a.
livestock.
Any place or operation where future farmers or 4-H groups, or private fairs conduct sales of
(5-3-03)
b.
Any place or operation conducted for a dispersal sale of the livestock of a farmer, dairyman,
livestock breeder, or feeder who is discontinuing said business and no other livestock is sold or offered for sale.
(5-3-03)
c.
Any place or operation where a breeder or an association of breeders of livestock assemble and
offer for sale and sell under their own management any livestock when such breeders shall assume all responsibility
of such sale and the title of livestock sold. This shall apply to all purebred livestock association sales.
(5-3-03)
d.
All sales of livestock by any generally recognized statewide association or associations composed
of persons engaged in the production in Idaho of cattle, calves, sheep, mules, horses, swine, or goats.
(5-3-03)
e.
Sales of livestock by any nonprofit cooperative association, corporation sole or religious, fraternal
or benevolent corporation, provided such association or corporation complies with regulations of the director in
connection with such sale and such sales are not held in the regular course of business of such corporation or
association.
(5-3-03)
f.
Any Idaho auction market operated by an Idaho licensed auctioneer selling not more than twenty
(20) animals a week or more than eighty (80) animals a month, provided such an auction market is bonded under the
provisions of the Federal Packers and Stockyards Act, of 1921, as amended.
(5-3-03)
02.
Sales of Other Animals Excluded. This exemption is limited to sales of cattle, calves, sheep,
mules, horses, swine, or goats. Sales of other animals do not qualify for the exemption regardless of who the seller is
and where the sale takes place.
(5-3-03)
135.
SNOWGROOMING AND SNOWMAKING EQUIPMENT (RULE 135).
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Idaho State Tax Commission
IDAPA 35.01.02
Idaho Sales & Use Tax Administrative Rules
01.
Exemption for Snow Equipment. Section 63-3622Y, Idaho Code, exempts the sale, storage, use
or other consumption of tangible personal property that will become a component of an aerial passenger tramway and
snowgrooming and snowmaking equipment purchased and used by the owner or operator of a downhill ski area. This
exemption also extends to sales and purchases of component parts used to build or repair snowgrooming and
snowmaking equipment.
(4-2-08)
02.
Consumable Supplies Not Exempt. This exemption only applies to sales and purchases of
equipment that will become a component part of snowmaking or snowgrooming equipment. It does not apply to sales
and purchases of fuel, fluids, or other consumable supplies.
(4-2-08)
136.
REBATES PAID TO CERTAIN REAL ESTATE DEVELOPERS (RULE 136).
01.
Rebate of Sales Tax. Section 63-3641, Idaho Code, provides for a rebate of sales taxes to be paid
to real estate developers who build a qualifying retail complex at a cost of four million dollars ($4,000,000) or more
and who expend more than six million dollars ($6,000,000) for the installation of a highway interchange or for
improvements on a highway. For the purposes of this rule, the term “qualifying shopping center” shall mean a
qualifying retail complex as specified by Section 63-3641, Idaho Code.
(4-7-11)
02.
Qualifying Shopping Center Location. Qualified retailers that are located in a qualifying
shopping center must apply for a separate sellers’ permit and report sales separately for that location. For instance, if
a retailer has multiple stores in Idaho it must file a separate return for any store located in a qualifying shopping
center. A retailer who ceases operation in a qualifying shopping center must notify the Tax Commission and cancel
the sellers’ permit for that location.
(4-7-11)
03.
Confidential Information. Information about an individual store’s sales or aggregate sales for
stores located in a qualifying shopping center is confidential and may not be released to the public.
(4-2-08)
04.
Developer Responsibilities. The developer of a qualifying shopping center must provide the
names and taxpayer identification numbers of the stores located in the shopping center to the Tax Commission. The
developer must also notify the Tax Commission whenever a new retailer begins operation or when a retailer ceases
operations in a qualifying shopping center.
(4-2-08)
05.
Certifying Expenditures Prior to Rebate Payment. No rebate will be paid unless the Idaho
Department of Transportation or an appropriate political subdivision of the state of Idaho has certified as to the
amounts actually expended and that the expenditures were made for the purpose of constructing approved
transportation improvements.
(4-7-11)
06.
Disposition of Revenue from a Qualifying Shopping Center. The Tax Commission will deposit
sixty percent (60%) of the sales and use tax reported by qualifying retailers in the demonstration pilot project fund
after a developer has:
(4-7-11)
a.
Identified the location and boundaries of the retail complex;
(4-7-11)
b.
Identified the qualified retailers making retail sales within the complex; and
(4-7-11)
c.
Verified that it has met the expenditure requirements of Subsection 136.01 of this rule.
(4-7-11)
137. -- 999.
(RESERVED)
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IAC 2011
Subject Index
A
B
Aboveground, Open Pit, Mining 70
Exempt Purchases 70
Exemption Certificate 71
Taxable Purchases 70
Additions & Penalties 110
Repeated or Intentional Invalid
Exemption Claims 110
Substantial Underpayment 110
Admissions Defined 24
Admissions 24
Rental of Tangible Personal
Property 24
Aircraft & Flying Services 28
Aerial Contracting Services 29
Air Ambulance Service 29
Aircraft Held for Resale 29
Definitions 28
Federal Law Prohibits States From
Taxing
Sales
of
Air
Transportation 28
Flying Instructions 29
Fuel 29
Recreational Flights 29
Rentals & Leases of Aircraft 28
Sales of Aircraft 28
Airlines, Buses, & Railway Dining
Cars 15
Complimentary Meals, Snacks,
Beverages or Other Tangible
Personal Property 15
Formula for Taxable Sales 15
Sale of Meals 15
Taxable Sales 15
Amusement Devices 99
Cross-Reference 100
Currency Operated Amusement
Devices 99
Non-Coin Operated Amusement
Machines or Games 100
Requirement to Obtain Permit 99
Application & Payment Of Use
Tax 60
Imposition of Use Tax 60
Out-of-State Purchases 60
Receipt Showing Sales Tax Paid 60
Removal from This State 61
Specifically Excluded From the
Definition of Both Use & Storage
Are 60
Storage 60
Taxes Paid to Another State 60
Use 60
Use Undeterminable at Time of
Purchase 61
Auctioneer, Agent, Broker, Distributor
& Factors 16
Bad Debts & Repossessions 52
Amount of Credit Allowed 53
Application to Taxpayers 53
Bad Debt Collected at a Later
Date 55
Cross-Reference 55
In General 52
Rules for Secured Credit Sales 53
Rules
for
Unsecured
Credit
Sales 52
To Claim Credit for a Bad Debt 55
Bonding 105
Amount of Security 105
Forms of Security 106
Posting Security 105
Release of Security 106
Written Demand 105
Boy Scout, Girl Scout & 4-H Group
Sales & Purchases 77
Purchases by Scout & 4-H
Groups 77
Sales by Scout & 4-H Groups 77
C
Certificates For Resale & Other
Exemption Claims 111
Burden of Proof 111
Description and Proper Execution of
Approved Forms 112
In General 111
Purchaser’s Responsibility 115
Qualified Buyers for Purposes of
Resale 111
Qualified Buyers for Purposes Other
Than Resale 111
Seller’s Responsibility - Purchases
Claimed Exempt From Sales Tax
for
Reasons
Other
Than
Resale 114
Seller’s Responsibility -- Purchases
for Resale 113
Timely
Acceptance
of
Certificates 116
Collection & Enforcement 110
Collection Of Tax 57
Bracket System for Five Percent Tax
Rate 57
Bracket System for Six Percent Tax
Rate 58
Computation of Tax 57
In General 57
Reimbursement of Tax From the
Purchaser to the Seller 58
Sales Tax to be Collected by
Retailer 57
Tax to Be Separately Displayed 58
Computer Equipment, Software, & Data
Page 120
Services 19
Canned Software 20
Computer Software, Storage Media
& Transfer Media Defined 20
Custom Software 22
Hardware 20
Hardware
&
Computers
Defined 19
Maintenance Contracts 20
Purchases for Resale 22
Reports
Compiled
by
a
Computer 21
Training Services 21
Containers - Returnable Nonreturnable 72
Container 72
Containers Exempt from Tax 73
Supplies 73
Taxable Containers 73
Contractor’s Use Of Tangible Personal
Property 56
Contractors Use of Tangible Personal
Property 56
Exception 56
Use 56
Contractors Improving Real
Property 9
Contract 9
Cross-References 11
Custom-Made Goods 10
Exempt
Purchases
by
Contractors 11
Fuels 10
In General 9
Land Leveling 11
Materials Provided by Project
Owner 10
Purchases by Contractors 10
Real Property 10
Subcontractor 10
Use 9
Use Tax Reporting Number 10
Value 10
Contractors/Retailers 12
Contractor/Retailer 12
In General 12
Inventory Withdrawals 13
Record Keeping Procedure 12
Sales of Both Tangible Personal
Property & Improvements to Real
Property 13
Sales with Agreement to Install 13
Tangible Personal Property vs.
Improvements
to
Real
Property 13
D
Definitions, IDAPA 35.01.02 5
Subject Index (Cont’d)
Admissions 6
Aircraft 6
Cash Discount 6
Contractor
Improving
Real
Property 6
Fleet 6
Hand Tool 6
Logging 6
Manufactured
Home/Mobile
Home 6
Manufacturer’s Discount Coupon 6
Manufacturer’s Rebates 6
Mining 6
Modular Building 6
Office Trailer 6
Orthopedic Appliances 7
Prescription or Work Order 7
Real Property 7
Tax Rate 7
Demurrage 55
Direct Pay Authority 102
Documentation 103
Expiration 103
Holder’s Responsibilities 103
In General 103
Purchases Subject to Tax 103
Revocation 103
Tax Imposed by Hotel/Motel Room
Sales Tax 103
Valid Only on Purchases of Tangible
Personal Property 103
Discounts, Coupons, Rebates, & Gift
Certificates 40
Adjustments That Apply After Tax
Calculation 40
Adjustments That Apply Before Tax
Calculation 41
Buy
One
Get
One
Free
Discounts 42
Complimentary Gift With Purchase
of an Item 42
Coupon Books 41
Donated Goods 41
Gift Certificates 41
Distribution Of Sales Tax
Revenues 110
Donations To Political Subdivisions &
Certain Nonprofit Organizations Of
Tangible Personal Property Used For
Improvements To Real Property 62
Donated Property 62
Property Not Incorporated Into Real
Property 62
Purchase of Donated Items 62
Drop Shipments 16
In General 16
Privity of Contract 17
Resale Certificate 17
Sales Tax Responsibilities of the
Manufacturer 17
Dry Cleaners, Laundries, Laundromats,
& Linen Suppliers 49
Dry Cleaners, Laundries, Laundromats,
& Linen Suppliers Dry Cleaners &
Laundries 49
Dry Cleaners, Laundries, Laundromats,
& Linen Suppliers Laundromats 49
Dry Cleaners, Laundries, Laundromats,
& Linen Suppliers Linen
Suppliers 49
duction Exemption
Exempt Purchases 65
Production Process Beginning &
End 65
Taxable Purchases 65
E
Exemption
Change in Primary Use of
Property 66
Exemption Certificate 67
Real Property 66
Special Rules 67
Transportation Activities 66
Exemption For Research &
Development At INL 63
Agreements with Contractors 63
In General 63
Incidental Use of Property 63
Motor Vehicles 63
Parts for Equipment 63
Property
Directly
Used
or
Consumed 63
Qualifying Activity 63
Radioactive Waste 63
Real Property 63
Exemptions On Purchases By Political
Subdivisions, Sales By The State Of
Idaho, ITS Departments, Institutions,
& All Other Political
Subdivisions 79
Extent of Exemptions 79
Federal Government 80
In General 79
Other States 80
Political Subdivisions 79
Purchases by Contractors 79
Sales by Political Subdivisions 79
F
Farming & Ranching 71
Directly Used 71
Disinfectants Used in the Dairy
Industry 72
Exemption Certificate 72
Page 121
Farming Exemption Does Not
Include 72
In General 71
Plants 72
Property Primarily & Directly
Used 71
Safety Supplies 72
Transportation Activities 71
Federal Excise Taxes & Retailers
Taxes 51
Excluded Federal Taxes 51
General Rule 51
Fees Charged For Fax Services 43
Receiving a Fax 43
Sending a Fax 43
Flying Clubs 29
Aircraft Repair Parts 30
Cross-Reference 30
In General 29
Other Charges to Members 30
Rental or Sale of Aircraft to
Members 29
Food, Meals, Or Drinks 31
Boarding Houses 32
Church Organizations 32
Clubs & Organizations 31
Colleges,
Universities,
&
Schools 31
Commercial Establishments 31
Fraternities,
Sororities,
&
Cooperative Living Group 31
Honor System Snack Sales 32
In General 31
Senior Citizens 32
Taxable
Purchases
by
Establishments Selling Meals or
Beverages 32
Foreign Diplomats 81
Documentation 81
Federal Tax Exemption Cards 81
In General 81
Mission Card 81
Free Distribution Newspapers 111
Newspaper Format 111
Purchase or Use of Tangible Personal
Property 111
Qualifying for Exemption 111
G
Gas, Water, Electricity Delivered To
Customers 78
In General 78
Telephone Service 78
H
Hand Tool, Component, & Unit
Price 88
Component 89
Subject Index (Cont’d)
Exempt Hand Tools 88
Unit 89
Unit Price 89
Hotels, Motels & Campgrounds 22
Fees 22
Purchases by Hotels, Motels, &
Campground 22
Tangible Personal Property Subject
to Tax 22
I
Interest On Deficiencies, Refunds &
Estimated Returns 109
Alternate Formulas 110
Estimated Returns 110
Failure to Register 110
Interest Accruing During a Period
Subject to Audit 110
Interest Rate 109
Judgments 110
Interstate Commerce 58
Irrigation Equipment & Supplies 80
Agricultural Irrigation 80
Exemption Certificate 80
Nonagricultural
Irrigation
Equipment or Supplies 80
Real Property Improvements 80
Title to Equipment 80
J
Jeopardy Determination
108
L
Layaway Sales 26
In General 26
The Time a Sale Occurs 26
Lease Or Rental Of Motion Picture Television Film 76
Logging 86
Directly Used 87
Election to Pay Sales Tax 88
In General 87
Logging Exemption 87
Logging Process Begins & Ends 87
Not
Included
in
Logging
Exemption 87
Property
Used
in
Logging
Operations 87
Real Property 87
Lumber Manufacturing 67
Exemption Certificate 68
Nontaxable Activities 67
Taxable Activities 68
M
Manufactured Homes (Mobile Homes)
& Modular Buildings 38
Component Parts 38
Modular Building 38
New Manufactured Home 38
Noncomponent Parts 39
Repairs 39
Sale of Office Trailer 38
Used Manufactured Home 38
Money Operated Dispensing
Equipment 80
Money
Operated
Dispensing
Equipment 80
Parts, Kits, or Supplies 80
Motor Fuels 64
Exclusion from Exemption 64
Exemptions 64
Motor Vehicles - Manufacturer’s,
Rental Company’s, & Dealer’s
Purchase Or Use Of Motor
Vehicles 98
Applicability of Rule 108 99
Dealer Plates 98
Inventory
Withdrawals
by
Dealers 99
Inventory Withdrawals by Rental
Companies 99
Purchases of Motor Vehicles for
Resale 98
Service Vehicles 99
Titling a Motor Vehicle 98
Motor Vehicles - Sales, Rentals, &
Leases 93
Cross-References 94
Forms 93
In General 93
Vehicles Purchased From Idaho
Dealers 93
Vehicles
Purchased
From
Nondealers 93
Vehicles Purchased From Out-ofState Dealers 93
Vehicles Rented or Leased 94
Motor Vehicles & Trailers Used In
Interstate Commerce 86
Documentation 86
Failure To Meet Interstate Mileage
Requirement 86
In General 86
Motor Vehicles 86
Repair Parts & Supplies 86
Title or Base Plate 86
Trailers 86
Multi-Level Marketing Firms 16
Agents 16
Multi-Level Marketing Firm 16
Notification 16
Requirement
of
Multi-Level
Marketing Firms to Collect
Tax 16
N
Nontaxable Purchases by
Page 122
Establishments Selling Meals or
Beverages 32
Notice Of Deficiency - Administrative
Review & Appeals 108
Administrative Review 108
Administrative
Review
Procedures 109
Appeals of Final Decisions 109
Failure to Appear, Produce or Submit
Materials 109
Form of Petition 108
Informal Conference 109
Notice of Deficiency 108
Procedures 109
Representation 109
Submission
of
Additional
Documents 109
O
Occasional Sales 81
Bulk Sale - Sale of an On-Going
Business 82
Change in the Form of Doing
Business 82
Exclusion From the Occasional Sale
Exemption 84
Exempt Sales of Aircraft, Boats, &
Recreation-Related Vehicles 84
Motor Vehicles 83
Occasional Seller 81
Sale of a Motor Vehicle Between
Family Members 82
Sales & Rentals to Related
Parties 83
Sales of Business Assets 83
Taxable Sales of Aircraft, Boats, &
Recreation Related Vehicles 83
Outfitters, Guides, & Like Operations
36
Equipment Rental 37
Federal Preemption 38
Game Processing, Packing, &
Taxidermy 37
Government Use Fee 37
In General 36
Lodging 37
Prepaid Travel Expense 37
Pre-Purchased Hunting & Fishing
Licenses 37
Purchases by Outfitters & Like
Operations 38
Services Performed in More Than
One State 36
Travel Agency Services 37
Out-Of-State Sales 78
Out-of-State Sales 78
Records 78
Subject Index (Cont’d)
P
Permits 59
Cancellation
of
Sales
Tax
Permits 59
Out-of-State Seller 59
Requirements
for
Obtaining
Permits 59
Requirements of Holding a Seller’s
Permit 59
Sales in Leased Premises 59
Seller’s Permit and Sales Tax
Permit 60
Suspension
of
Sales
Tax
Permits 59
Temporary Seller’s Permits 60
Persons Engaged In Advertising 44
Advertising Agency as Agent of
Client or as Non-Agent 44
Cross-References 48
In General 44
Items Prepared by Agency 45
Media
Advertising
&
Advertisements 45
Purchases by Advertising Agencies,
Graphic Artists, & Similar
Operations 47
Purchases by Radio & Television
Broadcasters 47
Sale of Custom Made Audio-Visual
Films & Audio Recordings 46
Sales of Design Services 46
Sales
of
Non-Media
Advertising 45
Persons Engaged In Printing 43
Advertising Inserts 44
Labels & Other Printed Matter Sold
to Manufacturers 44
Printing upon Special Order 43
Private Printing Plants 43
Sales by Persons Engaged in
Printing 43
Photographers & Photofinishers 48
Sales
by
Photographers
&
Photofinishers 48
Sales
to
Photographers
&
Photofinishers 48
Plating & Replating 36
Exchange Basis 36
Plating & Replating 36
Reconditioned Material 36
Prescriptions 84
Dental
&
Orthodontic
Appliances 86
In General 84
Purchases by Nursing Homes & For
Profit Hospitals 85
Purchases by Practitioners 85
Sale Of Eyeglasses, Removable
Contact Lenses, & Other Products
by Optometrists, Oculists, &
Ophthalmologists 85
Seller Must Document Exempt
Sale 85
Price Labels 33
Producing, Fabricating, &
Processing 23
In General 23
Repairing
&
Reconditioning
Distinguished 23
Production Exemption 64
In General 64
Qualifying Businesses 64
Professional Taxidermist 30
Fabrication 30
In General 30
Materials 31
Promoter Sponsored Events
Examples 117
Participant’s Failure to Provide a
Form
ST-124
to
the
Promoter 117
Period of Time for Which a Form ST124 Is Valid 117
Promoter’s Responsibility 117
Promoter’s Sales Tax Liability 118
Temporary Seller’s Permit Issued by
Promoter 118
Use of the Form ST-124 117
R
Radio & Telecommunications
Equipment & Land Mobile Radio
Service Of Systems 24
Drop-In Equipment & Inside
Wiring 25
General Rule & Scope 24
Land Mobile Radio Systems or
Services 24
Provider Equipment 24
Telephone Terminal Equipment &
Services 24
Wireless
Telecommunications
Equipment 25
Radio & Television Broadcast
Equipment, Idaho Sales & Use
Tax 118
Railroad Rolling Stock, Parts, Materials
& Equipment 89
Definitions 89
Generally, Excluded from This
Exemption 90
Generally, Included Within the
Exemption 90
In General 89
Real Property 56
Page 123
Abandoned Cable 57
Example 1 56
Example 2 56
Improvements or Fixtures 56
Personal Property Incidental to the
Sale of Real Property 57
Store Fixtures 57
Three Factor Test 56
Rebates Paid To Certain Real Estate
Developers 119
Certifying Expenditures Prior to
Rebate Payment 119
Confidential Information 119
Developer Responsibilities 119
Disposition of Revenue from a
Qualifying Shopping Center 119
Qualifying
Shopping
Center
Location 119
Rebate of Sales Tax 119
Records Required & Auditing Of
Records 100
Alternative Storage Media 101
Examination of Records 102
Failure of the Taxpayer, Records
Required
&
Auditing
of
Records 102
In General 100
Record Retention 102
Records Prepared by Automated
Data
Processing
Systems,
ADP 102
Records Required, Food Stamps, &
WIC Checks 104
In General 104
Records Required 104
Records Required, Nontaxed Sales By
Retail Food Stores 105
Authority 105
Form Required 105
Petition for Reduced Record
Keeping 105
Review of Petitions 105
Standard Industry Code 105
Recreational Vehicle Registration 103
Boat 103
Snowmobile,
Motorbike,
or
ATV 103
Refund Claims 106
Bad Debts 106
Claim Form 106
Denial of a Refund Claim 107
In General 106
Interest on Refunds 107
Mathematical Errors 106
Outstanding Liabilities 106
Payment of Sales or Use Tax Directly
to the State 106
Subject Index (Cont’d)
Payment of Sales Tax by a Purchaser
to a Vendor 106
Payment Under Protest 106
Statute of Limitations 107
Taxes Paid in Response to a Notice of
Deficiency Determination 107
Rentals Or Leases Of Real
Property 19
Hotel, Motel, & Campground
Accommodations 19
In General 19
Rentals Or Leases Of Tangible Personal
Property 17
Bare Equipment Rental 17
Cross-References 19
Exempt Equipment Rentals 18
Fully
Operated
Equipment
Rentals 17
In General 17
Lease-Purchase & Lease With
Option to Purchase 19
Maintenance
of
Rental
Equipment 18
Mixed Use of Rental Equipment 18
Operator Required to Be Paid by
Customer 18
Out-of-State Rental/Lease 19
Personal Property Tax 18
Rental Payments Applied to Future
Sales 18
Rentals to Exempt Entities 18
Repairs - Sale Of Parts & Material 52
In General 52
Incidental Material 52
Parts for Resale 52
Repairs Covered by Insurance
Benefits 52
Repairs Versus Fabrications 52
Separate Statement of Parts or
Materials 52
Shop Supplies 52
Rescinded Sale, Refunds Of Purchase
Price 35
Amount Refunded Reduced 36
Documentation 36
Refund of Remitted Sales Tax 36
Required to Buy Other Property 36
Rescinded Sale 36
Restocking Charge 36
Responsibility For Payment Of Sales
Taxes Due From Corporations 107
Corporate Officers Duty to Pay Sales
Tax 107
Penalty for Failure to Collect 107
Retail Sale Of Asphalt, Concrete, &
Concrete Products 14
Agricultural Irrigation 14
In General 14
Production Exemption 14
Retail Sales
Sale At Retail 7
Determining the Type of Sale 8
Kinds of Services Incidental to the
Sale 8
Retail Sales 7
Retail Sales of Tangible Personal
Property
Together
with
Services 7
Separately
Stated
Nontaxable
Charges 9
Tangible Personal Property Used or
Consumed by a Business 9
Retailer Defined 15
An Agent as a Retailer 15
Farmers 15
Retailer 15
Retailers Selling Incidental Tangible
Personal Property 15
Returns Filed By County Assessors &
Financial Institutions 100
Filing Returns 100
Financial Institutions 100
Reimbursement 100
Road & Paving Contractors 11
In General 11
Materials 11
Production Exemption 12
Road or Paving Contractor 11
Rock Crushing 11
S
Sale & Purchase Of Bullion, Coins, Or
Other Currency
Jewelry or Other Works of Art 30
Sales & Purchases of Bullion 30
Sale & Purchase of Bullion, Coins, or
Other Currency 30
Sale Of Tangible Personal Property
Relating To Funeral Services 42
Caskets,
Vaults,
&
Burial
Receptacles 42
Documenting
Purchases
for
Resale 43
In General 42
Purchases by Licensed Funeral
Directors 42
Sales
by
Licensed
Funeral
Directors 42
Seller’s Permit Required 43
Use Tax 43
Sale Or Purchase Of Matter Used To
Produce Heat By Burning 76
Documentation of Other Exempt
Sales 77
Page 124
Limitation 76
Liquefied Propane 76
Scope 76
Sales & Purchases By Religious
Organizations 75
In General 75
Incidental Sales by Religious
Corporations or Societies 75
Meals Sold by a Church to Members
Only 75
Sales of Literature by a Nonprofit
Corporation 76
Sales & Use Tax Liability Of Federal &
State Credit Unions, National & State
Banks, & Federal & State Savings &
Loan Associations 78
Purchases by Banks and Savings and
Loan Associations 78
Purchases by Credit Unions 78
Sales by Credit Unions, Banks,
Savings & Loan Associations 78
Sales By County Sheriffs 16
Requirement to Register 16
Sales 16
Sales By Florists 50
Rentals 51
Sales 50
Street Vendors 51
Telegraphed Sales 51
Sales Of Livestock
Exempt Sales of Livestock 118
Sales
of
Other
Animals
Excluded 118
Sales Of Newspapers & Magazines 25
Carriers Less Than Sixteen Years
Old 26
Computation of Tax 25
Cross-Reference 26
Independent Retailer Sales 26
Individual Sales 25
Product
Consumed
by
the
Publisher 26
Single Copy Price 25
Single Unit Price & Net Press
Run 26
Subscription Price 25
Subscriptions 25
Vending Machine Sales 26
Sales Price Or Purchase Price
Defined 33
Charges Not Included 33
Gratuities 34
Sales Price & Purchase Price 33
Service Charges 34
Services Agreed to be Rendered as a
Part of the Sale 33
Sales Tax Collected By The State
Subject Index (Cont’d)
Liquor Dispensary 110
Liquor Subject to Sales Tax 111
Reporting 111
Sales for Resale 111
Sales Through Vending Machines 49
Amount Subject to Tax 49
Calculation of Tax 50
Cross-References 50
In General 49
Requirement to Obtain a Seller’s
Permit 49
Sales To & Purchases By Nonprofit
Organizations 73
Educational Institutions 73
Exemption Certificate 74
Food Banks & Soup Kitchens 74
Free Dental Clinics 75
Health Related Entities 73
Hospitals 73
Idaho
Foodbank
Warehouse,
Inc 74
In General 73
Literature 74
Nonsale Clothiers 74
Red Cross 74
Sales
by
Nonprofit
Organizations 74
Senior Citizen Centers 75
Sales To Indians 78
Records 78
Sales of Motor Vehicles to
Indians 78
Sales to Indians 78
Signs & Billboards 27
Billboards 27
Custom Painting Directly on Real
Property 27
Material That Becomes Part of a
Sign 27
Rental of Signs 27
Signs & Billboards as Custom Made
Articles 27
Snowgrooming & Snowmaking
Equipment 118
Consumable
Supplies
Not
Exempt 119
Exemption
for
Snow
Equipment 119
Successor’s Liability 107
Application for Seller’s Permit
Number 108
Copy of Earnest Money 107
Making Inquiries 107
Written Inquiry Required 107
Written Statement from State Tax
Commission 108
T
Tangible Personal Property Brought Or
Shipped To Idaho 61
Equipment Brought into Idaho 61
Licensed Motor Vehicles 62
Substantive Use 61
Transient Equipment 61
Time & Imposition Of Tax, Returns,
Payments & Partial Payments 90
Filing Dates--General Rule 93
Forms Required 92
Payment of Tax 92
Perpetual Extensions of Time to File
Revoked 92
Returns 91
Time & Imposition of Tax 90
Use of Estimates Extension of Time
Returns 92
Valid Return 91
Tires - Balancing, Studding, &
Siping 55
Cross-Reference 56
Materials Used in Performing a
Service 55
Services Not Subject to Sales
Tax 55
Services Subject to Sales Tax 55
Trade-Ins, Trade-Downs & Barter 34
Core Charges 35
Disallowed
Trade-In
Deductions 34
Insurance Settlements 34
Rental/Lease Property
TradedIn 35
Trade-In Allowance 34
Trade-In
for
Rental/Lease
Property 35
Trade-Ins 34
Trading Stamps 26
Purchase of Trading Stamps by
Retailer 26
Sales Price 26
Transfers Between Related Parties,
Occasional Sale 82
Transportation, Freight, & Handling
Charges 51
Charges Not Separately Stated 51
Example 1
Charges for Delivery to the
Seller 51
Example 2
Freight-In Taxable 51
Example 3
Delivery by Retailer 51
Example 4
Use of Transportation Charges as a
Means of Avoiding Sales Tax 52
Page 125
In General
51
U
Underground Mining 68
Exemption Certificate 70
Nontaxable Purchases 68
Taxable Purchases 69
Use Of A Recreational Facility,
Instructional Fees, & Pari-Mutuel
Betting 116
Dues 116
Instructional Fees 116
Pari-Mutuel Betting 116
Use of a Recreational Facility 116
Use
of
Tangible
Personal
Property 116
V
Vehicles & Vessels - Gifts, Military
Personnel, Nonresident, New
Resident, Tax Paid To Another State,
Sales To Family Members, Sales To
American Indians, & Other
Exemptions 95
Bulk Sale Transfers 97
Gifts of Motor Vehicles 95
In General 95
Military Personnel 96
Motor Vehicles & Trailers Used in
Interstate Commerce 98
New Residents 96
Nonresidents 95
Related Party Transfers & Sales 98
Sales to American Indians 97
Sales to Family Members 97
Tax Paid to Another State 96
Vehicles & Vessels Purchased in
Idaho by Nonresidents for Use
Outside Idaho 97
Veterinarians & Veterinary Supplies
40
Drugs & Other Supplies 40
Equipment & Supplies 40
In General 40
Retail
Sales
of
Drugs
&
Supplies 40
Services Provided to Exempt
Customers 40
W
Warranties & Service Agreements 39
Non-Optional Warranty or Service
Agreement 39
Optional Warranty or Service
Agreement 39
Parts in Addition to Warranty
Fee 40
Replacement Parts & Maintenance
Supplies 40
Subject Index (Cont’d)
Separate Optional Contract 39
Services Agreed to be Rendered 39
Warranties
&
Service
Agreements 39
Well Drillers/Pump Installers 13
Contractor
Improving
Real
Property 13
Exemptions 14
Fuel 14
In General 13
Motor Vehicles 14
Types 13
Well Drillers/Pump Installers as a
Retailer 14
Y
Yard Sales 80
Exempt Yard Sales 81
In General 80
Page 126
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