Adesso | NUSCAN 3200 series | Preliminary Design Report

Preliminary Design Report
Preliminary Design Report
(Shake and Bake)
Andrew Townsend
Ryan Johnson
Kara Tobey
Aldo Campos
Grant Arthur
Shake and Bake: Preliminary Design Report
October 12, 2011
Table of Contents
Background .................................................................................................................................3
Principles of Operation................................................................................................................4
System Description and Block Diagrams .....................................................................................5
Power Supply .......................................................................................................................7
User Interface.......................................................................................................................9
Control Unit ....................................................................................................................... 12
Dispensing Unit ................................................................................................................. 15
System Analysis ........................................................................................................................ 17
Extrusion Screw and Housing Design ................................................................................ 18
Motors and Gearing ........................................................................................................... 21
Program Design ................................................................................................................. 22
Project Plan ............................................................................................................................... 24
Organization and Management ........................................................................................... 25
Budget ............................................................................................................................... 26
Gantt Chart Fall 2011 ......................................................................................................... 27
Gantt Chart Spring 2012 .................................................................................................... 28
Pert Chart Fall 2011 ........................................................................................................... 29
Pert Chart Spring 2012 ....................................................................................................... 30
Work Breakdown Structure Fall 2011 ................................................................................ 30
Work Breakdown Structure Spring 2012 ............................................................................ 33
Appendix A: ............................................................................................................................. 36
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Shake and Bake: Preliminary Design Report
October 12, 2011
Background
Fresh-baked cookies, banana bread, and hot biscuits are integral to American culture.
Hundreds of such deserts, breads and pastries are made by household cooks every year, from
small children standing on chairs to the moms who help them stir to great-grandmothers who
have prepared such treats for several generations. Small-scale baking is a ubiquitous activity
which captures the attention of many. Every local coffee shop hides someone whipping up a
batch of blueberry scones in the back, and many small restaurants offer their own homemade
desserts.
The system of measuring out ingredients for such projects is a standard process that has
remained steadfast for generations. The process is simple, but time-consuming and messy.
Frequently, ingredients are spilled onto the countertop or floor during measuring. If a scoop
needs to be reused, it must be washed first in order to avoid contamination and all measuring
utensils must be washed again at the end of the process. This cleaning up is generally detested
by bakers, who would rather spend their time on other activities. Also, accuracy is sacrificed
when the baker is in a hurry and doesn’t have time for exact measurements.
A device capable of making accurate measurements without the need for cleanup would
make baking much more enjoyable for users. The Shake and Bake ingredient dispenser speeds
up and cleans up the baking process, allowing cooks to focus on other elements of their work,
rather than fussing with measurements. The machine’s functions greatly simplify the common
but inefficient process that includes opening containers, retrieving measuring utensils, measuring
out ingredients, cleaning up spills, closing containers, and washing utensils.
This device measures out dry ingredients common to baking in increments specified by
the user. In addition to delivering accurate quantities in a timely manner, it stores the ingredients
and keeps them fresh, dry and clean. It eliminates spills, the need to search for and wash
measuring cups and spoons, and the headache of maneuvering many different containers. Also,
the device can store previously used recipes and doesn’t forget how many cups it has measured
already, as cooks are notorious for doing. The ingredient dispenser generally creates a cleaner,
more efficient baking environment.
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Shake and Bake: Preliminary Design Report
October 12, 2011
Principles of Operation
The ingredient dispenser will store six different ingredients (flour, white sugar, brown
sugar, salt, baking soda, and baking powder) in sealed containers made of FDA-approved
materials. It will take input from the user, allowing measurements to be specified in cups,
tablespoons, teaspoons, or grams. It will then dispense the ingredients in amounts accurate to
within 5% of the user input. It will store at least five recipes in memory, allowing the user to
recall them instead of manually entering commonly used recipes repeatedly. The machine will
communicate with the user visually via a LCD screen.
The device will perform more quickly than a human measuring by hand (including
retrieving, using, washing and putting away necessary instruments). It will dispense one cup of
flour, white sugar, or brown sugar in 75 s or less and one tablespoon of salt, baking soda or
baking powder in 75 s or less. The containers will be easily detachable, making them easy to
clean. The finished structure will be easy to move and store, weighing no more than 15 kg when
empty, and having dimensions no more than 0.5 m wide by 1.0 m long. It will be no noisier than
other kitchen appliances, producing less than 90 dB at a distance of 1 m.
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Shake and Bake: Preliminary Design Report
October 12, 2011
System Description and Block Diagrams
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Shake and Bake: Preliminary Design Report
October 12, 2011
The ingredient dispenser consists of four primary subsystems: the power supply, the user
interface, the control unit, and the dispensing unit. The relationships between these four
components are shown in Fig. 1. The power supply provides electrical power to the other three
units. The user interface communicates with the user, receiving commands and providing
information about the dispensing status. The control unit determines the ingredient and the
amount of that ingredient to be dispensed. The dispensing unit transfers the ingredients out of
the unit for use by the user.
Figure 1: Level 1 Functional Block Diagram for Device
These four units are further decomposed in level 2 block diagrams on the following
pages. For all diagrams, the inputs and outputs for each unit are indicated with arrows. Dotted
lines represent a signal, solid lines represent power, and bold lines represent materials.
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Power Supply
The power supply converts a 120 V AC signal from a standard home wall socket into a
12 V DC signal. It then steps this voltage down to the amounts required by the various electrical
units used in the device. The power is supplied to the microprocessor, memory, keypad, scanner,
screen, sensors and motors. The power supply will be purchased or built to meet requirements.
The level 2 block diagram for the power supply is shown in Fig. 2. This diagram includes the
components that will be needed if the power supply is built.
Input
120 V AC from wall
Output
5 V DC, 45 mA to microprocessor
5 V DC, 3 mA to memory
5 V DC, 45 mA to keypad
5 V DC, 25-80 mA to scanner
3.3 V DC, 8.6 mA to LCD screen for logic
12 V DC, 20 mA to LCD screen for backlight
5 V DC, 2 mA to each sensor
12 V DC, 82 mA to each motor
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Shake and Bake: Preliminary Design Report
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Figure 2: Level 2 Functional Block Diagram for Power Supply
AC Voltage Step Down
This component drops the incoming 120 V AC to 20 V AC.
Rectification
Diodes are used to rectify the AC signal.
Filter to Remove Ripple
A filter is used to stabilize the signal, creating a steady output.
DC Step Down
Three DC step down components reduce the 20 V to the voltages required by the various
components that are powered by the power supply. The voltage is first stepped down to 12 V,
which is used to power the motors and the screen backlight. It is then stepped down to 5 V,
which is used to power the microprocessor, memory, sensors, keypad and scanner. Finally, the
voltage is stepped down to 3.3 V, which is used to power the screen logic.
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User Interface
The user interface is the system through which the device communicates with the user,
prompting the user for input, receiving commands, and providing information about the
dispenser’s status. It consists of a keypad, barcode scanner, on/off switch, and LCD screen. The
level 2 block diagram for the user interface is show in Fig. 3.
Figure 3: Level 2 Functional Block Diagram for User Interface
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Keypad
The keypad takes input from the user, who chooses the desired ingredient and
measurement combinations, which are then sent to the microprocessor.
Input
Power 5 V DC, .5 mA
Mechanical signal from user pushing keypad buttons
Output
Digital signal to microprocessor 0-5 V DC, 0.5 mA
Scanner
The scanner reads barcodes that contain recipes (combinations of ingredients and their
corresponding measurements) and sends this information to the microprocessor.
Input
Power 5 V DC, 25-80 mA
Values encoded in barcode provided by user
Output
Digital signal to microprocessor 0-5 V DC, 0.5 mA
Switch
A mechanically operated switch is the means by which the user tells the device to begin
dispensing. Each container has its own switch which, when engaged, connects the corresponding
motor to the power supply. If the microprocessor has sent a signal to the motor at this point,
engaging the switch will cause the motor to begin rotating.
Input
Power 12 V, 82 mA
Mechanical manipulation by user
Output
12 V, 82 mA to motor (each)
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LCD Screen
An LCD screen outputs information from the microprocessor to the user. The screen is
used to interact with the user and provides information about which containers are currently
programmed, what measurements have been entered, and which recipes are stored.
Input
Power 3.3 V, 8.6 mA
Power 3.3 V, 20 mA
Digital signal from microprocessor 0-5 V DC, 0.5 mA
Output
Visual output to user
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Control Unit
The control unit consists of the microprocessor, memory and sensors. The control unit
controls and monitors the dispensing process. It gathers information about the container weights
from the sensors, sends information to and retrieves information from the user interface, and
signals the motors to turn on or off. The level 2 block diagram for the control unit is shown in
Fig. 4.
Figure 4: Level 2 Functional Block Diagram for Control Unit
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Microprocessor
The microprocessor takes information from the user via the keypad and scanner. It
controls which containers dispense and how much ingredient they dispense based on user input.
The microprocessor controls dispensing by engaging and disengaging the motors. It gathers
information about the containers through the force sensors, monitoring the amount of ingredient
in a container throughout the dispensing process. The microprocessor communicates to the user
with a screen.
Input
Power 5 V DC, 45 mA
Analog signals from sensors 0-2 V DC, 0.5 mA
Digital signal from keypad 0-5 V DC, 0.5 mA
Digital signal from scanner 0-5 V DC, 0.5 mA
Digital signal from memory 0-5 V DC, 3 mA
Output
Digital signal to motor 0-5 V, 0.5 mA (each)
Digital signal to LCD screen 0-5 V, 0.5 mA
Digital signal to memory 0-5 V, 0.5 mA
Memory
Memory, which may be internal or external to the microprocessor, stores combinations of
ingredients as recipes. This allows the user to recall and use stored recipes.
Input
Power 5 V DC, 3 mA
Digital signal from microprocessor 0-5 V DC, 0.5 mA
Output
Digital signal to microprocessor 0-5 V DC, 3 mA
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Sensors
Force sensors measure the weight of each container and send this information to the
microprocessor, allowing the microprocessor to monitor the amounts of ingredients in each
container. During dispensing, the microprocessor uses the change in weight of a container to
determine how much of an ingredient has been dispensed.
Input
Power 5 V DC, 2 mA (each)
0-35 N force from containers
Output
Digital signal to microprocessor 0-5 V DC, 0.5 mA
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Dispensing Unit
The dispensing unit consists of the ingredient containers, dispensing mechanisms and
motors. This system holds the ingredients and uses mechanical power to move the ingredients
out of the containers. The level 2 block diagram for this unit is shown in Fig. 5. Descriptions of
each component follow.
Figure 5: Level 2 Functional Block Diagram for Dispensing Unit
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Containers
Six separate containers will be used to hold various ingredients. There are two different
container sizes. The three larger containers are designed to hold flour, white sugar, and brown
sugar. Three smaller containers hold salt, baking soda, and baking powder.
Input
Ingredients, from user
Output
Ingredients, to dispensing mechanism
0-35 N force, to sensors
Dispensing Mechanism
The dispensing mechanism is a mechanical assembly used to move ingredients out of the
containers and into a receptacle provided by the user. The main component is a threaded screw
which pushes the ingredient as it rotates. This screw is turned by a geared motor.
Input
Ingredients, from containers
Mechanical torque from motors
Output
Ingredients, to user
Motors
The motors mechanically power the dispensing mechanism. They are turned on and off
by the microprocessor when it receives instructions for a container. In addition, the motors will
take a signal from the user via the “dispense now” mechanism, engaging only when the user is
ready for dispensing.
Input
Power 12 V, 82 mA each (from switch)
Digital signal from microprocessor 0-5 V, 0.5 mA (each)
Output
Mechanical torque applied to dispensing mechanism
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System Analysis
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Shake and Bake: Preliminary Design Report
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Extrusion Screw and Housing Design
Table 1 displays the material densities gathered from a chart published on simetric.co.uk.
Using these densities, a rudimentary screw and screw housing design have been started.
Table 1: Ingredient Densities
Ingredient
flour
sugar
brown sugar
salt
baking powder
baking soda
Density (Kg/m^3)
593.00
849.00
721.00
1200.00
721.00
689.00
Density (Lb/in^3)
0.0214
0.0307
0.0260
0.0434
0.0260
0.0249
As seen in Table 1, the salt has the highest density; therefore one would surmise that the
dispensing design will be critical on the salt properties because of the higher amount of mass in
the system when salt is used. However, the information that is actually critical in this regard is
the viscosity, not the density. This can be assumed because the amount of mass in this system is
so miniscule that the inertial forces involved to move the mass can be disregarded. This
assumption was affirmed by discussing the design with engineers working with the Molon
Motors Company. Based on this information, it can be assumed that the brown sugar will be the
most critical part of the dispensing design. This assumption has been made based on the fact that
all of the ingredients are dry and powder like with the exception of brown sugar which usually
has molasses or some other type of viscous syrup. This assumption was affirmed by talking with
a technical sales person with the Augers Unlimited Company.
Based on the information gathered by talking to representatives from Augers Unlimited
and Molon Motors, two screw designs could be implemented. This information is shown in
Table 2. These designs represent a rough range for the auger screw. Screw Design 1 being the
smallest and Screw Design 2 being the largest. Therefore, there is an expected volume range of
0.3 in3 to 14.5 in3 of material being pushed out by the screw at any given time.
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Table 2: Table for Imputing Possible Auger Screw Designs
Threads/In.
Exposure
Length
(In.)
Barrel
Length
(In.)
Material in
Exposure
Region
(In.^3)
0.18
3.00
3.00
3
0.1471
0.1471
0.2943
0.18
3.00
3.00
3
7.2157
7.2157
14.4315
Screw
Design:
Outer
Dia.
(In.)
Root
Dia.
(In.)
Thread
width
(In.)
1
1.00
0.50
2
2.00
0.50
Material
in Barrel
(In.^3)
Total
Materal In
Screw
(In.^3)
Table 3 and Table 4 show the mass calculations for each ingredient. This table was
formulated using each ingredient density value from Table 1 along with the total mass in the
system calculated for Screw Design 1 and Screw Design from Table 2. Doing this for the two
assumed screw size ranges can give estimated value for the maximum mass that will be pushed
through the auger screw at any given time. The maximum mass found based on the rudimentary
designs is .6256 pounds for our critical ingredient, brown sugar. This is the load the screw will
have to constantly push at varied rates to output the critical ingredient. This information will help
determine a torque requirement for the motors.
Table 3: Mass Calculations for Screw Design 1:
Mass in
Exposure
Screw Design Region
1:
(Lbs)
flour
0.0032
sugar
0.0045
brown sugar
0.0038
salt
0.0064
baking
powder
0.0038
baking soda
0.0037
Mass in
Barrel
(Lbs)
0.0032
0.0045
0.0038
0.0064
Total
Mass in
Screw
(Lbs)
0.0063
0.0090
0.0077
0.0128
0.0038
0.0037
0.0077
0.0073
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Table 4: Mass Calculations for Screw Design 2:
Mass in
Exposure
Screw Design Region
2:
(Lbs)
flour
0.1546
sugar
0.2213
brown sugar
0.1880
salt
0.3128
baking
powder
0.1880
baking soda
0.1796
Mass in
Barrel
(Lbs)
0.1546
0.2213
0.1880
0.3128
Total
Mass in
Screw
(Lbs)
0.3092
0.4426
0.3759
0.6256
0.1880
0.3759
0.1796
0.3592
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Shake and Bake: Preliminary Design Report
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Motors and Gearing
Because significant friction occurs between the screw and material, the screw and
housing, and the material itself, an exact value for the torque required from the motor is difficult
to calculate. A model needs to be constructed and tested to incorporate friction values into
torque requirements. To acquire the torque requirement for the motors, various auger companies
and motor companies were consulted based on the project scope. These companies concluded
that several motors are capable of driving this dispensing system. They also concluded that there
are several motors that meet the specifications and fit the budget. One engineer from Molon that
was consulted estimated that the necessary torque would be between 2 and 5 inch pounds of
torques. From a table found on the internet, 557.6 in*lbs of torque is roughly one N*m.
Therefore, the metric torque requirement should not exceed 0.009 N*m of motor torque. The
current dispensing motors selected provide .3 N*m at 60 rpm. Because the torque supplied by
the motors is significantly higher than the torque requirements, the motor may be geared to
decrease torque and increase rpm to ensure that one cup of ingredient is dispensed in 75 seconds.
The flow rate required to achieve this dispensing time is 3.15 cm3/second. Using Screw Design
1, which outputs 8.576 cm3/rev, the minimum required rotational speed is 22.0 rpm for 75
seconds.
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Shake and Bake: Preliminary Design Report
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Program Design
In Figure 6, shown on the following page, the preliminary program is outlined with a
flow chart. This flow chart is a basic representation of how the device will operate. The program
will take multiple complex algorithms working together in order to produce the desired final
operation of the device. The basic functions within our flow chart incorporate:
·
The input of the user from the home screen
·
Checking to see if the contents of the containers have enough ingredients to dispense
the recipe entered
·
Give the user an option to save the recipe entered
·
Prompt the user to dispense when ready
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Figure 6: Basic Overall Flow Chart Design for Program
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Project Plan
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Shake and Bake: Preliminary Design Report
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Organization and Management
Team Shake and Bake consists of three mechanical engineering students, one electrical
engineering student, and one computer engineering student. The tasks will be assigned to project
members as follows:
Andrew Townsend - mechanical engineer
Andrew is the team leader, responsible for coordinating group meetings and
consolidating written reports. He is the primary engineer designing the dispensing mechanism
and choosing the motors and gearing that will be used to power this mechanism.
Ryan Johnson - mechanical engineer
Ryan is responsible for implementing the scales into the dispenser design. It is his job to
choose which sensors to use, where they will be placed, and how they will be configured. He is
also overseeing the structural design of the control unit, which will house many of the electrical
components, including the user interface and microprocessor.
Kara Tobey - mechanical engineer
Kara is the engineer designing the six bases and containers. She will address issue
regarding materials, configuration, connections between bases and containers, connections
between the different bases, and interfacing with the dispensing unit and sensors.
Aldo Campos - computer engineer
Aldo is in charge of selecting the microprocessor for the project and any additional
memory that is needed. He will be the primary engineer responsible for programming the
microprocessor to perform its various functions.
Grant Arthur - electrical engineer
Grant is designing and implementing the electrical components for this project. It is his
job to select the power supply, keypad, scanner, and LCD screen that will be used and to design
the circuit board. Grant is also in charge of keeping track of the budget and expenses.
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Shake and Bake: Preliminary Design Report
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Budget
Part
Description
Quantity Price
per
Tax and
Price
shipping
Total
Vendor
Unit
DC Motors
Jammeco 38GM-253500
6
$15.95
$7.00
$102.70 jameco.com
Force Sensors
Interlink Electronics
32
$6.44
$2.56
$208.64 DigiKey.com
Microprocessor DSPIC30F6015
2
$9.94
$0.00
$19.88
Barcode
Adesso NuScan 3200
1
$111.95
$9.90
$121.85 bhphotovideo.com
Scanner
Optical Laser USB
Standard 402 FSR
Newark.com
Barcode Scanner
Extrusion
6
$0.00
$0.00
3-D Printer
Screw
LCD Screen
LCD DISP TFT 3.5"
1
$28.50
$6.24
$34.74
DigiKey.com
1
$44.51
$7.00
$51.51
Onlinecomponents.com
$0.00
3-D Printer
$51.00
expresspcb.com
320X240 B/L
Power Supply
Power One BLP55-3300
Gears
PCB Board
Professional Circuit Board
Miscellaneous
1
$51.00
1
$50.00
1
$13.52
1
$100.00
1
$26.98
$0.00
$50.00
Electronics
Keypad
KEYPAD 12 KEY
$2.56
$16.08
DigiKey.com
FRONT PANEL MNT
Material
Container
DURAPLEX 2' x 4' Clear
Material
Acrylic Sheet
Miscellaneous
$100.00
$1.89
$28.87
$20.00
$20.00
$57.15
$805.27
Lowe's
Shipping
Total
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Shake and Bake: Preliminary Design Report
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Gantt Chart Fall 2011
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Gantt Chart Spring 2012
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Shake and Bake: Preliminary Design Report
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Pert Chart Fall 2011
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Shake and Bake: Preliminary Design Report
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Pert Chart Spring 2012
Work Breakdown Structure Fall 2011
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Shake and Bake: Preliminary Design Report
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ID
Task
Description
Deliverables
Duration
(Days)
People*
Resources
O1.0
Project
Management
Ensure that the
project is on
schedule and on
budget
Specifications met
in a timely manner
80
Andrew
PC
O2.0
Documentation
Keep records of
design decisions,
research, and tests
Engineering
notebooks and A3 reports
80
A, Al, G, K, R
PC,
Notebooks
F1.0
F2.0
Project Selection
Requirement
Specifications
Select a project
Technical
Description of
project goals
A verbal decision
Document
12
16
A, Al, G, K, R
A, Al, G, K, R
Notebooks
PC
F3.0
System Design and
Project Plan
Description of
systems operation,
project plan, and
budget
Document
9
A, Al, G, K, R
PC
F4.0
System Layout
Develop a plan for
device operation
and functionality
Notebook
documentation
11
A,Al, G, K, R
Notebooks
F5.0
Device Design
Design the device
Detailed design of
all components
47
A, Al, G, K, R
PC
F6.0
Sensor Placement
Select appropriate
force sensors.
Design appropriate
electrical interface
and placement
Detailed design,
Schematics
7
Ryan
PC
F7.0
Dispensing
Mechanism Design
Design the
extrusion method
and motor system
Detailed design,
Solidworks
drawing
14
Andrew
PC
F8.0
User Interface
Detailed design,
Schematics
20
Grant
PC
F9.0
Microprocessor
Interface
Select the
appropriate LCD
and bar code
scanner. Design
appropriate
electrical interface
Microprocessor to
operate all
components
Detailed design
20
Aldo
PC
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F10.0 Container Housing
Design
Design a housing
for the motors and
scales. Also holds
the containers
Detailed design,
Solidworks
drawing
14
Kara
PC
F11.0 Power Supply
Selection
Select a suitable
power supply
Specifications
3
Grant
PC
F12.0 Container Design
Design a sealable
container that can
house the
dispensing
mechanism
Detailed design,
Solidworks
drawing
18
Kara
PC
F13.0 Electronic Housing
Design
Design a housing
for the
microprocessor and
electronics
Interim system and
subsystem design
Detailed design,
Solidworks
drawing
13
Ryan
PC
Document,
Presentation
23
A, Al, G, K, R
PC
F14.0 Interim Design
*A = Andrew, Al = Aldo, G = Grant, K = Kara, R = Ryan
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Work Breakdown Structure Spring 2012
ID
Task
Description
Deliverables Duration
(days)
People*
Resources
O1.0
Project
Management
Ensure that the
project is on
schedule and on
budget
Specifications
met in a timely
manner
79
Andrew
PC
O2.0
Project
Documentation
Keep records of
design decisions,
research, and tests
Engineering
notebooks and
A-3 reports
79
A, Al, G, K,
R
PC,
Notebooks
S1.0
Device Build
Assemble of all the
device components
Assembled
components
38
A, Al, G, K,
R
Workshop,
PC
S2.0
Dispensing
Mechanism
Build
Build the dispensing
mechanism used in
our device
Assembled
components
23
Andrew
Work Shop
S3.0
Microprocessor Write the code for
Programming
the microprocessor
and download to
device
A programmed
and functional
microprocessor
23
Aldo
PC,
Evaluation
board,
Oscilloscope
S4.0
Sensor Build
Build the platform
on which the
sensors rest and
install sensors
Assembled
components
23
Ryan
Workshop
S5.0
User Interface
Build
Build the
components that
will communicate
with the user
Assembled
components
23
Grant
PC,
Evaluation
board,
Oscilloscope
S6.0
Container Build
Build the containers, Assembled
which will hold the
components
ingredients
11
Kara
Work Shop
S7.0
Container
Housing Build
Build the housing
for the containers
Assembled
components
13
Kara
Work Shop
S8.0
Container
Testing
Perform a test on
the containers to
make sure it can
hold a standardized
bag, and also keep
the ingredients
fresh
Working
components,
that meet the
specifications
documented
14
Kara
Workshop
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S9.0
Container
Housing
Testing
Make sure the
container attaches
to it, and it can also
hold the containers
full of each
ingredient
Working
components,
that meet the
specifications
documented
14
Kara
Workshop
S10.0
Electronic
Housing Build
Assemble all the
electric components
Assembled
components
11
Ryan
Workshop
S11.0
Sensor Testing
Test the sensors to
ensure that they are
registering the
correct force and
communicating to
the microprocessor
Working
components,
that meet the
specifications
documented
11
Ryan
Workshop
S12.0
Power Supply
Testing
Test with different
loads, the ripple, 30
Ω resistor, and with
a oscilloscope to
test the ripple
Working
components,
that meet the
specifications
documented
6
Grant
Workshop
S13.0
Dispensing
Mechanism
Testing
Perform a test on
the dispensing
mechanism to
ensure that it
dispenses within the
documented error
Working
components,
that meet the
specifications
documented
13
Andrew
Workshop
S14.0
User Interface
Testing
Perform a test
within the
components
communicating with
the user to make
sure it is outputting
the right things, and
also receiving the
right input
Microprocessor Verify that the
Testing
microprocessor is
operating as desired
Working
components,
that meet the
specifications
documented
11
Grant
PC,
Evaluation
board,
Oscilloscope
Functional
microprocessor
operating as
desired
11
Aldo
PC,
Evaluation
board,
Oscilloscope
Electronic
Housing
Testing
Working
components,
that meet the
specifications
documented
6
Ryan
Workshop
S15.0
S16.0
Test all the output
and input of the
electric components
34
Shake and Bake: Preliminary Design Report
October 12, 2011
S17.0
System
Integration
Combine all the
components
Complete
System
19
A, Al, G, K,
R
Workshop
S18.0
System Testing
Test system for
technical
specifications;
modify what is
needed
Fully
functioning
prototype
18
A, Al, G, K,
R
PC,
Evaluation
board,
Oscilloscope
S19.0
User’s Manual
Describes how to
use the device along
with any special
considerations
Document
11
A, Al, G, K,
R
PC
S20.0
Final Report
Final report about
the prototype
Document
13
A, Al, G, K,
R
PC
*A = Andrew, Al = Aldo, G = Grant, K = Kara, R = Ryan
35
Shake and Bake: Preliminary Design Report
October 12, 2011
Appendix A:
Technical Requirement Specifications
36
Shake and Bake: Preliminary Design Report
October 12, 2011
Overview:
Fresh-baked cookies, banana bread, and hot biscuits are integral to American culture. Hundreds
of such deserts, breads and pastries are made by household cooks every year, from small children
standing on chairs to the moms who help them stir to great-grandmothers who have prepared such
treats for several generations. Small-scale baking is a ubiquitous activity which captures the attention of
many. Every local coffee shop hides someone whipping up a batch of blueberry scones in the back, and
many small restaurants offer their own homemade desserts.
The system of measuring out ingredients for such projects is a standard process that has
remained steadfast for generations. The process is simple, but time-consuming and messy. Frequently,
ingredients are spilled onto the countertop or floor during measuring. If a scoop needs to be reused, it
must be washed first in order to avoid contamination and all measuring utensils must be washed again
at the end of the process. The cleaning up that is necessary due to these factors is generally detested by
bakers, who would rather spend their time on other activities. Also, accuracy is sacrificed when the
baker is in a hurry and doesn’t have time for exact measurements; time is sacrificed when the baker
slows down to focus on accuracy.
We believe that baking can be simplified with new technology, as so many other areas of life
have been. There’s no need to keep using the same old process when the cookies can taste just as good
and take less time!
Our ingredient dispenser measures out dry ingredients common to baking in increments
specified by the user. The machine’s functions greatly simplify the common but inefficient process that
includes opening containers, retrieving measuring utensils, measuring out ingredients, cleaning up spills,
closing containers, and washing utensils.
Benefits of this product are numerous. In addition to dispensing accurate quantities in a timely
manner, it stores the ingredients and keeps them fresh, dry and clean. It eliminates spills, the need to
search for and wash measuring cups and spoons, and the headache of maneuvering many different
containers. Also, the device can store previously used recipes and doesn’t forget how many cups it has
measured already, as cooks are notorious for doing. The ingredient dispenser generally creates a
cleaner, more efficient baking environment.
37
Shake and Bake: Preliminary Design Report
October 12, 2011
Problem Statement:
The majority of household cooks and small-scale bakers spend hours meticulously measuring
out ingredients by hand, using an assortment of cups, spoons, and scoops. This method is timeconsuming, requires repeatedly washing measuring utensils, and is often inaccurate when performed by
rushed or easily distracted cooks. This device can speed up and clean up the baking process in homes
and small restaurants, allowing cooks to focus on other elements of their work, rather than fussing with
measurements.
Customer Needs:
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
·
Dispenses "quickly"
Reasonable size/weight in order to be easily handled
Digitally stores combinations of ingredient measurements for repeated use
Measures and dispenses multiple baking ingredients
Device separates different ingredients
Containers hold entirety of a standard-sized package of ingredients
Keeps ingredients dry and clean
Containers can be easily refilled when empty
Containers are easily cleaned
Not too "noisy"
Notified when ingredient containers need to be refilled
Measures contents in various units commonly used in baking
Can customize recipes for various batch sizes
Measures the amount of an ingredient(s) in response to user input
Measures ingredients accurately
38
Shake and Bake: Preliminary Design Report
October 12, 2011
User Manual Rough Draft:
The ingredient dispenser is simple to setup and operate. The user needs only to fill the containers with
the appropriate ingredients, and then enter the desired amounts of ingredients or a recipe code via the
user interface. Finally, insert a bowl and manually activate the dispensing mechanism, and the process
is complete!
1. Remove the device from storage.
2. Connect to the desired power source.
3. Power on the device.
4. Fill empty containers.
5. Allow machine to calibrate.
6. Input the recipe or ingredients to be used and the desired amounts.
7. Place bowl underneath dispenser.
8. Activate dispensing mechanism.
9. Repeat steps 7-8 until all desired ingredients have been dispensed.
10. Power off the device.
11. Store the device in desired location.
39
Shake and Bake: Preliminary Design Report
October 12, 2011
Technical Requirements Specification:
1. The time required to dispense one cup of ingredient should not exceed 75 seconds. (This is the
approximate time a user needs to retrieve a measuring device and ingredient, use measuring
device, wash measuring device, and put away measuring device and ingredient.)
2. The mass of the empty device should not exceed 15 kg. (This is the weight of an average
countertop microwave.)
3. The device dimensions should be no greater than 0.5 m wide by 1.0 m long.
4. The device should have the capability to store at least five recipes in memory.
5. The device should have the capacity to contain no less than six separate ingredients. (This
accounts for the most common baking ingredients: flour, white sugar, brown sugar, salt, baking
powder, baking soda.)
6. The device should have containers with volumes no less than 0.4 L and no greater than 4.1 L.
(This is based on standard ingredient package sizes, plus 20% extra volume)
7. The containers should be sealable.
8. The containers should detach from the main device in under ten seconds by a user familiar with
the user manual.
9. The containers should be made out of an FDA-approved material.
10. The device should not produce a noise exceeding 90 dB within 1 m of the device. (This is the
volume level of a standard household blender.)
11. The device should communicate with the user with visual output.
12. The device should perform according to user input.
13. The device should dispense correct ingredients within ±5% of the user input.
40
Measurement Accuracy
User Input
*
Program Output
Composition of Containers
*
*
Noise Level
Time to Detach Containers
Means of Keeping Ingredients Airtight
Size of Ingredient Containers
*
Number of Ingredient Containers
Device Dimensions
*
Memory Capability
Weight of Device
Need
Dispenses "quickly"
Reasonable size/weight in order to be easily handled
Digitally stores combinations of ingredient measurements for repeated use
Measures and dispenses multiple baking ingredients
Device separates different ingredients
Containers hold entirety of a standard-sized package of ingredients
Keeps ingredients dry and clean
Containers can be easily refilled when empty
Containers are easily cleaned
Not too "noisy"
Notified when ingredient containers need to be refilled
Measures contents in various units commonly used in baking
Can customize recipes for various batch sizes
Measures the amount of an ingredient(s) in response to user input
Measures ingredients accurately
October 12, 2011
Dispensing time
Metric
Shake and Bake: Preliminary Design Report
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
Table 1: Matrix containing our customer needs and resulting metrics
41
Shake and Bake: Preliminary Design Report
October 12, 2011
Design Deliverables:
1. A working automated ingredient dispenser.
2. Comes with ingredient containers. Replacement containers can be purchased.
3. Baking ingredients will be supplied for testing purposes, but customers will be responsible for
purchasing their own ingredients for home use of the device
a) System specifications
b) Budget
c) User manual
d) Final report, including detailed drawings, schematics, flow charts, code, and test results
Preliminary Test Plans:
1. Dispensing Time
a. For flour, white sugar, brown sugar – User inputs 1 c of ingredient into device. Device is
timed with a stopwatch from activation to completion of dispensing. Pass if this time is
under 75 s for each ingredient.
b. For salt, baking soda, baking powder – User inputs 1 T of ingredient into device. Device
is timed with a stopwatch from activation to completion of dispensing. Pass if this time
is under 75 s for each ingredient.
2. Weight of device – Weigh empty device with a scale that is accurate to 0.5 kg. Pass if weight is
less than 15 kg.
3. Device Dimensions – Measure length and width of device with a tape measure. Pass if length is
1.0 m or less and width is 0.5 m or less
4. Memory Capability – Use memory function to recall a recipe, then dispense each ingredient
from the recipe into separate containers. Measure the amounts with standard measuring cups
or spoons. Repeat test with four additional recipes. Pass if device completes task and
ingredient amounts are accurate.
5. Number of Ingredient Containers – Pass if device contains six different containers for holding
ingredients.
6. Size of Ingredient Containers – One container of each size is filled with water. Water is weighed
with a digital scale. Pass if weight of water is between 0.4 and 4.1 kg. (Corresponds to 0.4 and
4.1 L of water)
42
Shake and Bake: Preliminary Design Report
October 12, 2011
7. Means of Keeping Ingredients Airtight – Submerge each sealed container in water for 10 s. Pass
if all containers are able to keep out water.
8. Time to Detach Containers – Three people who have read the user manual (not members of the
Shake and Bake team) will detach all six containers from the device while being timed with a
stopwatch. Users will then complete a survey about the understandability of the user manual
and ease of use of the device. Pass if all three users complete the task in 60 seconds or less and
select “agree” or “strongly agree” on the survey.
9. Composition of Containers – Pass if material used in containers is on FDA list of approved
materials. If material from 3D printer is used in prototype, state in documentation that
production units will be made of an FDA-approved material.
10. Noise Level – Measure the noise level (in dB) at a distance of 1 m from the device with a noise
level meter. Pass if level is ≤ 90 dB.
11. Program Output – Pass if the device contains a component with visual output.
12. User Input and Measurement Accuracy – Input a measurement of 10 g of flour.
a. For flour, white sugar, brown sugar – Input a measurement of 10 g of flour. Dispense
flour and weigh with a scale capable of measuring to the 0.5 g. Repeat experiment with
measurements of 10 g, 50 g, 100g, and 150 g for each ingredient. Pass if all amounts are
within 5% of the inputted amounts.
b. For salt, baking soda, baking powder – Input a measurement of 5 g of salt. Dispense
flour and weigh with a digital scale capable of measuring to the 0.5 g. Repeat
experiment with measurements of 5 g, 10 g, 25g, and 50 g for each ingredient. Pass if all
amounts are within 5% of the inputted amounts.
43
Shake and Bake: Preliminary Design Report
October 12, 2011
Implementation Considerations:
1. Ingredients must be restocked after repeated use. Device will notify user if there are not
sufficient quantities to complete a function.
2. Containers designed to be periodically removed and cleaned manually.
3. Device designed to be self-calibrating.
4. Device to notify user if the proper ingredients are not in place.
Attachments:
1.
Patent Search: #5460209 – Applied in 1993 (See Appendix A)
Relevant Codes and Standards:
1. Sanitary Design and Construction of Food Equipment – University of Florida IFAS Extension (See
Appendix B)
44
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