JBC Hearing

JBC Hearing
DEPARTMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION
FY 2014-15 JOINT BUDGET COMMITTEE HEARING AGENDA
Thursday, December 12, 2013
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Legislative Services Building Hearing Room A
9:00-9:40
DEPARTMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION
Questions Common To All Departments
1. Please describe how the department responds to inquiries that are made to the department.
How does the department ensure that all inquiries receive a timely and accurate response?
The Department of Higher Education strives to provide excellent customer service in response
to all inquiries or complaints. In addition to providing support and service to Colorado’s
institutions of higher education, the department also provides direct service and assistance to
students when necessary. For inquires of the department, issues are directed to the specific
division or staff who can provide responses to the questions. As it relates to complaints, the
department has an on-line process which allows individuals to file their grievance which is
directed and resolved by the appropriate staff depending on the type of institution and the
specific complaint or issue. This process allows the department to track complaints and
ensure that they are being addressed and resolved as timely as possible. The department’s
complaint policy and process is noted below.
Complaint Policy
To file a complaint against a Colorado institution (public or private) or report a possible
diploma mill or illegal school, follow the steps below to determine your next step in reporting
a complaint/grievance to the Colorado Department of Higher Education.
For additional information about diploma mills and illegal schools, including a list of all
accredited institutions and programs recognized in the U.S., view this Council for Higher
Education Accreditation (CHEA) website. Click Here
Read through the process completely before continuing with the process.
If you are filing a complaint...
STEP 1: Have you filed a complaint/grievance at your institution? Before submitting a
complaint with the Department of Higher Education, you must exhaust opportunities
for resolution at your institution. If the institutional procedure has been utilized with
no resolution, proceed to STEP 2.
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NOTE: There is no similar filing requirement that a student must first exhaust a
private occupational school’s internal grievance procedure before filing a complaint
with the Division of Private Occupational Schools, although attempting a resolution
before filing is strongly encouraged.
STEP 2: If the issue is with a Colorado public higher education institution, review the
Department of Higher Education's student appeals FAQ and policy.
If the issue is with a Colorado private or occupational institution, be aware that
Colorado Law, Rules and Regulations concerning the regulation of private
occupational schools (12-59-118), Complaints of Deceptive Trade or Sales Practices,
states in part that, “A complaint filed under this section is a public record subject to the
provisions of article 72 of title 24, C.R.S., and shall be filed within two years after the
student discontinues his/her training at the school.”
STEP 3: Once an understanding has been established between the student/complainant and the
Department of Higher Education. Complete and submit the online complaint form.
STEP 4: Division personnel will review the information provided, and where appropriate an
investigation will be initiated. On all matters, this agency will either investigate the
complaint or will send it directly to another agency that is authorized to address the
concerns. If academic or personal records from the institution are required to
investigate the complaint, you will be required to submit signed authorization
permitting the school/institution to release records to us.
If you are reporting a diploma mill...
STEP 1: Read the definition of a diploma mill or illegal school at the Department of Education.
Click Here Once you have confirmed that this definition fits your scenario, proceed to
Step 2...
STEP 2: Complete and submit the online complaint form to report a diploma mill or illegal
school. When prompted to select a school, choose the 'Not Listed' option to enter your
specific information.
STEP 3: Division personnel will review the information provided, and where appropriate an
investigation will be initiated. On all matters, this agency will either investigate the
complaint or will send it directly to another agency that is authorized to address the
concerns. If academic or personal records from the institution are required to
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investigate the complaint, you will be required to submit signed authorization
permitting the school/institution to release records to us.
Questions for the Department of Higher Education
Trends: Tuition, Enrollment, Performance
2. Compare increases in tuition between the early 2000s recession and most recent recession.
How did S.B. 10-003 impact tuition and institutions’ revenue in the most recent recession?
The chart below shows the tuition increases during the last two recessions, from FY 2001-02
to FY 2003-04 and from FY 2008-09 to FY 2013-14. The tuition increases during the
recession in the early 2000s were slightly smaller than those during the most recent recession.
This can be explained in large part by looking at the decreases in General Fund during the
earlier recession compared to the recent one. From the time period of FY 2000-2001 to FY
2003-04, General Fund appropriations to institutions of higher education (in 2013 dollars)
decreased by 23%. General Fund appropriations decreased by 30% during the most recent
period of state funding reductions, FY 2009-10 to FY 2012-13.
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Change in Resident Undergraduate Tuition During Recessions:
FY 2001 to FY 2004 and FY 2009 to FY 2013
2001-02
2002-03
2003-04
2008-09
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
2013-14
Institution
Dollar Percent Dollar Percent Dollar Percent
Change Change Change Change Change Change
Dollar Percent Dollar Percent Dollar Percent Dollar Percent Dollar Percent Dollar Percent
Change Change Change Change Change Change Change Change Change Change Change Change
University of Colorado - Boulder
$100
4.0%
$162
6.2%
$416 15.0%
$504
9.3%
$524
8.8%
$572
8.9%
$654
9.3%
$384
5.0%
$704
8.7%
University of Colorado - Colorado Springs
$192
8.4%
$260 10.4%
$274 10.0%
$390
7.5%
$270
4.8%
$420
7.2%
$450
7.2%
$330
4.9%
$420
6.0%
University of Colorado - Denver
$192
8.4%
$262 10.5%
$276 10.0%
$430
8.5%
$228
4.2%
$504
8.8%
$560
9.0% $1,204 17.8%
$480
6.0%
Colorado State University
$94
3.9%
$153
6.1%
$253
9.5%
$384
9.5%
$398
9.0%
$434
9.0% $1,051 20.0%
$568
9.0%
$619
9.0%
Colorado State University - Pueblo
$80
4.1%
$120
6.2%
$229 11.1%
$238
7.5%
$310
9.1%
$336
9.0%
$524
12.9%
$902
19.6%
$0
0.0%
Fort Lewis College
$68
3.9%
$110
6.1%
$118
6.2%
$198
7.5%
$256
9.0%
$278
9.0%
$668
19.8%
$752
18.6%
$432
9.0%
University of Northern Colorado
$83
4.0%
$135
6.3%
$230 10.0%
$342
9.5%
$354
9.0%
$384
8.9%
$620
13.2%
$164
3.1%
$284
5.2%
Adams State University
$62
3.9%
$76
4.6%
$86
5.0%
$168
7.2%
$216
8.7%
$240
8.8%
$360
12.2%
$504
15.2% $1,056 27.7%
Colorado Mesa University
$65
4.0%
$79
4.7%
$88
5.0%
$432
11.1%
$367
8.5%
$788 16.8%
$300
5.5%
$322
5.6%
$336
5.5%
Metropolitan State University of Denver
$70
4.0%
$87
4.7%
$96
5.0%
$183
7.5%
$235
9.0%
$320 11.2%
$639
20.2%
$495
13.0%
$387
9.0%
Western State Colorado University
$62
4.0%
$76
4.7%
$85
5.0%
$192
7.1%
$260
9.0%
$282
9.0%
$500
14.6%
$705
18.0%
$648
14.0%
$190
4.0%
$306
6.2%
$454
8.7%
$851
9.5%
$780
8.0%
$960
9.1% $1,035 9.0% $1,005 8.0%
$810
6.0%
$69
4.0%
$86
4.8%
$94
5.0%
$115
5.0%
$219
9.0%
$239
9.0%
$202
6.0%
$102
4.66%
$147
6.28%
$208
8.12%
Colorado School of Mines
Colorado Community College System
Average Tuition Increase
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$341
8.21%
$340
8.15%
$443 9.59%
Higher Education-hearing
$288
10.0%
$588 12.52%
$207
6.5%
$580 11.10%
$491 8.62%
The deeper cuts to state higher education state support funding during the most recent
recession and continued economic uncertainty created a need for greater tuition setting
flexibility as reflected in the passage of Senate Bill 10-003 which granted the public
institutions the ability to increase resident undergraduate tuition by up to 9 percent over the
prior year and higher pending the approval of a financial accountability plan. One of the
impacts of cuts to operating funding and increased tuition was the acceleration of the reliance
on tuition and fee funding system wide as illustrated in the following table:
In FY 2000-01, the student’s share of revenues was 32% and the state’s share was 68%. For
FY 2013-14, these percentages have switched, with tuition making up 68% and the state’s
share being 32%. When looking specifically at the three years since the passage of S.B. 10003, in FY 2009-10 the state and student split the cost of college almost down the middle at
50%. Four years later, in FY 2013-14, the state share of the costs had decreased by 18% and
the students share had increased by the same amount.
3. How did student enrollment growth compare during the last two recessions? Are populations
stabilizing or declining now that the recession is easing?
Overall, resident enrollment growth (FTE) during the last two recessions (FY 2002 through
FY 2004 and FY 2009 through FY 2011) was very similar, with total growth from the
beginning to the end of the recessions of about fifteen percent. During the most recent
recession, the majority of resident enrollment growth occurred between FY 2009 to FY 2010,
with an additional 14,234 FTE in FY 2010, an increase of 9.8%. However, in the earlier
recession, the resident enrollment growth occurred at a steadier rate, with the largest
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increase of 8,414 FTE, or 6.6%, occurring from FY 2002 to FY 2003. See Table One below
for a detailed breakdown of resident enrollment changes during the last two recessions.
While enrollment has been decreasing the previous two years, it is likely that this is due to a
stabilization of campus populations after the last recession created an artificial spike in
resident enrollment. As illustrated in Table Two below, in the last year before the recession,
FY 2007-08, total enrollment was 140,604 FTE. Five years later, in FY 2012-13, enrollment
had spiked to 160,980 FTE, even after two years of decreases in enrollment. Additionally,
over the last 20 years, the average annual increase in resident FTE has been 1.8%. During
the last recession, annual increases in resident FTE ranged from 2.8% to 9.8%, much larger
than the average annual increase of 1.8%. Therefore, it is expected that enrollment would dip
and then stabilize after such large increases during the recession.
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Table 1
Change in Enrollment During Recessions:
FY 2001 to FY 2004 and FY 2009 to FY 2013
2000-01
FTE
Change
2001-02
Percent
Change
FTE
Change
2002-03
Percent
Change
FTE
Change
2003-04
Percent
Change
FTE
Change
2008-09
Percent
Change
FTE
Change
1
2009-10
Percent
Change
FTE
Change
2010-11
Percent
Change
FTE
Change
2011-12
Percent
Change
FTE
Change
2012-13
Percent
Change
FTE
Change
Percent
Change
University of Colorado
System
287
1.0%
906
3.1%
2,182
7.2%
1,520
4.7%
507
1.4%
1,608
4.5%
-155
-0.4%
-280
-0.8%
-466
-1.3%
Colorado State University
System
-59
-0.3%
532
2.8%
755
3.8%
595
2.9%
533
2.6%
806
3.8%
645
2.9%
-286
-1.3%
-420
-1.9%
Community Colleges of
Colorado System
463
1.3%
1,867
5.2%
4,109
10.9%
2,659
6.3%
2,992
7.1%
8,485
18.9%
5,589
10.5%
-198
-0.3%
-3,321
-5.6%
Adams State University
-85
-4.5%
111
6.1%
46
2.4%
27
1.4%
-57
-3.3%
211
12.8%
92
5.0%
30
1.5%
-76
-3.8%
Colorado Mesa University
180
4.9%
147
3.8%
179
4.4%
125
3.0%
82
1.8%
738
16.3%
605
11.5%
459
7.8%
255
4.0%
Colorado School of Mines
-93
-4.0%
106
4.7%
128
5.4%
130
5.2%
99
3.3%
195
6.2%
40
1.2%
13
0.4%
60
1.8%
Fort Lewis College
-84
-3.0%
128
4.8%
-16
-0.6%
-57
-2.0%
-195
-7.4%
-19
-0.8%
-9
-0.4%
-109
-4.5%
-62
-2.7%
Metropolitan State
University of Denver
-97
-0.8%
915
7.7%
959
7.5%
458
3.3%
486
3.2%
1,154
7.4%
448
2.7%
-440
-2.6%
-517
-3.1%
51
0.6%
47
0.5%
333
3.7%
175
1.9%
-704
-7.5%
246
2.8%
135
1.5%
-67
-0.7%
-220
-2.5%
-67
-4.5%
67
4.7%
51
3.4%
68
4.4%
25
1.8%
-31
-2.1%
-25
-1.8%
-54
-3.9%
-7
-0.5%
52
0.9%
136
2.3%
-312
-5.1%
-389
-6.7%
205
4.1%
841
16.3%
436
7.2%
110
1.7%
-35
-0.5%
548
0.4%
4,963
4.0%
8,414
6.6%
5,311
3.9%
3,973
2.8%
14,234
9.8%
7,801
4.9%
-822
-0.5%
-4,809
-2.9%
University of Northern
Colorado
Western State Colorado
University
Local District Colleges
Total
1
Data includes FTE for resident undergraduate and graduate students from the annual FTE report.
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Table 2
Enrollment History During Recession
FY 2001 to FY 2004 and FY 2009 to FY 2013
2000-01
2001-02
2002-03
2003-04
2004-05
2005-06
2006-07
1
2007-08
2008-09
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
University of Colorado
System
29,258
30,164
32,346
33,866
34,571
34,842
34,792
35,184
35,691
37,299
37,144
36,864
36,398
Colorado State University
System
19,106
19,638
20,393
20,988
21,480
21,135
20,754
20,770
21,303
22,109
22,754
22,468
22,048
Community Colleges of
Colorado System
35,938
37,805
41,914
44,573
44,564
42,454
40,876
41,928
44,920
53,405
58,994
58,796
55,475
Adams State University
1,809
1,920
1,966
1,993
1,894
1,933
1,822
1,703
1,646
1,857
1,949
1,979
1,903
Colorado Mesa University
3,883
4,030
4,209
4,334
4,481
4,229
4,411
4,459
4,541
5,279
5,884
6,343
6,598
Colorado School of Mines
2,251
2,357
2,485
2,615
2,845
2,974
3,019
3,045
3,144
3,339
3,379
3,392
3,452
Fort Lewis College
2,672
2,800
2,784
2,727
2,733
2,656
2,644
2,621
2,426
2,407
2,398
2,289
2,227
11,846
12,761
13,720
14,178
14,627
14,686
14,744
15,135
15,621
16,775
17,223
16,783
16,266
University of Northern
Colorado
9,041
9,088
9,421
9,596
9,878
9,881
9,658
9,362
8,658
8,904
9,039
8,972
8,752
Western State Colorado
University
1,432
1,499
1,550
1,618
1,545
1,522
1,452
1,428
1,453
1,422
1,397
1,343
1,336
Local District Colleges
6,021
6,157
5,845
5,456
5,231
5,041
5,085
4,969
5,174
6,015
6,451
6,561
6,526
123,256
128,219
136,633
141,944
143,849
141,353
139,257
140,604
144,577
158,811
166,612
165,790
160,981
Metropolitan State
University of Denver
Total
1
Data includes FTE for resident undergraduate and graduate students from the annual FTE report.
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4. Is enrollment at some types of institutions more counter-cyclical than at others? Do
institutions that are more expensive lose students during recession because the students have
to pay more? Are there more students in school because there is less of a job market?
Percent change in resident undergraduate FTE over time
(Average FY 2012-2013 Tuition and Fees in parenthesis)
25.0%
20.0%
CSM ($15,654)
15.0%
UCB ($9,482)
UCD ($8,940)
10.0%
Top 4
highest
tuition &
fees, 4 year
public
CSU ($8,649)
WSCU ($6,449)
5.0%
ASU ($6,448)
MSUD ($5,341)
0.0%
CCCS ($3,737)
-5.0%
-10.0%
FY 07 to 08
FY 08 to 09
FY 09 to 10
FY 10 to 11
FY 11 to 12
FY 12 to 13
Enrollment in higher education, in general, tends to run counter-cyclical to economic conditions.
When the economy is contracting and fewer jobs are available, enrollment in higher education
tends to increase. However, when the economy begins to recover and jobs become more plentiful,
as is the current trend, some students may opt to suspend coursework and reenter the workforce.
Colorado specific data suggest that in the wake of the Great Recession, enrollment in public
Institutions did increase significantly. The Colorado Community College System (CCCS) saw the
largest percent change in resident FTE undergraduates from FY 2008-09 to FY 2009-10 (18.9%).
Adams State University (ASU) and Metropolitan State University of Denver (MSUD), which have
the lowest published tuition and fees for public four-year institutions in Colorado, also saw large
gains in FTE enrollment during that same time period (12.7% and 7.4% respectively). Four-year
institutions with higher tuition and fees such as Colorado School of Mines (CSM), University of
Colorado Boulder (UCB) and Colorado State University (CSU) had lower enrollment gains
(4.4%, 2.2% and 2.5% respectively) during the peak effects of the recession. The University of
Colorado Denver (UCD), which has the third highest tuition and fees for four-year public
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Higher Education-hearing
Bottom 3
lowest
tuition &
fees, 4 year
public
institutions, still saw significant gains in enrollment from FY 2008-09 to FY 2009-10 (7.3%), and
Western State Colorado University, which has low tuition and fees, saw no gains during that
period. Thus, when looking at four-year public institutions overall, less expensive institutions had
larger enrollment gains following the recession than more expensive institutions, but there are
clearly other factors at play than the economy that affect enrollment patterns (as evidenced by
UCD and WSCU). The clearest trend, nonetheless, is the surge in community college enrollment
in FY 2009-10 to 2010-11. These findings are substantiated by national trends.
The National Student Clearinghouse released a report in 2011 titled National Postsecondary
Enrollment Trends: Before, During, and After the Great Recession. The study looked at
enrollment patterns for the nation as whole and found significant increases in community college
enrollment, peaking in 2009 and declining in 2010. The report notes that the surge in community
college enrollment may have been driven by two groups of traditional-age students believed to
have entered community colleges in larger numbers during this time:
(1) students who, in a better economy, might have enrolled in other types of institutions but who
may have chosen to enroll in community colleges instead during the recession, possibly to save
money; and (2) students who, in a better economy, may have entered directly into the workforce
after high school but who during this period may have chosen to enter college instead. These
trends likely also reflect strategies employed by community colleges during this time, such as
targeted marketing campaigns, as well as increased federal investment in the Pell grant program.
(NSC, 2011, 6)
Another reason for increased enrollment at community colleges is that there was an increased
need for adults—who may have been laid off during the recession—to return to college to get
retrained or to learn new skills. The report continues on to explain the effects of increases in
enrollment and subsequent declines:
Enrollment declines at community colleges in 2010 coincided with the strains on capacity faced
by many institutions during the 2009 surges in enrollment, as well as with the initial turn toward
economic recovery. These findings underscore the importance of enhancing vertical transfer
pathways for students who are entering community colleges as a first step toward a bachelor’s
degree. In addition, they help point to the need for continued state support and enhanced
structural development within the two-year public sector. (NSC, 2011, 6)
Since 2012, enrollment flattened by about 5,000 FTE. All higher education institutions are
impacted to some degree but the trend is that open access institutions are impacted to a greater
extent than four year or research institutions. The Colorado Community College System and
Metropolitan State University of Denver, have experienced more dramatic swings of 5.6% and
3.1% in FY 2012-13 respectively because their student populations are more likely to feel the
pressure to move back to gainful employment once the workforce adequately recovers. Less
impacted are four year and research institutions, in part because they did not experience the
same enrollment increases during the Great Recession.
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Sources:
Colorado Department of Higher Education, FTE Student Enrollment Report, 2013.
Colorado Department of Higher Education, Tuition and Fees Report Fiscal Year 2012-13, 2013.
National Student Clearinghouse Research Center, National Postsecondary Enrollment Trends: Before, During, and
After the Great Recession, 2013.
5.
[Background: The 2012 Master Plan includes a goal of 66 percent postsecondary credential
attainment for Colorado citizens aged 25-34 by 2025 (1,000 additional undergraduate
credentials per year).] How is this goal affected by the cyclical trends in higher education
enrollment? Did the Great Recession assist the state in moving toward this goal as people
stayed in school longer? Are improvements in the economy making it difficult to achieve this
goal and driving enrollment declines? Will getting additional degrees actually assist people to
get jobs that pay well upon graduation?
National studies have shown that there is a counter-cyclical relationship between a state’s
economic performance and enrollment in higher education. A recent University Of
Wisconsin, Madison study using data collected from 1990 through 2009, found that a one
percentage point uptick in unemployment is associated with a 1.1 to 3.3 percent increase in
enrollment demand at community colleges. The same study found that higher levels of
unemployment are associated with a greater increase in fulltime college attendance (as
opposed to part-time). There are also some indicators that the impact of a bad economy on
increased enrollment is greater for institutions in metropolitan areas as opposed to rural
institutions. Certainly in Colorado we saw more dramatic increases in enrollment with the
onset of the Great Recession and as the Colorado economy continues to recover we’re seeing
enrollment numbers flatten as some would-be students opt to defer studies in order to seek
employment or remain in the workforce at existing education levels. (See question #4).
Cyclical enrollment trends driven by the economy tend to be short term and a relatively minor
factor when measured against total postsecondary enrollment. By contrast, the 2012 Master
Plan goal represents an effort toward a long-term course correction recognizing that
Colorado and the nation will require many more citizens with postsecondary degrees in order
to remain economically competitive. Studies by the Georgetown Center for Education Studies
and the Workforce show that by 2018, 67% of jobs in Colorado will require some level of
post-secondary education. In fact the Great Recession has dramatically increased the
importance of postsecondary degree attainment:

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Earnings potential is no longer the driver of postsecondary education: without
postsecondary skills, many people will not be able to get a job at all. Almost half of
the jobs lost in the recession that began in December, 2007 have been recovered and
virtually all of those jobs required some form of postsecondary education.
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Higher Education-hearing


In 2012, seven percent of graduates with a bachelor degree or better are still
unemployed and another 14 percent are underemployed in jobs beneath their skill
levels. By comparison, the unemployment rate for new high school graduates is 24
percent and 42 percent for those individuals are underemployed.
During the recession the US shed 5.6 million jobs that were held by Americans with
high school or less education and 1.75 million jobs that required an associate’s
degree or less. Meanwhile the number of jobs available for Americans with a
bachelor’s degree or more actually grew.
The bottom line is that the recession has underscored the need for the Master Plan goal for
increased postsecondary degree attainment as desirable for students to succeed in the
workforce and necessary for the continued health of the state’s economy. For more
information see:
http://www9.georgetown.edu/grad/gppi/hpi/cew/pdfs/CollegeAdvantage.FullReport.081512.p
df
6. Have changes in the Pell affected enrollment? Do some institutions still allow students who
do not have high school diploma or GED to attend? How does that impact funding? How are
these students paying for these degrees? Do institutions do remedial education to help the
students get the GED so that they can qualify for the Pell grants?
In FY2012-13 both resident undergraduate FTE and Pell recipient FTE have dropped off
slightly from prior years but there is no clear correlation between these factors.
The changes to Pell eligibility have resulted in a 5.6% drop in Pell grant recipients from the
prior year. This is the first time that there were fewer recipients than the prior year since FY
2006-07. At public institutions in Colorado, the changes to Pell grant eligibility reduced total
Pell funding by nearly $9.7 million, but the average Pell grant per FTE increased slightly.
This is illustrated in the table below:
Pell Grant Recipient FTE at Public Institutions
Fiscal Year
2008-2009
2009-2010
2010-2011
2011-2012
2012-2013
Pell recipient
FTE
40,090
56,638
70,413
75,169
70,970
Undergraduate
Res FTE
134,026
147,747
154,890
154,284
149,849
Percentage
Pell FTE
29.91%
38.33%
45.46%
48.72%
47.36%
Total Pell
Grants
133,037,979
232,555,692
294,568,494
296,301,033
286,537,462
Average
Pell per
FTE
3,318
4,106
4,183
3,942
4,037
The Consolidated Appropriations Act of 2012 limits federal financial aid eligibility to students
12-Dec-13
12
Higher Education-hearing
who have earned either a GED or a high school diploma. The law was enacted in FY 201213. There is a grandfathering provision for students who were enrolled prior to July 1, 2012
who qualified for aid under the prior rules. At community colleges, students without a GED
or high school diploma may be admitted but the students will not be eligible for financial aid.
As a result there is no impact on aid funding for eligible students.
The Colorado Department of Education oversees GED preparation programs in Colorado. A
list of GED preparation is available here: http://www.cde.state.co.us/cdeadult/gedprepsites.
7. Provide an update on graduation rates and how these compare across institutions. How do
retention rates and graduation at Mines compare to the rest of the system?
Statewide, graduation rates across the different institutions have increased since 2010.
Graduation rates at two-year institutions have fluctuated slightly, but in 2012, two-year
institutions graduated 21.5 percent of students within 3 years. At four-year institutions, the
graduation rate has been steadily increasing, with graduations in 2012 at 58.5 percent within
6 years. Graduation Rates at 150% by year of graduation means graduating within three
years at a two-year institution and graduating within six years at a four-year institution. Data
for the past three years is provided in the table below:
12-Dec-13
13
Higher Education-hearing
Graduation Rates, 150%, by Year of Graduation
Sum of
cohort
Two Year Institutions
Aims Community College
Arapahoe Community College
Colorado Mountain College
Colorado Northwestern Community College
Community College of Aurora
Community College of Denver
Front Range Community College
Lamar Community College
Morgan Community College
Northeastern Junior College
Otero Junior College
Pikes Peak Community College
Pueblo Community College
Red Rocks Community College
Trinidad State Junior College
Four Year Institutions
Adams State University
Colorado Mesa University
Colorado School of Mines
Colorado State University
Colorado State University - Pueblo
Fort Lewis College
Metropolitan State University of Denver
University of Colorado Boulder
University of Colorado Colorado Springs
University of Colorado Denver
University of Northern Colorado
Western State Colorado University
Private Institutions
Regis University
University of Denver
Grand Total
5845
226
395
335
99
361
411
1136
111
35
305
242
1111
327
470
281
19030
307
782
746
4047
753
930
1815
5130
939
686
2412
483
24875
2010
2011
2012
Sum of
Sum of
Sum of
grad rate Sum of
grad rate Sum of
grad rate
grad any
grad any
grad any
%
cohort
%
cohort
%
inst
inst
inst
1223
20.9%
6779
1760
26.0%
7728
1658
21.5%
47
20.8%
426
100
23.5%
539
123
22.8%
85
21.5%
315
61
19.4%
399
71
17.8%
72
21.5%
388
101
26.0%
99
17
17.2%
14
14.1%
145
29
20.0%
147
42
28.6%
69
19.1%
472
125
26.5%
457
71
15.5%
41
10.0%
448
53
11.8%
789
71
9.0%
198
17.4%
1398
309
22.1%
1628
275
16.9%
32
28.8%
246
106
43.1%
182
61
33.5%
4
11.4%
68
28
41.2%
58
18
31.0%
104
34.1%
343
125
36.4%
323
102
31.6%
85
35.1%
264
131
49.6%
262
116
44.3%
175
15.8%
1106
232
21.0%
1149
162
14.1%
60
18.3%
323
70
21.7%
578
141
24.4%
106
22.6%
573
146
25.5%
781
204
26.1%
131
46.6%
264
144
54.5%
337
184
54.6%
10887
57.2%
18707
10754
57.5%
19338
11324
58.6%
101
32.9%
371
117
31.5%
382
120
31.4%
256
32.7%
826
266
32.2%
719
252
35.0%
538
72.1%
824
630
76.5%
762
563
73.9%
2787
68.9%
3622
2544
70.2%
3825
2626
68.7%
269
35.7%
665
263
39.5%
631
249
39.5%
421
45.3%
842
373
44.3%
842
382
45.4%
452
24.9%
1840
483
26.3%
1711
506
29.6%
3669
71.5%
5015
3598
71.7%
5606
4006
71.5%
498
53.0%
1000
522
52.2%
974
536
55.0%
348
50.7%
744
372
50.0%
885
468
52.9%
1347
55.8%
2483
1363
54.9%
2491
1385
55.6%
201
41.6%
475
223
46.9%
510
231
45.3%
1249
945
75.7%
112
60
53.6%
1137
885
77.8%
12110
48.7%
26705
10853
40.6%
28315
13927
49.2%
http://highered.colorado.gov/i3/Reports.aspx?cat=11
12-Dec-13
14
Higher Education-hearing
One Year Fall-to-Fall Retention Rates
Two Year Institutions
Aims Community College
Arapahoe Community College
Colorado Mountain College
Colorado Northwestern Community College
Community College of Aurora
Community College of Denver
Front Range Community College
Lamar Community College
Morgan Community College
Northeastern Junior College
Otero Junior College
Pikes Peak Community College
Pueblo Community College
Red Rocks Community College
Trinidad State Junior College
Four Year Institutions
Adams State University
Colorado Mesa University
Colorado School of Mines
Colorado State University
Colorado State University - Pueblo
Fort Lewis College
Metropolitan State University of Denver
University of Colorado Boulder
University of Colorado Colorado Springs
University of Colorado Denver
University of Northern Colorado
Western State Colorado University
Public Two & Four Year Institutions
Private Institutions
Colorado Christian University
Regis University
University of Denver
Grand Total
Fall 2009-to-Fall 2010
Fall 2010-to-Fall 2011
Fall 2011-to-Fall 2012
#
#
#
retained
%
retained
%
retained
%
cohort next fall retained cohort next fall retained cohort next fall retained
7603
4181
55.0%
8451
4548
53.8%
7247
3906
53.9%
539
283
52.5%
399
236
59.1%
396
256
64.6%
399
220
55.1%
452
226
50.0%
466
235
50.4%
99
44
44.4%
366
183
50.0%
396
200
50.5%
143
63
44.1%
158
81
51.3%
148
72
48.6%
429
217
50.6%
494
278
56.3%
437
214
49.0%
759
419
55.2%
870
464
53.3%
625
329
52.6%
1650
942
57.1%
1544
897
58.1%
1362
801
58.8%
187
101
54.0%
134
72
53.7%
151
71
47.0%
61
35
57.4%
87
53
60.9%
63
29
46.0%
352
193
54.8%
411
240
58.4%
403
215
53.3%
262
149
56.9%
283
130
45.9%
228
123
53.9%
1069
581
54.3%
1612
809
50.2%
1154
592
51.3%
632
354
56.0%
522
262
50.2%
459
230
50.1%
709
385
54.3%
832
449
54.0%
665
376
56.5%
313
195
62.3%
287
168
58.5%
294
163
55.4%
20704
15679
75.7%
20463
15513
75.8%
21029
15677
74.5%
428
258
60.3%
477
255
53.5%
492
284
57.7%
963
631
65.5%
1108
713
64.4%
1287
819
63.6%
879
768
87.4%
874
783
89.6%
879
783
89.1%
4274
3552
83.1%
4326
3609
83.4%
4357
3662
84.0%
1016
646
63.6%
979
642
65.6%
1025
594
58.0%
769
477
62.0%
829
541
65.3%
771
467
60.6%
1960
1306
66.6%
1878
1231
65.5%
1725
1123
65.1%
5530
4682
84.7%
5144
4308
83.7%
5653
4697
83.1%
1074
731
68.1%
1124
796
70.8%
1287
859
66.7%
1039
761
73.2%
1022
781
76.4%
854
609
71.3%
2273
1572
69.2%
2223
1554
69.9%
2267
1508
66.5%
499
295
59.1%
479
300
62.6%
432
272
63.0%
28307
19860
70.2%
28914
20061
69.4%
28276
19583
69.3%
1521
248
113
1160
29828
1255
160
102
993
21115
82.5%
64.5%
90.3%
85.6%
70.8%
1551
264
128
1159
30465
1289
187
107
995
21350
83.1%
70.8%
83.6%
85.8%
70.1%
1625
273
166
1186
29901
1190
184
0
1006
20773
73.2%
67.4%
0.0%
84.8%
69.5%
http://highered.colorado.gov/i3/Reports.aspx?cat=12
The retention and graduation rates at Colorado School of Mines are higher than the other
institutions across the state. In 2012, Colorado School of Mines had a graduation rate of 73.9
percent within 6 years, well above the averages for two-year institutions, four-year institutions
and other research institutions. The Colorado School of Mines has highly selective admission
standards and generally serves a very high achieving and well prepared student population.
Other institutions serve different student populations where preparation levels can make timely
completion more challenging.
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Higher Education-hearing
Graduation Rate within 150% By Year of Graduation**
90.00%
80.00%
70.00%
60.00%
50.00%
40.00%
30.00%
20.00%
10.00%
0.00%
Graduation Rate in 2010
Graduation Rate in 2011
Graduation Rate in 2012
*With the exception of Colorado School of Mines
**A 150% Graduation Rate refers to a three year time to completion for two year institutions and a six year time to
completion for four year institutions.
Source: http://highered.colorado.gov/i3/Reports.aspx?cat=11
Retention Rate (Students Returning From One Fall to the Following Fall)
100%
90%
80%
70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
Retention Rate Fall 2009
to Fall 2010
Retention Rate Fall 2010
to Fall 2011
Retention Rate Fall 2011
to Fall 2012
*With the exception of Colorado School of Mines
Source: http://highered.colorado.gov/i3/Reports.aspx?cat=12
12-Dec-13
16
Higher Education-hearing
Retention Rate Retention Rate Retention Rate
Graduation Rate Graduation Rate Graduation Rate Fall 2009 to Fall Fall 2010 to Fall Fall 2011 to Fall
Institution
in 2010
in 2011
in 2012
2010
2011
2012
Average Two Year Institution
20.90%
26%
21.50%
55%
53.80%
53.90%
Average Four Year Institution
38%
38.70%
41.20%
65.90%
66.60%
63.90%
Average Research
Institution*
67.30%
67.50%
67.20%
81.20%
81%
80.40%
Colorado School of Mines
72.10%
*with the exception of Colorado School of Mines
http://highered.colorado.gov/i3/Reports.aspx?cat=12
http://highered.colorado.gov/i3/Reports.aspx?cat=11
76.50%
73.90%
87.40%
89.60%
89.10%
8. How does Colorado rank nationally and regionally on the cost of higher education?
Rankings for Colorado on the cost of higher education are derived from the College Board.
Nationally, Colorado is ranked 27th on the cost of tuition and fees for public two-year
institutions and 31st on the cost of tuition and fees for four-year institutions. The cost of
higher education in Colorado is higher than the national average for both public two-year
institutions and public four-year institutions. The following figure from the College Board
demonstrates Colorado’s position in comparison to other states in terms of tuition and fees as
well as the five-year percent changes in inflation adjusted tuition and fees based on the 2008
academic year through the 2013 academic year. The average cost of public two-year
institutions in Colorado increased by 39% between 2008 and 2013. Additionally, the average
cost of public four-year institutions increased by 48% during the same time period.
12-Dec-13
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Higher Education-hearing
Average 2013-14 In-State Tuition and Fees at Public Four-Year and Two-Year
Institutions, by State, and Five-Year Percentage Changes in Inflation-Adjusted Tuition
and Fees, 2008-09 to 2013-14
SOURCE: The College Board, Annual Survey of Colleges.
Comparisons of the cost of higher education in Colorado to the region are derived from
the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE). Within WICHE, in the
2012 academic year, Colorado is 10th out of the 15 WICHE member states for the cost of
tuition at four- year public universities. The average tuition at a public four-year
institution in Colorado was $8,095 compared to the WICHE average of $7,237.
12-Dec-13
18
Higher Education-hearing
Resident and Nonresident Undergraduate Tuition and Fees at Public Four-Year
Institutions in the WICHE Region, State Weighted Averages, 2012-13, 2011-12, 2007-08,
and 2002-03
Resident Undergraduate Tuition and Fees at Public Four-Year Institutions
State
Alaska
Arizona
California
Colorado
Hawaii
Idaho
Montana
Nevada
New Mexico
North Dakota
Oregon
South Dakota
Utah
Washington
Wyoming
Percent Change
2011-12 to 2007-08 to 2002-03 to
2012-13
2012-13
2012-13
4.2%
12.1%
38.9%
-0.9%
77.2%
188.6%
-0.9%
65.6%
157.5%
5.3%
38.8%
93.1%
1.8%
55.7%
110.2%
3.6%
23.6%
51.2%
2.5%
4.3%
19.1%
3.7%
46.0%
99.3%
2.5%
21.0%
45.9%
-0.1%
9.0%
54.4%
1.5%
26.8%
42.2%
4.7%
25.3%
49.2%
3.7%
23.9%
58.9%
11.8%
60.6%
99.6%
1.9%
8.9%
9.4%
2012-13
$5,778
$9,727
$8,934
$8,095
$8,604
$5,985
$6,112
$6,474
$5,614
$6,955
$8,279
$7,565
$5,527
$10,624
$4,278
2011-12
$5,544
$9,816
$9,019
$7,691
$8,453
$5,779
$5,964
$6,244
$5,476
$6,965
$8,161
$7,227
$5,332
$9,503
$4,199
2007-08
$5,157
$5,491
$5,395
$5,834
$5,526
$4,842
$5,862
$4,434
$4,641
$6,381
$6,531
$6,040
$4,459
$6,615
$3,927
2002-03
$4,160
$3,371
$3,469
$4,193
$4,094
$3,958
$5,131
$3,249
$3,847
$4,506
$5,821
$5,072
$3,477
$5,324
$3,911
WICHE Average
$7,237
$7,025
$5,409
$4,239
3.0%
33.8%
70.7%
US
$8,655
$8,372
$6,809
$5,213
3.4%
27.1%
66.0%
Notes: All averages are enrollment weighted averages presented in constant 2012 dollars; unweighted averages are also available
from the Tuition & Fees in the West report tables.
Source: Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, Tuition and Fees in Public Higher Education in the West: 201213, Detailed Tuition and Fees Tables , T able 3a. College Board, Trends in College Pricing 2012 , T able 2.
The cost of public two-year institutions in Colorado is higher than that of the regional and
national average. Colorado is ranked 12th out of the 15 states in the WICHE region for the
cost of tuition and fees at two-year institutions. In the 2012 academic year, the average
tuition for a two-year public institution was $3,577 compared with the regional average of
$3,223. Additionally, tuition and fees has increased by a higher percentage in Colorado
than it has for the rest of the WICHE region.
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19
Higher Education-hearing
Resident In-District/County Tuition and Fees at Public Two-Year Institutions
in the WICHE Region, State Weighted Averages, 2012-13, 2011-12, 2007-08, and 2002-03
State Averages
Alaska
Arizona
California
Colorado
Hawaii
Idaho
Montana
Nevada
New Mexico
North Dakota
Oregon
South Dakota
Utah
Washington
Wyoming
2011-12 to
Percent Change
2007-08 to
2002-03 to
2012-13
$4,570
2011-12
$4,377
2007-08
$3,922
2002-03
$2,881
2012-13
2012-13
2012-13
4.4%
16.5%
58.6%
$2,211
$2,201
$1,839
$1,571
0.5%
20.2%
40.7%
$1,104
$1,099
$663
$431
0.4%
66.5%
156.4%
$3,577
$3,444
$2,732
$2,061
3.9%
31.0%
73.6%
$3,101
$3,034
$2,146
$1,732
2.2%
44.5%
79.1%
$2,740
$2,723
$2,305
$1,889
0.6%
18.9%
45.0%
$3,334
$3,361
$3,363
$2,950
-0.8%
-0.8%
13.0%
$2,700
$2,558
$1,947
$1,938
5.6%
38.7%
39.3%
$1,392
$1,384
$1,202
$1,012
0.6%
15.8%
37.5%
$3,978
$4,016
$4,078
$2,881
-1.0%
-2.5%
38.1%
$4,282
$4,085
$3,515
$2,864
4.8%
21.8%
49.5%
$5,568
$5,280
$4,165
---
5.5%
33.7%
---
$3,149
$3,074
$2,731
$2,245
2.4%
15.3%
40.3%
$4,236
$3,869
$3,169
$2,391
$2,395
$2,330
$2,113
$2,013
9.5%
2.8%
33.7%
13.4%
77.2%
19.0%
WICHE Average w/o CA
WICHE Average w/ CA
$3,374
$3,223
$3,267
$3,122
$2,802
$2,659
$2,187
$2,061
3.3%
3.2%
20.4%
21.2%
54.3%
56.3%
US
$3,131
$3,001
$2,523
$2,129
4.3%
24.1%
47.1%
Notes: All averages are enrollment weighted averages presented in constant 2012 dollars; unweighted averages are also available from the Tuition &
Fees in the West report tables. South Dakota tuition and fees were not available for 2002-03. T he WICHE average without California was calculated
because the large number of two-year colleges and the historically low matriculation fee structure distort regional patterns. T he national average
includes California institutions.
Source: Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, Tuition and Fees in Public Higher Education in the West: 2012-13, Detailed Tuition
and Fees Tables, T able 7a. College Board, Trends in College Pricing 2012 , T able 2.
Financial Health of Public Higher Education Institutions:
9. Discuss the variations in institutional financial performance.
a) Is financial performance a problem for all small colleges?
While Colorado public colleges and universities share the common purpose of
providing quality higher education services to students they have unique role and
missions as well as demographics, geography and history within the state. When
institutions were founded financial performance was not a primary consideration
while today it is increasingly important for public institutions as it has been for
private and for-profit institutions.
12-Dec-13
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Higher Education-hearing
Generally speaking, the larger research institutions both in Colorado and across
the nation have greater economies of scale and therefore a greater ability to deal
with challenges like state funding reductions and enrollment fluctuations. Smaller
institutions, like small businesses have fewer near-term options available when
facing funding reductions or flattened enrollment making optimal financial
performance more challenging.
During the funding cuts of recent years institutions large and small take the same
types of measures that the state makes when facing revenue reductions. Reserves
are drawn down, budget cuts are enacted, hiring freezes are implemented and
salary increases are suspended. Institutions financial health is a significant
concern and the department agrees with Joint Budget Committee staff that the
financial health of especially the smaller institutions needs to be carefully
monitored. We would point out, however, that an assessment of the financial
health of institutions is impacted by the decisions that were made in recent years to
deal with budget reductions and may not reflect institutions multi-year strategies
regarding institutional investments or enrollment planning.
b) How do the populations served by Adams and Western State differ from those
served by other institutions?
Adams serves a 7,300 square mile rural region with a total population of 45,000
people with a median family income of $33,560. This translates to a rural, widely
dispersed and economically challenged service region. ASU’s service region
includes the three poorest counties in the state and ASU has the highest percentage
of Pell eligible students of all public higher education institutions in the state.
Students of color represent 40% of its population, with 31% of those being
Hispanic.
Western State Colorado University serves students from all 50 states and from all
over Colorado. The University offers a liberal arts focused education with some
specialized and professional programs. Western State Colorado University also
serves as a regional education provided for the relatively remote and rural
Gunnison region of the state.
Adams State University and Western State Colorado University share the
characteristic of having smaller enrollments in a rural setting.
The following charts compare Adams State University and Western State Colorado
University to other Colorado institutions on the basis of Pell grants, ethnicity,
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21
Higher Education-hearing
enrollment, and gender.
Western State Colorado University and Adams State University differ both from
one another and from the average of other four year institutions in regards to Pell
grants. Adams State University consistently has a significantly higher percentage
of students that receive Pell grants than that of the average other institution.
Conversely, Western State Colorado University has a consistently lower
percentage of Pell grant recipients than the state average.
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The ethnicities of the students at both Adams State University and Western State
Colorado University differ highly from each other and from the state averages.
For example, Adams State University has a student population that is 27.4 percent
Hispanic while that average for other institutions in the state is 14.4 percent.
Western State Colorado University has a much smaller minority population with
white, non-Hispanic students making up 70.1 percent of the population.
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ENROLLMENT
Adams State University and Western State Colorado University have the two
smallest student populations among four year institutions. These two institutions
serve a very small percentage of the total student population in the state. Due to
the small size, they serve much different populations than other institutions in the
state.
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GENDER
On a basis of gender, these two institutions differ from the other institutions in the
state. In 2012, in the other institutions with the exception of Adams State
University and Western State Colorado University, 46.3 percent of the population
was male and 53.4 percent was female. At Adams State University, 42.6 percent of
the population was male and 56.9 percent was female. There was a much different
dynamic at Western State Colorado University with 60.9 percent of the population
was male and 39.1 percent female students.
c) How do you explain the differences in performance between Mesa State and
Western State?
It is difficult to explain the difference in performance between institutions
particularly because very few institutions share the identical circumstances and
statutory charge.
The Colorado Mesa University and Western State Colorado University, per
statute, have different roles and missions (see below):
Colorado Mesa University
There is hereby established a college at Grand Junction, to be known as Colorado
Mesa university, which shall be a general baccalaureate and graduate institution
with selective admission standards. Colorado Mesa university shall offer liberal
arts and sciences, professional, and technical degree programs and a limited
number of graduate programs. Colorado Mesa university shall also maintain a
community college role and mission, including career and technical education
programs. Colorado Mesa university shall receive resident credit for two-year
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course offerings in its commission-approved service area. Colorado Mesa
university shall also serve as a regional education provider.
C.R.S. 23-53-101 (2013)
Western State Colorado University
There is hereby established a college at Gunnison, which shall be known as
Western state Colorado university. Western state Colorado university shall be a
general baccalaureate institution with moderately selective admission standards.
Western state college of Colorado shall offer undergraduate liberal arts and
sciences, teacher preparation, and business degree programs and a limited
number of graduate programs. Western state college of Colorado shall also serve
as a regional education provider.
C.R.S. 23-56-101 (2013)
The institutions have different admission standards as well as a different array or
statutory charges related to the types of programs they can offer. While both
serving as regional education providers, CMU also has the statutory authority to
provide services of a community college including career and technical education
programs.
Additionally, the institutions are located in different geographic settings, have
different student demographics and serve different numbers of students as their
respective total student populations. There is no doubt that leadership at
institutions of higher education also plays an important role in its performance as
well as the financial circumstances which leaders inherit from their predecessors.
As such there is not one clear issue which can be identified which explains the
difference between these institutions. Importantly the performance contract
signed between all of the governing boards and commission within the last year
will be able to clearly measure how each institution is doing in measuring
improvement against itself, in helping the state achieve its master plan goals.
d) Why do you believe the community colleges are doing so well? Does the level of
funding provided by the state to community colleges help them to stay financially
strong?
The primary reason that the CCCS KPMG CFI index is higher for CCCS than
other Colorado public institutions is the relatively low level of CCCS debt. In the
year that JBC staff examined, the total debt for CCCS’s thirteen colleges serving
over 62,000 student FTE was less than the total debt of Western, which serves
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approximately 1,800 student FTE. With a governing board’s debt ratio weighted
at 35% of the total CFI index calculation, debt levels play a large role in the final
index score of a governing board.
That being said, maintaining fiscal health and financial flexibility via relatively
low debt levels has been a deliberate management strategy over the last decade of
both the CCCS Board and executive management of the System. Also, the
favorable interest rate environment and the strong credit rating of CCCS have
allowed the System to refinance much of its prior, callable debt under very
favorable terms over the last several years. The debt that the CCCS Board does
choose to take on is done deliberately and is focused on explicitly supporting the
CCCS core missions and strategic plan goals.
10. Who is responsible if an institution defaults on its bonds? How can the State be financially
responsible if an institution is classified as an enterprise under TABOR?
Bond Default:
Institutions can issue bonds in one of two ways. An institution can issue a bond using its own
credit rating or they can issue bonds through the Higher Education Revenue Bond Intercept
Program (C.R.S. 23-5-139), which allows them to use the State of Colorado’s credit rating
and in turn, a more favorable interest rate:
“If an institution indicates that it will not make a payment by the date on which it is due…
the state treasurer shall forward the amount in immediately available funds necessary to
make the payment of the principal of or interest on the bonds or other obligations of the
institution to the paying agent. The state treasurer shall recover the amount forwarded by
withholding amounts from the institution’s payment of the state’s fee-for-service contract
with the institution, from any other state support for the institution, and from any
unpledged tuition moneys collected by the institution” Colorado Revised Statutes 23-5139 (3).
In other words, if an institution is borrowing under the Intercept Program and does not make
a payment on a project funded through the intercept bond program, the State Treasurer will
make the payment for the institution and recover the amount forwarded from the institution.
In the instances when the institution is not borrowing under the intercept bond program and is
using their own credit rating the state is not directly responsible in the event of a default.
Enterprise Status:
To retain enterprise status under Article X Section 20 of the Colorado Constitution (TABOR),
a governing board must: (1) have the authority to issue revenue bonds on behalf the of the
institution; (2) receive less than ten percent of its total annual revenues in grants from all
Colorado state and local governments combined; and (3) enterprise status is statutorily
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granted (C.R.S. 23-5-101.7(2013)). A public higher education institution being recognized as
an enterprise under TABOR is possible through the College Opportunity Fund (COF) system
which provides stipends for undergraduate resident students in place of state operating
support funding to the institutions. In addition Fee-For-Service contracts are established
under the COF program to pay for educational services not funded through COF stipends.
Neither the stipends provided for undergraduate resident students nor Fee-For-Service
contracts are considered state grants for the purposes of TABOR. In other words, by
retaining enterprise status, the funding provided to public higher education institutions
through COF as well as cash funds in the form of tuition and fee funding to the institutions do
not count against the State’s annual TABOR revenue cap. The Legislative Audit Committee in
conjunction with the department and the State Controller’s Office conduct an annual
evaluation of which higher education institutions qualify for TABOR enterprise status. With
respect to debt, TABOR enterprise status is a necessary factor allowing public higher
education institutions to issue debt but such status does not impact debt limit and is not
related to responsibility for payment in case of default.
Intercept Debt Limits:
In prior years, the borrowing limit for institutions utilizing the intercept program could not
exceed 100% of the institution’s prior year COF Fee-For-Service contract amount. Last year
with the passage of Senate Bill 13-199 the law was changed such that each governing board
had to meet a “credit and coverage test” in order to issue additional debt. The “credit and
coverage test” is comprised of the governing board retaining a credit rating of “A” or better
from at least two of the three major credit rating agencies (Moody’s, Standard and Poors,
Fitch); and a governing board’s debt service coverage ratio that meets or exceeds 100 to
150% of the governing board’s net revenues. In other words, a governing board has to show
it has at least one and a half the amount of revenue available and unobligated for current and
future debt payments in order to issue additional debt. Finally, revenue bonds must be
accounted for separately in institutional financial records by the institution. Under the new
borrowing limits established by S.B 13-199, the remaining intercept bond program capacity
at each governing board is based upon the financial health of the governing board and credit
ratings determined externally. Currently, all institutions, except for Western State Colorado
University, are eligible to continue to issue debt under the intercept program. Western has
been restricted from the program based upon its credit rating, which is not currently in one of
the three highest categories.
11. Discuss CCHE’s role in reviewing requests for cash-funded capital projects, including
revenue-bond intercept projects. Does CCHE examine institutional debt load as part of its
review process for cash funded projects? If not, should it?
The public higher education governing boards have broad authority with respect to academic
policy and budget and finance areas. Currently the Colorado Commission on Higher
Education’s role in reviewing cash-funded capital projects is limited and is outlined in C.R.S.
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23-1-106: “The commission shall request annually from the governing board of each state
institution of higher education a two-year projection of capital construction or acquisition
projects to be undertaken [using cash funds] and estimated to require total project
expenditures exceeding two million dollars. The projection shall include the estimated cost,
the method of funding, and a schedule for project completion for each project” (C.R.S. 23-1106(6)(b)). These two-year projections must be approved by an institution’s governing board
before they are submitted to CCHE and institutions can amend this list at any time during the
year.
The role of the Commission and department staff as it relates to cash funded projects is
primarily to ensure the projects make programmatic sense and comport with institutional
capital planning. DHE staff reviews all two-year projections for alignment with the
institutional facilities master plan, considers the source of cash funds (student fees, donations,
etc.), and the size and scope of the projects. The Commission reviews these lists and sends
them to the Capital Development Committee (CDC) for a hearing to either approve the
projections or return them to the institution for modification. The Commission “shall provide
the capital development committee with comments concerning each projection” (C.R.S. 23-1106 (7)(c)(II)(A)). Cash projects that are on a CDC approved two-year projection list and
that will not use the revenue bond intercept program, “shall not be subject to additional
review or approval by the commission, the office of state planning and budgeting, the capital
development committee or the joint budget committee” (C.R.S. 23-1-106(9)(a) and (b)). With
regard to non-intercept cash projects, CCHE is tasked with coordinating the submission of
two-year cash projection lists and providing comments on the lists to the Capital Development
Committee.
Pursuant to C.R.S. 23-1-106(10), projects that utilize the revenue-bond intercept program, the
Colorado Commission on Higher Education is also required to review and approve any plan
for a capital construction or acquisition project. Colorado Commission on Higher Education
Policy III-E (1.03)(B) further defines this role and sets forth the evaluation criteria for facility
program plans including:
 “Consistency with role and mission; academic, facility, and technology planning goals;
state higher education policy;
 Consistency with campus facilities master plan and academic master planning;
 Consistency of space utilization with CCHE guidelines and campus physical master
plan space allocations;
 Alternative facilities solutions and life-cycle costs as required by CCHE; and
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Higher Education-hearing

Appropriateness of source of funds, cost estimate methods, financing implications for
life-cycle of construction as required, operations, and maintenance at projected
enrollment increments.”
As related to institutional debt issuance and the revenue-bond intercept program, the
Commission conforms to the restrictions placed on the program by statute as they relate to
institutional debt load, recognizing that the governing boards have broad authority in this
area. C.R.S. 23-5-139 restricts an institution’s use of the revenue bond intercept program
based upon specific criteria. Prior to the passage of Senate Bill 13-199, the amount an
institution could bond as part of the intercept program was restricted by the total annual debt
service payments being no more than the institution’s prior year fee-for-service contract
amount (see question #10). Senate Bill 13-199 changed statute so that the intercept program
is restricted for use by institutions based upon a credit rating that is in the three highest
categories and a debt service coverage ratio of at least 1.5 to 1.0 (net revenue available for
annual debt service over the total amount of annual debt service). Currently, all institutions,
except for Western State Colorado University, are eligible to use the intercept program.
Western has been restricted from the program based upon its credit rating, which is not
currently in one of the three highest categories.
12. Are the financial problems facing higher education institutions an opportunity for paradigm
shift on how we do higher education in Colorado? How should the General Assembly
participate in planning for such changes?
The financial problems facing higher education institutions both in Colorado and throughout
the nation are not new, although they have accelerated over the last decade. Those financial
challenges are a result of many factors, including declining state support, certainly, but also
wide fluctuations in demand and enrollment from year to year, significant new competition
from for-profit institutions, policy shifts to encourage enrollment of more academically
unprepared and financially needy students, and a greater reliance on, and costs associated
with, technology.
In recent years we have seen a great deal of innovation in our state supported colleges and
universities as the direct result of all of those factors, as well as the anticipation that
decreases in state funding will continue. Governor Hickenlooper and the General Assembly
have shown a strong commitment to increasing support for Higher Education as we work our
way out of the recession. However, these innovations are generally in addition to the
traditional course delivery methods that students have always demanded and continue to
demand even in the face of increasing tuition. That is, while there are ways to stem the
increase in tuition, students and families tend to demand the very things that lead to
increasing costs, such as highly qualified instructors, up-to-date technology and classrooms,
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and on-campus amenities that institutions feel compelled to offer in order to compete for “full
pay" students. Typically, most institutions offer significant "institutional scholarships" or
"tuition discounting" that drives the actual cost of attendance considerably lower that the
"advertised price".
Where the General Assembly and the institutions should be focused is on what really drives
increased costs for students and families, and that can be seen by looking at the increase in
the number of semesters it takes for most students to earn either a two year or a 4 year
degree. Those increased costs are borne not just by the student but by the state. The
paradigm shift that we need to see is towards a greater emphasis on timely completion of
degree programs. This shift will only occur with an actively engaged and vigilant legislature
and department of higher education, as well as a funding system that rewards efficiency and
timely completion.
To accomplish that end, Colorado put into place Performance Contracts and a Performance
Funding Plan that when funded, will incent institutions to assist students toward timely
completion. Additionally, the Colorado Commission on Higher Education has recently redesigned its Financial Aid allocation methodology to incent institutions to assist students so
they retain and persist toward a certificate or degree. As a state, Colorado needs effective,
system wide coordination with the ability to gather consistent data and use it to inform
secondary education systems, higher education systems, the public, and policy makers. That
data can be used to increase retention, success, and effectiveness while preserving academic
quality and ensuring greater transparency and accountability. Institutions’ primary
responsibility is to serve the state and their students not merely by enrolling students, but by
graduating them, and by ensuring that the credentials they earn are indicative of an ability to
function responsibly as an employee and as an engaged citizen.
Requested Increase for the Department of Higher Education - Tuition Restrictions
13. Given the Governor’s proposal, why not change statute to take the 9 percent tuition cap out
and put 6 percent in for FY 2014-15?
The Governor’s November 1, 2013 FY 2014-15 budget request in part, seeks an 11 percent
increase in operating funding to the public institutions of higher education. One of the
desired policy outcomes from an increase of state funding of this magnitude is keeping
resident undergraduate tuition lower than it has been over the recent past. To achieve this
outcome, the Governor’s Office and department considered multiple options including setting
tuition caps at various levels while taking into account variables such as the amount of
general fund revenue potentially available for operational support at public higher education
institutions and funding restoration/allocation alternatives. These variables were considered
alongside the planning needs of the diverse institutions and timing of tuition setting later this
spring for the various governing boards. One reason the department supports an across-theboard General Fund operating increase of 11% for the public institutions is that it allows
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governing boards to know in advance the minimum amount of operating support available for
the upcoming year. This gives the governing boards a far better sense of need and allows the
development of strategies to set resident tuition as low as possible this spring. Currently the
Governor and department have agreement from the leadership of all of the public institutions
of higher education to keep resident undergraduate resident tuition as low as possible and in
no case exceed 6 percent going into FY 2014-15.
The department did not specifically include a request for a legislative change associated with
the 6 percent undergraduate resident tuition cap because it had agreement with the
institutions around the limit. The General Assembly has the ability to consider changes in
statute that would impact tuition setting by the governing boards.
14. Please clarify what the institutions have agreed to with respect to capping tuition in FY 201415. Does this include fees?
The department and the Governor’s Office have agreement and have directed the governing
boards of the public institutions of higher education to utilize the requested 11 percent
increase in state funding to keep tuition as low as possible and cap undergraduate resident
tuition increases for FY 2014-15 to 6 percent.
This agreement and direction did not specifically address fee increases; however, the
department’s expectation is that the requested increase in state funding should provide an
opportunity to limit increases in those costs borne by resident undergraduate students and
their families.
15. Will institutions raise student fees because they are not increasing tuition as much?
The Governor’s FY 2014-15 budget request contained specific direction regarding
undergraduate resident tuition but did not specifically address student fee increases.
However, the department’s expectation is that the requested increase in state funding should
provide an opportunity to limit increases in any costs borne by resident undergraduate
students and their families. As with tuition setting, the governing boards take seriously the
responsibility of setting student fees and are required to follow the procedure for student input
and approval within approved fee plans.
Following a 2010 student fee audit, Section 23-1-105.5 C.R.S. requires publically funded
institutions of higher education to have an institution fee plan on file with the department of
Higher Education that describes its policies and procedures regarding student fees, including
increases in mandatory fees and the addition of new fees. Below is a chart that describes some
of the constraints placed on governing boards though institutional fee policies. The complete
fee policies can be found at: http://highered.colorado.gov/Finance/Fees/default.html.
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Institutional Fee Policies
Institution
Adams State University
Colorado Community College
System
Colorado Mesa University
Colorado School of Mines
Colorado State University
Colorado State University – Pueblo
Fort Lewis College
Metropolitan State University of
Denver
University of Colorado – Boulder
University of Colorado – Colorado
Springs
University of Colorado – Denver
University of Northern Colorado
Fee Policy
Student government serves to recommend or comment on any new
mandatory fees or increases in mandatory fees. Certain types of new
mandatory fees or increases in mandatory fees (in excess of inflation) must
be approved by student election.
New mandatory fees or fee increases (in excess of inflation) must be
approved by student election.
The student senate holds hearings, makes recommendations and presents to
the governing board on student activity fees. All capital fees must be
approved by student referendum or the student government. There is an
appeals process in place for a student or student group to oppose a proposed
new fee or fee increase.
New mandatory fees or fee increases (in excess of inflation) must be
approved by student election.
The student Senate must approval all new fees and any increases in fees
before they can be adopted by the governing board.
Increases to existing or new mandatory student fees must be recommended
by both the Student Fee Governing Board and the Associated Student
Government in order to be considered by the Board of Governors.
The student Senate has can recommend, not recommend or recommend
with modifications most new mandatory fees or fee increases (in excess of
inflation) before the fee is reviewed by the governing board.
Fees can be increased by a mandatory cost percent without a student vote.
An increase in program fees and administrative fees does not require a
referendum. Other fee increases require a referendum from the Student
Government Assembly.
Fee proposals and recommendations will be reviewed by a Boulder Campus
Fee Advisory Board. Most new student fees must be approved by a simple
majority of voting students at a regularly scheduled election.
Mandatory campus-wide student fee proposals must be approved by a
majority vote of the student body and must contain an expiration date, if
applicable.
Existing fees may be increased at the rate of inflation from the DenverBoulder CPI. New, increased, eliminated, and modified student fees must
be approved by the Management Fee Review Team (MFRT), the CU
Denver Chancellor, and the CU Board of Regents. Student activity fees will
be subject to a referendum.
Members of the student body may propose new fees. Student Senate
may recommend an increase per student fees by the official
CPI rate of inflation for DenverBoulder-Greeley.
Western State Colorado University
Newly proposed campus wide fees are subject to a vote by the student
body. The Student Senate will review all new fees and fee increases and
forward any recommendations or comments to the President’s cabinet.
The recent changes in law and policy surrounding student fees make it difficult to use the
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Higher Education-hearing
historical data on mandatory student fees as a benchmark for long-term trends. In light of
the 2010 student fee audit and to comply with the changes in the law, the CCHE policy
updated definitions for student fees. At the same time a number of governing boards have
taken active measures in recent years to realign mandatory general purpose fees that
impact all students into tuition. For example, in 2010 as part of financial accountability
plan process, Metropolitan State University of Denver converted $5.3 million in
mandatory general-purpose technology and registration fees into tuition. In the past,
technology improvements and charges related to accessing the Internet were typically
funded through student fees. Today the need for technology improvements is universal
and ongoing on college campuses so funding technology through student fees doesn’t
make sense anymore. The funding that once was derived from fees at Metro is still used
for technological infrastructure and upgrades but as it is a common cost of doing business
and benefits all students across the institution it made more sense to acknowledge the cost
as part of a tuition increase.
Given that context, the table in Question 16 refers to the percent change in the ten year
history of undergraduate mandatory fees. Generally, as the rate of tuition increases have
flattened, fee increases have flattened and as the rate of tuition growth increased, fee
increases grew. However, given the changes described above, there does not appear to be
a clear and direct connection between historical undergraduate tuition increases or caps
and fees.
16. Provide a ten-year history of fees by institution.
The table below includes a ten-year history of mandatory fees by institution. The department
and institutions define a mandatory fee as the minimum student fees for the academic year
that are charged to all students regardless of class standing, courses selected, and/or
program of study and does not include fees which are optional or frequently waived.
Examples of mandatory fees include those for: student activity, technology, capital
construction, and registration. It is important to note that due to statutory changes included in
House Bill 11-1301 Fees collected by the institutions are not subject to annual appropriation
by the General Assembly (under current practice, fee revenue is included in the Long Bill
appropriation as a footnote, for informational purposes).
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10 Year History of Undergraduate Mandatory Fees (30 Credit Hours Per Academic Year)
* Includes mandatory fees paid by all enrolled students. Institutions may utilize course or program specific fees or charges-for-service which are not listed.
FY 2004-05
Student Fees
Institution
FY 2005-06
Student Fees
FY 2006-07
Student Fees
FY 2007-08
Student Fees
FY 2008-09
Student Fees
FY 2009-10
Student Fees
FY 2010-11
Student Fees
FY 2011-12
Student Fees
FY 2012-13
Student Fees
FY 2013-14
Student Fees
University of Colorado - Boulder
Mandatory Fees
$
861
$
926
$
1,089
$
1,217
$
1,356
$
1,486
$
1,493
$
1,480
$
1,426
$
1,587
University of Colorado - Colorado Springs
Mandatory Fees
$
853
$
923
$
968
$
1,081
$
1,096
$
1,147
$
1,147
$
1,174
$
1,189
$
1,189
University of Colorado - Denver
Mandatory Fees
$
678
$
682
$
731
$
765
$
795
$
830
$
883
$
926
$
960
$
1,016
Colorado State University
Mandatory Fees
$
850
$
1,182
$
1,251
$
1,379
$
1,450
$
1,496
$
1,729
$
1,735
$
1,774
$
1,819
Colorado State University - Pueblo
Mandatory Fees
$
696
$
1,215
$
1,215
$
1,215
$
1,245
$
1,478
$
1,547
$
1,677
$
1,833
$
1,833
Fort Lewis College
Mandatory Fees
$
790
$
830
$
871
$
1,146
$
1,350
$
1,544
$
1,544
$
1,544
$
1,662
$
1,691
University of Northern Colorado
Mandatory Fees
$
520
$
645
$
674
$
713
$
738
$
1,155
$
1,317
$
1,324
$
1,373
$
1,420
Adams State University
Mandatory Fees 1
$
785
$
873
$
895
$
1,138
$
1,294
$
1,742
$
2,019
$
2,315
$
2,632
$
2,577
Colorado Mesa University
Mandatory Fees
$
661
$
721
$
108
$
262
$
414
$
704
$
768
$
768
$
768
$
768
Metropolitan State University of Denver
Mandatory Fees
$
554
$
554
$
590
$
603
$
627
$
790
$
986
$
1,025
$
1,037
$
1,053
Western State Colorado University
Mandatory Fees
$
781
$
786
$
797
$
886
$
898
$
924
$
1,354
$
1,582
$
1,822
$
2,068
Colorado School of Mines
Mandatory Fees
$
746
$
896
$
983
$
1,286
$
1,429
$
1,654
$
1,854
$
1,869
$
2,064
$
2,085
Colorado Community College System
Arapahoe Community College
Colorado Northwestern Community College
Community College of Aurora
Community College of Denver
Front Range Community College
Lamar Community College
Morgan Community College
Northeastern Junior College
Otero Junior College
Pikes Peak Community College
Pueblo Community College
Red Rocks Community College
Trinidad State Junior College
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
161
180
114
444
246
316
158
570
172
152
223
218
348
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
170
232
126
322
274
373
161
593
172
156
243
276
379
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
170
232
126
365
277
373
161
593
172
156
223
225
379
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
171
232
126
429
284
374
164
594
194
244
263
230
379
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
175
240
146
512
289
382
167
612
199
250
271
236
390
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
182
249
150
547
296
394
171
595
206
260
343
243
405
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
182
249
178
637
296
394
171
595
206
269
511
243
405
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
185
249
179
652
227
397
172
595
206
274
511
243
406
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
192
280
185
729
230
402
175
596
287
283
529
285
435
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
$
174
280
189
800
282
405
177
599
292
288
537
286
434
12-Dec-13
35
Higher Education-hearing
NOTE:
For FY09-10 the official CCHE policy on mandatory fees was amended with new definitions for mandatory fees. This may impact the historical trend analysis.
1
In 2013-14, Adams State University converted a portion of their fees to tuition.
17. Should tuition flexibility be extended or allowed to sunset?
In considering this question it is important to review the background and context of the
existing tuition flexibility framework for Colorado public higher education. Public higher
education in Colorado experienced historic reductions in state funding between FY 2008-09
and FY 2012-13. Through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, Colorado
was able to backfill most of the state funding reductions in FY 2008-09, FY 2009-10, and FY
2010-11. Through Senate Bill 10-003, tuition flexibility was granted to the governing boards
for five years commencing in FY 2011-12. The section of statute related to tuition flexibility is
currently scheduled to be repealed on July 1, 2016. A primary purpose behind the five-year
window of tuition flexibility was to acknowledge continued economic uncertainty given the
severity of the recession and provide institutions the ability to increase tuition revenue in light
of the reductions taken in state operational funding.
Tuition flexibility under Senate Bill 10-003 is qualified. Safeguards were put in place through
the requirement of financial accountability plans to be approved by the Colorado Commission
on Higher Education (CCHE) for governing boards seeking to increase tuition beyond nine
percent over the prior year for resident undergraduate students. Generally speaking,
financial accountability plans required governing boards to ensure that access and
affordability for the enrollment of low and middle income students would be preserved and
levels of service and quality would be maintained. As a practical matter this required
department staff and CCHE to review plans submitted by the governing boards when they
sought tuition setting authority beyond the 9 percent cap along with a presentation of the plan
by institution leadership to the Commission.
In recent years, as the Colorado economy has recovered, reductions in operating support
funding are gradually being restored, and the need for higher tuition increase levels
anticipated by Senate Bill 10-003 have not materialized. Of the ten public governing boards,
only two are operating in the current year with tuition increases that exceeded nine percent
over FY 2012-13 for resident, undergraduate students. For FY 2014-15, all of the governing
boards have agreed to keep tuition levels for resident undergraduate students at no more than
a six percent rate increase over the past year.
In determining whether tuition flexibility should be extended beyond FY 2015-16, factors such
as statewide economic conditions, operating support levels, the diversity of the institutions
and especially the needs of Colorado students and families should be taken into consideration
and we would encourage working closely with the legislature, representatives of the
institutions and governing boards as well as the department going forward.
18. Would institutions’ agreements to guarantee a cap on tuition put a four-year guaranteed tuition
level in jeopardy in any way?
The department does not believe that the 6 percent cap on tuition puts a four-year guaranteed
12-Dec-13
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Higher Education-hearing
tuition level in jeopardy.
No Colorado public institution of higher education offers a guaranteed tuition rate for
resident, undergraduate students although the statutory ability to offer such guarantees exists
(see Section 23-5-131, C.R.S. (2013)).
However, CSU-Global does offer a Tuition Guarantee for enrolling students in a BS or MS
degree program. Upon enrolling the students online tuition rate is locked in throughout the
program, as long as the student remains in classes and in good academic standing but the
agreement is not anticipated to have an impact on these online tuition rates.
Therefore, any agreement to cap resident, undergraduate tuition would not impact these
students. It is also worth noting that the University of Colorado currently offers a tuition
guarantee approach to its non-resident students. However, since non-resident tuition is not
implicated in any “cap” discussions or agreement, the guaranteed tuition is not at issue.
Requested Increases - Financial Aid
19. Discuss the balance between merit-based and need-based aid. Is there a need for more meritbased aid?
The majority of the request is to support the state need-based aid program. Need-based aid is
intended to provide access for students with the least ability to pay. The new need-based aid
allocation method approved by CCHE last year is specifically designed to target aid to
students and institutions based on the progress of Pell eligible students towards degree and
certificate completion. The increase to need based aid will allow institutions to award larger
amounts to more students.
With rising college costs students from middle income families have fewer options for grant
aid programs and merit is one of the few options available for students without regard to
need. A state funded merit aid program helps to retain Colorado’s high achieving students.
As the prior state merit program was reduced and eventually eliminated, many of the
institutions were able to back fill the cuts with institutional aid. Not all institutions had the
same ability to backfill the cuts, so a state merit based program helps institutions with fewer
resources to attract meritorious students.
20. What factors will CCHE consider in deciding how to allocate work-study grants? If we
already have programs in place, why reinvent the wheel? Should we have less of the merit
based grants and more of the work study grants?
The Commission has asked for recommendations based upon feedback from the institutions.
The state work-study allocations have not been reviewed in more than a decade and the
requested funding provides an opportunity to evaluate the existing work-study allocation and
make improvements if possible. Increases to work-study include an administrative component
12-Dec-13
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Higher Education-hearing
in the hiring and oversight of student workers. Not all institutions have the ability to absorb
new student positions, while others may be able to add multiple positions with ease. In
addition, as the economy recovers, work-study positions are not as attractive to students
because there are often more lucrative off-campus job opportunities. It is the intent of CDHE
to work with the campuses to find the right balance to determine the work study allocation.
Merit based grants serve a different purpose than work-study grants. Diversifying aid options
provides more opportunities to different types of students. Since merit aid has not been
offered for several years, the new infusion of funding would present an opportunity to assess
how best to allocate the new funds. Similar to work-study funding, the department intends to
work closely with the institutions on implementing a merit based grant program and
allocation model.
21. Discuss the statutory authorization for financial aid transfers and provide a history of transfers
between different types of financial aid over the last five years.
C.R.S. 23-3.3-102 (7) provides the Commission transfer authority between financial aid
appropriations up to ten percent of the lesser appropriation. The state controller’s office
must approve transfers greater than ten percent.
The way that the Commission has used the transfer authority has varied based upon the
financial circumstances in the state. For the past few years, the transfer authority has
been used as a financial management tool to use roll forward financial aid funds for
increases in the Dependents Tuition Assistance Program appropriation.
Prior to the economic downturn, the Commission used the transfer authority to transfer
funds between appropriation lines to ensure maximum expenditure of all financial aid
appropriations. For example, there was an appropriation for Pre Collegiate Scholarships
from FY 2006-07 to FY 2008-09. The guidelines for the program were narrow and in FY
2008-09, the program funding doubled. Institutions had problems identifying eligible
students so the unspent funds were transferred to need based grants. Transfer from FY
2006-07 through FY 2012-13 are detailed in the table below.
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Higher Education-hearing
Fiscal Year Amount
Appropriation Transfer was Made From
2006-07
$50,000 National Guard Tuition Assistnace Fund
$60,000
DTAP
$64,384
Need Based Grants
$12,060 Scholarship for Precollegiate Programs
$336
DTAP
$291,392
Required Federal Match
Appropriation Transfer was
Made To
Need Based Grants
Need Based Grants
Work Study
Work Study
Work Study
Work Study
2007-08
$13,500
Required Federal Match
DTAP
$681 National Guard Tuition Assistance Fund
Need Based Grants
$12,048
Need Based grants
DTAP
$4,952
Need Based
Scholarship
grants for Precollegiate Programs
$30,754
Need Based grants
Work Study
$187,952
Required Federal Match
Work Study
2008-09
$62,409
$186,962
$58,279
$17,005
$362,433
Work Study
Required Federal Match
Scholarships for Precollegiat Programs
TCG
Need Based Grants
DTAP
Need Based Grants
Need Based Grants
Need Based Grants
Work Study
2009-10
$14,703
$158,008
$19,866
$9,134
Work Study
Need Based Grants
Required Federal Match
Teach Colorado Initiative
DTAP
Work Study
Work Study
Work Study
2010-11
$23,014
$5,500
$29,374
Required Federal Match
Need Based Grants
Required Federal Match
DTAP
Work Study
Work Study
2011-12
$81,807
$3,765
$3,319
Need Based Grants
Need Based Grants
DTAP
DTAP
Work Study
Work Study
2012-13
$124,778
$62,263
Need Based Grants
Need Based Grants
DTAP
Work Study
To cover the costs of private stipends that exceed the Long Bill appropriation, a different
authority has been employed. In years when the Department has required additional
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Higher Education-hearing
funding to fully cover all authorized private stipends that must be paid, it has submitted a
transfer request to the State Controller and the Governor’s Office per the Governors’
transfer authority as found in section 24-75-108 (1) C.R.S. These transfer requests are
submitted under the criteria of “like purpose” of programs. Private stipends are
considered financial aid because, according to an Attorney General’s opinion, they
represent the States payment or “waiver” on behalf of the student and are paid directly to
the student, not the institution.
Transfers to Private Stipend Line Item
Amount
Transferred to
Fiscal Year Private Stipends
2006-07
$0
Originating
Appropriation
N/A
2007-08
$0
N/A
2008-09
$16,401
Work Study
2009-10
$156,954 Required Federal Match
2010-11
$157,867
Need Based Grants
2011-12
$170,425
$31,681
$202,106
Need Based Grants
Work Study
$76,906
$107,853
$184,759
Need Based Grants
Work Study
Total 11-12
2012-13
Total 12-13
22. Do you have a position on the staff recommendations to change financial aid statutes? Is there
a problem with how institutions are operating under the current statute? Do you believe this
could be done quickly or should it be delayed for more study?
The JBC staff recommendations related to changes in the financial aid statute were broken
into two separate issue numbers (found on page 53 thru 56 of the JBC Staff Budget Briefing:
FY 2014-15 document).
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As with any legislative proposal the department would need to review the exact wording of the
proposed legislative change to determine its position on the subject, but has attempted to
provide its general response to the proposed staff recommended changes by issue.
Generally speaking, the department would not oppose efforts to clarify and modernize statute
to bring the law into alignment with current practice. However changes that would materially
interfere with governing board’s existing flexibility to leverage and optimize aid for based on
student needs at individual institutions would need to be considered carefully in conjunction
with the governing boards as not to result in any unintended impacts.
Currently, state funded financial aid programs are audited to ensure that institutions are
audited against allocation notices issued by the Colorado Department of Higher Education.
If audits result in aid being awarded outside of the allocation notice, funds are returned to the
state and reverted to the General Fund. The instances of aid being awarded outside of the
allocation notice are limited and the amounts tend to be less than $5,000. Typically, the
errors are a result to a student’s change in enrollment or change on their Free Application
for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The department believes the current audit practices
provide an appropriate level of program oversight.
The JBC staff recommendation for Issue #1 included three options (noted below):



12-Dec-13
Issue #1 – Who defines what constitutes “Need Based Grants” or “Merit Based
Grants”?
Option 1: Add statutory language requiring that funds be spent by the institutions
consistent with the purposes specified by Long Bill line item titles, footnotes and the
definitions in the article. Then, add definitions to the statute for “Need-based Grants”,
“Work Study” and “Merit Based Grants”. Such definitions could be extremely broad,
leaving institutions with substantial flexibility.
Option 2: Add language to clarify the Commission’s authority to establish broad
parameters for institutions’ use of appropriated financial aid. This might include, for
example clarifying Section 23-3.3-102 (1), C.R.S., to specify that the Commission
may establish, in consultation with the institutions, general guidelines within which
institutionally-administered programs must operate.
Option 3: [Could be combined with Options 1 or 2] Provide the Commission authority
to review/approve financial assistance program policies and procedures established by
the governing boards. Staff recognizes that this might be controversial, but it would
restore a mechanism by which CCHE could “smell test” institutional policies to ensure
they are consistent with legislative intent as expressed in Long Bill line item titles and
footnotes.
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Higher Education-hearing
On issue #1, the department views Option 1 as clarifying and modernizing statute to bring the
law into alignment with current practice. Option 2 would clarify and add to Commission
authority to establish broad parameters for institutions’ use of appropriated financial aid. If
a legislative change is desired to define need based and merit based grants, options one and
two from the staff recommendations would be preferred by the department. Option three is
more difficult to implement due to the timing of legislative session and financial aid
packaging timelines. As such it could create an additional administrative burden for the
institutions and could potentially require additional staff resources at the department for
implementation. Again, specific language would need to be reviewed under each option to
have a formal opinion on the legislative change.
The JBC staff recommendation for Issue #2 (noted below):
Issue #2 Archaic language/authority of CCHE to transfer funds:
Staff recommends that the Committee sponsor legislation to update this statute to more
clearly conform to current practice. To do this, statute would need to specify that:
• The General Assembly may appropriate funds for the purposes specified in the article;
• The Department has authority to transfer some portion of the total funds appropriated for
financial aid among line items (10 percent or some smaller amount); and
• Transfer authority extends to College Opportunity Fund stipends to private institutions
Any effort to clarify archaic language is welcome by the department. With regard to the
transfer issue, if the transfer authority is too limited and the definitions are too narrow, it
could result in increased involvement with the state controller’s office to approve any transfer
between lines that falls outside of the definitions. Additionally, the inability to transfer funds
between lines could potentially result in reversions of financial aid to the General Fund
rather than monies being transferred for use for a like purpose of financial aid. Maintaining
the department’s transfer authority at ten percent seems reasonable to the department.
Lastly, after further investigation into what authority was used for purposes of transfer, the
department’s transfer authority has not been used for the College Opportunity Fund, but
rather through the Governor’s transfer authority was used in this instance.
Performance/Outcomes-based Funding
23. Review your proposal for tying performance to funding (due December 1, 2013, pursuant to
S.B. 11-052).
The Performance Funding Plan was approved by the Colorado Commission on Higher
Education on December 5, 2013 and sent to the House and Senate Education Committees and
the Joint Budget Committee on December 6, 2013. The centerpiece of the plan is a description
of the quantitative process used to allocate performance funds and it details the steps for
collecting data, awarding and weighting points, and finally scaling and totaling points.
Ultimately these points are then applied against available performance funding to be
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Higher Education-hearing
allocated by governing board. Each state with a performance funding mechanism for higher
education uses a unique allocation methodology and Colorado’s was developed with the input
of the institutions, evaluation of other state systems and the assistance of the department and
the National Center for Higher Education Management Systems (NCHEMS).
Over the summer and autumn department staff met with governing board CFOs and
institution data experts (Data Advisory Committee) to establish common principles and
develop a Technical Guidebook to ensure that data are collected consistently and applied
accurately. Principles included concepts such as measuring progress toward a goal
alongside goal achievement. For example, if an institution gains ground toward a metric goal
and gets 80% of the way to meeting that goal, that institution would still “get credit” for that
progress.
The actual performance assignment process breaks down into the following steps:
1. Data are collected and points are assigned for each metric associated with one of the
four goals,
2. The points are weighted in accordance with the weights assigned by governing boards
in the performance contracts,
3. The weighted points are scaled to account for the relative size of the institution or
system,
4. The relative share of “total” performance across all the institutions is measured
against total performance funds available and shares of funding are awarded to
governing boards.
The plan walks through a hypothetical allocation scenario based on credential completion to
illustrate the process. Continued data collection and the collective work of the department
and institutions will be needed to build performance funding “baseline” data and complete a
fully functioning performance funding model.
Another part of the plan required by statute is related to how performance funding will impact
Colorado’s unique funding allocation system, the College Opportunity Fund (known as COF).
The COF system of funding student stipends and fee-for-service contracts was implemented in
2005 long before a performance funding mechanism was anticipated. The primary concern
with the potential overlay of performance funding as it relates to COF is the ability to retain
TABOR enterprise status for the publically funded institutions and governing boards. To this
end, the plan recommends that a third category of COF be created in anticipation of
performance funding becoming available that would allow Colorado to “purchase”
performance (such as additional degree completion) through COF in the same way that the
state purchases unique services through COF fee-for-service contracts. While this will likely
require slight statutory changes, initial department discussions with legislative legal services
staff indicate that this approach would meet the needs of COF and adequately segregate
performance funding from the other COF funding categories.
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The plan closes by highlighting next steps as well as some of the challenges and opportunities
in successfully implementing performance funding over the next few years. The plan
anticipates the ability to further evaluate and adjust Colorado’s approach to performance
funding in anticipation of funding levels that will trigger performance implementation.
The full plan can be found at:
http://highered.colorado.gov/CCHE/Meetings/2013/dec/dec5_perffundingA.pdf
24. Do we really have to wait until all funds have been restored (to $706 million) to go to
performance-based funding?
By statute, the actual allocation of performance funding will occur beginning as soon as FY
2016-17 when state funding for higher education is at or above $706 million with 25 percent
of the amount over $650 million being made available for performance funding. The amount
of funding currently authorized in statute for performance funding would be approximately
$14 million at the $706 million trigger. In order for performance funding to begin sooner, at
a different trigger point, or for a different amount current statute would need to be modified.
The Department is supportive of the performance funding process to date and has worked
closely with governing board representatives to develop a comprehensive tool to allocate any
available performance funding based on performance metrics. The benefit of the performance
funding approach currently in statute is that it allows the metrics selected by governing
boards as the basis of the performance funding plan to be in place and have data collected
prior to performance funding actually flowing through the model. This allows the department
to collect “baseline” data to test and where necessary, work with the governing boards to
make modifications to the funding model or the metrics before performance funding is at
stake.
Performance funding could begin sooner than currently anticipated with a statutory change
but we do not believe an acceleration of the performance plan in place is beneficial or
realistic given anticipated funding levels and the need to collect baseline performance data.
Even at the level of the Governor’s FY2014-15 funding request, public funding per student for
Colorado public higher education would still be well below almost every other state. In
addition, the process is already underway for collecting commonly measurable baseline data
to support the recently executed performance contracts. Changes to the contracts and metrics
could reset the timeline for collecting this data and push outcome-based measurement to an
even later date.
For these reasons, the Department recommends the current approach which allows for
continued financial recovery for the system concurrent with the collection and evaluation of
output-driven data. This will allow institutions to evaluate performance results while planning
for operations with available resources and provide a transparent public comparison of
12-Dec-13
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Higher Education-hearing
output-driven data under the new performance contracts.
25. Provide additional information on other states’ performance funding efforts. How do these
address the differences between different kinds of institutions?
Many states have embarked on efforts to provide a portion of higher education funding based
on performance indicators. Performance-based funding is based on a formula that utilizes
performance indicators such as course completion, time to degree, transfer rates, degrees
awarded, and low income and minority graduates in order to allocate a portion of its higher
education funding.
Successful performance-based funding programs allow for postsecondary institutions with
different missions to use different metrics to accommodate institutional differences. Generally
speaking, there are three models utilized by states in implementing performance-based
funding models: output-based funding formulas, performance set-asides, and performance
contracts.
Variations of these three models are applied by different states, but all address the differences
between different kinds of institutions. Output-based funding formulas utilize a portion of
the annual base appropriations as a financial incentive for institutions meeting certain
metrics. Output-based funding formulas acknowledge the differences between different types
of institutions by applying different weights based on institutional missions. Performance setasides allocate a specific percentage of state funding to be “set aside” for the highest
performing institutions and again have allowances to account for institutional differences. In
the third model, performance contracts, individual institutions have established numerical
goals identified in contract that need to be met in order to be awarded funding.
In recent years, more states are utilizing performance funding to incentivize progress towards
institutional missions as well as alignment with a state’s priorities. There are currently
twenty-two states with performance-based funding in place, seven states that are in the
process of transitioning to performance-based funding (including Colorado), ten states where
performance funding is being considered and only twelve states with no indication of moving
towards performance based funding.
12-Dec-13
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Higher Education-hearing
Tennessee, Pennsylvania, and Nevada all provide good examples of different approaches to
performance-based funding and are described in greater detail below:
Tennessee
Tennessee provides a unique example in its approach to performance-funding. In 2010, the
Tennessee state legislature drastically redesigned their higher education funding formula with
the passage of the Complete College Tennessee Act. While Tennessee had been the first state
to introduce performance-based funding in 1978, prior to 2010 it had only made up a small
proportion of state appropriations. The 2010 program changes the focus from an enrollment
based funding formula to persistence and graduation. Tennessee will soon be the first state to
base 100 percent of higher education funding on performance-based indicators. Tennessee
separates metrics designed to measure university performance from community college
performance. In their formula, degree completion for non-traditional (adults over 25) and for
low income students are weighted more heavily (receiving a 40 percent bonus per credit hour
earned). Individual institutional mission and priorities are recognized through additional
weighting and scaling.
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Higher Education-hearing
Tennessee Performance Based Funding Metrics
University Metrics
Community College Metrics
Students
accumulating: 24, 48, Student accumulating: 12, 24,
and 72 credit hours
and 36 hours
Bachelor’s, Master’s,
Doctoral, and law
degrees
Research/grant
funding
Transfers out with 12
hours
Degrees per 100 fulltime equivalent (FTE)
Six-year graduation
rate
Dual enrolled students
Associated degrees
Graduates placed in jobs
Remedial and development
success
Transfers out with 12 credit
hours
Workforce training (contact
hours)
Award per 100 FTEs
Source: National Conference of State Legislatures
Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania provides an example where performance funding has been in place long enough
to begin to show measurable results. Pennsylvania incorporated performance-based funding
into its higher education system in 2000. Since implementing this approach, the public
colleges in Pennsylvania have experienced a 10 percent increase in overall graduation rates
and a 15 percent increase in retention rates for Hispanic students. In 2011, the Pennsylvania
State System of Higher Education changed its performance-based funding model in order to
integrate specific institutional goals into the model. The performance-based funding was
changed from 8 percent of its state appropriation to 2.4 percent of the total education and
general budget. This change in allocation did not change the overall funding amount, which
remains at approximately $36 million annually.
Pennsylvania’s new performance funding model recognizes the differences between different
kinds of institutions by allowing institutions to play a role in the creation of the indicators of
success. Colleges are measured against 10 separate performance indicators: five are
mandatory state wide indicators that are applied to all institutions while five are designed by
the institutions themselves as illustrated in the table below:
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Higher Education-hearing
Pennsylvania Performance Based Funding Metrics
State Metrics
Institutional Metrics
1. Student Success: deep learning scale results;
1. Student Success: Number of Degrees
senior survey; student persistence; value added;
Awarded
and STEM degrees
2. Access: faculty career advancement;
2. Student Success: Improvement of
employment diversity; student experience with
Graduation Rates
diversity; and student diversity
3. Stewardship: facilities investment; admin.
expenditures as a percent of educational costs;
3. Access: Reduction in Achievement Gaps
faculty productivity; and employee productivity
4. University-specific: may create no more than
4. Access: Faculty Diversity
2 indicators
5. Stewardship: Private Support Dollars
5. University-specific: may create no more than
Raised
2 indicators
Source: National Conference of State Legislators
Nevada
The Nevada State Legislature adopted a performance funding pool for the seven teaching
institutions and the Desert Research Institute which together comprise the Nevada System of
Higher Education (NSHE). Funding is allocated to NSHE institutions through a base formula
and a performance pool. The performance pool will be a carve-out from total state funding
for higher education. Nevada will begin implementing funding through the performance pool
in FY 2014. In Nevada performance funding will ramp up over time. In the first years five
percent of available funds will be allocated based upon performance, 10 percent in the second
year, 15 percent in the third year, with a maximum of 20 percent set aside after the fourth
year. Like many states Nevada has experienced significant funding cuts in recent years and
through performance-funding institutions will have the opportunity to “earn back” funding
based upon performance.
Performance measures will be based on seven metrics. These include graduation rates
(completion) with extra credit granted for completing students in defined populations (such as
minority and Pell eligible). Each metric is weighted, with the highest weighting applied
towards graduation.
Institutional differences are recognized in that institutions will compete against themselves in
individual pools of peer institutions with consistent set of measures within tiers as illustrated
in the tables below:
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Higher Education-hearing
Other Questions
26. What is driving the requested increase for the DTAP program? Is it the number eligible for
the program or are costs actually increasing?
There are multiple factors driving the requested increase for the DTAP program including the
number of eligible participants and increasing costs. Costs related to the DTAP benefit are
increasing as are the number of eligible students applying for the program. In 2008 DTAP
funded 52 eligible students and today there are 64 eligible DTAP students in the program.
The Dependent Tuition Assistance Program (DTAP) pays costs related to tuition and oncampus room and board for dependents of Colorado law enforcement officers, fire or national
guard personnel killed or disabled in the line of duty, and for dependents of prisoners of war
or service personnel listed as missing in action. The program is overseen by the Colorado
Commission on Higher Education through the day-to-day management of department staff.
The majority of DTAP students are dependents of police, sheriff, law enforcement officers and
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Higher Education-hearing
firefighters. The DTAP caseload and cost can be difficult to predict as the primary driver is
determined by the number of eligible dependents of Colorado law enforcement officers, fire or
National Guard personnel killed or disabled in the line of duty. DTAP cost increases are also
a factor of tuition and room/board costs increases each year. Often costs related to room and
board increase more rapidly than tuition and currently represent the greater share of cost for
DTAP students. For the fall 2013 semester, the total cost of tuition was $144,015 and the
room and board costs were $149,504.
Other factors also contribute to the difficulty in predicting annual DTAP costs. Under the
law, DTAP recipients can opt to go to school out-of-state and in this case the benefit is
adjusted to a level comparable to an in state rate for a Colorado institution. Students that opt
to attend out-of-state are not eligible for the room and board benefit thus reducing the total
cost to the DTAP program. This occurrence is offset when an eligible DTAP applicant is
living out-of-state and then returns to attend a Colorado institution. In this case, such a
student does not qualify for Colorado in-state tuition rates and the program has to cover the
cost of non-resident tuition plus room and board.
The definition of “dependent” in statute also creates some inconsistency and unpredictability
in the operation of the DTAP program. Colorado Revised Statutes (23-3.3-201) define
“Dependent” as: “Any natural child born or conceived before the period of time either of
said child’s parents served as a prisoner of war, was declared a person missing in action,
served on state active duty or authorized training duty as a Colorado national guardsman, or
was permanently disabled or killed while acting to preserve the public peace, health, and
safety in the capacity of police officer, sheriff, or other law enforcement officer or firefighter.”
In this case, the statute specifically states that the eligible parent must be a Colorado national
guardsman but does not specify that the police officer, sheriff, or other law enforcement
officer or firefighter had to have been employed in Colorado, thus expanding the class of
eligible participants and increasing total DTAP program costs.
27. Why hasn’t the Department attempted to implement the COF as was originally intended?
The June 2012 Legislative Audit Committee Performance Audit of the Implementation of the
College Opportunity Fund Program report specifically stated that:
“A primary factor that has affected total COF Program funding has been outside the
Department’s control. The economic recession and State resource limitations have
reduced the State’s ability to fund and implement the COF Program as intended in
statute.”
The economic conditions Colorado faced between Fiscal Years 2008 and 2011 created
significant barriers to implementing the COF Program as intended. In particular, the sharp
decline in State revenues to support higher education limited the State’s ability to fund the
COF Program at the level originally anticipated when Senate Bill 04-189 passed and to
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increase stipend funding at a pace equivalent to enrollment growth and inflation.
As noted in the 2008 evaluation of the COF program conducted by the Western Interstate
Commission for Higher Education (WICHE), the stipend amount that was originally
considered was “much richer than the amount that eventually was included in the policy. By
the time the legislature enacted the policy, the state economic recession had led to a reduction
in the stipend amount from the originally proposed $4,000 annually for a full‐time student to
$2,400. Several of the proponents argued that the reduction largely gutted the capacity of the
stipend to influence the enrollment decisions of prospective students” [CITE: An Evaluation
of Colorado’s College Opportunity Fund and Related Policies, p. 24, WICHE, 2008].
During the Great Recession, college enrollment nationwide expanded dramatically which
contributed to difficulties among states nationwide to fund higher education in line with
enrollment growth. Based on the most recent national data available, enrollment in
Colorado’s public higher education institutions was similar to the national trend; it
significantly increased in Fiscal Years 2009 and 2010 while State funds available for higher
education declined.
While Colorado is making significant progress towards restoration of higher education
funding as the economy improves, the total amount required to fully fund COF stipend
enrollment is substantial. To fully address the 2012 College Opportunity Fund audit
recommendations, the Colorado Commission on Higher Education (CCHE) prepared and
submitted to the JBC estimates of funding needed to fully fund the COF program as statutorily
required (enrollment plus inflation) on November 1, 2013. Specifically, for the COF Stipend
to keep pace with inflation as well as the growing enrollment of the eligible population since
the implementation of COF in FY 2005-06, it would cost the state approximately $141.6
million additional General Fund in FY 2014-15 as compared to its current funding level (in
FY 2013-14). This does not address any inflationary increases related to COF fee-for-service
(FFS) contract funding from its inception in FY 2005-06 to FY 2014-15, since it is not
required by statute.
28. What entity is responsible for building maintenance management for institutional properties?
Clarify the roles of the institutions, CCHE, and the State Architect.
Both the institutions and State are responsible for building maintenance on institutional
properties. There are three methods by which an institution can fund building maintenance.
1. If the cost of the maintenance is estimated to be under two million dollars or
the project can be broken down into a few phases costing less than two million
dollars each, the institution can submit a controlled maintenance request for
state funds to the Office of the State Architect. The State Architect reviews
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these requests, ranks them according to severity and submits a recommended
controlled maintenance list to the Capital Development Committee (CDC).
2. If the cost of the maintenance is estimated to be over two million dollars, the
institution can submit a capital renewal request to both the State Architect and
CCHE. These projects are reviewed and treated as other capital construction
requests by CCHE.
3. Due to the number of building on institution’s campuses, there are greater
maintenance needs than there are state funds for controlled maintenance.
Additionally, the State Architect’s controlled maintenance list generally
includes the most severe projects and is broken up into three levels. In recent
years, the list has been funded through level one (most severe) and
occasionally, through level two (moderately severe). Generally, controlled
maintenance is less costly when it is addressed immediately. As a result of the
factors listed above, institutions have taken it upon themselves to fund a
majority of their controlled maintenance projects through cash funds. Most of
the cash-funded controlled maintenance projects are under two million dollars
and therefore, not required to be approved by CCHE or CDC. The institutions
report their cash spending on capital projects every year and DHE staff uses
this data to compile an annual cash-funded capital projects report.
In order to attract, retain and properly educate students, institution’s need safe and well
maintained facilities. As a result, institutions have assumed responsibility for the majority of
building maintenance on their campuses. Of the total funds spent on higher education specific
controlled maintenance in FY 2012-13, 15% were state funds and 85% were institutional cash
funds In FY 2011-12, the breakdown of total maintenance funding was 3% state funds and
97% institutional cash funds.
29. What are institutional policies related to national merit scholars? Do they typically receive
merit-based aid or admissions preferences?
There is no state-wide policy for National Merit Scholars either for admissions or merit based
aid at institutions. It is fair to say that National Merit Scholars are likely to meet the criteria
to receive institutional merit based scholarships at some institutions, but not all merit
scholars will receive merit aid.
The National Merit Scholarship is a competitive scholarship and only 8,000 students
nationwide qualify for a scholarship. Two institutions in Colorado participate as Merit
Scholarship Sponsors (Colorado State University and Colorado College). More information
can be found here: http://www.nationalmerit.org/student_guide.pdf
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9:40-10:10
WESTERN STATE COLORADO UNIVERSITY
Note: The JBC requests that trustees be present for the hearing
Financial Health of Institution
1. What is your plan to ensure there is long term financial health of your institution?
The University has identified and implemented strategies to achieve financial health through
growing enrollment and by adjusting its financial model and.
Growing Enrollment
Critical to the success of the University and the achievement of financial health is stabilizing
and growing the institution’s enrollment. The University’s 2009-2014 Strategic Plan
identifies enrollment growth as a central goal. To this end, the University has undertaken
numerous initiatives to implement the Strategic Plan and provides the Board of Trustees
regular updates on its progress. These initiatives focus on both recruitment of new students
and the retention of existing students.
While many initiatives have been implemented since the inception of the 2009-2014 Strategic
Plan, it is important to highlight several that have been instrumental in the recent increases in
enrollment at the University:



The University developed a comprehensive First-Year Experience (FYE) program that was
implemented in fall 2012. This program restructured the University’s orientation program
and initiated a First-Year Seminar which all incoming students must take. The primary
focus of the FYE is to engage students with their academic majors (or to encourage
exploration of majors if undecided), in living-learning communities, in the Gunnison
Valley, and with each other. Based on preliminary fall enrollment data, the University’s
freshman to sophomore retention rate is up approximately 5 percentage points from 63
percent to 68 percent.
The University developed a comprehensive SophoMore Experience program that was
implemented in fall 2013. Following the FYE theme of engagement, this program focuses
on providing leadership opportunities and skills-development for the University’s second
year students. As part of the SophoMore Experience, the University instituted a secondyear live-on requirement that was effective this fall. Not only has this helped ensure
student engagement on campus and further community development, it has provided
additional revenue to the auxiliary programs.
The University has successfully re-launched graduate programs. In 2007, legislation was
passed that allowed the University to offer graduate programs, an authority stripped away
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

in the late 1980s. Starting in fiscal year 2011, the University began offering a Masters of
Arts in Teacher Education and a Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing. These programs
are managed through the institution’s Extended Studies program and are entirely cashfunded. These programs help the University fulfill its role as a regional education
provider and, through the overhead allocation, provide a source of income to support
undergraduate programs at the institution
In fiscal year 2013, the University added two women sports programs, soccer and
swimming, to attract female students. As an institution that has a higher proportion of
males than females, striking a more balanced gender mix within the student body will help
improve the University’s retention rates.
The University changed its name in fiscal year 2013 from Western State College of
Colorado to Western State Colorado University. The change from college to university
better reflects to prospective students and the general public the institution’s program
offerings and aspirations.
The implementation of these recent initiatives, along with others, has contributed to
enrollment growth as illustrated in Table 1. Specifically, headcount enrollment has grown
over 150 the past two fiscal years.
Table 1
Resident
FTE-S
NonResident
FTE-S
Cash
Funded
FTE-S
2011-12
1,343
455
199
1,997
2,242
2012-13
1,336
456
199
1,991
2,301
2013-14 Est.1
1,354
475
205
2,034
2,397
Year
Total
FTE-S
Total Fall
Unduplicated
Headcount
1
Based on fall 2013 census information.
In addition to the completed initiatives mentioned above, the following are some key tasks
currently underway that will support continued progress towards enrollment growth:


The University recently reorganized the enrollment management function to streamline
processes and ensure better productivity and success, particularly in areas of student
recruitment.
The University is in the process of developing a comprehensive enrollment management
plan that will utilize data in decision making and identify mechanisms to measure success
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



in areas of both student recruitment and retention. This plan should be completed by the
end of the calendar year.
The University is in the process of developing a comprehensive marketing plan, as a
component of the enrollment management plan. This plan will focus on ways to help grow
the University’s pool of prospective students by raising institutional visibility and
awareness. This plan should be completed by the end of the calendar year.
The University is continuing to develop graduate and undergraduate programs that are
consistent with the institution’s role and mission. In fall 2014, a third graduate program, a
Masters in Environmental Management, will enroll its first class. The University has also
initiated undergraduate program development that will result in the increased offerings by
fall 2015.
Western has piloted a concurrent enrollment program over the past two years that has
included regional and state-wide course offerings on-line, at Western’s campus, and for
qualified K-12 teachers on their campuses under Western professors’ guidance. Over the
past year the University’s concurrent high school enrollment has grown considerably,
reaching 128 students enrolled in Fall 2013. Based on the experiences with the pilots,
Western has refined the model to focus on on-campus and K-12 teacher-led face-to-face
courses overseen by Western faculty. School districts are most interested in the second
model, and the University is in negotiations with several school districts to collaborate
with them. Western is also working on a rural funding model with the CDE which may be
more advantageous for the school districts. Not only does this meet a need of Colorado’s
high school students, but it serves as a great opportunity for Western to build awareness
and recruit students.
The University has been recently named a military-friendly institution and will continue to
develop and maintain strong working relationships with regional military bases to improve
the services provided to the veteran population and to enhance opportunities for their
enrollment at the University.
An undergraduate marginal cost model was completed in fall 2012. This was in response to a
specific request by the Board of Trustees to gain a better understanding of the optimal
enrollment for the University. The model accounted for factors such as type of student (e.g.,
resident or nonresident), method of educational delivery, ratios of students to faculty/staff and
revenue generated per additional student. The model is a tool that allows the Board to identify
practical enrollment targets while setting specific revenue and expenditure assumptions and
taking into account the University’s history and unique geographic location. A copy of the
model can be made available to the Committee if desired.
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Changing the Financial Model
The University recognizes that state funding is not likely to recover to previous levels due to
Colorado’s budget dynamics that simultaneously mandate funding for areas like K-12
education and federal program matches (e.g., Medicaid) while limiting tax revenue. As such,
funding for higher education continues to be considered a discretionary piece of the state
budget and will likely remain as one of the first areas cut in an economic downturn. Over the
past ten years, these funding dynamics have resulted in a significant shift in the economic
model for public higher education in Colorado as demonstrated in Figure 1.
Figure 1
Precipitated by the reductions in state support and the tuition-setting flexibility provided by
legislature, the University has begun to restructure its financial model to be one that is more
dependent on tuition revenue. Being a smaller, rural institution, the University has
traditionally been more reliant on state funding than other four-year public institutions in the
state. While this reliance has made this transition more challenging, opportunities for tuition
revenue growth exist due to the relatively low rates charged by the University. In fact, even
as the University is in the midst of this transition, it continues to retain tuition and fee rates
that are competitive and in some cases below statewide and national peer averages.
While there is opportunity to increase tuition revenue through rate increases, the University
values access and affordability. As such, the University has made significant investments in
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institutional financial aid, increasing its allocation from $2.4 million in fiscal year 2010 to
$4.1 million budgeted for fiscal year 2014. Equally important, the strategic use of
institutional financial aid, as informed by a price sensitivity analysis conducted in 2009, has
allowed the University to achieve enrollment growth in the past two years while maintaining
positive net revenues (Figure 2).
Figure 2
35.0%
30.0%
Western State Colorado University
Discount Rates and Net Revenues
25.5%
25.0%
20.0%
25.2%
29.4%
32.4%
32.7%
33.0%
23.3%
24.2%
25.0%
27.9%
25.5%
21.1%
21.7%
22.6%
23.9%
22.8%
21.2%
19.0%
15.0%
10.0%
5.0%
0.0%
FY2007-08FY2008-09FY2009-10FY2010-11FY2011-12 FY2012- FY2013-14 FY2014-15 FY2015-16
13
Est.
Proj.
Proj.
Change in Net Revenues
Change in Net Revenues per FTE
Resident Discount Rate
Nonresident Discount Rate
In addition to modifying its financial model for annual operations, the University has
recognized that the state can no longer be relied upon to fund its capital construction needs.
As a primarily residential campus serving a student body of traditional age, the University
must have facilities that are contemporary and well-maintained in order to remain
competitive in student recruitment and retention. The University has made significant
investments in its physical plant which has increased the annual depreciation cost. To help
offset this cost, and to preserve these investments, the University has dedicated approximately
$400,000 annually of the revenue generated by the student-approved facility fee toward
capital renewal and replacement. While this amount represents a relatively small portion of
the annual depreciation cost, it is step in the right direction and will help the University
mitigate a growing deferred maintenance backlog.
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Based on an analysis conducted by the University, the composite score can be improved to at
least 1.0 in the next three years by increasing student enrollment by 100 students per year,
both a reasonable target given the institution’s recent history and a target consistent with the
marginal cost model. To achieve stronger ratios would require the dedication of tuition
revenue generated from the enrollment. All other revenue generated from projected increases
in base tuition and fees, as outlined in the Financial and Accountability Plan (available upon
request), could be dedicated to supporting University operations, including covering cost
increases and programmatic enhancements that can support further growth in enrollment.
2. How do the areas you serve affect your performance? How does your situation compare with
Mesa State’s?
The two institutions, per statute, have different roles and missions, although each serves as a
regional education provider. Western State Colorado University was established as a general
baccalaureate institution with moderately selective admission standards. The institution offers
liberal arts and science, teacher prep, business and graduate programs.
Colorado Mesa University is established in statue as a general baccalaureate and graduate
institution with selective admission standards. Colorado Mesa University offers programs in
liberal arts and sciences, professional and technical degrees, and a limited number of
graduate programs. Colorado Mesa possesses a two-year role and mission.
Western currently offers 22 undergraduate majors, 5 minors and 60 areas of undergraduate
studies (i.e., emphases). Western also offers two graduate programs with a third starting in
summer 2014.
Western State Colorado University serves students from all over the state of Colorado and
from all 50 states. Western’s ability to draw from a broad base of students, both
geographically and socio-economically, positions the University well for improved and
sustained financial performance.
3. Review your recent construction projects. When will we know if your capital investments
have succeeded in drawing students?
Western was founded in 1901 and was the first institution of higher learning on the Western
Slope and fourth public institution established in the state of Colorado. As one of the oldest
institutions in the state, Western has a relatively aged facility inventory. Based on original
construction dates, the average age of a building on Western’s campus is 52 years.
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Over the past ten years, Western has invested over $128 million into its facilities, both in the
form of capital construction and controlled maintenance. Of this amount, approximately $30
million (23%) came for state funding, $14 million (11%) came from private sources and $84
million (66%) came from institutional sources, including reserves and bond proceeds. Of the
$128 million invested, over 75% ($96 million) was utilized to renovate or rebuild existing
buildings in order to bring these facilities into proper compliance (code or otherwise) or up to
contemporary standards.
As an institution that draws over 90% of its students from over 100 miles away, Western is not
a choice of convenience. The University’s draw is having strong academic programs whose
delivery can be supported and enhanced by the facilities that house them.
The final project of this phase of investment is the recreation center and indoor field house
which will be completed in early 2014. This project also represents the only one which was
not a renovation or replacement. Western is including in its marketing and recruiting
campaigns information about the campus’s physical revitalization and expects that this will
positively contribute to meeting the University’s enrollment goals.
4. Provide the schedule for anticipated increases in bond payments and/or student fees.
Fiscal Year
2014
2015
2016
2017
2018
2019
2020
Schedule of projected bond payments and related students fees:
Amount from
Bond
Facility Fee
Facility Fee
Auxiliary
Principal/Interest*
Revenue**
(FT Rate)**
Funds
4,868,424
4,870,419
4,875,358
4,866,965
5,244,950
5,702,441
5,882,953
1,418,968
1,662,013
1,914,780
2,177,659
2,451,052
2,735,381
3,031,083
1,300
1,544
1,797
2,060
2,334
2,619
2,915
3,449,456
3,208,406
2,960,578
2,689,306
2,793,898
2,967,060
2,851,870
* Bond payments are net of the federal interest subsidy based on the FY14 amount which is $1,148,711
** Facility fee also generates revenue for deferred maintenance and scholarships. Revenue shown here only encompasses that
which is dedicated to bond repayment.
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In addition to the revenue sources dedicated to debt service payments, the University
maintains a debt service reserve fund that can mitigate any fluctuations in enrollment. The
reserve fund’s balance is currently $2.3 million.
5. Are cost increases affecting enrollment?
Overall headcount enrollment has increased by approximately 7% over the last two years,
and resident student headcount and FTE are projected to increase by 2.6% and 1.3%,
respectively, in the current year. Western’s investment in institutional financial aid has offset
tuition rate increases and has allowed the University to maintain access and affordability.
For the current year, resident tuition was increased by $648 per full-time student per year.
Institutional financial aid was increased on average by $412 per full-time student for the
current year, resulting in an average net cost increase of $236 per resident student per year.
This fall’s incoming class reflected the highest proportion of underserved students in recent
years, demonstrating Western’s commitment to serving these populations and meeting the
goals of the Statewide Master Plan. Western achieved this through intentional outreach
efforts, including the dedication of institutional financial aid as outlined in the University’s
approved FAP. The University has and will continue to comply with all requirements outlined
in the approved FAP as it relates to mitigating tuition increases for low- and middle-income
students. Table 2 below illustrates the changes in the average offered aid packages for these
students at Western:
Table 2
Fall
Western’s Tuition Impact on PELL Eligible, Level 1 and Level 2 Colorado Residents
# of PELL, Level 1,
Average
Offered Aid
Resident
% of Tuition
and Level 2 Colorado
Offered Aid
Package
Tuition $
Change Covered
residents
Package
$ Change
Change
2010
697
$11,477
n/a
n/a
2011
2012
2013
731
699
717
$12,157
$14,804
$16,461
$680
$2,647
$1,657
$499
$706
$648
136%
375%
256%
6. If your institution is unable to cover its bond payments, who is responsible? Is it the State?
Do you foresee this happening? If so, when?
Western does not anticipate any inability to cover existing bond obligations. Coverage ratios
(pledged revenues less expenses) remain strong at an average of 1.5 times since the issuance
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of the 2010 bonds, and it is anticipated that these ratios will continue at or above this level.
The University has also established an institutionally held debt service reserve fund to help
mitigate any fluctuations in enrollment. The balance of this fund is currently $2.3 million.
All of Western’s current debt is backed by the State Intercept Program. Under this program,
if Western is unable to make payment, the state can “intercept” fee-for-service payments due
to the University to satisfy bond obligations.
7. Is there interest in merging with other institutions of higher education in an effort to reduce
your fixed overhead costs?
Western does not have an interest in merging with other institutions of higher education.
Independent governing boards allow institutions better capability to capitalize on their unique
strengths. For Western, one of those strengths is a dedicated and generous alumni base. In
the less than ten years that Western has been independently governed, the University has
raised over $50 million in private support. This would not have been possible if Western were
a part of a larger system.
Western also does not believe that fixed overhead costs would be substantially reduced with a
merger. There are no positions on Western’s campus that are strictly responsible for
governance management and do not have operational responsibilities. The operating costs
associated with the University’s Board of Trustees are less than $160,000 annually.
Higher Education Funding Request and Options for Statutory Change
8. Please clarify your plans for tuition and fee increases in FY 2014-15.
The University intends to increase resident student tuition no more than 6% per the
Governor’s budget request. With the exception of the University’s facility fee, mandatory
student fees will not increase beyond the rate of inflation. The facility fee was approved on a
set schedule of adjustments and will increase by $243 per full-time student for FY2014-15.
9. How will low income students fare under your plan for FY 2014-15 tuition increases and
financial aid allocations?
The University will continue to comply with the requirements set forth in the approved
Financial and Accountability Plan and ensure low and middle income students are least
affected by tuition increases. This includes limiting tuition and fee increases for PELL
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eligible, Level 1 (no Pell) and Level 2 students to no more than one-half of the approved
increase.
As noted earlier, Western has made significant investments in institutional financial aid,
increasing expenditures by over $1 million since FY2009-10, and will continue its
commitment to access and affordability for low- and middle-income students.
10. Several years ago, the Colorado Legislature gave flexibility to institutions of higher education
to set your own tuition costs (S.B. 10-003). What is your opinion of this statute and is it time
for change?
Governing boards should continue to retain the authority to set tuition rates. The governing
boards are best equipped to understand their markets and price points and can develop
pricing and financial aid strategies that will ensure long-term sustainability of the institutions
they oversee.
A majority of the revenue generated through the flexible tuition authorized through S.B. 10003 was utilized to maintain operations at the University. While the state has made funding
higher education a priority for FY2014-15, the long-term sustainability of these dollars
remains uncertain. Continuing to have flexibility would not only provide tools for better
institutional management, but it would benefit strategies geared toward improving retention
and completion and reducing the attainment gap, both stated goals of the Statewide Master
Plan.
11. What recommendations do you have for the Joint Budget Committee and the General
Assembly to make the funding for higher education more equitable across institutions?
A fundamental strength of Colorado’s system of higher education is the diverse array of
educational opportunities and experiences that exist from which Colorado residents can
choose. Funding allocations should, in large part, reflect and recognize the uniqueness that
exists between and among our institutions.
Western also supports the move to performance based funding so far as there are sufficient
resources to dedicate towards this model and that performance include the commitment to
providing student access to higher education.
12. How does your institution define “need based aid”, “merit based aid”, and “work study”? Do
you have a position on the staff recommendation to clarify financial aid statutes?
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Need based aid is defined on the federal needs analysis calculation, Cost of Attendance minus
Estimated Family Contribution (EFC), which provides a student’s eligibility for need based
financial aid, and encompasses “need based aid”, “merit based aid” and “work study”. The
difference between the three listed in this question is need based aid has many forms (grants,
scholarships, work-study and loans). Merit scholarships are awarded based on academic or
other merit based criteria; however, merit aid still counts as need based assistance when a
student completes the FAFSA application. Work study is a form of need based funding
provided to students that wish to seek employment on campus. Work study funds from the
state may also be awarded to students that do not demonstrate need through the federal needs
analysis calculation.
Currently institutions have flexibility in awarding state financial aid dollars. This allows
Western to address unique circumstances and better meet the needs of the University’s lowand middle-income students and underserved populations. At this time Western’s
recommendation would be to continue to provide institutions with flexibility in administering
state financial aid dollars.
Tuition Increases: Cost Drivers
13. What does it cost you to educate a student? Is your tuition above or below that amount?
Total Cost per E&G Student FTE: FY2012-131
CSM
UC-B
CSU
UC-D
Ft Lewis
Western
UC-CS
Adams
UNC
CSU-P
CMU
Metro
$24,417 $22,818 $16,428 $14,858 $13,052
1
Source: Budget Data Books- Format 30, Line 16
$12,985
$12,853
$12,581
$11,862
$11,294
$9,279
$7,838
Per the Budget Data Book, the cost to educate a student at Western in FY2012-13 was
$12,985. Resident tuition for FY2012-13 was $4,627 and nonresident tuition was $14,496.
14. If tuition were lowered would more students come? Would it increase overall revenues if
tuition were less? What is the breakeven point?
While Western remains cognizant of price sensitivity and how it affects enrollment, the
University believes that lowering tuition would negatively impact the perceived value of the
education provided. Western has historically had one of the lowest resident tuition rates in
the state and this has not proven to be an enrollment driver. Most important is ensuring that
the net price, after the application of financial aid, remains affordable, and Western has
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committed substantial institutional resources toward ensuring accessibility. In fact, over the
past two years, resident tuition has increased by 32% at Western, and with strategic
investment in institutional financial aid, among other initiatives, the University has grown
resident enrollment (headcount) by 5.4%.
It should be emphasized that the rising price of tuition is the result of a cost shift due to state
appropriation reductions. Reducing tuition rates without a sustainable back-stop of state
support can result in programmatic cuts at institutions of higher education. This can diminish
the quality of the education provided and make it difficult for institutions to grow enrollment,
and more importantly, to meet the goals outlined in the Statewide Master Plan.
15. Since FY 2000, how have your operations costs increased and by what percentage? Please
describe reasons for operational cost increases.
Fiscal
Year
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
University
Operations
21,783,390
21,609,537
22,955,796
22,829,618
24,551,248
25,121,687
27,044,405
%
Change
Fiscal
Year
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
-0.80%
6.23%
-0.47%
6.47%
2.08%
6.74%
University
Operations
28,719,194
30,212,878
32,294,253
32,673,427
31,047,524
31,190,479
31,964,656
%
Change
5.46%
4.59%
6.06%
1.04%
-4.38%
0.40%
2.01%
Operations costs are defined as University expenditures as shown in the Financial Statement,
less non-base, state-funded controlled maintenance and depreciation. Cost increases occur
due to a variety of reasons, including, but not limited to, funding mandates, implementation of
strategic initiatives, and general inflationary adjustments.
16. For institutions of higher education that are in rural areas of the state, are there increased
operational costs? Please explain.
Western is located in a rural area with a relatively small community population. This limits
the schools ability to hire adjunct or part-time faculty. This limitation means fixed, full-time
faculty salary costs are a greater percent of total salaries than similar institutions in
Colorado. In larger communities, adjunct faculty can be utilized to offer additional course
sections, as well as to provide instruction at a lower costs.
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Travel for faculty, staff or students’ who must attend meetings and professional conferences is
also more costly. In recent years the University has implemented measures to reduce travel
and related costs as other means, such as teleconferencing, have become better available and
more reliable. The location also adds cost for goods and services, as compared to an urban
area where delivery costs are more reasonable.
While these technological capabilities can decrease operational costs that might be otherwise
inherent for a rural institution, they can also have a tendency to amplify isolation through
reducing presence and visibility, thus impacting these institutions’ ability to influence policy
matters. Institutions on the Front Range are closer to the capitol and department offices and
have a greater ability to share and receive information, and thus influence decision-making.
17. Since 2000, please provide a breakdown of your administrative costs and the percentage of
annual increases.
Fiscal
Year
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
%
Costs
Change
5,126,230
4,726,504 -7.80%
4,776,141 1.05%
4,812,793 0.77%
5,405,293 12.31%
5,293,402 -2.07%
5,539,710 4.65%
Fiscal
Year
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
%
Costs
Change
6,196,086 11.85%
6,678,509 7.79%
7,159,681 7.20%
6,935,847 -3.13%
6,924,850 -0.16%
6,580,135 -4.98%
6,805,850 3.43%
Administrative costs are defined as education and general (E&G) fund expenditures classified
as Institutional Support and Operations and Maintenance of Plant.
18. Please provide a breakdown of the salaries for administration positions, faculty, etc.
Funding Source
Educ. & General Fund
Ext. Studies, Grad. & Grant
Educ. & General Fund
Auxiliary Funds
Educ. & General Fund
Auxiliary Funds
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Status
Faculty
Faculty
Admin. & Professional
Admin. & Professional
Classified
Classified
65
Total
Salaries
6,259,788
1,245,052
3,963,786
1,228,398
1,540,947
887,287
FTE
115.0
19.8
79.6
26.5
39.9
24.6
Average
Salary
54,433
62,881
49,792
46,281
38,622
36,066
Higher Education-hearing
Totals
15,125,258
305.4
49,518
19. What is the percentage of full time faculty vs. adjunct faculty?
The University considers both Tenure/Tenure Track and full-time non-tenure/tenure-track
faculty positions full time. Based on the most recent IPEDS information the distribution is:
Faculty:
Tenure/tenure track
Full time, non-tenured
Total full time faculty
Part time faculty
Total
52%
21%
73%
27%
100%
20. What is the ratio of students per faculty member at your institution of higher education?
For the current fall semester the student to faculty ratio is 18:1.
21. What is the ratio of student tuition increases in comparison to salary for administration,
faculty and other staff?
Fiscal Year
FY2008-09
FY2009-10
FY2010-11
FY2011-12
FY2012-13
FY2013-14
Tuition Increases
Resident
NonTuition
Resident
7.1%
2.9%
8.3%
4.0%
9.0%
4.5%
14.6%
5.0%
18.0%
7.1%
14.0%
5.0%
Base Salary increases
Average
Faculty
Admin
other staff
6.0%
4.0%
4.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
2.5%
2.5%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
3.0%
3.0%
5.4%
22. How will the Affordable Care Act decrease health care costs for employees? Does your
institution of higher education anticipate long-term savings? If so, please explain.
The Affordable Care Act will not decrease health care costs for employees. The University’s
health insurance plans are provided through the CHEIBA Trust or through the State of
Colorado, and both are large group plans. Western’s health insurance plans already have
deductibles and maximum out of pocket costs to employees that are lower than those required
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by the Affordable Care Act. Prior to the effective date required by the Affordable Care Act,
the University’s plan already offered more coverage than the “essential benefits”, no lifetime
maximum on benefits, covered preventive health services at 100%, covered dependent
children to age 26 and offered a plan to cover those with pre-existing conditions.
Western does not anticipate any long-term savings as a result of the Affordable Care Act. The
Affordable Care Act will, instead, contribute to increased health insurance premium
costs. For 2014, Western experienced a 5.5% health insurance premium increase, of which
4% was attributable to new fees created by the Affordable Care Act. Western decided not to
increase the employee share of health insurance premiums in 2014, but the 5.5% premium
increase will cost the University over $200,000 in calendar 2014. Fees attributable to the
ACA, will be ongoing. After January 1, 2015 when the Affordable Care Act’s Employer
Shared Responsibility Mandate is effective, the University will be required to ensure that
premiums for employee-only coverage for full time employees, as defined by the Act, do not
exceed 9.5% of salary. We anticipate that this will further increase the University’s costs.
Student Loans
23. What is the loan default rate of graduates of your institution? If high, what steps are you
taking to address it?
Western’s most recent two-year and three-year default rate is 4.8% and 8.4%, respectively.
In 2008, the two-year default rate at Western was 8.5% and the three-year default rate was
10.6%. These default rates are among the lowest of all higher education institutions in the
state and this is due to our commitment to default management and prevention. Three years
ago, Western implemented in-person group session exit counseling, which has had a
significant impact in reducing our federal default rate the last 3 years.
24. What is the average amount of time that it takes your graduates to repay their student loans?
Standard repayment for all federal loans is 10 years. The majority, if not all students, repay
their loans within that time frame.
Workforce Needs and Employment After Graduation
25. Please provide information regarding what your institution of higher education is currently
doing to ensure job placement.
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Western offers Career Services programming and resume/cover letter reviews for all students
and alumni. During 2012-2013, 163 students met with the Career & Academic Advisor to
review resumes and cover letters, and 34 students took advantage of advising related to
careers, interviewing, and/or job/internship search techniques.
The Career & Academic Advisor also creates and implements programming related to Career
Services, including mock interviews, career closet, class presentations, presenting at preview
and accepted student days, and Western’s two largest events, the Etiquette Dinner and the
Career, Job, & Internship Fair held each spring, in which over 300 students participate and
over 30 employers and graduate schools attend. Lastly, an online job search database is
available to students and alumni through western.edu/career.
26. Once students graduate from your institution of higher education, what is the percentage that
use their degree to find employment?
Unknown at this time, however, the Career Services Office is collaborating with the Alumni
Relations Office and has created an alumni survey in which that data will be collected and
assessed. In addition, Western is in the process of creating a full time Career Services
position to better aid in our data collection and tracking. By 2015, the University will have
solid data that will be used to assess current Career Services offerings and will provide
important information to Western’s academic programs.
27. What is the average wage of your graduates?
Please see answer to question above regarding the newly created survey and full time Career
Services position.
28. If a graduate has a difficult time finding employment, what resources are available to him /
her through your institution of higher education to find a job? What are the success rates of
this effort?
All Career Services resources are open and available to University graduates. Alumni are
welcome to visit in person to review resumes, cover letters, and job search/interview
techniques. They are able to access the online job search database as well. In most cases,
alumni ask for assistance with gaining access to the online job search database or with
resume writing. Western will soon be implementing a tracking system to determine the
success rates of these efforts. This will allow for further collaboration between the Alumni
Relations Office and Career Services.
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29. What efforts is your institution undertaking to receive input from Colorado businesses to
prepare graduates that meet their workforce needs? How often do the Colorado businesses that
you work with actually hire your graduates?
The Career Services Office coordinates the annual Career, Job & Internship Fair each spring
and all of the 34 businesses or graduate schools who attended in 2013 have Colorado roots
and opportunities in Colorado. We have received comments after the Fair from businesses
and education programs stating that Western students are well prepared for interviews and
networking.
In certain disciplines across campus, such as Professional Land & Resource Management
(PLRM), Education, and Accounting, there is a direct connection from Western professors to
organizational professionals. Due to the institution’s remote location, there are limited
company recruiters who are able to physically come to campus to recruit. The PLRM
program is probably the most consistent program that offers on-campus recruiting, but mainly
for internship openings. It is unknown as to how many graduates get hired by Colorado
businesses, yet this is information Western will receive on the newly created survey going to
all Western alumni.
With the new Career Services position, Western will be surveying Colorado businesses to ask
about what they are looking for with new graduates and will use that information to assess
Career Services offerings to ensure students are prepared to the best extent possible.
Performance: Persistence, Completion, Closing the Gap
30. Since the Lt. Governor announced the "Master Plan" for institutions of higher education,
please describe the following:
a. If applicable, has your institution of higher education reduced the amount of time to
credential their graduates? If applicable, has your institution of higher education
reduced the amount of time to receive a 2-year or 4-year degree? Please distinguish
percentages based on demographics, underserved communities, gender, etc.
Among Colorado peers such as Adams, Mesa, CSU Pueblo, Ft Lewis and Metro,
Western has the highest 6 year graduation rate at 39 percent
(CollegeMeasures.org) which makes Western’s time to graduation comparable with
UCCS and UC Denver. Some of the measures that impact this graduation rate
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favorably are: tightly enforced limits on credits required per degree; retention
initiatives for first and second year, and mandatory advising. Revisions to
remediation, policy changes regarding transfer and residency requirements as well
as upgrades to graduation planning software are expected to further reduce time to
graduation.
b. What is your institution of higher education doing to retain students? What is your
retention rate? Please distinguish percentages based on demographics, underserved
communities, gender, etc.
Based on preliminary data for fall 2013, Western had its highest first to second year
retention rate in recent school history, at 68%. The retention rate has shown steady
improvement over the last three years. Also up significantly over the last three
years, the underserved (minority) retention rate was 68%. Overall, female students
continue to retain at higher rates than male students, which aligns with national
trends. Female student first to second year retention was 74% compared to male
student retention of 65%. These rates already place Western among the highest of
comparable Colorado institutions, and Western continues to strive to improve them.
The University developed a comprehensive First-Year Experience (FYE) program
that was implemented in fall 2012. This program restructured the University’s
orientation program and initiated a First-Year Seminar which all incoming students
must take. The primary focus of the FYE is to engage students with their academic
majors (or to encourage exploration of majors if undecided), with their
communities and with each other.
The University developed a comprehensive second year program, the SophoMore
Experience, that was implemented in fall 2013. Following the FYE theme of
engagement, this program focuses on providing leadership opportunities and skillsdevelopment for the University’s second year students. As part of the SophoMore
Experience, the University instituted a second-year live-on requirement that was
effective this fall.
Western is also instituting Supplemental Academic Instruction programming for fall
of 2014 to ensure students are college-ready and to move students out of basic skills
coursework and into college level courses.
This complements Western’s
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supplemental instruction (SI) program providing support for student success in
courses in which data shows that students struggle.
c. Does your institution of higher education experience an attainment gap? If so, what
is the institution doing to remedy such issues?
Between the 2005 and 2008 cohorts, the average gap in attainment between white
students and students from underserved populations was 11.2%. By the 2012-13
reporting year this attainment gap had essentially reversed itself
(CollegeMeasures.org).
Retention efforts for underserved population such as the PRIME program are
aimed at addressing the attainment gap. Promoting Readiness in Math and English
(PRIME) is focused on helping students attain basic college skill levels in Math and
English with out-of-classroom support. Also, the University’s Multicultural Center
continues to play a role in the expansion of on-campus programming and support
for underserved populations by creating a strong social network and support
system for students, including peer mentoring and tutoring, study-skill workshops
and early warning systems.
As noted earlier, retention rates for underserved populations are climbing at
Western and this is further improving educational attainment for traditionally
underserved student populations. Again, our graduation and retention rates for
African-American, Hispanic and female students are higher, in some cases
significantly so, than those of our Colorado peer institutions.
ASSET
31. Last session, we passed Colorado Asset (S.B. 13-033) so that undocumented students are able
to receive in-state tuition. How many undocumented students is your institution of higher
education currently serving?
For the fall 2013 semester Western has admitted 6 undocumented students.
10:10-10:50
COLORADO COMMUNITY COLLEGE SYSTEM
Higher Education Funding Request and Options for Statutory Change
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1. Please clarify your plans for tuition and fee increases in FY 2014-15.
The State Board for Community Colleges and Occupational Education (the State Board)
typically sets FY 2014-15 tuition rates in April 2014. As a result, there are no specific plans
in place at this time. However, as the Governor has requested, CCCS is committed, given the
level of state support allocated in the November 1 budget request, to keep resident tuition
increases for FY 2014-15 below 6%. In terms of mandatory student fees, the maximum a fee
is allowed to increase in a fiscal year is at the rate of the Denver-Boulder CPI. A successful
student referendum agreeing to any additional increase is necessary to go above that rate of
increase.
2. How will low income students fare under your plan for FY 2014-15 tuition increases and
financial aid allocations?
Without specific information about how the FY 2014-15 CCHE financial aid allocation model
will distribute funds to our colleges/students and final resident tuition rates for FY 2014-15, it
is too early to give a concrete response the question. However, given the very large increase
in state financial aid and the CCCS mission and demographics, we believe that low income
students (as they have been in past years) will fare well in FY 2014-15.
3. Several years ago, the Colorado Legislature gave flexibility to institutions of higher education
to set your own tuition costs (S.B. 10-003). What is your opinion of this statute and is it time
for change?
CCCS believes that the current statute allows the institutions of higher education the
flexibility to respond to difficult budget situations and was a valuable tool during the last
recession. Given our mission and demographics, CCCS tries to keep resident tuition as low as
feasible while maintaining quality, as evidenced by the 6.5% and 6% resident tuition rate
increases for FY 12 and FY 13, respectively, when allowed by statute to raise the rate by 9%
in each of those fiscal years. Regardless of any future decisions regarding the current statute,
allowing some level of flexibility for difficult budget times is important given the history of
state support variation in Colorado.
4. What recommendations do you have for the Joint Budget Committee and the General
Assembly to make the funding for higher education more equitable across institutions?
More generally, the first step is to re-invest in higher education to recover from the great
recession’s cuts, allowing colleges and universities to ease back on resident tuition rate
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increases used to cover lost state revenue. The Governor’s FY 2014-15 budget request for
higher education is a great step in this direction. For the future, the State needs to invest its
operating state support for higher education in a way that recognizes the role that student
demographics (from growth in numbers, to income type, to student preparedness) play in
successfully meeting of the State’s master plan goals.
5. How does your institution define “need based aid”, “merit based aid”, and “work study”? Do
you have a position on the staff recommendation to clarify financial aid statutes?
Need based aid is defined as any financial aid applied against the student’s unmet need.
Unmet need is calculated as: the estimated cost of attendance minus the student’s expected
family contribution minus any additional aid or educational resources. Merit based aid is
defined as any financial aid that is awarded based on the student’s academic work, using
measures reflective of academic success (e.g., high school GPA or the student’s college GPA).
Work study is defined as self-help aid which a student earns by working on campus in a parttime position. While we would not take a formal position without seeing the specific changes
to statute, if the changes were clarifying in nature CCCS would likely be fine as long as the
flexibility to package aid remains at the institutional level.
Financial Performance
6. Please provide composite financial index figures for each of your institutions. How do rural
campuses fare in comparison to urban ones?
While providing this detailed analysis for 13 institutions that make up the CCCS in the time
frame allowed for responses is not possible, we would echo JBC staff’s statement at the
briefing that the CCCS views financial management through a system perspective. As a result,
we believe measurement at the governing board level is the appropriate lens to view the
financial performance of the CCCS through. That being said, financial indexes at our rural
colleges on average will be lower than our urban institutions, by virtue of fixed costs to
student ratios and the role that debt attributed to a specific institution plays in the KPMG CFI
calculations. But to reemphasize the point, the decision on whether debt is taken on is made
at the system level and is based on the System’s credit, so the analysis is appropriately done
at the system-wide level.
Tuition Increases: Cost Drivers
7. What does it cost you to educate a student? Is your tuition above or below that amount?
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While the individual costs vary from program to program (and institution to institution), from
a Education and General expense perspective, in FY 2012-13, the cost to educate a student
was approximately $6,626 per full-time, 30 credit hour student. Our resident tuition rate is
below that amount, with the base resident rate for FY 2012-13 at $3,383.
8. If tuition were lowered would more students come? Would it increase overall revenues if
tuition were less? What is the breakeven point?
Compared to a four-year university’s student demographics, community college students tend
to be more price sensitive when it comes to tuition. As a result, the strategy that the CCCS
employs is to keep resident tuition as low as reasonable given economic conditions, while
maintaining the ability to invest in quality educational delivery. If tuition rates were lowered,
it is possible that demand would increase. And, 10 years ago, it may have been possible to
even slightly increase overall tuition revenue using this approach. But with Colorado higher
education institutions so reliant on tuition revenue now (from 1/3 of appropriated revenue a
decade ago to 2/3 of appropriated revenue in recent years) and CCCS’s relatively low tuition
rate, you would likely lose more revenue in your existing tuition base than you would gain in
revenue from new students. At the levels of state support that Colorado is currently able to
provide its higher education institutions, there is likely not a breakeven point where this type
of strategy could work effectively.
9. Since FY 2000, how have your operations costs increased and by what percentage? Please
describe reasons for operational cost increases.
While we do not have easily accessible data back to 2000, we do have it back to FY 2005-06
(when the CCCS implemented a new consolidated, system-wide enterprise resource
management system, including financial tracking and reporting). Between FY 2005-06 and
FY 2012-13, E&G operating costs per student FTE have increased on average by 3.76%
annually over the time period. The largest percent increases annually in operational costs
over the time period were in academic support and student services (7.7% and 7.1%,
respectively) where the System and its colleges have made strategic investments in areas like
advising, counseling, financial aid, and related technology to meet the CCCS Board’s goals of
access and success and to serve our student populations more effectively.
10. For institutions of higher education that are in rural areas of the state, are there increased
operational costs? Please explain.
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Yes, on per student FTE basis, operational costs are higher in rural areas of the state. For
the CCCS rural institutions, the primary reasons are: higher fixed costs per student FTE,
which result from spreading the necessary fixed costs of operating an institution over a
relatively smaller student FTE base; and less access to a pool of lower cost, more flexible
adjunct faculty pool, which results in having to hire and maintain more full-time faculty that
urban colleges in our system.
11. Since 2000, please provide a breakdown of your administrative costs and the percentage of
annual increases.
While we do not have easily accessible data back to 2000, we do have it back to FY 2005-06
(when the CCCS implemented a consolidated enterprise resource management system,
including financial tracking and reporting). Between FY 2005-06 and FY 2012-13, E&G
institutional support expenses (which includes both administration and information
technology expenses) increased by 4.1% annually over the time period. This reflects,
primarily, a significant investment in information technology (predominately increased
staffing and IT infrastructure/hardware/software) in order to maintain the level of educational
technology resources necessary to meet the Board’s goals and student expectations/needs.
12. Please provide a breakdown of the salaries for administration positions, faculty, etc.
Average full-time faculty salary: $51,214
Average full-time classified salary: $38,020
Average full-time Admin-Protech salary: $54,502
13. What is the percentage of full time faculty vs. adjunct faculty?
29% full-time faculty and 71% adjunct faculty.
14. What is the ratio of students per faculty member at your institution of higher education?
At our rural colleges, the average ratio is approximately 12 student FTE:1 faculty FTE; at
our urban colleges the average ratio is approximately 16 student FTE:1 faculty FTE.
15. What is the ratio of student tuition increases in comparison to salary for administration,
faculty and other staff?
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In FY 2012-13 and FY 2013-14, resident tuition increases were 6.5 percent and 6.0 percent,
respectively. Salary increase averages were 2.0 percent and 3.0 percent, respectively, during
the same fiscal years.
16. How will the Affordable Care Act decrease health care costs for employees? Does your
institution of higher education anticipate long-term savings? If so, please explain.
At this point it is too early to gauge the impact of the ACA on long-term health care costs for
our employees. In terms of long-term fiscal impact to our colleges, it is also too early to
gauge the impact of the ACA. In terms of short-term fiscal impact, there will be increased
costs to our colleges as adjunct instructors who work 30 hours or more join CCCS health
plans starting January 2015.
Workforce Needs and Employment After Graduation
17. Please provide information regarding what your institution of higher education is currently
doing to ensure job placement.
All CCCS approved Career and Technical Education (CTE) Programs are required to contact
students who have completed their programs and submit annual placement reports through
the VE 135 online system. This data is reviewed and evaluated as a component of each
program’s renewal process. Each review compares the annual progress to the prior five
years and other like programs across this state. Programs not comparing favorably in the
placement of their students are required to create a plan for improvement of this measure of
success.
18. Once students graduate from your institution of higher education, what is the percentage that
use their degree to find employment?
For 2010-11 Degree recipients: 91% of previous year CTE completers whose schools were
able to contact them and who were seeking employment had obtained jobs within a year
following program completion. (CCCS is currently in the process of compiling placement data
for the 2011-12 program completers.)
19. What is the average wage of your graduates?
Please see the following web-link to wage data for Colorado community college graduates:
http://esm.collegemeasures.org/esm/colorado/default.aspx. Please select which college you
want to find information on from the drop down menu and the site will return the relevant
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data about that specific college. The results from this college measures database indicate that
one year after graduation, students with applied science degrees from Colorado’s two-year
colleges earn nearly $7,000 more than graduates with bachelor’s degrees from Colorado
four-year colleges and universities.
20. If a graduate has a difficult time finding employment, what resources are available to him /
her through your institution of higher education to find a job? What are the success rates of
this effort?
A variety of resources are available at each of our institutions and within each specific
program. These range from job boards, connections to local workforce centers, and
opportunities provided by advisory committees. Anecdotal information and informal surveys
indicate that these do help students find employment.
21. What efforts is your institution undertaking to receive input from Colorado businesses to
prepare graduates that meet their workforce needs? How often do the Colorado businesses that
you work with actually hire your graduates?
Our colleges work very closely with the local businesses/industries in their service area and
regions in getting feedback on industry demand as well as how changes in industry trends
should be incorporated into new programs or updates to the curriculum of existing programs.
In addition, each CCCS approved CTE program must meet or exceed the following Technical
Advisory Committee requirements:
All approved programs must have a technical advisory committee that functions at the state,
regional, or local level to assist education providers in planning, conducting and evaluating
their program curricula and operations. Each program is encouraged to have a local
committee focused specifically on their program. However, district or regional committees
are acceptable as long as each program is receiving independent review and guidance each
year and committee membership includes business & industry representation from each
program area for which the committee offers guidance. 51% of the voting members shall be
from related business and industry occupations.
While no official data exists regarding the number or frequency of hiring by Technical
Advisory Committees, it is commonly understood that many graduates do find employment
through the program’s business partners.
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Student Loans
22. What is the loan default rate of graduates of your institution? If high, what steps are you
taking to address it?
Default rates for graduates of our colleges range from 16.5% to 34.2%. Two of our colleges
have exceeded the 30% threshold. There are two primary strategies that colleges are utilizing
to lower these default rates: 1) contracting with a default management firm for specialized
tracking and communication post enrollment; and 2) up front academic and financial aid
advising to develop individualized academic plans. Please keep in mind at our small, rural
colleges, having 20 to 30 additional students get back into repayment plans can have
significant impact on the overall percentage default rate at those colleges.
23. What is the average amount of time that it takes your graduates to repay their student loans?
Data is not available from the federal government broken out by college or governing board.
However, the standard Stafford repayment time period is 10 years with the maximum payment
period at 20 years.
Performance: Persistence, Completion, Closing the Gap
24. Since the Lt. Governor announced the "Master Plan" for institutions of higher education,
please describe the following:
a. If applicable, has your institution of higher education reduced the amount
of time to credential their graduates? If applicable, has your institution of
higher education reduced the amount of time to receive a 2-year or 4-year
degree? Please distinguish percentages based on demographics,
underserved communities, gender, etc.
N/A; Time to degree was not part of the CCCS’s DHE performance
metrics.
b. What is your institution of higher education doing to retain students?
What is your retention rate? Please distinguish percentages based on
demographics, underserved communities, gender, etc.
Please see the attached link that outlines retention rates for CCCS
colleges: http://highered.colorado.gov/i3/Reports.aspx. When the web
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link pull up, please choose ‘retention rates’ on the ‘locate report’ box
under ‘by category’. CCCS is doing a variety of things to increase
retention at our colleges, including: counseling, mentoring, learning
communities, and early intervention with academic progress issues.
c. Does your institution of higher education experience an attainment gap?
If so, what is the institution doing to remedy such issues?
CCCS has a 3 year rolling average completions attainment gap between
minorities and non-minorities of 2.57 percent. The system also has a
1.99 percent gap in transfer rates between minorities and non-minorities
on a 3 year rolling average (this is of new students in the fall that
transferred to a 4 year institution the following fall). Narrowing these
gaps is part of the CCCS strategic plan. CCCS is doing a variety of
things to narrow this gap, including: counseling, mentoring, learning
communities, and early intervention with academic progress issues.
ASSET
25. Last session, we passed Colorado Asset (S.B. 13-033) so that undocumented students are able
to receive in-state tuition. How many undocumented students is your institution of higher
education currently serving?
The current estimate for Fall 2013 is 171 students. This figure will be finalized in early
February. We anticipate the number of students in future academic terms to grow as
qualifying students learn about the opportunities afforded by S.B. 13-033.
10:50-11:00
BREAK
11:00-11:20
COLORADO SCHOOL OF MINES
Higher Education Funding Request and Options for Statutory Change
1. Please clarify your plans for tuition and fee increases in FY 2014-15.
Colorado School of Mines intends to follow the Governor’s request that higher education
institutions not exceed 6% tuition increases for resident undergraduates. The exact increase will
not be known until the budgeting process begins in the spring.
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2. How will low income students fare under your plan for FY 2014-15 tuition increases and
financial aid allocations?
In SB10-003, Colorado School of Mines committed to use all of our fee-for-service funding for
financial support of undergraduate and graduate students by 2021. We are on track to gradually
convert these funds over the 10-year period. We are currently analyzing the impact of our tuition
on the enrollment of low income students with the assistance of an outside consultant, and plan to
deploy financial aid funds accordingly.
3. Several years ago, the Colorado Legislature gave flexibility to institutions of higher education
to set your own tuition costs (S.B. 10-003). What is your opinion of this statute and is it time
for change?
We believe the intent of the statute to provide greater flexibility to make governing decisions at
institution level and promote entrepreneurial practices remains vitally important for Colorado
higher education institutions. This is especially true for Mines as we work to ensure that the
university remains competitive for highly accomplished Colorado students. Also, as noted above
Colorado School of Mines committed to using all of its state funding (through fee for service) for
financial support of undergraduate and graduate students by 2021.
4. What recommendations do you have for the Joint Budget Committee and the General
Assembly to make the funding for higher education more equitable across institutions?
In many ways the answer might depend on what is meant by equitable. Equalizing per student
funding may be one measurement, but then how would the State value unique elements within its
system of higher education such as small institutions, specialized, high-cost degree programs
(such as STEM), or service to geographic regions?
We encourage the General Assembly to seek to add more funding for higher education before
dramatically changing the allocation basis. The current levels of funding may be barely sufficient
for institutional survival for some.
5. How does your institution define “need based aid”, “merit based aid”, and “work study”? Do
you have a position on the staff recommendation to clarify financial aid statutes?
Need Based Aid: Aid that is awarded to a student based on their need as determined by the
federal government through the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid).
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Merit Based Aid: Aid that is awarded to a student based on academic accomplishments in high
school or college. GPAs and test scores are considered during the awarding process without
regard to the families’ financial standing.
Work Study: Aid awarded to a student to be received through the payroll process. Student
interested in work study seek and secure employment in departments across campus as well as
community service positions in the community. There are both need based and non-need based
work study opportunities.
As stated earlier, we have long supported greater decision making at the institutional level.
Nowhere is this more relevant than with financial aid. We believe an institution’s financial aid
offices are best equipped to develop the financial aid package for students. The state’s financial
aid is vitally important, but for many students at Mines it represents only a fraction of financial
aid revenue sources. In some cases they may receive merit scholarships from Mines funds, and/or
a need based grant from the CSM Foundation, or other awards from outside organizations.
Tuition Increases: Cost Drivers
6. What does it cost you to educate a student? Is your tuition above or below that amount?
97% of the total degrees awarded by the Colorado School of Mines are within high-cost science
and engineering fields. CSM uses the NACUBO Cost of College formula to determine the full cost
of educating an undergraduate student. For Fiscal Year 2012 the cost to educate an
undergraduate student at Mines was $21,686. FY13 has not been calculated as the audited
financial statements were only recently published. In FY 2013 full time tuition rate (student share)
is $14,400.
In an article in Time (9/26/13), L. Rafael Reif, President of MIT wrote, “At a technology-intensive
research university like Massachusetts Institute of Technology, it now costs three times as much
to educate an undergraduate as we receive in net tuition…” According to IPEDS, MIT’s net
tuition is $20,660, placing its cost to educate a student at around $60,000.
7. If tuition were lowered would more students come? Would it increase overall revenues if
tuition were less? What is the breakeven point?
Colorado School of Mines is a highly selective institution. Due to campus infrastructure, physical
facilities and desire to maintain a student to faculty ratio that supports quality instruction in a
highly technical environment, we attempt to limit the size of the incoming class of new freshman
and transfer students to 950 FTE. For Fall of 2013, the institution received 13,060 applications.
From those applications, 4,715 highly qualified students were accepted for admission, and 1,098
enrolled – 15.5% greater than the targeted FTE. Because of the nature of our programs,
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enrollment growth is especially costly if that growth requires new teaching laboratories and
classrooms to be built.
Furthermore it is worthwhile to note that over the past 10 years – when tuition increases had to
offset cuts in state funding – Mines actually saw a 60% growth in enrollment. The quality of the
product / experience does matter in enrollment growth, especially for an institution like Mines.
This is not simply a function of price.
8. Since FY 2000, how have your operations costs increased and by what percentage? Please
describe reasons for operational cost increases.
There are several reasons for increases in operating costs. Enrollment over the last ten years has
increased by 60%. Research expenditures have increased by 152%. In addition, the institution
has grown its residential campus and has invested in capital and controlled maintenance projects
for academic buildings to support enrollment and research growth.
Operating Costs (not adjusted for inflation) are provided below:
Total Operating Expenses
2000
2001
2002
2003
87,637,000 92,268,000 91,777,000 103,838,000
5.3%
-8.0%
13.1%
2004
2005
2006
98,835,000 99,816,000 113,686,000
-4.8%
1.0%
13.9%
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
117,806,000 131,980,000 145,869,000 156,579,000 163,516,000 178,031,000 192,733,000
3.6%
12.0%
10.5%
7.3%
4.4%
8.9%
8.3%
9. Since 2000, please provide a breakdown of your administrative costs and the percentage of
annual increases.
Administrative costs would include both Academic Support and Institutional Support and support
the academic and research functions of the institution. This includes functions such as the
library, computing, and research administration. Significant drivers for these increases are
similar to those explained in question #8, namely to support 60% growth in enrollment and 152%
growth in research expenditures.
These expenses since 2000 are provided below:
Administrative costs
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
11,706,000 11,824,000 11,044,000 12,549,000 12,653,000 13,128,000 15,252,000
1.0% -6.6%
13.6%
0.8%
3.8%
16.2%
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2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
15,570,000 19,090,000 21,917,000 20,352,000 21,118,000 23,434,000 27,842,000
2.1%
22.6%
14.8%
-7.1%
3.8%
11.0%
18.8%
Higher Education-hearing
As seen in the data, increases occurred in some years after an experiencing an economic
downturn. In general, many of these increases were to restore staffing and salary levels after
hiring and salary freezes where implemented.
Other specific increases reflected in the data are due to the following reasons:

Increase in 2006 is primarily due to the implementation of a new financial system and
investments in the IT programs.

Increases in 2008 is primarily due to an accounting write-off of a large research contract
that did not receive previously recorded revenue, and a reclassification of salary for
Academic Department Heads to administration. Because many academic department
heads retain teaching, research and advising roles they were previously reported as
instruction. It was felt this change better reflected the majority function of the positions.

Increases in 2009 are due an accounting reclassification of work study salary expenses
from financial aid to administrative and significant increases to insurance, legal and audit
costs.

One of the impacts of enrollment and research growth was that academic departments
required additional administrative support. In 2012 and 2013, Mines installed a new
college structure to provide such support. In addition, investments were made in
Research support services to help support the dramatic growth in research at Mines.
These years also saw positions filled which had been previously frozen during the
economic uncertainty of the previous years.
10. Please provide a breakdown of the salaries for administration positions, faculty, etc.
Employee Category
Research Faculty
Academic Faculty
Administrative
Classified
Adjuncts and Temps
Teaching and Research Assistants
Salary
7,360,350.52
29,859,779.40
16,247,740.07
12,101,465.20
3,550,766.97
16,032,344.00
85,152,446.16
%
9%
35%
19%
14%
4%
19%
100%
11. What is the percentage of full time faculty vs. adjunct faculty?
The answer depends on how this question defines its terms. If simply referencing headcount, our
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numbers would be:
 70.7% Academic Permanent Faculty (tenured, tenure-track, instructors, lecturers)
 29.3% Total Adjunct
We will also examine credit hour delivery as an internal performance measure. For the current
Fall 2013 semester, the breakdown of credit hour delivery is:
 75% Academic Permanent Faculty
 18.5% by adjunct faculty
 6.5% Permanent Mines administrators or research faculty.
12. What is the ratio of students per faculty member at your institution of higher education?
The 2012-13 Common Data Set = 16:1.
13. What is the ratio of student tuition increases in comparison to salary for administration,
faculty and other staff?
We are not completely sure what is being asked, but here is an attempted response. For the
current 2013-14 academic year – assuming constant enrollment -- a 6% tuition increase on
resident students (undergraduate and graduate) would generate $2.8 million in additional gross
revenue. The average salary increase of 3.5% (based on State personnel system mandated
increases) and increases in benefit costs resulted in additional compensation expenses of $4.22
million.
It should be noted that careful consideration was placed last year on the total cost of attendance
including room and board. As a result while tuition was increased by 6%, the total cost of
attendance (living on campus) increased by only 3.8%.
14. How will the Affordable Care Act decrease health care costs for employees? Does your
institution of higher education anticipate long-term savings? If so, please explain.
We do not anticipate that the Affordable Care Act (ACA) will decrease health care costs for
employees. Due to taxes and fees included in the ACA that affect insurance plans as well as
benefits mandates within ACA, premiums are rising at a faster rate than would otherwise be the
case. If one assumes that the employer proportion of insurance premiums remains constant, the
ACA caused increases in premiums will be passed along to employees in the same proportion as
the employees’ share of current premiums.
We do not expect to see any long-term savings from ACA as it is currently structured.
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Economic Impacts
15. How much General Fund does Mines receive compared to other schools? Compare this to
Mines’ output on economic development.
In the 2013-14 fiscal year, Colorado School of Mines will receive $16,813,547, which is
approximately 3.0% of the total state funding to public institution governing boards. In total, the
$16 million investment by the state helps generate total annual operating expenditures of over
$175 million. In addition over the past 6 years, Mines has initiated or completed capital
construction projects totaling approximately $170 million solely through private gifts and private
(non-state) financing. Capital expenditures are not included in operating expenditures.
There are many ways to measure economic development output. Certainly we believe our most
important economic impact is the success of our graduates (see responses to #17 and #18 for
data). Mines graduates are recruited by companies (small and large) driving economic impact in
Colorado through the energy and resources industries, environmental firms, aerospace, and
advanced materials – and many others.
The success of the institution has also helped make Mines a leading choice for students
throughout the nation, not just in Colorado. Mines has been able to grow its non-resident student
population over the last 10 years without sacrificing resident student growth. In fact during this
time, Mines has the 2nd largest resident student growth (% FTE growth) among all the public
governing boards. Mines faculty are also leading scientific and technological innovations that
have both immediate and long-term benefit to the State’s economy. Last year, Mines faculty
generated over $62 million in research awards
Workforce Needs and Employment After Graduation
16. Please provide information regarding what your institution of higher education is currently
doing to ensure job placement.
To ensure successful employment and outcomes of the graduates, the Colorado School of
Mines (Mines) Career Center interacts with students soon after they begin their academic
endeavor. Early contact is integral to the success of Mines graduates so they will be able to
acquire the necessary job search and professional development skills. The initial goal is to
help the student first obtain experience while they are in school. Having experience through
internships, co-ops, and research opportunities on the student’s resume is crucial to landing a
solid field-related job after graduation. In fact, between 75 – 80% of Mines graduates have
field- relate experience by the time they graduate.
In order to achieve this goal, the Career Center starts the students’ career development
process in their freshman year through workshops, one-on-one job search advice, resume
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development, practice interviews, proactive recruiting outreach, student and parent
presentations, and continuous communications. Students are strongly encouraged to attend
the huge fall and spring Career Day events at Mines (over 225 employers in September 2013;
3312 students and grads attended), company information sessions, use of the online recruiting
database, and on-campus interviews (over 3400 since September 10). This focused job search
strategy is updated and refined by the student each semester.
Approximately two months prior to each graduation, the Career Center Staff collects the
names, relevant data, employment/outcomes status of every upcoming graduate. If at that time
a student has not reached his or her next goal (obtaining full-time employment, acceptance to
grad school, etc.), the Career Center staff will contact this graduate several times a month
with recruiting opportunities, advanced level workshops, and more one-on-one assistance.
The team tracks the outcomes of the graduating class weekly. The data for the report is based
up all graduates between September 1 and August 31 of each year (please see link below). We
keep in contact with all unemployed grads, assisting them through their job process, and
report 6-month, 12- month, and 18-month post-graduation updates.
Data on all recruiting activities, graduate employment, outcomes, and salaries can be found
at http://careers.mines.edu/Salary%20Survey.html
17. Once students graduate from your institution of higher education, what is the percentage that
use their degree to find employment?
The 2012-2013 Outcomes for Colorado School of Mines graduates (September 1 – August 31) are
as follows:
BS - 91%.
MS - 95%.
PhD - 98%. Details are listed at the link above in the Colorado School of Mines 2012-2013 Graduate
Outcomes and Salary Survey.
18. What is the average wage of your graduates?
The overall average salary offers reported are:
BS – $67,055
MS – $77,116
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PhD – $80,201 The details, including high salary, low salary, and number of reported salaries for
each major and degree level are listed at the link above in the Colorado School of Mines 20122013 Graduate Outcomes and Salary Survey.
19. If a graduate has a difficult time finding employment, what resources are available to him /
her through your institution of higher education to find a job? What are the success rates of
this effort?
The successful career development and job search strategy outlined in Question 16 is employed
immediately. If a student has challenges, additional, customized job search strategies may be
employed and vary for each student.
20. What efforts is your institution undertaking to receive input from Colorado businesses to
prepare graduates that meet their workforce needs? How often do the Colorado businesses that
you work with actually hire your graduates?
The Colorado School of Mines Career Center sends a detailed survey to its employers one to two
times a year asking about the quality of the recruiting activities on campus, preparation of
students, and comments/suggestions for additional tips. Approximately 51% of Colorado School
of Mine graduates accepting industry or government positions stayed in Colorado.
Additionally each academic department maintains an external visiting committee. The visiting
committee visits and reviews the department every 3 or 4 years. The visiting committee is
comprised of representatives of industry, government and academia. One of the roles of the
visiting committee is to assess how well (or not well) the curriculum prepares the graduate for
employment or graduate school.
Student Loans
21. What is the loan default rate of graduates of your institution? If high, what steps are you
taking to address it?
The student default rates are reported below.
2010 3YR Official = 4.1%
2011 2YR Official = 1.8%
Based on thresholds set by the US Department of Education, we do not consider the default rates
of Colorado School of Mines graduates to be high. 2010 data shows some impact of the
economic recession, and 2011 data is more in line with other years. That said, in an effort to at
least maintain, and preferably decrease, the current default rate, the school has become more
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proactive with those students who become delinquent upon graduation. Currently, in-person Exit
Counseling is available for students wishing to elect this service, and is required for those
students with over $30,000 in student loans.
22. What is the average amount of time that it takes your graduates to repay their student loans?
The institution does not have a tool to determine the answer. In general, the majority of our
students use the standard 10 yr. repayment option.
Performance: Persistence, Completion, Closing the Gap
23. Since the Lt. Governor announced the "Master Plan" for institutions of higher education,
please describe the following:
Mines annually publishes a comprehensive report on our persistence and graduate rates, which
includes breakdowns by demographics where allowed by FERPA restrictions. This report
provides data to each of these questions and can be accessed via our IR website:
http://inside.mines.edu/mines_only/institutional-research/2013GraduationPersistenceRpt.pdf
a) If applicable, has your institution of higher education reduced the amount of time
to credential their graduates? If applicable, has your institution of higher education
reduced the amount of time to receive a 2-year or 4-year degree? Please distinguish
percentages based on demographics, underserved communities, gender, etc.
We have not reduced the amount of time to credential graduates across the board. Two years ago
Mines reorganized its largest degree program. As a result the electrical and mechanical
engineering programs reduced credit hours to bachelors degree by 4 and 3 hours respectively.
This change impacts 27% of the entire student body.
Improving the percentage of students graduating in 4 years is a significant issue for Mines. We
are pleased to report that the 4-year graduation rate has increased from 35% for the 2006 cohort
to 44.1% for the 2009 cohort.
a. What is your institution of higher education doing to retain students?
What is your retention rate? Please distinguish percentages based on
demographics, underserved communities, gender, etc.
Mines has numerous programs to improve retention rates, which is a key strategic goal for Mines.
In the 2013 fiscal year, Mines created the Center for Academic Success and Advising – the first
ever professional advising center at Mines. Mines also supports organizations such as Multicultural Engineering Program (MEP) and Women in Science Engineering and Math (WISEM) to
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lead programs to support the retention and success of these specific populations. In recent years,
Mines has also invested into creating a more vibrant residential campus, which seeks to create
stronger connections for students with other students through activities on campus. Studies have
shown the co-curricular activities have direct impact on retention and graduation rates. The
residence life programs also added professional residence hall directors instead of relying solely
on student residence hall assistants. This has been very helping in creating greater programming
for students as well as identifying and intervening on possible student issues earlier in the
process.
While many factors go into improving retention rates, we’ve been pleased to see continued
growth in our retention rates. Last year’s freshman class retained into the sophomore year at the
highest rate in our history – 92%
b. Does your institution of higher education experience an attainment gap?
If so, what is the institution doing to remedy such issues?
Since the 2006 cohort, Hispanic students at Mines have retained to the 4th year at levels equal to
or greater than the general population. African-American cohorts have had mixed results. This is
somewhat driven by the impact one or two students can have on this smaller cohort population.
Mines continues to invest in student support programs such as our MEP program and student
advising center to help student success at Mines. It also has been building stronger relationships
with K-12 schools, primarily middle schools, to encourage more underserved populations to seek
engineering and science careers.
ASSET
24. Last session, we passed Colorado Asset (S.B. 13-033) so that undocumented students are able
to receive in-state tuition. How many undocumented students is your institution of higher
education currently serving?
We currently do not have any undocumented students enrolled.
11:20-11:40 COLORADO MESA UNIVERSITY
Higher Education Funding Request and Options for Statutory Change
1. Please clarify your plans for tuition and fee increases in FY 2014-15.
Our current plans are based on a combined tuition and fee increase of less than 5%.1
2. How will low income students fare under your plan for FY 2014-15 tuition increases and
financial aid allocations?
As reflected in the chart below, CMU has made very material investments in institutional
financial aid over the past five years. Although our focus has been primarily on merit aid
which recognizes both a student’s past academic success and encourages a student to achieve
1
Source: CMU Budget Office.
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future success, it is very important to note that our recent experience is that more than 50%
of all merit recipients are “need based eligible” based on federal definitions.2 Our strategy
is to provide a “hand up” rather than a “hand out”. We have also offered approximately
$522,000 (FY 2014) in MavWorks funds, an institutional “work study” program directed at
middle income students who just miss qualifying for federal financial aid but still struggle
financially.3 Our research shows that students at CMU who work on campus are 25% more
likely to be retained or graduate over the general population and gain stronger affinity with
the institution.4
CMU Institutional Support, by Account
Description
SEOG Match
Athletic Scholarships
Institutional Scholarships
Institutional Scholarships - Need
Mavworks
Student Medicare Contribution
Student Assist
Federal Work Study Match
Non-Resident Scholars/Early Scholars Discount
Tuition Discounts - Post
SPS Tuition Reimbursements
SPS Dependent Tuition Reimbursements
CN Tuition Reimbursements
CN Dependent Tuition Reimbursements
Veteran Yellow Ribbon
Other Veteran Institutional Support
Total
Source: CMU Banner.
FY08
$
32,400.66
$ 722,366.33
$ 1,422,341.24
$ 294,157.50
$
$
7,919.56
$ 1,087,305.97
$
57,838.26
$
25,058.40
$
$
11,240.76
$
2,849.87
$
18,766.11
$
11,250.69
$
$
$ 3,693,495.35
FY09
$
39,437.83
$ 856,386.26
$ 2,166,192.97
$ 295,933.00
$
$
7,912.81
$ 1,226,658.21
$
48,163.02
$
5,660.00
$
$
12,174.68
$
3,011.79
$
24,802.78
$
13,536.39
$
$
$ 4,699,869.74
FY10
$
46,559.50
$ 934,798.88
$ 2,518,385.70
$ 454,287.00
$
46,267.82
$
9,793.55
$ 1,654,270.67
$
62,857.20
$
$
$
12,848.57
$
3,854.34
$
32,825.68
$
19,689.45
$
$
$ 5,796,438.36
FY11
$
40,955.75
$ 1,154,349.72
$ 3,630,411.80
$
16,334.00
$ 357,785.06
$
10,662.95
$ 1,823,102.67
$
45,812.13
$
$
$
12,756.93
$
5,914.04
$
39,842.25
$
23,679.12
$
$
$ 7,161,606.42
FY12
$
38,548.50
$ 1,263,756.84
$ 4,179,452.27
$
4,770.00
$ 479,785.64
$
9,613.12
$ 2,312,772.70
$
47,112.86
$
$
$
22,431.38
$
4,045.86
$
65,449.53
$
24,234.80
$
$
$ 8,451,973.50
FY13
$
44,146.50
$ 1,335,461.60
$ 3,741,230.03
$ 214,195.98
$ 430,509.01
$
5,910.35
$ 2,655,088.69
$
47,263.54
$
30,917.24
$
13,406.24
$
4,550.47
$
3,051.15
$
55,426.75
$
21,663.16
$
$
$ 8,602,820.71
FY14 Budget
$
47,000.00
$ 1,872,320.00
$ 5,638,637.98
$
240,000.00
$
442,000.00
$
2,656.07
$ 2,617,599.71
$
49,274.00
$
11,378.10
$
17,752.60
$
18,207.00
$
2,575.20
$
42,533.58
$
18,777.50
$
48,927.51
$
45,422.70
$ 11,115,061.95
3. Several years ago, the Colorado Legislature gave flexibility to institutions of higher education
to set your own tuition costs (S.B. 10-003). What is your opinion of this statute and is it time
for change?
CMU does not support a change in this statue. CMU, like every institution, is both similar
and different from its higher education sister institutions, each serving its particular mission
on behalf of Colorado. A 9% increase in tuition at one intuition, when converted to dollars,
can be vastly different than at another institution. We believe there is strength in diversity –
both individual and by institution. Moody’s Credit agency affirmed that the greatest
“difference maker” at CMU has been a governing board solely dedicated to CMU and
whose undivided attention is on the institution. Governing board members are appointed by
the Governor and approved by the State Senate. They are the best and brightest individuals
who give up their time to serve at no compensation. According to the National Center for
Higher Education Management Systems Colorado produces undergraduate degrees at a
lower cost per degree than any other state.5 We believe the Governing Board’s involvement
and judgment is instrumental in this trend and their judgment should prevail. As evidence,
2
Source: CMU Financial Aid.
Source: CMU Financial Aid.
4
Source: CMU Office of Institutional Research.
5
Source: National Center for Higher Education Management Systems.
3
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CMU’s tuition and fee increase over the past three years is less than 5% despite material
reductions in state funding per resident FTE – although the Board has the flexibility to raise
tuition and fees up to 9%, or even higher, if they choose to amend the university’s Financial
Accountability Plan (FAP) with CCHE.6
State and Student Share of Tuition
State Share %
80%
70%
70%
66%
66%
Student Share %
63%
57%
60%
58%
56%
55%
51%
50%
49%
40%
43%
30%
20%
30%
34%
34%
42%
44%
66%
68%
34%
32%
59%
41%
45%
37%
10%
0%
4. What recommendations do you have for the Joint Budget Committee and the General
Assembly to make the funding for higher education more equitable across institutions?
This is not a question that can easily be answered. Each institution has its own role and
mission. Each, for the most part, serve different student demographics and are dispersed
geographically across the state in different communities. We do not think the state can just do
a “U” turn on how institutions are currently funded without major impacts to some
institutions– particularly after the economic “roll-coaster” ride the state and institutions have
experienced over the past five years. CMU does absolutely believe that enrollment growth,
both system-wide, and at each intuition, should be a factor in funding appropriations – which
over the past few years has been at least somewhat factored into higher education funding
models – both to determine cuts or increases. Further while arguments can be made for
higher funding levels for a variety of factors (level of student preparation, research, size)
arguably the most equitable approach would be to fund all institutions at the same level per
student.
6
Source: Colorado Long Bills, CMU Office of Institutional Research and CMU Budget Office.
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5. How does your institution define “need based aid”, “merit based aid”, and “work study”? Do
you have a position on the staff recommendation to clarify financial aid statutes?
CMU defines "need based aid" as aid awarded that fulfills a documented financial need of
any amount.
"Merit based aid" is awarded based upon the level at which a student excels. It is awarded
both on academic “grade point average” (GPA) but also when one excels in in their
particular field such as performing arts e.g. theatre, dance or athletics or a particular skill
like welding or culinary arts.
CMU defines “work study” as any student employment funded from state, federal or
institutional means that covers wages received by students to assist in covering their
educational costs, preferably giving them experience in their field of study.7
Tuition Increases: Cost Drivers
6. What does it cost you to educate a student? Is your tuition above or below that amount?
For FY 2013, the cost to educate a student was $313.42 per credit hour while resident
undergraduate tuition was $203.41 per credit hour. For FY 2014, the cost to educate a
student per credit hour is estimated to be $348.64 while resident undergraduate tuition in
FY2014 is $214.60 per credit hour.8
7. If tuition were lowered would more students come? Would it increase overall revenues if
tuition were less? What is the breakeven point?
CMU does not believe that lowering our tuition will have an appreciable impact on our
recruiting efforts in terms of volume. Prospective students and their parents already know
that CMU provides a very good value. CMU believes this might even have a negative impact,
making CMU’s perception of quality could be questioned. However, CMU still strives to
keep our increases as close to the consumer price index as possible to reinforce the message
that we are efficient and a great value. To answer our breakeven point, see the answer to
question #6 above.
8. Since FY 2000, how have your operations costs increased and by what percentage? Please
describe reasons for operational cost increases.
Operational costs have increased 138% since FY 2000. The largest of these investments
consisted of: a $25,425,038 increase in instruction, academic support and student services, a
$9,416,923 (555%) increase in scholarships and institutional financial aid, (includes all of
CMU’s student aid including the MavWorks work study program),and a $5,264,790 increase
in facilities operational costs. The main reasons for these increases in operational costs are a
35% cumulative inflation rate, a doubling of student enrollment, the increase in campus size
and facilities, the investment in the care and maintenance of these state assets and major
7
8
Source: CMU Financial Aid.
Source: CMU Budget Office.
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investments in technology. With all of these factors, CMU is arguably educating students
more efficiently today than in FY 2000.9
9. For institutions of higher education that are in rural areas of the state, are there increased
operational costs? Please explain.
This is a difficult question to answer not fully knowing the cost drivers and economies of scale
in other geographic communities. We can tell you that CMU is constantly working to control
costs and add value. To a large extent, markets drive our costs, but we make it our top
priority to invest in attracting and retaining the best people for our students and the state of
Colorado. We also work very diligently to create a competitive environment for all of our
support services which is reflected in our cost per student being basically flat in inflation
adjusted dollars over the past ten years.
10. Since 2000, please provide a breakdown of your administrative costs and the percentage of
annual increases.
Institutional support is less than 7% of CMU’s total FY 2014 operational costs. Of the total
operational increases from FY2000 to FY2013, administrative costs only accounts for 8% of
the total increase.10
11. Please provide a breakdown of the salaries for administration positions, faculty, etc.
The average salary per administrative employee FTE is $57,353; the average salary for full
time tenure/tenure-track faculty is $61,988; the average salary for full time faculty (includes
full time instructors) is $59,315 (FY14 base salaries).11
12. What is the percentage of full time faculty vs. adjunct faculty?
Based on number of credit hours taught, in FY2013, 73% of CMU course credit hours were
taught by full time faculty, while 27% of course credit hours are taught by part time faculty.
This is somewhat atypical based on historical numbers which reflect adjuncts generally teach
around 25% of academic instruction. The reason for this rise is as enrollments continue to
grow it takes time to search and hire full time faculty – yet, new students need to be served. As
an example, CMU currently is currently conducting 18 full time faculty searches. Plus, we
view adjuncts as a strength because they bring unique expertise credentials and practical
experience that complements our academic programs.
13. What is the ratio of students per faculty member at your institution of higher education?
CMU averages 24 students per faculty member which is higher than optimum and we
anticipate drawing this ratio down as we successfully recruit and hire more faculty.12
9
Source: CMU Budget Office.
Source: CMU Budget Office.
11
Source: CMU Budget Office.
12
Source: CMU Office of Institutional Research.
10
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14. What is the ratio of student tuition increases in comparison to salary for administration,
faculty and other staff?
The average resident undergraduate tuition rate and fee increase over the last three years
has been less than 5%. The average cost of living salary increase over the same three
years has been 2.87%.13 Much of the difference between these two percentages over the
past few years has come from maintaining the state’s physical assets and increasing
spending on student services – particularly financial aid, tutoring and advising.
15. How will the Affordable Care Act decrease health care costs for employees? Does your
institution of higher education anticipate long-term savings? If so, please explain.
While implementation of the ACA is in its early stages, thus making it difficult to predict the
full effect of the Act, our experience so far predicts it is unlikely to decrease health care costs
for employees. While certain preventive services and prescriptions are “free” to the patient,
the cost has been passed on to CMU in the form of higher premiums. As an example, this
calendar year, 2013, CMU has been charged $75.00 per subscriber for ACA costs and fees by
our provider who has passed them on to us. Additionally, our health insurance renewal for
2014 included an additional 2.46% increase in premiums attributed solely to ACA fees, for a
yearly cost increase of $306 per employee – approaching a cost of nearly $200,000. With
employees’ contribution being more than 35% of the total cost of their health care benefit,
they too are being financially impacted.14
Further, if we should fail to offer health coverage to 95% of our eligible employees (we do not
expect to fail) and one of those employees receives a premium tax credit in the exchange,
CMU would be penalized $2000 x the number of full time employees. With 650 fulltime
employees, the penalty would be $1,300,000. It is therefore imperative that we track all
employees differently than we currently do (complicated with part time employees and adjunct
faculty who, during the course of a year, may move from less than thirty hours a week to more
than thirty hours per week – the threshold to be eligible for health care benefits). This more
intense tracking will increase administrative costs.15
Also, in Mesa County, individuals will pay more in the exchange than those in some other
parts of the state. (See table below.) The same is true for mountain areas and outlying
eastern and western locales.
Location
Provider
Vail
Durango
Anthem
RMHP
Deductible on lowest cost
plan
5000/10000
6300/12600
Lowest cost plan16
$821.06
$628.60
13
Source: CMU Budget Office.
Source: CMU Human Resources.
15
Source: CMU Human Resources.
16
Lowest Cost Plan for single coverage for person born June 1954, no tobacco use, in locations noted. Source:
https://www.healthcare.gov/.
14
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Steamboat
Sterling
Grand Junction
Limon
Pueblo
Colorado Springs
Denver
Aurora
Greeley
Fort Collins
RMHP
Colo Health Op
RMHP
Colorado Choice
Kaiser
Kaiser
Kaiser
Kaiser
Kaiser
Kaiser
6300/12600
5500/11000
6300/12600
5000/10000
5000/10000
5000/10000
5000/10000
5000/10000
5000/10000
5000/10000
$628.60
$545.76
$513.83
$483.88
$455.10
$417.17
$379.25
$379.25
$360.29
$360.29
Workforce Needs and Employment After Graduation
16. Please provide information regarding what your institution of higher education is currently
doing to ensure job placement.
CMU prepares students with the knowledge and skills required for a program of study and
offers support services that can enhance a student’s marketability for employment. Among
these services are:
• CMU’s faculty members routinely provide students with information about their major.
Because at least half of the full time faculty members bring professional experience from a
career prior to joining the university, they are well-versed on the type of preparation
students need for employment at the time of graduation.
• Nearly all majors require some type of “applied” experience or practical application in
the major, such as completion of an internship, clinical placement, or student teaching
assignment. These experiences often lead to initial employment as employers can “test”
these temporary hires.
• All program sheets not only identify the academic requirements that must be completed to
earn a degree but also include a section “what you can do with this major.” Thus CMU
students receive information about the types of employment they are prepared for prior to
selecting a major.
• Multiple times each semester, staff in the Office of Career Services post openings through
various campus outlets, update resources on its website, schedule career fairs for
potential employers, offer resources that assist students in identifying major and career
interests, and conduct workshops that range from resume writing to interview skills to job
seeking strategies.
That said, the university cannot ensure placement for a variety of reasons. First, a field of
study may or may not correlate with a specific major selected by the students (e.g.,
completion of a nursing vs. English program). Second, the university has no control over
position availability that companies have. Finally, a student can be seeking to upgrade
their skills and not complete; rather they may be working toward promotion at their current
place of employment.
17. Once students graduate from your institution of higher education, what is the percentage that
use their degree to find employment?
Tracking students to collect information about their post-graduation activities is an expensive
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process that CMU does on a limited basis. CMU follows up with graduates at two points.
The first is approximately a week before graduation, and the second, a survey is sent to
program completers as part of each program’s review process which occurs over a six-year
cycle. On CMU’s most recent Program Review Data, 70.1% of CMU graduates among
known programs held jobs relevant to their degree.17
18. What is the average wage of your graduates?
Because CMU’s graduates range from those completing a one-year technical certificate to a
four-year baccalaureate degree, a meaningful average wage cannot be calculated. However,
students receive a self-reported survey at the time of graduation. For 2012-13, graduates
median annual base salary had a range of $30-50K depending on the level of certificate or
degree and the related academic discipline. 18
19. If a graduate has a difficult time finding employment, what resources are available to him /
her through your institution of higher education to find a job? What are the success rates of
this effort?
CMU’s support is not limited to recent graduates. Alumni can access all career services at
any time at no cost, with the exception of Optimal Resume, which is a service CMU has to pay
for.
20. What efforts is your institution undertaking to receive input from Colorado businesses to
prepare graduates that meet their workforce needs? How often do the Colorado businesses that
you work with actually hire your graduates?
With a unique role and mission focused on graduate, baccalaureate, career and technical
training, Colorado Mesa University is committed to including Colorado employers in the
development and maintenance of new and existing academic programs at every level. A
primary mechanism for this engagement is a series of advisory committees across academic
programs designed to connect employers with university personnel on a regular basis to
discuss curriculum needs, program needs, workforce needs, and the like. In addition to
program specific advisory committees, Colorado Mesa University also relies upon longstanding relationships with employers throughout our region and state to connect students
and graduates with relevant internships to prepare them for careers in their respective fields.
While job placement “within relevant fields” can be difficult track at liberal arts institutions,
recent data for Colorado Mesa University graduates by program based on Program Review
Data, is as follows:
17
18
Source: CMU Office of Institutional Research.
Source: CMU Office of Institutional Research.
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Program19
Placement Rate
Graduate School
Accounting
81.8%
18.2%
English
50.0%
50.0%
Music
75.0%
0.0%
Art
75.0%
0.0%
Computer Science
62.5%
12.5%
Graphic Design
100.0%
0.0%
History
55.6%
66.7%
Mass Communications
30.8%
7.7%
Theatre
50.0%
0.0%
Culinary Arts - AAS
100.0%
N/A
Math
50.0%
33.3%
Business Administration
81.8%
12.1%
MBA
100.0%
N/A
Liberal Arts
80.0%
20.0%
Psychology
33.3%
33.3%
Sociology
85.7%
14.3%
Spanish
0.0%
0.0%
Teacher Education
92.3%
23.1%
Total
70.1%
20.3%
Student Loans
21. What is the loan default rate of graduates of your institution? If high, what steps are you
taking to address it?
Foremost, one needs to take into account that institutions do not determine federal loan
eligibility or the amount a student can borrow, institutions do not serve or collect the loans
and the default rate is based on only those who graduate. To further remove any perceived
transparency of the meaningfulness of this statistic, a student with very high loans from
another institution who transfers and carries with them those previous high loan amounts
from other institutions is factored into the new institution’s loan rate and unfortunately can
impact the default rate. We absolutely agree a debate on the benefits and harm of student
loans should be a very high priority at the highest legislative levels – both state and federal.
We are doing are best to counsel and underwrite the costs to educate students (see financial
aid table with question #2 above).
The Cohort Default Rate for Colorado Mesa University is 12%. 20 To address concerns over
19
Source: CMU Office of Institutional Research. These two columns are not mutually-exclusive. Graduates can
attend graduate school while holding a job in their field.
20
Source: http://www2.ed.gov/offices/OSFAP/defaultmanagement/cdr2yr.html.
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student borrowing and default rates, the university hired a financial literacy and debt
management counselor in May 2012 with specific responsibilities to:
• Reduce the default rate on direct loans and Perkins loans as compared with prior years;
• Reduce private loan borrowing;
• Monitor overall student indebtedness with a target goal of decreasing amount borrowed;
• Monitor use of alternative funds (e.g. scholarships, MavWorks (institutional work-study
program), federal work-study, Colorado work-study);
• Work with and support the CMU Foundation to increase alternative funds for students.
CMU strategies being implemented to reduce default rates include:
• Educating students in degree selection and reasonable salary expectations;
• Teaching life skills (budgeting, credit, etc.);
• Communicating with students;
• Notifying students of loan limits and expected repayment amounts;
• Contacting students before default and informing them of its consequences;
• Continuing communication with students after graduation.
Additionally, faculty members in the Department of Business offer a three-credit-hour course
on BUGB 249 (Personal Finance) open to all students. The goals of the course are to develop
student financial and economic literacy so as to improve decision-making in the context of
personal budgeting and to develop a personal financial plan that includes consumer credit,
taxes, home purchase and interest rates.
The success of these efforts is being measured by tracking student indebtedness and use of
alternative funds and then comparing data to those for previous years. Finally, the CMU
financial aid staff members also have begun reaching out to high school students through
presentations at local schools to educate potential student on costs prior to their enrollment.
In fall 2013, an additional course was piloted with provisionally-admitted baccalaureateseeking students. As part of Higher Success Skills (SUPP 100), students will not only develop
an academic success plan, but they also complete finance-based activities that assist them in
projecting earnings for their majors upon graduation and creating a monthly budget plan.
Doing so will enable them to better understand how their current decisions on borrowing
affect their long-term income and expenses.
22. What is the average amount of time that it takes your graduates to repay their student loans?
Student Loans are awarded by Colorado Mesa University according to Federal Legislation
and Regulations. As such, Colorado Mesa University is obligated to award the requested
amount by the student up to the yearly maximum as long as the student meets the mandated
guidelines. Colorado Mesa University acts as an intermediary to ensure the loan proceeds
provided by the federal government are properly disbursed to the student. Repayment of the
student’s loan is handled by the loan servicer designated by the Federal Department of
Education. There are a number of servicers that handle Colorado Mesa University’s
student’s loans. Because Colorado Mesa University does not service these loans it is not
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possible to determine the average time it takes a student to pay off his or her loan. The
standard repayment length is 10 years according to federal regulation but the student may
choose other repayment options. Recently, the Department of Education has strongly
encouraged students to utilize the Income Based Repayment option (IBR) which calculates the
payment as a percentage of yearly income. After a certain number of years, the unpaid
portion of the loan is written off but counts as income for the student.
Performance: Persistence, Completion, Closing the Gap
23. Since the Lt. Governor announced the "Master Plan" for institutions of higher education,
please describe the following:
a. If applicable, has your institution of higher education reduced the amount
of time to credential their graduates? If applicable, has your institution of
higher education reduced the amount of time to receive a 2-year or 4-year
degree? Please distinguish percentages based on demographics,
underserved communities, gender, etc.
In reviewing CMU’s retention data, it is important to keep in mind that
nearly 50% of CMU entering, first-time students require remediation in
at least one discipline, thereby extending their time to degree.
Approximately 40% of CMU students are Pell-eligible, indicating the
overall socio-economic level of students served by the institution, and the
university estimates that 62% are employed either full or part time while
enrolled in school. CMU’s overall retention rate is affected by the socioeconomic level of our student body because, in many cases, students take
time off to earn more money before returning to school.
In 2010, the University designed its MAV3 program (50 Bachelor Degree
fields of study), developed specifically so that, if students followed a
specific set of advising requirements, they could earn a baccalaureate
degree in three years. To date, only 8 students have completed a
baccalaureate degree through the program. The average length of time
to a baccalaureate degree for students enrolled solely at CMU (i.e.,
excludes transfer students) is 5.45 years which essentially has not
changed for the past five years.21
b. What is your institution of higher education doing to retain students?
What is your retention rate? Please distinguish percentages based on
demographics, underserved communities, gender, etc.
First year retention rates for the five most recent cohorts of first time, full
time, baccalaureate-seeking students are shown below, including rates
21
Source: CMU Office of Academic Affairs.
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for specific sub-population.22
Retained to 2nd Year
2007
2008
2009
2010
2011
# Students in Original Cohort
689
731
964
1,108
1,288
Total
61.0%
63.2%
65.9%
64.4%
64.6%
Female
Male
64.0%
57.1%
70.9%
54.5%
66.9%
64.7%
67.6%
61.3%
67.4%
61.5%
Black
Hispanic
Asian
Pacific Islander
Amer Indian
White
Multi-racial
Non-res Alien
Unknown
70.6%
63.9%
60.0%
61.5%
61.5%
65.2%
61.5%
64.6%
68.4%
73.3%
61.9%
82.9%
52.9%
61.4%
28.6%
63.7%
40.9%
66.2%
60.0%
64.1%
44.8%
57.1%
75.0%
41.7%
70.0%
66.3%
60.3%
0.0%
50.0%
0.0%
63.6%
100.0%
70.8%
64.7%
86.7%
Colorado Mesa University pays careful attention to the retention and
completion rates of its students. The Board of Trustees, President's
Office, the Vice President for Academic Affairs, and other administrative
staff receive regular updates on these rates, and the university has
responded by implementing programs and methods to help students
continue and complete their education at CMU. Particularly noteworthy
are the following efforts undertaken to increase the likelihood of student
success over the past three years:
• Articulating and implementing student retention strategies by all
academic and administrative units, documenting the on-going attention
given to this priority; the importance of this effort is reflected in the
University’s strategic plan and its performance contract with CCHE in
addition to the continued monitoring of the success of these efforts;
• Creating the Office of Student Success and substantially increasing the
use of academic and student support services by students that include
Tutoring, Advising, Advising, Mentoring, Career Services;
• Implementing 14 recommendations related to admissions, assessment,
advising, and enrollment from the Working Group to Improve Student
Academic Success;
22
Source: CMU Office of Institutional Research.
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• Adding significantly to the investments in institutional financial aid
(e.g., MavWorks);
• Increasing the admissions index for baccalaureate-seeking students and
redirecting the admission of lesser-prepared students through the
community college division;
• Surveying students frequently to measure student satisfaction and
engagement through multiple instruments and evaluate various
academic and administrative operations;
• Planning the delivery of courses over a two-year cycle used for
academic advising;
• Expanding the availability of academic support, co- and extracurricular activities, and student services;
• Enhancing the effectiveness of faculty instruction and assessment of
student learning outcomes; and
• Collecting and analyzing an extensive amount of data related to student
preparation and success that is used to evaluate projects’ success and
subsequent improvement. For example, the results of data mining have
identified some of the factors affecting CMU student success. Other
factors serving as a basis for retention analyses include: gender, living
on campus, participating in intercollegiate athletics, provisionallyadmitted students, admissions index, and freshmen students registering
early vs. late for their initial semester. These examples illustrate the
types of retention questions being asked by administrators; information
is shared with internal constituents for use in assessment and planning.
c. Does your institution of higher education experience an attainment gap?
If so, what is the institution doing to remedy such issues?
See the answer to Question 23b.
ASSET
24. Last session, we passed Colorado Asset (S.B. 13-033) so that undocumented students are able
to receive in-state tuition. How many undocumented students is your institution of higher
education currently serving?
In fall 2013, CMU had 50 Asset students.23
23
Source: CMU Office of Institutional Research.
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11:40-12:00
UNIVERSITY OF NORTHERN COLORADO
Higher Education Funding Request and Options for Statutory Change
1. Please clarify your plans for tuition and fee increases in FY 2014-15.
UNC’s tuition increase will certainly be under the agreed-upon 6% resident undergraduate
rate increase. In the past two years, resident undergraduate tuition has increased 3% and 5%.
We have historically increased fees at approximately CPI and anticipate a similar increase
for FY 2014-15.
2. How will low income students fare under your plan for FY 2014-15 tuition increases and
financial aid allocations?
UNC continues to gather data and develop more sophisticated financial aid models to address
affordability for both low- and middle-income students. Sufficient financial aid is a critical
issue for UNC since about 40% of our undergraduate resident students are Pell-eligible or
Level 1. For the last several years at least 25% of undergraduate tuition increases have been
used for institutional financial aid. The additional financial aid proposed by the Governor
would help us insure that low-income students would be virtually unaffected by tuition
increases and allow us to continue to address affordability for middle-income students.
3. Several years ago, the Colorado Legislature gave flexibility to institutions of higher education
to set your own tuition costs (S.B. 10-003). What is your opinion of this statute and is it time
for change?
UNC’s Board has consistently taken a very conservative approach to price increases. Our
total tuition and fees remain affordable in comparison to other Colorado universities and our
national peers. Allowing our Board the flexibility to set tuition and fees is essential to taking
long-term approach to improving graduation rates through investments in innovative
instructional methods and programs and student support services, while also maintaining
affordability.
4. What recommendations do you have for the Joint Budget Committee and the General
Assembly to make the funding for higher education more equitable across institutions?
UNC continues to believe that with limited state funding prospects, additional financial aid to
the student makes good use of public funding.
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5. How does your institution define “need based aid”, “merit based aid”, and “work study”? Do
you have a position on the staff recommendation to clarify financial aid statutes?
Need-based aid: College-funded or college-administered award from institutional, state, federal,
or other sources for which a student must have financial need to qualify. This includes both
institutional and non-institutional student aid (grants, jobs, and loans).
Merit-based Aid: Scholarships, grants and gifts, from institutional, state, federal, or other
sources (including unrestricted funds or gifts and endowment income) awarded on the basis of
academic achievement.
Work study and employment: Federal and state work study aid, and any employment packaged
by UNC in financial aid.
We support efforts to clarify and modernize statute to bring the law into alignment with current
practice. We do not support changes that would interfere with governing boards’ existing
flexibility to leverage and optimize aid based on student needs at individual institutions.
Tuition Increases: Cost Drivers
6. What does it cost you to educate a student? Is your tuition above or below that amount?
It costs approximately $12,000 per year to educate an undergraduate student. Our tuition
($5,748) plus COF ($1,920) for a resident undergraduate is $7,668. Fees are an additional
$1,420.
7. If tuition were lowered would more students come? Would it increase overall revenues if
tuition were less? What is the breakeven point?
UNC looks at both the sticker price and the discounted net price for segments of its population
(by academic preparation and socioeconomic status). Generally speaking, we find that students’
decision to attend is based first upon academic quality/institutional fit, and, to the extent that
price is a consideration, additional financial aid (discounting) is a greater incentive to attend
than lowering the sticker price of tuition.
8. Since FY2000, how have your operations costs increased and by what percentage? Please
describe reasons for operational cost increases.



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FY2000: $121.5M
FY2013:$186.3M
53.3% increase
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Operating cost increases include greater-than-inflation annual increases in utilities, food costs,
library materials, health insurance, and PERA, as well as general inflation. As discussed in
question 14, UNC has invested in employee compensation at the 45th percentile of our peers. In
addition changing student demographics has driven the need for more diverse student support
services.
9. For institutions of higher education that are in rural areas of the state, are there increased
operational costs? Please explain.
N/A
10. Since 2000, please provide a breakdown of your administrative costs and the percentage of
annual increases.
Institutional Support
% Change
2000
6,997,026
2001
6,242,784
-10.8%
2002
9,048,830
44.9%
2003
7,427,433
-17.9%
2004
5,533,618
-25.5%
2005
6,213,142
12.3%
2006
7,759,832
24.9%
2007
9,659,058
24.5%
2008
8,576,536
-11.2%
2009
8,873,255
3.5%
2010
8,878,558
0.1%
2011
9,008,519
1.5%
2012
9,232,840
2.5%
2013
8,470,634
-8.3%
11. Please provide a breakdown of the salaries for administration positions, faculty, etc.
FY14
Per Approved Budget:
Faculty
Exempt
Classified
Subtotal Salaries
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42,619,570
23,500,756
19,732,972
85,853,298
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12. What
is
the
percentage
of
full
time
faculty
vs.
adjunct
faculty?
72% full time faculty
13. What is the ratio of students per faculty member at your institution of higher education?
Student to Faculty Ratio (Fall 13) = 16.67 to 1
14. What is the ratio of student tuition increases in comparison to salary for administration,
faculty and other staff?
As part of UNC’s multiyear planning, we are working to establish sustainable practices for
providing competitive compensation to recruit and retain faculty and staff to deliver on our
promise of transformative education to students. We are working to move UNC’s average
salaries, over the span of five years, to the 45th percentile of institutions in our identified peer
group.
Fiscal Year 2013
Faculty & Exempt: 5%
Classified One-Time Performance Pay: 3%
Tuition: 3%
Fiscal Year 2014
Faculty & Exempt: 5%
Classified: 2.6%-4.0%
Tuition: 5%
15. How will the Affordable Care Act decrease health care costs for employees? Does your
institution of higher education anticipate long-term savings? If so, please explain.
The Affordable Care Act has three employer based fees (Patient Centered Outcome Research
Institute (PCORI) Fee, Insurer Fee, and Reinsurer Fee) that in 2014 will cost UNC $231,259.
These fees are reset annually and with current participation rates in the State and Federal
plans, our health care consultants anticipate an increase in the fees next year. The costs
associated with the ACA increased our employees’ premiums by 3.9% more than the
calculated premium without the ACA fees.
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Workforce Needs and Employment After Graduation
16. Please provide information regarding what your institution of higher education is currently
doing to ensure job placement.
The University of Northern Colorado has implemented a number of strategies to support job
placement. Below is a partial listing of these strategies:




Many undergraduate and graduate programs require students to complete internships or
other clinical experiences. Nearly 80% of undergraduate programs offer internship or
other field-based experiences for credit, with half of these programs requiring an
internship or other field-based experience for graduation.
Academic programs in specialized fields seek or maintain accreditation from professional
organizations. Some professions require graduation from an accredited program for
certification or licensure, while for others, graduation from an accredited program makes
program graduates more competitive. A complete list of accredited programs is available
here: http://www.unco.edu/assessment/pdf/Specialized%20Accreditation_5113.pdf
Curriculum revisions and program development are implemented in response to changing
requirements for entry, certification, or licensure in specialized fields. For example, UNC
developed a Master of Accounting degree in response to changes in Colorado licensure
requirements. The Dietetics program increased admissions requirements and changed
from a BA to a BS degree to ensure that graduates of the program remained competitive
for industry-required internships.
UNC houses a full-service Career Services department. In the last year, the department
served students and alumni through the following activities:
o Individual counseling appointments with over 1500 students and alumni
o Presentations in classes and other forums reaching over 4000 students
o 5 hiring fairs serving 1462 internship and job candidates
o Serving as a clearinghouse for employers offering internships
o Developing relationships with nearly 650 recruiters and over 330 organizations
17. Once students graduate from your institution of higher education, what is the percentage that
use their degree to find employment?
Based on self-reported data collected through an annual survey of 2011-2012 undergraduate
degree recipients 72% of those who responded (N=346, 19% response rate) indicated they were
employed in a field related to their major.
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Of the 2011-2012 graduate degree recipients who responded to the survey (N = 216, 33%
response rate) 92% were employed in a field related to their degree.
18. What is the average wage of your graduates?
Of those who responded to the survey, the average starting salary for undergraduate degree
recipients employed full-time within 12 months of graduation was $32,729.
The average starting salary for graduate degree recipients was $40,763.
19. If a graduate has a difficult time finding employment, what resources are available to him /
her through your institution of higher education to find a job? What are the success rates of
this effort?
UNC’s Career Services provides an extensive menu of services to current students and all alumni.
These services include the following:







Individual career counseling
Career assessments
Resume writing and job search strategies, including online resume builder
Online database of full-time job offerings
On campus interviews with employers interested in employing UNC students and alumni
Workshops and networking events
Employment fairs
20. What efforts is your institution undertaking to receive input from Colorado businesses to
prepare graduates that meet their workforce needs? How often do the Colorado businesses that
you work with actually hire your graduates?
The University of Northern Colorado employs numerous strategies of engagement with Colorado
employers to prepare graduates that meet their workforce needs. Examples include the following:

The College of Natural and Health Sciences has an explicit goal to develop and implement
strategies that interface education, industry, workforce, and worldwide community.
Specific strategies include meeting with the Colorado Workforce Development Council,
individual contacts and surveys of healthcare organizations, expanding internship
placement sites, and maintaining college-level and program-specific advisory boards
comprised of representatives from business and industry.
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


The Monfort College of Business and each disciplinary area have advisory boards whose
membership is comprised primarily of Colorado business leaders. The major role of these
boards is to provide input on workforce needs. Faculty in the college are active in
professional organizations, and regularly network with members of the business
community through formal and informal communications.
The College of Education and Behavioral Sciences regularly runs focus groups with
principals and classroom teachers to get their perspective on the quality of UNC
graduates. The college also surveys Human Resources personnel from school districts,
taking particular advantage of their presence at the UNC Teacher Employment Fair. The
college also gathers information from external agencies on graduate quality and the
relevance of the curriculum.
The College of Performing and Visual Arts has a Community Advisory Board. All three of
its schools are accredited by their respective professional accreditation bodies, who
establish criteria and standards relevant to the skills and knowledge necessary for
professional advancement of the college’s graduates. In addition, many of the faculty are
professionally engaged in their respective fields in the performing and visual arts, which
helps them remain current with workforce needs in those fields.
Among respondents to the most recent alumni survey, 75% of undergraduate degree recipients
were employed in Colorado. Examples of employers include Adams 12 School District, Aurora
Public Schools, Bank of Colorado, Banner Health, Price Waterhouse Coopers, State Farm
Insurance, and Weld County School District.
73% of graduate degree recipients were employed in Colorado. Examples of employers include
Boulder Valley School District, Cherry Creek Schools, City of Aurora, Poudre School District,
and North Range Behavioral Health.
Student Loans
21. What is the loan default rate of graduates of your institution? If high, what steps are you
taking to address it?
3 Year Cohort Default Rate (FFELP/Direct)
Cohort
Year/(Reported)
UNC 3-Year
National 3Year
Colorado 3Year
2009 / (2012)
7.60%
13.10%
16.90%
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2010 / (2013)
7.60%
14.70%
16.20%
22. What is the average amount of time that it takes your graduates to repay their student loans?
This is not data that is collected by UNC, but the standard repayment is 10 years. Depending on
the debt and repayment method selected, repayment could take up to 20 years.
Performance: Persistence, Completion, Closing the Gap
23. Since the Lt. Governor announced the "Master Plan" for institutions of higher education,
please describe the following:
a. If applicable, has your institution of higher education reduced the amount
of time to credential their graduates? If applicable, has your institution of
higher education reduced the amount of time to receive a 2-year or 4-year
degree? Please distinguish percentages based on demographics,
underserved communities, gender, etc.
b. What is your institution of higher education doing to retain students?
What is your retention rate? Please distinguish percentages based on
demographics, underserved communities, gender, etc.
UNC has several programs in place that provide support with the goal of retaining students.
Many of these programs serve targeted at-risk populations, and will be discussed under item (c).
The most recent activities that a campus-wide scope are:



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Our participation in the Student Success Collaborative, a nationwide
initiative of the Education Advisory Board. This collaboration will
provide the institution with sophisticated analytics that provide
“early warning” opportunities for data-informed advising
interventions, including opportunities to compare a student’s
academic achievement profile to majors that are a good “fit.” The
program is being piloted in Spring 2014 with a small number of
targeted programs, and will roll out to the whole campus in the
following year;
the implementation of a user-friendly degree audit tool. To allow
academic advisers and students to plan a clear path to graduation.
the renewability of several scholarships that were formerly one-time
awards, thus eliminating one financial barrier to retention.
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
Joint UNC-City of Greeley initiatives, including the “University
District” undertaking, that connect the campus to the city and
promote “student-friendly” practices in the local community.
Our overall retention rate (Fall 2012-Fall 2013) is 66.2%. A more detailed retention rate by
demographics:
 Male American Indian or Alaska Native 66.67%
 Male Asian 41.67%
 Male Black or African American 62.50%
 Male Hispanic or Latino 60.76%
 Male Multiracial 58.97%
 Male Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander 100.00%
 Male Non-U.S. Citizen 66.67%
 Male Unknown 63.16%
 Male White 62.23%
 Female American Indian or Alaska Native 33.33%
 Female Asian 77.78%
 Female Black or African American 56.86%
 Female Hispanic or Latino 70.19%
 Female Multiracial 62.96%
 Female Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander 50.00%
 Female Non-U.S. Citizen 80.00%
 Female Unknown 58.62%
 Female White 70.04%
[Please note that some of the rates (e.g. Native American/Alaskan Native) are skewed because
they reflect very small student populations. Among our under-represented population, Hispanic
students represent the largest group, at 17.2% of the total population as of Fall 2013 Census.]
c. Does your institution of higher education experience an attainment gap?
If so, what is the institution doing to remedy such issues?
UNC does experience some attainment gaps. The first of these is for academically
underprepared students who are also low-income (Pell recipient). Compared to the
institutional retention rate of 66.2%, Pell students with sub-93 index scores (i.e. window
admits) have a Fall-to-Fall retention rate of 54.8%, and Pell students with indices of 94-99
have a rate of just under 59%. This retention issue translates into depressed graduation rates:
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whereas UNC has an overall six-year graduation rate of 46.3%, students with sub-99 indices
have a graduation rate of 35%. To address this issue, UNC has begun using (for Fall 2013
entering freshmen) an instrument called the Insight Questionnaire, which was developed at
the University of Oregon. This instrument measures non-cognitive features such as resilience,
as predictors of greater likelihood of persistence. Our goal is to be more selective within the
“window” population, not by changing our standards, but by enrolling those students who
give evidence of having the tools to help them overcome the barrier of poor academic
preparation. Secondly, we are developing more supportive structures for gateway Math and
English courses, beginning with better diagnostics in the placement process and moving
toward targeted Supplemental Academic Instruction. We anticipate that many of these
structures will be in place in the Fall of 2015.
UNC is also experiencing an attainment gap with respect to underserved students. Against
our overall six-year graduation rate of 46.3%, our Hispanic student graduation rate for the
most recent cohort (entering Fall 2007) is 37.6%, our African-American graduation rate is
21.8%, and our low-income (Pell-recipient) rate is 37%.
In addition to the campus-wide retention and success initiatives outlined in item (b) above, UNC
is doing several things specifically to address these disparities in attainment:
1. Our partnership with the Denver Scholarship Foundation provides
both incentivized scholarship funds and intensive academic
coaching for a population of 300-325 made up of predominantly
low-income and under-represented minority students. We have
maintained retention rates for participating students at or above
our target of 85%, and will be taking in progressively larger
cohorts over the next few years.
2. Our Student Support Services grant program (Center for Human
Enrichment) provides academic and other support, including
advising, tutoring, counseling, and supplemental instruction to 200
students who meet TRiO criteria (low-income, first-generation,
under-represented minority). For several years this program’s
retention rates have been significantly above the overall
institutional rate, with an 88% year-to-year persistence rate.
3. UNC’s Academic Support and Advising office has instituted weekly
hours in our four cultural centers, to provide enhanced academic
advising and to “bridge” any barriers that might be experienced by
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students of color who participate in the activities of the cultural
centers.
4. In Fall 2014 the Cultural Centers will begin participating in an
early alert program designed to connect for first-year students of
color and window-admits, with student-support resources on
campus.
ASSET
24. Last session, we passed Colorado Asset (S.B. 13-033) so that undocumented students are able
to receive in-state tuition. How many undocumented students is your institution of higher
education currently serving?
Information provided by DHE, December 2013- 6 ASSET students have received COF to date.
12:00-1:30
LUNCH
1:30-1:50
METROPOLITAN STATE UNIVERSITY OF DENVER
Higher Education Funding Request and Options for Statutory Change
1. Please clarify your plans for tuition and fee increases in FY 2014-15.
Tuition
Metropolitan State University of Denver (MSU Denver) has an approved Financial
Accountability Plan (FAP), which allows MSU Denver’s Governing Board to increase the
tuition for the next two fiscal years up to 9%. However, based on the Governor’s proposal,
MSU Denver is considering a resident undergraduate tuition increase of 6%. MSU Denver
needs to complete a more in-depth analysis to fully understand our needs for the next fiscal
year.
Mandatory Fees
Currently, the estimated fee increases are mainly limited to CPI adjustments for two of the
mandatory fees. This will be a total estimated increase of $7.30 per academic year for a
student taking 30 credit hours.
The table below summarizes the total estimated tuition and fee increases per above
information for a student taking 15 credit hours each semester and benefiting from the current
tuition window between 12 and 18 credit hours:
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Cost to student with potential tuition increase of 6%
Estimated
Estimated
FY2014-15
FY2014-15
FY2013-14
FY2013-14
Semester
Academic Year
At 15 Credit Hours
Est. Tuition
$
Est. Mandatory Fees $
Total
$
$ Change
% Change
2,345.40 $
526.46 $
2,871.86 $
2,485.80
530.11
3,015.91
$
144.05
5.02%
$
$
$
4,690.80 $
1,052.92 $
5,743.72 $
4,971.60
1,060.22
6,031.82
$
288.10
5.02%
2. How will low income students fare under your plan for FY 2014-15 tuition increases and
financial aid allocations?
Anticipating a 6% tuition increase in 2014-15, our lowest income students would be provided
financial aid to cover tuition, fees and books without the need for loans.
3. Several years ago, the Colorado Legislature gave flexibility to institutions of higher education
to set your own tuition costs (S.B. 10-003). What is your opinion of this statute and is it time
for change?
MSU Denver believes that this flexibility should be extended to allow more responsibility and
accountability to Colorado Institutions of Higher Education. This bill was an important tool
for MSU Denver to manage our vital funding needs through the recovery from the recession.
MSU Denver periodically completes self-imposed program reviews, self-studies, and selfregulations to ensure our full commitment to the success of our student population. The
Flexibility bill allows us to strive for the best business practices to ensure that our resource
distribution and spending are aligned with our targeted performance outcomes.
Nationally, there have been concerns about the rise of tuition and fees for public institutions,
and the cost of higher education. While MSU Denver had to raise its tuition and fees over the
past several years, the university has been able to maintain its accessibility by increasing
efficiency and providing institutional financial aid. The university has also explored
additional revenue sources including public/private partnerships, such as the new Hotel and
Hospitality Learning Center (HLC).
As national and state resources decline, public institutions of Higher Education need to stay
competitive, and as a nation we need to continue to increase access to higher education for as
many individuals as possible. The increased number of well-educated individuals in the state
leads to prosperity and boosts the economy. Allowing public institutions of higher education
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to conduct their affairs in ways that are tailored to each of their specific visions, similar to an
enterprise business, will result in stronger business decisions and financial sustainability.
4. What recommendations do you have for the Joint Budget Committee and the General
Assembly to make the funding for higher education more equitable across institutions?
MSU Denver recommends the following principles to be included in Colorado’s Higher
Education funding formula:

Equity in the state’s support per student by its sector – community college, four-year
comprehensive and research universities, with no institution within a sector receiving one
standard deviation above or below the sector average.

A funding component that addresses the state’s goals for retention and graduation of
historically underrepresented populations by recognizing those students may require more
intensive support services in the first two years. This would be similar to the concept
applied in Proposition 66 for K-12 schools.

Consistent application of enrollment adjustments up or down. Institutions would be
permitted to have a one-percent variance before positive or negative enrollment
adjustments are made.

Equity funding should be phased in so that by the time the performance contract threshold
is achieved, base funding equity among institutions within a sector will have been
realized.
5. How does your institution define “need based aid”, “merit based aid”, and “work study”? Do
you have a position on the staff recommendation to clarify financial aid statutes?
Definition of “need based aid” – Aid that is awarded to students as determined by the
expected family contribution on the FAFSA.
Definition of “merit based aid” – Aid awarded to students based on academic factors such as
academic major, GPA, enrollment and completion rate. Institutional funded scholarships will
be awarded to students who are classified as Colorado Residents for tuition purposes.
Definition of “work study” – students working a job approved thru Human Resources for
work study funds.
The state guidelines for the state need based grant, merit and work study give sufficient
definitions/regulations for Financial Aid offices in the state to follow. We are unsure as to the
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need to change or make more restrictive any definitions. State aid currently only goes to
students who are Colorado residents and qualify for aid under federal and state guidelines.
Tuition Increases: Cost Drivers
6. What does it cost you to educate a student? Is your tuition above or below that amount?
Per Fiscal Year 2012-13 MSU Denver Financial Statements and total student FTE, cost per
FTE equals $9,030. This cost includes all services essential to our students and are partially
paid for through Auxiliary funds. Our current fiscal year tuition rate of $4,690.8 for a
resident undergraduate student taking 30 credit hours in one academic year is below this cost.
7. If tuition were lowered would more students come? Would it increase overall revenues if
tuition were less? What is the breakeven point?
MSU Denver in the last couple fiscal years has experienced slight enrollment shortfalls that
are mainly the result of the post-recession economy. Since MSU Denver already has the
lowest tuition and fees among Colorado institutions of Higher Education, lower tuition rate,
with the absence of state funding, would create adverse results. Lowering tuition may create
the opposite effect and lower the enrollment, as there maybe concerns regarding the quality of
the education experience for students. It is difficult to establish a direct relationship between
tuition increases and enrollment while we are still in post-recession years. MSU Denver has a
diverse student population and the largest number of lower income students. Therefore,
providing appropriate financial aid has been a key goal for the University to maintain
accessibility while state support has declined.
8. Since FY 2000, how have your operations costs increased and by what percentage? Please
describe reasons for operational cost increases.
Increases are mainly related to the CPI, new full time faculty, and personnel due to 28%
enrollment increases since 2000, health insurance, cost of technology and instructional space
needs. The table below shows the percentage of increases for total operational expenses:
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FY00
FY01
FY02
FY03
FY04
FY05
FY06
FY07
FY08
FY09
FY10
FY11
FY12
FY13
MSU Denver
Percent
Operating
Increase/
Expenses
(Decrease)
109,653,540.00
108,585,496.00
(1.0%)
102,206,899.00
(5.9%)
107,169,459.00
4.9%
103,869,968.00
(3.1%)
107,176,979.00
3.2%
107,881,811.00
0.7%
116,530,994.00
8.0%
124,622,768.00
6.9%
134,634,390.00
8.0%
138,186,826.00
2.6%
149,568,170.00
8.2%
151,491,262.00
1.3%
160,510,967.00
6.0%
9. Since 2000, please provide a breakdown of your administrative costs and the percentage of
annual increases.
The table below has the total administrative cost and the percentage increases:
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MSU Denver
FY
FY00
FY01
FY02
FY03
FY04
FY05
FY06
FY07
FY08
FY09
FY10
FY11
FY12
FY13
Institutional
Support
8,657,268.00
9,177,403.00
9,156,066.00
9,481,652.00
8,429,758.00
9,040,134.00
10,147,251.00
13,006,385.00
13,425,560.00
15,371,446.00
14,714,941.00
15,782,608.00
13,729,183.00
14,335,136.00
Academic
Support
9,957,779.00
10,428,200.00
9,937,164.00
10,027,303.00
8,451,183.00
8,308,226.00
8,200,404.00
8,765,196.00
10,943,404.00
9,672,244.00
9,687,612.00
9,814,762.00
10,485,609.00
13,898,702.00
Total
Percent
Administrative Increase/
Expenses
(Decrease)
18,615,047.00
19,605,603.00
5.3%
19,093,230.00
(2.6%)
19,508,955.00
2.2%
16,880,941.00
(13.5%)
17,348,360.00
2.8%
18,347,655.00
5.8%
21,771,581.00
18.7%
24,368,964.00
11.9%
25,043,690.00
2.8%
24,402,553.00
(2.6%)
25,597,370.00
4.9%
24,214,792.00
(5.4%)
28,233,838.00
16.6%
Important Notes:
a- MSU Denver is including Institutional and Academic Support, as part of the total
Administrative Support. These functions include expenses, such as library, a portion of
our payment to AHEC, computing, and administration.
b- For the above numbers the main increase in Academic Support from FY12 to FY13 is the
result of reallocating Information Technology and Educational Technology expenses from
Instructional category to the Academic Support category based on a current review of the
department’s function.
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10. Please provide a breakdown of the salaries for administration positions, faculty, etc.
Salary
2013-14
All Funds
Faculty
Vacant Faculty
Summer Faculty
Part-time Faculty
12-Month Faculty
Contract Administrator Personnel
Classified Support Personnel
Total Salaries for FY13-14
31,319,220.00
6,535,922.00
2,155,363.00
9,339,490.00
553,638.00
26,418,354.00
12,843,397.00
89,165,384.00
11. What is the percentage of full time faculty vs. adjunct faculty?
For FY 2012-13 we had 56.2% of the faculty FTE taught by full-time faculty and 43.8% by
adjunct faculty.
12. What is the ratio of students per faculty member at your institution of higher education?
For FY 2012-13 we showed a 19.3 student to faculty ratio.
13. What is the ratio of student tuition increases in comparison to salary for administration,
faculty and other staff?
This comparison can be misleading considering that today over two thirds of MSU Denver’s
operating expenses are supported by tuition revenue. In other words, the tuition revenue pays
for $2 of every $3 in operating expenses.
The following table shows the ratio of student tuition increases in comparison to salary
increases for five fiscal years:
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Additional
Revenue
% Tuition
from
Fiscal Year Increase Tuition Inc.
%
Salary % of
% Fac. % Admin. Classified Total Salary additional
Inc.
Inc
Inc.
Increases
Rev
FY09-10
9.00%
4,699,407
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
122,311
FY10-11
9.00%
5,539,045
2.00%
0.00%
0.00%
687,945
12.42%
FY11-12
22.60% 14,637,756
2.00%
2.00%
0.00%
972,089
6.64%
FY12-13
13.00% 11,228,728
3.00%
2.00%
0.00%
1,491,274
13.28%
3.00%
2.00%
2.00%
1,890,170
25.36%
FY13-14
9.00%
7,454,008
Notes
2.60% No Mass increases just Rank, Merit, and Equity Adjustments
IT, Internet, and Registration fees were converted to tuition & are
included in the 22.6% increase.
Lower tuition increases, therefore, higher rate. Plus Classified
increases that includes a mass increase of 2%.
14. How will the Affordable Care Act decrease health care costs for employees? Does your
institution of higher education anticipate long-term savings? If so, please explain.
We do not anticipate the ACA will decrease health care costs; on the contrary, we anticipate
that the costs will increase, possibly significantly for the following reason:




Under ACA, we are required to increase the type of coverage offered to our employees
by including benefits and coverage that were not previously mandated, such as
wellness for prenatal care.
We will have to provide coverage to individuals who we have not had to provide
coverage to in the past based on the requirement to cover employees who work 30 or
more hours per week on average.
We have incurred additional expense due to the fact that we are now having to track
the number of hours being worked by our employees, which resulted in us having to
hire a full time employee dedicated to tracking the hours.
We anticipate the employer mandated fees will add an additional 9% to our total
premium costs which will have to be paid by the employer and cannot be passed on to
the employee in part or in entirety.
Workforce Needs and Employment After Graduation
15. Please provide information regarding what your institution of higher education is currently
doing to ensure job placement.
Below is a summary of job search services provided by the Office of Career Services:
Career & Job Search Preparation
Purpose: Help students gain knowledge about themselves & careers, prepare students for the
job search
Services & Programs:
o Individual career counseling appointments & walk-ins
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o Employment workshops (Job Search, Interviewing, Resume Writing)
o Occupational research tools (Choices Explorer, ONet Online, Occupational
Outlook Handbook, Career Library, Career Services website)
o Online Career Videos
o Networking Workshop
o Graduate School Workshop
o Fast Track Career Program (week-long series of messaging and workshops for
graduating seniors)
On-Campus Recruiting
Purpose: Connect students with recruiting resources and networking opportunities
Services & Programs:
o On-campus Interviews
o Online Job postings
o Optimal Resume (resume writing software)
o Career Fairs (one each semester)
o Employer Visit Days
o Employer Information Sessions & Presentations
o Accounting Practice Interviews
o School of Business Mock Interviews
16. Once students graduate from your institution of higher education, what is the percentage that
use their degree to find employment?
Using the College Measures Economic Success Measures for Colorado – MSU Denver, we
saw that 31% reported earnings for graduates from 2006-07 through 2010-11. Note the
percentage is of graduates with reported Colorado employment earnings meeting the 4quarter minimum rule. These graduates are earning equal to or above the Colorado
minimum wage. For the state of Colorado overall we see that approximately 26% of all
college graduates (61,800) have Colorado employment earnings.
17. What is the average wage of your graduates?
Using the College Measures Economic Success Measures for Colorado – MSU Denver, our
first year earnings median is $38,547 for a bachelor degree.
18. If a graduate has a difficult time finding employment, what resources are available to him /
her through your institution of higher education to find a job? What are the success rates of
this effort?
The MSU Denver Alumni Association offers a comprehensive suite of career services to
alumni. This includes a 24/7 robust career module – OptimalResume – that features resume
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building, interactive interview techniques, and interview preparation. We provide personal
counseling services on a limited basis ranging from the entry level job search to executive
level review and assistance. The Association also provides a full series of webinars that may
be viewed in real time or via the archive. On-site programming has been a feature in the last
year, and we participate in the All Colorado/All Alumni Career Fair(s). Additionally, we
utilize LinkedIn programming and networking to provide informal mentoring and a job
board. We host and coordinate the MSU Denver Graduate School Fair in partnership with
several campus offices.
The program launched in the last year and half, so placement rates are not available. We
have provided service to more than 1,200 alumni in some fashion to date.
19. What efforts is your institution undertaking to receive input from Colorado businesses to
prepare graduates that meet their workforce needs? How often do the Colorado businesses that
you work with actually hire your graduates?
All of the professionally oriented programs at MSU Denver bring together industry advisory
councils to provide up-to-date information about trends in relevant industries and to review
and provide input on curriculum. More broadly, the University has embraced partnerships
with Colorado businesses from across strategic economic clusters, namely in
hospitality/tourism and in aerospace/engineering, to construct not only state-of-the-art
learning facilities but also new models for educating students to meet emerging needs in
Colorado’s key industries. For example, President Obama identified advanced manufacturing
as an area needing workforce development. Local businesses and Chambers suggested we
should address it specifically in aerospace since Colorado has the second largest aerospace
sector in the nation and a growing need for educated workers. As MSU Denver started
designing a new program in Advanced Manufacturing, meetings were immediately set up with
Colorado business leaders in the aerospace sector to determine what they needed in
workforce development.
Colorado businesses also play a direct role in preparing MSU Denver students for their
careers after graduation by offering both paid and unpaid internships. MSU Denver has
ongoing partnerships with between 500 and 600 employers who provide up to 1,000
internship placements every year, providing hands-on, relevant, opportunities for MSU
Denver students to apply their learning in the professional workplace. Approximately 30% of
the internships into which MSU Denver students are placed lead to full-time employment after
graduation.
Additionally, the Office of Career Services solicits input from Colorado businesses on
graduate preparedness in the following ways:
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
Employer Advisory Board – we have a small board of employers who meet twice a
year to provide input on our campus recruiting operations and student preparedness
and to connect them to the institution. Board members have included representatives
from the following organizations: Arapahoe House, Charles Schwab & Co., Inc., Eide
Bailly, GHP Horwath, P.C., Kasier Permanente, Mental Health Center of Denver,
Wells Fargo Bank.

Program Evaluations – every time the office sponsors a career fair, they ask
employers to provide feedback on the event and the students they met.

End-of-semester employer survey – at the end of each semester the office sends an
email to all employers who recruited through the Career Services Office (job posting,
career fair, campus interview, visit-day) to determine hiring outcomes and input on
the event and students they met.
Student Loans
20. What is the loan default rate of graduates of your institution? If high, what steps are you
taking to address it?
MSU Denver’s default 2 year rate is 10.7%. We have recently signed a 3 year contract with
American Student Assistance (ASA) to participate in their SALT program. This is a financial
literacy program in which ASA helps the school by giving students financial literacy tips such
as loan debt, money management and other life situation tips. We have established a campus
wide financial literacy team with staff from all areas of campus such as Orientation,
Admissions, Alumni, Registrar and Academic departments. We will be working as a team in
order to develop more strategies in help with lowering our default rates.
21. What is the average amount of time that it takes your graduates to repay their student loans?
This is an average that is unknown and not given to schools. Standard repayment is 10 years,
however this is based on the debt and repayment method selected which could extend it to 20
years.
Performance: Persistence, Completion, Closing the Gap
22. Since the Lt. Governor announced the "Master Plan" for institutions of higher education,
please describe the following:
a) If applicable, has your institution of higher education reduced the amount of time
to credential their graduates? If applicable, has your institution of higher education
reduced the amount of time to receive a 2-year or 4-year degree? Please distinguish
percentages based on demographics, underserved communities, gender, etc.
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Regarding time to degree completion:
We are actively promoting the completion of 30 credit hours per year so students can finish
their degrees in 4 years. While we have offered a tuition window for some time, we have not
actively communicated the impact of students going full-time at 12 credit hours vs. 15-18
credit hours until this summer. We have created a comprehensive communications plan for
students that includes a “Graduate in 4” video. New students are introduced to the concept at
New Student Orientation (NSO) and sign a banner with their anticipated 4, 5 or 6 year class
year (class of ’17, ’18 or ’19). The message is reinforced by financial aid regarding the
associated increases in costs in the NSO publications and presentations, and we have
companion ads running in our student newspaper and our Facebook page to get the message
out to currently enrolled students. The results are still in the initial stages, but MSU Denver
did experience a slight increase in the average number of credit hours enrolled by students in
fall 2013.
The following information is a summary of data on student performance:
FIRST-TIME FRESHMEN, DEGREE SEEKING STUDENTS (SIX-YEAR GRADUATION RATE):

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Full-Time increased from 21.4% to 25.0%
Part-Time increased from 6.5% to 7.9%
Full-Time Students of Color increased from 17.0% to 24.6%
Part-Time Students of Color increased from 3.9% to 4.9%
Full-Time Hispanic or Latino Students increased from 13.7% to 23.6%
Part-Time Hispanic or Latino Students decreased from 6.2% to 4.7%
Full-Time Females increased from 24.0% to 28.6%
Part-Time Females increased from 8.2% to 10.4%
Full-Time Males increased from 18.6% to 20.6%
Part-Time Males increased from 5.0% to 5.3%
TRANSFER, DEGREE SEEKING STUDENTS (SIX-YEAR GRADUATION RATES):

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Full-Time increased from 43.8% to 46.7%
Part-Time increased from 26.0% to 29.9%
Full-Time Students of Color increased from 36.1% to 41.0%
Part-Time Students of Color increased from 24.3% to 26.9%
Full-Time Hispanic or Latino Students increased from 36.1% to 43.2%
Part-Time Hispanic or Latino Students increased from 25.2% to 25.5%
Full-Time Females dropped slightly from 49.6% to 49.5%
Part-Time Females increased from 28.5% to 30.9%
Full-Time Males increased from 36.8% to 43.7%
Part-Time Males increased from 22.3% to 28.4%
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b) What is your institution of higher education doing to retain students? What is your
retention rate? Please distinguish percentages based on demographics, underserved
communities, gender, etc.
Following are a few key examples of what we are doing to retain students:


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Supplemental Academic Instruction: MSU Denver is the first four-year Colorado
institution to be authorized to offer Supplemental Academic Instruction (SAI). The
goal of SAI is to eliminate the need for remedial classes for students with limited
academic deficiencies in favor of more intense mainstreamed instruction in a freshman
course in Math or English plus a co-requisite section of supplemental academic
support. MSU Denver is offering SAI in three foundational areas: Mathematics,
English, and Reading. With the implementation of SAI, MSU Denver students who had
previously been required to enroll for coursework at the community college will now
be enrolled in MSU Denver college-level coursework, taught by MSU Denver faculty
and enrolled with MSU Denver peers.
MSU Denver has begun to implement a number of “best practices” already in place at
many IHES and proven to help with retention of students. Some of them are relatively
simple, as in ensuring that students take their key foundational general education
courses (English, quantitative literacy, and oral communication courses) early in their
college careers so that they are prepared for subsequent upper division courses. We
are also implementing an “intent to enroll” fee that would apply to the tuition costs of
those students who ultimately do enroll at MSU Denver so that we can plan course
offerings more effectively. We have several other similar kinds of tactical practices
that we have implemented in the last 2 years; it will likely take 2-4 more years before
we can really have a meaningful analysis of their impact.
o Gates-Funded Adaptive Learning Program: A partnership among MSU
Denver, Excelsior College, University of Missouri St. Louis, AASCU
(American Association of State Colleges and Universities), and Cerego (a
technology vendor that develops adaptive learning software, designed to
provide enhanced supplemental academic support via technology). This twoyear project is focused on improving performance in both face-to-face and
online learning environments among students with diverse backgrounds
including ethnicity, age, and socioeconomic characteristics. In particular, we
are focusing on two entry level gateway courses: Intro to Biology (BIO 1080)
and Contemporary Mathematics (MTH 1080).
o Gardner Institute Gateways to Completion TM Program: The John W.
Gardner Institute for Excellence in Undergraduate Education (JWGI) is a
highly respected organization, whose work has focused in the past on first year
success programs. This year they have launched a national pilot program
designed to support post-secondary institutions addressing the challenge of
high student failure rates in gateway courses. MSU Denver was selected to be
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among the 12 founding institutions participating in Gateways to Completion
TM (G2CTM). Our steering committee for this project will be working with
course specific faculty committees on five gateway courses over the next three
years including Math 1110, English 1010, CIS 1010, Nutrition 2040, and
Psych 1001. This collective effort will result in the development of evidence
based plans designed to improve student learning and success in these
historically high enrollment, high failure rate courses.
o The First Year Success (FYS) program offers an opportunity for all full-time,
first-time-to-college students to participate in a unique educational experience.
Small learning communities of 25 students are co-enrolled in two linked,
gateway courses in their first semester. Faculty members collaborate with one
another, working with student supplemental instructors (SI’s) and student
ambassadors assigned to their learning community. These communities
provide an environment where new students make strong personal connections
with faculty and one another. These personal connections with peers and
faculty members have a significant, positive impact on student retention and
academic success.
Significant growth in the program is reflected in several areas. Since 2010
there has been a 112% increase in student participation with almost 58%
growth from fall 2012 to fall 2013. This fall FYS enrolled almost 1,400 of the
1,699 full-time, first-time students (82%). The program is on track to enroll all
such MSU Denver students in the fall of 2014. Since 2009 the combined
average retention rate for FYS has been 9.15% higher than the identified
comparison group that contains non-provisional students who were eligible but
did not participate in the FYS program.
The following information is a summary of data on student retention:
FIRST-TIME FRESHMEN, DEGREE SEEKING STUDENTS (SECOND-YEAR RETENTION RATE):
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Full-Time decreased from 66.0% to 65.4%
Part-Time decreased from 58.0% to 49.5%
Full-Time Students of Color decreased from 66.8% to 63.3%
Part-Time Students of Color decreased from 58.5% to 50.4%
Full-Time Hispanic or Latino Students decreased from 66.4% to 65.2%
Part-Time Hispanic or Latino Students increased from 51.0% to 52.1%
Full-Time Females decreased from 68.8% to 67.5%
Part-Time Females decreased from 58.9% to 47.7%
Full-Time Males decreased slightly from 63.4% to 63.3%
Part-Time Males decreased from 57.1% to 51.3%
Full-Time Pell Eligible for 2011 is 63.3%
Part-Time Pell Eligible for 2011 is 47.2%
Full-Time First-Generation for 2011 is 64.2%
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
Part-Time First-Generation for 2011 is 48.4%
FIRST-TIME TRANSFER, DEGREE SEEKING STUDENTS (SECOND-YEAR RETENTION RATE):
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Full-Time decreased from 73.9% to 67.9%
Part-Time decreased from 64.7% to 57.7%
Full-Time Students of Color decreased from 73.7% to 64.8%
Part-Time Students of Color decreased from 63.5% to 56.2%
Full-Time Hispanic or Latino Students decreased from 75.0% to 68.1%
Part-Time Hispanic or Latino Students decreased from 65.8% to 65.3%
Full-Time Females decreased from 73.5% to 71.4%
Part-Time Females decreased from 64.0% to 57.8%
Full-Time Males decreased from 74.3% to 64.2%
Part-Time Males decreased from 65.9% to 57.6%
Full-Time Pell Eligible for 2011 is 67.3%
Part-Time Pell Eligible for 2011 is 60.3%
Full-Time First-Generation for 2011 is 67.0%
Part-Time First-Generation for 2011 is 58.2%
c) Does your institution of higher education experience an attainment gap? If so, what
is the institution doing to remedy such issues?
In addition to the above efforts, we are currently engaged in a major effort to understand the
retention and graduation gaps among our student populations so that we can address the
issues needing attention and intervene effectively.
 Equity in Excellence: A national 2-year program from the University of Southern
California’s Rossier School of Education’s Center for Urban Education. This is the
third in a series of three “Equity Scorecard” projects. MSU Denver is the only
institution that has participated in all three: 1-Equity in Excellence, 2-Gates-Funded
Adaptive Learning Program, and 3-Gardner Institute Gateways to Completion TM
Program . The goals of the projects include, but are not limited to,
o Identifying gaps in retention and graduation rates among our ethnic groups of
students,
o Identifying when and why these students are dropping out of the institution,
o Developing specific Action Plans designed to help us intervene effectively at
those points where we find that students are leaving us.
ASSET
23. Last session, we passed Colorado Asset (S.B. 13-033) so that undocumented students are able
to receive in-state tuition. How many undocumented students is your institution of higher
education currently serving?
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As of Census Fall 2013 we have 348 students enrolled that are qualified based on the ASSET
Bill.
1:50-2:20
ADAMS STATE UNIVERSITY
Note: The JBC requests that trustees be present for the hearing
Financial Health of Institution
1. What is your plan to ensure there is long term financial health of your institution?
Continued state support is vital to the long-term viability of Adams State. Adams State University has
an annual economic impact of $85 million in the region. With over 370 employees it ranks as one of
the region’s top employers.
ASU’s mission is to educate, serve, and inspire our diverse populations in the pursuit of their lifelong
dreams and ambitions. The vision is to become the university community of choice for diverse and
traditionally underrepresented groups and all who value quality education and inclusivity. Core to
that mission is our role in educating low-income undergraduate resident students of this region. In
order to serve our core constituents, the people of the San Luis Valley, ASU leadership made strategic
investments that would bring in new revenue from our secondary market – nonresident students and
graduate students. Simply put, we need a higher percentage of students coming from middle to high
income families. In order to maintain our low-income enrollments, we had to grow the whole pie. As
the graph illustrates, since FY2008-09 ASU has been able to grow resident enrollment by 14%, which
is 2% better than the statewide average. During that same span ASU grew graduate enrollment by
98%, where the statewide average was 8%, and nonresident undergraduate enrollment by 23%, 5%
above the statewide average. This was strategic. It was not due to a “soft economy” as was suggested
at the higher education briefing.
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In 2005 ASU embarked on a long-range plan to strengthen recruitment assets, technology
assets, and physical plant assets. Those investments have been bearing fruit in the form of
enrollments (27% growth) and degrees awarded (42% growth).
The top priority of Adams State University is to make education accessible, which means
keeping it affordable. To that end, ASU developed a high tuition/high aid model. In order for
this to be effective, ASU had to recruit more “full payers”. Those “full payers” are graduate
and nonresident students. ASU increased graduate revenue by $4.7 million in the last five
years with $1.5 million going directly into on-campus undergraduate education in FY201213. A $2 million increase in nonresident undergraduate tuition helped support the campus.
One program that those tuition dollars help support is the SLV Promise Award, which covers
full tuition and fees for qualified students. The award is available to qualified graduates of all
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high schools in the San Luis Valley. It applies to continuing Adams State students, as well as
incoming freshmen.
It is understandable that the KPMG analysis caused concern. However, it is a snapshot in
time taken at an important juncture in ASU’s strategic journey. As state above, enrollment
growth in a “full payer” population is a key to our long-term financial stability. Market
research told us that we were viewed as a “fall back” institution. In order to attract “full
payers” and become a first choice institution we had to invest in our physical plant. The
campus, and the technology on campus, was outdated and worn out.
In March of 2008 ASU leadership went to the students and asked for their support. If we
wanted to resurrect this campus, they would be the ones who would have to pay for it. Their
support was overwhelming. With 1/3 of the population voting, the student capital fee passed
by with 79% of the students voting in favor. The fee is structured such that it ramps up over
time to align with the borrowing. The long-term plan was to renovate campus and
simultaneously build a revenue stream moving into the future to maintain the campus. In
FY2015-16 the revenue begins to surpass the debt service, which flattens out for the
remainder of the term. This fee will generate $1,000,000 annually to be reinvested in the
physical plant. The State of Colorado does not have the means to maintain these buildings. If
the state is unable handle all of it, the students must bear some of the cost. That cost is
reflected in our fee structure. We don’t like it, but it is a cost of doing business.
Adams State always has been, and will continue to be, reliant on continued, and consistent
state support. The dramatic cuts in recent years to higher education have strained the entire
system. We applaud the Governor’s effort to restore funding for higher education. The
investment in need based aid will help us package those students who have been dramatically
impacted by the reductions in Pell.
2. How do the areas you serve affect your performance? How does your situation compare with
Mesa State’s?
Adams State University is not comparable to Colorado Mesa University. Adams serves a
8,000 square mile rural region with a total population of 45,000 people with a median family
income of $41,560. The population of the region has remained flat for the last twenty years.
ASU’s service region includes the three poorest counties in the state. Students of color
represent 40% of our population, with 31% of those being Hispanic. ASU is the oldest
Hispanic Serving Institution in the state. ASU has the highest percentage of Pell eligible
students of all public higher education institutions in the state.
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With an enrollment 6,598 students in 2013, CMU is three times the size of ASU. The
population of Mesa County is three times that of the San Luis Valley. Their student
demographic and service region demographics are entirely different. Mesa County’s
population has grown from a little over 50,000 in 1970 to 150,000 in 2012. The table below
highlights the differences.
3. Review your recent construction projects. When will we know if your capital investments
have succeeded in drawing students?
In 2005 the Adams State campus was in a serious state of disrepair. The first order of
business was to demolish two condemned apartment buildings, the police station, and the
radio station. Many of the buildings listed below represent 40 to 50 years of accumulated
deferred maintenance. The living and learning environments had an early 1970s feel. In order
to turn trending downward enrollment around, ASU set out on an aggressive transformation
project. The results of our efforts can be seen across our campus and in our enrollment
growth (27%), housing occupancy growth from 654 in Fall 2005 to 1,042 in Fall 2013 (59%
increase), and meal plan growth from 386 to 669 (73% increase).
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4. Provide the schedule for anticipated increases in bond payments and/or student fees.
The ASU Student Capital Fee was designed to ramp up with the debt service structure to
FY2014-15. By FY2016-17 the capital fee revenue combined with the auxiliary operations
pledged revenues, will exceed debt service requirements by approximately $1,000,000
annually, which is intended to be used as institutional controlled maintenance funds to help
sustain the physical plant into the future.
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5. Are cost increases affecting enrollment?
Cost is not as big a factor as financial aid packaging. ASU enrollment has grown with
increased rates. Dips in enrollment are more directly linked to the changes in Federal Pell
grant policies. On July 1, 2011 the Feds discontinued the summer Pell program. The result
was a decline in ASU summer enrollment by 18%. On July 1, 2012 the Feds lowered the
lifetime Pell cap. ASU lost 120 students overnight.
6. If your institution is unable to cover its bond payments, who is responsible? Is it the State?
Do you foresee this happening? If so, when?
Adams will cover its bond obligations. One cannot begin to understand the financial
intricacies of this institution by using a snap shot financial ratio analysis. ASU has persevered
through difficult financial times throughout its history.
The KPMG ratio analysis presented at the higher education briefing is a valid reason to have
concern. However the sky is not falling in the San Luis Valley. ASU leadership shares your
concerns. Every year we complete a similar ratio analysis for our Higher Learning
Commission accreditation. Every year it results in a score that indicates ASU is vulnerable.
ASU’s financial fortunes will always be directly linked with the State. Over the last eight
years ASU’s average score is 1.4, with 1.0 indicating “very little financial health”. FY2007
was the only year the ASU’s score of 2.7 approached the “threshold value of moderate
financial health”. On paper ASU looked “healthy” in 2007, but the physical plant was
anything but healthy. Five years ago ASU presented the HLC ratio analysis, which is similar
to KPMG’s ratio analysis, to the higher education CFO group hoping to have this analysis
become one of the factors when considering general fund allocations. While that did not
occur, ASU would still like to see it happen. The analysis would have to be modified to
account for debt taken on by an institution because that discretionary action shouldn’t be
factored into an allocation model. However, debt is not the key factor in the ratio analysis. If
ASU retired $45 million of its $73 million in debt tomorrow, the ratio would move from -0.31
to 0.00. A more important factor is unrestricted reserves. ASU could not pass on all the state
cuts in the last few years to its students in the form of tuition. In the last four years ASU has
expended $5 million from it unrestricted cash reserve to balance its budget. If that $5 million
was replaced, the ratio would move from -0.31 up to 0.00. Like the State, it will take time to
replenish cash reserves that were used to balance its budget. However, ASU’s coverage of
reserves to operational expense sits at 26% versus the State’s 6%. In order to meet KPMG’s
CFI to 3.0 for “moderate financial health” ASU’s reserve would have to be 134% of
operating expenses.
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7. Is there interest in merging with other institutions of higher education in an effort to reduce
your fixed overhead costs?
Adams State leadership is always interested in advancing the institution’s mission and would
entertain any conversations toward that goal. It is unlikely that fixed overhead costs would be
reduced. An analysis of CSU Pueblo, or other campus’s that are part of a system, might be
beneficial in determining if institutional support costs at these institutions are lower
compared to ASU.
Higher Education Funding Request and Options for Statutory Change
8. Please clarify your plans for tuition and fee increases in FY 2014-15.
ASU does not present a tuition and fee proposal to its board until the Long Bill is finalized
and state support is certain. The table below represents a worst-case scenario and is based
on the Governor’s 6% tuition cap and the student capital fee escalation. Administration has
been working on the budget for the past 3 months in an effort to keep the increase at 3%.
9. How will low-income students fare under your plan for FY 2014-15 tuition increases and
financial aid allocations?
We plan to direct a significant portion of the additional Colorado state grant and work-study
dollars allocated to Adams State toward our low income and needy students in order to
compensate for a 3% to 6% tuition increase. We are also bracing for additional tightening of
eligibility for federal financial aid that is likely to reduce the amount of Pell grant and other
federal aid to those same needy students.
10. Several years ago, the Colorado Legislature gave flexibility to institutions of higher education
to set your own tuition costs (S.B. 10-003). What is your opinion of this statute and is it time
for change?
Adams State would support a change provided that a consistent stream of ongoing revenue
from the state, or other sources, was available to offset mandatory cost increases.
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11. What recommendations do you have for the Joint Budget Committee and the General
Assembly to make the funding for higher education more equitable across institutions?
Allocation models must account for mission, student demographics, tuition capacity, and third
party support from foundation support and indirect cost recoveries. Consideration should
also be given to state support relative to those of the institution’s peer group used in the
performance contracts. ASU state support is running 24% below its national peers. The
KPMG or HLC ratio matrix for measuring financial health should also be taken into
consideration.
12. How does your institution define “need based aid”, “merit based aid”, and “work study”? Do
you have a position on the staff recommendation to clarify financial aid statutes?
Need-based aid, generally speaking, goes to students with an Expected Family Contribution
(EFC) under $10,000 but also as determined by a student's FAFSA.
Merit-based aid is awarded to students who meet academic requirements for a particular
merit award without regard to EFC/need.
Adams State University defines work study as a form of financial aid, funded by federal, state,
and institutional sources that help undergraduate students meet educationally related
expenses through part-time employment. ASU awards a work study offer to all undergraduate
students who submit a FAFSA.
Tuition Increases: Cost Drivers
13. What does it cost you to educate a student? Is your tuition above or below that amount?
The cost per student FTE is $12,596. ASU’s current tuition is $4,872
14. If tuition were lowered would more students come? Would it increase overall revenues if
tuition were less? What is the breakeven point?
This question would take an in-depth analysis that cannot be completed given the time frame
to compile a response.
15. Since FY 2000, how have your operations costs increased and by what percentage? Please
describe reasons for operational cost increases.
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ASU was part of the State College System until FY03-04. The table below is the data from
that year moving forward. Primary drivers behind operational expense increases are
enrollment growth, utilities escalations, PERA employer rate increases, risk management
increases, classified salary survey increases, and health, life, dental premium increases.
Enrollment increases in FY04-05 drove increase expenditures of $1.5 million in instruction
due to the growth in graduate programs and distance education. In that same year ASU put
an additional $600,000 into scholarships. The same is true in FY10-11 with enrollment
growth pushing instruction expense by $1.2 million and scholarships by $500,000.
16. For institutions of higher education that are in rural areas of the state, are there increased
operational costs? Please explain.
When compared to ASU’s national peer group used in the performance contract, ASU’s
institutional support (administration, records, financial aid, admissions, legal, etc.) is 11% of
our operational expense. This is 3% below the average of our peer institutions. Cost of
instruction at ASU is 46% of operating expenses, while ASU peers are averaging 39%. ASU is
outperforming its peers. Compare those expenses to Metropolitan State University of Denver,
which is in an urban setting and has nearly 10 times ASU’s enrollment and you can see some
economies of scale when fixed costs are spread over a larger student population. Based on
Metro’s FY2011-12 financial statements its institutional support runs 9% of operating
expenses compared to ASU’s 11%.
17. Since 2000, please provide a breakdown of your administrative costs and the percentage of
annual increases.
ASU was part of the State College System until FY03-04. The table below is the data from
that year moving forward. Primary drivers behind instructional support spikes in expense
relate to additional staff in admissions, financial aid, and records, along with investments in
recruitment travel, and marketing. We also invested heavily in upgrading our technology to
meet the demands of our growing online programs. Because personnel costs are a large
portion of the base expense, annual health insurance premium increases, PERA employer
contribution increases, and cost of living increases also contribute to annual increases.
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18. Please provide a breakdown of the salaries for administration positions, faculty, etc.
Policies on compensation - Salaries and increases are determined using the policies outlined
below:
 ASU Classified Staff: COLA and merit both based on actions taken by General
Assembly.
 ASU Faculty and Administrative Staff: COLA is based on average of classified staff
COLA granted by General Assembly. COLA has been given to faculty or
administrative staff one time in the last five years. Base salary compensation is based
on 90% of the institutional academic comparison peer group average from the annual
CUPA national survey (College and University Personnel Association).
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19. What is the percentage of full time faculty vs. adjunct faculty?
ASU full-time faculty accounted for 121.41 FTE or 67% of the instruction in FY12-13. Note
this also includes faculty overloads.
20. What is the ratio of students per faculty member at your institution of higher education?
Student to Faculty ratio is 13.5 students/faculty
21. What is the ratio of student tuition increases in comparison to salary for administration,
faculty and other staff?
ASU faculty and exempt staff have received one cost of living increase in five years.
22. How will the Affordable Care Act decrease health care costs for employees? Does your
institution of higher education anticipate long-term savings? If so, please explain.
The ACA has decreased health care costs for employees by increasing coverage of health care
services such as preventative care which must now be covered 100%. However we do not
anticipate long-term savings to the institution as we anticipate an increase in the number of
employees that are covered under the employer health plan, increasing the total dollars spent
by the institution on health insurance. We also anticipate the cost of the current health plans
to increase, those costs will have to be absorbed by the institution or by the employee.
Student Loans
23. What is the loan default rate of graduates of your institution? If high, what steps are you
taking to address it?
ASU’s 2010 three-year default rate is 15.7%. It was 19.2% in 2009. The decrease is due to
several initiatives: hiring a loan default prevention manager, increasing financial literacy
workshop offerings, and having a more intensive loan exit counseling program. While Adams
State has a higher default rate than other public 4-year institutions in Colorado, it also has a
two-year mission and has a rate lower than any of the community colleges in the state.
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24. What is the average amount of time that it takes your graduates to repay their student loans?
We do not formally track the average length of time it takes our students to repay their federal
loans. However, we informally keep track of many students who leave Adams State. We find
that almost all of them repay their loans on the regular 10 year schedule.
Workforce Needs and Employment After Graduation
25. Please provide information regarding what your institution of higher education is currently
doing to ensure job placement.
Due to liability issues, ASU does not ensure job placement. We’re focused on helping students
make good quality decisions about what they want to major in at ASU, and on being as
effective as possible in marketing themselves to prospective employers when the time comes
for the student to pursue a career. Both of those objectives help our graduates find jobs, but
they don’t guarantee that the graduates will find jobs. We utilize several different respected
inventories to help our students find the right major; the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator, the
Strong Interest Inventory, and the College Majors Scorecard. Those inventories are offered
free of charge to our students, and when combined with working with a career counselor, the
results can be really helpful for students in figuring out what major and career their skills,
interests and values are going to best align with.
26. Once students graduate from your institution of higher education, what is the percentage that
use their degree to find employment?
ASU does not collect this data.
27. What is the average wage of your graduates?
ASU does not collect this data. We’ve not been historically able to gather good employment
information on our alumni. The alumni office gathers some information through surveys, but
the surveys get about a 6 – 7% return rate which doesn’t provide us statistically significant
information. We’ve researched ways that we could get a better return on gathering this
information – Northern Colorado has had a pretty good program for contacting alumni about
their employment situations – but these initiatives are going to cost $12,000 - $15,000 to
implement and to run on a yearly basis, and our desire for the data also has to balance with
our efforts to build and maintain strong relationships with our alumni.
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28. If a graduate has a difficult time finding employment, what resources are available to him /
her through your institution of higher education to find a job? What are the success rates of
this effort?
We offer individual help and workshops on putting together and fine-tuning a résumé, how to
construct a strong cover letter (and how to get your résumé and cover letter to work well
together), how to develop and practice strong interviewing skills (as well as offering mock
interviews), how to network and how to conduct a job search. We also offer etiquette dinners
twice a year that train students on what to wear to interviews, how to conduct oneself at an
interview, and specifically how to handle business dinner/dinner interview situations.
All of these services are marketed heavily to our students while they’re here, and they
continue to be available to our graduates after they’ve moved on. Our policies state that we’ll
continue to work with our graduates for one semester after they graduate, but in practice
we’ve always worked with our graduates for as long as help is needed. Because our
resources our limited, we focus on the students that are enrolled, but we recognize that
students may not have chosen to take advantage of the Career Services department while they
were here, and we do our best to help them even if it’s been awhile since they graduated. We
have very good success working with students through the Career Center. Much of our
energy over the last couple of years has been in marketing to the student body and in making
sure our students are aware of the services they can receive through the Career Center.
We have very good success working with students and alumni in helping them find a job.
Some of that is obviously impacted though by the choices the student continues to make. If
students are committed for whatever reason to staying in the San Luis Valley, it’s going to be
much more challenging for them to find work because the opportunities are extremely limited
here. If a student states that they want the highest earning potential possible, but they won’t
leave the state of Colorado, that’s also going to limit their chances for success since salaries
skew higher on both coasts than in the Mountain West region.
We network with all of the college and university Career Centers in the State of Colorado
through the Collegiate Career Services Association of Colorado & Wyoming (CCSA) and that
has allowed us to be involved in the Colorado Consortium for job postings. The Colorado
Consortium allows employers to post their open job announcements in one place, and that
information is communicated to every college and university who participates in the
consortium. These jobs along with all of the other job announcements we become aware of,
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are posted in our Grizzly Careers online program (linked to career.adams.edu) which are
available to our current students and our alumni.
29. What efforts is your institution undertaking to receive input from Colorado businesses to
prepare graduates that meet their workforce needs? How often do the Colorado businesses that
you work with actually hire your graduates?
We offer a local employment job fair every fall, and we offer a regional/national career fair in
the spring. Career counseling staff are currently working hard with faculty to obtain specific
information about the companies that hire each academic department’s students so that we
can be intentional about inviting those companies to our on-campus recruiting events.
Companies like the Department of the Interior/Office of Surface Mining have worked directly
with ASU to develop programs that will train our students to meet their employer needs. We
work closely with numerous Colorado businesses like Spanish Peaks Regional Health Center,
Parkview Medical Center, St. Mary Corwin Medical Center and the San Luis Valley Health
Center (and others) to train nurses who are hired by these organizations after graduation.
Other Colorado companies like Crossroads/Turning Points, Sherwin Williams, Enterprise
Rent-a-Car and others have strong relationships with our Career Center and work closely
with us to recruit students for their employment opportunities. ASU teacher education career
advisors help place our students in schools across the state.
Performance: Persistence, Completion, Closing the Gap
30. Since the Lt. Governor announced the "Master Plan" for institutions of higher education,
please describe the following:
a. If applicable, has your institution of higher education reduced the amount
of time to credential their graduates? If applicable, has your institution of
higher education reduced the amount of time to receive a 2-year or 4-year
degree? Please distinguish percentages based on demographics,
underserved communities, gender, etc.
The best way to get our students to graduate more quickly is to have them
complete more hours each year. We have done that in two primary ways.
First, we encouraged more students to take summer classes and even
redesigned several degrees in order to facilitate earlier degree completion
for summer students. This approach worked very well until the Federal
government eliminated the summer Pell grant. Without Federal financial
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aid, most of our students cannot take summer classes and our summer
enrollments have dropped accordingly.
The second approach is the implementation, in Fall 2010, of a
comprehensive campaign called “Finish in Four. It is designed to
encourage students to take 15 hours through a campus-wide marketing
campaign, training programs for academic advisors on the benefits of
taking 15 hours, and a change in our tuition structure such that 12 hours
costs the same as 15. This allows students to “take four courses and get
the fifth one free”.
As shown below, the impact of the Finish in Four campaign has been
impressive.
Year
Average Credit Hours per Student
2005 thru 2009
Fall 2010
Fall 2011
Fall 2012
Fall 2013
23.7
24.6
25.2
25.7
26.2
In fall 2009, Adams State students took an average annual load of 23.7
hours. By the fall of 2013, that load has increased by nearly 11%. Over
time, this increase will have a significant impact on time-to-degree for our
students.
We do not have good institutional data on the time to degree rates of our
students by demographics.
b. What is your institution of higher education doing to retain students?
What is your retention rate? Please distinguish percentages based on
demographics, underserved communities, gender, etc.


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Retention of current students is a top priority at Adams State. We track
our progress, implement new programs based on best practices, and
assess the impact of those new programs. Recently, we have revised our
first-year experience program and expanded the number of learning
communities available to students. Our undergraduate retention rates (3
year averages) are as follows:
Freshman to Sophomore: 54%
Sophomore to Junior: 73%
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

Junior to Senior: 72%
Senior to Graduation (or fifth year): 70%









There is substantial variation in the retention rates of Adams State
students. The most important factor in student success is student
preparation. Among first year students who enter ASU with an Index
score of 100 or above, the retention rate is 66%. Among those students
who enter with an Index score of 70 or less, the retention rate is 45%.
Some of the first year retention rates by demographics are as follows:
Colorado Residents 57%
Non-Residents 49%
Residents of the San Luis Valley 58%
Men 51%
Women 57%
Whites 56%
Hispanic 54%
Black 53%
First generation 58%
c. Does your institution of higher education experience an attainment gap?
If so, what is the institution doing to remedy such issues?
1. There is very little difference in the success rates between our students by
their ethnic/racial background. Hispanic and Black students retain at
rates similar to the majority students. However, because minority
students accumulate slightly fewer hours each term, they take longer to
graduate. Among those students who entered in Fall of 2007, 30% of
White students had graduated in 6 years. The graduation rate for
Hispanic students was 24%. For Black students, the six year graduation
rate was 20%.
ASSET
31. Last session, we passed Colorado Asset (S.B. 13-033) so that undocumented students are able
to receive in-state tuition. How many undocumented students is your institution of higher
education currently serving?
Two.
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2:20-3:00
COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM
Higher Education Funding Request and Options for Statutory Change
1. Clarify your plans for tuition and fee increases in FY 2014-15.
The Colorado State University System plans to adhere to the 6% voluntary tuition increase
limit for resident undergraduate students. Other students may face higher charges.
2. How will low income students fare under your plan for FY 2014-15 tuition increases and
financial aid allocations?
The CSU System will continue to allocate 20% of any resident undergraduate tuition increase
to institutional need based aid, so in general the lowest income students should not be
negatively impacted.
3. Several years ago, the Colorado Legislature gave flexibility to institutions of higher education
to set your own tuition costs (S.B. 10-003). What is your opinion of this statute and is it time
for change?
The Colorado General Assembly provided flexibility to higher education systems in Colorado
because they recognized that declining funding and bureaucratic red tape caused by statutory
regulation was a problem. In fact, they recognized that if the state provided the same per
pupil funding as it did 15 years ago they would need to put almost $1.2B into higher
education. We can see no reason to remove this needed flexibility.
4. What recommendations do you have for the Joint Budget Committee and the General
Assembly to make the funding for higher education more equitable across institutions?
In the past our system has participated, proposed, and reviewed dozens of funding models
over the years. Each has had pluses and minuses and various related issues. We support the
current model because it represents a negotiated compromise between institutions that allows
many factors to be addressed without harming any particular school. This in our mind is the
best type of model.
5. How does your institution define “need based aid”, “merit based aid”, and “work study”? Do
you have a position on the staff recommendation to clarify financial aid statutes?
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Need-based Aid: Aid awarded to students to offset demonstrated need based on the following
formula. Cost of Attendance - (Expected Family Contribution + Other Resources) = Need
Merit-based Aid: Aid awarded to students based on their academic, artistic, athletic or other
special accomplishments.
Work-Study: Aid awarded to students that is earned through work in part-time jobs while they
are enrolled.
Financial Aid Statutes: Although we are very supportive of resources being dedicated to need
based aid, we also feel that there is value in providing merit based aid in working to keep our
best and brightest students in the State of Colorado.
Financial Performance
6. Please provide composite financial index figures for each of your institutions. How does CSU
Pueblo fare in comparison to Fort Collins?
The composite financial index is not a model widely adopted by higher education and in large
part was abandoned in the mid-2000’s. We would be happy to run the model but need some
time to accomplish that task.
Tuition Increases: Cost Drivers
7. What does it cost you to educate a student? Is your tuition above or below that amount?
It costs $18, 694.45 annually to educate a student; CSU’s resident undergraduate and graduate tuition
is below this amount.
Undergraduate
Resident
NonResident
Graduate
Resident
NonResident
FY13 Annual Tuition
$6,875
$22,667
$8,392
$20,582
At CSU-Global Campus, for a traditional online course, our costs are around $200 per credit
hour which is below the amount we charge (undergrad $350-315; grad $500-$450).
CSU-Pueblo: The cost to educate an undergraduate student is $9,980 and $10,718 for a
graduate student. Current resident, undergraduate tuition is $5,494 and resident, graduate
tuition is $6,240. Non-resident, undergraduate tuition is $15,816.
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8. If tuition were lowered would more students come? Would it increase overall revenues if
tuition were less? What is the breakeven point?
This last year we held tuition to 0% at CSU-Pueblo and placed more money in financial
scholarships to try and attract more students. The experiment failed and so it is not apparent
to us that lower tuition equates to increased enrollment.
CSU-Global is already less expensive in total than its online competitors, and we have found
that students are less concerned about costs than they are about quality of service. The
business model of CSU-Global has scale efficiencies so while increases in revenues have less
impact, if enrollment were to drop to below 3,000 active students the cost per credit hour
increases.
9. Since FY 2000, how have your operations costs increased and by what percentage? Please
describe reasons for operational cost increases.
Operation costs have increased $17.9 million, 74.1% between FY2000 and FY2013, due to
increases in capital, utilities, rentals, new and renovated building, and salaries. These figures
are not inflation adjusted.
SEE SCHEDULE A ON PAGE 229
CSU-Global opened its doors to students in Sept. 2008. Since that inception, costs per credit
hour have decreased as enrollment has grown and as the university has made investments in
technology.
CSU-Pueblo: Operation costs since FY2004 have increased by an average of 6% per year,
88% overall. Instruction costs have increased $8.3mil since FY2004.
10. For institutions of higher education that are in rural areas of the state, are there increased
operational costs? Please explain.
CSU-Global’s cost per credit hour remains the same for students throughout Colorado and
beyond.
CSU-Pueblo: Pueblo is not considered a rural area of the state. Operational costs would be
expected to be the same as a metropolitan area.
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11. Since 2000, please provide a breakdown of your administrative costs and the percentage of
annual increases.
SEE SCHEDULE B ON PAGE 229
CSU-Global Campus
Expenses
2008
$
3,226,394
2009
$
4,587,477
2010
$
2,951,743
2011
$
1,183,187
2012
$
4,131,357
2013
$
5,820,294
% Change
42%
-36%
-60%
249%
41%
Revenues
$
$
$
$
$
1,684,323
6,367,137
17,009,947
25,246,341
35,173,005
% Change
278%
167%
48%
39%
CSU-Pueblo
Total
FY2002
FY2003
FY2004
FY2005
FY2006
FY2007
FY2008
FY2009
FY2010
FY2011
FY2012
FY2013
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5,471,424
5,134,920
5,081,016
5,325,869
5,836,994
6,020,712
6,298,292
7,389,087
7,529,052
8,026,987
8,434,674
7,444,972
Annual
Percent
Change
-6%
-1%
5%
10%
3%
5%
17%
2%
7%
5%
-12%
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12. Please provide a breakdown of the salaries for administration positions, faculty, etc.
Employee Group
Faculty
Faculty (Transitional)
Grad. Asst.
AP
Post Doc.
Post Doc. Intern
State Classified
Vet. Resident
Sum Annual
Percent
Salary
Annual Salary
$141,892,542
28.8%
$3,612,288
0.7%
$57,988,627
11.8%
$200,861,568
40.8%
$10,834,606
2.2%
$454,104
0.1%
$71,972,148
14.6%
$5,280,723
1.1%
CSU-Global Campus:
Staff: $5,776,007.49
Faculty: $5,934,089.74
Total: $11,710,097.23 out of $27,403,061 in Total Expenses to $35,173,005 in Revenues
CSU-Pueblo:
FY13
Faculty
Administrative
Classified
Total
$
12,637,622.00
$
6,885,879.00
$
4,742,289.00
$
24,265,790.00
13. What is the percentage of full time faculty vs. adjunct faculty?
CSU
Employee Group
TT-Faculty
Special Faculty*
Temporary Faculty
Total
Full-Time
987
251
15
1,253
Headcount
Part-Time
58
174
225
457
Total
1045
425
240
1,710
Percentage
Count
Percent
94.4%
5.6%
59.1%
40.9%
6.3%
93.8%
73.3%
26.7%
*Special appointments are normally used when positions are supported by sponsored programs or when funds are available only for the
duration of the specific assignment. Faculty members on special appointment are not eligible for tenure. Special appointments may either be
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full-time or part-time.
CSU-Global Campus: 7 FT Faculty; 364 Adjunct Faculty
CSU-Pueblo: As of November 5 2013, we had 183 “adjuncts” and 207 full time faculty,
thus 47% adjuncts, 53% full-time faculty by headcount. Of course, an adjunct generally
teaches fewer sections than a full-time faculty member; approximately75% of all fall 2013
course sections are taught by full-time faculty.
14. What is the ratio of students per faculty member at your institution of higher education?
Student Faculty Ratio is 17:1 following IPEDS and CDS operational definition.
CSU-Global Campus: 27:1
CSU-Pueblo: 22:1
15. What is the ratio of student tuition increases in comparison to salary for administration,
faculty and other staff?
SEE SCHEDULE C ON PAGE 230- Included within this schedule are the historical tuition
rate increases for each category of student along with salary increases for each category of
employee from 2000 to 2014. We have also included a limited data set for 2013 and 2014
indicating the resources generated through the respective tuition rate and the amount of these
funds dedicated to cover the respective annual salary increase. The remaining funds were
utilized to cover items such as need based financial aid and mandatory costs.
CSU-Global undergraduate tuition has not increased since July 2011 ($299 to $350)
CSU-Global graduate tuition has not increased since Jan. 2012 ($399 to $450 July 1, 2011;
and then from $450 to $500 on July 1, 2012)
CSU-Global’s first cost of living salary increase since 2009 was a 3% increase in 2012; there
have been no additional increases.
CSU-Pueblo: Student tuition increased by 6% per year.
In the past 5 years administration has had no increase in salary and faculty & staff received a
$3,000 raise last fiscal year only.
16. How will the Affordable Care Act decrease health care costs for employees? Does your
institution of higher education anticipate long-term savings? If so, please explain.
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CSU does not anticipate any savings from the ACA. Conversely, we anticipate an increase to
overall premium costs (ER and EE) in the order of $750k - $1M annually. This is driven by
two components. First, the imbedded ‘fees’ such as the PCORI and Transitional Reinsurance
Fee -resulting in a net increase of cost to the plan of approximately $550k/yr. (for the next
three years unless extended) and second, an anticipated increase to plan costs for additional
services provided (range likely in the order of $200-450k annually with a projected growth of
8% in perpetuity).
CSU-Global and CSU-Pueblo are part of the CHEIBA Trust and if there is no change in that
relationship it is expected that health care costs will continue to increase.
It is not at all clear that the affordable care act will reduce health care costs for employees.
At best it may marginally reduce the rate of increase. The Act has actually resulted in
increased costs in the form of fees and taxes that raise premiums for employees. For example
our premium increase for 2014 will be approximately 5.5% of which on 1.9% can be
attributable to projected claims costs and the balance of approximately 3.5% is due to ACA
fees and taxes. It is by no means certain that ACA will be any more successful at controlling
costs than any of the long succession of other measures utilized over the last 30 years.
Theoretically it is possible that by requiring everyone to purchase health insurance, the cost
of paying for uninsured health care consumers will no longer be transferred to insured users.
If that happens there might be a marginal reduction in the cost growth for our employees.
Putting ACA related fees and taxes aside, ACA may have a marginal short term benefit in
slowing the rate of increase in the cost of health care, but it is very unlikely to reduce costs.
Workforce Needs and Employment After Graduation
17. Please provide information regarding what your institution of higher education is currently
doing to ensure job placement.
At Colorado State University in 2012-13:
a) 949 unique employers hired; 737 were from Colorado; over 500 actively recruited
on-campus
b) CSU students were accepted to 152 graduate schools
c) 10,500 Job and Internship Postings on CSU’s CareerRam website
d) Over 3,000 on-campus interviews
e) 12 unique career fairs were hosted
f) 11,000+ students received 1:1 career coaching
g) 10,000+ students received group career training
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h) Senior class projects were offered by companies in multiple senior capstone
courses
CSU-Global has a 24x7 Career Center available to current students and alumni that provides
information and support on Finding a Job, Landing a Job, Keeping a Job; with free services
that include resume and cover letter creation assistance, career coaching, workshops,
seminars, and a searchable database for jobs.
CSU-Pueblo: In regards to student job placement, CSU-Pueblo Career Center, academic
departments and colleges have a shared mission to provide career services to all students and
alumni of CSU-Pueblo. These services include assisting students and alumni in the
development of career objectives, obtaining relevant work experiences, and the development
of the necessary skills to conduct successful self-directed job searches. CSU-Pueblo’s goal is
to have students employed upon graduation in their chosen career fields.
Students are first provided career information in relation to their chosen academic majors.
These individuals, along with students who have not yet determined a career path, are
provided an opportunity to explore careers through one-on-one advising meetings and selfdirected assessments including the Strong Interest Inventory® and Myers-Briggs Type
Indicator®. As their academic plan unfolds, answers to “What can I do with this major?” are
provided directly and supported through the use of software programs that assist with
advising students with what careers are associated with various academic majors. All areas
welcome employers to campus to host informational sessions and participate in class
activities which allow for student engagement and career exploration.
It is the intent of the Career Center, academic departments and colleges to assist students in
developing career objectives and plans. These plans should include relevant work
experiences through paid and/or un-paid internships as well as full- and part-time
employment experiences while attending college. To assist in these areas, the university has a
dedicated internship coordinator position and the individual departments and colleges assist
in identifying internship and employment experiences.
Once career paths have been chosen, students are then informed about “soft skills” that are
expected by the workforce. Various desirable soft skills are demonstrated and taught such as
how to create an “executive presence,” how to create an online image and proper business
dinner etiquette. Interview techniques are presented to students as well as resume
assessments. By using actual interview opportunities, students are coached to be successful in
making that most important “first impression.”
The Career Center, faculty and key department staff collaborate to build strong working
relationships with employers to provide students with career opportunities. A master online
job board is facilitated through the Center as well as the coordinator of Career, Internship,
and Teacher Education Fairs. These are opportunities for students to apply for jobs and
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internships from many of the area and national employers. All on-campus recruiting
activities by potential employers are coordinated by the Career Center as well. Students are
timely informed of all recruiting activities and are advised to attend in proper business attire.
18. Once students graduate from your institution of higher education, what is the percentage that
use their degree to find employment?
72% of employed CSU graduates in 2012-13 stated that their employment was related to their
degree.
 The above rate varies by academic college
o Health and Human Sciences = 81% related to degree
o Vet, Med, Biosciences = 79% related
o Natural Sciences = 68% related
o Liberal Arts = 49% related
o Natural Resources = 81% related
o Business = 81% related
o Agricultural Sciences = 82% related
o Engineering = 87% related
CSU-Global Campus
 95% of alumni are working for pay; alumni average salaries increased 20% twelve
months after graduation (Feb. & Nov. 2013 survey data).
 38% of alumni believe that their CSU-Global degree helped them get a better job in
their field (Spring 2012 Alumni Survey).
 27% of alumni believe that their CSU-Global degree helped them get a job in a new
field (Spring 2012 Alumni Survey).
 41% of alumni believe that their CSU-Global degree helped them get a promotion in
their current organizations (Spring 2012 Alumni Survey).
 64% of alumni believe that their CSU-Global degree helped them increase their job
security in their current organizations (Spring 2012 Alumni Survey).
CSU-Pueblo - 45 of 58 alumni responses from those who graduated since 2000 stated that
they agreed or strongly agreed that they are employed in a position related to their CSUPueblo degree (78%). (These are from alumni who responded to an online survey which
opened in 2010.)
19. What is the average wage of your graduates?
The average full-time salary for 2012-13 was $45,692
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CSU-Global Campus: 55% are earning more than $55,000/yr (Feb. 2013 Survey)
CSU-Pueblo: From a study conducted by collegemeasures.org (conducted jointly with
CDHE), data are available for those with unemployment insurance coverage in Colorado.
From the data available, of those 1,022 bachelor degree completers over the 5-year
period of the study (namely 27% of all completers), the median income was $37,726. Of
those 97 master degree completers over the 5-year period of the study (namely 26% of all
completers), the median income was $56,055.
20. If a graduate has a difficult time finding employment, what resources are available to him /
her through your institution of higher education to find a job? What are the success rates of
this effort?
Graduates can take advantage of the full-range of career services offered by The CSU
Career Center for 1 year after graduation, and then have access to an Alumni Career
Advancement coach for life, through a partnership with the CSU Alumni Association and
CSU Career Center.
Over 1,000 alumni were served through the above services in 2012-13.
CSU-Global has a 24x7 Career Center available to current students and alumni that
provides information and support on Finding a Job, Landing a Job, Keeping a Job; with
free services that include resume and cover letter creation assistance, career coaching,
workshops, seminars, and a searchable database for jobs. CSU-Global also provides
alumni with ongoing access to its 24x7 research Library.
 95% of alumni are working for pay; alumni average salaries increased 20%
twelve months after graduation (Feb. & Nov. 2013 survey data).
CSU-Pueblo: CSU-Pueblo alumni are offered the same career services afforded current
students. Currently these services are offered free of charge by the Career Center and
Alumni Office. Opportunities include assistance obtaining relevant work experiences,
access to the online job board, development of new career objectives and plan, and use of
all online and one-on-one career support needed to conduct successful self-directed job
searches. In many cases alumni are assisted with the development of new academic plans
that require re-tooling their current skills in new career paths. Currently, there is no
success rate tracking available.
21. What efforts is your institution undertaking to receive input from Colorado businesses to
prepare graduates that meet their workforce needs? How often do the Colorado businesses that
you work with actually hire your graduates?
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Each CSU Academic College has a Dean’s leadership council consisting of representatives
from various industries around the state of Colorado, most of which actually hire CSU
students.
The Career Center has an Employer Advisory Board composed of 14 Colorado organizations,
all of which actually hire CSU students.
Feedback is gathered from over 400 unique employers that attend CSU Career Fairs on an
annual basis.
The CSU offices of research, corporate relations, alumni relations, career services, external
relations, and CSU ventures meet monthly to discuss corporate feedback, trends, and
engagement, in order to ensure continuous process and relationship improvement.
80% of employed CSU graduates in 2012-13 were employed in the State of Colorado.
CSU-Global uses Industry Advisory Councils to provide feedback on the learning outcomes
and goals for all of its degree programs.
CSU-Pueblo: Input from Colorado businesses on their workforce needs is gleaned through
both formal and informal ways at CSU-Pueblo. Formal methods include advisory boards that
provide input on workforce needs and professional standards. These boards exist at all levels
of the university and include the president, colleges, and individual academic departments.
Because of their professional backgrounds, extensive experience, and current workforce
knowledge, these individuals provide vital information to ensure curriculum remains current,
and graduates remain competitive in the marketplace.
Additionally, CSU-Pueblo has a Career Center funded through student fees which provides
numerous services to students to help prepare them for job opportunities following
graduation. Career Center services related specifically to business input include posting job
opportunities, hosting three job-related fairs each academic year, and arranging for
businesses to do on-campus recruiting of students. These fairs generally include as many as
50 different organizations interested in meeting CSU-Pueblo students, either for internships
or job placement. Close to 400 organizations have provided internships to CSU-Pueblo
students during the past five years.
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Our membership in the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) provides
information directly from employers about preferred job skills and methods students can
employ to conduct job searches.
Finally, informally, the president is very community oriented and is an ex-officio member of
the Pueblo Economic Development Corporation, and works closely with the Greater Pueblo
Chamber of Commerce and the Latino Chamber of Commerce. Such community involvement
offers opportunities for business leaders to directly provide input to the president on majors,
faculty, students, and curriculum.
Currently, the university has no data on the number of Colorado businesses who hire CSUPueblo graduates.
Student Loans
22. What is the loan default rate of graduates of your institution? If high, what steps are you
taking to address it?
3-year cohort default rate: 4.8%
CSU-Global Campus - FY 2011 2 yr Cohort Default Rate: 3.4%, FY 2010 3 yr rate Default
Rate: 4.8%. CSU-Global has retained a reputable and established organization that will be
conducting outreach, beginning January 1, 2014; to students who have either stopped
attending classes for 6 months or who have graduated to ensure that the students understand
their repayment responsibilities and to help them take the necessary steps for repayment or
deferral.
CSU-Pueblo: 15%. We have started to analyze our defaulted students, and a comprehensive
report will be available in January 2014. We have dedicated staff time toward examining
cohort default rate challenges and appeal processes, more aggressive skip tracing practices,
and utilization of delinquent borrower reports available. We have also started using SALT, a
financial literacy and student debt management program, and hundreds of students and
alumni have signed up to date.
23. What is the average amount of time that it takes your graduates to repay their student loans?
This is not readily available, if at all. The Department of Education’s standard repayment
plan is 10 years.
Performance: Persistence, Completion, Closing the Gap
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24. Since the Lt. Governor announced the "Master Plan" for institutions of higher education,
please describe the following: SEE SCHEDULE D ON PAGE 231
a. If applicable, has your institution of higher education reduced the amount
of time to credential their graduates? If applicable, has your institution of
higher education reduced the amount of time to receive a 2-year or 4-year
degree? Please distinguish percentages based on demographics,
underserved communities, gender, etc.
CSU-Global average time to completion is 22 months.
b. What is your institution of higher education doing to retain students?
What is your retention rate? Please distinguish percentages based on
demographics, underserved communities, gender, etc.
CSU-Global has Student Support representatives that work with each
student prior to his/her first class to ensure readiness for course work.
The university also provides an Enrollment Agreement prior to a
student’s first class that outlines how many credits can be transferred,
how many are left to complete for the selected degree, how much it will
cost the student to complete the degree, and how much Federal Financial
Aid is available to the students. Once a student is actively taking classes,
he/she is assigned a Student Advisor through to graduation.
The 4-year cohort retention rate (Fall 2009 to Fall 2013) is 78% (45%
graduated, 33% still actively taking classes). The statistical difference
between the 4-year cohort retention rate and that of First Generation,
underserved populations, and the military population is less than 2%.
c. Does your institution of higher education experience an attainment gap?
If so, what is the institution doing to remedy such issues?
No, but the university actively strives to increase retention rates for all of
its students on a continual basis with an ongoing committee on retention.
ASSET
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25. Last session, we passed Colorado Asset (S.B. 13-033) so that undocumented students are able
to receive in-state tuition. How many undocumented students is your institution of higher
education currently serving?
Fall 2013: 8 students enrolled
3:00-3:10
BREAK
3:10-3:30
FORT LEWIS COLLEGE
Higher Education Funding Request and Options for Statutory Change
1. Please clarify your plans for tuition and fee increases in FY 2014-15.
The college is planning the following tuition and fee increases in FY 2014-15:
 Resident Tuition (Student Share): Increase of 6% or $322 annually, from $5,232 to
$5,554. The Board of Trustees will determine the exact increase in February 2014.
 Non-Resident Tuition: No increase, annual tuition to remain at $16,072. This will be
the 5th year in a row of holding nonresident tuition flat.
 Mandatory Student Fees: Maximum increase of 1.1% or $19.50 annually from
$1,690.50 to $1,710. The amount indicated represents the requested and, therefore,
maximum increase. The college is currently conducting the fee approval process
which includes Student Fee Review Board (7 students) review and recommendations
followed by Budget Committee review and recommendation to the Board. The Board
of Trustees will determine the exact increase in February 2014.
2. How will low income students fare under your plan for FY 2014-15 tuition increases and
financial aid allocations?
In FY 2013-14, Fort Lewis College anticipates receiving $870,000 in Need Based Aid from
the State, and $265,000 in work study. To these amounts, the college and foundation add
approximately $9.8M in institutional aid. With the inclusion of federal aid, regardless of the
type of aid offered, Fort Lewis is able to meet approximately 56% of the total need of a typical
incoming class.
Currently, the college awards $2,000 of state allocated need based aid to students that have a
need of at least $7,621 (150% of Pell eligibility). The proposed increase in need-based grant
funding will allow Fort Lewis College to award these grants to more students, rather than
increase the amount per student. In the Fall 2013 class, there were 1,495 students at Fort
Lewis College meeting this qualification; the college was only able to fund approximately 435
of these students. The anticipated increase in need based grant will allow the college to help
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approximately 150 more students.
3. Several years ago, the Colorado Legislature gave flexibility to institutions of higher education
to set your own tuition costs (S.B. 10-003). What is your opinion of this statute and is it time
for change?
With the volatile nature of state revenues, the tuition flexibility offered in SB 10-003 is
extremely important to Fort Lewis College. In August 2011, the University of Denver’s
Center for Colorado’s Economic Future issued a report titled “Financing Colorado’s Future:
An Analysis of the Fiscal Sustainability of State Government.” The report found that by FY
2023-24 “Colorado will generate only enough sales, income and other general-purpose tax
revenue to pay for the three largest programs in the General Fund – public schools, health
care and prisons. There will be no tax revenue for public colleges and universities, no money
for the state court system, nothing for child-protection services, nothing for youth corrections,
nothing for state crime labs and nothing for other core services of state government.” The
report has recently been updated by the Colorado Futures Center at Colorado State
University, and while the date has moved to 2029-30, the outcome remains the same; barring
substantive statutory or constitution change, state funding for higher education will decline to
zero.
Fort Lewis College has adopted a multi-year budget process to help the Board of Trustees
and campus constituencies put financial decisions into a context of the potential loss of state
revenues over time. The tuition flexibility afforded in SB 10-003 has helped the college to
gradually increase tuition rates over the last four years. If the projections in this study come
to fruition, all institutions must be ready to support operations solely from tuition and private
support.
As a result of SB-10-003, the College proposed and the CCHE approved a Financial
Accountability Plan whereby resident tuition was effectively increased by 19.8% and 18.6% in
FY 2011-12 and FY 2012-13, respectively. The tuition increase was accomplished by both
closing the “tuition window” and increasing the per credit hour charge. In those years,
institutional need based aid was increased to mitigate the tuition increase for students
showing a need of up to 150% of Pell eligibility. Despite these increases, Fort Lewis College
still has the second lowest resident tuition and fees among all four-year institutions in the
State of Colorado.
4. What recommendations do you have for the Joint Budget Committee and the General
Assembly to make the funding for higher education more equitable across institutions?
Fort Lewis College is very supportive of the Governor’s budget request for an 11% General
Fund increase for each governing board. For future years, if state funding increases, the
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College would support the development of a new allocation methodology. Colorado has not
had a consistent funding formula for higher education in many years. Over the last decade
Colorado higher education has experienced many changes, including governance changes,
stipends, fee for services, enrollment variations, role and mission changes, and, most
importantly, differentiated funding increases and reductions. The current General Fund per
student shows little consistency by role and mission or by size of institution. A new allocation
methodology should be student-based, and provide for predictable funding for institutions. A
new funding methodology could consider various attributes, including:
 Institutional size
 Role and mission
 Recognition of fixed and variable costs
 Total funds available
 High cost programs
 Performance – or “Outcome” funding
5. How does your institution define “need based aid”, “merit based aid”, and “work study”? Do
you have a position on the staff recommendation to clarify financial aid statutes?
Fort Lewis College uses the following definitions:
 Need Based Aid: The college uses information received from the Federal Application
for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Students that have a cost of attendance greater than
the Expected Family Contribution (EFC) are considered to be in need.
 Merit Based Aid: Aid awarded based upon any criteria other than financial need.
The college’s merit program considers application date, high school GPA and test
scores to determine award level.
 Work Study is awarded to students with financial need that express a willingness to
receive part of their aid package for working.
Fort Lewis College believes that clarifying financial aid definitions in statute could be
beneficial, in order to consistently allocate and award aid. The college further agrees that the
state would be better served by redirecting the proposed merit-based aid to need-based aid.
Native American Tuition Waiver
6. Provide an update on your efforts to get federal changes related to the Waiver requirement.
Fort Lewis College is in its third year of advocating for federal legislation to help alleviate
the financial burden to the State of Colorado of non-resident Native American student tuition.
In the first session of the 113th Congress, the college has made seven trips to Washington D.C.
to meet with congressional members, staff, and national education and tribal organizations.
Momentum continues to increase for the legislation, as the number of co-sponsors has
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doubled from 20 in the 112th Congress to 41 in just the first session of the 113th Congress. In
July, Governor Hickenlooper opened an office in Washington D.C. that advocates for
Colorado interests. Ms. Jena Griswold, who operates the Governor’s D.C. office, has
generously offered additional support for the tuition waiver legislative effort by attending Hill
meetings and assisting with resolutions of support from the National Governors Association.
Tuition Increases: Cost Drivers
7. What does it cost you to educate a student? Is your tuition above or below that amount?
The cost to educate a student is a calculation that divides total Education & General Fund
expenditures by the total student FTE. The college performs this calculation annually. The
FY 2013-14 budget cost per student is $13,729. Resident and non-resident tuition represents
38.1% and 117.1% of cost per student, respectively.
8. If tuition were lowered would more students come? Would it increase overall revenues if
tuition were less? What is the breakeven point?
The Board of Trustees carefully considers how the college compares to both other Colorado
institutions and peers within the Council of Public Liberal Arts Colleges (COPLAC). In FY
2013-14, Fort Lewis College has the 2nd lowest combined resident tuition and fees in the
state when compared to other four-year institutions. When the college compares resident
tuition to our COPLAC peers, Fort Lewis College’s resident tuition and fees is 75% of the
COPLAC average. Even though our cost is one of the lowest in the state, the college has seen
a decrease in resident enrollment, as students are staying closer to home. Because Fort Lewis
College is already one of the best values in the state, we do not believe that lowering tuition
rates would increase enrollment.
9. Since FY 2000, how have your operations costs increased and by what percentage? Please
describe reasons for operational cost increases.
Higher education expenditures are tracked using the National College and University
Business Officers established program categories: Instruction, Public Support, Academic
Support, Student Support, Institutional Support and Operation and Maintenance of Plant
(OMP). For purposes of this and question 11 below, Instruction, Academic Support, Student
Support and OMP have been combined to represent “operations” and Institutional Support is
used to represent “Administrative” costs. The chart below shows the annual percent change
from previous year from FY 1999-00 through FY 2012-13.
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The chart shows there is much variation in these categories from year to year. These annual
changes in operations and administration are driven by state funding levels, enrollment
projections, changes in non-discretionary expenses, and salary and benefits increases.
Additionally, in recent years, federal and state mandates have driven an increase in the
resources devoted to compliance.
10. For institutions of higher education that are in rural areas of the state, are there increased
operational costs? Please explain.
Fort Lewis College is situated in both a rural and tourist/resort economy. As a result,
Durango tends to have a higher cost of living than most other cities in the state. Our costs
will be impacted by the rural nature of our location; we have limited ability to hire adjunct
faculty, for example. But a more important cost “driver” is our location in a resort
community. This higher cost of living is driven primarily from housing prices. However,
grocery and gasoline prices also add to the increased cost to live in Durango. This higher
cost of living produces the need to pay faculty and staff higher salaries than many of our
competitors, due to the fact that the college recruits nationally. Additionally, because of our
remote location and not having easy access to the front-range corridor, travel and recruiting
costs are higher.
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Furthermore, as a small institution, the college is not afforded the economies of scale as the
larger universities; there are fewer students to cover the cost of administrative units.
11. Since 2000, please provide a breakdown of your administrative costs and the percentage of
annual increases.
See the response to question 9 above.
12. Please provide a breakdown of the salaries for administration positions, faculty, etc.
The following chart shows the total budgeted salaries in the three employment categories
tracked by the college over the last five fiscal years; the second chart shows the percentage of
each category to the total:
Fort Lewis College – Budgeted Salaries by Employee Classification
FY 2013-14 FY 2012-13 FY 2011-12 FY 2010-11 FY 2009-10
12,749,365
11,826,679
10,991,971
11,185,897
10,992,556
Faculty
8,885,975
7,930,288
7,631,574
7,424,652
7,603,822
Exempt Staff
3,823,640
4,002,571
4,077,877
4,326,359
4,742,036
Classified Staff
Fort Lewis College – Percent of Budgeted Salaries by Employee Classification
FY 2013-14 FY 2012-13 FY 2011-12 FY 2010-11 FY 2009-10
50.1%
49.8%
48.4%
48.8%
47.1%
Faculty
34.9%
33.4%
33.6%
32.4%
32.6%
Exempt Staff
15.0%
16.8%
18.0%
18.9%
20.3%
Classified Staff
13. What is the percentage of full time faculty vs. adjunct faculty?
The percentage of full time to adjunct faculty fluctuates depending upon the needs each
semester; following is information regarding the fall semester over the last four years:
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Fort Lewis College – Faculty Classification
Fall 2012 Fall 2011 Fall 2010 Fall 2009
64%
59%
60%
59%
Ongoing Faculty
Temporary
36%
41%
40%
41%
Faculty
14. What is the ratio of students per faculty member at your institution of higher education?
Following are the student faculty ratios for the last five years:
Fort Lewis College – Student Faculty Ratio
FY 2012-13 FY 2011-12 FY 2010-11
FY 2009-10 FY 2008-09
19.8:1
18.5:1
19.1:1
17.6:1
18.2:1
15. What is the ratio of student tuition increases in comparison to salary for administration,
faculty and other staff?
The following chart shows salary increases by employee classification: Faculty, Exempt Staff
and Classified Staff compared to Resident Tuition increases over the last eleven years.
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16. How will the Affordable Care Act decrease health care costs for employees? Does your
institution of higher education anticipate long-term savings? If so, please explain.
At this point in the implementation cycle, the college has actually seen an increase in
insurance premium costs, as policies have been adjusted to become compliant with the
Affordable Care Act (ACA). The college does not anticipate long-term savings to insurance
premium costs unless a decision is made to decrease the amount contributed by the institution.
The potential for the ACA to decrease health care costs for employees will only happen if total
health care costs are reduced as a result of the act. Individuals may ultimately pay less for
their individual care, after deductible expenses, maximum out-of-pocket expenses, etc., if the
theories behind the implementation of the ACA hold true.
Student Loans
17. What is the loan default rate of graduates of your institution? If high, what steps are you
taking to address it?
The standard loan default rate calculation is based upon all students, not just those who
graduate. The default rate is calculated on a three year rolling cycle. The most recent
published 3-year default rate for Fort Lewis College is 12.9%, down from the previous year’s
published rate of 14.6%. Studies have shown that the students who do not graduate are more
likely to default. As such, the college is developing programs and policies to help ensure that
students are successful and complete college.
18. What is the average amount of time that it takes your graduates to repay their student loans?
The standard repayment time on student loans is 10 years.
Workforce Needs and Employment After Graduation
19. Please provide information regarding what your institution of higher education is currently
doing to ensure job placement.
The Career Services office at Fort Lewis College offer many different opportunities to help
students prepare to gain employment. Students may schedule a one on one appointment with a
Career Counselor to discuss an array of topics including resume building, interviewing, and
internships. Numerous workshops are offered throughout the semester on similar topics and
employers are often invited to assist in facilitating these workshops. Additionally, employers
visit campus for information sessions and the bi-annual job fairs. Career Services offers a
website full of content and provides students with an online job board, the Skyhawk’s Job
Source. Employers can post and edit jobs and internships free of charge, 24/7.
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20. Once students graduate from your institution of higher education, what is the percentage that
use their degree to find employment?
Based upon information collected in our study of subsequent enrollment and senior exit
surveys, the college believes that immediately after graduation:
 65 percent of graduates use their degree to get a job
 20 percent of graduates will take short term jobs (raft guides, wait staff, railroad,
etc.) in order to stay in, and enjoy, the Durango area
 15 percent of graduates will attend another school within a year of graduation
Additionally, five years after graduation 35% of graduates will enroll somewhere else
subsequent to graduation (both 2 and 4-year subsequent enrollment).
21. What is the average wage of your graduates?
The college has two sources of information regarding the average wage of graduates:
 The American Institute for Research and College Measures.org examined the economic
success of college graduates this past year based upon information provided by five states,
including Colorado. The investigation suggested that Fort Lewis College graduates earn
an average of $33,000. Because wage data was only available for 15% of our students
that completed over the time period of the study, this figure may not be representative.
 Data collected by the national organization Payscale.com found that Fort Lewis College
graduates earn anywhere between $30,000 and $102,000 annually, with an average of
approximately $41,000 for recent graduates.
22. If a graduate has a difficult time finding employment, what resources are available to him /
her through your institution of higher education to find a job? What are the success rates of
this effort?
The services described #19 above are also available to alumni. The success rates of this
effort are difficult to track, as students/alumni are not required to report their outcomes. The
college is currently developing strategies to acquire this type of data.
23. What efforts is your institution undertaking to receive input from Colorado businesses to
prepare graduates that meet their workforce needs? How often do the Colorado businesses that
you work with actually hire your graduates?
The Career Services office is constantly in contact with employers. Many local and regional
employers lead career-related workshops hosted by Career Services. The employers
participate in the job fairs and come to campus to interview students and host information
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sessions. Employers are invited to complete a survey after events and interviews to assist
Career Services in making their visits more successful. The office has also developed
internship agreements with many local agencies. Examples of local businesses hiring Fort
Lewis College graduates include: Stoneage Tools, Alpine Bank, Wells Fargo, Bank of
Colorado and Mercury Payment Systems.
In addition to specific career services office activity, the individual schools and academic
departments work continuously to develop and maintain relationships with employers. As an
example, the accounting program within the School of Business Administration has been
engaging in something they call the Accounting Roadshow for over a decade. That program
takes high achieving accounting students to Denver every September for office tours,
information sessions, and student professional development. Recent visits have included
BKD, Eide Bailly, KPMG, Anton Collins Mitchell, Colorado Society of CPAs, and more. This
activity has resulted in robust placement of accounting graduates for many years.
Fort Lewis College deans are extremely active in the local and state business
community. This close interaction with the regional and Front Range business communities
has resulted in a keen understanding of the needs of the business community regarding the
development of their future workforce.
Performance: Persistence, Completion, Closing the Gap
24. Since the Lt. Governor announced the "Master Plan" for institutions of higher education,
please describe the following:
a) If applicable, has your institution of higher education reduced the amount of time to
credential their graduates? If applicable, has your institution of higher education reduced
the amount of time to receive a 2-year or 4-year degree? Please distinguish percentages
based on demographics, underserved communities, gender, etc.
The Master Plan was announced in October 2012. New initiatives aimed at accelerating
credit accumulation and reducing the number of unnecessary courses students take should
reduce time to degree for the entering cohort of 2013, with results available after FY
2016-17.
As part of Fort Lewis College’s reaccreditation process and in anticipation of the State’s
Master Plan, the College adopted a Quality Initiative to reduce completion time of our
students. The average time to degree for first-time freshmen is 4.5 years. This rate has
been stable for the last five years. The college is working to reduce the completion time
using a combination of policy and advising changes, as well as, evaluating course
offerings and maps to graduation. Based upon the changes discussed below, first year
data indicates that these initiatives seem to be altering student behavior as anticipated.
A policy was adopted during FY 2012-13, requiring that students complete 30 credits each
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academic year to maintain eligibility for institutional merit scholarships. As part of the
evaluation of course offerings, the following initiatives have been approved:
 Establishing policy that students must declare a major no later than by their
completion of 45 credits.
 Publication of maps to graduation for each major that specify exactly which
courses need to be taken during which semester to accomplish degree completion
in four academic years.
b) What is your institution of higher education doing to retain students? What is your
retention rate? Please distinguish percentages based on demographics, underserved
communities, gender, etc.
Our freshman retention rates, overall and for underserved populations are presented in
Table 1. To improve the freshman retention rates, the college is pursuing three initiatives:
1. A new model of student success and academic advising, backed by a significant
investment in analytic systems that allow us to identify students at risk. The new
model, which is being piloted in FY 2013-14, re-deploys our professional advising
staff as academic success coaches to our new freshmen for their first three semesters.
Success coaches will be leveraging several analytic systems to identify students at risk
for attrition. They focus their outreach and intervention efforts on prioritized students.
These analytic systems include:
 Map-Works, which assigns risk to first-semester freshmen based on student
responses to a survey and data from the Student Information System (pilot
completed);
 Student Success Collaborative, which assigns risk to students as they progress in
various degree programs based on institutional data about student success in
specific courses (pilot underway);
 Canvas, the learning management system, which offers a grade book function that
will flag students who are at risk in specific courses (pilot underway).
2. Implementation of four-year planning horizon:
 Publication of maps to graduation for each major that specify exactly which
courses need to be taken during which semester to accomplish degree completion
in four academic years.
 The acquisition of a new degree planning and tracking technology, which allows
students to develop customized degree plans on a web-based system, and allows
advisors to identify and intervene with students who have not developed plans or
who have developed plans but are not following them.
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3. Addition of financial incentives to our four-year graduation agreement program
required by the Student Bill of Rights. Following the Bill & Melinda Gates pay-forperformance demonstration project model, the college is offering $500 scholarships,
applicable to the next semester’s educational expenses, to students each semester they
stay on their plans.
Table 1: 2011 First-Time, Full-Time Freshman Cohort Retention Rates
Gender
Ethnicity/Race
Income
Overall
Men
Women White
Native
Hispanic
Pell
Not Pell
Eligible
Eligible
Not
Not
61%
57%
67%
64%
47%
67%
available
available
Traditionally underserved populations at Fort Lewis College: Male students, Native American
students, Pell eligible
c) Does your institution of higher education experience an attainment gap? If so, what is the
institution doing to remedy such issues?
In the “Reducing the Gap” section of the Master Plan, an attainment gap is defined as the
difference between an underserved population’s achievement and the non-underserved
population’s achievement on a given metric. As shown in Table 2, in terms of the metric
of six-year graduation, men are underserved compared to women, Native American
students are underserved compared to white and Hispanic students and Pell eligible
students are underserved compared to non-Pell eligible students. As Table 3 shows, the
College has made progress in reducing the attainment gap for Native American students
and Pell eligible students. The College is poised through our new model of student
success and academic advising, backed by our investment in analytic systems that will
allow us to monitor students in underserved populations, to systematically reduce the
attainment gap for all underserved populations.
Table 2: 2007 First-Time, Full-Time Freshman Cohort Six-Year Graduation Rates
Income
Pell
Not Pell
Eligible
Eligible
37%
32%
42%
40%
28%
41%
26.9%
37.3%
Traditionally underserved populations at Fort Lewis College: Male students, Native American
students, Pell eligible students
Overall
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Table 3: Progress in Reducing Attainment Gap in Six Year Graduation
Rate in Underserved Populations
Baseline:
Most recent:
2002
2007
7%
10%
Gap between Men and Women
Gap between Native American students
20%
12%
and White students
Gap between Pell-eligible students and
12%
10%
non-Pell eligible students
Traditionally underserved populations at Fort Lewis College: Male students, Native American
students, Pell eligible students
ASSET
25. Last session, we passed Colorado Asset (S.B. 13-033) so that undocumented students are able
to receive in-state tuition. How many undocumented students is your institution of higher
education currently serving?
Fort Lewis College currently has three (3) students registered under the ASSET bill.
3:30-4:10
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO SYSTEM
Higher Education Funding Request and Options for Statutory Change
1. Please clarify your plans for tuition and fee increases in FY 2014-15.
The Board of Regents is currently considering the parameters for the FY 2014-15 budget and
tuition setting. The Board will follow the Governor’s intent to limit tuition increases to six
percent. Campus fee-setting is underway consistent with institutional fee plans.
2. How will low income students fare under your plan for FY 2014-15 tuition increases and
financial aid allocations?
The University of Colorado is committed to maintaining affordability for low income students.
CU has increased its investment in institutional financial aid by over 198% over the last ten
years. The following chart shows CU’s institutional financial aid during this time along with
federal and state financial aid sources.
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CU Investment in Financial Aid
$200.0
$180.0
$44.8
$44.3
$160.0
$140.0
$120.0
Millions
$40.3
$44.9
$102.0
$107.1
$107.8
$24.2
$21.7
$100.0
$19.1
$19.8
$80.0
$16.4
$18.9
$19.7
$132.4
$86.4
$60.0
$72.5
$40.0
$123.0
$44.3
$44.7
$49.9
$17.1
$14.1
$13.4
FY 2003
FY 2004
FY 2005
$73.9
$20.0
$13.6
$16.9
$19.3
$22.5
$21.9
$20.5
$18.4
$18.0
FY 2007
FY 2008
FY 2009
FY 2010
FY 2011
FY 2012
FY 2013
$FY 2006
State Aid
CU Institutional Aid
Federal Pell
As a result of CU’s continued commitment, on average, a resident undergraduate student with
an income of less than $32,500 pays no out-of-pocket tuition and fee costs.
In addition to our existing institutional financial aid commitments, CU has committed to
increase institutional need-based financial aid expenditures (per FTE) at a rate at or above
tuition increases for resident undergraduate students as part of the new performance contract.
3. Several years ago, the Colorado Legislature gave flexibility to institutions of higher education
to set your own tuition costs (S.B. 10-003). What is your opinion of this statute and is it time
for change?
SB10-003 was an important legislative response to the dramatic challenges faced by the
General Assembly during the recession. While the focus has been on tuition flexibility,
important efficiencies were also achieved in the areas of human resources, financial
reporting, procurement, technology, and capital construction. We feel that it is very important
to maintain tuition flexibility going forward. This flexibility could be tied to changes in state
support to mitigate increases when state support is robust, and allowing more flexibility when
the state is not able to adequately increase funding for higher education. Our research
indicates that the state will likely not be able to maintain funding levels for higher education
over the next decade.
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4. What recommendations do you have for the Joint Budget Committee and the General
Assembly to make the funding for higher education more equitable across institutions?
The University of Colorado is grateful for the support we receive from the state of Colorado
and for the increase in funding recommended by CCHE and the Governor for FY 2014-15.
We support their recommended proportional allocation. While we could argue that the
allocation is not quite equitable to CU, we understand that other governing boards could
make the same argument for different reasons. The proportional allocation recommended by
the Governor and CCHE is fair.
The concept of equity includes many considerations, including: mandatory costs, cost of
education, enrollment, peer funding, resident and non-resident revenue and the institution’s
role and mission. The goal of a funding formula should be to provide adequate funding for an
institution to effectively purse its role and mission. Equity should also promote positive
outcomes while taking into consideration an institution’s unique opportunities and challenges.
For example, an equitable model should provide more state funding for higher cost programs
while at the same time, also providing more state funding for institutions in rural Colorado
that have fewer revenue options.
5. How does your institution define “need based aid”, “merit based aid”, and “work study”? Do
you have a position on the staff recommendation to clarify financial aid statutes?
Need-Based aid is categorized as an award that was paid to the student where financial need
is either the only component or the primary component used to determine the recipient.
Financial need is calculated based on the Federal Needs Analysis Methodology that is
completed as part of the financial aid application process.
Cost of Attendance – Expected Family Contribution = Demonstrated Need
Merit-based aid is categorized as an award that was paid to the student from institutional
funds without ANY regard for financial need when determining the recipient.
Work-Study is an employment program designed to allow students to earn funds to assist in
attending eligible educational institutions in Colorado. Employment may be in jobs at eligible
Colorado educational institutions, non-profit organizations, governmental agencies, or forprofit organizations. Students with financial need, as well as those with no evidence of
financial need but who have a personal need for work experience, may benefit from the
program.
We would resist changes to an institution’s flexibility regarding financial aid awarding and
we do not believe further changes to statute are needed. We continue to support the changes
that the General Assembly passed in SB10-003. Our financial aid offices do an exceptional
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job of packaging aid for students and any additional changes would impact our ability to meet
student’s individual needs.
Financial Performance
6. Please provide composite financial index figures for each of your institutions.
The CFI for the CU system is healthy. The University of Colorado’s combined CFI was 3.4 in
FY 2012 and 3.9 in FY 2013 when the CU Foundation is included.
CU is one body corporate and debt is issued as a system as enterprise-wide debt instruments.
Thus, while we will provide the JBC with a CFI calculation for each campus within the next
week, the university is interwoven financially among all of the campuses with cross-pledging
of revenues and other strong diversification strategies that result in very solid bond ratings.
Tuition Increases: Cost Drivers
7. What does it cost you to educate a student? Is your tuition above or below that amount?
The annual cost of educating a student (graduate and undergraduate combined) is calculated
by DHE formula and is reported annually in the budget data book. While resident tuition
rates cover a portion of the costs, they do not cover the entire cost. The following are the FY
2013 Education & General cost per student by campus: UCB- $22,818, UCCS- $12,853, CU
Denver- $14,858
8. If tuition were lowered would more students come? Would it increase overall revenues if
tuition were less? What is the breakeven point?
It is difficult to predict the impact of price decreases. In April 2012, The Colorado
Department of Higher Education engaged Augenblick, Palaich and Associates (APA) to
assess student price sensitivity among Colorado students. Results were inconclusive as
evidenced by the following statement from the report summary:
“Increases in net price decreased the probability that students would choose a given institution by
3.4%, in general. When disaggregated by students’ background characteristics (e.g., race/ethnicity,
gender, ACT score, year of attendance, and socio-economic background), this trend continued
with one exception: increases in college prices had the opposite effect on higher income students.
That is, higher prices increased the probability of selection by 3.3% for higher income students.”
This finding is consistent with recent increases in freshmen enrollment at our campuses
despite tuition increases. As noted in Question 2, CU is committed to maintaining
affordability through increased investment in institutional financial aid.
To improve access and keep costs affordable while serving students in non-traditional
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populations and in rural Colorado the UCCS campus has implemented four 2+2 online
programs and the Denver campus also has adopted a 2+2 program with the Community
College of Denver.
9. Since FY 2000, how have your operations costs increased and by what percentage? Please
describe reasons for operational cost increases.
Accounting for enrollment growth, Education & General operating costs have increased by
an average of 4.2% annually since FY 2000. The main contributors for increases are salary
and benefits, student financial aid, and utilities.
10. Since 2000, please provide a breakdown of your administrative costs and the percentage of
annual increases.
Accounting for enrollment growth, administrative costs have increased by an average of
1.5% annually since FY 2000. In FY 2000, the average administration costs per student FTE
were $1,597. In FY 2013 costs were $1,900 per student FTE.
11. Please provide a breakdown of the salaries for administration positions, faculty, etc.
The following chart outlines the average faculty, administrative, and classified salary plus
benefits since FY 2009.
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CU Employee Average Salary plus Benefits History vs. CPI
Full-Time Employee Average
$110,000
$102,866
$98,996
$95,692
$100,000
$90,000
$95,251
$91,667
$89,898
$80,000
$70,000
$60,000
$60,032
$55,834
$55,587
$50,000
$40,000
$30,000
FY 2009
FY 2010
FY 2011
Classified Actual
Exempt Actual
Faculty Actual
FY 2012
FY 2013
Classified 2009 Inflated by CPI
Exempt 2009 Inflated by CPI
Faculty 2009 Inflated by CPI
Note: Does not include Anschutz faculty
Office of the Vice President for Budget and Finance
7
12. What is the percentage of full time faculty vs. adjunct faculty?
75% of CU’s instructional faculty members are full-time employees; 25% are part-time.
13. What is the ratio of students per faculty member at your institution of higher education?
Boulder 19:1
Colorado Springs 17:1
Denver 17:1
14. What is the ratio of student tuition increases in comparison to salary for administration,
faculty and other staff?
For FY 2014, the compensation pool for CU faculty and exempt staff was 3.1% and for
classified staff 3.6%. Tuition increases included a linearity shift from 11.25 to 12.00 credit
hours + 1.9% rate increase at the Boulder campus and a 6% increase at the Colorado
Springs and Denver campuses. Non-resident undergraduate tuition at the Boulder campus
went up 1.9% but this increase only applies to incoming freshman because of guaranteed
tuition. Non-resident undergraduate tuition increased by 5% at CU-Denver and 4% at UCCS.
15. How will the Affordable Care Act decrease health care costs for employees? Does your
institution of higher education anticipate long-term savings? If so, please explain.
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Mercer estimates that ACA implementation will have an approximately $1.2M impact on the
CU Health Trust; 90% of the impact will be absorbed by the employer and 10% by the
employees. While certain aspects, including preventive services, should have a positive
impact on both employee and employer costs over time, expected overall employee out-ofpocket costs may not decrease as a result of ACA (including premium costs and other plan
design changes that may be made). Removing upper limits on certain forms of care will save
employees money, but potential savings are unknown. An additional employer cost will be 1
FTE for Employee Services (about $50k) to handle the requirement of offering/providing
coverage for those who work 75% (30 hours a week) or more in job positions that usually do
not have long periods of health plan coverage (adjunct faculty and graduate students).
Significant employee engagement/communications regarding benefit changes for preventive
services will be needed to ensure long-term savings.
Workforce Needs and Employment After Graduation
16. Please provide information regarding what your institution of higher education is currently
doing to ensure job placement.
Each CU campus offers a wide range of career planning and job placement services. These
include individual counseling, tools for exploring career options, resume writing assistance,
interview preparation, job search strategies, and salary negotiation. Campuses also host job
fairs, networking events, employer information sessions, and provide information on specific
job openings. Career Services offices put considerable effort in developing relationships with
potential employers and are also instrumental in helping students secure internships that
often lead to full-time employment.
17. Once students graduate from your institution of higher education, what is the percentage that
use their degree to find employment?
Tracking students following graduation is difficult, however all campuses routinely survey
alumni in an attempt to gather information on employment status.
Boulder
The Boulder campus periodically surveys alumni who are three to five years postgraduation. See http://www.colorado.edu/pba/surveys/alumni/11/tables/deglvl.htm for results
by degree level from the most recent alumni survey (summer 2011).
Based on the 2011 survey, 77% of bachelor’s degree recipients were employed, 7% were
seeking employment, and 15% were not employed but also not seeking employment. Many
who were not seeking employment were furthering their education. Among master’s degree
recipients, 93% were employed and 7% were seeking employment. Most (94%) of doctorate
degree recipients were employed; 3% were seeking employment.
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Colorado Springs
Colorado Springs has surveyed alumni every one to two years, with the last alumni survey
conducted in 2011. The survey was sent to students who completed a degree in Fall 2010 or
Spring 2011. Results for undergraduates are available at
http://www.uccs.edu/Documents/ir/surveys/Baccalaureate%20Alumni%20Survey%20Report
%202011.pdf and results for graduate students are available at
http://www.uccs.edu/Documents/ir/surveys/Graduate%20Alumni%202011.pdf.
Summary findings indicate that 74% of baccalaureate degree recipients were employed, and
15% were seeking employment. The remaining respondents were not actively seeking
employment. Among graduate degree recipients, 93% were employed and 4% were seeking
employment.
Denver
Based on the most recent alumni survey (2010), 87% of Denver Campus undergraduate
respondents were employed (of those actively seeking employment and not enrolled in another
degree program). Survey results are available at:
http://www.ucdenver.edu/about/departments/InstitutionalResearch/Documents/HEOA/Alumni
Survey2010.pdf.
Some additional information was available directly from programs, including professional
programs at the Anschutz Medical Campus. Some examples of those data include:
 Doctor of Physical Therapy: among the 45 graduates in 2011, 100% of survey
respondents began work as a physical therapist within the first 6 months of obtaining
post-graduation licensure.
 MD program: overall residency placement rates are well over 95% for a typical
graduating class. Employment in a residency training program is the standard postgraduation path for MD recipients.
 Pharmacy Doctorate: of 149 graduates in 2012, on graduation day, 57% (85) reported
having employment or a residency position (further specialized education). This is an
underestimate of overall employment because post-graduation data are not currently
available.
 The Child Health Associate/Physician’s Assistant program indicates that over 95% of
the class of 2011 secured employment within 10 months following graduation.
18. What is the average wage of your graduates?
Some earnings data are available from alumni surveys.
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In a 2011 survey of alumni, CU-Boulder bachelor's recipients reported median full-time
annual salaries of $40,000 to $55,000, while master's and doctoral recipients reported
medians of $55,000 to $80,000, three to five years after graduation.
In a 2012 survey, 40% of UCCS baccalaureate recipient reported an annual salary of less
than $20,000; 14% reported a salary between $20,000 and $29,999; 23% between $30,000
and $39,999; and 10% between $50,000 and $59,999. It is important to note that students
were surveyed only one year after graduation.
19. If a graduate has a difficult time finding employment, what resources are available to him /
her through your institution of higher education to find a job? What are the success rates of
this effort?
All career services available to current CU students are also available to alumni. Campuses
also host networking events and other functions specifically targeted to alumni. For example,
the UCCS campus host an alumni career speaker series to assist former students in
developing job search or career advancement strategies. The Boulder campus provides an
extensive offering of monthly career events for alumni on a range of topics. They provide
direct assistance to recent graduates, those recently laid off, or those considering a career
change. Similarly, the Denver campus offers tools for career exploration and assistance in
finding specific job opportunities.
20. What efforts is your institution undertaking to receive input from Colorado businesses to
prepare graduates that meet their workforce needs? How often do the Colorado businesses that
you work with actually hire your graduates?
At UCCS, this activity is handled at the program level in each college. Deans and Chairs
receive input from community business leaders to help develop internships and further
develop curriculum.
Boots to suits program is a partnership between CU Denver and the local business
community. Veterans are assigned a mentor from the business community to assist in the
transition from school to workplace. This is the first initiative that will be used to adapt to the
greater student population.
The CU Denver Career Center recently hired an Employer Relations and Outreach
Coordinator in order to improve relationships between the university and Colorado
Businesses, gather information about what traits graduates need in order to be hired and
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connect employers with students in a more meaningful manner.
The CU Denver campus is engaging in a broad discussion of integrative learning, based on
Essential Learning Outcomes that specifically deal with the integration of workforce needs
into the general education and major curricula.
UCB Career Services has an Advisory Board that includes representatives from industry in
Colorado. The office also participates in the Collegiate Employment Research Institute's
annual national survey and are given data from Colorado companies on workforce trends.
Student Loans
21. What is the loan default rate of graduates of your institution? If high, what steps are you
taking to address it?
Loan Default Rate Comparison
12.0%
10.4%
10.0%
10.0%
8.0%
6.0%
4.0%
3.8%
2.0%
0.0%
2005
2006
2007
CU
2008
Colorado
2009
2010
2011
National
Source: U.S Department of Education
22. What is the average amount of time that it takes your graduates to repay their student loans?
Students have a choice of several repayment plans that are designed to meet their needs. The
amount a student pays and the length of time to repay loans will vary depending on the
repayment plan they chose. Some of the plans include pay as you earn, income based
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repayment, and graduated repayment. Depending on the plan, debt will be paid off between
10-25 years. In circumstances such as certain kinds of teaching service, total and permanent
disability, the obligation may be removed.
Performance: Persistence, Completion, Closing the Gap
23. Since the Lt. Governor announced the "Master Plan" for institutions of higher education,
please describe the following:
a. If applicable, has your institution of higher education reduced the amount of time to
credential their graduates? If applicable, has your institution of higher education
reduced the amount of time to receive a 2-year or 4-year degree? Please distinguish
percentages based on demographics, underserved communities, gender, etc.
The time it takes students to complete a degree varies as students are able to enroll on
a part-time basis at any time during their academic career.
At UCCS, the four-year graduation rate has increased from (approximately) 20% to
26% over the past seven cohort years. Six-year graduation rates are approximately
45% with minor increases over the past several years. Generally, women are more
likely to graduate and more likely to graduate in fewer years than men; graduation
rates for students in ethnic minority groups tend to be similar as rates for white
students, but these rates vary dramatically per ethnic group, especially when cohort
sizes are very small. Pell Grant recipients tend to persist at the same rate as other
students and do quite well at UCCS; approximately 1/3 of the undergraduate students
are Pell recipients and yet they make up 40-45% of the typical graduating class.
At the Denver Campus, there have been small fluctuations in the percentage of
students graduating in four, five, or six years, but no consistent trend showing an
increased or reduced time to degree (either overall or by individual ethnic groups or
gender). Graduation rates for women are consistently higher than for men. The 4year graduation rate for the 2006 cohort was 18%; the 5-yr rate was 39%; and the 6yr rate was 45%.
At the Boulder Campus, the majority of students graduate in four years or less and the
percentage has increased over the last few years. For example, in 2009, 55% of
students graduated in four years or less; in 2013, 61% graduated in four years or less.
The percentage of minority students and first generation students completing their
degree in four years or less increased along with the total student population. The 6year graduation rate for the 2007 cohort reached an all-time high at 70%.
CU has adopted various approaches to help students complete their degree in a timely
manner. These include clear transfer agreements with community colleges, weekend
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classes, Maymester, and concurrent Bachelor’s/Master’s degree programs, among
others.
b. What is your institution of higher education doing to retain students? What is your
retention rate? Please distinguish percentages based on demographics, underserved
communities, gender, etc.
The UCCS Office for Student Retention manages numerous campus-wide efforts and
intervention strategies specifically aimed at increasing retention: academic skill
development workshops, early alert programs, mentoring programs, learning
communities, success coaching, and recognition programs to list a few. Other
initiatives include improving amenities and services such as the construction of new
residence halls, a recreation center, reorganized offices to serve international and
military students, continued development of Freshmen Seminar classes, improved
integration and promotion of athletics, and partnership with the city to develop a
shopping and dining center adjacent to the campus.
At CU Denver, several initiatives have been launched to increase retention and help
students reach graduation. A mandatory new student orientation has been
implemented where the process for first semester advising and registration has been
streamlined. The university is in the process of fully implementing the Degree Audit
Reporting System (DARS) to enable students to track their progress toward meeting
degree requirements. An Advising Task Force has been charged to research the
academic advising models on campus and provide recommendations for improving the
quality and efficacy of advising for our students. A comprehensive student service
blueprinting initiative has been launched where more than 70 staff members across
the campus have committed to documenting the student experience within their units
for the purpose of improving processes and helping students to get the services that
they need. In addition, three learning communities will be launched in Fall 2014.
Also, the development of a strong school community has been a priority, including the
implementation of a club sports program.
The CU-Boulder Chancellor recently articulated a bold and aggressive goal to
increase the Boulder campus six year graduation rate from 70% to 80%. In response
to this challenge, the campus has launched a number of coordinated initiatives to
increase student retention and persistence to graduation. After conducting a
comprehensive survey of national 'best practices' in student advising, a faculty-staff
task force provided the campus with recommendations to reform our current student
advising practices. These reforms include the implementation of 'drop in' advising
program that will be available to students into the evening after normal business
hours, the use of peer advisors, and a better coordination of advising across our
various schools and colleges. With respect to the latter, the Boulder campus is
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working to identify and implement a single, integrated advising software platform that
will serve the campus in its entirety. This fall, the Boulder Faculty Assembly recruited
over125 faculty volunteers, each of whom 'adopted' and periodically meet with 10 to
15 new freshman students. Other strategies to promote student retention include
expansion of the use of diagnostic tests designed to place students in the most
appropriate math and foreign language classes early in their academic careers, a
strategy that has been shown to have significant impacts on student success. These
are just a few of the student retention strategies that the Boulder campus is currently
engaged in.
Freshman Retention Rates
2011 First-Year Cohort: Percent Enrolled One Year Later
Boulder
Colorado
Springs
All Students
84%
66%
Minority Students
82%
67%
Pell Recipients
79%
63%
Denver
71%
75%
73%
Additional data on retention rates are available online. UCCS retention reports at
http://www.uccs.edu/ir/data/students.html show rates per student characteristic;
women tend to persist at a minimally higher rate than men whereas rates per ethnic
group vary dramatically. The same is true for the Denver campus – retention rates for
women are usually slightly higher than the rate for men and retention rates across
different ethnic groups vary substantially. More detailed data on retention rates of
Boulder students over time are available at
http://www.colorado.edu/pba/records/gradrt/. Reports show significant variation
among ethnic groups and lower retention rates for Pell recipients and first generation
students.
c. Does your institution of higher education experience an attainment gap? If so, what is
the institution doing to remedy such issues?
The 6-year graduation rate for underserved students (underrepresented minorities
and/or Pell grant recipients) lags behind the rate for other students. For the 2007
cohort, the rate for underserved students was 2 percentage points lower at Denver, 5
percentage points lower at Colorado Springs, and 6 percentage points lower at
Boulder.
Six-Year Graduation Rates
2007 Cohort
Boulder
Underserved Students
All Other Students
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73%
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Springs
44%
49%
Denver
39%
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Higher Education-hearing
All campuses are committed to reducing the attainment gap. At UCCS, in addition to
retention strategies, the Multicultural Office for Student Access, Inclusiveness, and
Community (MOSAIC) manages numerous events and programs and coordinates
extensively with both the Office of Student Activities as well as dozens of Student Clubs
to support student success.
Beginning in June 2013, CU Denver has partnered with the Center for Urban
Education (CUE) at the Rossier School of Education of the University of Southern
California and the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE) to
launch the Equity in Excellence initiative. Equity in Excellence involves a committee
of campus constituents that has been trained to conduct equity-focused data analysis
and qualitative inquiry with the goal of establishing targets and action plans for
improving retention and completion rates and equity in outcomes. This initiative will
continue through May 2014. CU Denver has developed several programs to improve
student retention over the last 5-10 years. These include: a first-year seminar
program, an early intervention program, an honors and leadership program, student
mentoring, and student affairs support programs (e.g. TRiO, Learning Resource
Center, Disability Services, Veterans Services), among others. Over the next 1-2 years
CU Denver will move to better place incoming freshmen students in the proper
English composition and mathematics courses and to provide Supplemental Academic
Instruction to students who will register for a credit-bearing course, but who need
some assistance for success.
At CU-Boulder, the Office of Diversity, Equity and Community Engagement (ODECE)
manages Pre-Collegiate Outreach Programs that serves over 1,400 middle school and
high school students and their families. This includes providing academic enrichment,
leadership skills, ACT preparation, and assisting students in completing college
applications and financial aid applications. This culminates in a 5-week summer
residential program at CU-Boulder.
In addition, The Student Academic Success Center at Boulder provides low income
and first generation college students with academic skills development, math and
writing courses, supplementary instruction in gateway courses, tutoring, precollegiate opportunities and graduate research opportunities. Student success is also
enhanced by a network of 13 “academic neighborhoods” and affiliate programs that
make up the CU LEAD Alliance which assists underrepresented and first-generation
students. Serving approximately 1,500 undergraduates, the programs offer
scholarships and promote academic excellence through cohort experiences, academic
enrichment and community building. CU LEAD supports students’ access to special
learning opportunities such as honors thesis, internships, undergraduate research and
global experiences.
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ASSET
24. Last session, we passed Colorado Asset (S.B. 13-033) so that undocumented students are able
to receive in-state tuition. How many undocumented students is your institution of higher
education currently serving?
Based on preliminary numbers, CU is currently serving 45 students through SB 13-033.
Boulder: 17; Colorado Springs: 14; Denver: 14
4:10-4:40
LOCAL DISTRICT JUNIOR COLLEGES
Colorado Mountain College
Higher Education Funding Request and Options for Statutory Change
1. Please clarify your plans for tuition and fee increases in FY 2014-15.
For Colorado Mountain College it is early in the process of setting tuition and fees for
2014-15 and CMC’s Board of Trustees has not discussed the topic. Over the next few
months administration will consider budgets for FY 2014-15 and reconcile revenue
projections with projected expenses. At that point administration will make tuition rate
recommendations to the Board of Trustees. Please be assured that Colorado Mountain
College is committed to honor the request of the Governor to contain any tuition increase to
6% or less for FY 2014-15. We will also make every effort to hold increases to a minimum
for students who reside in the CMC district.
2. How will low income students fare under your plan for FY 2014-15 tuition increases and
financial aid allocations?
Low income students are eligible for the greatest amount of “need based” aid, and a slight
increase in tuition would have a minimal impact on their ability to cover their CMC tuition
charges using grant funding. The Federal Pell grant, along with eligible Colorado grant
funding, allows CMC’s low income students the opportunity to cover the majority, if not all,
of their tuition charges without student loan assistance.
3. What recommendations do you have for the Joint Budget Committee and the General
Assembly to make the funding for higher education more equitable across institutions?
For institutions that serve at-risk, lower income, non-traditional, and underrepresented
populations, dedicated resources are needed to address issues often unique to these
students, to remedy academic and other deficiencies, and to level the playing field for
students who enter with less preparation and fewer support systems. For example, at
Colorado Mountain College, completion rates and degrees awarded are impacted by the
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fact that we are a community college. Not all students who attend CMC do so to attain a
degree or “complete,” yet many meet personal goals to receive specialized workforce
training, certificates, or credits toward a degree they must pursue slowly due to other
demands on their time (work, family, etc.).
4. How does your institution define “need based aid”, “merit based aid”, and “work study”?
Do you have a position on the staff recommendation to clarify financial aid statutes?
Need based aid is determined by the student’s Expected Financial Contribution (EFC)
calculated by the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and subtracted from
the student’s Cost of Attendance (COA) determined by the institution. If there is a positive
amount remaining after the EFC is subtracted from the COA, the student may have
eligibility for need based aid. Merit based aid is determined based on academic
performance and/or skills and achievements without regard to financial need. Merit based
eligibility may be established if the student meets or exceeds performance/skills and
achievements standards. Merit based aid is also known as non-need based aid. Work study
provides part-time student employment for students while they are enrolled in college. Work
study positions are available on campus, with non-profit organizations, and through
community service outreach.
Clarification on financial aid statutes would enhance and improve an institution’s ability to
properly award and report state aid.
Tuition Increases: Cost Drivers
5. What does it cost you to educate a student? Is your tuition above or below that amount?
The operating cost per FTE (no capital funds included) for FY 2012-13 was $12,771.
Colorado Mountain College’s service area covers 12,000 square miles and includes seven
campuses that comprise 11 locations. Maintaining services for students in all of these
locations drives up the cost per FTE at CMC. Annual tuition at Colorado Mountain College
for a full time student (30 credit hours) is:
In District
$1,680
In State
$2,850
Out of State
$8,970
As is evident, tuition does not cover the cost per FTE. We are able to keep tuition affordable
primarily due to the College’s ability to levy property tax revenue. This revenue is intended
to subsidize tuition rates; therefore, tuition alone does not cover the cost per FTE.
6. If tuition were lowered would more students come? Would it increase overall revenues if
tuition were less? What is the breakeven point?
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Although it is possible that lowering tuition would prompt more students to attend, it is not
necessarily true in the case of CMC. First, CMC already has the lowest tuition in the State,
and based on historical data it is evident that tuition rates do not always drive student
numbers. As reflected in the chart below, in some years when tuition increases, FTE
decreases, yet in other years increased tuition produced increased FTE (2005-06 and 201011). There have also been instances when tuition remained flat and FTE declined (2004-05).
There does not appear to be consistent, strong correlation between tuition rate and
enrollment. Colorado Mountain College strives to keep tuition rates low and offer the best
value/highest quality for higher education in the State. Property tax revenue subsidizes
tuition revenue at CMC; therefore, a breakeven is more difficult to calculate. However, the
College feels there is still room to increase tuition modestly and continue to see FTE
increase. The College realizes the sensitivity to tuition increases and continues to make it a
priority to keep rates low.
7. Since FY 2000, how have your operations costs increased and by what percentage? Please
describe reasons for operational cost increases.
The following charts display the percentage change in operations costs since 2000, as well
as a percentage in terms of the constant dollar percentage change, as based on the CPI in
each of those years.
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OPERATING EXPENSES ($ in 1,000s) FY99/00 FY00/01 FY01/02 FY02/03 FY03/04
Total Salary Expense
$14,100 $15,717 $18,052 $19,647 $19,409
Total Benefits Expense
$3,428 $2,917 $3,978 $4,435 $4,786
Total Operating Expenses
$4,849 $5,199 $6,469 $6,488 $6,098
TOTAL GENERAL FUND EXPENSES
$22,376 $23,832 $28,499 $30,570 $30,294
Constant Dollar Amount
FY04/05
$20,072
$4,891
$6,090
$31,053
FY05/06
$21,173
$5,311
$7,357
$33,841
FY06/07
$23,202
$5,591
$7,230
$36,022
FY07/08
$24,945
$6,783
$8,537
$40,264
FY08/09
$27,456
$7,783
$8,541
$43,779
FY09/10
$29,450
$9,581
$8,687
$47,718
FY10/11
$30,097
$10,162
$8,887
$49,146
FY11/12
$30,112
$10,699
$9,078
$49,890
$13,431 $13,760 $15,719 $16,542 $16,217 $16,606 $17,727 $18,221 $19,933 $20,857 $22,886 $23,138 $22,646 $22,888
Percentage Change
Constant Dollar Percentage Change
7%
2%
20%
14%
7%
5%
-1%
-2%
3%
2%
9%
7%
6%
3%
12%
9%
9%
5%
9%
10%
3%
1%
Operating Expenses Trend
$'s in Thousands
$60,000
Operating
Expenses
$50,000
$40,000
$30,000
Operating
Expenses
(Constant
Dollar)
$20,000
FY12…
FY11…
FY10…
FY09…
FY08…
FY07…
FY06…
FY05…
FY04…
FY03…
FY02…
FY01…
FY00…
$0
FY99…
$10,000
8. For institutions of higher education that are in rural areas of the state, are there increased
operational costs? Please explain.
Colorado Mountain College is located in rural areas, yet the areas the College serves are
often referred to as rural/resort areas. In many cases the towns/cities that CMC serves
represent world-class ski areas. The cost of living in our service area and district is high,
thus property is expensive, and attracting quality faculty and staff requires higher salaries
and benefits. Colorado Mountain College’s service area covers 12,000 square miles in the
mountains and includes seven campuses that comprise 11 locations. The cost to maintain a
physical presence across the district and to travel between campus locations is costly. In
addition, the cost to maintain a robust technology network to support academics and student
services across seven campuses and in remote areas is arguably more expensive than in
urban settings.
9. Since 2000, please provide a breakdown of your administrative costs and the percentage of
annual increases.
For purposes of answering this question, CMC has defined administrative costs as expenses
for executive-level activities concerned with management and long-range planning for the
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$30,678
$11,341
$9,387
$51,407
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2%
-2%
3%
1%
entire institution, such as planning and programming operations, and legal services; fiscal
operations, including the investment office; administrative information technology;
employee personnel and records; logistical activities that provide procurement services to
the institution; support services to faculty and staff that are not operated as auxiliary
enterprises; and activities concerned with community and alumni relations, including
development and fundraising.
ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES ($ in 1,000s) *
FY99/00 FY00/01 FY01/02 FY02/03 FY03/04 FY04/05 FY05/06 FY06/07 FY07/08 FY08/09 FY09/10 FY10/11 FY11/12 FY12/13
$5,789 $5,955 $7,708 $9,057 $8,384 $7,529 $8,774 $8,830 $10,157 $11,307 $12,510 $12,879 $13,655 $14,198
Total Administrative Expenses
Constant Dollar Amount
$3,475
Percentage Change
Constant Dollar Percentage Change
$3,438
$4,251
$4,901
$4,488
$4,026
$4,596
$4,466
$5,028
$5,387
$6,000
$6,064
$6,198
$6,321
3%
-1%
29%
24%
18%
15%
-7%
-8%
-10%
-10%
17%
14%
1%
-3%
15%
13%
11%
7%
11%
11%
3%
1%
6%
2%
4%
2%
$'s in Thousands
$16,000
Administrative Expenses Trend
$14,000
Administrative
Expenses
$12,000
$10,000
$8,000
Administrative
Expenses
(Constant Dollar)
$6,000
$4,000
$2,000
$0
10. Please provide a breakdown of the salaries for administration positions, faculty, etc.
2012/13
Expenses
FT Admin
Salaries
FT Faculty
Salaries
FT NonExempt
Total
Instruction
Community
Service
Instructional Student
Support
Services
Institutional
Support
Physical
Plant
Total
1,852,919
149,707
1,285,857
1,830,323
3,590,278
264,970
8,974,054
7,973,583
0
0
0
0
0
7,973,583
1,375,723
11,202,224
0
149,707
404,509
1,690,367
922,584
2,752,907
2,167,249
5,757,527
1,125,292
1,390,262
5,995,357
22,942,993
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Administrative Positions
Grade 12A - $100,000 - $170,000 ($8,333.33 - $14,166.66
monthly)
Chief Operations Officer***
Vice President, Academic Affairs***
Hiring
Range:
Exempt
Exempt
Vice President College Advancement and CEO of the Foundation
Exempt
Vice President, Fiscal Affairs***
Exempt
Vice President, Student Affairs
Exempt
Vice President, Human Resources
Exempt
Campus Vice President
Exempt
Associate Vice President, Virtual Campus***
Exempt
Grade 11A - $85,732 - $128,598 ($7,144 - $10,717 monthly)
Associate Vice President, Academic Affairs - Arts & Science
Hiring
Range:
Assistant Vice President, Academic Affairs - Arts & Science
Exempt
Assistant Vice President, Career & Technical Education
Exempt
Assistant Vice President, Institutional Effectiveness
Exempt
Assistant Vice President, Student Affairs
Exempt
Assistant Vice President, Enrollment Services
Exempt
Dean of Business & Industry
Exempt
Director of Facilities
Exempt
Director, Issacson School of New Media
Exempt
Hiring
Range:
Grade 7A - $65,079 - $97,619 ($5,423 - $8,135 monthly)
Dean of Academic Affairs
Exempt
Director of Application Services
Exempt
Director Technical and Network Services
Exempt
Director of Institutional Research
Exempt
Director of Marketing and Communication
Exempt
Director of Nursing Education
Exempt
Director of Development
Exempt
Dean of Student Affairs
Exempt
Hiring
Range:
Grade 5A - $60,814 - $91,221 ($5,068 - $7,602 monthly)
Director of Campus Operations - Non-Residential
Exempt
Director of Campus Operations - Residential
Exempt
Purchasing & Contract Director
Exempt
Public Information Officer
Exempt
Director of Assessment
Exempt
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$85,732 - $107-165
Exempt
Hiring
Range:
Grade 9A - $72,154 - $108,231 ($6,013 - $9,019 monthly)
$88,732-$110,916
$72.154 - $90,193
$65,079 - $81,349
$60,814 - $67,049
Higher Education-hearing
Director of Financial Aid
Exempt
Director of Risk Management
Exempt
Director of Emergency Medical Services,
Nursing Assistant & Medical Assistant Programs
Exempt
Hiring
Range:
Grade 4A - $58,832 -$88,248 ($4,903 - $7,354 monthly)
Network Engineer
$58,832 - $64,866
Exempt
Hiring
Range:
Grade 3A - $56,838 - $85,257 (4,736 - $7,105 monthly)
Budget Finance Director
Exempt
Upward Bound Director*
Exempt
Director Student Support Services (SSS TRIO)*
Exempt
Instructional Coordinator
Exempt
Director of Developmental Education
Exempt
Innovation for Teaching & Learning Manager
Exempt
$56,838 - $62,671
Hiring
Range:
Grade 1A - $53,125 - $79,687 ($4,427 - $6,641 monthly)
Continuing Education Director
$53,125 - $58,569
Exempt
Instructional Chairs**
Staff Position place on Faculty Matrix for Salary Placement
Technical/Professional Positions:
Grade 12T/P - $54,981 - $82,472 ($4,582 - $6,873 monthly)
Web Developer/System Integrator
Hiring
Range:
$54,981 - $60,626
Exempt
Grade 11T/P - $55,125 - $79,687 ($4,427 - $6,641 monthly)
Hiring
Range:
Employment Manager
Exempt
Disability Services Coordinator
Exempt
Grants Writer/Coordinator
Exempt
Grade 10T/P - $51,394 - $77,090 ($4,283 - $6,642 monthly)
$55,125 - $58,569
Hiring
Range:
$51,394 - $56,650
Physical Plant Manager
Exempt
System Administrator - Network Operations
Non-Exempt
Database Administrator
Exempt
Systems Analyst II
Exempt
Sys Admin II-ERP/Sys Analyst II
Exempt
Hiring
Range:
Grade 9T/P - $49,650 - $74,475 ($4,137 - $6,206 monthly)
College Counselor
Exempt
College Counselor(.875)
Exempt
Division Director I (.625)
Exempt
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$49,650 - $54,730
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Benefits Manager
Exempt
Payroll Manager
Exempt
Library Director
Exempt
Virtual Library Director
Exempt
Marketing Editor
Exempt
Student Support Generalist
Exempt
Energy Training Coordinator
Exempt
Campus Grant Contract Manager
Exempt
Student Support Services Coordinator (.75)*
Exempt
Student Support Services Coordinator *
Exempt
Student Support Services (.75)*
Exempt
Program Coordinator/Student Services Counselor*
Exempt
Director of Women/Men in Transition/Gateway (.80)*
Exempt
Manager. SBDA & Business Enterprise Center (.75)*
Exempt
Director of Recreational Culinary Institute**
Exempt
Grade 8T/P - $48,032 - $72,048 ($4,003 - $6,004 monthly)
Hiring
Range:
$48,032 - $52,949
Systems Analyst I
Exempt
Technology Training Coordinator
Exempt
Network Administrator
Non-Exempt
Web Content Editor
Exempt
Grade 7T/P - $46,401 - $69,601 ($3,867 - $5,800 monthly)
Hiring
Range:
Assistant to the President
Exempt
Assistant Public Information Officer
Exempt
Assistant Registrar
Exempt
Budget Finance Analyst
Exempt
Career Services Director
Exempt
Community & Corporate Learning Manager
Exempt
Coordinator Student Life
Exempt
Foundation Accountant
Exempt
Instructional Designer, Learning Technologies
Exempt
Instructional/Reference Librarian
Exempt
Institutional Research Analyst II
Exempt
Workforce Training Coordinator
Exempt
LMS Administrator/Faculty Trainer
Exempt
Integrated Energy Program Grant Coordinator*
Exempt
Grade 6T/P - $44,883 - $67,325 ($3,740 - $5,610 monthly)
Service Desk Manager
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Hiring
Range:
$46,401 - $51,155
$44,883 - $49,487
Exempt
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Smart Classrooms Tech Specialist
Non-Exempt
Technology Support Specialist II
Non-Exempt
Grade 5T/P - $43,365 - $65,048 ($3,614 - $5,421 monthly)
Hiring
Range:
$43,365 - $47,806
Clinical Coordinator, EMS Programs
Exempt
Communication & Graphic Design Specialist
Exempt
Director of Children's Mini College (.90)
Exempt
Human Resource Payroll Specialist
Non-Exempt
Marketing & Communications Specialist
Exempt
Science Laboratory Manager
Exempt
Ski Coach
Exempt
Assistant Project Manager II, Natural Resource Manager*
Exempt
Integrated Energy Program Instructional Designer*
Exempt
RSVP Director*
Exempt
Upward Bound Coordinator*
Exempt
Grade 4T/P - $41,408 - $62,113 ($3,451 - $5,176 monthly)
Technology Support Specialist I
Hiring
Range:
$41,408 - $45,510
Non-Exempt
Grade 3T/P - $39,452 - $59,177 ($3,288 - $4,931 monthly)
Hiring
Range:
$39,452 - $43,202
Accounting Technician III
Non-Exempt
Admissions Counselor
Exempt
Admissions Coordinator
Exempt
Admissions Representative
Exempt
Animal Resource Manager
Non-Exempt
Financial Aid Systems Specialist
Non-Exempt
Institutional Research Analyst I
Non-Exempt
Marketing Specialist
Non-Exempt
Youth Outreach Coordinator
Exempt
Hiring
Range:
Grade 2T/P - $38,260 - $57,390 ($3,188 - $4,782 monthly)
Customer Support Analyst
$38,260 - $41,735
Non-Exempt
Grade 1T/P - $38,260 - $57,390 ($3,089 - $4,634 monthly)
Hiring
Range:
$37,068 - $40,267
Senior Executive Assistant
Non-Exempt
Academic Credentials Evaluator
Non-Exempt
Academic Services Specialist
Non-Exempt
Assistant Coordinator of Student Activities - Trainee
Non-Exempt
Assistant Coordinator of Student Life
Exempt
Bookstore Manager
Exempt
Campus Financial Aid Specialist
Non-Exempt
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CEPA/GED Coordinator
Exempt
Coordinator of Student Activities & Summer Conference
Exempt
Facilities Specialist
Non-Exempt
Financial Aid and Resource Specialist
Non-Exempt
Financial Aid Federal Program Specialist
Non-Exempt
Foundation Specialist
Non-Exempt
Procurement Specialist
Non-Exempt
Career Coach, Integrated Energy Program*
Exempt
Clerical Positions:
Grade 13C - $38,172 - 57,258 ($3,181 - $4,772 monthly)
Hiring
Range:
$38,172 - $41,634
Accounting Technician II
Non-Exempt
Accounting Technician II - Cash Management
Non-Exempt
Accounts Manager II
Non-Exempt
Executive Administrative Assistant
Non-Exempt
Lead Administrative Assistant
Non-Exempt
Lead Administrative Assistant II
Non-Exempt
Lead Administrative Technician
Non-Exempt
Grade 12C - $36,504 - $54,755 ($3,042 - $4,563 monthly)
Grade 11C - $34,835 - $52,253 ($2,903 - $4,354 monthly)
Hiring
Range:
Hiring
Range:
$36,504 - $39,815
$34,835 - $37,984
Accounts Manager I
Non-Exempt
Administrative Assistant II
Non-Exempt
Administrative Technician
Non-Exempt
Admissions Assistant
Non-Exempt
Bookstore Assistant
Non-Exempt
Customer Support Specialist
Non-Exempt
Instructional Technology Support Specialist
Non-Exempt
Instructional Support Technician
Non-Exempt
Library Technician
Non-Exempt
Library Technician (.92)
Non-Exempt
Photo and Media Lab Technician
Non-Exempt
Registration Technician
Non-Exempt
Registration Technician, Admissions
Non-Exempt
Student Receivable Clerk
Non-Exempt
Lead Administrative Assistant
Non-Exempt
Office Manager/Administrative Technician
Non-Exempt
Grade 10C - $33,129 - $49,694 ($2,761 - $4,141 monthly)
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Hiring
Range:
$33,129 - $36,140
Higher Education-hearing
Grade 9C - $31,423 - $47,135 ($2,619 - $3,508 monthly)
Hiring
Range:
$31,423 - $34,283
Administrative Assistant I
Non-Exempt
Administrative Clerk
Non-Exempt
Grade 7C - $28,061 - $42,092 ($2,328 - $3,508 monthly)
Library Clerk
Hiring
Range:
$29,061 - $30,608
Non-Exempt
Maintenance Positions:
Grade 15M - $46,401 - $69,602 ( $3,867 - $5,800 monthly)
Hiring
Range:
$46,401 - $$51,155
Operational/Energy Manager
Non-Exempt
Construction Manager
Exempt
Grade 11M - $42,066 - $63,098 ($3,506 - $5,258 monthly)
Hiring
Range:
$42,066 - $46,378
Maintenance Manager
Non-Exempt
Journeyman Carpenter
Non-Exempt
Grade 9M - $36,504 - $54,755 ($3,042 - $4,563 monthly)
Hiring
Range:
$36,504 - 39,815
Maintenance Mechanic
Non-Exempt
Maintenance Mechanic/Groundskeeper
Non-Exempt
Grade 7M - $31,423 - $47,135 ($2,619 - $3,928 monthly)
Hiring
Range:
$31,423 - $34,283
Custodian
Non-Exempt
Custodian/Maintenance Mechanic
Non-Exempt
Groundskeeper/Custodian
Non-Exempt
Grade 5M - $28,061 - $42,092 ($2,338 - $3,508 monthly)
Custodian
Hiring
Range:
$28,061 - $30,608
Non-Exempt
11. What is the percentage of full time faculty vs. adjunct faculty?
For the 2012-13 fiscal year, approximately 35% of credit hours were taught by full-time
faculty, while the remaining 65% were taught by adjuncts. As a note, given the large
geographic area that CMC serves, and the resort areas in which our campuses reside, we are
able to employ highly skilled and trained part-time faculty who have retired to or own homes
in our communities.
12. What is the ratio of students per faculty member at your institution of higher education?
The student-faculty ratio for Fall 2012, based on IPEDS definition, is 14 to 1.
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13. What is the ratio of student tuition increases in comparison to salary for administration,
faculty and other staff?
Ratio of Change
In-District Tuition
FY09/10
Tuition Salary
0.0%
In-State Tuition
0.0%
Out-of-State Tuition
0.0%
3.5%
FY10/11
Tuition Salary
8.9%
9.3%
1.0%
8.9%
FY11/12
Tuition Salary
8.2%
8.5%
0.0%
9.0%
FY12/13
Tuition Salary
5.7%
6.7%
3.0%
7.2%
FY13/14
Tuition Salary
0.0%
0.0%
3.0%
0.0%
Tuition Increases vs. Faculty/Staff Pay Increses
10.0%
In-District Tuition %
Change
In-State Tuition %
Change
Out-of-State Tuition
% Change
Faculty & Staff
Increases % Change
8.0%
6.0%
4.0%
2.0%
0.0%
FY09/10
FY10/11
FY11/12
FY12/13
FY13/14
14. How will the Affordable Care Act decrease health care costs for employees? Does your
institution of higher education anticipate long-term savings? If so, please explain.
The Affordable Care Act will not decrease our health benefit costs for employees. The
College currently provides 100% employer-paid coverage for all full-time benefit eligible
employees and provides some employer-paid contribution towards dependent coverage.
The College does not anticipate any short or long term savings due to the Affordable Care
Act.
Workforce Needs and Employment After Graduation
15. Please provide information regarding what your institution of higher education is currently
doing to ensure job placement.
As a comprehensive community college, CMC serves credit and non-credit students. CMC’s
largest body of credit students are within AA, AS and AGS degrees. Students have the
opportunity to continue on for a four-year degree at CMC, transfer to other four-year
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colleges, or find employment. For these students, our job placement efforts are limited to
informing students of job and career potential in these various fields. The AAS degree and
certificate students have opportunities to complete work experiences/ internships in their
program of study. Additionally, job and career information, career coaching and job fairs
are co-designed with Program Advisory Committees (PACs) to ensure that the skills taught
are to provide preparation for jobs in local business and industry.
CMC has begun offering two bachelor’s degrees, a B.A. in Sustainability Studies and a B.S.
in Business Administration. As part of the accreditation process CMC began a new Career
Services office to assist students in identifying employers, arranging job fairs, and providing
student training in resume writing, job interviewing and other job preparation areas. The
college is currently expanding the responsibilities of the Career Services Director to
provide assistance to ALL CMC (non-transfer) GRADUATES and to improve internship
placement.
16. Once students graduate from your institution of higher education, what is the percentage that
use their degree to find employment?
According to our 2012-13 Graduate Survey:
Out of 1,006 graduated students, 50.20% responded to the survey. Employment question
breakdown follows.
Of the respondents almost 70% of graduates indicated they were employed.
42% indicated they were employed and it is NOT in related field of study.
36% indicated they were employed in a related field of study.
16% indicated they were seeking employment.
6% not seeking employment.
CMC also tracks the graduates of Career and Technical programs through the Federal V-135
process. For the 2011-12 fiscal year, 918 student records were surveyed and 424 did not
answer the placement question or the CCCS data is not capturing it; of the remaining 494
records the data for 2011-12 indicated the following in December 2012:




204 students were employed in their CTE training area
70 students were employed in an unrelated field
22 students were unemployed and seeking employment
15 students were unemployed and not seeking employment
In comparison, for the 2010-11 Fiscal Year, 974 student records were surveyed. Of these,
480 did not answer the placement question or the CCCS data is not capturing it; of the
remaining 494 records the data for 2010-11 indicated the following in December 2011:
 206 students were employed in their CTE training area
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


84 students were employed in an unrelated field
14 students were unemployed and seeking employment
20 students were unemployed and not seeking employment
In terms of the Bachelor’s graduates, the new Career Services Office is working to establish
the processes to better track student placement after graduation. As the college had its first
cohort of students graduate less than a year ago, we are still working to collect the
employment percentages.
17. What is the average wage of your graduates?
We do not have specific data on the average wage of our graduates, although we are
considering adding this question to our next VE 135 survey.
18. If a graduate has a difficult time finding employment, what resources are available to him /
her through your institution of higher education to find a job? What are the success rates of
this effort?
CMC has piloted a career coaching model for our Integrated Energy degree and certificate
students. Through a grant, we offer services to students that include career advising and
coaching, interest inventories, resume writing and interviewing skill workshops, job and
career information. Additionally, hosting job fairs and on-campus company interviews and
work experiences/internships have increased placement rates. This has also strengthened
employer relationships as well as gaining their support to assist the students in degree
completion. Faculty work closely with their CTE students in getting them placed in work
experiences/internships which lead to employment opportunities.
CMC has a new Career Services Office that provides assistance either in person, by phone,
or by the website which includes a job-search database.
19. What efforts is your institution undertaking to receive input from Colorado businesses to
prepare graduates that meet their workforce needs? How often do the Colorado businesses
that you work with actually hire your graduates?
The college relies on external stakeholders to help develop new programs and
update/change existing programs. The new program process depends on having a team that
consists of business and industry with current career, technical or professional experience
or expertise in the area being developed. During the development of a new program a
feasibility study is conducted to gather data from local/regional business and industry to
make sure that the proposal meets current workforce needs. These external stakeholders
serve on program advisory committees and continually provide updates on courses and
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programs. This involvement helps to ensure that these local/regional business and industries
hire our graduates as we have met their needs. Institutional Research does business and
industry as well as community surveys to keep the college knowledgeable on trends that can
impact programs. The college works closely with the Colorado Workforce Centers in the
development of new programs as well as helping students to get the skills they need to be
employed locally. Local business and industry hire our graduates on a regular basis, much
of that is attributed to their involvement mentioned above.
Student Loans
20. What is the loan default rate of graduates of your institution? If high, what steps are you
taking to address it?
The Fiscal Year 2010 three-year Cohort Default Rate (CDR) for CMC is currently 16.2%.
Even though CMC is among the average for the state of Colorado, we are actively pursuing
a Default Management Team to engage and educate our students on financial literacy and
loan repayment options.
21. What is the average amount of time that it takes your graduates to repay their student loans?
The average timeframe for loan repayment for CMC students is not currently calculated.
Due to the many loan repayment options available and various loan servicing agencies,
there is not a centralized process to pull this information. The standard repayment term is
10 years with opportunities to utilize other payment plans such as Income Based Repayment
with a repayment term up to 25 years. The Default Management Team we are developing
will be charged with researching this information.
Performance: Persistence, Completion, Closing the Gap
22. Since the Lt. Governor announced the "Master Plan" for institutions of higher education,
please describe the following:
a) If applicable, has your institution of higher education reduced the amount of time
to credential their graduates? If applicable, has your institution of higher education
reduced the amount of time to receive a 2-year or 4-year degree? Please distinguish
percentages based on demographics, underserved communities, gender, etc.
According to our most recent graduation rate or time to completion data for
IPEDS, which is cohort based (First-time, Full-time, Degree seeking), the college
tends to graduate students within 150% of the time (6 years) at about a 22% rate.
Additionally, the transfer-out rate is 31%. Time to completion is not one of CMC’s
indicators in its contract with the State, although we work to get students
graduated more quickly since students who delay have a lower overall likelihood
of completion. CMC is participating in the redesign of developmental education so
that students will be ready for college coursework after just one semester. Also,
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CMC has expanded its online offerings to meet the scheduling needs of students
who cannot attend face-to-face classes.
b) What is your institution of higher education doing to retain students? What is your
retention rate? Please distinguish percentages based on demographics, underserved
communities, gender, etc.
CMC does many things to retain students since student retention continues to be
on CMC’s Balanced Scorecard (dashboard). Student Affairs has a very large
array of activities such as comprehensive student-orientations, tutoring, advising,
and counseling. Since student engagement is critical to student success, the college
has a wide array of activities such as clubs, parties, special speakers, etc. to bring
students together with each other and faculty and staff. Academic Affairs scores
very high on CCSSE benchmarked data in terms of student engagement by way of
class-based and extracurricular activities which level our mountain locations and
local recreational opportunities. CMC targets the most vulnerable students for
better retention by identifying a large list of “Barrier Courses,” those courses with
the highest attrition rates. Barrier courses receive more attention in terms of
tutoring, advising, mentoring, etc. CMC data show significant improvements in
student completion due to Barrier Course interventions.
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Retention rates:
c) Does your institution of higher education experience an attainment gap? If so, what
is the institution doing to remedy such issues?
Success of at-risk, minority and under-represented (e.g. women or men) students is
very important to CMC. We do in fact have some attainment gaps.
As a response to these gaps, CMC has taken on various initiatives. For example,
we have a full-time Youth Outreach Coordinator who focuses largely on Hispanic
students and we provide some daycare assistance at some locations. The Assistant
VP over Career and Technical Education has a variety of initiatives to improve
minority participation in programs, including special training, bringing experts,
working with advisory committees, etc. The improvement of success of at-risk and
minority students has been on the college’s Strategic Plan for the past several
years, as an initiative to improve recruitment and retention of Latino and other
under-represented populations college wide. Also, this effort is in support of
CMC’s Master Plan with the State.
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ASSET
23. Last session, we passed Colorado Asset (S.B. 13-033) so that undocumented students are
able to receive in-state tuition. How many undocumented students is your institution of
higher education currently serving?
Colorado Mountain College is currently serving 148 ASSET students. Ninety-seven of them
are returning students and 51 are new students.
Aims Community College
Higher Education Funding Request and Options for Statutory Change
24. Please clarify your plans for tuition and fee increases in FY 2014-15.
The College is now debating whether or not a modest increase of 1% is viable. One
consideration regarding tuition is perceived value if tuition is too low or significantly lower
than everyone else. Since Aims has not increased tuition rates in the last two years and
eliminated various fees, we are concerned that a portion of the population we serve may
perceive this negatively and, thus, go elsewhere to enroll in College.
25. How will low income students fare under your plan for FY 2014-15 tuition increases and
financial aid allocations?
We anticipate little or no impact.
26. What recommendations do you have for the Joint Budget Committee and the General
Assembly to make the funding for higher education more equitable across institutions?
Depends on mission and how you define equitable. Is it based on FTE, or completers or
performance contract metrics?
27. How does your institution define “need based aid”, “merit based aid”, and “work study”? Do
you have a position on the staff recommendation to clarify financial aid statutes?
Aims uses standard definitions of need-based, merit and work-study.
Need-based aid: financial aid that you can receive if you have financial need and meet other
eligibility criteria. You can’t receive more need-based aid than the amount of your financial
need.
Non-need based aid: financial aid that is not based on your expected family contribution
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(EFC). What matters is your cost of attendance (COA) and how much other assistance you’ve
been awarded so far.
Work-study: provides part-time jobs for students with financial need, allowing them to earn
money to help pay education expenses.
Tuition Increases: Cost Drivers
28. What does it cost you to educate a student? Is your tuition above or below that amount?
The cost depends on the courses. In general transfer courses other than aviation, according
to the Budget Data Book submitted for 2012-13, we spent $9,115.32 per student in the general
fund. We collected a total of $9,208,117 in tuition for 3,591 FTE. This is $2,564 tuition per
student. Obviously, tuition is below the amount to educate.
29. If tuition were lowered would more students come? Would it increase overall revenues if
tuition were less? What is the breakeven point?
We anticipate that we would not get more students unless we significantly dropped tuition
value proposition. We have held tuition steady for the past two years and enrollment has
declined slightly. As it is, our tuition rate is one of the best deals around. If we do not get
more students, then it would only lead to decrease in revenues.
30. Since FY 2000, how have your operations costs increased and by what percentage? Please
describe reasons for operational cost increases.
Most increases have to do with technology upgrades and facility increases.
(See table below)
31. For institutions of higher education that are in rural areas of the state, are there increased
operational costs? Please explain.
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Aims’ operational costs are affected by the operational and travel costs of serving our district
and area. We incur more travel because of distances between our south, west, and north
district areas. In order to adequately serve program needs we are not able to share immobile
equipment for programs so either we cannot offer the program or we must duplicate costs to
adequately serve our district's needs.
We are not able to collaborate with any 4 year colleges on similar programs because it is not
in their role and mission to offer such programs as welding, auto service, and auto collision
etc. which incur ongoing and high capital costs.
Since 2000, please provide a breakdown of your administrative costs and the percentage of
annual increases.
(see table below)
32. Please provide a breakdown of the salaries for administration positions, faculty, etc.
Annual Salaries:
Total administrators = $2,845,876
Total FT faculty = $5,355,472
Total FT exempt staff = $4,152,251
Total FT non-exempt staff = $3,904,422
33. What is the percentage of full time faculty vs. adjunct faculty?
98 (27%) full time faculty
268 (73%) adjunct faculty
34. What is the ratio of students per faculty member at your institution of higher education?
Student: Faculty ratio 16:1 (IPEDS)
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35. What is the ratio of student tuition increases in comparison to salary for administration,
faculty and other staff?
No tuition increase for past three years
4% salary increase for administration, faculty, exempt & non-exempt staff for FY 13/14
36. How will the Affordable Care Act decrease health care costs for employees? Does your
institution of higher education anticipate long-term savings? If so, please explain.
For full-time benefited employees, there is a reduction of out-of-pocket expenses due to
Essential Health Benefits implemented due to ACA. For part-time non-benefited employees,
the cost is unknown. Aims does not anticipate long-term savings.
Workforce Needs and Employment After Graduation
37. Please provide information regarding what your institution of higher education is currently
doing to ensure job placement.
CTE programs are developed and maintained for those industries with local, regional, and
state demand for employees. Programs are regularly evaluated to ensure that they remain
viable for preparing students for direct entry into the workforce, and/or for further
postsecondary education.
To ensure job placement, Aims Community College maintains strong advisory committees for
each CTE Program. The committees, comprised of 51 percent or higher of business/industry
members meet a minimum of two times per year (or more) to review and make
recommendations on curriculum. Certificate and degree programs are regularly revised to
ensure that students learn the required job skills for employment.
Students participate in clinicals for Health programs, and in many other CTE programs,
students have the opportunity to enroll in job-related Internships. The internships may be paid
or unpaid.
Aims has had a strong, long-term partnership with Employment Services of Weld County and
Larimer County. Through these partnerships, task forces in a variety of industries have been
formed to invite business members to the table to share requirements for the workplace. Over
the years, a stronger emphasis and recommendations have been placed on soft skills required
for employment. Due to these recommendations, several CTE programs have added
Management courses in Team Building, Ethics & Values, and Time Management.
38. Once students graduate from your institution of higher education, what is the percentage that
use their degree to find employment?
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For the most recent reporting year for CTE Follow-up, 93.9 percent of certificate and/or
degree completers were reported as TPP (Total Positive Placement). TPP includes CTE
completers who were placed in employment, continuing education, or placed in military
service or apprenticeships programs two quarters after the end of the academic reporting
year.
39. What is the average wage of your graduates?
Aims Community College no longer asks CTE Completers salary/wage information.
40. If a graduate has a difficult time finding employment, what resources are available to him /
her through your institution of higher education to find a job? What are the success rates of
this effort?
The Career Services Office provides job search assistance for all current and former
students. This includes:


Educating students on how to write cover letters and resumes.
Recording mock interviews with students and sharing constructive feedback to
prepare them for professional job interviews.
 Helping students register for Career Advance which allows employers to post jobs
and enables students to upload job search materials to apply for jobs online.
 Connecting students with employers through our annual career fair.
The primary users of these services are students pursuing CTE (Career & Technical)
education programs. As such, these students also tap into the expertise of their CTE faculty
who refer them to job opportunities and provide job search advice. Furthermore, each CTE
program meets bi-annually with their advisory committees consisting of business and industry
professionals who review existing and/or create new program curriculum to ensure the
program adequately prepares students for entry-level positions. Students often network with
these individuals through class presentations and internship opportunities, thus, gaining yet
another potential employment pathway.
Because of the multiple avenues students access to receive employment assistance, identifying
the most significant piece that contributed to the employment for the student is difficult at
best. The institution does track employment rates of CTE students per state law; however,
the report does not provide the level of detail to answer this question.
41. What efforts is your institution undertaking to receive input from Colorado businesses to
prepare graduates that meet their workforce needs? How often do the Colorado businesses that
you work with actually hire your graduates?
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Response #15 above relates to efforts that Aims takes to receive input from business/industry
to prepare graduates. Involved business/industry members regularly hire completers from
Aims CTE certificate and degree programs. Two excellent examples include the hiring of
health care students for Assisted Living Homes (CNAs), and local and regional hospitals
hiring nurses. Also, as an indication of commitment, Leed Fabrication recently donated a
monetary gift of $100,000.00 to help equip the expansion of Aims Welding facility to the south
county campus in Fort Lupton. Leed states that Aims students have excellent welding skills
and soft skills for employment.
Aims is also partnering with the Greeley Chamber of Commerce to develop “Aims
WorkSource”. The program provides affordable, relevant and reliable training for our
students that will prepare them for careers in current and emerging industries.
www.aims.edu/worksource
Student Loans
42. What is the loan default rate of graduates of your institution? If high, what steps are you
taking to address it?
Aims most recent 3-year cohort default rate is 23.5%. We are forming an advisory committee
to establish a default management plan. We are also developing a financial literacy program.
In addition, a staff member has begun to work on other default prevention strategies. Due to
the economic conditions in the State from 2008 – 2012, job availability had an impact on
students’ ability to repay their student loans. This has been a contributor in the increase in
the default rate.
43. What is the average amount of time that it takes your graduates to repay their student loans?
Actual timeframe for repayment for Aims students is unknown. The normal repayment time is
10 years.
Performance: Persistence, Completion, Closing the Gap
44. Since the Lt. Governor announced the "Master Plan" for institutions of higher education,
please describe the following:
a. If applicable, has your institution of higher education reduced the amount
of time to credential their graduates? If applicable, has your institution of
higher education reduced the amount of time to receive a 2-year or 4-year
degree? Please distinguish percentages based on demographics,
underserved communities, gender, etc.
While it is too soon to determine the success of the redesign of the
Colorado Community College Developmental Education process, Aims has
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committed to focusing on the changes to the process to provide a course
structure to allow students the opportunity to complete their course work in
developmental Math and English after two semesters and start their college
coursework sooner.
While there has been success with this process for some students, others
find they need more developmental assistance to be ready to take on the
rigor of a typical college level Math or English class.
b. What is your institution of higher education doing to retain students?
What is your retention rate? Please distinguish percentages based on
demographics, underserved communities, gender, etc.
Aims has several programs to promote retention including two TRIO
grants and the Emerging Scholars Program which offer services to highrisk student populations such as first-generation students, students of low
income, and those who place into developmental courses. Services include
intensive academic advising, scholarship money, tutoring, peer mentoring,
and focused study groups.
The college offers a First Year Experience (FYE) class to all incoming
students and requires this course for any student who places into
developmental courses. The FYE class supports the successful academic
and social transition of students to promote engagement and retention.
Additionally, the college employs a tracking system (Starfish) which allows
faculty to report students at any point in the term who are at risk of failing.
Once a student is reported, Retention Advisors follow-up to direct those
students to institutional resources that aid in retention.
Aims institutional retention rate is 65% (fall to spring) and 39% (fall to
fall).The TRIO programs average 70% retention fall to fall and 88%
retention fall to spring. The Emerging Scholars and FYE programs average
75% retention fall to fall and 51% retention fall to spring.
Full-time student retention = 65%
Part-time student retention = 43%
c. Does your institution of higher education experience an attainment gap?
If so, what is the institution doing to remedy such issues?
The only gaps we scrutinized were with Math and English courses. The
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populations we looked at were Minority, Low-Income and First
Generation. We have a slight gap in the minority population compared to
the non-minority population, but we don't have gaps in Low-income or first
generation. Aims is providing additional Student Support Services to
increase attainment. (See answer to question 22 b.)
ASSET
45. Last session, we passed Colorado Asset (S.B. 13-033) so that undocumented students are able
to receive in-state tuition. How many undocumented students is your institution of higher
education currently serving?
45 students enrolled at some point this Fall semester
37 students still enrolled by end of this Fall semester
4:40-5:00
AREA VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS
Higher Education Funding Request and Options for Statutory Change
1. Please clarify your plans for tuition and fee increases in FY 2014-15.
We plan to raise tuition at a level consistent with years past, which will either be 0%, or at
most at a level which is in line with the Denver area CPI of 3-4%. We do not envision any
issues with containing tuition and per credit fees to the ceiling of 6% for the upcoming year.
None of our three campuses can remember when we raised tuition in excess of 6 percent in
any one year.
2. How will low income students fare under your plan for FY 2014-15 tuition increases and
financial aid allocations?
Our institutions serve a wide variety of student demographics, and we have always placed a
high importance/emphasis on providing opportunity to all students who wish to learn. Given
this, coupled with the fact we are the lowest tuition option in the state, we feel our moderate
tuition increases will have little to no effect on low income students. In addition, given the
high percentage of our population who are Pell Eligible, of which currently averages 43% of
our population, financial aid increases will definitely assist with our needs based students.
3. What recommendations do you have for the Joint Budget Committee and the General
Assembly to make the funding for higher education more equitable across institutions?
The three Area Vocational Schools are very pleased with the Governor’s Budget request of 11
percent General Fund increase for each governing board. Although we are not state
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agencies, we will absolutely comply with the tuition limitation of 6 percent.
As state support continues to increase, we would be happy to engage with representatives of
other institutions in order to consider allocation methodologies. The state should consider
“updating” its allocation methodology to reflect current role and missions, high cost
programs, enrollment changes, and total funding available to institutions. We look forward to
these discussions.
4. How does your institution define “need based aid”, “merit based aid”, and “work study”? Do
you have a position on the staff recommendation to clarify financial aid statutes?
We define "need based aid”, and "work study" through the Expected Family Contribution
(EFC) number, from the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). We currently do
not have any merit based aid with our institutions, but will participate in Colorado Merit in F
2014-15, assuming the budget is approved.
We have worked well with the CCHE and Department staff in the past and see no need for
statutory modification at this time.
Tuition Increases: Cost Drivers
5. What does it cost you to educate a student? Is your tuition above or below that amount?
The costs vary by program, as some of our programs have a mandated faculty: staff ratio as
set by accrediting boards (example is Practical Nursing with its 6:1 clinical ratio as dictated
by the ACEN, Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing). In addition, some
programs are much more cost intensive from a material standpoint (Aircraft Maintenance,
Welding etc...) than others, which will greatly impact any analysis on the “cost” to educate a
student. Bottom line, tuition is not enough to cover the cost to educate a student, in any of our
programs, and we must rely on fees, grants and most importantly state General Fund
appropriations to assist in funding a student’s education.
6. If tuition were lowered would more students come? Would it increase overall revenues if
tuition were less? What is the breakeven point?
The assumption that more students would come due to lower tuition would have to be
analyzed based on an economic trend analysis of this particular scenario. The breakeven
point would have to be determined by the data from the trend analysis. Given we offer the
most affordable tuition in the state, and we have made a consistent practice of increasing
tuition at a rate less than our peers (typically 0-4% per year), we feel we represent the
working example of the spirit of this question. It may be possible that more students would
come if tuition were lowered, but without knowing with certainty the pipeline of potential
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students who are not currently attending because of the tuition price, we do not know with
certainty if more students would come. To look at it economically, we would have to increase
enrollment at a rate (% wise) higher than the % reduction in price. Assuming we can draw
more students than this, and we have the capacity to accommodate them, then overall
revenues would go up incrementally. Capacity could be an issue for some of our programs –
with mandated students/faculty ratios, as well as space and materials concerns, our programs
can’t automatically increase.
7. Since FY 2000, how have your operations costs increased and by what percentage? Please
describe reasons for operational cost increases. We are members of our local school districts,
and as a result, we comply, use and are subject to the tools and data that is reported and
stored by the districts. We do not prepare separate financial statements. Given more time to
prepare for this, we could assemble paper copies (only means possible back to FY 2000, at
this point) from the District back to the specified timeframe to accurately answer this
question.
If we look at data readily available, our operational costs for the past eleven (11) years have
increased a total of six (6) percent over that timeframe. There are many variables at play
including high cost attrition of faculty and various savings associated with equipment and
technology advancements that are offset by risings costs of materials, labor and benefit costs
as well as investments in ERP technology.
Operational Costs
$12,000,000
EGTC Costs
$10,000,000
$8,000,000
$6,000,000
$4,000,000
$2,000,000
$FY03
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FY08
FY09
FY10
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8. For institutions of higher education that are in rural areas of the state, are there increased
operational costs? Please explain.
This question pertains to one of the three Area Vocational Schools (Delta-Montrose). The
isolation of Delta Montrose Technical College does create some high cost challenges. The 10
county service areas on the Western Slope requires additional travel costs for student
internships, clinicals and industry learning experiences. That geographical distance requires
more distance delivery of curricular content, which necessitates additional staff time in order
to support distance learning, while still providing hands-on labs and clinical
experiences. There are increased costs for staff development due to fewer opportunities on the
western slope which creates the cost of travel for staff training.
9. Since 2000, please provide a breakdown of your administrative costs and the percentage of
annual increases.
We are members of our local school districts, and as a result, we comply, use and are subject
to the tools and data that is reported and stored by the districts. We do not prepare separate
financial statements. In addition, all administrative increases are linked in with the local
school district negotiations with all bargaining units and job classes (including administrative
roles). Given more time to prepare for this question, we could assemble paper copies (only
means possible back to FY 2000, at this point) from the District back to the specified
timeframe to accurately answer this question. Over the past five years, those increases have
fluctuated between zero percent (0%) and 1.7% annually.
10. Please provide a breakdown of the salaries for administration positions, faculty, etc.
It should be noted that we are part of the Public School Systems, and as a result, we comply
and work with all bargaining units associated with the District(s), and that each classification
listed below it based on where the district classifies the position. Salary increases for all
groups, including administrators, are handled by the School District, as part of their
negotiations with each respective unit.
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Emily Griffith Employee Salary Breakdown
14%
Instructional
4%
Administrative
11%
Clerical
57%
Facilities
14%
Support
Delta-Montrose Employee Salary Breakdown
33%
Instructional
Administrative
52%
Other/Support
15%
11. What is the percentage of full time faculty vs. adjunct faculty?
Part
Time/Adjunct
Institution
Full Time
Emily Griffith (w/ Apprenticeship)
22%
78%
Emily Griffith (w/o Apprenticeship)
44%
56%
Pickens
69%
31%
Delta-Montrose
17%
83%
12. What is the ratio of students per faculty member at your institution of higher education?
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Based on data, as published by IPEDS and used by the National Center for Education
Statistics, our student to faculty ratio is:
Institution
Emily Griffith
Pickens
Delta-Montrose
Faculty:Student Ratio
12:1
23:1
8:1
13. What is the ratio of student tuition increases in comparison to salary for administration,
faculty and other staff?
Institution
Emily Griffith
Pickens
Delta-Montrose
Tuition to Admin
salary increase ratio
2.5:1
3:1
0:1.5
Tuition to Admin
salary increase %
4.3% / 1.7%
1% / .3%
0% / 1.5%
*Pickens modeled over 3 years. The last FY saw 0% for both
14. How will the Affordable Care Act decrease health care costs for employees? Does your
institution of higher education anticipate long-term savings? If so, please explain.
Given we are associated with the Public School Systems, we are linked in with them on all
Health Care decisions. Given these decisions are made centrally, we do not currently have
control or insight into the long term impacts of the Affordable Health Care Act impacts on our
employees. We do not anticipate any material impacts or benefits to employees, as the vast
majority will retain their current employee sponsored plans.
Workforce Needs and Employment After Graduation
15. Please provide information regarding what your institution of higher education is currently
doing to ensure job placement.
Emily Griffith provides placement services and assistance to all students. We have revised our
focus with our Career and Placement Advisers to work closely with students upon admission
to the college to develop an understanding of the career they are attempting to pursue. Once
a student is enrolled in their program and is close to completion students are provided
assistance with interviews, resume workshops, and a working wardrobe for appropriate attire
for work. Students can also access job postings through their student portal in our student
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information system. These services are provided through our Student Success Center and
Supervisor of Career and Placement Advising. We also have a Cooperative Education
Coordinator for our Business Programs who works closely with each faculty member,
employers, and the student to establish leads, interviews and job opportunities for program
completers. Specific to Pickens, instructors, administrators and advisory board members
collaborate to assist with individual job placement needs along with our academic advisors.
We are currently researching the possibility of hiring a full time job placement internship
coordinator for the 2014-2015 school year. In January of this year we will be hiring an
adjunct to begin the work.
16. Once students graduate from your institution of higher education, what is the percentage that
use their degree to find employment?
The Area Technical Colleges placement rate currently stands at 65% (FY12), based on
positive respondents vs. total completers. We believe in strong placement rates, and have
placed emphasis in the “Master Plan” on maintaining excellence by achieving placement
rates at a level at or among the top 25% of peer institutions.
ATC Placement Trend
4,500
4,000
3,500
3,000
2,500
2,000
1,500
1,000
500
-
3,837
3,960
3,816
3,859
3,175
Completer
2,783
2,161
FY 2008
FY 2009
2,485
FY 2010
2,350
2,493
FY 2011
FY 2012
Total Positive
Placement
17. What is the average wage of your graduates? –
We offer variety of programs, and our goal is to attract, retain, complete and place students
into employment in their field. Salary ranges can vary greatly depending on the program, and
examples based on the Colorado Department of Labor Occupational Handbook have been
included below:
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Program
HVAC
Practical Nursing
Cosmetology
Automotive Technician
Entry level
$
$
$
$
Example Wages
Experienced
14.69 $
26.75
17.31 $
23.61
9.17 $
14.56
10.43 $
22.34
18. If a graduate has a difficult time finding employment, what resources are available to him /
her through your institution of higher education to find a job? What are the success rates of
this effort?
For Emily Griffith, we are currently establishing a system to have students report to us if they
are having difficulty finding employment so we can provide assistance. For Pickens, we
currently have instructors, administrators and advisory board members collaborate to assist
with individual job placement needs along with our academic advisors. We are currently
researching the possibility of hiring a full time job placement internship coordinator for the
2014-2015 school year. In January of this year we will be hiring an adjunct to begin this
work.
19. What efforts is your institution undertaking to receive input from Colorado businesses to
prepare graduates that meet their workforce needs? How often do the Colorado businesses
that you work with actually hire your graduates?
Each instructional program has its own advisory committee made up of business and industry
representatives. We use the advisory groups to assist us with curriculum review as well as job
placement, internships etc….
Student Loans
20. What is the loan default rate of graduates of your institution? If high, what steps are you
taking to address it?
Currently, Delta-Montrose is the only Area Technical College that offers student loans. Their
official three (3) year default rate is 18.8%.
21. What is the average amount of time that it takes your graduates to repay their student loans?
Currently, Delta-Montrose is the only Area Technical College that offers student loans. Their
average payback is three (3) years, due to the small loan amount compared to 4 year
institutions.
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Performance: Persistence, Completion, Closing the Gap
22. Since the Lt. Governor announced the "Master Plan" for institutions of higher education,
please describe the following:
a. If applicable, has your institution of higher education reduced the amount
of time to credential their graduates? If applicable, has your institution of
higher education reduced the amount of time to receive a 2-year or 4-year
degree? Please distinguish percentages based on demographics,
underserved communities, gender, etc. – Not applicable
b. What is your institution of higher education doing to retain students?
What is your retention rate? Please distinguish percentages based on
demographics, underserved communities, gender, etc. – A majority of our
programs can be completed is less than 12 months. However, as part of
our performance plan metric, as submitted to CDHE, our goal is increase
persistence rates within certificate programs more than one semester in
length from Semester 1 to Semester 2.
c. Does your institution of higher education experience an attainment gap?
If so, what is the institution doing to remedy such issues? – Using
national data, we measure time to completion for our students against
national peer institutions. The peer data indicates positive performance
for the three Area Technical Colleges. Still, this is always a critical
issue, and something that must be constantly measured and monitored.
200% of normal time
150% of normal time
Peer Group
ATC
normal time
0%
20%
40%
60%
80%
100%
Graduation Rate
Pickens does experience the attainment gap; they have services in place
such as free and reduced lunch options and access to computers and
technology to students who do not have their own.
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ASSET
23. Last session, we passed Colorado Asset (S.B. 13-033) so that undocumented students are able
to receive in-state tuition. How many undocumented students is your institution of higher
education currently serving?
Emily Griffith currently has eighteen (18) students who have applied and been granted InState tuition/fees under the ASSET bill. Pickens currently have processed 23 applications,
and have another 3 pending.
ADDENDUM: OTHER QUESTIONS FOR WHICH SOLELY WRITTEN RESPONSES ARE REQUESTED
Department of Higher Education
1. Provide a list of any legislation that the Department has: (a) not implemented or (b) partially
implemented. Explain why the Department has not implement or has partially implemented
the legislation on this list.
Currently, there is no unimplemented legislation that impacts the Department.
2. Does the Department have any outstanding high priority recommendations as identified in the
"Annual Report of Audit Recommendations Not Fully Implemented" that was published by
the State Auditor's Office on June 30, 2013? What is the department doing to resolve the
outstanding high priority recommendations?
http://www.leg.state.co.us/OSA/coauditor1.nsf/All/D36AE0269626A00B87257BF30051FF84
/$FILE/1337S%20Annual%20Rec%20Database%20as%20of%2006302013.pdf
The Department has no outstanding audit recommendations. The recommendation identified
in the “Annual Report of Audit Recommendations Not Fully Implemented” as of June 30,
2013 has been implemented as fully as is practicable at this time. Specifically, the
recommendation pertains to fee-for-service contracts and better specifying what exactly is
being purchased through these contracts with the governing boards. The Department of
Higher Education has engaged with representatives from the Governing Boards in an
evolving conversation about Fee for Service contracts and the College Opportunity Fund
system in general. This conversation includes discussion of the accuracy and usefulness of the
Fee for Service contract categories and how to better represent what is being purchased by
the State in the contracts. However, due to the larger issues surrounding higher education
funding, namely TABOR Enterprise status, no final resolutions have, as yet, been determined.
The Department continues to evaluate the issue of Fee for Service contract categories as they
relate to the larger issue of the College Opportunity Fund and are being specifically
addressed through development of a performance based funding plan as required by 23-1108(1.9)(a)(II) C.R.S.
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In an effort to foster better transparency in the Fee for Service contract process, the
Department recently began posting all the contracts on its website along with a “key” that
breaks each down in a tabulated format. Please see the following link for more information:
http://highered.colorado.gov/Finance/Budget/FFS.html
3. Does the department pay annual licensing fees for its state professional employees? If so,
what professional employees does the department have and from what funding source(s) does
the department pay the licensing fees? If the department has professions that are required to
pay licensing fees and the department does not pay the fees, are the individual professional
employees responsible for paying the associated licensing fees?
The Department of Higher Education does not pay professional licensing fees for employees.
4. Does the department provide continuing education, or funds for continuing education, for
professionals within the department? If so, which professions does the department provide
continuing education for and how much does the department spend on that? If the department
has professions that require continuing education and the department does not pay for
continuing education, does the employee have to pay the associated costs?
The Department of Higher Education does not pay continuing education for employees.
5. During the hiring process, how often does the number one choice pick candidate turn down a
job offer from the department because the starting salary that is offered is not high enough?
The Department does not specifically track this data, but on occasion a candidate has turned
down the position due to compensation. However, since all posted positions contain
compensation ranges, the Department assumes that those for whom the ranges are not
adequate simply do not apply.
6. What is the turnover rate for staff in the department?
The Department of Personnel will provide a statewide report in response to this question
during the Department of Personnel's hearing with the Joint Budget Committee.
History Colorado
Department of Higher Education
Questions Common To All Departments
1. Please describe how the department responds to inquiries that are made to the department.
How does the department ensure that all inquiries receive a timely and accurate response?
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History Colorado is a public service agency that responds to inquiries in a number of ways.

Open records requests
Requests are coordinated through the Human Resources Office, which provides follow up
with the appropriate staff person in each program area to ensure that responses are
generated in a timely manner meeting all required deadlines. This could be the
designated agency ombudsman in the President’s Office who works with the Governor’s
Office to coordinate complaints or issues or phone calls received by the Governor’s
Office, Department of Higher Education, and directly from the general public.

Museum operations and historic research requests for information
Museum Operations staff receive many kinds of requests -- requests to donate objects;
requests for specific historic information; requests for resources from school teachers;
and requests from companies wanting to sell us any number of products, including
traveling exhibits. It is our policy to respond to all such requests as promptly as we
possibly can. Serving audiences -- teachers, potential donors, interested members of the
public -- is central to our mission. This service is at the heart of History Colorado’s
work.

State Historical Fund
General inquiries are fielded by a Grants Assistant who answers the question or who
transfers the question to a specialist. Detailed questions from potential grant recipients
are referred to Outreach Specialists who address issues either by phone, e-mail, or in
regional meetings. Questions directed to the office are typically answered immediately or
at least within a 24-hour period. Historic Preservation Specialists and Contracts
Specialists work in tandem on grants that have been awarded to address questions about
the grants they oversee. To ensure timely response, all inquiries are logged and a Gifts
database tracks the progress of awarded grants and associated correspondence.

Office of Archaeology and Historic Preservation (OAHP)
OAHP handles a wide variety of inquiries related to its many responsibilities. It
administers the state's responsibilities under the National Historic Preservation Act, the
state's statutes covering antiquities and unmarked human graves, issues concerning
preservation planning and tax credits, and an information management system that keeps
records on historic structures, districts, and archaeological sites in the state. The office
normally reviews about 3,000 projects a year and works with our federal, state, and
private partners to respond to all inquiries, typically within 5 to 10 days of receipt of a
letter. All correspondence must be addressed within a 30-day limit. Phone calls are
logged and typically answered either immediately or within a 24-hour period. A similar
response time is typical for e-mail. For data requests the response rate ranges from no
more than two hours for phone inquiries to two - five days for inquiries regarding data for
large survey areas or significant numbers of records. Reports of unmarked graves are
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addressed expeditiously and always within 24 to 48 hours of the report. The office has
professionals with a wide range of expertise so that questions about archaeology, historic
structures, tax credits, historic preservation, and information management can be
addressed promptly. All units keep records of their correspondence to ensure accurate
and timely responses.
ADDENDUM: OTHER QUESTIONS FOR WHICH SOLELY WRITTEN RESPONSES ARE REQUESTED
1. Provide a list of any legislation that the Department has: (a) not implemented or (b) partially
implemented. Explain why the Department has not implement or has partially implemented
the legislation on this list.
History Colorado has no outstanding legislative issues.
2. Does Department have any outstanding high priority recommendations as identified in the
"Annual Report of Audit Recommendations Not Fully Implemented" that was published by
the State Auditor's Office on June 30, 2013? What is the department doing to resolve the
outstanding high priority recommendations?
The outstanding issue is the Cash Funds Excess Uncommitted Reserves. CRS. 24-80-209 is
the statute that established this Fund. Fund 509 consists of earned revenue that is generated
at seven regional museums statewide and event revenue at the new History Colorado Center
in Denver. History Colorado has reported that the excess uncommitted reserve minus non-fee
and exempt fund balance is $38,800 as of July 1, 2013. History Colorado expended
$140,298 in excess uncommitted reserves in FY 2012-13. This was the first year of full
business operation of the new History Colorado Center. Its operations resulted in the growth
of non-exempt earned revenue. The growth of non-exempt revenue resulted in the excess
uncommitted reserve that was cited in the Audit Report. History Colorado financial staff
monitors the revenues, uncommitted cash reserves and expenditures monthly to ensure
compliance with the statute on uncommitted cash fund reserves. History Colorado intends to
have the fund balance in compliance with targeted fee reserve by the end of FY 2013-14.
3. Does the department pay annual licensing fees for its state professional employees? If so,
what professional employees does the department have and from what funding source(s) does
the department pay the licensing fees? If the department has professions that are required to
pay licensing fees and the department does not pay the fees, are the individual professional
employees responsible for paying the associated licensing fees?
There are no professional staff employed at History Colorado required to maintain
professional licenses.
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4. Does the department provide continuing education, or funds for continuing education, for
professionals within the department? If so, which professions does the department provide
continuing education for and how much does the department spend on that? If the department
has professions that require continuing education and the department does not pay for
continuing education, does the employee have to pay the associated costs?
History Colorado recognizes that the skills and knowledge of its employees are critical to the
success of the organization. The agency addresses staff development in two ways. One is
annual professional development through conferences and non-degree or non-certification
courses. These costs are annually budgeted within the department’s operational budget.
The other is a higher educational tuition assistance program intended to encourage
employees to improve job-related skills and to be in a position to advance within History
Colorado
.
Employees interested in educational tuition assistance must apply through their Division
supervisor. Approved applications are forwarded to the President and CEO. Final approval is
at the President and CEO’s discretion. All applications are subject to meeting requirements of
the program and availability of budgeted funds. Assistance is limited and employee match is
required with school and degree program performance requirements specified. All History
Colorado staff are eligible for the program. Last fiscal year (FY-13), the agency invested
$7,950.
5. During the hiring process, how often does the number one choice pick candidate turn down a
job offer from the department because the starting salary that is offered is not high enough?
It has not been the case that the number one candidate has turned down a job offer due to the
hiring salary. It is History Colorado’s practice to post the salary on the job announcement
and clearly communicate salary restrictions throughout the recruitment and selection process.
6. What is the turnover rate for staff in the department?
It is History Colorado’s understanding per coordination with DPA that DPA is providing the
turnover rate.
History Colorado
1. Submit in writing the approximate number of K-12 students that go through the history
museums throughout the state.
Performance
Measure
Participants in
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Outcome
Benchmark
FY11-12
Actual
33,000
FY12-13
Actual
62,000
224
FY13-14
Forecast
81,142
FY14-15
Forecast
83,756
Higher Education-hearing
K-12 Education
Programming
including on
site at the
museums, and
through
facilitated
outreach.
Number of
Districts served
through online
and on-site
outreach efforts:
179 districts
statewide
estimates
Actual
Benchmark
estimates
Actual
44,653
79,454
75
90
78
92
95
100
Institutional Reponses for Common Questions to All Departments (Written Response Only)
The Colorado Community College System
1. Provide a list of any legislation that the Department has: (a) not implemented or (b) partially
implemented. Explain why the Department has not implement or has partially implemented
the legislation on this list.
The State Board for Community Colleges and Occupational Education is in the process of
implementing SB 13-178 (Concerning Authorizing Red Rocks Community College to Offer a
Physician’s Assistant Studies Program as a Program of Graduate Education) and HB 131165 (Concerning the Creation of a Manufacturing Career Pathway for Colorado). Both of
these bills were passed last session and are being implemented in the timeframes outlined in
the legislation.
2. Does the Department have any outstanding high priority recommendations as identified in the
"Annual Report of Audit Recommendations Not Fully Implemented" that was published by
the State Auditor's Office on June 30, 2013? What is the department doing to resolve the
outstanding high priority recommendations?
As of December 1, 2013, there are no outstanding high priority recommendations for CCCS’s
colleges.
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3. Does the department pay annual licensing fees for its state professional employees? Please
refer to response to common question #4 below. If so, what professional employees does the
department have and from what funding source(s) does the department pay the licensing fees?
Please refer to response to common question #4 below. If the department has professions that
are required to pay licensing fees and the department does not pay the fees, are the individual
professional employees responsible for paying the associated licensing fees? Please refer to
response to common question #4 below.
4. Does the department provide continuing education, or funds for continuing education, for
professionals within the department?
CCCS makes continuing education and training available for its employees more broadly,
including professional employees. If so, which professions does the department provide
continuing education for and how much does the department spend on that? CCCS makes
continuing education and training available for its employees more broadly, including
professional employees. The amount spent on continuing education varies by program and
depends on a number of factors, most importantly availability of budget. If the department has
professions that require continuing education and the department does not pay for continuing
education, does the employee have to pay the associated costs? CCCS does not pay
specifically for required continuing education directly for professional certification/licensure.
However, if the continuing education and training agreed upon in an individual’s
training/development plan also yields credits toward renewal of professional
certification/licensure, then CCCS will pay for this continuing education as part of its
training/development plan.
5. During the hiring process, how often does the number one choice pick candidate turn down a
job offer from the department because the starting salary that is offered is not high enough?
For certain occupational groups, particularly in information technology and finance, this
does occur. However, we do not track this metric specifically.
6. What is the turnover rate for staff in the department?
For the System as a whole, the annual turnover rate is 11.4%
Colorado Mesa University
1. Provide a list of any legislation that the Department has: (a) not implemented or (b) partially
implemented. Explain why the Department has not implement or has partially implemented
the legislation on this list.
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No.
2. Does the Department have any outstanding high priority recommendations as identified in the
"Annual Report of Audit Recommendations Not Fully Implemented" that was published by
the State Auditor's Office on June 30, 2013? What is the department doing to resolve the
outstanding high priority recommendations?
No.
3. Does the department pay annual licensing fees for its state professional employees? If so,
what professional employees does the department have and from what funding source(s) does
the department pay the licensing fees? If the department has professions that are required to
pay licensing fees and the department does not pay the fees, are the individual professional
employees responsible for paying the associated licensing fees?
No, CMU does not.
4. Does the department provide continuing education, or funds for continuing education, for
professionals within the department? If so, which professions does the department provide
continuing education for and how much does the department spend on that? If the department
has professions that require continuing education and the department does not pay for
continuing education, does the employee have to pay the associated costs?
Yes, CMU offers a discounted tuition waiver for employees if studies are related to
professional development in their career ladder.
5. During the hiring process, how often does the number one choice pick candidate turn down a
job offer from the department because the starting salary that is offered is not high enough?
87% of the time the CMU first-choice applicant accepts the position.
University of Northern Colorado
1. Provide a list of any legislation that the Department has: (a) not implemented or (b) partially
implemented. Explain why the Department has not implement or has partially implemented
the legislation on this list.
UNC continues to work with the Department of Higher Education on appropriate implementation
of legislation related to remedial education, assessment for English and Math, and credit for
prior learning.
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2. Does Department have any outstanding high priority recommendations as identified in the
"Annual Report of Audit Recommendations Not Fully Implemented" that was published by
the State Auditor's Office on June 30, 2013? What is the department doing to resolve the
outstanding high priority recommendations?
The University of Northern Colorado (the University) has received six audit recommendations
since July 2008. The University agreed or partially agreed to implement all of the
recommendations.
Financial Audit Recommendations
As of June 30, 2013, the OSA’s follow-up audit process determined that all of the financial audit
recommendations that the University agreed or partially agreed to implement have been fully
implemented. In our 2012 Annual Report of Audit Recommendations Not Fully Implemented
(2012 Annual Report), the University had no outstanding financial audit recommendations.
3. Does the department pay annual licensing fees for its state professional employees? If so,
what professional employees does the department have and from what funding source(s) does
the department pay the licensing fees? If the department has professions that are required to
pay licensing fees and the department does not pay the fees, are the individual professional
employees responsible for paying the associated licensing fees?
UNC does not pay for employees’ professional licensure.
4. Does the department provide continuing education, or funds for continuing education, for
professionals within the department? If so, which professions does the department provide
continuing education for and how much does the department spend on that? If the department
has professions that require continuing education and the department does not pay for
continuing education, does the employee have to pay the associated costs?
Employees may use either a tuition waiver to attend a class that meets a continuing education
requirement, or they may attend a conference in support of UNC’s needs that incidentally also
meets this requirement for their licensure.
5. During the hiring process, how often does the number one choice pick candidate turn down a
job offer from the department because the starting salary that is offered is not high enough?
We don’t collect this data regularly. Anecdotally, we estimate this to be the case in about 25% of
our searches. Anecdotally we also see that potential candidates may choose not to apply because
of the starting salary.
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6. What is the turnover rate for staff in the department?
Total Turnover is 8%
Breakdown: 7% classified staff, 12% exempt staff, 7% Faculty
Colorado Mountain Colleges
1. Provide a list of any legislation that the Department has: (a) not implemented or (b) partially
implemented. Explain why the Department has not implement or has partially implemented
the legislation on this list.
Response:
Colorado Mountain College does not have any legislation that has not been implemented.
2. Does Department have any outstanding high priority recommendations as identified in the
"Annual Report of Audit Recommendations Not Fully Implemented" that was published by
the State Auditor's Office on June 30, 2013? What is the department doing to resolve the
outstanding high priority recommendations?
Response:
The State Auditor’s Office report does not apply to the Local District Colleges therefore
Colorado Mountain College does not have a response to this question.
3. Does the department pay annual licensing fees for its state professional employees? If so,
what professional employees does the department have and from what funding source(s) does
the department pay the licensing fees? If the department has professions that are required to
pay licensing fees and the department does not pay the fees, are the individual professional
employees responsible for paying the associated licensing fees?
Response:
If a professional license is required by the position it may be paid for by a department. It is
very dependent upon budget allocations from year to year and is left up to the budget officer
for the individual departments as to whether the cost is covered by the College or not.
4. Does the department provide continuing education, or funds for continuing education, for
professionals within the department? If so, which professions does the department provide
continuing education for and how much does the department spend on that? If the department
has professions that require continuing education and the department does not pay for
continuing education, does the employee have to pay the associated costs?
Response:
Colorado Mountain College provides funding for professional development or continuing
education for both faculty and staff. The College provides full time staff and faculty with 12
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free credit hours through CMC each semester and provides additional funding for courses
taken at other institutions through a tuition assistance benefit. Other professional
development funds, for conference attendance and other external education are allocated to
campus and department budgets and are awarded by supervisors. These funds have been
reduced in on-going base budgets of the College in recent years due to decreased revenues.
However, one-time funds have been made available for the last two years.
5. During the hiring process, how often does the number one choice pick candidate turn down a
job offer from the department because the starting salary that is offered is not high enough?
Response:
CMC does have candidates who turn down job offers due to salary however, steps have been
put in place which have decreased the frequency of this happening in recent past:
1. The hiring range is posted in the position advertising.
2. The HR department has discussions with the candidates during the hiring process
regarding the cost of living in the region. It is strongly recommended that they explore the
cost of housing, etc. prior to coming for an on-site interview.
3. Benefits (college contributions included) are discussed in depth so that candidates
understand the total compensation package.
6. What is the turnover rate for staff in the department?
Response:
Historically and on average, the turnover rate for Colorado Mountain College is 8-10%.
Area Vocational Schools
6. Provide a list of any legislation that the Department has: (a) not implemented or (b) partially
implemented. Explain why the Department has not implement or has partially implemented
the legislation on this list. Nothing outstanding as it pertains to the Area Technical Colleges.
7. Does Department have any outstanding high priority recommendations as identified in the
"Annual Report of Audit Recommendations Not Fully Implemented" that was published by
the State Auditor's Office on June 30, 2013? What is the department doing to resolve the
outstanding high priority recommendations?
We do not have any outstanding high priority recommendations as identified in the Annual
Report of Audit Recommendations.
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8. Does the department pay annual licensing fees for its state professional employees? If so,
what professional employees does the department have and from what funding source(s) does
the department pay the licensing fees? If the department has professions that are required to
pay licensing fees and the department does not pay the fees, are the individual professional
employees responsible for paying the associated licensing fees? – We do not pay any licensing
fees for our state professional employees. Given this, the employees are responsible for
paying these fees directly.
9. Does the department provide continuing education, or funds for continuing education, for
professionals within the department? If so, which professions does the department provide
continuing education for and how much does the department spend on that? If the department
has professions that require continuing education and the department does not pay for
continuing education, does the employee have to pay the associated costs?
We offer up to 6 credits of continuing education, offered exclusively at our schools, to our
employees. These credits can be used on any of our programs offered at the school, and
include any and all delivery methods. Employees must work more than 20 hours per week,
and are capped at 6 credits per year. For the Fiscal year 2013, the tuition waivers amounted
to $10,200.
10. During the hiring process, how often does the number one choice pick candidate turn down a
job offer from the department because the starting salary that is offered is not high enough?
- Using the past year as reference, since this data is not tracked by the institution, roughly
one (1) out of ten (10), or 10%, have turned down the position due to the salary not being
high enough.
11. What is the turnover rate for staff in the department?
Using the past year as a model, we saw staff attrition (all forms of attrition, including
voluntary and involuntary) of 6%.
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Colorado State University: Attachments A through D
SCHEDULE A
Colorado State University
Operations Costs
Schedule A
2000
Education & General
2001
%
2002
%
2003
%
2004
%
2005
%
2006
%
2007
%
2008
%
2009
%
2010
%
2011
%
2012
%
2013
%
2014 (Est)
21,570,396
23,616,139
26,540,607
26,175,542
24,950,479
24,980,290
31,067,894
37,049,407
33,342,447
33,173,208
31,876,872
35,163,212
36,037,559
37,792,907
37,762,083
Professional Veterinary Medicine
1,457,009
1,545,587
1,672,254
1,859,225
1,818,439
1,749,767
2,026,125
2,076,743
2,143,384
2,253,470
2,591,348
2,728,295
2,674,728
2,672,797
2,408,393
CSU Agencies
1,201,048
1,225,937
1,317,765
1,414,145
1,271,278
1,307,627
1,456,816
1,467,065
1,522,680
1,566,030
1,671,031
1,685,368
1,750,892
1,705,682
1,790,831
Total CSU
24,228,453
26,387,663 8.18% 29,530,626 10.64% 29,448,912 -0.28%
28,040,196 -5.02% 28,037,684 -0.01%
34,550,835 18.85%
40,593,215 14.89% 37,008,511
%
-9.69% 36,992,708 -0.04% 36,139,251 -2.36% 39,576,875 8.69% 40,463,179 2.19% 42,171,386 4.05% 41,961,307 -0.50%
Source: Budget Data Books
SCHEDULE B
Colorado State University
Administrative Support (Institutional Support)*
Schedule B
2000
2001
%
2002
%
2003
%
2004
%
2005
%
2006
%
2007
%
2008
%
2009
%
2010
%
2011
%
2012
%
2013
%
2014 (Est)
%
Education & General
Salaries
9,890,351
10,208,193
11,237,663
11,787,066
10,972,635
11,127,284
13,926,235
15,730,443
17,498,488
21,518,057
19,057,373
18,295,249
18,146,922
18,392,863
Travel
91,169
91,612
92,426
70,374
79,699
74,784
142,769
136,219
126,322
156,127
101,594
158,638
239,132
279,903
252,995
Other
3,701,384
3,346,230
3,659,670
3,623,049
3,133,320
3,482,845
4,063,728
4,211,123
10,033,722
10,679,140
8,135,763
8,164,075
7,966,828
8,003,607
8,100,571
Capital
20,356,241
901,931
326,282
298,998
377,288
239,125
298,930
625,925
419,945
659,791
324,487
229,199
170,240
56,131
131,454
11,806
14,584,835
13,972,317
15,288,757
15,857,777
14,424,779
14,983,843
18,758,657
20,497,730
28,318,323
32,677,811
27,523,929
26,788,202
26,409,013
26,807,827
28,721,613
Salaries
-
1,734
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
28,175
135,724
Travel
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
199
-
-
-
92
1,704
-
Other
1,164,858
1,213,831
1,256,082
1,346,384
1,163,219
1,343,511
1,407,854
1,430,568
1,450,789
1,493,607
1,532,371
1,541,702
1,663,785
1,650,842
1,433,710
Professional Veterinary Medicine
Capital
-
-
-
-
230,284
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1,164,858
1,215,565
1,256,082
1,346,384
1,393,503
1,343,511
1,407,854
1,430,568
1,450,988
1,493,607
1,532,371
1,541,702
1,663,877
1,680,721
1,569,434
Salaries
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Travel
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Other
1,082,883
1,114,287
1,158,859
1,213,325
1,236,378
1,249,978
1,249,978
1,276,229
1,322,174
1,360,518
1,401,334
1,406,939
1,433,671
1,469,513
1,523,885
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1,082,883
1,114,287
1,158,859
1,213,325
1,236,378
1,249,978
1,249,978
1,276,229
1,322,174
1,360,518
1,401,334
1,406,939
1,433,671
1,469,513
1,523,885
CSU Agencies:
Capital
Total CSU
16,832,576
16,302,169 -3.25%
17,703,698 7.92%
18,417,486 3.88%
17,054,660 -7.99%
17,577,332 2.97%
21,416,489 17.93%
23,204,527 7.71%
31,091,485 25.37%
35,531,936 12.50%
* Assumption was made that Administrative Support = Institutional Support Format 1600 of Budget Data Book (includes Human Resources, Business and Financial Services, Budget Office, External Relations, etc. )
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30,457,634 -16.66% 29,736,843 -2.42% 29,506,561 -0.78% 29,958,061 1.51% 31,814,932 5.84%
SCHEDULE C
Colorado State University
Student Tuition Increases vs. Salary Increases
Schedule C
FY00
FY01
FY02
FY03
FY04
FY05
FY06
FY07
FY08
FY09
FY10
FY11
FY12
FY13
FY14
Resident Undergraduate Tuition Rate*
2.4%
2.9%
4.0%
6.2%
9.53%
1.1%
15.0%
2.5%
5.0%
9.0%
9.0%
9.0%
20% 1
9.0%
9.0%
Nonresident Undergraduate Tuition Rate
2.4%
4.0%
5.0%
9.0%
12.2%
1.1%
6.0%
4.5%
16.6%
15.2%
3.0%
9.0%
20%
1
9.0%
3.0%
Resident Graduate Tuition Rate
2.4%
2.9%
3.9%
6.2%
9.5%
1.1%
9.0%
15.1%
15.0%
15.0%
15.0%
15.0%
7.5%
5.0%
5.0%
Nonresident Graduate Tuition Rate
2.4%
4.0%
4.9%
9.0%
12.2%
1.1%
6.0%
4.6%
5.0%
5.0%
5.0%
5.0%
3.0%
5.0%
5.0%
Faculty/Administrative Salary Average Increase
3.0%
4.0%
5.0%
5.0%
0.0%
2.0%
4.3%
3.0%
5.0%
5.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
3.0%
3.0%
State Classified Salary Average Increase
5.9%
6.1%
6.6%
6.6%
0.0%
3.1%
3.0%
3.1%
4.2%
4.3%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
3.5%
Graduate Assistant Stipend
3.0%
5.0%
5.0%
5.0%
0.0%
2.0%
4.3%
3.0%
5.0%
5.0%
0.0%
0.0%
0.0%
3.0%
3.0%
The Ratio of Student Tuition Increases in Comparison to Salary for Administration, Faculty and other Staff
2
Tuition (Incremental)
Salaries and Benefits (Incremental)
Ratio
FY13
13,667,000
6,613,000
2:1
FY14
15,030,500
9,794,000
1.5:1
*Resident Undergraduate Tuition Increase.
1
2
FY12 2 Student Credit Hour Closure = includes 2 credit hour closure for full-time from 10 to 12 credit hours for all undergraduates.
Includes incremental amount associated with RUG,NRUG,GR,GNR and PVM; doesn't include enrollment growth, discounts, differential tuition or program charges
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SCHEDULE D
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DEPARTMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION
FY 2014-15 JOINT BUDGET COMMITTEE HEARING AGENDA
Thursday, December 12, 2013
9:00 am – 5:00 pm
Legislative Services Building Hearing Room A
9:00-9:40
DEPARTMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION
Questions Common To All Departments
1. Please describe how the department responds to inquiries that are made to the department.
How does the department ensure that all inquiries receive a timely and accurate response?
Questions for the Department of Higher Education
Trends: Tuition, Enrollment, Performance
2. Compare increases in tuition between the early 2000s recession and most recent recession.
How did S.B. 10-003 impact tuition and institutions’ revenue in the most recent recession?
3. How did student enrollment growth compare during the last two recessions? Are populations
stabilizing or declining now that the recession is easing?
4. Is enrollment at some types of institutions more counter-cyclical than at others? Do
institutions that are more expensive lose students during recession because the students have
to pay more? Are there more students in school because there is less of a job market?
5.
[Background: The 2012 Master Plan includes a goal of 66 percent postsecondary credential
attainment for Colorado citizens aged 25-34 by 2025 (1,000 additional undergraduate
credentials per year).] How is this goal affected by the cyclical trends in higher education
enrollment? Did the Great Recession assist the state in moving toward this goal as people
stayed in school longer? Are improvements in the economy making it difficult to achieve this
goal and driving enrollment declines? Will getting additional degrees actually assist people to
get jobs that pay well upon graduation?
6. Have changes in the PELL affected enrollment? Do some institutions still allow students who
do not have high school diploma or GED to attend? How does that impact funding? How are
these students paying for these degrees? Do institutions do remedial education to help the
students get the GED so that they can qualify for the PELL grants?
7. Provide an update on graduation rates and how these compare across institutions. How do
retention rates and graduation at Mines compare to the rest of the system?
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Higher Education-hearing
8. How does Colorado rank nationally and regionally on the cost of higher education?
Financial Health of Public Higher Education Institutions:
9. Discuss the variations in institutional financial performance.
a) Is financial performance a problem for all small colleges?
b) How do the populations served by Adams and Western State differ from those
served by other institutions?
c) How do you explain the differences in performance between Mesa State and
Western State?
d) Why do you believe the community colleges are doing so well? Does the level of
funding provided by the state to community colleges help them to stay financially
strong?
10. Who is responsible if an institution defaults on its bonds? How can the State be financially
responsible if an institution is classified as an enterprise under TABOR?
11. Discuss CCHE’s role in reviewing requests for cash-funded capital projects, including
revenue-bond intercept projects. Does CCHE examine institutional debt load as part of its
review process for cash funded projects? If not, should it?
12. Are the financial problems facing higher education institutions an opportunity for paradigm
shift on how we do higher education in Colorado? How should the General Assembly
participate in planning for such changes?
Requested Increase for the Department of Higher Education - Tuition Restrictions
13. Given the Governor’s proposal, why not change statute to take the 9 percent tuition cap out
and put 6 percent in for FY 2014-15?
14. Please clarify what the institutions have agreed to with respect to capping tuition in FY 201415. Does this include fees?
15. Will institutions raise student fees because they are not increasing tuition as much?
16. Provide a ten-year history of fees by institution.
17. Should tuition flexibility be extended or allowed to sunset?
18. Would institutions’ agreements to guarantee a cap on tuition put a four-year guaranteed tuition
level in jeopardy in any way?
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Higher Education-hearing
Requested Increases - Financial Aid
19. Discuss the balance between merit-based and need-based aid. Is there a need for more meritbased aid?
20. What factors will CCHE consider in deciding how to allocate work-study grants? If we
already have programs in place, why reinvent the wheel? Should we have less of the merit
based grants and more of the work study grants?
21. Discuss the statutory authorization for financial aid transfers and provide a history of transfers
between different types of financial aid over the last five years.
22. Do you have a position on the staff recommendations to change financial aid statutes? Is there
a problem with how institutions are operating under the current statute? Do you believe this
could be done quickly or should it be delayed for more study?
Performance/Outcomes-based Funding
23. Review your proposal for tying performance to funding (due December 1, 2013, pursuant to
S.B. 11-052).
24. Do we really have to wait until all funds have been restored (to $706 million) to go to
performance-based funding?
25. Provide additional information on other states’ performance funding efforts. How do these
address the differences between different kinds of institutions?
Other
26. What is driving the requested increase for the DTAP program? Is it the number eligible for
the program or are costs actually increasing?
27. Why hasn’t the Department attempted to implement the COF as was originally intended?
28. What entity is responsible for building maintenance management for institutional properties?
Clarify the roles of the institutions, CCHE, and the State Architect.
29. What are institutional policies related to national merit scholars? Do they typically receive
merit-based aid or admissions preferences?
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9:40-10:10
WESTERN STATE COLORADO UNIVERSITY
Note: The JBC requests that trustees be present for the hearing
Financial Health of Institution
1. What is your plan to ensure there is long term financial health of your institution?
2. How do the areas you serve affect your performance? How does your situation compare with
Mesa State’s?
3. Review your recent construction projects. When will we know if your capital investments
have succeeded in drawing students?
4. Provide the schedule for anticipated increases in bond payments and/or student fees.
5. Are cost increases affecting enrollment?
6. If your institution is unable to cover its bond payments, who is responsible? Is it the State?
Do you foresee this happening? If so, when?
7. Is there interest in merging with other institutions of higher education in an effort to reduce
your fixed overhead costs?
Higher Education Funding Request and Options for Statutory Change
8. Please clarify your plans for tuition and fee increases in FY 2014-15.
9. How will low income students fare under your plan for FY 2014-15 tuition increases and
financial aid allocations?
10. Several years ago, the Colorado Legislature gave flexibility to institutions of higher education
to set your own tuition costs (S.B. 10-003). What is your opinion of this statute and is it time
for change?
11. What recommendations do you have for the Joint Budget Committee and the General
Assembly to make the funding for higher education more equitable across institutions?
12. How does your institution define “need based aid”, “merit based aid”, and “work study”? Do
you have a position on the staff recommendation to clarify financial aid statutes?
Tuition Increases: Cost Drivers
13. What does it cost you to educate a student? Is your tuition above or below that amount?
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Higher Education-hearing
14. If tuition were lowered would more students come? Would it increase overall revenues if
tuition were less? What is the breakeven point?
15. Since FY 2000, how have your operations costs increased and by what percentage? Please
describe reasons for operational cost increases.
16. For institutions of higher education that are in rural areas of the state, are there increased
operational costs? Please explain.
17. Since 2000, please provide a breakdown of your administrative costs and the percentage of
annual increases.
18. Please provide a breakdown of the salaries for administration positions, faculty, etc.
19. What is the percentage of full time faculty vs. adjunct faculty?
20. What is the ratio of students per faculty member at your institution of higher education?
21. What is the ratio of student tuition increases in comparison to salary for administration,
faculty and other staff?
22. How will the Affordable Care Act decrease health care costs for employees? Does your
institution of higher education anticipate long-term savings? If so, please explain.
Student Loans
23. What is the loan default rate of graduates of your institution? If high, what steps are you
taking to address it?
24. What is the average amount of time that it takes your graduates to repay their student loans?
Workforce Needs and Employment After Graduation
25. Please provide information regarding what your institution of higher education is currently
doing to ensure job placement.
26. Once students graduate from your institution of higher education, what is the percentage that
use their degree to find employment?
27. What is the average wage of your graduates?
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Higher Education-hearing
28. If a graduate has a difficult time finding employment, what resources are available to him /
her through your institution of higher education to find a job? What are the success rates of
this effort?
29. What efforts is your institution undertaking to receive input from Colorado businesses to
prepare graduates that meet their workforce needs? How often do the Colorado businesses that
you work with actually hire your graduates?
Performance: Persistence, Completion, Closing the Gap
30. Since the Lt. Governor announced the "Master Plan" for institutions of higher education,
please describe the following:
a. If applicable, has your institution of higher education reduced the amount
of time to credential their graduates? If applicable, has your institution of
higher education reduced the amount of time to receive a 2-year or 4-year
degree? Please distinguish percentages based on demographics,
underserved communities, gender, etc.
b. What is your institution of higher education doing to retain students?
What is your retention rate? Please distinguish percentages based on
demographics, underserved communities, gender, etc.
c. Does your institution of higher education experience an attainment gap?
If so, what is the institution doing to remedy such issues?
ASSET
31. Last session, we passed Colorado Asset (S.B. 13-033) so that undocumented students are able
to receive in-state tuition. How many undocumented students is your institution of higher
education currently serving?
10:10-10:50
COLORADO COMMUNITY COLLEGE SYSTEM
Higher Education Funding Request and Options for Statutory Change
1. Please clarify your plans for tuition and fee increases in FY 2014-15.
2. How will low income students fare under your plan for FY 2014-15 tuition increases and
financial aid allocations?
12-Dec-13
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Higher Education-hearing
3. Several years ago, the Colorado Legislature gave flexibility to institutions of higher education
to set your own tuition costs (S.B. 10-003). What is your opinion of this statute and is it time
for change?
4. What recommendations do you have for the Joint Budget Committee and the General
Assembly to make the funding for higher education more equitable across institutions?
5. How does your institution define “need based aid”, “merit based aid”, and “work study”? Do
you have a position on the staff recommendation to clarify financial aid statutes?
Financial Performance
6. Please provide composite financial index figures for each of your institutions. How do rural
campuses fare in comparison to urban ones?
Tuition Increases: Cost Drivers
7. What does it cost you to educate a student? Is your tuition above or below that amount?
8. If tuition were lowered would more students come? Would it increase overall revenues if
tuition were less? What is the breakeven point?
9. Since FY 2000, how have your operations costs increased and by what percentage? Please
describe reasons for operational cost increases.
10. For institutions of higher education that are in rural areas of the state, are there increased
operational costs? Please explain.
11. Since 2000, please provide a breakdown of your administrative costs and the percentage of
annual increases.
12. Please provide a breakdown of the salaries for administration positions, faculty, etc.
13. What is the percentage of full time faculty vs. adjunct faculty?
14. What is the ratio of students per faculty member at your institution of higher education?
15. What is the ratio of student tuition increases in comparison to salary for administration,
faculty and other staff?
16. How will the Affordable Care Act decrease health care costs for employees? Does your
institution of higher education anticipate long-term savings? If so, please explain.
12-Dec-13
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Higher Education-hearing
Workforce Needs and Employment After Graduation
17. Please provide information regarding what your institution of higher education is currently
doing to ensure job placement.
18. Once students graduate from your institution of higher education, what is the percentage that
use their degree to find employment?
19. What is the average wage of your graduates?
20. If a graduate has a difficult time finding employment, what resources are available to him /
her through your institution of higher education to find a job? What are the success rates of
this effort?
21. What efforts is your institution undertaking to receive input from Colorado businesses to
prepare graduates that meet their workforce needs? How often do the Colorado businesses that
you work with actually hire your graduates?
Student Loans
22. What is the loan default rate of graduates of your institution? If high, what steps are you
taking to address it?
23. What is the average amount of time that it takes your graduates to repay their student loans?
Performance: Persistence, Completion, Closing the Gap
24. Since the Lt. Governor announced the "Master Plan" for institutions of higher education,
please describe the following:
a. If applicable, has your institution of higher education reduced the amount
of time to credential their graduates? If applicable, has your institution of
higher education reduced the amount of time to receive a 2-year or 4-year
degree? Please distinguish percentages based on demographics,
underserved communities, gender, etc.
b. What is your institution of higher education doing to retain students?
What is your retention rate? Please distinguish percentages based on
demographics, underserved communities, gender, etc.
c. Does your institution of higher education experience an attainment gap?
If so, what is the institution doing to remedy such issues?
12-Dec-13
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Higher Education-hearing
ASSET
25. Last session, we passed Colorado Asset (S.B. 13-033) so that undocumented students are able
to receive in-state tuition. How many undocumented students is your institution of higher
education currently serving?
10:50-11:00
BREAK
11:00-11:20
COLORADO SCHOOL OF MINES
Higher Education Funding Request and Options for Statutory Change
1. Please clarify your plans for tuition and fee increases in FY 2014-15.
2. How will low income students fare under your plan for FY 2014-15 tuition increases and
financial aid allocations?
3. Several years ago, the Colorado Legislature gave flexibility to institutions of higher education
to set your own tuition costs (S.B. 10-003). What is your opinion of this statute and is it time
for change?
4. What recommendations do you have for the Joint Budget Committee and the General
Assembly to make the funding for higher education more equitable across institutions?
5. How does your institution define “need based aid”, “merit based aid”, and “work study”? Do
you have a position on the staff recommendation to clarify financial aid statutes?
Tuition Increases: Cost Drivers
6. What does it cost you to educate a student? Is your tuition above or below that amount?
7. If tuition were lowered would more students come? Would it increase overall revenues if
tuition were less? What is the breakeven point?
8. Since FY 2000, how have your operations costs increased and by what percentage? Please
describe reasons for operational cost increases.
9. Since 2000, please provide a breakdown of your administrative costs and the percentage of
annual increases.
10. Please provide a breakdown of the salaries for administration positions, faculty, etc.
11. What is the percentage of full time faculty vs. adjunct faculty?
12-Dec-13
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Higher Education-hearing
12. What is the ratio of students per faculty member at your institution of higher education?
13. What is the ratio of student tuition increases in comparison to salary for administration,
faculty and other staff?
14. How will the Affordable Care Act decrease health care costs for employees? Does your
institution of higher education anticipate long-term savings? If so, please explain.
Economic Impacts
15. How much General Fund does Mines receive compared to other schools? Compare this to
Mines’ output on economic development.
Workforce Needs and Employment After Graduation
16. Please provide information regarding what your institution of higher education is currently
doing to ensure job placement.
17. Once students graduate from your institution of higher education, what is the percentage that
use their degree to find employment?
18. What is the average wage of your graduates?
19. If a graduate has a difficult time finding employment, what resources are available to him /
her through your institution of higher education to find a job? What are the success rates of
this effort?
20. What efforts is your institution undertaking to receive input from Colorado businesses to
prepare graduates that meet their workforce needs? How often do the Colorado businesses that
you work with actually hire your graduates?
Student Loans
21. What is the loan default rate of graduates of your institution? If high, what steps are you
taking to address it?
22. What is the average amount of time that it takes your graduates to repay their student loans?
Performance: Persistence, Completion, Closing the Gap
23. Since the Lt. Governor announced the "Master Plan" for institutions of higher education,
please describe the following:
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10
Higher Education-hearing
a. If applicable, has your institution of higher education reduced the amount
of time to credential their graduates? If applicable, has your institution of
higher education reduced the amount of time to receive a 2-year or 4-year
degree? Please distinguish percentages based on demographics,
underserved communities, gender, etc.
b. What is your institution of higher education doing to retain students?
What is your retention rate? Please distinguish percentages based on
demographics, underserved communities, gender, etc.
c. Does your institution of higher education experience an attainment gap?
If so, what is the institution doing to remedy such issues?
ASSET
24. Last session, we passed Colorado Asset (S.B. 13-033) so that undocumented students are able
to receive in-state tuition. How many undocumented students is your institution of higher
education currently serving?
11:20-11:40
COLORADO MESA UNIVERSITY
Higher Education Funding Request and Options for Statutory Change
1. Please clarify your plans for tuition and fee increases in FY 2014-15.
2. [How will low income students fare under your plan for FY 2014-15 tuition increases and
financial aid allocations?
3. Several years ago, the Colorado Legislature gave flexibility to institutions of higher education
to set your own tuition costs (S.B. 10-003). What is your opinion of this statute and is it time
for change?
4. What recommendations do you have for the Joint Budget Committee and the General
Assembly to make the funding for higher education more equitable across institutions?
5. How does your institution define “need based aid”, “merit based aid”, and “work study”? Do
you have a position on the staff recommendation to clarify financial aid statutes?
Tuition Increases: Cost Drivers
6. What does it cost you to educate a student? Is your tuition above or below that amount?
12-Dec-13
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Higher Education-hearing
7. If tuition were lowered would more students come? Would it increase overall revenues if
tuition were less? What is the breakeven point?
8. Since FY 2000, how have your operations costs increased and by what percentage? Please
describe reasons for operational cost increases.
9. For institutions of higher education that are in rural areas of the state, are there increased
operational costs? Please explain.
10. Since 2000, please provide a breakdown of your administrative costs and the percentage of
annual increases.
11. Please provide a breakdown of the salaries for administration positions, faculty, etc.
12. What is the percentage of full time faculty vs. adjunct faculty?
13. What is the ratio of students per faculty member at your institution of higher education?
14. What is the ratio of student tuition increases in comparison to salary for administration,
faculty and other staff?
15. How will the Affordable Care Act decrease health care costs for employees? Does your
institution of higher education anticipate long-term savings? If so, please explain.
Workforce Needs and Employment After Graduation
16. Please provide information regarding what your institution of higher education is currently
doing to ensure job placement.
17. Once students graduate from your institution of higher education, what is the percentage that
use their degree to find employment?
18. What is the average wage of your graduates?
19. If a graduate has a difficult time finding employment, what resources are available to him /
her through your institution of higher education to find a job? What are the success rates of
this effort?
20. What efforts is your institution undertaking to receive input from Colorado businesses to
prepare graduates that meet their workforce needs? How often do the Colorado businesses that
you work with actually hire your graduates?
12-Dec-13
12
Higher Education-hearing
Student Loans
21. What is the loan default rate of graduates of your institution? If high, what steps are you
taking to address it?
22. What is the average amount of time that it takes your graduates to repay their student loans?
Performance: Persistence, Completion, Closing the Gap
23. Since the Lt. Governor announced the "Master Plan" for institutions of higher education,
please describe the following:
a. If applicable, has your institution of higher education reduced the amount
of time to credential their graduates? If applicable, has your institution of
higher education reduced the amount of time to receive a 2-year or 4-year
degree? Please distinguish percentages based on demographics,
underserved communities, gender, etc.
b. What is your institution of higher education doing to retain students?
What is your retention rate? Please distinguish percentages based on
demographics, underserved communities, gender, etc.
c. Does your institution of higher education experience an attainment gap?
If so, what is the institution doing to remedy such issues?
ASSET
24. Last session, we passed Colorado Asset (S.B. 13-033) so that undocumented students are able
to receive in-state tuition. How many undocumented students is your institution of higher
education currently serving?
11:40-12:00
UNIVERSITY OF NORTHERN COLORADO
Higher Education Funding Request and Options for Statutory Change
1. Please clarify your plans for tuition and fee increases in FY 2014-15.
2. [How will low income students fare under your plan for FY 2014-15 tuition increases and
financial aid allocations?
3. Several years ago, the Colorado Legislature gave flexibility to institutions of higher education
to set your own tuition costs (S.B. 10-003). What is your opinion of this statute and is it time
for change?
12-Dec-13
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Higher Education-hearing
4. What recommendations do you have for the Joint Budget Committee and the General
Assembly to make the funding for higher education more equitable across institutions?
5. How does your institution define “need based aid”, “merit based aid”, and “work study”? Do
you have a position on the staff recommendation to clarify financial aid statutes?
Tuition Increases: Cost Drivers
6. What does it cost you to educate a student? Is your tuition above or below that amount?
7. If tuition were lowered would more students come? Would it increase overall revenues if
tuition were less? What is the breakeven point?
8. Since FY 2000, how have your operations costs increased and by what percentage? Please
describe reasons for operational cost increases.
9. For institutions of higher education that are in rural areas of the state, are there increased
operational costs? Please explain.
10. Since 2000, please provide a breakdown of your administrative costs and the percentage of
annual increases.
11. Please provide a breakdown of the salaries for administration positions, faculty, etc.
12. What is the percentage of full time faculty vs. adjunct faculty?
13. What is the ratio of students per faculty member at your institution of higher education?
14. What is the ratio of student tuition increases in comparison to salary for administration,
faculty and other staff?
15. How will the Affordable Care Act decrease health care costs for employees? Does your
institution of higher education anticipate long-term savings? If so, please explain.
Workforce Needs and Employment After Graduation
16. Please provide information regarding what your institution of higher education is currently
doing to ensure job placement.
17. Once students graduate from your institution of higher education, what is the percentage that
use their degree to find employment?
12-Dec-13
14
Higher Education-hearing
18. What is the average wage of your graduates?
19. If a graduate has a difficult time finding employment, what resources are available to him /
her through your institution of higher education to find a job? What are the success rates of
this effort?
20. What efforts is your institution undertaking to receive input from Colorado businesses to
prepare graduates that meet their workforce needs? How often do the Colorado businesses that
you work with actually hire your graduates?
Student Loans
21. What is the loan default rate of graduates of your institution? If high, what steps are you
taking to address it?
22. What is the average amount of time that it takes your graduates to repay their student loans?
Performance: Persistence, Completion, Closing the Gap
23. Since the Lt. Governor announced the "Master Plan" for institutions of higher education,
please describe the following:
a. If applicable, has your institution of higher education reduced the amount
of time to credential their graduates? If applicable, has your institution of
higher education reduced the amount of time to receive a 2-year or 4-year
degree? Please distinguish percentages based on demographics,
underserved communities, gender, etc.
b. What is your institution of higher education doing to retain students?
What is your retention rate? Please distinguish percentages based on
demographics, underserved communities, gender, etc.
c. Does your institution of higher education experience an attainment gap?
If so, what is the institution doing to remedy such issues?
12-Dec-13
15
Higher Education-hearing
ASSET
24. Last session, we passed Colorado Asset (S.B. 13-033) so that undocumented students are able
to receive in-state tuition. How many undocumented students is your institution of higher
education currently serving?
12:00-1:30
LUNCH
1:30-1:50
METROPOLITAN STATE UNIVERSITY OF DENVER
Higher Education Funding Request and Options for Statutory Change
1. Please clarify your plans for tuition and fee increases in FY 2014-15.
2. How will low income students fare under your plan for FY 2014-15 tuition increases and
financial aid allocations?
3. Several years ago, the Colorado Legislature gave flexibility to institutions of higher education
to set your own tuition costs (S.B. 10-003). What is your opinion of this statute and is it time
for change?
4. What recommendations do you have for the Joint Budget Committee and the General
Assembly to make the funding for higher education more equitable across institutions?
5. How does your institution define “need based aid”, “merit based aid”, and “work study”? Do
you have a position on the staff recommendation to clarify financial aid statutes?
Tuition Increases: Cost Drivers
6. What does it cost you to educate a student? Is your tuition above or below that amount?
7. If tuition were lowered would more students come? Would it increase overall revenues if
tuition were less? What is the breakeven point?
8. Since FY 2000, how have your operations costs increased and by what percentage? Please
describe reasons for operational cost increases.
9. Since 2000, please provide a breakdown of your administrative costs and the percentage of
annual increases.
10. Please provide a breakdown of the salaries for administration positions, faculty, etc.
11. What is the percentage of full time faculty vs. adjunct faculty?
12-Dec-13
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Higher Education-hearing
12. What is the ratio of students per faculty member at your institution of higher education?
13. What is the ratio of student tuition increases in comparison to salary for administration,
faculty and other staff?
14. How will the Affordable Care Act decrease health care costs for employees? Does your
institution of higher education anticipate long-term savings? If so, please explain.
Workforce Needs and Employment After Graduation
15. Please provide information regarding what your institution of higher education is currently
doing to ensure job placement.
16. Once students graduate from your institution of higher education, what is the percentage that
use their degree to find employment?
17. What is the average wage of your graduates?
18. If a graduate has a difficult time finding employment, what resources are available to him /
her through your institution of higher education to find a job? What are the success rates of
this effort?
19. What efforts is your institution undertaking to receive input from Colorado businesses to
prepare graduates that meet their workforce needs? How often do the Colorado businesses that
you work with actually hire your graduates?
Student Loans
20. What is the loan default rate of graduates of your institution? If high, what steps are you
taking to address it?
21. What is the average amount of time that it takes your graduates to repay their student loans?
Performance: Persistence, Completion, Closing the Gap
22. Since the Lt. Governor announced the "Master Plan" for institutions of higher education,
please describe the following:
a. If applicable, has your institution of higher education reduced the amount
of time to credential their graduates? If applicable, has your institution of
higher education reduced the amount of time to receive a 2-year or 4-year
12-Dec-13
17
Higher Education-hearing
degree? Please distinguish percentages based on demographics,
underserved communities, gender, etc.
b. What is your institution of higher education doing to retain students?
What is your retention rate? Please distinguish percentages based on
demographics, underserved communities, gender, etc.
c. Does your institution of higher education experience an attainment gap?
If so, what is the institution doing to remedy such issues?
ASSET
23. Last session, we passed Colorado Asset (S.B. 13-033) so that undocumented students are able
to receive in-state tuition. How many undocumented students is your institution of higher
education currently serving?
1:50-2:20
ADAMS STATE UNIVERSITY
Note: The JBC requests that trustees be present for the hearing
Financial Health of Institution
1. What is your plan to ensure there is long term financial health of your institution?
2. How do the areas you serve affect your performance? How does your situation compare with
Mesa State’s?
3. Review your recent construction projects. When will we know if your capital investments
have succeeded in drawing students?
4. Provide the schedule for anticipated increases in bond payments and/or student fees.
5. Are cost increases affecting enrollment?
6. If your institution is unable to cover its bond payments, who is responsible? Is it the State?
Do you foresee this happening? If so, when?
7. Is there interest in merging with other institutions of higher education in an effort to reduce
your fixed overhead costs?
Higher Education Funding Request and Options for Statutory Change
8. Please clarify your plans for tuition and fee increases in FY 2014-15.
12-Dec-13
18
Higher Education-hearing
9. How will low income students fare under your plan for FY 2014-15 tuition increases and
financial aid allocations?
10. Several years ago, the Colorado Legislature gave flexibility to institutions of higher education
to set your own tuition costs (S.B. 10-003). What is your opinion of this statute and is it time
for change?
11. What recommendations do you have for the Joint Budget Committee and the General
Assembly to make the funding for higher education more equitable across institutions?
12. How does your institution define “need based aid”, “merit based aid”, and “work study”? Do
you have a position on the staff recommendation to clarify financial aid statutes?
Tuition Increases: Cost Drivers
13. What does it cost you to educate a student? Is your tuition above or below that amount?
14. If tuition were lowered would more students come? Would it increase overall revenues if
tuition were less? What is the breakeven point?
15. Since FY 2000, how have your operations costs increased and by what percentage? Please
describe reasons for operational cost increases.
16. For institutions of higher education that are in rural areas of the state, are there increased
operational costs? Please explain.
17. Since 2000, please provide a breakdown of your administrative costs and the percentage of
annual increases.
18. Please provide a breakdown of the salaries for administration positions, faculty, etc.
19. What is the percentage of full time faculty vs. adjunct faculty?
20. What is the ratio of students per faculty member at your institution of higher education?
21. What is the ratio of student tuition increases in comparison to salary for administration,
faculty and other staff?
22. How will the Affordable Care Act decrease health care costs for employees? Does your
institution of higher education anticipate long-term savings? If so, please explain.
12-Dec-13
19
Higher Education-hearing
Student Loans
23. What is the loan default rate of graduates of your institution? If high, what steps are you
taking to address it?
24. What is the average amount of time that it takes your graduates to repay their student loans?
Workforce Needs and Employment After Graduation
25. Please provide information regarding what your institution of higher education is currently
doing to ensure job placement.
26. Once students graduate from your institution of higher education, what is the percentage that
use their degree to find employment?
27. What is the average wage of your graduates?
28. If a graduate has a difficult time finding employment, what resources are available to him /
her through your institution of higher education to find a job? What are the success rates of
this effort?
29. What efforts is your institution undertaking to receive input from Colorado businesses to
prepare graduates that meet their workforce needs? How often do the Colorado businesses that
you work with actually hire your graduates?
Performance: Persistence, Completion, Closing the Gap
30. Since the Lt. Governor announced the "Master Plan" for institutions of higher education,
please describe the following:
a. If applicable, has your institution of higher education reduced the amount
of time to credential their graduates? If applicable, has your institution of
higher education reduced the amount of time to receive a 2-year or 4-year
degree? Please distinguish percentages based on demographics,
underserved communities, gender, etc.
b. What is your institution of higher education doing to retain students?
What is your retention rate? Please distinguish percentages based on
demographics, underserved communities, gender, etc.
c. Does your institution of higher education experience an attainment gap?
If so, what is the institution doing to remedy such issues?
12-Dec-13
20
Higher Education-hearing
ASSET
31. Last session, we passed Colorado Asset (S.B. 13-033) so that undocumented students are able
to receive in-state tuition. How many undocumented students is your institution of higher
education currently serving?
2:20-3:00
COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY SYSTEM
Higher Education Funding Request and Options for Statutory Change
1. clarify your plans for tuition and fee increases in FY 2014-15.
2. How will low income students fare under your plan for FY 2014-15 tuition increases and
financial aid allocations?
3. Several years ago, the Colorado Legislature gave flexibility to institutions of higher education
to set your own tuition costs (S.B. 10-003). What is your opinion of this statute and is it time
for change?
4. What recommendations do you have for the Joint Budget Committee and the General
Assembly to make the funding for higher education more equitable across institutions?
5. How does your institution define “need based aid”, “merit based aid”, and “work study”? Do
you have a position on the staff recommendation to clarify financial aid statutes?
Financial Performance
6. Please provide composite financial index figures for each of your institutions. How does CSU
Pueblo fare in comparison to Fort Collins?
Tuition Increases: Cost Drivers
7. What does it cost you to educate a student? Is your tuition above or below that amount?
8. If tuition were lowered would more students come? Would it increase overall revenues if
tuition were less? What is the breakeven point?
9. Since FY 2000, how have your operations costs increased and by what percentage? Please
describe reasons for operational cost increases.
10. For institutions of higher education that are in rural areas of the state, are there increased
operational costs? Please explain.
12-Dec-13
21
Higher Education-hearing
11. Since 2000, please provide a breakdown of your administrative costs and the percentage of
annual increases.
12. Please provide a breakdown of the salaries for administration positions, faculty, etc.
13. What is the percentage of full time faculty vs. adjunct faculty?
14. What is the ratio of students per faculty member at your institution of higher education?
15. What is the ratio of student tuition increases in comparison to salary for administration,
faculty and other staff?
16. How will the Affordable Care Act decrease health care costs for employees? Does your
institution of higher education anticipate long-term savings? If so, please explain.
Workforce Needs and Employment After Graduation
17. Please provide information regarding what your institution of higher education is currently
doing to ensure job placement.
18. Once students graduate from your institution of higher education, what is the percentage that
use their degree to find employment?
19. What is the average wage of your graduates?
20. If a graduate has a difficult time finding employment, what resources are available to him /
her through your institution of higher education to find a job? What are the success rates of
this effort?
21. What efforts is your institution undertaking to receive input from Colorado businesses to
prepare graduates that meet their workforce needs? How often do the Colorado businesses that
you work with actually hire your graduates?
Student Loans
22. What is the loan default rate of graduates of your institution? If high, what steps are you
taking to address it?
23. What is the average amount of time that it takes your graduates to repay their student loans?
12-Dec-13
22
Higher Education-hearing
Performance: Persistence, Completion, Closing the Gap
24. Since the Lt. Governor announced the "Master Plan" for institutions of higher education,
please describe the following:
a. If applicable, has your institution of higher education reduced the amount
of time to credential their graduates? If applicable, has your institution of
higher education reduced the amount of time to receive a 2-year or 4-year
degree? Please distinguish percentages based on demographics,
underserved communities, gender, etc.
b. What is your institution of higher education doing to retain students?
What is your retention rate? Please distinguish percentages based on
demographics, underserved communities, gender, etc.
c. Does your institution of higher education experience an attainment gap?
If so, what is the institution doing to remedy such issues?
ASSET
25. Last session, we passed Colorado Asset (S.B. 13-033) so that undocumented students are able
to receive in-state tuition. How many undocumented students is your institution of higher
education currently serving?
3:00-3:10
BREAK
3:10-3:30
FORT LEWIS COLLEGE
Higher Education Funding Request and Options for Statutory Change
1. Please clarify your plans for tuition and fee increases in FY 2014-15.
2. How will low income students fare under your plan for FY 2014-15 tuition increases and
financial aid allocations?
3. Several years ago, the Colorado Legislature gave flexibility to institutions of higher education
to set your own tuition costs (S.B. 10-003). What is your opinion of this statute and is it time
for change?
4. What recommendations do you have for the Joint Budget Committee and the General
Assembly to make the funding for higher education more equitable across institutions?
12-Dec-13
23
Higher Education-hearing
5. How does your institution define “need based aid”, “merit based aid”, and “work study”? Do
you have a position on the staff recommendation to clarify financial aid statutes?
Native American Tuition Waiver
6. Provide an update on your efforts to get federal changes related to the Waiver requirement.
Tuition Increases: Cost Drivers
7. What does it cost you to educate a student? Is your tuition above or below that amount?
8. If tuition were lowered would more students come? Would it increase overall revenues if
tuition were less? What is the breakeven point?
9. Since FY 2000, how have your operations costs increased and by what percentage? Please
describe reasons for operational cost increases.
10. For institutions of higher education that are in rural areas of the state, are there increased
operational costs? Please explain.
11. Since 2000, please provide a breakdown of your administrative costs and the percentage of
annual increases.
12. Please provide a breakdown of the salaries for administration positions, faculty, etc.
13. What is the percentage of full time faculty vs. adjunct faculty?
14. What is the ratio of students per faculty member at your institution of higher education?
15. What is the ratio of student tuition increases in comparison to salary for administration,
faculty and other staff?
16. How will the Affordable Care Act decrease health care costs for employees? Does your
institution of higher education anticipate long-term savings? If so, please explain.
Student Loans
17. What is the loan default rate of graduates of your institution? If high, what steps are you
taking to address it?
18. What is the average amount of time that it takes your graduates to repay their student loans?
12-Dec-13
24
Higher Education-hearing
Workforce Needs and Employment After Graduation
19. Please provide information regarding what your institution of higher education is currently
doing to ensure job placement.
20. Once students graduate from your institution of higher education, what is the percentage that
use their degree to find employment?
21. What is the average wage of your graduates?
22. If a graduate has a difficult time finding employment, what resources are available to him /
her through your institution of higher education to find a job? What are the success rates of
this effort?
23. What efforts is your institution undertaking to receive input from Colorado businesses to
prepare graduates that meet their workforce needs? How often do the Colorado businesses that
you work with actually hire your graduates?
Performance: Persistence, Completion, Closing the Gap
24. Since the Lt. Governor announced the "Master Plan" for institutions of higher education,
please describe the following:
a. If applicable, has your institution of higher education reduced the amount
of time to credential their graduates? If applicable, has your institution of
higher education reduced the amount of time to receive a 2-year or 4-year
degree? Please distinguish percentages based on demographics,
underserved communities, gender, etc.
b. What is your institution of higher education doing to retain students?
What is your retention rate? Please distinguish percentages based on
demographics, underserved communities, gender, etc.
c. Does your institution of higher education experience an attainment gap?
If so, what is the institution doing to remedy such issues?
ASSET
25. Last session, we passed Colorado Asset (S.B. 13-033) so that undocumented students are able
to receive in-state tuition. How many undocumented students is your institution of higher
education currently serving?
12-Dec-13
25
Higher Education-hearing
3:30-4:10
UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO SYSTEM
Higher Education Funding Request and Options for Statutory Change
1. Please clarify your plans for tuition and fee increases in FY 2014-15.
2. How will low income students fare under your plan for FY 2014-15 tuition increases and
financial aid allocations?
3. Several years ago, the Colorado Legislature gave flexibility to institutions of higher education
to set your own tuition costs (S.B. 10-003). What is your opinion of this statute and is it time
for change?
4. What recommendations do you have for the Joint Budget Committee and the General
Assembly to make the funding for higher education more equitable across institutions?
5. How does your institution define “need based aid”, “merit based aid”, and “work study”? Do
you have a position on the staff recommendation to clarify financial aid statutes?
Financial Performance
6. Please provide composite financial index figures for each of your institutions.
Tuition Increases: Cost Drivers
7. What does it cost you to educate a student? Is your tuition above or below that amount?
8. If tuition were lowered would more students come? Would it increase overall revenues if
tuition were less? What is the breakeven point?
9. Since FY 2000, how have your operations costs increased and by what percentage? Please
describe reasons for operational cost increases.
10. Since 2000, please provide a breakdown of your administrative costs and the percentage of
annual increases.
11. Please provide a breakdown of the salaries for administration positions, faculty, etc.
12. What is the percentage of full time faculty vs. adjunct faculty?
13. What is the ratio of students per faculty member at your institution of higher education?
12-Dec-13
26
Higher Education-hearing
14. What is the ratio of student tuition increases in comparison to salary for administration,
faculty and other staff?
15. How will the Affordable Care Act decrease health care costs for employees? Does your
institution of higher education anticipate long-term savings? If so, please explain.
Workforce Needs and Employment After Graduation
16. Please provide information regarding what your institution of higher education is currently
doing to ensure job placement.
17. Once students graduate from your institution of higher education, what is the percentage that
use their degree to find employment?
18. What is the average wage of your graduates?
19. If a graduate has a difficult time finding employment, what resources are available to him /
her through your institution of higher education to find a job? What are the success rates of
this effort?
20. What efforts is your institution undertaking to receive input from Colorado businesses to
prepare graduates that meet their workforce needs? How often do the Colorado businesses that
you work with actually hire your graduates?
Student Loans
21. What is the loan default rate of graduates of your institution? If high, what steps are you
taking to address it?
22. What is the average amount of time that it takes your graduates to repay their student loans?
Performance: Persistence, Completion, Closing the Gap
23. Since the Lt. Governor announced the "Master Plan" for institutions of higher education,
please describe the following:
a. If applicable, has your institution of higher education reduced the amount
of time to credential their graduates? If applicable, has your institution of
higher education reduced the amount of time to receive a 2-year or 4-year
degree? Please distinguish percentages based on demographics,
underserved communities, gender, etc.
12-Dec-13
27
Higher Education-hearing
b. What is your institution of higher education doing to retain students?
What is your retention rate? Please distinguish percentages based on
demographics, underserved communities, gender, etc.
c. Does your institution of higher education experience an attainment gap?
If so, what is the institution doing to remedy such issues?
ASSET
24. Last session, we passed Colorado Asset (S.B. 13-033) so that undocumented students are able
to receive in-state tuition. How many undocumented students is your institution of higher
education currently serving?
4:10-4:40
LOCAL DISTRICT JUNIOR COLLEGES
Higher Education Funding Request and Options for Statutory Change
1. Please clarify your plans for tuition and fee increases in FY 2014-15.
2. How will low income students fare under your plan for FY 2014-15 tuition increases and
financial aid allocations?
3. What recommendations do you have for the Joint Budget Committee and the General
Assembly to make the funding for higher education more equitable across institutions?
4. How does your institution define “need based aid”, “merit based aid”, and “work study”? Do
you have a position on the staff recommendation to clarify financial aid statutes?
Tuition Increases: Cost Drivers
5. What does it cost you to educate a student? Is your tuition above or below that amount?
6. If tuition were lowered would more students come? Would it increase overall revenues if
tuition were less? What is the breakeven point?
7. Since FY 2000, how have your operations costs increased and by what percentage? Please
describe reasons for operational cost increases.
8. For institutions of higher education that are in rural areas of the state, are there increased
operational costs? Please explain.
9. Since 2000, please provide a breakdown of your administrative costs and the percentage of
annual increases.
12-Dec-13
28
Higher Education-hearing
10. Please provide a breakdown of the salaries for administration positions, faculty, etc.
11. What is the percentage of full time faculty vs. adjunct faculty?
12. What is the ratio of students per faculty member at your institution of higher education?
13. What is the ratio of student tuition increases in comparison to salary for administration,
faculty and other staff?
14. How will the Affordable Care Act decrease health care costs for employees? Does your
institution of higher education anticipate long-term savings? If so, please explain.
Workforce Needs and Employment After Graduation
15. Please provide information regarding what your institution of higher education is currently
doing to ensure job placement.
16. Once students graduate from your institution of higher education, what is the percentage that
use their degree to find employment?
17. What is the average wage of your graduates?
18. If a graduate has a difficult time finding employment, what resources are available to him /
her through your institution of higher education to find a job? What are the success rates of
this effort?
19. What efforts is your institution undertaking to receive input from Colorado businesses to
prepare graduates that meet their workforce needs? How often do the Colorado businesses that
you work with actually hire your graduates?
Student Loans
20. What is the loan default rate of graduates of your institution? If high, what steps are you
taking to address it?
21. What is the average amount of time that it takes your graduates to repay their student loans?
Performance: Persistence, Completion, Closing the Gap
22. Since the Lt. Governor announced the "Master Plan" for institutions of higher education,
please describe the following:
12-Dec-13
29
Higher Education-hearing
a. If applicable, has your institution of higher education reduced the amount
of time to credential their graduates? If applicable, has your institution of
higher education reduced the amount of time to receive a 2-year or 4-year
degree? Please distinguish percentages based on demographics,
underserved communities, gender, etc.
b. What is your institution of higher education doing to retain students?
What is your retention rate? Please distinguish percentages based on
demographics, underserved communities, gender, etc.
c. Does your institution of higher education experience an attainment gap?
If so, what is the institution doing to remedy such issues?
ASSET
23. Last session, we passed Colorado Asset (S.B. 13-033) so that undocumented students are able
to receive in-state tuition. How many undocumented students is your institution of higher
education currently serving?
4:40-5:00
AREA VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS
Higher Education Funding Request and Options for Statutory Change
1. Please clarify your plans for tuition and fee increases in FY 2014-15.
2. How will low income students fare under your plan for FY 2014-15 tuition increases and
financial aid allocations?
3. What recommendations do you have for the Joint Budget Committee and the General
Assembly to make the funding for higher education more equitable across institutions?
4. How does your institution define “need based aid”, “merit based aid”, and “work study”? Do
you have a position on the staff recommendation to clarify financial aid statutes?
Tuition Increases: Cost Drivers
5. What does it cost you to educate a student? Is your tuition above or below that amount?
6. If tuition were lowered would more students come? Would it increase overall revenues if
tuition were less? What is the breakeven point?
7. Since FY 2000, how have your operations costs increased and by what percentage? Please
describe reasons for operational cost increases.
12-Dec-13
30
Higher Education-hearing
8. For institutions of higher education that are in rural areas of the state, are there increased
operational costs? Please explain.
9. Since 2000, please provide a breakdown of your administrative costs and the percentage of
annual increases.
10. Please provide a breakdown of the salaries for administration positions, faculty, etc.
11. What is the percentage of full time faculty vs. adjunct faculty?
12. What is the ratio of students per faculty member at your institution of higher education?
13. What is the ratio of student tuition increases in comparison to salary for administration,
faculty and other staff?
14. How will the Affordable Care Act decrease health care costs for employees? Does your
institution of higher education anticipate long-term savings? If so, please explain.
Workforce Needs and Employment After Graduation
15. Please provide information regarding what your institution of higher education is currently
doing to ensure job placement.
16. Once students graduate from your institution of higher education, what is the percentage that
use their degree to find employment?
17. What is the average wage of your graduates?
18. If a graduate has a difficult time finding employment, what resources are available to him /
her through your institution of higher education to find a job? What are the success rates of
this effort?
19. What efforts is your institution undertaking to receive input from Colorado businesses to
prepare graduates that meet their workforce needs? How often do the Colorado businesses that
you work with actually hire your graduates?
Student Loans
20. What is the loan default rate of graduates of your institution? If high, what steps are you
taking to address it?
12-Dec-13
31
Higher Education-hearing
21. What is the average amount of time that it takes your graduates to repay their student loans?
Performance: Persistence, Completion, Closing the Gap
22. Since the Lt. Governor announced the "Master Plan" for institutions of higher education,
please describe the following:
a. If applicable, has your institution of higher education reduced the amount
of time to credential their graduates? If applicable, has your institution of
higher education reduced the amount of time to receive a 2-year or 4-year
degree? Please distinguish percentages based on demographics,
underserved communities, gender, etc.
b. What is your institution of higher education doing to retain students?
What is your retention rate? Please distinguish percentages based on
demographics, underserved communities, gender, etc.
c. Does your institution of higher education experience an attainment gap?
If so, what is the institution doing to remedy such issues?
ASSET
23. Last session, we passed Colorado Asset (S.B. 13-033) so that undocumented students are able
to receive in-state tuition. How many undocumented students is your institution of higher
education currently serving?
ADDENDUM: OTHER QUESTIONS FOR WHICH SOLELY WRITTEN RESPONSES ARE REQUESTED
Department of Higher Education
1. Provide a list of any legislation that the Department has: (a) not implemented or (b) partially
implemented. Explain why the Department has not implement or has partially implemented
the legislation on this list.
2. Does Department have any outstanding high priority recommendations as identified in the
"Annual Report of Audit Recommendations Not Fully Implemented" that was published by
the State Auditor's Office on June 30, 2013? What is the department doing to resolve the
outstanding high priority recommendations?
http://www.leg.state.co.us/OSA/coauditor1.nsf/All/D36AE0269626A00B87257BF30051FF84
/$FILE/1337S%20Annual%20Rec%20Database%20as%20of%2006302013.pdf
3. Does the department pay annual licensing fees for its state professional employees? If so,
what professional employees does the department have and from what funding source(s) does
the department pay the licensing fees? If the department has professions that are required to
12-Dec-13
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Higher Education-hearing
pay licensing fees and the department does not pay the fees, are the individual professional
employees responsible for paying the associated licensing fees?
4. Does the department provide continuing education, or funds for continuing education, for
professionals within the department? If so, which professions does the department provide
continuing education for and how much does the department spend on that? If the department
has professions that require continuing education and the department does not pay for
continuing education, does the employee have to pay the associated costs?
5. During the hiring process, how often does the number one choice pick candidate turn down a
job offer from the department because the starting salary that is offered is not high enough?
6. What is the turnover rate for staff in the department?
History Colorado
1. Submit in writing the approximate number of k-12 students that go through the history
museums throughout the state.
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Higher Education-hearing
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