AirSep | Focus Portable | Find out the Facts before Choosing a Portable Oxygen Concentrator

Find out the Facts before Choosing a Portable Oxygen Concentrator
This article reprinted courtesy of The Pulmonary Paper.
Find out the Facts before Choosing a Portable Oxygen Concentrator:
The Pulmonary Paper’s Annual POC Review
P
ortable oxygen concentrators (POCs) are still
a relatively new addition to the family of home
oxygen therapy equipment. The first modern
small-form POC was released in the early 2000s –
AirSep’s LifeStyle was a 10-pound, pulse-only device
with a rechargeable battery that allowed its user to
carry the unit with them wherever they went. It was
2005 before the first continuous flow-capable POC hit
the market. SeQual’s first generation Eclipse weighed
nearly twice that of the LifeStyle, but had over triple
the oxygen production capacity, giving a wide range of
oxygen users the option of a portable unit that could
meet most of their needs.
AirSep Life Style – the very first POC had
a battery that lasted for 45 minutes.
After that, the POC market quickly expanded. From
2006 to 2011 no less than 15 different POCs were
released, each one bringing its own unique performance
capabilities and characteristics. This wasn’t a bad thing,
but the flood of new products and their varying abilities
has created a market where confusion exists over which
POCs are “right” for someone. Some units weigh less
than five pounds, but they also do not manufacture
much oxygen. Other units are able to make quite a
bit of oxygen, but they weigh anywhere from 10 to
The ability of the unit to oxygenate
the user during all of their daily
activities should be the first priority
when selecting a POC – if the unit
cannot provide enough oxygen to meet
someone’s daily oxygen needs,
they should look elsewhere.
May/June 2013
18 pounds – and that’s before adding the weight of
the battery and cart. Some units have continuous flow
ability, others don’t. And while all POCs feature pulse
settings, the volumes delivered by each POC at a given
setting wildly vary. For example, one device set at “5”
may deliver 30 mL of oxygen per pulse, while another
device delivers 66 mL of oxygen per pulse. That’s over
double the pulse volume of the first device, yet both are
set to the same setting of “5”.
The purpose of the chart on the following pages is to
have the most basic information about POCs assembled
in one place. It is hoped that anyone interested in a POC
can use this information chart as a starting point in
their quest to find the POC that is “right” for them or
someone they know. The ability of the unit to oxygenate
the user during all of their daily activities should be
the first priority when selecting a POC – if the unit
cannot provide enough oxygen to meet someone’s daily
oxygen needs, they should look elsewhere. It is highly
recommended that anyone wanting to buy a POC find
a provider or manufacturer that will allow them to
“test drive” the unit before purchasing – no one wants
to spend a considerable amount of money on a product
that does not perform to their expectations.
Every attempt has been made to accurately represent
the individual products’ abilities as found in the
respective manufacturer’s product literature (manuals,
specifications, official product websites). No guarantees
are made toward the accuracy of the information
provided. Manufacturer specifications are often
stated under ideal conditions. Always refer to the
manufacturer’s recommendations for use. Please consult
with your primary caregiver(s) to discuss whether a
portable oxygen concentrator may be an option for
you. If you have any questions about the information
provided, or if you find an error, please do not hesitate
to contact me at the email address
below.
Ryan Diesem is Research Manager
at Valley Inspired Products, Apple
Valley, MN. Email: info@pulmonary
paper.org.
www.pulmonarypaper.org
3
2013: Portable Oxygen Concentrators
Note: Please consult with your doctor or therapist before deciding to use or purchase any of these devices.
Intermittent Flow POCs (IF POCs)
Pulse
Dose
Type
Maximum
Dose per
Breath
None
selectable
Minute Vol.
Delivery: Dose
decreases as
rate rises
15 BPM: 22 mL
30 BPM: 11 mL
2 lbs.
Add 2–5 lbs.
1.5 hours
4 hours
10,000 ft
AirSep®
FreeStyle 3™
1 to 3
Minute Vol.
Delivery: Dose
decreases as
rate rises
15 BPM: 33 mL
30 BPM: 16 mL
4 lbs.
Add 2–5 lbs.
2.5 hours
3.5 hours
12,000 ft
AirSep®
FreeStyle 5™
1 to 5
Minute Vol.
Delivery: Dose
decreases as
rate rises
15 BPM: 66 mL
30 BPM: 33 mL
6 lbs.
Add 2–5 lbs.
2 hours
3.25 hours
12,000 ft
Inogen One®
G2
1 to 5
Minute Vol.
Delivery: Dose
decreases as
rate rises
15 BPM: 60 mL
30 BPM: 30 mL
7 lbs.
Add 2–5 lbs.
3 hours
4 hours
10,000 ft
Inogen One®
G3
1 to 4
Minute Vol.
Delivery: Dose
decreases as
rate rises
15 BPM: 56 mL
30 BPM: 28 mL
5 lbs.
Add 2–5 lbs.
3 hours
4 hours
10,000 ft
Inova Labs
Life Choice®
1 to 3
Fixed Delivery:
1) 10 mL
2) 20 mL
3) 30 mL
30 mL
5 lbs.
Add 2–5 lbs.
2 hours
4 hours
10,000 ft
Inova Labs
Activox®
1 to 3
Fixed Delivery:
1) 10 mL
2) 20 mL
3) 30 mL
30 mL
5 lbs.
Add 2–5 lbs.
6 hours
4 hours
10,000 ft
Invacare®
XPO2™
1 to 5
Minute Vol.
Delivery: Dose
decreases as
rate rises
15 BPM: 56 mL
30 BPM: 28 mL
6 lbs.
Add 2–5 lbs.
2.5 hours
4 hours
10,000 ft
Unit Name
AirSep® Focus
Available
Settings
Unit
Unit
Battery Time at
& Battery w/Accessories Pulse Setting 2
(Approx.)
(Approx.)
(Approx.)
Battery
(Approved)
Charge Time
Maximum
(Approx.) (Unit Off)
Altitude
Dose Volumes:***
May/June 2013
www.pulmonarypaper.org
4
* The Eclipse 3 also has pulse settings of 128, 160 and 192 mL, but has additional restrictions for use. See Eclipse 3 manual for more information.
** The SimplyGo has (2) IF delivery modes: Pulse Mode and Night Mode. Shown volumes are for Pulse Mode. Night Mode has minute volume delivery.
*** Approximate Continuous Flow volumes at 2 LPM and 4 LPM are provided for comparison to maximum volumes delivered by selected POC.
Intermittent Flow POCs (IF POCs)
Available
Settings
Unit Name
Pulse
Dose
Type
Maximum
Dose per
Breath
Unit
& Battery
(Approx.)
Unit
w/Accessories
(Approx.)
Battery Time at
Pulse Setting 2
(Approx.)
Battery Charge
Time (Approx.)
(Unit Off)
(Approved)
Maximum
Altitude
Oxus
1 to 5
Fixed Delivery:
9 mL per
setting
43 mL
10 lbs.
Add 2–5 lbs.
3 hours
3 hours
8,000 ft
Precision
EasyPulse
1 to 5
Minute Vol.
Delivery: Dose
decreases as
rate rises
15 BPM: 52 mL
30 BPM: 26 mL
7 lbs.
Add 2–5 lbs.
3 hours
4 hours
9,000 ft
Respironics
EverGo
1 to 6
Combination
Fixed/Minute
Vol. Delivery
15 BPM: 70 mL
30 BPM: 35 mL
9 lbs.
Add 2–5 lbs.
4 hours
2 hours
8,000 ft
Continuous Flow POCs (CF POCs)
DeVilbiss
iGo®
Pulse: 1 to 6
Continuous:
1 to 3
Fixed Delivery:
16 mL per
setting
96 mL
19 lbs.
Add 5–10 lbs.
4.5 hours
3 hours
13,123 ft
Invacare®
Solo2
Pulse: 1 to 6
Continuous:
0.5 to 3
Minute Vol.
Delivery: Dose
decreases as
rate rises
15 BPM: 133 mL
30 BPM: 66 mL
<20 lbs.
Add 5–10 lbs.
3.5 hours
5 hours
10,000 ft
O2 Concepts
Pulse: 1 to 6
Continuous:
1 to 3
Fixed Delivery:
16 mL per
setting
96 mL
18 lbs.
Add 5–10 lbs.
3 hours
4 hours
13,123 ft
Respironics
SimplyGo
Pulse: 1 to 6
Continuous:
0.5 to 2
Combination
Fixed/Minute
Vol. Delivery**
15 BPM: 72 mL
30 BPM: 66 mL
10 lbs.
Add 2–5 lbs.
3 hours
2.5 hours
10,000 ft
SeQual®
Eclipse 3™
Pulse: 1 to 6* Fixed Delivery:
Continuous:
16 mL per
0.5 to 3
setting
96 mL*
18 lbs.
Add 5–10 lbs.
5 hours
3 hours
13,123 ft
OxLife Independence
Dose Volumes***: 2 LPM Continuous Flow Volume per Breath–15 BPM: 44 mL, 30 BPM: 22mL
Dose Volumes:*** 4 LPM Continuous Flow Volume per Breath–15 BPM: 88 mL, 30 BPM, 44 mL
May/June 2013
www.pulmonarypaper.org
5
Calling Dr. Bauer …
Dr. Michael Bauer
Oximeter Facts
Oxygen is carried in the blood
on hemoglobin. A pulse oximeter
calculates the percentage of oxygen
that is attached to the hemoglobin
with an accuracy between 1%
and 3%.
Factors that can affect readings:
• Poor circulation to the
hands
• Excessive motion
• Blue or green nail pol
ish
• Weak or irregular puls
e
• Pressure on the sensor
• A sat
uration l
evel belo
w 70%
May/June 2013
Dear Dr. Bauer,
Why is it that I feel so short of breath when my oximeter is reading
in the low 90s? It’s confusing.
Dana A., Ormond Beach, FL
Many of my patients with advanced lung disease have asked me why they
are still so short of breath even when their oxygen level’s in an acceptable
range of 90% or better. There are complex reasons for this. It is true that
low oxygen levels (below 88%) can be a strong signal to the brain to make
us sense air hunger and dyspnea (the medical term for short of breath).
Many additional factors also result in the sensation of dyspnea.
We lung doctors often check pulmonary function tests. We typically
measure the Vital Capacity (how much air from the beginning to the end
of a breath) and the FEV1 (how much air you can forcefully exhale in one
second). Even when your oxygen level is good, when these numbers are
low, the body senses dyspnea. The respiratory muscles need to work in
overdrive and the brain just gets that feeling of “I’m not getting enough
air”. This is why inhalers can be so effective in improving breathing
symptoms. They often immediately improve the Vital Capacity and FEV1.
Patients with lung disease are often just not physically fit. This situation
comes hand in hand with medical illness as well as advancing age. Walking
up the stairs or vacuuming is likely to cause shortness of breath in anyone
who has not been used to exercise or is overweight. Exercising and
pulmonary rehabilitation are the key here.
Low blood counts (anemia), heart disease (congestive heart failure
or irregular heart rhythms) and advanced kidney disease are common
conditions that may cause shortness of breath even when lungs are
working well. Your doctor tries to make sure all these situations are
optimally treated.
www.pulmonarypaper.org
6
May/June 2013
www.pulmonarypaper.org
7
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