Biennial Report 2011

Biennial Report 2011
Biennial Report
2011 - 2012
DEPARTMENT OF ARCHAEOLOGY
SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY
Edited by Catherine D’Andrea & Laura Walker
Prepared by Sandie Dielissen
This Biennial Report is a departmental publication available as a downloadable PDF
from the Department of Archaeology website: http://www.sfu.ca/archaeology
© 2013 Department of Archaeology, SFU
Table of Contents
Chair’s Report ................................................................................................................................................. 1
Department Organization............................................................................................................................ 3
Committees.............................................................................................................................................. 5
Staff Profiles.............................................................................................................................................. 7
Faculty Retirements ....................................................................................................................................... 8
Brian Hayden ........................................................................................................................................... 8
Mark Skinner ........................................................................................................................................... 9
Graduate Programme.................................................................................................................................... 10
Graduate Programme Committee Report ........................................................................................... 10
Graduate Degrees Awarded ................................................................................................................... 11
Graduate Students ................................................................................................................................... 12
Graduate Departmental and External Awards .................................................................................... 13
Graduate Student Caucus Report.......................................................................................................... 14
Undergraduate Programme.......................................................................................................................... 15
Undergraduate Programme Committee Report ................................................................................. 15
Honours Theses Completed................................................................................................................... 16
Undergraduate Awards and Prizes........................................................................................................ 17
Archaeology Student Society Report.................................................................................................... 18
Undergraduate Courses Offered ........................................................................................................... 18
Field Schools ............................................................................................................................................ 21
Field School Reports...................................................................................................................................... 22
2011 Field School at Cochrane Bay....................................................................................................... 22
2012 South Pacific Field School in Fiji ................................................................................................. 23
2012 Field School in Greece................................................................................................................... 24
Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology.................................................................................................... 25
Centre for Forensic Research ....................................................................................................................... 26
Archaeology Laboratories............................................................................................................................. 27
Administrative Services................................................................................................................................. 29
Department of First Nations Studies.......................................................................................................... 30
2011-2012 Biennial Report
Faculty Research .............................................................................................................................................
31
David Burley.............................................................................................................................................
31
Roy Carlson..............................................................................................................................................
32
Mark Collard............................................................................................................................................
32
Catherine D’Andrea.................................................................................................................................
32
Jonathan Driver........................................................................................................................................
33
Biruté Mary Galdikas..............................................................................................................................
34
Ross Jamieson ..........................................................................................................................................
34
Dana Lepofsky..........................................................................................................................................
35
Robert Muir..............................................................................................................................................
36
George Nicholas.......................................................................................................................................
36
Rudy Reimer/Yumks...............................................................................................................................
37
John Welch................................................................................................................................................
38
Dongya Yang............................................................................................................................................
38
Eldon Yellowhorn....................................................................................................................................
39
Post Doctoral Research & Instructor Profiles...........................................................................................
40
Ana Boza-Arlotti......................................................................................................................................
40
Briggs Buchanan .....................................................................................................................................
40
Ernest Bumann........................................................................................................................................
40
Alvaro Higueras.......................................................................................................................................
41
David Maxwell ........................................................................................................................................
41
Deborah Merrett......................................................................................................................................
42
Jessica Munson ........................................................................................................................................
42
Douglas Ross............................................................................................................................................
43
Dennis Sandgathe....................................................................................................................................
43
Valentina Savo..........................................................................................................................................
44
Jon Scholnick ...........................................................................................................................................
44
Camilla Speller.........................................................................................................................................
45
Graduate Seminar Series Speakers..............................................................................................................
46
Research Grants ..............................................................................................................................................
50
Publications List..............................................................................................................................................
52
2011-2012 Biennial Report
Chair’s Report
in this we were assisted by the Dean’s office personnel. The
year 2011 was followed in 2012 by a veritable whirlwind of
activity including a departmental external review, a series of
legal strikes and job action by our CUPE and TSSU colleagues,
and two new faculty hires! As usual, archaeology faculty were highly successful in
attracting both external and internal research funding
in 2011-12. Most notable was a SFU Community Trust
Endowment Fund of $1.1 million awarded to Mark Collard to
support research in Human Evolution. With the retirements
of Mark Skinner and Brian Hayden in 2011, the department
lost two distinguished faculty members. Both however, are
still actively conducting research, with Brian continuing
archaeological excavations at Keatley Creek and Mark
pursuing investigations in bioanthropology and forensic
anthropology. After enduring several years of non-replaced
faculty retirements, the department was finally given leave
to hire two new limited-term faculty members in 2012.
Hugo Cardoso, a bioanthropologist, and Francesco Berna,
a geoarchaeologist, were appointed and we are very much
looking forward to welcoming them to our department
in 2013. We have been blessed with a dynamic group of
post-doctoral fellows and adjunct faculty whose presence
truly enriches our department. They are engaged in a wide
variety of research ranging from historical archaeology to
Palaeolithic studies and they have made significant teaching
contributions.
T
At Ona Adi site in Northern Ethiopia, June 2013
he past two years have seen a lot of lively activity in
our department. Perhaps the most momentous event
was our move to the Faculty of the Environment
which officially took effect on 1 April 2011. This represented
the end of a two-year long process when we transitioned
out of the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences which
had been our home for 40 years. Our department staff
worked hard to make this transition a smooth one, and
We were saddened to learn of the death of Herbert Alexander
in March 2011. Herbert was a founding faculty member of
our department who left in 1980 to pursue other interests in
Australia. As a member of our department his archaeological
work focussed on the Palaeo-Indian period.
The Undergraduate Executive Committee in 2011-12 was
led by Bob Muir, who implemented and worked the bugs
out of a newly revised undergraduate curriculum. In these
tasks he was ably assisted by Chris Papaianni and Laura
Walker (formerly Nielson). Our undergraduate students
continued to impress us with their involvement in our
department and the wider university community. They
organised numerous social events, and several undergrads
traveled to Victoria to attend the Canadian Association for
2011-2012 Biennial Report
1
Physical Anthropology annual meeting in March 2012. Our
department continued to offer highly acclaimed field schools
in the South Pacific, Greece, and locally on the Sunshine
Coast. A key to the success of our undergraduate programme
has been the support we receive from a talented group of
sessional instructors who bring a fresh perspective to our
established courses and have developed new course offerings
relating to their research specializations.
Our Graduate Programme underwent an extensive review
in 2011-12, resulting in major changes to the comprehensive
exams and graduate student progress review procedures.
In this we are indebted to Dongya Yang as Grad Chair,
supported by Merrill Farmer, both of whom went to great
lengths to ensure a smooth transition to the new procedures.
Our graduate students continue to shine as evidenced by the
increasing number of external and internal awards received
in 2011-12. In 2011 our department was fortunate to receive a
new graduate scholarship, thanks to the generosity of the Kiaii
family of Vancouver. They established the Alexia Sepideh
Kiaii Graduate Scholarship which is designed to support
graduate students who are required to travel to complete
their dissertation research. Alexia was very passionate about
archaeology and Italian culture. She completed her MA in
Classical Archaeology at UBC but her life was tragically cut
short at the age of 37. We are extremely grateful to the Kiaii
family for their support of our students.
One of the highlights of 2011 was the repatriation of a large
quantity of ancestral remains excavated from the Namu site
to the Heiltsuk First Nation of Bella Bella. Shannon Wood
worked tirelessly to prepare and inventory the remains
for repatriation. We organised a special event in the SFU
Atrium, Ceremony for the Return of Namu Ancestors, with
the assistance of Rudy Reimer, Eldon Yellowhorn, Shannon
Wood, Laura Walker, and Peter Locher. Speakers included
President Andrew Petter, Chiefs Edwin Newman, Harvey
Humchitt and Marilyn Slett, Roy Carlson, and Dean John
Craig. In preparation to receive the ancestral remains, Chief
Harvey Humchitt oversaw the completion of 48 exquisite
bentwood boxes which housed the remains that were buried
near the site of the original Namu excavations. Roy and
Maureen Carlson and I had the honour of witnessing the
ceremonies held in Bella Bella, which for me was one of the
2 2011-2012 Biennial Report
most memorable events of my term as department chair.
The Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology under the
direction of Barbara Winter launched a highly successful
website in 2011 entitled Investigating Forensics. In addition
the museum received a wonderful collection of Haida argillite
carvings donated by the McLean family. A highly enjoyable
event to celebrate this donation and to thank the McLean
family was held in the museum in March 2012.
The year 2012 brought words that fill department chairs with
terror---external review. This is required of all university units
once every seven years, where a panel of external experts
hold site visits and conduct interviews with departmental
representatives. In preparation for this, we held a retreat
and collectively prepared a self-study document. Thanks
to everyone pulling together it turned out to be one of our
most positive external reviews. It was noted by the senior
administration and thanks to the support of our Dean, John
Pierce, it lead to the two limited term-appointments made
later that year.
This is my final biennial report as I leave the Chair’s office on
31 August 2013, when David Burley takes over. It has been
an honor to serve the department over the past five years
and I have learned much from this experience. I would like
to express my appreciation to our faculty Dean, John Pierce
who has been a strong advocate of our department. I have
benefited greatly from his guidance. An especially enjoyable
part of my job was working with our office and technical
staff, including Chris Papaianni, Shannon Wood, Barbara
Winter, Merrill Farmer, Laura Walker and Peter Locher.
These colleagues have formed some of the most productive
and enjoyable working relationships I’ve experienced in my
career, and their whole-hearted dedication to our department
has been a source of inspiration.
Catherine D’Andrea
Department Chair
Department Organization
Faculty
Adjunct Faculty
Dr. David Burley, Professor
Dr. Mark Collard, Professor
Dr. Catherine D’Andrea, Department Chair, Professor
Dr. Jonathan Driver, Vice-President Academic and Provost, Professor
Dr. Biruté Galdikas, Professor
Dr. Ross Jamieson, Associate Professor
Dr. Dana Lepofsky, Professor
Dr. Robert J. Muir, Senior Lecturer
Dr. George Nicholas, Professor
Dr. Rudy Reimer, Assistant Professor
Dr. John Welch, Associate Professor
Dr. Dongya Yang, Associate Professor
Dr. Eldon Yellowhorn, Associate Professor; Chair, Department
of First Nations Studies
Dr. Ron Adams
Dr. Clement Apaak
Dr. Ana Boza-Arlotti
Dr. Jerome Cybulski
Dr. James Delgado
Dr. Richard Lazenby
Dr. Alan McMillan
Dr. Deborah C. Merrett
Dr. Michael Richards
Dr. Sarah C. Walshaw
Dr. Darlene Weston
Dr. Michael Wilson
Dr. Robyn Woodward
Dr. Harald Yurk
Professors Emeriti
Department Staff
Dr. Roy Carlson
Dr. Knut Fladmark
Dr. Brian Hayden
Dr. Erle Nelson
Dr. Mark Skinner
Merrill Farmer
Chair Secretary & Graduate Programme Assistant
Associate Faculty
Dr. John Clague (Earth Sciences, Professor)
Dr. David Huntley (Physics, Professor Emeritus )
Dr. Rolf Mathewes (Biology, Professor)
Dr. George MacDonald (Bill Reid Foundation)
Dr. Pablo Nepomnaschy (Health Sciences, Associate Professor)
Peter Locher
Laboratory Technician
Chris Papaianni
Manager & Academic Advisor
Laura Walker
Undergraduate Programme Assistant & Budget Clerk
Barbara Winter
Museum Curator
Shannon Wood
Laboratory Manager
2011-2012 Biennial Report
3
Limited Term &
Laboratory Instructors
Summer 2011
Nyra Chalmer
Lab Instructor, Local Field School
Fall 2011
Dr. Dennis Sandgathe
Limited Term Lecturer
Spring 2012
Dr. Dennis Sandgathe
Limited Term Lecturer
Summer 2012
Dr. Dennis Sandgathe
Nyra Chalmer
Limited Term Lecturer
Lab Instructor, Fiji Field School
Fall 2012
Dr. Dennis Sandgathe
Antonia Rodrigues
Limited Term Lecturer
Lab Instructor, ARCH 373
Spring 2012
Dr. Alvaro Higueras
Dr. Doug Ross
Dr. David Maxwell
Dr. Barbara Winter
Dr. Deborah Merrett
Dr. Briggs Buchanan
ARCH 100
ARCH 100
ARCH 201
ARCH 348
ARCH 452
ARCH 894
Fall 2012
Dr. David Maxwell
Dr. Ernest Bumann
Dr. Alvaro Higueras
Dr. Ana Boza-Arlotti
ARCH 100, 131
ARCH 100
ARCH 100 Surrey
ARCH 442
Sessional Instructors
Post Doctoral Fellows
Spring 2011
Dr. Alvaro Higueras
Dr. Jane Roy
Dr. David Maxwell
Dr. Dennis Sandgathe
Alan Cross
Dr. Deborah Merrett
Dr. Barbara Winter
Dr. Briggs Buchanan
Dr. Briggs Buchanan
Dr. Jessica Munson
Dr. Douglas Ross
Dr. Valentina Savo
Dr. Jon Scholnick
Dr. Camilla Speller
ARCH 100
ARCH 100
ARCH 131 Surrey
ARCH 131
ARCH 333
ARCH 334
ARCH 349
ARCH 376
Distance Education Course Supervisor
Dr. Dennis Sandgathe
ARCH 131
Summer 2011
Distance Education Course Supervisor
Dr. Dennis Sandgathe
ARCH 131
Fall 2011
Dr. David Maxwell
Jennifer Lewis
Dr. Alvaro Higueras
Dr. Ana Boza-Arlotti
ARCH 100, 201
ARCH 332
ARCH 334
ARCH 373
Distance Education Course Supervisors
Dr. Dennis Sandgathe
ARCH 131
Dr. Barbara Winter
ARCH 301
PhD student Habtamu Taddesse conducting field
survey in Ethiopia.
4 2011-2012 Biennial Report
Committees
Department Tenure Committee 2011
Department Tenure Committee 2012
Chair: Catherine D’Andrea
Mark Collard
Biruté Galdikas
Ross Jamieson
George Nicholas
John Welch
Eldon Yellowhorn
Dongya Yang (Alternate)
Chair: Catherine D’Andrea
David Burley
Dana Lepofsky
George Nicholas
Rudy Reimer
John Welch
Eldon Yellowhorn
Mark Collard (Alternate)
Graduate Executive Committee 2011
Appointments Committee 2012
Chair: Dongya Yang
Ross Jamieson
Eldon Yellowhorn
John Welch
Merrill Farmer (Staff Representative)
Graduate Representative (n/a)
Chair: Catherine D’Andrea
Chris Papaianni (Staff Representative)
Matthew Go (Undergraduate Representative)
Marina Elliott (Graduate Representative)
Graduate Executive Committee 2012
Chair: Dongya Yang
Ross Jamieson
John Welch
Eldon Yellowhorn
Merrill Farmer (Staff Representative)
Graduate Representative (n/a)
David Burley
Roy Carlson
Mark Collard
Ross Jamieson
Dana Lepofsky
Bob Muir
George Nicholas
John Welch
Dongya Yang
Eldon Yellowhorn
Undergraduate Programme Committee
Spring 2011
Chair: David Burley
Dongya Yang
Chris Papaianni
Chelsey Armstrong (Undergraduate Representative)
Laura Walker (Recording Secretary)
Spring 2012
Chair: Bob Muir
Rudy Reimer
John Welch
Chris Papaianni
Alexa Walker (Undergraduate Representative)
Laura Walker (Recording Secretary)
Fall 2011
Chair: John Welch
Bob Muir
Rudy Reimer
Chris Papaianni
Kody Huard / Alexa Walker (Undergraduate Representatives)
Laura Walker (Recording Secretary)
Fall 2012
Chair: Bob Muir
Rudy Reimer
John Welch
Chris Papaianni
Matthew Go (Undergraduate Representative)
Laura Walker (Recording Secretary)
2011-2012 Biennial Report
5
Archaeology Student Society (Undergraduate)
Fall 2011
President
Vice President
Treasurer
Faculty Liaison
Forum Rep
Secretary
Debitage Editors
Rhory Gillies
Tyrone Hamilton
Kody Huard
Alexa Walker
Jaclyn Deacon
Kristen McLaughlin
Nikki Gervais, Katie Hausch
Spring 2012
President
Rhory Gillies
Vice President Tyrone Hamilton
Treasurer
Kody Huard
Faculty Liaison Alexa Walker
Forum Rep Jaclyn Deacon
Secretary
Kristen McLaughlin
Debitage Editors Nikki Gervais, Katie Hausch
Summer 2012
President
Vice President
Treasurer
Faculty Liaison
Forum Rep
Secretary
Debitage Editor
Michael Elvidge
Carleen Novak
Nyomi Sherwin
n/a
n/a
Kristen McLaughlin
n/a
Fall 2012
President
Vice President
Treasurer
Faculty Liaison
Forum Rep
Secretary
Debitage Editors
Michael Elvidge
Carleen Novak
Nyomi Sherwin
Matthew Go
Jaclyn Deacon
Kristen McLaughlin
Nyomi Sherwin, Chelsea Muirhead
Archaeology Graduate Student Committee
2011
Chair
Lia Tarle
Co-Chair
Sarah Carr-Locke
Treasurer
Antonia Rodrigues
Secretary
Kathleen LeBlanc
GSS Rep
Travis Freeland
GSS Alt. Rep
Sarah Carr-Locke
TSSU Rep
Melissa Roth
Department Rep Luseadra McKerracher
Space Sarah Carr-Locke
2012
Chair
Vacant
Co-ChairVacant
Treasurer
Antonia Rodrigues
Secretary
Kathleen LeBlanc
GSS Rep
Travis Freeland
TSSU Rep
Shea Henry
2nd TSSU Rep Melissa Roth
Department Rep Elizabeth Peterson
Space Sarah Carr-Locke
Raffle Sarah Oas
Seminar Series Organizing Committee
Library Committee Representative
2011
Mark Collard
Bethany Mathews
2011
Dana Lepofsky
2012
Sarah Carr-Locke
Julia Jackley
Dana Lepofsky
Antonia Rodrigues
6 2011-2012 Biennial Report
2012
Ross Jamieson
Staff Profiles
Merrill Farmer (BA, SFU)
Graduate Programme Assistant & Secretary to the Chair
Merrill Farmer joined the department in 2007 after graduating
from Simon Fraser University with a Bachelor of Arts degree
in Political Science. Her main interests included international
war and peace studies. Merrill’s main roles as Graduate
Programme Assistant & Secretary to the Chair include
graduate admissions, awards and advising, as well as assisting
with tenures, promotions and faculty liaising. Merrill takes
pride in working in the University environment and aiding in
the success of students.
Peter Locher (MA, SFU)
Laboratory Technician
In the position of Laboratory Technician, Peter is responsible
for all technical aspects of the Department’s teaching/research
laboratories and collections, computing operations, and the
maintenance of laboratory and field equipment. Peter received
an MA from SFU in 2006. His specialization is Geoarchaeology
and BC prehistoric archaeology.
Chris Papaianni (BA, SFU)
Manager & Academic Advisor
The budgetary side of Chris’ position involves managing the
departmental operating budgets, providing administrative
support for research and specific purpose budgets. Chris
develops and proposes the department’s instructional and
teaching assistant budgets for the Chair’s approval and
manages their execution. Chris also manages departmental
undergraduate activities, by providing academic advising
support to prospective and registered undergraduate students,
participating as a member of the undergraduate curriculum
committee, creating and monitoring the undergraduate
semesterly course schedules, developing and participating
in long-range course planning, and monitoring course
enrollments.
Laura Walker (BA, SFU)
of her duties as the Undergraduate Programme Assistant
& Budget Clerk include: ordering textbooks; collecting and
disseminating course outlines; processing financial paperwork;
account reconciliation; and various other tasks to assist
undergraduate students and the Department of Archaeology
team.
Barbara Winter (PhD, SFU)
Curator, SFU Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology
I have been directing the Museum of Archaeology and
Ethnology since 1990, and have developed the museum
collections through actively seeking donations of photographic
images and objects relating to archaeology and ethnology
around the world. I have focused a great deal of attention on
the Museum’s web site through a series of Virtual Museum of
Canada sponsored projects that have each involved up to 70
researchers, writers, designers, programmers, videographers,
photographers and translators, providing opportunities for
student employment. These sites have won major international
educational and design awards. During this time I have
managed the renovation and renewal of the museum exhibit
galleries.
I teach courses in Ancient Visual Art, Archaeological
Conservation, Archaeological Collections Management and
group directed study courses in exhibit design on an on-going
basis. Graduates of these courses are employed in permanent,
professional positions in museums throughout BC and beyond.
During the report period I was a Consulting Editor for ‘Dig’,
published in partnership with Archaeology Magazine, and
served on Sarah Carr-Locke’s graduate committee.
Shannon Wood (MA, SFU)
Manager, Archaeology Laboratories & Curator,
Research Collections
Shannon earned a BA, High Honours, in Anthropology from
the University of Saskatchewan in 1984, and completed her MA
in Archaeology at SFU in 1992. Her thesis was entitled: Tooth
wear and the sexual division of labour in an Inuit population.
Undergraduate Programme Assistant & Budget Clerk
Laura graduated from Simon Fraser University in 2005 with a
BA in Archaeology and has worked at SFU since 2006. Some
2011-2012 Biennial Report
7
Faculty Retirements
Brian Hayden
A fundamental question in understanding human sociality
concerns its biological basis. Some scholars have argued
that many human behaviours (such as art, language,
abstract thinking) could not occur until people with modern
brain structures evolved. Hayden disputes this biological
determinism, arguing that the wide range of social behaviours,
that first appear clearly in archaeological sites about 30,000
years ago and flourish after 10,000 years ago, resulted from
human responses to new pressures and opportunities and
not from the physical evolution of new brain structures. To
support this claim, Hayden undertook a substantial review
of the cultural capacities of Neanderthals, who preceded
anatomically modern people in Eurasia. Published in 1993, this
prescient study demonstrated that Neanderthals possessed the
capacity for modern behaviour, but that there were insufficient
selective pressures to make such behaviours common. Since
then, archaeological finds and analyses have shown that premodern humans were capable of what we think of as modern
behaviours at least 100,000 years before those behaviours
became commonplace. Hayden continues to write on this
theme.
Hayden’s work since the early 1990s has focused on two other
questions. First, why did some societies become socially
complex, evolving institutions such as chiefdoms or states?
Second, why did agriculture, the economic foundation of most
social complexity, develop? Hayden considers the answers to
these questions to be closely linked.
Brian Hayden at Keatley Creek, 2011 Photo: Russell Clark
I
n an impressive research record spanning more than 40
years, Brian Hayden has made original contributions to
some of the most long-standing questions posed by social
scientists: what are the origins of human society; why did people
develop agriculture; and, how do socially complex societies
emerge? In his contributions to these questions, Hayden has
undertaken archaeological and ethnographic investigations in
Canada, Central America, France, southeast Asia, the Pacific
and Australia. This interplay between fieldwork and theory is
characteristic of his entire academic career.
8 2011-2012 Biennial Report
Building on work begun in the 1980s, Hayden has studied
“transegalitarian” societies – those that are not egalitarian
but do not have clearly institutionalized hierarchical social
structures. Transegalitarian societies are well represented in
the archaeological record, and in numerous village-based tribal
societies around the modern world. Hayden has tackled the
origin of social complexity by studying these groups through
archaeology, ethnography, and cross-cultural studies.
Hayden has grounded his wide-ranging theoretical studies in
a long-term archaeological project on the interior plateau of
British Columbia, where he has focused on the excavation of a
village site inhabited for thousands of years by transegalitarian
hunter-gatherers, whose social complexity was based on
surpluses of salmon. His work at Keatley Creek has examined
how archaeologists can translate empirical, material evidence
into statements about social and economic organization in
societies that were neither egalitarian hunter-gatherer bands
nor fully-fledged hierarchical chiefdoms.
Mark Skinner
In summary, Hayden has advanced our understanding of the
origins of social complexity through studies of archaeological
data and modern societies, through careful cross-cultural
analysis, and through the development of powerful theory that
other archaeologists have been able to evaluate empirically. He
has changed our view of how egalitarian and transegalitarian
societies operate, and has focused attention on the role of
individual ambition as a force that leads to social and economic
transformations. His long-term development of important
hypotheses about the emergence of fundamental human
behaviour has been widely disseminated, stimulating and
controversial.
Dr. Jonathan Driver
M
ark Skinner retired in 2011 becoming Professor
Emeritus in the Department of Archaeology, Simon
Fraser University. Subsequently, he took his beloved
digital microscope to the University of York in the United
Kingdom where he is an Honorary Visiting Professor in the
Department of Archaeology. He is extending his studies of
linear enamel hypoplasia from chimpanzees in West Africa to
orangutans in Malesia. He is currently looking at comparative
episodic stress in Bornean and Sumatran orangutans. He
continues to consult in forensic anthropology especially to
families and the UBC Innocence Project. His future research
includes developing a pig model to understand enamel
hypoplasia in human milk teeth.
Machu Picchu
Photo: Katie LeBlanc, winner of the 2012 Archaeology Photo Contest
2011-2012 Biennial Report
9
Graduate Programme
Graduate Programme Committee REport
S
FU has long been recognised as a center of excellence
in Canada for graduate training in archaeology and
biological anthropology. The diversity of faculty research
interests and the availability of state-of-the-art laboratory
facilities have enabled graduate students to explore their
academic interests using a wide range of methodologies in
different geographical regions. By the end of December 2012,
there were 29 PhD students and 28 MA students enrolled in our
graduate programme. Between 2011 and 2012, one PhD and 13
MA students successfully completed their thesis studies.
While we are still facing challenges to secure multi-year
funding for our students, in 2011-12 the graduate student
funding situation improved significantly. During this period,
four of our graduate students received SFU’s prestigious C.D.
Nelson Entrance Scholarship. In addition greater numbers
of our Canadian graduate students have received Canadian
Government Scholarships from SSHRC in 2011-12, including
seven MA and four PhD students. Our international doctoral
students also have been highly successful in attracting multiyear external funding from the Wenner-Gren Foundation and
the Government of Ecuador.
In 2011-12, our graduate programme underwent a major
review which resulted in significant modifications to ensure
our students successfully complete their requirements in a
timely manner. These included:
1. A new format of PhD comprehensive examinations was
introduced to replace written examinations. The new exam
combines writing three review papers (Statements of Field)
followed by an oral examination of the statements. It creates
a new mechanism for students to work closely with faculty to
develop sufficient breadth and depth in their degree studies.
2. A new format of progress review for graduate students was
tested, revised and implemented in 2013. The new system
encourages students and faculty to work more closely with
each other to develop achievable milestones to facilitate their
progress.
3. Additional internal funds were allocated into the “Travel and
Minor Research Awards” to encourage graduate students to
present their studies at national and international conferences.
Each student may receive up to $1000 (PhD) or $800 (MA) to
help cover conference expenses. This has resulted in a better
representation of our graduate work at local and international
conferences.
Our recent graduates have had continued success at securing
employment with local consulting companies as well as
teaching positions at colleges and universities. We hope that
our student success will continue and that the changes made
in our programme will have an overall positive effect on our
students and the department.
Dongya Yang
Graduate Programme Chair
10 2011-2012 Biennial Report
Graduate Degrees Awarded
2011 Doctor of Philosophy
Ursula Arndt
Ancient DNA Analysis of North East Pacific Humpback Whale (Megaptera novaeangliae)
Senior Supervisor: Dr. Dongya Yang
2011 Master of Arts
Kristina HannisOn the Edge of Change: Shifting Land Use in the Piikani Timber Limit, Porcupine Hills, Alberta
Senior Supervisor: Dr. Eldon Yellowhorn
Julia Jackley
Weaving the Histories of Klehkwahnnohm: A Tla’amin Community in Southwest British Columbia
Senior Supervisor: Dr. Dana Lepofsky
Kathleen LeBlanc
Ceramic Ethnoarchaeology in Fiji: The Role of Social Processes in Ceramic Diversity
Senior Supervisor: Dr. David Burley
Jason Moore
Comparative Study of Ancient DNA Extraction Methods for Archaeological Plant Remains
Senior Supervisor: Dr. Dongya Yang
Alana Peters
The Real Wild West: The Archaeology and History of the ‘Casa Grande’
Senior Supervisor: Dr. Ross Jamieson
Nova Pierson
Bridging Troubled Waters: Zooarchaeology and Marine Conservation on Burrard Inlet, Southwest British Columbia
Senior Supervisor: Dr. Dana Lepofsky
April Ruttle
Risk and Technology: Exploring the Causes of Toolkit Variation Among Subsistence Farmers
Senior Supervisor: Dr. Mark Collard
Simon Solomon
Shattered Glass and Broken Bones: Piikani Domestic Space 1880-1960
Senior Supervisor: Dr. Eldon Yellowhorn
2012 Master of Arts
Daniela Balanzategui
Colonial Indigenous and Mastizo Foodways: Ceramic Analysis and Ethnoarchaeology in the Highlands of Ecuador
Senior Supervisor: Dr. Ross Jamieson
Mairi Capper
Urban Subsistence in the Bronze and Iron Ages: The Palaeoethnobotany of Tell Tayinat, Turkey
Senior Supervisor: Dr. Catherine D’Andrea
Sandie Dielissen Teaching a School to Talk: Archaeology of the Queen Victoria Jubilee Home for Indian Children
Senior Supervisor: Dr. Eldon Yellowhorn
Antonia Rodrigues
Experimental Investigation into the Preservation and Recovery of Degraded DNA from Sediments
Senior Supervisor: Dr. Dongya Yang
Lia Tarle
Clothing and the Replacement of Neanderthals by Modern Humans
Senior Supervisor: Dr. Mark Collard
2011-2012 Biennial Report
11
Graduate Students
PhD Students
Fernando Astudillo
Daniela Balanzategui
Chris Carleton
Sarah Carr-Locke
Diane Cockle
Alan Cross
Mana Dembo
Sandie Dielissen
Marina Elliott
Mariane Gaudreau
Shea Henry
Julia Jackley
Jennifer Jones
Michael Klassen
Kathleen LeBlanc Jennifer Lewis
Luseadra McKerracher
Elizabeth Peterson Brianne Phaff
Antonia Rodrigues
Craig Rust
April Ruttle
Audrey Scott
Chris Springer
Habtamu Taddesse
Lia Tarle
Grace Hua Zhang
Supervisor
Dr. Ross Jamieson
Dr. Ross Jamieson
Dr. Mark Collard
Dr. George Nicholas
Dr. Lynne Bell
Dr. Mark Collard
Dr. Mark Collard
Dr. Eldon Yellowhorn
Dr. Mark Collard
Dr. George Nicholas
Dr. David Burley
Dr. Dana Lepofsky
Dr. Ross Jamieson
Dr. Eldon Yellowhorn
Dr. David Burley
Dr. John Welch
Dr. Mark Collard
Dr. George Nicholas
Dr. David Burley
Dr. Dongya Yang
Dr. John Welch
Dr. Mark Collard
Dr. Pablo Nepomnaschy
Dr. Dana Lepofsky
Dr. Catherine D’Andrea
Dr. Mark Collard
Dr. Dongya Yang
MA Student Sarah Oas, Ethopia MEZBER 2012
12 2011-2012 Biennial Report
Masters Students
Ruth Aloua
Amelia Barker
Emily Benson
Nyra Chalmer
Laurie Darcus
Travis Freeland
Annique-Elise Goode
Jenifer Gustavsen
Cara Halseth
Evan Hardy
Erin Hogg
Kody Huard
Michelle Lynch
Bethany Mathews Sarah Oas
Alexis Ohman
Michelle Puckett
Melissa Roth
Thomas Royle
Ian Sellers
Elizabeth Velliky
Louise Williams
Kasia Zimmerman
Supervisor
Dr. John Welch
Dr. Mark Collard
Dr. George Nicholas
Dr. Dana Lepofsky
Dr. Catherine D’Andrea
Dr. David Burley
Dr. George Nicholas
Dr. Mark Collard
Dr. Dongya Yang
Dr. Dongya Yang
Dr. John Welch
Dr. David Burley
Dr. David Burley
Dr. George Nicholas
Dr. Catherine D’Andrea
Dr. Catherine D’Andrea
Dr. Dana Lepofsky
Dr. Dongya Yang
Dr. Dongya Yang
Dr. Ross Jamieson
Dr. Rudy Reimer
Dr. Dana Lepofsky
Dr. Dongya Yang
PhD Student Sarah Carr-Locke
Graduate Departmental and External Awards
External Awards
CGS Michael Smith Foreign Study Supplement (SSHRC)
Jennifer Jones
Society for American Archaeology Award
Simon Solomon
SENESCYT-HECE Scholarship Beca Convocatoria Abierta
Senescyt Primera Fase
Daniela Balanzategui
Fernando Astudillo
Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of
Canada (SSHRC) – Joseph Armand Bombardier Doctoral
Awards
Kathleen LeBlanc
Chris Carleton
Mariane Gaudreau
April Ruttle
Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of
Canada (SSHRC) – Joseph Armand Bombardier Masters
Awards
Laurie Darcus
Travis Freeland
Cara Halseth
Misha Puckett
Antonia Rodrigues
Lia Tarle
Kasia Zimmerman
Wadsworth International Fellowship, Wenner-Gren
Foundation, USA
Habtamu Taddesse
SFU Administered Awards
Alexia Sepideh Kiaii Archaeology Graduate Scholarship
Alexis Ohman
Graduate International Scholarship
Sarah Oas
Canadian Pacific Teck Resources Award for Environmental
Innovation
Antonia Rodrigues
Pacific Century Scholarship
Lia Tarle
Chris Springer
C.D. Nelson Graduate Entrance Scholarship
Mariane Gaudreau
Alexandra Kruse (2)
Kathleen LeBlanc (4)
Thomas Royle
Provost’s Prize of Distinction
Chris Carleton (4)
Nyra Chalmer (2)
Laurie Darcus
Travis Freeland (3)
Cara Halseth (3)
Kathleen LeBlanc (3)
Chris Springer (3)
Community Trust Endowment Funds (CTEF) Doctoral
Graduate Fellowship in Humanities
Alan Cross
Julia Jackley
April Ruttle
Dr. J.V. Christensen Graduate Scholarship
Daniela Balanzategui
Sarah Carr-Locke
Kathleen LeBlanc
Special Graduate Entrance Scholarship
Emily Benson
Travis Freeland
Sarah Oas
Elizabeth Peterson
Thomas Royle
Graduate International Research Travel Award
Lia Tarle
2011-2012 Biennial Report
13
Department of Archaeology Administered awards
SFU Graduate Fellowship
Ruth Rebeccalynne Aloua (MA)
Daniela Balanzategui (MA, PhD)
Amelia Barker (MA)
Sarah Carr-Locke (PhD)
Nyra Chalmer (MA)
Mana Dembo (PhD)
Jenifer Gustavsen (MA)
Cara Halseth (MA)
Shea Henry (PhD)
Alexandra Kruse (MA)
Jennifer Lewis (PhD)
Michelle Lynch (MA)
Bethany Mathews (MA)
Jason Moore (MA)
Sarah Oas (MA)
Alexis Ohman (MA)
Melissa Roth (MA)
Craig Rust (PhD)
Ian Sellers (MA)
Lia Tarle (PhD)
Elizabeth Velliky (MA)
Louise Williams (MA)
Dr. Jack Nance Memorial Graduate Scholarship
in Archaeology
Sarah Carr-Locke
Bethany Mathews
Antonia Rodrigues
Roy L. Carlson Graduate Scholarship in Prehistoric
British Columbia Archaeology
Elizabeth Velliky
Louise Williams
PhD student Kathleen LeBlanc
Graduate Student Caucus Report
T
he Archaeology Graduate Student Caucus (AGSC) is
an organized body of the current graduate students of
the Department of Archaeology. Our core mission is to
administer revenue generated through graduate student fees
and through weekly fundraising raffles/events to our caucus
members. The AGSC is comprised of an executive, several
representatives that liaise with other administrative bodies, and
assorted committees that organize events for and allocate space
to our members.
During the 2011-2012 and 2012-13 academic years, we fulfilled
our mandate with regard to the administration of our available
funds. We reorganized the spending of our funds by the
discontinuation of the unwanted filtered water in the Grad
Lab. We have also extended our efforts in raising funds by
14 2011-2012 Biennial Report
conducting an ongoing bake sale at the weekly seminar series
for the Archaeology department where each member of the
AGSC takes turns in providing the baked goods that are sold.
Regarding the supplying of funds, AGSC has reimbursed more
than a dozen students for costs associated with conference and/
or research-related travel. Additionally, AGSC contributed
financially to the organization of the 2011 undergraduate
Archaeology Student Society social.
We are all looking forward to the upcoming academic year and
are optimistic that the 2013-2014 cohort of graduate students
will provide fresh enthusiasm and integrity to the AGSC
community.
Elizabeth Peterson
AGSC Department Representative
Undergraduate Programme
Undergraduate Programme Committee Report
A
rchaeology department undergraduate enrollments
remained relatively stable throughout 2011-2012, with
total enrollments of 3220 in 2011 and 3204 in 2012.
However, the number of archaeology majors rose substantially
during the same period, from 146 in Fall 2011 to 183 in Fall
2012. The increase in majors may have been, in part, due to
our move to the Faculty of Environment, where students have
direct entry into their majors at the start of their programme
rather than during their second year in the Faculty of Arts
and Social Sciences. Enrollment in our Certificate in Cultural
Resource Management program also increased from 19 to 29
declared students during this period. This programme has
proven to be very popular, with 41 students having earned the
credential since its inception in Fall 2009.
Archaeology, Biological Anthropology and Topical Courses.
The changes were made in an effort to better reflect the strengths
and structure of our department/programme, which had
undergone a number of faculty changes during the preceding
four years as well as to improve integration of our programme
with the objectives of the Faculty of Environment at SFU.
Bob Muir
Undergraduate Committee Chair
Chris Papaianni
Manager & Academic Advisor
A major restructuring of the undergraduate programme
curriculum and degree requirements, developed in 2010, was
approved by Senate and undertaken in 2011. These changes
primarily involved reorganizing our upper level course
requirements under three thematic categories: Environmental
2011-2012 Biennial Report
15
Honours Theses Completed
Spring 2011
Chelsey Armstrong
The Tree of Life: Garry Oak Ecosystems and Ancient DNA
Supervisor: Dr. Dongya Yang
Andrea Logan
Understanding Conflict on the Canadian Plateau: A Study of Intra- and Inter-Group Relations Within and Between Aboriginal Societies in the Pre-Contact and Historic Period
Supervisor: Dr. George Nicholas
Anna Shoemaker
An Archaeobotanical Analysis of the Role of Oil Palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) and Incense Tree (Canarium schweinfurthii) at Bosumpra Cave, Ghana
Supervisor: Dr. Catherine D’Andrea
Fall 2011
Brigit Burbank
Sex Estimation using the Temporal Bone: Review of the Lateral Angle Method
Supervisor: Dr. Deborah Merrett
Spring 2012
Sarah Brooks
The Meaning Behind the Bone: A Population Analysis of Cribra Orbitalia
Supervisor: Dr. Deborah Merrett
Tyrone Hamilton
Visual and Geochemical Analysis of Dacite Lithic Artifacts from the Squamish Region
Supervisor: Dr. Rudy Reimer
Katie Hausch
Unauthorized Heritage Site Alteration in British Columbia: Criminal Intent or
Ignorance?
Supervisor: Dr. John Welch
Kody Huard
Toki: An Analysis of Tongan Adzes
Supervisor: Dr. David Burley
Fall 2012
Jeffrey Nelson
Assessment of Nutritional Deficiency in the Skeletal Assemblage of Seh Gabi
Supervisor: Dr. Deborah Merrett
16 2011-2012 Biennial Report
Undergraduate Awards and Prizes
Ingrid Nystrom Archaeology Award
2011/2012Aleesha Bakkelund
2012/2013 Matthew Go
Brian Williamson Memorial Award in Archaeology
2011/2012Kristen McLaughlin
2012/2013Melissa Scott
Jack Nance Memorial Essay Prize
2011/2012 Alexa Walker Indigenous Egyptology: How the Egyptian People Reclaimed their Cultural Heritage
2012/2013
Eric Simons A Chorus in A(sia) Minor: Multivocality in Practice at Çatalhöyük
Chair’s Essay Prize
2011/2012
Laurel Berg Getting Beyond the Minutiae: A Critique of the Major Contributions of Anthropologist Julian Steward to the New Archaeology Movement
2012/2013
Origins of Microblade Technology
Jordan Handley Students learn flint knapping
Developing x-rays
2011-2012 Biennial Report
17
Archaeology Student Society Report
T
he Archaeology Student Society (A.S.S) was active
during the last academic year. During the Fall 2012
semester the A.S.S held several meetings and introduced
an almost entirely new executive. One of the highlights of this
semester was the Museum Meet and Greet, which was held on
October 17, 2012. This event fostered communication between
faculty, graduate students, and undergraduates. The A.S.S
continued to host archaeology movie nights as well as student
pub nights to maintain and build the archaeology student
community. We also created a petition and sent letters to the
Simon Fraser Student Society (SFSS) executive in order to
reinstate conference funding for all students. This arose when
the A.S.S was denied funding to send a group of students to the
2012 Canadian Association for Physical Anthropology (CAPA)
conference in Victoria, B.C. Although this received little
attention during the Fall semester it was discussed by the SFSS
in a March 2013 meeting, and it is expected that conference
funding will be returned to students with a re-evaluated system.
students. It is expected that this will be a barbeque that will
take place within the first week of the Fall semester. This will
hopefully be used to showcase what archaeology students are
doing and to increase outside student interest in archaeology to
both enlist new students and gain support for the concerns of
our community.
I would like to thank the Archaeology Department for all their
contributions to the A.S.S over the last year and the wonderful
team of executives, without whom none of the achievements of
our student society would have been possible.
Michael Elvidge
A.S.S President
The A.S.S. continued to produce The Debitage, which has been
very successful. Special thanks to the Editors (Nyomi Sherwin
and Chelsea Muirhead) and the many contributors.
In the next year it is expected that the A.S.S will continue the
events that are enjoyed by both faculty and students, such as
the Meet and Greet, and will make further progress in fostering
academic and personal relationships for all students. It is also the
intention of the A.S.S to continue to distribute The Debitage as
well as provide the means for student concerns to be addressed
to the appropriate parties. Planning is also underway to make
a new welcome and orientation day for new and returning
Daniel Dick presenting at Undergraduate Student Symposium
Undergraduate Courses Offered
Spring 2011
100-3
100-3
100-3
100-3
131-3
131-3
131-3
201-3
252-3
273-3
332-3
333-3
334-3
Ancient Peoples and Places
Ancient Peoples and Places
Ancient Peoples and Places
Ancient Peoples and Places
Human Origins
Human Origins
Human Origins
Introduction to Archaeology
Ancient Egypt and Africa
Archaeology of the New World
Special Topics in Archaeology I: Native Cultures of North America
Special Topics in Archaeology II: Climate and Human Evolution
Special Topics in Archaeology III: Plagues and People
18 2011-2012 Biennial Report
Brian Hayden
Ross Jamieson
Alvaro Higueras
Jane Roy
Dennis Sandgathe
Dennis Sandgathe
David Maxwell
Brian Hayden
Catherine D’Andrea
Eldon Yellowhorn
Rudy Reimer
Alan Cross
Deborah Merrett
338-3
Archaeology of China
349-5
Management of Archaeological Collections
372-5
Material Culture Analysis
373-5
Human Osteology
376-5Quantitative Methods in Archaeology
378-3Pacific Northwest of North America
385-5Paleoanthropology
471W-5Archaeological Theory
479-3Directed Readings
480-5Directed Laboratory/Library/Field Research
498-5Honours Reading
499-5Honours Thesis
Dongya Yang
Barbara Winter
Brian Hayden
Dongya Yang
Briggs Buchanan
Dana Lepofsky
Mark Collard
George Nicholas
Faculty
Faculty
Faculty
Faculty
Summer 2011
100-3Ancient Peoples and Places
131-3Human Origins
433-6Background to Fieldwork: Cochrane Bay
434-3Exercises in Mapping and Recording: Cochrane Bay
435-6Field Work Practicum: Cochrane Bay
479-3Directed Readings
480-5Directed Laboratory/Library/Field Research
498-5Honours Reading
499-5Honours Thesis
Brian Hayden
Dennis Sandgathe
Bob Muir
Bob Muir
Bob Muir
Faculty
Faculty
Faculty
Faculty
Fall 2011
100-3Ancient Peoples and Places
100-3Ancient Peoples and Places
100-3Ancient Peoples and Places
131-3Human Origins
131-3Human Origins
131-3Human Origins
131-3Human Origins
201-3Introduction to Archaeology
272-3Archaeology of the Old World
301-3Prehistoric Art
332-3Special Topics in Archaeology I: Near Eastern Archaeology
334-3Special Topics in Archaeology III: Aztec & Inca: Archaeology of Empires
339-3Special Temporary Topics: Culture of Greece
340-5Zooarchaeology
344-3Primate Behaviour
372-5Material Culture Analysis
373-5Human Osteology
383-3Molecular Bioarchaeology
386-3Archaeological Resource Management
435-6Field Work Practicum: Greece
471W-5Archaeological Theory
479-3Directed Readings
480-5Directed Laboratory/Library/Field Research
485-5Lithic Technology
498-5Honours Reading
499-5Honours Thesis
Ross Jamieson
Ross Jamieson
David Maxwell
Dennis Sandgathe
Biruté Galdikas
Dennis Sandgathe
Dennis Sandgathe
David Maxwell
Catherine D’Andrea
Barbara Winter
Jennifer Lewis
Alvaro Higueras
Geoffrey Schmalz
Bob Muir
Biruté Galdikas
Bob Muir
Ana Boza-Arlotti
Dongya Yang
John Welch
Geoffrey Schmalz
George Nicholas
Faculty
Faculty
Dennis Sandgathe
Faculty
Faculty
2011-2012 Biennial Report
19
Spring 2012
100-3Ancient Peoples and Places
100-3Ancient Peoples and Places
100-3Ancient Peoples and Places
100-3Ancient Peoples and Places
131-3Human Origins
131-3Human Origins
131-3Human Origins
201-3Introduction to Archaeology
252-3Ancient Egypt and Africa
273-3Archaeology of the New World
321-3Select Regions in World Archaeology I: Archaeology of Latin America
329-3Special Topics in Environmental Archaeology: Geoarchaeology
331-3Select Regions in World Archaeology II: Ancient Greece
332-3Special Topics in Archaeology I: Palaeolithic Archaeology
348-5Archaeological Conservation
372-5Material Culture Analysis
373-5Human Osteology
376-5Quantitative Methods in Archaeology
452-5Introduction to Paleopathology
471W-5Archaeological Theory
479-3Directed Readings
480-5Directed Laboratory/Library/Field Research
498-5Honours Reading
499-5Honours Thesis
Ross Jamieson
Ross Jamieson
Alvaro Higueras
Douglas Ross
Dennis Sandgathe
Dennis Sandgathe
Dennis Sandgathe
David Maxwell
Catherine D’Andrea
Eldon Yellowhorn
Ross Jamieson
Rudy Reimer
Geoffrey Schmalz
Dennis Sandgathe
Barbara Winter
Bob Muir
Dongya Yang
Bob Muir
Deborah Merrett
George Nicholas
Faculty
Faculty
Faculty
Faculty
Summer 2012
100-3Ancient Peoples and Places
100-3Ancient Peoples and Places
131-3Human Origins
131-3Human Origins
252-3Ancient Egypt and Africa
301-3Ancient Visual Art
321-3Select Regions in World Archaeology I: Prehistory of British Columbia
331-3Select Regions in World Archaeology II: Fiji Culture, History and Archaeology
434-3Archaeological Field Methods: Fiji
434-3Archaeological Field Methods: SFU Burnaby
435-6Field Work Practicum: Fiji
479-3Directed Readings
480-5Directed Laboratory/Library/Field Research
498-5Honours Reading
499-5Honours Thesis
Ross Jamieson
Dennis Sandgathe
Dennis Sandgathe
Dennis Sandgathe
Catherine D’Andrea
Barbara Winter
Bob Muir
David Burley
David Burley
Bob Muir
David Burley
Faculty
Faculty
Faculty
Faculty
Fall 2012
100-3Ancient Peoples and Places
100-3Ancient Peoples and Places
100-3Ancient Peoples and Places
100-3Ancient Peoples and Places
20 2011-2012 Biennial Report
Ross Jamieson
David Maxwell
Ernest Bumann
Alvaro Higueras
131-3Human Origins
131-3Human Origins
131-3Human Origins
201-3Introduction to Archaeology
272-3Archaeology of the Old World
301-3Ancient Visual Art
321-3Select Regions in World Archaeology I: Aboriginal Australia
322-3Special Topics in Biological Anthropology: Great Apes
331-3Select Regions in World Archaeology II: American Southwest
333-3Special Topics in Archaeology II: Greece Field School
344-3Primate Behaviour
365-3Ecological Archaeology
372-5Material Culture Analysis
373-5Human Osteology
386-3Archaeological Resource Management
435-6
Field Work Practicum: Greece
442-5
Forensic Anthropology
471W-5
Archaeological Theory
479-3Directed Readings
480-5Directed Laboratory/Library/Field Research
498-5Honours Reading
499-5Honours Thesis
Dennis Sandgathe
Dennis Sandgathe
David Maxwell
David Burley
Catherine D’Andrea
Barbara Winter
George Nicholas
Biruté Galdikas
John Welch
Andonis Vasilakis
Biruté Galdikas
Dana Lepofsky
Bob Muir
Dongya Yang
Bob Muir
Andonis Vasilakis
Ana Boza-Arlotti
George Nicholas
Faculty
Faculty
Faculty
Faculty
Field Schools
Summer 2011
Fall 2011
Summer 2012
Fall 2012
Cochrane Bay, Sunshine Coast, BC
Field Director: Bob Muir
Kefalonia, Greece
Field Director: Geoffrey Schmalz
Sigatoka Sand Dunes, Viti Levu, Fiji
Field Director: David Burley Kefalonia, Greece
Field Director: Andonis Vasilakis
PhD student Chris Springer taking a
break from field work
2011-2012 Biennial Report
21
Field School reports
2011 Field School at Cochrane Bay
Cochrane Bay site is a pre-contact residential site situated
in Malaspina Inlet, North of Powell River. The information
collected during excavations of Cochrane Bay will form the basis
of Nyra’s MA thesis. Twelve SFU undergraduates participated
in the program and despite a distinct lack of sunshine, managed
to contribute to an exceptionally productive and enjoyable
field season. In addition to the excavations at Cochrane Bay
the students also had the opportunity to contribute to other
aspects of the overall research project including a regional
inventory of archaeological sites (directed by SFU PhD student
Chris Springer); the mapping and investigation of intertidal
fish traps (directed by University of Alberta PhD student
and SFU alumna Megan Caldwell); and contributed to the
Willingdon Beach Park, Aboriginal Day celebrations where
they presented information about archaeology, artifacts, stone
tool manufacturing and intertidal fish traps to children from
throughout the Powell River School District.
I
n the summer of 2011 our local B.C. field school was once
again held on the Sunshine Coast. This was the fourth year
of research done in collaboration with the Tla’amin First
Nation as part of a multi-year research program in Archaeology
and Heritage Stewardship (co-lead by Drs. John Welch and
Dana Lepofsky). The overall goal of the research program is to
conduct archaeological and heritage research that is meaningful
to and driven by Tla’amin community needs and desires. This
collaborative project has focused on a comprehensive study of
Tla’amin history through integrating archaeological evidence,
traditional knowledge and archival materials. Since the project’s
inception, this approach has continued to create opportunities
for community engagement, information sharing and fostering
mutually-beneficial partnerships between Tla’amin and SFU
communities and beyond. In addition to contributing to
the development of a research strategy, the Tla’amin Nation
also generously provided support in the form of equipment,
housing, and knowledgable field researchers throughout the
course of the field season.
The 2011 field school component focussed on archaeological
excavation of the Cochrane Bay site, and was directed by Dr.
Bob Muir and Nyra Chalmer (SFU graduate student). The
22 2011-2012 Biennial Report
Bob Muir, Nyra Chalmer and Dana Lepofsky
Field school participants show artifacts to school children.
2012 South Pacific Field School in Fiji
T
he 10th SFU South Pacific archaeological field school
was held in the Republic of Fiji during the summer
semester of 2012. Taught by David Burley, this is a joint
undertaking between the Department of Archaeology and
SFU International Programs. Fourteen students participated
with graduate students Nyra Chalmer, Kathleen LeBlanc and
Travis Freeland respectively serving as Laboratory Instructor,
Assistant Field Supervisor and Field Laboratory Supervisor.
Course offerings included ARCH 332-3 (Fiji Culture, History
and Archaeology), ARCH 434-3 (Mapping and Recording)
and ARCH 435-6 (Field Work Practicum) with initial lectures
spread between SFU Burnaby and the University of South
Pacific in Suva. While in Fiji students also spent time at
Levuka, the former colonial capital on the island of Ovalau,
Waidracia Village in the Natasiri highlands of Viti Levu, Colo i
Suva Forest Park on the outskirts of Suva, and Tavuni Hill Fort
on the Sigatoka River. The fieldwork practicum was conducted
at the Sigatoka Sand Dunes National Park on the Coral Coast
of Viti Levu, the largest island in Fiji.
The Sigatoka Sand Dunes are a parabolic dune field stretching
from the mouth of the Sigatoka River westward along the
coastal shore for a 5 km distance. As the dunes erode and
move inland, archaeological materials are continually being
exposed. The practicum course, thus, not only provides
training and experience in archaeological field methods to
the student group but also documents and undertakes rescue
excavations in support of National Park heritage conservation
efforts. All work is done in collaboration with the Archaeology
Division of the Fiji Museum and the National Trust for Fiji, the
latter being the government agency responsible for National
Park administration. The principal focus for 2012 was a
fifth field season of excavation at a site with superimposed
village occupation floors, each characterized by a distinctive
assemblage of mid-sequence (1300-1500 BP) Plainware and
Navatu phase ceramics. A total area of 36 m2 was excavated
resulting in the recovery of tens of thousands of ceramic
sherds and other materials. Students additionally carried out
archaeological survey along the coastal margins and inland
dune valleys of the National Park.
David Burley
SFU field school students being hosted to a feast by Waidracia Village,
Viti Levu, Fiji
SFU 2012 South Pacific archaeological field School students at Sigatoka
Sand Dunes National Park, Viti Levu, Fiji, also including teaching staff,
Fiji Museum field officers and local field assistants
2011-2012 Biennial Report
23
2012 Field School in Greece
TZANNATA LH SETTLEMENT PROJECT
T
he excavation, directed by Dr. Andonis Vasilakis, now
Director Emeritus of the 35th Ephoreia of Antiquities of
Kefalonia, took place in 2011 and 2012 at ‘Riza’ near the
village Tzannata/Poros, in the SE part of the island of Kefallinia.
Part of a LH settlement was discovered. The project was funded
by the Society for Research of Prehistoric Kefalonia. SFU field
school students participated in this project in the Fall semester
of 2012.
A large apsidal-ovoid (or ellipsoid) building (Megaron A, in
green) with 4 rooms of LH II B to LH III A2 date (1450-1300
BC) has been excavated. A paved road bordered by two long
walls (in red) and a smaller apsidal building dated (in blue) to
the LM III B-C period were also discovered, above the remains
of the Megaron A. Five pure tile graves of the Late Roman
period were also discovered to the east.
Room 4 was the last to be discovered and excavated in 2012.
In its centre we left a square meter unexcavated to document
the road. Of this room only the eastern part was completely
excavated. The western part was left for the coming year. In the
deepest layer traces of a wall from previous occupation of the
site was discovered.
There is strong evidence - from remains of walls in all 3 rooms
(but not in Room 1) and from pottery, collected from what
seems to have been a deposit, on which the west and north part
of the circular wall has been built - that these deep layers are
dated to MH III and/or LH I (in brown). Main finds were: fine
and coarse pottery of LH II and LH III periods, a boar tusk,
many clay spindle weights, and a shaped triangular flint blade.
Andonis Vasilakis
Room 1 of the ellipsoid megaron is in the south part of the
structure. Half of the east part of the thick south round wall
was totally destroyed by an olive tree and plowing, which went
as deep as the bed rock. On its floor, which was of beaten earth,
two small round stone built structures were used for pithoi. Two
mud plastered pits/hearths were also discovered in the floor.
Room 2 is almost square and its east (exterior) and south
walls are much destroyed. In its northeast angle ten river
pebbles were discovered in situ, thus suggesting that the floor
was paved. Much of the debris of this room, as was the case
with Room A, was totally destroyed by plowing, thus only the
destruction layer with the stones and the pottery beneath them
was preserved intact. In the middle of the room close to the west
wall, traces of wall of an earlier occupation were discovered.
Room 3 is the largest, the best preserved and the most
complicated. Here the small apsidal building (Megaron B)
was built after the destruction and abandonment of the large
building (see bellow). Almost half of the room underlay the
small apsidal building, and this makes its exploration very
difficult. Only a small trial trench was made in the apse of the
small building, uncovering the border of the western hearth
and the traces of the southern separating wall. The excavation
will continue here.
24 2011-2012 Biennial Report
Ground plan of the excavation
Museum of Archaeology
and Ethnology
We continued the practice of engaging local communities by
bringing museum exhibit design expertise to the small coastal
community of Powell River, B.C., where students designed
an archaeological exhibit in collaboration with Michele
Washington of the Tla’amin Band and mounted a new exhibit
in the Powell River Museum. Barbara Winter assisted the
Eastern Tigrai Archaeological project during 2011, working
with ceramic collections from the site of Mezber. While in
Ethiopia she presented three papers on museum development
and conservation to a UNESCO sponsored conference of
museum professionals, and advised several museums on
conservation issues.
O
Dr. Barbara Winter, Curator
ur Department’s complement of outstanding research,
training and outreach facilities includes the SFU
Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology. The Museum
plays essential outreach, research, and training roles at SFU
and serves as the repository for diverse collections, with
substantial concentrations of materials from Latin America,
North America’s Northwest Coast, and the Pacific Rim more
generally.
The staff of the museum was effectively tripled in 2012 with
the development and launch of the Research Associates
programme. The programme is open to recent graduates,
undergraduates and graduate-level students of all majors. All
positions are project-oriented with the incumbents’ career
and learning aspirations matched to the projects assigned.
The programme allows research associates to relate theory to
practice and gain practical experience in a field of interest.
Projects can be completed in research, collections management,
exhibit development and education. The museum welcomed
Kira Baker, Duncan MacLeod, and Laura Termes into these
positions.
Our new website ‘Investigating Forensics’ highlighting the
research undertaken by the Centre for Forensic Research was
completed and launched. The site features many high quality
images and videos designed for instructional use in forensics
classes. The site is built around an exercise in critical thinking,
and was created in collaboration with the Centre for Forensic
Research and The Critical Thinking Consortium. The curator
also collaborated on the SFU Library’s website on the Komagata
Maru Incident. This site was launched in 2012.
The museum received a donation of $100,000 for new exhibit
cases which will improve our ability to exhibit fragile and
environmentally sensitive objects. Barbara Winter and Duncan
MacLeod have developed completely new gallery exhibits. A
team of senior undergraduate students will be designing,
developing and installing the exhibits during the summer of
2013.
We continue to build the collections of the museum through
an active acquisitions and donation programme. Donations of
objects received in 2011 and 2012 include terracotta and stone
oil lamps from the Mediterranean and Levant. Other notable
donations include two groups of objects from Ethiopia, one of
mixed ethnographic materials dating from the 1950s and early
1960s, the other of recent domestic handmade ceramics.
The archival collection is being actively developed through
donation and ongoing collection management. We are
Kira Baker, 2012/13 Research Associate Archivist of Digital Collections
Research, Care and Management
2011-2012 Biennial Report
25
developing
the
SFU
collection to document
archaeological sites in
their recent and current
state of conservation and
interpretation, the practice
of archaeology in the
present and recent past,
ethnographic diversity in
an increasingly globalized
world, and objects of
material culture. These
images are used in
instruction in the department, in web and gallery based exhibits
and limited rights to use of the images are sold to publishers
and documentary filmmakers, providing a small revenue
stream for the museum. Images from the forensics website
were published in ‘Archeothema’, an archaeology magazine in
France, and several children’s science magazines, with royalties
going into the museum equipment purchase fund. In the last
two years we have received images from North America, Africa
and Papua New Guinea. Students digitize and catalogue and
database the images, developing web and gallery exhibits.
Barbara Winter
Museum Curator
Duncan MacLeod, 2012/13 Research Associate Curator of Archaeology,
Research and Collections Care and Management
T
Centre for
Forensic Research
he Centre for Forensic Research (CFR) is an
interdisciplinary research program at SFU that was
formed in 2007 with a mandate to create new knowledge
in the forensic sciences for the purposes of solving crimes,
identifying human remains, determining elapsed time since
death and in investigating circumstances of death on local and
global scales. The Centre serves the research and day-to-day
needs of law enforcement and death investigation agencies
nationally and provincially. The Centre is housed in the
north wing of the Saywell Hall Building with state-of-the-art
laboratories, providing an excellent environment for research
and graduate student training.
The Centre was originally composed of five core faculty
members: Dr. Mark Skinner (retired in 2011) and Dr. Dongya
Yang from the Department of Archaeology, Dr. Gail Anderson
and Dr. Lynne Bell from the School of Criminology, and Dr.
Rolf Mathewes from the Department of Biological Sciences.
Both Dr. Anderson and Dr. Yang served as the co-directors in
2011-12 while Andrew Barton continues to be the operations
manager of the Centre.
The Centre has provided forensic anthropology, forensic
26 2011-2012 Biennial Report
archaeology and forensic DNA services to both BC Coroner’s
Service and the RCMP. The capacity of this service was
significantly affected by the retirement of Dr. Skinner in 2011.
Fortunately, Dr. Ana Boza-Arlotti, Research Associate of the
CFR and adjunct faculty in the Department of Archeology
took on the role of forensic anthropologist left by Dr. Skinner.
Through her exemplary work on many cases, Dr. Boza-Arlotti
was able to sustain the services provided by the CFR with the
assistance of Dr. Deborah Merrett, another adjunct faculty
member in forensic anthropology from the Department of
Archaeology. In addition, Dr. Yang and his graduate students
were involved in individual identification of cold cases using
ancient DNA methods. Graduate student Antonia Rodrigues
received a research grant (C. Stevens Wildlife Award) to develop
DNA-based techniques for specific identifications of processed
pangolins products.
Forensic DNA research in the CFR has used animals as proxies
in controlled experiments to study molecular taphonomy,
DNA degradation in bones, teeth and soils. Dr. Yang’s group
is developing DNA identification methods for human skeletal
remains, animal and plant materials for forensic and wildlife
investigations. On-going and completed DNA projects include
a wildlife forensics program in collaboration with the World
Wildlife Fund Canada (WWF), TRAFFIC, and the Pacific
Environmental Science Centre of Environment Canada. The
program aims to incorporate morphology- and DNA-based
methods for the identification of endangered and threatened
species from modified and processed animal and plant
materials to stop illegal trading of the protected species.
Centre for Forensic Research at SFU
those aiming to develop optimal techniques for the recovery of
DNA from historic envelopes, dry corals, and furs.
In 2011 and 2012, the CFR made significant efforts to develop
By the end of 2012, the Department of Archaeology hired a
new faculty member, Dr. Hugo Cardoso who has extensive
expertise in human osteology and forensic anthropology. Dr.
Cardoso will join the Centre as a faculty replacement for Dr.
Mark Skinner. With his involvement, it can be expected that
the capacity of research, service and graduate training of the
CFR will be dramatically increased and significantly enhanced.
Dongya Yang
CFR Co-Director
Archaeology Laboratories
T
he Archaeology Laboratories support laboratory classes,
field and research projects; acquire and maintain
laboratory and field equipment; act as local network
administrators; maintain department laboratories; and curate
the department’s teaching and research collections. Currently
the Laboratories are staffed by Shannon Wood, Manager, and
Peter Locher, Technician.
In 2011-2012, laboratory staff supported 24 laboratory classes,
two field schools and approximately 50 field and laboratory
projects led by faculty, graduate and undergraduate students,
and visiting researchers. Fourteen work-study students and
two volunteers have been supervised on various projects,
including work in the zooarchaeology collection, the historic
collection, photography collection, the C14 database and
osteology. Department Teaching and Reference collections and
Excavation level materials are being stored and maintained on
an ongoing basis.
A number of renovations occurred during this period. Security
for the Museum back hallway was increased with the installation
of a new door to its eastern end and a card reader system.
Security was also upgraded in the 8000 level laboratory
hallway in light of a break-in in the summer of 2011.
Further options for security in this area were investigated
in 2012 and installation of these options is scheduled for
2013. Security was also increased in the General Office,
which underwent renovations in late 2011 and early 2012 to
decrease access to the area. This was accomplished by moving
the front counter, with its old, insecure shutter system and
mailboxes, behind a lockable door off the main hallway.
Smaller projects included the repair of skylights in EDB 8617B,
the installation of a SANTIS alarm system for computers in
the Computer Lab and initial attempts to mitigate ventilation
noise in some of the laboratories in Saywell Hall. This project
will continue into 2013.
In the spring of 2012, the Archaeology Trailer was transferred
to Biology and the faunal material stored within it was
reboxed and transferred to other department storage. One of
the Chemistry lab groups were temporarily housed in SWH
9126 and SWH 9121.1 while renovations to their laboratories
were completed. Laboratory staff assisted in several research
laboratory and faculty office moves.
2011-2012 Biennial Report
27
support for this event. Laboratory staff continue to work on an
anticipated repatriation to Tsawwassen and Tla’Amin.
In late 2012, the Archaeology Laboratories entered into an
agreement with the Provincial Archaeology Branch and
Coroner’s service whereby the Archaeology Laboratories agreed
to store human remains that were either unprovenienced,
or were not able to be repatriated due to conflict between
neighbouring groups. The Archaeology Branch will work
to resolve these disputes, upon which the individuals will be
returned. Unprovenienced materials will be used for teaching
purposes.
In the spring of 2011 the radiography lab was surveyed
for radiation leakage. The lab was found to be safe. In the
summer of 2011, the laboratories underwent an audit by
Environmental Health and Safety. As a result laboratory
staff have created laboratory-specific safety guidelines for all
the labs and furnished them with binders of safety protocols
and MSDS information. The weekly laboratory walk-through
has been formalized with a safety check list. Laboratory staff
also created a pandemic plan for the laboratories in the fall of
2011 and revised the Flaking Pit policy. In the fall of 2012 the
department took advantage of a University shelving restraint
program designed to increase safety during an earthquake.
SWH 9131 is certified each year for the storage and processing of
imported soil samples. In the summer of 2012, the Department
received a soil importation permit. Chemical storage, spill-kits,
and hazard door-signage are maintained throughout the year.
With the assistance of Laura Walker, laboratory staff moved the
Department webpages from SmartTemplates to the University
supported CQ program. Staff also oversaw the transition
to the Trend antivirus software and new requirements for
some software downloads. Staff continue to support all
department members with computing related operations and
trouble-shooting issues and attend the regular meetings of the
university-wide Local Area Network administrator group.
During this time period three highly successful repatriations
were carried out. Individuals were returned to the Penelakut,
Tk’emlups and Heiltsuk First Nations. The largest of these
repatriations was the return of the Namu individuals to the
Heiltsuk, an event that was marked by a ceremony in the fall
of 2011. Laboratory staff were heavily involved in the logistical
28 2011-2012 Biennial Report
The loss of the Department van in an accident in November, 2011
was somewhat mitigated by the Department’s participation in
the lease of a vehicle by the Faculty of Environment. Laboratory
staff have also been working with Risk Management for the
certification of all marine vessels.
Partially aided by the insurance payout for the van, the following
major purchases were made: primate and paleontological casts,
pathology casts, small microscopes, a motorized photography
system for the Leica microscope, a studio photography camera
with macro lens, a rugged laptop and a Trimble GPS system.
Earth Science donated a semi-automated x-ray development
machine in spring of 2011 and in the fall of 2012 the Department
traded a cast articulated human skeleton for a real articulated
human skeleton from a local high school.
The University provided funding for the purchase of a portable
XRF machine. Laboratory staff arranged training for this
instrument and are creating policies and protocols for its use.
Laboratory staff took part in the Department Retreat and
External Review and the recent hiring of two new faculty
members. Laboratory staff have also participated in a number of
outreach programs, including laboratory tours for elementary,
high school and university students, the SFU Open House
and Geek Week. A tour of the radiographic facility is given
once each semester as part of the Radiation Safety Program.
Archaeological equipment, primarily the sandboxes, has been
loaned to University Highlands Elementary for their yearly
carnival.
Shannon Wood
Manager, Archaeology Laboratories &
Curator, Research Collections
Administrative Services
semesterly course schedules, managing enrollments and
waitlists, ordering textbooks, providing academic advising
for program and degree completion, defence scheduling, and
final grade submission. There were a total of 141 Archaeology
degrees and certificates awarded during this period.
Merrill Farmer demonstrates excavation techniques at
SFU Open House, 2012
A
dministrative Services, staffed by Chris Papaianni,
Merrill Farmer, and Laura Walker, provides support to
departmental faculty, staff, graduate and undergraduate
students, liaises with all areas of the university, and provides
information to the general public. Administrative staff are
responsible for the mounting and delivery of the academic course
schedule, the management and execution of the temporary
instruction and non-salary operating budgets, the facilitation
of faculty grant expenditures, providing academic advising,
assisting with committee work and program development,
initiating and processing departmental employment contracts,
the development and participation in university recruitment
events, as well as organizing departmental events.
The Department’s move to the Faculty of Environment in
April 2011 necessitated changes to various university systems.
Administrative staff facilitated the migration of student records
pertaining to Archaeology programs to their home within the
new faculty. Students were notified and supported through this
transition via academic and e-mail advising. The move also
required staff to facilitate in the budget transfer of all salary and
non-salary operating, research and special purpose budgets to
new cost centres.
In 2011-2012 administrative staff supported the delivery of
181 undergraduate and graduate courses, the registration
of approximately 6800 students, creating and mounting the
Administrative staff created, processed, and managed
approximately 200 employment contracts, including all
departmental Limited Term, Teaching Assistant, Sessional
Instructor, Work Study, and Research Assistant contracts.
Staff also provided financial support to department and
faculty research grants through the processing of invoices,
independent contractor agreements, and travel and business
expense claims, as well as facilitating over $300,000 in graduate
student financial support.
In 2012 administrative staff supported the process of hiring two
new faculty members, aiding in job advertisements, travel and
accommodation booking, conducting and participating in the
interviews of shortlisted candidates, and serving on the search
committee.
Administrative staff organized a number of successful
departmental events during this period, including the annual
Graduate Meet and Greet, the retirement party for Dr. Brian
Hayden, the public ceremony portion of the Repatriation of
Heiltsuk Ancestors, Holiday parties, and the department retreat
and external review.
Several university-sponsored recruiting and outreach events
were held during this period in which administrative staff
played a key role. Staff developed and organized interactive
and engaging displays and exhibits of archaeological artifacts,
faculty and graduate student research profiles, and games and
activities. Events included: Information Evening, a recruitment
event for highly qualified prospective students and their
families; the Faculty of Science’s Geek Week; Academic Options
Day; and the SFU Education Fair/Open House, a community
outreach event that welcomed 19,000 visitors to the Burnaby
Campus. Staff also conducted workshops and information
sessions for students applying to graduate school and for federal
grant funding.
Chris Papaianni
Manager & Academic Advisor
2011-2012 Biennial Report
29
T
Department of
First Nations Studies
he Department of First Nations Studies was established
within the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences on
April 1, 2012. It comprises 5 faculty, two are tenured
and three are in tenure-stream, representing 3.75 full-time
equivalent appointments. Four continuing faculty hold joint
appointments, with two being ¼ time in the Department of
Archaeology. First Nations Studies curriculum specializes in
topics that reference perspectives derived from the experience
of Aboriginal people. Our courses are informed by the applied
research of our faculty who add substance to the directive of
engaging aboriginal communities through their inquiries
and creative works. Moreover, the principle of respect for
Aboriginal peoples and cultures is implicit in the creation of the
Department of First Nations Studies. Our mission is to deliver
courses that investigate indigenous knowledge in its traditional
and contemporary milieux.
By its very nature, First Nations Studies encourages
interdisciplinary research and our faculty have made significant
contributions to their respective disciplines. In doing so,
they have established extensive networks of collaborators
and research associates that cross disciplinary boundaries.
Through original research in areas such as archaeology,
language revitalization and ethnobotany, coupled with creative
production in the visual and literary arts, scholarly work
situated here has propelled SFU to the forefront of indigenous
studies. Our courses are recognized by cognate disciplines as
Navajo Artist, Marilou Schultz demonstrates wool spinning techniques
to First Nations Studies students
30 2011-2012 Biennial Report
indispensible for certificates, such as the CRM certificate in
Archaeology, minors, such as Development Studies (DEVS),
and the proposed major leading to a BENV. Media outlets
routinely contact our department for expert analysis of topics
germane to Aboriginal people.
Among the faculty there is a good balance between the creative
arts, the humanities and the sciences. Our faculty demonstrate
research and teaching strength in the following areas:
anthropology, archaeology, fine arts and indigenous literature.
Our faculty have worked hard to establish SFU as a centre for
innovative research and teaching excellence in FNST. They
have demonstrated success in securing funds for their research
and creative production and they have established strong links
with First Nations in the local area and across the province.
We offer undergraduate courses in First Nations Studies that
span environmentalism (ethnobotany, environmental justice),
gender studies, heritage stewardship, traditional knowledge
and humanities. Engaging aboriginal communities with a
dynamic research agenda will continue to be our priority. We
can achieve this ambition by concentrating on areas where we
have substantial expertise and the skill sets to influence the
production of new knowledge.
Eldon Yellowhorn
Chair, Department of First Nations Studies
Faculty and friends celebrate the newly established
Department of First Nations Studies, April 2012
Faculty Research
David Burley
Travis Freeland, two additional projects were conducted in
Fiji. The first involved test excavations at the early Lapita site
on Kavewa Island recorded in 2011. These illustrate a high
degree of site integrity with considerable research potential for
gaining insight into first settlement and its transformation in
northern Fiji.
The second project also was a follow-up from the 2011 survey.
A unique late prehistoric coral rock roadbed was found
crossing the mangrove swamp on the north coast of Mali Island
near Labasa, Vanua Levu. This corridor connected Mali Island
villages and facilitated access to a hill fort on the islands east
end. The 2012 project further documented the road while also
preparing a detailed map of the hill fort, including defensive
ditches, fighting platforms, ramparts and house platforms.
F
ield research in the summer of 2011 was focused largely
on continued archaeological survey of southwest Viti
Levu and northeast Vanua Levu in the Republic of
Fiji. These projects are part of a larger SSHRC sponsored
study of early settlement in Fiji and its relationship with a
pre-Polynesian homeland in Tonga and Lau, but potentially
extending into northeastern Fiji. Both surveys successfully
recorded a wide range of sites including an early Lapita (ca
3000 BP) colonizing site on the small island of Kavewa off
the north Vanua Levu coast. Also initiated in 2011 with PhD
student Kathleen LeBlanc was an ethno-archaeological study
of ngatu (barkcloth) production and design on Tongatapu,
Kingdom of Tonga. Contemporary ngatu retains several
Lapita decorative motifs, and it further provides insights into
a traditional craft production system through which Lapita
pottery manufacture may be modeled. This study ultimately
will form one component of Kathleen’s dissertation on Lapita
decorative design in Oceania.
Research efforts from May to July 2012 first were centred on
South Pacific field school excavations at the Sigatoka Sand
Dunes in Fiji. Continued excavation was carried out on
superimposed village occupations associated with Plainware
and Navatu phases of the Fijian mid-sequence (ca 1300-1500
BP). As with earlier field schools, survey and site recording on
the coastal margin of the Sigatoka Sand Dunes National Park
also was undertaken by field school students. With MA student
Finally of note, in 2011/2012, a collaborative project was
initiated with Marshall Weisler and Xin-Jian Zhou of the
University of Queensland. This was to explore the viability of
uranium thorium dating of coral file abraders for high precision
age determination at Lapita-age sites in the Kingdom of Tonga.
This proved spectacular with 2σ calibrated age ranges lowered
to as little as ± 7 years. As a consequence, the initial occupation
of Nukuleka, and the first Lapita landfall in Polynesia, is now
dated to 2838 ± 8 cal BP.
SFU 2012 field school excavations of Fijian Plainware and Navatu
phase village occupation floors, Sigatoka Sand Dunes National Park,
Viti Levu, Fiji
2011-2012 Biennial Report
31
Roy Carlson
Catherine D’Andrea
M
T
y research over the last two years has continued
to concentrate on analysis of the artifacts and
description of the excavations that I directed in the
Republic of the Sudan as part of the Aswan Reservoir project in
1965-66. Two Paleolithic sites, Khor Abu Anga and Magendohli,
and four younger ceramic period sites were excavated. Analysis
of the Paleolithic material and completion of a monograph is
expected to take another two years.
I organized a symposium on Archaeology and Prehistory of the
lower Fraser Valley for the BC Studies Conference held May
14-16 at Douglas College in New Westminster. The paper I
presented in this symposium was entitled: “The Fraser River
Salish as Innovators”
I continue as Managing Editor of SFU Archaeology Press.
Mark Collard
I
am
the
Canada
Research Chair in
Human Evolutionary
Studies and a Full Professor
of
Archaeology
and
Biological Anthropology. I
am also the director of the
SFU Human Evolutionary
Studies Program.
With regard to research, I
am working on a number
of topics in evolutionary
anthropology. Among these are the identification of species in
the hominin fossil record, the reconstruction of fossil hominin
and non-human primate phylogenetic relationships, and the
estimation of body mass, stature and age from skeletal material.
In addition, I am using methods and theory from evolutionary
biology to investigate archaeologically - and ethnographically documented patterns of material culture variation.
32 2011-2012 Biennial Report
he Eastern Tigrai Archaeological Project (ETAP)
continued a programme of archaeological research in
northern Ethiopia in 2011-12. We are an international
team with participants from Canada (SFU, University of
Toronto), Ethiopia (Aksum University), USA (University of
Florida, Gainesville, Washington University St. Louis), and
Italy (University of Naples). SFU ETAP team members in
2011-12 included Shannon Wood, Barbara Winter, Habtamu
Mekonnen, Laurie Darcus, Sarah Oas, and Elizabeth Peterson.
We are examining the dynamics of early state formation in
northern Ethiopia, concentrating on the pre-Aksumite period
(ca. 800-400 BC).
The highlights of our 2011 and 2012 field seasons were the
discovery of two intact burials at the pre-Aksumite site of
Mezber in 2011 and a workshop completed as part of an
ethnoarchaeological study of grindingstones in 2012.
Excavations at the rural site of Mezber were completed at
the end of the 2012 season. The site is providing us with an
unprecedented view of rural life during the pre-Aksumite
period. During the 2011 season, two intact human burials were
recovered. Although they date to different periods, they were
found one stratigraphically above the other and both had large
rocks placed around the crania and upper torsos. The upper
burial is a post-occupational triple burial including the remains
of two females and a small child, all three of which were found
in an extended position. The lower burial is of a male found in
a fetal position. This lower burial can be stratigraphically dated
to pre-Aksumite times and represents the first non-elite burial
known for the period. AMS dating and stable isotopic analyses
of individuals from both burials are in progress and osteological
studies are planned for 2013 by Shannon Wood. Excavations by
ETAP scheduled for 2013 will shift to the large town site of Ona
Adi, which will be a focus of a PhD dissertation by Habtamu
Mekonnen.
In 2012, MA student Laurie Darcus began an ethnoarchaeological
study of grindingstones which remain part of a living tradition
in the ETAP study area. She held a highly successful workshop
for local residents who were interviewed about grinding stone
production and use. They also were asked to provide comments
on archaeological grindingstone fragments excavated from
Mezber.
In 2011-12 work continued on several African
palaeoethnobotanical projects, the most significant of which
was at Bosumpra Cave, Ghana. This work forms the basis of
Sarah Oas’ MA thesis, which has revealed a 10,000 year history
of plant use in West Africa.
Jonathan Driver
I
continue to work on zooarchaeological studies of Ancestral
Puebloan communities in the American Southwest,
although my research time is currently limited by my work
as a university administrator. I completed analyses of animal
bones from Pueblo Bonito (New Mexico) collected in the
late 19th and early 20th centuries and stored in the American
Museum of Natural History and the Smithsonian. This will
complement the analysis of a more recently recovered faunal
assemblage from that site. I also returned to a former interest –
the role of mass predation in human ecology – and I expect to
continue work on this area in the future.
A short article on identification methods that I completed
more than 20 years ago has received renewed attention and
was republished with a commentary from me and others on
the need to be more vigilant about this fundamental aspect of
zooarchaeology.
Grindingstone workshop conducted by Laurie Darcus, MA
Student, assisted by ETAP members
Part of the collection of hundreds of bone artifacts
from Pueblo Bonito
Pre-Aksumite burial at Mezber
2011-2012 Biennial Report
33
Biruté Mary Galdikas
Ross Jamieson
D
r. Biruté Mary
Galdikas
has
been called one
of the world’s leading
conservationists and the
world’s foremost authority
on orangutans.
She
has been studying wild
orangutans for over 42 years
at her Camp Leakey study
area in Tanjung Puting
National Park, Kalimantan
Tengah, Indonesia. With the
exception of Jane Goodall’s
work, Dr. Galdikas’ research
is the longest continuous
study of any single wild mammal population undertaken by a
principal investigator. She is the co-founder and President of
Orangutan Foundation International (OFI), a non-profit with
sister organizations in Canada, the US, Europe, Indonesia,
and Australia. Dr. Galdikas and OFI are fighting the threat of
orangutan extinction which is mainly due to the destruction
of tropical rainforests, the orangutan’s only habitat. OFI runs
numerous conservation and orangutan welfare programs in
Kalimantan, including purchasing and protecting tracts of forest
land, patrolling national parks and other conservation areas,
promoting sustainable eco-tourism, and providing education
initiatives to local people and training plantation workers to
implement a “zero-tolerance” policy on killing, harming, and
capturing endangered species. OFI also runs a Care Center
and Quarantine (OCCQ) that takes in orphaned orangutans
and rehabilitates them for release back into the wild, providing
them with medical care, support, and nurture. Currently, the
OCCQ houses 320 orphan orangutans. Dr. Galdikas has won
numerous awards and prizes for her scientific and conservation
work including the prestigious Tyler Prize, Officer of the Order
of Canada, and Chico Mendes Award from the Sierra Club, as
well as the Indonesian Kalpataru Award. Dr. Galdikas leads
OFI’s work and spends up to half the year in Kalimantan at the
OCCQ and Camp Leakey in addition to her teaching duties at
SFU where she has taught one semester a year since 1981.
34 2011-2012 Biennial Report
M
y work with the community of Sicalpa, Ecuador
continued throughout 2011/2012, in the location
of the Spanish colonial city of Riobamba, destroyed
by an earthquake in AD 1797. Colonial ceramics recovered in
previous urban excavations and rural survey were subjected to
neutron activation analysis of ceramic pastes, in a collaboration
with Ron Hancock at the nuclear reactor at McMaster
University. I will now be comparing these results to those
we can obtain from our own SFU portable x-ray florescence
unit, in a collaboration with Rudy Reimer. The results of these
studies can tell us a lot about the ceramic trade in the Northern
Andes during both the late prehistoric, and colonial periods.
From September to December 2012 a three-month field season
in the Sicalpa area allowed us the opportunity to carry out
both further rural survey, with a focus on the colonial and
republican-period rural hacienda agricultural system, and
urban excavations on colonial sites in Sicalpa. This work was
carried out in collaboration with Laurie Beckwith, of Douglas
College, who is doing archaeological research on prehistoric
sites in the region. Historic-period excavations included the
rescue excavation of a series of 19th-century human burials,
which were threatened when the local church of San Lorenzo
was undergoing renovation, and the excavation of a 17th
century household in the urban core of the colonial city, giving
us one of the first glimpses of what urban life for elites was like
in the colonial Andes.
natural and social science research currently being conducted
by graduate students and post-docs at several universities.
I am also very pleased to have taken on two PhD students from
Ecuador, Daniela Balanzategui and Fernando Astudillo, who are
at SFU under the auspices of Ecuador’s new SENESCYT funding
program. This is a huge change for Ecuador, in providing a
well-funded program for international graduate training in
both the arts and sciences, and Daniela and Fernando have now
begun their own research on colonial Ecuadorian archaeology
towards their doctoral dissertations here at SFU.
Also as part of the Hakai Network, and generously supported
by the Tula Foundation, Jennifer Carpenter (Heiltsuk First
Nation), Nancy Turner (UVic), and I are co-directing a
Heiltsuk community based project entitled, “From mountain
top to ocean floor: the eco-cultural history of Hayaut, N. Hunter
Island”. The archaeology of Hayaut will form the PhD research
of archaeology student and Hakai Scholar, Julia Jackley.
Dana Lepofsky
Evidence of plant management in Hayaut Hunter Island. Berry garden
in foreground, clover root intertidal garden in background.
(Photo: Nancy Turner)
I
n 2011 and 2012, my graduate students and I were involved
in several research initiatives, in several regions of the
Northwest Coast. In my role within the “Hakai Network
for Coastal People, Ecosystems and Management”, I am one
of the principle organizers of the “Herring School”. The goal
of the herring school is to bring together knowledge holders
from different communities throughout the coast who have an
interest and expertise in the natural and cultural importance
of herring. In addition to the on-going support of the Tula
Foundation, we received several grants that supported two
successful workshops, an active outreach program (the web
site and documentary are almost complete), and considerable
I continue my commitment of the field of ethnobiology by being
an active member of the Society of Ethnobiology. During this
period, I finished my last year as the Society of Ethnobiology
President and started a new on-line publication series called,
“Contributions in Ethnobiology” http://ethnobiology.org/
publications/contributions. Our first publication, in honour
of ethnobiologist Amadeo Rea, was released at the end of 2012.
I continue my collaboration with Tla’amin First Nation. In
2012, I joined forces with Keith Carlson of the University of
Saskatchewan and we co-ran the first Tla’amin-SFU-USask
Ethnohistory-Archaeology Fieldschool. The students were
ethnohistory and archaeology students from throughout
Canada. The excavations were led by Archaeology PhD student
Chris Springer, whose PhD research is focused on a survey of
settlements in Tla’amin territory. The results of the excavations
and student interviews will be compiled in a Tla’amin Historical
Atlas. We acknowledge office of the Dean of the Faculty of
Environment for their support of SFU’s participation in this
innovative field school.
Finally, I have continued my research on ancient resource
management in the Coast Salish region. Drs. Anne Salomon
(REM), Kirsten Rowell (UWashington) and I have joined
forces to examine the ecological and cultural history of
traditional clam management. We have been conducting work
in Northern Quadra Island, where there are abundant clam
management features and associated middens. MA student
Amy Groesbeck (REM) conducted several controlled ecology
experiments to evaluate the productivity of these features.
Archaeology student Misha Puckett is conducting parallel
analyses in the associated middens.
2011-2012 Biennial Report
35
Robert Muir
George Nicholas
I
n the summer of 2011
Nyra Chalmer (SFU
Graduate student) and
I directed the department’s
local archaeological field
school. The primary research
component of this program
focused on excavations
at the Cochrane Bay site,
North of Powell River, B.C.
These investigations are part
of a larger on-going multiyear collaborative research
project with the Tla’amin
First Nation, co-lead by
Dana Lepofsky and John
Welch of our department.
In the spring of 2012 I ran an archaeological field worker
training program for the Tsleil-Waututh Nation. This consisted
of a 40 hour training program that encompassed the Province
of British Columbia’s “Archaeology Inventory Training for
Crew Members” curriculum, developed and administered by
the BC Provincial Resource Inventory Standards Committee
(RISC). The training program resulted in 9 members of the
Tsleil-Waututh Nation being certified to work as field crew on
archaeological inventory projects in the Province of British
Columbia. Later that spring, in partnership with the TsleilWaututh Nation and their archaeologist, Dr. Jesse Morin, I
directed an archaeology inventory of the Admiralty Point Lease
Lands, immediately south of Belcarra Park, Port Moody. This
project was the focus of a field methods course (ARCH 434)
that included participation of 12 undergraduate students from
SFU.
Also in 2012 I developed an archaeological inventory sampling
scheme for BC Hydro’s Arrow Lakes Reservoir. This project is
related to a archaeological inventory strategy that I developed
for BC Hydro’s reservoir areas in 2007. I continue to be involved
in this on-going inventory work, as an advisor to both BC
Hydro and the consulting archaeology firms conducting this
work throughout the province.
36 2011-2012 Biennial Report
M
y research spans three different but intersecting
realms of archaeology and cultural heritage: fieldbased archaeology focusing on prehistoric human
ecology; participation in, and study of what has become known
as Indigenous archaeology; and academic and communitybased research and practice oriented to the intangible aspects
of heritage around the world.
I continue to pursue a long-term research agenda that explores
hunter-gatherer land use associated with wetland-rich settings
around the world extending back to the later Pleistocene
period. This work is contributing to a fuller understanding of
the range of lifeways associated with small-scale societies in
resource-rich environments. Within British Columbia, I have
been analyzing survey and excavation data from a number of
early and middle Holocene-aged sites on the Kamloops Indian
Reserve.
That work stems from my long-term commitment to working
with the Kamloops Indian Band and with other Indigenous
groups in Canada and beyond to ensure that archaeology is
both accessible and beneficial to them. This is a topic I continue
to explore and publish extensively on. I am also working on
initiatives to facilitate cross-cultural research ethics at local
through international levels, including presentations on behalf
of Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation National Forum and
UNESCO’s exploration of the challenges of digital heritage.
Since 2008 I have directed the Intellectual Properties Issues in
Cultural Heritage (IPinCH) research project, a $2.5 million,
seven-year SSHRC Major Collaborative Research Initiative
that explores and facilitates fair and equitable exchanges
of knowledge relating to archaeology and heritage. This
timely investigation of the intangible and tangible aspects
of cultural heritage, and their implications for local and
global interpretations of culture, rights, and knowledge,
is being undertaken by an international, interdisciplinary
collaboration (2008-2015) involving more than 50 scholars, 40
Associate members and Graduate Fellows, and 25 partnering
organizations.
In the past two years, IPinCH teams have completed a series
of major projects including a Moriori-initiated traditional
cultural landscape database in the Chatham Islands (New
Zealand); a study of artifacts in the Smithsonian Institution
by Inuvialuit elders to repatriate knowledge of traditional tool
and clothing manufacture to their community; an initiative
to protect Inuit language and heritage and archaeological
sites in the context of cultural tourism in Nunavut; and the
development of a community-created visitor’s guide for
Ngaut Ngaut (Devon Downs), the first scientifically excavated
rockshelter in Australia.
The IPinCH team has also organized international symposia,
workshops, and conferences; produced many publications and
a growing number of podcasts and videos; provided extensive
support and mentoring to many graduate and undergraduate
students; and worked to build capacity within the communities
and organizations we partner with.
Fluorescence. I use these seemingly disparate modes of inquiry
to explore the ancient use of tool stone, rock art, terrestrial and
marine resources and the ways communities were connected
in the past. I do this through the examination of different kinds
of archaeological sites ranging from sea level to high elevation
alpine contexts, with minimal impact, and the examination of
existing collections.
I attempt in many ways to make my research useful and
meaningful to the communities I work with, be they academic,
public or Indigenous. Examples of work I and my students and
colleagues have been involved in include, the characterization
of obsidian and other lithics materials from across the Pacific
Northwest using XRF, the chemical characterization of ochre
pigments and rock art images in southern British Columbia,
the technological organization and lithic chemistry of
assemblages from rock shelter sites in the Squamish territory,
the Stave Lake watershed and the paleo-Indian site famously
known as the Little John site at the Yukon-Alaska border,
and the recovery of an in situ stone bowl along the Squamish
River. Other community outreach endeavors in the past 2 years
include the organization of the annual BC Archaeology Forum
in Squamish BC, and the co-organization of the Canadian
Archaeological Association annual conference in Whistler BC,
the co-development of exhibits at the Sunshine Coast Museum
and Archives and the Squamish-Lil’wat Cultural Centre, along
with numerous community and museum/heritage organization
talks. I was invited to host the pilot episode of Wild Archaeology
for the Aboriginal People’s Television Network. I am also a
member of the Indigenous Research Institute at Simon Fraser
University.
Rudy Reimer / Yumks
I
am an Indigenous Archaeologist from Skwxwu7mesh
Uxwumixw (Squamish Nation) and Yumks is my
ancestral name. My research area is my home territory,
the Northwest Coast and adjacent interior Plateau. As a cross
appointed faculty member in Archaeology and First Nations
Studies my research interests are many and varied but share
some common threads. As a starting point my research takes a
community up approach that considers oral history, traditions,
place names and landscape knowledge on par with scientific
inquiry and non-destructive techniques such as X-Ray
2011-2012 Biennial Report
37
years of research, writing, and politicking, U.S. Secretary of
the Interior Ken Salazar signed the nomination I submitted
on behalf of the Tribe and the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs
to designate Fort Apache and TR School a National Historic
Landmark. The photograph to the left, taken at the designation
ceremony in May 2012, shows me with Hon. Ronnie Lupe,
who has served as a member or leader of the Tribe’s governing
body since 1968.
John Welch
M
Hon. Ronnie
Lupe, White
Mountain
Apache and
John Welch at
designation
ceremony,
May 2012
y work continues to focus on assisting indigenous
communities with the investigation and management
of cultural and historical sites. I am particularly
interested in how indigenous community leaders are asserting
longstanding and customary law and policy in the contexts
of site conservation and adaptive reuse of these places as well
as management principles appropriate in particular cultural
settings.
Much of this work is occurring on White Mountain
Apache lands in Arizona. There, working with the Tribe
and collaborators from the University of Arizona and the
U.S. National Science Foundation, we conducted six-week
summer field schools for undergraduates interested in using
geographic information science (GIS) as a tool for collecting
and interpreting ethnographic and historical information.
Headquartered at the Fort Apache and Theodore Roosevelt
School historic district, the field schools have now trained 12
Apaches and 12 non-Apaches in the spatialization of cultural
and documentary data. Also in 2012, following more than 12
38 2011-2012 Biennial Report
Other successes in 2011 and 2012 include the completion of
a multi-authored volume on the archaeology, history and
management of the ancestral Hopi and Zuni site of Kinishba,
also located on White Mountain Apache lands (published
by the Arizona State Museum). In summer 2012 we started
work on Fire and Humans in Resilient Ecosystems, a fouryear, National Science Foundation-funded project led by Tom
Swetnam (U Arizona) and Chris Roos (Southern Methodist) to
examine and model human settlement, vegetation, and wildland
fire activity in the forest around Jemez Pueblo, New Mexico.
Working with T.J. Ferguson (U Arizona) and representatives
of Jemez, Apache, Hopi, Zuni, and wildland firefighter ‘tribes,’
my job is to collect documentary and consultant information
on how different groups perceive and value fire and the roles it
plays in cultures and economies.
Dongya Yang
I
am a biological anthropologist by training. While I have
been involved in the study of human osteoarchaeology in
China, my main research theme has focused on ancient
DNA-based archaeological research. In the past ten years, most
of my research projects have been based on the Northwest
Coast of North America and in China.
My ancient DNA-based research includes: 1) the development
of lab techniques for optimal DNA extractions and analyses and
better contamination controls from the study of different types
of ancient remains; 2) the development of research strategies
to more effectively integrate ancient DNA analysis with other
archaeological investigations; and 3) the application of ancient
DNA techniques to forensic identifications of degraded human
and wildlife DNA samples.
I follow a science-model (team approach) for conducting
lab-based research and for graduate student training, which
have proven to be effective for enhancing interdisciplinary
collaborations and for assisting students to climb the steep
learning curve of ancient DNA research. In 2011-2012, three
graduate students completed their degree research (one PhD
and two MA); and by the end of 2012, seven on-going graduate
students (two PhD and five MA) continued their studies under
my supervision (as the senior supervisor).
In 2011-2012, I also served as the host to help the Department
receive three visiting faculty and postdoctoral follows from
China (Professor Quanchao Zhang from Jilin University,
Professor Minghui Wang and Dr. Xin Zhao from the Institute
of Archaeology, Beijing, CASS). Both Wang and Zhao were
supported by Henry Luce Fellowships. As a result, formal
partnerships have been developed with the Institute of
Archaeology in Beijing to collaborate on ancient DNA research,
and with Jilin University on human osteoarchaeology.
Dongya Yang visiting Tla’amin First Nation archaeological sites
on the sunshine coast of BC Canada
Eldon Yellowhorn
I
n the academic year of 2011-12, three graduate students
completed their MA programmes under my supervision. All
three worked with me on my Piikani historical archaeology
research project.
April 1, 2012 was an auspicious day. I became the first chair of
the newly created Department of First Nations Studies within
the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences.
In May 2012, I represented SFU on a trip to Bolivia to meet
with Indigenous people who are research partners with SFU
faculty. Also in May, I completed my term as President of the
Canadian Archaeological Association at the annual meeting in
Montréal.
On June 21, 2012 (National Aboriginal Day), the Indigenous
Research Institute held its inaugural meeting. I was also
appointed the Director for the IRI.
Celebrating the newly created Department of First Nations Studies
2011-2012 Biennial Report
39
Post Doctoral Research &
Instructor Profiles
Ana Boza-Arlotti
I
n 2009 I began my work with the British Columbia
Coroners Service as a forensic anthropologist consultant
working from the Centre of Forensic Research located at
Simon Fraser University. Since 2010, I have been an Adjunct
Professor in the Department of Archaeology. As such I had
the responsibility to apply my skills in forensics and osteology
to the analysis of skeletonized human remains. Many are the
proveniences of these remains, but the most common reason
why they require a forensic anthropologist is to assist in their
identification and to support the forensic pathologist in finding
cause and manner of death. As a forensic anthropologist
consultant for the British Columbia Coroners Service I have
to develop biological profiles were I assess, among other
things: age, sex, bio affinity, stature, pre-existing pathological
conditions, trauma and its timing in the individual’s life.
Another area of my work as a forensic anthropology consultant
is to assess the skeletal remains as relevant to forensic interest
or as part of the archaeological repertoire. The identification of
human remains vs. other vertebrate species is also an important
part of my every day work.
My training as an archaeologist has allowed me to help the
police in surface collection and/or exhumation of skeletal
remains from clandestine and sometimes legal interments.
The careful and scientific collection of evidence is vital for a
successful forensic case. Here is where my skills as a physical
anthropologist and an archaeologist are applied in a very
successful symbiosis of sciences.
I have also been a sessional instructor at Kwantlen Polytechnic
University where I taught a special topic course on Mass Graves
through history. In this course I was able to analyze mass graves
pertaining to different time periods in history and interpret the
evidence in order to understand the meaning of the skeletal
remains found in these mass graves. As part of the course we
studied the skills and methods required for the analysis of
skeletal remains and the interpretation of the evidence found
associated with those remains.
40 2011-2012 Biennial Report
Briggs Buchanan
D
uring
2011-2012
I
worked as a postdoctoral
fellow
under
the
combined supervision of Mark
Collard and Michael J. O’Brien
(University of Missouri). During
this time we continued our
efforts to address key questions
regarding Paleoindian origins
and adaptations in North
America, as well as investigating
hypotheses concerning the evolution of technology. This work
was published in ten articles in refereed journals during this
period. I presented the results of these studies at conferences
in Memphis, Tucson, and Sacramento and at two international
workshops. In 2011 I began working as a member of the
advisory and editorial board for the journal North American
Archaeologist.
Ernest Bumann
E
rnest
Bumann,
born and raised in
Switzerland, received
his PhD in Egyptology from
the Hebrew University of
Jerusalem, Israel. Beside
his MA in Egyptology,
Ernest also holds a MA in
Biblical History (Jerusalem
University
College,
Jerusalem) and an MEd in
Education (University of
Exeter, England).
Ernest
specialized
in the history, archaeology and languages of ancient
Egypt and the ancient Near East. His dissertation
“The Hyksos and Acculturation: Processes of Acculturation
of the Asiatic Population at Tell el-Dab’a (Avaris) during the
Late Middle Kingdom and the Second Intermediate Period”
focusses not only on archaeological and linguistic features,
but also on anthropological theories, such as acculturation of
some of these well-studied ancient populations and how they
related to each other. Another focus of his studies is the history
of the Biblical period in close correlation with the neighboring
societies and countries of the Ancient Near East. Beyond
Ancient Egypt and the Ancient Near East, Ernest is also very
interested in the cultural development and exchange between
other ancient civilizations in the Old World (Indus Valley
Civilization, Ancient China, Ancient Europe) and the New
World (Mesoamerica and South America).
Alvaro Higueras
I
started as a sessional
instructor at SFU after
more than a decade of
archaeological and cultural
heritage
experience
in
Eritrea, Italy, Andean South
America and the Balkans,
and experience as a United
Nations consultant in cultural
heritage in Kosovo. I am
currently exploring cultural
heritage rights in Peru, where
historical and cultural factors
have created status differences between Indigenous highland
groups and those in the Amazon forest.
In 2011-12, I taught ARCH 100 - Ancient Peoples and Places
and ARCH 334 - Aztec and Inca: Archaeology of Empires. My
teaching tenure at SFU was complemented with instruction
in the Department of First Nations Studies, with a course on
Statistics, and in the History Department with the course:
“Empire to Empire: Transition from Native to Spanish Empire
in the Americas”.
David Maxwell
D
uring the period of 2011-2012, I was involved in a
variety of activities relating to archaeology. Much of my
time has been devoted to teaching, and I have worked
as a sessional instructor for the Department of Archaeology at
SFU. During this period, I taught ARCH 100 (Ancient Peoples
and Places) twice, ARCH 131 (Human Origins) twice, and
ARCH 201 (Introduction to Archaeology) 3 times. All of these
are introductory courses, with student loads ranging from as
few as 40 for an evening course, to as many as 250 for a large
class. I also served as a sessional instructor for the Department
of Anthropology at UBC in Vancouver, teaching ANTH 225
(Human Origins), a course very similar to ARCH 131 at SFU,
with a student load of 94.
I have also continued to be involved with the SFU Continuing
Education Senior’s Lifetime Learning Program for SFU
Downtown. During this period, I have taught nine courses,
including a course based on ARCH 131, entitled Human
Origins: Where Did We Come From and How Did We Get Here?
(3 times), a course based on ARCH 201 entitled, Digging It:
An Introduction to Archaeology, a course entitled Civilizations
of Ancient Mexico (3 times), a course entitled Archaeology of
the American Southwest, and finally a course entitled Dinosaur
Evolution and Extinction. Each class was filled to capacity and
all were extremely satisfying to me as an instructor.
I assisted Dr. Jonathan C. Driver with the completion of a draft
chapter of an analysis of the vertebrate fauna from Pueblo
Bonito in Chaco Canyon, New Mexico, which is still in the
hands of the volume editor.
Dr. Driver and I have been collaborating on a number of
research projects relating to Plains bison kill sites and mass
kill mortality profile analysis, resulting in 2 invited papers in
symposia at the Society for American Archaeology meetings,
and a single publication to date in Quaternary International.
I acted as faunal analyst for an SFU field school project on the
Sunshine Coast, under Dr. Dana Lepofsky and Nyra Chalmer,
consisting of the identification, description, and analysis of a
large collection of vertebrate remains. I also acted as senior
2011-2012 Biennial Report
41
faunal analyst on a long-term project in Kamloops, under Dr.
George Nicholas, which is ongoing.
Finally, over the same span, I was engaged in my ongoing
research into caches and votive offerings from the major
Maya centre of Tikal in Guatemala. My research during this
period was primarily focused on marine shell taxonomy and
distribution through time and on stingray spine use in votive
offerings. Both research projects were presented as posters at
the Society for American Archaeology meetings.
Also involving microscopic analysis of skeletal tissues is
the research extending from forensic work I have done for
the RCMP in Manitoba. This research is in preparation for
publication in the Journal of Forensic Sciences and was
presented at the annual meeting of the Canadian Association
of Forensic Science.
Jessica Munson
Deborah Merrett
T
he emphasis of my research is on the estimation of
health in past human societies at the population level
with a focus on two geographic regions: Near East
and northern China. For the Near East, tooth crowns of
infants from one Neolithic site in Iran have been embedded
for analysis of the enamel microstructure. The resulting thin
sections will allow for chronological age-at-death estimations
of the infants. Teeth from an additional site are in the process
of being analysed for comparison. Not only will this allow for
age estimation but will also facilitate inter-site comparisons
of the population health from the two ancient human skeletal
samples.
I am also involved in a multidisciplinary
SSHRC-funded project with principal
investigator Dr. Dongya Yang on the
health of Chinese populations across
the subsistence transition from hunting/
gathering to agriculture and through the
development of civilization in northern
China. The results of a pilot study of the
oral health of people of the Houtaumuga
site have been presented at the annual
meeting of the Canadian Association
for Physical Anthropology. Additional
Cast of incisor
health-related research will be continuing
showing linear enamel in the field season of 2013 with the aim of
hypoplasia
establishing population parameters for
health from tooth microstructure.
42 2011-2012 Biennial Report
A
fter receiving my PhD (2012) from the School of
Anthropology at the University of Arizona, I began a
postdoctoral fellowship under the supervision of Dr.
Mark Collard and jointly supported by the Human Evolutionary
Studies Program at SFU and the Cultural Evolution of Religion
Research Consortium at UBC. Building on prior epigraphic
research, my postdoctoral project investigates the changing role
and cultural contexts of ritual bloodletting practices in Classic
Maya society. Applying an evolutionary approach to the study
of religion, we are interested in testing theories about the
relationships between religious behaviors and the emergence
of large-scale cooperative societies, as well as understanding
how ritual practices and beliefs spread in specific sociocultural
contexts in the prehispanic past.
In addition to this work, my research focuses on technological
and social changes in the construction of ritual architecture
at a minor ceremonial center located in the southern Maya
lowlands.
I conducted archaeological investigations at the site of
Caobal, Petén, Guatemala and collected a detailed record
of artifacts and architectural changes spanning sixteen
centuries of occupation. This study developed a multilayered
diachronic approach to investigate the ways prehispanic Maya
communities constructed and modified their social landscape
over long periods of time. By focusing on the emergence and
transformation of temple architecture beyond primary centers
of power, this study shows how ceremonial buildings were
locations of daily practices, identity politics, and religious
values in prehispanic Maya society.
of migration narratives in constructing a sense of community
among Asian immigrants. Outside of academics I spent two
summers surveying historic sites along the Peace River in
northern BC as part of an impact assessment for the Site C
hydroelectric dam project.
Dennis Sandgathe
Douglas Ross
F
or 2011 I was
awarded
a
Wenner-Gren
Hunt
Postdoctoral
Fellowship to turn
my
2009
doctoral
dissertation
on
transnational consumer
habits and diasporic
identities among early
Chinese and Japanese
immigrants in British Columbia into a book, to be published in
2013 by the University Press of Florida. In 2011 and 2012 I also
published papers on the dining habits of Chinese and Japanese
immigrants (Historical Archaeology), challenges facing the
interpretation of cultural origins of historic artifacts (Journal
of Anthropological Archaeology), and the identification and
dating of Japanese ceramics from 19th and 20th century sites
(Ceramics in America).
In 2012 I taught introductory courses in archaeology and
physical anthropology at SFU and Douglas College and
participated in a symposium at Barkerville Historic Town
on the research potential of the site’s archival and artifact
collections, where I delivered a paper on the archaeology
of Chinese immigrants in BC. I also gave a talk for the
Archaeological Society of BC in 2011 on my work at a World
War II Japanese internment camp in Idaho, and presented a
paper at the 2012 AAA conference in San Francisco on the role
Part of the 2012 crew excavating at the Palaeolithic site La Ferrassie
(France) including SFU students Gabby Jackson (sitting fourth from
right) and Jan Anderson (second from right).
O
ver the course of 2011 and 2012 I continued with
several field projects that were begun in previous
years. One of these was the Palaeolithic site of Grotte
de Contrebandiers on the Atlantic coast of Morocco. My
colleagues and I began digging here in 2007, and 2011 was the
final excavation season. In 2011 work focussed on dating the
remains of a 100,000 year old Anatomically Modern Human
child we discovered in 2009 (National Geographic Society
produced a 2011 TV special on this - The World’s Oldest Child).
Most of my fieldwork is carried out in Southwest France and in
2011 and 2012 I continued excavating the Middle Palaeolithic
site of La Ferrassie: a site made famous a century ago by the
discovery of the remains of 6 Neandertals. My colleagues and
I are investigating the context of these remains and studying
the stone tool industries associated with the site. In 2012 we
received a National Science Foundation grant for $175,000
to continue the excavation for several more years. In 2012
we also began test excavations at another Palaeolithic site in
2011-2012 Biennial Report
43
the same region called La Gane. Limited excavations were
carried out here in the 1940s, but its potential to contain a deep
depositional sequence has yet to be properly investigated.
Mediterranean plant ecology, bioclimate, ethnobotany,
Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and plant
iconography. More recently, she has been working with
environmental resource managers analyzing their observations
on changes in the environment.
She has recently been awarded a postdoctoral fellowship from
the Foreign Affairs and International Trade of Canada and has
joined the Hakai Network as a Hakai Post-Doctoral scholar.
Her research explores Coastal First Nations’ observations
of and adaptations to climate change in British Columbia.
This information will be correlated with quantitative data on
environmental changes for a better understanding of climate
change and its effects.
Jon Scholnick
2011 Excavations underway at the Palaeolithic site of La Ferrassie,
France. SFU student Luseadra McKerracher and UBC student Gervaise
Whitlam are excavating at the near end of the trench.
Valentina Savo
D
r. Valentina Savo’s research is rooted in ethnobotany
and aims to include a more complex view of the
relationships between humans and the environment.
Since 2003 (and over the last two years 2011-2012) she has
been working on several different projects spanning from
44 2011-2012 Biennial Report
I
n 2012, I began a NSF
International Research
Fellowship
under
the supervision of Mark
Collard. This two-year
postdoctoral
fellowship
is focused on using
archaeological data to
evaluate and refine models
of cultural evolution. In
particular, I am using treebuilding or phylogenetic
methods,
and
social
network analysis to examine the ways that social structure
shapes technological and stylistic knowledge. While treebuilding methods are well established in biology, they have
seen more limited application in the social sciences. Modeling
efforts have shown mixed results about whether these methods
can be adapted for cultural transmission, where, unlike genetic
transmission, knowledge can be acquired from peers. Using
well-controlled empirical data, we can evaluate the merits of
these tree-building methods.
My work focuses on seventeenth and eighteenth century New
England gravestone decoration, which is a textbook example
in archaeology. These artifacts have dates inscribed on them
and thousands of them remain standing in the burial grounds
where they were placed hundreds of years ago. The decorative
motifs carved on these gravestones provide a strong empirical
case study to examine modes of social learning. Many of
the grave markers can be linked to known carvers through
estate settlement documents, and others were inscribed with
signatures or initials of their carvers. In 2012, I spent several
months in Massachusetts doing field survey to locate and
record gravestones that are referenced in the documentary
record.
I have also been working on understanding decorative variation
in artifacts more broadly using the gravestone data. In 2012, I
presented a paper on the diversity of gravestone motifs in a
symposium, “Recent developments in cultural transmission
theory and its applications,” at the SAA meetings in Memphis.
Here I use a selectively neutral model of stylistic diversity to
identify when and where gravestone choices are affected by
conformist tendencies among consumers and carvers. I am also
working with Mark Collard and Briggs Buchanan on the role of
demography in gravestone motif choice, testing the hypothesis
that decorative diversity scales with population size. This work
was presented at the 2013 SAAs in Honolulu.
archaeological herring remains along the coast to reconstruct
the ancient genetic diversity of this species prior to industrial
over-fishing in the last century. We have been working closely
with Dr. Lorenz Hauser from the University of Washington to
optimize techniques for obtaining DNA from ancient herring
remains; our results were published in PLoS ONE last year.
As a Marie Curie Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of
York, UK, I have also been applying bimolecular approaches
to study the exploitation of whales on the Pacific Northwest.
Whale hunting has been practiced by a variety of cultures
worldwide for millennia. Little is known, however, about the
transition from the scavenging of stranded whale carcasses to
active whale hunting largely due to difficulties in species‐level
identifications of archaeological whale bone. In collaboration
with researchers at SFU and the University of York, I am
developing and comparing two rapid, low‐cost, and highly‐
accessible species identification techniques using proteins and
ancient DNA analysis, and will apply these methods to explore
whale exploitation patterns over the last 4000 years. I will
investigate the taxonomic abundance and distribution of whale
species through time and space, and explore how accurate
species identification affects current hypotheses on the history
of whale hunting and exploitation on the Northwest Coast.
Camilla Speller
M
y research interests
focus on the use
of ancient DNA
techniques to study past human
behaviour and its relationship
to the natural environment.
My postdoctoral research
is focused on ‘Molecular
Environmental Archaeology’:
the application of ancient DNA
techniques to environmental
issues and human-environment interaction. As part of a larger
multi-disciplinary project, I have been working with Dana
Lepofsky and Dongya Yang to examine the past biodiversity
of herring stocks on the Northwest Coast of North America.
My portion of the project involves the DNA analysis of
PhD Student Elizabeth Peterson excavating at Casas Grandes, Mexico
2011-2012 Biennial Report
45
2011
Graduate Seminar Series
Speakers
January 13
Dongya Yang - Department of Archaeology, Simon Fraser University
“Ancient DNA-Based Archaeology: Integrating Ancient DNA and Archaeology”
January 27
Archaeology Department 40th Anniversary Special Seminar: Bioanthropology
Paul Vasey - Department of Psychology, University of Lethbridge
“Evolution and male androphilia in comparative perspective”
February 03
Ann Stahl - Department of Anthropology, University of Victoria
“Archaeological Taxonomies & Communities of Practice in Temporal Perspective: Reflections from Banda, Ghana”
February 10
Geoffrey Schmalz - Hellenic Studies Program, Simon Fraser University
“The Ancient Greek City-State of Pronnoi on Kefalonia: The Third Season of SFU’s NW Necropolis Excavation Project”
February 17
Henry Cary - Parks Canada
“Discovering HMS Investigator”
February 24
Archaeology Department 40th Anniversary Special Seminar: Pacific Rim Archaeology
David Burley - Department of Archaeology, Simon Fraser University
“Becoming Polynesian - A Viginti Annus Opus”
March 3
Adam Rorabaugh - Department of Anthropology, Washington State University
“Learning a Living: Modeling and Examining the Social Learning of Pre-contact Coast Salish Lithic Technologies”
March 17
Jesse Morin - Department of Anthropology, University of British Columbia
“The Political Economy of Stone Celt Exchange in Pre-Contact British Columbia: The Salish Nephrite/
Jade Industry”
March 24
Dale Croes - Department of Anthropology, South Puget Sound Community College
“Salish Sea: Ancient Basketry reflecting Long-term Salish Heritage throughout their Sea”
March 31
Sean Robertson - Department of Geography, Simon Fraser University
“Bearing witness to bare life: counter-geographies of the “extinction” of the Sinixt peoples”
April 7
Tim Harrison - Near and Middle Eastern Civilizations Department, University of Toronto
“The late Bronze/Early Iron Age transition in the northeastern Mediterranean: Cultural Collapse or Continuity?”
September 15
Marcus Hamilton - Department of Biology and Department of Anthropology, University of New Mexico, and Santa Fe Institute
“The evolution of the human metabolic niche”
**Co-sponsored by the SFU Departments of Biological Sciences and Archaeology, and the SFU Human Evolutionary Studies Program**
46 2011-2012 Biennial Report
September 22
Maciek Chudek - Department of Psychology, University of British Columbia
“New insights into the origins of human cooperation: norm-psychology and negative indirect reciprocity”
September 29
Panos Pappas & Arne Mooers - Department of Linguistics & Department of Biological Sciences, Simon Fraser University
“Applying methods from evolutionary biology to language change: Greek as a case study”
October 6
Laura Dane - Department of Psychology, Douglas College
“An analysis of the sexual dimorphism of hands: can the human phenotype be considered a single,
condition-dependent ornament?”
October 13
Jason Cooper - AMEC Earth and Environmental Inc.
“Late Pleistocene lithic technologies in Jordan: lighting the fuse of the Neolithic revolution in Southwest Asia”
October 20
Brenda Bowser - Department of Anthropology, California State University-Fullerton
“Cultural transmission and material culture in the Ecuadorian Amazon”
**Co-sponsored by the SFU Department of Archaeology, the SFU Human Evolutionary Studies Program, and California State University-Fullerton**
October 27
Darlene Weston - Department of Anthropology, University of British Columbia
“White Plague and Black Death: the English medieval cemetery from Hereford Cathedral Close”
November 3
Quanchao Zhang - Department of Archaeology, Jilin University
“Ancient peoples along the Silk Road”
November 10
John Patton - Department of Anthropology, California State University-Fullerton
“Network altruism and cooperation in the Ecuadorian Amazon”
**Co-sponsored by the SFU Department of Archaeology, the SFU Human Evolutionary Studies Program, and California State University-Fullerton**
November 17
November 24
Sam Yeaman - Zoology, University of British Columbia
“The evolutionary effects of cultural transmission on maladaptation and population differentiation”
Robyn Woodward - Department of Archaeology, Simon Fraser University
“Ideology and Industry on the Early Spanish Colonial Frontier: an update on the Archaeology of Sevilla la Nueva, Jamaica”
December 1
Chris Carleton - Department of Archaeology & Human Evolutionary Studies Program, Simon Fraser University
“Modelling socioeconomic and socionatural dynamics at Catalhoyuk, Turkey”
2011-2012 Biennial Report
47
2012
January 12
Peter Stahl - Department of Anthropology, University of Victoria
“Humans, Foxes, and Dogs in Ancient South America”
January 19
Jon Scholnick - Department of Archaeology & Human Evolutionary Studies Program, Simon Fraser University
“Cultural Evolution and Rapid Stylistic Change in Historic New England Gravestones”
January 26
Jessica Munson - Department of Anthropology, University of Arizona
“Building on the Past: Continuity and Disjuncture in Prehispanic Maya Temple Construction at Caobal Peten, Guatemala”
February 2
Jonathan Driver - Department of Archaeology, Simon Fraser University
“Variation in Human Impacts on the Environment in the American Southwest”
February 9
James Chatters - Applied Paleoscience
“Old Cordilleran and the Macroevolution of Northwest Cultures”
**Supported by the Cathy and Jon Driver Endowment Fund**
March 8
Brian Kemp - Department of Anthropology, Washington State University
“Everyone Poops and Other Tales from Prehistory”
**Supported by the Cathy and Jon Driver Endowment Fund and the SFU Ancient DNA Lab**
March 15
April Nowell - Department of Anthropology, University of Victoria
“Pornography is in the Eye of the Beholder: Sex, Sexuality, and Gender in the Study of European Upper Palaeolithic Figurines”
**Co-sponsored by the SFU Human Evolutionary Studies Program**
March 22
Christine White - Department of Anthropology, University of Western Ontario
“Finding Private Lawless: The Isotopic (and other) Forensics of a World War I Casualty”
March 29
Alvaro Higueras - Department of Archaeology, Simon Fraser University
“An Indigenous Amazonian Society under Attack: Monitoring Heritage Risk and Social Decay in the Peruvian Amazon”
April 5
Alison Sheridan - Archaeology Department, National Museums of Scotland
“The Mesolithic-Neolithic Transition in Britain and Ireland: Competing Models”
**Co-sponsored by the SFU Human Evolutionary Studies Program and the UBC Archaeology Isotope Laboratory**
September 13
David Maxwell, David Burley, Rudy Reimer, and Eldon Yellowhorn - Department of Archaeology, Simon Fraser University
“Stories from the Field… in 10 minutes”
September 20
Ben Fitzhugh - Department of Anthropology, University of Washington
“Human Eco-dynamics in the Kuril Islands: Beyond Environmental Determinism and Historical Contingency”
48 2011-2012 Biennial Report
September 27
John Welch - Department Archaeology, Simon Fraser University
“Home, Home at the Fort: A Millennium of Place Making and Displacement at Fort Apache and TR School National Historic Landmark, Arizona”
October 4
Michael Blake - Department of Anthropology, University of British Columbia
“Maize Archaeology: What New Research Tells Us About Corn’s Role in Emerging Agriculture in the Americas”
October 11
Sarah Walshaw - Department of History, Simon Fraser University
“Plants in Domestic and Ritual Space at Songo Mnara, Tanzania 14th-15th C”
October 18
Paul Szpak - Department of Anthropology, University of Western Ontario
“Animal Management and Fertilization Practices in the Prehispanic Andes”
October 25
Wendy Wickwire - Department of History, University of Victoria
“What Can Archaeologists Take from the Work of James A. Teit?”
November 1
Duncan McLaren - Department of Anthropology, University of Victoria
“Archaeology and Ancient Landscapes of the Hakai Luxvbalis Conservancy Region on the Central Coast of BC” (Cancelled)
November 8
Ana Boza Arlotti - Department of Archaeology, Simon Fraser University
“Identifying the NN in BC: the Coroners Service and Forensic Anthropology”
November 15
Brian Pegg - Department of Anthropology, Kwantlen Polytechnic University
“After the Gold Rush: Archaeology and Colonial History in the Fraser Canyon”
November 22
Ernie Cooper - TRAFFIC Canada, World Wildlife Fund
“Wildlife Forensics”
November 29
Dennis Sandgathe - Department of Archaeology, Simon Fraser University
“The Use of Hearths as a Tool for Reconstructing Middle Paleolithic Spatial Organization”
Sigatoka Sand Dunes, Fiji
2011-2012 Biennial Report
49
Research Grants
Burley, D.
2012 SFU VPR Support Grant – “Data Mining in the South Pacific Archaeology Lab” ($10,000).
2012 SFU/SSHRC Small Project Grant – “Conflict and Warfare in the Archaeology of Northern Fiji” ($6,000).
2011-12 SSHRC Standard Research Grant – “Polynesian origins and the pre-Polynesian homeland” ($59,120) (Year 3).
2010-11 SSHRC Standard Research Grant – “Polynesian origins and the pre-Polynesian homeland” ($33,610) (Year 2).
Carlson, R.
2011-12 SFU/SSHRC Small Project Grant – “Paleolithic of Nubia monograph” ($5,000).
Collard, M.
2011-2016 SFU Community Trust Endowment Fund – “Human Evolutionary Studies” ($1,100,000) (Yr. 1 & 2).
D’Andrea, A.C.
2011-2016
2011-2013
Co-investigator, SSHRC Partnership Grant - “Computational Research on the Ancient Near East.”($1.9 million). T. Harrison, University of Toronto, Principal Investigator.
SSHRC Standard Research Grant - “The Pre-Aksumite Period in Highland Ethiopia” ($172,155).
Jamieson, R.
2012-2014
SFU VPR 4A Grant –“Colonial materiality and Social Relations in Ecuador” ($9,299).
2011-2013
SFU/SSHRC Small Research Grant – “Archaeological Survey of Hacienda Culluctus, Colta, Ecuador” ($5,896).
2011-2013
SFU Publication Fund – “Historical Archeology of Ecuador” ($5,000).
Lepofsky, D.
2012 Collaborative Teaching Fellow Program Grant – “Tla’amin-SFU-USaskatchewan Field School: Integrating Heritage and Environment through Archaeology and History” ($19,795).
2011 SFU Conference Grant – “The Herring School Workshop”, Burnaby ($1500).
2011 SSHRC Partnership Development Grant – “The herring school: bringing together culture, ecology, and governance to support sustainability on BC’s Central Coast” ($192,450).
2011 SSHRC Standard Research Grant – “Ancient resource management among Northern Coast Salish” ($80,384).
2011
SSHRC Aid to Research Workshops and Conferences in Canada – “The Herring School Workshop.” (with Martin Robards and Ken Lertzman) ($24,324).
2011 SSHRC Public Outreach: Dissemination Grant – “The herring school: visualizing culture, ecology, and management to support sustainability on BC’s Central Coast” ($49,752).
50 2011-2012 Biennial Report
Nicholas, G.
2008-2015
2012 SSHRC MCRI (Major Collaborative Research Initiatives) – “Intellectual Property Issues in Cultural Heritage” ($2,500,000).
SSHRC/SFU Small Research Grant - “Discerning Long-term Subsistence Patterns in the Interior Plateau of British Columbia” ($5,853).
Speller, C.
2012
Research Executive Agency Marie Curie International Incoming Fellowships - “ORCA: Optimizing Research tools for Cetaceans in Archaeology” (€209,033).
Yang, D.
2012-2017
2010-2013
2011-2018
2008-2015
SSHRC Insight Grant, Lisa Hodgetts (PI) and Dongya Yang (co-investigator) - “Archaeological Investigations of Past Hunting Landscapes on Banks Island, NWT.” ($278,200).
SSHRC Standard Research Grant - “Ancient DNA-based Interdisciplinary Investigation of the Origin and History of Domesticated Cattle in China.” ($162,168).
SSHRC MCRI (Major Collaborative Research Initiatives) Grant, Andrzej Weber (PI), Dongya Yang over 20 co-investigators) - “Holocene Hunter-Gatherers of Northeast Asia.” ($2,500,000).
SSHRC MCRI (Major Collaborative Research Initiatives) Grant, George Nicholas (PI), Dongya Yang over 25 co-investigators) - Intellectual Property Issues in Cultural Heritage: Theory, Practice, Policy, and Ethnics. ($2,500,000).
Roadbed of coral rock through mangrove, leading to late prehistoricearly historic hill fort. Mali Island, Fiji. (Photo: D. Burley)
PhD Student, Julia Jackley, kyack survey of
Heiltsuk Territory, central coast, BC
2011-2012 Biennial Report
51
Publications List
Aldeias, V., P. Goldberg, D.M. Sandgathe, F. Berna, H. L. Dibble, S.P. McPherron, and R. Zeljko
2012 Evidence for Neandertal Use of Fire at Roc de Marsal (France). Journal of Archaeological Science 39:2414-2423.
Badenhorst, S., R. Lyle, J. Merewether, J.C. Driver, and S. Ryan
2012 The potential of osteometric data for comprehensive studies of turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) husbandry in the American Southwest. Kiva 78(1): 61-78.
Brown, D. and G.P. Nicholas
2012 Protecting Indigenous Cultural Property in the Age of Digital Democracy: Institutional and Communal Responses to
Canadian First Nations and Maori Heritage Concerns. Journal of Material Culture 17(3): 307-324.
Buchanan, B., J. D. Kilby, B. B. Huckell, M. J. O’Brien, and M. Collard
2012 A morphometric assessment of the intended function of cached Clovis points. PLoS ONE 7(2):1-13 (e30530).
Buchanan, B., M. J. O’Brien, J. D. Kilby, B. B. Huckell, and M. Collard
2012 An assessment of the impact of hafting on Paleoindian projectile point variability. PLoS ONE 7(5):1-7(e36364).
Buchanan, B., M. Hamilton, K. Edinborough, M. J. O’Brien, and M. Collard
2011 A comment on Steele’s (2010) “Radiocarbon dates as data: quantitative strategies for estimating colonization front
speeds and event densities.” Journal of Archaeological Science 38:2116-2122.
Buchanan, B., M. Collard, M. J. Hamilton, and M. J. O’Brien
2011 Points and prey: an evaluation of the hypothesis that prey size predicts early Paleoindian projectile point form.
Journal of Archaeological Science 38:852-864.
Burley, D.V.
2012 Exploration as a strategic process in the Lapita settlement of Fiji: The implications of Vorovoro Island, Journal of
Pacific Archaeology 3(1): 22-34.
2012 Jim Specht, cautionary comments and the Lapita settlement of South Coast, Papua New Guinea. Australian
Archaeology 75: 13-14.
2012 Response to J. Davidson, “Intrusion, integration and innovation on small and not-so-small islands with particular
reference to Samoa”, Archaeology in Oceania 47(1): 10-11.
2012 Review of “How Chiefs Became Kings – Divine Kingship and the Rise of Archaic States in Ancient Hawaii.” (P.V.
Kirch). Journal of Island and Coastal Archaeology 7(1): 153-155.
2011 Comment upon P. Sheppard, Lapita colonization across the near/remote Oceania boundary. Current Anthropology
52(6): 820-821.
Burley, D.V. and J. Balenaivalu
2012 Kadavu archaeology: First insights from a preliminary survey. Domodomo 25(1&2).
Burley, D.V., P. Sheppard, and M. Simonin
2011 Tongan and Samoan volcanic glass: pXRF analysis and implications for constructs of ancestral Polynesian society.
Journal of Archaeological Science 38: 2625-2632.
52 2011-2012 Biennial Report
Burley, D.V., K. Taché, M. Purser, and J. Naucabalavu
2011 An archaeology of salt production in Fiji. Antiquity 85:187–200.
Burley, D.V., M Weisler, and X-J Zhao
2012 High Precision U/Th Dating of First Polynesian Settlement. PLoS ONE 7(11): e48769. doi:10.1371/journal.
pone.0048769
Caldwell, M., D. Lepofsky, G. Combes, J. Harper, J. Welch, and M. Washington
2012 A Bird’s Eye View of Northern Coast Salish Intertidal Resource Management Features. Journal of Island and Coastal
Archaeology 7:219–233.
Cannon A., D. Yang, and C. Speller
2011 Chapter 6: Site-specific salmon fisheries on the Central Coast of British Columbia in M Moss and A Cannon (eds.).
The Archaeology of North Pacific Fisheries. Fairbanks: University of Alaska Press, pp. 117-148.
Cannon, A. and D. Yang
2011 Pushing Limits and Finding Interpretive Balance: a Reply to Monks and Orchard. American Antiquity 76: 585-595.
Carlson, R.
2012 Something Fishey on the Northwest Coast. Review Article: Moss and Cannon, The Archaeology of North Pacific
Fisheries. Pp. 20-27 in The Review of Archaeology Vol. 30.
2012 Issues in Athapascan Prehistory. Ch. 18 in From the Land of Ever Winter to the American Southwest Athapascan
Migrations, Mobiity and Ethnogenesis. Deni J. Seymour (Ed.). University of Utah Press.
2011 The Religious System of the Northwest Coast of North America. Pp. 639-635 in The Oxford Handbook of Ritual and
Religion. Tim Insoll (Ed.). Oxford University Press, Oxford.
Carr-Locke, S. and G. Nicholas
2011 Working Towards Greater Equity and Understanding: Examples of Collaborative Archaeology and Museum
Initiatives with Indigenous Peoples in North America. Society for Applied Anthropology Newsletter 22(1): 4-9.
D’Andrea, A.C., M. Richards, L.A. Pavlish, S. Wood, A. Manzo, and H.S. Woldekiros
2011 Stable Isotopic Analysis of Human and Animal Diets from Two Pre-/Proto-Aksumite sites in Northern Ethiopia.
Journal of Archaeological Science 38:367-374.
D’Andrea, A.C. and P. Wadge
2011 T’ef (Eragrostis tef): A Legacy of Pastoralism? In A.G. Fahmy, S. Kahlheber, A.C. D’Andrea (eds.) Windows on the
African Past: Current Approaches to African Archaeobotany. Reports in African Archaeology, Volume 3. Frankfurt: Africa
Magna Verlag.
Dibble, H., V. Aldeias, E. Alvarez-Fernández, E. Hallett-Desguez, Z. Jacobs, D. Olszewski, D. Reed, K. Reed, T. Steele, D. Richter,
D. Sandgathe, U. Schurmans, and M. El-Hajraoui
2012 New Excavations at the Site of Contrebandiers Cave, Morocco. PaleoAnthropology 2012:145-201.
2011-2012 Biennial Report
53
Driver, J.C.
2011 Twenty years after “Identification, Classification and Zooarchaeology”. Ethnobiology Letters 2: 36-39.
2011 Identification, classification and zooarchaeology. Ethnobiology Letters 2: 19-29. [Reprint of 1992 paper]
2011 Human impacts on animal populations in the American Southwest. In Movement, Connectivity and Landscape
Change in the Ancient Southwest, edited by M.C. Nelson and C. Strawhacker, pp. 179-198. University Press of Colorado,
Boulder.
Ewonus, P.A., A. Cannon, and D. Yang
2011 Addressing Seasonal Site Use through Ancient DNA Species Identification of Pacific Salmon at Dionisio Point,
Galiano Island, British Columbia. Journal of Archaeological Science 38: 2536-2546.
Fahmy, A.G., S. Kahlheber, and A.C. D’Andrea (eds)
2011 Windows on the African Past: Current Approaches to African Archaeobotany. Frankfurt: Africa Magna Verlag.
Fowler, C. and D. Lepofsky
2011. Traditional Resource and Environmental Management, pp. 285-304. In. Ethnobiology, edited by G. Anderson.
Wiley-Blackwell.
Gao, X., X. Zhang, D. Yang, C. Shen, and X. Wu
2011 Revisiting the Origin of Modern Humans in China and its Implications for Global Human Evolution. Science China
Earth Sciences 53: 1927-1940.
Gilmour, B. and M.F. Skinner
2011 Forensic Scatology: Preliminary Experimental Study of the Preparation and Potential for Identification of Captive
Carnivore Scat. Journal of Forensic Sciences 57: 160-165
Goldberg, P., H. L. Dibble, F. Berna, D.M. Sandgathe, S. McPherron, and A. Turq
2012 New Evidence on Neandertal Use of Fire: Examples from Roc de Marsal and Pech de l’Azé IV. Quaternary
International 247:325-340.
Guérin G., E. Discamps, N. Mercier, P. Guibert, A. Turq, H. Dibble, S. McPherron, D. Sandgathe, and P. Goldberg
2012 Multi-method (TL and OSL), multi-material (quartz and flint) dating of the Mousterian site of Roc de Marsal
(Dordogne, France): correlating Neanderthal occupations with the climatic variability of MIS 5–3. Journal of
Archaeological Science 39(10):3071-3084.
King, A., D. Lepofsky, and D. Pokotylo
2011 Archaeology and Local Governments: The Perspectives of First Nations and Municipal Councilors in the Fraser
Valley, B.C. Canadian Journal of Archaeology 35: 258–291.
Lepofsky, D.
2011 “Everyone Loves Archaeology”: Bridging Communities through Archaeological Research. SAA Archaeological Record.
11(5):17-19.
54 2011-2012 Biennial Report
Lepofsky, D. and J. Kahn
2011 Cultivating an Ecological and Social Balance: Elite Demands and Commoner Knowledge in Ancient Maohi
Agriculture, Society Islands. American Anthropologist 113(3): 319-335.
Logan, A.L. and A.C. D’Andrea.
2012 Oil palm, Arboriculture, and Changing Subsistence Practices During Kintampo Times, 3900-3600 bp. Quaternary
International 249:63-71.
McPherron, S., S. Talamo, P. Goldberg, L. Niven, D. Sandgathe, M. Richards, D. Richter, A. Turq, and H. Dibble
2012 Radiocarbon Dates for the Late Middle Palaeolithic at Pech de l’Azé IV, France. Journal of Archaeological Science 39:
3436-3442
Nicholas, G.
2012 Toward an Anthropology of Wetland Archaeology: Hunter-Gatherers and Wetlands in Practice and Theory. In
The Oxford Handbook of Wetland Archaeology, edited by Francesco Menotti and Aidan O’Sullivan, pp. 761-778. Oxford
University Press, Oxford.
2012 “Making Us Uneasy”: Clarke, Wobst, and their Critique of Archaeological Practices. Archaeologies 8(3): 209-224.
2012 Intellectual Property Rights. The Oxford Companion to Archaeology, 2nd ed., edited by N.A. Silberman, Vol. 2: 106109. Oxford University Press, Oxford.
2012 Comment on “Casualities of Heritage Distancing,” by Patricia McAnany and Shoshauna Parks. Current Anthropology
53(1): 98-99.
2012 Obsuzhdenie stat’i S. Sokolovskogo “Neskol’ko istorii pro kopirait i kul’turu”’ [A Contribution to a Discussion of
Sergei Sokolovskiy’s Article “Copyright and Culture: Some Case Histories”], Antropologicheskii Forum 16: 209-216
2011 Indigenous Archaeology in the Late Glacial Period: Bridging 10,000 Years. In Ta’n Wetapeksi’k: Understanding from
Where We Come, edited by T. Bernard, L. Morine Rosenmeier, and S. Farrell, pp. 199-212. Eastern Woodland Publishing,
Truro, NS.
Nicholas, G. and R. Aloua
2012 Archaeology and Non-Western Societies and Indigenous Peoples: Introduction. The Oxford Companion to
Archaeology, 2nd ed., edited by N.A. Silberman, Vol. 2: 491-492. Oxford University Press, Oxford.
Nicholas, G. and the IPinCH Collective
2012 Collaborative, Community-Based Heritage Research, and the IPinCH Project. SAA Archaeological Record
(September): 30-32.
Nicholas, G., A. Roberts, D. Schaepe, J. Walkins, L. Leader-Elliot, and S. Rowley
2011 A Consideration of Theory, Principles and Practice in Collaborative Archaeology. Archaeological Review from
Cambridge 26(2): 11-30.
2011-2012 Biennial Report
55
Nicholas, G. and Alison Wylie
2012.“Do Not Do Unto Others...”: Cultural Misrecognition and the Harms of Appropriation in an Open-Source World.
In Appropriating the Past: Philosophical Perspectives on Archaeological Practice, edited by Robin Coningham and Geoffrey
Scarre, pp. 195-221. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge and New York.
Pavlish, L.A., H.G.V. Hancock, and A.C. D’Andrea
2011. The Basalts of the Independent State of Samoa. Pp. 279-284 in I. Turbanti-Memmi (ed.) Proceedings of the 37th
International Symposium on Archaeometry. Heidelberg: Springer.
Pullman, D. and G. Nicholas
2012 Intellectual Property and the Ethical/Legal Status of Human DNA: The (Ir)Relevance of Context. Inuit Studies
35(1+2): 146-164.
Ross, D. E.
2012 Late Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Century Japanese Domestic Wares from British Columbia. In: Ceramics in
America, Robert Hunter (ed.), pp. 2-29. The Chipstone Foundation: Fox Point, WI.
2012 Transnational Artifacts: Grappling with Fluid Material Origins and Identities in Archaeological Interpretations of
Culture Change. Journal of Anthropological Archaeology 31(1): 38-48.
2011 Factors Influencing the Dining Habits of Japanese and Chinese Migrants at a British Columbia Salmon Cannery.
Historical Archaeology 45(2): 68-96.
Sandgathe, D.M., H.L. Dibble, P. Goldberg, S.P. McPherron, A. Turq, L. Niven, and J. Hodgkins
2011 On the Role of Fire in Neandertal Adaptations in Western Europe: Evidence from Pech de l’Azé IV and Roc de
Marsal, France. PaleoAnthropology 2012:216-242.
2011 Timing of the Appearance of Habitual Fire Use. Letter, PNAS 108(29): E298.
Sandgathe, D.M., H. Dibble, P. Goldberg, and S.P. McPherron
2011 The Roc de Marsal Neandertal Child: A Reassessment of its Status as a Deliberate Burial. Journal of Human Evolution
61:243-253.
Schollmeyer, K.G. and J.C. Driver
2011 Deer in prehistory in the southwestern United States. Deer: The Journal of the British Deer Society 16(1):22-25
2012 The past, present, and future of small terrestrial mammals in human diets. In Conservation Biology and Applied
Zooarchaeology, edited by Steve Wolverton and R. Lee Lyman, pp. 179-207. University of Arizona Press, Tucson.
2012 Settlement patterns, source–sink dynamics, and artiodactyl hunting in the prehistoric U.S. Southwest. Journal of
Archaeological Method and Theory. Published online 10.1007/s10816-012-9160-5
Skinner, M.F. and J.D. Pruetz
2012 Reconstruction of Periodicity of Repetitive Linear Enamel Hypoplasia From Perikymata Counts on Imbricational
Enamel Among Dry-Adapted Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus) From Fongoli, Senegal. American Journal of Physical
Anthropology 149:468–482.
56 2011-2012 Biennial Report
Skinner, M.F., M.M. Skinner, and C. Boesch
2012. Developmental Defects of the Dental Crown in Chimpanzees From the Taı¨ National Park, Coˆte D’Ivoire:
Coronal Waisting. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 149:272–282.
Speller, C., L. Hauser, D. Lepofsky, D. Peterson, J. Moore, A. Rodriguez, M. Moss, I. McKechnie, and D. Yang
2012 High Potential for Using DNA from Ancient Herring Bones to Inform Modern Fisheries Management and
Conservation. PLOS One 7:1-13.
Speller, C.F., K.L. Spalding, B.A. Buchholz, D. Hildebrand, J. Moore, R. Mathewes, M.F. Skinner, and D. Yang
2012 Personal identification of cold case remains through combined contribution from anthropological, mtDNA and
bomb–pulse dating analyses. Journal of Forensic Sciences 57(5):1354-1360.
Speller, C., G. Nicholas, and D. Y. Yang
2011 Feather Barbs as a Rich Source of mtDNA Ideal for Minimally Destructive DNA Analysis in Forensic Wildlife Cases.
Investigative Genetics 2:16.
Springer, C. and D. Lepofsky
2011 People and Pithouses: Social identities in an isolated pithouse in the Harrison Watershed, SW British Columbia.
Canadian Journal of Archaeology 35:18-54.
Thornton, E.K., K.F. Emery, D. Steadman, C.F. Speller, R. Matheny, and D. Yang
2012 Earliest Mexican turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) in the Maya region: implications for pre- Hispanic animal trade and
the timing of turkey domestication. PLoS ONE 7(8): e42630.
Turq, A., S. P. McPherron , H. L. Dibble, P. Goldberg, D. M. Sandgathe, H. Jones, K. Maddison, B. Maureille, S. Mentzer, J. Rink,
and A. Steenhuyse
2011 Les Fouilles Recentes du Pech de l’Azé IV (Dordogne). Gallia Préhistoire 53:1-58.
Welch, J., D. Lepofsky, and M. Washington
2011 Assessing Collaboration with the Sliammon First Nation in a Community-Based Heritage Research and Stewardship
Program. Archaeological Review from Cambridge 26: 171-190.
Welch, J., D. Lepofsky, G. Combes, and C. Rust
2011 Treasure Bearers. Personal foundations for effective leadership in Northern Coast Salish Heritage Management.
Heritage and Society 4(1):83-114.
Wyndham, F., D. Lepofsky, and S. Tiffany.
2011 Taking Stock in Ethnobiology: Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going? Journal of
Ethnobiology 31:110 -127.
2011-2012 Biennial Report
57
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