Merlin | 1030 | An Overview of Merlin P h one S ys tems

An Overview of Merlin P h one S ys tems
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Copyright © 2003 John L. Shelton; all rights reserved. This document may
not be reproduced without permission, though small quotations for review
purposes may be used without permission.
The trademarks Merlin, Spirit, and Partner are owned by Avaya, the
successor to AT&T & Lucent.
Please send suggestions for enhancement to john@jshelton.com.
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Thanks to Ethan O’Toole for edit suggestions and additional details
(2003.June)
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INTRODUCTION..................................................................................................... 1
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
WHY THIS WAS WRITTEN ..................................................................................... 1
THE MERLIN CONCEPT ......................................................................................... 1
THE MANUFACTURERS ......................................................................................... 2
PREDECESSORS TO THE MERLIN SYSTEMS ............................................................ 3
AVAILABLE DOCUMENTATION ............................................................................. 5
2
COMPARISON AT A GLANCE: THE MERLIN SYSTEMS ............................ 6
3
THE ANALOG/HYBRID (CLASSIC) SYSTEMS................................................ 7
3.1
3.2
3.3
3.4
3.5
3.6
3.7
3.8
4
DIGITAL SYSTEMS.............................................................................................. 13
4.1
4.2
4.3
4.4
5
STATION WIRING ............................................................................................... 59
LINE WIRING ..................................................................................................... 60
OTHER WIRING .................................................................................................. 60
GROUND WIRING ................................................................................................ 60
OTHER WIRING ADAPTERS .................................................................................. 61
MUSIC ON HOLD ................................................................................................ 62
MAINTENANCE.................................................................................................... 66
7.1
%
COMPARISON AT A GLANCE ............................................................................... 31
SINGLE LINE TELEPHONES .................................................................................. 31
ANALOG/HYBRID PHONES (ATL) ...................................................................... 33
EARLY DIGITAL PHONES .................................................................................... 47
MLX DIGITAL PHONES ...................................................................................... 48
ETR DIGITAL PHONES ....................................................................................... 56
MERLIN MAGIX (TDL) PHONES ......................................................................... 56
THE WIRING ......................................................................................................... 59
6.1
6.2
6.3
6.4
6.5
6.6
7
MERLIN II .......................................................................................................... 13
MERLIN LEGEND ................................................................................................ 22
MERLIN MAGIX ................................................................................................. 27
MERLIN MAGIX SOFTWARE RELEASES ............................................................... 28
THE PHONES......................................................................................................... 31
5.1
5.2
5.3
5.4
5.5
5.6
5.7
6
MERLIN 206......................................................................................................... 7
MERLIN 410......................................................................................................... 7
MERLIN 820......................................................................................................... 8
FEATURE MODULES FOR THE SMALLER SYSTEMS (206, 410, 820) ....................... 8
MERLIN 1030....................................................................................................... 9
MERLIN 3070....................................................................................................... 9
EXPANSION PARTS & FEATURE MODULES FOR 1070 & 3070 ............................ 10
MERLIN PLUS (820D) ........................................................................................ 11
PROLONGING EQUIPMENT LIFE ........................................................................... 66
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7.2
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MINOR REFURBISHMENT OF TELEPHONES .......................................................... 66
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FIG. 1. AT&T 1A2 KEY SYSTEM TELEPHONE (565) ........................................................ 4
FIG. 2. AT&T COMKEY SYSTEM ..................................................................................... 5
FIG. 3. COMPARISON CHART, MERLIN SYSTEMS .............................................................. 6
FIG. 4. ILLUSTRATION OF MERLIN 206, 410 CONTROL UNITS .......................................... 8
FIG. 5. MERLIN 820 CONTROL UNIT WITH ONE PHONE CONNECTED ................................. 8
FIG. 6. MERLIN 1030 CONTROL UNIT.............................................................................. 9
FIG. 7. MERLIN 3070 CONTROL UNIT, EXPLODED .......................................................... 10
FIG. 8. MERLIN PLUS CONTROL UNIT ........................................................................... 11
FIG. 9. MERLIN PLUS, FULLY POPULATED, REVEALING MOH ....................................... 12
FIG. 10.
MERLIN II SYSTEM ......................................................................................... 13
FIG. 11.
MERLIN II CARDS ........................................................................................... 14
FIG. 12.
MERLIN II BASIC AND EXPANSION CARRIER ................................................... 15
FIG. 13.
MERLIN II AND MERLIN LEGEND CIRCUIT CARDS .......................................... 15
LEGEND SOFTWARE RELEASES ...................................................................... 22
FIG. 14.
FIG. 15.
MAGIX CIRCUIT CARDS .................................................................................. 27
FIG. 16.
AT&T 7101 SINGLE LINE PHONE ................................................................... 33
FIG. 17.
ORIGINAL “CLASSIC” MERLIN PHONES ......................................................... 34
FIG. 18.
FIXED METAL STAND FOR 5, 10, AND 22 BUTTON SETS (SHOWN UNDERNEATH A
5 BUTTON SET) ........................................................................................................... 36
FIG. 19.
ADJUSTABLE METAL STAND FOR 10 BUTTON SETS SHOWN ON BOTTOM OF
TELEPHONE ................................................................................................................ 36
FIG. 20.
ADJUSTABLE METAL STAND FOR 34 BUTTON SETS SHOWN WITHOUT
TELEPHONE ................................................................................................................ 37
COMPARISON CHART, MERLIN ANALOG PHONES .......................................... 38
FIG. 21.
FIG. 22.
MERLIN PFC PHONE FAX COPIER .................................................................. 44
FIG. 23.
ANALOG/HYBRID PHONE ACCESSORIES ......................................................... 45
FIG. 24.
ILLUSTRATION OF 7406D SERIES PHONE ........................................................ 48
FIG. 25.
MLX SERIES PHONES ..................................................................................... 50
MLX-20L CONSOLE WITH DIRECT STATION SELECTION ............................... 53
FIG. 26.
FIG. 27.
LEGEND DSS UNIT ......................................................................................... 55
FIG. 28.
MERLIN MAGIX (TDL) TELEPHONES ............................................................. 57
FIG. 29.
8-WIRE COLOR CODES: MERLIN & ETHERNET ................................................ 59
FIG. 30.
EXAMPLE GROUNDING ................................................................................... 61
FIG. 31.
RADIO SHACK 42-2434 TO CONNECT MOH TO CLASSIC SYSTEMS ................. 63
FIG. 32.
RADIO SHACK 42-2461 TO CONNECT MOH TO MERLIN PLUS (820D) ........... 63
FIG. 33.
SCHEMATIC FOR MUSIC-ON-HOLD CONNECTION TO MERLIN II OR LEGEND ... 64
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I am a telephone hobbyist. My professional work is not related to telephone
installation. In my spare time, I have tinkered with telephones for the last 40
years.
In the early 1980s, AT&T developed what would become one of its most
popular small business products, the Merlin series of telephone systems. Over
the years, millions of pieces of equipment were built and installed, and many
are still out there today. There is an active market in buying/selling used
Merlin equipment. Because older models are not now manufactured, there is
a dearth of information available to hobbyists.
Avaya, successor to AT&T, makes a current line of equipment, the Merlin
Magix, which is extremely capable, and suitable for modern office telecom
applications. By no means should this document dissuade anyone from
considering a Magix system.
Should you be interested in understanding the older systems, read further
here.
It is not the intention of this guide to replace the documentation originally
written for Merlin systems. If you want to know how to install and program
these systems, find the documentation elsewhere (see “Available
Documentation,” on page 5.)
This guide will help you understand the different models of phones and
systems, and compare them. It may also include obscure technical
documentation not easily found elsewhere. I encourage those with additional
knowledge to send me updates.
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The Merlin system has been one of the most successful of AT&T’s telephone
products for small businesses. The systems have a nearly 20-year history, and
support from 2 to 200 users with enough features to be considered a small
PBX (for larger Merlin systems). AT&T originally dovetailed the Merlin
series with its smaller electronic PBXs (the System 25). Phones for the larger
PBX (System 75) used different technology, but the same sleek style.
In contrast to earlier systems, AT&T designed the Merlin series for:
Feature plentiful operation
End-user programmability
Ease of installation (including installation by non Bell personnel)
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Low maintenance (electronic replacement of mechanical parts; LED
replacement of incandescent lights)
Sale to end users (as opposed the Bell System’s previous policy of leasing
equipment.)
AT&T continued its achievements in high reliability. Merlin systems were
designed for many years of service, in contrast to many other electronic key
systems from the 1980s. Consequently, Merlin systems were more expensive
than the low-cost import units flooding the market then.
AT&T, via its Bell Labs unit, invested considerably in Human Factors
Engineering, making these phones easy to learn and easy to use.
Remarkably, phones built in the early 1980s are still compatible with systems
built in the early 2000s.
Unlike the earlier 1A2 key system, other manufacturers never copied the
design. (1A2 key systems, described below, were copied part-for-part by a
half-dozen manufacturers.)
Smaller Merlin models were pure Key systems; standard phones had direct
access to one or more “outside” telephone lines. If two phones shared the
same outside lines, then users at those phones could talk simultaneously to an
outside party by selecting the same line button. A call could be placed on
“hold” at one phone, and retrieved at another phone (with the same line
button.)
Larger systems (1030, 3070, Merlin II, Legend, and Magix) also offer Pooled
(or PBX) operation, where users typically do not access an individual line,
but instead request an available line from a pool of similar lines. In a larger
office, it typically doesn’t matter to the user which outside line is selected,
they all work the same way. A call placed on hold in a pooled system can
only be retrieved at the original phone. But a call could be parked, and
retrieved from elsewhere via dialing a special code. Calls can be transferred
to another extension. Pooled mode operation still allows individual lines to be
assigned directly to one or more phones instead of participating in a pool.
Merlin II and succeeding phone systems also support a “behind PBX” mode,
designed for use in large offices with a PBX.
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Throughout this document, we typically say “AT&T,” but Merlin systems
have been manufactured by AT&T and its successors, as described below.
0"0
-' After the breakup of the Bell System, AT&T Technologies, a part of AT&T,
manufactured electronic telephone systems. The Western Electric name was
retired. Merlin was originally engineered, built, and sold by AT&T. The
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names “AT&T” and “AT&T Technologies” were both used on Merlin
equipment.
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In 1997, AT&T spun off Lucent, all the manufacturing divisions of AT&T.
AT&T wanted to be able to buy equipment from other manufacturers, and the
Lucent folks wanted to be able to sell more widely (including AT&T
competitors.)
Lucent continued the Merlin line of equipment. Many models of AT&T
equipment were simply re-branded Lucent; later, Lucent introduced new
models. For many years, Lucent made older equipment as
replacement/expansion units for existing customers, but did not actively
market the older units to new customers.
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Avaya is a new company, with a heritage dating back to Alexander
Graham Bell and AT&T. Avaya grew up in the Bell system. Over the
decades, the core of what is now Avaya became AT&T's Global
Business Communication Systems group. The next evolution came in
1996, when Avaya was part of the systems and technology business
that was spun off from AT&T as Lucent Technologies. Four years
later, Avaya was finally set to launch when the enterprise networking
part of Lucent was spun off. The move allowed Avaya to singularly
focus on the needs of enterprise customers. Avaya separated from
Lucent on Sept. 30, 2000 and began operating as an independent
company. 1
Avaya continues to make available certain older Merlin parts; large
customers, like the US Government, continue to buy classic system
components and telephones.
More importantly, Avaya continues the Merlin Magix system.
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The old “Bell System” (AT&T, Western Electric, etc.) provided multi-line
phone systems to users from the 1930s through the 1970s. These could be
classified into:
Private Branch Exchanges (PBXs), starting with traditional operator cordboards and advancing quickly to automatic exchanges; these served 100 –
10,000 phones
Key systems, managing a group of telephone lines across a group of users,
typically serving 5 – 100 users. Each user has access to a selection of
1
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From Avaya’s corporate web site.
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outside lines (or, installed “behind” a PBX, access to a selection of PBX
lines.
The Merlin systems below can serve as Key Systems or small PBXs.
The most popular key system was the electromechanical 1A2 key system,
built around small circuit cards, one per telephone line. Phones could support
from 5 to 30 phone lines. Systems (Key Service Units) supported from 4 lines
to hundreds, the larger ones built of racks of 15-line units. In addition to
giving users access to designated lines, users could contact each other
through manual signaling (press a button, and a buzzer somewhere else
buzzed), or through intercoms (dial a number on an intercom line, and
another user’s phone buzzed.) A given intercom circuit generally supported
only 10 dial-able extensions, so was not terribly useful in larger offices, but
since in larger offices the key systems were often used behind PBXs, a user
could just dial the extension of the other user on a regular line.
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In the 1970s, AT&T introduced the ComKey system (an update to the 1A2
system with a few more features) and the Horizon system, about which I
know very little.
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Concurrent with the Merlin systems, AT&T introduced Spirit, for very small
systems, and Partner, for medium sized systems. Neither was as flexible or
expandable as Merlin. The Spirit system had some design defect which
caused AT&T to cease manufacture in a short time, and was the basis of a
class action lawsuit. AT&T settled with discount coupons for maintenance or
additional parts. The Partner system continued to present-day, and has
replaced smaller Merlin systems.
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Avaya has kindly posted many old manuals on their web site in PDF format.
Look at http://support.Avaya.com for their Product Documentation section.
Some information can be found in old AT&T manuals and by cruising public
web auctions.
The Web forum “Tek-Tips” has a channel devoted to Merlin phone systems;
start at www.tek-tips.com. Send them some money to keep the web site alive.
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Here in a single chart are all the Merlin systems compared side-by-side. This
is not intended to be comprehensive: read the detailed descriptions that
follow.
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Small
Analog
ATL
2x6
Few, but
expandable
30!
Small
Analog
ATL
4 x 10
Few, but
expandable
2 !
Small
Analog
ATL
2 x 5 minimum
Few, but
expandable
8 x 20 max
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Large
Analog
ATL
5 x 10 min
Moderate,
expandable
10 x 30 max
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Large
Analog
ATL
5 x 10 min
Moderate,
expandable
30 x 70 max
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Small
Analog
ATL
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Rich with small
system features
8 x 20 max
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Large
Large
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4 x 10 min
Digital
ATL
Digital
,
Large
Digital
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4 x 8 min
Also singleline, digital
56 x 120 max
MLX
4 x 8 min
Also ATL,
MTR, singleline
80 x 200 max
TDL digital
80 x 200 max
2
3
Rich with large
system features
Very rich with
large system
features
Extremely rich
Also, MLX,
single-line
In general, the small systems are easier to install and administer, and are
more suitable for Small Office/Home Offices. The Large systems have many
additional features designed for bigger groups of people.
2
It may not be possible to reach all lines and all stations simultaneously, depending on
configuration of cards, types of telephone, etc.
3
It may not be possible to reach all lines and all stations simultaneously, depending on
configuration of cards, types of telephone, etc.
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All the systems in this section supported the Merlin analog/hybrid phones
(see section 5.2, “Single line telephones,” page 31. These were the original
systems, introduced in the early 1980s.
All the analog systems share the internal analog technology; connecting any
voice circuit (between telephones and/or phone lines) is done via ordinary
analog circuitry. Each system had a maximum capacity for these connections,
in some cases it was smaller than the system size might imply. For example,
on the Merlin 820D, it would not be possible to have 5 different intercom
conversations between internal users simultaneously.
All the analog systems support only one kind of telephone line: the traditional
Loop Start (LS) line, commonly found in homes and small businesses. The
loop start line is so-called because operating the telephone causes an
electrical loop to be closed, telling the Central Office to provide dial tone.
Medium and Large businesses often use Ground Start lines (or more
advanced digital lines) because they provide a more reliable way for the
central office and the customer equipment to work together. Ground Start
support is only available on the digital Merlin systems.
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First generation, small table-top unit (could be wall mounted) supporting 2
POTS4 lines and 6 analog/hybrid phones. Up to three feature cartridges could
be installed to give additional capabilities.
System programming is done from the “main” telephone, the one plugged
into the first jack.
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30!
Essentially the same as the 206, but supporting 4 phone lines and 10 stations.
4
POTS = Plain Old Telephone Service, standard lines such as are found in a residence or
small office. The phone company refers to these as Loop Start lines.
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Similar to the 410, but designed to be expandable; the unit supported up to 4
modules, each of which supported 2 phone lines and 5 terminals.
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The basic smaller systems came with remarkably few features. In order to do
things like Conference Calling and Automatic Dialing, one had to add one of
the two feature packs.
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+ 0 – adds features: on-hook dialing; call transfer; hold reminder;
group listening; prevents outbound calls on individual phones;
privacy; automatic outside and intercom dialing; last number redial;
auto line selection; do not disturb; and ringing options
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+ – Includes all the features of Feature Pack 1, plus personal and
system 3 digit speed dial; custom ringing; call pickup; group paging;
message waiting; outward toll restrictions; transfer return; voice
signaling disable; and per phone customizing capabilities
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, * : support for paging, music on hold
, * : power fail cutover, extra alert
All of these capabilities were built into the Merlin Plus later on.
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Similar technology to the 206-820 series, but designed for larger capacity,
more features, and improved expandability. The control unit housed a
number of modules: processor, power supply, line cards (5 lines each),
station cards (10 stations each), and various feature cards. Supported Square
or Pooled mode operation. They also supported automatic route selection
(ARS), allowing the control unit to choose the right kind of trunk lines for
each outgoing call.
System programming is done from the main telephone. It helps to have a
phone with as many programmable buttons as there are phones in the system.
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Similar to the 1030, but increased expandability through an expansion
chassis.
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– to power single-line (T/R) phones
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– if system is full of cards and phones
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more features.
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3 – Provides the following features:
Auto answer
Line pickup
Centralized voice terminal programming
Automatic route selection
Transfer return
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– Provides the following features:
Automatic route selection: Outgoing calls automatically follow the
least expensive available route you specify
Group call distribution: Internal and external calls go directly to the
number or group of numbers dialed
One-touch intercom, paging, call coverage
Privacy, bridging, do not disturb, on-hook dialing
3 enhanced night service features
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All telephone lines can appear on all telephone sets, up to 30
34 button BIS or existing 34 button deluxe set can be used as an
attendant console in small configurations
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– optional, aids in finding problems
, – optional for logging calls to a printer
, – supports Music on Hold, 3-zone Paging, supplemental alert
C
, – supports 4 loop-start phone lines
, – supports 10 ATL (hybrid) phones
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– supports 10 standard tip/ring telephones
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This was a second generation, feature-heavy replacement for the 206, 410,
and 820 systems; the unit started with 4 lines and 10 stations, and could be
expanded with an addition 4 lines and/or 10 stations to a maximum capacity
of 8x20. No additional feature modules were necessary; it included nearly
everything.
A few years later, AT&T came out with a second release (R2), which added a
few other powerful features including
Remote System Access (dial into the system with a password, then be able
to dial out)
automatic system answering (where the system would answer and prompt
the user to enter an extension)
busy buster, where the unit could be asked to re-dial calls until they
answer. This feature did not appear again on later systems.
The illustration below shows a control unit with only one line and one station
card installed:
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In the second illustration below, installation of a card is shown, as well as the
open upper area where Music On Hold (MOH) and paging ports are located.
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I believe this was the only control unit to provide full support for two analog
voice channels to each phone. See Section 5.2, “Single line telephones,”
page 31. Unfortunately, manufacture was discontinued in the 1990s; one
supposes that new customers were moved to the Partner system or upsold to
Merlin Legend.
While pooled mode operation was not offered with this system, it was
available in a very limited way. Single-line analog phones could be
connected via a Basic Telephone and Modem Interface (BTMI). The analog
phone could then dial an extension (by two-digit code), or dial 9 to access the
next available line, or dial 881-889 to access a specific line.
Merlin Plus supported Station Message Detail Recording (SMDR), designed
to drive a serial printer, printing a log of each phone call. The SMDR could
also be asked to print out the current system configuration. SMDR used one
station port, and required a special adaptor box. Nearly any ASCII serial
printer could be configured to work with SMDR.
Music on hold was provided via a dedicated audio input jack.
Loudspeaker paging was provided via a dedicated port on the processor. The
music-on-hold music source could be routed to the loudspeaker (for
background music) under system control.
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The digital systems bring a wealth of advantages to Merlin, in the areas of
capacity, features, and quality. Analog Merlin systems, for example, could
make conference calls by bridging together two telephone lines, but the
remote parties never received good sound quality.
All the digital Merlin systems support both Loop Start (LS) and Ground Start
(GS) telephone lines; digital trunks are supported in varying degrees. This
support allows “tighter integration” with the central office, making certain
features work more reliably.
30
44
This was a second generation, feature-heavy replacement for the 1030 and
3070 units. It was built with a modular chassis approach, allowing the
installation of various modules to suit the user’s needs. Each chassis held one
power supply and 6 cards; up to two chassis could be connected to support a
total of 12 cards. The main chassis requires a processor card. A blank card
could be used on the right side of a chassis to give support to the front cover
if not enough cards were installed.
System programming is done from the main telephone, preferably a Merlin II
System Display Console (which gives detailed menu prompts on an LCD
screen), but can also be done on the BIS-34D or SP-34D phones, though with
more difficulty.
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Merlin II initiated as an AT&T product in 1989.
Despite the fact that only a few digital phones were sold, this system was
designed from the ground up to be digital. The backplane supported digital
communication between all cards, and all phone conversations were
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converted to digital on each card. (Yet the typical phone was the
Analog/Hybrid phone.)
Cards were about 1 inch thick, 18 inches tall, and 10 inches deep; each card
contained a plastic shell and internal circuit cards. The plastic shell provided
physical protection, and helped with cooling the electronics within by
providing a “chimney effect.” As a result of the large plastic enclosures,
Merlin II systems were substantially larger than comparable earlier systems.
Sample cards are shown below, as are a pair of carriers which held the cards.
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The table below shows a complete listing of cards available for the Merlin II
and Merlin Legend series (since the Legend could re-use most Merlin II
cards.)
Most of the circuit cards have a part number beginning “517”. A letter code
follows, indicating the generation (higher letters indicate later versions or
generations), and a numeric part number. For example, 517C13, an 012 card,
replaced the 517B13 card. Where possible, I have listed known part numbers.
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Original
Power Supply
391A, 391AA,
391A1,
391A2, 391B1
Supported most cards, but had limited power
capacity, and in fully loaded systems required an
adjunct (external) power supply for assistance. A
ringing generator could be added to support the
012 (T/R) card.
Any
B-series power supplies used 220V input.
Supplies 54 “unit loads”
Upgraded
power supply
391A3 or
391B2
391C1
Supplied more power than the original, allowing a
system to be fully loaded without adjunct power
supply. Provided test ports to check voltage
levels. A ringing generator could be added to
support the 012 (T/R) card.
Any
A3 supplies 75 “unit loads”
C1 provides 96 “unit loads”
Merlin II
processor card
517A7
Provides the compute power for the system, and
included a replaceable feature module allowing
upgrades. Supported Feature Modules FM1 and
FM2.
Merlin II R1 – R2.
FM2 feature module has part number 517D6
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Merlin II R3
processor
517C7
Legend
original
processor
rd
Upgraded processor with 3 generation features
Merlin II R3
FM3 module is part number 517G6
Legend R1 – R2
Used pluggable Feature Module for software
upgrades. (FM 2 shown below, circuit side out.)
517A27
FM 2 was part number 517E25, 517G25, 517J25
Legend CKE3
Processor –
517B33
517C33
The Release 3.0 processor module contains a
PCMCIA memory card interface capable of
accommodating a single card.
Legend R3-R7
White cards, called “Translation” cards, store a
backup image of the programming; the Legend
can be set to automatically backup programming,
or you can do it manually.
Red cards, called “Forced Upgrade” are used to
upgrade the firmware.
While software release 7.0 can be installed on this
processor, it has some limitations due to the
processor memory.
Legend
Release 7
CKE4
Processor
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Newer processor for Legend system, can also
support Merlin Magix.
Legend R7
Distinguished by the label “Equipped with
CKE4”
07
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Blank Card
Used to fill out a non-full chassis
Any
007 MLM
Merlin Legend
Mail
Capacity: 7 internal, system-defined T/R jacks; 2
TTRs; internal remote maintenance device; serial
port for PC connection.5
Legend R1
Supports: MERLIN LEGEND Mail Voice
Messaging System; resides on this module and
the internal T/R jacks can be used only for this
application
The system software recognizes the MERLIN
LEGEND Mail VMS module as an 012 (T/R)
module. Even though the module has a maximum
of 7 T/R internal ports, including the modem jack,
it uses 12 ports of capacity in any of its three
configurations.
008 (ATL)
supported 8 analog/hybrid (ATL) phones
Unsupported in
Magix
008D
supported digital phones, but limited selection
All Merlin II, not
supported in Legend
008 MLX
8 digital extension jacks for MLX phones, each
with 1 or 2 extensions (each extension is assigned
an individual extension number)
Legend 1
517A3
517B3
517A21
517B21
517B21B
Supports: MLX extensions, including:
MLX voice only
MLX voice with Voice Announce to Busy
MLX voice and Multi-Function Module (MFM)
with T/R adjunct
MLX voice and MFM with Supplemental Station
Adapter (SSA)
ISDN terminal adapter only
Access device for data communications between a
PC on the system and a high-speed Internet
connection, connection to remote node LAN
access server, or ISDN router2
Computer Telephony Integration (CTI) link3
Videoconferencing systems using one jack and 2B
data feature or 2 jacks with ISDN terminal
adapters (depending on video system)
5
01021 ! ! 3
Several of the descriptions here are from AT&T/Lucent Merlin manuals.
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008 OPT
up to 8 single-line (POTS) telephones, in or out of
building. (OPT = Off Premise Telephone)
The system software recognizes the OPT module
as an 012 (T/R) module. Even though the OPT
module has only 8 jacks, it uses 12 ports of
capacity, thereby decreasing overall extension
capacity by 4 extensions for every OPT module.
012 (T/R)
517A13
517B13
517C13
517D13
517E13
517F13
Merlin II any
release
Capacity: 12 T/R extensions on 2-way voice
transmission path with support for telephones
with message-waiting lights, 2 TTRs
Supports: Single-line telephones; Intuity
AUDIX®; Messaging 2000; T/R adjuncts (such
as answering or fax machine); analog data devices
(such as modems)
Requires power supply with Ring Generator
installed
Several optional applications, if used with the
system, require a basic jack on a 012 module:
MERLIN MAIL Voice Messaging System,
MERLIN Attendant, AUDIX Voice Power — lS
II, and Integrated Voice Power Automated
Attendant — IS Il.
Up to four applications can be connected to the
system using the same 012 module. If there are
four applications, the module must be used
exclusively for this equipment If you have fewer
than four applications connected to an 012
module, some tip/ring devices also can be
connected. If possible, the module should be used
only for the application equipment.
Note: The applications discussed here do not
work properly with 012 module manufactured for
older MERLIN® II systems. These applications
must be connected to 012 modules with the code
517C13 or 517D13 on the label on the top of the
module. Modules with the code 517A13 or
517B13 can be used only to connect single-line
telephones and do not provide the disconnect
signal required by answering machines and
applications.
012 with ring
generator
Same as 012, but has internal ring generator
Merlin II any
release
517G13
517H13
01021 ! ! 3
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016 (T/R)
Capacity: 16 T/R extensions on 2-way voice
transmission path with support for telephones
with message-waiting lights, 4 TTRs
Legend R4
Supports: Single-line telephones; Intuity
AUDIX®; Messaging 2000; T/R adjuncts (such
as answering or fax machine); analog data devices
(such as modems)
Includes built-in ring generator
016 ETR
Capacity: 16 ETR station ports including 6 with
T/R functionality and 4 TTRs. First 10 ports are
ETR ports only; remaining 6 ports can support
either T/R or ETR, but not both simultaneously.
Legend R7
Supports: MLS, ETR, Business Cordless 905, and
TransTalk MDC and MDW telephones; and any
T/R device.
016 MLX
Like the 008 MLX, but 16 ports.
Legend R7
100D (DS1)
Capacity: 24 channels (“virtual” lines/trunks) for
voice and analog data or for digital data only
(T1); or 23 B-channels for voice and data, and 1
channel used for signaling (PRI).
Legend R1
517A15
517B15
517C15
517E15
517M15
Supports: T1 emulates 24 lines/trunks: loop-start,
ground-start, tie, and Direct Inward Dial (DID;
Hybrid/PBX mode only); can also supply
subscriber services. In Release 4.0 and later, T1
can also provide high-speed (56K) data
communications and digitally emulated tie trunks
for data communications. PRI supports subscriber
services, allows high-speed digital data
communications, and includes special features.
For Release 7.0 and later systems, Common
Channel Signaling (CCS) is not an option for T1.
100R INA
T1 voices & Data
Magix 1 or later
400 LS
provided 4 incoming telephone lines; one power
fail phone. LS = Loop Start, the standard for
residential and small business
Unsupported in
Magix
provided 4 incoming telephone lines; one power
fail phone. LS = Loop Start, the standard for
residential and small business. Includes 4 touchtone receivers
Unsupported in
Magix
517A2
517B2
400 LS with 4
TTRs
517A12
517B12
01021 ! ! 3
Supports private networking in Release 6.0 and
later systems, Hybrid/PBX mode only.
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400 EM
4 tie line trunks (E&M type)
517A14
400
GS/LS/TTR
517A18
supported 4 incoming lines, either ground-start or
loop-start, and includes 4 touch-tone receivers; 1
power fail phone
517B18
517C18
517D18
408 (LS ATL)
combination of 400 and 008 cards
Unsupported in
Magix
4 incoming lines (Ground start or Loop start) and
8 ATL phones
Unsupported in
Magix
4 incoming lines and 8 MLX phones
Legend R1
Adds Caller ID capability to the 408 GS/LS-MLX
Legend R2 to
recognize card; R7
to use Caller ID
517A1
517B1
517C1
517D1
408 GS/LS
517A26
517B26
517C26
517D26
408 GS/LSMLX
517A29
408 GS/LSID-MLX
01021 ! ! 3
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412 LS-IDETR
Capacity: 4 LS trunks with Caller ID and 2 TTRs
plus 12 ETR station ports, including 4 with T/R
functionality. First 8 ports are ETR only;
remaining 4 ports can support either T/R or ETR,
but not both simultaneously.
Legend R7
Supports: MLS, ETR, Business Cordless 905, and
TransTalk MDC and MDW telephones; and any
T/R device. In the event of a power failure, port
12 becomes the PFT port for line 1. If the port is
programmed for ETR, a single-line telephone
must be plugged into the port. Caller ID, if you
subscribe to caller identification from the local
telephone company, displays the telephone
number of incoming callers on supported display
telephones.
800 NI-BRI
517A32??
Capacity: 8 BRI facilities, each with 2 B-channels
(“virtual” lines) for voice and data and 1 channel
used for signaling
Legend R4
Unsupported in
Magix
Supports: Voice, data, video, and other services at
64 kbps over standard ISDN lines/trunks
800 (LS)
8 analog incoming lines; two power fail phones
Merlin II any
release
8 analog incoming lines with Direct Inward
Dialing (DID) information to allow direct
connection to extensions
Legend R1
517A4
517B4
800 DID
517C20
800 GS/LS
517A19
8 analog incoming lines, loop or ground start; two
power fail phones
517B19
517C19
800 GS/LS-ID
Capacity: 8 ground-start and/or loop-start
lines/trunks; 2 TTRs
Legend R3
Supports: 2 PFT telephones; Caller ID (loop-start
trunks only), if you subscribe to caller
identification from the local telephone company,
displays the number of incoming callers, and in
R7.0 and later, the name of incoming callers as
well, on MLX, MLS, and ETR display telephones
Line cards that support Loop Start or Ground Start lines typically have one or
two Power Fail ports. These are jacks connected to the first (or first and fifth)
lines on the card, providing access to dial tone when the system is powered
down. Users might plug in an emergency telephone.
01021 ! ! 3
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Legend was an extension of the Merlin II, using a new processor, and
requiring at least one digital phone as the console. In addition to supporting
many new digital phones (MLX phones,) Legend had more features,
increased system capacity, and support for voice mail, T1 trunks, and ISDN.
Almost all the Merlin II line and station cards can be recycled into Merlin
Legend systems.
Merlin Legend systems are packaged similarly to the Merlin II, but support
up to three carriers instead of two.
System programming can be done from either an MLX-20L operator console,
or from a PC running the WinSPM software. Using WinSPM, it is possible to
configure a system with no MLX phones.
Legend initiated as an AT&T product in 1991.
The standard digital phones (MLX) use an ISDN protocol: 2B+D (two basicrate digital channels of 64 kilobit/sec, plus one data/signaling channel (16
kilobit/sec). Legend also supports some other digital sets, including Partner
phones.
See the table above in “Merlin II,” for a listing of the cards that work in the
Legend system.
Later versions of the processor card included a PCMCIA slot. Backup
memory cards could store a backup copy of the system programming.
Upgrade cards allowed upgrading the system software (or software for some
newer modules.)
3 0
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,
The Legend system had 7 major releases, and a few minor releases. They are
summarized here.
. * 03
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1.0
Original Merlin Legend release
Original Legend
processor
1.1
1992.Oct
Adds French/Spanish language selection
Original Legend
processor
Phones available with buttons in French or Spanish
Minor improvements in programming/maintenance
Better usability; prompting on display phones
01021 ! ! 3
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2.0
1992.Oct
/
>
Copy extension feature
,
/))
,
Original Legend
processor with FM2
programming module
Integrated Solution III for programming of Legend & Audix
Finer granularity of Forced Idle to minimize disruption during
maintenance
Substantial usability enhancements particularly to support voice
mail
Enhancements to display prompts
Support for DID over T1 facility
New Fax Attendant System™ supports send/receive of faxes,
running on the IS III platform.
Support for new 408 GS/LS-MLX module
Improved PRI support
Improved maintenance with lots more error logging
2.1
Usability enhancements
1994.Aug
Improved SMDR logging for PRI based calls
Original processor with
FM2 card
New 012 card (rev 517G13 or higher) includes built-in ring
generator.
New 008 OPT card with built in ring generator
Support of PRI connectivity to Definity systems
New MLX-10DP telephones with extra jack to connect to
PassageWay solution on PCs.
Several new software packages for management, including
HackerTracker, Merlin Identifier.
Several new adjuncts including Magic on Hold, Off Premises
Range Extender, others.
01021 ! ! 3
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3.0
1994.Aug
/
>
New processor, “Release 3” with integrated modem, PCMCIA
card, 4mb Flash ROM, 1.5mb battery-backed RAM, and error
status display. Sometimes called “CKE3” processor.
,
/))
,
Release 3 processor
800 GS/LS-ID line/trunk module supporting Caller ID
Support for many more single-line phones including some
videophones.
Support for MDC 9000, MDW 9000 six-line cordless, wireless
phones.
Remote maintenance/programming by modem
Built-in backup to PCMCIA card, and automatic scheduling
Direct voice mail access
Miscellaneous enhancements
New PagePal for connecting paging systems
3.1
Major security enhancements to prevent fraud, hacking.
Release 3 processor
Expanded dial plan allowing up to 200 t/r devices
Release 3 processor
1996.Mar
4.0
1996.Mar
Support for National ISDN BRI service
New 800 NI-BRI module
New 016 tip/ring module
Support for T1 switched 56 digital data
Miscellaneous enhancements
4.1
1997.Jun
Minor enhancements
Release 3 processor
4.2
1997.Jun
Many minor enhancements
Release 3 processor
5.0
1997.Jun
Improved SMDR support and new Merlin Legend Reporter
application
New CTI allows telephony applications to control and monitor
MLX and ATL phone operations
Release 3 processor
Hotline feature
Group calling enhancements
Support for new MLX-5, MLX-5D phones.
6.0
1998.Feb
Support for private networks, with unified dial plan to allow
remote calls to appear local
Release 3 processor
Significant Group calling enhancements
Centrex Transfer via remote call forwarding
Improvements in authorization codes
01021 ! ! 3
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6.1
1998.Aug
/
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Enhanced private networking
,
/))
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Release 3 processor
Service observing, allowing one extension to observe call at
another extension
Introduction of WinSPM
7.0
1999.Apr
Increased to 200 the maximum MLX digital stations; by using
MFM adjuncts, now supports total 400 station endpoints.
CKE4 processor
Release 3 processor
works with most
functionality.
Support for MLS and Enhanced Tip/Ring (ETR) phones –
Partner phones, allowing a migration path. New 412 LS-IDETR and 016 ETR module.
New CKE4 processor required for full support of some new
features.
New 016 MLX module, supported with only CKE4 processor.
Voice Announce on Idle Only option for MLX phones
Priority Call Queuing
Caller ID with Name – allows display phones to show Name or
number by pressing a button.
Improved MLX headset operation
Choice of rotary or touch-tone signaling on a per-port basis for
T/R ports.
Abandoned call information reported to Merlin Legend
Reporter.
Release 7.0 was the final Legend release.
3
*
,
*
* )
Some programming information is not obvious from reading the manual.
Here are some tips.
By default, in Key system mode, Legend assigns two intercom buttons to
each phone, one is used when the caller wishes to ring the other party, and the
other is used when the caller wishes to speak over the other party’s speaker.
(The buttons are labeled ICOM RING and ICOM VOICE). It is possible to
have only one intercom button, freeing up more buttons for lines or features.
You can use Centralized Programming to delete the second ICOM button.
You can also switch the remaining button from RING to VOICE by using
feature code *19 or **19.
By default, in Key system mode, Legend selects either a ringing line or idle
line to be the line you will access when you lift the handset. If there is no line
ringing, you will access idle lines in order from 1 – 8, (starting with the first
button above the intercom buttons.) You can change the idle line preference
01021 ! ! 3
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order without re-arranging the buttons, for example, to give priority to a
“personal line” on button 5. Use the Automatic Line Selection feature, feature
codes *14 to start button ordering, and **14 when done.
3 "
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,
As documented on Tek-Tips, there are some dial codes that you can enter
from an extension while using an intercom line. I don’t have thorough
information:
E! !
From MLX phones tests communication, display, and lights
E! "F )
3 3
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Performs trunk testing
E! 3
TTR testing
E!
Display system software version
E! 2
Test telephone
' 5
SPM (for DOS computers) and WinSPM (for Windows computers) allows
remote programming of the Legend system.
The computer can be attached directly to the Legend system with a short
cable and adapter (see “Other wiring adapters,” in section 6.5, below,) or can
be connected via modem to an internal modem on the processor card.
Avaya offers upgrades to the WinSPM software via their web site; if you
have version 2 or greater, you can upgrade to newer versions.
For Legend release 1 – 5, the WinSPM software provides complete emulation
of the MLX-20L programming console, but not much more. For Legend
releases 6 and 7, the software provides shortcuts that make programming
easier.
WinSPM can also perform system backups, eliminating the need for memory
cards in the system processor. This is a very handy feature. WinSPM can also
perform upgrading of the system programming when the processor is
upgraded. One must purchase/install the processor upgrade separately from
WinSPM, then use WinSPM to convert the stored programming information.
WinSPM cannot by itself upgrade a Legend system.
WinSPM has limited performance because of the 1200 or 2400 bps serial
communication link.
01021 ! ! 3
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3"
* <
Magix was initiated as a Lucent product in 1999, and manufacture continues
today by Avaya.6
This document provides only limited information about Magix; consult
Avaya for current product information.
Magix builds on the Legend foundation, but introduces new packaging and
improved features. It also discontinues support for the classic (ATL or
Hybrid) Merlin phones.
The Magix uses a shielded, metal carrier for holding circuit cards. Many of
the Legend cards can be installed in the metal carrier. In the Merlin II and
Legend systems, each card is encased in a plastic shell. The Magix system
dispenses with the shells; the carrier provides full support for each circuit
card. Many of the older Legend cards can be removed from their plastic shell,
and some of the Magix cards can be placed in a plastic shell to allow
installation in a Legend system.
Magix can also support a mix of metal carriers and plastic (Legend) carriers.
Magix systems support the following phones:
MLX digital phones
4400 series digital phones
ETR (Enhanced Tip/Ring) Partner phones
ETR-34D Telephone
ETR-18/18D Telephones
ETR-6 Telephone
MLS phones
MLS-34D Telephone
MLS-18D Telephone
MLS-12/12D Telephones
MLS-6 Telephone
The following new circuit cards were introduced with Magix:
. * 0
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/
,
617R33, 617T33
,
- )
&
CKE5 Processor
Introduced for Magix
system, but can be used in
Legend. Normally shipped
617V33-K
)
6
Actually, as of 2003, Avaya contracts manufacture to Celestica, but continues to design and
market Merlin phones. Celestica also manufactures the Partner line.
01021 ! ! 3
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in a Magix-style board, but
can be put into a clamshell
to fit Legend systems.
617A52
412 TDL LS-ID
4 loop start lines and 12
Magix (TDL) stations
024 TDL
23 Magix (TDL) stations
100 DCD
One DS1 circuit (24
channels) configured for
either T1 or PRI service;
may include CSU/DSU.
617B52
617A58
617B58
617N15A
617S15
617T15
617A59
100R INA
617N15
100D
617C21
008 MLX
8 MLX stations
617A54
016 MLX
16 MLX stations
617E34
016 T/R
16 single line phones
617A56
016 ETR
16 ETR (Enhanced tip/ring)
(Partner) stations
617B35
800 NI-BRI
617G20
800 DID
617E28
880 OPT
617D14
400 E&M
4 E&M tie lines
617B31
800 GS/LS-ID
8 Loop Start or Ground start
lines with caller ID
617E29
408 GS/LS-MLX-ID
4 loop start or ground start
lines with caller ID; 8 MLX
stations
617A49
Merlin Messaging
R2 messaging; allows web
browser access to voice
mail; backup and restore
over LAN.
8 DID incoming lines
617B49
617C49
Supports up to 12 ports
33
* <
As of 2003, Magix included the following software releases:
01021 ! ! 3
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0!
0???
G
/
Original release; substantial features over previous Legend
release 7.0
ARS enhancements:
0
10 and 11-digit dialing
!!! /
Increase ARS tables from 16 to 24-digits
Wild Card entries in 6-digit table
Allow List enhancements:
Increase entries from 7 to 14-digits
Wildcard entry support in Allow and Disallow lists
Convert files to support upgrade from MERLIN LEGEND® to MERLIN
MAGIX® Integrated System
Automatic Daylight Savings Time updates for system and MERLIN
Messaging R2.0 (or later)
Serviceability enhancements:
Electronic serial number viewing
Automatic configuration of the MERLIN Messaging R2.0 (or later) system
Station Responding Test
Touch-Tone Receiver (TTR) Audit
DS1 Module with Built-In CSU/DSU (100DCD)
TransTalk® 9040 connection to TDL port
WinSPM R4 support
Call Center enhancements:
!
!!0
CTI Link in support of the Avaya's Solution Development Program
Real-Time Monitoring & Analysis plus Intelligent Queue Messages using
TASKE applications
WinSPM R5 support
MERLIN® Messaging R2.5 new feature support:
Caller ID/ANI integration
Display number of new and old messages
Delayed Announcement Service
01021 ! ! 3
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G
/
Call Center enhancements:
0
!!0G
Calling group agent in multiple calling groups
Selective login
Selective logout
Auxiliary Work Time
Selective Supervisor mode
Enhanced TSAPI events and services
Caller ID display enhancement:
100D/CSU/DSU maintenance enhancements
WinSPM R6 support
Loudspeaker page with Group Page
Call screening
!!
/
Hot Dialpad
Remote call forwarding with simultaneous internal alert
Headset displays
CTI link
-
"!
!!"
01021 ! ! 3
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-
)
0 (
)
*
This quick chart shows basic differences between the different kinds of
phones supported in the Merlin series.
/
*
H 4 &G
*
* <
33< <
, *
> # ,
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-
*
*
*
)
#/
(
*
/
;
#
Analog voice
channel, digital
signaling
ISDN all-digital
Analog voice
line
All
digital
5 – 34 for
standard phones,
82 button
console
5 – 28
None
6-24
Wide range
Limited
Wide range
limited
Classic
(membrane)
phones in 8
colors; newer
phones only in
black
Black & white
Dozens of
colors from
many
manufacturers
Black &
white
Most distinctive
styling
Improved
displays
Limited access
to system
features
Separate
handset
and
headset
jacks
additional 50button direct
station selection
Digital volume
control
2 wire
interface
*
)
AT&T made no single line phones for the Merlin system, though nearly
every Merlin system has had the ability to connect single-line telephones.
Smaller systems allowed this through an accessory device. Merlin II, Legend,
and Magix provided support via 012 T/R and 016 T/R cards.
A single line phone is often called “Tip/Ring T/R” because it uses only two
wires, the “tip” and “ring” wires. This wiring standard has been in use for
over 100 years.
01021 ! ! 3
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Single line phones have always been of limited utility in the Merlin systems.
Because of not having the fixed feature buttons and displays, users could
access limited features via dial-codes. The cost of adding single line phones
was also high for the early, smaller systems. (One reason for the Partner
system’s creation was to support single line phones more easily.)
Depending on the way of attachment, single line phones could take advantage
of various small features, such as rotary or touch-tone dialing, and a message
waiting indicator. Some features available to single-line phones are accessed
by doing a “switch hook flash,” depressing the switch hook for about 2/3 of a
second. Some single-line phones include a “flash” button to generate the right
timing.
.
The AT&T 7101 telephone, designed primarily for System 25 and System 75,
shared the same sleek, modern styling with the Hybrid sets described below,
but used standard analog signaling. The 7101 featured a Recall button, a
Disconnect button, and a message waiting light. These phones could be used
on any ordinary phone line.
AT&T described it as: “The Model 7101A single-line analog voice terminal
is about 2-¾ inches wide, 3-½ inches high, and 8-½ inches deep. The set
comes equipped with the following:
Handset
Touch-Tone Dial
Message Indicator
Tone Ringer with Volume Control
Two Fixed Feature Buttons
Recall - Used to place a call on hold and to obtain recall dial tone for
Conference, Transfer, and other features accessible by feature access
code.
Disconnect - Used to disconnect one call and immediately obtain dial
tone for another call.”
01021 ! ! 3
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. * 07
- ' - =0! 0
*
)
The phone included a removable metal stand; the stand provided necessary
mass to keep the phone from slipping off a table. No angle adjustment is
possible; it appears that different angles were available. In order to connect or
disconnect the line cord, it is necessary to remove the base. In order to
remove the base, it is necessary to remove the handset cord.
Wall mounting no doubt was possible, but unlike the cosmetically similar
ATL phones below, conversion probably required extra parts.
"
* 1> # , )
-
These were the first Merlin phones. The term Analog refers to the voice
channel; it is a traditional analog voice line, but no signaling is done over this
line. We sometimes call these phones “hybrid” because there is a digital
control channel that transmits button information from the phone to the
control unit, and light and ringing information from the control unit to the
phone. The term “ATL” was used for the Merlin II and Merlin Legend
systems to distinguish these phones from the newer MLX phones.
01021 ! ! 3
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. * 0=
*
I(
J
Of all the Merlin telephones, these original phones were the most elegant.
Merlin introduced a new, smaller handset, and an attractive flat chassis.
Membrane buttons kept the phone surface smooth, and allowed for large
labels.
The phones were originally introduced in 5, 10, and 34 button versions.
AT&T describes the signaling channel as “analog multi-line telephone
protocol (40 kbps).”
The first set of these phones had a “membrane” panel providing most of the
buttons. The membrane phone looked very high-tech, and the smooth wide
membrane buttons allowed large space for labeling. But the membranes had a
(relatively) high failure rate, and were later replaced with more normal
buttons in the second set.
There are some Merlin-compatible phones built for other AT&T systems that
work pretty well. But, as Brian Cox7 reports:
Merlin phones [installed in Classic systems] voice announce on
intercom calls by default. To turn voice announce off for a phone put
the switch on the left side of the phone to 'P', then touch the intercom
button to turn off the green led, and put the switch back to normal.
The phone will then ring on intercom calls.
The second set of these phones introduced the more reliable buttons and
speakerphone capabilities.
7
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All of these phones support two voice channels; when the handset is in use on
a call, the speaker can carry a second conversation. Not all control units
support this feature. Full two-way, dual channel mode was first supported
with the HFAI-10 phone (Hands Free Answer on Intercom) when connected
to the Merlin Plus system. In this combination, a user could be talking on the
handset, and an intercom call could come in via speaker. The user merely
covered the handset microphone, and talked back to the phone to answer the
intercom call.
Merlin II and Merlin Legend systems require use of two adjacent station
jacks to support this second channel.
The built-in speakerphones on these ATL phones use what is called the
“Pressure Zone Effect” to get remarkably good quality. A Pressure Zone
Microphone is mounted approximately 1/8 inch above a hard surface, such as
a table top. The effect helps cancel noise and echo, and during the 1980s was
considered the state of the art for conference room microphones. Merlin
speakerphones are rendered nearly useless when placed on a soft surface such
as a plush tablecloth or carpet, since the expected sound reflection is muffled.
All the ATL phones were designed for desk or wall mounting by selecting the
appropriate base. The available bases were:
Fixed angle metal base, kept the phone at a convenient angle, and
provided enough mass to keep the phone from sliding on a desk.
Available in narrow width which worked on the 5, 10, and 22 button
phones
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Adjustable angle metal base, allowing 3 different angles (the 11A stand.)
Designed for the 10 button sets, but could have been used on the 22
button set.
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The wide adjustable metal stand for use with 34 and 70 button sets, shown
below:
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Finally, a plastic stand offered either desk or wall mounting via
substitution of a small part.
The chart below shows all the Merlin ATL phones, roughly in order of (A)
number of programmable buttons, and (B) date of introduction. Unless
otherwise noted, all phones have regular buttons and an “Other” jack for
plugging in adjunct devices.
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Smallest phone; Membrane buttons. No “other”
adjunct jack.
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No
Black
White
Brown
Gray
Mid Blue
Burgundy
Cinnabar
AT&T never made an upgraded version of the 5B
phone, and discontinued the phone due to its
limitations.
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Only portable made for the Merlin series. No
“other” adjunct jack.
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No
Black
White
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Gray
Mid Blue
Burgundy
Cinnabar
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(HFAI) No “other” adjunct jack.
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Yes
Black
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Black
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Adds LCD display to show time, timer, called #
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Black
Not all buttons had lights; limited to autodial
function. Membrane buttons.
34
No
Black
Like 34B, but all buttons had lights. Membrane
buttons.
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No
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Speakerphone version of 34B; had dual lights on
only 10 line/feature buttons, and green lights on 2
additional buttons
34
Yes
Black
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Like the SP-34, but with a display
34
Yes
Black
34
Yes
Black
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Adds LCD display to show time, timer, called #, and
feedback during system programming
34
Yes
Black
Modified BIS-34D with built in Fax/Copier
34
Yes
Black
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Black
See illustration below
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Adds 36 buttons to the 34B console, but those
buttons are not fully programmable. Membrane
buttons.
White
Brown
Works as an operator console on 1030, 3070, Merlin
II, and Merlin Legend systems; 30 buttons on the
right side provide direct station selection (and busy
lamp indication); with 3 shift keys, this console can
direct calls to 90 extensions.
Gray
Mid Blue
Burgundy
Will work as a 34B on other systems.
Cinnabar
Misty
Cream
You can upgrade other 34 button sets to this console
by adding the console extension.
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Total 82 programmable buttons, used only as
reception/programming console on Merlin II. Can
also be used on Legend as an alternate console.
Requires external power supply. The speakerphone
is “Monitor only.”
82
No
Black
This reception console was also used on System 75;
some of the feature buttons had no function on
Merlin systems.
When used for programming the Merlin II, the
display provided menu prompting. On the Legend,
this phone can be used as an alternate DLC console,
but cannot be used for system programming.
The power supply for this phone, required, is about
the size of a brick. Other Merlin phones allow an
auxiliary power supply, but this one is the only one
to require it.
Merlin Receptionist Console
The Merlin analog phones could also be used on AT&T’s smallest PBX, the
System 25.
The Merlin PFC was an interesting development, a hybrid multi-line phone
and fax machine in a reasonably compact package. As can be seen from the
illustration below, it is not much bigger than the 34 button phones.
01021 ! ! 3
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The PFC used the selected line to send or receive a fax; one could not
simultaneously talk and fax.
Most of the phones above were supplied with plastic stands that allowed use
on a desk or wall mounting. Available as an option were metal stands,
suitable for desk use only, that were stronger and heavier. The metal stand for
the 5B and 10B sets is non-adjustable. A non-adjustable stand for the 34B
won’t fit newer 34 button sets. An adjustable metal stand was made that fits
all the 34 button sets.
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Most of the Analog/Hybrid phones (above) included an Other jack which
supported these accessories:
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With the General Purpose Adapter (GPA) you can connect to your voice terminal
Touch-Tone ( not rotary ) equipment such as manual dial modems, auto dialers,
answering machines, and telephone extensions (including cordless telephones).
Line selection is done on the telephone; when the attached device is in use, the phone
is “busy.” The GPA can be configured to allow both the phone and accessory to be
used (but sharing the line), or for the accessory to override the phone.
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Allows fully integrated attachment of a headset; when the headset is activated, the
phone acts as if the handset had been picked up. This is a great improvement over
most headsets, which connect to handset cords and require the user to lift the handset
to use the headset.
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Unlike the General Purpose Adapter, this plugs into the control unit in place of a
telephone, not an adjunct to a telephone. Since Merlin II and Legend support singleline analog telephones directly (through the 012 T/R and 016 T/R), this unit was less
useful on newer, larger systems.
The BTMI 2 version is shown here:
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You can connect Extra Alert Devices, such as a horn, bell, strobe, or chime, to your
system so that people working in noisy or remote areas of a building can be alerted
when a call rings. When you activate the Supplemental Alert Adapter (SAA) and a
voice terminal rings, the adapter automatically activates the connected extra alert
device, which gives a visual or audible signal that a call has come in.
A high quality speakerphone (S102A, available in glossy black or dusty silver) can be
attached, providing better speakerphone quality than that built-in to the BIS models, or
adding that capability to non-speakerphone models.
Newer versions of the speakerphone (S202, available in black or misty cream)
incorporated a “quality reset” which measured room acoustics and made internal
adjustments for best quality operation.
Both speakerphones used the Pressure Zone Effect.
01021 ! ! 3
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Used only with the Merlin Plus system for logging calls or configuration to a printer.
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In-Range, Out-of-Building protector, designed to protect phones and systems from
electrical interference, lightning problems, ground issues, etc. Used when a phone is
within the typical 1000 foot range of the system, but is not in the same building.
AT&T strongly cautions that these units are needed to protect people and equipment.
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For the Merlin II, and probably also supported by the Legend, AT&T built
the 008D card to support the 7406D digital phone. The 74xx series was
designed for larger PBX equipment (AT&T System 75, 85, and Definity), but
at least this one set was supported, in 4 configurations:
7406D
7406D with Display
7406D with Data Stand
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The Merlin II 008D card also supported a PT510D Digital Voice/Data set.
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AT&T describes the MLX series of phones as being ISDN sets: they
communicate 2 basic-rate channels and 1 data channel over 2 pairs of wire.
Clearly, the MLX series are optimized for use with a Merlin system, not
directly connected to the public switched ISDN network, because of the
dedicated feature buttons.
The primary improvements of the MLX series over the original
Analog/Hybrid phones are:
Use of standard technology (ISDN)8
Improved display (on many phones)
Electronic control of handset, speaker, and ringing volume (replacing
rotating knobs or sliding levers)
Return to the standard K-style handset, larger than the original Merlin
handset. Less “cool” looking, but cheaper and perhaps more comfortable
for the user.
A downside to the MLX phones was their lower reliability; many users have
reported failures that are traceable to keypad problems. See Section 7,
“Maintenance,” for more information.
All the MLX phones are designed for desk mounting and include a plastic
base that can be installed in two different ways to offer low-angle or highangle.
8
Although ISDN has not become popular in the US, as was expected when this effort was
started.
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The MLX-5, -10, and -16 sets are also designed for wall mounting by use of
an accessory wall mounting plate. To mount such phones on the wall, install
the accessory plate using suitable screws or anchors, and remove the plastic
base from the phone, exposing the key-hole shaped slots. These slots mate
with round tabs on the wall mounting plate.
While the MLX-20L and -28D are not designed for wall-mounting, you can
do so by removing the base, inverting it, and screwing it to the wall. This
requires that you drill 4 holes in the base, and mount the front (shorter) end of
the base upward. Hang the telephone from the tabs at the top, and the bottom
end of the phone will connect with other tabs on the base.
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Low-end phone with no display
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Preferred system programming console
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Supports Direct Station Selection (DSS) unit
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Supports Direct Station Selection (DSS) unit
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The MLX-20L console can have up to two Direct Station Selectors attached,
allowing fast connection of a call to a station.
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PassageWay Direct Connect Solution is a collection of five software
applications that provide an interface between an approved DOS PC and the
system through an MLX-28D, MLX-20L, MLX-16DP, or MLX-10DP
telephones. (These phones require and adjunct card installed; the “DP”
designation indicates the card has been installed.)
01021 ! ! 3
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. A card file application that enables a user to maintain names,
addresses, telephone numbers and other information.
-' -
. A telephone programming application that enables users to program
telephone features for their MLX-28D, MLX-20L, or MLX-10DP
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telephones from the PC. Multiple button programming files can be
created, saved, and exchanged with other users.
* L
. An application that enables users to access information from the
call log, which stores a record of every call made while using
AT&TCall.
-' -(
. Management software that provides the basis for all the other
PassageWay applications. AT&TConnect also provides autodialing
using the command set used by most modems.
- ' - $ / ; ; . An application that enables users to manage incoming calls
(answer, hold, or drop) and view the calling party number (Caller ID)
for each incoming call at their telephones.
As can be seen, these are very early “Computer Telephony Integration” (CTI)
applications. Avaya Merlin Magix has much stronger support for CTI.
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The Multi Function Module (MFM) is a circuit card installed in MLX phones
to support a secondary tip/ring (single line phone) device. Once installed, the
second item operates independently; it can initiate and receive calls in
parallel with the MLX phone. The MFM is assigned its own extension
number, independent from the MLX phone. (The extension number may be
related; for example, in a Legend system with 2 digit extensions, an MFM
attached to extension 18 will be assigned extension 718.
The MFM also supports extra ringing devices such as bells, chimes, or
horns, either 20 Hz AC ringing signal, or –48 VDC.
The MFM requires an adjunct power supply to generate a ringing signal. It
will work without the power supply for outbound calling.
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An adjunct unit connected to the DSS port on an MLX-20L or MLX-28D
telephone. This unit has 50 buttons for accessing 50 different extensions.
Each has a single red indicator light (for station status). Pressing an extension
button initiates a call to that station, or transfers a current call to that station.
Page buttons allow the 50 buttons to be used for 3 separate groups of
extensions; a single DSS unit then can easily access 150 stations.
01021 ! ! 3
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Unlike the ATL phones, the MLX phones do not require a special adapter for
headsets. Headsets plug into the handset jack on the telephone. Buttons may
be programmed to use the headset:
/
– for operators, when a call comes in, a short “buzz” is heard,
then the call is answered automatically
* / ) – answers or hangs up the call without needing to lift the handset
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– mutes either the headset or handset. (The permanent Mute button on
MLX phones affects only the speakerphone.)
/ - With headset operation on (green LED next to Headset Status button
is on), the user or operator answers and makes calls with the headset.
With headset operation off (green LED next to Headset Status button
is off), the user or operator answers and makes calls with the handset.
01021 ! ! 3
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These are Enhanced Tip Ring phones primarily designed for the AT&T
Partner system. They are supported on the Merlin Legend through ETR
station cards. Though supported, Partner-like features may not work
correctly when such phones are attached to a Merlin
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These newer all-digital phones work only on Magix systems, and require a
different station card than the MLX phones.
A significant enhancement is the inclusion of separate headset and handset
outlets, providing full support for headsets.
All the 4400 series phones use a two-wire digital interface, making system
wiring easier. Some phones require auxiliary power as noted.
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33! !
Single line, no display
None
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2 x 16
330 & F
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2 x 16
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24
2 x 16
33 3 & F
24
7 x 24
Only the display differs from the 4424D+ phone. Vacuum
Fluorescent display requires power adapter installed with
telephone.
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50 direct station
selection buttons
plus 10 feature
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Adjuct to the 4424D+ and 4424LD+ phones. May require
installation of power adapter.
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This section discusses various wire/cable arrangements for connecting Merlin
parts. Includes are some “secrets” to avoiding purchase of expensive parts.
70
5
*
Station wiring connects a Merlin Station (telephone) to the system.
The three station wiring descriptions below use standard 8-pin modular plugs,
and the cables are wired non-reversing: pin 1 on one plug is wired to pin 1 on
the other end of the cable. The connections are the same as standard 10-BaseT Ethernet cables (sometimes referred to as “CAT-5”). Indeed, one can use a
typical Ethernet cable if one is missing the station cable. You cannot,
however, use a Merlin station cable for Ethernet, because the quality is
insufficient to carry high-speed data.
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Wt/Gn
Ye
7
Bn/Wt
Bn
8
Wt/Bn
Sl
4 pair station wiring on 8-wire modular jack for feeding ATL
(analog/hybrid) phones. AT&T referred to this as the D8W cord. On
smaller systems like the Merlin Plus, all four pair were used:
Pair 1: primary voice channel (white-blue pair)
Pair 2: signaling (button presses, lights, etc) (white-orange pair)
9
The official phone wiring color two letter abbreviations are: Wt = White, Rd = Red, Bk =
Black, Ye = Yellow, Vi = Violet, Bu = Blue, Or = Orange, Gn = Green, Bn = Brown, and Sl
= Slate. These abbreviations are non-ambiguous.
01021 ! ! 3
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Pair 3: power (-48v DC) (white-green pair)
Pair 4: secondary voice channel (for HFAI, etc.) (white-brown pair)
3 pair station wiring on 8-wire modular jack for feeding ATL phones on
Merlin II and Merlin Legend. The ATL station cards in these systems
supported only 1 voice channel, but two adjacent jacks could be
“bridged” to support both voice channels to the ATL phones.
(This is really the same station wiring as above, but one pair is not used.)
3 pair station wiring on 8-wire modular jack for feeding MLX phones on
Merlin Legend. As can be seen, the power pair is different for MLX and
ATL phones, making it important to know which kind of phone is
connected to which jack.
Pair 1: Transmit +/Pair 3: Receive +/Pair 4: Power (-48v DC)
7
5
*
3 pair line wiring on 8-wire modular jack for E&M tie-line support on
Merlin II, Legend.
Pair 1: T, R (tip and ring)
Pair 2: T1, R1 (second tip & ring)
Pair 3: E & M
Single pair line on 6-wire modular jack for providing incoming Loop Start
or Ground Start lines – on all Merlin systems. The center two wires (pins
3 & 4, typically red & green conductors) are used. AT&T referred to this
as a D2R cord.
7"
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*
Adjunct device cable (between Analog/Hybrid phone and accessory) uses
a 4 pair cable, and special “Keyed Modular” 8 pin plugs; the “key” is a
small tab on the plug that prevents inserting these into a standard 8-pin
jack. Wiring is straight-through, but pair usage is unknown. AT&T made
a special 18-inch D8AC modular cord with light-blue modular plugs on
the ends.
These cables are very hard to find, and expensive when you do find them.
73 8
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AT&T has a long track record of safety and reliability. To improve both
aspects of an installation, they insist on strong ground wiring requirements.
My recommendation is to follow them; they take little money, a few extra
minutes during installation, and can prevent problems in the future.
01021 ! ! 3
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In general, AT&T recommends additional ground wires be installed between
the system and known reference points (beyond the grounding provided in
the grounded power cord.). Consult your installation guides for details. The
following illustration, for a Merlin Plus, has a typical arrangement: separate
ground wire from equipment, closely coupled to the incoming phone lines,
back to a good ground source.
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Here are miscellaneous adapters used in Merlin installations.
3 ! . B 8 wire modular plug. Allows connecting a Data Collector and Busy
Buster feature to Merlin Plus station 19.
3! ! $ – breaks out pins 7 & 8 for power
3! ! & C 8 wire modular plug, splits off pair 3.
Suttle, supplier to the telecom industry, has many wiring diagrams for
adapters (such as the one above) at www.suttleonline.com.
"
01021 ! ! 3
– 8 wire modular to DB-25 (traditional serial line) for SMDR or PC
hookup to a printer (used on Merlin II and Legend). Pin connections
70
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are believed to be: mod1 – db22; mod2 – db6+8; mod3 – db20; mod4
– db7; mod5 – db3; mod6 – db2.
If you wanted to make an adapter to connect to the DB-9 serial port
on a Windows computer, the following chart should help. This has
been tested working with WinSPM software.
8-pin modular jack
DB-9 female connector
1
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
2
3
6
7
4
8
5
9
view from back side of connector.
77
/
Pin 1
Pin 9
Pin 2
Pins 1, 6, 8
Pin 3
Pin 4
Pin 4
Pin 5
Pin 5
Pin 2
Pin 6
Pin 3
>
,
Several Merlin systems support Music On Hold. This feature provides music
to those callers who are placed on hold.
AT&T advises that:
If you use equipment that rebroadcasts music or other copyrighted
materials, you may be required to obtain a copyright license from and
pay license fees to a third party (such as the American Society of
Composers, Artists, and Producers or Broadcast Music Incorporated).
Magic on Hold® requires no such license and can be purchased from
AT&T.10
For non-commercial purposes, such as home use, I see no problem with using
a radio as the source of Music on Hold. You may want to check with your
lawyer or the radio station.
The early systems (206, 410, 820) allowed Music on Hold with the addition
of a feature cartridge. That cartridge had two screw terminals configured to
10
01021 ! ! 3
From a Merlin Legend manual; this citation appears in many AT&T manuals.
7
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be an 8-ohm load. You can connect to a radio using a cable with an earphone
plug on one end, and bare wires on the other end. Radio Shack part number
42-2434 is ideal for this use.
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The Merlin Plus has an RCA jack, also 8-ohm, for connection. Use the Radio
Shack 42-2461 cable to connect to a standard radio with earphone jack.
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The Merlin II and Merlin Legend systems do not have dedicate music on hold
ports. Instead, one must designate one of the trunk ports as the music source.
This is a little nasty, since trunk ports are traditionally expensive. AT&T also
required the purchase of a special music adapter to connect correctly. These
are not cheap, and not easy to find.
Fortunately, you can make your own. What’s required is an audio
transformer, to convert a standard 8-ohm earphone feed into the 600-ohm
standard phone line.
You will need the following parts:
A modular cable with a standard 6-pin plug on one end, and bare wires on
the other end. (Radio Shack part number 940-0473, but you can just take
a standard telephone cord and chop off one end.
A shielded earphone cable with a 1/8” plug on one end, and bare wires on
the other end (Radio Shack part number 42-2434, above)
An 8-ohm to 600-ohm audio transformer. (Radio Shack part 273-1380
can be used; it is 1000-ohms on one side, but center-tapped, which means
01021 ! ! 3
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it can be used as an 8-ohm to 500-ohm transformer, and that’s good
enough.)
A small metal box (Radio Shack 27-235 or equivalent)
Tools: drill, soldering iron, solder, tape
The crude drawing below shows how to hook the pieces together. Solder all
connections, and use tape to insulate them. Run the cords through the ends of
the metal box by drilling small holes. (Better to do this before hooking things
together!) Tie a knot in each cord to keep it from pulling out of the box.
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It’s best to keep the total wire length to under 10 feet to avoid picking up
hum or interference. Keep the modular cable end shorter, and if possible, use
special twisted wire cable (instead of standard flat modular cable) to
minimize interference.
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If you use the Radio Shack transformer listed above, you will not use one of
the 5 wires coming out of the transformer. Connect the red and white wires to
the earphone plug, and the blue and black (or green and black, it doesn’t
matter) to the telephone cord.
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With proper care, a Merlin system will last for decades. Some originally
installed systems are approaching 20 years today with little signs of
degradation.
Telephones with excessive wear are refurbished by dozens of companies; a
large aftermarket exists to generate parts for this effort. It is a testament to the
quality of the Merlin system that refurbishing continues today.
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You can take several steps to maximize the life of your Merlin equipment.
Follow AT&T/Lucent guidelines regarding system grounding and power
input. Use surge-protected power, and consider an uninterruptible power
supply (UPS) to keep your system properly powered at all times. Proper
grounding can reduce the effects of electrical surges.
Keep the system powered on at all times; don’t switch it on and off
frequently. Doing so causes the internal temperature to alternate, leading
to mechanical movement; over time, connections may become unstable.
Use proper lightning/surge protection for all trunks connected to the
system. Use a heavy (gauge 10 or better) ground wire in parallel with the
phone wires from the equipment to the service entry.
Follow instructions about proper clearance for ventilation; most Merlin
units prefer to be wall-mounted with adequate room to allow convection
air flow. Since the Merlins don’t have internal fans for cooling, they
depend on unimpeded air flow through the chassis; the natural warmth of
the electronics warms the surrounding air, which rises and is replaced
with cooler air. This won’t work if you block the ventilation slots on the
top and bottom of the control unit.
Improve handset cord life by periodically untwisting cords before they get
totally mangled. Most telephone users twist the cord one revolution each
time they use the phone.
Avoid placing stickers or tape on telephones. If necessary, remove
glue/gum with citrus oil solvents.
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You can improve the look of Merlin phones by printing professional labels
for all the buttons. The attached file, below, includes many labels for MLX
and ATL series phones.
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The Merlin BIS series of phones is easily disassembled. Remove 2 screws
from the bottom of the phone, and one screw from behind the number label.
Place the phone buttons down on a table, and gently remove the bottom by
lifting straight up. You can then lift off the circuit board, exposing all the
buttons and their rubber contact strips. These contact strips hold small black
nubs; when you press a button, the button pushes the rubber strip, moving the
nub down until it touches the circuit board.
If a phone button doesn’t work, it may be due to dirt accumulation on the nub
or the circuit board. Clean both with a gentle cleanser. If someone spilled
coffee inside the phone, you may have an hour’s worth of cleaning to do.
The buttons and the telephone case can be cleaned by soaking in soapy water.
Be sure all parts are dry before re-assembly.
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TBD.
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Mike Sandman at www.sandman.com has instructions for repairing the
membrane buttons on older Merlin phones.
www.tek-tips.com has a good forum for Merlin systems.
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