Planning_For_Partitioned_System_Operations_SA38..

Planning_For_Partitioned_System_Operations_SA38..

E

Rserver

IBM

pSeries

Planning for Partitioned-System Operations

SA38-0626-00

ERserver

IBM

pSeries

Planning for Partitioned-System Operations

SA38-0626-00

First Edition (October 2002)

Before using this information and the product it supports, read the information in Appendix A, “Notices” on page 41

and product warranties included with your system.

A reader’s comment form is provided at the back of this publication. If the form has been removed, address comments to Information Development, Department H6DS-905-6C006, 11501 Burnet Road, Austin, Texas

78758-3493. To send comments electronically, use this commercial internet address: [email protected]

. Any information that you supply may be used without incurring any obligation to you.

© International Business Machines Corporation, 2002. All rights reserved. Note to U.S. Government Users --

Documentation related to restricted rights -- Use, duplication or disclosure is subject to restrictions set forth is GSA

ADP Schedule Contract with IBM Corp.

Contents

About This Book . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v

ISO 9000 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v

Online Publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v

Related Publications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v

Trademarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vi

Chapter 1. Reference Materials. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

Documentation Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Chapter 2. Partitioning Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

Operating in a Partitioned Environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

Logical Partitioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

Dynamic Logical Partitioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

Affinity Logical Partitioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

Full System Partition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

Benefits of Partitioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Processor on Demand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Chapter 3. Planning for Logical Partitioning . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

Initial Phase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

Final Phase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

Basic LPAR Planning Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Detailed LPAR Planning Checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Instructions for LPAR Planning Worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Using the LPAR Planning Worksheets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Instructions for Partition Properties Worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Instructions for I/O Drawer Resource Worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . 20

Instructions for System Profile Worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

Chapter 4. Planning for Dynamic Logical Partitioning Updates . . . . . . 23

Adding a Processor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24

Moving a Processor Between Partitions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

Removing a Processor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

Adding Memory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28

Moving Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

Removing Memory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31

Adding an Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

Moving an Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

Removing a PCI Adapter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

Managing Devices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

Chapter 5. Processor on Demand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

Processor on Demand Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

Processor on Demand Activation Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

Capacity Planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

Processor on Demand Ordering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

Electronic Service Agent and Processor on Demand . . . . . . . . . . 38

Dynamic Processor Sparing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

Software Licenses and Processor on Demand . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

Activating Process for Processor on Demand. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

Appendix A. Notices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

iii

Appendix B. Worksheets for Partition Configuration Planning . . . . . . 43

Partition Properties Worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

I/O Drawer Resource Worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46

System Profile Worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49

iv

pSeries: Planning for Partitioned-System Operations

About This Book

This book provides information to planners, system administrators, and operators about how to plan for installing and using a partitioned server. It also discusses some issues associated with the planning and implementing of partitioning.

A discussion of permanent capacity on demand helps you understand how to order additional hardware for your system, and have this hardware available whenever you need it to supplement your server.

ISO 9000

ISO 9000 registered quality systems were used in the development and manufacturing of this product.

Online Publications

IBM

Eserver pSeries and AIX publications are available online. This documentation is available at the following Web address: http://publib16.boulder.ibm.com/pseries/en_US/infocenter/base.

Related Publications

v

The following publications contain related information: v

The documentation shipped with your managed system contains detailed planning, installation, and option information.

v

The managed system’s user’s guide contains user information for the managed system that might be partitioned.

v v v v

The

AIX 5L Version 5.2 AIX Installation in a Partitioned Environment

guide, order number SC23-4382, contains information about installing, managing, and maintaining the AIX 5L operating system in a partitioned environment.

The

Site and Hardware Planning Information

you plan the installation of your machine.

, order number SA38-0508, contains information to help

The

IBM Hardware Management Console for pSeries Installation and Operations Guide

SA38-0590, contains information to help you plan the installation of your machine.

, order number

The

Electronic Service Agent for eServer pSeries User’s Guide

detailed information about the Service Agent application.

, order number LCD4-1060, provides

The

PCI Adapter Placement Reference

, order number SA38-0538, provides information about the slots in which to place adapters in your managed system.

v

Trademarks

The following terms are trademarks of the International Business Machines Corporation in the United

States, other countries, or both: v

AIX v

AIX 5L v v

DB2 v

Eserver v

IBM pSeries

Microsoft and Windows are trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States, other countries, or both.

Other company, product, and service names may be trademarks or service marks of others.

vi

pSeries: Planning for Partitioned-System Operations

Chapter 1. Reference Materials

This chapter helps you get started with installing and configuring the

Eserver pSeries environment. The following information is included in the chapter: v

Eserver pSeries Roadmap v

Documentation Overview - Brief description of the printed and softcopy documentation shipped including targeted audience

The

Eserver pSeries Roadmap helps you locate marketing, service, and customer task information. The roadmap guides you through the tasks and the publications that document those tasks.

1

Begin

Marketing and Customer Tasks

Site and Hardware Planning Information

Planning for Partitioned-System Operations

Hardware Management Console

Installation and Operations Guide

Planning

Managed by HMC

?

No

Planning

Yes

Hardware

Installation

Site and Hardware Planning Information

Service Personnel Tasks

Hardware Installation Guide

Hardware Management Console

Installation and Operations Guide

Hardware

Installation

Customer Tasks

Planning for

Partitioned-System Operations

AIX Installation in a

Partitioned Environment

AIX Installation Guide and Reference

Operating System Installation:

Getting Started

Configuring

Partitions

Installing/Configuring the Operating System

Installing/Configuring the Operating System

Yes

Is System

Using

Partitions

?

No

Configuring Full

System Partition

Installing/Configuring

Applications

Using the System

AIX Installation in a Partitioned Environment

Application Documentation

AIX Documentation Library

Hardware User’s Guide

AIX Documentation Library

Application Documentation

The publications listed in this section are available online. To access the online books, visit our IBM

Eserver pSeries Information Center at http://publib16.boulder.ibm.com/pseries/en_US/infocenter/base.

2

pSeries: Planning for Partitioned-System Operations

Documentation Overview

This section provides descriptions and target audience information for the

Eserver pSeries and AIX 5L documentation libraries. Some of the documentation may only be available in printed form or in softcopy form. Based on the documentation content, the books are divided into the following categories: Planning,

Installing and Configuring, and Using the System.

Table 1. Planning

Documentation Title

Site and Hardware Planning

Information

Description

Contains information to help plan for site preparation tasks, such as floor-planning, electrical needs, air conditioning, and other site-planning considerations.

Audience

Marketing, system administrators

Planning for Partitioned-System

Operations

Describes planning considerations for partitioned systems, including information on dynamic partitioning and Capacity Upgrade on

Demand.

System administrators

Hardware Management

Console for pSeries Installation and Operations Guide

Provides information on how to install, configure, and use a Hardware Management

Console (HMC). Logical partition (LPAR) tasks, such as configuring and managing partitions on multiple host servers, are included.

System administrators

Type

softcopy printed and softcopy printed and softcopy

Chapter 1. Reference Materials

3

Table 2. Installing and Configuring

Documentation Title

Hardware Installation Guide

Description

Provides information on how to install system hardware, cable the system, and verify operations.

Audience Type

Service personnel printed and softcopy

Planning for Partitioned-System

Operations

Describes planning considerations for partitioned systems, including information on dynamic partitioning and Capacity Upgrade on

Demand.

Hardware Management

Console for pSeries Installation and Operations Guide

Provides information on how to install, configure, and use a Hardware Management

Console (HMC). Logical partition (LPAR) tasks, such as configuring and managing partitions on multiple host servers, are included.

System administrators

System administrators

AIX Installation in a Partitioned

Environment

AIX Operating System

Installation: Getting Started

Provides information on how to install the AIX operating system in an LPAR environment.

Provides information on how to install and configure the AIX operating system on a standalone system using a CD-ROM device.

System administrators

System administrators

AIX 5L Installation Guide and

Reference

System administrators

PCI Adapter Placement

Reference

AIX 5L Release Notes

AIX 5L Documentation CD

Provides information on installing the AIX 5L operating system on standalone systems, as well as on client systems using the Network

Installation Management (NIM) interface.

Outlines system-specific PCI adapter slot placement and adapter support configurations.

Provides late-breaking information for a specific AIX release.

AIX documentation library (system management guides, user guides, application programmer guides, commands and files references, AIX man pages, and so on).

Service personnel

System administrators

System administrators printed and softcopy printed and softcopy printed and softcopy printed and softcopy printed and softcopy printed printed and softcopy softcopy

4

pSeries: Planning for Partitioned-System Operations

Table 3. Using the System

Documentation Title

Hardware Management

Console for pSeries Installation and Operations Guide

Description

Provides information on how to install, configure, and use a Hardware Management Console

(HMC). Logical partition (LPAR) tasks, such as configuring and managing partitions on multiple host servers, are included.

Audience

System administrators

Type

printed and softcopy

Hardware User’s Guide Provides using, problem determination, and service processor information.

System administrators printed and softcopy

Diagnostic Information for

Multiple Bus Systems

Combines operating instructions for hardware diagnostic programs with common MAPs and

SRNs (Service Request Numbers).

Service personnel printed and softcopy

PCI Adapter Placement

Reference

Hardware Management

Console for pSeries

Maintenance Guide

Outlines system-specific PCI adapter slot placement and adapter support configurations.

Contains MAPs, removal and replacement, error code, and parts information to help diagnose and repair the system.

Service personnel

Service personnel

Adapters, Devices, and Cable

Information for Multiple Bus

Systems

Provides information about adapters, devices, and cables that are attached to or used within the system.

System Unit Safety Information Contains the English version of safety notices, as well as translations of those safety notices into other languages.

System administrators

System administrators, service personnel

AIX 5L Documentation CD

AIX documentation library (system management guides, user guides, application programmer guides, commands and files references, AIX man pages, and so on).

System administrators printed printed and softcopy printed and softcopy printed and softcopy softcopy

Chapter 1. Reference Materials

5

6

pSeries: Planning for Partitioned-System Operations

Chapter 2. Partitioning Overview

This chapter provides an overview of partitioning and some of the features that allow you to change partitions dynamically. Your planning needs will vary depending on your individual requirements. As your requirements change, careful planning helps you to be ready to change your system configuration.

Operating in a Partitioned Environment

Before partitioning, each system operated independently. The following figure represents three systems that could support three separate tasks and three sets of users.

A B X

Partitioning enables system administrators to configure a single computer into several independent systems. Each of these independent systems, also referred to as

partitions

, can run applications in its own independent environment. This independent environment contains its own operating system, its own set of system processors, its own memory, and its own I/O adapters and devices. Even though it runs on the same physical hardware with other operating systems, after it is configured, a partition is booted and used as an independent system. The following figure represents a server that is divided into three partitions.

A

B

X

You can choose to operate your managed system as a single server, or you can choose to run multiple partitions. Partition management is performed using the hardware management console (HMC). Each system that is running partitions and managed by the HMC is referred to as a

managed system

. A managed system is capable of being configured to use logical partitions (LPARs) or a full system partition.

If your computing needs are considered to be technical, real-time, or high-performance computing, a special type of partitioning called

affinity logical partitioning

is recommended.

A system that is configured to use logical partitions can run the following: v

Multiple logical partitions (LPAR or affinity logical partitions) v

A full system partition

7

The HMC (shown attached to three partitions in the following illustration) provides the interface that allows you to choose the partition environment that best fits your needs.

A

B

X

A

B

X

Logical Partitioning

Logical partitioning (LPAR) does not limit the number of hardware resources that are contained in a partition. A partition could have any number of the available processors assigned to it, limited only by the total number of processors. Similarly, a partition could have any amount of memory, limited only by the total amount of memory available. An I/O adapter is physically installed in one of many slots in the system.

However, with LPAR, any I/O adapter in any I/O drawer can be assigned to any partition. Each partition on a server is defined by a profile. Profiles for logical partitions are created and managed using the HMC.

The operating system that is running in a partition is completely independent of any other operating system that is running in another partition. Operating system levels in each partition do not need to be the same, nor do the application levels. For example, you can install the Linux operating system in one partition and the AIX operating system in another partition.

By using partitions, you can test new programs in one partition, while developing the same program on another partition, all at the same time and using the same system. This “same system” partitioning method is more cost-effective than using all of the system resources on one large partition. Using partitions eliminates the need for dedicated systems for test or other purposes.

Dynamic Logical Partitioning (DLPAR) allows you to implement changes to your partitions at any time without affecting a partition’s operation. LPAR should be used when the tasks you are performing are other

than technical computing, real-time computing, or high-performance computing (see “Affinity Logical

Partitioning” on page 9).

8

pSeries: Planning for Partitioned-System Operations

Dynamic Logical Partitioning

Dynamically changing a partition enables a partition’s resources to be changed while the partition is up and running. The operating system that is running in the partition can configure and use additional hardware without being rebooted. In a DLPAR environment, the processors, memory, or input/output adapters can be added, moved, or removed after the partition is up and running.

Systems that are capable of performing dynamic logical partitioning can support the following tasks: v

Processor Tasks

– Adding processors to a partition

– Moving processors from one partition to another

– Removing processors from a partition v

Memory Tasks

– Adding memory to a partition

– Moving memory from one partition to another

– Removing memory from a partition v

Input/Output Tasks

– Adding a PCI adapter

– Moving a PCI adapter

– Removing a PCI adapter

Affinity Logical Partitioning

An affinity logical partition is a special type of logical partition that has its processors and memory resources located physically close to one another. Processors needed for a partition can be grouped to use the closest physical memory available. Hardware resources for affinity partitioning are defined using the HMC. When creating an affinity partition, the HMC automatically determines which processors and memory are grouped and allows you to choose which type of grouping you want. The HMC then creates a profile for each affinity partition and a system profile that contains the affinity partitions for the managed system.

Affinity partitioning is best suited for use in technical computing, real-time computing, and high-performance computing. A system that is set up to use affinity logical partitions can dynamically move

I/O devices. To change the quantity of processors or memory assigned to an affinity logical partition, the

partition must be rebooted. A more detailed description of these tasks is found in Chapter 4, “Planning for

Dynamic Logical Partitioning Updates” on page 23.

Note: If your system is enabled for capacity upgrade on demand, affinity logical partitioning is not available.

Full System Partition

A special partition called the full system partition assigns all of your managed system’s resources to one large partition. The full system partition is similar to the traditional, nonpartitioned method of operating a system. Because all resources are assigned to this partition, no other partitions can be started when the full system partition is running. Likewise, the full system partition cannot be started while other partitions are running.

The HMC allows you to switch from the full system partition to logical partitions. The actual setup of the operating system in a partition might require some careful planning to ensure that no conflicts exist between the two environments.

Chapter 2. Partitioning Overview

9

Benefits of Partitioning

Partitioning provides greater flexibility when deploying multiple workloads on a server, providing better management, improved availability, and more efficient use of resources. Some systems allow you to purchase and install hardware, and then to dynamically configure that hardware to meet your operating needs. The following are some examples of how partitioning can benefit your computer operations: v

Consolidate servers: A server with sufficient processing capacity that is capable of being partitioned can address the need for server consolidation by logically subdividing the server into a number of separate, smaller systems. In this way, application-isolation needs can be met in a consolidated environment, with the additional benefits of reduced floor space, a single point of management, and easier redistribution of resources as workloads change.

v

Merge production and test environments: Partitioning enables separate partitions to be allocated for production and test systems, eliminating the need to purchase additional hardware and software. When testing has been completed, the resources allocated to the test partition can be returned to the production partition or elsewhere as required. As new projects are developed, they can be built and tested on the same hardware on which they will eventually be deployed.

v

Consolidate multiple versions of the same operating system: A single system can have different versions of the operating system installed to accommodate multiple application requirements.

Furthermore, a partition can be created to test applications under new versions of the operating system prior to upgrading the production environments. Instead of having a separate server for this function, a minimum set of resources can be temporarily used to create a new partition where the tests are performed. When the partition is no longer needed, its resources can be incorporated back into the other partitions.

v

Scalability balancing: Partitioning allows you to create resource configurations appropriate to the scaling characteristics of a particular application, without hardware-upgrade restrictions.

v

Consolidate applications requiring different time zone settings: Partitioning enables multiple regional workloads to be consolidated onto a single server. The different workloads can run in different partitions, with different operating systems, as well as with different time and date settings. For example, workloads for operations based in San Francisco and New York can run in different partitions on a single server. The evening batch workload, maintenance, or upgrade for the New York operation does not affect those of the San Francisco operation.

v

Flexible configuration: Partitioning gives you the ability to change configurations easily to adapt to changing workload patterns and fluctuating computing-capacity requirements.

Processor on Demand

The processor on demand feature can help you manage a partitioned system. A processor on demand feature is ordered and installed as additional hardware that is not part of the system until you want to add it. The cost of using a processor on demand feature is deferred until you activate the hardware. After processor on demand hardware is activated on a system, it can then be added to logical partitions, as needed, to handle additional requirements.

10

pSeries: Planning for Partitioned-System Operations

Chapter 3. Planning for Logical Partitioning

Planning for logical partitioning requires the consideration of numerous factors and may take some time. If possible, planning for partitioning of a system should be performed prior to having the system installed in your location. If the planning work is careful and complete, the installation and configuration of the system will take less time.

Planning for installing partitions on a system is a two-phase process: v

Initial Phase

Perform this planning phase when you are considering how much system capacity is required, in the form of processors, memory, and I/O, that you need for all your partitions. During this phase you begin your system design by identifying your requirements and completing worksheets to record your requirements. If, for example, the new system will duplicate the function of several existing systems, you probably will need a partition for each system. Each partition requires processors, memory, and I/O that is close to the capacity of the existing systems. When this phase is completed, you have your requirements documented on worksheets that you can use as a record of your requirements.

v

Final phase

Perform this planning phase after you have determined the general partition requirements. In this phase, details for each partition are developed and recorded. Information needed to set up and run partitions on your system when it is installed is finalized during this phase. Various worksheets are completed during this phase. After this phase is complete and the system is installed, you can then use your worksheets and the hardware management console to implement your system design.

Initial Phase

During this phase, you use a partition profile to identify fundamental requirements for each partition that you will implement on your system. The following list summarizes the steps for the initial phase:

1. Complete the “Basic LPAR Planning Checklist” on page 12.

2. Complete part of the “Partition Properties Worksheet” on page 44.

Final Phase

In the final phase of partition planning, you complete worksheets with the details for each of your planned partitions. When the following worksheet tasks are completed, you are ready to configure your system’s partitions:

1. Complete the “Detailed LPAR Planning Checklist” on page 14.

2. Complete the the remainder of the “Partition Properties Worksheet” on page 44.

3. Complete the “I/O Drawer Resource Worksheet” on page 46 (optional).

4. Complete the “System Profile Worksheet” on page 47.

11

Basic LPAR Planning Checklist

Use this checklist during system design, before the hardware is ordered. These activities help ensure that you have a good understanding of LPAR, to perform high-level system design and planning, and to ensure adequate machine resources are available to meet your needs. Begin the planning process with the steps outlined in the following table.

When you have completed this checklist, you can compare the requirements you have recorded, to your system order, to ensure that your requirements are being met:

Completed?

Completed?

Your Expectations

Determine your goals for partitioning your workloads. If you are planning to install a partitioned system to divide workloads, analyze how your workloads can be divided so that your partitions can be configured to have adequate capacity for the workload. For example, if you are planning to consolidate a number of systems, each system represents a workload.

If you are setting up a test environment and a production environment, consider each environment as a separate workload. You can then analyze your own workload and plan for a logical partition for each workload. As you define each workload for a partition, name the

partition, and record its name on your copy of the “Partition Properties Worksheet” on page 44.

If you want to isolate compatible workloads within a partition, you can use the Workload

Manager (WLM) tool. For more information about the AIX Workload Manager, see AIX

System Management Concepts: Operating System and Devices.

Hardware Configuration

Logical partition (LPAR) requirements have been determined for each workload that is desired for development, test, production, or failover environments. Record the partition

requirements in your copy of the “Partition Properties Worksheet” on page 44.

When performing this activity, carefully calculate the minimum resource requirements for each partition to ensure that the partition provides adequate performance.

Processor, memory, and I/O adapter requirements have been determined for each partition

and recorded on your copies of the “Partition Properties Worksheet” on page 44. Be sure to

order all of the hardware in the partition properties worksheet. Consider processors, memory, internal disks, network, and other I/O adapters.

A minimum of one network adapter has been included on the partition properties worksheet for each partition for administrative and user access. These adapters also can be used when configuring the HMC to be able to monitor each partition’s status. Consider availability requirements when deciding how many network adapters to configure in a partitioned

system. Update the “Partition Properties Worksheet” on page 44 as you define network

adapters for each partition.

Disk capacity and performance requirements have been determined for each partition for

operating system and application purposes and has been included on the “Partition

Properties Worksheet” on page 44. This should include redundant disks and disk adapters

for availability as needed.

Note: A disk 4-pack that is connected to a single controller can be owned and accessed by a single partition.

If you want a redundant HMC for availability, ensure that planning is done for this requirement and that the order includes the additional HMC.

If you are installing the new system in an environment that already has an HMC, decide whether to use the existing one, or to order an additional HMC. The HMC can be set up to be dedicated to the new system, shared by multiple systems, or connected in a redundant configuration so that two HMCs mirror each other.

12

pSeries: Planning for Partitioned-System Operations

Completed?

Software Configuration

On your copy of the “Partition Properties Worksheet” on page 44, for each partition, record

the application software to be run, the level of AIX, and whether it is running the 32-bit or

64-bit kernel (if known). The 32-bit and 64-bit multi-processor kernels are automatically installed. The uniprocessor kernel is not supported on LPAR enabled systems.

If you want to use the AIX Workload Manager and learn more about its features, see

AIX

System Management Concepts: Operating System and Devices.

Chapter 3. Planning for Logical Partitioning

13

Detailed LPAR Planning Checklist

Complete these activities after the system is ordered, and before partition deployment. The following table can be used as a checklist so that you can track your progress.

Completed?

Completed?

Completed?

Completed?

Documentation and Information

Obtain documentation relevant to partitioned systems, including

IBM Hardware Management

Console for pSeries Installation and Operations Guide, order number SA38-0590, and AIX

Installation in a Partitioned Environment, order number SC23-4382.

Hardware Configuration

Complete detailed I/O planning for each LPAR by completing a copy of the “I/O Drawer

Resource Worksheet” on page 46 for each I/O drawer (if the system unit drawer has I/O

slots, complete a worksheet for the system unit drawer also). On the worksheet, record the drawer and slot assignments for each LPAR. Be sure to consider application availability requirements when planning your adapter usage. You may want to dynamically move some adapters to different LPARs as your requirements change.

More information about considerations for adapter placement can be found in the section

“Configuring the LPAR Environment for High Availability” in the IBM pSeries 690 Availability

Best Practices white paper, available at http://www.ibm.com/servers/eserver/pseries/hardware/whitepapers/p690_avail.html and in the

PCI Adapter Placement Reference, order number SA38-0538.

Software Configuration

Perform detailed software-configuration planning for each partition, and record the

information on your copy of the “Partition Properties Worksheet” on page 44. For planning

requirements, refer to operating system and application documentation.

Plan for availability requirements for each partition, and record the information on your copy

of the “Partition Properties Worksheet” on page 44. At this point you can plan your maximum

and minimum resource requirements for each partition. Be sure to set the maximum values for resources in a partition higher than the desired value so that if you need to add resources dynamcially, the partition will allow the added resources. Also, be sure to set the minimum values for each partition so that resources are available from partitions if a dynamic move is required.

Verify that all software licensing terms for all software are understood and implemented. See the terms and conditions of your application license agreements.

Plan for any use of system profiles and record the information on your copy of the “System

Profile Worksheet” on page 47.

Installation and Update

Understand AIX installation choices and implications for ongoing maintenance (NIM versus

CD). NIM (Network Installation Management) is the recommended method. See AIX

Installation in a Partitioned Environment, order number SC23-4382.

Define and record your system profile using a copy of the “System Profile Worksheet” on page 47. Define profiles for booting into SMS menus, and with media (CD) as required.

When you are defining your system profile, ensure that you identify the minimum set of partitions that must be activated to handle the workload and still provide adequate performance.

When your system is installed and available, install each partition using the selected method. For instructions to help you set up your partitions and system profiles, refer to the

IBM Hardware Management Console for pSeries Installation and Operations Guide, order number SA38-0590.

To enable integrated management, Service Focal Point, and inventory collection, ensure that the network path is available between the HMC and each partition.

14

pSeries: Planning for Partitioned-System Operations

Completed?

System Management

Ensure that remote management alternatives are understood (Web-based System Manager and command line from Microsoft Windows or AIX) and appropriate equipment is in place.

Create a plan for backing up rootvg (root volume group) and non-rootvg in a partitioned environment.

Understand how to handle AIX dump devices in partitioned environment.

Define authorized users, with roles, for HMC and partition management.

Chapter 3. Planning for Logical Partitioning

15

Instructions for LPAR Planning Worksheet

This section contains samples of worksheets that have been completed for a typical managed system. Use these examples when completing worksheets for your system configuration planning. These worksheets are necessary when your system is installed and you are configuring your partitions for the first time.

Using the LPAR Planning Worksheets

The LPAR planning process proceeds through several phases, and the planning worksheets can be used to record design and implementation choices through those phases.

During the initial LPAR design phase, high-level choices about LPAR resource usage should be made to ensure an adequate machine configuration. Determine the number of desired LPARs, along with the usage of each. For each LPAR, record the number of processors, the amount of memory, and the I/O requirements to configure. To ensure adequate hardware redundancy, consider and record availability requirements. Total system memory size must leave adequate memory for operating system use.

Use the following table to determine the total number of partitions you can operate at one time, considering the total amount of memory available on your server.

Ensure that the total minimum resources for all partitions that you intend to run simultaneously does not exceed the total available system resources. You can also use the following table to verify that adequate operating system memory is available.

Total Memory

(in GB)

Maximum Number of

Partitions:

4GB

8GB

16GB

24GB

32GB

48GB

64GB

96GB

128GB

192GB

256GB

Approximate

Memory

Overhead

(memory required by firmware (in GB)

Approximate

Usable

Partition

Memory (in

GB)

.75 to 1GB

.75 to 1GB

.75 to 1GB

1 to 1.25GB

1 to 1.25GB

1.25 to 1.75GB

1.5 to 2GB

2 to 2.5GB

2.5 to 3.5GB

3.5 to 4.5GB

5 to 6GB

Maximum

Number of

Partitions:

AIX or Linux, any version

3 to 3.25

7 to 7.25

Partitions

16GB and

Partitions >

16GB (see

Notes 1 and 2)

3 and 0

6 and 0

15 to 15.25GB

14 and 0

22.75 to 23GB 16 and 0

30.75 to 31GB 16 and 0

46.25 to

46.75GB

16 and 1

62 to 62.5GB

93.5 to 94GB

16 and 2

16 and 4

124.5 to

125.5GB

187.5 to

188.5GB

250 to 251GB

16 and 6

16 and 10

16 and 14

Maximum

Number of

Partitions:

AIX 5.1

Partitions

16GB and

Partitions >

16GB (see

Notes 1 and 3)

13 and 0

16 and 0

16 and 0

16 and 0

16 and 0

16 and 1

16 and 2

16 and 4

16 and 6

16 and 10

16 and 14

AIX 5.2 (or higher) or

Linux

All partition sizes

(see Notes 1, 4, and

5)

13

16

16

16

16

16

16

16

16

16

16

16

pSeries: Planning for Partitioned-System Operations

Notes:

1. All partition maximum numbers are subject to availability of sufficient processor, memory, and I/O resources to support that number of partitions. For example, a system with only 8 processors can support a maximum of 8 partitions.

2. These rules apply to systems running partitions with any version of AIX or Linux, if the firmware and

HMC release levels are earlier than the 10/2002 release level.

3. These rules apply to systems running partitions with AIX Version 5.1, if the firmware and HMC release levels are at the 10/2002 release level (or later). Do not select the HMC partition profile option for

Small Real Mode Address Region for AIX 5.1 partitions. These numbers reflect the maximum when running only AIX 5.1 partitions, but AIX 5.1 and AIX 5.2 partitions can be mixed, and can allow for additional partitions to be run (up to the maximum of 16).

4. These rules apply to systems running partitions with AIX Version 5.2 (or later) or Linux, if the firmware and HMC release levels are at the 10/2002 release level (or later). Select the HMC partition profile option Small Real Mode Address Region for these partitions.

5. AIX 5.2, when run with the Small Real Mode Address Region profile option, requires that the maximum memory setting is no greater than 64 times the minimum memory setting. For example, if the minimum memory setting is 256 MB, then the maximum memory setting cannot be greater than 16

GB. Otherwise, AIX does not start.

To ensure that the system and partition profiles are created correctly as you complete the detailed partition

planning checklist, carefully complete the “Partition Properties Worksheet” on page 44. Additional dedicated

partition profiles for special use (for example, to boot to SMS menus, or to boot with and without a

CD-ROM drive) should be identified.

For example, if you know that a specific resource, such as a CD-ROM or a data disk is required to perform a set of user defined tasks, a dedicated partition profile can be created with these resources explicitly listed as “required” for the partition to boot. This technique can help you to avoid booting a partition only to find that specific resources are not available. Dedicated partition profiles are useful for ISA devices that cannot be dynamically reconfigured.

Complete details about operating-system levels and application-software levels should be recorded in this phase.

Advanced considerations, such as using multiple system profiles, should also be considered during the detailed planning phase.

Chapter 3. Planning for Logical Partitioning

17

Instructions for Partition Properties Worksheet

On your copy of the “Partition Properties Worksheet” on page 44, complete the following fields. See the

“Example of Partition Properties Worksheet” on page 19 for help when completing your worksheet. Using

the following table as a guide, work through the entries to complete the worksheet for each partition you have planned to set up on your system:

Worksheet Field

Partition Number

Partition Name

Processor Count

Memory Size

Network Adapter

Disk Drives

Description

Arbitrary, used as link to the same partition on the I/O properties worksheet.

Unique name for this partition (up to 31 characters).

Record the minimum number of processors required for this partition.

Record the minimum amount of memory required for this partition. Memory allocation total should leave enough room for the various system overheads in memory usage.

Each partition should have a network adapter. Initially record the type (for example,

Ethernet). As planning progresses, record the adapter part number.

Record the partition disk requirements including rootvg, data, use of internal 4-pack, mirroring, and so on.

Comment If you are migrating from an existing system into a partition, indicate the type of system and general configuration (such as processors or memory).

Partition Host Name Record host name for partition. This name must be resolvable by some method (such as

DNS, /etc/hosts, NIS).

Networking Configuration For each adapter, record the IP address, netmask information, and so on.

Application Stack

Software Levels

Application License

Requirements

Record levels of all applications to run in the partition. You can use this information to ensure application availability, and any operating system or application prerequisites.

Record license requirements from application license agreements. Use this information to define a partition profile that complies with the license agreements for your applications.

If an application has specific licensing issues, such as the maxumum number of processors allowed in a multiprocessor environment, the maximum resource can be set in the partition profile keep the partition within the license terms.

Availability Requirements Record desired availability requirements for this partition. This information can be used to plan for appropriate hardware and software redundancy to ensure availability. You might need redundant I/O for communication availability or you might decide to configure your partitions in a high-availability configuration (HA).

18

pSeries: Planning for Partitioned-System Operations

Example of Partition Properties Worksheet

Duplicate the worksheets from “Partition Properties Worksheet” on page 44, and complete a worksheet for

each partition. Examples of completed partition-properties worksheets follow:

Partition

Number

Partition

Name

Disk

Drives

Comments

1

2

3

4

5

WebServer

AppServer1

AppServer2

Database

Processor

Minimum/

Desired/

Maximum

Count

4/6/6

4/8/10

4/6/8

2/2/2

Development 2/4/4

Memory Size

Minimum/

Desired/

Maximum (in

GB)

1/2/4

Required

Network

Adapter

1/4/6

4/4/4

2/4/6

1/1/2

2x 10/100

Ethernet

10/100

Ethernet

10/100

Ethernet

10/100

Ethernet

10/100

Ethernet

2x36

2x36

2x36

2x36

2x36

...

16

Totals

Total Installed

16/26/30

24

9/15/22

16

When the partitions in the previous example are activated, there are not enough processors for each partition to use the desired value. Depending on the order in which the partitions are activated, one partition might have to be activated with fewer than the desired number of processors.

The memory values for Minimum/Desired/Maximum should leave enough room for the various system

overheads of memory usage. See the memory requirements table on page 16.

1

2

3

4

Partition

Number

Partition Host

Name

ws1.dot.com

ap1.dot.com

AppServ2.dot.com 108.25.25.11

db1.dot.com

108.25.25.13

dev1.dot.com

Networking

Configuration

108.25.25.2

108.25.25.5

108.25.25.15

Application

Stack

Software

Levels

Networking

Configuration

4GB

4GB

4GB

Availability

Requirements

Application Comments

License

Requirements

(New deployment or migration environment?)

Redundant

SCSI

Redundant

SCSI

Up to 6 processors

Second system will be added for

HACMP

HACMP

HA

HA 2 processors max.

HACMP

HACMP

1GB 5

...

16

Chapter 3. Planning for Logical Partitioning

19

Instructions for I/O Drawer Resource Worksheet

Duplicate the worksheet from the “I/O Drawer Resource Worksheet” on page 46 for each installed I/O

drawer (if the system unit has I/O slots or integrated I/O, complete a separate worksheet for the system unit as well). Record the drawer location code, adapter type for each slot, and also the partition assignment. Remember that full disk 4-packs that are connected to a single controller cannot be shared between partitions. Also, it is important for each partition to have a network adapter.

Example of I/O Drawer Resource Worksheet

Adapter Type I/O Drawer Location and Serial Number

U1.9

Px-I4

Px-I5

Px-I6

Px-I7

Px-I8

Px-I9

Px-I10

P1-I8

P1-I9

P1-I10

Px/Z1

Px/Z2

Px-I1

Px-I2

Px-I3

Adapter Slot

Physical Location

P1/Z1

P1/Z2

P1-I1

P1-I2

P1-I3

P1-I4

P1-I5

P1-I6

P1-I7

Integrated SCSI

Integrated SCSI

Fibre Channel

Ethernet

Fibre Channel

SCSI

SCSI

Integrated SCSI

Integrated SCSI

Fibre Channel

Fibre Channel

Ethernet

1

1

1

1

Partition

Assignment

1

1

2

2

1, 2, 3, 4

2

2

2

Comments

Hdisk0, hdisk1

Hdisk2, hdisk3 ent0

CD-ROM

Hdisk0, hdisk1

Hdisk2, hdisk3 ent0

20

pSeries: Planning for Partitioned-System Operations

Instructions for System Profile Worksheet

Duplicate the “System Profile Worksheet” on page 47 to record information about any system profiles you

want to create. A system profile allows you to activate or deactivate a set of partitions as needed. You can setup your system with system profiles that you might want to activate at different times of the day. For example, system profiles can be used to allocate different resources to your partitions based on workload peaks. If you want to deactivate a set of partitions and activate a different set of partitions, you would define your system profiles to match your requirements.

Remember that the memory allocation totals in the third column should leave enough room for the various system overheads of memory usage. For more information about system memory overheads, see the

memory requirements table on page 16.

Example of I/O a System Profile Worksheet

System Profile Name: Morning

Activation Times: 8:00 AM

Partition Name

Partition 1

Partition 2

Partition 3

Partition 4

Partition 5

...

Partition 16

Totals:

Total Installed:

Number of Desired Processors

4

4

4

2

2

16

16

Desired Memory Size

2GB

4GB

4GB

4GB

1GB

15GB

16GB

Chapter 3. Planning for Logical Partitioning

21

22

pSeries: Planning for Partitioned-System Operations

Chapter 4. Planning for Dynamic Logical Partitioning Updates

The dynamic LPAR (DLPAR) feature allows partitions to be changed while they are up and running. This chapter provides an overview of procedures related to DLPAR operations and outlines planning steps that you should consider before performing a DLPAR operation.

This chapter describes the considerations for adding resources to a partition, moving resources between partitions, and removing resources from partitions. Flowcharts are used to show the general process for each action. The gray highlighting in the flowcharts indicates planning considerations. The black highlighting indicates tasks that are performed using the HMC.

23

Adding a Processor

The following flowchart shows the basic steps needed to add processors to a partition that is already operational. Before adding processors to a partition, review the following planning considerations and the flowchart.

v

There are some considerations for each step of this process. Generally, the following questions correlate to a decision step in the flowchart: v

Are additional processors needed for a partition? Before adding a processor, ensure that it is necessary. A new application in a partition might require more processors, or there may be performance benefits with additional processors. Refer to your application documentation for recommendations, and also see the

Performance Management Guide

in the AIX documentation library.

Are extra processors available? To answer this question, use the HMC to check the system for available processors. If there are no available processors in your system, you can move a processor

from another partition, see “Moving a Processor Between Partitions” on page 26.

v

Are processors available in other partitions? If other partitions are not busy when you need to move a processor to supplement a partition, you can move the processor from one partition to another. If this

is an option you want to use now, go to “Moving a Processor Between Partitions” on page 26. If there

are no available processors in your system, you can either use a processor from another partition or add hardware to your system. If your system has Processors on Demand (POD) features installed, you might decide to enable additional processors now, and then add them to partitions as needed.

v

Are POD features available? If your system has inactive POD features installed, you can activate additional processors, and then add them to partitions as needed. To learn more about POD features,

see Chapter 5, “Processor on Demand” on page 37.

v

Does the new number exceed the maximum number of processors in the profile? When moving processors into a partition, the system allows only as many processors to be added to a partition as are allowed by the maximum set in the partition profile. If you plan to add processors to a partition and the partition is already at its maximum, you must change the partition profile to increase the maximum and then reboot the partition.

v

Do you have more processors to add to another partition? If you are in the process of moving processors, repeat the process for any additional processor moves you may need to do.

v

Are there any licensing requirements you need to consider? Check your partition profile worksheets

to see if you have noted any licensing requirements when you performed the procedures in “Using the

LPAR Planning Worksheets” on page 16.

24

pSeries: Planning for Partitioned-System Operations

Start

Additional processors are needed for a partition

Are extra processors available?

No

Yes

Are processors available in other partitions?

Yes

Go to

Move

Processor

No

Are CUoD processors available?

No

Purchase and install processors and return to Start

Yes

Activate

CUoD processors

HMC:

Select partition to add processors

Select menus:

Dynamic configuration of processors

DLPAR dialog:

Enter number of processors to add to partition

Greater than the maximum number of processors in the profile?

Yes

Reduce the number of processors, or update the partition profile, reboot and try again

No

More processors to add to another partition?

Yes

Return to Start

No

End

Chapter 4. Planning for Dynamic Logical Partitioning Updates

25

Moving a Processor Between Partitions

The following flowchart shows the basic steps needed to move processors from one operational partition to another operational partition. Before moving a processor from one partition to another, make sure that the partition from which you are moving the processor does not need that processor for performance requirements. Use the can spare processors.

Performance Tuning Guide

in the AIX documentation to help identify a partition that

Consider the following point for each step of the process before performing the task of moving a processor: v

Do you have more processors to move to another partition? You can move processors into or out of partitions as long as you do not exceed the minimum or maximum values for the partition. Ensure that you can add processors to the target partition (maximum value not exceeded) and that the moving of a processor into a partition does not violate any software license requirements. If you need to move more processors, repeat the process.

Start

HMC:

Select partition containing processors you want to move

Select menu for dynamic reconfiguration of processors

Enter the quantity of processors to move

More processors to move to other partitions? Yes

No

End

26

pSeries: Planning for Partitioned-System Operations

Removing a Processor

Removing a processor from a partition allows you to make processors available to be used by another partition. Before you remove a processor from a partition, prioritize your partitions and try to remove the processor from your lowest-priority partition that has available processors. Prioritizing your partitions helps you minimize the impact to the source partition.

If all of the processors have bound applications, then it might not be possible to remove a processor.

Whenever you perform dynamic remove operations, remember that it might be easier to remove a processor from another partition than to reconfigure applications.

v

The following flowchart shows the basic steps needed to remove processors from an operational partition.

Before performing the operation to remove processors, see the following flowchart and planning considerations. Use the

Performance Tuning Guide

that can spare a processor.

in the AIX documentation to help identify a partition

Is the processor count less than the partition profile minimum? If you attempt to remove processors from a partition, and the total number of processors that would remain is fewer than the minimum number specified in the partition’s profile, the operation will not complete. If this occurs, you must remove a processor from a different partition or reset the partition’s minimum value for processors.

Start

HMC:

Select partition containing processors you want to remove

Select processors

Type number of processors to remove

Does processor count drop below minimum profile amounts?

No

Yes

End

Edit profile properties or remove fewer processors

Chapter 4. Planning for Dynamic Logical Partitioning Updates

27

Adding Memory

The following flowchart shows the basic steps needed to add memory to a partition that is already operational. Before adding memory to a partition, review the flowchart and the planning considerations.

v

Consider the following points for each step of the process before performing the task of dynamically adding memory to a partition: v

Is additional unused memory available? To answer this question, use the HMC to check the system for available memory. Determine if memory is available for use in an existing partition. A new application on a partition might require more memory, or there might be performance benefits to increasing the amount of memory that is available to a partition. Refer to your application documentation for recommendations. Refer to the

Performance Tuning Guide

in the AIX documentation to help determine if the partition is doing excessive paging.

Does the new memory amount exceed the maximum amount of memory in the profile? Plan ahead to add memory as needed. When moving memory into a partition, the system allows only as much memory to be added to a partition as is allowed by the profile maximum. If you plan to add memory to a partition and the partition is already at or near its maximum, change the partition profile to increase the maximum and then reboot.

v

Does the new memory size require larger paging space? Check the applications for paging-space requirements. If necessary, use the operating system to change the paging-space parameters. When planning the memory values for the partition, plan the paging space using the following formula. The maximum amount of paging space that is required in the worst case, assuming that the partition is configured with the maximum amount of memory that is allowed by the partition profile. To this amount, add the difference between the maximum and the minimum. To avoid rebooting the partition to change the maximum memory amount, determine the maximum amount of memory needed during your planning for the partition.

v

Is memory available from other partitions? If you find that there is not enough available memory for the target partition, you may be able to get memory from other partitions. If a partition is not being used or if a partition has more memory than is needed, make the memory available to other partitions as required.

v

Does the system have room for more physical memory? If you cannot locate enough memory on your system to fulfill all your partition requirements, contact your sales representative to order additional memory.

v

Do you have more memory to add to another partition? You can move memory into or out of partitions at any time. If you are in the process of moving memory, repeat the process for any additional memory moves you might need to perform.

28

pSeries: Planning for Partitioned-System Operations

Start

Additional memory is needed for a partition

Is additional unused memory available?

No

Is memory available from other partitions?

No

Yes

Yes

Go to

Move

Memory

Does the system have room for more physical memory?

Yes

Purchase and install memory, return to

Start

No

Review your partition requirements, if possible, schedule partition loads to allow memory to be moved, go to Move Memory

HMC:

Select partition to add memory

Select menus:

Dynamic configuration of memory

DLPAR dialog:

Enter amount of memory to add to partition

Greater than the maximum amount of memory in the profile?

Yes

Reduce the amount of memory, or update the partition profile, reboot and try again

No

End

Chapter 4. Planning for Dynamic Logical Partitioning Updates

29

Moving Memory

The following flowchart shows the basic steps needed to move memory from one operational partition to another operational partition. Before performing the operation to move memory, review the following planning considerations and flowchart.

v

Is memory available in the source partition? Use the HMC to check other partitions to determine if there is enough memory available in those partitions for use in the partition where you need the extra memory. A new application on a partition might require more memory, or there may be performance benefits to increasing the memory that is available to a partition. Refer to your application documentation for recommendations.

v

Are minimum or maximum profile amounts exceeded? Plan ahead to move memory as needed. Do not allow the moved memory to cause the target partition to exceed the profile maximum for memory. In addition, the source partition’s minimum memory amount cannot fall below the minimum memory amount that is assigned.

v

Does the new memory size require larger paging space? Check your applications for paging-space requirements. If necessary, use the operating system to change the paging-space parameters. For more

information about paging space, see “Adding Memory” on page 28.

Start

Calculate memory needs

HMC:

Select partition containing memory you want to move

Select menus:

Dynamic Configuration of memory

DLPAR dialog:

Enter amount of memory to add to the target partition

Are profile amounts exceeded?

Yes

Edit profile properties, reboot.

End

30

pSeries: Planning for Partitioned-System Operations

Removing Memory

The following flowchart shows the basic steps needed to remove memory from an operational partition.

Removing memory from partitions is a convenient way to have the memory needed to start new partitions.

Before performing the operation to remove memory, consider the impacts to the partitions from which you remove memory.

v

Is memory available from a partition? Use the HMC to check other partitions to determine if there is enough memory available in those partitions for use in the partition where you need the extra memory.

A new application on a partition might require more memory, or there may be performance benefits to increasing the memory that is available to another partition. Refer to your application documentation for recommendations.

v

Is the memory amount less than the partition profile minimum? Plan ahead to move memory as needed. The remove memory operation will fail if the source partition’s memory amount falls below the minimum memory amount that is assigned.

Start

Determine need to reduce memory

HMC:

Select partition containing memory to be removed

Select menus:

Dynamic

Reconfiguration of memory

Type the amount of memory you want to remove

Has the source partition memory dropped below the minimum?

Yes

No

End

Edit profile properties, reboot

Chapter 4. Planning for Dynamic Logical Partitioning Updates

31

Adding an Adapter

The following flowchart shows the basic steps needed to dynamically add an adapter to a partition that is already operational. If the adapter is a hot-plug capable adapter, the adapter can be installed in the system and then added to a partition. Before adding an adapter to a partition, review the flowchart and the planning considerations.

v

Is the adapter already installed? If the adapter is not installed in the system, install the adapter hardware now and then perform the steps to add it to a partition.

v

Do you want to permanently add the adapter to the partition profile? If the adapter is to be permanently used by a partition, update the partition profile to include the new adapter.

Start

Additional PCI adapter is needed for a partition

Is the adapter installed and available?

Yes

No

OS: Run hot-plug procedures to identify slot, verify slot location

OS: Use hot-plug procedures to power off slot, install adapter

OS: Use hot-plug procedures to power on slot

HMC:

Select target LPAR, then from menu select Dynamic

Config/IO Slots

Select adapter to add to LPAR

Add permanently to LPAR profile?

Yes

HMC: Add to profile as required

No

Use OS tools or commands to make the device available, mount, etc.

HMC: Update Service

Focal Point with new LPAR configuration

End

32

pSeries: Planning for Partitioned-System Operations

Moving an Adapter

The following flowchart shows the basic steps needed to move an adapter from one operational partition to another operational partition. Before performing the operation to move an adapter, review the flowchart and the planning considerations.

v

Is the adapter in use? Before moving an I/O adapter from one partition to another, ensure that the adapter is available in the source partition from which you are moving the adapter. Use the operating system tools to make the adapters available.

v

Must the adapter be physically moved? As adapters are assigned to different partitions, you might want to move an adapter to a different I/O slot. If you decide to physically move a hot-plug adapter, the

PCI adapter hot-plug procedures that are available in the installation or user’s documentation for your system, allow this to be done without rebooting partitions.

v

Are you trying to move a required adapter? Some of the adapters installed for use in a partition are required to be in the partition. Before deciding to move an adapter that is required by a partition, check to ensure that the adapter can be moved.

v

Do you want to permanently add the adapter to a partition profile? If the adapter is to be permanently used by a partition, update the partition profile to include the new adapter.

Start

Plan to move a PCI adapter between partitions

Is the adapter in use?

Yes

No

HMC:

Select source

LPAR then from menu, select Dynamic

Configuration of

Adapters

Select LPAR to move adapter to; select adapter to move

OS: Use OS tools or commands to put the adapter into the defined state

Choose a different adapter to move

Are you trying to move a required adapter?

No

Yes

Add permanently to partition

Profile?

Yes

HMC:

Add adapter to profile as required

No

Use OS tools or commands to make the device available, mount, etc.

Use OS tools or commands to make the device available, mount, etc.

End

Chapter 4. Planning for Dynamic Logical Partitioning Updates

33

Removing a PCI Adapter

The following flowchart shows the basic steps needed to remove a PCI adapter from an operational partition. You might want to remove an adapter from a partition because: v

You are preparing to start a partition that needs a certain adapter.

v

You are upgrading your system.

Before performing the task of removing an adapter, review the flowchart and the planning considerations.

v

Is the adapter in use? Before removing I/O adapters, ensure that the adapter is available. If necessary, use the operating system tools to change the adapter state to defined.

v

Must the adapter be physically moved? As adapters are assigned to different partitions, you might want to move an adapter to a different I/O slot. If you decide to physically move a hot-plug adapter, the

PCI adapter hot-plug procedures that are available in the installation or user’s documentation for your system allow this to be done without rebooting partitions.

v

Are you trying to move a required adapter? Some of the adapters installed for use in a partition are required for that partition. Before deciding to remove an adapter that is required by a partition, verify that the adapter can be removed.

Start

OS: on source partition determine if the adapter is in use.

Is the adapter in use?

Yes

No

OS: Use OS tools or commands to put the adapter into the defined state

Must the adapter be physically removed?

Yes

No

HMC:

Select source LPAR then from menu, select Dynamic

Configuration of

Adapters

Select adapter to remove then press enter.

HMC: Select a different adapter is not required

Are you trying to remove a required adapter?

End

No

Yes

OS: Run hotplug procedures to identify slot, verify slot location, and deconfigure adapter

Use hot-plug procedures to power off slot, remove adapter

34

pSeries: Planning for Partitioned-System Operations

Managing Devices

When you need to add, move, or remove a device such as a SCSI device, you will need to perform those actions for these devices using the PCI slot that contains the adapter to which the devices are connected.

For example, to move the CD-ROM device that is attached to a SCSI adapter in a partition, you will need to move the adapter slot for the SCSI adapter from one partition to another. If the CD-ROM is attached to an integrated component (typically at least one SCSI adapter is integrated on a system board or I/O board) the slot that represents the integrated adapter is likewise moved.

Chapter 4. Planning for Dynamic Logical Partitioning Updates

35

36

pSeries: Planning for Partitioned-System Operations

Chapter 5. Processor on Demand

The Processor On Demand (POD) feature of some IBM servers allows the server to be manufactured with extra processor capacity built in, ready to be activated when you need it. If your system is ordered with processor on demand features, you can activate the features and pay for the increased processing power as your needs grow.

The processor on demand feature enables you to start small, and then increase your processing capacity without disrupting any of your current operations.

For information about how to activate processor on demand features on your server, refer to “Activating

Process for Processor on Demand” on page 39, or refer to the

IBM Hardware Management Console for pSeries Installation and Operations Guide

, order number SA38-0590 that was delivered with your hardware management console.

The processor on demand feature offers the capability to non-disruptively activate two or more processors on a server that was ordered and installed with inactive processor on demand features. The processor on demand feature adds capacity in increments of two processors, up to the maximum number of standby processors. The processor on demand feature adds significant value if you want to upgrade without disruption, handle business peaks, or add new workloads. The processor on demand feature adds permanent capacity growth with no requirement to reboot the server.

Processor on Demand Features

If your system was ordered with processor on demand features, your managed system has a set of processors that are

″ active

″ and a set of standby processors that are

″ not active.

In the event that an active processor fails, the inactive processors are then available to be used by the system until the failing processor is replaced.

Processor on Demand Activation Features

Standby processors (two or more) can be permanently activated by ordering a quantity of permanent processor on demand activation features. This order is filled when your service provider receives your request, generates an activation code, and delivers it to you. Activation codes can be delivered to you through postal mail and they are posted on the Web.

Capacity Planning

If you are doing capacity planning for models offering processor on demand, plan ahead for any potentially disruptive actions that might inhibit your using fully the capacity of the activated processors. Some actions you may want to take prior to activating any processor on demand features are as follows: v

Perform any I/O updates, such as adding adapters necessary to increase system capacity v

Perform memory upgrades v

Prepare LPAR partitions

By planning ahead, you can accommodate the growth of existing workloads, as well as handle new workloads without requiring a server outage. Other components of a server such as memory and I/O affect performance and overall throughput of workloads. By planning ahead and taking into account the complete server configuration, you can help ensure that you get the full benefit of processor on demand activations.

Note: If you have questions about capacity-planning topics not covered here, contact your sales representative for assistance.

37

Processor on Demand Ordering

Permanent processor-on-demand capacity can be activated in either of the following scenarios. The description of each of the following scenarios highlights if and when it is necessary to send vital product data (VPD) to IBM.

v

New system order (new footprint): An order can contain a number of processor on demand activation features. The manufacturing facility fills orders directly at the plant of manufacture, before the server is delivered to the customer.

v

Ordering activation features for an installed server: After you have determined that you want to permanently activate some or all of your standby processors, contact your business partner or sales representative to place an order.

When the order record and the VPD are both available to the manufacturing facility, a processor on demand activation code unique to your server is generated. The activation code is mailed to you and posted at a public Web site for quick access: http://www.ibm.com/servers/eserver/pseries/cuod/index.html

As part of the order process, VPD collected from the installed server is combined with information from the actual order records for processor on demand activation features. This combined information is used to generate a processor on demand activation code specifically for your server, enabling the activation of the desired number of standby processors. Allow some time for the order processing and posting of the processor on demand activation code to take place. Then use the code to activate the processor on demand features directly on your server.

Processor on demand activation features will not be fulfilled until you submit the VPD through the

Electronic Service Agent or manually to the following Web site: http://www.ibm.com/servers/eserver/pseries/cuod/index.html

When you enter a processor on demand activation code, standby processors will immediately become activated for use. After their status changes from Standby to Active, the processors can be dynamically moved to the partition where they are needed.

Electronic Service Agent and Processor on Demand

When Electronic Service Agent is used to electronically report VPD on a regular basis, you can eliminate potential delays in the order process for processor on demand activation features (no manual reporting of

VPD is necessary prior to the fulfillment of a feature upgrade order). To best utilize Electronic Service

Agent and to be prepared to activate processor on demand features conveniently, make sure that

Electronic Service Agent and related communications requirements are up and running. If this is done before the processor on demand activation features are ordered, the VPD for the system will already be up to date, and the manual process of updating the VPD is not needed.

After Electronic Service Agent is installed, follow the procedures under “Activating Process for Processor on Demand” on page 39 to enable the system to collect and transfer the required VPD for processor on

demand.

If a processor on demand activation feature is ordered and then canceled, an action by the service representative is required to cancel the order. After the activation code is posted on the Web or mailed, the order for processor on demand activation features is considered fulfilled, and the downstream billing process is started.

Dynamic Processor Sparing

In environments with CUoD, Dynamic Processor Sparing allows inactive processors to act as “dynamic spares”. An inactive processor is transparently activated if a failing processor reaches a predetermined error threshold, thus helping to maintain performance and improve system availability. Starting with AIX 5L

V5.2, this capability is offered on pSeries servers with CUoD to help minimize the impact to server

38

pSeries: Planning for Partitioned-System Operations

performance caused by a failed processor. This will happen dynamically and automatically when using

DLPAR and the failing processor is detected prior to failure. If not detected prior to failure or not using

DLPAR, a reboot of the system will bring onboard an alternate processor from the inactive spares. The user can then re-establish required performance levels without waiting for parts to arrive on-site. Dynamic

Processor Sparing does not require the purchase of an Activation Code, it only requires the system have inactive CUoD processors available.

Software Licenses and Processor on Demand

Activating a processor may change the terms and conditions for applications that you use on your server.

Consult the application documentation to determine if the license terms and conditions requirements change based on hardware configuration.

Activating Process for Processor on Demand

The processor on demand process begins when you determine a potential need for more processing capability in the future and want to have the hardware installed on the server now. If processor on demand features are ordered for your server, they are included in the server when it is delivered. When additional processors become a necessity, use the following steps to activate them:

1. Determine the number of standby processors you want to activate.

2. Contact your sales representative or business partner to place an order for particular processor on demand activation features.

3. The sales representative places an order to the system coordinator or feature coordinator for the specific number of processor on demand activation features. The order specifies the number of additional processors you have requested to add.

4. To process the order, you must send the system Vital Product Data (VPD) to IBM in either of the following ways: v

Electronic process (Electronic Service Agent) v

Web-based VPD entry:

For details on how to submit the VPD either through the Electronic Service Agent or using the Web system go to the following Web site and locate the document

Planning Guide for Capacity Upgrade on

Demand

. The planning guide provides detailed procedures.

http://www.ibm.com/servers/eserver/pseries/cuod/index.html

5. After the Activation Code is received (either from the Web or the mailed copy), enter the Activation

Code using the HMC. Detailed procedures are available in the document

Planning Guide for Capacity

Upgrade on Demand

.

6. Once you have finished the acivation process, you can assign the activated processors to a partition. If you are using dynamic partitioning (DLPAR), you need not reboot the system to use the processors. If you are not using DLPAR, you must reboot the managed system before the newly activated processors can be used.

Before adding processors to a partition that is running Linux, you must stop Linux partitions and then restart them after you have assigned the processors.

Begin using the new processor capacity. If you encountered any problems using the preceding process, see the following Web site: http://www.ibm.com/servers/eserver/pseries/cuod/index.html

Chapter 5. Processor on Demand

39

40

pSeries: Planning for Partitioned-System Operations

Appendix A. Notices

This information was developed for products and services offered in the U.S.A.

The manufacturer may not offer the products, services, or features discussed in this document in other countries. Consult the manufacturer’s representative for information on the products and services currently available in your area. Any reference to the manufacturer’s product, program, or service is not intended to state or imply that only that product, program, or service may be used. Any functionally equivalent product, program, or service that does not infringe any intellectual property right of the manufacturer may be used instead. However, it is the user’s responsibility to evaluate and verify the operation of any product, program, or service.

The manufacturer may have patents or pending patent applications covering subject matter described in this document. The furnishing of this document does not give you any license to these patents. You can send license inquiries, in writing, to the manufacturer.

The following paragraph does not apply to the United Kingdom or any country where such

provisions are inconsistent with local law: THIS MANUAL IS PROVIDED

AS IS

WITHOUT

WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EITHER EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO,

THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF NON-INFRINGEMENT, MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A

PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Some states do not allow disclaimer of express or implied warranties in certain transactions; therefore, this statement may not apply to you.

This information could include technical inaccuracies or typographical errors. Changes are periodically made to the information herein; these changes will be incorporated in new editions of the publication. The manufacturer may make improvements and/or changes in the product(s) and/or the program(s) described in this publication at any time without notice.

Information concerning products made by other than the manufacturer was obtained from the suppliers of those products, their published announcements, or other publicly available sources. The manufacturer has not tested those products and cannot confirm the accuracy of performance, compatibility or any other claims related to products made by other than the manufacturer. Questions on the capabilities of products made by other than the manufacturer should be addressed to the suppliers of those products.

41

42

pSeries: Planning for Partitioned-System Operations

Appendix B. Worksheets for Partition Configuration Planning

This appendix contains worksheets that you can use when planning for partition configuration. Make copies of these worksheets, and be sure to complete the worksheets for each partition that you plan to create.

43

13

14

15

16

9

10

11

12

7

8

5

6

3

4

1

2

Partition Properties Worksheet

Complete both of the the following worksheets for each partition that you plan to set up on your system:

1 of 2

Partition

Number

Partition

Name

Processor

Minimum/

Desired/

Maximum

Memory Size

Minimum/

Desired/

Maximum (in

GB)

Required

Network

Adapter

Disk Drives Comments

Totals (see note 1 below)

Total Installed

Notes:

1. The total memory size should leave enough room for various system overheads of memory usage.

See the memory requirements table on page 16

44

pSeries: Planning for Partitioned-System Operations

12

13

14

15

16

8

9

10

11

6

7

4

5

1

2

3

2 of 2

Partition Number Partition Host

Name

Networking

Configuration

Application

Stack Software

Levels

Availability

Requirements

Comments (new deployment or migration environment?)

Appendix B. Worksheets for Partition Configuration Planning

45

I/O Drawer Resource Worksheet

I/O drawers can be installed in different locations. Make a copy of the following worksheet for each I/O drawer in your managed system configuration based on the location code for that drawer. Use the worksheet copy to keep a record of slot usage for each adapter installed in each drawer.

I/O Drawer Location and Serial Number

U__.__

P1-I10

Px/Z1

Px/Z2

Px-I1

Px-I2

Px-I3

Px-I4

Px-I5

Px-I6

Px-I7

Px-I8

Px-I9

Px-I10

P1-I5

P1-I6

P1-I7

P1-I8

P1-I9

Adapter Slot

Physical Location

P1/Z1

P1/Z2

P1-I1

P1-I2

P1-I3

P1-I4

Adapter Type Partition

Assignment

Comments

46

pSeries: Planning for Partitioned-System Operations

System Profile Worksheet

Make a copy of this worksheet to keep track of the resources in the system profiles you create. Create a new worksheet for each additional system profile.

System Profile Name

Activation Times

Partition Name Number of Desired Processors Desired Memory Size

(see Note 1 below)

Partition 1

Partition 2

Partition 3

Partition 3

Partition 4

Partition 5

Partition 6

Partition 7

Partition 8

Partition 9

Partition 10

Partition 11

Partition 12

Partition 13

Partition 14

Partition 15

Partition 16

Totals:

Total Installed:

Notes:

1. The desired memory size amount should leave enough room for the various system overheads of

memory usage, see the memory requirements table on page 16.

Appendix B. Worksheets for Partition Configuration Planning

47

48

pSeries: Planning for Partitioned-System Operations

Index

A

activating process

processor on demand 39

activation features

processor on demand 37

adapter

moving 33

adding

adapter 32

memory 28

processors 24

affinity logical partitioning 9 overview 9

availability requirements 18

B

basic LPAR planning checklist 12

benefits

of logical partitioning 10

C

capacity planning

processor on demand 37

D

detailed LPAR planning checklist 14

devices

managing 35

documentation overview 3

dynamic logical partitioning

overview 9

dynamic processor sparing 38

E

electronic service agent 38

F

full system partition 9

I

I/O drawer resource planning worksheet example 20

I/O drawer resource planning worksheet instructions 20

L

logical partitioning 8

adding a processor 24

adding an adapter 32

adding memory 28

logical partitioning (continued)

affinity 9

basic planning checklist 12

benefits 10

detailed planning checklist 14

dynamic 9 full system partition 9

I/O drawer resource planning worksheet example 20

I/O drawer resource planning worksheet instructions 20

identification phase 11

moving an adapter 33

moving memory 30

moving processors 26

operating in 7 overview 7

partition properties planning worksheet example 19

partition properties planning worksheet instructions 18

planning 10

planning for updates 23

planning worksheet instructions 16

removing a PCI adapter 34

removing a processor 27

removing memory 31

system profile planning worksheet instructions 21

using the planning worksheets 16

LPAR planning worksheet instructions 16

M

managing devices 35

memory

adding 28

moving 30

removing 31

moving

adapter 33

memory 30

processors 26

O

online publications

v, 2

overview

documentation 3

partitioning 7

P

partition properties planning worksheet example 19

partition properties planning worksheet instructions 18

partitioning overview 7

PCI adapter

removing 34

49

permanent capacity on demand

overview 10

planning for logical partitioning

basic LPAR checklist 12

detailed LPAR checklist 14

I/O drawer resource worksheet example 20

I/O drawer resource worksheet instructions 20

identification phase 11

partition properties worksheet example 19

partition properties worksheet instructions 18

system profile worksheet instructions 21

using the worksheets 16

worksheet completion phase 11

worksheet instructions 16

planning worksheets 41

processor features

processor on demand 37

processor on demand

activating process 39

activation features 37 capacity planning 37

dynamic processor sparing 38

overview 35

processor features 37

service agent 38

software licenses 39

processor sparing, dynamic 38

processors

adding 24

moving 26

removing 27

publications

online 2

publications, online v

R

removing

a PCI adapter 34

memory 31

processors 27

requirements, availability 18

S

service agent

processor on demand 38

system profile planning worksheet instructions 21

W

worksheets, planning 41

50

pSeries: Planning for Partitioned-System Operations

Readers’ Comments — We’d Like to Hear from You

pSeries

Planning for Partitioned-System Operations

Publication No. SA38-0626-00

Overall, how satisfied are you with the information in this book?

Overall satisfaction

Very Satisfied h

Satisfied h

Neutral h

How satisfied are you that the information in this book is:

Accurate

Complete

Easy to find

Easy to understand

Well organized

Applicable to your tasks

Very Satisfied h h h h h h

Satisfied h h h h h h

Please tell us how we can improve this book:

Neutral h h h h h h

Dissatisfied h

Very Dissatisfied h

Dissatisfied h h h h h h

Very Dissatisfied h h h h h h

Thank you for your responses. May we contact you?

h

Yes h

No

When you send comments to IBM, you grant IBM a nonexclusive right to use or distribute your comments in any way it believes appropriate without incurring any obligation to you.

Address Name

Company or Organization

Phone No.

Readers’ Comments — We’d Like to Hear from You

SA38-0626-00

IBMR

Cut or Fold

Along Line

Please do not staple

BUSINESS REPLY MAIL

FIRST-CLASS MAIL PERMIT NO. 40 ARMONK, NEW YORK

POSTAGE WILL BE PAID BY ADDRESSEE

Information Development

Department H6DS-905-6C006

11501 Burnet Road

Austin, TX 78758-3493

Fold and Tape

NO POSTAGE

NECESSARY

IF MAILED IN THE

UNITED STATES

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Fold and Tape

Please do not staple

Fold and Tape

SA38-0626-00

Cut or Fold

Along Line

IBMR

Printed in U.S.A.

SA38-0626-00

Was this manual useful for you? yes no
Thank you for your participation!

* Your assessment is very important for improving the work of artificial intelligence, which forms the content of this project

Download PDF

advertisement

Table of contents